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Sample records for avian erythrocyte plasma

  1. Changes in haematology, plasma biochemistry and erythrocyte ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The haematology, plasma biochemistry and erythrocyte osmotic fragility of the Nigerian laughing dove (Streptopelia senegalensis) were studied after 4 and 8 weeks in captivity. At 8 weeks, there was a normocytic hypochromic anaemia characterized by reduced values for packed cell volume (PCV), red blood cell count ...

  2. Ectopic expression of the erythrocyte band 3 anion exchange protein, using a new avian retrovirus vector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuerstenberg, S; Beug, H; Introna, M

    1990-01-01

    A retrovirus vector was constructed from the genome of avian erythroblastosis virus ES4. The v-erbA sequences of avian erythroblastosis virus were replaced by those coding for neomycin phosphotransferase, creating a gag-neo fusion protein which provides G418 resistance as a selectable marker. The v...... into protein. Using the Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase gene cloned into the vector as a test construct, expression of enzyme activity could be detected in 90 to 95% of transfected target cells and in 80 to 85% of subsequently infected cells. In addition, a cDNA encoding the avian erythrocyte band 3 anion......-erbB sequences following the splice acceptor were replaced by a cloning linker allowing insertion of foreign genes. The vector has been tested in conjunction with several helper viruses for the transmission of G418 resistance, titer, stability, transcription, and the transduction and expression of foreign genes...

  3. [Ratio of erythrocyte and plasma in massive blood transfusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xian-Hui; Liu, Feng-Xia; Zhang, Jun-Hua; Gui, Rong

    2014-06-01

    This study was purposed to explore the suitable ratio between fresh frozen plasma and erythrocyte by retrospective analysis of coagulation in patients with massive blood transfusion. The clinical data of 151 cases with massive blood transfusion from January 2011 to January 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. According to coagulation, patients were divided into coagulation normal group (138 cases) and coagulation dysfunction group (13 cases). Based on the ratio of 1:1 of fresh frozen plasma and erythrocyte, the patients were divided into high plasma group(2:1), medium plasma group (1:1) and low plasma (blood transfusion. The results showed that prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and thrombin time (TT) were prolonged, fibrinogen (FIB) level decreased significantly (all P blood transfusion 24 h; the high plasma and the medium plasma group of coagulation normal group had no significant changes in coagulation (P > 0.05); prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time and fibrinogen level in the medium plasma and low plasma subgroup of coagulation dysfunction group after massive transfusion was still in abnormal levels (P > 0.05), coagulation function in high plasma subgroup was improved significantly (P blood transfusion, the ratio between fresh frozen plasma and erythrocyte is recommended to be 2:1 in patients of coagulation dysfunction in order to improve the patient's coagulation function and to reduce the incidence of adverse event, the ratio of fresh frozen plasma to erythrocyte is recommended to be 1:1 in patients with normal coagulation so as to reduce the dilutional coagulopathy and hypervolemia of blood.

  4. Changes in erythrocytic deformability and plasma viscosity in neonatal ictericia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonillo-Perales, A; Muñoz-Hoyos, A; Martínez-Morales, A; Molina-Carballo, A; Uberos-Fernández, J; Puertas-Prieto, A

    1999-01-01

    We studied 45 full-term newborns divided into 3 groups. Group 1: 17 newborns with bilirubin ictericia (bilirubin 11-20 mg/dL) and Group 3: 10 newborns with moderate hemolytic ictericia needing exchange transfusion. The following were studied: erythrocytic deformability, plasma viscosity, plasmatic osmolarity, seric bilirubin, bilirubin/albumin ratio, free fatty acids and corpuscular volume of the erythrocytes. In full-term newborns, the following are risk factors for increased erythrocytic rigidity: neonatal hemolytic illness (p = 0.004, odds ratio: 7.02), increases in total bilirubin (p = 0.02, odds ratio: 4.3) and increases in the bilirubin/albumin ratio (p = 0.025, odds ratio: 4.25). Furthermore, the most important risk factor for high plasma viscosity is also neonatal hemolytic illness (p = 0.01, odds ratio: 2.30). The role of total bilirubin is also important (p = 0.09, odds ratio: 2.10), while that of the bilirubin/albumin ratio (p = 0.012, NS) is less so. The greater the hemolysis, the greater the erythrocytic rigidity and plasma viscosity (p ictericia, hemolytic illness and increases in the bilirubin/albumin ratio are accompanied by rheological alterations that could affect cerebral microcirculation and cause a neurological deficit not exclusively related to the levels of bilirubin in plasma.

  5. Determination of molecular species of lecithin from erythrocytes and plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golde, L.M.G. van; Tomasi, V.; Deenen, L.L.M. van

    The molecular species of lecithin from erythrocyte and plasma of man and rabbit were determined after conversion of the lecithins into diglycerides by means of hydrolysis with phospholipase C. The resultant diglycerides were separated by thin-layer chromatography on silica impregnated with silver

  6. Receptor specificity and erythrocyte binding preferences of avian influenza viruses isolated from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawar Shailesh D

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hemagglutination (HA and hemagglutination inhibition (HI assays are conventionally used for detection and identification of influenza viruses. HI assay is also used for detection of antibodies against influenza viruses. Primarily turkey or chicken erythrocytes [red blood cells (RBCs] are used in these assays, as they are large, nucleated, and sediment fast, which makes it easy to determine the titer. Human influenza viruses agglutinate RBCs from chicken, human, and guinea pig, but not from horse. Human influenza viruses bind preferentially to sialic acid (SA linked to galactose (Gal by α 2, 6 linkage (SA α 2, 6-Gal, whereas avian influenza (AI viruses bind preferentially to SA α 2, 3-Gal linkages. With this background, the present study was undertaken to study erythrocyte binding preferences and receptor specificities of AI viruses isolated from India. Materials and methods A total of nine AI virus isolates (four subtypes from India and three reference AI strains (three subtypes were tested in HA and HI assays against mammalian and avian erythrocytes. The erythrocytes from turkey, chicken, goose, guinea pig and horse were used in the study. The receptor specificity determination assays were performed using goose and turkey RBCs. The amino acids present at 190 helix, 130 and 220 loops of the receptor-binding domain of the hemagglutinin protein were analyzed to correlate amino acid changes with the receptor specificity. Results All tested highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 viruses reacted with all five types of RBCs in the HA assay; AI H9N2 and H5N2 viruses did not react with horse RBCs. For H5N1 viruses guinea pig and goose RBCs were best for both HA and HI assays. For H9N2 viruses, guinea pig, fowl and turkey RBCs were suitable. For other tested AI subtypes, avian and guinea pig RBCs were better. Eight isolates of H5N1, one H4N6 and one H7N1 virus showed preference to avian sialic acid receptors. Importantly

  7. Red wine activates plasma membrane redox system in human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedesco, Idolo; Moccia, Stefania; Volpe, Silvestro; Alfieri, Giovanna; Strollo, Daniela; Bilotto, Stefania; Spagnuolo, Carmela; Di Renzo, Massimo; Aquino, Rita P; Russo, Gian Luigi

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we report that polyphenols present in red wine obtained by a controlled microvinification process are able to protect human erythrocytes from oxidative stress and to activate Plasma Membrane Redox System (PMRS). Human plasma obtained from healthy subjects was incubated in the presence of whole red wine at a concentration corresponding to 9.13-73 μg/ml gallic acid equivalents to verify the capacity to protect against hypochlorous acid (HOCl)-induced plasma oxidation and to minimize chloramine formation. Red wine reduced hemolysis and chloramine formation induced by HOCl of 40 and 35%, respectively. PMRS present on human erythrocytes transfers electrons from intracellular molecules to extracellular electron acceptors. We demonstrated that whole red wine activated PMRS activity in human erythrocytes isolated from donors in a dose-dependent manner with a maximum at about 70-100 μg/ml gallic acid equivalents. We also showed that red wine increased glutathione (GSH) levels and erythrocytic antioxidant capacity, measured by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) quenching assay. Furthermore, we reported that GSH played a crucial role in regulating PMRS activity in erythrocytes. In fact, the effect of iodoacetamide, an alkylating agent that induces depletion of intracellular GSH, was completely counteracted by red wine. Bioactive compounds present in red wine, such as gallic acid, resveratrol, catechin, and quercetin were unable to activate PMRS when tested at the concentrations normally present in aged red wines. On the contrary, the increase of PMRS activity was associated with the anthocyanin fraction, suggesting the capacity of this class of compounds to positively modulate PMRS enzymatic activity.

  8. The reference range of serum, plasma and erythrocyte magnesium

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    Suzanna Immanuel

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The interest in the clinical importance of serum magnesium level has just recently begun with the analysis and findings of abnormal magnesium level in cardiovascular, metabolic and neuromuscular disorder. Although the serum level does not reflect the body magnesium level, but currently, only serum magnesium determination is widely used. Erythrocyte magnesium is considered more sensitive than serum magnesium as it reflects intracellular magnesium status. According to NCCLS (National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards every laboratory is recommended to have its own reference range for the tests it performs, including magnesium determination. The reference range obtained is appropriate for the population and affected by the method and technique. This study aimed to find the reference range of serum and plasma magnesium and also intracellular magnesium i.e. erythrocyte magnesium by direct method, and compare the results of serum and plasma magnesium. Blood was taken from 114-blood donor from Unit Transfusi Darah Daerah (UTDD Budhyarto Palang Merah Indonesia (PMI DKI Jakarta, consisted of 57 male and 57 female, aged 17 – 65 years, clinically healthy according to PMI donor criteria. Blood was taken from blood set, collected into 4 ml vacuum tube without anticoagulant for serum magnesium determination and 3 ml vacuum tube with lithium heparin for determination of erythrocyte and plasma magnesium Determination of magnesium level was performed with clinical chemistry auto analyzer Hitachi 912 by Xylidil Blue method colorimetrically. This study showed no significant difference between serum and heparinized plasma extra cellular magnesium. The reference range for serum or plasma magnesium was 1.30 – 2.00 mEq/L and for erythrocyte magnesium was 4.46 - 7.10 mEq/L. (Med J Indones 2006; 15:229-35Keywords: Reference range, extracellular magnesium, intracellular magnesium

  9. Erythrocytic glutathione peroxidase: Its relationship to plasma selenium in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perona, G.; Cellerino, R.; Guidi, G.C.; Moschini, G.; Stievano, B.M.; Tregnaghi, C.

    1977-01-01

    Erythrocytic glutathione-peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity and plasma selenium concentrations were measured in 14 patients: 7 with iron deficiency and 7 with raised serum iron levels. The decreased enzymatic activity in iron deficiency was confirmed. Plasma selenium was significantly lower in patients with lower serum iron; furthermore there is a significant correlation between serum iron and plasma selenium concentrations. Another correlation even more significant was found between plasma selenium and enzyme activity in all the cases we studied. These data suggests that the importance of iron for GSH-Px activity may be merely due to its relationship with selenium and that plasma selenium concentration may be of critical importance for enzyme activity. (author)

  10. Modulation of Erythrocyte Plasma Membrane Redox System Activity by Curcumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhakar Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma membrane redox system (PMRS is an electron transport chain system ubiquitously present throughout all cell types. It transfers electron from intracellular substrates to extracellular acceptors for regulation of redox status. Curcumin, isolated from Curcuma longa, has modulatory effects on cellular physiology due to its membrane interaction ability and antioxidant potential. The present study investigates the effect of curcumin on PMRS activity of erythrocytes isolated from Wistar rats in vitro and in vivo and validated through an in silico docking simulation study using Molegro Virtual Docker (MVD. Effects of curcumin were also evaluated on level of glutathione (GSH and the oxidant potential of plasma measured in terms of plasma ferric equivalent oxidative potentials (PFEOP. Results show that curcumin significantly (p<0.01 downregulated the PMRS activity in a dose-dependent manner. Molecular docking results suggest that curcumin interacts with amino acids at the active site cavity of cytochrome b5 reductase, a key constituent of PMRS. Curcumin also increased the GSH level in erythrocytes and plasma while simultaneously decreasing the oxidant potential (PFEOP of plasma. Altered PMRS activity and redox status are associated with the pathophysiology of several health complications including aging and diabetes; hence, the above finding may explain part of the role of curcumin in health beneficial effects.

  11. Ectopic expression of the erythrocyte band 3 anion exchange protein, using a new avian retrovirus vector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuerstenberg, S; Beug, H; Introna, M

    1990-01-01

    -erbB sequences following the splice acceptor were replaced by a cloning linker allowing insertion of foreign genes. The vector has been tested in conjunction with several helper viruses for the transmission of G418 resistance, titer, stability, transcription, and the transduction and expression of foreign genes...... in both chicken embryo fibroblasts and the QT6 quail cell line. The results show that the vector is capable of producing high titers of Neor virus from stably integrated proviruses. These proviruses express a balanced ratio of genome length to spliced transcripts which are efficiently translated...... into protein. Using the Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase gene cloned into the vector as a test construct, expression of enzyme activity could be detected in 90 to 95% of transfected target cells and in 80 to 85% of subsequently infected cells. In addition, a cDNA encoding the avian erythrocyte band 3 anion...

  12. [Elimination of haloperidol from erythrocytes surfaces supernatant and blood plasma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanidze, L A

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the adsorption rate of haloperidol on erythrocytes surfaces. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters of haloperidol were monitored in the experiment. The neuroleptic was administered to 12 adult dogs and the blood samples were collected for further analysis following 20, 30, 60, 180, 240, 360, 420 and 480 minutes after the injection. The groups of samples (blood plasma and supernatant) were monitored during this period. The differences between haloperidol concentration in the supernatant and blood plasma were compared. Our data have shown that dynamics of the elimination of intact and acidified forms of haloperidol from the supernatant and the blood serum are not the same. Intact and acidified forms are differently regulated by plasma. albumines and globulines. The process of redistribution of haloperidol between the both substrates takes place, while the supernatant has a donor function for the free form of haloperidol and represents the acceptor of the haloperidol's metabolites. This provides the possibility to develop multidiscipline approach to the optimization to the prescription of haloperidol.

  13. Electron Pathways through Erythrocyte Plasma Membrane in Human Physiology and Pathology: Potential Redox Biomarker?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Matteucci

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Erythrocytes are involved in the transport of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the body. Since pH is the influential factor in the Bohr-Haldane effect, pHi is actively maintained via secondary active transports Na+/H+ exchange and HC3 -/Cl- anion exchanger. Because of the redox properties of the iron, hemoglobin generates reactive oxygen species and thus, the human erythrocyte is constantly exposed to oxidative damage. Although the adult erythrocyte lacks protein synthesis and cannot restore damaged proteins, it is equipped with high activity of protective enzymes. Redox changes in the cell initiate various signalling pathways. Plasma membrane oxido-reductases (PMORs are transmembrane electron transport systems that have been found in the membranes of all cells and have been extensively characterized in the human erythrocyte. Erythrocyte PMORs transfer reducing equivalents from intracellular reductants to extracellular oxidants, thus their most important role seems to be to enable the cell respond to changes in intra- and extra-cellular redox environments.So far the activity of erythrocyte PMORs in disease states has not been systematically investigated. This review summarizes present knowledge on erythrocyte electron transfer activity in humans (health, type 1 diabetes, diabetic nephropathy, and chronic uremia and hypothesizes an integrated model of the functional organization of erythrocyte plasma membrane where electron pathways work in parallel with transport metabolons to maintain redox homeostasis.

  14. Micro determination of plasma and erythrocyte copper by atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomfield, J; Macmahon, R A

    1969-03-01

    The free and total plasma copper and total erythrocyte copper levels have been determined by simple, yet sensitive and highly specific methods, using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. For total copper determination, the copper was split from its protein combination in plasma or red cells by the action of hydrochloric acid at room temperature. The liberated copper was chelated by ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and extracted into n-butyl acetate by shaking and the organic extract was aspirated into the atomic absorption spectrophotometer flame. The entire procedure was carried out in polypropylene centrifuge tubes, capped during shaking. For the free plasma copper measurement the hydrochloric acid step was omitted. Removal of the plasma or erythrocyte proteins was found to be unnecessary, and, in addition, the presence of trichloracetic acid caused an appreciable lowering of absorption. Using a double-beam atomic absorption spectrophotometer and scale expansion x 10, micro methods have been derived for determining the total copper of plasma or erythrocytes with 0.1 ml of sample, and the free copper of plasma with 0.5 ml. The macro plasma copper method requires 2 ml of plasma and is suitable for use with single-beam atomic absorption spectrophotometers. With blood from 50 blood donors, normal ranges of plasma and erythrocyte copper have been determined.

  15. An analysis of myo-[3H]inositol trisphosphates found in myo-[3H]inositol prelabelled avian erythrocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Stephens, L R; Hawkins, P T; Downes, C P

    1989-01-01

    Evidence is presented to show that acid extracts of avian erythrocytes prelabelled for 24-48 h with myo-[3H]inositol contain the following myo-[3H]inositol trisphosphates (expressed as a percentage of total myo-[3H]inositol trisphosphates extracted): 36% myo-[3H]inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate; 33.7% myo-[3H]inositol 1,3,4-trisphosphate; 13% myo-[3H]inositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate; 9.7% myo-[3H]inositol 3,4,6-trisphosphate; 4.4% myo-[3H]inositol 1,4,6-trisphosphate and 3.3% myo-[3H]inositol 1,3,6-t...

  16. Effect of garlic's mode of administration on erythrocytes and plasma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With regard to erythrocytes parameters, p.o. garlic treatment was found to have beneficial effects as it increased hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. Garlic i.p. treatment showed detrimental activity as it decreased these parameters. Our results reveal that garlic administered by p.o. does not involve any significant variation on ...

  17. Eggshell Biliverdin and Protoporphyrin Pigments in a Songbird: Are They Derived from Erythrocytes, Blood Plasma, or the Shell Gland?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargitai, Rita; Boross, Nóra; Hámori, Susanne; Neuberger, Eszter; Nyiri, Zoltán

    Biliverdin and protoporphyrin pigments are deposited into the eggshell when the developing egg is in the shell gland. However, the site of synthesis of eggshell pigments is still uncertain, although it may influence the possible costs and potential functions of eggshell coloration in avian species. Eggshell pigments may be derived from red blood cells or be produced in other organs and then transferred to the shell gland, or they may be synthesized de novo in the shell gland. We studied in the canary (Serinus canaria) whether eggshell blue-green and brown pigmentations are associated with experimentally elevated anemia, female hematocrit level, immature erythrocyte percentage, and feces and plasma pigment levels during egg laying to find out the possible origin of eggshell pigments. We found no significant effects of hematocrit level or experimentally elevated anemia on intensity of eggshell blue-green and brown pigmentations; therefore, we consider it less likely that eggshell pigments are derived from erythrocytes. In addition, we found no significant associations between female feces biliverdin concentration during egg laying and intensity of eggshell blue-green pigmentation, suggesting that eggshell biliverdin may not originate from the spleen or liver. We found a negative association between plasma and feces protoporphyrin concentrations during egg laying and eggshell brown chroma. This result suggests that an increased production of protoporphyrin in the liver, which could have elevated plasma and feces protoporphyrin concentrations, could inhibit eggshell protoporphyrin pigmentation, probably through affecting enzymatic activities. We suggest that both pigments are produced de novo in the shell gland in the canary, but circulating pigment levels may influence shell gland pigment synthesis, thus connecting the physiological status of the female to eggshell coloration.

  18. Plasma lipids profile and erythrocytes system in patients with coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinova, Lidia I.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Denisova, Tatyana P.

    2006-08-01

    Erythrocytes system study can provide a framework for detailed exploration of blood cell-cell and cell-vessel wall interactions, one of the key patterns in blood and vascular pathophysiology. Our objective was to explore erythrocytes system in patients with stable angina pectoris II f.c. (Canadian classification). The participants (N = 56, age 40 - 55 years) without obesity, glucose tolerance violations, lipid lowering drugs treating, heart failure of II and more functional classes (NYHA), coronary episode at least 6 months before study were involved in the study. Blood samples were incubated with glucose solutions of increasing concentrations (from 2.5% to 20% with 2.5% step) during 60 mm (36° C). In prepared blood smears erythrocyte's sizes were studied. Plasma total cholesterol, triglyceride and glucose levels were also measured. Received data were approximated by polynomials of high degree, with after going first and second derivations. Erythrocytes system "behavior" was studied by means of phase pattern constructing. By lipids levels all the patient were divided into five groups: 1) patients with normal lipids levels, 2) patients with borderline total cholesterol level, 3) patients with isolated hypercholesterolemia, 4) patients with isolated hypertriglyceridemia and 5) patients with combined hyperlipidemia. Erythrocytes size lowering process was of set of "stages", which characteristics differ significantly (p > 0.05) in all five groups. Their rate and acceleration characteristics allow us to detect type of lipid profile in patients. Erythrocyte system disturbing by glucose concentration increase show to be most resistant in group of patients with isolated hypercholesterolemia.

  19. Patient age does not affect mefloquine concentrations in erythrocytes and plasma during the acute phase of falciparum malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, José Luiz Fernandes; Borges, Larissa Maria Guimarães; Ferreira, Michelle Valéria Dias; Rivera, Juan Gonzalo Bardarez; Gomes, Margarete do Socorro Mendonça

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate whether patient age has a significant impact on mefloquine concentrations in the plasma and erythrocytes over the course of treatment for uncomplicated falciparum malaria. A total of 20 children aged between 8 and 11 years and 20 adult males aged between 22 and 41 years with uncomplicated falciparum malaria were enrolled in the study. Mefloquine was administered to patients in both age groups at a dose of 20mgkg(-1). The steady-state drug concentrations were measured by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. All patients had an undetectable mefloquine concentration on day 0. In adults, the plasma mefloquine concentrations ranged from 770 to 2930ngmL(-1) and the erythrocyte concentrations ranged from 2000 to 6030ngmL(-1). In children, plasma mefloquine concentrations ranged from 881 to 3300ngmL(-1) and erythrocyte concentrations ranged from 3000 to 4920ngmL(-1). There was no significant correlation between mefloquine concentrations in the plasma and erythrocytes in either adults or children. In the present study, we observed no effect of patient age on the steady-state concentrations of mefloquine in the plasma and erythrocytes. We found that the mefloquine concentration in the erythrocytes was approximately 2.8-times higher than in the plasma. There were no significant correlations between mefloquine concentrations in the erythrocytes and plasma for either age group. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Infectologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Impact of Ficoll density gradient centrifugation on major and trace element concentrations in erythrocytes and blood plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ying; Ahmed, Sultan; Harari, Florencia; Vahter, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Ficoll density gradient centrifugation is widely used to separate cellular components of human blood. We evaluated the suitability to use erythrocytes and blood plasma obtained from Ficoll centrifugation for assessment of elemental concentrations. We determined 22 elements (from Li to U) in erythrocytes and blood plasma separated by direct or Ficoll density gradient centrifugation, using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Compared with erythrocytes and blood plasma separated by direct centrifugation, those separated by Ficoll had highly elevated iodine and Ba concentration, due to the contamination from the Ficoll-Paque medium, and about twice as high concentrations of Sr and Mo in erythrocytes. On the other hand, the concentrations of Ca in erythrocytes and plasma were markedly reduced by the Ficoll separation, to some extent also Li, Co, Cu, and U. The reduced concentrations were probably due to EDTA, a chelator present in the Ficoll medium. Arsenic concentrations seemed to be lowered by Ficoll, probably in a species-specific manner. The concentrations of Mg, P, S, K, Fe, Zn, Se, Rb, and Cs were not affected in the erythrocytes, but decreased in plasma. Concentrations of Mn, Cd, and Pb were not affected in erythrocytes, but in plasma affected by EDTA and/or pre-analytical contamination. Ficoll separation changed the concentrations of Li, Ca, Co, Cu, As, Mo, I, Ba, and U in erythrocytes and blood plasma, Sr in erythrocytes, and Mg, P, S, K, Fe, Zn, Se, Rb and Cs in blood plasma, to an extent that will invalidate evaluation of deficiencies or excess intakes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Spectrophotometric and Refractometric Determination of Total Protein in Avian Plasma

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    Rodica Căpriță

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the total protein values obtained in heparin plasma of chickens by a spectrophotometric technique (biuret method, and the values obtained on the same day in the same samples by refractometry. The results obtained by refractometry (average value 2.638±0.153g% were higher than those obtained by the spectrophotometric method (average value 2.441±0.181g%. There was a low correlation (r = 0.6709 between the total protein values, determined with both methods. Protein is the major determinant of plasma refractive index, but glucose contributes too. The refractometric method is not recommended in chickens for the determination of total protein, because avian blood glucose concentration averages about twice than in mammalian blood.

  2. Avian anemia's

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    Raukar Jelena

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with avian anemia's classified by MCHC/MCV and with types of anemia's. Father hematological and immunological research is needed to secure information on hematological parameters in different avian species at their earliest age. Anemia is a common clinical finding in birds because the avian erythrocyte half - life is much shorter than the mammalian. Therefore anemia should be determined as soon as possible. Researchers should standardize hematological parameters for every single avian species.

  3. EFFECTS OF CIGARETTE SMOKING ON ERYTHROCYTE ANTIOXIDATIVE ENZYME ACTIVITIES AND PLASMA CONCENTRATIONS OF THEIR COFACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zahraie

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco smoke contains numerous compounds, many ‎of which are oxidants and capable of producing free radical and enhancing ‎the oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cigarette smoking on the erythrocyte antioxidative enzyme activities and the plasma ‎concentration of their cofactors. ‎Sixty eight healthy men were enrolled, 32 of whom had never smoked and 36 had smoked at least 10 cigarettes per day for ‎at least one year. Hemolysate superoxide dismutase (Cu-Zn SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px and ‎catalase (CAT activities were measured using spectrophotometer. Plasma copper, zinc and selenium concentrations were determined ‎using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Plasma iron concentration was determined by colorimetric ‎method. We found that erythrocyte Cu-Zn SOD activity was significantly higher in tobacco smokers ‎compared with non-smokers (1294 ± 206.7 U/gHb in smokers vs. 1121.6 ± 237.8 U/gHb in non-‎smokers, P < 0.01. While plasma selenium concentration was significantly lower in tobacco ‎smokers (62.7±14.8 μg/L in smokers vs. 92.1 ± 17.5 μg/L in non-smokers, P < 0.01, there were no significant ‎differences in erythrocyte GSH-Px and CAT activities and plasma copper, zinc and iron concentrations between the two groups. ‎It seems that cigarette smoking can alter antioxidative enzymes activity and plasma concentration of some trace elements.

  4. Study of the damping effect of human blood plasma by the after effect of optical irradiation on erythrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranova, L. N.; Kholmogorov, V. E.

    1994-06-01

    A yield of hemoglobin and different proteins from erythrocytes in physiological solution was registered by spectrophotometer Specord UV-VIS. This yield was noted after development of dark reactions upon single irradiation of erythrocytes by total light of the mercury lamp DRT-375. It was found that this effect took place in the presence of intact plasma at physiological solution (containing as much as 98% of plasma) too. However the higher percentage of plasma solution presented, the greater doses of irradiation was necessary for demonstration of a yield of different substances from erythrocytes. It was observed definite dependence of this dose versus percentage of plasma. It was indicated that the degree of the damping effect of plasma had time dependence from season, i.e. from a structural composition of plasma.

  5. Altered plasma and erythrocyte phospholipid fatty acid profile in elite female water polo and football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsić, Aleksandra; Vučić, Vesna; Tepšić, Jasna; Mazić, Sanja; Djelić, Marina; Glibetić, Marija

    2012-02-01

    The impact of chronic, intense exercise, such as in elite athletes, on phospholipids fatty acids (FA) composition has not been studied in women so far. This study aimed to investigate FA profiles in plasma and erythrocytes phospholipids in elite female water polo (N = 15) and football (N = 19) players in comparison with sedentary women. In spite of similar dietary patterns, as assessed by a food frequency questionnaire, plasma FA profile in the football players showed significantly higher proportions of stearic acid, oleic acid, and monounsaturated FA (MUFA), and significantly lower proportions of total and n-6 polyunsaturated FA (PUFA) than in the water polo and control group. The water polo players had higher percentages of palmitoleic acid and arachidonic acid than the control subjects. Erythrocyte FA profile differed among groups. We found significantly higher proportion of oleic acid and MUFA in the football group than in the controls, and decreased stearic acid and elevated palmitic and palmitoleic acid in the water polo players than in the other 2 groups. Both groups of athletes had significantly lower percentages of n-6 dihomo-γ-linolenic acid, n-6 PUFA, and total PUFA compared with the controls. The estimated activities of elongase and desaturases in erythrocytes were also altered in the athletes. Our results indicate that long-term, intense physical training significantly affects FA status of plasma and erythrocyte phospholipids in women. The observed differences between the water polo and the football players suggest that the type of regular training may contribute to the altered metabolism of FA, although possible genetic differences among the 3 study groups cannot be ruled out.

  6. Determination of CFTR densities in erythrocyte plasma membranes using recognition imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebner, Andreas; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Nikova, Dessy; Lange, Tobias; Bruns, Reimer; Oberleithner, Hans; Schillers, Hermann; Haeberle, Johannes; Falk, Sabine; Duebbers, Angelika

    2008-01-01

    CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) is a cAMP-regulated chloride (Cl - ) channel that plays an important role in salt and fluid movement across epithelia. Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common genetic disease among Caucasians, is caused by mutations in the gene encoding CFTR. The most predominant mutation, F508del, disturbs CFTR protein trafficking, resulting in a reduced number of CFTR in the plasma membrane. Recent studies indicate that CFTR is not only found in epithelia but also in human erythrocytes. Although considerable attempts have been made to quantify CFTR in cells, conclusions on numbers of CFTR molecules localized in the plasma membrane have been drawn indirectly. AFM has the power to provide the needed information, since both sub-molecular spatial resolution and direct protein recognition via antibody-antigen interaction can be observed. We performed a quantification study of the CFTR copies in erythrocyte membranes at the single molecule level, and compared the difference between healthy donors and CF patients. We detected that the number of CFTR molecules is reduced by 70% in erythrocytes of cystic fibrosis patients

  7. Decrease of trace elements in erythrocytes and plasma after removal of dental amalgam and other metal alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisk, Peter; Lindvall, Anders; Hudecek, Romuald; Lindh, Ulf

    2006-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the concentration changes of 13 elements in erythrocytes and plasma after the removal of dental amalgam and other metal alloys. Blood samples from 250 patients were collected, separated into erythrocytes and plasma, and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The 250 patients were divided into 3 groups (Negative, Zero, and Positive) depending on their estimation of quality of life in an earlier study. Magnesium in plasma, selenium and mercury in plasma, and erythrocytes showed decreased concentrations after amalgam removal in all groups (p amalgam removal in the Negative and Positive groups (p amalgam removal (p amalgam removal in the Negative compared to the Positive group (p amalgam removal.

  8. Translating plasma and whole blood fatty acid compositional data into the sum of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid in erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Ken D; Aristizabal Henao, Juan J; Metherel, Adam H; Pilote, Louise

    2016-01-01

    Specific blood levels of eicosapentaenoic plus docosahexaenoic acid (EPA+DHA, wt% of total) in erythrocytes or "the omega-3 index" have been recommended for cardio-protection, but fatty acids are often measured in different blood fractions. The ability to estimate the % of EPA+DHA in erythrocytes from the fatty acid composition of other blood fractions would enable clinical assessments of omega-3 status when erythrocyte fractions are not available and increase the ability to compare blood levels of omega-3 fatty acids across clinical studies. The fatty acid composition of baseline plasma, erythrocytes and whole blood samples from participants (n=1104) in a prospective, multicenter study examining acute coronary syndrome were determined. The ability to predict the % of EPA+DHA in erythrocytes from other blood fractions were examined using bivariate and multiple linear regression modelling. Concordance analysis was also used to compare the actual erythrocytes EPA+DHA values to values estimated from other blood fractions. EPA+DHA in erythrocytes was significantly (pacids appears to require translation by categorization rather than by translation as continuous data. This study shows that the fatty acid composition of different blood fractions can be used to estimate erythrocyte EPA+DHA in a population with acute coronary syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Plasma and erythrocyte fatty acid patterns in patients with recurrent depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assies, Johanna; Pouwer, François; Lok, Anja

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) composition of (nerve) cell membranes may be involved in the pathophysiology of depression. Studies so far, focussed mainly on omega-3 and omega-6 PUFAs. In the present study, saturated fatty acids (SFAs), monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs......) and PUFAs of the omega-3, -6 and -9 series in plasma and erythrocytes of patients with recurrent major depressive disorder (MDD-R) were compared with controls. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We carried out a case-control study. The sample consisted of 137 patients with MDD-R and 65 matched non-depressed...

  10. Avian anemia's

    OpenAIRE

    Raukar Jelena

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with avian anemia's classified by MCHC/MCV and with types of anemia's. Father hematological and immunological research is needed to secure information on hematological parameters in different avian species at their earliest age. Anemia is a common clinical finding in birds because the avian erythrocyte half - life is much shorter than the mammalian. Therefore anemia should be determined as soon as possible. Researchers should standardize hematologica...

  11. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase and xanthine oxidase activities in erythrocytes and plasma from marine, semiaquatic and terrestrial mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Cruz, Roberto I; Pérez-Milicua, Myrna Barjau; Crocker, Daniel E; Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Bernal-Vertiz, Jaime A; de la Rosa, Alejandro; Vázquez-Medina, José P; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2014-05-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) and xanthine oxidase (XO) are key enzymes involved in the purine salvage pathway. PNP metabolizes purine bases to synthetize purine nucleotides whereas XO catalyzes the oxidation of purines to uric acid. In humans, PNP activity is reported to be high in erythrocytes and XO activity to be low in plasma; however, XO activity increases after ischemic events. XO activity in plasma of northern elephant seals has been reported during prolonged fasting and rest and voluntary associated apneas. The objective of this study was to analyze circulating PNP and XO activities in marine mammals adapted to tolerate repeated cycles of ischemia/reperfusion associated with diving (bottlenose dolphin, northern elephant seal) in comparison with semiaquatic (river otter) and terrestrial mammals (human, pig). PNP activities in plasma and erythrocytes, as well as XO activity in plasma, from all species were quantified by spectrophotometry. No clear relationship in circulating PNP or XO activity could be established between marine, semiaquatic and terrestrial mammals. Erythrocytes from bottlenose dolphins and humans are highly permeable to nucleosides and glucose, intraerythrocyte PNP activity may be related to a release of purine nucleotides from the liver. High-energy costs will probably mean a higher ATP degradation rate in river otters, as compared to northern elephant seals or dolphins. Lower erythrocyte PNP activity and elevated plasma XO activity in northern elephant seal could be associated with fasting and/or sleep- and dive-associated apneas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of malnutrition on the erythrocyte fatty acid composition and plasma vitamin E levels of Pakistani children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, EN; Dijkstra, JM; Schnater, TA; Seerat, E; Muskiet, FAJ; Boersma, ER

    Erythrocyte fatty acids and plasma vitamin E concentrations were determined in 47 grade 2, and 21 grade 3 malnourished Pakistani children (ages 4-56 months). Data were compared with those of 26 age- and sex-matched apparently healthy controls. Evaluation with three statistical approaches revealed

  13. Erythrocyte folate, plasma folate and plasma homocysteine during normal pregnancy and postpartum: a longitudinal study comprising 404 danish women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milman, N; Byg, KE; Hvas, Anne-Mette

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess folate and homocysteine status during normal pregnancy and postpartum in a longitudinal setting. METHODS: This study, performed in 1995-1996, comprised 404 healthy pregnant Danish Caucasian women residential in Copenhagen County. Women taking folic acid tablets or vitamin B12...... injections were not included. Dietary multivitamin supplements containing folic acid 100 microg or vitamin B12 1 microg, taken by 34%, were discontinued at inclusion. Participants had normal renal function. Folate status [erythrocyte (Ery-) folate, plasma (P-) folate, P-homocysteine] was measured at 18, 32.......2% postpartum (P homocysteine demonstrated a significant increase: median value was 6.4, 7.0, 7.7 and 10.8 micromol/L, respectively (P homocysteine >13 micromol/L increased during pregnancy from 0.7% to 20.8% postpartum (P

  14. Comprehensive Identification of Glycated Peptides and Their Glycation Motifs in Plasma and Erythrocytes of Control and Diabetic Subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qibin; Monroe, Matthew E.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Clauss, Therese RW; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Meng, Da; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2011-07-01

    Non-enzymatic glycation of proteins is implicated in diabetes mellitus and its related complications. In this report, we extend our previous development and refinement of proteomics-based methods for the analysis of non-enzymatically glycated proteins to comprehensively identify glycated proteins in normal and diabetic human plasma and erythrocytes. Using immunodepletion, enrichment, and fractionation strategies, we identified 7749 unique glycated peptides, corresponding to 3742 unique glycated proteins. Semi-quantitative comparisons revealed a number of proteins with glycation levels significantly increased in diabetes relative to control samples and that erythrocyte proteins are more extensively glycated than plasma proteins. A glycation motif analysis revealed amino acids that are favored more than others in the protein primary structures in the vicinity of the glycation sites in both sample types. The glycated peptides and corresponding proteins reported here provide a foundation for the potential identification of novel markers for diabetes, glycemia, or diabetic complications.

  15. GRAVIMETRIC-DETERMINATION OF THE WATER CONCENTRATION IN WHOLE-BLOOD, PLASMA AND ERYTHROCYTES AND CORRELATIONS WITH HEMATOLOGICAL AND CLINICOCHEMICAL PARAMETERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LIJNEMA, TH; HUIZENGA, [No Value; JAGER, J; MACKOR, AJ; GIPS, CH

    1993-01-01

    We have assessed gravimetric methods for determination of intravascular water, established whole blood-, plasma- and erythrocyte water reference values in a healthy volunteer group (n = 97, 48 females) and correlated these variables with 30 simultaneous hematological, clinicochemical and body

  16. Discriminating the hemolytic risk of blood type A plasmas using the complement hemolysis using human erythrocytes (CHUHE) assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunnion, Kenji M; Hair, Pamela S; Krishna, Neel K; Sass, Megan A; Enos, Clinton W; Whitley, Pamela H; Maes, Lanne Y; Goldberg, Corinne L

    2017-03-01

    The agglutination-based cross-matching method is sensitive for antibody binding to red blood cells but is only partially predictive of complement-mediated hemolysis, which is important in many acute hemolytic transfusion reactions. Here, we describe complement hemolysis using human erythrocytes (CHUHE) assays that directly evaluate complement-mediated hemolysis between individual serum-plasma and red blood cell combinations. The CHUHE assay is used to evaluate correlations between agglutination titers and complement-mediated hemolysis as well as the hemolytic potential of plasma from type A blood donors. Plasma or serum from each type A blood donor was incubated with AB or B red blood cells in the CHUHE assay and measured for free hemoglobin release. CHUHE assays for serum or plasma demonstrate a wide, dynamic range and high sensitivity for complement-mediated hemolysis for individual serum/plasma and red blood cell combinations. CHUHE results suggest that agglutination assays alone are only moderately predictive of complement-mediated hemolysis. CHUHE results also suggest that plasma from particular type A blood donors produce minimal complement-mediated hemolysis, whereas plasma from other type A blood donors produce moderate to high-level complement-mediated hemolysis, depending on the red blood cell donor. The current results indicate that the CHUHE assay can be used to assess complement-mediated hemolysis for plasma or serum from a type A blood donor, providing additional risk discrimination over agglutination titers alone. © 2016 AABB.

  17. The Redox Balance in Erythrocytes, Plasma, and Periosteum of Patients with Titanium Fixation of the Jaw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Borys

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Titanium miniplates and screws are commonly used for fixation of jaw fractured or osteotomies. Despite the opinion of their biocompatibility, in clinical practice symptoms of chronic inflammation around the fixation develop in some patients, even many years after the application of miniplates and screws. The cause of these complications is still an unanswered question. Taking into account that oxidative stress is one of the toxic action of titanium, we have evaluated the antioxidant barrier as well as oxidative stress in the erythrocytes, plasma and periosteum covering the titanium fixation of the jaw. The study group was composed of 32 patients aged 20–30 with inserted miniplates and screws. The antioxidant defense: catalase (CAT, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1, uric acid (UA, total antioxidant capacity (TAC, as well as oxidative damage products: advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP, advanced glycation end products (AGE, dityrosine, kynurenine, N-formylkynurenine, tryptophan, malondialdehyde (MDA, 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE, total oxidant status (TOS, and oxidative status index (OSI were evaluated. SOD1 activity (↓37%, and tryptophan levels (↓34% showed a significant decrease while AOPP (↑25%, TOS (↑80% and OSI (↑101% were significantly elevated in maxillary periosteum of patients who underwent bimaxillary osteotomies as compared to the control group. SOD-1 (↓55%, TAC (↓58.6%, AGE (↓60% and N-formylkynurenine (↓34% was statistically reduced while AOPP (↑38%, MDA (↑29%, 4-HNE (↑114%, TOS (↑99%, and OSI (↑381% were significantly higher in the mandibular periosteum covering miniplates/screw compared with the control tissues. There were no correlations between antioxidants and oxidative stress markers in the periosteum of all patients and the blood. As exposure to the Ti6Al4V titanium alloy leads to disturbances of redox balance in the periosteum surrounding titanium implants of the maxilla

  18. Relationship between changes of plasma endothelin (ET) level, ATPase activity of erythrocyte membrane and development of nephropathy in patients with pregnancy induced hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Lin; Lu Beiyi

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the possible role played by alteration of plasma ET levels and activities of Na + - K + -APT ase and Ca 2+ -Mg 2+ -ATPase of erythrocyte membrane in patients with nephropathy pregnancy induced hypertension. Methods: The concentrations of plasma ET was detected with RIA and erythrocyte membrane ATPase activities were determined with Reilni method in 32 pregnant women with PIH complicated with nephropathy and 70 women with PIH but no nephropathy and 35 normal pregnant women as controls. Results: The plasma ET levels in patients with PHI (both with and without nephropathy) were significantly higher than those in normal preganat women (P + -K + -ATPase and Ca 2+ -Mg 2+ -ATPase levels were significantly de- creased (P + -K + -ATPase and Ca 2+ -Mg 2+ -ATPase activity of erythrocyte membrane. (authors)

  19. Associations between dietary n-6 and n-3 fatty acids and arachidonic acid compositions in plasma and erythrocytes in young and elderly Japanese volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawabata Terue

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We reported that the compositions of arachidonic acid (ARA in erythrocytes and plasma phospholipids (PL in the elderly were lower than those in the young, though the ARA intake was nearly identical. Objective We further analyzed data in four study groups with different ages and sexes, and determined that the blood ARA levels were affected by the kinds of dietary fatty acids ingested. Methods One hundred and four healthy young and elderly volunteers were recruited. Dietary records together with photographic records from 28 consecutive days were reviewed and the fatty acid composition in plasma lipid fractions and erythrocyte PL was analyzed. Results No correlations for ARA between dietary fatty acids and blood lipid fractions were observed. A significant negative correlation between eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA + docosahexaenoic acid (DHA intake and ARA composition in erythrocyte PL was observed. ARA composition in erythrocyte PL was significantly lower in elderly subjects than in young subjects, because EPA and DHA intake in elderly subjects was higher than in young subjects. However, after removing the effect of dietary EPA+DHA intake, the ARA composition in erythrocyte PL in elderly subjects was significantly lower than that in young subjects. Conclusions Changes in physical conditions with aging influenced the low ARA composition of erythrocyte in elderly subjects in addition to the effects of dietary EPA and DHA.

  20. Plasma lipid peroxidation, blood GSH concentration and erythrocyte antioxidant enzymes in menstruating females with ovulatory and anovulatory cycles compared with males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Lutosławska

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to evaluate plasma TBARS and blood GSH concentration and erythrocyte antioxidant enzymes (glutathione peroxidase, catalase and superoxide dismutase in active, regularly menstruating female physical education students with ovulatory and anovulatory menstrual cycles and in their male counterparts. A total of 27 subjects (12 males and 15 females volunteered to participate in the study. All females were regularly menstruating with cycle length between 26-31 days. Plasma progesterone and 17-β-estradiol concentrations were assayed during the 7th-9th and 22nd-25th day of the menstrual cycle. Women with plasma progesterone concentration exceeding 19 nmol•l-1 during the 22nd-25th day were referred to as ovulatory (Group OV; n=7. Women without a peak plasma progesterone concentration were referred to as anovulatory (Group AN; n=8. Blood from male subjects was withdrawn twice - two weeks apart, at their convenience. It was found that the menstrual cycle phases did not affect plasma TBARS and blood glutathione concentration and erythrocyte GPX, CAT and SOD activity. However, erythrocyte GPX activity either in ovulatory or anovulatory women was by about 30% higher than in male subjects. Erythrocyte SOD activity in ovulatory women both in follicular and luteal phase of the menstrual cycle (1557 U/g Hb and 1394.6 U/g Hb, respectively was markedly lower than in men (1951.8 and 1937.7 U/g Hb for blood sampling I and II, respectively. In contrast, erythrocyte SOD activity in anovulatory women (1855.5 U/g Hb and 1745.7 U/g Hb in the follicular and luteal phases, respectively was similar to that found in men. The above data indicated that erythrocyte GPX and SOD activities are sensitive to plasma ovarian hormone concentration. In addition, they suggested that due to higher erythrocyte GPX activity females even with anovulatory menstrual cycles are protected better than males against hydrogen peroxide action. However, lower superoxide

  1. The effect of d-galactose induced oxidative stress on in vitro redox homeostasis in rat plasma and erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delwing-de Lima, Daniela; Hennrich, Silmara Brietzig; Delwing-Dal Magro, Débora; Aurélio, Juliana Gruenwaldt Maia; Serpa, Ana Paula; Augusto, Thierry Waltrich; Pereira, Nariana Regina

    2017-02-01

    We, herein, investigated the in vitro effects of galactose on thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBA-RS), total sulfhydryl content, and on the activities of antioxidant enzymes, including catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) in the blood of 30- and 60-day-old rats. We also determined the influence of the antioxidants, trolox, ascorbic acid and glutathione, on the effects elicited by galactose on the parameters tested. Galactose was added to the assay at final concentrations of 0.1, 3.0, 5.0 and 10.0mM. Control experiments were performed without the addition of galactose. Rats were sacrificed by decapitation without anesthesia and a blood sample was removed for analysis. Galactose, at 3.0mM, 5.0mM and 10.0mM, enhanced TBA-RS in the plasma of 60-day-old rats, while 10.0mM galactose reduced total sulfhydryl content in the plasma of 30-day-old rats; 5.0mM and 10.0mM galactose enhanced CAT activity in the erythrocytes of 30- and 60-day-old rats and 10.0mM galactose reduced SOD activity in the erythrocytes of 60-day-old rats. Galactose did not alter BuChE activity. Data showed that at the pathologically high concentration (greater than 5.0mM), galactose induces lipid peroxidation, reduces total sulfhydryl content and alters antioxidant defenses in the blood of rats. Trolox, ascorbic acid and glutathione addition prevented most alterations in oxidative stress parameters that were caused by galactose. Our findings lend support to a potential therapeutic strategy for this disease, which may include the use of antioxidants for ameliorating the damage caused by galactose. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Gene-diet interaction of a common FADS1 variant with marine polyunsaturated fatty acids for fatty acid composition in plasma and erythrocytes among men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takkunen, Markus J; de Mello, Vanessa D; Schwab, Ursula S; Kuusisto, Johanna; Vaittinen, Maija; Ågren, Jyrki J; Laakso, Markku; Pihlajamäki, Jussi; Uusitupa, Matti I J

    2016-02-01

    Limited information exists on how the relationship between dietary intake of fat and fatty acids in erythrocytes and plasma is modulated by polymorphisms in the FADS gene cluster. We examined gene-diet interaction of total marine PUFA intake with a known gene encoding Δ-5 desaturase enzyme (FADS1) variant (rs174550) for fatty acids in erythrocyte membranes and plasma phospholipids (PL), cholesteryl esters (CE), and triglycerides (TG). In this cross-sectional study, fatty acid compositions were measured using GC, and total intake of polyunsaturated fat from fish and fish oil was estimated using a food frequency questionnaire in a subsample (n = 962) of the Metabolic Syndrome in Men Study. We found nominally significant gene-diet interactions for eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3) in erythrocytes (pinteraction = 0.032) and for EPA in plasma PL (pinteraction = 0.062), CE (pinteraction = 0.035), and TG (pinteraction = 0.035), as well as for docosapentaenoic acid (22:5n-3) in PL (pinteraction = 0.007). After excluding omega-3 supplement users, we found a significant gene-diet interaction for EPA in erythrocytes (pinteraction FADS1 (p = 1.5 × 10(-10) ). FADS1 variants may modulate the relationship between marine fatty acid intake and circulating levels of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Ionized magnesium in plasma and erythrocytes for the assessment of low magnesium status in alcohol dependent patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordak, Michal; Maj-Zurawska, Magdalena; Matsumoto, Halina; Bujalska-Zadrozny, Magdalena; Kieres-Salomonski, Ilona; Nasierowski, Tadeusz; Muszynska, Elzbieta; Wojnar, Marcin

    2017-09-01

    Studies on the homeostasis of magnesium in alcohol-dependent patients have often been characterized by low hypomagnesemia detection rates. This may be due to the fact that the content of magnesium in blood serum constitutes only 1% of the average magnesium level within the human body. However, the concentration of ionized magnesium is more physiologically important and makes up 67% of the total magnesium within a human organism. There are no data concerning the determination of the ionized fraction of magnesium in patients addicted to alcohol and its influence on mental health status. This study included 100 alcohol-dependent patients and 50 healthy subjects. The free magnesium fraction was determined using the potentiometric method by means of using ion-selective electrodes. The total magnesium level was determined by using a biochemical Indiko Plus analyzer. In this study, different psychometric scales were applied. Our results confirm the usefulness of ionized magnesium concentrations in erythrocytes and plasma as a diagnostic parameter of low magnesium status in alcohol-dependent patients. The lower the concentration of ionized magnesium, the worse the quality of life an alcohol-dependent person might experience. In the case of total magnesium, no such correlation was determined. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of Intake of Maternal Dietary Elaidic Acids during Pregnancy and Lactation on the Fatty Acid Composition of Plasma, Erythrocyte Membrane, and Brain in Rat Pups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriko Komatsuzaki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effects of a dam’s dietary elaidic acid (EA intake during pregnancy and lactation on the fatty acid composition of plasma, erythrocyte membrane, and brain in rat pups, we fed two groups of dams either a soybean oil diet (SOD or a shortening diet (SHD containing soybean oil (10% or shortening (10%, respectively. Although EA was not detected in the SOD, EA accounted for 25.3% of all fatty acid content in the SHD. On day 8 after birth, the EA levels in the stomach, plasma, and erythrocyte membrane of pups nursed by the dams fed the SHD were %, %, and %, respectively. Although on day 8 after birth the EA level of the brains of pups nursed by SHD-fed dams was %, EA was not detected on day 21 or day 82 after birth. These results suggest that EA intake during pregnancy and lactation supplies EA to plasma, remains in the erythrocyte membrane of pups, and moves into the brain in early infancy.

  5. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and fibrinogen concentration of whole blood influences the cellular composition of platelet-rich plasma obtained from centrifugation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wenjing; Xu, Zhengliang; Sheng, Jiagen; Xie, Xuetao; Zhang, Changqing

    2017-09-01

    Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), which reflects the sedimentation rate of platelets, leukocytes and erythrocytes in response to centrifugal force, may influence the cellular composition of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) obtained via centrifugation methods. However, no relevant studies have substantiated this. In the present study, blood was collected from 40 healthy volunteers and used to prepare PRP with two plasma-based preparation systems [YinPRP and Plasma Rich in Growth Factor (PRGF) systems] and two buffy coat-based systems (RegenPRP and WEGOPRP systems) in a single-donor model. Volumes of PRP and platelet-poor plasma (PPP) that were removed in the preparation process were recorded. Analyses of ESR, haematocrit, C-reaction protein, coagulation, serum glucose and serum lipid of the whole blood used for PRP preparation were performed to evaluate the levels of ESR and the factors known to influence it. Whole blood analysis was performed to evaluate the cellular composition of PRP. Results demonstrated that there were marked positive correlations between the ESR of the whole blood used for PRP preparation and PPP removal efficiencies, platelet concentrations, platelet capture efficiencies and platelet enrichment factors of PRP formulations obtained from plasma-based systems, and PRP yield efficiency of RegenPRP and PPP removal efficiency of WEGOPRP. Furthermore, there were marked negative correlations between ESR and concentrations and enrichment factors of platelets, leukocytes and erythrocytes of RegenPRP. Fibrinogen concentration of the whole blood, which had a marked positive correlation with ESR, also influenced the cellular composition of PRP. These findings may increase the understanding of PRP preparation and provide substantial evidence for the individualised optimisation of PRP preparation systems used in clinical practice.

  6. Oxidative Hemolysis of Erythrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodek, Lidia; Kusior, Dorota

    2006-01-01

    This exercise for students will allow them to simultaneously observe lipid peroxidation and consequent hemolysis of rat erythrocytes and the effect of sodium azide, a catalase inhibitor, on these processes. It will also demonstrate a protective action of antioxidants, the therapeutically used N-acetylcysteine and albumins present in plasma.

  7. Effect of a Diet Enriched with Fresh Coconut Saturated Fats on Plasma Lipids and Erythrocyte Fatty Acid Composition in Normal Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashree, Rokkam Shankar; Manjunath, N K; Indu, M; Ramesh, M; Venugopal, V; Sreedhar, P; Pavithra, N; Nagendra, Hongasandra R

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of increased saturated fatty acid (SFA) (provided by fresh coconut) versus monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) intake (provided by a combination of groundnuts and groundnut oil) on plasma lipids and erythrocyte fatty acid (EFA) composition in healthy adults. Fifty-eight healthy volunteers, randomized into 2 groups, were provided standardized diet along with 100 g fresh coconut or groundnuts and groundnut oil combination for 90 days in a Yoga University. Fasting blood samples were collected before and after the intervention period for the measurement of plasma lipids and EFA profile. Coconut diet increased low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels significantly. In contrast, the groundnut diet decreased total cholesterol (TC), mainly due to a decrease in HDL levels. There were no differences in the major SFA of erythrocytes in either group. However, coconut consumption resulted in an increase in C14:0 and C24:0 along with a decrease in levels of C18:1 n9 (oleic acid). There was a significant increase in levels of C20:3 n6 (dihomo-gamma linolenic acid, DGLA). Consumption of SFA-rich coconut for 3 months had no significant deleterious effect on erythrocytes or lipid-related factors compared to groundnut consumption. On the contrary, there was an increase in the anti-atherogenic HDL levels and anti-inflammatory precursor DGLA in erythrocyte lipids. This suggests that coconut consumption may not have any deleterious effects on cardiovascular risk in normal subjects.

  8. Stable-isotope dilution GC-MS approach for nitrite quantification in human whole blood, erythrocytes, and plasma using pentafluorobenzyl bromide derivatization: nitrite distribution in human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Alexandra; Modun, Darko; Heusser, Karsten; Tank, Jens; Gutzki, Frank-Mathias; Mitschke, Anja; Jordan, Jens; Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2011-05-15

    Previously, we reported on the usefulness of pentafluorobenzyl bromide (PFB-Br) for the simultaneous derivatization and quantitative determination of nitrite and nitrate in various biological fluids by GC-MS using their (15)N-labelled analogues as internal standards. As nitrite may be distributed unevenly in plasma and blood cells, its quantification in whole blood rather than in plasma or serum may be the most appropriate approach to determine nitrite concentration in the circulation. So far, GC-MS methods based on PFB-Br derivatization failed to measure nitrite in whole blood and erythrocytes because of rapid nitrite loss by oxidation and other unknown reactions during derivatization. The present article reports optimized and validated procedures for sample preparation and nitrite derivatization which allow for reliable quantification of nitrite in human whole blood and erythrocytes. Essential measures for stabilizing nitrite in these samples include sample cooling (0-4°C), hemoglobin (Hb) removal by precipitation with acetone and short derivatization of the Hb-free supernatant (5 min, 50°C). Potassium ferricyanide (K(3)Fe(CN)(6)) is useful in preventing Hb-caused nitrite loss, however, this chemical is not absolutely required in the present method. Our results show that accurate GC-MS quantification of nitrite as PFB derivative is feasible virtually in every biological matrix with similar accuracy and precision. In EDTA-anticoagulated venous blood of 10 healthy young volunteers, endogenous nitrite concentration was measured to be 486±280 nM in whole blood, 672±496 nM in plasma (C(P)), and 620±350 nM in erythrocytes (C(E)). The C(E)-to-C(P) ratio was 0.993±0.188 indicating almost even distribution of endogenous nitrite between plasma and erythrocytes. By contrast, the major fraction of nitrite added to whole blood remained in plasma. The present GC-MS method is useful to investigate distribution and metabolism of endogenous and exogenous nitrite in blood

  9. Possible role of plasma ceruloplasmin and erythrocyte sedimentation rate in assessing compliance with occupational hygiene and safety practices in waste management workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odewabi, Adesina O; Ogundahunsi, Omobola A; Odewabi, Adenike A; Oritogun, Kolawole S; Ekor, Martins

    2013-05-01

    Work-related health and safety risks are common among waste management workers (WMWs). This study investigated the level of compliance with safety measures in relation to levels of inflammatory markers among WMWs in Sagamu, South-West Nigeria. WMWs comprising 30 cart pushers (CPs) and 50 truck users (TUs) were recruited alongside 45 people from the normal population as control. Data on health complaints were obtained from questionnaire surveys. Inflammation was assessed by measuring plasma ceruloplasmin (Cp), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and albumin. WMWs exhibited a significantly higher prevalence of respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms and poor compliance with health and safety measures. Significant (P footwear between TUs and CPs. ESR, Cp, and CRP increased significantly (P safety measures. ESR and Cp may be useful predictors of occupational hygiene and compliance with safety measures among Nigerian WMWs.

  10. Purine metabolism in response to hypoxic conditions associated with breath-hold diving and exercise in erythrocytes and plasma from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Castillo Velasco-Martínez, Iris; Hernández-Camacho, Claudia J; Méndez-Rodríguez, Lía C; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2016-01-01

    In mammalian tissues under hypoxic conditions, ATP degradation results in accumulation of purine metabolites. During exercise, muscle energetic demand increases and oxygen consumption can exceed its supply. During breath-hold diving, oxygen supply is reduced and, although oxygen utilization is regulated by bradycardia (low heart rate) and peripheral vasoconstriction, tissues with low blood flow (ischemia) may become hypoxic. The goal of this study was to evaluate potential differences in the circulating levels of purine metabolism components between diving and exercise in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). Blood samples were taken from captive dolphins following a swimming routine (n=8) and after a 2min dive (n=8). Activity of enzymes involved in purine metabolism (hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT), inosine monophosphate deshydrogenase (IMPDH), xanthine oxidase (XO), purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP)), and purine metabolite (hypoxanthine (HX), xanthine (X), uric acid (UA), inosine monophosphate (IMP), inosine, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), adenosine, adenosine monophosphate (AMP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), ATP, guanosine diphosphate (GDP), guanosine triphosphate (GTP)) concentrations were quantified in erythrocyte and plasma samples. Enzymatic activity and purine metabolite concentrations involved in purine synthesis and degradation, were not significantly different between diving and exercise. Plasma adenosine concentration was higher after diving than exercise (p=0.03); this may be related to dive-induced ischemia. In erythrocytes, HGPRT activity was higher after diving than exercise (p=0.007), suggesting an increased capacity for purine recycling and ATP synthesis from IMP in ischemic tissues of bottlenose dolphins during diving. Purine recycling and physiological adaptations may maintain the ATP concentrations in bottlenose dolphins after diving and exercise. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Hypo - and hypernatremia results in inaccurate Erythrocytes mean Corpuscular Volume (MCV) measurement in vitro, when using Sysmex XE 2100

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kirsten Vikkelsø; Philipsen, Jens Peter

    Introduction: Automated hematology analyzers dilute patient erythrocytes with an isosmotic diluent before quantitating the erythrocyte Mean Cell Volume (MCV). However, if patient plasma osmolality differs from the diluent, water will cross the erythrocytes membrane and establish a new equilibrium...

  12. Study of factors that interfere in the labelling process of erythrocytes and plasma proteins with Technetium-99m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutfilen, Bianca

    1989-01-01

    The labelling of red blood cells (RBC) with technetium-99m (Tc-99m) depends on several factors, as the stannous ion (Sn++) concentration, time, temperature, the presence of plasma proteins (PP) and others. However the Sn++ concentration seems to be the most important factor; probably because the uptake of this reducing agent by RBC is limited. The excess of Sn++ in extracellular medium can determine the labelling of PP. the modifications of RBC at 50 deg C described in the literature, the possibility of labelling RBC with Tc-99m at this temperature and experimental results obtained made it possible to perform spleen selective scintigraphy through a simple technique with few manipulations. The effect of gentamicin, nifedipine and verapamil in the labelling of RBC and plasma proteins with Tc-99m was studied because of similarities between Ca++ and Sn++. The results show that, under some conditions, these drugs are capable to alter this Tc-99m incorporation. The modification of the ionic distribution determined by these drugs or the blockage of Sn++ and/or Tc-99m or the fact that they bind theirselves to plasma proteins, or the possibility of the labelling of these drugs, are factors that can interfere in the labelling process of red blood cells and plasma proteins with Tc-99m. (author)

  13. [The influence of sinusoidal modulated currents on the fatty acid composition of plasma and blood erythrocytes in the patients presenting with chronic cholecystitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyshova, V V; Denisenko, Yu K; Novgorodtseva, T P; Yurenko, A V; Gvozdenko, T A; Zhukova, N V

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment with sinusoidal modulated currents on lipid metabolism in the patients presenting with chronic cholecystitis in the state of remission. The study included 25 patients with chronic non-calculosis cholecystitis in phase of remission and 20 healthy subjects (controls). We studied the serum lipid spectrum as well as the fatty acid composition of plasma and blood erythrocytes before and after therapy with sinusoidal modulated currents applied to the right-sided hypochondrium region. The treatment of the patients with chronic cholecystitis in remission with the use of sinusoidal modulated currents produced moderate lipid-modulatory and membranotropic effects mediated through the activation of the processes of lipid metabolism that may result in the depletion of the pool of essential polyunsaturated fatty acids. The results of this study give evidence that it is advisable to treat the patients presenting with chronic cholecystitis by sinusoidal modulated currents in the combination with the oral intake of exogenous polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  14. Effects of magnesium on erythrocyte sodium-lithium countertransport and some of plasma biochemical parameters in rabbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samad Akbarzadeh

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Magnesium acts as an essential cofactor for the activity of many enzymes. It regulates the work of cardiovascular system. The activity of sodium–lithium countertransport (SLC and the concentrations of plasma biochemical parameters such as VLDL, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, sodium, potassium, urea and creatinine are changed in cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of magnesium on SLC activity and some of the plasma biochemical parameters. Methods: New Zealand white rabbits (weighed 1350 ± 50g were chosen for these experiments. This study was conducted through two in vitro and in vivo techniques. Through in vitro method, the effects of different concentrations of magnesium on SLC activity were investigated. In order to conduct in vivo method, the rabbits were divided into two groups (5 /group. One group was treated by MgSo4 (40 mg/kg body weight through peritoneum for two weeks. For the second group, deionized water was used. The activity of SLC and mentioned biochemical parameters were determined. Results: The results of both in vitro and in vivo studies showed that magnesium can significantly decrease the SLC activity and also causes an increase in Km and decreased Vmax/Km of the system and plasma concentrations of VLDL, LDL-cholesterol, total cholesterol and triglycerides were significantly decreased. Conclusion: Magnesium may cause a reduction in blood pressure through decreasing the SLC activity and affecting the concentrations of VLDL, LDL-cholesterol, total cholesterol and triglycerides and so improvement the cardiovascular diseases.

  15. Age-Related Relationships between Innate Immunity and Plasma Carotenoids in an Obligate Avian Scavenger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Rull, Isabel; Hornero-Méndez, Dámaso; Frías, Óscar; Blanco, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Variation in immunity is influenced by allocation trade-offs that are expected to change between age-classes as a result of the different environmental and physiological conditions that individuals encounter over their lifetime. One such trade-off occurs with carotenoids, which must be acquired with food and are involved in a variety of physiological functions. Nonetheless, relationships between immunity and carotenoids in species where these micronutrients are scarce due to diet are poorly studied. Among birds, vultures show the lowest concentrations of plasma carotenoids due to a diet based on carrion. Here, we investigated variations in the relationships between innate immunity (hemagglutination by natural antibodies and hemolysis by complement proteins), pathogen infection and plasma carotenoids in nestling and adult griffon vultures (Gyps fulvus) in the wild. Nestlings showed lower hemolysis, higher total carotenoid concentration and higher pathogen infection than adults. Hemolysis was negatively related to carotenoid concentration only in nestlings. A differential carotenoid allocation to immunity due to the incomplete development of the immune system of nestlings compared with adults is suggested linked to, or regardless of, potential differences in parasite infection, which requires experimental testing. We also found that individuals with more severe pathogen infections showed lower hemagglutination than those with a lower intensity infection irrespective of their age and carotenoid level. These results are consistent with the idea that intraspecific relationships between innate immunity and carotenoids may change across ontogeny, even in species lacking carotenoid-based coloration. Thus, even low concentrations of plasma carotenoids due to a scavenger diet can be essential to the development and activation of the immune system in growing birds.

  16. Chlorpromazine and dimethyl sulfoxide modulate the catalytic activity of the plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase from human erythrocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plenge-Tellechea, Fernando; Domínguez-Solís, Carlos A; Díaz-Sánchez, Ángel G; Meléndez-Martínez, David; Vargas-Medrano, Javier; Sierra-Fonseca, Jorge A

    2018-02-01

    The plasma membrane Ca 2+ -ATPase (PMCA) removes Ca 2+ from the cytosol into the extracellular space. Its catalytic activity can be stimulated by calmodulin (CaM) or by limited proteolysis. We evaluated the effect of chlorpromazine (CPZ) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) over the hydrolytic activity of PMCA. Activity was monitored in three different forms: native, CaM-activated and proteolyzed by trypsin. CPZ appears to inhibit PMCA without directly interfering with the C-terminal site, since it is affected by CaM and proteolysis. Although the treatment of PMCA with trypsin and CaM produces an activation, it also produces an enzymatic form that is more sensitive to inhibition by CPZ. The same case was observed in the DMSO inhibition experiments. In the absence of CPZ, DMSO produces a progressive loss of activity, but in the presence of CPZ the profile of activity against DMSO changes and produces a recovery of activity, indicating a possible partition of CPZ by the solvent. Increasing Ca 2+ concentrations indicated that CPZ interacts with PMCA rather than with CaM. This observation is supported by docking analysis that suggests that the CPZ-PMCA interaction is non-competitive. We propose that CPZ interacts with the state of lower affinity for Ca 2 + .

  17. Intravenous Fish Oil and Pediatric Intestinal Failure-Associated Liver Disease: Changes in Plasma Phytosterols, Cytokines, and Bile Acids and Erythrocyte Fatty Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, Kara L; DeBarber, Andrea; Steiner, Robert D; Flores, Martiniano J; Grogan, Tristan R; Henning, Susanne M; Reyen, Laurie; Venick, Robert S

    2017-05-01

    Soybean oil (SO) emulsions are associated with intestinal failure-associated liver disease (IFALD); fish oil (FO) emulsions are used to treat IFALD. SO and FO differ with respect to their fatty acid and phytosterol content. In children with IFALD whose SO was replaced with FO, we aimed to (1) quantify changes in erythrocyte fatty acids and plasma phytosterols, cytokines, and bile acids and (2) correlate these changes with direct bilirubin (DB). This study enrolled IFALD children who received 6 months of FO. Blood samples were collected prior to FO, and after 2 weeks and 3 and 6 months of FO. The primary outcome was 3-month vs baseline biomarker concentrations. At study initiation, the median patient age was 3 months (interquartile range, 3-17 months), and mean ± standard deviation DB was 5.6 ± 0.7 mg/dL (n = 14). Cholestasis reversed in 79% of subjects. Eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid was greater than baseline ( P < .001, all time points). Linoleic and arachidonic acid and sitosterol and stigmasterol were less than baseline ( P < .05, all time points). Three- and 6-month interleukin-8 (IL-8) and total and conjugated bile acids were less than baseline ( P < .05). Baseline IL-8 was correlated with baseline DB ( r = 0.71, P < .01). Early changes in stigmasterol and IL-8 were correlated with later DB changes ( r = 0.68 and 0.75, P < .05). Specific fat emulsion components may play a role in IFALD. Stigmasterol and IL-8 may predict FO treatment response.

  18. Altitude acclimatization and blood volume: effects of exogenous erythrocyte volume expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sawka, M N; Young, Jette Feveile; Rock, P B

    1996-01-01

    We studied sea-level residents during 13 days of altitude acclimatization to determine 1) altitude acclimatization effects on erythrocyte volume and plasma volume, 2) if exogenous erythrocyte volume expansion alters subsequent erythrocyte volume and plasma volume adaptations, 3) if an increased b......, and mean arterial pressure elevation. These findings better define human blood volume responses during altitude acclimatization....

  19. Erythrocyte membrane, plasma and atherosclerotic plaque lipid pattern in coronary heart disease Perfil lipídico de membrana de eritrocito, plasma y placa ateromatosa en la enfermedad coronaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia R. Lausada

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to analyze the lipid composition of the atherosclerotic plaque (AP, plasma and erythrocyte membrane (EM in patients with advanced coronary heart disease (CHD. AP were obtained through endarterectomy in 18 patients. Ten normolipemic healthy subjects were selected to obtain the normal lipid pattern profile. Total lipids of AP and EM were determined by HPTLC, and the fatty acid profile from AP, EM and plasma using TLC-FID. The relative amount of the lipid species analyzed in AP was in line with the data in the literature [phospholipids: 23.5 mol% ± 3.5; total cholesterol 68.9 mol% ± 7.9; triglyceride 7.6 mol% ± 3.4]. Plasma and EM from CHD patients compared to controls, showed a decrease in polyunsaturated fatty acids and an increase in saturated fatty acids leading to a decrease in the unsaturation index (plasma: 1.67 ± 0.06 vs. 1.28 ± 0.03, PEl objetivo fue analizar la composición lipídica de las membranas de eritrocitos (ME, plasma y placas ateromatosas (PA en pacientes con enfermedad coronaria avanzada (ECV. Las PA fueron obtenidas de endarterectomías coronarias de 18 pacientes. Fueron seleccionados 10 sujetos sanos, normolipémicos, como grupo control. Los lípidos totales de PA y ME se determinaron utilizando HPTLC, y el perfil de ácidos grasos de las PA, ME y plasma mediante TLC-FID. La cantidad relativa de las especies lipídicas obtenidas de las PA coinciden con la literatura [fosfolípidos 23.5 mol% ± 3.5; colesterol total 68.9 mol% ± 7.9; triglicéridos 7.6 mol% ± 3.4]. En el plasma y en las ME de los pacientes con ECV se observó, comparando con los pacientes controles, una disminución de los ácidos grasos poli-no saturados acompañado de un aumento de los ácidos grasos saturados que provocó el descenso del índice de instauración (plasma: 1.67 ± 0.06 vs. 1.28 ± 0.03, P<0.05; ME: 2.28 ± 0.04 vs. 1.25 ± 0.010, P<0.05 y el incremento del cociente AG saturados/insaturados (plasma: 0.35 ± 0.02 vs. 0

  20. Hemolitic action of Naja naja atra cardiotoxin on erythrocytes from different animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Troiano

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study on the sensitivity of erythrocytes from different vertebrate species (avian, mammalian and reptilian to the hemolytic action caused by cardiotoxin isolated from Naja naja atra venom was carried out. Cardiotoxin was able to induce direct hemolysis in washed erythrocytes from several animals, except for llama. The EC50 values from hemolysis of the most sensitive (cat and the most resistant (snake animal varied approximately tenfold. According to the cell behavior, it was possible to characterize four types of behavior: The first was observed in cat, horse and human cells; the second in rat, rabbit and dog erythrocytes; and the third only in llama erythrocytes, which were resistant to cardiotoxin concentrations up to 300 µg/ml. Finally, avian and reptilian erythrocytes were more resistant to cardiotoxin III-induced hemolysis than those of the mammalian species.

  1. The Effect of Diazinon on Cholinesterase Activity in Plasma and Erythrocytes of Male and Female Rats and the Protective Role of Vitamin E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Rahimi Anbarkeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Diazinon (DZN is an organophosphate insecticide that one of the mechanisms of toxicity is the inhibition of cholinesterase. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of diazinon on cholinesterase activity in blood serum and erythrocytes of male and female rats and to assess the protective role of vitamin E. Materials & Methods: In this experimental study, 60 adult wistar rats including 30 male and 30 female rats were selected and divided into 5 groups (n = 6: control group (without any intervention, sham group (received only pure olive oil daily, experimental group 1 (DZN daily, 60 mg/kg, experimental group 2 (received DZN+ vitamin E daily, with the same dose and experimental group 3(received vitamin E daily 200 mg/kg. Diazinon and solvent were injected intraperitoneally and vitamin E was given by gavage. After 2 weeks 3 ml blood was taken from the heart tissue, and titrimetric and Ellman’s method respectively were used for serum and erythrocyte cholinesterases activity assay. Results: In both genders, due to administration of diazinon, we observed significant reduction in serum and erythrocytes cholinesterase activity. The use of vitamin E increased serum and erythrocytes cholinesterase activity in experimental group 2 of female rats but inhibition in erythrocyte and serum cholinesterase activity was not recovered in experimental group 2 of male rats. Conclusion: According to a further reduction of these enzymes activity in female rats with the use of diazinon, it can be concluded that female rats are more sensitive than male rats and it seems that vitamin E as an antioxidants has a protective effect on cholinesterase activity and reduces the toxicity of DZN. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2015; 21 (4:294-303

  2. Avian Metapneumoviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) is an economically important virus that is the primary causal agent of turkey rhinotracheitis (TRT), also known as avian rhinotracheitis (ART). The virus causes an acute highly contagious infection of the upper respiratory tract in turkeys and was first isolated from tur...

  3. Apolipoprotein M mediates sphingosine-1-phosphate efflux from erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Pernille M.; Bosteen, Markus H.; Hajny, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lipid implicated in e.g. angiogenesis, lymphocyte trafficking, and endothelial barrier function. Erythrocytes are a main source of plasma S1P together with platelets and endothelial cells. Apolipoprotein M (apoM) in HDL carries 70% of plasma S1P, where...... of ABCB1 or ATPase. Thus, ABCC1 could be involved in export of S1P from erythrocytes to apoM....

  4. Avian Biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    2017-01-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) generate new individuals through differentiation, maturation and fertilization. This means that the manipulation of PGCs is directly linked to the manipulation of individuals, making PGCs attractive target cells in the animal biotechnology field. A unique biological property of avian PGCs is that they circulate temporarily in the vasculature during early development, and this allows us to access and manipulate avian germ lines. Following the development of a technique for transplantation, PGCs have become central to avian biotechnology, in contrast to the use of embryo manipulation and subsequent transfer to foster mothers, as in mammalian biotechnology. Today, avian PGC transplantation combined with recent advanced manipulation techniques, including cell purification, cryopreservation, depletion, and long-term culture in vitro, have enabled the establishment of genetically modified poultry lines and ex-situ conservation of poultry genetic resources. This chapter introduces the principles, history, and procedures of producing avian germline chimeras by transplantation of PGCs, and the current status of avian germline modification as well as germplasm cryopreservation. Other fundamental avian reproductive technologies are described, including artificial insemination and embryo culture, and perspectives of industrial applications in agriculture and pharmacy are considered, including poultry productivity improvement, egg modification, disease resistance impairment and poultry gene "pharming" as well as gene banking.

  5. Acute consumption of organic and conventional tropical grape juices (Vitis labrusca L.) increases antioxidants in plasma and erythrocytes, but not glucose and uric acid levels, in healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toaldo, Isabela Maia; Cruz, Fernanda Alves; da Silva, Edson Luiz; Bordignon-Luiz, Marilde T

    2016-08-01

    Bioactive polyphenols in grapes are influenced by grape variety and cultivation conditions. The Vitis labrusca L. varieties are cultivated in tropical regions and used for grape juice production. We hypothesized that polyphenols from tropical grape juices would beneficially affect redox homeostasis in humans. Therefore, the effects of acute consumption of organic and conventional grape juices from V labrusca L. on antioxidants biomarkers were investigated in healthy individuals. In a controlled, randomized, crossover, intervention trial, 24 individuals were assigned to drink 400 mL of conventional juice, organic juice, or water. Each intervention was followed by a 14-day washout period. Blood samples were obtained before and 1 hour after acute intake and analyzed for erythrocyte reduced glutathione, serum total antioxidant capacity, antioxidant enzymes in erythrocytes, and glucose and uric acid in serum. The ingestion of both grape juices resulted in elevated levels of reduced glutathione (Pgrape juices (PGrape juice polyphenols were associated with increased antioxidants, and the chemical differences between organic and conventional juices were not predictive of the observed responses. The results suggest a bioactive potential of V labrusca L. juices to improve redox homeostasis, which is involved in defense against oxidative stress in humans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Avian influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... develop flu-like symptoms within 10 days of handling infected birds or being in an area with ... your provider if you become sick after you return from your trip. Current information regarding avian flu ...

  7. Avian Flu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckburg, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Since 2003, a severe form of H5N1 avian influenza has rapidly spread throughout Asia and Europe, infecting over 200 humans in 10 countries. The spread of H5N1 virus from person-to-person has been rare, thus preventing the emergence of a widespread pandemic. However, this ongoing epidemic continues to pose an important public health threat. Avian flu and its pandemic potential in humans will be discussed.

  8. Sickle erythrocytes inhibit human endothelial cell DNA synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinstein, R.; Zhou, M.A.; Bartlett-Pandite, A.; Wenc, K.

    1990-01-01

    Patients with sickle cell anemia experience severe vascular occlusive phenomena including acute pain crisis and cerebral infarction. Obstruction occurs at both the microvascular and the arterial level, and the clinical presentation of vascular events is heterogeneous, suggesting a complex etiology. Interaction between sickle erythrocytes and the endothelium may contribute to vascular occlusion due to alteration of endothelial function. To investigate this hypothesis, human vascular endothelial cells were overlaid with sickle or normal erythrocytes and stimulated to synthesize DNA. The erythrocytes were sedimented onto replicate monolayers by centrifugation for 10 minutes at 17 g to insure contact with the endothelial cells. Incorporation of 3H-thymidine into endothelial cell DNA was markedly inhibited during contact with sickle erythrocytes. This inhibitory effect was enhanced more than twofold when autologous sickle plasma was present during endothelial cell labeling. Normal erythrocytes, with or without autologous plasma, had a modest effect on endothelial cell DNA synthesis. When sickle erythrocytes in autologous sickle plasma were applied to endothelial monolayers for 1 minute, 10 minutes, or 1 hour and then removed, subsequent DNA synthesis by the endothelial cells was inhibited by 30% to 40%. Although adherence of sickle erythrocytes to the endothelial monolayers was observed under these experimental conditions, the effect of sickle erythrocytes on endothelial DNA synthesis occurred in the absence of significant adherence. Hence, human endothelial cell DNA synthesis is partially inhibited by contact with sickle erythrocytes. The inhibitory effect of sickle erythrocytes occurs during a brief (1 minute) contact with the endothelial monolayers, and persists for at least 6 hours of 3H-thymidine labeling

  9. Acute dark chocolate ingestion is beneficial for hemodynamics via enhancement of erythrocyte deformability in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radosinska, Jana; Horvathova, Martina; Frimmel, Karel; Muchova, Jana; Vidosovicova, Maria; Vazan, Rastislav; Bernatova, Iveta

    2017-03-01

    Erythrocyte deformability is an important property of erythrocytes that considerably affects blood flow and hemodynamics. The high content of polyphenols present in dark chocolate has been reported to play a protective role in functionality of erythrocytes. We hypothesized that chocolate might influence erythrocytes not only after repeated chronic intake, but also immediately after its ingestion. Thus, we determined the acute effect of dark chocolate and milk (with lower content of biologically active substances) chocolate intake on erythrocyte deformability. We also focused on selected factors that may affect erythrocyte deformability, specifically nitric oxide production in erythrocytes and total antioxidant capacity of plasma. We determined posttreatment changes in the mentioned parameters 2hours after consumption of chocolate compared with their levels before consumption of chocolate. In contrast to milk chocolate intake, the dark chocolate led to a significantly higher increase in erythrocyte deformability. Nitric oxide production in erythrocytes was not changed after dark chocolate intake, but significantly decreased after milk chocolate. The plasma total antioxidant capacity remained unaffected after ingestion of both chocolates. We conclude that our hypothesis was confirmed. Single ingestion of dark chocolate improved erythrocyte deformability despite unchanged nitric oxide production and antioxidant capacity of plasma. Increased deformability of erythrocytes may considerably improve rheological properties of blood and thus hemodynamics in humans, resulting in better tissue oxygenation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Avian influenza

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    EFSA Panel on Animal Health and Welfare; More, Simon; Bicout, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    Previous introductions of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) to the EU were most likely via migratory wild birds. A mathematical model has been developed which indicated that virus amplification and spread may take place when wild bird populations of sufficient size within EU become...... infected. Low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) may reach similar maximum prevalence levels in wild bird populations to HPAIV but the risk of LPAIV infection of a poultry holding was estimated to be lower than that of HPAIV. Only few non-wild bird pathways were identified having a non...

  11. Plasma and erythrocyte uptake of omega-3 fatty acids from an intravenous fish oil based lipid emulsion in patients with advanced oesophagogastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltweri, A M; Thomas, A L; Fisk, H L; Arshad, A; Calder, P C; Dennison, A R; Bowrey, D J

    2017-06-01

    It has been demonstrated that short term intravenous (IV) administration of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) is more effective than oral supplementation at promoting incorporation of the bioactive omega-3 PUFAs eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) into plasma, blood cells and tissues. The effect of repeated short term IV infusion of omega-3 PUFAs was investigated in patients with advanced oesophagogastric cancer during palliative chemotherapy. Patients with advanced oesophagogastric cancer (n = 21) were recruited into a phase II pilot clinical trial. All patients were scheduled for an intravenous infusion of Omegaven ® (fish oil supplement containing EPA and DHA) at a rate of 2 ml/kg body weight for 4 h once a week for up to six months. Blood samples were collected to assess omega-3 PUFA uptake into plasma non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs) and phosphatidylcholine (PC) and into red blood cell (RBC) membranes. Fatty acid profiles were analysed by gas chromatography. Twenty patients received at least one Omegaven ® treatment and were included in the analysis. Each infusion of omega-3 PUFAs resulted in increased EPA and DHA in plasma NEFAs, but there was little effect on PUFAs within plasma PC during the infusions. However, with repeated weekly infusion of omega-3 PUFAs, the EPA content of plasma PC and of RBC membranes increased. Repeated weekly omega-3 PUFA infusion is effective in enriching plasma PC and RBC membranes in EPA in patients with advanced oesophagogastric cancer receiving palliative chemotherapy. Clinical Trials.Gov NCT01870791. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  12. Determination of avian influenza A (H9N2) virions by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry based magnetic immunoassay with gold nanoparticles labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Guangyang; Chen, Beibei; He, Man; Shi, Kaiwen; Zhang, Xing; Li, Xiaoting; Wu, Qiumei; Pang, Daiwen; Hu, Bin

    2017-12-01

    Avian influenza viruses are the pathogens of global poultry epidemics, and may even cause the human infections. Here, we proposed a novel inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) based immunoassay with gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) labeling for the determination of H9N2 virions. Magnetic-beads modified with anti-influenza A H9N2 hemagglutinin mono-antibody (mAb-HA) were utilized for the capture of H9N2 virions in complex matrix; and Au NPs conjugated with mAb-HA were employed for the specific labeling of H9N2 virions for subsequent ICP-MS detection. With a sandwich immunoassay strategy, this method exhibited a high specificity for H9N2 among other influenza A virions such as H1N1 and H3N2. Under the optimized conditions, this method could detect as low as 0.63 ng mL- 1 H9N2 virions with the linear range of 2-400 ng mL- 1, the relative standard deviation for seven replicate detections of H9N2 virions was 7.2% (c = 10 ng mL- 1). The developed method was applied for the detection of H9N2 virions in real-world chicken dung samples, and the recovery for the spiking samples was 91.4-116.9%. This method is simple, rapid, sensitive, selective, reliable and has a good application potential for virions detection in real-world samples.

  13. Avian Influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitlin, Gary Adam; Maslow, Melanie Jane

    2005-05-01

    The current epidemic of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza in Southeast Asia raises serious concerns that genetic reassortment will result in the next influenza pandemic. There have been 164 confirmed cases of human infection with avian influenza since 1996. In 2004, there were 45 cases of human H5N1 in Vietnam and Thailand, with a mortality rate more than 70%. In addition to the potential public health hazard, the current zoonotic epidemic has caused severe economic losses. Efforts must be concentrated on early detection of bird outbreaks with aggressive culling, quarantining, and disinfection. To prepare for and prevent an increase in human cases, it is essential to improve detection methods and stockpile effective antivirals. Novel therapeutic modalities, including short-interfering RNAs and new vaccine strategies that use plasmid-based genetic systems, offer promise should a pandemic occur.

  14. Avian cholera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Milton

    1999-01-01

    Avian cholera is a contagious disease resulting from infection by the bacterium Pasteurella multocida. Several subspecies of bacteria have been proposed for P. multocida, and at least 16 different P. multocida serotypes or characteristics of antigens in bacterial cells that differentiate bacterial variants from each other have been recognized. The serotypes are further differentiated by other methods, including DNA fingerprinting. These evaluations are useful for studying the ecology of avian cholera (Fig. 7.1), because different serotypes are generally found in poultry and free-ranging migratory birds. These evaluations also show that different P. multocida serotypes are found in wild birds in the eastern United States than those that are found in the birds in the rest of the Nation (Fig. 7.2).

  15. Platelet inhibition by nitrite is dependent on erythrocytes and deoxygenation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirada Srihirun

    Full Text Available Nitrite is a nitric oxide (NO metabolite in tissues and blood, which can be converted to NO under hypoxia to facilitate tissue perfusion. Although nitrite is known to cause vasodilation following its reduction to NO, the effect of nitrite on platelet activity remains unclear. In this study, the effect of nitrite and nitrite+erythrocytes, with and without deoxygenation, on platelet activity was investigated.Platelet aggregation was studied in platelet-rich plasma (PRP and PRP+erythrocytes by turbidimetric and impedance aggregometry, respectively. In PRP, DEANONOate inhibited platelet aggregation induced by ADP while nitrite had no effect on platelets. In PRP+erythrocytes, the inhibitory effect of DEANONOate on platelets decreased whereas nitrite at physiologic concentration (0.1 µM inhibited platelet aggregation and ATP release. The effect of nitrite+erythrocytes on platelets was abrogated by C-PTIO (a membrane-impermeable NO scavenger, suggesting an NO-mediated action. Furthermore, deoxygenation enhanced the effect of nitrite as observed from a decrease of P-selectin expression and increase of the cGMP levels in platelets. The ADP-induced platelet aggregation in whole blood showed inverse correlations with the nitrite levels in whole blood and erythrocytes.Nitrite alone at physiological levels has no effect on platelets in plasma. Nitrite in the presence of erythrocytes inhibits platelets through its reduction to NO, which is promoted by deoxygenation. Nitrite may have role in modulating platelet activity in the circulation, especially during hypoxia.

  16. Alterations of erythrocyte rheology and cellular susceptibility in end stage renal disease: Effects of peritoneal dialysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesrin Zeynep Ertan

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the effects of peritoneal dialysis on hemorheological and hematological parameters and their relations with oxidant and antioxidant status of uremic patients. Hemorheological parameters (erythrocyte deformability, erythrocyte aggregation, osmotic deformability, blood and plasma viscosity were measured in patients with renal insufficiency undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD and volunteers. Erythrocyte deformability, osmotic deformability and aggregation in both autologous plasma and 3% dextran 70 were measured by laser diffraction ektacytometry. Enzyme activities of glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase were studied in erythrocytes; lipid peroxidation was studied by measuring the amount of malondialdehyde in both erythrocytes and plasma samples. Blood viscosity at native hematocrit was significantly lower in PD patients at all measured shear rates compared to controls, but it was high in PD patients at corrected (45% hematocrit. Erythrocyte deformability did not show any difference between the two groups. Osmotic deformability was significantly lower in PD patients compared to controls. Aggregation index values were significantly high in PD patients in plasma Catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities in erythrocytes were decreased in PD patients whereas superoxide dismutase activity was increased compared to controls. Malondialdehyde was significantly increased in erythrocytes and plasma samples of PD patients which also shows correlations with aggregation parameters. It has been concluded that erythrocytes in PD patients are more prone to aggregation and this tendency could be influenced by lipid peroxidation activity in patient's plasma. These results imply that uremic conditions, loss of plasma proteins and an increased risk of oxidative stress because of decreasing levels of antioxidant enzymes affect erythrocyte rheology during peritoneal dialysis. This level of distortion may have

  17. Avian influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjandra Y. Aditama

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Avian influenza, or “bird flu”, is a contagious disease of animals which crossed the species barrier to infect humans and gave a quite impact on public health in the world since 2004, especially due to the threat of pandemic situation. Until 1st March 2006, laboratory-confirmed human cases have been reported in seven countries: Cambodia, Indonesia, Thailand, Viet Nam, China, Iraq and Turkey with a total of 174 cases and 94 dead (54.02%. Indonesia has 27 cases, 20 were dead (74.07%. AI cases in Indonesia are more in male (62.5% and all have a symptom of fever. An influenza pandemic is a rare but recurrent event. An influenza pandemic happens when a new subtype emerges that has not previously circulated in humans. For this reason, avian H5N1 is a strain with pandemic potential, since it might ultimately adapt into a strain that is contagious among humans. Impact of the pandemic could include high rates of illness and worker absenteeism are expected, and these will contribute to social and economic disruption. Historically, the number of deaths during a pandemic has varied greatly. Death rates are largely determined by four factors: the number of people who become infected, the virulence of the virus, the underlying characteristics and vulnerability of affected populations, and the effectiveness of preventive measures. Accurate predictions of mortality cannot be made before the pandemic virus emerges and begins to spread. (Med J Indones 2006; 15:125-8Keywords: Avian Influenza, Pandemic

  18. Dietary fatty acids modulate associations between genetic variants and circulating fatty acids in plasma and erythrocyte membranes: meta-analysis of 9 studies in the CHARGE consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Caren E.; Follis, Jack L.; Nettleton, Jennifer A.; Foy, Millennia; Wu, Jason H.Y.; Ma, Yiyi; Tanaka, Toshiko; Manichakul, Ani W.; Wu, Hongyu; Chu, Audrey Y.; Steffen, Lyn M.; Fornage, Myriam; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Kabagambe, Edmond K.; Ferruci, Luigi; da Chen, Yii-Der I; Rich, Stephen S.; Djoussé, Luc; Ridker, Paul M.; Tang, Weihong; McKnight, Barbara; Tsai, Michael Y.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Rotter, Jerome I.; Hu, Frank B.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Arnett, Donna K.; King, Irena B.; Sun, Qi; Wang, Lu; Lumley, Thomas; Chiuve, Stephanie E.; Siscovick, David S; Ordovás, José M.; Lemaitre, Rozenn N.

    2015-01-01

    Scope Tissue concentrations of omega-3 fatty acids may reduce cardiovascular disease risk, and genetic variants are associated with circulating fatty acids concentrations. Whether dietary fatty acids interact with genetic variants to modify circulating omega-3 fatty acids is unclear. Objective We evaluated interactions between genetic variants and fatty acid intakes for circulating alpha-linoleic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and docosapentaenoic acid (DPA). Methods and Results We conducted meta-analyses (N to 11,668) evaluating interactions between dietary fatty acids and genetic variants (rs174538 and rs174548 in FADS1 (fatty acid desaturase 1), rs7435 in AGPAT3 (1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate), rs4985167 in PDXDC1 (pyridoxal-dependent decarboxylase domain-containing 1), rs780094 in GCKR (glucokinase regulatory protein) and rs3734398 in ELOVL2 (fatty acid elongase 2)). Stratification by measurement compartment (plasma vs. erthyrocyte) revealed compartment-specific interactions between FADS1 rs174538 and rs174548 and dietary ALA and linoleic acid for DHA and DPA. Conclusion Our findings reinforce earlier reports that genetically-based differences in circulating fatty acids may be partially due to differences in the conversion of fatty acid precursors. Further, fatty acids measurement compartment may modify gene-diet relationships, and considering compartment may improve the detection of gene-fatty acids interactions for circulating fatty acid outcomes. PMID:25626431

  19. Bilayer/cytoskeleton interactions in lipid-symmetric erythrocytes assessed by a photoactivable phospholipid analogue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradhan, D.; Schlegel, R.A.; Williamson, P.

    1991-01-01

    Two mechanisms have been proposed for maintenance of transbilayer phospholipid asymmetry in the erythrocyte plasma membrane, one involving specific interactions between the aminophospholipids of the inner leaflet of the bilayer and the cytoskeleton, particularly spectrin, and the other involving the aminophospholipid translocase. If the former mechanism is correct, then erythrocytes which have lost their asymmetric distribution of phospholipids should display altered bilayer/cytoskeleton interactions. To test this possibility, normal erythrocytes, erythrocytes from patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia or sickle disease, and lipid-symmetric and -asymmetric erythrocyte ghosts were labeled with the radioactive photoactivable analogue of phosphatidylethanolamine, 2-(2-azido-4-nitrobenzoyl)-1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho[ 14 C] ethanolamine ([ 14 C]AzPE), previously shown to label cytoskeletal proteins from the bilayer. The labeling pattern of cytoskeletal proteins in pathologic erythrocytes and lipid-asymmetric erythrocyte ghosts was indistinguishable from normal erythrocytes, indicating that the probe detects no differences in bilayer/cytoskeleton interactions in these cells. In contrast, in lipid-symmetric erythrocyte ghosts, labeling of bands 4.1 and 4.2 and actin, and to a lesser extent ankyrin, by [ 14 C]AzPE was considerably reduced. Significantly, however, labeling of spectrin was unaltered in the lipid-symmetric cells. These results do not support a model in which spectrin is involved in the maintenance of an asymmetric distribution of phospholipids in erythrocytes

  20. Bilayer/cytoskeleton interactions in lipid-symmetric erythrocytes assessed by a photoactivable phospholipid analogue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pradhan, D.; Schlegel, R.A. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (United States)); Williamson, P. (Amherst Coll., MA (United States))

    1991-08-06

    Two mechanisms have been proposed for maintenance of transbilayer phospholipid asymmetry in the erythrocyte plasma membrane, one involving specific interactions between the aminophospholipids of the inner leaflet of the bilayer and the cytoskeleton, particularly spectrin, and the other involving the aminophospholipid translocase. If the former mechanism is correct, then erythrocytes which have lost their asymmetric distribution of phospholipids should display altered bilayer/cytoskeleton interactions. To test this possibility, normal erythrocytes, erythrocytes from patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia or sickle disease, and lipid-symmetric and -asymmetric erythrocyte ghosts were labeled with the radioactive photoactivable analogue of phosphatidylethanolamine, 2-(2-azido-4-nitrobenzoyl)-1-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho({sup 14}C) ethanolamine (({sup 14}C)AzPE), previously shown to label cytoskeletal proteins from the bilayer. The labeling pattern of cytoskeletal proteins in pathologic erythrocytes and lipid-asymmetric erythrocyte ghosts was indistinguishable from normal erythrocytes, indicating that the probe detects no differences in bilayer/cytoskeleton interactions in these cells. In contrast, in lipid-symmetric erythrocyte ghosts, labeling of bands 4.1 and 4.2 and actin, and to a lesser extent ankyrin, by ({sup 14}C)AzPE was considerably reduced. Significantly, however, labeling of spectrin was unaltered in the lipid-symmetric cells. These results do not support a model in which spectrin is involved in the maintenance of an asymmetric distribution of phospholipids in erythrocytes.

  1. Erythrocyte stability under imposed fields

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Critical monitoring of the volumes, ion fluxes and related measures in erythrocytes exposed to a ... The erythrocyte offered an excellent tool since its lysis can be monitored readily. A systematic investigation led to a number of insights ... The consequent increase in self potential of the charged 'sphere' would account for a ...

  2. The effect of different high-fat diets on erythrocyte osmotic fragility, growth performance and serum lipid concentrations in male, Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, J; Pillay, K; Madziva, M T; Erlwanger, K H

    2015-04-01

    Poultry diets are formulated with additional animal fat or vegetable oils to improve growth rate and feed conversion efficiency. High-fat diet feeding in rats and fish has been shown to result in alterations in the phospholipid composition and cholesterol content of the erythrocyte membrane, in turn affecting erythrocyte osmotic fragility. In contrast, the few studies performed using high-fat diet feeding in avian species show no changes in erythrocyte osmotic fragility. This study made use of the Japanese quail as no data exists on investigation of this species with respect to high-fat diet feeding and erythrocyte osmotic fragility. Fifty-seven male quail were randomly divided into six groups and fed either a standard diet (commercial poultry feed) or one of five high-fat diets (commercial poultry feed with 22% of either coconut oil, lard, palm oil, soya bean oil or sunflower oil on a weight/weight basis) for 12 weeks. All birds on the high-fat diets were significantly heavier (p quail erythrocytes. Feeding quail high-energy diets of varying degrees of fatty acid saturation was well tolerated and did not seem to affect the overall health status of the birds. Resistance of avian erythrocytes to modification by excess dietary fat may be a general characteristic of avian erythrocytes. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. Dyslipidemia, altered erythrocyte fatty acids and selenium are ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Venous blood sample was drawn from all subjects and erythrocytes separated for the determination of fatty acids. Plasma lipids, selenium and vitamin E levels were also measured. There were no differences in BMI, weight and height among the three groups except for systolic BP that was lower in VD (148.3±41.8mmHg) ...

  4. Electrophysiological studies of malaria parasite-infected erythrocytes: Current status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staines, Henry M.; Alkhalil, Abdulnaser; Allen, Richard J.; De Jonge, Hugo R.; Derbyshire, Elvira; Egée, Stéphane; Ginsburg, Hagai; Hill, David A.; Huber, Stephan M.; Kirk, Kiaran; Lang, Florian; Lisk, Godfrey; Oteng, Eugene; Pillai, Ajay D.; Rayavara, Kempaiah; Rouhani, Sherin; Saliba, Kevin J.; Shen, Crystal; Solomon, Tsione; Thomas, Serge L. Y.; Verloo, Patrick; Desai, Sanjay A.

    2009-01-01

    The altered permeability characteristics of erythrocytes infected with malaria parasites have been a source of interest for over 30 years. Recent electrophysiological studies have provided strong evidence that these changes reflect transmembrane transport through ion channels in the host erythrocyte plasma membrane. However, conflicting results and differing interpretations of the data have led to confusion in this field. In an effort to unravel these issues, the groups involved recently came together for a week of discussion and experimentation. In this article, the various models for altered transport are reviewed, together with the areas of consensus in the field and those that require a better understanding. PMID:17292372

  5. Avian respiratory system disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Glenn H.

    1989-01-01

    Diagnosing and treating respiratory diseases in avian species requires a basic knowledge about the anatomy and physiology of this system in birds. Differences between mammalian and avian respiratory system function, diagnosis, and treatment are highlighted.

  6. Avian Influenza (Bird Flu)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in People Spread of Bird Flu Viruses Between Animals and People Examples of Human Infections with Avian Influenza A ... Subtypes Transmission of Avian Influenza A Viruses Between Animals and People Related Links Research Glossary of Influenza (Flu) Terms ...

  7. Changes in haematology, plasma biochemistry and erythrocyte ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    concentration, mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH) and mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC), but the mean corpuscular volume (MCV) was unaltered compared with the corresponding values at 4 weeks. The platelet count, total white blood cell count, heterophil, lymphocyte and monocyte counts were ...

  8. Avian Influenza in Birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... However, some ducks can be infected without any signs of illness. Top of Page Avian Influenza in Wild Birds Avian influenza A viruses have ... hours. Some ducks can be infected without any signs of illness. Avian influenza outbreaks are of concern in domesticated birds for ...

  9. Avian influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) is type A influenza that is adapted to avian host species. Although the virus can be isolated from numerous avian species, the natural host reservoir species are dabbling ducks, shorebirds and gulls. Domestic poultry species (poultry being defined as birds that are rais...

  10. Stimulation of Suicidal Erythrocyte Death by Increased Extracellular Phosphate Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Voelkl

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Anemia in renal insufficiency results in part from impaired erythrocyte formation due to erythropoietin and iron deficiency. Beyond that, renal insufficiency enhances eryptosis, the suicidal erythrocyte death characterized by phosphatidylserine-exposure at the erythrocyte surface. Eryptosis may be stimulated by increase of cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i. Several uremic toxins have previously been shown to stimulate eryptosis. Renal insufficiency is further paralleled by increase of plasma phosphate concentration. The present study thus explored the effect of phosphate on erythrocyte death. Methods: Cell volume was estimated from forward scatter, phosphatidylserine-exposure from annexin V binding, and [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence. Results: Following a 48 hours incubation, the percentage of phosphatidylserine exposing erythrocytes markedly increased as a function of extracellular phosphate concentration (from 0-5 mM. The exposure to 2 mM or 5 mM phosphate was followed by slight but significant hemolysis. [Ca2+]i did not change significantly up to 2 mM phosphate but significantly decreased at 5 mM phosphate. The effect of 2 mM phosphate on phosphatidylserine exposure was significantly augmented by increase of extracellular Ca2+ to 1.7 mM, and significantly blunted by nominal absence of extracellular Ca2+, by additional presence of pyrophosphate as well as by presence of p38 inhibitor SB203580. Conclusion: Increasing phosphate concentration stimulates erythrocyte membrane scrambling, an effect depending on extracellular but not intracellular Ca2+ concentration. It is hypothesized that suicidal erythrocyte death is triggered by complexed CaHPO4.

  11. Expression of senescent antigen on erythrocytes infected with a knobby variant of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winograd, E.; Greenan, J.R.T.; Sherman, I.W.

    1987-04-01

    Erythrocytes infected with a knobby variant of Plasmodium falciparum selectively bind IgG autoantibodies in normal human serum. Quantification of membrane-bound IgG, by use of /sup 125/I-labeled protein A, revealed that erythrocytes infected with the knobby variant bound 30 times more protein A than did noninfected erythrocytes; infection with a knobless variant resulted in less than a 2-fold difference compared with noninfected erythrocytes. IgG binding to knobby erythrocytes appeared to be related to parasite development, since binding of /sup 125/I-labeled protein A to cells bearing young trophozoites (less than 20 hr after parasite invasion) was similar to binding to uninfected erythrocytes. By immunoelectron microscopy, the membrane-bound IgG on erythrocytes infected with the knobby variant was found to be preferentially associated with the protuberances (knobs) of the plasma membrane. The removal of aged or senescent erythrocytes from the peripheral circulation is reported to involve the binding of specific antibodies to an antigen (senescent antigen) related to the major erythrocyte membrane protein band 3. Since affinity-purified autoantibodies against band 3 specifically bound to the plasma membrane of erythrocytes infected with the knobby variant of P. falciparum, it is clear that the malaria parasite induces expression of senescent antigen.

  12. Apolipoprotein M mediates sphingosine-1-phosphate efflux from erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Pernille M.; Bosteen, Markus H.; Hajny, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lipid implicated in e.g. angiogenesis, lymphocyte trafficking, and endothelial barrier function. Erythrocytes are a main source of plasma S1P together with platelets and endothelial cells. Apolipoprotein M (apoM) in HDL carries 70% of plasma S1P, whereas...... 30% is carried by albumin. The current aim was to investigate the role of apoM in export of S1P from human erythrocytes. Erythrocytes exported S1P more efficiently to HDL than to albumin, particularly when apoM was present in HDL. In contrast, export of sphingosine to HDL was unaffected...... by the presence of apoM. The specific ability of apoM to promote export of S1P was independent of apoM being bound in HDL particles. Treatment with MK-571, an inhibitor of the ABCC1 transporter, effectively reduced export of S1P from human erythrocytes to apoM, whereas the export was unaffected by inhibitors...

  13. Radiation damages to cell membranes of dogs and rats quantitatively estimated by changes in sedimentation behaviour of erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhajlov, V.F.; Potemkin, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    It was shown that injury to plasma membranes leads to a change in the sedimentation behaviour of erythrocytes: the maximum effect is produced when a protein component of the membrane is affected. The same dose dependent character of the change in erythrocyte sedimentation in urografine are observed during the first 24 h after γ-irradiation of rats and dogs

  14. Lipidomics reveals accumulation of the oxidized cholesterol in erythrocytes of heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hsiang-Yu; Wang, Chao-Hung; Ho, Hung-Yao; Wu, Pei-Ting; Hung, Chun-Ling; Huang, Cheng-Yu; Wu, Pei-Ru; Yeh, Yung-Hsin; Cheng, Mei-Ling

    2018-04-01

    Lipids play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Changes in lipids of erythrocytes are indicative of the outcome of pathophysiological processes. In the present study, we assessed whether the lipid profiles of erythrocytes from heart failure (HF) patients are informative of their disease risk. The lipidomes of erythrocytes from 10 control subjects and 29 patients at different HF stages were analyzed using liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The lipid composition of erythrocytes obtained from HF patients was significantly different from that of normal controls. The levels of phosphatidylcholines (PCs), phosphatidylethanolamines (PEs), and sphingomyelins decreased in HF erythrocytes as compared with those of control subjects; however, the levels of lysoPCs, lysoPEs, and ceramides increased in HF erythrocytes. Notably, the oxidized cholesterol 7-ketocholesterol (7KCh) accumulated to higher level in HF erythrocytes than in plasma from the same patients. We further validated our findings with a cohort of 115 subjects of control subjects (n=28) and patients (n=87). Mechanistically, 7KCh promoted reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in cardiomyocytes; and induced their death, probably through an ATF4-dependent pathway. Our findings suggest that erythrocytic 7KCh can be a risk factor for HF, and is probably implicated in its pathophysiology. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Altered erythrocyte cation permeability in familial pseudohyperkalaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagher, G; Vantyghem, M C; Doise, B; Lallau, G; Racadot, A; Lefebvre, J

    1989-08-01

    1. Erythrocyte cation transport pathways have been investigated in a family with pseudohyperkalaemia. 2. Ouabain- and bumetanide-resistant Na+ and K+ effluxes in three pseudohyperkalaemic patients were not different from those of control subjects when assessed at 37 degrees C. 3. When the temperature was decreased to 20 degrees C and 9 degrees C, K+ passive permeability markedly increased and Na+ permeability remained unchanged in these patients. In contrast, in control subjects a reduction in temperature caused a marked reduction in Na+ and K+ passive permeability. 4. These findings could account for the marked increase in plasma K+ concentration observed at subphysiological temperatures. 5. The Na+-K+ co-transport pathway was reduced in all members of the family, but the Na+-K+ pump was reduced in only two of them. These alterations were independent from the pseudohyperkalaemic state.

  16. Carbon dioxide transport in alligator blood and its erythrocyte permeability to anions and water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, F B; Wang, T; Jones, D R

    1998-01-01

    + binding. Erythrocyte volume, plasma pH, and plasma HCO3- concentration also varied little with the degree of oxygenation. Diffusional water permeability was higher in oxygenated than deoxygenated RBCs. The RBCs have rapid band 3-mediated Cl- and HCO3- transport, which was not affected by degree...

  17. Erythrocyte potassium and glutathione polymorphism determination ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-06-13

    Jun 13, 2011 ... erythrocyte and hematocrit values (Igbokwe et al., 1998). This study aims to detect the genetic makeup of. Saanen x Malta crossbred goat depending on the gluta- thione and potassium types in erythrocyte and also to find if the association between erythrocyte potassium and some of the blood parameters ...

  18. Platelet- and erythrocyte-derived microparticles trigger thrombin generation via factor XIIa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Meijden, P E J; Van Schilfgaarde, M; Van Oerle, R; Renné, T; ten Cate, H; Spronk, H M H

    2012-07-01

    The procoagulant properties of microparticles (MPs) are due to the of the presence of phosphatidylserine (PS) and tissue factor (TF) on their surface. The latter has been demonstrated especially on MPs derived from monocytes. To investigate the relative contribution of TF and factor (F)XII in initiating coagulation on MPs derived from monocytes, platelets and erythrocytes. Microparticles were isolated from calcium ionophore-stimulated platelets, erythrocytes and monocytic THP-1 cells. MPs were quantified, characterized for cell-specific antigens and analyzed for TF, PS exposure and their thrombin-generating potential. The MP number was not proportional to PS exposure and the majority of the MPs exposed PS. TF activity was undetectable on platelet- and erythrocyte-derived MPs (monocyte-derived MPs exposed TF (32 fM nM(-1) PS). Platelet-, erythrocyte- and monocyte-derived MPs, but not purified phospholipids, initiated thrombin generation in normal plasma in the absence of an external trigger (lag time derived MPs, but interfered with monocyte MP-triggered coagulation. Platelet- and erythrocyte-derived MPs completely failed to induce thrombin generation in FXII-deficient plasma. In contrast, monocyte-derived MPs induced similar thrombin generation in normal vs. FXII-deficient plasma. MPs from platelets and erythrocytes not only propagate coagulation by exposing PS but also initiate thrombin generation independently of TF in a FXII-dependent manner. In contrast, monocyte-derived MPs trigger coagulation predominantly via TF. © 2012 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  19. Aluminum Trichloride Induces Hypertension and Disturbs the Function of Erythrocyte Membrane in Male Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiuyue; Cao, Zheng; Sun, Xudong; Zuang, Cuicui; Huang, Wanyue; Li, Yanfei

    2016-05-01

    Aluminum (Al) is the most abundant metal in the earth's crust. Al accumulates in erythrocyte and causes toxicity on erythrocyte membrane. The dysfunction of erythrocyte membrane is a potential risk to hypertension. The high Al content in plasma was associated with hypertension. To investigate the effect of AlCl3 on blood pressure and the function of erythrocyte membrane, the rats were intragastrically exposed to 0, 64(1/20 LD50), 128(1/10 LD50), and 256(1/5 LD50) mg/kg body weight AlCl3 in double distilled water for 120 days, respectively. Then, we determined the systolic and mean arterial blood pressures of rats, the osmotic fragility, the percentage of membrane proteins, the activities of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, Mg(2+)-ATPase, Ca(2+)-ATPase, catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-pX), and malondialdehyde (MDA) content of the erythrocyte membrane in this experiment. The results showed that AlCl3 elevated the systolic and mean arterial blood pressure of rats, increased the osmotic fragility, decreased the percentage of membrane protein, inhibited the activities of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, Mg(2+)-ATPase, Ca(2+)-ATPase, CAT, SOD and GSH-pX, and increased the MDA content of erythrocyte membrane. These results indicate that AlCl3 may induce hypertension by disturbing the function of erythrocyte membrane.

  20. 51Cr - erythrocyte survival curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paiva Costa, J. de.

    1982-07-01

    Sixteen patients were studied, being fifteen patients in hemolytic state, and a normal individual as a witness. The aim was to obtain better techniques for the analysis of the erythrocytes, survival curves, according to the recommendations of the International Committee of Hematology. It was used the radiochromatic method as a tracer. Previously a revisional study of the International Literature was made in its aspects inherent to the work in execution, rendering possible to establish comparisons and clarify phonomena observed in cur investigation. Several parameters were considered in this study, hindering both the exponential and the linear curves. The analysis of the survival curves of the erythrocytes in the studied group, revealed that the elution factor did not present a homogeneous answer quantitatively to all, though, the result of the analysis of these curves have been established, through listed programs in the electronic calculator. (Author) [pt

  1. Spectroscopic analysis of irradiated erythrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selim, Nabila S. [Biophysics Lab, Radiation Physics Department, National Center for Radiation Research and Technology (NCRRT), AEA, P.O. Box 29, Madinat Nasr, Cairo (Egypt); Desouky, Omar S., E-mail: omardesouky@yahoo.com [Biophysics Lab, Radiation Physics Department, National Center for Radiation Research and Technology (NCRRT), AEA, P.O. Box 29, Madinat Nasr, Cairo (Egypt); Ismail, Nagla M.; Dakrory, Amira Z. [Physics Department, Faculty of Girls for Arts, Sciences and Education, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2011-12-15

    The aim of the present work is to study the effect of gamma radiation on the lipid part of the erythrocyte membrane, and to test the efficiency of lipoic acid as a radioprotector. This effect was evaluated using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The results showed an increase in the number of spin density by 14%, 22% and 65% after exposure to 25, 50 and 100 Gy respectively; whereas there was a decline in the obtained density after incubation with lipoic acid by a factor of approximately 32%. The FT-IR spectra of the irradiated erythrocytes samples showed a marked decrease in the intensity of all characteristic peaks, which increased as the irradiation dose increased. The second-derivative of these spectra, allow the conformationally sensitive membrane acyl chain methylene stretching modes to be separated from the protein (mostly hemoglobin) vibrations that dominate the spectra of intact cells. The 2850 cm{sup -1} band showed changes in the band shape and position after exposure to 50 and 100 Gy. Therefore it can be concluded that the band at 2850 cm{sup -1} only is useful in monitoring the radiation effect of the lipids cell membrane intact cells. - Highlights: > Effect of {gamma} radiation on erythrocyte membrane was studied using EPR and FT-IR. > Efficiency of {alpha}-lipoic acid as radioprotector was tested. > Lipoic acid diminished the free radicals number after gamma irradiation by 32%. > FT-IR spectra of the irradiated erythrocyte showed a decrease in their intensity. > Lipoic acid enhances the membrane to resist the action of gamma radiation.

  2. Tank-treading of swollen erythrocytes in shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, W. R., III; Dimitrakopoulos, P.

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate computationally the oscillatory tank-treading motion of healthy swollen human erythrocytes (owing to lower than physiological plasma osmolarity) in shear flows with capillary number Ca=O(1) and small to moderate viscosity ratios 0.01≤λ≤2.75. Swollen cells show similar shear flow dynamics with normal cells but with significantly higher inclination and tank-treading speed owing to the higher cell thickness. For a given viscosity ratio, as the flow rate increases, the steady-state erythrocyte length L (in the shear plane) increases logarithmically while its depth W (normal to the shear plane) decreases logarithmically; increase of the viscosity ratio results in lower cell deformation. The erythrocyte width S, which exists in the shear plane, is practically invariant in time, flow rate, and viscosity ratio and corresponds to a real cell thickness of about 2.5μm at physiological osmolarity (300mO) and 3.4μm at an osmolarity of 217 mO. The erythrocyte inclination decreases as the flow rate increases or as the surrounding fluid viscosity decreases, owing to the increased inner rotational flow which tends to align the cell toward the flow direction. The ektacytometry deformation of swollen cells increases logarithmically with the shear stress but with a slower slope than that for normal cells owing mainly to the higher orientation of the more swollen cells. As the cell swelling increases, the tank-treading period decreases owing to the higher thickness of the actual cell which overcomes the opposite action of the reduced shape-memory effects (i.e., the more spherical-like erythrocyte's reference shape of shearing resistance). The local area incompressibility tensions from the lipid bilayer increase with the cell swelling and cause a higher cytoskeleton prestress; this increased prestress results in smaller, but still measurable, local area changes on the spectrin skeleton of the more swollen erythrocytes. Our work provides insight on

  3. Influence of Cocoa Flavanols and Procyanidins on Free Radical-induced Human Erythrocyte Hemolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Yan Zhu

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Cocoa can be a rich source of antioxidants including the flavan-3-ols, epicatechin and catechin, and their oligomers (procyanidins. While these flavonoids have been reported to reduce the rate of free radical-induced erythrocyte hemolysis in experimental animal models, little is known about their effect on human erythrocyte hemolysis. The major objective of this work was to study the effect of a flavonoid-rich cocoa beverage on the resistance of human erythrocytes to oxidative stress. A second objective was to assess the effects of select purified cocoa flavonoids, epicatechin, catechin, the procyanidin Dimer B2 and one of its major metabolites, 3ʹ-O-methyl epicatechin, on free radical-induced erythrocyte hemolysis in vitro. Peripheral blood was obtained from 8 healthy subjects before and 1, 2, 4 and 8 h after consuming a flavonoid-rich cocoa beverage that provided 0.25 g/kg body weight (BW, 0.375 or 0.50 g/kg BW of cocoa. Plasma flavanol and dimer concentrations were determined for each subject. Erythrocyte hemolysis was evaluated using a controlled peroxidation reaction. Epicatechin, catechin, 3ʹ-O-methyl epicatechin and (--epicatechin-(4β > 8epicatechin (Dimer B2 were detected in the plasma within 1 h after the consumption of the beverage. The susceptibility of erythrocytes to hemolysis was reduced significantly following the consumption of the beverages. The duration of the lag time, which reflects the capacity of cells to buffer free radicals, was increased. Consistent with the above, the purified flavonoids, epicatechin, catechin, Dimer B2 and the metabolite 3ʹ-O-methyl epicatechin, exhibited dose-dependent protection against AAPH-induced erythrocyte hemolysis at concentrations ranging from 2.5 to 20 μM. Erythrocytes from subjects consuming flavonoid-rich cocoa show reduced susceptibility to free radical-induced hemolysis (p < 0.05.

  4. Plasma volume changes during hypoglycaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Bendtsen, F; Christensen, N J

    1990-01-01

    To investigate whether previously reported changes in venous blood volume and composition induced by acute hypoglycaemia in humans are representative for the entire body we measured erythrocyte 51Cr content, haematocrit, plasma volume, intravascular albumin content and transcapillary escape rate ...

  5. Erythrocytes in alternating electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morariu, V.V.; Chifu, A.; Simplaceanu, T.; Frangopol, P.T.

    1983-02-01

    The elastic and inelastic deformation of erythrocytes induced by alternating fields and the suggestion that moderate field intensities (1.2 kV/cm) when continuously applied can cause lysis by a different mechanism compared to the action of short intense field pulses is presented. The different experimental conditions can be used to approach various properties of the membrane such as those related to the dielectric polarization of the membrane or to the interfacial polarization, leading to the inelastic deformation of the cells. (authors)

  6. Plasma exogenous creatinine excretion for the assessment of renal function in avian medicine--pharmacokinetic modeling in racing pigeons (Columba livia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scope, Alexandra; Schwendenwein, Ilse; Schauberger, Günther

    2013-09-01

    The diagnostic evaluation of the glomerular filtration rate by urinary clearance has significant practical limitations in birds because urine is excreted together with feces. Thus, pharmacokinetic modeling of an exogenous plasma creatinine clearance could be useful for assessing renal creatinine excretion in birds. For this study, creatinine (50 mg/kg) was administered to 2 groups of 15 pigeons (Columba livia) each; in one group by the intravenous (IV) route and in the second by the intramuscular (IM) route. The time series of the plasma creatinine concentrations were analyzed by pharmacokinetic models. Body mass-specific creatinine excretion was determined for IV and IM administration to be between 6.30 and 6.44 mL/min per kg, respectively. Body surface area-specific creatinine clearance, which is related to the metabolic rate, was calculated between 0.506 and 0.523 mL/min per dm2, respectively. The results showed that IV as well as IM administration can be used for assessing renal creatinine excretion in pigeons. For practical reasons, IM administration is recommended, with the use of the Bateman function to calculate creatinine elimination.

  7. Avian And Other Zoonotic Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... outbreaks in poultry have seriously impacted livelihoods, the economy and international trade in affected countries. Other avian influenza A( ... outbreaks in poultry have seriously impacted livelihoods, the economy and international trade in affected countries. Other avian influenza A( ...

  8. Antioxidant status of erythrocytes and their response to oxidative challenge in humans with argemone oil poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babu, Challagundla K.; Khanna, Subhash K.; Das, Mukul

    2008-01-01

    Oxidative damage of biomolecules and antioxidant status in erythrocytes of humans from an outbreak of argemone oil (AO) poisoning in Kannauj (India) and AO intoxicated experimental animals was investigated. Erythrocytes of the dropsy patients and AO treated rats were found to be more susceptible to 2,2'-azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH) induced peroxidative stress. Significant decrease in RBC glutathione (GSH) levels (46, 63%) with concomitant enhancement in oxidized glutathione (172, 154%) levels was noticed in patients and AO intoxicated animals. Further, depletion of glutathione reductase (GR), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PDH) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) (42-52%) was observed in dropsy patients. Oxidation of erythrocyte membrane lipids and proteins was increased (120-144%) in patients and AO treated animals (112-137%) along with 8-OHdG levels in whole blood (180%) of dropsy patients. A significant reduction in α-tocopherol content (68%) was noticed in erythrocytes of dropsy patients and hepatic, plasma and RBCs of AO treated rats (59-70%) thereby indicating the diminished antioxidant potential to scavenge free radicals or the limited transport of α-tocopherol from liver to RBCs leading to enhanced oxidation of lipids and proteins in erythrocytes. These studies implicate an important role of erythrocyte degradation in production of anemia and breathlessness in epidemic dropsy

  9. Hypo- and hypernatremia results in inaccurate erythrocyte mean corpuscular volume measurement in vitro, when using Sysmex XE 2100

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillipsen, Jens Peter; Madsen, Kirsten Vikkelsø

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Automated hematology analyzers dilute patient erythrocytes with an isoosmotic diluent before quantitating the erythrocyte mean cell volume (MCV). However, if patient plasma osmolality differs from the diluent, water will cross the erythrocytes membrane and establish a new equilibrium...... resulted in inaccurate MCV. The experimental results also revealed a strong correlation between P-Osmolality/P-Sodium and MCV inaccuracy (R2 = 0.70/0.85) similar to the theoretically calculated MCV inaccuracy. We suggest using mean cellular Hb (MCH) instead of MCV, mean corpuscular Hb concentration (MCHC...

  10. Invasion of erythrocytes by Babesia bovis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaffar, Fasila Razzia

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis we investigated the invasion of erythrocytes taking place during the asexual erythrocytic blood stage of the apicomplexan parasites Babesia bovis parasite. Host cell invasion by apicomplexan parasites is a complex process requiring multiple receptor-ligand interactions, involving

  11. Erythrocyte tagging with radiochromium (51Cr)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, U.W.

    1978-01-01

    A nomogram was set up which helps to estimate the erythrocyte-bound 51 Cr (E 51 Cr - radiochromium existing as erythrocyte-bound activity in the end product of the labelling process) and NE 51 Cr. With routine labelling conditions(VKZ 10 min, IKZ 77 min), NE 51 Cr values of about 2.5% can be expected. (orig.) [de

  12. Enzymatic assay for methotrexate in erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, H; Heinsvig, E M

    1985-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) accumulates in erythrocytes in MTX-treated patients. We present a modified enzymatic assay measuring MTX concentrations between 10 and 60 nmol/l in erythrocytes, adapted for a centrifugal analyser (Cobas Bio). About 40 patient's samples could be analysed within 1 h. The detection...

  13. Interaction of erythrocytes and hexavalent uranium compounds -an autoanalytical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, W.I.; Shying, M.E.

    1980-05-01

    An automated analytical system was devised to measure the kinetics of hemolysis by uranyl compounds. Accurate plots of percentage hemolysis v. time were obtained; these, together with the corresponding differential curves, show that hemolysis of plasma-free erythrocytes is a two-stage process. The first stage of hemolysis is particularly affected by pH and anion content of uranyl solutions, and also by incubation of cell suspensions at 37 deg. before mixing with lysing solution. Complementary studies involving Coulter counting and microscopic observation established the general pattern of hemolysis and showed that cell agglutination is a prominent feature of the interaction of cells with uranyl solutions

  14. Evaluation of erythrocyte flow at a bearing gap in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murashige, Tomotaka; Kosaka, Ryo; Sakota, Daisuke; Nishida, Masahiro; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Yamane, Takashi; Maruyama, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump for extracorporeal circulatory support. In the blood pump, a spiral groove bearing was adopted for a thrust bearing. In the spiral groove bearing, separation of erythrocytes and plasma by plasma skimming has been postulated to occur. However, it is not clarified that plasma skimming occurs in a spiral groove bearing. The purpose of this study is to verify whether plasma skimming occurs in the spiral groove bearing of a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump. For evaluation of plasma skimming in the spiral groove bearing, an impeller levitation performance test using a laser focus displacement meter and a microscopic visualization test of erythrocyte flow using a high-speed microscope were conducted. Bovine blood diluted with autologous plasma to adjust hematocrit to 1.0% was used as a working fluid. Hematocrit on the ridge region in the spiral groove bearing was estimated using image analysis. As a result, hematocrits on the ridge region with gaps of 45 μm, 31 μm, and 25 μm were calculated as 1.0%, 0.6%, and 0.3%, respectively. Maximum skimming efficiency in this study was calculated as 70% with a gap of 25 μm. We confirmed that separation of erythrocyte and plasma occurred in the spiral groove bearing with decrease in bearing gap in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

  15. The cholesterol content of the erythrocyte membrane is an important determinant of phosphatidylserine exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zwieten, Rob; Bochem, Andrea E.; Hilarius, Petra M.; van Bruggen, Robin; Bergkamp, Ferry; Hovingh, G. Kees; Verhoeven, Arthur J.

    2012-01-01

    Maintenance of the asymmetric distribution of phospholipids across the plasma membrane is a prerequisite for the survival of erythrocytes. Various stimuli have been shown to induce scrambling of phospholipids and thereby exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS). In two types of patients, both with

  16. Plasma antibodies from malaria-exposed pregnant women recognize variant surface antigens on Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes in a parity-dependent manner and block parasite adhesion to chondroitin sulfate A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ricke, C H; Staalsoe, T; Koram, K

    2000-01-01

    -associated malaria (PAM) in endemic areas is concentrated in the first few pregnancies, indicating that protective immunity to PAM is a function of parity. The placenta is often heavily infected in PAM, and placental parasites show a striking preference for chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) as an adhesion receptor. Plasma...

  17. Study of factors that interfere in the labelling process of erythrocytes and plasma proteins with Technetium-99m; Estudo de fatores que interferem no processo de marcacao de hemacias e proteinas plasmaticas com tecnecio-99m

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutfilen, Bianca

    1989-12-31

    The labelling of red blood cells (RBC) with technetium-99m (Tc-99m) depends on several factors, as the stannous ion (Sn++) concentration, time, temperature, the presence of plasma proteins (PP) and others. However the Sn++ concentration seems to be the most important factor; probably because the uptake of this reducing agent by RBC is limited. The excess of Sn++ in extracellular medium can determine the labelling of PP. the modifications of RBC at 50 deg C described in the literature, the possibility of labelling RBC with Tc-99m at this temperature and experimental results obtained made it possible to perform spleen selective scintigraphy through a simple technique with few manipulations. The effect of gentamicin, nifedipine and verapamil in the labelling of RBC and plasma proteins with Tc-99m was studied because of similarities between Ca++ and Sn++. The results show that, under some conditions, these drugs are capable to alter this Tc-99m incorporation. The modification of the ionic distribution determined by these drugs or the blockage of Sn++ and/or Tc-99m or the fact that they bind theirselves to plasma proteins, or the possibility of the labelling of these drugs, are factors that can interfere in the labelling process of red blood cells and plasma proteins with Tc-99m. (author) 55 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Extracellular histones induce erythrocyte fragility and anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordbacheh, Farzaneh; O'Meara, Connor H; Coupland, Lucy A; Lelliott, Patrick M; Parish, Christopher R

    2017-12-28

    Extracellular histones have been shown to play an important pathogenic role in many diseases, primarily through their cytotoxicity toward nucleated cells and their ability to promote platelet activation with resultant thrombosis and thrombocytopenia. In contrast, little is known about the effect of extracellular histones on erythrocyte function. We demonstrate in this study that histones promote erythrocyte aggregation, sedimentation, and using a novel in vitro shear stress model, we show that histones induce erythrocyte fragility and lysis in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, histones impair erythrocyte deformability based on reduced passage of erythrocytes through an artificial spleen. These in vitro results were mirrored in vivo with the injection of histones inducing anemia within minutes of administration, with a concomitant increase in splenic hemoglobin content. Thrombocytopenia and leukopenia were also observed. These findings suggest that histones binding to erythrocytes may contribute to the elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rates observed in inflammatory conditions. Furthermore, histone-induced increases in red blood cell lysis and splenic clearance may be a significant factor in the unexplained anemias seen in critically ill patients. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  19. Erythrocytes induce proinflammatory endothelial activation in hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas, Alice; Das, Shonit R; Emin, Memet; Sun, Li; Rifkind, Joseph M; Bhattacharya, Jahar; Bhattacharya, Sunita

    2013-01-01

    Although exposure to ambient hypoxia is known to cause proinflammatory vascular responses, the mechanisms initiating these responses are not understood. We tested the hypothesis that in systemic hypoxia, erythrocyte-derived H(2)O(2) induces proinflammatory gene transcription in vascular endothelium. We exposed mice or isolated, perfused murine lungs to 4 hours of hypoxia (8% O(2)). Leukocyte counts increased in the bronchoalveolar lavage. The expression of leukocyte adhesion receptors, reactive oxygen species, and protein tyrosine phosphorylation increased in freshly recovered lung endothelial cells (FLECs). These effects were inhibited by extracellular catalase and by the removal of erythrocytes, indicating that the responses were attributable to erythrocyte-derived H(2)O(2). Concomitant nuclear translocation of the p65 subunit of NF-κB and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α stabilization in FLECs occurred only in the presence of erythrocytes. Hemoglobin binding to the erythrocyte membrane protein, band 3, induced the release of H(2)O(2) from erythrocytes and the p65 translocation in FLECs. These data indicate for the first time, to our knowledge, that erythrocytes are responsible for endothelial transcriptional responses in hypoxia.

  20. Emergence of fatal avian influenza in New England harbor seals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, S J; St Leger, J A; Pugliares, K; Ip, H S; Chan, J M; Carpenter, Z W; Navarrete-Macias, I; Sanchez-Leon, M; Saliki, J T; Pedersen, J; Karesh, W; Daszak, P; Rabadan, R; Rowles, T; Lipkin, W I

    2012-01-01

    From September to December 2011, 162 New England harbor seals died in an outbreak of pneumonia. Sequence analysis of postmortem samples revealed the presence of an avian H3N8 influenza A virus, similar to a virus circulating in North American waterfowl since at least 2002 but with mutations that indicate recent adaption to mammalian hosts. These include a D701N mutation in the viral PB2 protein, previously reported in highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza viruses infecting people. Lectin staining and agglutination assays indicated the presence of the avian-preferred SAα-2,3 and mammalian SAα-2,6 receptors in seal respiratory tract, and the ability of the virus to agglutinate erythrocytes bearing either the SAα-2,3 or the SAα-2,6 receptor. The emergence of this A/harbor seal/Massachusetts/1/2011 virus may herald the appearance of an H3N8 influenza clade with potential for persistence and cross-species transmission. The emergence of new strains of influenza virus is always of great public concern, especially when the infection of a new mammalian host has the potential to result in a widespread outbreak of disease. Here we report the emergence of an avian influenza virus (H3N8) in New England harbor seals which caused an outbreak of pneumonia and contributed to a U.S. federally recognized unusual mortality event (UME). This outbreak is particularly significant, not only because of the disease it caused in seals but also because the virus has naturally acquired mutations that are known to increase transmissibility and virulence in mammals. Monitoring the spillover and adaptation of avian viruses in mammalian species is critically important if we are to understand the factors that lead to both epizootic and zoonotic emergence.

  1. A semi-automated multiplex high-throughput assay for measuring IgG antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) domains in small volumes of plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cham, Gerald K K; Kurtis, Jonathan; Lusingu, John

    2008-01-01

    proteins were covalently coupled onto beads each having its own unique detection signal and the human hyper-immune plasma reactivity was detected for each individual protein using a BioPlex100 system. Protein-coupled beads were analysed at two time points seven months apart, before and after lyophilization...... and the results compared to determine the effect of storage and lyophilization respectively on the beads. Multiplexed protein-coupled beads from twenty eight unique bead populations were evaluated on the BioPlex100 system against pooled human hyper-immune plasma before and after lyophilization. RESULTS: The bead...... analyses were highly correlated. The Spearman's rank correlation coefficients (Rho) were > or = 0.86, (P lyophilization had no impact on the assay...

  2. Induction of transient radioresistance in human erythrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krokosz, Anita [Department of Molecular Biophysics, University of Lodz, 90-237 Lodz (Poland)]. E-mail: krokosz@biol.uni.lodz.pl; Szweda-Lewandowska, Zofia [Department of Molecular Biophysics, University of Lodz, 90-237 Lodz (Poland)

    2006-09-15

    Human erythrocytes suspended in an isotonic Na-phosphate buffer, pH 7.4 (hematocrit of 2%), were irradiated with {gamma}-rays with single and split doses under air or N{sub 2}O in order to determine the physicochemical changes caused by the dose inducing an increase in resistance to radiation-induced hemolysis. The obtained results showed that under the applied irradiation conditions, the dose of 0.4 kGy induced changes in erythrocytes, which were responsible for temporary resistance of erythrocytes to hemolysis. We concluded that the observed resistance is caused mainly by the structural changes in proteins.

  3. The modified proteins in erythrocytes and regulation of erythrocytes volume in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muravlyova, L E; Molotov-Luchanskiy, V B; Bakirova, R Y; Kolesnikova, Y A; Nurgaliyeva, A S; Klyuyev, D A

    2015-11-01

    The role of oxidatively modified proteins in progression of chronic kidney disease has been discussed. We have got the results demonstrating the alteration of band 3 protein activity in erythrocytes of patients with chronic kidney disease. We presumed that it might be associated with oxidative damage of intracellular proteins. The purpose of the research was to study the modified proteins (protein reactive carbonyl derivatives, membrane-bounded hemoglobin) in erythrocytes, as well as the regulation of erythrocyte volume in patients with chronic kidney disease. 132 patients with various stages of chronic kidney disease and degree of chronic renal failure were divided into four groups. We enrolled 32 healthy subjects. In erythrocytes modified proteins (protein reactive carbonyl derivatives, membrane-bounded hemoglobin) concentrations and activity of Cl-/HCО3--exchanger have been estimated. the results demonstrated the strong disorder of Cl-/HCО3--exchanger activity in erythrocytes of patients. These data suggested the existence of erythrocytes subpopulations with different activity of Cl-/HCО3--exchangers in bloodstream of patients with chronic kidney disease depending on initial clinical form of the disease. In erythrocytes of all patients, the membrane-bounded hemoglobin concentration and reactive carbonyl derivatives of proteins were significantly higher than in control samples. We have assumed that in erythrocytes oxidized hemoglobin interacts with band 3 protein present on erythrocyte membrane. The membrane-bounded hemoglobin increase leads to increased stiffness of the erythrocyte membranes and affects the volume of erythrocytes. We hypothesized that erythrocytes with changed ability to regulate their volume and high concentration of modified proteins contributed to chronic kidney disease progression.

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of erythrocyte membranes in chronic myeloproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morariu, V V; Petrov, L

    1986-07-01

    The temperature dependence of the apparent water diffusional exchange through erythrocyte membranes in cases of policitemia vera, chronic granulocytic leukemia and primary myelofibrosis was measured by using a nuclear magnetic resonance method in the presence of Mn2+. The thermal transition shifted to lower temperatures in all cases, regardless of the stage of the disease, suggesting a structural alteration of the membrane. The shift of transition indirectly suggests a lower penetration of the erythrocytes by Mn2+. The water exchange time at 37 degrees C also increased, mainly in the blast crisis; it seems to have a prognostic value of some clinical interest. No simple correlation of the water exchange and the following clinical investigations was observed: the white count, the percentage of promyelocites and myeloblasts, the sedimentation rate of blood, the osmotic fragility of erythrocytes, the total concentration of proteins, albumin and immunoglobulins, respectively, in plasma.

  5. Effects of Iron Overload on the Activity of Na,K-ATPase and Lipid Profile of the Human Erythrocyte Membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leilismara Sousa

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential chemical element for human life. However, in some pathological conditions, such as hereditary hemochromatosis type 1 (HH1, iron overload induces the production of reactive oxygen species that may lead to lipid peroxidation and a change in the plasma-membrane lipid profile. In this study, we investigated whether iron overload interferes with the Na,K-ATPase activity of the plasma membrane by studying erythrocytes that were obtained from the whole blood of patients suffering from iron overload. Additionally, we treated erythrocytes of normal subjects with 0.8 mM H2O2 and 1 μM FeCl3 for 24 h. We then analyzed the lipid profile, lipid peroxidation and Na,K-ATPase activity of plasma membranes derived from these cells. Iron overload was more frequent in men (87.5% than in women and was associated with an increase (446% in lipid peroxidation, as indicated by the amount of the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS and an increase (327% in the Na,K-ATPase activity in the plasma membrane of erythrocytes. Erythrocytes treated with 1 μM FeCl3 for 24 h showed an increase (132% in the Na,K-ATPase activity but no change in the TBARS levels. Iron treatment also decreased the cholesterol and phospholipid content of the erythrocyte membranes and similar decreases were observed in iron overload patients. In contrast, erythrocytes treated with 0.8 mM H2O2 for 24 h showed no change in the measured parameters. These results indicate that erythrocytes from patients with iron overload exhibit higher Na,K-ATPase activity compared with normal subjects and that this effect is specifically associated with altered iron levels.

  6. Adenosine deaminase activity of erythrocytes in hyperuricemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, W.; Richter, V.; Beenken, O.; Weinhold, D.; Hirschberg, K.; Rotzsch, W.; Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Leipzig. Zentralinstitut fuer Isotopen- und Strahlenforschung)

    1982-01-01

    Erythrocytic adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity was determined in 55 patients with primary hyperuricemia and in 37 healthy control persons. Unlike the controls, the ADA activity in the patient group showed a two-peak response. Hyperuricemia patients with high ADA activity also exhibited increased uric acid excretion and elevated 15 N incorporation into uric acid. High activity values of erythrocytic ADA can be interpreted as an uric acid overproduction, giving hints for a therapeutic plan. (author)

  7. Stimulation of Erythrocyte Death by Phloretin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosi Bissinger

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Phloretin, a natural component of apples, pears and strawberries, has previously been shown to stimulate apoptosis of nucleated cells. Erythrocytes may similarly enter suicidal death or eryptosis, which is characterized by cell shrinkage and phospholipid scrambling of the erythrocyte cell membrane with phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Stimulators of eryptosis include increase of cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i, ceramide, ATP depletion, and activation of protein kinase C (PKC as well as p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (p38 kinase. Methods: Phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface was estimated from annexin V binding, cell volume from forward scatter, [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence, and ceramide abundance from binding of specific antibodies. Results: A 48 h exposure of human erythrocytes to phloretin significantly increased the percentage of annexin-V-binding cells (≥100 µM without significantly influencing forward scatter. Phloretin did not significantly modify [Ca2+]i and the stimulation of annexin-V-binding by phloretin (300 µM did not require presence of extracellular Ca2+. Phloretin did not significantly modify erythrocyte ATP levels, and the effect of phloretin on annexin-V-binding was not significantly altered by PKC inhibitor staurosporine (1 µM or p38 kinase inhibitor SB2203580 (2 µM. However, phloretin significantly increased the ceramide abundance at the cell surface. Conclusions: Phloretin stimulates phospholipid scrambling of the erythrocyte cell membrane, an effect at least partially due to up-regulation of ceramide abundance.

  8. Microcalorimetric measurements of heat production in human erythrocytes. IV. Comparison between different calorimetric techniques, suspension media, and preparation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, M; Wadsö, I

    1976-10-01

    Heat production in human erythrocytes from healthy subjects has been measured under different experimental conditions. Simultaneous measurements were made on the same samples using different types of microcalorimeters: a static ampoule calorimeter, an air perfusion calorimeter, and a flow calorimeter. Obtained heat effect values for specified standard conditions, P degrees, were within uncertainty limits the same for the different calorimeters. Cells were suspended either in autologous plasma or in a phosphate buffer. P degrees values for buffer suspensions were significantly higher than those for plasma suspensions. Erythrocyte samples prepared by the column adsorption technique gave higher P degrees values than those obtained by a conventional centrifugation procedure.

  9. Frictional characteristics of erythrocytes on coated glass plates subject to inclined centrifugal forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandori, Takashi; Hayase, Toshiyuki; Inoue, Kousuke; Funamoto, Kenichi; Takeno, Takanori; Ohta, Makoto; Takeda, Motohiro; Shirai, Atsushi

    2008-10-01

    In recent years a diamond-like carbon (DLC) film and a 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) polymer have attracted attention as coating materials for implantable artificial organs or devices. When these materials are coated on vascular devices, compatibility to blood is an important problem. The present paper focuses on friction characteristics of erythrocytes to these coating materials in a medium. With an inclined centrifuge microscope developed by the authors, observation was made for erythrocytes moving on flat glass plates with and without coating in a medium of plasma or saline under the effect of inclined centrifugal force. Friction characteristics of erythrocytes with respect to these coating materials were then measured and compared to each other to characterize DLC and MPC as coating materials. The friction characteristics of erythrocytes in plasma using the DLC-coated and noncoated glass plates are similar, changing approximately proportional to the 0.5th power of the cell velocity. The cells stick to these plates in saline as well, implying the influence of plasma protein. The results using the MPC-coated plate in plasma are similar to those of the other plates for large cell velocities, but deviate from the other results with decreased cell velocity. The results change nearly proportional to the 0.75th power of the cell velocity in the range of small velocities. The results for the MPC-coated plate in saline are similar to that in plasma but somewhat smaller, implying that the friction characteristics for the MPC-coated plate are essentially independent of plasma protein.

  10. Grid attacks avian flu

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    During April, a collaboration of Asian and European laboratories analysed 300,000 possible drug components against the avian flu virus H5N1 using the EGEE Grid infrastructure. Schematic presentation of the avian flu virus.The distribution of the EGEE sites in the world on which the avian flu scan was performed. The goal was to find potential compounds that can inhibit the activities of an enzyme on the surface of the influenza virus, the so-called neuraminidase, subtype N1. Using the Grid to identify the most promising leads for biological tests could speed up the development process for drugs against the influenza virus. Co-ordinated by CERN and funded by the European Commission, the EGEE project (Enabling Grids for E-sciencE) aims to set up a worldwide grid infrastructure for science. The challenge of the in silico drug discovery application is to identify those molecules which can dock on the active sites of the virus in order to inhibit its action. To study the impact of small scale mutations on drug r...

  11. Effect of radiation on sodium and water transport in rat erythrocytes and possible repair using olive oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, A.I.; El-Missiry, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    Gamma radiation dose 4 Gy was administered to whole rats, and sodium, water transport and sulfhydryl groups (-SH) contents of the erythrocytes were evaluated in vivo at postirradiation times 1, 3 and 7 days. The present results showed increased sodium and water gain associated with loss of sulfhydryl contents of the erythrocytes. These results are attributed to inhibition of Na pump activity and increased Na leakage into cells which increased the intracellular osmotic elements that lead to influx of water. These changes were secondary to the destruction of erythrocyte -SH groups which was investigated as a change in tertiary structure of the membrane proteins. Olive oil administered intraperitoneally resulted in restoration of the status of the studied parameters. We also noticed an increase in the amount of plasma unsaturated fatty acids including phospholipids. The relation between the reappearance of erythrocyte -SH groups and increased plasma phospholipids suggested a repair role for olive oil. This is through reconstitution of the Na-pump activity in erythrocytes by reactivation of (Na-K) ATPase stimulated by negatively charged plasma phospholipids.4 fig.,1 tab. i

  12. Tuning SERS for living erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brazhe, Nadezda; Parshina, E.Y.; Khabanova, V.V.

    2013-01-01

    amount of small NPs in colloids, with the decrease in AgNP size and with plasmon resonance shift to the shorter wavelength region. Obtained results can be explained by the ability of smaller AgNPs to get deeper into nano-invaginations of the plasma membrane than larger AgNPs. This shortens the distance...

  13. Allosensibilisation to erythrocyte antigens (literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Mineeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article literature review of the causes of allosensibilisation to erythrocyte antigens are presented. It is shown that the ability to produce antierythrocyte antibodies is affected by many factors, principal of whom it is difficult to identify. For the allosensibilisation development requires genetically determined differences in erythrocyte antigens phenotypes of donor and recipient, mother and fetus, which can lead to immune response and antibodies production. The biochemical nature of erythrocyte antigens, antigen dose (the amount of transfused doses, the number of antigens determinants on donor and fetus erythrocytes, the number of pregnancies are important. Individual patient characteristics: age, gender, diseases, the use of immunosuppressive therapy and the presence of inflammatory processes, are also relevant. Note that antibody to one erythrocyte antigens have clinical value, and to the other – have no. The actual data about frequency of clinically significant antibodies contribute to the development of post-transfusion hemolytic complications prophylaxis as well as the improvement of laboratory diagnosis of hemolytic disease of the newborn in the presence of maternal antierythrocyte antibodies.

  14. Stimulation of suicidal erythrocyte death by amantadine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Föller, Michael; Geiger, Corinna; Mahmud, Hasan; Nicolay, Jan; Lang, Florian

    2008-02-26

    Amantadine is an effective drug for treatment of both, Parkinson's disease and viral infections. Side effects of amantadine include anemia, which may limit its therapeutic use. The cause of amantatine induced anemia is ill defined. At least in theory, the anemia could partially result from suicidal erythrocyte death or eryptosis, which accelerates the clearance of circulating erythrocytes. Eryptosis is characterized by cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling leading to phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface. Triggers of erythrocyte membrane scrambling include an increase of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) resulting from activation of Ca2+-permeable cation channels. The present study has been performed to test for an effect of amantadine on eryptosis. Erythrocytes from healthy volunteers were exposed to amantadine and annexin V binding (disclosing phosphatidylserine exposure), forward scatter (reflecting cell volume), and Fluo3-dependent fluorescence (reflecting [Ca2+]i) were determined by flow cytometry. Exposure of erythrocytes to amantadine (> or =0.2 microg/ml) increased [Ca2+]i and triggered annexin V binding, and increased forward scatter. The effect on annexin V binding was virtually abolished in the absence of extracellular Ca2+. The present observations disclose mechanisms presumably contributing to amantadine induced anemia.

  15. Erythrocytes as a biological model for screening of xenobiotics toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Mayada Ragab; Alagawany, Mahmoud

    2018-01-05

    Erythrocytes are the main cells in circulation. They are devoid of internal membrane structures and easy to be isolated and handled providing a good model for different assays. Red blood cells (RBCs) plasma membrane is a multi-component structure that keeps the cell morphology, elasticity, flexibility and deformability. Alteration of membrane structure upon exposure to xenobiotics could induce various cellular abnormalities and releasing of intracellular components. Therefore the morphological changes and extracellular release of haemoglobin [hemolysis] and increased content of extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) [as signs of membrane stability] could be used to evaluate the cytotoxic effects of various molecules. The nucleated RBCs from birds, fish and amphibians can be used to evaluate genotoxicity of different xenobiotics using comet, DNA fragmentation and micronucleus assays. The RBCs could undergo programmed cell death (eryptosis) in response to injury providing a useful model to analyze some mechanisms of toxicity that could be implicated in apoptosis of nucleated cells. Erythrocytes are vulnerable to peroxidation making it a good biological membrane model for analyzing the oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation of various xenobiotics. The RBCs contain a large number of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants. The changes of the RBCs antioxidant capacity could reflect the capability of xenobiotics to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) resulting in oxidative damage of tissue. These criteria make RBCs a valuable in vitro model to evaluate the cytotoxicity of different natural or synthetic and organic or inorganic molecules by cellular damage measures. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Erythrocyte zinc protoporphyrin is elevated with prematurity and fetal hypoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, David G; Zimmerman, M Bridget; Labbé, Robert F; Kling, Pamela J; Widness, John A

    2005-08-01

    To examine the utility of red blood cell (RBC) zinc protoporphyrin/heme ratio (ZnPP/H) as an indicator of fetal iron status, because unfavorable neurodevelopmental outcomes have been associated with poor iron status at birth, as indicated by low serum ferritin, and because few reliable indicators of fetal and early neonatal iron status exist. Consecutively studied preterm and term fetuses at delivery included the following groups: (1) control nonhypoxic, (2) fetuses with intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), and (3) fetuses of insulin-treated mothers (FDM). We hypothesized (1) that rapid growth velocity associated with an accelerated erythropoiesis among normal fetuses will lead to reduced iron delivery to a rapidly expanding RBC mass and higher umbilical cord blood RBC ZnPP/H and (2) that fetuses that are exposed to pathologic hypoxemia will experience an additional increase in erythropoiesis and higher cord ZnPP/H. ZnPP/H was determined on saline-washed cord blood erythrocytes by hematofluorometry and was examined for its relationship with clinical factors and cord blood laboratory measurements indicative of tissue oxygenation (plasma erythropoietin [EPO] and reticulocyte count) and iron status (plasma ferritin and erythrocyte indices). Statistical testing included 1-way analysis of variance, 2-way analysis of variance with covariates, simple linear regression, and multiple regression analysis. Among control group subjects, gestational age at birth was inversely correlated with RBC ZnPP/H and reticulocyte count and positively correlated with ferritin and EPO. Relative to control subjects, IUGR and FDM fetuses at specified gestational age groupings had higher ZnPP/H, lower plasma ferritin, and higher plasma EPO. Statistical modeling of the relationship between ZnPP/H and plasma ferritin among all study groups demonstrated significant impacts of gestational age, plasma EPO, maternal hypertension, and maternal smoking. The inverse association of fetal ZnPP/H with

  17. Avian influenza surveillance and diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapid detection and accurate identification of low (LPAI) and high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) is critical to controlling infections and disease in poultry. Test selection and algorithms for the detection and diagnosis of avian influenza virus (AIV) in poultry may vary somewhat among differ...

  18. Functional and structural changes in human erythrocyte surface after irradiation by UV waves of various wavelengths. Report 1. Expression of ABO and rhesus system antigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samoylova, K.A.; Klimova, K.N.; Priezzheva, L.S.; Artsishevskaya, R.A.

    1983-12-01

    To determine whether shortwave UV (SUV) radiation causes changes in the external surface of human erythrocytes, modifying the expression of the ABO and Rh system antigens known to be related to the surface of the cells, work was performed on erythrocytes in a structurally prepared erythrocyte mass from the blood of 23 donors stabilized by glugicir or heparin. Three series of experiments were performed: on isolated erythrocytes, before irradiation thrice washed to remove plasma with isotonic NaCl 0.9% and resuspended at 5 x 10/sup 7/ cells per mililiter; on erythrocytes diluted to 5 x 10/sup 7/ cells per mililiter; and on erythrocytes on the undiluted erythrocyte mass about 7.5 x 10/sup 9/ cells per mililiter. SUV radiation at 254 nm was used at a power of 4.1 W/m/sup 2/ for 1 to 60 minutes. The agglutinating activity of the ABO and Rh antigens was then studied. Two to three hours after exposure to 248, 620, 1240 and 2480 J/m/sup 2/, the degree of hemolysis of isolated erythrocytes increased by 5,10,18 and 28%. Changes were also observed in agglutinating activity of ABO antigens. The agglutinating activity of A and B antigens increased by an average factor of 2 - H antigens by a factor of 4. SUV radiation did not cause any reliable activation of the Rh antigen. 14 references.

  19. Intracellular Erythrocyte Platelet-activating Factor Acetylhydrolase I Inactivates Aspirin in Blood*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Gang; Marathe, Gopal K.; Willard, Belinda; McIntyre, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) prophylaxis suppresses major adverse cardiovascular events, but its rapid turnover limits inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase activity and thrombosis. Despite its importance, the identity of the enzyme(s) that hydrolyzes the acetyl residue of circulating aspirin, which must be an existing enzyme, remains unknown. We find that circulating aspirin was extensively hydrolyzed within erythrocytes, and chromatography indicated these cells contained a single hydrolytic activity. Purification by over 1400-fold and sequencing identified the PAFAH1B2 and PAFAH1B3 subunits of type I platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase, a phospholipase A2 with selectivity for acetyl residues of PAF, as a candidate for aspirin acetylhydrolase. Western blotting showed that catalytic PAFAH1B2 and PAFAH1B3 subunits of the type I enzyme co-migrated with purified erythrocyte aspirin hydrolytic activity. Recombinant PAFAH1B2, but not its family member plasma PAF acetylhydrolase, hydrolyzed aspirin, and PAF competitively inhibited aspirin hydrolysis by purified or recombinant erythrocyte enzymes. Aspirin was hydrolyzed by HEK cells transfected with PAFAH1B2 or PAFAH1B3, and the competitive type I PAF acetylhydrolase inhibitor NaF reduced erythrocyte hydrolysis of aspirin. Exposing aspirin to erythrocytes blocked its ability to inhibit thromboxane A2 synthesis and platelet aggregation. Not all individuals or populations are equally protected by aspirin prophylaxis, the phenomenon of aspirin resistance, and erythrocyte hydrolysis of aspirin varied 3-fold among individuals, which correlated with PAFAH1B2 and not PAFAH1B3. We conclude that intracellular type I PAF acetylhydrolase is the major aspirin hydrolase of human blood. PMID:21844189

  20. Intracellular erythrocyte platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase I inactivates aspirin in blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Gang; Marathe, Gopal K; Willard, Belinda; McIntyre, Thomas M

    2011-10-07

    Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) prophylaxis suppresses major adverse cardiovascular events, but its rapid turnover limits inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase activity and thrombosis. Despite its importance, the identity of the enzyme(s) that hydrolyzes the acetyl residue of circulating aspirin, which must be an existing enzyme, remains unknown. We find that circulating aspirin was extensively hydrolyzed within erythrocytes, and chromatography indicated these cells contained a single hydrolytic activity. Purification by over 1400-fold and sequencing identified the PAFAH1B2 and PAFAH1B3 subunits of type I platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase, a phospholipase A(2) with selectivity for acetyl residues of PAF, as a candidate for aspirin acetylhydrolase. Western blotting showed that catalytic PAFAH1B2 and PAFAH1B3 subunits of the type I enzyme co-migrated with purified erythrocyte aspirin hydrolytic activity. Recombinant PAFAH1B2, but not its family member plasma PAF acetylhydrolase, hydrolyzed aspirin, and PAF competitively inhibited aspirin hydrolysis by purified or recombinant erythrocyte enzymes. Aspirin was hydrolyzed by HEK cells transfected with PAFAH1B2 or PAFAH1B3, and the competitive type I PAF acetylhydrolase inhibitor NaF reduced erythrocyte hydrolysis of aspirin. Exposing aspirin to erythrocytes blocked its ability to inhibit thromboxane A(2) synthesis and platelet aggregation. Not all individuals or populations are equally protected by aspirin prophylaxis, the phenomenon of aspirin resistance, and erythrocyte hydrolysis of aspirin varied 3-fold among individuals, which correlated with PAFAH1B2 and not PAFAH1B3. We conclude that intracellular type I PAF acetylhydrolase is the major aspirin hydrolase of human blood.

  1. Antioxidant enzymes in erythrocytes from goats seropositive to the sheep nose bot fly (Oestrus ovis L., Diptera: Oestridae) infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo-Valadez, C E; Reyes-Becerril, M C; Romero, G M J; Cepeda-Palacios, R; López-Aguilar, D R; Zenteno, T; Ascencio, F

    2011-12-29

    Oestrus ovis (Diptera: Oestridae) causes an important cosmopolitan parasitosis of the nasal and sinusal cavities of sheep and goats called oestrosis. Our objective was to analyze the participation of erythrocytes in the antioxidant system in goats seropositive to O. ovis infection under field conditions. Fifty female goats naturally exposed to O. ovis infection from Baja California Sur, México, were blood-sampled. Erythrocytic intracellular content was obtained from blood plasma. Oestrosis serodiagnosis was determined by ELISA. Protein, hemoglobin (Hb), superoxide dismutase (SOD), mieloperoxidase (MPO), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and lipid peroxidation in erythrocytes were determined in both seropositive and seronegative goats. Overall seroprevalence of O. ovis infection in goats was 56%. Positive significant (P<0.05) associations were observed among systemic IgG level and protein (0.34), hemoglobin (0.43), SOD (0.32), and MPO (0.41) in erythrocytes. Protein and hemoglobin concentrations, as well as SOD and MPO activities in erythrocytes were found significantly higher (P<0.05) in seropositive than in seronegative goats. By contrast, enzymatic activities of CAT and GST and lipid peroxidation values were similar in seropositive and seronegative groups. In conclusion, there was a systemic stimulation of Reactive Oxygen Species which was efficiently scavenged by erythrocytic antioxidant enzymes in goats seropositive to O. ovis infection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Lysis of erythrocytes by Trichomonas gallinae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Carli, G A; da Silva, A C; Wendorff, A; Rott, M

    1996-01-01

    The hemolytic activity of five live isolates of Trichomonas gallinae was investigated. The isolates were subsequently tested against the erythrocytes of seven adult animal species. Each of the five isolates tested lysed all human blood groups, as well as rabbit, rat, chicken, horse, bovine, and sheep erythrocytes. No hemolysin released by the parasite could be detected. Our preliminary results suggest that the hemolytic activity is not due to the hemolysin release by T. gallinae or to a product of its metabolism. Pretreatment of live trichomonads with concanavalin A reduced levels of hemolysis by 40%.

  3. Avian and human metapneumovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broor, Shobha; Bharaj, Preeti

    2007-04-01

    Pneumovirus infection remains a significant problem for both human and veterinary medicine. Both avian pneumovirus (aMPV, Turkey rhinotracheitis virus) and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) are pathogens of birds and humans, which are associated with respiratory tract infections. Based on their different genomic organization and low level of nucleotide (nt) and amino acid (aa) identity with paramyxoviruses in the genus Pneumovirus, aMPV and hMPV have been classified into a new genus referred to as Metapneumovirus. The advancement of our understanding of pneumovirus biology and pathogenesis of pneumovirus disease in specific natural hosts can provide us with strategies for vaccine formulations and combined antiviral and immunomodulatory therapies.

  4. Short range correlation of the erythrocyte membrane fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buimagă-Iarinca, Luiza; Morariu, Vasile V.

    2009-08-01

    The erythrocyte membrane fluctuations analysis was performed for two suspension media, plasma and phosphate buffered saline (PBS) respectively. The investigation methods consist of detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) and spectral analysis applied on data series formed by successive values of cellular area which were obtained by managing the sequential images set for each cell. We have shown that the suspension media influences significantly the membrane fluctuation characteristics. Detrended fluctuation analysis revealed two short range correlations both for cells suspended in their natural medium and artificial medium. Moreover, we found out the strength on interaction between terms in series by using spectral analysis and autoregressive modeling. The correlation between parameters obtained by the above mentioned methods was evidenced by theoretical models and certified by our experiments.

  5. Clinical relevance of erythrocyte ferritin in microcytic anemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagace, Jose M; Peças, Antonio; Groiss, Jorge; Bento, Celeste; Ribeiro, Maria Leticia; Gervasini, Guillermo

    2015-03-10

    Erythrocyte ferritin (EF) reflects the balance between iron supply and its utilization for hemoglobin synthesis. This balance is altered in microcytosis. We aimed to evaluate the diagnostic value of both EF and the ratio (FRR) plasma ferritin (PF)/EF in these disorders. A total of 231 subjects participated in the study. Samples from 93 adult patients with different causes of microcytosis, 57 healthy subjects and 81 full-term newborns were analyzed to determine EF and PF concentrations and other hematological parameters. In patients with iron deficiency, and in contrast to PF, EF decreased only in the presence of anemia and in direct correlation with the degree of microcytosis (Pearson's panemia of inflammation than in those with thalassemia (p<10e-5), thus helping to discriminate between these disorders. EF and FRR are tools that may be useful in the diagnosis of the main causes of microcytosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Short Communication: Erythrocyte Glutathione S-transferase Activity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malarious Male Human Volunteers Administered with Five Antimalarial Drugs. ... results of these findings suggested the capability of these drugs to bind to the human erythrocyte GST, accompanied with raised oxidant stress of the erythrocytes.

  7. Vitamin E supplementation protects erythrocyte membranes from oxidative stress in healthy Chinese middle-aged and elderly people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongye; Ma, Aiguo; Li, Yong; Han, Xiuxia; Wang, Qiuzhen; Liang, Hui

    2012-05-01

    Elderly people are subject to higher levels of oxidative stress than are young people. Vitamin E, as a powerful antioxidant residing mainly in biomembranes, may provide effective protection against oxidative membrane damage and resultant age-related deterioration, especially in the elderly. We hypothesized that appropriate levels of vitamin E supplementation would protect erythrocyte membranes from oxidative stress and thus improve membrane fluidity in healthy middle-aged and elderly people. To test this, we conducted a 4-month double-blind, randomized trial in which 180 healthy subjects (55-70 years old) were randomly divided into 4 groups: group C (control), and 3 treatment groups in which daily doses of 100 mg (VE1), 200 mg (VE2), and 300 mg (VE3) dl-α-tocopheryl acetate were administered. We measured plasma α-tocopherol concentration, malondialdehyde, and superoxide dismutase levels, erythrocyte hemolysis, and erythrocyte membrane fluidity at the beginning and end of the trial. After 4 months supplementation, plasma α-tocopherol concentrations in the 3 treatment groups had increased by 71%, 78%, and 95%, respectively (all P stress in healthy middle-aged to elderly people, at least in part by improving erythrocyte membrane fluidity and reducing erythrocyte hemolysis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Avian Primordial Germ Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagami, Takahiro; Miyahara, Daichi; Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    2017-01-01

    Germ cells transmit genetic information to the next generation through gametogenesis. Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are the first germ-cell population established during development, and are the common origins of both oocytes and spermatogonia. Unlike in other species, PGCs in birds undergo blood circulation to migrate toward the genital ridge, and are one of the major biological properties of avian PGCs. Germ cells enter meiosis and arrest at prophase I during embryogenesis in females, whereas in males they enter mitotic arrest during embryogenesis and enter meiosis only after birth. In chicken, gonadal sex differentiation occurs as early as embryonic day 6, but meiotic initiation of female germ cells starts from a relatively late stage (embryonic day 15.5). Retinoic acid controls meiotic entry in developing chicken gonads through the expressions of retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 2, a major retinoic acid synthesizing enzyme, and cytochrome P450 family 26, subfamily B member 1, a major retinoic acid-degrading enzyme. The other major biological property of avian PGCs is that they can be propagated in vitro for the long term, and this technique is useful for investigating proliferation mechanisms. The main factor involved in chicken PGC proliferation is fibroblast growth factor 2, which activates the signaling of MEK/ERK and thus promotes the cell cycle and anti-apoptosis. Furthermore, the activation of PI3K/Akt signaling is indispensable for the proliferation and survival of chicken PGCs.

  9. Effect of Lidocaine and Epinephrine on Human Erythrocyte Shape and Vesiculability of Blood Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Slokar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of local anesthetic composed of lidocaine and epinephrine on vesiculability of blood cells and erythrocyte shape was studied. Whole blood and plasma were incubated with lidocaine/epinephrine. Extracellular vesicles were isolated by centrifugation and washing and counted by flow cytometry. Lidocaine/epinephrine and each component alone were added to diluted blood. Shape changes were recorded by micrographs. An ensemble of captured frames was analyzed for populations of discocytes, echinocytes, and stomatocytes by using statistical methods. Incubation of whole blood and blood plasma with lidocaine/epinephrine considerably increased concentration of extracellular vesicles in isolates (for an average factor 3.4 in blood and 2.8 in plasma. Lidocaine/epinephrine caused change of erythrocyte shape from mainly discocytic to mainly stomatocytic (higher than 50%. Lidocaine alone had even stronger stomatocytic effect (the percent of stomatocytes was higher than 95% while epinephrine had echinocytic effect (the percent of echinocytes was higher than 80%. The differences were highly statistically significant p<10-8 with statistical power P=1. Lidocaine/epinephrine induced regions of highly anisotropically curved regions indicating that lidocaine and epinephrine interact with erythrocyte membrane. It was concluded that lidocaine/epinephrine interacts with cell membranes and increases vesiculability of blood cells in vitro.

  10. Facilitated uptake of a bioactive metabolite of maritime pine bark extract (pycnogenol into human erythrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Kurlbaum

    Full Text Available Many plant secondary metabolites exhibit some degree of biological activity in humans. It is a common observation that individual plant-derived compounds in vivo are present in the nanomolar concentration range at which they usually fail to display measurable activity in vitro. While it is debatable that compounds detected in plasma are not the key effectors of bioactivity, an alternative hypothesis may take into consideration that measurable concentrations also reside in compartments other than plasma. We analysed the binding of constituents and the metabolite δ-(3,4-dihydroxy-phenyl-γ-valerolactone (M1, that had been previously detected in plasma samples of human consumers of pine bark extract Pycnogenol, to human erythrocytes. We found that caffeic acid, taxifolin, and ferulic acid passively bind to red blood cells, but only the bioactive metabolite M1 revealed pronounced accumulation. The partitioning of M1 into erythrocytes was significantly diminished at higher concentrations of M1 and in the presence of glucose, suggesting a facilitated transport of M1 via GLUT-1 transporter. This concept was further supported by structural similarities between the natural substrate α-D-glucose and the S-isomer of M1. After cellular uptake, M1 underwent further metabolism by conjugation with glutathione. We present strong indication for a transporter-mediated accumulation of a flavonoid metabolite in human erythrocytes and subsequent formation of a novel glutathione adduct. The physiologic role of the adduct remains to be elucidated.

  11. Studies of the pathogenesis of anemia of inflammation: erythrocyte survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, D.J.; Krehbiel, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    Erythrocyte survival was investigated in healthy cats and in cats with sterile abscesses. Erythrocyte survival time in cats with sterile abscesses was found to be significantly reduced. The erythrocyte destruction appeared to be the major factor in the early stages of anemia of inflammation

  12. Paired Chicken and Mammalian Erythrocyte Indicator Systems for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three levels of erythrocytes suspensions, 1.5%, 1% and 0.5% respectively from goat and guinea pig, were compared to conventional 0.5% chicken erythrocytes, in an attempt to investigate the suitability for the two sources of mammalian erythrocytes as indicators for Newcastle disease virus haemagglutination (HA) tests.

  13. Baseline Haematology and Erythrocyte Morphological Changes of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Summary: This study evaluates the haematological parameters and the observed erythrocytes morphological changes in dogs raised in Ibadan, Oyo State in the south western part of Nigeria. Blood samples were collected from sixty-four apparently healthy dogs. The haematological parameters of the blood samples ...

  14. Erythrocyte aging in sickle cell disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.

    2004-01-01

    Physiological removal of old erythrocytes from the circulation by macrophages is initiated by binding of autologous IgG to senescent cell antigen (SCA). SCA is generated from the anion exchanger band 3. This process is accompanied by a number of alterations in the function and structure of band 3.

  15. Changes in Hematological Parameters and Erythrocyte Osmotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was aimed at evaluating the changes in haematological parameters and erythrocyte osmotic fragility in lame and aged horses administered with resveratrol supplement (Equithrive joint®). A total of 16 horses of both sexes, aged 18 ± 0.65 and showing lameness grade 3 were used for the study. The horses ...

  16. Sickle erythrocytes enhance phenylephrine and histamine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sickle erythrocytes enhance phenylephrine and histamine contractions of isolated rabbit carotid arteries. ... enhancement of histamine contractions, compared with phenylephrine (in AS and SS), suggests a possible role for histamine in the increased vascular tone and vaso-occlusive crisis in sickle cell disease.

  17. Erythrocyte potassium and glutathione polymorphism determination ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    This research is aimed at determining the erythrocyte potassium and glutathione polymorphisms and also to identify the relationship among the various blood parameters in Saanen x Malta crossbred goat raised in Turkey. The allele gene frequencies of KH and KL associated with the potassium concentration.

  18. Erythrocyte potassium and glutathione polymorphism determination ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research is aimed at determining the erythrocyte potassium and glutathione polymorphisms and also to identify the relationship among the various blood parameters in Saanen x Malta crossbred goat raised in Turkey. The allele gene frequencies of KH and KL associated with the potassium concentration were ...

  19. Brucella melitensis Invades Murine Erythrocytes during Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitry, Marie-Alice; Hanot Mambres, Delphine; Deghelt, Michaël; Hack, Katrin; Machelart, Arnaud; Lhomme, Frédéric; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie; Vermeersch, Marjorie; De Trez, Carl; Pérez-Morga, David; Letesson, Jean-Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Brucella spp. are facultative intracellular Gram-negative coccobacilli responsible for brucellosis, a worldwide zoonosis. We observed that Brucella melitensis is able to persist for several weeks in the blood of intraperitoneally infected mice and that transferred blood at any time point tested is able to induce infection in naive recipient mice. Bacterial persistence in the blood is dramatically impaired by specific antibodies induced following Brucella vaccination. In contrast to Bartonella, the type IV secretion system and flagellar expression are not critically required for the persistence of Brucella in blood. ImageStream analysis of blood cells showed that following a brief extracellular phase, Brucella is associated mainly with the erythrocytes. Examination by confocal microscopy and transmission electron microscopy formally demonstrated that B. melitensis is able to invade erythrocytes in vivo. The bacteria do not seem to multiply in erythrocytes and are found free in the cytoplasm. Our results open up new areas for investigation and should serve in the development of novel strategies for the treatment or prophylaxis of brucellosis. Invasion of erythrocytes could potentially protect the bacterial cells from the host's immune response and hamper antibiotic treatment and suggests possible Brucella transmission by bloodsucking insects in nature. PMID:25001604

  20. The Current Relevance and Applications of Erythrocyte ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) is a simple and inexpensive laboratory test. It is commonly used to assess the acute phase response. A review of relevant literature was done to evaluate the role of the ESR and its importance in different clinical conditions both inflammatory and non-inflammatory. Despite the critical ...

  1. Stimulation of suicidal erythrocyte death by sulforaphane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzoubi, Kousi; Calabrò, Salvatrice; Faggio, Caterina; Lang, Florian

    2015-03-01

    Sulforaphane, an isothiocyanate from cruciferous vegetable, counteracts malignancy. The effect is at least in part due to the stimulation of suicidal death or apoptosis of tumour cells. Mechanisms invoked in sulforaphane-induced apoptosis include mitochondrial depolarization and altered gene expression. Despite the lack of mitochondria and nuclei, erythrocytes may, similar to apoptosis of nucleated cells, enter eryptosis, a suicidal cell death characterized by cell shrinkage and phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Stimulators of eryptosis include increase of cytosolic Ca(2+)-activity ([Ca(2+)]i). This study explored whether sulforaphane stimulates eryptosis. Cell volume was estimated from forward scatter, phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface from annexin V binding and [Ca(2+)]i from Fluo-3 fluorescence. A 48-hr treatment of human erythrocytes with sulforaphane (50-100 μM) significantly decreased forward scatter, significantly increased the percentage of annexin V binding cells and significantly increased [Ca(2+)]i. The effect of sulforaphane (100 μM) on annexin V binding was significantly blunted but not abrogated by the removal of extracellular Ca(2+). Sulforaphane (100 μM) significantly increased ceramide formation. In conclusion, sulforaphane stimulates suicidal erythrocyte death or eryptosis, an effect at least partially, but not exclusively, due to the stimulation of Ca(2+) entry and ceramide formation. © 2014 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  2. Erythrocyte survival in sheep exposed to ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, G.S.; Calabrese, E.J.; Labato, F.J.

    1981-07-01

    Erythrocyte survival studies in the Dorset ewe using chromium 51 were performed. The purpose of the study was to determine if ozone exposure produces decreased cell survival which may be the result of premature erythrocyte aging. This strain of sheep has an erythrocyte glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity that is very low, being comparable to human A-variants with G6PD deficiency. Ozone exposure may produce hemolytic effects in G6PD deficients more readily than in erythrocytes with normal activity. A decrease in hematocrit was observed in the ozone exposed groups. With respect to red cell destruction, ozone does not appear to act immediately, but rather there appears to be a delayed effect. At 0.25 ppM ozone, the group reached the 50% remaining level an average of 1 day sooner than the control group. There was no significant difference between control and exposed groups at the 0.50 ppM and 0.70 ppM levels. Also, the results demonstrate a net decrease in hematocrit which is greater for 0.25 ppM ozone than any other exposure level. (RJC)

  3. Baseline Haematology and Erythrocyte Morphological Changes of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    Department of Veterinary Pathology, University of Ibadan. Nigeria Ibadan, Nigeria. Summary: This study evaluates the haematological parameters and the observed erythrocytes morphological changes in dogs raised in Ibadan, Oyo State in the south western part of Nigeria. Blood samples were collected from sixty-four.

  4. Comparative Erythrocytes Osmotic Fragility Test and some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erythrocytes osmotic fragility and haematological parameters of subjects with HbAS (sickle cell trait) and HbSS (sickle cell anaemia) were determined and compared with subjects with HbAA (normal adult haemoglobin), which acted as control. They were divided into three groups of 40 subjects for HbAA, 35 subjects for ...

  5. Triggering of Suicidal Erythrocyte Death by Gefitinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulla Al Mamun Bhuyan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor gefitinib is effective against several malignancies and is mainly utilized in the treatment of epidermal growth factor receptor mutation positive non-small cell lung cancer. The anti-cancer effect of the drug involves stimulation of apoptosis. Side effects of gefitinib include anemia. At least in theory, the development of anemia during gefitinib treatment could result from triggering of eryptosis, the suicidal erythrocyte death characterized by cell shrinkage and by cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Signaling potentially stimulating eryptosis include increase of cytosolic Ca2+ activity ([Ca2+]i and generation of oxidative stress. The present study explored, whether gefitinib stimulates eryptosis and, if so, whether its effect involves Ca2+ entry and/or oxidative stress. Methods: Flow cytometry was employed to quantify cell volume from forward scatter, phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface from annexin-V-binding, [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence, and reactive oxygen species (ROS abundance from 2’,7’-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA dependent fluorescence. Results: A 48 hours exposure of human erythrocytes to gefitinib (≥ 2 µg/ml significantly decreased forward scatter and significantly increased the percentage of annexin-V-binding cells. Gefitinib did not significantly increase Fluo3-fluorescence but the effect of gefitinib on annexin-V-binding was significantly blunted by removal of extracellular Ca2+. Gefitinib further significantly increased DCFDA fluorescence. Conclusions: Gefitinib triggers erythrocyte shrinkage and phospholipid scrambling of the erythrocyte cell membrane, an effect at least in part dependent on extracellular Ca2+ and paralleled by oxidative stress.

  6. Triggering of Suicidal Erythrocyte Death by Gefitinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Mamun Bhuyan, Abdulla; Wagner, Teresa; Cao, Hang; Lang, Florian

    2017-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor gefitinib is effective against several malignancies and is mainly utilized in the treatment of epidermal growth factor receptor mutation positive non-small cell lung cancer. The anti-cancer effect of the drug involves stimulation of apoptosis. Side effects of gefitinib include anemia. At least in theory, the development of anemia during gefitinib treatment could result from triggering of eryptosis, the suicidal erythrocyte death characterized by cell shrinkage and by cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Signaling potentially stimulating eryptosis include increase of cytosolic Ca2+ activity ([Ca2+]i) and generation of oxidative stress. The present study explored, whether gefitinib stimulates eryptosis and, if so, whether its effect involves Ca2+ entry and/or oxidative stress. Flow cytometry was employed to quantify cell volume from forward scatter, phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface from annexin-V-binding, [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) abundance from 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA) dependent fluorescence. A 48 hours exposure of human erythrocytes to gefitinib (≥ 2 µg/ml) significantly decreased forward scatter and significantly increased the percentage of annexin-V-binding cells. Gefitinib did not significantly increase Fluo3-fluorescence but the effect of gefitinib on annexin-V-binding was significantly blunted by removal of extracellular Ca2+. Gefitinib further significantly increased DCFDA fluorescence. Gefitinib triggers erythrocyte shrinkage and phospholipid scrambling of the erythrocyte cell membrane, an effect at least in part dependent on extracellular Ca2+ and paralleled by oxidative stress. © 2017 The Author(s)Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Effects of a homogeneous magnetic field on erythrocyte sedimentation and aggregation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iino, Masaaki [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Physiology I

    1997-05-01

    Effects of a homogeneous static magnetic field on erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) have been assessed by using the standard Westergren method. A magnetic field of 6.3 T in the vertical direction only slightly enhanced ESR in saline solution, which was consistent with an effect on cell orientation. On the other hand, the magnetic field greatly enhanced ESR in plasma. It took a long time (about 20 min) for an ESR change to occur in plasma in response to the magnetic field. The effects in plasma were too large to originate only from cell orientation and were clearly distinct from a magnetic field-induced Boycott effect under an inhomogeneous magnetic field. A morphological examination and the nonlinear time course of the sedimentation in plasma indicated that the magnetic field increased cell aggregation and thereby enhanced ESR in plasma.

  8. Effects of centrifugation on transmembrane water loss from normal and pathologic erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaperonis, A.A.; Chien, S.

    1989-01-01

    Plasma 125 I-albumin was used as a marker of extracellular dilution in order to study the effect of high-speed centrifugation on transmembrane water distribution in several types of human red cells, including normal (AA), hemoglobin variants (beta A, AS, SC, beta S, and SS), and those from patients with hereditary spherocytosis. SS and AA erythrocytes were also examined for changes in intracellular hemoglobin concentration of three different density fractions and with increasing duration of spin. The minimum force and duration of centrifugation required to impair water permeability were found to vary with the red cell type, the anticoagulant used (heparin or EDTA), the initial hematocrit of the sample centrifuged, as well as among the individual erythrocyte fractions within the same sample. When subjecting pathologic erythrocytes to high-speed centrifugation, the 125 I-albumin dilution technique can be used to determine whether the centrifugation procedure has led to an artifactual red cell water loss and to correct for this when it does occur. An abnormal membrane susceptibility to mechanical stress was demonstrated in erythrocytes from patients with hereditary spherocytosis and several hemoglobinopathies

  9. Effects of centrifugation on transmembrane water loss from normal and pathologic erythrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaperonis, A.A.; Chien, S.

    1989-02-01

    Plasma /sup 125/I-albumin was used as a marker of extracellular dilution in order to study the effect of high-speed centrifugation on transmembrane water distribution in several types of human red cells, including normal (AA), hemoglobin variants (beta A, AS, SC, beta S, and SS), and those from patients with hereditary spherocytosis. SS and AA erythrocytes were also examined for changes in intracellular hemoglobin concentration of three different density fractions and with increasing duration of spin. The minimum force and duration of centrifugation required to impair water permeability were found to vary with the red cell type, the anticoagulant used (heparin or EDTA), the initial hematocrit of the sample centrifuged, as well as among the individual erythrocyte fractions within the same sample. When subjecting pathologic erythrocytes to high-speed centrifugation, the /sup 125/I-albumin dilution technique can be used to determine whether the centrifugation procedure has led to an artifactual red cell water loss and to correct for this when it does occur. An abnormal membrane susceptibility to mechanical stress was demonstrated in erythrocytes from patients with hereditary spherocytosis and several hemoglobinopathies.

  10. Avian And Other Zoonotic Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... consultations Fact sheets Fact files Questions & answers Features Multimedia Contacts Influenza (Avian and other zoonotic) Fact sheet ... respiratory tract infection (fever and cough), early sputum production and rapid progression to severe pneumonia, sepsis with ...

  11. Limited cross-reactivity among domains of the Plasmodium falciparum clone 3D7 erythrocyte membrane protein 1 family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Louise; Turner, Louise; Magistrado, Pamela

    2006-01-01

    The var gene-encoded Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family is responsible for antigenic variation and sequestration of infected erythrocytes during malaria. We have previously grouped the 60 PfEMP1 variants of P. falciparum clone 3D7 into groups A and B/A (category A...... from clone 3D7 by using a competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a pool of plasma from 63 malaria-exposed Tanzanian individuals. We conclude that naturally acquired antibodies are largely directed toward epitopes varying between different domains with a few, mainly category A, domains...

  12. Effect of garlic's mode of administration on erythrocytes and plasma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP HP

    2012-04-24

    Apr 24, 2012 ... Garlic preparations are recognized as hypolipidemic, cardioprotective and antihypertensive agents. However, there are some discrepancies about the beneficial effects of garlic according to dosage and mode of administration. We aimed to determine the ability of high dosage garlic (5 g/kg bw) to modulate.

  13. Uric acid increases erythrocyte aggregation: Implications for cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloop, Gregory D; Bialczak, Jessica K; Weidman, Joseph J; St Cyr, J A

    2016-10-05

    Uric acid may be a risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, although the data conflict and the mechanism by which it may cause cardiovascular disease is uncertain. This study was performed to test the hypothesis that uric acid, an anion at physiologic pH, can cause erythrocyte aggregation, which itself is associated with cardiovascular disease. Normal erythrocytes and erythrocytes with a positive direct antiglobulin test for surface IgG were incubated for 15 minutes in 14.8 mg/dL uric acid. Erythrocytes without added uric acid were used as controls. Erythrocytes were then examined microscopically for aggregation. Aggregates of up to 30 erythrocytes were noted when normal erythrocytes were incubated in uric acid. Larger aggregates were noted when erythrocytes with surface IgG were incubated in uric acid. Aggregation was negligible in controls. These data show that uric acid causes erythrocyte aggregation. The most likely mechanism is decreased erythrocyte zeta potential. Erythrocyte aggregates will increase blood viscosity at low shear rates and increase the risk of atherothrombosis. In this manner, hyperuricemia and decreased zeta potential may be risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

  14. Pathogenicity of avian malaria in experimentally-infected Hawaii Amakihi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Carter T.; Dusek, Robert J.; Woods, K.L.; Iko, W.M.

    2000-01-01

    The introduction of avian malaria (Plasmodium relictum) and mosquitoes (Culex quinquefasciatus) to the Hawaiian Islands (USA) is believed to have played a major role in the decline and extinction of native Hawaiian honeycreepers (Drepanidinae). This introduced disease is thought to be one of the primary factors limiting recovery of honeycreepers at elevations below 1,200 m where native forest habitats are still relatively intact. One of the few remaining species of honeycreepers with a wide elevational distribution is the Hawaii Amakihi (Hernignathus virens). We measured morbidity and mortality in experimentally-infected Hawaii Amakihi that were captured in a high elevation, xeric habitat that is above the current range of the mosquito vector. Mortality among amakihi exposed to a single infective mosquito bite was 65% (13/20). All infected birds had significant declines in food consumption and a corresponding loss in body weight over the 60 day course of the experiment. Gross and microscopic lesions in birds that succumbed to malaria included enlargement and discoloration of the spleen and liver and parasitemias as high as 50% of circulating erythrocytes. Mortality in experimentally-infected amakihi was similar to that observed in Apapane (Himnatione sanguinea) and lower than that observed in Iiwi (Vestiaria coccinea) infected under similar conditions with the same parasite isolate. We conclude that the current elevational and geographic distribution of Hawaiian honeycreepers is determined by relative susceptibility to avian malaria.

  15. The early and late effects of digoxin treatment on the sodium transport, sodium content and Na+K+- ATPase or erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumberbatch, M; Zareian, K; Davidson, C; Morgan, D B; Swaminathan, R

    1981-06-01

    1 Erythrocyte sodium content, sodium transport (ouabain sensitive sodium flux Eos, and ouabain sensitive efflux rate constant ERCos) sodium, potassium activated ouabain sensitive adenosine triphosphatase (Na+K+ATPase) and plasma digoxin were measured in patients during acute digitalisation and in patients who were on long-term digoxin treatment. 2 In the six patients who were studied during digitalisation, the ERCos and Na+K+ATPase activity decreased and erythrocyte sodium content increased during days 2-4 treatment, but there was no change in Eos. 3 In 39 patients on long term digoxin therapy (2-119 months) the erythrocyte sodium content was normal, but the erythrocyte Na+K+ATPase activity was higher than the control group. When the results from these 39 patients were divided according to the duration of treatment it was found that the erythrocyte sodium content was higher in patients treated for 2-4 months than in patients treated for longer periods and the erythrocyte Na+K+ATPase activity increased with duration of treatment. In eight patients (duration of treatment greater than 29 months) in whom ERCos and Eos were measured, ERCos and Eos were higher than the control group. 4 The results suggest that the effects of digoxin on erythrocytes which occur during acute digoxin treatment do not persist in the long term. 5 The possible explanation for the higher ERCos, Eos and Na+K+ATPase activity in patients treated with digoxin for more than 2 months is discussed.

  16. Prostaglandin A1 metabolism and inhibition of cyclic AMP extrusion by avian erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heasley, L.E.; Brunton, L.L.

    1985-01-01

    Prostaglandins (PG) inhibit active cyclic AMP export from pigeon red cells, PGA1 and PGA2 most potently. To probe the mechanism of this action of PGA1, the authors have studied the interaction of [ 3 H]PGA1 with suspensions of pigeon red cells. The interaction of PGA1 with pigeon red cells is a multistep process of uptake, metabolism, and secretion. [ 3 H] PGA1 rapidly enters red cells and is promptly metabolized to a compound(s) that remains in the aqueous layer after ethylacetate extraction. The glutathione-depleting agent, diamide, inhibits formation of the PGA1 metabolite. The red cells secrete the polar metabolite of PGA1 by a saturable mechanism that lowered temperatures inhibit. Because uptake and metabolism progress with much greater rates than metabolite secretion, red cells transiently concentrate the polar compound intracellularly. Onset and reversal of inhibition of cyclic AMP export by PGA1 coincide with accumulation and secretion of PGA1 metabolite, suggesting that the polar metabolite acts at an intracellular site to inhibit cyclic AMP efflux

  17. Hypoxanthine transport through human erythrocyte membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capuozzo, E.; Crifo, C.; Gigante, M.C.; Salerno, C.

    1986-01-01

    The authors report the kinetics of 14-C hypoxanthine uptake by intact human erythrocytes suspended in a phosphate-free medium, i.e. in conditions which make negligible 14-C hypoxanthine phosphoribosylation. Human erythrocytes were prepared from blood freshly drawn in heparin and washed three times with isotonic glucose-NaCl solution. In the absence of inorganic phosphate in the suspending medium, hypoxanthine receptor appears to be saturated by relatively low purine base concentration. When the cells are suspended in a medium containing inorganic phosphate, and thus, phosphoribosylpyrophosphate becomes available for nucleotide synthesis, hypoxanthine in phosphoribosylted to IMP. It can be suggested that under these conditions the receptor gets rid of hypoxanthine, crosses the cell membrane, and takes up new exogenous purine base

  18. [Dynamics of bioelectric activity of the brain and erythrocyte ultrastructure after intravenous infusion of sodium bicarbonate to oncologic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydova, I G; Kassil', V L; Raĭkhlin, N T; Filippova, N A

    1992-04-01

    23 patients with malignant tumors of different location and histogenesis were investigated. There were no metastases in 9 cases. 10 patients had metastases in regional areas and 4--distant. The results were compared with those obtained in 4 patients with nonmalignant diseases. EEG, blood gases, plasma acid--base balance and ultrastructure of erythrocytes were explored before and after intravenous infusion of 4.2% sodium bicarbonate solution. The metabolic alkalosis induced amelioration of EEG, which was changed basically, the condense of pre-membrane layer disappeared or decreased in erythrocytes, and disaggregation of erythrocytes took place in cancer patients vs those with nonmalignant tumors. The results confirm the suggestion of generalized intracellular acidosis in malignant tumor patients. This acidosis can be temporarily avoided or diminished artificially by blood alkalosis.

  19. On the association of lipid rafts to the spectrin skeleton in human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciana, Annarita; Achilli, Cesare; Balduini, Cesare; Minetti, Giampaolo

    2011-01-01

    Lipid rafts are local inhomogeneities in the composition of the plasma membrane of living cells, that are enriched in sphingolipids and cholesterol in a liquid-ordered state, and proteins involved in receptor-mediated signalling. Interactions between lipid rafts and the cytoskeleton have been observed in various cell types. They are isolated as a fraction of the plasma membrane that resists solubilization by nonionic detergents at 4°C (detergent-resistant membranes, DRMs). We have previously described that DRMs are anchored to the spectrin-based membrane skeleton in human erythrocytes and can be released by increasing the pH and ionic strength of the solubilization medium with sodium carbonate. It was unexplained why this carbonate treatment was necessary and why this requirement was not reported by other workers in this area. We show here that when contaminating leukocytes are present in erythrocyte preparations that are subjected to detergent treatment, the isolation of DRMs can occur without the requirement for carbonate treatment. This is due to the uncontrolled breakdown of erythrocyte membrane components by hydrolases that are released from contaminating neutrophils that lead to proteolytic disruption of the supramolecular assembly of the membrane skeleton. Results presented here corroborate the concept that DRMs are anchored to the membrane skeleton through electrostatic interactions that most likely involve the spectrin molecule. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Study of rabbit erythrocytes membrane solubilization by sucrose monomyristate using laurdan and phasor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, German; Herlax, Vanesa; Lillo, M Pilar; Sandoval-Altamirano, Catalina; Belmar, Libnny N; Sánchez, Susana A

    2018-01-01

    The study of surfactant and bio membranes interaction is particularly complex due to the diversity in lipid composition and the presence of proteins in natural membranes. Even more difficult is the study of this interaction in vivo since cellular damage may complicate the interpretation of the results, therefore for most of the studies in this field either artificial or model systems are used. One of the model system most used to study biomembranes are erythrocytes due to their relatively simple structure (they lack nuclei and organelles having only the plasma membrane), their convenient experimental manipulation and availability. In this context, we used rabbit erythrocytes as a model membrane and Laurdan (6-lauroyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene) as the fluorescent probe to study changes promoted in the membrane by the interaction with the sucrose monoester of myristic acid, β-d-fructofuranosyl-6-O-myristoyl-α-d-glucopyranoside (MMS). Surfactant and erythrocytes interaction was studied by measuring hemoglobin release and the changes in water content in the membrane sensed by Laurdan. Using two-photon excitation, three types of measurements were performed: Generalized Polarization (analyzed as average GP values), Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging, FLIM (analyzed using phasor plots) and Spectral imaging (analyzed using spectral phasor). Our data indicate that at sublytical concentration of surfactant (20μM MMS), there is a decrease of about 35% in erythrocytes size, without changes in Laurdan lifetime or emission spectra. We also demonstrate that as hemolysis progress, Laurdan lifetime increased due to the decrease in hemoglobin (strong quencher of Laurdan emission) content inside the erythrocytes. Under these conditions, Laurdan spectral phasor analyses can extract the information on the water content in the membrane in the presence of hemoglobin. Our results indicate an increase in membrane fluidity in presence of MMS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  1. Oxidative stress and suicidal erythrocyte death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Florian; Abed, Majed; Lang, Elisabeth; Föller, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Eryptosis, the suicidal erythrocyte death, is characterized by cell shrinkage, membrane blebbing, and phosphatidylserine translocation to the outer membrane leaflet. Phosphatidylserine at the erythrocyte surface binds endothelial CXCL16/SR-PSOX (CXC-Motiv-Chemokin-16/Scavenger-receptor-for-phosphatidylserine-and-oxidized-low-density-lipoprotein) and fosters engulfment of affected erythrocytes by phagocytosing cells. Eryptosis serves to eliminate infected or defective erythrocytes, but excessive eryptosis may lead to anemia and may interfere with microcirculation. Clinical conditions with excessive eryptosis include diabetes, chronic renal failure, hemolytic uremic syndrome, sepsis, malaria, iron deficiency, sickle cell anemia, thalassemia, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, glutamate cysteine ligase modulator deficiency, and Wilson's disease. Eryptosis is triggered by a wide variety of xenobiotics and other injuries such as oxidative stress. Signaling of eryptosis includes prostaglandin E₂ formation with subsequent activation of Ca(2+)-permeable cation channels, Ca(2+) entry, activation of Ca(2+)-sensitive K(+) channels, and cell membrane scrambling, as well as phospholipase A2 stimulation with release of platelet-activating factor, sphingomyelinase activation, and ceramide formation. Eryptosis may involve stimulation of caspases and calpain with subsequent degradation of the cytoskeleton. It is regulated by AMP-activated kinase, cGMP-dependent protein kinase, Janus-activated kinase 3, casein kinase 1α, p38 kinase, and p21-activated kinase 2. It is inhibited by erythropoietin, antioxidants, and further small molecules. It remains uncertain for most disorders whether eryptosis is rather beneficial because it precedes and thus prevents hemolysis or whether it is harmful because of induction of anemia and impairment of microcirculation. This will address the significance of eryptosis, further mechanisms underlying eryptosis, and additional

  2. Triggering of Suicidal Erythrocyte Death by Regorafenib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Zierle

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The multikinase inhibitor regorafenib is utilized for the treatment of malignancy. The substance is effective in part by triggering suicidal death or apoptosis of tumor cells. Side effects of regorafenib include anemia. At least in theory, regorafenib induced anemia could result from stimulated suicidal erythrocyte death or eryptosis, characterized by cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Triggers of eryptosis include increase of cytosolic Ca2+ activity ([Ca2+]i, oxidative stress and ceramide. The present study explored, whether regorafenib induces eryptosis and, if so, whether it is effective up- and/or downstream of Ca2+. Methods: To this end, phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface was estimated from annexin-V-binding, cell volume from forward scatter, [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence, ROS formation from DCFDA dependent fluorescence, and ceramide abundance utilizing specific antibodies. Results: A 48 hours exposure of human erythrocytes to regorafenib (≥ 0.5 µg/ml significantly increased the percentage of annexin-V-binding cells, significantly decreased forward scatter (≥ 1.25 µg/ml, but did not significantly increase Fluo3-fluorescence, DCFDA fluorescence or ceramide abundance. The effect of regorafenib on annexin-V-binding and forward scatter was not significantly blunted by removal of extracellular Ca2+. Regorafenib (5 µg/ml significantly augmented the increase of annexin-V-binding, but significantly blunted the decrease of forward scatter following treatment with the Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin. Conclusions: Regorafenib triggers cell shrinkage and phospholipid scrambling of the erythrocyte cell membrane, an effect at least in part downstream of Ca2+.

  3. Triggering of Suicidal Erythrocyte Death by Regorafenib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zierle, Jens; Bissinger, Rosi; Bouguerra, Ghada; Abbès, Salem; Lang, Florian

    2016-01-01

    The multikinase inhibitor regorafenib is utilized for the treatment of malignancy. The substance is effective in part by triggering suicidal death or apoptosis of tumor cells. Side effects of regorafenib include anemia. At least in theory, regorafenib induced anemia could result from stimulated suicidal erythrocyte death or eryptosis, characterized by cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Triggers of eryptosis include increase of cytosolic Ca2+ activity ([Ca2+]i), oxidative stress and ceramide. The present study explored, whether regorafenib induces eryptosis and, if so, whether it is effective up- and/or downstream of Ca2+. To this end, phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface was estimated from annexin-V-binding, cell volume from forward scatter, [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence, ROS formation from DCFDA dependent fluorescence, and ceramide abundance utilizing specific antibodies. A 48 hours exposure of human erythrocytes to regorafenib (≥ 0.5 µg/ml) significantly increased the percentage of annexin-V-binding cells, significantly decreased forward scatter (≥ 1.25 µg/ml), but did not significantly increase Fluo3-fluorescence, DCFDA fluorescence or ceramide abundance. The effect of regorafenib on annexin-V-binding and forward scatter was not significantly blunted by removal of extracellular Ca2+. Regorafenib (5 µg/ml) significantly augmented the increase of annexin-V-binding, but significantly blunted the decrease of forward scatter following treatment with the Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin. Regorafenib triggers cell shrinkage and phospholipid scrambling of the erythrocyte cell membrane, an effect at least in part downstream of Ca2+. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Inhibition of Suicidal Erythrocyte Death by Reversine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Jemaà

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The A3 adenosine receptor antagonist reversine (2-(4-morpholinoanilino-6-cyclohexylaminopurine influences cellular differentiation, inhibits cell proliferation, induces cell-cycle arrest, triggers apoptosis, causes cell swelling with polyploidy and stimulates autophagy. The effect on apoptosis involves mitochondria and caspases. Erythrocytes are lacking mitochondria but express caspases and are, similar to apoptosis of nucleated cells, able to enter suicidal erythrocyte death or eryptosis. Stimulators of eryptosis include increase of cytosolic Ca2+ activity ([Ca2+]i, energy depletion and oxidative stress. The present study explored, whether reversine influences eryptosis. Methods: Flow cytometry was employed to quantify phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface from annexin-V-binding and cell volume from forward scatter. Measurements were made without or with energy depletion (glucose deprivation for 48 hours, Ca2+ loading (30 minutes treatment with 1 µM Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin, or oxidative stress (15 min exposure to 0.3 mM tert-butylhydroperoxide. Results: A 48 hours exposure of human erythrocytes to reversine (1-10 µM did not significantly modify the percentage of annexin-V-binding cells and forward scatter. Energy depletion, Ca2+ loading, and oxidative stress were each followed by profound and significant increase of the percentage annexin-V-binding erythrocytes and a significant decrease of forward scatter. The effects of each, Ca2+ loading, energy depletion and oxidative stress on annexin-V-binding were significantly blunted in the presence of reversine (1-10 µM. The effect of ionomycin, but not the effects of energy depletion and oxidative stress on forward scatter were again significantly blunted in the presence of reversine (≥1 µM]. Conclusions: Reversine is a powerful inhibitor of cell membrane scrambling following energy depletion, Ca2+ loading and oxidative stress.

  5. Stabilization of Erythrocyte Membranes by Polyamines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballas, Samir K.; Mohandas, Narla; Marton, Laurence J.; Shohet, Stephen B.

    1983-04-01

    Using a laser diffraction technique, we have studied the effects of putrescine, spermidine, and spermine, the three physiologic polyamines, on the deformability and mechanical stability of human erythrocyte membranes. Ghosts resealed with polyamines were subjected to high fluid shear stress in an ektacytometer. All polyamines increased the membrane shear modulus (decreased deformability) in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The order of effectiveness was spermine > spermidine > putrescine. At 10 μ M, spermine appreciably decreased membrane deformability. For the measurement of membrane mechanical stability, resealed ghosts were subjected to constant high shear stress in the ektacytometer and deformability was continuously recorded as the deformable ghosts fragmented into rigid spherical vesicles. Polyamines, especially spermine, caused a noticeable increase in the t1/2 for fragmentation. These effects could not be ascribed to proteolysis or Ca2+-induced transglutamination. That the effects of polyamines were specific and not simply due to their positive charge was demonstrated by the finding that Ca2+ and Mg2+ destabilized the erythrocyte membrane as evidenced by decreasing the t1/2 for fragmentation. Extracellular polyamines were not effective except under conditions that caused significant accumulation inside the cell. The data indicate that intracellular physiologic polyamines, especially spermine, decrease erythrocyte membrane deformability and stabilize the membrane skeleton, making it more resistant to fragmentation.

  6. Induction of Suicidal Erythrocyte Death by Novobiocin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Lupescu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Novobiocin, an aminocoumarin antibiotic, interferes with heat shock protein 90 and hypoxia inducible factor dependent gene expression and thus compromises cell survival. Similar to survival of nucleated cells, erythrocyte survival could be disrupted by eryptosis, the suicidal erythrocyte death characterized by cell shrinkage and by phospholipd scrambling of the cell membrane with phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Triggers of eryptosis include increase of cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i. The Ca2+ sensitivity of phospholipid scrambling is enhanced by ceramide. The present study explored, whether novobiocin elicits eryptosis. Methods: [Ca2+]i was estimated from Fluo3-fluorescence, ceramide abundance utilizing fluorescent antibodies, cell volume from forward scatter, phosphatidylserine-exposure from annexin V binding. Results: A 48 hours exposure to novobiocin (500 µM was followed by a significant increase of [Ca2+]i, decrease of forward scatter, increase of annexin-V-binding and enhanced ceramide formation. Removal of extracellular Ca2+ virtually abrogated the increase of annexin-V-binding following novobiocin exposure. Conclusions: Novobiocin stimulates eryptosis, an effect at least in part due to entry of extracellular Ca2+ and formation of ceramide.

  7. Seasonal variation in agglutination of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giha, H A; Theander, T G; Staalsø, T

    1998-01-01

    transmission in eastern Sudan. Plasma samples were obtained before, during, and after the transmission season from a volunteer cohort of 64 individuals seven years of age and older. These plasmas were assayed for their ability to agglutinate cultured parasitized erythrocytes originally obtained from acute...... malaria infection samples taken from five of the cohort members. Our data show that the capacity of donor plasma samples to agglutinate parasitized cells depended largely on the time of sampling relative to the transmission season, at least within this epidemiologic setting. Thus, although less than half...... of the pretransmission season samples could agglutinate any of the five lines of cultured parasites, all post-transmission season samples could agglutinate at least one of the parasite lines, with 74% agglutinating two or more lines. This increase in the agglutination capacity of individual plasma samples after...

  8. Protective Effect of Theaflavin on Erythrocytes Subjected to In Vitro Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahejabeen Fatima

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidant and free radical scavenging effect of black tea theaflavins has been shown in many epidemiological studies. In the present work we report the protective mechanism of tea theaflavins on biomarkers of oxidative stress, which are elevated during stress conditions. We hereby report the in vitro effect of theaflavins on erythrocyte malondialdehyde (MDA, intracellular reduced glutathione (GSH, and plasma membrane redox system (PMRS of rats. The effect of theaflavin on PMRS has also been validated through an in silico docking simulation study using Molegro Virtual Docker (MVD. We report that theaflavins show significant protection to erythrocyte against oxidative stress induced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP. The findings suggest a possible protective role of theaflavins as antioxidant.

  9. Effects of whole body UV-irradiation on oxygen delivery from the erythrocyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humpeler, E.; Mairbaeurl, H.; Hoenigsmann, H.

    1982-01-01

    In 16 healthy caucasian volunteers (mean age: 22.2 years) the influence of whole body UV-irradiation on the oxygen transport properties of erythrocytes was investigated. Four hours after irradiation with UV (using the minimal erythema dose, MED) no variation of haemoglobin concentration, hematocrit, mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration, pH or standard bicarbonate could be found, whereas inorganic plasma phosphate (Psub(i)), calcium, the intraerythrocytic 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG), the activity of erythrocytic phosphofructokinase (PFK) and pyruvatekinase (PK) increased significantly. The half saturation tension of oxygen (P 50 -value) tended to increase. The increase of Psub(i) causes - via a stimulation of the glycolytic pathway - an increase in 2,3-DPG concentration and thus results in a shift of the oxygen dissociation curve. It is therefore possible to enhance tissue oxygenation by whole body UV-irradiation. (orig.)

  10. Avian mycoplasmosis update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ER Nascimento

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Avian mycoplasmas occur in a variety of bird species. The most important mycoplasmas for chickens and turkeys are Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG, M. synoviae (MS, and M. meleagridis. Besides, M. iowe (MI is an emerging pathogen in turkeys, but of little concern for chickens. Mycoplasmas are bacteria that lack cell wall and belong to the class Mollicutes. Although they have been considered extracellular agents, scientists admit nowadays that some of them are obligatory intracellular microorganisms, whereas all other mycoplasmas are considered facultative intracellular organisms. Their pathogenic mechanism for disease include adherence to host target cells, mediation of apoptosis, innocent bystander damage to host cell due to intimate membrane contact, molecular (antigen mimicry that may lead to tolerance, and mitotic effect for B and/or T lymphocytes, which could lead to suppressed T-cell function and/or production of cytotoxic T cell, besides mycoplasma by-products, such as hydrogen peroxide and superoxide radicals. Moreover, mycoplasma ability to stimulate macrophages, monocytes, T-helper cells and NK cells, results in the production of substances, such as tumor necrosing factor (TNF-alpha, interleukin (IL-1, 2, 6 and interferon (a, b, g. The major clinical signs seen in avian mycoplasmosis are coughing, sneezing, snicks, respiratory rales, ocular and nasal discharge, decreased feed intake and egg production, increased mortality, poor hatchability, and, primarily in turkeys, swelling of the infraorbital sinus(es. Nevertheless, chronic and unapparent infections are most common and more threatening. Mycoplasmas are transmitted horizontally, from bird to bird, and vertically, from dam to offspring through the eggs. Losses attributed to mycoplasmosis, mainly MG and MS infections, result from decreased egg production and egg quality, poor hatchability (high rate of embryonic mortality and culling of day-old birds, poor feed efficiency, increase in

  11. Avian influenza : a review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yalda

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provides general information about avian influenza (bird flu and specific information about one type of bird flu, called avian influenza A (H5N1, that has caused infections in birds in Asia and Europe and in human in Asia. The main materials in this report are based on the World Health Organization (WHO , world organization for animal health (OIE , food and agriculture organization of the united nations (FAO information and recommendations and review of the published literature about avian influenza. Since December 2003, highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza viruses have swept through poultry populations across Asia and parts of Europe. The outbreaks are historically unprecedented in scale and geographical spread. Their economic impact on the agricultural sector of the affected countries has been large. Human cases, with an overall fatality rate around 50%, have also been reported and almost all human infections can be linked to contact with infected poultry. Influenza viruses are genetically unstable and their behaviour cannot be predicted so the risk of further human cases persists. The human health implications have now gained importance, both for illness and fatalities that have occurred following natural infection with avian viruses, and for the potential of generating a re-assortant virus that could give rise to the next human influenza pandemic.

  12. An overview on avian influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Rodrigo da Silva Martins

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Avian influenza (AI is considered an exotic disease in the Brazilian poultry industry, according to the National Avian Health Program (PNSA, with permanent monitoring of domestic, exotic and native avian species. Brazil presents privileged environmental conditions of reduced risk. In addition, all commercial poultry and conservation holdings are registered in state or national inventories and geographically located (GPS for health control. Poultry health standards are adopted for the conformity to the international market, mostly for the intensified poultry destined for exportation, but also for companion exotic and native conservation facilities. Guidelines for monitoring and the diagnosis of AI are published by the PNSA and follow the standards proposed by the international health code (World Organization for Animal Health, Organization International des Epizooties - OIE and insure the free of status for avian influenza virus (AIV of LPAIV-low pathogenicity AIV and HPAIV-high pathogenicity AIV. In addition, the infections by mesogenic and velogenic Newcastle disease virus, Mycoplasma gallisepticum, M. synoviae and M. meleagridis, Salmonella enteric subspecies enterica serovar Gallinarum biovars Gallinarum and Pullorum are eradicated from reproduction. Controlled infections by S.enterica subspecies enterica serovars Enteritidis and Typhimurium are monitored for breeders. The vaccination of chickens in ovo or at hatch against Marek's disease is mandatory. Broiler production is an indoor activity, confinement which insures biosecurity, with safe distances from the potential AIV reservoir avian species. Worldwide HPAIV H5N1 notifications to the OIE, in March 2011, included 51 countries.

  13. 77 FR 34783 - Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... Avian Influenza AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Interim rule... importation of bird and poultry products from regions where any subtype of highly pathogenic avian influenza... avian influenza (HPAI). On January 24, 2011, we published in the Federal Register (76 FR 4046-4056...

  14. 76 FR 24793 - Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-03

    ... Inspection Service 9 CFR Parts 93, 94, and 95 RIN 0579-AC36 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza AGENCY: Animal... products from regions where any subtype of highly pathogenic avian influenza is considered to exist. The... vaccinated for certain types of avian influenza, or that have moved through regions where any subtype of...

  15. Effects of humoral factors on amplification of nonrecognizable erythrocytic and granulocytic precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronkite, E.P.; Carsten, A.L.; Cohen, R.; Miller, M.E.; Moccia, G.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of these studies was to evaluate the effects of humoral factors on amplification of nonrecognizable erythrocytic and granulocytic precursors using the in vivo plasma clot diffusion chamber and the in vitro plasma clot culture methods. Plasma erythropoietin levels changes in the reticulocyte concentration and hematocrits of irradiated and non-irradiated Long-Evans rats exposed to hypoxia were also determined. While erythropoietin plasma levels appeared to effect BFU-E and CFU-E growth, results suggest erythropoietin may not be the sole regulator of red cell production and that inhibitors or chalone-like mechanisms may be involved. Measurements made on granulocyte precursors treated with CSF containing L-cell conditioned medium revealed granulocytic colonies and burst-like formations, similar to those seen for erythrocytic growth. There is strong evidence suggesting that CSF is a regulator of granulopoiesis; however, it is not the sole regulator and it appears that inhibitors may play an in vivo role. Growth of colonies with cell numbers not a power of 2 implies either asymmetric nitosis due to loss of genetic information required for continuing division, or differences in concentration of, or ability to recognize inhibitory factors. These possibilities are examined on the basis of results using in vivo and in vitro culture techniques

  16. Avian reproductive physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, G.F.; Gibbons, Edward F.; Durrant, Barbara S.; Demarest, Jack

    1995-01-01

    Knowledge of the many physiological factors associated with egg production , fertility, incubation, and brooding in nondomestic birds is limited. Science knows even less about reproduction in most of the 238 endangered or threatened birds. This discussion uses studies of nondomestic and, when necessary, domestic birds to describe physiological control of reproduction. Studies of the few nondomestic avian species show large variation in physiological control of reproduction. Aviculturists, in order to successfully propagate an endangered bird, must understand the bird's reproductive peculiarities. First, investigators can do studies with carefully chosen surrogate species, but eventually they need to confirm the results in the target endangered bird. Studies of reproduction in nondomestic birds increased in the last decade. Still, scientists need to do more comparative studies to understand the mechanisms that control reproduction in birds. New technologies are making it possible to study reproductive physiology of nondomestic species in less limiting ways. These technologies include telemetry to collect information without inducing stress on captives (Howey et al., 1987; Klugman, 1987), new tests for most of the humoral factors associated with reproduction, and the skill to collect small samples and manipulate birds without disrupting the physiological mechanisms (Bercovitz et al., 1985). Managers are using knowledge from these studies to improve propagation in zoological parks, private and public propagation facilities, and research institutions. Researchers need to study the control of ovulation, egg formation, and oviposition in the species of nondomestic birds that lay very few eggs in a season, hold eggs in the oviduct for longer intervals, or differ in other ways from the more thoroughly studied domestic birds. Other techniques that would enhance propagation for nondomestlc birds include tissue culture of cloned embryonic cells, cryopreservation of embryos

  17. Investigation of High-Speed Erythrocyte Flow and Erythrocyte-Wall Impact in a Lab-on-a-Chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Zheng, Lu; Zhang, Di; Xie, Yonghui; Feng, Yi; Xie, Gongnan

    2016-11-01

    To better understand erythrocyte high-speed motion, collision characteristics, and collision-induced hemolysis probability in rotary blood pumps, a visual experimental investigation of high-speed erythrocyte flow and erythrocyte-wall collision in a lab-on-a-chip was performed. The erythrocyte suspension was driven by a microsyringe pump connected to the microchip, and the erythrocyte flow and erythrocyte-wall impact process were observed and imaged by an optical microscope and a high-speed camera. Two types of microchips with different impact surfaces (flat and curved) were employed. The motion and deformation features before and after collision were studied in detail. The results show that erythrocytes not only move along the flow direction in the flow plane but also rotate and roll in three-dimensional space. Erythrocytes keep discoid shape during the movement in the straight channel, but their deformations during collision are mainly classified into two types: erythrocyte structure is still stable and the erythrocyte performance can be ensured to a certain extent in the TypeA deformation, while the TypeB deformation makes the membrane more likely to fracture on the stretched side, increasing the probability of hemolysis. Furthermore, the movements and deformations of the erythrocytes after collision are analyzed and classified into two types: bouncing and slipping. Moreover, a simulation method for the flow in microchip was performed and validated through a comparison of the streamlines and experimental erythrocytes tracks, which can be further employed to predict the high-speed blood flow, associated with collision process in mechanical blood pump. Copyright © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Insulin radioreceptor assay for human erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambhir, K.K.; Archer, J.A.; Carter, L.

    1977-01-01

    Human erythrocytes have specific insulin receptors. Radioreceptor assay for the determination of insulin binding to these receptors is presented. After two passages over a Boyum-type gradient, erythrocytes from freshly collected heparinized blood were isolated and 3.5 x 10 9 erythrocytes per milliliter were incubated for 2.5 h in a modified pH 8.0 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazine ethane sulfonate buffer, iodinated insulin (80 pg/ml), and a range of unlabeled insulin concentrations(0 to 1 x 10 5 ng/ml). Incubation was terminated by pipetting 200 μl of the incubated suspension onto 200 μl of buffer and 200 μl of dibutyl phthalate in pre-chilled microcentrifuge tubes. After centrifugation, supernatant fluid was aspirated, leaving about 0.1 of the dibutyl phthalate on the cell pellets. Percentage of [ 125 I] insulin bound was determined after radioactivity of the cell pellets was measured in a gamma counter. Under these conditions 11 normal volunteers demonstrated a mean of 7.2 +- 0.44% insulin bound specifically to 3.5 x 10 9 cells. The nonspecific binding varied from 8 to 17% of the total insulin bound. Further, a linear increase of specific binding from 1.35 to 13.55% was observed when the cell concentration was increased from 0.72 to 7.2 x 10 9 cells per milliliter, respectively. Insulin, 100 ng/ml, from several animal species inhibited more than half of the binding of porcine 125 I-labeled insulin. Bovine glucagon inhibited 9.8% and bovine somatotropin inhibited 1.1%, whereas desalanine-desasparagine insulin and human choriogonadotropin (10 int. units) did not inhibit binding of 125 I-labeled insulin. For seven duplicates done on a single assay, the CV was 16.1%, whereas that for 11 assays done on different subjects and on different days was 10.7%. Receptor assays utilizing this technique thus have sufficient specificity and sensitivity to be used for further clinical diagnostic and investigative studies of insulin receptors on human erythrocytes

  19. Phenolphthalein: induction of micronucleated erythrocytes in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, K L; Gulati, D K; Kaur, P; Shelby, M D

    1995-01-01

    Phenolphthalein was tested for the induction of micronucleated erythrocytes in mice. Results of an initial investigation revealed significant, dose-related increases in micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MN-PCE) and normochromatic erythrocytes (MN-NCE) in peripheral blood samples of male and female mice exposed to 0.6% to 5% phenolphthalein (approximately 1100 to 10,000 mg/kg/day) in feed for 90 days (Dietz et al., 1992). Results from a second long-term feed study with Swiss CD-1 mice confirmed this effect. However, administration of comparable doses of phenolphthalein by corn oil gavage on two consecutive days gave negative results in a mouse bone marrow micronucleus test. Subsequent tests were performed to clarify the conflicting results seen in the chronic exposure, dosed-feed, peripheral blood studies and the acute, corn oil gavage, bone marrow studies. Phenolphthalein was administered to male B6C3F1 mice in feed (3%) for 14 days. Peripheral blood samples taken at 4, 7, and 14 days all showed significant increases in micronucleated PCE; bone marrow samples taken on days 7 and 14 also were clearly positive for micronucleus induction. Therefore, comparable results were obtainable from both bone marrow and peripheral blood analyses. Because of the negative results in the two-exposure gavage test, additional tests were then designed to investigate the effects of bolus vs continuous dosing, feeding vs gavage administration, and corn oil vs feed as a carrier for phenolphthalein. Results of these tests indicated that the rate of exposure to phenolphthalein affects the frequency of induced MN-PCE and that micronucleated erythrocytes can be induced by phenolphthalein either by feeding or by corn oil gavage administration. In all the acute exposure studies, relatively high doses of phenolphthalein (2000-6000 mg/kg/day for at least 2 days) were required to induce micronuclei. The positive results obtained with phenolphthalein in vivo were consistent with the

  20. Influenza vaccines for avian species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beginning in Southeast Asia, in 2003, a multi-national epizootic outbreak of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) was identified in commercial poultry and wild bird species. This lineage, originally identified in Southern China in 1996 and then Hong Kong in 1997, caused severe morbidity an...

  1. Control strategies against avian influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since 1959, 40 epizootics of high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) have occurred (Figure 1). Thirty-five of these epizootic HPAI viruses were geographically-limited (mostly to single countries), involved farm-to-farm spread and were eradicated from poultry by stamping-out programs; i.e. the HPAI...

  2. Avian metapneumovirus in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the United States of America (USA), avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) causes an upper respiratory tract infection in turkeys; no outbreaks have been reported in commercial chicken flocks. Typical clinical signs of the disease in turkey poults include coughing, sneezing, nasal discharge, tracheal rale...

  3. Reverse genetics of avian metapneumoviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    An overview of avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) infection in turkeys and development of a reverse genetics system for aMPV subgroup C (aMPV-C) virus will be presented. By using reverse genetics technology, we generated recombinant aMPV-C viruses containing a different length of glycoprotein (G) gene or...

  4. Binding characteristics of swine erythrocyte insulin receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dieberg, G.; Bryan, G.S.; Sartin, J.L.; Williams, J.C.; Prince, T.J.; Kemppainen, R.J.

    1985-09-01

    Crossbred gilts had 8.8 +/- 1.1% maximum binding of ( SVI)insulin to insulin receptors on erythrocytes. The number of insulin-binding sites per cell was 137 +/- 19, with a binding affinity ranging from 7.4 X 10(7)M-1 to 11.2 X 10(7)M-1 and mean of 8.8 X 10(7)M-1. Pregnant sows had a significant increase in maximum binding due to an increase in number of receptor sites per cell. Lactating sows fed a high-fiber diet and a low-fiber diet did not develop a significant difference in maximum binding of insulin. Sows fed the low-fiber diet had a significantly higher number of binding sites and a significantly lower binding affinity than did sows fed a high-fiber diet. Receptor-binding affinity was lower in the low-fiber diet group than in cycling gilts, whereas data from sows fed the high-fiber diet did not differ from data for cycling gilts. Data from this study indicated that insulin receptors of swine erythrocytes have binding characteristics similar to those in other species. Pregnancy and diet will alter insulin receptor binding in swine.

  5. Plasmodium falciparum secretome in erythrocyte and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rani eSoni

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum is the causative agent of deadly malaria disease. It is an intracellular eukaryote and completes its multi-stage life cycle spanning the two hosts viz, mosquito and human. In order to habituate within host environment, parasite conform several strategies to evade host immune responses such as surface antigen polymorphism or modulation of host immune system and it is mediated by secretion of proteins from parasite to the host erythrocyte and beyond, collectively known as, malaria secretome. In this review, we will discuss about the deployment of parasitic secretory protein in mechanism implicated for immune evasion, protein trafficking, providing virulence, changing permeability and cyto-adherence of infected erythrocyte. We will be covering the possibilities of developing malaria secretome as a drug/vaccine target. This gathered information will be worthwhile in depicting a well-organized picture for host-pathogen interplay during the malaria infection and may also provide some clues for development of novel anti-malarial therapies.

  6. Induction of lipid peroxidation in erythrocytes during cholesterol oxidation catalyzed by cholesterol oxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagan, V.E.; Monovich, O.; Ribarov, S.R.

    1986-01-01

    The authors study the ability of cholesterol oxidase (ChO), which catalyzes oxidation of cholesterol (Ch) to cholest-4-en-3-one and, at the same time, reduction of O 2 to H 2 O 2 , to induce the lipid peroxidation (LPO) in plasma membranes. Erythrocyte ghosts were obtained from guinea pig blood; the reaction of oxidation of Ch in the erythrocyte ghosts or in micelles with Triton X-100 was carried out in the following medium: Tris-HCl 0.2 M, pH 7.0 (at 37 C), Triton X-100 0.25%, and ChO 0.05 U/ml. At the present time ChO is often used to study the asymmetry of distribution of Ch in biomembranes and the velocity of its transbilayer migration. It is suggested that changes in membrane permeability do not take place during the reaction catalyzed by the enzyme, and no products capable of affecting flip-flop in biological are formed. Accumulation of LPO products in erythrocyte membranes discovered in this investigation under the influence of ChO compels critical re-examination of the resutls

  7. Endogenous sphingomyelin segregates into submicrometric domains in the living erythrocyte membrane[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carquin, Mélanie; Pollet, Hélène; Veiga-da-Cunha, Maria; Cominelli, Antoine; Van Der Smissen, Patrick; N’kuli, Francisca; Emonard, Hervé; Henriet, Patrick; Mizuno, Hideaki; Courtoy, Pierre J.; Tyteca, Donatienne

    2014-01-01

    We recently reported that trace insertion of exogenous fluorescent (green BODIPY) analogs of sphingomyelin (SM) into living red blood cells (RBCs), partially spread onto coverslips, labels submicrometric domains, visible by confocal microscopy. We here extend this feature to endogenous SM, upon binding of a SM-specific nontoxic (NT) fragment of the earthworm toxin, lysenin, fused to the red monomeric fluorescent protein, mCherry [construct named His-mCherry-NT-lysenin (lysenin*)]. Specificity of lysenin* binding was verified with composition-defined liposomes and by loss of 125I-lysenin* binding to erythrocytes upon SM depletion by SMase. The 125I-lysenin* binding isotherm indicated saturation at 3.5 × 106 molecules/RBC, i.e., ∼3% of SM coverage. Nonsaturating lysenin* concentration also labeled sub­micrometric domains on the plasma membrane of partially spread erythrocytes, colocalizing with inserted green BODIPY-SM, and abrogated by SMase. Lysenin*-labeled domains were stable in time and space and were regulated by temperature and cholesterol. The abundance, size, positioning, and segregation of lysenin*-labeled domains from other lipids (BODIPY-phosphatidylcholine or -glycosphingolipids) depended on membrane tension. Similar lysenin*-labeled domains were evidenced in RBCs gently suspended in 3D-gel. Taken together, these data demonstrate submicrometric compartmentation of endogenous SM at the membrane of a living cell in vitro, and suggest it may be a genuine feature of erythrocytes in vivo. PMID:24826836

  8. Hemoglobin S and C affect protein export in Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Kilian

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a potentially deadly disease. However, not every infected person develops severe symptoms. Some people are protected by naturally occurring mechanisms that frequently involve inheritable modifications in their hemoglobin. The best studied protective hemoglobins are the sickle cell hemoglobin (HbS and hemoglobin C (HbC which both result from a single amino acid substitution in β-globin: glutamic acid at position 6 is replaced by valine or lysine, respectively. How these hemoglobinopathies protect from severe malaria is only partly understood. Models currently proposed in the literature include reduced disease-mediating cytoadherence of parasitized hemoglobinopathic erythrocytes, impaired intraerythrocytic development of the parasite, dampened inflammatory responses, or a combination thereof. Using a conditional protein export system and tightly synchronized Plasmodium falciparum cultures, we now show that export of parasite-encoded proteins across the parasitophorous vacuolar membrane is delayed, slower, and reduced in amount in hemoglobinopathic erythrocytes as compared to parasitized wild type red blood cells. Impaired protein export affects proteins targeted to the host cell cytoplasm, Maurer's clefts, and the host cell plasma membrane. Impaired protein export into the host cell compartment provides a mechanistic explanation for the reduced cytoadherence phenotype associated with parasitized hemoglobinopathic erythrocytes.

  9. Diffusion properties of band 3 in human erythrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Jeffrey O.

    The plasma membrane of the human erythrocyte (RBC) is a six fold symmetric network held together at various pinning points by several multi-protein complexes. This unique architecture is what gives the RBC its remarkable material properties and any disruptions to the network can have severe consequences for the cell. Band 3 is a major transmembrane protein that plays the role of linking the fluid lipid bilayer to the cytoskeletal network. To interrogate the structural integrity of the RBC membrane we have tracked individual band 3 molecules in RBCs displaying a variety of pathologies that are all a consequence of membrane or network related defects. These diseases are spherocytosis, elliptocytosis, and pyropokilocytosis. We have also investigated the protein related diseases sickle cell, and south east asian ovalocytosis. To assess the impact that the network has on the dynamic organization of the cell we have also studied the mobility of band 3 in RBC progenitor cells. Individual band 3 molecules were imaged at 120 frames/second and their diffusion coefficients and compartment sizes recorded. The distributions of the compartment sizes combined with the information about the short and long time diffusion of band 3 has given us insight into the architecture of the membrane in normal and diseased cells. The observation that different membrane pathologies can be distinguished, even to the point of different molecular origins of the same disease, implies that the mobility of transmembrane proteins may be a useful tool for characterizing the "health" of the membrane.

  10. Erythrocyte osmotic fragility of pigs administered ascorbic acid and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood samples for erythrocyte osmotic fragility determination which was done using standard procedure, were taken early in the morning a day before transportation, immediately after and a week after transportation. Erythrocyte osmotic fragility decreased significantly (P < 0.05) at NaCl concentration of 0.85, 0.80 and 0.70% ...

  11. Transcriptomic Analysis of Young and Old Erythrocytes of Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Götting

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding gene expression changes over the lifespan of cells is of fundamental interest and gives important insights into processes related to maturation and aging. This study was undertaken to understand the global transcriptome changes associated with aging in fish erythrocytes. Fish erythrocytes retain their nuclei throughout their lifetime and they are transcriptionally and translationally active. However, they lose important functions during their lifespan in the circulation. We separated rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss erythrocytes into young and old fractions using fixed angle-centrifugation and analyzed transcriptome changes using RNA sequencing (RNA-seq technology and quantitative real-time PCR. We found 930 differentially expressed between young and old erythrocyte fractions; 889 of these showed higher transcript levels in young, while only 34 protein-coding genes had higher transcript levels in old erythrocytes. In particular genes involved in ion binding, signal transduction, membrane transport, and those encoding various enzyme classes are affected in old erythrocytes. The transcripts with higher levels in old erythrocytes were associated with seven different GO terms within biological processes and nine within molecular functions and cellular components, respectively. Our study furthermore found several highly abundant transcripts as well as a number of differentially expressed genes (DEGs for which the protein products are currently not known revealing the gaps of knowledge in most non-mammalian vertebrates. Our data provide the first insight into changes involved in aging on the transcriptional level and thus opens new perspectives for the study of maturation processes in fish erythrocytes.

  12. Paired Chicken and Mammalian Erythrocyte Indicator Systems for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A retrospective flock health analysis revealed that the higher titres were associated with confirmable Newcastle Disease (ND) outbreaks in the affected flocks. These findings therefore suggested that the use of standardised guinea pig erythrocytes in parallel with chicken erythrocytes as indicators, might facilitate field ND ...

  13. Ionic fluxes in erythrocyte membranes of sickle cell anaemia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ionic fluxes in erythrocyte membranes of sickle cell anaemia subjects at different tonicities. ... Journal of African Association of Physiological Sciences ... The aim of this study was to investigate ionic fluxes in membrane of erythrocytes at different tonicities with a view to highlighting any selective ionic-fluxing potential of ...

  14. The Role and Mechanism of Erythrocyte Invasion by Francisella tularensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deanna M. Schmitt

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is an extremely virulent bacterium that can be transmitted naturally by blood sucking arthropods. During mammalian infection, F. tularensis infects numerous types of host cells, including erythrocytes. As erythrocytes do not undergo phagocytosis or endocytosis, it remains unknown how F. tularensis invades these cells. Furthermore, the consequence of inhabiting the intracellular space of red blood cells (RBCs has not been determined. Here, we provide evidence indicating that residing within an erythrocyte enhances the ability of F. tularensis to colonize ticks following a blood meal. Erythrocyte residence protected F. tularensis from a low pH environment similar to that of gut cells of a feeding tick. Mechanistic studies revealed that the F. tularensis type VI secretion system (T6SS was required for erythrocyte invasion as mutation of mglA (a transcriptional regulator of T6SS genes, dotU, or iglC (two genes encoding T6SS machinery severely diminished bacterial entry into RBCs. Invasion was also inhibited upon treatment of erythrocytes with venom from the Blue-bellied black snake (Pseudechis guttatus, which aggregates spectrin in the cytoskeleton, but not inhibitors of actin polymerization and depolymerization. These data suggest that erythrocyte invasion by F. tularensis is dependent on spectrin utilization which is likely mediated by effectors delivered through the T6SS. Our results begin to elucidate the mechanism of a unique biological process facilitated by F. tularensis to invade erythrocytes, allowing for enhanced colonization of ticks.

  15. Comparative Study of Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR) Using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL

    the rouleaux formation of erythrocyte all of which collectively permit circulation and formation of the blood constituent (Hall and Malia, 1998).Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) also called the Sed rate determination is a simple, inexpensive non-specific laboratory test that is frequently ordered in clinical medicine. The test ...

  16. Electrolyte Composition of Mink (Mustela vison Erythrocytes and Active Cation Transporters of the Cell Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clausen TN

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Red blood cells from mink (Mustela vison were characterized with respect to their electrolyte content and their cell membranes with respect to enzymatic activity for cation transport. The intra- and extracellular concentrations of Na+, K+, Cl-, Ca2+ and Mg2+ were determined in erythrocytes and plasma, respectively. Plasma and red cell water content was determined, and molal electrolyte concentrations were calculated. Red cells from male adult mink appeared to be of the low-K+, high-Na+ type as seen in other carnivorous species. The intracellular K+ concentration is slightly higher than the extracellular one and the plasma-to-cell chemical gradient for Na+ is weak, though even the molal concentrations may differ significantly. Consistent with the high intracellular Na+ and low K+ concentrations, a very low or no ouabain-sensitive Na+,K+-ATPase activity and no K+-activated pNPPase activity were found in the plasma membrane fraction from red cells. The Cl- and Mg2+ concentrations expressed per liter cell water were significantly higher in red cells than in plasma whereas the opposite was the case with Ca2+. The distribution of Cl- thus does not seem compatible with an inside-negative membrane potential in mink erythrocytes. In spite of a steep calcium gradient across the red cell membrane, neither a calmodulin-activated Ca2+-ATPase activity nor an ATP-activated Ca2+-pNPPase activity were detectable in the plasma membrane fraction. The origin of a supposed primary Ca2+ gradient for sustaining of osmotic balance thus seems uncertain.

  17. Metallic mercury uptake by catalase Part 1 In Vitro metallic mercury uptake by various kind of animals' erythrocytes and purified human erythrocyte catalase

    OpenAIRE

    劒持, 堅志

    1980-01-01

    The uptake of metallic mercury was studied using erythrocytes with different catalase activities taken from various kind of animals. The results were: 1) The uptake of metallic mercury by erythrocytes paralleled the activity of catalase in the erythrocytes with and without hydrogen peroxide, suggesting that the erythrocyte catalase activity is related to the uptake of metallic mercury. 2) The uptake of metallic mercury occurred not only with purified human erythrocyte catalase but also with h...

  18. Ultrastructure changes produced by the action of uranyl acetate on the human erythrocyte in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyatt, J.H.

    1975-06-01

    Human erythrocytes exposed in vitro to low concentrations of uranyl ions are immediately changed in shape to stomatocytes. Electron microscope examination demonstrates that cellular damage is confined to the plasma membrane. Endocytosis of the cell membrane produces groups of inside out membrane-lined vesicles within the cell; lipid from the membrane enters the cell, giving rise to intracellular myelin figures, and breaks are seen in the cell membrane. It is proposed that the lipid fraction of the cell membrane is the primary target for damage by uranyl ions. (author)

  19. Increased erythrocytic osmotic fragility in anemic domestic shorthair and purebred cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tritschler, Claudia; Mizukami, Keijiro; Raj, Karthik; Giger, Urs

    2016-06-01

    Increased erythrocytic osmotic fragility and splenomegaly have been reported in anemic Abyssinian and Somali cats. Here we report on this condition in anemic domestic shorthair cats and two other breeds, and describe common features of the clinicopathological profiles, management and outcomes. Anemic cats, other than Abyssinians and Somalis, were included. The erythrocytic osmotic fragility test was performed, known causes of anemia were excluded, the illness was followed and medical records were reviewed. Twelve neutered cats were first found to be anemic between 0.5 and 9.0 years of age. Pallor, lethargy, inappetence, pica, weight loss and splenomegaly were commonly observed. A moderate-to-severe macrocytic and hypochromic anemia with variable regeneration was noted. Infectious disease screening, direct Coombs' and pyruvate kinase DNA mutation test results were negative. Freshly drawn blood did not appear hemolysed but became progressively lysed during storage at 4°C. The sigmoid osmotic fragility curves were moderately to severely right shifted, indicating erythrocytic fragility at 20°C. Cross-correction studies indicated an intrinsic red cell effect rather than plasma effect. Most cats were treated with immunosuppressive doses of prednisolone and doxycycline, with variable responses. Five cats with recurrent or persistent anemia responded well to splenectomy. However, two had occasional recurrence of severe anemia: one was found to be Bartonella vinsonii-positive during one episode and responded to azithromycin and prednisolone, while the other cat had two episodes of severe anemia of unknown cause. Finally, six cats were euthanized within 1 month and 7 years after initial presentation. Histopathology of six spleens revealed mainly congestion and extramedullary hematopoiesis. Similarly to Abyssinian and Somali cats, domestic shorthair and cats of other breeds can also develop severe erythrocytic osmotic fragility with anemia and splenomegaly, which should be

  20. Assessment of antioxidant enzyme activities in erythrocytes of pre-hypertensive and hypertensive women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshad Amirkhizi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Few studies that have investigated hypertension have considered a state of oxidative stress that can contribute to the development of atherosclerosis and other hypertension induced organ damage. The aim of this study was to investigate whether pre-hypertension and hypertension status is associated with activities of erythrocyte antioxidant enzymes in a random sample of cardiovascular disease-free women. Methods: In this case-control study, 53 pre-hypertensive women, 32 hypertensive women and 75 healthy controls were included. General information was gathered using questionnaires and face-to-face interviews. Blood pressure and anthropometric measurements were measured for each subject. Venous blood samples were drawn from subjects and plasma was separated. Activities of erythrocyte antioxidant enzymes were also evaluated by measuring activities of copper zinc-superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPX and catalase (CAT in selected subjects. Results: Fifty-three (33.1% and 32 (20% participants were pre-hypertensive and hypertensive, respectively. The hypertensive and pre-hypertensive women had lower CuZn-SOD (p < 0.001 and GPX (p < 0.01 activities compared to normotensives. Furthermore, hypertensive women had lower CAT activity compared to pre-hypertensive and normotensive women (p < 0.001. Moreover, significant differences were also observed between hypertensive and pre-hypertensive women in erythrocyte CAT activity (p < 0.01. Conclusions: The present findings show that activities of erythrocyte antioxidant enzymes decrease in pre-hypertensive and hypertensive women, which may eventually lead to atherosclerosis and other high blood pressure related health problems.

  1. Preferential Elimination of Older Erythrocytes in Circulation and Depressed Bone Marrow Erythropoietic Activity Contribute to Cadmium Induced Anemia in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Sreoshi; Saxena, Rajiv K.

    2015-01-01

    Feeding cadmium chloride (50 or 1000 ppm CdCl2 in drinking water, ad libitum) to C57BL/6 mice resulted in a significant and sustained fall in blood erythrocyte count and hemoglobin levels that started 4 and 3 weeks after the start of 50 and 1000 ppm cadmium doses respectively. A transient yet significant reticulocytosis occurred during the first 4 weeks of cadmium treatment. Using the recently developed double in vivo biotinylation (DIB) technique, turnover of erythrocyte cohorts of different age groups was simultaneously monitored in control and cadmium treated mice. A significant accumulation of younger erythrocytes and a concomitant decline in the relative proportions of older erythrocytes in circulation was observed in both 50 and 1000 ppm cadmium groups indicating that older erythrocytes were preferentially eliminated in cadmium induced anemia. A significant increase in the erythropoietin levels in plasma was seen in mice exposed to 1000 ppm cadmium. Levels of inflammatory cytokines (IL1A, IL6, TNFα, IFNγ) were however not significantly altered in cadmium treated mice. A significant increase in cellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was observed in older erythrocytes in circulation but not in younger erythrocytes. Erythropoietic activity in the bone marrows and spleens of cadmium treated mice was examined by monitoring the relative proportion of cells belonging to the erythroid line of differentiation in these organs. Erythroid cells in bone marrow declined markedly (about 30%) in mice in the 1000 ppm cadmium group but the decline was not significant in the 50 ppm cadmium group. Cells representing various stages of erythroid differentiation in bone marrow and spleen were enumerated flow cytometrically by double staining with anti-Ter119 and anti-transferrin receptor (CD71) monoclonal antibodies. Decline of erythroid cells was essentially confined to pro-erythroblast and erythroblast-A, along with a concurrent increase in the splenic erythroid

  2. Erythrocyte 22Na+ influx in hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalev, O.; Eaton, J.W.; Ben-Ishay, D.

    1984-01-01

    We assessed 22Na+ uptake by erythrocytes (RBC) from 38 individuals with essential hypertension and 37 healthy controls. All subjects were male, white, non-obese and with normal renal function, obviating sex, race, hormonal, ponderal and renal factors known to influence RBC Na+ handling. The mean +/- sem 22Na+ uptake of the patients was 284 +/- 16 mumole/liter RBC/hour while that of normal controls was 249 +/- 11 mumole/liter RBC/hour; although the difference reached borderline significance, individual values showed considerable overlap. Consequently, in our population, RBC 22Na+ uptake is not a reliable marker for essential hypertension. We believe that previous studies should be reassessed with regard to patients' characteristics and future studies employ rigorous criteria in selection of subjects

  3. Fluorescence energy transfer on erythrocyte membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, H.M.; Hof, M.; Lawaczeck, R.

    1995-08-01

    Stationary and time-dependent fluorescence have been measured for a donor/acceptor (DA) pair bound to membrane proteins of bovine erythrocyte ghosts. The donor N-(p-(2-benzoxazolyl)phenyl)-maleimid (BMI) and the acceptor fluram bind to SH- and NH 2 -residues, respectively. The fluorescence spectra and the time-dependent emission are consistent with a radiationless fluorescence energy transfer (RET). The density of RET-effective acceptor binding sites c=0.072 nm -2 was calculated on the basis of the two-dimensional Foerster-kinetic. Band3 protein is the only membrane spanning protein with accessible SH-groups, and therefore only effective binding sites on the band3 protein are counted for the RET measurements performed. (author). 23 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  4. The erythrocyte sedimentation rates: some model experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerny, L C; Cerny, E L; Granley, C R; Compolo, F; Vogels, M

    1988-01-01

    In order to obtain a better understanding of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), several models are presented. The first directs attention to the importance of geometrical models to represent the structure of mixtures. Here it is our intention to understand the effect of the structure on the packing of red blood cells. In this part of the study, "Cheerios" (trademark General Mills) are used as a macroscopic model. It is interesting that a random sampling of "Cheerios" has the same volume distribution curve that is found for erythrocytes with a Coulter Sizing Apparatus. In order to examine the effect of rouleaux formation, the "Cheerios" are stacked one on top of another and then glued. Rouleaux of 2,3,4,5, 7 and 10 discs were used. In order to examine a more realistic biological model, the experiments of Dintenfass were used. These investigations were performed in a split-capillary photo viscometer using whole blood from patients with a variety of diseases. The novel part of this research is the fact that the work was performed at 1g and at near zero gravity in the space shuttle "Discovery." The size of the aggregates and/or rouleaux clearly showed a dependence upon the gravity of the experiment. The purpose of this model was to examine the condition of self-similarity and fractal behavior. Calculations are reported which clearly indicate that there is general agreement in the magnitude of the fractal dimension from the "Cheerios" model, the "Discovery" experiment with those determined with the automatic sedimentimeter. The final aspect of this work examines the surface texture of the sedimention tube. A series of tubes were designed with "roughened" interiors. A comparison of the sedimentation rates clearly indicates a more rapid settling in "roughened" tubes than in ones with a smooth interior surface.

  5. Protective role of vitamins C and E in diclorvos-induced oxidative stress in human erythrocytes in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sema Eroglu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Organophosphate (OP pesticides such as dichlorvos (DDVP intoxication has been shown to produce oxidative stress due to the generation of free radicals, which alter the antioxidant defense system in erythrocytes. In this study, the effects of DDVP (1, 10, 100 µM or DDVP + vitamin C (VC; 10 µM or vitamin E (VE; 30 µM, on the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA, superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT and glutathione peroxidase (GPx activities in human erythrocytes were examined in vitro. There were no statistical differences between all groups for 1 µM concentration of DDVP. Treatment with DDVP alone produced an increase in the level of MDA and decreased activities of antioxidant enzymes (P < 0.05. Groups treated with vitamins and DDVP showed protective effects of vitamins against DDVP-induced changes in antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation (LPO (10 µM. At 100 µM concentration of DDVP vitamins had no effect on DDVP-induced toxicity. The results show that administration of DDVP resulted in the induction of erythrocyte LPO and alterations in antioxidant enzyme activities, suggesting that reactive oxygen species (ROS may be involved in the toxic effects of DDVP. Also the data show that the plasma level of VC and VE may ameliorate OP-induced oxidative stress by decreasing LPO in erythrocytes at certain doses of OP pesicides.

  6. In Vitro Protective Effect of Phikud Navakot Extraction on Erythrocyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanchana Kengkoom

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Phikud Navakot (PN, Thai herbal remedy in National List of Essential Medicines, has been claimed to reduce many cardiovascular symptoms especially dizziness and fainting. Apart from blood supply, erythrocyte morphology, in both shape and size, is one of the main consideration factors in cardiovascular diseases and may be affected by vascular oxidative stress. However, little is known about antioxidative property of PN on erythrocyte to preserve red blood cell integrity. In this study, 1,000 μM hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress was conducted on sheep erythrocyte. Three doses of PN (1, 0.5, and 0.25 mg/mL and 10 μM of ascorbic acid were compared. The released hemoglobin absorbance was measured to demonstrate hemolysis. Electron microscopic and immunohistochemical studies were also performed to characterize dysmorphic erythrocyte and osmotic ability in relation to aquaporin- (AQP- 1 expression, respectively. The results revealed that all doses of PN and ascorbic acid decreased the severity of dysmorphic erythrocyte, particularly echinocyte, acanthocyte, knizocyte, codocyte, clumping, and other malformations. However, the most effective was 0.5 mg/mL PN dosage. In addition, hydrostatic pressure may be increased in dysmorphic erythrocyte in association with AQP-1 upregulation. Our results demonstrated that PN composes antioxidative effect to maintain the integrity and osmotic ability on sheep erythrocyte.

  7. Evidence-Based Advances in Avian Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summa, Noémie M; Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon

    2017-09-01

    This article presents relevant advances in avian medicine and surgery over the past 5 years. New information has been published to improve clinical diagnosis in avian diseases. This article also describes new pharmacokinetic studies. Advances in the understanding and treatment of common avian disorders are presented in this article, as well. Although important progress has been made over the past years, there is still much research that needs to be done regarding the etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of avian diseases and evidence-based information is still sparse in the literature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Avian Influenza infection in Human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan. M

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Outbreaks caused by the H5N1 strain are presently of the greatest concern for human health. In assessing risks to human health, it is important to know exactly which avian virus strains are causing the outbreaks in birds.All available evidence points to an increased risk of transmission to humans when outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza are widespread in poultry. There is mounting evidence that this strain has a unique capacity to jump the species barrier and cause severe disease, with high mortality, in humans. There is no evidence, to date that efficient human to human transmission of H5N1 strain has occurred and very often. Efficient transmission among humans is a key property of pandemic strains and a property that the avian H5N1 and H9N2 viruses apparently lacked. The biological and molecular basis for effective aerosol transmission among humans is not known. The virus can improve its transmissibility among humans via two principal mechanisms. The first is a “reassortment” event, in which genetic material is exchanged between human and avian viruses during co-infection of a human or pig.Reassortment could result in a fully transmissible pandemic virus, announced by a sudden surge of cases with explosive spread. The second mechanism is a more gradual process of adaptive mutation, whereby the capability of the virus to bind to human cells increases during subsequent infections of humans. Adaptive mutation, expressed initially as small clusters of human cases with some evidence of human-to-human transmission, would probably give the world some time to take defensive action, if detected sufficiently early. As the number of human infections grows, the risk increases that a new virus subtype could emerge, triggering an influenza pandemic. Humans as well as swine must now be considered a potential mixing vessel for the generation of such a virus. This link between widespread infection in poultry and increased risk of human

  9. Stimulating Effect of Terfenadine on Erythrocyte Cell Membrane Scrambling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Signoretto

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The antihistaminic drug Terfenadine may trigger apoptosis of tumor cells, an effect unrelated to its effect on histamine receptors. Similar to apoptosis of nucleated cells, erythrocytes may enter eryptosis, the suicidal death of erythrocytes characterized by cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Signaling triggering eryptosis include increase of cytosolic Ca2+ activity ([Ca2+]i, oxidative stress, and ceramide. The present study explored, whether Terfenadine is capable to trigger eryptosis. Methods: Flow cytometry was employed to estimate phosphatidylserine abundance at the erythrocyte surface from annexin-V-binding, cell volume from forward scatter, [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence, abundance of reactive oxygen species (ROS from 2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein (DCF diacetate dependent fluorescence, and ceramide abundance at the human erythrocyte surface utilizing specific antibodies. Hemolysis was quantified from haemoglobin concentration in the supernatant. Results: A 48 hours exposure of human erythrocytes to Terfenadine (≥ 5 µM significantly increased the percentage of annexin-V-binding cells and triggered hemolysis without significantly modifying the average forward scatter. Terfenadine (7.5 µM significantly increased Fluo3-fluorescence, but did not significantly modify DCF fluorescence or ceramide abundance. The effect of Terfenadine on annexin-V-binding was significantly blunted but not abolished by removal of extracellular Ca2+. Exposure of human erythrocytes to Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin (1 µM, 15 min triggered annexin-V-binding, an effect augmented by Terfenadine pretreatment (10 µM, 48 hours. Conclusions: Terfenadine triggers phospholipid scrambling of the human erythrocyte cell membrane, an effect in part due to entry of extracellular Ca2+ and in part due to sensitizing human erythrocyte cell membrane scrambling to Ca2+.

  10. The Uremic Toxin Acrolein Promotes Suicidal Erythrocyte Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Siyabeldin E. Ahmed

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anemia is a major complication of end stage renal disease. The anemia is mainly the result of impaired formation of erythrocytes due to lack of erythropoietin and iron deficiency. Compelling evidence, however, points to the contribution of accelerated erythrocyte death, which decreases the life span of circulating erythrocytes. Erythrocytes may enter suicidal death or eryptosis, which is characterized by cell shrinkage and by cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine-exposure at the erythrocyte surface. Triggers of eryptosis include increase of cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i. Erythrocytes could be sensitized to cytosolic Ca2+ by ceramide. In end stage renal disease, eryptosis may possibly be stimulated by uremic toxins. The present study explored, whether the uremic toxin acrolein could trigger eryptosis. Methods: Cell volume was estimated from forward scatter, phosphatidylserine-exposure from annexin-V-binding, hemolysis from hemoglobin release, [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence, and ceramide from fluorescent antibodies. Results: A 48 h exposure to acrolein (30 - 50 µM did not significantly modify [Ca2+]i but significantly decreased forward scatter and increased annexin-V-binding. Acrolein further triggered slight, but significant hemolysis and increased ceramide formation in erythrocytes. Acrolein (50 µM induced annexin-V-binding was significantly blunted in the nominal absence of extracellular Ca2+. Acrolein augmented the annexin-V-binding following treatment with Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin (1 µM. Conclusion: Acrolein stimulates suicidal erythrocyte death or eryptosis, an effect at least in part due to stimulation of ceramide formation with subsequent sensitisation of the erythrocytes to cytosolic Ca2+.

  11. Using EGEE against avian flu

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    During April 2006 avian flu was spreading across the world with the potential of turning into a pandemic, a drug to treat the deadly H5N1 strain was needed. Such a task required the huge processing power provided by EGEE, which analysed 300 000 possible drug components for their suitability. This map shows the network of computer centres and their activity during this time.

  12. Gender determination of avian embryo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daum, Keith A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Atkinson, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for gender determination of avian embryos. During the embryo incubation process, the outer hard shells of eggs are drilled and samples of allantoic fluid are removed. The allantoic fluids are directly introduced into an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) for analysis. The resulting spectra contain the relevant marker peaks in the positive or negative mode which correlate with unique mobilities which are sex-specific. This way, the gender of the embryo can be determined.

  13. Erythrocyte survival studies in a rat myelogenous leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derelanko, M.J.; Meagher, R.C.; Lobue, J.; Khouri, J.A.; Gordon, A.S.

    1982-01-01

    To determine the extent intrinsic erythrocyte defects and/or extrinsic factors were involved in anemia of rats bearing Shay chloroleukemia (SCL), survival of 3 H-DFP labeled erythrocytes was studied in leukemic and nonleukemic hosts. Red blood cells labeled before induction of leukemia, were rapidly lost from the peripheral circulation of SCL rats in terminal stages of disease. However, labeled erythrocytes from terminal SCL animals displayed normal lifespans when transfused into nonleukemic controls. Thus the anemia of this leukemia probably resulted from extrinsic factors associated with the leukemic process. Hemorrhage appeared to be primarily responsible for the anemia of this disease

  14. Mature Erythrocytes of Iguana iguana (Squamata, Iguanidae Possess Functional Mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Di Giacomo

    Full Text Available Electron microscopy analyses of Iguana iguana blood preparations revealed the presence of mitochondria within erythrocytes with well-structured cristae. Fluorescence microscopy analyses upon incubation with phalloidin-FITC, Hoechst 33342 and mitochondrial transmembrane potential (Δψm-sensitive probe MitoTracker Red indicated that mitochondria i widely occur in erythrocytes, ii are polarized, and iii seem to be preferentially confined at a "perinuclear" region, as confirmed by electron microscopy. The analysis of NADH-dependent oxygen consumption showed that red blood cells retain the capability to consume oxygen, thereby providing compelling evidence that mitochondria of Iguana erythrocytes are functional and capable to perform oxidative phosphorylation.

  15. Mature Erythrocytes of Iguana iguana (Squamata, Iguanidae) Possess Functional Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giacomo, Giuseppina; Campello, Silvia; Corrado, Mauro; Di Giambattista, Livia; Cirotti, Claudia; Filomeni, Giuseppe; Gentile, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Electron microscopy analyses of Iguana iguana blood preparations revealed the presence of mitochondria within erythrocytes with well-structured cristae. Fluorescence microscopy analyses upon incubation with phalloidin-FITC, Hoechst 33342 and mitochondrial transmembrane potential (Δψm)-sensitive probe MitoTracker Red indicated that mitochondria i) widely occur in erythrocytes, ii) are polarized, and iii) seem to be preferentially confined at a "perinuclear" region, as confirmed by electron microscopy. The analysis of NADH-dependent oxygen consumption showed that red blood cells retain the capability to consume oxygen, thereby providing compelling evidence that mitochondria of Iguana erythrocytes are functional and capable to perform oxidative phosphorylation.

  16. An HPLC-based assay of adenylosuccinate lyase in erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierau, Jörgen; Pooters, Ivo N A; Visser, Dennis; Bakker, Jaap A

    2011-11-01

    ADSL deficiency is a disorder of purine metabolism with a broad clinical spectrum. A rapid and simple HPLC-based assay to measure ADSL activity in erythrocytes was developed. The suitability of DBSs was assessed. ADSL activity was measured in erythrocyte lysates and DBS using succinyl-AMP as the substrate. Detection and quantification were performed using isocratic ion-pairing reversed-phase HPLC with UV-detection. Reference values in erythrocyte lysates were established. The intra- and interassay variations were 2% and 8%, respectively. ADSL deficiency was easily recognized. ADSL activity in DBS was highly unstable, disqualifying DBS for diagnostic procedures.

  17. Decreased NKCC1 activity in erythrocytes from African Americans with hypertension and dyslipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, Sergei N; Gossard, Francis; Pausova, Zdenka; Akimova, Olga A; Tremblay, Johanne; Grim, Clarence E; Kotchen, Jane M; Kotchen, Theodore A; Gaudet, Daniel; Cowley, Allen W; Hamet, Pavel

    2010-03-01

    Recent studies demonstrated a key role of ubiquitous isoform of Na+,K+,2Cl- co-transport (NKCC1) in regulation of myogenic tone and peripheral resistance. We examined the impact of race, gender, and plasma lipid on NKCC1 activity in French Canadians and African Americans with hypertension and dyslipidemia. NKCC and passive erythrocyte membrane permeability to K+, measured as ouabain-resistant, bumetanide-sensitive, and (ouabain+bumetanide)-resistant 86Rb influx, respectively, were compared in 111 French-Canadian men, 107 French-Canadian women, 26 African-American men, and 45 African-American women with essential hypertension and dyslipidemia. The African-American men and women were 7 years younger and presented twofold decreased plasma triglycerides compared to their French-Canadian counterparts (P women than in the French Canadians (P French-Canadian men only. NKCC1 activity is lower in erythrocytes of African Americans with essential hypertension and dyslipidemia than in Caucasian counterparts. We suggest that decreased NKCC1 may contribute to the feature of the pathogenesis of salt-sensitive hypertension seen in African Americans.

  18. Erythrocyte Features for Malaria Parasite Detection in Microscopic Images of Thin Blood Smear: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salam Shuleenda Devi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Microscopic image analysis of blood smear plays a very important role in characterization of erythrocytes in screening of malaria parasites. The characteristics feature of erythrocyte changes due to malaria parasite infection. The microscopic features of the erythrocyte include morphology, intensity and texture. In this paper, the different features used to differentiate the non- infected and malaria infected erythrocyte have been reviewed.

  19. Cases of mortality in little penguins (Eudyptula minor) in New Zealand associated with avian malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sijbranda, D C; Hunter, S; Howe, L; Lenting, B; Argilla, L; Gartrell, B D

    2017-11-01

    CASE HISTORY A little penguin (Eudyptula minor) of wild origin, in captivity at Wellington Zoo, became inappetent and lethargic in March 2013. Despite supportive care in the zoo's wildlife hospital, the bird died within 24 hours. CLINICAL FINDINGS Weight loss, dehydration, pale mucous membranes, weakness, increased respiratory effort and biliverdinuria were apparent on physical examination. Microscopic evaluation of blood smears revealed intra-erythrocytic stages of Plasmodium spp. and a regenerative reticulocytosis in the absence of anaemia. PATHOLOGICAL FINDINGS Post-mortem findings included reduced body condition, dehydration, pulmonary congestion and oedema, hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, hydropericardium and subcutaneous oedema. Histopathological findings included protozoal organisms in sections of lung, liver and spleen. A marked, diffuse, sub-acute interstitial histiocytic pneumonia was present. Accumulation of haemosiderin was noted in the Kupffer cells of the liver and in histiocytic-type cells in the spleen. MOLECULAR TESTING DNA was extracted from frozen portions of the liver. Nested PCR results and DNA sequencing confirmed infection of the deceased little penguin with Plasmodium (Huffia) elongatum lineage GRW06. DIAGNOSIS Avian malaria due to Plasmodium (Huffia) elongatum GRW06 RETROSPECTIVE INVESTIGATION A retrospective analysis of 294 little penguin cases in the Massey University post-mortem database revealed three other potential avian malaria cases. Analysis of archived tissues using a nested PCR for Plasmodium spp. followed by DNA sequencing revealed that a little penguin which died at Auckland Zoo was infected with P. elongatum GRW06 and two wild little penguins found dead on New Zealand beaches were infected with P. relictum SGS1 and Plasmodium. sp. lineage LINN1. Therefore, the overall frequency of deaths in little penguins associated with avian malaria was 4/295 (1.36%). CLINICAL RELEVANCE Our results suggest that avian malaria is associated with

  20. Avian endocrine responses to environmental pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rattner, B.A.; Eroschenko, V.P.; Fox, G.A.; Fry, D.M.; Gorsline, J.

    1984-12-01

    Many environmental contaminants are hazardous to populations of wild birds. Chlorinated hydrocarbon pesticides and industrial pollutants are thought to be responsible for population declines of several species of predatory birds through eggshell thinning. Studies have demonstrated that these contaminants have estrogenic potency and may affect the functioning of the gonadal and thyroidal endocrine subsystems. Petroleum crude oil exerts toxicity externally, by oiling of plumage, and internally, by way of ingestion of oil while feeding or preening. Extensive ultrastructural damage to the inner zone of the adrenal, diminished adrenal responsiveness to adrenocorticotrophic hormone, and reduced corticosterone secretion rate suggest that low levels of plasma corticosterone reflect a direct effect of petroleum on the adrenal gland. Suppressive effects of oil on the ovary and decreases in circulating prolactin have been associated with impaired reproductive function. Large-scale field studies of free-living seabirds have confirmed some of the inhibitory effects of oil on reproduction that have been observed in laboratory studies. Organophosphorus insecticides, representing the most widely used class of pesticides in North America, have been shown to impair reproductive function, possibly by altering secretion of luteinizing hormone and progesterone. Relevant areas of future research on the effects of contaminants on avian endocrine function are discussed.

  1. Structurafand metabolic peculiarities of erythrocytes in patients with systemic vasculitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M M Faslyev

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Obyective. To assess of functional , structural and metabolic changes of RBC in patients with systemic vasculitis. To estimate influence of RBC abnormalities on blood viscosity and hemostasis. Materials and methods. Blood samples of 75 pis with Henoch-Schonlein Purpura (HSP and 15 pts with microscopic polyarteritis (MPA were tested. The levels of ATP transporting enzymes and lipid peroxide oxidation (LPO in erythrocyte's membranes were assessed. The degree of erythrocyte membrane stability was estimated by test of osmotic and acidic membrane resistance. Results. Suppression of Na +, K +, Ca + activated ATP transporting enzyme in pts with MPA and renal form of HSP was found. This group of patients was also characterized by LPO activation, decreased osmotic and their acidic resistance of erythrocytes and their marked hyperaggregation. Conclusion. The assessment of structural and functional changes of erythrocytes helps to estimate abnormalities of blood viscosity and wo adjust management and predict prognosis in pts with systemic vasculitis.

  2. Dynamic fatigue measurement of human erythrocytes using dielectrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Yuhao; Liu, Jia; Du, E

    2017-07-15

    Erythrocytes must undergo severe deformation to pass through narrow capillaries and submicronic splenic slits for several hundred thousand times in their normal lifespan. Studies of erythrocyte biomechanics have been mainly focused on cell deformability and rheology measured from a single application of stress and mostly under a static or quasi-static state using classical biomechanical techniques, such as optical tweezers and micropipette aspiration. Dynamic behavior of erythrocytes in response to cyclic stresses that contributes to the membrane failure in blood circulation is not fully understood. This paper presents a new experimental method for dynamic fatigue analysis of erythrocytes, using amplitude modulated electrokinetic force field in a microfluidic platform. We demonstrate the capability of this new technique using a low cycle fatigue analysis of normal human erythrocytes and ATP-depleted erythrocytes. Cyclic tensile stresses are generated to induce repeated uniaxial stretching and extensional recovery of single erythrocytes. Results of morphological and biomechanical parameters of individually tracked erythrocytes show strong correlations with the number of the loading cycles. Under a same strength of electric field, after 180 stress cycles, for normal erythrocytes, maximum stretch ratio decreases from 3.80 to 2.86, characteristic time of cellular extensional recovery increases from 0.16s to 0.37s, membrane shear viscosity increases from 1.0(µN/m)s to 1.6(µN/m)s. Membrane deformation in a small number of erythrocytes becomes irreversible after large deformation for about 200 cyclic loads. ATP-depleted cells show similar trends in decreased deformation and increased characteristic time with the loading cycles. These results show proof of concept of the new microfluidics technique for dynamic fatigue analysis of human erythrocytes. Red blood cells (RBCs) experience a tremendous number of deformation in blood circulation before losing their mechanical

  3. Comparison of haemolytic activity of tentacle-only extract from jellyfish Cyanea capillata in diluted whole blood and erythrocyte suspension: diluted whole blood is a valid test system for haemolysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qianqian; Xiao, Liang; He, Qian; Liu, Sihua; Zhang, Jing; Li, Yue; Zhang, Zhi; Nie, Fei; Guo, Yufeng; Zhang, Liming

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we utilized two different test systems to compare the haemolysis of tentacle-only extract (TOE) devoid of nematocysts from jellyfish Cyanea capillata, the 1% whole blood and 0.45% erythrocyte suspension approximately with the same erythrocyte concentration from the blood samples of sheep, rabbit, mouse, rat and human, respectively. Without exception, the haemolytic activity of TOE was dose-dependent in both test systems from all the five kinds of blood samples, while it was generally stronger in erythrocyte suspension than that in diluted whole blood at the relatively high concentration of TOE. When various aliquots of plasma were added into the erythrocyte suspension test system, the haemolytic activity of TOE was declined with the plasma quantity increasing, and dropped to about 20% at the presence of two aliquots of plasma. If serum albumin of 0.5 mg/ml, approximately the same albumin content in 1% whole blood, was added into the erythrocyte suspension test system instead, the haemolysis of TOE was similarly inhibited. The effects of GSH, ascorbic acid and protease inhibitor on the haemolytic activity of TOE were detected in the erythrocyte suspension and diluted whole blood simultaneously, and the test results were coincident between the two systems. These results suggested that the inconsistency of TOE haemolysis between the erythrocyte suspension and diluted whole blood is a universal occurrence in the mammals, and blood plasma plays a dose-dependent protective role against haemolysis which may be due to serum albumin. Diluted whole blood is a valid and convenient test system for haemolysis study in vitro. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Seasonality, distribution and taxonomic status of avian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Description of a new species is based upon morphology of gametocyte development in the peripheral blood of the avian host. This does not distinguish between morphologically identical gametocytes from different avian host families, nor is species or family level a valid taxonomic character. Thus, Haemoproteus and ...

  5. Mechanisms of avian songs and calls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ole Næsbye

    2008-01-01

    The avian vocal organ, the syrinx, is a specialized structure located rather inaccessibly in an air sac close to the heart where the trachea bifurcates into the two primary bronchi. The syrinx of different avian taxa varies so much in position and morphology that it has been used for taxonomy. It...

  6. Avian Influenza A Virus Infections in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in People Spread of Bird Flu Viruses Between Animals and People Examples of Human Infections with Avian Influenza A ... Influenza A (H5N1) H5N1 in Birds and Other Animals H5N1 in People Public Health Threat of Highly Pathogenic Asian Avian ...

  7. Avian Influenza Policy Analysis | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Governments in Southeast Asia have adopted a range of policies aimed at controlling the disease in animals, preventing its spread to humans and strengthening national preparedness for an avian influenza pandemic. The Asia Partnership for Avian Influenza Research (APAIR) brings together national research agencies ...

  8. MANAGING AVIAN FLU, CARCASS MANAGEMENT & BIOSOLIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The avian influenza virus is discussed with emphasis on the impact to poultry and possible movement of the highly pathogenic H5N 1 virus to humans. A review is made of the worldwide effects to date of the avian influenza viruses; methods for the viruses to enter recreational wate...

  9. Cryo scanning electron microscopy of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempel, Casper

    2017-01-01

    on the erythrocyte surface, called knobs. Current methods for studying these knobs include atomic force microscopy and electron microscopy. Standard electron microscopy methods rely on chemical fixation and dehydration modifying cell size. Here, a novel method is presented using rapid freezing and scanning electron...... microscopy under cryogenic conditions allowing for high resolution and magnification of erythrocytes. This novel technique can be used for precise estimates of knob density and for studies on cytoadhesion....

  10. Insulin causes insulin-receptor internalization in human erythrocyte ghosts.

    OpenAIRE

    Kelleher, R S; Murray, E F; Peterson, S W

    1987-01-01

    The effect of incubation with insulin on insulin-receptor internalization by erythrocyte ghosts was investigated. The number of surface insulin receptors decreased by 30-40% after incubation of ghosts with insulin. Total insulin-receptor binding to solubilized ghosts was the same in insulin-incubated and control ghosts, whereas insulin binding to an internal vesicular fraction was substantially increased in insulin-incubated ghosts. Our findings suggest that erythrocyte-ghost insulin receptor...

  11. Insulin binding to erythrocytes after acute 16-methyleneprednisolone ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwenger, A; Holle, W; Zick, R; Trautschold, I

    1982-10-01

    The binding of [125I]insulin to erythrocytes, glucose and insulin were determined before and 1, 7 and 35 days after ingestion of 2 X 60-methyleneprednisolone. None of two groups of volunteers (7 males, 4 females showed clear alterations of the insulin binding parameters (Ka and R0), or of the fasting cortisol, glucose and insulin concentrations. These results exclude the possibility that the diabetogenic effect of glucocorticoides is accompanied by an alteration of the insulin receptor characteristics of erythrocytes.

  12. Soft X-ray microscopy analysis of cell volume and hemoglobin content in erythrocytes infected with asexual and sexual stages of Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanssen, Eric; Knoechel, Christian; Dearnley, Megan; Dixon, Matthew W A; Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn; Tilley, Leann

    2012-02-01

    Plasmodium falciparum, the most virulent agent of human malaria, undergoes both asexual cycling and sexual differentiation inside erythrocytes. As the intraerythrocytic parasite develops it increases in size and alters the permeability of the host cell plasma membrane. An intriguing question is: how is the integrity of the host erythrocyte maintained during the intraerythrocytic cycle? We have used water window cryo X-ray tomography to determine cell morphology and hemoglobin content at different stages of asexual and sexual differentiation. The cryo stabilization preserves native structure permitting accurate analyses of parasite and host cell volumes. Absorption of soft X-rays by protein adheres to Beer-Lambert's law permitting quantitation of the concentration of hemoglobin in the host cell compartment. During asexual development the volume of the parasite reaches about 50% of the uninfected erythrocyte volume but the infected erythrocyte volume remains relatively constant. The total hemoglobin content gradually decreases during the 48h cycle but its concentration remains constant until early trophozoite stage, decreases by 25%, then remains constant again until just prior to rupture. During early sexual development the gametocyte has a similar morphology to a trophozoite but then undergoes a dramatic shape change. Our cryo X-ray tomography analysis reveals that about 70% of the host cell hemoglobin is taken up and digested during gametocyte development and the parasite eventually occupies about 50% of the uninfected erythrocyte volume. The total volume of the infected erythrocyte remains constant, apart from some reversible shrinkage at stage IV, while the concentration of hemoglobin decreases to about 70% of that in an uninfected erythrocyte. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Stimulation of Suicidal Erythrocyte Death by the Antimalarial Drug Mefloquine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissinger, Rosi; Barking, Susanne; Alzoubi, Kousi; Liu, Guilai; Liu, Guoxing; Lang, Florian

    2015-01-01

    The antimalarial drug mefloquine has previously been shown to stimulate apoptosis of nucleated cells. Similar to apoptosis, erythrocytes may enter suicidal death or eryptosis, which is characterized by cell shrinkage and phospholipid scrambling of the erythrocyte cell membrane with phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Stimulators of eryptosis include oxidative stress, increase of cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i), and ceramide. Phosphatidylserine abundance at the cell surface was estimated from annexin V binding, cell volume from forward scatter, reactive oxidant species (ROS) from 2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA) fluorescence, [Ca2+]i from Fluo3- fluorescence, and ceramide abundance from specific antibody binding. A 48 h treatment of human erythrocytes with mefloquine significantly increased the percentage of annexin-V-binding cells (≥5 μg/ml), significantly decreased forward scatter (≥5 μg/ml), significantly increased ROS abundance (5 μg/ml), significantly increased [Ca2+]i (7.5 μg/ml) and significantly increased ceramide abundance (10 μg/ml). The up-regulation of annexin- V-binding following mefloquine treatment was significantly blunted but not abolished by removal of extracellular Ca2+. Even in the absence of extracellular Ca2+, mefloquine significantly increased annexin-V-binding. Mefloquine treatment leads to erythrocyte shrinkage and erythrocyte membrane scrambling, effects at least partially due to induction of oxidative stress, increase of [Ca2+]i and up-regulation of ceramide abundance. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Erythrocyte zinc levels in children with bronchial asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arik Yilmaz, E; Ozmen, S; Bostanci, I; Misirlioglu, E Dibek; Ertan, U

    2011-12-01

    Zinc deficiency may be suspected to play a role in the pathogenesis, control, and severity of asthma because of its antioxidant, antiapoptotic, and anti-inflammatory effects. We aimed to investigate whether there was any relationship between erythrocyte zinc levels and childhood asthma. The erythrocyte zinc levels of 67 asthmatic and 45 healthy children were analyzed in this case-control study. The mean concentrations of erythrocyte zinc were 1215.8 ± 145.1 µg/dl in asthma patients and 1206.9 ± 119.5 µg/dl in controls with no significant difference (P = 0.472). The erythrocyte zinc level was below 1,000 µg/dl in 6 asthmatic patients (8.9%) and 2 control group patients (4.4%). There was no relationship between erythrocyte zinc levels and duration of follow-up, severity, and control of the asthma (P > 0.05). On the other hand, patients hospitalized for an asthma attack had significantly lower erythrocyte zinc levels compared with nonhospitalized patients and the control group (P = 0.000 and P = 0.004 respectively). This study's findings indicate that asthmatic children are not a risk group for zinc deficiency. We emphasize that checking zinc levels in children who are hospitalized for an asthma attack may be useful. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Cyclin A2 regulates erythrocyte morphology and numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayapal, Senthil Raja; Ang, Heather Yin-Kuan; Wang, Chelsia Qiuxia; Bisteau, Xavier; Caldez, Matias J; Xuan, Gan Xiao; Yu, Weimiao; Tergaonkar, Vinay; Osato, Motomi; Lim, Bing; Kaldis, Philipp

    2016-11-16

    Cyclin A2 is an essential gene for development and in haematopoietic stem cells and therefore its functions in definitive erythropoiesis have not been investigated. We have ablated cyclin A2 in committed erythroid progenitors in vivo using erythropoietin receptor promoter-driven Cre, which revealed its critical role in regulating erythrocyte morphology and numbers. Erythroid-specific cyclin A2 knockout mice are viable but displayed increased mean erythrocyte volume and reduced erythrocyte counts, as well as increased frequency of erythrocytes containing Howell-Jolly bodies. Erythroblasts lacking cyclin A2 displayed defective enucleation, resulting in reduced production of enucleated erythrocytes and increased frequencies of erythrocytes containing nuclear remnants. Deletion of the Cdk inhibitor p27 Kip1 but not Cdk2, ameliorated the erythroid defects resulting from deficiency of cyclin A2, confirming the critical role of cyclin A2/Cdk activity in erythroid development. Loss of cyclin A2 in bone marrow cells in semisolid culture prevented the formation of BFU-E but not CFU-E colonies, uncovering its essential role in BFU-E function. Our data unveils the critical functions of cyclin A2 in regulating mammalian erythropoiesis.

  16. Diabetic Erythrocytes Test by Correlation Coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korol, A.M; Foresto, P; Darrigo, M; Rosso, O.A

    2008-01-01

    Even when a healthy individual is studied, his/her erythrocytes in capillaries continually change their shape in a synchronized erratic fashion. In this work, the problem of characterizing the cell behavior is studied from the perspective of bounded correlated random walk, based on the assumption that diffractometric data involves both deterministic and stochastic components. The photometric readings are obtained by ektacytometry over several millions of shear elongated cells, using a home-made device called Erythrodeformeter. We have only a scalar signal and no governing equations; therefore the complete behavior has to be reconstructed in an artificial phase space. To analyze dynamics we used the technique of time delay coordinates suggested by Takens, May algorithm, and Fourier transform. The results suggest that on random-walk approach the samples from healthy controls exhibit significant differences from those from diabetic patients and these could allow us to claim that we have linked mathematical nonlinear tools with clinical aspects of diabetic erythrocytes’ rheological properties. PMID:19415139

  17. Kinetics of heat-damaged homologous erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitriou, P.A.; Depascouale, A.K.; Germenis, A.E.; Antipas, S.E.P.

    1990-01-01

    A new theoretical five-compartmental model (5CM) was developed for analysis of the clearance of heat-damaged erythroctes (HDE) labelled with chronium 51. Besides the HDE-spleen interaction, this new model also takes into account the interaction between extrasplenic reticuloendothelial (RES) sites and HDE, i.e. the hepatic clearance of fragment erythrocytes (FE). Accordingly, HDE clearance curves are analysed into three exponential components, the fastest of which describes the RES-FE interaction, whereas the others describe the splenic clearance of spherocytes. Therefore, an estimation of the effective liver blood flow for HDE (ELBF) was achieved, along with a series of parameters describing splenic function. The 5CM proved to be more efficient than a previously proposed three-compartmental model (3CM) in the mathematical description of HDE clearance. Comparison was made by applying both models to 37 experimental curves obtained from 20 patients with congenital hemolytic anemias. The values for the splenic function parameters calculated by 5CM analysis and the strong correlations observed among them offer evidence that this model provides an adequate approximation to the real conditions under which HDE clearance takes place. Furthermore, a detailed quantitative analysis of the pooling of spherocytes within the spleen was attempted in this work, and this phenomenon was found to compete with splenic irreversible spherocyte trapping. The ELBF proved to be closely correlated with the hemodynamic splenic parameters, following first-order kinetics, as do low-dose colloids. (orig.)

  18. Phosphorylation of erythrocyte membrane liberates calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauhan, V.P.S.; Brockerhoff, H.

    1986-01-01

    Phosphorylation of permeabilized erythrocyte ghost membranes with ATP results in an increase free calcium level as measured with the help of Ca 2+ electrode and 45 Ca. This effect could not be observed in the presence of p - chloromercuric benzoate, an inhibitor of kinases. The rise in the free calcium due to phosphorylation of the membrane was accompanied by a decrease in the level of phosphatidylinositol (PI) and an increase in phosphatidylinositolmonophosphate (PIP) and phosphatidylinositolbisphosphate (PIP 2 ). These results support the proposal that an inositol shuttle, PI ↔ PIP ↔ PIP 2 , operates to maintain the intracellular calcium concentration. The cation is believed to be sequestered in a cage formed by the head groups of two acidic phospholipid molecules, e.g., phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol, with the participation of both PO and fatty acid ester CO groups. When the inositol group of such a cage is phosphorylated, inter-headgroup hydrogen bonding between the lipids is broken. As a result the cage opens and calcium is released

  19. Effects of dietary fat on lipid composition of serum and erythrocytes of the swine and in vitro incorporation of fatty acids into erythrocyte membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroaki

    1974-01-01

    Changes in ftty acid patterns of lipids in serum and erythrocytes induced by dietary fats and in vitro incorporation of fatty acids into erythrocyte membranes were investigated with pigs. On feeding various diets, it was found that fatty acid composition of serum and erythrocytes could be modified and altered toward the fatty acid pattern of the diet. In vitro, the incorporation of labelled fatty acids into erythrocyte membranes was accelerated by the addition of cofactors such as lysolecithin, CoA and ATP. Dietary fats also had certain effects on the incorporation of fatty acids into erythrocyte membranes. Erythrocytes, collected from the blood of pigs fed corn oil, incorporated and also released more labelled linoleate than those of pigs fed hydrogenated soybean oil. Palmitic acid was more slowly incorporated into erythrocyte membranes than linoleic acid in the pigs fed both a commercial chow and scheduled meals, indicating selective esterification of fatty acids in the erythrocyte membranes. (author)

  20. P2X receptor-dependent erythrocyte damage by α-hemolysin from Escherichia coli triggers phagocytosis by THP-1 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagerberg, Steen Kåre; Skals, Marianne Gerberg; Leipziger, Jens Georg

    2013-01-01

    , which is known to be a keen trigger for phagocytosis. We hypothesize that exposure to HlyA elicits removal of the damaged erythrocytes by phagocytic cells. Cultured THP-1 cells as a model for erythrocytal phagocytosis was verified by a variety of methods, including live cell imaging. We consistently...... of these channels potentiate the HlyA-induced hemolysis. This means that Ca2+-dependent activation of KCa3.1 and TMEM16A protects the cells against early hemolysis. Simultaneous to the HlyA-induced shrinkage, the erythrocytes show increased exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) in the outer plasma membrane leaflet...... found the HlyA to very potently trigger phagocytosis of erythrocytes by THP-1 cells. The HlyA-induced phagocytosis was prevented by inhibition of KCa3.1, which is known to reduce PS-exposure in human erythrocytes subjected to both ionomycin and HlyA. Moreover, we show that P2X receptor inhibition, which...

  1. Differential effect of extracellular calcium on the Na(+)-K+ pump activity in intact polymorphonuclear leucocytes and erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, R H; Knudsen, T; Johansen, Torben

    1991-01-01

    The effect of extracellular calcium on the Na(+)-K+ pump activity in human polymorphonuclear leucocytes and erythrocytes was studied and compared with the activity in mixed peritoneal leucocytes from rats. While there was maximal decrease in the pump activity (25-30%) of leucocytes from both rat...... and human by calcium 0.6 mM, a concentration of 0.1 mM caused a substantial decrease indicating a high sensitivity for extracellular calcium. In contrast, calcium had no effect on the pump activity in erythrocytes. The effect of calcium on the pump activity in leucocytes may be due to regulation...... of the influx of sodium across the plasma membrane, since in human leucocytes calcium had no effect on the pump activity if the cells were loaded with sodium....

  2. Significance of higher drug concentration in erythrocytes of mice infected with Schistosoma japonicum and treated orally with mefloquine at single doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yi; Xue, Jian; Jiang, Bin; Zhang, Hao-Bing; Xiao, Shu-Hua

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present study is to understand the pharmacokinetic feature of mefloquine measured by erythrocytes and plasma in Schistosoma japonicum (S. j.)-infected mice and non-infected mice after oral administration of the drug at single doses. A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was used to measure the plasma and erythrocyte concentrations of mefloquine at varying intervals posttreatment. Our results demonstrated that in non-infected mice treated orally with mefloquine at an ineffective dose of 50 mg/kg or effective dose of 200 mg/kg for 2-72 h, the erythrocyte-to-plasma ratios of mefloquine were 5.8-11.2 or 2-14.2. On the other hand, in S. j.-infected mice treated with the same single doses of the drug, the erythrocyte and plasma drug concentration ratios were 3.1-4.6 or 2.9-8.5, manifesting that either in infected mice or in non-infected mice that received oral mefloquine resulted in higher concentration of mefloquine in erythrocytes than that in plasma. Unexpectedly, under oral administration of mefloquine at a higher single dose of 200 mg/kg, the pharmacokinetic parameter C max values for plasma from S. j.-infected and non-infected mice were 1.6 ± 0.3 and 2.0 ± 0.4 μg/mL, respectively, which were below the determined in vitro LC50 (50 % lethal concentration) value of 4.93 μg/mL. Therefore, the plasma concentration of mefloquine may display a little effect against schistosomes during the treatment. Although the values of T 1/2 and AUC0-∞ for erythrocytes were significantly longer and higher in infected mice than those of corresponding non-infect mice that received the same single mefloqine dose of 50 mg/kg, the C max value was only 2.6 ± 0.4 μg/mL lower than the determined in vitro LC50, which may explain why this low single dose is ineffective against schistosomes in vivo. After administration of higher mefloquine dose of 200 mg/kg, the C max value for erythrocytes in infected mice was 30 % (7.4 ± 0

  3. Morphological characteristics of urine erythrocytes in children with erythrocyturia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Minakova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Nephropathies with erythrocyturia make up about 1/3 of all diseases of the kidneys and the urinary system, and they have some difficulties in differential diagnostics. Quite often, erythrocyturia is the only symptom of these diseases. In connection with this, determination of its origin is an important task in forming the correct diagnosis. Erythrocyturia in most diseases of the lower urinary tract is not accompanied by proteinuria or the presence of cylinders in the urine. The presence of proteinuria (more than 0.3 g/l or 1 g protein in urine per day, along with the appearance of erythrocytic cylinder in the urine sediment, raises suspicion in favor of glomerular or tubular diseases. Glomerular erythrocytes may be detected by means of urea concentration factor (UCF in the urinary sediment as a preliminary test for the determination of the erythrocyturia site. Erythrocytes that pass through the glomerular membrane have a changed form (dysmorphic. Determination of acanthocytes in the urine (ring-shaped erythrocytes with one or several bulges in the form of bubbles of different sizes and types is a more precise criterion of glomerular nephropathy than the presence of dysmorphic erythrocytes. The purpose of the study was to determine the morphological characteristics of urine erythrocytes in children with erythrocyturia, to improve the quality of differential diagnosis. Materials and methods. Determination of the morphological characteristics of urinary erythrocytes using UCF in 73 patients aged 1 to 18 years, of which 45 (61.6 % are patients with hematuric form of glomerulonephritis, 23 (31.5 % — with hereditary nephritis, and 5 (6.8 % — with dysmetabolic nephropathy. Detection of 50 to 80 % of dysmorphic erythrocytes in the urine sediment and finding in urine of more than 5 % of acanthocytes is a highly sensitive and specific diagnostic criterion for glomerular hematuria. Results. In children with a clinical diagnosis

  4. Differential uptake of cholesterol and plant sterols by rat erythrocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child, P; Kuksis, A

    1982-10-01

    The in vitro uptake of radioactively labeled cholesterol and the plant sterol beta-sitosterol has been examined in rat erythrocytes. From mixed micellar solutions containing egg yolk phospholipid and sodium taurocholate, the erythrocytes showed a nonlinear uptake of the two sterols. The uptake leveled off after about 45 min with the attainment of a 1:1 total sterol-to-phospholipid ratio within the cell membrane, as determined on a mass basis. From solutions containing egg yolk phospholipid, or purified egg yolk phosphatidylcholine, a preference for cholesterol over the plant sterol was observed, increasing with time from a cholesterol/beta-sitosterol uptake ratio of unity (the media ratio) to a maximum of 2 after a 60-min incubation. Correction of the data for nonspecifically bound sterol increased the ratio to a maximum of 5 at the 30-min time point. The increase in the cholesterol/beta-sitosterol uptake ratio with time, following an initial nonspecific association, showed that penetration of the plasma membrane by the sterol was required for the selectivity to be expressed. The presence of lysophosphatidylcholine or bovine serum albumin did not exert any noticeable influence over the extent or selectivity of absorption. Replacement of the egg yolk phospholipid with synthetic dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine led to a loss of the sterol selectivity. No evidence was found to support a selective extraction of sterol from the erythrocyte membrane to account for the observed effects, nor was there any sign of a mass accumulation of phospholipid during the incubation. It is suggested that the media phospholipid influences the membrane permeability toward cholesterol and beta-sitosterol.

  5. Prevalence of erythrocyte alloimmunization in polytransfused patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto de Oliveira Cruz

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the incidence and the rate of red blood cellalloimmunization in polytransfused patients. Methods: A polytransfusedpatient was defined as having received at least 6 units of red cellconcentrates during a 3-month period. The records of all patients(n = 12,904 who had received red blood cell units were examinedretrospectively by searching the computer database at Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein in São Paulo, Brazil, over a 6-year period, between 2003 and 2009. Results: During this time, 77,049 red cell concentrate transfusions were performed in 12,904 patients. There were 3,044 polytransfused patients, 227 of whom (7.5% presented with irregular erythrocyte antibodies. The prevalence of alloantibody specificity was: Anti-E>anti-D>anti-K>anti-C>anti-Dia>anti-c>anti-Jka>anti-S in 227 polytransfused patients. We found combinations of alloantibodies in 79 patients (34.8%, and the most common specificities were against the Rh and/or Kell systems. These antibodies show clinical significance, as they can cause delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions and perinatal hemolytic disease. About 20% of the patients showed an IgG autoantibody isolated or combined with alloantibodies. Interestingly, a high incidenceof antibodies against low frequency antigens was detected in thisstudy, mainly anti-Dia. Conclusion: Polytransfused patients have a high probability of developing alloantibodies whether alone or combined with autoantibodies and antibodies against low frequency antigens. Transfusion of red blood cells with a phenotype-compatible with RH (C, E, c, K, Fya, and Jka antigens is recommended for polytransfused patients in order to prevent alloimmunization and hemolytic transfusion reactions.

  6. Adenosine signaling in normal and sickle erythrocytes and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yujin; Xia, Yang

    2012-08-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a debilitating hemolytic genetic disorder with high morbidity and mortality affecting millions of individuals worldwide. Although SCD was discovered more than a century ago, no effective mechanism-based prevention and treatment are available due to poorly understood molecular basis of sickling, the fundamental pathogenic process of the disease. SCD patients constantly face hypoxia. One of the best-known signaling molecules to be induced under hypoxic conditions is adenosine. Recent studies demonstrate that hypoxia-mediated elevated adenosine signaling plays an important role in normal erythrocyte physiology. In contrast, elevated adenosine signaling contributes to sickling and multiple life threatening complications including tissue damage, pulmonary dysfunction and priapism. Here, we summarize recent research on the role of adenosine signaling in normal and sickle erythrocytes, progression of the disease and therapeutic implications. In normal erythrocytes, both genetic and pharmacological studies demonstrate that adenosine can enhance 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate (2,3-BPG) production via A(2B) receptor (ADORA2B) activation, suggesting that elevated adenosine has an unrecognized role in normal erythrocytes to promote O(2) release and prevent acute ischemic tissue injury. However, in sickle erythrocytes, the beneficial role of excessive adenosine-mediated 2,3-BPG induction becomes detrimental by promoting deoxygenation, polymerization of sickle hemoglobin and subsequent sickling. Additionally, adenosine signaling via the A(2A) receptor (ADORA2A) on invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells inhibits iNKT cell activation and attenuates pulmonary dysfunction in SCD mice. Finally, elevated adenosine coupled with ADORA2BR activation is responsible for priapism, a dangerous complication seen in SCD. Overall, the research reviewed here reveals a differential role of elevated adenosine in normal erythrocytes, sickle erythrocytes, iNK cells and

  7. Insulin radioreceptor assay on murine splenic leukocytes and peripheral erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, F.; Kahn, R.

    1982-01-01

    Insulin radioreceptor assays were developed using splenic leukocytes and peripheral erythrocytes from individual mice. Splenic leukocytes were prepared using an NH 4 Cl buffer which did not alter insulin binding, but gave much higher yields than density gradient methods. Mouse erythrocytes were isolated from heparinized blood by three passages over a Boyum gradient, and a similar buffer was used to separate cells from free [ 125 I]iodoinsulin at the end of the binding incubation. Insulin binding to both splenic leukocytes and peripheral erythrocytes had typical pH, temperature, and time dependencies, and increased linearly with an increased number of cells. Optimal conditions for the splenic leukocytes (6 x 10 7 /ml) consisted of incubation with [ 125 I]iodoinsulin at 15 C for 2 h in Hepes buffer, pH 8.0. In cells from 20 individual mice, the specific [ 125 I]iodoinsulin binding was 2.6 +/- 0.1% (SEM), and nonspecific binding was 0.3 +/- 0.04% (10.6% of total binding). Erythrocytes (2.8 x 10 9 /ml) were incubated with [ 125 ]iodoinsulin at 15 C for 2 h in Hepes buffer, pH 8.2. In cells from 25 individual mice, the specific [ 125 I]iodoinsulin binding was 4.5 +/- 0.2%, and nonspecific binding was 0.7 +/- 0.03% (13.6% of total binding). In both splenic leukocytes and peripheral erythrocytes, analysis of equilibrium binding data produced curvilinear Scatchard plots with approximately 3500 binding sites/leukocyte and 20 binding sites/erythrocyte. These data demonstrate that adequate numbers of splenic leukocytes and peripheral erythrocytes can be obtained from individual mice to study insulin binding in a precise and reproducible manner

  8. Genetic applications in avian conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haig, Susan M.; Bronaugh, Whitcomb M.; Crowhurst, Rachel S.; D'Elia, Jesse; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Epps, Clinton W.; Knaus, Brian; Miller, Mark P.; Moses, Michael L.; Oyler-McCance, Sara; Robinson, W. Douglas; Sidlauskas, Brian

    2011-01-01

    A fundamental need in conserving species and their habitats is defining distinct entities that range from individuals to species to ecosystems and beyond (Table 1; Ryder 1986, Moritz 1994, Mayden and Wood 1995, Haig and Avise 1996, Hazevoet 1996, Palumbi and Cipriano 1998, Hebert et al. 2004, Mace 2004, Wheeler et al. 2004, Armstrong and Ball 2005, Baker 2008, Ellis et al. 2010, Winker and Haig 2010). Rapid progression in this interdisciplinary field continues at an exponential rate; thus, periodic updates on theory, techniques, and applications are important for informing practitioners and consumers of genetic information. Here, we outline conservation topics for which genetic information can be helpful, provide examples of where genetic techniques have been used best in avian conservation, and point to current technical bottlenecks that prevent better use of genomics to resolve conservation issues related to birds. We hope this review will provide geneticists and avian ecologists with a mutually beneficial dialogue on how this integrated field can solve current and future problems.

  9. Preparation of small volume, leuko and erythrocyte very poor platelet concentrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valbonesi, M; Angelini, G; Malfanti, L; Lercari, G; Fella, M; Calderisi, S; Anselmo, A; Balistreri, M

    1986-05-01

    Recently developed automated discontinuous flow centrifuge (DFC) separators can produce leuko- and erythrocyte-poor platelet concentrates (PC). According to general experience with these machines it is difficult to obtain more than 4 X 10(11) platelets, though a second program set up by Coffe et al. appears to produce PC containing approximately 5 X 10(11) platelets suspended in a plasma volume of 390 ml. At our center we employed a new Dideco cell separator equipped with the surge pump and a technique developed for the production of small volume, RBC and WBC-very poor PC. In 60 routine procedures we obtained the following results: mean processing time 87 +/- 11 minutes; final volume of PC 136 +/- 19 ml, with a mean platelet yield of 5.21 X 10(11) platelets. WBC contamination was 1.8 X 10(8) (93% lymphocytes) and RBC were 3.1 X 10(8). Plasma volume as well as WBC and RBC contamination were reduced by recirculating PC after the 6th pass. The demand for single donor platelet concentrates (PC) is increasing progressively. Recently developed automated cell separators can produce leukocyte (WBC) and erythrocyte (RBC) poor PC. With these machines it may be difficult to obtain PC containing at least 4 X 10(11) platelets and less than 1 X 10(9) leukocytes (1, 2, 3) since donor variables such as hematocrit, precounts, buffy coat formation and initial plasma light transmission are of paramount importance for the efficiency of the program. At our center a prototype discontinuous flow centrifuge (DFC) cell separator equipped with the surge pump was studied.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Avian Respiratory Coinfection and Impact on Avian Influenza Pathogenicity in Domestic Poultry: Field and Experimental Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samy, Ahmed; Naguib, Mahmoud M

    2018-02-24

    The avian respiratory system hosts a wide range of commensal and potential pathogenic bacteria and/or viruses that interact with each other. Such interactions could be either synergistic or antagonistic, which subsequently determines the severity of the disease complex. The intensive rearing methods of poultry are responsible for the marked increase in avian respiratory diseases worldwide. The interaction between avian influenza with other pathogens can guarantee the continuous existence of other avian pathogens, which represents a global concern. A better understanding of the impact of the interaction between avian influenza virus and other avian respiratory pathogens provides a better insight into the respiratory disease complex in poultry and can lead to improved intervention strategies aimed at controlling virus spread.

  11. Avian influenza in shorebirds: experimental infection of ruddy turnstones (Arenaria interpres) with avian influenza virus

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Jeffrey S.; Krauss, Scott; Franson, J. Christian; TeSlaa, Joshua L.; Nashold, Sean W.; Stallknecht, David E.; Webby, Richard J.; Webster, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Hall et al. (2012) Avian influenza in shorebirds: experimental infection of ruddy turnstones (Arenaria interpres) with avian influenza virus. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses DOI: 10.1111/j.1750‐2659.2012.00358.x. Background  Low pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIV) have been reported in shorebirds, especially at Delaware Bay, USA, during spring migration. However, data on patterns of virus excretion, minimal infectious doses, and clinical outcome are l...

  12. Dynamics of interaction between complement-fixing antibody/dsDNA immune complexes and erythrocytes. In vitro studies and potential general applications to clinical immune complex testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.P.; Horgan, C.; Hooper, M.; Burge, J.

    1985-01-01

    Soluble antibody/ 3 H-double-stranded PM2 DNA (dsDNA) immune complexes were briefly opsonized with complement and then allowed to bind to human erythrocytes (via complement receptors). The cells were washed and subsequently a volume of autologous blood in a variety of media was added, and the release of the bound immune complexes from the erythrocytes was studied as a function of temperature and time. After 1-2 h, the majority of the bound immune complexes were not released into the serum during blood clotting at either 37 degrees C or room temperature, but there was a considerably greater release of the immune complexes into the plasma of blood that was anticoagulated with EDTA. Similar results were obtained using various conditions of opsonization and also using complexes that contained lower molecular weight dsDNA. Thus, the kinetics of release of these antibody/dsDNA immune complexes differed substantially from the kinetics of release of antibody/bovine serum albumin complexes that was reported by others. Studies using the solution phase C1q immune complex binding assay confirmed that in approximately half of the SLE samples that were positive for immune complexes, there was a significantly higher level of detectable immune complexes in plasma vs. serum. Freshly drawn erythrocytes from some SLE patients exhibiting this plasma/serum discrepancy had IgG antigen on their surface that was released by incubation in EDTA plasma. Thus, the higher levels of immune complexes observed in EDTA plasma vs. serum using the C1q assay may often reflect the existence of immune complexes circulating in vivo bound to erythrocytes

  13. Detection of Occult Erythrocytic Membrane Damages upon Pharmacological Exposures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Yu. Alekseyeva

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood administration of pharmaceuticals may cause occult effects of these agents on erythrocytic membranes. These effects may damage and cause additional membrane defects, but may strengthen. The type and degree of the effects of an agent were detected by calibrated irreversible electroporation with a pulsed electric field (PEF. The paper considers the erythrocytic membranous effects of a wide concentration range of agents used in anesthesiology, such as esmerone, tracrium, and mar-caine-adrenaline. Under the action of PEF and esmerone at the normal concentration N, the rate of erythrocytic hemolysis increased by several times as compared with the control. The similar effect also occurred when esmerone was added at the concentration C=10N. Tracrium exerted a fixing effect on erythrocytic membranes. Upon a combined exposure to PEF and tracrium in the normal concentration C=N; erythrocytic hemolysis was slow. So was with the concentration C=10N. The rate of hemolysis of the red blood cells subjected to a combined action of marcaine adrenaline at the normal concentration C=N and even at the concentration C=10N and PEF was comparable with the hemolytic rate of the reference suspension. 

  14. Very Deep Convolutional Neural Networks for Morphologic Classification of Erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Thomas J S; Olson, Eben M; Schulz, Wade L; Torres, Richard

    2017-12-01

    Morphologic profiling of the erythrocyte population is a widely used and clinically valuable diagnostic modality, but one that relies on a slow manual process associated with significant labor cost and limited reproducibility. Automated profiling of erythrocytes from digital images by capable machine learning approaches would augment the throughput and value of morphologic analysis. To this end, we sought to evaluate the performance of leading implementation strategies for convolutional neural networks (CNNs) when applied to classification of erythrocytes based on morphology. Erythrocytes were manually classified into 1 of 10 classes using a custom-developed Web application. Using recent literature to guide architectural considerations for neural network design, we implemented a "very deep" CNN, consisting of >150 layers, with dense shortcut connections. The final database comprised 3737 labeled cells. Ensemble model predictions on unseen data demonstrated a harmonic mean of recall and precision metrics of 92.70% and 89.39%, respectively. Of the 748 cells in the test set, 23 misclassification errors were made, with a correct classification frequency of 90.60%, represented as a harmonic mean across the 10 morphologic classes. These findings indicate that erythrocyte morphology profiles could be measured with a high degree of accuracy with "very deep" CNNs. Further, these data support future efforts to expand classes and optimize practical performance in a clinical environment as a prelude to full implementation as a clinical tool. © 2017 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  15. MODIFICATION OF ERYTHROCYTE MEMBRANE PROTEINS WITH POLYETHYLENE GLYCOL 1500

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. G. Zemlianskykh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was to study the effect of polyethylene glycol PEG-1500 on the Ca2+-ATPase activity and changes in CD44 surface marker expression in human erythrocyte membranes. Determination of the Ca2+-ATPase activity was carried out in sealed erythrocyte ghosts by the level of accumulation of inorganic phosphorus. Changes in the expression of CD44 and amount of CD44+-erythrocytes were evaluated by flow cytometry. The inhibition of Ca2+-ATPase activity and a reduction in the level of CD44 expression and also the decrease in the amount CD44+-cells were found, reflecting a fairly complex restructuring in the membrane-cytoskeleton complex of erythrocytes under the influence of PEG-1500. Effect of PEG-1500 on the surface CD44 marker could be mediated by modification of proteins of membrane-cytoskeleton complex, as indicated by accelerated loss of CD44 in erythrocyte membranes after application of protein cross-linking reagent diamide. Reduced activity of Ca2+-ATPase activity may contribute to the increase in intracellular Ca2+ level and thus leads to a modification of interactions of integral proteins with cytoskeletal components that eventually could result in membrane vesiculation and decreasing in expression of the CD44 marker, which is dynamically linked to the cytoskeleton.

  16. Cooperative inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activities by hexachlorophene in human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, H; Matsuoka, M; Igisu, H; Ikeda, M

    1997-01-01

    Hexachlorophene (HCP), pentachlorophenol (PCP), 2,4,5-trichlorophenol (2,4,5-TCP) and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP) all hemolyzed washed human erythrocytes and inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AchE) activities in erythrocyte membrane. HCP was much more potent in either effect than any other compound examined. The inhibition of AchE activities by HCP was reversed on adding albumin. The dose-response curves by HCP and PCP were sigmoidal, indicating cooperative inhibition, while those by 2,4,5-TCP and 2,4,6-TCP were not. Furthermore, the cooperativity of the inhibition by HCP was greater than by PCP. Differing from that by PCP, the cooperativity of inhibition increased depending on the temperature (13, 25, 37 degrees C) and decreased when the membrane was treated with Triton X-100. The cooperativity was also decreased in the presence of albumin. On a Scatchard plot analysis, erythrocyte membranes appeared to have multiple binding sites of different affinities for HCP; binding of HCP to the low affinity site [dissociation constant (Kd) 4.7 x 10(-5) M] seemed to be responsible for the observed cooperative inhibition of AchE activities. Neither neostigmine nor fenitrothion altered the cooperativity. HCP seems to be the most potent cooperative inhibitor of AchE in human erythrocyte membranes known to date. HCP may be useful to examine AchE and milieu in human erythrocyte membranes.

  17. Oxidative hemolysis of erythrocytes induced by various vitamins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, I H; Sallam, S M; Omar, H; Rizk, M

    2006-09-01

    Hemolytic effect of some water-soluble vitamins (niacin B5, pyridoxine B6, thiamine B1 and ascorbic and acid C) on erythrocytes was studied spectrophotometrically at relatively high concentration. The oxidation mechanism of hemoglobin was the same for the used vitamins. Vitamin C was the strongest hemolytic agent in comparison with the other vitamins, while vitamin B1 is the weakest one. The results were confirmed by studying the variation in conductivity of erythrocytes with temperature in the range 20-40°C for the used vitamins at a concentration of 2 mM and after two hours from adding each vitamin to the erythrocytes suspension. The conductivity measurements show that the conductivity for the used vitamins is lower than that for control (without adding vitamin) due to hemoglobin oxidation, also may be due to the electrical reorganization of the erythrocyte membrane after the interaction of the used vitamin with it. The obtained results insure the oxidizing effect of the used vitamins on hemoglobin and consequently their hemolytic effect on erythrocytes.

  18. Biorheological properties of reconstructed erythrocytes and its function of carrying-releasing oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang; Gao, Wei; Peng, Weiyan; Xie, Jiaxin; Li, Yaojin

    2009-01-01

    Erythrocyte shape and biomechanical properties have close relation to its physiological function. In this research the erythrocyte was reconstructed with natural structure protein and lipids based on cellular mechanics and hemorheology concepts. The biomechanical properties of the reconstructed erythrocyte were determined with the micropipette aspiration system. The shapes of reconstructed erythrocyte were obtained with electron scanning microscope. The oxygen carrying-releasing function was analyzed with the HEMOX analyzer from TCS, the experimental results indicated that the reconstructed erythrocytes were similar to the natural erythrocyte: having biconcave disc shape, good deformability and carrying-releasing oxygen function.

  19. Plasma volume changes during hypoglycaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Bendtsen, F; Christensen, N J

    1990-01-01

    To investigate whether previously reported changes in venous blood volume and composition induced by acute hypoglycaemia in humans are representative for the entire body we measured erythrocyte 51Cr content, haematocrit, plasma volume, intravascular albumin content and transcapillary escape rate...... of albumin in arterial and venous blood in seven healthy subjects before and during insulin-induced hypoglycaemia. In both vascular sites blood 51Cr content and the haematocrit increased, plasma volume and intravascular albumin content decreased and the transcapillary escape rate of albumin increased during...

  20. Avian Habitat Data; Seward Peninsula, Alaska, 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — This data product contains avian habitat data collected on the Seward Peninsula, Alaska, USA, during 21 May – 10 June 2012. We conducted replicated 10-min surveys...

  1. Specific binding of beta-endorphin to normal human erythrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chenet, B.; Hollis, V. Jr.; Kang, Y.; Simpkins, C.

    1986-03-05

    Beta-endorphin (BE) exhibits peripheral functions which may not be mediated by interactions with receptors in the brain. Recent studies have demonstrated binding of BE to both opioid and non-opioid receptors on lymphocytes and monocytes. Abood has reported specific binding of /sup 3/H-dihydromorphine in erythrocytes. Using 5 x 10/sup -11/M /sup 125/I-beta-endorphin and 10/sup -5/M unlabeled BE, they have detected 50% specific binding to human erythrocytes. This finding is supported by results from immunoelectron microscopy using rabbit anti-BE antibody and biotinylated secondary antibody with avidin-biotin complexes horseradish peroxidase. Binding is clearly observed and is confined to only one side of the cells. Conclusions: (1) BE binding to human erythrocytes was demonstrated by radioreceptor assay and immunoelectron microscopy, and (2) BE binding sites exist on only one side of the cells.

  2. Simulation of dielectric spectra of erythrocytes with various shapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asami, Koji, E-mail: asami@e.kuicr.kyoto-u.ac.j [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2009-07-07

    Dielectric spectra of erythrocyte suspensions were numerically simulated over a frequency range from 1 kHz to 100 MHz to study the effects of erythrocyte shape on the dielectric spectra. First, a biconcave-discoid model for normal erythrocytes or discocytes was compared with an equivalent oblate spheroid model. The two models showed similar dielectric spectra to each other, suggesting that the oblate spheroid model can be approximately used for discocytes. Second, dielectric spectra were simulated for discocytes deformed by osmotic cell swelling. The deformation resulted in the increase in relaxation intensity and the sharpening of spectrum shape. Finally, dielectric spectra were simulated for echinocytes, stomatocytes and sickle cells that are induced by chemical agents and diseases. The dielectric spectra of echinocytes and stomatocytes were similar to each other, being distinguishable from that of discocytes and quite different from that of sickle cells.

  3. Determination of somatic mutations in human erythrocytes by cytometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, R.H.; Langlois, R.G.; Bigbee, W.L.

    1985-06-21

    Flow cytometric assays of human erythrocytes labeled with monoclonal antibodies specific for glycophorin A were used to enumerate variant cells that appear in peripheral blood as a result of somatic gene-loss mutations in erythrocyte precursor cells. The assay was performed on erythrocytes from 10 oncology patients who had received at least one treatment from radiation or mutagenic chemotherapy at least 3 weeks before being assayed. The patients were suffering from many different malignancies (e.g., breast, renal, bone, colon and lung), and were treated with several different mutagenic therapeutics (e.g., cisplatinum, adriamycin, daunomycin, or cyclophosphamide). The frequency of these variant cells is an indication of the amount of mutagenic damage accumulated in the individual's erythropoietic cell population. Comparing these results to HPRT clonogenic assays, we find similar baseline frequencies of somatic mutation as well as similar correlation with mutagenic exposures. 9 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Optical Assay of Erythrocyte Function in Banked Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaduri, Basanta; Kandel, Mikhail; Brugnara, Carlo; Tangella, Krishna; Popescu, Gabriel

    2014-09-01

    Stored red blood cells undergo numerous biochemical, structural, and functional changes, commonly referred to as storage lesion. How much these changes impede the ability of erythrocytes to perform their function and, as result, impact clinical outcomes in transfusion patients is unknown. In this study we investigate the effect of the storage on the erythrocyte membrane deformability and morphology. Using optical interferometry we imaged red blood cell (RBC) topography with nanometer sensitivity. Our time-lapse imaging quantifies membrane fluctuations at the nanometer scale, which in turn report on cell stiffness. This property directly impacts the cell's ability to transport oxygen in microvasculature. Interestingly, we found that cells which apparently maintain their normal shape (discocyte) throughout the storage period, stiffen progressively with storage time. By contrast, static parameters, such as mean cell hemoglobin content and morphology do not change during the same period. We propose that our method can be used as an effective assay for monitoring erythrocyte functionality during storage time.

  5. Genotoxic Biomarkers in Erythrocytes of Lepidochelys olivacea (Cheloniidae from Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Hugo Quiroz Herrera

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted in the municipality of Bahia Solano, Colombia, and had as a goal to detect damage erythrocytes circulating with nuclear lesions in fifty-five Olive Ridley adult females using acridine orange immunostain, and correlate its frequencies with some physiological and biometric parameters. We determine a micronucleated erythrocytes (MNE frequency of 0.6 ± 0.6 and nuclear buds (NBE of 2.1 ± 1.9. We not found any relationship between the nuclear lesions with physiological or biometric parameters evaluated (Pearson and Kruskal-Wallis, p<0.05. We define a significative statistical difference (p=0.035 between both nuclear lesions frequencies. This results show nuclear damages in erythrocytes of Olive Ridley sea turtle for the first time in Colombia as an outcome of genotoxic stress. Also contributes key information for future research in the ecotoxicology area for endangered marine species.

  6. Red not dead: signaling in and from erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, Randy S; Stephenson, Alan H; Ellsworth, Mary L

    2007-11-01

    The oxygen required to meet metabolic needs of all tissues is delivered by the erythrocyte, a small, flexible cell which, in mammals, is devoid of a nucleus and mitochondria. Despite its simple appearance, this 'bag of hemoglobin' has an important role in its own distribution, enabling the delivery of oxygen to precisely meet localized metabolic need. When an erythrocyte enters an area in which tissue oxygen demand exceeds supply, a signaling pathway is activated resulting in the release of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). This ATP acts in a paracrine fashion to increase vascular caliber resulting in increased oxygen delivery. Defects in this pathway are found in erythrocytes of humans with type 2 diabetes (DM2) and could contribute to the perfusion abnormalities in skeletal muscle associated with this disease.

  7. Detection of antibodies to variant antigens on Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes by flow cytometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staalsoe, T; Giha, H A; Dodoo, D

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Naturally induced antibodies binding to surface antigens of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes can be detected by direct agglutination of infected erythrocytes or by indirect immunofluorescence on intact, unfixed, infected erythrocytes. Agglutinating antibodies have previously...

  8. [The method of analysis of distribution of erythrocytes by density: practical guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukrina, E S; Nesterenko, V M; Tsvetaeva, N V; Nikulina, O F; Ataullakhanov, F I

    2014-07-01

    The article describes the phthalate method of analysis of distribution of erythrocytes by density and demonstrates its possibility. The distribution of erythrocytes by density is implemented using centrifugation of blood in micro-hematocrit capillaries in presence of compounds of dimethyl- and dibuthylphthalates of known density. The acquisition of such clinically reliable parameters of distribution of erythrocytes by density as mean density of erythrocytes, width of distribution of erythrocytes by density, light and heavy fraction of erythrocytes and maximum of curve of distribution of erythrocytes by density is described. The causes of deviation of distribution of erythrocytes by density from standard values under various pathological conditions are considered. The syndrome of dehydration of erythrocytes is described in details. The simple and accessible method of acquisition of distribution of erythrocytes by density is described. It is demonstrated that analysis of distribution of erythrocytes by density makes it possible to determine character of changes occurring with erythrocytes. The monitoring of parameters of distribution of erythrocytes by density allows evaluating dynamics of pathological process and effectiveness of therapy.

  9. Aspectos estruturais da membrana eritrocitária Structural aspects of the erythrocyte membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Murador

    2007-06-01

    ócito e é ainda responsável pela estabilidade sob mecanismos de estresse. Essa revisão da membrana eritrocitária é importante para um melhor entendimento das reações transfusionais, onde a formação de anticorpos contra antígenos de alta freqüência dificulta a transfusão compatível. O estudo da diversidade antigênica, a caracterização bioquímica de diferentes proteínas trará uma contribuição para o estabelecimento da saúde, assim como para o diagnóstico, desenvolvimento de tecnologias, como a produção de anticorpos monoclonais e conduta terapêutica para muitas enfermidades.This article describes the structures and functions of the erythrocyte membrane and its importance in transfusional medicine. The erythrocyte membrane is one of the best known membranes in terms of structure, function and genetic disorders. As any other plasma membrane, it mediates transport functions. It also provides the erythrocytes with their resilience and deformability. According to the International Society of Blood Transfusion (ISBT, more than 500 antigens are expressed in the erythrocyte membrane, and around 270 are involved in transfusion reaction cases and hemolytic diseases of the fetus and newborn. In the ISBT classification, the high frequency series is represented by antigens in more than 99% of population (high prevalence antigen. In transfusion, the absence of these antigens determines severe problems as for example, one woman without the P antigen suffered 6 repetitive miscarriages due to placental insufficiency, which was caused by an antibody formed against the absent P antigen. Some important erythrocyte membrane proteins are described here including Band 3, Glycophorins and spectrin. The most abundant integral membrane protein is Band 3 and its main function is to mediate exchange of chloride and bicarbonate anions across the plasma membrane. The second most abundant integral membrane protein in the human erythrocyte is sialoglycoprotein glycophorin A (GPA

  10. Inhibition of Suicidal Erythrocyte Death by Indirubin-3'-Monoxime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunqiu; Jiang, Peipei; Xu, Yuanhong; Zheng, Meijuan; Qiao, Jinpin; Zhou, Xueyong; Huang, Dake; Bian, Maohong

    2018-01-01

    Qing Dai is a prized traditional Chinese medicine whose major component, indirubin, and its derivative, indirubin-3'-monoxime (IDM), have inhibitory effects on the growth of many human tumor cells and pronounced anti-leukemic activities. However, the effects of IDM on mature human erythrocytes are unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the potential impact of IDM on erythrocytes and the mechanisms underlying that impact. Utilizing flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy, phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface was estimated by annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC). The relative cell size, expressed in arbitrary units, was evaluated by forward scatter in a flow cytometer. Fluo-3 fluorescence was used to bewrite changes in cytosolic Ca2+ activity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation was assessed by 2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) fluorescence, and ceramide abundance was evaluated by FITC-conjugated specific antibodies. The 24-h exposure of human erythrocytes to IDM (12 µM) significantly decreased the percentage of annexin V-binding erythrocytes and the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). IDM (3-12 µM) did not significantly modify the ceramide level or DCFH-DA fluorescence. Energy depletion (removal of glucose for 24 hours) significantly increased annexin V binding and Fluo-3 fluorescence and diminished forward scatter, and these effects were significantly mitigated by IDM (12 µM). Moreover, the Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin (1 µM, 60 min) and oxidative stress (30 min exposure to 0.05 mM tert-butyl hydroperoxide, t-BHP) similarly triggered eryptosis, which was also significantly suppressed by IDM. IDM is a novel inhibitor of suicidal erythrocyte death following ionomycin treatment, t-BHP treatment and energy depletion. Thus, IDM may counteract anemia and impairment of microcirculation, at least in part, by inhibition of Ca2+ entry into erythrocytes. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Stimulating Effect of Elvitegravir on Suicidal Erythrocyte Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosi Bissinger

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The antiviral drug Elvitegravir is used for the treatment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV infections. The present study explored whether the drug is able to trigger eryptosis, the suicidal death of erythrocytes. Eryptosis is characterized by cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Stimulators of eryptosis include increase of cytosolic Ca2+ activity ([Ca2+]i, oxidative stress, ceramide, activated p38 kinase and activated caspases. The present study explored, whether Elvitegravir induces eryptosis and, if so, to shed light on the mechanisms involved. Methods: Phosphatidylserine abundance at the erythrocyte surface was estimated from annexin-V-binding, cell volume from forward scatter, [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence, abundance of reactive oxygen species (ROS from DCFDA dependent fluorescence, and ceramide abundance at the erythrocyte surface utilizing specific antibodies. Results: A 48 hours exposure of human erythrocytes to Elvitegravir (≥ 1.5 µg/ml significantly increased the percentage of annexin-V-binding cells, and significantly decreased forward scatter. Elvitegravir (2.5 µg/ml significantly increased Fluo3-fluorescence, but did not significantly modify DCFDA fluorescence or ceramide abundance. The effect of Elvitegravir on annexin-V-binding was significantly blunted by removal of extracellular Ca2+, but not in the presence of p38 kinase inhibitor SB203580 (2 µM or in the presence of pancaspase inhibitor zVAD (10 µM. Conclusions: Elvitegravir triggers cell shrinkage and phospholipid scrambling of the erythrocyte cell membrane, an effect in part due to entry of extracellular Ca2+.

  12. Isolation of avian influenza virus in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, S E; Naqi, S A; Grumbles, L C

    1981-01-01

    An avian influenza virus with surface antigens similar to those of fowl plague virus (Hav 1 Nav 2) was isolated in 1979 from 2 commercial turkey flocks in Central Texas. Two flocks in contact with these infected flocks developed clinical signs, gross lesions, and seroconversion but yielded no virus. This was the first recorded incidence of clinical avian influenza in Texas turkeys and only the second time that an agent with these surface antigens was isolated from turkeys in U.S.

  13. [Effect of treatment with enalapril maleate on the levels of circulating catecholamines, beta endorphins, prostaglandins, and concentration of sodium in erythrocytes in patients with essential hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodakowska, J; Wocial, B; Ignatowska-Switalska, H; Knypl, K; Brym, E; Czerniewska, E; Wacławek-Maczkowska, J; Jabłońska-Skwiecińska, E; Drygieniec, D; Januszewicz, W

    An effect of enalapril maleate on the activity of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and sympathetic reactivity, erythrocyte prostaglandin and sodium levels as well as blood beta-endorphin was investigated in 28 patients with the essential arterial blood hypertension. It was found that enalapril maleate significantly increased plasma renin activity, decreased plasma norepinephrine and its 24-hour excretion, and decreased erythrocyte beta-endorphin and sodium levels. Blood epinephrine and aldosterone levels and their daily excretion remained unchanged similarly to prostaglandins. The above results suggest that a decrease in sympathetic system activity and intracellular sodium concentration may play a role in the hypotensive action of enalapril maleate related to the inhibition of angiotensin II formation.

  14. Ecology and conservation biology of avian malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPointe, Dennis A.; Atkinson, Carter T.; Samuel, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Avian malaria is a worldwide mosquito-borne disease caused by Plasmodium parasites. These parasites occur in many avian species but primarily affect passerine birds that have not evolved with the parasite. Host pathogenicity, fitness, and population impacts are poorly understood. In contrast to continental species, introduced avian malaria poses a substantial threat to naive birds on Hawaii, the Galapagos, and other archipelagoes. In Hawaii, transmission is maintained by susceptible native birds, competence and abundance of mosquitoes, and a disease reservoir of chronically infected native birds. Although vector habitat and avian communities determine the geographic distribution of disease, climate drives transmission patterns ranging from continuous high infection in warm lowland forests, seasonal infection in midelevation forests, and disease-free refugia in cool high-elevation forests. Global warming is expected to increase the occurrence, distribution, and intensity of avian malaria across this elevational gradient and threaten high-elevation refugia, which is the key to survival of many susceptible Hawaiian birds. Increased temperatures may have already increased global avian malaria prevalence and contributed to an emergence of disease in New Zealand.

  15. Tracing of erythrocytes in vitro with technetium-99 m: clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boasquevisque, E.M.

    1983-01-01

    The human beings' erythrocytes were studied in vitro by the pre tinning method, using the pyrophosphate - Stannous Chloride Kit. Investigation of factors that can alter the labeling efficiency includes tin concentration, temperature and incubation period, besides of plasma concentration and hematocrit. It was seen that tin uptake by the red blood cells (RBC) was in an exponential fashion, with a reaction constant, K = 0,03 min -1 . The reaction approaches the equilibrium about the 90 minutes. The binding of Tc-99 m in the Acidic insoluble fraction occurs in greater amounts with more concentrated tin solutions. The labeled and heated TBC were used in vivo to scintigraphic investigation. Normal subjects, splenomegaly, accessory spleen and splenic function in sickel-cell disease were studied. Circulation time of labeled RBC appears to be greater in sickel-cell anemia than in controls or splenectomized patients. Uptake was greater in kidney than lungs and liver. (author)

  16. Antibodies to variable Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocyte surface antigens are associated with protection from novel malaria infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giha, H A; Staalsoe, T; Dodoo, D

    2000-01-01

    is maintained at low densities. Here, we test the hypothesis that the presence or absence of antibodies against variant antigens on the surface of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes protect individuals against some infectious challenges and render them susceptible to others. Plasma collected in Daraweesh...... susceptible and protected individuals. Together, the results indicate that pre-existing anti-PfEMP1 antibodies can reduce the risk of contracting clinical malaria when challenged by novel parasite clones expressing homologous, but not heterologous variable surface antigens. The results also confirm...

  17. Fish intake, erythrocyte n-3 fatty acid status and metabolic health in Danish adolescent girls and boys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Lotte; Harsløf, Laurine B. S.; Hellgren, Lars

    2012-01-01

    the effects of n-3 LCPUFA in adolescence. The present study examines associations between fish intake (assessed by a 7 d pre-coded food diary), erythrocyte (RBC) DHA status (analysed by GC) and metabolic syndrome measures (anthropometry, blood pressure and plasma lipids, insulin and glucose) in 109 17-year...... fasting insulin (P¼0·018), but no adverse association was observed with the mean metabolic syndrome z-score. Overall, the present study showed the expected association between fish intake and RBC-DHA, which in contrast to our expectations tended to be associated with a poorer metabolic profile. Whether...

  18. Bovine and human-derived passive immunization could help slow a future avian influenza pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alisky, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    An epidemic of human transmitted avian influenza could have casualties on a scale seen in the great Spanish influenza pandemic of 1918. This paper proposes that should such occur before effective vaccines and antiviral drugs are available, the outbreak could be significantly slowed by consumption of raw milk produced by herds of pathogen-free lactating cows intranasally inoculated with heat-sterilized sputa pooled from avian influenza patients, supplemented by parenteral serum immune globulin from the same cows. Efficiency of bovine antibody production could be enhanced using cholera toxin subunit b, and milk production could be rapidly accelerated using recombinant bovine somatotropin hormone. In this way, it would be possible to quickly create and distribute large quantities of milk-based and serum-based passive immune globulin active against the strains of avian influenza present in a particular geographic area and gain time for production of human convalescent plasma and other public health measures. This novel approach might also have utility for other serious respiratory infectious diseases, including non-avian influenza, SARS, hantavirus, respiratory syncytial virus, antibiotic-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and pneumonia-causing Staphylococcus aureus.

  19. Kinetics of viral load and erythrocytic inclusion body formation in pacific herring artificially infected with erythrocytic necrosis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Jolene A.; Emmenegger, Eveline J.; Grady, Courtney A.; Roon, Sean R.; Gregg, Jacob L.; Conway, Carla M.; Winton, James R.; Hershberger, Paul K.

    2012-01-01

    Viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN) is a condition that affects marine and anadromous fish species, including herrings and salmonids, in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Infection is frequently associated with severe anemia and causes episodic mortality among wild and hatchery fish when accompanied by additional stressors; VEN can be presumptively diagnosed by (1) light microscopic identification of a single characteristic—a round, magenta-colored, 0.8-μm-diameter inclusion body (IB) within the cytoplasm of erythrocytes and their precursors on Giemsa-stained blood films; or (2) observation (via transmission electron microscopy [TEM]) of the causative iridovirus, erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV), within erythrocytes or their precursors. To better understand the kinetics of VEN, specific-pathogen-free Pacific herring Clupea pallasii were infected with ENV by intraperitoneal injection. At 1, 4, 7, 10, 14, 21, and 28 d postexposure, samples of blood, spleen, and kidney were collected and assessed (1) via light microscopy for the number of intracytoplasmic IBs in blood smears and (2) via TEM for the number of virions within erythrocytes. The mean prevalence of intracytoplasmic IBs in the blood cells increased from 0% at 0–4 d postexposure to 94% at 28 d postexposure. Viral load within circulating red blood cells peaked at 7 d postexposure, fell slightly, and then reached a plateau. However, blood cells observed within the kidney and spleen tissues demonstrated high levels of ENV between 14 and 28 d postexposure. The results indicate that the viral load within erythrocytes does not correlate well with IB prevalence and that the virus can persist in infected fish for more than 28 d.

  20. Photolabeling and radioligand binding of human erythrocyte NaK-ATPase with 125I-derivatives of cymarin and digitoxigenin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowndes, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    NaK-ATPase is an enzyme which maintains Na + and K + gradients across the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells, and is specifically inhibited by cardiac glycosides. The cardiac glycoside binding site is located primarily on the catalytic α subunit but the glycoprotein β and proteolipid-γ subunits may also contribute to the structure of the site. In order to label the cardiac glycoside binding site of human erythrocytes, four photoaffinity ligands with very high specific radioactivity were synthesized. The compounds, which are abbreviated [ 125 I]AISC, [ 125 I]AIPP-GluD, [ 125 I]AIPP-GalD and [ 125 I]IA-GalD, were all effective photolabels for NaK-ATPase as shown by ouabain-protectable, covalent labeling of the α, β, and proteolipid-γ subunits. In order to study the possible existence of a very high affinity binding site in erythrocyte NaK-ATPase, a carrier-free radioligand, [ 125 I]I-TASC, was synthesized; this compound had the same structure as [ 125 I]AISC except that a light-sensitive azide group was replaced with a hydroxyl group. Competitive binding assays with cymarin against 0.2 nM [ 125 I]I-TASC suggested two classes of erythrocyte binding sites. Scatchard analysis of direct [ 125 I]I-TASC binding indicated that the very high affinity, low capacity class of erythrocyte bindings sites had a K D of 54 pM and a B max of 23 fmol/mg protein

  1. Python erythrocytes are resistant to α-hemolysin from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Casper K; Skals, Marianne; Wang, Tobias; Cheema, Muhammad U; Leipziger, Jens; Praetorius, Helle A

    2011-12-01

    α-Hemolysin (HlyA) from Escherichia coli lyses mammalian erythrocytes by creating nonselective cation pores in the membrane. Pore insertion triggers ATP release and subsequent P2X receptor and pannexin channel activation. Blockage of either P2X receptors or pannexin channels reduces HlyA-induced hemolysis. We found that erythrocytes from Python regius and Python molurus are remarkably resistant to HlyA-induced hemolysis compared to human and Trachemys scripta erythrocytes. HlyA concentrations that induced maximal hemolysis of human erythrocytes did not affect python erythrocytes, but increasing the HlyA concentration 40-fold did induce hemolysis. Python erythrocytes were more resistant to osmotic stress than human erythrocytes, but osmotic stress tolerance per se did not confer HlyA resistance. Erythrocytes from T. scripta, which showed higher osmotic resistance than python erythrocytes, were as susceptible to HlyA as human erythrocytes. Therefore, we tested whether python erythrocytes lack the purinergic signalling known to amplify HlyA-induced hemolysis in human erythrocytes. P. regius erythrocytes increased intracellular Ca²⁺ concentration and reduced cell volume when exposed to 3 mM ATP, indicating the presence of a P2X₇-like receptor. In addition, scavenging extracellular ATP or blocking P2 receptors or pannexin channels reduced the HlyA-induced hemolysis. We tested whether the low HlyA sensitivity resulted from low affinity of HlyA to the python erythrocyte membrane. We found comparable incorporation of HlyA into human and python erythrocyte membranes. Taken together, the remarkable HlyA resistance of python erythrocytes was not explained by increased osmotic resistance, lack of purinergic hemolysis amplification, or differences in HlyA affinity.

  2. ABO Blood Groups Influence Macrophage-mediated Phagocytosis of Plasmodium falciparum-infected Erythrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, Donald R.; Hult, Annika K.; Olsson, Martin L.; Liles, W. Conrad; Cserti-Gazdewich, Christine M.; Kain, Kevin C.

    2012-01-01

    Erythrocyte polymorphisms associated with a survival advantage to Plasmodium falciparum infection have undergone positive selection. There is a predominance of blood group O in malaria-endemic regions, and several lines of evidence suggest that ABO blood groups may influence the outcome of P. falciparum infection. Based on the hypothesis that enhanced innate clearance of infected polymorphic erythrocytes is associated with protection from severe malaria, we investigated whether P. falciparum-infected O erythrocytes are more efficiently cleared by macrophages than infected A and B erythrocytes. We show that human macrophages in vitro and mouse monocytes in vivo phagocytose P. falciparum-infected O erythrocytes more avidly than infected A and B erythrocytes and that uptake is associated with increased hemichrome deposition and high molecular weight band 3 aggregates in infected O erythrocytes. Using infected A1, A2, and O erythrocytes, we demonstrate an inverse association of phagocytic capacity with the amount of A antigen on the surface of infected erythrocytes. Finally, we report that enzymatic conversion of B erythrocytes to type as O before infection significantly enhances their uptake by macrophages to observed level comparable to that with infected O wild-type erythrocytes. These data provide the first evidence that ABO blood group antigens influence macrophage clearance of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes and suggest an additional mechanism by which blood group O may confer resistance to severe malaria. PMID:23071435

  3. Determination of alternative pathway of complement activity in mouse serum using rabbit erythrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, H. van; Rademaker, P.M.; Willers, J.M.N

    1980-01-01

    Rabbit, mouse and sheep erythrocytes expressing different concentrations of membrane sialic acid were used to study possible modes of activation of the alternative complement (C) pathway in mouse, human and guinea pig serum. Mouse erythrocytes activated only human serum, whereas rabbit erythrocytes

  4. Using avian radar to examine relationships among avian activity, bird strikes, and meteorological factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Peter S.; Casazza, Michael L.; Halstead, Brian J.; Fleskes, Joseph P.; Laughlin, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Radar systems designed to detect avian activity at airfields are useful in understanding factors that influence the risk of bird and aircraft collisions (bird strikes). We used an avian radar system to measure avian activity at Beale Air Force Base, California, USA, during 2008 and 2009. We conducted a 2-part analysis to examine relationships among avian activity, bird strikes, and meteorological and time-dependent factors. We found that avian activity around the airfield was greater at times when bird strikes occurred than on average using a permutation resampling technique. Second, we developed generalized linear mixed models of an avian activity index (AAI). Variation in AAI was first explained by seasons that were based on average migration dates of birds at the study area. We then modeled AAI by those seasons to further explain variation by meteorological factors and daily light levels within a 24-hour period. In general, avian activity increased with decreased temperature, wind, visibility, precipitation, and increased humidity and cloud cover. These effects differed by season. For example, during the spring bird migration period, most avian activity occurred before sunrise at twilight hours on clear days with low winds, whereas during fall migration, substantial activity occurred after sunrise, and birds generally were more active at lower temperatures. We report parameter estimates (i.e., constants and coefficients) averaged across models and a relatively simple calculation for safety officers and wildlife managers to predict AAI and the relative risk of bird strike based on time, date, and meteorological values. We validated model predictability and assessed model fit. These analyses will be useful for general inference of avian activity and risk assessment efforts. Further investigation and ongoing data collection will refine these inference models and improve our understanding of factors that influence avian activity, which is necessary to inform

  5. Clinical utility of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate test and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) is a relatively non-specific test that is often ignored during the diagnosis and monitoring of disease. However, in recent times, the test is often requested alongside haemoglobin electrophoretic pattern as pre marital test. This study was aimed at determining the ESR ...

  6. Erratum Detergent-resistant membranes in human erythrocytes and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Figure 3. Immunodetection of flotillin-2 and band 3 in DRMs isolated from erythrocyte ghosts by various treatments. Flotillin-2. (left) and band 3 (right) Western blotting in ten fractions of 0⋅5 ml each, obtained from the sucrose gradients described in figure 2 and numbered from top to bottom. Flotillin-2 is enriched in DRMs ...

  7. Erythrocyte Antioxidant Protection of Rose Hips (Rosa spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Widén

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rose hips are popular in health promoting products as the fruits contain high content of bioactive compounds. The aim of this study was to investigate whether health benefits are attributable to ascorbic acid, phenols, or other rose-hip-derived compounds. Freeze-dried powder of rose hips was preextracted with metaphosphoric acid and the sample was then sequentially eluted on a C18 column. The degree of amelioration of oxidative damage was determined in an erythrocyte in vitro bioassay by comparing the effects of a reducing agent on erythrocytes alone or on erythrocytes pretreated with berry extracts. The maximum protection against oxidative stress, 59.4±4.0% (mean ± standard deviation, was achieved when incubating the cells with the first eluted meta-phosphoric extract. Removal of ascorbic acid from this extract increased the protection against oxidative stress to 67.9±1.9%. The protection from the 20% and 100% methanol extracts was 20.8±8.2% and 5.0±3.2%, respectively. Antioxidant uptake was confirmed by measurement of catechin by HPLC-ESI-MS in the 20% methanol extract. The fact that all sequentially eluted extracts studied contributed to protective effects on the erythrocytes indicates that rose hips contain a promising level of clinically relevant antioxidant protection.

  8. Erythrocyte antioxidant protection of rose hips (Rosa spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widén, C; Ekholm, A; Coleman, M D; Renvert, S; Rumpunen, K

    2012-01-01

    Rose hips are popular in health promoting products as the fruits contain high content of bioactive compounds. The aim of this study was to investigate whether health benefits are attributable to ascorbic acid, phenols, or other rose-hip-derived compounds. Freeze-dried powder of rose hips was preextracted with metaphosphoric acid and the sample was then sequentially eluted on a C(18) column. The degree of amelioration of oxidative damage was determined in an erythrocyte in vitro bioassay by comparing the effects of a reducing agent on erythrocytes alone or on erythrocytes pretreated with berry extracts. The maximum protection against oxidative stress, 59.4 ± 4.0% (mean ± standard deviation), was achieved when incubating the cells with the first eluted meta-phosphoric extract. Removal of ascorbic acid from this extract increased the protection against oxidative stress to 67.9 ± 1.9%. The protection from the 20% and 100% methanol extracts was 20.8 ± 8.2% and 5.0 ± 3.2%, respectively. Antioxidant uptake was confirmed by measurement of catechin by HPLC-ESI-MS in the 20% methanol extract. The fact that all sequentially eluted extracts studied contributed to protective effects on the erythrocytes indicates that rose hips contain a promising level of clinically relevant antioxidant protection.

  9. Fragmentation of Human Erythrocyte Actin following Exposure to Hypoxia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Risso, A.; Santamaria, B.; Pistarino, E.; Cosulich, M. E.; Pompach, Petr; Bezouška, Karel; Antonutto, G.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 123, č. 1 (2010), s. 6-13 ISSN 0001-5792 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : beta-Actin * Erythrocytes * Hypoxia Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.316, year: 2010

  10. A review on radiation damage of erythrocyte membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Junling; Wang Weidong; Qin Guangyong

    2007-01-01

    Biomembrane has very important biological function. Its damage will seriously disturb the directivity, the orderly nature and coordination of cell metabolism, and finally causes the cell death. This paper reviewed the effects of radiation damage on erythrocyte membrane in membrane composition, membrane function and oxidation resistance system. (authors)

  11. Erythrocytes for Drug Delivery and their Applications: A Review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recent advances have witnessed the emergence of an increasing number of novel carriers for the delivery of drugs. In this manuscript, we review and discuss the blood cellular carriers because of their great biocompatibility and thus a reduction in side effects. Our emphasis was on the erythrocyte because recent studies ...

  12. In vitro effects of aspirin and paracetamol on human erythrocyte ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The activity of glutathione-S-transferase of human erythrocytes was monitored spectrophotometically in the presence and absence of two analgesics (aspirin and paracetamol). Five different concentrations (1.0, 3.0, 5.0, 7.0, 9.0 and 10.0 mg/ml) of each analgesic were used which covers the reported therapeutic and toxic ...

  13. Erythrocyte indices of iron status in children with cyanotic congenital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Iron (Fe) deficiency is a known feature of cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD) and may worsen symptoms. The prevalence of iron deficiency among children with CCHD at the University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan is unknown. Erythrocyte indices of iron status are easier and less expensive to ...

  14. Improved Erythrocyte Osmotic Fragility and Packed Cell Volume ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aloe barbadensis is a popular house plant that has a long history of a multipurpose folk remedy. It has been documented to have anti-diabetic, antiseptic and anti-inflammatory effects. The effect of Aloe barbadensis juice extract on erythrocyte osmotic fragility, packed cell volume and haemoglobin concentration in Wistar rats ...

  15. Changes in erythrocyte ATPase activity under different pathological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Changes in erythrocyte ATPase activity under different pathological conditions. Ali A Kherd, Nawal Helmi, Khadijah Saeed Balamash, Taha A Kumosani, Shareefa A AL-Ghamdi, Qari M, Etimad A Huwait, Soonham S Yaghmoor, Alaama Nabil, Maryam A AL-Ghamdi, Said S Moselhy ...

  16. Modulatory Role of Antioxidant Vitamins C and E on Erythrocyte ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vitamin C and E supplements were administered to sodium nitrate-treated rats in order to examine the possible ameliorative effects of these antioxidants on erythrocyte osmotic fragility. Seventy adult Wistar rats were randomly divided into seven groups (n=10) and administered drugs or distilled water orally using a metallic ...

  17. Erythrocyte osmotic fragility of pigs administered ascorbic acid and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The experiment was carried out with the aim of investigating the effect of an antioxidant ascorbic acid on erythrocyte osmotic fragility of pigs transported by road for 4 h during the harmattan season. 16 pigs administered with ascorbic acid at the dose of 250 mg/kg per os and individually served as experimental animals and ...

  18. Erythrocyte membrane fatty acids in multiple sclerosis patients and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with increased dietary intake of saturated fatty acids. For many years it has been suspected that this disease might be associated with an imbalance between unsaturated and saturated fatty acids. We determined erythrocyte membrane fatty acids levels in Hot ...

  19. Improved Erythrocyte Osmotic Fragility and Packed Cell Volume ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Improved Erythrocyte Osmotic Fragility and Packed Cell Volume following administration of Aloe barbadensis Juice Extract in Rats. ... Abstract. Aloe barbadensis is a popular house plant that has a long history of a multipurpose folk remedy. ... Keywords: osmotic fragility, packed cell volume, haemoglobin, Aloe vera ...

  20. Embelin-Induced Phosphatidylserine Translocation in the Erythrocyte Cell Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Bouguerra

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The antihelminthic, contraceptive, anti-inflammatory and anticancer phytochemical embelin is at least in part effective against malignancy by inducing suicidal death or apoptosis of tumor cells. Erythrocytes are similarly able to enter suicidal death or eryptosis, which is characterized by cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Signaling of eryptosis includes increase of cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i, ceramide formation, oxidative stress as well as activation of p38 kinase and protein kinase C (PKC. The present study tested, whether and how embelin induces eryptosis. Methods: Phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface was estimated from annexin V binding, cell volume from forward scatter, [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence, ceramide abundance utilizing specific antibodies and reactive oxygen species (ROS from 2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA fluorescence. Results: A 48 hours exposure of human erythrocytes to embelin (≥25 µM significantly increased the percentage of annexin-V-binding cells and hemolysis. Embelin did not significantly modify [Ca2+]i. The effect of embelin on annexin-V-binding was not blunted by removal of extracellular Ca2+, by p38 kinase inhibitor SB203580 (2 µM or by PKC inhibitor staurosporine (1 µM. Embelin did, however, significantly increase the ceramide abundance. Conclusions: Embelin stimulates phospholipid scrambling of the erythrocyte cell membrane, an effect involving ceramide formation.

  1. Phosphorylation of intact erythrocytes in human muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.M.; Nigro, M.

    1986-01-01

    The uptake of exogenous 32 Pi into the membrane proteins of intact erythrocytes was measured in 8 patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. No abnormalities were noted after autoradiographic analysis. This contrasts with earlier results obtained when isolated membranes were phosphorylated with gamma-[ 32 P]ATP, and suggests a possible reinterpretation of those experiments

  2. Inhibition of glycolysis by L-sorbose in dog erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, A; Keller, P

    1978-06-15

    We have demonstrated previously that in vitro L-sorbose acts directly on dog erythrocytes to induce hemolysis. Here we report that L-sorbose depresses lactate formation in dog hemolysates from glucose, mannose and fructose but not from glucose-6-phosphate and galactose, suggesting that L-sorbose interacts with glycolysis at the level of the hexokinase.

  3. Erythrocyte indices and serum biochemical constituents of broiler ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One hundred and twenty (120) four weeks old Ross breed broiler finisher birds were used to study the effect of feeding maggot meal as a replacement for fish meal on erythrocyte indices and serum biochemical constituents. The birds were divided into 5 treatment groups identified as T1, T2, T3 , T4 and T5 with 24 birds per ...

  4. Erratum Detergent-resistant membranes in human erythrocytes and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    –328. As printed in the June 2005 issue, figure 3 of the article is wrong. The correct figure is shown below. Figure 3. Immunodetection of flotillin-2 and band 3 in DRMs isolated from erythrocyte ghosts by various treatments. Flotillin-2. (left) and ...

  5. Mercury chloride-induced oxidative stress in human erythrocytes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mercury can exist in the environment as metal, as monovalent and divalent salts and as organomercurials, one of the most important of which is mercuric chloride (HgCl2). It has been shown to induce oxidative stress in erythrocytes through the generation of free radicals and alteration of the cellular antioxidant defense ...

  6. Mercury chloride-induced oxidative stress in human erythrocytes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-01-25

    Jan 25, 2010 ... Mercury can exist in the environment as metal, as monovalent and divalent salts and as organomercurials, one of the most important of which is mercuric chloride (HgCl2). It has been shown to induce oxidative stress in erythrocytes through the generation of free radicals and alteration of the.

  7. Role of aminotransferases in glutamate metabolism of human erythrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellinger, James J. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Biochemistry (United States); Lewis, Ian A. [Princeton University, Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics (United States); Markley, John L., E-mail: markley@nmrfam.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Biochemistry (United States)

    2011-04-15

    Human erythrocytes require a continual supply of glutamate to support glutathione synthesis, but are unable to transport this amino acid across their cell membrane. Consequently, erythrocytes rely on de novo glutamate biosynthesis from {alpha}-ketoglutarate and glutamine to maintain intracellular levels of glutamate. Erythrocytic glutamate biosynthesis is catalyzed by three enzymes, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and glutamine aminohydrolase (GA). Although the presence of these enzymes in RBCs has been well documented, the relative contributions of each pathway have not been established. Understanding the relative contributions of each biosynthetic pathway is critical for designing effective therapies for sickle cell disease, hemolytic anemia, pulmonary hypertension, and other glutathione-related disorders. In this study, we use multidimensional {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and multiple reaction mode mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) to measure the kinetics of de novo glutamate biosynthesis via AST, ALT, and GA in intact cells and RBC lysates. We show that up to 89% of the erythrocyte glutamate pool can be derived from ALT and that ALT-derived glutamate is subsequently used for glutathione synthesis.

  8. Effect of Aflatoxin B1 - contaminated feed on goat erythrocyte ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... action was concentration-dependent, typical of a saturation kinetic effect. The degree of stimulation varied from 20% to more than 90% between the lowest (0.1 M) and highest (1000 M) contentrations. AFB1 induced changes in the apparent kinetic parameters, Km and Vmax, of the erythrocyte membrane-bound enzyme.

  9. Associations of erythrocyte fatty acid patterns with insulin resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Synergistic and/or additive effects on cardiometabolic risk may be missed by examining individual fatty acids (FA). A pattern analysis may be a more useful approach. As well, it remains unclear whether erythrocyte fatty acid composition relates to insulin resistance among Hispanic/Latino...

  10. Avian cholera in Nebraska's Rainwater Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windingstad, R.M.; Hurt, J.J.; Trout, A.K.; Cary, J.

    1984-01-01

    The first report of avian cholera in North America occurred in northwestern Texas in winter 1944 (Quortrup et al. 1946). In 1975, mortality from avian cholera occurred for the first time in waterfowl in the Rainwater Basin of Nebraska when an estimated 25,000 birds died (Zinkl et al. 1977). Avian cholera has continued to cause mortality in wild birds in specific areas of the Basin each spring since. Losses of waterfowl from avian cholera continue to be much greater in some of the wetlands in the western part of the Basin than in the east. Several wetlands in the west have consistently higher mortality and are most often the wetlands where initial mortality is noticed each spring (Figure 1). The establishment of this disease in Nebraska is of considerable concern because of the importance of the Rainwater Basin as a spring staging area for waterfowl migrating to their breeding grounds. The wetlands in this area are on a major migration route used by an estimated 5 to 9 million ducks and several hundred thousand geese. A large portion of the western mid-continental greater white-fronted goose (Anser albifrons) population stage in the Basin each spring. Occasionally, whooping cranes (Grus americana) use these wetlands during migration, and lesser sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) staging on the nearby Platte River sometimes use wetlands where avian cholera occurs (Anonymous 1981). Our objectives were to determine whether certain water quality variables in the Rainwater Basin differed between areas of high and low avian cholera incidence. These results would then be used for laboratory studies involving the survivability of Pasteurella multocida, the causative bacterium of avian cholera. Those studies will be reported elsewhere.

  11. Biophysical Properties of Irradiated Erythrocytes and Role of Antioxidants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eman Mohammed Elbakrawy, E.M.

    2010-01-01

    Irradiation of blood and blood components with gamma-irradiation is recommended for the inactivation of T-lymphocytes and prevention of transfusion-associated graft versus host diseases. The aim of the present work is to ensure that the currently applied irradiation dose 25 Gy is a safe dose based on the study of the electrical behavior, rheological properties, membrane solubilization, membrane hemolysis and scanning electron microscope of stored erythrocytes. In addition it aims to study the possibility of increasing the irradiation doses to 50 and 100 Gy. Moreover Alpha lipoic acid (a potent natural antioxidant) was added to the stored erythrocytes before irradiation for radioprotection. Irradiation of erythrocytes with 25 Gy did not show significant changes for the calculated dielectric parameters. However, increasing the irradiation doses resulted in significant decrease in the calculated dielectric parameters reflecting the damaging effects of radiation on the membrane structure. The obtained results showed that α lipoic acid can play an important role in minimizing the radiation-induced damage to the erythrocytes and conserve their electrical properties. There were non-significant changes in viscosity after exposure to 25 Gy, while a significant increase at 50 Gy and a significant decrease at 100 Gy were observed. The study found that α lipoic acid (ALA) resulted in non-significant change in viscosity after exposure to 50 Gy and 100 Gy. A significant increase in the yield stress was observed after exposure to 25 and 50 Gy while at 100 Gy, the yield stress showed a remarkable decrease. Addition of .-lipoic acid before irradiation resulted in non-significant changes in the yield stress at doses 25, 50, 100 Gy.The obtained results of the average membrane solubilization (D 50 ) and the average membrane hemolysis (H 50 ) showed non-significant change at 25 Gy; while an observable decrease was observed at 50 Gy and 100 Gy. The addition of lipoic acid did not

  12. Triggering of Erythrocyte Cell Membrane Scrambling by Emodin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morena Mischitelli

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The natural anthraquinone derivative emodin (1,3,8-trihydroxy-6-methylanthraquinone is a component of several Chinese medicinal herbal preparations utilized for more than 2000 years. The substance has been used against diverse disorders including malignancy, inflammation and microbial infection. The substance is effective in part by triggering suicidal death or apoptosis. Similar to apoptosis of nucleated cells erythrocytes may enter suicidal erythrocyte death or eryptosis, characterized by cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Signaling involved in the triggering of eryptosis include increase of cytosolic Ca2+ activity ([Ca2+]i, oxidative stress and ceramide. The present study aimed to test, whether emodin induces eryptosis and, if so, to elucidate underlying cellular mechanisms. Methods: Phosphatidylserine abundance at the cell surface was estimated from annexin-V-binding, cell volume from forward scatter, [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence, ROS formation from DCFDA dependent fluorescence, and ceramide abundance utilizing specific antibodies. Results: Exposure of human erythrocytes for 48 hours to emodin (≥ 10 µM significantly increased the percentage of annexin-V-binding cells, and at higher concentrations (≥ 50 µM significantly increased forward scatter. Emodin significantly increased Fluo3-fluorescence (≥ 10 µM, DCFDA fluorescence (75 µM and ceramide abundance (75 µM. The effect of emodin on annexin-V-binding was significantly blunted but not abolished by removal of extracellular Ca2+. Conclusions: Emodin triggers phospholipid scrambling of the erythrocyte cell membrane, an effect at least in part due to stimulation of Ca2+ entry and paralleled by oxidative stress and ceramide appearance at the erythroctye surface.

  13. Stimulation of Suicidal Erythrocyte Death by Phosphatase Inhibitor Calyculin A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Almasry

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The serine/threonine protein phosphatase 1 and 2a inhibitor Calyculin A may trigger suicidal death or apoptosis of tumor cells. Similar to apoptosis of nucleated cells, erythrocytes may enter eryptosis, the suicidal erythrocyte death characterized by cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Triggers of eryptosis include increase of cytosolic Ca2+ activity ([Ca2+] i. Eryptosis is fostered by activation of staurosporine sensitive protein kinase C, SB203580 sensitive p38 kinase, and D4476 sensitive casein kinase. Eryptosis may further involve zVAD sensitive caspases. The present study explored, whether Calyculin A induces eryptosis and, if so, whether its effect requires Ca2+ entry, kinases and/or caspases Methods: Phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface was estimated from annexin-V-binding, cell volume from forward scatter, and [Ca2+] i from Fluo-3 fluorescence, as determined by flow cytometry. Results: A 48 hours exposure of human erythrocytes to Calyculin A (≥ 2.5 nM significantly increased the percentage of annexin-V-binding cells, significantly decreased forward scatter and significantly increased Fluo-3 fluorescence. The effect of Calyculin A on annexin-V-binding was significantly blunted by removal of extracellular Ca2+, by staurosorine (1 µM, SB203580 (2 µM, D4476 (10 µM, and zVAD (10 µM. Conclusions: Calyculin A triggers cell shrinkage and phospholipid scrambling of the erythrocyte cell membrane, an effect at least in part requiring Ca2+ entry, kinase activity and caspase activation.

  14. DIVA vaccination strategies for avian influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, David L

    2012-12-01

    Vaccination for both low pathogenicity avian influenza and highly pathogenic avian influenza is commonly used by countries that have become endemic for avian influenza virus, but stamping-out policies are still common for countries with recently introduced disease. Stamping-out policies of euthanatizing infected and at-risk flocks has been an effective control tool, but it comes at a high social and economic cost. Efforts to identify alternative ways to respond to outbreaks without widespread stamping out has become a goal for organizations like the World Organisation for Animal Health. A major issue with vaccination for avian influenza is trade considerations because countries that vaccinate are often considered to be endemic for the disease and they typically lose their export markets. Primarily as a tool to promote trade, the concept of DIVA (differentiate infected from vaccinated animals) has been considered for avian influenza, but the goal for trade is to differentiate vaccinated and not-infected from vaccinated and infected animals because trading partners are unwilling to accept infected birds. Several different strategies have been investigated for a DIVA strategy, but each has advantages and disadvantages. A review of current knowledge on the research and implementation of the DIVA strategy will be discussed with possible ways to implement this strategy in the field. The increased desire for a workable DIVA strategy may lead to one of these ideas moving from the experimental to the practical.

  15. Avian Flu Epidemic 2003: Public health consequences. Executive summary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosman A; Mulder YM; Leeuw JRJ de; Meijer A; Du Ry van Beest Holle M; Kamst RA; Velden PG van der; Conyn-van Spaendonck MAE; Koopmans MPG; Ruijten MWMM; Instituut voor Psychotrauma; CIE; MGO; LIS

    2004-01-01

    Executive summary Avian flu epidemic 2003: public health consequences.Risk factors, health, well-being, health care needs and preventive measures during the H7N7 avian flu outbreak control in the Netherlands.An estimated thousand people, possibly more have been infected with avian flu during the

  16. Proceedings of National Avian-Wind Power Planning Meeting IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NWCC Avian Subcommittee

    2001-05-01

    OAK-B135 The purpose of the fourth meeting was to (1) share research and update research conducted on avian wind interactions (2) identify questions and issues related to the research results, (3) develop conclusions about some avian/wind power issues, and (4) identify questions and issues for future avian research.

  17. Avian metapneumovirus subgroup C infection in chickens, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Li; Zhu, Shanshan; Yan, Xv; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Chunyan; Liu, Shuhang; She, Ruiping; Hu, Fengjiao; Quan, Rong; Liu, Jue

    2013-07-01

    Avian metapneumovirus causes acute respiratory tract infection and reductions in egg production in various avian species. We isolated and characterized an increasingly prevalent avian metapneumovirus subgroup C strain from meat-type commercial chickens with severe respiratory signs in China. Culling of infected flocks could lead to economic consequences.

  18. Avian Metapneumovirus Subgroup C Infection in Chickens, China

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Li; Zhu, Shanshan; Yan, Xv; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Chunyan; Liu, Shuhang; She, Ruiping; Hu, Fengjiao; Quan, Rong; Liu, Jue

    2013-01-01

    Avian metapneumovirus causes acute respiratory tract infection and reductions in egg production in various avian species. We isolated and characterized an increasingly prevalent avian metapneumovirus subgroup C strain from meat-type commercial chickens with severe respiratory signs in China. Culling of infected flocks could lead to economic consequences.

  19. Deforestation and avian infectious diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, R. N. M.

    2010-01-01

    In this time of unprecedented global change, infectious diseases will impact humans and wildlife in novel and unknown ways. Climate change, the introduction of invasive species, urbanization, agricultural practices and the loss of biodiversity have all been implicated in increasing the spread of infectious pathogens. In many regards, deforestation supersedes these other global events in terms of its immediate potential global effects in both tropical and temperate regions. The effects of deforestation on the spread of pathogens in birds are largely unknown. Birds harbor many of the same types of pathogens as humans and in addition can spread infectious agents to humans and other wildlife. It is thought that avifauna have gone extinct due to infectious diseases and many are presently threatened, especially endemic island birds. It is clear that habitat degradation can pose a direct threat to many bird species but it is uncertain how these alterations will affect disease transmission and susceptibility to disease. The migration and dispersal of birds can also change with habitat degradation, and thus expose populations to novel pathogens. Some recent work has shown that the results of landscape transformation can have confounding effects on avian malaria, other haemosporidian parasites and viruses. Now with advances in many technologies, including mathematical and computer modeling, genomics and satellite tracking, scientists have tools to further research the disease ecology of deforestation. This research will be imperative to help predict and prevent outbreaks that could affect avifauna, humans and other wildlife worldwide. PMID:20190120

  20. Deforestation and avian infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, R N M

    2010-03-15

    In this time of unprecedented global change, infectious diseases will impact humans and wildlife in novel and unknown ways. Climate change, the introduction of invasive species, urbanization, agricultural practices and the loss of biodiversity have all been implicated in increasing the spread of infectious pathogens. In many regards, deforestation supersedes these other global events in terms of its immediate potential global effects in both tropical and temperate regions. The effects of deforestation on the spread of pathogens in birds are largely unknown. Birds harbor many of the same types of pathogens as humans and in addition can spread infectious agents to humans and other wildlife. It is thought that avifauna have gone extinct due to infectious diseases and many are presently threatened, especially endemic island birds. It is clear that habitat degradation can pose a direct threat to many bird species but it is uncertain how these alterations will affect disease transmission and susceptibility to disease. The migration and dispersal of birds can also change with habitat degradation, and thus expose populations to novel pathogens. Some recent work has shown that the results of landscape transformation can have confounding effects on avian malaria, other haemosporidian parasites and viruses. Now with advances in many technologies, including mathematical and computer modeling, genomics and satellite tracking, scientists have tools to further research the disease ecology of deforestation. This research will be imperative to help predict and prevent outbreaks that could affect avifauna, humans and other wildlife worldwide.

  1. Transverse water relaxation in whole blood and erythrocytes at 3T, 7T, 9.4T, 11.7T and 16.4T; determination of intracellular hemoglobin and extracellular albumin relaxivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grgac, Ksenija; Li, Wenbo; Huang, Alan; Qin, Qin; van Zijl, Peter C M

    2017-05-01

    Blood is a physiological substance with multiple water compartments, which contain water-binding proteins such as hemoglobin in erythrocytes and albumin in plasma. Knowing the water transverse (R 2 ) relaxation rates from these different blood compartments is a prerequisite for quantifying the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) effect. Here, we report the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) based transverse (R 2CPMG ) relaxation rates of water in bovine blood samples circulated in a perfusion system at physiological temperature in order to mimic blood perfusion in humans. R 2CPMG values of blood plasma, lysed packed erythrocytes, lysed plasma/erythrocyte mixtures, and whole blood at 3 T, 7 T, 9.4 T, 11.7 T and 16.4 T were measured as a function of hematocrit or hemoglobin concentration, oxygenation, and CPMG inter-echo spacing (τ cp ). R 2CPMG in lysed cells showed a small τ cp dependence, attributed to the water exchange rate between free and hemoglobin-bound water to be much faster than τ cp . This was contrary to the tangential dependence in whole blood, where a much slower exchange between cells and blood plasma applies. Whole blood data were fitted as a function of τ cp using a general tangential correlation time model applicable for exchange as well as diffusion contributions to R 2CPMG , and the intercept R 20blood at infinitely short τ cp was determined. The R 20blood values at different hematocrit and the R 2CPMG values of lysed erythrocyte/plasma mixtures at different hemoglobin concentration were used to determine the relaxivity of hemoglobin inside the erythrocyte (r 2Hb ) and albumin (r 2Alb ) in plasma. The r 2Hb values obtained from lysed erythrocytes and whole blood were comparable at full oxygenation. However, while r 2Hb determined from lysed cells showed a linear dependence on oxygenation, this dependence became quadratic in whole blood. This possibly suggests an additional relaxation effect inside intact cells, perhaps due to hemoglobin

  2. Erythrocyte membrane ATPase and calcium pumping activities in porcine malignant hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thatte, H.S.; Mickelson, J.R.; Addis, P.B.; Louis, C.F.

    1987-01-01

    To investigate possible abnormalities in erythrocyte membrane enzyme activities in the pharmacogenetic disorder MH, membrane ATPase activities have been examined in erythrocyte ghosts prepared from red blood cells of MHS and normal swine. While no differences were noted in Mg2+-ATPase activities, the (Na+, K+)-ATPase activity of MHS erythrocyte ghosts was less than that of normal ghosts. Ca2+-ATPase activity exhibited low- and high-affinity Ca2+-binding sites in both types of erythrocyte ghost. While the Km for Ca2+ was greater for normal than for MHS erythrocyte ghosts at the high-affinity Ca2+-binding site, the reverse was true at the low-affinity Ca2+-binding site. Irrespective of the type of calcium binding site occupied, the Vmax for normal erythrocyte ghost Ca2+-ATPase activity was greater than that for MHS ghosts. In the presence of calmodulin, there was now no difference between MHS and normal erythrocyte ghosts in either the Km for Ca2+ or the Vmax of the Ca2+-ATPase activity. To determine if the calcium pumping activity of intact MHS and normal pig erythrocytes differed, calcium efflux from the 45 Ca-loaded erythrocytes was determined; this activity was significantly greater for MHS than for normal erythrocytes. Thus, the present study confirms that there are abnormalities in the membranes of MHS pig red blood cells. However, we conclude that these abnormalities are unlikely to result in an impaired ability of MHS erythrocytes to regulate their cytosolic Ca2+ concentration

  3. Attempts to validate a possible predictive animal model for human erythrocyte G-6-PD deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, H.M.; Calabrese, E.J.

    1986-01-01

    The use of Dorset sheep erythrocytes as a model for human G-6-PD deficient erythrocytes was investigated. Seven pharmaceuticals were examined for oxidant stressor effects using a liver microsomal enzyme system to generate metabolites of the drugs. The pharmaceuticals examined were salicyclic acid, dapsone, naphthalene, B-naphtol, p-aminobenzoic acid, sulfanilamide and sulfapyridine. The test compounds were incubated with Dorset sheep erythrocytes and oxidant stressor effects were measured through reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and methemaglobin formation. The response of the Dorset sheep erythrocytes to the seven agents was compared to previous studies revealing the response of human G-6-PD deficient erythrocytes to these agents. The results indicated that metabolites of the pharmaceuticals, B-naphthol, dapsone, and sulfanilamide, are oxidant stressor agents towards sheep G-6-PD deficient erythrocytes. These results agreed with studies on the response of human G-6-PD deficient erythrocytes. The metabolized naphthalene and sulfapyridine did not cause oxidant stress in the sheep erythrocytes, despite the fact that these two agents caused oxidizing effects in human G-6-PD deficient erythrocytes in previous studies. None of the non-metabolized parent compounds caused oxidant stress in the sheep erythrocytes, which agreed with the responses of human G-6-PD deficient erythrocytes.

  4. Flow cytometric determination of osmotic behaviour of animal erythrocytes toward their engineering for drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Ivana T.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that the methods based on the osmotic properties of the cells are the most widely used for loading of drugs in human and animal erythrocytes, data related to the osmotic properties of erythrocytes derived from animal blood are scarce. This work was performed with an aim to investigate the possibility of use the flow cytometry as a tool for determination the osmotic behaviour of porcine and bovine erythrocytes, and thus facilitate the engineering of erythrocytes from animal blood to be drug carriers. The method of flow cytometry successfully provided the information about bovine and porcine erythrocyte osmotic fragility, and made the initial steps in assessment of erythrocyte shape in a large number of erythrocytes. Although this method is not able to confirm the swelling of pig erythrocytes, it indicated to the differences in pig erythrocytes that had basic hematological parameters inside and outside the reference values. In order to apply/use the porcine and bovine erythrocytes as drug carriers, the method of flow cytometry, confirming the presence of osmotically different fractions of red blood cells, indicated that various amounts of the encapsulated drug in porcine and bovine erythrocytes can be expected.

  5. Origin and evolution of avian microchromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, D W

    2002-01-01

    The origin of avian microchromosomes has long been the subject of much speculation and debate. Microchromosomes are a universal characteristic of all avian species and many reptilian karyotypes. The typical avian karyotype contains about 40 pairs of chromosomes and usually 30 pairs of small to tiny microchromosomes. This characteristic karyotype probably evolved 100-250 million years ago. Once the microchromosomes were thought to be a non-essential component of the avian genome. Recent work has shown that even though these chromosomes represent only 25% of the genome; they encode 50% of the genes. Contrary to popular belief, microchromosomes are present in a wide range of vertebrate classes, spanning 400-450 million years of evolutionary history. In this paper, comparative gene mapping between the genomes of chicken, human, mouse and zebrafish, has been used to investigate the origin and evolution of avian microchromosomes during this period. This analysis reveals evidence for four ancient syntenies conserved in fish, birds and mammals for over 400 million years. More than half, if not all, microchromosomes may represent ancestral syntenies and at least ten avian microchromosomes are the product of chromosome fission. Birds have one of the smallest genomes of any terrestrial vertebrate. This is likely to be the product of an evolutionary process that minimizes the DNA content (mostly through the number of repeats) and maximizes the recombination rate of microchromosomes. Through this process the properties (GC content, DNA and repeat content, gene density and recombination rate) of microchromosomes and macrochromosomes have diverged to create distinct chromosome types. An ancestral genome for birds likely had a small genome, low in repeats and a karyotype with microchromosomes. A "Fission-Fusion Model" of microchromosome evolution based on chromosome rearrangement and minimization of repeat content is discussed. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  6. Ribosomal RNA gene functioning in avian oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshel, Elena; Galkina, Svetlana; Saifitdinova, Alsu; Dyomin, Alexandr; Deryusheva, Svetlana; Gaginskaya, Elena

    2016-12-01

    Despite long-term exploration into ribosomal RNA gene functioning during the oogenesis of various organisms, many intriguing problems remain unsolved. In this review, we describe nucleolus organizer region (NOR) activity in avian oocytes. Whereas oocytes from an adult avian ovary never reveal the formation of the nucleolus in the germinal vesicle (GV), an ovary from juvenile birds possesses both nucleolus-containing and non-nucleolus-containing oocytes. The evolutionary diversity of oocyte NOR functioning and the potential non-rRNA-related functions of the nucleolus in oocytes are also discussed.

  7. Structure and function in native and pathological erythrocytes: a quantitative view from the nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girasole, Marco; Dinarelli, Simone; Boumis, Giovanna

    2012-12-01

    introduction and use of the plasma membrane roughness as a morphometric parameter of simple derivation from the AFM images and that results sensitive to the structural integrity of the cells' membrane-skeleton. This offer a remarkable opportunity to investigate the relationship between structure and function in normal and pathological cells by using a morphometric parameter that probes the cell surface at the nanoscale level. At last, a complex but physio-pathologically important phenomenon such as the erythrocytes aging was considered. To properly analyze the many variation that the cells experience during the whole aging path we used all the parameters that the AFM can provides: quantitative imaging, analysis of the membrane roughness and local measure of the nanomechanical properties analyzed together with biochemical parameter such as the ATP content. The picture that emerged is that the aging path is triggered by the ATP intracellular concentration that influence the membrane-skeleton structure and the support exerted on the plasma membrane. The consequences of the membrane-skeleton involvement can be monitored by AFM and showed the occurrence of peculiar morphologies and morphological defects that appear in the very place where the membrane-skeleton contact with the membrane became loose. As a whole, the collected data enable to describe the entire phenomenon as a sequence of morphological intermediates following one another along the aging path. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Nigella sativa oil reduces aluminium chloride-induced oxidative injury in liver and erythrocytes of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouasla, Ihcene; Bouasla, Asma; Boumendjel, Amel; Messarah, Mahfoud; Abdennour, Cherif; Boulakoud, Mohamed Salah; El Feki, Abdelfattah

    2014-12-01

    The present study was planned to investigate the protective effects of Nigella sativa oil (NSO) supplementation against aluminium chloride (AlCl3)-induced oxidative damage in liver and erythrocytes of rats. Simultaneously, a preliminary phytochemical study was affected in order to characterize the bioactive components containing in the NSO using chemical assays. The antioxidant capacities of NSO were evaluated by DPPH assay. The results showed that NSO was found to contain large amounts of total phenolics, flavonoids and tannins. Twenty-four rats were equally divided into two groups, in which group A received standard diet, whereas group B treated daily with an oral gavage dose of 2 ml NSO/kg body weight. After 5 weeks pretreatment, both groups were divided again into two subgroups (A and B) of six animals each and treated for other 3 weeks. Therefore, subgroup A1 was served as a control which received standard diet, but subgroup A2 received AlCl3 (34 mg/kg bw mixed with food). Subgroup B1 received both AlCl3 and NSO; however, subgroup B2 received NSO only. Results showed that AlCl3 exhibited an increase in white blood cell counts and a marked decrease in erythrocyte counts and haemoglobin content. Plasma aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase activities and total bilirubin concentration were higher in AlCl3 group than those of the control, while albumin and total protein concentration were significantly lower. Compared to the control, a significant raise of hepatic and erythrocyte malondialdehyde level associated with a decrease in reduced glutathione content, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase, activities of AlCl3 treated rats. However, the administration of NSO alone or combined with AlCl3 has improved the status of all parameters studied. It can be concluded that AlCl3 has induced the oxidative stress, altered the biochemical parameters and the hepatic histological profile, but the

  9. Identification of a purine 5'-nucleotidase in human erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bontemps, F.; Hers, H.G.; Van den Berghe, G.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the partial purification and the kinetic properties of the purine-specific 5'nucleotidase present in human erythrocytes. 5'-nucleotidase activity was measured by a radiochemical assay. Appropriate amounts of hemolysate or enzyme were incubated at 37 C with (8- 14 C)AMP, (8- 14 C)IMP, (U- 14 C)GMP, or (U- 14 C)CMP at various concentrations. The activity of acid phosphatase was determined by measuring the production of Pi from 10 mM alpha-glycerophosphate in 50 nM MES buffer pH 5. This study demonstrates that human erythrocytes contain a purine 5'-nucleotidase, which is distinct from the one previously described in another study

  10. Quantitative evaluation of respiration induced metabolic oscillations in erythrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Bjørn; Madsen, Mads F; Danø, Sune

    2009-01-01

    The changes in the partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide (P(O(2)) and P(CO(2))) during blood circulation alter erythrocyte metabolism, hereby causing flux changes between oxygenated and deoxygenated blood. In the study we have modeled this effect by extending the comprehensive kinetic...... model by Mulquiney and Kuchel [P.J. Mulquiney, and P.W. Kuchel. Model of 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate metabolism in the human erythrocyte based on detailed enzyme kinetic equations: equations and parameter refinement, Biochem. J. 1999, 342, 581-596.] with a kinetic model of hemoglobin oxy...... relaxations during the 60 s period of the forced transitions cause significant overshoots of important fluxes and metabolite concentrations - notably ATP, 2,3-BPG, and Mg(2+). The overshoot phenomenon arises in consequence of a periodical forcing and is likely to be widespread in nature - warranting a special...

  11. [Effect of the quality characteristics of the fatty component of the diet on the fatty acid makeup of the erythrocytic and thrombocytic membranes in healthy persons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokrovskiĭ, A A; Levachev, M M; L'vovich, N A; Korf, I I; Braun, M B

    1977-01-01

    Practically healthy males received rations in which principal sources of fat in the descending order were butter, sunflower and mustard oil. The influence of qualitative properties of the ration's fat on the lipids metabolism in the plasma and the coefficient of the metabolization effectiveness of essential fatty acids (CEM) of the food into the membranes lipids was studied. The CEM was calculated by studying the fatty acids composition of the erythrocytes and thrombocytes stroma. Inclusion in the ration of butter alone, raised the cholesterol level, a fall of the plasma phospholipids level and a significant drop of the CEM. Substitution of sunflower oil for butter led to normalization of these figures. Mustard oil had no effect. Changes in the CEM of the erythrocytes stroma proceeded slowly, significant differences having been discovered only after 6 weeks of the butter consumption. The thrombocytes CEM changed quickly, a stable fatty acids composition of thrombocytes with this ration being established by the end of the 2nd week. The qualitative properties of the ration's fat exercise a sufficiently strong influence on the effective metabolization of fatty acids in the food into the lipid structures of the erythrocytes and thrombocytes membranes in a healthy subject, it being characterized by the CEM changes.

  12. [Incidence of erythrocyte alloimmunization in pregnant women in olomouc region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holusková, I; Lubušký, M; Studničková, M; Procházka, M

    2013-01-01

    To determine the incidence of clinically significant anti-erythrocyte alloantibodies in pregnant women, which can cause severe hemolytic disease in the fetus and newborn. Retrospective-prospecitive clinical study. Transfusion Department, University Hospital Olomouc, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital Olomouc. Between the years 2000-2011, a total of 45 435 pregnant women were examined at the Department of Transfusion Medicine at the University Hospital Olomouc. Screening for irregular anti-erythrocyte antibodies followed by identification of the alloantibody was performed in all women at the beginning of the pregnancy. Clinically significant anti-erythrocyte antibodies were diagnosed in 1.5% pregnant women (683/45435). The most common cause of maternal alloimmunization was antigen E with an incidence of 5.7 (258/45435), followed by antigen D 4.0 (181/45435), M 1.5 (70/45435), C 1.2 (54/45435), K 1.2 (55/45435), c 0.6 (26/45435), S 0.4 (20/45435), Jka 0.2 (9/45435), PP1pk (Tja) 0.1 (3/45435) and antigen Fya 0.0 (2/45435). Despite performing prophylaxis for RhD alloimmunization by administering anti-D immunoglobulin to RhD negative women during pregnancy and after the birth of an RhD positive child, antigen RhD still represents the 2nd most frequent cause of maternal erythrocyte alloimmunization. The remaining clinically significant alloimmunizations are caused by non-D antigens of the Rh system, antigens of the Kell system, and rarely observed antigens of the MNS and Kidd blood systems.

  13. Regulation and control of glucose overutilization in erythrocytes by vanadate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baquer, N Z; Saxena, A K; Srivastava, P

    The insulin mimetic effect of vanadate in in vitro incubation of erythrocytes with high glucose concentrations showed an increase in sorbitol accumulation and glucose utilization using U-14C-glucose. Aldose reductase inhibitors and vanadate addition reversed the sorbitol accumulation, whereas insulin could not reverse it. Increased glucose utilization was also normalized with vanadium compounds. Increased activity of aldose reductase and sorbitol levels in diabetic animals were also normalized with vanadate treatment.

  14. Erythrocyte glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from Brazilian opossum Didelphis marsupialis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barretto O.C. de O.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In a comparative study of erythrocyte metabolism of vertebrates, the specific activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD of the Brazilian opossum Didelphis marsupialis in a hemolysate was shown to be high, 207 ± 38 IU g-1 Hb-1 min-1 at 37ºC, compared to the human erythrocyte activity of 12 ± 2 IU g-1 Hb-1 min-1 at 37ºC. The apparent high specific activity of the mixture led us to investigate the physicochemical properties of the opossum enzyme. We report that reduced glutathione (GSH in the erythrocytes was only 50% higher than in human erythrocytes, a value lower than expected from the high G6PD activity since GSH is maintained in a reduced state by G6PD activity. The molecular mass, determined by G-200 Sephadex column chromatography at pH 8.0, was 265 kDa, which is essentially the same as that of human G6PD (260 kDa. The Michaelis-Menten constants (Km: 55 µM for glucose-6-phosphate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (Km: 3.3 µM were similar to those of the human enzyme (Km: 50-70 and Km: 2.9-4.4, respectively. A 450-fold purification of the opossum enzyme was achieved and the specific activity of the purified enzyme, 90 IU/mg protein, was actually lower than the 150 IU/mg protein observed for human G6PD. We conclude that G6PD after purification from the hemolysate of D. marsupialis does not have a high specific activity. Thus, it is quite probable that the red cell hyperactivity reported may be explained by increased synthesis of G6PD molecules per unit of hemoglobin or to reduced inactivation in the RBC hemolysate.

  15. Observation on PI (Π) based dimensions of the erythrocyte

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports data, which suggests that the relative dimensions of the blood erythrocyte appear to be approximate powers of the number pi (Π = 3.14). The estimated dimensions are: center thickness = 0.81μm; rim thickness = 2.58μm; diameter = 7.82μm; circumference = 24.57μm. These yielded simple ratios of: 1.00: ...

  16. Transformation of zearalenone and zearalenol by rat erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, W M; Lin, J K

    1984-11-01

    The interconversion of zearalenone and zearalenol by rat erythrocytes in vitro has been investigated. The major metabolite obtained by incubating zearalenone with erythrocytes or whole blood from Sprague-Dawley rats was alpha-zearalenol. beta-Zearalenol was also formed but at levels several times lower than those of alpha-zearalenol. In the cell-free haemolysate NADPH was much more effective than NADH as a co-factor in the reduction of zearalenone. The maximal transformation of zearalenone to zearalenol by haemolysates occurred at pH 8.0. Both NAD+ and NADP+ were effective as co-factors in the oxidation of alpha-zearalenol to zearalenone. However, only NADP+ was effective as a co-factor in the oxidation of beta-zearalenol. Conversion of alpha-zearalenol and beta-zearalenol to the corresponding epimer was observed in both erythrocyte suspensions and in cell-free haemolysates. The significance of these findings to the metabolism of zearalenone in vivo is discussed.

  17. Biorheological action of Ascaris lumbricoides larvae on human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de León, Patricia Ponce; Del Balzo, Gonzalo; Riquelme, Bibiana

    2013-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that A. lumbricoides extracts capture sialic acid (SA) from human red blood cells (RBC). The aim of this work was to study hemorheological alterations in vitro caused by parasite larvae. The biorheological action of three larva concentrates of first and second larval stage on group O erythrocytes was analyzed by incubating the erythrocyte packed together with an equal volume of larvae (treated RBC) and PBS (control RBC). Distribution and parameters of aggregation (digital image analysis), aggregation kinetics (erythroaggregameter), and viscoelasticity (erythrodeformeter) were measured. The digital image analysis showed that all the larvae diminished the isolated cells percentage and increased the size of the formed aggregates. The aggregate formation velocity was lower in the treated than in the control. The deformability index (ID) values of treated RBC did not present variations with respect to those of the control, but a decrease in the erythrocyte elastic modulus (μ(m)) and membrane surface viscosity (η(m)) values was observed, indicating that the larvae not only induced a diminution in the membrane surface viscosity of RBC but also altered the dynamic viscoelasticity of the membrane. Experiments carried out in vitro support the conclusion that the contact between larvae and RBC produces hemorheological alterations.

  18. Drug-loaded erythrocytes: on the road toward marketing approval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bourgeaux V

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Vanessa Bourgeaux,1 José M Lanao,2 Bridget E Bax,3 Yann Godfrin11ERYTECH Pharma, Lyon, France; 2Department of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain; 3Cardiovascular and Cell Sciences Research Institute, St George’s University of London, London, UKAbstract: Erythrocyte drug encapsulation is one of the most promising therapeutic alternative approaches for the administration of toxic or rapidly cleared drugs. Drug-loaded erythrocytes can operate through one of the three main mechanisms of action: extension of circulation half-life (bioreactor, slow drug release, or specific organ targeting. Although the clinical development of erythrocyte carriers is confronted with regulatory and development process challenges, industrial development is expanding. The manufacture of this type of product can be either centralized or bedside based, and different procedures are employed for the encapsulation of therapeutic agents. The major challenges for successful industrialization include production scalability, process validation, and quality control of the released therapeutic agents. Advantages and drawbacks of the different manufacturing processes as well as success key points of clinical development are discussed. Several entrapment technologies based on osmotic methods have been industrialized. Companies have already achieved many of the critical clinical stages, thus providing the opportunity in the future to cover a wide range of diseases for which effective therapies are not currently available.Keywords: red blood cell, encapsulation method, drug carrier, industrial development, clinical use

  19. Drug-loaded erythrocytes: on the road toward marketing approval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeaux, Vanessa; Lanao, José M; Bax, Bridget E; Godfrin, Yann

    2016-01-01

    Erythrocyte drug encapsulation is one of the most promising therapeutic alternative approaches for the administration of toxic or rapidly cleared drugs. Drug-loaded erythrocytes can operate through one of the three main mechanisms of action: extension of circulation half-life (bioreactor), slow drug release, or specific organ targeting. Although the clinical development of erythrocyte carriers is confronted with regulatory and development process challenges, industrial development is expanding. The manufacture of this type of product can be either centralized or bedside based, and different procedures are employed for the encapsulation of therapeutic agents. The major challenges for successful industrialization include production scalability, process validation, and quality control of the released therapeutic agents. Advantages and drawbacks of the different manufacturing processes as well as success key points of clinical development are discussed. Several entrapment technologies based on osmotic methods have been industrialized. Companies have already achieved many of the critical clinical stages, thus providing the opportunity in the future to cover a wide range of diseases for which effective therapies are not currently available.

  20. Erythrocyte oxidative stress markers in children with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Priscila Bacarin; Pianovski, Mara Albonei Dudeque; Henneberg, Railson; Nascimento, Aguinaldo José; Leonart, Maria Suely Soares

    2016-01-01

    To determine eight parameters of oxidative stress markers in erythrocytes from children with sickle cell disease and compare with the same parameters in erythrocytes from healthy children, since oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease and because this disease is a serious public health problem in many countries. Blood samples were obtained from 45 children with sickle cell disease (21 males and 24 females with a mean age of 9 years; range: 3-13 years) and 280 blood samples were obtained from children without hemoglobinopathies (137 males and 143 females with a mean age of 10 years; range: 8-11 years), as a control group. All blood samples were analyzed for methemoglobin, reduced glutathione, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, percentage of hemolysis, reactive oxygen species, and activity of the enzymes glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, superoxide dismutase, and catalase. Data were analyzed using Student's t-test and were expressed as the mean±standard deviation. A p-value of sickle cell disease and the control group for the parameters methemoglobin, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, hemolysis, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity, and reactive oxygen species, with higher levels in the patients than in the controls. Oxidative stress parameters in children's erythrocytes were determined using simple laboratory methods with small volumes of blood; these biomarkers can be useful to evaluate disease progression and outcomes in patients. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Human erythrocytes inhibit complement-mediated solubilization of immune complexes by human serum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorval, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an autologus human system to evaluate the effects of human erythrocytes on solubilization of immune complex precipitates (IC) by human serum. Incubation of IC with fresh human serum or guinea pig serum resulted in solubilization of IC. When packed erythrocytes were added to human serum or guinea pig serum binding of IC to the erythrocyte occurred and IC solubilization was inhibited significantly (p <.025). Sheep erythrocytes did not bind IC or inhibit IC solubilization. To evaluate the role of human erythrocyte complement receptor (CR1) on these findings, human erythrocytes were treated with trypsin or anti-CR1 antibodies. Both treatments abrogated IC binding to human erythrocytes but did not affect the ability of the human erythrocyte to inhibit IC solubilization. Radioimmunoassay was used to measure C3, C4 and C5 activation in human serum after incubation with IC, human erythrocytes, human erythrocytes plus IC, whole blood or in whole blood plus IC

  2. Food restriction reduces neurogenesis in the avian hippocampal formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara-Anne Robertson

    Full Text Available The mammalian hippocampus is particularly vulnerable to chronic stress. Adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus is suppressed by chronic stress and by administration of glucocorticoid hormones. Post-natal and adult neurogenesis are present in the avian hippocampal formation as well, but much less is known about its sensitivity to chronic stressors. In this study, we investigate this question in a commercial bird model: the broiler breeder chicken. Commercial broiler breeders are food restricted during development to manipulate their growth curve and to avoid negative health outcomes, including obesity and poor reproductive performance. Beyond knowing that these chickens are healthier than fully-fed birds and that they have a high motivation to eat, little is known about how food restriction impacts the animals' physiology. Chickens were kept on a commercial food-restricted diet during the first 12 weeks of life, or released from this restriction by feeding them ad libitum from weeks 7-12 of life. To test the hypothesis that chronic food restriction decreases the production of new neurons (neurogenesis in the hippocampal formation, the cell proliferation marker bromodeoxyuridine was injected one week prior to tissue collection. Corticosterone levels in blood plasma were elevated during food restriction, even though molecular markers of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation did not differ between the treatments. The density of new hippocampal neurons was significantly reduced in the food-restricted condition, as compared to chickens fed ad libitum, similar to findings in rats at a similar developmental stage. Food restriction did not affect hippocampal volume or the total number of neurons. These findings indicate that in birds, like in mammals, reduction in hippocampal neurogenesis is associated with chronically elevated corticosterone levels, and therefore potentially with chronic stress in general. This finding is consistent with the

  3. Effects of drought on avian community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas P. Albright; Anna M. Pidgeon; Chadwick D. Rittenhouse; Murray K. Clayton; Curtis H. Flather; Patrick D. Culbert; Brian D. Wardlow; Volker C. Radeloff

    2010-01-01

    Droughts are expected to become more frequent under global climate change. Avifauna depend on precipitation for hydration, cover, and food. While there are indications that avian communities respond negatively to drought, little is known about the response of birds with differing functional and behavioural traits, what time periods and indicators of drought are most...

  4. Serological diagnosis of avian influenza in poultry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comin, Arianna; Toft, Nils; Stegeman, Arjan

    2013-01-01

    Background The serological diagnosis of avian influenza (AI) can be performed using different methods, yet the haemagglutination inhibition (HI) test is considered the gold standard' for AI antibody subtyping. Although alternative diagnostic assays have been developed, in most cases, their accuracy...

  5. New Avian Hepadnavirus in Palaeognathous Bird, Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jo, Wendy K; Pfankuche, Vanessa M; Petersen, Henning; Frei, Samuel; Kummrow, Maya; Lorenzen, Stephan; Ludlow, Martin; Metzger, Julia; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Osterhaus, Albert; van der Vries, Erhard

    2017-01-01

    In 2015, we identified an avian hepatitis B virus associated with hepatitis in a group of captive elegant-crested tinamous (Eudromia elegans) in Germany. The full-length genome of this virus shares <76% sequence identity with other avihepadnaviruses. The virus may therefore be considered a new

  6. Avian Disease & Oncology Lab (ADOL) Research Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Employing Genomics, Epigenetics, and Immunogenetics to Control Diseases Induced by Avian Tumor Viruses - Gene expression is a major factor accounting for phenotypic variation. Taking advantage of allele-specific expression (ASE) screens, we found the use of genetic markers was superior to traditiona...

  7. Viral vectors for avian influenza vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior to 2003, vaccines against avian influenza (AI) had limited, individual country or regional use in poultry. In late 2003, H5N1 high pathogenicity (HP) AI spread from China to multiple Southeast Asian countries, and to Europe during 2005 and Africa during 2006, challenging governments and all p...

  8. the Avian Park Service Learning Centre story

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Ukwanda Centre for Rural Health (UCRH) opened in 2001, followed 10 years later by the establishment of the Ukwanda Rural Clinical School in one of the rural health districts of the Western Cape. This paper relates the journey of the Faculty with the underserviced community of Avian Park through the provision of ...

  9. Presumptive diagnosis of Avian encephalomyelitis in Japanese ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A report of Avian encephalomyelitis outbreak in two flocks of adult Japanese quail is presented. High mortalities, tremor, ataxia and lateral recumbency were the prominent clinical signs observed. Absence of gross pathology and microscopic lesions of gliosis, neuronal degeneration, meningitis, congested blood vessel with ...

  10. The genetics and evolution of avian migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pulido, F.

    2007-01-01

    One of the characteristics of avian migration is its variability within and among species. Variation in migratory behavior, and in physiological and morphological adaptations to migration, is to a large extent due to genetic differences. Comparative studies suggest that migratory behavior has

  11. Solar activity affects avian timing of reproduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M.E.; Sanz, J.J.

    2009-01-01

    Avian timing of reproduction is strongly affected by ambient temperature. Here we show that there is an additional effect of sunspots on laying date, from five long-term population studies of great and blue tits (Parus major and Cyanistes caeruleus), demonstrating for the first time that solar

  12. Vocal communication in an avian hybrid zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, Paula Maria den

    2008-01-01

    Avian vocalizations function in mate attraction and territorial defence. Vocalizations can act as behavioural barriers and play an important role in speciation processes. Hybrid zones illustrate behavioural barriers are not always impermeable and provide a natural laboratory to examine the role of

  13. Fossil avian eggshell preserves ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskam, Charlotte L; Haile, James Seymour; McLay, Emma

    2010-01-01

    Owing to exceptional biomolecule preservation, fossil avian eggshell has been used extensively in geochronology and palaeodietary studies. Here, we show, to our knowledge, for the first time that fossil eggshell is a previously unrecognized source of ancient DNA (aDNA). We describe the successful...

  14. Measuring Steroid Hormones in Avian Eggs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelhardt, Nikolaus von; Groothuis, Ton G.G.

    2005-01-01

    Avian eggs contain substantial levels of various hormones of maternal origin and have recently received a lot of interest, mainly from behavioral ecologists. These studies strongly depend on the measurement of egg hormone levels, but the method of measuring these levels has received little

  15. Measuring steroid hormones in avian eggs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Von Engelhardt, Nikolaus; Groothuis, Ton G. G.; Bauchinger, U; Goymann, W; JenniEiermann, S

    2005-01-01

    Avian eggs contain substantial levels of various hormones of maternal origin and have recently received a lot of interest, mainly from behavioral ecologists. These studies strongly depend on the measurement of egg hormone levels, but the method of measuring these levels has received little

  16. Sulfate influx on band 3 protein of equine erythrocyte membrane (Equus caballus) using different experimental temperatures and buffer solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casella, S; Piccione, D; Ielati, S; Bocchino, E G; Piccione, G

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the anion transport in equine erythrocytes through the measurement of the sulfate uptake operating from band 3 using different experimental temperatures and buffer solutions. Blood samples of six clinically healthy horses were collected via jugular vein puncture, and an emochrome-citometric examination was performed. The blood was divided into four aliquots and by centrifugation and aspiration the plasma and buffy coat were carefully discarded. The red blood cells were washed with an isosmotic medium and centrifuged. The obtained cell suspensions were incubated with two different experimental buffer solutions (buffer A: 115 mM Na2SO4, 10 mM NaCl, 20 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, 30 mM glucose; and buffer B: 115 mM Na2SO4, 10 mM NaCl, 20 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, 30 mM MgCl2) in a water bath for 1 h at 25 °C and 37 °C. Normal erythrocytes, suspended at 3% hematocrit, were used to measure the SO4= influx by absorption spectrophotometry at 425 nm wavelength. Unpaired Student's t-test showed a statistically significant decrease (P buffer solutions. Comparing the buffer A with buffer B unpaired Student's t-test showed statistically lower values (P < 0.0001) for A solution versus B solution both at 25 °C and at 37 °C. The greater inhibition of SO4 (=) influx measured in equine erythrocytes indicates the increased formation of the sulfydryl bonds in band 3 and the modulation of the sulfydryl groups, culminating in the conformational changes in band 3. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Interaction of diesel exhaust particles with human, rat and mouse erythrocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemmar, Abderrahim; Zia, Shaheen; Subramaniyan, Deepa; Al-Amri, Issa; Al Kindi, Mohammed A; Ali, Badreldin H

    2012-01-01

    Inhaled ultrafine (nano) particles can translocate into the bloodstream and interact with circulatory cells causing systemic and cardiovascular events. To gain more insight into this potential mechanism, we studied the interaction of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) with human, rat and mouse erythrocytes in vitro. Incubation of erythrocytes with DEP (1, 10 or 100 μg/ml) for 30 min caused the highest hemolytic effect (up to 38%) in rats, compared to small but significant hemolysis in mice (up to 2.5%) and humans (up to 0.7%). Transmission electron microscopy of erythrocytes revealed the presence of variable degrees of ultrafine (nano)-sized aggregates of DEP either internalized and/or adsorbed onto the erythrocytes in the three species. A significant amount of DEP was found in rat and mouse (but not human) erythrocytes. Lipid erythrocyte susceptibility to in vitro peroxidation measured by malondialdehyde showed a significant and dose-dependent increase in erythrocytes of rats, but not humans or mice. Unlike in human erythrocytes, total antioxidant status (TAS) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in rats were significantly and dose- dependently decreased. In mouse erythrocytes, DEP caused a decreased in SOD (at 10 μg/ml) and TAS (at 100 μg/ml) activities. In conclusion, DEP caused species-dependent erythrocyte hemolysis and oxidative stress, and were either taken up and/or adsorbed onto the red blood cells. Rat (and to a lesser degree mouse) erythrocytes were susceptible to DEP. Human erythrocytes showed the highest resistance to the observed effects. These species difference should be noted when using rats and mice blood as models for humans. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Comparative Pharmacokinetics and Allometric Scaling of Carboplatin in Different Avian Species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunther Antonissen

    Full Text Available The use of chemotherapeutics as a possible treatment strategy in avian oncology is steadily increasing over the last years. Despite this, literature reports regarding dosing strategies and pharmacokinetic behaviour of chemotherapeutics in avian species are lacking. The aim of the present study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of carboplatin in a representative species of the order of Galliformes, Anseriformes, Columbiformes and Psittaciformes. Eight chickens, ducks and pigeons and twenty-eight parakeets were administered carboplatin intravenously (5 mg/kg body weight. A specific and sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for quantification of the free carboplatin in plasma of the four birds species (limit of quantification: 20 ng/mL for chicken and duck, 50 ng/mL for pigeon and 100 ng/mL for parakeets. Non-compartmental pharmacokinetic analysis and allometric scaling demonstrated a significant correlation (R² = 0.9769 between body weight (BW and elimination half-life (T1/2el. T1/2el ranged from 0.41 h in parakeets (BW: 61 ± 8 g to 1.16 h chickens (BW: 1909 ± 619 g. T1/2el is a good parameter for dose optimization of carboplatin in other avian species, since also the previously reported T1/2el in cockatoos (average BW: 769 ± 68 g of 1.00 h corresponds to the results obtained in the present study.

  19. 4-Pyridone-3-carboxamide-1-β-D-ribonucleoside triphosphate (4PyTP), a novel NAD metabolite accumulating in erythrocytes of uremic children: a biomarker for a toxic NAD analogue in other tissues?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synesiou, Elena; Fairbanks, Lynnette D; Simmonds, H Anne; Slominska, Ewa M; Smolenski, Ryszard T; Carrey, Elizabeth A

    2011-06-01

    We have identified a novel nucleotide, 4-pyridone 3/5-carboxamide ribonucleoside triphosphate (4PyTP), which accumulates in human erythrocytes during renal failure. Using plasma and erythrocyte extracts obtained from children with chronic renal failure we show that the concentration of 4PyTP is increased, as well as other soluble NAD(+) metabolites (nicotinamide, N(1)-methylnicotinamide and 4Py-riboside) and the major nicotinamide metabolite N(1)-methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide (2PY), with increasing degrees of renal failure. We noted that 2PY concentration was highest in the plasma of haemodialysis patients, while 4PyTP was highest in erythrocytes of children undergoing peritoneal dialysis: its concentration correlated closely with 4Py-riboside, an authentic precursor of 4PyTP, in the plasma. In the dialysis patients, GTP concentration was elevated: similar accumulation was noted previously, as a paradoxical effect in erythrocytes during treatment with immunosuppressants such as ribavirin and mycophenolate mofetil, which deplete GTP through inhibition of IMP dehydrogenase in nucleated cells such as lymphocytes. We predict that 4Py-riboside and 4Py-nucleotides bind to this enzyme and alter its activity. The enzymes that regenerate NAD(+) from nicotinamide riboside also convert the drugs tiazofurin and benzamide riboside into NAD(+) analogues that inhibit IMP dehydrogenase more effectively than the related ribosides: we therefore propose that the accumulation of 4PyTP in erythrocytes during renal failure is a marker for the accumulation of a related toxic NAD(+) analogue that inhibits IMP dehydrogenase in other cells.

  20. 4-Pyridone-3-carboxamide-1-β-d-ribonucleoside Triphosphate (4PyTP, a Novel NAD+ Metabolite Accumulating in Erythrocytes of Uremic Children: A Biomarker for a Toxic NAD+ Analogue in Other Tissues?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A. Carrey

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We have identified a novel nucleotide, 4-pyridone 3/5-carboxamide ribonucleoside triphosphate (4PyTP, which accumulates in human erythrocytes during renal failure. Using plasma and erythrocyte extracts obtained from children with chronic renal failure we show that the concentration of 4PyTP is increased, as well as other soluble NAD+ metabolites (nicotinamide, N1-methylnicotinamide and 4Py-riboside and the major nicotinamide metabolite N1-methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide (2PY, with increasing degrees of renal failure. We noted that 2PY concentration was highest in the plasma of haemodialysis patients, while 4PyTP was highest in erythrocytes of children undergoing peritoneal dialysis: its concentration correlated closely with 4Py-riboside, an authentic precursor of 4PyTP, in the plasma. In the dialysis patients, GTP concentration was elevated: similar accumulation was noted previously, as a paradoxical effect in erythrocytes during treatment with immunosuppressants such as ribavirin and mycophenolate mofetil, which deplete GTP through inhibition of IMP dehydrogenase in nucleated cells such as lymphocytes. We predict that 4Py-riboside and 4Py-nucleotides bind to this enzyme and alter its activity. The enzymes that regenerate NAD+ from nicotinamide riboside also convert the drugs tiazofurin and benzamide riboside into NAD+ analogues that inhibit IMP dehydrogenase more effectively than the related ribosides: we therefore propose that the accumulation of 4PyTP in erythrocytes during renal failure is a marker for the accumulation of a related toxic NAD+ analogue that inhibits IMP dehydrogenase in other cells.

  1. Effect of dietary zinc deficiency on the endogenous phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of rat erythrocyte membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paterson, P.G.; Allen, O.B.; Bettger, W.J.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of dietary zinc deficiency on patterns of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of rat erythrocyte membrane proteins and erythrocyte filterability was examined. Weanling male Wistar rats were fed an egg white-based diet containing less than 1.1 mg zinc/kg diet ad libitum for 3 wk. Control rats were either pair-fed or ad libitum-fed the basal diet supplemented with 100 mg zinc/kg diet. Net phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of erythrocyte membrane proteins were carried out by an in vitro assay utilizing [gamma- 32 P]ATP. The membrane proteins were subsequently separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and the 32 P content of gel slices was counted by Cerenkov counting. Erythrocyte filterability was measured as the filtration time of suspensions of erythrocytes, both untreated and preincubated with diamide, under constant pressure. Erythrocyte ghosts from zinc-deficient rats demonstrated greater dephosphorylation of protein bands R1 plus R2 and R7 than pair-fed rats and greater net phosphorylation of band R2.2 than pair-fed or ad libitum-fed control rats (P less than 0.05). Erythrocytes from ad libitum-fed control rats showed significantly longer filtration times than those from zinc-deficient or pair-fed control rats. In conclusion, dietary zinc deficiency alters in vitro patterns of erythrocyte membrane protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, whereas the depression in food intake associated with the zinc deficiency increases erythrocyte filterability. 71 references

  2. Morphometric analysis of erythrocytes from patients with thalassemia using tomographic diffractive microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yang-Hsien; Huang, Shin-Shyang; Wu, Shang-Ju; Sung, Kung-Bin

    2017-11-01

    Complete blood count is the most common test to detect anemia, but it is unable to obtain the abnormal shape of erythrocytes, which highly correlates with the hematologic function. Tomographic diffractive microscopy (TDM) is an emerging technique capable of quantifying three-dimensional (3-D) refractive index (RI) distributions of erythrocytes without labeling. TDM was used to characterize optical and morphological properties of 172 erythrocytes from healthy volunteers and 419 erythrocytes from thalassemic patients. To efficiently extract and analyze the properties of erythrocytes, we developed an adaptive region-growing method for automatically delineating erythrocytes from 3-D RI maps. The thalassemic erythrocytes not only contained lower hemoglobin content but also showed doughnut shape and significantly lower volume, surface area, effective radius, and average thickness. A multi-indices prediction model achieved perfect accuracy of diagnosing thalassemia using four features, including the optical volume, surface-area-to-volume ratio, sphericity index, and surface area. The results demonstrate the ability of TDM to provide quantitative, hematologic measurements and to assess morphological features of erythrocytes to distinguish healthy and thalassemic erythrocytes.

  3. Wildlife disease and conservation in Hawaii: pathogenicity of avian malaria (Plasmodium relictum) in experimentally infected Iiwi (Vestiaria coccinea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, C.T.; Woods, K.L.; Dusek, Robert J.; Sileo, L.S.; Iko, W.M.

    1995-01-01

    Native Hawaiian forest birds are facing a major extinction crisis with more than 75% of species recorded in historical times either extinct or endangered. Reasons for this catastrophe include habitat destruction, competition with non-native species, and introduction of predators and avian diseases. We tested susceptibility of Iiwi (Vestiaria coccinea), a declining native species, and Nutmeg Mannikins (Lonchura punctulata), a common non-native species, to an isolate of Plasmodium relictum from the island of Hawaii. Food consumption, weight, and parasitaemia were monitored in juvenile Iiwi that were infected by either single (low-dose) or multiple (high-dose) mosquito bites. Mortality in both groups was significantly higher than in uninfected controls, reaching 100% of high-dose birds and 90% of low-dose birds. Significant declines in food consumption and a corresponding loss of body weight occurred in malaria-infected birds. Both sex and body weight had significant effects on survival time, with males more susceptible than females and birds with low initial weights more susceptible than those with higher initial weights. Gross and microscopic lesions in malaria fatalities included massive enlargement of the spleen and liver, hyperplasia of the reticuloendothelial system with extensive deposition of malarial pigment, and overwhelming anaemia in which over 30% of the circulating erythrocytes were parasitized. Nutmeg Mannikins, by contrast, were completely refractory to infection. Our findings support previous studies documenting high susceptibility of native Hawaiian forest birds to avian malaria. This disease continues to threaten remaining high elevation populations of endangered native birds.

  4. Pharmacokinetics and tissue concentrations of tylosin in selected avian species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, D.; Bush, M.; Carpenter, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    Tissue and plasma concentrations and the biological half-life of tylosin in avian species of a variety of body sizes and metabolic rates were studied. The species chosen were eastern bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus virginianus), pigeons (Columba livia), greater sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis tabida), and emus (Dromaius novaehollandiae). In the 1st phase of this study, tylosin was administered IM to quail, pigeons, and emus at a dosage rate of 25 mg/kg of body weight and to cranes at a dosage rate of 15 mg/kg. The average peak plasma concentrations of tylosin in quail, pigeons, cranes, and emus were 4.31, 5.63, 3.62, and 3.26 microgram/ml, respectively. These peak concentrations occurred at 0.5 to 1.5 hours after administration. The biological half-life of tylosin averaged 1.2 hours in quail, pigeons, and cranes, and was 4.7 hours in emus. In the 2nd phase of this study, tylosin concentrations in the tissues of quail, pigeons, and cranes were markedly higher than were plasma concentrations at corresponding sampling times. Six hours after antibiotic administration, tissue concentrations of tylosin in all species remained within the minimum inhibitory concentration for most pathogenic organisms. Dosage regimens of 25 mg of tylosin/kg 4 times daily for quail and pigeons, 15 mg/kg 3 times daily for cranes, and 25 mg/kg 3 times daily for emus would be needed to establish and maintain therapeutic tissue concentrations.

  5. The impact of hemodialysis on erythrocyte membrane cytoskeleton proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Olszewska

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hemodialysis (HD is one of the methods of renal replacement therapy, but it also contributes to an increase in oxidative stress. Hemodialysis leads to changes in the erythrocyte cytoskeleton structure, whilst the presence of glucose in the dialysis fluid which activates the pentose phosphate pathway contributes to the intensification of oxidative stress. Available literature lacks reports on the effect of glucose in the dialytic fluid on the composition of proteins of the cell membrane cytoskeleton.Material/Methods: Red blood cells for this analysis were collected from patients with chronic renal failure treated with hemodialysis using both glucose-containing and glucose-free dialysis fluid. Following the preparation of membranes, the electrophoretic separation of proteins was performed in denaturing conditions according to Laemmli. The level of tryptophan in membranes was determined by spectrofluorimetry, whilst the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase was determined by measuring the reduction of oxidated NADP.Results: Hemodialysis in both groups of patients resulted in a statistically significant reduction of tryptophan as an oxidative stress indicator when compared to the control group. Moreover, the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the group of patients was higher than in the control group, and following the HD procedure it decreased, which may have been caused by a reduced concentration of dialyzed glucose. The HD procedure affects the structure of the erythrocyte membrane cytoskeleton, which is reflected in the concentration changes in individual proteins and in their mutual relationships corresponding to vertical and horizontal interactions stabilizing the structure of the erythrocyte membrane cytoskeleton. These changes may contribute to the shortening of cell lifespan.

  6. Erythrocyte cation transport and age: effects of digoxin and furosemide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.G.; Copeland, S.; McDevitt, D.G.

    1983-01-01

    The uptake of rubidium 86 ( 86 Rb) by human erythrocytes was measured at various ages. Effects of digoxin and furosemide on this process were examined and, in the case of digoxin, related to its numbers of specific cellular binding sites. There were no significant effects of age on absolute cellular Rb uptake, digoxin-sensitive Rb uptake, or numbers of cellular binding sites for digoxin, but the ability of digoxin to inhibit digoxin-sensitive 86 Rb uptake increased with age. The ability of furosemide to inhibit digoxin-insensitive 86 Rb uptake did not change with age. Results suggest a dynamic contribution to altered sensitivity to digoxin in elderly persons

  7. Avian brains: Insights from development, behaviors and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Tadashi; Izawa, Ei-Ichi

    2017-05-01

    Birds are an extensively specialized animal group with unique anatomical, physiological and ecological characteristics. Sophisticated social behaviors and remarkable cognitive abilities are present in several avian lineages, driven by their enlarged brains and intricate neural networks. These unique traits could be a result of adaptive evolution under the wide range of environmental constraints; however, the intrinsic mechanisms of avian brain development and evolution remain unclear. Here, we introduce recent findings regarding developmental aspects of avian brain organization and neuronal networks for specific avian behaviors, which provide an insight into the link between the evolution of brain development and complex cognitive functions. © 2017 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  8. Avian use of Norris Hill Wind Resource Area, Montana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmata, A.; Podruzny, K.; Zelenak, J. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Biology Dept.

    1998-07-01

    This document presents results of a study of avian use and mortality in and near a proposed wind resource area in southwestern Montana. Data collected in autumn 1995 through summer 1996 represented preconstruction condition; it was compiled, analyzed, and presented in a format such that comparison with post-construction data would be possible. The primary emphasis of the study was recording avian migration in and near the wind resource area using state-of-the-art marine surveillance radar. Avian use and mortality were investigated during the breeding season by employing traditional avian sampling methods, radiotelemetry, radar, and direct visual observation. 61 figs., 34 tabs.

  9. Avian Circadian Organization: A Chorus of Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassone, Vincent M

    2013-01-01

    In birds, biological clock function pervades all aspects of biology, controlling daily changes in sleep: wake, visual function, song, migratory patterns and orientation, as well as seasonal patterns of reproduction, song and migration. The molecular bases for circadian clocks are highly conserved, and it is likely the avian molecular mechanisms are similar to those expressed in mammals, including humans. The central pacemakers in the avian pineal gland, retinae and SCN dynamically interact to maintain stable phase relationships and then influence downstream rhythms through entrainment of peripheral oscillators in the brain controlling behavior and peripheral tissues. Birds represent an excellent model for the role played by biological clocks in human neurobiology; unlike most rodent models, they are diurnal, they exhibit cognitively complex social interactions, and their circadian clocks are more sensitive to the hormone melatonin than are those of nocturnal rodents. PMID:24157655

  10. Decreased erythrocyte superoxide dismutase in elderly men with early nuclear cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Rose

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Imbalance between oxidative processes and antioxidant defenses has been considered to play a role in cataractogenesis, particularly in diabetes patients. Superoxide dismutase (SOD is an important precursor for oxidative stress in the human lens, and its activity is mainly dependent on the copper and zinc levels in the body. The aim of this study was to compare erythrocyte SOD, erythrocyte zinc and total serum testosterone levels in male patients with early senile nuclear cataract and evaluate the correlations between the parameters in all subjects. METHODS A community-based study of cross-sectional design was conducted at Cilandak District Primary Health Center where 52 adult and 17 elderly men with early senile nuclear cataract were chosen as the study subjects. Erythrocyte SOD, erythrocyte zinc, serum testosterone, and fasting blood glucose (FBG levels were measured in all subjects. Nuclear cataract stage was assessed with the Pentacam® instrument (Oculus, Germany. Independent Student t test and Pearson’s correlation were used to analyze the results. RESULTS Erythrocyte SOD level was significantly decreased in elderly men compared to adult men (p=0.014. Erythrocyte zinc, serum testosterone and FBG did not differ significantly in adult and elderly males (at p=0.304; p=0.145;and p=0.376, respectively. Erythrocyte SOD activity was significantly associated with erythrocyte zinc level (r=0.486; p=0.048. CONCLUSIONS Lower erythrocyte SOD activity was found in elderly males than in adult males with early nuclear cataract. There was a relationship between erythrocyte SOD and erythrocyte zinc level in elderly males with early nuclear cataract.

  11. Rapid and highly sensitive detection of malaria-infected erythrocytes using a cell microarray chip.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouki Yatsushiro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malaria is one of the major human infectious diseases in many endemic countries. For prevention of the spread of malaria, it is necessary to develop an early, sensitive, accurate and conventional diagnosis system. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A cell microarray chip was used to detect for malaria-infected erythrocytes. The chip, with 20,944 microchambers (105 µm width and 50 µm depth, was made from polystyrene, and the formation of monolayers of erythrocytes in the microchambers was observed. Cultured Plasmodium falciparum strain 3D7 was used to examine the potential of the cell microarray chip for malaria diagnosis. An erythrocyte suspension in a nuclear staining dye, SYTO 59, was dispersed on the chip surface, followed by 10 min standing to allow the erythrocytes to settle down into the microchambers. About 130 erythrocytes were accommodated in each microchamber, there being over 2,700,000 erythrocytes in total on a chip. A microarray scanner was employed to detect any fluorescence-positive erythrocytes within 5 min, and 0.0001% parasitemia could be detected. To examine the contamination by leukocytes of purified erythrocytes from human blood, 20 µl of whole blood was mixed with 10 ml of RPMI 1640, and the mixture was passed through a leukocyte isolation filter. The eluted portion was centrifuged at 1,000×g for 2 min, and the pellet was dispersed in 1.0 ml of medium. SYTO 59 was added to the erythrocyte suspension, followed by analysis on a cell microarray chip. Similar accommodation of cells in the microchambers was observed. The number of contaminating leukocytes was less than 1 on a cell microarray chip. CONCLUSION: The potential of the cell microarray chip for the detection of malaria-infected erythrocytes was shown, it offering 10-100 times higher sensitivity than that of conventional light microscopy and easy operation in 15 min with purified erythrocytes.

  12. Avian Radar - Is It Worth the Cost?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    DC: The Federal Aviation Administration, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service , Wildlife...Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Wildlife Services. York, D. L., Engeman, R. M., Cummings, J. L., Rossi, C. L., & Sinnett, D. R... Health Inspection Service , Wildlife Services. DOT/FAA/AR-09/61. (2010). Deployments of Avian Radars at Civil Airports. Springfield: National

  13. Common Avian Infection Plagued the Tyrant Dinosaurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Ewan D. S.; Salisbury, Steven W.; Horner, John R.; Varricchio, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Tyrannosaurus rex and other tyrannosaurid fossils often display multiple, smooth-edged full-thickness erosive lesions on the mandible, either unilaterally or bilaterally. The cause of these lesions in the Tyrannosaurus rex specimen FMNH PR2081 (known informally by the name ‘Sue’) has previously been attributed to actinomycosis, a bacterial bone infection, or bite wounds from other tyrannosaurids. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted an extensive survey of tyrannosaurid specimens and identified ten individuals with full-thickness erosive lesions. These lesions were described, measured and photographed for comparison with one another. We also conducted an extensive survey of related archosaurs for similar lesions. We show here that these lesions are consistent with those caused by an avian parasitic infection called trichomonosis, which causes similar abnormalities on the mandible of modern birds, in particular raptors. Conclusions/Significance This finding represents the first evidence for the ancient evolutionary origin of an avian transmissible disease in non-avian theropod dinosaurs. It also provides a valuable insight into the palaeobiology of these now extinct animals. Based on the frequency with which these lesions occur, we hypothesize that tyrannosaurids were commonly infected by a Trichomonas gallinae-like protozoan. For tyrannosaurid populations, the only non-avian dinosaur group that show trichomonosis-type lesions, it is likely that the disease became endemic and spread as a result of antagonistic intraspecific behavior, consumption of prey infected by a Trichomonas gallinae-like protozoan and possibly even cannibalism. The severity of trichomonosis-related lesions in specimens such as Tyrannosaurus rex FMNH PR2081 and Tyrannosaurus rex MOR 980, strongly suggests that these animals died as a direct result of this disease, mostly likely through starvation. PMID:19789646

  14. Common avian infection plagued the tyrant dinosaurs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewan D S Wolff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tyrannosaurus rex and other tyrannosaurid fossils often display multiple, smooth-edged full-thickness erosive lesions on the mandible, either unilaterally or bilaterally. The cause of these lesions in the Tyrannosaurus rex specimen FMNH PR2081 (known informally by the name 'Sue' has previously been attributed to actinomycosis, a bacterial bone infection, or bite wounds from other tyrannosaurids. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted an extensive survey of tyrannosaurid specimens and identified ten individuals with full-thickness erosive lesions. These lesions were described, measured and photographed for comparison with one another. We also conducted an extensive survey of related archosaurs for similar lesions. We show here that these lesions are consistent with those caused by an avian parasitic infection called trichomonosis, which causes similar abnormalities on the mandible of modern birds, in particular raptors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This finding represents the first evidence for the ancient evolutionary origin of an avian transmissible disease in non-avian theropod dinosaurs. It also provides a valuable insight into the palaeobiology of these now extinct animals. Based on the frequency with which these lesions occur, we hypothesize that tyrannosaurids were commonly infected by a Trichomonas gallinae-like protozoan. For tyrannosaurid populations, the only non-avian dinosaur group that show trichomonosis-type lesions, it is likely that the disease became endemic and spread as a result of antagonistic intraspecific behavior, consumption of prey infected by a Trichomonas gallinae-like protozoan and possibly even cannibalism. The severity of trichomonosis-related lesions in specimens such as Tyrannosaurus rex FMNH PR2081 and Tyrannosaurus rex MOR 980, strongly suggests that these animals died as a direct result of this disease, mostly likely through starvation.

  15. Avian influenza in birds and mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, Carol J; Xing, Zheng; Sandrock, Christian E; Davis, Cristina E

    2009-07-01

    The disease syndromes caused by avian influenza viruses are highly variable depending on the host species infected, its susceptibility and response to infection and the virulence of the infecting viral strain. Although avian influenza viruses have a broad host range in general, it is rare for an individual strain or subtype to infect more than one species. The H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) lineages of viruses that descended from A/goose/Guandong/96 (H5N1 HPAIV) are unusual in the diversity of species they have infected worldwide. Although the species affected by H5N1 HPAI in the field and those that have been experimentally studied are diverse, their associated disease syndromes are remarkably similar across species. In some species, multi-organ failure and death are rapid and no signs of the disease are observed. Most prominently in this category are chickens and other avian species of the order Galliformes. In other species, neurologic signs develop resulting in the death of the host. This is what has been reported in domestic cats (Carnivora), geese (Anseriformes), ratites (Struthioniformes), pigeons inoculated with high doses (Columbiformes) and ducks infected with H5N1 HPAIV isolated since 2002 (Anseriformes). In some other species, the disease is more prolonged and although multi-organ failure and death are the eventual outcomes, the signs of disease are more extensive. Predominantly, these species include humans (Primates) and the laboratory models of human disease, the ferret (Carnivora), mouse (Rodentia) and cynamologous macaques (Primates). Finally, some species are more resistant to infection with H5N1 HPAIV and show few or no signs of disease. These species include pigeons in some studies (Columbiformes), ducks inoculated with pre-2002 isolates (Anseriformes), and pigs (Artiodactyla).

  16. Common avian infection plagued the tyrant dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Ewan D S; Salisbury, Steven W; Horner, John R; Varricchio, David J

    2009-09-30

    Tyrannosaurus rex and other tyrannosaurid fossils often display multiple, smooth-edged full-thickness erosive lesions on the mandible, either unilaterally or bilaterally. The cause of these lesions in the Tyrannosaurus rex specimen FMNH PR2081 (known informally by the name 'Sue') has previously been attributed to actinomycosis, a bacterial bone infection, or bite wounds from other tyrannosaurids. We conducted an extensive survey of tyrannosaurid specimens and identified ten individuals with full-thickness erosive lesions. These lesions were described, measured and photographed for comparison with one another. We also conducted an extensive survey of related archosaurs for similar lesions. We show here that these lesions are consistent with those caused by an avian parasitic infection called trichomonosis, which causes similar abnormalities on the mandible of modern birds, in particular raptors. This finding represents the first evidence for the ancient evolutionary origin of an avian transmissible disease in non-avian theropod dinosaurs. It also provides a valuable insight into the palaeobiology of these now extinct animals. Based on the frequency with which these lesions occur, we hypothesize that tyrannosaurids were commonly infected by a Trichomonas gallinae-like protozoan. For tyrannosaurid populations, the only non-avian dinosaur group that show trichomonosis-type lesions, it is likely that the disease became endemic and spread as a result of antagonistic intraspecific behavior, consumption of prey infected by a Trichomonas gallinae-like protozoan and possibly even cannibalism. The severity of trichomonosis-related lesions in specimens such as Tyrannosaurus rex FMNH PR2081 and Tyrannosaurus rex MOR 980, strongly suggests that these animals died as a direct result of this disease, mostly likely through starvation.

  17. The Avian Transcriptome Response to Malaria Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Videvall, Elin; Cornwallis, Charlie K.; Palinauskas, Vaidas; Valki?nas, Gediminas; Hellgren, Olof

    2015-01-01

    Malaria parasites are highly virulent pathogens which infect a wide range of vertebrates. Despite their importance, the way different hosts control and suppress malaria infections remains poorly understood. With recent developments in next-generation sequencing techniques, however, it is now possible to quantify the response of the entire transcriptome to infections. We experimentally infected Eurasian siskins (Carduelis spinus) with avian malaria parasites (Plasmodium ashfordi), and used hig...

  18. Integration and Validation of Avian Radars (IVAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    shape, density, gender ) is problematic; • Not suited to high-clutter environments (e.g., in forests, near buildings); • Health & safety issues...Fuca and the Saratoga Passage and within the rain shadow of the Olympic Mountains, NAS Whidbey Island offers high quality year round training...was to demonstrate that the digital avian radars being evaluated by the IVAR project can automatically discriminate the echoes of moving targets

  19. Applications of thermal imaging in avian science

    OpenAIRE

    McCafferty, D.J.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal imaging, or infrared thermography, has been used in avian science since the 1960s. More than 30 species of birds, ranging in size from passerines to ratites, have been studied using this technology. The main strength of this technique is that it is a non-invasive and non-contact method of measuring surface temperature. Its limitations and measurement errors are well understood and suitable protocols have been developed for a variety of experimental settings. Thermal imaging has been u...

  20. Tracing the evolution of avian wing digits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xing; Mackem, Susan

    2013-06-17

    It is widely accepted that birds are a subgroup of dinosaurs, but there is an apparent conflict: modern birds have been thought to possess only the middle three fingers (digits II-III-IV) of an idealized five-digit tetrapod hand based on embryological data, but their Mesozoic tetanuran dinosaur ancestors are considered to have the first three digits (I-II-III) based on fossil evidence. How could such an evolutionary quirk arise? Various hypotheses have been proposed to resolve this paradox. Adding to the confusion, some recent developmental studies support a I-II-III designation for avian wing digits whereas some recent paleontological data are consistent with a II-III-IV identification of the Mesozoic tetanuran digits. A comprehensive analysis of both paleontological and developmental data suggests that the evolution of the avian wing digits may have been driven by homeotic transformations of digit identity, which are more likely to have occurred in a partial and piecemeal manner. Additionally, recent genetic studies in mouse models showing plausible mechanisms for central digit loss invite consideration of new alternative possibilities (I-II-IV or I-III-IV) for the homologies of avian wing digits. While much progress has been made, some advances point to the complexity of the problem and a final resolution to this ongoing debate demands additional work from both paleontological and developmental perspectives, which will surely yield new insights on mechanisms of evolutionary adaptation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Avian cytokines in health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wigley P

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytokines are proteins secreted by cells that play an important role in the activation and regulation of other cells and tissues during inflammation and immune responses. Although well described in several mammalian species, the role of cytokines and other related proteins is poorly understood in avian species. Recent advances in avian genetics and immunology have begun to allow the exploration of cytokines in health and disease. Cytokines may be classified in a number of ways, but may be conveniently arranged into four broad groups on the basis of their function. Proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 and interleukin-1beta play a role in mediating inflammation during disease or injury. Th1 cytokines, including interleukin-12 and interferon-gamma, are involved in the induction of cell-mediated immunity, whereas Th2 cytokines such as interleukin-4 are involved in the induction of humoral immunity. The final group Th3 or Tr cytokines play a role in regulation of immunity. The role of various cytokines in infectious and non-infectious diseases of chickens and turkeys is now being investigated. Although there are only a few reliable ELISAs or bioassays developed for avian cytokines, the use of molecular techniques, and in particular quantitative RT-PCR (Taqman has allowed investigation of cytokine responses in a number of diseases including salmonellosis, coccidiosis and autoimmune thyroiditis. In addition the use of recombinant cytokines as therapeutic agents or as vaccine adjuvants is now being explored.

  2. Global phylogeographic limits of Hawaii's avian malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beadell, J.S.; Ishtiaq, F.; Covas, R.; Melo, M.; Warren, B.H.; Atkinson, C.T.; Bensch, S.; Graves, G.R.; Jhala, Y.V.; Peirce, M.A.; Rahmani, A.R.; Fonseca, D.M.; Fleischer, R.C.

    2006-01-01

    The introduction of avian malaria (Plasmodium relictum) to Hawaii has provided a model system for studying the influence of exotic disease on naive host populations. Little is known, however, about the origin or the genetic variation of Hawaii's malaria and traditional classification methods have confounded attempts to place the parasite within a global ecological and evolutionary context. Using fragments of the parasite mitochondrial gene cytochrome b and the nuclear gene dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase obtained from a global survey of greater than 13 000 avian samples, we show that Hawaii's avian malaria, which can cause high mortality and is a major limiting factor for many species of native passerines, represents just one of the numerous lineages composing the morphological parasite species. The single parasite lineage detected in Hawaii exhibits a broad host distribution worldwide and is dominant on several other remote oceanic islands, including Bermuda and Moorea, French Polynesia. The rarity of this lineage in the continental New World and the restriction of closely related lineages to the Old World suggest limitations to the transmission of reproductively isolated parasite groups within the morphological species. ?? 2006 The Royal Society.

  3. Altered erythrocyte Na-K pump in anorectic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquali, R.; Strocchi, E.; Malini, P.; Casimirri, F.; Ambrosioni, E.; Melchionda, N.; Labo, G.

    1985-07-01

    The status of the erythrocyte sodium pump was evaluated in a group of patients suffering from anorexia nervosa and a group of healthy female control subjects. Anorectic patients showed significantly higher mean values of digoxin-binding sites/cell (ie, the number of Na-K-ATPase units) with respect to control subjects while no differences were found in the specific /sup 86/Rb uptake (which reflects the Na-K-ATPase activity) between the two groups. A significant correlation was found between relative weight and the number of Na-K-ATPase pump units (r = -0.66; P less than 0.0001). Anorectic patients showed lower serum T3 concentrations (71.3 +/- 53 ng/dL) with respect to control subjects (100.8 +/- 4.7 ng/dL; P less than 0.0005) and a significant negative correlation between T3 levels and the number of pump units (r = -0.52; P less than 0.003) was found. This study therefore shows that the erythrocyte Na-K pump may be altered in several anorectic patients. The authors suggest that this feature could be interrelated with the degree of underweight and/or malnutrition.

  4. Evaluation of Hemagglutination Activity of Chitosan Nanoparticles Using Human Erythrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Muniz de Lima

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan is a polysaccharide composed of randomly distributed chains of β-(1-4 D-glucosamine and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. This compound is obtained by partial or total deacetylation of chitin in acidic solution. The chitosan-based hemostatic agents have been gaining much attention in the management of bleeding. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro hemagglutination activity of chitosan nanoparticles using human erythrocytes. The preparation of nanoparticles was achieved by ionotropic gelification technique followed by neutralization with NaOH 1 mol/L−1. The hemagglutination activity was performed on a solution of 2% erythrocytes (pH 7.4 on PBS collected from five healthy volunteers. The hemolysis determination was made by spectrophotometric analysis. Chitosan nanoparticle solutions without NaOH addition changed the reddish colour of the wells into brown, suggesting an oxidative reaction of hemoglobin and possible cell lysis. All neutralized solutions of chitosan nanoparticles presented positive haemagglutination, without any change in reaction color. Chitosan nanoparticles presented hemolytic activity ranging from 186.20 to 223.12%, while neutralized solutions ranged from 2.56 to 72.54%, comparing to distilled water. Results highlight the need for development of new routes of synthesis of chitosan nanoparticles within human physiologic pH.

  5. Blood-group-Ii-active gangliosides of human erythrocyte membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feizi, T.; Childs, R.A.; Hakomori, S.-I.; Powell, M.E.

    1978-01-01

    More than ten new types of gangliosides, in addition to haematoside and sialosylparagloboside, were isolated from human erythrocyte membranes. These were separated by successive chromatographies on DAEA-Sephadex, on porous silica-gel columns and on thin-layer silica gel as acetylated compounds. Highly potent blood-group-Ii and moderate blood-group-H activities were demonstrated in some of the ganglioside fractions. The gangliosides incorporated into chlolesterol/phosphatidylcholine liposomes stoicheiometrically inhibited binding of anti-(blood-group-I and i) antibodies to a radioiodinated blood-group-Ii-active glycoprotein. The fraction with the highest blood-group-I activity, I(g) fraction, behaved like sialosyl-deca- to dodeca-glycosylceramides on t.l.c. Certain blood-group-I and most of the i-determinants were in partially or completely cryptic form and could be unmasked by sialidase treatment. Thus the I and i antigens, which are known to occur on internal structures of blood-group-ABH-active glycoproteins in secretions, also occur in the interior of the carbohydrate chains of erythrocyte gangliosides. (author)

  6. Erythrocyte membrane stabilization effect and antioxidant activity of methyl methacrylate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, B.

    2004-01-01

    Methyl methacrylate (MMK) is a synthetic product with mild impact on human health that is not well studied on cellular basis. Here, human erythrocytes were used to investigate the effects MMK exerts on acid and heat-induced hemolysis. Biphasic effect of MMK was observed for acid-induced hemolysis; i.e., protection at low (0 - 0.05% v/v) and stimulation at higher (0.1- 0.4% v/v) concentrations. The maximal protective effect was produced at 0.03% (v/v). At this concentration MMK increased the temperatures of heat denaturation of erythrocyte membrane proteins, spectrin and integral proteins, by about 2 0 C and inhibited the heat-induced hemolysis by 20 %. This membrane stabilization effect of MMK is similar to that produced by some anti-inflammatory and antirheumatic drugs. The increased acid resistance possibly indicated anti-oxidant properties of MMK. The nonenzymatic antioxidant activity test evidenced that MMK has no superoxide dismutase-like activity but demonstrates strong catalase-like activity (about 900 kU/mmol at 0.05-0.1 mmol/l concentration). The results indicate that at low concentration MMK exerts benign effect on cellular membrane that could find therapeutic usage. (author)

  7. Hepatic and erythrocytic glutathione peroxidase activity in liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, R; Ortiz, A; Hernández, R; López, V; Gómez, M M; Mena, P

    1996-09-01

    Hepatic and erythrocytic glutathione peroxidase activity, together with malondialdehyde levels, were determined as indicators of peroxidation in 83 patients from whom liver biopsies had been taken for diagnostic purposes. On histological study, the patients were classified into groups as minimal changes (including normal liver), steatosis, alcoholic hepatitis, hepatic cirrhosis, light to moderately active chronic hepatitis, and severe chronic active hepatitis. The glutathione peroxidase activity in erythrocytes showed no significant changes in any liver disease group. In the hepatic study, an increased activity was observed in steatosis with respect to the minimal changes group, this increased activity induced by the toxic agent in the initial stages of the alcoholic hepatic disease declining as the hepatic damage progressed. There was a negative correlation between the levels of hepatic malondialdehyde and hepatic glutathione peroxidase in subjects with minimal changes. This suggested the existence of an oxidative equilibrium in this group. This equilibrium is broken in the liver disease groups as was manifest in a positive correlation between malondialdehyde and glutathione peroxidase activity.

  8. Physicochemical characterization of artificial nanoerythrosomes derived from erythrocyte ghost membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deák, Róbert; Mihály, Judith; Szigyártó, Imola Cs; Wacha, András; Lelkes, Gábor; Bóta, Attila

    2015-11-01

    Colloidal stabile nanoerythrosomes with 200 nm average diameter were formed from hemoglobin-free erythrocyte ghost membrane via sonication and membrane extrusion. The incorporation of extra lipid (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, DPPC), added to the sonicated ghosts, caused significant changes in the thermotropic character of the original membranes. As a result of the increased DPPC ratio the chain melting of the hydrated DPPC system and the characteristic small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) of the lipid bilayers appeared. Significant morphological changes were followed by transmission electron microscopy combined with freeze fracture method (FF-TEM). After the ultrasonic treatment the large entities of erythrocyte ghosts transformed into nearly spherical nanoerythrosomes with diameters between 100 and 300 nm and at the same time a great number of 10-30 nm large membrane proteins or protein clusters were dispersed in the aqueous medium. The infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) pointed out, that the sonication did not cause changes in the secondary structures of the membrane proteins under our preparation conditions. About fivefold of extra lipid--compared to the lipid content of the original membrane--caused homogeneous dispersion of nanoerythrosomes however the shape of the vesicles was not uniform. After the addition of about tenfold of DPPC, monoform and monodisperse nanoerythrosomes became typical. The outer surfaces of these roughly spherical objects were frequently polygonal, consisting of a net of pentagons and hexagons. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Altered erythrocyte Na-K pump in anorectic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquali, R.; Strocchi, E.; Malini, P.; Casimirri, F.; Ambrosioni, E.; Melchionda, N.; Labo, G.

    1985-01-01

    The status of the erythrocyte sodium pump was evaluated in a group of patients suffering from anorexia nervosa and a group of healthy female control subjects. Anorectic patients showed significantly higher mean values of digoxin-binding sites/cell (ie, the number of Na-K-ATPase units) with respect to control subjects while no differences were found in the specific 86 Rb uptake (which reflects the Na-K-ATPase activity) between the two groups. A significant correlation was found between relative weight and the number of Na-K-ATPase pump units (r = -0.66; P less than 0.0001). Anorectic patients showed lower serum T3 concentrations (71.3 +/- 53 ng/dL) with respect to control subjects (100.8 +/- 4.7 ng/dL; P less than 0.0005) and a significant negative correlation between T3 levels and the number of pump units (r = -0.52; P less than 0.003) was found. This study therefore shows that the erythrocyte Na-K pump may be altered in several anorectic patients. The authors suggest that this feature could be interrelated with the degree of underweight and/or malnutrition

  10. Transport of bimane-S-glutathione in human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pułaski, L; Bartosz, G

    1995-09-21

    Export of glutathione S-conjugate of bimane (BSG) was studied in human erythrocytes. Characteristics of the BSG transport is similar to that of dinitrophenyl-S-glutathione (DNP-SG). BSG transport has two kinetic components, one of high affinity and low capacity (Km = 7.4 +/- 0.2 mumol/ml cells, Vm = 2.7 +/- 0.1 nmol/min per ml RBC) and another of low affinity and high capacity (Km = 242 +/- 8 mumol/ml cells, Vm = 9.6 +/- 1.6 nmol/min per ml RBC). BSG export is inhibited by vanadate (Ki = 65 +/- 6 microM) and fluoride (Ki = 11.4 +/- 0.8 mM). Activation energy of the transport is 67 +/- 7 kJ/mol. BSG transport is independent of membrane potential; its rate increases with pH in the pH range of 6-8, in line with the assumption that the anionic conjugate is cotransported with proton. BSG import to erythrocyte membrane inside-out vesicles is stimulated by ATP. Fluorimetric measurements of BSG export require low amounts of cells and may also be useful for other cell types as an alternative to studies of glutatione S-conjugate transport using radioactive substrates.

  11. Reduced PKC α Activity Induces Senescent Phenotype in Erythrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rukmini B. Govekar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanism mediating expression of senescent cell antigen-aggregated or cleaved band 3 and externalized phosphatidylserine (PS on the surface of aged erythrocytes and their premature expression in certain anemias is not completely elucidated. The erythrocytes with these surface modifications undergo macrophage-mediated phagocytosis. In this study, the role of protein kinase C (PKC isoforms in the expression of these surface modifications was investigated. Inhibition of PKC α by 30 μM rottlerin (R30 and 2.3 nM Gö 6976 caused expression of both the senescent cell marker-externalized PS measured by FACS analysis and aggregated band 3 detected by western blotting. In contrast to this observation, but in keeping with literature, PKC activation by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA also led to the expression of senescence markers. We explain this antithesis by demonstrating that PMA-treated cells show reduction in the activity of PKC α, thereby simulating inhibition. The reduction in PKC α activity may be attributed to the known downregulation of PMA-activated PKC α, caused by its membrane translocation and proteolysis. We demonstrate membrane translocation of PKC α in PMA-treated cells to substantiate this inference. Thus loss of PKC α activity either by inhibition or downregulation can cause surface modifications which can trigger erythrophagocytosis.

  12. Erythrocyte deformation in high-throughput optical stretchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sraj, Ihab; Szatmary, Alex C.; Desai, Sanjay A.; Marr, David W. M.; Eggleton, Charles D.

    2013-01-01

    Optical stretchers can be used to quantify elastic and homeostatic properties of cells. Because they can apply forces to cells without requiring direct contact, they may noninvasively measure mechanical properties related to cell and membrane health. Present-day optical stretchers are, however, limited to measurements on individual stationary cells, limiting throughput. To overcome this limitation and allow study of variations in cell populations, we recently developed and tested a microfluidic chamber that measures optical stretching parameters for erythrocytes under dynamic flowing conditions. The method uses a single linear diode laser bar and permitted measurements at low flow rates and higher throughput. Here, we numerically investigate the feasibility of further increasing the measurement rates of the optical stretcher in parameter domains where hydrodynamic and optical forces are of comparable magnitude. To do this we couple a recently implemented dynamic optical ray-tracing technique with a fluid-structure interaction solver to simulate the deformation of osmotically swollen erythrocytes in fluid flow of variable rate. Our results demonstrate that a detectable steady-state stretch is induced at nominal optical powers and flow rates. In addition, we find that flow rates can be increased significantly with no major effect on net cell stretch showing the feasibility of application of this technique at greatly increased throughputs. PMID:22680514

  13. Protective Effects of Ferulic Acid on High Glucose-Induced Protein Glycation, Lipid Peroxidation, and Membrane Ion Pump Activity in Human Erythrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sompong, Weerachat; Cheng, Henrique; Adisakwattana, Sirichai

    2015-01-01

    Ferulic acid (FA) is the ubiquitous phytochemical phenolic derivative of cinnamic acid. Experimental studies in diabetic models demonstrate that FA possesses multiple mechanisms of action associated with anti-hyperglycemic activity. The mechanism by which FA prevents diabetes-associated vascular damages remains unknown. The aim of study was to investigate the protective effects of FA on protein glycation, lipid peroxidation, membrane ion pump activity, and phosphatidylserine exposure in high glucose-exposed human erythrocytes. Our results demonstrated that FA (10-100 μM) significantly reduced the levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) whereas 0.1-100 μM concentrations inhibited lipid peroxidation in erythrocytes exposed to 45 mM glucose. This was associated with increased glucose consumption. High glucose treatment also caused a significant reduction in Na+/K+-ATPase activity in the erythrocyte plasma membrane which could be reversed by FA. Furthermore, we found that FA (0.1-100 μM) prevented high glucose-induced phosphatidylserine exposure. These findings provide insights into a novel mechanism of FA for the prevention of vascular dysfunction associated with diabetes. PMID:26053739

  14. Heterologous desensitization of adenylate cyclase from pigeon erythrocytes under the action of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, K.M.; Bulargina, T.V.; Severin, E.S.

    1985-01-01

    Preincubation of the plasma membranes from pigeon erythrocytes with the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase leads to desensitization of adenylate cyclase of the erythrocytes. The adenylate cyclase activity, measured in the presence of 10 μM isoproterenol and 50 μM GTP-γ-S, is decreased by 40% in 10 min of incubation, while the activity in the presence of 50 μM GTP-γ-S is decreased by 35% in 20 min. The decrease in the adenylate cyclase activity is due to an increase in the lag phase of activation of the enzyme in the presence of a GTP analog stable to hydrolysis and a decrease in the activity in the steady-state phase of activation. Heterologous desensitization of adenylate cyclase under the action of cAMP-dependent protein kinase is coupled with a decrease in the number of β-adrenoreceptors capable of passing into a state of high affinity for antagonists in the absence of guanylic nucleotides. The influence of the catalytic subunit on adenylate cyclase entirely models the process of desensitization of the enzyme absorbed in the influence of isoproterenol or cAMP on erythrocytes

  15. Protective Effects of Ferulic Acid on High Glucose-Induced Protein Glycation, Lipid Peroxidation, and Membrane Ion Pump Activity in Human Erythrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weerachat Sompong

    Full Text Available Ferulic acid (FA is the ubiquitous phytochemical phenolic derivative of cinnamic acid. Experimental studies in diabetic models demonstrate that FA possesses multiple mechanisms of action associated with anti-hyperglycemic activity. The mechanism by which FA prevents diabetes-associated vascular damages remains unknown. The aim of study was to investigate the protective effects of FA on protein glycation, lipid peroxidation, membrane ion pump activity, and phosphatidylserine exposure in high glucose-exposed human erythrocytes. Our results demonstrated that FA (10-100 μM significantly reduced the levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c whereas 0.1-100 μM concentrations inhibited lipid peroxidation in erythrocytes exposed to 45 mM glucose. This was associated with increased glucose consumption. High glucose treatment also caused a significant reduction in Na+/K+-ATPase activity in the erythrocyte plasma membrane which could be reversed by FA. Furthermore, we found that FA (0.1-100 μM prevented high glucose-induced phosphatidylserine exposure. These findings provide insights into a novel mechanism of FA for the prevention of vascular dysfunction associated with diabetes.

  16. Erythrocyte flow and dynamic hematocrit in the renal papilla of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerhackl, B; Dussel, R; Steinhausen, M

    1985-12-01

    The microcirculation of the renal papilla was investigated in 32 vasa recta of Wistar rats. Using fluorescence microscopy in combination with a high-sensitivity television system we measured the velocity and flux of fluorescent-tagged erythrocytes in descending (DVR) and ascending vasa recta (AVR). After staining the plasma with fluorescent high molecular weight dextran we determined the diameters of DVR and AVR. Red cell flux (Qrbc) was determined from the ratio of the frequency of fluorescent-tagged red cells detected per unit time (fFITC) to the number of fluorescent-tagged red cells per nanoliter packed red cells (NFITC). From red cell velocity (Vrbc) and vessel diameter (D) we calculated the volume flow (Vapp). The dynamic hematocrit was directly derived as the ratio of Qrbc to Vapp. During antidiuresis Vrbc was 1.35 +/- 0.15 mm X s-1 (mean +/- SE) in DVR and 0.47 +/- 0.07 mm X s-1 in AVR. Qrbc in the same vessels averaged 3.26 +/- 0.9 and 1.72 +/- 0.35 nl X min-1, respectively. The diameter in DVR was 14.3 +/- 0.9 and in AVR 17.9 +/- 0.9 micron. From these values we calculated a dynamic hematocrit of 26 +/- 4 in DVR and 25 +/- 4% in AVR. The systemic hematocrit was 44 +/- 1%. The dynamic hematocrit in vasa recta represented 59 +/- 9 and 57 +/- 8% of the value in the systemic circulation, respectively.

  17. l-Arginine supplementation enhances antioxidant activity and erythrocyte integrity in sickle cell anaemia subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehinde, M O; Ogungbemi, S I; Anigbogu, C N; Jaja, S I

    2015-09-01

    The effect of oral, low-dose l-arginine supplementation (1g/day for 6 weeks) on antioxidant activity, haematological parameters and osmotic fragility of red blood cells was investigated in sickle cell disease sufferers. Twenty eight sickle cell anaemia subjects were recruited for the study. Five millilitres of blood was withdrawn from an ante-cubital vein for the estimation of plasma arginine concentration ([R]), total antioxidant enzymes (TAE) activity, malondialdehyde concentration ([MDA]), RBC count, [Hb], PCV, MCHC, MCV, MCH, percent irreversibly sickled cells (%ISC)) and osmotic fragility of red blood cells in the subjects. l-arginine supplementation increased [R] (pSupplementation shifted the osmotic fragiligram to the right and reduced the concentrations of NaCl at which initial and complete lyses of erythrocytes occurred. Study showed that low-dose, oral l-arginine increased antioxidant activity, red blood cell resistance to osmotic lysis but reduced red cell density in SCD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Isolation and characterization of cDNA clones for human erythrocyte β-spectrin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prchal, J.T.; Morley, B.J.; Yoon, S.H.; Coetzer, T.L.; Palek, J.; Conboy, J.G.; Kan, Y.W.

    1987-01-01

    Spectrin is an important structural component of the membrane skeleton that underlies and supports the erythrocyte plasma membrane. It is composed of nonidentical α (M/sub r/ 240,000) and β (M/sub r/ 220,000) subunits, each of which contains multiple homologous 106-amino acid segments. The authors report here the isolation and characterization of a human erythroid-specific β-spectrin cDNA clone that encodes parts of the β-9 through β-12 repeat segments. This cDNA was used as a hybridization probe to assign the β-spectrin gene to human chromosome 14 and to begin molecular analysis of the gene and its mRNA transcripts. RNA transfer blot analysis showed that the reticulocyte β-spectrin mRNA is 7.8 kilobases in length. Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA revealed the presence of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) within the β-spectrin gene locus. The isolation of human spectrin cDNA probes and the identification of closely linked RFLPs will facilitate analysis of mutant spectrin genes causing congenital hemolytic anemias associated with quantitative and qualitative spectrin abnormalities

  19. Validity of rapid estimation of erythrocyte volume in the diagnosis of polycytemia vera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, S.; Roedbro, P.

    1989-01-01

    In the diagnosis of polycytemia vera, estimation of erythrocyte volume (EV) from plasma volume (PV) and venous hematocrit (Hct v ) is usually thought unadvisable, because the ratio of whole body hematocrit to venous hematocrit (f ratio) is higher in patients with splenomegaly than in normal subjects, and varies considerably between individuals. We determined the mean f ratio in 232 consecutive patients suspected of polycytemia vera (anti f=0.967; SD 0.048) and used it with each patient's PV and Hct v to calculate an estimated normalised EV n . With measured EV as a reference value, EV n was investigated as a diagnostic test. By means of two cut off levels the EV n values could be divided into EV n elevated, EV n not elevated (both with high predictive values), and an EV n borderline group. The size of the borderline EV n group ranged from 5% to 46% depending on position of the cut off levels, i.e. with the efficiency demanded from the diagnostic test. EV can safely and rapidly be estimated from PV and Hct v , if anti f is determined from the relevant population, and if the results in an easily definable borderline range of EV n values are supplemented by direct EV determination. (orig.)

  20. Erythrocyte glutathione concentration and production during hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and endotoxemia in healthy humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Crabben, Saskia N.; Stegenga, Michiel E.; Blümer, Regje M. E.; Ackermans, Mariëtte T.; Endert, Erik; Tanck, Michael W. T.; Serlie, Mireille J.; van der Poll, Tom; Sauerwein, Hans P.

    2011-01-01

    In diabetes mellitus and sepsis, low erythrocyte glutathione (GSH) concentrations are found. Whether this is caused by lowered GSH production has not been clarified. To obtain insight in the relationship between erythrocyte GSH concentrations and GSH production, GSH kinetics were measured in healthy

  1. Sesquicentennial of the birth of Edmund Faustinus Biernacki, a discoverer of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharz, Eugeniusz J

    2017-01-01

    Edmund Faustinus Biernacki (1866-1911) was a Polish physician and philosopher of medicine. He described erythrocyte sedimentation, designed equipment to measure the erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and applied it to clinical practice. His contribution to the development of one of the most commonly used medical laboratory tests is forgotten, and the test is attributed to other scientists.

  2. Orientation of glutaraldehyde-fixed erythrocytes in strong static magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, T; Sagawa, S; Ashida, N; Takeuchi, T

    1996-01-01

    In a uniform static magnetic field up to 8 Telsa, glutaraldehyde-fixed erythrocytes showed an orientation in which their disk plane was perpendicular to the magnetic field. The paramagnetism of membrane-bound hemoglobin was through to contribute significantly to this orientation. The observation of magnetic orientation is directed toward understanding the fundamental microstructural aspects of the erythrocyte.

  3. Comparative studies on osmosis based encapsulation of sodium diclofenac in porcine and outdated human erythrocyte ghosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukara, Katarina; Drvenica, Ivana; Ilić, Vesna; Stančić, Ana; Mišić, Danijela; Vasić, Borislav; Gajić, Radoš; Vučetić, Dušan; Kiekens, Filip; Bugarski, Branko

    2016-12-20

    The objective of our study was to develop controlled drug delivery system based on erythrocyte ghosts for amphiphilic compound sodium diclofenac considering the differences between erythrocytes derived from two readily available materials - porcine slaughterhouse and outdated transfusion human blood. Starting erythrocytes, empty erythrocyte ghosts and diclofenac loaded ghosts were compared in terms of the encapsulation efficiency, drug releasing profiles, size distribution, surface charge, conductivity, surface roughness and morphology. The encapsulation of sodium diclofenac was performed by an osmosis based process - gradual hemolysis. During this process sodium diclofenac exerted mild and delayed antihemolytic effect and increased potassium efflux in porcine but not in outdated human erythrocytes. FTIR spectra revealed lack of any membrane lipid disorder and chemical reaction with sodium diclofenac in encapsulated ghosts. Outdated human erythrocyte ghosts with detected nanoscale damages and reduced ability to shrink had encapsulation efficiency of only 8%. On the other hand, porcine erythrocyte ghosts had encapsulation efficiency of 37% and relatively slow drug release rate. More preserved structure and functional properties of porcine erythrocytes related to their superior encapsulation and release performances, define them as more appropriate for the usage in sodium diclofenac encapsulation process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. ATP release and extracellular nucleotidase activity in erythrocytes and coronary circulation of rainbow trout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank B; Agnisola, Claudio; Novak, Ivana

    2009-01-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that rainbow trout erythrocytes release ATP upon deoxygenation, a mechanism that enables mammalian erythrocytes to produce local vasodilation. We also investigated ATP release and ectonucleotidase activity in the coronary circulation of the isolated trout h...

  5. Protective effect of heme oxygenase-1 on lung injury induced by erythrocyte instillation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Qing-Feng; Zhou, Qiao-Mei; Zeng, Si; Dou, Li-Dong; Ji, Yong; Zeng, Yin-Ming

    2008-09-05

    Intratracheal instillation of blood induces self-repaired acute lung injury. However, the mechanism of repair has been unclear. Heme-oxygenase (HO)-1, which catalyzes heme breakdown, acts as an inducible defense against oxidative stress and plays an important role in inflammation. The objective of this study was to test the role of HO-1 in lung injury caused by intratracheal instillation of red cells. Forty healthy, male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups: normal group, saline group, erythrocyte group, erythrocyte+zinc-protoporphyrin (ZnPP, HO-1 inhibitor) group and saline+ZnPP group. At 2 days after intratracheal instillation of red cells, lung tissues and lavage samples were isolated for biochemical determinations and histological measurements. Histological analysis revealed that administration of ZnPP worsened the acute lung injury induced by instilled erythrocytes. HO-1 was over-expressed in the erythrocyte group and in the erythrocyte + ZnPP group. Compared with the erythrocyte + ZnPP group, the levels of total protein, lactate dehydrogenase and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in the lavage were lower (P < 0.01), while the level of interleukin-10 was higher in the erythrocyte group (P < 0.01). HO-1 protects against erythrocyte-induced inflammatory injury in lung.

  6. Triggers, inhibitors, mechanisms, and significance of eryptosis: the suicidal erythrocyte death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Elisabeth; Lang, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Suicidal erythrocyte death or eryptosis is characterized by erythrocyte shrinkage, cell membrane blebbing, and cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Triggers of eryptosis include Ca(2+) entry, ceramide formation, stimulation of caspases, calpain activation, energy depletion, oxidative stress, and dysregulation of several kinases. Eryptosis is triggered by a wide variety of xenobiotics. It is inhibited by several xenobiotics and endogenous molecules including NO and erythropoietin. The susceptibility of erythrocytes to eryptosis increases with erythrocyte age. Phosphatidylserine exposing erythrocytes adhere to the vascular wall by binding to endothelial CXC-Motiv-Chemokin-16/Scavenger-receptor for phosphatidylserine and oxidized low density lipoprotein (CXCL16). Phosphatidylserine exposing erythrocytes are further engulfed by phagocytosing cells and are thus rapidly cleared from circulating blood. Eryptosis eliminates infected or defective erythrocytes thus counteracting parasitemia in malaria and preventing detrimental hemolysis of defective cells. Excessive eryptosis, however, may lead to anemia and may interfere with microcirculation. Enhanced eryptosis contributes to the pathophysiology of several clinical disorders including metabolic syndrome and diabetes, malignancy, cardiac and renal insufficiency, hemolytic uremic syndrome, sepsis, mycoplasma infection, malaria, iron deficiency, sickle cell anemia, thalassemia, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, and Wilson's disease. Facilitating or inhibiting eryptosis may be a therapeutic option in those disorders.

  7. Effect of adenine nucleotides and gamma radiation on the transport of TEMPOL across the erythrocyte membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jozwiak, Z.; Gwozdzinski, K.; Helszer, Z. (Lodz Univ. (Poland). Dept. of Biophysics)

    1983-09-01

    External adenine compounds bring about changes in the transport of hydrophilic molecules across control and irradiated bovine erythrocyte membranes. Changes in the transport induced by incubation of erythrocytes with nucleotides depend on the type of nucleotide and its concentration. The range of nucleotide concentrations over which the stimulatory effect on the transport occurs is established.

  8. Erythrocyte lysis in isotonic solution of ammonium chloride: Theoretical modelling and experimental verification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chernyshev, A.V.; Tarasov, P.A.; Semianov, K.A.; Nekrasov, V.M.; Hoekstra, A.G.; Maltsev, V.P.

    2008-01-01

    A mathematical model of erythrocyte lysis in isotonic solution of ammonium chloride is presented in frames of a statistical approach. The model is used to evaluate several parameters of mature erythrocytes (volume, surface area, hemoglobin concentration, number of anionic exchangers on membrane,

  9. Sheep erythrocyte membrane binding and transfer of long-chain fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojesen, Inge Norby; Bojesen, Eigil

    1999-01-01

    Palmitic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid, arachidonic acid, sheep erythrocyte ghosts, transporting elements, transport kinetics, fatty acid transport, transport rate constants......Palmitic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid, arachidonic acid, sheep erythrocyte ghosts, transporting elements, transport kinetics, fatty acid transport, transport rate constants...

  10. Triggers, Inhibitors, Mechanisms, and Significance of Eryptosis: The Suicidal Erythrocyte Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Lang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Suicidal erythrocyte death or eryptosis is characterized by erythrocyte shrinkage, cell membrane blebbing, and cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface. Triggers of eryptosis include Ca2+ entry, ceramide formation, stimulation of caspases, calpain activation, energy depletion, oxidative stress, and dysregulation of several kinases. Eryptosis is triggered by a wide variety of xenobiotics. It is inhibited by several xenobiotics and endogenous molecules including NO and erythropoietin. The susceptibility of erythrocytes to eryptosis increases with erythrocyte age. Phosphatidylserine exposing erythrocytes adhere to the vascular wall by binding to endothelial CXC-Motiv-Chemokin-16/Scavenger-receptor for phosphatidylserine and oxidized low density lipoprotein (CXCL16. Phosphatidylserine exposing erythrocytes are further engulfed by phagocytosing cells and are thus rapidly cleared from circulating blood. Eryptosis eliminates infected or defective erythrocytes thus counteracting parasitemia in malaria and preventing detrimental hemolysis of defective cells. Excessive eryptosis, however, may lead to anemia and may interfere with microcirculation. Enhanced eryptosis contributes to the pathophysiology of several clinical disorders including metabolic syndrome and diabetes, malignancy, cardiac and renal insufficiency, hemolytic uremic syndrome, sepsis, mycoplasma infection, malaria, iron deficiency, sickle cell anemia, thalassemia, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, and Wilson’s disease. Facilitating or inhibiting eryptosis may be a therapeutic option in those disorders.

  11. Micellar electrokinetic chromatography with laser induced fluorescence detection shows increase of putrescine in erythrocytes of Parkinson's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt, L; Rada, P; Hernandez, L; Araujo, H; Ceballos, G A; Hernandez, L E; Tucci, P; Mari, Z; De Pasquale, M; Paredes, D A

    2018-04-01

    A highly sensitive method was developed to measure putrescine by micellar electrokinetic chromatography with laser induced fluorescence detection with excellent linearity in the 1 nM to 3 μM range. The technique was tested on a drop of blood from Parkinson's disease patients obtained by finger prick. The results showed a statistically significant increase of putrescine in the erythrocytes compared to controls and a non-significant increase in plasma. This high level of putrescine does not constitute by itself proof that putrescine and polyamines are directly related to Parkinson's disease. However, the present results and several others addressed in the discussion suggest that these compounds might be causally involved in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease. In addition, the analytical method reported here may help to find new biomarkers for many diseases including Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Characterisation and Identification of Avian Influenza Virus (AI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Ayu Hewajuli

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Avian Influenza is caused by Influenza A virus which is a member of Orthomyxoviridae family. Influenza A virus is enveloped single stranded RNA with eight-segmented, negative polarity and filament or oval form, 50 – 120 by 200 – 300 nm diameters. Influenza A viruses have been found to infect birds, human, pig, horse and sometimes in the other mammalian such as seal and whale. The viruses are divided into different subtypes based on the antigenic protein which covers the virus surface i.e. Haemaglutinin (HA and Neuraminidase (NA. In addition, the nomenclature of subtype virus is based on HA and NA i.e HxNx, for example H5N1, H9N2 and the others. According to pathogenic, it could be divided into two distinct groups, they are Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI and Low Pathogenic Avian Influenza (LPAI. The Avian Influenza viruses have been continuously occurred and spread out in some continents such us America, Europe, Africa and Asian countries. The outbreak of Avian Influenza caused high mortality on birds and it has been reported that in human case Avian Influenza subtype H5N1 virus has caused several deaths. To anticipate this condition, an effort to prevent the transmission of Avian Influenza is needed. These strategic attempts include biosecurity, depopulation, vaccination, control of virus movement, monitoring and evaluation. Laboratory diagnostic plays an important role for successful prevention, control and eradication programs of Avian Influenza. Recently, there are two diagnostic methods for Avian Influenza. They are conventional (virological diagnosis and molecular methods. The conventional method is usually used for initial diagnostic of Avian Influenza. The conventional method takes more time and more costly, whereas the molecular method is more effective than conventional method. Based on the available diagnostic technique, basically diagnostic of Avian Influenza is done by serology test, isolation and identification as well

  13. Specific T-cell recognition of the merozoite proteins rhoptry-associated protein 1 and erythrocyte-binding antigen 1 of Plasmodium falciparum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, P H; Hviid, L; Theander, T G

    1993-01-01

    The merozoite proteins merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP-1) and rhoptry-associated protein 1 (RAP-1) and synthetic peptides containing sequences of MSP-1, RAP-1, and erythrocyte-binding antigen 1, induced in vitro proliferative responses of lymphocytes collected from Ghanaian blood donors living...... by individuals living in an area with a high transmission rate of malaria. Most of the donor plasma samples tested contained immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM antibodies recognizing the merozoite proteins, while only a minority showed high IgG reactivity to the synthetic peptides....

  14. Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) and salicylic acid interaction with the human erythrocyte membrane bilayer induce in vitro changes in the morphology of erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwalsky, Mario; Belmar, Jessica; Villena, Fernando; Gallardo, María José; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2013-11-01

    Despite the well-documented information, there are insufficient reports concerning the effects of salicylate compounds on the structure and functions of cell membranes, particularly those of human erythrocytes. With the aim to better understand the molecular mechanisms of the interaction of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and salicylic acid (SA) with cell membranes, human erythrocyte membranes and molecular models were utilized. These consisted of bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), representative of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane, respectively. The capacity of ASA and SA to perturb the multibilayer structures of DMPC and DMPE was evaluated by X-ray diffraction while DMPC unilamellar vesicles (LUV) were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy. Moreover, we took advantage of the capability of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to detect the changes in the thermotropic phase behavior of lipid bilayers resulting from ASA and SA interaction with PC and PE molecules. In an attempt to further elucidate their effects on cell membranes, the present work also examined their influence on the morphology of intact human erythrocytes by means of defocusing and scanning electron microscopy, while isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes (IUM) were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy. Results indicated that both salicylates interact with human erythrocytes and their molecular models in a concentration-dependent manner perturbing their bilayer structures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Reduction of hydrogen peroxide-induced erythrocyte damage by Carica papaya leaf extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoko, Tebekeme; Ere, Diepreye

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the in vitro antioxidant potential of Carica papaya (C. papaya) leaf extract and its effect on hydrogen peroxide-induced erythrocyte damage assessed by haemolysis and lipid peroxidation. Hydroxyl radical scavenging activities, hydrogen ion scavenging activity, metal chelating activity, and the ferrous ion reducing ability were assessed as antioxidant indices. In the other experiment, human erythrocytes were treated with hydrogen peroxide to induce erythrocyte damage. The extract (at various concentrations) was subsequently incubated with the erythrocytes and later analysed for haemolysis and lipid peroxidation as indices for erythrocyte damage. Preliminary investigation of the extract showed that the leaf possessed significant antioxidant and free radical scavenging abilities using in vitro models in a concentration dependent manner (Ppapaya leaves possess significant bioactive potential which is attributed to the phytochemicals which act in synergy. Thus, the leaves can be exploited for pharmaceutical and nutritional purposes.

  16. Chronic exposure to quinalphos shows biochemical changes and genotoxicty in erythrocytes of silver barb, Barbonymus gonionotus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadiqul Islam M.

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available An in vivo study was carried out on the freshwater fish Barbonymus gonionotus to evaluate the genotoxic effects of the organophosphate quinalphos. The fish were exposed to sub-lethal doses of quinalphos (0%, 10%, 25%, and 50% of LC50 for a period of 30 days. Analysis of biochemical characteristics (protein and lipid contents of different organs, nuclear abnormalities of erythrocytes (NAE and morphological abnormalities of erythrocytes (MAE were performed on peripheral erythrocytes sampled at post-treatment intervals of 0 and 30 days. The biochemical results revealed a significant dose-dependent decline in protein and lipid contents and increase in the frequencies of NAE as well as MAE. Our findings also confirmed that the morphological deformations of erythrocytes in addition to NAE on fish erythrocytes in vivo are effective tools in determining the potential genotoxicity of organophosphates.

  17. Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome with increased erythrocytic hydrogen sulfide and response to midodrine hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinyan; Zhao, Juan; Du, Shuxu; Liu, Die; Fu, Chunhin; Li, Xueying; Chen, Stella; Tang, Chaoshu; Du, Junbao; Jin, Hongfang

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the use of erythrocytic hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in predicting the therapeutic efficacy of midodrine hydrochloride for children with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS). Fifty-five children were included in this study, involving 28 children with POTS (POTS group) and 27 healthy children (control group). Children in the POTS group received midodrine hydrochloride treatment. Erythrocytic H2S production was measured; a receiver operating characteristic curve was used to assess if erythrocytic H2S could predict the therapeutic response to midodrine hydrochloride treatment. H2S production from erythrocytes was significantly higher in the POTS group than in the control group (P midodrine hydrochloride than in non-responders (P midodrine hydrochloride therapy for children with POTS. Erythrocytic H2S could serve as a useful predictor of therapeutic response to midodrine hydrochloride in children with POTS. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The hemolytic component of cancer anemia: effects of osmotic and metabolic stress on the erythrocytes of rats bearing multifocal inoculations of the Walker 256 tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vido A.A.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer anemia is classified as an anemia of chronic diseases, although it is sometimes the first symptom of cancer. Cancer anemia includes a hemolytic component, important in the terminal stage when even transfused cells are rapidly destroyed. The presence of a chronic component and the terminal complications of the illness limit studies of the hemolytic component. A multifocal model of tumor growth was used here to simulate the terminal metastatic dissemination stage (several simultaneous inoculations of Walker 256 cells. The hemolytic component of anemia began 3-4 days after inoculation in 100% of the rats and progressed rapidly thereafter: Hb levels dropped from 14.9 ± 0.02 to 8.7 ± 0.06 from days 7 to 11 (~5 times the physiologically normal rate in rats in the absence of bleeding. The development of anemia was correlated (r2 = 0.86 with the development of other systemic effects such as anorexia. There was a significant decrease in the osmotic fragility of circulating erythrocytes: the NaCl concentration causing 50% lysis was reduced from 4.52 ± 0.06 to 4.10 ± 0.01 (P<0.01 on day 7, indicating a reduction in erythrocyte volume. However, with mild metabolic stress (4-h incubation at 37oC, the erythrocytes showed a greater increase in osmotic fragility than the controls, suggesting marked alteration of erythrocyte homeostasis. These effects may be due to primary plasma membrane alterations (transport and/or permeability and/or may be secondary to metabolic changes. This multifocal model is adequate for studying the hemolytic component of cancer anemia since it is rapid, highly reproducible and causes minimal animal suffering.

  19. Erythrocyte membrane fatty acids in multiple sclerosis patients and hot-nature dietary intervention with co-supplemented hemp-seed and evening-primrose oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezapour-Firouzi, Soheila; Arefhosseini, Seyed Rafie; Ebrahimi-Mamaghani, Mehrangiz; Farhoudi, Mehdi; Baradaran, Behzad; Ali, Torbati Mohammad; Zamani, Fatemeh

    2013-01-01

    The risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with increased dietary intake of saturated fatty acids. For many years it has been suspected that this disease might be associated with an imbalance between unsaturated and saturated fatty acids. We determined erythrocyte membrane fatty acids levels in Hot nature dietary intervention with co-supplemented hemp seed and evening primrose oils in multiple sclerosis patients. To determine the erythrocyte membrane fatty acids levels and correlate it with expanded disability status scale (EDSS) at baseline after 6 months intervention in MS patients by gas chromatography, in this double blind, randomized trial, 100 RRMS patients with EDSShemp seed and evening primrose oils with advised Hot nature diet. "Group B" received olive oil and "Group C" received the co-supplemented oils. The results showed that the mean follow-up was 180 ± 2.9SD days (N=65, 23 M and 42 F aged 34.25 ± 8.07 years with disease duration of 6.80 ± 4.33 years). There was no significant difference in the study parameters at baseline. After 6 months, EDSS, Immunological parameters and the erythrocyte cell membrane with regard to specific fatty acids showed improvement in the group A and C, whereas there was worsening condition for the group B after the intervention. We concluded that Hot-nature dietary intervention with co-supplemented hemp seed and evening primrose oils caused an increase PUFAs in MS patients and improvement in the erythrocyte membrane fatty acids composition. This could be an indication of restored plasma stores, and a reflection of disease severity reduction.

  20. [Change of erythrocyte charge with the use of Alcian blue method in Ascaris lumbricoides extracts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce de León, Patricia; Di Vita, Santiago; Racca, Liliana; Biondi, Claudia; Valverde, Juana

    2011-01-01

    the study of the host-parasite interactions is a new challenge to understanding some aspects of the parasitic metabolism and the mechanisms of invasion, immunological evasion and damage. Ascaris lumbricoides may cause anemia and thrombosis. It was previously shown that Ascaris lumbricoides modified the superficial charge of erythrocytes, which means that the parasite can capture sialic acid from the red blood cell. to study the effect of adult parasite extracts on the erythrocyte charge using the Alcian Blue method and to compare its sensitivity with the Polybrene method: fifty five adult parasite extracts and Group O erythrocyte suspensions were used. The erythrocytes were treated by incubating the sediment with an equal volume of parasite extracts for one hour at 37 degrees C. The control group (erythrocytes without any contact with the parasite extracts) was incubated with pH 7.4 phosphate buffer solution. Alcian Blue method was applied and the percentage erythrocyte anionic charge was determined in the control group and in the treated red cells. The experimental coefficient of erythrocyte anionic charge was defined as the quotient between the initial and the final percentage erythrocyte anionic charge. it was shown that 27 out of 55 parasite extracts (49.1 %) modified the charge of the red blood cells, being their experimental coefficient of the erythrocyte anionic charge 0.75 +/- 0.1144 whereas the same coefficient amounted to 0,94 +/- 0.0445 for those which did not show any charge variation. The statistical analysis concluded that the Polybrene and Alcian Blue Methods had comparable sensitivities (p>0.20). A. lumbricoides is able to capture sialic acid from the erythrocyte, which would not only explain the thrombosis attributed to the parasite, but also suggest that the nematode could use this acid either in its metabolic routes or for its strategies of immunological evasion.

  1. 2 original article non-attenuation of highly pathogenic avian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Oboro VO

    Ularamu, H. G1., Ponman, S1 and Nwagbo, I2., 1 FAO Regional Laboratory for Avian Influenza and Newcastle. Disease (West and Central ... Avian influenza H5N1 represents one of the most researched viruses in laboratories world-wide in recent times with regards ..... Cayouette B. Kinetics of ultra- violet light inactivation of.

  2. High prevalence of avian malaria infection to avifauna at Cape ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This investigation was undertaken during January and February 2004, to determine the epidemiological risk of avian malaria infection to seabirds at the proposed marine animal rehabilitation complex, to be sited at Cape Receife. Despite low numbers of mosquitoes trapped, the incidence of avian malaria infections was ...

  3. Genetic differences between avian and human isolates of Candida dubliniensis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McManus, Brenda A

    2009-09-01

    When Candida dubliniensis isolates obtained from seabird excrement and from humans in Ireland were compared by using multilocus sequence typing, 13 of 14 avian isolates were genetically distinct from human isolates. The remaining avian isolate was indistinguishable from a human isolate, suggesting that transmission may occur between humans and birds.

  4. Avian fossils from the Early Miocene Moghra Formation of Egypt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Avian remains from the Early Miocene (~17 Ma) Moghra Formation of Egypt include new records of 'waterbirds' (storks, herons, pelicans and allies) and a ratite. Only a single avian fossil has been previously reported from Wadi Moghra and, thus, additional knowledge of the avifauna complements previously documented ...

  5. Avian influenza, Newcastle and Gumboro disease antibodies and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies on avian influenza and Newcastle disease focus on waterfowls, considered natural reservoirs of these viruses. This study surveyed avian influenza (AI), Gumboro and Newcastle disease antibodies and antigens in birds in live wild bird markets (LWBMs), live poultry markets (LPMs) and free flying in Kaduna State ...

  6. Flock-based surveillance for lowpathogenic avian influenza virus in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Flock-based surveillance for lowpathogenic avian influenza virus in commercial breeders and layers, southwest Nigeria. ... African Journal of Infectious Diseases ... Background: Flock surveillance systems for avian influenza (AI) virus play a critical role in countries where vaccination is not practiced so as to establish the ...

  7. Avian nestling predation by endangered Mount Graham red squirrel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claire A. Zugmeyer; John L. Koprowski

    2007-01-01

    Studies using artificial nests or remote cameras have documented avian predation by red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus). Although several direct observations of avian predation events are known in the northern range of the red squirrel distribution, no accounts have been reported in the southern portion. We observed predation upon a hermit thrush...

  8. 9 CFR 113.208 - Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., Killed Virus. 113.208 Section 113.208 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.208 Avian Encephalomyelitis Vaccine, Killed Virus. Avian...

  9. Prevention and Treatment of Avian Influenza A Viruses in People

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in People Spread of Bird Flu Viruses Between Animals and People Examples of Human Infections with Avian Influenza A ... Influenza A (H5N1) H5N1 in Birds and Other Animals H5N1 in People Public Health Threat of Highly Pathogenic Asian Avian ...

  10. Avian Influenza A (H7N9) Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in People Spread of Bird Flu Viruses Between Animals and People Examples of Human Infections with Avian Influenza A ... Influenza A (H5N1) H5N1 in Birds and Other Animals H5N1 in People Public Health Threat of Highly Pathogenic Asian Avian ...

  11. Avian research in the U.S. Forest Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatrice Van Horne

    2005-01-01

    Avian research in the Federal Government is in a crisis. Yes, there is a strong interest in avian research, as evidenced by the size and level of interest in this conference. But political parties increasingly see wildlife research as expendable. At the same time, the reaction to environment-friendly legislation of the 1970s and 1980s has been strong from both sides....

  12. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of avian interleukin-19

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study describes the cloning and functional characterization of avian interleukin (IL)-19, a cytokine that, in mammals, alters the balance of Th1 and Th2 cells in favor of the Th2 phenotype. The full-length avian IL-19 gene, located on chromosome 26, was amplified from LPS-stimulated chi...

  13. Socioeconomic Impacts of Avian Influenza on Small and Backyard ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    and compensation schemes are more difficult to enforce than in large commercial poultry farms. Moreover, small and backyard farmers have fewer reserves to cope with the financial impact of avian influenza and, possibly, greater motivation to circumvent government control measures. The Asian Partnership for Avian ...

  14. Ontogeny of avian thermoregulation from a neural point of view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baarendse, P.J.J.; Debonne, M.; Decuypere, M.P.; Kemp, B.; Brand, van den H.

    2007-01-01

    The ontogeny of thermoregulation differs among (avian) species, but in all species both neural and endocrinological processes are involved. In this review the neural processes in ontogeny of thermoregulation during the prenatal and early postnatal phase are discussed. Only in a few avian species

  15. 9 CFR 113.70 - Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian Isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Isolate. 113.70 Section 113.70 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... REQUIREMENTS Live Bacterial Vaccines § 113.70 Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian Isolate. Pasteurella Multocida Vaccine, Avian Isolate, shall be prepared as a desiccated live culture of an avirulent or modified...

  16. Detection of avian nephritis virus and chicken astrovirus in Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Avian nephritis virus (ANV) and chicken astrovirus (CAstV) are widely distributed in poultry flocks worldwide, causing growth retardation. However, these avian astroviruses have not been previously diagnosed in poultry species in Nigeria. Real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (rRTPCR) and reverse ...

  17. Nanostructures for the development of vaccines against avian ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2018-01-12

    Jan 12, 2018 ... Photo: IDRC / Sven Torfinn. The impact of avian influenza. The livelihoods of smallholder farmers, who most frequently own poultry have been severely impacted by recent outbreaks of avian influenza (AI). The severity of the disease can range from mild to extremely severe cases with up to a 100% mortality ...

  18. Plasma turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, W.

    1998-07-01

    The origin of plasma turbulence from currents and spatial gradients in plasmas is described and shown to lead to the dominant transport mechanism in many plasma regimes. A wide variety of turbulent transport mechanism exists in plasmas. In this survey the authors summarize some of the universally observed plasma transport rates

  19. Effect of thiol reactive reagents and ionizing radiation on the permeability of erythrocyte membrane for non-electrolyte spin labels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwozdzinski, K.

    1986-08-01

    The paper presents some results on the effect of PCMB and NEM on the transport of non-electrolyte spin labels: TEMPO and TEMPOL across non-irradiated and irradiated porcine erythrocyte. Irradiated erythrocytes exhibited increased inhibitory effect of thiol reactive compounds in the TEMPO and TEMPOL transport compared to non-irradiated erythrocytes.

  20. Hierarchical, domain type-specific acquisition of antibodies to Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 in Tanzanian children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cham, Gerald K K; Turner, Louise; Kurtis, Jonathan D

    2010-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) is a variant antigen expressed on the surface of malaria-infected erythrocytes. PfEMP1 attaches to the vascular lining and allows infected erythrocytes to avoid filtration through the spleen. Each parasite genome encodes about 60 diffe...

  1. Avian influenza in shorebirds: experimental infection of ruddy turnstones (Arenaria interpres) with avian influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jeffrey S.; Krauss, Scott; Franson, J. Christian; TeSlaa, Joshua L.; Nashold, Sean W.; Stallknecht, David E.; Webby, Richard J.; Webster, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Low pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIV) have been reported in shorebirds, especially at Delaware Bay, USA, during spring migration. However, data on patterns of virus excretion, minimal infectious doses, and clinical outcome are lacking. The ruddy turnstone (Arenaria interpres) is the shorebird species with the highest prevalence of influenza virus at Delaware Bay. Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to experimentally assess the patterns of influenza virus excretion, minimal infectious doses, and clinical outcome in ruddy turnstones. Methods: We experimentally challenged ruddy turnstones using a common LPAIV shorebird isolate, an LPAIV waterfowl isolate, or a highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus. Cloacal and oral swabs and sera were analyzed from each bird. Results: Most ruddy turnstones had pre-existing antibodies to avian influenza virus, and many were infected at the time of capture. The infectious doses for each challenge virus were similar (103·6–104·16 EID50), regardless of exposure history. All infected birds excreted similar amounts of virus and showed no clinical signs of disease or mortality. Influenza A-specific antibodies remained detectable for at least 2 months after inoculation. Conclusions: These results provide a reference for interpretation of surveillance data, modeling, and predicting the risks of avian influenza transmission and movement in these important hosts.

  2. Changes in erythrocyte insulin receptors in normal dogs and keeshond dogs with inheritable, early onset, insulin dependent diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klaassen, J.K.

    1986-01-01

    Validation of a procedure to evaluate insulin receptors on erythrocytes (RBC-IR) in dogs is described. The specific binding of (/sup 125/I)iodoinsulin to RBC-IR of normal dogs is significantly greater than binding in keeshonds with an inheritable form of early onset diabetes mellitus. This decreased binding was due to a significant decrease in RBC-IR affinity in the diabetic keeshonds. To determine the effect on RBC-IR, normal dogs were treated with either dexamethasone (0.1 mg/kg) or prednisone (0.3 mg/kg) for 10 days: concentrations of plasma cortisol, glucose, and insulin, plus binding characteristics of RBC-IR were determined. In the dexamethasone treated group, plasma glucose concentrations were elevated significantly by day 6 and continued through day 10. Insulin concentrations were elevated significantly by day 3 and remained elevated through day 10. In the prednisone treated group, glucose concentrations were elevated significantly by day 3, while insulin concentrations were elevated significantly by day 8. Maximum binding of RBC-IR was unaffected by prednisone and neither affinities nor receptor numbers were significantly different from day 1. No changes in plasma cortisol concentration were seen. Diabetic keeshonds on daily insulin treatment were removed from exogenous insulin therapy for 48 hours. Significant increases in glucose concentrations were observed, but no significant changes in cortisol, insulin, average receptor binding affinity, or RBC-IR number per cell occurred.

  3. Changes in erythrocyte insulin receptors in normal dogs and keeshond dogs with inheritable, early onset, insulin dependent diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klaassen, J.K.

    1986-01-01

    Validation of a procedure to evaluate insulin receptors on erythrocytes (RBC-IR) in dogs is described. The specific binding of ( 125 I)iodoinsulin to RBC-IR of normal dogs is significantly greater than binding in keeshonds with an inheritable form of early onset diabetes mellitus. This decreased binding was due to a significant decrease in RBC-IR affinity in the diabetic keeshonds. To determine the effect on RBC-IR, normal dogs were treated with either dexamethasone (0.1 mg/kg) or prednisone (0.3 mg/kg) for 10 days: concentrations of plasma cortisol, glucose, and insulin, plus binding characteristics of RBC-IR were determined. In the dexamethasone treated group, plasma glucose concentrations were elevated significantly by day 6 and continued through day 10. Insulin concentrations were elevated significantly by day 3 and remained elevated through day 10. In the prednisone treated group, glucose concentrations were elevated significantly by day 3, while insulin concentrations were elevated significantly by day 8. Maximum binding of RBC-IR was unaffected by prednisone and neither affinities nor receptor numbers were significantly different from day 1. No changes in plasma cortisol concentration were seen. Diabetic keeshonds on daily insulin treatment were removed from exogenous insulin therapy for 48 hours. Significant increases in glucose concentrations were observed, but no significant changes in cortisol, insulin, average receptor binding affinity, or RBC-IR number per cell occurred

  4. Avian mycobacteriosis in companion birds: 20-year survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manarolla, Giovanni; Liandris, Emmanouil; Pisoni, Giuliano; Sassera, Davide; Grilli, Guido; Gallazzi, Daniele; Sironi, Giuseppe; Moroni, Paolo; Piccinini, Renata; Rampin, Tiziana

    2009-02-02

    The causative agents of avian mycobacteriosis in pet birds are rarely identified. The aim of this study is to add information about the etiology of avian mycobacteriosis. The identification of mycobacterium species in 27 cases of avian mycobacteriosis in pet birds was investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing of a rRNA hypervariable region. Avian mycobacteriosis appeared to be an infrequent diagnosis. Interestingly, a few cases of avian mycobacteriosis were recorded in very young birds. The most commonly affected species were the canary (Serinus canarius), the Eurasian goldfinch (Carduelis carduelis) and the red siskin (Spinus cucullatus). All but one bird were infected with Mycobacterium genavense. Mycobacterium avium was identified only in one case.

  5. assessment of the economic and social implications of the avian flu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admin

    2006-01-22

    Jan 22, 2006 ... KEYWORDS: Assessment, Economic, Social Implications, Avian Flu, Nigerian Poultry. INTRODUCTION. Avian flu is a highly infectious, contagious and zoonotic disease of man, poultry and other birds caused by the avian influenza type A virus, Emmanuel et.al. (2006). The avian influenza virus belongs to ...

  6. Fish oil affects blood pressure and the plasma lipid profile in healthy Danish infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, C.T.; Schack-Nielsen, L.; Michaelsen, K.F.

    2006-01-01

    with an oscillometric device, and blood was sampled for analysis of erythrocyte fatty acid composition and the plasma lipid profile. This paper examines the effects of the fish oil supplement, with adjustment for the effects of the milk intervention when relevant. The fish oil intervention increased erythrocyte (n-3.......04) than infants not administered fish oil. Plasma triacylglycerol was inversely associated with the erythrocyte content of eicosapentaenoic acid (r = 0.34, P dose. The observed effects of fish oil are in accordance with findings in adults. The long-term health implications......Animal and epidemiologic studies indicate that early nutrition has lasting effects on metabolism and cardiovascular disease risk. In adults, (n-3) long-chain PUFA (LCPUFA) from fish oils improve blood pressure, the lipid profile, and possibly cardiovascular disease mortality. This randomized trial...

  7. New USDA licensed avian influenza vaccine (rHVT-AI) for protection against H5 avian influenza and usage discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently, a new avian influenza vaccine was licensed by USDA for use in the United States for protection of commercial poultry. The vaccine is a recombinant herpes virus of turkeys expressing the hemagglutinin gene of an H5 subtype avian influenza virus belonging to the 2.2 clade of the H5N1 highly ...

  8. Estimates of plasma, packed cell and total blood volume in tissues of the rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingerich, W.H.; Pityer, R.A.; Rach, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    1. Total blood volume and relative blood volumes in selected tissues were determined in non-anesthetized, confined rainbow trout by using 51Cr-labelled trout erythrocytes as a vascular space marker.2. Mean total blood volume was estimated to be 4.09 ± 0.55 ml/100 g, or about 75% of that estimated with the commonly used plasma space marker Evans blue dye.3. Relative tissue blood volumes were greatest in highly perfused tissues such as kidney, gills, brain and liver and least in mosaic muscle.4. Estimates of tissue vascular spaces, made using radiolabelled erythrocytes, were only 25–50% of those based on plasma space markers.5. The consistently smaller vascular volumes obtained with labelled erythrocytes could be explained by assuming that commonly used plasma space markers diffuse from the vascular compartment.

  9. Influence of suspension osmolarity and erythrocyte volume on cell deformability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feo, C. (Institut de Pathologie Cellulaire, INSERM, 94 - Kremlin-Bicetre (France)); Phillips, W.M. (School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (USA))

    1982-01-01

    Erythrocytes were suspended in dextran solutions of phosphate buffered saline with solution osmolarities from 400 to 20 mosM/kg. The dilute suspensions were subjected to linear shear and their deformation determined by laser diffractometry (Ektacytometer). Cell volumes were measured using a Coulter counter following fixation in glutaraldehyde to eliminate the influence of deformability on the volume measurement. Minimum deformability generally agreed with the maximum cellular volume produced by hypotonic solutions. However, reduced deformability was observed for both hyperosmotic and hypoosmotic conditions. The oncotic effect of the dextran delayed hemolysis to surprisingly low values of solution osmolarity. In contrast with the usual osmotic fragility results, in the hypotonic dextran solutions there was no evidence of hemoglobin release. At low shear stresses, deformability was found to be enhanced by reducing intracellular viscosity (via osmotic water transport into the cell). However, the maximum cellular deformation obtained at high shear stress was always less than for the normal discocyte at normal osmolarities.

  10. Action of certain chemical compounds on radiation haemolysis of erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolesnikov, Yu.A.; Shulgina, M.A.; Yartsev, E.I.; Novoseltseva, S.D.; Bogatyrev, G.P.

    1975-01-01

    A radioprotective action of a number of protective chemicals on radiation haemolysis of erythrocytes has been studied. S-bearing radioprotectors, serotonin and arginine possess the highest radioprotective activity. The same radioprotectors delivered to the medium after irradiation do not influence the development of the post-irradiation haemolysis. Certain amino acids, namely proline, serine and taurine have a pronounced radio-protective action when given to the medium after irradiation, taurine producing the strongest effect on the development of radiation haemolysis. The mechanism of action of these substances is unrelated to the increased osmotic pressure of the medium and might be explained by normalization of the functional state of cytomembranes and processes of cell metabolism

  11. SANS studies of interacting hemoglobin in intact erythrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krueger, S.; Nossal, R.

    1988-01-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to investigate interaction forces between hemoglobin (Hb) molecules contained within human red cells. The scattering separately attributable to cell membranes and intracellular Hb was identified. A series of D/sub 2/O-H/sub 2/O contrast variation measurements were made in order to establish conditions for which scattering from the cell membrane is minimized (approximately 15% D/sub 2/O). Measurements then were performed to examine changes in intermolecular Hb interactions occurring when the cells are contracted or swollen by varying the ionic strength of the suspension buffer. The scattering cross-sections were fitted to structure factors computed by a mean spherical approximation, and molecular parameters thereby extracted. Oxygenation studies on normal cells were performed, and results contrasted with those of similar studies of erythrocytes obtained from sickle cell disease patients.

  12. Arrangement of phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine in the erythrocyte membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinetti, G V

    1977-03-01

    Cross-linking of phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylserine in the erythrocyte membrane with the reagent difluorodinitrobenzene was studied as a function of temperature, time and concentration of difluorodinitrobenzene. The optimal extent of cross-linking of phosphatidylethanolamine to phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylethanolamine to phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylserine to phosphatidylserine was expressed as molar ratios of these three different cross-linked species. The experimental results were compared to different models of a phospholipid monolayer containing phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylserine in which phosphatidylserine was arranged primarily as singles (having 6 phosphatidylethanolamine neighbors) as clusters of dimers, trimer and tetramers or as large clusters. In the various model monolayers each lipid component has 6 neighbors. The models which are consistent with the experimental results are those in which phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine occur as small clusters in a non-random array.

  13. Plasma properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weitzner, H.

    1990-06-01

    This paper discusses the following topics: MHD plasma activity: equilibrium, stability and transport; statistical analysis; transport studies; edge physics studies; wave propagation analysis; basic plasma physics and fluid dynamics; space plasma; and numerical methods

  14. Solubilization of human erythrocyte membranes by ASB detergents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.C. Domingues

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the membrane solubilization process and finding effective solubilizing agents are crucial challenges in biochemical research. Here we report results on the interaction of the novel linear alkylamido propyl dimethyl amino propanosulfonate detergents, ASB-14 and ASB-16, with human erythrocyte membranes. An estimation of the critical micelle concentration of these zwitterionic detergents (ASB-14 = 100 µM and ASB-16 = 10 µM was obtained using electron paramagnetic resonance. The amount of proteins and cholesterol solubilized from erythrocytes by these detergents was then determined. The hemolytic activities of the ASB detergents were assayed and the detergent/lipid molar ratios for the onset of hemolysis (Re sat and total lysis (Re sol were calculated, allowing the determination of the membrane binding constants (Kb. ASB-14 presented lower membrane affinity (Kb = 7050 M-1 than ASB-16 (Kb = 15610 M-1. The amount of proteins and cholesterol solubilized by both ASB detergents was higher while Re sat values (0.22 and 0.08 detergent/lipid for ASB-14 and ASB-16, respectively were smaller than those observed with the classic detergents CHAPS and Triton X-100. These results reveal that, besides their well-known use as membrane protein solubilizers to enhance the resolution of two dimensional electrophoresis/mass spectrometry, ASB-14 and ASB-16 are strong hemolytic agents. We propose that the physicochemical properties of ASB detergents determine their membrane disruption efficiency and can help to explain the improvement in the solubilization of membrane proteins, as reported in the literature.

  15. Erythrocyte caspase-3 levels in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak-Jonkisz, D; Purzyc, L; Szcepańska, M; Makulska, I

    2013-02-01

    In chronic kidney disease (CKD), a number of intra- and extracellular factors, e.g., uremic toxins, mechanic, oxidative or osmotic stress - induce changes (rearrangements) in the structure of cytoplasmatic membrane, while also simultaneously deregulating blood cell metabolism and, in consequence, contributing to preliminary ageing and suicidal death of red blood cells (RBCs).The aim of the reported study was an evaluation of caspase-3 and lactate dehydrogenase activities and of ATP concentrations in erythrocytes as cellular responses to CKD progress. Conservatively treated sixty (60) CKD children were enrolled into the study and divided, according to CKD progression (stage I-IV). The control group consisted of twenty-five (25) healthy children. The activity of caspase-3 (Casp-3) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were spectrophotometrically assayed in haemolysed erythrocytes. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP(e)) concentrations were measured by means of a luciferin-luciferase kit. A gradual increase of LDH and ATP levels was observed in transition from CKD stage I to stage III. In Group IV, the levels of those parameters were statistically significantly lower than in the control group. The activity of Casp-3 in Group I was comparable to that in healthy children. The highest activity of Casp-3 was observed in Group III. 1. The activity of caspase-3 in RBCs of CKD children grows with progression of the disease. 2. The lower LDH activities and the ATP concentration drop below the values characteristic for the control group, as observed in stage IV of CKD, indicate a compromised energy balance. Copyright © 2012 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Epidemiological perspectives on SARS and avian influenza].

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Rey Calero, Juan

    2004-01-01

    SARS is a respiratory infection caused by Coronavirus (Nidoviruses, RNA) from which 3 groups are known. Group 1 affects dogs, cats, pigs, and the human agent is 229 E. Group 2 affects bovines or rodents, and the human agent is OC43. And group 3 corresponds to the avian pathology.... The epidemics emerged on February 2003 in Guangdong, South China, due to consumption of exotic animals (Civeta, etc.), and it spread through interperson contagion to other regions in Asia, America and Europe. Incubation period is about 2-7 days. Transmission Of the virus is person-to person, but also by excretions and residual water. Basic reproductive rate is 2 to 4, and it is considered that 2.7 persons are infected from the initial case. In June 2003, SARS affected over 8,000 people and 774 were killed. Mortality approaches to 10%, and it is higher among older people rising up to 50% in those aged over 65 years. It is important to quickly establish action protocols regarding clinical, epidemiological and prevention aspects. Avian influenza is an infection caused by type A Influenza Orthomixovirus, in which migration birds and wild ducks are the main reservoir. Avian viruses correspond to H5, H7, H9. In 1997 it was observed that type AH5N1 jumped interspecies barrier and affected 18 humans, and 6 of them died. At the end of 2003 and in 2004 this type of poultry flu was described in Asia. FAO has emphasized that sacrifice of chicken in affected farms is the most effective measure to fight against the disease. It has also been established suppression of imports from these countries. There is no evidence on interperson contagion from chicken contagion, nor on food-borne contagion to humans.

  17. The avian transcriptome response to malaria infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videvall, Elin; Cornwallis, Charlie K; Palinauskas, Vaidas; Valkiūnas, Gediminas; Hellgren, Olof

    2015-05-01

    Malaria parasites are highly virulent pathogens which infect a wide range of vertebrates. Despite their importance, the way different hosts control and suppress malaria infections remains poorly understood. With recent developments in next-generation sequencing techniques, however, it is now possible to quantify the response of the entire transcriptome to infections. We experimentally infected Eurasian siskins (Carduelis spinus) with avian malaria parasites (Plasmodium ashfordi), and used high-throughput RNA-sequencing to measure the avian transcriptome in blood collected before infection (day 0), during peak parasitemia (day 21 postinfection), and when parasitemia was decreasing (day 31). We found considerable differences in the transcriptomes of infected and uninfected individuals, with a large number of genes differentially expressed during both peak and decreasing parasitemia stages. These genes were overrepresented among functions involved in the immune system, stress response, cell death regulation, metabolism, and telomerase activity. Comparative analyses of the differentially expressed genes in our study to those found in other hosts of malaria (human and mouse) revealed a set of genes that are potentially involved in highly conserved evolutionary responses to malaria infection. By using RNA-sequencing we gained a more complete view of the host response, and were able to pinpoint not only well-documented host genes but also unannotated genes with clear significance during infection, such as microRNAs. This study shows how the avian blood transcriptome shifts in response to malaria infection, and we believe that it will facilitate further research into the diversity of molecular mechanisms that hosts utilize to fight malaria infections. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  18. The threshold of a stochastic avian-human influenza epidemic model with psychological effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fengrong; Zhang, Xinhong

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, a stochastic avian-human influenza epidemic model with psychological effect in human population and saturation effect within avian population is investigated. This model describes the transmission of avian influenza among avian population and human population in random environments. For stochastic avian-only system, persistence in the mean and extinction of the infected avian population are studied. For the avian-human influenza epidemic system, sufficient conditions for the existence of an ergodic stationary distribution are obtained. Furthermore, a threshold of this stochastic model which determines the outcome of the disease is obtained. Finally, numerical simulations are given to support the theoretical results.

  19. Current genomic editing approaches in avian transgenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Tae Sub; Kang, Kyung Soo; Han, Jae Yong

    2013-09-01

    The chicken was domesticated from Red Jungle Fowl over 8000years ago and became one of the major food sources worldwide. At present, the poultry industry is one of the largest industrial animal stocks in the world, and its economic scale is expanding significantly with increasing consumption. Additionally, since Aristotle used chicken eggs as a model to provide remarkable insights into how life begins, chickens have been used as invaluable and powerful experimental materials for studying embryo development, immune systems, biomedical processes, and hormonal regulation. Combined with advancements in efficient transgenic technology, avian models have become even more important than would have been expected. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. USGS highly pathogenic avian influenza research strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M. Camille; Miles, A. Keith; Pearce, John M.; Prosser, Diann J.; Sleeman, Jonathan M.; Whalen, Mary E.

    2015-09-09

    Avian influenza viruses are naturally occurring in wild birds such as ducks, geese, swans, and gulls. These viruses generally do not cause illness in wild birds, however, when spread to poultry they can be highly pathogenic and cause illness and death in backyard and commercial farms. Outbreaks may cause devastating agricultural economic losses and some viral strains have the potential to infect people directly. Furthermore, the combination of avian influenza viruses with mammalian viruses can result in strains with the ability to transmit from person to person, possibly leading to viruses with pandemic potential. All known pandemic influenza viruses have had some genetic material of avian origin. Since 1996, a strain of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus, H5N1, has caused infection in wild birds, losses to poultry farms in Eurasia and North Africa, and led to the deaths of several hundred people. Spread of the H5N1 virus and other influenza strains from China was likely facilitated by migratory birds. In December 2014, HPAI was detected in poultry in Canada and migratory birds in the United States. Since then, HPAI viruses have spread to large parts of the United States and will likely continue to spread through migratory bird flyways and other mechanisms throughout North America. In the United States, HPAI viruses have severely affected the poultry industry with millions of domestic birds dead or culled. These strains of HPAI are not known to cause disease in humans; however, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) advise caution when in close contact with infected birds. Experts agree that HPAI strains currently circulating in wild birds of North America will likely persist for the next few years. This unprecedented situation presents risks to the poultry industry, natural resource management, and potentially human health. Scientific knowledge and decision support tools are urgently needed to understand factors affecting the persistence

  1. Avian influenza overview September–November 2017

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Ian; Kuiken, Thijs; Mulatti, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    the outbreaks, no transmission to humans has been identified in the EU. The report includes an update of the list of wild bird target species for passive surveillance activities that is based on reported AI-infected wild birds since 2006. The purpose of this list is to provide information on which bird species...... the continuing threat of this avian influenza virus to human health and possible introduction via migratory wild birds into Europe. Close monitoring is required of the situation in Africa with regards to HPAI of the subtypes A(H5N1) and A(H5N8), given the rapidity of the evolution and the uncertainty...

  2. Parathyroid hormone binding to cultured avian osteoclasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teti, A.; Rizzoli, R.; Zambonin Zallone, A. (Univ. of Bari (Italy))

    1991-02-14

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) increases serum calcium concentration via a controversial cellular mechanism. We investigated whether PTH binds avian osteoclasts. Isolated hypocalcaemic hen osteoclasts were incubated with ({sup 125}I)--bovine PTH (1-84). Specific binding of the hormone to the cells, which reached the equilibrium within 60 min, was observed. Half maximal binding was reached by 10 min. Binding was competitively inhibited by increasing doses of unlabeled PTH, and was about 55% displaced by adding, at the equilibrium, 10(-6) M unlabeled PTH. Autoradiography demonstrated specific label on the osteoclast. The cellular mechanism activated by the hormone remains to be elucidated.

  3. Tissue interactions of avian viral attachment proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Ambepitiya Wickramasinghe, I.N.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses can infect a wide range of hosts; varying from bacteria and plants to animals and humans. While many viral infections may pass unnoticed, some are of major importance due to their implications on health and welfare of plants, animals and/or humans. In particular, viruses that can infect avian hosts have been studied intensively due the occurrence of the pandemics of highly pathogenic influenza A virus infection or “bird flu’’. Viral infections in domesticated birds can result in huge ...

  4. Decrease in Antioxidant Status of Plasma and Erythrocytes from Geriatric Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumawat, Manjulata; Sharma, Tarun Kumar; Singh, Ishwar; Singh, Neelima; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar; Ghalaut, Veena Singh; Shankar, Vijay; Vardey, Satish Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Background: Ageing is associated with an accumulation of free radical damage, which leads to physiological and clinical modifications. The study aims to find out the status of lipid profile, antioxidant enzymes, malondialdehyde in geriatric population. Patients/methods: The study was conducted on 150 subjects (75 healthy control between the ages of 20–30 years and 75 elderly subjects between ages of 50–70 years as cases). The following parameters were analyzed using the standard reference methods: lipid profile, reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, catalase, superoxide dismutase and malondialdehyde. Results: The present study was conducted to estimate the oxidative stress parameters in geriatric population. Highly significant increase in total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C), VLDL-cholesterol (VLDL-C), malondialdehyde, catalase and decrease in high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, superoxide dismutase was observed in geriatrics when compared with their younger counterparts. Conclusion: This study concluded that there is enhanced oxidative stress and decreased antioxidant defence in geriatrics as compared to younger subjects which could play an important role in ageing. Dyslipidemia has become one of the important risk factors for the increasing prevalence of cardiovascular diseases. There is lack of awareness on the relationship between blood lipids and the risk of cardiovascular diseases in geriatric population. The strategy of early prevention should be adopted against dyslipidemia. PMID:23089922

  5. Plasma harmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Ganeev, Rashid A

    2014-01-01

    Preface; Why plasma harmonics? A very brief introduction Early stage of plasma harmonic studies - hopes and frustrations New developments in plasma harmonics studies: first successes Improvements of plasma harmonics; Theoretical basics of plasma harmonics; Basics of HHG Harmonic generation in fullerenes using few-cycle pulsesVarious approaches for description of observed peculiarities of resonant enhancement of a single harmonic in laser plasmaTwo-colour pump resonance-induced enhancement of odd and even harmonics from a tin plasmaCalculations of single harmonic generation from Mn plasma;Low-o

  6. In vitro erythrocyte oxidative damage of Morinda citrifolia L (noni leaves extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Lagarto

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Slight decrease of hemoglobin and erythrocyte count was observed previously after subchronic oral dosing of Morinda citrifolia L leaves extract in rats. Induction of erythrocyte membrane damage could be the cause for these effects. Aims: The objective of this investigation was to assess the in vitro cytotoxicity of Morinda citrifolia L leaves extract and fractions on rat erythrocytes. Methods: Hemolytic damage was assayed in rat erythrocytes. Oxidative stress was assessed by measuring methemoglobin formation, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS and enzyme antioxidant activities, superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT. Results: Morinda citrifolia L extract caused no hemolysis and induced oxidative damage to red cells in vitro. Methemoglobin increase was observed at concentration between 2 and 8 mg/ml of the extract. Lipid peroxidation was increased and CAT and SOD activities were depleted indicating a possible increase of hydrogen peroxide and superoxide radicals in erythrocytes. Ethyl acetate, dichloromethane and butanol fraction did not cause methemoglobin formation while water fraction increased methemoglobin level at doses up to 6 mg/ml. Conclusions: We concluded that high doses of Morinda citrifolia L extract promote erythrocyte oxidative damage due to metabolites present in water fraction. These could be the cause of decreased erythrocyte and hemoglobin levels observed. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2013; 2(3.000: 135-140

  7. Phagocytic activity of three Naegleria strains in the presence of erythrocytes of various types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, P; Zubiaur, E

    1985-11-01

    The phagocytic activities of N. lovaniensis (Aq/9/1/45D) and N. gruberi (1518/1f and 1518/1e) were studied in the presence of erythrocytes of various species: chicken, rabbit, goat, and human (A+, B+, and AB+ were tested). The percentage of amoebae with ingested red cells, the phagocytic index (PhI), can be considered as an expression of phagocytic activity. Under given conditions (erythrocyte concentration, incubation time, age of amoebic cultures) each strain of Naegleria prefers one erythrocyte type. Thus, for 72-h cultures, N. lovaniensis ingested more A+ type erythrocytes than did N. gruberi strains but had very low affinity for rabbit red cells except when very high concentrations were tested. Naegleria gruberi 1f was the most active of the three strains towards rabbit and B+ and AB+ human erythrocytes, but very low PhIs were obtained with goat erythrocytes. Naegleria gruberi 1e exhibited high phagocytic activity for every erythrocyte type except for rabbit red cells.

  8. THE IMPORTANCE OF THE ERYTHROCYTES OSMOTIC FRAGILITY TEST PERFORMED IN CHILDREN WITH INDIRECT HYPERBILIRUB1NEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Stojanović

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The osmotic fragility test of erythrocytes is useful in the diagnosis of different types of hereditary hemolytic anemias followed with hyperbilirubinemia. Hemolytic anemias, characterized by accelerated destruction of red blood cells, are usually the consequence of many metabolic abnormalities like cellular membrane defect, erythrocyte enzymes defect or hemoglobin abnormalities – hemoglobinopathies. The object of our study was to assess the relationship between osmotic fragility test of erythrocytes and severity of indirect hyperbilirubinemia in some inherited erythrocytes’ disorders. We did the osmotic fragility test of erythrocytes by using Dacie, s method with normal values of erythrocytes hemolysis between 0,48 to 0,34% NaCl (minimal to maximal hemolysis. In hereditary spherocytosis, fragility of erythrocytes was increased (min. at 0,50 % NaCl to max. 0,44 % NaCl . In the child with β- thalassemia and cycle cell anemia erythrocytes fragility was decreased (min . at 0,42 to max. 0,32 % NaCl, that is 0,40% min. of hemolysis and 0,34% max. hemolysis in the second case. In newborn infants with high levels of indirect bilirubin in serum as a cause of physiological jaundice, the osmotic fragility test was within a normal range. Our findings point out the diagnostic value of osmotic fragility test in assessing patients with the indirect hyperbilirubinemia. This simple and important diagnostic test can be performed in small laboratories.

  9. Diminished osmotic fragility of mouse erythrocytes following intravenous injection of polymeric plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshima, Hisamasa; Kashima, Masatoshi; Matsuoka, Osamu

    1984-01-01

    Changes in the osmotic fragility and the mean corpuscular diameter of erythrocytes in CFNo.1/Nrs male mice caused by internal irradiation with polymeric 239 Pu at the dose levels of 15 μCi/kg, 10 μCi/kg and 5 μCi/kg were studied at 28 and 56 days after intravenous injection of plutonium. At 56 days after injection of plutonium, osmotic fragility curves were found to shift toward lower NaCl concentration in proportion to the amount of plutonium injected, which indicated the reduction of osmotic fragility. The size distribution curves of erythrocytes were slightly shifted toward larger size, depending on the amount of plutonium injected. Mean corpuscular diameter of erythrocytes in the highest dose group was significantly larger than that of control group. Mean corpuscular thickness of erythrocytes in plutonium injected groups was not different from that of control group. The increase in the mean corpuscular diameter-to-thickness ratio might allow the erythrocyte to accumulate a larger volume of water in a hypotonic environment before reaching the critical hemolytic volume. In the present study, it was concluded that the increased diameter-to-thickness ratio of erythrocytes could be related to the diminished osmotic fragility of erythrocytes in animals given polymeric plutonium. (author)

  10. Intraspecific variation in erythrocyte sizes among populations of Hypsiboas cordobas (Anura: Hylidae

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    Mariana Baraquet

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We studied the morphology and size of erythrocytes of H. cordobae, and analysed the geographic variation of this character along the distribution of the species, in relation to the latitudinal and altitudinal distances. Erythrocyte shape of the H. cordobae is ellipsoidal and the nuclei are also ellipsoidal and centrally oriented. Erythrocyte and nuclear size showed significant differences among populations, with the highest mean size corresponding to the population of Achiras (low altitude site and the lowest mean size to Los Linderos (high altitude site. There was no significant relationship between the latitude of each population and the both erythrocyte and nuclear size. The altitudinal variation in erythrocyte cell size may be attributable to the surface available for gas exchange; a small erythrocyte offers a possibility of greater rate of exchange than a larger one. Our results are consistent with studies of other amphibians, where intraspecific comparisons of populations at different altitudes show that individuals at higher altitudes are characterized by smaller erythrocytes.

  11. Deoxygenation Affects Composition of Membrane-Bound Proteins in Human Erythrocytes

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    Oksana G. Luneva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: ATP release from erythrocyte plays a key role in hypoxia-induced elevation of blood flow in systematic circulation. We have previously shown that hemolysis contributes to erythrocyte ATP release triggered by several stimuli, including hypoxia, but the molecular mechanisms of hypoxia-increased membrane fragility remain unknown. Methods: In this study, we compared the action of hypoxia on hemolysis, ATP release and the composition of membrane-bound proteins in human erythrocytes. Results: Twenty minutes incubation of human erythrocytes in the oxygen-free environment increased the content of extracellular hemoglobin by ∼1.5 fold. Paired measurements of hemoglobin and ATP content in the same samples, showed a positive correlation between hemolysis and ATP release. Comparative analysis of SDS-PAGE electrophoresis of erythrocyte ghosts obtained under control and deoxygenated conditions revealed a ∼2-fold elevation of the content of membrane-bound protein with Mr of ∼60 kDa. Conclusion: Deoxygenation of human erythrocytes affects composition of membrane-bound proteins. Additional experiments should be performed to identify the molecular origin of 60 kDa protein and its role in the attenuation of erythrocyte integrity and ATP release in hypoxic conditions.

  12. Adenovirus coxsackie adenovirus receptor-mediated binding to human erythrocytes does not preclude systemic transduction.

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    Rojas, L A; Moreno, R; Calderón, H; Alemany, R

    2016-12-01

    There is great skepticism in the capability of adenovirus vectors and oncolytic adenoviruses to reach specific organs or tumors upon systemic administration. Besides antibodies, the presence of CAR (coxsackie and adenovirus receptor) in human erythrocytes has been postulated to sequester CAR-binding adenoviruses, commonly used in gene therapy and oncolytic applications. The use of non-CAR-binding fibers or serotypes has been postulated to solve this limitation. Given the lack of integrins in erythrocytes and therefore of internalization of the CAR-bound virus, we hypothesized that the interaction of adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) with CAR in human erythrocytes could be reversible. In this work, we have studied the effects of Ad5 interaction with human erythrocytes via CAR. Although erythrocyte binding was observed, it did not reduce viral transduction of tumor cells in vitro after long-term incubations. Transplantation of human erythrocytes into nude mice did not reduce Ad5 extravasation and transduction of liver and human xenograft tumors after systemic administration. These findings indicate that despite human erythrocytes are able to bind to Ad5, this binding is reversible and does not prevent extravasation and organ transduction after systemic delivery. Thus, the poor bioavailability of systemically delivered CAR-binding adenoviruses in humans is likely due to other factors such as liver sequestration or neutralizing antibodies.

  13. A GBP 130 derived peptide from Plasmodium falciparum binds to human erythrocytes and inhibits merozoite invasion in vitro

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    Jorge E Suarez

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available The malarial GBP 130 protein binds weakly to intact human erythrocytes; the binding sites seem to be located in the repeat region and this region's antibodies block the merozoite invasion. A peptide from this region (residues from 701 to 720 which binds to human erythrocytes was identified. This peptide named 2220 did not bind to sialic acid; the binding site on human erythrocyte was affected by treatment with trypsin but not by chymotrypsin. The peptide was able to inhibit Plasmodium falciparum merozoite invasion of erythrocytes. The residues F701, K703, L705, T706, E713 (FYKILTNTDPNDEVERDNAD were found to be critical for peptide binding to erythrocytes.

  14. The Trw type IV secretion system of Bartonella mediates host-specific adhesion to erythrocytes.

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    Muriel Vayssier-Taussat

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial pathogens typically infect only a limited range of hosts; however, the genetic mechanisms governing host-specificity are poorly understood. The alpha-proteobacterial genus Bartonella comprises 21 species that cause host-specific intraerythrocytic bacteremia as hallmark of infection in their respective mammalian reservoirs, including the human-specific pathogens Bartonella quintana and Bartonella bacilliformis that cause trench fever and Oroya fever, respectively. Here, we have identified bacterial factors that mediate host-specific erythrocyte colonization in the mammalian reservoirs. Using mouse-specific Bartonella birtlesii, human-specific Bartonella quintana, cat-specific Bartonella henselae and rat-specific Bartonella tribocorum, we established in vitro adhesion and invasion assays with isolated erythrocytes that fully reproduce the host-specificity of erythrocyte infection as observed in vivo. By signature-tagged mutagenesis of B. birtlesii and mutant selection in a mouse infection model we identified mutants impaired in establishing intraerythrocytic bacteremia. Among 45 abacteremic mutants, five failed to adhere to and invade mouse erythrocytes in vitro. The corresponding genes encode components of the type IV secretion system (T4SS Trw, demonstrating that this virulence factor laterally acquired by the Bartonella lineage is directly involved in adherence to erythrocytes. Strikingly, ectopic expression of Trw of rat-specific B. tribocorum in cat-specific B. henselae or human-specific B. quintana expanded their host range for erythrocyte infection to rat, demonstrating that Trw mediates host-specific erythrocyte infection. A molecular evolutionary analysis of the trw locus further indicated that the variable, surface-located TrwL and TrwJ might represent the T4SS components that determine host-specificity of erythrocyte parasitism. In conclusion, we show that the laterally acquired Trw T4SS diversified in the Bartonella lineage

  15. Dapsone hydroxylamine induces premature removal of human erythrocytes by membrane reorganization and antibody binding

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    Bordin, Luciana; Fiore, Cristina; Zen, Francesco; Coleman, Michael D; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Clari, Giulio

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE N-hydroxylation of dapsone leads to the formation of the toxic hydroxylamines responsible for the clinical methaemoglobinaemia associated with dapsone therapy. Dapsone has been associated with decreased lifespan of erythrocytes, with consequences such as anaemia and morbidity in patients treated with dapsone for malaria. Here, we investigated how dapsone and/or its hydroxylamine derivative (DDS-NHOH) induced erythrocyte membrane alterations that could lead to premature cell removal. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Erythrocytes from healthy donors were subjected to incubation with dapsone and DDS-NHOH for varying times and the band 3 protein tyrosine-phosphorylation process, band 3 aggregation, membrane alteration and IgG binding were all examined and compared with erythrocytes from two patients receiving dapsone therapy. KEY RESULTS The hydroxylamine derivative, but not dapsone (the parent sulphone) altered membrane protein interactions, leading both to aggregation of band 3 protein and to circulating autologous antibody binding, shown in erythrocytes from patients receiving dapsone therapy. The band 3 tyrosine-phosphorylation process can be used as a diagnostic system to monitor membrane alterations both in vitro, assessing concentration and time-dependent effects of DDS-NHOH treatment, and in vivo, evaluating erythrocytes from dapsone-treated patients, in resting or oxidatively stimulated conditions. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS DDS-NHOH-induced alterations of human erythrocytes can be directly monitored in vitro by tyrosine-phosphorylation level and formation of band 3 protein aggregates. The latter, together with antibody-mediated labelling of erythrocytes, also observed after clinical use of dapsone, may lead to shortening of erythrocyte lifespan. PMID:20662842

  16. Automated REcognition of tissue-associated erythrocytes (ARETE)-a new tool in tissue cytometry.

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    Heindl, Andreas; Seewald, Alexander K; Thalhammer, Theresia; Bises, Giovanna; Schepelmann, Martin; Uhrova, Hana; Dekan, Sabine; Mesteri, Ildiko; Rogojanu, Radu; Ellinger, Isabella

    2013-04-01

    Automated microscopic image analysis of immunofluorescence-stained targets on tissue sections is challenged by autofluorescent elements such as erythrocytes, which might interfere with target segmentation and quantification. Therefore, we developed an automated system (Automated REcognition of Tissue-associated Erythrocytes; ARETE) for in silico exclusion of erythrocytes. To detect erythrocytes in transmission images, a cascade of boosted decision trees of Haar-like features was trained on 8,640/4,000 areas (15 × 15 pixels) with/without erythrocytes from images of placental sections (4 µm). Ground truth data were generated on 28 transmission images. At least two human experts labelled the area covered by erythrocytes. For validation, output masks of human experts and ARETE were compared pixel-wise against a mask obtained from majority voting of human experts. F1 score, specificity, and Cohen's κ coefficients were calculated. To study the influence of erythrocyte-derived autofluorescence, we investigated the expression levels of a protein (receptor for advanced glycated end products; RAGE) in placenta and number of Ki-67-positive/cytokeratin 8-positive epithelial cells in colon sections. ARETE exhibited high sensitivity (99.87%) and specificity (99.81%) on a training-subset and processed transmission images (1,392 × 1,024 pixels) within 4 sec. ARETE and human expert's F1-scores were 0.55 versus 0.76, specificities 0.85 versus 0.92 and Cohen's κ coefficients 0.41 versus 0.68. A ranking of Cohen's κ coefficient by the scale of Fleiss certified "good agreement" between ARETE and the human experts. Applying ARETE, we demonstrated 4-14% false-positive RAGE-expression in placenta, and 18% falsely detected proliferative epithelial cells in colon, caused by erythrocyte-autofluorescence. ARETE is a fast system for in silico reduction of erythrocytes, which improves automated image analysis in research and diagnostic pathology. Copyright © 2013 International Society

  17. [In vitro study of the cytotoxic activity of sipunculid leukocytes towards allogeneic and xenogenic erythrocytes].

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    Boiledieu, D; Valembois, P

    1976-07-19

    A cell mediated cytotoxic reaction analogous to that known in Vertebrates is induced in vitro by leukocytes of sipunculid worms (coelomata invertebrates). Xenogenic or allogenic erythrocytes are employed as target cells. A cytotoxic effect always occurs when killer leukocytes react against xenogenic cells. A cytotoxic activity against allogenic erythrocytes occurs in all cases when donors of leukocytes and donors of erythrocytes arise from stations far apart (Roscoff and Arcachon). Between stations near each other (4 miles apart) a cytotoxic effect is noticed only in one case out of three. No reaction is noticed between Sipunculus nudus from the same station.

  18. The osmotic fragility of human erythrocytes is inhibited by laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habodaszova, D.; Sikurova, L.; Waczulikova, I.

    2004-01-01

    In this study we investigated the influence of green laser irradiation (532 nm, 30 mW, 31,7 J/cm 2 ) on the membrane integrity of human erythrocytes and compared the results with the effect of infrared laser irradiation (810 nm, 50 mW, 31,3 J/cm 2 ). To evaluate the membrane integrity of erythrocytes, one clinical parameter, the osmotic fragility, was investigated. We observed a decrease in osmotic fragility of the erythrocytes after irradiation by the green laser light as well as by the infrared laser compared to non-irradiated controls (Authors)

  19. In vitro studies of graphene oxide reinforced hydroxyapatite nanobiocomposite on human erythrocytes

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    Radha, G.; Rohith Vinod, K.; Venkatesan, Balaji; Vellaichamy, Elangovan; Balakumar, S.

    2017-05-01

    We report the interaction of graphene oxide reinforced hydroxyapatite (GO-HAp) nanocomposites with human erythrocytes. The hemocompatibility of GO-HAp found to be superior as compared to the pristine graphene oxide. It is found that the HAp nanoparticles on GO decrease the disruption of erythrocytes by minimizing the exposure of oxygen groups to phosphatidylcholine surface of erythrocyte membrane and it enhances hemocompatibility. Further, it is also found that the graphene oxide reinforced HAp nanobiocomposite enhances the metabolic activity of osteoblasts-like cells by promoting cell proliferation.

  20. Association of aggressive periodontitis with reduced erythrocyte counts and reduced hemoglobin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, P S; Sagar, D K; Ashok, S; Kamath, K P

    2014-12-01

    Studies have shown that erythrocyte counts and hemoglobin levels are reduced in patients with chronic periodontitis, suggesting that this condition may be associated with anemia of chronic disease. Although increased leukocyte counts have been reported in aggressive periodontitis, very little is known about the effects of aggressive periodontitis on erythrocyte counts. The present study was undertaken to determine whether generalized aggressive periodontitis is associated with reduced erythrocyte counts and reduced hemoglobin levels. The present study was conducted as a case-control study in which 64 patients with generalized aggressive periodontitis were categorized as cases and 58 periodontally healthy individuals were categorized as controls. Erythrocyte parameters (such as erythrocyte count, hemoglobin concentration, and hematocrit and erythrocyte indices) and clinical parameters (such as gingival index, plaque index, probing depth, clinical attachment level and percentage of severe sites) were recorded. Significant differences were observed between cases and controls in mean erythrocyte count (4.45 ± 0.6 × 10(6) erythrocytes/μL and 4.78 ± 0.56 × 10(6) erythrocytes/μL respectively, p = 0.002) and hemoglobin level (12.43 ± 1.83 g/dL and 13.53 ± 1.64 g/dL, respectively, p = 0.001). Other erythrocyte parameters, such as hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular hemoglobin, were also significantly lower among cases compared with controls. Logistic regression analyses showed that generalized aggressive periodontitis was significantly associated with lower erythrocyte counts ( p = 0.032) and a lower hemoglobin concentration ( p = 0.017). The findings of the present study suggest that patients with generalized aggressive periodontitis tend to have lower erythrocyte counts and lower hemoglobin levels compared with periodontally healthy controls. This suggests that generalized aggressive periodontitis, like chronic