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Sample records for auxin-mediated leaf longevity

  1. Interactions between leaf nitrogen status and longevity in relation to N cycling in three contrasting European forest canopies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, L.; Ibrom, Andreas; Korhonen, J. F. J.; Frumau, K. F. Arnoud; Wu, Jian; Pihlatie, M.; Schjoerring, J. K.

    2013-01-01

    the leaf habit, i.e. deciduous versus evergreen, the majority of the canopy foliage N was retained within the trees. This was accomplished through an effective N re-translocation (beech), higher foliage longevity (fir) or both (boreal pine forest). In combination with data from a literature review, a......Seasonal and spatial variations in foliar nitrogen (N) parameters were investigated in three European forests with different tree species, viz. beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) growing in Denmark, the Netherlands and...... Finland, respectively. The objectives were to investigate the distribution of N pools within the canopies of the different forests and to relate this distribution to factors and plant strategies controlling leaf development throughout the seasonal course of a vegetation period. Leaf N pools generally...

  2. Interactions between leaf nitrogen status and longevity in relation to N cycling in three contrasting European forest canopies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Wang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal and spatial variations in foliar nitrogen (N parameters were investigated in three European forests with different tree species, viz. beech (Fagus sylvatica L., Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb. Franco and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. growing in Denmark, the Netherlands and Finland, respectively. The objectives were to investigate the distribution of N pools within the canopies of the different forests and to relate this distribution to factors and plant strategies controlling leaf development throughout the seasonal course of a vegetation period. Leaf N pools generally showed much higher seasonal and vertical variability in beech than in the coniferous canopies. However, also the two coniferous tree species behaved very differently with respect to peak summer canopy N content and N re-translocation efficiency, showing that generalisations on tree internal vs. ecosystem internal N cycling cannot be made on the basis of the leaf duration alone. During phases of intensive N turnover in spring and autumn, the NH4+ concentration in beech leaves rose considerably, while fully developed green beech leaves had relatively low tissue NH4+, similar to the steadily low levels in Douglas fir and, particularly, in Scots pine. The ratio between bulk foliar concentrations of NH4+ and H+, which is an indicator of the NH3 emission potential, reflected differences in foliage N concentration, with beech having the highest values followed by Douglas fir and Scots pine. Irrespectively of the leaf habit, i.e. deciduous versus evergreen, the majority of the canopy foliage N was retained within the trees. This was accomplished through an effective N re-translocation (beech, higher foliage longevity (fir or both (boreal pine forest. In combination with data from a literature review, a general relationship of decreasing N re

  3. Stomatal responses to drought at a Mediterranean site: a comparative study of co-occurring woody species differing in leaf longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediavilla, Sonia; Escudero, Alfonso

    2003-10-01

    We studied stomatal responses to decreasing predawn water potential (Psipd) and increasing leaf-to-air water vapor pressure difference (VPD) of co-occurring woody Mediterranean species with contrasting leaf habits and growth form. The species included two evergreen oaks (Quercus ilex subsp. ballota (Desf.) Samp. and Q. suber L.), two deciduous oaks (Q. faginea Lam. and Q. pyrenaica Willd.) and two deciduous shrubs (Pyrus bourgaeana Decne. and Crataegus monogyna Jacq.). Our main objective was to determine if stomatal sensitivity is related to differences in leaf life span and leaf habit. The deciduous shrubs had the least conservative water-use characteristics, with relatively high stomatal conductance and low stomatal sensitivity to soil and atmospheric drought. As a result, Psipd decreased greatly in both species during the growing season, resulting in early leaf abscission in the summer. The deciduous oaks showed intermediate water-use characteristics, having maximum stomatal conductances and CO2 assimilation rates similar to or even higher than those of the deciduous shrubs. However, they had greater stomatal sensitivity to soil drying and showed less negative Psipd values than the deciduous shrubs. The evergreen oaks, and especially the species with the greatest leaf longevity, Q. ilex, exhibited the most conservative water-use behavior, having lower maximum stomatal conductances and greater sensitivity to VPD than the deciduous species. As a result, Psipd decreased less during the growing season in the evergreens than in the deciduous species, which may contribute to greater leaf longevity by avoiding irreversible damage during the summer drought. However, the combination of low maximum CO2 assimilation rates and high stomatal sensitivity to drought must have a negative impact on the final carbon budget of leaves with a long life span. PMID:12952785

  4. NCP1/AtMOB1A Plays Key Roles in Auxin-Mediated Arabidopsis Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lizhen; Wang, Yanli; Cheng, Youfa

    2016-01-01

    MOB1 protein is a core component of the Hippo signaling pathway in animals where it is involved in controlling tissue growth and tumor suppression. Plant MOB1 proteins display high sequence homology to animal MOB1 proteins, but little is known regarding their role in plant growth and development. Herein we report the critical roles of Arabidopsis MOB1 (AtMOB1A) in auxin-mediated development in Arabidopsis. We found that loss-of-function mutations in AtMOB1A completely eliminated the formation of cotyledons when combined with mutations in PINOID (PID), which encodes a Ser/Thr protein kinase that participates in auxin signaling and transport. We showed that atmob1a was fully rescued by its Drosophila counterpart, suggesting functional conservation. The atmob1a pid double mutants phenocopied several well-characterized mutant combinations that are defective in auxin biosynthesis or transport. Moreover, we demonstrated that atmob1a greatly enhanced several other known auxin mutants, suggesting that AtMOB1A plays a key role in auxin-mediated plant development. The atmob1a single mutant displayed defects in early embryogenesis and had shorter root and smaller flowers than wild type plants. AtMOB1A is uniformly expressed in embryos and suspensor cells during embryogenesis, consistent with its role in embryo development. AtMOB1A protein is localized to nucleus, cytoplasm, and associated to plasma membrane, suggesting that it plays roles in these subcellular localizations. Furthermore, we showed that disruption of AtMOB1A led to a reduced sensitivity to exogenous auxin. Our results demonstrated that AtMOB1A plays an important role in Arabidopsis development by promoting auxin signaling. PMID:26942722

  5. Interactions between leaf nitrogen status and longevity in relation to N cycling in three contrasting European forest canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Ibrom, A.; Korhonen, J. F. J.; Arnoud Frumau, K. F.; Wu, J.; Pihlatie, M.; Schjoerring, J. K.

    2012-07-01

    support the hypothesis that a high N status, e.g. as a consequence of chronically high atmospheric N inputs, increases ecosystem internal over tree-bulk-tissue internal N cycling in conifer stands. The two evergreen tree species investigated in the present study behaved very differently in all relevant parameters, i.e. needle longevity, Nc and ηr, showing that generalisations on tree internal vs. ecosystem internal N cycling cannot be made on the basis of the leaf habit alone.

  6. Effects of Neem Leaf Dust and a Commercial Formulation of a Neem Compound on the Longevity, Fecundity and Ovarian Development of the Melon Fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett and the Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel (Diptera: Tephritidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahfuza Khan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Neem leaf dust and a commercial formulation of neem were tested on adult Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett and Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel to determine their effects on the longevity, fecundity and ovarian development. Different combinations of neem leaf dust and a commercial formulation of a neem compound incorporated with sugar solution and adult rearing diets were tested. The Laboratory tests showed that ingestion of neem can significantly reduced the longevity and fertility of both the fly species. Significantly fewer pupae were collected from adults fed on laboratory rearing diet and nimbicidine as water source. Effect of neem treatment on the pupation and subsequent adult emergence of late-instar larvae was negligible. Microscopic observation indicated that the decreased fecundity was due to the block of ovarian development. Experimental results confirmed that neem can be effectively used as a safe alternative insecticide for the control of Bactrocera species.

  7. Complete disintegration of the microtubular cytoskeleton precedes its auxin-mediated reconstruction in postmitotic maize root cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baluska, F.; Barlow, P. W.; Volkmann, D.

    1996-01-01

    The inhibitory action of 0.1 microM auxin (IAA) on maize root growth was closely associated with a rapid and complete disintegration of the microtubular (MT) cytoskeleton, as visualized by indirect immunofluorescence of tubulin, throughout the growth region. After 30 min of this treatment, only fluorescent spots were present in root cells, accumulating either around nuclei or along cell walls. Six h later, in addition to some background fluorescence, dense but partially oriented oblique or longitudinal arrays of cortical MTs (CMTs) were found in most growing cells of the root apex. After 24 h of treatment, maize roots had adapted to the auxin, as inferred from the slowly recovering elongation rate and from the reassembly of a dense and well-ordered MT cytoskeleton which showed only slight deviations from that of the control root cells. Taxol pretreatment (100 microM, 24 h) prevented not only the rapid auxin-mediated disintegration of the MT cytoskeleton but also a reorientation of the CMT arrays, from transversal to longitudinal. The only tissue to show MTs in their cells throughout the auxin treatment was the epidermis. Significant resistance of transverse CMT arrays in these cells towards auxin was confirmed using a higher auxin concentration (100 microM, 24 h). The latter auxin dose also revealed inter-tissue-specific responses to auxin: outer cortical cell files reoriented their CMTs from the transversal to longitudinal orientation, whereas inner cortical cell files lost their MTs. This high auxin-mediated response, associated with the swelling of root apices, was abolished with the pretreatment of maize root with taxol.

  8. Auxin-mediated lamina growth in tomato leaves is restricted by two parallel mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Gera, Hadas; Dafna, Asaf; Alvarez, John Paul; Bar, Maya; Mauerer, Mareike; Ori, Naomi

    2016-06-01

    In the development of tomato compound leaves, local auxin maxima points, separated by the expression of the Aux/IAA protein SlIAA9/ENTIRE (E), direct the formation of discrete leaflets along the leaf margin. The local auxin maxima promote leaflet initiation, while E acts between leaflets to inhibit auxin response and lamina growth, enabling leaflet separation. Here, we show that a group of auxin response factors (ARFs), which are targeted by miR160, antagonizes auxin response and lamina growth in conjunction with E. In wild-type leaf primordia, the miR160-targeted ARFs SlARF10A and SlARF17 are expressed in leaflets, and SlmiR160 is expressed in provascular tissues. Leaf overexpression of the miR160-targeted ARFs SlARF10A, SlARF10B or SlARF17, led to reduced lamina and increased leaf complexity, and suppressed auxin response in young leaves. In agreement, leaf overexpression of miR160 resulted in simplified leaves due to ectopic lamina growth between leaflets, reminiscent of e leaves. Genetic interactions suggest that E and miR160-targeted ARFs act partially redundantly but are both required for local inhibition of lamina growth between initiating leaflets. These results show that different types of auxin signal antagonists act cooperatively to ensure leaflet separation in tomato leaf margins. PMID:27121172

  9. Arabidopsis PROTEASOME REGULATOR1 is required for auxin-mediated suppression of proteasome activity and regulates auxin signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bao-Jun; Han, Xin-Xin; Yin, Lin-Lin; Xing, Mei-Qing; Xu, Zhi-Hong; Xue, Hong-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The plant hormone auxin is perceived by the nuclear F-box protein TIR1 receptor family and regulates gene expression through degradation of Aux/IAA transcriptional repressors. Several studies have revealed the importance of the proteasome in auxin signalling, but details on how the proteolytic machinery is regulated and how this relates to degradation of Aux/IAA proteins remains unclear. Here we show that an Arabidopsis homologue of the proteasome inhibitor PI31, which we name PROTEASOME REGULATOR1 (PTRE1), is a positive regulator of the 26S proteasome. Loss-of-function ptre1 mutants are insensitive to auxin-mediated suppression of proteasome activity, show diminished auxin-induced degradation of Aux/IAA proteins and display auxin-related phenotypes. We found that auxin alters the subcellular localization of PTRE1, suggesting this may be part of the mechanism by which it reduces proteasome activity. Based on these results, we propose that auxin regulates proteasome activity via PTRE1 to fine-tune the homoeostasis of Aux/IAA repressor proteins thus modifying auxin activity. PMID:27109828

  10. Managing longevity risk

    OpenAIRE

    LI Hong

    2015-01-01

    The thesis first examines the choice of sample size for mortality forecasting, and then deal with the hedging of longevity risk using longevity-linked instruments. Chapter 2 proposes a Bayesian learning approach to determine the (posterior distribution of) the sample sizes for mortality forecasting using mortality models based on linear extrapolation approaches. Chapter 3 studies the static robust management of longevity risk in the situation that the hedger does not have precise knowledge of...

  11. Modulating aging and longevity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rattan, Suresh

    Provides information and an evaluation of a variety of approaches tried for modulating aging and longevity, including dietary supplementation with antioxidants, vitamins and hormones, genetic engineering, life-style alterations, and hormesis through mild stress. After decades of systematic...... mild stress. The goal of research on ageing is not to increase human longevity regardless of the consequences, but to increase active longevity free from disability and functional dependence...

  12. Longevity in gibbons (Hylobatidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Geissmann, T.; Geschke, K; Blanchard, B J

    2009-01-01

    A longevity record of 60 years spent in captivity by a Mueller’s gibbon (Hylobates muelleri) is reported here. This appears to be the second-highest age so far reported for a non-human primate, but it is especially remarkable when adjusted for body size. It is well known that longevity in mammals correlates with body weight. Small apes should, therefore, be expected to exhibit lower longevity than the great apes because of their lower body weight. However, the longevity record for Hylobates r...

  13. Birth Month Affects Longevity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Ernest L.; Kruger, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    The authors examined the association between birth month and longevity for major league baseball players. Players born in the month of November had the greatest longevities whereas those born in June had the shortest life spans. These differences remained after controlling for covariates such as birth year, career length, age at debut, height, and…

  14. Managing longevity risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The thesis first examines the choice of sample size for mortality forecasting, and then deal with the hedging of longevity risk using longevity-linked instruments. Chapter 2 proposes a Bayesian learning approach to determine the (posterior distribution of) the sample sizes for mortality forecasting

  15. Longevity for free?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wit, Janneke; Sarup, Pernille Merete; Lupsa, Nikolett;

    2013-01-01

    reproduction. In our longevity selection lines, we did not find such a trade-off. Rather, we find that females have similar or higher fecundity throughout life compared to non-selected controls. To determine whether increased longevity affects responses in other traits, we looked at several stress resistance...... traits (chill coma recovery, heat knockdown, desiccation and starvation), geo- tactic behaviour, egg-to-adult viability, body size, developmental time as well as metabolic rate. Longevity select- ed flies were more starvation resistant. However, in females longevity and fecundity were not negatively...... correlated with the other traits assayed. Males from longevity selected lines were slower at recovering from a chill induced coma and resting metabolic rate increased with age, but did not correlate with life span....

  16. Replication studies in longevity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varcasia, O; Garasto, S; Rizza, T;

    2001-01-01

    In Danes we replicated the 3'APOB-VNTR gene/longevity association study previously carried out in Italians, by which the Small alleles (less than 35 repeats) had been identified as frailty alleles for longevity. In Danes, neither genotype nor allele frequencies differed between centenarians and 20......-sex interaction relevant to Long alleles (more than 37 repeats). The different findings in Denmark and Italy suggest that gene/longevity associations are population-specific, and heavily affected by the population-specific genetic and environmental history....

  17. The longevity gender gap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aviv, Abraham; Shay, Jerry; Christensen, Kaare;

    2005-01-01

    In this Perspective, we focus on the greater longevity of women as compared with men. We propose that, like aging itself, the longevity gender gap is exceedingly complex and argue that it may arise from sex-related hormonal differences and from somatic cell selection that favors cells more...... resistant to the ravages of time. We discuss the interplay of these factors with telomere biology and oxidative stress and suggest that an explanation for the longevity gender gap may arise from a better understanding of the differences in telomere dynamics between men and women....

  18. Sharing Longevity Risk: Why Governments Should Issue Longevity Bonds

    OpenAIRE

    Blake, David; Boardman, Tom; Cairns, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Government-issued longevity bonds would allow longevity risk to be shared efficiently and fairly between generations. In exchange for paying a longevity risk premium, the current generation of retirees can look to future generations to hedge their aggregate longevity risk. There are also wider social benefits. Longevity bonds will lead to a more secure pension savings market - both defined contribution and defined benefit - together with a more efficient annuity market resulting in less means...

  19. Competition and Car Longevity

    OpenAIRE

    Macauley, Molly; Hamilton, Bruce

    1998-01-01

    We examine determinants of the nearly 30 percent increase in the average age of domestically produced, registered automobiles since the mid-1960s. We find that very little of the increase in car longevity is attributable to improvements in the inherent durability of cars. Rather, we find that the temporal pattern of longevity improvement is highly correlated with the level of market concentration in the auto industry. In particular, we argue that the arrival of competition in the industry led...

  20. Three measures of longevity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canudas-Romo, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the trend over time in the measures of "typical" longevity experienced by members of a population: life expectancy at birth, and the median and modal ages at death. The article also analyzes trends in record values observed for all three measures. The record life expectancy at...

  1. Heterogeneity in expected longevities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pijoan-Mas, Josep; Ríos-Rull, José-Víctor

    2014-12-01

    We develop a new methodology to compute differences in the expected longevity of individuals of a given cohort who are in different socioeconomic groups at a certain age. We address the two main problems associated with the standard use of life expectancy: (1) that people's socioeconomic characteristics change, and (2) that mortality has decreased over time. Our methodology uncovers substantial heterogeneity in expected longevities, yet much less heterogeneity than what arises from the naive application of life expectancy formulae. We decompose the longevity differences into differences in health at age 50, differences in the evolution of health with age, and differences in mortality conditional on health. Remarkably, education, wealth, and income are health-protecting but have very little impact on two-year mortality rates conditional on health. Married people and nonsmokers, however, benefit directly in their immediate mortality. Finally, we document an increasing time trend of the socioeconomic gradient of longevity in the period 1992-2008, and we predict an increase in the socioeconomic gradient of mortality rates for the coming years. PMID:25391225

  2. Measuring Longevity Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyer, Martin M.; Mejza, Joanna; Stentoft, Lars

    2014-01-01

    case of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police pension plan, we illustrate the importance of mortality forecasting to value a pension fund's actuarial liabilities. As future survival rates are uncertain, pensioners may live longer than expected. We find that such longevity risk represents approximately 2......An employer that sets up a defined benefit pension plan promises to periodically pay a certain sum to each participant starting at some future date and continuing until death. Although both the future beneficiary and the employer can be asked to finance the plan throughout the beneficiary's career.......8 percent of the total liability ascribable to retired pensioners (as measured by the relative value at risk at the 95th percentile) and 2.5 percent of the total liabilities ascribable to current regular contributors. Longevity risk compounds the model risk associated with not knowing what is the true...

  3. Diet and Longevity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Bingxian

    2000-01-01

    @@In 1985 the International Natural Medicine Society declared the Hoten area, Xinjiang (a province of China) as one of the areas of most pronounced longevity in the world. Why are there more elderly people in Hoten? There are many factors. On the basis of our many years of research, our claim is that diet is the most important factor. Now I will discuss the following factors to illustrate.

  4. Heterogeneity in Expected Longevities

    OpenAIRE

    Josep Pijoan-Mas; José-Víctor Ríos-Rull

    2012-01-01

    We develop a new methodology to compute differences in the expected longevity of individuals who are in different socioeconomic groups at age 50. We deal with two main problems associated with the standard use of life expectancy: that people’s socioeconomic characteristics evolve over time and that there is a time trend that reduces mortality over time. Using HRS data for individuals from different cohorts, we estimate a hazard model for survival with time-varying stochastic endogenous covari...

  5. Homocysteine and Familial Longevity: The Leiden Longevity Study

    OpenAIRE

    Wijsman, Carolien A.; Diana van Heemst; Rozing, Maarten P.; Eline Slagboom, P.; Marian Beekman; Anton J M de Craen; Maier, Andrea B.; Westendorp, Rudi G. J.; Henk J. Blom; Mooijaart, Simon P.

    2011-01-01

    Homocysteine concentrations are a read-out of methionine metabolism and have been related to changes in lifespan in animal models. In humans, high homocysteine concentrations are an important predictor of age related disease. We aimed to explore the association of homocysteine with familial longevity by testing whether homocysteine is lower in individuals that are genetically enriched for longevity. We measured concentrations of total homocysteine in 1907 subjects from the Leiden Longevity St...

  6. LONGEVITY INSURANCE: A MISSING MARKET

    OpenAIRE

    ADAM CREIGHTON; HENRY HONGBO JIN; JOHN PIGGOTT; Emiliano A. Valdez

    2005-01-01

    More than half of the world's old live in Asia, and around 35% in India and China alone. As demographic transition proceeds regionally and globally, the development of a robust and reliable longevity insurance market will become essential. Although the need for such insurance is most pressing in Asia, longevity risk is poorly managed practically everywhere. This paper reviews theory and practice relating to longevity risk and insurance, amid a rapidly changing demographic and policy landscape...

  7. Nature versus Nurture in Longevity

    OpenAIRE

    Avi Simhon

    2010-01-01

    This paper estimates the contribution of nature and nurture to the variance of longevity in a cross section of individuals. Our approach differs from that used in the genetics and biological literature in that we develop a simple model of longevity determination and use it to bound the contribution of nature to longevity. Using estimates of the key model parameters available in the demographic and genetics literature as well as our own estimate of the genetic transmission parameter (based on ...

  8. Exercise and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gremeaux, Vincent; Gayda, Mathieu; Lepers, Romuald; Sosner, Philippe; Juneau, Martin; Nigam, Anil

    2012-12-01

    Aging is a natural and complex physiological process influenced by many factors, some of which are modifiable. As the number of older individuals continues to increase, it is important to develop interventions that can be easily implemented and contribute to "successful aging". In addition to a healthy diet and psychosocial well-being, the benefits of regular exercise on mortality, and the prevention and control of chronic disease affecting both life expectancy and quality of life are well established. We summarize the benefits of regular exercise on longevity, present the current knowledge regarding potential mechanisms, and outline the main recommendations. Exercise can partially reverse the effects of the aging process on physiological functions and preserve functional reserve in the elderly. Numerous studies have shown that maintaining a minimum quantity and quality of exercise decreases the risk of death, prevents the development of certain cancers, lowers the risk of osteoporosis and increases longevity. Training programs should include exercises aimed at improving cardiorespiratory fitness and muscle function, as well as flexibility and balance. Though the benefits of physical activity appear to be directly linked to the notion of training volume and intensity, further research is required in the elderly, in order to develop more precise recommendations, bearing in mind that the main aim is to foster long-term adherence to physical activity in this growing population. PMID:23063021

  9. Height, body size and longevity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaras TT

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available Life expectancy, mortality and longevity data related to height and body size for various US and world population samples are reviewed. Research on energy restriction, smaller body size and longevity is also examined. Information sources include various medical and scientific journals, books and personal communications with researchers. Additional information is presented based on research involving eight populations of the world noted for their health, vigor and longevity. This information includes the findings of one of the authors who led research teams to study these populations. While conflicting findings exist on the cardiovascular death rates for shorter people, many examples of short populations with very little heart disease are described. Most cancer studies indicate that shorter people have significantly lower mortality risk. Considerable data suggest that shorter people generally have greater longevity than taller people, and extensive animal research supports human longevity findings. Tall populations with low mortality rates are also described. Shorter stature and smaller body weight appear to promote better health and longevity in the absence of malnutrition and infectious diseases. Several theoretical reasons for this greater longevity potential are covered. Also discussed, is the role of socioeconomic status, diet, relative weight, environment and other factors in increasing or decreasing the longevity of individuals, regardless of their heights and weights.

  10. Bioinformatic cis-element analyses performed in Arabidopsis and rice disclose bZIP- and MYB-related binding sites as potential AuxRE-coupling elements in auxin-mediated transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berendzen Kenneth W

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In higher plants, a diverse array of developmental and growth-related processes is regulated by the plant hormone auxin. Recent publications have proposed that besides the well-characterized Auxin Response Factors (ARFs that bind Auxin Response Elements (AuxREs, also members of the bZIP- and MYB-transcription factor (TF families participate in transcriptional control of auxin-regulated genes via bZIP Response Elements (ZREs or Myb Response Elements (MREs, respectively. Results Applying a novel bioinformatic algorithm, we demonstrate on a genome-wide scale that singular motifs or composite modules of AuxREs, ZREs, MREs but also of MYC2 related elements are significantly enriched in promoters of auxin-inducible genes. Despite considerable, species-specific differences in the genome structure in terms of the GC content, this enrichment is generally conserved in dicot (Arabidopsis thaliana and monocot (Oryza sativa model plants. Moreover, an enrichment of defined composite modules has been observed in selected auxin-related gene families. Consistently, a bipartite module, which encompasses a bZIP-associated G-box Related Element (GRE and an AuxRE motif, has been found to be highly enriched. Making use of transient reporter studies in protoplasts, these findings were experimentally confirmed, demonstrating that GREs functionally interact with AuxREs in regulating auxin-mediated transcription. Conclusions Using genome-wide bioinformatic analyses, evolutionary conserved motifs have been defined which potentially function as AuxRE-dependent coupling elements to establish auxin-specific expression patterns. Based on these findings, experimental approaches can be designed to broaden our understanding of combinatorial, auxin-controlled gene regulation.

  11. Longevity Risk and Private Pensions

    OpenAIRE

    Pablo Antolin

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines how uncertainty regarding future mortality and life expectancy outcomes, i.e. longevity risk, affects employer-provided defined benefit (DB) private pension plans liabilities. For this purpose, it examines the different approaches that private pension plans follow in practice when incorporating longevity risk in their actuarial calculations. Unfortunately, most pension funds do not fully account for future improvements in mortality and life expectancy. The paper then prese...

  12. Increased longevity evolves from grandmothering

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Peter S.; Coxworth, James E.; Hawkes, Kristen

    2012-01-01

    Postmenopausal longevity may have evolved in our lineage when ancestral grandmothers subsidized their daughters' fertility by provisioning grandchildren, but the verbal hypothesis has lacked mathematical support until now. Here, we present a formal simulation in which life spans similar to those of modern chimpanzees lengthen into the modern human range as a consequence of grandmother effects. Greater longevity raises the chance of living through the fertile years but is opposed by costs that...

  13. Apolipoprotein E and familial longevity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schupf, Nicole; Barral, Sandra; Perls, Thomas;

    2013-01-01

    Exceptional longevity is associated with substantial heritability. The ε4 allele in apolipoprotein E and the linked G allele in rs2075650 of TOMM40 have been associated with increased mortality and the ε2 allele with decreased mortality, although inconsistently. Offspring from long-lived families...... findings support the hypothesis that both reduction in the frequency of the ε4 allele and increase in the frequency of the ε2 allele contribute to longevity....

  14. Thermosensation and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Rui; Liu, Jianfeng; Xu, X Z Shawn

    2015-09-01

    Temperature has profound effects on behavior and aging in both poikilotherms and homeotherms. To thrive under the ever fluctuating environmental temperatures, animals have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to sense and adapt to temperature changes. Animals sense temperature through various molecular thermosensors, such as thermosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) channels expressed in neurons, keratinocytes, and intestine. These evolutionarily conserved thermosensitive TRP channels feature distinct activation thresholds, thereby covering a wide spectrum of ambient temperature. Temperature changes trigger complex thermosensory behaviors. Due to the simplicity of the nervous system in model organisms such as Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila, the mechanisms of thermosensory behaviors in these species have been extensively studied at the circuit and molecular levels. While much is known about temperature regulation of behavior, it remains largely unclear how temperature affects aging. Recent studies in C. elegans demonstrate that temperature modulation of longevity is not simply a passive thermodynamic phenomenon as suggested by the rate-of-living theory, but rather a process that is actively regulated by genes, including those encoding thermosensitive TRP channels. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of thermosensation and its role in aging. PMID:26101089

  15. 28 CFR 345.55 - Longevity pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Longevity pay. 345.55 Section 345.55... (FPI) INMATE WORK PROGRAMS Inmate Pay and Benefits § 345.55 Longevity pay. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, an inmate earns longevity pay raises after 18 months spent in FPI work...

  16. Longevity Of Dry Film Lubricants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannel, J. W.; Stockwell, R. D.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes evaluation of dry film lubricants candidate for use in rotary joints of proposed Space Station. Study included experiments and theoretical analyses focused on longevity of sputtered molybdenum disulfide films and ion-plated lead films under conditions partially simulating rolling contact.

  17. Female Superintendent Longevity in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohlfing, Tracy

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate, through narrative inquiry (Clandinin & Connelly, 2000), the leadership evolution of five female superintendents in California with longevity of 5 or more years in their current school district positions. The research question addressed was, "How do California female superintendents evolve to…

  18. The Statistics of Health and Longevity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zarulli, Virginia

    Increases in human longevity have made it critical to distinguish healthy longevity from longevity without regard to health. We present a new method for calculating the statistics of healthy longevity which extends, in several directions, current calculations of health expectancy (HE) and......, applies to both binary and continuous measures, and provides not only the expectation but also the variance, coefficient of variation, skewness and other distributional properties of longevity. We apply the method to 9 European countries using the SHARE survey data on disability and on grip strength. The...

  19. Leaf Longevity and Defense Characteristics in Trees of Betulaceae

    OpenAIRE

    KOIKE, TAKAYOSHI; Matsuki, Sawako; Choi, Dongsu; Matsumoto, Takeshi

    2006-01-01

    Proceedings : IUFRO Kanazawa 2003 "Forest Insect Population Dynamics and Host Influences"., Scedule:14-19 September 2003, Vemue: Kanazawa Citymonde Hotel, Kanazawa, Japan, Joint metting of IUFRO working groups : 7.01.02 Tree resistance to Insects | 7.03.06 Integrated management of forset defoloating insects | 7.03.07 Population dynamics of forest insects, Sponsored by: IUFRO-J | Ishikawa Prefecture | Kanazawa City | 21st-COE Program of Kanazawa University, Editors: Kamata, Naoto | Liebhold, N...

  20. Freqüência e severidade de corte das fôlhas do sisal(*. Influência sôbre o desenvolvimento das plantas, produção e características da fibra Frequency and severity of leaf cutting upon the growth, longevity and yield of the sisal plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Medina

    1954-01-01

    Full Text Available O A. apresenta nêste artigo os resultados obtidos em uma experiência de corte das folhas do sisal (Agave sisalana Perrine, na qual se procurou comparar os efeitos da combinação de diversas freqüências e severidades de corte sobre o desenvolvimento, produção e longevidade da planta, assim como sôbre as características tecnológicas da fibra. Ficou provado que, com cortes freqüentes e severos, o ciclo de vida das plantas fica bastante prolongado, ao mesmo tempo que a produção de fibras por unidade de área decai sensivelmente, em conseqüência da redução de tamanho das fôlhas e menor conteúdo de fibras nas fôlhas das plantas submetidas a êsse sistema de corte. Os exames de laboratório demonstraram que, enquanto as características químicas das fibras não eram afetadas pelos sistemas de corte estudados, as características físicas eram, pelo contrário, sensivelmente afetados pelo corte freqüente e severo.This paper describes the results obtained with the sisal plant (Agave sisalana Perrine in a cutting trial located in the "Estação Experimental Central do Instituto Agronômico", at Campinas. This trial was designed to compare the effects of four cutting cycles, combined with three levels of severity of cutting, upon growth, longevity, and yield of the sisal plant, and on the quality of its fiber. The experiment was laid out in 4 randomized blocks of 4 plots, each plot having 3 sub-plots. Sub-plot size was of twelve plants spaced 2.5 x 1.5 m and arranged in two rows of 6 plants each. The results can be summarized as follows : (a The life cycle of the sisal plant was greatly influenced by the cutting method used. The greater the frequency and severity of cutting the slower was the growth of the plant and the longer it took to pole. (b Light cutting at six to twelve-month cycles was conducive to early poling, and the plant yielded fewer, though heavier, leaves. (c Heavy cutting at a three-month cycle reduced plant size

  1. Longevity: epigenetic and biomolecular aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taormina, Giusi; Mirisola, Mario G

    2015-04-01

    Many aging theories and their related molecular mechanisms have been proposed. Simple model organisms such as yeasts, worms, fruit flies and others have massively contributed to their clarification, and many genes and pathways have been associated with longevity regulation. Among them, insulin/IGF-1 plays a key and evolutionary conserved role. Interestingly, dietary interventions can modulate this pathway. Calorie restriction (CR), intermittent fasting, and protein and amino acid restriction prolong the lifespan of mammals by IGF-1 regulation. However, some recent findings support the hypothesis that the long-term effects of diet also involve epigenetic mechanisms. In this review, we describe the best characterized aging pathways and highlight the role of epigenetics in diet-mediated longevity. PMID:25883209

  2. Indy mutations and Drosophila longevity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanka eRogina

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Decreased expression of the fly and worm Indy genes extends longevity. The fly Indy gene and its mammalian homolog are transporters of Krebs cycle intermediates, with the highest rate of uptake for citrate. Cytosolic citrate has a role in energy regulation by affecting fatty acid synthesis and glycolysis. Fly, worm and mice Indy gene homologues are predominantly expressed in places important for intermediary metabolism. Consequently, decreased expression of Indy in fly and worm, and the removal of mIndy in mice exhibit changes associated with calorie restriction, such as decreased levels of lipids, changes in carbohydrate metabolism and increased mitochondrial biogenesis. Here we report that several Indy alleles in a diverse array of genetic backgrounds confer increased longevity.

  3. Statistical laws for career longevity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Alexander; Jung, Woo-Sung; Yang, Jae-Suk; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2009-03-01

    Career length distinguishes successful long tenures from unsuccessful short stints, and partially reflects the contributions of an employee to the goals of the employer. In some professions, there are well-defined metrics that quantify career longevity, prowess, and productivity, which together contribute to the overall success rating for an individual employee. In this talk, I motivate a stochastic model for career development that relies on two key ingredients, random progress within the career and random stopping times terminating the career. This model is exactly solvable, predicting the probability density function (pdf) of career longevity, characterized by two parameters, α and xc. The parameter α quantifies the power-law scaling of the pdf, which is terminated by an exponential cutoff after a crossover value xc, representing the mean career lifetime. We test the model with the large quantity of empirical data available for several professional sports leagues, American baseball, Korean baseball, American basketball, and English soccer, finding excellent agreement with the model's predictions. In all, the generality of the model suggests that there may be common stochastic forces that underly progress, success, and longevity in various professions.

  4. "Predicting" parental longevity from offspring endophenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yashin, Anatoli I; Arbeev, Konstantin G; Kulminski, Alexander;

    2010-01-01

    While there is evidence that longevity runs in families, the study of long-lived families is complicated by the fact that longevity-related information is available only for the oldest old, many of whom may be deceased and unavailable for testing, and information on other living family members......, primarily descendents, is censored. This situation requires a creative approach for analyzing determinants of longevity in families. There are likely biomarkers that predict an individual's longevity, suggesting the possibility that those biomarkers which are heritable may constitute valuable endophenotypes...... for exceptional survival. These endophenotypes could be studied in families to identify human longevity genes and elucidate possible mechanisms of their influence on longevity. In this paper, we analyze data collected in the Long Life Family Study (LLFS) investigating whether indicators of...

  5. Securitization of Longevity and Mortality Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Tomas Cipra

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with Alternative Risk Transfer (ART) through the securitization of longevity and mortality risks in pension plans and commercial life insurance. Various types of such mortality-linked securities are described (e.g., CATM bonds, longevity bonds, mortality forwards and futures, and mortality swaps). Pricing methods and real examples are given. Hypothetical calculations concerning the pricing of potential mortality forwards that correspond to the evolution of longevity in the Cz...

  6. Gut Microbiota and Extreme Longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagi, Elena; Franceschi, Claudio; Rampelli, Simone; Severgnini, Marco; Ostan, Rita; Turroni, Silvia; Consolandi, Clarissa; Quercia, Sara; Scurti, Maria; Monti, Daniela; Capri, Miriam; Brigidi, Patrizia; Candela, Marco

    2016-06-01

    The study of the extreme limits of human lifespan may allow a better understanding of how human beings can escape, delay, or survive the most frequent age-related causes of morbidity, a peculiarity shown by long-living individuals. Longevity is a complex trait in which genetics, environment, and stochasticity concur to determine the chance to reach 100 or more years of age [1]. Because of its impact on human metabolism and immunology, the gut microbiome has been proposed as a possible determinant of healthy aging [2, 3]. Indeed, the preservation of host-microbes homeostasis can counteract inflammaging [4], intestinal permeability [5], and decline in bone and cognitive health [6, 7]. Aiming at deepening our knowledge on the relationship between the gut microbiota and a long-living host, we provide for the first time the phylogenetic microbiota analysis of semi-supercentenarians, i.e., 105-109 years old, in comparison to adults, elderly, and centenarians, thus reconstructing the longest available human microbiota trajectory along aging. We highlighted the presence of a core microbiota of highly occurring, symbiotic bacterial taxa (mostly belonging to the dominant Ruminococcaceae, Lachnospiraceae, and Bacteroidaceae families), with a cumulative abundance decreasing along with age. Aging is characterized by an increasing abundance of subdominant species, as well as a rearrangement in their co-occurrence network. These features are maintained in longevity and extreme longevity, but peculiarities emerged, especially in semi-supercentenarians, describing changes that, even accommodating opportunistic and allochthonous bacteria, might possibly support health maintenance during aging, such as an enrichment and/or higher prevalence of health-associated groups (e.g., Akkermansia, Bifidobacterium, and Christensenellaceae). PMID:27185560

  7. Genetic and biomarker studies of human longevity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deelen, Joris

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to identify novel lifespan regulating loci that influence human longevity and population mortality. To this end, we performed two genome-wide association studies, one of long-lived individuals from the family-based Leiden Longevity Study (LLS) and an extended one of long-l

  8. Leaf economics and hydraulic traits are decoupled in five species-rich tropical-subtropical forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Le; McCormack, M Luke; Ma, Chengen; Kong, Deliang; Zhang, Qian; Chen, Xiaoyong; Zeng, Hui; Niinemets, Ülo; Guo, Dali

    2015-09-01

    Leaf economics and hydraulic traits are critical to leaf photosynthesis, yet it is debated whether these two sets of traits vary in a fully coordinated manner or there is room for independent variation. Here, we tested the relationship between leaf economics traits, including leaf nitrogen concentration and leaf dry mass per area, and leaf hydraulic traits including stomatal density and vein density in five tropical-subtropical forests. Surprisingly, these two suites of traits were statistically decoupled. This decoupling suggests that independent trait dimensions exist within a leaf, with leaf economics dimension corresponding to light capture and tissue longevity, and the hydraulic dimension to water-use and leaf temperature maintenance. Clearly, leaf economics and hydraulic traits can vary independently, thus allowing for more possible plant trait combinations. Compared with a single trait dimension, multiple trait dimensions may better enable species adaptations to multifarious niche dimensions, promote diverse plant strategies and facilitate species coexistence. PMID:26108338

  9. Prediction of C. elegans Longevity Genes by Human and Worm Longevity Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Robi Tacutu; Shore, David E.; Arie Budovsky; João Pedro de Magalhães; Gary Ruvkun; Fraifeld, Vadim E.; Curran, Sean P.

    2012-01-01

    Intricate and interconnected pathways modulate longevity, but screens to identify the components of these pathways have not been saturating. Because biological processes are often executed by protein complexes and fine-tuned by regulatory factors, the first-order protein-protein interactors of known longevity genes are likely to participate in the regulation of longevity. Data-rich maps of protein interactions have been established for many cardinal organisms such as yeast, worms, and humans....

  10. Ageing and longevity in Volga region population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denisova T.P.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of complete clinical and demographic investigation of Volga Region population of long-livers have been presented. Anthropologic, social, clinical, laboratory and instrumental markers of longevity have been determined.

  11. Genes Might Explain Hispanics' Added Longevity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160528.html Genes Might Explain Hispanics' Added Longevity Differences in 'genetic ... Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Genes and Gene Therapy Hispanic American Health Recent Health ...

  12. Regulation of metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans longevity

    OpenAIRE

    Gallo, Marco; Riddle, Donald L.

    2010-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a favorite model for the study of aging. A wealth of genetic and genomic studies show that metabolic regulation is a hallmark of life-span modulation. A recent study in BMC Biology identifying metabolic signatures for longevity suggests that amino-acid pools may be important in longevity. See research article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/8/14.

  13. Longevity-contingent deferred life annuities

    OpenAIRE

    Denuit, M; Haberman, S; Renshaw, A.E.

    2015-01-01

    Considering the substantial systematic longevity risk threatening annuity providers’ solvency, indexing benefits on actual mortality improvements appears to be an efficient risk management tool, as discussed in Denuit et al. (2011) and Richter and Weber (2011). Whereas these papers consider indexing annuity payments, the present work suggests that the length of the deferment period could also be subject to revision, providing longevity-contingent deferred life annuities.

  14. Genetics, lifestyle and longevity: Lessons from centenarians

    OpenAIRE

    Diddahally Govindaraju; Gil Atzmon; Nir Barzilai

    2015-01-01

    Longevity as a complex life-history trait shares an ontogenetic relationship with other quantitative traits and varies among individuals, families and populations. Heritability estimates of longevity suggest that about a third of the phenotypic variation associated with the trait is attributable to genetic factors, and the rest is influenced by epigenetic and environmental factors. Individuals react differently to the environments that they are a part of, as well as to the environments they c...

  15. Worker Longevity in Harvester Ants (Pogonomyrmex)

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, D M; Hölldobler, B.

    1987-01-01

    Most studies of worker longevity in ants have been made in the laboratory (Haskins and Haskins 1980; Porter and Tschinkel 1982). In the field, increased energy expenditures, predation, and environmental fluctuations may all contribute to shorten the life of a worker ant. In the few existing studies of worker longevity conducted in the field, the lifespan of exterior workers was found to be extremely short. For example, Schmid-Hempel and Schmid- Hempel (1984) found that the half-life of Catagl...

  16. Longevity risks: modelling and financial engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Shaohui

    2008-01-01

    In this dissertation, we investigate various aspects of the systematic mortality risks, in particular, the longevity risks. To describe the precise meaning of random survival probability, we model the systematic mortality risks by generalizing the idea of conditional independence into a dynamical setting. The effects of systematic mortality risks on actuarial science are also analyzed. To evaluate and hedge the longevity risks on capital markets, we build up an arbitrage-free financial mar...

  17. Genetics, lifestyle and longevity: Lessons from centenarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diddahally Govindaraju

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Longevity as a complex life-history trait shares an ontogenetic relationship with other quantitative traits and varies among individuals, families and populations. Heritability estimates of longevity suggest that about a third of the phenotypic variation associated with the trait is attributable to genetic factors, and the rest is influenced by epigenetic and environmental factors. Individuals react differently to the environments that they are a part of, as well as to the environments they construct for their survival and reproduction; the latter phenomenon is known as niche construction. Lifestyle influences longevity at all the stages of development and levels of human diversity. Hence, lifestyle may be viewed as a component of niche construction. Here, we: a interpret longevity using a combination of genotype-epigenetic-phenotype (GEP map approach and niche-construction theory, and b discuss the plausible influence of genetic and epigenetic factors in the distribution and maintenance of longevity among individuals with normal life span on the one hand, and centenarians on the other. Although similar genetic and environmental factors appear to be common to both of these groups, exceptional longevity may be influenced by polymorphisms in specific genes, coupled with superior genomic stability and homeostatic mechanisms, maintained by negative frequency-dependent selection. We suggest that a comparative analysis of longevity between individuals with normal life span and centenarians, along with insights from population ecology and evolutionary biology, would not only advance our knowledge of biological mechanisms underlying human longevity, but also provide deeper insights into extending healthy life span.

  18. Staying Alive: Molecular Aspects of Seed Longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Naoto; Rajjou, Loïc; North, Helen M; Debeaujon, Isabelle; Marion-Poll, Annie; Seo, Mitsunori

    2016-04-01

    Mature seeds are an ultimate physiological status that enables plants to endure extreme conditions such as high and low temperature, freezing and desiccation. Seed longevity, the period over which seed remains viable, is an important trait not only for plant adaptation to changing environments, but also, for example, for agriculture and conservation of biodiversity. Reduction of seed longevity is often associated with oxidation of cellular macromolecules such as nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. Seeds possess two main strategies to combat these stressful conditions: protection and repair. The protective mechanism includes the formation of glassy cytoplasm to reduce cellular metabolic activities and the production of antioxidants that prevent accumulation of oxidized macromolecules during seed storage. The repair system removes damage accumulated in DNA, RNA and proteins upon seed imbibition through enzymes such as DNA glycosylase and methionine sulfoxide reductase. In addition to longevity, dormancy is also an important adaptive trait that contributes to seed lifespan. Studies in Arabidopsis have shown that the seed-specific transcription factor ABSCISIC ACID-INSENSITIVE3 (ABI3) plays a central role in ABA-mediated seed dormancy and longevity. Seed longevity largely relies on the viability of embryos. Nevertheless, characterization of mutants with altered seed coat structure and constituents has demonstrated that although the maternally derived cell layers surrounding the embryos are dead, they have a significant impact on longevity. PMID:26637538

  19. Associations between STR autosomal markers and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bediaga, N G; Aznar, J M; Elcoroaristizabal, X; Albóniga, O; Gómez-Busto, F; Artaza Artabe, I; Rocandio, Ana; de Pancorbo, M M

    2015-10-01

    Life span is a complex and multifactorial trait, which is shaped by genetic, epigenetic, environmental, and stochastic factors. The possibility that highly hypervariable short tandem repeats (STRs) associated with longevity has been largely explored by comparing the genotypic pools of long lived and younger individuals, but results so far have been contradictory. In view of these contradictory findings, the present study aims to investigate whether HUMTHO1 and HUMCSF1PO STRs, previously associated with longevity, exert a role as a modulator of life expectancy, as well as to assess the extent to which other autosomal STR markers are associated with human longevity in population from northern Spain. To that end, 21 autosomal microsatellite markers have been studied in 304 nonagenarian individuals (more than 90 years old) and 516 younger controls of European descent. Our results do not confirm the association found in previous studies between longevity and THO1 and CSF1PO loci. However, significant association between longevity and autosomal STR markers D12S391, D22S1045, and DS441 was observed. Even more, when we compared allelic frequency distribution of the 21 STR markers between cases and controls, we found that 6 out of the 21 STRs studied showed different allelic frequencies, thus suggesting that the genomic portrait of the human longevity is far complex and probably shaped by a high number of genomic loci. PMID:26335621

  20. A Family Longevity Selection Score: Ranking Sibships by Their Longevity, Size, and Availability for Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sebastiani, Paola; Hadley, Evan C; Province, Michael;

    2009-01-01

    Family studies of exceptional longevity can potentially identify genetic and other factors contributing to long life and healthy aging. Although such studies seek families that are exceptionally long lived, they also need living members who can provide DNA and phenotype information. On the basis of...... these considerations, the authors developed a metric to rank families for selection into a family study of longevity. Their measure, the family longevity selection score (FLoSS), is the sum of 2 components: 1) an estimated family longevity score built from birth-, gender-, and nation-specific cohort...... families with exceptional longevity, satisfactory sibship sizes and numbers of living siblings, and high ages. Parameters in the FLoSS formula can be tailored for studies of specific populations or age ranges or with different conditions. The first component of the FLoSS also provides a conceptually sound...

  1. Longevity of orders is related to the longevity of their constituent genera rather than genus richness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornholdt, Stefan; Sneppen, Kim; Westphal, Hildegard

    2009-05-01

    Longevity of a taxonomic group is an important issue in understanding the dynamics of evolution. In this respect a key observation is that genera, families or orders can each be assigned a characteristic average lifetime (Van Valen in Evol Theory 1:1-30, 1973). Using the fossil marine animal genera database (Sepkoski in Bull Am Paleontol 363, pp 563, 2002) we here examine the relationship between longevity of a higher taxonomic group (orders) and the longevity of its lower taxonomic groups (genera). We find insignificant correlation between the size of an order and its longevity, whereas we observe large correlation between the lifetime of an order and the lifetime of its constituent genera. These observations suggest that longevity of taxonomic groups is heritable intrinsically or on the grounds of environmental preferences. PMID:19101746

  2. Exploring mechanisms of sex differences in longevity: lifetime ovary exposure and exceptional longevity in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, David J; Kengeri, Seema S; Clever, Beth; Booth, Julie A; Maras, Aimee H; Schlittler, Deborah L; Hayek, Michael G

    2009-12-01

    To move closer to understanding the mechanistic underpinnings of sex differences in human longevity, we studied pet dogs to determine whether lifetime duration of ovary exposure was associated with exceptional longevity. This hypothesis was tested by collecting and analyzing lifetime medical histories, age at death, and cause of death for a cohort of canine 'centenarians'--exceptionally long-lived Rottweiler dogs that lived more than 30% longer than average life expectancy for the breed. Sex and lifetime ovary exposure in the oldest-old Rottweilers (age at death, > or = 13 years) were compared to a cohort of Rottweilers that had usual longevity (age at death, 8.0-10.8 years). Like women, female dogs were more likely than males to achieve exceptional longevity (OR, 95% CI = 2.0, 1.2-3.3; P = 0.006). However, removal of ovaries during the first 4 years of life erased the female survival advantage. In females, a strong positive association between ovaries and longevity persisted in multivariate analysis that considered other factors, such as height, body weight, and mother with exceptional longevity. A beneficial effect of ovaries on longevity in females could not be attributed to resistance against a particular disease or major cause of death. Our results document in dogs a female sex advantage for achieving exceptional longevity and show that lifetime ovary exposure, a factor not previously evaluated in women, is associated with exceptional longevity. This work introduces a conceptual framework for designing additional studies in pet dogs to define the ovary-sensitive biological processes that promote healthy human longevity. PMID:19732047

  3. Longevity genes across species: conservation versus evolvability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Salvioli

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The search for longevity genes has greatly developed in recent years basing on the idea that a consistent part of longevity is determined by genetics. The ultimate goal of this research is to identify possible genetic determinants of human aging and longevity, but studies on humans are limited by a series of critical restrictions. For this reason, most of the studies in this field have been, and still are, performed on animal models, basing on the assumption that fundamental biological mechanisms are highly conserved throughout evolution and that, accordingly, extrapolation from model systems to humans is quite reasonable. Indeed, many comparative data obtained on single genes or gene families fit with this assumption. However, it is also clear that, despite such a basic conservative scenario, major changes also occurred in evolution, particularly regarding biological regulatory processes and integration between and among pathways. This consideration raises the fundamental question of the transferability of the results obtained from model systems to humans. In this review, we discuss the differences between animal models and men regarding the genetics of aging and longevity, and the possible reasons that can explain such discrepancies, with a particular emphasis on the phenomena of conservation and evolvability of biological systems. Finally we will suggest a possible strategy to identify putative longevity genes basing on their position inside conserved metabolic structures

  4. Longevity Problem of Sterile Neutrino Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Ishida, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Fuminobu

    2013-01-01

    Sterile neutrino dark matter of mass O(1-10)keV decays into an active neutrino and an X-ray photon, and the non-observation of the corresponding X-ray line requires the sterile neutrino to be more long-lived than estimated based on the seesaw formula: the longevity problem. We show that, if one or more of the B-L Higgs fields are charged under a flavor symmetry, the split mass spectrum for the right-handed neutrinos is realized, and most importantly, the longevity problem can be solved naturally. We provide several examples which solve the longevity problem and predict the X-ray flux just below the current bound.

  5. Influence of various chemical compounds on postharvest longevity of cut leaves of Waldsteinia geoides Willd.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria P. Ulczycka-Walorska

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of conditioning and different methods of application of chemical compounds on cut leaves of Waldsteinia geoides was assessed. Gibberellic acid and benzyladenine at a concentration of 50 or 100 mg × dm-3, and 8-hydroxyquinoline sulphate at a concentration of 200 mg × dm-3 were used in the process of conditioning. The leaves were conditioned in two different ways. In the first one, half of leaf stalks were soaked for 24 hours. In the latter, whole leaf blades were dipped for thirty seconds. Cut leaves were stored either in water or in the solution of 8-hydroxyquinoline sulphate at a concentration of 200 mg × dm-3. It was both the chemical compounds applied and the application method that influenced the postharvest longevity of the leaves. The leaves conditioned in 8HQS and stored in water, those conditioned in BA at a concentration of 50 mg × dm-3 and stored in 8HQS, and those which were not conditioned and stored in 8HQS exhibited the highest level of postharvest longevity. The application of 8HQS for conditioning had a favorable effect on the increase in the weight of Waldsteinia geoides cut leaves. 8HQS applied in storing resulted in a smaller decrease in the values of the leaf greenness index.

  6. Cancer and Longevity--Is There a Trade-off?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kaare; Pedersen, Jacob K; Hjelmborg, Jacob V B;

    2012-01-01

    Animal models and a few human studies have suggested a complex interaction between cancer risk and longevity indicating a trade-off where low cancer risk is associated with accelerating aging phenotypes and, vice versa, that longevity potential comes with the cost of increased cancer risk. This...... hypothesis predicts that longevity in one twin is associated with increased cancer risk in the cotwin....

  7. 77 FR 5443 - Longevity Annuity Contracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... for Participants and Beneficiaries in Retirement Plans in the Federal Register (75 FR 5253). That... whom a longevity annuity contract is purchased under these plans and IRAs (and their beneficiaries... of a public hearing on these proposed regulations. DATES: Written or electronic comments must...

  8. Nectarine promotes longevity in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aging is associated with increased oxidative damage and gradual decline of physiology function with age, and is modulated by numerous genetic and environmental factors. Functional fruits are thought to be ideal candidates for promoting longevity and healthspan due to their high contents of polypheno...

  9. Longevity and aging in vertebrate evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacher, G.A

    1978-08-01

    Mammalian lifespan has a close allometric association with brain weight, body weight, metabolic rate, and body temperature. Longevity, then, if governed by natural selection acting on positive genetic mechanisms for stabilizing life processes, rather than by the random accumulation of ''senescence genes.'' This paper compares the social implications of these hypotheses.

  10. Longevity and Depreciation of Audiovisual Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Richard

    1987-01-01

    Describes results of survey of media service directors at public universities in Ohio to determine the expected longevity of audiovisual equipment. Use of the Delphi technique for estimates is explained, results are compared with an earlier survey done in 1977, and use of spreadsheet software to calculate depreciation is discussed. (LRW)

  11. Leaf Development

    OpenAIRE

    Tsukaya, Hirokazu

    2013-01-01

    Leaves are the most important organs for plants. Without leaves, plants cannot capture light energy or synthesize organic compounds via photosynthesis. Without leaves, plants would be unable perceive diverse environmental conditions, particularly those relating to light quality/quantity. Without leaves, plants would not be able to flower because all floral organs are modified leaves. Arabidopsis thaliana is a good model system for analyzing mechanisms of eudicotyledonous, simple-leaf developm...

  12. Genetic signatures of exceptional longevity in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Sebastiani

    Full Text Available Like most complex phenotypes, exceptional longevity is thought to reflect a combined influence of environmental (e.g., lifestyle choices, where we live and genetic factors. To explore the genetic contribution, we undertook a genome-wide association study of exceptional longevity in 801 centenarians (median age at death 104 years and 914 genetically matched healthy controls. Using these data, we built a genetic model that includes 281 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and discriminated between cases and controls of the discovery set with 89% sensitivity and specificity, and with 58% specificity and 60% sensitivity in an independent cohort of 341 controls and 253 genetically matched nonagenarians and centenarians (median age 100 years. Consistent with the hypothesis that the genetic contribution is largest with the oldest ages, the sensitivity of the model increased in the independent cohort with older and older ages (71% to classify subjects with an age at death>102 and 85% to classify subjects with an age at death>105. For further validation, we applied the model to an additional, unmatched 60 centenarians (median age 107 years resulting in 78% sensitivity, and 2863 unmatched controls with 61% specificity. The 281 SNPs include the SNP rs2075650 in TOMM40/APOE that reached irrefutable genome wide significance (posterior probability of association = 1 and replicated in the independent cohort. Removal of this SNP from the model reduced the accuracy by only 1%. Further in-silico analysis suggests that 90% of centenarians can be grouped into clusters characterized by different "genetic signatures" of varying predictive values for exceptional longevity. The correlation between 3 signatures and 3 different life spans was replicated in the combined replication sets. The different signatures may help dissect this complex phenotype into sub-phenotypes of exceptional longevity.

  13. Longevity suppresses conflict in animal societies

    OpenAIRE

    Port, M; Cant, M A

    2013-01-01

    Models of social conflict in animal societies generally assume that within-group conflict reduces the value of a communal resource. For many animals, however, the primary cost of conflict is increased mortality. We develop a simple inclusive fitness model of social conflict that takes this cost into account. We show that longevity substantially reduces the level of within-group conflict, which can lead to the evolution of peaceful animal societies if relatedness among group members is high. B...

  14. The Value of Health and Longevity

    OpenAIRE

    Kevin M. Murphy; Robert H. Topel

    2005-01-01

    We develop an economic framework for valuing improvements to health and life expectancy, based on individuals' willingness to pay. We then apply the framework to past and prospective reductions in mortality risks, both overall and for specific life-threatening diseases. We calculate (i) the social values of increased longevity for men and women over the 20th century; (ii) the social value of progress against various diseases after 1970; and (iii) the social value of potential future progress ...

  15. Longevity and Patau syndrome: what determines survival?

    OpenAIRE

    Peroos, Sherina; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Pugh, Jennifer Harriet; Arthur-Farraj, Peter; Hodes, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    The authors report of an 8-year-old girl with non-mosaic Patau syndrome. The median life expectancy of Patau syndrome is 7–10 days, and 90% die in the first year of life. Survival is often attributed to mosaicism and the severity of associated malformations. We delineate the developing phenotype and review the literature discussing potential contributory factors to longevity.

  16. Longevity and Patau syndrome: what determines survival?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peroos, Sherina; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Pugh, Jennifer Harriet; Arthur-Farraj, Peter; Hodes, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    The authors report of an 8-year-old girl with non-mosaic Patau syndrome. The median life expectancy of Patau syndrome is 7-10 days, and 90% die in the first year of life. Survival is often attributed to mosaicism and the severity of associated malformations. We delineate the developing phenotype and review the literature discussing potential contributory factors to longevity. PMID:23220825

  17. Generality of leaf trait relationships: A test across six biomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reich, P.B. [Univ. of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN (United States). Dept. of Forest Resources; Ellsworth, D.S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Applied Science; Walters, M.B. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Forestry; Vose, J.M. [Forest Service, Otto, NC (United States). Coweeta Hydrological Lab.; Gresham, C. [Clemson Univ., Georgetown, SC (United States). Baruch Forest Inst.; Volin, J.C. [Florida Atlantic Univ., Davie, FL (United States). Div. of Science; Bowman, W.D. [Inst. of Arctic and Alpine Research, Boulder, CO (United States). Mountain Research Station]|[Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Evolutionary, Population, and Organismic Biology

    1999-09-01

    Convergence in interspecific leaf trait relationships across diverse taxonomic groups and biomes would have important evolutionary and ecological implications. Such convergence has been hypothesized to result from trade-offs that limit the combination of plant traits for any species. Here the authors address this issue by testing for biome differences in the slope and intercept of interspecific relationships among leaf traits: longevity, net photosynthetic capacity (A{sub max}), leaf diffusive conductance (G{sub S}), specific leaf area (SLA), and nitrogen (N) status, for more than 100 species in six distinct biomes of the Americas. The six biomes were: alpine tundra-subalpine forest ecotone, cold temperate forest-prairie ecotone, montane cool temperate forest, desert shrubland, subtropical forest, and tropical rain forest. Despite large differences in climate and evolutionary history, in all biomes mass-based leaf N (N{sub mass}), SLA, G{sub S}, and A{sub max} were positively related to one another and decreased with increasing leaf life span. The relationships between pairs of leaf traits exhibited similar slopes among biomes, suggesting a predictable set of scaling relationships among key leaf morphological, chemical, and metabolic traits that are replicated globally among terrestrial ecosystems regardless of biome or vegetation type. However, the intercept (i.e., the overall elevation of regression lines) of relationships between pairs of leaf traits usually differed among biomes. With increasing aridity across sites, species had greater A{sub max} for a given level of G{sub S} and lower SLA for any given leaf life span. Using principal components analysis, most variation among species was explained by an axis related to mass-based leaf traits (A{sub max}, N, and SLA) while a second axis reflected climate, G{sub S}, and other area-based leaf traits.

  18. Genetic parameters for longevity in Holteins cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Junqueira Oliveira

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The milk yield has been the most selected trait in dairy cattle breeding programs. However various studies have shown a decline in adaptive and longevity traits in herds that are under selection for improving production, especially in taurine breeds, as the Holstein, who was highly selected for milk production. The aim of this study was to estimate genetic parameters for first lactation 305-day milk yield (Y305 and for longevity traits and to verify the association among them, in high production Holstein cows. The data sets used were from Agrindus Farm, with calving occurring between 1989 and 2005. The traits analyzed were Y305, productive life (PL, calculated as the length of lactation days from the first day of lactation until the culling, and age at culling (AC. Variance components were estimated by Restricted Maximum Likelihood, applying multi-trait animal model. Heritability estimates for Y305, PL and AC were, respectively, 0.35, 0.07 and 0.10. Heritability estimates for PL and AC suggest small genetic variability to get genetic gains by direct selection for these traits, because they are influenced by decisions of voluntary and involuntary culling, being largely affected by factors related to the environment. It is difficult to measure these traits because it is necessary to evaluate culling of animals and causes of culling. The magnitude of the heritability estimate for Y305 evidences the existence of reasonable additive genetic variability, which allows efficiency by selecting for this trait. The genetic correlations between Y305 and PL was 0.02 and between Y305 and AC was 0.01, suggesting small genetic association between Y305 and longevity traits. In this case, the selection for Y305 is viable due to high heritability estimate and the favorable and almost null genetic correlation between Y305 and the longevity traits. Some studies have used to analyze longevity traits as threshold and since this trait has great economic importance, it

  19. The longevity legacy: the problem of old animals in zoos

    OpenAIRE

    Kitchener, Andrew; Macdonald, Alastair A

    2002-01-01

    Zoos once demonstrated their skill in keeping wild mammals in captivity by longevity records. However, as our knowledge of animal husbandry in zoos has increased and breeding in most species has become commonplace, so the emphasis has shifted to continued breeding success and the management of sustainable zoo populations. There has also been undoubtedly an increase in the maximum and mean longevities of most species. For example, in a period of 30 years, the maximum longevities of gorillas (G...

  20. Bacteria and the Aging and Longevity of Caenorhabditis elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Dennis H.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular genetic analysis of longevity of Caenorhabditis elegans has yielded fundamental insights into evolutionarily conserved pathways and processes governing the physiology of aging. Recent studies suggest that interactions between C. elegans and its microbial environment may influence the aging and longevity of this simple host organism. Experimental evidence supports a role for bacteria in affecting longevity through distinct mechanisms—as a nutrient source, as a potential pathogen ...

  1. Plasma long-chain free fatty acids predict mammalian longevity

    OpenAIRE

    Mariona Jové; Alba Naudí; Juan Carlos Aledo; Rosanna Cabré; Victoria Ayala; Manuel Portero-Otin; Gustavo Barja; Reinald Pamplona

    2013-01-01

    Membrane lipid composition is an important correlate of the rate of aging of animals and, therefore, the determination of their longevity. In the present work, the use of high-throughput technologies allowed us to determine the plasma lipidomic profile of 11 mammalian species ranging in maximum longevity from 3.5 to 120 years. The non-targeted approach revealed a specie-specific lipidomic profile that accurately predicts the animal longevity. The regression analysis between lipid species and ...

  2. Economic Evaluation of Longevity in Organic Dairy Farming

    OpenAIRE

    Horn, Marco; Knaus, Wilhelm; Kirner, Leopold; Steinwidder, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to highlight the economic importance of longevity in organic dairy cattle husbandry. Performance and reproductive data of 44,976 Austrian organic Simmental dairy cows were analysed by applying a bio-economic model. A farm scenario as well as different market situations were modelled. Overall costs declined with increasing longevity, due to dropping replacement costs. Annual profit was influenced considerably by milk yield and longevity. Short-lived animals needed sub...

  3. Association of exceptional parental longevity and physical function in aging

    OpenAIRE

    Ayers, Emmeline; Barzilai, Nir; Crandall, Jill P.; Milman, Sofiya; Verghese, Joe

    2014-01-01

    Offspring of parents with exceptional longevity (OPEL), who are more likely to carry longevity-associated genotypes, may age more successfully than offspring of parents with usual survival (OPUS). Maintenance of physical function is a key attribute of successful aging. While many genetic and non-genetic factors interact to determine physical phenotype in aging, examination of the contribution of exceptional parental longevity to physical function in aging is limited. The LonGenity study recru...

  4. Longevity risks and capital markets: The 2010-2011 update

    OpenAIRE

    Blake, David; Courbage, Christophe; MacMinn, Richard; Sherris, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This Special Issue of Geneva Papers on Risk and Insurance - Issues and Practice contains 10 contributions to the academic literature all dealing with longevity risk and capital markets. Draft versions of the papers were presented at Longevity Six: The Sixth International Longevity Risk and Capital Markets Solutions Conference that was held in Sydney on 9-10 September 2010. It was hosted by the Australian Institute for Population Ageing Research, the Australian School of Business and the Unive...

  5. Endocrine and metabolic features of familial longevity : the Leiden Longevity Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozing, Maarten Pieter

    2011-01-01

    This thesis discusses the metabolic and endocrine characteristics of long-lived Dutch families. We found that familial longevity is marked by low thyroid function and preserved insulin senitivity. The second part of this thesis adresses the Gompertz law of mortality as an estimate of the rate of sen

  6. [Why regular physical activity favors longevity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentimone, F; Del Corso, L

    1998-06-01

    Regular physical exercise is useful at all ages. In the elderly, even a gentle exercise programme consisting of walking, bicycling, playing golf if performed constantly increases longevity by preventing the onset of the main diseases or alleviating the handicaps they may have caused. Cardiovascular diseases, which represent the main cause of death in the elderly, and osteoporosis, a disabling disease potentially capable of shortening life expectancy, benefit from physical exercise which if performed regularly well before the start of old age may help to prevent them. Over the past few years there has been growing evidence of the concrete protection offered against neoplasia and even the ageing process itself. PMID:9739351

  7. Longevity of Emplacement Drift Ground Support Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, David H.

    2001-05-30

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the factors affecting the longevity of emplacement drift ground support materials and to develop a basis for the selection of materials for ground support that will function throughout the preclosure period of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. REV 01 ICN 01 of this analysis is developed in accordance with AP-3.10Q, Analyses and Models, Revision 2, ICN 4, and prepared in accordance with the Technical Work Plan for Subsurface Design Section FY 01 Work Activities (CRWMS M&O 2001a). The objective of this analysis is to update the previous analysis (CRWMS M&O 2000a) to account for related changes in the Ground Control System Description Document (CRWMS M&O 2000b), the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document, which is included in the Requirements and Criteria for Implementing a Repository Design that can be Operated Over a Range of Thermal Modes (BSC 2001), input information, and in environmental conditions, and to provide updated information on candidate ground support materials. Candidate materials for ground support are carbon steel and cement grout. Steel is mainly used for steel sets, lagging, channel, rock bolts, and wire mesh. Cement grout is only considered in the case of grouted rock bolts. Candidate materials for the emplacement drift invert are carbon steel and granular natural material. Materials are evaluated for the repository emplacement drift environment based on the updated thermal loading condition and waste package design. The analysis consists of the following tasks: (1) Identify factors affecting the longevity of ground support materials for use in emplacement drifts. (2) Review existing documents concerning the behavior of candidate ground support materials during the preclosure period. (3) Evaluate impacts of temperature and radiation effects on mechanical and thermal properties of steel. Assess corrosion potential of steel at emplacement drift environment. (4) Evaluate factors

  8. Longevity of Emplacement Drift Ground Support Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the factors affecting the longevity of emplacement drift ground support materials and to develop a basis for the selection of materials for ground support that will function throughout the preclosure period of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. REV 01 ICN 01 of this analysis is developed in accordance with AP-3.10Q, Analyses and Models, Revision 2, ICN 4, and prepared in accordance with the Technical Work Plan for Subsurface Design Section FY 01 Work Activities (CRWMS M and O 2001a). The objective of this analysis is to update the previous analysis (CRWMS M and O 2000a) to account for related changes in the Ground Control System Description Document (CRWMS M and O 2000b), the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document, which is included in the Requirements and Criteria for Implementing a Repository Design that can be Operated Over a Range of Thermal Modes (BSC 2001), input information, and in environmental conditions, and to provide updated information on candidate ground support materials. Candidate materials for ground support are carbon steel and cement grout. Steel is mainly used for steel sets, lagging, channel, rock bolts, and wire mesh. Cement grout is only considered in the case of grouted rock bolts. Candidate materials for the emplacement drift invert are carbon steel and granular natural material. Materials are evaluated for the repository emplacement drift environment based on the updated thermal loading condition and waste package design. The analysis consists of the following tasks: (1) Identify factors affecting the longevity of ground support materials for use in emplacement drifts. (2) Review existing documents concerning the behavior of candidate ground support materials during the preclosure period. (3) Evaluate impacts of temperature and radiation effects on mechanical and thermal properties of steel. Assess corrosion potential of steel at emplacement drift environment. (4

  9. Longevity of Emplacement Drift Ground Support Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the factors affecting the longevity of emplacement drift ground support materials and to develop a basis for selection of materials for ground support that will function throughout the preclosure period. The Development Plan (DP) for this analysis is given in CRWMS M and O (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor) (1999a). The candidate materials for ground support are steel (carbon steel, ductile cast iron, galvanized steel, and stainless steel, etc.) and cement. Steel will mainly be used for steel sets, lagging, channels, rock bolts, and wire mesh. Cement usage is only considered in the case of grouted rock bolts. The candidate materials for the invert structure are steel and crushed rock ballast. The materials shall be evaluated for the repository emplacement drift environment under a specific thermal loading condition based on the proposed License Application Design Selection (LADS) design. The analysis consists of the following tasks: (1) Identify factors affecting the longevity of ground control materials for use in emplacement drifts. (2) Review existing documents concerning behavior of candidate ground control materials during the preclosure period. The major criteria to be considered for steel are mechanical and thermal properties, and durability, of which corrosion is the most important concern. (3) Evaluate the available results and develop recommendations for material(s) to be used

  10. Mediterranean Way of Drinking and Longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacosa, Attilio; Barale, Roberto; Bavaresco, Luigi; Faliva, Milena Anna; Gerbi, Vincenzo; La Vecchia, Carlo; Negri, Eva; Opizzi, Annalisa; Perna, Simone; Pezzotti, Mario; Rondanelli, Mariangela

    2016-03-11

    The relation between alcohol consumption and mortality is a J-shaped curve in most of the many studies published on this topic. The Copenhagen Prospective Population Studies demonstrated in the year 2000 that wine intake may have a beneficial effect on all cause mortality that is additive to that of alcohol. Wine contains various poliphenolic substances which may be beneficial for health and in particular flavonols (such as myricetin and quercetin), catechin and epicatechin, proanthocyanidins, anthocyanins, various phenolic acids and the stilbene resveratrol. In particular, resveratrol seems to play a positive effect on longevity because it increases the expression level of Sirt1, besides its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic properties. Moderate wine drinking is part of the Mediterranean diet, together with abundant and variable plant foods, high consumption of cereals, olive oil as the main (added) fat and a low intake of (red) meat. This healthy diet pattern involves a "Mediterranean way of drinking," that is a regular, moderate wine consumption mainly with food (up to two glasses a day for men and one glass for women). Moderate wine drinking increases longevity, reduces the risk of cardiovascular diseases and does not appreciably influence the overall risk of cancer. PMID:25207479

  11. Species longevity in North American fossil mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prothero, Donald R

    2014-08-01

    Species longevity in the fossil record is related to many paleoecological variables and is important to macroevolutionary studies, yet there are very few reliable data on average species durations in Cenozoic fossil mammals. Many of the online databases (such as the Paleobiology Database) use only genera of North American Cenozoic mammals and there are severe problems because key groups (e.g. camels, oreodonts, pronghorns and proboscideans) have no reliable updated taxonomy, with many invalid genera and species and/or many undescribed genera and species. Most of the published datasets yield species duration estimates of approximately 2.3-4.3 Myr for larger mammals, with small mammals tending to have shorter species durations. My own compilation of all the valid species durations in families with updated taxonomy (39 families, containing 431 genera and 998 species, averaging 2.3 species per genus) yields a mean duration of 3.21 Myr for larger mammals. This breaks down to 4.10-4.39 Myr for artiodactyls, 3.14-3.31 Myr for perissodactyls and 2.63-2.95 Myr for carnivorous mammals (carnivorans plus creodonts). These averages are based on a much larger, more robust dataset than most previous estimates, so they should be more reliable for any studies that need species longevity to be accurately estimated. PMID:25236413

  12. Longevity and diet. Myth or pragmatism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrysohoou, Christina; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2013-12-01

    Longevity is a very complex phenomenon, because many environmental, behavioral, socio-demographic and dietary factors influence the physiological pathways of aging and life-expectancy. Nutrition has been recognized to have an important impact on overall mortality and morbidity; and its role in extending life expectancy has been the object of extensive scientific research. This paper reviews the pathophysiological mechanisms that potentially link aging with diet and the scientific evidence supporting the anti-aging effect of the traditional Mediterranean diet, as well as of some specific foods. The diet and several of its components have additionally been shown to have beneficial effects on the co-morbidities typical of elderly populations. Furthermore, the epigenetic effects of diet on the aging process - through calorie restriction and the consumption of foods like red wine, orange juice, probiotics and prebiotics - have attracted scientific interest. Some, such as dark chocolate, red wine, nuts, beans, avocados are being promoted as anti-aging foods, due to their anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. Finally, an important moderator in the relationship between diet, longevity and human health remains the socio-economic status of individual, as a healthy diet, due to its higher cost, is closely related to higher financial and educational status. PMID:24210636

  13. Longevity and Education: A Demographic Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasilionis, Domantas; Shkolnikov, Vladimir M

    2016-01-01

    In the second half of the 20th century, the advances in human longevity observed have been accompanied by an increase in the disparities between countries and regions. Education is one of the strongest predictors of life expectancy. Studies have shown that both relative and absolute mortality differences by education within countries have been increasing, even in the most developed and egalitarian countries. It is possible to assume that groups of highly educated people who systematically display life expectancy levels which are higher than the observed best practice (record) life expectancy at the national level are vanguards who are leading the way toward a lengthening of life for the remaining population groups. This evidence based on population-level statistics and exploring an important single factor could inspire further discussion about the possibilities for extending human length of life at the national level. However, more comprehensive and reliable data covering a larger number of countries and more covariates are needed for understanding health effects of education and prospects of human longevity. PMID:26375385

  14. What are the longevities of teeth and oral implants?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm-Pedersen, Poul; Lang, Niklaus P; Müller, Frauke

    2007-01-01

    To analyse tooth loss and to evaluate the longevity of healthy teeth and teeth compromised by diseases and influenced by therapy as well as that of oral implants.......To analyse tooth loss and to evaluate the longevity of healthy teeth and teeth compromised by diseases and influenced by therapy as well as that of oral implants....

  15. Comments on Dietary Restriction, Okinawa Diet and Longevity

    OpenAIRE

    Gavrilova, Natalia S.; Gavrilov, Leonid A.

    2011-01-01

    Longevity in Okinawa is considered to be a result of traditional low calorie diet. Le Bourg suggests that Okinawa is an example of severe malnutrition, which is harmful for later generations. We believe that current loss of longevity advantage in Okinawa is a result of diet westernization and that the dietary restriction is a valid way of life extension in humans.

  16. Comments on dietary restriction, Okinawa diet and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilova, Natalia S; Gavrilov, Leonid A

    2012-01-01

    Longevity in Okinawa is considered to be a result of traditional low calorie diet. Le Bourg suggests that Okinawa is an example of severe malnutrition, which is harmful for later generations. We believe that current loss of longevity advantage in Okinawa is a result of diet westernization and that the dietary restriction is a valid way of life extension in humans. PMID:21893946

  17. Endogenous longevity and the value-maximizing firm

    OpenAIRE

    Zsolt Becsi

    2002-01-01

    We develop a simple analytical framework where the longevity of profit-maximizing firms requires costly resources. We show that a firm's longevity and value are positively related to the firm''s pricing power, cash reserves, honesty, and ratio of equity to debt financing.

  18. Heritability of and mortality prediction with a longevity phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanders, Jason L; Minster, Ryan L; Barmada, M Michael;

    2014-01-01

    Longevity-associated genes may modulate risk for age-related diseases and survival. The Healthy Aging Index (HAI) may be a subphenotype of longevity, which can be constructed in many studies for genetic analysis. We investigated the HAI's association with survival in the Cardiovascular Health Study...

  19. Intergenerational redistribution and risk sharing with changing longevity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben M.

    2014-01-01

    Trend increases in longevity are a global phenomenon challenging the fiscal sustainability of current welfare arrangements. Policy proposals abound and often build on implicit assertions concerning intergenerational equity. This paper offers a simple but manageable OLG model with endogenous...... retirement and cohort-specific longevity to address intergenerational redistribution and risk sharing. While it is well known that a utilitarian planner strives for consumption smoothing, it is shown that healthy ageing calls for work smoothing in the sense that retirement ages increase with longevity. Hence......, cohorts with higher longevity should contribute to their larger consumption needs via later retirement, although it is shown that the planner still front-loads some financing (pre-saving). Stochastic longevity raises the issue of intergenerational risk sharing, which implies that cohorts turning out to...

  20. A novel sampling design to explore gene-longevity associations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Rango, Francesco; Dato, Serena; Bellizzi, Dina;

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the genetic contribution to familial similarity in longevity, we set up a novel experimental design where cousin-pairs born from siblings who were concordant or discordant for the longevity trait were analyzed. To check this design, two chromosomal regions already known to encompass...... longevity-related genes were examined: 6p21.3 (genes TNFalpha, TNFbeta, HSP70.1) and 11p15.5 (genes SIRT3, HRAS1, IGF2, INS, TH). Population pools of 1.6, 2.3 and 2.0 million inhabitants were screened, respectively, in Denmark, France and Italy to identify families matching the design requirements. A total...... longevity-related chromosomal regions. This will allow to dimension future sampling campaigns to study-genetic basis of human longevity.European Journal of Human Genetics (2008) 16, 236-242; doi:10.1038/sj.ejhg.5201950; published online 7 November 2007....

  1. Longevity of orders is related to the longevity of their constituent genera rather than genus richness

    OpenAIRE

    Bornholdt, Stefan; Sneppen, Kim; Westphal, Hildegard

    2006-01-01

    Longevity of a taxonomic group is an important issue in understanding the dynamics of evolution. In this respect a key observation is that genera, families or orders can each be assigned a characteristic average lifetime [Van Valen, L., (1973) Evolutionary Theory 1, 1-30]. Using the fossil marine animal genera database [Sepkoski, J.J.Jr. (2002) A Compendium of Fossil Marine Animal Genera, Bull. Am. Paleontol. 363, 563 pp.] we here examine key determinants for robustness of a higher taxonomic ...

  2. Puzzling role of genetic risk factors in human longevity: "risk alleles" as pro-longevity variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukraintseva, Svetlana; Yashin, Anatoliy; Arbeev, Konstantin; Kulminski, Alexander; Akushevich, Igor; Wu, Deqing; Joshi, Gaurang; Land, Kenneth C; Stallard, Eric

    2016-02-01

    Complex diseases are major contributors to human mortality in old age. Paradoxically, many genetic variants that have been associated with increased risks of such diseases are found in genomes of long-lived people, and do not seem to compromise longevity. Here we argue that trade-off-like and conditional effects of genes can play central role in this phenomenon and in determining longevity. Such effects may occur as result of: (i) antagonistic influence of gene on the development of different health disorders; (ii) change in the effect of gene on vulnerability to death with age (especially, from "bad" to "good"); (iii) gene-gene interaction; and (iv) gene-environment interaction, among other factors. A review of current knowledge provides many examples of genetic factors that may increase the risk of one disease but reduce chances of developing another serious health condition, or improve survival from it. Factors that may increase risk of a major disease but attenuate manifestation of physical senescence are also discussed. Overall, available evidence suggests that the influence of a genetic variant on longevity may be negative, neutral or positive, depending on a delicate balance of the detrimental and beneficial effects of such variant on multiple health and aging related traits. This balance may change with age, internal and external environments, and depend on genetic surrounding. We conclude that trade-off-like and conditional genetic effects are very common and may result in situations when a disease "risk allele" can also be a pro-longevity variant, depending on context. We emphasize importance of considering such effects in both aging research and disease prevention. PMID:26306600

  3. Longevity, Capital Formation and Economic Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Qiong

    2012-01-01

    Many researchers have concluded that longer life expectancies prompt increased investment in education, as a pro- longed labor supply raises the rate of return on education. Besides explaining the empirical evidence behind this conclusion (at an absolute level), there is another issue to be discussed: does time spent studying and working increase proportionally with higher longevity? Building on an extended life-cycle model, this paper shows that prolonged life expectancy will cause individuals to increase their time in education but may not warrant rises in labor input. Later we show that higher improvement rate of longevity rather than initial life expectancy will promote economic growth, even we exclude the mechanism of human capital formation, and only consider growth effects of higher improvement rate of life expectancy from physical capital investment.

  4. Theoretical investigations of grout seal longevity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical investigations into the longevity of repository seals have dealt primarily with the development of a methodology to evaluate interactions between portland cement-based grout and groundwater. Groundwater travel times through a seal have been calculated based on Darcy's Law, with an assumed hydraulic gradient for the site and initial hydraulic conductivity for the grout. Chemical interactions between a model grout and actual groundwater compositions have been evaluated by means of geochemical modelling codes. Changes in grout porosity derived from the geochemical modelling have been extended to yield estimates of hydraulic conductivity, based on published experimental results. Also, a preliminary approach to the evaluation of the role of diffusion processes in grout alteration has begun. Results of these investigations suggest that cement grout seals will maintain an acceptable level of performance for tens of thousands to millions of years, provided the repository is sited where groundwater chemistry is compatible with the seals and hydrologic gradients are low. (au) (21 refs.)

  5. Regional aging and longevity characteristics in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Li, Yonghua; Li, Hairong; Holdaway, Jennifer; Hao, Zhe; Wang, Wuyi; Krafft, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The factors that influence the length of human life are complex and longevity remains a controversial topic, particularly in China. This paper demonstrates the spatial patterns and changes of the elderly group (65 years old and over), the oldest old (80 years old and over) and the centenarians in China in the last decade, analyzes the influence of economic development on aging, and in the end, using a case study, explores the characteristics of the centenarians' behavior. The results indicate that high elderly and the oldest old proportions are more common in regions with higher socio-economic development and that have a favorable climate. Centenarian distribution pattern is less influenced by economic but only for few regions. Lifestyle factors, such as sufficient sleep, positive mental state and a light diet are also largely found among the centenarian group. PMID:27544461

  6. Biology of Healthy Aging and Longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, Juan José; Michan, Shaday

    2016-01-01

    As human life expectancy is prolonged, age-related diseases are thriving. Aging is a complex multifactorial process of molecular and cellular decline that affects tissue function over time, rendering organisms frail and susceptible to disease and death. Over the last decades, a growing body of scientific literature across different biological models, ranging from yeast, worms, flies, and mice to primates, humans and other long-lived animals, has contributed greatly towards identifying conserved biological mechanisms that ward off structural and functional deterioration within living systems. Collectively, these data offer powerful insights into healthy aging and longevity. For example, molecular integrity of the genome, telomere length, epigenetic landscape stability, and protein homeostasis are all features linked to "youthful" states. These molecular hallmarks underlie cellular functions associated with aging like mitochondrial fitness, nutrient sensing, efficient intercellular communication, stem cell renewal, and regenerative capacity in tissues. At present, calorie restriction remains the most robust strategy for extending health and lifespan in most biological models tested. Thus, pathways that mediate the beneficial effects of calorie restriction by integrating metabolic signals to aging processes have received major attention, such as insulin/insulin growth factor-1, sirtuins, mammalian target of rapamycin, and 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase. Consequently, small-molecule targets of these pathways have emerged in the impetuous search for calorie restriction mimetics, of which resveratrol, metformin, and rapamycin are the most extensively studied. A comprehensive understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie age-related deterioration and repair, and how these pathways interconnect, remains a major challenge for uncovering interventions to slow human aging while extending molecular and physiological youthfulness

  7. Comparative endocrinology of aging and longevity regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John eAllard

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Hormones regulate growth, development, metabolism, and other complex processes in multicellular animals. For many years it has been suggested that hormones may also influence the rate of the aging process. Aging is a multifactorial process that causes biological systems to break down and cease to function in adult organisms as time passes, eventually leading to death. The exact underlying causes of the aging process remain a topic for debate, and clues that may shed light on these causes are eagerly sought after. In the last two decades, gene mutations that result in delayed aging and extended longevity have been discovered, and many of the affected genes have been components of endocrine signaling pathways. In this review we summarize the current knowledge on the roles of endocrine signaling in the regulation of aging and longevity in various animals. We begin by discussing the notion that conserved systems, including endocrine signaling pathways, regulate the aging process. Findings from the major model organisms: worms, flies and rodents, are then outlined. Unique lessons from studies of non-traditional models: bees, salmon and naked mole rats, are also discussed. Finally, we summarize the endocrinology of aging in humans, including changes in hormone levels with age, and the involvement of hormones in aging-related diseases. The most well studied and widely conserved endocrine pathway that affects aging is the insulin/insulin-like growth factor system. Mutations in genes of this pathway increase the lifespan of worms, flies, and mice. Population genetic evidence also suggests this pathway’s involvement in human aging. Other hormones including steroids have been linked to aging only in a subset of the models studied. Because of the value of comparative studies, it is suggested that the aging field could benefit from adoption of additional model organisms.

  8. Effect of metconazole on post-harvest longevity of tulips (Tulipa sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Janowska

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Tulips were conditioned for 4 h in room at temperature of 18-20°C and/or 24 h in cool room of 5°C in water solution of metconazole in Caramba 6- SL at concentrations of 300, 600 and 900 mg∙dm-3. The post-harvest longevity of ‘Strong Gold’ and ‘Foxtrot’ increased after conditioning in metconazole at concentrations of 300-900 mg∙dm-3 for 4 and 24 h. Metconazole used in mentioned concentrations did not inhibit the elongation of stems and upper internodes of stickled cultivars. Conditioning for 4 and 24 h in metconazole at concentrations 300-900 mg∙dm-3 stimulated the elongation of petals in ‘Strong Gold’. Regardless of conditioning time metconazole affected higher leaf greenness index value of the studied cultivars.  

  9. Genome-wide linkage analysis for human longevity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beekman, Marian; Blanché, Hélène; Perola, Markus;

    2013-01-01

    Clear evidence exists for heritability of human longevity, and much interest is focused on identifying genes associated with longer lives. To identify such longevity alleles, we performed the largest genome-wide linkage scan thus far reported. Linkage analyses included 2118 nonagenarian Caucasian...... sibling pairs that have been enrolled in 15 study centers of 11 European countries as part of the Genetics of Healthy Aging (GEHA) project. In the joint linkage analyses, we observed four regions that show linkage with longevity; chromosome 14q11.2 (LOD = 3.47), chromosome 17q12-q22 (LOD = 2...

  10. Health-related phenotypes and longevity in Danish twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulminski, Alexander M; Arbeev, Konstantin G; Culminskaya, Irina V;

    2009-01-01

    Aging studies can be facilitated by refocusing from longevity phenotypes to their proxies (intermediate phenotypes). Robust selection of the intermediate phenotypes requires data on such phenotypes and life span measured in the same individuals, which is not always the case in aging studies. A...... promising approach is to select intermediate phenotypes using information on longevity measured in related individuals. We evaluated feasibility of this approach focusing on 32 geriatric diseases as potential intermediate phenotypes of longevity assessed in the Longitudinal Study of Aging Danish Twins. Our...

  11. Hyper-longevity, a late-modern paradigm for understanding longevity, ageing and their complexities in Western developed globalised countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzetta, Roberto; Cesario, Alfredo; Fini, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    If longevity is a biological and demographic indicator to determine human lifetime extension, hyper-longevity notion can represent a heuristic tool to better disentangle the complex bio-psycho-social implications of ageing and elderly in Western developed globalised countries. Departing from the assumption of a holistic approach to human condition understanding, it is possible to reveal the grounds and patterns of a multilayered and multidimensional structuring of longevity and ageing in our societies that would lead to a form of hyper-longevity. Socio-cultural processes, underlying hyper-longevity notion, rise the question of transition from modern/ latemodern societies to post-modern ones and it offers room for a cultural analysis of concepts, such as space time compression, digital capitalism, knowledge and mass information society. These are relevant ideas that can contribute to reshape and rethink the boundaries and traits of ageing experience in 21(st) century societies. To better catch the point emerging social category of Baby Boomers is presented and used to provide a concrete context related example on how hyper-longevity can better explain complex social evidences in many cultural respects and social domains. As a conclusive step some preliminary reflections, largely centered on the relation between Baby Boomers, hyper-longevity and bio-medical sciences are presented and discussed to provide a starting point for further future analyses within a trans and inter-disciplinary framework. PMID:24641235

  12. Novel loci and pathways significantly associated with longevity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Yi; Nie, Chao; Min, Junxia;

    2016-01-01

    Only two genome-wide significant loci associated with longevity have been identified so far, probably because of insufficient sample sizes of centenarians, whose genomes may harbor genetic variants associated with health and longevity. Here we report a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of Han...... Chinese with a sample size 2.7 times the largest previously published GWAS on centenarians. We identified 11 independent loci associated with longevity replicated in Southern-Northern regions of China, including two novel loci (rs2069837-IL6; rs2440012-ANKRD20A9P) with genome-wide significance and the...... rest with suggestive significance (P < 3.65 × 10(-5)). Eight independent SNPs overlapped across Han Chinese, European and U.S. populations, and APOE and 5q33.3 were replicated as longevity loci. Integrated analysis indicates four pathways (starch, sucrose and xenobiotic metabolism; immune response and...

  13. Flies selected for longevity retain a young gene expression profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarup, Pernille Merete; Sørensen, Peter; Loeschcke, Volker

    2011-01-01

      We investigated correlated responses in the transcriptomes of longevity-selected lines of Drosophila melanogaster to identify pathways that affect life span in metazoan systems. We evaluated the gene expression profile in young, middle-aged, and old male flies, finding that 530 genes were...... differentially expressed between selected and control flies when measured at the same chronological age. The longevity-selected flies consistently showed expression profiles more similar to control flies one age class younger than control flies of the same age. This finding is in accordance with a younger gene...... expression profile in longevity-selected lines. Among the genes down-regulated in longevity-selected lines, we found a clear over-representation of genes involved in immune functions, supporting the hypothesis of a life-shortening effect of an overactive immune system, known as inflammaging. We judged the...

  14. Longevity, Growth and Intergenerational Equity - The Deterministic Case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben M.; Gestsson, Marias Halldór

    Challenges raised by ageing (increasing longevity) have prompted policy debates featuring policy proposals justified by reference to some notion of intergenerational equity. However, very different policies ranging from pre-savings to indexation of retirement ages have been justified in this way....... We develop an overlapping generations model in continuous time which encompasses different generations with different mortality rates and thus longevity. Allowing for both trend increases in longevity and productivity, we address the issue of intergenerational equity under a utilitarian criterion...... when future generations are better off in terms of both material and non-material well being. Increases in productivity and longevity are shown to have very different implications for intergenerational distribution....

  15. Naked Mole Rat Longevity — Possible Mechanism Identified —

    Science.gov (United States)

    University of Rochester researchers, who previously discovered a mechanism that may contribute to the species’ resistance to tumor formation, have announced that ribosome function may help account for the rats’ longevity.

  16. The effect of floral resources on parasitoid and host longevity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigsgaard, Lene; Betzer, Cathrine; Naulin, Cyril;

    2013-01-01

    increase functional biodiversity, the longevity of C. aretas and its host A. comariana was assessed on 5 flowering species: buckwheat, Fagopyrum esculentum Moench (Caryophyllales: Polygonaceae); borage, Borago officinalis L. (Boraginaceae); strawberry, Fragaria x ananassa Duchesne (Rosales: Rosaceae...

  17. Financial Innovation and the Hedging of Longevity Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Sherris Michael; Wills Samuel

    2008-01-01

    Longevity risk is one of the remaining frontiers challenging modern financial markets and financial engineering. Financial innovation has yet to successfully master this very significant risk facing many countries internationally. For well over a hundred years this risk has been the domain of life insurance companies, reinsurance companies and actuaries. The aging population around the world drives the need for new products for managing longevity risk and new markets for hedging this risk. We...

  18. Sources of U.S. Longevity Increase, 1960 -1997

    OpenAIRE

    Lichtenberg, Frank

    2000-01-01

    Between 1960 and 1997, life expectancy at birth of Americans increased approximately 10% - from 69.7 to 76.5 years - and it has been estimated that the value of life extension during this period nearly equaled the gains in tangible consumption. We investigate whether an aggregate health production function can help to explain the substantial fluctuations in the rate of increase in longevity since 1960. We view longevity as the output of the health production function, and output fluctuations ...

  19. Diet mediates the relationship between longevity and reproduction in mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Wilder, Shawn M.; Le Couteur, David G; Simpson, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    The disposable soma hypothesis posits a negative correlation between longevity and reproduction, presumably because these aspects of fitness compete for a limited pool of nutrients. However, diet, which varies widely among animals, could affect the availability of key nutrients required for both reproduction and longevity, especially protein. We used a comparative database of mammal life history data to test the hypothesis that carnivores experience less of a negative relationship between rep...

  20. Psychological Skills, Education, and Longevity of High-Ability Individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Peter A. Savelyev

    2014-01-01

    Based on the 1922–1991 Terman data of children with high ability, I investigate the effects of childhood psychological skills and post-compulsory education on longevity. I identify causal effects and account for measurement error using factor-analytic methodology (Heckman et al., 2006). Latent class analysis supports the causal interpretation of results. For males, I find strong effects of psychological skills and education on longevity and an interaction between personality and education. ...

  1. Longevity in mice: is stress resistance a common factor?

    OpenAIRE

    Brown-Borg, H.M.

    2006-01-01

    A positive relationship between stress resistance and longevity has been reported in a multitude of studies in organisms ranging from yeast to mice. Several mouse lines have been discovered or developed that exhibit extended longevities when compared with normal, wild-type mice of the same genetic background. These long-living lines include the Ames dwarf, Snell dwarf, growth hormone receptor knockout (Laron dwarf), IGF-1 receptor heterozygote, Little, α-MUPA knockout, p66shc knockout, FIRKO,...

  2. SIX SYMBOLS OF LONGEVITY A TIBETAN TRADITIONAL PAINTING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The"six symbols of longevity"inspires peoples of the world to cherish all life on the earth and sustain it in a harmonious state in order to maintain ecological balance.Only by taking this approach,can the environment where humanity lives be protected.An ecologically balanced system could make a sustainable and pleasant homestead possible and finally the ideology of"six longevities"could become a reality.

  3. A Multivariate Model of Strategic Asset Allocation with Longevity Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Bisetti, Emilio; Favero, Carlo A.; Nocera, Giacomo; Tebaldi, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Generalized unexpected raise in life expectancy is a source of aggregate risk. Longevity-linked securities are a natural instrument to reallocate these risks by making them tradable in the financial market. This paper extends the Campbell and Viceira (2005) strategic asset allocation model including a longevity-linked investment possibility in addition to equity and fixed income securities. Estimation of the model, based on prices for standardized annuities publicly offered by US insurance co...

  4. What relation exists between CSR and longevity of firms?

    OpenAIRE

    Sahut, Jean-Michel; Boulerne, Sandrine; MILI, MEDHI; Frédéric TEULON

    2013-01-01

    The relation between company longevity and its performance is undeniable; however the relationship between sustainability and performance remains the subject of multiple studies which seem to confirm a positive link. But what type of relationship exists between a firm’s longevity and sustainability management? In this paper, we demonstrate that the adoption of corporate social responsibility (CSR) principles explains this link. Therefore, sustainable development policies can create a rampart ...

  5. Familial longevity is marked by better cognitive performance at middle age: the Leiden Longevity Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjon Stijntjes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Decline in cognitive performance is a highly prevalent health condition in elderly. We studied whether offspring of nonagenarian siblings with a familial history of longevity, perform better on cognitive tests compared to their partners as controls. This is relevant since it could provide insights into determinants underlying decline in cognitive performance. METHODS: Cross-sectional analysis within the longitudinal cohort of the Leiden Longevity Study consisting of middle-aged offspring of nonagenarian siblings together with their partners (n = 500, mean age (SD 66.3 (6.1 and 65.7 (7.2 years, respectively as controls. Memory function, attention and processing speed were tested using the 15-Picture Learning Test, Stroop test and Digit Symbol Substitution Test. Data were analyzed with regression adjusted for age, gender, years of education and additionally for diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases, alcohol use, smoking, inflammatory markers and apolipoprotein E genotype. Robust standard errors were used to account for familial relationships among the offspring. RESULTS: Cognitive performance was worse at higher calendar age (p<0.001, all except Stroop test part 1. The offspring performed better compared to their partners on trial 3 (p = 0.005, the immediate (p = 0.016 and delayed (p = 0.004 recall of the 15-Picture Learning Test as well as on the interference and combined interference score of the Stroop test (p = 0.014 and p = 0.036, respectively in the fully adjusted model. The difference between offspring and partners was estimated to be more than three years according to the observed difference in calendar age. CONCLUSIONS: Offspring of nonagenarian siblings with a familial history of longevity have better cognitive performance compared to the group of their partners of comparable age. This effect is independent of age-related diseases and known possible confounders. Possible explanations might be differences in subclinical

  6. Managing Systematic Mortality Risk in Life Annuities: An Application of Longevity Derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Man Chung Fung; Katja Ignatieva; Michael Sherris

    2015-01-01

    This paper assesses the hedge effectiveness of an index-based longevity swap and a longevity cap. Although swaps are a natural instrument for hedging longevity risk, derivatives with non-linear pay-offs, such as longevity caps, also provide downside protection. A tractable stochastic mortality model with age dependent drift and volatility is developed and analytical formulae for prices of these longevity derivatives are derived. Hedge effectiveness is considered for a hypothetical life annuit...

  7. Heart ischemic disease and longevity: unsolved problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markova T.Yu.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to estimate clinical signs and course of coronary heart disease in long-livers and centenarians. Material and Methods. The study included overall population of Saratov — Engels agglomeration's long-livers (>=90 years old, n=198. Results. The rates of major clinical forms of coronary heart disease were detected: atrial fibrillation — 10.6%, chronic heart failure (with preserved ejection fraction — 10.1 % and angina — 5.1 %. Myocardial infarction was verified in 9.6% of long-livers. Myocardial scar criteria prevailed over myocardial infarction history. Received data corroborated dissolving phenomena of coronary heart disease and noninsulin dependent diabetes mellitus in long-livers. Gender differences in electrophysiological parameters were detected in long-livers. Centenarians with the history of myocardial infarction preserved a satisfactory level of physical activity. Conclusion. Received data confirm a presence of an excessive security: prevention of coronary heart disease manifestation and progression in longevity. Long-livers should be considered as a natural model of an antiatherogenic factors and mechanisms.

  8. Alkaline Water and Longevity: A Murine Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magro, Massimiliano; Corain, Livio; Ferro, Silvia; Baratella, Davide; Bonaiuto, Emanuela; Terzo, Milo; Corraducci, Vittorino; Salmaso, Luigi; Vianello, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The biological effect of alkaline water consumption is object of controversy. The present paper presents a 3-year survival study on a population of 150 mice, and the data were analyzed with accelerated failure time (AFT) model. Starting from the second year of life, nonparametric survival plots suggest that mice watered with alkaline water showed a better survival than control mice. Interestingly, statistical analysis revealed that alkaline water provides higher longevity in terms of “deceleration aging factor” as it increases the survival functions when compared with control group; namely, animals belonging to the population treated with alkaline water resulted in a longer lifespan. Histological examination of mice kidneys, intestine, heart, liver, and brain revealed that no significant differences emerged among the three groups indicating that no specific pathology resulted correlated with the consumption of alkaline water. These results provide an informative and quantitative summary of survival data as a function of watering with alkaline water of long-lived mouse models. PMID:27340414

  9. Visceral adipose tissue modulates mammalian longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzumdar, Radhika; Allison, David B; Huffman, Derek M; Ma, Xiaohui; Atzmon, Gil; Einstein, Francine H; Fishman, Sigal; Poduval, Aruna D; McVei, Theresa; Keith, Scott W; Barzilai, Nir

    2008-06-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) can delay many age-related diseases and extend lifespan, while an increase in adiposity is associated with enhanced disease risk and accelerated aging. Among the various fat depots, the accrual of visceral fat (VF) is a common feature of aging, and has been shown to be the most detrimental on metabolic syndrome of aging in humans. We have previously demonstrated that surgical removal of VF in rats improves insulin action; thus, we set out to determine if VF removal affects longevity. We prospectively studied lifespan in three groups of rats: ad libitum-fed (AL-fed), CR (Fed 60% of AL) and a group of AL-fed rats with selective removal of VF at 5 months of age (VF-removed rats). We demonstrate that compared to AL-fed rats, VF-removed rats had a significant increase in mean (p fat mass, specifically VF, may be one of the possible underlying mechanisms of the anti-aging effect of CR. PMID:18363902

  10. [Latest evidence about longevity of Sun Simiao].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhen-Min

    2013-01-01

    Recording in the preface of Binglishufu (written by Lu Zhaolin of the Tang Dynasty) was the only direct evidence about the longevity of Sun Simiao. It recorded 'Sun Simiao said since his birth in the Xinyou Year of the Kaihuang Period, he was 93 years old'. But there were disputes over the time of Xinyou Year-581 AD or 541 AD? It is easy to pick holes in both arguments and the whole research, so the conclusion is not reliable. Recordings in Biography of Sun Simiao, which said 'the governor of the Luozhou area marveled at Sun's intelligence and called him the saint child', are also fabricated. According to literature, 'in the 3(rd) year of the Xianqing Period, Sun Simiao was invited by the emperor and lived in the deserted house of the Boyang Princess. He was more than 90 years old and did not have any visual or hearing loss … he was good to give lectures at various schools like Zhuang and Lao … in the Zhou Xuan Emperor Period Sun was tired of royal affairs and chose to be a hermit in the Taibai Mountain' (Tanghuiyao, Datang Xinyu, Tanbinlu). Sun Simiao should have been born in 560 AD. This time conformed to the time of his other events. He was 20 when a hermit and was 99 when he was invited by the Emperor Gaozong in the 3(rd) year of Xianqing. PMID:23879977

  11. Longevity of dental amalgam in comparison to composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Windisch, Friederike

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Health political background: Caries is one of the most prevalent diseases worldwide. For (direct restaurations of carious lesions, tooth-coloured composite materials are increasingly used. The compulsory health insurance pays for composite fillings in front teeth; in posterior teeth, patients have to bear the extra cost. Scientific background: Amalgam is an alloy of mercury and other metals and has been used in dentistry for more than one hundred and fifty years. Composites consist of a resin matrix and chemically bonded fillers. They have been used for about fifty years in front teeth. Amalgam has a long longevity; the further development of composites has also shown improvements regarding their longevity. Research questions: This HTA-report aims to evaluate the longevity (failure rate, median survival time (MST, median age of direct amalgam fillings in comparison to direct composite fillings in permanent teeth from a medical and economical perspective and discusses the ethical, legal and social aspects of using these filling materials. Methods: The systematic literature search yielded a total of 1,149 abstracts. After a two-step selection process based on defined criteria 25 publications remained to be assessed. Results: The medical studies report a longer longevity for amalgam fillings than for composite fillings. However, the results of these studies show a large heterogeneity. No publication on the costs or the cost-effectiveness of amalgam and composite fillings exists for Germany. The economic analyses (NL, SWE, GB report higher costs for composite fillings when longevity is assumed equal (for an observation period of five years or longer for amalgam compared to composite fillings. These higher costs are due to the higher complexity of placing composite fillings. Discussion: Due to different study designs and insufficient documentation of study details, a comparison of different studies on longevity of direct amalgam and composite

  12. Distinguishing Between Longevity and Buffered-Deleterious Genotypes for Exceptional Human Longevity: The Case of the MTP Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Huffman, Derek M.; Deelen, Joris; Ye, Kenny; Bergman, Aviv; Slagboom, Eline P.; Barzilai, Nir; Atzmon, Gil

    2012-01-01

    The single nucleotide polymorphism, rs2866164, in the MTP gene, has been associated with human longevity but has not been validated by subsequent longevity studies. Using our population of Ashkenazi Jews, we find that the MTP CC genotype is significantly overrepresented in centenarians and their offspring, as compared with controls (p < .05). However, when we examined MTP CC genotype frequency pattern with aging, we observed a monotonic decline between ages 55–85 years followed by a dramatic ...

  13. Genetic selection strategies to improve longevity in Chianina beef cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piter Bijma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Longevity in beef cattle is an important economic trait. Including this trait in a breeding scheme increases profit and has a positive impact on the well-being and welfare of the animals. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the conse- quences of alternative selection strategies to include longevity in different breeding schemes using deterministic simula- tion. Different schemes were compared and economic (EcW and empirical weights (EmW were used to evaluate the responses. The empirical weights of average daily gain (ADG and muscularity (MU were identical because both traits have an identical importance for the breeders. Economic weights have been derived from profit equations. Traits used in the Basescenarios were: average daily gain pre-performance test (ADG1, average daily gain during the performance test (ADG2 and muscularity (MU; longevity (L was included in the alternative schemes. When longevity was included both in the breeding index and in the breeding goal (scenario A-2, the total longevity response using EmW and EcW was +2.97 d/yr and +4.92 d/yr, respectively. The total economic response for scenario A-2 using EmW and EcW were 3.020 €/yr and 3.342 €/yr, respectively, and the total response in units of Bull Selection Index were +0.699 and +0.678, respectively. Longevity decreased when it was not included in either the breeding goal or in the breeding index (scenario Base, and economic response was the lowest found. The results of the current study indicate that the highest total response using either economic weights or empirical weights was found when information on longevity was included both in the breeding index and in the breeding goal (scenario A-2.

  14. Mapping leaf surface landscapes.

    OpenAIRE

    Mechaber, W.L.; Marshall, D B; Mechaber, R A; Jobe, R T; Chew, F S

    1996-01-01

    Leaf surfaces provide the ecologically relevant landscapes to those organisms that encounter or colonize the leaf surface. Leaf surface topography directly affects microhabitat availability for colonizing microbes, microhabitat quality and acceptability for insects, and the efficacy of agricultural spray applications. Prior detailed mechanistic studies that examined particular fungi-plant and pollinator-plant interactions have demonstrated the importance of plant surface topography or roughne...

  15. Factors Affecting Longevity of Tunneled Central Venous Cathe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji Won; Lee, Jong Min [Dept. of Radiology, Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    To evaluate factors which affect the longevity of tunneled central venous catheters (T-CVCs). A retrospective study was conducted on 363 T-CVCs. We evaluated the relevant factors affecting the longevity of the T-CVCs, such as age, gender, indication for catheterization, site of entry vessel, diameter and type of T-CVC, catheter tip position, and underlying diseases. Of the 363 T-CVCs which had been inserted, 331 (91%) were placed through the right internal jugular vein (RIJV). The catheter tip position was the strongest predictor for the longevity of the T-CVC. The short limb of the catheter tip placed either at the cavoatrial junction (CA junction) or below the lower margin of the right main bronchus had a good prognosis. The vessel through which the T-CVC was placed significantly influenced the longevity of the T-CVC; the RIJV was associated with better results than the left internal jugular vein. Also, a split-type catheter was significantly associated with a better result. A two distinct and separate type T-CVC placed through the RIJV in which the short limb catheter tip position was at the level of the CA junction, significantly increased the longevity of T-CVCs.

  16. Longevity and mortality of owned dogs in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, D G; Church, D B; McGreevy, P D; Thomson, P C; Brodbelt, D C

    2013-12-01

    Improved understanding of longevity represents a significant welfare opportunity for the domestic dog, given its unparalleled morphological diversity. Epidemiological research using electronic patient records (EPRs) collected from primary veterinary practices overcomes many inherent limitations of referral clinic, owner questionnaire and pet insurance data. Clinical health data from 102,609 owned dogs attending first opinion veterinary practices (n=86) in central and southeast England were analysed, focusing on 5095 confirmed deaths. Of deceased dogs with information available, 3961 (77.9%) were purebred, 2386 (47.0%) were female, 2528 (49.8%) were neutered and 1105 (21.7%) were insured. The overall median longevity was 12.0 years (IQR 8.9-14.2). The longest-lived breeds were the Miniature poodle, Bearded collie, Border collie and Miniature dachshund, while the shortest-lived were the Dogue de Bordeaux and Great Dane. The most frequently attributed causes of death were neoplastic, musculoskeletal and neurological disorders. The results of multivariable modelling indicated that longevity in crossbred dogs exceeded purebred dogs by 1.2 years (95% confidence interval 0.9-1.4; P<0.001) and that increasing bodyweight was negatively correlated with longevity. The current findings highlight major breed differences for longevity and support the concept of hybrid vigour in dogs. PMID:24206631

  17. Recent advances in human gene-longevity association studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Benedictis, G; Tan, Q; Jeune, B;

    2001-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent literature on genes and longevity. The influence of genes on human life span has been confirmed in studies of life span correlation between related individuals based on family and twin data. Results from major twin studies indicate that approximately 25% of the...... this possible. This paper summarizes the rich literature dealing with the various aspects of the influence of genes on individual survival. Common phenomena affecting the development of disease and longevity are discussed. The major methodological difficulty one is confronted with when studying the...... epidemiology of longevity involves the complexity of the phenomenon, which arises from the polygenic nature of life span and historical mortality change. We discuss this issue and suggest new methodological approaches....

  18. Effect of interleukin-6 polymorphisms on human longevity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Bona, Danilo; Vasto, Sonya; Capurso, Cristiano;

    2009-01-01

    -6 levels. However, discordant results have been obtained. To explore the relationship between this polymorphism and longevity, we analyzed individual data on long-living subjects and controls from eight case-control studies conducted in Europeans, using meta-analysis. There was no significant...... GG genotype was significantly lower than the other genotypes (OR=0.49; 95% C.I.: 0.31-0.80; p=0.004), with no evidence of heterogeneity (I2=0%). Our data supports a negative association between the GG genotype of IL-6 SNP and longevity in Italian centenarians, with males who carry the genotype being...... two times less likely to reach extreme old age compared with subjects carrying CC or CG genotypes. These findings were not replicated in other European groups suggesting a possible interaction between genetics, sex and environment in reaching longevity....

  19. Aging. Lysosomal signaling molecules regulate longevity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folick, Andrew; Oakley, Holly D; Yu, Yong; Armstrong, Eric H; Kumari, Manju; Sanor, Lucas; Moore, David D; Ortlund, Eric A; Zechner, Rudolf; Wang, Meng C

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomes are crucial cellular organelles for human health that function in digestion and recycling of extracellular and intracellular macromolecules. We describe a signaling role for lysosomes that affects aging. In the worm Caenorhabditis elegans, the lysosomal acid lipase LIPL-4 triggered nuclear translocalization of a lysosomal lipid chaperone LBP-8, which promoted longevity by activating the nuclear hormone receptors NHR-49 and NHR-80. We used high-throughput metabolomic analysis to identify several lipids in which abundance was increased in worms constitutively overexpressing LIPL-4. Among them, oleoylethanolamide directly bound to LBP-8 and NHR-80 proteins, activated transcription of target genes of NHR-49 and NHR-80, and promoted longevity in C. elegans. These findings reveal a lysosome-to-nucleus signaling pathway that promotes longevity and suggest a function of lysosomes as signaling organelles in metazoans. PMID:25554789

  20. Longevity records of North American birds. Supplement 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimkiewicz, M.K.; Futcher, A.G.

    1989-01-01

    This is the first supplement to the previous published four-part series on avian longevities (Clapp et al. 1982, 1983; Klimkiewicz et al. 1983; Klimkiewicz and Futcher 1987). R ecords processed in the Bird Banding Laboratory through August 1988 are included, as well as several corrections to the original series. One hundred-seven of the 147 entries in this supplement are new longevity records for species or forms listed previously. Another 37 entries represent taxa not listed before, and the remaining three records correct previous listings that were in error.

  1. Longevity and the stress response in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vermeulen, Corneel J.; Loeschcke, Volker

    2007-01-01

    substances. Do these same changes in patterns of expression have the ability to mitigate ageing and prolong lifespan? It appears that parts of this response indeed are also associated with extended longevity, whereas some elements are not, due to their high cost or long-term deleterious consequences. Here we...... briefly review the state of the art of research on ageing and longevity in the model organism Drosophila, with focus on the role of the general stress response. We will conclude by contemplating some of the implications of the findings in this research and will suggest several directions for future...

  2. Laboratory studies on the longevity of cement grouts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes laboratory studies of the longevity of cement-based grouts being carried out as part of the International Stripa Project Phase III. The longevity properties determined for a reference grout (90% Sulphate Resistant Portland Cement, 10% silica fume, 0.4< water/cement<0.6 and superplasticizer) are compared with those of a slag cement grout. Laboratory tests have been carried out to determine the following: the mechanistic function of superplasticizer in fresh cement pastes; the leachability of the sorbed superplasticizer and its location in the structure of hardened cement paste; and the general leaching properties of selected cement-based grouts

  3. Human longevity and variation in DNA damage response and repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debrabant, Birgit; Soerensen, Mette; Flachsbart, Friederike;

    2014-01-01

    others. Data were applied on 592 SNPs from 77 genes involved in nine sub-processes: DNA-damage response, base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair, non-homologous end-joining, homologous recombinational repair (HRR), RecQ helicase activities (RECQ), telomere functioning...... and mitochondrial DNA processes. The study population was 1089 long-lived and 736 middle-aged Danes. A self-contained set-based test of all SNPs displayed association with longevity (P-value=9.9 × 10-5), supporting that the overall pathway could affect longevity. Investigation of the nine sub-processes using...

  4. Fertility and longevity in the Reggiana cattle breed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gandini

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Comparisons between commercial and local breeds should be based on both productive and functional traits. Proper performance evaluations of local breeds may enlighten possible strong points and provide elements for conservation decisions. The analysis of functional traits, such as fertility, milkability, longevity and disease resistance is required for developing sustainable breeding programs (Olesen et al., 2000. This study is part of a project aimed to compare productivity between Reggiana and Italian Holstein herds (Maltecca et al., 2000; Bagnato et al., 2001. Here we report on fertility and longevity traits...........

  5. Power Estimation for Gene-Longevity Association Analysis Using Concordant Twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Qihua; Zhao, Jing Hua; Kruse, Torben A;

    2014-01-01

    population. The genetic association study on human longevity, a complex trait that is under control of both genetic and environmental factors, has been confronted by the small sample sizes of longevity subjects which limit statistical power. Twin pairs concordant for longevity have increased probability for...... carrying beneficial genes and thus are useful samples for gene-longevity association analysis. We conducted a computer simulation to estimate the power of association study using longevity concordant twin pairs. We observed remarkable power increases in using singletons from longevity concordant twin pairs...... as cases in comparison with cases of sporadic proband. A similar power would require doubled sample sizes for fraternal twins than for identical twins who are concordant for longevity suggesting that longevity concordant identical twins are more efficient samples than fraternal twins. We also...

  6. Individual Post-Retirement Longevity Risk Management Under Systematic Mortality Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Katja Hanewald; John Piggott; Michael Sherris

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyzes an individual's post retirement longevity risk management strategy allowing for systematic longevity risk, recent product innovations, and product loadings. A complete-markets discrete state model and multi-period simulations of portfolio strategies are used to assess individual longevity insurance product portfolios with differing levels of systematic and idiosyncratic longevity risk. Portfolios include: fixed life annuities, deferred annuities, inflation-indexed annuitie...

  7. Molecular markers as a tool for breeding for flower longevity in Asiatic hybrid lilies.

    OpenAIRE

    Meulen, van der, P.; Oeveren, van, H.; Sandbrink, J.M.; Tuyl, van, H.D.

    1996-01-01

    Segregation of flower longevity in two lily populations was studied and the genetic linkage of morphological markers and RAPD markers with loci involved in flower longevity was investigated. A large variation in flower longevity was found within the two populations tested at individual plant level. Longevity values were well correlated between experiments at the individual plant level and at clonal level. One out of 278 RAPD markers and one morphological marker (male sterility) were significa...

  8. takeout-dependent longevity is associated with altered Juvenile Hormone signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Chamseddin, Khalil H.; Khan, Sabina Q.; Nguyen, Mai L.H.; Antosh, Michael; Morris, Siti Nur Sarah; Kolli, Santharam; Neretti, Nicola; HELFAND, STEPHEN L.; Bauer, Johannes H.

    2012-01-01

    In order to understand the molecular mechanisms of longevity regulation, we recently performed a screen designed to enrich for genes common to several longevity interventions. Using this approach, we identified the Drosophila melanogaster gene takeout. takeout is upregulated in a variety of long-lived flies, and extends life span when overexpressed. Here, we investigate the mechanisms of takeout-dependent longevity.

  9. Molecular markers as a tool for breeding for flower longevity in Asiatic hybrid lilies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulen, van der J.J.M.; Oeveren, van J.C.; Sandbrink, J.M.; Tuyl, van J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Segregation of flower longevity in two lily populations was studied and the genetic linkage of morphological markers and RAPD markers with loci involved in flower longevity was investigated. A large variation in flower longevity was found within the two populations tested at individual plant level.

  10. Genome-wide association study for longevity with whole-genome sequencing in 3 cattle breeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Qianqian; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Thomasen, Jørn Rind; Lund, Mogens Sandø; Sahana, Goutam

    2016-01-01

    Longevity is an important economic trait in dairy production. Improvements in longevity could increase the average number of lactations per cow, thereby affecting the profitability of the dairy cattle industry. Improved longevity for cows reduces the replacement cost of stock and enables animals

  11. Individual Cell Longevity, 'Life's Timekeeper', and Metazoan Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, David

    2016-01-01

    It is proposed that a primary and fundamental aspect of metazoan evolution is an ability to control and extend the longevity of individual cells. This was achieved through an intracellular oscillator, dubbed 'Life's Timekeeper', which evolved in the hypothetical ancestor of all metazoans. Slower oscillatory frequencies directed metazoan evolution towards extended longevity of individual cells, enabling generation of many specialised types of terminally differentiated cells. As the longevity of these cells was still relatively short in more primitive metazoans, stem cells, capable of differentiating into all specialised cell types, were retained in order to replace senescent cells. With increasing cell longevity, continual replacement of all senescent cells was no longer necessary. Cells such as neurons could be sustained throughout life, enabling the evolution of brains, hence, complex behaviour and intelligence. In multicellular metazoans the oscillator remains synchronised across all cells. It coordinates the timing of all cell-cell signalling systems, hence controls the timing of development and aging/senescence. In advanced metazoans, where senescent cells are not continually replaced, it controls lifespan. With regards to morphological evolution the oscillator, through alterations to developmental timing, controls change in size and shape. With regards to life history theory it functions as the key variable mediating the correlation between life history traits. This theory is compatible with a prominent role for environmental selection but, as it implicates some degree of internal mediation and direction, it is not entirely compatible with the 'modern synthesis' view of natural selection. PMID:26777340

  12. Delayed and accelerated aging share common longevity assurance mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Schumacher; I. van der Pluijm; M.J. Moorhouse; T. Kosteas; A.R. Robinson; Y. Suh; T.M. Breit; H. van Steeg; L.J. Niedernhofer; W. van IJcken; A. Bartke; S.R. Spindler; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers; G.T.J. van der Horst; G.A. Garinis

    2008-01-01

    Mutant dwarf and calorie-restricted mice benefit from healthy aging and unusually long lifespan. In contrast, mouse models for DNA repair-deficient progeroid syndromes age and die prematurely. To identify mechanisms that regulate mammalian longevity, we quantified the parallels between the genome-wi

  13. Genetics of longevity. data from the studies on Sicilian centenarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balistreri Carmela R

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The demographic and social changes of the past decades have determined improvements in public health and longevity. So, the number of centenarians is increasing as a worldwide phenomenon. Scientists have focused their attention on centenarians as optimal model to address the biological mechanisms of "successful and unsuccessful ageing". They are equipped to reach the extreme limits of human life span and, most importantly, to show relatively good health, being able to perform their routine daily life and to escape fatal age-related diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Thus, particular attention has been centered on their genetic background and immune system. In this review, we report our data gathered for over 10 years in Sicilian centenarians. Based on results obtained, we suggest longevity as the result of an optimal performance of immune system and an over-expression of anti-inflammatory sequence variants of immune/inflammatory genes. However, as well known, genetic, epigenetic, stochastic and environmental factors seem to have a crucial role in ageing and longevity. Epigenetics is associated with ageing, as demonstrated in many studies. In particular, ageing is associated with a global loss of methylation state. Thus, the aim of future studies will be to analyze the weight of epigenetic changes in ageing and longevity.

  14. Superintendent Longevity and Its Relationship to Student Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlau, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Researchers have recently focused attention on the impact of district level leadership on student achievement. Superintendents are at the heart of that discussion as they are district leaders and thus held accountable for the performance of the school district. Superintendent longevity has been an issue for many years and even though researchers…

  15. Diallel analysis of floral longevity in Impatiens walleriana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impatiens walleriana is currently among the most valuable and widely cultivated floriculture crops in the world. Highly floriferous cultivars are a primary goal for breeders of I. walleriana. Although breeders have selected for floriferousness, little consideration has been given to floral longevity...

  16. Perspectives on the Biodemography of Longevity and Aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baudisch, Annette

    2015-01-01

    Biodemography is a timely and exciting area of research that has been emerging over the past 15–20 years and might arguably be the most quickly growing area of demography. From the perspective of longevity and aging, questions arise that touch on the biological foundation of aging. With a focus on...

  17. Age of failed restorations: A deceptive longevity parameter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opdam, N.J.M.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Cenci, M.S.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.; Wilson, N.H.F.

    2011-01-01

    There is pressing need to enhance evidence base in respect of longevity of restorations. Currently, there is lack of appreciation of differences between survival data based on the age of failed restorations as compared to gold standard Kaplan-Meier statistics. OBJECTIVES: This study was undertaken t

  18. Sexual Cooperation: Mating Increases Longevity in Ant Queens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrempf, Alexandra; Heinze, Jürgen; Cremer, Sylvia

    2005-01-01

    sterilized male lived considerably longer and started laying eggs earlier than virgin queens. Only queens that received viable sperm from fertile males showed increased fecundity. The lack of a trade-off between fecundity and longevity is unexpected, given evolutionary theories of aging [6] . Our data...

  19. Multivariate Survival Mixed Models for Genetic Analysis of Longevity Traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pimentel Maia, Rafael; Madsen, Per; Labouriau, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    concentrates on longevity studies. The framework presented allows to combine models based on continuous time with models based on discrete time in a joint analysis. The continuous time models are approximations of the frailty model in which the hazard function will be assumed to be piece-wise constant. The...

  20. Three measures of longevity: time trends and record values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canudas-Romo, V

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the trend over time in the measures of “typical” longevity experienced by members of a population: life expectancy at birth, and the median and modal ages at death. The article also analyzes trends in record values observed for all three measures. The record life expectancy at...

  1. Does Education Matter? Major League Baseball Players and Longevity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalist, David E.; Peng, Yingwei

    2007-01-01

    The authors used duration analysis to examine the longevity of Major League Baseball players. Using data on players who were born between 1945 and 1964, the authors found that the hazard rate of death for players who only attended high school was almost 2.0 times higher than those players who attended a 4-year university, evidence that the…

  2. Explaining Optimistic Old Age Disability and Longevity Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Font, Joan; Costa-Font, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    Biased health care decision making has been regarded as responsible for inefficient behaviours (for example, the limited insurance purchase). This paper empirically examines two sets of biases in the perception of old age disability and longevity. Particularly, we test for the existence of a so called cumulative bias and, secondly, a so called…

  3. Being cool: how body temperature influences ageing and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Gerald; Cummings, Elizabeth; de Magalhães, João Pedro

    2015-08-01

    Temperature is a basic and essential property of any physical system, including living systems. Even modest variations in temperature can have profound effects on organisms, and it has long been thought that as metabolism increases at higher temperatures so should rates of ageing. Here, we review the literature on how temperature affects longevity, ageing and life history traits. From poikilotherms to homeotherms, there is a clear trend for lower temperature being associated with longer lifespans both in wild populations and in laboratory conditions. Many life-extending manipulations in rodents, such as caloric restriction, also decrease core body temperature. Nonetheless, an inverse relationship between temperature and lifespan can be obscured or reversed, especially when the range of body temperatures is small as in homeotherms. An example is observed in humans: women appear to have a slightly higher body temperature and yet live longer than men. The mechanisms involved in the relationship between temperature and longevity also appear to be less direct than once thought with neuroendocrine processes possibly mediating complex physiological responses to temperature changes. Lastly, we discuss species differences in longevity in mammals and how this relates to body temperature and argue that the low temperature of the long-lived naked mole-rat possibly contributes to its exceptional longevity. PMID:25832892

  4. Longevity, Growth and Intergenerational Equity: The Deterministic Case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben M.; Gestsson, Marias Halldór

    2016-01-01

    Challenges raised by aging (increasing longevity) have prompted policy debates featuring policy proposals justified by reference to some notion of intergenerational equity. However, very different policies ranging from presavings to indexation of retirement ages have been justified in this way. We...

  5. Association of exceptional parental longevity and physical function in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, Emmeline; Barzilai, Nir; Crandall, Jill P; Milman, Sofiya; Verghese, Joe

    2014-01-01

    Offspring of parents with exceptional longevity (OPEL), who are more likely to carry longevity-associated genotypes, may age more successfully than offspring of parents with usual survival (OPUS). Maintenance of physical function is a key attribute of successful aging. While many genetic and non-genetic factors interact to determine physical phenotype in aging, examination of the contribution of exceptional parental longevity to physical function in aging is limited. The LonGenity study recruited a relatively genetically homogenous cohort of Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) adults age 65 and older, who were defined as either OPEL (having at least one parent who lived to age 95 or older) or OPUS (neither parent survived to age 95). Subjective and objective measures of physical function were compared between the two groups, accounting for potential confounders. Of the 893 LonGenity subjects, 365 were OPEL and 528 were OPUS. OPEL had better objective and subjective measures of physical function than OPUS, especially on unipedal stance (p = 0.009) and gait speed (p = 0.002). Results support the protective role of exceptional parental longevity in preventing decline in physical function, possibly via genetic mechanisms that should be further explored. PMID:24997018

  6. Leaf spring, and electromagnetic actuator provided with a leaf spring

    OpenAIRE

    Berkhoff, Arthur Perry; Lemmen, Remco Louis Christiaan

    2002-01-01

    The invention relates to a leaf spring for an electromagnetic actuator and to such an electromagnetic actuator. The leaf spring is formed as a whole from a disc of plate-shaped, resilient material. The leaf spring comprises a central fastening part, an outer fastening part extending therearound and at least two leaf spring arms extending between the central and outer fastening part. Viewed from the central fastening part, the leaf spring arms (23) have a first zone (24) originating from the c...

  7. Longevity of Emplacement Drift Ground Support Materials, Rev. 01

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the factors affecting the longevity of emplacement drift ground support materials and to develop a basis for the selection of materials for ground support that will function throughout the preclosure period of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. The Development Plan (DP) for this analysis is given in Longevity of Emplacement Drift Ground Support Materials (CRWMS M and O 1999a). The objective of this analysis is to update the previous analysis (CRWMS M and O 2000a) to account for related changes in the Ground Control System Description Document (CRWMS M and O 2000b), the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document (CRWMS M and O 1999b), and in environmental conditions, and to provide updated information on candidate ground support materials. Candidate materials for ground support are carbon steel and cement grout. Steel is mainly used for steel sets, lagging, channel, rock bolts, and wire mesh. Cement grout is only considered in the case of grouted rock bolts. Candidate materials for the emplacement drift invert are carbon steel and crushed rock ballast. Materials are evaluated for the repository emplacement drift environment based on the updated thermal loading condition and waste package design. The analysis consists of the following tasks: (1) Identify factors affecting the longevity of ground support materials for use in emplacement drifts; (2) Review existing documents concerning the behavior of candidate ground support materials during the preclosure period; (3) Evaluate impacts of temperature and radiation effects on mechanical and thermal properties of steel. Assess corrosion potential of steel at emplacement drift environment; (4) Evaluate factors affecting longevity of cement grouts for fully grouted rock bolt system. Provide updated information on cement grout mix design for fully grouted rock bolt system; and (5) Evaluate longevity of materials for the emplacement drift invert

  8. Impact of automatic threshold capture on pulse generator longevity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ruo-han; CHEN Ke-ping; WANG Fang-zheng; HUA Wei; ZHANG Shu

    2006-01-01

    Background The automatic, threshold tracking, pacing algorithm developed by St. Jude Medical, verifies ventricular capture beat by beat by recognizing the evoked response following each pacemaker stimulus. This function was assumed to be not only energy saving but safe. This study estimated the extension in longevity obtained by AutoCapture (AC) compared with pacemakers programmed to manually optimized, nominal output.Methods Thirty-four patients who received the St. Jude Affinity series pacemaker were included in the study.The following measurements were taken: stimulation and sensing threshold, impedance of leads, evoked response and polarization signals by 3501 programmer during followup, battery current and battery impedance under different conditions. For longevity comparison, ventricular output was programmed under three different conditions: (1) AC on; (2) AC off with nominal output, and (3) AC off with pacing output set at twice the pacing threshold with a minimum of 2.0 V. Patients were divided into two groups: chronic threshold is higher or lower than 1 V. The efficacy of AC was evaluated.Results Current drain in the AC on group, AC off with optimized programming or nominal output was (14.33±2.84) mA, (16.74±2.75) mA and (18.4±2.44) mA, respectively (AC on or AC off with optimized programming vs. nominal output, P < 0.01). Estimated longevity was significantly extended by AC on when compared with nominal setting [(103 ± 27) months, (80 ± 24) months, P < 0.01). Furthermore, compared with the optimized programming, AC extends the longevity when the pacing threshold is higher than 1 V.Conclusion AC could significantly prolong pacemaker longevity; especially in the patient with high pacing threshold.

  9. Geometric leaf placement strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geometric leaf placement strategies for multileaf collimators (MLCs) typically involve the expansion of the beam's-eye-view contour of a target by a uniform MLC margin, followed by movement of the leaves until some point on each leaf end touches the expanded contour. Film-based dose-distribution measurements have been made to determine appropriate MLC margins-characterized through an index d90-for multileaves set using one particular strategy to straight lines lying at various angles to the direction of leaf travel. Simple trigonometric relationships exist between different geometric leaf placement strategies and are used to generalize the results of the film work into d90 values for several different strategies. Measured d90 values vary both with angle and leaf placement strategy. A model has been derived that explains and describes quite well the observed variations of d90 with angle. The d90 angular variations of the strategies studied differ substantially, and geometric and dosimetric reasoning suggests that the best strategy is the one with the least angular variation. Using this criterion, the best straightforwardly implementable strategy studied is a 'touch circle' approach for which semicircles are imagined to be inscribed within leaf ends, the leaves being moved until the semicircles just touch the expanded target outline

  10. Ageing Drosophila selected for longevity retain a young gene expression profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarup, Pernille Merete

    chronological age were downregulated with age in both control and longevity lines. This is in accordance with a younger gene expression profile of longevity selected lines. Similarly genes that were downregulated in old longevity flies compared to control flies were upregulated with older age in both control...... genes in an analysis of hierarchical clustering of lines and age groups. The results showed that longevity selected flies consistently clustered with control flies that were one age class younger. Most of the genes that were upregulated in old longevity selected flies compared to control flies of equal...

  11. Deer predation on leaf miners via leaf abscission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Kazuo; Sugiura, Shinji

    2008-03-01

    The evergreen oak Quercus gilva Blume sheds leaves containing mines of the leaf miner Stigmella sp. (Lepidoptera: Nepticulidae) earlier than leaves with no mines in early spring in Nara, central Japan. The eclosion rates of the leaf miner in abscised and retained leaves were compared in the laboratory to clarify the effects of leaf abscission on leaf miner survival in the absence of deer. The leaf miner eclosed successfully from both fallen leaves and leaves retained on trees. However, sika deer ( Cervus nippon centralis Kishida) feed on the fallen mined leaves. Field observations showed that deer consume many fallen leaves under Q. gilva trees, suggesting considerable mortality of leaf miners due to deer predation via leaf abscission. This is a previously unreported relationship between a leaf miner and a mammalian herbivore via leaf abscission.

  12. Pathophysiology of ageing, longevity and age related diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santoni Angela

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract On April 18, 2007 an international meeting on Pathophysiology of Ageing, Longevity and Age-Related Diseases was held in Palermo, Italy. Several interesting topics on Cancer, Immunosenescence, Age-related inflammatory diseases and longevity were discussed. In this report we summarize the most important issues. However, ageing must be considered an unavoidable end point of the life history of each individual, nevertheless the increasing knowledge on ageing mechanisms, allows envisaging many different strategies to cope with, and delay it. So, a better understanding of pathophysiology of ageing and age-related disease is essential for giving everybody a reasonable chance for living a long and enjoyable final part of the life.

  13. Lithium Promotes Longevity through GSK3/NRF2-Dependent Hormesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Quan, Jorge Iván; Li, Li; Kinghorn, Kerri J.; Ivanov, Dobril K.; Tain, Luke S.; Slack, Cathy; Kerr, Fiona; Nespital, Tobias; Thornton, Janet; Hardy, John; Bjedov, Ivana; Partridge, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Summary The quest to extend healthspan via pharmacological means is becoming increasingly urgent, both from a health and economic perspective. Here we show that lithium, a drug approved for human use, promotes longevity and healthspan. We demonstrate that lithium extends lifespan in female and male Drosophila, when administered throughout adulthood or only later in life. The life-extending mechanism involves the inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) and activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (NRF-2). Combining genetic loss of the NRF-2 repressor Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) with lithium treatment revealed that high levels of NRF-2 activation conferred stress resistance, while low levels additionally promoted longevity. The discovery of GSK-3 as a therapeutic target for aging will likely lead to more effective treatments that can modulate mammalian aging and further improve health in later life. PMID:27068460

  14. Reduced prevalence of cognitive impairment in families with exceptional longevity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cosentino, Stephanie; Schupf, Nicole; Christensen, Kaare;

    2013-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Family studies of centenarians and long-lived persons have found substantial familial aggregation of survival to extreme ages; however, the extent to which such familial longevity is characterized by cognitively intact survival is not established. OBJECTIVE To determine whether families...... with exceptional longevity are protected against cognitive impairment consistent with Alzheimer disease. DESIGN Cross-sectional analysis. SETTING Multisite study in New York, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, and Denmark. PARTICIPANTS A total of 1870 individuals (1510 family members and 360 spouse controls......) recruited through the Long Life Family Study. MAIN OUTCOME AND MEASURE Prevalence of cognitive impairment based on a diagnostic algorithm validated using the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center data set. RESULTS The cognitive algorithm classified 546 individuals (38.5%) as having cognitive impairment...

  15. Hypothalamic and dietary control of temperature-mediated longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabarean, Iustin; Morrison, Brad; Marcondes, Maria Cecilia; Bartfai, Tamas; Conti, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    Temperature is an important modulator of longevity and aging in both poikilotherms and homeotherm animals. In homeotherms, temperature homeostasis is regulated primarily in the preoptic area (POA) of the hypothalamus. This region receives and integrates peripheral, central and environmental signals and maintains a nearly constant core body temperature (T(core)) by regulating the autonomic and hormonal control of heat production and heat dissipation. Temperature sensitive neurons found in the POA are considered key elements of the neuronal circuitry modulating these effects. Nutrient homeostasis is also a hypothalamically regulated modulator of aging as well as one of the signals that can influence T(core) in homeotherms. Investigating the mechanisms of the regulation of nutrient and temperature homeostasis in the hypothalamus is important to understanding how these two elements of energy homeostasis influence longevity and aging as well as how aging can affect hypothalamic homeostatic mechanisms. PMID:19631766

  16. Extreme Longevity in Proteinaceous Deep-Sea Corals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roark, E B; Guilderson, T P; Dunbar, R B; Fallon, S J; Mucciarone, D A

    2009-02-09

    Deep-sea corals are found on hard substrates on seamounts and continental margins world-wide at depths of 300 to {approx}3000 meters. Deep-sea coral communities are hotspots of deep ocean biomass and biodiversity, providing critical habitat for fish and invertebrates. Newly applied radiocarbon age date from the deep water proteinaceous corals Gerardia sp. and Leiopathes glaberrima show that radial growth rates are as low as 4 to 35 {micro}m yr{sup -1} and that individual colony longevities are on the order of thousands of years. The management and conservation of deep sea coral communities is challenged by their commercial harvest for the jewelry trade and damage caused by deep water fishing practices. In light of their unusual longevity, a better understanding of deep sea coral ecology and their interrelationships with associated benthic communities is needed to inform coherent international conservation strategies for these important deep-sea ecosystems.

  17. Neuronal Inputs and Outputs of Aging and Longevity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy eAlcedo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available An animal’s survival strongly depends on its ability to maintain homeostasis in response to the changing quality of its external and internal environment. This is achieved through intracellular and intercellular communication within and among different tissues. One of the organ systems that plays a major role in this communication and the maintenance of homeostasis is the nervous system. Here we highlight different aspects of the neuronal inputs and outputs of pathways that affect aging and longevity. Accordingly, we discuss how sensory inputs influence homeostasis and lifespan through the modulation of different types of neuronal signals, which reflects the complexity of the environmental cues that affect physiology. We also describe feedback, compensatory and feed-forward mechanisms in these longevity-modulating pathways that are necessary for homeostasis. Finally, we consider the temporal requirements for these neuronal processes and the potential role of natural genetic variation in shaping the neurobiology of aging.

  18. Impaired Perinatal Growth and Longevity: A Life History Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah M. Sloboda

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Life history theory proposes that early-life cues induce highly integrated responses in traits associated with energy partitioning, maturation, reproduction, and aging such that the individual phenotype is adaptively more appropriate to the anticipated environment. Thus, maternal and/or neonatally derived nutritional or endocrine cues suggesting a threatening environment may favour early growth and reproduction over investment in tissue reserve and repair capacity. These may directly affect longevity, as well as prioritise insulin resistance and capacity for fat storage, thereby increasing susceptibility to metabolic dysfunction and obesity. These shifts in developmental trajectory are associated with long-term expression changes in specific genes, some of which may be underpinned by epigenetic processes. This normative process of developmental plasticity may prove to be maladaptive in human environments in transition towards low extrinsic mortality and energy-dense nutrition, leading to the development of an inappropriate phenotype with decreased potential for longevity and/or increased susceptibility to metabolic disease.

  19. Lithium Promotes Longevity through GSK3/NRF2-Dependent Hormesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Quan, Jorge Iván; Li, Li; Kinghorn, Kerri J; Ivanov, Dobril K; Tain, Luke S; Slack, Cathy; Kerr, Fiona; Nespital, Tobias; Thornton, Janet; Hardy, John; Bjedov, Ivana; Partridge, Linda

    2016-04-19

    The quest to extend healthspan via pharmacological means is becoming increasingly urgent, both from a health and economic perspective. Here we show that lithium, a drug approved for human use, promotes longevity and healthspan. We demonstrate that lithium extends lifespan in female and male Drosophila, when administered throughout adulthood or only later in life. The life-extending mechanism involves the inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) and activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (NRF-2). Combining genetic loss of the NRF-2 repressor Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) with lithium treatment revealed that high levels of NRF-2 activation conferred stress resistance, while low levels additionally promoted longevity. The discovery of GSK-3 as a therapeutic target for aging will likely lead to more effective treatments that can modulate mammalian aging and further improve health in later life. PMID:27068460

  20. Subjective wellbeing and longevity: a co-twin control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadler, Michael E; Miller, Christopher J; Christensen, Kaare;

    2011-01-01

    Mental health is increasingly defined not only by the absence of illness but by the presence of subjective well-being (SWB). Previous cohort studies have consistently shown that indicators of SWB predict favorable life outcomes, including better mental and somatic health, and longevity. The favor......Mental health is increasingly defined not only by the absence of illness but by the presence of subjective well-being (SWB). Previous cohort studies have consistently shown that indicators of SWB predict favorable life outcomes, including better mental and somatic health, and longevity....... The favorable effects associated with SWB have prompted new research aimed at raising happiness and wellbeing through individual interventions and public health initiatives. Standard observational studies of individual-level associations, however, are subject to potential confounding of exposure and outcome...

  1. CALCULATION ALGORITHM FOR CONCRETE LONGEVITY BY GENERALIZED CRITERION

    OpenAIRE

    S. N. Leonovich

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes problems pertaining to corrosion theory and forecast of reinforced concrete structure service life. The author considers that application of modern investigation methods on the basis of failure mechanics and analysis concrete porosity will make it possible to develop a general theory of concrete corrosion and calculation of reinforced concrete structure service life. Provision of the required longevity of reinforced concrete structures is not less important than the provis...

  2. Intergenerational exchanges, children's education and parents' longevity in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Graham, Elspeth; Sabater, Albert

    2016-01-01

    The link between children’s health and the education of their parents, especially mothers, is now well established. However, far less is known about the possible influence of the educational attainment of adult children on the health of their parents. This study investigates the relationship between the education of adult children and the longevity of older parents using individual-level longitudinal data for 11 countries from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE). Of ...

  3. The Effects of Longevity and Distortions on Education and Retirement

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro Cavalcanti Ferreira; Samuel de Abreu Pessoa

    2007-01-01

    This article studies the impact of longevity and taxation on life-cycle decisions and long run income. Individuals allocate optimally their total lifetime between education, working and retirement. They also decide at each moment how much to save or consume out of their income, and, after entering the labor market, how to divide their time between labor and leisure. The model incorporates experience-earnings profiles and return to education function that follows evidence from the labor litera...

  4. Being cool: how body temperature influences ageing and longevity

    OpenAIRE

    Keil, Gerald; Cummings, Elizabeth; de Magalhães, João Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Temperature is a basic and essential property of any physical system, including living systems. Even modest variations in temperature can have profound effects on organisms, and it has long been thought that as metabolism increases at higher temperatures so should rates of ageing. Here, we review the literature on how temperature affects longevity, ageing and life history traits. From poikilotherms to homeotherms, there is a clear trend for lower temperature being associated with longer lifes...

  5. Hypothalamic and dietary control of temperature-mediated longevity

    OpenAIRE

    Tabarean, Iustin; Morrison, Brad; Marcondes, Maria Cecilia; Bartfai, Tamas; Conti, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Temperature is an important modulator of longevity and aging in both poikilotherms and homeotherm animals. In homeotherms, temperature homeostasis is regulated primarily in the preoptic area (POA) of the hypothalamus. This region receives and integrates peripheral, central and environmental signals and maintains a nearly constant core body temperature (Tcore) by regulating the autonomic and hormonal control of heat production and heat dissipation. Temperature sensitive neurons found in the PO...

  6. Juvenile hormone regulation of longevity in the migratory monarch butterfly.

    OpenAIRE

    Herman, W. S.; Tatar, M.

    2001-01-01

    Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) of eastern North America are well known for their long-range migration to overwintering roosts in south-central Mexico. An essential feature of this migration involves the exceptional longevity of the migrant adults; individuals persist from August/September to March while their summer counterparts are likely to live less than two months as adults. Migrant adults persist during a state of reproductive diapause in which both male and female reproductive d...

  7. The impact of biomedical innovation on longevity and health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank R Lichtenberg

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Many authors have expressed the view that a substantial portion of recent gains in longevity and health is due to biomedical research and innovation. This article describes the methodologies and findings of a number of studies based on observational data that have sought to measure the impact of biomedical innovation on the longevity and health of Americans and other populations during recent decades. Most of these studies have examined the impact of innovation in pharmaceuticals, the most research-intensive medical good or service. Two measures of medical innovation that have been used are the mean vintage of the medical goods or procedures used by an individual or population, and the number of distinct products (e.g. drugs available for treating a condition. Longevity (e.g. time till death is the health outcome that has been analyzed the most, but several studies have studied the impact of medical (i.e. pharmaceutical innovation on the ability of people to work or engage in activities of daily living. Some studies have been based on cross-sectional patient-level data. Others have been based on longitudinal, region-level data; they have investigated whether regions (e.g. states undergoing more rapid medical innovation have exhibited larger improvements in health. And some studies have been based on longitudinal, disease-level data; they have investigated whether the medical conditions undergoing more rapid innovation have exhibited larger gains in health outcomes. Innovation related to some specific major diseases (e.g. cardiovascular disease and cancer has been investigated, but the overall impact of innovation related to other major diseases (e.g. diabetes has not.These studies provide considerable support for the hypothesis that a substantial portion of recent gains in longevity and health is due to biomedical research and innovation. It would be desirable to apply these methods to data from developing countries.

  8. Skeletal muscle as a regulator of the longevity protein, Klotho

    OpenAIRE

    KeithGAvin; PaulMCoen; DonnaStolz; JohnJDubé; FabrisiaAmbrosio

    2014-01-01

    Klotho is a powerful longevity protein that has been linked to the prevention of muscle atrophy, osteopenia, and cardiovascular disease. Similar anti-aging effects have also been ascribed to exercise and physical activity. While an association between muscle function and Klotho expression has been previously suggested from longitudinal cohort studies, a direct relationship between circulating Klotho and skeletal muscle has not been investigated. In this paper, we present a review of the liter...

  9. Long-run trends of human aging and longevity

    OpenAIRE

    Strulik, Holger; Vollmer, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Over the last 200 years, humans experienced a huge increase of life expectancy. These advances were largely driven by extrinsic improvements of their environment (for example, the available diet, disease prevalence, vaccination, and the state of hygiene and sanitation). In this paper, we ask whether future improvements of life expectancy will be bounded from above by human life span. Life span, in contrast to life expectancy, is conceptualized as a biological measure of longevity driven by th...

  10. Lysosomal Signaling Molecules Regulate Longevity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Folick, Andrew; Oakley, Holly Doebbler; Yu, Yong; Armstrong, Eric H.; Kumari, Manju; Sanor, Lucas; Moore, David D.; Ortlund, Eric A.; Zechner, Rudolf; Wang, Meng C.

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomes are crucial cellular organelles for human health that function in digestion and recycling of extracellular and intracellular macromolecules. We describe a signaling role for lysosomes that affects aging. In the worm, Caenorhabditis elegans, the lysosomal acid lipase LIPL-4 triggered nuclear translocalization of a lysosomal lipid chaperone LBP-8, consequently promoting longevity by activating the nuclear hormone receptors NHR-49 and NHR-80. We used high-throughput metabolomic analysi...

  11. Modern Medicine: Towards Prevention, Cure, Well-being and Longevity

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Ajai R.

    2010-01-01

    Modern medicine has done much in the fields of infectious diseases and emergencies to aid cure. In most other fields, it is mostly control that it aims for, which is another name for palliation. Pharmacology, psychopharmacology included, is mostly directed towards such control and palliation too. The thrust, both of clinicians and research, must now turn decisively towards prevention and cure. Also, longevity with well-being is modern medicine′s other big challenge. Advances in vaccine...

  12. Facing Up to Uncertain Life Expectancy: The Longevity Fan Charts

    OpenAIRE

    Dowd, Kevin; BLAKE, DAVID; CAIRNS, ANDREW J.G.

    2010-01-01

    This article uses longevity fan charts to represent the uncertainty in projections of future life expectancy. These fan charts are based on a mortality model calibrated on mortality data for English and Welsh males. The fan charts indicate strong upward sloping trends in future life expectancy. Their widths indicate the extent of uncertainty in these projections, and this uncertainty increases as the forecast horizon lengthens. Allowing for uncertainty in the parameter values of the model add...

  13. Lifelong pathways to longevity: personality, relationships, flourishing, and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Margaret L; Della Porta, Serenity S; Friedman, Howard S

    2014-12-01

    Building upon decades of research with the lifelong (nine-decade) Terman Life Cycle Study, we present a life pathway model for understanding human thriving that accounts for long-term individual difference in health and longevity, with a particular focus on child personality and adult social relationships. Developing data derived and supplemented from the Terman study (N = 570 males, 451 females), we employed regression and survival analyses to test models of childhood personality predicting adult psychosocial factors (subjective well-being, family relationships, community involvement, subjective achievement, hardships) and subsequent longevity. Child personality differentially related to midlife social relationships, well-being, and hardships. Conscientiousness and good social relationships predicted longer life, whereas subjective well-being was unrelated to mortality risk. Examining multiple life factors across long time periods uncovers important pathways through which personality relates to premature mortality or longevity. Typical stress-and-illness models are untenable and should be replaced with life span trajectory approaches. PMID:23927423

  14. Burial increases seed longevity of two Artemisia tridentata (Asteraceae) subspecies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijayratne, Upekala C.; Pyke, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Premise of the study: Seed longevity and persistence in soil seed banks may be especially important for population persistence in ecosystems where opportunities for seedling establishment and disturbance are unpredictable. The fire regime, an important driver of population dynamics in sagebrush steppe ecosystems, has been altered by exotic annual grass invasion. Soil seed banks may play an active role in postfire recovery of the foundation shrub Artemisia tridentata, yet conditions under which seeds persist are largely unknown. Methods: We investigated seed longevity of two Artemisia tridentata subspecies in situ by retrieving seed bags that were placed at varying depths over a 2 yr period. We also sampled naturally dispersed seeds in litter and soil immediately after seed dispersal and before flowering in subsequent seasons to estimate seed persistence. Key results: After 24 mo, seeds buried at least 3 cm below the soil surface retained 30–40% viability whereas viability of seeds on the surface and under litter declined to 0 and Artemisia tridentata has the potential to form a short-term soil seed bank that persists longer than has been commonly assumed, and that burial is necessary for seed longevity. Use of seeding techniques that promote burial of some seeds to aid in formation of a soil seed bank may increase restoration potential.

  15. Human longevity: Genetics or Lifestyle? It takes two to tango.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passarino, Giuseppe; De Rango, Francesco; Montesanto, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Healthy aging and longevity in humans are modulated by a lucky combination of genetic and non-genetic factors. Family studies demonstrated that about 25 % of the variation in human longevity is due to genetic factors. The search for genetic and molecular basis of aging has led to the identification of genes correlated with the maintenance of the cell and of its basic metabolism as the main genetic factors affecting the individual variation of the aging phenotype. In addition, studies on calorie restriction and on the variability of genes associated with nutrient-sensing signaling, have shown that ipocaloric diet and/or a genetically efficient metabolism of nutrients, can modulate lifespan by promoting an efficient maintenance of the cell and of the organism. Recently, epigenetic studies have shown that epigenetic modifications, modulated by both genetic background and lifestyle, are very sensitive to the aging process and can either be a biomarker of the quality of aging or influence the rate and the quality of aging. On the whole, current studies are showing that interventions modulating the interaction between genetic background and environment is essential to determine the individual chance to attain longevity. PMID:27053941

  16. Juvenile hormone regulation of longevity in the migratory monarch butterfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, W S; Tatar, M

    2001-12-22

    Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) of eastern North America are well known for their long-range migration to overwintering roosts in south-central Mexico. An essential feature of this migration involves the exceptional longevity of the migrant adults; individuals persist from August/September to March while their summer counterparts are likely to live less than two months as adults. Migrant adults persist during a state of reproductive diapause in which both male and female reproductive development is arrested as a consequence of suppressed synthesis of juvenile hormone. Here, we describe survival in monarch butterflies as a function of the migrant syndrome. We show that migrant adults are longer lived than summer adults when each are maintained under standard laboratory conditions, that the longevity of migrant adults is curtailed by treatment with juvenile hormone and that the longevity of summer adults is increased by 100% when juvenile hormone synthesis is prevented by surgical removal of its source, the corpora allatum. Thus, monarch butterfly persistence through a long winter season is ensured in part by reduced ageing that is under endocrine regulation, as well as by the unique environmental properties of their winter roost sites. Phenotypic plasticity for ageing is an integral component of the monarch butterflies' migration-diapause syndrome. PMID:11749703

  17. Modern Medicine: Towards Prevention, Cure, Well-being and Longevity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajai R Singh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern medicine has done much in the fields of infectious diseases and emergencies to aid cure. In most other fields, it is mostly control that it aims for, which is another name for palliation. Pharmacology, psychopharmacology included, is mostly directed towards such control and palliation too. The thrust, both of clinicians and research, must now turn decisively towards prevention and cure. Also, longevity with well-being is modern medicine's other big challenge. Advances in vaccines for hypertension, diabetes, cancers etc, deserve attention; as also, the role of meditation, yoga, spirituality etc in preventing disease at various levels. Studies on longevity, life style changes and healthy centenarians deserve special scrutiny to find what aids longevity with wellbeing. A close look at complementary and alternative medicine is needed to find any suitable models they may have, cutting aside their big talk and/or hostility towards mainstream medical care. Medicine is a manifestation of the human eros, and should not become a means of its thanatos. It must realise its true potential, so that eros prevails, and thanatos prevails only ultimately, not prematurely.

  18. Modern Medicine: Towards Prevention, Cure, Well-being and Longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajai R

    2010-01-01

    Modern medicine has done much in the fields of infectious diseases and emergencies to aid cure. In most other fields, it is mostly control that it aims for, which is another name for palliation. Pharmacology, psychopharmacology included, is mostly directed towards such control and palliation too. The thrust, both of clinicians and research, must now turn decisively towards prevention and cure. Also, longevity with well-being is modern medicine's other big challenge. Advances in vaccines for hypertension, diabetes, cancers etc, deserve attention; as also, the role of meditation, yoga, spirituality etc in preventing disease at various levels. Studies on longevity, life style changes and healthy centenarians deserve special scrutiny to find what aids longevity with wellbeing. A close look at complementary and alternative medicine is needed to find any suitable models they may have, cutting aside their big talk and/or hostility towards mainstream medical care. Medicine is a manifestation of the human eros, and should not become a means of its thanatos. It must realise its true potential, so that eros prevails, and thanatos prevails only ultimately, not prematurely. PMID:21327168

  19. Leaf spring, and electromagnetic actuator provided with a leaf spring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhoff, Arthur Perry; Lemmen, Remco Louis Christiaan

    2002-01-01

    The invention relates to a leaf spring for an electromagnetic actuator and to such an electromagnetic actuator. The leaf spring is formed as a whole from a disc of plate-shaped, resilient material. The leaf spring comprises a central fastening part, an outer fastening part extending therearound and

  20. An OLG model of growth with longevity: when grandparents take care of grandchildren

    OpenAIRE

    Fanti, Luciano; Gori, Luca

    2011-01-01

    By assuming that grandparents take care of grandchildren, in this paper we aim at studying the effects of longevity on economic growth in the basic OLG model with endogenous fertility. We show that a rise in longevity can actually reduce long-run growth. Moreover, we also find that an increasing longevity (i) increases the supply of labour by the young parents, and (ii) causes fertility either to increase of decrease depending on the size of the grandparental child rearing time.

  1. Understanding, Modeling and Managing Longevity Risk: Key Issues and Main Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Barrieu, Pauline; Bensusan, Harry; El Karoui, Nicole; Hillairet, Caroline; Loisel, Stéphane; Claudia RAVANELLI; Salhi, Yahia

    2012-01-01

    This article investigates the latest developments in longevity risk modelling, and explores the key risk management challenges for both the financial and insurance industries. The article discusses key definitions that are crucial for the enhancement of the way longevity risk is understood; providing a global view of the practical issues for longevity-linked insurance and pension products that have evolved concurrently with the steady increase in life expectancy since 1960s. In addition, the ...

  2. Human insulin/IGF-1 and familial longevity at middle age

    OpenAIRE

    Rozing, Maarten P.; Westendorp, Rudi G J; Frölich, Marijke; de Craen, Anton J.M.; Beekman, Marian; Heijmans, Bastiaan T; Simon P Mooijaart; Blauw, Gerard-Jan; Slagboom, P Eline; van Heemst, Diana; Group, on behalf of the Leiden Longevity Study (LLS)

    2009-01-01

    Recently, we have shown that compared to controls, long-lived familial nonagenarians (mean age: 93.4 years) from the Leiden Longevity Study displayed a lower mortality rate, and their middle-aged offspring displayed a lower prevalence of cardio-metabolic diseases, including diabetes mellitus. The evolutionarily conserved insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS) pathway has been implicated in longevity in model organisms, but its relevance for human longevity has generated much controversy. Here, we show...

  3. Accelerated protein evolution analysis reveals genes and pathways associated with the evolution of mammalian longevity

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yang; de Magalhães, João Pedro

    2011-01-01

    The genetic basis of the large species differences in longevity and aging remains a mystery. Thanks to recent large-scale genome sequencing efforts, the genomes of multiple species have been sequenced and can be used for cross-species comparisons to study species divergence in longevity. By analyzing proteins under accelerated evolution in several mammalian lineages where maximum lifespan increased, we identified genes and processes that are candidate targets of selection when longevity evolv...

  4. The Trade-Off between Female Fertility and Longevity during the Epidemiological Transition in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Kaptijn, R.; Thomese, F.; Liefbroer, A.C.; van Poppel, F.W.A.; Bodegom, D. van; Westendorp, R G J

    2015-01-01

    Several hypotheses have been put forward to explain the relationship between women’s fertility and their post-reproductive longevity. In this study, we focus on the disposable soma theory, which posits that a negative relationship between women’s fertility and longevity can be understood as an evolutionary trade-off between reproduction and survival. We examine the relationship between fertility and longevity during the epidemiological transition in the Netherlands. This period of rapid decli...

  5. Genetic association between leg conformation in young pigs and sow longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, T H; Madsen, P; Lundeheim, N; Nilsson, K; Norberg, E

    2016-08-01

    Longevity is important in pig production with respect to both economic and ethical aspects. Direct selection for longevity might be ineffective because 'true' longevity can only be recorded when a sow has been culled or died. Thus, indirect selection for longevity using information from other traits that can be recorded early in life and are genetically correlated with longevity might be an alternative. Leg conformation has been included in many breeding schemes for a number of years. However, proving that leg conformation traits are good early indicators for longevity still remains. Our aim was to study genetic associations between leg conformation traits of young (5 months; 100 kg) Swedish Yorkshire pigs in nucleus herds and longevity traits of sows in nucleus and multiplier herds. Data included 97 533 animals with information on conformation (Movement and Overall score) recorded at performance testing and 26 962 sows with information on longevity. The longevity traits were as follows: stayability from 1st to 2nd parity, lifetime number of litters and lifetime number of born alive piglets. Genetic analyses were performed with both linear models using REML and linear-threshold models using Bayesian methods. Heritabilities estimated using the Bayesian method were higher than those estimated using REML, ranging from 0.10 to 0.24 and 0.07 to 0.20, respectively. All estimated genetic correlations between conformation and longevity traits were significant and favourable. Heritabilities and genetic correlations between conformation and longevity indicate that selection on leg conformation should improve sow longevity. PMID:26578175

  6. Innovative Approaches to Managing Longevity Risk in Asia : Lessons from the West

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Amlan

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses what is longevity risk, why it is important, approaches used by the West to manage longevity risk and what lessons can be learnt by Asian countries from the experiences of the West. Increasing and uncertain longevity has emerged as a key risk affecting individuals, pension plans, insurers and governments in both the developed and emerging world. I discuss progress in the field of longevity modelling and the merits as well as drawbacks of these models. In Western countr...

  7. RPD3 histone deacetylase and nutrition have distinct but interacting effects on Drosophila longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Stewart; Woods, Jared; Ziafazeli, Tahereh; Rogina, Blanka

    2015-12-01

    Single-gene mutations that extend longevity have revealed regulatory pathways related to aging and longevity. RPD3 is a conserved histone deacetylase (Class I HDAC). Previously we showed that Drosophila rpd3 mutations increase longevity. Here we tested the longevity effects of RPD3 on multiple nutrient levels. Dietary restriction (DR) has additive effects on RPD3-mediated longevity extension, but the effect may be modestly attenuated relative to controls. RPD3 and DR therefore appear to operate by distinct but interacting mechanisms. Since RPD3 regulates transcription, the mRNA levels for two proteins involved in nutrient signaling, 4E-BP and Tor, were examined in rpd3 mutant flies. 4E-BP mRNA was reduced under longevity-increasing conditions. Epistasis between RPD3 and 4E-BP with regard to longevity was then tested. Flies only heterozygous for a mutation in Thor, the 4E-BP gene, have modestly decreased life spans. Flies mutant for both rpd3 and Thor show a superposition of a large RPD3-mediated increase and a small Thor-mediated decrease in longevity at all food levels, consistent with each gene product having distinct effects on life span. However, DR-mediated extension was absent in males carrying both mutations and lessened in females. Our results support the view that multiple discrete but interacting mechanisms regulate longevity. PMID:26647291

  8. RPD3 histone deacetylase and nutrition have distinct but interacting effects on Drosophila longevity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Stewart; Woods, Jared; Ziafazeli, Tahereh; Rogina, Blanka

    2015-01-01

    Single-gene mutations that extend longevity have revealed regulatory pathways related to aging and longevity. RPD3 is a conserved histone deacetylase (Class I HDAC). Previously we showed that Drosophila rpd3 mutations increase longevity. Here we tested the longevity effects of RPD3 on multiple nutrient levels. Dietary restriction (DR) has additive effects on RPD3-mediated longevity extension, but the effect may be modestly attenuated relative to controls. RPD3 and DR therefore appear to operate by distinct but interacting mechanisms. Since RPD3 regulates transcription, the mRNA levels for two proteins involved in nutrient signaling, 4E-BP and Tor, were examined in rpd3 mutant flies. 4E-BP mRNA was reduced under longevity-increasing conditions. Epistasis between RPD3 and 4E-BP with regard to longevity was then tested. Flies only heterozygous for a mutation in Thor, the 4E-BP gene, have modestly decreased life spans. Flies mutant for both rpd3 and Thor show a superposition of a large RPD3-mediated increase and a small Thor-mediated decrease in longevity at all food levels, consistent with each gene product having distinct effects on life span. However, DR-mediated extension was absent in males carrying both mutations and lessened in females. Our results support the view that multiple discrete but interacting mechanisms regulate longevity. PMID:26647291

  9. Gene activation regresses atherosclerosis, promotes health, and enhances longevity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luoma Pauli V

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lifestyle factors and pharmacological compounds activate genetic mechanisms that influence the development of atherosclerotic and other diseases. This article reviews studies on natural and pharmacological gene activation that promotes health and enhances longevity. Results Living habits including healthy diet and regular physical activity, and pharmacotherapy, upregulate genes encoding enzymes and apolipoprotein and ATP-binding cassette transporters, acting in metabolic processes that promote health and increase survival. Cytochrome P450-enzymes, physiological factors in maintaining cholesterol homeostasis, generate oxysterols for the elimination of surplus cholesterol. Hepatic CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase-α is an important regulator of plasma HDL-C level. Gene-activators produce plasma lipoprotein profile, high HDL-C, HDL2-C and HDL-C/cholesterol ratio, which is typical of low risk of atherosclerotic disease, and also of exceptional longevity together with reduced prevalence of cardiovascular, metabolic and other diseases. High HDL contributes to protection against inflammation, oxidation and thrombosis, and associates with good cognitive function in very old people. Avoiding unhealthy stress and managing it properly promotes health and increases life expectancy. Conclusions Healthy living habits and gene-activating xenobiotics upregulate mechanisms that produce lipoprotein pattern typical of very old people and enhance longevity. Lipoprotein metabolism and large HDL2 associate with the process of living a very long life. Major future goals for health promotion are the improving of commitment to both wise lifestyle choices and drug therapy, and further the developing of new and more effective and well tolerated drugs and treatments.

  10. Longevity and reproduction of Ceriodaphnia dubia in receiving waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seven-day tests with Ceriodaphnia dubia are commonly used to estimate toxicity of effluents or receiving waters but can sometimes yield no toxicity outcomes even if pollutants are present. The authors conducted two sets of full life-cycle tests with C. dubia to (1) determine whether tests with longer exposure periods to low concentrations of contaminants in ambient water might reveal evidence of toxicity that could not be discerned from 7-d tests and (2) determine the relative importance of water quality versus food as factors influencing C. dubia longevity and reproduction. In the first set of tests, C. dubia was reared in diluted mineral water (a negative control), water from a stream impacted by coal fly-ash, or water from a retention basin containing sediments contaminated with mercury, other metals, and polychlorinated biphenyls. The second set of tests used water from the retention basin only. Before testing, though, water in the second set of tests was either filtered or not filtered, and food was either added or not added. Ceriodaphnia dubia longevity and reproduction did not differ much among the three water types in the first set of tests, but both longevity and reproduction were strongly affected by the filtering and food-addition treatments in the second set of tests. Thus, C. dubia appeared to be relatively insensitive to general water quality factors but sensitive to food-related factors. In five of the six full life-cycle tests, lifetime reproduction by C. dubia could not be reliably predicted from reproduction data from the first 7 d of testing. The increase in predictability of lifetime reproduction of C. dubia as a function of test duration also differed among water types in the first set of tests and among treatments in the second set of tests. This, it may not be possible to reliably extrapolate the results of 7-d tests with C. dubia to longer time scales

  11. Longevity records of North American birds: Coerebinae through Estrildidae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimkiewicz, M.K.; Futcher, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    This is the fourth paper of a 4-part series detailing the longevity records of marked North American birds. The previous three papers can be found in the Journal of Field Ornithology, Volumes 53 and 54. Prio to this series only one definitive paper ( Kennard 1975) had been written on North American taxa. Records for 84 taxa are included in this paper. Thirty are birds older than those listed by Kennard. Thirty-nine are new records and 9 are those listed in Kennard.

  12. Cancer resistance, high molecular weight hyaluronic acid, and longevity

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    Longevity varies greatly among mammals. The naked mole rat is among the longest-lived rodents, having an average lifespan of 32 years, compared to the similarly-sized house mouse with lifespan of 4 years. The rate of cancer also varies widely among mammals and interestingly, the naked mole rat is essentially cancer-free (Gorbunova et al., Nat Rev Genet 15(531):540, 2014). A series of elegant studies (Tian et al. Nature 499:346–349, 2013) has revealed that this cancer resistance derives from t...

  13. Leaf absorbance and photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurer, Kees

    1994-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of a leaf is often thought to contain some clues to the photosynthetic action spectrum of chlorophyll. Of course, absorption of photons is needed for photosynthesis, but the reverse, photosynthesis when there is absorption, is not necessarily true. As a check on the existence of absorption limits we measured spectra for a few different leaves. Two techniques for measuring absorption have been used, viz. the separate determination of the diffuse reflectance and the diffuse transmittance with the leaf at a port of an integrating sphere and the direct determination of the non-absorbed fraction with the leaf in the sphere. In a cross-check both methods yielded the same results for the absorption spectrum. The spectrum of a Fuchsia leaf, covering the short-wave region from 350 to 2500 nm, shows a high absorption in UV, blue and red, the well known dip in the green and a steep fall-off at 700 nm. Absorption drops to virtually zero in the near infrared, with subsequent absorptions, corresponding to the water absorption bands. In more detailed spectra, taken at 5 nm intervals with a 5 nm bandwidth, differences in chlorophyll content show in the different depths of the dip around 550 nm and in a small shift of the absorption edge at 700 nm. Spectra for Geranium (Pelargonium zonale) and Hibiscus (with a higher chlorophyll content) show that the upper limit for photosynthesis can not be much above 700 nm. No evidence, however, is to be seen of a lower limit for photosynthesis and, in fact, some experiments down to 300 nm still did not show a decrease of the absorption although it is well recognized that no photosynthesis results with 300 nm wavelengths.

  14. Longevity of treethrow microtopography: implications for mass wasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaetzl, R.J.; Follmer, L.R.

    1990-01-01

    This study examines and compares methods of dating pit/mound microtopography formed by tree uprooting, and provides 14C evidence for the longevity of these landforms. Microtopography can often by dated by reference to known meteorological phenomena, or within certain age constraints, by dendrochronologic means. We used 14C analysis of buried wood and charcoal in treethrow mounds in Michigan and Wisconsin, U.S.A. to arrive at estimates of the geochronometric ages of treethrow mounds. Results indicate that mounds in these areas often persist for more than 1000 years, which are two to five times longer than published estimates by less reliable methods. The longevity of treethrow mounds in these regions is ascribed to (l) sandy, porous soils which minimize runoff, (2) a continuous mat of forest litter and vegetation cover, (3) surface concentrations of gravel which may act as an "armor", (4) large initial size of the features, and (5) soil freezing. Implications are that rates of mass movement due to uprooting may be substantially less than studies from other regions suggest. ?? 1990.

  15. Mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms associated with longevity in the Turkish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guney, Ozgur; Ak, Handan; Atay, Sevcan; Ozkaya, Ali Burak; Aydin, Hikmet Hakan

    2014-07-01

    The accumulation of mutations in mitochondrial DNA is a widely recognized mechanism for aging and age related diseases. However, studies indicate that some mutations could be beneficial to longevity by slowing down the function of the electron transport chain, reducing free radical production. In this study, we re-sequenced the entire mitochondrial DNA from 50 individuals and examined aging-related variations in the Turkish population. We evaluated sequence data by comparing whole SNP frequencies, individual SNP frequencies, the effect of SNPs, SNP accumulation in certain mtDNA regions and haplotype profiles between elderly and control groups. The frequency of total mitochondrial SNPs was significantly higher in nonagenarians than controls (p=0.0094). Furthermore, non-coding, synonymous and tRNA mutations were more prevalent in the 90+ group compared to controls (p=0.0001, pmutations in the D-loop region and genes encoding Complex I subunits (ND1-6) (pmutation frequency of Complex I genes in aged subjects (p<0.0001). Haplotype H was also significantly increased in the control group (p=0.0405). Overall, our findings support a role for mitochondrial genome variations and the functionality of oxidative phosphorylation in longevity. In this report, we sequenced the whole mtDNA of the Turkish population for the first time. PMID:24792352

  16. Geochemical factors in borehole-shaft plug longevity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geochemical investigations that address factors controlling the longevity of repository sealing materials in a geochemical environment are discussed. Studies are being made of cement-based materials as major candidates for seals for borehole plugging, and shaft and tunnel sealing in certain potential repository environments. Factors controlling the extent of attainment of equilibrium of the plug components with time and the rate of approach to a state of stable equilibrium of the plug component chemical subsystem within the total system are discussed. The effect of these factors on changes in physical, mechanical and thermal properties of a seal system, and the consequent effectiveness of the seal in preventing transport of radioactive waste species are the dominant features to be determined. Laboratory experiments on the effects of anticipated temperature, pressure, and environmental factors (including chemical composition and specific rock type) are described. Thermodynamic studies are used to determine the potentially stable reaction products under conditions similar to those anticipated for the repository boreholes, shafts, and tunnels during and after the operating stage. Multitemperature reaction series are studied, and reaction kinetics are investigated for the purpose of predicting the course of likely reactions. Detailed studies of permeability, diffusion, and interfacial properties and chemical and microphase characterization of the products of experiments are carried out. Characterization studies of old and ancient cements, mortars, and concretes and prototype man-made seal materials are performed to further assess the factors associated with longevity

  17. Seed longevity and germination characteristics of six fen plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatár, S

    2010-01-01

    Fens are among the most threatened habitats in Europe as their area has decreased considerably in the last centuries. For successful management and restoration conservationists need detailed knowledge about seed bank formation and seed longevity of plants, as these features are closely related to successional and vegetation dynamical processes. I analysed seed longevity and the germination characteristics of six fen plant species by seed burial experiments. Based on seed weight, seed bank was expected for long-term persistent for the light-seeded Schoenus nigricans, Carex appropinquata, C. pseudocyperus, C. davalliana and Peucedanum palustre and also that for the medium-seeded Cicuta virosa. It was proved that, the latter two species have short-term persistent seed banks, while Carex pseudocyperus has a transient seed bank, therefore these species may only have a limited role in restoration from seed banks. It was found that Schoenus nigricans, Carex appropinquata and C. davalliana have persistent seed banks, because some of their four-year-old seeds have emerged. Fresh seeds had low germination rate in all studied species and majority of seeds emerged after winter, except for Carex pseudocyperus. After the germination peak in spring, the majority of the ungerminated seeds of Schoenus nigricans, Peucedanum palustre, Carex appropinquata, C. davalliana and Cicuta virosa entered a secondary dormancy phase that was broken in autumn. I found the seasonal emergence of the latter three species highly similar. PMID:21565777

  18. Longevity of posterior dental restorations and reasons for failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopperud, Simen E; Tveit, Anne Bjørg; Gaarden, Torunn; Sandvik, Leiv; Espelid, Ivar

    2012-12-01

    Tooth-coloured restorative materials are being used increasingly more often in Class II preparations in permanent teeth. Using a practice-based study design, we aimed to assess the survival time of Class II restorations and to identify factors relevant to their longevity. Class II restorations (n = 4,030), consisting of resin composites (81.5%), compomers (12.7%), amalgams (4.6%), and glass-ionomer cement restorations (1.2%), were placed in 1,873 patients with a median age of 15 yr. In total, 92.7% of restorations were placed due to primary caries and 5.8% were replacements. After an average follow-up period of 4.6 yr, 61.6% of the restorations were successful, 11.2% had failed, and 27.2% were not available for evaluation (owing to patient drop-out). The mean annual failure rate was 2.9% for resin-composite restorations and 1.6% for amalgams. For resin-composite restorations, secondary caries was the most common reason for replacement (73.9%), followed by loss (8.0%), fracture (5.3%), and marginal defects (2.4%). Multilevel Cox-regression analyses identified young age of the patient, high previous caries experience, deep cavities, and saucer-shaped preparation technique as predisposing to shorter longevity of resin-composite restorations. One brand of resin composite had a shorter survival time than the others. PMID:23167471

  19. Leaf-to-leaf distances in Catalan tree graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Goldsborough, Andrew M.; Fellows, Jonathan M; Bates, Matthew; Rautu, S. Alex; Rowlands, George; Römer, Rudolf A.

    2015-01-01

    We study the average leaf-to-leaf path lengths on ordered Catalan tree graphs with $n$ nodes and show that these are equivalent to the average length of paths starting from the root node. We give an explicit analytic formula for the average leaf-to-leaf path length as a function of separation of the leaves and study its asymptotic properties. At the heart of our method is a strategy based on an abstract graph representation of generating functions which we hope can be useful also in other con...

  20. Using genetic inference to re-evaluate the minimum longevity of the lemon shark Negaprion brevirostris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, J L; Guttridge, T L; Franks, B R; Grubbs, R D; Chapman, D D; Gruber, S H; Dibattista, J D; Feldheim, K A

    2016-05-01

    A combination of mark-recapture and genetic sampling was used to extend the minimum longevity of an elasmobranch species and the life span estimate of the lemon shark Negaprion brevirostris was increased conservatively from 20·2 to 37 years. This increase in longevity means higher vulnerability and a longer recovery time from exploitation. PMID:27060882

  1. Longevity of posterior resin composite restorations in permanent teeth in Public Dental Health Service

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Ulla; van Dijken, Jan W V; Halken, Jette; Hallonsten, Anna-Lena; Höigaard, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    To investigate in a prospective follow up the longevity of posterior resin composites (RC) placed in permanent teeth of children and adolescents attending Public Dental Health Service.......To investigate in a prospective follow up the longevity of posterior resin composites (RC) placed in permanent teeth of children and adolescents attending Public Dental Health Service....

  2. Career Longevity among Southeastern Band Directors: Environmental, Personal, and Educational Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearn, Sidney Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine whether variables reported in previous research on teacher turnover could be reduced to a number of factors, and to determine how those resulting factors affected career longevity in band directors. Career longevity was defined as the total number of years teaching. Literature on teacher turnover was…

  3. Effect of floral bud reduction on flower longevity in Asiatic hybrids lilies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulen-Muisers, van der J.J.M.; Oeveren, van J.C.; Sandbrink, J.M.; Tuyl, van J.M.

    1995-01-01

    Floral bud abortion was found to be an undesirable source of non-genetic variation in breeding trials directed on the improvement of individual flower longevity in Asiatic hybrid lilies. It increased the longevity of the remaining flowers of the inflorescence. A similar response was found after elim

  4. Physiological responding to stress in middle-aged males enriched for longevity: a social stress study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.W.M. Jansen; D. van Heemst; J. van der Grond; R. Westendorp; N.Y.L. Oei

    2015-01-01

    Individuals enriched for familial longevity display a lower prevalence of age-related diseases, such as cardiovascular- and metabolic diseases. Since these diseases are associated with stress and increased cortisol levels, one of the underlying mechanisms that may contribute to healthy longevity mig

  5. The Trade-Off between Female Fertility and Longevity during the Epidemiological Transition in the Netherlands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaptijn, Ralf; Thomese, Fleur; Liefbroer, Aart C;

    2015-01-01

    Several hypotheses have been put forward to explain the relationship between women's fertility and their post-reproductive longevity. In this study, we focus on the disposable soma theory, which posits that a negative relationship between women's fertility and longevity can be understood as an...... evolutionary trade-off between reproduction and survival. We examine the relationship between fertility and longevity during the epidemiological transition in the Netherlands. This period of rapid decline in mortality from infectious diseases offers a good opportunity to study the relationship between...... fertility and longevity, using registry data from 6,359 women born in The Netherlands between 1850 and 1910. We hypothesize that an initially negative relationship between women's fertility and their longevity gradually turns less negative during the epidemiological transition, because of decreasing costs...

  6. Leaf development: A cellular perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrit TS Beemster

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Through its photosynthetic capacity the leaf provides the basis for growth of the whole plant. In order to improve crops for higher productivity and resistance for future climate scenarios, it is important to obtain a mechanistic understanding of leaf growth and development and the effect of genetic and environmental factors on the process. Cells are both the basic building blocks of the leaf and the regulatory units that integrate genetic and environmental information into the developmental program. Therefore, to fundamentally understand leaf development, one needs to be able to reconstruct the developmental pathway of individual cells (and their progeny from the stem cell niche to their final position in the mature leaf. To build the basis for such understanding, we review current knowledge on the spatial and temporal regulation mechanisms operating on cells, contributing to the formation of a leaf. We focus on the molecular networks that control exit from stem cell fate, leaf initiation, polarity, cytoplasmic growth, cell division, endoreduplication, transition between division and expansion, expansion and differentiation and their regulation by intercellular signaling molecules, including plant hormones, sugars, peptides, proteins and microRNAs. We discuss to what extent the knowledge available in the literature is suitable to be applied in systems biology approaches to model the process of leaf growth, in order to better understand and predict leaf growth starting with the model species Arabidopsis thaliana.

  7. How Households Adjust their Consumption and Investment Plans under Longevity Risk: An Experimental Approach-based Study in Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph J Tien; Jerry C Y Miao

    2013-01-01

    Longevity risk may be defined as the risk of outliving one’s accumulated wealth. Although many theoretical studies have suggested that individuals will increase their precautionary saving in order to mitigate longevity risk, only a few of such studies have used empirical data to test people’s decision-making behaviour in response to longevity risk. The main purpose of this paper is to investigate how households adjust their consumption and investment plans in response to longevity risk. We fi...

  8. 7 CFR 29.2528 - Leaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2528 Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip form, shall describe the divided unit of a whole leaf. ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf. 29.2528 Section 29.2528 Agriculture...

  9. Experiments to measure sterile male medfly dispersal and longevity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently, most of the SIT projects use the aerial release of sterile flies with some supplementary ground releases using paper bags that cannot be used on a large scale. Aside from its efficiency, the aerial release suffers from several limitations such as high cost, insufficiency over harsh mountainous and densely vegetated terrain and it is impractical for far and isolated orchards. Also it is highly dependent on suitable weather for flying the aircraft. Therefore, there is a need for an efficient ground release system as a practical alternative. One of the key parameters dictating the ground release strategy is the dispersal of the flies. As part of the Cleanfruit Project, improvement of the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) to control medfly (Ceratitis capitata) in the Mediterranean basin, a protocol was developed to be used in three regions: Madeira Island (Portugal), Valencia (Spain) and Hafetz Hayim (Israel). Three parallel trials were conducted in order to assess sterile male medfly dispersal. One hundred thousand sterile males (Vienna mix 2000) were released in a single point from the ground in the centre of a circle area with diameters of 400m. Jackson traps, baited with trimedlure were distributed in two circles around, consisted of 10, and 20 traps, at a radius of 100m and 200m, respectively from the release point. In Madeira, because of the topography, the outer ring was smaller and not complete - set at 150 m and consisted of only 12 traps. Parallel to the releases, the longevity of the flies with or without food and water under the field conditions was evaluated. Eight containers, each with 50-100 flies, 4 without and 4 with food and water, were deployed under the tree's canopies inside the release areas. In Madeira and Valencia, an average of 2.38 % and 2.15 % of the flies were recaptured respectively and in Israel 6.45 %. The fly dispersion was not homogenous and usually shifted toward one direction. Interestingly, in all locations the shift in the

  10. Effect of Plant Growth Regulators on Leaf Number, Leaf Area and Leaf Dry Matter in Grape

    OpenAIRE

    Zahoor Ahmad BHAT; Rizwan RASHID; Javid Ahmad BHAT

    2011-01-01

    Influence of phenylureas (CPPU) and brassinosteriod (BR) along with GA (gibberellic acid) were studied on seedless grape vegetative characteristics like leaf number, leaf area and leaf dry matter. Growth regulators were sprayed on the vines either once (7 days after fruit set or 15 days after fruit set) or twice (7+15 days after fruit set). CPPU 2 ppm+BR 0.4 ppm+GA 25 ppm produced maximum number of leaves (18.78) while as untreated vines produced least leaf number (16.22) per shoot. Maximum l...

  11. The artificial leaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocera, Daniel G

    2012-05-15

    To convert the energy of sunlight into chemical energy, the leaf splits water via the photosynthetic process to produce molecular oxygen and hydrogen, which is in a form of separated protons and electrons. The primary steps of natural photosynthesis involve the absorption of sunlight and its conversion into spatially separated electron-hole pairs. The holes of this wireless current are captured by the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) to oxidize water to oxygen. The electrons and protons produced as a byproduct of the OEC reaction are captured by ferrodoxin of photosystem I. With the aid of ferrodoxin-NADP(+) reductase, they are used to produce hydrogen in the form of NADPH. For a synthetic material to realize the solar energy conversion function of the leaf, the light-absorbing material must capture a solar photon to generate a wireless current that is harnessed by catalysts, which drive the four electron/hole fuel-forming water-splitting reaction under benign conditions and under 1 sun (100 mW/cm(2)) illumination. This Account describes the construction of an artificial leaf comprising earth-abundant elements by interfacing a triple junction, amorphous silicon photovoltaic with hydrogen- and oxygen-evolving catalysts made from a ternary alloy (NiMoZn) and a cobalt-phosphate cluster (Co-OEC), respectively. The latter captures the structural and functional attributes of the PSII-OEC. Similar to the PSII-OEC, the Co-OEC self-assembles upon oxidation of an earth-abundant metal ion from 2+ to 3+, may operate in natural water at room temperature, and is self-healing. The Co-OEC also activates H(2)O by a proton-coupled electron transfer mechanism in which the Co-OEC is increased by four hole equivalents akin to the S-state pumping of the Kok cycle of PSII. X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies have established that the Co-OEC is a structural relative of Mn(3)CaO(4)-Mn cubane of the PSII-OEC, where Co replaces Mn and the cubane is extended in a

  12. Detecting genes contributing to longevity using twin data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begun Alexander

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Searching for genes contributing to longevity is a typical task in association analysis. A number of methods can be used for finding this association -- from the simplest method based on the technique of contingency tables to more complex algorithms involving demographic data, which allow us to estimate the genotype-specific hazard functions. The independence of individuals is the common assumption in all these methods. At the same time, data on related individuals such as twins are often used in genetic studies. This paper proposes an extension of the relative risk model to encompass twin data. We estimate the power and also discuss what happens if we treat the twin data using the univariate model.

  13. Metabolic engineering of resveratrol and other longevity boosting compounds.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y; Chen, H; Yu, O

    2010-09-16

    Resveratrol, a compound commonly found in red wine, has attracted many attentions recently. It is a diphenolic natural product accumulated in grapes and a few other species under stress conditions. It possesses a special ability to increase the life span of eukaryotic organisms, ranging from yeast, to fruit fly, to obese mouse. The demand for resveratrol as a food and nutrition supplement has increased significantly in recent years. Extensive work has been carried out to increase the production of resveratrol in plants and microbes. In this review, we will discuss the biosynthetic pathway of resveratrol and engineering methods to heterologously express the pathway in various organisms. We will outline the shortcuts and limitations of common engineering efforts. We will also discuss briefly the features and engineering challenges of other longevity boosting compounds.

  14. Association of Vitamin D Receptor with Longevity and Healthy Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Ghaderpanahi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Longevity is a multifaceted trait in which variety of genes and environmental factors are involved. Newly, the role of vitamin D has been revived regarding its potential advantage on delaying the aging process. Vitamin D exerts its effect through vitamin D receptor (VDR. VDR-FokI is the only polymorphism which alters the VDR length. We examined the frequency of FokI genotypes in old age population as compared to young adults to determine the discerning genotype of FokI polymorphism leading to longer living. In addition, to highlight the position of FokІ polymorphism in quality of life; a cognitive function assessment was performed. 728 participants participated in this study of which 166 individuals were elderly residents of Kahrizak Charity Foundation. The rest were participants of Iranian Multicenter Osteoporosis Study (IMOS. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and VDR genotype was detected by the polymerase chain reaction. The participants in the elderly group underwent a cognitive function assessment. Cognitive function was measured with the mini mental state examination (MMSE. Data were analyzed by SPSS 16.5. The prevalence of ff genotype showed 48% decrease in elderly population as compared to young adults (P=0.06. In addition, F allele was over-represented in the elderly group as compared to controls (P=0.05. Also, “FF” participants of elderly group had higher MMSE as compared to “ff” genotype (18.16Vs17.12. Our data suggest that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in FokI may be possibly involved in longevity and cognitive function

  15. Mood, stress and longevity: convergence on ANK3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangaraju, S; Levey, D F; Nho, K; Jain, N; Andrews, K D; Le-Niculescu, H; Salomon, D R; Saykin, A J; Petrascheck, M; Niculescu, A B

    2016-08-01

    Antidepressants have been shown to improve longevity in C. elegans. It is plausible that orthologs of genes involved in mood regulation and stress response are involved in such an effect. We sought to understand the underlying biology. First, we analyzed the transcriptome from worms treated with the antidepressant mianserin, previously identified in a large-scale unbiased drug screen as promoting increased lifespan in worms. We identified the most robust treatment-related changes in gene expression, and identified the corresponding human orthologs. Our analysis uncovered a series of genes and biological pathways that may be at the interface between antidepressant effects and longevity, notably pathways involved in drug metabolism/degradation (nicotine and melatonin). Second, we examined which of these genes overlap with genes which may be involved in depressive symptoms in an aging non-psychiatric human population (n=3577), discovered using a genome-wide association study (GWAS) approach in a design with extremes of distribution of phenotype. Third, we used a convergent functional genomics (CFG) approach to prioritize these genes for relevance to mood disorders and stress. The top gene identified was ANK3. To validate our findings, we conducted genetic and gene-expression studies, in C. elegans and in humans. We studied C. elegans inactivating mutants for ANK3/unc-44, and show that they survive longer than wild-type, particularly in older worms, independently of mianserin treatment. We also show that some ANK3/unc-44 expression is necessary for the effects of mianserin on prolonging lifespan and survival in the face of oxidative stress, particularly in younger worms. Wild-type ANK3/unc-44 increases in expression with age in C. elegans, and is maintained at lower youthful levels by mianserin treatment. These lower levels may be optimal in terms of longevity, offering a favorable balance between sufficient oxidative stress resistance in younger worms and survival

  16. Longevity of Mass-Produced Bactrocera tryoni (Diptera: Tephritidae) Held Without Food or Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominiak, Bernard C; Sundaralingam, Selliah; Jiang, Laura; Nicol, Helen I

    2014-12-01

    The sterile insect technique is used to manage or control fruit flies throughout the world. The technique relies on large scale production before delivery to release managers. As part of the mass production phase, there are many quality control tests to demonstrate and maintain high quality pupae and flies. One highly desirable characteristic is adults with a long life so that these adults can reach sexual maturity and sterile males mate with wild fertile flies in the field and thus produce no viable offspring. Originally longevity was assessed allowing adults to have unlimited access to food and water. As quality and longevity increased, this methodology added significantly to workload and space demands and many facilities moved to testing longevity under stress where no food or water was provided. Here we examined >27,000 Queensland fruit fly Bactrocera tryoni (Froggatt) from 160 weekly production batches from July 2004 to October 2009 where flies were not provided food or water. The mean longevity was 54.4 ± SE hours. Longevity was significantly shorter from August to March, and the longevity was significantly longer in June. Longevity was not related to pupal weight, contrary to expectations. Weights were significantly lower in June and highest in summer. PMID:26470075

  17. Longevity and effectiveness of aluminum addition to reduce sediment phosphorus release and restore lake water quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huser, Brian J; Egemose, Sara; Harper, Harvey; Hupfer, Michael; Jensen, Henning; Pilgrim, Keith M; Reitzel, Kasper; Rydin, Emil; Futter, Martyn

    2016-06-15

    114 lakes treated with aluminum (Al) salts to reduce internal phosphorus (P) loading were analyzed to identify factors driving longevity of post-treatment water quality improvements. Lakes varied greatly in morphology, applied Al dose, and other factors that may have affected overall treatment effectiveness. Treatment longevity based on declines in epilimnetic total P (TP) concentration averaged 11 years for all lakes (range of 0-45 years). When longevity estimates were used for lakes with improved conditions through the end of measurements, average longevity increased to 15 years. Significant differences in treatment longevity between deeper, stratified lakes (mean 21 years) and shallow, polymictic lakes (mean 5.7 years) were detected, indicating factors related to lake morphology are important for treatment success. A decision tree developed using a partition model suggested Al dose, Osgood index (OI, a morphological index), and watershed to lake area ratio (related to hydraulic residence time, WA:LA) were the most important variables determining treatment longevity. Multiple linear regression showed that Al dose, WA:LA, and OI explained 47, 32 and 3% respectively of the variation in treatment longevity. Other variables (too data limited to include in the analysis) also appeared to be of importance, including sediment P content to Al dose ratios and the presence of benthic feeding fish in shallow, polymictic lakes. PMID:26250754

  18. Employing biomarkers of healthy ageing for leveraging genetic studies into human longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deelen, Joris; van den Akker, Erik B; Trompet, Stella; van Heemst, Diana; Mooijaart, Simon P; Slagboom, P Eline; Beekman, Marian

    2016-09-01

    Genetic studies have thus far identified a limited number of loci associated with human longevity by applying age at death or survival up to advanced ages as phenotype. As an alternative approach, one could first try to identify biomarkers of healthy ageing and the genetic variants associated with these traits and subsequently determine the association of these variants with human longevity. In the present study, we used this approach by testing whether the 35 baseline serum parameters measured in the Leiden Longevity Study (LLS) meet the proposed criteria for a biomarker of healthy ageing. The LLS consists of 421 families with long-lived siblings of European descent, who were recruited together with their offspring and the spouses of the offspring (controls). To test the four criteria for a biomarker of healthy ageing in the LLS, we determined the association of the serum parameters with chronological age, familial longevity, general practitioner-reported general health, and mortality. Out of the 35 serum parameters, we identified glucose, insulin, and triglycerides as biomarkers of healthy ageing, meeting all four criteria in the LLS. We subsequently showed that the genetic variants previously associated with these parameters are significantly enriched in the largest genome-wide association study for human longevity. In conclusion, we showed that biomarkers of healthy ageing can be used to leverage genetic studies into human longevity. We identified several genetic variants influencing the variation in glucose, insulin and triglycerides that contribute to human longevity. PMID:27374409

  19. Variation in floral longevity in the genus Leptosiphon: mating system consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, J J; Goodwillie, C

    2013-01-01

    Pollination or fertilisation trigger floral senescence in a wide range of flowering plants, and yet little attention has been given to the implications of this phenomenon to mating system evolution. We examined the effects of pollination on floral senescence in the genus Leptosiphon. Species in the genus exhibit a wide range of breeding systems. In all cases, compatible pollination induced senescence; emasculated flowers lived longer than hand-outcrossed flowers. In the self-compatible species, Leptosiphon acicularis and L. bicolor, and in one highly selfing population of L. jepsonii, unmanipulated flowers had reduced longevity compared to emasculated flowers, suggesting that autonomous self-pollination limits floral longevity in these species. Limited floral longevity in these highly selfing taxa may reduce opportunities for male outcross success, representing a possible source of selection on the mating system. In turn, the mating system might influence how selection acts on floral longevity; obligately outcrossing taxa are expected to benefit from longer floral longevities to maximise opportunities for pollination, while selfing taxa might benefit from earlier floral senescence to reduce resource expenditure. Overall, the longevity of unpollinated flowers increased with the level of outcrossing in the genus Leptosiphon. Our results taken together with those of a previous study and similar results in other species suggest that floral longevity may represent a largely unexamined role in mating system evolution. PMID:22607097

  20. The pursuit of longevity - the bringer of peace to the middle East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambler, Ilia

    2014-01-01

    Despite the common apprehensions regarding the aging population, this work aims to argue, on both deontological and utilitarian moral grounds, that any increase in general life-expectancy will be beneficial for the Middle East, countering the common fears associated with this increase. A set of ethical arguments concerning increasing longevity is presented, from both the deontological and utilitarian perspective. A wide selection of economic, psychological, demographic and epidemiological literature and databases is analyzed to determine common correlates of extended longevity. On the deontological grounds, the value of extended longevity is derived from the value of life preservation, regardless of its term. On the utilitarian grounds, the value of extended longevity is demonstrated by its correlation with further human values, such as education level and intellectual activity, economic prosperity, equality, solidarity and peacefulness. With the common apprehensions of stagnation and scarcity due to life extension found wanting, the pursuit of longevity by the population can be seen as a cross-cultural and cross-generational good. Though the current study mainly refers to sources and data relevant to the Middle East, a similar pro-longevity argument can be also made for other cultural contexts. In view of its numerous benefits, normatively, the goal of longevity should be set clearly and openly by the society, and actively pursued, or at least discussed, in academia, the political system and broader public. PMID:24852012

  1. Interactions between leaf nitrogen status and longevity in relation to N cycling in three contrasting European forest canopies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, L.; Ibrom, Andreas; Korhonen, J. F. J.;

    2013-01-01

    Seasonal and spatial variations in foliar nitrogen (N) parameters were investigated in three European forests with different tree species, viz. beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) growing in Denmark, the Netherlands a...... peak summer canopy N content and also returned the largest amount of N in foliage litter, suggesting that higher N fertility leads to increased turnover in the ecosystem N cycle with higher risks of losses such as leaching and gas emissions....

  2. Physiological responding to stress in middle-aged males enriched for longevity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Steffy W M; van Heemst, Diana; van der Grond, Jeroen;

    2016-01-01

    might be a more adaptive response to stress. To investigate this, male middle-aged offspring from long-lived families (n = 31) and male non-offspring (with no familial history of longevity) (n = 26) were randomly allocated to the Trier Social Stress Test or a control condition in an experimental design......Individuals enriched for familial longevity display a lower prevalence of age-related diseases, such as cardiovascular- and metabolic diseases. Since these diseases are associated with stress and increased cortisol levels, one of the underlying mechanisms that may contribute to healthy longevity...

  3. Human longevity is characterised by high thyroid stimulating hormone secretion without altered energy metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, S W; Akintola, A A; Roelfsema, F;

    2015-01-01

    hormone (TH) in an inverse relationship. Greater longevity has been associated with higher TSH and lower TH levels, but mechanisms underlying TSH/TH differences and longevity remain unknown. The HPT axis plays a pivotal role in growth, development and energy metabolism. We report that offspring of...... nonagenarians with at least one nonagenarian sibling have increased TSH secretion but similar bioactivity of TSH and similar TH levels compared to controls. Healthy offspring and spousal controls had similar resting metabolic rate and core body temperature. We propose that pleiotropic effects of the HPT axis...... may favour longevity without altering energy metabolism....

  4. Non-existence of Steady State Equilibrium in the Neoclassical Growth Model with a Longevity Trend

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Mikkel Nørlem

    declining mortality rates have received little attention. Furthermore, the economic literature on the consequences of changing longevity has relied almost entirely on analysis applying a once and for all change in the survival probability. This paper raises concern about such an approach of comparison of...... steady state equilibrium when considering the empirically observed trend in longevity. We extend a standard continuous time overlapping generations model by a longevity trend and are thereby able to study the properties of mortality-driven population growth. This turns out to be exceedingly complicated...

  5. Leaf Relative Water Content Estimated from Leaf Reflectance and Transmittance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderbilt, Vern; Daughtry, Craig; Dahlgren, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Remotely sensing the water status of plants and the water content of canopies remain long term goals of remote sensing research. In the research we report here, we used optical polarization techniques to monitor the light reflected from the leaf interior, R, as well as the leaf transmittance, T, as the relative water content (RWC) of corn (Zea mays) leaves decreased. Our results show that R and T both change nonlinearly. The result show that the nonlinearities cancel in the ratio R/T, which appears linearly related to RWC for RWC less than 90%. The results suggest that potentially leaf water status and perhaps even canopy water status could be monitored starting from leaf and canopy optical measurements.

  6. Regulation of Compound Leaf Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Wang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Leaf morphology is one of the most variable, yet inheritable, traits in the plant kingdom. How plants develop a variety of forms and shapes is a major biological question. Here, we discuss some recent progress in understanding the development of compound or dissected leaves in model species, such as tomato (Solanum lycopersicum, Cardamine hirsuta and Medicago truncatula, with an emphasis on recent discoveries in legumes. We also discuss progress in gene regulations and hormonal actions in compound leaf development. These studies facilitate our understanding of the underlying regulatory mechanisms and put forward a prospective in compound leaf studies.

  7. STATIC ANALYSIS OF LEAF SPRING

    OpenAIRE

    E VENUGOPAL GOUD; G HARINATH GOWD

    2012-01-01

    Leaf springs are special kind of springs used in automobile suspension systems. The advantage of leaf spring over helical spring is that the ends of the spring may be guided along a definite path as it deflects to act as a structural member in addition to energy absorbing device. The main function of leaf spring is not only tosupport vertical load but also to isolate road induced vibrations. It is subjected to millions of load cycles leading to fatigue failure. Static analysis determines the ...

  8. Endless paces of degeneration—applying comparative genomics to study evolution's moulding of longevity

    OpenAIRE

    de Magalhães, João Pedro; Kean, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Why do mice and humans have such different lifespans? Genome sequencing efforts are allowing researchers to pick apart the genetic foundations of longevity, with some promising results beginning to emerge.

  9. Human insulin/IGF-1 and familial longevity at middle age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozing, Maarten P.; Westendorp, Rudi G.J.; Frölich, Marijke; de Craen, Anton J.M.; Beekman, Marian; Heijmans, Bastiaan T.; Mooijaart, Simon P.; Blauw, Gerard-Jan; Slagboom, P. Eline; van Heemst, Diana; Group, on behalf of the Leiden Longevity Study (LLS)

    2009-01-01

    Recently, we have shown that compared to controls, long-lived familial nonagenarians (mean age: 93.4 years) from the Leiden Longevity Study displayed a lower mortality rate, and their middle-aged offspring displayed a lower prevalence of cardio-metabolic diseases, including diabetes mellitus. The evolutionarily conserved insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS) pathway has been implicated in longevity in model organisms, but its relevance for human longevity has generated much controversy. Here, we show that compared to their partners, the offspring of familial nonagenarians displayed similar non-fasted serum levels of IGF-1, IGFBP3 and insulin but lower non-fasted serum levels of glucose, indicating that familial longevity is associated with differences in insulin sensitivity. PMID:20157552

  10. Immunochip analysis identifies association of the RAD50/IL13 region with human longevity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flachsbart, Friederike; Ellinghaus, David; Gentschew, Liljana;

    2016-01-01

    -wide significant signal (PI mmunochip = 7.01 × 10(-9) ) for the SNP rs2075650 in the TOMM40/APOE region, which has been previously described in the context of human longevity. To identify novel susceptibility loci, we selected 15 markers with PI mmunochip < 5 × 10(-4) for replication in two samples from France......Human longevity is characterized by a remarkable lack of confirmed genetic associations. Here, we report on the identification of a novel locus for longevity in the RAD50/IL13 region on chromosome 5q31.1 using a combined European sample of 3208 long-lived individuals (LLI) and 8919 younger controls...... seems a plausible longevity candidate due to its involvement in DNA repair and inflammation. Further studies are needed to identify the functional variant(s) that predispose(s) to a long and healthy life....

  11. Effect of Plant Growth Regulators on Leaf Number, Leaf Area and Leaf Dry Matter in Grape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahoor Ahmad BHAT

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Influence of phenylureas (CPPU and brassinosteriod (BR along with GA (gibberellic acid were studied on seedless grape vegetative characteristics like leaf number, leaf area and leaf dry matter. Growth regulators were sprayed on the vines either once (7 days after fruit set or 15 days after fruit set or twice (7+15 days after fruit set. CPPU 2 ppm+BR 0.4 ppm+GA 25 ppm produced maximum number of leaves (18.78 while as untreated vines produced least leaf number (16.22 per shoot. Maximum leaf area (129.70 cm2 and dry matter content (26.51% was obtained with higher CPPU (3 ppm and BR (0.4 ppm combination along with GA 25 ppm. Plant growth regulators whether naturally derived or synthetic are used to improve the productivity and quality of grapes. The relatively high value of grapes justifies more expensive inputs. A relatively small improvement in yield or fruit quality can justify the field application of a very costly product. Application of new generation growth regulators like brassinosteroids and phenylureas like CPPU have been reported to increase the leaf number as well as leaf area and dry matter thereby indirectly influencing the fruit yield and quality in grapes.

  12. No association between microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) haplotype and longevity in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Nebel, Almut; Croucher, Peter J. P.; Stiegeler, Rieke; Nikolaus, Susanna; Krawczak, Michael; Schreiber, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    Human longevity is a multifactorial condition with a significant genetic contribution. A recent association study in two independent samples of long-lived U.S. Caucasians [long-lived individuals (LLI)] identified a SNP haplotype of the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP, 4q25) that was underrepresented among LLI when compared with younger controls. This suggested that variation in the MTP gene might modify human longevity. Because of its function in lipid metabolism, the MTP gene p...

  13. The common germline Arg72Pro polymorphism of p53 and increased longevity in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojesen, S.E.; Nordestgaard, Børge

    2008-01-01

    Arg72Pro substitution in the p53 protein has important influence on cell death via increased apoptosis. Thus, the increased longevity may be due to a generally increased robustness after a diagnosis of any life-threatening disease. In contrast to widespread skepticism on the importance of SNPs in...... humans, this gain-of-function p53 SNP of importance for cell repair mechanisms has a profound influence on longevity Udgivelsesdato: 2008/1/15...

  14. Sperm fractions obtained following density gradient centrifugation in human ejaculates show differences in sperm DNA longevity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Gosálvez

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: 1 Unnecessary incubation of spermatozoa prior to artificial insemination or in vitro fertilization, should be avoided, since sperm DNA longevity is significantly reduced after ex vivo sperm handling and 2 Although sperm selection by DCG significantly reduces the baseline levels of SDF of sperm in Fraction 3, sperm DNA longevity in this fraction was ultimately lower following 24 h incubation when compared to sperm recovered from non-centrifuged NSS.

  15. Cloning approaches for identifying aging and longevity-related genes in mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Simoes, Davina C.; Gonos, Efstathios S.

    2008-01-01

    Aging is a phenomenon that affects nearly all animal species. Several studies using different systems have identified a number of processes thought to contribute to the aging phenotype. Many differentially expressed genes have been implicated, but the mechanisms governing mammalian aging (and longevity) are not yet fully understood, and the list of concerned genes is still incomplete and fragmented. Different approaches have been used to clone aging and longevity-related genes. In this articl...

  16. Phenotypic plasticity and longevity in plants and animals: cause and effect?

    OpenAIRE

    Borges, Renee M

    2009-01-01

    Immobile plants and immobile modular animals outlive unitary animals. This paper discusses competing but not necessarily mutually exclusive theories to explain this extreme longevity, especially from the perspective of phenotypic plasticity. Stem cell immortality, vascular autonomy, and epicormic branching are some important features of the phenotypic plasticity of plants that contribute to their longevity. Monocarpy versus polycarpy can also influence the kind of senescent processes experien...

  17. Cardiovascular Diseases, Aging and the Gender Gap in the Human Longevity

    OpenAIRE

    Aviv, Abraham

    2007-01-01

    This brief communication probes into the biological meaning of the gender gap in longevity and its possible ramifications to the expression of cardiovascular diseases in humans. It addresses the potential role of the estrogen and the X chromosome in the longer life span of women than men in modern societies. In addition, it links features of the reproductive and post-reproductive periods with cardiovascular diseases and longevity in women.

  18. Differences in productive robustness in rabbits selected for reproductive longevity or litter size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilgaard, R; Baselga, M; Blas, E;

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the ability of a line selected for reproductive longevity (LP) to confront productive challenges compared to a line selected during 31 generations for litter size at weaning (V). A total of 133 reproductive rabbit does were used (72 and 61 from LP and V lines.......05). These results show that the rabbit line selected for reproductive longevity is more robust with respect to coping with productive challenges, than a line selected for reproductive intensity....

  19. Effects of intraspecific larval competition on adult longevity in the mosquitoes Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus

    OpenAIRE

    Reiskind, M.H.; Lounibos, L. P.

    2009-01-01

    Larval competition is common in container-breeding mosquitoes. The impact of competition on larval growth has been thoroughly examined and findings that larval competition can lead to density-dependent effects on adult body size have been documented. The effects of larval competition on adult longevity have been less well explored. The effects of intraspecific larval densities on the longevity of adults maintained under relatively harsh environmental conditions were tested in the laboratory b...

  20. The Impacts of Tourism in A Chinese Longevity Area -the case of Bama Village

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Dong Xing

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This research reflects the issues of tourism development in Bama-a longevity area in China. It focuses on examining three research questions: the tourist motivation, the stakeholders’ attitudes about tourism development and the managerial problems of the destination. Especially, it deeply discusses the negative impacts of tourism development on the natural environment and socio-culture elements what the longevity phenomena rest on in this region. Qualitative research methods...

  1. Efficacy of Dietary Behavior Modification for Preserving Cardiovascular Health and Longevity

    OpenAIRE

    Moira McAllister Pryde; William Bernard Kannel

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and its predisposing risk factors are major lifestyle and behavioral determinants of longevity. Dietary lifestyle choices such as a heart healthy diet, regular exercise, a lean weight, moderate alcohol consumption, and smoking cessation have been shown to substantially reduce CVD and increase longevity. Recent research has shown that men and women who adhere to this lifestyle can substantially reduce their risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). The preventive bene...

  2. Cell Life Versus Cell Longevity: The Mysteries Surrounding the NAD+ Precursor Nicotinamide

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Faqi; Chong, Zhao Zhong; Maiese, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    Nicotinamide, the amide form of niacin (vitamin B3), is the precursor for the coenzyme β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) and plays a significant role during the enhancement of cell survival as well as cell longevity. Yet, these abilities of nicotinamide appear to be diametrically opposed. Here we describe the development of nicotinamide as a novel agent that is critical for modulating cellular metabolism, plasticity, longevity, and inflammatory microglial function as well as for infl...

  3. Uncoupling of longevity and paraquat resistance in mutants of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Michihiko; Tanaka, Nanae; Miki, Kensuke; Hossain, Mohammad Nazir; Endoh, Morio; Ayusawa, Dai

    2005-10-01

    To analyze the relationship between resistance to oxidative stress and longevity, we isolated three novel paraquat-resistant mutants, mev-5, mev-6, and mev-7, from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. They all showed the Dyf (defective in dye filling) phenotype, but not always resistance to heat or UV. Life-span extension was observed only in the mev-5 mutant at 26 degrees C. These results indicate that longevity is uncoupled with the phenotype of paraquat resistance. PMID:16244463

  4. Human longevity at the cost of reproductive success : evidence from global data

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, F; Teriokhin, A T; Renaud, F.; de Meeûs, T.; Guégan, Jean-François

    2000-01-01

    A trade-off between reproduction and somatic maintenance and hence survival is fundamental to life-history theory. We investigated the relationship between female fecundity and longevity in #Homo sapiens$ using data from 153 countries located all over the world. The raw correlation betwen life span and fecundity was highly significant with a negative trend. After longevity and fecundity estimates were controlled for by confounding factors such as historical (i.e. human ethnic groups), religio...

  5. 7 CFR 29.3033 - Leaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip form, shall describe the divided... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf. 29.3033 Section 29.3033 Agriculture Regulations... Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS...

  6. 7 CFR 29.3036 - Leaf surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Leaf surface. The smoothness or roughness of the web or lamina of a tobacco leaf. Leaf surface is... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf surface. 29.3036 Section 29.3036 Agriculture... Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS...

  7. 7 CFR 29.3525 - Leaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Type 95) § 29.3525 Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip form, shall... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf. 29.3525 Section 29.3525 Agriculture Regulations... Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS...

  8. 7 CFR 29.1028 - Leaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Type 92) § 29.1028 Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip form, shall... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf. 29.1028 Section 29.1028 Agriculture Regulations... Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS...

  9. Genetics of Ophraella leaf beetles

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This proposal is to collect samples of each species of Ophraella leaf beetle encountered, not to exceed 50 specimens per species, for genetic analysis using DNA...

  10. Agave Americana Leaf Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Hulle

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The growing environmental problems, the problem of waste disposal and the depletion of non-renewable resources have stimulated the use of green materials compatible with the environment to reduce environmental impacts. Therefore, there is a need to design products by using natural resources. Natural fibers seem to be a good alternative since they are abundantly available and there are a number of possibilities to use all the components of a fiber-yielding crop; one such fiber-yielding plant is Agave Americana. The leaves of this plant yield fibers and all the parts of this plant can be utilized in many applications. The “zero-waste” utilization of the plant would enable its production and processing to be translated into a viable and sustainable industry. Agave Americana fibers are characterized by low density, high tenacity and high moisture absorbency in comparison with other leaf fibers. These fibers are long and biodegradable. Therefore, we can look this fiber as a sustainable resource for manufacturing and technical applications. Detailed discussion is carried out on extraction, characterization and applications of Agave Americana fiber in this paper.

  11. Why do leaf-tying caterpillars abandon their leaf ties?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Sliwinski

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Leaf-tying caterpillars act as ecosystem engineers by building shelters between overlapping leaves, which are inhabited by other arthropods. Leaf-tiers have been observed to leave their ties and create new shelters (and thus additional microhabitats, but the ecological factors affecting shelter fidelity are poorly known. For this study, we explored the effects of resource limitation and occupant density on shelter fidelity and assessed the consequences of shelter abandonment. We first quantified the area of leaf material required for a caterpillar to fully develop for two of the most common leaf-tiers that feed on white oak, Quercus alba. On average, Psilocorsis spp. caterpillars consumed 21.65 ± 0.67 cm2 leaf material to complete development. We also measured the area of natural leaf ties found in a Maryland forest, to determine the distribution of resources available to caterpillars in situ. Of 158 natural leaf ties examined, 47% were too small to sustain an average Psilocorsis spp. caterpillar for the entirety of its development. We also manipulated caterpillar densities within experimental ties on potted trees to determine the effects of cohabitants on the likelihood of a caterpillar to leave its tie. We placed 1, 2, or 4 caterpillars in ties of a standard size and monitored the caterpillars twice daily to track their movement. In ties with more than one occupant, caterpillars showed a significantly greater propensity to leave their tie, and left sooner and at a faster rate than those in ties as single occupants. To understand the consequences of leaf tie abandonment, we observed caterpillars searching a tree for a site to build a shelter in the field. This is a risky behavior, as 17% of the caterpillars observed died while searching for a shelter site. Caterpillars that successfully built a shelter traveled 110 ± 20 cm and took 28 ± 7 min to find a suitable site to build a shelter. In conclusion, leaf-tying caterpillars must frequently

  12. What determines a leaf's shape?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dkhar, Jeremy; Pareek, Ashwani

    2014-01-01

    The independent origin and evolution of leaves as small, simple microphylls or larger, more complex megaphylls in plants has shaped and influenced the natural composition of the environment. Significant contributions have come from megaphyllous leaves, characterized usually as flat, thin lamina entrenched with photosynthetic organelles and stomata, which serve as the basis of primary productivity. During the course of evolution, the megaphylls have attained complexity not only in size or venation patterns but also in shape. This has fascinated scientists worldwide, and research has progressed tremendously in understanding the concept of leaf shape determination. Here, we review these studies and discuss the various factors that contributed towards shaping the leaf; initiated as a small bulge on the periphery of the shoot apical meristem (SAM) followed by asymmetric outgrowth, expansion and maturation until final shape is achieved. We found that the underlying factors governing these processes are inherently genetic: PIN1 and KNOX1 are indicators of leaf initiation, HD-ZIPIII, KANADI, and YABBY specify leaf outgrowth while ANGUSTIFOLIA3 and GROWTH-REGULATING FACTOR5 control leaf expansion and maturation; besides, recent research has identified new players such as APUM23, known to specify leaf polarity. In addition to genetic control, environmental factors also play an important role during the final adjustment of leaf shape. This immense amount of information available will serve as the basis for studying and understanding innovative leaf morphologies viz. the pitchers of the carnivorous plant Nepenthes which have evolved to provide additional support to the plant survival in its nutrient-deficient habitat. In hindsight, formation of the pitcher tube in Nepenthes might involve the recruitment of similar genetic mechanisms that occur during sympetaly in Petunia. PMID:25584185

  13. Survivorship and longevity of Diamesa mendotae Muttkowski (Diptera: Chironomidae under snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Anderson

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Diamesa mendotae Muttkowski commonly grow and emerge from groundwater dominated streams in winter. Previous estimates of longevity for adults of D. mendotae collected from the snow surface averaged 18.6 days post-collection, with 76.9% of individuals dying between Day 10 and Day 30 post-collection and 4.4% surviving over 40 days. Maximum longevities for males and females were 48 and 54 days, respectively. In this paper, we report survivorship and longevity of fieldcollected adults of D. mendotae kept at ambient snow temperature conditions. Adults (n=140 were collected in February from snow along groundwater-dominated sections of the Kinnickinnic River (Wisconsin, USA. All individuals were placed in vials, buried in snow, and retrieved in batches of 10 males and 10 females at 4-day intervals for 28 days. Once retrieved, adults were maintained at 6°C in controlled environmental chambers to determine survivorship and longevity. All individuals survived snow burial treatment, indicating they are capable of surviving sub-freezing field conditions for at least 28 days. Estimates of adult maximum longevity were as high as 66 days, higher than previous estimates for this genus. Our results suggest adults of D. mendotae can persist under snow cover, with high survivorship and longevity, potentially increasing their probability of successful reproduction in regions where lethal winter air temperatures occur.

  14. Evolution of longevity, age at last birth and sexual conflict with grandmothering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Matthew H; Hawkes, Kristen; Kim, Peter S

    2016-03-21

    We use a two-sex partial differential equation (PDE) model based on the Grandmother hypothesis. We build on an earlier model by Kim et al. (2014) by allowing for evolution in both longevity and age at last birth, and also assuming that post-fertile females support only their daughters' fertility. Similarly to Kim et al. (2014), we find that only two locally stable equilibria exist: one corresponding to great ape-like longevities and the other corresponding to hunter-gatherer longevities. Our results show that grandmothering enables the transition between these two equilibria, without extending the end of fertility. Moreover, sensitivity analyses of the model show that male competition, arising from a skew in the mating sex ratio towards males, plays a significant role in determining whether the transition from great ape-like longevities to higher longevities is possible and the equilibrium value of the average adult lifespan. Whereas grandmothering effects have a significant impact on the equilibrium value of the average age at last birth and enable the transition to higher longevities, they have an insignificant impact on the equilibrium value of the average adult lifespan. PMID:26796225

  15. Genome-Wide Scan Informed by Age-Related Disease Identifies Loci for Exceptional Human Longevity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, Kristen; Dobriban, Edgar; Garagnani, Paolo; Pirazzini, Chiara; Monti, Daniela; Mari, Daniela; Atzmon, Gil; Barzilai, Nir; Franceschi, Claudio; Owen, Art B.; Kim, Stuart K.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a new statistical framework to find genetic variants associated with extreme longevity. The method, informed GWAS (iGWAS), takes advantage of knowledge from large studies of age-related disease in order to narrow the search for SNPs associated with longevity. To gain support for our approach, we first show there is an overlap between loci involved in disease and loci associated with extreme longevity. These results indicate that several disease variants may be depleted in centenarians versus the general population. Next, we used iGWAS to harness information from 14 meta-analyses of disease and trait GWAS to identify longevity loci in two studies of long-lived humans. In a standard GWAS analysis, only one locus in these studies is significant (APOE/TOMM40) when controlling the false discovery rate (FDR) at 10%. With iGWAS, we identify eight genetic loci to associate significantly with exceptional human longevity at FDR age-related diseases and traits, including coronary artery disease and Alzheimer’s disease. iGWAS provides a new analytical strategy for uncovering SNPs that influence extreme longevity, and can be applied more broadly to boost power in other studies of complex phenotypes. PMID:26677855

  16. Longevity and effectiveness of aluminum addition to reduce sediment phosphorus release and restore lake water quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huser, Brian J; Egemose, Sara; Harper, Harvey;

    2016-01-01

    114 lakes treated with aluminum (Al) salts to reduce internal phosphorus (P) loading were analyzed to identify factors driving longevity of post-treatment water quality improvements. Lakes varied greatly in morphology, applied Al dose, and other factors that may have affected overall treatment ef...... longevity. Other variables (too data limited to include in the analysis) also appeared to be of importance, including sediment P content to Al dose ratios and the presence of benthic feeding fish in shallow, polymictic lakes.......114 lakes treated with aluminum (Al) salts to reduce internal phosphorus (P) loading were analyzed to identify factors driving longevity of post-treatment water quality improvements. Lakes varied greatly in morphology, applied Al dose, and other factors that may have affected overall treatment...... effectiveness. Treatment longevity based on declines in epilimnetic total P (TP) concentration averaged 11 years for all lakes (range of 0-45 years). When longevity estimates were used for lakes with improved conditions through the end of measurements, average longevity increased to 15 years. Significant...

  17. Increasing leaf hydraulic conductance with transpiration rate minimizes the water potential drawdown from stem to leaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonin, Kevin A; Burns, Emily; Choat, Brendan; Barbour, Margaret M; Dawson, Todd E; Franks, Peter J

    2015-03-01

    Leaf hydraulic conductance (k leaf) is a central element in the regulation of leaf water balance but the properties of k leaf remain uncertain. Here, the evidence for the following two models for k leaf in well-hydrated plants is evaluated: (i) k leaf is constant or (ii) k leaf increases as transpiration rate (E) increases. The difference between stem and leaf water potential (ΔΨstem-leaf), stomatal conductance (g s), k leaf, and E over a diurnal cycle for three angiosperm and gymnosperm tree species growing in a common garden, and for Helianthus annuus plants grown under sub-ambient, ambient, and elevated atmospheric CO₂ concentration were evaluated. Results show that for well-watered plants k leaf is positively dependent on E. Here, this property is termed the dynamic conductance, k leaf(E), which incorporates the inherent k leaf at zero E, which is distinguished as the static conductance, k leaf(0). Growth under different CO₂ concentrations maintained the same relationship between k leaf and E, resulting in similar k leaf(0), while operating along different regions of the curve owing to the influence of CO₂ on g s. The positive relationship between k leaf and E minimized variation in ΔΨstem-leaf. This enables leaves to minimize variation in Ψleaf and maximize g s and CO₂ assimilation rate over the diurnal course of evaporative demand. PMID:25547915

  18. Patterns of Stem Cell Divisions Contribute to Plant Longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burian, Agata; Barbier de Reuille, Pierre; Kuhlemeier, Cris

    2016-06-01

    The lifespan of plants ranges from a few weeks in annuals to thousands of years in trees. It is hard to explain such extreme longevity considering that DNA replication errors inevitably cause mutations. Without purging through meiotic recombination, the accumulation of somatic mutations will eventually result in mutational meltdown, a phenomenon known as Muller's ratchet. Nevertheless, the lifespan of trees is limited more often by incidental disease or structural damage than by genetic aging. The key determinants of tree architecture are the axillary meristems, which form in the axils of leaves and grow out to form branches. The number of branches is low in annual plants, but in perennial plants iterative branching can result in thousands of terminal branches. Here, we use stem cell ablation and quantitative cell-lineage analysis to show that axillary meristems are set aside early, analogous to the metazoan germline. While neighboring cells divide vigorously, axillary meristem precursors maintain a quiescent state, with only 7-9 cell divisions occurring between the apical and axillary meristem. During iterative branching, the number of branches increases exponentially, while the number of cell divisions increases linearly. Moreover, computational modeling shows that stem cell arrangement and positioning of axillary meristems distribute somatic mutations around the main shoot, preventing their fixation and maximizing genetic heterogeneity. These features slow down Muller's ratchet and thereby extend lifespan. PMID:27161504

  19. The energy trade-off between growth and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Chen

    2013-09-01

    Understanding the trade-offs between organisms' life history traits has been a major goal of physiology, ecology and evolution. In the last few decades, two types of intra-specific studies have highlighted the trade-off between growth and longevity. First, diet restriction (DR), as an environmental intervention, has been shown to suppress growth and extend the lifespan of a broad range of animals. Second, genetic studies have also shown that mice, whose growth hormone function is genetically modified (GM), grow slower and live longer than their wild-type siblings. Despite a wealth of empirical data, still largely missing is a theoretical framework that specifies and makes quantitative predictions on this trade-off. Here, I present a mechanistic model based on the principles of energy conservation. The model quantifies explicitly how DR and GM alter the animal's energy budget, and channel metabolic energy to somatic maintenance by suppressing growth, thereby extending lifespan. Data from a diverse set of empirical studies on small rodents supports the predictions of the model. More importantly, the model reveals that although DR and GM are two different methods to extend lifespan, i.e., environmental vs. genetic, the underlying mechanisms of them are the same from the energetic viewpoint. PMID:23872259

  20. Contribution of adipose tissue to health span and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Derek M; Barzilai, Nir

    2010-01-01

    Adipose tissue accounts for approximately 20% (lean) to >50% (in extreme obesity) of body mass and is biologically active through its secretion of numerous peptides and release and storage of nutrients such as free fatty acids. Studies in rodents and humans have revealed that body fat distribution, including visceral fat (VF), subcutaneous (SC) fat and ectopic fat are critical for determining the risk posed by obesity. Specific depletion or expansion of the VF depot using genetic or surgical strategies in animal models has proven to have direct effects on metabolic characteristics and disease risk. In humans, there is compelling evidence that abdominal obesity most strongly predicts mortality risk, while in rats, surgical removal of VF improves mean and maximum life span. There is also growing evidence that fat deposition in ectopic depots such as skeletal muscle and liver can cause lipotoxicity and impair insulin action. Conversely, expansion of SC adipose tissue may confer protection from metabolic derangements by serving as a 'metabolic sink' to limit both systemic lipids and the accrual of visceral and ectopic fat. Treatments targeting the prevention of fat accrual in these harmful depots should be considered as a primary target for improving human health span and longevity. PMID:20703052

  1. Gamma thermometer longevity test: Laguna Verde 2 instruments recent performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuevas V, G. [Global Nuclear Fuel, Americas, 3901 Castle Hayne Road, Wilmington, North Carolina (United States); Avila N, A.; Calleros M, G., E-mail: Gabriel.Cuevas-Vivas@gnf.com [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nucleoelectrica Laguna Verda, Carretera Veracruz-Nautla Km 42.5, Alto Lucero, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    This paper is informative of the General Electric Hitachi and Global Nuclear Fuel - Americas are collaboration with Comision Federal de Electricidad in a longevity test of thermocouples as power monitoring devices. The test conclusions will serve for final engineering design in detailing the Automated Fixed In-core Probes for calibration of the Local Power Range Monitors (LPRMs) of the Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor. This paper introduces the collaboration description and some recent performance evaluation of the thermocouples that are sensitive to gamma radiation and are known generically as Gamma Thermometers (G T). The G Ts in Laguna Verde 2 are radially located inside six instrumentation tubes in the core and consist of seven thermocouples, four are aligned with the LPRM heights and three are axially located between LPRM heights. The Laguna Verde 2 G T test has become the longest test of thermocouples as power monitoring devices in a BWR industry history and confirms their reliability in terms of time-dependent small noise under steady state reactor conditions and good agreement against Traversing In-core Probes power measurements. (Author)

  2. Membrane lipid unsaturation as physiological adaptation to animal longevity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ReinaldPamplona

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The appearance of oxygen in the terrestrial atmosphere represented an important selective pressure for ancestral living organisms and contributed toward setting up the pace of evolutionary changes in structural and functional systems. The evolution of using oxygen for efficient energy production served as a driving force for the evolution of complex organisms. The redox reactions associated with its use were, however, responsible for the production of reactive species (derived from oxygen and lipids with damaging effects due to oxidative chemical modifications of essential cellular components. Consequently, aerobic life required the emergence and selection of antioxidant defense systems. As a result, a high diversity in molecular and structural antioxidant defenses evolved. In the following paragraphs, we analyze the adaptation of biological membranes as a dynamic structural defense against reactive species evolved by animals. In particular, our goal is to describe the physiological mechanisms underlying the structural adaptation of cellular membranes to oxidative stress and to explain the meaning of this adaptive mechanism, and to review the state of the art about the link between membrane composition and longevity of animal species.

  3. The ins and outs of aging and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rando, Thomas A

    2013-01-01

    As a nod to the oft-quoted evolutionary theorist George Williams, "It is remarkable that after a seemingly miraculous feat of morphogenesis, a complex metazoan should be unable to perform the much simpler task of merely maintaining what is already formed". How and why we age are mysteries of the ages. The "how" of this mystery is the purview of experimental biologists who try to understand the basic processes that lead to system maintenance failure-from the level of molecules to that of entire organisms-that we term "aging". The "why" of this mystery is the purview of evolutionary theorists whose ideas shape the questions that biogerontologists pose, on the basis of the premise put forth by another preeminent geneticist and evolutionary biologist, Theodosius Dobzhansky, that "[n]othing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution". These experimental and evolutionary perspectives converge in the modern science of aging, and its curious cousin "longevity", in an attempt to unify extensive findings from diverse areas of biology. PMID:23398156

  4. Movement and longevity of imperiled Okaloosa Darters (Etheostoma okaloosae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Daniel E.; Jelks, Howard L.; Jordan, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Movement and longevity studies inform management and conservation plans for imperiled organisms. We used a mark–recapture study to reveal information about these key biological characteristics for imperiled Okaloosa Darters (Etheostoma okaloosae). Okaloosa Darters were captured from 20 m reaches at six separate streams, marked with VIE on the left or right dorsum according to the side of the stream from which they were captured, and released on the same side where they were captured. Okaloosa Darters were recounted (but not recaptured) at 24 h and one month, and then recaptured once per year for the following eight years. During the final recapture year, we measured standard length of all Okaloosa Darters and constructed length frequency distributions to identify distinct cohorts. We found that significant numbers of Okaloosa Darters remained within their 20 m reaches after 24 h (31%), one month (45%), and one year (22%) and rarely crossed open, sandy stream channels from one side to the other. Our recapture data and length frequency distributions indicate that Okaloosa Darters live longer than the 2–3 years suggested by previous authors. One of our recaptured fish was at least eight years old, making Okaloosa Darters the most long-lived etheostomine.

  5. Estimated longevity of performance of Portland cement grout seal materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sealing of boreholes, fractures and underground workings of repositories is a common concern for all programs investigating the deep burial of nuclear waste as a disposal mechanism. Two grouting materials, bentonite and portland cement, have been identified by many programs as likely candidate seal materials. The longevity of performance of both of these materials is currently being investigated under the auspices of the Stripa Project. These investigations comprise coordinated laboratory, field and modeling studies to produce fundamental data, practical experience and estimates of long-range performance, respectively. Long-term performance is an especially sensitive issue for cement because the phases that comprise cement are metastable. Accordingly, it may be assumed that cement grout performance will degrade with time. For a simplified cement system, two mechanisms for chemical degradation have been considered: phase change and dissolution. When considering dissolution, both equilibrium (slow flow) and open (fast flow) systems have been analyzed to establish bounds. Granitic terrain groundwaters ranging from fresh to saline have been taken as solvents. To assess the consequences in terms of flow, an empirical relation between cement permeability and porosity has been developed. Predictions of performance changes with time have been produced by making conservative estimates of local hydraulic head conditions for various periods of repository history. For the crystalline rock environments considered, preliminary results indicate that cement grout performance may be acceptable for tens of thousands to millions of years providing its initial hydraulic conductivity is on the order of 10-12 m/s

  6. Theoretical investigations of grout seal longevity - Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical investigations into the longevity of repository seals have dealt primarily with the development of a methodology to evaluate interactions between portland cement-based grout and groundwater. Evaluation of chemical thermodynamic equilibria between grout and groundwater, and among grout, groundwater, and granitic host rock phases using the geochemical codes EQ3NR/EQ6 suggests that a fracture filled with grout and saturated with groundwater will tend to fill and 'tighten' with time. Results of these investigations suggest that cement grout seals will maintain an acceptable level of performance for tens of thousands to millions of years, provided the repository is sited where groundwater chemistry is compatible with the seals and hydrologic gradients are low. The results of the grout: groundwater: rock calculations suggest that buffering of the fracture seals chemical systems by the granite rock may be important in determining the long-term fate of grout seals and the resulting phase assemblage in the fracture. The similarity of the modelled reaction products to those observed in naturally filled fractures suggests that with time equilibrium will be approached and grouted fractures subject to low hydrologic gradients will continue to seal. If grout injected into fractures materially reduces groundwater flux, the approach to chemical equilibrium will likely be accelerated. In light of this, even very thin or imperfectly grouted fractures would tighten in suitable hydrogeologic environments. (29 refs.) (au)

  7. COMMUNICATION: Minocycline increases quality and longevity of chronic neural recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennaker, R. L.; Miller, J.; Tang, H.; Wilson, D. A.

    2007-06-01

    Brain/machine interfaces could potentially be used in the treatment of a host of neurological disorders ranging from paralysis to sensory deficits. Insertion of chronic micro-electrode arrays into neural tissue initiates a host of immunological responses, which typically leads to the formation of a cellular sheath around the implant, resulting in the loss of useful signals. Minocycline has been shown to have neuroprotective and neurorestorative effects in certain neural injury and neurodegenerative disease models. This study examined the effects of minocycline administration on the quality and longevity of chronic multi-channel microwire neural implants 1 week and 1 month post-implantation in auditory cortex. The mean signal-to-noise ratio for the minocycline group stabilized at the end of week 1 and remained above 4.6 throughout the following 3 weeks. The control group signal-to-noise ratio dropped throughout the duration of the study and at the end of 4 weeks was 2.6. Furthermore, 68% of electrodes from the minocycline group showed significant stimulus-driven activity at week 4 compared to 12.5% of electrodes in the control group. There was a significant reduction in the number of activated astrocytes around the implant in minocycline subjects, as well as a reduction in total area occupied by activated astrocytes at 1 and 4 weeks.

  8. Skeletal muscle as a regulator of the longevity protein, Klotho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith G Avin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Klotho is a powerful longevity protein that has been linked to the prevention of muscle atrophy, osteopenia, and cardiovascular disease. Similar anti-aging effects have also been ascribed to exercise and physical activity. While an association between muscle function and klotho expression has been previously suggested from longitudinal cohort studies, a direct relationship between circulating klotho and skeletal muscle has not been investigated. In this paper, we present a review of the literature and preliminary evidence that, together, suggests klotho expression may be modulated by skeletal muscle activity. Our pilot clinical findings performed in young and aged individuals suggest that circulating klotho levels are upregulated in response to an acute exercise bout, but that the response may be dependent on fitness level. A similar upregulation of circulating klotho is also observed in response to an acute exercise in young and old mice, suggesting this may be a good model for mechanistically probing the role of physical activity on klotho expression. Finally, we highlight overlapping signaling pathways that are modulated by both klotho and skeletal muscle and propose potential mechanisms for cross-talk between the two. It is hoped that this review will stimulate further consideration of the relationship between skeletal muscle activity and klotho expression, potentially leading to important insights into the well-documented systemic anti-aging effects of exercise.

  9. Variation in male reproductive longevity across traditional societies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucio Vinicius

    Full Text Available Most accounts of human life history propose that women have short reproductive spans relative to their adult lifespans, while men not only remain fertile but carry on reproducing until late life. Here we argue that studies have overlooked evidence for variation in male reproductive ageing across human populations. We apply a Bayesian approach to census data from Agta hunter-gatherers and Gambian farmers to show that long post-reproductive lifespans characterise not only women but also males in some traditional human populations. We calculate three indices of reproductive ageing in men (oldest age at reproduction, male late-life reproduction, and post-reproductive representation and identify a continuum of male reproductive longevity across eight traditional societies ranging from !Kung, Hadza and Agta hunter-gatherers exhibiting low levels of polygyny, early age at last reproduction and long post-reproductive lifespans, to male Gambian agriculturalists and Turkana pastoralists showing higher levels of polygyny, late-life reproduction and shorter post-reproductive lifespans. We conclude that the uniquely human detachment between rates of somatic senescence and reproductive decline, and the existence of post-reproductive lifespans, are features of both male and female life histories, and therefore not exclusive consequences of menopause.

  10. Gamma thermometer longevity test: Laguna Verde 2 instruments recent performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is informative of the General Electric Hitachi and Global Nuclear Fuel - Americas are collaboration with Comision Federal de Electricidad in a longevity test of thermocouples as power monitoring devices. The test conclusions will serve for final engineering design in detailing the Automated Fixed In-core Probes for calibration of the Local Power Range Monitors (LPRMs) of the Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor. This paper introduces the collaboration description and some recent performance evaluation of the thermocouples that are sensitive to gamma radiation and are known generically as Gamma Thermometers (G T). The G Ts in Laguna Verde 2 are radially located inside six instrumentation tubes in the core and consist of seven thermocouples, four are aligned with the LPRM heights and three are axially located between LPRM heights. The Laguna Verde 2 G T test has become the longest test of thermocouples as power monitoring devices in a BWR industry history and confirms their reliability in terms of time-dependent small noise under steady state reactor conditions and good agreement against Traversing In-core Probes power measurements. (Author)

  11. STATIC ANALYSIS OF LEAF SPRING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E VENUGOPAL GOUD

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Leaf springs are special kind of springs used in automobile suspension systems. The advantage of leaf spring over helical spring is that the ends of the spring may be guided along a definite path as it deflects to act as a structural member in addition to energy absorbing device. The main function of leaf spring is not only tosupport vertical load but also to isolate road induced vibrations. It is subjected to millions of load cycles leading to fatigue failure. Static analysis determines the safe stress and corresponding pay load of the leaf spring and also to study the behavior of structures under practical conditions. The present work attempts to analyze the safeload of the leaf spring, which will indicate the speed at which a comfortable speed and safe drive is possible. A typical leaf spring configuration of TATA-407 light commercial vehicle is chosen for study. Finite element analysis has been carried out to determine the safe stresses and pay loads.

  12. Relating Stomatal Conductance to Leaf Functional Traits

    OpenAIRE

    Kröber, Wenzel; Plath, Isa; Heklau, Heike; Bruelheide, Helge

    2015-01-01

    Leaf functional traits are important because they reflect physiological functions, such as transpiration and carbon assimilation. In particular, morphological leaf traits have the potential to summarize plants strategies in terms of water use efficiency, growth pattern and nutrient use. The leaf economics spectrum (LES) is a recognized framework in functional plant ecology and reflects a gradient of increasing specific leaf area (SLA), leaf nitrogen, phosphorus and cation content, and decreas...

  13. Shortest-path network analysis is a useful approach toward identifying genetic determinants of longevity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J R Managbanag

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Identification of genes that modulate longevity is a major focus of aging-related research and an area of intense public interest. In addition to facilitating an improved understanding of the basic mechanisms of aging, such genes represent potential targets for therapeutic intervention in multiple age-associated diseases, including cancer, heart disease, diabetes, and neurodegenerative disorders. To date, however, targeted efforts at identifying longevity-associated genes have been limited by a lack of predictive power, and useful algorithms for candidate gene-identification have also been lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have utilized a shortest-path network analysis to identify novel genes that modulate longevity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Based on a set of previously reported genes associated with increased life span, we applied a shortest-path network algorithm to a pre-existing protein-protein interaction dataset in order to construct a shortest-path longevity network. To validate this network, the replicative aging potential of 88 single-gene deletion strains corresponding to predicted components of the shortest-path longevity network was determined. Here we report that the single-gene deletion strains identified by our shortest-path longevity analysis are significantly enriched for mutations conferring either increased or decreased replicative life span, relative to a randomly selected set of 564 single-gene deletion strains or to the current data set available for the entire haploid deletion collection. Further, we report the identification of previously unknown longevity genes, several of which function in a conserved longevity pathway believed to mediate life span extension in response to dietary restriction. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This work demonstrates that shortest-path network analysis is a useful approach toward identifying genetic determinants of longevity and represents the first application of

  14. Leaf-cutting ants toxicity of limonexic acid and degraded limonoids from Raulinoa echinata: X-ray structure of epoxy-fraxinellone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phytochemical survey of roots extracts of the South Brazilian endemic plant Raulinoa echinata Cowan, Rutaceae led to the isolation of known degraded limonoids: fraxinellone, fraxinellonone and epoxy-fraxinellone. The latter was previously isolated also from the stems, but the relative configuration could not be solved by NMR experiments. This paper deals with the X-ray diffraction analysis of epoxy-fraxinellone and its toxicity to leaf-cutting ants, describes the isolation of fraxinellonone and fraxinellone for the first time in Raulinoa. Epoxy-fraxinellone showed no toxicity to the leaf-cutting ants (Atta sexdens rubropilosa). The limonoid limonexic acid, isolated from stems, presented high toxicity to the leaf-cutting ants, diminishing considerably their longevity. (author)

  15. Leaf-cutting ants toxicity of limonexic acid and degraded limonoids from Raulinoa echinata: X-ray structure of epoxy-fraxinellone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biavatti, Maique W.; Westerlon, Rosangela [Universidade do Vale do Itajai, SC (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Farmaceuticas]. E-mail: maique@univali.br; Vieira, Paulo C.; Silva, M. Fatima G.F. da; Fernandes, Joao B. [Sao Carlos Univ., SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Penaflor, M. Fernanda G.V.; Bueno, Odair C. [UNESP, Rio Claro, SP (Brazil). Centro de Estudos de Insetos Sociais; Ellena, Javier [Sao Paulo Univ., Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2005-11-15

    Phytochemical survey of roots extracts of the South Brazilian endemic plant Raulinoa echinata Cowan, Rutaceae led to the isolation of known degraded limonoids: fraxinellone, fraxinellonone and epoxy-fraxinellone. The latter was previously isolated also from the stems, but the relative configuration could not be solved by NMR experiments. This paper deals with the X-ray diffraction analysis of epoxy-fraxinellone and its toxicity to leaf-cutting ants, describes the isolation of fraxinellonone and fraxinellone for the first time in Raulinoa. Epoxy-fraxinellone showed no toxicity to the leaf-cutting ants (Atta sexdens rubropilosa). The limonoid limonexic acid, isolated from stems, presented high toxicity to the leaf-cutting ants, diminishing considerably their longevity. (author)

  16. Application of gamma radiation on longevity of some mites species (Acari: Tetranychidade)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machi, Andre R., E-mail: rica_machi@hotmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Arthur, Valter, E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Mites are pests agricultural found in various environments accessible to animal life: soil, aerial parts of the plants, host insects. In this research the effects of gamma irradiation on longevity of mite pests of the tetranychidae family have been studied. The mites were irradiated in a source of Cobalt-60, Gammacell-220 type, at a dose rate of 0.486 kGy located in the CENA/USP, in the doses of 0 (control), 100, 200, 300, and 400 Gy with sixteen replicates per dose. After the irradiation, the mites were placed in petri dishes totalizing 5 treatments in 32 repetitions. The analysis of variance design with completely randomized design using the Statistical Analysis System (SAS) and the Tukey test, the verification of means. Were evaluated daily the adult mortality and longevity of irradiated mites. After 25 days was observed a mean longevity of mites, for O.ilicis, 100 Gy was equal the control dose (18.3 days), but to T. desertorum and T. urticae the larger longevity was observed in the dose of 200 Gy (19.0 days) being that this dose, obtained the larger longevity in comparison to control dose (18.5 days), in general the longevity decreased in relation to increased doses. Thus, only the dose of 100 Gy and 200 Gy stimulated an increased the longevity in O. ilicis and T. desertorum and T. urticae respectively. The exact mechanism by which the mites are tolerant to avoid damage caused by radicals when exposed to ionizing radiation is not fully understood. (author)

  17. Application of gamma radiation on longevity of some mites species (Acari: Tetranychidade)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mites are pests agricultural found in various environments accessible to animal life: soil, aerial parts of the plants, host insects. In this research the effects of gamma irradiation on longevity of mite pests of the tetranychidae family have been studied. The mites were irradiated in a source of Cobalt-60, Gammacell-220 type, at a dose rate of 0.486 kGy located in the CENA/USP, in the doses of 0 (control), 100, 200, 300, and 400 Gy with sixteen replicates per dose. After the irradiation, the mites were placed in petri dishes totalizing 5 treatments in 32 repetitions. The analysis of variance design with completely randomized design using the Statistical Analysis System (SAS) and the Tukey test, the verification of means. Were evaluated daily the adult mortality and longevity of irradiated mites. After 25 days was observed a mean longevity of mites, for O.ilicis, 100 Gy was equal the control dose (18.3 days), but to T. desertorum and T. urticae the larger longevity was observed in the dose of 200 Gy (19.0 days) being that this dose, obtained the larger longevity in comparison to control dose (18.5 days), in general the longevity decreased in relation to increased doses. Thus, only the dose of 100 Gy and 200 Gy stimulated an increased the longevity in O. ilicis and T. desertorum and T. urticae respectively. The exact mechanism by which the mites are tolerant to avoid damage caused by radicals when exposed to ionizing radiation is not fully understood. (author)

  18. Genome-wide association study for longevity with whole-genome sequencing in 3 cattle breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qianqian; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Thomasen, Jørn Rind; Lund, Mogens Sandø; Sahana, Goutam

    2016-09-01

    Longevity is an important economic trait in dairy production. Improvements in longevity could increase the average number of lactations per cow, thereby affecting the profitability of the dairy cattle industry. Improved longevity for cows reduces the replacement cost of stock and enables animals to achieve the highest production period. Moreover, longevity is an indirect indicator of animal welfare. Using whole-genome sequencing variants in 3 dairy cattle breeds, we carried out an association study and identified 7 genomic regions in Holstein and 5 regions in Red Dairy Cattle that were associated with longevity. Meta-analyses of 3 breeds revealed 2 significant genomic regions, located on chromosomes 6 (META-CHR6-88MB) and 18 (META-CHR18-58MB). META-CHR6-88MB overlaps with 2 known genes: neuropeptide G-protein coupled receptor (NPFFR2; 89,052,210-89,059,348 bp) and vitamin D-binding protein precursor (GC; 88,695,940-88,739,180 bp). The NPFFR2 gene was previously identified as a candidate gene for mastitis resistance. META-CHR18-58MB overlaps with zinc finger protein 717 (ZNF717; 58,130,465-58,141,877 bp) and zinc finger protein 613 (ZNF613; 58,115,782-58,117,110 bp), which have been associated with calving difficulties. Information on longevity-associated genomic regions could be used to find causal genes/variants influencing longevity and exploited to improve the reliability of genomic prediction. PMID:27289149

  19. Functional relationships of leafing intensity to plant height, growth form and leaf habit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, En-Rong; Milla, Rubén; Aarssen, Lonnie W.; Wang, Xi-Hua

    2012-05-01

    Leafing intensity, i.e. the number of leaves per unit of stem volume or mass, is a common developmental correlate of leaf size. However, the ecological significance and the functional implications of variation in leafing intensity, other than its relation to leaf size, are unknown. Here, we explore its relationships with plant height, growth form, leaf size, and leaf habit to test a series of corollaries derived from the leafing intensity premium hypothesis. Volume-based leafing intensities and plant heights were recorded for 109 woody species from the subtropical evergreen broadleaf forests of eastern China. In addition, we compiled leafing intensity data from published literature, and combined it with our data to form a 398 species dataset, to test for differences of leafing intensity between plant growth forms (i.e. herbaceous and woody) and leaf habits (i.e. deciduous and evergreens). Leafing intensity was negatively correlated with plant height and individual leaf mass. Volume-based leafing intensities were significantly higher in herbaceous species than in woody species, and also higher in deciduous than in evergreen woody species. In conclusion, leafing intensity relates strongly to plant height, growth form, leaf size, and leaf habit in directions generally in accordance to the leafing intensity premium hypothesis. These results can be interpreted in terms of the evolution of adaptive strategies involving response to herbivory, competitive ability for light and reproductive economy.

  20. How to pattern a leaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolduc, N; O'Connor, D; Moon, J; Lewis, M; Hake, S

    2012-01-01

    Leaf development presents a tremendous resource for tackling the question of patterning in biology. Leaves can be simple or highly dissected. They may have elaborated parts such as the tendrils of a pea leaf or the rolled blade of a carnivorous pitcher plant. Despite the variation in size, shape, and function, all leaves initiate in the same manner: from the flanks of a meristem. The maize leaf is useful for analysis of patterning due to the wealth of mutants and the distinct tissues along the proximal distal axis. The blade is distal, the sheath is proximal, and the ligule forms at the blade/sheath boundary. Establishment of this boundary involves the transcription factors LIGULELESS1 and LIGULELESS2 and the kinase LIGULELESS NARROW. The meristem-specific protein KNOTTED1 (KN1) binds and modulates the lg2 gene. Given the localization of KN1 at the proximal end of the leaf from the time of inception, we hypothesize that KN1 has a role in establishing the very proximal end of the leaf, whereas an auxin maximum guides the growing distal tip. PMID:23174765

  1. Plant AGC protein kinases orient auxin-mediated differential growth and organogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galván Ampudia, Carlos Samuel

    2009-01-01

    In view of their predominant sessile lifestyle, plants need to be able to adapt to changes in their environment. Environmental signals such as light and gravity modulate plant growth and architecture by redirecting polar cell-to-cell transport of auxin, thus causing changes in the distribution of th

  2. Aintegumenta and Aintegumenta-Like6 regulate auxin-mediated flower development in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krizek Beth A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two related genes encoding AP2/ERF-type transcription factors, AINTEGUMENTA (ANT and AINTEGUMENTA-LIKE6 (AIL6, are important regulators of floral growth and patterning in Arabidopsis. Evidence suggests that these genes promote several aspects of flower development in response to auxin. To investigate the interplay of ANT, AIL6 and auxin during floral development, I have examined the phenotypic consequences of disrupting polar auxin transport in ant, ail6 and ant ail6 mutants by either genetic or chemical means. Results Plants containing mutations in ANT or AIL6 alone or in both genes together exhibit increased sensitivity to disruptions in polar auxin transport. Both genes promote shoot growth, floral meristem initiation and floral meristem patterning in combination with auxin transport. However, differences in the responses of ant and ail6 single mutants to perturbations in auxin transport suggest that these two genes also have non-overlapping activities in each of these developmental processes. Conclusions The enhanced sensitivity of ant and ail6 mutants to alterations in polar auxin transport suggests that these mutants have defects in some aspect of auxin physiology. The inability of ant ail6 double mutants to initiate flowers in backgrounds disrupted for auxin transport confirm the proposed roles for these two genes in floral meristem initiation.

  3. Association between FOXO3A gene polymorphisms and human longevity:a meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JiMing Bao; XianLu Song; YingQia Hong; HaiLi Zhu; Cui Li; Tao Zhang; Wei Chen; ShanChao Zhao; Qing Chen

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown associations between the FOXO3Agene, encoding the forkhead box O3 transcription factor, and human or speciifcally male longevity. However, the associations of speciifc FOXO3A polymorphisms with longevity remain inconclusive. We performed a meta-analysis of existing studies to clarify these potential associations. A comprehensive search was conducted to identify studies of FOXO3A gene polymorphisms and longevity. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95%conifdence intervals (CIs) were calculated by comparing the minor and major alleles. A total of seven articles reporting associations of FOXO3A polymorphisms with longevity were identiifed and included in this meta-analysis. These comprised 11 independent studies with 5241 cases and 5724 controls from different ethnic groups. rs2802292, rs2764264, rs13217795, rs1935949 and rs2802288 polymorphisms were associated with human longevity (OR=1.36, 95%CI=1.10-1.69, P=0.005;OR=1.20, 95%CI=1.04-1.37, P=0.01;OR=1.27, 95%CI=1.10-1.46, P=0.001;OR=1.14, 95%CI=1.01-1.27 and OR=1.24, 95%CI=1.07-1.43, P=0.003, respectively). Analysis stratiifed by gender indicated signiifcant associations between rs2802292, rs2764264 and rs13217795 and male longevity (OR=1.54, 95%CI=1.33-1.79, P<0.001;OR=1.38, 95%CI=1.15-1.66, P=0.001;and OR=1.39, 95%CI=1.15-1.67, P=0.001), but rs2802292, rs2764264 and rs1935949 were not linked to female longevity. Moreover, our study showed no association between rs2153960, rs7762395 or rs13220810 polymorphisms and longevity. In conclusion, this meta-analysis indicates a signiifcant association of ifve FOXO3Agene polymorphisms with longevity, with the effects of rs2802292 and rs2764264 being male-speciifc. Further investigations are required to conifrm these ifndings.

  4. RNA helicase SACY-1 is required for longevity caused by various genetic perturbations in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Mihwa; Park, Sangsoon; Nam, Hong Gil; Lee, Seung-Jae V

    2016-07-17

    RNA helicases, which unwind RNAs, are essential for RNA metabolism and homeostasis. However, the roles of RNA helicases in specific physiological processes remain poorly understood. We recently reported that an RNA helicase, HEL-1, promotes long lifespan conferred by reduced insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling (IIS) in Caenorhabditis elegans. We also showed that HEL-1 induces the expression of longevity genes by physically interacting with Forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factor. Thus, the HEL-1 RNA helicase appears to regulate lifespan by specifically activating FOXO in IIS. In the current study, we report another longevity-promoting RNA helicase, Suppressor of ACY-4 sterility 1 (SACY-1). SACY-1 contributed to the longevity of daf-2/insulin/IGF-1 receptor mutants. Unlike HEL-1, SACY-1 was also required for the longevity due to mutations in genes involved in non-IIS pathways. Thus, SACY-1 appears to function as a general longevity factor for various signaling pathways, which is different from the specific function of HEL-1. PMID:27153157

  5. Telomerase reverse transcriptase synergizes with calorie restriction to increase health span and extend mouse longevity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Vera

    Full Text Available Caloric restriction (CR, a reduction of food intake while avoiding malnutrition, can delay the onset of cancer and age-related diseases in several species, including mice. In addition, depending of the genetic background, CR can also increase or decrease mouse longevity. This has highlighted the importance of identifying the molecular pathways that interplay with CR in modulating longevity. Significant lifespan extension in mice has been recently achieved through over-expression of the catalytic subunit of mouse telomerase (mTERT in a cancer protective background. Given the CR cancer-protective effects in rodents, we set to address here whether CR impacts on telomere length and synergizes with mTERT to extend mouse longevity. CR significantly decreased tumor incidence in TERT transgenic (TgTERT mice and extended their lifespan compared to wild-type (WT controls under the same diet, indicating a synergy between TgTERT and CR in increasing mouse longevity. In addition, longitudinal telomere length measurements in peripheral blood leukocytes from individual mice showed that CR resulted in maintenance and/or elongation telomeres in a percentage of WT mice, a situation that mimics telomere dynamics in TgTERT cohorts. These results demonstrate that CR attenuates telomere erosion associated to aging and that synergizes with TERT over-expression in increasing "health span" and extending mouse longevity.

  6. Constructing seasonal LAI trajectory by data-model fusion for global evergreen needle-leaf forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R.; Chen, J.; Mo, G.

    2010-12-01

    is used as an anchor point of the LAI trajectory. Ground data are used for validation. The resulting LAI does not show strong seasonality within a year, which is reasonable for evergreen needle-leaf forests with known leaf longevity.

  7. Analysis of Peanut Leaf Proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramesh, R.; Suravajhala, Prashanth; Pechan, T.

    2010-01-01

    approach to define function of their associated genes. Proteome analysis linked to genome sequence information is critical for functional genomics. However, the available protein expression data is extremely inadequate. Proteome analysis of peanut leaf was conducted using two-dimensional gel....... Furthermore, the leaf proteome map will lead to development of protein markers for cultivar identification at seedling stage of the plant. Overall, this study will contribute to improve our understanding of plant genetics and metabolism, and overall assist in the selection and breeding programs geared toward...

  8. Biophysical control of leaf temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, N.; Prentice, I. C.; Wright, I. J.

    2014-12-01

    In principle sunlit leaves can maintain their temperatures within a narrower range than ambient temperatures. This is an important and long-known (but now overlooked) prediction of energy balance theory. Net radiation at leaf surface in steady state (which is reached rapidly) must be equal to the combination of sensible and latent heat exchanges with surrounding air, the former being proportional to leaf-to-air temperature difference (ΔT), the latter to the transpiration rate. We present field measurements of ΔT which confirm the existence of a 'crossover temperature' in the 25-30˚C range for species in a tropical savanna and a tropical rainforest environment. This finding is consistent with a simple representation of transpiration as a function of net radiation and temperature (Priestley-Taylor relationship) assuming an entrainment factor (ω) somewhat greater than the canonical value of 0.26. The fact that leaves in tropical forests are typically cooler than surrounding air, often already by solar noon, is consistent with a recently published comparison of MODIS day-time land-surface temperatures with air temperatures. Theory further predicts a strong dependence of leaf size (which is inversely related to leaf boundary-layer conductance, and therefore to absolute magnitude of ΔT) on moisture availability. Theoretically, leaf size should be determined by either night-time constraints (risk of frost damage to active leaves) or day-time constraints (risk of heat stress damage),with the former likely to predominate - thereby restricting the occurrence of large leaves - at high latitudes. In low latitudes, daytime maximum leaf size is predicted to increase with temperature, provided that water is plentiful. If water is restricted, however, transpiration cannot proceed at the Priestley-Taylor rate, and it quickly becomes advantageous for plants to have small leaves, which do not heat up much above the temperature of their surroundings. The difference between leaf

  9. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MANGOSTEEN LEAF NITROGEN CONTENTS AND LEAF SPAD VALUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eko Setiawan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated nitrogen contents on mangosteen leaf and related on leaf SPAD value. The experiment was conducted using mangosteen trees grown in commercial orchard in Bogor, Indonesia during May to October 2010. Mangosteen trees of 3 different ages, young (20-year-old, middle-aged (35-year-old, and old (50-year-old trees, each of five trees, were selected for study, and the canopy of each tree was divided into 9 sectors based on height (bottom, middle, top and width (inner, center, outer. SPAD values had a negative correlation with leaf N content in all ages and could be explained by regressionl equations N level (% DW = -0.0099 × SPAD + 2.2366; R² = 0.91; N level (% DW = -0.0177 × SPAD + 2.8001; R² = 0.67; and N level (% DW = -0.0187 × SPAD + 2.7785; R² = 0.45 in young, middle-aged and old trees, respectively. It is suggested that the SPAD value determined by a portable chlorophyll meter can be used to obtain a quick estimation of mangosteen leaf N status. Keywords: age, fruiting position, Garcinia mangostana L., nitrogen, SPAD

  10. A leaf detection method using image sequences and leaf movement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemming, J.; Henten, van E.J.; Tuijl, van B.A.J.; Bontsema, J.

    2005-01-01

    Besides harvesting the fruits, a very time demanding task is removing old leaves from cucumber and tomato plants grown in greenhouses. To be able to automate this process by a robot, a leaf detection method is required. One possibility for the detection is to exploit the different dynamic behaviour

  11. Spectral reflectance relationships to leaf water stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripple, William J.

    1986-01-01

    Spectral reflectance data were collected from detached snapbean leaves in the laboratory with a multiband radiometer. Four experiments were designed to study the spectral response resulting from changes in leaf cover, relative water content of leaves, and leaf water potential. Spectral regions included in the analysis were red (630-690 nm), NIR (760-900 nm), and mid-IR (2.08-2.35 microns). The red and mid-IR bands showed sensitivity to changes in both leaf cover and relative water content of leaves. The NIR was only highly sensitive to changes in leaf cover. Results provided evidence that mid-IR reflectance was governed primarily by leaf moisture content, although soil reflectance was an important factor when leaf cover was less than 100 percent. High correlations between leaf water potentials and reflectance were attributed to covariances with relative water content of leaves and leaf cover.

  12. Characterization of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal-Axis in Familial Longevity under Resting Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Steffy W; Roelfsema, Ferdinand; Akintola, Abimbola A;

    2015-01-01

    ). METHODS: During 24 h, venous blood was sampled every 10 minutes for determination of circulatory ACTH and cortisol concentrations. Deconvolution analysis, cross approximate entropy analysis and ACTH-cortisol-dose response modeling were used to assess, respectively, ACTH and cortisol secretion parameters...... HPA-axis in offspring from long-lived siblings, who are enriched for familial longevity and age-matched controls. DESIGN: Case-control study within the Leiden Longevity study cohort consisting of 20 middle-aged offspring of nonagenarian siblings (offspring) together with 18 partners (controls...... differ between offspring and controls. In addition, no significant differences in feedforward and feedback synchrony and adrenal gland ACTH responsivity were observed between groups. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that familial longevity is not associated with major differences in HPA-axis activity...

  13. Physical nature of longevity of light actinides in dynamic failure phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchaev, A. Ya.; Punin, V. T.; Selchenkova, N. I.; Kosheleva, E. V.; Kosachev, V. V.

    2015-12-01

    It is shown in this work that the physical nature of the longevity of light actinides under extreme conditions in a range of nonequilibrium states of t ~ 10-6-10-10 s is determined by the time needed for the formation of a critical concentration of a cascade of failure centers, which changes connectivity of the body. These centers form a percolation cluster. The longevity is composed of waiting time t w for the appearance of failure centers and clusterization time t c of cascade of failure centers, when connectivity in the system of failure centers and the percolation cluster arise. A unique mechanism of the dynamic failure process, a unique order parameter, and an equal dimensionality of the space in which the process occurs determine the physical nature of the longevity of metals, including fissionable materials.

  14. Physical nature of longevity of light actinides in dynamic failure phenomenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchaev, A. Ya., E-mail: uchaev@expd.vniief.ru; Punin, V. T.; Selchenkova, N. I.; Kosheleva, E. V. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center—VNIIEF (Russian Federation); Kosachev, V. V. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    It is shown in this work that the physical nature of the longevity of light actinides under extreme conditions in a range of nonequilibrium states of t ∼ 10{sup –6}–10{sup –10} s is determined by the time needed for the formation of a critical concentration of a cascade of failure centers, which changes connectivity of the body. These centers form a percolation cluster. The longevity is composed of waiting time t{sub w} for the appearance of failure centers and clusterization time t{sub c} of cascade of failure centers, when connectivity in the system of failure centers and the percolation cluster arise. A unique mechanism of the dynamic failure process, a unique order parameter, and an equal dimensionality of the space in which the process occurs determine the physical nature of the longevity of metals, including fissionable materials.

  15. Phenotypic plasticity and longevity in plants and animals: cause and effect?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Renee M Borges

    2009-10-01

    Immobile plants and immobile modular animals outlive unitary animals. This paper discusses competing but not necessarily mutually exclusive theories to explain this extreme longevity, especially from the perspective of phenotypic plasticity. Stem cell immortality, vascular autonomy, and epicormic branching are some important features of the phenotypic plasticity of plants that contribute to their longevity. Monocarpy versus polycarpy can also influence the kind of senescent processes experienced by plants. How density-dependent phenomena affecting the establishment of juveniles in these immobile organisms can influence the evolution of senescence, and consequently longevity, is reviewed and discussed. Whether climate change scenarios will favour long-lived or short-lived organisms, with their attendant levels of plasticity, is also presented.

  16. Longevity of cut inflorescence shoots of high kamasija (Camassia quamash (Pursh Greene depending on postharvest treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Paulina Ulczycka

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The research was carried out to determine the effect of conditioning of cut flowering shoots of the Camassia quamash in 8-hydroxyquinoline sulphate on postharvest longevity. The inflorescence shoots were conditioned for 24 h in water solutions of 8-hydroxyquinoline sulphate at concentration of 200 mg·dm-3 and then kept in water or gibberellic acid solutions at concentration of 50 or 100 mg·dm-3. The inflorescent shoots not conditioned and kept in water showed the longest postharvest longevity. 8-hydroxyquinoline sulphate and gibberellic acid solutions shortened their longevity. The shortest fresh weight loss of Camassia quamash then was kept in gibberellic acid solutions at concentration of 100 mg·dm-3. The smallest change of the inflorescence shoots length of Camassia quamash was observed after application of gibberellic acid solutions at concentration of 50 mg·dm-3.

  17. Laboratory selection for increased longevity in Drosophila melanogaster reduces field performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wit, Janneke; Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard; Sarup, Pernille; Frydenberg, Jane; Loeschcke, Volker

    2013-01-01

    traits when tested in the laboratory. Functional senescence in longevity selected lines has also been shown to occur at a slower rate. However, it is known that performance in a controlled laboratory setting is not necessarily representative of performance in nature. In this study the effect of ageing......,while longevity selected flieswere tested at the intermediate temperature only. The ability of flies to locate and reach a food sourcewas tested. Flies of intermediate agewere generally better at locating resources than both younger and older flies, where hot and cold environments accelerate the senescent decline......, environmental temperature and longevity selection on performance in the fieldwas tested. Flies fromlongevity selected and control lines of different ages (2, 5, 10 and 15 days) were released in an environment free of natural food sources. Control flies were tested at low, intermediate and high temperatures...

  18. A method to improve leaf succulence quantification

    OpenAIRE

    André Mantovani

    1999-01-01

    Leaf succulence has important physiological and ecological implications. Currently it is quantified by Delf's index (fresh weight/leaf area) and fresh weight/ dry weight ratio. Both indeces are reconsidered and a new index is proposed. Shade and sun leaves from terrestrial, hemiepiphytic and epiphytic aroids were studied. Delf's formula, which does not consider dry weight, overestimated leaf succulence. As fresh weight / dry weight ratio (fw / dw) does not consider leaf area, plants with the ...

  19. Analysis of Circadian Leaf Movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Niels A; Jiménez-Gómez, José M

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock is a molecular timekeeper that controls a wide variety of biological processes. In plants, clock outputs range from the molecular level, with rhythmic gene expression and metabolite content, to physiological processes such as stomatal conductance or leaf movements. Any of these outputs can be used as markers to monitor the state of the circadian clock. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, much of the current knowledge about the clock has been gained from time course experiments profiling expression of endogenous genes or reporter constructs regulated by the circadian clock. Since these methods require labor-intensive sample preparation or transformation, monitoring leaf movements is an interesting alternative, especially in non-model species and for natural variation studies. Technological improvements both in digital photography and image analysis allow cheap and easy monitoring of circadian leaf movements. In this chapter we present a protocol that uses an autonomous point and shoot camera and free software to monitor circadian leaf movements in tomato. PMID:26867616

  20. A matrix approach to the statistics of longevity in heterogeneous frailty models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hal Caswell

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The gamma-Gompertz model is a fixed frailty model in which baseline mortality increasesexponentially with age, frailty has a proportional effect on mortality, and frailty at birth follows a gamma distribution. Mortality selects against the more frail, so the marginal mortality rate decelerates, eventually reaching an asymptote. The gamma-Gompertz is one of a wider class of frailty models, characterized by the choice of baseline mortality, effects of frailty, distributions of frailty, and assumptions about the dynamics of frailty. Objective: To develop a matrix model to compute all the statistical properties of longevity from thegamma-Gompertz and related models. Methods: I use the vec-permutation matrix formulation to develop a model in which individuals are jointly classified by age and frailty. The matrix is used to project the age and frailty dynamicsof a cohort and the fundamental matrix is used to obtain the statistics of longevity. Results: The model permits calculation of the mean, variance, coefficient of variation, skewness and all moments of longevity, the marginal mortality and survivorship functions, the dynamics of the frailty distribution, and other quantities. The matrix formulation extends naturally to other frailty models. I apply the analysis to the gamma-Gompertz model (for humans and laboratory animals, the gamma-Makeham model, and the gamma-Siler model, and to a hypothetical dynamic frailty model characterized by diffusion of frailty with reflecting boundaries.The matrix model permits partitioning the variance in longevity into components due to heterogeneity and to individual stochasticity. In several published human data sets, heterogeneity accounts for less than 10Š of the variance in longevity. In laboratory populations of five invertebrate animal species, heterogeneity accounts for 46Š to 83Š ofthe total variance in longevity.

  1. Disease-specific longevity of impulse generators in deep brain stimulation and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Riesen, Christoph; Tsironis, Georg; Gruber, Doreen; Klostermann, Fabian; Krause, Patricia; Schneider, Gerd Helge; Kupsch, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) represents an established and internationally approved therapy for movement disorders. In the present retrospective analysis, we evaluated disease-specific longevity of dual channel impulse generators (IPG) used in different movement disorders. We correlated the battery lifetime with electrical stimulation settings, "total electrical energy delivered" (TEED), stimulation modi (monopolar, double monopolar and bipolar) and targets. Specifically, we reviewed the longevity and stimulation settings of 464 IPGs implanted between 1996 until 2011 in a single university center. Disease entities comprised Parkinson's disease (PD, n = 257), dystonia (n = 130) and essential tremor (ET, n = 50). Further subanalyses aimed at assessing differential longevity in different subtypes of PD and dystonia. The main finding relates to longer IPG longevity in ET (thalamic DBS) and PD (subthalamic DBS) vs. dystonia (pallidal DBS; 71.9 ± 6.7 vs. 51.5 ± 2.3 vs. 37 ± 2 months). In PD the tremor-dominant type was associated with a significant shorter battery survival than in the akinetic-rigid type without tremor or the "balanced" type with tremor, bradykinesia and rigidity (38.8 ± 3.9 vs. 53.6 ± 3.4 vs. 58.8 ± 4.1 months), while there were no significant differences in longevity between the subtypes of dystonia. Frequency, amplitude, pulse widths and TEED correlated inversely with battery lifetime. Pallidal DBS in dystonia is associated with a shorter lifetime of IPGs than subthalamic or thalamic DBS for PD or ET. The present results may contribute to the rapidly evolving refinement of DBS devices. Future studies that assess energy consumption both in patients with and without IPG replacement could help to avoid potential underestimation of longevity of IPGs. PMID:27198700

  2. Increased ROS production: a component of the longevity equation in the male mygalomorph, Brachypelma albopilosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois Criscuolo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The diversity of longevities encountered in wildlife is one of the most intriguing problems in biology. Evolutionary biologists have proposed different theories to explain how longevity variability may be driven by bad genes expression in late life or by gene pleiotropic effects. This reflexion has stimulated, in the last ten years, an active research on the proximal mechanisms that can shape lifespan. Reactive oxygen species (ROS, i.e., the by-products of oxidative metabolism, have emerged as the main proximate cause of ageing. Because ROS are mainly produced by the mitochondria, their production is linked to metabolic rate, and this may explain the differences in longevity between large and small species. However, their implication in the sex difference in longevity within a species has never been tested, despite the fact that these differences are widespread in the animal kingdom. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mitochondrial superoxide production of hemolymph immune cells and antioxidant and oxidative damages plasma levels were measured in adult male and female B. albopilosa at different ages. We found that female spiders are producing less mitochondrial superoxide, are better protected against oxidative attack and are then suffering less oxidative damages than males at adulthood. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In tarantulas, once reaching sexual maturity, males have a life expectancy reduced to 1 to 2 years, while females can still live for 20 years, in spite of the fact that females continue to grow and moult. This study evidences an increased exposure of males to oxidative stress due to an increase in mitochondrial superoxide production and a decrease in hemolymph antioxidant defences. Such a phenomenon is likely to be part of the explanation for the sharp reduction of longevity accompanying male tarantula maturity. This opens several fundamental research roads in the future to better understand how reproduction and longevity are

  3. 7 CFR 29.2277 - Leaf scrap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2277 Leaf scrap. A byproduct of unstemmed tobacco. Leaf scrap results from handling unstemmed tobacco and consists... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.2277 Section 29.2277...

  4. 7 CFR 29.3526 - Leaf scrap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Type 95) § 29.3526 Leaf scrap. A byproduct of unstemmed tobacco Leaf scrap results from handling unstemmed tobacco and consists of loose and tangled whole or broken leaves. ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.3526 Section 29.3526...

  5. 7 CFR 29.6023 - Leaf structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.6023 Section 29.6023 Agriculture... Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6023 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by...

  6. 7 CFR 29.2529 - Leaf scrap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2529 Leaf scrap. A byproduct of unstemmed tobacco. Leaf scrap results from handling unstemmed tobacco and consists of loose and tangled whole or... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.2529 Section 29.2529...

  7. 7 CFR 29.3034 - Leaf scrap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Leaf scrap. A by-product of unstemmed tobacco. Leaf scrap results from handling unstemmed tobacco and... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.3034 Section 29.3034 Agriculture... Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS...

  8. 7 CFR 29.6022 - Leaf scrap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6022 Leaf scrap. A byproduct of unstemmed tobacco Leaf scrap results from handling unstemmed tobacco and consists of loose and tangled whole or broken leaves. ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.6022 Section 29.6022...

  9. Longevity and admission to nursing home according to age after isolated coronary artery bypass surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Kristinn; Andreasen, Jan Jesper; Torp-Pedersen, Christian;

    2015-01-01

    O5 Longevity and admission to nursing home according to age after isolated coronary artery bypass surgery: A nationwide cohort study Kristinn Thorsteinsson, Jan Jesper Andreasen, Christian Torp Pedersen, Kirsten Fonager, Rikke Nørmark Mortensen, Kristian Kragholm, Gunnar Gislason, Lars Køber....... Aalborg, Denmark Background: Data on nursing home admission in patients >80 years of age after isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) are scarce. Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate longevity and subsequent admission to nursing home stratified by age in a nationwide CABG cohort...

  10. Dispersal and longevity of mass-released, sterilized Mexican fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trap-back experiments using McPhail traps were conducted to study dispersal and longevity of mass-released, sterile Mexican fruit flies, Anastrepha ludens (Loew). The flies were released at 3 ecologically different sites in northern Mexico. Some flies were recaptured up to 9 km from the release point. However, standard distance was estimated using a regression model that indicated 240 m was the typical dispersal distance. The life expectancy of the released flies from the time of release varied from 5 to 10 d. Greatest longevity, up to 22 wk, occurred during the winter months

  11. The effect of pensions on longevity: evidence from Union Army veterans

    OpenAIRE

    Salm, Martin

    2007-01-01

    This study uses changes in pension laws for Union Army veterans as a natural experiment to estimate the causal effect of pensions on longevity, and to examine potential pathways underlying such a relationship. We examine the effects of the pension laws of 1907 and 1912, which granted old-age pensions to Union Army veterans. Life expectancy for veterans, who received such a pension, increased by 0.5 years and 2.7 years, respectively. The effect of veteran pensions on longevity was large across...

  12. First record of minimum Irish hare (Lepus timidus hibernicus Bell 1837) longevity in the wild.

    OpenAIRE

    Reid, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Average longevity of the mountain hare (Lepus timidus L., 1758) has been estimated at nine years in the wild (Macdonald D. and Barrett, P. 1993 Mammals of Britain and Europe. Harper Collins Publishers, London) with a maximum recorded age of 18 years for one marked animal (Angerbjörn, A. and Flux, J. E. C. 1995 Lepus timidus. Mammalian Species 495: 1–11). However, the longevity of the Irish hare (L. t. hibernicus Bell 1837) is entirely unknown. A total of 14 Irish hares was trapped and tagged ...

  13. Transcriptional profiling of human familial longevity indicates a role for ASF1A and IL7R

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passtoors, W.M.; Boer, J.M.; Goeman, J.G.; Van den Akker, E.B.; Deelen, J.; Zwaan, B.J.; Scarborough, A.; Van der Breggen, R.; Vossen, R.H.A.M.; et al.

    2012-01-01

    The Leiden Longevity Study consists of families that express extended survival across generations, decreased morbidity in middle-age, and beneficial metabolic profiles. To identify which pathways drive this complex phenotype of familial longevity and healthy aging, we performed a genome-wide gene ex

  14. Effect of somatic cell count level on functional longevity in Valle del Belice dairy sheep assessed using survival analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riggio, V.; Maizon, D.O.; Portolano, B.; Bovenhuis, H.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of somatic cell count (SCC) on functional longevity and to estimate the heritability of functional longevity using survival analysis in Valle del Belice dairy sheep. A total of 4,880 lactations of 2,190 ewes from 11 flocks were used. In this s

  15. Longevity Risk and Natural Hedge Potential in Portfolios Of Life Insurance Products : The Effect of Investment Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, R.S.P.; De Waegenaere, A.M.B.; Melenberg, B.

    2011-01-01

    Payments of life insurance products depend on the uncertain future evolution of survival probabilities. This uncertainty is referred to as longevity risk. Existing literature shows that the effect of longevity risk on single life annuities can be substantial, and that there exists a (natural) hedge

  16. 7 CFR 29.1162 - Leaf (B Group).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Quality Green Leaf Immature, tight leaf structure, fleshy, lean in oil, narrow. Uniformity, 70 percent... Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, lean in oil, weak color intensity, narrow... Quality Lemon Leaf Ripe, firm leaf structure, medium body, lean in oil, weak color intensity,...

  17. Investigating Seed Longevity of Big Sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijayratne, Upekala C.; Pyke, David A.

    2009-01-01

    The Intermountain West is dominated by big sagebrush communities (Artemisia tridentata subspecies) that provide habitat and forage for wildlife, prevent erosion, and are economically important to recreation and livestock industries. The two most prominent subspecies of big sagebrush in this region are Wyoming big sagebrush (A. t. ssp. wyomingensis) and mountain big sagebrush (A. t. ssp. vaseyana). Increased understanding of seed bank dynamics will assist with sustainable management and persistence of sagebrush communities. For example, mountain big sagebrush may be subjected to shorter fire return intervals and prescribed fire is a tool used often to rejuvenate stands and reduce tree (Juniperus sp. or Pinus sp.) encroachment into these communities. A persistent seed bank for mountain big sagebrush would be advantageous under these circumstances. Laboratory germination trials indicate that seed dormancy in big sagebrush may be habitat-specific, with collections from colder sites being more dormant. Our objective was to investigate seed longevity of both subspecies by evaluating viability of seeds in the field with a seed retrieval experiment and sampling for seeds in situ. We chose six study sites for each subspecies. These sites were dispersed across eastern Oregon, southern Idaho, northwestern Utah, and eastern Nevada. Ninety-six polyester mesh bags, each containing 100 seeds of a subspecies, were placed at each site during November 2006. Seed bags were placed in three locations: (1) at the soil surface above litter, (2) on the soil surface beneath litter, and (3) 3 cm below the soil surface to determine whether dormancy is affected by continued darkness or environmental conditions. Subsets of seeds were examined in April and November in both 2007 and 2008 to determine seed viability dynamics. Seed bank samples were taken at each site, separated into litter and soil fractions, and assessed for number of germinable seeds in a greenhouse. Community composition data

  18. Effects of delayed mating on the fecundity, fertility and longevity of females of diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-Ping Wang; Yu-Ling Fang; Zhong-Ning Zhang

    2011-01-01

    The effects of delayed mating on the copulation duration, female fertility, fecundity, egg fertility, longevity and the number days alive after mating of females of diamondback moth (DBM), Plutella xylostella, were studied. When male mating was delayed, the female fertility, fecundity, egg fertility, longevity and number days alive after mating of DBM decreased, and there was a negative correlation between the age of the moth with those variables except copulation duration. When female mating was delayed, the female fertility, fecundity, percent egg fertility and number days alive after mating of DBM also decreased, but the longevity increased, which also showed a negative relationship between the age of the moth with the variables except copulation duration and longevity. When both males and females delayed mating, the female fertility and fecundity decreased; egg fertility was affected marginally, and the longevity of females increased. The moth age was negatively correlated with those variables.

  19. Leaf litter quality affects aquatic insect emergence: contrasting patterns from two foundation trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compson, Zacchaeus G; Adams, Kenneth J; Edwards, Joeseph A; Maestas, Jesse M; Whitham, Thomas G; Marks, Jane C

    2013-10-01

    results challenge the notion that leaf quality is a simple function of decomposition, suggesting instead that aquatic insects benefit differentially from different leaf types, such that some use slow-decomposing litter for habitat and its temporal longevity and others utilize fast-decomposing litter with more immediate nutrient release. PMID:23532583

  20. Leaf spring assembly for wheel suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiyama, K.; Mishima, Y.; Kuwayama, K.

    1986-09-16

    This patent describes a leaf spring assembly which consists of: a longitudinal leaf spring made of fiber reinforced plastics having a first surface to be applied with a tension force and a second surface to be applied with a compression force, the first surface of the leaf spring being a flat surface, and the second surface of the leaf spring being provided with a protrusion located substantially at the central portion of the leaf spring. The protrusion is made of a number of laminated short fibrous sheet-like materials saturated with synthetic resin, the short fibrous sheet-like materials of the protrusion being laminated independently and separately from reinforcement fibrous sheet-like materials in the leaf spring; a pair of pad members of elastic material attached to the first and second surfaces of the leaf spring; a pair of retainer plates attached to the first and second surfaces of the leaf spring through the pad members, one of the retainer plates being formed with an indented portion coupled with the protrusion of the leaf spring through one of the pad members without any clearance to clamp the leaf spring at its central portion and being further provided with a pair of protruded portions which are arranged adjacent to the indented portion to retain the paid member in place by engagement therewith; and means for clamping the retainer plates to the leaf spring and mounting the same on an axle housing.

  1. The relationship of leaf photosynthetic traits - V cmax and J max - to leaf nitrogen, leaf phosphorus, and specific leaf area: a meta-analysis and modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Anthony P; Beckerman, Andrew P; Gu, Lianhong; Kattge, Jens; Cernusak, Lucas A; Domingues, Tomas F; Scales, Joanna C; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Wullschleger, Stan D; Woodward, F Ian

    2014-08-01

    Great uncertainty exists in the global exchange of carbon between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere. An important source of this uncertainty lies in the dependency of photosynthesis on the maximum rate of carboxylation (V cmax) and the maximum rate of electron transport (J max). Understanding and making accurate prediction of C fluxes thus requires accurate characterization of these rates and their relationship with plant nutrient status over large geographic scales. Plant nutrient status is indicated by the traits: leaf nitrogen (N), leaf phosphorus (P), and specific leaf area (SLA). Correlations between V cmax and J max and leaf nitrogen (N) are typically derived from local to global scales, while correlations with leaf phosphorus (P) and specific leaf area (SLA) have typically been derived at a local scale. Thus, there is no global-scale relationship between V cmax and J max and P or SLA limiting the ability of global-scale carbon flux models do not account for P or SLA. We gathered published data from 24 studies to reveal global relationships of V cmax and J max with leaf N, P, and SLA. V cmax was strongly related to leaf N, and increasing leaf P substantially increased the sensitivity of V cmax to leaf N. J max was strongly related to V cmax, and neither leaf N, P, or SLA had a substantial impact on the relationship. Although more data are needed to expand the applicability of the relationship, we show leaf P is a globally important determinant of photosynthetic rates. In a model of photosynthesis, we showed that at high leaf N (3 gm(-2)), increasing leaf P from 0.05 to 0.22 gm(-2) nearly doubled assimilation rates. Finally, we show that plants may employ a conservative strategy of J max to V cmax coordination that restricts photoinhibition when carboxylation is limiting at the expense of maximizing photosynthetic rates when light is limiting. PMID:25473475

  2. Is there a role for oligosaccharides in seed longevity? An assessment of intracellular glass stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buitink, J.; Hemminga, M.A.; Hoekstra, F.A.

    2000-01-01

    We examined whether oligosaccharides extend seed longevity by increasing the intracellular glass stability. For that purpose, we used a spin probe technique to measure the molecular mobility and glass transition temperature of the cytoplasm of impatiens (Impatiens walleriana) and bell pepper (Capsic

  3. Forced egg retention induced by diethyl-phenylacetamide diminishes the fecundity and longevity of dengue vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thangaraj Seenivasagan

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusion: Presence of DEPA odor on water surface forced the gravid Aedes females to retain their eggs, affecting their fecundity and longevity. This indigenously developed topical repellent DEPA may be applied to container′s water that act as breeding grounds for dengue vectors to deter gravid females from oviposition in the vicinity of a household.

  4. Preferences of heart failure patients in daily clinical practice : quality of life or longevity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraai, Imke H.; Vermeulen, Karin M.; Luttik, Marie Louise A.; Hoekstra, Tialda; Jaarsma, Trijntje; Hillege, Hans L.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of patient preferences is vital for delivering optimal healthcare. This study uses utility measurement to assess the preferences of heart failure (HF) patients regarding quality of life or longevity. The utility approach represents the perspective of a patient; facilitates the combination

  5. Short communication: Genetic relationships between functional longevity and direct health traits in Austrian Fleckvieh cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, C; Fuerst, C; Ducrocq, V; Fuerst-Waltl, B

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a multitrait 2-step approach applied to yield deviations and deregressed breeding values to get genetic parameters of functional longevity, clinical mastitis, early fertility disorders, cystic ovaries, and milk fever of Austrian Fleckvieh cattle. An approximate multitrait approach allows the combination of information from pseudo-phenotypes derived from different statistical models in routine genetic evaluation, which cannot be estimated easily in a full multitrait model. A total of 66,890 Fleckvieh cows were included in this study. For estimating genetic parameters, a simple linear animal model with year of birth as a fixed effect and animal as a random genetic effect was fitted. The joint analysis of yield deviations and deregressed breeding values was feasible. As expected, heritabilities were low, ranging from 0.03 (early fertility disorders) to 0.15 (functional longevity). Genetic correlations between functional longevity and clinical mastitis, early fertility disorders, cystic ovaries, and milk fever were 0.63, 0.29, 0.20, and 0.20, respectively. Within direct health traits genetic correlations were between 0.14 and 0.45. Results suggest that selecting for more robust disease-resistant cows would imply an improvement of functional longevity. PMID:26277309

  6. Centenarian Self-Perceptions of Factors Responsible for Attainment of Extended Health and Longevity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Shannon; Garcia, John; Marston, Hannah R.

    2013-01-01

    Pathways healthy and physically functional centenarians take to achieve advanced old age have fascinated mankind for centuries. This hermeneutic phenomenological study documents characteristics perceived by centenarians as important and central to their attainment of advanced longevity. Secondary data including written transcripts and audio and…

  7. Psychosocial Dimensions of Exceptional Longevity: A Qualitative Exploration of Centenarians' Experiences, Personality, and Life Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darviri, Christina; Demakakos, Panayotes; Tigani, Xanthi; Charizani, Fotini; Tsiou, Chrysoula; Tsagkari, Christina; Chliaoutakis, Joannes; Monos, Dimitrios

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative study provides a comprehensive account of the social and life experiences and strategies and personality attributes that characterize exceptional longevity (living to 100 or over). It is based on nine semi-structured interviews of relatively healthy and functional Greek centenarians of both sexes. The analytic approach was…

  8. Self-Rated Activity Levels and Longevity: Evidence from a 20 Year Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullee, Mark A.; Coleman, Peter G.; Briggs, Roger S. J.; Stevenson, James E.; Turnbull, Joanne C.

    2008-01-01

    The study reports on factors predicting the longevity of 328 people over the age of 65 drawn from an English city and followed over 20 years. Both the reported activities score and the individual's comparative evaluation of their own level of activity independently reduced the risk of death, even when health and cognitive status were taken into…

  9. Effects of delayed mating and access to water on oviposition and longevity in navel orangeworm females

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study of delayed mating in the navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) was conducted to provide information about the potential impact of mating disruption treatments on this key pest of California tree nut crops. Fecundity, fertility, longevity, and ovipositional ...

  10. The Hidden Turmoil: Females Achieving Longevity in the Outdoor Learning Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Michelle; Gray, Tonia

    2013-01-01

    Being a woman in the outdoor learning profession can bring distinctive challenges and roadblocks. Even more difficult is sustaining a life-long career, flourishing into a woman's 50s or 60s. Based on this premise, career longevity seems elusive for some women who aspire to work in the outdoors. This paper analyses the autobiographies of three…

  11. Precocity Predicts Shorter Life for Major League Baseball Players: Confirmation of Mccann's Precocity-Longevity Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Ernest L.; Kruger, Michael L.

    2007-01-01

    We tested McCann's precocity-longevity hypothesis, which proposes that early career achievement is related to premature death, for Major League baseball players (N = 3,760). Age at debut was the definition for precocity. We controlled for possible artifacts of life expectancy selection, the "healthy worker" effect, player position, and body-mass…

  12. Early Educational Milestones as Predictors of Lifelong Academic Achievement, Midlife Adjustment, and Longevity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Margaret L.; Friedman, Howard S.

    2008-01-01

    This study gathered follow-up data from the Terman Life Cycle Study (N = 1023) to examine how age at first reading and age at school entry relate to grade school academic performance, lifelong educational attainment, midlife health and mental adjustment, and longevity across eight decades. Early reading was associated with early academic success,…

  13. Longevity in the Superintendency: A Case Study of New Jersey District Factor Group CD Superintendents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaquinto, Annette C.

    2010-01-01

    During the past several decades the demand for school accountability has increased, with much of the attention and pressure on school leaders, particularly the public school superintendent. Since the 1950's, there has been a marked decline in the average longevity of superintendents in a district which changed from an average of 20-plus years to…

  14. Measuring Longevity Achievements under Welfare Interdependencies: A Case for Joint Life Expectancy Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponthiere, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    Whereas period life expectancy constitutes an intuitive indicator of the survival conditions prevailing at a particular period, this paper argues that, given the existence of welfare interdependencies, that widespread indicator is nonetheless an incomplete measure of the longevity achievements relevant for human well-being. The central importance…

  15. Hearts of Hope: Experiences of EBD Teachers and Factors Contributing to Career Longevity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boe, Val Rae Marie

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study examined EBD teacher experiences through phenomenological research. Data was collated through interviews, a focus group, memos, and field notes. Questions focused on how EBD teachers described their work and the factors that contributed to career longevity. The study was conducted in one self-contained school for students…

  16. Natural variation for seed longevity and seed dormancy are negatively correlated in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, T.P.; Keizer, L.C.P.; Eeuwijk, van F.; Smeekens, S.C.M.; Bentsink, L.

    2012-01-01

    Dormancy is a state of metabolic arrest that facilitates the survival of organisms during environmental conditions incompatible with their regular course of life. Many organisms have deep dormant stages to promote an extended life span (increased longevity). In contrast, plants have seed dormancy an

  17. Genetic and physiological aspects of postharvest flower longevity in Asiatic hybrid lilies (Lilium L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulen-Muisers, van der J.J.M.

    2000-01-01

    In The Netherlands Lilium is economically the fourth overall flower crop for cut flower production. Longevity is a main quality characteristic for cut flowers. During postharvest handling of Asiatic hybrid lilies pretreatment with chemical solutions containing silver is carried out to ensure a satis

  18. A Quantitative Study of the Presidential Search Process and Position Longevity in Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howells, Constance L.

    2011-01-01

    A great deal of time, money, and effort can be expended on hiring community college presidents without any assurance that they will remain in their new positions a substantial amount of time. Building on decades of literature reporting the continuing decrease of presidential longevity, this study examined the methods most successful in selecting…

  19. Influences Contributing to the Longevity of Experienced Teachers in the Elementary, Middle, and High School Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, Theresa A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors that contribute to teachers' career longevity. The study gives voice to nine experienced teachers to help understand the challenges these teachers faced, the satisfaction they obtained, and the opportunities that allowed them to remain at one school for ten years or more. I use the lenses of…

  20. Genetic analysis of sow longevity and sow lifetime reproductive traits using censored data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engblom, L; Calderón Díaz, J A; Nikkilä, M; Gray, K; Harms, P; Fix, J; Tsuruta, S; Mabry, J; Stalder, K

    2016-04-01

    Sow longevity is a key component for efficient and profitable pig farming; however, approximately 50% of sows are removed annually from a breeding herd. There is no consensus in the scientific literature regarding a definition for sow longevity; however, it has been suggested that it can be measured using several methods such as stayability and economic indicators such as lifetime piglets produced. Sow longevity can be improved by genetic selection; however, it is rarely included in genetic evaluations. One reason is elongated time intervals required to collect complete lifetime data. The effect of genetic parameter estimation software in handling incomplete data (censoring) and possible early indicator traits were evaluated analysing a 30% censored data set (12 725 pedigreed Landrace × Large White sows that included approximately 30% censored data) with DMU6, THRGIBBS1F90 and GIBBS2CEN. Heritability estimates were low for all the traits evaluated. The results show that the binary stayability traits benefited from being analysed with a threshold model compared to analysing with a linear model. Sires were ranked very similarly regardless if the program handled censoring when all available data were included. Accumulated born alive and stayability were good indicators for lifetime born alive traits. Number of piglets born alive within each parity could be used as an early indicator trait for sow longevity. PMID:26174369

  1. Psychological Consequences of Longevity: The Increasing Importance of Self-Regulation in Old Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Alexandra M.; Nikitin, Jana; Ritter, Johannes O.

    2009-01-01

    How do changes in life expectancy and longevity affect life-span development? This paper argues that historical increases in life expectancy primarily have an impact on the later and less on the earlier parts of the life span. Increased life expectancy is both a challenge and an opportunity for positive development. A perspective is outlined…

  2. Genetic association between leg conformation in young pigs and longevity of Yorkshire sows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le, Thu Hong; Nilsson, Katja; Norberg, Elise;

    ); length of productive life (LPL); number of litters (NoL); lifetime born alive (LBA) and lifetime total born (LTB). The estimated heritabilities ranged from 0.05 to 0.16. Almost all estimated genetic correlations between conformation and longevity traits were significantly favorable (better scores...

  3. Effects of multiple mating and adult nutrition on longevity and fecundity in two Yponomeuta species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Parker; P. Roessingh; S.B.J. Menken

    2007-01-01

    Many male Lepidoptera transfer a large ejaculate, containing nutrients and/or secondary plant compounds. In principle this 'nuptial gift' could help to increase female survival and longevity. Here we investigated the effects of both multiple mating and extra nutrition in the adult stage on males and

  4. Correlation of emission capability and longevity of dispenser cathodes with characteristics of tungsten powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intercorrelation of tungsten powder properties, such as grain size, distribution and morphology, and porous matrix parameters with electron emission capability and longevity of Ba dispenser cathodes are investigated for three different grain morphologies. Best results of tungsten cathode life were found for isoaxis polyhedron morphology in combination with certain powder and matrix parameters

  5. Correlation of emission capability and longevity of dispenser cathodes with characteristics of tungsten powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikova, Irina P.; Vorozheikin, Victor G.; Usanov, Dmitry A.

    2003-06-01

    The intercorrelation of tungsten powder properties, such as grain size, distribution and morphology, and porous matrix parameters with electron emission capability and longevity of Ba dispenser cathodes are investigated for three different grain morphologies. Best results of tungsten cathode life were found for isoaxis polyhedron morphology in combination with certain powder and matrix parameters.

  6. The influence of irradiated wheat on longevity and reproduction of lesser grain borer, Rhyzopertha dominica Fabr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of the present research was to determine the influence of gamma radiation on wheat, the diet of the lesser grain Rhyzopertha dominica (Fabr.), using the longevity and reproduction of this insect, as parameters. (author). 11 refs., 1 tab

  7. Role of insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 signaling pathway in longevity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Lei Cheng; Tian-Qin Gao; Zhen Wang; Dian-Dong Li

    2005-01-01

    The insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling pathway is evolutionary conserved in diverse species including C.elegans, saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, rodents and humans, which is involved in many interrelated functions that are necessary for metabolism, growth and reproduction. Interestingly,more and more research has revealed that insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in the regulation of longevity. Generally, disruption of the power of this pathway will extend longevity in species ranging from C.elegansto humans. The role of insulin/IGF-1 in longevity is probably related to stress resistance. Although the underlying mechanisms of longevity are not fully understood,the Insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway has attracted substantial attention and it will be a novel target to prevent or postpone age-related diseases and extend life span.In this review, we mainly focus on the similar constitution and role of insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway in C.elegans,saccharomyces cerevisiae, rodents and humans.

  8. LeafJ: an ImageJ plugin for semi-automated leaf shape measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloof, Julin N; Nozue, Kazunari; Mumbach, Maxwell R; Palmer, Christine M

    2013-01-01

    High throughput phenotyping (phenomics) is a powerful tool for linking genes to their functions (see review and recent examples). Leaves are the primary photosynthetic organ, and their size and shape vary developmentally and environmentally within a plant. For these reasons studies on leaf morphology require measurement of multiple parameters from numerous leaves, which is best done by semi-automated phenomics tools. Canopy shade is an important environmental cue that affects plant architecture and life history; the suite of responses is collectively called the shade avoidance syndrome (SAS). Among SAS responses, shade induced leaf petiole elongation and changes in blade area are particularly useful as indices. To date, leaf shape programs (e.g. SHAPE, LAMINA, LeafAnalyzer, LEAFPROCESSOR) can measure leaf outlines and categorize leaf shapes, but can not output petiole length. Lack of large-scale measurement systems of leaf petioles has inhibited phenomics approaches to SAS research. In this paper, we describe a newly developed ImageJ plugin, called LeafJ, which can rapidly measure petiole length and leaf blade parameters of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. For the occasional leaf that required manual correction of the petiole/leaf blade boundary we used a touch-screen tablet. Further, leaf cell shape and leaf cell numbers are important determinants of leaf size. Separate from LeafJ we also present a protocol for using a touch-screen tablet for measuring cell shape, area, and size. Our leaf trait measurement system is not limited to shade-avoidance research and will accelerate leaf phenotyping of many mutants and screening plants by leaf phenotyping. PMID:23380664

  9. Sperm fractions obtained following density gradient centrifugation in human ejaculates show differences in sperm DNA longevity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jaime Goslvez; Stephen Johnston; Carmen Lpez-Fernndez; Altea Goslbez; Francisca Arroyo; Jose Lus Fernndez; Juan G lvarez

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the DNA longevity characteristics associated with each resultant fraction following density gradient centrifugation (DGC) in comparison to that of the original neat ejaculated sample. Methods:An aliquot of neat semen (NSS) collected from 7 patients was processed using DGC resulting in 3 fractions;Fraction 1:seminal plasma/40%gradient interface (GI);Fraction 2:40%GI/80%GI;Fraction 3:80%GI/pellet. An aliquot of each fraction and NSS was cryopreserved, thawed and incubated at 37 ℃for 24h;the increase of sperm DNA fragmentation was assessed using the Dyn-Halosperm assay following 0, 3, 6 and 24h of incubation. Results:While there was a significant reduction in the incidence of baseline sperm DNA fragmentation following DGC in Fraction 3, sperm DNA longevity was shown to be higher in the NSS than in any other sub-population following incubation. The highest levels of baseline DNA damage were found in Fractions 1 and 2;these fractions also showed the highest rate DNA fragmentation following incubation, subsequently exhibiting the lowest DNA longevity. Conclusion:1) Unnecessary incubation of spermatozoa prior to artificial insemination or in vitro fertilization, should be avoided, since sperm DNA longevity is significantly reduced after ex vivo sperm handling and 2) Although sperm selection by DCG significantly reduces the baseline levels of SDF of sperm in Fraction 3, sperm DNA longevity in this fraction was ultimately lower following 24 h incubation when compared to sperm recovered from non-centrifuged NSS.

  10. Mitochondrial DNA haplogroup D4a is a marker for extreme longevity in Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan Bilal

    Full Text Available We report results from the analysis of complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA sequences from 112 Japanese semi-supercentenarians (aged above 105 years combined with previously published data from 96 patients in each of three non-disease phenotypes: centenarians (99-105 years of age, healthy non-obese males, obese young males and four disease phenotypes, diabetics with and without angiopathy, and Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease patients. We analyze the correlation between mitochondrial polymorphisms and the longevity phenotype using two different methods. We first use an exhaustive algorithm to identify all maximal patterns of polymorphisms shared by at least five individuals and define a significance score for enrichment of the patterns in each phenotype relative to healthy normals. Our study confirms the correlations observed in a previous study showing enrichment of a hierarchy of haplogroups in the D clade for longevity. For the extreme longevity phenotype we see a single statistically significant signal: a progressive enrichment of certain "beneficial" patterns in centenarians and semi-supercentenarians in the D4a haplogroup. We then use Principal Component Spectral Analysis of the SNP-SNP Covariance Matrix to compare the measured eigenvalues to a Null distribution of eigenvalues on Gaussian datasets to determine whether the correlations in the data (due to longevity arises from some property of the mutations themselves or whether they are due to population structure. The conclusion is that the correlations are entirely due to population structure (phylogenetic tree. We find no signal for a functional mtDNA SNP correlated with longevity. The fact that the correlations are from the population structure suggests that hitch-hiking on autosomal events is a possible explanation for the observed correlations.

  11. Interactive influence of leaf age, light intensity, and girdling on green ash foliar chemistry and emerald ash borer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yigen; Poland, Therese M

    2009-07-01

    Biotic and abiotic environmental factors affect plant nutritional quality and defensive compounds that confer plant resistance to herbivory. Influence of leaf age, light availability, and girdling on foliar nutrition and defense of green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh) was examined in this study. Longevity of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), adults reared on green ash foliage subjected to these factors was assayed. Mature leaves generally were more nutritious with greater amino acids and a greater ratio of protein to non-structural carbohydrate (P:C) than young leaves, in particular when trees were grown in shade. On the other hand, mature leaves had lower amounts of trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitors, and total phenolics compared to young leaves. Lower defense of mature leaves alone, or along with higher nutritional quality may lead to increased survival and longevity of emerald ash borer feeding on mature leaves. Sunlight reduced amino acids and P:C ratio, irrespective of leaf age and girdling, and elevated total protein of young foliage, but not protein of mature leaves. Sunlight also dramatically increased all investigated defensive compounds of young, but not mature leaves. Girdling reduced green ash foliar nutrition, especially, of young leaves grown in shade and of mature leaves grown in sun. However emerald ash borer performance did not differ when fed leaves from trees grown in sun or shade, or from girdled or control trees. One explanation is that emerald ash borer reared on lower nutritional quality food may compensate for nutrient deficiency by increasing its consumption rate. The strong interactions among leaf age, light intensity, and girdling on nutrition and defense highlight the need for caution when interpreting data without considering possible interactions. PMID:19568811

  12. INVESTIGATION OF STRESSES IN MASTER LEAF OF LEAF SPRING BY FEM AND ITS EXPERIMENTAL VERIFICATION

    OpenAIRE

    R. B. Charde; Dr. D. V. Bhope

    2012-01-01

    The main component of leaf spring is master leaf and it is subjected to cyclic loading. There are many causes of master leaf failure. The maximum stress induced in the master leaf is at support. Due to non geometric linearity and large deflection behavior the stress may be occurred at any section over the span of leaf spring. Hence inthis work evaluation of stresses in master leaf over the span is studied using finite element method and strain gauge technique. The stress analysis of half cant...

  13. Worker longevity in an Amazonian Melipona (Apidae, Meliponini) species: effects of season and age at foraging onset

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, Rafael Leandro Corrêa; Menezes, Cristiano; Contrera, Felipe Andrés León

    2015-01-01

    AbstractWe studied the relationship between worker longevity and the age of foraging onset in the bee Melipona fasciculata, as well as the longevity oscillation in the rainy and dry seasons. Workers that emerged in the rainy season started to forage later and lived at least 50 % longer than foragers from the dry season. In both periods, a higher longevity was observed in workers that started to forage earlier in life but did not forage all days of their careers. We also showed, by using a Wei...

  14. Hormonal Regulation of Leaf Morphogenesis in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin-Chuan Li; Ding-Ming Kang; Zhang-Liang Chen; Li-Jia Qu

    2007-01-01

    Leaf morphogenesis is strictly controlled not only by intrinsic genetic factors, such as transcriptional factors, but also by environmental cues, such as light, water and pathogens. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanism of how leaf rnorphogenesis is regulated by genetic programs and environmental cues is far from clear. Numerous series of events demonstrate that plant hormones, mostly small and simple molecules,play crucial roles in plant growth and development, and in responses of plants to environmental cues such as light. With more and more genetics and molecular evidence obtained from the model plant Arabidopsis,several fundamental aspects of leaf rnorphogenesis including the initiation of leaf primordia, the determination of leaf axes, the regulation of cell division and expansion in leaves have been gradually unveiled.Among these phytohormones, auxin is found to be essential in the regulation of leaf morphogenesis.

  15. Static Analysis of Hybrid Composite Leaf Spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.Arun*1,

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Leaf spring is a simple form of suspension spring used to absorb vibrations induced during the motion of a vehicle. The automobile industry has shown increased interest in the replacement of steel leaf spring (65Si7 with hybrid composite leaf spring with Jute/E-glass/Epoxy due to high strength to weight ratio, higher stiffness, high impact energy absorption and lesser stresses. This research is aimed to investigate the suitability of natural and synthetic fiber reinforced hybrid composite material in automobile leaf spring application. hybrid composite leaf spring with Jute/E-glass/Epoxy due to high strength to weight ratio, higher stiffness, high impact energy absorption and lesser stresses. This research is aimed to investigate the suitability of natural and synthetic fiber reinforced hybrid composite material in automobile leaf spring application.

  16. Static Analysis of Hybrid Composite Leaf Spring

    OpenAIRE

    B.Arun*1,; P. Chithambaranathan2

    2014-01-01

    Leaf spring is a simple form of suspension spring used to absorb vibrations induced during the motion of a vehicle. The automobile industry has shown increased interest in the replacement of steel leaf spring (65Si7) with hybrid composite leaf spring with Jute/E-glass/Epoxy due to high strength to weight ratio, higher stiffness, high impact energy absorption and lesser stresses. This research is aimed to investigate the suitability of natural and synthetic fiber reinforced hybrid comp...

  17. Comparative leaf anatomy of Heisteria (Olacaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Baas, P; Kool, R.

    1983-01-01

    The leaf anatomy of all 33 species of Heisteria is described, based on a study of 143 specimens. There is a considerable amount of diversity in stomatal type (anisocytic, anomocytic, cyclocytic, laterocytic or paracytic), in occurrence and type of mesophyll sclereids, and of fibre bundles along the leaf margin. Outline and thickness of anticlinal epidermal cell walls, cuticle thickness, crystal complement, and stomatal size also vary, but often below the species level. The leaf anatomical div...

  18. Anaerobic Capacities of Leaf Litter

    OpenAIRE

    Kusel, K.; Drake, H L

    1996-01-01

    Leaf litter displayed a capacity to spontaneously form organic acids, alcohols, phenolic compounds, H(inf2), and CO(inf2) when incubated anaerobically at 20(deg)C either as buffered suspensions or in a moistened condition in microcosms. Acetate was the predominant organic product formed regardless of the degree of litter decomposition. Initial rates of acetate formation in litter suspensions and microcosms approximated 2.6 and 0.53 (mu)mol of acetate per g (dry weight) of litter per h, respec...

  19. 7 CFR 28.471 - Below Leaf Grade Cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Below Leaf Grade Cotton. 28.471 Section 28.471... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Below Leaf Grade Cotton § 28.471 Below Leaf Grade Cotton. Below leaf grade cotton is American Upland cotton which is lower in leaf grade than...

  20. Rearing Technique, Biology and Sterilization of the Coffee Leaf Miner, Leucoptera Coffeella Guer. (Lepidoptera: Lyonetiidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For two years the authors studied the feasibility of controlling the coffee leaf miner Leucoptera coffeella Guer. by the radiation sterilization technique. During this period a technique for raising large numbers of tills insect on potted coffee plants in the laboratory was devised. The optimal range for the development of egg, larval and pupal stages of the coffee leaf miner was between 20 and 30° C. The pupal stage of female insects was slightly shorter than that of the male. The laying of fertile eggs began during the first night following emergence. During an oviposition period of 16 days the average fecundity was 68 eggs. The maximum oviposition by a single female was 131 eggs over the life span while as many as 34 eggs were laid during a single day of oviposition. To investigate the best stage to induce radiation sterilization, pupal and adult insects were irradiated with 60CO gamma rays. Seven-day pupae (close to emergence) showed 88% lethality in males when given 60 krad; the survivors retained some fertility. Adult females receiving 70 krad were 100% sterile while males given 90 krad showed 0.02% fertility. Doses as high as 90 krad given to newly emerged adults did not reduce longevity. Studies are continuing to determine if sterilizing doses impair sexual vigour and mating competitiveness of the treated males. (author)

  1. On career longevity distributions in professional sports and a stochastic mechanism underlying their empirical power-law behavior

    CERN Document Server

    Petersen, Alexander; Yang, Jae-Suk; Stanley, H Eugene

    2008-01-01

    We provide a simple and intuitive stochastic process that accounts for the observed probability density functions governing career longevity in several professional sports leagues in various countries. Our mechanism characterizes the probability density functions governing career longevity with two parameters, \\alpha and \\tau . The exponent \\alpha < 1 characterizes the scaling in the power-law regime, which is followed by an exponential cutoff after a critical value \\tau, representing the mean lifetime in each sport. In addition, we also show that the probability density functions of career statistical metrics within each sport follow directly from the density functions of career longevity. Thus, our process is a universal mechanism describing longevity in a competitive environment, with the exponent \\alpha representing the role of experience and reputation in career development. Because net career tallies of in-game success ultimately serve as a metric for classifying careers, our findings provide a robus...

  2. Analysis of Environmental and Socio-economic Determinants Affecting Population Longevity Level at County Level in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Jiehua; Wang Hongbo; Pan Yi

    2005-01-01

    Based on the current literature, this paper is mainly intended to test whether environmental factors and socio-economic factors will have direct effect on the longevity at county level in China in order to determine the major determinants affecting local longevity level. Using the multi-regression model,we find the result that factors such as temperature,climate, longitude, type of soils, as well as type of agricultural food production play a major role in shaping the longevity at county level, and that socioeconomic factors like infant mortality and gross death rate also have some direct impact on longevity, but the degree of impact is not as strong as the above environmental factors.

  3. The Timing Effects of Reward, Business Longevity, and Involvement on Consumers’ Responses to a Reward Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badri Munir Sukoco

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Managers could elicit customers’ repeat purchase behavior through a well-designed reward program. This study examines two extrinsic cues - business longevity and timing effects of reward – to determine the consumers’ perceived risk and intention to participate in this kind of program. Moreover, this study discusses how different levels of involvement might interact with these two cues. An experiment with a 2 (business longevity: long vs. short x 2 (timing of reward: delayed vs. immediate x 2 (involvement: high vs. low between-subject factorial design is conducted to validate the proposed research hypotheses. The results show that an immediate reward offered by an older, more established, firm for a highly-involved product, make loyalty programs less risky and consequently attract consumers to participate. Interestingly, immediate rewards that are offered by older firms for a product that customers are less involved in has the opposite effects. Managerial and academic implications are further presented in this study.

  4. Longevity and health expectancy in an ageing society: implications for public health in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Noale

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: While the prolongation of life expectancy is due to medical, economic, social and public health advancements, longevity may not necessarily be an indicator of real development. Epidemiologic data indicate, in fact, that advanced age carries the risk of multiple diseases, disability and loss of autonomy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: How the years gained are lived need to be assessed evaluating quality of life, health status, and disability. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Good health care planning should aim to ensure that the years of life gained are lived in good health conditions in the light of the World Health Organization's declaration that "increased longevity without quality of life is an empty prize. Health expectancy is more important than life expectancy".

  5. Environmental Temperature Differentially Modulates C. elegans Longevity through a Thermosensitive TRP Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bi; Xiao, Rui; Ronan, Elizabeth A; He, Yongqun; Hsu, Ao-Lin; Liu, Jianfeng; Xu, X Z Shawn

    2015-06-01

    Temperature profoundly affects aging in both poikilotherms and homeotherms. A general belief is that lower temperatures extend lifespan, whereas higher temperatures shorten it. Although this "temperature law" is widely accepted, it has not been extensively tested. Here, we systematically evaluated the role of temperature in lifespan regulation in C. elegans. We found that, although exposure to low temperatures at the adult stage prolongs lifespan, low-temperature treatment at the larval stage surprisingly reduces lifespan. Interestingly, this differential effect of temperature on longevity in larvae and adults is mediated by the same thermosensitive TRP channel TRPA-1 that signals to the transcription factor DAF-16/FOXO. DAF-16/FOXO and TRPA-1 act in larva to shorten lifespan but extend lifespan in adulthood. DAF-16/FOXO differentially regulates gene expression in larva and adult in a temperature-dependent manner. Our results uncover complexity underlying temperature modulation of longevity, demonstrating that temperature differentially regulates lifespan at different stages of life. PMID:26027928

  6. Genetic parameters estimation and genetic evaluation for longevity in Italian Brown Swiss bulls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Nicoletti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct longevity EBV of Italian Brown Swiss sires were predicted using a Weibull proportional hazards model. This trait was defined as the risk of culling from first calving. Records from 511,596 Brown Swiss cows with first calving from 1985 to 2005 were used. The model include fixed (age at first calving and random (sire’s additive genetic time independent effects, fixed (herd, parity, quantile of mature equivalent deviation from the yearly herd mature equivalent average, and regression on the dynamic herd size and random (herd-year with log-gamma distribution time dependent effects. Predicted breeding values for functional longevity, expressed as relative risk ratios, ranged from 0.58 to 1.69. The EBV were standardized with mean 100 and standard deviation 12. EBV were positively submitted to Interbull trend validation procedure in order to assess EBV variation over time and the possibility of including them in the international exchange of bull indexes.

  7. Successful Aging and Longevity in Older Old Women: The Role of Depression and Cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Paulson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Based in successful aging theory and terminal cognitive drop research, this paper investigates cerebrovascular burden (CVB, depressive symptoms, and cognitive decline as threats to longevity. A subsample of stroke-free women over the age of 80 was identified in the Health and Retirement Survey (years 2000–2008. Mortality at 2, 6, and 8 year intervals was predicted using CVB (diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, and cognitive decline (decline of 1 standard deviation or more on the 35-point Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status over 2 years. At most waves (2002, 2004, and 2006 mortality was predicted by CVB, depressive symptoms, and cognitive drop measured 2 years prior. CVB and depressive symptoms at the 2000 wave predicted mortality at 6 and 8 years. Older women with the greatest longevity had low CVB, robust cognitive functioning, and few depression symptoms, supporting successful aging theory and terminal cognitive drop.

  8. Early educational milestones as predictors of lifelong academic achievement, midlife adjustment, and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Margaret L; Friedman, Howard S

    2008-01-01

    This study gathered follow-up data from the Terman Life Cycle Study (N = 1,023) to examine how age at first reading and age at school entry relate to grade school academic performance, lifelong educational attainment, midlife health and mental adjustment, and longevity across eight decades. Early reading was associated with early academic success, but less lifelong educational attainment and worse midlife adjustment. Early school entry was associated with less educational attainment, worse midlife adjustment, and most importantly, increased mortality risk. Personality, midlife adjustment, and educational attainment partially mediated the school entry-longevity association (controlling for age, sex, personal characteristics, and home environment factors). Although the sample is limited in some respects and care should be taken in generalizing the results, findings do confirm the importance of lifespan approaches in understanding the effects of education on individual patterns within social contexts. PMID:19626128

  9. Efficacy of dietary behavior modification for preserving cardiovascular health and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryde, Moira McAllister; Kannel, William Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and its predisposing risk factors are major lifestyle and behavioral determinants of longevity. Dietary lifestyle choices such as a heart healthy diet, regular exercise, a lean weight, moderate alcohol consumption, and smoking cessation have been shown to substantially reduce CVD and increase longevity. Recent research has shown that men and women who adhere to this lifestyle can substantially reduce their risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). The preventive benefits of maintaining a healthy lifestyle exceed those reported for using medication and procedures. Among the modifiable preventive measures, diet is of paramount importance, and recent data suggest some misconceptions and uncertainties that require reconsideration. These include commonly accepted recommendations about polyunsaturated fat intake, processed meat consumption, fish choices and preparation, transfatty acids, low carbohydrate diets, egg consumption, coffee, added sugar, soft drink beverages, glycemic load, chocolate, orange juice, nut consumption, vitamin D supplements, food portion size, and alcohol. PMID:21253499

  10. Efficacy of Dietary Behavior Modification for Preserving Cardiovascular Health and Longevity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moira McAllister Pryde

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD and its predisposing risk factors are major lifestyle and behavioral determinants of longevity. Dietary lifestyle choices such as a heart healthy diet, regular exercise, a lean weight, moderate alcohol consumption, and smoking cessation have been shown to substantially reduce CVD and increase longevity. Recent research has shown that men and women who adhere to this lifestyle can substantially reduce their risk of coronary heart disease (CHD. The preventive benefits of maintaining a healthy lifestyle exceed those reported for using medication and procedures. Among the modifiable preventive measures, diet is of paramount importance, and recent data suggest some misconceptions and uncertainties that require reconsideration. These include commonly accepted recommendations about polyunsaturated fat intake, processed meat consumption, fish choices and preparation, transfatty acids, low carbohydrate diets, egg consumption, coffee, added sugar, soft drink beverages, glycemic load, chocolate, orange juice, nut consumption, vitamin D supplements, food portion size, and alcohol.

  11. The impact of recent chemotherapy innovation on the longevity of myeloma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hostenkamp, Gisela; Lichtenberg, Frank R.

    2015-01-01

    The longevity of multiple myeloma patients increased sharply since the late 1990s. This increase coincided with the introduction of several important innovations in chemotherapy for myeloma. In this study, we aim to quantify the impact of recent chemotherapy innovation on the longevity of myeloma...... back-of-the-envelope calculation, this means that the cost per US life-year gained from post-1997 chemotherapy innovation is unlikely to have exceeded $46,000.We also investigate the impact of chemotherapy innovation on the myeloma mortality rate using longitudinal country-level data on 38 countries...... chemotherapy regimen is similar in other countries to its effect in the US. Non-US prices of two of the three new drugs were lower than US prices, so recent myeloma chemotherapy innovation may have been more cost-effective in other countries than it was in the US.Recent chemotherapy innovation has had a...

  12. Differences in health between Americans and Western Europeans: Effects on longevity and public finance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Pierre-Carl; Goldman, Dana; Lakdawalla, Darius; Gailey, Adam; Zheng, Yuhui

    2011-07-01

    In 1975, 50-year-old Americans could expect to live slightly longer than most of their Western European counterparts. By 2005, American life expectancy had fallen behind that of most Western European countries. We find that this growing longevity gap is primarily due to real declines in the health of near-elderly Americans, relative to their Western European peers. We use a microsimulation approach to project what US longevity would look like, if US health trends approximated those in Western Europe. The model implies that differences in health can explain most of the growing gap in remaining life expectancy. In addition, we quantify the public finance consequences of this deterioration in health. The model predicts that gradually moving American cohorts to the health status enjoyed by Western Europeans could save up to $1.1 trillion in discounted total health expenditures from 2004 to 2050. PMID:21719178

  13. Leaf hydraulic conductance in relation to anatomical and functional traits during Populus tremula leaf ontogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasamaa, Krõõt; Niinemets, Ulo; Sõber, Anu

    2005-11-01

    Leaf hydraulic conductance (K(leaf)) and several characteristics of hydraulic architecture and physiology were measured during the first 10 weeks of leaf ontogeny in Populus tremula L. saplings growing under control, mild water deficit or elevated temperature conditions. During the initial 3 weeks of leaf ontogeny, most measured characteristics rapidly increased. Thereafter, a gradual decrease in K(leaf) was correlated with a decrease in leaf osmotic potential under all conditions, and with increases in leaf dry mass per area and bulk modulus of elasticity under mild water deficit and control conditions. From about Week 3 onward, K(leaf) was 33% lower in trees subjected to mild water deficit and 33% higher in trees held at an elevated temperature relative to control trees. Mild water deficit and elevated temperature treatment had significant and opposite effects on most of the other characteristics measured. The ontogenetic maximum in K(leaf) was correlated positively with the width of xylem conduits in the midrib, but negatively with the overall width of the midrib xylem, number of lateral ribs, leaf dry mass per area and bulk modulus of elasticity. The ontogenetic maximum in K(leaf) was also correlated positively with the proportion of intercellular spaces and leaf osmotic potential, but negatively with leaf thickness, volume of mesophyll cells and epidermis and number of cells per total mesophyll cell volume, the closest relationships being between leaf osmotic potential and number of cells per total mesophyll cell volume. It was concluded that differences in protoplast traits are more important than differences in xylem or parenchymal cell wall traits in determining the variability in K(leaf) among leaves growing under different environmental conditions. PMID:16105808

  14. AKT1 fails to replicate as a longevity-associated gene in Danish and German nonagenarians and centenarians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Marianne; Soerensen, Mette; Flachsbart, Friederike; Mengel-From, Jonas; Tan, Qihua; Schreiber, Stefan; Nebel, Almut; Christensen, Kaare; Christiansen, Lene

    2013-01-01

    ancestry. None of the seven SNPs tested were significantly associated with longevity in either a case-control or a longitudinal setting, although a supportive nominal indication of a disadvantageous effect of rs3803304 was found in a restricted group of Danish centenarian men. Overall, our results do not...... support AKT1 as a universal longevity-associated gene.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 29 August 2012; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2012.196....

  15. Sperm velocity and longevity trade off each other and influence fertilization in the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus.

    OpenAIRE

    Levitan, D R

    2000-01-01

    The theoretical prediction that fast sperm should be more effective at fertilizing eggs has never been documented empirically. Interspecific comparisons suggest an inverse relationship between sperm velocity and sperm longevity but this trade-off has never been demonstrated within a species. Here I investigate how sperm velocity and sperm longevity influence the patterns of fertilization in the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus. In the laboratory I examined 11 male female pairs of sea urchins ...

  16. Values and longevity in family business: Evidence from a cross-cultural analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Tapies, Josep; Fernandez, Maria

    2010-01-01

    The link between longevity and values has been pointed out by several authors, who have underlined values as an important factor for supporting a long-term vision, as well as a source of competitive advantage based on using values as specific company resources. Nevertheless, not many empirical works have dealt with this topic. The present paper aims to shed light on this stream of research by developing a cross-cultural analysis, contrasting samples from Spain, Italy, France and Finland.

  17. Reproduction and longevity among the British peerage: the effect of frailty and health selection.

    OpenAIRE

    Doblhammer, Gabriele; Oeppen, Jim

    2003-01-01

    Whether a cost of reproduction exists among humans is still questionable. A major study of aristocratic British families finds a significant positive correlation between parity and late-life mortality, which indicates a trade-off between reproduction and longevity. This result is supported by four other studies, while earlier studies have not found a relationship or came to the opposite conclusion. We show that in natural fertility populations the relationship between fertility and late-life ...

  18. Genetics of human longevity with emphasis on the relevance of HSP70 as candidate genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Ripudaman; Kølvrå, Steen; Rattan, Suresh I S

    2007-01-01

    mechanisms. One such pathway includes the battery of stress response genes, especially the heat shock protein HSP70 genes. Three such genes, HSPA1A, HSPA1B and HSPA1L, are present within the MHC-III region on the short arm of chromosome 6. We and others have found alleles, genotypes and haplotypes which have...... heat shock. Stress response genes, particularly HSP70, are now the major candidates in the gene-longevity association studies....

  19. Identification of longevity, fertility and growth-promoting properties of pomegranate in Caenorhabditis elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Kılıçgün, Hasan; Arda, Nazlı; Uçar, Evren Önay

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) is commonly consumed as fresh fruit and fruit juice. It is also used in the production of jam, wine, food coloring agent, and flavor enhancer. Objective: The aim of this study was to identify the possible longevity, fertility and growth promoting properties of different ethanolic extract concentrations of pomegranate in Caenorhabditis elegans, which is increasingly popular and has proven to be a very useful experimental model organism for aging stu...

  20. The Effect of Improvements in Health and Longevity on Optimal Retirement and Saving

    OpenAIRE

    Bloom, David E.; David Canning; Michael Moore

    2004-01-01

    We develop a life-cycle model of optimal retirement and savings behavior under complete markets where retirement is caused by worsening health in old age. Our model explains the long-run decline in the age of retirement as an income level effect. We show that improvements in health and longevity tend to increase the desired retirement age, though less than proportionately, while, contrary to conventional views, reducing savings rates. The retirement age is not simply proportional to healthy l...

  1. Early educational milestones as predictors of lifelong academic achievement, midlife adjustment, and longevity

    OpenAIRE

    Kern, Margaret L.; Friedman, Howard S

    2008-01-01

    This study gathered follow-up data from the Terman Life Cycle Study (N = 1,023) to examine how age at first reading and age at school entry relate to grade school academic performance, lifelong educational attainment, midlife health and mental adjustment, and longevity across eight decades. Early reading was associated with early academic success, but less lifelong educational attainment and worse midlife adjustment. Early school entry was associated with less educational attainment, worse mi...

  2. Gender Employment Longevity: I.T Staff Response to Organizational Support in Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Haque, Adnan ul; Yamoah, Fred

    2014-01-01

    This research attempts to explain reasons behind employment longevity on the basis of gender among the I.T staff. Previous empirical researches have confirmed the correlation between organisational commitment, job satisfaction, and organisational support programme. However, most researches were single dimension primarily due to their focus on establishing the relationship between above mentioned variables in different organisational settings whereas, this research mainly explore on the groun...

  3. Quest for a Long Life: Paradoxes and Essentials of Evolving Longevity

    OpenAIRE

    Mori, Nozomu; Mori, Mari

    2012-01-01

    Among the countries in the developed world, Japan has the longest mean lifespan for women; however, the nation has encountered serious problems in policy and economics, as well as in managing medical care for its aging population. Aging is inevitable, but it also constitutes a major challenge in modern biology and medicine. In the treatment of geriatric patients, an understanding of the fundamental biological mechanisms of aging and longevity is crucial for the effective treatment and prevent...

  4. Pollen limitation and variation in floral longevity in gynodioecious Potentilla tanacetifolia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong YAO; yi-Bo LUO

    2011-01-01

    Pollination limitation is common in flowering plants and is thought to be a factor driving the evolution of floral traits.The plasticity of floral longevity to pollination may be an adaptation of plants to pollen limitation.However,this adaptation is less critical in short-lived flowers.To evaluate pollen limitation and the plasticity of floral longevity to pollination in Potentilla tanacetifolia,a gynodioecious herb with short-lived flowers,we analyzed its breeding system,tested sex-differential pollen limitation,and compared variations in floral display size in natural populations in Duolun County,Inner Mongolia,China.Hand pollination experiments and pollinator exclusion treatments revealed that P tanacetifolia is self-compatible and non-autonomously apomictic and shows sex-differential pollen limitation.The plasticity of floral longevity to pollination was observed; the floral duration of female plants was prolonged by approximately 3-4 hours with pollination exclusion treatment.Moreover,the percentage of flowers displayed on female plants during pollination exclusion treatment was significantly higher than that during natural pollination.Under natural pollination conditions,the percentage of flowers displayed on female plants was significantly higher than on hermaphrodite plants.Furthermore,approximately 50% of the pollen grains spread out of the anthers of hermaphrodite flowers within 2 h of anthesis; the number of pollen grains adhering to the stigmas of hermaphrodite flowers was significantly higher than that adhering to female flowers when flowers shed their petals.These results indicate that variation in floral longevity may be an adaptive strategy to pollination conditions for gynodioecious P tanacetifolia.

  5. Free Flow of Qi in Conception Vessel and Governor Vessel Leading to Longevity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUI Liang; CUI Yi-jun

    2003-01-01

    @@ Circle of Qi in human body, is namely Conception Vessel and Governor Vessel. It is divided into Large and Small Circle of qi. Small Circle of qi means that qi flows along the Circle of qi. Large Circle of qi means that vitality flows along the Circle of qi.Health-preserving expert holds that, if someone can achieve the skill of Small Circle of qi, he can return to juvenscence in essence, consolidating the body and achieve longevity.

  6. Power Estimation for Gene-Longevity Association Analysis Using Concordant Twins

    OpenAIRE

    Qihua Tan; Jing Hua Zhao; Torben Kruse; Kaare Christensen

    2014-01-01

    Statistical power is one of the major concerns in genetic association studies. Related individuals such as twins are valuable samples for genetic studies because of their genetic relatedness. Phenotype similarity in twin pairs provides evidence of genetic control over the phenotype variation in a population. The genetic association study on human longevity, a complex trait that is under control of both genetic and environmental factors, has been confronted by the small sample sizes of longevi...

  7. Longevity of animals under reactive oxygen species stress and disease susceptibility due to global warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paital, Biswaranjan; Panda, Sumana Kumari; Hati, Akshaya Kumar; Mohanty, Bobllina; Mohapatra, Manoj Kumar; Kanungo, Shyama; Chainy, Gagan Bihari Nityananda

    2016-02-26

    The world is projected to experience an approximate doubling of atmospheric CO2 concentration in the next decades. Rise in atmospheric CO2 level as one of the most important reasons is expected to contribute to raise the mean global temperature 1.4 °C-5.8 °C by that time. A survey from 128 countries speculates that global warming is primarily due to increase in atmospheric CO2 level that is produced mainly by anthropogenic activities. Exposure of animals to high environmental temperatures is mostly accompanied by unwanted acceleration of certain biochemical pathways in their cells. One of such examples is augmentation in generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent increase in oxidation of lipids, proteins and nucleic acids by ROS. Increase in oxidation of biomolecules leads to a state called as oxidative stress (OS). Finally, the increase in OS condition induces abnormality in physiology of animals under elevated temperature. Exposure of animals to rise in habitat temperature is found to boost the metabolism of animals and a very strong and positive correlation exists between metabolism and levels of ROS and OS. Continuous induction of OS is negatively correlated with survivability and longevity and positively correlated with ageing in animals. Thus, it can be predicted that continuous exposure of animals to acute or gradual rise in habitat temperature due to global warming may induce OS, reduced survivability and longevity in animals in general and poikilotherms in particular. A positive correlation between metabolism and temperature in general and altered O2 consumption at elevated temperature in particular could also increase the risk of experiencing OS in homeotherms. Effects of global warming on longevity of animals through increased risk of protein misfolding and disease susceptibility due to OS as the cause or effects or both also cannot be ignored. Therefore, understanding the physiological impacts of global warming in relation to

  8. Genetic parameters estimation and genetic evaluation for longevity in Italian Brown Swiss bulls

    OpenAIRE

    Chiara Nicoletti; Attilio Rossoni; Omar Bonetti

    2010-01-01

    Direct longevity EBV of Italian Brown Swiss sires were predicted using a Weibull proportional hazards model. This trait was defined as the risk of culling from first calving. Records from 511,596 Brown Swiss cows with first calving from 1985 to 2005 were used. The model include fixed (age at first calving) and random (sire’s additive genetic) time independent effects, fixed (herd, parity, quantile of mature equivalent deviation from the yearly herd mature equivalent average, and regress...

  9. Longevity of cut inflorescence shoots of high kamasija (Camassia quamash (Pursh) Greene) depending on postharvest treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Paulina Ulczycka; Agnieszka Krzymińska

    2013-01-01

    The research was carried out to determine the effect of conditioning of cut flowering shoots of the Camassia quamash in 8-hydroxyquinoline sulphate on postharvest longevity. The inflorescence shoots were conditioned for 24 h in water solutions of 8-hydroxyquinoline sulphate at concentration of 200 mg·dm-3 and then kept in water or gibberellic acid solutions at concentration of 50 or 100 mg·dm-3. The inflorescent shoots not conditioned and kept in water showed the longest posthar...

  10. The Longevity of Arteriovenous Graft for Hemodialysis Patients—Externally Supported or Nonsupported

    OpenAIRE

    Hung, Yen-Ni; Ko, Po-Jen; Ng, Yee-Yung; Wu, Shiao-Chi

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: Because thrombosis and stenosis are the most frequent causes of arteriovenous graft (AVG) failure, several externally supported grafts were designed to enhance incompressibility and kinking resistance to improve the patency. However, consensus on advantage of these modifications having still not been reached might relate to the previous limited patient numbers and small studies. This study analyzed the longevity of externally supported and nonsupported AVG on the ba...

  11. Family cohesion as a longevity factor of business with intergenerational transmission

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández-Roca, Fco. Javier; López-Manjón, Jesús D.; Gutiérrez-Hidalgo, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    This article contributes to a line of research in Business History that aims to determine the factors of family business longevity in the long term with the study of individual cases. The literature has identified family cohesion as one of the essential factors for survival. Cohesion may be reinforced or broken at the time of the intergenerational transfer. This study finds that a critical response on the part of the business family to the difficulties associated with intergenerational transf...

  12. Carotenoids and retinol: their possible importance in determining longevity of primate species.

    OpenAIRE

    Cutler, R.G.

    1984-01-01

    Aging and cancer share a number of characteristics. This has led to the hypothesis that species' differences in longevity may be governed in part by the same mechanisms as those processes governing species' differences in their age-dependent probability of developing cancer. Much evidence has indicated that beta-carotene and retinol may be important natural anticarcinogens. Accordingly, they also may be important antiaging agents. This possibility has been tested by determining if a positive ...

  13. Successful Aging and Longevity in Older Old Women: The Role of Depression and Cognition

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Paulson; Mary Elizabeth Bowen; Lichtenberg, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Based in successful aging theory and terminal cognitive drop research, this paper investigates cerebrovascular burden (CVB), depressive symptoms, and cognitive decline as threats to longevity. A subsample of stroke-free women over the age of 80 was identified in the Health and Retirement Survey (years 2000–2008). Mortality at 2, 6, and 8 year intervals was predicted using CVB (diabetes, heart disease, hypertension), depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale), an...

  14. Disruption of growth hormone receptor prevents calorie restriction from improving insulin action and longevity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Bonkowski

    Full Text Available Most mutations that delay aging and prolong lifespan in the mouse are related to somatotropic and/or insulin signaling. Calorie restriction (CR is the only intervention that reliably increases mouse longevity. There is considerable phenotypic overlap between long-lived mutant mice and normal mice on chronic CR. Therefore, we investigated the interactive effects of CR and targeted disruption or knock out of the growth hormone receptor (GHRKO in mice on longevity and the insulin signaling cascade. Every other day feeding corresponds to a mild (i.e. 15% CR which increased median lifespan in normal mice but not in GHRKO mice corroborating our previous findings on the effects of moderate (30% CR on the longevity of these animals. To determine why insulin sensitivity improves in normal but not GHRKO mice in response to 30% CR, we conducted insulin stimulation experiments after one year of CR. In normal mice, CR increased the insulin stimulated activation of the insulin signaling cascade (IR/IRS/PI3K/AKT in liver and muscle. Livers of GHRKO mice responded to insulin by increased activation of the early steps of insulin signaling, which was dissipated by altered PI3K subunit abundance which putatively inhibited AKT activation. In the muscle of GHRKO mice, there was elevated downstream activation of the insulin signaling cascade (IRS/PI3K/AKT in the absence of elevated IR activation. Further, we found a major reduction of inhibitory Ser phosphorylation of IRS-1 seen exclusively in GHRKO muscle which may underpin their elevated insulin sensitivity. Chronic CR failed to further modify the alterations in insulin signaling in GHRKO mice as compared to normal mice, likely explaining or contributing to the absence of CR effects on insulin sensitivity and longevity in these long-lived mice.

  15. Stress Biology and Aging Mechanisms: Toward Understanding the Deep Connection Between Adaptation to Stress and Longevity

    OpenAIRE

    Epel, Elissa S.; Lithgow, Gordon J.

    2014-01-01

    The rate of biological aging is modulated in part by genes interacting with stressor exposures. Basic research has shown that exposure to short-term stress can strengthen cellular responses to stress (“hormetic stress”). Hormetic stress promotes longevity in part through enhanced activity of molecular chaperones and other defense mechanisms. In contrast, prolonged exposure to stress can overwhelm compensatory responses (“toxic stress”) and shorten lifespan. One key question is whether the str...

  16. Examining fuel treatment longevity through experimental and simulated surface fire behaviour: a maritime pine case study

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Paulo

    2009-01-01

    The adequate prediction of fire behaviour characteristics for both scientific and management objectives is greatly impacted by the performance of fire behaviour models. Lack of experimentation and limitations in fire behaviour models are constraining our current understanding of fuel treatment effectiveness and longevity. The residual effect of a 10-year old prescribed fire treatment is quantified by simulating and observing actual real-world fire behaviour in treated (T10) and untreated (U25...

  17. Adiponectin in mice with altered growth hormone action: links to insulin sensitivity and longevity?

    OpenAIRE

    Lubbers, Ellen R; List, Edward O.; Jara, Adam; Sackman-Sala, Lucila; Cordoba-Chacon, Jose; Gahete, Manuel D.; Kineman, Rhonda D.; Boparai, Ravneet; Bartke, Andrzej; Kopchick, John J.; Berryman, Darlene E.

    2013-01-01

    Adiponectin is positively correlated with longevity and negatively correlated with many obesity-related diseases. While there are several circulating forms of adiponectin, the high molecular weight (HMW) version has been suggested to have the predominant bioactivity. Adiponectin gene expression and cognate serum protein levels are of particular interest in mice with altered growth hormone (GH) signaling as these mice exhibit extremes in obesity that are positively associated with insulin sens...

  18. Treatment decisions on approximal caries and longevity of Class II restorations

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Placing restorations due to dental caries is still a commonly performed treatment by dental practitioners in Norway. The aim of this thesis was to explore dentists’ treatment decisions on approximal caries and to assess the longevity of approximal restorations in posterior teeth and reasons for their failure. The research employed a questionnaire and included a practice-based study. The questionnaire revealed that, in 2009, 7% of Norwegian dentists would restore approximal lesions confined to...

  19. Development of leaf area and leaf number of micropropagated potato plants

    OpenAIRE

    Tadesse, M.; Lommen, W.J.M.; Putten, van, M.; Struik, P. C.

    2001-01-01

    Aboveground leaf area and leaf number development of in vitro produced potato plantlets was studied over three growth phases. In vitro plantlets were produced at 17 or 23°C (normalisation phase, 3 weeks), planted in soil at 18/12 or 26/20°C (transplant production phase, 2 weeks), and later transplanted at 18/12 or 26/20°C (tuber production phase, 6 weeks). Boosts in leaf area increase and leaf appearance occurred in the first days after planting to soil. A shock in leaf area increase occurred...

  20. Inhibition of telomere recombination by inactivation of KEOPS subunit Cgi121 promotes cell longevity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Peng

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA double strand break (DSB is one of the major damages that cause genome instability and cellular aging. The homologous recombination (HR-mediated repair of DSBs plays an essential role in assurance of genome stability and cell longevity. Telomeres resemble DSBs and are competent for HR. Here we show that in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae telomere recombination elicits genome instability and accelerates cellular aging. Inactivation of KEOPS subunit Cgi121 specifically inhibits telomere recombination, and significantly extends cell longevity in both telomerase-positive and pre-senescing telomerase-negative cells. Deletion of CGI121 in the short-lived yku80(tel mutant restores lifespan to cgi121Δ level, supporting the function of Cgi121 in telomeric single-stranded DNA generation and thus in promotion of telomere recombination. Strikingly, inhibition of telomere recombination is able to further slow down the aging process in long-lived fob1Δ cells, in which rDNA recombination is restrained. Our study indicates that HR activity at telomeres interferes with telomerase to pose a negative impact on cellular longevity.

  1. On the Study of Longevity Palace%益延寿宫考略

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚生民

    2012-01-01

    益延寿宫是汉武帝为求仙于甘泉宫所建的宫观,但其名称和地理位置历有异议。通过对宫观遗迹、遗物的考查,结合相关历史文献记载,论证益延寿宫应在今陕西省淳化县甘泉宫遗址,其宫名应为“益延寿宫”。%Longevity Palace is the palace built in Ganquan Palace by Emperor Hanwu. However, there has been controversy over its name and geographical position over the years. Through examinations of the cultural remains and sites of the palace in combination with relevant record in historical literature, it was proved that Longevity Palace should be located in the relic of Ganquan Palace in Chunhua County with its name being "Longevity Palace".

  2. A genetic program promotes C. elegans longevity at cold temperatures via a thermosensitive TRP channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Rui; Zhang, Bi; Dong, Yongming; Gong, Jianke; Xu, Tao; Liu, Jianfeng; Xu, X Z Shawn

    2013-02-14

    Both poikilotherms and homeotherms live longer at lower body temperatures, highlighting a general role of temperature reduction in lifespan extension. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. One prominent model is that cold temperatures reduce the rate of chemical reactions, thereby slowing the rate of aging. This view suggests that cold-dependent lifespan extension is simply a passive thermodynamic process. Here, we challenge this view in C. elegans by showing that genetic programs actively promote longevity at cold temperatures. We find that TRPA-1, a cold-sensitive TRP channel, detects temperature drop in the environment to extend lifespan. This effect requires cold-induced, TRPA-1-mediated calcium influx and a calcium-sensitive PKC that signals to the transcription factor DAF-16/FOXO. Human TRPA1 can functionally substitute for worm TRPA-1 in promoting longevity. Our results reveal a previously unrecognized function for TRP channels, link calcium signaling to longevity, and, importantly, demonstrate that genetic programs contribute to lifespan extension at cold temperatures. PMID:23415228

  3. Forever Young: Mechanisms of Natural Anoxia Tolerance and Potential Links to Longevity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Krivoruchko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available While mammals cannot survive oxygen deprivation for more than a few minutes without sustaining severe organ damage, some animals have mastered anaerobic life. Freshwater turtles belonging to the Trachemys and Chrysemys genera are the champion facultative anaerobes of the vertebrate world, often surviving without oxygen for many weeks at a time. The physiological and biochemical mechanisms that underlie anoxia tolerance in turtles include profound metabolic rate depression, post-translational modification of proteins, strong antioxidant defenses, activation of specific stress-responsive transcription factors, and enhanced expression of cyto-protective proteins. Turtles are also known for their incredible longevity and display characteristics of “negligible senescence.” We propose that the robust stress-tolerance mechanisms that permit long term anaerobiosis by turtles may also support the longevity of these animals. Many of the mechanisms involved in natural anoxia tolerance, such as hypometabolism or the induction of various protective proteins/pathways, have been shown to play important roles in mammalian oxygen-related diseases and improved understanding of how cells survive without oxygen could aid in the understanding and treatment of various pathological conditions that involve hypoxia or oxidative stress. In the present review we discuss the recent advances made in understanding the molecular nature of anoxia tolerance in turtles and the potential links between this tolerance and longevity.

  4. Inflammaging and Anti-Inflammaging: The Role of Cytokines in Extreme Longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minciullo, Paola Lucia; Catalano, Antonino; Mandraffino, Giuseppe; Casciaro, Marco; Crucitti, Andrea; Maltese, Giuseppe; Morabito, Nunziata; Lasco, Antonino; Gangemi, Sebastiano; Basile, Giorgio

    2016-04-01

    Longevity and aging are two sides of the same coin, as they both derive from the interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Aging is a complex, dynamic biological process characterized by continuous remodeling. One of the most recent theories on aging focuses on immune response, and takes into consideration the activation of subclinical, chronic low-grade inflammation which occurs with aging, named "inflammaging". Long-lived people, especially centenarians, seem to cope with chronic subclinical inflammation through an anti-inflammatory response, called therefore "anti-inflammaging". In the present review, we have focused our attention on the contrast between inflammaging and anti-inflammaging systems, by evaluating the role of cytokines and their impact on extreme longevity. Cytokines are the expression of a network involving genes, polymorphisms and environment, and are involved both in inflammation and anti-inflammation. We have described the role of IL-1, IL-2, IL-6, IL-12, IL-15, IL-18, IL-22, IL-23, TNF-α, IFN-γ as pro-inflammatory cytokines, of IL-1Ra, IL-4, IL-10, TGF-β1 as anti-inflammatory cytokines, and of lipoxin A4 and heat shock proteins as mediators of cytokines. We believe that if inflammaging is a key to understand aging, anti-inflammaging may be one of the secrets of longevity. PMID:26658771

  5. Comparison of longevity and production traits of Holstein and Simmental cows of different origin in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Ocepek

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to establish whether there are differences in the longevity and production characteristics within the studied breeds of cows of different origin. Holstein cows of Slovenian (461 and foreign (356 origin and Simmental cows of Slovenian (261 and foreign (43 origin were studied. Only culled animals that previously had between 1 and 9 lactations were included. The analyzed properties consisted of characteristics related to the longevity and lifetime productivity. Compared with Slovenian cows, imported Holstein cows had a significantly longer calving interval (1210±31 days, 1337±39 days, P=0.008, a longer dry period (172±6 days, 192±7 days, P=0.022, and a significantly lower daily milk yield (23.0±0.2 kg, 22.0±0.3 kg, P=0.002. Significant differences between Simmental cows of Slovenian and foreign origin were observed in functional productivity (1317±52 days, 1808±186 days, P=0.006, longevity (2175±53 days, 2701±145 days, P=0.004, and duration of lifetime lactation (990±38 days, 1265±137 days, P=0.037.

  6. Data Resources for Biodemographic Studies on Familial Clustering of Human Longevity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available The main cause that hampered many previous biodemographic studies of human longevity is the lack of appropriate data. At the same time, many existing data resources (millions of genealogical records are under-utilized, because their very existence is not widely known, let alone the quality and scientific value of these data sets are not yet validated. The purpose of this work is to review the data resources that could be used in familial studies of human longevity. This is an extended and supplemented version of the previous study made by the authors upon the request of the National Institute on Aging (1998 NIH Professional Service Contract. The review describes: (1 data resources developed for biodemographic studies, (2 data collected in the projects on historical demography, (3 data resources for long lived individuals and their families, (4 publicly available computerized genealogical data resources, (5 published genealogical and family history data. The review also contains the description of databases developed by the participants of the Research Workshops "Genes, Genealogies, and Longevity" organized by the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research.

  7. Tooth loss as a predictor of shortened longevity: exploring the hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Paula K; Lamster, Ira B

    2016-10-01

    Many factors contribute to human tooth loss, including oral hygiene practices, trauma, smoking, health status, socio-economic status and individual preferences. Loss of teeth impairs quality-of-life measures, including the eating of most foods that require full masticatory function. A recent study of centenarians found that at age 65-74 years, those who lived to be 100 had a lower rate of edentulism than did younger members of their birth cohort at ages 65-74 years. Oral health was consistent with compression of morbidity toward the end of life. This article explores the hypothesis that factors associated with oral disease and noncommunicable diseases may increase the risk of tooth loss and lead to diminished longevity as a result of multifactorial interactions. It specifically addresses two critical questions. The first is: 'Can we conclude that the number of teeth in aging humans can affect longevity and life expectancy?' The answer is yes. The second is: 'Is tooth loss a predictor of shortened longevity?' Again, the answer is yes. Edentulism and partial edentulism are discussed as a disability, and how the philosophy/belief systems of dental providers and patients toward retaining teeth influences the outcome of tooth loss is also examined. Osteoporosis and cognitive impairment provide examples of modifying risk factors. PMID:27501497

  8. 7 CFR 29.2530 - Leaf structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2530 Leaf structure. The cell development of... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.2530 Section 29.2530 Agriculture... Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS...

  9. 7 CFR 30.2 - Leaf tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf tobacco. 30.2 Section 30.2 Agriculture... Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO STOCKS AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.2...

  10. 7 CFR 29.1029 - Leaf scrap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Type 92) § 29.1029 Leaf scrap. A byproduct of stemmed and unstemmed tobacco. ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.1029 Section 29.1029 Agriculture... Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS...

  11. 7 CFR 29.2278 - Leaf structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2278 Leaf... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.2278 Section 29.2278...

  12. Leaf Histology--Two Modern Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, H. E.

    1984-01-01

    Two methods for examining leaf structure are presented; both methods involve use of "superglue." The first method uses the glue to form a thin, permanent, direct replica of a leaf surface on a microscope slide. The second method uses the glue to examine the three-dimensional structure of spongy mesophyll. (JN)

  13. Possible Roles of Strigolactones during Leaf Senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Yamada

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Leaf senescence is a complicated developmental process that involves degenerative changes and nutrient recycling. The progress of leaf senescence is controlled by various environmental cues and plant hormones, including ethylene, jasmonic acid, salicylic acid, abscisic acid, cytokinins, and strigolactones. The production of strigolactones is induced in response to nitrogen and phosphorous deficiency. Strigolactones also accelerate leaf senescence and regulate shoot branching and root architecture. Leaf senescence is actively promoted in a nutrient-poor soil environment, and nutrients are transported from old leaves to young tissues and seeds. Strigolactones might act as important signals in response to nutrient levels in the rhizosphere. In this review, we discuss the possible roles of strigolactones during leaf senescence.

  14. Changes in mortality and human longevity in Kerala: are they leading to the advanced stage?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muttikkal B. Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: During the last century, Kerala witnessed drastic mortality reduction and high improvement in longevity. This achievement is often compared with that of developed countries. However, how far the early advantages in mortality reduction have further enhanced in Kerala remains unknown. In most developed countries, advanced stage of mortality reduction and further increase in longevity was achieved mainly due to the mortality shift from adult and older ages to oldest ages (Olshansky and Ault 1986. Objectives: Considering the lack of comprehensive study on the change in longevity in Kerala, this study focuses on discovering (i the historical time-periods that provided the biggest gain to life expectancy and also the beneficiaries (by age group and sex and (ii the contributions of major groups of causes of death in mortality reduction and consequent improvement in longevity. Methodology and data: The study uses the methodology proposed by Olshansky and Ault in 1986. It used methods such as Temporary Life Expectancy (TLE, Annual Relative Change in TLE, Decomposition of changes in longevity among different age groups (gender and spatial and causes of deaths, for the analysis. It used data from various sources such as Census, Civil Registration System (CRS and Directorate of Health Services (DHS, as well as survey data from Sample Registration System (SRS and Medically Certified Causes of Deaths (MCCD for this study. Finding and conclusion: The study found that overall mortality dramatically declined in the state in the recent decades. Younger ages have contributed the most for this reduction. Therefore, further mortality reduction is possible in adult and early old ages. However, the contribution of these ages to life expectancy was lower than that of youngsters until 1991–2000 especially among males. This may indicate a slow progress towards the advanced stage of epidemiological transition characterized by high prevalence of non

  15. Phenolic composition of Cydonia oblonga Miller leaf.

    OpenAIRE

    B.M. Silva; Oliveira, A.P.; Pereira, J.A.; Valentão, P.; Seabra, R.M.; Andrade, P.B.

    2008-01-01

    Phenolic profile of 36 Cydonia oblonga Miller leaf samples, from 3 different geographical origins of Portugal, harvested in 3 collection months, was determined by HPLC/DAD. Quince leaf presented a common profile composed by 9 constituents: 3-0-, 4-0- and 5-0-caffeoylquinic acids, 3,5-0-dicaffeoylquinic acid, quercetin-3-0 galactoside, quercetin-3-0-rutinoside, kaempferol-3-0-glycoside, kaempferol-3-0-g1ucoside and kaempferol-3-0-rutinoside. C. oblonga leaf total content varied from 4...

  16. Evaluation of Methane from Sisal Leaf Residue and Palash Leaf Litter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arisutha, S.; Baredar, P.; Deshpande, D. M.; Suresh, S.

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate methane production from sisal leaf residue and palash leaf litter mixed with different bulky materials such as vegetable market waste, hostel kitchen waste and digested biogas slurry in a laboratory scale anaerobic reactor. The mixture was prepared with 1:1 proportion. Maximum methane content of 320 ml/day was observed in the case of sisal leaf residue mixed with vegetable market waste as the feed. Methane content was minimum (47 ml/day), when palash leaf litter was used as feed. This was due to the increased content of lignin and polyphenol in the feedstock which were of complex structure and did not get degraded directly by microorganisms. Sisal leaf residue mixtures also showed highest content of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) as compared to palash leaf litter mixtures. It was observed that VFA concentration in the digester first increased, reached maximum (when pH was minimum) and then decreased.

  17. Wheat leaf photosynthesis loss due to leaf rust, with respect to lesion development and leaf nitrogen status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Corinne; Bancal, Marie-Odile; Ney, Bertrand; Lannou, Christian

    2005-01-01

    In wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. Soissons) plants grown under three different fertilisation treatments, we quantified the effect of leaf rust (Puccinia triticina) on flag leaf photosynthesis during the whole sporulation period. Bastiaans' model: Y = (1 - x)beta was used to characterize the relationship between relative leaf photosynthesis (Y) and disease severity (x). The evolution of the different types of symptoms induced by the pathogen (sporulating, chlorotic and necrosed tissues) was evaluated using image analysis. The beta-values varied from 2 to 11, 1.4-2, and 0.8-1 during the sporulation period, when considering the proportion of sporulating, sporulating + necrotic, and total diseased area, respectively. Leaf nitrogen (N) content did not change the effect of the disease on host photosynthesis. We concluded that leaf rust has no global effect on the photosynthesis of the symptomless parts of the leaves and that the large range in the quantification of leaf rust effect on the host, which is found in the literature, can be accounted for by considering the different symptom types. We discuss how our results could improve disease assessments and damage prediction in a wheat crop. PMID:15720636

  18. Prospect inversion for indirect estimation of leaf dry matter content and specific leaf area

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, A.; Darvishzadeh, R; Skidmore, A.-K.; Duren, I.-V.; U. Heiden; Heurich, M.

    2015-01-01

    Quantification of vegetation properties plays an indispensable role in assessments of ecosystem function with leaf dry mater content (LDMC) and specific leaf area (SLA) being two important vegetation properties. Methods for fast, reliable and accurate measurement of LDMC and SLA are still lacking. In this study, the inversion of the PROSPECT radiative transfer model was used to estimate these two leaf parameters. Inversion of PROSPECT traditionally aims at quantifying its direct inpu...

  19. Easy Leaf Area: Automated Digital Image Analysis for Rapid and Accurate Measurement of Leaf Area

    OpenAIRE

    Hsien Ming Easlon; Bloom, Arnold J.

    2014-01-01

    Premise of the study: Measurement of leaf areas from digital photographs has traditionally required significant user input unless backgrounds are carefully masked. Easy Leaf Area was developed to batch process hundreds of Arabidopsis rosette images in minutes, removing background artifacts and saving results to a spreadsheet-ready CSV file. Methods and Results: Easy Leaf Area uses the color ratios of each pixel to distinguish leaves and calibration areas from their background and compares ...

  20. Independence of stem and leaf hydraulic traits in six Euphorbiaceae tree species with contrasting leaf phenology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun-Wen; Zhang, Qiang; Li, Xiao-Shuang; Cao, Kun-Fang

    2009-08-01

    Hydraulic traits and hydraulic-related structural properties were examined in three deciduous (Hevea brasiliensis, Macaranga denticulate, and Bischofia javanica) and three evergreen (Drypetes indica, Aleurites moluccana, and Codiaeum variegatum) Euphorbiaceae tree species from a seasonally tropical forest in south-western China. Xylem water potential at 50% loss of stem hydraulic conductivity (P50(stem)) was more negative in the evergreen tree, but leaf water potential at 50% loss of leaf hydraulic conductivity (P50(leaf)) did not function as P50(stem) did. Furthermore, P50(stem) was more negative than P50(leaf) in the evergreen tree; contrarily, this pattern was not observed in the deciduous tree. Leaf hydraulic conductivity overlapped considerably, but stem hydraulic conductivity diverged between the evergreen and deciduous tree. Correspondingly, structural properties of leaves overlapped substantially; however, structural properties of stem diverged markedly. Consequently, leaf and stem hydraulic traits were closely correlated with leaf and stem structural properties, respectively. Additionally, stem hydraulic efficiency was significantly correlated with stem hydraulic resistance to embolism; nevertheless, such a hydraulic pattern was not found in leaf hydraulics. Thus, these results suggest: (1) that the evergreen and deciduous tree mainly diverge in stem hydraulics, but not in leaf hydraulics, (2) that regardless of leaf or stem, their hydraulic traits result primarily from structural properties, and not from leaf phenology, (3) that leaves are more vulnerable to drought-induced embolism than stem in the evergreen tree, but not always in the deciduous tree and (4) that there exists a trade-off between hydraulic efficiency and safety for stem hydraulics, but not for leaf hydraulics. PMID:19495788

  1. Effect of herbivore damage on broad leaf motion in wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Nicholas; Kothari, Adit

    2015-11-01

    Terrestrial plants regularly experience wind that imposes aerodynamic forces on the plants' leaves. Passive leaf motion (e.g. fluttering) and reconfiguration (e.g. rolling into a cone shape) in wind can affect the drag on the leaf. In the study of passive leaf motion in wind, little attention has been given to the effect of herbivory. Herbivores may alter leaf motion in wind by making holes in the leaf. Also, a small herbivore (e.g. snail) on a leaf can act as a point mass, thereby affecting the leaf's motion in wind. Conversely, accelerations imposed on an herbivore sitting on a leaf by the moving leaf may serve as a defense by dislodging the herbivore. In the present study, we investigated how point masses (>1 g) and holes in leaves of the tuliptree affected passive leaf motion in turbulent winds of 1 and 5 m s-1. Leaf motion was unaffected by holes in the leaf surface (about 10% of leaf area), but an herbivore's mass significantly damped the accelerations of fluttering leaves. These results suggest that an herbivore's mass, but not the damage it inflicts, can affect leaf motion in the wind. Furthermore, the damping of leaf fluttering from an herbivore's mass may prevent passive leaf motions from being an effective herbivore defense.

  2. 7 CFR 29.3647 - Heavy Leaf (B Group).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Grades § 29.3647 Heavy Leaf (B Group). This group consists of leaves... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Heavy Leaf (B Group). 29.3647 Section 29.3647... specifications, and tolerances B1F Choice Quality Medium-brown Heavy Leaf. Ripe medium body, open leaf...

  3. 7 CFR 30.31 - Classification of leaf tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Classification of leaf tobacco. 30.31 Section 30.31... REGULATIONS TOBACCO STOCKS AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.31 Classification of leaf tobacco. For the purpose of this classification leaf tobacco...

  4. 7 CFR 29.3648 - Thin Leaf (C Group).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Grades § 29.3648 Thin Leaf (C Group). This group consists of leaves... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Thin Leaf (C Group). 29.3648 Section 29.3648... specifications, and tolerances C1L Choice Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Ripe, thin, open leaf structure,...

  5. What Is a Leaf? An Online Tutorial and Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Geoffrey

    2008-01-01

    A leaf is a fundamental unit in botany and understanding what constitutes a leaf is fundamental to many plant science activities. My observations and subsequent testing indicated that many students could not confidently and consistently recognise a leaf from a leaflet, or recognise basic leaf arrangements and the various types of compound or…

  6. Longevity and relationships with children: the importance of the parental role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchez Maria-Teresa

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Social networks predict longevity across societies but specific mechanisms are largely unknown. The aim of this work was to examine the role of children in the longevity of elderly men and women in a cohort of community dwelling elderly people in Spain. Methods The data were taken from the "Aging in Leganes" cohort study with 15 years of follow-up. The baseline population was an age- and sex-stratified random sample of community dwelling people over 65 living in Leganés (Madrid in 1993. Poor relationship with at least one child, emotional support and the perceived roles elders play in the lives of their children, extended family, spouse and friends were assessed at baseline. Cox proportional hazards models were fit to investigate the effects of social roles variables on longevity, adjusting for a wide range of socioeconomic, behavioural and health covariates. Results In the fully adjusted model, having a poor relationship with at least one child increased mortality by 30%. Elderly persons who felt their role in their children's lives was important (HR = 0.70; 95% CI 0.54; 0.91 had a lower mortality risk than those who felt they played a small role. Feeling loved and listened to by one's children did not have an effect on survival. Maintaining an important role in the extended family was also significantly associated with survival. Conclusion In this Mediterranean population, maintaining an important role in the lives of one's children is associated with survival. Functions of social networks related to meaning of life and different forms of social support may have important effects on mortality, and these functions may vary across cultures according to family norms and values.

  7. The Mass-Longevity Triangle: Pareto Optimality and the Geometry of Life-History Trait Space.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Szekely

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available When organisms need to perform multiple tasks they face a fundamental tradeoff: no phenotype can be optimal at all tasks. This situation was recently analyzed using Pareto optimality, showing that tradeoffs between tasks lead to phenotypes distributed on low dimensional polygons in trait space. The vertices of these polygons are archetypes--phenotypes optimal at a single task. This theory was applied to examples from animal morphology and gene expression. Here we ask whether Pareto optimality theory can apply to life history traits, which include longevity, fecundity and mass. To comprehensively explore the geometry of life history trait space, we analyze a dataset of life history traits of 2105 endothermic species. We find that, to a first approximation, life history traits fall on a triangle in log-mass log-longevity space. The vertices of the triangle suggest three archetypal strategies, exemplified by bats, shrews and whales, with specialists near the vertices and generalists in the middle of the triangle. To a second approximation, the data lies in a tetrahedron, whose extra vertex above the mass-longevity triangle suggests a fourth strategy related to carnivory. Each animal species can thus be placed in a coordinate system according to its distance from the archetypes, which may be useful for genome-scale comparative studies of mammalian aging and other biological aspects. We further demonstrate that Pareto optimality can explain a range of previous studies which found animal and plant phenotypes which lie in triangles in trait space. This study demonstrates the applicability of multi-objective optimization principles to understand life history traits and to infer archetypal strategies that suggest why some mammalian species live much longer than others of similar mass.

  8. The Mass-Longevity Triangle: Pareto Optimality and the Geometry of Life-History Trait Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekely, Pablo; Korem, Yael; Moran, Uri; Mayo, Avi; Alon, Uri

    2015-10-01

    When organisms need to perform multiple tasks they face a fundamental tradeoff: no phenotype can be optimal at all tasks. This situation was recently analyzed using Pareto optimality, showing that tradeoffs between tasks lead to phenotypes distributed on low dimensional polygons in trait space. The vertices of these polygons are archetypes--phenotypes optimal at a single task. This theory was applied to examples from animal morphology and gene expression. Here we ask whether Pareto optimality theory can apply to life history traits, which include longevity, fecundity and mass. To comprehensively explore the geometry of life history trait space, we analyze a dataset of life history traits of 2105 endothermic species. We find that, to a first approximation, life history traits fall on a triangle in log-mass log-longevity space. The vertices of the triangle suggest three archetypal strategies, exemplified by bats, shrews and whales, with specialists near the vertices and generalists in the middle of the triangle. To a second approximation, the data lies in a tetrahedron, whose extra vertex above the mass-longevity triangle suggests a fourth strategy related to carnivory. Each animal species can thus be placed in a coordinate system according to its distance from the archetypes, which may be useful for genome-scale comparative studies of mammalian aging and other biological aspects. We further demonstrate that Pareto optimality can explain a range of previous studies which found animal and plant phenotypes which lie in triangles in trait space. This study demonstrates the applicability of multi-objective optimization principles to understand life history traits and to infer archetypal strategies that suggest why some mammalian species live much longer than others of similar mass. PMID:26465336

  9. Seed longevity of Eragrostis plana Nees buried in natural grassland soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Borges de Medeiros

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to evaluate the seed longevity of Eragrostis plana Nees buried at different soil depths, in a natural-grassland area in the Pampa biome (46 m altitude, 30º05´S and 51º40´W of Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. The experimental design was a split-plot type in complete blocks with two factors: seeds buried at five different depth levels (soil surface and 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 cm and seven exhumation dates. The blocks were allocated in natural grassland grazed by cattle, allocated in a 12-m-long transection. Fifty-four permeable nylon bags filled with 100 seeds in each division, with five vertical divisions, were buried in each row. Seven exhumation dates were used: the first on October 14, 2003 and the last on January 14, 2006. The percentage of viable seeds of E. plana, collected at seven exhumation times and set at different depths in the soil horizon, were described by simple negative exponential equations. Based on the model, the percentage of viable seeds collected at the five depths, (soil surface and 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 cm, after 2.5 years of burial, were 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 7.4 and 22.1%, respectively. Increase in depth is directly associated with physical and physiological seed integrity of E. plana. Negative simple exponential equations can be used to predict seed longevity of E. plana buried in nylon bags. This invader species accumulates soil seed-bank of high longevity.

  10. Aging and Longevity: Why Knowing the Difference Is Important to Nutrition Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger B. McDonald

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Life expectancies after the age of 70 and the number of individuals living with age-related chronic conditions that affect daily activities continue to increase. Age-specific nutritional recommendations may help to decrease the incidence or severity of age-related debilitating chronic disorders. However, research in this area has seen limited success in identifying nutrition-related mechanisms that underlie the functional loss and chronic conditions that occur as a function of time. We believe that the limited success in establishing age-specific nutrition recommendations for the older population reflects, at least in part, research designs that fail to consider the evolutionary and biological bases of aging and longevity. Longevity has evolved as a by-product of genes selected for their contribution in helping the organism survive to the age of reproduction. As such, the principle of genetic determinism provides an appropriate underlying theory for research designs evaluating nutritional factors involved with life span. Aging is not a product of evolution and reflects stochastic and/or random events that most likely begin during the early, reproductively-active years. The genetic determinism model by which young (normal, control are compared to old (abnormal, experimental groups will not be effective in identifying underlying mechanisms and nutritional factors that impact aging. The purpose of this commentary is to briefly discuss the difference between aging and longevity and why knowing the difference is important to nutrition research and to establishing the most precise nutritional recommendations possible for the older population.

  11. Altered signalling from germline to intestine pushes daf-2;pept-1 Caenorhabditis elegans into extreme longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanier, Britta; Rubio-Aliaga, Isabel; Hu, Hao; Daniel, Hannelore

    2010-08-01

    The insulin-like signalling pathway is a central regulator of development, metabolism, stress resistance and lifespan in eukaryotes. Caenorhabditis elegans daf-2(e1370) animals with a loss-of-function mutation in the insulin-like receptor live twice as long as wild-type animals, and the additional knockout of the intestinal di- and tripeptide transporter pept-1 further increases lifespan by 60%. In assessing the underlying molecular mechanisms for this phenomenon, microarray-based transcriptome data sets of daf-2(e1370) and daf-2(e1370);pept-1(lg601) animals were compared with a focus on genes that showed significantly higher changes in expression levels in daf-2;pept-1 than in daf-2. We identified 187 genes with at least fourfold decreased transcript levels and 170 with more than a fourfold increase. A large fraction of the down-regulated genes encode proteins involved in germline proliferation and reproduction. The DAF-9/DAF-12 signalling cascade was identified as a prime pathway that mediates the longevity of daf-2;pept-1 with a strict dependance on DAF-16. Loss of DAF-9/DAF-12 or KRI-1 reduces the lifespan of daf-2;pept-1 to that of the daf-2 mutant. Amongst the DAF-16 target genes, numerous enzymes involved in the defence of reactive oxygen species were with increased expression level in daf-2;pept-1. On a functional level, it was demonstrated that amongst those, a high de novo synthesis rate of glutathione is most important for the longevity phenotype of this strain. Taken together, a close interdependence of endocrine hormone signalling from germline to intestine was identified as an essential element in the control of the extreme longevity of C. elegans lacking a proper function of the insulin receptor and lacking the intestinal peptide transporter. PMID:20550516

  12. Sugar-feeding behaviour and longevity of European Culicoides biting midges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, C; Mathis, A; Vorburger, C

    2015-03-01

    Most haematophagous insect vectors can also use sugar as an energy source; thus their sugar-feeding behaviour influences their longevity and blood-feeding rate and hence their vectorial capacity. Scant information is available on the sugar-feeding behaviour of Culicoides Latreille biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), which are vectors of bluetongue and Schmallenberg viruses. The longevity of laboratory-reared Culicoides nubeculosus (Meigen) under fluctuating temperatures (16 and 28 °C) and with access to water or water and blood was on average 6.4 days and 8.9 days, respectively, which was around one third of the lifespan of siblings with access to sugar or sugar and blood (22.2 days and 27.1 days, respectively). Access to honeydew significantly increased the midge's longevity, whereas the provision of extrafloral nectaries had no impact. Females with access to sugar produced a significantly higher number of eggs (65.5 ± 5.2) than their starved sisters (45.4 ± 8.4). More than 80% of field-caught female Culicoides from the two most abundant European groups, Obsoletus (n = 2243) and Pulicaris (n = 805), were fructose-positive. Fructose-positivity was high in all physiological stages and no seasonal variability was noted. The high rate of natural sugar feeding of Culicoides offers opportunities for the development of novel control strategies using toxic sugar baits and for the monitoring of vector-borne diseases using sugar-treated FTA (nucleic acid preservation) cards in the field. PMID:25155520

  13. Exceptional Parental Longevity Associated with Reduced Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease and Memory Decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, Richard B.; Hirsch, Jamie; Katz, Mindy J.; Wang, Cuiling; Sanders, Amy E.; Verghese, Joe; Barzilai, Nir; Derby, Carol A.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether offspring of parents with exceptional longevity (OPEL) have a lower rate of dementia than offspring of parents with usual survival (OPUS). Design Community based prospective cohort study. Setting Bronx, New York Participants A volunteer sample of 424 non-demented, community residing older adults (age 75–85) recruited from Bronx County starting in 1980 and followed for up to 23 years. Measurements Epidemiologic, clinical and neuropsychological assessments were completed every 12 to 18 months. OPEL were defined as having at least one parent who reached the age of at least 85 years. OPUS were those for whom neither parent reached the age of 85 years. Dementia was diagnosed by case conference consensus based on DSM-IIIR criteria without access to information on parental longevity. Alzheimer’s disease was diagnosed using established criteria. Results Of 424 subjects, 149 (35%) were OPEL and 275 (65%) were OPUS. Mean age at entry for both groups was 79. In comparison with OPUS, the OPEL group had a reduced incidence of Alzheimer’s disease (HR 0.57; 95% CI: 0.35 – 0.93). After adjusting for sex, education, race, hypertension, myocardial infarction, diabetes and stroke results were essentially unchanged. OPEL also had a significantly reduced rate of memory decline on the Selective Reminding Test (SRT) in comparison with the OPUS group (p=0.034). Conclusion OPEL develop dementia and Alzheimer’s disease at a significantly lower rate than OPUS. This result is not explained by demographic or medical confounders. Factors associated with longevity may protect against dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease. PMID:20487085

  14. The association between total leukocyte count and longevity: Evidence from longitudinal and cross-sectional data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Piotr Paweł; Borysławski, Krzysztof; Chmielowiec, Krzysztof; Chmielowiec, Jolanta; Strzelec, Bartłomiej

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between age-dependent changes in total leukocyte count (TLC) and certain selected differential counts expressed as frequencies (granulocytes, band cells, eosinophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes) and longevity in physically healthy men and women aged 45+. Longitudinal data on cell counts from 142 subjects (68 men and 74 women; all aged 45-70 and examined for 25 years) were compared with cross-sectional data from 225 subjects (113 men and 112 women; this group was divided into four categories of average lifespan; i.e.: 53, 63, 68, and 76+ years of age). ANOVA, t-test, and regression analysis were employed. Secular changes in leukocyte count were controlled. Men had continuously higher TLC compared with women. Moreover, sex differences in patterns of changes with age were found. The longitudinal assessment revealed a U-shaped pattern of changes in TLC in men (y=0.0026x(2)-0.2866x+14.4374; R(2)=0.852) and women (y=0.0048x(2)-0.5386x+20.922; R(2)=0.938), whereas the cross-sectional comparison showed an inverted U-shaped pattern in men (y=-0.0021x(2)+0.2421x; R(2)=0.417) and women (y=-0.0017x(2)+0.2061x; R(2)=0.888). In general, the comparison of longitudinal and cross-sectional data on changes with age in TLC indicates that longevity favors individuals with lower yet normal TLC and this correlation is more pronounced in men. In conclusion, our findings are in line with previous longitudinal studies of aging and suggest that lower TLC within the normal range (4.0-10.0×10(3)μL(-1)) can be a useful predictor of longevity in physically healthy individuals. PMID:26434754

  15. Longevity and reproductive success of Aethina tumida (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) fed different natural diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, James D; Neumann, Peter; Hepburn, Randall; Elzen, Patti J

    2002-10-01

    The longevity and reproductive success of newly emerged, unfed adult Aethina tumida Murray assigned different diets (control = unfed; honey-pollen; honey; pollen; empty brood comb; bee brood; fresh Kei apples; and rotten Kei apples) were determined. Longevity in honey-fed small hive beetle adults (average maximum: 167 d) was significantly higher than on other diets. Small hive beetles fed empty brood comb lived significantly longer (average maximum: 49.8 d) than unfed beetles (average maximum: 9.6 d). Small hive beetle offspring were produced on honey-pollen, pollen, bee brood, fresh Kei apples, and rotten Kei apples but not on honey alone, empty brood comb, or in control treatments. The highest reproductive success occurred in pollen fed adults (1773.8 +/- 294.4 larvae per three mating pairs of adults). The data also show that A. tumida can reproduce on fruits alone, indicating that they are facultative parasites. The pupation success and sex ratio of small hive beetle offspring were also analyzed. Larvae fed pollen, honey-pollen, or brood had significantly higher pupation success rates of 0.64, 0.73, and 0.65 respectively than on the other diets. Sex ratios of emerging adults fed diets of pollen or brood as larvae were significantly skewed toward females. Because small hive beetle longevity and overall reproductive success was highest on foodstuffs located in honey bee colonies, A. tumida are efficient at causing large-scale damage to colonies of honey bees resulting in economic injury for the beekeeper. Practical considerations for the control of A. tumida are briefly discussed. PMID:12403414

  16. Fecundity, Longevity, and Host Finding of Three Parasitoid Species of Liriomyza sativae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SITI HERLINDA

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Liriomyza sativae is a polyphagous agromyzid leafminer and it has invaded large part of world, i.e Hemiptarsenus varicornis, Gronotoma micromorpha, and Opius dissitus. This research were conducted to investigate progeny, immature development period, longevity of female parasitoids of L. sativae, and to study female parasitoid behaviour in host finding. Host finding behaviour was observed by examining their visit frequency to the leaves that mined by leafminer larvae and healthy leaves. Results showed that H. varicornis produced more progenies (10.70 + 2.58 progenies/female, but not significantly different (P < 0.05 from progenies produced by G. micromorpha (9.90 + 3.81 progenies/female and O. dissitus (9.60 + 3.31 progenies/female. The immature development period of G. micromorpha (25.65 + 0.38 days was found to be longer than H. varicornis (16.14 ± 1.20 days and O. dissitus (14.03 + 0.22 days. Significant different (P = 0.1014 of adult longevity was not found among H. varicornis (9.22 + 2.48 days, G. micromorpha (7.25 + 1.34 days, and O. dissitus (8.74 + 2.18 days. Our analyses also indicated that G. micromorpha and O. dissitus found their hosts based on the larvae mining, however, H. varicornis performed it randomly. Based on the number of progeny and longevity of adult female, all parasitoids tested may have a potential as biological control agents of leafminer, L. sativae.

  17. Transcriptomic Signatures Mirror the Lack of the Fecundity/Longevity Trade-Off in Ant Queens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Wyschetzki, Katharina; Rueppell, Olav; Oettler, Jan; Heinze, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    Life-history theory predicts a trade-off between reproductive investment and self-maintenance. The negative association between fertility and longevity found throughout multicellular organisms supports this prediction. As an important exception, the reproductives of many eusocial insects (ants, bees, and termites) are simultaneously very long-lived and highly fertile. Here, we examine the proximate basis for this exceptional relationship by comparing whole-body transcriptomes of differently aged queens of the ant Cardiocondyla obscurior. We show that the sets of genes differentially expressed with age significantly overlap with age-related expression changes previously found in female Drosophila melanogaster. We identified several developmental processes, such as the generation of neurons, as common signatures of aging. More generally, however, gene expression in ant queens and flies changes with age mainly in opposite directions. In contrast to flies, reproduction-associated genes were upregulated and genes associated with metabolic processes and muscle contraction were downregulated in old relative to young ant queens. Furthermore, we searched for putative C. obscurior longevity candidates associated with the previously reported lifespan-prolonging effect of mating by comparing the transcriptomes of queens that differed in mating and reproductive status. We found 21 genes, including the putative aging candidate NLaz (an insect homolog of APOD), which were consistently more highly expressed in short-lived, unmated queens than in long-lived, mated queens. Our study provides clear evidence that the alternative regulation of conserved molecular pathways that mediate the interplay among mating, egg laying, and aging underlies the lack of the fecundity/longevity trade-off in ant queens. PMID:26341296

  18. Photosynthesis and Respiration in Leaf Slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Simon

    1998-01-01

    Demonstrates how leaf slices provide an inexpensive material for illustrating several fundamental points about the biochemistry of photosynthesis and respiration. Presents experiments that illustrate the effects of photon flux density and herbicides and carbon dioxide concentration. (DDR)

  19. 7 CFR 29.3528 - Leaf surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Dark Air-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 35, 36, 37 and Foreign Type 95) § 29.3528 Leaf surface. The roughness or smoothness of the web or lamina of a tobacco...

  20. EVALUATION OF HYPOGLYCEMIC EFFECT OF MANGIFERA LEAF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratul Chandra Sarmah

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available From the time of immemorial people have used various plant extracts in their own ethnic therapeutic system. Mango (Mangifera indica is adorned all over the world as a fruit. But these plants have some medicinal utility also. The present research work is done to evaluate the antidiabetic effect of mango leaf on albino rat. Phytochemical tests are made with ethanolic extract of mango leaf. Albino rats were treated with ethanolic plant extract at the dose of 100,200 and 400 mg/kg body weight respectively. Another group of diabetic rats are given standard insulin dose as hypoglycemic agent. The blood sugar levels are monitored separately for different groups at different time periods. A significant reduction in blood glucose level is observed at 200mg/kg level after four hours of leaf extract application. It shows that Mangifera leaf is almost equipotent to insulin in its ability to reduce blood sugar.

  1. Spectroscopic Measurement of Leaf Water Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Alexander F. H.; Boardman, Joseph W.

    1995-01-01

    A leaf drying experiment was carried out in the laboratory in which simultaneous spectral reflectance in the 350-2450 nm region, and leaf weights, were measured at 10 second intervals over a 40 minute period. As the leaf water weight dropped from approximately 60 to 38%. a nearly-linear rise in reflectance at all wavelengths beyond 1000 nm was observed. A principal components analysis of the time series of spectra in the 2000-2500 nm wavelength region showed that over 99% of the variance in the spectra, that were individually scaled to have a sum equal to that of the mean spectrum and subsequently mean corrected, was in the first component. This result shows that it is feasible to determine leaf water content remotely with an imaging spectrometer independent of the surface irradiance effects caused by topography.

  2. Intestinal Insulin Signaling Encodes Two Different Molecular Mechanisms for the Shortened Longevity Induced by Graphene Oxide in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunli; Yang, Ruilong; Rui, Qi; Wang, Dayong

    2016-04-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) has been shown to cause multiple toxicities in various organisms. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms for GO-induced shortened longevity are still unclear. We employed Caenorhabditis elegans to investigate the possible involvement of insulin signaling pathway in the control of GO toxicity and its underlying molecular mechanisms. Mutation of daf-2, age-1, akt-1, or akt-2 gene induced a resistant property of nematodes to GO toxicity, while mutation of daf-16 gene led to a susceptible property of nematodes to GO toxicity, suggesting that GO may dysregulate the functions of DAF-2/IGF-1 receptor, AGE-1, AKT-1 and AKT-2-mediated kinase cascade, and DAF-16/FOXO transcription factor. Genetic interaction analysis suggested the involvement of signaling cascade of DAF-2-AGE-1-AKT-1/2-DAF-16 in the control of GO toxicity on longevity. Moreover, intestinal RNA interference (RNAi) analysis demonstrated that GO reduced longevity by affecting the functions of signaling cascade of DAF-2-AGE-1-AKT-1/2-DAF-16 in the intestine. DAF-16 could also regulate GO toxicity on longevity by functioning upstream of SOD-3, which encodes an antioxidation system that prevents the accumulation of oxidative stress. Therefore, intestinal insulin signaling may encode two different molecular mechanisms responsible for the GO toxicity in inducing the shortened longevity. Our results highlight the key role of insulin signaling pathway in the control of GO toxicity in organisms.

  3. Sublethal effects of imidacloprid on the fecundity, longevity, and enzyme activity of Sitobion avenae (Fabricius) and Rhopalosiphum padi (Linnaeus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y-H; Zheng, X-S; Gao, X-W

    2016-08-01

    The aphid species Sitobion avenae and Rhopalosiphum padi are the most important pests in wheat growing regions of many countries. In this study, we investigated the sublethal effects of imidacloprid on fecundity, longevity, and enzyme activity in both aphid species by comparing 3-h exposure for one or three generations. Our results indicated that 3-h exposure to sublethal doses of imidacloprid for one generation had no discernible effect on the survival, fecundity, longevity, or enzyme activity levels of aphids. However, when pulse exposures to imidacloprid were sustained over three generations, both fecundity and longevity were significantly decreased in both S. avenae and R. padi. Interestingly, the fecundity of R. padi had almost recovered by the F5 generation, but its longevity was still deleteriously affected. These results indicated that R. padi laid eggs in shorter time lags and has a more fast resilience. The change in reproduction behavior may be a phenomenon of R. padi to compensate its early death. If this is stable for the next generation, it means that the next generation is more competitive than unexposed populations, which could be the reason underlying population outbreaks that occur after longer-term exposure to an insecticide. This laboratory-based study highlights the sublethal effects of imidacloprid on the longevity and fecundity of descendants and provides an empirical basis from which to consider management decisions for chemical control in the field. PMID:27161277

  4. Information technology as a facilitator of suppliers’ collaborative communication, network governance and relationship longevity in supply chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Chinomona

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing awareness about the paramount importance of information technology within business in the context of large businesses. However, research about the investigation of the role of information technology resources in fostering collaborative communication, network governance and relationship longevity in the small and medium enterprise sector has remained scant. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the influence of information technology on collaborative communication, network governance and relationship longevity in Zimbabwe’s SME sector. Five research hypotheses were posited and sample data from 162 small and medium enterprise suppliers were collected and used to empirically test the hypotheses. The results of this study showed that information technology resources positively influenced small and medium enterprise suppliers’ collaborative communication, network governance and consequential relationship longevity with their buyers in a significant way. Overall, the current study findings provided tentative support to the proposition that information technology resources, collaborative communication and network governance should be recognised as significant antecedents for improved relationship longevity between suppliers and their buyers in the SME setting. Therefore, managers in the small and medium enterprise sector and small and medium enterprise owners need to pay attention to both collaborative communication and network governance in order to optimise information technology resource impact on their relationship longevity with their business counterparts. Limitations and future research directions were also indicated.

  5. Study on the Rapid Method to Predict Longevity of Controlled Release Fertilizer Coated by Water Soluble Resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Jian-jun; FAN Xiao-lin; YU Jian-gang; LIU Fang; ZHANG Qiao

    2008-01-01

    The study discussed the rapid method to test and predict the longevity of controlled release fertilizers (CRFs) coated by water soluble resin by using the short-term leaching under higher temperature.Pure water dissolving incubation and higher temperature leaching were used to study the patterns of the nutrient release of the CRFs.The correlation analysis between the days at 25℃ and the hours at 80℃ of Trincote 1 and Trincote 2 for the same cumulative release rates were conducted.Patterns of cumulative nutrient release curve followed one factor quadratic regression equation at each given temperatures,and each of relative coefficient was bigger than 0.995.As the temperature increased,nutrients release of the CRFs increased.The longevity of resin coated CRFs were predicted by use of both the cumulative nutrients release equation at 80℃ and the regression equation of release time needed for the same cumulative release rates between 25 and 80℃.There were only 0.3-6.9% relative errors between the tested longevity and predicted one.In conclusion,the longevity of resin coated CRFs could be predicted more quickly and precisely by use of the higher temperature short-term leaching method than that of the traditional differential release rate.The longevity of resin coated CRF could be rapidly and precisely predicted in a few hours by application of the higher temperature shortterm leaching method.

  6. Research on the modeling method of soybean leafs structure simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Leaf is one of the most important organs of soybean. The modeling of soybean leaf structure is useful to research of leaf function. The paper discussed it from two aspects that were distilling method of leaf profile and establishing method of leaf simulation model. It put forward basic method of soybean leaf digital process, and successfully established simulation model of soybean leaf structure based on L-system. It also solved a critical problem in the process of establishing soybean growth simulation model. And the research had guiding significance to establishment of soybean plant model.

  7. Anti-allergic activity of Thai medicinal plants used in longevity formulation

    OpenAIRE

    Sawanee Kraithep; Kwunchit Oungbho; Supinya Tewtrakul*

    2008-01-01

    The ethanolic (EtOH) and water extracts of six plants including Piper nigrum, Streblus asper, Cyperus rotundus, Tinospora crispa, Diospyros rhodocalyx and Albizia procera used in Thai traditional longevity formulation, were examined for anti-allergic activity on antigen-induced b-hexosaminidase release from RBL-2H3 cells (rat-basophilic leukemia cell line), a tumor analog of mast cell. It was revealed that Piper nigrum (EtOH) extract exhibited the most potent activity with an IC50 value of 14...

  8. Seed longevity of Eragrostis plana Nees buried in natural grassland soil

    OpenAIRE

    Renato Borges de Medeiros; Telmo Focht; Leandro Luiz Menegon; Mário Ruschel Freitas

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the seed longevity of Eragrostis plana Nees buried at different soil depths, in a natural-grassland area in the Pampa biome (46 m altitude, 30º05´S and 51º40´W) of Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. The experimental design was a split-plot type in complete blocks with two factors: seeds buried at five different depth levels (soil surface and 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 cm) and seven exhumation dates. The blocks were allocated in natural grassland grazed by c...

  9. DNA Methyltransferase Gene dDnmt2 and Longevity of Drosophila

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng-JauLin; Lin-YaTang; M.NarsaReddy; C.K.JamesShen

    2005-01-01

    The DNA methylation program of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is carried out by the single DNA methyltransferase gene dDnmt2, the function of which is unknown before. We present evidence that intactness of the gene is required for maintenance of the normal life span of the fruit flies. In contrast, overexpression of dDnmt2 could extend Drosophila life span. The study links the Drosophila DNA methylation program with the small heatshock proteins and longevity/aging and has interesting implication on the eukaryotic DNA methyl-ation programs in general.

  10. Effect of metconazole on post-harvest longevity of tulips (Tulipa sp.)

    OpenAIRE

    Beata Janowska; Agnieszka Kupska; Iwona Rossa

    2013-01-01

    Tulips were conditioned for 4 h in room at temperature of 18-20°C and/or 24 h in cool room of 5°C in water solution of metconazole in Caramba 6- SL at concentrations of 300, 600 and 900 mg∙dm-3. The post-harvest longevity of ‘Strong Gold’ and ‘Foxtrot’ increased after conditioning in metconazole at concentrations of 300-900 mg∙dm-3 for 4 and 24 h. Metconazole used in mentioned concentrations did not inhibit the elongation of stems and upper internod...

  11. Telomerase gene therapy in adult and old mice delays aging and increases longevity without increasing cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bernardes de Jesus, Bruno; Vera, Elsa; Schneeberger, Kerstin; Tejera, Agueda M.; Ayuso, Eduard; Bosch, Fatima; Blasco, Maria A.

    2012-01-01

    A major goal in aging research is to improve health during aging. In the case of mice, genetic manipulations that shorten or lengthen telomeres result, respectively, in decreased or increased longevity. Based on this, we have tested the effects of a telomerase gene therapy in adult (1 year of age) and old (2 years of age) mice. Treatment of 1- and 2-year old mice with an adeno associated virus (AAV) of wide tropism expressing mouse TERT had remarkable beneficial effects on health and fitness,...

  12. Body weight is not always a good predictor of longevity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, Vladimir N; Arbeev, Konstantin G; Popovich, Irina G; Zabezhinksi, Mark A; Rosenfeld, Svetlana V; Piskunova, Tatiana S; Arbeeva, Lyubov S; Semenchenko, Anna V; Yashin, Anatoli I

    2004-03-01

    There have been some observations that low body weight and a low level of some hormones (e.g. IGF-1) during the first half of life are predictors of longer life in mice. However, contradictions in the available data on the biomarkers of aging and predictors of longevity have shown that the research in these fields has become a controversial pursuit. In our study we addressed the following questions: (i) Can particular physiological parameters (body weight, food intake, estrus function, body temperature, incidence of chromosome aberrations in bone marrow cells) measured at the age of 3 and 12 months be a predictor of longevity and the rate of tumor development in five strains of mice? (ii) Can a heavy body weight at the age of 3 and 12 months be a predictor of longevity and high tumor risk in five strains of mice? Mice of five strains-CBA, SHR, SAMR, SAMP and transgenic HER-2/neu (FVB/N)-were under observation from the age of 2-3 months until natural death. Body weight and temperature, food consumption, and estrous cycle were longitudinally studied in all animals. Tumors discovered at autopsy were studied morphologically. We calculated the life span's parameters (mean, maximum, mortality rate, mortality rate doubling time) as well as their correlation with other parameters studied. The longest living CBA mice have the lowest body weight at the ages of 3 and 12 months, the lowest food consumption, body temperature, incidence of chromosome aberrations and spontaneous tumor incidence. In comparison with all other mouse strains they also have the latest disturbances in estrus function and highest body weight gain. The shortest living transgenic HER-2/neu mice have the lowest weight at the ages of 12 months, the lowest body weight gain, maximal body temperature, the most rapid disturbances in estrus function and the highest incidence of chromosome aberrations and tumor incidence in comparison to all other mouse strains. Our findings have shown that heavier body weight at

  13. Leaf-Cutter Ant Parasitoids: Current Knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia J. Folgarait

    2013-01-01

    This review updates and summarizes the current knowledge about the interaction of leaf-cutter ants and their parasitoids by providing comparable data for Acromyrmex and Atta ants. First, an overview of the relevant aspects of the biology and taxonomy of leaf cutters and of their parasitoids is provided. Second, I show the peculiarities of the parasitoids attacking behaviors towards their host as well as the responses or ant defenses against the phorids exhibited by their hosts. Third, I discu...

  14. Pharmacognostical evaluation of Barringtonia acutangula leaf

    OpenAIRE

    Padmavathi, Dharamaraj; Susheela, Lakshmi; Bharathi, Rajkishore Vijaya

    2011-01-01

    Barringtonia acutangula (L.) Gaertn. (Family: Lecythidaceae) is an evergreen tree with simple, alternate leaves, long pendulous racemes, dark scarlet flowers, and ellipsoid to ovoid berries containing one ovoid black seed. The present study deals with a detailed pharmacognostical study on the leaf of the crude drug, B. acutangula. Morphoanatomy of the leaf was studied using light and confocal microscopy and World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines on quality control methods for medicinal pl...

  15. Leaf stripe resistance of spring barley cultivars

    OpenAIRE

    Pinnschmidt, Hans O; Nielsen, Bent J.

    2006-01-01

    Results of six years of screening trials clearly indicate that effective resistance against barley leaf stripe is available, also in modern cultivars. Among the spring barley cultivars that are currently most widely grown in Denmark, Cabaret, Troon, Sebastian, Justina and Brazil appear most resistant, but only Brazil combines a favourable resistance performance (= low mean and standard deviation of environment-adjusted leaf stripe incidence) with a high number of observations (= years of test...

  16. Analysis of Parabolic Leaf Spring Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Kainulainen, Perttu

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this final project was to make an the fracture analysis for a parabolic leaf spring. The leaf spring type is used in a mining machine. The machine is designed for personnel and equipment transportation in a mine environment. The objectives were to gather information about effects of the improvement in the spring’ structure and study phenomena which eventually lead to the fracture of the spring. The project was divided into theoretical and experimental sections. The theoreti...

  17. Peach Leaf Senescence Delayed by Criconemella xenoplax

    OpenAIRE

    Nyczepir, A. P.; Wood, B. W.

    1988-01-01

    Fall annual leaf senescence of peach was delayed in the field and in microplots in the presence of Criconemella xenoplax. Soil from the rhizosphere of orchard trees with greener leaves had ca. 2.5 × more nematodes than soil around trees in a more advanced state of fall senescence. In microplots, monoclonal antibody enzyme immunoassay (EIA) of leaf cytokinins indicated that concentration of zeatin riboside-like substances and chlorophyll content were greater in leaves of trees growing in nemat...

  18. Remote sensing of leaf water status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripple, William J.; Schrumpf, Barry J.

    1987-01-01

    Relative water content (RWC) measurements were made concurrently with spectral reflectance measurements from individual snapbean leaves. The relationships between spectra and RWC were described using second order polynomial equations. The middle infrared bands most sensitive to changes in leaf RWC also had the highest water absorption coefficients, as published by Curcio Petty (1951). The relationship between reflectance at 2100nm and total water potential for a single leaf was found to be linear.

  19. The Pathogenicity of Bio-Insecticide Protecto to Gamma Irradiated Cotton Leaf Worm Spodoptera littoralis (Boisd.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toxicological study using commercial formulation of Protecto based on the entomopathogenic bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis var kurstaki (B.t) in concentrations ranging from 0.09 to 10% were carried out versus second and fourth larval instar of the cotton leaf worm Spodoptera littoralis (Boisd.). The different pathological and biological aspects as larval and pupal mortality and developmental periods obviously increased by concentration increment, where the maximum mortality percentage, 91.66%, was observed when a concentration of 10% was used against the second instar. The longest developmental period, 29.1 days, was obtained when a concentration of 10% was applied against the second instar while it was 24.88 days when the same concentration was applied against the fourth instar. The pupation percentage, adult emergence percentage, survival percentage and adult longevity almost decreased by concentration increase where the least pupation and adult emergence percentage of second larval instar were observed at a concentration of 10%, it was 18.33 and 45.45% respectively and survival percentage decreased to 8.33, 21.66% at both instars at the concentration of 10%. Also the adult female and male moth longevity decreased by increasing Bacterial concentration. LC50 was calculated for second and fourth instar. Two substerlizing doses of gamma radiation 175 and 125 Gy were applied to full grown male pupae and different mating aspects as mating percentage, fecundity, fertility, average number of spermatophores per mated female were calculated where the fecundity and fertility were significantly decreased among P1 and F1 generations compared to control. The second and fourth larval instar of the F1 generation of the two substerlizing doses were treated with LC50 of protecto and the different mating statuses were studied which indicated a clear decrease in fecundity and a significant decrease in fertility of females mated with treated males among P1 and F1 generations. The

  20. Wind increases leaf water use efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schymanski, Stanislaus J; Or, Dani

    2016-07-01

    A widespread perception is that, with increasing wind speed, transpiration from plant leaves increases. However, evidence suggests that increasing wind speed enhances carbon dioxide (CO2 ) uptake while reducing transpiration because of more efficient convective cooling (under high solar radiation loads). We provide theoretical and experimental evidence that leaf water use efficiency (WUE, carbon uptake per water transpired) commonly increases with increasing wind speed, thus improving plants' ability to conserve water during photosynthesis. Our leaf-scale analysis suggests that the observed global decrease in near-surface wind speeds could have reduced WUE at a magnitude similar to the increase in WUE attributed to global rise in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. However, there is indication that the effect of long-term trends in wind speed on leaf gas exchange may be compensated for by the concurrent reduction in mean leaf sizes. These unintuitive feedbacks between wind, leaf size and water use efficiency call for re-evaluation of the role of wind in plant water relations and potential re-interpretation of temporal and geographic trends in leaf sizes. PMID:26714739

  1. Leaf spring puller for nuclear fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogg, J.L.

    1981-11-03

    A fuel rod puller in the form of a collet for pulling fuel rods from a storage area into grids of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly. The rod puller moves longitudinally through the grids to a storage area where projections on the end of leaf springs grasp onto an end plug in a fuel rod. Drive apparatus then pulls the rod puller and connected fuel rod from the storage area into the fuel assembly grids. The rod puller includes an outer tube having leaf springs on one end thereof in one modification, mounted within the outer tube is a movable plunger which acts to urge the leaf springs outwardly to a position to permit passing or with the end of a end plug. Upon withdrawal of the plunger, the leaf springs move into a groove formed in the end of a fuel rod end plug, and the fuel rod subsequently is pulled into the fuel assembly grids. In another modification, the leaf springs on the outer rod are biased in an outward direction and a longitudinally movable tube on the outer rod is moved in a direction to contract the leaf springs into a position where the projections thereof engage the groove formed in a fuel rod end plug.

  2. Association of tomato leaf curl Sudan virus with leaf curl disease of tomato in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrab, Sayed Sartaj; Yasir, Muhammad; El-Kafrawy, Sherif Ali; Abbas, Ayman T; Mousa, Magdi Ali Ahmed; Bakhashwain, Ahmed A

    2016-06-01

    Tomato is an important vegetable crop and its production is adversely affected by leaf curl disease caused by begomovirus. Leaf curl disease is a serious concern for tomato crops caused by begomovirus in Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Tomato leaf curl disease has been shown to be mainly caused either by tomato leaf curl Sudan virus or tomato yellow leaf curl virus as well as tomato leaf curl Oman virus. Many tomato plants infected with monopartite begomoviruses were also found to harbor a symptom enhancing betasatellites. Here we report the association of tomato leaf curl Sudan virus causing leaf curl disease of tomato in Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The complete genome sequence analysis showed highest (99.9 %) identity with tomato leaf curl Sudan virus causing leaf curl disease in Arabian Peninsula. In phylogenetic relationships analysis, the identified virus formed closest cluster with tomato leaf curl Sudan virus. In recombination analysis study, the major parent was identified as tomato leaf curl Sudan virus. Findings of this study strongly supports the associated virus is a variant of tomato leaf curl Sudan virus causing disease in Sudan, Yemen and Arabian Peninsula. The betasatellites sequence analysis showed highest identity (99.8 %) with tomato leaf curl betasatellites-Amaranthus-Jeddah. The phylogenetic analysis result based on betasatellites formed closed cluster with tomato yellow leaf curl Oman betasatellites. The importance of these findings and occurrence of begomovirus in new geographic regions causing leaf curl disease of tomato in Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia are discussed. PMID:27366765

  3. Home of Longevity in China---An Attribution Study of Bozhou Qiaocheng Longevity%中国长寿之乡--亳州市谯城区的长寿归因研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘海莲; 代志星

    2015-01-01

    亳州市谯城区作为长寿现象的一个样本,对于研究探讨长寿与运动的关联具有一定价值。研究中针对谯城区的长寿现象,结合相关文献资料,采用数理统计和专家访谈等方法,分析谯城区长寿老人的长寿归因,考究长寿现象与运动的相关性,阐述了长寿现象的发生和运动特征的关联情况,为开展老龄健康研究、建设有利于“居民健康长寿”的宜居社区环境提供理论支持,为构建和谐社会提供有益参考。%Qiaocheng District of Bozhou City, as a sample of longevity, has a certain value to explore the association of longevity and sports.Aiming at the phenomenon of longevity in Qiaocheng District, combining with the related docu-ments and by using the method of mathematical statistics and expert interview, this paper analyzes what the longevity of the long-lived people in Qiaocheng is attributed to, the correlation of longevity and sports and its characteristics, in order to provide theoretical support for age-related health research and the building of the nice community environ-ment of "residents'health and longevity", and provide a useful reference for building a harmonious society.

  4. ANALYSIS OF COMPOSITE LEAF SPRING BY USING ANALYTICAL & FEA

    OpenAIRE

    Ranjeet Mithari; Amar Patil; Prof. E. N. Aitavade

    2012-01-01

    Leaf spring are of the oldest suspension component they are still frequently used. The current leaf spring is multiple leaf spring types with a steel material. It has high weight, low natural frequency, high corrosion, more noise. Therefore current multiple leaf spring is replaced by mono composite (E- Glass epoxy) leaf spring which has high natural frequency, low weight etc. The maximum stress produced at the cylindrically joint than fixed joint. Therefore stress analysis of composite materi...

  5. Ginseng leaf-stem: bioactive constituents and pharmacological functions

    OpenAIRE

    Xie Jingtian; Peng Dacheng; Wang Hongwei

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Ginseng root is used more often than other parts such as leaf stem although extracts from ginseng leaf-stem also contain similar active ingredients with pharmacological functions. Ginseng's leaf-stems are more readily available at a lower cost than its root. This article reviews the pharmacological effects of ginseng leaf-stem on some diseases and adverse effects due to excessive consumption. Ginseng leaf-stem extract contains numerous active ingredients, such as ginsenosides, polysa...

  6. PREDICTION OF LEAF SPRING PARAMETERS USING ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS

    OpenAIRE

    Dr.D.V.V.KRISHNA PRASAD; J.P.KARTHIK

    2013-01-01

    In this paper an attempt is made to predict the optimum design parameters using artificial neural networks. For this static and dynamic analysis on various leaf spring configuration is carried out by ANSYS and is used as training data for neural network. Training data includes cross section of the leaf, load on the leaf spring, stresses, displacement and natural frequencies. By creating a network using thickness and width of the leaf, load on the leaf spring as input parameters and stresses, ...

  7. Barley Leaf Area and Leaf Growth Rates Are Maximized during the Pre-Anthesis Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad M. Alqudah

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Leaf developmental traits are an important component of crop breeding in small-grain cereals. Surprisingly, little is known about the genetic basis for the differences in barley (Hordeum vulgare L. leaf development. The two barley row-type classes, i.e., two- and six-rowed, show clear-cut differences in leaf development. To quantify these differences and to measure the genetic component of the phenotypic variance for the leaf developmental differences in both row-type classes we investigated 32 representative spring barley accessions (14 two- and 18 six-rowed accessions under three independent growth conditions. Leaf mass area is lower in plants grown under greenhouse (GH conditions due to fewer, smaller, and lighter leaf blades per main culm compared to pot- and soil-grown field plants. Larger and heavier leaf blades of six-rowed barley correlate with higher main culm spike grain yield, spike dry weight, and harvest index; however, smaller leaf area (LA in two-rowed barley can be attributed to more spikes, tillers, and biological yield (aboveground parts. In general, leaf growth rate was significantly higher between awn primordium and tipping stages. Moderate to very high broad-sense heritabilities (0.67–0.90 were found under all growth conditions, indicating that these traits are predominantly genetically controlled. In addition, our data suggests that GH conditions are suitable for studying leaf developmental traits. Our results also demonstrated that LA impacts single plant yield and can be reconsidered in future breeding programs. Six-rowed spike 1 (Vrs1 is the major determinate of barley row-types, the differences in leaf development between two- and six-rowed barleys may be attributed to the regulation of Vrs1 in these two classes, which needs further testing.

  8. Molecular characterization of Chilli leaf curl virus and satellite molecules associated with leaf curl disease of Amaranthus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, B; Kumar, R Vinoth; Chakraborty, S

    2014-04-01

    Amaranthus, collectively known as amaranth, is an annual or short-lived perennial plant used as leafy vegetables, cereals and for ornamental purposes in many countries including India. During 2011, leaf samples of Amaranthus plants displaying leaf curling, leaf distortion, leaf crinkling and yellow leaf margins were collected from Banswara district, Rajasthan in India. Full-length clones of a monopartite begomovirus, a betasatellite and an alphasatellite were characterized. The complete nucleotide sequence of the isolated begomovirus features as a typical 'Old World' begomovirus with the highest nucleotide per cent identity with Chilli leaf curl virus and hence, considered as an isolate of Chilli leaf curl virus. The complete nucleotide sequences of betasatellite and alphasatellite possess maximum nucleotide identity with Tomato yellow leaf curl Thailand betasatellite and Chilli leaf curl alphasatellite, respectively. This is the first report of the association of chilli-infecting begomovirus and satellite molecules infecting a new host, Amaranthus, causing leaf curl disease. PMID:24368759

  9. The Status and Associated Factors of Successful Aging among Older Adults Residing in Longevity Areas in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Wen Hui; andSHI Xiao Ming; ZHANG Hong Yan; ZHANG Juan; LYU Yue Bin; Melanie Sereny Brasher; YIN Zhao Xue; LUO Jie Si; HU Dong Sheng; FEN Lei

    2016-01-01

    ObjectiveThis study aims to assess the status of successful aging (SA) in longevity areas in Chinaand explore multiple factors associated with SA among the young-old and oldest-old. MethodsA total of 2296 elderly people aged 65 and older were interviewed in the longevity areas sub-sample of the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS) in 2012. Baseline assessments included a researcher-administered questionnaire, physical examination, and laboratory testing. A logistic regression model was used to identify factors associated with SA. ResultsThe prevalenceof SA was 38.81% in the CLHLS in 2012. There were significant differences between ages groups, with SA compromising 56.85%among≥65 years group and 20.31% among ≥100 years group (χ2trend=126.73,P ConclusionPreventing central obesity, improving sleep quality and promoting healthy lifestyle may contribute to achieve SA among the elderly.

  10. A novel permutation test for case-only analysis identifies epistatic effects on human longevity in the FOXO gene family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Qihua; Sørensen, Mette; Kruse, Torben A;

    2013-01-01

    Genetic interactions or epistasis could make a substantial contribution to variation in human complex traits including longevity. However, detecting epistatic interactions in high dimensional datasets is difficult due to various reasons including multiple testing of correlated tests. We introduce a...... novel permutation strategy to the case-only analysis of gene by gene interaction using multiple SNPs. The method is applied to genes coding for Forkhead box O transcription factors which recently have been associated with human longevity across different populations hypothesizing that epistatic...... interaction in the regulation and expression of the FOXO gene family could contribute to the human longevity phenotype. Genotype data was collected from 1088 individuals from the Danish 1905 birth cohort aged over 92/93 years with 12 SNPs in the FOXO1a and 15 SNPs in the FOXO3a genes. Our analysis detected a...

  11. The longevity of broadleaf deciduous trees in Northern Hemisphere temperate forests: insights from tree-ring series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo eDi Filippo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the factors controlling the expression of longevity in trees is still an outstanding challenge for tree biologists and forest ecologists. We gathered tree-ring data and literature for broadleaf deciduous (BD temperate trees growing in closed-canopy old-growth forests in the Northern Hemisphere to explore the role of geographic patterns, climate variability, and growth rates on longevity. Our pan-continental analysis, covering 32 species from 12 genera, showed that 300-400 years can be considered a baseline threshold for maximum tree lifespan in many temperate deciduous forests. Maximum age varies greatly in relation to environmental features, even within the same species. Tree longevity is generally promoted by reduced growth rates across large genetic differences and environmental gradients. We argue that slower growth rates, and the associated smaller size, provide trees with an advantage against biotic and abiotic disturbance agents, supporting the idea that size, not age, is the main constraint to tree longevity. The oldest trees were living most of their life in subordinate canopy conditions and/or within primary forests in cool temperate environments and outside major storm tracks. Very old trees are thus characterized by slow growth and often live in forests with harsh site conditions and infrequent disturbance events that kill much of the trees. Temperature inversely controls the expression of longevity in mesophilous species (Fagus spp., but its role in Quercus spp. is more complex and warrants further research in disturbance ecology. Biological, ecological and historical drivers must be considered to understand the constraints imposed to longevity within different forest landscapes.

  12. Vase water effects on postharvest longevity and water relations of gladiolus grandiflorus 'white prosperity'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water from different sources was compared in regard to optimizing the postharvest performance of cut gladiolus flowers. Tap water from different flower markets was compared with distilled, deionized, canal, and carbonated water to find the best water type to be used by the industry in regards to postharvest longevity and water relations of cut gladiolus. Carbonated water proved to be the best water for handling cut gladiolus as it not only extended longevity, but also maintained relative fresh weight, and continued water uptake by the cut stems. Deionized water and distilled water were better than tap water from different regional flower markets. The canal water and tap water from Pattoki were the worst water types due to their higher heavy metals and salt levels; therefore, the growers and florists should avoid using these water types for handling their cut flowers. In summary, cut gladiolus should be placed in carbonated water for its effective control on bacterial proliferation and lower pH. Additionally, tap water should be analyzed before using for cut flower handling. (author)

  13. Longevity expectations in the pension fund, insurance, and employee benefits industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhavoronkov A

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Alex Zhavoronkov Biogerontology Research Foundation, London, United Kingdom Abstract: Considerable progress has been made in many areas of biomedical science since the 1960s, suggesting likely increases in life expectancy and decreases in morbidity and mortality in the adult population. These changes may pose substantial risks to the pensions and benefits industries. While there is no significant statistical evidence demonstrating rapid decreases in mortality rates, there are conflicting opinions among demographers and biogerontologists on the biological limits of the human lifespan and trends in life expectancy. We administered a survey of the International Employee Benefits Association (IEBA, a large, international industry group. Industry professionals employed by consulting (35%, insurance (24%, pension (14%, and other (27% companies responded to 32 questions. Respondents showed reasonably conservative views on the future of longevity and retirement, including that for women. The respondents formed their personal longevity expectations based on their family history and, to a lesser degree, on the actuarial life tables. Most of the sample expressed no desire to life past age 100 years, even if the enabling technologies required to maintain a healthy youthful state were available, and only a few respondents in the sample expressed a desire to live for the maximum period (at least offered by the survey question. The majority of the respondents would not undergo any invasive procedures, and only 56% of the respondents would opt for noninvasive therapies to extend their healthy lifespans to 150 years of age if these were available. Keywords: life expectancy, gerontology, actuarial, retirement, beliefs

  14. Longevity expectations in the pension fund, insurance, and employee benefits industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhavoronkov, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in many areas of biomedical science since the 1960s, suggesting likely increases in life expectancy and decreases in morbidity and mortality in the adult population. These changes may pose substantial risks to the pensions and benefits industries. While there is no significant statistical evidence demonstrating rapid decreases in mortality rates, there are conflicting opinions among demographers and biogerontologists on the biological limits of the human lifespan and trends in life expectancy. We administered a survey of the International Employee Benefits Association (IEBA), a large, international industry group. Industry professionals employed by consulting (35%), insurance (24%), pension (14%), and other (27%) companies responded to 32 questions. Respondents showed reasonably conservative views on the future of longevity and retirement, including that for women. The respondents formed their personal longevity expectations based on their family history and, to a lesser degree, on the actuarial life tables. Most of the sample expressed no desire to life past age 100 years, even if the enabling technologies required to maintain a healthy youthful state were available, and only a few respondents in the sample expressed a desire to live for the maximum period (at least) offered by the survey question. The majority of the respondents would not undergo any invasive procedures, and only 56% of the respondents would opt for noninvasive therapies to extend their healthy lifespans to 150 years of age if these were available. PMID:25653568

  15. X-ray-induced sterility in Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) and male longevity following irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, H; Parker, A G; Oliva, C F; Balestrino, F; Gilles, J R L

    2014-07-01

    The mosquito Aedes albopictus (Skuse, 1895) is a potent vector of several arboviral diseases, most notably chikungunya and dengue fever. In the context of the sterile insect technique (SIT), the sterilization of the male mosquitoes before their release can be achieved by gamma-ray irradiation. As gamma-ray irradiators are becoming increasingly problematic to purchase and transport, the suitability of an X-ray irradiator as an alternative for the sterilization of Ae. albopictus males was studied. The sterilization of up to 200,000 pupae at one time can be achieved with relative ease, and the sterility results obtained were comparable with those achieved by gamma irradiation, where 99% sterility is induced with a dose of 40 Gy. A significant reduction of longevity was observed in the latter stages of the males' life after irradiation treatments, especially at doses > 40 Gy, which is consistent with the negative effects on longevity induced by similar radiation doses using gamma rays. Females irradiated at 40 Gy were not only 100% sterile, but also failed to oviposit entirely, i.e., all of the females laid 0 eggs. Overall, it was found that the X-ray irradiator is generally suitable for the sterilization process for sterile insect technique programs, as it showed a high processing capacity, practicality, high effectiveness, and reproducibility. PMID:25118413

  16. A chromatin modifier integrates insulin/IGF-1 signalling and dietary restriction to regulate longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anupama; Kumar, Neeraj; Matai, Latika; Jain, Vaibhav; Garg, Amit; Mukhopadhyay, Arnab

    2016-08-01

    Insulin/IGF-1-like signalling (IIS) and dietary restriction (DR) are the two major modulatory pathways controlling longevity across species. Here, we show that both pathways license a common chromatin modifier, ZFP-1/AF10. The downstream transcription factors of the IIS and select DR pathways, DAF-16/FOXO or PHA-4/FOXA, respectively, both transcriptionally regulate the expression of zfp-1. ZFP-1, in turn, negatively regulates the expression of DAF-16/FOXO and PHA-4/FOXA target genes, apparently forming feed-forward loops that control the amplitude as well as the duration of gene expression. We show that ZFP-1 mediates this regulation by negatively influencing the recruitment of DAF-16/FOXO and PHA-4/FOXA to their target promoters. Consequently, zfp-1 is required for the enhanced longevity observed during DR and on knockdown of IIS. Our data reveal how two distinct sensor pathways control an overlapping set of genes, using different downstream transcription factors, integrating potentially diverse and temporally distinct nutritional situations. PMID:27039057

  17. Healthspan and longevity can be extended by suppression of growth hormone signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartke, Andrzej

    2016-08-01

    Average and maximal lifespan are important biological characteristics of every species, but can be modified by mutations and by a variety of genetic, dietary, environmental, and pharmacological interventions. Mutations or disruption of genes required for biosynthesis or action of growth hormone (GH) produce remarkable extension of longevity in laboratory mice. Importantly, the long-lived GH-related mutants exhibit many symptoms of delayed and/or slower aging, including preservation of physical and cognitive functions and resistance to stress and age-related disease. These characteristics could be collectively described as "healthy aging" or extension of the healthspan. Extension of both the healthspan and lifespan in GH-deficient and GH-resistant mice appears to be due to multiple interrelated mechanisms. Some of these mechanisms have been linked to healthy aging and genetic predisposition to extended longevity in humans. Enhanced insulin sensitivity combined with reduced insulin levels, reduced adipose tissue, central nervous system inflammation, and increased levels of adiponectin represent such mechanisms. Further progress in elucidation of mechanisms that link reduced GH action to delayed and healthy aging should identify targets for lifestyle and pharmacological interventions that could benefit individuals as well as society. PMID:26909495

  18. Determinants of rodent longevity in the chaperone-protein degradation network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Karl A; Valentine, Joseph M; Kramer, David A; Gelfond, Jonathan A; Kristan, Deborah M; Nevo, Eviatar; Buffenstein, Rochelle

    2016-05-01

    Proteostasis is an integral component of healthy aging, ensuring maintenance of protein structural and functional integrity with concomitant impact upon health span and longevity. In most metazoans, increasing age is accompanied by a decline in protein quality control resulting in the accrual of damaged, self-aggregating cytotoxic proteins. A notable exception to this trend is observed in the longest-lived rodent, the naked mole-rat (NMR, Heterocephalus glaber) which maintains proteostasis and proteasome-mediated degradation and autophagy during aging. We hypothesized that high levels of the proteolytic degradation may enable better maintenance of proteostasis during aging contributing to enhanced species maximum lifespan potential (MLSP). We test this by examining proteasome activity, proteasome-related HSPs, the heat-shock factor 1 (HSF1) transcription factor, and several markers of autophagy in the liver and quadriceps muscles of eight rodent species with divergent MLSP. All subterranean-dwelling species had higher levels of proteasome activity and autophagy, possibly linked to having to dig in soils rich in heavy metals and where underground atmospheres have reduced oxygen availability. Even after correcting for phylogenetic relatedness, a significant (p machinery and maintenance of protein quality play a pivotal role in species longevity among rodents. PMID:26894765

  19. Age-related changes in semen quality characteristics and expectations of reproductive longevity in Duroc boars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu Hung; Lo, Ling Ling; Liu, Shyh Hwa; Yang, Tien Shuh

    2010-08-01

    Quadratic fitting was used to regress semen characteristics of 1441 samples consisting of 12-month collection from 58 Duroc boars against animal age varied from 10 to 80 months. Data was divided into two groups of cool (14.0-22.7 degrees C, RH 81.5%) and hot season (22.9-29.9 degrees C, RH 86.6%), to test effects of age, season and their interactions. Results revealed that young boars of around 1 year old could endure the hot season. The endurance gradually diminished as animals grew. In the hot season animals exhibited peak performance at age around 33 month and it remained for 1 month, while cool-season kept boars could last for 48 months from 16 months old onward. The reproductive longevity should be 51 month in a subtropical environment and it may extend to 70 month if heat stress can be avoided. The estimated total sperm contribution of a Duroc boar would be 1.8 times more when kept below 22 degrees C than in a natural subtropical environment. It is concluded that to maintain Duroc boars as semen donor to at least 4 years of age is feasible in a subtropical environment and boar longevity could reach 6 years old if well kept in a temperate region. PMID:20662811

  20. Correlation between haplotype of apolipoprotein B gene and natural longevity persons in Uygur Nationality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG WenXi; QIU ChangChun; CHENG ZuHeng; ZHOU WenYu; GU MingLiang; XU Qun; FANG MingWu; NIU WenQuan

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigated the correlation between polymorphisms and haplotypes in the apolipoprotein B (apoB) gene (SP-I/D, XbaI-RFLP, VNTR) and natural longevity persons among the Uygur people in Xinjiang. For this purpose, 191 healthy Uygur individuals aged above 90 from Hetian area of Xinjiang were recruited, and another 53 persons aged 65-70 from the same nationality, the same region and with the same gender ratio, served as the control group. Genotyping was performed by PCR-SSP, PCR-RFLP and PCR-sequencing methods. Logistic regression analyses revealed that the frequencies of X+X+ genotype, M and L alleles and the genetypes composed of M and L were significantly higher in the longevity group than in the control group. In haplotype analyses, we found that, in the long-lived people, the frequency of haplotypes composed of the X+ and M alleles was significantly higher whereas the frequency of haplotypes composed of the X- and S alleles was significantly lower (both P<0.05) I than those of their controls. These results indicated that the S allele, SS genotype and X+-S, D-S, D-X+-S haplotypes were the possible adverse factors, whereas the M, L alleles, X+X+, MM, ML, LL genotypes and I-X+-M, X+-M haplotypes were the possibe protective factors for the naturally long-lived Uygur people in China.