WorldWideScience

Sample records for autophagy mediates pharmacological

  1. Endosome-mediated autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondylis, Vangelis; van Nispen tot Pannerden, Hezder E.; van Dijk, Suzanne; ten Broeke, Toine; Wubbolts, Richard; Geerts, Willie J.; Seinen, Cor; Mutis, Tuna; Heijnen, Harry F.G.

    2013-01-01

    Activation of TLR signaling has been shown to induce autophagy in antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Using high-resolution microscopy approaches, we show that in LPS-stimulated dendritic cells (DCs), autophagosomes emerge from MHC class II compartments (MIICs) and harbor both the molecular machinery for antigen processing and the autophagosome markers LC3 and ATG16L1. This ENdosome-Mediated Autophagy (ENMA) appears to be the major type of autophagy in DCs, as similar structures were observed upon established autophagy-inducing conditions (nutrient deprivation, rapamycin) and under basal conditions in the presence of bafilomycin A1. Autophagosome formation was not significantly affected in DCs expressing ATG4BC74A mutant and atg4b−/− bone marrow DCs, but the degradation of the autophagy substrate SQSTM1/p62 was largely impaired. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the previously described DC aggresome-like LPS-induced structures (DALIS) contain vesicular membranes, and in addition to SQSTM1 and ubiquitin, they are positive for LC3. LC3 localization on DALIS is independent of its lipidation. MIIC-driven autophagosomes preferentially engulf the LPS-induced SQSTM1-positive DALIS, which become later degraded in autolysosomes. DALIS-associated membranes also contain ATG16L1, ATG9 and the Q-SNARE VTI1B, suggesting that they may represent (at least in part) a membrane reservoir for autophagosome expansion. We propose that ENMA constitutes an unconventional, APC-specific type of autophagy, which mediates the processing and presentation of cytosolic antigens by MHC class II machinery, and/or the selective clearance of toxic by-products of elevated ROS/RNS production in activated DCs, thereby promoting their survival. PMID:23481895

  2. Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejarano, Eloy; Cuervo, Ana Maria

    2010-01-01

    Continuous renewal of intracellular components is required to preserve cellular functionality. In fact, failure to timely turnover proteins and organelles leads often to cell death and disease. Different pathways contribute to the degradation of intracellular components in lysosomes or autophagy. In this review, we focus on chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA), a selective form of autophagy that modulates the turnover of a specific pool of soluble cytosolic proteins. Selectivity in CMA is conferred by the presence of a targeting motif in the cytosolic substrates that, upon recognition by a cytosolic chaperone, determines delivery to the lysosomal surface. Substrate proteins undergo unfolding and translocation across the lysosomal membrane before reaching the lumen, where they are rapidly degraded. Better molecular characterization of the different components of this pathway in recent years, along with the development of transgenic models with modified CMA activity and the identification of CMA dysfunction in different severe human pathologies and in aging, are all behind the recent regained interest in this catabolic pathway. PMID:20160146

  3. Cocaine induces astrocytosis through ER stress-mediated activation of autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periyasamy, Palsamy; Guo, Ming-Lei; Buch, Shilpa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cocaine is known to induce inflammation, thereby contributing in part, to the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration. A recent study from our lab has revealed a link between macroautophagy/autophagy and microglial activation. The current study was aimed at investigating whether cocaine could also mediate activation of astrocytes and, whether this process involved induction of autophagy. Our findings demonstrated that cocaine mediated the activation of astrocytes by altering the levels of autophagy markers, such as BECN1, ATG5, MAP1LC3B-II, and SQSTM1 in both human A172 astrocytoma cells and primary human astrocytes. Furthermore, cocaine treatment resulted in increased formation of endogenous MAP1LC3B puncta in human astrocytes. Additionally, astrocytes transfected with the GFP-MAP1LC3B plasmid also demonstrated cocaine-mediated upregulation of the green fluorescent MAP1LC3B puncta. Cocaine-mediated induction of autophagy involved upstream activation of ER stress proteins such as EIF2AK3, ERN1, ATF6 since blockage of autophagy using either pharmacological or gene-silencing approaches, had no effect on cocaine-mediated induction of ER stress. Using both pharmacological and gene-silencing approaches to block either ER stress or autophagy, our findings demonstrated that cocaine-induced activation of astrocytes (measured by increased levels of GFAP) involved sequential activation of ER stress and autophagy. Cocaine-mediated-increased upregulation of GFAP correlated with increased expression of proinflammatory mediators such as TNF, IL1B, and IL6. In conclusion, these findings reveal an association between ER stress-mediated autophagy and astrogliosis in cocaine-treated astrocytes. Intervention of ER stress and/or autophagy signaling would thus be promising therapeutic targets for abrogating cocaine-mediated neuroinflammation. PMID:27337297

  4. Cocaine induces astrocytosis through ER stress-mediated activation of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periyasamy, Palsamy; Guo, Ming-Lei; Buch, Shilpa

    2016-08-02

    Cocaine is known to induce inflammation, thereby contributing in part, to the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration. A recent study from our lab has revealed a link between macroautophagy/autophagy and microglial activation. The current study was aimed at investigating whether cocaine could also mediate activation of astrocytes and, whether this process involved induction of autophagy. Our findings demonstrated that cocaine mediated the activation of astrocytes by altering the levels of autophagy markers, such as BECN1, ATG5, MAP1LC3B-II, and SQSTM1 in both human A172 astrocytoma cells and primary human astrocytes. Furthermore, cocaine treatment resulted in increased formation of endogenous MAP1LC3B puncta in human astrocytes. Additionally, astrocytes transfected with the GFP-MAP1LC3B plasmid also demonstrated cocaine-mediated upregulation of the green fluorescent MAP1LC3B puncta. Cocaine-mediated induction of autophagy involved upstream activation of ER stress proteins such as EIF2AK3, ERN1, ATF6 since blockage of autophagy using either pharmacological or gene-silencing approaches, had no effect on cocaine-mediated induction of ER stress. Using both pharmacological and gene-silencing approaches to block either ER stress or autophagy, our findings demonstrated that cocaine-induced activation of astrocytes (measured by increased levels of GFAP) involved sequential activation of ER stress and autophagy. Cocaine-mediated-increased upregulation of GFAP correlated with increased expression of proinflammatory mediators such as TNF, IL1B, and IL6. In conclusion, these findings reveal an association between ER stress-mediated autophagy and astrogliosis in cocaine-treated astrocytes. Intervention of ER stress and/or autophagy signaling would thus be promising therapeutic targets for abrogating cocaine-mediated neuroinflammation.

  5. Degradation of AF1Q by chaperone-mediated autophagy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Peng; Ji, Min; Lu, Fei; Zhang, Jingru; Li, Huanjie; Cui, Taixing; Li Wang, Xing; Tang, Dongqi; Ji, Chunyan

    2014-01-01

    AF1Q, a mixed lineage leukemia gene fusion partner, is identified as a poor prognostic biomarker for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML), adult AML with normal cytogenetic and adult myelodysplastic syndrome. AF1Q is highly regulated during hematopoietic progenitor differentiation and development but its regulatory mechanism has not been defined clearly. In the present study, we used pharmacological and genetic approaches to influence chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) and explored the degradation mechanism of AF1Q. Pharmacological inhibitors of lysosomal degradation, such as chloroquine, increased AF1Q levels, whereas activators of CMA, including 6-aminonicotinamide and nutrient starvation, decreased AF1Q levels. AF1Q interacts with HSPA8 and LAMP-2A, which are core components of the CMA machinery. Knockdown of HSPA8 or LAMP-2A increased AF1Q protein levels, whereas overexpression showed the opposite effect. Using an amino acid deletion AF1Q mutation plasmid, we identified that AF1Q had a KFERQ-like motif which was recognized by HSPA8 for CMA-dependent proteolysis. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that AF1Q can be degraded in lysosomes by CMA. - Highlights: • Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) is involved in the degradation of AF1Q. • Macroautophagy does not contribute to the AF1Q degradation. • AF1Q has a KFERQ-like motif that is recognized by CMA core components

  6. Degradation of AF1Q by chaperone-mediated autophagy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Peng; Ji, Min; Lu, Fei; Zhang, Jingru [Department of Hematology, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Li, Huanjie; Cui, Taixing; Li Wang, Xing [Research Center for Cell Therapy, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Tang, Dongqi, E-mail: tangdq@sdu.edu.cn [Research Center for Cell Therapy, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Center for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, The Second Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250033 (China); Ji, Chunyan, E-mail: jichunyan@sdu.edu.cn [Department of Hematology, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China)

    2014-09-10

    AF1Q, a mixed lineage leukemia gene fusion partner, is identified as a poor prognostic biomarker for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML), adult AML with normal cytogenetic and adult myelodysplastic syndrome. AF1Q is highly regulated during hematopoietic progenitor differentiation and development but its regulatory mechanism has not been defined clearly. In the present study, we used pharmacological and genetic approaches to influence chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) and explored the degradation mechanism of AF1Q. Pharmacological inhibitors of lysosomal degradation, such as chloroquine, increased AF1Q levels, whereas activators of CMA, including 6-aminonicotinamide and nutrient starvation, decreased AF1Q levels. AF1Q interacts with HSPA8 and LAMP-2A, which are core components of the CMA machinery. Knockdown of HSPA8 or LAMP-2A increased AF1Q protein levels, whereas overexpression showed the opposite effect. Using an amino acid deletion AF1Q mutation plasmid, we identified that AF1Q had a KFERQ-like motif which was recognized by HSPA8 for CMA-dependent proteolysis. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that AF1Q can be degraded in lysosomes by CMA. - Highlights: • Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) is involved in the degradation of AF1Q. • Macroautophagy does not contribute to the AF1Q degradation. • AF1Q has a KFERQ-like motif that is recognized by CMA core components.

  7. Sulforaphane-induced autophagy flux prevents prion protein-mediated neurotoxicity through AMPK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J-H; Jeong, J-K; Park, S-Y

    2014-10-10

    Prion diseases are neurodegenerative and infectious disorders that involve accumulation of misfolded scrapie prion protein, and which are characterized by spongiform degeneration. Autophagy, a major homeostatic process responsible for the degradation of cytoplasmic components, has garnered attention as the potential target for neurodegenerative diseases such as prion disease. We focused on protective effects of sulforaphane found in cruciferous vegetables on prion-mediated neurotoxicity and the mechanism of sulforaphane related to autophagy. In human neuroblastoma cells, sulforaphane protected prion protein (PrP) (106-126)-mediated neurotoxicity and increased autophagy flux marker microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3-II protein levels, following a decrease of p62 protein level. Pharmacological and genetical inhibition of autophagy by 3MA, wortmannin and knockdown of autophagy-related 5 (ATG5) led to block the effect of sulforaphane against PrP (106-126)-induced neurotoxicity. Furthermore we demonstrated that both sulforaphane-induced autophagy and protective effect of sulforaphane against PrP (106-126)-induced neurotoxicity are dependent on the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling. The present results indicated that sulforaphane of cruciferous vegetables enhanced autophagy flux led to the protection effects against prion-mediated neurotoxicity, which was regulated by AMPK signaling pathways in human neuron cells. Our data also suggest that sulforaphane has a potential value as a therapeutic tool in neurodegenerative disease including prion diseases. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Pharmacologic inhibition of autophagy sensitizes human acute leukemia Jurkat T cells to acacetin-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Young; Jun, Do Youn; Kim, Ki Yun; Ha, Eun Ji; Woo, Mi Hee; Ko, Jee Youn; Yun, Young Ho; Oh, In-Seok; Kim, Young Ho

    2016-11-04

    Exposure of Jurkat T cell clone (J/Neo cells) to acacetin (5,7-dihydroxy-4'-methoxyflavone), which is present in barnyard millet [Echinochloa esculenta (A. Braun)] grains, resulted in cytotoxicity, accumulation of apoptotic sub-G1 cells, Bak activation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3, cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and FITC-Annexin V-stainable phosphatidylserine exposure on the external surface of the cytoplasmic membrane without accompanying necrosis. These apoptotic responses were completely abrogated in Jurkat T cell clone (J/Bcl-xL) overexpressing Bcl-xL. Under these conditions, cellular autophagic responses, including suppression of the Akt-mTOR pathway and p62/SQSTM1 down-regulation, were detected both J/Neo and J/Bcl-xL cells; however, formation of acridine orange-stainable acidic vascular organelles, LC3-I/II conversion, and Beclin1 phosphorylation (Ser-15) were detected only in J/Neo cells. Correspondingly, concomitant treatment with the autophagy inhibitor (3-methyladenine or LY294002) appeared to enhance acacetin-induced apoptotic responses, such as Bak activation, Δψm loss, activation of caspae-9 and caspase-3, and apoptotic sub-G1 accumulation. This indicated that acacetin could induce apoptosis and cytoprotective autophagy in Jurkat T cells simultaneously. Together, these results demonstrate that acacetin induces not only apoptotic cell death via Bak activation, Δψm loss, and mitochondria-dependent activation of the caspase cascade, but also cytoprotective autophagy resulting from suppression of the Akt-mTOR pathway. Furthermore, pharmacologic inhibition of the autophagy pathway augments Bak activation and resultant mitochondrial damage-mediated apoptosis in Jurkat T cells.

  9. Autophagy is required for IL-2-mediated fibroblast growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Rui [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15219 (United States); Tang, Daolin, E-mail: tangd2@upmc.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15219 (United States); Lotze, Michael T., E-mail: lotzemt@upcm.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15219 (United States); Zeh III, Herbert J., E-mail: zehh@upmc.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15219 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved pathway responsible for delivery of cytoplasmic material into the lysosomal degradation pathway to enable vesicular exocytosis. Interleukin (IL)-2 is produced by T-cells and its activity is important for immunoregulation. Fibroblasts are an immune competent cell type, playing a critical role in wound healing, chronic inflammation, and tumor development. Although autophagy plays an important role in each of these processes, whether it regulates IL-2 activity in fibroblasts is unknown. Here, we show that autophagy is required for IL-2-induced cell growth in fibroblasts. IL-2 significantly induced autophagy in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and primary lung fibroblasts. Autophagy inhibitors (e.g., 3-methylamphetamine and bafilomycin A1) or knockdown of ATG5 and beclin 1 blocked clinical grade IL-2-induced autophagy. Moreover, IL-2 induced HMGB1 cytoplasmic translocation in MEFs and promoted interaction between HMGB1 and beclin1, which is required for autophagy induction. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy inhibited IL-2-induced cell proliferation and enhanced IL-2-induced apoptosis. These findings suggest that autophagy is an important pro-survival regulator for IL-2-induced cell growth in fibroblasts.

  10. Suppression of autophagy exacerbates Mefloquine-mediated cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ji Hyun; Park, So Jung; Jo, Yoon Kyung; Kim, Eun Sung; Kang, Hee; Park, Ji-Ho; Lee, Eunjoo H; Cho, Dong-Hyung

    2012-05-02

    Mefloquine is an effective treatment drug for malaria. However, it can cause several adverse side effects, and the precise mechanism associated with the adverse neurological effects of Mefloquine is not clearly understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of Mefloquine on autophagy in neuroblastoma cells. Mefloquine treatment highly induced the formation of autophagosomes and the conversion of LC3I into LC3II. Moreover, Mefloquine-induced autophagy was efficiently suppressed by an autophagy inhibitor and by down regulation of ATG6. The autophagy was also completely blocked in ATG5 deficient mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. Moreover, suppression of autophagy significantly intensified Mefloquine-mediated cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. Our findings suggest that suppression of autophagy may exacerbate Mefloquine toxicity in neuroblastoma cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Autophagy Is Required for Neutrophil-Mediated Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhisek Bhattacharya

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy, an intracellular degradation and energy recycling mechanism, is emerging as an important regulator of immune responses. However, the role of autophagy in regulating neutrophil functions is not known. We investigated neutrophil biology using myeloid-specific autophagy-deficient mice and found that autophagy deficiency reduced neutrophil degranulation in vitro and in vivo. Mice with autophagy deficiency showed reduced severity of several neutrophil-mediated inflammatory and autoimmune disease models, including PMA-induced ear inflammation, LPS-induced breakdown of blood-brain barrier, and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. NADPH oxidase-mediated reactive oxygen species generation was also reduced in autophagy-deficient neutrophils, and inhibition of NADPH oxidase reduced neutrophil degranulation, suggesting NADPH oxidase to be a player at the intersection of autophagy and degranulation. Overall, this study establishes autophagy as an important regulator of neutrophil functions and neutrophil-mediated inflammation in vivo.

  12. Atg5-mediated autophagy deficiency in proximal tubules promotes cell cycle G2/M arrest and renal fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiyan; Peng, Xuan; Wang, Yating; Cao, Shirong; Xiong, Liping; Fan, Jinjin; Wang, Yihan; Zhuang, Shougang; Yu, Xueqing; Mao, Haiping

    2016-09-01

    Macroautophagy/autophagy protects against cellular stress. Renal sublethal injury-triggered tubular epithelial cell cycle arrest at G2/M is associated with interstitial fibrosis. However, the role of autophagy in renal fibrosis is elusive. Here, we hypothesized that autophagy activity in tubular epithelial cells is pivotal for inhibition of cell cycle G2/M arrest and subsequent fibrogenic response. In both renal epithelial cells stimulated by angiotensin II (AGT II) and the murine kidney after unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO), we observed that occurrence of autophagy preceded increased production of COL1 (collagen, type I). Pharmacological enhancement of autophagy by rapamycin suppressed COL1 accumulation and renal fibrosis. In contrast, genetic ablation of autophagy by proximal tubular epithelial cell-specific deletion of Atg5, with reduction of the LC3-II protein level and degradation of SQSTM1/p62, showed marked cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase, robust COL1 deposition, and severe interstitial fibrosis in a UUO model, as compared with wild-type mice. In vitro, AGT II exposure triggered autophagy preferentially in the G1/S phase, and increased COL1 expression in the G2/M phase in renal epithelial cells. Stimulation of Atg5-deficient primary proximal tubular cells with AGT II also resulted in elevated G2/M arrest and COL1 production. Pharmacological or genetic inhibition of autophagy increased AGT II-mediated G2/M arrest. Enhanced expression of ATG5, but not the autophagy-deficient ATG5 mutant K130R, rescued the G2/M arrest, suggesting the regulation of cell cycle progression by ATG5 is autophagy dependent. In conclusion, Atg5-mediated autophagy in proximal epithelial cells is a critical host-defense mechanism that prevents renal fibrosis by blocking G2/M arrest.

  13. Acute ethanol exposure-induced autophagy-mediated cardiac injury via activation of the ROS-JNK-Bcl-2 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhongxin; Huang, Yewei; Lv, Lingchun; Tao, Youli; Shao, Minglong; Zhao, Congcong; Xue, Mei; Sun, Jia; Niu, Chao; Wang, Yang; Kim, Sunam; Cong, Weitao; Mao, Wei; Jin, Litai

    2018-02-01

    Binge drinking is associated with increased cardiac autophagy, and often triggers heart injury. Given the essential role of autophagy in various cardiac diseases, this study was designed to investigate the role of autophagy in ethanol-induced cardiac injury and the underlying mechanism. Our study showed that ethanol exposure enhanced the levels of LC3-II and LC3-II positive puncta and promoted cardiomyocyte apoptosis in vivo and in vitro. In addition, we found that ethanol induced autophagy and cardiac injury largely via the sequential triggering of reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), phosphorylation of Bcl-2, and dissociation of the Beclin 1/Bcl-2 complex. By contrast, inhibition of ethanol-induced autophagic flux with pharmacologic agents in the hearts of mice and cultured cells significantly alleviated ethanol-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis and heart injury. Elimination of ROS with the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or inhibition of JNK with the JNK inhibitor SP600125 reduced ethanol-induced autophagy and subsequent autophagy-mediated apoptosis. Moreover, metallothionein (MT), which can scavenge reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, also attenuated ethanol-induced autophagy and cell apoptosis in MT-TG mice. In conclusion, our findings suggest that acute ethanol exposure induced autophagy-mediated heart toxicity and injury mainly through the ROS-JNK-Bcl-2 signaling pathway. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. New Potential Pharmacological Functions of Chinese Herbal Medicines via Regulation of Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty Yuen Kwan Law

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a universal catabolic cellular process for quality control of cytoplasm and maintenance of cellular homeostasis upon nutrient deprivation and environmental stimulus. It involves the lysosomal degradation of cellular components such as misfolded proteins or damaged organelles. Defects in autophagy are implicated in the pathogenesis of diseases including cancers, myopathy, neurodegenerations, infections and cardiovascular diseases. In the recent decade, traditional drugs with new clinical applications are not only commonly found in Western medicines, but also highlighted in Chinese herbal medicines (CHM. For instance, pharmacological studies have revealed that active components or fractions from Chaihu (Radix bupleuri, Hu Zhang (Rhizoma polygoni cuspidati, Donglingcao (Rabdosia rubesens, Hou po (Cortex magnoliae officinalis and Chuan xiong (Rhizoma chuanxiong modulate cancers, neurodegeneration and cardiovascular disease via autophagy. These findings shed light on the potential new applications and formulation of CHM decoctions via regulation of autophagy. This article reviews the roles of autophagy in the pharmacological actions of CHM and discusses their new potential clinical applications in various human diseases.

  15. Crosstalk of ER stress-mediated autophagy and ER-phagy: Involvement of UPR and the core autophagy machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shuling; Tan, Jin; Miao, Yuyang; Zhang, Qiang

    2018-05-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, a common cellular stress response, is closely related to the activation of autophagy that is an important and evolutionarily conserved mechanism for maintaining cellular homeostasis. Autophagy induced by ER stress mainly includes the ER stress-mediated autophagy and ER-phagy. The ER stress-mediated autophagy is characterized by the generation of autophagosomes that include worn-out proteins, protein aggregates, and damaged organelles. While the autophagosomes of ER-phagy selectively include ER membranes, and the double membranes also derive, at least in part, from the ER. The signaling pathways of IRE1α, PERK, ATF6, and Ca 2+ are necessary for the activation of ER stress-mediated autophagy, while the receptor-mediated selective ER-phagy degrades the ER is Atg40/FAM134B. The ER stress-mediated autophagy and ER-phagy not only have differences, but also have connections. The activation of ER-phagy requires the core autophagy machinery, and the ER-phagy may be a branch of ER stress-mediated autophagy that selectively targets the ER. However, the determined factors that control the changeover switch between ER stress-mediated autophagy and ER-phagy are largely obscure, which may be associated with the type of cells and the extent of stimulation. This review summarized the crosstalk between ER stress-mediated autophagy and ER-phagy and their signaling networks. Additionally, we discussed the possible factors that influence the type of autophagy induced by ER stress. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. p53-Mediated Molecular Control of Autophagy in Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Mrakovcic

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an indispensable mechanism of the eukaryotic cell, facilitating the removal and renewal of cellular components and thereby balancing the cell’s energy consumption and homeostasis. Deregulation of autophagy is now regarded as one of the characteristic key features contributing to the development of tumors. In recent years, the suppression of autophagy in combination with chemotherapeutic treatment has been approached as a novel therapy in cancer treatment. However, depending on the type of cancer and context, interference with the autophagic machinery can either promote or disrupt tumorigenesis. Therefore, disclosure of the major signaling pathways that regulate autophagy and control tumorigenesis is crucial. To date, several tumor suppressor proteins and oncogenes have emerged as eminent regulators of autophagy whose depletion or mutation favor tumor formation. The mammalian cell “janitor” p53 belongs to one of these tumor suppressors that are most commonly mutated in human tumors. Experimental evidence over the last decade convincingly reports that p53 can act as either an activator or an inhibitor of autophagy depending on its subcellular localization and its mode of action. This finding gains particular significance as p53 deficiency or mutant variants of p53 that accumulate in the cytoplasm of tumor cells enable activation of autophagy. Accordingly, we recently identified p53 as a molecular hub that regulates autophagy and apoptosis in histone deacetylase inhibitor-treated uterine sarcoma cells. In light of this novel experimental evidence, in this review, we focus on p53 signaling as a mediator of the autophagic pathway in tumor cells.

  17. Autophagy Mediates Interleukin-1β Secretion in Human Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Iula

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-1β (IL-1β, a major pro-inflammatory cytokine, is a leaderless cytosolic protein whose secretion does not follow the classical endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi pathway, and for which a canonical mechanism of secretion remains to be established. Neutrophils are essential players against bacterial and fungi infections. These cells are rapidly and massively recruited from the circulation into infected tissues and, beyond of displaying an impressive arsenal of toxic weapons effective to kill pathogens, are also an important source of IL-1β in infectious conditions. Here, we analyzed if an unconventional secretory autophagy mechanism is involved in the exportation of IL-1β by these cells. Our findings indicated that inhibition of autophagy with 3-methyladenine and Wortmannin markedly reduced IL-1β secretion induced by LPS + ATP, as did the disruption of the autophagic flux with Bafilomycin A1 and E64d. These compounds did not noticeable affect neutrophil viability ruling out that the effects on IL-1β secretion were due to cell death. Furthermore, VPS34IN-1, a specific autophagy inhibitor, was still able to reduce IL-1β secretion when added after it was synthesized. Moreover, siRNA-mediated knockdown of ATG5 markedly reduced IL-1β secretion in neutrophil-differentiated PLB985 cells. Upon LPS + ATP stimulation, IL-1β was incorporated to an autophagic compartment, as was revealed by its colocalization with LC3B by confocal microscopy. Overlapping of IL-1β-LC3B in a vesicular compartment peaked before IL-1β increased in culture supernatants. On the other hand, stimulation of autophagy by cell starvation augmented the colocalization of IL-1β and LC3B and then promoted neutrophil IL-1β secretion. In addition, specific ELISAs indicated that although both IL-1β and pro-IL-1β are released to culture supernatants upon neutrophil stimulation, autophagy only promotes IL-1β secretion. Furthermore, the serine proteases inhibitor

  18. Shear Stress Induces Phenotypic Modulation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells via AMPK/mTOR/ULK1-Mediated Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liqian; Zhao, Manman; Liu, Aihua; Lv, Ming; Zhang, Jingbo; Li, Youxiang; Yang, Xinjian; Wu, Zhongxue

    2018-03-01

    Phenotypic modulation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) is involved in the pathophysiological processes of the intracranial aneurysms (IAs). Although shear stress has been implicated in the proliferation, migration, and phenotypic conversion of VSMCs, the molecular mechanisms underlying these events are currently unknown. In this study, we investigated whether shear stress(SS)-induced VSMC phenotypic modulation was mediated by autophagy involved in adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)/Unc-51-like kinase 1 (ULK1) pathway. The results show that shear stress could inhibit the expression of key VSMC contractile genes and induce pro-inflammatory/matrix-remodeling genes levels, contributing to VSMCs phenotypic switching from a contractile to a synthetic phenotype. More importantly, Shear stress also markedly increased the levels of the autophagy marker microtubule-associated protein light chain 3-II (LC3II), Beclin-1, and p62 degradation. The autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) significantly blocked shear-induced phenotypic modulation of VSMCs. To further explore the molecular mechanism involved in shear-induced autophagy, we found that shear stress could activate AMPK/mTOR/ULK1 signaling pathway in VSMCs. Compound C, a pharmacological inhibitor of AMPK, significantly reduced the levels of p-AMPK and p-ULK, enhanced p-mTOR level, and finally decreased LC3II and Beclin-1 level, which suggested that activated AMPK/mTOR/ULK1 signaling was related to shear-mediated autophagy. These results indicate that shear stress promotes VSMC phenotypic modulation through the induction of autophagy involved in activating the AMPK/mTOR/ULK1 pathway.

  19. Modulating polyplex-mediated gene transfection by small-molecule regulators of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xiao; Panus, David; Ji, Weihang; Wang, Chun

    2015-03-02

    Nonviral gene transfection mediated by cationic polymer/DNA polyplexes often imposes stress and toxicity to cells. To better understand the relationship between cellular stress responses and polyplex-mediated transfection, polyplex-induced early autophagy in mouse fibroblasts was characterized and the impact of autophagy modulation on transgene expression evaluated. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the formation of double-membraned autophagosome in the cytoplasm of polyplex-transfected cells. Immunofluorescence staining and microscopy revealed intracellular LC3 punctation that was characteristic of early autophagy activation. Elevated expression of autophagosome-associated LC3 II protein was also detected by Western blot. When cells were treated with small-molecule modulators of autophagy, polyplex-mediated gene transfection efficiency was significantly affected. 3-Methyladenine (3-MA), an early autophagy inhibitor, reduced transfection efficiency, whereas rapamycin, an autophagy inducer, enhanced transgene expression. Importantly, the observed functional impact on gene transfection by autophagy modulation was decoupled from that of other modes of cellular stress response (apoptosis/necrosis). Treatment of cells by 3-MA or rapamycin did not affect the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) but did decrease or increase, respectively, nuclear localization of polyplex-delivered plasmid DNA. These findings suggest new possibilities of enhancing polyplex-mediated gene delivery by codelivery of small-molecule regulators of autophagy.

  20. Autophagy Plays an Essential Role in Mediating Regression of Hypertrophy during Unloading of the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariharan, Nirmala; Ikeda, Yoshiyuki; Hong, Chull; Alcendor, Ralph R.; Usui, Soichiro; Gao, Shumin; Maejima, Yasuhiro; Sadoshima, Junichi

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is a bulk degradation mechanism for cytosolic proteins and organelles. The heart undergoes hypertrophy in response to mechanical load but hypertrophy can regress upon unloading. We hypothesize that autophagy plays an important role in mediating regression of cardiac hypertrophy during unloading. Mice were subjected to transverse aortic constriction (TAC) for 1 week, after which the constriction was removed (DeTAC). Regression of cardiac hypertrophy was observed after DeTAC, as indicated by reduction of LVW/BW and cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area. Indicators of autophagy, including LC3-II expression, p62 degradation and GFP-LC3 dots/cell, were significantly increased after DeTAC, suggesting that autophagy is induced. Stimulation of autophagy during DeTAC was accompanied by upregulation of FoxO1. Upregulation of FoxO1 and autophagy was also observed in vitro when cultured cardiomyocytes were subjected to mechanical stretch followed by incubation without stretch (de-stretch). Transgenic mice with cardiac-specific overexpression of FoxO1 exhibited smaller hearts and upregulation of autophagy. Overexpression of FoxO1 in cultured cardiomyocytes significantly reduced cell size, an effect which was attenuated when autophagy was inhibited. To further examine the role of autophagy and FoxO1 in mediating the regression of cardiac hypertrophy, beclin1+/− mice and cultured cardiomyocytes transduced with adenoviruses harboring shRNA-beclin1 or shRNA-FoxO1 were subjected to TAC/stretch followed by DeTAC/de-stretch. Regression of cardiac hypertrophy achieved after DeTAC/de-stretch was significantly attenuated when autophagy was suppressed through downregulation of beclin1 or FoxO1. These results suggest that autophagy and FoxO1 play an essential role in mediating regression of cardiac hypertrophy during mechanical unloading. PMID:23308102

  1. Centriolar Satellites Control GABARAP Ubiquitination and GABARAP-Mediated Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joachim, Justin; Razi, Minoo; Judith, Delphine; Wirth, Martina; Calamita, Emily; Encheva, Vesela; Dynlacht, Brian D; Snijders, Ambrosius P; O'Reilly, Nicola; Jefferies, Harold B J; Tooze, Sharon A

    2017-07-24

    Autophagy maintains cellular health and homeostasis during stress by delivering cytosolic material captured by autophagosomes to lysosomes for degradation. Autophagosome formation is complex: initiated by the recruitment of autophagy (Atg) proteins to the formation site, it is sustained by activation of Atg proteins to allow growth and closure of the autophagosome. How Atg proteins are translocated to the forming autophagosome is not fully understood. Transport of the ATG8 family member GABARAP from the centrosome occurs during starvation-induced autophagosome biogenesis, but how centrosomal proteins regulate GABARAP localization is unknown. We show that the centriolar satellite protein PCM1 regulates the recruitment of GABARAP to the pericentriolar material. In addition to residing on the pericentriolar material, GABARAP marks a subtype of PCM1-positive centriolar satellites. GABARAP, but not another ATG8 family member LC3B, binds directly to PCM1 through a canonical LIR motif. Loss of PCM1 results in destabilization of GABARAP, but not LC3B, through proteasomal degradation. GABARAP instability is mediated through the centriolar satellite E3 ligase Mib1, which interacts with GABARAP through its substrate-binding region and promotes K48-linked ubiquitination of GABARAP. Ubiquitination of GABARAP occurs in the N terminus, a domain associated with ATG8-family-specific functions during autophagosome formation, on residues absent in the LC3 family. Furthermore, PCM1-GABARAP-positive centriolar satellites colocalize with forming autophagosomes. PCM1 enhances GABARAP/WIPI2/p62-positive autophagosome formation and flux but has no significant effect on LC3B-positive autophagosome formation. These data suggest a mechanism for how centriolar satellites can specifically regulate an ATG8 ortholog, the centrosomal GABARAP reservoir, and centrosome-autophagosome crosstalk. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. The induction of autophagy against mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in lung cancer cells by a ruthenium (II) imidazole complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Fa; Jie, Xinming; Dongye, Guangzhi; Cai, Kangrong; Feng, Ruibing; Li, Baojun; Zeng, Qingwang; Lun, Kaiyi; Chen, Jincan; Xu, Bilian

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, it was found that the ruthenium (II) imidazole complex [Ru(Im)4(dppz)]2+ (Ru1) could induce significant growth inhibition and apoptosis in A549 and NCI-H460 cells. Apart from the induction of apoptosis, it was reported for the first time that Ru1 induced an autophagic response in A549 and NCI-H460 cells as evidenced by the formation of autophagosomes, acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs), and the up-regulation of LC3-II. Furthermore, scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by antioxidant NAC or Tiron inhibited the release of cytochrome c, caspase-3 activity, and eventually rescued cancer cells from Ru1-mediated apoptosis, suggesting that Ru1 inducing apoptosis was partially caspase 3-dependent by triggering ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction in A549 and NCI-H460 cells. Further study indicated that the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway was involved in Ru1-induced autophagy in A549 and NCI-H460 cells. Moreover, blocking autophagy using pharmacological inhibitors 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and chloroquine (CQ) enhanced Ru1-induced apoptosis, indicating the cytoprotective role of autophagy in Ru1-treated A549 and NCI-H460 cells. Finally, the in vivo mice bearing A549 xenografts, Ru1 dosed at 10 or 20 mg/kg significantly inhibited tumor growth. PMID:27811372

  3. A novel autophagy/mitophagy inhibitor liensinine sensitizes breast cancer cells to chemotherapy through DNM1L-mediated mitochondrial fission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing; Li, Guobing; Zheng, Yi; Shen, Han-Ming; Hu, Xiaoye; Ming, Qian-Liang; Huang, Cheng; Li, Peng; Gao, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy inhibition has been widely accepted as a promising therapeutic strategy in cancer, while the lack of effective and specific autophagy inhibitors hinders its application. Here we found that liensinine, a major isoquinoline alkaloid, inhibits late-stage autophagy/mitophagy through blocking autophagosome-lysosome fusion. This effect is likely achieved via inhibiting the recruitment of RAB7A to lysosomes but not to autophagosomes. We further investigated the effects of autophagy inhibition by liensinine on the therapeutic efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs and found that cotreatment of liensinine markedly decreased the viability and increased apoptosis in breast cancer cells treated with various chemotherapeutic agents. Mechanistically, we found that inhibition of autophagy/mitophagy by liensinine enhanced doxorubicin-mediated apoptosis by triggering mitochondrial fission, which resulted from dephosphorylation and mitochondrial translocation of DNM1L. However, blocking autophagosome/mitophagosome formation by pharmacological or genetic approaches markedly attenuated mitochondrial fission and apoptosis in cells with combinatatorial treatment. Moreover, liensinine was synergized with doxorubicin to inhibit tumor growth in MDA-MB-231 xenograft in vivo. Our findings suggest that liensinine could potentially be further developed as a novel autophagy/mitophagy inhibitor, and a combination of liensinine with classical chemotherapeutic drugs could represent a novel therapeutic strategy for treatment of breast cancer.

  4. Humanin is an endogenous activator of chaperone-mediated autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhenwei; Tasset, Inmaculada; Diaz, Antonio; Anguiano, Jaime; Tas, Emir; Cui, Lingguang; Kuliawat, Regina; Liu, Honghai; Kühn, Bernhard; Cuervo, Ana Maria; Muzumdar, Radhika

    2018-02-05

    Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) serves as quality control during stress conditions through selective degradation of cytosolic proteins in lysosomes. Humanin (HN) is a mitochondria-associated peptide that offers cytoprotective, cardioprotective, and neuroprotective effects in vivo and in vitro. In this study, we demonstrate that HN directly activates CMA by increasing substrate binding and translocation into lysosomes. The potent HN analogue HNG protects from stressor-induced cell death in fibroblasts, cardiomyoblasts, neuronal cells, and primary cardiomyocytes. The protective effects are lost in CMA-deficient cells, suggesting that they are mediated through the activation of CMA. We identified that a fraction of endogenous HN is present at the cytosolic side of the lysosomal membrane, where it interacts with heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) and stabilizes binding of this chaperone to CMA substrates as they bind to the membrane. Inhibition of HSP90 blocks the effect of HNG on substrate translocation and abolishes the cytoprotective effects. Our study provides a novel mechanism by which HN exerts its cardioprotective and neuroprotective effects. © 2018 Gong et al.

  5. Heat Shock Proteins and Autophagy Pathways in Neuroprotection: from Molecular Bases to Pharmacological Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botond Penke

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases (NDDs such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and Huntington’s disease (HD, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and prion diseases are all characterized by the accumulation of protein aggregates (amyloids into inclusions and/or plaques. The ubiquitous presence of amyloids in NDDs suggests the involvement of disturbed protein homeostasis (proteostasis in the underlying pathomechanisms. This review summarizes specific mechanisms that maintain proteostasis, including molecular chaperons, the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS, endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation (ERAD, and different autophagic pathways (chaperon mediated-, micro-, and macro-autophagy. The role of heat shock proteins (Hsps in cellular quality control and degradation of pathogenic proteins is reviewed. Finally, putative therapeutic strategies for efficient removal of cytotoxic proteins from neurons and design of new therapeutic targets against the progression of NDDs are discussed.

  6. Pharmacological promotion of autophagy alleviates steatosis and injury in alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver conditions in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Wen; Zhang, Hao; Li, Min; Xiong, Xiwen; Chen, Xi; Chen, Xiaoyun; Dong, Xiaocheng C; Yin, Xiao-Ming

    2013-05-01

    Pharmacological approaches can potentially improve fatty liver condition in alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases. The salutary effects of reducing lipid synthesis or promoting lipid oxidation have been well reported, but the benefits of increasing lipid degradation have yet to be well explored. Macroautophagy is a cellular degradation process that can remove subcellular organelles including lipid droplets. We thus investigated whether pharmacological modulation of macroautophagy could be an effective approach to alleviate fatty liver condition and liver injury. C57BL/6 mice were given ethanol via intraperitoneal injection (acute) or by a 4-week oral feeding regime (chronic), or high fat diet for 12 weeks. An autophagy enhancer, carbamazepine or rapamycin, or an autophagy inhibitor, chloroquine, was given before sacrifice. Activation of autophagy, level of hepatic steatosis, and blood levels of triglycerides, liver enzyme, glucose and insulin were measured. In both acute and chronic ethanol condition, macroautophagy was activated. Carbamazepine, as well as rapamycin, enhanced ethanol-induced macroautophagy in hepatocytes in vitro and in vivo. Hepatic steatosis and liver injury were exacerbated by chloroquine, but alleviated by carbamazepine. The protective effects of carbamazepine and rapamycin in reducing steatosis and in improving insulin sensitivity were also demonstrated in high fat diet-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver condition. These findings indicate that pharmacological modulation of macroautophagy in the liver can be an effective strategy for reducing fatty liver condition and liver injury. Copyright © 2013 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Autophagy as a mediator of life and death in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Üstün, Suayib; Hafrén, Anders; Hofius, Daniel

    2017-12-01

    Autophagy is a major pathway for degradation and recycling of cytoplasmic material, including individual proteins, aggregates, and entire organelles. Autophagic processes serve mainly survival functions in cellular homeostasis, stress adaptation and immune responses but can also have death-promoting activities in different eukaryotic organisms. In plants, the role of autophagy in the regulation of programmed cell death (PCD) remained elusive and a subject of debate. More recent evidence, however, has resulted in the consensus that autophagy can either promote or restrict different forms of PCD. Here, we present latest advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms and functions of plant autophagy and discuss their implications for life and death decisions in the context of developmental and pathogen-induced PCD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. DJ-1 overexpression restores ischaemic post-conditioning-mediated cardioprotection in diabetic rats: role of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bin; Lei, Shaoqing; Xue, Rui; Leng, Yan; Xia, Zhengyuan; Xia, Zhong-Yuan

    2017-06-01

    IPO (ischaemic post-conditioning) is a promising method of alleviating myocardial IR (ischaemia-reperfusion) injury; however, IPO-mediated cardioprotection is lost in diabetic hearts via mechanisms that remain largely unclear. We hypothesized that decreased cardiac expression of DJ-1, a positive modulator of autophagy, compromises the effectiveness of IPO-induced cardioprotection in diabetic rats. Diabetic rats subjected to myocardial IR (30 min of coronary artery occlusion followed by 120 min of reperfusion) exhibited more severe myocardial injury, less cardiac autophagy, lower DJ-1 expression and AMPK (adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase)/mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) pathway activity than non-diabetic rats. IPO significantly attenuated myocardial injury and up-regulated cardiac DJ-1 expression, AMPK/mTOR activity and autophagy in non-diabetic rats but not in diabetic rats. AAV9 (adeno-associated virus 9)-mediated cardiac DJ-1 overexpression as well as pretreatment with the autophagy inducer rapamycin restored IPO-induced cardioprotection in diabetic rats, an effect accompanied by AMPK/mTOR activation and autophagy up-regulation. Combining HPO (hypoxic post-conditioning) with DJ-1 overexpression markedly attenuated HR (hypoxia-reoxygenation) injury in H9c2 cells with high glucose (HG, 30 mM) exposure, accompanied by AMPK/mTOR signalling activation and autophagy up-regulation. The DJ-1 overexpression-mediated preservation of HPO-induced cardioprotection was completely inhibited by the AMPK inhibitor compound C (CC) and the autophagy inhibitor 3-MA (3-methyladenine). Thus, decreased cardiac DJ-1 expression, which results in impaired AMPK/mTOR signalling and decreased autophagy, could be a major mechanism underlying the loss of IPO-induced cardioprotection in diabetes. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  9. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid sensitizes neuroblastoma to paclitaxel by inhibiting thioredoxin-related protein 14-mediated autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Zijun; Yang, Kaibin; Ye, Litong; You, Zhiyao; Chen, Rirong; Liu, Ying; He, Youjian

    2017-07-01

    Paclitaxel is not as effective for neuroblastoma as most of the front-line chemotherapeutics due to drug resistance. This study explored the regulatory mechanism of paclitaxel-associated autophagy and potential solutions to paclitaxel resistance in neuroblastoma. The formation of autophagic vesicles was detected by scanning transmission electron microscopy and flow cytometry. The autophagy-associated proteins were assessed by western blot. Autophagy was induced and the autophagy-associated proteins LC3-I, LC3-II, Beclin 1, and thioredoxin-related protein 14 (TRP14), were found to be upregulated in neuroblastoma cells that were exposed to paclitaxel. The inhibition of Beclin 1 or TRP14 by siRNA increased the sensitivity of the tumor cells to paclitaxel. In addition, Beclin 1-mediated autophagy was regulated by TRP14. Furthermore, the TRP14 inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) downregulated paclitaxel-induced autophagy and enhanced the anticancer effects of paclitaxel in normal control cancer cells but not in cells with upregulated Beclin 1 and TRP14 expression. Our findings showed that paclitaxel-induced autophagy in neuroblastoma cells was regulated by TRP14 and that SAHA could sensitize neuroblastoma cells to paclitaxel by specifically inhibiting TRP14. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  10. The role of chaperone-mediated autophagy in huntingtin degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Qi

    Full Text Available Huntington Disease (HD is caused by an abnormal expansion of polyQ tract in the protein named huntingtin (Htt. HD pathology is featured by accumulation and aggregation of mutant Htt in striatal and cortical neurons. Aberrant Htt degradation is implicated in HD pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the regulatory role of chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA components, heat shock protein cognate 70 (Hsc70 and lysosome-associated protein 2A (LAMP-2A in degradation of Htt fragment 1-552aa (Htt-552. A cell model of HD was produced by overexpression of Htt-552 with adenovirus. The involvement of CMA components in degradation of Htt-552 was determined with over-expression or silencing of Hsc70 and LAMP-2A. The results confirmed previous reports that both macroautophagy and CMA were involved in degradation of Htt-552. Changing the levels of CMA-related proteins affected the accumulation of Htt-552. The lysosomal binding and luminal transport of Htt-552 was demonstrated by incubation of Htt-552 with isolated lysosomes. Expansion of the polyQ tract in Htt-552 impaired its uptake and degradation by lysosomes. Mutation of putative KFERQ motif in wild-type Htt-552 interfered with interactions between Htt-552 and Hsc70. Endogenous Hsc70 and LAMP-2A interacted with exogenously expressed Htt-552. Modulating the levels of CMA related proteins degraded endogenous full-length Htt. These studies suggest that Hsc70 and LAMP-2A through CMA play a role in the clearance of Htt and suggest a novel strategy to target the degradation of mutant Htt.

  11. NBR1-mediated selective autophagy targets insoluble ubiquitinated protein aggregates in plant stress responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhou

    Full Text Available Plant autophagy plays an important role in delaying senescence, nutrient recycling, and stress responses. Functional analysis of plant autophagy has almost exclusively focused on the proteins required for the core process of autophagosome assembly, but little is known about the proteins involved in other important processes of autophagy, including autophagy cargo recognition and sequestration. In this study, we report functional genetic analysis of Arabidopsis NBR1, a homolog of mammalian autophagy cargo adaptors P62 and NBR1. We isolated two nbr1 knockout mutants and discovered that they displayed some but not all of the phenotypes of autophagy-deficient atg5 and atg7 mutants. Like ATG5 and ATG7, NBR1 is important for plant tolerance to heat, oxidative, salt, and drought stresses. The role of NBR1 in plant tolerance to these abiotic stresses is dependent on its interaction with ATG8. Unlike ATG5 and ATG7, however, NBR1 is dispensable in age- and darkness-induced senescence and in resistance to a necrotrophic pathogen. A selective role of NBR1 in plant responses to specific abiotic stresses suggest that plant autophagy in diverse biological processes operates through multiple cargo recognition and delivery systems. The compromised heat tolerance of atg5, atg7, and nbr1 mutants was associated with increased accumulation of insoluble, detergent-resistant proteins that were highly ubiquitinated under heat stress. NBR1, which contains an ubiquitin-binding domain, also accumulated to high levels with an increasing enrichment in the insoluble protein fraction in the autophagy-deficient mutants under heat stress. These results suggest that NBR1-mediated autophagy targets ubiquitinated protein aggregates most likely derived from denatured or otherwise damaged nonnative proteins generated under stress conditions.

  12. IFNG-mediated immune responses enhance autophagy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens in patients with active tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovetta, Ana I; Peña, Delfina; Hernández Del Pino, Rodrigo E; Recalde, Gabriela M; Pellegrini, Joaquín; Bigi, Fabiana; Musella, Rosa M; Palmero, Domingo J; Gutierrez, Marisa; Colombo, María I; García, Verónica E

    2015-01-01

    Protective immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) requires IFNG. Besides, IFNG-mediated induction of autophagy suppresses survival of virulent Mtb in macrophage cell lines. We investigated the contribution of autophagy to the defense against Mtb antigen (Mtb-Ag) in cells from tuberculosis patients and healthy donors (HD). Patients were classified as high responders (HR) if their T cells produced significant IFNG against Mtb-Ag; and low responders (LR) when patients showed weak or no T cell responses to Mtb-Ag. The highest autophagy levels were detected in HD cells whereas the lowest quantities were observed in LR patients. Interestingly, upon Mtb-Ag stimulation, we detected a positive correlation between IFNG and MAP1LC3B-II/LC3-II levels. Actually, blockage of Mtb-Ag-induced IFNG markedly reduced autophagy in HR patients whereas addition of limited amounts of IFNG significantly increased autophagy in LR patients. Therefore, autophagy collaborates with human immune responses against Mtb in close association with specific IFNG secreted against the pathogen. PMID:25426782

  13. MiR-30-Regulated Autophagy Mediates Angiotensin II-Induced Myocardial Hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wei; Zhong, Yun; Cheng, Chuanfang; Liu, Benrong; Wang, Li; Li, Aiqun; Xiong, Longgen; Liu, Shiming

    2013-01-01

    Dysregulated autophagy may lead to the development of disease. Role of autophagy and the diagnostic potential of microRNAs that regulate the autophagy in cardiac hypertrophy have not been evaluated. A rat model of cardiac hypertrophy was established using transverse abdominal aortic constriction (operation group). Cardiomyocyte autophagy was enhanced in rats from the operation group, compared with those in the sham operation group. Moreover, the operation group showed up-regulation of beclin-1 (an autophagy-related gene), and down-regulation of miR-30 in cardiac tissue. The effects of inhibition and over-expression of the beclin-1 gene on the expression of hypertrophy-related genes and on autophagy were assessed. Angiotensin II-induced myocardial hypertrophy was found to be mediated by over-expression of the beclin-1 gene. A dual luciferase reporter assay confirmed that beclin-1 was a target gene of miR-30a. miR-30a induced alterations in beclin-1 gene expression and autophagy in cardiomyocytes. Treatment of cardiomyocytes with miR-30a mimic attenuated the Angiotensin II-induced up-regulation of hypertrophy-related genes and decreased in the cardiomyocyte surface area. Conversely, treatment with miR-30a inhibitor enhanced the up-regulation of hypertrophy-related genes and increased the surface area of cardiomyocytes induced by Angiotensin II. In addition, circulating miR-30 was elevated in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy, and circulating miR-30 was positively associated with left ventricular wall thickness. Collectively, these above-mentioned results suggest that Angiotensin II induces down-regulation of miR-30 in cardiomyocytes, which in turn promotes myocardial hypertrophy through excessive autophagy. Circulating miR-30 may be an important marker for the diagnosis of left ventricular hypertrophy. PMID:23326547

  14. Mitochondria mediate septin cage assembly to promote autophagy of Shigella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirianni, Andrea; Krokowski, Sina; Lobato-Márquez, Damián; Buranyi, Stephen; Pfanzelter, Julia; Galea, Dieter; Willis, Alexandra; Culley, Siân; Henriques, Ricardo; Larrouy-Maumus, Gerald; Hollinshead, Michael; Sancho-Shimizu, Vanessa; Way, Michael; Mostowy, Serge

    2016-07-01

    Septins, cytoskeletal proteins with well-characterised roles in cytokinesis, form cage-like structures around cytosolic Shigella flexneri and promote their targeting to autophagosomes. However, the processes underlying septin cage assembly, and whether they influence S. flexneri proliferation, remain to be established. Using single-cell analysis, we show that the septin cages inhibit S. flexneri proliferation. To study mechanisms of septin cage assembly, we used proteomics and found mitochondrial proteins associate with septins in S. flexneri-infected cells. Strikingly, mitochondria associated with S. flexneri promote septin assembly into cages that entrap bacteria for autophagy. We demonstrate that the cytosolic GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) interacts with septins to enhance mitochondrial fission. To avoid autophagy, actin-polymerising Shigella fragment mitochondria to escape from septin caging. Our results demonstrate a role for mitochondria in anti-Shigella autophagy and uncover a fundamental link between septin assembly and mitochondria. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  15. Carbamazepine suppresses calpain-mediated autophagy impairment after ischemia/reperfusion in mouse livers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae-Sung, E-mail: Jae.Kim@surgery.ufl.edu; Wang, Jin-Hee, E-mail: jin-hee.wang@surgery.ufl.edu; Biel, Thomas G., E-mail: Thomas.Biel@surgery.ufl.edu; Kim, Do-Sung, E-mail: do-sung.kim@surgery.med.ufl.edu; Flores-Toro, Joseph A., E-mail: Joseph.Flores-Toro@surgery.ufl.edu; Vijayvargiya, Richa, E-mail: rvijayvargiya@ufl.edu; Zendejas, Ivan, E-mail: ivan.zendejas@surgery.ufl.edu; Behrns, Kevin E., E-mail: Kevin.Behrns@surgery.ufl.edu

    2013-12-15

    Onset of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) plays a causative role in ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Current therapeutic strategies for reducing reperfusion injury remain disappointing. Autophagy is a lysosome-mediated, catabolic process that timely eliminates abnormal or damaged cellular constituents and organelles such as dysfunctional mitochondria. I/R induces calcium overloading and calpain activation, leading to degradation of key autophagy-related proteins (Atg). Carbamazepine (CBZ), an FDA-approved anticonvulsant drug, has recently been reported to increase autophagy. We investigated the effects of CBZ on hepatic I/R injury. Hepatocytes and livers from male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to simulated in vitro, as well as in vivo I/R, respectively. Cell death, intracellular calcium, calpain activity, changes in autophagy-related proteins (Atg), autophagic flux, MPT and mitochondrial membrane potential after I/R were analyzed in the presence and absence of 20 μM CBZ. CBZ significantly increased hepatocyte viability after reperfusion. Confocal microscopy revealed that CBZ prevented calcium overloading, the onset of the MPT and mitochondrial depolarization. Immunoblotting and fluorometric analysis showed that CBZ blocked calpain activation, depletion of Atg7 and Beclin-1 and loss of autophagic flux after reperfusion. Intravital multiphoton imaging of anesthetized mice demonstrated that CBZ substantially reversed autophagic defects and mitochondrial dysfunction after I/R in vivo. In conclusion, CBZ prevents calcium overloading and calpain activation, which, in turn, suppresses Atg7 and Beclin-1 depletion, defective autophagy, onset of the MPT and cell death after I/R. - Highlights: • A mechanism of carbamazepine (CBZ)-induced cytoprotection in livers is proposed. • Impaired autophagy is a key event contributing to lethal reperfusion injury. • The importance of autophagy is extended and confirmed in an in vivo model. • CBZ is a potential

  16. Endosome-mediated autophagy: an unconventional MIIC-driven autophagic pathway operational in dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondylis, Vangelis; van Nispen Tot Pannerden, Hezder E; van Dijk, Suzanne; Ten Broeke, Toine; Wubbolts, Richard; Geerts, Willie J; Seinen, Cor; Mutis, Tuna; Heijnen, Harry F G

    2013-06-01

    Activation of TLR signaling has been shown to induce autophagy in antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Using high-resolution microscopy approaches, we show that in LPS-stimulated dendritic cells (DCs), autophagosomes emerge from MHC class II compartments (MIICs) and harbor both the molecular machinery for antigen processing and the autophagosome markers LC3 and ATG16L1. This ENdosome-Mediated Autophagy (ENMA) appears to be the major type of autophagy in DCs, as similar structures were observed upon established autophagy-inducing conditions (nutrient deprivation, rapamycin) and under basal conditions in the presence of bafilomycin A1. Autophagosome formation was not significantly affected in DCs expressing ATG4B (C74A) mutant and atg4b (-/-) bone marrow DCs, but the degradation of the autophagy substrate SQSTM1/p62 was largely impaired. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the previously described DC aggresome-like LPS-induced structures (DALIS) contain vesicular membranes, and in addition to SQSTM1 and ubiquitin, they are positive for LC3. LC3 localization on DALIS is independent of its lipidation. MIIC-driven autophagosomes preferentially engulf the LPS-induced SQSTM1-positive DALIS, which become later degraded in autolysosomes. DALIS-associated membranes also contain ATG16L1, ATG9 and the Q-SNARE VTI1B, suggesting that they may represent (at least in part) a membrane reservoir for autophagosome expansion. We propose that ENMA constitutes an unconventional, APC-specific type of autophagy, which mediates the processing and presentation of cytosolic antigens by MHC class II machinery, and/or the selective clearance of toxic by-products of elevated ROS/RNS production in activated DCs, thereby promoting their survival.

  17. Autophagy is activated in compression-induced cell degeneration and is mediated by reactive oxygen species in nucleus pulposus cells exposed to compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, K-G; Shao, Z-W; Yang, S-H; Wang, J; Wang, B-C; Xiong, L-M; Wu, Q; Chen, S-F

    2013-12-01

    To determine whether autophagy contributes to the pathogenesis of degenerative disc disease (DDD) or retards the intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration, and investigate the possible relationship between compression-induced autophagy and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in nucleus pulposus (NP) cells in vitro. The autophagosome and autophagy-related markers were used to explore the role of autophagy in rat NP cells under compressive stress, which were measured directly by electronic microscopy, monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining, immunofluorescence, western blot, and indirectly by analyzing the impact of pharmacological inhibitors of autophagy such as 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and chloroquine (CQ). And the relationship between autophagy and apoptosis was investigated by Annexin-V/propidium iodide (PI)-fluorescein staining. In addition, ROS were measured to determine whether these factors are responsible for the development of compression-induced autophagy. Our results indicated that rat NP cells activated autophagy in response to the same strong apoptotic stimuli that triggered apoptosis by compression. Autophagy and apoptosis were interconnected and coordinated in rat NP cells exposed to compression stimuli. Compression-induced autophagy was closely related to intracellular ROS production. Enhanced degradation of damaged components of NP cells by autophagy may be a crucial survival response against mechanical overload, and extensive autophagy may trigger autophagic cell death. Regulating autophagy and reducing the generation of intracellular ROS may retard IVD degeneration. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Fluoride induces oxidative damage and SIRT1/autophagy through ROS-mediated JNK signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Maiko; Bandoski, Cheryl; Bartlett, John D

    2015-12-01

    Fluoride is an effective caries prophylactic, but at high doses can also be an environmental health hazard. Acute or chronic exposure to high fluoride doses can result in dental enamel and skeletal and soft tissue fluorosis. Dental fluorosis is manifested as mottled, discolored, porous enamel that is susceptible to dental caries. Fluoride induces cell stress, including endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress, which leads to impairment of ameloblasts responsible for dental enamel formation. Recently we reported that fluoride activates SIRT1 and autophagy as an adaptive response to protect cells from stress. However, it still remains unclear how SIRT1/autophagy is regulated in dental fluorosis. In this study, we demonstrate that fluoride exposure generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the resulting oxidative damage is counteracted by SIRT1/autophagy induction through c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling in ameloblasts. In the mouse-ameloblast-derived cell line LS8, fluoride induced ROS, mitochondrial damage including cytochrome-c release, up-regulation of UCP2, attenuation of ATP synthesis, and H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX), which is a marker of DNA damage. We evaluated the effects of the ROS inhibitor N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and the JNK inhibitor SP600125 on fluoride-induced SIRT1/autophagy activation. NAC decreased fluoride-induced ROS generation and attenuated JNK and c-Jun phosphorylation. NAC decreased SIRT1 phosphorylation and formation of the autophagy marker LC3II, which resulted in an increase in the apoptosis mediators γH2AX and cleaved/activated caspase-3. SP600125 attenuated fluoride-induced SIRT1 phosphorylation, indicating that fluoride activates SIRT1/autophagy via the ROS-mediated JNK pathway. In enamel organs from rats or mice treated with 50, 100, or 125 ppm fluoride for 6 weeks, cytochrome-c release and the DNA damage markers 8-oxoguanine, p-ATM, and γH2AX were increased compared to those in controls (0 ppm fluoride). These

  19. Fluoride induces oxidative damage and SIRT1/autophagy through ROS-mediated JNK signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Maiko; Bandoski, Cheryl; Bartlett, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Fluoride is an effective caries prophylactic, but at high doses can also be an environmental health hazard. Acute or chronic exposure to high fluoride doses can result in dental enamel and skeletal and soft tissue fluorosis. Dental fluorosis is manifested as mottled, discolored, porous enamel that is susceptible to dental caries. Fluoride induces cell stress, including endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress, which leads to impairment of ameloblasts responsible for dental enamel formation. Recently we reported that fluoride activates SIRT1 and autophagy as an adaptive response to protect cells from stress. However, it still remains unclear how SIRT1/autophagy is regulated in dental fluorosis. In this study, we demonstrate that fluoride exposure generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the resulting oxidative damage is counteracted by SIRT1/autophagy induction through c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling in ameloblasts. In the mouse-ameloblast-derived cell line LS8, fluoride induced ROS, mitochondrial damage including cytochrome-c release, up-regulation of UCP2, attenuation of ATP synthesis, and H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX), which is a marker of DNA damage. We evaluated the effects of the ROS inhibitor N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and the JNK inhibitor SP600125 on fluoride-induced SIRT1/autophagy activation. NAC decreased fluoride-induced ROS generation and attenuated JNK and c-Jun phosphorylation. NAC decreased SIRT1 phosphorylation and formation of the autophagy marker LC3II, which resulted in an increase in the apoptosis mediators γH2AX and cleaved/activated caspase-3. SP600125 attenuated fluoride-induced SIRT1 phosphorylation, indicating that fluoride activates SIRT1/autophagy via the ROS-mediated JNK pathway. In enamel organs from rats or mice treated with 50, 100, or 125 ppm fluoride for 6 weeks, cytochrome-c release and the DNA damage markers 8-oxoguanine, p-ATM, and γH2AX were increased compared to those in controls (0 ppm fluoride). These

  20. Autophagy mediates the degradation of synaptic vesicles: A potential mechanism of synaptic plasticity injury induced by microwave exposure in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yanhui; Li, Wenchao; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Jing; Yu, Chao; Tan, Shengzhi; Wang, Haoyu; Xu, Xinping; Dong, Ji; Yao, Binwei; Zhou, Hongmei; Zhao, Li; Peng, Ruiyun

    2018-02-03

    To explore how autophagy changes and whether autophagy is involved in the pathophysiological process of synaptic plasticity injury caused by microwave radiation, we established a 30 mW/cm 2 microwave-exposure in vivo model, which caused reversible injuries in rat neurons. Microwave radiation induced cognitive impairment in rats and synaptic plasticity injury in rat hippocampal neurons. Autophagy in rat hippocampal neurons was activated following microwave exposure. Additionally, we observed that synaptic vesicles were encapsulated by autophagosomes, a phenomenon more evident in the microwave-exposed group. Colocation of autophagosomes and synaptic vesicles in rat hippocampal neurons increased following microwave exposure. microwave exposure led to the activation of autophagy in rat hippocampal neurons, and excessive activation of autophagy might damage synaptic plasticity by mediating synaptic vesicle degradation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. NOX4 mediates cytoprotective autophagy induced by the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib in head and neck cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobhakumari, Arya; Schickling, Brandon M.; Love-Homan, Laurie; Raeburn, Ayanna; Fletcher, Elise V.M.; Case, Adam J.; Domann, Frederick E.; Miller, Francis J.

    2013-01-01

    Most head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) overexpress epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and EGFR inhibitors are routinely used in the treatment of HNSCC. However, many HNSCC tumors do not respond or become refractory to EGFR inhibitors. Autophagy, which is a stress-induced cellular self-degradation process, has been reported to reduce the efficacy of chemotherapy in various disease models. The purpose of this study is to determine if the efficacy of the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib is reduced by activation of autophagy via NOX4-mediated oxidative stress in HNSCC cells. Erlotinib induced the expression of the autophagy marker LC3B-II and autophagosome formation in FaDu and Cal-27 cells. Inhibition of autophagy by chloroquine and knockdown of autophagy pathway genes Beclin-1 and Atg5 sensitized both cell lines to erlotinib-induced cytotoxicity, suggesting that autophagy may serve as a protective mechanism. Treatment with catalase (CAT) and diphenylene iodonium (DPI) in the presence of erlotinib suppressed the increase in LC3B-II expression in FaDu and Cal-27 cells. Erlotinib increased NOX4 mRNA and protein expression by increasing its promoter activity and mRNA stability in FaDu cells. Knockdown of NOX4 using adenoviral siNOX4 partially suppressed erlotinib-induced LC3B-II expression, while overexpression of NOX4 increased expression of LC3B-II. These studies suggest that erlotinib may activate autophagy in HNSCC cells as a pro-survival mechanism, and NOX4 may play a role in mediating this effect. - Highlights: • Erlotinib increased LC3B-II and autophagosome formation in HNSCC cells. • Inhibition of autophagy sensitized HNSCC cells to erlotinib. • Erlotinib increased NOX4 promoter and 3′UTR luciferase activity. • Manipulating NOX4 decreases or increases autophagy

  2. Apoptotic Cell Death Induced by Resveratrol Is Partially Mediated by the Autophagy Pathway in Human Ovarian Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangfang Lang

    Full Text Available Resveratrol (trans-3,4,5'-trihydroxystilbene is an active compound in food, such as red grapes, peanuts, and berries. Resveratrol exhibits an anticancer effect on various human cancer cells. However, the mechanism of resveratrol-induced anti-cancer effect at the molecular level remains to be elucidated. In this study, the mechanism underlying the anti-cancer effect of resveratrol in human ovarian cancer cells (OVCAR-3 and Caov-3 was investigated using various molecular biology techniques, such as flow cytometry, western blotting, and RNA interference, with a major focus on the potential role of autophagy in resveratrol-induced apoptotic cell death. We demonstrated that resveratrol induced reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, which triggers autophagy and subsequent apoptotic cell death. Resveratrol induced ATG5 expression and promoted LC3 cleavage. The apoptotic cell death induced by resveratrol was attenuated by both pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy. The autophagy inhibitor chloroquine, which functions at the late stage of autophagy, significantly reduced resveratrol-induced cell death and caspase 3 activity in human ovarian cancer cells. We also demonstrated that targeting ATG5 by siRNA also suppressed resveratrol-induced apoptotic cell death. Thus, we concluded that a common pathway between autophagy and apoptosis exists in resveratrol-induced cell death in OVCAR-3 human ovarian cancer cells.

  3. Andrographolide enhances cisplatin-mediated anticancer effects in lung cancer cells through blockade of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuwen, Daolu; Mi, Shanwei; Ma, Yuzhu; Guo, Wenjie; Xu, Qiang; Shen, Yan; Shu, Yongqian

    2017-10-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide and the platinum-based drugs such as cisplatin have been used as the first line of the treatment. However, the clinical effectiveness of such chemotherapy is limited by intrinsic or acquired resistance. In this study, we found that cisplatin induced autophagy that attenuated the sensitivity of both A549 and Lewis lung cancer (LLC) cells to cisplatin. In contrast, the clinical drug andrographolide (Andro) suppressed autophagy and enhanced cisplatin-mediated apoptosis in these cells. Using two murine lung cancer models, including a subcutaneously inoculated LLC model and an orthotopic LLC implantation model, we investigated the therapeutic efficacy of the combined treatment of cisplatin and Andro. Compared with the sole cisplatin treatment, combining cisplatin with Andro potentially inhibited tumor growth, reduced the incidence of lung metastases, and relieved renal tubular damage. Moreover, the combined treatment prolonged the life span of tumor-bearing mice. TUNEL and immunohistochemistry assays showed the increase in apoptotic cells and the decrease in both conversion of LC3B-I to LC3B-II and Atg5 protein expression in the tumor tissues from mice with the combined treatment. These results suggest that Andro offers an ideal candidate of autophagy inhibitors in clinical application, and combination of cisplatin with Andro could be a promising strategy for the treatment of lung cancer.

  4. Macroautophagy and Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy in Heart Failure: The Known and the Unknown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeshwary Ghosh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac diseases including hypertrophic and ischemic cardiomyopathies are increasingly being reported to accumulate misfolded proteins and damaged organelles. These findings have led to an increasing interest in protein degradation pathways, like autophagy, which are essential not only for normal protein turnover but also in the removal of misfolded and damaged proteins. Emerging evidence suggests a previously unprecedented role for autophagic processes in cardiac physiology and pathology. This review focuses on the major types of autophagic processes, the genes and protein complexes involved, and their regulation. It discusses the key similarities and differences between macroautophagy, chaperone-mediated autophagy, and selective mitophagy structures and functions. The genetic models available to study loss and gain of macroautophagy, mitophagy, and CMA are discussed. It defines the markers of autophagic processes, methods for measuring autophagic activities, and their interpretations. This review then summarizes the major studies of autophagy in the heart and their contribution to cardiac pathology. Some reports suggest macroautophagy imparts cardioprotection from heart failure pathology. Meanwhile, other studies find macroautophagy activation may be detrimental in cardiac pathology. An improved understanding of autophagic processes and their regulation may lead to a new genre of treatments for cardiac diseases.

  5. Endogenous n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids attenuate T cell-mediated hepatitis via autophagy activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanli Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs exert anti-inflammatory effects in several liver disorders, including cirrhosis, acute liver failure, and fatty liver disease. To date, little is known about their role in immune-mediated liver diseases. In this study, we used fat-1 transgenic mice rich in endogenous n-3 PUFAs to examine the role of n-3 PUFAs in immune-mediated liver injury. Concanavalin A (Con A was administered intravenously to wild-type (WT and fat-1 transgenic mice to induce T cell-mediated hepatitis. Reduced liver damage was shown in Con A-administrated fat-1 transgenic mice, as evidenced by decreased mortality, attenuated hepatic necrosis, lessened serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT activity, and inhibited production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g. TNF-α, IL-6, IL-17A and IFN-γ. In vivo and in vitro studies demonstrated that n-3 PUFAs significantly inhibited the activation of hepatic T cells and the differentiation of Th1 cells after Con A challenge. Further studies showed that n-3 PUFAs markedly increased autophagy level in Con A-treated fat-1 T cells compared with the WT counterparts. Blocking hepatic autophagy activity with chloroquine diminished the differences in T cell activation and liver injury between Con A-injected WT and fat-1 transgenic mice. We conclude that n-3 PUFAs limit Con A-induced hepatitis via an autophagy-dependent mechanism, and could be exploited as a new therapeutic approach for autoimmune hepatitis.

  6. Apoptosis and autophagy induced by pyropheophorbide-α methyl ester-mediated photodynamic therapy in human osteosarcoma MG-63 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiu; Ou, Yun-Sheng; Tao, Yong; Yin, Hang; Tu, Ping-Hua

    2016-06-01

    Pyropheophorbide-α methyl ester (MPPa) was a second-generation photosensitizer with many potential applications. Here, we explored the impact of MPPa-mediated photodynamic therapy (MPPa-PDT) on the apoptosis and autophagy of human osteosarcoma (MG-63) cells as well as the relationships between apoptosis and autophagy of the cells, and investigated the related molecular mechanisms. We found that MPPa-PDT demonstrated the ability to inhibit MG-63 cell viability in an MPPa concentration- and light dose-dependent manner, and to induce apoptosis via the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Additionally, MPPa-PDT could also induce autophagy of MG-63 cell. Meanwhile, the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and the Jnk inhibitor SP600125 were found to inhibit the MPPa-PDT-induced autophagy, and NAC could also inhibit Jnk phosphorylation. Furthermore, pretreatment with the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine or chloroquine showed the potential in reducing the apoptosis rate induced by MPPa-PDT in MG-63 cells. Our results indicated that the mitochondrial pathway was involved in MPPa-PDT-induced apoptosis of MG-63 cells. Meanwhile the ROS-Jnk signaling pathway was involved in MPPa-PDT-induced autophagy, which further promoted the apoptosis in MG-63 cells.

  7. Ulk1-mediated autophagy plays an essential role in mitochondrial remodeling and functional regeneration of skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, Jarrod A; Wilson, Rebecca J; Laker, Rhianna C; Zhang, Mei; Kundu, Mondira; Yan, Zhen

    2017-06-01

    Autophagy is a conserved cellular process for degrading aggregate proteins and dysfunctional organelle. It is still debatable if autophagy and mitophagy (a specific process of autophagy of mitochondria) play important roles in myogenic differentiation and functional regeneration of skeletal muscle. We tested the hypothesis that autophagy is critical for functional regeneration of skeletal muscle. We first observed time-dependent increases (3- to 6-fold) of autophagy-related proteins (Atgs), including Ulk1, Beclin1, and LC3, along with reduced p62 expression during C2C12 differentiation, suggesting increased autophagy capacity and flux during myogenic differentiation. We then used cardiotoxin (Ctx) or ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) to induce muscle injury and regeneration and observed increases in Atgs between days 2 and 7 in adult skeletal muscle followed by increased autophagy flux after day 7 Since Ulk1 has been shown to be essential for mitophagy, we asked if Ulk1 is critical for functional regeneration in skeletal muscle. We subjected skeletal muscle-specific Ulk1 knockout mice (MKO) to Ctx or I/R. MKO mice had significantly impaired recovery of muscle strength and mitochondrial protein content post-Ctx or I/R. Imaging analysis showed that MKO mice have significantly attenuated recovery of mitochondrial network at 7 and 14 days post-Ctx. These findings suggest that increased autophagy protein and flux occur during muscle regeneration and Ulk1-mediated mitophagy is critical for recovery for the mitochondrial network and hence functional regeneration. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  8. SPHK1/sphingosine kinase 1-mediated autophagy differs between neurons and SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moruno Manchon, Jose Felix; Uzor, Ndidi-Ese; Finkbeiner, Steven; Tsvetkov, Andrey S

    2016-08-02

    Although implicated in neurodegeneration, autophagy has been characterized mostly in yeast and mammalian non-neuronal cells. In a recent study, we sought to determine if SPHK1 (sphingosine kinase 1), implicated previously in macroautophagy/autophagy in cancer cells, regulates autophagy in neurons. SPHK1 synthesizes sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a bioactive lipid involved in cell survival. In our study, we discovered that, when neuronal autophagy is pharmacologically stimulated, SPHK1 relocalizes to the endocytic and autophagic organelles. Interestingly, in non-neuronal cells stimulated with growth factors, SPHK1 translocates to the plasma membrane, where it phosphorylates sphingosine to produce S1P. Whether SPHK1 also binds to the endocytic and autophagic organelles in non-neuronal cells upon induction of autophagy has not been demonstrated. Here, we determined if the effect in neurons is operant in the SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line. In both non-differentiated and differentiated SH-SY5Y cells, a short incubation of cells in amino acid-free medium stimulated the formation of SPHK1-positive puncta, as in neurons. We also found that, unlike neurons in which these puncta represent endosomes, autophagosomes, and amphisomes, in SH-SY5Y cells SPHK1 is bound only to the endosomes. In addition, a dominant negative form of SPHK1 was very toxic to SH-SY5Y cells, but cultured primary cortical neurons tolerated it significantly better. These results suggest that autophagy in neurons is regulated by mechanisms that differ, at least in part, from those in SH-SY5Y cells.

  9. Photodynamic N-TiO2 Nanoparticle Treatment Induces Controlled ROS-mediated Autophagy and Terminal Differentiation of Leukemia Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Moosavi, Mohammad Amin; Sharifi, Maryam; Ghafary, Soroush Moasses; Mohammadalipour, Zahra; Khataee, Alireza; Rahmati, Marveh; Hajjaran, Sadaf; ?os, Marek J.; Klonisch, Thomas; Ghavami, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we used nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide (N-TiO2) NPs in conjugation with visible light, and show that both reactive oxygen species (ROS) and autophagy are induced by this novel NP-based photodynamic therapy (PDT) system. While well-dispersed N-TiO2 NPs (?100??g/ml) were inert, their photo-activation with visible light led to ROS-mediated autophagy in leukemia K562 cells and normal peripheral lymphocytes, and this increased in parallel with increasing NP concentrations and light...

  10. Photodynamic N-TiO2 Nanoparticle Treatment Induces Controlled ROS-mediated Autophagy and Terminal Differentiation of Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi, Mohammad Amin; Sharifi, Maryam; Ghafary, Soroush Moasses; Mohammadalipour, Zahra; Khataee, Alireza; Rahmati, Marveh; Hajjaran, Sadaf; Łos, Marek J; Klonisch, Thomas; Ghavami, Saeid

    2016-10-04

    In this study, we used nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide (N-TiO 2 ) NPs in conjugation with visible light, and show that both reactive oxygen species (ROS) and autophagy are induced by this novel NP-based photodynamic therapy (PDT) system. While well-dispersed N-TiO 2 NPs (≤100 μg/ml) were inert, their photo-activation with visible light led to ROS-mediated autophagy in leukemia K562 cells and normal peripheral lymphocytes, and this increased in parallel with increasing NP concentrations and light doses. At a constant light energy (12 J/cm 2 ), increasing N-TiO 2 NP concentrations increased ROS levels to trigger autophagy-dependent megakaryocytic terminal differentiation in K562 cells. By contrast, an ROS challenge induced by high N-TiO 2 NP concentrations led to autophagy-associated apoptotic cell death. Using chemical autophagy inhibitors (3-methyladenine and Bafilomycin A1), we confirmed that autophagy is required for both terminal differentiation and apoptosis induced by photo-activated N-TiO 2 . Pre-incubation of leukemic cells with ROS scavengers muted the effect of N-TiO 2 NP-based PDT on cell fate, highlighting the upstream role of ROS in our system. In summary, PDT using N-TiO 2 NPs provides an effective method of priming autophagy by ROS induction. The capability of photo-activated N-TiO 2 NPs in obtaining desirable cellular outcomes represents a novel therapeutic strategy of cancer cells.

  11. Activation of RARα induces autophagy in SKBR3 breast cancer cells and depletion of key autophagy genes enhances ATRA toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigger, D; Schläfli, A M; Garattini, E; Tschan, M P

    2015-08-27

    All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), a pan-retinoic acid receptor (RAR) agonist, is, along with other retinoids, a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of a variety of solid tumors. On the one hand, preclinical studies have shown promising anticancer effects of ATRA in breast cancer; on the other hand, resistances occurred. Autophagy is a cellular recycling process that allows the degradation of bulk cellular contents. Tumor cells may take advantage of autophagy to cope with stress caused by anticancer drugs. We therefore wondered if autophagy is activated by ATRA in mammary tumor cells and if modulation of autophagy might be a potential novel treatment strategy. Indeed, ATRA induces autophagic flux in ATRA-sensitive but not in ATRA-resistant human breast cancer cells. Moreover, using different RAR agonists as well as RARα-knockdown breast cancer cells, we demonstrate that autophagy is dependent on RARα activation. Interestingly, inhibition of autophagy in breast cancer cells by either genetic or pharmacological approaches resulted in significantly increased apoptosis under ATRA treatment and attenuated epithelial differentiation. In summary, our findings demonstrate that ATRA-induced autophagy is mediated by RARα in breast cancer cells. Furthermore, inhibition of autophagy results in enhanced apoptosis. This points to a potential novel treatment strategy for a selected group of breast cancer patients where ATRA and autophagy inhibitors are applied simultaneously.

  12. Autophagy, Metabolism, and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Eileen; Mehnert, Janice M; Chan, Chang S

    2015-11-15

    Macroautophagy (autophagy hereafter) captures intracellular proteins and organelles and degrades them in lysosomes. The degradation breakdown products are released from lysosomes and recycled into metabolic and biosynthetic pathways. Basal autophagy provides protein and organelle quality control by eliminating damaged cellular components. Starvation-induced autophagy recycles intracellular components into metabolic pathways to sustain mitochondrial metabolic function and energy homeostasis. Recycling by autophagy is essential for yeast and mammals to survive starvation through intracellular nutrient scavenging. Autophagy suppresses degenerative diseases and has a context-dependent role in cancer. In some models, cancer initiation is suppressed by autophagy. By preventing the toxic accumulation of damaged protein and organelles, particularly mitochondria, autophagy limits oxidative stress, chronic tissue damage, and oncogenic signaling, which suppresses cancer initiation. This suggests a role for autophagy stimulation in cancer prevention, although the role of autophagy in the suppression of human cancer is unclear. In contrast, some cancers induce autophagy and are dependent on autophagy for survival. Much in the way that autophagy promotes survival in starvation, cancers can use autophagy-mediated recycling to maintain mitochondrial function and energy homeostasis to meet the elevated metabolic demand of growth and proliferation. Thus, autophagy inhibition may be beneficial for cancer therapy. Moreover, tumors are more autophagy-dependent than normal tissues, suggesting that there is a therapeutic window. Despite these insights, many important unanswered questions remain about the exact mechanisms of autophagy-mediated cancer suppression and promotion, how relevant these observations are to humans, and whether the autophagy pathway can be modulated therapeutically in cancer. See all articles in this CCR Focus section, "Cell Death and Cancer Therapy." ©2015

  13. Sirt3-Mediated Autophagy Contributes to Resveratrol-Induced Protection against ER Stress in HT22 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Jun Yan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress occurring in stringent conditions is critically involved in neuronal survival and death. Resveratrol is a non-flavonoid polyphenol that has neuroprotective effects against many neurological disorders. Here, we investigated the potential protective effects of resveratrol in an in vitro ER stress model mimicked by tunicamycin (TM treatment in neuronal HT22 cells. We found that TM dose-dependently decreased cell viability and increased apoptosis, which were both significantly attenuated by resveratrol treatment. Resveratrol markedly reduced the expression or activation of ER stress-associated factors, including GRP78, CHOP, and caspase-12. The results of immunocytochemistry and western blot showed that resveratrol promoted autophagy in TM-treated cells, as evidenced by increased LC3II puncta number, bcelin1 expression and LC3II/LC3I ratio. Pretreatment with the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine could reduce the protective effects of resveratrol. In addition, the expression of Sirt3 protein and its downstream enzyme activities were significantly increased in resveratrol-treated HT22 cells. To confirm the involvement of Sirt3-mediated mechanisms, siRNA transfection was used to knockdown Sirt3 expression in vitro. The results showed that downregulation of Sirt3 could partially prevented the autophagy and protection induced by resveratrol after TM treatment. Our study demonstrates a pivotal role of Sirt3-mediated autophagy in mediating resveratrol-induced protection against ER stress in vitro, and suggests the therapeutic values of resveratrol in ER stress-associated neuronal injury conditions.

  14. Importance of Autophagy in Mediating Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Morphine-Induced Metabolic Dysfunction and Inflammation in Human Astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Myosotys; Lapierre, Jessica; Ojha, Chet Raj; Estrada-Bueno, Hary; Dever, Seth M; Gewirtz, David A; Kashanchi, Fatah; El-Hage, Nazira

    2017-07-28

    Under physiological conditions, the function of astrocytes in providing brain metabolic support is compromised under pathophysiological conditions caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and opioids. Herein, we examined the role of autophagy, a lysosomal degradation pathway important for cellular homeostasis and survival, as a potential regulatory mechanism during pathophysiological conditions in primary human astrocytes. Blocking autophagy with small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting BECN1 , but not the Autophagy-related 5 ( ATG5 ) gene, caused a significant decrease in HIV and morphine-induced intracellular calcium release. On the contrary, inducing autophagy pharmacologically with rapamycin further enhanced calcium release and significantly reverted HIV and morphine-decreased glutamate uptake. Furthermore, siBeclin1 caused an increase in HIV-induced nitric oxide (NO) release, while viral-induced NO in astrocytes exposed to rapamycin was decreased. HIV replication was significantly attenuated in astrocytes transfected with siRNA while significantly induced in astrocytes exposed to rapamycin. Silencing with siBeclin1, but not siATG5, caused a significant decrease in HIV and morphine-induced interleukin (IL)-8 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) release, while secretion of IL-8 was significantly induced with rapamycin. Mechanistically, the effects of siBeclin1 in decreasing HIV-induced calcium release, viral replication, and viral-induced cytokine secretion were associated with a decrease in activation of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathway.

  15. TFEB-mediated autophagy rescues midbrain dopamine neurons from α-synuclein toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Decressac, Mickael; Mattsson, Bengt; Weikop, Pia

    2013-01-01

    The aggregation of α-synuclein plays a major role in Parkinson disease (PD) pathogenesis. Recent evidence suggests that defects in the autophagy-mediated clearance of α-synuclein contribute to the progressive loss of nigral dopamine neurons. Using an in vivo model of α-synuclein toxicity, we show...... that the PD-like neurodegenerative changes induced by excess cellular levels of α-synuclein in nigral dopamine neurons are closely linked to a progressive decline in markers of lysosome function, accompanied by cytoplasmic retention of transcription factor EB (TFEB), a major transcriptional regulator...... in both A9 and A10 dopamine neurons. Delayed activation of TFEB function through inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin blocked α-synuclein induced neurodegeneration and further disease progression. The results provide a mechanistic link between α-synuclein toxicity and impaired TFEB function...

  16. Trehalose-mediated autophagy impairs the anti-viral function of human primary airway epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qun Wu

    Full Text Available Human rhinovirus (HRV is the most common cause of acute exacerbations of chronic lung diseases including asthma. Impaired anti-viral IFN-λ1 production and increased HRV replication in human asthmatic airway epithelial cells may be one of the underlying mechanisms leading to asthma exacerbations. Increased autophagy has been shown in asthmatic airway epithelium, but the role of autophagy in anti-HRV response remains uncertain. Trehalose, a natural glucose disaccharide, has been recognized as an effective autophagy inducer in mammalian cells. In the current study, we used trehalose to induce autophagy in normal human primary airway epithelial cells in order to determine if autophagy directly regulates the anti-viral response against HRV. We found that trehalose-induced autophagy significantly impaired IFN-λ1 expression and increased HRV-16 load. Inhibition of autophagy via knockdown of autophagy-related gene 5 (ATG5 effectively rescued the impaired IFN-λ1 expression by trehalose and subsequently reduced HRV-16 load. Mechanistically, ATG5 protein interacted with retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I and IFN-β promoter stimulator 1 (IPS-1, two critical molecules involved in the expression of anti-viral interferons. Our results suggest that induction of autophagy in human primary airway epithelial cells inhibits the anti-viral IFN-λ1 expression and facilitates HRV infection. Intervention of excessive autophagy in chronic lung diseases may provide a novel approach to attenuate viral infections and associated disease exacerbations.

  17. Autophagy downregulation contributes to insulin resistance mediated injury in insulin receptor knockout podocytes in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Xu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available It is unknown whether autophagy activity is altered in insulin resistant podocytes and whether autophagy could be a therapeutic target for diabetic nephropathy (DN. Here we used shRNA transfection to knockdown the insulin receptor (IR gene in cultured human immortalized podocytes as an in vitro insulin resistant model. Autophagy related proteins LC3, Beclin, and p62 as well as nephrin, a podocyte injury marker, were assessed using western blot and immunofluorescence staining. Our results show that autophagy is suppressed when podocytes lose insulin sensitivity and that treatment of rapamycin, an mTOR specific inhibitor, could attenuate insulin resistance induced podocytes injury via autophagy activation. The present study deepens our understanding of the role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of DN.

  18. Structural Basis for Receptor-Mediated Selective Autophagy of Aminopeptidase I Aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinori Yamasaki

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Selective autophagy mediates the degradation of various cargoes, including protein aggregates and organelles, thereby contributing to cellular homeostasis. Cargo receptors ensure selectivity by tethering specific cargo to lipidated Atg8 at the isolation membrane. However, little is known about the structural requirements underlying receptor-mediated cargo recognition. Here, we report structural, biochemical, and cell biological analysis of the major selective cargo protein in budding yeast, aminopeptidase I (Ape1, and its complex with the receptor Atg19. The Ape1 propeptide has a trimeric coiled-coil structure, which tethers dodecameric Ape1 bodies together to form large aggregates. Atg19 disassembles the propeptide trimer and forms a 2:1 heterotrimer, which not only blankets the Ape1 aggregates but also regulates their size. These receptor activities may promote elongation of the isolation membrane along the aggregate surface, enabling sequestration of the cargo with high specificity.

  19. Mir143-BBC3 cascade reduces microglial survival via interplay between apoptosis and autophagy: Implications for methamphetamine-mediated neurotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan; Shen, Kai; Bai, Ying; Lv, Xuan; Huang, Rongrong; Zhang, Wei; Chao, Jie; Nguyen, Lan K.; Hua, Jun; Gan, Guangming; Hu, Gang; Yao, Honghong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT BBC3 (BCL2 binding component 3) is a known apoptosis inducer; however, its role in microglial survival remains poorly understood. In addition to the classical transcription factor TRP53, Mir143 is involved in BBC3 expression at the post-transcriptional level. Here, we identify unique roles of Mir143-BBC3 in mediating microglial survival via the regulation of the interplay between apoptosis and autophagy. Autophagy inhibition accelerated methamphetamine-induced apoptosis, whereas autophagy induction attenuated the decrease in microglial survival. Moreover, anti-Mir143-dependent BBC3 upregulation reversed the methamphetamine-induced decrease in microglial survival via the regulation of apoptosis and autophagy. The in vivo relevance of these findings was confirmed in mouse models, which demonstrated that the microinjection of anti-Mir143 into the hippocampus ameliorated the methamphetamine-induced decrease in microglia as well as that observed in heterozygous Mir143+/− mice. These findings provide new insight regarding the specific contributions of Mir143-BBC3 to microglial survival in the context of drug abuse. PMID:27464000

  20. IFN-gamma-inducible Irga6 mediates host resistance against Chlamydia trachomatis via autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munir A Al-Zeer

    Full Text Available Chlamydial infection of the host cell induces Gamma interferon (IFNgamma, a central immunoprotector for humans and mice. The primary defense against Chlamydia infection in the mouse involves the IFNgamma-inducible family of IRG proteins; however, the precise mechanisms mediating the pathogen's elimination are unknown. In this study, we identify Irga6 as an important resistance factor against C. trachomatis, but not C. muridarum, infection in IFNgamma-stimulated mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs. We show that Irga6, Irgd, Irgm2 and Irgm3 accumulate at bacterial inclusions in MEFs upon stimulation with IFNgamma, whereas Irgb6 colocalized in the presence or absence of the cytokine. This accumulation triggers a rerouting of bacterial inclusions to autophagosomes that subsequently fuse to lysosomes for elimination. Autophagy-deficient Atg5-/- MEFs and lysosomal acidification impaired cells surrender to infection. Irgm2, Irgm3 and Irgd still localize to inclusions in IFNgamma-induced Atg5-/- cells, but Irga6 localization is disrupted indicating its pivotal role in pathogen resistance. Irga6-deficient (Irga6-/- MEFs, in which chlamydial growth is enhanced, do not respond to IFNgamma even though Irgb6, Irgd, Irgm2 and Irgm3 still localize to inclusions. Taken together, we identify Irga6 as a necessary factor in conferring host resistance by remodelling a classically nonfusogenic intracellular pathogen to stimulate fusion with autophagosomes, thereby rerouting the intruder to the lysosomal compartment for destruction.

  1. The Francisella O-antigen mediates survival in the macrophage cytosol via autophagy avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Russo Case, Elizabeth; Chong, Audrey; Wehrly, Tara D.; Hansen, Bryan; Child, Robert; Hwang, Seungmin; Virgin, Herbert W.; Celli, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Summary Autophagy is a key innate immune response to intracellular parasites that promotes their delivery to degradative lysosomes following detection in the cytosol or within damaged vacuoles. Like Listeria and Shigella, which use specific mechanisms to avoid autophagic detection and capture, the bacterial pathogen Francisella tularensis proliferates within the cytosol of macrophages without demonstrable control by autophagy. To examine how Francisella evades autophagy, we screened a library of F. tularensis subsp. tularensis Schu S4 HimarFT transposon mutants in GFP-LC3-expressing murine macrophages by microscopy for clones localised within autophagic vacuoles after phagosomal escape. Eleven clones showed autophagic capture at six hours post-infection, whose HimarFT insertions clustered to four genetic loci involved in lipopolysaccharidic and capsular O-antigen biosynthesis. Consistent with the HimarFT mutants, in-frame deletion mutants of two representative loci, FTT1236 and FTT1448c (manC), lacking both LPS and capsular O-antigen, underwent phagosomal escape but were cleared from the host cytosol. Unlike wild type Francisella, the O-antigen deletion mutants were ubiquitinated, and recruited the autophagy adaptor p62/SQSTM1 and LC3 prior to cytosolic clearance. Autophagy-deficient macrophages partially supported replication of both mutants, indicating that O-antigen-lacking Francisella are controlled by autophagy. These data demonstrate the intracellular protective role of this bacterial surface polysaccharide against autophagy. PMID:24286610

  2. Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Tax-Deregulated Autophagy Pathway and c-FLIP Expression Contribute to Resistance against Death Receptor-Mediated Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weimin; Zhou, Jiansuo; Shi, Juan; Zhang, Yaxi; Liu, Shilian

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax protein is considered to play a central role in the process that leads to adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). HTLV-1 Tax-expressing cells show resistance to apoptosis induced by Fas ligand (FasL) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). The regulation of Tax on the autophagy pathway in HeLa cells and peripheral T cells was recently reported, but the function and underlying molecular mechanism of the Tax-regulated autophagy are not yet well defined. Here, we report that HTLV-1 Tax deregulates the autophagy pathway, which plays a protective role during the death receptor (DR)-mediated apoptosis of human U251 astroglioma cells. The cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP), which is upregulated by Tax, also contributes to the resistance against DR-mediated apoptosis. Both Tax-induced autophagy and Tax-induced c-FLIP expression require Tax-induced activation of IκB kinases (IKK). Furthermore, Tax-induced c-FLIP expression is regulated through the Tax-IKK-NF-κB signaling pathway, whereas Tax-triggered autophagy depends on the activation of IKK but not the activation of NF-κB. In addition, DR-mediated apoptosis is correlated with the degradation of Tax, which can be facilitated by the inhibitors of autophagy. IMPORTANCE Our study reveals that Tax-deregulated autophagy is a protective mechanism for DR-mediated apoptosis. The molecular mechanism of Tax-induced autophagy is also illuminated, which is different from Tax-increased c-FLIP. Tax can be degraded via manipulation of autophagy and TRAIL-induced apoptosis. These results outline a complex regulatory network between and among apoptosis, autophagy, and Tax and also present evidence that autophagy represents a new possible target for therapeutic intervention for the HTVL-1 related diseases. PMID:24352466

  3. Autophagy mediates cytotoxicity of human colorectal cancer cells treated with garcinielliptone FC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Shen-Jeu; Yen, Cheng-Hsin; Lin, Ting-Yu; Jiang-Shieh, Ya-Fen; Lin, Chun-Nan; Chen, Jyun-Ti; Su, Chun-Li

    2018-01-01

    The tautomeric pair of garcinielliptone FC (GFC) is a novel tautomeric pair of polyprenyl benzophenonoid isolated from the pericarps of Garcinia subelliptica Merr. (G. subelliptica, Clusiaceae), a tree with abundant sources of polyphenols. Our previous report demonstrated that GFC induced apoptosis on various types of human cancer cell lines including chemoresistant human colorectal cancer HT-29 cells. In the present study, we observed that many autophagy-related genes in GFC-treated HT-29 cells were up- and down-regulated using a cDNA microarray containing oncogenes and kinase genes. GFC-induced autophagy of HT-29 cells was confirmed by observing the formation of acidic vesicular organelles, LC3 puncta, and double-membrane autophagic vesicles using flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. Inhibition of AKT/mTOR/P70S6K signaling as well as formation of Atg5-Atg12 and PI3K/Beclin-1 complexes were observed using Western blot. Administration of autophagy inhibitor (3-methyladenine and shRNA Atg5) and apoptosis inhibitor Z-VAD showed that the GFC-induced autophagy was cytotoxic form and GFC-induced apoptosis enhanced GFC-induced autophagy. Our data suggest the involvement of autophagy and apoptosis in GFC-induced anticancer mechanisms of human colorectal cancer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. 2-Deoxy-D-glucose treatment of endothelial cells induces autophagy by reactive oxygen species-mediated activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qilong Wang

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a cellular self-digestion process activated in response to stresses such as energy deprivation and oxidative stress. However, the mechanisms by which energy deprivation and oxidative stress trigger autophagy remain undefined. Here, we report that activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK by mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS is required for autophagy in cultured endothelial cells. AMPK activity, ROS levels, and the markers of autophagy were monitored in confluent bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC treated with the glycolysis blocker 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG. Treatment of BAEC with 2-DG (5 mM for 24 hours or with low concentrations of H(2O(2 (100 µM induced autophagy, including increased conversion of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3-I to LC3-II, accumulation of GFP-tagged LC3 positive intracellular vacuoles, and increased fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes. 2-DG-treatment also induced AMPK phosphorylation, which was blocked by either co-administration of two potent anti-oxidants (Tempol and N-Acetyl-L-cysteine or overexpression of superoxide dismutase 1 or catalase in BAEC. Further, 2-DG-induced autophagy in BAEC was blocked by overexpressing catalase or siRNA-mediated knockdown of AMPK. Finally, pretreatment of BAEC with 2-DG increased endothelial cell viability after exposure to hypoxic stress. Thus, AMPK is required for ROS-triggered autophagy in endothelial cells, which increases endothelial cell survival in response to cell stress.

  5. Concanavalin A/IFN-gamma triggers autophagy-related necrotic hepatocyte death through IRGM1-mediated lysosomal membrane disruption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Peng Chang

    Full Text Available Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ, a potent Th1 cytokine with multiple biological functions, can induce autophagy to enhance the clearance of the invading microorganism or cause cell death. We have reported that Concanavalin A (Con A can cause autophagic cell death in hepatocytes and induce both T cell-dependent and -independent acute hepatitis in immunocompetent and immunodeficient mice, respectively. Although IFN-γ is known to enhance liver injury in Con A-induced hepatitis, its role in autophagy-related hepatocyte death is not clear. In this study we report that IFN-γ can enhance Con A-induced autophagic flux and cell death in hepatoma cell lines. A necrotic cell death with increased lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP is observed in Con A-treated hepatoma cells in the presence of IFN-γ. Cathepsin B and L were released from lysosomes to cause cell death. Furthermore, IFN-γ induces immunity related GTPase family M member 1(IRGM1 translocation to lysosomes and prolongs its activity in Con A-treated hepatoma cells. Knockdown of IRGM1 inhibits the IFN-γ/Con A-induced LMP change and cell death. Furthermore, IFN-γ(-/- mice are resistant to Con A-induced autophagy-associated necrotic hepatocyte death. We conclude that IFN-γ enhances Con A-induced autophagic flux and causes an IRGM1-dependent lysosome-mediated necrotic cell death in hepatocytes.

  6. Carnosol induces ROS-mediated beclin1-independent autophagy and apoptosis in triple negative breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusra Al Dhaheri

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the in vitro and in vivo anticancer effect of carnosol, a naturally occurring polyphenol, in triple negative breast cancer.We found that carnosol significantly inhibited the viability and colony growth induced G2 arrest in the triple negative MDA-MB-231. Blockade of the cell cycle was associated with increased p21/WAF1 expression and downregulation of p27. Interestingly, carnosol was found to induce beclin1-independent autophagy and apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 cells. The coexistence of both events, autophagy and apoptosis, was confirmed by electron micrography. Induction of autophagy was found to be an early event, detected within 3 h post-treatment, which subsequently led to apoptosis. Carnosol treatment also caused a dose-dependent increase in the levels of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (pERK1/2. Moreover, we show that carnosol induced DNA damage, reduced the mitochondrial potential and triggered the activation of the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathway. Furthermore, we found that carnosol induced a dose-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and inhibition of ROS by tiron, a ROS scavenger, blocked the induction of autophagy and apoptosis and attenuated DNA damage. To our knowledge, this is the first report to identify the induction of autophagy by carnosol.In conclusion our findings provide strong evidence that carnosol may be an alternative therapeutic candidate against the aggressive form of breast cancer and hence deserves more exploration.

  7. Carnosol Induces ROS-Mediated Beclin1-Independent Autophagy and Apoptosis in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Dhaheri, Yusra; Attoub, Samir; Ramadan, Gaber; Arafat, Kholoud; Bajbouj, Khuloud; Karuvantevida, Noushad; AbuQamar, Synan; Eid, Ali; Iratni, Rabah

    2014-01-01

    Background In this study we investigated the in vitro and in vivo anticancer effect of carnosol, a naturally occurring polyphenol, in triple negative breast cancer. Results We found that carnosol significantly inhibited the viability and colony growth induced G2 arrest in the triple negative MDA-MB-231. Blockade of the cell cycle was associated with increased p21/WAF1 expression and downregulation of p27. Interestingly, carnosol was found to induce beclin1-independent autophagy and apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 cells. The coexistence of both events, autophagy and apoptosis, was confirmed by electron micrography. Induction of autophagy was found to be an early event, detected within 3 h post-treatment, which subsequently led to apoptosis. Carnosol treatment also caused a dose-dependent increase in the levels of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (pERK1/2). Moreover, we show that carnosol induced DNA damage, reduced the mitochondrial potential and triggered the activation of the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathway. Furthermore, we found that carnosol induced a dose-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inhibition of ROS by tiron, a ROS scavenger, blocked the induction of autophagy and apoptosis and attenuated DNA damage. To our knowledge, this is the first report to identify the induction of autophagy by carnosol. Conclusion In conclusion our findings provide strong evidence that carnosol may be an alternative therapeutic candidate against the aggressive form of breast cancer and hence deserves more exploration. PMID:25299698

  8. Na+/H+ Exchanger Regulates Amino Acid-Mediated Autophagy in Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiying Shi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Dysfunctional autophagy has been reported to be associated with aberrant intestinal metabolism. Amino acids can regulate autophagic activity in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs. Na+/H+-exchanger 3 (NHE3 has been found to participate in the absorption of amino acids in the intestine, but whether NHE3 is involved in the regulation of autophagy in IECs is unclear. Methods: In the present study, an amino acid starvation-induced autophagic model was established. Then, the effects of alanine and proline with or without the NHE inhibitor 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl amiloride (EIPA were evaluated. Autophagy was examined based on the microtubule-associated light chain 3 (LC3 levels, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, tandem GFP-mCherry-LC3 construct, sequestosome-1 (SQSTM1, P62 mRNA and protein levels, and autophagy-related gene (ATG 5, 7, and 12 expression levels. The autophagic flux was evaluated as the ratio of yellow (autophagosomes to red (autolysosomes LC3 puncta. Results: Following amino acid starvation, we found the LC3-II and ATG expression levels were enhanced in the IEC-18 cells. An increase in the number of autophagic vacuoles was concomitantly observed by TEM and confocal microscopy. Based on the results, supplementation with either alanine or proline depressed autophagy in the IEC-18 cells. Consistent with the elevated LC3-II levels, ATG expression increased upon NHE3 inhibition. Moreover, the mCherry-GFP-LC3 autophagic puncta representing both autophagosomes and autolysosomes per cell increased after EIPA treatment. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that NHE (most likely NHE3 may participate in the amino acid regulation of autophagy in IECs, which would aid in the design of better treatments for intestinal inflammation.

  9. Idarubicin induces mTOR-dependent cytotoxic autophagy in leukemic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ristic, Biljana [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 1, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Bosnjak, Mihajlo [Institute of Histology and Embryology, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Arsikin, Katarina [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 1, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Mircic, Aleksandar; Suzin-Zivkovic, Violeta [Institute of Histology and Embryology, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Bogdanovic, Andrija [Clinic for Hematology, Clinical Centre of Serbia, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Perovic, Vladimir [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 1, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Martinovic, Tamara; Kravic-Stevovic, Tamara; Bumbasirevic, Vladimir [Institute of Histology and Embryology, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Trajkovic, Vladimir, E-mail: vtrajkovic@med.bg.ac.rs [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 1, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Harhaji-Trajkovic, Ljubica, E-mail: buajk@yahoo.com [Institute for Biological Research, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Despot Stefan Blvd. 142, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2014-08-01

    We investigated if the antileukemic drug idarubicin induces autophagy, a process of programmed cellular self-digestion, in leukemic cell lines and primary leukemic cells. Transmission electron microscopy and acridine orange staining demonstrated the presence of autophagic vesicles and intracellular acidification, respectively, in idarubicin-treated REH leukemic cell line. Idarubicin increased punctuation/aggregation of microtubule-associated light chain 3B (LC3B), enhanced the conversion of LC3B-I to autophagosome-associated LC3B-II in the presence of proteolysis inhibitors, and promoted the degradation of the selective autophagic target p62, thus indicating the increase in autophagic flux. Idarubicin inhibited the phosphorylation of the main autophagy repressor mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and its downstream target p70S6 kinase. The treatment with the mTOR activator leucine prevented idarubicin-mediated autophagy induction. Idarubicin-induced mTOR repression was associated with the activation of the mTOR inhibitor AMP-activated protein kinase and down-regulation of the mTOR activator Akt. The suppression of autophagy by pharmacological inhibitors or LC3B and beclin-1 genetic knockdown rescued REH cells from idarubicin-mediated oxidative stress, mitochondrial depolarization, caspase activation and apoptotic DNA fragmentation. Idarubicin also caused mTOR inhibition and cytotoxic autophagy in K562 leukemic cell line and leukocytes from chronic myeloid leukemia patients, but not healthy controls. By demonstrating mTOR-dependent cytotoxic autophagy in idarubicin-treated leukemic cells, our results warrant caution when considering combining idarubicin with autophagy inhibitors in leukemia therapy. - Highlights: • Idarubicin induces autophagy in leukemic cell lines and primary leukemic cells. • Idarubicin induces autophagy by inhibiting mTOR in leukemic cells. • mTOR suppression by idarubicin is associated with AMPK activation and Akt blockade.

  10. Inhibition of chaperone-mediated autophagy prevents glucotoxicity in the Caenorhabditis elegans mev-1 mutant by activation of the proteasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisermann, Dorothé Jenni; Wenzel, Uwe; Fitzenberger, Elena

    2017-02-26

    Chronic hyperglycemia is a hallmark of diabetes mellitus and the main cause of diabetes-associated complications. Increased intracellular glucose levels lead to damaged proteins and in consequence disturb cellular proteostasis. As an important contributor to the maintenance and restoration of proteostasis, autophagy mediates the lysosomal degradation of damaged proteins or entire cellular organelles. In the present study we used the stress-sensitive mev-1 mutant of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans in order to assess the role of lmp-2, a homologue of the lysosome associated membrane protein type 2A, in the context of glucotoxicity, which was achieved by feeding glucose in a liquid medium. Knockdown of lmp-2 by RNA interference completely prevented the survival reduction caused by glucose under heat stress. Those effects were associated with the prevention of (1) increased lysosome formation and (2) reduction of proteasomal activity, which were observed under glucose feeding. Finally, the survival reduction due to knockdown of ubiquitin remained unaffected by the additional lmp-2 knockdown in the absence or presence of glucose. In conclusion, our study provides evidence that lmp-2, a key player in chaperone-mediated autophagy, is functional in C. elegans, too. Inhibition of lmp-2 prevents the reduction of proteasomal activity by glucose and thereby prevents also glucotoxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Regional deficiencies in chaperone-mediated autophagy underlie α-synuclein aggregation and neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkus, Kristen A.; Ischiropoulos, Harry

    2012-01-01

    In neurodegenerative diseases, it remains unclear why certain brain regions are selectively vulnerable to protein aggregation. In transgenic mice expressing human A53T α-synuclein, the brainstem and spinal cord develop the most prominent α-synuclein inclusions which correlate with age-dependent motor dysfunction. Herein we present the novel finding that this selective aggregation is in part dependent on the inability of chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) to effectively degrade α-synuclein in these brain regions. Lysosomal assays revealed that CMA activity was significantly decreased in aggregation-prone regions compared to the remainder of the brain. Previously, CMA activity has been shown to be proportional to levels of the CMA receptor Lamp-2a. Using antibodies, brain tissue from Lamp-2a null mice, enzymatic deglycosylation, and mass spectrometry, we identified Lamp2a as a novel 72 kDa glycoprotein in the mouse brain. Examination of Lamp-2a levels revealed differences in expression across brain regions. The brainstem and the spinal cord had a more than three-fold greater levels of Lamp-2a as compared to regions less vulnerable to aggregation and exhibited a selective upregulation of Lamp-2a during development of α-synuclein inclusions. Despite this dynamic response of Lamp-2a, the levels of substrates bound to the brain lysosomes as well as the rates of substrate uptake and degradation were not proportional to the levels of Lamp-2a. These regional differences in CMA activity and Lamp-2a expression were found in both non-transgenic mice as well as A53T α-syn mice. Therefore, these are inherent variations and not a transgene-specific effect. However, differences in CMA activity may render select brain regions vulnerable to homeostatic dysfunction in the presence of stressors such as overexpression of human A53T α-syn. Collectively, the data provide a potential mechanism to explain the dichotomy of vulnerability or resistance that underlies brain regions

  12. Caspase-mediated cleavage of Beclin1 inhibits autophagy and promotes apoptosis induced by S1 in human ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoning; Su, Jing; Xia, Meihui; Li, Hongyan; Xu, Ye; Ma, Chunhui; Ma, Liwei; Kang, Jingsong; Yu, Huimei; Zhang, Zhichao; Sun, Liankun

    2016-02-01

    S1, a novel BH3 mimetic, can induce apoptosis dependent on Bax/Bak through inhibition of Bcl-2 in various tumors. S1 also induces autophagy through interrupting the interaction of Bcl-2 and Beclin1. Our results showed that S1 induces apoptosis in human ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Autophagy precedes apoptosis, in SKOV3 cells treated with S1 (6 μmol/L), autophagy reached the maximum peak at 12 h after treatment and decreased to 24 h. In SKOV3 cells treated with different concentrations of S1 for 24 h, the highest level of autophagy was observed with 5 μmol/L and decreased to 10 μmol/L. Autophagy inhibitors 3-MA and CQ enhanced apoptosis induced by S1 in SKOV3 cells. However, overactivation of caspases in apoptosis induced by S1 may inhibit the autophagy-inducing function of Beclin1. Because the pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD recovered the autophagy-inducing function of Beclin1 through reduction of activated caspase-mediated cleavage of Beclin1. Furthermore, the Beclin1 cleavage products could further increase apoptosis induced by S1 in SKOV3 cells. This indicates that apoptosis induced by high doses and long exposure of S1 causes the overactivation of caspases and subsequent cleavage of Beclin1, and inhibits the protection of autophagy. Moreover, the cleaved product of Beclin1 further promotes apoptosis induced by S1 in SKOV3 cells. Our results suggest this may be a molecular mechanism for enhancing the sensitivity of cancer cells to apoptosis induced by small molecular compound targeting Bcl-2.

  13. Control of GABARAP-mediated autophagy by the Golgi complex, centrosome and centriolar satellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joachim, Justin; Tooze, Sharon A

    2018-01-01

    Within minutes of induction of autophagy by amino-acid starvation in mammalian cells, multiple autophagosomes form throughout the cell cytoplasm. During their formation, the autophagosomes sequester cytoplasmic material and deliver it to lysosomes for degradation. How these organelles can be so rapidly formed and how their formation is acutely regulated are major questions in the autophagy field. Protein and lipid trafficking from diverse cell compartments contribute membrane to, or regulate the formation of the autophagosome. In addition, recruitment of Atg8 (in yeast), and the ATG8-family members (in mammalian cells) to autophagosomes is required for efficient autophagy. Recently, it was discovered that the centrosome and centriolar satellites regulate autophagosome formation by delivery of an ATG8-family member, GABARAP, to the forming autophagosome membrane, the phagophore. We propose that GABARAP regulates phagophore expansion by activating the ULK complex, the amino-acid controlled initiator complex. This finding reveals a previously unknown link between the centrosome, centriolar satellites and autophagy. © 2017 Société Française des Microscopies and Société de Biologie Cellulaire de France. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Conformational Flexibility Enables the Function of a BECN1 Region Essential for Starvation-Mediated Autophagy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, Yang; Ramanathan, Arvind; Glover, Karen; Stanley, Christopher; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Yang, Zhongyu; Colbert, Christopher L.; Sinha, Sangita C.

    2016-04-05

    BECN1 is essential for autophagy, a critical eukaryotic cellular homeostasis pathway. Here we delineate a highly conserved BECN1 domain located between previously characterized BH3 and coiled-coil domains and elucidate its structure and role in autophagy. The 2.0 angstrom sulfur-single-wavelength anomalous dispersion X-ray crystal structure of this domain demonstrates that its N-terminal half is unstructured while its C-terminal half is helical; hence, we name it the flexible helical domain (FHD). Circular dichroism spectroscopy, double electron electron resonance electron paramagnetic resonance, and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analyses confirm that the FHD is partially disordered, even in the context of adjacent BECN1 domains. Molecular dynamic simulations fitted to SAXS data indicate that the FHD transiently samples more helical conformations. FHD helicity increases in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol, suggesting it may become more helical upon binding. Lastly, cellular studies show that conserved FHD residues are required for starvation-induced autophagy. Thus, the FHD likely undergoes a binding-associated disorder to-helix transition, and conserved residues critical for this interaction are essential for starvation-induced autophagy.

  15. Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG sensitizes Bcl-2 inhibitor (-)-gossypol by suppressing ERK-mediated protective autophagy and Mcl-1 accumulation in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Chen, Linfeng; Ni, Zhenhong; Dai, Xufang; Qin, Liyan; Wu, Yaran; Li, Xinzhe; Xu, Liang; Lian, Jiqin; He, Fengtian

    2014-11-01

    Natural BH3-memitic (-)-gossypol shows promising antitumor efficacy in several kinds of cancer. However, our previous studies have demonstrated that protective autophagy decreases the drug sensitivities of Bcl-2 inhibitors in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. In the present study, we are the first to report that Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG enhanced (-)-gossypol-induced apoptosis via suppressing (-)-gossypol-triggered protective autophagy and Mcl-1 accumulation. The suppression effect of 17-AAG on autophagy was mediated by inhibiting ERK-mediated Bcl-2 phosphorylation while was not related to Beclin1 or LC3 protein instability. Meanwhile, 17-AAG downregulated (-)-gossypol-triggered Mcl-1 accumulation by suppressing Mcl-1(Thr163) phosphorylation and promoting protein degradation. Collectively, our study indicates that Hsp90 plays an important role in tumor maintenance and inhibition of Hsp90 may become a new strategy for sensitizing Bcl-2-targeted chemotherapies in HCC cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Andrographolide Analogue Induces Apoptosis and Autophagy Mediated Cell Death in U937 Cells by Inhibition of PI3K/Akt/mTOR Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Kumar

    Full Text Available Current chemotherapeutic agents based on apoptosis induction are lacking in desired efficacy. Therefore, there is continuous effort to bring about new dimension in control and gradual eradication of cancer by means of ever evolving therapeutic strategies. Various forms of PCD are being increasingly implicated in anti-cancer therapy and the complex interplay among them is vital for the ultimate fate of proliferating cells. We elaborated and illustrated the underlying mechanism of the most potent Andrographolide analogue (AG-4 mediated action that involved the induction of dual modes of cell death-apoptosis and autophagy in human leukemic U937 cells.AG-4 induced cytotoxicity was associated with redox imbalance and apoptosis which involved mitochondrial depolarisation, altered apoptotic protein expressions, activation of the caspase cascade leading to cell cycle arrest. Incubation with caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk or Bax siRNA decreased cytotoxic efficacy of AG-4 emphasising critical roles of caspase and Bax. In addition, AG-4 induced autophagy as evident from LC3-II accumulation, increased Atg protein expressions and autophagosome formation. Pre-treatment with 3-MA or Atg 5 siRNA suppressed the cytotoxic effect of AG-4 implying the pro-death role of autophagy. Furthermore, incubation with Z-VAD-fmk or Bax siRNA subdued AG-4 induced autophagy and pre-treatment with 3-MA or Atg 5 siRNA curbed AG-4 induced apoptosis-implying that apoptosis and autophagy acted as partners in the context of AG-4 mediated action. AG-4 also inhibited PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. Inhibition of mTOR or Akt augmented AG-4 induced apoptosis and autophagy signifying its crucial role in its mechanism of action.Thus, these findings prove the dual ability of AG-4 to induce apoptosis and autophagy which provide a new perspective to it as a potential molecule targeting PCD for future cancer therapeutics.

  17. Andrographolide Analogue Induces Apoptosis and Autophagy Mediated Cell Death in U937 Cells by Inhibition of PI3K/Akt/mTOR Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Deepak; Das, Bimolendu; Sen, Rupashree; Kundu, Priyanka; Manna, Alak; Sarkar, Avijit; Chowdhury, Chinmay; Chatterjee, Mitali; Das, Padma

    2015-01-01

    Current chemotherapeutic agents based on apoptosis induction are lacking in desired efficacy. Therefore, there is continuous effort to bring about new dimension in control and gradual eradication of cancer by means of ever evolving therapeutic strategies. Various forms of PCD are being increasingly implicated in anti-cancer therapy and the complex interplay among them is vital for the ultimate fate of proliferating cells. We elaborated and illustrated the underlying mechanism of the most potent Andrographolide analogue (AG-4) mediated action that involved the induction of dual modes of cell death-apoptosis and autophagy in human leukemic U937 cells. AG-4 induced cytotoxicity was associated with redox imbalance and apoptosis which involved mitochondrial depolarisation, altered apoptotic protein expressions, activation of the caspase cascade leading to cell cycle arrest. Incubation with caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk or Bax siRNA decreased cytotoxic efficacy of AG-4 emphasising critical roles of caspase and Bax. In addition, AG-4 induced autophagy as evident from LC3-II accumulation, increased Atg protein expressions and autophagosome formation. Pre-treatment with 3-MA or Atg 5 siRNA suppressed the cytotoxic effect of AG-4 implying the pro-death role of autophagy. Furthermore, incubation with Z-VAD-fmk or Bax siRNA subdued AG-4 induced autophagy and pre-treatment with 3-MA or Atg 5 siRNA curbed AG-4 induced apoptosis-implying that apoptosis and autophagy acted as partners in the context of AG-4 mediated action. AG-4 also inhibited PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. Inhibition of mTOR or Akt augmented AG-4 induced apoptosis and autophagy signifying its crucial role in its mechanism of action. Thus, these findings prove the dual ability of AG-4 to induce apoptosis and autophagy which provide a new perspective to it as a potential molecule targeting PCD for future cancer therapeutics.

  18. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonist 15d-prostaglandin J2 mediates neuronal autophagy after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Xu

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ has recently emerged as potential therapeutic agents for cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (I/R injury because of anti-neuronal apoptotic actions. However, whether PPAR-γ activation mediates neuronal autophagy in such conditions remains unclear. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the role of PPAR-γ agonist 15-PGJ(2 on neuronal autophagy induced by I/R. The expression of autophagic-related protein in ischemic cortex such as LC3-II, Beclin 1, cathepsin-B and LAMP1 increased significantly after cerebral I/R injury. Furthermore, increased punctate LC3 labeling and cathepsin-B staining occurred in neurons. Treatment with PPAR-γ agonist 15d-PGJ(2 decreased not only autophagic-related protein expression in ischemic cortex, but also immunoreactivity of LC3 and cathepsin-B in neurons. Autophagic inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA decreased LC3-II levels, reduced the infarct volume, and mimicked some protective effect of 15d-PGJ(2 against cerebral I/R injury. These results indicate that PPAR-γ agonist 15d-PGJ(2 exerts neuroprotection by inhibiting neuronal autophagy after cerebral I/R injury. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying PPAR-γ agonist in mediating neuronal autophagy remain to be determined, neuronal autophagy may be a new target for PPAR-γ agonist treatment in cerebral I/R injury.

  19. Retinoid receptor signaling and autophagy in acute promyelocytic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orfali, Nina [Cork Cancer Research Center, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Department of Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA. (United States); McKenna, Sharon L. [Cork Cancer Research Center, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Cahill, Mary R. [Department of Hematology, Cork University Hospital, Cork (Ireland); Gudas, Lorraine J., E-mail: ljgudas@med.cornell.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA. (United States); Mongan, Nigel P., E-mail: nigel.mongan@nottingham.ac.uk [Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, University of Nottingham, LE12 5RD (United Kingdom); Department of Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA. (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Retinoids are a family of signaling molecules derived from vitamin A with well established roles in cellular differentiation. Physiologically active retinoids mediate transcriptional effects on cells through interactions with retinoic acid (RARs) and retinoid-X (RXR) receptors. Chromosomal translocations involving the RARα gene, which lead to impaired retinoid signaling, are implicated in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). All-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), alone and in combination with arsenic trioxide (ATO), restores differentiation in APL cells and promotes degradation of the abnormal oncogenic fusion protein through several proteolytic mechanisms. RARα fusion-protein elimination is emerging as critical to obtaining sustained remission and long-term cure in APL. Autophagy is a degradative cellular pathway involved in protein turnover. Both ATRA and ATO also induce autophagy in APL cells. Enhancing autophagy may therefore be of therapeutic benefit in resistant APL and could broaden the application of differentiation therapy to other cancers. Here we discuss retinoid signaling in hematopoiesis, leukemogenesis, and APL treatment. We highlight autophagy as a potential important regulator in anti-leukemic strategies. - Highlights: • Normal and aberrant retinoid signaling in hematopoiesis and leukemia is reviewed. • We suggest a novel role for RARα in the development of X-RARα gene fusions in APL. • ATRA therapy in APL activates transcription and promotes onco-protein degradation. • Autophagy may be involved in both onco-protein degradation and differentiation. • Pharmacologic autophagy induction may potentiate ATRA's therapeutic effects.

  20. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG, a green tea polyphenol, stimulates hepatic autophagy and lipid clearance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Zhou

    Full Text Available Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG is a major polyphenol in green tea that has been shown to have anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, anti-steatotic effects on the liver. Autophagy also mediates similar effects; however, it is not currently known whether EGCG can regulate hepatic autophagy. Here, we show that EGCG increases hepatic autophagy by promoting the formation of autophagosomes, increasing lysosomal acidification, and stimulating autophagic flux in hepatic cells and in vivo. EGCG also increases phosphorylation of AMPK, one of the major regulators of autophagy. Importantly, siRNA knockdown of AMPK abrogated autophagy induced by EGCG. Interestingly, we observed lipid droplet within autophagosomes and autolysosomes and increased lipid clearance by EGCG, suggesting it promotes lipid metabolism by increasing autophagy. In mice fed with high-fat/western style diet (HFW; 60% energy as fat, reduced levels of calcium, vitamin D3, choline, folate, and fiber, EGCG treatment reduces hepatosteatosis and concomitantly increases autophagy. In summary, we have used genetic and pharmacological approaches to demonstrate EGCG induction of hepatic autophagy, and this may contribute to its beneficial effects in reducing hepatosteatosis and potentially some other pathological liver conditions.

  1. Autophagy Inhibition Enhances the Mitochondrial-Mediated Apoptosis Induced by Mangrove (Avicennia marina) Extract in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Esau, Luke

    2015-01-10

    %. Conclusion: Our data provide evidence that AM extract triggers ROS-mediated autophagy as well as caspase-independent apoptosis. The results also strengthen the view that concurrent targeting of apoptotic and autophagic pathways may provide effective therapeutic strategy against cancer.

  2. Changes in macroautophagy, chaperone-mediated autophagy, and mitochondrial metabolism in murine skeletal and cardiac muscle during aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jin; Chong, Shu Yun; Lim, Andrea; Singh, Brijesh K; Sinha, Rohit A; Salmon, Adam B; Yen, Paul M

    2017-02-26

    Aging causes a general decline in cellular metabolic activity, and function in different tissues and whole body homeostasis. However, the understanding about the metabolomic and autophagy changes in skeletal muscle and heart during aging is still limited. We thus examined markers for macroautophagy, chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA), mitochondrial quality control, as well as cellular metabolites in skeletal and cardiac muscle from young (5 months old) and aged (27 months old) mice. We found decreased autophagic degradation of p62 and increased ubiquitinated proteins in both tissues from aged mice, suggesting a decline in macroautophagy during aging. In skeletal muscle from aged mice, there also was a decline in LC3B-I conjugation to phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) possibly due to decreased protein levels of ATG3 and ATG12-ATG5. The CMA markers, LAMP-2A and Hsc70, and mitochondrial turnover markers, Drp1, PINK1 and PGC1α also were decreased. Metabolomics analysis showed impaired β-oxidation in heart of aged mice, whereas increased branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) and ceramide levels were found in skeletal muscle of aged mice that in turn, may contribute to insulin resistance in muscle. Taken together, our studies showed similar declines in macroautophagy but distinct effects on CMA, mitochondrial turnover, and metabolic dysfunction in muscle vs. heart during aging.

  3. Defects in MAP1S-mediated autophagy turnover of fibronectin cause renal fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guibin; Yue, Fei; Huang, Hai; He, Yongzhong; Li, Xun; Zhao, Haibo; Su, Zhengming; Jiang, Xianhan; Li, Wenjiao; Zou, Jing; Chen, Qi; Liu, Leyuan

    2016-05-01

    Excessive deposition of extracellular matrix proteins in renal tissues causes renal fibrosis and renal function failure. Mammalian cells primarily use the autophagy-lysosome system to degrade misfolded/aggregated proteins and dysfunctional organelles. MAP1S is an autophagy activator and promotes the biogenesis and degradation of autophagosomes. Previously, we reported that MAP1S suppresses hepatocellular carcinogenesis in a mouse model and predicts a better prognosis in patients suffering from clear cell renal cell carcinomas. Furthermore, we have characterized that MAP1S enhances the turnover of fibronectin, and mice overexpressing LC3 but with MAP1S deleted accumulate fibronectin and develop liver fibrosis because of the synergistic impact of LC3-induced over-synthesis of fibronectin and MAP1S depletion-caused impairment of fibronectin degradation. Here we show that a suppression of MAP1S in renal cells caused an impairment of autophagy clearance of fibronectin and an activation of pyroptosis. Depletion of MAP1S in mice leads to an accumulation of fibrosis-related proteins and the development of renal fibrosis in aged mice. The levels of MAP1S were dramatically reduced and levels of fibronectin were greatly elevated in renal fibrotic tissues from patients diagnosed as renal atrophy and renal failure. Therefore, MAP1S deficiency may cause the accumulation of fibronectin and the development of renal fibrosis.

  4. Autophagy plays a critical role in ChLym-1-induced cytotoxicity of non-hodgkin's lymphoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiajun Fan

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a critical mechanism in both cancer therapy resistance and tumor suppression. Monoclonal antibodies have been documented to kill tumor cells via apoptosis, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC. In this study, we report for the first time that chLym-1, a chimeric anti-human HLA-DR monoclonal antibody, induces autophagy in Raji Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL cells. Interestingly, inhibition of autophagy by pharmacological inhibitors (3-methyladenine and NH4Cl or genetic approaches (siRNA targeting Atg5 suppresses chLym-1-induced growth inhibition, apoptosis, ADCC and CDC in Raji cells, while induction of autophagy could accelerate cytotoxic effects of chLym-1 on Raji cells. Furthermore, chLym-1-induced autophagy can mediate apoptosis through Caspase 9 activation, demonstrating the tumor-suppressing role of autophagy in antilymphoma effects of chLym-1. Moreover, chLym-1 can activate several upstream signaling pathways of autophagy including Akt/mTOR and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2. These results elucidate the critical role of autophagy in cytotoxicity of chLym-1 antibody and suggest a potential therapeutic strategy of NHL therapy by monoclonal antibody chLym-1 in combination with autophagy inducer.

  5. Aloe-emodin-mediated photodynamic therapy induces autophagy and apoptosis in human osteosarcoma cell line MG‑63 through the ROS/JNK signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Pinghua; Huang, Qiu; Ou, Yunsheng; Du, Xing; Li, Kaiting; Tao, Yong; Yin, Hang

    2016-06-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the effect and mechanisms of aloe‑emodin (AE)-mediated photodynamic therapy (AE-PDT) on the human osteosarcoma cell line MG-63. After treatment with AE-PDT, the human osteosarcoma cell line MG-63 was tested for levels of viability, autophagy, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis and changes in cell morphology with the Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK‑8), monodansylcadaverine (MDC) and Hoechst staining and transmission electron microscopy. The expression of proteins including LC-3, cleaved caspase-3, Beclin-1, Bcl-2, p-JNK, t-JNK and β-actin was examined with western blotting. AE-PDT significantly inhibited the viability of the MG-63 cells in an AE-concentration- and PDT energy density-dependent manner. Autophagy and apoptosis of MG-63 cells was substantially promoted in the AE-PDT group compared to the control group, the AE alone group and the light emitting diode (LED) alone group. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3-MA) (5 mM) and chloroquine (CQ) (15 µM) significantly promoted the apoptosis rate and improved the sensitivity of the MG-63 cells to AE-PDT. AE-PDT was found to induce the expression of ROS and p-JNK. ROS scavenger, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, 5 mM), was able to hinder the autophagy, apoptosis and phosphorylation of JNK, and JNK inhibitor (SP600125, 10 µM) significantly inhibited the autophagy and apoptosis, and attenuated the sensitivity of MG63 cells to AE-PDT. In conclusion, AE-PDT induced the autophagy and apoptosis of human osteosarcoma cell line MG-63 through the activation of the ROS-JNK signaling pathway. Autophagy may play a protective role during the early stage following treatment of AE-PDT.

  6. The pancreatitis-associated protein VMP1, a key regulator of inducible autophagy, promotes KrasG12D-mediated pancreatic cancer initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loncle, C; Molejon, M I; Lac, S; Tellechea, J I; Lomberk, G; Gramatica, L; Fernandez Zapico, M F; Dusetti, N; Urrutia, R; Iovanna, J L

    2016-01-01

    Both clinical and experimental evidence have firmly established that chronic pancreatitis, in particular in the context of Kras oncogenic mutations, predisposes to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). However, the repertoire of molecular mediators of pancreatitis involved in Kras-mediated initiation of pancreatic carcinogenesis remains to be fully defined. In this study we demonstrate a novel role for vacuole membrane protein 1 (VMP1), a pancreatitis-associated protein critical for inducible autophagy, in the regulation of Kras-induced PDAC initiation. Using a newly developed genetically engineered model, we demonstrate that VMP1 increases the ability of Kras to give rise to preneoplastic lesions, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (PanINs). This promoting effect of VMP1 on PanIN formation is due, at least in part, by an increase in cell proliferation combined with a decrease in apoptosis. Using chloroquine, an inhibitor of autophagy, we show that this drug antagonizes the effect of VMP1 on PanIN formation. Thus, we conclude that VMP1-mediated autophagy cooperate with Kras to promote PDAC initiation. These findings are of significant medical relevance, molecules targeting autophagy are currently being tested along chemotherapeutic agents to treat PDAC and other tumors in human trials. PMID:27415425

  7. Ursolic acid-mediated changes in glycolytic pathway promote cytotoxic autophagy and apoptosis in phenotypically different breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinska, Anna; Adamczyk-Grochala, Jagoda; Kwasniewicz, Ewa; Deregowska, Anna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2017-06-01

    Plant-derived pentacyclic triterpenotids with multiple biological activities are considered as promising candidates for cancer therapy and prevention. However, their mechanisms of action are not fully understood. In the present study, we have analyzed the effects of low dose treatment (5-20 µM) of ursolic acid (UA) and betulinic acid (BA) on breast cancer cells of different receptor status, namely MCF-7 (ER + , PR +/- , HER2 - ), MDA-MB-231 (ER - , PR - , HER2 - ) and SK-BR-3 (ER - , PR - , HER2 + ). UA-mediated response was more potent than BA-mediated response. Triterpenotids (5-10 µM) caused G0/G1 cell cycle arrest, an increase in p21 levels and SA-beta-galactosidase staining that was accompanied by oxidative stress and DNA damage. UA (20 µM) also diminished AKT signaling that affected glycolysis as judged by decreased levels of HK2, PKM2, ATP and lactate. UA-induced energy stress activated AMPK that resulted in cytotoxic autophagy and apoptosis. UA-mediated elevation in nitric oxide levels and ATM activation may also account for AMPK activation-mediated cytotoxic response. Moreover, UA-promoted apoptosis was associated with decreased pERK1/2 signals and the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential. Taken together, we have shown for the first time that UA at low micromolar range may promote its anticancer action by targeting glycolysis in phenotypically distinct breast cancer cells.

  8. RelA-Mediated BECN1 Expression Is Required for Reactive Oxygen Species-Induced Autophagy in Oral Cancer Cells Exposed to Low-Power Laser Irradiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Wen Shu

    Full Text Available Low-power laser irradiation (LPLI is a non-invasive and safe method for cancer treatment that alters a variety of physiological processes in the cells. Autophagy can play either a cytoprotective role or a detrimental role in cancer cells exposed to stress. The detailed mechanisms of autophagy and its role on cytotoxicity in oral cancer cells exposed to LPLI remain unclear. In this study, we showed that LPLI at 810 nm with energy density 60 J/cm2 increased the number of microtubule associated protein 1 light chain 3 (MAP1LC3 puncta and increased autophagic flux in oral cancer cells. Moreover, reactive oxygen species (ROS production was induced, which increased RelA transcriptional activity and beclin 1 (BECN1 expression in oral cancer cells irradiated with LPLI. Furthermore, ROS scavenger or knockdown of RelA diminished LPLI-induced BECN1 expression and MAP1LC3-II conversion. In addition, pharmacological and genetic ablation of autophagy significantly enhanced the effects of LPLI-induced apoptosis in oral cancer cells. These results suggest that autophagy may be a resistant mechanism for LPLI-induced apoptosis in oral cancer cells.

  9. E3 Ubiquitin Ligase CHIP and NBR1-Mediated Selective Autophagy Protect Additively against Proteotoxicity in Plant Stress Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jingxia; Chi, Yingjin; Fan, Baofang; Yu, Jing-Quan; Chen, Zhixiang

    2014-01-01

    Plant stress responses require both protective measures that reduce or restore stress-inflicted damage to cellular structures and mechanisms that efficiently remove damaged and toxic macromolecules, such as misfolded and damaged proteins. We have recently reported that NBR1, the first identified plant autophagy adaptor with a ubiquitin-association domain, plays a critical role in plant stress tolerance by targeting stress-induced, ubiquitinated protein aggregates for degradation by autophagy. Here we report a comprehensive genetic analysis of CHIP, a chaperone-associated E3 ubiquitin ligase from Arabidopsis thaliana implicated in mediating degradation of nonnative proteins by 26S proteasomes. We isolated two chip knockout mutants and discovered that they had the same phenotypes as the nbr1 mutants with compromised tolerance to heat, oxidative and salt stresses and increased accumulation of insoluble proteins under heat stress. To determine their functional interactions, we generated chip nbr1 double mutants and found them to be further compromised in stress tolerance and in clearance of stress-induced protein aggregates, indicating additive roles of CHIP and NBR1. Furthermore, stress-induced protein aggregates were still ubiquitinated in the chip mutants. Through proteomic profiling, we systemically identified heat-induced protein aggregates in the chip and nbr1 single and double mutants. These experiments revealed that highly aggregate-prone proteins such as Rubisco activase and catalases preferentially accumulated in the nbr1 mutant while a number of light-harvesting complex proteins accumulated at high levels in the chip mutant after a relatively short period of heat stress. With extended heat stress, aggregates for a large number of intracellular proteins accumulated in both chip and nbr1 mutants and, to a greater extent, in the chip nbr1 double mutant. Based on these results, we propose that CHIP and NBR1 mediate two distinct but complementary anti

  10. E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP and NBR1-mediated selective autophagy protect additively against proteotoxicity in plant stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Yan; Qi, Jingxia; Chi, Yingjin; Fan, Baofang; Yu, Jing-Quan; Chen, Zhixiang

    2014-01-01

    Plant stress responses require both protective measures that reduce or restore stress-inflicted damage to cellular structures and mechanisms that efficiently remove damaged and toxic macromolecules, such as misfolded and damaged proteins. We have recently reported that NBR1, the first identified plant autophagy adaptor with a ubiquitin-association domain, plays a critical role in plant stress tolerance by targeting stress-induced, ubiquitinated protein aggregates for degradation by autophagy. Here we report a comprehensive genetic analysis of CHIP, a chaperone-associated E3 ubiquitin ligase from Arabidopsis thaliana implicated in mediating degradation of nonnative proteins by 26S proteasomes. We isolated two chip knockout mutants and discovered that they had the same phenotypes as the nbr1 mutants with compromised tolerance to heat, oxidative and salt stresses and increased accumulation of insoluble proteins under heat stress. To determine their functional interactions, we generated chip nbr1 double mutants and found them to be further compromised in stress tolerance and in clearance of stress-induced protein aggregates, indicating additive roles of CHIP and NBR1. Furthermore, stress-induced protein aggregates were still ubiquitinated in the chip mutants. Through proteomic profiling, we systemically identified heat-induced protein aggregates in the chip and nbr1 single and double mutants. These experiments revealed that highly aggregate-prone proteins such as Rubisco activase and catalases preferentially accumulated in the nbr1 mutant while a number of light-harvesting complex proteins accumulated at high levels in the chip mutant after a relatively short period of heat stress. With extended heat stress, aggregates for a large number of intracellular proteins accumulated in both chip and nbr1 mutants and, to a greater extent, in the chip nbr1 double mutant. Based on these results, we propose that CHIP and NBR1 mediate two distinct but complementary anti

  11. Swimming attenuates d-galactose-induced brain aging via suppressing miR-34a-mediated autophagy impairment and abnormal mitochondrial dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Xianjuan; Li, Jie; Liu, Xingran; Chang, Jingru; Zhao, Qingxia; Jia, Shaohui; Fan, Jingjing; Chen, Ning

    2017-06-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) have been reported to be involved in many neurodegenerative diseases. To explore the regulatory role of miR-34a in aging-related diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) during exercise intervention, we constructed a rat model with d-galactose (d-gal)-induced oxidative stress and cognitive impairment coupled with dysfunctional autophagy and abnormal mitochondrial dynamics, determined the mitigation of cognitive impairment of d-gal-induced aging rats during swimming intervention, and evaluated miR-34a-mediated functional status of autophagy and abnormal mitochondrial dynamics. Meanwhile, whether the upregulation of miR-34a can lead to dysfunctional autophagy and abnormal mitochondrial dynamics was confirmed in human SH-SY5Y cells with silenced miR-34a by the transfection of a miR-34a inhibitor. Results indicated that swimming intervention could significantly attenuate cognitive impairment, prevent the upregulation of miR-34a, mitigate the dysfunctional autophagy, and inhibit the increase of dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1) in d-gal-induced aging model rats. In contrast, the miR-34a inhibitor in cell model not only attenuated D-gal-induced the impairment of autophagy but also decreased the expression of DRP1 and mitofusin 2 (MFN2). Therefore, swimming training can delay brain aging of d-gal-induced aging rats through attenuating the impairment of miR-34a-mediated autophagy and abnormal mitochondrial dynamics, and miR-34a could be the novel therapeutic target for aging-related diseases such as AD. NEW & NOTEWORTHY In the present study, we have found that the upregulation of miR-34a is the hallmark of aging or aging-related diseases, which can result in dysfunctional autophagy and abnormal mitochondrial dynamics. In contrast, swimming intervention can delay the aging process by rescuing the impaired functional status of autophagy and abnormal mitochondrial dynamics via the suppression of miR-34a. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  12. TFE3 Alleviates Hepatic Steatosis through Autophagy-Induced Lipophagy and PGC1α-Mediated Fatty Acid β-Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Xiong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy flux deficiency is closely related to the development of hepatic steatosis. Transcription factor E3 (TFE3 is reported to be a crucial gene that regulates autophagy flux and lysosome function. Therefore, we investigated the role of TFE3 in a cell model of hepatic steatosis. We constructed L02 hepatocyte lines that stably over-expressed or knocked down the expression of TFE3. Subsequently, the effects of TFE3 on hepatocellular lipid metabolism were determined by autophagy flux assay, lipid oil red O (ORO staining, immunofluorescence staining, and mitochondrial β-oxidation assessment. Finally, we analyzed whether peroxisome proliferative activated receptor gamma coactivator 1α (PGC1α was the potential target gene of TFE3 in the regulation of hepatic steatosis using a chromatin immunoprecipitation (CHIP assay and a luciferase reporter system. We found that overexpression of TFE3 markedly alleviated hepatocellular steatosis. On the contrary, downregulation of TFE3 resulted in an aggravated steatosis. The mechanistic studies revealed that the TFE3-manipulated regulatory effects on hepatocellular steatosis are dependent on autophagy-induced lipophagy and PGC1α-mediated fatty acid β-oxidation because blocking these pathways with an Atg5 small interfering RNA (siRNA or PGC1α siRNA dramatically blunted the TFE3-mediated regulation of steatosis. In conclusion, TFE3 gene provides a novel insight into the treatment of hepatic steatosis and other metabolic disease.

  13. [Autophagy in the kidney].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallet, Nicolas

    2017-03-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved, physiological, catabolic process, involving the lysosomal degradation of cytosolic components, including macromolecules (such as proteins and lipids) and cytosolic organelles. Autophagy is believed to be essential for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis, for a number of fundamental biological activities, and an important component of the complex response of cells to multiple forms of stress. Autophagy is involved in the pathogenesis of a number of clinically important disorders but, until recently, little was known about its connection to kidney diseases. However, there is now growing evidence that autophagy is specifically linked to the pathogenesis of important renal diseases such as acute kidney injury, diabetic nephropathy and polycystic kidney disease. However, an understanding of the precise role of autophagy in the course of kidney diseases is still in its infancy. The review points out areas of particular interest for future research, and also discusses the importance of such information on whether the pharmacologic agents that modulate autophagy are potentially usable as novel forms of treatment for various kidney diseases. © 2017 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  14. miR-409-3p sensitizes colon cancer cells to oxaliplatin by inhibiting Beclin-1-mediated autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shifan; Shi, Huijuan; Ba, Mingchen; Lin, Shengqv; Tang, Hongsheng; Zeng, Xiaoqi; Zhang, Xiangliang

    2016-04-01

    The chemoresistance of colon cancer cells limits the efficacy of chemotherapy. miR-409-3p has been shown to be downregulated in various types of cancer. In the present study, we examined the role of miR-409-3p in colon cancer as well as the effects of miR‑409-3p on the sensitivity of colon cancer cells to oxaliplatin. The expression of miR-409 was significantly downregulated in the human colon cancer cell lines compared with the normal colon epithelial cells. Importantly, the miR-409-3p expression levels were lower in human colon cancer patient samples than in normal colon tissues. Moreover, we observed a negative correlation between the miR‑409-3p levels and resistance to oxaliplatin: the oxaliplatin-resistant colon cancer cells exhibited significantly downregulated miR‑409-3p levels, but higher autophagic activity than the oxaliplatin-sensitive cells. Using bioinformatics analysis, we predicted that miR‑409-3p miRNA binds to the key autophagy gene encoding Beclin-1. Our findings indicated that the overexpression of miR‑409-3p inhibited Beclin-1 expression and autophagic activity by binding to the 3'-untranslated region of Beclin-1 mRNA. In addition, the overexpression of miR‑409-3p enhanced the chemosensitivity of the oxaliplatin-sensitive and oxaliplatin-resistant colon cancer cells. The restoration of Beclin-1 abrogated these effects of miR‑409-3p. In a xenograft model using nude mice, we examined the effects of miR‑409-3p on tumor growth during chemotherapy. miR‑409-3p overexpression sensitized the tumor to chemotherapy, while inhibiting chemotherapy-induced autophagy in a manner dependent on Beclin-1. The findings of our study suggest that miR-409-3p is capable of enhancing the chemosensitivity of colon cancer cells by inhibiting Beclin-1-mediated autophagy.

  15. Induction of autophagy by Imatinib sequesters Bcr-Abl in autophagosomes and down-regulates Bcr-Abl protein.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Elzinga, Baukje M

    2013-06-01

    Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) is a disease of hematopoietic stem cells which harbor the chimeric gene Bcr-Abl. Expression levels of this constitutively active tyrosine kinase are critical for response to tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment and also disease progression, yet the regulation of protein stability is poorly understood. We have previously demonstrated that imatinib can induce autophagy in Bcr-Abl expressing cells. Autophagy has been associated with the clearance of large macromolecular signaling complexes and abnormal proteins, however, the contribution of autophagy to the turnover of Bcr-Abl protein in imatinib treated cells is unknown. In this study, we show that following imatinib treatment, Bcr-Abl is sequestered into vesicular structures that co-localize with the autophagy marker LC3 or GABARAP. This association is inhibited by siRNA mediated knockdown of autophagy regulators (Beclin 1\\/ATG7). Pharmacological inhibition of autophagy also reduced Bcr-Abl\\/LC3 co-localization in both K562 and CML patient cells. Bcr-Abl protein expression was reduced with imatinib treatment. Inhibition of both autophagy and proteasome activity in imatinib treated cells was required to restore Bcr-Abl protein levels to those of untreated cells. This ability to down-regulate Bcr-Abl protein levels through the induction of autophagy may be an additional and important feature of the activity of imatinib.

  16. LAMP-2 deficiency leads to hippocampal dysfunction but normal clearance of neuronal substrates of chaperone-mediated autophagy in a mouse model for Danon disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rothaug, Michelle; Stroobants, Stijn; Schweizer, Michaela; Peters, Judith; Zunke, Friederike; Allerding, Mirka; D?Hooge, Rudi; Saftig, Paul; Blanz, Judith

    2015-01-01

    The Lysosomal Associated Membrane Protein type-2 (LAMP-2) is an abundant lysosomal membrane protein with an important role in immunity, macroautophagy (MA) and chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA). Mutations within the Lamp2 gene cause Danon disease, an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder characterized by (cardio)myopathy and intellectual dysfunction. The pathological hallmark of this disease is an accumulation of glycogen and autophagic vacuoles in cardiac and skeletal muscle that, along with ...

  17. Autophagy and ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis may not be involved in the degradation of spermatozoon mitochondria in mouse and porcine early embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yong-Xun; Zheng, Zhong; Yu, Xian-Feng; Zhang, Jia-Bao; Namgoong, Suk; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2016-02-01

    The mitochondrial genome is maternally inherited in animals, despite the fact that paternal mitochondria enter oocytes during fertilization. Autophagy and ubiquitin-mediated degradation are responsible for the elimination of paternal mitochondria in Caenorhabditis elegans; however, the involvement of these two processes in the degradation of paternal mitochondria in mammals is not well understood. We investigated the localization patterns of light chain 3 (LC3) and ubiquitin in mouse and porcine embryos during preimplantation development. We found that LC3 and ubiquitin localized to the spermatozoon midpiece at 3 h post-fertilization, and that both proteins were colocalized with paternal mitochondria and removed upon fertilization during the 4-cell stage in mouse and the zygote stage in porcine embryos. Sporadic paternal mitochondria were present beyond the morula stage in the mouse, and paternal mitochondria were restricted to one blastomere of 4-cell embryos. An autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine (3-MA), did not affect the distribution of paternal mitochondria compared with the positive control, while an autophagy inducer, rapamycin, accelerated the removal of paternal mitochondria compared with the control. After the intracytoplasmic injection of intact spermatozoon into mouse oocytes, LC3 and ubiquitin localized to the spermatozoon midpiece, but remnants of undegraded paternal mitochondria were retained until the blastocyst stage. Our results show that paternal mitochondria colocalize with autophagy receptors and ubiquitin and are removed after in vitro fertilization, but some remnants of sperm mitochondrial sheath may persist up to morula stage after intracytoplasmic spermatozoon injection (ICSI).

  18. Role of TFEB Mediated Autophagy, Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Cell Death in Endotoxin Induced Myocardial Toxicity of Young and Aged Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Elderly patients are susceptible to sepsis. LPS induced myocardial injury is a widely used animal model to assess sepsis induced cardiac dysfunction. The age dependent mechanisms behind sepsis susceptibility were not studied. We analyzed age associated changes to cardiac function, cell death, inflammation, oxidative stress, and autophagy in LPS induced myocardial injury. Both young and aged C57BL/6 mice were used for LPS administration. The results demonstrated that LPS induced more cardiac injury (creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, troponin I, and cardiac myosin-light chains 1, cardiac dysfunction (left ventricular inner dimension, LVID, and ejection fraction (EF, cell death, inflammation, and oxidative stress in aged mice compared to young mice. However, a significant age dependent decline in autophagy was observed. Translocation of Transcription Factor EB (TFEB to nucleus and formation of LC3-II were significantly reduced in LPS administered aged mice compared to young ones. In addition to that, downstream effector of TFEB, LAMP-1, was induced in response to LPS challenge in young mice. The present study newly demonstrates that TFEB mediated autophagy is crucial for protection against LPS induced myocardial injury particularly in aging senescent heart. Targeting this autophagy-oxidative stress-inflammation-cell death axis may provide a novel therapeutic strategy for cardioprotection in the elderly.

  19. Epigallocatechin-gallate (EGCG) regulates autophagy in human retinal pigment epithelial cells: A potential role for reducing UVB light-induced retinal damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Chao-Peng; Yao, Jin; Tao, Zhi-Fu; Li, Xiu-Miao; Jiang, Qin; Yan, Biao

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •UVB irradiation induces RPE autophagy. •EGCG treatment represses UVB-mediated autophagy. •EGCG regulates UVB-mediated autophagy through mTOR signaling pathway. •EGCG sensitizes RPE cells to UVB-induced damage in an autophagy-dependent manner. -- Abstract: Autophagy is an intracellular catabolic process involved in protein and organelle degradation via the lysosomal pathway that has been linked in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). UVB irradiation-mediated degeneration of the macular retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is an important hallmark of AMD, which is along with the change in RPE autophagy. Thus, pharmacological manipulation of RPE autophagy may offer an alternative therapeutic target in AMD. Here, we found that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a polyphenolic compound from green tea, plays a regulatory role in UVB irradiation-induced autophagy in RPE cells. UVB irradiation results in a marked increase in the amount of LC3-II protein in a dose-dependent manner. EGCG administration leads to a significant reduction in the formation of LC3-II and autophagosomes. mTOR signaling activation is required for EGCG-induced LC3-II formation, as evidenced by the fact that EGCG-induced LC3-II formation is significantly impaired by rapamycin administration. Moreover, EGCG significantly alleviates the toxic effects of UVB irradiation on RPE cells in an autophagy-dependent manner. Collectively, our study reveals a novel role of EGCG in RPE autophagy. EGCG may be exploited as a potential therapeutic reagent for the treatment of pathological conditions associated with abnormal autophagy

  20. Epigallocatechin-gallate (EGCG) regulates autophagy in human retinal pigment epithelial cells: A potential role for reducing UVB light-induced retinal damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chao-Peng; Yao, Jin; Tao, Zhi-Fu; Li, Xiu-Miao; Jiang, Qin, E-mail: jqin710@vip.sina.com; Yan, Biao, E-mail: yanbiao1982@hotmail.com

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •UVB irradiation induces RPE autophagy. •EGCG treatment represses UVB-mediated autophagy. •EGCG regulates UVB-mediated autophagy through mTOR signaling pathway. •EGCG sensitizes RPE cells to UVB-induced damage in an autophagy-dependent manner. -- Abstract: Autophagy is an intracellular catabolic process involved in protein and organelle degradation via the lysosomal pathway that has been linked in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). UVB irradiation-mediated degeneration of the macular retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is an important hallmark of AMD, which is along with the change in RPE autophagy. Thus, pharmacological manipulation of RPE autophagy may offer an alternative therapeutic target in AMD. Here, we found that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a polyphenolic compound from green tea, plays a regulatory role in UVB irradiation-induced autophagy in RPE cells. UVB irradiation results in a marked increase in the amount of LC3-II protein in a dose-dependent manner. EGCG administration leads to a significant reduction in the formation of LC3-II and autophagosomes. mTOR signaling activation is required for EGCG-induced LC3-II formation, as evidenced by the fact that EGCG-induced LC3-II formation is significantly impaired by rapamycin administration. Moreover, EGCG significantly alleviates the toxic effects of UVB irradiation on RPE cells in an autophagy-dependent manner. Collectively, our study reveals a novel role of EGCG in RPE autophagy. EGCG may be exploited as a potential therapeutic reagent for the treatment of pathological conditions associated with abnormal autophagy.

  1. E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP and NBR1-mediated selective autophagy protect additively against proteotoxicity in plant stress responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant stress responses require both protective measures that reduce or restore stress-inflicted damage to cellular structures and mechanisms that efficiently remove damaged and toxic macromolecules, such as misfolded and damaged proteins. We have recently reported that NBR1, the first identified plant autophagy adaptor with a ubiquitin-association domain, plays a critical role in plant stress tolerance by targeting stress-induced, ubiquitinated protein aggregates for degradation by autophagy. Here we report a comprehensive genetic analysis of CHIP, a chaperone-associated E3 ubiquitin ligase from Arabidopsis thaliana implicated in mediating degradation of nonnative proteins by 26S proteasomes. We isolated two chip knockout mutants and discovered that they had the same phenotypes as the nbr1 mutants with compromised tolerance to heat, oxidative and salt stresses and increased accumulation of insoluble proteins under heat stress. To determine their functional interactions, we generated chip nbr1 double mutants and found them to be further compromised in stress tolerance and in clearance of stress-induced protein aggregates, indicating additive roles of CHIP and NBR1. Furthermore, stress-induced protein aggregates were still ubiquitinated in the chip mutants. Through proteomic profiling, we systemically identified heat-induced protein aggregates in the chip and nbr1 single and double mutants. These experiments revealed that highly aggregate-prone proteins such as Rubisco activase and catalases preferentially accumulated in the nbr1 mutant while a number of light-harvesting complex proteins accumulated at high levels in the chip mutant after a relatively short period of heat stress. With extended heat stress, aggregates for a large number of intracellular proteins accumulated in both chip and nbr1 mutants and, to a greater extent, in the chip nbr1 double mutant. Based on these results, we propose that CHIP and NBR1 mediate two distinct but

  2. Regulation of autophagy by polyphenols: Paving the road for treatment of neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Sureda, Antoni; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Shirooie, Samira; Silva, Ana Sanches; Devi, Kasi Pandima; Ahmed, Touqeer; Ishaq, Nafeesa; Hashim, Rabia; Sobarzo-Sánchez, Eduardo; Daglia, Maria; Braidy, Nady; Volpicella, Mariateresa; Vacca, Rosa Anna; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2017-12-06

    In the present paper, we will discuss on the importance of autophagy in the central nervous system, and outline the relation between autophagic pathways and the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. The potential therapeutic benefits of naturally occurring phytochemicals as pharmacological modulators of autophagy will also be addressed. Our findings provide renewed insight on the molecular modes of protection by polyphenols, which is likely to be at least in part mediated not only by their potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, but also through modulation of autophagic processes to remove the aberrant protein aggregates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Neuronal death after perinatal cerebral hypoxia-ischemia: Focus on autophagy-mediated cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descloux, C; Ginet, V; Clarke, P G H; Puyal, J; Truttmann, A C

    2015-10-01

    Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy is a critical cerebral event occurring around birth with high mortality and neurological morbidity associated with long-term invalidating sequelae. In view of the great clinical importance of this condition and the lack of very efficacious neuroprotective strategies, it is urgent to better understand the different cell death mechanisms involved with the ultimate aim of developing new therapeutic approaches. The morphological features of three different cell death types can be observed in models of perinatal cerebral hypoxia-ischemia: necrotic, apoptotic and autophagic cell death. They may be combined in the same dying neuron. In the present review, we discuss the different cell death mechanisms involved in neonatal cerebral hypoxia-ischemia with a special focus on how autophagy may be involved in neuronal death, based: (1) on experimental models of perinatal hypoxia-ischemia and stroke, and (2) on the brains of human neonates who suffered from neonatal hypoxia-ischemia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Autophagy involved in lipopolysaccharide-induced foam cell formation is mediated by adipose differentiation-related protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xuyang; Yuan, Yuan; Wang, Chao; Feng, Jun; Yuan, Zuyi; Zhang, Xiumin; Sui, Wen; Hu, Peizhen; Zheng, Pengfei; Ye, Jing

    2014-01-09

    Autophagy is an essential process for breaking down macromolecules and aged/damaged cellular organelles to maintain cellular energy balance and cellular nutritional status. The idea that autophagy regulates lipid metabolism is an emerging concept with important implications for atherosclerosis. However, the potential role of autophagy and its relationship with lipid metabolism in foam cell formation remains unclear. In this study, we found that autophagy was involved in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced the formation of foam cells and was at least partially dependent on adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP). Foam cell formation was evaluated by Oil red O staining. Autophagic activity was determined by immunofluorescence and Western blotting. ADRP gene expression of ADRP was examined by real-time PCR (RT-PCR). The protein expression of ADRP and LC3 was measured using Western blotting analysis. Intracellular cholesterol and triglyceride levels in foam cells were quantitatively measured by enzymatic colorimetric assays. LPS promoted foam cell formation by inducing lipid accumulation in macrophages. The activation of autophagy with rapamycin (Rap) decreased intracellular cholesterol and triglyceride levels, whereas the inhibition of autophagy with 3-methyladenine (3MA) enhanced the accumulation of lipid droplets. Overexpression of ADRP alone increased the formation of foam cells and consequently autophagic activity. In contrast, the inhibitory effects of ADRP activity with siRNA suppressed the activation of autophagy. Taken together, we propose a novel role for ADRP in the regulation of macrophage autophagy during LPS stimulation. We defined a new molecular pathway in which LPS-induced foam cell formation is regulated through autophagy. These findings facilitate the understanding of the role of autophagy in the development of atherosclerosis.

  5. Melatonin Reverses Fas, E2F-1 and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Mediated Apoptosis and Dysregulation of Autophagy Induced by the Herbicide Atrazine in Murine Splenocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Sharma

    Full Text Available Exposure to the herbicide Atrazine (ATR can cause immunotoxicity, apart from other adverse consequences for animal and human health. We aimed at elucidating the apoptotic mechanisms involved in immunotoxicity of ATR and their attenuation by Melatonin (MEL. Young Swiss mice were divided into control, ATR and MEL+ATR groups based on daily (x14 intraperitoneal administration of the vehicle (normal saline, ATR (100 mg/kg body weight and MEL (20 mg/kg body weight with ATR. Isolated splenocytes were processed for detection of apoptosis by Annexin V-FITC and TUNEL assays, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress by immunostaining. Key proteins involved in apoptosis, ER stress and autophagy were quantified by immunoblotting. ATR treatment resulted in Fas-mediated activation of caspases 8 and 3 and inactivation of PARP1 which were inhibited significantly by co-treatment with MEL. MEL also attenuated the ATR-induced, p53 independent mitochondrial apoptosis through upregulation of E2F-1 and PUMA and suppression of their downstream target Bax. An excessive ER stress triggered by ATR through overexpression of ATF-6α, spliced XBP-1, CREB-2 and GADD153 signals was reversed by MEL. MEL also reversed the ATR-induced impairment of autophagy which was indicated by a decline in BECN-1, along with significant enhancement in LC3B-II and p62 expressions. Induction of mitochondrial apoptosis, ER stress and autophagy dysregulation provide a new insight into the mechanism of ATR immunotoxicity. The cytoprotective role of MEL, on the other hand, was defined by attenuation of ER stress, Fas-mediated and p53 independent mitochondria-mediated apoptosis as well as autophagy signals.

  6. Curcumin sensitizes prostate cancer cells to radiation partly via epigenetic activation of miR-143 and miR-143 mediated autophagy inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianbo; Li, Min; Wang, Yuewei; Luo, Jianchao

    2017-08-01

    Curcumin has been reported as a radiosensitizer in prostate cancer. But the underlying mechanism is not well understood. In this study, we firstly assessed how curcumin affects the expression of miR-143/miR-145 cluster. Then, we investigated whether miR-143 is involved in regulation of radiosensitivity and its association with autophagy in prostate cancer cells. Our data showed that PC3, DU145 and LNCaP cells treated with curcumin had significantly restored miR-143 and miR-145 expression. Curcumin showed similar effect as 5-AZA-dC on reducing methylation of CpG dinucleotides in miR-143 promoter. In addition, curcumin treatment reduced the expression of DNMT1 and DNMT3B, which contribute to promoter hypermethylation of the miR-143/miR-145 cluster. Therefore, we infer that curcumin can restore miR-143 and miR-145 expression via hypomethylation. MiR-143 overexpression and curcumin pretreatment enhanced radiation induced cancer cell growth inhibition and apoptosis. MiR-143 and curcumin remarkably reduced radiation-induced autophagy in PC3 and DU145 cells. MiR-143 overexpression alone also reduced the basal level of autophagy in DU145 cells. Mechanistically, miR-143 can suppress autophagy in prostate cancer cells at least via downregulating ATG2B. Based on these findings, we infer that curcumin sensitizes prostate cancer cells to radiation partly via epigenetic activation of miR-143 and miR-143 mediated autophagy inhibition.

  7. Autophagy mediates cell cycle response by regulating nucleocytoplasmic transport of PAX6 in limbal stem cells under ultraviolet-A stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Laggner

    Full Text Available Limbal stem cells (LSC account for homeostasis and regeneration of corneal epithelium. Solar ultraviolet A (UVA is the major source causing oxidative damage in the ocular surface. Autophagy, a lysosomal degradation mechanism, is essential for physiologic function and stress defense of stem cells. PAX6, a master transcription factor governing corneal homeostasis by regulating cell cycle and cell fate of LSC, responds to oxidative stress by nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. Impaired autophagy and deregulated PAX6 have been reported in oxidative stress-related ocular surface disorders. We hypothesize a functional role for autophagy and PAX6 in LSC's stress response to UVA. Therefore, human LSC colonies were irradiated with a sub-lethal dose of UVA and autophagic activity and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS were measured by CYTO-ID assay and CM-H2DCFDA live staining, respectively. Following UVA irradiation, the percentage of autophagic cells significantly increased in LSC colonies while intracellular ROS levels remained unaffected. siRNA-mediated knockdown (KD of ATG7 abolished UVA-induced autophagy and led to an excessive accumulation of ROS. Upon UVA exposure, LSCs displayed nuclear-to-cytoplasmic translocation of PAX6, while ATG7KD or antioxidant pretreatment largely attenuated the intracellular trafficking event. Immunofluorescence showing downregulation of proliferative marker PCNA and induction of cell cycle regulator p21 indicates cell cycle arrest in UVA-irradiated LSC. Abolishing autophagy, adenoviral-assisted restoration of nuclear PAX6 or antioxidant pretreatment abrogated the UVA-induced cell cycle arrest. Adenoviral expression of an ectopic PAX gene, PAX7, did not affect UVA cell cycle response. Furthermore, knocking down PAX6 attenuated the cell cycle progression of irradiated ATG7KD LSC by de-repressing p21 expression. Collectively, our data suggest a crosstalk between autophagy and PAX6 in regulating cell cycle response of

  8. Interleukin-6: a bone marrow stromal cell paracrine signal that induces neuroendocrine differentiation and modulates autophagy in bone metastatic PCa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delk, Nikki A; Farach-Carson, Mary C

    2012-04-01

    Autophagy reallocates nutrients and clears normal cells of damaged proteins and organelles. In the context of metastatic disease, invading cancer cells hijack autophagic processes to survive and adapt in the host microenvironment. We sought to understand how autophagy is regulated in the metastatic niche for prostate cancer (PCa) cells where bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) paracrine signaling induces PCa neuroendocrine differentiation (NED). In PCa, this transdifferentiation of metastatic PCa cells to neuronal-like cells correlates with advanced disease. Because autophagy provides a survival advantage for cancer cells and promotes cell differentiation, we hypothesized that autophagy mediates PCa NED in the bone. Thus, we determined the ability of paracrine factors in conditioned media (CM) from two separate BMSC subtypes, HS5 and HS27a, to induce autophagy in C4-2 and C4-2B bone metastatic PCa cells by characterizing the autophagy marker, LC3. Unlike HS27a CM, HS5 CM induced LC3 accumulation in PCa cells, suggesting autophagy was induced and indicating that HS5 and HS27a secrete a different milieu of paracrine factors that influence PCa autophagy. We identified interleukin-6 (IL-6), a cytokine more highly expressed in HS5 cells than in HS27a cells, as a paracrine factor that regulates PCa autophagy. Pharmacological inhibition of STAT3 activity did not attenuate LC3 accumulation, implying that IL-6 regulates NED and autophagy through different pathways. Finally, chloroquine inhibition of autophagic flux blocked PCa NED; hence autophagic flux maintains NED. Our studies imply that autophagy is cytoprotective for PCa cells in the bone, thus targeting autophagy is a potential therapeutic strategy.

  9. Targeting Autophagy in the Tumor Microenvironment: New Challenges and Opportunities for Regulating Tumor Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassam Janji

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells evolve in the tumor microenvironment, which is now well established as an integral part of the tumor and a determinant player in cancer cell adaptation and resistance to anti-cancer therapies. Despite the remarkable and fairly rapid progress over the past two decades regarding our understanding of the role of the tumor microenvironment in cancer development, its precise contribution to cancer resistance is still fragmented. This is mainly related to the complexity of the “tumor ecosystem” and the diversity of the stromal cell types that constitute the tumor microenvironment. Emerging data indicate that several factors, such as hypoxic stress, activate a plethora of resistance mechanisms, including autophagy, in tumor cells. Hypoxia-induced autophagy in the tumor microenvironment also activates several tumor escape mechanisms, which effectively counteract anti-tumor immune responses mediated by natural killer and cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Therefore, strategies aiming at targeting autophagy in cancer cells in combination with other therapeutic strategies have inspired significant interest to overcome immunological tolerance and promote tumor regression. However, a number of obstacles still hamper the application of autophagy inhibitors in clinics. First, the lack of selectivity of the current pharmacological inhibitors of autophagy makes difficult to draw a clear statement about its effective contribution in cancer. Second, autophagy has been also described as an important mechanism in tumor cells involved in presentation of antigens to T cells. Third, there is a circumstantial evidence that autophagy activation in some innate immune cells may support the maturation of these cells, and it is required for their anti-tumor activity. In this review, we will address these aspects and discuss our current knowledge on the benefits and the drawbacks of targeting autophagy in the context of anti-tumor immunity. We believe that it is

  10. Autophagy Negatively Regulates Transmissible Gastroenteritis Virus Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Longjun; Yu, Haidong; Gu, Weihong; Luo, Xiaolei; Li, Ren; Zhang, Jian; Xu, Yunfei; Yang, Lijun; Shen, Nan; Feng, Li; Wang, Yue

    2016-03-31

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily ancient pathway that has been shown to be important in the innate immune defense against several viruses. However, little is known about the regulatory role of autophagy in transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) replication. In this study, we found that TGEV infection increased the number of autophagosome-like double- and single-membrane vesicles in the cytoplasm of host cells, a phenomenon that is known to be related to autophagy. In addition, virus replication was required for the increased amount of the autophagosome marker protein LC3-II. Autophagic flux occurred in TGEV-infected cells, suggesting that TGEV infection triggered a complete autophagic response. When autophagy was pharmacologically inhibited by wortmannin or LY294002, TGEV replication increased. The increase in virus yield via autophagy inhibition was further confirmed by the use of siRNA duplexes, through which three proteins required for autophagy were depleted. Furthermore, TGEV replication was inhibited when autophagy was activated by rapamycin. The antiviral response of autophagy was confirmed by using siRNA to reduce the expression of gene p300, which otherwise inhibits autophagy. Together, the results indicate that TGEV infection activates autophagy and that autophagy then inhibits further TGEV replication.

  11. Short-chain fatty acids induced autophagy serves as an adaptive strategy for retarding mitochondria-mediated apoptotic cell death

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Y; Chen, Y; Jiang, H; Nie, D

    2010-01-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are the major by-products of bacterial fermentation of undigested dietary fibers in the large intestine. SCFAs, mostly propionate and butyrate, inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in colon cancer cells, but clinical trials had mixed results regarding the anti-tumor activities of SCFAs. Herein we demonstrate that propionate and butyrate induced autophagy in human colon cancer cells to dampen apoptosis whereas inhibition of autophagy potentiated SCFA induc...

  12. shRNA-mediated AMBRA1 knockdown reduces the cisplatin-induced autophagy and sensitizes ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Lijuan; Yu, Lili; Wei, Wei; Lin, Xueyan; Hou, Xiaoman; Tian, Yongjie

    2016-02-01

    Recent research has revealed a role for Ambra1, an autophagy-related gene-related (ATG) protein, in the autophagic pro-survival response, and Ambra1 has been shown to regulate Beclin1 and Beclin1-dependent autophagy in embryonic stem cells and cancer cells. However, whether Ambra1 plays an important role in the autophagy pathway in ovarian cancer cells is unknown. In this study, we hypothesized that Ambra1 is an important regulator of autophagy and apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells. We firstly confirmed autophagic activity in ovarian cancer OVCAR-3 cells which were treated with cisplatin by assessing endogenous microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) localization and the presence of autophagosomes and LC3 protein levels in OVCAR-3 cells. Cell apoptosis and viability were measured by annexin-V and PI staining and MTT assays. We then knocked down Ambra1 expression with transfection with the plasmid expressing the small hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting AMBRA1, then re-evaluated autophagy in the OVCAR-3 cells subject to cisplatin treatment, and re-determined the sensitivity of OVCAR-3 cells to cisplatin. Results demonstrated that cisplatin treatment induced autophagy in OVCAR-3 cells in association with Ambra1 upregulation in the ovarian cancer cells. When Ambra1 expression was reduced by shRNA, the ovarian cancer cells were more sensitive to cisplatin. In conclusion, Ambra1 is a crucial regulator of autophagy and apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells subject to cisplatin to maintain the balance between autophagy and apoptosis. And the Ambra1-targeting inhibition might be an effective method to sensitize ovarian cancer cells to chemotherapy.

  13. Autophagy Limits Endotoxemic Acute Kidney Injury and Alters Renal Tubular Epithelial Cell Cytokine Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy S Leventhal

    Full Text Available Sepsis related acute kidney injury (AKI is a common in-hospital complication with a dismal prognosis. Our incomplete understanding of disease pathogenesis has prevented the identification of hypothesis-driven preventive or therapeutic interventions. Increasing evidence in ischemia-reperfusion and nephrotoxic mouse models of AKI support the theory that autophagy protects renal tubular epithelial cells (RTEC from injury. However, the role of RTEC autophagy in septic AKI remains unclear. We observed that lipopolysaccharide (LPS, a mediator of gram-negative bacterial sepsis, induces RTEC autophagy in vivo and in vitro through TLR4-initiated signaling. We modeled septic AKI through intraperitoneal LPS injection in mice in which autophagy-related protein 7 was specifically knocked out in the renal proximal tubules (ATG7KO. Compared to control littermates, ATG7KO mice developed more severe renal dysfunction (24hr BUN 100.1mg/dl +/- 14.8 vs 54.6mg/dl +/- 11.3 and parenchymal injury. After injection with LPS, analysis of kidney lysates identified higher IL-6 expression and increased STAT3 activation in kidney lysates from ATG7KO mice compared to controls. In vitro experiments confirmed an altered response to LPS in RTEC with genetic or pharmacological impairment of autophagy. In conclusion, RTEC autophagy protects against endotoxin induced injury and regulates downstream effects of RTEC TLR4 signaling.

  14. [Molecular mechanisms of autophagy in regulating renal aging and interventional effects of Chinese herbal medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Yue; Sun, Wei; Chen, Di-Ping; Wan, Yi-Gang; Wu, Wei; Yao, Jian

    2016-11-01

    Aging is the gradual functional recession of the living tissues or organs caused by a variety of genetic and environmental factors together. Autophagy is a process of degrading cytoplasmic components mediated by lysosomes in eukaryotic cells. Kidney is a typical target organ of aging. Autophagy regulates renal aging. Decrease in autophagy can accelerate renal aging,whereas,increase in autophagy can delay renal aging. During the process of regulating renal aging,the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and its related signaling pathways including the adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK)/mTOR,the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/ serine-threonine kinase(Akt)/mTOR,the AMPK/silent information regulation 1 (Sirt1) and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) play the important roles in renal aging. Regulating the key signaling molecules in these pathways in vivo can control renal aging. Some Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) and their extracts with the effects of nourishing kidney or activating stasis, such as Cordyceps sinensis, curcumin and resveratrol have the beneficial effects on renal aging and/or autophagy. Therefore,revealing the pharmacological effects of CHM in anti-renal aging based on the molecular mechanisms of autophagy will become one of the development trends in the future study. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  15. Transcriptomic insights into the alternative splicing-mediated adaptation of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana to host niches: autophagy-related gene 8 as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wei-Xia; Ding, Jin-Li; Gao, Yang; Peng, Yue-Jin; Feng, Ming-Guang; Ying, Sheng-Hua

    2017-10-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) regulates various biological processes in fungi by extending the cellular proteome. However, comprehensive studies investigating AS in entomopathogenic fungi are lacking. Based on transcriptome data obtained via dual RNA-seq, the first overview of AS events was developed for Beauveria bassiana growing in an insect haemocoel. The AS was demonstrated for 556 of 8840 expressed genes, accounting for 5.4% of the total genes in B. bassiana. Intron retention was the most abundant type of AS, accounting for 87.1% of all splicing events and exon skipping events were rare, only accounting for 2.0% of all events. Functional distribution analysis indicated an association between alternatively spliced genes and several physiological processes. Notably, B. bassiana autophagy-related gene 8 (BbATG8), an indispensable gene for autophagy, was spliced at an alternative 5' splice site to generate two transcripts (BbATG8-α and BbATG8-β). The BbATG8-α transcript was necessary for fungal autophagy and oxidation tolerance, while the BbATG8-β transcript was not. These two transcripts differentially contributed to the formation of conidia or blastospores as well as fungal virulence. Thus, AS acts as a powerful post-transcriptional regulatory strategy in insect mycopathogens and significantly mediates fungal transcriptional adaption to host niches. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Neferine augments therapeutic efficacy of cisplatin through ROS- mediated non-canonical autophagy in human lung adenocarcinoma (A549 cells).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalai Selvi, Sivalingam; Vinoth, Amirthalingam; Varadharajan, Thiyagarajan; Weng, Ching Feng; Vijaya Padma, Viswanadha

    2017-05-01

    Combination of dietary components with chemotherapy drugs is an emerging new strategy for cancer therapy to increase antitumor responses. Neferine, major bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid isolated from the seed embryo of Nelumbo nucifera (Lotus). In the present study, we investigated the efficacy of the combinatorial regimen of neferine and cisplatin compared to cisplatin high dose in human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) cells. Co-treatment with neferine enhanced cisplatin-induced autophagy in A549 cells was accompanied by Acidic vesicular accumulation (AVO), enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and depletion of intracellular glutathione (GSH), down regulation of PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, conversion of LC3B-I to LC3B-II. This enhanced autophagy developed via a non-canonical mechanism that did not require Beclin-1, PI3KCIII. In conclusion, these results suggest that neferine enhances cisplatin -induced autophagic cancer cell death through downregulation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pro-survival pathway and ROS- mediated Beclin-1 and PI3K CIII independent autophagy in human lung adenocarcinoma (A549 cells). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. High Endogenous Accumulation of ω-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Protect against Ischemia-Reperfusion Renal Injury through AMPK-Mediated Autophagy in Fat-1 Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Do Hyeong Gwon

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Regulated autophagy is involved in the repair of renal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI. Fat-1 transgenic mice produce ω3-Polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω3-PUFAs from ω6-Polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω6-PUFAs without a dietary ω3-PUFAs supplement, leading to a high accumulation of omega-3 in various tissues. ω3-PUFAs show protective effects against various renal injuries and it has recently been reported that ω3-PUFAs regulate autophagy. We assessed whether ω3-PUFAs attenuated IR-induced acute kidney injury (AKI and evaluated its associated mechanisms. C57Bl/6 background fat-1 mice and wild-type mice (wt were divided into four groups: wt sham (n = 10, fat-1 sham (n = 10, wt IRI (reperfusion 35 min after clamping both the renal artery and vein; n = 15, and fat-1 IRI (n = 15. Kidneys and blood were harvested 24 h after IRI and renal histological and molecular data were collected. The kidneys of fat-1 mice showed better renal cell survival, renal function, and pathological damage than those of wt mice after IRI. In addition, fat-1 mice showed less oxidative stress and autophagy impairment; greater amounts of microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3-II, Beclin-1, and Atg7; lower amounts of p62; and, higher levels of renal cathepsin D and ATP6E than wt kidneys. They also showed more adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK activation, which resulted in the inhibition of phosphorylation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR. Collectively, ω3-PUFAs in fat-1 mice contributed to AMPK mediated autophagy activation, leading to a renoprotective response.

  18. STAT3 balances myocyte hypertrophy vis-à-vis autophagy in response to Angiotensin II by modulating the AMPKα/mTOR axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Zhao, Lin; Samanta, Anweshan; Mahmoudi, Seyed Morteza; Buehler, Tanner; Cantilena, Amy; Vincent, Robert J; Girgis, Magdy; Breeden, Joshua; Asante, Samuel; Xuan, Yu-Ting; Dawn, Buddhadeb

    2017-01-01

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) is known to participate in various cardiovascular signal transduction pathways, including those responsible for cardiac hypertrophy and cytoprotection. However, the role of STAT3 signaling in cardiomyocyte autophagy remains unclear. We tested the hypothesis that Angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy is effected, at least in part, through STAT3-mediated inhibition of cellular autophagy. In H9c2 cells, Ang II treatment resulted in STAT3 activation and cellular hypertrophy in a dose-dependent manner. Ang II enhanced autophagy, albeit without impacting AMPKα/mTOR signaling or cellular ADP/ATP ratio. Pharmacologic inhibition of STAT3 with WP1066 suppressed Ang II-induced myocyte hypertrophy and mRNA expression of hypertrophy-related genes ANP and β-MHC. These molecular events were recapitulated in cells with STAT3 knockdown. Genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of STAT3 significantly increased myocyte ADP/ATP ratio and enhanced autophagy through AMPKα/mTOR signaling. Pharmacologic activation and inhibition of AMPKα attenuated and exaggerated, respectively, the effects of Ang II on ANP and β-MHC gene expression, while concomitant inhibition of STAT3 accentuated the inhibition of hypertrophy. Together, these data indicate that novel nongenomic effects of STAT3 influence myocyte energy status and modulate AMPKα/mTOR signaling and autophagy to balance the transcriptional hypertrophic response to Ang II stimulation. These findings may have significant relevance for various cardiovascular pathological processes mediated by Ang II signaling.

  19. ADIPOQ/adiponectin induces cytotoxic autophagy in breast cancer cells through STK11/LKB1-mediated activation of the AMPK-ULK1 axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Seung J; Nagaraju, Ganji Purnachandra; Nagalingam, Arumugam; Muniraj, Nethaji; Kuppusamy, Panjamurthy; Walker, Alyssa; Woo, Juhyung; Győrffy, Balázs; Gabrielson, Ed; Saxena, Neeraj K; Sharma, Dipali

    2017-08-03

    ADIPOQ/adiponectin, an adipocytokine secreted by adipocytes in the breast tumor microenvironment, negatively regulates cancer cell growth hence increased levels of ADIPOQ/adiponectin are associated with decreased breast cancer growth. However, its mechanisms of action remain largely elusive. We report that ADIPOQ/adiponectin induces a robust accumulation of autophagosomes, increases MAP1LC3B-II/LC3B-II and decreases SQSTM1/p62 in breast cancer cells. ADIPOQ/adiponectin-treated cells and xenografts exhibit increased expression of autophagy-related proteins. LysoTracker Red-staining and tandem-mCherry-GFP-LC3B assay show that fusion of autophagosomes and lysosomes is augmented upon ADIPOQ/adiponectin treatment. ADIPOQ/adiponectin significantly inhibits breast cancer growth and induces apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo, and these events are preceded by macroautophagy/autophagy, which is integral for ADIPOQ/adiponectin-mediated cell death. Accordingly, blunting autophagosome formation, blocking autophagosome-lysosome fusion or genetic-knockout of BECN1/Beclin1 and ATG7 effectively impedes ADIPOQ/adiponectin induced growth-inhibition and apoptosis-induction. Mechanistic studies show that ADIPOQ/adiponectin reduces intracellular ATP levels and increases PRKAA1 phosphorylation leading to ULK1 activation. AMPK-inhibition abrogates ADIPOQ/adiponectin-induced ULK1-activation, LC3B-turnover and SQSTM1/p62-degradation while AMPK-activation potentiates ADIPOQ/adiponectin's effects. Further, ADIPOQ/adiponectin-mediated AMPK-activation and autophagy-induction are regulated by upstream master-kinase STK11/LKB1, which is a key node in antitumor function of ADIPOQ/adiponectin as STK11/LKB1-knockout abrogates ADIPOQ/adiponectin-mediated inhibition of breast tumorigenesis and molecular analyses of tumors corroborate in vitro mechanistic findings. ADIPOQ/adiponectin increases the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents. Notably, high expression of ADIPOQ receptor ADIPOR2, ADIPOQ

  20. Autophagy, lipophagy and lysosomal lipid storage disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Carl; Martinez-Lopez, Nuria; Otten, Elsje G; Carroll, Bernadette; Maetzel, Dorothea; Singh, Rajat; Sarkar, Sovan; Korolchuk, Viktor I

    2016-04-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process with an essential function in the maintenance of cellular and tissue homeostasis. It is primarily recognised for its role in the degradation of dysfunctional proteins and unwanted organelles, however in recent years the range of autophagy substrates has also been extended to lipids. Degradation of lipids via autophagy is termed lipophagy. The ability of autophagy to contribute to the maintenance of lipo-homeostasis becomes particularly relevant in the context of genetic lysosomal storage disorders where perturbations of autophagic flux have been suggested to contribute to the disease aetiology. Here we review recent discoveries of the molecular mechanisms mediating lipid turnover by the autophagy pathways. We further focus on the relevance of autophagy, and specifically lipophagy, to the disease mechanisms. Moreover, autophagy is also discussed as a potential therapeutic target in several key lysosomal storage disorders. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. CaMKII-mediated Beclin 1 phosphorylation regulates autophagy that promotes degradation of Id and neuroblastoma cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuan; Wu, Xiao-Qi; Deng, Rong; Li, Dan-Dan; Tang, Jun; Chen, Wen-Dan; Chen, Jing-Hong; Ji, Jiao; Jiao, Lin; Jiang, Shan; Yang, Fen; Feng, Gong-Kan; Senthilkumar, Ravichandran; Yue, Fei; Zhang, Hai-Liang; Wu, Rui-Yan; Yu, Yan; Xu, Xue-Lian; Mai, Jia; Li, Zhi-Ling; Peng, Xiao-Dan; Huang, Yun; Huang, Xiang; Ma, Ning-Fang; Tao, Qian; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Zhu, Xiao-Feng

    2017-10-27

    Autophagy is a degradative pathway that delivers cellular components to the lysosome for degradation. The role of autophagy in cell differentiation is poorly understood. Here we show that CaMKII can directly phosphorylate Beclin 1 at Ser90 to promote K63-linked ubiquitination of Beclin 1 and activation of autophagy. Meanwhile, CaMKII can also promote K63-linked ubiquitination of inhibitor of differentiation 1/2 (Id-1/2) by catalyzing phosphorylation of Id proteins and recruiting TRAF-6. Ubiquitinated Id-1/Id-2 can then bind to p62 and be transported to autolysosomes for degradation. Id degradation promotes the differentiation of neuroblastoma cells and reduces the proportion of stem-like cells. Our study proposes a mechanism by which autophagic degradation of Id proteins can regulate cell differentiation. This suggests that targeting of CaMKII and the regulation of autophagic degradation of Id may be an effective therapeutic strategy to induce cell differentiation in neuroblastoma.

  2. Autophagy attenuates noise-induced hearing loss by reducing oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hu; Wang, Xianren; Hill, Kayla; Chen, Jun; Lemasters, John; Yang, Shi-Ming; Sha, Su-Hua

    2015-05-20

    Reactive oxygen species play a dual role in mediating both cell stress and defense pathways. Here, we used pharmacological manipulations and siRNA silencing to investigate the relationship between autophagy and oxidative stress under conditions of noise-induced temporary, permanent, and severe permanent auditory threshold shifts (temporary threshold shift [TTS], permanent threshold shift [PTS], and severe PTS [sPTS], respectively) in adult CBA/J mice. Levels of oxidative stress markers (4-hydroxynonenal [4-HNE] and 3-nitrotyrosine [3-NT]) increased in outer hair cells (OHCs) in a noise-dose-dependent manner, whereas levels of the autophagy marker microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 B (LC3B) were sharply elevated after TTS but rose only slightly in response to PTS and were unaltered by sPTS noise. Furthermore, green fluorescent protein (GFP) intensity increased in GFP-LC3 mice after TTS-noise exposure. Treatment with rapamycin, an autophagy activator, significantly increased LC3B expression, while diminishing 4-HNE and 3-NT levels, reducing noise-induced hair cell loss, and, subsequently, noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). In contrast, treatment with either the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3MA) or LC3B siRNA reduced LC3B expression, increased 3-NT and 4-HNE levels, and exacerbated TTS to PTS. This study demonstrates a relationship between oxidative stress and autophagy in OHCs and reveals that autophagy is an intrinsic cellular process that protects against NIHL by attenuating oxidative stress. The results suggest that the lower levels of oxidative stress incurred by TTS-noise exposure induce autophagy, which promotes OHC survival. However, excessive oxidative stress under sPTS-noise conditions overwhelms the beneficial potential of autophagy in OHCs and leads to OHC death and NIHL.

  3. Luteoloside induces G0/G1 arrest and pro-death autophagy through the ROS-mediated AKT/mTOR/p70S6K signalling pathway in human non-small cell lung cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Menglu; Shen, Shuying; Zhao, Xin; Gong, Xingguo

    2017-12-09

    Autophagy has attracted a great deal of interest in tumour therapy research in recent years. However, the anticancer effect of luteoloside, a naturally occurring flavonoid isolated from the medicinal plant Gentiana macrophylla, on autophagy remains poorly understood in human lung cells. In the present study, we have investigated the anticancer effects of luteoloside on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and demonstrated that luteoloside effectively inhibited cancer cell proliferation, inducing G 0 /G 1 phase arrest associated with reduced expression of CyclinE, CyclinD1 and CDK4; we further found that treatment with luteoloside did not strongly result in apoptotic cell death in NSCLC (A549 and H292) cells. Interestingly, luteoloside induced autophagy in lung cancer cells, which was correlated with the formation of autophagic vacuoles, breakdown of p62, and the overexpression of Beclin-1 and LC3-II, but not in a human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B). Notably, pretreatment of cancer cells with 3-MA, an autophagy inhibitor, protected against autophagy and promoted cell viability but not apoptosis. To further clarify whether luteoloside-induced autophagy depended on the PI3K/AKT/mTOR/p70S6K signalling pathway, a major autophagy-suppressive cascade, cells were treated with a combination of AKT inhibitor (LY294002) and mTOR inhibitor (Rap). These results demonstrated that luteoloside induced autophagy in lung cancer cell lines by inhibiting the pathway at p-Akt (Ser473), p-mTOR and p-p70S6K (Thr389). Moreover, we observed that luteoloside-induced cell autophagy was correlated with production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). NAC-mediated protection against ROS clearly implicated ROS in the activation of autophagy and cell death. In addition, the results showed that ROS served as an upstream effector of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR/p70S6K pathway. Taken together, the present study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying luteoloside-mediated cell

  4. Inducing autophagy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Lea M; Bunkenborg, Jakob; Andersen, Jens S.

    2014-01-01

    catabolism, which has recently been found to induce autophagy in an MTOR independent way and support cancer cell survival. In this study, quantitative phosphoproteomics was applied to investigate the initial signaling events linking ammonia to the induction of autophagy. The MTOR inhibitor rapamycin was used...... as a reference treatment to emphasize the differences between an MTOR-dependent and -independent autophagy-induction. By this means 5901 phosphosites were identified of which 626 were treatment-specific regulated and 175 were coregulated. Investigation of the ammonia-specific regulated sites supported that MTOR...

  5. 14-Deoxy-11,12-didehydroandrographolide induces DDIT3-dependent endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated autophagy in T-47D breast carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Heng Kean; Muhammad, Tengku Sifzizul Tengku; Tan, Mei Lan

    2016-01-01

    14-Deoxy-11,12-didehydroandrographolide (14-DDA), a major diterpenoid isolated from Andrographis paniculata (Burm.f.) Nees, is known to be cytotoxic and elicits a non-apoptotic cell death in T-47D breast carcinoma cells. In this study, the mechanistic toxicology properties of 14-DDA in T-47D cells were further investigated. 14-DDA is found to induce the formation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) vacuoles and autophagosomes, with concurrent upregulation of LC3-II in the breast carcinoma cells. It stimulated an increase in cytosolic calcium concentration and caused a collapse in mitochondrial membrane potential in these cells. In addition, both DDIT3 and GADD45A, molecules implicated in ER stress pathway, were significantly upregulated. DDIT3 knockdown suppressed the formation of both ER vacuoles and autophagosomes, indicating that 14-DDA-induced ER stress and autophagy is dependent on this transcription factor. Collectively, it is possible that GADD45A/p38 MAPK/DDIT3 pathway is involved in the 14-DDA-induced ER-stress-mediated autophagy in T-47D cells. - Highlights: • The mechanistic toxicology properties of 14-DDA in T-47D breast carcinoma cells were investigated. • 14-DDA induces the formation of ER vacuoles and autophagosomes, with concurrent upregulation of LC3-II. • It stimulates an increase in cytosolic calcium concentration and causing collapse in the mitochondrial membrane potential. • Both DDIT3 and GADD45A, molecules implicated in ER stress pathway, were significantly upregulated. • 4-DDA induces ER stress-mediated autophagy in T-47D cells possibly via GADD45A/p38 MAPK/DDIT3 pathway.

  6. Regulation of HA14-1 mediated oxidative stress, toxic response, and autophagy by curcumin to enhance apoptotic activity in human embryonic kidney cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Kishu; Sharma, Anupama; Surolia, Avadhesha; Pathak, Chandramani

    2014-01-01

    An alteration in susceptibility to apoptosis not only contributes to promotion of malignancy but can also enhance drug resistance in response to anticancer therapies. HA14-1 is a small molecule which has the potential of inducing apoptosis in cancerous cells. HA14-1 manifests an antagonistic effect on antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and consequently induces cell death in various cancerous cell lines. However, it is also known to generate ROS and toxic response in the cells upon decomposition. Elevated level of ROS is responsible for oxidative stress and other pathological consequences, if not metabolized properly. The aim of the present study was to examine the synergistic effect of curcumin in promoting apoptosis by regulating the HA14-1 mediated ROS generation, toxicity, oxidative stress, and autophagy in human embryonic kidney cells. Our study demonstrates that curcumin efficiently scavenges HA14-1 mediated generation of ROS and toxic response resulting in augmentation of apoptosis in HEK 293T cells by promoting inhibition of antiapoptotic proteins and process of autophagy. Thus curcumin along with HA14-1 regulates cell proliferation by disruption of the antiapoptotic signaling mechanism. This approach could serve as a promising strategy for therapeutic potential to overcome their adverse effects. © 2013 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  7. Cannabinoid action induces autophagy-mediated cell death through stimulation of ER stress in human glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, María; Carracedo, Arkaitz; Salanueva, Iñigo J; Hernández-Tiedra, Sonia; Lorente, Mar; Egia, Ainara; Vázquez, Patricia; Blázquez, Cristina; Torres, Sofía; García, Stephane; Nowak, Jonathan; Fimia, Gian María; Piacentini, Mauro; Cecconi, Francesco; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; González-Feria, Luis; Iovanna, Juan L; Guzmán, Manuel; Boya, Patricia; Velasco, Guillermo

    2009-05-01

    Autophagy can promote cell survival or cell death, but the molecular basis underlying its dual role in cancer remains obscure. Here we demonstrate that delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main active component of marijuana, induces human glioma cell death through stimulation of autophagy. Our data indicate that THC induced ceramide accumulation and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2alpha (eIF2alpha) phosphorylation and thereby activated an ER stress response that promoted autophagy via tribbles homolog 3-dependent (TRB3-dependent) inhibition of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) axis. We also showed that autophagy is upstream of apoptosis in cannabinoid-induced human and mouse cancer cell death and that activation of this pathway was necessary for the antitumor action of cannabinoids in vivo. These findings describe a mechanism by which THC can promote the autophagic death of human and mouse cancer cells and provide evidence that cannabinoid administration may be an effective therapeutic strategy for targeting human cancers.

  8. Safety Pharmacology assessment of drugs with biased 5-HT(2B) receptor agonism mediating cardiac valvulopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavero, Icilio; Guillon, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    The rhythmic opening and tightly closing of cardiac valve leaflets are cardiac cyclic events imposing to blood a unidirectional course along the vascular tree. Drugs with 5-HT2B agonism properties can seriously compromise this biological function critical for hemodynamic efficiency as their intrinsic pro-fibrotic effects can, with time, make valvular coaptation blood regurgitant. Cardiac valve anatomy, physiology and pathology as well as 5-HT2B receptor properties (coupling, effects mediated, biased agonism) are briefly exposed. Approaches to unveil 5-HT2B receptor liability of drug candidates are detailed. In silico computational models can rapidly probe molecules for chemical signatures associated with 5-HT2B receptor affinity. In vitro radioligand competition assays allow quantifying receptor binding capacity (Ki, IC50), the pharmacological nature (agonism, antagonism) of which can be ascertained from cytosolic second messenger (inositol phosphates, Ca(++), MAPK2) changes. Potencies calculated from the latter data may exhibit variability as they are dependent upon the readout measured and the experimental conditions (e.g., receptor density level of cell material expressing human 5-HT2B receptors). The in vivo valvulopathy effects of 5-HT2B receptor agonists can be assessed by echocardiographic measurements and valve histology in rats chronically treated with the candidate drug. Finally, safety margins derived from from nonclinical and clinical data are evaluated in terms of the readout, usefulness and scientific reliability. The Safety Pharmacology toolbox for detecting possible 5-HT2B receptor agonism liabilities of candidate drugs requires meticulous optimization and validation of all its (in silico, in vitro and in vivo) components to perfect its human predictability power. In particular, since 5-HT2B receptor agonism is biased in nature, the most predictive readout(s) of valvular liability should be identified and prioritized in keeping with best scientific

  9. Autophagy in plasma cell pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eOliva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cells are the effectors responsible for antibody-mediated immunity. They differentiate from B lymphocytes through a complete remodeling of their original structure and function. Stress is a constitutive element of plasma cell differentiation. Macroautophagy, conventionally referred to as autophagy, is a conserved lysosomal recycling strategy that integrates cellular metabolism and enables adaptation to stress. In metazoa, autophagy plays diverse roles in cell differentiation. Recently, a number of autophagic functions have been recognized in innate and adaptive immunity, including clearance of intracellular pathogens, inflammasome regulation, lymphocyte ontogenesis, and antigen presentation. We identified a previously unrecognized role played by autophagy in plasma cell differentiation and activity. Following B cell activation, autophagy moderates the expression of the transcriptional repressor Blimp-1 and immunoglobulins through a selective negative control exerted on the size of the endoplasmic reticulum and its stress signaling response, including the essential plasma cell transcription factor, XBP-1. This containment of plasma cell differentiation and function, i.e., antibody production, is essential to optimize energy metabolism and viability. As a result, autophagy sustains antibody responses in vivo. Moreover, autophagy is an essential intrinsic determinant of long-lived plasma cells in their as yet poorly understood bone marrow niche. In this essay, we discuss these findings in the context of the established biological functions of autophagy, and their manifold implications for adaptive immunity and plasma cell diseases, in primis multiple myeloma.

  10. Attenuation of TNFSF10/TRAIL-induced apoptosis by an autophagic survival pathway involving TRAF2- and RIPK1/RIP1-mediated MAPK8/JNK activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Weiyang; Wang, Qiong; Xu, Jennings; Xu, Xiuling; Padilla, Mabel T.; Ren, Guosheng; Gou, Xin; Lin, Yong

    2012-01-01

    Although it is known that tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TNFSF10/TRAIL) induces autophagy, the mechanism by which autophagy is activated by TNFSF10 is still elusive. In this report, we show evidence that TRAF2- and RIPK1-mediated MAPK8/JNK activation is required for TNFSF10-induced cytoprotective autophagy. TNFSF10 activated autophagy rapidly in cancer cell lines derived from lung, bladder and prostate tumors. Blocking autophagy with either pharmacological inhibitors or siRNAs targeting the key autophagy factors BECN1/Beclin 1 or ATG7 effectively increased TNFSF10-induced apoptotic cytotoxicity, substantiating a cytoprotective role for TNFSF10-induced autophagy. Blocking MAPK8 but not NFκB effectively blocked autophagy, suggesting that MAPK8 is the main pathway for TNFSF10-induced autophagy. In addition, blocking MAPK8 effectively inhibited degradation of BCL2L1/Bcl-xL and reduction of the autophagy-suppressing BCL2L1–BECN1complex. Knockdown of TRAF2 or RIPK1 effectively suppressed TNFSF10-induced MAPK8 activation and autophagy. Furthermore, suppressing autophagy inhibited expression of antiapoptosis factors BIRC2/cIAP1, BIRC3/cIAP2, XIAP and CFLAR/c-FLIP and increased the formation of TNFSF10-induced death-inducing signaling complex (DISC). These results reveal a critical role for the MAPK8 activation pathway through TRAF2 and RIPK1 for TNFSF10-induced autophagy that blunts apoptosis in cancer cells. Thus, suppression of MAPK8-mediated autophagy could be utilized for sensitizing cancer cells to therapy with TNFSF10. PMID:23051914

  11. Autophagy controls BCG-induced trained immunity and the response to intravesical BCG therapy for bladder cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Buffen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The anti-tuberculosis-vaccine Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG is the most widely used vaccine in the world. In addition to its effects against tuberculosis, BCG vaccination also induces non-specific beneficial effects against certain forms of malignancy and against infections with unrelated pathogens. It has been recently proposed that the non-specific effects of BCG are mediated through epigenetic reprogramming of monocytes, a process called trained immunity. In the present study we demonstrate that autophagy contributes to trained immunity induced by BCG. Pharmacologic inhibition of autophagy blocked trained immunity induced in vitro by stimuli such as β-glucans or BCG. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the autophagy genes ATG2B (rs3759601 and ATG5 (rs2245214 influenced both the in vitro and in vivo training effect of BCG upon restimulation with unrelated bacterial or fungal stimuli. Furthermore, pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of autophagy blocked epigenetic reprogramming of monocytes at the level of H3K4 trimethylation. Finally, we demonstrate that rs3759601 in ATG2B correlates with progression and recurrence of bladder cancer after BCG intravesical instillation therapy. These findings identify a key role of autophagy for the nonspecific protective effects of BCG.

  12. Melatonin-Mediated Intracellular Insulin during 2-Deoxy-d-glucose Treatment Is Reduced through Autophagy and EDC3 Protein in Insulinoma INS-1E Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Sung Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available 2-DG triggers glucose deprivation without altering other nutrients or metabolic pathways and then activates autophagy via activation of AMPK and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. We investigated whether 2-DG reduced intracellular insulin increased by melatonin via autophagy/EDC3 in insulinoma INS-1E cells. p-AMPK and GRP78/BiP level were significantly increased by 2-DG in the presence/absence of melatonin, but IRE1α level was reduced in 2-DG treatment. Levels of p85α, p110, p-Akt (Ser473, Thr308, and p-mTOR (Ser2481 were also significantly reduced by 2-DG in the presence/absence of melatonin. Mn-SOD increased with 2-DG plus melatonin compared to groups treated with/without melatonin alone. Bcl-2 was decreased and Bax increased with 2-DG plus melatonin. LC3II level increased with 2-DG treatment in the presence/absence of melatonin. Intracellular insulin production increased in melatonin plus 2-DG but reduced in treatment with 2-DG with/without melatonin. EDC3 was increased by 2-DG in the presence/absence of melatonin. Rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor, increased GRP78/BiP and EDC3 levels in a dose-dependent manner and subsequently resulted in a decrease in intracellular production of insulin. These results suggest that melatonin-mediated insulin synthesis during 2-DG treatment involves autophagy and EDC3 protein in rat insulinoma INS-1E cells and subsequently results in a decrease in intracellular production of insulin.

  13. Autophagy regulates chlorpyrifos-induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Hyeon [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Hanyang University (Korea, Republic of); Hanyang Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Graduate School of Biomedical Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Eun [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Hanyang University (Korea, Republic of); Hanyang Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, In Chul [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Hanyang University (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Hyun Chul, E-mail: hckoh@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Hanyang University (Korea, Republic of); Hanyang Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Graduate School of Biomedical Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that up-regulation of autophagy may be a tractable therapeutic intervention for clearing disease-causing proteins, including α-synuclein, ubiquitin, and other misfolded or aggregated proteins in pesticide-induced neurodegeneration. In a previous study, we reported that chlorpyrifos (CPF)-induced mitochondria-dependent apoptosis is mediated through reactive oxygen species in SH-SY5Y cells. In this study, we explored a novel pharmacotherapeutic approach to prevent CPF neurotoxicity involving the regulation of autophagy. We investigated the modulation of CPF-induced apoptosis according to autophagy regulation. We found that CPF induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells, as demonstrated by the activation of caspase-3 and nuclear condensation. In addition, we observed that cells treated with CPF underwent autophagic cell death by monitoring the expression of LC3-II and p62. Pretreatment with the autophagy inducer rapamycin significantly enhanced the cell viability of CPF-exposed cells, and the enhancement of cell viability was partially due to alleviation of CPF-induced apoptosis via a decrease in levels of cleaved caspase-3. Specifically, rapamycin pretreatment decreased Bax and increased Bcl-2 expression in mitochondria. In addition, rapamycin significantly decreased cytochrome c release in from mitochondria into the cytosol. However, pretreatment of cells with the autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine (3MA), remarkably increased CPF toxicity in these cells; this with correlated with increased expression of Bax and decreased expression of Bcl-2 in mitochondria. Our results suggest that CPF-induced cytotoxicity is modified by autophagy regulation and that rapamycin protects against CPF-induced apoptosis by enhancing autophagy. Pharmacologic induction of autophagy by rapamycin may be a useful treatment strategy in neurodegenerative disorders. - Highlights: ► Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is cytotoxic to SH-SY5Y cells ► CPF-induced cytotoxicity is mediated by

  14. Dopamine Oxidation and Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Muñoz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms involved in the neurodegenerative process of Parkinson's disease remain unclear. Currently, there is a general agreement that mitochondrial dysfunction, α-synuclein aggregation, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and impaired protein degradation are involved in the neurodegeneration of dopaminergic neurons containing neuromelanin in Parkinson's disease. Aminochrome has been proposed to play an essential role in the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons containing neuromelanin by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, the formation of neurotoxic α-synuclein protofibrils, and impaired protein degradation. Here, we discuss the relationship between the oxidation of dopamine to aminochrome, the precursor of neuromelanin, autophagy dysfunction in dopaminergic neurons containing neuromelanin, and the role of dopamine oxidation to aminochrome in autophagy dysfunction in dopaminergic neurons. Aminochrome induces the following: (i the formation of α-synuclein protofibrils that inactivate chaperone-mediated autophagy; (ii the formation of adducts with α- and β-tubulin, which induce the aggregation of the microtubules required for the fusion of autophagy vacuoles and lysosomes.

  15. TORC1 Inhibits GSK3-Mediated Elo2 Phosphorylation to Regulate Very Long Chain Fatty Acid Synthesis and Autophagy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmermann, Christine; Santos, Aline; Gable, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) are essential fatty acids with multiple functions, including ceramide synthesis. Although the components of the VLCFA biosynthetic machinery have been elucidated, how their activity is regulated to meet the cell's metabolic demand remains unknown. The goal...... of autophagy. Together, our data reveal a function for TORC1 and GSK3 in the regulation of VLCFA synthesis that has important implications for autophagy and cell homeostasis....... of this study was to identify mechanisms that regulate the rate of VLCFA synthesis, and we discovered that the fatty acid elongase Elo2 is regulated by phosphorylation. Elo2 phosphorylation is induced upon inhibition of TORC1 and requires GSK3. Expression of nonphosphorylatable Elo2 profoundly alters...

  16. Oxidative stress plays a key role in butyrate-mediated autophagy via Akt/mTOR pathway in hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Kishor; Saraya, Anoop; Venugopal, Senthil K

    2017-08-01

    Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most aggressive forms of cancer, responsible for a number of deaths in humans. Butyrate, one of the short chain fatty acids produced by the gut microbiota during anaerobic fermentation, was shown to be beneficial for inhibiting cancer growth. In this study, we showed that sodium butyrate induced autophagy via reactive oxygen species (ROS) in hepatoma cells. Butyrate (0-6 mM) incubation significantly increased intracellular ROS levels (45.2% compared to control), which in turn inhibited phosphorylation of akt and mTOR, leading to the upregulation of autophagic proteins, such as beclin 1, ATG 5, LC3-II, followed by the increased autophagosome formation (34.4% compared to control cells). Addition of a known antioxidant, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), reversed these butyrate-induced ROS and autophagy. It was also found that butyrate-induced ROS enhanced MAPK activation, which was inhibited by NAC. In conclusion, our data showed that butyrate induced ROS, which in turn induced autophagy via inhibition of akt/mTOR pathway. Hence, butyrate could be considered as a potential candidate for HCC treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Polyphenol-Rich Diets Exacerbate AMPK-Mediated Autophagy, Decreasing Proliferation of Mosquito Midgut Microbiota, and Extending Vector Lifespan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Dutra Nunes

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mosquitoes feed on plant-derived fluids such as nectar and sap and are exposed to bioactive molecules found in this dietary source. However, the role of such molecules on mosquito vectorial capacity is unknown. Weather has been recognized as a major determinant of the spread of dengue, and plants under abiotic stress increase their production of polyphenols.Here, we show that including polyphenols in mosquito meals promoted the activation of AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK. AMPK positively regulated midgut autophagy leading to a decrease in bacterial proliferation and an increase in vector lifespan. Suppression of AMPK activity resulted in a 6-fold increase in midgut microbiota. Similarly, inhibition of polyphenol-induced autophagy induced an 8-fold increase in bacterial proliferation. Mosquitoes maintained on the polyphenol diet were readily infected by dengue virus.The present findings uncover a new direct route by which exacerbation of autophagy through activation of the AMPK pathway leads to a more efficient control of mosquito midgut microbiota and increases the average mosquito lifespan. Our results suggest for the first time that the polyphenol content and availability of the surrounding vegetation may increase the population of mosquitoes prone to infection with arboviruses.

  18. Polyphenol-Rich Diets Exacerbate AMPK-Mediated Autophagy, Decreasing Proliferation of Mosquito Midgut Microbiota, and Extending Vector Lifespan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Rodrigo Dutra; Ventura-Martins, Guilherme; Moretti, Débora Monteiro; Medeiros-Castro, Priscilla; Rocha-Santos, Carlucio; Daumas-Filho, Carlos Renato de Oliveira; Bittencourt-Cunha, Paula Rego Barros; Martins-Cardoso, Karina; Cudischevitch, Cecília Oliveira; Menna-Barreto, Rubem Figueiredo Sadok; Oliveira, José Henrique Maia; Gusmão, Desiely Silva; Alves Lemos, Francisco José; Alviano, Daniela Sales; Oliveira, Pedro Lagerblad; Lowenberger, Carl; Majerowicz, David; Oliveira, Ricardo Melo; Mesquita, Rafael Dias; Atella, Georgia Correa

    2016-01-01

    Background Mosquitoes feed on plant-derived fluids such as nectar and sap and are exposed to bioactive molecules found in this dietary source. However, the role of such molecules on mosquito vectorial capacity is unknown. Weather has been recognized as a major determinant of the spread of dengue, and plants under abiotic stress increase their production of polyphenols. Results Here, we show that including polyphenols in mosquito meals promoted the activation of AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK positively regulated midgut autophagy leading to a decrease in bacterial proliferation and an increase in vector lifespan. Suppression of AMPK activity resulted in a 6-fold increase in midgut microbiota. Similarly, inhibition of polyphenol-induced autophagy induced an 8-fold increase in bacterial proliferation. Mosquitoes maintained on the polyphenol diet were readily infected by dengue virus. Conclusion The present findings uncover a new direct route by which exacerbation of autophagy through activation of the AMPK pathway leads to a more efficient control of mosquito midgut microbiota and increases the average mosquito lifespan. Our results suggest for the first time that the polyphenol content and availability of the surrounding vegetation may increase the population of mosquitoes prone to infection with arboviruses. PMID:27732590

  19. Andrographolide sodium bisulfate-induced apoptosis and autophagy in human proximal tubular endothelial cells is a ROS-mediated pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hong; Zhang, Xin-Yue; Wang, Yi-Qi; Zheng, Xiao-Liang; Yin-Zhao; Xing, Wen-Min; Zhang, Qin

    2014-03-01

    The nephrotoxic mechanisms of andrographolide sodium bisulfate (ASB) remain largely unknown. This study attempted to explore the mechanism of ASB-induced nephrotoxicity using human proximal tubular endothelial cells (HK-2). For this study HK-2 cells were treated with rising concentrations of ASB. Their survival rate was detected using MTT assay and ultrastructure was observed with electron microscopy. L-Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay was followed by examination of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) was detected using different methods and apoptosis/autophage related proteins were detected using immunoblotting. We found that ASB inhibited HK-2 cell proliferation and decreased cell survival rate in a time and dose-dependent manner (Papoptosis and autophagy were observed. MMP gradually decreased and ROS was induced. The expression of JNK and Beclin-1 increased and activation of the JNK signaling pathway were seen. Apoptosis was induced via the mitochondrial-dependent caspase-3 and caspase-9 pathway, and autophagy related protein Beclin-1 was enhanced by ASB. The data show that ASB induces high levels of ROS generation in HK-2 cells and activates JNK signaling. Furthermore, ASB induces cell apoptosis via the caspase-dependent mitochondrial pathway, and induces cellular autophagy, in part by enhancing Beclin-1 protein expression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. DHA supplementation improves cognitive function via enhancing Aβ-mediated autophagy in Chinese elderly with mild cognitive impairment: a randomised placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan-Ping; Lou, Yinyin; Hu, Jing; Miao, Rujuan; Ma, Fei

    2018-04-01

    Higher docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) intake is inversely correlated with relative risk of Alzheimer's disease. The potential benefits of DHA supplementation in people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) have not been fully examined. Our study aimed to assess the effect of a 24-month DHA supplementation on cognitive function and amyloid beta (Aβ)-mediated autophagy in elderly subjects with MCI. This was a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in Tianjin, China. A total of 240 individuals with MCI were identified and randomly divided into intervention (DHA 2 g/day, n=120) and control (corn oil as placebo, n=120) groups. Cognitive function and blood Aβ-related biomarkers were measured at baseline, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. Data were analysed using generalised estimating equation. A total of 217 participants (DHA: 109, placebo: 108) completed the trial. During the follow-up, scores of full-scale IQ, verbal IQ and subdomains of information and digit span were significantly higher in the intervention group than the convention group (p<0.05). In the intervention group, blood Aβ-42 level and expression of Aβ protein precursor mRNA were decreased (p<0.05), while Beclin-1 and LC3-II levels and expression of LC3-II mRNA were increased (p<0.05). Daily oral DHA supplementation (2 g/day) for 24 months may improve cognitive function and change blood biomarker-related Aβ-mediated autophagy in people with MCI. Larger longer-term confirmatory studies are warranted. ChiCTR-IOR-15006058. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. HDAC6 controls innate immune and autophagy responses to TLR-mediated signalling by the intracellular bacteria Listeria monocytogenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Moreno-Gonzalo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence on HDAC6 function underlines its role as a key protein in the innate immune response to viral infection. However, whether HDAC6 regulates innate immunity during bacterial infection remains unexplored. To assess the role of HDAC6 in the regulation of defence mechanisms against intracellular bacteria, we used the Listeria monocytogenes (Lm infection model. Our data show that Hdac6-/- bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs have a higher bacterial load than Hdac6+/+ cells, correlating with weaker induction of IFN-related genes, pro-inflammatory cytokines and nitrite production after bacterial infection. Hdac6-/- BMDCs have a weakened phosphorylation of MAPK signalling in response to Lm infection, suggesting altered Toll-like receptor signalling (TLR. Compared with Hdac6+/+ counterparts, Hdac6-/- GM-CSF-derived and FLT3L-derived dendritic cells show weaker pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion in response to various TLR agonists. Moreover, HDAC6 associates with the TLR-adaptor molecule Myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88, and the absence of HDAC6 seems to diminish the NF-κB induction after TLR stimuli. Hdac6-/- mice display low serum levels of inflammatory cytokine IL-6 and correspondingly an increased survival to a systemic infection with Lm. The impaired bacterial clearance in the absence of HDAC6 appears to be caused by a defect in autophagy. Hence, Hdac6-/- BMDCs accumulate higher levels of the autophagy marker p62 and show defective phagosome-lysosome fusion. These data underline the important function of HDAC6 in dendritic cells not only in bacterial autophagy, but also in the proper activation of TLR signalling. These results thus demonstrate an important regulatory role for HDAC6 in the innate immune response to intracellular bacterial infection.

  2. Autophagy, signaling and obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lavallard, Vanessa J.; Meijer, Alfred J.; Codogno, Patrice; Gual, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular pathway crucial for development, differentiation, survival and homeostasis. Autophagy can provide protection against aging and a number of pathologies such as cancer, neurodegeneration, cardiac disease and infection. Recent studies have reported new functions of autophagy in

  3. Autophagy and the nutritional signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long HE,Shabnam ESLAMFAM,Xi MA,Defa LI

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available During their growth and development, animals adapt to tremendous changes in order to survive. These include responses to both environmental and physiological changes and autophagy is one of most important adaptive and regulatory mechanisms. Autophagy is defined as an autolytic process to clear damaged cellular organelles and recycle the nutrients via lysosomic degradation. The process of autophagy responds to special conditions such as nutrient withdrawal. Once autophagy is induced, phagophores form and then elongate and curve to form autophagosomes. Autophagosomes then engulf cargo, fuse with endosomes, and finally fuse with lysosomes for maturation. During the initiation process, the ATG1/ULK1 (unc-51-like kinase 1 and VPS34 (which encodes a class III phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns 3-kinase complexes are critical in recruitment and assembly of other complexes required for autophagy. The process of autophagy is regulated by autophagy related genes (ATGs. Amino acid and energy starvation mediate autophagy by activating mTORC1 (mammalian target of rapamycin and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK. AMPK is the energy status sensor, the core nutrient signaling component and the metabolic kinase of cells. This review mainly focuses on the mechanism of autophagy regulated by nutrient signaling especially for the two important complexes, ULK1 and VPS34.

  4. Suppression of the toll-like receptor 7-dependent type I interferon production pathway by autophagy resulting from enterovirus 71 and coxsackievirus A16 infections facilitates their replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jie; Hu, Yajie; Li, Jiaqi; Zheng, Huiwen; Wang, Jingjing; Guo, Lei; Shi, Haijng; Liu, Longding

    2018-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) act as molecular sentinels, detecting invading viral pathogens and triggering host innate immune responses, including autophagy. However, many viruses have evolved a series of strategies to manipulate autophagy for their own benefit. Enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackievirus A16 (CA16), as the primary agents causing hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), can induce autophagy leading to their replication. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate whether enhanced viral replication caused by autophagy in EV71 and CA16 infections was associated with a TLR-related signaling pathway. Our results demonstrate that complete autophagy and incomplete autophagy were observed in human bronchial epithelial (16HBE) cells infected with EV71 and CA16. Moreover, suppression of autophagy by the pharmacological modulator 3-MA significantly and clearly decreased the survival rates and viral replication of EV71 and CA16 in 16HBE cells. Inhibition of autophagy also enhanced the expression of molecules related to the TLR7-dependent type I interferon (IFN-I) production pathway, such as TLR7, MyD88, IRF7 and IFN-α/β. Finally, immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that TLR7 endosome marker M6PR levels were clearly reduced in EV71- and CA16-infected cells, while they were markedly elevated in infected cells treated with 3-MA. These findings suggest that increased EV71 and CA16 replication meditated by autophagy in 16HBE cells might promote degradation of the endosome, leading to suppression of the TLR7-mediated IFN-I signaling pathway.

  5. Pharmacological targeting of IDO-mediated tolerance for treating autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penberthy, W Todd

    2007-04-01

    Cells at the maternal-fetal interface express indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) to consume all local tryptophan for the express purpose of starving adjacent maternal T cells of this most limiting and essential amino acid. This stops local T cell proliferation to ultimately result in the most dramatic example of immune tolerance, acceptance of the fetus. By contrast, inhibition of IDO using 1-methyl-tryptophan causes a sudden catastrophic rejection of the mammalian fetus. Immunomodulatory factors including IFNgamma, TNFalpha, IL-1, and LPS use IDO induction in responsive antigen presenting cells (APCs) also to transmit tolerogenic signals to T cells. Thus it makes sense to consider IDO induction towards tolerance for autoimmune diseases in general. Approaches to cell specific therapeutic IDO induction with NAD precursor supplementation to prevent the collateral non-T cell pathogenesis due to chronic TNFalpha-IDO activated tryptophan depletion in autoimmune diseases are reviewed. Tryptophan is an essential amino acid most immediately because it is the only precursor for the endogenous biosynthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD). Both autoimmune disease and the NAD deficiency disease pellagra occur in women at greater than twice the frequency of occurrence in men. The importance of IDO dysregulation manifest as autoimmune pellagric dementia is genetically illustrated for Nasu-Hakola Disease (or PLOSL), which is caused by a mutation in the IDO antagonizing genes TYROBP/DAP12 or TREM2. Loss of function leads to psychotic symptoms rapidly progressing to presenile dementia likely due to unchecked increases in microglial IDO expression, which depletes neurons of tryptophan causing neurodegeneration. Administration of NAD precursors rescued entire mental hospitals of dementia patients literally overnight in the 1930's and NAD precursors should help Nasu-Hakola patients as well. NAD depletion mediated by peroxynitrate PARP1 activation is one of the few

  6. The potential of lactulose and melibiose, two novel trehalase-indigestible and autophagy-inducing disaccharides, for polyQ-mediated neurodegenerative disease treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Guan-Chiun; Lin, Chih-Hsin; Tao, Yu-Chen; Yang, Jinn-Moon; Hsu, Kai-Cheng; Huang, Yin-Jung; Huang, Shih-Han; Kung, Pin-Jui; Chen, Wan-Ling; Wang, Chien-Ming; Wu, Yih-Ru; Chen, Chiung-Mei; Lin, Jung-Yaw; Hsieh-Li, Hsiu Mei; Lee-Chen, Guey-Jen

    2015-05-01

    The unique property of trehalose encourages its pharmaceutical application in aggregation-mediated neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and many polyglutamine (polyQ)-mediated diseases. However, trehalose is digested into glucose by trehalase and which reduced its efficacy in the disease target tissues. Therefore, searching trehalase-indigestible analogs of trehalose is a potential strategy to enhance therapeutic effect. In this study, two trehalase-indigestible trehalose analogs, lactulose and melibiose, were selected through compound topology and functional group analyses. Hydrogen-bonding network analyses suggest that the elimination of the hydrogen bond between the linker ether and aspartate 321 (D321) of human trehalase is the key for lactulose and melibiose to avoid the hydrolyzation. Using polyQ-mediated spinocerebellar ataxia type 17 (SCA17) cell and slice cultures, we found the aggregation was significantly prohibited by trehalose, lactulose, and melibiose, which may through up-regulating of autophagy. These findings suggest the therapeutic applications of trehalase-indigestible trehalose analogs in aggregation-associated neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular Interactions of Autophagy with the Immune System and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunho Jin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a highly conserved catabolic mechanism that mediates the degradation of damaged cellular components by inducing their fusion with lysosomes. This process provides cells with an alternative source of energy for the synthesis of new proteins and the maintenance of metabolic homeostasis in stressful environments. Autophagy protects against cancer by mediating both innate and adaptive immune responses. Innate immune receptors and lymphocytes (T and B are modulated by autophagy, which represent innate and adaptive immune responses, respectively. Numerous studies have demonstrated beneficial roles for autophagy induction as well as its suppression of cancer cells. Autophagy may induce either survival or death depending on the cell/tissue type. Radiation therapy is commonly used to treat cancer by inducing autophagy in human cancer cell lines. Additionally, melatonin appears to affect cancer cell death by regulating programmed cell death. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of autophagy and its regulation in cancer.

  8. Autophagy in health and disease: focus on the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mialet-Perez, Jeanne; Vindis, Cécile

    2017-12-12

    Autophagy is a highly conserved mechanism of lysosome-mediated protein and organelle degradation that plays a crucial role in maintaining cellular homeostasis. In the last few years, specific functions for autophagy have been identified in many tissues and organs. In the cardiovascular system, autophagy appears to be essential to heart and vessel homeostasis and function; however defective or excessive autophagy activity seems to contribute to major cardiovascular disorders including heart failure (HF) or atherosclerosis. Here, we review the current knowledge on the role of cardiovascular autophagy in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  9. Cold stress accentuates pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy and contractile dysfunction: role of TRPV1/AMPK-mediated autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Songhe; Xu, Dezhong

    2013-12-06

    Severe cold exposure and pressure overload are both known to prompt oxidative stress and pathological alterations in the heart although the interplay between the two remains elusive. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a nonselective cation channel activated in response to a variety of exogenous and endogenous physical and chemical stimuli including heat and capsaicin. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of cold exposure on pressure overload-induced cardiac pathological changes and the mechanism involved. Adult male C57 mice were subjected to abdominal aortic constriction (AAC) prior to exposure to cold temperature (4 °C) for 4 weeks. Cardiac geometry and function, levels of TRPV1, mitochondrial, and autophagy-associated proteins including AMPK, mTOR, LC3B, and P62 were evaluated. Sustained cold stress triggered cardiac hypertrophy, compromised depressed myocardial contractile capacity including lessened fractional shortening, peak shortening, and maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening, enhanced ROS production, and mitochondrial injury, the effects of which were negated by the TRPV1 antagonist SB366791. Western blot analysis revealed upregulated TRPV1 level and AMPK phosphorylation, enhanced ratio of LC3II/LC3I, and downregulated P62 following cold exposure. Cold exposure significantly augmented AAC-induced changes in TRPV1, phosphorylation of AMPK, LC3 isoform switch, and p62, the effects of which were negated by SB366791. In summary, these data suggest that cold exposure accentuates pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy and contractile defect possibly through a TRPV1 and autophagy-dependent mechanism. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Role of autophagy in development and progression of acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Shuli

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is considered an autodigestive disorder in which inappropriate activation of trypsinogen to trypsin within pancreatic acinar cells leads to the development of pancreatitis. Autophagy is an evolutionarily preserved degradation process of cytoplasmic cellular constituents, and it is one of the early pathological processes in acute pancreatitis. Autophagic flux is impaired in acute pancreatitis, which mediates the key pathologic responses of this disease. Impaired autophagy, dysfunction of lysosomes, and dysregulation of autophagy suggest a disorder of the endolysosomal pathway in acute pancreatitis. The role of autophagy in acute pancreatitis is discussed from the aspects of autophagic process, autophagy and activation of trypsinogen, impaired autophagy and acute pancreatitis, and defective autophagy promoting inflammation.

  11. A novel protoapigenone analog RY10-4 induces breast cancer MCF-7 cell death through autophagy via the Akt/mTOR pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xuenong; Wei, Han; Liu, Ziwei; Yuan, Qianying [Key Laboratory of Natural Medicinal Chemistry and Resource Evaluation of Hubei Province, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China); Wei, Anhua [Department of Pharmacy, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China); Shi, Du; Yang, Xian [Key Laboratory of Natural Medicinal Chemistry and Resource Evaluation of Hubei Province, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China); Ruan, Jinlan, E-mail: jinlan8152@163.com [Key Laboratory of Natural Medicinal Chemistry and Resource Evaluation of Hubei Province, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China)

    2013-07-15

    Protoapigenone is a unique flavonoid and enriched in many ferns, showing potent antitumor activity against a broad spectrum of human cancer cell lines. RY10-4, a modified version of protoapigenone, manifested better anti-proliferation activity in human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. The cytotoxicity of RY10-4 against MCF-7 cells is exhibited in both time- and concentration-dependent manners. Here we investigated a novel effect of RY10-4 mediated autophagy in autophagy defect MCF-7 cells. Employing immunofluorescence assay for microtubule-associated protein light-chain 3 (LC3), monodansylcadaverine staining, Western blotting analyses for LC3 and p62 as well as ultrastructural analysis by transmission electron microscopy, we showed that RY10-4 induced autophagy in MCF-7 cells but protoapigenone did not. Meanwhile, inhibition of autophagy by pharmacological and genetic approaches significantly increased the viability of RY10-4 treated cells, suggesting that the autophagy induced by RY10-4 played as a promotion mechanism for cell death. Further studies revealed that RY10-4 suppressed the activation of mTOR and p70S6K via the Akt/mTOR pathway. Our results provided new insights for the mechanism of RY10-4 induced cell death and the cause of RY10-4 showing better antitumor activity than protoapigenone, and supported further evidences for RY10-4 as a lead to design a promising antitumor agent. - Highlights: • We showed that RY10-4 induced autophagy in MCF-7 cells but protoapigenone did not. • Autophagy induced by RY10-4 played as a promotion mechanism for cell death. • RY10-4 induced autophagy in MCF-7 cell through the Akt/mTOR pathway. • We provided new insights for the mechanism of RY10-4 induced cell death.

  12. Effects of RNAi-mediated TUSC3 silencing on radiation-induced autophagy and radiation sensitivity of human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 under hypoxic condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ya-Guang; Liang, Nai-Xin; Qin, Ying-Zhi; Ma, Dong-Jie; Huang, Chang-Jin; Liu, Lei; Li, Shan-Qing

    2016-11-30

    This study examined the effects of RNAi-mediated TUSC3 silencing on radiation-induced autophagy and radiation sensitivity of human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 under hypoxic condition. Different CoCl 2 concentrations were used to treat A549 cells and establish a CoCl 2 -induced hypoxic model of A549 cells. MTT and clone formation assays were used to determine the effects of different concentrations of CoCl 2 on the growth and proliferation of A549 cells treated by different doses of X-ray irradiation. The siRNA-expressing vector was transfected by liposomes and for silencing of TUSC3. Flow cytometry was used to measure cell cycle changes and apoptosis rate. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay was performed to detect the expression of TUSC3 mRNA. Western blotting was applied to detect the changes of TUSC3, LC3, and p62 proteins under different CoCl 2 concentrations and after siRNA silencing of TUSC3. The TUSC3 levels in A549 cells increased under hypoxic conditions in a dose-dependent manner (P A549 cells and promoted apoptosis (P A549 cells showed significantly increased growth and proliferation and decreased apoptosis (P A549 cell growth and proliferation after radiotherapy under hypoxic condition, promoted apoptosis, increased G0/G1 phase cells, and reduced S phase cells (all P A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells.

  13. Phosphorylation-regulated degradation of the tumor-suppressor form of PED by chaperone-mediated autophagy in lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintavalle, Cristina; Di Costanzo, Stefania; Zanca, Ciro; Tasset, Immaculada; Fraldi, Alessandro; Incoronato, Mariarosaria; Mirabelli, Peppino; Monti, Maria; Ballabio, Andrea; Pucci, Piero; Cuervo, Ana Maria; Condorelli, Gerolama

    2014-10-01

    PED/PEA-15 is a death effector domain (DED) family member with a variety of effects on cell growth and metabolism. To get further insight into the role of PED in cancer, we aimed to find new PED interactors. Using tandem affinity purification, we identified HSC70 (Heat Shock Cognate Protein of 70 kDa)-which, among other processes, is involved in chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA)-as a PED-interacting protein. We found that PED has two CMA-like motifs (i.e., KFERQ), one of which is located within a phosphorylation site, and demonstrate that PED is a bona fide CMA substrate and the first example in which phosphorylation modifies the ability of HSC70 to access KFERQ-like motifs and target the protein for lysosomal degradation. Phosphorylation of PED switches its function from tumor suppression to tumor promotion, and we show that HSC70 preferentially targets the unphosphorylated form of PED to CMA. Therefore, we propose that the up-regulated CMA activity characteristic of most types of cancer cell enhances oncogenesis by shifting the balance of PED function toward tumor promotion. This mechanism is consistent with the notion of a therapeutic potential for targeting CMA in cancer, as inhibition of this autophagic pathway may help restore a physiological ratio of PED forms. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Curcumin Suppresses Proliferation and Migration of MDA-MB-231 Breast Cancer Cells through Autophagy-Dependent Akt Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yemin; Zhou, Yu; Li, Mingxin; Wang, Changhua

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have evidenced that the anticancer potential of curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a main yellow bioactive compound from plant turmeric was mediated by interfering with PI3K/Akt signaling. However, the underlying molecular mechanism is still poorly understood. This study experimentally revealed that curcumin treatment reduced Akt protein expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, along with an activation of autophagy and suppression of ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) function. The curcumin-reduced Akt expression, cell proliferation, and migration were prevented by genetic and pharmacological inhibition of autophagy but not by UPS inhibition. Additionally, inactivation of AMPK by its specific inhibitor compound C or by target shRNA-mediated silencing attenuated curcumin-activated autophagy. Thus, these results indicate that curcumin-stimulated AMPK activity induces activation of the autophagy-lysosomal protein degradation pathway leading to Akt degradation and the subsequent suppression of proliferation and migration in breast cancer cell. PMID:26752181

  15. Crosstalk between 6-OHDA-induced autophagy and apoptosis in PC12 cells is mediated by phosphorylation of Raf-1/ERK1/2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Ma, Lan; Fan, Ying; Zhang, Yina; Sun, Dianjun; Wu, Bo

    2016-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a degenerative brain disorder characterized by motor symptoms and loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra. The mechanisms for DA cell death in PD have been extensively investigated using PC12 cells treated with a dopamine neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). 6-OHDA may induce both autophagy and apoptosis in PC12 cells. However, it remains unclear whether crosstalk occurs between autophagy and apoptosis in PC12 cells treated with 6-OHDA and whether Raf-1/ERK1/2 and their phosphorylation status play a role in autophagy. In this study, we used MDC staining assay and flow cytometry and found that 6-OHDA induced autophagy in PC12 cells. This induction was inhibited by the autophagy inhibitor 3-MA. Our electron microscopy observations also supported 6-OHDA induced autophagy in PC12 cells. Apoptosis of PC12 cells was increased with inhibition of autophagy by 3-MA. In addition, Inhibition of Raf-1 resulted in a decreased 6-OHDA-induced autophagy rate among PC12 cells. Phosphorylation levels of Raf-1 and ERK1/2 were increased in PC12 cells treated with 6-OHDA and inhibited by co-treatment with 6-OHDA and 3-MA. These data suggest that crosstalk between 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis and autophagy in PC12 cells may be regulated via the Raf-1/ERK1/2 signaling pathway. Our data suggest a mechanism for 6-OHDA toxicity in PC12 cells, contributing to our understanding of the pathogenesis of PD.

  16. Role of autophagy in HIV infection and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardacci, R; Ciccosanti, F; Marsella, C; Ippolito, G; Piacentini, M; Fimia, G M

    2017-05-01

    The aim of autophagy is to re-establish homeostasis in response to a variety of stress conditions. By forming double-membrane vesicles, autophagy engulfs damaged or superfluous cytoplasmic material and recycles degradation products for new synthesis or energy production. Of note, the same mechanism is used to capture pathogens and has important implications in both innate and adaptive immunity. To establish a chronic infection, pathogens have therefore evolved multiple mechanisms to evade autophagy-mediated degradation. HIV infection represents one of the best characterized systems in which autophagy is disarmed by a virus using multiple strategies to prevent the sequestration and degradation of its proteins and to establish a chronic infection. HIV alters autophagy at various stages of the process in both infected and bystander cells. In particular, the HIV proteins TAT, NEF and ENV are involved in this regulation by either blocking or stimulating autophagy through direct interaction with autophagy proteins and/or modulation of the mTOR pathway. Although the roles of autophagy during HIV infection are multiple and vary amongst the different cell types, several lines of evidence point to a potential beneficial effect of stimulating autophagy-mediated lysosomal degradation to potentiate the immune response to HIV. Characterization of the molecular mechanisms regulating selective autophagy is expected to be valuable for developing new drugs able to specifically enhance the anti-HIV response. © 2017 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  17. Role of chaperone mediated autophagy (CMA) in the degradation of misfolded N-CoR protein in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Azhar Bin; Nin, Dawn Sijin; Tam, John; Khan, Matiullah

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear receptor co-repressor (N-CoR) plays important role in transcriptional control mediated by several tumor suppressor proteins. Recently, we reported a role of misfolded-conformation dependent loss (MCDL) of N-CoR in the activation of oncogenic survival pathway in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Since N-CoR plays important role in cellular homeostasis in various tissues, therefore, we hypothesized that an APL like MCDL of N-CoR might also be involved in other malignancy. Indeed, our initial screening of N-CoR status in various leukemia and solid tumor cells revealed an APL like MCDL of N-CoR in primary and secondary tumor cells derived from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The NSCLC cell specific N-CoR loss could be blocked by Kaletra, a clinical grade protease inhibitor and by genistein, an inhibitor of N-CoR misfolding previously characterized by us. The misfolded N-CoR presented in NSCLC cells was linked to the amplification of ER stress and was subjected to degradation by NSCLC cell specific aberrant protease activity. In NSCLC cells, misfolded N-CoR was found to be associated with Hsc70, a molecular chaperone involved in chaperone mediated autophagy (CMA). Genetic and chemical inhibition of Lamp2A, a rate limiting factor of CMA, significantly blocked the loss of N-CoR in NSCLC cells, suggesting a crucial role of CMA in N-CoR degradation. These findings identify an important role of CMA-induced degradation of misfolded N-CoR in the neutralization of ER stress and suggest a possible role of misfolded N-CoR protein in the activation of oncogenic survival pathway in NSCLC cells.

  18. Pressure-mediated versus pharmacologic treatment of radial artery spasm during cardiac catheterisation: a randomised pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, Carlos; Corral, Juan M; Cavalcante, Rafael; Tateishi, Hiroki; Belzarez, Oward; Ribamar Costa, Jose; Costa, Ricardo; Chamié, Daniel; Onuma, Yoshinobu; de Winter, Robbert J; Abizaid, Alexandre; Serruys, Patrick W

    2017-04-07

    The aim of the study was to determine the effectiveness of a novel strategy to treat radial artery spasm (RAS). We conducted a prospective, randomised, single-centre, open-label trial comparing a novel strategy of pressure-mediated dilatation versus intra-arterial administration of a combination of nitroglycerine plus verapamil for the treatment of RAS. The primary endpoint was radial artery intraluminal diameter acute gain assessed by quantitative radial angiography. After screening two hundred and twenty consecutive cases, twenty patients presented with RAS and were randomised 1:1 to either strategy. Overall the mean age was 60.8±11.5 years and 53% were females. Pre-treatment angiographic characteristics were similar between the groups. The primary endpoint of radial artery acute gain was significantly greater in the pressure-mediated dilatation group (0.85±0.46 mm vs. 0.03±0.24 mm, p<0.001). Blood pressure drop was significantly lower in the pressure-mediated dilatation group (ΔBP -3.8±24 vs. -31.6±19 mmHg, p<0.001). There was one case of radial artery occlusion in the pressure-mediated dilatation group at follow-up. Short-duration pain was observed during the application of pressure. Pressure-mediated dilatation for the treatment of RAS was feasible, with superior angiographic results compared to a pharmacologic vasodilator strategy, with no impact on blood pressure. This novel approach proved to be safe and effective and should be tested in a large randomised trial.

  19. Raising the roof: the preferential pharmacological stimulation of Th1 and th2 responses mediated by NKT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    East, James E; Kennedy, Andrew J; Webb, Tonya J

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells serve as a bridge between the innate and adaptive immune systems, and manipulating their effector functions can have therapeutic significances in the treatment of autoimmunity, transplant biology, infectious disease, and cancer. NKT cells are a subset of T cells that express cell-surface markers characteristic of both natural killer cells and T cells. These unique immunologic cells have been demonstrated to serve as a link between the innate and adaptive immune systems through their potent cytokine production following the recognition of a range of lipid antigens, mediated through presentation of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I like CD1d molecule, in addition to the NKT cell's cytotoxic capabilities upon activation. Although a number of glycolipid antigens have been shown to complex with CD1d molecules, most notably the marine sponge derived glycolipid alpha-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer), there has been debate as to the identity of the endogenous activating lipid presented to the T-cell receptor (TCR) via the CD1d molecule on antigen-presenting cells (APCs). This review aims to survey the use of pharmacological agents and subsequent structure-activity relationships (SAR) that have given insight into the binding interaction of glycolipids with both the CD1d molecules as well as the TCR and the subsequent immunologic response of NKT cells. These studies not only elucidate basic binding interactions but also pave the way for future pharmacological modulation of NKT cell responses. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Raising the Roof: The Preferential Pharmacological Stimulation of Th1 and Th2 Responses Mediated by NKT Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    East, James E.; Kennedy, Andrew J.; Webb, Tonya J.

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells serve as a bridge between the innate and adaptive immune systems, and manipulating their effector functions can have therapeutic significances in the treatment of autoimmunity, transplant biology, infectious disease, and cancer. NKT cells are a subset of T cells that express cell-surface markers characteristic of both natural killer cells and T cells. These unique immunologic cells have been demonstrated to serve as a link between the innate and adaptive immune systems through their potent cytokine production following the recognition of a range of lipid antigens, mediated through presentation of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I like CD1d molecule, in addition to the NKT cell′s cytotoxic capabilities upon activation. Although a number of glycolipid antigens have been shown to complex with CD1d molecules, most notably the marine sponge derived glycolipid alpha-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer), there has been debate as to the identity of the endogenous activating lipid presented to the T-cell receptor (TCR) via the CD1d molecule on antigen-presenting cells (APCs). This review aims to survey the use of pharmacological agents and subsequent structure–activity relationships (SAR) that have given insight into the binding interaction of glycolipids with both the CD1d molecules as well as the TCR and the subsequent immunologic response of NKT cells. These studies not only elucidate basic binding interactions but also pave the way for future pharmacological modulation of NKT cell responses. PMID:23239102

  1. Inhibition of Cellular Autophagy Deranges Dengue Virion Maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Roberto; Nagamine, Claude M.; Spagnolo, Jeannie; Méndez, Ernesto; Rahe, Michael; Gale, Michael; Yuan, Junying

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is an important component of the innate immune response, directly destroying many intracellular pathogens. However, some pathogens, including several RNA viruses, subvert the autophagy pathway, or components of the pathway, to facilitate their replication. In the present study, the effect of inhibiting autophagy on the growth of dengue virus was tested using a novel inhibitor, spautin-1 (specific and potent autophagy inhibitor 1). Inhibition of autophagy by spautin-1 generated heat-sensitive, noninfectious dengue virus particles, revealing a large effect of components of the autophagy pathway on viral maturation. A smaller effect on viral RNA accumulation was also observed. Conversely, stimulation of autophagy resulted in increased viral titers and pathogenicity in the mouse. We conclude that the presence of functional autophagy components facilitates viral RNA replication and, more importantly, is required for infectious dengue virus production. Pharmacological inhibition of host processes is an attractive antiviral strategy to avoid selection of treatment-resistant variants, and inhibitors of autophagy may prove to be valuable therapeutics against dengue virus infection and pathogenesis. PMID:23175363

  2. Adipocyte Fatty Acid Binding Protein Potentiates Toxic Lipids-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Macrophages via Inhibition of Janus Kinase 2-dependent Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoo, Ruby L C; Shu, Lingling; Cheng, Kenneth K Y; Wu, Xiaoping; Liao, Boya; Wu, Donghai; Zhou, Zhiguang; Xu, Aimin

    2017-01-17

    Lipotoxicity is implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity-related inflammatory complications by promoting macrophage infiltration and activation. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (A-FABP) play key roles in obesity and mediate inflammatory activity through similar signaling pathways. However, little is known about their interplay in lipid-induced inflammatory responses. Here, we showed that prolonged treatment of palmitic acid (PA) increased ER stress and expression of A-FABP, which was accompanied by reduced autophagic flux in macrophages. Over-expression of A-FABP impaired PA-induced autophagy associating with enhanced ER stress and pro-inflammatory cytokine production, while genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of A-FABP reversed the conditions. PA-induced expression of autophagy-related protein (Atg)7 was attenuated in A-FABP over-expressed macrophages, but was elevated in A-FABP-deficient macrophages. Mechanistically, A-FABP potentiated the effects of PA by inhibition of Janus Kinase (JAK)2 activity, thus diminished PA-induced Atg7 expression contributing to impaired autophagy and further augmentation of ER stress. These findings suggest that A-FABP acts as autophagy inhibitor to instigate toxic lipids-induced ER stress through inhibition of JAK2-dependent autophagy, which in turn triggers inflammatory responses in macrophages. A-FABP-JAK2 axis may represent an important pathological pathway contributing to obesity-related inflammatory diseases.

  3. Novel Pharmacological Targets for NF2-Mediated Yap/Taz Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    coactivator of the TEAD family of transcription factors. In the absence of Merlin, Yap translocates to the nucleus where it binds to TEADs to promote...human schannoma cell line, HEI-193. Since the TEAD family of transcription factors are essential in mediating Yap-dependent gene expression we...developed DNA constructs that carry multimerized copies of a TEAD -DNA binding site (TBS) upstream of a promoter driving the expression of luciferase or

  4. Optineurin is an autophagy receptor for damaged mitochondria in parkin-mediated mitophagy that is disrupted by an ALS-linked mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yvette C.; Holzbaur, Erika L. F.

    2014-01-01

    Mitophagy is a cellular quality control pathway in which the E3 ubiquitin ligase parkin targets damaged mitochondria for degradation by autophagosomes. We examined the role of optineurin in mitophagy, as mutations in optineurin are causative for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and glaucoma, diseases in which mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated. Using live cell imaging, we demonstrate the parkin-dependent recruitment of optineurin to mitochondria damaged by depolarization or reactive oxygen species. Parkin’s E3 ubiquitin ligase activity is required to ubiquitinate outer mitochondrial membrane proteins, allowing optineurin to stably associate with ubiquitinated mitochondria via its ubiquitin binding domain; in the absence of parkin, optineurin transiently localizes to damaged mitochondrial tips. Following optineurin recruitment, the omegasome protein double FYVE-containing protein 1 (DFCP1) transiently localizes to damaged mitochondria to initialize autophagosome formation and the recruitment of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3). Optineurin then induces autophagosome formation around damaged mitochondria via its LC3 interaction region (LIR) domain. Depletion of endogenous optineurin inhibits LC3 recruitment to mitochondria and inhibits mitochondrial degradation. These defects are rescued by expression of siRNA-resistant wild-type optineurin, but not by an ALS-associated mutant in the ubiquitin binding domain (E478G), or by optineurin with a mutation in the LIR domain. Optineurin and p62/SQSTM1 are independently recruited to separate domains on damaged mitochondria, and p62 is not required for the recruitment of either optineurin or LC3 to damaged mitochondria. Thus, our study establishes an important role for optineurin as an autophagy receptor in parkin-mediated mitophagy and demonstrates that defects in a single pathway can lead to neurodegenerative diseases with distinct pathologies. PMID:25294927

  5. Studying the Effect of Downregulating Autophagy-Related Gene LC3 on TLR3 Apoptotic Pathway Mediated by dsRNA in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guilan; Zhang, Maona; Li, Yunlong; Zhou, Jiaming; Chen, Li

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the role of the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) activated Toll-interleukin-1 receptor domain-containing adaptor inducing interferon β (TRIF) signal pathway in triggering apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. First, siRNA targeted autophagy-related gene LC3 (pU6H1-LC3 siRNA and siLC3) and a dsRNA used as a Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) ligand was constructed and synthesized, respectively. Then, a human HCC cell line was transfected with dsRNA, siLC3, and cotransfected with siLC3 and dsRNA (siLC3+dsRNA), respectively. Finally, quantification real-time polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, and immunofluorescence staining were used in the HCC line (SMMC7721), and MTT assay, flow cytometry, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end-labeling, and transmission electron microscopy were used in an HCC xenograft model of nude mice. Human umbilical vein endothelial cell tube forming assay, color Doppler ultrasonographic flow image examination, and CD34-positive microvessel density were used in vitro and in vivo . Compared with untreated cells, the protein and mRNA expression of TLR3 and TRIF was up-regulated, in order, siLC3+dsRNA, dsRNA, and siLC3. Expression of LC3 was obviously down-regulated and the autophagosomes were significantly decreased in siLC3+dsRNA and siLC3, whereas in dsRNA (p protein, which can promote triggering of apoptosis by the TLR3-TRIF pathway. dsRNA and siLC3 could play anticancer roles in coordination.

  6. Reclassifying Anaphylaxis to Neuromuscular Blocking Agents Based on the Presumed Patho-Mechanism: IgE-Mediated, Pharmacological Adverse Reaction or ?Innate Hypersensitivity??

    OpenAIRE

    Spoerl, David; Nigolian, Haig; Czarnetzki, Christoph; Harr, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Approximately 60% of perioperative anaphylactic reactions are thought to be immunoglobulin IgE mediated, whereas 40% are thought to be non-IgE mediated hypersensitivity reactions (both considered non-dose-related type B adverse drug reactions). In both cases, symptoms are elicited by mast cell degranulation. Also, pharmacological reactions to drugs (type A, dose-related) may sometimes mimic symptoms triggered by mast cell degranulation. In case of hypotension, bronchospasm, or urticarial rash...

  7. The lack of autophagy triggers precocious activation of Notch signaling during Drosophila oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Julia M I; Hafen, Ernst; Köhler, Katja

    2012-12-05

    The proper balance of autophagy, a lysosome-mediated degradation process, is indispensable for oogenesis in Drosophila. We recently demonstrated that egg development depends on autophagy in the somatic follicle cells (FC), but not in the germline cells (GCs). However, the lack of autophagy only affects oogenesis when FCs are autophagy-deficient but GCs are wild type, indicating that a dysfunctional signaling between soma and germline may be responsible for the oogenesis defects. Thus, autophagy could play an essential role in modulating signal transduction pathways during egg development. Here, we provide further evidence for the necessity of autophagy during oogenesis and demonstrate that autophagy is especially required in subsets of FCs. Generation of autophagy-deficient FCs leads to a wide range of phenotypes that are similar to mutants with defects in the classical cell-cell signaling pathways in the ovary. Interestingly, we observe that loss of autophagy leads to a precocious activation of the Notch pathway in the FCs as monitored by the expression of Cut and Hindsight, two downstream effectors of Notch signaling. Our findings point to an unexpected function for autophagy in the modulation of the Notch signaling pathway during Drosophila oogenesis and suggest a function for autophagy in proper receptor activation. Egg development is affected by an imbalance of autophagy between signal sending (germline) and signal receiving cell (FC), thus the lack of autophagy in the germline is likely to decrease the amount of active ligand and accordingly compensates for increased signaling in autophagy-defective follicle cells.

  8. Autophagy in brain ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Kost

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an intracellular process of macromolecule and organelle degradation, which plays an important role both in maintaining homeostasis and in responding to various harmful stimuli. Recent studies clearly indicate upregulation of autophagy in neurons challenged with brain ischemia. In this paper we present biosynthesis of autophagosomes as well as the role and molecular mechanisms of basal and induced neuronal autophagy. We have also reviewed recently published papers concerning the potential role of autophagy in brain ischemia. Results of both in vivo and in vitro experimental studies indicate that signaling pathways related to autophagy might become a target of new neuroprotective strategies.

  9. The Salmonella effectors SseF and SseG inhibit Rab1A-mediated autophagy to facilitate intracellular bacterial survival and replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhao-Zhong; Jiang, An-Jie; Mao, An-Wen; Feng, Yuhan; Wang, Weinan; Li, Jingjing; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Xing, Ke; Peng, Xue

    2018-04-02

    In mammalian cells, autophagy plays crucial roles in restricting further spread of invading bacterial pathogens. Previous studies have established that the Salmonella virulence factors SseF and SseG are required for intracellular bacterial survival and replication. However, the underlying mechanism by which these two effectors facilitate bacterial infection remains elusive. Here, we report that SseF and SseG secreted by Salmonella Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) inhibit autophagy in host cells and thereby establish a replicative niche for the bacteria in the cytosol. Mechanistically, SseF and SseG impaired autophagy initiation by directly interacting with the small GTPase Rab1A in the host cell. This interaction abolished Rab1A activation by disrupting the interaction with its guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), the TRAPPIII ( abbreviation for the transport protein particle III ) complex. This disruption of Rab1A signaling blocked the recruitment and activation of Unc51 like autophagy activating kinase 1 (ULK1) and decreased phosphatidylinositol 3 phosphate biogenesis, which ultimately impeded autophagosome formation. Furthermore, SseF or SseG deficient bacterial strains exhibited reduced survival and growth in both mammalian cell lines and mouse infection models, and Rab1A depletion could rescue these defects. These results reveal that virulence factor dependent inactivation of the small GTPase Rab1A represents a previously unrecognized strategy of S. Typhimurium to evade autophagy and the host defense system. Copyright © 2018, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  10. Autophagy in proximal tubules protects against acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Man; Wei, Qingqing; Dong, Guie; Komatsu, Masaaki; Su, Yunchao; Dong, Zheng

    2012-12-01

    Autophagy is induced in renal tubular cells during acute kidney injury; however, whether this is protective or injurious remains controversial. We address this question by pharmacologic and genetic blockade of autophagy using mouse models of cisplatin- and ischemia-reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury. Chloroquine, a pharmacological inhibitor of autophagy, blocked autophagic flux and enhanced acute kidney injury in both models. Rapamycin, however, activated autophagy and protected against cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury. We also established a renal proximal tubule-specific autophagy-related gene 7-knockout mouse model shown to be defective in both basal and cisplatin-induced autophagy in kidneys. Compared with wild-type littermates, these knockout mice were markedly more sensitive to cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury as indicated by renal functional loss, tissue damage, and apoptosis. Mechanistically, these knockout mice had heightened activation of p53 and c-Jun N terminal kinase, the signaling pathways contributing to cisplatin acute kidney injury. Proximal tubular cells isolated from the knockout mice were more sensitive to cisplatin-induced apoptosis than cells from wild-type mice. In addition, the knockout mice were more sensitive to renal ischemia-reperfusion injury than their wild-type littermates. Thus, our results establish a renoprotective role of tubular cell autophagy in acute kidney injury where it may interfere with cell killing mechanisms.

  11. Plumbagin induces cell cycle arrest and autophagy and suppresses epithelial to mesenchymal transition involving PI3K/Akt/mTOR-mediated pathway in human pancreatic cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang F

    2015-01-01

    PLB and investigate the underlying mechanism in human pancreatic cancer PANC-1 and BxPC-3 cells. The results showed that PLB exhibited potent inducing effects on cell cycle arrest in PANC-1 and BxPC-3 cells via the modulation of cell cycle regulators including CDK1/CDC2, cyclin B1, cyclin D1, p21 Waf1/Cip1, p27 Kip1, and p53. PLB treatment concentration- and time-dependently increased the percentage of autophagic cells and significantly increased the expression level of phosphatase and tensin homolog, beclin 1, and the ratio of LC3-II over LC3-I in both PANC-1 and BxPC-3 cells. PLB induced inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK pathways and activation of 5'-AMP-dependent kinase as indicated by their altered phosphorylation, contributing to the proautophagic activities of PLB in both cell lines. Furthermore, SB202190, a selective inhibitor of p38 MAPK, and wortmannin, a potent, irreversible, and selective PI3K inhibitor, remarkably enhanced PLB-induced autophagy in PANC-1 and BxPC-3 cells, indicating the roles of PI3K and p38 MAPK mediated signaling pathways in PLB-induced autophagic cell death in both cell lines. In addition, PLB significantly inhibited epithelial to mesenchymal transition phenotype in both cell lines with an increase in the expression level of E-cadherin and a decrease in N-cadherin. Moreover, PLB treatment significantly suppressed the expression of Sirt1 in both cell lines. These findings show that PLB promotes cell cycle arrest and autophagy but inhibits epithelial to mesenchymal transition phenotype in pancreatic cancer cells with the involvement of PI3K/protein kinase B/ mammalian target of rapamycin and p38 MAPK mediated pathways. Keywords: Plumbagin, pancreatic cancer, cell cycle, autophagy, EMT, Sirt1

  12. Autophagy in Inflammatory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J. S. Choi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy provides a mechanism for the turnover of cellular organelles and proteins through a lysosome-dependent degradation pathway. During starvation, autophagy exerts a homeostatic function that promotes cell survival by recycling metabolic precursors. Additionally, autophagy can interact with other vital processes such as programmed cell death, inflammation, and adaptive immune mechanisms, and thereby potentially influence disease pathogenesis. Macrophages deficient in autophagic proteins display enhanced caspase-1-dependent proinflammatory cytokine production and the activation of the inflammasome. Autophagy provides a functional role in infectious diseases and sepsis by promoting intracellular bacterial clearance. Mutations in autophagy-related genes, leading to loss of autophagic function, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease. Furthermore, autophagy-dependent mechanisms have been proposed in the pathogenesis of several pulmonary diseases that involve inflammation, including cystic fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension. Strategies aimed at modulating autophagy may lead to therapeutic interventions for diseases associated with inflammation.

  13. Autophagy in freshwater planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Estévez, Cristina

    2008-01-01

    Planarians provide a new and emergent in vivo model organism to study autophagy. On the whole, maintaining the normal homeostatic balance in planarians requires continuous dynamic adjustment of many processes, including proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, and autophagy. This makes them very different from other models where autophagy only occurs at very specific times and/or in very specific organs. This chapter aims to offer a general vision of planarians as a model organism, placing more emphasis on those characteristics related to autophagy and describing how autophagy fits into the processes of body remodeling during regeneration and starvation. We also define exactly what is known about autophagy in these organisms and we discuss the techniques available to study the relevant processes, as well as the techniques that are currently being developed. As such, this chapter will serve as a compilation of the techniques available to investigate autophagy in planarians.

  14. Autophagy-dependent secretion: contribution to tumor progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Keulers

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is best known as a lysosomal degradation and recycling pathway to maintain cellular homeostasis. During autophagy, cytoplasmic content is recognized and packed in autophagic vacuoles, or autophagosomes, and targeted for degradation. However, during the last years, it has become evident that the role of autophagy is not restricted to degradation alone but also mediates unconventional forms of secretion. Furthermore, cells with defects in autophagy apparently are able to reroute their cargo, like mitochondria, to the extracellular environment; effects that contribute to an array of pathologies. In this review we discuss the current knowledge of the physiological roles of autophagy-dependent secretion, i.e. the effect on inflammation and insulin/ hormone secretion. Finally, we focus on the effects of autophagy-dependent secretion on the tumour microenvironment and tumour progression. The autophagy mediated secreted factors may stimulate cellular proliferation via auto- and paracrine signaling. The autophagy mediated release of immune modulating proteins change the immunosuppresive tumor microenvironment and may promote an invasive phenotype. These effects may be either direct or indirect through facilitating formation of the mobilized vesicle, aid in anterograde trafficking or alterations in homeostasis and/or autonomous cell signaling.

  15. Low-density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein-1 (LRP1) Mediates Autophagy and Apoptosis Caused by Helicobacter pylori VacA*

    OpenAIRE

    Yahiro, Kinnosuke; Satoh, Mamoru; Nakano, Masayuki; Hisatsune, Junzo; Isomoto, Hajime; Sap, Jan; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Nomura, Fumio; Noda, Masatoshi; Moss, Joel; Hirayama, Toshiya

    2012-01-01

    In Helicobacter pylori infection, vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA)-induced mitochondrial damage leading to apoptosis is believed to be a major cause of cell death. It has also been proposed that VacA-induced autophagy serves as a host mechanism to limit toxin-induced cellular damage. Apoptosis and autophagy are two dynamic and opposing processes that must be balanced to regulate cell death and survival. Here we identify the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP1) as the VacA rec...

  16. Autophagy Inhibition Dysregulates TBK1 Signaling and Promotes Pancreatic Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shenghong; Imamura, Yu; Jenkins, Russell W; Cañadas, Israel; Kitajima, Shunsuke; Aref, Amir; Brannon, Arthur; Oki, Eiji; Castoreno, Adam; Zhu, Zehua; Thai, Tran; Reibel, Jacob; Qian, Zhirong; Ogino, Shuji; Wong, Kwok K; Baba, Hideo; Kimmelman, Alec C; Pasca Di Magliano, Marina; Barbie, David A

    2016-06-01

    Autophagy promotes tumor progression downstream of oncogenic KRAS, yet also restrains inflammation and dysplasia through mechanisms that remain incompletely characterized. Understanding the basis of this paradox has important implications for the optimal targeting of autophagy in cancer. Using a mouse model of cerulein-induced pancreatitis, we found that loss of autophagy by deletion of Atg5 enhanced activation of the IκB kinase (IKK)-related kinase TBK1 in vivo, associated with increased neutrophil and T-cell infiltration and PD-L1 upregulation. Consistent with this observation, pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of autophagy in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells, including suppression of the autophagy receptors NDP52 or p62, prolonged TBK1 activation and increased expression of CCL5, IL6, and several other T-cell and neutrophil chemotactic cytokines in vitro Defective autophagy also promoted PD-L1 upregulation, which is particularly pronounced downstream of IFNγ signaling and involves JAK pathway activation. Treatment with the TBK1/IKKε/JAK inhibitor CYT387 (also known as momelotinib) not only inhibits autophagy, but also suppresses this feedback inflammation and reduces PD-L1 expression, limiting KRAS-driven pancreatic dysplasia. These findings could contribute to the dual role of autophagy in oncogenesis and have important consequences for its therapeutic targeting. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(6); 520-30. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Autophagy: More Than a Nonselective Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulvio Reggiori

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a catabolic pathway conserved among eukaryotes that allows cells to rapidly eliminate large unwanted structures such as aberrant protein aggregates, superfluous or damaged organelles, and invading pathogens. The hallmark of this transport pathway is the sequestration of the cargoes that have to be degraded in the lysosomes by double-membrane vesicles called autophagosomes. The key actors mediating the biogenesis of these carriers are the autophagy-related genes (ATGs. For a long time, it was assumed that autophagy is a bulk process. Recent studies, however, have highlighted the capacity of this pathway to exclusively eliminate specific structures and thus better fulfil the catabolic necessities of the cell. We are just starting to unveil the regulation and mechanism of these selective types of autophagy, but what it is already clearly emerging is that structures targeted to destruction are accurately enwrapped by autophagosomes through the action of specific receptors and adaptors. In this paper, we will briefly discuss the impact that the selective types of autophagy have had on our understanding of autophagy.

  18. 5-HT1C receptor-mediated stimulation of inositol phosphate production in pig choroid plexus. A pharmacological characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, D; Waeber, C; Schoeffter, P; Palacios, J M; Dravid, A

    1989-03-01

    1) 5-HT (5-hydroxytryptamine, serotonin) induces inositol phosphate production in a pig choroid plexus preparation. This effect has been pharmacologically characterized and the data compared to those obtained from radioligand binding studies performed with [3H]mesulergine to 5-HT1C sites in pig choroid plexus membranes. 2) The rank order of potency of agonists stimulating inositol phosphate production was: alpha-methyl-5-HT greater than 1-methyl-5-HT greater than DOI greater than bufotenine = SKF 83566 = 5-HT greater than 5-MeO-DMT greater than 5-MeOT = RU 24969 greater than SCH 23390 greater than 5-CT. 8-OH-DPAT was virtually devoid of activity at 100 mumol/l. 3) The increase in inositol phosphate production induced by 5-HT and other agonists was surmountably antagonised by mesulergine, ketanserin and spiperone with pKB values of 8.7, 6.7 and 5.3, respectively. 4) The rank order of potency of antagonists was: metergoline greater than mesulergine greater than LY 53857 greater than ritanserin greater than methiothepin greater than mianserin greater than cyproheptadine greater than pirenperone greater than cinanserin greater than ketanserin greater than spiperone. The following antagonists were virtually devoid of activity at 100 mumol/l; pindolol, 21-009 and yohimbine. 5) The results obtained both with agonists and antagonists strongly support the view that 5-HT1C receptors mediate agonist induced production of inositol phosphates in pig choroid plexus.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Wogonoside inhibits cell growth and induces mitochondrial-mediated autophagy-related apoptosis in human colon cancer cells through the PI3K/AKT/mTOR/p70S6K signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chengzheng; Xing, Guozheng; Zhang, Mengying; Zhong, Min; Han, Zhen; He, Chiyi; Liu, Xiaoping

    2018-04-01

    Wogonoside, the main effective constituent of traditional Chinese medicine Scutellaria , belongs to the glucuronide family, with various functions, including detoxification, anti-inflammation and nourishing gallbladder, lowering blood pressure, diuresis and anti-allergic reactions. However, the effects of wogonoside on human colon cancer cells remain unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the anticancer effect of wogonoside on human colon cancer cells in vitro and its anticancer mechanisms. The results demonstrated that wogonoside significantly inhibited cell growth, induced apoptosis and mitochondrial-mediated autophagy of colon cancer cells. Furthermore, the results revealed that wogonoside significantly increased caspase-3 and caspase-9 expression levels, induced apoptosis regulator Bax/Bcl-2 and microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 protein expression, suppressed the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K)/RAC-α serine/threonine-protein kinase (Akt)/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR)/p70 S6 kinase (p70S6K) signaling pathway and induced p62 protein expression in colon cancer cells. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that wogonoside inhibits cell growth and induces mitochondrial mediated autophagy-related apoptosis in human colon cancer cells through modulation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K signaling pathway.

  20. Multi-layered control of Galectin-8 mediated autophagy during adenovirus cell entry through a conserved PPxY motif in the viral capsid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Montespan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cells employ active measures to restrict infection by pathogens, even prior to responses from the innate and humoral immune defenses. In this context selective autophagy is activated upon pathogen induced membrane rupture to sequester and deliver membrane fragments and their pathogen contents for lysosomal degradation. Adenoviruses, which breach the endosome upon entry, escape this fate by penetrating into the cytosol prior to autophagosome sequestration of the ruptured endosome. We show that virus induced membrane damage is recognized through Galectin-8 and sequesters the autophagy receptors NDP52 and p62. We further show that a conserved PPxY motif in the viral membrane lytic protein VI is critical for efficient viral evasion of autophagic sequestration after endosomal lysis. Comparing the wildtype with a PPxY-mutant virus we show that depletion of Galectin-8 or suppression of autophagy in ATG5-/- MEFs rescues infectivity of the PPxY-mutant virus while depletion of the autophagy receptors NDP52, p62 has only minor effects. Furthermore we show that wildtype viruses exploit the autophagic machinery for efficient nuclear genome delivery and control autophagosome formation via the cellular ubiquitin ligase Nedd4.2 resulting in reduced antigenic presentation. Our data thus demonstrate that a short PPxY-peptide motif in the adenoviral capsid permits multi-layered viral control of autophagic processes during entry.

  1. Crosstalk between autophagy and inflammatory signalling pathways: balancing defence and homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadwell, Ken

    2016-11-01

    Autophagy has broad functions in immunity, ranging from cell-autonomous defence to coordination of complex multicellular immune responses. The successful resolution of infection and avoidance of autoimmunity necessitates efficient and timely communication between autophagy and pathways that sense the immune environment. The recent literature indicates that a variety of immune mediators induce or repress autophagy. It is also becoming increasingly clear that immune signalling cascades are subject to regulation by autophagy, and that a return to homeostasis following a robust immune response is critically dependent on this pathway. Importantly, examples of non-canonical forms of autophagy in mediating immunity are pervasive. In this article, the progress in elucidating mechanisms of crosstalk between autophagy and inflammatory signalling cascades is reviewed. Improved mechanistic understanding of the autophagy machinery offers hope for treating infectious and inflammatory diseases.

  2. [Morphological analysis of autophagy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Fang; Hu, Zhuo-wei

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is an important homeostatic cellular recycling mechanism responsible for degrading injured or dysfunctional subcellular organelles and proteins in all living cells. The process of autophagy can be divided into three relatively independent steps: the initiation of phagophore, the formation of autophagosome and the maturation/degradation stage. Different morphological characteristics and molecular marker changes can be observed at these stages. Morphological approaches are useful to produce novel knowledge that would not be achieved through other experimental methods. Here we summarize the morphological methods in monitoring autophagy, the principles in data interpretation and the cautions that should be considered in the study of autophagy.

  3. Glycogen autophagy in glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotoulas, O B; Kalamidas, S A; Kondomerkos, D J

    2006-01-01

    Glycogen autophagy, the sequestration and degradation of cell glycogen in the autophagic vacuoles, is a selective, hormonally controlled and highly regulated process, representing a mechanism of glucose homeostasis under conditions of demand for the production of this sugar. In the newborn animals, this process is induced by glucagon secreted during the postnatal hypoglycemia and inhibited by insulin and parenteral glucose, which abolishes glucagon secretion. Hormonal action is mediated by the cAMP/protein kinase A (induction) and phosphoinositides/mTOR (inhibition) pathways that converge on common targets, such as the protein phosphatase 2A to regulate autophgosomal glycogen-hydrolyzing acid glucosidase and glycogen autophagy. Intralysosomal phosphate exchange reactions, which are affected by changes in the calcium levels and acid mannose 6- and acid glucose 6-phosphatase activities, can modify the intralysosomal composition in phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated glucose and promote the exit of free glucose through the lysosomal membrane. Glycogen autophagy-derived nonphosphorylated glucose assists the hyaloplasmic glycogen degradation-derived glucose 6-phosphate to combat postnatal hypoglycemia and participates in other metabolic pathways to secure the fine tuning of glucose homeostasis during the neonatal period.

  4. Autophagy modulates articular cartilage vesicle formation in primary articular chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Ann K; Gohr, Claudia M; Mitton-Fitzgerald, Elizabeth; Grewal, Rupinder; Ninomiya, James; Coyne, Carolyn B; Jackson, William T

    2015-05-22

    Chondrocyte-derived extracellular organelles known as articular cartilage vesicles (ACVs) participate in non-classical protein secretion, intercellular communication, and pathologic calcification. Factors affecting ACV formation and release remain poorly characterized; although in some cell types, the generation of extracellular vesicles is associated with up-regulation of autophagy. We sought to determine the role of autophagy in ACV production by primary articular chondrocytes. Using an innovative dynamic model with a light scatter nanoparticle counting apparatus, we determined the effects of autophagy modulators on ACV number and content in conditioned medium from normal adult porcine and human osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Healthy articular chondrocytes release ACVs into conditioned medium and show significant levels of ongoing autophagy. Rapamycin, which promotes autophagy, increased ACV numbers in a dose- and time-dependent manner associated with increased levels of autophagy markers and autophagosome formation. These effects were suppressed by pharmacologic autophagy inhibitors and short interfering RNA for ATG5. Caspase-3 inhibition and a Rho/ROCK inhibitor prevented rapamycin-induced increases in ACV number. Osteoarthritic chondrocytes, which are deficient in autophagy, did not increase ACV number in response to rapamycin. SMER28, which induces autophagy via an mTOR-independent mechanism, also increased ACV number. ACVs induced under all conditions had similar ecto-enzyme specific activities and types of RNA, and all ACVs contained LC3, an autophagosome-resident protein. These findings identify autophagy as a critical participant in ACV formation, and augment our understanding of ACVs in cartilage disease and repair. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Monitoring Autophagy in the Model Green Microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Esther Pérez-Pérez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an intracellular catabolic system that delivers cytoplasmic constituents and organelles in the vacuole. This degradative process is mediated by a group of proteins coded by autophagy-related (ATG genes that are widely conserved from yeasts to plants and mammals. Homologs of ATG genes have been also identified in algal genomes including the unicellular model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The development of specific tools to monitor autophagy in Chlamydomonas has expanded our current knowledge about the regulation and function of this process in algae. Recent findings indicated that autophagy is regulated by redox signals and the TOR network in Chlamydomonas and revealed that this process may play in important role in the control of lipid metabolism and ribosomal protein turnover in this alga. Here, we will describe the different techniques and approaches that have been reported to study autophagy and autophagic flux in Chlamydomonas.

  6. Bim Inhibits Autophagy by Recruiting Beclin 1 to Microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shouqing; Garcia-Arencibia, Moises; Zhao, Rui; Puri, Claudia; Toh, Pearl P.C.; Sadiq, Oana; Rubinsztein, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Bim is a proapoptotic BH3-only Bcl-2 family member. In response to death stimuli, Bim dissociates from the dynein light chain 1 (DYNLL1/LC8), where it is inactive, and can then initiate Bax/Bak-mediated mitochondria-dependent apoptosis. We found that Bim depletion increases autophagosome synthesis in cells and in vivo, and this effect is inhibited by overexpression of cell death-deficient Bim. Bim inhibits autophagy by interacting with Beclin 1, an autophagy regulator, and this interaction is facilitated by LC8. Bim bridges the Beclin 1-LC8 interaction and thereby inhibits autophagy by mislocalizing Beclin 1 to the dynein motor complex. Starvation, an autophagic stimulus, induces Bim phosphorylation, which abrogates LC8 binding to Bim, leading to dissociation of Bim and Beclin 1. Our data suggest that Bim switches locations between apoptosis-inactive/autophagy-inhibitory and apoptosis-active/autophagy-permissive sites. PMID:22742832

  7. Angiogenesis impairment in diabetes: role of methylglyoxal-induced receptor for advanced glycation endproducts, autophagy and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Liu

    Full Text Available Diabetes impairs physiological angiogenesis by molecular mechanisms that are not fully understood. Methylglyoxal (MGO, a metabolite of glycolysis, is increased in patients with diabetes. This study defined the role of MGO in angiogenesis impairment and tested the mechanism in diabetic animals. Endothelial cells and mouse aortas were subjected to Western blot analysis of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2 protein levels and angiogenesis evaluation by endothelial cell tube formation/migration and aortic ring assays. Incubation with MGO reduced VEGFR2 protein, but not mRNA, levels in a time and dose dependent manner. Genetic knockdown of the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE attenuated the reduction of VEGFR2. Overexpression of Glyoxalase 1, the enzyme that detoxifies MGO, reduced the MGO-protein adducts and prevented VEGFR2 reduction. The VEGFR2 reduction was associated with impaired angiogenesis. Suppression of autophagy either by inhibitors or siRNA, but not of the proteasome and caspase, normalized both the VEGFR2 protein levels and angiogenesis. Conversely, induction of autophagy either by rapamycin or overexpression of LC3 and Beclin-1 reduced VEGFR2 and angiogenesis. MGO increased endothelial LC3B and Beclin-1, markers of autophagy, which were accompanied by an increase of both autophagic flux (LC3 punctae and co-immunoprecipitation of VEGFR2 with LC3. Pharmacological or genetic suppression of peroxynitrite (ONOO(- generation not only blocked the autophagy but also reversed the reduction of VEGFR2 and angiogenesis. Like MGO-treated aortas from normglycemic C57BL/6J mice, aortas from diabetic db/db and Akita mice presented reductions of angiogenesis or VEGFR2. Administration of either autophagy inhibitor ex vivo or superoxide scavenger in vivo abolished the reductions. Taken together, MGO reduces endothelial angiogenesis through RAGE-mediated, ONOO(-dependent and autophagy-induced VEGFR2 degradation, which

  8. Autophagy and Alzheimer's Disease: From Molecular Mechanisms to Therapeutic Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Md Sahab; Stachowiak, Anna; Mamun, Abdullah Al; Tzvetkov, Nikolay T; Takeda, Shinya; Atanasov, Atanas G; Bergantin, Leandro B; Abdel-Daim, Mohamed M; Stankiewicz, Adrian M

    2018-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of progressive dementia in the elderly. It is characterized by a progressive and irreversible loss of cognitive abilities and formation of senile plaques, composed mainly of amyloid β (Aβ), and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), composed of tau protein, in the hippocampus and cortex of afflicted humans. In brains of AD patients the metabolism of Aβ is dysregulated, which leads to the accumulation and aggregation of Aβ. Metabolism of Aβ and tau proteins is crucially influenced by autophagy. Autophagy is a lysosome-dependent, homeostatic process, in which organelles and proteins are degraded and recycled into energy. Thus, dysfunction of autophagy is suggested to lead to the accretion of noxious proteins in the AD brain. In the present review, we describe the process of autophagy and its importance in AD. Additionally, we discuss mechanisms and genes linking autophagy and AD, i.e., the mTOR pathway, neuroinflammation, endocannabinoid system, ATG7, BCL2, BECN1, CDK5, CLU, CTSD, FOXO1, GFAP, ITPR1, MAPT, PSEN1, SNCA, UBQLN1 , and UCHL1 . We also present pharmacological agents acting via modulation of autophagy that may show promise in AD therapy. This review updates our knowledge on autophagy mechanisms proposing novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of AD.

  9. Autophagy in photodynamic therapy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Macroautophagy (autophagy) is crucial for cell survival during starvation and plays important roles in ... The work in this area is still limited. Keywords: Autophagy, Photodynamic therapy, Apoptosis, Cancer. Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research is indexed by Science .... photodynamic dosages did not result in.

  10. DAP-kinase-mediated phosphorylation on the BH3 domain of beclin 1 promotes dissociation of beclin 1 from Bcl-XL and induction of autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalckvar, Einat; Berissi, Hanna; Mizrachy, Liat; Idelchuk, Yulia; Koren, Itay; Eisenstein, Miriam; Sabanay, Helena; Pinkas-Kramarski, Ronit; Kimchi, Adi

    2009-01-01

    Autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved process, has functions both in cytoprotective and programmed cell death mechanisms. Beclin 1, an essential autophagic protein, was recently identified as a BH3-domain-only protein that binds to Bcl-2 anti-apoptotic family members. The dissociation of beclin 1 from its Bcl-2 inhibitors is essential for its autophagic activity, and therefore should be tightly controlled. Here, we show that death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) regulates this process. The activated form of DAPK triggers autophagy in a beclin-1-dependent manner. DAPK phosphorylates beclin 1 on Thr 119 located at a crucial position within its BH3 domain, and thus promotes the dissociation of beclin 1 from Bcl-XL and the induction of autophagy. These results reveal a substrate for DAPK that acts as one of the core proteins of the autophagic machinery, and they provide a new phosphorylation-based mechanism that reduces the interaction of beclin 1 with its inhibitors to activate the autophagic machinery. PMID:19180116

  11. Autophagy and Liver Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Cursio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver ischemia-reperfusion (I-R injury occurs during liver resection, liver transplantation, and hemorrhagic shock. The main mode of liver cell death after warm and/or cold liver I-R is necrosis, but other modes of cell death, as apoptosis and autophagy, are also involved. Autophagy is an intracellular self-digesting pathway responsible for removal of long-lived proteins, damaged organelles, and malformed proteins during biosynthesis by lysosomes. Autophagy is found in normal and diseased liver. Although depending on the type of ischemia, warm and/or cold, the dynamic process of liver I-R results mainly in adenosine triphosphate depletion and in production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, leads to both, a local ischemic insult and an acute inflammatory-mediated reperfusion injury, and results finally in cell death. This process can induce liver dysfunction and can increase patient morbidity and mortality after liver surgery and hemorrhagic shock. Whether autophagy protects from or promotes liver injury following warm and/or cold I-R remains to be elucidated. The present review aims to summarize the current knowledge in liver I-R injury focusing on both the beneficial and the detrimental effects of liver autophagy following warm and/or cold liver I-R.

  12. Autophagy and its implication in human oral diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ya-Qin; Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Gang

    2017-02-01

    Macroautophagy/autophagy is a conserved lysosomal degradation process essential for cell physiology and human health. By regulating apoptosis, inflammation, pathogen clearance, immune response and other cellular processes, autophagy acts as a modulator of pathogenesis and is a potential therapeutic target in diverse diseases. With regard to oral disease, autophagy can be problematic either when it is activated or impaired, because this process is involved in diverse functions, depending on the specific disease and its level of progression. In particular, activated autophagy functions as a cytoprotective mechanism under environmental stress conditions, which regulates tumor growth and mediates resistance to anticancer treatment in established tumors. During infections and inflammation, activated autophagy selectively delivers microbial antigens to the immune systems, and is therefore connected to the elimination of intracellular pathogens. Impaired autophagy contributes to oxidative stress, genomic instability, chronic tissue damage, inflammation and tumorigenesis, and is involved in aberrant bacterial clearance and immune priming. Hence, substantial progress in the study of autophagy provides new insights into the pathogenesis of oral diseases. This review outlines the mechanisms of autophagy, and highlights the emerging roles of this process in oral cancer, periapical lesions, periodontal diseases, and oral candidiasis.

  13. Role of Autophagy in Cisplatin Resistance in Ovarian Cancer Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Wu, Gen Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin-based treatment is the first line chemotherapy for several cancers including ovarian cancer. The development of cisplatin resistance results in treatment failure, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Here we show that the induction of autophagy plays an important role in cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer cells. Specifically, we show that cisplatin resistance is correlated with autophagy induction in a panel of ovarian cancer cells but not in immortalized human ovarian surface epithelial cells. Mechanistically, cisplatin treatment activates ERK and subsequently promotes autophagy. The inhibition of ERK activation with MEK inhibitors or knockdown of ERK expression with siRNA decreases cisplatin-induced autophagy and subsequently sensitizes ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. In ovarian cancer cells that have developed acquired cisplatin resistance, both ERK activation and autophagy induction are increased. Importantly, knockdown of ERK or inhibition of autophagy promotes cisplatin-induced apoptosis in acquired cisplatin-resistant cells. Collectively, our data indicate that ERK-mediated autophagy can lead to cisplatin resistance and suggest that cisplatin resistance can be overcome by inhibition of autophagy in ovarian cancer cells. PMID:24794870

  14. LC3B is indispensable for selective autophagy of p62 but not basal autophagy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Yoko; Sou, Yu-Shin; Kageyama, Shun; Takahashi, Takao; Ueno, Takashi; Tanaka, Keiji; Komatsu, Masaaki; Ichimura, Yoshinobu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Knockdown of LC3 or GABARAP families did not affect the basal autophagy. • LC3B has a higher affinity for the autophagy-specific substrate, p62, than GABARAPs. • siRNA-mediated knockdown of LC3B, but not that of GABARAPs, resulted in significant accumulation of p62. - Abstract: Autophagy is a unique intracellular protein degradation system accompanied by autophagosome formation. Besides its important role through bulk degradation in supplying nutrients, this system has an ability to degrade certain proteins, organelles, and invading bacteria selectively to maintain cellular homeostasis. In yeasts, Atg8p plays key roles in both autophagosome formation and selective autophagy based on its membrane fusion property and interaction with autophagy adaptors/specific substrates. In contrast to the single Atg8p in yeast, mammals have 6 homologs of Atg8p comprising LC3 and GABARAP families. However, it is not clear these two families have different or similar functions. The aim of this study was to determine the separate roles of LC3 and GABARAP families in basal/constitutive and/or selective autophagy. While the combined knockdown of LC3 and GABARAP families caused a defect in long-lived protein degradation through lysosomes, knockdown of each had no effect on the degradation. Meanwhile, knockdown of LC3B but not GABARAPs resulted in significant accumulation of p62/Sqstm1, one of the selective substrate for autophagy. Our results suggest that while mammalian Atg8 homologs are functionally redundant with regard to autophagosome formation, selective autophagy is regulated by specific Atg8 homologs

  15. LC3B is indispensable for selective autophagy of p62 but not basal autophagy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, Yoko [Protein Metabolism Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan); Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Sou, Yu-Shin; Kageyama, Shun [Protein Metabolism Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan); Takahashi, Takao [Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Ueno, Takashi [Division of Proteomics and Biomolecular Science, Center for Biomedical Research Resources, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Tanaka, Keiji [Laboratory of Protein Metabolism, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan); Komatsu, Masaaki, E-mail: komatsu-ms@igakuken.or.jp [Protein Metabolism Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan); Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Niigata University, Niigata 951-8510 (Japan); Ichimura, Yoshinobu, E-mail: ichimura-ys@igakuken.or.jp [Protein Metabolism Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo 156-8506 (Japan)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Knockdown of LC3 or GABARAP families did not affect the basal autophagy. • LC3B has a higher affinity for the autophagy-specific substrate, p62, than GABARAPs. • siRNA-mediated knockdown of LC3B, but not that of GABARAPs, resulted in significant accumulation of p62. - Abstract: Autophagy is a unique intracellular protein degradation system accompanied by autophagosome formation. Besides its important role through bulk degradation in supplying nutrients, this system has an ability to degrade certain proteins, organelles, and invading bacteria selectively to maintain cellular homeostasis. In yeasts, Atg8p plays key roles in both autophagosome formation and selective autophagy based on its membrane fusion property and interaction with autophagy adaptors/specific substrates. In contrast to the single Atg8p in yeast, mammals have 6 homologs of Atg8p comprising LC3 and GABARAP families. However, it is not clear these two families have different or similar functions. The aim of this study was to determine the separate roles of LC3 and GABARAP families in basal/constitutive and/or selective autophagy. While the combined knockdown of LC3 and GABARAP families caused a defect in long-lived protein degradation through lysosomes, knockdown of each had no effect on the degradation. Meanwhile, knockdown of LC3B but not GABARAPs resulted in significant accumulation of p62/Sqstm1, one of the selective substrate for autophagy. Our results suggest that while mammalian Atg8 homologs are functionally redundant with regard to autophagosome formation, selective autophagy is regulated by specific Atg8 homologs.

  16. Autophagy-regulating protease Atg4: structure, function, regulation and inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Tatsuro; Noda, Nobuo N

    2018-01-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular degradation system that contributes to cellular homeostasis through degradation of various targets such as proteins, organelles and microbes. Since autophagy is related to various diseases such as infection, neurodegenerative diseases and cancer, it is attracting attention as a new therapeutic target. Autophagy is mediated by dozens of autophagy-related (Atg) proteins, among which Atg4 is the sole protease that regulates autophagy through the processing and deconjugating of Atg8. As the Atg4 activity is essential and highly specific to autophagy, Atg4 is a prospective target for developing autophagy-specific inhibitors. In this review article, we summarize our current knowledge of the structure, function and regulation of Atg4 including efforts to develop Atg4-specific inhibitors. PMID:28901328

  17. Restarting stalled autophagy a potential therapeutic approach for the lipid storage disorder, Niemann-Pick type C1 disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sovan; Maetzel, Dorothea; Korolchuk, Viktor I; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2014-06-01

    Autophagy is essential for cellular homeostasis and its dysfunction in human diseases has been implicated in the accumulation of misfolded protein and in cellular toxicity. We have recently shown impairment in autophagic flux in the lipid storage disorder, Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1) disease associated with abnormal cholesterol sequestration, where maturation of autophagosomes is impaired due to defective amphisome formation caused by failure in SNARE machinery. Abrogation of autophagy also causes cholesterol accumulation, suggesting that defective autophagic flux in NPC1 disease may act as a primary causative factor not only by imparting its deleterious effects, but also by increasing cholesterol load. However, cholesterol depletion treatment with HP-β-cyclodextrin impedes autophagy, whereas pharmacologically stimulating autophagy restores its function independent of amphisome formation. Of potential therapeutic relevance is that a low dose of HP-β-cyclodextrin that does not perturb autophagy, coupled with an autophagy inducer, may rescue both the cholesterol and autophagy defects in NPC1 disease.

  18. NF-κB p65 repression by the sesquiterpene lactone, Helenalin, contributes to the induction of autophagy cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Chuan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous studies have demonstrated that autophagy plays a vital role in maintaining cellular homeostasis. Interestingly, several anticancer agents were found to exert their anticancer effects by triggering autophagy. Emerging data suggest that autophagy represents a novel mechanism that can be exploited for therapeutic benefit. Pharmacologically active natural compounds such as those from marine, terrestrial plants and animals represent a promising resource for novel anticancer drugs. There are several prominent examples from the past proving the success of natural products and derivatives exhibiting anticancer activity. Helenalin, a sesquiterpene lactone has been demonstrated to have potent anti-inflammatory and antitumor activity. Albeit previous studies demonstrating helenalin’s multi modal action on cellular proliferative and apoptosis, the mechanisms underlying its action are largely unexplained. Methods To deduce the mechanistic action of helenalin, cancer cells were treated with the drug at various concentrations and time intervals. Using western blot, FACS analysis, overexpression and knockdown studies, cellular signaling pathways were interrogated focusing on apoptosis and autophagy markers. Results We show here that helenalin induces sub-G1 arrest, apoptosis, caspase cleavage and increases the levels of the autophagic markers. Suppression of caspase cleavage by the pan caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-fmk, suppressed induction of LC3-B and Atg12 and reduced autophagic cell death, indicating caspase activity was essential for autophagic cell death induced by helenalin. Additionally, helenalin suppressed NF-κB p65 expression in a dose and time dependent manner. Exogenous overexpression of p65 was accompanied by reduced levels of cell death whereas siRNA mediated suppression led to augmented levels of caspase cleavage, autophagic cell death markers and increased cell death. Conclusions Taken together, these results show

  19. Regulation of autophagy in human skeletal muscle: effects of exercise, exercise training and insulin stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzen, Andreas M.; Madsen, Agnete B.; Kleinert, Maximilian; Treebak, Jonas T.; Lundsgaard, Anne‐Marie; Jensen, Thomas E.; Richter, Erik A.; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen; Kiens, Bente

    2016-01-01

    Key points Regulation of autophagy in human muscle in many aspects differs from the majority of previous reports based on studies in cell systems and rodent muscle.An acute bout of exercise and insulin stimulation reduce human muscle autophagosome content.An acute bout of exercise regulates autophagy by a local contraction‐induced mechanism.Exercise training increases the capacity for formation of autophagosomes in human muscle.AMPK activation during exercise seems insufficient to regulate autophagosome content in muscle, while mTORC1 signalling via ULK1 probably mediates the autophagy‐inhibiting effect of insulin. Abstract Studies in rodent muscle suggest that autophagy is regulated by acute exercise, exercise training and insulin stimulation. However, little is known about the regulation of autophagy in human skeletal muscle. Here we investigate the autophagic response to acute one‐legged exercise, one‐legged exercise training and subsequent insulin stimulation in exercised and non‐exercised human muscle. Acute one‐legged exercise decreased (Pexercise in human muscle. The decrease in LC3‐II/LC3‐I ratio did not correlate with activation of 5′AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) trimer complexes in human muscle. Consistently, pharmacological AMPK activation with 5‐aminoimidazole‐4‐carboxamide riboside (AICAR) in mouse muscle did not affect the LC3‐II/LC3‐I ratio. Four hours after exercise, insulin further reduced (Pexercised and non‐exercised leg in humans. This coincided with increased Ser‐757 phosphorylation of Unc51 like kinase 1 (ULK1), which is suggested as a mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) target. Accordingly, inhibition of mTOR signalling in mouse muscle prevented the ability of insulin to reduce the LC3‐II/LC3‐I ratio. In response to 3 weeks of one‐legged exercise training, the LC3‐II/LC3‐I ratio decreased (Pexercise and insulin stimulation reduce muscle autophagosome content, while exercise

  20. Nobiletin attenuates adverse cardiac remodeling after acute myocardial infarction in rats via restoring autophagy flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoqian; Zheng, Dechong; Qin, Yuyan; Liu, Zumei; Zhang, Guiping; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Zeng, Lihuan; Liang, Zhenye

    2017-10-14

    Our previous study showed that autophagy flux was impaired with sustained heart ischemia, which exacerbated adverse cardiac remodeling after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Here we investigated whether Nobiletin, a citrus polymethoxylated flavonoids, could restore the autophagy flux and improve cardiac prognosis after AMI. AMI was induced by ligating left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery in rats. Nobiletin improved the post-infarct cardiac dysfunction significantly and attenuated adverse cardiac remodeling. Meanwhile, Nobiletin protected H9C2 cells against oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) in vitro. The impaired autophagy flux due to ischemia was ameliorated after Nobiletin treatment by testing the autophagy substrate, LC3BⅡ and P62 protein level both in vivo and in vitro. GFP-mRFP-LC3 adenovirus transfection also supported that Nobiletin restored the impaired autophagy flux. Specifically, the autophagy flux inhibitor, chloroquine, but not 3 MA, alleviated Nobiletin-mediated protection against OGD. Notably, Nobiletin does not affect the activation of classical upstream autophagy signaling pathways. However, Nobiletin increased the lysosome acidation which also supported that Nobiletin accelerated autophagy flux. Taken together, our findings suggested that Nobiletin restored impaired autophagy flux and protected against acute myocardial infarction, suggesting a potential role of autophagy flux in Nobiletin-mediated myocardial protection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Inhibition of colorectal cancer stem cell survival and invasive potential by hsa-miR-140-5p mediated suppression of Smad2 and autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Haiyan; Fesler, Andrew; Ba, Yufeng; Wu, Song; Ju, Jingfang

    2015-08-14

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third highest mortality cancer in the United States and frequently metastasizes to liver and lung. Smad2 is a key element downstream of the TGF-β signaling pathway to regulate cancer metastasis by promoting epithelial to mesenchymal transition and maintaining the cancer stem cell (CSC) phenotype. In this study, we show that hsa-miR-140-5p directly targets Smad2 and overexpression of hsa-miR-140-5p in CRC cell lines decreases Smad2 expression levels, leading decreased cell invasion and proliferation, and increasing cell cycle arrest. Ectopic expression of hsa-miR-140-5p in colorectal CSCs inhibited CSC growth and sphere formation in vitro by disrupting autophagy. We have systematically identified targets of hsa-miR-140-5p involved in autophagy. Furthermore, overexpression of hsa-miR-140-5p in CSCs abolished tumor formation and metastasis in vivo. In addition, there is a progressive loss of hsa-miR-140-5p expression from normal colorectal mucosa to primary tumor tissues, with further reduction in liver metastatic tissues. Higher hsa-miR-140 expression is significantly correlated with better survival in stage III and IV colorectal cancer patients.The functional and clinical significance of hsa-miR-140-5p suggests that it is a key regulator in CRC progression and metastasis, and may have potential as a novel therapeutic molecule to treat CRC.

  2. Chemical Inhibition of Autophagy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baek, Eric; Lin Kim, Che; Gyeom Kim, Mi

    2016-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells activate and undergo apoptosis and autophagy for various environmental stresses. Unlike apoptosis, studies on increasing the production of therapeutic proteins in CHO cells by targeting the autophagy pathway are limited. In order to identify the effects of chemical...... autophagy inhibitors on the specific productivity (qp), nine chemical inhibitors that had been reported to target three different phases of autophagy (metformin, dorsomorphin, resveratrol, and SP600125 against initiation and nucleation; 3-MA, wortmannin, and LY294002 against elongation, and chloroquine...... and bafilomycin A1 against autophagosome fusion) were used to treat three recombinant CHO (rCHO) cell lines: the Fc-fusion protein-producing DG44 (DG44-Fc) and DUKX-B11 (DUKX-Fc) and antibody-producing DG44 (DG44-Ab) cell lines. Among the nine chemical inhibitors tested, 3-MA, dorsomorphin, and SP600125...

  3. Dengue Virus and Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas S. Heaton

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Several independent groups have published that autophagy is required for optimal RNA replication of dengue virus (DENV. Initially, it was postulated that autophagosomes might play a structural role in replication complex formation. However, cryo-EM tomography of DENV replication complexes showed that DENV replicates on endoplasmic reticulum (ER cisternae invaginations and not on classical autophagosomes. Recently, it was reported that autophagy plays an indirect role in DENV replication by modulating cellular lipid metabolism. DENV-induced autophagosomes deplete cellular triglycerides that are stored in lipid droplets, leading to increased β-oxidation and energy production. This is the first example of a virus triggering autophagy to modulate cellular physiology. In this review, we summarize these data and discuss new questions and implications for autophagy during DENV replication.

  4. Autophagy, Warburg, and Warburg Reverse Effects in Human Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio D. Gonzalez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a highly regulated-cell pathway for degrading long-lived proteins as well as for clearing cytoplasmic organelles. Autophagy is a key contributor to cellular homeostasis and metabolism. Warburg hypothesized that cancer growth is frequently associated with a deviation of a set of energy generation mechanisms to a nonoxidative breakdown of glucose. This cellular phenomenon seems to rely on a respiratory impairment, linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. This mitochondrial dysfunction results in a switch to anaerobic glycolysis. It has been recently suggested that epithelial cancer cells may induce the Warburg effect in neighboring stromal fibroblasts in which autophagy was activated. These series of observations drove to the proposal of a putative reverse Warburg effect of pathophysiological relevance for, at least, some tumor phenotypes. In this review we introduce the autophagy process and its regulation and its selective pathways and role in cancer cell metabolism. We define and describe the Warburg effect and the newly suggested “reverse” hypothesis. We also discuss the potential value of modulating autophagy with several pharmacological agents able to modify the Warburg effect. The association of the Warburg effect in cancer and stromal cells to tumor-related autophagy may be of relevance for further development of experimental therapeutics as well as for cancer prevention.

  5. Cytoplasmic sphingosine-1-phosphate pathway modulates neuronal autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moruno Manchon, Jose Felix; Uzor, Ndidi-Ese; Dabaghian, Yuri; Furr-Stimming, Erin E; Finkbeiner, Steven; Tsvetkov, Andrey S

    2015-10-19

    Autophagy is an important homeostatic mechanism that eliminates long-lived proteins, protein aggregates and damaged organelles. Its dysregulation is involved in many neurodegenerative disorders. Autophagy is therefore a promising target for blunting neurodegeneration. We searched for novel autophagic pathways in primary neurons and identified the cytosolic sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) pathway as a regulator of neuronal autophagy. S1P, a bioactive lipid generated by sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) in the cytoplasm, is implicated in cell survival. We found that SK1 enhances flux through autophagy and that S1P-metabolizing enzymes decrease this flux. When autophagy is stimulated, SK1 relocalizes to endosomes/autophagosomes in neurons. Expression of a dominant-negative form of SK1 inhibits autophagosome synthesis. In a neuron model of Huntington's disease, pharmacologically inhibiting S1P-lyase protected neurons from mutant huntingtin-induced neurotoxicity. These results identify the S1P pathway as a novel regulator of neuronal autophagy and provide a new target for developing therapies for neurodegenerative disorders.

  6. Autophagy in the immune response to tuberculosis: clinical perspectives.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ní Cheallaigh, C

    2011-06-01

    A growing body of evidence points to autophagy as an essential component in the immune response to tuberculosis. Autophagy is a direct mechanism of killing intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis and also acts as a modulator of proinflammatory cytokine secretion. In addition, autophagy plays a key role in antigen processing and presentation. Autophagy is modulated by cytokines; it is stimulated by T helper type 1 (Th1) cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-γ, and is inhibited by the Th2 cytokines interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13 and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Vitamin D, via cathelicidin, can also induce autophagy, as can Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated signals. Autophagy-promoting agents, administered either locally to the lungs or systemically, could have a clinical application as adjunctive treatment of drug-resistant and drug-sensitive tuberculosis. Moreover, vaccines which effectively induce autophagy could be more successful in preventing acquisition or reactivation of latent tuberculosis.

  7. Nanomaterials and Autophagy: New Insights in Cancer Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panzarini, Elisa; Inguscio, Valentina; Tenuzzo, Bernardetta Anna; Carata, Elisabetta; Dini, Luciana, E-mail: luciana.dini@unisalento.it [Department of Biological and Environmental Science and Technology (Di.S.Te.B.A.), University of Salento, Lecce 73100 (Italy)

    2013-03-21

    Autophagy represents a cell’s response to stress. It is an evolutionarily conserved process with diversified roles. Indeed, it controls intracellular homeostasis by degradation and/or recycling intracellular metabolic material, supplies energy, provides nutrients, eliminates cytotoxic materials and damaged proteins and organelles. Moreover, autophagy is involved in several diseases. Recent evidences support a relationship between several classes of nanomaterials and autophagy perturbation, both induction and blockade, in many biological models. In fact, the autophagic mechanism represents a common cellular response to nanomaterials. On the other hand, the dynamic nature of autophagy in cancer biology is an intriguing approach for cancer therapeutics, since during tumour development and therapy, autophagy has been reported to trigger both an early cell survival and a late cell death. The use of nanomaterials in cancer treatment to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs and target tumours is well known. Recently, autophagy modulation mediated by nanomaterials has become an appealing notion in nanomedicine therapeutics, since it can be exploited as adjuvant in chemotherapy or in the development of cancer vaccines or as a potential anti-cancer agent. Herein, we summarize the effects of nanomaterials on autophagic processes in cancer, also considering the therapeutic outcome of synergism between nanomaterials and autophagy to improve existing cancer therapies.

  8. ROS-AKT-mTOR axis mediates autophagy of human umbilical vein endothelial cells induced by cooking oil fumes-derived fine particulate matters in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Rui; Zhang, Chao; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Cheng, Han; Zhu, Furong; Xu, Yachun; Liu, Ying; Wen, Longping; Cao, Jiyu

    2017-12-01

    Cooking oil fumes-derived PM 2.5 (COFs-derived PM 2.5 ) exposure can induce oxidative stress and cytotoxic effects. Here we investigated the role of ROS-AKT-mTOR axis in COFs-derived PM 2.5 -induced autophagy in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). HUVECs were treated with different concentrations of COFs-derived PM 2.5 , together with or without N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, a radical scavenger) or 3-methyladenine (3-MA, an autophagy inhibitor). Cell viability was assessed with MTT assay, and ROS level was measured with DCFH-DA assay after the treatment. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to evaluate the formation of autophagosomes, while immunofluorescent assay and western blot were used to assess the expression of LC3-I/II and beclin 1. Proteins involved in the PI3K-AKT-mTOR signaling pathway were measured with western blot. The results showed that the treatment of COFs-derived PM 2.5 dose-dependently reduced the viability of HUVECs and increased the ROS levels in the cells. Both immunofluorescent assay and western blot showed that treatment with COFs-derived PM 2.5 significantly increased LC3-II and beclin 1 levels, as well as the ratio of LC3-II/LC3-I, which could be rescued by the co-incubation with NAC or 3-MA. TEM also confirmed the increased formation of autophagosomes in the cells treated with COFs-derived PM 2.5 , while co-treatment with NAC evidently decreased autophagosomes formation. In addition, western blot also showed that the phosphorylation of PI3K, AKT, and mTOR all decreased by the treatment of COFs-derived PM 2.5 , which was effectively rescued by the co-treatment with NAC. These findings demonstrate ROS-AKT-mTOR axis plays a critical role in HUVECs autophagy induced by COFs-derived PM 2.5 . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. VMP1 related autophagy and apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells: VMP1 regulates cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Qinyi [Department of Ultrasonograph, Changshu No. 2 People’s Hospital, Changshu (China); Zhou, Hao; Chen, Yan [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou (China); Shen, Chenglong [Department of General Surgery, Changshu No. 2 People’s Hospital, Changshu (China); He, Songbing; Zhao, Hua; Wang, Liang [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou (China); Wan, Daiwei, E-mail: 372710369@qq.com [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Gu, Wen, E-mail: 505339704@qq.com [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou (China)

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •This research confirmed VMP1 as a regulator of autophagy in colorectal cancer cell lines. •We proved the pro-survival role of VMP1-mediated autophagy in colorectal cancer cell lines. •We found the interaction between VMP1 and BECLIN1 also existing in colorectal cancer cell lines. -- Abstract: Vacuole membrane protein 1 (VMP1) is an autophagy-related protein and identified as a key regulator of autophagy in recent years. In pancreatic cell lines, VMP1-dependent autophagy has been linked to positive regulation of apoptosis. However, there are no published reports on the role of VMP1 in autophagy and apoptosis in colorectal cancers. Therefore, to address this gap of knowledge, we decided to interrogate regulation of autophagy and apoptosis by VMP1. We have studied the induction of autophagy by starvation and rapamycin treatment in colorectal cell lines using electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting. We found that starvation-induced autophagy correlated with an increase in VMP1 expression, that VMP1 interacted with BECLIN1, and that siRNA mediated down-regulation of VMP1-reduced autophagy. Next, we examined the relationship between VMP1-dependent autophagy and apoptosis and found that VMP1 down-regulation sensitizes cells to apoptosis and that agents that induce apoptosis down-regulate VMP1. In conclusion, similar to its reported role in other cell types, VMP1 is an important regulator of autophagy in colorectal cell lines. However, in contrast to its role in pancreatic cell lines, in colorectal cancer cells, VMP1-dependent autophagy appears to be pro-survival rather than pro-cell death.

  10. The lack of autophagy triggers precocious activation of Notch signaling during Drosophila oogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barth Julia MI

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The proper balance of autophagy, a lysosome-mediated degradation process, is indispensable for oogenesis in Drosophila. We recently demonstrated that egg development depends on autophagy in the somatic follicle cells (FC, but not in the germline cells (GCs. However, the lack of autophagy only affects oogenesis when FCs are autophagy-deficient but GCs are wild type, indicating that a dysfunctional signaling between soma and germline may be responsible for the oogenesis defects. Thus, autophagy could play an essential role in modulating signal transduction pathways during egg development. Results Here, we provide further evidence for the necessity of autophagy during oogenesis and demonstrate that autophagy is especially required in subsets of FCs. Generation of autophagy-deficient FCs leads to a wide range of phenotypes that are similar to mutants with defects in the classical cell-cell signaling pathways in the ovary. Interestingly, we observe that loss of autophagy leads to a precocious activation of the Notch pathway in the FCs as monitored by the expression of Cut and Hindsight, two downstream effectors of Notch signaling. Conclusion Our findings point to an unexpected function for autophagy in the modulation of the Notch signaling pathway during Drosophila oogenesis and suggest a function for autophagy in proper receptor activation. Egg development is affected by an imbalance of autophagy between signal sending (germline and signal receiving cell (FC, thus the lack of autophagy in the germline is likely to decrease the amount of active ligand and accordingly compensates for increased signaling in autophagy-defective follicle cells.

  11. Persistent activation of autophagy in kidney tubular cells promotes renal interstitial fibrosis during unilateral ureteral obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Man J.; Ding, Han-Fei; Huang, Shuang; Hill, Joseph A.; Yin, Xiao-Ming; Dong, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Renal fibrosis is the final, common pathway of end-stage renal disease. Whether and how autophagy contributes to renal fibrosis remains unclear. Here we first detected persistent autophagy in kidney proximal tubules in the renal fibrosis model of unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) in mice. UUO-associated fibrosis was suppressed by pharmacological inhibitors of autophagy and also by kidney proximal tubule-specific knockout of autophagy-related 7 (PT-Atg7 KO). Consistently, proliferation and activation of fibroblasts, as indicated by the expression of ACTA2/α-smooth muscle actin and VIM (vimentin), was inhibited in PT-Atg7 KO mice, so was the accumulation of extracellular matrix components including FN1 (fibronectin 1) and collagen fibrils. Tubular atrophy, apoptosis, nephron loss, and interstitial macrophage infiltration were all inhibited in these mice. Moreover, these mice showed a specific suppression of the expression of a profibrotic factor FGF2 (fibroblast growth factor 2). In vitro, TGFB1 (transforming growth factor β 1) induced autophagy, apoptosis, and FN1 accumulation in primary proximal tubular cells. Inhibition of autophagy suppressed FN1 accumulation and apoptosis, while enhancement of autophagy increased TGFB1-induced-cell death. These results suggest that persistent activation of autophagy in kidney proximal tubules promotes renal interstitial fibrosis during UUO. The profibrotic function of autophagy is related to the regulation on tubular cell death, interstitial inflammation, and the production of profibrotic factors. PMID:27123926

  12. Autophagy research Lessons from metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Alfred J.

    2009-01-01

    Autophagy research continues to expand exponentially. Clearly autophagy and metabolism are intimately connected; however, the rapid expansion of research into this topic inevitably brings the risk that important basic knowledge of metabolism will be overlooked when considering experimental data.

  13. Toxic metals and autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Sarmishtha; Sarkar, Shuvasree; Bhattacharya, Shelley

    2014-11-17

    The earth's resources are finite, and it can no longer be considered a source of inexhaustible bounty for the human population. However, this realization has not been able to contain the human desire for rapid industrialization. The collateral to overusing environmental resources is the high-level contamination of undesirable toxic metals, leading to bioaccumulation and cellular damage. Cytopathological features of biological systems represent a key variable in several diseases. A review of the literature revealed that autophagy (PCDII), a high-capacity process, may consist of selective elimination of vital organelles and/or proteins that intiate mechanisms of cytoprotection and homeostasis in different biological systems under normal physiological and stress conditions. However, the biological system does survive under various environmental stressors. Currently, there is no consensus that specifies a particular response as being a dependable biomarker of toxicology. Autophagy has been recorded as the initial response of a cell to a toxic metal in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Various signaling pathways are triggered through cellular proteins and/or protein kinases that can lead to autophagy, apoptosis (or necroptosis), and necrosis. Although the role of autophagy in tumorigenesis is associated with promoting tumor cell survival and/or acting as a tumor suppressive mechanism, PCDII in metal-induced toxicity has not been extensively studied. The aim of this review is to analyze the comparative cytotoxicity of metals/metalloids and nanoparticles (As, Cd, Cr, Hg, Fe, and metal-NP) in cells enduring autophagy. It is noted that metals/metalloids and nanoparticles prefer ATG8/LC3 as a potent inducer of autophagy in several cell lines or animal cells. MAP kinases, death protein kinases, PI3K, AKT, mTOR, and AMP kinase have been found to be the major components of autophagy induction or inhibition in the context of cellular responses to metals/metalloids and

  14. Autophagy contributes to gefitinib-induced glioma cell growth inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Cheng-Yi [Department of Surgery, Fong-Yuan Hospital, Taichung 420, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung 406, Taiwan (China); Kuan, Yu-Hsiang [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Department of Pharmacy, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Ou, Yen-Chuan; Li, Jian-Ri [Division of Urology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chih-Cheng [Department of Anesthesiology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Department of Financial and Computational Mathematics, Providence University, Taichung 433, Taiwan (China); Pan, Pin-Ho [Department of Pediatrics, Tungs’ Taichung MetroHarbor Hospital, Taichung 435, Taiwan (China); Chen, Wen-Ying [Department of Veterinary Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Huang, Hsuan-Yi [Department of Surgery, Fong-Yuan Hospital, Taichung 420, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chun-Jung, E-mail: cjchen@vghtc.gov.tw [Department of Medical Research, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Rong Hsing Research Center for Translational Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Center for General Education, Tunghai University, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Department of Nursing, HungKuang University, Taichung 433, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-10

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including gefitinib, have been evaluated in patients with malignant gliomas. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in gefitinib-mediated anticancer effects against glioma are incompletely understood. In the present study, the cytostatic potential of gefitinib was demonstrated by the inhibition of glioma cell growth, long-term clonogenic survival, and xenograft tumor growth. The cytostatic consequences were accompanied by autophagy, as evidenced by monodansylcadaverine staining of acidic vesicle formation, conversion of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II), degradation of p62, punctate pattern of GFP-LC3, and conversion of GFP-LC3 to cleaved-GFP. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenosine and chloroquine and genetic silencing of LC3 or Beclin 1 attenuated gefitinib-induced growth inhibition. Gefitinib-induced autophagy was not accompanied by the disruption of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. Instead, the activation of liver kinase-B1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling correlated well with the induction of autophagy and growth inhibition caused by gefitinib. Silencing of AMPK suppressed gefitinib-induced autophagy and growth inhibition. The crucial role of AMPK activation in inducing glioma autophagy and growth inhibition was further supported by the actions of AMP mimetic AICAR. Gefitinib was shown to be capable of reducing the proliferation of glioma cells, presumably by autophagic mechanisms involving AMPK activation. - Highlights: • Gefitinib causes cytotoxic and cytostatic effect on glioma. • Gefitinib induces autophagy. • Gefitinib causes cytostatic effect through autophagy. • Gefitinib induces autophagy involving AMPK.

  15. Autophagy regulated by miRNAs in colorectal cancer progression and resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Fesler

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The catabolic process of autophagy is an essential cellular function that allows for the breakdown and recycling of cellular macromolecules. In recent years, the impact of epigenetic regulation of autophagy by noncoding miRNAs has been recognized in human cancer. In colorectal cancer, autophagy plays critical roles in cancer progression as well as resistance to chemotherapy, and recent evidence demonstrates that miRNAs are directly involved in mediating these functions. In this review, we focus on the recent advancements in the field of miRNA regulation of autophagy in colorectal cancer.

  16. Autophagy in Neurodegeneration: Can't Digest It, Spit It Out!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthet, Valentin J A; Ryan, Kevin M

    2018-03-01

    The autophagy-lysosome pathway maintains cellular homeostasis and protects against neurodegenerative disorders. Recent findings show that autophagy can be impaired in these diseases, and that the cell activates an alternative Golgi-mediated degradation pathway, leading to expulsion of toxic protein aggregates. Ultimately this process leads to nuclear breakdown and neuronal cell death. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Calcium Homeostasis and ER Stress in Control of Autophagy in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Kania

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a basic catabolic process, serving as an internal engine during responses to various cellular stresses. As regards cancer, autophagy may play a tumor suppressive role by preserving cellular integrity during tumor development and by possible contribution to cell death. However, autophagy may also exert oncogenic effects by promoting tumor cell survival and preventing cell death, for example, upon anticancer treatment. The major factors influencing autophagy are Ca2+ homeostasis perturbation and starvation. Several Ca2+ channels like voltage-gated T- and L-type channels, IP3 receptors, or CRAC are involved in autophagy regulation. Glucose transporters, mainly from GLUT family, which are often upregulated in cancer, are also prominent targets for autophagy induction. Signals from both Ca2+ perturbations and glucose transport blockage might be integrated at UPR and ER stress activation. Molecular pathways such as IRE 1-JNK-Bcl-2, PERK-eIF2α-ATF4, or ATF6-XBP 1-ATG are related to autophagy induced through ER stress. Moreover ER molecular chaperones such as GRP78/BiP and transcription factors like CHOP participate in regulation of ER stress-mediated autophagy. Autophagy modulation might be promising in anticancer therapies; however, it is a context-dependent matter whether inhibition or activation of autophagy leads to tumor cell death.

  18. Thermogenic activation represses autophagy in brown adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairó, M; Villarroya, J; Cereijo, R; Campderrós, L; Giralt, M; Villarroya, F

    2016-10-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis is an adaptive process, essential for energy expenditure and involved in the control of obesity. Obesity is associated with abnormally increased autophagy in white adipose tissue. Autophagy has been proposed as relevant for brown-vs-white adipocyte differentiation; however, its role in the response of BAT to thermogenic activation is unknown. The effects of thermogenic activation on autophagy in BAT were analyzed in vivo by exposing mice to 24 h cold condition. The effects of norepinephrine (NE), cAMP and modulators of lysosomal activity were determined in differentiated brown adipocytes in the primary culture. Transcript expression was quantified by real-time PCR, and specific proteins were determined by immunoblot. Transmission electron microscopy, as well as confocal microscopy analysis after incubation with specific antibodies or reagents coupled to fluorescent emission, were performed in BAT and cultured brown adipocytes, respectively. Autophagy is repressed in association with cold-induced thermogenic activation of BAT in mice. This effect was mimicked by NE action in brown adipocytes, acting mainly through a cAMP-dependent protein kinase A pathway. Inhibition of autophagy in brown adipocytes leads to an increase in UCP1 protein and uncoupled respiration, suggesting a repressing role for autophagy in relation to the activity of BAT thermogenic machinery. Under basal conditions, brown adipocytes show signs of active lipophagy, which is suppressed by a cAMP-mediated thermogenic stimulus. Our results show a noradrenergic-mediated inverse relationship between autophagy and thermogenic activity in BAT and point toward autophagy repression as a component of brown adipocyte adaptive mechanisms to activate thermogenesis.

  19. Primary cilium and autophagy: The avengers of cell-size regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orhon, Idil; Dupont, Nicolas; Codogno, Patrice

    2016-11-01

    The maintenance of cellular homeostasis in response to extracellular stresses by autophagy is vital for the health of various tissues. Extracellular stimuli may include nutrient starvation, endoplasmic reticulum stress, hypoxia, cytotoxic agents, or mechanical stress. The primary cilium (PC) is a microtubule-based sensory organelle that regulates the integration of various extracellular stimuli. The interconnection between macroautophagy/autophagy and the PC is beginning to be illuminated. In this punctum, we discuss our recent study of PC-dependent autophagy in response to fluid flow in kidney epithelial cells. Urinary flow in kidney tubules creates a shear stress that regulates epithelial cell volume. PC-mediated autophagy is necessary for the regulation of cell size. The signal from the PC is transduced by the activation of STK11/LKB1 and by MTOR inhibition. Our results clarify the physiological role of PC-dependent autophagy in the kidney and suggest that autophagy manipulation may provide a route to the treatment of ciliopathies.

  20. Reclassifying Anaphylaxis to Neuromuscular Blocking Agents Based on the Presumed Patho-Mechanism: IgE-Mediated, Pharmacological Adverse Reaction or “Innate Hypersensitivity”?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Spoerl

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 60% of perioperative anaphylactic reactions are thought to be immunoglobulin IgE mediated, whereas 40% are thought to be non-IgE mediated hypersensitivity reactions (both considered non-dose-related type B adverse drug reactions. In both cases, symptoms are elicited by mast cell degranulation. Also, pharmacological reactions to drugs (type A, dose-related may sometimes mimic symptoms triggered by mast cell degranulation. In case of hypotension, bronchospasm, or urticarial rash due to mast cell degranulation, identification of the responsible mechanism is complicated. However, determination of the type of the underlying adverse drug reaction is of paramount interest for the decision of whether the culprit drug may be re-administered. Neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBA are among the most frequent cause of perioperative anaphylaxis. Recently, it has been shown that NMBA may activate mast cells independently from IgE antibodies via the human Mas-related G-protein-coupled receptor member X2 (MRGPRX2. In light of this new insight into the patho-mechanism of pseudo-allergic adverse drug reactions, in which as drug-receptor interaction results in anaphylaxis like symptoms, we critically reviewed the literature on NMBA-induced perioperative anaphylaxis. We challenge the dogma that NMBA mainly cause IgE-mediated anaphylaxis via an IgE-mediated mechanism, which is based on studies that consider positive skin test to be specific for IgE-mediated hypersensitivity. Finally, we discuss the question whether MRGPRX2 mediated pseudo-allergic reactions should be re-classified as type A adverse reactions.

  1. Reclassifying Anaphylaxis to Neuromuscular Blocking Agents Based on the Presumed Patho-Mechanism: IgE-Mediated, Pharmacological Adverse Reaction or "Innate Hypersensitivity"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoerl, David; Nigolian, Haig; Czarnetzki, Christoph; Harr, Thomas

    2017-06-07

    Approximately 60% of perioperative anaphylactic reactions are thought to be immunoglobulin IgE mediated, whereas 40% are thought to be non-IgE mediated hypersensitivity reactions (both considered non-dose-related type B adverse drug reactions). In both cases, symptoms are elicited by mast cell degranulation. Also, pharmacological reactions to drugs (type A, dose-related) may sometimes mimic symptoms triggered by mast cell degranulation. In case of hypotension, bronchospasm, or urticarial rash due to mast cell degranulation, identification of the responsible mechanism is complicated. However, determination of the type of the underlying adverse drug reaction is of paramount interest for the decision of whether the culprit drug may be re-administered. Neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBA) are among the most frequent cause of perioperative anaphylaxis. Recently, it has been shown that NMBA may activate mast cells independently from IgE antibodies via the human Mas-related G-protein-coupled receptor member X2 (MRGPRX2). In light of this new insight into the patho-mechanism of pseudo-allergic adverse drug reactions, in which as drug-receptor interaction results in anaphylaxis like symptoms, we critically reviewed the literature on NMBA-induced perioperative anaphylaxis. We challenge the dogma that NMBA mainly cause IgE-mediated anaphylaxis via an IgE-mediated mechanism, which is based on studies that consider positive skin test to be specific for IgE-mediated hypersensitivity. Finally, we discuss the question whether MRGPRX2 mediated pseudo-allergic reactions should be re-classified as type A adverse reactions.

  2. Autophagy in plant pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Hong; Xu, Fei; Snyder, John Hugh; Shi, Huan-Bin; Lu, Jian-Ping; Lin, Fu-Cheng

    2016-09-01

    Autophagy is a conserved cellular process that degrades cytoplasmic constituents in vacuoles. Plant pathogenic fungi develop special infection structures and/or secrete a range of enzymes to invade their plant hosts. It has been demonstrated that monitoring autophagy processes can be extremely useful in visualizing the sequence of events leading to pathogenicity of plant pathogenic fungi. In this review, we introduce the molecular mechanisms involved in autophagy. In addition, we explore the relationship between autophagy and pathogenicity in plant pathogenic fungi. Finally, we discuss the various experimental strategies available for use in the study of autophagy in plant pathogenic fungi. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces the miR-33 locus to reprogram autophagy and host lipid metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Ouimet, Mireille; Koster, Stefan; Sakowski, Erik; Ramkhelawon, Bhama; van Solingen, Coen; Oldebeken, Scott; Karunakaran, Denuja; Celhay, Cynthia Portal; Sheedy, Frederick J.; Ray, Tathagat Dutta; Cecchini, Katharine; Zamore, Philip D; Rayner, Katey J; Marcel, Yves L; Philips, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) survives within macrophages by evading delivery to the lysosome and promoting the accumulation of lipid bodies, which serve as a bacterial source of nutrients. Here we show that by inducing miR-33 and its passenger strand miR-33*, Mtb inhibits integrated pathways involved in autophagy, lysosomal function and fatty acid oxidation to support bacterial replication. Silencing of miR-33 and miR-33* by genetic or pharmacological means promotes autophagy flux through...

  4. Association of FKBP51 with Priming of Autophagy Pathways and Mediation of Antidepressant Treatment Response: Evidence in Cells, Mice, and Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zschocke, Jürgen; Stepan, Jens; Hafner, Kathrin; Zellner, Andreas; Kirmeier, Thomas; Kollmannsberger, Lorenz; Wagner, Klaus V.; Dedic, Nina; Balsevich, Georgia; Deussing, Jan M.; Kloiber, Stefan; Lucae, Susanne; Holsboer, Florian; Eder, Matthias; Uhr, Manfred; Ising, Marcus; Schmidt, Mathias V.; Rein, Theo

    2014-01-01

    Background FK506 binding protein 51 (FKBP51) is an Hsp90 co-chaperone and regulator of the glucocorticoid receptor, and consequently of stress physiology. Clinical studies suggest a genetic link between FKBP51 and antidepressant response in mood disorders; however, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. The objective of this study was to elucidate the role of FKBP51 in the actions of antidepressants, with a particular focus on pathways of autophagy. Methods and Findings Established cell lines, primary neural cells, human blood cells of healthy individuals and patients with depression, and mice were treated with antidepressants. Mice were tested for several neuroendocrine and behavioral parameters. Protein interactions and autophagic pathway activity were mainly evaluated by co-immunoprecipitation and Western blots. We first show that the effects of acute antidepressant treatment on behavior are abolished in FKBP51 knockout (51KO) mice. Autophagic markers, such as the autophagy initiator Beclin1, were increased following acute antidepressant treatment in brains from wild-type, but not 51KO, animals. FKBP51 binds to Beclin1, changes decisive protein interactions and phosphorylation of Beclin1, and triggers autophagic pathways. Antidepressants and FKBP51 exhibited synergistic effects on these pathways. Using chronic social defeat as a depression-relevant stress model in combination with chronic paroxetine (PAR) treatment revealed that the stress response, as well as the effects of antidepressants on behavior and autophagic markers, depends on FKBP51. In human blood cells of healthy individuals, FKBP51 levels correlated with the potential of antidepressants to induce autophagic pathways. Importantly, the clinical antidepressant response of patients with depression (n = 51) could be predicted by the antidepressant response of autophagic markers in patient-derived peripheral blood lymphocytes cultivated and treated ex vivo (Beclin1/amitriptyline: r = 0.572, p

  5. Genome-wide analysis of autophagy-related genes in banana highlights MaATG8s in cell death and autophagy in immune response to Fusarium wilt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yunxie; Liu, Wen; Hu, Wei; Liu, Guoyin; Wu, Chunjie; Liu, Wei; Zeng, Hongqiu; He, Chaozu; Shi, Haitao

    2017-08-01

    MaATG8s play important roles in hypersensitive-like cell death and immune response, and autophagy is essential for disease resistance against Foc in banana. Autophagy is responsible for the degradation of damaged cytoplasmic constituents in the lysosomes or vacuoles. Although the effects of autophagy have been extensively revealed in model plants, the possible roles of autophagy-related gene in banana remain unknown. In this study, 32 MaATGs were identified in the draft genome, and the profiles of several MaATGs in response to fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc) were also revealled. We found that seven MaATG8s were commonly regulated by Foc. Through transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, we highlight the novel roles of MaATG8s in conferring hypersensitive-like cell death, and MaATG8s-mediated hypersensitive response-like cell death is dependent on autophagy. Notablly, autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) treatment resulted in decreased disease resistance in response to Foc4, and the effect of 3-MA treatment could be rescued by exogenous salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and ethylene, indicating the involvement of autophagy-mediated plant hormones in banana resistance to Fusarium wilt. Taken together, this study may extend our understanding the putative role of MaATG8s in hypersensitive-like cell death and the essential role of autophagy in immune response against Foc in banana.

  6. Autophagy contributes to degradation of Hirano bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hwan; Davis, Richard C; Furukawa, Ruth; Fechheimer, Marcus

    2009-01-01

    Hirano bodies are actin-rich inclusions reported most frequently in the hippocampus in association with a variety of conditions including neurodegenerative diseases, and aging. We have developed a model system for formation of Hirano bodies in Dictyostelium and cultured mammalian cells to permit detailed studies of the dynamics of these structures in living cells. Model Hirano bodies are frequently observed in membrane-enclosed vesicles in mammalian cells consistent with a role of autophagy in the degradation of these structures. Clearance of Hirano bodies by an exocytotic process is supported by images from electron microscopy showing extracellular release of Hirano bodies, and observation of Hirano bodies in the culture medium of Dictyostelium and mammalian cells. An autophagosome marker protein Atg8-GFP, was co-localized with model Hirano bodies in wild type Dictyostelium cells, but not in atg5(-) or atg1-1 autophagy mutant strains. Induction of model Hirano bodies in Dictyostelium with a high level expression of 34 kDa DeltaEF1 from the inducible discoidin promoter resulted in larger Hirano bodies and a cessation of cell doubling. The degradation of model Hirano bodies still occurred rapidly in autophagy mutant (atg5(-)) Dictyostelium, suggesting that other mechanisms such as the ubiquitin-mediated proteasome pathway could contribute to the degradation of Hirano bodies. Chemical inhibition of the proteasome pathway with lactacystin, significantly decreased the turnover of Hirano bodies in Dictyostelium providing direct evidence that autophagy and the proteasome can both contribute to degradation of Hirano bodies. Short term treatment of mammalian cells with either lactacystin or 3-methyl adenine results in higher levels of Hirano bodies and a lower level of viable cells in the cultures, supporting the conclusion that both autophagy and the proteasome contribute to degradation of Hirano bodies.

  7. Defective Insulin Signalling, Mediated by Inflammation, Connects Obesity to Alzheimer Disease; Relevant Pharmacological Therapies and Preventive Dietary Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Casado, Arantxa; Toledano-Díaz, Adolfo; Toledano, Adolfo

    2017-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that obesity, besides being a risk factor for cardiovascular events, also increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease. Insulin resistance is common in all cases of obesity and appears to be the linkage between both diseases. Obesity, often associated with excessive fat and sugar intake, represents a preclinical stage toward insulin resistance during which nutrition intervention is likely to have maximum effect. In this way, healthy lifestyles lifetime to prevent obesity-related modifiable risk factors such as inflammation, oxidative stress and metabolic disorders could be simultaneously beneficial for preserving cognition and controlling the Alzheimer's disease. This review relates extensive research literature on facts linking nutrients and dietary patterns to obesity and Alzheimer's disease. In addition briefly presents molecular mechanisms involved in obesity- induced insulin resistance and the contribution of peripheral inflammatory and defective insulin signalling pathways, as well as ectopic lipids accumulation to Alzheimer's development through brain inflammation, neuronal insulin resistance, and cognitive dysfunction seen in Alzheimer's disease. The work relates current and emerging pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies for the management of obesity, insulin resistance and Alzheimer's considering them as disorders with common molecular features. The findings of this review validate the importance of some nutritional interventions as possible approach to prevent or delay simultaneously progression of Alzheimer's disease and obesity. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. BECN2 interacts with ATG14 through a metastable coiled-coil to mediate autophagy: BECN2 CCD Structure and Interaction with ATG14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Minfei; Li, Yue; Wyborny, Shane; Neau, David; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Levine, Beth; Colbert, Christopher L.; Sinha, Sangita C. (NDSU); (IIT); (Cornell); (UTSMC)

    2017-03-12

    ATG14 binding to BECN/Beclin homologs is essential for autophagy, a critical catabolic homeostasis pathway. Here, we show that the α-helical, coiled-coil domain (CCD) of BECN2, a recently identified mammalian BECN1 paralog, forms an antiparallel, curved homodimer with seven pairs of nonideal packing interactions, while the BECN2 CCD and ATG14 CCD form a parallel, curved heterodimer stabilized by multiple, conserved polar interactions. Compared to BECN1, the BECN2 CCD forms a weaker homodimer, but binds more tightly to the ATG14 CCD. Mutation of nonideal BECN2 interface residues to more ideal pairs improves homodimer self-association and thermal stability. Unlike BECN1, all BECN2 CCD mutants bind ATG14, although more weakly than wild type. Thus, polar BECN2 CCD interface residues result in a metastable homodimer, facilitating dissociation, but enable better interactions with polar ATG14 residues stabilizing the BECN2:ATG14 heterodimer. These structure-based mechanistic differences in BECN1 and BECN2 homodimerization and heterodimerization likely dictate competitive ATG14 recruitment.

  9. Organometallic Gold(III) Complexes Similar to Tetrahydroisoquinoline Induce ER-Stress-Mediated Apoptosis and Pro-Death Autophagy in A549 Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ke-Bin; Wang, Feng-Yang; Tang, Xiao-Ming; Feng, Hai-Wen; Chen, Zhen-Feng; Liu, Yan-Cheng; Liu, You-Nian; Liang, Hong

    2018-04-26

    Agents inducing both apoptosis and autophagic death can be effective chemotherapeutic drugs. In our present work, we synthesized two organometallic gold(III) complexes harboring C^N ligands that structurally resemble tetrahydroisoquinoline (THIQ): Cyc-Au-1 (AuL 1 Cl 2 , L 1 = 3,4-dimethoxyphenethylamine) and Cyc-Au-2 (AuL 2 Cl 2 , L 2 = methylenedioxyphenethylamine). In screening their in vitro activity, we found both gold complexes exhibited lower toxicity, lower resistance factors, and better anticancer activity than those of cisplatin. The organometallic gold(III) complexes accumulate in mitochondria and induce elevated ROS and an ER stress response through mitochondrial dysfunction. These effects ultimately result in simultaneous apoptosis and autophagy. Importantly, compared to cisplatin, Cyc-Au-2 exhibits lower toxicity and better anticancer activity in a murine tumor model. To the best of our knowledge, Cyc-Au-2 is the first organometallic Au(III) compound that induces apoptosis and autophagic death. On the basis of our results, we believe Cyc-Au-2 to be a promising anticancer agent or lead compound for further anticancer drug development.

  10. Inhibition or Stimulation of Autophagy Affects Early Formation of Lipofuscin-Like Autofluorescence in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Lei

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of lipofuscin in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE is dependent on the effectiveness of photoreceptor outer segment material degradation. This study explored the role of autophagy in the fate of RPE lipofuscin degradation. After seven days of feeding with either native or modified rod outer segments, ARPE-19 cells were treated with enhancers or inhibitors of autophagy and the autofluorescence was detected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Supplementation with different types of rod outer segments increased lipofuscin-like autofluorescence (LLAF after the inhibition of autophagy, while the induction of autophagy (e.g., application of rapamycin decreased LLAF. The effects of autophagy induction were further confirmed by Western blotting, which showed the conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II, and by immunofluorescence microscopy, which detected the lysosomal activity of the autophagy inducers. We also monitored LLAF after the application of several autophagy inhibitors by RNA-interference and confocal microscopy. The results showed that, in general, the inhibition of the autophagy-related proteins resulted in an increase in LLAF when cells were fed with rod outer segments, which further confirms the effect of autophagy in the fate of RPE lipofuscin degradation. These results emphasize the complex role of autophagy in modulating RPE autofluorescence and confirm the possibility of the pharmacological clearance of RPE lipofuscin by small molecules.

  11. MicroRNA-155 promotes autophagy to eliminate intracellular mycobacteria by targeting Rheb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinli; Yang, Kun; Zhou, Lin; Minhaowu; Wu, Yongjian; Zhu, Min; Lai, Xiaomin; Chen, Tao; Feng, Lianqiang; Li, Meiyu; Huang, Chunyu; Zhong, Qiu; Huang, Xi

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a hard-to-eradicate intracellular pathogen that infects one-third of the global population. It can live within macrophages owning to its ability to arrest phagolysosome biogenesis. Autophagy has recently been identified as an effective way to control the intracellular mycobacteria by enhancing phagosome maturation. In the present study, we demonstrate a novel role of miR-155 in regulating the autophagy-mediated anti-mycobacterial response. Both in vivo and in vitro studies showed that miR-155 expression was significantly enhanced after mycobacterial infection. Forced expression of miR-155 accelerated the autophagic response in macrophages, thus promoting the maturation of mycobacterial phagosomes and decreasing the survival rate of intracellular mycobacteria, while transfection with miR-155 inhibitor increased mycobacterial survival. However, macrophage-mediated mycobacterial phagocytosis was not affected after miR-155 overexpression or inhibition. Furthermore, blocking autophagy with specific inhibitor 3-methyladenine or silencing of autophagy related gene 7 (Atg7) reduced the ability of miR-155 to promote autophagy and mycobacterial elimination. More importantly, our study demonstrated that miR-155 bound to the 3'-untranslated region of Ras homologue enriched in brain (Rheb), a negative regulator of autophagy, accelerated the process of autophagy and sequential killing of intracellular mycobacteria by suppressing Rheb expression. Our results reveal a novel role of miR-155 in regulating autophagy-mediated mycobacterial elimination by targeting Rheb, and provide potential targets for clinical treatment.

  12. MicroRNA-155 promotes autophagy to eliminate intracellular mycobacteria by targeting Rheb.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinli Wang

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a hard-to-eradicate intracellular pathogen that infects one-third of the global population. It can live within macrophages owning to its ability to arrest phagolysosome biogenesis. Autophagy has recently been identified as an effective way to control the intracellular mycobacteria by enhancing phagosome maturation. In the present study, we demonstrate a novel role of miR-155 in regulating the autophagy-mediated anti-mycobacterial response. Both in vivo and in vitro studies showed that miR-155 expression was significantly enhanced after mycobacterial infection. Forced expression of miR-155 accelerated the autophagic response in macrophages, thus promoting the maturation of mycobacterial phagosomes and decreasing the survival rate of intracellular mycobacteria, while transfection with miR-155 inhibitor increased mycobacterial survival. However, macrophage-mediated mycobacterial phagocytosis was not affected after miR-155 overexpression or inhibition. Furthermore, blocking autophagy with specific inhibitor 3-methyladenine or silencing of autophagy related gene 7 (Atg7 reduced the ability of miR-155 to promote autophagy and mycobacterial elimination. More importantly, our study demonstrated that miR-155 bound to the 3'-untranslated region of Ras homologue enriched in brain (Rheb, a negative regulator of autophagy, accelerated the process of autophagy and sequential killing of intracellular mycobacteria by suppressing Rheb expression. Our results reveal a novel role of miR-155 in regulating autophagy-mediated mycobacterial elimination by targeting Rheb, and provide potential targets for clinical treatment.

  13. Targeting autophagy in obesity: from pathophysiology to management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingmei; Sowers, James R; Ren, Jun

    2018-04-23

    Obesity poses a severe threat to human health, including the increased prevalence of hypertension, insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus, cancer, inflammation, sleep apnoea and other chronic diseases. Current therapies focus mainly on suppressing caloric intake, but the efficacy of this approach remains poor. A better understanding of the pathophysiology of obesity will be essential for the management of obesity and its complications. Knowledge gained over the past three decades regarding the aetiological mechanisms underpinning obesity has provided a framework that emphasizes energy imbalance and neurohormonal dysregulation, which are tightly regulated by autophagy. Accordingly, there is an emerging interest in the role of autophagy, a conserved homeostatic process for cellular quality control through the disposal and recycling of cellular components, in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and organ function by selectively ridding cells of potentially toxic proteins, lipids and organelles. Indeed, defects in autophagy homeostasis are implicated in metabolic disorders, including obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis. In this Review, the alterations in autophagy that occur in response to nutrient stress, and how these changes alter the course of obesogenesis and obesity-related complications, are discussed. The potential of pharmacological modulation of autophagy for the management of obesity is also addressed.

  14. Avian metapneumovirus subgroup C induces autophagy through the ATF6 UPR pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Lei; Wei, Li; Zhu, Shanshan; Wang, Jing; Quan, Rong; Li, Zixuan; Liu, Jue

    2017-10-03

    An increasing number of studies have demonstrated that macroautophagy/autophagy plays an important role in the infectious processes of diverse pathogens. However, it remains unknown whether autophagy is induced in avian metapneumovirus (aMPV)-infected host cells, and, if so, how this occurs. Here, we report that aMPV subgroup C (aMPV/C) induces autophagy in cultured cells. We demonstrated this relationship by detecting classical autophagic features, including the formation of autophagsomes, the presence of GFP-LC3 puncta and the conversation of LC3-I into LC3-II. Also, we used pharmacological regulators and siRNAs targeting ATG7 or LC3 to examine the role of autophagy in aMPV/C replication. The results showed that autophagy is required for efficient replication of aMPV/C. Moreover, infection with aMPV/C promotes autophagosome maturation and induces a complete autophagic process. Finally, the ATF6 pathway, of which one component is the unfolded protein response (UPR), becomes activated in aMPV/C-infected cells. Knockdown of ATF6 inhibited aMPV/C-induced autophagy and viral replication. Collectively, these results not only show that autophagy promotes aMPV/C replication in the cultured cells, but also reveal that the molecular mechanisms underlying aMPV/C-induced autophagy depends on regulation of the ER stress-related UPR pathway.

  15. Pharmacological Inhibition of NOS Activates ASK1/JNK Pathway Augmenting Docetaxel-Mediated Apoptosis in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávila-González, Daniel; Choi, Dong Soon; Rosato, Roberto R; Granados-Principal, Sergio M; Kuhn, John G; Li, Wen-Feng; Qian, Wei; Chen, Wen; Kozielski, Anthony J; Wong, Helen; Dave, Bhuvanesh; Chang, Jenny C

    2018-03-01

    Purpose: Chemoresistance in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is associated with the activation of a survival mechanism orchestrated by the endoplasmic reticulum (EnR) stress response and by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Our aim was to determine the effects of pharmacologic NOS inhibition on TNBC. Experimental Design: TNBC cell lines, SUM-159PT, MDA-MB-436, and MDA-MB-468, were treated with docetaxel and NOS inhibitor (L-NMMA) for 24, 48, and 72 hours. Apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry using Annexin-V and propidium iodide. Western blot was used to assess ER stress and apoptosis, and rtPCR was used to evaluate s-XBP1. TNBC patient-derived xenografts (PDX) were treated either with vehicle, docetaxel, or combination therapy (NOS inhibition + docetaxel). Mouse weight and tumor volumes were recorded twice weekly. Docetaxel concentration was determined using mass spectrometry. To quantify proliferation and apoptosis, PDX tumor samples were stained using Ki67 and TUNEL assay. Results: In vitro, L-NMMA ameliorated the iNOS upregulation associated with docetaxel. Apoptosis increased when TNBC cells were treated with combination therapy. In TNBC PDXs, combination therapy significantly reduced tumor volume growth and increased survival proportions. In the BCM-5998 PDX model, intratumoral docetaxel concentration was higher in mice receiving combination therapy. Coupling docetaxel with NOS inhibition increased EnR-stress response via coactivation of ATF4 and CHOP, which triggered the pASK1/JNK proapoptotic pathway, promoting cleavage of caspases 3 and 9. Conclusions: iNOS is a critical target for docetaxel resistance in TNBC. Pharmacologic inhibition of NOS enhanced chemotherapy response in TNBC PDX models. Combination therapy may improve prognosis and prevent relapse in TNBC patients who have failed conventional chemotherapy. Clin Cancer Res; 24(5); 1152-62. ©2018 AACR . ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. The role of autophagy in microbial infection and immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desai M

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mayura Desai,1 Rong Fang,2 Jiaren Sun11Department of Microbiology and Immunology, 2Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Galveston, TX, USAAbstract: The autophagy pathway represents an evolutionarily conserved cell recycling process that is activated in response to nutrient deprivation and other stress signals. Over the years, it has been linked to an array of cellular functions. Equally, a wide range of cell-intrinsic, as well as extracellular, factors have been implicated in the induction of the autophagy pathway. Microbial infections represent one such factor that can not only activate autophagy through specific mechanisms but also manipulate the response to the invading microbe's advantage. Moreover, in many cases, particularly among viruses, the pathway has been shown to be intricately involved in the replication cycle of the pathogen. Conversely, autophagy also plays a role in combating the infection process, both through direct destruction of the pathogen and as one of the key mediating factors in the host defense mechanisms of innate and adaptive immunity. Further, the pathway also plays a role in controlling the pathogenesis of infectious diseases by regulating inflammation. In this review, we discuss various interactions between pathogens and the cellular autophagic response and summarize the immunological functions of the autophagy pathway.Keywords: autophagy, xenophagy, antiviral, antibacterial

  17. DNA damage and autophagy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Garcia-Garcia, Aracely; Panayiotidis, Mihalis I.; Franco, Rodrigo

    2011-01-01

    Both exogenous and endogenous agents are a threat to DNA integrity. Exogenous environmental agents such as ultraviolet (UV) and ionizing radiation, genotoxic chemicals and endogenous byproducts of metabolism including reactive oxygen species can cause alterations in DNA structure (DNA damage). Unrepaired DNA damage has been linked to a variety of human disorders including cancer and neurodegenerative disease. Thus, efficient mechanisms to detect DNA lesions, signal their presence and promote their repair have been evolved in cells. If DNA is effectively repaired, DNA damage response is inactivated and normal cell functioning resumes. In contrast, when DNA lesions cannot be removed, chronic DNA damage triggers specific cell responses such as cell death and senescence. Recently, DNA damage has been shown to induce autophagy, a cellular catabolic process that maintains a balance between synthesis, degradation, and recycling of cellular components. But the exact mechanisms by which DNA damage triggers autophagy are unclear. More importantly, the role of autophagy in the DNA damage response and cellular fate is unknown. In this review we analyze evidence that supports a role for autophagy as an integral part of the DNA damage response.

  18. Receptor-independent, vacuolar ATPase-mediated cellular uptake of histamine receptor-1 ligands: Possible origin of pharmacological distortions and side effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morissette, Guillaume; Lodge, Robert; Bouthillier, Johanne; Marceau, Francois

    2008-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate whether several histamine receptor agonists and antagonists are subjected to receptor-independent ion trapping into acidic organelles, and whether this sequestration influences their pharmacological or toxicological properties. Vacuolar (V)-ATPase-dependent intracellular sequestration of agonists was recognized as morphological alterations (large fluid-filled vacuoles for betahistine and 1-methylhistamine, granular uptake for fluorescent BODIPY FL histamine) prevented by the specific V-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1 in rabbit vascular smooth muscle cells. Lipophilicity was the major determinant of these cellular effects (order of potency: BODIPY FL histamine > betahistine > 1-methylhistamine > histamine) that occurred at high concentrations. This ranking was dissociable from the potency order for H 1 receptor-mediated contraction of the rabbit aorta, a response uninfluenced by bafilomycin. Antihistamines are inherently more lipophilic and caused vacuolization of a proportion of cells at 5-500 μM. Agonist or antagonist-induced vacuoles were of macroautophagic nature (labeled with GFP-conjugated LC3, Rab7 and CD63; detection of LC3 II). Further, the 2 most lipophilic antihistamines tested, astemizole and terfenadine, were potentiated by V-ATPase blockade in the aortic contractility assay (13- and 3.6-fold more potent, respectively, pA 2 scale), suggesting that V-ATPase-mediated cation trapping sequesters these antagonists from the vicinity of H 1 receptors in the therapeutic concentration range. This potentiation did not apply to less lipophilic antagonists (pyrilamine, diphenhydramine). While some agonists and all tested antagonists of the histamine H 1 receptors induce the V-ATPase-dependent vacuolar and autophagic cytopathology, sequestration affects the pharmacology of only the most lipophilic antagonists, the ones prone to off-target arrhythmogenic side effects

  19. Association of FKBP51 with priming of autophagy pathways and mediation of antidepressant treatment response: evidence in cells, mice, and humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils C Gassen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available FK506 binding protein 51 (FKBP51 is an Hsp90 co-chaperone and regulator of the glucocorticoid receptor, and consequently of stress physiology. Clinical studies suggest a genetic link between FKBP51 and antidepressant response in mood disorders; however, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. The objective of this study was to elucidate the role of FKBP51 in the actions of antidepressants, with a particular focus on pathways of autophagy.Established cell lines, primary neural cells, human blood cells of healthy individuals and patients with depression, and mice were treated with antidepressants. Mice were tested for several neuroendocrine and behavioral parameters. Protein interactions and autophagic pathway activity were mainly evaluated by co-immunoprecipitation and Western blots. We first show that the effects of acute antidepressant treatment on behavior are abolished in FKBP51 knockout (51KO mice. Autophagic markers, such as the autophagy initiator Beclin1, were increased following acute antidepressant treatment in brains from wild-type, but not 51KO, animals. FKBP51 binds to Beclin1, changes decisive protein interactions and phosphorylation of Beclin1, and triggers autophagic pathways. Antidepressants and FKBP51 exhibited synergistic effects on these pathways. Using chronic social defeat as a depression-relevant stress model in combination with chronic paroxetine (PAR treatment revealed that the stress response, as well as the effects of antidepressants on behavior and autophagic markers, depends on FKBP51. In human blood cells of healthy individuals, FKBP51 levels correlated with the potential of antidepressants to induce autophagic pathways. Importantly, the clinical antidepressant response of patients with depression (n = 51 could be predicted by the antidepressant response of autophagic markers in patient-derived peripheral blood lymphocytes cultivated and treated ex vivo (Beclin1/amitriptyline: r = 0.572, p = 0.003; Beclin1/PAR: r

  20. Heme oxygenase-1 enhances autophagy in podocytes as a protective mechanism against high glucose-induced apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Chenglong [Department of Endocrinology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Zheng, Haining [Department of Hyperbaric Oxygen, Nanjing General Hospital of Nanjing Military Command, Nanjing (China); Huang, Shanshan; You, Na; Xu, Jiarong; Ye, Xiaolong; Zhu, Qun; Feng, Yamin; You, Qiang; Miao, Heng [Department of Endocrinology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Ding, Dafa, E-mail: dingdafa2004@aliyun.com [Department of Endocrinology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Lu, Yibing, E-mail: luyibing2004@126.com [Department of Endocrinology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China)

    2015-10-01

    Injury and loss of podocytes play vital roles in diabetic nephropathy progression. Emerging evidence suggests autophagy, which is induced by multiple stressors including hyperglycemia, plays a protective role. Meanwhile, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) possesses powerful anti-apoptotic properties. Therefore, we investigated the impact of autophagy on podocyte apoptosis under diabetic conditions and its association with HO-1. Mouse podocytes were cultured in vitro; apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry. Transmission electron microscopy and biochemical autophagic flux assays were used to measure the autophagy markers microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II) and beclin-1. LC3-II and beclin-1 expression peaked 12–24 h after exposing podocytes to high glucose. Inhibition of autophagy with 3-methyladenine or Beclin-1 siRNAs or Atg 5 siRNAs sensitized cells to apoptosis, suggesting autophagy is a survival mechanism. HO-1 inactivation inhibited autophagy, which aggravated podocyte injury in vitro. Hemin-induced autophagy also protected podocytes from hyperglycemia in vitro and was abrogated by HO-1 siRNA. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase phosphorylation was higher in hemin-treated and lower in HO-1 siRNA-treated podocytes. Suppression of AMPK activity reversed HO-1-mediated Beclin-1 upregulation and autophagy, indicating HO-1-mediated autophagy is AMPK dependent. These findings suggest HO-1 induction and regulation of autophagy are potential therapeutic targets for diabetic nephropathy. - Highlights: • High glucose leads to increased autophagy in podocytes at an early stage. • The early autophagic response protects against high glucose-induced apoptosis. • Heme oxygenase-1 enhances autophagy and decreases high glucose -mediated apoptosis. • Heme oxygenase-1 induces autophagy through the activation of AMPK.

  1. Autophagy in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avignat S Patel

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a basic cellular homeostatic process important to cell fate decisions under conditions of stress. Dysregulation of autophagy impacts numerous human diseases including cancer and chronic obstructive lung disease. This study investigates the role of autophagy in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.Human lung tissues from patients with IPF were analyzed for autophagy markers and modulating proteins using western blotting, confocal microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. To study the effects of TGF-β(1 on autophagy, human lung fibroblasts were monitored by fluorescence microscopy and western blotting. In vivo experiments were done using the bleomycin-induced fibrosis mouse model.Lung tissues from IPF patients demonstrate evidence of decreased autophagic activity as assessed by LC3, p62 protein expression and immunofluorescence, and numbers of autophagosomes. TGF-β(1 inhibits autophagy in fibroblasts in vitro at least in part via activation of mTORC1; expression of TIGAR is also increased in response to TGF-β(1. In the bleomycin model of pulmonary fibrosis, rapamycin treatment is antifibrotic, and rapamycin also decreases expression of á-smooth muscle actin and fibronectin by fibroblasts in vitro. Inhibition of key regulators of autophagy, LC3 and beclin-1, leads to the opposite effect on fibroblast expression of á-smooth muscle actin and fibronectin.Autophagy is not induced in pulmonary fibrosis despite activation of pathways known to promote autophagy. Impairment of autophagy by TGF-β(1 may represent a mechanism for the promotion of fibrogenesis in IPF.

  2. Autophagy in Measles Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurore Rozières

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a biological process that helps cells to recycle obsolete cellular components and which greatly contributes to maintaining cellular integrity in response to environmental stress factors. Autophagy is also among the first lines of cellular defense against invading microorganisms, including viruses. The autophagic destruction of invading pathogens, a process referred to as xenophagy, involves cytosolic autophagy receptors, such as p62/SQSTM1 (Sequestosome 1 or NDP52/CALCOCO2 (Nuclear Dot 52 KDa Protein/Calcium Binding And Coiled-Coil Domain 2, which bind to microbial components and target them towards growing autophagosomes for degradation. However, most, if not all, infectious viruses have evolved molecular tricks to escape from xenophagy. Many viruses even use autophagy, part of the autophagy pathway or some autophagy-associated proteins, to improve their infectious potential. In this regard, the measles virus, responsible for epidemic measles, has a unique interface with autophagy as the virus can induce multiple rounds of autophagy in the course of infection. These successive waves of autophagy result from distinct molecular pathways and seem associated with anti- and/or pro-measles virus consequences. In this review, we describe what the autophagy–measles virus interplay has taught us about both the biology of the virus and the mechanistic orchestration of autophagy.

  3. Hijacker of the Antitumor Immune Response: Autophagy Is Showing Its Worst Facet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viry, Elodie; Noman, Muhammad Zaeem; Arakelian, Tsolère; Lequeux, Audrey; Chouaib, Salem; Berchem, Guy; Moussay, Etienne; Paggetti, Jérôme; Janji, Bassam

    2016-01-01

    Macroautophagy (hereafter referred to as autophagy) is a housekeeping process constitutively executed at basal level in all cells to promote cellular homeostasis by regulating organelle and protein turnover. However, autophagy deregulation caused by several stress factors, such as hypoxia, is prevalent in many cancers. It is now well established that autophagy can act as tumor suppressor or tumor promoter depending on tumor type, stage, and genetic context. In developed tumors, autophagy promotes the survival of cancer cells and therefore operates as a cell resistance mechanism. Emerging evidence point to the prominent role of autophagy in disabling the antitumor immune response by multiple overlapping mechanisms leading to tumor escape from immune cell attack mediated by both natural killer cells and cytotoxic T-lymphocytes. Such a role has inspired significant interest in applying anti-autophagy therapies as an entirely new approach to overcome tumor escape from immune surveillance, which constitutes so far a major challenge in developing more effective cancer immunotherapies. In this review, we will summarize recent reports describing how tumor cells, by activating autophagy, manage to hijack the immune system. In particular, we will focus on the emerging role of hypoxia-induced autophagy in shaping the antitumor immune response and in allowing tumor cells to outmaneuver an effective immune response and escape immunosurveillance. In keeping with this, we strongly believe that autophagy represents an attractive future therapeutic target to develop innovative and effective cancer immunotherapeutic approaches.

  4. Alisertib induces cell cycle arrest and autophagy and suppresses epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition involving PI3K/Akt/mTOR and sirtuin 1-mediated signaling pathways in human pancreatic cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang F

    2015-01-01

    PC-3 cells in G2/M phase via regulating the expression of cyclin-dependent kinases 1 and 2, cyclin B1, cyclin D1, p21 Waf1/Cip1, p27 Kip1, and p53. ALS concentration-dependently induced autophagy in PANC-1 and BxPC-3 cells, which may be attributed to the inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/protein kinase B (Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK, and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (Erk1/2 but activation of 5'-AMP-dependent kinase signaling pathways. ALS significantly inhibited EMT in PANC-1 and BxPC-3 cells with an increase in the expression of E-cadherin and a decrease in N-cadherin. In addition, ALS suppressed the expression of sirtuin 1 (Sirt1 and pre-B cell colony-enhancing factor/visfatin in both cell lines with a rise in the level of acetylated p53. These findings show that ALS induces cell cycle arrest and promotes autophagic cell death but inhibits EMT in pancreatic cancer cells with the involvement of PI3K/Akt/mTOR, p38 MAPK, Erk1/2, and Sirt1-mediated signaling pathways. Taken together, ALS may represent a promising anticancer drug for pancreatic cancer treatment. More studies are warranted to investigate other molecular targets and mechanisms and verify the efficacy and safety of ALS in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.Keywords: alisertib, pancreatic cancer, cell cycle, autophagy, EMT, Sirt1

  5. Lutein Induces Autophagy via Beclin-1 Upregulation in IEC-6 Rat Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chi-Jen; Lin, Ji-Fan; Hsiao, Chien-Yu; Chang, Hsun-Hao; Li, Hsin-Ju; Chang, Hsun-Hsien; Lee, Gon-Ann; Hung, Chi-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Lutein is a carotenoid with anti-oxidant properties. Autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved catabolic cellular pathway for coping with stress conditions, is responsive to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and degrades damaged organelles. We previously demonstrated that lutein can induce anti-oxidant enzymes to relieve methotrexate-induced ROS stress. We therefore hypothesized that lutein, which activates ROS-scavenging enzymes, can also induce autophagy for cell survival. In this study, we demonstrated that lutein treatment attenuated the reduction in cell viability caused by H 2 O 2 . Lutein dose-dependently induced the processing of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3)-II, an autophagy marker protein, and accumulation of LC3-positive puncta in rat intestinal IEC-6 cells. Furthermore, (a) direct observation of autophagosome formation through transmission electron microscopy, (b) upregulation of autophagy-related genes including ATG4A, ATG5, ATG7, ATG12, and beclin-1 (BENC1), and (c) increased BECN1/Bcl-2 ratio confirmed the induction of autophagy by lutein. The results revealed that bafilomycin-A1-induced inhibition of autophagy reduced cell viability and increased apoptosis in lutein-treated cells, indicating a protective role of lutein-induced autophagy. Lutein treatment also activated adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p-38, but had no effects on the induction of extracellular signal-related kinase or inhibition of mTOR; however, the inhibition of activated AMPK, JNK, or p-38 did not attenuate lutein-induced autophagy. Finally, increased BECN1 expression levels were detected in lutein-treated cells, and BECN1 knockdown abolished autophagy induction. These results suggest that lutein-induced autophagy was mediated by the upregulation of BECN1 in IEC-6 cells. We are the first to demonstrate that lutein induces autophagy. Elevated autophagy in lutein-treated IEC-6 cells may have a protective role

  6. Inhibition of peroxynitrite-mediated DNA strand cleavage and hydroxyl radical formation by aspirin at pharmacologically relevant concentrations: Implications for cancer intervention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Wei; Zhu, Hong; Jia, Zhenquan; Li, Jianrong; Misra, Hara P.; Zhou, Kequan; Li, Yunbo

    2009-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested that the long-term use of aspirin is associated with a decreased incidence of human malignancies, especially colorectal cancer. Since accumulating evidence indicates that peroxynitrite is critically involved in multistage carcinogenesis, this study was undertaken to investigate the ability of aspirin to inhibit peroxynitrite-mediated DNA damage. Peroxynitrite and its generator 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) were used to cause DNA strand breaks in φX-174 plasmid DNA. We demonstrated that the presence of aspirin at concentrations (0.25-2 mM) compatible with amounts in plasma during chronic anti-inflammatory therapy resulted in a significant inhibition of DNA cleavage induced by both peroxynitrite and SIN-1. Moreover, the consumption of oxygen caused by 250 μM SIN-1 was found to be decreased in the presence of aspirin, indicating that aspirin might affect the auto-oxidation of SIN-1. Furthermore, EPR spectroscopy using 5,5-dimethylpyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) as a spin trap demonstrated the formation of DMPO-hydroxyl radical adduct (DMPO-OH) from authentic peroxynitrite, and that aspirin at 0.25-2 mM potently diminished the radical adduct formation in a concentration-dependent manner. Taken together, these results demonstrate for the first time that aspirin at pharmacologically relevant concentrations can inhibit peroxynitrite-mediated DNA strand breakage and hydroxyl radical formation. These results may have implications for cancer intervention by aspirin.

  7. Inhibition of peroxynitrite-mediated DNA strand cleavage and hydroxyl radical formation by aspirin at pharmacologically relevant concentrations: Implications for cancer intervention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wei [Division of Biomedical Sciences, Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Virginia Tech Corporate Research Center, Blacksburg, VA 24060 (United States); College of Food Science and Biotechnology, Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou 310035 (China); Department of Food Science and Technology, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Zhu, Hong; Jia, Zhenquan [Division of Biomedical Sciences, Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Virginia Tech Corporate Research Center, Blacksburg, VA 24060 (United States); Li, Jianrong [College of Food Science and Biotechnology, Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou 310035 (China); Misra, Hara P. [Division of Biomedical Sciences, Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Virginia Tech Corporate Research Center, Blacksburg, VA 24060 (United States); Zhou, Kequan, E-mail: kzhou@wayne.edu [Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Li, Yunbo, E-mail: yli@vcom.vt.edu [Division of Biomedical Sciences, Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Virginia Tech Corporate Research Center, Blacksburg, VA 24060 (United States)

    2009-12-04

    Epidemiological studies have suggested that the long-term use of aspirin is associated with a decreased incidence of human malignancies, especially colorectal cancer. Since accumulating evidence indicates that peroxynitrite is critically involved in multistage carcinogenesis, this study was undertaken to investigate the ability of aspirin to inhibit peroxynitrite-mediated DNA damage. Peroxynitrite and its generator 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) were used to cause DNA strand breaks in {phi}X-174 plasmid DNA. We demonstrated that the presence of aspirin at concentrations (0.25-2 mM) compatible with amounts in plasma during chronic anti-inflammatory therapy resulted in a significant inhibition of DNA cleavage induced by both peroxynitrite and SIN-1. Moreover, the consumption of oxygen caused by 250 {mu}M SIN-1 was found to be decreased in the presence of aspirin, indicating that aspirin might affect the auto-oxidation of SIN-1. Furthermore, EPR spectroscopy using 5,5-dimethylpyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) as a spin trap demonstrated the formation of DMPO-hydroxyl radical adduct (DMPO-OH) from authentic peroxynitrite, and that aspirin at 0.25-2 mM potently diminished the radical adduct formation in a concentration-dependent manner. Taken together, these results demonstrate for the first time that aspirin at pharmacologically relevant concentrations can inhibit peroxynitrite-mediated DNA strand breakage and hydroxyl radical formation. These results may have implications for cancer intervention by aspirin.

  8. Pharmacological identification of β-adrenoceptor subtypes mediating isoprenaline-induced relaxation of guinea pig colonic longitudinal smooth muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chino, Daisuke; Sone, Tomoyo; Yamazaki, Kumi; Tsuruoka, Yuri; Yamagishi, Risa; Shiina, Shunsuke; Obara, Keisuke; Yamaki, Fumiko; Higai, Koji; Tanaka, Yoshio

    2018-01-01

    Object We aimed to identify the β-adrenoceptor (β-AR) subtypes involved in isoprenaline-induced relaxation of guinea pig colonic longitudinal smooth muscle using pharmacological and biochemical approaches. Methods Longitudinal smooth muscle was prepared from the male guinea pig ascending colon and contracted with histamine prior to comparing the relaxant responses to three catecholamines (isoprenaline, adrenaline, and noradrenaline). The inhibitory effects of subtype-selective β-AR antagonists on isoprenaline-induced relaxation were then investigated. Results The relaxant potencies of the catecholamines were ranked as: isoprenaline > noradrenaline ≈ adrenaline, whereas the rank order was isoprenaline > noradrenaline > adrenaline in the presence of propranolol (a non-selective β-AR antagonist; 3 × 10−7 M). Atenolol (a selective β1-AR antagonist; 3 × 10−7–10−6 M) acted as a competitive antagonist of isoprenaline-induced relaxation, and the pA2 value was calculated to be 6.49 (95% confidence interval: 6.34–6.83). The relaxation to isoprenaline was not affected by ICI-118,551 (a selective β2-AR antagonist) at 10−9–10−8 M, but was competitively antagonized by 10−7–3 × 10−7 M, with a pA2 value of 7.41 (95% confidence interval: 7.18–8.02). In the presence of propranolol (3 × 10−7 M), the relaxant effect of isoprenaline was competitively antagonized by bupranolol (a non-selective β-AR antagonist), with a pA2 value of 5.90 (95% confidence interval: 5.73–6.35). Conclusion These findings indicated that the β-AR subtypes involved in isoprenaline-induced relaxation of colonic longitudinal guinea pig muscles are β1-AR and β3-AR. PMID:29540623

  9. Downregulation of SIRT1 signaling underlies hepatic autophagy impairment in glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Ho Cho

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A deficiency in glucose-6-phosphatase-α (G6Pase-α in glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia leads to impaired glucose homeostasis and metabolic manifestations including hepatomegaly caused by increased glycogen and neutral fat accumulation. A recent report showed that G6Pase-α deficiency causes impairment in autophagy, a recycling process important for cellular metabolism. However, the molecular mechanism underlying defective autophagy is unclear. Here we show that in mice, liver-specific knockout of G6Pase-α (L-G6pc-/- leads to downregulation of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1 signaling that activates autophagy via deacetylation of autophagy-related (ATG proteins and forkhead box O (FoxO family of transcriptional factors which transactivate autophagy genes. Consistently, defective autophagy in G6Pase-α-deficient liver is characterized by attenuated expressions of autophagy components, increased acetylation of ATG5 and ATG7, decreased conjugation of ATG5 and ATG12, and reduced autophagic flux. We further show that hepatic G6Pase-α deficiency results in activation of carbohydrate response element-binding protein, a lipogenic transcription factor, increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ, a lipid regulator, and suppressed expression of PPAR-α, a master regulator of fatty acid β-oxidation, all contributing to hepatic steatosis and downregulation of SIRT1 expression. An adenovirus vector-mediated increase in hepatic SIRT1 expression corrects autophagy defects but does not rectify metabolic abnormalities associated with G6Pase-α deficiency. Importantly, a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV vector-mediated restoration of hepatic G6Pase-α expression corrects metabolic abnormalities, restores SIRT1-FoxO signaling, and normalizes defective autophagy. Taken together, these data show that hepatic G6Pase-α deficiency-mediated down-regulation of SIRT1 signaling underlies defective hepatic autophagy in GSD-Ia.

  10. Autophagy to Survive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzeyyen Izmirli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is the catabolic mechanism that involves cell degradation of unnecessary or dysfunctional cellular components through the actions of lysosomes. It helps to keep the cells alive in such cases like oxidative stress, lack of nutrients and growth factors providing recycling of intracellular molecules. However, it works as a part of metabolism regulation, morphogenesis, cell differentiation, senescence, cell death and immune system. As a result of impairment of this mechanism, pathological situations arise including cancer, neurodegenerative and infectious diseases. Consequently, researches about autophagy mechanism are important for the development of novel diagnosis, follow-up and treatment modalities in health problems. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(3.000: 411-419

  11. Autophagy protects gastric mucosal epithelial cells from ethanol-induced oxidative damage via mTOR signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Weilong; Bai, Jie; Tian, Shaobo; Ma, Muyuan; Li, Wei; Yin, Yuping; Deng, Rui; Cui, Jinyuan; Li, Jinjin; Wang, Guobin; Zhang, Peng; Tao, Kaixiong

    2017-05-01

    Alcohol abuse is an important cause of gastric mucosal epithelial cell injury and gastric ulcers. A number of studies have demonstrated that autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved cellular mechanism, has a protective effect on cell survival. However, it is not known whether autophagy can protect gastric mucosal epithelial cells against the toxic effects of ethanol. In the present study, gastric mucosal epithelial cells (GES-1 cells) and Wistar rats were treated with ethanol to detect the adaptive response of autophagy. Our results demonstrated that ethanol exposure induced gastric mucosal epithelial cell damage, which was accompanied by the downregulation of mTOR signaling pathway and activation of autophagy. Suppression of autophagy with pharmacological agents resulted in a significant increase of GES-1 cell apoptosis and gastric mucosa injury, suggesting that autophagy could protect cells from ethanol toxicity. Furthermore, we evaluated the cellular oxidative stress response following ethanol treatment and found that autophagy induced by ethanol inhibited generation of reactive oxygen species and degradation of antioxidant and lipid peroxidation. In conclusion, these findings provide evidence that ethanol can activate autophagy via downregulation of the mTOR signaling pathway, serving as an adaptive mechanism to ameliorate oxidative damage induced by ethanol in gastric mucosal epithelial cells. Therefore, modifying autophagy may provide a therapeutic strategy against alcoholic gastric mucosa injury. Impact statement The effect and mechanism of autophagy on ethanol-induced cell damage remain controversial. In this manuscript, we report the results of our study demonstrating that autophagy can protect gastric mucosal epithelial cells against ethanol toxicity in vitro and in vivo. We have shown that ethanol can activate autophagy via downregulation of the mTOR signaling pathway, serving as an adaptive mechanism to ameliorate ethanol-induced oxidative damage in

  12. 5-Methoxyflavanone induces cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase, apoptosis and autophagy in HCT116 human colon cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Soon Young; Hyun, Jiye; Yu, Jae-Ran; Lim, Yoongho; Lee, Young Han

    2011-01-01

    Natural flavonoids have diverse pharmacological activities, including anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer activities. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism underlying the action of 5-methoxyflavanone (5-MF) which has a strong bioavailability and metabolic stability. Our results show that 5-MF inhibited the growth and clonogenicity of HCT116 human colon cancer cells, and that it activated DNA damage responses, as revealed by the accumulation of p53 and the phosphorylation of DNA damage-sensitive proteins, including ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) at Ser1981, checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2) at Thr68, and histone H2AX at Ser139. 5-MF-induced DNA damage was confirmed in a comet tail assay. We also found that 5-MF increased the cleavage of caspase-2 and -7, leading to the induction of apoptosis. Pretreatment with the ATM inhibitor KU55933 enhanced 5-MF-induced γ-H2AX formation and caspase-7 cleavage. HCT116 cells lacking p53 (p53 -/- ) or p21 (p21 -/- ) exhibited increased sensitivity to 5-MF compared to wild-type cells. 5-MF further induced autophagy via an ERK signaling pathway. Blockage of autophagy with the MEK inhibitor U0126 potentiated 5-MF-induced γ-H2AX formation and caspase-2 activation. These results suggest that a caspase-2 cascade mediates 5-MF-induced anti-tumor activity, while an ATM/Chk2/p53/p21 checkpoint pathway and ERK-mediated autophagy act as a survival program to block caspase-2-mediated apoptosis induced by 5-MF. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: → 5-MF inhibits the proliferation of HCT116 colon cancer cells. → 5-MF inhibits cell cycle progression and induces apoptosis. → Inhibition of autophagy triggers 5-MF-induced apoptosis. → Inhibition of ERK signaling blocks 5-MF-induced autophagy but activates apoptosis. → Treatment with 5-MF in combination with an ERK inhibitor may be a potential therapeutic strategy in human colon cancer.

  13. Autophagy and Alzheimer’s Disease: From Molecular Mechanisms to Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Sahab Uddin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the most common cause of progressive dementia in the elderly. It is characterized by a progressive and irreversible loss of cognitive abilities and formation of senile plaques, composed mainly of amyloid β (Aβ, and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs, composed of tau protein, in the hippocampus and cortex of afflicted humans. In brains of AD patients the metabolism of Aβ is dysregulated, which leads to the accumulation and aggregation of Aβ. Metabolism of Aβ and tau proteins is crucially influenced by autophagy. Autophagy is a lysosome-dependent, homeostatic process, in which organelles and proteins are degraded and recycled into energy. Thus, dysfunction of autophagy is suggested to lead to the accretion of noxious proteins in the AD brain. In the present review, we describe the process of autophagy and its importance in AD. Additionally, we discuss mechanisms and genes linking autophagy and AD, i.e., the mTOR pathway, neuroinflammation, endocannabinoid system, ATG7, BCL2, BECN1, CDK5, CLU, CTSD, FOXO1, GFAP, ITPR1, MAPT, PSEN1, SNCA, UBQLN1, and UCHL1. We also present pharmacological agents acting via modulation of autophagy that may show promise in AD therapy. This review updates our knowledge on autophagy mechanisms proposing novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of AD.

  14. Simultaneous activation of mitophagy and autophagy by staurosporine protects against dopaminergic neuronal cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Ji-Young; Kim, Ji-Soo; Kim, Seo-Eun; Son, Jin H

    2014-02-21

    Abnormal autophagy is frequently observed during dopaminergic neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, it is not yet firmly established whether active autophagy is beneficial or pathogenic with respect to dopaminergic cell loss. Staurosporine, a common inducer of apoptosis, is often used in mechanistic studies of dopaminergic cell death. Here we report that staurosporine activates both autophagy and mitophagy simultaneously during dopaminergic neuronal cell death, and evaluate the physiological significance of these processes during cell death. First, staurosporine treatment resulted in induction of autophagy in more than 75% of apoptotic cells. Pharmacological inhibition of autophagy by bafilomycin A1 decreased significantly cell viability. In addition, staurosporine treatment resulted in activation of the PINK1-Parkin mitophagy pathway, of which deficit underlies some familial cases of PD, in the dopaminergic neuronal cell line, SN4741. The genetic blockade of this pathway by PINK1 null mutation also dramatically increased staurosporine-induced cell death. Taken together, our data suggest that staurosporine induces both mitophagy and autophagy, and that these pathways exert a significant neuroprotective effect, rather than a contribution to autophagic cell death. This model system may therefore be useful for elucidating the mechanisms underlying crosstalk between autophagy, mitophagy, and cell death in dopaminergic neurons. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Autophagy and Alzheimer’s Disease: From Molecular Mechanisms to Therapeutic Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Md. Sahab; Stachowiak, Anna; Mamun, Abdullah Al; Tzvetkov, Nikolay T.; Takeda, Shinya; Atanasov, Atanas G.; Bergantin, Leandro B.; Abdel-Daim, Mohamed M.; Stankiewicz, Adrian M.

    2018-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common cause of progressive dementia in the elderly. It is characterized by a progressive and irreversible loss of cognitive abilities and formation of senile plaques, composed mainly of amyloid β (Aβ), and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), composed of tau protein, in the hippocampus and cortex of afflicted humans. In brains of AD patients the metabolism of Aβ is dysregulated, which leads to the accumulation and aggregation of Aβ. Metabolism of Aβ and tau proteins is crucially influenced by autophagy. Autophagy is a lysosome-dependent, homeostatic process, in which organelles and proteins are degraded and recycled into energy. Thus, dysfunction of autophagy is suggested to lead to the accretion of noxious proteins in the AD brain. In the present review, we describe the process of autophagy and its importance in AD. Additionally, we discuss mechanisms and genes linking autophagy and AD, i.e., the mTOR pathway, neuroinflammation, endocannabinoid system, ATG7, BCL2, BECN1, CDK5, CLU, CTSD, FOXO1, GFAP, ITPR1, MAPT, PSEN1, SNCA, UBQLN1, and UCHL1. We also present pharmacological agents acting via modulation of autophagy that may show promise in AD therapy. This review updates our knowledge on autophagy mechanisms proposing novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of AD. PMID:29441009

  16. CRISPR-Mediated Drug-Target Validation Reveals Selective Pharmacological Inhibition of the RNA Helicase, eIF4A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Chu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Targeting translation initiation is an emerging anti-neoplastic strategy that capitalizes on de-regulated upstream MAPK and PI3K-mTOR signaling pathways in cancers. A key regulator of translation that controls ribosome recruitment flux is eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF 4F, a hetero-trimeric complex composed of the cap binding protein eIF4E, the scaffolding protein eIF4G, and the RNA helicase eIF4A. Small molecule inhibitors targeting eIF4F display promising anti-neoplastic activity in preclinical settings. Among these are some rocaglate family members that are well tolerated in vivo, deplete eIF4F of its eIF4A helicase subunit, have shown activity as single agents in several xenograft models, and can reverse acquired resistance to MAPK and PI3K-mTOR targeted therapies. Herein, we highlight the power of using genetic complementation approaches and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated editing for drug-target validation ex vivo and in vivo, linking the anti-tumor properties of rocaglates to eIF4A inhibition.

  17. Pharmacologically-mediated reactivation and reconsolidation blockade of the psychostimulant-abuse circuit: A novel treatment strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tong H.; Szabo, Steven T.; Fowler, J. Corey; Mannelli, Paolo; Mangum, O. Barry; Beyer, Wayne F.; Patkar, Ashwin; Wetsel, William C.

    2012-01-01

    Psychostimulant abuse continues to present legal, socioeconomic and medical challenges as a primary psychiatric disorder, and represents a significant comorbid factor in major psychiatric and medical illnesses. To date, monotherapeutic drug treatments have not proven effective in promoting long-term abstinence in psychostimulant abusers. In contrast to clinical trials utilizing monotherapies, combinations of dopamine (DA) agonists and selective 5-HT3, 5HT2A/2C, or NK1 antagonists have shown robust efficacy in reversing behavioral and neurobiological alterations in animal models of psychostimulant abuse. One important temporal requirement for these treatments is that the 5-HT or NK1 receptor antagonist be given at a critical time window after DA agonist administration. This requirement may reflect a necessary dosing regimen towards normalizing underlying dysfunctional neural circuits and “addiction memory” states. Indeed, chronic psychostimulant abuse can be conceptualized as a consolidated form of dysfunctional memory maintained by repeated drug- or cue-induced reactivation of neural circuit and subsequent reconsolidation. According to this concept, the DA agonist given first may reactivate this memory circuit, thereby rendering it transiently labile. The subsequent antagonist is hypothesized to disrupt reconsolidation necessary for restabilization, thus leading progressively to a therapeutically-mediated abolishment of dysfunctional synaptic plasticity. We propose that long-term abstinence in psychostimulant abusers may be achieved not only by targeting putative mechanistic pathways, but also by optimizing drug treatment regimens designed to disrupt the neural processes underlying the addicted state. PMID:22356892

  18. Sinomenine Hydrochloride Protects against Polymicrobial Sepsis via Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis, a systemic inflammatory response to infection, is the major cause of death in intensive care units (ICUs. The mortality rate of sepsis remains high even though the treatment and understanding of sepsis both continue to improve. Sinomenine (SIN is a natural alkaloid extracted from Chinese medicinal plant Sinomenium acutum, and its hydrochloride salt (Sinomenine hydrochloride, SIN-HCl is widely used to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA. However, its role in sepsis remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of SIN-HCl in sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP in BALB/c mice and the corresponding mechanism. SIN-HCl treatment improved the survival of BALB/c mice that were subjected to CLP and reduced multiple organ dysfunction and the release of systemic inflammatory mediators. Autophagy activities were examined using Western blotting. The results showed that CLP-induced autophagy was elevated, and SIN-HCl treatment further strengthened the autophagy activity. Autophagy blocker 3-methyladenine (3-MA was used to investigate the mechanism of SIN-HCl in vitro. Autophagy activities were determined by examining the autophagosome formation, which was shown as microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3 puncta with green immunofluorescence. SIN-HCl reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced inflammatory cytokine release and increased autophagy in peritoneal macrophages (PM. 3-MA significantly decreased autophagosome formation induced by LPS and SIN-HCl. The decrease of inflammatory cytokines caused by SIN-HCl was partially aggravated by 3-MA treatment. Taken together, our results indicated that SIN-HCl could improve survival, reduce organ damage, and attenuate the release of inflammatory cytokines induced by CLP, at least in part through regulating autophagy activities.

  19. Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces the miR-33 locus to reprogram autophagy and host lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouimet, Mireille; Koster, Stefan; Sakowski, Erik; Ramkhelawon, Bhama; van Solingen, Coen; Oldebeken, Scott; Karunakaran, Denuja; Portal-Celhay, Cynthia; Sheedy, Frederick J; Ray, Tathagat Dutta; Cecchini, Katharine; Zamore, Philip D; Rayner, Katey J; Marcel, Yves L; Philips, Jennifer A; Moore, Kathryn J

    2016-06-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) survives in macrophages by evading delivery to the lysosome and promoting the accumulation of lipid bodies, which serve as a bacterial source of nutrients. We found that by inducing the microRNA (miRNA) miR-33 and its passenger strand miR-33*, Mtb inhibited integrated pathways involved in autophagy, lysosomal function and fatty acid oxidation to support bacterial replication. Silencing of miR-33 and miR-33* by genetic or pharmacological means promoted autophagy flux through derepression of key autophagy effectors (such as ATG5, ATG12, LC3B and LAMP1) and AMPK-dependent activation of the transcription factors FOXO3 and TFEB, which enhanced lipid catabolism and Mtb xenophagy. These data define a mammalian miRNA circuit used by Mtb to coordinately inhibit autophagy and reprogram host lipid metabolism to enable intracellular survival and persistence in the host.

  20. MDM2 Inhibitor, Nutlin 3a, Induces p53 Dependent Autophagy in Acute Leukemia by AMP Kinase Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautam Borthakur

    Full Text Available MDM2 (mouse double minute 2 inhibitors that activate p53 and induce apoptosis in a non-genotoxic manner are in clinical development for treatment of leukemias. P53 can modulate other programmed cell death pathways including autophagy both transcriptionally and non-transcriptionally. We investigated autophagy induction in acute leukemia by Nutlin 3a, a first-in-class MDM2 inhibitor. Nutlin 3a induced autophagy in a p53 dependent manner and transcriptional activation of AMP kinase (AMPK is critical, as this effect is abrogated in AMPK -/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Nutlin 3a induced autophagy appears to be pro-apoptotic as pharmacological (bafilomycin or genetic inhibition (BECLIN1 knockdown of autophagy impairs apoptosis induced by Nutlin 3a.

  1. Autophagy: Regulation by Energy Sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Alfred J.; Codogno, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is inhibited by the mTOR signaling pathway, which is stimulated by increased amino acid levels. When cellular energy production is compromised, AMP-activated protein kinase is activated, mTOR is inhibited and autophagy is stimulated. Two recent studies have shed light on the molecular

  2. Regulation of Autophagy by Kinases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sridharan, Savitha; Jain, Kirti; Basu, Alakananda

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is a process of self-degradation that maintains cellular viability during periods of metabolic stress. Although autophagy is considered a survival mechanism when faced with cellular stress, extensive autophagy can also lead to cell death. Aberrations in autophagy are associated with several diseases, including cancer. Therapeutic exploitation of this process requires a clear understanding of its regulation. Although the core molecular components involved in the execution of autophagy are well studied there is limited information on how cellular signaling pathways, particularly kinases, regulate this complex process. Protein kinases are integral to the autophagy process. Atg1, the first autophagy-related protein identified, is a serine/threonine kinase and it is regulated by another serine/threonine kinase mTOR. Emerging studies suggest the participation of many different kinases in regulating various components/steps of this catabolic process. This review focuses on the regulation of autophagy by several kinases with particular emphasis on serine/threonine protein kinases such as mTOR, AMP-activated protein kinase, Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK, p38 and JNK) and protein kinase C that are often deregulated in cancer and are important therapeutic targets

  3. Regulation of Autophagy by Kinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, Savitha; Jain, Kirti; Basu, Alakananda, E-mail: alakananda.basu@unthsc.edu [Department of Molecular Biology and Immunology, Institute for Cancer Research, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States)

    2011-06-09

    Autophagy is a process of self-degradation that maintains cellular viability during periods of metabolic stress. Although autophagy is considered a survival mechanism when faced with cellular stress, extensive autophagy can also lead to cell death. Aberrations in autophagy are associated with several diseases, including cancer. Therapeutic exploitation of this process requires a clear understanding of its regulation. Although the core molecular components involved in the execution of autophagy are well studied there is limited information on how cellular signaling pathways, particularly kinases, regulate this complex process. Protein kinases are integral to the autophagy process. Atg1, the first autophagy-related protein identified, is a serine/threonine kinase and it is regulated by another serine/threonine kinase mTOR. Emerging studies suggest the participation of many different kinases in regulating various components/steps of this catabolic process. This review focuses on the regulation of autophagy by several kinases with particular emphasis on serine/threonine protein kinases such as mTOR, AMP-activated protein kinase, Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK, p38 and JNK) and protein kinase C that are often deregulated in cancer and are important therapeutic targets.

  4. Regulation of Autophagy by Kinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Savitha; Jain, Kirti; Basu, Alakananda

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is a process of self-degradation that maintains cellular viability during periods of metabolic stress. Although autophagy is considered a survival mechanism when faced with cellular stress, extensive autophagy can also lead to cell death. Aberrations in autophagy are associated with several diseases, including cancer. Therapeutic exploitation of this process requires a clear understanding of its regulation. Although the core molecular components involved in the execution of autophagy are well studied there is limited information on how cellular signaling pathways, particularly kinases, regulate this complex process. Protein kinases are integral to the autophagy process. Atg1, the first autophagy-related protein identified, is a serine/threonine kinase and it is regulated by another serine/threonine kinase mTOR. Emerging studies suggest the participation of many different kinases in regulating various components/steps of this catabolic process. This review focuses on the regulation of autophagy by several kinases with particular emphasis on serine/threonine protein kinases such as mTOR, AMP-activated protein kinase, Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK, p38 and JNK) and protein kinase C that are often deregulated in cancer and are important therapeutic targets. PMID:24212825

  5. Regulation of Autophagy by Kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savitha Sridharan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a process of self-degradation that maintains cellular viability during periods of metabolic stress. Although autophagy is considered a survival mechanism when faced with cellular stress, extensive autophagy can also lead to cell death. Aberrations in autophagy are associated with several diseases, including cancer. Therapeutic exploitation of this process requires a clear understanding of its regulation. Although the core molecular components involved in the execution of autophagy are well studied there is limited information on how cellular signaling pathways, particularly kinases, regulate this complex process. Protein kinases are integral to the autophagy process. Atg1, the first autophagy-related protein identified, is a serine/threonine kinase and it is regulated by another serine/threonine kinase mTOR. Emerging studies suggest the participation of many different kinases in regulating various components/steps of this catabolic process. This review focuses on the regulation of autophagy by several kinases with particular emphasis on serine/threonine protein kinases such as mTOR, AMP-activated kinase, Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK, p38 and JNK and protein kinase C that are often deregulated in cancer and are important therapeutic targets.

  6. IFNB1/interferon-ß-induced autophagy in MCF-7 breast cancer cells counteracts its proapoptotic function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambjørn, Malene; Ejlerskov, Patrick; Liu, Yawei

    2013-01-01

    differs significantly from type I IFNs, can induce autophagy, no such function for any type I IFN has been reported. We show here that IFNB1 induces autophagy in MCF-7, MDAMB231 and SKBR3 breast cancer cells by measuring the turnover of two autophagic markers, MAP1LC3B/LC3 and SQSTM1/p62. The induction...... of autophagy in MCF-7 cells occurred upstream of the negative regulator of autophagy MTORC1, and autophagosome formation was dependent on the known core autophagy molecule ATG7 and the IFNB1 signaling molecule STAT1. Using siRNA-mediated silencing of several core autophagy molecules and STAT1, we provide...

  7. Anesthetic Agents and Neuronal Autophagy. What We Know and What We Don't.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lili; Shen, Jianjun; McQuillan, Patrick M; Hu, Zhiyong

    2018-01-01

    Ethanol is known to have both γ-Aminobutyric acid agonist and Nmethyl- D-aspartate antagonist characteristics similar to commonly used volatile anesthetic agents. Recent evidence demonstrates that autophagy can reduce the development of ethanol induced neurotoxicity. Recent studies have found that general anesthesia can cause longterm impairment of both mitochondrial morphogenesis and synaptic transmission in the developing rat brain, both of which are accompanied by enhanced autophagy activity. Autophagy may play an important role in general anesthetic mediated neurotoxicity. This review outlines the role of autophagy in the development of anesthetic related neurotoxicity and includes an explanation of the role of autophagy in neuronal cell survival and death, the relationship between anesthetic agents and neuronal autophagy, possible molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying general anesthetic agent induced activation of neuronal autophagy in the developing brain, and potential therapeutic approaches aimed at modulating autophagic pathways. In a time- and concentration-dependent pattern, general anesthetic agents can disrupt intracellular calcium homeostasis which enhances both autophagy and apoptosis activation. The degree of neural cell injury may be ultimately determined by the interplay between autophagy and apoptosis. It appears likely that the increase in calcium flux associated with some anesthetic agents disrupts lysosomal function. This results in an over-activation of endosomal- lysosomal trafficking causing mitochondrial damage, reactive oxygen species upregulation, and lipid peroxidation. Autophagy may play a role in the development of anesthetic related neurotoxicity. Understanding this may lead to strategies or therapies aimed at preventing or ameliorating general anesthetic agent mediated neurotoxicity. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Ammonia Induces Autophagy through Dopamine Receptor D3 and MTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiyuan; Ji, Xinmiao; Wang, Wenchao; Liu, Juanjuan; Liang, Xiaofei; Wu, Hong; Liu, Jing; Eggert, Ulrike S.; Liu, Qingsong

    2016-01-01

    Hyperammonemia is frequently seen in tumor microenvironments as well as in liver diseases where it can lead to severe brain damage or death. Ammonia induces autophagy, a mechanism that tumor cells may use to protect themselves from external stresses. However, how cells sense ammonia has been unclear. Here we show that culture medium alone containing Glutamine can generate milimolar of ammonia at 37 degrees in the absence of cells. In addition, we reveal that ammonia acts through the G protein-coupled receptor DRD3 (Dopamine receptor D3) to induce autophagy. At the same time, ammonia induces DRD3 degradation, which involves PIK3C3/VPS34-dependent pathways. Ammonia inhibits MTOR (mechanistic target of Rapamycin) activity and localization in cells, which is mediated by DRD3. Therefore, ammonia has dual roles in autophagy: one to induce autophagy through DRD3 and MTOR, the other to increase autophagosomal pH to inhibit autophagic flux. Our study not only adds a new sensing and output pathway for DRD3 that bridges ammonia sensing and autophagy induction, but also provides potential mechanisms for the clinical consequences of hyperammonemia in brain damage, neurodegenerative diseases and tumors. PMID:27077655

  9. Sigma-1 and Sigma-2 receptor ligands induce apoptosis and autophagy but have opposite effect on cell proliferation in uveal melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhitano, Lucia; Castracani, Carlo Castruccio; Tibullo, Daniele; Avola, Roberto; Viola, Maria; Russo, Giuliano; Prezzavento, Orazio; Marrazzo, Agostino; Amata, Emanuele; Reibaldi, Michele; Longo, Antonio; Russo, Andrea; Parrinello, Nunziatina Laura; Volti, Giovanni Li

    2017-10-31

    Uveal melanoma is the most common primary intraocular tumor in adults, with about 1200-1500 new cases occurring per year in the United States. Metastasis is a frequent occurrence in uveal melanoma, and outcomes are poor once distant spread occurs and no clinically significant chemotherapeutic protocol is so far available. The aim of the present study was to test the effect of various σ 1 and σ 2 receptor ligands as a possible pharmacological strategy for this rare tumor. Human uveal melanoma cells (92.1) were treated with various concentrations of different σ 2 ligands (haloperidol and haloperidol metabolite II) and σ 1 ligand ((+)-pentazocine) at various concentrations (1, 10 and 25 μM) and time points (0, 4 h, 8 h, 24 h and 48 h). Cell proliferation and migration were evaluated respectively by continuous cell monitoring by xCELLigence analysis, clonogenic assay and wound healing. Apoptosis and autophagy were also measured by cytofluorimetric and microscopy analysis. Our results showed that σ 2 receptor ligands significantly reduced cell proliferation whereas (+)-pentazocine exhibited opposite results. All tested ligands showed significant decrease in cell migration. Interestingly, both σ 1 and σ 2 receptor ligands showed significant increase of autophagy and apoptosis at all concentrations. Taken all together these results suggest that sigma receptors mediates opposite biological effects but they also share common pharmacological effect on apoptosis and autophagy in uveal melanoma. In conclusion, these data provide the first evidence that sigma receptors may represent a "druggable" target to develop new chemotherapic agent for uveal melanoma.

  10. Anesthetic pharmacology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Evers, Alex S; Maze, M; Kharasch, Evan D

    2011-01-01

    ...: Section 1 introduces the principles of drug action, Section 2 presents the molecular, cellular and integrated physiology of the target organ/functional system and Section 3 reviews the pharmacology...

  11. Acid-induced autophagy protects human lung cancer cells from apoptosis by activating ER stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wen-Yue; Zhou, Xiang-Dong; Li, Qi; Chen, Ling-Xiu; Ran, Dan-Hua

    2015-12-10

    An acidic tumor microenvironment exists widely in solid tumors. However, the detailed mechanism of cell survival under acidic stress remains unclear. The aim of this study is to clarify whether acid-induced autophagy exists and to determine the function and mechanism of autophagy in lung cancer cells. We have found that acute low pH stimulated autophagy by increasing LC3-positive punctate vesicles, increasing LC3 II expression levels and reducing p62 protein levels. Additionally, autophagy was inhibited by the addition of Baf or knockdown of Beclin 1, and cell apoptosis was increased markedly. In mouse tumors, the expression of cleaved caspase3 and p62 was enhanced by oral treatment with sodium bicarbonate, which can raise the intratumoral pH. Furthermore, the protein levels of ER stress markers, including p-PERK, p-eIF2α, CHOP, XBP-1s and GRP78, were also increased in response to acidic pH. The antioxidant NAC, which reduces ROS accumulation, alleviated acid-mediated ER stress and autophagy, and knocking down GRP78 reduced autophagy activation under acidic conditions, which suggests that autophagy was induced by acidic pH through ER stress. Taken together, these results indicate that the acidic microenvironment in non-small cell lung cancer cells promotes autophagy by increasing ROS-ER stress, which serves as a survival adaption in this setting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Pharmacological isolation of postsynaptic currents mediated by NR2A- and NR2B-containing NMDA receptors in the anterior cingulate cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao Xiaoyan

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract NMDA receptors (NMDARs are involved in excitatory synaptic transmission and plasticity associated with a variety of brain functions, from memory formation to chronic pain. Subunit-selective antagonists for NMDARs provide powerful tools to dissect NMDAR functions in neuronal activities. Recently developed antagonist for NR2A-containing receptors, NVP-AAM007, triggered debates on its selectivity and involvement of the NMDAR subunits in bi-directional synaptic plasticity. Here, we re-examined the pharmacological properties of NMDARs in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC using NVP-AAM007 as well as ifenprodil, a selective antagonist for NR2B-containing NMDARs. By alternating sequence of drug application and examining different concentrations of NVP-AAM007, we found that the presence of NVP-AAM007 did not significantly affect the effect of ifenprodil on NMDAR-mediated EPSCs. These results suggest that NVP-AAM007 shows great preference for NR2A subunit and could be used as a selective antagonist for NR2A-containing NMDARs in the ACC.

  13. GABA(A receptor-mediated acceleration of aging-associated memory decline in APP/PS1 mice and its pharmacological treatment by picrotoxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Yoshiike

    Full Text Available Advanced age and mutations in the genes encoding amyloid precursor protein (APP and presenilin (PS1 are two serious risk factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD. Finding common pathogenic changes originating from these risks may lead to a new therapeutic strategy. We observed a decline in memory performance and reduction in hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP in both mature adult (9-15 months transgenic APP/PS1 mice and old (19-25 months non-transgenic (nonTg mice. By contrast, in the presence of bicuculline, a GABA(A receptor antagonist, LTP in adult APP/PS1 mice and old nonTg mice was larger than that in adult nonTg mice. The increased LTP levels in bicuculline-treated slices suggested that GABA(A receptor-mediated inhibition in adult APP/PS1 and old nonTg mice was upregulated. Assuming that enhanced inhibition of LTP mediates memory decline in APP/PS1 mice, we rescued memory deficits in adult APP/PS1 mice by treating them with another GABA(A receptor antagonist, picrotoxin (PTX, at a non-epileptic dose for 10 days. Among the saline vehicle-treated groups, substantially higher levels of synaptic proteins such as GABA(A receptor alpha1 subunit, PSD95, and NR2B were observed in APP/PS1 mice than in nonTg control mice. This difference was insignificant among PTX-treated groups, suggesting that memory decline in APP/PS1 mice may result from changes in synaptic protein levels through homeostatic mechanisms. Several independent studies reported previously in aged rodents both an increased level of GABA(A receptor alpha1 subunit and improvement of cognitive functions by long term GABA(A receptor antagonist treatment. Therefore, reduced LTP linked to enhanced GABA(A receptor-mediated inhibition may be triggered by aging and may be accelerated by familial AD-linked gene products like Abeta and mutant PS1, leading to cognitive decline that is pharmacologically treatable at least at this stage of disease progression in mice.

  14. Interferon-regulatory factor-1 (IRF1) regulates bevacizumab induced autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Verlene; Tiao, Ningyi; de Groot, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Antiangiogenic therapy is commonly being used for the treatment of glioblastoma. However, the benefits of angiogenesis inhibitors are typically transient and resistance often develops. Determining the mechanism of treatment failure of the VEGF monoclonal antibody bevacizumab for malignant glioma would provide insight into approaches to overcome therapeutic resistance. Experimental Design In this study, we evaluated the effects of bevacizumab on the autophagy of glioma cells and determined target genes involving in the regulation of bevacizumab-induced autophagy. Results We demonstrated that bevacizumab treatment increased expression of autophagy markers and autophagosome formation in cell culture experiments as well as in in vivo studies. Gene expression profile analysis performed on murine xenograft models of glioblastoma showed increased transcriptional levels of STAT1/IRF1 signaling in bevacizumab resistant tumors compared to control tumors. In vitro experiments showed that bevacizumab treatment increased IRF1 expression in a dose and time dependent manner, which was coincident with bevacizumab-mediated autophagy. Down regulation of IRF1 by shRNA blocked autophagy and increased AIF-dependent apoptosis in bevacizumab-treated glioma cells. Consistently, IRF1 depletion increased the efficacy of anti-VEGF therapy in a glioma xenograft model, which was due to less bevacizumab-promoted autophagy and increased apoptosis in tumors with down-regulated IRF1. Conclusions These data suggest that IRF1 may regulate bevacizumab-induced autophagy, and may be one important mediator of glioblastoma resistant to bevacizumab. PMID:26362401

  15. ProbioticBacillus amyloliquefaciensSC06 Induces Autophagy to Protect against Pathogens in Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanping; Wang, Yang; Zou, Hai; Wang, Baikui; Sun, Qiming; Fu, Aikun; Wang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yibing; Xu, Xiaogang; Li, Weifen

    2017-01-01

    Probiotics are increasingly applied in popularity in both humans and animals. Decades of research has revealed their beneficial effects, including the immune modulation in intestinal pathogens inhibition. Autophagy-a cellular process that involves the delivery of cytoplasmic proteins and organelles to the lysosome for degradation and recirculation-is essential to protect cells against bacterial pathogens. However, the mechanism of probiotics-mediated autophagy and its role in the elimination of pathogens are still unknown. Here, we evaluated Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SC06 (Ba)-induced autophagy and its antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli ( E. coli ) in murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7 cells. Western blotting and confocal laser scanning analysis showed that Ba activated autophagy in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Ba-induced autophagy was found to play a role in the elimination of intracellular bacteria when RAW264.7 cells were challenged with E. coli . Ba induced autophagy by increasing the expression of Beclin1 and Atg5-Atg12-Atg16 complex, but not the AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. Moreover, Ba pretreatment attenuated the activation of JNK in RAW264.7 cells during E. coli infection, further indicating a protective role for probiotics via modulating macrophage immunity. The above findings highlight a novel mechanism underlying the antibacterial activity of probiotics. This study enriches the current knowledge on probiotics-mediated autophagy, and provides a new perspective on the prevention of bacterial infection in intestine, which further the application of probiotics in food products.

  16. Regulation of autophagy by amino acids and MTOR-dependent signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Alfred J; Lorin, Séverine; Blommaart, Edward F; Codogno, Patrice

    2015-10-01

    Amino acids not only participate in intermediary metabolism but also stimulate insulin-mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR)-mediated signal transduction which controls the major metabolic pathways. Among these is the pathway of autophagy which takes care of the degradation of long-lived proteins and of the elimination of damaged or functionally redundant organelles. Proper functioning of this process is essential for cell survival. Dysregulation of autophagy has been implicated in the etiology of several pathologies. The history of the studies on the interrelationship between amino acids, MTOR signaling and autophagy is the subject of this review. The mechanisms responsible for the stimulation of MTOR-mediated signaling, and the inhibition of autophagy, by amino acids have been studied intensively in the past but are still not completely clarified. Recent developments in this field are discussed.

  17. Autophagy modulates dynamics of connexins at the plasma membrane in a ubiquitin-dependent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejarano, Eloy; Girao, Henrique; Yuste, Andrea; Patel, Bindi; Marques, Carla; Spray, David C.; Pereira, Paulo; Cuervo, Ana Maria

    2012-01-01

    Different pathways contribute to the turnover of connexins, the main structural components of gap junctions (GJs). The cellular pool of connexins targeted to each pathway and the functional consequences of degradation through these degradative pathways are unknown. In this work, we focused on the contribution of macroautophagy to connexin degradation. Using pharmacological and genetic blockage of macroautophagy both in vitro and in vivo, we found that the cellular pool targeted by this autophagic system is primarily the one organized into GJs. Interruption of connexins' macroautophagy resulted in their retention at the plasma membrane in the form of functional GJs and subsequent increased GJ-mediated intercellular diffusion. Up-regulation of macroautophagy alone is not sufficient to induce connexin internalization and degradation. To better understand what factors determine the autophagic degradation of GJ connexins, we analyzed the changes undergone by the fraction of plasma membrane connexin 43 targeted for macroautophagy and the sequence of events that trigger this process. We found that Nedd4-mediated ubiquitinylation of the connexin molecule is required to recruit the adaptor protein Eps15 to the GJ and to initiate the autophagy-dependent internalization and degradation of connexin 43. This study reveals a novel regulatory role for macroautophagy in GJ function that is directly dependent on the ubiquitinylation of plasma membrane connexins. PMID:22496425

  18. Autophagy, stress, and cancer metabolism: what doesn't kill you makes you stronger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, R; White, E

    2011-01-01

    Altered metabolism is a hallmark of cancer. Oncogenic events that lead to cancerous states reorganize metabolic pathways to increase nutrient uptake, which promotes biosynthetic capabilities and cell-autonomous behavior. Increased biosynthesis dictates metabolic demand for ATP, building blocks, and reducing equivalents, rendering cancer cells metabolically in a perpetually hungry state. Moreover, most chemotherapy agents induce acute metabolic stress that cancer cells must overcome for their survival. These metabolic stress cues in cancer cells can activate and cause dependence on the self-cannibalization mechanism of macroautophagy (autophagy hereafter) for the lysosomal turnover and recycling of organelles and proteins for energy and stress survival. For example, activating mutations in Ras or Ras-effector pathways induce autophagy, and cancer cell lines with Ras activation show elevated levels of basal autophagy that is essential for starvation survival and tumor growth. The metabolic implications of this are profound and multifaceted. First, autophagy-mediated degradation and recycling of cellular substrates can support metabolism and promote survival and tumor growth. Second, acute autophagy activation in response to cancer therapy can potentially lead to refractory tumors resistant to conventional chemotherapy. For example, a specific form of autophagy that targets mitochondria (mitophagy) may also function to promote cell survival by the clearance of damaged mitochondria that are potential sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These point to the possibility that autophagy is a unique metabolic need, important for survival as well as therapy resistance in cancer cells. Targeting autophagy in single-agent therapy to sensitize aggressive cancers that are dependent on autophagy for survival or in combination with therapeutic agents that induce autophagy as a resistance mechanism may be an effective therapeutic strategy to treat cancer.

  19. Tetrandrine induces lipid accumulation through blockade of autophagy in a hepatic stellate cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamae, Yusaku, E-mail: ymiyamae@lif.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Oiwakecho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Nishito, Yukina; Nakai, Naomi [Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Oiwakecho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Nagumo, Yoko; Usui, Takeo [Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan); Masuda, Seiji; Kambe, Taiho [Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Oiwakecho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Nagao, Masaya, E-mail: mnagao@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Oiwakecho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2016-08-12

    Macroautophagy, or autophagy, is a cellular response in which unnecessary cytoplasmic components, including lipids and organelles, are self-degraded. Recent studies closely related autophagy to activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), a process critical in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. During HSC activation, cytoplasmic lipid droplets (LDs) are degraded as autophagic cargo, and then cells express fibrogenic genes. Thus, inhibition of autophagy in HSCs is a potential therapeutic approach for attenuating liver fibrosis. We found that tetrandrine, a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid isolated from Stephania tetrandra, induced lipid accumulation, a phenotype associated with quiescent HSCs, through blockade of autophagy in the rat-derived HSC line HSC-T6. Tetrandrine inhibited autophagic flux without affecting lysosomal function. A phenotypic comparison using siRNA knockdown suggested that tetrandrine may target regulators, involved in fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes (e.g., syntaxin 17). Moreover, perilipin 1, an LD-coated protein, co-localized specifically with LC3, a marker protein for autophagosomes, in tetrandrine-treated HSC-T6 cells. This suggests a potential role for perilipin 1 in autophagy-mediated LD degradation in HSCs. Our results identified tetrandrine as a potential tool for prevention and treatment of HSC activation. - Highlights: • Autophagy is closely related to lipid degradation in hepatic stellate cells. • Tetrandrine (Tet) causes lipid accumulation via blockade of autophagy in HSC-T6 cells. • Tet blocked autophagy without affecting lysosomal function unlike bafilomycin A{sub 1}. • Perilipin 1 was specifically co-localized with LC3 in Tet-treated cells. • Perilipin 1 may play potential roles in autophagy-mediated lipid degradation.

  20. Estrogen receptor α induces prosurvival autophagy in papillary thyroid cancer via stimulating reactive oxygen species and extracellular signal regulated kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Dahua; Liu, Shirley Y W; van Hasselt, C Andrew; Vlantis, Alexander C; Ng, Enders K W; Zhang, Haitao; Dong, Yujuan; Ng, Siu Kwan; Chu, Ryan; Chan, Amy B W; Du, Jing; Wei, Wei; Liu, Xiaoling; Liu, Zhimin; Xing, Mingzhao; Chen, George G

    2015-04-01

    The incidence of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) shows a predominance in females, with a male:female ratio of 1:3, and none of the known risk factors are associated with gender difference. Increasing evidence indicates a role of estrogen in thyroid tumorigenesis, but the mechanism involved remains largely unknown. This study aimed to assess the contribution of autophagy to estrogen receptor α (ERα)-mediated growth of PTC. The expression of ERα in thyroid tissue of patients with PTC tissues was analyzed. Cell viability, proliferation, and apoptosis were evaluated after chemical and genetic inhibition of autophagy. Autophagy in PTC cell lines BCPAP and BCPAP-ERα was assessed. ERα expression was increased in PTC tissues compared with the adjacent nontumor tissues. Estrogen induced autophagy in an ERα-dependent manner. Autophagy induced by estrogen/ERα is associated with generation of reactive oxygen species, activation of ERK1/2, and the survival/growth of PTC cells. Chemical and genetic inhibition of autophagy dramatically decreased tumor cell survival and promoted apoptosis, confirming the positive role of autophagy in the growth of PTC. ERα contributes to the growth of PTC by enhancing an important prosurvival catabolic process, autophagy, in PTC cells. The inhibition of autophagy promotes apoptosis, implicating a novel strategy for the treatment of ERα-positive PTC.

  1. Atrogin-1 deficiency promotes cardiomyopathy and premature death via impaired autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaglia, Tania; Milan, Giulia; Ruhs, Aaron; Franzoso, Mauro; Bertaggia, Enrico; Pianca, Nicola; Carpi, Andrea; Carullo, Pierluigi; Pesce, Paola; Sacerdoti, David; Sarais, Cristiano; Catalucci, Daniele; Krüger, Marcus; Mongillo, Marco; Sandri, Marco

    2014-06-01

    Cardiomyocyte proteostasis is mediated by the ubiquitin/proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy/lysosome system and is fundamental for cardiac adaptation to both physiologic (e.g., exercise) and pathologic (e.g., pressure overload) stresses. Both the UPS and autophagy/lysosome system exhibit reduced efficiency as a consequence of aging, and dysfunction in these systems is associated with cardiomyopathies. The muscle-specific ubiquitin ligase atrogin-1 targets signaling proteins involved in cardiac hypertrophy for degradation. Here, using atrogin-1 KO mice in combination with in vivo pulsed stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture proteomics and biochemical and cellular analyses, we identified charged multivesicular body protein 2B (CHMP2B), which is part of an endosomal sorting complex (ESCRT) required for autophagy, as a target of atrogin-1-mediated degradation. Mice lacking atrogin-1 failed to degrade CHMP2B, resulting in autophagy impairment, intracellular protein aggregate accumulation, unfolded protein response activation, and subsequent cardiomyocyte apoptosis, all of which increased progressively with age. Cellular proteostasis alterations resulted in cardiomyopathy characterized by myocardial remodeling with interstitial fibrosis, with reduced diastolic function and arrhythmias. CHMP2B downregulation in atrogin-1 KO mice restored autophagy and decreased proteotoxicity, thereby preventing cell death. These data indicate that atrogin-1 promotes cardiomyocyte health through mediating the interplay between UPS and autophagy/lysosome system and its alteration promotes development of cardiomyopathies.

  2. Autophagy regulates the stemness of cervical cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Y

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Yi Yang,1,2 Li Yu,1 Jin Li,1 Ya Hong Yuan,1 Xiao Li Wang,1 Shi Rong Yan,1 Dong Sheng Li,1 Yan Ding1 1Hubei Key Laboratory of Embryonic Stem Cell Research, 2Reproductive Center, Taihe Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs are a rare population of multipotent cells with the capacity to self-renew. It has been reported that there are CSCs in cervical cancer cells. Pluripotency-associated (PA transcription factors such as Oct4, Sox2, Nanog and CD44 have been used to isolate CSCs subpopulations. In this study, we showed that autophagy plays an important role in the biological behavior of cervical cancer cells. The expression of the autophagy protein Beclin 1 and LC3B was higher in tumorspheres established from human cervical cancers cell lines (and CaSki than in the parental adherent cells. It was also observed that the basal and starvation-induced autophagy flux was higher in tumorspheres than in the bulk population. Autophagy could regulate the expression level of PA proteins in cervical CSCs. In addition, CRISPR/Cas 9-mediated Beclin 1 knockout enhanced the malignancy of HeLa cells, leading to accumulation of PA proteins and promoted tumorsphere formation. Our findings suggest that autophagy modulates homeostasis of PA proteins, and Beclin 1 is critical for CSC maintenance and tumor development in nude mice. This demonstrates that a prosurvival autophagic pathway is critical for CSC maintenance. Keywords: cervical cancer, autophagy, cancer stem cell, LC3, Oct4

  3. Clinical pharmacology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    General anaesthesia should be considered for potentially difficult procedures and for those involving large wounds. RENEÉ DE WAAL, MB ChB, MFPM. MARC BLOCKMAN, BPharm,. MB ChB, Dip Int Res Ethics, MMed. (Clin Pharmacol), AFCCP. Division of Clinical Pharmacology Department of Medicine University of Cape ...

  4. Caloric restriction and the precision-control of autophagy: A strategy for delaying neurodegenerative disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntsapi, C; Loos, B

    2016-10-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) is known to extend lifespan in most organisms, indicating that nutrient and energy regulatory mechanisms impact aging. The greatest risk factor for neurodegeneration is age; thus, the antiaging effects of CR might attenuate progressive cell death and avert the aggregation of abnormal proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases. CR is a potent inducer of autophagy, a tightly regulated intracellular process that facilitates recycling of abnormal protein aggregates and damaged organelles into bioenergetic and biosynthetic materials to maintain homeostasis. Thus, dysregulated autophagy can lead to cellular dysfunction, abnormal protein accumulation, proteotoxicity and subsequently the onset of several neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, the targeted and precision-controlled activation of autophagy represents a promising therapeutic strategy. Non-pharmacological therapeutic interventions that delay aging by modulating specific stages of autophagy might be beneficial against premature aging, neurodegeneration and its associated ailments. However, the dynamic and often compensatory cross-talk that exists between the protein degradation pathways makes clinical translational approaches challenging. Here we review the primary autophagy pathways in the context of age-related neurodegenerative diseases, focusing on compensatory mechanisms and pathway failure. By critically assessing each underlying molecular machinery, we reveal their impact on aging and unmask the role of caloric restriction in changing cellular fate by delayed aging through stimulation of autophagy. This may point towards novel and better targeted interventions that exploit the autophagic machinery in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. EGFRvIII expression triggers a metabolic dependency and therapeutic vulnerability sensitive to autophagy inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutten, Barry; Keulers, Tom G; Peeters, Hanneke J M; Schaaf, Marco B E; Savelkouls, Kim G M; Compter, Inge; Clarijs, Ruud; Schijns, Olaf E M G; Ackermans, Linda; Teernstra, Onno P M; Zonneveld, Marijke I; Colaris, Resi M E; Dubois, Ludwig; Vooijs, Marc A; Bussink, Johan; Sotelo, Julio; Theys, Jan; Lammering, Guido; Rouschop, Kasper M A

    2018-01-29

    Expression of EGFRvIII is frequently observed in glioblastoma and is associated with increased cellular proliferation, enhanced tolerance to metabolic stresses, accelerated tumor growth, therapy resistance and poor prognosis. We observed that expression of EGFRvIII elevates the activation of macroautophagy/autophagy during starvation and hypoxia and explored the underlying mechanism and consequence. Autophagy was inhibited (genetically or pharmacologically) and its consequence for tolerance to metabolic stress and its therapeutic potential in (EGFRvIII + ) glioblastoma was assessed in cellular systems, (patient derived) tumor xenopgrafts and glioblastoma patients. Autophagy inhibition abrogated the enhanced proliferation and survival advantage of EGFRvIII + cells during stress conditions, decreased tumor hypoxia and delayed tumor growth in EGFRvIII + tumors. These effects can be attributed to the supporting role of autophagy in meeting the high metabolic demand of EGFRvIII + cells. As hypoxic tumor cells greatly contribute to therapy resistance, autophagy inhibition revokes the radioresistant phenotype of EGFRvIII + tumors in (patient derived) xenograft tumors. In line with these findings, retrospective analysis of glioblastoma patients indicated that chloroquine treatment improves survival of all glioblastoma patients, but patients with EGFRvIII + glioblastoma benefited most. Our findings disclose the unique autophagy dependency of EGFRvIII + glioblastoma as a therapeutic opportunity. Chloroquine treatment may therefore be considered as an additional treatment strategy for glioblastoma patients and can reverse the worse prognosis of patients with EGFRvIII + glioblastoma.

  6. Autophagy in DNA Damage Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Czarny

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage response (DDR involves DNA repair, cell cycle regulation and apoptosis, but autophagy is also suggested to play a role in DDR. Autophagy can be activated in response to DNA-damaging agents, but the exact mechanism underlying this activation is not fully understood, although it is suggested that it involves the inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1. mTORC1 represses autophagy via phosphorylation of the ULK1/2–Atg13–FIP200 complex thus preventing maturation of pre-autophagosomal structures. When DNA damage occurs, it is recognized by some proteins or their complexes, such as poly(ADPribose polymerase 1 (PARP-1, Mre11–Rad50–Nbs1 (MRN complex or FOXO3, which activate repressors of mTORC1. SQSTM1/p62 is one of the proteins whose levels are regulated via autophagic degradation. Inhibition of autophagy by knockout of FIP200 results in upregulation of SQSTM1/p62, enhanced DNA damage and less efficient damage repair. Mitophagy, one form of autophagy involved in the selective degradation of mitochondria, may also play role in DDR. It degrades abnormal mitochondria and can either repress or activate apoptosis, but the exact mechanism remains unknown. There is a need to clarify the role of autophagy in DDR, as this process may possess several important biomedical applications, involving also cancer therapy.

  7. Cytotoxic Autophagy in Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khushboo Sharma

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a process of cellular self-digestion, whereby the cell degrades subcellular materials in order to generate energy and metabolic precursors in order to prolong survival, classically under conditions of nutrient deprivation. Autophagy can also involve the degradation of damaged or aged organelles, and misfolded or damaged proteins to eliminate these components that might otherwise be deleterious to cellular survival. Consequently, autophagy has generally been considered a prosurvival response. Many, if not most chemotherapeutic drugs and radiation also promote autophagy, which is generally considered a cytoprotective response, in that its inhibition frequently promotes apoptotic cells death. Furthermore, it has been shown that conventional chemotherapeutic drugs and radiation alone rarely induce a form of autophagy that leads to cell death. However, there are multiple examples in the literature where newer chemotherapeutic agents, drug combinations or drugs in combination with radiation promote autophagic cell death. This review will describe autophagic cell death induced in breast tumor cells, lung cancer cells as well as glioblastoma, demonstrating that it cannot be concluded that stress induced autophagy is, of necessity, cytoprotective in function.

  8. microRNA-7 impairs autophagy-derived pools of glucose to suppress pancreatic cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Dian-Na; Jiang, Ming-Jie; Mei, Zhu; Dai, Juan-Juan; Dai, Chen-Yun; Fang, Chi; Huang, Qian; Tian, Ling

    2017-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer commonly addicts to aerobic glycolysis, and abnormally activates autophagy to adapt the stringent metabolic microenvironment. microRNA-7 (miR-7) was supposed to modulate various gastrointestinal cancer progression. We wonder whether miR-7 could destroy the reprogrammed metabolic homeostasis in pancreatic cancer via modulating the level of autophagy, and further affect tumor proliferation and survival. Herein, we first reported that pancreatic cancer could take advantage of autophagy as a survival strategy to provide essential glucose required for glycolysis metabolism. Of note, under the stressful tumor microenvironment, miR-7 could repress autophagy through up-regulation of LKB1-AMPK-mTOR signaling, and directly targeting the stages of autophagy induction and vesicle elongation to reduce the supply of intracellular glucose to glycolysis metabolism. Furthermore, miR-7 inhibited pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and metastasis in vitro and in vivo. Consistently, lentivirus-mediated miR-7 effectively reduced the growth of patient-derived xenograft by interfering glycolysis via inhibition of autophagy. Together, these data suggested miR-7 might function as an important regulator to impair autophagy-derived pools of glucose to suppress pancreatic cancer progress. Hence, miR-7 might be a potential therapeutic target in pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Stimulation of autophagy prevents amyloid-β peptide-induced neuritic degeneration in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Chen, Sicong; Zhang, Jiafeng; Li, Chentan; Sun, Yonghong; Zhang, Lihui; Zheng, Xiaoxiang

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a lysosomal degradative process essential for neuronal homeostasis, whereas autophagic failure has been linked to accumulating neurodegenerative disorders. However, the precise role of autophagy in axonal and dendritic degeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD) remains unclear. In this study, we aim to investigate the precise effect of autophagy in amyloid-β peptide (Aβ)25-35-mediated neurite degeneration. Aβ35-25, the non-neurotoxic reverse sequence analogue of Aβ25-35, was used as a negative control. Our results showed that Aβ25-35 dose-dependently suppressed PC12 proliferation and induced autophagy induction in neurites (axons and dendrites). A high proportion of autophagic structures in PC12 neurites were autolysosomes after 24 h of Aβ25-35 treatment. Autophagy inhibition by 3-methyladenine (3MA), LY294002, and chloroquine (CQ) could not relieve the Aβ25-35-induced neurite degeneration, while administration of autophagy stimulator rapamycin or AR-12 efficiently suppressed neurite degeneration. Autophagosomes colocalized with fragmented mitochondria after Aβ25-35 treatment. Similar results were obtained using in vitro cultured superior cervical ganglion neurons. These findings demonstrate that autophagy stimulation may prevent neuritic degeneration following Aβ25-35 treatment. Upregulation of autophagic activity may provide a valuable approach for the treatment of axonal and dendritic dystrophy in AD patients.

  10. Differential use of autophagy by primary dendritic cells specialized in cross-presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintern, Justine D; Macri, Christophe; Chin, Wei Jin; Panozza, Scott E; Segura, Elodie; Patterson, Natalie L; Zeller, Peter; Bourges, Dorothee; Bedoui, Sammy; McMillan, Paul J; Idris, Adi; Nowell, Cameron J; Brown, Andrew; Radford, Kristen J; Johnston, Angus Pr; Villadangos, Jose A

    2015-01-01

    Antigen-presenting cells survey their environment and present captured antigens bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. Formation of MHC-antigen complexes occurs in specialized compartments where multiple protein trafficking routes, still incompletely understood, converge. Autophagy is a route that enables the presentation of cytosolic antigen by MHC class II molecules. Some reports also implicate autophagy in the presentation of extracellular, endocytosed antigen by MHC class I molecules, a pathway termed "cross-presentation." The role of autophagy in cross-presentation is controversial. This may be due to studies using different types of antigen presenting cells for which the use of autophagy is not well defined. Here we report that active use of autophagy is evident only in DC subtypes specialized in cross-presentation. However, the contribution of autophagy to cross-presentation varied depending on the form of antigen: it was negligible in the case of cell-associated antigen or antigen delivered via receptor-mediated endocytosis, but more prominent when the antigen was a soluble protein. These findings highlight the differential use of autophagy and its machinery by primary cells equipped with specific immune function, and prompt careful reassessment of the participation of this endocytic pathway in antigen cross-presentation.

  11. WW domain of BAG3 is required for the induction of autophagy in glioma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merabova, Nana; Sariyer, Ilker Kudret; Saribas, A Sami; Knezevic, Tijana; Gordon, Jennifer; Weaver, Michael; Landry, Jacques; Khalili, Kamel

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved, selective degradation pathway of cellular components that is important for cell homeostasis under healthy and pathologic conditions. Here we demonstrate that an increase in the level of BAG3 results in stimulation of autophagy in glioblastoma cells. BAG3 is a member of a co-chaperone family of proteins that associate with Hsp70 through a conserved BAG domain positioned near the C-terminus of the protein. Expression of BAG3 is induced by a variety of environmental changes that cause stress to cells. Our results show that BAG3 overexpression induces autophagy in glioma cells. Interestingly, inhibition of the proteasome caused an increase in BAG3 levels and induced autophagy. Further analysis using specific siRNA against BAG3 suggests that autophagic activation due to proteosomal inhibition is mediated by BAG3. Analyses of BAG3 domain mutants suggest that the WW domain of BAG3 is crucial for the induction of autophagy. BAG3 overexpression also increased the interaction between Bcl2 and Beclin-1, instead of disrupting them, suggesting that BAG3 induced autophagy is Beclin-1 independent. These observations reveal a novel role for the WW domain of BAG3 in the regulation of autophagy. PMID:25204229

  12. Involvement of autophagy in viral infections: antiviral function and subversion by viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espert, Lucile; Codogno, Patrice; Biard-Piechaczyk, Martine

    2007-08-01

    Autophagy is a cellular process involved in the degradation and turn-over of long-lived proteins and organelles, which can be subjected to suppression or further induction in response to different stimuli. According to its essential role in cellular homeostasis, autophagy has been implicated in several pathologies including cancer, neurodegeneration and myopathies. More recently, autophagy has been described as a mechanism of both innate and adaptive immunity against intracellular bacteria and viruses. In this context, autophagy has been proposed as a protective mechanism against viral infection by degrading the pathogens into autolysosomes. This is strengthened by the fact that several proteins involved in interferon (IFN) signalling pathways are linked to autophagy regulation. However, several viruses have evolved strategies to divert IFN-mediated pathways and autophagy to their own benefit. This review provides an overview of the autophagic process and its involvement in the infection by different viral pathogens and of the connections existing between autophagy and proteins involved in IFN signalling pathways.

  13. Interplay between unfolded protein response and autophagy promotes tumor drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ming-Ming; Ni, Jiang-Dong; Song, Deye; Ding, Muliang; Huang, Jun

    2015-10-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is involved in the quality control of secreted protein via promoting the correct folding of nascent protein and mediating the degradation of unfolded or misfolded protein, namely ER-associated degradation. When the unfolded or misfolded proteins are abundant, the unfolded protein response (UPR) is elicited, an adaptive signaling cascade from the ER to the nucleus, which restores the homeostatic functions of the ER. Autophagy is a conserved catabolic process where cellular long-lived proteins and damaged organelles are engulfed and degraded for recycling to maintain homeostasis. The UPR and autophagy occur simultaneously and are involved in pathological processes, including tumorigenesis, chemoresistance of malignancies and neurodegeneration. Accumulative data has indicated that the UPR may induce autophagy and that autophagy is able to alleviate the UPR. However, the detailed mechanism of interplay between autophagy and UPR remains to be fully understood. The present review aimed to depict the core pathways of the two processes and to elucidate how autophagy and UPR are regulated. Moreover, the review also discusses the molecular mechanism of crosstalk between the UPR and autophagy and their roles in malignant survival and drug resistance.

  14. Secreted autotransporter toxin (Sat) triggers autophagy in epithelial cells that relies on cell detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa; Comenge, Yannick; Ruby, Vincent; Amsellem, Raymonde; Nicolas, Valérie; Servin, Alain L

    2011-07-01

    The secreted autotransporter toxin, Sat, which belongs to the subfamily of serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae, acts as a virulence factor in extraintestinal and intestinal pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli. We observed that HeLa cells exposed to the cell-free culture supernatant of recombinant strain AAEC185p(Sat-IH11128) producing the Sat toxin (CFCS(Sat) ), displayed dramatic disorganization of the F-actin cytoskeleton before loosening cell-to-cell junctions and detachment. Examination of the effect of Sat on GFP-microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) HeLa cells revealed that CFCS(Sat) -induced autophagy follows CFCS(Sat) -induced F-actin cytoskeleton rearrangement. The induced autophagy shows an acceleration of the autophagy flux soon after Sat treatment, followed later by a blockade of the flux leading to the accumulation of large GFP-LC3-positive vacuoles in the cell cytoplasm. CFCS(Sat) did not induce cell detachment in autophagy-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts in contrast with wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts. The CFCS(Sat) -induced large GFP-LC3 dots do not display the characteristics of autophagolysosomes including expression of cathepsin D and Lamp-1 and 2 proteins, and Lysotracker Red- and DQ-BSA-positive labelling. We provide evidences that CFCS(Sat) -induced autophagy is not a cell response intended to get rid of the intracellular toxin. By a pharmacological blockers approach, we found that the blockade of Erk1/2 and p38 MAPKs, but not JNK, inhibited the CFCS(Sat) -induced autophagy and cell detachment whereas phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase blockers inhibiting canonical autophagy were inactive. When attached CFCS(Sat) -treated cells start to detach they showed caspase-independent cell death and rearrangements of the focal adhesion-associated vinculin and paxillin. Collectively, our results support that Sat triggers autophagy in epithelial cells that relies on its cell-detachment effect. © 2011 Blackwell

  15. Autophagy in human embryonic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tra, Thien; Gong, Lan; Kao, Lin-Pin; Li, Xue-Lei; Grandela, Catarina; Devenish, Rodney J.; Wolvetang, Ernst; Prescott, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy (macroautophagy) is a degradative process that involves the sequestration of cytosolic material including organelles into double membrane vesicles termed autophagosomes for delivery to the lysosome. Autophagy is essential for preimplantation development of mouse embryos and cavitation of

  16. Enhanced myometrial autophagy in postpartum uterine involution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keng-Fu Hsu

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: Autophagy of myocytes may play an important role in uterine involution. These results have implications for our understanding of myometrial functional adaptations during pregnancy and the physiological role of autophagy in the uterine remodeling events in the postpartum period.

  17. Interactions between Autophagy and Inhibitory Cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tian-Tian; Li, Wei-Min; Yao, Yong-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a degradative pathway that plays an essential role in maintaining cellular homeostasis. Most early studies of autophagy focused on its involvement in age-associated degeneration and nutrient deprivation. However, the immunological functions of autophagy have become more widely studied in recent years. Autophagy has been shown to be an intrinsic cellular defense mechanism in the innate and adaptive immune responses. Cytokines belong to a broad and loose category of proteins and are crucial for innate and adaptive immunity. Inhibitory cytokines have evolved to permit tolerance to self while also contributing to the eradication of invading pathogens. Interactions between inhibitory cytokines and autophagy have recently been reported, revealing a novel mechanism by which autophagy controls the immune response. In this review, we discuss interactions between autophagy and the regulatory cytokines IL-10, transforming growth factor-β, and IL-27. We also mention possible interactions between two newly discovered cytokines, IL-35 and IL-37, and autophagy.

  18. Zymophagy: Selective Autophagy of Secretory Granules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria I. Vaccaro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Timing is everything. That's especially true when it comes to the activation of enzymes created by the pancreas to break down food. Pancreatic enzymes are packed in secretory granules as precursor molecules called zymogens. In physiological conditions, those zymogens are activated only when they reach the gut, where they get to work releasing and distributing nutrients that we need to survive. If this process fails and the enzymes are prematurely activated within the pancreatic cell, before they are released from the gland, they break down the pancreas itself causing acute pancreatitis. This is a painful disease that ranges from a mild and autolimited process to a severe and lethal condition. Recently, we demonstrated that the pancreatic acinar cell is able to switch on a refined mechanism that could explain the autolimited form of the disease. This is a novel selective form of autophagy named zymophagy, a cellular process to specifically detect and degrade secretory granules containing activated enzymes before they can digest the organ. In this work, we revise the molecules and mechanisms that mediate zymophagy, a selective autophagy of secretory granules.

  19. Pseudomonas toxin pyocyanin triggers autophagy: Implications for pathoadaptive mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhong-Shan; Ma, Lan-Qing; Zhu, Kun; Yan, Jin-Yuan; Bian, Li; Zhang, Ke-Qin; Zou, Cheng-Gang

    2016-06-02

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa can establish life-long chronic infection in patients with cystic fibrosis by generating genetic loss-of-function mutations, which enhance fitness of the bacterium in the airways. However, the precise role of the pathoadaptive mutations in persistence in chronic airways infection remains largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that pyocyanin, a well-described P. aeruginosa virulence factor that plays an important role in the initial infection, promotes autophagy in bronchial epithelial cells. Disruption of phzM, which is required for pyocyanin biosynthesis, leads to a significant reduction in autophagy in Beas-2B cells and lung tissues. Pyocyanin-induced autophagy is mediated by the EIF2AK4/GCN2-EIF2S1/eIF2α-ATF4 pathway. Interestingly, rats infected with the phzMΔ mutant strain have high mortality rate and numbers of colony-forming units, compared to those infected with wild-type (WT) P. aeruginosa PA14 strain, during chronic P. aeruginosa infection. In addition, the phzMΔ mutant strain induces more extensive alveolar wall thickening than the WT strain in the pulmonary airways of rats. As autophagy plays an essential role in suppressing bacterial burden, our findings provide a detailed understanding of why reduction of pyocyanin production in P. aeruginosa in chronic airways infections has been associated with better host adaptation and worse outcomes in cystic fibrosis.

  20. Retinoid receptor signaling and autophagy in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Orfali, Nina

    2014-05-15

    Retinoids are a family of signaling molecules derived from vitamin A with well established roles in cellular differentiation. Physiologically active retinoids mediate transcriptional effects on cells through interactions with retinoic acid (RARs) and retinoid-X (RXR) receptors. Chromosomal translocations involving the RARα gene, which lead to impaired retinoid signaling, are implicated in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). All-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), alone and in combination with arsenic trioxide (ATO), restores differentiation in APL cells and promotes degradation of the abnormal oncogenic fusion protein through several proteolytic mechanisms. RARα fusion-protein elimination is emerging as critical to obtaining sustained remission and long-term cure in APL. Autophagy is a degradative cellular pathway involved in protein turnover. Both ATRA and ATO also induce autophagy in APL cells. Enhancing autophagy may therefore be of therapeutic benefit in resistant APL and could broaden the application of differentiation therapy to other cancers. Here we discuss retinoid signaling in hematopoiesis, leukemogenesis, and APL treatment. We highlight autophagy as a potential important regulator in anti-leukemic strategies.

  1. Autophagy and amino acid metabolism in the brain: implications for epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejarano, Eloy; Rodríguez-Navarro, José Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic pathway responsible for the maintenance of the tissue and organism homeostasis. Several amino acids regulate autophagic activity in different tissues, such as liver and muscle, but much less is known about this regulation in the brain. The lack of autophagy in neurons leads to a strong neurodegenerative phenotype and epileptic disorders. We summarize the current knowledge about the regulation of autophagy mediated by amino acids and how macroautophagy could serve as source of amino acids. We review the contribution of macroautophagy in the brain physiology and pathology emphasizing the relevancy of the proper control of amino acid levels such as glutamate and GABA in the brain due to its role as neurotransmitters and energy source. Furthermore, we discuss how malfunction in autophagy may result in pathological consequences, because many genetic epileptic disorders are related to signaling or metabolic pathways controlling both macroautophagy and amino acid metabolism in the brain.

  2. Rapamycin regulates autophagy and cell adhesion in induced pluripotent stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Areechun Sotthibundhu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular reprogramming is a stressful process, which requires cells to engulf somatic features and produce and maintain stemness machineries. Autophagy is a process to degrade unwanted proteins and is required for the derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs. However, the role of autophagy during iPSC maintenance remains undefined. Methods Human iPSCs were investigated by microscopy, immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting to detect autophagy machinery. Cells were treated with rapamycin to activate autophagy and with bafilomycin to block autophagy during iPSC maintenance. High concentrations of rapamycin treatment unexpectedly resulted in spontaneous formation of round floating spheres of uniform size, which were analyzed for differentiation into three germ layers. Mass spectrometry was deployed to reveal altered protein expression and pathways associated with rapamycin treatment. Results We demonstrate that human iPSCs express high basal levels of autophagy, including key components of APMKα, ULK1/2, BECLIN-1, ATG13, ATG101, ATG12, ATG3, ATG5, and LC3B. Block of autophagy by bafilomycin induces iPSC death and rapamycin attenuates the bafilomycin effect. Rapamycin treatment upregulates autophagy in iPSCs in a dose/time-dependent manner. High concentration of rapamycin reduces NANOG expression and induces spontaneous formation of round and uniformly sized embryoid bodies (EBs with accelerated differentiation into three germ layers. Mass spectrometry analysis identifies actin cytoskeleton and adherens junctions as the major targets of rapamycin in mediating iPSC detachment and differentiation. Conclusions High levels of basal autophagy activity are present during iPSC derivation and maintenance. Rapamycin alters expression of actin cytoskeleton and adherens junctions, induces uniform EB formation, and accelerates differentiation. IPSCs are sensitive to enzyme dissociation and require a lengthy differentiation time

  3. ESAT6 inhibits autophagy flux and promotes BCG proliferation through MTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Hu, E-mail: austhudong@126.com [Department of Medical Immunology, Medical School, Anhui University of Science and Technology (China); Medical Inspection Center, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan (China); Jing, Wu, E-mail: wujing8008@126.com [Department of Medical Immunology, Medical School, Anhui University of Science and Technology (China); Medical Inspection Center, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan (China); Runpeng, Zhao; Xuewei, Xu; Min, Mu; Ru, Cai [Department of Medical Immunology, Medical School, Anhui University of Science and Technology (China); Yingru, Xing; Shengfa, Ni [Affiliated Cancer Hospital, Anhui University of Science and Technology (China); Rongbo, Zhang [Department of Medical Immunology, Medical School, Anhui University of Science and Technology (China); Medical Inspection Center, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan (China)

    2016-08-19

    In recent years, increasing studies have found that pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) inhibits autophagy, which mediates the anti-mycobacterial response, but the mechanism is not clear. We previously reported that secretory acid phosphatase (SapM) of Mtb can negatively regulate autophagy flux. Recently, another virulence factor of Mtb, early secretory antigenic target 6 (ESAT6), has been found to be involved in inhibiting autophagy, but the mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we show that ESAT6 hampers autophagy flux to boost bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) proliferation and reveals a mechanism by which ESAT6 blocks autophagosome-lysosome fusion in a mammalian target of rapamycin (MTOR)-dependent manner. In both Raw264.7 cells and primary macrophages derived from the murine abdominal cavity (ACM), ESAT6 repressed autophagy flux by interfering with the autophagosome-lysosome fusion, which resulted in an increased load of BCG. Impaired degradation of LC3Ⅱ and SQSTM1 by ESAT6 was related to the upregulated activity of MTOR. Contrarily, inhibiting MTOR with Torin1 removed the ESAT6-induced autophagy block and lysosome dysfunction. Furthermore, in both Raw264.7 and ACM cells, MTOR inhibition significantly suppressed the survival of BCG. In conclusion, our study highlights how ESAT6 blocks autophagy and promotes BCG survival in a way that activates MTOR. - Highlights: • A mechanism for disruping autophagy flux induced by ESAT6. • ESAT6-inhibited autophagy is MTOR-dependent. • ESAT6-boosted BCG is MTOR-dependent.

  4. DRAM1 Protects Neuroblastoma Cells from Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation/Reperfusion-Induced Injury via Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengqiang Yu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage-regulated autophagy modulator protein 1 (DRAM1, a multi-pass membrane lysosomal protein, is reportedly a tumor protein p53 (TP53 target gene involved in autophagy. During cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury, DRAM1 protein expression is increased, and autophagy is activated. However, the functional significance of DRAM1 and the relationship between DRAM1 and autophagy in brain I/R remains uncertain. The aim of this study is to investigate whether DRAM1 mediates autophagy activation in cerebral I/R injury and to explore its possible effects and mechanisms. We adopt the oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion (OGD/R Neuro-2a cell model to mimic cerebral I/R conditions in vitro, and RNA interference is used to knock down DRAM1 expression in this model. Cell viability assay is performed using the LIVE/DEAD viability/cytotoxicity kit. Cell phenotypic changes are analyzed through Western blot assays. Autophagy flux is monitored through the tandem red fluorescent protein–Green fluorescent protein–microtubule associated protein 1 light chain 3 (RFP–GFP–LC3 construct. The expression levels of DRAM1 and microtubule associated protein 1 light chain 3II/I (LC3II/I are strongly up-regulated in Neuro-2a cells after OGD/R treatment and peaked at the 12 h reperfusion time point. The autophagy-specific inhibitor 3-Methyladenine (3-MA inhibits the expression of DRAM1 and LC3II/I and exacerbates OGD/R-induced cell injury. Furthermore, DRAM1 knockdown aggravates OGD/R-induced cell injury and significantly blocks autophagy through decreasing autophagosome-lysosome fusion. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that DRAM1 knockdown in Neuro-2a cells inhibits autophagy by blocking autophagosome-lysosome fusion and exacerbated OGD/R-induced cell injury. Thus, DRAM1 might constitute a new therapeutic target for I/R diseases.

  5. Sonodynamic therapy induces the interplay between apoptosis and autophagy in K562 cells through ROS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaomin; Wang, Pan; Yang, Shuang; Zhang, Kun; Liu, Quanhong; Wang, Xiaobing

    2015-03-01

    Sonodynamic therapy (SDT) is a relatively new approach in the treatment of various cancers including leukemia cells. The aim of this study is to investigate the occurrence of apoptosis and autophagy after treated by protoporphyrin IX (PpIX)-mediated SDT (PpIX-SDT) on human leukemia K562 cells as well as the relationship between them. Firstly, mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis was observed through morphological observation and biochemical analysis. Meanwhile, SDT was shown to induce autophagy in K562 cells, which caused an increase in EGFP-LC3 puncta cells, a conversion of LC3 II/I, formation of acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs) and co-localization between LC3 and LAMP2 (a lysosome marker). Besides, pretreatment with autophagy inhibitor 3-MA or bafilomycin A1 was shown to provide protection against autophagy and to enhance SDT-induced apoptosis and necrosis, while the apoptosis suppressor z-VAD-fmk failed to affect formation of autophagic vacuoles or partially prevented SDT-induced cytotoxicity, which suggested that SDT-induced autophagy functioned as a survival mechanism. Additionally, this study reported apparent apoptosis and autophagy with dependence on intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Preliminary data showed that ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC) effectively blocked the SDT induced accumulation of ROS, reversed sono-damage, cell apoptosis and autophagy. Taken together, these data indicate that autophagy may be cytoprotective in our experimental system, and the ROS caused by PpIX-SDT treatment may play an important role in initiating apoptosis and autophagy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. An Update on AMPK in Hydrogen Sulfide Pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjun Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S, the third bio-active gasotransmitter, is produced endogenously and tightly involved in the pathogenesis and treatment for various diseases. Adenosine 5′-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK plays a paramount role in maintaining cellular energetic balance. Increasing evidences have also suggested AMPK as a novel modulator in multiple pathological conditions. In this paper, we will review the biological principles of H2S and AMPK, and most importantly, the recent discoveries regarding AMPK-mediated pharmacological actions of H2S. Emphasis will be laid on AMPK/H2S interactions in the cardiovascular system, autophagy, diabetic complications, and inflammation. In most cases described in this article, by promoting AMPK activation, H2S exerts cytoprotective effects or therapeutic potentials, though there remain some controversies before we can fully understand the involved mechanisms. Further researches are in need to investigate more closely any relationship between H2S and AMPK, and to put forward the development of H2S donors for clinical application.

  7. Mesenchymal stem cells promote cell invasion and migration and autophagy-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Dan; Hu, Shiyuan; Tang, Chunlan; Liu, Guoxiang

    2018-03-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are recruited into the tumour microenvironment and promote tumour growth and metastasis. Tumour microenvironment-induced autophagy is considered to suppress primary tumour formation by impairing migration and invasion. Whether these recruited MSCs regulate tumour autophagy and whether autophagy affects tumour growth are controversial. Our data showed that MSCs promote autophagy activation, reactive oxygen species production, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) as well as increased migration and invasion in A549 cells. Decreased expression of E-cadherin and increased expression of vimentin and Snail were observed in A549 cells cocultured with MSCs. Conversely, MSC coculture-mediated autophagy positively promoted tumour EMT. Autophagy inhibition suppressed MSC coculture-mediated EMT and reduced A549 cell migration and invasion slightly. Furthermore, the migratory and invasive abilities of A549 cells were additional increased when autophagy was further enhanced by rapamycin treatment. Taken together, this work suggests that microenvironments containing MSCs can promote autophagy activation for enhancing EMT; MSCs also increase the migratory and invasive abilities of A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells. Mesenchymal stem cell-containing microenvironments and MSC-induced autophagy signalling may be potential targets for blocking lung cancer cell migration and invasion. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Concurrent Autophagy Inhibition Overcomes the Resistance of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Human Bladder Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minyong Kang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite the potential therapeutic efficacy of epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR inhibitors in the treatment of advanced stage bladder cancer, there currently is no clear evidence to support this hypothesis. In this study, we investigate whether the concurrent treatment of autophagy-blocking agents with EGFR inhibitors exerts synergistic anti-cancer effects in T24 and J82 human bladder cancer cells. Lapatinib and gefitinib were used as EGFR inhibitors, and bafilomycin A1 (BFA1, chloroquine (CQ and 3-methyladenine (3-MA were used as the pharmacologic inhibitors of autophagy activities. To assess the proliferative and self-renewal capabilities, the Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8 assay and a clonogenic assay were performed, respectively. To examine apoptotic cell death, flow cytometry using annexin-V/propidium iodide (PI was used. To measure the autophagy activities, the expression levels of LC3I and II was determined by Western blot analysis. To validate the synergistic effects of autophagy inhibition with EGFR inhibitors, we specifically blocked key autophagy regulatory gene ATG12 by transfection of small interference RNA and examined the phenotypic changes. Of note, lapatinib and gefitinib triggered autophagy activities in T24 and J82 human bladder cancer cells, as indicated by upregulation of LC3II. More importantly, inhibiting autophagy activities with pharmacologic inhibitors (BFA1, CQ or 3-MA remarkably reduced the cell viabilities and clonal proliferation of T24 and J82 cells, compared to those treated with either of the agents alone. We also obtained similar results of the enhanced anti-cancer effects of EGFR inhibitors by suppressing the expression of ATG12. Notably, the apoptotic assay showed that synergistic anti-cancer effects were induced via the increase of apoptotic cell death. In summary, concomitant inhibition of autophagy activities potentiated the anti-cancer effects of EGFR inhibitors in human bladder cancer cells, indicating

  9. A Yin-Yang 1/miR-30a regulatory circuit modulates autophagy in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chuang; Zhang, Jing-Jing; Peng, Yun-Peng; Zhu, Yi; Yin, Ling-Di; Wei, Ji-Shu; Gao, Wen-Tao; Jiang, Kui-Rong; Miao, Yi

    2017-10-19

    Autophagy is a highly regulated biological process that mediates the degradation of intracellular components. It is required for tumor cell metabolism and homeostasis. Yin-Yang 1 (YY1) has been reported to be involved in autophagy in several carcinomas. However, its role in autophagy in pancreatic cancer, one of the deadliest human malignancies, is unknown. Here, we investigated the function of YY1 in pancreatic cancer cells autophagy and its mechanisms of action. The activity of cells undergoing autophagy was assessed using transmission electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and Western blotting. A luciferase activity assay, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) were also used to identify putative downstream targets of YY1. YY1 was confirmed to regulate autophagy in pancreatic cancer cells. It was found to directly regulate the expression of miR-30a, a known modulator of autophagy-associated genes. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-30a attenuated the pro-autophagic effects of YY1. Cumulatively, our data suggest that miR-30a acts in a feedback loop to modulate the pro-autophagic activities of YY1. Thus, autophagy in pancreatic cancer cells may be regulated, in part, by a tightly coordinated YY1/miR-30a regulatory circuit. These findings provide a potential druggable target for the development of treatments for pancreatic cancer.

  10. Advances in Autophagy Regulatory Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E. Gallagher

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy plays a critical role in cell metabolism by degrading and recycling internal components when challenged with limited nutrients. This fundamental and conserved mechanism is based on a membrane trafficking pathway in which nascent autophagosomes engulf cytoplasmic cargo to form vesicles that transport their content to the lysosome for degradation. Based on this simple scheme, autophagy modulates cellular metabolism and cytoplasmic quality control to influence an unexpectedly wide range of normal mammalian physiology and pathophysiology. In this review, we summarise recent advancements in three broad areas of autophagy regulation. We discuss current models on how autophagosomes are initiated from endogenous membranes. We detail how the uncoordinated 51-like kinase (ULK complex becomes activated downstream of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (MTORC1. Finally, we summarise the upstream signalling mechanisms that can sense amino acid availability leading to activation of MTORC1.

  11. Role of autophagy and lysosomal drug sequestration in acquired resistance to doxorubicin in MCF-7 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Baoqing; Tam, Adam; Santi, Stacey A.; Parissenti, Amadeo M.

    2016-01-01

    that autophagy associated with doxorubicin resistance may be distinct from classical starvation-induced autophagy, since Beclin 1 and Atg7 expression did not change upon acquisition of doxorubicin resistance, nor did recombinant Bcl2 overexpression or an Atg7 knockdown alter doxorubicin cytotoxicity. Taken together, our findings suggest that doxorubicin resistance in MCF-7 breast cancer cells is mediated, at least in part, by the activation of autophagy, which may be distinct from starvation-induced autophagy

  12. [Autophagy in the cardiovascular system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheloufi, Marouane; Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel; Boulanger, Chantal M

    2017-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Studies regarding the role of autophagy in cardiac and vascular tissues have opened new therapeutic avenues to treat cardiovascular disorders. Altogether, these studies point out that autophagic activity needs to be maintained at an optimal level to preserve cardiovascular function. Reaching this goal constitutes a challenge for future efficient therapeutic strategies. The present review therefore highlights recent advances in the understanding of the role of autophagy in cardiovascular pathologies. © 2017 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  13. Modulation of pathogen recognition by autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Eun eOh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an ancient biological process for maintaining cellular homeostasis by degradation of long-lived cytosolic proteins and organelles. Recent studies demonstrated that autophagy is availed by immune cells to regulate innate immunity. On the one hand, cells exert direct effector function by degrading intracellular pathogens; on the other hand, autophagy modulates pathogen recognition and downstream signaling for innate immune responses. Pathogen recognition via pattern recognition receptors induces autophagy. The function of phagocytic cells is enhanced by recruitment of autophagy-related proteins. Moreover, autophagy acts as a delivery system for viral replication complexes to migrate to the endosomal compartments where virus sensing occurs. In another case, key molecules of the autophagic pathway have been found to negatively regulate immune signaling, thus preventing aberrant activation of cytokine production and consequent immune responses. In this review, we focus on the recent advances in the role of autophagy in pathogen recognition and modulation of innate immune responses.

  14. Natriuretic peptide receptor A inhibition suppresses gastric cancer development through reactive oxygen species-mediated G2/M cell cycle arrest and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Wang, Ji-Wei; Wang, Wei-Zhi; Zhi, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Qun; Li, Bo-Wen; Wang, Lin-Jun; Xie, Kun-Ling; Tao, Jin-Qiu; Tang, Jie; Wei, Song; Zhu, Yi; Xu, Hao; Zhang, Dian-Cai; Yang, Li; Xu, Ze-Kuan

    2016-10-01

    Natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPRA), the major receptor for atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), has been implicated in tumorigenesis; however, the role of ANP-NPRA signaling in the development of gastric cancer remains unclear. Immunohistochemical analyses indicated that NPRA expression was positively associated with gastric tumor size and cancer stage. NPRA inhibition by shRNA induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, cell death, and autophagy in gastric cancer cells, due to accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Either genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of autophagy led to caspase-dependent cell death. Therefore, autophagy induced by NPRA silencing may represent a cytoprotective mechanism. ROS accumulation activated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). ROS-mediated activation of JNK inhibited cell proliferation by disturbing cell cycle and decreased cell viability. In addition, AMPK activation promoted autophagy in NPRA-downregulated cancer cells. Overall, our results indicate that the inhibition of NPRA suppresses gastric cancer development and targeting NPRA may represent a promising strategy for the treatment of gastric cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Pharmacological LXR activation reduces presence of SR-B1 in liver membranes contributing to LXR-mediated induction of HDL-cholesterol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Grefhorst (Aldo); D.M. Oosterveer (Daniella); G. Brufau (Gemma); M. Boesjes (Marije); F. Kuipers (Folkert); A. Groen (Albert)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractObjective: Pharmacological LXR activation has anti-atherosclerotic actions in animal models. Part of these beneficial effects may be explained by accelerated reverse cholesterol transport since both plasma high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and fecal neutral sterol secretion are

  16. Pharmacological LXR activation reduces presence of SR-B1 in liver membranes contributing to LXR-mediated induction of HDL-cholesterol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grefhorst, Aldo; Oosterveer, Maaike H.; Brufau, Gemma; Boesjes, Marije; Kuipers, Folkert; Groen, Albert K.

    Objective: Pharmacological LXR activation has anti-atherosclerotic actions in animal models. Part of these beneficial effects may be explained by accelerated reverse cholesterol transport since both plasma high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and fecal neutral sterol secretion are higher upon

  17. mTOR Hyperactivation by Ablation of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex 2 in the Mouse Heart Induces Cardiac Dysfunction with the Increased Number of Small Mitochondria Mediated through the Down-Regulation of Autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manabu Taneike

    Full Text Available Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 is a key regulator of cell growth, proliferation and metabolism. mTORC1 regulates protein synthesis positively and autophagy negatively. Autophagy is a major system to manage bulk degradation and recycling of cytoplasmic components and organelles. Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC 1 and 2 form a heterodimeric complex and inactivate Ras homolog enriched in brain, resulting in inhibition of mTORC1. Here, we investigated the effects of hyperactivation of mTORC1 on cardiac function and structure using cardiac-specific TSC2-deficient (TSC2-/- mice. TSC2-/- mice were born normally at the expected Mendelian ratio. However, the median life span of TSC2-/- mice was approximately 10 months and significantly shorter than that of control mice. TSC2-/- mice showed cardiac dysfunction and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy without considerable fibrosis, cell infiltration or apoptotic cardiomyocyte death. Ultrastructural analysis of TSC2-/- hearts revealed misalignment, aggregation and a decrease in the size and an increase in the number of mitochondria, but the mitochondrial function was maintained. Autophagic flux was inhibited, while the phosphorylation level of S6 or eukaryotic initiation factor 4E -binding protein 1, downstream of mTORC1, was increased. The upregulation of autophagic flux by trehalose treatment attenuated the cardiac phenotypes such as cardiac dysfunction and structural abnormalities of mitochondria in TSC2-/- hearts. The results suggest that autophagy via the TSC2-mTORC1 signaling pathway plays an important role in maintenance of cardiac function and mitochondrial quantity and size in the heart and could be a therapeutic target to maintain mitochondrial homeostasis in failing hearts.

  18. 17-AAG and Apoptosis, Autophagy, and Mitophagy in Canine Osteosarcoma Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimini, M; Palmieri, C; De Maria, R; Romanucci, M; Malatesta, D; De Martinis, M; Maniscalco, L; Ciccarelli, A; Ginaldi, L; Buracco, P; Bongiovanni, L; Della Salda, L

    2017-05-01

    Canine osteosarcoma is highly resistant to current chemotherapy; thus, clarifying the mechanisms of tumor cell resistance to treatments is an urgent need. We tested the geldanamycin derivative 17-AAG (17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin) prototype of Hsp90 (heat shock protein 90) inhibitors in 2 canine osteosarcoma cell lines, D22 and D17, derived from primary and metastatic tumors, respectively. With the aim to understand the interplay between cell death, autophagy, and mitophagy, in light of the dual effect of autophagy in regulating cancer cell viability and death, D22 and D17 cells were treated with different concentrations of 17-AAG (0.5 μM, 1 μM) for 24 and 48 hours. 17-AAG-induced apoptosis, necrosis, autophagy, and mitophagy were assessed by transmission electron microscopy, flow cytometry, and immunofluorescence. A simultaneous increase in apoptosis, autophagy, and mitophagy was observed only in the D22 cell line, while D17 cells showed low levels of apoptotic cell death. These results reveal differential cell response to drug-induced stress depending on tumor cell type. Therefore, pharmacological treatments based on proapoptotic chemotherapy in association with autophagy regulators would benefit from a predictive in vitro screening of the target cell type.

  19. Induction of genomic instability and activation of autophagy in artificial human aneuploid cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ariyoshi, Kentaro [Hirosaki University, Institute of Radiation Emergency Medicine, 66-1 Hon-cho, Hirosaki 036-8564 (Japan); Miura, Tomisato; Kasai, Kosuke; Fujishima, Yohei [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Health Sciences, 66-1 Hon-cho, Hirosaki 036-8564 (Japan); Oshimura, Mitsuo [Chromosome Engineering Research Center (CERC), Tottori University, Nishicho 86, Yonago, Tottori 683-8503 (Japan); Yoshida, Mitsuaki A., E-mail: ariyoshi@hirosaki-u.ac.jp [Hirosaki University, Institute of Radiation Emergency Medicine, 66-1 Hon-cho, Hirosaki 036-8564 (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Clones with artificial aneuploidy of chromosome 8 or chromosome 22 both show inhibited proliferation and genomic instability. • Increased autophagy was observed in the artificially aneuploid clones. • Inhibition of autophagy resulted in increased genomic instability and DNA damage. • Intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species were up-regulated in the artificially aneuploid clones. - Abstract: Chromosome missegregation can lead to a change in chromosome number known as aneuploidy. Although aneuploidy is a known hallmark of cancer cells, the various mechanisms by which altered gene and/or DNA copy number facilitate tumorigenesis remain unclear. To understand the effect of aneuploidy occurring in non-tumorigenic human breast epithelial cells, we generated clones harboring artificial aneuploidy using microcell-mediated chromosome transfer. Our results demonstrate that clones with artificial aneuploidy of chromosome 8 or chromosome 22 both show inhibited proliferation and genomic instability. Also, the increased autophagy was observed in the artificially aneuploidy clones, and inhibition of autophagy resulted in increased genomic instability and DNA damage. In addition, the intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species were up-regulated in the artificially aneuploid clones, and inhibition of autophagy further increased the production of reactive oxygen species. Together, these results suggest that even a single extraneous chromosome can induce genomic instability, and that autophagy triggered by aneuploidy-induced stress is a mechanism to protect cells bearing abnormal chromosome number.

  20. NPY/neuropeptide Y enhances autophagy in the hypothalamus: a mechanism to delay aging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aveleira, Célia A; Botelho, Mariana; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2015-01-01

    Aging was recently described as a life event programmed by the hypothalamus, a key brain region that is crucial for the neuroendocrine interaction between the central nervous system and the periphery. Autophagy impairment is a hallmark of aging, contributing to the aging phenotype and to the aggravation of age-related diseases. Since hypothalamic autophagy decreases with age, strategies to promote autophagy in the hypothalamus may be relevant for control of the aging process. NPY (neuropeptide Y) is an endogenous neuropeptide mainly produced by the hypothalamus. We recently reported, for the first time, that NPY stimulates autophagy in rodent hypothalamus and mediates caloric restriction-induced autophagy in hypothalamic neurons. Moreover, we observed that NPY acts through NPY1R (neuropeptide Y receptor Y1) or NPY5R activation involving a concerted action of different signaling pathways. Since both hypothalamic autophagy and NPY levels decrease with age, modulation of NPY levels could provide new putative therapeutic tools to ameliorate age-related deteriorations and extend longevity.

  1. PRKCI negatively regulates autophagy via PIK3CA/AKT–MTOR signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Liujing; Li, Ge; Xia, Dan; Hongdu, Beiqi; Xu, Chentong; Lin, Xin [Key Laboratory of Medical Immunology, Ministry of Health, Peking University Health Sciences Center, Beijing (China); Peking University Center for Human Disease Genomics, Peking University, Beijing (China); Chen, Yingyu, E-mail: yingyu_chen@bjmu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Medical Immunology, Ministry of Health, Peking University Health Sciences Center, Beijing (China); Peking University Center for Human Disease Genomics, Peking University, Beijing (China)

    2016-02-05

    The atypical protein kinase C isoform PRKC iota (PRKCI) plays a key role in cell proliferation, differentiation, and carcinogenesis, and it has been shown to be a human oncogene. Here, we show that PRKCI overexpression in U2OS cells impaired functional autophagy in normal or cell stress conditions, as characterized by decreased levels of light chain 3B-II protein (LC3B-II) and weakened degradation of endogenous and exogenous autophagic substrates. Conversely, PRKCI knockdown by small interference RNA resulted in opposite effects. Additionally, we identified two novel PRKCI mutants, PRKCI{sup L485M} and PRKCI{sup P560R}, which induced autophagy and exhibited dominant negative effects. Further studies indicated that PRKCI knockdown–mediated autophagy was associated with the inactivation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase alpha/AKT–mammalian target of rapamycin (PIK3CA/AKT–MTOR) signaling. These data underscore the importance of PRKCI in the regulation of autophagy. Moreover, the finding may be useful in treating PRKCI-overexpressing carcinomas that are characterized by increased levels of autophagy. - Highlights: • The atypical protein kinase C iota isoform (PRKCI) is a human oncogene. • PRKCI overexpression impairs functional autophagy in U2OS cells. • It reduces LC3B-II levels and weakens SQSTM1 and polyQ80 aggregate degradation. • PRKCI knockdown has the opposite effect. • The effect of PRKCI knockdown is related to PIK3CA/AKT–MTOR signaling inactivation.

  2. Modulation of Autophagy by a Small Molecule Inverse Agonist of ERRα Is Neuroprotective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Suresh

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Mechanistic insights into aggrephagy, a selective basal autophagy process to clear misfolded protein aggregates, are lacking. Here, we report and describe the role of Estrogen Related Receptor α (ERRα, HUGO Gene Nomenclature ESRRA, new molecular player of aggrephagy, in keeping autophagy flux in check by inhibiting autophagosome formation. A screen for small molecule modulators for aggrephagy identified ERRα inverse agonist XCT 790, that cleared α-synuclein aggregates in an autophagy dependent, but mammalian target of rapamycin (MTOR independent manner. XCT 790 modulates autophagosome formation in an ERRα dependent manner as validated by siRNA mediated knockdown and over expression approaches. We show that, in a basal state, ERRα is localized on to the autophagosomes and upon autophagy induction by XCT 790, this localization is lost and is accompanied with an increase in autophagosome biogenesis. In a preclinical mouse model of Parkinson’s disease (PD, XCT 790 exerted neuroprotective effects in the dopaminergic neurons of nigra by inducing autophagy to clear toxic protein aggregates and, in addition, ameliorated motor co-ordination deficits. Using a chemical biology approach, we unrevealed the role of ERRα in regulating autophagy and can be therapeutic target for neurodegeneration.

  3. Autophagy is Required for the Maintenance of Liver Progenitor Cell Functionality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiji Cheng

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Liver progenitor cells (LPCs are bipotent stem cells existing in the adult liver, which could be activated upon massive liver injury and contribute to liver regeneration. However, mechanisms of maintenance of LPC functionality remain poorly understood. Previous studies found that autophagy was required for the self-renewal and differentiation of several tissue stem cells. Methods: The study compared the level of autophagic activity in LPCs and differentiated hepatocytes. Then, autophagic activity was inhibited in LPCs by lentivirus-mediated autophagy-related gene 5 or Beclin 1 knockdown. Clonogenic assay, cell viability assays, hepatic differentiation assay, and senescence analysis were conducted to assess the role of autophagy in regulating self-renewal, hepatic differentiation and senescence of LPCs. Results: We observed high autophagic activity in LPCs compared with differentiated hepatocytes. We found that inhibition of autophagy impaired the self-renewal, proliferation, and hepatic differentiation capability of LPCs under normal cultural condition, but had little impact on cell viability. Interestingly, while wild-type LPCs remained rarely affected by the toxin, etoposide, inhibition of autophagy induced the senescent phenotype of LPCs. Overexpression of Beclin 1 in Beclin 1-knockdown LPCs restored the functionality of stem cells. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that autophagy may function as a critical regulator of LPC functionality under both physiological and pathological condition.

  4. Canonical and Non-Canonical Autophagy in HIV-1 Replication Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leymarie, Olivier; Lepont, Leslie; Berlioz-Torrent, Clarisse

    2017-09-23

    Autophagy is a lysosomal-dependent degradative process essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis, and is a key player in innate and adaptive immune responses to intracellular pathogens such as human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). In HIV-1 target cells, autophagy mechanisms can (i) selectively direct viral proteins and viruses for degradation; (ii) participate in the processing and presentation of viral-derived antigens through major histocompatibility complexes; and (iii) contribute to interferon production in response to HIV-1 infection. As a consequence, HIV-1 has evolved different strategies to finely regulate the autophagy pathway to favor its replication and dissemination. HIV-1 notably encodes accessory genes encoding Tat, Nef and Vpu proteins, which are able to perturb and hijack canonical and non-canonical autophagy mechanisms. This review outlines the current knowledge on the complex interplay between autophagy and HIV-1 replication cycle, providing an overview of the autophagy-mediated molecular processes deployed both by infected cells to combat the virus and by HIV-1 to evade antiviral response.

  5. MITA modulated autophagy flux promotes cell death in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatelia, Khyati; Singh, Kritarth; Prajapati, Paresh; Sripada, Lakshmi; Roy, Milton; Singh, Rajesh

    2017-07-01

    The crosstalk between inflammation and autophagy is an emerging phenomenon observed during tumorigenesis. Activation of NF-κB and IRF3 plays a key role in the regulation of cytokines that are involved in tumor growth and progression. The genes of innate immunity are known to regulate the master transcription factors like NF-κB and IRF3. Innate immunity pathways at the same time regulate the genes of the autophagy pathway which are essential for tumor cell metabolism. In the current study, we studied the role of MITA (Mediator of IRF3 Activation), a regulator of innate immunity, in the regulation of autophagy and its implication in cell death of breast cancer cells. Here, we report that MITA inhibits the fusion of autophagosome with lysosome as evident from different autophagy flux assays. The expression of MITA induces the translocation of p62 and NDP52 to mitochondria which further recruits LC3 for autophagosome formation. The expression of MITA decreased mitochondrial number and enhances mitochondrial ROS by increasing complex-I activity. The enhancement of autophagy flux with rapamycin or TFEB expression normalized MITA induced cell death. The evidences clearly show that MITA regulates autophagy flux and modulates mitochondrial turnover through mitophagy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Ohmyungsamycins promote antimicrobial responses through autophagy activation via AMP-activated protein kinase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Sung; Shin, Yern-Hyerk; Lee, Hye-Mi; Kim, Jin Kyung; Choe, Jin Ho; Jang, Ji-Chan; Um, Soohyun; Jin, Hyo Sun; Komatsu, Masaaki; Cha, Guang-Ho; Chae, Han-Jung; Oh, Dong-Chan; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2017-06-13

    The induction of host cell autophagy by various autophagy inducers contributes to the antimicrobial host defense against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), a major pathogenic strain that causes human tuberculosis. In this study, we present a role for the newly identified cyclic peptides ohmyungsamycins (OMS) A and B in the antimicrobial responses against Mtb infections by activating autophagy in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs). OMS robustly activated autophagy, which was essentially required for the colocalization of LC3 autophagosomes with bacterial phagosomes and antimicrobial responses against Mtb in BMDMs. Using a Drosophila melanogaster-Mycobacterium marinum infection model, we showed that OMS-A-induced autophagy contributed to the increased survival of infected flies and the limitation of bacterial load. We further showed that OMS triggered AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation, which was required for OMS-mediated phagosome maturation and antimicrobial responses against Mtb. Moreover, treating BMDMs with OMS led to dose-dependent inhibition of macrophage inflammatory responses, which was also dependent on AMPK activation. Collectively, these data show that OMS is a promising candidate for new anti-mycobacterial therapeutics by activating antibacterial autophagy via AMPK-dependent signaling and suppressing excessive inflammation during Mtb infections.

  7. Benefit of Oleuropein Aglycone for Alzheimer’s Disease by Promoting Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín G. Cordero

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease is a proteinopathy characterized by accumulation of hyperphosphorylated Tau and β-amyloid. Autophagy is a physiological process by which aggregated proteins and damaged organelles are eliminated through lysosomal digestion. Autophagy deficiency has been demonstrated in Alzheimer’s patients impairing effective elimination of aggregates and damaged mitochondria, leading to their accumulation, increasing their toxicity and oxidative stress. In the present study, we demonstrated by microarray analysis the downregulation of fundamental autophagy and mitophagy pathways in Alzheimer’s patients. The benefits of the Mediterranean diet on Alzheimer’s disease and cognitive impairment are well known, attributing this effect to several polyphenols, such as oleuropein aglycone (OLE, present in extra virgin olive oil. OLE is able to induce autophagy, achieving a decrease of aggregated proteins and a reduction of cognitive impairment in vivo. This effect is caused by the modulation of several pathways including the AMPK/mTOR axis and the activation of autophagy gene expression mediated by sirtuins and histone acetylation or EB transcription factor. We propose that supplementation of diet with extra virgin olive oil might have potential benefits for Alzheimer’s patients by the induction of autophagy by OLE.

  8. Induction of genomic instability and activation of autophagy in artificial human aneuploid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ariyoshi, Kentaro; Miura, Tomisato; Kasai, Kosuke; Fujishima, Yohei; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Yoshida, Mitsuaki A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Clones with artificial aneuploidy of chromosome 8 or chromosome 22 both show inhibited proliferation and genomic instability. • Increased autophagy was observed in the artificially aneuploid clones. • Inhibition of autophagy resulted in increased genomic instability and DNA damage. • Intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species were up-regulated in the artificially aneuploid clones. - Abstract: Chromosome missegregation can lead to a change in chromosome number known as aneuploidy. Although aneuploidy is a known hallmark of cancer cells, the various mechanisms by which altered gene and/or DNA copy number facilitate tumorigenesis remain unclear. To understand the effect of aneuploidy occurring in non-tumorigenic human breast epithelial cells, we generated clones harboring artificial aneuploidy using microcell-mediated chromosome transfer. Our results demonstrate that clones with artificial aneuploidy of chromosome 8 or chromosome 22 both show inhibited proliferation and genomic instability. Also, the increased autophagy was observed in the artificially aneuploidy clones, and inhibition of autophagy resulted in increased genomic instability and DNA damage. In addition, the intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species were up-regulated in the artificially aneuploid clones, and inhibition of autophagy further increased the production of reactive oxygen species. Together, these results suggest that even a single extraneous chromosome can induce genomic instability, and that autophagy triggered by aneuploidy-induced stress is a mechanism to protect cells bearing abnormal chromosome number.

  9. Implications of Therapy-Induced Selective Autophagy on Tumor Metabolism and Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke R. K. Hughson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence indicates that therapies designed to trigger apoptosis in tumor cells cause mitochondrial depolarization, nuclear damage, and the accumulation of misfolded protein aggregates, resulting in the activation of selective forms of autophagy. These selective forms of autophagy, including mitophagy, nucleophagy, and ubiquitin-mediated autophagy, counteract apoptotic signals by removing damaged cellular structures and by reprogramming cellular energy metabolism to cope with therapeutic stress. As a result, the efficacies of numerous current cancer therapies may be improved by combining them with adjuvant treatments that exploit or disrupt key metabolic processes induced by selective forms of autophagy. Targeting these metabolic irregularities represents a promising approach to improve clinical responsiveness to cancer treatments given the inherently elevated metabolic demands of many tumor types. To what extent anticancer treatments promote selective forms of autophagy and the degree to which they influence metabolism are currently under intense scrutiny. Understanding how the activation of selective forms of autophagy influences cellular metabolism and survival provides an opportunity to target metabolic irregularities induced by these pathways as a means of augmenting current approaches for treating cancer.

  10. Diabetes and the Brain: Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Muriach

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a common metabolic disorder associated with chronic complications including a state of mild to moderate cognitive impairment, in particular psychomotor slowing and reduced mental flexibility, not attributable to other causes, and shares many symptoms that are best described as accelerated brain ageing. A common theory for aging and for the pathogenesis of this cerebral dysfunctioning in diabetes relates cell death to oxidative stress in strong association to inflammation, and in fact nuclear factor κB (NFκB, a master regulator of inflammation and also a sensor of oxidative stress, has a strategic position at the crossroad between oxidative stress and inflammation. Moreover, metabolic inflammation is, in turn, related to the induction of various intracellular stresses such as mitochondrial oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, and autophagy defect. In parallel, blockade of autophagy can relate to proinflammatory signaling via oxidative stress pathway and NFκB-mediated inflammation.

  11. ERK1/2 is involved in luteal cell autophagy regulation during corpus luteum regression via an mTOR-independent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, JongYeob; Jo, MinWha; Lee, EunYoung; Choi, DooSeok

    2014-10-01

    Autophagy is known to be regulated by the phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K)-protein kinase B (AKT) and/or mitogen-activated protein kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2)-extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) pathways, leading to activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a major negative regulator of autophagy. However, some reports have also suggested that autophagic regulation by the PI3K-AKT and/or MEK1/2-ERK1/2 pathways may not be mediated by mTOR activity, and there is no direct evidence of the involvement of these pathways in luteal cell autophagy regulation. To elucidate the luteal cell-specific regulatory mechanisms of autophagy induction during corpus luteum (CL) regression, we evaluated whether luteal cell autophagy is regulated by the PI3K-AKT pathway and/or MEK1/2-ERK1/2 pathway and if this regulation is mediated by mTOR. We found that autophagy induction increased despite mTOR activation in luteal cells cultured with prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α), an important mediator of CL regression, suggesting that PGF2α-induced autophagy is independent of mTOR regulation. We also found that PGF2α-induced autophagy was not mediated by AKT activity, because AKT inhibition using a PI3K inhibitor (wortmannin) did not change autophagy induction or mTOR activity. In contrast, ERK1/2 activity increased in PGF2α-treated luteal cells, as did the levels of autophagy induction despite increased mTOR activity. Furthermore, PGF2α-mediated up-regulation of luteal cell autophagy was reversed by addition of ERK1/2 inhibitors, despite a decrease in mTOR activity. These in vitro results suggest that luteal cell autophagy is induced by increased ERK1/2 activity during CL regression, and is independent of mTOR activity. This finding was further supported by in vivo experiments in a pseudo-pregnant rat model, which showed that induction of luteal cell autophagy increased during luteal stage progression and that this was accompanied by increased ERK1/2 and mTOR activity. Taken

  12. The transporter-mediated cellular uptake of pharmaceutical drugs is based on their metabolite-likeness and not on their bulk biophysical properties: Towards a systems pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas B. Kell

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Several recent developments are brought together: (i the new availability of a consensus, curated human metabolic network reconstruction (Recon2, approximately a third of whose steps are represented by transporters, (ii the recognition that most successful (marketed drugs, as well as natural products, bear significant similarities to the metabolites in Recon2, (iii the recognition that to get into and out of cells such drugs hitchhike on the transporters that are part of normal intermediary metabolism, and the consequent recognition that for intact biomembrane Phospholipid Bilayer diffusion Is Negligible (PBIN, and (iv the consequent recognition that we need to exploit this and to use more phenotypic assays to understand how drugs affect cells and organisms. I show in particular that lipophilicity is a very poor predictor of drug permeability, and that we need to (and can bring together our knowledge of both pharmacology and systems biology modelling into a new systems pharmacology.

  13. PMI: a ΔΨm independent pharmacological regulator of mitophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    East, Daniel A; Fagiani, Francesca; Crosby, James; Georgakopoulos, Nikolaos D; Bertrand, Hélène; Schaap, Marjolein; Fowkes, Adrian; Wells, Geoff; Campanella, Michelangelo

    2014-11-20

    Mitophagy is central to mitochondrial and cellular homeostasis and operates via the PINK1/Parkin pathway targeting mitochondria devoid of membrane potential (ΔΨm) to autophagosomes. Although mitophagy is recognized as a fundamental cellular process, selective pharmacologic modulators of mitophagy are almost nonexistent. We developed a compound that increases the expression and signaling of the autophagic adaptor molecule P62/SQSTM1 and forces mitochondria into autophagy. The compound, P62-mediated mitophagy inducer (PMI), activates mitophagy without recruiting Parkin or collapsing ΔΨm and retains activity in cells devoid of a fully functional PINK1/Parkin pathway. PMI drives mitochondria to a process of quality control without compromising the bio-energetic competence of the whole network while exposing just those organelles to be recycled. Thus, PMI circumvents the toxicity and some of the nonspecific effects associated with the abrupt dissipation of ΔΨm by ionophores routinely used to induce mitophagy and represents a prototype pharmacological tool to investigate the molecular mechanisms of mitophagy.

  14. Repetitive stimulation of autophagy-lysosome machinery by intermittent fasting preconditions the myocardium to ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godar, Rebecca J; Ma, Xiucui; Liu, Haiyan; Murphy, John T; Weinheimer, Carla J; Kovacs, Attila; Crosby, Seth D; Saftig, Paul; Diwan, Abhinav

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy, a lysosomal degradative pathway, is potently stimulated in the myocardium by fasting and is essential for maintaining cardiac function during prolonged starvation. We tested the hypothesis that intermittent fasting protects against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury via transcriptional stimulation of the autophagy-lysosome machinery. Adult C57BL/6 mice subjected to 24-h periods of fasting, every other day, for 6 wk were protected from in-vivo ischemia-reperfusion injury on a fed day, with marked reduction in infarct size in both sexes as compared with nonfasted controls. This protection was lost in mice heterozygous null for Lamp2 (coding for lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2), which demonstrate impaired autophagy in response to fasting with accumulation of autophagosomes and SQSTM1, an autophagy substrate, in the heart. In lamp2 null mice, intermittent fasting provoked progressive left ventricular dilation, systolic dysfunction and hypertrophy; worsening cardiomyocyte autophagosome accumulation and lack of protection to ischemia-reperfusion injury, suggesting that intact autophagy-lysosome machinery is essential for myocardial homeostasis during intermittent fasting and consequent ischemic cardioprotection. Fasting and refeeding cycles resulted in transcriptional induction followed by downregulation of autophagy-lysosome genes in the myocardium. This was coupled with fasting-induced nuclear translocation of TFEB (transcription factor EB), a master regulator of autophagy-lysosome machinery; followed by rapid decline in nuclear TFEB levels with refeeding. Endogenous TFEB was essential for attenuation of hypoxia-reoxygenation-induced cell death by repetitive starvation, in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, in-vitro. Taken together, these data suggest that TFEB-mediated transcriptional priming of the autophagy-lysosome machinery mediates the beneficial effects of fasting-induced autophagy in myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  15. PTEN Activation by DNA Damage Induces Protective Autophagy in Response to Cucurbitacin B in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Niu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cucurbitacin B (Cuc B, a natural product, induced both protective autophagy and DNA damage mediated by ROS while the detailed mechanisms remain unclear. This study explored the mechanism of Cuc B-induced DNA damage and autophagy. Cuc B decreased cell viability in concentration- and time-dependent manners. Cuc B caused long comet tails and increased expression of γ-H2AX, phosphorylation of ATM/ATR, and Chk1/Chk2. Cuc B induced autophagy as evidenced by monodansylcadaverine (MDC staining, increased expression of LC3II, phosphorylated ULK1, and decreased expression of phosphorylated AKT, mTOR. Cuc B induced apoptosis mediated by Bcl-2 family proteins and caspase activation. Furthermore, Cuc B induced ROS formation, which was inhibited by N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC. NAC pretreatment dramatically reversed Cuc B-induced DNA damage, autophagy, and apoptosis. Cuc B-induced apoptosis was reversed by NAC but enhanced by 3-methyladenine (3-MA, chloroquine (CQ, and silencing phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN. 3-MA and CQ showed no effect on Cuc B-induced DNA damage. In addition, Cuc B increased PTEN phosphorylation and silence PTEN restored Cuc B-induced autophagic protein expressions without affecting DNA damage. In summary, Cuc B induced DNA damage, apoptosis, and protective autophagy mediated by ROS. PTEN activation in response to DNA damage bridged DNA damage and prosurvival autophagy.

  16. Autophagy and IL-1 family cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James eHarris

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an important intracellular homeostatic mechanism for the targeting of cytosolic constituents, including organelles, for lysosomal degradation. Autophagy plays roles in numerous physiological processes, including immune cell responses to endogenous and exogenous pathogenic stimuli. Moreover, autophagy has a potentially pivotal role to play in the regulation of inflammatory responses. In particular, autophagy regulates endogenous inflammasome activators, as well as inflammasome components and pro-IL-1β. As a result, autophagy acts a key modulator of IL-1β and IL-18, as well as IL-1α, release. This review focuses specifically on the role autophagy plays in regulating the production, processing and secretion of IL-1 and IL-18 and the consequences of this important function.

  17. Feedback regulation between autophagy and PKA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Quiroz, Francisco; Filteau, Marie; Landry, Christian R

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) controls diverse cellular processes and homeostasis in eukaryotic cells. Many processes and substrates of PKA have been described and among them are direct regulators of autophagy. The mechanisms of PKA regulation and how they relate to autophagy remain to be fully understood. We constructed a reporter of PKA activity in yeast to identify genes affecting PKA regulation. The assay systematically measures relative protein-protein interactions between the regulatory and catalytic subunits of the PKA complex in a systematic set of genetic backgrounds. The candidate PKA regulators we identified span multiple processes and molecular functions (autophagy, methionine biosynthesis, TORC signaling, protein acetylation, and DNA repair), which themselves include processes regulated by PKA. These observations suggest the presence of many feedback loops acting through this key regulator. Many of the candidate regulators include genes involved in autophagy, suggesting that not only does PKA regulate autophagy but that autophagy also sends signals back to PKA.

  18. Autophagy is essential for hearing in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Chisato; Iwasaki, Shinichi; Urata, Shinji; Morishita, Hideaki; Sakamaki, Yuriko; Fujioka, Masato; Kondo, Kenji; Mizushima, Noboru; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2017-05-11

    Hearing loss is the most frequent sensory disorder in humans. Auditory hair cells (HCs) are postmitotic at late-embryonic differentiation and postnatal stages, and their damage is the major cause of hearing loss. There is no measurable HC regeneration in the mammalian cochlea, and the maintenance of cell function is crucial for preservation of hearing. Here we generated mice deficient in autophagy-related 5 (Atg5), a gene essential for autophagy, in the HCs to investigate the effect of basal autophagy on hearing acuity. Deletion of Atg5 resulted in HC degeneration and profound congenital hearing loss. In autophagy-deficient HCs, polyubiquitinated proteins and p62/SQSTM1, an autophagy substrate, accumulated as inclusion bodies during the first postnatal week, and these aggregates increased in number. These findings revealed that basal autophagy has an important role in maintenance of HC morphology and hearing acuity.

  19. Osteoporosis and autophagy: What is the relationship?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinaldo Florencio-Silva

    Full Text Available Summary Autophagy is a survival pathway wherein non-functional proteins and organelles are degraded in lysosomes for recycling and energy production. Therefore, autophagy is fundamental for the maintenance of cell viability, acting as a quality control process that prevents the accumulation of unnecessary structures and oxidative stress. Increasing evidence has shown that autophagy dysfunction is related to several pathologies including neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. Moreover, recent studies have shown that autophagy plays an important role for the maintenance of bone homeostasis. For instance, in vitro and animal and human studies indicate that autophagy dysfunction in bone cells is associated with the onset of bone diseases such as osteoporosis. This review had the purpose of discussing the issue to confirm whether a relationship between autophagy dysfunction and osteoporosis exits.

  20. Increased autophagy and apoptosis contribute to muscle atrophy in a myotonic dystrophy type 1 Drosophila model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariadna Bargiela

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Muscle mass wasting is one of the most debilitating symptoms of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1 disease, ultimately leading to immobility, respiratory defects, dysarthria, dysphagia and death in advanced stages of the disease. In order to study the molecular mechanisms leading to the degenerative loss of adult muscle tissue in DM1, we generated an inducible Drosophila model of expanded CTG trinucleotide repeat toxicity that resembles an adult-onset form of the disease. Heat-shock induced expression of 480 CUG repeats in adult flies resulted in a reduction in the area of the indirect flight muscles. In these model flies, reduction of muscle area was concomitant with increased apoptosis and autophagy. Inhibition of apoptosis or autophagy mediated by the overexpression of DIAP1, mTOR (also known as Tor or muscleblind, or by RNA interference (RNAi-mediated silencing of autophagy regulatory genes, achieved a rescue of the muscle-loss phenotype. In fact, mTOR overexpression rescued muscle size to a size comparable to that in control flies. These results were validated in skeletal muscle biopsies from DM1 patients in which we found downregulated autophagy and apoptosis repressor genes, and also in DM1 myoblasts where we found increased autophagy. These findings provide new insights into the signaling pathways involved in DM1 disease pathogenesis.

  1. Homocysteine Aggravates Cortical Neural Cell Injury through Neuronal Autophagy Overactivation following Rat Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yaqian; Huang, Guowei; Chen, Shuang; Gou, Yun; Dong, Zhiping; Zhang, Xumei

    2016-01-01

    Elevated homocysteine (Hcy) levels have been reported to be involved in neurotoxicity after ischemic stroke. However, the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood to date. In the current study, we hypothesized that neuronal autophagy activation may be involved in the toxic effect of Hcy on cortical neurons following cerebral ischemia. Brain cell injury was determined by hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining and TdT-mediated dUTP Nick-End Labeling (TUNEL) staining. The level and localization of autophagy were detected by transmission electron microscopy, western blot and immunofluorescence double labeling. The oxidative DNA damage was revealed by immunofluorescence of 8-Hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG). Hcy treatment aggravated neuronal cell death, significantly increased the formation of autophagosomes and the expression of LC3B and Beclin-1 in the brain cortex after middle cerebral artery occlusion-reperfusion (MCAO). Immunofluorescence analysis of LC3B and Beclin-1 distribution indicated that their expression occurred mainly in neurons (NeuN-positive) and hardly in astrocytes (GFAP-positive). 8-OHdG expression was also increased in the ischemic cortex of Hcy-treated animals. Conversely, LC3B and Beclin-1 overexpression and autophagosome accumulation caused by Hcy were partially blocked by the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA). Hcy administration enhanced neuronal autophagy, which contributes to cell death following cerebral ischemia. The oxidative damage-mediated autophagy may be a molecular mechanism underlying neuronal cell toxicity of elevated Hcy level. PMID:27455253

  2. Homocysteine Aggravates Cortical Neural Cell Injury through Neuronal Autophagy Overactivation following Rat Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaqian Zhao

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Elevated homocysteine (Hcy levels have been reported to be involved in neurotoxicity after ischemic stroke. However, the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood to date. In the current study, we hypothesized that neuronal autophagy activation may be involved in the toxic effect of Hcy on cortical neurons following cerebral ischemia. Brain cell injury was determined by hematoxylin-eosin (HE staining and TdT-mediated dUTP Nick-End Labeling (TUNEL staining. The level and localization of autophagy were detected by transmission electron microscopy, western blot and immunofluorescence double labeling. The oxidative DNA damage was revealed by immunofluorescence of 8-Hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG. Hcy treatment aggravated neuronal cell death, significantly increased the formation of autophagosomes and the expression of LC3B and Beclin-1 in the brain cortex after middle cerebral artery occlusion-reperfusion (MCAO. Immunofluorescence analysis of LC3B and Beclin-1 distribution indicated that their expression occurred mainly in neurons (NeuN-positive and hardly in astrocytes (GFAP-positive. 8-OHdG expression was also increased in the ischemic cortex of Hcy-treated animals. Conversely, LC3B and Beclin-1 overexpression and autophagosome accumulation caused by Hcy were partially blocked by the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA. Hcy administration enhanced neuronal autophagy, which contributes to cell death following cerebral ischemia. The oxidative damage-mediated autophagy may be a molecular mechanism underlying neuronal cell toxicity of elevated Hcy level.

  3. The pan-inhibitor of Aurora kinases danusertib induces apoptosis and autophagy and suppresses epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in human breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin-Ping; Yang, Yin-Xue; Liu, Qi-Lun; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Pan, Shu-Ting; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhang, Xueji; Yang, Tianxin; Pan, Si-Yuan; Duan, Wei; He, Shu-Ming; Chen, Xiao-Wu; Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Danusertib (Danu) is a pan-inhibitor of Aurora kinases and a third-generation breakpoint cluster region-Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog 1 (Bcr-Abl) tyrosine kinase inhibitor, but its antitumor effect and underlying mechanisms in the treatment of human breast cancer remain elusive. This study aimed to investigate the effects of Danu on the growth, apoptosis, autophagy, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the molecular mechanisms in human breast cancer MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. The results demonstrated that Danu remarkably inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis and autophagy, and suppressed EMT in both breast cancer cell lines. Danu arrested MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells in G2/M phase, accompanied by the downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 and cyclin B1 and upregulation of p21 Waf1/Cip1, p27 Kip1, and p53. Danu significantly decreased the expression of B-cell lymphoma-extra-large (Bcl-xl) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), but increased the expression of Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) and p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA), and promoted the cleavage of caspases 3 and 9. Furthermore, Danu significantly increased the expression levels of the membrane-bound microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3-II) and beclin 1 in breast cancer cells, two markers for autophagy. Danu induced the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (Erk1/2) and inhibited the activation of protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways in breast cancer cells. Treatment with wortmannin (a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor) markedly inhibited Danu-induced activation of p38 MAPK and conversion of cytosolic LC3-I to membrane-bound LC3-II. Pharmacological inhibition and small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of p38 MAPK suppressed Akt activation, resulting in LC3-II accumulation and enhanced autophagy. Pharmacological inhibition

  4. Mediatization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjarvard, Stig

    2017-01-01

    Mediatization research shares media effects studies' ambition of answering the difficult questions with regard to whether and how media matter and influence contemporary culture and society. The two approaches nevertheless differ fundamentally in that mediatization research seeks answers...... research is concerned with long-term structural changes involving media, culture, and society, i.e. the influences of the media are understood in relation to how media are implicated in social and cultural changes and how these processes come to create new conditions for human communication and interaction....... From the perspective of mediatization research, the most important effect of the media stems from their embeddedness in culture and society....

  5. The role of autophagy in cardiac hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lanfang; Xu, Jin; He, Lu; Peng, Lijun; Zhong, Qiaoqing; Chen, Linxi; Jiang, Zhisheng

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is conserved in nature from lower eukaryotes to mammals and is an important self-cannibalizing, degradative process that contributes to the elimination of superfluous materials. Cardiac hypertrophy is primarily characterized by excess protein synthesis, increased cardiomyocyte size, and thickened ventricular walls and is a major risk factor that promotes arrhythmia and heart failure. In recent years, cardiomyocyte autophagy has been considered to play a role in controlling the hypertrophic response. However, the beneficial or aggravating role of cardiomyocyte autophagy in cardiac hypertrophy remains controversial. The exact mechanism of cardiomyocyte autophagy in cardiac hypertrophy requires further study. In this review, we summarize the controversies associated with autophagy in cardiac hypertrophy and provide insights into the role of autophagy in the development of cardiac hypertrophy. We conclude that future studies should emphasize the relationship between autophagy and the different stages of cardiac hypertrophy, as well as the autophagic flux and selective autophagy. Autophagy will be a potential therapeutic target for cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:27084518

  6. Approaches for Studying Autophagy in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfang Chen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Macroautophagy (hereafter referred to as autophagy is an intracellular degradative process, well conserved among eukaryotes. By engulfing cytoplasmic constituents into the autophagosome for degradation, this process is involved in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. Autophagy induction triggers the formation of a cup-shaped double membrane structure, the phagophore, which progressively elongates and encloses materials to be removed. This double membrane vesicle, which is called an autophagosome, fuses with lysosome and forms the autolysosome. The inner membrane of the autophagosome, along with engulfed compounds, are degraded by lysosomal enzymes, which enables the recycling of carbohydrates, amino acids, nucleotides, and lipids. In response to various factors, autophagy can be induced for non-selective degradation of bulk cytoplasm. Autophagy is also able to selectively target cargoes and organelles such as mitochondria or peroxisome, functioning as a quality control system. The modification of autophagy flux is involved in developmental processes such as resistance to stress conditions, aging, cell death, and multiple pathologies. So, the use of animal models is essential for understanding these processes in the context of different cell types throughout the entire lifespan. For almost 15 years, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has emerged as a powerful model to analyze autophagy in physiological or pathological contexts. This review presents a rapid overview of physiological processes involving autophagy in Caenorhabditis elegans, the different assays used to monitor autophagy, their drawbacks, and specific tools for the analyses of selective autophagy.

  7. Involvement of Autophagy in Coronavirus Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Britton

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Coronaviruses are single stranded, positive sense RNA viruses, which induce the rearrangement of cellular membranes upon infection of a host cell. This provides the virus with a platform for the assembly of viral replication complexes, improving efficiency of RNA synthesis. The membranes observed in coronavirus infected cells include double membrane vesicles. By nature of their double membrane, these vesicles resemble cellular autophagosomes, generated during the cellular autophagy pathway. In addition, coronavirus infection has been demonstrated to induce autophagy. Here we review current knowledge of coronavirus induced membrane rearrangements and the involvement of autophagy or autophagy protein microtubule associated protein 1B light chain 3 (LC3 in coronavirus replication.

  8. Newly synthesized bis-benzimidazole compound 8 induces apoptosis, autophagy and reactive oxygen species generation in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Naying; Yao, Guodong; Liu, Yuan; Cheng, Maosheng; Ikejima, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    Compound 8 (C8) is a newly synthesized bis-benzimidazole derivative and exerts significant anti-tumor activity in vitro. Previous studies demonstrated that C8 induced apoptosis and autophagy in human promyelocytic leukemia HL60 cells. However, cytotoxicity study on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMC) showed that C8 exhibited less toxicity in normal cells. In this study, the molecular mechanism of C8 on human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells was investigated. The results showed that C8 inhibited the growth of HeLa cells and triggered both apoptotic and autophagic cell death. Subsequent experiment also indicated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was induced in C8-treated HeLa cells. Since ROS scavenger decreased the ratio of apoptotic and autophagic cells, ROS generation contributed to C8-induced apoptosis and autophagy. Furthermore, inhibitors of apoptosis and autophagy also reduced ROS generation, respectively. Autophagy inhibition increased cell growth compared to C8-treated group and attenuated apoptotic cell death, indicating that C8-induced autophagy promoted apoptosis for cell death. However, the percentage of autophagic cells was enhanced when limiting apoptosis process. Taken together, C8 induced ROS-mediated apoptosis and autophagy in HeLa cells, autophagy promoted apoptosis but the former was antagonized by the latter. The data also gave us a new perspective on the anti-tumor effect of C8. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Excess iodine promotes apoptosis of thyroid follicular epithelial cells by inducing autophagy suppression and is associated with Hashimoto thyroiditis disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chengcheng; Wu, Fei; Mao, Chaoming; Wang, Xuefeng; Zheng, Tingting; Bu, Ling; Mou, Xiao; Zhou, Yuepeng; Yuan, Guoyue; Wang, Shengjun; Xiao, Yichuan

    2016-12-01

    The incidence of the autoimmune thyroid disease Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) has increased in recent years, and increasing evidence supports the contribution of excess iodine intake to thyroid disease. In this study, we examined the status of autophagy and apoptosis in thyroid tissues obtained from patients with HT, and we determined the effects of excessive iodine on the autophagy and apoptosis of thyroid follicular cells (TFCs) in an attempt to elucidate the effects of excess iodine on HT development. Our results showed decreases in the autophagy-related protein LC3B-II, and increases in caspase-3 were observed in thyroid tissues from HT patients. Interestingly, the suppression of autophagy activity in TFCs was induced by excess iodine in vitro, and this process is mediated through transforming growth factor-β1 downregulation and activation of the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. In addition, excess iodine induced autophagy suppression and enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and apoptosis of TFCs, which could be rescued by the activation of autophagy. Taken together, our results demonstrated that excess iodine contributed to autophagy suppression and apoptosis of TFCs, which could be important factors predisposing to increased risk of HT development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Isoflavones Induce BEX2-Dependent Autophagy to Prevent ATR-Induced Neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Atrazine (ATR is a broad-spectrum herbicide in wide use around the world. However, ATR is neurotoxic and can cause cell death in dopaminergic neurons, leading to neurodegenerative disorders. Autophagy is the basic cellular catabolic process involving the degradation of proteins and damaged organelles. Studies have shown that certain plant compounds can induce autophagy and prevent neuronal cell death. This prompted us to investigate plant compounds that might reduce the neurotoxic effects of ATR. Methods: By CCK-8 and flow cytometry, we tested the ability of five candidate compounds—isoflavones, resveratrol, quercetin, curcumin, and green tea polyphenols—to protect cells from ATR. Changes in the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH and brain-expressed X-linked 2 (BEX2, autophagy-related proteins and key factors in mTOR signaling, were detected by Western blotting. Results: Isoflavones had the strongest activity against ATR-induced neuronal apoptosis. ATR reduced the expression of TH and BEX2, whereas isoflavones increased TH and BEX2 expression. In addition, ATR inhibited autophagy, whereas isoflavones induced autophagy through the accumulation of LC3-II and decreased expression of p62; this effect was abolished by 3-methyladenine (3-MA. Furthermore, BEX2 siRNA abolished isoflavone-mediated autophagy and neuroprotection in vitro. Conclusion: Isoflavones activate BEX2-dependent autophagy, protecting against ATR-induced neuronal apoptosis.

  11. Transforming Growth Factor TGFβ Increases Levels of Microtubule-Associated Protein MAP1S and Autophagy Flux in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kun; Hu, Wei; Yue, Fei; Zou, Jing; Li, Wenjiao; Chen, Qi; Yao, Qizhi; Sun, Weijia; Liu, Leyuan

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular process to regulate the turnover of misfolded/aggregated proteins or dysfunctional organelles such as damaged mitochondria. Microtubule-associated protein MAP1S (originally named C19ORF5) is a widely-distributed homologue of neuronal-specific MAP1A and MAP1B with which autophagy marker light chain 3 (LC3) was originally co-purified. MAP1S bridges autophagic components with microtubules and mitochondria through LC3 and positively regulates autophagy flux from autophagosomal biogenesis to degradation. The MAP1S-mediated autophagy suppresses tumorigenesis as suggested in a mouse liver cancer model and in prostate cancer patients. The TGFβ signaling pathway plays a central role in pancreatic tumorigenesis, and high levels of TGFβ suggest a tumor suppressive function and predict a better survival for some patients with resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. In this study, we try to understand the relationship between TGFβ and MAP1S-mediated autophagy in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. We collected the tumor and its adjacent normal tissues from 33 randomly selected patients of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas to test the association between TGFβ and autophagy markers MAP1S and LC3. Then we tested the cause and effect relation between TGFβ and autophagy markers in cultured pancreatic cancer cell lines. Here we show that levels of TGFβ and autophagy markers MAP1S and LC3 are dramatically elevated in tumor tissues from patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. TGFβ increases levels of MAP1S protein and enhances autophagy flux. TGFβ may suppress the development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas by enhancing MAP1S-mediated autophagy.

  12. Transforming Growth Factor TGFβ Increases Levels of Microtubule-Associated Protein MAP1S and Autophagy Flux in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Song

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a cellular process to regulate the turnover of misfolded/aggregated proteins or dysfunctional organelles such as damaged mitochondria. Microtubule-associated protein MAP1S (originally named C19ORF5 is a widely-distributed homologue of neuronal-specific MAP1A and MAP1B with which autophagy marker light chain 3 (LC3 was originally co-purified. MAP1S bridges autophagic components with microtubules and mitochondria through LC3 and positively regulates autophagy flux from autophagosomal biogenesis to degradation. The MAP1S-mediated autophagy suppresses tumorigenesis as suggested in a mouse liver cancer model and in prostate cancer patients. The TGFβ signaling pathway plays a central role in pancreatic tumorigenesis, and high levels of TGFβ suggest a tumor suppressive function and predict a better survival for some patients with resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. In this study, we try to understand the relationship between TGFβ and MAP1S-mediated autophagy in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.We collected the tumor and its adjacent normal tissues from 33 randomly selected patients of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas to test the association between TGFβ and autophagy markers MAP1S and LC3. Then we tested the cause and effect relation between TGFβ and autophagy markers in cultured pancreatic cancer cell lines.Here we show that levels of TGFβ and autophagy markers MAP1S and LC3 are dramatically elevated in tumor tissues from patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. TGFβ increases levels of MAP1S protein and enhances autophagy flux.TGFβ may suppress the development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas by enhancing MAP1S-mediated autophagy.

  13. Glutamate dehydrogenase contributes to leucine sensing in the regulation of autophagy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorin, Séverine; Tol, Marc J.; Bauvy, Chantal; Strijland, Anneke; Poüs, Christian; Verhoeven, Arthur J.; Codogno, Patrice; Meijer, Alfred J.

    2013-01-01

    Amino acids, leucine in particular, are known to inhibit autophagy, at least in part by their ability to stimulate MTOR-mediated signaling. Evidence is presented showing that glutamate dehydrogenase, the central enzyme in amino acid catabolism, contributes to leucine sensing in the regulation of

  14. Regulation of autophagy by amino acids and MTOR-dependent signal transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Alfred J.; Lorin, Séverine; Blommaart, Edward F.; Codogno, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Amino acids not only participate in intermediary metabolism but also stimulate insulin-mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR)-mediated signal transduction which controls the major metabolic pathways. Among these is the pathway of autophagy which takes care of the degradation of long-lived proteins

  15. Guidelines for the use and interpretation of assays for monitoring autophagy (3rd edition)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Váchová, Libuše

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2016), s. 1-222 ISSN 1554-8627 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109; GA MŠk(CZ) LD15129 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : autolysosome * autophagosome * chaperone-mediated autophagy Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 8.593, year: 2016

  16. Spectral imaging-based methods for quantifying autophagy and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolloff, Nathan G; Ma, Xiahong; Dicker, David T; Humphreys, Robin C; Li, Lin Z; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2011-08-15

    Spectral imaging systems are capable of detecting and quantifying subtle differences in light quality. In this study we coupled spectral imaging with fluorescence and white light microscopy to develop new methods for quantifying autophagy and apoptosis. For autophagy, we employed multispectral imaging to examine spectral changes in the fluorescence of LC3-GFP, a chimeric protein commonly used to track autophagosome formation. We found that punctate autophagosome-associated LC3-GFP exhibited a spectral profile that was distinctly different from diffuse cytosolic LC3-GFP. We then exploited this shift in spectral quality to quantify the amount of autophagosome-associated signal in single cells. Hydroxychloroquine (CQ), an anti-malarial agent that increases autophagosomal number, significantly increased the punctate LC3-GFP spectral signature, providing proof-of-principle for this approach. For studying apoptosis, we employed the Prism and Reflector Imaging Spectroscopy System (PARISS) hyperspectral imaging system to identify a spectral signature for active caspase-8 immunostaining in ex vivo tumor samples. This system was then used to rapidly quantify apoptosis induced by lexatumumab, an agonistic TRAIL-R2/DR5 antibody, in histological sections from a preclinical mouse model. We further found that the PARISS could accurately distinguish apoptotic tumor regions in hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections, which allowed us to quantify death receptor-mediated apoptosis in the absence of an apoptotic marker. These spectral imaging systems provide unbiased, quantitative and fast means for studying autophagy and apoptosis and complement the existing methods in their respective fields.

  17. Autophagy, Innate Immunity and Tissue Repair in Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pu Duann

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Kidney is a vital organ with high energy demands to actively maintain plasma hemodynamics, electrolytes and water homeostasis. Among the nephron segments, the renal tubular epithelium is endowed with high mitochondria density for their function in active transport. Acute kidney injury (AKI is an important clinical syndrome and a global public health issue with high mortality rate and socioeconomic burden due to lack of effective therapy. AKI results in acute cell death and necrosis of renal tubule epithelial cells accompanied with leakage of tubular fluid and inflammation. The inflammatory immune response triggered by the tubular cell death, mitochondrial damage, associative oxidative stress, and the release of many tissue damage factors have been identified as key elements driving the pathophysiology of AKI. Autophagy, the cellular mechanism that removes damaged organelles via lysosome-mediated degradation, had been proposed to be renoprotective. An in-depth understanding of the intricate interplay between autophagy and innate immune response, and their roles in AKI pathology could lead to novel therapies in AKI. This review addresses the current pathophysiology of AKI in aspects of mitochondrial dysfunction, innate immunity, and molecular mechanisms of autophagy. Recent advances in renal tissue regeneration and potential therapeutic interventions are also discussed.

  18. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor induces vascular leakage via autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Ru Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular leakage is an important feature of acute inflammatory shock, which currently has no effective treatment. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that can induce vascular leakage and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of shock. However, the mechanism of MIF-induced vascular leakage is still unclear. In this study, using recombinant MIF (rMIF, we demonstrated that MIF induced disorganization and degradation of junction proteins and increased the permeability of human endothelial cells in vitro. Western blotting analysis showed that rMIF treatment induced LC3 conversion and p62 degradation. Inhibition of autophagy with a PI3K inhibitor (3-MA, a ROS scavenger (NAC or autophagosomal-lysosomal fusion inhibitors (bafilomycin A1 and chloroquine rescued rMIF-induced vascular leakage, suggesting that autophagy mediates MIF-induced vascular leakage. The potential involvement of other signaling pathways was also studied using different inhibitors, and the results suggested that MIF-induced vascular leakage may occur through the ERK pathway. In conclusion, we showed that MIF triggered autophagic degradation of endothelial cells, resulting in vascular leakage. Inhibition of MIF-induced autophagy may provide therapeutic targets against vascular leakage in inflammatory shock.

  19. Prognostic impact of autophagy biomarkers for cutaneous melanoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Yao Li Tang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Prognosis and survival for malignant melanoma is highly dependent on early diagnosis and treatment. While the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC criteria provides a means of staging melanomas and guiding treatment approaches, it is unable to identify the risk of disease progression of early stage tumours or provide reliable stratification for novel adjuvant therapies. The demand for credible prognostic/companion biomarkers able to identify high risk melanoma subgroups as well as guide more effective personalised/precision based therapy is therefore of paramount importance. Autophagy, the principle lysosomal-mediated process for the degradation/recycling of cellular debris, is a hot topic in cancer medicine and observations of its deregulation in melanoma have brought its potential as a prognostic biomarker to the forefront of current research. Key regulatory proteins, including Atg8/microtubule-associated light chain 3 (LC3 and BECN1 (Beclin 1 have been proposed as potential prognostic biomarkers. However, given the dynamic nature of autophagy, their expression in vitro does not translate to their use as a prognostic biomarker for melanoma in vivo. We have recently identified the expression levels of Sequestosome1/SQSTM1 (p62 and activating molecule in Beclin 1 regulated autophagy protein 1 (AMBRA1 as novel independent prognostic biomarkers for early stage melanomas. While increasing followed by subsequent decreasing levels of p62 expression reflects the paradoxical role of autophagy in melanoma, expression levels additionally define a novel prognostic biomarker for AJCC stage II tumours. Conversely, loss of AMBRA1 in the epidermis overlying primary melanomas defines a novel prognostic biomarker for AJCC stage I tumours. Collectively, the definition of AMBRA1 and p62 as prognostic biomarkers for early stage melanomas provides novel and accurate means through which to identify tumours at risk of disease progression, facilitating earlier

  20. 17-AAG enhances the cytotoxicity of flavopiridol in mantle cell lymphoma via autophagy suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Y; Guan, J

    2015-01-01

    Flavopiridol, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CDKI), shows promising anti-tumor activity in hematologic malignancies. However, Flavopiridol-induced protective autophagy may lead to drug resistance. Here we found that Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG can sensitize mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cells to flavopiridol by suppressing flavopiridol-triggered protective autophagy. The suppressing effect of 17-AAG on autophgy was mediated by Beclin1 degradation and ERK inactivation. Furthermore, 17-AAG enhanced flavopiridol-induced apoptosis and growth suppression in MCL cells. Our study may provide some insights into CDKI -targeted chemotherapies.

  1. Autophagy contributes to falcarindiol-induced cell death in breast cancer cells with enhanced endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Lu

    Full Text Available Falcarindiol (FAD is a natural polyyne have been found in many food and dietary plants. It has been found to have various beneficial biological activities. In this study, we demonstrated its anticancer function and mechanism in breast cancer cells. We found that FAD preferentially induces cell death in breast cancer cells. FAD-induced cell death is caspase-dependent. However, FAD induces autophagy to contribute to the cell death. Blocking autophagy by either chemical inhibitors or genetic knockout of autophagy signaling component inhibits FAD-induced cell death. We further found that FAD-induced cell death is mediated by the induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress. We also identified that FAD has synergistic effect with approved cancer drugs 5-FU and Bortezomib in killing breast cancer cells. Summarily, these data demonstrate that FAD has strong and specific anticancer effect in breast cancer cells, and provide some insights about the roles of autophagy in FAD-induced cell death.

  2. Autophagy contributes to falcarindiol-induced cell death in breast cancer cells with enhanced endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tingting; Gu, Ming; Zhao, Yan; Zheng, Xinyu; Xing, Chengzhong

    2017-01-01

    Falcarindiol (FAD) is a natural polyyne have been found in many food and dietary plants. It has been found to have various beneficial biological activities. In this study, we demonstrated its anticancer function and mechanism in breast cancer cells. We found that FAD preferentially induces cell death in breast cancer cells. FAD-induced cell death is caspase-dependent. However, FAD induces autophagy to contribute to the cell death. Blocking autophagy by either chemical inhibitors or genetic knockout of autophagy signaling component inhibits FAD-induced cell death. We further found that FAD-induced cell death is mediated by the induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress. We also identified that FAD has synergistic effect with approved cancer drugs 5-FU and Bortezomib in killing breast cancer cells. Summarily, these data demonstrate that FAD has strong and specific anticancer effect in breast cancer cells, and provide some insights about the roles of autophagy in FAD-induced cell death.

  3. The pharmacology of salmeterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M; Butchers, P R; Coleman, R A; Nials, A T; Strong, P; Sumner, M J; Vardey, C J; Whelan, C J

    1993-01-01

    Salmeterol was developed to provide prolonged bronchodilatation to control nocturnal symptoms and improve maintenance therapy in asthmatic patients. Salmeterol is > 10,000 times more lipophilic than salbutamol and has greater affinity for the beta 2-adrenoceptor. Membrane binding is non-competitive and dissociation is slow so that its effects last for many hours. Despite this, salmeterol does not accumulate in tissues. Its mechanism of action can be explained by binding to a specific exo-site domain of the beta 2-receptor protein to produce continuous stimulation of the active site of the receptor, which gives salmeterol a profile of pharmacological activity unlike that of other beta 2-agonists. Due to its potent and prolonged activation of beta 2-adrenoceptors in airway smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, mast cells and epithelial cells, salmeterol induces prolonged bronchodilatation, reduced vascular permeability, inhibition of inflammatory mediators, stimulation of ciliary function and modulation of ion and water transport across the bronchial mucosa.

  4. Formation of a Snf1-Mec1-Atg1 Module on Mitochondria Governs Energy Deprivation-Induced Autophagy by Regulating Mitochondrial Respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Cong; Tong, Jingjing; Lu, Puzhong; Wang, Yizheng; Zhang, Jinxie; Sun, Chen; Yuan, Kangning; Xue, Renyu; Zou, Bing; Li, Nianzhong; Xiao, Shuhua; Dai, Chong; Huang, Yuwei; Xu, Liling; Li, Lin; Chen, She; Miao, Di; Deng, Haiteng; Li, Hongliang; Yu, Li

    2017-04-10

    Autophagy is essential for maintaining glucose homeostasis, but the mechanism by which energy deprivation activates autophagy is not fully understood. We show that Mec1/ATR, a member of the DNA damage response pathway, is essential for glucose starvation-induced autophagy. Mec1, Atg13, Atg1, and the energy-sensing kinase Snf1 are recruited to mitochondria shortly after glucose starvation. Mec1 is recruited through the adaptor protein Ggc1. Snf1 phosphorylates Mec1 on the mitochondrial surface, leading to recruitment of Atg1 to mitochondria. Furthermore, the Snf1-mediated Mec1 phosphorylation and mitochondrial recruitment of Atg1 are essential for maintaining mitochondrial respiration during glucose starvation, and active mitochondrial respiration is required for energy deprivation-activated autophagy. Thus, formation of a Snf1-Mec1-Atg1 module on mitochondria governs energy deprivation-induced autophagy by regulating mitochondrial respiration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of the autophagy marker protein Atg8 reveals atypical features of autophagy in Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Navale

    Full Text Available Conventional autophagy is a lysosome-dependent degradation process that has crucial homeostatic and regulatory functions in eukaryotic organisms. As malaria parasites must dispose a number of self and host cellular contents, we investigated if autophagy in malaria parasites is similar to the conventional autophagy. Genome wide analysis revealed a partial autophagy repertoire in Plasmodium, as homologs for only 15 of the 33 yeast autophagy proteins could be identified, including the autophagy marker Atg8. To gain insights into autophagy in malaria parasites, we investigated Plasmodium falciparum Atg8 (PfAtg8 employing techniques and conditions that are routinely used to study autophagy. Atg8 was similarly expressed and showed punctate localization throughout the parasite in both asexual and sexual stages; it was exclusively found in the pellet fraction as an integral membrane protein, which is in contrast to the yeast or mammalian Atg8 that is distributed among cytosolic and membrane fractions, and suggests for a constitutive autophagy. Starvation, the best known autophagy inducer, decreased PfAtg8 level by almost 3-fold compared to the normally growing parasites. Neither the Atg8-associated puncta nor the Atg8 expression level was significantly altered by treatment of parasites with routinely used autophagy inhibitors (cysteine (E64 and aspartic (pepstatin protease inhibitors, the kinase inhibitor 3-methyladenine, and the lysosomotropic agent chloroquine, indicating an atypical feature of autophagy. Furthermore, prolonged inhibition of the major food vacuole protease activity by E64 and pepstatin did not cause accumulation of the Atg8-associated puncta in the food vacuole, suggesting that autophagy is primarily not meant for degradative function in malaria parasites. Atg8 showed partial colocalization with the apicoplast; doxycycline treatment, which disrupts apicoplast, did not affect Atg8 localization, suggesting a role, but not exclusive, in

  6. Pharmacologic inhibition of sphingomyelin synthase (SMS) activity reduces apolipoprotein-B secretion from hepatocytes and attenuates endotoxin-mediated macrophage inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Bin; Dong, Jibin; Li, Yali; Ding, Tingbo; Bi, Tingting; Li, Yue; Deng, Xiaodong; Ye, Deyong; Jiang, Xian-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Sphingomyelin synthase (SMS) plays an important role in plasma atherogenic lipoprotein metabolism, inflammation, and the development of atherosclerosis. To understand whether the impaired apoB secretion and inflammation response is a direct result from lack of SMS activity, in this study, we prepared a series of compounds that inhibit SMS activity. Further, we characterized Dy105, the most potent inhibitor. We found that Dy105 treatment significantly reduces SM levels in SM-rich microdomain on cell membranes. Moreover, we found that SMS inhibition reduces apoB secretion in a human hepatoma cell line and reduces the activation of NFκB and p38, a MAP kinase, in bone marrow derived macrophages. These studies provided further evidence that SMS activity regulates atherogenic lipoprotein metabolism and inflammatory responses. Pharmacologic inhibition of SMS may be a new therapy for atherosclerosis by reducing apoB secretion, and reducing inflammation.

  7. Noncoding RNA blockade of autophagy is therapeutic in medullary thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gundara, Justin S; Zhao, JingTing; Gill, Anthony J; Lee, James C; Delbridge, Leigh; Robinson, Bruce G; McLean, Catriona; Serpell, Jonathan; Sidhu, Stan B

    2015-01-01

    Micro-RNAs are dysregulated in medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) and preliminary studies have shown that miRNAs may enact a therapeutic effect through changes in autophagic flux. Our aim was to study the in vitro effect of miR-9-3p on MTC cell viability, autophagy and to investigate the mRNA autophagy gene profile of sporadic versus hereditary MTC. The therapeutic role of miR-9-3p was investigated in vitro using human MTC cell lines (TT and MZ-CRC-1 cells), cell viability assays, and functional mechanism studies with a focus on cell cycle, apoptosis, and autophagy. Post-miR-9-3p transfection mRNA profiling of cell lines was performed using a customized, quantitative RT-PCR gene array card. This card was also run on clinical tumor samples (sporadic: n = 6; hereditary: n = 6) and correlated with clinical data. Mir-9-3p transfection resulted in reduced in vitro cell viability; an effect mediated through autophagy inhibition. This was accompanied by evidence of G2 arrest in the TT cell line and increased apoptosis in both cell lines. Atg5 was validated as a predicted miR-9-3p mRNA target in TT cells. Post-miR-9-3p transfection array studies showed a significant global decline in autophagy gene expression (most notably in PIK3C3, mTOR, and LAMP-1). Autophagy gene mRNAs were generally overexpressed in sporadic (vs. hereditary MTC) and Beclin-1 overexpression was shown to correlate with residual disease. Autophagy is a tumor cell survival mechanism in MTC that when disabled, is of therapeutic advantage. Beclin-1 expression may be a useful prognostic biomarker of aggressive disease

  8. Ulmus davidiana Nakai induces apoptosis and autophagy on non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Soon-Oh; Choi, In Keun; Jeong, Wonsik; Lee, Se Ryeon; Sung, Hwa Jung; Hong, Seong Su; Seo, Jae Hong

    2017-04-18

    Ulmus davidiana Nakai (UDN) is frequently used in the treatment of cancer in traditional oriental medicine. Although several reports indicate that UDN has inhibitory effects in some cancers, there has been no report on the inhibitory effects of UDN via both autophagy and apoptosis. Cytotoxicity induced by UDN in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) H-1299 and H-460 cell lines was evaluated using the 2, 3-Bis (2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide inner salt (XTT) assay and trypan blue exclusion assay. Induction of apoptosis was also investigated using Hoechst staining and annexin-V binding assay and was confirmed with western blot analysis. Induction of autophagy was investigated through observation of autophagy vacuoles under inverted phase-contrast microscopy and was confirmed by observing the formation of autophagy vacuoles under a fluorescence microscope using monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining and western blot analysis. The in vivo anti-tumorigenic effect of UDN was investigated in an athymic nude mouse xenograft model using H-1299 NSCLC cells. UDN exhibited a marked inhibitory effect on cell growth in H-1299 and H-460 human NSCLC cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner in vitro and in vivo. It induced not only apoptosis, but also autophagy in both H-1299 and H-460 cells in a dose-dependent manner. UDN-mediated autophagy led to the accumulation of autophagosome, resulting in apoptosis induction and cell death. From our current knowledge, we are the first to demonstrate that UDN has the potential to induce both autophagy and apoptosis in H-1299 and H-460 human NSCLC cell lines. We suggest that UDN can be considered a potential candidate for lung cancer-specific chemotherapy with efficacy as a cytotoxic agent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Mevalonate cascade regulation of airway mesenchymal cell autophagy and apoptosis: a dual role for p53.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Ghavami

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Statins inhibit the proximal steps of cholesterol biosynthesis, and are linked to health benefits in various conditions, including cancer and lung disease. We have previously investigated apoptotic pathways triggered by statins in airway mesenchymal cells, and identified reduced prenylation of small GTPases as a primary effector mechanism leading to p53-mediated cell death. Here, we extend our studies of statin-induced cell death by assessing endpoints of both apoptosis and autophagy, and investigating their interplay and coincident regulation. Using primary cultured human airway smooth muscle (HASM and human airway fibroblasts (HAF, autophagy, and autophagosome formation and flux were assessed by transmission electron microscopy, cytochemistry (lysosome number and co-localization with LC3 and immunoblotting (LC3 lipidation and Atg12-5 complex formation. Chemical inhibition of autophagy increased simvastatin-induced caspase activation and cell death. Similarly, Atg5 silencing with shRNA, thus preventing Atg5-12 complex formation, increased pro-apoptotic effects of simvastatin. Simvastatin concomitantly increased p53-dependent expression of p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA, NOXA, and damage-regulated autophagy modulator (DRAM. Notably both mevalonate cascade inhibition-induced autophagy and apoptosis were p53 dependent: simvastatin increased nuclear p53 accumulation, and both cyclic pifithrin-α and p53 shRNAi partially inhibited NOXA, PUMA expression and caspase-3/7 cleavage (apoptosis and DRAM expression, Atg5-12 complex formation, LC3 lipidation, and autophagosome formation (autophagy. Furthermore, the autophagy response is induced rapidly, significantly delaying apoptosis, suggesting the existence of a temporally coordinated p53 regulation network. These findings are relevant for the development of statin-based therapeutic approaches in obstructive airway disease.

  10. Guttiferone K induces autophagy and sensitizes cancer cells to nutrient stress-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Man; Lao, Yuanzhi; Xu, Naihan; Wang, Xiaoyu; Tan, Hongsheng; Fu, Wenwei; Lin, Zhixiu; Xu, Hongxi

    2015-09-15

    Medicinal plants have long been an excellent source of pharmaceutical agents. Autophagy, a catabolic degradation process through lysosomes, plays an important role in tumorigenesis and cancer therapy. Through a screen designed to identify autophagic regulators from a library of natural compounds, we found that Guttiferone K (GUTK) can activate autophagy in several cancer cell lines. The objective of this study is to investigate the mechanism by which GUTK sensitizes cancer cells to cell death in nutrient starvation condition. Cell death analysis was performed by propidium iodide staining with flow cytometry or Annexin V-FITC/PI staining assay. DCFH-DA staining was used for intracellular ROS measurement. Protein levels were analyzed by western blot analysis. Cell viability was measured by MTT assay. Exposure to GUTK was observed to markedly induce GFP-LC3 puncta formation and activate the accumulation of LC3-II and the degradation of p62 in HeLa cells, suggesting that GUTK is an autophagy inducer. Importantly, hydroxychloroquine, an autophagy inhibitor, was found to significantly prevent GUTK-induced cell death in nutrient starvation conditions, suggesting that the cell death observed is largely dependent on autophagy. We further provide evidence that GUTK inhibits Akt phosphorylation, thereby inhibiting the mTOR pathway in cancer cells during nutrient starvation. In addition, GUTK causes the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the phosphorylation of JNK in EBSS, which may mediate both autophagy and apoptosis. These data indicate that GUTK sensitizes cancer cells to nutrient stress-induced cell death though Akt/mTOR dependent autophagy pathway. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  11. Inhibition of NF-κB promotes autophagy via JNK signaling pathway in porcine granulosa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Hui; Lin, Lu; Haq, Ihtesham Ul; Zeng, Shen-ming, E-mail: zengshenming@gmail.com

    2016-04-22

    The transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) plays an important role in diverse processes, including cell proliferation and differentiation, apoptosis and inflammation. However, the role of NF-κB in porcine follicle development is not clearly elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) increased the level of inhibitor of NF-κB (IκB) protein and promoted the cytoplasmic localization of p65, indicating that FSH inhibits the activation of NF-κB in porcine granulosa cells. Moreover, inhibition of NF-κB by FSH or another specific inhibitor of NF-κB, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), could activate JNK signaling and enhance autophagic activity in porcine granulosa cells. Knockdown of RelA (p65) Subunit of NF-κB by RNA interference abrogated the activation of JNK signaling pathway and the increase of autophagic protein expression by FSH. Meanwhile, the functional significance of FSH or PDTC-mediated autophagy were further investigated. Our results demonstrated that the increased autophagy promoted progesterone secretion in porcine granulosa cells. Blockage of autophagy by chloroquine obviated the FSH or PDTC-induced progesterone production. Taken together, these results indicate that inhibition of NF-κB increased autophagy via JNK signaling, and promote steroidogenesis in porcine granulosa cells. Our results provide new insights into the regulation and function of autophagy in mammalian follicle development. - Highlights: • FSH inhibits the activation of NF-κB in porcine primary granulosa cells. • Inhibition of NF-κB by FSH promotes autophagy via JNK signaling in granulosa cells. • Increased autophagy contributes to progesterone production in granulosa cells. • This is the first report against beclin1 regulation in porcine granulosa cells.

  12. Effect of limb demand ischemia on autophagy and morphology in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albadawi, Hassan; Oklu, Rahmi; Milner, John D; Uong, Thuy P; Yoo, Hyung-Jin; Austen, William G; Watkins, Michael T

    2015-10-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for diabetes and peripheral arterial disease, which frequently leads to lower limb demand ischemia. Skeletal muscle autophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis are important processes for proper oxidative capacity and energy metabolism, which are compromised in diabetes. This study compares autophagy, mitochondrial biogenesis, energy metabolism, and morphology in the hind limbs of obese diabetic mice subjected to demand or sedentary ischemia. Unilateral hind limb demand ischemia was created in a group of diet-induced obese mice after femoral artery ligation and 4 wk of daily exercise. A parallel group of mice underwent femoral artery ligation but remained sedentary for 4 wk. Hind limb muscles were analyzed for markers of autophagy, mitochondrial biogenesis, adenosine triphosphate, and muscle tissue morphology. At the end of the 4-wk exercise period, demand ischemia increased the autophagy mediator Beclin-1, but it did not alter the autophagy indicator, LC3B-II/I ratio, or markers of mitochondrial biogenesis, optic atrophy/dynamin-related protein. In contrast, exercise significantly increased the level of mitochondrial protein-succinate dehydrogenase subunit-A and reduced adipocyte accumulation and the percentage of centrally nucleated myofibers in the demand ischemia limb. In addition, demand ischemia resulted in decreased uncoupling protein-3 levels without altering muscle adenosine triphosphate or pS473-Akt levels. Limb demand ischemia markedly decreased adipocyte accumulation and enhanced muscle regeneration in obese mice, but it did not appear to enhance autophagy, mitochondrial biogenesis, energy metabolism, or insulin sensitivity. Future studies aimed at evaluating novel therapies that enhance autophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis in diabetes with peripheral arterial disease are warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Autophagy: A Sweet Process in Diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Alfred J.; Codogno, Patrice

    2008-01-01

    Autophagy is inhibited by the insulin-amino acid-mTOR signaling pathway. Two papers in this issue of Cell Metabolism (Ebato et al., 2008; Jung et al., 2008) provide evidence that basal autophagy is necessary to maintain the architecture and function of pancreatic beta cells and that its induction in

  14. Zinc starvation induces autophagy in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamata, Tomoko; Horie, Tetsuro; Matsunami, Miou; Sasaki, Michiko; Ohsumi, Yoshinori

    2017-05-19

    Zinc is an essential nutrient for all forms of life. Within cells, most zinc is bound to protein. Because zinc serves as a catalytic or structural cofactor for many proteins, cells must maintain zinc homeostasis under severely zinc-deficient conditions. In yeast, the transcription factor Zap1 controls the expression of genes required for uptake and mobilization of zinc, but to date the fate of existing zinc-binding proteins under zinc starvation remains poorly understood. Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved cellular degradation/recycling process in which cytoplasmic proteins and organelles are sequestered for degradation in the vacuole/lysosome. In this study, we investigated how autophagy functions under zinc starvation. Zinc depletion induced non-selective autophagy, which is important for zinc-limited growth. Induction of autophagy by zinc starvation was not directly related to transcriptional activation of Zap1. Instead, TORC1 inactivation directed zinc starvation-induced autophagy. Abundant zinc proteins, such as Adh1, Fba1, and ribosomal protein Rpl37, were degraded in an autophagy-dependent manner. But the targets of autophagy were not restricted to zinc-binding proteins. When cellular zinc is severely depleted, this non-selective autophagy plays a role in releasing zinc from the degraded proteins and recycling zinc for other essential purposes. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Tumor Suppression and Promotion by Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yenniffer Ávalos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a highly regulated catabolic process that involves lysosomal degradation of proteins and organelles, mostly mitochondria, for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and reduction of metabolic stress. Problems in the execution of this process are linked to different pathological conditions, such as neurodegeneration, aging, and cancer. Many of the proteins that regulate autophagy are either oncogenes or tumor suppressor proteins. Specifically, tumor suppressor genes that negatively regulate mTOR, such as PTEN, AMPK, LKB1, and TSC1/2 stimulate autophagy while, conversely, oncogenes that activate mTOR, such as class I PI3K, Ras, Rheb, and AKT, inhibit autophagy, suggesting that autophagy is a tumor suppressor mechanism. Consistent with this hypothesis, the inhibition of autophagy promotes oxidative stress, genomic instability, and tumorigenesis. Nevertheless, autophagy also functions as a cytoprotective mechanism under stress conditions, including hypoxia and nutrient starvation, that promotes tumor growth and resistance to chemotherapy in established tumors. Here, in this brief review, we will focus the discussion on this ambiguous role of autophagy in the development and progression of cancer.

  16. A genetic screen for modifiers of Drosophila caspase Dcp-1 reveals caspase involvement in autophagy and novel caspase-related genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahnn Joohong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Caspases are cysteine proteases with essential functions in the apoptotic pathway; their proteolytic activity toward various substrates is associated with the morphological changes of cells. Recent reports have described non-apoptotic functions of caspases, including autophagy. In this report, we searched for novel modifiers of the phenotype of Dcp-1 gain-of-function (GF animals by screening promoter element- inserted Drosophila melanogaster lines (EP lines. Results We screened ~15,000 EP lines and identified 72 Dcp-1-interacting genes that were classified into 10 groups based on their functions and pathways: 4 apoptosis signaling genes, 10 autophagy genes, 5 insulin/IGF and TOR signaling pathway genes, 6 MAP kinase and JNK signaling pathway genes, 4 ecdysone signaling genes, 6 ubiquitination genes, 11 various developmental signaling genes, 12 transcription factors, 3 translation factors, and 11 other unclassified genes including 5 functionally undefined genes. Among them, insulin/IGF and TOR signaling pathway, MAP kinase and JNK signaling pathway, and ecdysone signaling are known to be involved in autophagy. Together with the identification of autophagy genes, the results of our screen suggest that autophagy counteracts Dcp-1-induced apoptosis. Consistent with this idea, we show that expression of eGFP-Atg5 rescued the eye phenotype caused by Dcp-1 GF. Paradoxically, we found that over-expression of full-length Dcp-1 induced autophagy, as Atg8b-GFP, an indicator of autophagy, was increased in the eye imaginal discs and in the S2 cell line. Taken together, these data suggest that autophagy suppresses Dcp-1-mediated apoptotic cell death, whereas Dcp-1 positively regulates autophagy, possibly through feedback regulation. Conclusions We identified a number of Dcp-1 modifiers that genetically interact with Dcp-1-induced cell death. Our results showing that Dcp-1 and autophagy-related genes influence each other will aid future

  17. Autophagy induction halts axonal degeneration in a mouse model of X-adrenoleukodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Launay, Nathalie; Aguado, Carmen; Fourcade, Stéphane; Ruiz, Montserrat; Grau, Laia; Riera, Jordi; Guilera, Cristina; Giròs, Marisa; Ferrer, Isidre; Knecht, Erwin; Pujol, Aurora

    2015-03-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a rare neurometabolic disease characterized by the accumulation of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) due to a loss of function of the peroxisomal transporter ABCD1. Here, using in vivo and in vitro models, we demonstrate that autophagic flux was impaired due to elevated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, which contributed to X-ALD pathogenesis. We also show that excess VLCFAs downregulated autophagy in human fibroblasts. Furthermore, mTOR inhibition by a rapamycin derivative (temsirolimus) restored autophagic flux and inhibited the axonal degenerative process as well as the associated locomotor impairment in the Abcd1 (-) /Abcd2 (-/-) mouse model. This process was mediated through the restoration of proteasome function and redox as well as metabolic homeostasis. These findings provide the first evidence that links impaired autophagy to X-ALD, which may yield a therapy based on autophagy activators for adrenomyeloneuropathy patients.

  18. The flavonoid luteolin enhances doxorubicin-induced autophagy in human osteosarcoma U2OS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baoliang; Yu, Xin; Xia, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Luteolin (LUT), a flavone, which is universally present as constituent of medicinal plants as well as some vegetables and spices, has been demonstrated display specific anti-carcinogenic effects. However, the mechanisms by which LUT inhibits human osteosarcoma growth remain unknown. The effects of LUT on cell growth in human osteosarcoma U2OS cells were measured by MTT assay and flowcytometry. The effects of LUT on morphological markers of autophagy in U2OS were analyzed by fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy. Autophagic markers, beclin1 and LC3 were detected by western blotting. Here, we found that LUT induced autophagy in U2OS and acted as an enhancer to sensitize doxorubicin (DOX)-mediated autophagy signaling. The combined treatment of LUT and DOX greatly decreases the growth of U2OS, showing synergistic cytotoxicity. Our results indicate that LUT in combination with DOX maybe a novel strategy for the treatment of human osteosarcoma.

  19. Contribution of autophagy to antiviral immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-Jurado, Emma; Riedel, Claudia A; González, Pablo A; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2015-11-14

    Although identified in the 1960's, interest in autophagy has significantly increased in the past decade with notable research efforts oriented at understanding as to how this multi-protein complex operates and is regulated. Autophagy is commonly defined as a "self-eating" process evolved by eukaryotic cells to recycle senescent organelles and expired proteins, which is significantly increased during cellular stress responses. In addition, autophagy can also play important roles during human diseases, such as cancer, neurodegenerative and autoimmune disorders. Furthermore, novel findings suggest that autophagy contributes to the host defense against microbial infections. In this article, we review the role of macroautophagy in antiviral immune responses and discuss molecular mechanisms evolved by viral pathogens to evade this process. A role for autophagy as an effector mechanism used both, by innate and adaptive immunity is also discussed. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Autophagy in endometriosis: Friend or foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Lei; Li, Jun; Wei, Bing

    2018-01-01

    Endometriosis is a chronic, estrogen-dependent disease and characterized by the implantation of endometrial glands and stroma deep and haphazardly into the outside the uterine cavity. It affects an estimated 10% of the female population of reproductive age and results in obvious reduction in health-related quality of life. Unfortunately, there is no a consistent theory for the etiology of endometriosis. Furthermore, the endometriosis is hard to diagnose in early stage and the treatment methods are limited. Importantly, emerging evidence has investigated that there is a close relationship between endometriosis and autophagy. However, autophagy is a friend or foe in endometriosis is puzzling, the precise mechanism underlying autophagy in endometriosis has not been fully elucidated yet. Here, we provide an integrated view on the acquired findings of the connections between endometriosis and autophagy. We also discuss which may contribute to the abnormal level of autophagy in endometriosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Autophagy Proteins in Phagocyte Endocytosis and Exocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Münz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy was initially described as a catabolic pathway that recycles nutrients of cytoplasmic constituents after lysosomal degradation during starvation. Since the immune system monitors products of lysosomal degradation via major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II restricted antigen presentation, autophagy was found to process intracellular antigens for display on MHC class II molecules. In recent years, however, it has become apparent that the molecular machinery of autophagy serves phagocytes in many more membrane trafficking pathways, thereby regulating immunity to infectious disease agents. In this minireview, we will summarize the recent evidence that autophagy proteins regulate phagocyte endocytosis and exocytosis for myeloid cell activation, pathogen replication, and MHC class I and II restricted antigen presentation. Selective stimulation and inhibition of the respective functional modules of the autophagy machinery might constitute valid therapeutic options in the discussed disease settings.

  2. Picornavirus Subversion of the Autophagy Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William T. Jackson

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available While autophagy has been shown to act as an anti-viral defense, the Picornaviridae avoid and, in many cases, subvert this pathway to promote their own replication. Evidence indicates that some picornaviruses hijack autophagy in order to induce autophagosome-like membrane structures for genomic RNA replication. Expression of picornavirus proteins can specifically induce the machinery of autophagy, although the mechanisms by which the viruses employ autophagy appear to differ. Many picornaviruses up-regulate autophagy in order to promote viral replication while some members of the family also inhibit degradation by autolysosomes. Here we explore the unusual relationship of this medically important family of viruses with a degradative mechanism of innate immunity.

  3. Picornavirus subversion of the autophagy pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Kathryn A; Jackson, William T

    2011-09-01

    While autophagy has been shown to act as an anti-viral defense, the Picornaviridae avoid and, in many cases, subvert this pathway to promote their own replication. Evidence indicates that some picornaviruses hijack autophagy in order to induce autophagosome-like membrane structures for genomic RNA replication. Expression of picornavirus proteins can specifically induce the machinery of autophagy, although the mechanisms by which the viruses employ autophagy appear to differ. Many picornaviruses up-regulate autophagy in order to promote viral replication while some members of the family also inhibit degradation by autolysosomes. Here we explore the unusual relationship of this medically important family of viruses with a degradative mechanism of innate immunity.

  4. Autophagy, apoptosis, vitamin D, and vitamin D receptor in hepatocellular carcinoma associated with hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Mohsen, Mohamed Ahmed; El-Braky, Ahlam Abd-Allah; Ghazal, Abeer Abd El-Rahim; Shamseya, Mohammed Mohammed

    2018-03-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the interplay between autophagy and apoptosis and to investigate the association between both of autophagy and apoptosis and vitamin D and its receptor in hepatitis C virus (HCV) viral infection and its implication in the progression into hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).A cross-sectional study where serum levels of microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3); marker of autophagy, caspase-3; marker of apoptosis, vitamin D3 and vitamin D receptor (VDR) were measured in healthy subjects as well as HCV and HCV-HCC patients using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique.Collectively, the liver profile revealed hepatic dysfunctions in HCV patients with or without HCC. A significant reduction in the serum concentration levels LC3 and caspase-3 were observed referring to the down regulation of autophagy and host-mediated apoptosis in HCV patients with or without HCC. Deficiency of vitamin D and decreased levels of its receptor were observed in HCV and HCV-HCC patients.The perturbation in vitamin D/VDR axis, which modulates both of autophagy and apoptosis in HCV infection, may point out to its involvement and implication in the pathogenesis of HCV infection and the development of HCV-related HCC. Therefore, supplementation with vitamin D may not be the only solution to restore the vital biological functions of vitamin D but VDR-targeted therapy may be of great importance in this respect.

  5. Phosphoethanolamine Modification of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Lipid A Reduces Autophagy Flux in Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susu M Zughaier

    Full Text Available Autophagy, an ancient homeostasis mechanism for macromolecule degradation, performs an important role in host defense by facilitating pathogen elimination. To counteract this host defense strategy, bacterial pathogens have evolved a variety of mechanisms to avoid or otherwise dysregulate autophagy by phagocytic cells so as to enhance their survival during infection. Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a strictly human pathogen that causes the sexually transmitted infection, gonorrhea. Phosphoethanolamine (PEA addition to the 4' position of the lipid A (PEA-lipid A moiety of the lipooligosaccharide (LOS produced by gonococci performs a critical role in this pathogen's ability to evade innate defenses by conferring decreased susceptibility to cationic antimicrobial (or host-defense peptides, complement-mediated killing by human serum and intraleukocytic killing by human neutrophils compared to strains lacking this PEA decoration. Heretofore, however, it was not known if gonococci can evade autophagy and if so, whether PEA-lipid A contributes to this ability. Accordingly, by using murine macrophages and human macrophage-like phagocytic cell lines we investigated if PEA decoration of gonococcal lipid A modulates autophagy formation. We report that infection with PEA-lipid A-producing gonococci significantly reduced autophagy flux in murine and human macrophages and enhanced gonococcal survival during their association with macrophages compared to a PEA-deficient lipid A mutant. Our results provide further evidence that PEA-lipid A produced by gonococci is a critical component in the ability of this human pathogen to evade host defenses.

  6. Regulation of Autophagy by High Glucose in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Yao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autophagy is a self-degradative process that is important for balancing sources of energy at critical times in development and in response to nutrient stress. Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE works as the outer blood retina barrier and is vulnerable to energy stress-induced injury. However, the effect of high glucose treatment on autophagy is still unclear in RPE. Methods: Transmission electron microscopy was used to detect the generation of autophagosome. Small interfering RNA (siRNA and MTT was used to determine the effect of autophagy on cell viability. Western blots and immunohistochemistry were used to detect the expression pattern of autophagic markers, including LC3 and p62. Results: High glucose treatment results in a significant increase in the generation of autophagosome and altered expression of LC3 and p62. High glucose-induced autophagy is independent of mTOR signaling, but is mainly regulated via ROS-mediated ER stress signaling. Conclusion: In the scenario of high glucose-induced oxidative stress, autophagy may be required for the removal of damaged proteins, and provide a default mechanism to prevent high glucose-induced injury in RPE.

  7. Andrographolide radiosensitizes human ovarian cancer SKOV3 xenografts due to an enhanced apoptosis and autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Qiu, Xingsheng

    2015-11-01

    Andrographolide (AND), a diterpenoid lactone isolated from Andrographis paniculata, has been shown to have radiosensitivity in several types of cancer. Whether AND can radiosensitize ovarian cancer remains unknown. The present study investigated the radiosensitizing effects of AND in human ovarian SKOV3 xenografts and examined the molecular mechanisms of AND-mediated radiosensitization. Nude mice bearing human ovarian SKOV3 were treated with AND to investigate the effects of drug administration on tumor growth, radiosensitivity, apoptosis, and autophagy. Subsequent Western blot analysis and monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining (autophagy analysis) were used to determine the role of AND. Finally, the pathway of apoptosis was characterized by caspase-3 activity assay as well as TUNEL analysis. AND potently sensitized SKOV3 xenografts to radiation. Moreover, apoptosis and autophagy in radiation combined with drug-treated xenografts increased significantly compared with the simple drug or single radiation treatment. This result was associated with an increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 protein ratio and p-p53 expression after exposure to combination treatment. Meanwhile, the level of Beclin 1 and Atg5 and the conversion from LC3-I to LC3-II, three important proteins involved in autophagy, were increased. AND acts as a strong radiosensitizer in human ovarian SKOV3 xenografts in vivo by increasing the Bax/Bcl-2 protein ratio and promoting the activation of caspase-3, leading to enhanced apoptosis as well as autophagy.

  8. EVA1A inhibits GBM cell proliferation by inducing autophagy and apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Xue; Kan, Shifeng; Liu, Zhen [Department of Cell Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100191 (China); Lu, Guang [Department of Cell Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100191 (China); Department of Physiology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117597 (Singapore); Zhang, Xiaoyan [Department of Cell Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100191 (China); Chen, Yingyu [Department of Immunology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100191 (China); Peking University Center for Human Disease Genomics, Beijing 100191 (China); Bai, Yun, E-mail: baiyun@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Cell Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2017-03-01

    Eva-1 homolog A (EVA1A) is a novel lysosome and endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein involved in autophagy and apoptosis. In this study, we constructed a recombinant adenovirus 5-EVA1A vector (Ad5-EVA1A) to overexpress EVA1A in glioblastoma (GBM) cell lines and evaluated its anti-tumor activities in vitro and in vivo. We found that overexpression of EVA1A in three GBM cell lines (U251, U87 and SHG44) resulted in a suppression of tumor cell growth via activation of autophagy and induction of cell apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. EVA1A-mediated autophagy was associated with inactivation of the mTOR/RPS6KB1 signaling pathway. Furthermore in vivo, overexpression of EVA1A successfully inhibited tumor growth in NOD/SCID mice. Our data suggest that EVA1A-induced autophagy and apoptosis play a role in suppressing the development of GBM and their up-regulation may be an effective method for treating this form of cancer. - Highlights: • Overexpression of EVA1A suppresses GBM cell growth. • EVA1A induces autophagy through the mTOR/RPS6KB1 pathway. • EVA1A induces GBM cell apoptosis. • EVA1A inhibits the development of GBM in vivo.

  9. Beclin1-induced autophagy abrogates radioresistance of lung cancer cells by suppressing osteopontin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Seung-Hee; Minai-Tehrani, Arash; Shin, Ji-Young

    2012-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) serves as an indicator of resistance to radiotherapy. However, the role of OPN in the development of acquired radioresistance in human lung cancer cells has not yet been fully elucidated. Therefore, the potential importance of OPN as a marker of lung cancer with a potential significant role in the development of radioresistance against repeated radiotherapy has prompted us to define the pathways by which OPN regulates lung cancer cell growth. In addition, autophagy has been reported to play a key role in the radiosensitization of cancer cells. Here, we report that increased OPN expression through induction of nuclear p53 following irradiation was inhibited by exogenous beclin-1 (BECN1). Our results clearly show that BECN1 gene expression led to induction of autophagy and inhibition of cancer cell growth and angiogenesis. Our results suggest that the induction of autophagy abrogated the radioresistance of the cancer cells. Interestingly, we showed that knockdown of OPN by lentivirus-mediated shRNA induced the autophagy of human lung cancer cell. Taken together, these results suggest that OPN and BECN1 can be molecular targets for overcoming radioresistance by controlling autophagy. (author)

  10. Hypercholesterolemia downregulates autophagy in the rat heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giricz, Zoltán; Koncsos, Gábor; Rajtík, Tomáš; Varga, Zoltán V; Baranyai, Tamás; Csonka, Csaba; Szobi, Adrián; Adameová, Adriana; Gottlieb, Roberta A; Ferdinandy, Péter

    2017-03-23

    We have previously shown that efficiency of ischemic conditioning is diminished in hypercholesterolemia and that autophagy is necessary for cardioprotection. However, it is unknown whether isolated hypercholesterolemia disturbs autophagy or the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways. Therefore, we investigated whether isolated hypercholesterolemia modulates cardiac autophagy-related pathways or programmed cell death mechanisms such as apoptosis and necroptosis in rat heart. Male Wistar rats were fed either normal chow (NORM; n = 9) or with 2% cholesterol and 0.25% cholic acid-enriched diet (CHOL; n = 9) for 12 weeks. CHOL rats exhibited a 41% increase in plasma total cholesterol level over that of NORM rats (4.09 mmol/L vs. 2.89 mmol/L) at the end of diet period. Animals were sacrificed, hearts were excised and briefly washed out. Left ventricles were snap-frozen for determination of markers of autophagy, mTOR pathway, apoptosis, and necroptosis by Western blot. Isolated hypercholesterolemia was associated with a significant reduction in expression of cardiac autophagy markers such as LC3-II, Beclin-1, Rubicon and RAB7 as compared to controls. Phosphorylation of ribosomal S6, a surrogate marker for mTOR activity, was increased in CHOL samples. Cleaved caspase-3, a marker of apoptosis, increased in CHOL hearts, while no difference in the expression of necroptotic marker RIP1, RIP3 and MLKL was detected between treatments. This is the first comprehensive analysis of autophagy and programmed cell death pathways of apoptosis and necroptosis in hearts of hypercholesterolemic rats. Our data show that isolated hypercholesterolemia suppresses basal cardiac autophagy and that the decrease in autophagy may be a result of an activated mTOR pathway. Reduced autophagy was accompanied by increased apoptosis, while cardiac necroptosis was not modulated by isolated hypercholesterolemia. Decreased basal autophagy and elevated apoptosis may be responsible for the

  11. WNK1 is an unexpected autophagy inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallolu Kankanamalage, Sachith; Lee, A-Young; Wichaidit, Chonlarat; Lorente-Rodriguez, Andres; Shah, Akansha M.; Stippec, Steve; Whitehurst, Angelique W.; Cobb, Melanie H.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autophagy is a cellular degradation pathway that is essential to maintain cellular physiology, and deregulation of autophagy leads to multiple diseases in humans. In a recent study, we discovered that the protein kinase WNK1 (WNK lysine deficient protein kinase 1) is an inhibitor of autophagy. The loss of WNK1 increases both basal and starvation-induced autophagy. In addition, the depletion of WNK1 increases the activation of the class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdIns3K) complex, which is required to induce autophagy. Moreover, the loss of WNK1 increases the expression of ULK1 (unc-51 like kinase 1), which is upstream of the PtdIns3K complex. It also increases the pro-autophagic phosphorylation of ULK1 at Ser555 and the activation of AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase), which is responsible for that phosphorylation. The inhibition of AMPK by compound C decreases the magnitude of autophagy induction following WNK1 loss; however, it does not prevent autophagy induction. We found that the UVRAG (UV radiation resistance associated gene), which is a component of the PtdIns3K, binds to the N-terminal region of WNK1. Moreover, WNK1 partially colocalizes with UVRAG and this colocalization decreases when autophagy is stimulated in cells. The loss of WNK1 also alters the cellular distribution of UVRAG. The depletion of the downstream target of WNK1, OXSR1/OSR1 (oxidative-stress responsive 1) has no effect on autophagy, whereas the depletion of its relative STK39/SPAK (serine/threonine kinase 39) induces autophagy under nutrient-rich and starved conditions. PMID:28282258

  12. Inhibition of autophagy overcomes the nanotoxicity elicited by cadmium-based quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jiajun; Sun, Yun; Wang, Shaofei; Li, Yubin; Zeng, Xian; Cao, Zhonglian; Yang, Ping; Song, Ping; Wang, Ziyu; Xian, Zongshu; Gao, Hongjian; Chen, Qicheng; Cui, Daxiang; Ju, Dianwen

    2016-02-01

    Cadmium-based quantum dots (QDs) have shown their values in disease diagnosis, cellular and molecular tracking, small-animal imaging, and therapeutic drug delivery. However, the potential safety problems of QDs, mainly due to their nanotoxicities by unclear mechanisms, have greatly limited its applications. To reverse this situation, we investigated the underlying biological mechanisms of the toxicity of Quantum Dots CdTe/CdS 655 (QDs 655) in this work. QDs 655 was found to elicit nanotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. During the process, autophagy was activated, which was characterized by three main stages of autophagic flux including formation of autophagosomes, lysosomes fused with autophagosomes, and degradation of autophagosomes by lysosomes. Furthermore, the autophagic cell death was demonstrated in vitro under QDs 655 treatment while inhibition of autophagy by pharmacological inhibitors or genetic approaches could attenuate the toxicity induced by QDs 655 in vitro and in vivo. These results indicated that autophagic flux and autophagic cell death were triggered by QDs 655, which elucidated the critical role of autophagy in QDs 655 induced toxicity. Our data may suggest the approach to overcome the toxicity of QDs and other nanoparticles by autophagy inhibition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Pharmacological reversal of endothelin-1 mediated constriction of the spiral modiolar artery: a potential new treatment for sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold Wolfgang

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vasospasm of the spiral modiolar artery (SMA may cause ischemic stroke of the inner ear. Endothelin-1 (ET-1 induces a strong, long-lasting constriction of the SMA by increasing contractile apparatus Ca2+ sensitivity via Rho-kinase. We therefore tested several Rho-kinase inhibitors and a cell-permeable analogue of cAMP (dbcAMP for their ability to reverse ET-1-induced constriction and Ca2+-sensitization. Methods The present study employed SMA isolated from gerbil temporal bones. Ca2+sensitivity was evaluated by correlating vascular diameter and smooth muscle cell [Ca2+]i, measured by fluo-4-microfluorometry and videomicroscopy. Results The Rho-kinase inhibitors Y-27632, fasudil, and hydroxy-fasudil reversed ET-1-induced vasoconstriction with an IC50 of 3, 15, and 111 μmol/L, respectively. DbcAMP stimulated a dose-dependent vasodilation (Ec50 = 1 mmol/L and a reduction of [Ca2+]i (EC50 = 0.3 μmol/L of ET-1-preconstricted vessels (1 nmol/L. Fasudil and dbcAMP both reversed the ET-1-induced increase in Ca2+ sensitivity. Conclusion Rho-kinase inhibition and dbcAMP reversed ET-1-induced vasoconstriction and Ca2+-sensitization. Therefore, Rho-kinase inhibitors or cAMP modulators could possess promise as pharmacological tools for the treatment of ET-1-induced constriction, ischemic stroke and sudden hearing loss.

  14. Autophagy and apoptosis in planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Estévez, Cristina; Saló, Emili

    2010-03-01

    Adult planarians are capable of undergoing regeneration and body remodelling in order to adapt to physical damage or extreme environmental conditions. Moreover, most planarians can tolerate long periods of starvation and during this time, they shrink from an adult size to, and sometimes beyond, the initial size at hatching. Indeed, these properties have made them a classic model to study stem cells and regeneration. Under such stressful conditions, food reserves from the gastrodermis and parenchyma are first used up and later the testes, copulatory organs and ovaries are digested. More surprisingly, when food is again made available to shrunken individuals, they grow back to adult size and all their reproductive structures reappear. These cycles of growth and shrinkage may occur over long periods without any apparent impairment to the individual, or to its future maturation and breeding capacities. This plasticity resides in a mesoderm tissue known as the parenchyma, which is formed by several differentiated non-proliferating cell types and only one mitotically active cell type, the neoblasts, which represent approximately 20-30% of the cells in the parenchyma. Neoblasts are generally thought to be somatic stem-cells that participate in the normal continuous turnover of all cell types in planarians. Hence, planarians are organisms that continuously adapt their bodies (morphallaxis) to different environmental stresses (i.e.: injury or starvation). This adaptation involves a variety of processes including proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and autophagy, all of which are perfectly orchestrated and tightly regulated to remodel or restore the body pattern. While neoblast biology and body re-patterning are currently the subject of intense research, apoptosis and autophagy remain much less studied. In this review we will summarize our current understanding and hypotheses regarding where and when apoptosis and autophagy occur and fulfil an essential role in

  15. Breviscapine confers a neuroprotective efficacy against transient focal cerebral ischemia by attenuating neuronal and astrocytic autophagy in the penumbra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pengyue, Zhang; Tao, Guo; Hongyun, He; Liqiang, Yang; Yihao, Deng

    2017-06-01

    Breviscapine is a flavonoid derived from a traditional Chinese herb Erigerin breviscapus (Vant.) Hand-Mazz, and has been extensively used in clinical treatment for cerebral stroke in China, but the underlying pharmacological mechanisms are still unclear. In present study, we investigated whether breviscapine could confer a neuroprotection against cerebral ischemia injury by targeting autophagy mechanisms. A cerebral stroke model in Sprague-Dawley rats was prepared by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), rats were then randomly divided into 5 groups: MCAO+Bre group, rats were treated with breviscapine; MCAO+Tat-Beclin-1 group, animals were administrated with specific autophagy inducer Tat-Beclin-1; MCAO+Bre+Tat-Beclin-1 group, rats were treated with both breviscapine and Tat-Beclin-1, MCAO+saline group, rats received the same volume of physiological saline, and Sham surgery group. The autophagy levels in infarct penumbra were evaluated by western blotting, real-time PCR and immunofluorescence 7days after the insult. Meanwhile, infarct volume, brain water content and neurological deficit score were assessed. The results illustrated that the infarct volume, brain water content and neurofunctional deficiency were significantly reduced by 7days of breviscapine treatment in MCAO+Bre group, compared with those in MCAO+saline group. Meanwhile, the western blotting, quantitative PCR and immunofluorescence showed that the autophagy in both neurons and astrocytes at the penumbra were markedly attenuated by breviscapine admininstration. Moreover, these pharmacological effects of breviscapine could be counteracted by autophagy inducer Tat-Beclin-1. Our study suggests that breviscapine can provide a neuroprotection against transient focal cerebral ischemia, and this biological function is associated with attenuating autophagy in both neurons and astrocytes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Not all autophagy is equal

    OpenAIRE

    Czyzyk-Krzeska, Maria F.; Meller, Jarek; Plas, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is an important mechanism in cancer cell survival and tumor growth and plays both pro- and anti-oncogenic roles. However, the biochemical basis for these diverse functions is not well understood. Our work provides new evidence for the existence of two separate autophagic programs regulated in an opposite manner by the von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor (VHL). These programs, marked by differential requirements for LC3B vs. LC3C, play tumor-promoting and tumor-suppressing roles in re...

  17. Autophagy in human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thien Tra

    Full Text Available Autophagy (macroautophagy is a degradative process that involves the sequestration of cytosolic material including organelles into double membrane vesicles termed autophagosomes for delivery to the lysosome. Autophagy is essential for preimplantation development of mouse embryos and cavitation of embryoid bodies. The precise roles of autophagy during early human embryonic development, remain however largely uncharacterized. Since human embryonic stem cells constitute a unique model system to study early human embryogenesis we investigated the occurrence of autophagy in human embryonic stem cells. We have, using lentiviral transduction, established multiple human embryonic stem cell lines that stably express GFP-LC3, a fluorescent marker for the autophagosome. Each cell line displays both a normal karyotype and pluripotency as indicated by the presence of cell types representative of the three germlayers in derived teratomas. GFP expression and labelling of autophagosomes is retained after differentiation. Baseline levels of autophagy detected in cultured undifferentiated hESC were increased or decreased in the presence of rapamycin and wortmannin, respectively. Interestingly, autophagy was upregulated in hESCs induced to undergo differentiation by treatment with type I TGF-beta receptor inhibitor SB431542 or removal of MEF secreted maintenance factors. In conclusion we have established hESCs capable of reporting macroautophagy and identify a novel link between autophagy and early differentiation events in hESC.

  18. Autophagy in lung disease pathogenesis and therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan W. Ryter

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy, a cellular pathway for the degradation of damaged organelles and proteins, has gained increasing importance in human pulmonary diseases, both as a modulator of pathogenesis and as a potential therapeutic target. In this pathway, cytosolic cargos are sequestered into autophagosomes, which are delivered to the lysosomes where they are enzymatically degraded and then recycled as metabolic precursors. Autophagy exerts an important effector function in the regulation of inflammation, and immune system functions. Selective pathways for autophagic degradation of cargoes may have variable significance in disease pathogenesis. Among these, the autophagic clearance of bacteria (xenophagy may represent a crucial host defense mechanism in the pathogenesis of sepsis and inflammatory diseases. Our recent studies indicate that the autophagic clearance of mitochondria, a potentially protective program, may aggravate the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by activating cell death programs. We report similar findings with respect to the autophagic clearance of cilia components, which can contribute to airways dysfunction in chronic lung disease. In certain diseases such as pulmonary hypertension, autophagy may confer protection by modulating proliferation and cell death. In other disorders, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and cystic fibrosis, impaired autophagy may contribute to pathogenesis. In lung cancer, autophagy has multiple consequences by limiting carcinogenesis, modulating therapeutic effectiveness, and promoting tumor cell survival. In this review we highlight the multiple functions of autophagy and its selective autophagy subtypes that may be of significance to the pathogenesis of human disease, with an emphasis on lung disease and therapeutics.

  19. Autophagy in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and HIV infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucile eEspert

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb are among the most lethal human pathogens worldwide, each being responsible for around 1.5 million deaths annually. Moreover, synergy between acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS and tuberculosis (TB has turned HIV/M.tb co-infection into a major public health threat in developing countries. In the past decade, autophagy, a lysosomal catabolic process, has emerged as a major host immune defense mechanism against infectious agents like M.tb and HIV. Nevertheless, in some instances, autophagy machinery appears to be instrumental for HIV infection. Finally, there is mounting evidence that both pathogens deploy various countermeasures to thwart autophagy. This mini-review proposes an overview of the roles and regulations of autophagy in HIV and M.tb infections with an emphasis on microbial factors. We also discuss the role of autophagy manipulation in the context of HIV/M.tb co-infection. In future, a comprehensive understanding of autophagy interaction with these pathogens will be critical for development of autophagy-based prophylactic and therapeutic interventions for AIDS and TB.

  20. Autophagy and BNIP3 protein in tumorogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina Świderek

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a process necessary for maintaining cell homeostasis in physiological conditions, as well as during certain stresses like nutrients or oxygen deprivation. Autophagy also plays an essential role in tumorigenesis. It prevents cell transformation, but on the other hand, autophagy enables existing cancer cells to adapt to harmful conditions and increased glucose demand, supports maintaining of cellular metabolism and accelerates tumor growth. Among others, it refers to Ras-transformed cells. Recent research unveiled BNIP3 protein as one of the key players involved in autophagy. Although BNIP3 is classified as proapoptotic member of BH3-only subfamily, its proapoptotic activity is questionable. However, BNIP3 demonstrates ability to induce or stimulate autophagy and its specific variant – mitophagy. This paper aims to summarize the existing body of knowledge related to the role of BNIP3 in autophagy, as well as the importance of this process in tumorigenesis. In particular, we emphasize the relation between autophagy and BNIP3 expression induced by Ras oncogene.

  1. Autophagy Interplay with Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Regulation in the Growth Inhibiting Effect of Resveratrol in Glioma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippi-Chiela, Eduardo C.; Villodre, Emilly Schlee; Zamin, Lauren L.; Lenz, Guido

    2011-01-01

    Prognosis of patients with glioblastoma (GBM) remains very poor, thus making the development of new drugs urgent. Resveratrol (Rsv) is a natural compound that has several beneficial effects such as neuroprotection and cytotoxicity for several GBM cell lines. Here we evaluated the mechanism of action of Rsv on human GBM cell lines, focusing on the role of autophagy and its crosstalk with apoptosis and cell cycle control. We further evaluated the role of autophagy and the effect of Rsv on GBM Cancer Stem Cells (gCSCs), involved in GBM resistance and recurrence. Glioma cells treated with Rsv was tested for autophagy, apoptosis, necrosis, cell cycle and phosphorylation or expression levels of key players of these processes. Rsv induced the formation of autophagosomes in three human GBM cell lines, accompanied by an upregulation of autophagy proteins Atg5, beclin-1 and LC3-II. Inhibition of Rsv-induced autophagy triggered apoptosis, with an increase in Bax and cleavage of caspase-3. While inhibition of apoptosis or autophagy alone did not revert Rsv-induced toxicity, inhibition of both processes blocked this toxicity. Rsv also induced a S-G2/M phase arrest, accompanied by an increase on levels of pCdc2(Y15), cyclin A, E and B, and pRb (S807/811) and a decrease of cyclin D1. Interestingly, this arrest was dependent on the induction of autophagy, since inhibition of Rsv-induced autophagy abolishes cell cycle arrest and returns the phosphorylation of Cdc2(Y15) and Rb(S807/811), and levels of cyclin A, and B to control levels. Finally, inhibition of autophagy or treatment with Rsv decreased the sphere formation and the percentage of CD133 and OCT4-positive cells, markers of gCSCs. In conclusion, the crosstalk among autophagy, cell cycle and apoptosis, together with the biology of gCSCs, has to be considered in tailoring pharmacological interventions aimed to reduce glioma growth using compounds with multiple targets such as Rsv. PMID:21695150

  2. MicroRNA-106a targets autophagy and enhances sensitivity of lung cancer cells to Src inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Sacha I; Gautschi, Oliver; Batliner, Jasmin; Gugger, Mathias; Fey, Martin F; Tschan, Mario P

    2017-05-01

    Src tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) significantly inhibit cell migration and invasion in lung cancer cell lines with minor cytotoxic effects. In clinical trials, however, they show modest activity in combination with chemotherapeutic agents. Possible resistance mechanisms include the induction of cytoprotective autophagy upon Src inhibition. Autophagy is a cellular recycling process that allows cell survival in response to a variety of stress stimuli including responses to various treatments. We screened autophagic activity in A549, H460, and H1299 NSCLC cell lines treated with two different Src-TKIs (saracatinib, dasatinib) or shRNA targeting SRC. The autophagy response was determined by LC3B-I to -II conversion, increased ULK1 epxression and increased GFP-LC3B dot formation. Autophagy was inhibited by pharmacological (bafilomycin A, chloroquine) or genetic (ULK1 shRNA) means. Expression of miR-106a and miR-20b was analyzed by qPCR, and we used different lentivral vectors for ectopic expression of either miR-106a mimetics, anti-sense miR-106a or different miR-106a-363 cluster constructs. In the current study we found that Src-TKIs induce autophagy in lung adenocarcinoma cell lines and that a combination of autophagy and Src tyrosine kinase inhibition results in cell death. Moreover, Src-TKI induced autophagy depends on the induction of the key autophagy kinase ULK1. This ULK1 upregulation is caused by downregulation of the ULK1-targeting microRNA-106a. An inverse correlation of miR-106a and ULK1 expression was seen in lung adenocarcinoma. Accordingly, ectopic expression of miR-106a in combination with Src-TKI treatment resulted in significant cell death as compared to control transduced cells. Autophagy protects lung adenocarcinoma cells from Src-TKIs via a newly identified miR-106a-ULK1 signaling pathway. The combined inhibition of Src and ULK1/autophagy might represent a promising treatment option for future clinical trials. Lastly, our data might challenge

  3. Endocytosis of AtRGS1 Is Regulated by the Autophagy Pathway after D-Glucose Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanquan Yan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Sugar, as a signal molecule, has significant functions in signal transduction in which the seven-transmembrane regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS1 protein participates. D-Glucose causes endocytosis of the AtRGS1, leading to the physical uncoupling of AtRGS1 from AtGPA1 and thus a release of the GAP activity and concomitant sustained activation of G-protein signaling. Autophagy involves in massive degradation and recycling of cytoplasmic components to survive environmental stresses. The function of autophagy in AtRGS1 endocytosis during D-glucose stimulation has not been elucidated. In this study, we investigate the relationship between autophagy and AtRGS1 in response to D-glucose. Our findings demonstrated that AtRGS1 mediated the activation of autophagy by affecting the activities of the five functional groups of protein complexes and promoted the formation of autophagosomes under D-glucose application. When the autophagy pathway was interrupted, AtRGS1 recovery increased and endocytosis of ATRGS1 was inhibited, indicating that autophagy pathway plays an important role in regulating the endocytosis and recovery of AtRGS1 after D-glucose stimulation.

  4. Mouse Sirt3 promotes autophagy in AngII-induced myocardial hypertrophy through the deacetylation of FoxO1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingyuan; Chen, Tongshuai; Xiao, Ming; Li, Na; Wang, Shujian; Su, Hongyan; Guo, Xiaobin; Liu, Hui; Yan, Fangying; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Yun; Bu, Peili

    2016-12-27

    Sirt3, a mitochondrial NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase, is the only member proven to promote longevity in mammalian Sirtuin family. The processed short form of Sirt3 has been demonstrated to target many mediators of energy metabolism and mitochondrial stress adaptive program. Autophagy serves as a dynamic recycling mechanism and provides energy or metabolic substrates. Among the mechanisms triggered by cardiac stress, opinions vary as to whether autophagy is a protective or detrimental response. Here, by inducing the Sirt3-knockout mice to myocardial hypertrophy with chronic angiotensin II infusion for four weeks, we determined the role of Sirt3 in myocardial hypertrophy and autophagy. In this study, the Sirt3-knockout mice developed deteriorated cardiac function and impaired autophagy compared to wild-type mice. What's more, the overexpression of Sirt3 by lentivirus transfection attenuated cardiomyocytes hypertrophy by promoting autophagy. We further demonstrated that Sirt3 could bind to FoxO1 and activate its deacetylation. Sequentially, deacetylated FoxO1 translocates to the nucleus where it facilitates downstream E3 ubiquitin ligases such as Muscle RING Finger 1 (MuRF1) and muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx, Atrogin1). Altogether, these results revealed that Sirt3 activation is essential to improve autophagy flux by reducing the acetylation modification on FoxO1, which in turn alleviates myocardial hypertrophy.

  5. Autophagy is involved in anti-viral activity of pentagalloylglucose (PGG) against Herpes simplex virus type 1 infection in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Ying, E-mail: peiying-19802@163.com [Biomedicine Research and Development Center of Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510632 (China); Chen, Zhen-Ping, E-mail: 530670663@qq.com [Biomedicine Research and Development Center of Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510632 (China); Ju, Huai-Qiang, E-mail: 344464448@qq.com [Biomedicine Research and Development Center of Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510632 (China); Komatsu, Masaaki, E-mail: komatsu-ms@igakuken.or.jp [Laboratory of Frontier Science, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8613 (Japan); Ji, Yu-hua, E-mail: tjyh@jnu.edu.cn [Institute of Tissue Transplantation and Immunology, College of Life Science and Technology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Liu, Ge, E-mail: lggege_15@hotmail.com [Division of Molecular Pharmacology of Infectious agents, Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan); Guo, Chao-wan, E-mail: chaovan_kwok@hotmail.com [Division of Molecular Pharmacology of Infectious agents, Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan); Zhang, Ying-Jun, E-mail: zhangyj@mail.kib.ac.cn [Kunming Institute of Botany, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yunnan, Kunming 650204 (China); Yang, Chong-Ren, E-mail: cryang@mail.kib.ac.cn [Kunming Institute of Botany, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yunnan, Kunming 650204 (China); Wang, Yi-Fei, E-mail: twang-yf@163.com [Biomedicine Research and Development Center of Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510632 (China); Kitazato, Kaio, E-mail: kkholi@msn.com [Division of Molecular Pharmacology of Infectious agents, Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan)

    2011-02-11

    Research highlights: {yields} We showed PGG has anti-viral activity against Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and can induce autophgy. {yields} Autophagy may be a novel and important mechanism mediating PGG anti-viral activities. {yields} Inhibition of mTOR pathway is an important mechanism of induction of autophagy by PGG. -- Abstract: Pentagalloylglucose (PGG) is a natural polyphenolic compound with broad-spectrum anti-viral activity, however, the mechanisms underlying anti-viral activity remain undefined. In this study, we investigated the effects of PGG on anti-viral activity against Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) associated with autophagy. We found that the PGG anti-HSV-1 activity was impaired significantly in MEF-atg7{sup -/-} cells (autophagy-defective cells) derived from an atg7{sup -/-} knockout mouse. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that PGG-induced autophagosomes engulfed HSV-1 virions. The mTOR signaling pathway, an essential pathway for the regulation of autophagy, was found to be suppressed following PGG treatment. Data presented in this report demonstrated for the first time that autophagy induced following PGG treatment contributed to its anti-HSV activity in vitro.

  6. Autophagy. A strategy for cell survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica A. Costas

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a process of recycling parts of the cell. As described in this review, it occurs naturally in order to preserve cells from the accumulation of toxins, damaged molecules and organelles, and to allow processes of tissue development and differentiation. In the course of autophagy, the processing of the substrates to be recycled generates ATP, thus providing an alternative source of energy in stress situations. In this sense, under hostile conditions such as hypoxia or lack of nutrients, the autophagy process can be exacerbated leading to cell death. Some alterations in its functioning may involve the development of various pathologies, including liver damage, cancer and neurodegenerative diseases

  7. The dual role of autophagy under hypoxia-involvement of interaction between autophagy and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengmeng; Tan, Jin; Miao, Yuyang; Lei, Ping; Zhang, Qiang

    2015-06-01

    Hypoxia is one of severe cellular stress and it is well known to be associated with a worse outcome since a lack of oxygen accelerates the induction of apoptosis. Autophagy, an important and evolutionarily conserved mechanism for maintaining cellular homeostasis, is closely related to the apoptosis caused by hypoxia. Generally autophagy blocks the induction of apoptosis and inhibits the activation of apoptosis-associated caspase which could reduce cellular injury. However, in special cases, autophagy or autophagy-relevant proteins may help to induce apoptosis, which could aggravate cell damage under hypoxia condition. In addition, the activation of apoptosis-related proteins-caspase can also degrade autophagy-related proteins, such as Atg3, Atg4, Beclin1 protein, inhibiting autophagy. Although the relationship between autophagy and apoptosis has been known for rather complex for more than a decade, the underlying regulatory mechanisms have not been clearly understood. This short review discusses and summarizes the dual role of autophagy and the interaction and molecular regulatory mechanisms between autophagy and apoptosis under hypoxia.

  8. Appropriate modulation of autophagy sensitizes malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor cells to treatment with imatinib mesylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Munehiro; Sakata, Naoki; Ueda, Satoshi; Takemura, Tsukasa

    2014-04-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST), very rare in childhood, is a highly aggressive soft-tissue tumor. We experienced a case of a 7-year-old boy with MPNST who was treated with imatinib mesylate (imatinib) after the identification of platelet-derived growth factor receptor expression in his tumor. We were unable to observe clinical benefits of imatinib in this patient. Therefore, cellular reactions of imatinib were investigated in vitro using 3 MPNST cell lines. Imatinib induced cytotoxicity in vitro with variable IC50 values (11.7 to >30 μM). Induction of apoptosis was not a pivotal mechanism in the inhibitory effects. We found that the treatment of MPNST cell lines with imatinib induced autophagy. Suppression of the initiation of autophagy by 3-methyladenine or small interfering RNA (siRNA) against beclin-1 attenuated the imatinib-mediated cytotoxicity. In contrast, blocking the formation of autophagosomes or the development of autolysosomes using siRNA against microtubule-associated protein light chain 3B, bafilomycin A1, chloroquine, or an MEK1/2 inhibitor (U0126) enhanced the imatinib-induced cytotoxicity in MPNST cells. Our data showed that the imatinib-mediated autophagy can function as a cytotoxic mechanism and that appropriate modulation of autophagy may sensitize MPNST cells to imatinib, which in turn may be a novel therapeutic strategy for MPNST.

  9. Simvastatin alleviates airway inflammation and remodelling through up-regulation of autophagy in mouse models of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wen; Cui, Rong; Ding, Tao; Li, Xiaoming; Peng, Juan; Xu, Weiguo; Han, Fengfeng; Guo, Xuejun

    2017-04-01

    Statins have been widely used in inflammatory diseases including asthma, because of their anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties. It has been shown that simvastatin induces autophagy and cell death in some circumstances. However, the possible cross-talk between simvastatin and autophagic processes in lung disease is largely unknown. Thus, we investigated the impact of simvastatin on airway inflammation and airway remodelling and the possible relationship of these processes to a simvastatin-induced autophagic pathway in mouse models of asthma. Ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized and challenged mice were treated with simvastatin and sacrificed. The autophagy-related proteins Atg5, LC3B and Beclin1 were quantified, as well as the autophagy flux in bronchial smooth muscle cells (BSMCs). The relationship between airway inflammation and the autophagic process was investigated. We show that simvastatin treatment mediates activation of autophagy in BSMCs, which is correlated with airway inflammation and airway remodelling in mouse models of asthma. Simvastatin increases autophagy-related protein Atg5, LC3B and Beclin1 expression and autophagosome formation in lung tissue. Simvastatin-induced autophagy is associated with increased interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and decreased IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 cytokines production in BSMCs, as well as reversed extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition. In contrast, autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) eliminates the therapeutic effect of simvastatin. These findings demonstrate that simvastatin inhibits airway inflammation and airway remodelling through an activated autophagic process in BSMCs. We propose a crucial function of autophagy in statin-based therapeutic approaches in asthma. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  10. AMPK activation restores ischemic post‑conditioning cardioprotection in STZ‑induced type 1 diabetic rats: Role of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bin; Leng, Yan; Lei, Shao-Qing; Xia, Zhong-Yuan

    2017-09-01

    Although the mechanism remains unclear, ischemic post‑conditioning (IPO) is a promising approach to combat myocardial ischemia reperfusion (IR) injury; however, it has been proven ineffective in diabetes. The present study aimed to identify whether hyperglycemia‑induced AMP‑activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibition contributes to the ineffectiveness of IPO via autophagy attenuation in diabetic hearts. Diabetic and non‑diabetic rats were subjected to myocardial IR and/or IPO with/without treatment with the AMPK activator A‑769662 and/or autophagy inhibitor 3‑methyladenine (3‑MA). Rat cardiomyocyte H9c2 cells were pretreated with A‑769662 and/or 3‑MA, and subjected to hypoxia reoxygenation (HR) or hypoxia post‑conditioning (HPO). The degree of injury to the myocardium/cells, oxidative stress, AMPK/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling and autophagy status were analyzed. In diabetic rats the myocardial infarct size, and creatine kinase‑MB and malondialdehyde release, were increased compared with non‑diabetic rats, concomitant with increased cardiac dysfunction and decreased cardiac superoxide dismutase activity, AMPK phosphorylation and autophagy following IR. IPO attenuated myocardial infarct size, increased AMPK phosphorylation and enhanced autophagy in non‑diabetic animals. A‑769662 (6.0 mg/kg) restored IPO cardioprotection in diabetic rats. In vitro, HPO combined with A‑769662 decreased HR injury in H9c2 cells exposed to high glucose, as evidenced by decreased lactic dehydrogenase expression and oxidative stress, accompanied by increased cell viability and autophagy. The A‑769662‑mediated restoration of IPO/HPO cardioprotection was completely reversed by treatment with the autophagy inhibitor 3‑MA. In conclusion, AMPK inhibition, by decreasing autophagy, may be a mechanism through which diabetic hearts are rendered unresponsive to IPO cardioprotection.

  11. Autophagy suppresses proliferation of HepG2 cells via inhibiting glypican-3/wnt/β-catenin signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu P

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Pei Hu,1,2 Bin Cheng,3 Yulin He,3 Zhiqiang Wei,3 Dongfang Wu,1 Zhongji Meng3,4 1Department of Pharmacy, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, 2Department of Clinical Laboratory Medicine, 3Institute of Biomedical Research, 4Department of Infectious Disease, Taihe Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan, People’s Republic of China Introduction: Autophagy plays an important role in the growth and survival of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC cells through several target proteins or signaling pathways. Glypican-3 (GPC3 is a new reliable HCC marker, which is involved in tumor growth in HCC, primarily mediated by wnt/β-catenin signaling. Objective: The present study aimed to identify the role of autophagy in the proliferation of HepG2 cells through GPC3/wnt/β-catenin signaling. Results and discussion: Results demonstrated that induction of autophagy by nutrition starvation and rapamycin treatment led to the downregulation of GPC3 expression in HepG2 cells, accompanied by the decreased expression of wnt downstream target genes (β-catenin, c-myc and cyclin D1. On the other hand, inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyl adenine (3-MA could rescue rapamycin-directed downregulation of GPC3 and wnt/β-catenin target genes and augment the proliferation of HepG2 cells. Furthermore, interference of GPC3 by siRNA suppressed wnt/β-catenin signaling and attenuated 3-MA stimulation of HepG2 cell proliferation. More interestingly, the mRNA of GPC3 remained unchanged when the protein levels of GPC3 were decreased by autophagy activation, suggesting that induction of autophagy may accelerate the degradation of GPC3. Conclusion: These results suggest that autophagy suppresses proliferation of HepG2 cells partially by inhibition of GPC3/wnt/β-catenin signaling. Keywords: hepatocellular carcinoma, glypican-3, autophagy, proliferation, wnt/β-catenin signaling

  12. Autophagy as an emerging therapy target for ovarian carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Lei; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Wenyan; Song, Enxue; Fan, Yijun; Li, Jun; Wei, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a conserved cellular self-digestion pathway for maintenance of homeostasis under basal and stressed conditions. Autophagy plays pivotal roles in the pathogenesis of many diseases, such as aging-related diseases, autoimmune diseases, cardiovascular diseases, and cancers. Of special note is that accumulating data suggest an intimate relationship between autophagy and ovarian carcinoma. Autophagy is well identified to act as either as a tumor-suppressor or as a tumor-promoter in ovarian carcinoma. The exact function of autophagy in ovarian carcinoma is highly dependent on the circumstances of cancer including hypoxic, nutrient-deficient, chemotherapy and so on. However, the mechanism underlying autophagy associated with ovarian carcinoma remains elusive, the precise role of autophagy in ovarian carcinoma also remains undetermined. In this review, we tried to sum up and discuss recent research achievements of autophagy in ovarian cancer. Moreover, waves of novel therapies ways for ovarian carcinoma based on the functions of autophagy were collected. PMID:27825125

  13. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-Induced Autophagy Is Responsible for Enhanced Osteoclastogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sul, Ok-Joo; Park, Hyun-Jung; Son, Ho-Jung; Choi, Hye-Seon

    2017-11-30

    We hypothesized that inflammation affects number and activity of osteoclasts (OCs) via enhancing autophagy. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced autophagy, osteoclastogenesis, and cytoplasmic reactive oxygen species (ROS) in bone marrow-derived macrophages that were pre-stimulated with receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand. An autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine (3-MA) decreased LPS-induced OC formation and bone resorption, indicating that autophagy is responsible for increasing number and activity of OCs upon LPS stimulus. Knockdown of autophagy-related protein 7 attenuated the effect of LPS on OC-specific genes, supporting a role of LPS as an autophagy inducer in OC. Removal of ROS decreased LPS-induced OC formation as well as autophagy. However, 3-MA did not affect LPS-induced ROS levels, suggesting that ROS act upstream of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase in LPS-induced autophagy. Our results suggest the possible use of autophagy inhibitors targeting OCs to reduce inflammatory bone loss.

  14. Evolving insights on metabolism, autophagy and epigenetics in liver myofibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeribe Chike Nwosu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Liver myofibroblasts (MFB are crucial mediators of extracellular matrix (ECM deposition in liver fibrosis. They arise mainly from hepatic stellate cells (HSCs upon a process termed activation. To a lesser extent, and depending on the cause of liver damage, portal fibroblasts, mesothelial cells and fibrocytes may also contribute to the MFB population. Targeting MFB to reduce liver fibrosis is currently an area of intense research. Unfortunately, a clog in the wheel of antifibrotic therapies is the fact that although MFB are known to mediate scar formation, and participate in liver inflammatory response, many of their molecular portraits are currently unknown. In this review, we discuss recent understanding of MFB in health and diseases, focusing specifically on three evolving research fields: metabolism, autophagy and epigenetics. We have emphasized on therapeutic prospects where applicable and mentioned techniques for use in MFB studies. Subsequently, we highlighted uncharted territories in MFB research to help direct future efforts aimed at bridging gaps in current knowledge.

  15. Structural transitions in conserved, ordered Beclin 1 domains essential to regulating autophagy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, Karen; Li, Yue; Mukhopadhyay, Shreya; Leuthner, Zoe; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Colbert, Christopher L.; Sinha, Sangita C. (NDSU); (IIT)

    2017-08-10

    Beclin 1 (BECN1) is a key regulator of autophagy, a critical catabolic homeostasis pathway that involves sequestration of selected cytoplasmic components by multilayered vesicles called autophagosomes, followed by lysosomal fusion and degradation. BECN1 is a core component of class III phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase complexes responsible for autophagosome nucleation. Without heterologous binding partners, BECN1 forms an antiparallel homodimer via its coiled-coil domain (CCD). However, the last 16 CCD residues, composing an “overlap helix” (OH), have been crystallized in two mutually exclusive states: either as part of the CCD or packed against the C-terminal β-α repeated, autophagy-specific domain (BARAD). Here, using CD spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, and small-angle X-ray scattering, we show that in the homodimeric state, the OH transitions between these two different packing states, with the predominant state comprising the OH packed against the BARAD, contrary to expectations based on known BECN1 interactions with heterologous partners. We confirmed this observation by comparing the impact of mutating four residues that mediate packing of the OH against both the CCD and BARAD on structure and stability of the CCD, the OH+BARAD, and the two-domain CCD–BARAD. Last, we used cellular assays to demonstrate that mutation of these OH-interface residues abrogates starvation-induced up-regulation of autophagy but does not affect basal autophagy. In summary, we have identified a BECN1 helical region that transitions between packing as part of either one of two conserved domains (i.e. the CCD or the BARAD). Our findings have important implications for the relative stability of autophagy-inactive and autophagy-active BECN1 complexes.

  16. Modulation of Apoptosis Pathways by Oxidative Stress and Autophagy in β Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maorong Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human islets isolated for transplantation are exposed to multiple stresses including oxidative stress and hypoxia resulting in significant loss of functional β cell mass. In this study we examined the modulation of apoptosis pathway genes in islets exposed to hydrogen peroxide, peroxynitrite, hypoxia, and cytokines. We observed parallel induction of pro- and antiapoptotic pathways and identified several novel genes including BFAR, CARD8, BNIP3, and CIDE-A. As BNIP3 is an inducer of autophagy, we examined this pathway in MIN6 cells, a mouse beta cell line and in human islets. Culture of MIN6 cells under low serum conditions increased the levels of several proteins in autophagy pathway, including ATG4, Beclin 1, LAMP-2, and UVRAG. Amino acid deprivation led to induction of autophagy in human islets. Preconditioning of islets with inducers of autophagy protected them from hypoxia-induced apoptosis. However, induction of autophagy during hypoxia exacerbated apoptotic cell death. ER stress led to induction of autophagy and apoptosis in β cells. Overexpression of MnSOD, an enzyme that scavenges free radicals, resulted in protection of MIN6 cells from cytokine-induced apoptosis. Ceramide, a mediator of cytokine-induced injury, reduced the active phosphorylated form of Akt and downregulated the promoter activity of the antiapoptotic gene bcl-2. Furthermore, cytokine-stimulated JNK pathway downregulated the bcl-2 promoter activity which was reversed by preincubation with SP600125, a JNK inhibitor. Our findings suggest that β cell apoptosis by multiple stresses in islets isolated for transplantation is the result of orchestrated gene expression in apoptosis pathway.

  17. Chemo-tolerance and sensitization by short-term fasting: The autophagy connection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustav Van Niekerk

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Preclinical studies suggest that fasting prior to chemotherapy may be an effective strategy to protect patients against the adverse effects of chemo-toxicity. Fasting may also sensitize cancer cells to chemotherapy. It is further suggested that fasting may similarly augment the efficacy of oncolytic viral therapy. The primary mechanism mediating these beneficial effects is thought to relate to the fact that fasting results in a decrease of circulating growth factors. In turn, such fasting cues would prompt normal cells to redirect energy towards cell maintenance and repair processes, rather than growth and proliferation. However, fasting is also known to up-regulate autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process that is up-regulated in response to various cell stressors. Here we review a number of mechanisms by which fasting-induced autophagy may have an impact on both chemo-tolerance and chemo-sensitization. Firstly, fasting may exert a protective effect by mobilizing autophagic components prior to chemo-induction. In turn, the autophagic apparatus can be repurposed for removing cellular components damaged by chemotherapy. Autophagy also plays a key role in epitope expression as well as in modulating inflammation. Chemo-sensitization resulting from fasting may in fact be an effect of enhanced immune surveillance as a result of better autophagy-dependent epitope processing. Finally, autophagy is involved in host defense against viruses, and aspects of the autophagic process are also often targets for viral subversion. Consequently, altering autophagic flux by fasting may alter viral infectivity. These observations suggest that fasting-induced autophagy may have an impact on therapeutic efficacy in various oncological contexts.

  18. A Becn1 mutation mediates hyperactive autophagic sequestration of amyloid oligomers and improved cognition in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altea Rocchi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Impairment of the autophagy pathway has been observed during the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD, a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by abnormal deposition of extracellular and intracellular amyloid β (Aβ peptides. Yet the role of autophagy in Aβ production and AD progression is complex. To study whether increased basal autophagy plays a beneficial role in Aβ clearance and cognitive improvement, we developed a novel genetic model to hyperactivate autophagy in vivo. We found that knock-in of a point mutation F121A in the essential autophagy gene Beclin 1/Becn1 in mice significantly reduces the interaction of BECN1 with its inhibitor BCL2, and thus leads to constitutively active autophagy even under non-autophagy-inducing conditions in multiple tissues, including brain. Becn1F121A-mediated autophagy hyperactivation significantly decreases amyloid accumulation, prevents cognitive decline, and restores survival in AD mouse models. Using an immunoisolation method, we found biochemically that Aβ oligomers are autophagic substrates and sequestered inside autophagosomes in the brain of autophagy-hyperactive AD mice. In addition to genetic activation of autophagy by Becn1 gain-of-function, we also found that ML246, a small-molecule autophagy inducer, as well as voluntary exercise, a physiological autophagy inducer, exert similar Becn1-dependent protective effects on Aβ removal and memory in AD mice. Taken together, these results demonstrate that genetically disrupting BECN1-BCL2 binding hyperactivates autophagy in vivo, which sequestrates amyloid oligomers and prevents AD progression. The study establishes new approaches to activate autophagy in the brain, and reveals the important function of Becn1-mediated autophagy hyperactivation in the prevention of AD.

  19. Altered Autophagy-Associated Genes Expression in T Cells of Oral Lichen Planus Correlated with Clinical Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Qin Tan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral lichen planus (OLP is a T cell-mediated inflammatory autoimmune disease. Autophagy has emerged as a fundamental trafficking event in mediating T cell response, which plays crucial roles in innate and adaptive immunity. The present study mainly investigated the mRNA expression of autophagy-associated genes in peripheral blood T cells of OLP patients and evaluated correlations between their expression and the clinical features of OLP. Five differentially expressed autophagy-associated genes were identified by autophagy array. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR results confirmed that IGF1 expression in the peripheral blood T cells of OLP patients was significantly higher than that in controls, especially in female and middle-aged (30–50 years old OLP patients. In addition, ATG9B mRNA levels were significantly lower in nonerosive OLP patients. However, no significant differences were found in the expression of HGS, ESR1, and SNCA between OLP patients and controls. Taken together, dysregulation of T cell autophagy may be involved in immune response of OLP and may be correlated with clinical patterns.

  20. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells protect against n-hexane-induced neuropathy through beclin 1-independent inhibition of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jie; Li, Shuangyue; Shi, Xiaoxia; Qian, Zhiqiang; Sun, Yijie; Wang, Dunjia; Zhou, Xueying; Qu, Hongxin; Hu, Shuhai; Zuo, Enjun; Zhang, Cong; Hou, Liyan; Wang, Qingshan; Piao, Fengyuan

    2018-03-14

    Chronic exposure to n-hexane, a widely used organic solvent in industry, induces central-peripheral neuropathy, which is mediated by its active metabolite, 2,5-hexanedione (HD). We recently reported that transplantation of bone marrow-mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC) significantly ameliorated HD-induced neuronal damage and motor deficits in rats. However, the mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we reported that inhibition of HD-induced autophagy contributed to BMSC-afforded protection. BMSC transplantation significantly reduced the levels of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II) and the degradation of sequestosome-1 (p62) in the spinal cord and sciatic nerve of HD-intoxicated rats. Downregulation of autophagy by BMSC was also confirmed in VSC4.1 cells exposed to HD. Moreover, inhibition of autophagy by PIK III mitigated the neurotoxic effects of HD and, meanwhile, abolished BMSC-afforded neuroprotection. Furthermore, we found that BMSC failed to interfere with Beclin 1, but promoted activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Unc-like kinse 1 (ULK1) was further recognized as the downstream target of mTOR responsible for BMSC-mediated inhibition of autophagy. Altogether, BMSC transplantation potently ameliorated HD-induced autophagy through beclin 1-independent activation of mTOR pathway, providing a novel insight for the therapeutic effects of BMSC against n-hexane and other environmental toxicants-induced neurotoxicity.

  1. Autophagy inhibition synergistically enhances anti-cancer efficacy of RAMBA, VN/12-1 in SKBR-3 cells and tumor xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbole, Abhijit M.; Purushottamachar, Puranik; Martin, Marlena S.; Daskalakis, Constantine; Njar, Vincent C. O.

    2012-01-01

    VN/12-1 is a novel retinoic acid metabolism blocking agent (RAMBA) discovered in our laboratory. The purpose of the study was to elucidate the molecular mechanism of VN/12-1’s anticancer activity in breast cancer cell lines and in tumor xenografts. We investigated the effects of VN/12-1 on induction of autophagy andapoptosis in SKBR-3 cells. Further, we also examined the impact of pharmacological and genomic inhibition of autophagy on VN/12-1’s anti-cancer activity. Finally, the anti-tumor activity of VN/12-1 was evaluated as a single agent and in combination with autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CHL) in an SKBR-3 mouse xenograft model. Short exposure of low dose (< 10 µM) of VN/12-1 induced endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS), autophagy and inhibits G1-S phase transition and caused a protective response. However, higher dose of VN/12-1 initiates apoptosis in vitro. Inhibition of autophagy using either pharmacological inhibitors or RNA interference of Beclin-1 enhanced anti-cancer activity induced by VN/12-1 in SKBR-3 cells by triggering apoptosis. Importantly, VN/12-1 (5 mg/kg twice weekly) and the combination of VN/12-1 (5 mg/kg twice weekly) + chloroquine (50 mg/kg twice weekly) significantly suppressed established SKBR-3 tumor growth by 81.4% (p < 0.001 vs. control) and 96.2% (p < 0.001 vs. control), respectively. Our novel findings suggest that VN/12-1 may be useful as a single agent or in combination with autophagy inhibitors for treating human breast cancers. Our data provides a strong rationale for clinical evaluation of VN/12-1 as single agent or in combination with autophagy inhibitors. PMID:22334589

  2. Extracellular Vesicles and Autophagy in Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianyang Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a type of chronic joint disease that is characterized by the degeneration and loss of articular cartilage and hyperplasia of the synovium and subchondral bone. There is reasonable knowledge about articular cartilage physiology, biochemistry, and chondrocyte metabolism. However, the etiology and pathogenesis of OA remain unclear and need urgent clarification to guide the early diagnosis and treatment of OA. Extracellular vesicles (EVs are small membrane-linking particles that are released from cells. In recent decades, several special biological properties have been found in EV, especially in terms of cartilage. Autophagy plays a critical role in the regulation of cellular homeostasis. Likewise, more and more research has gradually focused on the effect of autophagy on chondrocyte proliferation and function in OA. The synthesis and release of EV are closely associated with autophagy. At the same time, both EV and autophagy play a role in OA development. Based on the mechanism of EV and autophagy in OA development, EV may be beneficial in the early diagnosis of OA; on the other hand, the combination of EV and autophagy-related regulatory drugs may provide insight into possible OA therapeutic strategies.

  3. Kinases Involved in Both Autophagy and Mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyuan Li

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Both mitosis and autophagy are highly regulated dynamic cellular processes and involve various phosphorylation events catalysed by kinases, which play vital roles in almost all physiological and pathological conditions. Mitosis is a key event during the cell cycle, in which the cell divides into two daughter cells. Autophagy is a process in which the cell digests its own cellular contents. Although autophagy regulation has mainly been studied in asynchronous cells, increasing evidence indicates that autophagy is in fact tightly regulated in mitosis. Here in this review, we will discuss kinases that were originally identified to be involved in only one of either mitosis or autophagy, but were later found to participate in both processes, such as CDKs (cyclin-dependent kinases, Aurora kinases, PLK-1 (polo-like kinase 1, BUB1 (budding uninhibited by benzimidazoles 1, MAPKs (mitogen-activated protein kinases, mTORC1 (mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1, AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase, PI3K (phosphoinositide-3 kinase and protein kinase B (AKT. By focusing on kinases involved in both autophagy and mitosis, we will get a more comprehensive understanding about the reciprocal regulation between the two key cellular events, which will also shed light on their related therapeutic investigations.

  4. Induction of autophagy markers is associated with attenuation of miR-133a in diabetic heart failure patients undergoing mechanical unloading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Shyam Sundar; Duryee, Michael J; Shahshahan, Hamid R; Thiele, Geoffrey M; Anderson, Daniel R; Mishra, Paras K

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is ubiquitous in all forms of heart failure and cardioprotective miR-133a is attenuated in human heart failure. Previous reports from heart failure patients undergoing left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation demonstrated that autophagy is upregulated in the LV of the failing human heart. Studies in the murine model show that diabetes downregulates miR-133a. However, the role of miR-133a in the regulation of autophagy in diabetic hearts is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that diabetes exacerbates cardiac autophagy by inhibiting miR-133a in heart failure patients undergoing LVAD implantation. The miRNA assay was performed on the LV of 15 diabetic (D) and 6 non-diabetic (ND) heart failure patients undergoing LVAD implantation. Four ND with highly upregulated and 5 D with highly downregulated miR-133a were analyzed for autophagy markers (Beclin1, LC3B, ATG3) and their upstream regulators (mTOR and AMPK), and hypertrophy marker (beta-myosin heavy chain) by RT-qPCR, Western blotting and immunofluorescence. Our results demonstrate that attenuation of miR-133a in diabetic hearts is associated with the induction of autophagy and hypertrophy, and suppression of mTOR without appreciable difference in AMPK activity. In conclusion, attenuation of miR-133a contributes to the exacerbation of diabetes mediated cardiac autophagy and hypertrophy in heart failure patients undergoing LVAD implantation.

  5. Apicomplexan autophagy and modulation of autophagy in parasite-infected host cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perle Laté de Laté

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Apicomplexan parasites are responsible for a number of important human pathologies. Obviously, as Eukaryotes they share a number of cellular features and pathways with their respective host cells. One of them is autophagy, a process involved in the degradation of the cell's own components. These intracellular parasites nonetheless seem to present a number of original features compared to their very evolutionarily distant host cells. In mammals and other metazoans, autophagy has been identified as an important contributor to the defence against microbial pathogens. Thus, host autophagy also likely plays a key role in the control of apicomplexan parasites, although its potential manipulation and subversion by intracellular parasites creates a complex interplay in the regulation of host and parasite autophagy. In this mini-review, we summarise current knowledge on autophagy in both parasites and their host cells, in the context of infection by three Apicomplexa: Plasmodium, Toxoplasma, and Theileria.

  6. Pharmacologic or Genetic Targeting of Glutamine Synthetase Skews Macrophages toward an M1-like Phenotype and Inhibits Tumor Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika M. Palmieri

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine-synthetase (GS, the glutamine-synthesizing enzyme from glutamate, controls important events, including the release of inflammatory mediators, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR activation, and autophagy. However, its role in macrophages remains elusive. We report that pharmacologic inhibition of GS skews M2-polarized macrophages toward the M1-like phenotype, characterized by reduced intracellular glutamine and increased succinate with enhanced glucose flux through glycolysis, which could be partly related to HIF1α activation. As a result of these metabolic changes and HIF1α accumulation, GS-inhibited macrophages display an increased capacity to induce T cell recruitment, reduced T cell suppressive potential, and an impaired ability to foster endothelial cell branching or cancer cell motility. Genetic deletion of macrophagic GS in tumor-bearing mice promotes tumor vessel pruning, vascular normalization, accumulation of cytotoxic T cells, and metastasis inhibition. These data identify GS activity as mediator of the proangiogenic, immunosuppressive, and pro-metastatic function of M2-like macrophages and highlight the possibility of targeting this enzyme in the treatment of cancer metastasis.

  7. Spliced XBP1 promotes macrophage survival and autophagy by interacting with Beclin-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Ping-Ge [Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510515 (China); Jiang, Zhi-Xin [Centre Laboratory, The 305th Hospital of the People' s Liberation Army, Beijing 100017 (China); Li, Jian-Hua [Department of Geriatric Cardiology, Chinese PLA General Hosptial, Beijing 100853 (China); Zhou, Zhe, E-mail: zhouzhe76@126.com [Laboratory of Biotechnology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China); Zhang, Qing-Hua, E-mail: 1056055170@qq.com [Department of Cardiology, The 305th Hospital of the People' s Liberation Army, Beijing 100017 (China)

    2015-08-07

    Macrophage autophagy plays an important role in the development of atherosclerosis, but the precise mechanism mediating this process is unclear. The potential role of the X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1), a crucial transduction factor that is involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response, in bone marrow-derived macrophage autophagy is unknown. This study mainly explores the roles of XBP1 mRNA splicing in bone marrow-derived macrophage autophagy. The present study shows that the transient overexpression of spliced XBP1 via adenovirus-mediated gene transfer induces autophagy and promotes proliferation in bone marrow-derived macrophages via the down-regulation of Beclin-1, but that the sustained overexpression of spliced XBP1 leads to apoptosis. When XBP1 is down-regulated in bone marrow-derived macrophages using siRNA, rapamycin-induced autophagosome formation is ablated. Furthermore, we have detected the overexpression of XBP1 in areas of atherosclerotic plaques in the arteries of ApoE−/− mice. These results demonstrate that XBP1 mRNA splicing plays an important role in maintaining the function of bone marrow-derived macrophages and provide new insight into the study and treatment of atherosclerosis. - Highlights: • XBP1 was up-regulated in atherosclerotic plaques of ApoE−/− mice. • Transient spliced XBP1 overexpression induced macrophages autophagy via Beclin-1. • Sustained spliced XBP1 overexpression triggered macrophages apoptosis. • Spliced XBP1 plays a key role in maintaining the macrophages survival.

  8. Autophagy as a target for cancer therapy: new developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carew, Jennifer S; Kelly, Kevin R; Nawrocki, Steffan T

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved lysosomal degradation pathway that eliminates cytosolic proteins, macromolecules, organelles, and protein aggregates. Activation of autophagy may function as a tumor suppressor by degrading defective organelles and other cellular components. However, this pathway may also be exploited by cancer cells to generate nutrients and energy during periods of starvation, hypoxia, and stress induced by chemotherapy. Therefore, induction of autophagy has emerged as a drug resistance mechanism that promotes cancer cell survival via self-digestion. Numerous preclinical studies have demonstrated that inhibition of autophagy enhances the activity of a broad array of anticancer agents. Thus, targeting autophagy may be a global anticancer strategy that may improve the efficacy of many standard of care agents. These results have led to multiple clinical trials to evaluate autophagy inhibition in combination with conventional chemotherapy. In this review, we summarize the anticancer agents that have been reported to modulate autophagy and discuss new developments in autophagy inhibition as an anticancer strategy

  9. Characterization of early autophagy signaling by quantitative phosphoproteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rigbolt, Kristoffer Tg; Zarei, Mostafa; Sprenger, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Under conditions of nutrient shortage autophagy is the primary cellular mechanism ensuring availability of substrates for continuous biosynthesis. Subjecting cells to starvation or rapamycin efficiently induces autophagy by inhibiting the MTOR signaling pathway triggering increased autophagic flux...

  10. Autophagy suppresses host adaptive immune responses toward Borrelia burgdorferi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buffen, Kathrin; Oosting, Marije; Li, Yang; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Netea, Mihai G.; Joosten, Leo A. B.

    Inhibition of autophagy increases the severity of murine Lyme arthritis and human adaptive immune responses against B. burgdorferi. We have previously demonstrated that inhibition of autophagy increased the Borrelia burgdorferi induced innate cytokine production in vitro, but little is known

  11. Emerging role of mammalian autophagy in ketogenesis to overcome starvation

    OpenAIRE

    Takagi, Ayano; Kume, Shinji; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Uzu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is essential for the survival of lower organisms under conditions of nutrient depletion. However, whether autophagy plays a physiological role in mammals experiencing starvation is unknown. Ketogenesis is critical for overcoming starvation in mammals. We recently revealed that hepatic and renal autophagy are involved in starvation-induced ketogenesis, by utilizing tissue-specific autophagy-deficient mouse models. The liver is the principal organ to regulate ketogenesis, and a defici...

  12. Distinct surveillance pathway for immunopathology during acute infection via autophagy and SR-BI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiler, Susanne; Khandagale, Avinash B.; Magenau, Astrid; Nichols, Maryana; Heijnen, Harry F. G.; Rinninger, Franz; Ziegler, Tilman; Seveau, Stephanie; Schubert, Sören; Zahler, Stefan; Verschoor, Admar; Latz, Eicke; Massberg, Steffen; Gaus, Katharina; Engelmann, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms protecting from immunopathology during acute bacterial infections are incompletely known. We found that in response to apoptotic immune cells and live or dead Listeria monocytogenes scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI), an anti-atherogenic lipid exchange mediator, activated internalization mechanisms with characteristics of macropinocytosis and, assisted by Golgi fragmentation, initiated autophagic responses. This was supported by scavenger receptor-induced local increases in membrane cholesterol concentrations which generated lipid domains particularly in cell extensions and the Golgi. SR-BI was a key driver of beclin-1-dependent autophagy during acute bacterial infection of the liver and spleen. Autophagy regulated tissue infiltration of neutrophils, suppressed accumulation of Ly6C+ (inflammatory) macrophages, and prevented hepatocyte necrosis in the core of infectious foci. Perifocal levels of Ly6C+ macrophages and Ly6C− macrophages were unaffected, indicating predominant regulation of the focus core. SR-BI-triggered autophagy promoted co-elimination of apoptotic immune cells and dead bacteria but barely influenced bacterial sequestration and survival or inflammasome activation, thus exclusively counteracting damage inflicted by immune responses. Hence, SR-BI- and autophagy promote a surveillance pathway that partially responds to products of antimicrobial defenses and selectively prevents immunity-induced damage during acute infection. Our findings suggest that control of infection-associated immunopathology can be based on a unified defense operation. PMID:27694929

  13. Oxidized low-density lipoproteins upregulate proline oxidase to initiate ROS-dependent autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabirnyk, Olga; Liu, Wei; Khalil, Shadi; Sharma, Anit; Phang, James M

    2010-03-01

    Epidemiological studies showed that high levels of oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDLs) are associated with increased cancer risk. We examined the direct effect of physiologic concentrations oxLDL on cancer cells. OxLDLs were cytotoxic and activate both apoptosis and autophagy. OxLDLs have ligands for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and upregulated proline oxidase (POX) through this nuclear receptor. We identified 7-ketocholesterol (7KC) as a main component responsible for the latter. To elucidate the role of POX in oxLDL-mediated cytotoxicity, we knocked down POX via small interfering RNA and found that this (i) further reduced viability of cancer cells treated with oxLDL; (ii) decreased oxLDL-associated reactive oxygen species generation; (iii) decreased autophagy measured via beclin-1 protein level and light-chain 3 protein (LC3)-I into LC3-II conversion. Using POX-expressing cell model, we established that single POX overexpression was sufficient to activate autophagy. Thus, it led to autophagosomes accumulation and increased conversion of LC3-I into LC3-II. Moreover, beclin-1 gene expression was directly dependent on POX catalytic activity, namely the generation of POX-dependent superoxide. We conclude that POX is critical in the cellular response to the noxious effects of oxLDL by activating protective autophagy.

  14. Improving nuclear envelope dynamics by EBV BFRF1 facilitates intranuclear component clearance through autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guan-Ting; Kung, Hsiu-Ni; Chen, Chung-Kuan; Huang, Cheng; Wang, Yung-Li; Yu, Cheng-Pu; Lee, Chung-Pei

    2018-02-26

    Although a vesicular nucleocytoplasmic transport system is believed to exist in eukaryotic cells, the features of this pathway are mostly unknown. Here, we report that the BFRF1 protein of the Epstein-Barr virus improves vesicular transport of nuclear envelope (NE) to facilitate the translocation and clearance of nuclear components. BFRF1 expression induces vesicles that selectively transport nuclear components to the cytoplasm. With the use of aggregation-prone proteins as tools, we found that aggregated nuclear proteins are dispersed when these BFRF1-induced vesicles are formed. BFRF1-containing vesicles engulf the NE-associated aggregates, exit through from the NE, and putatively fuse with autophagic vacuoles. Chemical treatment and genetic ablation of autophagy-related factors indicate that autophagosome formation and autophagy-linked FYVE protein-mediated autophagic proteolysis are involved in this selective clearance of nuclear proteins. Remarkably, vesicular transport, elicited by BFRF1, also attenuated nuclear aggregates accumulated in neuroblastoma cells. Accordingly, induction of NE-derived vesicles by BFRF1 facilitates nuclear protein translocation and clearance, suggesting that autophagy-coupled transport of nucleus-derived vesicles can be elicited for nuclear component catabolism in mammalian cells.-Liu, G.-T., Kung, H.-N., Chen, C.-K., Huang, C., Wang, Y.-L., Yu, C.-P., Lee, C.-P. Improving nuclear envelope dynamics by EBV BFRF1 facilitates intranuclear component clearance through autophagy.

  15. REP1 Modulates Autophagy and Macropinocytosis to Enhance Cancer Cell Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jungwon; Kim, Hyena; Bae, Young Ki; Cheong, Heesun

    2017-08-28

    Rab escort protein 1 (REP1), a component of the Rab geranyl-geranyltransferase 2 complex, plays a role in Rab protein recruitment in proper vesicles during vesicle trafficking. In addition to having well-known tissue degenerative phenotypes in the REP1 mutant, REP1 is tightly associated with cancer devel