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Sample records for autophagic cell death

  1. Autophagic components contribute to hypersensitive cell death in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofius, Daniel; Schultz-Larsen, Torsten; Joensen, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Autophagy has been implicated as a prosurvival mechanism to restrict programmed cell death (PCD) associated with the pathogen-triggered hypersensitive response (HR) during plant innate immunity. This model is based on the observation that HR lesions spread in plants with reduced autophagy gene...... expression. Here, we examined receptor-mediated HR PCD responses in autophagy-deficient Arabidopsis knockout mutants (atg), and show that infection-induced lesions are contained in atg mutants. We also provide evidence that HR cell death initiated via Toll/Interleukin-1 (TIR)-type immune receptors through...... the defense regulator EDS1 is suppressed in atg mutants. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PCD triggered by coiled-coil (CC)-type immune receptors via NDR1 is either autophagy-independent or engages autophagic components with cathepsins and other unidentified cell death mediators. Thus, autophagic cell death...

  2. Autophagonizer, a novel synthetic small molecule, induces autophagic cell death

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    Choi, In-Kwon; Cho, Yoon Sun; Jung, Hye Jin [Chemical Genomics Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Translational Research Center for Protein Function Control, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Ho Jeong, E-mail: kwonhj@yonsei.ac.kr [Chemical Genomics Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Translational Research Center for Protein Function Control, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-19

    Autophagy is an apoptosis-independent mechanism of cell death that protects the cell from environmental imbalances and infection by pathogens. We identified a novel small molecule, 2-(3-Benzyl-4-oxo-3,4,5,6,7,8-hexahydro-benzo[4,5]thieno[2,3-d] pyrimidin-2-ylsulfanylmethyl)-oxazole-4-carboxylic acid (2-pyrrolidin-1-yl-ethyl)-amide (referred as autophagonizer), using high-content cell-based screening and the autophagosome marker EGFP-LC3. Autophagonizer inhibited growth and induced cell death in the human tumor cell lines MCF7, HeLa, HCT116, A549, AGS, and HT1080 via a caspase-independent pathway. Conversion of cytosolic LC3-I to autophagosome-associated LC3-II was greatly enhanced by autophagonizer treatment. Transmission electron microscopy and acridine orange staining revealed increased autophagy in the cytoplasm of autophagonizer-treated cells. In conclusion, autophagonizer is a novel autophagy inducer with unique structure, which induces autophagic cell death in the human tumor cell lines.

  3. Bortezomib induces autophagic death in proliferating human endothelial cells

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    Belloni, Daniela; Veschini, Lorenzo [Myeloma Unit, Department of Oncology, IRCCS H San Raffaele, Milan (Italy); Foglieni, Chiara [Department of Cardiology, IRCCS H San Raffaele, Milan (Italy); Dell' Antonio, Giacomo [Department of Pathology, IRCCS H San Raffaele, Milan (Italy); Caligaris-Cappio, Federico [Myeloma Unit, Department of Oncology, IRCCS H San Raffaele, Milan (Italy); Universita Vita-Salute IRCCS H San Raffaele, Milan (Italy); Ferrarini, Marina [Myeloma Unit, Department of Oncology, IRCCS H San Raffaele, Milan (Italy); Ferrero, Elisabetta, E-mail: elisabetta.ferrero@hsr.it [Myeloma Unit, Department of Oncology, IRCCS H San Raffaele, Milan (Italy)

    2010-04-01

    The proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib has been approved for the treatment of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (MM), thanks to its ability to induce MM cell apoptosis. Moreover, Bortezomib has antiangiogenic properties. We report that endothelial cells (EC) exposed to Bortezomib undergo death to an extent that depends strictly on their activation state. Indeed, while quiescent EC are resistant to Bortezomib, the drug results maximally toxic in EC switched toward angiogenesis with FGF, and exerts a moderate effect on subconfluent HUVEC. Moreover, EC activation state deeply influences the death pathway elicited by Bortezomib: after treatment, angiogenesis-triggered EC display typical features of apoptosis. Conversely, death of subconfluent EC is preceded by ROS generation and signs typical of autophagy, including intense cytoplasmic vacuolization with evidence of autophagosomes at electron microscopy, and conversion of the cytosolic MAP LC3 I form toward the autophagosome-associated LC3 II form. Treatment with the specific autophagy inhibitor 3-MA prevents both LC3 I/LC3 II conversion and HUVEC cell death. Finally, early removal of Bortezomib is accompanied by the recovery of cell shape and viability. These findings strongly suggest that Bortezomib induces either apoptosis or autophagy in EC; interfering with the autophagic response may potentiate the antiangiogenic effect of the drug.

  4. Signalome-wide RNAi screen identifies GBA1 as a positive mediator of autophagic cell death

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    Dasari, Santosh K; Bialik, Shani; Levin-Zaidman, Smadar; Levin-Salomon, Vered; Merrill, Alfred H; Futerman, Anthony H; Kimchi, Adi

    2017-01-01

    Activating alternative cell death pathways, including autophagic cell death, is a promising direction to overcome the apoptosis resistance observed in various cancers. Yet, whether autophagy acts as a death mechanism by over consumption of intracellular components is still controversial and remains undefined at the ultrastructural and the mechanistic levels. Here we identified conditions under which resveratrol-treated A549 lung cancer cells die by a mechanism that fulfills the previous definition of autophagic cell death. The cells displayed a strong and sustained induction of autophagic flux, cell death was prevented by knocking down autophagic genes and death occurred in the absence of apoptotic or necroptotic pathway activation. Detailed ultrastructural characterization revealed additional critical events, including a continuous increase over time in the number of autophagic vacuoles, in particular autolysosomes, occupying most of the cytoplasm at terminal stages. This was followed by loss of organelles, disruption of intracellular membranes including the swelling of perinuclear space and, occasionally, a unique type of nuclear shedding. A signalome-wide shRNA-based viability screen was applied to identify positive mediators of this type of autophagic cell death. One top hit was GBA1, the Gaucher disease-associated gene, which encodes glucocerebrosidase, an enzyme that metabolizes glucosylceramide to ceramide and glucose. Interestingly, glucocerebrosidase expression levels and activity were elevated, concomitantly with increased intracellular ceramide levels, both of which correlated in time with the appearance of the unique death characteristics. Transfection with siGBA1 attenuated the increase in glucocerebrosidase activity and the intracellular ceramide levels. Most importantly, GBA1 knockdown prevented the strong increase in LC3 lipidation, and many of the ultrastructural changes characteristic of this type of autophagic cell death, including a significant

  5. The natural product peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth by inducing autophagic cell death

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    Lyu, Qing [School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Key Lab in Healthy Science and Technology, Division of Life Science, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen, 518055 (China); Tou, Fangfang [Jiangxi Provincial Key Lab of Oncology Translation Medicine, Jiangxi Cancer Hospital, Nanchang, 330029 (China); Su, Hong; Wu, Xiaoyong [First Affiliated Hospital, Guiyang College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Guiyang, 550002 (China); Chen, Xinyi [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, 100029 (China); Zheng, Zhi, E-mail: zheng_sheva@hotmail.com [Jiangxi Provincial Key Lab of Oncology Translation Medicine, Jiangxi Cancer Hospital, Nanchang, 330029 (China)

    2015-06-19

    Autophagy is evolutionarily conservative in eukaryotic cells that engulf cellular long-lived proteins and organelles, and it degrades the contents through fusion with lysosomes, via which the cell acquires recycled building blocks for the synthesis of new molecules. In this study, we revealed that peiminine induces cell death and enhances autophagic flux in colorectal carcinoma HCT-116 cells. We determined that peiminine enhances the autophagic flux by repressing the phosphorylation of mTOR through inhibiting upstream signals. Knocking down ATG5 greatly reduced the peiminine-induced cell death in wild-type HCT-116 cells, while treating Bax/Bak-deficient cells with peiminine resulted in significant cell death. In summary, our discoveries demonstrated that peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma cell proliferation and cell growth by inducing autophagic cell death. - Highlights: • Peiminine induces autophagy and upregulates autophagic flux. • Peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth. • Peiminine induces autophagic cell death. • Peiminine represses mTOR phosphorylation by influencing PI3K/Akt and AMPK pathway.

  6. The natural product peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth by inducing autophagic cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyu, Qing; Tou, Fangfang; Su, Hong; Wu, Xiaoyong; Chen, Xinyi; Zheng, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is evolutionarily conservative in eukaryotic cells that engulf cellular long-lived proteins and organelles, and it degrades the contents through fusion with lysosomes, via which the cell acquires recycled building blocks for the synthesis of new molecules. In this study, we revealed that peiminine induces cell death and enhances autophagic flux in colorectal carcinoma HCT-116 cells. We determined that peiminine enhances the autophagic flux by repressing the phosphorylation of mTOR through inhibiting upstream signals. Knocking down ATG5 greatly reduced the peiminine-induced cell death in wild-type HCT-116 cells, while treating Bax/Bak-deficient cells with peiminine resulted in significant cell death. In summary, our discoveries demonstrated that peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma cell proliferation and cell growth by inducing autophagic cell death. - Highlights: • Peiminine induces autophagy and upregulates autophagic flux. • Peiminine represses colorectal carcinoma tumor growth. • Peiminine induces autophagic cell death. • Peiminine represses mTOR phosphorylation by influencing PI3K/Akt and AMPK pathway

  7. MnSOD upregulation induces autophagic programmed cell death in senescent keratinocytes.

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    Emeric Deruy

    Full Text Available Senescence is a state of growth arrest resulting mainly from telomere attrition and oxidative stress. It ultimately leads to cell death. We have previously shown that, in keratinocytes, senescence is induced by NF-kappaB activation, MnSOD upregulation and H(2O(2 overproduction. We have also shown that senescent keratinocytes do not die by apoptosis but as a result of high macroautophagic activity that targets the primary vital cell components. Here, we investigated the mechanisms that activate this autophagic cell death program. We show that corpses occurring at the senescence plateau display oxidatively-damaged mitochondria and nucleus that colocalize with autophagic vacuoles. The occurrence of such corpses was decreased by specifically reducing the H(2O(2 level with catalase, and, conversely, reproduced by overexpressing MnSOD or applying subtoxic doses of H(2O(2. This H(2O(2-induced cell death did occur through autophagy since it was accompanied by an accumulation of autophagic vesicles as evidenced by Lysotracker staining, LC3 vesiculation and transmission electron microscopy. Most importantly, it was partly abolished by 3-methyladenine, the specific inhibitor of autophagosome formation, and by anti-Atg5 siRNAs. Taken together these results suggest that autophagic cell death is activated in senescent keratinocytes because of the upregulation of MnSOD and the resulting accumulation of oxidative damages to nucleus and mitochondria.

  8. Akebia saponin PA induces autophagic and apoptotic cell death in AGS human gastric cancer cells.

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    Xu, Mei-Ying; Lee, Dong Hwa; Joo, Eun Ji; Son, Kun Ho; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we investigated the anticancer mechanism of akebia saponin PA (AS), a natural product isolated from Dipsacus asperoides in human gastric cancer cell lines. It was shown that AS-induced cell death is caused by autophagy and apoptosis in AGS cells. The apoptosis-inducing effect of AS was characterized by annexin V/propidium (PI) staining, increase of sub-G1 phase and caspase-3 activation, while the autophagy-inducing effect was indicated by the formation of cytoplasmic vacuoles and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain-3 II (LC3-II) conversion. The autophagy inhibitor bafilomycin A1 (BaF1) decreased AS-induced cell death and caspase-3 activation, but caspase-3 inhibitor Ac-DEVD-CHO did not affect LC3-II accumulation or AS-induced cell viability, suggesting that AS induces autophagic cell death and autophagy contributes to caspase-3-dependent apoptosis. Furthermore, AS activated p38/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), which could be inhibited by BaF1, and caspase-3 activation was attenuated by both SB202190 and SP600125, indicating that AS-induced autophagy promotes mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs)-mediated apoptosis. Taken together, these results demonstrate that AS induces autophagic and apoptotic cell death and autophagy plays the main role in akebia saponin PA-induced cell death. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Sodium nitroprusside induces autophagic cell death in glutathione-depleted osteoblasts.

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    Son, Min Jeong; Lee, Seong-Beom; Byun, Yu Jeong; Lee, Hwa Ok; Kim, Ho-Shik; Kwon, Oh-Joo; Jeong, Seong-Whan

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies reported that high levels of nitric oxide (NO) induce apoptotic cell death in osteoblasts. We examined molecular mechanisms of cytotoxic injury induced by sodium nitroprusside (SNP), a NO donor, in both glutathione (GSH)-depleted and control U2-OS osteoblasts. Cell viability was reduced by much lower effective concentrations of SNP in GSH-depleted cells compared to normal cells. The data suggest that the level of intracellular GSH is critical in SNP-induced cell death processes of osteoblasts. The level of oxidative stress due to SNP treatments doubled in GSH-depleted cells when measured with fluorochrome H2DCFDA. Pretreatment with the NO scavenger PTIO preserved the viability of cells treated with SNP. Viability of cells treated with SNP was recovered by pretreatment with Wortmannin, an autophagy inhibitor, but not by pretreatment with zVAD-fmk, a pan-specific caspase inhibitor. Large increases of LC3-II were shown by immunoblot analysis of the SNP-treated cells, and the increase was blocked by pretreatment with PTIO or Wortmannin; this implies that under GSH-depleted conditions SNP induces different molecular signaling that lead to autophagic cell death. The ultrastructural morphology of SNP-treated cells in transmission electron microscopy showed numerous autophagic vacuoles. These data suggest NO produces oxidative stress and cellular damage that culminate in autophagic cell death of GSH-depleted osteoblasts. Copyright 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Conessine Interferes with Oxidative Stress-Induced C2C12 Myoblast Cell Death through Inhibition of Autophagic Flux.

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    Hyunju Kim

    Full Text Available Conessine, a steroidal alkaloid isolated from Holarrhena floribunda, has anti-malarial activity and interacts with the histamine H3 receptor. However, the cellular effects of conessine are poorly understood. Accordingly, we evaluated the involvement of conessine in the regulation of autophagy. We searched natural compounds that modulate autophagy, and conessine was identified as an inhibitor of autophagic flux. Conessine treatment induced the formation of autophagosomes, and p62, an autophagic adapter, accumulated in the autophagosomes. Reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 result in muscle cell death by inducing excessive autophagic flux. Treatment with conessine inhibited H2O2-induced autophagic flux in C2C12 myoblast cells and also interfered with cell death. Our results indicate that conessine has the potential effect to inhibit muscle cell death by interfering with autophagic flux.

  11. Zanthoxylum fruit extract from Japanese pepper promotes autophagic cell death in cancer cells.

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    Nozaki, Reo; Kono, Toru; Bochimoto, Hiroki; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Oketani, Kaori; Sakamaki, Yuichi; Okubo, Naoto; Nakagawa, Koji; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2016-10-25

    Zanthoxylum fruit, obtained from the Japanese pepper plant (Zanthoxylum piperitum De Candolle), and its extract (Zanthoxylum fruit extract, ZFE) have multiple physiological activities (e.g., antiviral activity). However, the potential anticancer activity of ZFE has not been fully examined. In this study, we investigated the ability of ZFE to induce autophagic cell death (ACD). ZFE caused remarkable autophagy-like cytoplasmic vacuolization, inhibited cell proliferation, and ultimately induced cell death in the human cancer cell lines DLD-1, HepG2, and Caco-2, but not in A549, MCF-7, or WiDr cells. ZFE increased the level of LC3-II protein, a marker of autophagy. Knockdown of ATG5 using siRNA inhibited ZFE-induced cytoplasmic vacuolization and cell death. Moreover, in cancer cells that could be induced to undergo cell death by ZFE, the extract increased the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and the JNK inhibitor SP600125 attenuated both vacuolization and cell death. Based on morphology and expression of marker proteins, ZFE-induced cell death was neither apoptosis nor necrosis. Normal intestinal cells were not affected by ZFE. Taken together, our findings show that ZFE induces JNK-dependent ACD, which appears to be the main mechanism underlying its anticancer activity, suggesting a promising starting point for anticancer drug development.

  12. Cyclic Mechanical Stretching Induces Autophagic Cell Death in Tenofibroblasts Through Activation of Prostaglandin E2 Production

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    Hua Chen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Autophagic cell death has recently been implicated in the pathophysiology of tendinopathy. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, a known inflammatory mediator of tendinitis, inhibits tenofibroblast proliferation in vitro; however, the underlying mechanism is unclear. The present study investigated the relationship between PGE2 production and autophagic cell death in mechanically loaded human patellar tendon fibroblasts (HPTFs in vitro. Methods: Cultured HPTFs were subjected to exogenous PGE2 treatment or repetitive cyclic mechanical stretching. Cell death was determined by flow cytometry with acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining. Induction of autophagy was assessed by autophagy markers including the formation of autophagosomes and autolysosomes (by electron microscopy, AO staining, and formation of GPF-LC3-labeled vacuoles and the expression of LC3-II and BECN1 (by western blot. Stretching-induced PGE2 release was determined by ELISA. Results: Exogenous PGE2 significantly induced cell death and autophagy in HPTFs in a dose-dependent manner. Blocking autophagy using inhibitors 3-methyladenine and chloroquine, or small interfering RNAs against autophagy genes Becn-1 and Atg-5 prevented PGE2-induced cell death. Cyclic mechanical stretching at 8% and 12% magnitudes for 24 h significantly stimulated PGE2 release by HPTFs in a magnitude-dependent manner. In addition, mechanical stretching induced autophagy and cell death. Blocking PGE2 production using COX inhibitors indomethacin and celecoxib significantly reduced stretching-induced autophagy and cell death. Conclusion: Taken together, cyclic mechanical stretching induces autophagic cell death in tenofibroblasts through activation of PGE2 production.

  13. Hyperthermia enhances radiosensitivity of colorectal cancer cells through ROS inducing autophagic cell death.

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    Ba, Ming-Chen; Long, Hui; Wang, Shuai; Wu, Yin-Bing; Zhang, Bo-Huo; Yan, Zhao-Fei; Yu, Fei-Hong; Cui, Shu-Zhong

    2018-04-01

    Hyperthermia (HT) enhances the anti-cancer effects of radiotherapy (RT), but the precise biochemical mechanisms involved are unclear. This study was aim to investigate if mild HT sensitizes colorectal cancer cells to RT through reactive oxygen species (ROS)-inducing autophagic cell death in a mice model of HCT116 human colorectal cancer. HCT116 mice model were randomly divided into five groups: mock group, hyperthermia group (HT), radiotherapy group (RT), HT + RT group, and HT + RT +N-acetyl L-cysteine (NAC) group (HT + CT + NAC). After four weeks of treatment, cancer growth inhibition, rate and mitochondrial membrane potential were measured with MTT and JC-1 assays, respectively, while ROS were estimated fluorimetrically. The relationship of these parameters to expressions of autophagy-related genes Beclin1, LC3B, and mTOR was analyzed. Gene expression was measured by Real-Time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). There were significant increases in ROS levels and mitochondrial membrane potential in the HT + RT group. ROS levels in the HT + RT group increased more significantly than in any other group. In contrast, ROS levels in the HT + RT + NAC group were significantly decreased relative to the HT + RT group. The number of autophagic bodies in HT + RT group was higher than that of mock group. There were significant increases in the expression of Beclin1 and LC3B genes, while mTOR expression was significantly decreased in the HT + CT group. Treatment with NAC reversed the pattern of these changes. These results indicate that HT enhances the radiosensitivity of colorectal cancer cells to RT through ROS inducing autophagic cell death. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Clozapine Induces Autophagic Cell Death in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

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    Yu-Chun Yin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Previous studies have shown that patients with schizophrenia have a lower incidence of cancer than the general population, and several antipsychotics have been demonstrated to have cytotoxic effects on cancer cells. However, the mechanisms underlying these results remain unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of clozapine, which is often used to treat patients with refractory schizophrenia, on the growth of non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines and to examine whether autophagy contributes to its effects. Methods: A549 and H1299 cells were treated with clozapine, and cell cytotoxicity, cell cycle and autophagy were then assessed. The autophagy inhibitor bafilomycin A1 and siRNA-targeted Atg7 were used to determine the role of autophagy in the effect of clozapine. Results: Clozapine inhibited A549 and H1299 proliferation and increased p21 and p27 expression levels, leading to cell cycle arrest. Clozapine also induced a high level of autophagy, but not apoptosis, in both cell lines, and the growth inhibitory effect of clozapine was blunted by treatment with the autophagy inhibitor bafilomycin A1 or with an siRNA targeting atg7. Conclusions: Clozapine inhibits cell proliferation by inducing autophagic cell death in two non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines. These findings may provide insights into the relationship between clozapine use and the lower incidence of lung cancer among patients with schizophrenia.

  15. MP Resulting in Autophagic Cell Death of Microglia through Zinc Changes against Spinal Cord Injury

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    Dingding Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Methylprednisolone pulse therapy (MPPT, as a public recognized therapy of spinal cord injury (SCI, is doubted recently, and the exact mechanism of MP on SCI is unclear. This study sought to investigate the exact effect of MP on SCI. We examined the effect of MP in a model of SCI in vivo and an LPS induced model in vitro. We found that administration of MP produced an increase in the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan scores and motor neurons counts of injured rats. Besides the number of activated microglia was apparently reduced by MP in vivo, and Beclin-1 dependent autophagic cell death of microglia was induced by MP in LPS induced model. At the same time, MP increases cellular zinc concentration and level of ZIP8, and TPEN could revert effect of MP on autophagic cell death of microglia. Finally, we have found that MP could inhibit NF-κβ in LPS induced model. These results show that the MP could result in autophagic cell death of microglia, which mainly depends on increasing cellular labile zinc, and may be associated with inhibition of NF-κβ, and that MP can produce neuroprotective effect in SCI.

  16. MP Resulting in Autophagic Cell Death of Microglia through Zinc Changes against Spinal Cord Injury.

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    Li, Dingding; Wang, Guannan; Han, Donghe; Bi, Jing; Li, Chenyuan; Wang, Hongyu; Liu, Zhiyuan; Gao, Wei; Gao, Kai; Yao, Tianchen; Wan, Zhanghui; Li, Haihong; Mei, Xifan

    2016-01-01

    Methylprednisolone pulse therapy (MPPT), as a public recognized therapy of spinal cord injury (SCI), is doubted recently, and the exact mechanism of MP on SCI is unclear. This study sought to investigate the exact effect of MP on SCI. We examined the effect of MP in a model of SCI in vivo and an LPS induced model in vitro. We found that administration of MP produced an increase in the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan scores and motor neurons counts of injured rats. Besides the number of activated microglia was apparently reduced by MP in vivo, and Beclin-1 dependent autophagic cell death of microglia was induced by MP in LPS induced model. At the same time, MP increases cellular zinc concentration and level of ZIP8, and TPEN could revert effect of MP on autophagic cell death of microglia. Finally, we have found that MP could inhibit NF-κβ in LPS induced model. These results show that the MP could result in autophagic cell death of microglia, which mainly depends on increasing cellular labile zinc, and may be associated with inhibition of NF-κβ, and that MP can produce neuroprotective effect in SCI.

  17. 5-ALA mediated photodynamic therapy induces autophagic cell death via AMP-activated protein kinase

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    Lin Yu-Hsin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Photodynamic therapy (PDT has been developed as an anticancer treatment, which is based on the tumor-specific accumulation of a photosensitizer that induces cell death after irradiation of light with a specific wavelength. Depending on the subcellular localization of the photosensitizer, PDT could trigger various signal transduction cascades and induce cell death such as apoptosis, autophagy, and necrosis. In this study, we report that both AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling cascades are activated following 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA-mediated PDT in both PC12 and CL1-0 cells. Although the activities of caspase-9 and -3 are elevated, the caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk did not protect cells against ALA-PDT-induced cell death. Instead, autophagic cell death was found in PC12 and CL1-0 cells treated with ALA-PDT. Most importantly, we report here for the first time that it is the activation of AMPK, but not MAPKs that plays a crucial role in mediating autophagic cell death induced by ALA-PDT. This novel observation indicates that the AMPK pathway play an important role in ALA-PDT-induced autophagy.

  18. BH3 Mimetics Reactivate Autophagic Cell Death in Anoxia-Resistant Malignant Glioma Cells

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    Holger Hetschko

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Here, we investigated the specific roles of Bcl-2 family members in anoxia tolerance of malignant glioma. Flow cytometry analysis of cell death in 17 glioma cell lines revealed drastic differences in their sensitivity to oxygen withdrawal (<0.1% O2. Cell death correlated with mitochondrial depolarization, cytochrome C release, and translocation of green fluorescent protein (GFP-tagged light chain 3 to autophagosomes but occurred in the absence of caspase activation or phosphatidylserine exposure. In both sensitive and tolerant glioma cell lines, anoxia caused a significant up-regulation of BH3-only genes previously implicated in mediating anoxic cell death in other cell types (BNIP3, NIX, PUMA, and Noxa. In contrast, we detected a strong correlation between anoxia resistance and high expression levels of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins Bcl-xL, Bcl-2, and Mcl-1 that function to neutralize the proapoptotic activity of BH3-only proteins. Importantly, inhibition of both Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL with the small-molecule BH3 mimetics HA14-1 and BH3I-2′ and by RNA interference reactivated anoxia-induced autophagic cell death in previously resistant glioma cells. Our data suggest that endogenous BH3-only protein induction may not be able to compensate for the high expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins in anoxia-resistant astrocytomas. They also support the conjecture that BH3 mimetics may represent an exciting new approach for the treatment of malignant glioma.

  19. Eclalbasaponin II induces autophagic and apoptotic cell death in human ovarian cancer cells

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    Yoon Jin Cho

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Triterpenoids echinocystic acid and its glycosides, isolated from several Eclipta prostrata, have been reported to possess various biological activities such as anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, and anti-diabetic activity. However, the cytotoxicity of the triterpenoids in human cancer cells and their molecular mechanism of action are poorly understood. In the present study, we found that eclalbasaponin II with one glucose moiety has potent cytotoxicity in three ovarian cancer cells and two endometrial cancer cells compared to an aglycone echinocystic acid and eclalbasaponin I with two glucose moiety. Eclalbasaponin II treatment dose-dependently increased sub G1 population. Annexin V staining revealed that eclalbasaponin II induced apoptosis in SKOV3 and A2780 ovarian cancer cells. In addition, eclalbasaponin II-induced cell death was associated with characteristics of autophagy; an increase in acidic vesicular organelle content and elevation of the levels of LC3-II. Interestingly, autophagy inhibitor BaF1 suppressed the eclalbasaponin II-induced apoptosis. Moreover, eclalbasaponin II activated JNK and p38 signaling and inhibited the mTOR signaling. We further demonstrated that pre-treatment with a JNK and p38 inhibitor and mTOR activator attenuated the eclalbasaponin II-induced autophagy. This suggests that eclalbasaponin II induces apoptotic and autophagic cell death through the regulation of JNK, p38, and mTOR signaling in human ovarian cancer cells.

  20. Mediation of autophagic cell death by type 3 ryanodine receptor (RyR3 in adult hippocampal neural stem cells

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    Kyung Min eChung

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic Ca2+ actively engages in diverse intracellular processes from protein synthesis, folding and trafficking to cell survival and death. Dysregulation of intracellular Ca2+ levels is observed in various neuropathological states including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Ryanodine receptors (RyRs and IP3 receptors (IP3Rs, the main Ca2+ release channels located in endoplasmic reticulum (ER membranes, are known to direct various cellular events such as autophagy and apoptosis. Here we investigated the intracellular Ca2+-mediated regulation of survival and death of adult hippocampal neural stem (HCN cells utilizing an insulin withdrawal model of autophagic cell death. Despite comparable expression levels of RyR and IP3R transcripts in HCN cells at normal state, the expression levels of RyRs — especially RyR3 — were markedly upregulated upon insulin withdrawal. While treatment with the RyR agonist caffeine significantly promoted the autophagic death of insulin-deficient HCN cells, treatment with its inhibitor dantrolene prevented the induction of autophagy following insulin withdrawal. Furthermore, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout of the RyR3 gene abolished autophagic cell death of HCN cells. This study delineates a distinct, RyR3-mediated ER Ca2+ regulation of autophagy and programmed cell death in neural stem cells. Our findings provide novel insights into the critical, yet understudied mechanisms underlying the regulatory function of ER Ca2+ in neural stem cell biology.

  1. Autophagic or necrotic cell death triggered by distinct motifs of the differentiation factor DIF-1.

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    Luciani, M F; Kubohara, Y; Kikuchi, H; Oshima, Y; Golstein, P

    2009-04-01

    Autophagic or necrotic cell death (ACD and NCD, respectively), studied in the model organism Dictyostelium which offers unique advantages, require triggering by the same differentiation-inducing factor DIF-1. To initiate these two types of cell death, does DIF-1 act through only one or through two distinct recognition structures? Such distinct structures may recognize distinct motifs of DIF-1. To test this albeit indirectly, DIF-1 was modified at one or two of several positions, and the corresponding derivatives were tested for their abilities to induce ACD or NCD. The results strongly indicated that distinct biochemical motifs of DIF-1 were required to trigger ACD or NCD, and that these motifs were separately recognized at the onset of ACD or NCD. In addition, both ACD and NCD were induced more efficiently by DIF-1 than by either its precursors or its immediate catabolite. These results showed an unexpected relation between a differentiation factor, the cellular structures that recognize it, the cell death types it can trigger and the metabolic state of the cell. The latter seems to guide the choice of the signaling pathway to cell death, which in turn imposes the cell death type and the recognition pattern of the differentiation factor.

  2. Zinc oxide nanoparticle induced autophagic cell death and mitochondrial damage via reactive oxygen species generation.

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    Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Yoon, Tae-Jong; Minai-Tehrani, Arash; Kim, Ji-Eun; Park, Soo Jin; Jeong, Min Sook; Ha, Shin-Woo; Lee, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Jun Sung; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2013-06-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-np) are used in an increasing number of industrial products such as paint, coating and cosmetics, and in other biological applications. There have been many suggestions of a ZnO-np toxicity paradigm but the underlying molecular mechanisms about the toxicity of ZnO-np remain unclear. This study was done to determine the potential toxicity of ZnO-np and to assess the toxicity mechanism in normal skin cells. Synthesized ZnO-np generated reactive oxygen species (ROS), as determined by electron spin resonance. After uptake into cells, ZnO-np induced ROS in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. To demonstrate ZnO-np toxicity mechanism related to ROS, we detected abnormal autophagic vacuoles accumulation and mitochondria dysfunction after ZnO-np treatment. Furthermore mitochondria membrane potential and adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) production are decreased for culture with ZnO-np. We conclude that ZnO-np leads to cell death through autophagic vacuole accumulation and mitochondria damage in normal skin cells via ROS induction. Accordingly, ZnO-np may cause toxicity and the results highlight and need for careful regulation of ZnO-np production and use. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Lapatinib induces autophagic cell death and differentiation in acute myeloblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen YJ

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Yu-Jen Chen,1–4 Li-Wen Fang,5 Wen-Chi Su,6,7 Wen-Yi Hsu,1 Kai-Chien Yang,1 Huey-Lan Huang8 1Department of Medical Research, 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Mackay Memorial Hospital, 3Institute of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, 4Institute of Pharmacology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 5Department of Nutrition, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, 6Research Center for Emerging Viruses, China Medical University Hospital, 7Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, 8Department of Bioscience Technology, College of Health Science, Chang Jung Christian University, Tainan, Taiwan, Republic of China Abstract: Lapatinib is an oral-form dual tyrosine kinase inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR or ErbB/Her superfamily members with anticancer activity. In this study, we examined the effects and mechanism of action of lapatinib on several human leukemia cells lines, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML, chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL cells. We found that lapatinib inhibited the growth of human AML U937, HL-60, NB4, CML KU812, MEG-01, and ALL Jurkat T cells. Among these leukemia cell lines, lapatinib induced apoptosis in HL-60, NB4, and Jurkat cells, but induced nonapoptotic cell death in U937, K562, and MEG-01 cells. Moreover, lapatinib treatment caused autophagic cell death as shown by positive acridine orange staining, the massive formation of vacuoles as seen by electronic microscopy, and the upregulation of LC3-II, ATG5, and ATG7 in AML U937 cells. Furthermore, autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine and knockdown of ATG5, ATG7, and Beclin-1 using short hairpin RNA (shRNA partially rescued lapatinib-induced cell death. In addition, the induction of phagocytosis and ROS production as well as the upregulation of surface markers CD14 and CD68 was detected in lapatinib-treated U937 cells, suggesting the induction of

  4. Precise temporal regulation of roughest is required for correct salivary gland autophagic cell death in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Claudio R; Moda, Livia M R; Octacilio-Silva, Shirlei; Anhezini, Lucas; Machado-Gitai, Luciana C H; Ramos, Ricardo Guelerman P

    2009-07-01

    The Drosophila roughest (rst) locus encodes an immunoglobulin superfamily transmembrane glycoprotein implicated in a variety of embryonic and postembryonic developmental processes. Here we demonstrate a previously unnoticed role for this gene in the autophagic elimination of larval salivary glands during early pupal stages by showing that overexpression of the Rst protein ectodomain in early pupa leads to persistence of salivary glands up to at least 12 hours after head eversion, although with variable penetrance. The same phenotype is observed in individuals carrying the dominant regulatory allele rst(D), but not in loss of function alleles. Analysis of persistent glands at the ultrastructural level showed that programmed cell death starts at the right time but is arrested at an early stage of the process. Finally we describe the expression pattern and intracellular distribution of Rst in wild type and rst(D) mutants, showing that its downregulation in salivary glands at the beginning of pupal stage is an important factor in the correct implementation of the autophagic program of this tissue in space and time. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Time course of programmed cell death, which included autophagic features, in hybrid tobacco cells expressing hybrid lethality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Naoya; Nihei, Saori; Miyakawa, Naoto; Hirasawa, Tadashi; Kanekatsu, Motoki; Marubashi, Wataru; van Doorn, Wouter G; Yamada, Tetsuya

    2016-12-01

    PCD with features of vacuolar cell death including autophagy-related features were detected in hybrid tobacco cells, and detailed time course of features of vacuolar cell death were established. A type of interspecific Nicotiana hybrid, Nicotiana suaveolens × N. tabacum exhibits temperature-sensitive lethality. This lethality results from programmed cell death (PCD) in hybrid seedlings, but this PCD occurs only in seedlings and suspension-cultured cells grown at 28 °C, not those grown at 36 °C. Plant PCD can be classified as vacuolar cell death or necrotic cell death. Induction of autophagy, vacuolar membrane collapse and actin disorganization are each known features of vacuolar cell death, but observed cases of PCD showing all these features simultaneously are rare. In this study, these features of vacuolar cell death were evident in hybrid tobacco cells expressing hybrid lethality. Ion leakage, plasma membrane disruption, increased activity of vacuolar processing enzyme, vacuolar membrane collapse, and formation of punctate F-actin foci were each evident in these cells. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that macroautophagic structures formed and tonoplasts ruptured in these cells. The number of cells that contained monodansylcadaverine (MDC)-stained structures and the abundance of nine autophagy-related gene transcripts increased just before cell death at 28 °C; these features were not evident at 36 °C. We assessed whether an autophagic inhibitor, wortmannin (WM), influenced lethality in hybrid cells. After the hybrid cell began to die, WM suppressed increases in ion leakage and cell deaths, and it decreased the number of cells containing MDC-stained structures. These results showed that several features indicative of autophagy and vacuolar cell death were evident in the hybrid tobacco cells subject to lethality. In addition, we documented a detailed time course of these vacuolar cell death features.

  6. Polyphenols purified from the Brazilian aroeira plant (Schinus terebinthifolius, Raddi) induce apoptotic and autophagic cell death of DU145 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queires, L C S; Fauvel-Lafètve, F; Terry, S; De la Taille, A; Kouyoumdjian, J C; Chopin, D K; Vacherot, F; Rodrigues, L E A; Crépin, M

    2006-01-01

    Polyphenols extracted from many plants have shown antiproliferative and antitumor activities in a wide range of carcinogenesis models. The antiproliferative effects of polyphenols purified from the Brazilian aroeira plant (Schinus terebinthifolius, Raddi) were investigated on the androgen-insensitive DU145 human prostatic carcinoma cell line. A F3 fraction purified from leaf extract inhibited the DU145 cell proliferation more than 30-fold compared to the crude extract. By flow cytometric analysis, the polyphenol fraction was demonstrated to induce G0/G1 cell growth arrest and cell apoptosis. This apoptosis was evidenced by caspase 3 stimulation in F3-treated cells as compared to crude extract treated cells. The acid phosphatase activity of lysosomes was strongly activated in the lysosomal fraction of the F3-treated DU145 cells. This lysosomal activation, together with the appearance of autophagic vacuoles, suggests that "type 2 physiological cell death" was also involved in this antiproliferative effect. HPLC analysis of this F3 fraction showed 18 different subfractions. Among these subfractions, F3-3, F3-7 and F3-13 strongly inhibited DU145 cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. However, the nature of these polyphenols remains unknown since only one (Isoquercitrin) of the tested pure polyphenols co-migrated with F3-13. Since lysosomotropic drugs are considered as possible regulators of lysosome activity, aroeira polyphenols could target lysosomes of prostatic cancer cells to induce autophagic cell death.

  7. Cigarette smoke extract induces prolonged endoplasmic reticulum stress and autophagic cell death in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csordas, Adam; Kreutmayer, Simone; Ploner, Christian; Braun, Peter R; Karlas, Alexander; Backovic, Aleksandar; Wick, Georg; Bernhard, David

    2011-10-01

    Consumption of cigarette smoke (CS) is a well-known risk factor for early atherosclerosis; yet, the underlying mechanisms of smoking-associated atherosclerosis are poorly understood. Based on the previous results indicating that CS-induced endothelial cell death neither shows typical features of apoptosis nor of necrosis, we investigated the role of autophagy in CS extract (CSE)-induced cell death of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Here, we demonstrate that overexpression of the classical apoptosis inhibitor BCL-XL had no protective effect on CSE-induced cell death, whereas the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenin and an shRNAi-mediated knockdown of the autophagy mediator ATG5 significantly delayed cell death. Our results indicate that CSE induces an excess accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and consequently the onset of the unfolded protein response. We provide evidence that the ER-resident kinase PERK is a major transducer of ER stress leading to phosphorylation of eIF2α and attenuation of protein synthesis. Finally, we show that prolonged ER stress in cells subjected to CS is followed by activation of an autophagic programme. CSE-induced autophagy is characterized by an increase in LC3 II/I ratio and activation ATG12. The autophagic signalling pathway via energy depletion and consequent activation AMP-activated protein kinase could be excluded. Our results confirm and extend previous findings reporting on the induction of autophagy by CSE in the lung. We show that protein damage caused by CSE activates autophagy, ultimately resulting in necrotic death of HUVECs. Via this mechanism, cigarette smoking may contribute to the deterioration of vascular endothelial function and the initiation of atherosclerosis.

  8. Benzyl isothiocyanate causes FoxO1-mediated autophagic death in human breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Xiao

    Full Text Available Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC, a constituent of edible cruciferous vegetables, inhibits growth of breast cancer cells but the mechanisms underlying growth inhibitory effect of BITC are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that BITC treatment causes FoxO1-mediated autophagic death in cultured human breast cancer cells. The BITC-treated breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, MDA-MB-468, BT-474, and BRI-JM04 and MDA-MB-231 xenografts from BITC-treated mice exhibited several features characteristic of autophagy, including appearance of double-membrane vacuoles (transmission electron microscopy and acidic vesicular organelles (acridine orange staining, cleavage of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3, and/or suppression of p62 (p62/SQSTM1 or sequestosome 1 expression. On the other hand, a normal human mammary epithelial cell line (MCF-10A was resistant to BITC-induced autophagy. BITC-mediated inhibition of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cell viability was partially but statistically significantly attenuated in the presence of autophagy inhibitors 3-methyl adenine and bafilomycin A1. Stable overexpression of Mn-superoxide dismutase, which was fully protective against apoptosis, conferred only partial protection against BITC-induced autophagy. BITC treatment decreased phosphorylation of mTOR and its downstream targets (P70s6k and 4E-BP1 in cultured MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells and MDA-MB-231 xenografts, but activation of mTOR by transient overexpression of its positive regulator Rheb failed to confer protection against BITC-induced autophagy. Autophagy induction by BITC was associated with increased expression and acetylation of FoxO1. Furthermore, autophagy induction and cell growth inhibition resulting from BITC exposure were significantly attenuated by small interfering RNA knockdown of FoxO1. In conclusion, the present study provides novel insights into the molecular circuitry of BITC-induced cell death involving FoxO1-mediated autophagy.

  9. Andrographolide induces autophagic cell death in human liver cancer cells through cyclophilin D-mediated mitochondrial permeability transition pore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Feng, Lina; Nie, Hao; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2012-11-01

    Liver cancer is the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide and about half of the patients with liver cancer require adjuvant therapy after surgical resection. Therefore, development of novel agents to eradicate cancer cells may constitute a viable approach to treat patients with liver cancer. Andrographolide, a diterpenoid lactone isolated from Andrographis paniculata, is known to possess potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antineoplastic and antiviral properties. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effect of andrographolide on human liver cancer cells and explored the cell death mechanism. Andrographolide induced a cell death distinct from apoptosis in multiple human liver cancer cells. The death was characterized by autophagy as evidenced by the accumulation of LC3 II and autophagosomes, and the formation of puncta GFP-LC3. This autophagy as well as cytotoxicity caused by andrographolide could be effectively prevented by 3-methyladenine (a chemical inhibitor of autophagy). Mechanistic study indicated that andrographolide induced autophagic cell death by disruption of mitochondrial transmembrane potential and elevation of reactive oxygen species, which were correlated with mitochondrial permeability transition pore Inhibition of cyclophilin D (a component of MPTP) by cyclosporin A or abrogation of its expression by small interfering RNA significantly suppressed the cytotoxicity of andrographolide, suggesting that cyclophilin D may play an important role in mediating andrographolide-induced cytotoxicity. Taken together, our findings unveil a novel mechanism of drug action by andrographolide in liver cancer cells and suggest that andrographolide may represent a promising novel agent in the treatment of liver cancer.

  10. Neuroprotective effects of Activin A on endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptotic and autophagic PC12 cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long-xing Xue

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Activin A, a member of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily, plays a neuroprotective role in multiple neurological diseases. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress-mediated apoptotic and autophagic cell death is implicated in a wide range of diseases, including cerebral ischemia and neurodegenerative diseases. Thapsigargin was used to induce PC12 cell death, and Activin A was used for intervention. Our results showed that Activin A significantly inhibited morphological changes in thapsigargin-induced apoptotic cells, and the expression of apoptosis-associated proteins [cleaved-caspase-12, C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP and cleaved-caspase-3] and biomarkers of autophagy (Beclin-1 and light chain 3, and downregulated the expression of thapsigargin-induced ER stress-associated proteins [inositol requiring enzyme-1 (IRE1, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2, apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK and p38]. The inhibition of thapsigargin-induced cell death was concentration-dependent. These findings suggest that administration of Activin A protects PC12 cells against ER stress-mediated apoptotic and autophagic cell death by inhibiting the activation of the IRE1-TRAF2-ASK1-JNK/p38 cascade.

  11. Death by over-eating: The Gaucher disease associated gene GBA1, identified in a screen for mediators of autophagic cell death, is necessary for developmental cell death in Drosophila midgut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schejter, Eyal; Bialik, Shani; Levin-Zaidman, Smadar; Kimchi, Adi

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autophagy is critical for homeostasis and cell survival during stress, but can also lead to cell death, a little understood process that has been shown to contribute to developmental cell death in lower model organisms, and to human cancer cell death. We recently reported1 on our thorough molecular and morphologic characterization of an autophagic cell death system involving resveratrol treatment of lung carcinoma cells. To gain mechanistic insight into this death program, we performed a signalome-wide RNAi screen for genes whose functions are necessary for resveratrol-induced death. The screen identified GBA1, the gene encoding the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase, as an important mediator of autophagic cell death. Here we further show the physiological relevance of GBA1 to developmental cell death in midgut regression during Drosophila metamorphosis. We observed a delay in midgut cell death in two independent Gba1a RNAi lines, indicating the critical importance of Gba1a for midgut development. Interestingly, loss-of-function GBA1 mutations lead to Gaucher Disease and are a significant risk factor for Parkinson Disease, which have been associated with defective autophagy. Thus GBA1 is a conserved element critical for maintaining proper levels of autophagy, with high levels leading to autophagic cell death. PMID:28933588

  12. Phosphorylation of p62 by AMP-activated protein kinase mediates autophagic cell death in adult hippocampal neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Shinwon; Jeong, Seol-Hwa; Yi, Kyungrim; Chung, Kyung Min; Hong, Caroline Jeeyeon; Kim, Seong Who; Kim, Eun-Kyoung; Yu, Seong-Woon

    2017-08-18

    In the adult brain, programmed death of neural stem cells is considered to be critical for tissue homeostasis and cognitive function and is dysregulated in neurodegeneration. Previously, we have reported that adult rat hippocampal neural (HCN) stem cells undergo autophagic cell death (ACD) following insulin withdrawal. Because the apoptotic capability of the HCN cells was intact, our findings suggested activation of unique molecular mechanisms linking insulin withdrawal to ACD rather than apoptosis. Here, we report that phosphorylation of autophagy-associated protein p62 by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) drives ACD and mitophagy in HCN cells. Pharmacological inhibition of AMPK or genetic ablation of the AMPK α2 subunit by clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 genome editing suppressed ACD, whereas AMPK activation promoted ACD in insulin-deprived HCN cells. We found that following insulin withdrawal AMPK phosphorylated p62 at a novel site, Ser-293/Ser-294 (in rat and human p62, respectively). Phosphorylated p62 translocated to mitochondria and induced mitophagy and ACD. Interestingly, p62 phosphorylation at Ser-293 was not required for staurosporine-induced apoptosis in HCN cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the direct phosphorylation of p62 by AMPK. Our data suggest that AMPK-mediated p62 phosphorylation is an ACD-specific signaling event and provide novel mechanistic insight into the molecular mechanisms in ACD. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Andrographolide Induces Autophagic Cell Death and Inhibits Invasion and Metastasis of Human Osteosarcoma Cells in An Autophagy-Dependent Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Osteosarcoma (OS is the most common primary malignant tumor of bone tissue. Although treatment effectiveness has improved, the OS survival rate has fluctuated in recent years. Andrographolide (AG has been reported to have antitumor activity against a variety of tumors. Our aim was to investigate the effects and potential mechanisms of AG in human osteosarcoma. Methods: Cell viability and morphological changes were assessed by MTT and live/dead assays. Apoptosis was detected using Annexin V-FITC/PI double staining, DAPI, and caspase-3 assays. Autophagy was detected with mRFP-GFP-LC3 adenovirus transfection and western blot. Cell migration and invasion were detected by wound healing assay and Transwell® experiments. Results: AG dose-dependently reduced the viability of osteosarcoma cells. No increase in apoptosis was detected in AG-treated human OS MG-63 and U-2OS cells, and the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD did not attenuate AG-induced cell death. However, AG induced autophagy by suppressing PI3K/Akt/mTOR and enhancing JNK signaling pathways. 3-MA and Beclin-1 siRNA could reverse the cytotoxic effects of AG. In addition, AG inhibited the invasion and metastasis of OS, and this effect could be reversed with Beclin-1 siRNA. Conclusion: AG inhibits viability and induces autophagic death in OS cells. AG-induced autophagy inhibits the invasion and metastasis of OS.

  14. Andrographolide Induces Autophagic Cell Death and Inhibits Invasion and Metastasis of Human Osteosarcoma Cells in An Autophagy-Dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Zhang, Yan; Zou, Jilong; Yan, Lixin; Yu, Xiufeng; Lu, Peng; Wu, Xiaomeng; Li, Qiaozhi; Gu, Rui; Zhu, Daling

    2017-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary malignant tumor of bone tissue. Although treatment effectiveness has improved, the OS survival rate has fluctuated in recent years. Andrographolide (AG) has been reported to have antitumor activity against a variety of tumors. Our aim was to investigate the effects and potential mechanisms of AG in human osteosarcoma. Cell viability and morphological changes were assessed by MTT and live/dead assays. Apoptosis was detected using Annexin V-FITC/PI double staining, DAPI, and caspase-3 assays. Autophagy was detected with mRFP-GFP-LC3 adenovirus transfection and western blot. Cell migration and invasion were detected by wound healing assay and Transwell® experiments. AG dose-dependently reduced the viability of osteosarcoma cells. No increase in apoptosis was detected in AG-treated human OS MG-63 and U-2OS cells, and the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD did not attenuate AG-induced cell death. However, AG induced autophagy by suppressing PI3K/Akt/mTOR and enhancing JNK signaling pathways. 3-MA and Beclin-1 siRNA could reverse the cytotoxic effects of AG. In addition, AG inhibited the invasion and metastasis of OS, and this effect could be reversed with Beclin-1 siRNA. AG inhibits viability and induces autophagic death in OS cells. AG-induced autophagy inhibits the invasion and metastasis of OS. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Staurosporine-induced cell death in Tetrahymena thermophila has mixed characteristics of both apoptotic and autophagic degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, S T; Chemnitz, J; Straarup, E M

    1998-01-01

    phosphorylation of the PKC-specific substrate, myelin basic protein fragment 4-14. Our results show that cell death in the presence of staurosporine is associated with morphological and ultrastructural changes similar to both apoptosis and autophagic degeneration, but these in turn can be postponed or prevented...... by 8-bromo-cyclic GMP, protoporphyrin IX, hemin or actinomycin D, although phorbol ester and insulin were ineffective. The results support the notion that staurosporine-induced cell death is an active process, associated with and/or requiring de novo RNA synthesis.......Staurosporine blocks signal transduction associated with cell survival, proliferation and chemosensory behaviour in the ciliated protozoan, Tetrahymena thermophila. Staurosporine inhibits cell proliferation and in vivo protein phosphorylation induced by phorbol ester. It also reduces the in vitro...

  16. Benzo[a]pyrene Induces Autophagic and Pyroptotic Death Simultaneously in HL-7702 Human Normal Liver Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Li; Liu, Junyi; Deng, Hong; Gao, Chunxia

    2017-11-08

    As a common polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compound, benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is readily produced in processing of oil and fatty foods. It is not only a strong carcinogen but also a substance with strong immunotoxicity and reproduction toxicity. Autophagy and pyroptosis are two types of programmed cell death. Whether or not BaP damages body tissues via autophagy or pyroptosis remains unknown. The present study investigated the effects of BaP on autophagy and pyroptosis in HL-7702 cells. The results showed that BaP induced cell death in HL-7702 cells enhanced the intracellular levels of ROS and arrested the cell cycle at the S phase. Additionally, BaP resulted in cell death through autophagy and pyroptosis. Compared with the BaP group, the autophagy inhibitor 3-MA significantly (p < 0.01) inhibited the release of LDH by 70.53% ± 0.46 and NO by 50.36% ± 0.80, the increase of electrical conductivity by 12.08% ± 0.55, and the expressions of pyroptotic marker proteins (Caspase-1, Cox-2, IL-1β, IL-18). The pyroptosis inhibitor Ac-YVAD-CM also notably (p < 0.01) blocked BaP-induced autophagic cell death characterized by the increase of autophagic vacuoles and overexpression of Beclin-1 and LC3-II. In conclusion, BaP led to injury by inducing autophagy and pyroptosis simultaneously, the two of which coexisted and promoted each other in HL-7702 cells.

  17. Novel monofunctional platinum (II) complex Mono-Pt induces apoptosis-independent autophagic cell death in human ovarian carcinoma cells, distinct from cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Yang-Miao; Zhang, Li; Huang, Bin; Tao, Fei-Fei; Chen, Wei; Guo, Zi-Jian; Xu, Qiang; Sun, Yang

    2013-07-01

    Failure to engage apoptosis appears to be a leading mechanism of resistance to traditional platinum drugs in patients with ovarian cancer. Therefore, an alternative strategy to induce cell death is needed for the chemotherapy of this apoptosis-resistant cancer. Here we report that autophagic cell death, distinct from cisplatin-induced apoptosis, is triggered by a novel monofunctional platinum (II) complex named Mono-Pt in human ovarian carcinoma cells. Mono-Pt-induced cell death has the following features: cytoplasmic vacuolation, caspase-independent, no nuclear fragmentation or chromatin condensation, and no apoptotic bodies. These characteristics integrally indicated that Mono-Pt, rather than cisplatin, initiated a nonapoptotic cell death in Caov-3 ovarian carcinoma cells. Furthermore, incubation of the cells with Mono-Pt but not with cisplatin produced an increasing punctate distribution of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3), and an increasing ratio of LC3-II to LC3-I. Mono-Pt also caused the formation of autophagic vacuoles as revealed by monodansylcadaverine staining and transmission electron microscopy. In addition, Mono-Pt-induced cell death was significantly inhibited by the knockdown of either BECN1 or ATG7 gene expression, or by autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine, chloroquine and bafilomycin A 1. Moreover, the effect of Mono-Pt involved the AKT1-MTOR-RPS6KB1 pathway and MAPK1 (ERK2)/MAPK3 (ERK1) signaling, since the MTOR inhibitor rapamycin increased, while the MAPK1/3 inhibitor U0126 decreased Mono-Pt-induced autophagic cell death. Taken together, our results suggest that Mono-Pt exerts anticancer effect via autophagic cell death in apoptosis-resistant ovarian cancer. These findings lead to increased options for anticancer platinum drugs to induce cell death in cancer.

  18. G9a Inhibition Induces Autophagic Cell Death via AMPK/mTOR Pathway in Bladder Transitional Cell Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Li

    Full Text Available G9a has been reported to highly express in bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC and G9a inhibition significantly attenuates cell proliferation, but the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. The present study aimed at examining the potential role of autophagy in the anti-proliferation effect of G9a inhibition on TCC T24 and UMUC-3 cell lines in vitro. We found that both pharmaceutical and genetical G9a inhibition significantly attenuated cell proliferation by MTT assay, Brdu incorporation assay and colony formation assay. G9a inhibition induced autophagy like morphology as determined by transmission electron microscope and LC-3 fluorescence assay. In addition, autophagy flux was induced by G9a inhibition in TCC cells, as determined by p62 turnover assay and LC-3 turnover assay. The autophagy induced positively contributed to the inhibition of cell proliferation because the growth attenuation capacity of G9a inhibition was reversed by autophagy inhibitors 3-MA. Mechanically, AMPK/mTOR pathway was identified to be involved in the regulation of G9a inhibition induced autophagy. Intensively activating mTOR by Rheb overexpression attenuated autophagy and autophagic cell death induced by G9a inhibition. In addition, pre-inhibiting AMPK by Compound C attenuated autophagy together with the anti-proliferation effect induced by G9a inhibition while pre-activating AMPK by AICAR enhanced them. In conclusion, our results indicate that G9a inhibition induces autophagy through activating AMPK/mTOR pathway and the autophagy induced positively contributes to the inhibition of cell proliferation in TCC cells. These findings shed some light on the functional role of G9a in cell metabolism and suggest that G9a might be a therapeutic target in bladder TCC in the future.

  19. Mild hyperthermia enhances sensitivity of gastric cancer cells to chemotherapy through reactive oxygen species-induced autophagic death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, Ming-Chen; Long, Hui; Cui, Shu-Zhong; Gong, Yuan-Feng; Yan, Zhao-Fei; Wang, Shuai; Wu, Yin-Bing

    2017-06-01

    Mild hyperthermia enhances anti-cancer effects of chemotherapy, but the precise biochemical mechanisms involved are not clear. This study was carried out to investigate whether mild hyperthermia sensitizes gastric cancer cells to chemotherapy through reactive oxygen species-induced autophagic death. In total, 20 BABL/c mice of MKN-45 human gastric cancer tumor model were divided into hyperthermia + chemotherapy group, hyperthermia group, chemotherapy group, N-acetyl-L-cysteine group, and mock group. Reactive oxygen species production and expression of autophagy-related genes Beclin1, LC3B, and mammalian target of rapamycin were determined. The relationships between tumor growth regression, expression of autophagy-related genes, and reactive oxygen species production were evaluated. Tumor size and wet weight of hyperthermia + chemotherapy group was significantly decreased relative to values from hyperthermia group, chemotherapy group, N-acetyl-L-cysteine group, and mock group ( F = 6.92, p Reactive oxygen species production was significantly higher in hyperthermia + chemotherapy group than in hyperthermia, chemotherapy, and mock groups. The expression levels of Beclin1 and LC3B were significantly higher, while those of mammalian target of rapamycin were significantly lower in hyperthermia + chemotherapy group than in hyperthermia, chemotherapy, and mock groups. Tumor growth regression was consistent with changes in reactive oxygen species production and expression of autophagy-related genes. N-acetyl-L-cysteine inhibited changes in the expression of the autophagy-related genes and also suppressed reactive oxygen species production and tumor growth. Hyperthermia + chemotherapy increase expression of autophagy-related genes Beclin1 and LC3B, decrease expression of mammalian target of rapamycin, and concomitantly increase reactive oxygen species generation. These results strongly indicate that mild hyperthermia enhances sensitivity of gastric

  20. Kaempferol induces autophagic cell death of hepatocellular carcinoma cells via activating AMPK signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Yu, Yi-Qun; Yang, Qi-Lian; Shen, Chun-Ying; Wang, Xiao-Juan

    2017-10-17

    In the present study, we demonstrate that Kaempferol inhibited survival and proliferation of established human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines (HepG2, Huh-7, BEL7402, and SMMC) and primary human HCC cells. Kaempferol treatment in HCC cells induced profound AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation, which led to Ulk1 phosphorylation, mTOR complex 1 inhibition and cell autophagy. Autophagy induction was reflected by Beclin-1/autophagy gene 5 upregulation and p62 degradation as well as light chain 3B (LC3B)-I to LC3B-II conversion and LC3B puncta formation. Inhibition of AMPK, via AMPKα1 shRNA or dominant negative mutation, reversed above signaling changes. AMPK inhibition also largely inhibited Kaempferol-induced cytotoxicity in HCC cells. Autophagy inhibition, by 3-methyaldenine or Beclin-1 shRNA, also protected HCC cells from Kaempferol. Kaempferol downregulated melanoma antigen 6, the AMPK ubiquitin ligase, causing AMPKα1 stabilization and accumulation. We conclude that Kaempferol inhibits human HCC cells via activating AMPK signaling.

  1. Doxorubicin resistance mediated by cytoplasmic macrophage colony-stimulating factor is associated with switch from apoptosis to autophagic cell death in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mengxia; Zhang, Hailiang; Tang, Fan; Wang, Yuhua; Mo, Zhongcheng; Lei, Xiaoyong

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage colony-stimulating factor is a vital factor in maintaining the biological function of monocyte–macrophage lineage. It is expressed in many tumor tissues and cancer cells. Recent findings indicate that macrophage colony-stimulating factor might contribute to chemoresistance, but the precise mechanisms are unclear. This study was to explore the effect of macrophage colony-stimulating factor on doxorubicin resistance in MCF-7 breast cancer cells and the possible mechanism. In the study, the human breast cancer cells, MCF-7, were transfected with macrophage colony-stimulating factor. We document that cytoplasmic macrophage colony-stimulating factor induces doxorubicin resistance and inhibits apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. Further studies demonstrated that cytoplasmic macrophage colony-stimulating factor-mediated apoptosis inhibition was dependent on the activation of PI3K/Akt/Survivin pathway. More importantly, we found that macrophage colony-stimulating factor-induced autophagic cell death in doxorubicin-treated MCF-7 cells. Taken together, we show for the first time that macrophage colony-stimulating factor-induced doxorubicin resistance is associated with the changes in cell death response with defective apoptosis and promotion of autophagic cell death. PMID:27439542

  2. Araguspongine C Induces Autophagic Death in Breast Cancer Cells through Suppression of c-Met and HER2 Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed R. Akl

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Receptor tyrosine kinases are key regulators of cellular growth and proliferation. Dysregulations of receptor tyrosine kinases in cancer cells may promote tumorigenesis by multiple mechanisms including enhanced cell survival and inhibition of cell death. Araguspongines represent a group of macrocyclic oxaquinolizidine alkaloids isolated from the marine sponge Xestospongia species. This study evaluated the anticancer activity of the known oxaquinolizidine alkaloids araguspongines A, C, K and L, and xestospongin B against breast cancer cells. Araguspongine C inhibited the proliferation of multiple breast cancer cell lines in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, araguspongine C-induced autophagic cell death in HER2-overexpressing BT-474 breast cancer cells was characterized by vacuole formation and upregulation of autophagy markers including LC3A/B, Atg3, Atg7, and Atg16L. Araguspongine C-induced autophagy was associated with suppression of c-Met and HER2 receptor tyrosine kinase activation. Further in-silico docking studies and cell-free Z-LYTE assays indicated the potential of direct interaction between araguspongine C and the receptor tyrosine kinases c-Met and HER2 at their kinase domains. Remarkably, araguspongine C treatment resulted in the suppression of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling cascade in breast cancer cells undergoing autophagy. Induction of autophagic death in BT-474 cells was also associated with decreased levels of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor upon treatment with effective concentration of araguspongine C. In conclusion, results of this study are the first to reveal the potential of araguspongine C as an inhibitor to receptor tyrosine kinases resulting in the induction of autophagic cell death in breast cancer cells.

  3. Studying p53 family proteins in yeast: Induction of autophagic cell death and modulation by interactors and small molecules

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    Leão, Mariana; Gomes, Sara; Bessa, Cláudia; Soares, Joana; Raimundo, Liliana [REQUIMTE, Laboratório de Microbiologia, Departamento de Ciências Biológicas, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade do Porto, Rua de Jorge Viterbo Ferreira n. 164, 4050-313 Porto (Portugal); Monti, Paola; Fronza, Gilberto [Mutagenesis Unit, Istituto di Ricerca e Cura a Carattere Scientifico Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria San Martino-IST-Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro, 16132 Genoa (Italy); Pereira, Clara [REQUIMTE, Laboratório de Microbiologia, Departamento de Ciências Biológicas, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade do Porto, Rua de Jorge Viterbo Ferreira n. 164, 4050-313 Porto (Portugal); Saraiva, Lucília, E-mail: lucilia.saraiva@ff.up.pt [REQUIMTE, Laboratório de Microbiologia, Departamento de Ciências Biológicas, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade do Porto, Rua de Jorge Viterbo Ferreira n. 164, 4050-313 Porto (Portugal)

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used to individually study human p53, p63 (full length and truncated forms) and p73. Using this cell system, the effect of these proteins on cell proliferation and death, and the influence of MDM2 and MDMX on their activities were analyzed. When expressed in yeast, wild-type p53, TAp63, ΔNp63 and TAp73 induced growth inhibition associated with S-phase cell cycle arrest. This growth inhibition was accompanied by reactive oxygen species production and autophagic cell death. Furthermore, they stimulated rapamycin-induced autophagy. On the contrary, none of the tested p53 family members induced apoptosis either per se or after apoptotic stimuli. As previously reported for p53, also TAp63, ΔNp63 and TAp73 increased actin expression levels and its depolarization, suggesting that ACT1 is also a p63 and p73 putative yeast target gene. Additionally, MDM2 and MDMX inhibited the activity of all tested p53 family members in yeast, although the effect was weaker on TAp63. Moreover, Nutlin-3a and SJ-172550 were identified as potential inhibitors of the p73 interaction with MDM2 and MDMX, respectively. Altogether, the yeast-based assays herein developed can be envisaged as a simplified cell system to study the involvement of p53 family members in autophagy, the modulation of their activities by specific interactors (MDM2 and MDMX), and the potential of new small molecules to modulate these interactions. - Highlights: • p53, p63 and p73 are individually studied in the yeast S. cerevisiae. • p53 family members induce ROS production, cell cycle arrest and autophagy in yeast. • p53 family members increase actin depolarization and expression levels in yeast. • MDM2 and MDMX inhibit the activity of p53 family members in yeast. • Yeast can be a useful tool to study the biology and drugability of p53, p63 and p73.

  4. Studying p53 family proteins in yeast: Induction of autophagic cell death and modulation by interactors and small molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leão, Mariana; Gomes, Sara; Bessa, Cláudia; Soares, Joana; Raimundo, Liliana; Monti, Paola; Fronza, Gilberto; Pereira, Clara; Saraiva, Lucília

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used to individually study human p53, p63 (full length and truncated forms) and p73. Using this cell system, the effect of these proteins on cell proliferation and death, and the influence of MDM2 and MDMX on their activities were analyzed. When expressed in yeast, wild-type p53, TAp63, ΔNp63 and TAp73 induced growth inhibition associated with S-phase cell cycle arrest. This growth inhibition was accompanied by reactive oxygen species production and autophagic cell death. Furthermore, they stimulated rapamycin-induced autophagy. On the contrary, none of the tested p53 family members induced apoptosis either per se or after apoptotic stimuli. As previously reported for p53, also TAp63, ΔNp63 and TAp73 increased actin expression levels and its depolarization, suggesting that ACT1 is also a p63 and p73 putative yeast target gene. Additionally, MDM2 and MDMX inhibited the activity of all tested p53 family members in yeast, although the effect was weaker on TAp63. Moreover, Nutlin-3a and SJ-172550 were identified as potential inhibitors of the p73 interaction with MDM2 and MDMX, respectively. Altogether, the yeast-based assays herein developed can be envisaged as a simplified cell system to study the involvement of p53 family members in autophagy, the modulation of their activities by specific interactors (MDM2 and MDMX), and the potential of new small molecules to modulate these interactions. - Highlights: • p53, p63 and p73 are individually studied in the yeast S. cerevisiae. • p53 family members induce ROS production, cell cycle arrest and autophagy in yeast. • p53 family members increase actin depolarization and expression levels in yeast. • MDM2 and MDMX inhibit the activity of p53 family members in yeast. • Yeast can be a useful tool to study the biology and drugability of p53, p63 and p73

  5. 1-Hydroxy-3-[(E)-4-(piperazine-diium)but-2-enyloxy]-9,10-anthraquinone ditrifluoroactate induced autophagic cell death in human PC3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, A-Mei; Lin, Kai-Wei; Lin, Wei-Hong; Wu, Li-Hung; Chang, Hao-Chun; Ni, Chujun; Wang, Danny Ling; Hsu, Hsue-Yin; Su, Chun-Li; Shih, Chiaho

    2018-02-01

    The autophagy of human prostate cancer cells (PC3 cells) induced by a new anthraquinone derivative, 1-Hydroxy-3-[(E)-4-(piperazine-diium)but-2-enyloxy]-9,10-anthraquinone ditrifluoroactate (PA) was investigated, and the relationship between autophagy and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was studied. The results indicated that PA induced PC3 cell death in a time- and dose-dependent manner, could inhibit PC3 cell growth by G1 phase cell cycle arrest and corresponding decrease in the G2/M cell population and induced S-phase arrest accompanied by a significant decrease G2/M and G1 phase numbers after PC3 cells treated with PA for 48 h, and increased the accumulation of autophagolysosomes and microtubule-associated protein LC3-ll, a marker of autophagy. However, these phenomenon were not observed in the group pretreated with the autophagy inhibitor 3-MA or Bafilomycin A1 (BAF), suggesting that PA induced PC3 cell autophagy. In addition, we found that PA triggered ROS generation in cells, while the levels of ROS decreased in the N-acetylcysteine (NAC) co-treatment, indicating that PA-mediated autophagy was partly blocked by NAC. In summary, the autophagic cell death of human PC3 cells mediated by PA-triggered ROS generation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A novel cycloartane triterpenoid from Cimicifuga induces apoptotic and autophagic cell death in human colon cancer HT-29 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiaoli; Liu, Jing; Nian, Yin; Qiu, Ming-Hua; Luo, Ying; Zhang, Jihong

    2017-04-01

    The extract from Cimicifuga, a genus of flowering plants, has been demonstrated to have mainly therapeutic effects on menstrual and menopausal symptoms and also exhibits immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial activity. Moreover, the anticancer effects of Cimicifuga have been reported, but the underlying mechanism causing cancer cell death has been poorly described. The present study was designed to investigate the antitumor effects and underlying molecular mechanisms of cimigenol (KY17), a novel cycloartane triterpenoid from Cimicifuga. KY17-induced autophagy and apoptotic cell death in human colon cancer cells (HT-29) was investigated. KY17 treatment induced growth inhibition and apoptotic cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. The induction of apoptosis was confirmed by a change in cell morphology, and an increase in the G2/M phase, as well as increased protein levels of cleaved-caspase-8 and -3; cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) in the HT-29 cells following KY17 treatment. In addition, autophagy was evaluated by the accumulation of acridine orange, the appearance of green fluorescent protein-light-chain 3 (LC3) punctate structures and increased levels of LC3-II protein expression. Furthermore, combination treatment with the autophagy inhibitor bafilomycin A1 enhanced the induction of apoptosis by KY17. Taken together, the present study provides new insight into the role of KY17 as a potential antitumor compound. Combination of KY17 with an autophagy inhibitor may be a valuable strategy for the chemoprevention or treatment of colon cancer.

  7. A novel strategy inducing autophagic cell death in Burkitt's lymphoma cells with anti-CD19-targeted liposomal rapamycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, K; Sato, T; Iyama, S; Tatekoshi, A; Hashimoto, A; Kamihara, Y; Horiguchi, H; Kikuchi, S; Kawano, Y; Takada, K; Hayashi, T; Miyanishi, K; Sato, Y; Takimoto, R; Kobune, M; Kato, J

    2014-01-01

    Relapsed or refractory Burkitt's lymphoma often has a poor prognosis in spite of intensive chemotherapy that induces apoptotic and/or necrotic death of lymphoma cells. Rapamycin (Rap) brings about autophagy, and could be another treatment. Further, anti-CD19-targeted liposomal delivery may enable Rap to kill lymphoma cells specifically. Rap was encapsulated by anionic liposome and conjugated with anti-CD19 antibody (CD19-GL-Rap) or anti-CD2 antibody (CD2-GL-Rap) as a control. A fluorescent probe Cy5.5 was also liposomized in the same way (CD19 or CD2-GL-Cy5.5) to examine the efficacy of anti-CD19-targeted liposomal delivery into CD19-positive Burkitt's lymphoma cell line, SKW6.4. CD19-GL-Cy5.5 was more effectively uptaken into SKW6.4 cells than CD2-GL-Cy5.5 in vitro. When the cells were inoculated subcutaneously into nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency mice, intravenously administered CD19-GL-Cy5.5 made the subcutaneous tumor fluorescent, while CD2-GL-Cy5.5 did not. Further, CD19-GL-Rap had a greater cytocidal effect on not only SKW6.4 cells but also Burkitt's lymphoma cells derived from patients than CD2-GL-Rap in vitro. The specific toxicity of CD19-GL-Rap was cancelled by neutralizing anti-CD19 antibody. The survival period of mice treated with intravenous CD19-GL-Rap was significantly longer than that of mice treated with CD2-GL-Rap after intraperitoneal inoculation of SKW6.4 cells. Anti-CD19-targeted liposomal Rap could be a promising lymphoma cell-specific treatment inducing autophagic cell death

  8. Src mediates extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation and autophagic cell death induced by cardiac glycosides in human non-small cell lung cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Zhan, Yuechen; Xu, Rong; Shao, Rongguang; Jiang, Jiandong; Wang, Zhen

    2015-06-01

    Aberrant Na(+) /K(+) -ATPases (NKA) expression is closely related to the incidence and development of cancer, making NKA targeted cancer therapy more intriguing. Cardiac glycosides (CGs) belong to NKA inhibitors and possess potent anti-cancer properties in many cancers. Our previous work demonstrates that CGs family member digoxin or ouabain induces autophagic cell death in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines through regulation of both mammalian target of rapamycin and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) pathway. However, what acts as an upstream regulator of ERK1/2 activation during autophagy induction remains obscure. In the present study, the role of Src in the ERK1/2 signaling pathway as well as autophagic cell death induced by either digoxin or ouabain was examined in A549 and H460 cells. Src is significantly activated simultaneously with mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2) and ERK1/2 activation upon the drug treatment. Moreover, Src inhibitor PP2 could block either drug induced MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, together with autophagic phenotypes in the cells. Knockdown of Src with siRNA causes the similar effect as PP2, both of which markedly alleviate the drugs' cytotoxicity. In addition, increased levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) are found to be involved in Src mediated autophagy. Together, this work provides evidences showing that Src mediates MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 pathway as well as ROS generation, and regulates autophagic cell death induced by the cardiac glycosides. These observations may further help understand the molecular mechanisms of autophagy induced by NKA inhibitors in NSCLC cells. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Attenuation of Aβ25–35-induced parallel autophagic and apoptotic cell death by gypenoside XVII through the estrogen receptor-dependent activation of Nrf2/ARE pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Xiangbao; Wang, Min; Sun, Guibo; Ye, Jingxue; Zhou, Yanhui; Dong, Xi; Wang, Tingting; Lu, Shan; Sun, Xiaobo

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid-beta (Aβ) has a pivotal function in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. To investigate Aβ neurotoxicity, we used an in vitro model that involves Aβ 25–35 -induced cell death in the nerve growth factor-induced differentiation of PC12 cells. Aβ 25–35 (20 μM) treatment for 24 h caused apoptotic cell death, as evidenced by significant cell viability reduction, LDH release, phosphatidylserine externalization, mitochondrial membrane potential disruption, cytochrome c release, caspase-3 activation, PARP cleavage, and DNA fragmentation in PC12 cells. Aβ 25–35 treatment led to autophagic cell death, as evidenced by augmented GFP-LC3 puncta, conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II, and increased LC3-II/LC3-I ratio. Aβ 25–35 treatment induced oxidative stress, as evidenced by intracellular ROS accumulation and increased production of mitochondrial superoxide, malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl, and 8-OHdG. Phytoestrogens have been proved to be protective against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity and regarded as relatively safe targets for AD drug development. Gypenoside XVII (GP-17) is a novel phytoestrogen isolated from Gynostemma pentaphyllum or Panax notoginseng. Pretreatment with GP-17 (10 μM) for 12 h increased estrogen response element reporter activity, activated PI3K/Akt pathways, inhibited GSK-3β, induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation, augmented antioxidant responsive element enhancer activity, upregulated heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) expression and activity, and provided protective effects against Aβ 25–35 -induced neurotoxicity, including oxidative stress, apoptosis, and autophagic cell death. In conclusion, GP-17 conferred protection against Aβ 25–35 -induced neurotoxicity through estrogen receptor-dependent activation of PI3K/Akt pathways, inactivation of GSK-3β and activation of Nrf2/ARE/HO-1 pathways. This finding might provide novel insights into understanding the mechanism for neuroprotective effects of phytoestrogens or gypenosides

  10. 1,1-Bis(3'-indolyl-1-(p-substituted phenylmethanes induce autophagic cell death in estrogen receptor negative breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chadalapaka Gayathri

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A novel series of methylene-substituted DIMs (C-DIMs, namely 1,1-bis(3'-indolyl-1-(p-substituted phenylmethanes containing t-butyl (DIM-C-pPhtBu and phenyl (DIM-C-pPhC6H5 groups inhibit proliferation of invasive estrogen receptor-negative MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-453 human breast cancer cell lines with IC50 values between 1-5 uM. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the pathways of C-DIM-induced cell death. Methods The effects of the C-DIMs on apoptotic, necrotic and autophagic cell death were determined using caspase inhibitors, measurement of lactate dehydrogenase release, and several markers of autophagy including Beclin and light chain associated protein 3 expression (LC3. Results The C-DIM compounds did not induce apoptosis and only DIM-C-pPhCF3 exhibited necrotic effects. However, treatment of MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-453 cells with C-DIMs resulted in accumulation of LC3-II compared to LC3-I protein, a characteristic marker of autophagy, and transient transfection of green fluorescent protein-LC3 also revealed that treatment with C-DIMs induced a redistribution of LC3 to autophagosomes after C-DIM treatment. In addition, the autofluorescent drug monodansylcadaverine (MDC, a specific autophagolysosome marker, accumulated in vacuoles after C-DIM treatment, and western blot analysis of lysates from cells treated with C-DIMs showed that the Beclin 1/Bcl-2 protein ratio increased. Conclusion The results suggest that C-DIM compounds may represent a new mechanism-based agent for treating drug-resistant ER-negative breast tumors through induction of autophagy.

  11. 1,1-Bis(3'-indolyl)-1-(p-substituted phenyl)methanes induce autophagic cell death in estrogen receptor negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderlaag, Kathy; Su, Yunpeng; Frankel, Arthur E; Burghardt, Robert C; Barhoumi, Rola; Chadalapaka, Gayathri; Jutooru, Indira; Safe, Stephen

    2010-12-03

    A novel series of methylene-substituted DIMs (C-DIMs), namely 1,1-bis(3'-indolyl)-1-(p-substituted phenyl)methanes containing t-butyl (DIM-C-pPhtBu) and phenyl (DIM-C-pPhC6H5) groups inhibit proliferation of invasive estrogen receptor-negative MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-453 human breast cancer cell lines with IC50 values between 1-5 uM. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the pathways of C-DIM-induced cell death. The effects of the C-DIMs on apoptotic, necrotic and autophagic cell death were determined using caspase inhibitors, measurement of lactate dehydrogenase release, and several markers of autophagy including Beclin and light chain associated protein 3 expression (LC3). The C-DIM compounds did not induce apoptosis and only DIM-C-pPhCF3 exhibited necrotic effects. However, treatment of MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-453 cells with C-DIMs resulted in accumulation of LC3-II compared to LC3-I protein, a characteristic marker of autophagy, and transient transfection of green fluorescent protein-LC3 also revealed that treatment with C-DIMs induced a redistribution of LC3 to autophagosomes after C-DIM treatment. In addition, the autofluorescent drug monodansylcadaverine (MDC), a specific autophagolysosome marker, accumulated in vacuoles after C-DIM treatment, and western blot analysis of lysates from cells treated with C-DIMs showed that the Beclin 1/Bcl-2 protein ratio increased. The results suggest that C-DIM compounds may represent a new mechanism-based agent for treating drug-resistant ER-negative breast tumors through induction of autophagy.

  12. Ginsenoside G-Rh2 synergizes with SMI-4a in anti-melanoma activity through autophagic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Da-Lun; Chen, Lei; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Wang, He-Li; Wang, Shuai; Liu, Wen-Bei

    2018-01-01

    Melanoma is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide, and SMI-4a and G-Rh2 exert anti-tumor activity in multiple cancer. However, SMI-4a as well as a synergistic relationship between SMI-4a and G-Rh2 in anti-melanoma capacity are still unknown. Therefore, we investigated the effects of SMI-4a and combined SMI-4a with G-Rh2 on the viability, apoptosis and autophagy of melanoma, and to preliminarily explore the underlying mechanism of SMI-4a and combined SMI-4a with G-Rh2 in inhibiting tumor growth. Cell viability was examined with cell counting Kit 8 assay and colony formation assay; Apoptosis was evaluated by flow cytometry and Caspase 3/7 activity assay; Western blotting was used to test proteins related to autophagy and the AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway; Tumor xenograft model in BALB/c nude mice was performed to evaluate the effects of SMI-4a and combined SMI-4a with G-Rh2 in anti-melanoma in vivo. SMI-4a, a pharmacological inhibitor of PIM-1, could decrease cell viability, induce apoptosis, and promote Caspase 3/7 activity in both A375 and G361 melanoma cells, and SMI-4a inhibited tumor growth by inducing autophagy via down-regulating AKT/mTOR axis in melanoma cells. Furthermore, G-Rh2 amplified the anti-tumor activity of SMI-4a in melanoma cells via strengthening autophagy. Our results suggested that SMI-4a could enhance autophagy-inducing apoptosis by inhibiting AKT/mTOR signaling pathway in melanoma cells, and G-Rh2 could enhance the effects of SMI-4a against melanoma cancer via amplifying autophagy induction. This study demonstrates that combined SMI-4a and G-Rh2 might be a novel alternative strategy for melanoma treatment.

  13. Procyanidins from Vitis vinifera seeds induce apoptotic and autophagic cell death via generation of reactive oxygen species in squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hah, Young-Sool; Kim, Jin Gu; Cho, Hee Young; Park, Jin Sung; Heo, Eun Phil; Yoon, Tae-Jin

    2017-08-01

    Procyanidins can inhibit cell proliferation and tumorigenesis and induce apoptosis in human skin, breast and prostate carcinoma cell lines. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin is a common form of keratinocytic or non-melanoma skin cancer and is a deadly disease with a poor prognosis due to the ineffectiveness of therapy. The present study aimed to determine whether grape seed proanthocyanidin (GSP) may regulate different modes of cell death in the human SCC12 cell line. The present study found that the treatment of SCC12 cells with GSP inhibited proliferation in a dose-dependent manner and reduced the motility and invasiveness of SCC12 cells through suppression of matrix metalloproteinase-2/9 expression. GSP treatment also resulted in induction of apoptosis and autophagy via generation of reactive oxygen species. The inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine decreased GSP-induced cell death, which suggested that GSP-induced autophagy can promote cell death. The results of the present study suggested that autophagy functions as a death mechanism in SCC and provided a rationale for the use of GSP in combination with autophagy activators for treating cancers such as SCC.

  14. Autophagic regulation of smooth muscle cell biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua K. Salabei

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy regulates the metabolism, survival, and function of numerous cell types, including those comprising the cardiovascular system. In the vasculature, changes in autophagy have been documented in atherosclerotic and restenotic lesions and in hypertensive vessels. The biology of vascular smooth muscle cells appears particularly sensitive to changes in the autophagic program. Recent evidence indicates that stimuli or stressors evoked during the course of vascular disease can regulate autophagic activity, resulting in modulation of VSMC phenotype and viability. In particular, certain growth factors and cytokines, oxygen tension, and pharmacological drugs have been shown to trigger autophagy in smooth muscle cells. Importantly, each of these stimuli has a redox component, typically associated with changes in the abundance of reactive oxygen, nitrogen, or lipid species. Collective findings support the hypothesis that autophagy plays a critical role in vascular remodeling by regulating smooth muscle cell phenotype transitions and by influencing the cellular response to stress. In this graphical review, we summarize current knowledge on the role of autophagy in the biology of the smooth muscle cell in (pathophysiology.

  15. Oxidative stress promotes autophagic cell death in human neuroblastoma cells with ectopic transfer of mitochondrial PPP2R2B (Bβ2

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    Lin Ming-Yi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The multifunctional protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A is a heterotrimeric serine/threonine protein phosphatase composed of a scaffolding, catalytic and regulatory subunits. By modifying various downstream signal transducers, the aberrant expression of the brain-targeted regulatory subunit PPP2R2B is associated with the onset of a panel of neuronal disorders. The alternatively splicing of PPP2R2B encodes two regulatory subunit isoforms that determine cellular distribution of the neuron-specific holoenzyme to mitochondria (Bβ2 and cytoplasm (Bβ1, respectively. Results Human neuroblastoma cells were transfected with PPP2R2B constructs encoding the complete sequences of Bβ2 and Bβ1, respectively. The colonies with antibiotic resistance were selected as stable cell lines. Both ectopic Bβ1 and Bβ2 clones exhibited characteristics of autophagy. To test how cells respond to reactive oxygen species generators, the cells were treated with either hydrogen peroxide or t-butyl hydroperoxide and Bβ2 clones induced cell death. Suppression of autophagy using either RNA interference of the essential autophagy gene or pharmacological inhibitor rescued cell death caused by oxidative stress. Conclusions Cells with ectopically expressed mitochondria-targeted regulatory subunit PPP2R2B of the holoenzyme PP2A were shown predisposed to autophagy and oxidative stress induced cell death that is related to apoptosis. The results promised a model for studying the mechanism and function of aberrant PPP2R2B expression in neuronal cells. The work provided a new target for understanding and prevention of neuropathogenesis.

  16. Attenuation of Aβ{sub 25–35}-induced parallel autophagic and apoptotic cell death by gypenoside XVII through the estrogen receptor-dependent activation of Nrf2/ARE pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Xiangbao; Wang, Min [Key Laboratory of Bioactive Substances and Resources Utilization of Chinese Herbal Medicine, Ministry of Education, Institute of Medicinal Plant Development, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100193 (China); Sun, Guibo, E-mail: sunguibo@126.com [Key Laboratory of Bioactive Substances and Resources Utilization of Chinese Herbal Medicine, Ministry of Education, Institute of Medicinal Plant Development, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100193 (China); Ye, Jingxue [Jilin Agricultural University, Changchun, Jilin 130021 (China); Zhou, Yanhui [Center of Cardiology, People' s Hospital of Jilin Province, Changchun, 130021, Jilin (China); Dong, Xi [Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325035 (China); Wang, Tingting; Lu, Shan [Key Laboratory of Bioactive Substances and Resources Utilization of Chinese Herbal Medicine, Ministry of Education, Institute of Medicinal Plant Development, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100193 (China); Sun, Xiaobo, E-mail: sun_xiaobo163@163.com [Key Laboratory of Bioactive Substances and Resources Utilization of Chinese Herbal Medicine, Ministry of Education, Institute of Medicinal Plant Development, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100193 (China)

    2014-08-15

    Amyloid-beta (Aβ) has a pivotal function in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. To investigate Aβ neurotoxicity, we used an in vitro model that involves Aβ{sub 25–35}-induced cell death in the nerve growth factor-induced differentiation of PC12 cells. Aβ{sub 25–35} (20 μM) treatment for 24 h caused apoptotic cell death, as evidenced by significant cell viability reduction, LDH release, phosphatidylserine externalization, mitochondrial membrane potential disruption, cytochrome c release, caspase-3 activation, PARP cleavage, and DNA fragmentation in PC12 cells. Aβ{sub 25–35} treatment led to autophagic cell death, as evidenced by augmented GFP-LC3 puncta, conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II, and increased LC3-II/LC3-I ratio. Aβ{sub 25–35} treatment induced oxidative stress, as evidenced by intracellular ROS accumulation and increased production of mitochondrial superoxide, malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl, and 8-OHdG. Phytoestrogens have been proved to be protective against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity and regarded as relatively safe targets for AD drug development. Gypenoside XVII (GP-17) is a novel phytoestrogen isolated from Gynostemma pentaphyllum or Panax notoginseng. Pretreatment with GP-17 (10 μM) for 12 h increased estrogen response element reporter activity, activated PI3K/Akt pathways, inhibited GSK-3β, induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation, augmented antioxidant responsive element enhancer activity, upregulated heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) expression and activity, and provided protective effects against Aβ{sub 25–35}-induced neurotoxicity, including oxidative stress, apoptosis, and autophagic cell death. In conclusion, GP-17 conferred protection against Aβ{sub 25–35}-induced neurotoxicity through estrogen receptor-dependent activation of PI3K/Akt pathways, inactivation of GSK-3β and activation of Nrf2/ARE/HO-1 pathways. This finding might provide novel insights into understanding the mechanism for neuroprotective effects of phytoestrogens

  17. Arctigenin inhibits the activation of the mTOR pathway, resulting in autophagic cell death and decreased ER expression in ER-positive human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Thressi; Lee, Kyu Shik; Kim, Soyoung; Nam, Kyung-Soo

    2018-04-01

    Arctigenin, a member of the Asteraceae family, is a biologically active lignan that is consumed worldwide due to its several health benefits. However, its use may pose a problem for patients with estrogen receptor (ER)α-positive breast cancer, since studies have shown that arctigenin is a phytoestrogen that exerts a proliferative effect by binding to the ER. Thus, in this study, we examined the effect of arctigenin on ERα-positive MCF-7 human breast cancer cells to determine whether the consumption of arctigenin is safe for patients with breast cancer. First, we found that arctigenin inhibited the viability of the MCF-7 cells, and colony formation assay confirmed that this effect was cytotoxic rather than cytostatic. The cytotoxic effects were not mediated by cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or necroptosis, despite DNA damage, as indicated by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage and phosphorylated H2A.X. An increase in lipidated LC3, a marker of autophagosome formation, was observed, indicating that autophagy was induced by arctigenin, which was found to be triggered by the inhibition of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. We then examined the effects of arctigenin on ERα expression and determined whether it affects the sensitivity of the cells to tamoxifen, as tamoxifen is commonly used against hormone-responsive cancers and is known to act via the ERα. We found that treatment with arctigenin effectively downregulated ERα expression, which was found to be a consequence of the inhibition of the mTOR pathway. However, treatment with arctigenin in combination with tamoxifen did not affect the sensitivity of the cells to tamoxifen, but instead, exerted a synergistic effect. On the whole, our data indicate that the phytoestrogen, arctigenin, mainly targeted the mTOR pathway in ERα-positive MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, leading to autophagy-induced cell death and the downregulation of ERα expression. Furthermore, the synergistic effects

  18. MAPK/JNK1 activation protects cells against cadmium-induced autophagic cell death via differential regulation of catalase and heme oxygenase-1 in oral cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Keum-Young; Kim, Sang-Hun; Jung, Ki-Tae; Lee, Hyun-Young; Oh, Seon-Hee

    2017-10-01

    Antioxidant enzymes are related to oral diseases. We investigated the roles of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and catalase in cadmium (Cd)-induced oxidative stress and the underlying molecular mechanism in oral cancer cells. Exposing YD8 cells to Cd reduced the expression levels of catalase and superoxide dismutase 1/2 and induced the expression of HO-1 as well as autophagy and apoptosis, which were reversed by N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC). Cd-exposed YD10B cells exhibited milder effects than YD8 cells, indicating that Cd sensitivity is associated with antioxidant enzymes and autophagy. Autophagy inhibition via pharmacologic and genetic modulations enhanced Cd-induced HO-1 expression, caspase-3 cleavage, and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Ho-1 knockdown increased autophagy and apoptosis. Hemin treatment partially suppressed Cd-induced ROS production and apoptosis, but enhanced autophagy and CHOP expression, indicating that autophagy induction is associated with cellular stress. Catalase inhibition by pharmacological and genetic modulations increased Cd-induced ROS production, autophagy, and apoptosis, but suppressed HO-1, indicating that catalase is required for HO-1 induction. p38 inhibition upregulated Cd-induced phospho-JNK and catalase, but suppressed HO-1, autophagy, apoptosis. JNK suppression exhibited contrary results, enhancing the expression of phospho-p38. Co-suppression of p38 and JNK1 failed to upregulate catalase and procaspase-3, which were upregulated by JNK1 overexpression. Overall, the balance between the responses of p38 and JNK activation to Cd appears to have an important role in maintaining cellular homeostasis via the regulation of antioxidant enzymes and autophagy induction. In addition, the upregulation of catalase by JNK1 activation can play a critical role in cell protection against Cd-induced oxidative stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Suppression of PC-1/PrLZ sensitizes prostate cancer cells to ionizing radiation by attenuating DNA damage repair and inducing autophagic cell death

    OpenAIRE

    Shang, Zeng-Fu; Wei, Qiang; Yu, Lan; Huang, Fang; Xiao, Bei-Bei; Wang, Hongtao; Song, Man; Wang, Li; Zhou, Jianguang; Wang, Jian; Li, Shanhu

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is promising and effective for treating prostate cancer but the addition of a tumor cell radiosensitizer would improve therapeutic outcomes. PC-1/PrLZ, a TPD52 protein family member is frequently upregulated in advanced prostate cancer cells and may be a biomarker of aggressive prostate cancer. Therefore, we investigated the potential role of PC-1/PrLZ for increasing radioresistance in human prostate cancer cell lines. Growth curves and survival assays after g-ray irradiation con...

  20. Suppression of PC-1/PrLZ sensitizes prostate cancer cells to ionizing radiation by attenuating DNA damage repair and inducing autophagic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Zeng-Fu; Wei, Qiang; Yu, Lan; Huang, Fang; Xiao, Bei-Bei; Wang, Hongtao; Song, Man; Wang, Li; Zhou, Jianguang; Wang, Jian; Li, Shanhu

    2016-09-20

    Radiotherapy is promising and effective for treating prostate cancer but the addition of a tumor cell radiosensitizer would improve therapeutic outcomes. PC-1/PrLZ, a TPD52 protein family member is frequently upregulated in advanced prostate cancer cells and may be a biomarker of aggressive prostate cancer. Therefore, we investigated the potential role of PC-1/PrLZ for increasing radioresistance in human prostate cancer cell lines. Growth curves and survival assays after g-ray irradiation confirmed that depletion of endogenous PC-1/PrLZ significantly increased prostate cancer cell radiosensitivity. Irradiation (IR) increased PC-1/PrLZ expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner and increased radiosensitivity in PC-1/PrLZ-suppressed cells was partially due to decreased DNA double strand break (DBS) repair which was measured with comet and gH2AX foci assays. Furthermore, depletion of PC-1/PrLZ impaired the IR-induced G2/M checkpoint, which has been reported to be correlate with radioresistance in cancer cells. PC-1/PrLZ-deficient cells exhibited higher level of autophagy when compared with control cells. Thus, specific inhibition of PC-1/PrLZ might provide a novel therapeutic strategy for radiosensitizing prostate cancer cells.

  1. Analysis of autophagic flux in response to sulforaphane in metastatic prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Gregory W; Wickramasekara, Samanthi; Fang, Yufeng; Palomera-Sanchez, Zoraya; Maier, Claudia S; Williams, David E; Dashwood, Roderick H; Perez, Viviana I; Ho, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Scope The phytochemical sulforaphane has been shown to decrease prostate cancer metastases in a genetic mouse model of prostate carcinogenesis, though the mechanism of action is not fully known. Sulforaphane has been reported to stimulate autophagy, and modulation of autophagy has been proposed to influence sulforaphane cytotoxicity; however, no conclusions about autophagy can be drawn without assessing autophagic flux, which has not been characterized in prostate cancer cells following sulforaphane treatment. Methods and Results We conducted an investigation to assess the impact of sulforaphane on autophagic flux in two metastatic prostate cancer cell lines at a concentration shown to decrease metastasis in vivo. Autophagic flux was assessed by multiple autophagy related proteins and substrates. We found that sulforaphane can stimulate autophagic flux and cell death only at high concentrations, above what has been observed in vivo. Conclusion These results suggest that sulforaphane does not directly stimulate autophagy or cell death in metastatic prostate cancer cells under physiologically relevant conditions, but instead supports the involvement of in vivo factors as important effectors of sulforaphane- mediated prostate cancer suppression. PMID:26108801

  2. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Induce Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Mediated Autophagic Cell Death via Mitochondria-Associated Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane Disruption in Normal Lung Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Chang, Seung-Hee; Park, Soo Jin; Lim, Joohyun; Lee, Jinkyu; Yoon, Tae-Jong; Kim, Jun-Sung; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials are used in diverse fields including food, cosmetic, and medical industries. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NP) are widely used, but their effects on biological systems and mechanism of toxicity have not been elucidated fully. Here, we report the toxicological mechanism of TiO2-NP in cell organelles. Human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE14o-) were exposed to 50 and 100 μg/mL TiO2-NP for 24 and 48 h. Our results showed that TiO2-NP induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the cells and disrupted the mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membranes (MAMs) and calcium ion balance, thereby increasing autophagy. In contrast, an inhibitor of ER stress, tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), mitigated the cellular toxic response, suggesting that TiO2-NP promoted toxicity via ER stress. This novel mechanism of TiO2-NP toxicity in human bronchial epithelial cells suggests that further exhaustive research on the harmful effects of these nanoparticles in relevant organisms is needed for their safe application. PMID:26121477

  3. Dicrocoelium dendriticum induces autophagic vacuoles accumulation in human hepatocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, P; Castellano, M; Alfano, S; Della Pepa, M E; Tirino, V; Piemonte, M; Desiderio, V; Zappavigna, S; Galdiero, M; Caraglia, M; Cringoli, G; Rinaldi, L; Galdiero, M

    2015-09-15

    The relationship between Dicrocoelium dendriticum and cancer has been poorly investigated so far, but a large amount of findings suggest that other trematodes can favour cancer in both animals and humans. In this study, the effects of D. dendriticum on cell proliferation, cell death mechanisms and oxidative stress induction were evaluated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines (HepG2 and HuH7). Results showed that short time exposure to low concentrations of somatic antigens from D. dendriticum caused slight proliferation in both HepG2 and HuH7 cells while high concentrations and long exposure time to extracts from D. dendriticum caused a significant growth inhibition. This effect was, however, not paralleled by apoptosis but it occurred with an about 40% increase of the formation of autophagic vacuoles. In the same experimental conditions, a strong oxidative stress was recorded with an about 100% increase of the intracellular O(2-). These data suggest the occurrence of an escape anti-apoptotic mechanism in HCC cells. In conclusion, these results suggest a role for D. dendriticum in the chronic oxidative stress and in the regulation of transformation processes in HCC warranting additional investigations in this specific area of research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Live cell X-ray imaging of autophagic vacuoles formation and chromatin dynamics in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelnikova, Natalja; Sauter, Nora; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Göllner, Michael; Diaz, Ana; Delivani, Petrina; Chacón, Mariola; Tolić, Iva M; Zaburdaev, Vasily; Pfohl, Thomas

    2017-10-23

    Seeing physiological processes at the nanoscale in living organisms without labeling is an ultimate goal in life sciences. Using X-ray ptychography, we explored in situ the dynamics of unstained, living fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells in natural, aqueous environment at the nanoscale. In contrast to previous X-ray imaging studies on biological matter, in this work the eukaryotic cells were alive even after several ptychographic X-ray scans, which allowed us to visualize the chromatin motion as well as the autophagic cell death induced by the ionizing radiation. The accumulated radiation of the sequential scans allowed for the determination of a characteristic dose of autophagic vacuole formation and the lethal dose for fission yeast. The presented results demonstrate a practical method that opens another way of looking at living biological specimens and processes in a time-resolved label-free setting.

  5. Menopause-induced uterine epithelium atrophy results from arachidonic acid/prostaglandin E2 axis inhibition-mediated autophagic cell death

    OpenAIRE

    Shengtao Zhou; Linjie Zhao; Tao Yi; Yuquan Wei; Xia Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Women experience menopause later in life. Menopause is characterized by dramatically decreased circulating estrogen level secondary to loss of ovarian function and atrophic state of genital organs. However, the molecular mechanisms for this process are not fully understood. In this study, we aimed to investigate the potential molecular mechanisms that underlie menopause-induced uterine endometrial atrophy. Our data showed that autophagy was activated in the uterine epithelial cells of both ov...

  6. Autophagic degradation of dBruce controls DNA fragmentation in nurse cells during late Drosophila melanogaster oogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shravage, Bhupendra V.; Sagona, Antonia P.; Lamark, Trond; Bjørkøy, Geir; Johansen, Terje; Rusten, Tor Erik; Brech, Andreas; Baehrecke, Eric H.

    2010-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved pathway responsible for degradation of cytoplasmic material via the lysosome. Although autophagy has been reported to contribute to cell death, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. In this study, we show that autophagy controls DNA fragmentation during late oogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster. Inhibition of autophagy by genetically removing the function of the autophagy genes atg1, atg13, and vps34 resulted in late stage egg chambers that contained persisting nurse cell nuclei without fragmented DNA and attenuation of caspase-3 cleavage. The Drosophila inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) dBruce was found to colocalize with the autophagic marker GFP-Atg8a and accumulated in autophagy mutants. Nurse cells lacking Atg1 or Vps34 in addition to dBruce contained persisting nurse cell nuclei with fragmented DNA. This indicates that autophagic degradation of dBruce controls DNA fragmentation in nurse cells. Our results reveal autophagic degradation of an IAP as a novel mechanism of triggering cell death and thereby provide a mechanistic link between autophagy and cell death. PMID:20713604

  7. Enhanced Autophagy and Reduced Expression of Cathepsin D Are Related to Autophagic Cell Death in Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Nasal Natural Killer/T-Cell Lymphomas: An Immunohistochemical Analysis of Beclin-1, LC3, Mitochondria (AE-1), and Cathepsin D in Nasopharyngeal Lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasui, Kazuhisa; Wang, Jia; Jia, Xinshan; Tanaka, Masashi; Nagai, Taku; Matsuyama, Takami; Eizuru, Yoshito

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated autophagy in 37 cases of nasopharyngeal lymphomas including 23 nasal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphomas (NKTCL), 3 cytotoxic T-cell lymphomas (cytotoxic-TML) and 9 B-cell lymphomas (BML) by means of antigen-retrieval immunohistochemistry of beclin-1, LC3, mitochondria (AE-1) and cathepsin D. Peculiar necrosis was noted in EBV + lymphomas comprising 21 NKTCL, 2 cytotoxic-TML and 1 BML. Lymphomas without peculiar necrosis showed high expression of beclin-1, macrogranular cytoplasmal stain of LC3 with sporadic nuclear stain, a hallmark of autophagic cell death (ACD), some aggregated mitochondria and high expression of cathepsin D, suggesting a state of growth with enhanced autophagy with sporadic ACD. EBV + NKTCL with the peculiar necrosis, showed significantly low level of macrogranular staining of LC3, aggregated mitochondria and low expression of cathepsin D in the cellular areas when degenerative lymphoma cells showed decreased beclin-1, significantly advanced LC3-labeled autophagy, residual aggregated mitochondria and significantly reduced expression of cathepsin D, suggesting advanced autophagy with regional ACD. Consequently it was suggested that enhanced autophagy and reduced expression of lysosomal enzymes induced regional ACD under EBV infection in NKTCL

  8. Fullerenol cytotoxicity in kidney cells is associated with cytoskeleton disruption, autophagic vacuole accumulation, and mitochondrial dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson-Lyles, Denise N.; Peifley, Kimberly; Lockett, Stephen; Neun, Barry W.; Hansen, Matthew; Clogston, Jeffrey; Stern, Stephan T.; McNeil, Scott E.

    2010-01-01

    Water soluble fullerenes, such as the hydroxylated fullerene, fullerenol (C 60 OH x ), are currently under development for diagnostic and therapeutic biomedical applications in the field of nanotechnology. These molecules have been shown to undergo urinary clearance, yet there is limited data available on their renal biocompatibility. Here we examine the biological responses of renal proximal tubule cells (LLC-PK1) exposed to fullerenol. Fullerenol was found to be cytotoxic in the millimolar range, with viability assessed by the sulforhodamine B and trypan blue assays. Fullerenol-induced cell death was associated with cytoskeleton disruption and autophagic vacuole accumulation. Interaction with the autophagy pathway was evaluated in vitro by Lysotracker Red dye uptake, LC3-II marker expression and TEM. Fullerenol treatment also resulted in coincident loss of cellular mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP depletion, as measured by the Mitotracker Red dye and the luciferin-luciferase assays, respectively. Fullerenol-induced ATP depletion and loss of mitochondrial potential were partially ameliorated by co-treatment with the autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine. In vitro fullerenol treatment did not result in appreciable oxidative stress, as measured by lipid peroxide and glutathione content. Based on these data, it is hypothesized that cytoskeleton disruption may be an initiating event in fullerenol cytotoxicity, leading to subsequent autophagy dysfunction and loss of mitochondrial capacity. As nanoparticle-induced cytoskeleton disruption, autophagic vacuole accumulation and mitochondrial dysfunction are commonly reported in the literature, the proposed mechanism may be relevant for a variety of nanomaterials.

  9. Evaluation of the Cytotoxic and Autophagic Effects of Atorvastatin on Mcf-7 Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Tuğba Alarcon; Zeybek, Naciye Dilara; Müftüoğlu, Sevda

    2018-02-27

    Recently, cytotoxic effects of statins on breast cancer cells have been reported. However, the mechanism of anti-proliferative effects is currently unknown. Autophagy is a non-apoptotic programmed cell death, which is characterized by degradation of cytoplasmic components and with a role in cancer pathogenesis. To investigate the anti-proliferative effects of atorvastatin was on MCF-7 human breast adenocarcinoma cells in aspect of autophagy and apoptosis. Cell culture study. Cell viability was analyzed using WST-1 cell proliferation assay. Apoptosis was determined by TUNEL method, whereas autophagy was assessed by Beclin-1 and LC3B immunofluorescence staining. Ultrastructural analysis of cells was performed by electron microscopy. Atorvastatin reduced MCF-7 cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner inducing TUNEL, Beclin-1, and LC3B positive cells. Moreover, ultrastructural analysis showed apoptotic, autophagic and necrotic morphological changes in treatment groups. Statistically significant increase in apoptotic index was detected with increased concentrations of atorvastatin at 24h and 48h (p<0.05). The anti-proliferative effects of atorvastatin on breast cancer cells is mediated by induction of apoptosis and autophagy which shows statins as a potential treatment option for breast cancer.

  10. Increased autophagic response in a population of metastatic breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    LI, YI; LIBBY, EMILY FALK; LEWIS, MONICA J.; LIU, JIANZHONG; SHACKA, JOHN J.; HURST, DOUGLAS R.

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer cells are heterogeneous in their ability to invade and fully metastasize, and thus also in their capacity to survive the numerous stresses encountered throughout the multiple steps of the metastatic cascade. Considering the role of autophagy as a survival response to stress, the present study hypothesized that distinct populations of breast cancer cells may possess an altered autophagic capacity that influences their metastatic potential. It was observed that a metastatic breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, that was sensitive to autophagic induction additionally possessed the ability to proliferate following nutrient deprivation. Furthermore, a selected subpopulation of these cells that survived multiple exposures to starvation conditions demonstrated a heightened response to autophagic induction compared to their parent cells. Although this subpopulation maintained a more grape-like pattern in three-dimensional culture compared to the extended spikes of the parent population, autophagic induction in this subpopulation elicited an invasive phenotype with extended spikes. Taken together, these results suggest that autophagic induction may contribute to the ability of distinct breast cancer cell populations to survive and invade. PMID:27347175

  11. Autophagic flux is highly active in early mitosis and differentially regulated throughout the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiyuan; Ji, Xinmiao; Wang, Dongmei; Liu, Juanjuan; Zhang, Xin

    2016-06-28

    Mitosis is a fast process that involves dramatic cellular remodeling and has a high energy demand. Whether autophagy is active or inactive during the early stages of mitosis in a naturally dividing cell is still debated. Here we aimed to use multiple assays to resolve this apparent discrepancy. Although the LC3 puncta number was reduced in mitosis, the four different cell lines we tested all have active autophagic flux in both interphase and mitosis. In addition, the autophagic flux was highly active in nocodazole-induced, double-thymidine synchronization released as well as naturally occurring mitosis in HeLa cells. Multiple autophagy proteins are upregulated in mitosis and the increased Beclin-1 level likely contributes to the active autophagic flux in early mitosis. It is interesting that although the autophagic flux is active throughout the cell cycle, early mitosis and S phase have relatively higher autophagic flux than G1 and late G2 phases, which might be helpful to degrade the damaged organelles and provide energy during S phase and mitosis.

  12. The bifunctional autophagic flux by 2-deoxyglucose to control survival or growth of prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Jeong Yong; Kim, Seung Won; Park, Ki Cheong; Yun, Mijin

    2015-01-01

    Recent reports using metabolism regulating drugs showed that nutrient deprivation was an efficient tool to suppress cancer progression. In addition, autophagy control is emerging to prevent cancer cell survival. Autophagy breaks down the unnecessary cytoplasmic components into anabolic units and energy sources, which are the most important sources for making the ATP that maintains homeostasis in cancer cell growth and survival. Therefore, the glucose analog 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) has been used as an anticancer reagent due to its inhibition of glycolysis. Prostate cancer cells (PC3) were treated with 2DG for 6 h or 48 h to analyze the changing of cell cycle and autophagic flux. Rapamycin and LC3B overexpressing vectors were administered to PC3 cells for autophagy induction and chloroquine and shBeclin1 plasmid were used to inhibit autophagy in PC3 cells to analyze PC3 cells growth and survival. The samples for western blotting were prepared in each culture condition to confirm the expression level of autophagy related and regulating proteins. We demonstrated that 2DG inhibits PC3 cells growth and had discriminating effects on autophagy regulation based on the different time period of 2DG treatment to control cell survival. Short-term treatment of 2DG induced autophagic flux, which increased microtubule associated protein 1 light chain 3B (LC3B) conversion rates and reduced p62 levels. However, 2DG induced autophagic flux is remarkably reduced over an extended time period of 2DG treatment for 48 h despite autophagy inducing internal signaling being maintained. The relationship between cell growth and autophagy was proved. Increased autophagic flux by rapamycin or LC3B overexpression powerfully reduced cell growth, while autophagy inhibition with shBeclin1 plasmid or chloroquine had no significant effect on regulating cell growth. Given these results, maintaining increased autophagic flux was more effective at inhibiting cancer cell progression than inhibition of

  13. ATP Release from Dying Autophagic Cells and Their Phagocytosis Are Crucial for Inflammasome Activation in Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayna, Gizem; Krysko, Dmitri V.; Kaczmarek, Agnieszka; Petrovski, Goran; Vandenabeele, Peter; Fésüs, László

    2012-01-01

    Pathogen-activated and damage-associated molecular patterns activate the inflammasome in macrophages. We report that mouse macrophages release IL-1β while co-incubated with pro-B (Ba/F3) cells dying, as a result of IL-3 withdrawal, by apoptosis with autophagy, but not when they are co-incubated with living, apoptotic, necrotic or necrostatin-1 treated cells. NALP3-deficient macrophages display reduced IL-1β secretion, which is also inhibited in macrophages deficient in caspase-1 or pre-treated with its inhibitor. This finding demonstrates that the inflammasome is activated during phagocytosis of dying autophagic cells. We show that activation of NALP3 depends on phagocytosis of dying cells, ATP release through pannexin-1 channels of dying autophagic cells, P2X7 purinergic receptor activation, and on consequent potassium efflux. Dying autophagic Ba/F3 cells injected intraperitoneally in mice recruit neutrophils and thereby induce acute inflammation. These findings demonstrate that NALP3 performs key upstream functions in inflammasome activation in mouse macrophages engulfing dying autophagic cells, and that these functions lead to pro-inflammatory responses. PMID:22768222

  14. Herpes simplex virus type I induces an incomplete autophagic response in human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Soraya; Bullido, Maria Jesús; Recuero, Maria; Valdivieso, Fernando; Aldudo, Jesus

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is a homeostatic process involved in the turnover or elimination of cytoplasmic components, damaged organelles, and protein aggregates via a lysosomal degradation mechanism. Autophagy also provides a mechanism of innate immunity, known as xenophagy, designed to protect cells from intracellular pathogens, but it may unfortunately be subverted to act as a pro-viral pathway facilitating the replication of certain viruses. Herpes simplex virus type I (HSV-1) is a neurotropic virus that remains latent in host neurons; it is the most common cause of sporadic viral encephalitis. Moreover, HSV-1 has been related to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. HSV-1 can modulate the autophagic process through a mechanism mediated by the viral protein ICP34.5. Here we report that HSV-1 induces a strong increase in GFP-LC3 and endogenous LC3 lipidation, and triggers the accumulation of intracellular autophagic compartments (mainly autophagosomes) without enhancing autophagic long-lived protein degradation in the late stages of infection. Autophagy inhibition mediated by ATG5 gene silencing had no effect on viral growth. The present results suggest that HSV-1 infection activates the host autophagic machinery and strongly controls the autophagic process, blocking the fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes. These events might be important in the neurodegenerative process associated with HSV-1 infection.

  15. Inducible cell death in plant immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofius, Daniel; Tsitsigiannis, Dimitrios I; Jones, Jonathan D G

    2006-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) occurs during vegetative and reproductive plant growth, as typified by autumnal leaf senescence and the terminal differentiation of the endosperm of cereals which provide our major source of food. PCD also occurs in response to environmental stress and pathogen attack......, and these inducible PCD forms are intensively studied due their experimental tractability. In general, evidence exists for plant cell death pathways which have similarities to the apoptotic, autophagic and necrotic forms described in yeast and metazoans. Recent research aiming to understand these pathways...

  16. Graphene Oxide Nanoribbons Induce Autophagic Vacuoles in Neuroblastoma Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Mari

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Since graphene nanoparticles are attracting increasing interest in relation to medical applications, it is important to understand their potential effects on humans. In the present study, we prepared graphene oxide (GO nanoribbons by oxidative unzipping of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and analyzed their toxicity in two human neuroblastoma cell lines. Neuroblastoma is the most common solid neoplasia in children. The hallmark of these tumors is the high number of different clinical variables, ranging from highly metastatic, rapid progression and resistance to therapy to spontaneous regression or change into benign ganglioneuromas. Patients with neuroblastoma are grouped into different risk groups that are characterized by different prognosis and different clinical behavior. Relapse and mortality in high risk patients is very high in spite of new advances in chemotherapy. Cell lines, obtained from neuroblastomas have different genotypic and phenotypic features. The cell lines SK-N-BE(2 and SH-SY5Y have different genetic mutations and tumorigenicity. Cells were exposed to low doses of GO for different times in order to investigate whether GO was a good vehicle for biological molecules delivering individualized therapy. Cytotoxicity in both cell lines was studied by measuring cellular oxidative stress (ROS, mitochondria membrane potential, expression of lysosomial proteins and cell growth. GO uptake and cytoplasmic distribution of particles were studied by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM for up to 72 h. The results show that GO at low concentrations increased ROS production and induced autophagy in both neuroblastoma cell lines within a few hours of exposure, events that, however, are not followed by growth arrest or death. For this reason, we suggest that the GO nanoparticle can be used for therapeutic delivery to the brain tissue with minimal effects on healthy cells.

  17. Diversity of cell death pathways: insight from the fly ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Victoria K; Timmons, Allison K; McCall, Kimberly

    2013-11-01

    Multiple types of cell death exist including necrosis, apoptosis, and autophagic cell death. The Drosophila ovary provides a valuable model to study the diversity of cell death modalities, and we review recent progress to elucidate these pathways. At least five distinct types of cell death occur in the ovary, and we focus on two that have been studied extensively. Cell death of mid-stage egg chambers occurs through a novel caspase-dependent pathway that involves autophagy and triggers phagocytosis by surrounding somatic epithelial cells. For every egg, 15 germline nurse cells undergo developmental programmed cell death, which occurs independently of most known cell death genes. These forms of cell death are strikingly similar to cell death observed in the germlines of other organisms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Heat shock transcription factors regulate heat induced cell death in a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu Sudhan

    2007-03-29

    Mar 29, 2007 ... We are reporting for the first time that HSF2 is heat inducible and functions in heat shock induced autophagic cell death in BC-8 tumor cells. [Prasad K V, Taiyab A, Jyothi D, Srinivas U K and Sreedhar A S 2007 Heat shock transcription factors regulate heat induced cell death in a rat histiocytoma; J. Biosci.

  19. SET overexpression in HEK293 cells regulates mitochondrial uncoupling proteins levels within a mitochondrial fission/reduced autophagic flux scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Luciana O.; Goto, Renata N. [Department of Clinical Analyses, Toxicology and Food Sciences, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Neto, Marinaldo P.C. [Department of Physics and Chemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Sousa, Lucas O. [Department of Clinical Analyses, Toxicology and Food Sciences, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Curti, Carlos [Department of Physics and Chemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Leopoldino, Andréia M., E-mail: andreiaml@usp.br [Department of Clinical Analyses, Toxicology and Food Sciences, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2015-03-06

    We hypothesized that SET, a protein accumulated in some cancer types and Alzheimer disease, is involved in cell death through mitochondrial mechanisms. We addressed the mRNA and protein levels of the mitochondrial uncoupling proteins UCP1, UCP2 and UCP3 (S and L isoforms) by quantitative real-time PCR and immunofluorescence as well as other mitochondrial involvements, in HEK293 cells overexpressing the SET protein (HEK293/SET), either in the presence or absence of oxidative stress induced by the pro-oxidant t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP). SET overexpression in HEK293 cells decreased UCP1 and increased UCP2 and UCP3 (S/L) mRNA and protein levels, whilst also preventing lipid peroxidation and decreasing the content of cellular ATP. SET overexpression also (i) decreased the area of mitochondria and increased the number of organelles and lysosomes, (ii) increased mitochondrial fission, as demonstrated by increased FIS1 mRNA and FIS-1 protein levels, an apparent accumulation of DRP-1 protein, and an increase in the VDAC protein level, and (iii) reduced autophagic flux, as demonstrated by a decrease in LC3B lipidation (LC3B-II) in the presence of chloroquine. Therefore, SET overexpression in HEK293 cells promotes mitochondrial fission and reduces autophagic flux in apparent association with up-regulation of UCP2 and UCP3; this implies a potential involvement in cellular processes that are deregulated such as in Alzheimer's disease and cancer. - Highlights: • SET, UCPs and autophagy prevention are correlated. • SET action has mitochondrial involvement. • UCP2/3 may reduce ROS and prevent autophagy. • SET protects cell from ROS via UCP2/3.

  20. Pancreatic stellate cells support tumour metabolism through autophagic alanine secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Cristovão M; Biancur, Douglas E; Wang, Xiaoxu; Halbrook, Christopher J; Sherman, Mara H; Zhang, Li; Kremer, Daniel; Hwang, Rosa F; Witkiewicz, Agnes K; Ying, Haoqiang; Asara, John M; Evans, Ronald M; Cantley, Lewis C; Lyssiotis, Costas A; Kimmelman, Alec C

    2016-08-25

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive disease characterized by an intense fibrotic stromal response and deregulated metabolism. The role of the stroma in PDAC biology is complex and it has been shown to play critical roles that differ depending on the biological context. The stromal reaction also impairs the vasculature, leading to a highly hypoxic, nutrient-poor environment. As such, these tumours must alter how they capture and use nutrients to support their metabolic needs. Here we show that stroma-associated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are critical for PDAC metabolism through the secretion of non-essential amino acids (NEAA). Specifically, we uncover a previously undescribed role for alanine, which outcompetes glucose and glutamine-derived carbon in PDAC to fuel the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and thus NEAA and lipid biosynthesis. This shift in fuel source decreases the tumour’s dependence on glucose and serum-derived nutrients, which are limited in the pancreatic tumour microenvironment. Moreover, we demonstrate that alanine secretion by PSCs is dependent on PSC autophagy, a process that is stimulated by cancer cells. Thus, our results demonstrate a novel metabolic interaction between PSCs and cancer cells, in which PSC-derived alanine acts as an alternative carbon source. This finding highlights a previously unappreciated metabolic network within pancreatic tumours in which diverse fuel sources are used to promote growth in an austere tumour microenvironment.

  1. YAP enhances autophagic flux to promote breast cancer cell survival in response to nutrient deprivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghe Song

    Full Text Available The Yes-associated protein (YAP, a transcriptional coactivator inactivated by the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, functions as an oncoprotein in a variety of cancers. However, its contribution to breast cancer remains controversial. This study investigated the role of YAP in breast cancer cells under nutrient deprivation (ND. Here, we show that YAP knockdown sensitized MCF7 breast cancer cells to nutrient deprivation-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, in response to ND, YAP increased the autolysosome degradation, thereby enhancing the cellular autophagic flux in breast cancer cells. Of note, autophagy is crucial for YAP to protect MCF7 cells from apoptosis under ND conditions. In addition, the TEA domain (TEAD family of growth-promoting transcription factors was indispensable for YAP-mediated regulation of autophagy. Collectively, our data reveal a role for YAP in promoting breast cancer cell survival upon ND stress and uncover an unappreciated function of YAP/TEAD in the regulation of autophagy.

  2. Programmed cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on the role programmed cell death plays in normal development and homeostasis of many organisms. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: invertebrate development; immunology/neurology; bcl-2 family; biochemistry; programmed cell death in viruses; oncogenesis; vertebrate development; and diseases.

  3. Effect of natural uranium on the UMR-106 osteoblastic cell line: impairment of the autophagic process as an underlying mechanism of uranium toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierrefite-Carle, Valérie; Santucci-Darmanin, Sabine; Breuil, Véronique; Gritsaenko, Tatiana; Vidaud, Claude; Creff, Gaelle; Solari, Pier Lorenzo; Pagnotta, Sophie; Al-Sahlanee, Rasha; Auwer, Christophe Den; Carle, Georges F

    2017-04-01

    Natural uranium (U), which is present in our environment, exerts a chemical toxicity, particularly in bone where it accumulates. Generally, U is found at oxidation state +VI in its oxocationic form [Formula: see text] in aqueous media. Although U(VI) has been reported to induce cell death in osteoblasts, the cells in charge of bone formation, the molecular mechanism for U(VI) effects in these cells remains poorly understood. The objective of our study was to explore U(VI) effect at doses ranging from 5 to 600 µM, on mineralization and autophagy induction in the UMR-106 model osteoblastic cell line and to determine U(VI) speciation after cellular uptake. Our results indicate that U(VI) affects mineralization function, even at subtoxic concentrations (metal exposure. We observed that U(VI) was able to rapidly activate autophagy but an inhibition of the autophagic flux was observed after 24 h. Thus, our results indicate that U(VI) perturbs osteoblastic functions by reducing mineralization capacity. Our study identifies for the first time U(VI) in the form of meta-autunite in mammalian cells. In addition, U(VI)-mediated inhibition of the autophagic flux may be one of the underlying mechanisms leading to the decreased mineralization and the toxicity observed in osteoblasts.

  4. Serratia marcescens Is Able to Survive and Proliferate in Autophagic-Like Vacuoles inside Non-Phagocytic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, María Isabel; García Véscovi, Eleonora

    2011-01-01

    Serratia marcescens is an opportunistic human pathogen that represents a growing problem for public health, particularly in hospitalized or immunocompromised patients. However, little is known about factors and mechanisms that contribute to S. marcescens pathogenesis within its host. In this work, we explore the invasion process of this opportunistic pathogen to epithelial cells. We demonstrate that once internalized, Serratia is able not only to persist but also to multiply inside a large membrane-bound compartment. This structure displays autophagic-like features, acquiring LC3 and Rab7, markers described to be recruited throughout the progression of antibacterial autophagy. The majority of the autophagic-like vacuoles in which Serratia resides and proliferates are non-acidic and have no degradative properties, indicating that the bacteria are capable to either delay or prevent fusion with lysosomal compartments, altering the expected progression of autophagosome maturation. In addition, our results demonstrate that Serratia triggers a non-canonical autophagic process before internalization. These findings reveal that S. marcescens is able to manipulate the autophagic traffic, generating a suitable niche for survival and proliferation inside the host cell. PMID:21901159

  5. Induction of cell death on Plasmodium falciparum asexual blood stages by Solanum nudum steroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López, Mary Luz; Vommaro, Rossiane; Zalis, Mariano

    2010-01-01

    -87 μM. However, their mode of action is unknown. Steroids regulate important cellular functions including cell growth, differentiation and death. Thus, the aim of this work was to determine the effects of S. nudum compounds on P. falciparum asexual blood stages and their association with cell death. We....... The Mitochondria presented no morphological alterations and the nuclei showed no abnormal chromatin condensation. By the use of S. nudum compounds, cell death in P. falciparum was evident by a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, DNA fragmentation and cytoplasmic acidification. The asexual blood stages...... of P. falciparum showed some apoptotic-like and autophagic-like cell death characteristics induced by SNs treatment....

  6. Intense pseudotransport of a cationic drug mediated by vacuolar ATPase: Procainamide-induced autophagic cell vacuolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morissette, Guillaume; Lodge, Robert; Marceau, Francois

    2008-01-01

    Cationic drugs frequently exhibit large apparent volumes of distribution, consistent with various forms of cellular sequestration. The contributions of organelles and metabolic processes that may mimic drug transport were defined in human vascular smooth muscle cells. We hypothesized that procainamide-induced vacuolar cytopathology is driven by intense pseudotransport mediated by the vacuolar (V)-ATPase and pursued the characterization of vesicular trafficking alterations in this model. Large amounts of procainamide were taken up by intact cells (maximal in 2 h, reversible upon washout, apparent K M 4.69 mM; fluorometric determination of cell-associated drug). Procainamide uptake was extensively prevented or reversed by pharmacological inhibition of the V-ATPase with bafilomycin A1 or FR 167356, decreased at low extracellular pH and preceded vacuolar cell morphology. However, the uptake of procainamide was unaffected by mitochondrial poisons that reduced the uptake of rhodamine 6G. Large vacuoles induced by millimolar procainamide were labeled with the late endosome/lysosome markers Rab7 and CD63 and the autophagy effector LC3; their osmotic formation (but not procainamide uptake) was reduced by extracellular mannitol and parallel to LC3 II formation. Procainamide-induced vacuolization is associated with defective endocytosis of fluorophore-labeled bovine serum albumin, but not with induction of the unfolded protein response. The contents of a vacuole subset slowly (≥ 24 h) become positive for Nile red staining (phospholipidosis-like response). V-ATPase-driven ion trapping is a form of intense cation pseudotransport that concerns the uncharged form of the drugs, and is associated with a vacuolar, autophagic and evolutive cytopathology and profound effects on vesicular trafficking

  7. High-fat diet increases autophagic flux in pancreatic beta cells in vivo and ex vivo in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Kwan Yi; O'Reilly, Liam; Ramm, Georg; Biden, Trevor J

    2015-09-01

    Defective beta cell function during lipid oversupply and type 2 diabetes is associated with dysregulation of lysosomal function and autophagy. Whether this dysregulation represents augmentation or inhibition is unclear because of technical limitations in assaying autophagy. The current aim was to determine the effects of high-fat feeding on true autophagic flux in beta cells in vivo in mice, and to establish the relationship between autophagy, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and apoptosis. Green fluorescent protein-microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (GFP-LC3) mice were fed chow or high-fat diets for 8-10 weeks and injected with 100 mg kg(-1) day(-1) chloroquine for 5 days, prior to being killed, to block clearance of autophagic markers. Pancreases and livers were fixed and GFP-LC3 aggregates or autophagosomes were detected by fluorescence or electron microscopy, respectively. Independently, islets isolated from chow or high-fat-fed mice were treated for 2 h with chloroquine ex vivo, and immunoblotting was performed for markers of autophagy (LC3 lipidation - LC3II and p62/SQSTM1), ER stress (C/EBP homology protein [CHOP], phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α [p-eIFα] and inositol requiring enzyme 1α [p-IRE1α]) and apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3). Numbers of autophagosomes and GFP puncta were increased in beta cells by combined high-fat feeding and chloroquine injection, indicative of enhanced autophagic flux. By contrast, GFP puncta were attenuated in liver under the same conditions. Relative to chow-fed controls, islets isolated from fat-fed mice exhibited higher LC3II levels when treated ex vivo with chloroquine. The combination of high-fat feeding and acute chloroquine treatment induced CHOP, p-eIF2α and caspase-3, but not either treatment alone. We provide the first in vivo demonstrations that high-fat feeding increases autophagic flux in pancreatic beta cells, and that this serves to protect against induction of terminal ER stress. We

  8. Programmed cell death: Superman meets Dr Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Pascal; Silke, John

    2003-12-01

    This year's Cold Spring Harbor meeting on programmed cell death (September 17-21, 2003), organised by Craig Thompson and Junying Yuan, was proof that the 'golden age' of research in this field is far from over. There was a flurry of fascinating insights into the regulation of diverse apoptotic pathways and unexpected non-apoptotic roles for some of the key apoptotic regulators and effectors. In addition to their role in cell death, components of the apoptotic molecular machinery are now known to also function in a variety of essential cellular processes, such as regulating glucose homeostasis, lipid metabolism, cell proliferation and differentiation.

  9. Cell Death Pathways and Phthalocyanine as an Efficient Agent for Photodynamic Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Mfouo-Tynga

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of cell death can be predetermined (programmed or not and categorized into apoptotic, autophagic and necrotic pathways. The process of Hayflick limits completes the execution of death-related mechanisms. Reactive oxygen species (ROS are associated with oxidative stress and subsequent cytodamage by oxidizing and degrading cell components. ROS are also involved in immune responses, where they stabilize and activate both hypoxia-inducible factors and phagocytic effectors. ROS production and presence enhance cytodamage and photodynamic-induced cell death. Photodynamic cancer therapy (PDT uses non-toxic chemotherapeutic agents, photosensitizer (PS, to initiate a light-dependent and ROS-related cell death. Phthalocyanines (PCs are third generation and stable PSs with improved photochemical abilities. They are effective inducers of cell death in various neoplastic models. The metallated PCs localize in critical cellular organelles and are better inducers of cell death than other previous generation PSs as they favor mainly apoptotic cell death events.

  10. How to reduce the accumulation of autophagic vacuoles in NPC1-deficient neurons: a comparison of two pharmacological strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meske, Volker; Priesnitz, Timm; Albert, Frank; Ohm, Thomas Georg

    2015-02-01

    A disturbed autophagic pathway leads to chronically increased levels of autophagic vacuoles in Niemann Pick Type-C 1 (NPC1) deficient neurons. Since these accumulations potentially contribute to neuronal cell death associated with the disease, we investigated two pharmacological strategies which potentially reduce the number of autophagic structures under following aspects: efficiency, sustainability and effect on neuronal cell viability. The strategies comprised (i) an interruption of the autophagic flux by the class III PI3K inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and (ii) an acceleration of the autophagic execution by 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (pCD). Our data show that the inhibition of autophagy with 3-MA only initially reduced the number of autophagic vacuoles in cultured neurons. Prolonged treatments with the PI3K-inhibitor reversed this lowering effect. The re-increase in the number of autophagic vacuoles was combined with a defect in the integrity of lysosomes which endangered further survival of cells. The treatment with pCD evoked a slow but sustained reduction of autophagic structures and had no negative effects on neuronal survival.

  11. A novel acridine derivative, LS-1-10 inhibits autophagic degradation and triggers apoptosis in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Wan; Li, Xue; Lu, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Luyao; Li, Ran; Zhang, Nan; Liu, Shan; Yang, Xin; Wang, Yue; Zhao, Ying; Meng, Xiangbao; Zhu, Wei-Guo

    2017-10-05

    Autophagy promotes cancer cell survival and drug resistance by degrading harmful cellular components and maintaining cellular energy levels. Disruption of autophagy may be a promising approach to sensitize cancer cells to anticancer drugs. The combination of autophagic inhibitors, such as chloroquine (CQ) and lucanthone with conventional cancer therapeutics has been investigated in clinical trials, but adverse drug-drug interactions are a high possibility. Here we designed and synthesized a novel, small-molecule library based on an acridine skeleton and the CQ structure with various modifications and substitutions and screened the compounds for effective autophagy inhibition. We found that 9-chloro-2-(3-(dimethylamino)propyl)pyrrolo[2,3,4-kl]acridin-1(2H)-one (LS-1-10) was the most effective from our library at inhibiting autophagic-mediated degradation and could decrease the viability of multiple colon cancer cells. In addition, LS-1-10 induced DNA damage and caspase 8-mediated apoptosis. Overall, this small molecule was more efficient at reducing the viability of cancer cells than other conventional chemotherapeutic agents, such as CQ and amsacrine. The anticancer and autophagy-inhibiting activities of LS-1-10 were confirmed in vivo in a xenograft mouse model. Collectively, this study has identified a new and efficient single compound with both autophagy-inhibiting and anticancer activity, which may provide a novel approach for cancer therapy.

  12. NF-κB p65 repression by the sesquiterpene lactone, Helenalin, contributes to the induction of autophagy cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Chuan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous studies have demonstrated that autophagy plays a vital role in maintaining cellular homeostasis. Interestingly, several anticancer agents were found to exert their anticancer effects by triggering autophagy. Emerging data suggest that autophagy represents a novel mechanism that can be exploited for therapeutic benefit. Pharmacologically active natural compounds such as those from marine, terrestrial plants and animals represent a promising resource for novel anticancer drugs. There are several prominent examples from the past proving the success of natural products and derivatives exhibiting anticancer activity. Helenalin, a sesquiterpene lactone has been demonstrated to have potent anti-inflammatory and antitumor activity. Albeit previous studies demonstrating helenalin’s multi modal action on cellular proliferative and apoptosis, the mechanisms underlying its action are largely unexplained. Methods To deduce the mechanistic action of helenalin, cancer cells were treated with the drug at various concentrations and time intervals. Using western blot, FACS analysis, overexpression and knockdown studies, cellular signaling pathways were interrogated focusing on apoptosis and autophagy markers. Results We show here that helenalin induces sub-G1 arrest, apoptosis, caspase cleavage and increases the levels of the autophagic markers. Suppression of caspase cleavage by the pan caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-fmk, suppressed induction of LC3-B and Atg12 and reduced autophagic cell death, indicating caspase activity was essential for autophagic cell death induced by helenalin. Additionally, helenalin suppressed NF-κB p65 expression in a dose and time dependent manner. Exogenous overexpression of p65 was accompanied by reduced levels of cell death whereas siRNA mediated suppression led to augmented levels of caspase cleavage, autophagic cell death markers and increased cell death. Conclusions Taken together, these results show

  13. Neuronal death after perinatal cerebral hypoxia-ischemia: Focus on autophagy-mediated cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descloux, C; Ginet, V; Clarke, P G H; Puyal, J; Truttmann, A C

    2015-10-01

    Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy is a critical cerebral event occurring around birth with high mortality and neurological morbidity associated with long-term invalidating sequelae. In view of the great clinical importance of this condition and the lack of very efficacious neuroprotective strategies, it is urgent to better understand the different cell death mechanisms involved with the ultimate aim of developing new therapeutic approaches. The morphological features of three different cell death types can be observed in models of perinatal cerebral hypoxia-ischemia: necrotic, apoptotic and autophagic cell death. They may be combined in the same dying neuron. In the present review, we discuss the different cell death mechanisms involved in neonatal cerebral hypoxia-ischemia with a special focus on how autophagy may be involved in neuronal death, based: (1) on experimental models of perinatal hypoxia-ischemia and stroke, and (2) on the brains of human neonates who suffered from neonatal hypoxia-ischemia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Fusobacterium nucleatum-Induced Impairment of Autophagic Flux Enhances the Expression of Proinflammatory Cytokines via ROS in Caco-2 Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Tang

    Full Text Available Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum plays a critical role in gastrointestinal inflammation. However, the exact mechanism by which F. nucleatum contributes to inflammation is unclear. In the present study, it was revealed that F. nucleatum could induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-8, IL-1β and TNF-α and reactive oxygen species (ROS in Caco-2 colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. Furthermore, ROS scavengers (NAC or Tiron could decrease the production of proinflammatory cytokines during F. nucleatum infection. In addition, we observed that autophagy is impaired in Caco-2 cells after F. nucleatum infection. The production of proinflammatory cytokines and ROS induced by F. nucleatum was enhanced with either autophagy pharmacologic inhibitors (3-methyladenine, bafilomycin A1 or RNA interference in essential autophagy genes (ATG5 or ATG12 in Caco-2 cells. Taken together, these results indicate that F. nucleatum-induced impairment of autophagic flux enhances the expression of proinflammatory cytokines via ROS in Caco-2 Cells.

  15. Fusobacterium nucleatum-Induced Impairment of Autophagic Flux Enhances the Expression of Proinflammatory Cytokines via ROS in Caco-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bin; Wang, Kun; Jia, Yin-Ping; Zhu, Pan; Fang, Yao; Zhang, Zhu-Jun; Mao, Xu-Hu; Li, Qian; Zeng, Dong-Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum) plays a critical role in gastrointestinal inflammation. However, the exact mechanism by which F. nucleatum contributes to inflammation is unclear. In the present study, it was revealed that F. nucleatum could induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-8, IL-1β and TNF-α) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Caco-2 colorectal) adenocarcinoma cells. Furthermore, ROS scavengers (NAC or Tiron) could decrease the production of proinflammatory cytokines during F. nucleatum infection. In addition, we observed that autophagy is impaired in Caco-2 cells after F. nucleatum infection. The production of proinflammatory cytokines and ROS induced by F. nucleatum was enhanced with either autophagy pharmacologic inhibitors (3-methyladenine, bafilomycin A1) or RNA interference in essential autophagy genes (ATG5 or ATG12) in Caco-2 cells. Taken together, these results indicate that F. nucleatum-induced impairment of autophagic flux enhances the expression of proinflammatory cytokines via ROS in Caco-2 Cells.

  16. Detection of programmed cell death in plant embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filonova, Lada H; Suárez, María F; Bozhkov, Peter V

    2008-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an integral part of embryogenesis. In plant embryos, PCD functions during terminal differentiation and elimination of the temporary organ, suspensor, as well as during establishment of provascular system. Embryo abortion is another example of embryonic PCD activated at pathological situations and in polyembryonic seeds. Recent studies identified the sequence of cytological events leading to cellular self-destruction in plant embryos. As in most if not all the developmental cell deaths in plants, embryonic PCD is hallmarked by autophagic degradation of the cytoplasm and nuclear disassembly that includes breakdown of the nuclear envelope and DNA fragmentation. The optimized setup of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) allows the routine in situ analysis of nuclear DNA fragmentation in plant embryos. This chapter provides step-by-step procedure of how to process embryos for TUNEL and how to combine TUNEL with immunolocalization of the protein of interest.

  17. Guidelines and recommendations on yeast cell death nomenclature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didac Carmona-Gutierrez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Elucidating the biology of yeast in its full complexity has major implications for science, medicine and industry. One of the most critical processes determining yeast life and physiology is cellular demise. However, the investigation of yeast cell death is a relatively young field, and a widely accepted set of concepts and terms is still missing. Here, we propose unified criteria for the definition of accidental, regulated, and programmed forms of cell death in yeast based on a series of morphological and biochemical criteria. Specifically, we provide consensus guidelines on the differential definition of terms including apoptosis, regulated necrosis, and autophagic cell death, as we refer to additional cell death routines that are relevant for the biology of (at least some species of yeast. As this area of investigation advances rapidly, changes and extensions to this set of recommendations will be implemented in the years to come. Nonetheless, we strongly encourage the authors, reviewers and editors of scientific articles to adopt these collective standards in order to establish an accurate framework for yeast cell death research and, ultimately, to accelerate the progress of this vibrant field of research.

  18. Alpha-hemolysin is required for the activation of the autophagic pathway in Staphylococcus aureus-infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestre, María Belén; Fader, Claudio M; Sola, Claudia; Colombo, María Isabel

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a pathogen that causes serious infectious diseases eventually leading to septic and toxic shock. Classically S. aureus has been considered an extracellular pathogen, but cumulative evidence indicates that it invades cells and replicates intracellularly leading to staphylococcal persistence and chronic disease. It has been previously shown that this pathogen localizes to LC3-labeled compartments and subverts the autophagy pathway. One of the key features of S. aureus infection is the production of a series of virulence factors, including secreted enzymes and toxins. In the present report we present evidence that the pore-forming toxin alpha-hemolysin (Hla) is a S. aureus secreted factor which participates in the activation of the autophagic pathway. In addition, our results indicate that although the toxin elicits an autophagic response this pathway is dysfunctional as indicated by the accumulation of the LC3-II form in cell lysates obtained from intoxicated cells. In addition, not only the purified Hla toxin but also the toxin-secreting pathogen prevented the maturation of autophagosomes. Interestingly, in cells infected with the wild-type strain of S. aureus the bacteria-containing compartments which recruited LC3 onto the limiting membrane did not accumulate the acidotropic probe LysoTracker. In contrast, those phagosomes containing the Hla(-) mutant (unable to produce the toxin) localized in an acidic compartment unlabeled by LC3. These results suggest that the LC3 protein is recruited only to those damaged vacuoles (i.e., perforated by the toxin), perhaps as an attempt to protect the cells. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that the toxin-dependent activation of autophagy (although it is regulated by calcium and requires Atg5) is independent of both PI3Kinase activity and Beclin 1 suggesting the involvement of a non-canonical autophagy pathway.

  19. Vacuolar cell death in plants: Metacaspase releases the brakes on autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minina, Elena A; Smertenko, Andrei P; Bozhkov, Peter V

    2014-05-01

    Vacuolar programmed cell death (PCD) is indispensable for plant development and is accompanied by a dramatic growth of lytic vacuoles, which gradually digest cytoplasmic content leading to self-clearance of dying cells. Our recent data demonstrate that vacuolar PCD critically requires autophagy and its upstream regulator, a caspase-fold protease metacaspase. Furthermore, both components lie downstream of the point of no return in the cell-death pathway. Here we consider the possibilities that i) autophagy could have both cytotoxic and cytoprotective roles in the vacuolar PCD, and ii) metacaspase could augment autophagic flux through targeting an as yet unknown autophagy repressor.

  20. HEPES activates a MiT/TFE-dependent lysosomal-autophagic gene network in cultured cells: A call for caution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tol, Marc J; van der Lienden, Martijn J C; Gabriel, Tanit L; Hagen, Jacob J; Scheij, Saskia; Veenendaal, Tineke; Klumperman, Judith; Donker-Koopman, Wilma E; Verhoeven, Arthur J; Overkleeft, Hermen; Aerts, Johannes M; Argmann, Carmen A; van Eijk, Marco

    2018-02-17

    In recent years, the lysosome has emerged as a highly dynamic, transcriptionally regulated organelle that is integral to nutrient-sensing and metabolic rewiring. This is coordinated by a lysosome-to-nucleus signaling nexus in which MTORC1 controls the subcellular distribution of the microphthalmia-transcription factor E (MiT/TFE) family of "master lysosomal regulators". Yet, despite the importance of the lysosome in cellular metabolism, the impact of traditional in vitro culture media on lysosomal dynamics and/or MiT/TFE localization has not been fully appreciated. Here, we identify HEPES, a chemical buffering agent that is broadly applied in cell culture, as a potent inducer of lysosome biogenesis. Supplementation of HEPES to cell growth media is sufficient to decouple the MiT/TFE family members-TFEB, TFE3 and MITF-from regulatory mechanisms that control their cytosolic retention. Increased MiT/TFE nuclear import in turn drives the expression of a global network of lysosomal-autophagic and innate host-immune response genes, altering lysosomal dynamics, proteolytic capacity, autophagic flux, and inflammatory signaling. In addition, siRNA-mediated MiT/TFE knockdown effectively blunted HEPES-induced lysosome biogenesis and gene expression profiles. Mechanistically, we show that MiT/TFE activation in response to HEPES requires its macropinocytic ingestion and aberrant lysosomal storage/pH, but is independent of MTORC1 signaling. Altogether, our data underscore the cautionary use of chemical buffering agents in cell culture media due to their potentially confounding effects on experimental results.

  1. A systems level strategy for analyzing the cell death network: implication in exploring the apoptosis/autophagy connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalckvar, E; Yosef, N; Reef, S; Ber, Y; Rubinstein, A D; Mor, I; Sharan, R; Ruppin, E; Kimchi, A

    2010-08-01

    The mammalian cell death network comprises three distinct functional modules: apoptosis, autophagy and programmed necrosis. Currently, the field lacks systems level approaches to assess the extent to which the intermodular connectivity affects cell death performance. Here, we developed a platform that is based on single and double sets of RNAi-mediated perturbations targeting combinations of apoptotic and autophagic genes. The outcome of perturbations is measured both at the level of the overall cell death responses, using an unbiased quantitative reporter, and by assessing the molecular responses within the different functional modules. Epistatic analyses determine whether seemingly unrelated pairs of proteins are genetically linked. The initial running of this platform in etoposide-treated cells, using a few single and double perturbations, identified several levels of connectivity between apoptosis and autophagy. The knock down of caspase3 turned on a switch toward autophagic cell death, which requires Atg5 or Beclin-1. In addition, a reciprocal connection between these two autophagic genes and apoptosis was identified. By applying computational tools that are based on mining the protein-protein interaction database, a novel biochemical pathway connecting between Atg5 and caspase3 is suggested. Scaling up this platform into hundreds of perturbations potentially has a wide, general scope of applicability, and will provide the basis for future modeling of the cell death network.

  2. Interplay between autophagy and programmed cell death in mammalian neural stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Min Chung

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian neural stem cells (NSCs are of particular interestbecause of their role in brain development and function. Recentfindings suggest the intimate involvement of programmed celldeath (PCD in the turnover of NSCs. However, the underlyingmechanisms of PCD are largely unknown. Although apoptosis isthe best-defined form of PCD, accumulating evidence hasrevealed a wide spectrum of PCD encompassing apoptosis,autophagic cell death (ACD and necrosis. This mini-reviewaims to illustrate a unique regulation of PCD in NSCs. Theresults of our recent studies on autophagic death of adulthippocampal neural stem (HCN cells are also discussed. HCNcell death following insulin withdrawal clearly provides areliable model that can be used to analyze the molecularmechanisms of ACD in the larger context of PCD. Moreresearch efforts are needed to increase our understanding of themolecular basis of NSC turnover under degenerating conditions,such as aging, stress and neurological diseases. Efforts aimed atprotecting and harnessing endogenous NSCs will offer novelopportunities for the development of new therapeutic strategiesfor neuropathologies. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(8: 383-390

  3. Cardiac Glycoside Glucoevatromonoside Induces Cancer Type-Specific Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naira F. Z. Schneider

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac glycosides (CGs are natural compounds used traditionally to treat congestive heart diseases. Recent investigations repositioned CGs as potential anticancer agents. To discover novel cytotoxic CG scaffolds, we selected the cardenolide glucoevatromonoside (GEV out of 46 CGs for its low nanomolar anti-lung cancer activity. GEV presented reduced toxicity toward non-cancerous cell types (lung MRC-5 and PBMC and high-affinity binding to the Na+/K+-ATPase α subunit, assessed by computational docking. GEV-induced cell death was caspase-independent, as investigated by a multiparametric approach, and culminates in severe morphological alterations in A549 cells, monitored by transmission electron microscopy, live cell imaging and flow cytometry. This non-canonical cell death was not preceded or accompanied by exacerbation of autophagy. In the presence of GEV, markers of autophagic flux (e.g. LC3I-II conversion were impacted, even in presence of bafilomycin A1. Cell death induction remained unaffected by calpain, cathepsin, parthanatos, or necroptosis inhibitors. Interestingly, GEV triggered caspase-dependent apoptosis in U937 acute myeloid leukemia cells, witnessing cancer-type specific cell death induction. Differential cell cycle modulation by this CG led to a G2/M arrest, cyclin B1 and p53 downregulation in A549, but not in U937 cells. We further extended the anti-cancer potential of GEV to 3D cell culture using clonogenic and spheroid formation assays and validated our findings in vivo by zebrafish xenografts. Altogether, GEV shows an interesting anticancer profile with the ability to exert cytotoxic effects via induction of different cell death modalities.

  4. The nuclear receptor NR4A1 induces a form of cell death dependent on autophagy in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimena Bouzas-Rodríguez

    Full Text Available The control of cell death is a biological process essential for proper development, and for preventing devastating pathologies like cancer and neurodegeneration. On the other hand, autophagy regulation is essential for protein and organelle degradation, and its dysfunction is associated with overlapping pathologies like cancer and neurodegeneration, but also for microbial infection and aging. In the present report we show that two evolutionarily unrelated receptors--Neurokinin 1 Receptor (NK(1R, a G-protein coupled receptor, and Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 Receptor (IGF1R, a tyrosine kinase receptor--both induce non-apoptotic cell death with autophagic features and requiring the activity of the autophagic core machinery proteins PI3K-III, Beclin-1 and Atg7. Remarkably, this form of cell death occurs in apoptosis-competent cells. The signal transduction pathways engaged by these receptors both converged on the activation of the nuclear receptor NR4A1, which has previously been shown to play a critical role in some paradigms of apoptosis and in NK(1R-induced cell death. The activity of NR4A1 was necessary for IGF1R-induced cell death, as well as for a canonical model of cell death by autophagy induced by the presence of a pan-caspase inhibitor, suggesting that NR4A1 is a general modulator of this kind of cell death. During cell death by autophagy, NR4A1 was transcriptionally competent, even though a fraction of it was present in the cytoplasm. Interestingly, NR4A1 interacts with the tumor suppressor p53 but not with Beclin-1 complex. Therefore the mechanism to promote cell death by autophagy might involve regulation of gene expression, as well as protein interactions. Understanding the molecular basis of autophagy and cell death mediation by NR4A1, should provide novel insights and targets for therapeutic intervention.

  5. 17-AAG post-treatment ameliorates memory impairment and hippocampal CA1 neuronal autophagic death induced by transient global cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianxiong; Yang, Fei; Guo, Jia; Zhang, Rongrong; Xing, Xiangfeng; Qin, Xinyue

    2015-06-12

    Neuro-inflammation plays an important role in global cerebral ischemia (GCI). The 72-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp70) has been reported to be involved in the inflammatory response of many central nervous system diseases. Preclinical findings implicate that 17-allylamino-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), an anticancer drug in clinical, provide neuroprotection actions in a rat model of traumatic brain injury, and the beneficial effects of 17-AAG were specifically due to up-regulation of Hsp70. However, no experiments have tested whether 17-AAG has beneficial or harmful effects in the setting of GCI. The present study was designed to determine the hypothesis that administration of 17-AAG could attenuate cerebral infarction and improve neuronal survival, thereby ameliorating memory impairment in a rat model of GCI. Furthermore, to test whether any neuroprotective effect of 17-AAG was associated with inflammatory response and neuronal autophagy, we examined the expression of multiplex inflammatory cytokine levels as well as autophagy-associate protein in hippocampal CA1 of rat brain. Our results showed that post-GCI administration of 17-AAG significantly protected rats against GCI induced brain injury, and 17-AAG is also an effective antagonist of the inflammatory response and thereby ameliorates hippocampal CA1 neuronal autophagic death. We therefore believe that the present study provides novel clues in understanding the mechanisms by which 17-AAG exerts its neuroprotective activity in GCI. All data reveal that 17-AAG might be a potential neuroprotective agent for ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Glutathione in Cancer Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, Angel L. [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Valencia, 17 Av. Blasco Ibanez, 46010 Valencia (Spain); Mena, Salvador [Green Molecular SL, Pol. Ind. La Coma-Parc Cientific, 46190 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Estrela, Jose M., E-mail: jose.m.estrela@uv.es [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Valencia, 17 Av. Blasco Ibanez, 46010 Valencia (Spain)

    2011-03-11

    Glutathione (L-γ-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine; GSH) in cancer cells is particularly relevant in the regulation of carcinogenic mechanisms; sensitivity against cytotoxic drugs, ionizing radiations, and some cytokines; DNA synthesis; and cell proliferation and death. The intracellular thiol redox state (controlled by GSH) is one of the endogenous effectors involved in regulating the mitochondrial permeability transition pore complex and, in consequence, thiol oxidation can be a causal factor in the mitochondrion-based mechanism that leads to cell death. Nevertheless GSH depletion is a common feature not only of apoptosis but also of other types of cell death. Indeed rates of GSH synthesis and fluxes regulate its levels in cellular compartments, and potentially influence switches among different mechanisms of death. How changes in gene expression, post-translational modifications of proteins, and signaling cascades are implicated will be discussed. Furthermore, this review will finally analyze whether GSH depletion may facilitate cancer cell death under in vivo conditions, and how this can be applied to cancer therapy.

  7. Glutathione in Cancer Cell Death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, Angel L.; Mena, Salvador; Estrela, Jose M.

    2011-01-01

    Glutathione (L-γ-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine; GSH) in cancer cells is particularly relevant in the regulation of carcinogenic mechanisms; sensitivity against cytotoxic drugs, ionizing radiations, and some cytokines; DNA synthesis; and cell proliferation and death. The intracellular thiol redox state (controlled by GSH) is one of the endogenous effectors involved in regulating the mitochondrial permeability transition pore complex and, in consequence, thiol oxidation can be a causal factor in the mitochondrion-based mechanism that leads to cell death. Nevertheless GSH depletion is a common feature not only of apoptosis but also of other types of cell death. Indeed rates of GSH synthesis and fluxes regulate its levels in cellular compartments, and potentially influence switches among different mechanisms of death. How changes in gene expression, post-translational modifications of proteins, and signaling cascades are implicated will be discussed. Furthermore, this review will finally analyze whether GSH depletion may facilitate cancer cell death under in vivo conditions, and how this can be applied to cancer therapy

  8. Identification of novel autophagic Radix Polygalae fraction by cell membrane chromatography and UHPLC-(Q)TOF-MS for degradation of neurodegenerative disease proteins

    OpenAIRE

    An-Guo Wu; Vincent Kam-Wai Wong; Wu Zeng; Liang Liu; Betty Yuen-Kwan Law

    2015-01-01

    With its traditional use in relieving insomnia and anxiety, our previous study has identified onjisaponin B from Radix Polygalae (RP), as a novel autophagic enhancer with potential neuroprotective effects. In current study, we have further identified a novel active fraction from RP, contains 17 major triterpenoid saponins including the onjisaponin B, by the combinational use of cell membrane chromatography (CMC) and ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to (quadrupole) time-of-fligh...

  9. New steroidal aromatase inhibitors: Suppression of estrogen-dependent breast cancer cell proliferation and induction of cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roleira Fernanda MF

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aromatase, the cytochrome P-450 enzyme (CYP19 responsible for estrogen biosynthesis, is an important target for the treatment of estrogen-dependent breast cancer. In fact, the use of synthetic aromatase inhibitors (AI, which induce suppression of estrogen synthesis, has shown to be an effective alternative to the classical tamoxifen for the treatment of postmenopausal patients with ER-positive breast cancer. New AIs obtained, in our laboratory, by modification of the A and D-rings of the natural substrate of aromatase, compounds 3a and 4a, showed previously to efficiently suppress aromatase activity in placental microsomes. In the present study we have investigated the effects of these compounds on cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and induction of cell death using the estrogen-dependent human breast cancer cell line stably transfected with the aromatase gene, MCF-7 aro cells. Results The new steroids inhibit hormone-dependent proliferation of MCF-7aro cells in a time and dose-dependent manner, causing cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and inducing cell death with features of apoptosis and autophagic cell death. Conclusion Our in vitro studies showed that the two steroidal AIs, 3a and 4a, are potent inhibitors of breast cancer cell proliferation. Moreover, it was also shown that the antiproliferative effects of these two steroids on MCF-7aro cells are mediated by disrupting cell cycle progression, through cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and induction of cell death, being the dominant mechanism autophagic cell death. Our results are important for the elucidation of the cellular effects of steroidal AIs on breast cancer.

  10. Cell death control: the interplay of apoptosis and autophagy in the pathogenicity of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Kabbage

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death is characterized by a cascade of tightly controlled events that culminate in the orchestrated death of the cell. In multicellular organisms autophagy and apoptosis are recognized as two principal means by which these genetically determined cell deaths occur. During plant-microbe interactions cell death programs can mediate both resistant and susceptible events. Via oxalic acid (OA, the necrotrophic phytopathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum hijacks host pathways and induces cell death in host plant tissue resulting in hallmark apoptotic features in a time and dose dependent manner. OA-deficient mutants are non-pathogenic and trigger a restricted cell death phenotype in the host that unexpectedly exhibits markers associated with the plant hypersensitive response including callose deposition and a pronounced oxidative burst, suggesting the plant can recognize and in this case respond, defensively. The details of this plant directed restrictive cell death associated with OA deficient mutants is the focus of this work. Using a combination of electron and fluorescence microscopy, chemical effectors and reverse genetics, we show that this restricted cell death is autophagic. Inhibition of autophagy rescued the non-pathogenic mutant phenotype. These findings indicate that autophagy is a defense response in this necrotrophic fungus/plant interaction and suggest a novel function associated with OA; namely, the suppression of autophagy. These data suggest that not all cell deaths are equivalent, and though programmed cell death occurs in both situations, the outcome is predicated on who is in control of the cell death machinery. Based on our data, we suggest that it is not cell death per se that dictates the outcome of certain plant-microbe interactions, but the manner by which cell death occurs that is crucial.

  11. Daunomycin accumulation and induction of programmed cell death in rat hair follicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, Masashi; Larsson, Lars-Inge; Hougaard, David M.

    2009-01-01

    -positive matrix cells are detectable up to 48 h after injection and exhibit a characteristic granular morphology, which is not observed in saline-injected controls. TUNEL-staining has revealed that DM injection induces programmed cell death (PCD) in rat hair follicles. Cells undergoing PCD are detectable as late...... and in the outer root sheath. Ultrastructural immunocytochemistry has shown the presence of DM-positive cells with two different types of morphology. About half of the immunopositive cells exhibit a morphology typical of classical apoptosis (PCD type 1), whereas the other half show signs of autophagic cell death...... (PCD type 2). Interestingly, little, if any, DM accumulation or apoptosis has been detected in the dermal hair papillae. This may have a bearing on potential regeneration of the hair follicles. Thus, DM accumulates in a characteristic pattern in hair follicles. This accumulation is associated...

  12. Programmed cell death in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomicheva, A S; Tuzhikov, A I; Beloshistov, R E; Trusova, S V; Galiullina, R A; Mochalova, L V; Chichkova, N V; Vartapetian, A B

    2012-12-01

    The modern concepts of programmed cell death (PCD) in plants are reviewed as compared to PCD (apoptosis) in animals. Special attention is focused on considering the potential mechanisms of implementation of this fundamental biological process and its participants. In particular, the proteolytic enzymes involved in PCD in animals (caspases) and plants (phytaspases) are compared. Emphasis is put on elucidation of both common features and substantial differences of PCD implementation in plants and animals.

  13. Koelreuteria Formosana Extract Induces Growth Inhibition and Cell Death in Human Colon Carcinoma Cells via G2/M Arrest and LC3-II Activation-Dependent Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horng, Chi-Ting; Wu, Yueh-Jung; Chen, Pei-Ni; Chu, Shu-Chen; Tsai, Chun-Miao; Hsieh, Yih-Shou

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is a self-destructive process that degrades cytoplasmic constituents. In our previous study, Koelreuteria formosana ethanolic extract (KFEE), which is obtained from natural plants endemic to Taiwan, has inhibited cell metastasis in renal carcinoma cells. However, the anticancer effects of KFEE on colon cancer remain unclear. In this study, KFEE exerted a strong cytotoxic effect on DLD-1 and COLO 205 human colorectal cancer cell lines. KFEE effectively inhibited cancer cell proliferation, induced G2/M-phase arrest associated with downregulaton of cyclin E, cyclin B and cdc25C and upregulation of p21, and induced cell death by activating autophagy but did not cause apoptotic cell death. Exposed KFEE cells showed increased levels of acridine orange, autophagic vacuoles, and LC3-II proteins, which are specific autophagic markers. Bcl-2, p-Akt, and p-mTOR levels, which have been implicated in autophagic downregulation, were decreased after KFEE treatment. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenosine and bafilomycin-A1 and genetic silencing of LC3 attenuated KFEE-induced growth inhibition. These findings suggested that KFEE causes cytostatic effect through autophagy. In xenograft studies, oral administration of KFEE had significantly inhibited the tumor growth in nude mice that had received subcutaneous injection of DLD-1 cells. KFEE is a promising candidate in phytochemical-based, mechanistic, and pathway-targeted cancer prevention strategies.

  14. Simultaneous activation of mitophagy and autophagy by staurosporine protects against dopaminergic neuronal cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Ji-Young; Kim, Ji-Soo; Kim, Seo-Eun; Son, Jin H

    2014-02-21

    Abnormal autophagy is frequently observed during dopaminergic neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, it is not yet firmly established whether active autophagy is beneficial or pathogenic with respect to dopaminergic cell loss. Staurosporine, a common inducer of apoptosis, is often used in mechanistic studies of dopaminergic cell death. Here we report that staurosporine activates both autophagy and mitophagy simultaneously during dopaminergic neuronal cell death, and evaluate the physiological significance of these processes during cell death. First, staurosporine treatment resulted in induction of autophagy in more than 75% of apoptotic cells. Pharmacological inhibition of autophagy by bafilomycin A1 decreased significantly cell viability. In addition, staurosporine treatment resulted in activation of the PINK1-Parkin mitophagy pathway, of which deficit underlies some familial cases of PD, in the dopaminergic neuronal cell line, SN4741. The genetic blockade of this pathway by PINK1 null mutation also dramatically increased staurosporine-induced cell death. Taken together, our data suggest that staurosporine induces both mitophagy and autophagy, and that these pathways exert a significant neuroprotective effect, rather than a contribution to autophagic cell death. This model system may therefore be useful for elucidating the mechanisms underlying crosstalk between autophagy, mitophagy, and cell death in dopaminergic neurons. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Betulinic acid-induced mitochondria-dependent cell death is counterbalanced by an autophagic salvage response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potze, L.; Mullauer, F. B.; Colak, S.; Kessler, J. H.; Medema, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    Betulinic acid (BetA) is a plant-derived pentacyclic triterpenoid that exerts potent anti-cancer effects in vitro and in vivo. It was shown to induce apoptosis via a direct effect on mitochondria. This is largely independent of proapoptotic BAK and BAX, but can be inhibited by cyclosporin A (CsA),

  16. Autophagic effects of Hibiscus sabdariffa leaf polyphenols and epicatechin gallate (ECG) against oxidized LDL-induced injury of human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing-Hsien; Lee, Ming-Shih; Wang, Chi-Ping; Hsu, Cheng-Chin; Lin, Hui-Hsuan

    2017-08-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) contributes to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis by promoting vascular endothelial cell injury. Hibiscus sabdariffa leaf polyphenols (HLP), rich in flavonoids, have been shown to possess antioxidant and antiatherosclerotic activities. In this study, we examined the protective role of HLP and its main compound (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECG) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) exposed to ox-LDL in vitro. In a model of ox-LDL-impaired HUVECs, assessments of cell viability, cytotoxicity, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and autophagy were detected. To highlight the mechanisms of the antiapoptotic effects of HLP and ECG, the expressions of molecular proteins were measured by Western blotting, real-time PCR, and so on. HLP or ECG improved the survival of HUVECs from ox-LDL-induced viability loss. In addition, HLP or ECG showed potential in reducing ox-LDL-dependent apoptosis. Next, the ox-LDL-induced formation of acidic vesicular organelles and upregulation of the autophagy-related genes were increased by HLP or ECG. The HLP-triggered autophagic flux was further confirmed by increasing the LC3-II level under the pretreatment of an autophagy inhibitor chloroquine. Molecular data indicated the autophagic effect of HLP or ECG might be mediated via class III PI3K/Beclin-1 and PTEN/class I PI3K/Akt cascade signaling, as demonstrated by the usage of a class III PI3K inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and a PTEN inhibitor SF1670. Our data imply that ECG-enriched HLP upregulates the autophagic pathway, which in turn led to reduce ox-LDL-induced HUVECs injury and apoptosis and provide a new mechanism for its antiatherosclerotic activity.

  17. Autophagic clearance of bacterial pathogens: molecular recognition of intracellular microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Maria Eugenia Mansilla; Colombo, Maria I

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is involved in several physiological and pathological processes. One of the key roles of the autophagic pathway is to participate in the first line of defense against the invasion of pathogens, as part of the innate immune response. Targeting of intracellular bacteria by the autophagic machinery, either in the cytoplasm or within vacuolar compartments, helps to control bacterial proliferation in the host cell, controlling also the spreading of the infection. In this review we will describe the means used by diverse bacterial pathogens to survive intracellularly and how they are recognized by the autophagic molecular machinery, as well as the mechanisms used to avoid autophagic clearance.

  18. Active ras triggers death in glioblastoma cells through hyperstimulation of macropinocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overmeyer, Jean H; Kaul, Aparna; Johnson, Erin E; Maltese, William A

    2008-06-01

    Expression of activated Ras in glioblastoma cells induces accumulation of large phase-lucent cytoplasmic vacuoles, followed by cell death. This was previously described as autophagic cell death. However, unlike autophagosomes, the Ras-induced vacuoles are not bounded by a double membrane and do not sequester organelles or cytoplasm. Moreover, they are not acidic and do not contain the autophagosomal membrane protein LC3-II. Here we show that the vacuoles are enlarged macropinosomes. They rapidly incorporate extracellular fluid-phase tracers but do not sequester transferrin or the endosomal protein EEA1. Ultimately, the cells expressing activated Ras detach from the substratum and rupture, coincident with the displacement of cytoplasm with huge macropinosome-derived vacuoles. These changes are accompanied by caspase activation, but the broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor carbobenzoxy-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone does not prevent cell death. Moreover, the majority of degenerating cells do not exhibit chromatin condensation typical of apoptosis. These observations provide evidence for a necrosis-like form of cell death initiated by dysregulation of macropinocytosis, which we have dubbed "methuosis." An activated form of the Rac1 GTPase induces a similar form of cell death, suggesting that Ras acts through Rac-dependent signaling pathways to hyperstimulate macropinocytosis in glioblastoma. Further study of these signaling pathways may lead to the identification of other chemical and physiologic triggers for this unusual form of cell death.

  19. Guttiferone K induces autophagy and sensitizes cancer cells to nutrient stress-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Man; Lao, Yuanzhi; Xu, Naihan; Wang, Xiaoyu; Tan, Hongsheng; Fu, Wenwei; Lin, Zhixiu; Xu, Hongxi

    2015-09-15

    Medicinal plants have long been an excellent source of pharmaceutical agents. Autophagy, a catabolic degradation process through lysosomes, plays an important role in tumorigenesis and cancer therapy. Through a screen designed to identify autophagic regulators from a library of natural compounds, we found that Guttiferone K (GUTK) can activate autophagy in several cancer cell lines. The objective of this study is to investigate the mechanism by which GUTK sensitizes cancer cells to cell death in nutrient starvation condition. Cell death analysis was performed by propidium iodide staining with flow cytometry or Annexin V-FITC/PI staining assay. DCFH-DA staining was used for intracellular ROS measurement. Protein levels were analyzed by western blot analysis. Cell viability was measured by MTT assay. Exposure to GUTK was observed to markedly induce GFP-LC3 puncta formation and activate the accumulation of LC3-II and the degradation of p62 in HeLa cells, suggesting that GUTK is an autophagy inducer. Importantly, hydroxychloroquine, an autophagy inhibitor, was found to significantly prevent GUTK-induced cell death in nutrient starvation conditions, suggesting that the cell death observed is largely dependent on autophagy. We further provide evidence that GUTK inhibits Akt phosphorylation, thereby inhibiting the mTOR pathway in cancer cells during nutrient starvation. In addition, GUTK causes the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the phosphorylation of JNK in EBSS, which may mediate both autophagy and apoptosis. These data indicate that GUTK sensitizes cancer cells to nutrient stress-induced cell death though Akt/mTOR dependent autophagy pathway. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  20. Polycation-mediated integrated cell death processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parhamifar, Ladan; Andersen, Helene; Wu, Linping

    2014-01-01

    standard. PEIs are highly efficient transfectants, but depending on their architecture and size they induce cytotoxicity through different modes of cell death pathways. Here, we briefly review dynamic and integrated cell death processes and pathways, and discuss considerations in cell death assay design...

  1. Vacuolar H+ -ATPase c protects glial cell death induced by sodium nitroprusside under glutathione-depleted condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Yu Jeong; Lee, Seong-Beom; Lee, Hwa Ok; Son, Min Jeong; Kim, Ho-Shik; Kwon, Oh-Joo; Jeong, Seong-Whan

    2011-08-01

    We examined the role of the c subunit (ATP6L) of vacuolar H(+) -ATPase and its molecular mechanisms in glial cell death induced by sodium nitroprusside (SNP). ATP6L siRNA-transfected cells treated with SNP showed a significant increase in cytotoxicity under glutathione (GSH)-depleted conditions after pretreatment with buthionine sulfoximine, but reduction of ATP6L did not affect the regulation of lysosomal pH in analyses with lysosomal pH-dependent fluorescence probes. Photodegraded SNP and ferrous sulfate induced cytotoxicity with the same pattern as that of SNP, but SNAP and potassium cyanide did not show activity. Pretreatment of the transfected cells with deferoxamine (DFO) reduced ROS production and significantly inhibited the cytotoxicity, which indicates that primarily iron rather than nitric oxide or cyanide from SNP contributes to cell death. Involvement of apoptotic processes in the cells was not shown. Pretreatment with JNK or p38 chemical inhibitor significantly inhibited the cytotoxicity, and we also confirmed that the MAPKs were activated in the cells by immunoblot analysis. Significant increase of LC3-II conversion was observed in the cells, and the conversions were inhibited by cotransfection of the MAPK siRNAs and pretreatment with DFO. Introduction of Atg5 siRNA inhibited the cytotoxicity and inhibited the activation of MAPKs and the conversion of LC3. We finally confirmed autophagic cell death and involvement of MAPKs by observation of autophagic vacuoles via electron microscopy. These data suggest that ATP6L has a protective role against SNP-induced autophagic cell death via inhibition of JNK and p38 in GSH-depleted glial cells. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Endosome-mediated autophagy: an unconventional MIIC-driven autophagic pathway operational in dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondylis, Vangelis; van Nispen Tot Pannerden, Hezder E; van Dijk, Suzanne; Ten Broeke, Toine; Wubbolts, Richard; Geerts, Willie J; Seinen, Cor; Mutis, Tuna; Heijnen, Harry F G

    2013-06-01

    Activation of TLR signaling has been shown to induce autophagy in antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Using high-resolution microscopy approaches, we show that in LPS-stimulated dendritic cells (DCs), autophagosomes emerge from MHC class II compartments (MIICs) and harbor both the molecular machinery for antigen processing and the autophagosome markers LC3 and ATG16L1. This ENdosome-Mediated Autophagy (ENMA) appears to be the major type of autophagy in DCs, as similar structures were observed upon established autophagy-inducing conditions (nutrient deprivation, rapamycin) and under basal conditions in the presence of bafilomycin A1. Autophagosome formation was not significantly affected in DCs expressing ATG4B (C74A) mutant and atg4b (-/-) bone marrow DCs, but the degradation of the autophagy substrate SQSTM1/p62 was largely impaired. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the previously described DC aggresome-like LPS-induced structures (DALIS) contain vesicular membranes, and in addition to SQSTM1 and ubiquitin, they are positive for LC3. LC3 localization on DALIS is independent of its lipidation. MIIC-driven autophagosomes preferentially engulf the LPS-induced SQSTM1-positive DALIS, which become later degraded in autolysosomes. DALIS-associated membranes also contain ATG16L1, ATG9 and the Q-SNARE VTI1B, suggesting that they may represent (at least in part) a membrane reservoir for autophagosome expansion. We propose that ENMA constitutes an unconventional, APC-specific type of autophagy, which mediates the processing and presentation of cytosolic antigens by MHC class II machinery, and/or the selective clearance of toxic by-products of elevated ROS/RNS production in activated DCs, thereby promoting their survival.

  3. The autophagy induced by curcumin via MEK/ERK pathway plays an early anti-leukemia role in human Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia SUP-B15 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Guo

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: Curcumin induce autophagic cell death in SUP-B15 cells via activating RAF/MEK/ERK pathway. These findings suggest that autophagic mechanism contribute to the curcumin-induced early SUP-B15 cell death, and autophagy is another anti-leukemia mechanism of curcumin.

  4. Cell death in the cardiovascular system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Murray; Bennett, Martin; Littlewood, Trevor

    2007-01-01

    Cell death is important for both development and tissue homeostasis in the adult. As such, it is tightly controlled and deregulation is associated with diverse pathologies; for example, regulated cell death is involved in vessel remodelling during development or following injury, but deregulated death is implicated in pathologies such as atherosclerosis, aneurysm formation, ischaemic and dilated cardiomyopathies and infarction. We describe the mechanisms of cell death and its role in the normal physiology and various pathologies of the cardiovascular system. PMID:16547202

  5. Cathepsin D inhibits oxidative stress-induced cell death via activation of autophagy in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hah, Young-Sool; Noh, Hae Sook; Ha, Ji Hye; Ahn, Jin Sook; Hahm, Jong Ryeal; Cho, Hee Young; Kim, Deok Ryong

    2012-10-28

    Cathepsin D (CatD), a lysosomal aspartic protease, plays an essential role in tumor progression and apoptosis. However, the function of CatD in cell death is not yet fully understood. In this study, we identified CatD as one of up-regulated proteins in human malignant glioblastoma M059J cells that lack the catalytic subunit of DNA-PK compared with its isogenic M059K cells with normal DNA-PK activity. M059J cells were relatively more resistant to genotoxic stress than M059K cells. Overexpression of wild-type CatD but not catalytically inactive mutant CatD (D295N) inhibited H(2)O(2)-induced cell death in HeLa cells. Furthermore, knockdown of CatD expression abolished anti-apoptotic effect by CatD in the presence of H(2)O(2). Interestingly, high expression of CatD in HeLa cells significantly activated autophagy: increase of acidic autophagic vacuoles, LC3-II formation, and GFP-LC3 puncta. These results suggest that CatD can function as an anti-apoptotic mediator by inducing autophagy under cellular stress. In conclusion, inhibition of autophagy could be a novel strategy for the adjuvant chemotherapy of CatD-expressing cancers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparative analysis of programmed cell death pathways in filamentous fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wortman Jennifer R

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fungi can undergo autophagic- or apoptotic-type programmed cell death (PCD on exposure to antifungal agents, developmental signals, and stress factors. Filamentous fungi can also exhibit a form of cell death called heterokaryon incompatibility (HI triggered by fusion between two genetically incompatible individuals. With the availability of recently sequenced genomes of Aspergillus fumigatus and several related species, we were able to define putative components of fungi-specific death pathways and the ancestral core apoptotic machinery shared by all fungi and metazoa. Results Phylogenetic profiling of HI-associated proteins from four Aspergilli and seven other fungal species revealed lineage-specific protein families, orphan genes, and core genes conserved across all fungi and metazoa. The Aspergilli-specific domain architectures include NACHT family NTPases, which may function as key integrators of stress and nutrient availability signals. They are often found fused to putative effector domains such as Pfs, SesB/LipA, and a newly identified domain, HET-s/LopB. Many putative HI inducers and mediators are specific to filamentous fungi and not found in unicellular yeasts. In addition to their role in HI, several of them appear to be involved in regulation of cell cycle, development and sexual differentiation. Finally, the Aspergilli possess many putative downstream components of the mammalian apoptotic machinery including several proteins not found in the model yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Conclusion Our analysis identified more than 100 putative PCD associated genes in the Aspergilli, which may help expand the range of currently available treatments for aspergillosis and other invasive fungal diseases. The list includes species-specific protein families as well as conserved core components of the ancestral PCD machinery shared by fungi and metazoa.

  7. Programmed Cell Death in Neurospora crassa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pedro Gonçalves

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death has been studied for decades in mammalian cells, but simpler organisms, including prokaryotes, plants, and fungi, also undergo regulated forms of cell death. We highlight the usefulness of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa as a model organism for the study of programmed cell death. In N. crassa, cell death can be triggered genetically due to hyphal fusion between individuals with different allelic specificities at het loci, in a process called “heterokaryon incompatibility.” Chemical induction of cell death can also be achieved upon exposure to death-inducing agents like staurosporine, phytosphingosine, or hydrogen peroxide. A summary of the recent advances made by our and other groups on the discovery of the mechanisms and mediators underlying the process of cell death in N. crassa is presented.

  8. Molecular mechanisms of cell death: recommendations of the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death 2018.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vitale, Ilio; Aaronson, Stuart A; Abrams, John M; Adam, Dieter; Agostinis, Patrizia; Alnemri, Emad S; Altucci, Lucia; Amelio, Ivano; Andrews, David W; Annicchiarico-Petruzzelli, Margherita; Antonov, Alexey V; Arama, Eli; Baehrecke, Eric H; Barlev, Nickolai A; Bazan, Nicolas G; Bernassola, Francesca; Bertrand, Mathieu J M; Bianchi, Katiuscia; Blagosklonny, Mikhail V; Blomgren, Klas; Borner, Christoph; Boya, Patricia; Brenner, Catherine; Campanella, Michelangelo; Candi, Eleonora; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Cecconi, Francesco; Chan, Francis K-M; Chandel, Navdeep S; Cheng, Emily H; Chipuk, Jerry E; Cidlowski, John A; Ciechanover, Aaron; Cohen, Gerald M; Conrad, Marcus; Cubillos-Ruiz, Juan R; Czabotar, Peter E; D'Angiolella, Vincenzo; Dawson, Ted M; Dawson, Valina L; De Laurenzi, Vincenzo; De Maria, Ruggero; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Deshmukh, Mohanish; Di Daniele, Nicola; Di Virgilio, Francesco; Dixit, Vishva M; Dixon, Scott J; Duckett, Colin S; Dynlacht, Brian D; El-Deiry, Wafik S; Elrod, John W; Fimia, Gian Maria; Fulda, Simone; García-Sáez, Ana J; Garg, Abhishek D; Garrido, Carmen; Gavathiotis, Evripidis; Golstein, Pierre; Gottlieb, Eyal; Green, Douglas R; Greene, Lloyd A; Gronemeyer, Hinrich; Gross, Atan; Hajnoczky, Gyorgy; Hardwick, J Marie; Harris, Isaac S; Hengartner, Michael O; Hetz, Claudio; Ichijo, Hidenori; Jäättelä, Marja; Joseph, Bertrand; Jost, Philipp J; Juin, Philippe P; Kaiser, William J; Karin, Michael; Kaufmann, Thomas; Kepp, Oliver; Kimchi, Adi; Kitsis, Richard N; Klionsky, Daniel J; Knight, Richard A; Kumar, Sharad; Lee, Sam W; Lemasters, John J; Levine, Beth; Linkermann, Andreas; Lipton, Stuart A; Lockshin, Richard A; López-Otín, Carlos; Lowe, Scott W; Luedde, Tom; Lugli, Enrico; MacFarlane, Marion; Madeo, Frank; Malewicz, Michal; Malorni, Walter; Manic, Gwenola; Marine, Jean-Christophe; Martin, Seamus J; Martinou, Jean-Claude; Medema, Jan Paul; Mehlen, Patrick; Meier, Pascal; Melino, Sonia; Miao, Edward A; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Moll, Ute M; Muñoz-Pinedo, Cristina; Nagata, Shigekazu; Nuñez, Gabriel; Oberst, Andrew; Oren, Moshe; Overholtzer, Michael; Pagano, Michele; Panaretakis, Theocharis; Pasparakis, Manolis; Penninger, Josef M; Pereira, David M; Pervaiz, Shazib; Peter, Marcus E; Piacentini, Mauro; Pinton, Paolo; Prehn, Jochen H M; Puthalakath, Hamsa; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Rehm, Markus; Rizzuto, Rosario; Rodrigues, Cecilia M P; Rubinsztein, David C; Rudel, Thomas; Ryan, Kevin M; Sayan, Emre; Scorrano, Luca; Shao, Feng; Shi, Yufang; Silke, John; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Sistigu, Antonella; Stockwell, Brent R; Strasser, Andreas; Szabadkai, Gyorgy; Tait, Stephen W G; Tang, Daolin; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Thorburn, Andrew; Tsujimoto, Yoshihide; Turk, Boris; Vanden Berghe, Tom; Vandenabeele, Peter; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Villunger, Andreas; Virgin, Herbert W; Vousden, Karen H; Vucic, Domagoj; Wagner, Erwin F; Walczak, Henning; Wallach, David; Wang, Ying; Wells, James A; Wood, Will; Yuan, Junying; Zakeri, Zahra; Zhivotovsky, Boris; Zitvogel, Laurence; Melino, Gerry; Kroemer, Guido

    2018-03-01

    Over the past decade, the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death (NCCD) has formulated guidelines for the definition and interpretation of cell death from morphological, biochemical, and functional perspectives. Since the field continues to expand and novel mechanisms that orchestrate multiple cell death pathways are unveiled, we propose an updated classification of cell death subroutines focusing on mechanistic and essential (as opposed to correlative and dispensable) aspects of the process. As we provide molecularly oriented definitions of terms including intrinsic apoptosis, extrinsic apoptosis, mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT)-driven necrosis, necroptosis, ferroptosis, pyroptosis, parthanatos, entotic cell death, NETotic cell death, lysosome-dependent cell death, autophagy-dependent cell death, immunogenic cell death, cellular senescence, and mitotic catastrophe, we discuss the utility of neologisms that refer to highly specialized instances of these processes. The mission of the NCCD is to provide a widely accepted nomenclature on cell death in support of the continued development of the field.

  9. Monitoring protein turnover during phosphate starvation-dependent autophagic degradation using a photoconvertible fluorescent protein aggregate in tobacco BY-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasaki, Maiko; Asatsuma, Satoru; Matsuoka, Ken

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a system for quantitative monitoring of autophagic degradation in transformed tobacco BY-2 cells using an aggregate-prone protein comprised of cytochrome b5 (Cyt b5) and a tetrameric red fluorescent protein (RFP). Unfortunately, this system is of limited use for monitoring the kinetics of autophagic degradation because the proteins synthesized before and after induction of autophagy cannot be distinguished. To overcome this problem, we developed a system using kikume green-red (KikGR), a photoconvertible and tetrameric fluorescent protein that changes its fluorescence from green to red upon irradiation with purple light. Using the fusion protein of Cyt b5 and KikGR together with a method for the bulk conversion of KikGR, which we had previously used to convert the Golgi-localized monomeric KikGR fusion protein, we were able to monitor both the growth and de novo formation of aggregates. Using this system, we found that tobacco cells do not cease protein synthesis under conditions of phosphate (Pi)-starvation. Induction of autophagy under Pi-starvation, but not under sugar- or nitrogen-starvation, was specifically inhibited by phosphite, which is an analog of Pi with a different oxidation number. Therefore, the mechanism by which BY-2 cells can sense Pi-starvation and induce autophagy does not involve sensing a general decrease in energy supply and a specific Pi sensor might be involved in the induction of autophagy under Pi-starvation.

  10. Monitoring protein turnover during phosphate starvation-dependent autophagic degradation using a photoconvertible fluorescent protein aggregate in tobacco BY-2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiko eTasaki

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a system for quantitative monitoring of autophagic degradation in transformed tobacco BY-2 cells using an aggregate-prone protein comprised of cytochrome b5 (Cyt b5 and a tetrameric red fluorescent protein (RFP. Unfortunately, this system is of limited use for monitoring the kinetics of autophagic degradation because the proteins synthesized before and after induction of autophagy cannot be distinguished. To overcome this problem, we developed a system using kikume green-red (KikGR, a photoconvertible and tetrameric fluorescent protein that changes its fluorescence from green to red upon irradiation with purple light. Using the fusion protein of Cyt b5 and KikGR together with a method for the bulk conversion of KikGR, which we had previously used to convert the Golgi-localized monomeric KikGR fusion protein, we were able to monitor both the growth and de novo formation of aggregates. Using this system, we found that tobacco cells do not cease protein synthesis under conditions of phosphate (Pi-starvation. Induction of autophagy under Pi-starvation, but not under sugar- or nitrogen-starvation, was specifically inhibited by phosphite, which is an analog of Pi with a different oxidation number. Therefore, the mechanism by which BY-2 cells can sense Pi-starvation and induce autophagy does not involve sensing a general decrease in energy supply and a specific Pi sensor might be involved in the induction of autophagy under Pi-starvation.

  11. Identification of novel autophagic Radix Polygalae fraction by cell membrane chromatography and UHPLC-(Q)TOF-MS for degradation of neurodegenerative disease proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, An-Guo; Wong, Vincent Kam-Wai; Zeng, Wu; Liu, Liang; Law, Betty Yuen-Kwan

    2015-11-24

    With its traditional use in relieving insomnia and anxiety, our previous study has identified onjisaponin B from Radix Polygalae (RP), as a novel autophagic enhancer with potential neuroprotective effects. In current study, we have further identified a novel active fraction from RP, contains 17 major triterpenoid saponins including the onjisaponin B, by the combinational use of cell membrane chromatography (CMC) and ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to (quadrupole) time-of-flight mass spectrometry {UHPLC-(Q)TOF-MS}. By exhibiting more potent autophagic effect in cells, the active fraction enhances the clearance of mutant huntingtin, and reduces protein level and aggregation of α-synuclein in a higher extent when compared with onjisaponin B. Here, we have reported for the first time the new application of cell-based CMC and UHPLC-(Q)TOF-MS analysis in identifying new autophagy inducers with neuroprotective effects from Chinese medicinal herb. This result has provided novel insights into the possible pharmacological actions of the active components present in the newly identified active fraction of RP, which may help to improve the efficacy of the traditional way of prescribing RP, and also provide new standard for the quality control of decoction of RP or its medicinal products in the future.

  12. Hibiscus sabdariffa leaf polyphenolic extract induces human melanoma cell death, apoptosis, and autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chun-Tang; Hsuan, Shu-Wen; Lin, Hui-Hsuan; Hsu, Cheng-Chin; Chou, Fen-Pi; Chen, Jing-Hsien

    2015-03-01

    Melanoma is the least common but most fatal form of skin cancer. Previous studies have indicated that an aqueous extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa leaves possess hypoglycemic, hypolipidemic, and antioxidant effects. In this study, we want to investigate the anticancer activity of Hibiscus leaf polyphenolic (HLP) extract in melanoma cells. First, HLP was exhibited to be rich in epicatechin gallate (ECG) and other polyphenols. Apoptotic and autophagic activities of HLP and ECG were further evaluated by DAPI stain, cell-cycle analysis, and acidic vascular organelle (AVO) stain. Our results revealed that both HLP and ECG induced the caspases cleavages, Bcl-2 family proteins regulation, and Fas/FasL activation in A375 cells. In addition, we also revealed that the cells presented AVO-positive after HLP treatments. HLP could increase the expressions of autophagy-related proteins autophagy-related gene 5 (ATG5), Beclin1, and light chain 3-II (LC3-II), and induce autophagic cell death in A375 cells. These data indicated that the anticancer effect of HLP, partly contributed by ECG, in A375 cells. HLP potentially could be developed as an antimelanoma agent. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  13. The Arabidopsis peptide kiss of death is an inducer of programmed cell death

    OpenAIRE

    Blanvillain, Robert; Young, Bennett; Cai, Yao-min; Hecht, Valérie; Varoquaux, Fabrice; Delorme, Valérie; Lancelin, Jean-Marc; Delseny, Michel; Gallois, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    This study identifies a novel regulator of cell death in plants and shows that the 25-amino-acid peptide kiss of death regulates programmed cell death at an early step in the cell death-signalling cascade.

  14. Detection of cell death in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Kimberly; Peterson, Jeanne S; Pritchett, Tracy L

    2009-01-01

    Drosophila is a powerful model system for the identification of cell death genes and understanding the role of cell death in development. In this chapter, we describe three methods typically used for the detection of cell death in Drosophila. The TUNEL and acridine orange methods are used to detect dead or dying cells in a variety of tissues. We focus on methods for the embryo and the ovary, but these techniques can be used on other tissues as well. The third method is the detection of genetic interactions by expressing cell death genes in the Drosophila eye.

  15. [Methuosis: a novel type of cell death].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hongbing; Liu, Jinkun; Fan, Qin; Li, Xin

    2013-12-01

    Cell death is a major physiological or pathological phenomenon in life activities. The classic forms of cell death include apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagy. Recently, a novel type of cell death has been observed and termed as methuosis, in which excessive stimuli can induce cytoplasmic uptake and accumulation of small bubbles that gradually merge into giant vacuoles, eventually leading to decreased cellular metabolic activity, cell membrane rupture and cell death. In this article, we describe the nomenclature, morphological characteristics and underlying mechanisms of methuosis, compare methuosis with autophagy, oncosis and paraptosis, and review the related researches.

  16. A novel mTOR activating protein protects dopamine neurons against oxidative stress by repressing autophagy related cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyou-Chan; Kim, Shin-Hee; Ha, Ji-Young; Kim, Sang-Tae; Son, Jin H

    2010-01-01

    Our previous microarray analysis identified a neuroprotective protein Oxi-alpha, that was down-regulated during oxidative stress (OS)-induced cell death in dopamine neurons [Neurochem. Res. (2004) vol. 29, pp. 1223]. Here we find that the phylogenetically conserved Oxi-alpha protects against OS by a novel mechanism: activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase and subsequent repression of autophagic vacuole accumulation and cell death. To the best of our knowledge, Oxi-alpha is the first molecule discovered in dopamine neurons, which activates mTOR kinase. Indeed, the down-regulation of Oxi-alpha by OS suppresses the activation of mTOR kinase. The pathogenic effect of down-regulated Oxi-alpha was confirmed by gene-specific knockdown experiment, which resulted in not only the repression of mTOR kinase and the subsequent phosphorylation of p70 S6 kinase and 4E-BP1, but also enhanced susceptibility to OS. In accordance with these observations, treatment with rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor and autophagy inducer, potentiated OS-induced cell death, while similar treatment with an autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine protected the dopamine cells. Our findings present evidence for the presence of a novel class of molecule involved in autophagic cell death triggered by OS in dopamine neurons.

  17. Programmed Cell Death During Caenorhabditis elegans Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conradt, Barbara; Wu, Yi-Chun; Xue, Ding

    2016-08-01

    Programmed cell death is an integral component of Caenorhabditis elegans development. Genetic and reverse genetic studies in C. elegans have led to the identification of many genes and conserved cell death pathways that are important for the specification of which cells should live or die, the activation of the suicide program, and the dismantling and removal of dying cells. Molecular, cell biological, and biochemical studies have revealed the underlying mechanisms that control these three phases of programmed cell death. In particular, the interplay of transcriptional regulatory cascades and networks involving multiple transcriptional regulators is crucial in activating the expression of the key death-inducing gene egl-1 and, in some cases, the ced-3 gene in cells destined to die. A protein interaction cascade involving EGL-1, CED-9, CED-4, and CED-3 results in the activation of the key cell death protease CED-3, which is tightly controlled by multiple positive and negative regulators. The activation of the CED-3 caspase then initiates the cell disassembly process by cleaving and activating or inactivating crucial CED-3 substrates; leading to activation of multiple cell death execution events, including nuclear DNA fragmentation, mitochondrial elimination, phosphatidylserine externalization, inactivation of survival signals, and clearance of apoptotic cells. Further studies of programmed cell death in C. elegans will continue to advance our understanding of how programmed cell death is regulated, activated, and executed in general. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  18. Deoxycholate, an Endogenous Cytotoxin/Geno toxin, Induces the Autophagic Stress-Survival Pathway: Implications for Colon Carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, C.M.; Skillicorn, C.C.; Holubec, H.; Bernstein, C.; Dvorak, K.; Bernstein, H.; Moyer, M.P.; Garewal, H.

    2009-01-01

    We report that deoxycholate (DOC), a hydrophobic bile acid associated with a high-fat diet, activates the autophagic pathway in non-cancer colon epithelial cells (NCM-460), and that this activation contributes to cell survival. The DOC-induced increase in autophagy was documented by an increase in autophagic vacuoles (detected using transmission electron microscopy, increased levels of LC3-I and LC3-II (western blotting), an increase in acidic vesicles (fluorescence spectroscopy of monodansylcadaverine and lyso tracker red probes), and increased expression of the autophagic protein, beclin-1 (immunohistochemistry/western blotting). The DOC-induced increase in beclin-1 expression was ROS-dependent. Rapa mycin (activator of autophagy) pre-treatment of NCM-460 cells significantly (P<.05) decreased, and 3-MA (inhibitor of autophagy) significantly (P<.05) increased the cell loss caused by DOC treatment, alone. Rapa mycin pre-treatment of the apoptosis-resistant colon cancer cell line, HCT-116RC (developed in our laboratory), resulted in a significant decrease in DOC-induced cell death. Bafilomycin A1 and hydroxychloroquine (inhibitors of the autophagic process) increased the DOC-induced percentage of apoptotic cells in HCT-116RC cells. It was concluded that the activation of autophagy by DOC has important implications for colon carcinogenesis and for the treatment of colon cancer in conjunction with commonly used chemotherapeutic agents.

  19. CERT depletion predicts chemotherapy benefit and mediates cytotoxic and polyploid‐specific cancer cell death through autophagy induction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Alvin J. X.; Roylance, Rebecca; Sander, Jil

    2012-01-01

    to the death of CIN cancer cells. Using an integrative functional genomics approach, we find that CERT‐specific multidrug sensitization is associated with enhanced autophagosome–lysosome flux, resulting from the expression of LAMP2 following CERT silencing in colorectal and HER2+ breast cancer cell lines. Live...... cell microscopy analysis revealed that CERT depletion induces LAMP2‐dependent death of polyploid cells following exit from mitosis in the presence of paclitaxel. We find that CERT is relatively over‐expressed in HER2+ breast cancer and CERT protein expression acts as an independent prognostic variable...... and predictor of outcome in adjuvant chemotherapy‐treated patients with primary breast cancer. These data suggest that the induction of LAMP2‐dependent autophagic flux through CERT targeting may provide a rational approach to enhance multidrug sensitization and potentiate the death of polyploid cells following...

  20. High-mobility group box 1 released by autophagic cancer-associated fibroblasts maintains the stemness of luminal breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xi-Long; Lin, Yong; Jiang, Jun; Tang, Zhuo; Yang, Shuai; Lu, Lu; Liang, Yan; Liu, Xue; Tan, Jiao; Hu, Xu-Gang; Niu, Qin; Fu, Wen-Juan; Yan, Ze-Xuan; Guo, De-Yu; Ping, Yi-Fang; Wang, Ji Ming; Zhang, Xia; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Bian, Xiu-Wu; Yao, Xiao-Hong

    2017-11-01

    Cancer stem cells/cancer-initiating cells (CICs) and their microenvironmental niche play a vital role in malignant tumour recurrence and metastasis. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are major components of the niche of breast cancer-initiating cells (BCICs), and their interactions may profoundly affect breast cancer progression. Autophagy has been considered to be a critical process for CIC maintenance, but whether it is involved in the cross-talk between CAFs and CICs to affect tumourigenesis and pathological significance has not been determined. In this study, we found that the presence of CAFs containing high levels of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3II), a marker of autophagosomes, was associated with more aggressive luminal human breast cancer. CAFs in human luminal breast cancer tissues with high autophagy activity enriched BCICs with increased tumourigenicity. Mechanistically, autophagic CAFs released high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), which activated its receptor, Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4, expressed by luminal breast cancer cells, to enhance their stemness and tumourigenicity. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry of 180 luminal breast cancers revealed that high LC3II/TLR4 levels predicted an increased relapse rate and a poorer prognosis. Our findings demonstrate that autophagic CAFs play a critical role in promoting the progression of luminal breast cancer through an HMGB1-TLR4 axis, and that both autophagy in CAFs and TLR4 on breast cancer cells constitute potential therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Strain Difference in Photoreceptor Cell Death After Retinal Detachment in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hidetaka; Kataoka, Keiko; Tsoka, Pavlina; Connor, Kip M.; Miller, Joan W.; Vavvas, Demetrios G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the potential for mouse genetic background to effect photoreceptor cell death in response to experimental retinal detachment (RD). Methods. Retinal detachment was induced in three inbred mouse strains (C57BL/6, BALB/c, and B6129SF2) by subretinal injection of sodium hyaluronate. A time course of photoreceptor cell death was assessed by TUNEL assay. Total photoreceptor cell death was analyzed through comparing the outer nuclear layer (ONL)/inner nuclear layer (INL) ratio 7 days post RD. Western blot analysis or quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) were performed to assess cell death signaling, expression of endogenous neurotrophin, and levels of apoptosis inhibitors 24 hours after RD. Inflammatory cytokine secretion and inflammatory cell infiltration were quantified by ELISA and immunostaining, respectively. Results. The peak of photoreceptor cell death after RD was at 24 hours in all strains. Photoreceptor cell death as well as monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 and interleukin 6 secretion at 24 hours after RD was the highest in BALB/c, followed in order of magnitude by C57BL/6 and B6129SF2. Conversely, nerve growth factor expression and ONL/INL ratio were the lowest in BALB/c. Apoptosis signaling was higher in C57BL/6, whereas necroptosis signaling was higher in C57BL/6 and BALB/c. Autophagic signaling was higher in BALB/c. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) and survivin protein levels were lower in C57BL/6 and BALB/c, respectively. Macrophage/microglia infiltration was higher in C57BL/6 and BALB/c at 24 hours after RD. Conclusions. Photoreceptor cell death after RD was significantly different among the three strains, suggesting the presence of genetic factors that affect photoreceptor cell death after RD. PMID:24854853

  2. Morphological classification of plant cell deaths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Doorn, W.G.; Beers, E.P.; Dangl, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an integral part of plant development and of responses to abiotic stress or pathogens. Although the morphology of plant PCD is, in some cases, well characterised and molecular mechanisms controlling plant PCD are beginning to emerge, there is still confusion about...... the classification of PCD in plants. Here we suggest a classification based on morphological criteria. According to this classification, the use of the term 'apoptosis' is not justified in plants, but at least two classes of PCD can be distinguished: vacuolar cell death and necrosis. During vacuolar cell death......, the cell contents are removed by a combination of autophagy-like process and release of hydrolases from collapsed lytic vacuoles. Necrosis is characterised by early rupture of the plasma membrane, shrinkage of the protoplast and absence of vacuolar cell death features. Vacuolar cell death is common during...

  3. Mulberry anthocyanins improves thyroid cancer progression mainly by inducing apoptosis and autophagy cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou-Long Long

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Dietary anthocyanin compounds have multiple biological effects, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-atherosclerotic characteristics. The present study evaluated the anti-tumor capacity of mulberry anthocyanins (MA in thyroid cancer cells. Our data showed that MA suppressed SW1736 and HTh-7 cell proliferation in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Meanwhile, flow cytometry results indicated that MA significantly increased SW1736 and HTh-7 cell apoptosis. We additionally observed that SW1736 and HTh-7 cell autophagy was markedly enhanced after MA treatment. Importantly, anthocyanin-induced cell death was largely abolished by 3-methyladenine (3-MA or chloroquine diphosphate salt (CQ treatment, suggesting that MA-induced SW1736 and HTh-7 cell death was partially dependent on autophagy. In addition, activation of protein kinase B (Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, and ribosomal protein S6 (S6 were significantly suppressed by anthocyanin exposure. In summary, MA may serve as an adjunctive therapy for thyroid cancer patients through induction of apoptosis and autophagy-dependent cell death. Keywords: Mulberry anthocyanins, Thyroid cancer, Apoptosis, Autophagic death

  4. Protein synthesis persists during necrotic cell death.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saelens, X.; Festjens, N.; Parthoens, E.; Overberghe, I. van; Kalai, M.; Kuppeveld, F.J.M. van; Vandenabeele, P.

    2005-01-01

    Cell death is an intrinsic part of metazoan development and mammalian immune regulation. Whereas the molecular events orchestrating apoptosis have been characterized extensively, little is known about the biochemistry of necrotic cell death. Here, we show that, in contrast to apoptosis, the

  5. Endoplasmic reticulum involvement in yeast cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicanor Austriaco, O.

    2012-01-01

    Yeast cells undergo programed cell death (PCD) with characteristic markers associated with apoptosis in mammalian cells including chromatin breakage, nuclear fragmentation, reactive oxygen species generation, and metacaspase activation. Though significant research has focused on mitochondrial involvement in this phenomenon, more recent work with both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe has also implicated the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in yeast PCD. This minireview provides an overview of ER stress-associated cell death (ER-SAD) in yeast. It begins with a description of ER structure and function in yeast before moving to a discussion of ER-SAD in both mammalian and yeast cells. Three examples of yeast cell death associated with the ER will be highlighted here including inositol starvation, lipid toxicity, and the inhibition of N-glycosylation. It closes by suggesting ways to further examine the involvement of the ER in yeast cell death.

  6. Pro-apoptotic and pro-autophagic effects of the Aurora kinase A inhibitor alisertib (MLN8237) on human osteosarcoma U-2 OS and MG-63 cells through the activation of mitochondria-mediated pathway and inhibition of p38 MAPK/PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Ning-Kui; Wang, Zi-Li; Pan, Shu-Ting; Ding, Hui-Qiang; Au, Giang H T; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Xiao, Guozhi; Yang, Yin-Xue; Zhang, Xueji; Yang, Tianxin; Chen, Xiao-Wu; Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common malignant bone tumor occurring mostly in children and adolescents between 10 and 20 years of age with poor response to current therapeutics. Alisertib (ALS, MLN8237) is a selective Aurora kinase A inhibitor that displays anticancer effects on several types of cancer. However, the role of ALS in the treatment of OS remains unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effects of ALS on the cell growth, apoptosis, autophagy, and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the underlying mechanisms in two human OS cell lines U-2 OS and MG-63. The results showed that ALS had potent growth inhibitory, pro-apoptotic, pro-autophagic, and EMT inhibitory effects on U-2 OS and MG-63 cells. ALS remarkably induced G2/M arrest and down-regulated the expression levels of cyclin-dependent kinases 1 and 2 and cyclin B1 in both U-2 OS and MG-63 cells. ALS markedly induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis with a significant increase in the expression of key pro-apoptotic proteins and a decrease in main anti-apoptotic proteins. Furthermore, ALS promoted autophagic cell death via the inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) signaling pathways, and activation of 5'-AMP-dependent kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway. Inducers or inhibitors of apoptosis or autophagy simultaneously altered ALS-induced apoptotic and autophagic death in both U-2 OS and MG-63 cells, suggesting a crosstalk between these two primary modes of programmed cell death. Moreover, ALS suppressed EMT-like phenotypes with a marked increase in the expression of E-cadherin but a decrease in N-cadherin in U-2 OS and MG-63 cells. ALS treatment also induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation but inhibited the expression levels of sirtuin 1 and nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in both cell lines. Taken together, these findings show that ALS promotes

  7. Induction of apoptotic cell death by putrescine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takao, Koichi; Rickhag, Karl Mattias; Hegardt, Cecilia

    2006-01-01

    that overexpression of a metabolically stable ODC in CHO cells induced a massive cell death unless the cells were grown in the presence of the ODC inhibitor alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO). Cells overexpressing wild-type (unstable) ODC, on the other hand, were not dependent on the presence of DFMO...

  8. [Expression of autophagy related gene BECLIN-1 and number of autophagic vacuoles in bone marrow mononuclear cells from 40 myelodysplastic syndromes patients and their significance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bin; Yue, Qin-Fang; Chen, Ye; Bu, Fan-Dan; Sun, Chun-Yan; Liu, Xin-Yue

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to detect the expression level of autophagy related gene BECLIN-1 and the number of autophagic vacuoles in bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNC) from myelodysplastic syndrome(MDS) patients and to explore their difference in different stage of MDS and relationship between their difference and disease characteristics. The BMMNC from 9 normal controls, 19 cases of low-risk MDS, 14 cases of high-risk MDS and 7 cases of MDS-transformed AML were collected. The expression level of BECLIN-1 was detected by real time PCR (RT-PCR) and the amount of autophagic vacuoles was counted by transmission electron microscopy. The expression level of BECLIN-1 in BMMNC from patients with low-risk group was obviously higher than that in BMMNC from normal controls; the expression level of BECLIN-1 in BMMNC from patients of hgh risk group was higher than that in BMMNC of normal group, but there was no statistical significance (P > 0.05); the expression level of BECLIN-1 in BMMNC from patients with MDS-transformed AML group was significanly lower than that in BMMNC of normal group (P vacuoles in BMMNC from patients with low-risk and high-risk MDS groups was more than that in normal control, but there was no stetistcal significance (P > 0.05), while the amount of autopuagic vecuoles in BMMNC from patients of MDS-transformed AML group was significantly less (P vacuoles in BMMNC from patients with MDS progression and patients with MDS-transformed AML are gradually declining. The autophagy may be associated with disease progression.

  9. Trypanosoma cruzi response to sterol biosynthesis inhibitors: morphophysiological alterations leading to cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Luis Kessler

    Full Text Available The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi displays similarities to fungi in terms of its sterol lipid biosynthesis, as ergosterol and other 24-alkylated sterols are its principal endogenous sterols. The sterol pathway is thus a potential drug target for the treatment of Chagas disease. We describe here a comparative study of the growth inhibition, ultrastructural and physiological changes leading to the death of T. cruzi cells following treatment with the sterol biosynthesis inhibitors (SBIs ketoconazole and lovastatin. We first calculated the drug concentration inhibiting epimastigote growth by 50% (EC(50/72 h or killing all cells within 24 hours (EC(100/24 h. Incubation with inhibitors at the EC(50/72 h resulted in interesting morphological changes: intense proliferation of the inner mitochondrial membrane, which was corroborated by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy of the parasites stained with rhodamine 123, and strong swelling of the reservosomes, which was confirmed by acridine orange staining. These changes to the mitochondria and reservosomes may reflect the involvement of these organelles in ergosterol biosynthesis or the progressive autophagic process culminating in cell lysis after 6 to 7 days of treatment with SBIs at the EC(50/72 h. By contrast, treatment with SBIs at the EC(100/24 h resulted in rapid cell death with a necrotic phenotype: time-dependent cytosolic calcium overload, mitochondrial depolarization and reservosome membrane permeabilization (RMP, culminating in cell lysis after a few hours of drug exposure. We provide the first demonstration that RMP constitutes the "point of no return" in the cell death cascade, and propose a model for the necrotic cell death of T. cruzi. Thus, SBIs trigger cell death by different mechanisms, depending on the dose used, in T. cruzi. These findings shed new light on ergosterol biosynthesis and the mechanisms of programmed cell death in this ancient protozoan parasite.

  10. Discovering Protein-Protein Interactions within the Programmed Cell Death Network Using a Protein-Fragment Complementation Screen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuval Gilad

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis and autophagy are distinct biological processes, each driven by a different set of protein-protein interactions, with significant crosstalk via direct interactions among apoptotic and autophagic proteins. To measure the global profile of these interactions, we adapted the Gaussia luciferase protein-fragment complementation assay (GLuc PCA, which monitors binding between proteins fused to complementary fragments of a luciferase reporter. A library encompassing 63 apoptotic and autophagic proteins was constructed for the analysis of ∼3,600 protein-pair combinations. This generated a detailed landscape of the apoptotic and autophagic modules and points of interface between them, identifying 46 previously unknown interactions. One of these interactions, between DAPK2, a Ser/Thr kinase that promotes autophagy, and 14-3-3τ, was further investigated. We mapped the region responsible for 14-3-3τ binding and proved that this interaction inhibits DAPK2 dimerization and activity. This proof of concept underscores the power of the GLuc PCA platform for the discovery of biochemical pathways within the cell death network.

  11. Infertility in the hyperplasic ovary of freshwater planarians: the role of programmed cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrath, Abdel Halim; Semlali, Abdelhabib; Mansour, Lamjed; Ahmed, Mukhtar; Sirotkin, Alexander V; Al Omar, Suliman Y; Arfah, Maha; Al Anazi, Mohamed S; Alhazza, Ibrahim M; Nyengaard, Jens R; Alwasel, Saleh

    2014-11-01

    Ex-fissiparous planarians produce infertile cocoons or, in very rare cases, cocoons with very low fertility. Here, we describe the features of programmed cell death (PCD) occurring in the hyperplasic ovary of the ex-fissiparous freshwater planarian Dugesia arabica that may explain this infertility. Based on TEM results, we demonstrate a novel extensive co-clustering of cytoplasmic organelles, such as lysosomes and microtubules, and their fusion with autophagosomes during the early stage of oocyte cell death occurring through an autophagic pattern. During a later stage of cell death, the generation of apoptotic vesicles in the cytoplasm can be observed. The immunohistochemical labeling supports the ultrastructural results because it has been shown that the proapoptotic protein bax was more highly expressed in the hyperplasic ovary than in the normal one, whereas the anti-apoptotic protein bcl2 was slightly more highly expressed in the normal ovary compared to the hyperplasic one. TUNEL analysis of the hyperplasic ovary confirmed that the nuclei of the majority of differentiating oocytes were TUNEL-positive, whereas the nuclei of oogonia and young oocytes were TUNEL-negative; in the normal ovary, oocytes are TUNEL-negative. Considering all of these data, we suggest that the cell death mechanism of differentiating oocytes in the hyperplasic ovary of freshwater planarians is one of the most important factors that cause ex-fissiparous planarian infertility. We propose that autophagy precedes apoptosis during oogenesis, whereas apoptotic features can be observed later.

  12. Cannabinoid action induces autophagy-mediated cell death through stimulation of ER stress in human glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, María; Carracedo, Arkaitz; Salanueva, Iñigo J; Hernández-Tiedra, Sonia; Lorente, Mar; Egia, Ainara; Vázquez, Patricia; Blázquez, Cristina; Torres, Sofía; García, Stephane; Nowak, Jonathan; Fimia, Gian María; Piacentini, Mauro; Cecconi, Francesco; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; González-Feria, Luis; Iovanna, Juan L; Guzmán, Manuel; Boya, Patricia; Velasco, Guillermo

    2009-05-01

    Autophagy can promote cell survival or cell death, but the molecular basis underlying its dual role in cancer remains obscure. Here we demonstrate that delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main active component of marijuana, induces human glioma cell death through stimulation of autophagy. Our data indicate that THC induced ceramide accumulation and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2alpha (eIF2alpha) phosphorylation and thereby activated an ER stress response that promoted autophagy via tribbles homolog 3-dependent (TRB3-dependent) inhibition of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) axis. We also showed that autophagy is upstream of apoptosis in cannabinoid-induced human and mouse cancer cell death and that activation of this pathway was necessary for the antitumor action of cannabinoids in vivo. These findings describe a mechanism by which THC can promote the autophagic death of human and mouse cancer cells and provide evidence that cannabinoid administration may be an effective therapeutic strategy for targeting human cancers.

  13. Atg16L1, an essential factor for canonical autophagy, participates in hormone secretion from PC12 cells independently of autophagic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Koutaro; Uemura, Takefumi; Waguri, Satoshi; Fukuda, Mitsunori

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is a bulk degradation system in all eukaryotic cells and regulates a variety of biological activities in higher eukaryotes. Recently involvement of autophagy in the regulation of the secretory pathway has also been reported, but the molecular mechanism linking autophagy with the secretory pathway remains largely unknown. Here we show that Atg16L1, an essential protein for canonical autophagy, is localized on hormone-containing dense-core vesicles in neuroendocrine PC12 cells and that knockdown of Atg16L1 causes a dramatic reduction in the level of hormone secretion independently of autophagic activity. We also find that Atg16L1 interacts with the small GTPase Rab33A and that this interaction is required for the dense-core vesicle localization of Atg16L1 in PC12 cells. Our findings indicate that Atg16L1 regulates not only autophagy in all cell types, but also secretion from dense-core vesicles, presumably by acting as a Rab33A effector, in particular cell types. PMID:22740627

  14. mTOR kinase inhibitor pp242 causes mitophagy terminated by apoptotic cell death in E1A-Ras transformed cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordeev, Serguei A; Bykova, Tatiana V; Zubova, Svetlana G; Bystrova, Olga A; Martynova, Marina G; Pospelov, Valery A; Pospelova, Tatiana V

    2015-12-29

    mTOR is a critical target for controlling cell cycle progression, senescence and cell death in mammalian cancer cells. Here we studied the role of mTOR-dependent autophagy in implementating the antiprolifrative effect of mTORC1-specific inhibitor rapamycin and ATP-competitive mTOR kinase inhibitor pp242. We carried out a comprehensive analysis of pp242- and rapamycin-induced autophagy in ERas tumor cells. Rapamycin exerts cytostatic effect on ERas tumor cells, thus causing a temporary and reversible cell cycle arrest, activation of non-selective autophagy not accompanied by cell death. The rapamycin-treated cells are able to continue proliferation after drug removal. The ATP-competitive mTORC1/mTORC2 kinase inhibitor pp242 is highly cytotoxic by suppressing the function of mTORC1-4EBP1 axis and mTORC1-dependent phosphorylation of mTORC1 target--ULK1-Ser757 (Atg1). In contrast to rapamycin, pp242 activates the selective autophagy targeting mitochondria (mitophagy). The pp242-induced mitophagy is accompanied by accumulation of LC3 and conversion of LC3-I form to LC3-II. However reduced degradation of p62/SQSTM indicates abnormal flux of autophagic process. According to transmission electron microscopy data, short-term pp242-treated ERas cells exhibit numerous heavily damaged mitochondria, which are included in single membrane-bound autophagic/autolysophagic vacuoles (mitophagy). Despite the lack of typical for apoptosis features, ERas-treated cells with induced mitophagy revealed the activation of caspase 3, 9 and nucleosomal DNA fragmentation. Thus, pp242 activates autophagy with suppressed later stages, leading to impaired recycling and accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria and cell death. Better understanding of how autophagy determines the fate of a cell--survival or cell death, can help to development of new strategy for cancer therapy.

  15. Subversion of autophagy in adherent invasive Escherichia coli-infected neutrophils induces inflammation and cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abderrahman Chargui

    Full Text Available Invading bacteria are recognized, captured and killed by a specialized form of autophagy, called xenophagy. Recently, defects in xenophagy in Crohn's disease (CD have been implicated in the pathogenesis of human chronic inflammatory diseases of uncertain etiology of the gastrointestinal tract. We show here that pathogenic adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC isolated from CD patients are able to adhere and invade neutrophils, which represent the first line of defense against bacteria. Of particular interest, AIEC infection of neutrophil-like PLB-985 cells blocked autophagy at the autolysosomal step, which allowed intracellular survival of bacteria and exacerbated interleukin-8 (IL-8 production. Interestingly, this block in autophagy correlated with the induction of autophagic cell death. Likewise, stimulation of autophagy by nutrient starvation or rapamycin treatment reduced intracellular AIEC survival and IL-8 production. Finally, treatment with an inhibitor of autophagy decreased cell death of AIEC-infected neutrophil-like PLB-985 cells. In conclusion, excessive autophagy in AIEC infection triggered cell death of neutrophils.

  16. Molecular mechanisms of cell death: recommendations of the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death 2018

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vitale, Ilio; Aaronson, Stuart A.; Abrams, John M.; Adam, Dieter; Agostinis, Patrizia; Alnemri, Emad S.; Altucci, Lucia; Amelio, Ivano; Andrews, David W.; Annicchiarico-Petruzzelli, Margherita; Antonov, Alexey V.; Arama, Eli; Baehrecke, Eric H.; Barlev, Nickolai A.; Bazan, Nicolas G.; Bernassola, Francesca; Bertrand, Mathieu J. M.; Bianchi, Katiuscia; Blagosklonny, Mikhail V.; Blomgren, Klas; Borner, Christoph; Boya, Patricia; Brenner, Catherine; Campanella, Michelangelo; Candi, Eleonora; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Cecconi, Francesco; Chan, Francis K.-M.; Chandel, Navdeep S.; Cheng, Emily H.; Chipuk, Jerry E.; Cidlowski, John A.; Ciechanover, Aaron; Cohen, Gerald M.; Conrad, Marcus; Cubillos-Ruiz, Juan R.; Czabotar, Peter E.; D'Angiolella, Vincenzo; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.; de Laurenzi, Vincenzo; de Maria, Ruggero; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Deshmukh, Mohanish; Di Daniele, Nicola; Di Virgilio, Francesco; Dixit, Vishva M.; Dixon, Scott J.; Duckett, Colin S.; Dynlacht, Brian D.; El-Deiry, Wafik S.; Elrod, John W.; Fimia, Gian Maria; Fulda, Simone; García-Sáez, Ana J.; Garg, Abhishek D.; Garrido, Carmen; Gavathiotis, Evripidis; Golstein, Pierre; Gottlieb, Eyal; Green, Douglas R.; Greene, Lloyd A.; Gronemeyer, Hinrich; Gross, Atan; Hajnoczky, Gyorgy; Hardwick, J. Marie; Harris, Isaac S.; Hengartner, Michael O.; Hetz, Claudio; Ichijo, Hidenori; Jäättelä, Marja; Joseph, Bertrand; Jost, Philipp J.; Juin, Philippe P.; Kaiser, William J.; Karin, Michael; Kaufmann, Thomas; Kepp, Oliver; Kimchi, Adi; Kitsis, Richard N.; Klionsky, Daniel J.; Knight, Richard A.; Kumar, Sharad; Lee, Sam W.; Lemasters, John J.; Levine, Beth; Linkermann, Andreas; Lipton, Stuart A.; Lockshin, Richard A.; López-Otín, Carlos; Lowe, Scott W.; Luedde, Tom; Lugli, Enrico; MacFarlane, Marion; Madeo, Frank; Malewicz, Michal; Malorni, Walter; Manic, Gwenola; Marine, Jean-Christophe; Martin, Seamus J.; Martinou, Jean-Claude; Medema, Jan Paul; Mehlen, Patrick; Meier, Pascal; Melino, Sonia; Miao, Edward A.; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; Moll, Ute M.; Muñoz-Pinedo, Cristina; Nagata, Shigekazu; Nuñez, Gabriel; Oberst, Andrew; Oren, Moshe; Overholtzer, Michael; Pagano, Michele; Panaretakis, Theocharis; Pasparakis, Manolis; Penninger, Josef M.; Pereira, David M.; Pervaiz, Shazib; Peter, Marcus E.; Piacentini, Mauro; Pinton, Paolo; Prehn, Jochen H. M.; Puthalakath, Hamsa; Rabinovich, Gabriel A.; Rehm, Markus; Rizzuto, Rosario; Rodrigues, Cecilia M. P.; Rubinsztein, David C.; Rudel, Thomas; Ryan, Kevin M.; Sayan, Emre; Scorrano, Luca; Shao, Feng; Shi, Yufang; Silke, John; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Sistigu, Antonella; Stockwell, Brent R.; Strasser, Andreas; Szabadkai, Gyorgy; Tait, Stephen W. G.; Tang, Daolin; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Thorburn, Andrew; Tsujimoto, Yoshihide; Turk, Boris; Vanden Berghe, Tom; Vandenabeele, Peter; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Villunger, Andreas; Virgin, Herbert W.; Vousden, Karen H.; Vucic, Domagoj; Wagner, Erwin F.; Walczak, Henning; Wallach, David; Wang, Ying; Wells, James A.; Wood, Will; Yuan, Junying; Zakeri, Zahra; Zhivotovsky, Boris; Zitvogel, Laurence; Melino, Gerry; Kroemer, Guido

    2018-01-01

    Over the past decade, the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death (NCCD) has formulated guidelines for the definition and interpretation of cell death from morphological, biochemical, and functional perspectives. Since the field continues to expand and novel mechanisms that orchestrate multiple cell

  17. Epidermal cell death in frogs with chytridiomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A. Brannelly

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Amphibians are declining at an alarming rate, and one of the major causes of decline is the infectious disease chytridiomycosis. Parasitic fungal sporangia occur within epidermal cells causing epidermal disruption, but these changes have not been well characterised. Apoptosis (planned cell death can be a damaging response to the host but may alternatively be a mechanism of pathogen removal for some intracellular infections. Methods In this study we experimentally infected two endangered amphibian species Pseudophryne corroboree and Litoria verreauxii alpina with the causal agent of chytridiomycosis. We quantified cell death in the epidermis through two assays: terminal transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labelling (TUNEL and caspase 3/7. Results Cell death was positively associated with infection load and morbidity of clinically infected animals. In infected amphibians, TUNEL positive cells were concentrated in epidermal layers, correlating to the localisation of infection within the skin. Caspase activity was stable and low in early infection, where pathogen loads were light but increasing. In animals that recovered from infection, caspase activity gradually returned to normal as the infection cleared. Whereas, in amphibians that did not recover, caspase activity increased dramatically when infection loads peaked. Discussion Increased cell death may be a pathology of the fungal parasite, likely contributing to loss of skin homeostatic functions, but it is also possible that apoptosis suppression may be used initially by the pathogen to help establish infection. Further research should explore the specific mechanisms of cell death and more specifically apoptosis regulation during fungal infection.

  18. Non-canonical programmed cell death mechanisms triggered by natural compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diederich, Marc; Cerella, Claudia

    2016-10-01

    Natural compounds are the fundament of pharmacological treatments and more than 50% of all anticancer drugs are of natural origins or at least derived from scaffolds present in Nature. Over the last 25 years, molecular mechanisms triggered by natural anticancer compounds were investigated. Emerging research showed that molecules of natural origins are useful for both preventive and therapeutic purposes by targeting essential hallmarks and enabling characteristics described by Hanahan and Weinberg. Moreover, natural compounds were able to change the differentiation status of selected cell types. One of the earliest response of cells treated by pharmacologically active compounds is the change of its morphology leading to ultra-structural perturbations: changes in membrane composition, cytoskeleton integrity, alterations of the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and of the nucleus lead to formation of morphological alterations that are a characteristic of both compound and cancer type preceding cell death. Apoptosis and autophagy were traditionally considered as the most prominent cell death or cell death-related mechanisms. By now multiple other cell death modalities were described and most likely involved in response to chemotherapeutic treatment. It can be hypothesized that especially necrosis-related phenotypes triggered by various treatments or evolving from apoptotic or autophagic mechanisms, provide a more efficient therapeutic outcome depending on cancer type and genetic phenotype of the patient. In fact, the recent discovery of multiple regulated forms of necrosis and the initial elucidation of the corresponding cell signaling pathways appear nowadays as important tools to clarify the immunogenic potential of non-canonical forms of cell death induction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Noisy-threshold control of cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilar Jose MG

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular responses to death-promoting stimuli typically proceed through a differentiated multistage process, involving a lag phase, extensive death, and potential adaptation. Deregulation of this chain of events is at the root of many diseases. Improper adaptation is particularly important because it allows cell sub-populations to survive even in the continuous presence of death conditions, which results, among others, in the eventual failure of many targeted anticancer therapies. Results Here, I show that these typical responses arise naturally from the interplay of intracellular variability with a threshold-based control mechanism that detects cellular changes in addition to just the cellular state itself. Implementation of this mechanism in a quantitative model for T-cell apoptosis, a prototypical example of programmed cell death, captures with exceptional accuracy experimental observations for different expression levels of the oncogene Bcl-xL and directly links adaptation with noise in an ATP threshold below which cells die. Conclusions These results indicate that oncogenes like Bcl-xL, besides regulating absolute death values, can have a novel role as active controllers of cell-cell variability and the extent of adaptation.

  20. Programmed cell death and hybrid incompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, S A; Barr, C M

    2003-01-01

    We propose a new theory to explain developmental aberrations in plant hybrids. In our theory, hybrid incompatibilities arise from imbalances in the mechanisms that cause male sterility in hermaphroditic plants. Mitochondria often cause male sterility by killing the tapetal tissue that nurtures pollen mother cells. Recent evidence suggests that mitochondria destroy the tapetum by triggering standard pathways of programmed cell death. Some nuclear genotypes repress mitochondrial male sterility and restore pollen fertility. Normal regulation of tapetal development therefore arises from a delicate balance between the disruptive effects of mitochondria and the defensive countermeasures of the nuclear genes. In hybrids, incompatibilities between male-sterile mitochondria and nuclear restorers may frequently upset the regulatory control of programmed cell death, causing tapetal abnormalities and male sterility. We propose that hybrid misregulation of programmed cell death may also spill over into other tissues, explaining various developmental aberrations observed in hybrids.

  1. Systematic analysis of human cells lacking ATG8 proteins uncovers roles for GABARAPs and the CCZ1/MON1 regulator C18orf8/RMC1 in macro and selective autophagic flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontano Vaites, Laura; Paulo, Joao A; Huttlin, Edward L; Harper, J Wade

    2017-10-16

    Selective and macro autophagy sequester specific organelles/substrates or bulk cytoplasm, respectively, inside autophagosomes as cargo for delivery to lysosomes. The mammalian ATG8 orthologues (MAP1LC3A/B/C and GABARAP/L1/L2) are ubiquitin (UB)-like proteins conjugated to the autophagosome membrane and are thought to facilitate cargo receptor recruitment, vesicle maturation, and lysosomal fusion. To elucidate the molecular functions of the ATG8 proteins, we engineered cells lacking genes for each subfamily as well as all six mammalian ATG8s. Loss of GABARAPs alone attenuates autophagic flux basally and in response to macro or selective autophagic stimuli including PARKIN-dependent mitophagy, and cells lacking all ATG8 proteins accumulate cytoplasmic UB aggregates, which are resolved following ectopic expression of individual GABARAPs. Autophagosomes from cells lacking GABARAPs had reduced lysosomal content by quantitative proteomics, consistent with fusion defects, but accumulated regulators of late endosome (LE)/autophagosome maturation. Through interaction proteomics of proteins accumulating in GABARAP/L1/L2-deficient cells, we identified C18orf8/RMC1 as a new subunit of the CCZ1-MON1 RAB7 guanine exchange factor (GEF) that positively regulates RAB7 recruitment to LE/autophagosomes. This work defines unique roles for GABARAP and LC3 subfamilies in macro and selective autophagy and demonstrates how analysis of autophagic machinery in the absence of flux can identify new regulatory circuits. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. How Kidney Cell Death Induces Renal Necroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulay, Shrikant R; Kumar, Santhosh V; Lech, Maciej; Desai, Jyaysi; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2016-05-01

    The nephrons of the kidney are independent functional units harboring cells of a low turnover during homeostasis. As such, physiological renal cell death is a rather rare event and dead cells are flushed away rapidly with the urinary flow. Renal cell necrosis occurs in acute kidney injuries such as thrombotic microangiopathies, necrotizing glomerulonephritis, or tubular necrosis. All of these are associated with intense intrarenal inflammation, which contributes to further renal cell loss, an autoamplifying process referred to as necroinflammation. But how does renal cell necrosis trigger inflammation? Here, we discuss the role of danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), mitochondrial (mito)-DAMPs, and alarmins, as well as their respective pattern recognition receptors. The capacity of DAMPs and alarmins to trigger cytokine and chemokine release initiates the recruitment of leukocytes into the kidney that further amplify necroinflammation. Infiltrating neutrophils often undergo neutrophil extracellular trap formation associated with neutrophil death or necroptosis, which implies a release of histones, which act not only as DAMPs but also elicit direct cytotoxic effects on renal cells, namely endothelial cells. Proinflammatory macrophages and eventually cytotoxic T cells further drive kidney cell death and inflammation. Dissecting the molecular mechanisms of necroinflammation may help to identify the best therapeutic targets to limit nephron loss in kidney injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The regulation of apoptotic cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarante-Mendes G.P.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is a fundamental biological phenomenon in which the death of a cell is genetically and biochemically regulated. Different molecules are involved in the regulation of the apoptotic process. Death receptors, coupled to distinct members of the caspases as well as other adapter molecules, are involved in the initiation of the stress signals (The Indictment. Members of the Bcl-2 family control at the mitochondrial level the decision between life and death (The Judgement. The effector caspases are responsible for all morphological and biochemical changes related to apoptosis including the "eat-me" signals perceived by phagocytes and neighboring cells (The Execution. Finally, apoptosis would have little biological significance without the recognition and removal of the dying cells (The Burial.

  4. The regulation of apoptotic cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.P. Amarante-Mendes

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is a fundamental biological phenomenon in which the death of a cell is genetically and biochemically regulated. Different molecules are involved in the regulation of the apoptotic process. Death receptors, coupled to distinct members of the caspases as well as other adapter molecules, are involved in the initiation of the stress signals (The Indictment. Members of the Bcl-2 family control at the mitochondrial level the decision between life and death (The Judgement. The effector caspases are responsible for all morphological and biochemical changes related to apoptosis including the "eat-me" signals perceived by phagocytes and neighboring cells (The Execution. Finally, apoptosis would have little biological significance without the recognition and removal of the dying cells (The Burial.

  5. Methylene blue photodynamic therapy induces selective and massive cell death in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Ancély F; Terra, Letícia F; Wailemann, Rosangela A M; Oliveira, Talita C; Gomes, Vinícius de Morais; Mineiro, Marcela Franco; Meotti, Flávia Carla; Bruni-Cardoso, Alexandre; Baptista, Maurício S; Labriola, Leticia

    2017-03-15

    Breast cancer is the main cause of mortality among women. The disease presents high recurrence mainly due to incomplete efficacy of primary treatment in killing all cancer cells. Photodynamic therapy (PDT), an approach that causes tissue destruction by visible light in the presence of a photosensitizer (Ps) and oxygen, appears as a promising alternative therapy that could be used adjunct to chemotherapy and surgery for curing cancer. However, the efficacy of PDT to treat breast tumours as well as the molecular mechanisms that lead to cell death remain unclear. In this study, we assessed the cell-killing potential of PDT using methylene blue (MB-PDT) in three breast epithelial cell lines that represent non-malignant conditions and different molecular subtypes of breast tumours. Cells were incubated in the absence or presence of MB and irradiated or not at 640 nm with 4.5 J/cm 2 . We used a combination of imaging and biochemistry approaches to assess the involvement of classical autophagic and apoptotic pathways in mediating the cell-deletion induced by MB-PDT. The role of these pathways was investigated using specific inhibitors, activators and gene silencing. We observed that MB-PDT differentially induces massive cell death of tumour cells. Non-malignant cells were significantly more resistant to the therapy compared to malignant cells. Morphological and biochemical analysis of dying cells pointed to alternative mechanisms rather than classical apoptosis. MB-PDT-induced autophagy modulated cell viability depending on the cell model used. However, impairment of one of these pathways did not prevent the fatal destination of MB-PDT treated cells. Additionally, when using a physiological 3D culture model that recapitulates relevant features of normal and tumorous breast tissue morphology, we found that MB-PDT differential action in killing tumour cells was even higher than what was detected in 2D cultures. Finally, our observations underscore the potential of MB

  6. Plasma membrane changes during programmed cell deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingying; Chen, Xin; Gueydan, Cyril; Han, Jiahuai

    2018-01-01

    Ruptured and intact plasma membranes are classically considered as hallmarks of necrotic and apoptotic cell death, respectively. As such, apoptosis is usually considered a non-inflammatory process while necrosis triggers inflammation. Recent studies on necroptosis and pyroptosis, two types of programmed necrosis, revealed that plasma membrane rupture is mediated by MLKL channels during necroptosis but depends on non-selective gasdermin D (GSDMD) pores during pyroptosis. Importantly, the morphology of dying cells executed by MLKL channels can be distinguished from that executed by GSDMD pores. Interestingly, it was found recently that secondary necrosis of apoptotic cells, a previously believed non-regulated form of cell lysis that occurs after apoptosis, can be programmed and executed by plasma membrane pore formation like that of pyroptosis. In addition, pyroptosis is associated with pyroptotic bodies, which have some similarities to apoptotic bodies. Therefore, different cell death programs induce distinctive reshuffling processes of the plasma membrane. Given the fact that the nature of released intracellular contents plays a crucial role in dying/dead cell-induced immunogenicity, not only membrane rupture or integrity but also the nature of plasma membrane breakdown would determine the fate of a cell as well as its ability to elicit an immune response. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in the field of apoptosis, necroptosis and pyroptosis, with an emphasis on the mechanisms underlying plasma membrane changes observed on dying cells and their implication in cell death-elicited immunogenicity.

  7. ETosis: A Microbicidal Mechanism beyond Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson B. Guimarães-Costa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Netosis is a recently described type of neutrophil death occurring with the release to the extracellular milieu of a lattice composed of DNA associated with histones and granular and cytoplasmic proteins. These webs, initially named neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs, ensnare and kill microorganisms. Similarly, other cell types, such as eosinophils, mast cells, and macrophages, can also dye by this mechanism; thus, it was renamed as ETosis, meaning death with release of extracellular traps (ETs. Here, we review the mechanism of NETosis/etosis, emphasizing its role in diseases caused by protozoan parasites, fungi, and viruses.

  8. Studies on the mechanisms of autophagy: maturation of the autophagic vacuole

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    Data presented in the accompanying paper suggests nascent autophagic vacuoles are formed from RER (Dunn, W. A. 1990. J. Cell Biol. 110:1923- 1933). In the present report, the maturation of newly formed or nascent autophagic vacuoles into degradative vacuoles was examined using morphological and biochemical methods combined with immunological probes. Within 15 min of formation, autophagic vacuoles acquired acid hydrolases and lysosomal membrane proteins, thus becoming degradative vacuoles. A p...

  9. Dietary fat composition influences glomerular and proximal convoluted tubule cell structure and autophagic processes in kidneys from calorie-restricted mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Rubio, Miguel; Burón, M Isabel; López-Lluch, Guillermo; Navas, Plácido; de Cabo, Rafael; Ramsey, Jon J; Villalba, José M; González-Reyes, José A

    2016-06-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) has been repeatedly shown to prevent cancer, diabetes, hypertension, and other age-related diseases in a wide range of animals, including non-human primates and humans. In rodents, CR also increases lifespan and is a powerful tool for studying the aging process. Recently, it has been reported in mice that dietary fat plays an important role in determining lifespan extension with 40% CR. In these conditions, animals fed lard as dietary fat showed an increased longevity compared with mice fed soybean or fish oils. In this paper, we study the effect of these dietary fats on structural and physiological parameters of kidney from mice maintained on 40% CR for 6 and 18 months. Analyses were performed using quantitative electron microcopy techniques and protein expression in Western blots. CR mitigated most of the analyzed age-related parameters in kidney, such as glomerular basement membrane thickness, mitochondrial mass in convoluted proximal tubules and autophagic markers in renal homogenates. The lard group showed improved preservation of several renal structures with aging when compared to the other CR diet groups. These results indicate that dietary fat modulates renal structure and function in CR mice and plays an essential role in the determination of health span in rodents. © 2016 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Anticancer Effect of Ginger Extract against Pancreatic Cancer Cells Mainly through Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Autotic Cell Death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miho Akimoto

    Full Text Available The extract of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe and its major pungent components, [6]-shogaol and [6]-gingerol, have been shown to have an anti-proliferative effect on several tumor cell lines. However, the anticancer activity of the ginger extract in pancreatic cancer is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the ethanol-extracted materials of ginger suppressed cell cycle progression and consequently induced the death of human pancreatic cancer cell lines, including Panc-1 cells. The underlying mechanism entailed autosis, a recently characterized form of cell death, but not apoptosis or necroptosis. The extract markedly increased the LC3-II/LC3-I ratio, decreased SQSTM1/p62 protein, and enhanced vacuolization of the cytoplasm in Panc-1 cells. It activated AMPK, a positive regulator of autophagy, and inhibited mTOR, a negative autophagic regulator. The autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine and chloroquine partially prevented cell death. Morphologically, however, focal membrane rupture, nuclear shrinkage, focal swelling of the perinuclear space and electron dense mitochondria, which are unique morphological features of autosis, were observed. The extract enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, and the antioxidant N-acetylcystein attenuated cell death. Our study revealed that daily intraperitoneal administration of the extract significantly prolonged survival (P = 0.0069 in a peritoneal dissemination model and suppressed tumor growth in an orthotopic model of pancreatic cancer (P < 0.01 without serious adverse effects. Although [6]-shogaol but not [6]-gingerol showed similar effects, chromatographic analyses suggested the presence of other constituent(s as active substances. Together, these results show that ginger extract has potent anticancer activity against pancreatic cancer cells by inducing ROS-mediated autosis and warrants further investigation in order to develop an efficacious candidate drug.

  11. Growth arrest and induction of apoptotic and non-apoptotic programmed cell death by, Physalis minima L. chloroform extract in human ovarian carcinoma Caov-3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Kheng Leong; Muhammad, Tengku Sifzizul Tengku; Sulaiman, Shaida Fariza

    2010-03-02

    The decoction of the whole plant of Physalis minima L. is traditionally consumed to treat cancer. Its anticancer property has been previously verified (using in vitro cytotoxicity assays) against NCI-H23 lung, CORL23 lung and MCF7 breast cancer cell lines but the mechanism underlying the anticancer potency towards ovarian carcinoma cells remain unclear. The present study is aimed to systematically determine the cytotoxicity and possible cell death mechanism elicited by the chloroform extract of Physalis minima in human ovarian Caov-3 carcinoma. Cytotoxicity of the extract was measured using the methylene blue assay. The mechanism of cell death was determined using four independent methods, namely DeadEnd assay to label the DNA fragmentation nuclei cells, RT-PCR analysis to determine the mRNA expression level of three apoptotic genes (c-myc, p53 and caspase-3 genes), Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) analysis to describe the ultra structural characteristics and annexin V and propidium iodide staining to confirm the types and stages of cell deaths. Cytotoxicity screening of the extract on Caov-3 cells exhibited concentration- and time-dependent inhibitory effects. A combination of apoptotic and autophagic programmed cell death was detected. The apoptotic characteristic was initially determined by DNA fragmentation followed by the expression of c-myc and p53 genes that was much earlier than caspase-3. Apoptotic ultra structural changes (including clumping and magination of chromatin, blebbing and convolution of nucleus membrane and formation of apoptotic bodies) and autophagy (Type II non-apoptotic programmed cell death) with distinct vacuolated morphology were detected in TEM analysis. The existence of these programmed cell deaths was then corroborated using annexin V and propidium iodide staining. The chloroform extract of Physalis minima exerted anticancer effect due to a combination of apoptotic and autophagic cell death mechanisms on Caov-3 cells. The

  12. Optical imaging of cancer and cell death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, Bangwen

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the work included in this PhD thesis was to explore the diverse application possibility of using NIR fluorescent probes with specific properties to visualize and characterize cancer and cell death. In this thesis, we mainly focus on optical imaging and its application, both at microscopic

  13. Morphological classification of plant cell deaths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van W.G.; Beers, E.P.; Dangl, J.L.; Franklin-Tong, V.E.; Woltering, E.J.

    2011-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an integral part of plant development and of responses to abiotic stress or pathogens. Although the morphology of plant PCD is, in some cases, well characterised and molecular mechanisms controlling plant PCD are beginning to emerge, there is still confusion about the

  14. Lysosomal cell death at a glance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aits, Sonja; Jaattela, Marja

    2013-01-01

    Lysosomes serve as the cellular recycling centre and are filled with numerous hydrolases that can degrade most cellular macromolecules. Lysosomal membrane permeabilization and the consequent leakage of the lysosomal content into the cytosol leads to so-called "lysosomal cell death". This form...

  15. Hemoglobins, programmed cell death and somatic embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Robert D; Huang, Shuanglong; Stasolla, Claudio

    2013-10-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a universal process in all multicellular organisms. It is a critical component in a diverse number of processes ranging from growth and differentiation to response to stress. Somatic embryogenesis is one such process where PCD is significantly involved. Nitric oxide is increasingly being recognized as playing a significant role in regulating PCD in both mammalian and plant systems. Plant hemoglobins scavenge NO, and evidence is accumulating that events that modify NO levels in plants also affect hemoglobin expression. Here, we review the process of PCD, describing the involvement of NO and plant hemoglobins in the process. NO is an effector of cell death in both plants and vertebrates, triggering the cascade of events leading to targeted cell death that is a part of an organism's response to stress or to tissue differentiation and development. Expression of specific hemoglobins can alter this response in plants by scavenging the NO, thus, interrupting the death process. Somatic embryogenesis is used as a model system to demonstrate how cell-specific expression of different classes of hemoglobins can alter the embryogenic process, affecting hormone synthesis, cell metabolite levels and genes associated with PCD and embryogenic competence. We propose that plant hemoglobins influence somatic embryogenesis and PCD through cell-specific expression of a distinct plant hemoglobin. It is based on the premise that both embryogenic competence and PCD are strongly influenced by cellular NO levels. Increases in cellular NO levels result in elevated Zn(2+) and reactive-oxygen species associated with PCD, but they also result in decreased expression of MYC2, a transcription factor that is a negative effector of indoleacetic acid synthesis, a hormone that positively influences embryogenic competence. Cell-specific hemoglobin expression reduces NO levels as a result of NO scavenging, resulting in cell survival. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd

  16. Evidence of biological activity of Mentha species extracts on apoptotic and autophagic targets on murine RAW264.7 and human U937 monocytic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmi, Fatiha; Hadj-Ahmed, Samia; Zarrouk, Amira; Bezine, Maryem; Nury, Thomas; Madani, Khodir; Chibane, Mohamed; Vejux, Anne; Andreoletti, Pierre; Boulekbache-Makhlouf, Lila; Lizard, Gérard

    2017-12-01

    Mints (Lamiaceae) are used as traditional remedies for the treatment of several diseases. Their extracts are recognized as anti-inflammatory compounds. This study characterized the cytotoxic effects of Mentha spicata L. (MS), Mentha pulegium L. (MP) and Mentha rotundifolia (L). Huds (MR) on macrophage cells (RAW264.7; U937) and determined their impact on apoptosis and autophagy, which can play a role in controlling inflammation. The extracts were prepared in culture medium and tested from 25 to 400 μg/mL after 24-48 h of treatment. To show the effect of the aqueous ethanol (50%) extracts on apoptosis and authophagy, the presence of cleaved caspase-3, and the conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II was evaluated by Western blotting. Compared with the MTT assay, crystal violet showed a pronounced decrease in the number of cells with all extracts at 48 h. Calculated IC 50 values were 257.31, 207.82 and 368.02 μg/mL for MS, MP and MR, respectively. A significant increase in PI positive cells was observed with all extracts at 200-400 μg/mL. Mitochondrial dysfunctions and nuclear morphological changes were detected with MS and MR extracts at 400 μg/mL. At this concentration, no cleaved caspase-3 was found whereas stabilized caspase-3 in its dimeric form was identified. MS and MR extracts also favour LC3-I to LC3-II conversion which is a criterion of autophagy. The cytotoxic profiles depend on the extracts considered; MS extract showed the strong activity. However, all the mint extracts studied interact with the apoptotic and autophagic pathways at elevated concentrations.

  17. Apoptosis-Like Cell Death Induction and Aberrant Fibroblast Properties in Human Incisional Hernia Fascia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Ramon; Quiles, Maria T.; Guillem-Marti, Jordi; Lopez-Cano, Manuel; Huguet, Pere; Ramon-y-Cajal, Santiago; Reventos, Jaume; Armengol, Manel; Arbos, Maria A.

    2011-01-01

    Incisional hernia often occurs following laparotomy and can be a source of serious problems. Although there is evidence that a biological cause may underlie its development, the mechanistic link between the local tissue microenvironment and tissue rupture is lacking. In this study, we used matched tissue-based and in vitro primary cell culture systems to examine the possible involvement of fascia fibroblasts in incisional hernia pathogenesis. Fascia biopsies were collected at surgery from incisional hernia patients and non-incisional hernia controls. Tissue samples were analyzed by histology and immunoblotting methods. Fascia primary fibroblast cultures were assessed at morphological, ultrastructural, and functional levels. We document tissue and fibroblast loss coupled to caspase-3 activation and induction of apoptosis-like cell-death mechanisms in incisional hernia fascia. Alterations in cytoskeleton organization and solubility were also observed. Incisional hernia fibroblasts showed a consistent phenotype throughout early passages in vitro, which was characterized by significantly enhanced cell proliferation and migration, reduced adhesion, and altered cytoskeleton properties, as compared to non-incisional hernia fibroblasts. Moreover, incisional hernia fibroblasts displayed morphological and ultrastructural alterations compatible with autophagic processes or lysosomal dysfunction, together with enhanced sensitivity to proapoptotic challenges. Overall, these data suggest an ongoing complex interplay of cell death induction, aberrant fibroblast function, and tissue loss in incisional hernia fascia, which may significantly contribute to altered matrix maintenance and tissue rupture in vivo. PMID:21641387

  18. Catalase and NO CATALASE ACTIVITY1 Promote Autophagy-Dependent Cell Death in Arabidopsis[C][W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackenberg, Thomas; Juul, Trine; Auzina, Aija; Gwiżdż, Sonia; Małolepszy, Anna; Van Der Kelen, Katrien; Dam, Svend; Bressendorff, Simon; Lorentzen, Andrea; Roepstorff, Peter; Lehmann Nielsen, Kåre; Jørgensen, Jan-Elo; Hofius, Daniel; Breusegem, Frank Van; Petersen, Morten; Andersen, Stig Uggerhøj

    2013-01-01

    Programmed cell death often depends on generation of reactive oxygen species, which can be detoxified by antioxidative enzymes, including catalases. We previously isolated catalase-deficient mutants (cat2) in a screen for resistance to hydroxyurea-induced cell death. Here, we identify an Arabidopsis thaliana hydroxyurea-resistant autophagy mutant, atg2, which also shows reduced sensitivity to cell death triggered by the bacterial effector avrRpm1. To test if catalase deficiency likewise affected both hydroxyurea and avrRpm1 sensitivity, we selected mutants with extremely low catalase activities and showed that they carried mutations in a gene that we named NO CATALASE ACTIVITY1 (NCA1). nca1 mutants showed severely reduced activities of all three catalase isoforms in Arabidopsis, and loss of NCA1 function led to strong suppression of RPM1-triggered cell death. Basal and starvation-induced autophagy appeared normal in the nca1 and cat2 mutants. By contrast, autophagic degradation induced by avrRpm1 challenge was compromised, indicating that catalase acted upstream of immunity-triggered autophagy. The direct interaction of catalase with reactive oxygen species could allow catalase to act as a molecular link between reactive oxygen species and the promotion of autophagy-dependent cell death. PMID:24285797

  19. Polydatin post-treatment alleviates myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion injury by promoting autophagic flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Yuanna; Chen, Guiming; Deng, Yi; Tang, Huixiong; Ling, Long; Zhou, Xiaoming; Song, Xudong; Yang, Pingzhen; Liu, Yingfeng; Li, Zhiliang; Zhao, Cong; Yang, Yufei; Wang, Xianbao; Kitakaze, Masafumi; Liao, Yulin; Chen, Aihua

    2016-09-01

    Polydatin (PD), a resveratrol (RES) glycoside, has a stronger antioxidative effect than RES. It is known that RES is an autophagic enhancer and exerts a cardioprotective effect against ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. However, the effect of PD post-treatment on myocardial I/R injury remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the influences of PD post-treatment on myocardial I/R injury and autophagy. C57BL/6 mice underwent left coronary artery (LCA) occlusion and cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCs) subjected to hypoxia were treated with vehicle or PD during reperfusion or re-oxygenation. We noted that PD enhanced autophagy and decreased apoptosis during I/R or hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R), and this effect was antagonized by co-treatment with adenovirus carrying short hairpin RNA for Beclin 1 and 3-methyladenine (3-MA), an autophagic inhibitor. Compared with vehicle-treated mice, PD-treated mice had a significantly smaller myocardial infarct size (IS) and a higher left ventricular fractional shortening (LVFS) and ejection fraction (EF), whereas these effects were partly reversed by 3-MA. Furthermore, in the PD-treated NRCs, tandem fluorescent mRFP-GFP-LC3 assay showed abundant clearance of autophagosomes with an enhanced autophagic flux, and co-treatment with Bafilomycin A1 (Baf), a lysosomal inhibitor, indicated that PD promoted the degradation of autolysosome. In addition, PD post-treatment reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in NRCs, and these effects were partially blocked by Baf. These findings indicate that PD post-treatment limits myocardial I/R injury by promoting autophagic flux to clear damaged mitochondria to reduce ROS and cell death. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  20. Herpes simplex virus type I induces the accumulation of intracellular β-amyloid in autophagic compartments and the inhibition of the non-amyloidogenic pathway in human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Soraya; Recuero, Maria; Bullido, Maria Jesús; Valdivieso, Fernando; Aldudo, Jesus

    2012-02-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Epidemiological analyses have shown that HSV-1 is a risk factor for AD in people with at least 1 type 4 allele of the apolipoprotein E gene. Recent studies have also suggested that HSV-1 contributes to the appearance of the biochemical anomalies characteristic of AD brains. In addition, autophagic activity appears to be reduced with aging, and the final stages of autophagy in neurodegenerative process appear to be impaired. The present work reports that HSV-1 provokes the strong intracellular accumulation of both the main species of β-amyloid (Aβ) in the autophagic compartments and that it is associated with a marked inhibition of Aβ secretion. Autophagosomes containing Aβ failed to fuse with lysosomes in HSV-1-infected cells, indicating the impaired degradation of Aβ localized in the autophagic vesicles. In addition, HSV-1 infection was associated with the inhibition of the nonamyloidogenic pathway of amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing without significantly affecting the activity of the secretases involved in the amyloidogenic pathway. Taken together, these data suggest that HSV-1 infection modulates autophagy and amyloid precursor protein processing, contributing to the accumulation of Aβ characteristic of AD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Roles of zinc and metallothionein-3 in oxidative stress-induced lysosomal dysfunction, cell death, and autophagy in neurons and astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Sook-Jeong

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Zinc dyshomeostasis has been recognized as an important mechanism for cell death in acute brain injury. An increase in the level of free or histochemically reactive zinc in astrocytes and neurons is considered one of the major causes of death of these cells in ischemia and trauma. Although zinc dyshomeostasis can lead to cell death via diverse routes, the major pathway appears to involve oxidative stress. Recently, we found that a rise of zinc in autophagic vacuoles, including autolysosomes, is a prerequisite for lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cell death in cultured brain cells exposed to oxidative stress conditions. The source of zinc in this process is likely redox-sensitive zinc-binding proteins such as metallothioneins, which release zinc under oxidative conditions. Of the metallothioneins, metallothionein-3 is especially enriched in the central nervous system, but its physiologic role in this tissue is not well established. Like other metallothioneins, metallothionein-3 may function as metal detoxicant, but is also known to inhibit neurite outgrowth and, sometimes, promote neuronal death, likely by serving as a source of toxic zinc release. In addition, metallothionein-3 regulates lysosomal functions. In the absence of metallothionein-3, there are changes in lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 and -2, and reductions in certain lysosomal enzymes that result in decreased autophagic flux. This may have dual effects on cell survival. In acute oxidative injury, zinc dyshomeostasis and lysosomal membrane permeabilization are diminished in metallothionein-3 null cells, resulting in less cell death. But over the longer term, diminished lysosomal function may lead to the accumulation of abnormal proteins and cause cytotoxicity. The roles of zinc and metallothionein-3 in autophagy and/or lysosomal function have just begun to be investigated. In light of evidence that autophagy and lysosomes may play significant roles in the

  2. Programmed cell death in the plant immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll, N S; Epple, P; Dangl, J L

    2011-08-01

    Cell death has a central role in innate immune responses in both plants and animals. Besides sharing striking convergences and similarities in the overall evolutionary organization of their innate immune systems, both plants and animals can respond to infection and pathogen recognition with programmed cell death. The fact that plant and animal pathogens have evolved strategies to subvert specific cell death modalities emphasizes the essential role of cell death during immune responses. The hypersensitive response (HR) cell death in plants displays morphological features, molecular architectures and mechanisms reminiscent of different inflammatory cell death types in animals (pyroptosis and necroptosis). In this review, we describe the molecular pathways leading to cell death during innate immune responses. Additionally, we present recently discovered caspase and caspase-like networks regulating cell death that have revealed fascinating analogies between cell death control across both kingdoms.

  3. Homeostatic Mass Control in Gastric Non-Neoplastic Epithelia under Infection of Helicobacter pylori: An Immunohistochemical Analysis of Cell Growth, Stem Cells and Programmed Cell Death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Kenji; Hasui, Kazuhisa; Wang, Jia; Kawano, Yoshifumi; Aikou, Takashi; Murata, Fusayoshi

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated homeostatic mass control in non-neoplastic gastric epithelia under Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection in the macroscopically normal-appearing mucosa resected from the stomach with gastric cancer, immunohistochemically analyzing the proliferation, kinetics of stem cells and programmed cell death occurring in them. Ki67 antigen-positive proliferating cells were found dominantly in the elongated neck portion, sparsely in the fundic areas and sporadically in the stroma with chronic infiltrates. CD117 could monitor the kinetics of gastric stem cells and showed its expression in two stages of gastric epithelial differentiation, namely, in transient cells from the gastric epithelial stem cells to the foveolar and glandular cells in the neck portion and in what are apparently progenitor cells from the gastric stem cells in the stroma among the infiltrates. Most of the nuclei were positive for ssDNA in the almost normal mucosa, suggesting DNA damage. Cleaved caspase-3-positive foveolar cells were noted under the surface, suggesting the suppression of apoptosis in the surface foveolar cells. Besides such apoptosis of the foveolar cells, in the severely inflamed mucosa apoptotic cells were found in the neck portion where most of the cells were Ki67 antigen-positive proliferating cells. Beclin-1 was recognized in the cytoplasm and in a few nuclei of the fundic glandular cells, suggesting their autophagic cell death and mutated beclin-1 in the nuclei. Taken together, the direct and indirect effects of HP infection on the gastric epithelial proliferation, differentiation and programmed cell death suggested the in-situ occurrence of gastric cancer under HP infection

  4. Programmed cell death during quinoa perisperm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Fernández, María Paula; Maldonado, Sara

    2013-08-01

    At seed maturity, quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) perisperm consists of uniform, non-living, thin-walled cells full of starch grains. The objective of the present study was to study quinoa perisperm development and describe the programme of cell death that affects the entire tissue. A number of parameters typically measured during programmed cell death (PCD), such as cellular morphological changes in nuclei and cytoplasm, endoreduplication, DNA fragmentation, and the participation of nucleases and caspase-like proteases in nucleus dismantling, were evaluated; morphological changes in cytoplasm included subcellular aspects related to starch accumulation. This study proved that, following fertilization, the perisperm of quinoa simultaneously accumulates storage reserves and degenerates, both processes mediated by a programme of developmentally controlled cell death. The novel findings regarding perisperm development provide a starting point for further research in the Amaranthaceae genera, such as comparing seeds with and without perisperm, and specifying phylogeny and evolution within this taxon. Wherever possible and appropriate, differences between quinoa perisperm and grass starchy endosperm--a morphologically and functionally similar, although genetically different tissue--were highlighted and discussed.

  5. UV-Induced Cell Death in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawkar, Ganesh M.; Maibam, Punyakishore; Park, Jung Hoon; Sahi, Vaidurya Pratap; Lee, Sang Yeol; Kang, Chang Ho

    2013-01-01

    Plants are photosynthetic organisms that depend on sunlight for energy. Plants respond to light through different photoreceptors and show photomorphogenic development. Apart from Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR; 400–700 nm), plants are exposed to UV light, which is comprised of UV-C (below 280 nm), UV-B (280–320 nm) and UV-A (320–390 nm). The atmospheric ozone layer protects UV-C radiation from reaching earth while the UVR8 protein acts as a receptor for UV-B radiation. Low levels of UV-B exposure initiate signaling through UVR8 and induce secondary metabolite genes involved in protection against UV while higher dosages are very detrimental to plants. It has also been reported that genes involved in MAPK cascade help the plant in providing tolerance against UV radiation. The important targets of UV radiation in plant cells are DNA, lipids and proteins and also vital processes such as photosynthesis. Recent studies showed that, in response to UV radiation, mitochondria and chloroplasts produce a reactive oxygen species (ROS). Arabidopsis metacaspase-8 (AtMC8) is induced in response to oxidative stress caused by ROS, which acts downstream of the radical induced cell death (AtRCD1) gene making plants vulnerable to cell death. The studies on salicylic and jasmonic acid signaling mutants revealed that SA and JA regulate the ROS level and antagonize ROS mediated cell death. Recently, molecular studies have revealed genes involved in response to UV exposure, with respect to programmed cell death (PCD). PMID:23344059

  6. UV-Induced cell death in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawkar, Ganesh M; Maibam, Punyakishore; Park, Jung Hoon; Sahi, Vaidurya Pratap; Lee, Sang Yeol; Kang, Chang Ho

    2013-01-14

    Plants are photosynthetic organisms that depend on sunlight for energy. Plants respond to light through different photoreceptors and show photomorphogenic development. Apart from Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR; 400-700 nm), plants are exposed to UV light, which is comprised of UV-C (below 280 nm), UV-B (280-320 nm) and UV-A (320-390 nm). The atmospheric ozone layer protects UV-C radiation from reaching earth while the UVR8 protein acts as a receptor for UV-B radiation. Low levels of UV-B exposure initiate signaling through UVR8 and induce secondary metabolite genes involved in protection against UV while higher dosages are very detrimental to plants. It has also been reported that genes involved in MAPK cascade help the plant in providing tolerance against UV radiation. The important targets of UV radiation in plant cells are DNA, lipids and proteins and also vital processes such as photosynthesis. Recent studies showed that, in response to UV radiation, mitochondria and chloroplasts produce a reactive oxygen species (ROS). Arabidopsis metacaspase-8 (AtMC8) is induced in response to oxidative stress caused by ROS, which acts downstream of the radical induced cell death (AtRCD1) gene making plants vulnerable to cell death. The studies on salicylic and jasmonic acid signaling mutants revealed that SA and JA regulate the ROS level and antagonize ROS mediated cell death. Recently, molecular studies have revealed genes involved in response to UV exposure, with respect to programmed cell death (PCD).

  7. MicroRNA-20a inhibits autophagic process by targeting ATG7 and ATG16L1 and favors mycobacterial survival in macrophage cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Guo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy plays important roles in the host immune response against mycobacterial infection. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis can live in macrophages owing to its ability to evade attacks by regulating autophagic response. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small noncoding, endogenously encoded RNA which plays critical roles in precise regulation of macrophage functions. Whether miRNAs specifically influence the activation of macrophage autophagy during M. tuberculosis infection are largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that BCG infection of macrophages resulted in enhanced expression of miRNA-20a, which inhibits autophagic process by targeting ATG7 and ATG16L1 and promotes BCG survival in macrophages. Forced overexpression of miR-20a decreased the expression levels of LC3-II and the number of LC3 puncta in macrophages, and promoted BCG survival in macrophages, while transfection with miR-20a inhibitor had the opposite effect. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of miR-20a on autophagy was further confimed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM analysis. Quantification of autophagosomes per cellular cross-section revealed a significant reduction upon transfection with miR-20a mimic, but transfection with miR-20a inhibitor increased the number of autophagosomes per cellular cross-section. Moreover, silencing of ATG7 significantly inhibited autophagic response, and transfection with ATG7 siRNA plus miR-20a mimic could further decrease autophagic response. Collectively, our data reveal that miR-20a inhibits autophagic response and promotes BCG survival in macrophages by targeting ATG7 and ATG16L1, which may have implications for a better understanding of pathogenesis of M. tuberculosis infection.

  8. microRNA-20a Inhibits Autophagic Process by Targeting ATG7 and ATG16L1 and Favors Mycobacterial Survival in Macrophage Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Le; Zhao, Jin; Qu, Yuliang; Yin, Runting; Gao, Qian; Ding, Shuqin; Zhang, Ying; Wei, Jun; Xu, Guangxian

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy plays important roles in the host immune response against mycobacterial infection. Mycobacterium tuberculosis ( M. tuberculosis ) can live in macrophages owing to its ability to evade attacks by regulating autophagic response. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding, endogenously encoded RNA which plays critical roles in precise regulation of macrophage functions. Whether miRNAs specifically influence the activation of macrophage autophagy during M. tuberculosis infection are largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that BCG infection of macrophages resulted in enhanced expression of miRNA-20a, which inhibits autophagic process by targeting ATG7 and ATG16L1 and promotes BCG survival in macrophages. Forced overexpression of miR-20a decreased the expression levels of LC3-II and the number of LC3 puncta in macrophages, and promoted BCG survival in macrophages, while transfection with miR-20a inhibitor had the opposite effect. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of miR-20a on autophagy was further confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. Quantification of autophagosomes per cellular cross-section revealed a significant reduction upon transfection with miR-20a mimic, but transfection with miR-20a inhibitor increased the number of autophagosomes per cellular cross-section. Moreover, silencing of ATG7 significantly inhibited autophagic response, and transfection with ATG7 siRNA plus miR-20a mimic could further decrease autophagic response. Collectively, our data reveal that miR-20a inhibits autophagic response and promotes BCG survival in macrophages by targeting ATG7 and ATG16L1, which may have implications for a better understanding of pathogenesis of M. tuberculosis infection.

  9. Picornaviruses and Apoptosis: Subversion of Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, Sarah N; Walker, Erin J; Ghildyal, Reena

    2017-09-19

    Infected cells can undergo apoptosis as a protective response to viral infection, thereby limiting viral infection. As viruses require a viable cell for replication, the death of the cell limits cellular functions that are required for virus replication and propagation. Picornaviruses are single-stranded RNA viruses that modify the host cell apoptotic response, probably in order to promote viral replication, largely as a function of the viral proteases 2A, 3C, and 3CD. These proteases are essential for viral polyprotein processing and also cleave cellular proteins. Picornavirus proteases cleave proapoptotic adaptor proteins, resulting in downregulation of apoptosis. Picornavirus proteases also cleave nucleoporins, disrupting the orchestrated manner in which signaling pathways use active nucleocytoplasmic trafficking, including those involved in apoptosis. In addition to viral proteases, the transmembrane 2B protein alters intracellular ion signaling, which may also modulate apoptosis. Overall, picornaviruses, via the action of virally encoded proteins, exercise intricate control over and subvert cell death pathways, specifically apoptosis, thereby allowing viral replication to continue. Copyright © 2017 Croft et al.

  10. Rhodiola crenulata induces death and inhibits growth of breast cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Yifan; Roberts, Louis; Shetty, Kalidas; Schneider, Sallie Smith

    2008-09-01

    Diverse compounds from many different chemical classes are currently targeted in preclinical analyses for their ability to act as both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents. Phenolic phytochemicals from Rhodiola crenulata has such potential. This Rhodiola species is a perennial plant that grows in the Tundra, Siberia, and high-elevation regions of Tibet. The phenolic secondary metabolites isolated from R. crenulata were recently analyzed in a preclinical setting for their ability to treat lymphosarcomas and superficial bladder cancers. However, the effects of R. crenulata have yet to be examined for its implications in breast cancer prevention or for its chemotherapeutic abilities. Therefore this study investigated the effects of R. crenulata on breast cancer both in vivo and in vitro. Experiments using aggressive human-derived MDA-MB-231 and mouse-derived V14 breast cancer cell lines demonstrated that phenolic-enriched R. crenulata extract was capable of inhibiting the proliferation, motility, and invasion of these cells. In addition, the extracts induced autophagic-like vesicles in all cell lines, eventually leading to death of the tumor cell lines but not the immortal or normal human mammary epithelial cells. Finally, an in vivo experiment showed that phenolic-enriched dietary R. crenulata is effective in preventing the initiation of tumors and slowing down the tumor growth in mice bearing tumor grafts, thereby further demonstrating its possible potential for treatment of breast cancer progression and metastasis.

  11. Colorectal Cancer Stem Cells and Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catalano, Veronica [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Gaggianesi, Miriam [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Department of Cellular and Molecular Oncology, IRCCS Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, Via Salvatore Maugeri, 27100 Pavia, PV (Italy); Spina, Valentina; Iovino, Flora [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Dieli, Francesco [Departement of Biopathology and Medicine Biotechnologies, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Stassi, Giorgio, E-mail: giorgio.stassi@unipa.it [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Department of Cellular and Molecular Oncology, IRCCS Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, Via Salvatore Maugeri, 27100 Pavia, PV (Italy); Todaro, Matilde [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy)

    2011-04-11

    Nowadays it is reported that, similarly to other solid tumors, colorectal cancer is sustained by a rare subset of cancer stem–like cells (CSCs), which survive conventional anticancer treatments, thanks to efficient mechanisms allowing escape from apoptosis, triggering tumor recurrence. To improve patient outcomes, conventional anticancer therapies have to be replaced with specific approaches targeting CSCs. In this review we provide strong support that BMP4 is an innovative therapeutic approach to prevent colon cancer growth increasing differentiation markers expression and apoptosis. Recent data suggest that in colorectal CSCs, protection from apoptosis is achieved by interleukin-4 (IL-4) autocrine production through upregulation of antiapoptotic mediators, including survivin. Consequently, IL-4 neutralization could deregulate survivin expression and localization inducing chemosensitivity of the colon CSCs pool.

  12. Programmed cell death in plants and caspase-like activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaussand, Gwénael Martial Daniel Jean-Marie

    2007-01-01

    The development of multicellular organisms involves an important balance between cell growth, cell division and cell death. In animals, programmed cell death (PCD) plays a key role by forming and deleting structures, controlling cell numbers and eliminating abnormal damaged cells. Caspases were

  13. Melting Behaviour of Cell Death Lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Sherry; Sot, Jesus; Goni, Felix; Thewalt, Jenifer

    2009-05-01

    Sphingomyelin is a major lipid constituent of mammalian cell plasma membranes. It is converted into ceramide during programmed cell death. It is hypothesized that this conversion induces a structural change in membranes that is responsible for downstream signaling. To characterize these structural changes, deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is used to create a concentration-temperature phase diagram of palmitoyl sphingomyelin:ceramide multilamellar vesicles in excess water between 0-40 mol% ceramide and 25-80^oC. The two lipids are fully miscible at high temperatures and at 40 mol% ceramide. A variety of solid-liquid coexistence phase behavior is observed at lower concentrations. With increasing ceramide content, a gel phase is observed at progressively higher temperatures, implying that at physiological temperature, ceramide may increase the gel phase propensity of cell membranes.

  14. Substituted 2-hydroxy-N-(arylalkyl)benzamide sensitizes cancer cells to metabolic stress by disrupting actin cytoskeleton and inhibiting autophagic flux

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pachnikova, G.; Uldrijan, S.; Imramovský, A.; Kryštof, Vladimír; Slaninová, I.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 37, DEC (2016), s. 70-78 ISSN 0887-2333 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : hepatocellular-carcinoma cells * sorafenib * apoptosis * death * maturation * membrane * melanoma * Actin * Autophagy * Melanoma * Metabolic stress * Sorafenib * Substituted 2-hydroxy-N-(arylalkyl)benzamide Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.866, year: 2016

  15. Tryptamine induces cell death with ultrastructural features of autophagy in neurons and glia: Possible relevance for neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Federico; Martin, Vanesa; Carrera, Pilar; García-Santos, Guillermo; Rodriguez-Blanco, Jezabel; Rodriguez, Carmen; Antolín, Isaac

    2006-09-01

    Tryptamine derivatives are a family of biogenic amines that have been suggested to be modulators of brain function at physiological concentrations. However, pharmacological concentrations of these amines display amphetamine-like properties, and they seem to play a role in brain disorders. Amphetamines induce autophagy in nerve cells, and this type of cell death has also been involved in neurodegenerative diseases. In the present work, we clearly demonstrate for the very first time that high concentrations of tryptamine (0.1-1 mM) induce autophagy in HT22 and SK-N-SH nerve cell lines and in primary cultures of astrocytes, glial cells being less sensitive than neurons. Ultrastructural cell morphology shows all of the typical hallmarks of autophagy. There is no nuclear chromatin condensation, endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria are swollen, and a great number of double-membraned autophagosomes and residual bodies can be shown in the cytoplasm. Autophagosomes and residual bodies contain mitochondria, membranes, and vesicles and remain unabridged until the cell membrane is disrupted and the cell dies. The same results have been found when cells were incubated with high concentrations of 5-methoxytryptamine (0.1-1 mM). Our results establish a possible link between the role of tryptamine derivatives in brain disorders and the presence of autophagic cell death in these kinds of disorders. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Cell cycle regulation and radiation-induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favaudon, V.

    2000-01-01

    Tight control of cell proliferation is mandatory to prevent cancer formation as well as to normal organ development and homeostasis. This occurs through checkpoints that operate in both time and space and are involved in the control of numerous pathways including DNA replication and transcription, cell cycle progression, signal transduction and differentiation. Moreover, evidence has accumulated to show that apoptosis is tightly connected with the regulation of cell cycle progression. In this paper we describe the main pathways that determine checkpoints in the cell cycle and apoptosis. It is also recalled that in solid tumors radiation-induced cell death occurs most frequently through non-apoptotic mechanisms involving oncosis, and mitotic or delayed cell death. (author)

  17. Patterns of cell death in the perinatal mouse forebrain

    OpenAIRE

    Mosley, Morgan; Shah, Charisma; Morse, Kiriana A.; Miloro, Stephen A.; Holmes, Melissa M.; Ahern, Todd H.; Forger, Nancy G.

    2016-01-01

    The importance of cell death in brain development has long been appreciated, but many basic questions remain, such as what initiates or terminates the cell death period. One obstacle has been the lack of quantitative data defining exactly when cell death occurs. We recently created a “cell death atlas,” using the detection of activated caspase-3 (AC3) to quantify apoptosis in the postnatal mouse ventral forebrain and hypothalamus, and found that the highest rates of cell death were seen at th...

  18. Nanomaterial-induced cell death in pulmonary and hepatic cells following exposure to three different metallic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kermanizadeh, Ali; Jantzen, Kim; Ward, Michael B

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is the catabolic process involving the sequestration of the cytoplasm within double-membrane vesicles, which fuse with lysosomes to form autolysosomes in which autophagic targets are degraded. Since most endocytic routes of nanomaterial uptake converge upon the lysosome and the possibil...... cytoskeleton. This response was not observed following the exposure to low-toxicity TiO2 NMs. Overall, the results show that high toxicity NMs can cause a dysfunction in the autophagy pathway which is associated with apoptotic cell death....... and the possibility that autophagy induction by NMs may be an attempt by the cell to self-preserve following the external challenge, this study investigated the role of autophagy following exposure to a panel of widely used metal-based NMs with high toxicity (Ag and ZnO) or low toxicity (TiO2) in a pulmonary (A549......) and hepatic (HepG2) cell line. The in vitro exposure to the Ag and ZnO NMs resulted in the induction of both apoptosis and autophagy pathways in both cell types. However, the progression of autophagy was blocked in the formation of the autolysosome, which coincided with morphologic changes in the actin...

  19. Listeria phospholipases subvert host autophagic defenses by stalling pre-autophagosomal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattoli, Ivan; Sorbara, Matthew T; Yang, Chloe; Tooze, Sharon A; Philpott, Dana J; Girardin, Stephen E

    2013-01-01

    Listeria can escape host autophagy defense pathways through mechanisms that remain poorly understood. We show here that in epithelial cells, Listeriolysin (LLO)-dependent cytosolic escape of Listeria triggered a transient amino-acid starvation host response characterized by GCN2 phosphorylation, ATF3 induction and mTOR inhibition, the latter favouring a pro-autophagic cellular environment. Surprisingly, rapid recovery of mTOR signalling was neither sufficient nor necessary for Listeria avoidance of autophagic targeting. Instead, we observed that Listeria phospholipases PlcA and PlcB reduced autophagic flux and phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI3P) levels, causing pre-autophagosomal structure stalling and preventing efficient targeting of cytosolic bacteria. In co-infection experiments, wild-type Listeria protected PlcA/B-deficient bacteria from autophagy-mediated clearance. Thus, our results uncover a critical role for Listeria phospholipases C in the inhibition of autophagic flux, favouring bacterial escape from host autophagic defense. PMID:24162724

  20. The photodynamic action of pheophorbide a induces cell death through oxidative stress in Leishmania amazonensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Nathielle; Volpato, Hélito; da Silva Rodrigues, Jean Henrique; Caetano, Wilker; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia; de Oliveira Silva, Sueli; Nakamura, Celso Vataru

    2017-09-01

    Leishmaniasis is a disease caused by hemoflagellate protozoa, affecting millions of people worldwide. The difficulties of treating patients with this parasitosis include the limited efficacy and many side effects of the currently available drugs. Therefore, the search for new compounds with leishmanicidal action is necessary. Photodynamic therapy has been studied in the medical field because of its selectivity, utilizing a combination of visible light, a photosensitizer compound, and singlet oxygen to reach the area of treatment. The continued search for selective alternative treatments and effective targets that impact the parasite and not the host are fundamentally important for the development of new drugs. Pheophorbide a is a photosensitizer that may be promising for the treatment of leishmaniasis. The present study evaluated the in vitro biological effects of pheophorbide a and its possible mechanisms of action in causing cell death in L. amazonensis. Pheophorbide a was active against promastigote and amastigote forms of the parasite. After treatment, we observed ultrastructural alterations in this protozoan. We also observed changes in promastigote macromolecules and organelles, such as loss of mitochondrial membrane potential [∆Ψ m ], lipid peroxidation, an increase in lipid droplets, DNA fragmentation, phosphatidylserine exposure, an increase in caspase-like activity, oxidative imbalance, and a decrease in antioxidant defense systems. These findings suggest that cell death occurred through apoptosis. The mechanism of cell death in intracellular amastigotes appeared to involve autophagy, in which we clearly observed an increase in reactive oxygen species, a compromised ∆Ψ m , and an increase in the number of autophagic vacuoles. The present study contributes to the development of new photosensitizers against L. amazonensis. We also elucidated the mechanism of action of pheophorbide a, mainly in intracellular amastigotes, which is the most clinically

  1. Concanavalin A/IFN-gamma triggers autophagy-related necrotic hepatocyte death through IRGM1-mediated lysosomal membrane disruption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Peng Chang

    Full Text Available Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ, a potent Th1 cytokine with multiple biological functions, can induce autophagy to enhance the clearance of the invading microorganism or cause cell death. We have reported that Concanavalin A (Con A can cause autophagic cell death in hepatocytes and induce both T cell-dependent and -independent acute hepatitis in immunocompetent and immunodeficient mice, respectively. Although IFN-γ is known to enhance liver injury in Con A-induced hepatitis, its role in autophagy-related hepatocyte death is not clear. In this study we report that IFN-γ can enhance Con A-induced autophagic flux and cell death in hepatoma cell lines. A necrotic cell death with increased lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP is observed in Con A-treated hepatoma cells in the presence of IFN-γ. Cathepsin B and L were released from lysosomes to cause cell death. Furthermore, IFN-γ induces immunity related GTPase family M member 1(IRGM1 translocation to lysosomes and prolongs its activity in Con A-treated hepatoma cells. Knockdown of IRGM1 inhibits the IFN-γ/Con A-induced LMP change and cell death. Furthermore, IFN-γ(-/- mice are resistant to Con A-induced autophagy-associated necrotic hepatocyte death. We conclude that IFN-γ enhances Con A-induced autophagic flux and causes an IRGM1-dependent lysosome-mediated necrotic cell death in hepatocytes.

  2. Death Receptor-Mediated Cell Death and Proinflammatory Signaling in Nonalcoholic SteatohepatitisSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Hirsova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is becoming a public health problem worldwide. A subset of patients develop an inflammatory disease, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, characterized by steatosis, hepatocellular death, macrophage and neutrophil accumulation, and varying stages of fibrosis. Hepatocyte cell death triggers the cellular inflammatory response, therefore reducing cell death may be salutary in the steatohepatitis disease process. Recently, a better understanding of hepatocyte apoptosis in NASH has been obtained and new information regarding other cell death modes such as necroptosis and pyroptosis has been reported. Hepatocyte lipotoxicity is often triggered by death receptors. In addition to causing apoptosis, death receptors have been shown to mediate proinflammatory signaling, suggesting that apoptosis in this context is not an immunologically silent process. Here, we review recent developments in our understanding of hepatocyte cell death by death receptors and its mechanistic link to inflammation in NASH. We emphasize how proapoptotic signaling by death receptors may induce the release of proinflammatory extracellular vesicles, thereby recruiting and activating macrophages and promoting the steatohepatitis process. Potential therapeutic strategies are discussed based on this evolving information. Keywords: Apoptosis, Caspase Inhibitor, Cell Death, Death Receptors, Exosomes, Extracellular Vesicles, Fibrosis, Inflammation, Inflammasome, Microvesicles, Necroptosis, Pyroptosis

  3. Programmed Cell Death in Plants: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locato, Vittoria; De Gara, Laura

    2018-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a controlled mechanism that eliminates specific cells under developmental or environmental stimuli. All organisms-from bacteria to multicellular eukaryotes-have the ability to induce PCD in selected cells. Although this process was first identified in plants, the interest in deciphering the signaling pathways leading to PCD strongly increased when evidence came to light that PCD may be involved in several human diseases. In plants, PCD activation ensures the correct occurrence of growth and developmental processes, among which embryogenesis and differentiation of tracheary elements. PCD is also part of the defense responses activated by plants against environmental stresses, both abiotic and biotic.This chapter gives an overview of the roles of PCD in plants as well as the problems arising in classifying different kinds of PCD according to defined biochemical and cellular markers, and in comparison with the various types of PCD occurring in mammal cells. The importance of understanding PCD signaling pathways, with their elicitors and effectors, in order to improve plant productivity and resistance to environmental stresses is also taken into consideration.

  4. Monitoring Autophagic Responses in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papandreou, M E; Tavernarakis, N

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy, from the Greek auto (self) and phagy (eating), is a self-degradative process critical for eukaryotic cell homeostasis. Its rapidly responsive, highly dynamic nature renders this process essential for adapting to and offsetting acute/harsh conditions such as starvation, organelle dysfunction, and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage. Autophagy involves an intricate network of interacting factors with multiple levels of control. Importantly, dysregulation of autophagy has been linked to numerous debilitating pathologies, including cancer and neurodegenerative conditions in humans. Methods to monitor and quantify autophagic activity reliably are essential both for studying the basic mechanisms of autophagy and for dissecting its involvement in disease. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a particularly suitable model organism to effectively visualize and study autophagy, in vivo, in a physiological and pathological context due to its optical transparency, experimental malleability, and precise developmental and anatomical characterization. Here, we outline the main tools and approaches to monitor and measure autophagic responses in C. elegans. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Plant programmed cell death, ethylene and flower senescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woltering, E.J.; Jong, de A.; Hoeberichts, F.A.; Iakimova, E.T.; Kapchina, V.

    2005-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) applies to cell death that is part of the normal life of multicellular organisms. PCD is found throughout the animal and plant kingdoms; it is an active process in which a cell suicide pathway is activated resulting in controlled disassembly of the cell. Most cases of PCD

  6. The anti-cell death FNK protein protects cells from death induced by freezing and thawing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, Kentaro; Asoh, Sadamitsu; Ohsawa, Ikuroh; Ozaki, Daiya; Yamagata, Kumi; Ito, Hiromoto; Ohta, Shigeo

    2005-01-01

    The FNK protein, constructed from anti-apoptotic Bcl-x L with enhanced activity, was fused with the protein transduction domain (PTD) of the HIV/Tat protein to mediate the delivery of FNK into cells. The fusion protein PTD-FNK was introduced into chondrocytes in isolated articular cartilage-bone sections, cultured neurons, and isolated bone marrow mononuclear cells to evaluate its ability to prevent cell death induced by freezing and thawing. PTD-FNK protected the cells from freeze-thaw damage in a concentration-dependent manner. Addition of PTD-FNK with conventional cryoprotectants (dimethyl sulfoxide and hydroxyethyl starch) increased surviving cell numbers around 2-fold compared with controls treated only with the cryoprotectants. Notably, PTD-FNK allowed CD34 + cells among bone marrow mononuclear cells to survive more efficiently (12-fold more than the control cells) from two successive freeze-thaw cycles. Thus, PTD-FNK prevented cell death induced by freezing and thawing, suggesting that it provides for the successful cryopreservation of biological materials

  7. Cell lineage and cell death: Caenorhabditis elegans and cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, Malia B; Cameron, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease in which cells have circumvented normal restraints on tissue growth and have acquired complex abnormalities in their genomes, posing a considerable challenge to identifying the pathways and mechanisms that drive fundamental aspects of the malignant phenotype. Genetic analyses of the normal development of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans have revealed evolutionarily conserved mechanisms through which individual cells establish their fates, and how they make and execute the decision to survive or undergo programmed cell death. The pathways identified through these studies have mammalian counterparts that are co-opted by malignant cells. Effective cancer drugs now target some of these pathways, and more are likely to be discovered.

  8. Analysis of cell death inducing compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spicker, Jeppe; Pedersen, Henrik Toft; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn

    2007-01-01

    Biomarkers for early detection of toxicity hold the promise of improving the failure rates in drug development. In the present study, gene expression levels were measured using full-genome RAE230 version 2 Affymetrix GeneChips on rat liver tissue 48 h after administration of six different compounds......), ornithine aminotransferase (OAT) and Cytochrome P450, subfamily IIC (mephenytoin 4-hydroxylase) (Cyp2C29). RT-PCR for these three genes was performed and four additional compounds were included for validation. The quantitative RT-PCR analysis confirmed the findings based on the microarray data and using...... the three genes a classification rate of 55 of 57 samples was achieved for the classification of not toxic versus toxic. The single most promising biomarker (OAT) alone resulted in a surprisingly 100% correctly classified samples. OAT has not previously been linked to toxicity and cell death...

  9. Morphodynamics of a growing microbial colony driven by cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Pushpita; Levine, Herbert

    2017-11-01

    Bacterial cells can often self-organize into multicellular structures with complex spatiotemporal morphology. In this work, we study the spatiotemporal dynamics of a growing microbial colony in the presence of cell death. We present an individual-based model of nonmotile bacterial cells which grow and proliferate by consuming diffusing nutrients on a semisolid two-dimensional surface. The colony spreads by growth forces and sliding motility of cells and undergoes cell death followed by subsequent disintegration of the dead cells in the medium. We model cell death by considering two possible situations: In one of the cases, cell death occurs in response to the limitation of local nutrients, while the other case corresponds to an active death process, known as apoptotic or programmed cell death. We demonstrate how the colony morphology is influenced by the presence of cell death. Our results show that cell death facilitates transitions from roughly circular to highly branched structures at the periphery of an expanding colony. Interestingly, our results also reveal that for the colonies which are growing in higher initial nutrient concentrations, cell death occurs much earlier compared to the colonies which are growing in lower initial nutrient concentrations. This work provides new insights into the branched patterning of growing bacterial colonies as a consequence of complex interplay among the biochemical and mechanical effects.

  10. The Bcr-Abl kinase inhibitor INNO-406 induces autophagy and different modes of cell death execution in Bcr-Abl-positive leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamitsuji, Y; Kuroda, J; Kimura, S; Toyokuni, S; Watanabe, K; Ashihara, E; Tanaka, H; Yui, Y; Watanabe, M; Matsubara, H; Mizushima, Y; Hiraumi, Y; Kawata, E; Yoshikawa, T; Maekawa, T; Nakahata, T; Adachi, S

    2008-11-01

    Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase (TK) inhibitors are promising therapeutic agents for Bcr-Abl-positive (Bcr-Abl(+)) leukemias. Although they are known to promote caspase-mediated apoptosis, it remains unclear whether caspase-independent cell death-inducing mechanisms are also triggered. Here we demonstrated that INNO-406, a second-generation Bcr-Abl TK inhibitor, induces programmed cell death (PCD) in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cell lines through both caspase-mediated and caspase-independent pathways. The latter pathways include caspase-independent apoptosis (CIA) and necrosis-like cell death (CIND), and the cell lines varied regarding which mechanism was elicited upon INNO-406 treatment. We also observed that the propensity toward CIA or CIND in cells was strongly associated with cellular dependency on apoptosome-mediated caspase activity. Cells that undergo CIND have a high apoptosome activity potential whereas cells that undergo CIA tend to have a lower potential. Moreover, we found that INNO-406 promotes autophagy. When autophagy was inhibited with chloroquine or gene knockdown of beclin1 by shRNA, INNO-406-induced cell death was enhanced, which indicates that the autophagic response of the tumor cells is protective. These findings suggest new insights into the biology and therapy of Bcr-Abl(+) leukemias.

  11. Cell-in-Cell Death Is Not Restricted by Caspase-3 Deficiency in MCF-7 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shan; He, Meifang; Li, Linmei; Liang, Zhihua; Zou, Zehong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cell-in-cell structures are created by one living cell entering another homotypic or heterotypic living cell, which usually leads to the death of the internalized cell, specifically through caspase-dependent cell death (emperitosis) or lysosome-dependent cell death (entosis). Although entosis has attracted great attention, its occurrence is controversial, because one cell line used in its study (MCF-7) is deficient in caspase-3. Methods We investigated this issue using MCF-7 and A431 cell lines, which often display cell-in-cell invasion, and have different levels of caspase-3 expression. Cell-in-cell death morphology, microstructures, and signaling pathways were compared in the two cell lines. Results Our results confirmed that MCF-7 cells are caspase-3 deficient with a partial deletion in the CASP-3 gene. These cells underwent cell death that lacked typical apoptotic properties after staurosporine treatment, whereas caspase-3-sufficient A431 cells displayed typical apoptosis. The presence of caspase-3 was related neither to the lysosome-dependent nor to the caspase-dependent cell-in-cell death pathway. However, the existence of caspase-3 was associated with a switch from lysosome-dependent cell-in-cell death to the apoptotic cell-in-cell death pathway during entosis. Moreover, cellular hypoxia, mitochondrial swelling, release of cytochrome C, and autophagy were observed in internalized cells during entosis. Conclusion The occurrence of caspase-independent entosis is not a cell-specific process. In addition, entosis actually represents a cellular self-repair system, functioning through autophagy, to degrade damaged mitochondria resulting from cellular hypoxia in cell-in-cell structures. However, sustained autophagy-associated signal activation, without reduction in cellular hypoxia, eventually leads to lysosome-dependent intracellular cell death. PMID:27721872

  12. Programmed cell death and cell extrusion in rat duodenum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schauser, Kirsten; Larsson, Lars-Inge

    2005-01-01

    The small intestinal epithelium is continously renewed through a balance between cell division and cell loss. How this balance is achieved is uncertain. Thus, it is unknown to what extent programmed cell death (PCD) contributes to intestinal epithelial cell loss. We have used a battery...... of techniques detecting the events associated with PCD in order to better understand its role in the turnover of the intestinal epithelium, including modified double- and triple-staining techniques for simultaneously detecting multiple markers of PCD in individual cells. Only a partial correlation between TUNEL...... positivity for DNA fragmentation, c-jun phosphorylation on serine-63, positivity for activated caspase-3 and apoptotic morphology was observed. Our results show that DNA fragmentation does not invariable correlate to activation of caspase-3. Moreover, many cells were found to activate caspase-3 early...

  13. Senescence and programmed cell death : substance or semantics?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van W.G.; Woltering, E.J.

    2004-01-01

    The terms senescence and programmed cell death (PCD) have led to some confusion. Senescence as visibly observed in, for example, leaf yellowing and petal wilting, has often been taken to be synonymous with the programmed death of the constituent cells. PCD also obviously refers to cells, which show

  14. Mechanisms of Betulinic acid‐induced cell death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potze, L.

    2015-01-01

    The scope of this thesis was to investigate the mechanisms by which BetA induces cell death in cancer cells in more detail. At the start of the studies described in this thesis several questions urgently needed an answer. Although BetA induces cell death via apoptosis, when blocking this form of

  15. Programmed cell death for defense against anomaly and tumor formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Sohei; Norimura, Toshiyuki; Nomura, Taisei

    1995-01-01

    Cell death after exposure to low-level radiation is often considered evidence that radiation is poisonous, however small the dose. Evidence has been accumulating to support the notion that cell death after low-level exposure to radiation results from activation of suicidal genes open-quote programmed cell death close-quote or open-quote apoptosis close-quote - for the health of the whole body. This paper gives experimental evidence that embryos of fruit flies and mouse fetuses have potent defense mechanisms against teratogenic or tumorigenic injury caused by radiation and carcinogens, which function through programmed cell death

  16. The End of the Beginning: Cell Death in the Germline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jeanne S; Timmons, Allison K; Mondragon, Albert A; McCall, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    Programmed cell death occurs in the germline of many organisms, both as an essential part of development and throughout adult life. Germline cell death can be apoptotic or nonapoptotic, depending on the stimulus or stage of development. Here, we focus on the Drosophila ovary, which is a powerful model for studying diverse types of cell death. In Drosophila, the death of primordial germ cells occurs normally during embryonic development, and germline nurse cells are programmed to die during oocyte development in adult flies. Cell death of previtellogenic egg chambers in adults can also be induced by starvation or other environmental cues. Mid-oogenesis seems to be particularly sensitive to such cues and has been proposed to serve as a checkpoint to avoid the energetically expensive cost of egg production. After the germline dies in mid-oogenesis, the remnants are engulfed by an epithelial layer of follicle cells; thus, the fly ovary also serves as a highly tractable model for engulfment by epithelial cells. These examples of cell death in the fly ovary share many similarities to the types of cell death seen in the mammalian germline. Recent progress in elucidating the molecular mechanisms of cell death in the germline is discussed. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Proteomics investigation reveals cell death-associated proteins of basidiomycete fungus Trametes versicolor treated with Ferruginol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Han; Yeh, Ting-Feng; Chu, Fang-Hua; Hsu, Fu-Lan; Chang, Shang-Tzen

    2015-01-14

    Ferruginol has antifungal activity against wood-rot fungi (basidiomycetes). However, specific research on the antifungal mechanisms of ferruginol is scarce. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and fluorescent image analysis were employed to evaluate the differential protein expression of wood-rot fungus Trametes versicolor treated with or without ferruginol. Results from protein identification of tryptic peptides via liquid chromatography–electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC–ESI-MS/MS) analyses revealed 17 protein assignments with differential expression. Downregulation of cytoskeleton β-tubulin 3 indicates that ferruginol has potential to be used as a microtubule-disrupting agent. Downregulation of major facilitator superfamily (MFS)–multiple drug resistance (MDR) transporter and peroxiredoxin TSA1 were observed, suggesting reduction in self-defensive capabilities of T. versicolor. In addition, the proteins involved in polypeptide sorting and DNA repair were also downregulated, while heat shock proteins and autophagy-related protein 7 were upregulated. These observations reveal that such cellular dysfunction and damage caused by ferruginol lead to growth inhibition and autophagic cell death of fungi.

  18. Patterns of cell death in the perinatal mouse forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosley, Morgan; Shah, Charisma; Morse, Kiriana A; Miloro, Stephen A; Holmes, Melissa M; Ahern, Todd H; Forger, Nancy G

    2017-01-01

    The importance of cell death in brain development has long been appreciated, but many basic questions remain, such as what initiates or terminates the cell death period. One obstacle has been the lack of quantitative data defining exactly when cell death occurs. We recently created a "cell death atlas," using the detection of activated caspase-3 (AC3) to quantify apoptosis in the postnatal mouse ventral forebrain and hypothalamus, and found that the highest rates of cell death were seen at the earliest postnatal ages in most regions. Here we have extended these analyses to prenatal ages and additional brain regions. We quantified cell death in 16 forebrain regions across nine perinatal ages from embryonic day (E) 17 to postnatal day (P) 11 and found that cell death peaks just after birth in most regions. We found greater cell death in several regions in offspring delivered vaginally on the day of parturition compared with those of the same postconception age but still in utero at the time of collection. We also found massive cell death in the oriens layer of the hippocampus on P1 and in regions surrounding the anterior crossing of the corpus callosum on E18 as well as the persistence of large numbers of cells in those regions in adult mice lacking the pro-death Bax gene. Together these findings suggest that birth may be an important trigger of neuronal cell death and identify transient cell groups that may undergo wholesale elimination perinatally. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:47-64, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Multiple mediators of plant programmed cell death : interplay of conserved cell death mechanisms and plant-specific regulators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeberichts, F.A.; Woltering, E.J.

    2002-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a process aimed at the removal of redundant, misplaced, or damaged cells and it is essential to the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms. In contrast to the relatively well-described cell death pathway in animals, often referred to as apoptosis,

  20. Cell death programs in Yersinia immunity and pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Hannah Philip

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Cell death plays a central role in host-pathogen interactions, as it can eliminate the pathogen’s replicative niche and provide pro-inflammatory signals necessary for an effective immune response; conversely, cell death can allow pathogens to eliminate immune cells and evade anti-microbial effector mechanisms. In response to developmental signals or cell-intrinsic stresses, the executioner caspases-3 and -7 mediate apoptotic cell death, which is generally viewed as immunologically silent or immunosuppressive. A proinflammatory form of cell death that requires caspase-1, termed pyroptosis, is activated in response to microbial products within the host cytosol or disruption of cellular membranes by microbial pathogens. Infection by the bacterial pathogen Yersinia has features of both apoptosis and pyroptosis. Cell death and caspase-1 processing in Yersinia-infected cells occur in response to inhibition of NF-κB and MAPK signaling by the Yersinia virulence factor YopJ. However, the molecular basis of YopJ-induced cell death, and the role of different death pathways in anti-Yersinia immune responses remain enigmatic. Here, we discuss the role that cell death may play in inducing specific pro-inflammatory signals that shape innate and adaptive immune responses against Yersinia infection.

  1. RNA Viruses: ROS-Mediated Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshi, Mohammad Latif; Su, Yi-Che; Hong, Jiann-Ruey

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are well known for being both beneficial and deleterious. The main thrust of this review is to investigate the role of ROS in ribonucleic acid (RNA) virus pathogenesis. Much evidences has accumulated over the past decade, suggesting that patients infected with RNA viruses are under chronic oxidative stress. Changes to the body's antioxidant defense system, in relation to SOD, ascorbic acid, selenium, carotenoids, and glutathione, have been reported in various tissues of RNA-virus infected patients. This review focuses on RNA viruses and retroviruses, giving particular attention to the human influenza virus, Hepatitis c virus (HCV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and the aquatic Betanodavirus. Oxidative stress via RNA virus infections can contribute to several aspects of viral disease pathogenesis including apoptosis, loss of immune function, viral replication, inflammatory response, and loss of body weight. We focus on how ROS production is correlated with host cell death. Moreover, ROS may play an important role as a signal molecule in the regulation of viral replication and organelle function, potentially providing new insights in the prevention and treatment of RNA viruses and retrovirus infections. PMID:24899897

  2. Dual PI-3 kinase/mTOR inhibition impairs autophagy flux and induces cell death independent of apoptosis and necroptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Button, Robert W.; Vincent, Joseph H.; Strang, Conor J.; Luo, Shouqing

    2016-01-01

    The PI-3 kinase (PI-3K)/mTOR pathway is critical for cell growth and proliferation. Strategies of antagonising this signaling have proven to be detrimental to cell survival. This observation, coupled with the fact many tumours show enhanced growth signaling, has caused dual inhibitors of PI-3K and mTOR to be implicated in cancer treatment, and have thus been studied across various tumour models. Since PI-3K (class-I)/mTOR pathway negatively regulates autophagy, dual inhibitors of PI-3K/mTOR are currently believed to be autophagy activators. However, our present data show that the dual PI-3K/mTOR inhibition (DKI) potently suppresses autophagic flux. We further confirm that inhibition of Vps34/PI3KC3, the class-III PI-3K, causes the blockade to autophagosome-lysosome fusion. Our data suggest that DKI induces cell death independently of apoptosis and necroptosis, whereas autophagy perturbation by DKI may contribute to cell death. Given that autophagy is critical in cellular homeostasis, our study not only clarifies the role of a dual PI-3K/mTOR inhibitor in autophagy, but also suggests that its autophagy inhibition needs to be considered if such an agent is used in cancer chemotherapy. PMID:26814436

  3. Mitochondrial apoptotic pathways induced by Drosophila programmed cell death regulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claveria, Cristina; Torres, Miguel

    2003-01-01

    Multicellular organisms eliminate unwanted or damaged cells by cell death, a process essential to the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Cell death is a tightly regulated event, whose alteration by excess or defect is involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases such as cancer, autoimmune syndromes, and neurodegenerative processes. Studies in model organisms, especially in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, have been crucial in identifying the key molecules implicated in the regulation and execution of programmed cell death. In contrast, the study of cell death in Drosophila melanogaster, often an excellent model organism, has identified regulators and mechanisms not obviously conserved in other metazoans. Recent molecular and cellular analyses suggest, however, that the mechanisms of action of the main programmed cell death regulators in Drosophila include a canonical mitochondrial pathway

  4. Mechanisms of Virus-Induced Neural Cell Death

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tyler, Kenneth

    2002-01-01

    Virtually all known neurotropic viruses are capable of killing infected cells by inducing a specific pattern of cell death known as apoptosis, yet the mechanism by which this occurs and its relevance...

  5. Chemical -induced apoptotic cell death in tomato cells : involvement of caspase-like proteases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de A.J.; Hoeberichts, F.A.; Yakimova, E.T.; Maximova, E.; Woltering, E.J.

    2000-01-01

    A new system to study programmed cell death in plants is described. Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) suspension cells were induced to undergo programmed cell death by treatment with known inducers of apoptosis in mammalian cells. This chemical-induced cell death was accompanied by the

  6. Hydrogen peroxide as a signal controlling plant programmed cell death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gechev, Tsanko S.; Hille, Jacques

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) has established itself as a key player in stress and programmed cell death responses, but little is known about the signaling pathways leading from H2O2 to programmed cell death in plants. Recently, identification of key regulatory mutants and near-full genome coverage

  7. Chemical- and pathogen-induced programmed cell death in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakimova, E.T.; Atanassov, A.; Woltering, E.J.

    2005-01-01

    This review focuses on recent update in the understanding of programmed cell death regarding the differences and similarities between the diverse types of cell death in animal and plant systems and describes the morphological and some biochemical determinants. The role of PCD in plant development

  8. Sphingolipid metabolism and programmed cell death in tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spassieva, Stefanka Diankova

    2003-01-01

    Programmed cell death is genetically determined. When the regulation of the process is disrupted it can have severe or lethal consequences for the organism. In mammals, cancer and neurodegenerative diseases are associated with abnormalities in programmed cell death. Development of an animal embryo

  9. Actin as Deathly Switch? How Auxin Can Suppress Cell-Death Related Defence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xiaoli; Riemann, Michael; Liu, Qiong; Nick, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Plant innate immunity is composed of two layers – a basal immunity, and a specific effector-triggered immunity, which is often accompanied by hypersensitive cell death. Initiation of cell death depends on a complex network of signalling pathways. The phytohormone auxin as central regulator of plant growth and development represents an important component for the modulation of plant defence. In our previous work, we showed that cell death is heralded by detachment of actin from the membrane. Both, actin response and cell death, are triggered by the bacterial elicitor harpin in grapevine cells. In this study we investigated, whether harpin-triggered actin bundling is necessary for harpin-triggered cell death. Since actin organisation is dependent upon auxin, we used different auxins to suppress actin bundling. Extracellular alkalinisation and transcription of defence genes as the basal immunity were examined as well as cell death. Furthermore, organisation of actin was observed in response to pharmacological manipulation of reactive oxygen species and phospholipase D. We find that induction of defence genes is independent of auxin. However, auxin can suppress harpin-induced cell death and also counteract actin bundling. We integrate our findings into a model, where harpin interferes with an auxin dependent pathway that sustains dynamic cortical actin through the activity of phospholipase D. The antagonism between growth and defence is explained by mutual competition for signal molecules such as superoxide and phosphatidic acid. Perturbations of the auxin-actin pathway might be used to detect disturbed integrity of the plasma membrane and channel defence signalling towards programmed cell death. PMID:25933033

  10. Heat stress induces ferroptosis-like cell death in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distéfano, Ayelén Mariana; Martin, María Victoria; Córdoba, Juan Pablo; Bellido, Andrés Martín; D'Ippólito, Sebastián; Colman, Silvana Lorena; Soto, Débora; Roldán, Juan Alfredo; Bartoli, Carlos Guillermo; Zabaleta, Eduardo Julián; Fiol, Diego Fernando; Stockwell, Brent R; Dixon, Scott J; Pagnussat, Gabriela Carolina

    2017-02-01

    In plants, regulated cell death (RCD) plays critical roles during development and is essential for plant-specific responses to abiotic and biotic stresses. Ferroptosis is an iron-dependent, oxidative, nonapoptotic form of cell death recently described in animal cells. In animal cells, this process can be triggered by depletion of glutathione (GSH) and accumulation of lipid reactive oxygen species (ROS). We investigated whether a similar process could be relevant to cell death in plants. Remarkably, heat shock (HS)-induced RCD, but not reproductive or vascular development, was found to involve a ferroptosis-like cell death process. In root cells, HS triggered an iron-dependent cell death pathway that was characterized by depletion of GSH and ascorbic acid and accumulation of cytosolic and lipid ROS. These results suggest a physiological role for this lethal pathway in response to heat stress in Arabidopsis thaliana The similarity of ferroptosis in animal cells and ferroptosis-like death in plants suggests that oxidative, iron-dependent cell death programs may be evolutionarily ancient. © 2017 Distéfano et al.

  11. Chronicles of a death foretold: dual sequential cell death checkpoints in TNF signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Marie Anne; Ting, Adrian T

    2010-03-15

    The kinase RIP1 wears a coat of many colors during TNF receptor signaling and can regulate both activation of pro-survival NFkB and programmed cell death pathways. In this review, we outline how coating RIP1 with K63-linked ubiquitin chains forms a protective layer that prevents RIP1 from binding apoptotic regulators and serves as an early guard against cell death. Further on, binding of NFkB signaling components to the ubiquitin coat of RIP1 activates long-term pro-survival signaling and forms a more impenetrable suit of armor against cell death. If RIP1 is not decorated with ubiquitin chains it becomes an unstoppable harbinger of bad news: programmed cell death.

  12. Biochemical events in naturally occurring forms of cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesus, L

    1993-08-09

    Several molecular elements of programmed cell death and apoptosis have recently been revealed. The function of gene products which deliver the lethal 'hit' is still not known. Well-characterized and newly discovered cell surface structures (e.g. antigen receptors, FAS/APO-1), as well as transcriptional factors (steroid receptor, c-myc, P53, retinoblastoma protein and others), have been implicated in the initiation of the death pathway. Negative regulators of the process (ced-9 gene product in programmed death of cells in Caenorhabditis elegans and bcl-2 protein in apoptosis) have been described. Biochemical mechanisms responsible for the silent nature of natural deaths of cells include their rapid engulfment (mainly through integrin receptors), transglutaminase-catalyzed cross-linking of cellular proteins, and fragmentation of DNA. Several lines of evidence suggest that distinct molecular mechanisms may operate in various forms of natural cell death.

  13. Stem cell death and survival in heart regeneration and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelwahid, Eltyeb; Kalvelyte, Audrone; Stulpinas, Aurimas; de Carvalho, Katherine Athayde Teixeira; Guarita-Souza, Luiz Cesar; Foldes, Gabor

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are major causes of mortality and morbidity. Cardiomyocyte apoptosis disrupts cardiac function and leads to cardiac decompensation and terminal heart failure. Delineating the regulatory signaling pathways that orchestrate cell survival in the heart has significant therapeutic implications. Cardiac tissue has limited capacity to regenerate and repair. Stem cell therapy is a successful approach for repairing and regenerating ischemic cardiac tissue; however, transplanted cells display very high death percentage, a problem that affects success of tissue regeneration. Stem cells display multipotency or pluripotency and undergo self-renewal, however these events are negatively influenced by upregulation of cell death machinery that induces the significant decrease in survival and differentiation signals upon cardiovascular injury. While efforts to identify cell types and molecular pathways that promote cardiac tissue regeneration have been productive, studies that focus on blocking the extensive cell death after transplantation are limited. The control of cell death includes multiple networks rather than one crucial pathway, which underlies the challenge of identifying the interaction between various cellular and biochemical components. This review is aimed at exploiting the molecular mechanisms by which stem cells resist death signals to develop into mature and healthy cardiac cells. Specifically, we focus on a number of factors that control death and survival of stem cells upon transplantation and ultimately affect cardiac regeneration. We also discuss potential survival enhancing strategies and how they could be meaningful in the design of targeted therapies that improve cardiac function.

  14. Autophagic machinery activated by dengue virus enhances virus replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.-R.; Lei, H.-Y.; Liu, M.-T.; Wang, J.-R.; Chen, S.-H.; Jiang-Shieh, Y.-F.; Lin, Y.-S.; Yeh, T.-M.; Liu, C.-C.; Liu, H.-S.

    2008-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular response against stresses which include the infection of viruses and bacteria. We unravel that Dengue virus-2 (DV2) can trigger autophagic process in various infected cell lines demonstrated by GFP-LC3 dot formation and increased LC3-II formation. Autophagosome formation was also observed under the transmission electron microscope. DV2-induced autophagy further enhances the titers of extracellular and intracellular viruses indicating that autophagy can promote viral replication in the infected cells. Moreover, our data show that ATG5 protein is required to execute DV2-induced autophagy. All together, we are the first to demonstrate that DV can activate autophagic machinery that is favorable for viral replication

  15. Changes in gene expression during programmed cell death in tomato cell suspensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeberichts, F.A.; Orzaez, D.; Plas, van der L.H.W.; Woltering, E.J.

    2001-01-01

    To identify genes involved in plant programmed cell death (PCD), changes in gene expression during PCD in a model system of suspension-cultured tomato cells were studied. In this system, cell death is triggered by treatment with camptothecin, an inhibitor of topoisomerase I. Cell death was

  16. Imaging plant cell death: GFP-Nit1 aggregation marks an early step of wound and herbicide induced cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somerville Chris R

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A great deal is known about the morphological endpoints of plant cell death, but relatively little is known about its sequence of events and / or its execution at the biochemical level. Live cell imaging using GFP-tagged markers is a powerful way to provide dynamic portraits of a cellular process that can in turn provide a descriptive foundation valuable for future biochemical and genetic investigations. Results While characterizing a collection of random GFP-protein fusion markers we discovered that mechanical wounding induces rapid aggregation of a GFP-Nitrilase 1 fusion protein in Arabidopsis cells directly abutting wound sites. Time-lapse imaging of this response shows that the aggregation occurs in cells that subsequently die 30 – 60 minutes post-wounding, indicating that GFP-Nit1 aggregation is an early marker of cell death at wound sites. Time-lapse confocal imaging was used to characterize wound-induced cell death using GFP-Nit1 and markers of the nucleus and endoplasmic reticulum. These analyses provide dynamic portraits of well-known death-associated responses such as nuclear contraction and cellular collapse and reveal novel features such as nuclear envelope separation, ER vesiculation and loss of nuclear-lumen contents. As a parallel system for imaging cell death, we developed a chemical method for rapidly triggering cell death using the herbicides bromoxynil or chloroxynil which cause rapid GFP-Nit1 aggregation, loss of nuclear contents and cellular collapse, but not nuclear contraction, separating this response from others during plant cell death. Conclusion Our observations place aggregation of Nitrilase 1 as one of the earliest events associated with wound and herbicide-induced cell death and highlight several novel cellular events that occur as plant cells die. Our data create a detailed descriptive framework for future investigations of plant cell death and provide new tools for both its cellular and

  17. Imaging plant cell death: GFP-Nit1 aggregation marks an early step of wound and herbicide induced cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, Sean R; Somerville, Chris R

    2005-01-01

    Background A great deal is known about the morphological endpoints of plant cell death, but relatively little is known about its sequence of events and / or its execution at the biochemical level. Live cell imaging using GFP-tagged markers is a powerful way to provide dynamic portraits of a cellular process that can in turn provide a descriptive foundation valuable for future biochemical and genetic investigations. Results While characterizing a collection of random GFP-protein fusion markers we discovered that mechanical wounding induces rapid aggregation of a GFP-Nitrilase 1 fusion protein in Arabidopsis cells directly abutting wound sites. Time-lapse imaging of this response shows that the aggregation occurs in cells that subsequently die 30 – 60 minutes post-wounding, indicating that GFP-Nit1 aggregation is an early marker of cell death at wound sites. Time-lapse confocal imaging was used to characterize wound-induced cell death using GFP-Nit1 and markers of the nucleus and endoplasmic reticulum. These analyses provide dynamic portraits of well-known death-associated responses such as nuclear contraction and cellular collapse and reveal novel features such as nuclear envelope separation, ER vesiculation and loss of nuclear-lumen contents. As a parallel system for imaging cell death, we developed a chemical method for rapidly triggering cell death using the herbicides bromoxynil or chloroxynil which cause rapid GFP-Nit1 aggregation, loss of nuclear contents and cellular collapse, but not nuclear contraction, separating this response from others during plant cell death. Conclusion Our observations place aggregation of Nitrilase 1 as one of the earliest events associated with wound and herbicide-induced cell death and highlight several novel cellular events that occur as plant cells die. Our data create a detailed descriptive framework for future investigations of plant cell death and provide new tools for both its cellular and biochemical analysis. PMID

  18. Mechanical Stress Promotes Cisplatin-Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riad, Sandra; Bougherara, Habiba

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin (CisPt) is a commonly used platinum-based chemotherapeutic agent. Its efficacy is limited due to drug resistance and multiple side effects, thereby warranting a new approach to improving the pharmacological effect of CisPt. A newly developed mathematical hypothesis suggested that mechanical loading, when coupled with a chemotherapeutic drug such as CisPt and immune cells, would boost tumor cell death. The current study investigated the aforementioned mathematical hypothesis by exposing human hepatocellular liver carcinoma (HepG2) cells to CisPt, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and mechanical stress individually and in combination. HepG2 cells were also treated with a mixture of CisPt and carnosine with and without mechanical stress to examine one possible mechanism employed by mechanical stress to enhance CisPt effects. Carnosine is a dipeptide that reportedly sequesters platinum-based drugs away from their pharmacological target-site. Mechanical stress was achieved using an orbital shaker that produced 300 rpm with a horizontal circular motion. Our results demonstrated that mechanical stress promoted CisPt-induced death of HepG2 cells (~35% more cell death). Moreover, results showed that CisPt-induced death was compromised when CisPt was left to mix with carnosine 24 hours preceding treatment. Mechanical stress, however, ameliorated cell death (20% more cell death). PMID:25685789

  19. Ethambutol induces impaired autophagic flux and apoptosis in the rat retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun-Ping Huang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ethambutol (EMB, an effective first-line antituberculosis agent, can cause serious visual impairment or irreversible vision loss in a significant number of patients. However, the mechanism underlying this ocular cytotoxicity remains to be elucidated. In this study, we found that there were statistically significant dose- and time-dependent increases in the number of cytoplasmic vacuoles and the level of cell death in EMB-treated RGC-5 cells (retinal ganglion cells. The protein kinase C (PKCδ inhibitor rottlerin markedly reduced the EMB-induced activation of caspase-3 and the subsequent apoptosis of RGC-5 cells. Western blot analysis revealed that the expression levels of class III PI3K, Beclin-1, p62 and LC3-II were upregulated, and LC3 immunostaining results showed activation of the early phase and inhibition of the late stage of autophagy in retinas of the EMB-intraperitoneal (IP-injected rat model. We further demonstrated that exposure to EMB induces autophagosome accumulation, which results from the impaired autophagic flux that is mediated by a PKCδ-dependent pathway, inhibits the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway and leads to apoptotic death in retina neuronal cells. These results indicate that autophagy dysregulation in retinal neuronal cells might play a substantial role in EMB-induced optic neuroretinopathy.

  20. Accelerated Tumor Cell Death by Angiogenic Modifiers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chung, Leland W. K

    2002-01-01

    ... cancer cells in vitro and xenografts tumor models in vivo While in vitro synergistic interaction was demonstrated specifically in human prostate cancer cell lines containing a functional androgen...

  1. Mitochondrial VDAC and hexokinase together modulate plant programmed cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbole, Ashwini; Dubey, Ashvini Kumar; Reddy, Palakolanu S; Udayakumar, M; Mathew, Mathew K

    2013-08-01

    The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) and mitochondrially located hexokinase have been implicated both in pathways leading to cell death on the one hand, and immortalization in tumor formation on the other. While both proteins have also been implicated in death processes in plants, their interaction has not been explored. We have examined cell death following heterologous expression of a rice VDAC in the tobacco cell line BY2 and in leaves of tobacco plants and show that it is ameliorated by co-expression of hexokinase. Hexokinase also abrogates death induced by H2O2. We conclude that the ratio of expression of the two proteins and their interaction play a major role in modulating death pathways in plants.

  2. Many ways to excit? Cell death categories in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van W.G.; Woltering, E.J.

    2005-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an integral part of plant development and defence. It occurs at all stages of the life cycle, from fertilization of the ovule to death of the whole plant. Without it, tall trees would probably not be possible and plants would more easily succumb to invading

  3. Checkpoint Inhibition: Programmed Cell Death 1 and Programmed Cell Death 1 Ligand Inhibitors in Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villasboas, Jose Caetano; Ansell, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a lymphoid malignancy characterized by a reactive immune infiltrate surrounding relatively few malignant cells. In this scenario, active immune evasion seems to play a central role in allowing tumor progression. Immune checkpoint inhibitor pathways are normal mechanisms of T-cell regulation that suppress immune effector function following an antigenic challenge. Hodgkin lymphoma cells are able to escape immune surveillance by co-opting these mechanisms. The programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) pathway in particular is exploited in HL as the malignant Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells express on their surface cognate ligands (PD-L1/L2) for the PD-1 receptor and thereby dampen the T-cell-mediated antitumoral response. Monoclonal antibodies that interact with and disrupt the PD-1:PD-L1/L2 axis have now been developed and tested in early-phase clinical trials in patients with advanced HL with encouraging results. The remarkable clinical activity of PD-1 inhibitors in HL highlights the importance of immune checkpoint pathways as therapeutic targets in HL. In this review, we discuss the rationale for targeting PD-1 and PD-L1 in the treatment of HL. We will evaluate the published clinical data on the different agents and highlight the safety profile of this class of agents. We discuss the available evidence on the use of biomarkers as predictors of response to checkpoint blockade and summarize the areas under active investigation in the use of PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors for the treatment of HL.

  4. Regulated forms of cell death are induced by the photodynamic action of the fluorogenic substrate, Hypocrellin B-acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santin, Giada; Bottone, Maria Grazia; Malatesta, Manuela; Scovassi, Anna Ivana; Bottiroli, Giovanni; Pellicciari, Carlo; Croce, Anna Cleta

    2013-08-05

    The addition of chemical groups to a photosensitizer makes it to act as a fluorogenic substrate, increasing its ability to enter the cells. In this work, the cytotoxic efficacy of Hypocrellin B modified by addition of two acetate groups (HypB-Ac) was investigated in HeLa cells. Using transmission electron microscopy, cytochemical and immunocytochemical techniques, and flow cytometry we demonstrated that light irradiation of HypB-Ac-loaded cells resulted in either necrosis or apoptosis, depending on the HypB-Ac concentration. Administration of Hyp-Ac at high concentration (1×10(-)(5) M) resulted in massive necrosis, while at low concentration (2.5×10(-)(7) M) apoptosis along with autophagy were induced. Focusing on cells still exhibiting non-apoptotic features, we provide the evidence of early involvement of different organelles in the photodamage, with the frequent presence of autophagic vacuoles already at very short post-irradiation times (30 min, when ultrastructural apoptotic features are rarely found). These findings suggest that the widespread photodamage rather than the target organelle(s) involved is crucial for inducing either a catastrophic or a regulated form of cell death. Fluorogenic substrates such as HypB-Ac have an increased capability to accumulate in cancer cells compared to the native photosensitizing molecules: this would allow to use lower drug doses in vivo, thus decreasing the risk of systemic cytotoxicity in the absence of irradiation improving the efficacy of photodynamic therapy. The ability of HypB-Ac at very low concentration to induce autophagy and apoptosis would additionally be advantageous for therapeutic application, as the preferential induction of regulated forms of cell death entails the rapid phagocytotic removal of dying cells without affecting the tissue and organ structure. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Accelerated Tumor Cell Death by Angiogenic Modifiers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chung, Leland W. K

    2001-01-01

    Because of the inherent stability of endothelial cells and the importance of this cell type for the proliferation of both localized and disseminated cancers, anti- angiogenic therapy is an attractive...

  6. Nerve Growth Factor in Cancer Cell Death and Survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molloy, Niamh H.; Read, Danielle E.; Gorman, Adrienne M.

    2011-01-01

    One of the major challenges for cancer therapeutics is the resistance of many tumor cells to induction of cell death due to pro-survival signaling in the cancer cells. Here we review the growing literature which shows that neurotrophins contribute to pro-survival signaling in many different types of cancer. In particular, nerve growth factor, the archetypal neurotrophin, has been shown to play a role in tumorigenesis over the past decade. Nerve growth factor mediates its effects through its two cognate receptors, TrkA, a receptor tyrosine kinase and p75 NTR , a member of the death receptor superfamily. Depending on the tumor origin, pro-survival signaling can be mediated by TrkA receptors or by p75 NTR . For example, in breast cancer the aberrant expression of nerve growth factor stimulates proliferative signaling through TrkA and pro-survival signaling through p75 NTR . This latter signaling through p75 NTR promotes increased resistance to the induction of cell death by chemotherapeutic treatments. In contrast, in prostate cells the p75 NTR mediates cell death and prevents metastasis. In prostate cancer, expression of this receptor is lost, which contributes to tumor progression by allowing cells to survive, proliferate and metastasize. This review focuses on our current knowledge of neurotrophin signaling in cancer, with a particular emphasis on nerve growth factor regulation of cell death and survival in cancer

  7. THE PROGRAMED CELL DEATH REGULATORS OF ISOLATED MODEL SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Vatlitsov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The technology evolution creates the prerequisites for the emergence of new informational concept and approaches to the formation of a fundamentally new principles of biological objects understanding. The aim was to study the activators of the programmed cell death in an isolated system model. Cell culture aging parameters were performed on flow cytometer. It had formed the theory that the changes in the concentrations of metal ions and increase their extracellular concentration had formed a negative gradient into the cells.regulation of cell death. It was shown that the metals ions concentrations.

  8. Expression of death receptor 4 induces caspase-independent cell death in MMS-treated yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Mi-Sun; Lee, Sung-Keun; Park, Chang-Shin; Kang, Ju-Hee; Bae, Sung-Ho; Yu, Sung-Lim

    2008-11-14

    DR4, a tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptor, is a key element in the extrinsic pathway of TRAIL/TRAIL receptor-related apoptosis that exerts a preferential toxic effect against tumor cells. However, TRAIL and DR4 are expressed in various normal cells, and recent studies indicate that DR4 has a number of non-apoptotic functions. In this study, we evaluated the effects of human DR4 expression in yeast to determine the function of DR4 in normal cells. The expression of DR4 in yeast caused G1 arrest, which resulted in transient growth inhibition. Moreover, treatment of DR4-expressing yeast with a DNA damaging agent, MMS, elicited drastic, and sustained cell growth inhibition accompanied with massive apoptotic cell death. Further analysis revealed that cell death in the presence of DNA damage and DR4 expression was not dependent on the yeast caspase, YCA1. Taken together, these results indicate that DR4 triggers caspase-independent programmed cell death during the response of normal cells to DNA damage.

  9. Pro-apoptotic and pro-autophagic effects of the Aurora kinase A inhibitor alisertib (MLN8237 on human osteosarcoma U-2 OS and MG-63 cells through the activation of mitochondria-mediated pathway and inhibition of p38 MAPK/PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niu NK

    2015-03-01

    mesenchymal transition (EMT and the underlying mechanisms in two human OS cell lines U-2 OS and MG-63. The results showed that ALS had potent growth inhibitory, pro-apoptotic, pro-autophagic, and EMT inhibitory effects on U-2 OS and MG-63 cells. ALS remarkably induced G2/M arrest and down-regulated the expression levels of cyclin-dependent kinases 1 and 2 and cyclin B1 in both U-2 OS and MG-63 cells. ALS markedly induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis with a significant increase in the expression of key pro-apoptotic proteins and a decrease in main anti-apoptotic proteins. Furthermore, ALS promoted autophagic cell death via the inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/protein kinase B (Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK signaling pathways, and activation of 5'-AMP-dependent kinase (AMPK signaling pathway. Inducers or inhibitors of apoptosis or autophagy simultaneously altered ALS-induced apoptotic and autophagic death in both U-2 OS and MG-63 cells, suggesting a crosstalk between these two primary modes of programmed cell death. Moreover, ALS suppressed EMT-like phenotypes with a marked increase in the expression of E-cadherin but a decrease in N-cadherin in U-2 OS and MG-63 cells. ALS treatment also induced reactive oxygen species (ROS generation but inhibited the expression levels of sirtuin 1 and nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 in both cell lines. Taken together, these findings show that ALS promotes apoptosis and autophagy but inhibits EMT via PI3K/Akt/mTOR, p38 MAPK, and AMPK signaling pathways with involvement of ROS- and sirtuin 1-associated pathways in U-2 OS and MG-63 cells. ALS is a promising anticancer agent in OS treatment and further studies are needed to confirm its efficacy and safety in OS chemotherapy. Keywords: ALS, autophagy, apoptosis, osteosarcoma, PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway, EMT

  10. Apoptotic-like programmed cell death in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reape, Theresa J; McCabe, Paul F

    2008-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is now accepted as a fundamental cellular process in plants. It is involved in defence, development and response to stress, and our understanding of these processes would be greatly improved through a greater knowledge of the regulation of plant PCD. However, there may be several types of PCD that operate in plants, and PCD research findings can be confusing if they are not assigned to a specific type of PCD. The various cell-death mechanisms need therefore to be carefully described and defined. This review describes one of these plant cell death processes, namely the apoptotic-like PCD (AL-PCD). We begin by examining the hallmark 'apoptotic-like' features (protoplast condensation, DNA degradation) of the cell's destruction that are characteristic of AL-PCD, and include examples of AL-PCD during the plant life cycle. The review explores the possible cellular 'executioners' (caspase-like molecules; mitochondria; de novo protein synthesis) that are responsible for the hallmark features of the cellular destruction. Finally, senescence is used as a case study to show that a rigorous definition of cell-death processes in plant cells can help to resolve arguments that occur in the scientific literature regarding the timing and control of plant cell death.

  11. Programmed Cell Death and Complexity in Microbial Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Pierre M; Sym, Stuart; Michod, Richard E

    2016-07-11

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is central to organism development and for a long time was considered a hallmark of multicellularity. Its discovery, therefore, in unicellular organisms presents compelling questions. Why did PCD evolve? What is its ecological effect on communities? To answer these questions, one is compelled to consider the impacts of PCD beyond the cell, for death obviously lowers the fitness of the cell. Here, we examine the ecological effects of PCD in different microbial scenarios and conclude that PCD can increase biological complexity. In mixed microbial communities, the mode of death affects the microenvironment, impacting the interactions between taxa. Where the population comprises groups of relatives, death has a more explicit effect. Death by lysis or other means can be harmful, while PCD can evolve by providing advantages to relatives. The synchronization of death between individuals suggests a group level property is being maintained and the mode of death also appears to have had an impact during the origin of multicellularity. PCD can result in the export of fitness from the cell to the group level via re-usable resources and PCD may also provide a mechanism for how groups beget new groups comprising kin. Furthermore, PCD is a means for solving a central problem of group living - the toxic effects of death - by making resources in dying cells beneficial to others. What emerges from the data reviewed here is that while PCD carries an obvious cost to the cell, it can be a driver of complexity in microbial communities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Ricinosomes: an organelle for developmentally regulated programmed cell death in senescing plant tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gietl, C.; Schmid, M.

    2001-02-01

    This review describes aspects of programmed cell death (PCD). Present research maps the enzymes involved and explores the signal transduction pathways involved in their synthesis. A special organelle (the ricinosome) has been discovered in the senescing endosperm of germinating castor beans (Ricinus communis) that develops at the beginning of PCD and delivers large amounts of a papain-type cysteine endopeptidase (CysEP) in the final stages of cellular disintegration. Castor beans store oil and proteins in a living endosperm surrounding the cotyledons. These stores are mobilized during germination and transferred into the cotyledons. PCD is initiated after this transfer is complete. The CysEP is synthesized in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where it is retained by its C-terminal KDEL peptide as a rather inactive pro-enzyme. Large number of ricinosomes bud from the ER at the same time as the nuclear DNA is characteristically fragmented during PCD. The mitochondria, glyoxysomes and ribosomes are degraded in autophagic vacuoles, while the endopeptidase is activated by removal of the propeptide and the KDEL tail and enters the cytosol. The endosperm dries and detaches from the cotyledons. A homologous KDEL-tailed cysteine endopeptidase has been found in several senescing tissues; it has been localized in ricinosomes of withering day-lily petals and dying seed coats. Three genes for a KDEL-tailed cysteine endopeptidase have been identified in Arabidopsis. One is expressed in senescing ovules, the second in the vascular vessels and the third in maturing siliques. These genes open the way to exploring PCD in plants.

  13. Cell death in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webb, J.S.; Thompson, L.S.; James, S.

    2003-01-01

    Bacteria growing in biofilms often develop multicellular, three-dimensional structures known as microcolonies. Complex differentiation within biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, leading to the creation of voids inside microcolonies and to the dispersal of cells from within these voids...

  14. Early cell death detection with digital holographic microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Pavillon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Digital holography provides a non-invasive measurement of the quantitative phase shifts induced by cells in culture, which can be related to cell volume changes. It has been shown previously that regulation of cell volume, in particular as it relates to ionic homeostasis, is crucially involved in the activation/inactivation of the cell death processes. We thus present here an application of digital holographic microscopy (DHM dedicated to early and label-free detection of cell death. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We provide quantitative measurements of phase signal obtained on mouse cortical neurons, and caused by early neuronal cell volume regulation triggered by excitotoxic concentrations of L-glutamate. We show that the efficiency of this early regulation of cell volume detected by DHM, is correlated with the occurrence of subsequent neuronal death assessed with the widely accepted trypan blue method for detection of cell viability. CONCLUSIONS: The determination of the phase signal by DHM provides a simple and rapid optical method for the early detection of cell death.

  15. Programmed cell death - strategy for maintenance cellular organisms homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godlewski, Mirosław; Kobylińska, Agnieszka

    2016-12-20

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a cellular suicide process, commonly found in organisms, that is important for elimination unnecessary and damaged cells during development and adaptation to abiotic and biotic environmental stresses. PCD is a complex and precise, genetically controlled cellular process, in opposite to non-programmed death, necrosis, in which cells are "killed" by strong abiotic factors. This article shows: the occurrence of PCD during animals and plants ontogenesis, classification of cell death types in these organisms with description of autophagy, apoptosis and necrotic cell death and with discussion on plant cell death by apoptosis. The role of Bcl-2 protein and other proteins involved in the regulation of apoptosis induction and detection in the plant's (whose genomes do not encode these proteins) proteins of analogous function is also discussed. The paper also presents the effects of the expression of animals pro- and anti-apoptotic genes transformed into yeast and plants, and the use of transformed yeast as model to identify in cDNA libraries animal and plant genes involved in regulation of the induction and course of the PCD.

  16. The Apoptosome: Heart and Soul of the Cell Death Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arul M. Chinnaiyan

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is a fundamental biologic process by which metazoan cells orchestrate their own self-demise. Genetic analyses of the nematode C elegans identified three core components of the suicide apparatus which include CED-3, CED-4, and CED-9. An analogous set of core constituents exists in mammalian cells and includes caspase-9, Apaf-1, and bcl-2/xL, respectively. CED-3 and CED-4, along with their mammalian counterparts, function to kill cells, whereas CED-9 and its mammalian equivalents protect cells from death. These central components biochemically intermingle in a ternary complex recently dubbed the “apoptosome.” The C elegans protein EGL-1 and its mammalian counterparts, pro-apoptotic members of the bcl-2 family, induce cell death by disrupting apoptosome interactions. Thus, EGL-1 may represent a primordial signal integrator for the apoptosome. Various biochemical processes including oligomerization, adenosine triphosphate ATP/dATP binding, and cytochrome c interaction play a role in regulating the ternary death complex. Recent studies suggest that cell death receptors, such as CD95, may amplify their suicide signal by activating the apoptosome. These mutual associations by core components of the suicide apparatus provide a molecular framework in which diverse death signals likely interface. Understanding the apoptosome and its cellular connections will facilitate the design of novel therapeutic strategies for cancer and other disease states in which apoptosis plays a pivotal role.

  17. Programmed cell death – strategy for maintenance cellular organisms homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirosław Godlewski

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death (PCD is a cellular suicide process, commonly found in organisms, that is important for elimination unnecessary and damaged cells during development and adaptation to abiotic and biotic environmental stresses. PCD is a complex and precise, genetically controlled cellular process, in opposite to non-programmed death, necrosis, in which cells are “killed” by strong abiotic factors. This article shows: the occurrence of PCD during animals and plants ontogenesis, classification of cell death types in these organisms with description of autophagy, apoptosis and necrotic cell death and with discussion on plant cell death by apoptosis. The role of Bcl-2 protein and other proteins involved in the regulation of apoptosis induction and detection in the plant’s (whose genomes do not encode these proteins proteins of analogous function is also discussed. The paper also presents the effects of the expression of animals pro- and anti-apoptotic genes transformed into yeast and plants, and the use of transformed yeast as model to identify in cDNA libraries animal and plant genes involved in regulation of the induction and course of the PCD.

  18. Omega-3 docosahexaenoic acid induces pyroptosis cell death in triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizato, Nathalia; Luzete, Beatriz Christina; Kiffer, Larissa Fernanda Melo Vasconcelos; Corrêa, Luís Henrique; de Oliveira Santos, Igor; Assumpção, José Antônio Fagundes; Ito, Marina Kiyomi; Magalhães, Kelly Grace

    2018-01-31

    The implication of inflammation in pathophysiology of several type of cancers has been under intense investigation. Omega-3 fatty acids can modulate inflammation and present anticancer effects, promoting cancer cell death. Pyroptosis is an inflammation related cell death and so far, the function of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in pyroptosis cell death has not been described. This study investigated the role of DHA in triggering pyroptosis activation in breast cancer cells. MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells were supplemented with DHA and inflammation cell death was analyzed. DHA-treated breast cancer cells triggered increased caspase-1and gasdermin D activation, enhanced IL-1β secretion, translocated HMGB1 towards the cytoplasm, and membrane pore formation when compared to untreated cells, suggesting DHA induces pyroptosis programmed cell death in breast cancer cells. Moreover, caspase-1 inhibitor (YVAD) could protect breast cancer cells from DHA-induced pyroptotic cell death. In addition, membrane pore formation showed to be a lysosomal damage and ROS formation-depended event in breast cancer cells. DHA triggered pyroptosis cell death in MDA-MB-231by activating several pyroptosis markers in these cells. This is the first study that shows the effect of DHA triggering pyroptosis programmed cell death in breast cancer cells and it could improve the understanding of the omega-3 supplementation during breast cancer treatment.

  19. Characterization of Autophagic Responses in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, T; Kumar, S; Denton, D

    2017-01-01

    Drosophila is an excellent model system for studying autophagy during animal development due to the availability of genetic reagents and opportunity for in vivo cell biological analysis. The regulation and mechanism of autophagy are highly evolutionarily conserved and the role of autophagy has been characterized during various stages of Drosophila development as well as following starvation. Studies in Drosophila have revealed novel insights into the role of distinct components of the autophagy machinery. This chapter describes protocols for examining autophagy during Drosophila development. A crucial step in the induction of autophagy is the incorporation of Atg8a into the autophagosome. This can be measured as autophagic puncta using live fluorescent imaging, immunostaining, or immunoblot analysis of LC3/Atg8a processing. The level of autophagy can also be examined using other specific components of the autophagy pathway as markers detected by immunofluorescent imaging. Based on the distinct morphology of autophagy, it can also be examined by transmission electron microscopy. In addition, one of the advantages of using Drosophila as a model is the ability to undertake genetic analysis of individual components of the autophagy machinery. Current approaches that can be used to monitor autophagy, including the overall flux and individual steps in Drosophila melanogaster, will be discussed. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. BID links ferroptosis to mitochondrial cell death pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Neitemeier

    2017-08-01

    In the present study, we find that erastin-induced ferroptosis in neuronal cells was accompanied by BID transactivation to mitochondria, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, enhanced mitochondrial fragmentation and reduced ATP levels. These hallmarks of mitochondrial demise are also established features of oxytosis, a paradigm of cell death induced by Xc- inhibition by millimolar concentrations of glutamate. Bid knockout using CRISPR/Cas9 approaches preserved mitochondrial integrity and function, and mediated neuroprotective effects against both, ferroptosis and oxytosis. Furthermore, the BID-inhibitor BI-6c9 inhibited erastin-induced ferroptosis, and, in turn, the ferroptosis inhibitors ferrostatin-1 and liproxstatin-1 prevented mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in the paradigm of oxytosis. These findings show that mitochondrial transactivation of BID links ferroptosis to mitochondrial damage as the final execution step in this paradigm of oxidative cell death.

  1. Pannexin1 as mediator of inflammation and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo Yanguas, Sara; Willebrords, Joost; Johnstone, Scott R; Maes, Michaël; Decrock, Elke; De Bock, Marijke; Leybaert, Luc; Cogliati, Bruno; Vinken, Mathieu

    2017-01-01

    Pannexins form channels at the plasma membrane surface that establish a pathway for communication between the cytosol of individual cells and their extracellular environment. By doing so, pannexin signaling dictates several physiological functions, but equally underlies a number of pathological processes. Indeed, pannexin channels drive inflammation by assisting in the activation of inflammasomes, the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and the activation and migration of leukocytes. Furthermore, these cellular pores facilitate cell death, including apoptosis, pyroptosis and autophagy. The present paper reviews the roles of pannexin channels in inflammation and cell death. In a first part, a state-of-the-art overview of pannexin channel structure, regulation and function is provided. In a second part, the mechanisms behind their involvement in inflammation and cell death are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Cell death induced by ionizing radiations in human radio-resistant tumours: in-vitro and in-vivo study of mechanisms involved in its induction by different types of radiations and pharmacological modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altmeyer, Anais

    2010-01-01

    Whereas chemo-radiotherapy protocols revealed to be very efficient when taking tumours into care, the treatment of some tumours remains very limited due to their critical location or to the weak radio-sensitivity to conventional radiations. One way to work around this problem is to use high linear energy transfer radiations or hadron therapy, in combination with radio-sensitizers. This research thesis reports the assessment of radio-sensitizer effects of different molecules on human radio-resistant cell lines and more particularly the SK-Hep1 line from a hepatocellular carcinoma. In vitro studies have been performed and then in vivo studies by using fast neutron irradiation on a mice liver sample. Observations made by optic fibre confocal microscopy and transmission electronic microscopy confirmed in vitro observations: the prevailing cell death after such an irradiation is the autophagic cell death. It shows the importance of the autophagic phenomenon induced by radiations with high linear transfer energy. This could lead to new therapeutic protocols for radio-resistant cancers [fr

  3. Hypothesis: patient with possible disturbance in programmed cell death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennekam, R. C.; Cohen, M. M.

    1995-01-01

    Programmed cell death is a physiological process in mammalian development by which specific types of cells are eliminated, and, hence, is of fundamental importance in normal human embryogenesis. A patient is described with multiple congenital anomalies that may be explained by a disturbance of

  4. Cell death by mitotic catastrophe: a molecular definition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castedo, M.; Perfettini, J.-L.; Roumier, T.; Andreau, K.; Medema, R.H.; Kroemer, G.

    2004-01-01

    The current literature is devoid of a clearcut definition of mitotic catastrophe, a type of cell death that occurs during mitosis. Here, we propose that mitotic catastrophe results from a combination of deficient cell-cycle checkpoints (in particular the DNA structure checkpoints and the spindle

  5. Palladium induced oxidative stress and cell death in normal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pretreatment of hepatocytes with ROS scavengers and MPT pore sealing agents reduced cell death which explains the role of oxidative stress and mitochondrial pathway of ROS formation in Pd hepatocytes cell toxicity. Overall, the results have distinctly determined the mechanism by which Pd-induced toxicity in the ...

  6. Mechanisms of developmentally controlled cell death in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Durme, Matthias; Nowack, Moritz K

    2016-02-01

    During plant development various forms of programmed cell death (PCD) are implemented by a number of cell types as inherent part of their differentiation programmes. Differentiation-induced developmental PCD is gradually prepared in concert with the other cell differentiation processes. As precocious or delayed PCD can have detrimental consequences for plant development, the actual execution of PCD has to be tightly controlled. Once triggered, PCD is irrevocably and rapidly executed accompanied by the breakdown of cellular compartments. In most developmental PCD forms, cell death is followed by cell corpse clearance. Devoid of phagocytic mechanisms, dying plant cells have to prepare their own demise in a cell-autonomous fashion before their deaths, ensuring the completion of cell clearance post mortem. Depending on the cell type, cell clearance can be complete or rather selective, and persistent corpses of particular cells accomplish vital functions in the plant body. The present review attempts to give an update on the molecular mechanisms that coordinate differentiation-induced PCD as vital part of plant development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Signal transduction events in aluminum-induced cell death in tomato suspension cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakimova, E.T.; Kapchina-Toteva, V.M.; Woltering, E.J.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, some of the signal transduction events involved in AlCl3-induced cell death in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) suspension cells were elucidated. Cells treated with 100 ¿M AlCl3 showed typical features of programmed cell death (PCD) such as nuclear and cytoplasmic condensation.

  8. The apolipoprotein L family of programmed cell death and immunity genes rapidly evolved in primates at discrete sites of host-pathogen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Eric E; Malik, Harmit S

    2009-05-01

    Apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1) is a human protein that confers immunity to Trypanosoma brucei infections but can be countered by a trypanosome-encoded antagonist SRA. APOL1 belongs to a family of programmed cell death genes whose proteins can initiate host apoptosis or autophagic death. We report here that all six members of the APOL gene family (APOL1-6) present in humans have rapidly evolved in simian primates. APOL6, furthermore, shows evidence of an adaptive sweep during recent human evolution. In each APOL gene tested, we found rapidly evolving codons in or adjacent to the SRA-interacting protein domain (SID), which is the domain of APOL1 that interacts with SRA. In APOL6, we also found a rapidly changing 13-amino-acid cluster in the membrane-addressing domain (MAD), which putatively functions as a pH sensor and regulator of cell death. We predict that APOL genes are antagonized by pathogens by at least two distinct mechanisms: SID antagonists, which include SRA, that interact with the SID of various APOL proteins, and MAD antagonists that interact with the MAD hinge base of APOL6. These antagonists either block or prematurely cause APOL-mediated programmed cell death of host cells to benefit the infecting pathogen. These putative interactions must occur inside host cells, in contrast to secreted APOL1 that trafficks to the trypanosome lysosome. Hence, the dynamic APOL gene family appears to be an important link between programmed cell death of host cells and immunity to pathogens.

  9. Alpha-Tocopheryl Succinate Inhibits Autophagic Survival of Prostate Cancer Cells Induced by Vitamin K3 and Ascorbate to Trigger Cell Death

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomasetti, M.; Nocchi, L.; Neužil, Jiří; Goodwin, J.; Nguyen, M.; Dong, L.; Manzella, N.; Staffolani, S.; Milanese, C.; Garrone, B.; Alleva, R.; Borghi, B.; Santarelli, L.; Guerrieri, R.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 12 (2012), e52263 E-ISSN 1932-6203 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : Vitamin E analogue * Mitochondrial targeting * Induced apoptosis Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 3.730, year: 2012

  10. Erythropoietin attenuates motor neuron programmed cell death in a burn animal model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Hua Wu

    Full Text Available Burn-induced neuromuscular dysfunction may contribute to long-term morbidity; therefore, it is imperative to develop novel treatments. The present study investigated whether erythropoietin (EPO administration attenuates burn-induced motor neuron apoptosis and neuroinflammatory response. To validate our hypothesis, a third-degree hind paw burn rat model was developed by bringing the paw into contact with a metal surface at 75°C for 10 s. A total of 24 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to four groups: Group A, sham-control; Group B, burn-induced; Group C, burn + single EPO dose (5000 IU/kg i.p. at D0; and Group D, burn + daily EPO dosage (3000 IU/kg/day i.p. at D0-D6. Two treatment regimens were used to evaluate single versus multiple doses treatment effects. Before sacrifice, blood samples were collected for hematological parameter examination. The histological analyses of microglia activation, iNOS, and COX-2 in the spinal cord ventral horn were performed at week 1 post-burn. In addition, we examined autophagy changes by biomarkers of LC3B and ATG5. The expression of BCL-2, BAX, cleaved caspase-3, phospho-AKT, and mTOR was assessed simultaneously through Western blotting. EPO administration after burn injury attenuated neuroinflammation through various mechanisms, including the reduction of microglia activity as well as iNOS and COX-2 expression in the spinal cord ventral horn. In addition, the expression of phospho-AKT, mTOR and apoptotic indicators, such as BAX, BCL-2, and cleaved caspase-3, was modulated. Furthermore, the activity of burn-induced autophagy in the spinal cord ventral horn characterized by the expression of autophagic biomarkers, LC3B and ATG5, was reduced after EPO administration. The present results indicate that EPO inhibits the AKT-mTOR pathway to attenuate burn-induced motor neuron programmed cell death and microglia activation. EPO can modulate neuroinflammation and programmed cell death and may be a

  11. Plant programmed cell death from a chromatin point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latrasse, D; Benhamed, M; Bergounioux, C; Raynaud, C; Delarue, M

    2016-10-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a ubiquitous genetically regulated process consisting of the activation of finely controlled signalling pathways that lead to cellular suicide. PCD can be part of a developmental programme (dPCD) or be triggered by environmental conditions (ePCD). In plant cells, as in animal cells, extensive chromatin condensation and degradation of the nuclear DNA are among the most conspicuous features of cells undergoing PCD. Changes in chromatin condensation could either reflect the structural changes required for internucleosomal fragmentation of nuclear DNA or relate to large-scale chromatin rearrangements associated with a major transcriptional switch occurring during cell death. The aim of this review is to give an update on plant PCD processes from a chromatin point of view. The first part will be dedicated to chromatin conformational changes associated with cell death observed in various developmental and physiological conditions, whereas the second part will be devoted to histone dynamics and DNA modifications associated with critical changes in genome expression during the cell death process. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Non-apoptotic cell death associated with perturbations of macropinocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltese, William A; Overmeyer, Jean H

    2015-01-01

    Although macropinocytosis is widely recognized as a distinct form of fluid-phase endocytosis in antigen-presenting dendritic cells, it also occurs constitutively in many other normal and transformed cell types. Recent studies have established that various genetic or pharmacological manipulations can hyperstimulate macropinocytosis or disrupt normal macropinosome trafficking pathways, leading to accumulation of greatly enlarged cytoplasmic vacuoles. In some cases, this extreme vacuolization is associated with a unique form of non-apoptotic cell death termed "methuosis," from the Greek methuo (to drink to intoxication). It remains unclear whether cell death related to dysfunctional macropinocytosis occurs in normal physiological contexts. However, the finding that some types of cancer cells are particularly vulnerable to this unusual form of cell death has raised the possibility that small molecules capable of altering macropinosome trafficking or function might be useful as therapeutic agents against cancers that are resistant to drugs that work by inducing apoptosis. Herein we review examples of cell death associated with dysfunctional macropinocytosis and summarize what is known about the underlying mechanisms.

  13. Non-apoptotic cell death associated with perturbations of macropinocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A. Maltese

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Although macropinocytosis is widely recognized as a distinct form of fluid-phase endocytosis in antigen-presenting dendritic cells, it also occurs constitutively in many other normal and transformed cell types. Recent studies have established that various genetic or pharmacological manipulations can hyperstimulate macropinocytosis or disrupt normal macropinosome trafficking pathways, leading to accumulation of greatly enlarged cytoplasmic vacuoles. In some cases, this extreme vacuolization is associated with a unique form of non-apoptotic cell death termed ‘methuosis’, from the Greek methuo (to drink to intoxication. It remains unclear whether cell death related to dysfunctional macropinocytosis occurs in normal physiological contexts. However, the finding that some types of cancer cells are particularly vulnerable to this unusual form of cell death has raised the possibility that small molecules capable of altering macropinosome trafficking or function might be useful as therapeutic agents against cancers that are resistant to drugs that work by inducing apoptosis. Herein we review examples of cell death associated with dysfunctional macropinocytosis and summarize what is known about the underlying mechanisms.

  14. How does metabolism affect cell death in cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Elodie; Ricci, Jean-Ehrland

    2016-07-01

    In cancer research, identifying a specificity of tumor cells compared with 'normal' proliferating cells for targeted therapy is often considered the Holy Grail for researchers and clinicians. Although diverse in origin, most cancer cells share characteristics including the ability to escape cell death mechanisms and the utilization of different methods of energy production. In the current paradigm, aerobic glycolysis is considered the central metabolic characteristic of cancer cells (Warburg effect). However, recent data indicate that cancer cells also show significant changes in other metabolic pathways. Indeed, it was recently suggested that Kreb's cycle, pentose phosphate pathway intermediates, and essential and nonessential amino acids have key roles. Renewed interest in the fact that cancer cells have to reprogram their metabolism in order to proliferate or resist treatment must take into consideration the ability of tumor cells to adapt their metabolism to the local microenvironment (low oxygen, low nutrients). This variety of metabolic sources might be either a strength, resulting in infinite possibilities for adaptation and increased ability to resist chemotherapy-induced death, or a weakness that could be targeted to kill cancer cells. Here, we discuss recent insights showing how energetic metabolism may regulate cell death and how this might be relevant for cancer treatment. © 2015 FEBS.

  15. Fas Protects Breast Cancer Stem Cells from Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    sensor detected changes at endogenous expression levels, and that CD44high/CD24low CSCs from breast cancer MCF-7 and T47D cells could be enriched by...1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0301 TITLE: Fas Protects Breast Cancer Stem Cells from Death PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Paolo...investigations on Fas (also called CD95) signaling in breast cancer and in breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) led me to identify a novel life- protective

  16. Oxidative Stress and Programmed Cell Death in Yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrugia, Gianluca; Balzan, Rena

    2012-01-01

    Yeasts, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, have long served as useful models for the study of oxidative stress, an event associated with cell death and severe human pathologies. This review will discuss oxidative stress in yeast, in terms of sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS), their molecular targets, and the metabolic responses elicited by cellular ROS accumulation. Responses of yeast to accumulated ROS include upregulation of antioxidants mediated by complex transcriptional changes, activation of pro-survival pathways such as mitophagy, and programmed cell death (PCD) which, apart from apoptosis, includes pathways such as autophagy and necrosis, a form of cell death long considered accidental and uncoordinated. The role of ROS in yeast aging will also be discussed.

  17. Sensory hair cell death and regeneration in fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry D. Monroe

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sensory hair cells are specialized mechanotransductive receptors required for hearing and vestibular function. Loss of hair cells in humans and other mammals is permanent and causes reduced hearing and balance. In the early 1980’s, it was shown that hair cells continue to be added to the inner ear sensory epithelia in cartilaginous and bony fishes. Soon thereafter, hair cell regeneration was documented in the chick cochlea following acoustic trauma. Since then, research using chick and other avian models has led to great insights into hair cell death and regeneration. However, with the rise of the zebrafish as a model organism for studying disease and developmental processes, there has been an increased interest in studying sensory hair cell death and regeneration in its lateral line and inner ears. Advances derived from studies in zebrafish and other fish species include understanding the effect of ototoxins on hair cells and finding otoprotectants to mitigate ototoxin damage, the role of cellular proliferation versus direct transdifferentiation during hair cell regeneration, and elucidating cellular pathways involved in the regeneration process. This review will summarize research on hair cell death and regeneration using fish models, indicate the potential strengths and weaknesses of these models, and discuss several emerging areas of future studies.

  18. Herceptin conjugates linked by EDC boost direct tumor cell death via programmed tumor cell necrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiemiao Hu

    Full Text Available Tumor-targeted antibody therapy is one of the safest biological therapeutics for cancer patients, but it is often ineffective at inducing direct tumor cell death and is ineffective against resistant tumor cells. Currently, the antitumor efficacy of antibody therapy is primarily achieved by inducing indirect tumor cell death, such as antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity. Our study reveals that Herceptin conjugates, if generated via the crosslinker EDC (1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl carbodiimide hydrochloride, are capable of engendering human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2 positive tumor cells death. Using a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC system, three peaks with estimated molecular weights of antibody monomer, dimer, and trimer were isolated. Both Herceptin trimer and dimer separated by HPLC induced significant levels of necrotic tumor cell death, although the trimer was more effective than the dimer. Notably, the Herceptin trimer also induced Herceptin-resistant tumor cell death. Surprisingly different from the known cell death mechanism that often results from antibody treatment, the Herceptin trimer elicited effective and direct tumor cell death via a novel mechanism: programmed cell necrosis. In Her2-positive cells, inhibition of necrosis pathways significantly reversed Herceptin trimer-induced cell death. In summary, the Herceptin trimer reported herein harbors great potential for overcoming tumor cell resistance to Herceptin treatment.

  19. Death of effector memory T cells characterizes AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mireille, Laforge; Anna, Senik; Marie-Christine, Cumont; Valerie, Monceaux; Bruno, Hurtrel; Jerome, Estaquier

    2009-01-01

    The adaptive effector CD4+ T helper-mediated immune response is highly heterogeneous, based on the development of distinct subsets that are characterized by the expression of different profiles of cell surface markers. Functional impairment of T cells is characteristic of many chronic mouse and human viral infections. Excessive induction of apoptosis in infected and uninfected CD4+ T cells has been proposed as one of the pathogenic mechanisms that may impair the immune response and cause the development of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Thus, the death of effector/memory CD4+ T cells during both the acute and chronic phase represents one the main characteristic of such viral infection that predicts disease outcome. Improving our understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to the death of memory CD4+ T cells should enable us to improve vaccination protocols and treatments, by combining them with antiretroviral drugs and molecules designed to decrease apoptotic phenomena.

  20. Aggressive human neuroblastomas show a massive increase in the numbers of autophagic vacuoles and damaged mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samardzija, Gordana; Stevovic, Tamara Kravic; Djuricic, Slavisa; Djokic, Dragomir; Djurisic, Marina; Ciric, Darko; Martinovic, Tamara; Bumbasirevic, Vladimir; Vujic, Dragana

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is activated in cancer cells in response to multiple stresses and has been demonstrated to promote tumor cell survival and drug resistance in neuroblastoma (NB). This study was conducted to analyze the ultrastructural features of peripheral neuroblastic tumors (pNTs) and identify the relation of the types of NTs, the proliferation rate, and MYCN gene amplification with a number of autophagic vacuoles. Our results indicate that aggressive human NBs show a massive increase in the number of autophagic vacuoles associated with proliferation rate and that alteration of the mitochondria might be an important factor for the induction of autophagy in NTs.

  1. ATG7 deficiency suppresses apoptosis and cell death induced by lysosomal photodamage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, David H.; Price, Michael; Reiners, Jr., John J.

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves photosensitizing agents that, in the presence of oxygen and light, initiate formation of cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS). PDT commonly induces both apoptosis and autophagy. Previous studies with murine hepatoma 1c1c7 cells indicated that loss of autophagy-related protein 7 (ATG7) inhibited autophagy and enhanced the cytotoxicity of photosensitizers that mediate photodamage to mitochondria or the endoplasmic reticulum. In this study, we examined two photosensitizing agents that target lysosomes: the chlorin NPe6 and the palladium bacteriopheophorbide WST11. Irradiation of wild-type 1c1c7 cultures loaded with either photosensitizer induced apoptosis and autophagy, with a blockage of autophagic flux. An ATG7- or ATG5-deficiency suppressed the induction of autophagy in PDT protocols using either photosensitizer. Whereas ATG5-deficient cells were quantitatively similar to wild-type cultures in their response to NPe6 and WST11 PDT, an ATG7-deficiency suppressed the apoptotic response (as monitored by analyses of chromatin condensation and procaspase-3/7 activation) and increased the LD50 light dose by > 5-fold (as monitored by colony-forming assays). An ATG7-deficiency did not prevent immediate lysosomal photodamage, as indicated by loss of the lysosomal pH gradient. However, unlike wild-type and ATG5-deficient cells, the lysosomes of ATG7-deficient cells recovered this gradient within 4 h of irradiation, and never underwent permeabilization (monitored as release of endocytosed 10-kDa dextran polymers). We propose that the efficacy of lysosomal photosensitizers is in part due to both promotion of autophagic stress and suppression of autophagic prosurvival functions. In addition, an effect of ATG7 unrelated to autophagy appears to modulate lysosomal photodamage. PMID:22889762

  2. Delayed cell death signaling in traumatized central nervous system: hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Danielle; Qiu, JingXin; Grafe, Marjorie; Fabian, Roderick; Kent, Thomas A; Rassin, David; Nesic, Olivera; Werrbach-Perez, Karin; Perez-Polo, Regino

    2002-02-01

    There are two different ways for cells to die: necrosis and apoptosis. Cell death has traditionally been described as necrotic or apoptotic based on morphological criteria. There are controversy about the respective roles of apoptosis and necrosis in cell death resulting from trauma to the central nervous system (CNS). An evaluation of work published since 1997 in which electron microscopy was applied to ascertain the role of apoptosis and necrosis in: spinal cord injury, stroke, and hypoxia/ischemia (H/I) showed evidence for necrosis and apoptosis based on DNA degradation, presence of histones in cytoplasm, and morphological evidence in spinal cord. In the aftermath of stroke, many of the biochemical markers for apoptosis were present but the morphological determinations suggested that necrosis is the major source of post-traumatic cell death. This was not the case in H/I where both biochemical assays and the morphological studies gave more consistent results in a manner similar to the spinal cord injury studies. After H/I, major factors affecting cell death outcomes are DNA damage and repair processes, expression of bcl-like gene products and inflammation-triggered cytokine production.

  3. Lipid raft involvement in yeast cell growth and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faustino eMollinedo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The notion that cellular membranes contain distinct microdomains, acting as scaffolds for signal transduction processes, has gained considerable momentum. In particular, a class of such domains that is rich in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed as lipid rafts, is thought to compartmentalize the plasma membrane, and to have important roles in survival and cell death signaling in mammalian cells. Likewise, yeast lipid rafts are membrane domains enriched in sphingolipids and ergosterol, the yeast counterpart of mammalian cholesterol. Sterol-rich membrane domains have been identified in several fungal species, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the pathogens Candida albicans and Crytococcus neoformans. Yeast rafts have been mainly involved in membrane trafficking, but increasing evidence implicates rafts in a wide range of additional cellular processes. Yeast lipid rafts house biologically important proteins involved in the proper function of yeast, such as proteins that control Na+, K+ and pH homeostasis, which influence many cellular processes, including cell growth and death. Membrane raft constituents affect drug susceptibility, and drugs interacting with sterols alter raft composition and membrane integrity, leading to yeast cell death. Because of the genetic tractability of yeast, analysis of yeast rafts could be an excellent model to approach unanswered questions of mammalian raft biology, and to understand the role of lipid rafts in the regulation of cell death and survival in human cells. A better insight in raft biology might lead to envisage new raft-mediated approaches to the treatment of human diseases where regulation of cell death and survival is critical, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Lipid raft involvement in yeast cell growth and death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mollinedo, Faustino

    2012-01-01

    The notion that cellular membranes contain distinct microdomains, acting as scaffolds for signal transduction processes, has gained considerable momentum. In particular, a class of such domains that is rich in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed as lipid rafts, is thought to compartmentalize the plasma membrane, and to have important roles in survival and cell death signaling in mammalian cells. Likewise, yeast lipid rafts are membrane domains enriched in sphingolipids and ergosterol, the yeast counterpart of mammalian cholesterol. Sterol-rich membrane domains have been identified in several fungal species, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the pathogens Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Yeast rafts have been mainly involved in membrane trafficking, but increasing evidence implicates rafts in a wide range of additional cellular processes. Yeast lipid rafts house biologically important proteins involved in the proper function of yeast, such as proteins that control Na + , K + , and pH homeostasis, which influence many cellular processes, including cell growth and death. Membrane raft constituents affect drug susceptibility, and drugs interacting with sterols alter raft composition and membrane integrity, leading to yeast cell death. Because of the genetic tractability of yeast, analysis of yeast rafts could be an excellent model to approach unanswered questions of mammalian raft biology, and to understand the role of lipid rafts in the regulation of cell death and survival in human cells. A better insight in raft biology might lead to envisage new raft-mediated approaches to the treatment of human diseases where regulation of cell death and survival is critical, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. Coordinate reduction in cell proliferation and cell death in mouse olfactory epithelium from birth to maturity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fung, KM; Peringa, J; Venkatachalam, S; Lee, VMY; Trojanowski, JQ

    1997-01-01

    We investigated cell proliferation and cell death in the olfactory epithelium (OE) of mice from birth to maturity using bromodeoxyuridine and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase nick end labeling. We show that cell death events and proliferative activity diminish concomitantly with age in the OE.

  6. Induction of cell death by chemotherapeutic methylating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quiros Barrantes, Steve

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism of cell death induced by O 6 MeG has been investigated and inhibition of homologous recombination as a strategy for sensitization of tumor cells against methylating agents S N 1. Dependence of the cell cycle was determined toxic responses triggered by O''6 MeG and evaluated by proliferation assays if apoptotic cells have originated exclusively from the second post-treatment cycle. Dependence of O''6 MeG was found at DSB formation. The activation of the control points of the cell cycle and induction of apoptosis is generated during the second cell cycle. Additionally, a portion of the cells has been determined that triggers apoptosis in subsequent generations in the second cell cycle. Inhibition of homologous recombination has been a reasonable strategy to increase S N 1 alkylating agent effectiveness. Evidence has been provided in NHEJ dependent inhibition of DNA-PK that not significantly sensitizes the glioblastoma cells against temozolomide [es

  7. Retinal Cell Death Caused by Sodium Iodate Involves Multiple Caspase-Dependent and Caspase-Independent Cell-Death Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin Balmer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we have investigated retinal cell-death pathways in response to the retina toxin sodium iodate (NaIO3 both in vivo and in vitro. C57/BL6 mice were treated with a single intravenous injection of NaIO3 (35 mg/kg. Morphological changes in the retina post NaIO3 injection in comparison to untreated controls were assessed using electron microscopy. Cell death was determined by TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL staining. The activation of caspases and calpain was measured using immunohistochemistry. Additionally, cytotoxicity and apoptosis in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells, primary retinal cells, and the cone photoreceptor (PRC cell line 661W were assessed in vitro after NaIO3 treatment using the ApoToxGlo™ assay. The 7-AAD/Annexin-V staining was performed and necrostatin (Nec-1 was administered to the NaIO3-treated cells to confirm the results. In vivo, degenerating RPE cells displayed a rounded shape and retracted microvilli, whereas PRCs featured apoptotic nuclei. Caspase and calpain activity was significantly upregulated in retinal sections and protein samples from NaIO3-treated animals. In vitro, NaIO3 induced necrosis in RPE cells and apoptosis in PRCs. Furthermore, Nec-1 significantly decreased NaIO3-induced RPE cell death, but had no rescue effect on treated PRCs. In summary, several different cell-death pathways are activated in retinal cells as a result of NaIO3.

  8. Overexpression of alpha-synuclein at non-toxic levels increases dopaminergic cell death induced by copper exposure via modulation of protein degradation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandhan, Annadurai; Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Bohovych, Iryna; Griggs, Amy M; Zavala-Flores, Laura; Reyes-Reyes, Elsa M; Seravalli, Javier; Stanciu, Lia A; Lee, Jaekwon; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Franco, Rodrigo

    2015-09-01

    Gene multiplications or point mutations in alpha (α)-synuclein are associated with familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). An increase in copper (Cu) levels has been reported in the cerebrospinal fluid and blood of PD patients, while occupational exposure to Cu has been suggested to augment the risk to develop PD. We aimed to elucidate the mechanisms by which α-synuclein and Cu regulate dopaminergic cell death. Short-term overexpression of wild type (WT) or mutant A53T α-synuclein had no toxic effect in human dopaminergic cells and primary midbrain cultures, but it exerted a synergistic effect on Cu-induced cell death. Cell death induced by Cu was potentiated by overexpression of the Cu transporter protein 1 (Ctr1) and depletion of intracellular glutathione (GSH) indicating that the toxic effects of Cu are linked to alterations in its intracellular homeostasis. Using the redox sensor roGFP, we demonstrated that Cu-induced oxidative stress was primarily localized in the cytosol and not in the mitochondria. However, α-synuclein overexpression had no effect on Cu-induced oxidative stress. WT or A53T α-synuclein overexpression exacerbated Cu toxicity in dopaminergic and yeast cells in the absence of α-synuclein aggregation. Cu increased autophagic flux and protein ubiquitination. Impairment of autophagy by overexpression of a dominant negative Atg5 form or inhibition of the ubiquitin/proteasome system (UPS) with MG132 enhanced Cu-induced cell death. However, only inhibition of the UPS stimulated the synergistic toxic effects of Cu and α-synuclein overexpression. Our results demonstrate that α-synuclein stimulates Cu toxicity in dopaminergic cells independent from its aggregation via modulation of protein degradation pathways. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Hydrogen Peroxide-induced Cell Death in Arabidopsis : Transcriptional and Mutant Analysis Reveals a Role of an Oxoglutarate-dependent Dioxygenase Gene in the Cell Death Process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gechev, Tsanko S.; Minkov, Ivan N.; Hille, Jacques

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is a major regulator of plant programmed cell death (PCD) but little is known about the downstream genes from the H2O2-signaling network that mediate the cell death. To address this question, a novel system for studying H2O2-induced programmed cell death in Arabidopsis thaliana was

  10. Combinatorial strategies for the induction of immunogenic cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo eGalluzzi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The term immunogenic cell death (ICD is commonly employed to indicate a peculiar instance of regulated cell death (RCD that engages the adaptive arm of the immune system. The inoculation of cancer cells undergoing ICD into immunocompetent animals elicits a specific immune response associated with the establishment of immunological memory. Only a few agents are intrinsically endowed with the ability to trigger ICD. These include a few chemotherapeutics that are routinely employed in the clinic, like doxorubicin, mitoxantrone, oxaliplatin and cyclophosphamide, as well as some agents that have not yet been approved for use in humans. Accumulating clinical data indicate that the activation of adaptive immune responses against dying cancer cells is associated with improved disease outcome in patients affected by various neoplasms. Thus, novel therapeutic regimens that trigger ICD are urgently awaited. Here, we discuss current combinatorial approaches to convert otherwise non-immunogenic instances of RCD into bona fide ICD.

  11. Guidelines and recommendations on yeast cell death nomenclature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Bauer, Maria Anna; Zimmermann, Andreas; Aguilera, Andrés; Austriaco, Nicanor; Ayscough, Kathryn; Balzan, Rena; Bar-Nun, Shoshana; Barrientos, Antonio; Belenky, Peter; Blondel, Marc; Braun, Ralf J; Breitenbach, Michael; Burhans, William C; Büttner, Sabrina; Cavalieri, Duccio; Chang, Michael; Cooper, Katrina F; Côrte-Real, Manuela; Costa, Vítor; Cullin, Christophe; Dawes, Ian; Dengjel, Jörn; Dickman, Martin B; Eisenberg, Tobias; Fahrenkrog, Birthe; Fasel, Nicolas; Fröhlich, Kai-Uwe; Gargouri, Ali; Giannattasio, Sergio; Goffrini, Paola; Gourlay, Campbell W; Grant, Chris M; Greenwood, Michael T; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Heger, Thomas; Heinisch, Jürgen; Herker, Eva; Herrmann, Johannes M; Hofer, Sebastian; Jiménez-Ruiz, Antonio; Jungwirth, Helmut; Kainz, Katharina; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; Ludovico, Paula; Manon, Stéphen; Martegani, Enzo; Mazzoni, Cristina; Megeney, Lynn A; Meisinger, Chris; Nielsen, Jens; Nyström, Thomas; Osiewacz, Heinz D; Outeiro, Tiago F; Park, Hay-Oak; Pendl, Tobias; Petranovic, Dina; Picot, Stephane; Polčic, Peter; Powers, Ted; Ramsdale, Mark; Rinnerthaler, Mark; Rockenfeller, Patrick; Ruckenstuhl, Christoph; Schaffrath, Raffael; Segovia, Maria; Severin, Fedor F; Sharon, Amir; Sigrist, Stephan J; Sommer-Ruck, Cornelia; Sousa, Maria João; Thevelein, Johan M; Thevissen, Karin; Titorenko, Vladimir; Toledano, Michel B; Tuite, Mick; Vögtle, F-Nora; Westermann, Benedikt; Winderickx, Joris; Wissing, Silke; Wölfl, Stefan; Zhang, Zhaojie J; Zhao, Richard Y; Zhou, Bing; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kroemer, Guido; Madeo, Frank

    2018-01-01

    Elucidating the biology of yeast in its full complexity has major implications for science, medicine and industry. One of the most critical processes determining yeast life and physiology is cel-lular demise. However, the investigation of yeast cell death is a relatively young field, and a widely

  12. Mitochondrial and Cell Death Mechanisms in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee J. Martin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS are the most common human adult-onset neurodegenerative diseases. They are characterized by prominent age-related neurodegeneration in selectively vulnerable neural systems. Some forms of AD, PD, and ALS are inherited, and genes causing these diseases have been identified. Nevertheless, the mechanisms of the neuronal cell death are unresolved. Morphological, biochemical, genetic, as well as cell and animal model studies reveal that mitochondria could have roles in this neurodegeneration. The functions and properties of mitochondria might render subsets of selectively vulnerable neurons intrinsically susceptible to cellular aging and stress and overlying genetic variations, triggering neurodegeneration according to a cell death matrix theory. In AD, alterations in enzymes involved in oxidative phosphorylation, oxidative damage, and mitochondrial binding of Aβ and amyloid precursor protein have been reported. In PD, mutations in putative mitochondrial proteins have been identified and mitochondrial DNA mutations have been found in neurons in the substantia nigra. In ALS, changes occur in mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes and mitochondrial cell death proteins. Transgenic mouse models of human neurodegenerative disease are beginning to reveal possible principles governing the biology of selective neuronal vulnerability that implicate mitochondria and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. This review summarizes how mitochondrial pathobiology might contribute to neuronal death in AD, PD, and ALS and could serve as a target for drug therapy.

  13. PROGRAMMED CELL DEATH IN EXTRAOCULAR MUSCLE TENDON/SCLERA PRECURSORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractPurpose: This study was designed to examine the occurrence of natural cell death in the periocular mesenchyme of mouse embryos. Methods: Vital staining with LysoTracker Red and Nile blue sulphate as well as terminal nick end labeling (TUNEL) were utiliz...

  14. What history tells us XXI. Apoptosis and programmed cell death

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-04-30

    Apr 30, 2010 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 35; Issue 2. What history tells us XXI. Apoptosis and programmed cell death: when biological categories are blurred. Michel Morange. Series Volume 35 Issue 2 June 2010 pp 177-181 ...

  15. What history tells us XXI. Apoptosis and programmed cell death ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-04-30

    Apr 30, 2010 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 35; Issue 2. What history tells us XXI. Apoptosis and programmed cell death: when biological categories are blurred. Michel Morange. Series Volume 35 Issue 2 June 2010 pp 177-181 ...

  16. Networked T cell death following macrophage infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen H-F Macdonald

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Depletion of T cells following infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb impairs disease resolution, and interferes with clinical test performance that relies on cell-mediated immunity. A number of mechanisms contribute to this T cell suppression, such as activation-induced death and trafficking of T cells out of the peripheral circulation and into the diseased lungs. The extent to which Mtb infection of human macrophages affects T cell viability however, is not well characterised. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that lymphopenia (<1.5 × 10(9 cells/l was prevalent among culture-positive tuberculosis patients, and lymphocyte counts significantly improved post-therapy. We previously reported that Mtb-infected human macrophages resulted in death of infected and uninfected bystander macrophages. In the current study, we sought to examine the influence of infected human alveolar macrophages on T cells. We infected primary human alveolar macrophages (the primary host cell for Mtb or PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells with Mtb H37Ra, then prepared cell-free supernatants. The supernatants of Mtb-infected macrophages caused dose-dependent, caspase-dependent, T cell apoptosis. This toxic effect of infected macrophage secreted factors did not require TNF-α or Fas. The supernatant cytotoxic signal(s were heat-labile and greater than 50 kDa in molecular size. Although ESAT-6 was toxic to T cells, other Mtb-secreted factors tested did not influence T cell viability; nor did macrophage-free Mtb bacilli or broth from Mtb cultures. Furthermore, supernatants from Mycobacterium bovis Bacille de Calmette et Guerin (BCG- infected macrophages also elicited T cell death suggesting that ESAT-6 itself, although cytotoxic, was not the principal mediator of T cell death in our system. CONCLUSIONS: Mtb-Infected macrophages secrete heat-labile factors that are toxic to T cells, and may contribute to the immunosuppression seen in tuberculosis as well as

  17. Cell death in the injured brain: roles of metallothioneins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mie Ø; Larsen, Agnete; Stoltenberg, Meredin

    2009-01-01

    oxygen species (ROS). ROS promote oxidative stress, which leads to neurodegeneration and ultimately results in programmed cell death (secondary injury). Since this delayed, secondary tissue loss occurs days to months following the primary injury it provides a therapeutic window where potential......In traumatic brain injury (TBI), the primary, irreversible damage associated with the moment of impact consists of cells dying from necrosis. This contributes to fuelling a chronic central nervous system (CNS) inflammation with increased formation of proinflammatory cytokines, enzymes and reactive...

  18. Molecular Control of Interdigital Cell Death and Cell Differentiation by Retinoic Acid during Digit Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Elena Díaz-Hernández

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The precise coordination of cell death and cell differentiation during the formation of developing digits is essential for generating properly shaped limbs. Retinoic acid (RA has a fundamental role in digit development; it promotes or inhibits the molecular expression of several critical genes. This control of gene expression establishes molecular cascades that enable both the commencement of cell death and the inhibition of cell differentiation. In this review, we focus on the antagonistic functions between RA and fibroblast growth factor (FGF signaling in the control of cell death and between RA and transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ signaling in the control of cell differentiation.

  19. 'How can I halt thee?' The puzzles involved in autophagic inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinod, V; Padmakrishnan, C J; Vijayan, Bejoy; Gopala, Srinivas

    2014-04-01

    The strategy for interpreting the role of autophagy on the basis of evidence obtained through autophagic inhibition sounds logical, but is beset with practical constraints. The knock down of autophagy-related (ATG) gene(s) or blockage of class III PI3-Kinase are the most common approaches for inhibiting autophagy. However, during stressful conditions, autophagy may operate in synchrony with other processes such as apoptosis; autophagy-related genes, unlike what their name implies, exert their regulation on apoptosis as well. Knocking down such genes not only blocks autophagy but also renders apoptosis defective, making the interpretation of autophagic roles unreliable. Similarly, class III PI3-Kinase aids in initiating autophagy but it is not a quintessential autophagic regulator. Class III PI3-Kinase also has a role in regulating almost all membrane transport in cells. Blocking it not only inhibits autophagy, but also hampers all the membrane trades, including endosomal transport. The pharmacological inhibitors used to block autophagy by blocking class III PI3-Kinase further compound these limitations with their off-target effects. Knowing the limitations involved in blocking a target or using an autophagy-blocking tool is a prerequisite for designing the experiments meant for analyzing autophagic functions. This review attempts to provide a detailed overview about the practical constraints involved in using autophagic inhibition as a strategy to understand autophagy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Molecular and Translational Classifications of DAMPs in Immunogenic Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek D Garg

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The immunogenicity of malignant cells has recently been acknowledged as a critical determinant of efficacy in cancer therapy. Thus, besides developing direct immunostimulatory regimens including dendritic cell-based vaccines, checkpoint-blocking therapies, and adoptive T-cell transfer, researchers have started to focus on the overall immunobiology of neoplastic cells. It is now clear that cancer cells can succumb to some anticancer therapies by undergoing a peculiar form of cell death that is characterized by an increased immunogenic potential, owing to the emission of so-called damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs. The emission of DAMPs and other immunostimulatory factors by cells succumbing to immunogenic cell death (ICD favors the establishment of a productive interface with the immune system. This results in the elicitation of tumor-targeting immune responses associated with the elimination of residual, treatment-resistant cancer cells, as well as with the establishment of immunological memory. Although ICD has been characterized with increased precision since its discovery, several questions remain to be addressed. Here, we summarize and tabulate the main molecular, immunological, preclinical and clinical aspects of ICD, in an attempt to capture the essence of this clinically relevant phenomenon, and identify future challenges for this rapidly expanding field of investigation.

  1. Radiation-induced cell death in embryogenic cells of coniferous plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Yoshito; Homma-Takeda, Shino; Yukawa, Masae; Nishimura, Yoshikazu; Sasamoto, Hamako; Takahagi, Masahiko

    2004-01-01

    Reproductive processes are particularly radiosensitive in plant development, which was clearly illustrated in reduction of seed formation in native coniferous plants around Chernobyl after the nuclear accident. For the purpose to investigate the effects of ionizing radiation on embryonic formation in coniferous plants, we used an embryo-derived embryogenic cell culture of a Japanese native coniferous plant, Japanese cedar (Cryplomeria japonica). The embryogenic cells were so radiosensitive that most of the cells died by X-ray irradiation of 5 Gy. This indicated that the embryogenic cells are as radiosensitive as some mammalian cells including lymphocytes. We considered that this type of radiosensitive cell death in the embryogenic cells should be responsible for reproductive damages of coniferous plants by low dose of ionizing radiation. The cell death of the embryogenic cells was characteristic of nuclear DNA fragmentation, which is typically observed in radiation-induced programmed cell death, i.e. apoptosis, in mammalian cells. On the other hand, cell death with nuclear DNA fragmentation did not develop by X-ray irradiation in vegetative cells including meristematic cells of Japanese cedar. This suggests that an apoptosis-like programmed cell death should develop cell-specifically in embryogenic cells by ionizing radiation. The abortion of embryogenic cells may work to prevent transmission of radiation-induced genetic damages to the descendants. (author)

  2. A Conserved Core of Programmed Cell Death Indicator Genes Discriminates Developmentally and Environmentally Induced Programmed Cell Death in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olvera-Carrillo, Yadira; Van Bel, Michiel; Van Hautegem, Tom; Fendrych, Matyáš; Huysmans, Marlies; Simaskova, Maria; van Durme, Matthias; Buscaill, Pierre; Rivas, Susana; Coll, Nuria S.; Coppens, Frederik; Maere, Steven; Nowack, Moritz K.

    2015-12-01

    A plethora of diverse programmed cell death (PCD) processes has been described in living organisms. In animals and plants, different forms of PCD play crucial roles in development, immunity, and responses to the environment. While the molecular control of some animal PCD forms such as apoptosis is known in great detail, we still know comparatively little about the regulation of the diverse types of plant PCD. In part, this deficiency in molecular understanding is caused by the lack of reliable reporters to detect PCD processes. Here, we addressed this issue by using a combination of bioinformatics approaches to identify commonly regulated genes during diverse plant PCD processes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Our results indicate that the transcriptional signatures of developmentally controlled cell death are largely distinct from the ones associated with environmentally induced cell death. Moreover, different cases of developmental PCD share a set of cell death-associated genes. Most of these genes are evolutionary conserved within the green plant lineage, arguing for an evolutionary conserved core machinery of developmental PCD. Based on this information, we established an array of specific promoter-reporter lines for developmental PCD in Arabidopsis. These PCD indicators represent a powerful resource that can be used in addition to established morphological and biochemical methods to detect and analyze PCD processes in vivo and in planta. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Canthin-6-one induces cell death, cell cycle arrest and differentiation in human myeloid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira Torquato, Heron F; Ribeiro-Filho, Antonio C; Buri, Marcus V; Araújo Júnior, Roberto T; Pimenta, Renata; de Oliveira, José Salvador R; Filho, Valdir C; Macho, Antonio; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J; de Oliveira Martins, Domingos T

    2017-04-01

    Canthin-6-one is a natural product isolated from various plant genera and from fungi with potential antitumor activity. In the present study, we evaluate the antitumor effects of canthin-6-one in human myeloid leukemia lineages. Kasumi-1 lineage was used as a model for acute myeloid leukemia. Cells were treated with canthin-6-one and cell death, cell cycle and differentiation were evaluated in both total cells (Lin + ) and leukemia stem cell population (CD34 + CD38 - Lin -/low ). Among the human lineages tested, Kasumi-1 was the most sensitive to canthin-6-one. Canthin-6-one induced cell death with apoptotic (caspase activation, decrease of mitochondrial potential) and necrotic (lysosomal permeabilization, double labeling of annexin V/propidium iodide) characteristics. Moreover, canthin-6-one induced cell cycle arrest at G 0 /G 1 (7μM) and G 2 (45μM) evidenced by DNA content, BrdU incorporation and cyclin B1/histone 3 quantification. Canthin-6-one also promoted differentiation of Kasumi-1, evidenced by an increase in the expression of myeloid markers (CD11b and CD15) and the transcription factor PU.1. Furthermore, a reduction of the leukemic stem cell population and clonogenic capability of stem cells were observed. These results show that canthin-6-one can affect Kasumi-1 cells by promoting cell death, cell cycle arrest and cell differentiation depending on concentration used. Canthin-6-one presents an interesting cytotoxic activity against leukemic cells and represents a promising scaffold for the development of molecules for anti-leukemic applications, especially by its anti-leukemic stem cell activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Megasporogenesis and programmed cell death in Tillandsia (Bromeliaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papini, Alessio; Mosti, Stefano; Milocani, Eva; Tani, Gabriele; Di Falco, Pietro; Brighigna, Luigi

    2011-10-01

    The degeneration of three of four meiotic products is a very common process in the female gender of oogamous eukaryotes. In Tillandsia (and many other angiosperms), the surviving megaspore has a callose-free wall in chalazal position while the other three megaspores are completely embedded in callose. Therefore, nutrients and signals can reach more easily the functional megaspore from the nucellus through the chalazal pole with respect to the other megaspores. The abortion of three of four megaspores was already recognized as the result of a programmed cell death (PCD) process. We investigated the process to understand the modality of this specific type of PCD and its relationship to the asymmetric callose deposition around the tetrad. The decision on which of the four megaspores will be the supernumerary megaspores in angiosperms, and hence destined to undergo programmed cell death, appears to be linked to the callose layer deposition around the tetrad. During supernumerary megaspores degeneration, events leading to the deletion of the cells do not appear to belong to a single type of cell death. The first morphological signs are typical of autophagy, including the formation of autophagosomes. The TUNEL positivity and a change in morphology of mitochondria and chloroplasts indicate the passage to an apoptotic-like PCD phase, while the cellular remnants undergo a final process resembling at least partially (ER swelling) necrotic morphological syndromes, eventually leading to a mainly lipidic cell corpse still separated from the functional megaspore by a callose layer.

  5. Investigating cell death mechanisms in Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis using transcriptomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Roy Heath

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a motor neuron disease characterised by degeneration and loss of upper and lower motor neurons from the motor cortex, brainstem and spinal cord although evidence is suggesting that there is further involvement of other cell types in the surrounding tissue. Transcriptomic analysis by gene expression profiling using microarray technology has enabled the determination of patterns of cell death in the degenerating tissues. This work has examined gene expression at the level of the tissue and individual cell types in both sporadic and familial forms of the disease. In addition, further studies have examined the differential vulnerability of neuronal cells in different regions of the central nervous system. Model systems have also provided further information to help unravel the mechanisms that lead to death of the motor neurons in disease and also provided novel insights. In this review we shall describe the methods that have been used in these investigations and describe how they have contributed to our knowledge of the cell death mechanisms in ALS.

  6. Interphase death of dividing cells. Kinetics of death of cultured Chinese hamster fibroblasts after irradiation with various doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kublik, L.N.; Veksler, A.M.; Ehjdus, L.Kh.

    1989-01-01

    In studying the kinetics of interphase death (ID) of cultured Chinese hamster cells after irradiation with doses of 100 to 800 Gy the authors showed an increase in the ID rate with increasing radiation dose; the presence of serum in the medium both during and after irradiation prevents the cell death

  7. Pirarubicin induces an autophagic cytoprotective response through suppression of the mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway in human bladder cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Kuiqing; Chen, Xu; Liu, Cheng; Gu, Peng; Li, Zhuohang; Wu, Shaoxu; Xu, Kewei; Lin, Tianxin; Huang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Pirarubicin is widely used in intravesical chemotherapy for bladder cancer, but its efficacy is limited due to drug resistance; the mechanism has not been well studied. Emerging evidence shows that autophagy can be a novel target for cancer therapy. This study aimed to investigate the role of autophagy in pirarubicin-treated bladder cancer cells. Bladder cancer cells EJ and J82 were treated with pirarubicin, siRNA, 3-methyladenine or hydroxychloroquine. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were tested by cell survival assay and flow cytometric analysis, respectively. Autophagy was evaluated by immunoblotting before and after the treatments. The phosphorylated mammalian target of rapamycin, serine/threonine kinase p70 S6 kinase, and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 were also investigated by immunoblotting. We found that pirarubicin could induce autophagy in bladder cancer cells. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine, hydroxychloroquine or knockdown of autophagy related gene 3 significantly increased apoptosis in pirarubicin-treated bladder cancer cells. Pirarubicin-induced autophagy was mediated via the mTOR/p70S6K/4E-BP1 signaling pathway. In conclusion, autophagy induced by pirarubicin plays a cytoprotective role in bladder cancer cells, suggesting that inhibition of autophagy may improve efficacy over traditional pirarubicin chemotherapy in bladder cancer patients. - Highlights: • Pirarubicin induced autophagy in bladder cancer cells. • Inhibition of autophagy enhanced pirarubicin-induced apoptosis. • Pirarubicin induced autophagy through inhibition of mTOR signaling pathway

  8. Pirarubicin induces an autophagic cytoprotective response through suppression of the mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway in human bladder cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Kuiqing; Chen, Xu [Department of Urology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Malignant Tumor Epigenetics and Gene Regulation, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Liu, Cheng [Department of Urology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Gu, Peng; Li, Zhuohang; Wu, Shaoxu [Department of Urology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Malignant Tumor Epigenetics and Gene Regulation, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Xu, Kewei [Department of Urology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Lin, Tianxin, E-mail: tianxinl@sina.com [Department of Urology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Malignant Tumor Epigenetics and Gene Regulation, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Huang, Jian, E-mail: urolhj@sina.com [Department of Urology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China)

    2015-05-01

    Pirarubicin is widely used in intravesical chemotherapy for bladder cancer, but its efficacy is limited due to drug resistance; the mechanism has not been well studied. Emerging evidence shows that autophagy can be a novel target for cancer therapy. This study aimed to investigate the role of autophagy in pirarubicin-treated bladder cancer cells. Bladder cancer cells EJ and J82 were treated with pirarubicin, siRNA, 3-methyladenine or hydroxychloroquine. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were tested by cell survival assay and flow cytometric analysis, respectively. Autophagy was evaluated by immunoblotting before and after the treatments. The phosphorylated mammalian target of rapamycin, serine/threonine kinase p70 S6 kinase, and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 were also investigated by immunoblotting. We found that pirarubicin could induce autophagy in bladder cancer cells. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine, hydroxychloroquine or knockdown of autophagy related gene 3 significantly increased apoptosis in pirarubicin-treated bladder cancer cells. Pirarubicin-induced autophagy was mediated via the mTOR/p70S6K/4E-BP1 signaling pathway. In conclusion, autophagy induced by pirarubicin plays a cytoprotective role in bladder cancer cells, suggesting that inhibition of autophagy may improve efficacy over traditional pirarubicin chemotherapy in bladder cancer patients. - Highlights: • Pirarubicin induced autophagy in bladder cancer cells. • Inhibition of autophagy enhanced pirarubicin-induced apoptosis. • Pirarubicin induced autophagy through inhibition of mTOR signaling pathway.

  9. Cranberry proanthocyanidins inhibit esophageal adenocarcinoma in vitro and in vivo through pleiotropic cell death induction and PI3K/AKT/mTOR inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresty, Laura A.; Weh, Katherine M.; Zeyzus-Johns, Bree; Perez, Laura N.; Howell, Amy B.

    2015-01-01

    Cranberries are rich in bioactive constituents known to improve urinary tract health and more recent evidence supports cranberries possess cancer inhibitory properties. However, mechanisms of cancer inhibition by cranberries remain to be elucidated, particularly in vivo. Properties of a purified cranberry-derived proanthocyanidin extract (C-PAC) were investigated utilizing acid-sensitive and acid-resistant human esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) cell lines and esophageal tumor xenografts in athymic NU/NU mice. C-PAC induced caspase-independent cell death mainly via autophagy and low levels of apoptosis in acid-sensitive JHAD1 and OE33 cells, but resulted in cellular necrosis in acid-resistant OE19 cells. Similarly, C-PAC induced necrosis in JHAD1 cells pushed to acid-resistance via repeated exposures to an acidified bile cocktail. C-PAC associated cell death involved PI3K/AKT/mTOR inactivation, pro-apoptotic protein induction (BAX, BAK1, deamidated BCL-xL, Cytochrome C, PARP), modulation of MAPKs (P-P38/P-JNK) and G2-M cell cycle arrest in vitro. Importantly, oral delivery of C-PAC significantly inhibited OE19 tumor xenograft growth via modulation of AKT/mTOR/MAPK signaling and induction of the autophagic form of LC3B supporting in vivo efficacy against EAC for the first time. C-PAC is a potent inducer of EAC cell death and is efficacious in vivo at non-toxic behaviorally achievable concentrations, holding promise for preventive or therapeutic interventions in cohorts at increased risk for EAC, a rapidly rising and extremely deadly malignancy. PMID:26378019

  10. Bee Venom Protects against Rotenone-Induced Cell Death in NSC34 Motor Neuron Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Young Jung

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is known to elevate mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and induce apoptosis via activation of the caspase-3 pathway. Bee venom (BV extracted from honey bees has been widely used in oriental medicine and contains melittin, apamin, adolapin, mast cell-degranulating peptide, and phospholipase A2. In this study, we tested the effects of BV on neuronal cell death by examining rotenone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. NSC34 motor neuron cells were pretreated with 2.5 μg/mL BV and stimulated with 10 μM rotenone to induce cell toxicity. We assessed cell death by Western blotting using specific antibodies, such as phospho-ERK1/2, phospho-JNK, and cleaved capase-3 and performed an MTT assay for evaluation of cell death and mitochondria staining. Pretreatment with 2.5 μg/mL BV had a neuroprotective effect against 10 μM rotenone-induced cell death in NSC34 motor neuron cells. Pre-treatment with BV significantly enhanced cell viability and ameliorated mitochondrial impairment in rotenone-treated cellular model. Moreover, BV treatment inhibited the activation of JNK signaling and cleaved caspase-3 related to cell death and increased ERK phosphorylation involved in cell survival in rotenone-treated NSC34 motor neuron cells. Taken together, we suggest that BV treatment can be useful for protection of neurons against oxidative stress or neurotoxin-induced cell death.

  11. Normal autophagic activity in macrophages from mice lacking Gαi3, AGS3, or RGS19.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Vural

    Full Text Available In macrophages autophagy assists antigen presentation, affects cytokine release, and promotes intracellular pathogen elimination. In some cells autophagy is modulated by a signaling pathway that employs Gαi3, Activator of G-protein Signaling-3 (AGS3/GPSM1, and Regulator of G-protein Signaling 19 (RGS19. As macrophages express each of these proteins, we tested their importance in regulating macrophage autophagy. We assessed LC3 processing and the formation of LC3 puncta in bone marrow derived macrophages prepared from wild type, Gnai3(-/-, Gpsm1(-/-, or Rgs19(-/- mice following amino acid starvation or Nigericin treatment. In addition, we evaluated rapamycin-induced autophagic proteolysis rates by long-lived protein degradation assays and anti-autophagic action after rapamycin induction in wild type, Gnai3(-/-, and Gpsm1(-/- macrophages. In similar assays we compared macrophages treated or not with pertussis toxin, an inhibitor of GPCR (G-protein couple receptor triggered Gαi nucleotide exchange. Despite previous findings, the level of basal autophagy, autophagic induction, autophagic flux, autophagic degradation and the anti-autophagic action in macrophages that lacked Gαi3, AGS3, or RGS19; or had been treated with pertussis toxin, were similar to controls. These results indicate that while Gαi signaling may impact autophagy in some cell types it does not in macrophages.

  12. Cell death induced by gamma irradiation of developing skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olive, M.; Blanco, R.; Rivera, R.; Cinos, C.; Ferrer, I.

    1995-01-01

    Newborn Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to a single dose of 2 Gy gamma rays and killed from 6 h to 5 d later. Increased numbers of dying cells, characterised by their extreme chromatin condensation and often nuclear fragmentation were seen in skeletal muscle 6 h after irradiation. Dying cells decreased to nearly normal values 48 h later. In situ labelling of nuclear DNA fragmentation identified individual cells bearing fragmented DNA. The effects of gamma rays were suppressed following cycloheximide i.p. at a dose of 1 μg/g body weight given at the time of irradiation. Taken together, the present morphological and pharmacological results suggest that gamma ray induced cell death in skeletal muscle is apoptotic, and that the process is associated with protein synthesis. Finally, proliferating cell nuclear antigen-immunoreactive cells, which were abundant in control rats, decreased in number 48 h after irradiation. However, a marked increase significantly above normal age values was observed at the 5th day, thus suggesting that regeneration occurs following irradiation-induced cell death in developing muscle. (author)

  13. MYC, Cell Competition, and Cell Death in Cancer: The Inseparable Triad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giacomo, Simone; Sollazzo, Manuela; Paglia, Simona; Grifoni, Daniela

    2017-04-17

    Deregulation of MYC family proteins in cancer is associated with a global reprogramming of gene expression, ultimately promoting glycolytic pathways, cell growth, and proliferation. It is well known that MYC upregulation triggers cell-autonomous apoptosis in normal tissues, while frankly malignant cells develop resistance to apoptotic stimuli, partly resulting from MYC addiction. As well as inducing cell-autonomous apoptosis, MYC upregulation is able to trigger non cell-autonomous apoptotic death through an evolutionarily conserved mechanism known as "cell competition". With regard to this intimate and dual relationship between MYC and cell death, recent evidence obtained in Drosophila models of cancer has revealed that, in early tumourigenesis, MYC upregulation guides the clonal expansion of mutant cells, while the surrounding tissue undergoes non-cell autonomous death. Apoptosis inhibition in this context was shown to restrain tumour growth and to restore a wild-type phenotype. This suggests that cell-autonomous and non cell-autonomous apoptosis dependent on MYC upregulation may shape tumour growth in different ways, soliciting the need to reconsider the role of cell death in cancer in the light of this new level of complexity. Here we review recent literature about MYC and cell competition obtained in Drosophila , with a particular emphasis on the relevance of cell death to cell competition and, more generally, to cancer. Possible implications of these findings for the understanding of mammalian cancers are also discussed.

  14. Ayanin diacetate-induced cell death is amplified by TRAIL in human leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrero, María Teresa; Estévez, Sara; Negrín, Gledy; Quintana, José; López, Mariana; Pérez, Francisco J.; Triana, Jorge; León, Francisco; Estévez, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ayanin diacetate as apoptotic inducer in leukemia cells. ► Cell death was prevented by caspase inhibitors and by the overexpression of Bcl-x L . ► The intrinsic and the extrinsic pathways are involved in the mechanism of action. ► Death receptors are up-regulated and TRAIL enhances apoptotic cell death. -- Abstract: Here we demonstrate that the semi-synthetic flavonoid ayanin diacetate induces cell death selectively in leukemia cells without affecting the proliferation of normal lymphocytes. Incubation of human leukemia cells with ayanin diacetate induced G 2 -M phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis which was prevented by the non-specific caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk and reduced by the overexpression of Bcl-x L . Ayanin diacetate-induced cell death was found to be associated with: (i) loss of inner mitochondrial membrane potential, (ii) the release of cytochrome c, (iii) the activation of multiple caspases, (iv) cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and (v) the up-regulation of death receptors for TRAIL, DR4 and DR5. Moreover, the combined treatment with ayanin diacetate and TRAIL amplified cell death, compared to single treatments. These results provide a basis for further exploring the potential applications of this combination for the treatment of cancer.

  15. Ayanin diacetate-induced cell death is amplified by TRAIL in human leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrero, Maria Teresa; Estevez, Sara; Negrin, Gledy; Quintana, Jose [Departamento de Bioquimica, Unidad Asociada al Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Plaza Dr. Pasteur s/n, 35016 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Lopez, Mariana; Perez, Francisco J.; Triana, Jorge [Departamento de Quimica, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Instituto Canario de Investigacion del Cancer, 35017 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Leon, Francisco [Instituto de Productos Naturales y Agrobiologia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Avda. Astrofisico F. Sanchez 3, 38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Estevez, Francisco, E-mail: festevez@dbbf.ulpgc.es [Departamento de Bioquimica, Unidad Asociada al Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Plaza Dr. Pasteur s/n, 35016 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain)

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ayanin diacetate as apoptotic inducer in leukemia cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell death was prevented by caspase inhibitors and by the overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The intrinsic and the extrinsic pathways are involved in the mechanism of action. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Death receptors are up-regulated and TRAIL enhances apoptotic cell death. -- Abstract: Here we demonstrate that the semi-synthetic flavonoid ayanin diacetate induces cell death selectively in leukemia cells without affecting the proliferation of normal lymphocytes. Incubation of human leukemia cells with ayanin diacetate induced G{sub 2}-M phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis which was prevented by the non-specific caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk and reduced by the overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L}. Ayanin diacetate-induced cell death was found to be associated with: (i) loss of inner mitochondrial membrane potential, (ii) the release of cytochrome c, (iii) the activation of multiple caspases, (iv) cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and (v) the up-regulation of death receptors for TRAIL, DR4 and DR5. Moreover, the combined treatment with ayanin diacetate and TRAIL amplified cell death, compared to single treatments. These results provide a basis for further exploring the potential applications of this combination for the treatment of cancer.

  16. Thymoquinone causes multiple effects, including cell death, on dividing plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanien, Sameh E; Ramadan, Ahmed M; Azeiz, Ahmed Z Abdel; Mohammed, Rasha A; Hassan, Sabah M; Shokry, Ahmed M; Atef, Ahmed; Kamal, Khalid B H; Rabah, Samar; Sabir, Jamal S M; Abuzinadah, Osama A; El-Domyati, Fotouh M; Martin, Gregory B; Bahieldin, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Thymoquinone (TQ) is a major constituent of Nigella sativa oil with reported anti-oxidative activity and anti-inflammatory activity in animal cells. It also inhibits proliferation and induces programmed cell death (apoptosis) in human skin cancer cells. The present study sought to detect the influence of TQ on dividing cells of three plant systems and on expression of Bcl2-associated athanogene-like (BAG-like) genes that might be involved during the process of cell death. BAG genes are known for the regulation of diverse physiological processes in animals, including apoptosis, tumorigenesis, stress responses, and cell division. Synthetic TQ at 0.1mg/mL greatly reduced wheat seed germination rate, whereas 0.2mg/mL completely inhibited germination. An Evans blue assay revealed moderate cell death in the meristematic zone of Glycine max roots after 1h of TQ treatment (0.2mg/mL), with severe cell death occurring in this zone after 2h of treatment. Light microscopy of TQ-treated (0.2mg/mL) onion hairy root tips for 1h revealed anti-mitotic activity and also cell death-associated changes, including nuclear membrane disruption and nuclear fragmentation. Transmission electron microscopy of TQ-treated cells (0.2mg/mL) for 1h revealed shrinkage of the plasma membrane, leakage of cell lysate, degradation of cell walls, enlargement of vacuoles and condensation of nuclei. Expression of one BAG-like gene, previously associated with cell death, was induced 20 min after TQ treatment in Glycine max root tip cells. Thus, TQ has multiple effects, including cell death, on dividing plant cells and plants may serve as a useful system to further investigate the mechanisms underlying the response of eukaryotic cells to TQ. © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  17. Programmed cell death in plants: lessons from bacteria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junhui; Bayles, Kenneth W

    2013-03-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) has well-established roles in the development and physiology of animals, plants, and fungi. Although aspects of PCD control appear evolutionarily conserved between these organisms, the extent of conservation remains controversial. Recently, a putative bacterial PCD protein homolog in plants was found to play a significant role in cell death control, indicating a conservation of function between these highly divergent organisms. Interestingly, these bacterial proteins are thought to be evolutionarily linked to the Bcl-2 family of proteins. In this opinion article, we propose a new unifying model to describe the relationship between bacterial and plant PCD systems and propose that the underlying control of PCD is conserved across at least three Kingdoms of life. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A contribution of glutathione to interphase death of dividing cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rybina, V.V.; Korystov, Yu.N.; Degtyareva, O.V.; Dobrovinskaya, O.R.; Ehjdus, L.Kh.

    1988-01-01

    A study was made of a change in the content of reduced glutathionine (GSH) in Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) cells after irradiation with doses evoking their interphase death (ID). GSH content was determined in a suspension of EAT cells fixed by hot ethanol. The postirradiation decrease in the GSH content of the suspension was due to its oxidation by hydrogen peroxide resulting from radiochemical reactions after releasing thereof from cells upon fixation. In the absence of an irradiated medium no changes occurred in the GSH content of EAT cells. It is concluded that ID of EAT cells is not associated with the radiation-induced decrease in the content of GSH, an endogenous antioxidant

  19. Targeted cancer cell death induced by biofunctionalized magnetic nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Contreras, Maria F.

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic micro and nanomaterials are increasingly interesting for biomedical applications since they possess many advantageous properties: they can become biocompatible, they can be functionalized to target specific cells and they can be remotely manipulated by magnetic fields. The goal of this study is to use antibody-functionalized nickel nanowires (Ab-NWs) as an alternative method in cancer therapy overcoming the limitations of current treatments that lack specificity and are highly cytotoxic. Ab-NWs have been incubated with cancer cells and a 12% drop on cell viability was observed for a treatment of only 10 minutes and an alternating magnetic field of low intensity and low frequency. It is believed that the Ab-NWs vibrate transmitting a mechanical force to the targeted cells inducing cell death. © 2014 IEEE.

  20. Using microfluidics to study programmed cell death: A new approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark, Christina; Zor, Kinga; Heiskanen, Arto

    This project focuses on applying microfluidic tissue culture for electrochemical or optical measurements during programmed cell death (PCD) in barley aleurone layer to increase understanding of the underlying mechanisms of PCD in plants. Microfluidic tissue culture enables in vitro experiments...... a double-fluorescent probe-system also used by Fath et al5. Future challenges include integrating both these systems into a microfluidic device for plant tissue culture....

  1. Curcumin induces apoptosis-independent death in oesophageal cancer cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan-Coyne, G

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Oesophageal cancer incidence is increasing and survival rates remain extremely poor. Natural agents with potential for chemoprevention include the phytochemical curcumin (diferuloylmethane). We have examined the effects of curcumin on a panel of oesophageal cancer cell lines. METHODS: MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyldiazol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assays and propidium iodide staining were used to assess viability and DNA content, respectively. Mitotic catastrophe (MC), apoptosis and autophagy were defined by both morphological criteria and markers such as MPM-2, caspase 3 cleavage and monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining. Cyclin B and poly-ubiquitinated proteins were assessed by western blotting. RESULTS: Curcumin treatment reduces viability of all cell lines within 24 h of treatment in a 5-50 muM range. Cytotoxicity is associated with accumulation in G2\\/M cell-cycle phases and distinct chromatin morphology, consistent with MC. Caspase-3 activation was detected in two out of four cell lines, but was a minor event. The addition of a caspase inhibitor zVAD had a marginal or no effect on cell viability, indicating predominance of a non-apoptotic form of cell death. In two cell lines, features of both MC and autophagy were apparent. Curcumin-responsive cells were found to accumulate poly-ubiquitinated proteins and cyclin B, consistent with a disturbance of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. This effect on a key cell-cycle checkpoint regulator may be responsible for the mitotic disturbances and consequent cytotoxicity of this drug. CONCLUSION: Curcumin can induce cell death by a mechanism that is not reliant on apoptosis induction, and thus represents a promising anticancer agent for prevention and treatment of oesophageal cancer.

  2. Curcumin induces apoptosis-independent death in oesophageal cancer cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan-Coyne, G

    2009-10-06

    Background:Oesophageal cancer incidence is increasing and survival rates remain extremely poor. Natural agents with potential for chemoprevention include the phytochemical curcumin (diferuloylmethane). We have examined the effects of curcumin on a panel of oesophageal cancer cell lines.Methods:MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyldiazol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assays and propidium iodide staining were used to assess viability and DNA content, respectively. Mitotic catastrophe (MC), apoptosis and autophagy were defined by both morphological criteria and markers such as MPM-2, caspase 3 cleavage and monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining. Cyclin B and poly-ubiquitinated proteins were assessed by western blotting.Results:Curcumin treatment reduces viability of all cell lines within 24 h of treatment in a 5-50 muM range. Cytotoxicity is associated with accumulation in G2\\/M cell-cycle phases and distinct chromatin morphology, consistent with MC. Caspase-3 activation was detected in two out of four cell lines, but was a minor event. The addition of a caspase inhibitor zVAD had a marginal or no effect on cell viability, indicating predominance of a non-apoptotic form of cell death. In two cell lines, features of both MC and autophagy were apparent. Curcumin-responsive cells were found to accumulate poly-ubiquitinated proteins and cyclin B, consistent with a disturbance of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. This effect on a key cell-cycle checkpoint regulator may be responsible for the mitotic disturbances and consequent cytotoxicity of this drug.Conclusion:Curcumin can induce cell death by a mechanism that is not reliant on apoptosis induction, and thus represents a promising anticancer agent for prevention and treatment of oesophageal cancer.British Journal of Cancer advance online publication, 6 October 2009; doi:10.1038\\/sj.bjc.6605308 www.bjcancer.com.

  3. Vacuolar processing enzyme in plant programmed cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriyuki eHatsugai

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Vacuolar processing enzyme (VPE is a cysteine proteinase originally identified as the proteinase responsible for the maturation and activation of vacuolar proteins in plants, and it is known to be an orthologue of animal asparaginyl endopeptidase (AEP/VPE/legumain. VPE has been shown to exhibit enzymatic properties similar to that of caspase 1, which is a cysteine protease that mediates the programmed cell death (PCD pathway in animals. Although there is limited sequence identity between VPE and caspase 1, their predicted three-dimensional structures revealed that the essential amino-acid residues for these enzymes form similar pockets for the substrate peptide YVAD. In contrast to the cytosolic localization of caspases, VPE is localized in vacuoles. VPE provokes vacuolar rupture, initiating the proteolytic cascade leading to PCD in the plant immune response. It has become apparent that the VPE-dependent PCD pathway is involved not only in the immune response, but also in the responses to a variety of stress inducers and in the development of various tissues. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the contribution of VPE to plant PCD and its role in vacuole-mediated cell death, and it also compares VPE with the animal cell death executor caspase 1.

  4. Crystalline structure of pulverized dental calculus induces cell death in oral epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziauddin, S M; Yoshimura, A; Montenegro Raudales, J L; Ozaki, Y; Higuchi, K; Ukai, T; Kaneko, T; Miyazaki, T; Latz, E; Hara, Y

    2017-11-20

    Dental calculus is a mineralized deposit attached to the tooth surface. We have shown that cellular uptake of dental calculus triggers nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor family pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activation, leading to the processing of the interleukin-1β precursor into its mature form in mouse and human phagocytes. The activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome also induced a lytic form of programmed cell death, pyroptosis, in these cells. However, the effects of dental calculus on other cell types in periodontal tissue have not been investigated. The aim of this study was to determine whether dental calculus can induce cell death in oral epithelial cells. HSC-2 human oral squamous carcinoma cells, HOMK107 human primary oral epithelial cells and immortalized mouse macrophages were exposed to dental calculus or 1 of its components, hydroxyapatite crystals. For inhibition assays, the cells were exposed to dental calculus in the presence or absence of cytochalasin D (endocytosis inhibitor), z-YVAD-fmk (caspase-1 inhibitor) or glyburide (NLRP3 inflammasome inhibitor). Cytotoxicity was determined by measuring lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and staining with propidium iodide. Tumor necrosis factor-α production was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Oral epithelial barrier function was examined by permeability assay. Dental calculus induced cell death in HSC-2 cells, as judged by LDH release and propidium iodide staining. Dental calculus also induced LDH release from HOMK107 cells. Following heat treatment, dental calculus lost its capacity to induce tumor necrosis factor-α in mouse macrophages, but could induce LDH release in HSC-2 cells, indicating a major role of inorganic components in cell death. Hydroxyapatite crystals also induced cell death in both HSC-2 and HOMK107 cells, as judged by LDH release, indicating the capacity of crystal particles to induce cell death. Cell death induced by dental

  5. Destabilization of Akt Promotes the Death of Myeloma Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Constitutive activation of Akt is believed to be an oncogenic signal in multiple myeloma and is associated with poor patient prognosis and resistance to available treatment. The stability of Akt proteins is regulated by phosphorylating the highly conserved turn motif (TM of these proteins and the chaperone protein HSP90. In this study we investigate the antitumor effects of inhibiting mTORC2 plus HSP90 in myeloma cell lines. We show that chronic exposure of cells to rapamycin can inhibit mTORC2 pathway, and AKT will be destabilized by administration of the HSP90 inhibitor 17-allylamino-geldanamycin (17-AAG. Finally, we show that the rapamycin synergizes with 17-AAG and inhibits myeloma cells growth and promotes cell death to a greater extent than either drug alone. Our studies provide a clinical rationale of use mTOR inhibitors and chaperone protein inhibitors in combination regimens for the treatment of human blood cancers.

  6. Topological defects in epithelia govern cell death and extrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Thuan Beng; Doostmohammadi, Amin; Nier, Vincent; Kocgozlu, Leyla; Thampi, Sumesh; Toyama, Yusuke; Marcq, Philippe; Lim, Chwee Teck; Yeomans, Julia M.; Ladoux, Benoit

    2017-04-01

    Epithelial tissues (epithelia) remove excess cells through extrusion, preventing the accumulation of unnecessary or pathological cells. The extrusion process can be triggered by apoptotic signalling, oncogenic transformation and overcrowding of cells. Despite the important linkage of cell extrusion to developmental, homeostatic and pathological processes such as cancer metastasis, its underlying mechanism and connections to the intrinsic mechanics of the epithelium are largely unexplored. We approach this problem by modelling the epithelium as an active nematic liquid crystal (that has a long range directional order), and comparing numerical simulations to strain rate and stress measurements within monolayers of MDCK (Madin Darby canine kidney) cells. Here we show that apoptotic cell extrusion is provoked by singularities in cell alignments in the form of comet-shaped topological defects. We find a universal correlation between extrusion sites and positions of nematic defects in the cell orientation field in different epithelium types. The results confirm the active nematic nature of epithelia, and demonstrate that defect-induced isotropic stresses are the primary precursors of mechanotransductive responses in cells, including YAP (Yes-associated protein) transcription factor activity, caspase-3-mediated cell death, and extrusions. Importantly, the defect-driven extrusion mechanism depends on intercellular junctions, because the weakening of cell-cell interactions in an α-catenin knockdown monolayer reduces the defect size and increases both the number of defects and extrusion rates, as is also predicted by our model. We further demonstrate the ability to control extrusion hotspots by geometrically inducing defects through microcontact printing of patterned monolayers. On the basis of these results, we propose a mechanism for apoptotic cell extrusion: spontaneously formed topological defects in epithelia govern cell fate. This will be important in predicting

  7. In Vivo Evidence for Lysosome Depletion and Impaired Autophagic Clearance in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia Type SPG11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Rita-Eva; Khundadze, Mukhran; Damme, Markus; Nietzsche, Sandor; Hoffmann, Birgit; Stauber, Tobias; Koch, Nicole; Hennings, J Christopher; Franzka, Patricia; Huebner, Antje K; Kessels, Michael M; Biskup, Christoph; Jentsch, Thomas J; Qualmann, Britta; Braulke, Thomas; Kurth, Ingo; Beetz, Christian; Hübner, Christian A

    2015-08-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is characterized by a dying back degeneration of corticospinal axons which leads to progressive weakness and spasticity of the legs. SPG11 is the most common autosomal-recessive form of HSPs and is caused by mutations in SPG11. A recent in vitro study suggested that Spatacsin, the respective gene product, is needed for the recycling of lysosomes from autolysosomes, a process known as autophagic lysosome reformation. The relevance of this observation for hereditary spastic paraplegia, however, has remained unclear. Here, we report that disruption of Spatacsin in mice indeed causes hereditary spastic paraplegia-like phenotypes with loss of cortical neurons and Purkinje cells. Degenerating neurons accumulate autofluorescent material, which stains for the lysosomal protein Lamp1 and for p62, a marker of substrate destined to be degraded by autophagy, and hence appears to be related to autolysosomes. Supporting a more generalized defect of autophagy, levels of lipidated LC3 are increased in Spatacsin knockout mouse embryonic fibrobasts (MEFs). Though distinct parameters of lysosomal function like processing of cathepsin D and lysosomal pH are preserved, lysosome numbers are reduced in knockout MEFs and the recovery of lysosomes during sustained starvation impaired consistent with a defect of autophagic lysosome reformation. Because lysosomes are reduced in cortical neurons and Purkinje cells in vivo, we propose that the decreased number of lysosomes available for fusion with autophagosomes impairs autolysosomal clearance, results in the accumulation of undegraded material and finally causes death of particularly sensitive neurons like cortical motoneurons and Purkinje cells in knockout mice.

  8. Lung autophagic response following exposure of mice to whole body irradiation, with and without amifostine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zois, Christos E.; Giatromanolaki, Alexandra; Kainulainen, Heikki; Botaitis, Sotirios; Torvinen, Sira; Simopoulos, Constantinos; Kortsaris, Alexandros; Sivridis, Efthimios; Koukourakis, Michael I.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We investigated the effect 6 Gy of WBI on the autophagic machinery of normal mouse lung. → Irradiation induces dysfunction of the autophagic machinery in normal lung, characterized by decreased transcription of the LC3A/Beclin-1 mRNA and accumulation of the LC3A, and p62 proteins. → The membrane bound LC3A-II protein levels increased in the cytosolic fraction (not in the pellet), contrasting the patterns noted after starvation-induced autophagy. → Administration of amifostine, reversed all the LC3A and p62 findings, suggesting protection of the normal autophagic function. -- Abstract: Purpose: The effect of ionizing irradiation on the autophagic response of normal tissues is largely unexplored. Abnormal autophagic function may interfere the protein quality control leading to cell degeneration and dysfunction. This study investigates its effect on the autophagic machinery of normal mouse lung. Methods and materials: Mice were exposed to 6 Gy of whole body γ-radiation and sacrificed at various time points. The expression of MAP1LC3A/LC3A/Atg8, beclin-1, p62/sequestosome-1 and of the Bnip3 proteins was analyzed. Results: Following irradiation, the LC3A-I and LC3A-II protein levels increased significantly at 72 h and 7 days. Strikingly, LC3A-II protein was increased (5.6-fold at 7 days; p < 0.001) only in the cytosolic fraction, but remained unchanged in the membrane fraction. The p62 protein, was significantly increased in both supernatant and pellet fraction (p < 0.001), suggesting an autophagosome turnover deregulation. These findings contrast the patterns of starvation-induced autophagy up-regulation. Beclin-1 levels remained unchanged. The Bnip3 protein was significantly increased at 8 h, but it sharply decreased at 72 h (p < 0.05). Administration of amifostine (200 mg/kg), 30 min before irradiation, reversed all the LC3A and p62 findings on blots, suggesting restoration of the normal autophagic function. The LC3A and Beclin1 m

  9. EFFECTS OF ETHANOL AND HYDROGEN PEROXIDE ON MOUSE LIMB BUD MESENCHYME DIFFERENTIATION AND CELL DEATH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many of the morphological defects associated with embryonic alcohol exposure are a result of cell death. During limb development, ethanol administration produces cell death in the limb and digital defects, including postaxial ectrodactyly. Because an accumulation of reactive oxyg...

  10. Inhibition of Autophagy via Activation of PI3K/Akt Pathway Contributes to the Protection of Ginsenoside Rb1 against Neuronal Death Caused by Ischemic Insults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianfei Luo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Lethal autophagy is a pathway leading to neuronal death caused by transient global ischemia. In this study, we examined the effect of Ginsenoside Rb1 (GRb1 on ischemia/reperfusion-induced autophagic neuronal death and investigated the role of PI3K/Akt. Ischemic neuronal death in vitro was induced by using oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD in SH-SY5Y cells, and transient global ischemia was produced by using two vessels occlusion in rats. Cellular viability of SH-SY5Y cells was assessed by MTT assay, and CA1 neuronal death was evaluated by Hematoxylin-eosin staining. Autophagic vacuoles were detected by using both fluorescent microscopy in combination with acridine orange (AO and Monodansylcadaverine (MDC staining and transmission electronic microscopy. Protein levels of LC3II, Beclin1, total Akt and phosphor-Akt at Ser473 were examined by western blotting analysis. GRb1 inhibited both OGD and transient ischemia-induced neuronal death and mitigated OGD-induced autophagic vacuoles in SH-SY5Y cells. By contrast, PI3K inhibitor LY294002 counteracted the protection of GRb1 against neuronal death caused by either OGD or transient ischemia. LY294002 not only mitigated the up-regulated protein level of phosphor Akt at Ser473 caused by GRb1, but also reversed the inhibitory effect of GRb1 on OGD and transient ischemia-induced elevation in protein levels of LC3II and Beclin1.

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection induces non-apoptotic cell death of human dendritic cells

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Ruth CM

    2011-10-24

    Abstract Background Dendritic cells (DCs) connect innate and adaptive immunity, and are necessary for an efficient CD4+ and CD8+ T cell response after infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). We previously described the macrophage cell death response to Mtb infection. To investigate the effect of Mtb infection on human DC viability, we infected these phagocytes with different strains of Mtb and assessed viability, as well as DNA fragmentation and caspase activity. In parallel studies, we assessed the impact of infection on DC maturation, cytokine production and bacillary survival. Results Infection of DCs with live Mtb (H37Ra or H37Rv) led to cell death. This cell death proceeded in a caspase-independent manner, and without nuclear fragmentation. In fact, substrate assays demonstrated that Mtb H37Ra-induced cell death progressed without the activation of the executioner caspases, 3\\/7. Although the death pathway was triggered after infection, the DCs successfully underwent maturation and produced a host-protective cytokine profile. Finally, dying infected DCs were permissive for Mtb H37Ra growth. Conclusions Human DCs undergo cell death after infection with live Mtb, in a manner that does not involve executioner caspases, and results in no mycobactericidal effect. Nonetheless, the DC maturation and cytokine profile observed suggests that the infected cells can still contribute to TB immunity.

  12. Betulinic acid induces cell death by necrosis in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Paloma Leão; Souza, Racquel Oliveira da Silva; Tessarolo, Louise Donadello; de Menezes, Ramon Róseo Paula Pessoa Bezerra; Sampaio, Tiago Lima; Canuto, Jader Almeida; Martins, Alice Maria Costa

    2017-10-01

    Chagas' disease is a neglected disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and constitutes a serious health problem worldwide. The treatment is limited, with variable efficacy of benznidazole and nifurtimox. Betulinic Acid (BA), a triterpene, can be found in medicinal herbs and has a wide variety of biological and pharmacological activities. The objective was to evaluate betulinic acid effects on the cell death mechanism in Trypanosoma cruzi strain Y. BA inhibited the growth of epimastigotes in periods of 24h (IC 50 =73.43μM), 48h (IC 50 =119.8μM) and 72h (IC 50 =212.2μM) of incubation; of trypomastigotes (IC 50 =51.88μM) in periods of 24h and intracellular amastigotes (IC 50 =25.94μM) in periods of 24 and 48h of incubation, no toxicity on LLC-MK 2 cells at the concentrations used. Analysis of the possible mechanism of parasite cell death showed alterations in mitochondrial membrane potential, alterations in cell membrane integrity, an increase in the formation of reactive oxygen species and increase swelling of the reservosomes. In conclusion, betulinic acid was be able to inhibition all developmental forms of Trypanosoma cruzi Y strain with necrotic mechanism and involvement of mitochondrial membrane potential alteration and increase in reactive oxygen species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Statins and voriconazole induce programmed cell death in Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Navarro, Carmen M; López-Arencibia, Atteneri; Sifaoui, Ines; Reyes-Batlle, María; Valladares, Basilio; Martínez-Carretero, Enrique; Piñero, José E; Maciver, Sutherland K; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob

    2015-05-01

    Members of the genus Acanthamoeba are facultative pathogens of humans, causing a sight-threatening keratitis and a life-threatening encephalitis. In order to treat those infections properly, it is necessary to target the treatment not only to the trophozoite but also to the cyst. Furthermore, it may be advantageous to avoid parasite killing by necrosis, which may induce local inflammation. We must also avoid toxicity of host tissue. Many drugs which target eukaryotes are known to induce programmed cell death (PCD), but this process is poorly characterized in Acanthamoeba. Here, we study the processes of programmed cell death in Acanthamoeba, induced by several drugs, such as statins and voriconazole. We tested atorvastatin, fluvastatin, simvastatin, and voriconazole at the 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) and IC90s that we have previously established. In order to evaluate this phenomenon, we investigated the DNA fragmentation, one of the main characteristics of PCD, with quantitative and qualitative techniques. Also, the changes related to phosphatidylserine exposure on the external cell membrane and cell permeability were studied. Finally, because caspases are key to PCD pathways, caspase activity was evaluated in Acanthamoeba. All the drugs assayed in this study induced PCD in Acanthamoeba. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study where PCD induced by drugs is described quantitatively and qualitatively in Acanthamoeba. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. RIP1 COMES BACK TO LIFE AS A CELL DEATH REGULATOR IN TNFR1 SIGALING

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Donnell, Marie Anne; Ting, Adrian T.

    2011-01-01

    Cell death induction by TNF has been an intensively studied area for the last two decades. Although it may appear that the skeleton should have been picked clean by now, new secrets about TNF death signaling are still being uncovered. In particular, the recent evidence that ubiquitination of the death kinase RIP1 regulates its participation in apoptotic and necrotic cell death is opening up unexplored avenues in the catacombs of TNF death signaling. In this minireview, we focus on two major cell death checkpoints that determine whether RIP1 functions as a pro-survival or pro-death molecule. PMID:21232018

  15. The Life and Death of a Plant Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabbage, Mehdi; Kessens, Ryan; Bartholomay, Lyric C; Williams, Brett

    2017-04-28

    Like all eukaryotic organisms, plants possess an innate program for controlled cellular demise termed programmed cell death (PCD). Despite the functional conservation of PCD across broad evolutionary distances, an understanding of the molecular machinery underpinning this fundamental program in plants remains largely elusive. As in mammalian PCD, the regulation of plant PCD is critical to development, homeostasis, and proper responses to stress. Evidence is emerging that autophagy is key to the regulation of PCD in plants and that it can dictate the outcomes of PCD execution under various scenarios. Here, we provide a broad and comparative overview of PCD processes in plants, with an emphasis on stress-induced PCD. We also discuss the implications of the paradox that is functional conservation of apoptotic hallmarks in plants in the absence of core mammalian apoptosis regulators, what that means, and whether an equivalent form of death occurs in plants.

  16. Programmed cell death in C. elegans, mammals and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Christina E N; Gunawardena, Arunika H L A N

    2012-08-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is the regulated removal of cells within an organism and plays a fundamental role in growth and development in nearly all eukaryotes. In animals, the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) has aided in elucidating many of the pathways involved in the cell death process. Various analogous PCD processes can also be found within mammalian PCD systems, including vertebrate limb development. Plants and animals also appear to share hallmarks of PCD, both on the cellular and molecular level. Cellular events visualized during plant PCD resemble those seen in animals including: nuclear condensation, DNA fragmentation, cytoplasmic condensation, and plasma membrane shrinkage. Recently the molecular mechanisms involved in plant PCD have begun to be elucidated. Although few regulatory proteins have been identified as conserved across all eukaryotes, molecular features such as the participation of caspase-like proteases, Bcl-2-like family members and mitochondrial proteins appear to be conserved between plant and animal systems. Transgenic expression of mammalian and C. elegans pro- and anti-apoptotic genes in plants has been observed to dramatically influence the regulatory pathways of plant PCD. Although these genes often show little to no sequence similarity they can frequently act as functional substitutes for one another, thus suggesting that action may be more important than sequence resemblance. Here we present a summary of these findings, focusing on the similarities, between mammals, C. elegans, and plants. An emphasis will be placed on the mitochondria and its role in the cell death pathway within each organism. Through the comparison of these systems on both a cellular and molecular level we can begin to better understand PCD in plant systems, and perhaps shed light on the pathways, which are controlling the process. This manuscript adds to the field of PCD in plant systems by profiling apoptotic factors, to scale on a protein

  17. Hydralazine rescues PC12 cells from acrolein-mediated death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu-Snyder, Peishan; Borgens, Richard Ben; Shi, Riyi

    2006-07-01

    Acrolein, a major lipid peroxidation product, has been associated with both CNS trauma and neurodegenerative diseases. Because of its long half-life, acrolein is a potent endogenous toxin capable of killing healthy cells during the secondary injury process. Traditionally, attempts to intervene in the process of progressive cell death after the primary injury have included scavenging reactive oxygen species (so-called free radicals). The animal data supporting such an approach have generally been positive, but all human clinical trials attempting a similar outcome in human CNS injury have failed. New drugs that might reduce toxicity by scavenging the products of lipid peroxidation present a promising, and little investigated, therapeutic approach. Hydralazine, a well-known treatment for hypertension, has been reported to react with acrolein, forming hydrazone in cell-free systems. In the companion paper, we have established an acrolein-mediated cell injury model using PC12 cells in vitro. Here we test the hypothesis that the formation of hydrazone adducts with acrolein is able to reduce acrolein toxicity and spare a significant percentage of the population of PC12 cells from death. Concentrations of approximately 1 mM of this aldehyde scavenger can rescue over 80% of the population of PC12 cells. This study provides a basis for a new pharmacological treatment to reduce the effects of secondary injury in the damaged and/or diseased nervous system. In particular, we describe the need for new drugs that possess aldehyde scavenging properties but do not interfere with the regulation of blood pressure. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Modulating cell-to-cell variability and sensitivity to death ligands by co-drugging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flusberg, Deborah A; Sorger, Peter K

    2013-01-01

    TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) holds promise as an anti-cancer therapeutic but efficiently induces apoptosis in only a subset of tumor cell lines. Moreover, even in clonal populations of responsive lines, only a fraction of cells dies in response to TRAIL and individual cells exhibit cell-to-cell variability in the timing of cell death. Fractional killing in these cell populations appears to arise not from genetic differences among cells but rather from differences in gene expression states, fluctuations in protein levels and the extent to which TRAIL-induced death or survival pathways become activated. In this study, we ask how cell-to-cell variability manifests in cell types with different sensitivities to TRAIL, as well as how it changes when cells are exposed to combinations of drugs. We show that individual cells that survive treatment with TRAIL can regenerate the sensitivity and death-time distribution of the parental population, demonstrating that fractional killing is a stable property of cell populations. We also show that cell-to-cell variability in the timing and probability of apoptosis in response to treatment can be tuned using combinations of drugs that together increase apoptotic sensitivity compared to treatment with one drug alone. In the case of TRAIL, modulation of cell-to-cell variability by co-drugging appears to involve a reduction in the threshold for mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization. (paper)

  19. Secretory phospholipase A2-mediated neuronal cell death involves glutamate ionotropic receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolko, Miriam; de Turco, Elena B; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    2002-01-01

    To define the significance of glutamate ionotropic receptors in sPLA -mediated neuronal cell death we used the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 and the AMPA receptor antagonist PNQX. In primary neuronal cell cultures both MK-801 and PNQX inhibited sPLA - and glutamate-induced neuronal death. [ H...... neuronal cell death. We conclude that glutamatergic synaptic activity modulates sPLA -induced neuronal cell death....

  20. Methuosis: Nonapoptotic Cell Death Associated with Vacuolization of Macropinosome and Endosome Compartments

    OpenAIRE

    Maltese, William A.; Overmeyer, Jean H.

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis is the most widely recognized form of physiological programmed cell death. During the past three decades, various nonapoptotic forms of cell death have gained increasing attention, largely because of their potential importance in pathological processes, toxicology, and cancer therapy. A recent addition to the panoply of cell death phenotypes is methuosis. The neologism is derived from the Greek methuo (to drink to intoxication) because the hallmark of this form of cell death is disp...

  1. Bimodal cell death induced by high radiation doses in the radioresistant sf9 insect cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandna, S.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: This study was conducted to investigate the mode(s) of cell death induced by high radiation doses in the highly radioresistant Sf9 insect ovarian cell line. Methods: Cells were exposed to γ-radiation doses 200Gy and 500Gy, harvested at various time intervals (6h-72h) following irradiation, and subjected to cell morphology assay, DNA agarose gel electrophoresis, single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE; comet assay) and Annexin-V labeling for the detection of membrane phosphatidylserine externalization. Cell morphology was assessed in cells entrapped and fixed in agarose gel directly from the cell suspension, thus preventing the possible loss of fragments/ apoptotic bodies. Surviving fraction of Sf9 cells was 0.01 at 200Gy and 98%) undergoing extensive DNA fragmentation at 500Gy, whereas the frequency of cells with DNA fragmentation was considerably less (∼12%) at 200Gy. Conclusions: While the mode of cell death at 200Gy seems to be different from typical apoptosis, a dose of 500Gy induced bimodal cell death, with typical apoptotic as well as the atypical cell death observed at 200Gy

  2. Cell arrest and cell death in mammalian preimplantation development: lessons from the bovine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leidenfrost, Sandra; Boelhauve, Marc; Reichenbach, Myriam; Güngör, Tuna; Reichenbach, Horst-Dieter; Sinowatz, Fred; Wolf, Eckhard; Habermann, Felix A

    2011-01-01

    The causes, modes, biological role and prospective significance of cell death in preimplantation development in humans and other mammals are still poorly understood. Early bovine embryos represent a very attractive experimental model for the investigation of this fundamental and important issue. To obtain reference data on the temporal and spatial occurrence of cell death in early bovine embryogenesis, three-dimensionally preserved embryos of different ages and stages of development up to hatched blastocysts were examined in toto by confocal laser scanning microscopy. In parallel, transcript abundance profiles for selected apoptosis-related genes were analyzed by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Our study documents that in vitro as well as in vivo, the first four cleavage cycles are prone to a high failure rate including different types of permanent cell cycle arrest and subsequent non-apoptotic blastomere death. In vitro produced and in vivo derived blastocysts showed a significant incidence of cell death in the inner cell mass (ICM), but only in part with morphological features of apoptosis. Importantly, transcripts for CASP3, CASP9, CASP8 and FAS/FASLG were not detectable or found at very low abundances. In vitro and in vivo, errors and failures of the first and the next three cleavage divisions frequently cause immediate embryo death or lead to aberrant subsequent development, and are the main source of developmental heterogeneity. A substantial occurrence of cell death in the ICM even in fast developing blastocysts strongly suggests a regular developmentally controlled elimination of cells, while the nature and mechanisms of ICM cell death are unclear. Morphological findings as well as transcript levels measured for important apoptosis-related genes are in conflict with the view that classical caspase-mediated apoptosis is the major cause of cell death in early bovine development.

  3. Cell arrest and cell death in mammalian preimplantation development: lessons from the bovine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Leidenfrost

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The causes, modes, biological role and prospective significance of cell death in preimplantation development in humans and other mammals are still poorly understood. Early bovine embryos represent a very attractive experimental model for the investigation of this fundamental and important issue. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To obtain reference data on the temporal and spatial occurrence of cell death in early bovine embryogenesis, three-dimensionally preserved embryos of different ages and stages of development up to hatched blastocysts were examined in toto by confocal laser scanning microscopy. In parallel, transcript abundance profiles for selected apoptosis-related genes were analyzed by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Our study documents that in vitro as well as in vivo, the first four cleavage cycles are prone to a high failure rate including different types of permanent cell cycle arrest and subsequent non-apoptotic blastomere death. In vitro produced and in vivo derived blastocysts showed a significant incidence of cell death in the inner cell mass (ICM, but only in part with morphological features of apoptosis. Importantly, transcripts for CASP3, CASP9, CASP8 and FAS/FASLG were not detectable or found at very low abundances. CONCLUSIONS: In vitro and in vivo, errors and failures of the first and the next three cleavage divisions frequently cause immediate embryo death or lead to aberrant subsequent development, and are the main source of developmental heterogeneity. A substantial occurrence of cell death in the ICM even in fast developing blastocysts strongly suggests a regular developmentally controlled elimination of cells, while the nature and mechanisms of ICM cell death are unclear. Morphological findings as well as transcript levels measured for important apoptosis-related genes are in conflict with the view that classical caspase-mediated apoptosis is the major cause of cell death in early bovine

  4. Escaping Death: Mitochondrial Redox Homeostasis in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Ciccarese

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are important signaling molecules that act through the oxidation of nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids. Several hallmarks of cancer, including uncontrolled proliferation, angiogenesis, and genomic instability, are promoted by the increased ROS levels commonly found in tumor cells. To counteract excessive ROS accumulation, oxidative stress, and death, cancer cells tightly regulate ROS levels by enhancing scavenging enzymes, which are dependent on the reducing cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH. This review focuses on mitochondrial ROS homeostasis with a description of six pathways of NADPH production in mitochondria and a discussion of the possible strategies of pharmacological intervention to selectively eliminate cancer cells by increasing their ROS levels.

  5. Using microfluidics to study programmed cell death: A new approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark, Christina; Zor, Kinga; Heiskanen, Arto

    This project focuses on applying microfluidic tissue culture for electrochemical or optical measurements during programmed cell death (PCD) in barley aleurone layer to increase understanding of the underlying mechanisms of PCD in plants. Microfluidic tissue culture enables in vitro experiments...... to approach in vivo conditions. Microfluidics also allow implementation of a wide range of electrochemical or optical assays for online, real-time, parallel analysis of important parameters such as redox activity, O2 and H2O2 concentration, extracellular pH, cell viability and enzyme activity1,2. Currently......, we are optimising an intracellular whole-cell redox activity assay3 that detects changes in redox activity in barley aleurone layer during PCD. The assay uses a double mediator-system to electrochemically measure redox activity via changes in the NADP:NADPH ratio. Initial experiments assay show...

  6. Bifurcate effects of glucose on caspase-independent cell death during hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aki, Toshihiko; Nara, Akina; Funakoshi, Takeshi; Uemura, Koichi

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the effect of glucose on hypoxic death of rat cardiomyocyte-derived H9c2 cells and found that there is an optimal glucose concentration for protection against hypoxic cell death. Hypoxic cell death in the absence of glucose is accompanied by rapid ATP depletion, release of apoptosis-inducing factor from mitochondria, and nuclear chromatin condensation, all of which are inhibited by glucose in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, excessive glucose also induces hypoxic cell death that is not accompanied by these events, suggesting a change in the mode of cell death between hypoxic cells with and without glucose supplementation.

  7. MECHANISMS OF MANGANESE-INDUCED RAT PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA (PC12) CELL DEATH AND CELL DIFFERENTIATION. (R826248)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mn is a neurotoxin that leads to a syndrome resembling Parkinson's disease after prolonged exposure to high concentrations. Our laboratory has been investigating the mechanism by which Mn induces neuronal cell death. To accomplish this, we have utilized rat pheochromocytom...

  8. Metal stress induces programmed cell death in aquatic fungi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, Maria-Manuel; Almeida, Bruno; Ludovico, Paula; Cassio, Fernanda

    2009-01-01

    Aquatic hyphomycetes are a group of fungi that play a key role in organic matter turnover in both clean and metal-polluted streams. We examined the ability of Cu or Zn to induce programmed cell death (PCD) in three aquatic hyphomycete species through the evaluation of typical apoptotic markers, namely reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, caspase-like activity, nuclear morphological alterations, and the occurrence of DNA strand breaks assessed by TUNEL assay. The exposure to both metals induced apoptotic events in all tested aquatic fungi. The most tolerant fungi either to Zn (Varicosporium elodeae) or Cu (Heliscussubmersus) exhibited higher levels of PCD markers, suggesting that PCD processes might be linked to fungal resistance/tolerance to metal stress. Moreover, different patterns of apoptotic markers were found, namely a PCD process independent of ROS accumulation in V. elodeae exposed to Cu, or independent of caspase-like activity in Flagellospora curta exposed to Zn, or even without the occurrence of DNA strand breaks in F. curta exposed to Cu. This suggests that a multiplicity of PCD pathways might be operating in aquatic hyphomycetes. The occurrence of a tightly regulated cell death pathway, such as PCD, in aquatic hyphomycetes under metal stress might be a part of the mechanisms underlying fungal acclimation in metal-polluted streams, because it would allow the rapid removal of unwanted or damaged cells sparing nutrients and space for the fittest ones.

  9. Mast Cell Function and Death in Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuser-Batista, Marcelo; Corrêa, José Raimundo; Carvalho, Vinícius Frias; de Carvalho Britto, Constança Felícia De Paoli; da Cruz Moreira, Otacilio; Batista, Marcos Meuser; Soares, Maurílio José; Filho, Francisco Alves Farias; e Silva, Patrícia Machado R.; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Silva, Robson Coutinho; Henriques-Pons, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Although the roles of mast cells (MCs) are essential in many inflammatory and fibrotic diseases, their role in Trypanosoma cruzi–induced cardiomyopathy is unexplored. In this study, we treated infected CBA mice with cromolyn, an MC stabilizer, and observed much greater parasitemia and interferon-γ levels, higher mortality, myocarditis, and cardiac damage. Although these data show that MCs are important in controlling acute infection, we observed MC apoptosis in the cardiac tissue and peritoneal cavity of untreated mice. In the heart, pericardial mucosal MC die, perhaps because of reduced amounts of local stem cell factor. Using RT-PCR in purified cardiac MCs, we observed that infection induced transcription of P2X7 receptor and Fas, two molecules reportedly involved in cell death and inflammatory regulation. In gld/gld mice (FasL−/−), apoptosis of cardiac, but not peritoneal, MCs was decreased. Conversely, infection of P2X7−/− mice led to reduced peritoneal, but not cardiac, MC death. These data illustrate the immunomodulatory role played by MCs in T. cruzi infection and the complexity of molecular interactions that control inflammatory pathways in different tissues and compartments. PMID:21819958

  10. Cell death versus cell survival instructed by supramolecular cohesion of nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomb, Christina J.; Sur, Shantanu; Ortony, Julia H.; Lee, One-Sun; Matson, John B.; Boekhoven, Job; Yu, Jeong Min; Schatz, George C.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2014-02-01

    Many naturally occurring peptides containing cationic and hydrophobic domains have evolved to interact with mammalian cell membranes and have been incorporated into materials for non-viral gene delivery, cancer therapy or treatment of microbial infections. Their electrostatic attraction to the negatively charged cell surface and hydrophobic interactions with the membrane lipids enable intracellular delivery or cell lysis. Although the effects of hydrophobicity and cationic charge of soluble molecules on the cell membrane are well known, the interactions between materials with these molecular features and cells remain poorly understood. Here we report that varying the cohesive forces within nanofibres of supramolecular materials with nearly identical cationic and hydrophobic structure instruct cell death or cell survival. Weak intermolecular bonds promote cell death through disruption of lipid membranes, while materials reinforced by hydrogen bonds support cell viability. These findings provide new strategies to design biomaterials that interact with the cell membrane.

  11. Anhydrobiosis and programmed cell death in plants: Commonalities and Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer Singh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Anhydrobiosis is an adaptive strategy of certain organisms or specialised propagules to survive in the absence of water while programmed cell death (PCD is a finely tuned cellular process of the selective elimination of targeted cell during developmental programme and perturbed biotic and abiotic conditions. Particularly during water stress both the strategies serve single purpose i.e., survival indicating PCD may also function as an adaptive process under certain conditions. During stress conditions PCD cause targeted cells death in order to keep the homeostatic balance required for the organism survival, whereas anhydrobiosis suspends cellular metabolic functions mimicking a state similar to death until reestablishment of the favourable conditions. Anhydrobiosis is commonly observed among organisms that have ability to revive their metabolism on rehydration after removal of all or almost all cellular water without damage. This feature is widely represented in terrestrial cyanobacteria and bryophytes where it is very common in both vegetative and reproductive stages of life-cycle. In the course of evolution, with the development of advanced vascular system in higher plants, anhydrobiosis was gradually lost from the vegetative phase of life-cycle. Though it is retained in resurrection plants that primarily belong to thallophytes and a small group of vascular angiosperm, it can be mostly found restricted in orthodox seeds of higher plants. On the contrary, PCD is a common process in all eukaryotes from unicellular to multicellular organisms including higher plants and mammals. In this review we discuss physiological and biochemical commonalities and differences between anhydrobiosis and PCD.

  12. Ras and Rheb Signaling in Survival and Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrkamp, Anja [Molecular Neurobiochemistry, Ruhr University of Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Herrmann, Christian [Department of Physical Chemistry1, Protein Interaction, Ruhr University of Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Stoll, Raphael [Biomolecular NMR, Ruhr University of Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Heumann, Rolf, E-mail: rolf.heumann@rub.de [Molecular Neurobiochemistry, Ruhr University of Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2013-05-28

    One of the most obvious hallmarks of cancer is uncontrolled proliferation of cells partly due to independence of growth factor supply. A major component of mitogenic signaling is Ras, a small GTPase. It was the first identified human protooncogene and is known since more than three decades to promote cellular proliferation and growth. Ras was shown to support growth factor-independent survival during development and to protect from chemical or mechanical lesion-induced neuronal degeneration in postmitotic neurons. In contrast, for specific patho-physiological cases and cellular systems it has been shown that Ras may also promote cell death. Proteins from the Ras association family (Rassf, especially Rassf1 and Rassf5) are tumor suppressors that are activated by Ras-GTP, triggering apoptosis via e.g., activation of mammalian sterile 20-like (MST1) kinase. In contrast to Ras, their expression is suppressed in many types of tumours, which makes Rassf proteins an exciting model for understanding the divergent effects of Ras activity. It seems likely that the outcome of Ras signaling depends on the balance between the activation of its various downstream effectors, thus determining cellular fate towards either proliferation or apoptosis. Ras homologue enriched in brain (Rheb) is a protein from the Ras superfamily that is also known to promote proliferation, growth, and regeneration through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTor) pathway. However, recent evidences indicate that the Rheb-mTor pathway may switch its function from a pro-growth into a cell death pathway, depending on the cellular situation. In contrast to Ras signaling, for Rheb, the cellular context is likely to modulate the whole Rheb-mTor pathway towards cellular death or survival, respectively.

  13. Ras and Rheb Signaling in Survival and Cell Death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrkamp, Anja; Herrmann, Christian; Stoll, Raphael; Heumann, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    One of the most obvious hallmarks of cancer is uncontrolled proliferation of cells partly due to independence of growth factor supply. A major component of mitogenic signaling is Ras, a small GTPase. It was the first identified human protooncogene and is known since more than three decades to promote cellular proliferation and growth. Ras was shown to support growth factor-independent survival during development and to protect from chemical or mechanical lesion-induced neuronal degeneration in postmitotic neurons. In contrast, for specific patho-physiological cases and cellular systems it has been shown that Ras may also promote cell death. Proteins from the Ras association family (Rassf, especially Rassf1 and Rassf5) are tumor suppressors that are activated by Ras-GTP, triggering apoptosis via e.g., activation of mammalian sterile 20-like (MST1) kinase. In contrast to Ras, their expression is suppressed in many types of tumours, which makes Rassf proteins an exciting model for understanding the divergent effects of Ras activity. It seems likely that the outcome of Ras signaling depends on the balance between the activation of its various downstream effectors, thus determining cellular fate towards either proliferation or apoptosis. Ras homologue enriched in brain (Rheb) is a protein from the Ras superfamily that is also known to promote proliferation, growth, and regeneration through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTor) pathway. However, recent evidences indicate that the Rheb-mTor pathway may switch its function from a pro-growth into a cell death pathway, depending on the cellular situation. In contrast to Ras signaling, for Rheb, the cellular context is likely to modulate the whole Rheb-mTor pathway towards cellular death or survival, respectively

  14. Induction of Programmed Cell Death in Human Alveolar Epithelial Cells Infected with Influenza Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh Shahsavandi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Avian influenza viruses are considered as a serious threat to human and animal health. An increase in expression of proinflammatory cytokines and type I IFN genes, as well as host cell death responses contribute to the pathogenesis of influenza infection. Hence, this study aimed to evaluate the growth dynamics of subacute avian influenza virus in human respiratory alveolar epithelium cells (A549. Methods: The A549 cell cultures were infected at MOIs 0.1 and 2.0 viral doses in the presence and absence of trypsin. The virus growth kinetics were elucidated by the plaque assay and the cell viability was determined by MTT at various times after the infection. The induction quality of programmed cell death as well as the signal transduction pathway of death were assessed by genomic DNA fragmentation and western blotting respectively. Results: The study findings indicated that although the H9N2 virus replication did produce a marked cytopathic effect on the alveolar cells, which led to a reduction in the cell viability, the viral titers were increased in the infected cells. The virus replication of in these cells indicated repression of host defense mechanism as well as activation of cell death. The induction of apoptosis in A549 cells was correlated with the increased virus titers as well as virus replication (p< 0.05. Conclusion: H9N2 avian influenza virus were demonstrated to induce apoptosis in human alveolar epithelial cells via the intrinsic pathway in a dose-dependent manner.

  15. Attenuation of oxidative neuronal cell death by coffee phenolic phytochemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Eun Sun; Jang, Young Jin [Department of Agricultural Biotechnology and Research Institute for Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Mun Kyung; Kang, Nam Joo [Department of Agricultural Biotechnology and Research Institute for Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Konkuk University, 1 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ki Won [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Konkuk University, 1 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: kiwon@konkuk.ac.kr; Lee, Hyong Joo [Department of Agricultural Biotechnology and Research Institute for Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: leehyjo@snu.ac.kr

    2009-02-10

    Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) are strongly associated with oxidative stress, which is induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) including hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). Recent studies suggest that moderate coffee consumption may reduce the risk of neurodegenerative diseases such as AD, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect remain to be clarified. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of chlorogenic acid (5-O-caffeoylquinic acid; CGA), a major phenolic phytochemical found in instant decaffeinated coffee (IDC), and IDC against oxidative PC12 neuronal cell death. IDC (1 and 5 {mu}g/ml) or CGA (1 and 5 {mu}M) attenuated H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced PC12 cell death. H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation were strongly inhibited by pretreatment with IDC or CGA. Pretreatment with IDC or CGA also inhibited the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and downregulation of Bcl-X{sub L} and caspase-3. The accumulation of intracellular ROS in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-treated PC12 cells was dose-dependently diminished by IDC or CGA. The activation of c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in PC12 cells was also inhibited by IDC or CGA. Collectively, these results indicate that IDC and CGA protect PC12 cells from H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced apoptosis by blocking the accumulation of intracellular ROS and the activation of MAPKs.

  16. Acrolein-induced cell death in PC12 cells: role of mitochondria-mediated oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jian; Robinson, J Paul; Shi, Riyi

    2005-12-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in acrolein cytotoxicity in various cell types, including mammalian spinal cord tissue. In this study we report that acrolein also decreases PC12 cell viability in a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent manner. Specifically, acrolein-induced cell death, mainly necrosis, is accompanied by the accumulation of cellular ROS. Elevating ROS scavengers can alleviate acrolein-induced cell death. Furthermore, we show that exposure to acrolein leads to mitochondrial dysfunction, denoted by the loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, reduction of cellular oxygen consumption, and decrease of ATP level. This raises the possibility that the cellular accumulation of ROS could result from the increased production of ROS in the mitochondria of PC12 cells as a result of exposure to acrolein. The acrolein-induced significant decrease of ATP production in mitochondria may also explain why necrosis, not apoptosis, is the dominant type of cell death. In conclusion, our data suggest that one possible mechanism of acrolein-induced cell death could be through mitochondria as its initial target. The subsequent increase of ROS then inflicts cell death and further worsens mitochondria function. Such mechanism may play an important role in CNS trauma and neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Regulatory mechanism of radiation-induced cancer cell death by the change of cell cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Soo Jin; Jeong, Min Ho; Jang, Ji Yeon [College of Medicine, Donga Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-09-01

    In our previous study, we have shown the main cell death pattern induced by irradiation or protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitors in K562 human myelogenous leukemic cell line. Death of the cells treated with irradiation alone was characterized by mitotic catastrophe and typical radiation-induced apoptosis was accelerated by herbimycin A (HMA). Both types of cell death were inhibited by genistein. In this study, we investigated the effects of HMA and genistein on cell cycle regulation and its correlation with the alterations of radiation-induced cell death. K562 cells in exponential growth phase were used for this study. The cells were irradiated with 10 Gy using 6 MeV Linac (200-300 cGy/min). Immediately after irradiation, cells were treated with 250 nM of HMA or 25{mu}M of genistein. The distributions of cell cycle, the expressions of cell cycle-related protein, the activities of cyclin-dependent kinase, and the yield of senescence and differentiation were analyzed. X-irradiated cells were arrested in the G2 phase of the cell cycle but unlike the p53-positive cells, they were not able to sustain the cell cycle arrest. An accumulation of cells in G2 phase of first cell-cycle post-treatment and an increase of cyclin B1 were correlated with spontaneous, premature, chromosome condensation and mitotic catastrophe. HMA induced rapid G2 checkpoint abrogation and concomitant p53-independent G1 accumulation HMA-induced cell cycle modifications correlated with the increase of cdc2 kinase activity, the decrease of the expressions of cyclins E and A and of CDK2 kinase activity, and the enhancement of radiation-induced apoptosis. Genistein maintained cells that were arrested in the G2-phase, decreased the expressions of cyclin B1 and cdc25C and cdc2 kinase activity, increased the expression of p16, and sustained senescence and megakaryocytic differentiation. The effects of HMA and genistein on the radiation-induced cell death of K562 cells were closely related to the cell

  18. IsaB Inhibits Autophagic Flux to Promote Host Transmission of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pei-Feng; Cheng, Jin-Shiung; Sy, Cheng-Len; Huang, Wei-Chun; Yang, Hsiu-Chen; Gallo, Richard L; Huang, Chun-Ming; Shu, Chih-Wen

    2015-11-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has emerged as a major nosocomial pathogen that is widespread in both health-care facilities and in the community at large, as a result of direct host-to-host transmission. Several virulence factors are associated with pathogen transmission to naive hosts. Immunodominant surface antigen B (IsaB) is a virulence factor that helps Staphylococcus aureus to evade the host defense system. However, the mechanism of IsaB on host transmissibility remains unclear. We found that IsaB expression was elevated in transmissible MRSA. Wild-type isaB strains inhibited autophagic flux to promote bacterial survival and elicit inflammation in THP-1 cells and mouse skin. MRSA isolates with increased IsaB expression showed decreased autophagic flux, and the MRSA isolate with the lowest IsaB expression showed increased autophagic flux. In addition, recombinant IsaB rescued the virulence of the isaB deletion strain and increased the group A streptococcus (GAS) virulence in vivo. Together, these results reveal that IsaB diminishes autophagic flux, thereby allowing MRSA to evade host degradation. These findings suggest that IsaB is a suitable target for preventing or treating MRSA infection.

  19. Bax-induced cell death in tobacco is similar to the hypersensitive response

    OpenAIRE

    Lacomme, Christophe; Santa Cruz, Simon

    1999-01-01

    Bax, a death-promoting member of the Bcl-2 family of proteins, triggered cell death when expressed in plants from a tobacco mosaic virus vector. Analysis of Bax deletion mutants demonstrated a requirement for the BH1 and BH3 domains in promoting rapid cell death, whereas deletion of the carboxyl-terminal transmembrane domain completely abolished the lethality of Bax in plants. The phenotype of cell death induced by Bax closely resembled the hypersensitive response induced by wild-type tobacco...

  20. Programmed cell death in periodontitis: recent advances and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, B; Zhou, T; Yang, W L; Liu, J; Shao, L Q

    2017-07-01

    Periodontitis is a highly prevalent infectious disease, characterized by destruction of the periodontium, and is the main cause of tooth loss. Periodontitis is initiated by periodontal pathogens, while other risk factors including smoking, stress, and systemic diseases aggravate its progression. Periodontitis affects many people worldwide, but the molecular mechanisms by which pathogens and risk factors destroy the periodontium are unclear. Programmed cell death (PCD), different from necrosis, is an active cell death mediated by a cascade of gene expression events and can be mainly classified into apoptosis, autophagy, necroptosis, and pyroptosis. Although PCD is involved in many inflammatory diseases, its correlation with periodontitis is unclear. After reviewing the relevant published articles, we found that apoptosis has indeed been reported to play a role in periodontitis. However, the role of autophagy in periodontitis needs further verification. Additionally, implication of necroptosis or pyroptosis in periodontitis remains unknown. Therefore, we recommend future studies, which will unravel the pivotal role of PCD in periodontitis, allowing us to prevent, diagnose, and treat the disease, as well as predict its outcomes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The Molecular Ecophysiology of Programmed Cell Death in Marine Phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidle, Kay D.

    2015-01-01

    Planktonic, prokaryotic, and eukaryotic photoautotrophs (phytoplankton) share a diverse and ancient evolutionary history, during which time they have played key roles in regulating marine food webs, biogeochemical cycles, and Earth's climate. Because phytoplankton represent the basis of marine ecosystems, the manner in which they die critically determines the flow and fate of photosynthetically fixed organic matter (and associated elements), ultimately constraining upper-ocean biogeochemistry. Programmed cell death (PCD) and associated pathway genes, which are triggered by a variety of nutrient stressors and are employed by parasitic viruses, play an integral role in determining the cell fate of diverse photoautotrophs in the modern ocean. Indeed, these multifaceted death pathways continue to shape the success and evolutionary trajectory of diverse phytoplankton lineages at sea. Research over the past two decades has employed physiological, biochemical, and genetic techniques to provide a novel, comprehensive, mechanistic understanding of the factors controlling this key process. Here, I discuss the current understanding of the genetics, activation, and regulation of PCD pathways in marine model systems; how PCD evolved in unicellular photoautotrophs; how it mechanistically interfaces with viral infection pathways; how stress signals are sensed and transduced into cellular responses; and how novel molecular and biochemical tools are revealing the impact of PCD genes on the fate of natural phytoplankton assemblages.

  2. Humanin Derivatives Inhibit Necrotic Cell Death in Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Aviv; Lerner-Yardeni, Jenny; Meridor, David; Kasher, Roni; Nathan, Ilana; Parola, Abraham H

    2015-06-04

    Humanin and its derivatives are peptides known for their protective antiapoptotic effects against Alzheimer's disease. Herein, we identify a novel function of the humanin-derivative AGA(C8R)-HNG17 (namely, protection against cellular necrosis). Necrosis is one of the main modes of cell death, which was until recently considered an unmoderated process. However, recent findings suggest the opposite. We have found that AGA(C8R)-HNG17 confers protection against necrosis in the neuronal cell lines PC-12 and NSC-34, where necrosis is induced in a glucose-free medium by either chemohypoxia or by a shift from apoptosis to necrosis. Our studies in traumatic brain injury models in mice, where necrosis is the main mode of neuronal cell death, have shown that AGA(C8R)-HNG17 has a protective effect. This result is demonstrated by a decrease in a neuronal severity score and by a reduction in brain edema, as measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An insight into the peptide's antinecrotic mechanism was attained through measurements of cellular ATP levels in PC-12 cells under necrotic conditions, showing that the peptide mitigates a necrosis-associated decrease in ATP levels. Further, we demonstrate the peptide's direct enhancement of the activity of ATP synthase activity, isolated from rat-liver mitochondria, suggesting that AGA(C8R)-HNG17 targets the mitochondria and regulates cellular ATP levels. Thus, AGA(C8R)-HNG17 has potential use for the development of drug therapies for necrosis-related diseases, for example, traumatic brain injury, stroke, myocardial infarction, and other conditions for which no efficient drug-based treatment is currently available. Finally, this study provides new insight into the mechanisms underlying the antinecrotic mode of action of AGA(C8R)-HNG17.

  3. Eryptosis: An Erythrocyte’s Suicidal Type of Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Repsold

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Erythrocytes play an important role in oxygen and carbon dioxide transport. Although erythrocytes possess no nucleus or mitochondria, they fulfil several metabolic activities namely, the Embden-Meyerhof pathway, as well as the hexose monophosphate shunt. Metabolic processes within the erythrocyte contribute to the morphology/shape of the cell and important constituents are being kept in an active, reduced form. Erythrocytes undergo a form of suicidal cell death called eryptosis. Eryptosis results from a wide variety of contributors including hyperosmolarity, oxidative stress, and exposure to xenobiotics. Eryptosis occurs before the erythrocyte has had a chance to be naturally removed from the circulation after its 120-day lifespan and is characterised by the presence of membrane blebbing, cell shrinkage, and phosphatidylserine exposure that correspond to nucleated cell apoptotic characteristics. After eryptosis is triggered there is an increase in cytosolic calcium (Ca2+ ion levels. This increase causes activation of Ca2+-sensitive potassium (K+ channels which leads to a decrease in intracellular potassium chloride (KCl and shrinkage of the erythrocyte. Ceramide, produced by sphingomyelinase from the cell membrane’s sphingomyelin, contributes to the occurrence of eryptosis. Eryptosis ensures healthy erythrocyte quantity in circulation whereas excessive eryptosis may set an environment for the clinical presence of pathophysiological conditions including anaemia.

  4. Programmed cell death in plants: A chloroplastic connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambastha, Vivek; Tripathy, Baishnab C; Tiwari, Budhi Sagar

    2015-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an integral cellular program by which targeted cells culminate to demise under certain developmental and pathological conditions. It is essential for controlling cell number, removing unwanted diseased or damaged cells and maintaining the cellular homeostasis. The details of PCD process has been very well elucidated and characterized in animals but similar understanding of the process in plants has not been achieved rather the field is still in its infancy that sees some sporadic reports every now and then. The plants have 2 energy generating sub-cellular organelles- mitochondria and chloroplasts unlike animals that just have mitochondria. The presence of chloroplast as an additional energy transducing and ROS generating compartment in a plant cell inclines to advocate the involvement of chloroplasts in PCD execution process. As chloroplasts are supposed to be progenies of unicellular photosynthetic organisms that evolved as a result of endosymbiosis, the possibility of retaining some of the components involved in bacterial PCD by chloroplasts cannot be ruled out. Despite several excellent reviews on PCD in plants, there is a void on an update of information at a place on the regulation of PCD by chloroplast. This review has been written to provide an update on the information supporting the involvement of chloroplast in PCD process and the possible future course of the field.

  5. Cell death and impairment of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion induced by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in the β-cell line INS-1E

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piaggi, Simona; Novelli, Michela; Martino, Luisa; Masini, Matilde; Raggi, Chiara; Orciuolo, Enrico; Masiello, Pellegrino; Casini, Alessandro; De Tata, Vincenzo

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this research was to characterize 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) toxicity on the insulin-secreting β-cell line INS-1E. A sharp decline of cell survival (below 20%) was observed after 1 h exposure to TCDD concentrations between 12.5 and 25 nM. Ultrastructurally, β-cell death was characterized by extensive degranulation, appearance of autophagic vacuoles, and peripheral nuclear condensation. Cytotoxic concentrations of TCDD rapidly induced a dose-dependent increase in intracellular calcium concentration. Blocking calcium entry by EGTA significantly decreased TCDD cytotoxicity. TCDD was also able to rapidly induce mitochondrial depolarization. Interestingly, 1 h exposition of INS-1E cells to very low TCDD concentrations (0.05-1 nM) dramatically impaired glucose-stimulated but not KCl-stimulated insulin secretion. In conclusion, our results clearly show that TCDD exerts a direct β-cell cytotoxic effect at concentrations of 15-25 nM, but also markedly impairs glucose-stimulated insulin secretion at concentrations 20 times lower than these. On the basis of this latter observation we suggest that pancreatic β-cells could be considered a specific and sensitive target for dioxin toxicity

  6. The role of mislocalized phototransduction in photoreceptor cell death of retinitis pigmentosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Nakao

    Full Text Available Most of inherited retinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP cause photoreceptor cell death resulting in blindness. RP is a large family of diseases in which the photoreceptor cell death can be caused by a number of pathways. Among them, light exposure has been reported to induce photoreceptor cell death. However, the detailed mechanism by which photoreceptor cell death is caused by light exposure is unclear. In this study, we have shown that even a mild light exposure can induce ectopic phototransduction and result in the acceleration of rod photoreceptor cell death in some vertebrate models. In ovl, a zebrafish model of outer segment deficiency, photoreceptor cell death is associated with light exposure. The ovl larvae show ectopic accumulation of rhodopsin and knockdown of ectopic rhodopsin and transducin rescue rod photoreceptor cell death. However, knockdown of phosphodiesterase, the enzyme that mediates the next step of phototransduction, does not. So, ectopic phototransduction activated by light exposure, which leads to rod photoreceptor cell death, is through the action of transducin. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that forced activation of adenylyl cyclase in the inner segment leads to rod photoreceptor cell death. For further confirmation, we have also generated a transgenic fish which possesses a human rhodopsin mutation, Q344X. This fish and rd10 model mice show photoreceptor cell death caused by adenylyl cyclase. In short, our study indicates that in some RP, adenylyl cyclase is involved in photoreceptor cell death pathway; its inhibition is potentially a logical approach for a novel RP therapy.

  7. Molecular and cellular control of cell death and defense signaling in pepper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-01-01

    Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) provides a good experimental system for studying the molecular and functional genomics underlying the ability of plants to defend themselves against microbial pathogens. Cell death is a genetically programmed response that requires specific host cellular factors. Hypersensitive response (HR) is defined as rapid cell death in response to a pathogen attack. Pepper plants respond to pathogen attacks by activating genetically controlled HR- or disease-associated cell death. HR cell death, specifically in incompatible interactions between pepper and Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria, is mediated by the molecular genetics and biochemical machinery that underlie pathogen-induced cell death in plants. Gene expression profiles during the HR-like cell death response, virus-induced gene silencing and transient and transgenic overexpression approaches are used to isolate and identify HR- or disease-associated cell death genes in pepper plants. Reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, cytosolic calcium ion and defense-related hormones such as salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, ethylene and abscisic acid are involved in the execution of pathogen-induced cell death in plants. In this review, we summarize recent molecular and cellular studies of the pepper cell death-mediated defense response, highlighting the signaling events of cell death in disease-resistant pepper plants. Comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the cellular functions of pepper cell death response genes will aid the development of novel practical approaches to enhance disease resistance in pepper, thereby helping to secure the future supply of safe and nutritious pepper plants worldwide.

  8. TORC1 is required to balance cell proliferation and cell death in planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Kimberly C; Pearson, Bret J; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2012-05-15

    Multicellular organisms are equipped with cellular mechanisms that enable them to replace differentiated cells lost to normal physiological turnover, injury, and for some such as planarians, even amputation. This process of tissue homeostasis is generally mediated by adult stem cells (ASCs), tissue-specific stem cells responsible for maintaining anatomical form and function. To do so, ASCs must modulate the balance between cell proliferation, i.e. in response to nutrients, and that of cell death, i.e. in response to starvation or injury. But how these two antagonistic processes are coordinated remains unclear. Here, we explore the role of the core components of the TOR pathway during planarian tissue homeostasis and regeneration and identified an essential function for TORC1 in these two processes. RNAi-mediated silencing of TOR in intact animals resulted in a significant increase in cell death, whereas stem cell proliferation and stem cell maintenance were unaffected. Amputated animals failed to increase stem cell proliferation after wounding and displayed defects in tissue remodeling. Together, our findings suggest two distinct roles for TORC1 in planarians. TORC1 is required to modulate the balance between cell proliferation and cell death during normal cell turnover and in response to nutrients. In addition, it is required to initiate appropriate stem cell proliferation during regeneration and for proper tissue remodeling to occur to maintain scale and proportion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. An extensive microarray analysis of AAL-toxin-induced cell death in Arabidopsis thaliana brings new insights into the complexity of programmed cell death in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gechev, T.S.; Gadjev, I.Z.; Hille, J.

    2004-01-01

    A T-DNA knockout of the Arabidopsis homologue of the tomato disease resistance gene Asc was obtained. The asc gene renders plants sensitive to programmed cell death (PCD) triggered by the fungal AAL toxin. To obtain more insights into the nature of AAL-toxin-induced cell death and to identify genes

  10. Oleuropein Prevents Neuronal Death, Mitigates Mitochondrial Superoxide Production and Modulates Autophagy in a Dopaminergic Cellular Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imène Achour

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, primarily affecting dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. There is currently no cure for PD and present medications aim to alleviate clinical symptoms, thus prevention remains the ideal strategy to reduce the prevalence of this disease. The goal of this study was to investigate whether oleuropein (OLE, the major phenolic compound in olive derivatives, may prevent neuronal degeneration in a cellular dopaminergic model of PD, differentiated PC12 cells exposed to the potent parkinsonian toxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA. We also investigated OLE’s ability to mitigate mitochondrial oxidative stress and modulate the autophagic flux. Our results obtained by measuring cytotoxicity and apoptotic events demonstrate that OLE significantly decreases neuronal death. OLE could also reduce mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species resulting from blocking superoxide dismutase activity. Moreover, quantification of autophagic and acidic vesicles in the cytoplasm alongside expression of specific autophagic markers uncovered a regulatory role for OLE against autophagic flux impairment induced by bafilomycin A1. Altogether, our results define OLE as a neuroprotective, anti-oxidative and autophagy-regulating molecule, in a neuronal dopaminergic cellular model.

  11. Reactive oxygen species contribute toward Smac mimetic/temozolomide-induced cell death in glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfrid, Mathieu; Marschall, Viola; Fulda, Simone

    2016-11-01

    Small-molecule inhibitors of Inhibitor of Apoptosis proteins such as Smac mimetics have been reported to provide a promising tool to sensitize glioblastoma (GBM) cells to cytotoxic therapies including chemotherapeutic drugs. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of action have not yet been fully unraveled. In the present study, we therefore investigated the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the regulation of Smac mimetic/temozolomide (TMZ)-induced cell death in GBM cells. Here, we show that the Smac mimetic BV6 and TMZ act in concert to stimulate the production of both cytosolic and mitochondrial ROS. This accumulation of ROS contributes toward the activation of the proapoptotic factor BAX upon BV6/TMZ cotreatment as several ROS scavengers (i.e. N-acetyl-L-cysteine, MnTBAP, or α-tocopherol) protect GBM cells against BV6/TMZ-mediated BAX activation. In addition, ROS scavengers significantly rescue GBM cells from BV6/TMZ-triggered cell death, indicating that ROS generation is required for the induction of cell death. By showing that ROS play an important role in the regulation of Smac mimetic/TMZ-induced cell death, our work sheds light on the crucial role of the oxidative system in the cooperative antitumor activity of Smac mimetic/TMZ combination therapy against GBM cells.

  12. The calcimimetic R-568 induces apoptotic cell death in prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Guangming

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased serum level of parathyroid hormone (PTH was found in metastatic prostate cancers. Calcimimetic R-568 was reported to reduce PTH expression, to suppress cell proliferation and to induce apoptosis in parathyroid cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of R-568 on cellular survival of prostate cancer cells. Methods Prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP and PC-3 were used in this study. Cellular survival was determined with MTT, trypan blue exclusion and fluorescent Live/Death assays. Western blot assay was utilized to assess apoptotic events induced by R-568 treatment. JC-1 staining was used to evaluate mitochondrial membrane potential. Results In cultured prostate cancer LNCaP and PC-3 cells, R-568 treatment significantly reduced cellular survival in a dose- and time-dependent manner. R-568-induced cell death was an apoptotic event, as evidenced by caspase-3 processing and PARP cleavage, as well as JC-1 color change in mitochondria. Knocking down calcium sensing receptor (CaSR significantly reduced R-568-induced cytotoxicity. Enforced expression of Bcl-xL gene abolished R-568-induced cell death, while loss of Bcl-xL expression led to increased cell death in R-568-treated LNCaP cells,. Conclusion Taken together, our data demonstrated that calcimimetic R-568 triggers an intrinsic mitochondria-related apoptotic pathway, which is dependent on the CaSR and is modulated by Bcl-xL anti-apoptotic pathway.

  13. Taxifolin synergizes Andrographolide-induced cell death by attenuation of autophagy and augmentation of caspase dependent and independent cell death in HeLa cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazen Alzaharna

    Full Text Available Andrographolide (Andro has emerged recently as a potential and effective anticancer agent with induction of apoptosis in some cancer cell lines while induction of G2/M arrest with weak apoptosis in others. Few studies have proved that Andro is also effective in combination therapy. The flavonoid Taxifolin (Taxi has showed anti-oxidant and antiproliferative effects against different cancer cells. Therefore, the present study investigated the cytotoxic effects of Andro alone or in combination with Taxi on HeLa cells. The combination of Andro with Taxi was synergistic at all tested concentrations and combination ratios. Andro alone induced caspase-dependent apoptosis which was enhanced by the combination with Taxi and attenuated partly by using Z-Vad-Fmk. Andro induced a protective reactive oxygen species (ROS-dependent autophagy which was attenuated by Taxi. The activation of p53 was involved in Andro-induced autophagy where the use of Taxi or pifithrin-α (PFT-α decreased it while the activation of JNK was involved in the cell death of HeLa cells but not in the induction of autophagy. The mitochondrial outer-membrane permeabilization (MOMP plays an important role in Andro-induced cell death in HeLa cells. Andro alone increased the MOMP which was further increased in the case of combination. This led to the increase in AIF and cytochrome c release from mitochondria which consequently increased caspase-dependent and independent cell death. In conclusion, Andro induced a protective autophagy in HeLa cells which was reduced by Taxi and the cell death was increased by increasing the MOMP and subsequently the caspase-dependent and independent cell death.

  14. Taxifolin synergizes Andrographolide-induced cell death by attenuation of autophagy and augmentation of caspase dependent and independent cell death in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzaharna, Mazen; Alqouqa, Iyad; Cheung, Hon-Yeung

    2017-01-01

    Andrographolide (Andro) has emerged recently as a potential and effective anticancer agent with induction of apoptosis in some cancer cell lines while induction of G2/M arrest with weak apoptosis in others. Few studies have proved that Andro is also effective in combination therapy. The flavonoid Taxifolin (Taxi) has showed anti-oxidant and antiproliferative effects against different cancer cells. Therefore, the present study investigated the cytotoxic effects of Andro alone or in combination with Taxi on HeLa cells. The combination of Andro with Taxi was synergistic at all tested concentrations and combination ratios. Andro alone induced caspase-dependent apoptosis which was enhanced by the combination with Taxi and attenuated partly by using Z-Vad-Fmk. Andro induced a protective reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent autophagy which was attenuated by Taxi. The activation of p53 was involved in Andro-induced autophagy where the use of Taxi or pifithrin-α (PFT-α) decreased it while the activation of JNK was involved in the cell death of HeLa cells but not in the induction of autophagy. The mitochondrial outer-membrane permeabilization (MOMP) plays an important role in Andro-induced cell death in HeLa cells. Andro alone increased the MOMP which was further increased in the case of combination. This led to the increase in AIF and cytochrome c release from mitochondria which consequently increased caspase-dependent and independent cell death. In conclusion, Andro induced a protective autophagy in HeLa cells which was reduced by Taxi and the cell death was increased by increasing the MOMP and subsequently the caspase-dependent and independent cell death.

  15. Cell death induced by tamoxifen in human blood lymphocytes cultivated in vitro = Morte celular induzida pelo tamoxifeno em linfócitos humanos cultivados in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Candelária Genari

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Many chemotherapeutic agents with a potential against solid tumors or leukemia can cause lymphopenia. Tamoxifen (TAM is a synthetic non-steroidal anti-estrogen drug employed in female breast cancer treatment. The present study investigated the capacity of TAM to induce cell death in human lymphocytes cultivated in vitro. Lymphocytes were obtained from young (25-30 years; n = 3 and elderly women (58-77 years; n = 3 and cultivated for 24 or 48h, with or without TAM (20 ƒÊM. After the culture, cell viability, immunocytochemical response and ultrastructure were evaluated. TAM affected lymphocytes in a time- dependent manner, and cells obtained from elderly women were the most sensitive to TAM. Immunocytochemicalanalysis evidenced higher frequency of apoptosis in treated cells, and the ultrastructural study revealed autophagic vacuoles, differing from the controls. In summary, the treated lymphocytes were affected by TAM, leading to cell death by apoptosis and autophagy.Muitos agentes quimioterapicos com potencial contra tumores solidos ou leucemias podem causar linfopenia. O Tamoxifeno (TAM e um agente antiestrogeno nao-esteroidal empregado no tratamento de cancer de mama feminino. O presente trabalho investigou a capacidade do TAM em induzir morte celular em linfocitos humanos cultivados in vitro. Oslinfocitos foram obtidos de mulheres jovens (25-30 anos; n = 3 e idosas (58-77 anos; n = 3 e cultivados por 24 ou 48h, com ou sem TAM (20 ƒÊM. Apos a cultura, foram analisadas a viabilidade celular, a resposta imunocitoquimica e a ultraestrutura. Os resultados indicam que o Tamoxifeno induziu morte celular em linfocitos de ambos os grupos, entretanto, as celulas das mulheres idosas apresentaram-se mais sensiveis ao tratamento. A analise imunocitoquimica mostrou maior frequencia de apoptose nas celulas tratadas e o estudo ultraestrutural revelou vacuolos autofagicos nos linfocitos expostos ao Tamoxifeno. Em conclusao, nosso estudo revelou que o TAM

  16. Type I collagen gel protects murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells from TNFα-induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hong-Ju; He, Wen-Qi; Chen, Ling; Liu, Wei-Wei; Xu, Qian; Xia, Ming-Yu; Hayashi, Toshihiko; Fujisaki, Hitomi; Hattori, Shunji; Tashiro, Shin-ichi; Onodera, Satoshi; Ikejima, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells have been used to test efficacy of proinflammatory cytokine TNFα. In the present study, we reported on protective effect of type I collagen gel used as L929 cell culture. L929 cell grew and proliferated well on collagen gel. However, the L929 cells exhibited cobblestone-like morphology which was much different from the spread fusiform shape when cultured on conventional cell dishes as well as the cells tended to aggregate. On conventional cell culture dishes, the cells treated with TNFα became round in shape and eventually died in a necroptotic manner. The cells cultured on collagen gel, however, were completely unaffected. TNFα treatment was reported to induce autophagy in L929 cells on the plastic dish, and therefore we investigated the effect of collagen gel on induction of autophagy. The results indicated that autophagy induced by TNFα treatment was much reduced when the cells were cultured on collagen gel. In conclusion, type I collagen gel protected L929 cell from TNFα-induced cell death. - Highlights: • Collagen gel culture changed the morphology of L929 cells. • L929 cell cultured on collagen gel were resistant to TNFα-induced cell death. • Collagen gel culture inhibited TNFα-induced autophagy in L929 cells

  17. L-carnitine protects C2C12 cells against mitochondrial superoxide overproduction and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Borgne, Françoise; Ravaut, Gaétan; Bernard, Arnaud; Demarquoy, Jean

    2017-02-26

    To identify and characterize the protective effect that L-carnitine exerted against an oxidative stress in C2C12 cells. Myoblastic C2C12 cells were treated with menadione, a vitamin K analog that engenders oxidative stress, and the protective effect of L-carnitine (a nutrient involved in fatty acid metabolism and the control of the oxidative process), was assessed by monitoring various parameters related to the oxidative stress, autophagy and cell death. Associated with its physiological function, a muscle cell metabolism is highly dependent on oxygen and may produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), especially under pathological conditions. High levels of ROS are known to induce injuries in cell structure as they interact at many levels in cell function. In C2C12 cells, a treatment with menadione induced a loss of transmembrane mitochondrial potential, an increase in mitochondrial production of ROS; it also induces autophagy and was able to provoke cell death. Pre-treatment of the cells with L-carnitine reduced ROS production, diminished autophagy and protected C2C12 cells against menadione-induced deleterious effects. In conclusion, L-carnitine limits the oxidative stress in these cells and prevents cell death.

  18. Intermittent fasting preserves beta-cell mass in obesity-induced diabetes via the autophagy-lysosome pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haiyan; Javaheri, Ali; Godar, Rebecca J; Murphy, John; Ma, Xiucui; Rohatgi, Nidhi; Mahadevan, Jana; Hyrc, Krzysztof; Saftig, Paul; Marshall, Connie; McDaniel, Michael L; Remedi, Maria S; Razani, Babak; Urano, Fumihiko; Diwan, Abhinav

    2017-01-01

    Obesity-induced diabetes is characterized by hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and progressive beta cell failure. In islets of mice with obesity-induced diabetes, we observe increased beta cell death and impaired autophagic flux. We hypothesized that intermittent fasting, a clinically sustainable therapeutic strategy, stimulates autophagic flux to ameliorate obesity-induced diabetes. Our data show that despite continued high-fat intake, intermittent fasting restores autophagic flux in islets and improves glucose tolerance by enhancing glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, beta cell survival, and nuclear expression of NEUROG3, a marker of pancreatic regeneration. In contrast, intermittent fasting does not rescue beta-cell death or induce NEUROG3 expression in obese mice with lysosomal dysfunction secondary to deficiency of the lysosomal membrane protein, LAMP2 or haplo-insufficiency of BECN1/Beclin 1, a protein critical for autophagosome formation. Moreover, intermittent fasting is sufficient to provoke beta cell death in nonobese lamp2 null mice, attesting to a critical role for lysosome function in beta cell homeostasis under fasting conditions. Beta cells in intermittently-fasted LAMP2- or BECN1-deficient mice exhibit markers of autophagic failure with accumulation of damaged mitochondria and upregulation of oxidative stress. Thus, intermittent fasting preserves organelle quality via the autophagy-lysosome pathway to enhance beta cell survival and stimulates markers of regeneration in obesity-induced diabetes.

  19. A role for programmed cell death in the microbial loop.

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    Mónica V Orellana

    Full Text Available The microbial loop is the conventional model by which nutrients and minerals are recycled in aquatic eco-systems. Biochemical pathways in different organisms become metabolically inter-connected such that nutrients are utilized, processed, released and re-utilized by others. The result is that unrelated individuals end up impacting each others' fitness directly through their metabolic activities. This study focused on the impact of programmed cell death (PCD on a population's growth as well as its role in the exchange of carbon between two naturally co-occurring halophilic organisms. Flow cytometric, biochemical, ¹⁴C radioisotope tracing assays, and global transcriptomic analyses show that organic algal photosynthate released by Dunalliela salina cells undergoing PCD complements the nutritional needs of other non-PCD D. salina cells. This occurs in vitro in a carbon limited environment and enhances the growth of the population. In addition, a co-occurring heterotroph Halobacterium salinarum re-mineralizes the carbon providing elemental nutrients for the mixoheterotrophic chlorophyte. The significance of this is uncertain and the archaeon can also subsist entirely on the lysate of apoptotic algae. PCD is now well established in unicellular organisms; however its ecological relevance has been difficult to decipher. In this study we found that PCD in D. salina causes the release of organic nutrients such as glycerol, which can be used by others in the population as well as a co-occurring halophilic archaeon. H. salinarum also re-mineralizes the dissolved material promoting algal growth. PCD in D. salina was the mechanism for the flow of dissolved photosynthate between unrelated organisms. Ironically, programmed death plays a central role in an organism's own population growth and in the exchange of nutrients in the microbial loop.

  20. Cell-Centric View of Apoptosis and Apoptotic Cell Death-Inducing Antitumoral Strategies

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    Maria Dolores Boyano

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death and especially apoptotic cell death, occurs under physiological conditions and is also desirable under pathological circumstances. However, the more we learn about cellular signaling cascades, the less plausible it becomes to find restricted and well-limited signaling pathways. In this context, an extensive description of pathway-connections is necessary in order to point out the main regulatory molecules as well as to select the most appropriate therapeutic targets. On the other hand, irregularities in programmed cell death pathways often lead to tumor development and cancer-related mortality is projected to continue increasing despite the effort to develop more active and selective antitumoral compounds. In fact, tumor cell plasticity represents a major challenge in chemotherapy and improvement on anticancer therapies seems to rely on appropriate drug combinations. An overview of the current status regarding apoptotic pathways as well as available chemotherapeutic compounds provides a new perspective of possible future anticancer strategies.

  1. Autophagy contributes to falcarindiol-induced cell death in breast cancer cells with enhanced endoplasmic reticulum stress.

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    Tingting Lu

    Full Text Available Falcarindiol (FAD is a natural polyyne have been found in many food and dietary plants. It has been found to have various beneficial biological activities. In this study, we demonstrated its anticancer function and mechanism in breast cancer cells. We found that FAD preferentially induces cell death in breast cancer cells. FAD-induced cell death is caspase-dependent. However, FAD induces autophagy to contribute to the cell death. Blocking autophagy by either chemical inhibitors or genetic knockout of autophagy signaling component inhibits FAD-induced cell death. We further found that FAD-induced cell death is mediated by the induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress. We also identified that FAD has synergistic effect with approved cancer drugs 5-FU and Bortezomib in killing breast cancer cells. Summarily, these data demonstrate that FAD has strong and specific anticancer effect in breast cancer cells, and provide some insights about the roles of autophagy in FAD-induced cell death.

  2. Autophagy contributes to falcarindiol-induced cell death in breast cancer cells with enhanced endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tingting; Gu, Ming; Zhao, Yan; Zheng, Xinyu; Xing, Chengzhong

    2017-01-01

    Falcarindiol (FAD) is a natural polyyne have been found in many food and dietary plants. It has been found to have various beneficial biological activities. In this study, we demonstrated its anticancer function and mechanism in breast cancer cells. We found that FAD preferentially induces cell death in breast cancer cells. FAD-induced cell death is caspase-dependent. However, FAD induces autophagy to contribute to the cell death. Blocking autophagy by either chemical inhibitors or genetic knockout of autophagy signaling component inhibits FAD-induced cell death. We further found that FAD-induced cell death is mediated by the induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress. We also identified that FAD has synergistic effect with approved cancer drugs 5-FU and Bortezomib in killing breast cancer cells. Summarily, these data demonstrate that FAD has strong and specific anticancer effect in breast cancer cells, and provide some insights about the roles of autophagy in FAD-induced cell death.

  3. Increasing RpoS expression causes cell death in Borrelia burgdorferi.

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    Linxu Chen

    Full Text Available RpoS, one of the two alternative σ factors in Borrelia burgdorferi, is tightly controlled by multiple regulators and, in turn, determines expression of many critical virulence factors. Here we show that increasing RpoS expression causes cell death. The immediate effect of increasing RpoS expression was to promote bacterial division and as a consequence result in a rapid increase in cell number before causing bacterial death. No DNA fragmentation or degradation was observed during this induced cell death. Cryo-electron microscopy showed induced cells first formed blebs, which were eventually released from dying cells. Apparently blebbing initiated cell disintegration leading to cell death. These findings led us to hypothesize that increasing RpoS expression triggers intracellular programs and/or pathways that cause spirochete death. The potential biological significance of induced cell death may help B. burgdorferi regulate its population to maintain its life cycle in nature.

  4. Contact-independent cell death of human microglial cells due to pathogenic Naegleria fowleri trophozoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Daesik; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2008-12-01

    Free-living Naegleria fowleri leads to a fatal infection known as primary amebic meningoencephalitis in humans. Previously, the target cell death could be induced by phagocytic activity of N. fowleri as a contact-dependent mechanism. However, in this study we investigated the target cell death under a non-contact system using a tissue-culture insert. The human microglial cells, U87MG cells, co-cultured with N. fowleri trophozoites for 30 min in a non-contact system showed morphological changes such as the cell membrane destruction and a reduction in the number. By fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis, U87MG cells co-cultured with N. fowleri trophozoites in a non-contact system showed a significant increase of apoptotic cells (16%) in comparison with that of the control or N. fowleri lysate. When U87MG cells were co-cultured with N. fowleri trophozoites in a non-contact system for 30 min, 2 hr, and 4 hr, the cytotoxicity of amebae against target cells was 40.5, 44.2, and 45.6%, respectively. By contrast, the cytotoxicity of non-pathogenic N. gruberi trophozoites was 10.2, 12.4, and 13.2%, respectively. These results suggest that the molecules released from N. fowleri in a contact-independent manner as well as phagocytosis in a contact-dependent manner may induce the host cell death.

  5. Oxidative Stress, Cell Death, and Other Damage to Alveolar Epithelial Cells Induced by Cigarette Smoke

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    Nagai A

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor in the development of various lung diseases, including pulmonary emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, and lung cancer. The mechanisms of these diseases include alterations in alveolar epithelial cells, which are essential in the maintenance of normal alveolar architecture and function. Following cigarette smoking, alterations in alveolar epithelial cells induce an increase in epithelial permeability, a decrease in surfactant production, the inappropriate production of inflammatory cytokines and growth factors, and an increased risk of lung cancer. However, the most deleterious effect of cigarette smoke on alveolar epithelial cells is cell death, i.e., either apoptosis or necrosis depending on the magnitude of cigarette smoke exposure. Cell death induced by cigarette smoke exposure can largely be accounted for by an enhancement in oxidative stress. In fact, cigarette smoke contains and generates many reactive oxygen species that damage alveolar epithelial cells. Whether apoptosis and/or necrosis in alveolar epithelial cells is enhanced in healthy cigarette smokers is presently unclear. However, recent evidence indicates that the apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells and alveolar endothelial cells is involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema, an important cigarette smoke-induced lung disease characterized by the loss of alveolar structures. This review will discuss oxidative stress, cell death, and other damage to alveolar epithelial cells induced by cigarette smoke.

  6. Induction of cell death by graphene in Arabidopsis thaliana (Columbia ecotype) T87 cell suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begum, Parvin; Fugetsu, Bunshi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • This study was set up to explore potential influence of graphene on T87 cells. • Fragmented nuclei, membrane damage, mitochondrial dysfunction were observed. • ROS increased, ROS are key mediators in the cell death signaling pathway. • Translocation of graphene into cells and an endocytosis-like structure was observed. • Graphene entering into the cells by endocytosis. -- Abstract: The toxicity of graphene on suspensions of Arabidopsis thaliana (Columbia ecotype) T87 cells was investigated by examining the morphology, mitochondrial dysfunction, reactive oxygen species generation (ROS), and translocation of graphene as the toxicological endpoints. The cells were grown in Jouanneau and Péaud-Lenoel (JPL) media and exposed to graphene at concentrations 0–80 mg/L. Morphological changes were observed by scanning electron microscope and the adverse effects such as fragmented nuclei, membrane damage, mitochondrial dysfunction was observed with fluorescence microscopy by staining with Hoechst 33342/propidium iodide and succinate dehydrogenase (mitochondrial bioenergetic enzyme). Analysis of intracellular ROS by 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate demonstrated that graphene induced a 3.3-fold increase in ROS, suggesting that ROS are key mediators in the cell death signaling pathway. Transmission electron microscopy verified the translocation of graphene into cells and an endocytosis-like structure was observed which suggested graphene entering into the cells by endocytosis. In conclusion, our results show that graphene induced cell death in T87 cells through mitochondrial damage mediated by ROS

  7. Melatonina: modulador de morte celular Melatonin: cell death modulator

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    Cecília da Silva Ferreira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A apoptose ou morte programada é um fenômeno biológico essencial para o desenvolvimento e manutenção de uma população celular. Neste processo, as células senescentes ou indesejáveis são eliminadas após ativação de um programa de morte celular, que envolve a participação de moléculas pró-apoptóticas (Fas, FasL, Bax, Caspases 2, 3, 6, 7, 8 e 9. A ativação destas moléculas provoca típicas alterações morfológicas como a retração celular, perda de aderência à matriz extracelular e às células vizinhas, condensação da cromatina, fragmentação do DNA e formação de corpos apoptóticos. Moléculas antiapoptóticas (Bcl2, FLIP bloqueiam o surgimento e a evolução destas alterações celulares e evitam a morte celular. É o equilíbrio entre moléculas pró e antiapoptóticas que assegura a homeostase tecidual. O descontrole da apoptose pode contribuir para o aparecimento de diversas doenças neoplásicas, autoimunes e neurodegenerativas. Diversos agentes indutores e inibidores de apoptose são reconhecidos como armas potenciais no combate a doenças relacionadas a distúrbios de proliferação e morte celular, dentre eles, destacam-se os hormônios. A melatonina tem sido relatada com importante ação antiápoptótica em diversos tecidos, modulando a expressão de agentes, reduzindo a entrada de cálcio na célula, bem como atenuando a produção de espécies reativas de oxigênio e de proteínas pró-apoptóticas, tal como, diminuição da Bax. O conhecimento de novos agentes capazes de atuar nas vias da apoptose é de grande valia para o desenvolvimento de futuras terapias no tratamento de diversas doenças. Assim, o objetivo dessa revisão é elucidar os principais aspectos da morte celular pela apoptose e o papel da melatonina neste processo.Apoptosis or programmed death is a biological phenomenon, which is essential for the development and maintenance of a cell population. In this process, senescent or damaged

  8. Differential effect of baicalein on ionizing radiation induced cell death in normal lymphocytes and lymphoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patwardhan, R.S.; Sharma, Deepak; Checker, Rahul; Santosh Kumar, S.

    2013-01-01

    Baicalein (5,6,7-trihydroxy-2-phenyl-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one), a naturally occurring flavone, present in Indian and Chinese medicinal plants has been reported to possess potent antioxidant activity. Previous reports from our laboratory have elucidated the radical scavenging and radioprotective potential of this compound in cell free system. To investigate potential of baicalein as a radioprotector, we have studied its effect on normal lymphocytes and lymphoma cells (EL-4 cells) in presence of radiation. Baicalein protected murine splenic lymphocytes against radiation (4Gy) induced apoptosis as assessed by propidium iodide staining. It inhibited background cell death in lymphocytes whereas, baicalein induced concentration dependent cell death in EL-4 cells and did not protect against radiation induced apoptosis. Interestingly, baicalein scavenged radiation derived ROS (reactive oxygen species) in both the cell types suggesting that, it is not exhibiting differential antioxidant action. Despite scavenging radiation derived ROS, which are principal mediators of radiation induced cell death, baicalein induced cell death in EL-4 cells. To investigate the reason for this differential behavior, we investigated the effect of baicalein on pro-survival molecules viz. ERK and NF-kB. Baicalein induced phosphorylation of ERK in normal lymphocytes in a time dependent manner, but, it did not alter pERK levels in EL-4 cells. Baicalein treatment per se induced degradation of IkBα and increased nuclear accumulation of NF-kB in normal lymphocytes. Whereas, baicalein pre-treatment reduced basal NF-kB levels in EL-4 cells and it also suppressed TNF-α induced nuclear accumulation of NF-kB. This study suggests that, differential regulation of pro-survival transcription factor NF-kB may be playing a role in differential effect of baicalein in normal lymphocytes and lymphoma cells. (author)

  9. Bioactive compounds from crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis) white blood cells induced apoptotic cell death in hela cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patathananone, Supawadee; Thammasirirak, Sompong; Daduang, Jureerut; Chung, Jing Gung; Temsiripong, Yosapong; Daduang, Sakda

    2016-08-01

    Crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis) white blood cell extracts (WBCex) were examined for anticancer activity in HeLa cell lines using the MTT assay. The percentage viability of HeLa cells significantly deceased after treatment with WBCex in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The IC50 dose was suggested to be approximately 225 μg/mL protein. Apoptotic cell death occurred in a time-dependent manner based on investigation by flow cytometry using annexin V-FITC and PI staining. DAPI nucleic acid staining indicated increased chromatin condensation. Caspase-3, -8 and -9 activities also increased, suggesting the induction of the caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway. Furthermore, the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm ) of HeLa cells was lost as a result of increasing levels of Bax and reduced levels of Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, Bcl-Xs, and XIAP. The decreased ΔΨm led to the release of cytochrome c and the activation of caspase-9 and -3. Apoptosis-inducing factor translocated into the nuclei, and endonuclease G (Endo G) was released from the mitochondria. These results suggest that anticancer agents in WBCex can induce apoptosis in HeLa cells via both caspase-dependent and -independent pathways. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 986-997, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Nucleosomes in serum as a marker for cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdenrieder, S; Stieber, P; Bodenmüller, H; Fertig, G; Fürst, H; Schmeller, N; Untch, M; Seidel, D

    2001-07-01

    The concentration of nucleosomes is elevated in blood of patients with diseases which are associated with enhanced cell death. In order to detect these circulating nucleosomes, we used the Cell Death Detection-ELISAplus (CDDE) from Roche Diagnostics (Mannheim, Germany) (details at http:\\\\biochem.roche.com). For its application in liquid materials we performed various modifications: we introduced a standard curve with nucleosome-rich material, which enabled direct quantification and improved comparability of the values within (CVintraassay:3.0-4.11%) and between several runs (CVinterassay:8.6-13.5%), and tested the analytical specificity of the ELISA. Because of the fast elimination of nucleosomes from circulation and their limited stability, we compared plasma and serum matrix and investigated in detail the pre-analytical handling of serum samples which can considerably influence the test results. Careless venipuncture producing hemolysis, delayed centrifugation and bacterial contamination of the blood samples led to false-positive results; delayed stabilization with EDTA and insufficient storage conditions resulted in false-negative values. At temperatures of -20 degrees C, serum samples which were treated with 10 mM EDTA were stable for at least 6 months. In order to avoid possible interfering factors, we recommend a schedule for the pre-analytical handling of the samples. As the first stage, the possible clinical application was investigated in the sera of 310 persons. Patients with solid tumors (n=220; mean=361 Arbitrary Units (AU)) had considerably higher values than healthy persons (n=50; mean=30 AU; p=0.0001) and patients with inflammatory diseases (n=40; mean= 296 AU; p=0.096). Within the group of patients with tumors, those in advanced stages (UICC 4) showed significantly higher values than those in early stages (UICC 1-3) (p=0.0004).

  11. Calix[6]arene bypasses human pancreatic cancer aggressiveness: downregulation of receptor tyrosine kinases and induction of cell death by reticulum stress and autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelizzaro-Rocha, Karin Juliane; de Jesus, Marcelo Bispo; Ruela-de-Sousa, Roberta Regina; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Reis, Fabiano Souza; de Fátima, Angelo; Ferreira-Halder, Carmen Veríssima

    2013-12-01

    Pancreatic cancer ranks fourth among cancer-related causes of death in North America. Minimal progress has been made in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with late-stage tumors. Moreover, pancreatic cancer aggressiveness is closely related to high levels of pro-survival mediators, which can ultimately lead to rapid disease progression, resistance and metastasis. The main goal of this study was to define the mechanisms by which calix[6]arene, but not other calixarenes, efficiently decreases the aggressiveness of a drug resistant human pancreas carcinoma cell line (Panc-1). Calix[6]arene was more potent in reducing Panc-1 cell viability than gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil. In relation to the underlying mechanisms of cytotoxic effects, it led to cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase through downregulation of PIM1, CDK2, CDK4 and retinoblastoma proteins. Importantly, calix[6]arene abolished signal transduction of Mer and AXL tyrosine kinase receptors, both of which are usually overexpressed in pancreatic cancer. Accordingly, inhibition of PI3K and mTOR was also observed, and these proteins are positively modulated by Mer and AXL. Despite decreasing the phosphorylation of AKT at Thr308, calix[6]arene caused an increase in phosphorylation at Ser473. These findings in conjunction with increased BiP and IRE1-α provide a molecular basis explaining the capacity of calix[6]arene to trigger endoplasmic reticulum stress and autophagic cell death. Our findings highlight calix[6]arene as a potential candidate for overcoming pancreatic cancer aggressiveness. Importantly, we provide evidence that calix[6]arene affects a broad array of key targets that are usually dysfunctional in pancreatic cancer, a highly desirable characteristic for chemotherapeutics. © 2013.

  12. Quantification of cell death in developing cerebellum by a 14C tracer method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, W.S.; Woodward, D.J.; Chanda, R.

    1978-01-01

    To study the question of whether or not cell death contributes significantly to normal or stressed postnatal brain development in a way which is biochemically quantifiable, we carried out an experiment to assess the amount of cell death in developing cerebellum. By measuring the loss of DNA content and the loss of 14 C from labelled thymidine previously incorporated into the DNA fraction (DNAF) in X-irradiated neonatal animals, shown by histological methods to have cell death to the degree of degranulating the external granular layer (EGL), we showed that when cells die both label and DNA content are greatly decreased in the cerebellum. Experiments on both normal and malnourished animals showed that cell death does not contribute significantly to cerebellar development in either malnutrition-stressed or normal animals. Here, we present a biochemical tool for assessing cell death and evidence that cell death does not contribute significantly to cerebellar development

  13. L-carnitine protects C2C12 cells against mitochondrial superoxide overproduction and cell death

    OpenAIRE

    Le Borgne, Fran?oise; Ravaut, Ga?tan; Bernard, Arnaud; Demarquoy, Jean

    2017-01-01

    AIM To identify and characterize the protective effect that L-carnitine exerted against an oxidative stress in C2C12 cells. METHODS Myoblastic C2C12 cells were treated with menadione, a vitamin K analog that engenders oxidative stress, and the protective effect of L-carnitine (a nutrient involved in fatty acid metabolism and the control of the oxidative process), was assessed by monitoring various parameters related to the oxidative stress, autophagy and cell death. RESULTS Associated with it...

  14. Caspase-independent cell death mediated by apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) nuclear translocation is involved in ionizing radiation induced HepG2 cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Hengwen; Yang, Shana; Li, Jianhua; Zhang, Yajie; Gao, Dongsheng; Zhao, Shenting

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer in the world. The aim of radiotherapy is to eradicate cancer cells with ionizing radiation. Except for the caspase-dependent mechanism, several lines of evidence demonstrated that caspase-independent mechanism is directly involved in the cell death responding to irradiation. For this reason, defining the contribution of caspase-independent molecular mechanisms represents the main goal in radiotherapy. In this study, we focused on the role of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), the caspase-independent molecular, in ionizing radiation induced hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2) cell death. We found that ionizing radiation has no function on AIF expression in HepG2 cells, but could induce AIF release from the mitochondria and translocate into nuclei. Inhibition of AIF could reduce ionizing radiation induced HepG2 cell death. These studies strongly support a direct relationship between AIF nuclear translocation and radiation induced cell death. What's more, AIF nuclear translocation is caspase-independent manner, but not caspase-dependent manner, in this process. These new findings add a further attractive point of investigation to better define the complex interplay between caspase-independent cell death and radiation therapy. - Highlights: • AIF nuclear translocation is involved in ionizing radiation induced hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2 cell death. • AIF mediated cell death induced by ionizing radiation is caspase-independent. • Caspase-independent pathway is involved in ionzing radiation induced HepG2 cell death.

  15. Caspase-independent cell death mediated by apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) nuclear translocation is involved in ionizing radiation induced HepG2 cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Hengwen [Department of Radiation, Cancer Center of Guangdong General Hospital (Guangdong Academy of Medical Science), Guangzhou, 510080, Guangdong (China); Yang, Shana; Li, Jianhua [Department of Physiology, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, 510182, Guangdong (China); Zhang, Yajie [Department of Pathology, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, 510182, Guangdong (China); Gao, Dongsheng [Department of Oncology, Guangdong Medical College Affiliated Pengpai Memorial Hospital, Hai Feng, 516400, Gungdong (China); Zhao, Shenting, E-mail: zhaoshenting@126.com [Department of Physiology, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, 510182, Guangdong (China)

    2016-03-25

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer in the world. The aim of radiotherapy is to eradicate cancer cells with ionizing radiation. Except for the caspase-dependent mechanism, several lines of evidence demonstrated that caspase-independent mechanism is directly involved in the cell death responding to irradiation. For this reason, defining the contribution of caspase-independent molecular mechanisms represents the main goal in radiotherapy. In this study, we focused on the role of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), the caspase-independent molecular, in ionizing radiation induced hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2) cell death. We found that ionizing radiation has no function on AIF expression in HepG2 cells, but could induce AIF release from the mitochondria and translocate into nuclei. Inhibition of AIF could reduce ionizing radiation induced HepG2 cell death. These studies strongly support a direct relationship between AIF nuclear translocation and radiation induced cell death. What's more, AIF nuclear translocation is caspase-independent manner, but not caspase-dependent manner, in this process. These new findings add a further attractive point of investigation to better define the complex interplay between caspase-independent cell death and radiation therapy. - Highlights: • AIF nuclear translocation is involved in ionizing radiation induced hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2 cell death. • AIF mediated cell death induced by ionizing radiation is caspase-independent. • Caspase-independent pathway is involved in ionzing radiation induced HepG2 cell death.

  16. Cell death patterns in Arabidopsis cells subjected to four physiological stressors indicate multiple signalling pathways and cell cycle phase specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathirana, Ranjith; West, Phillip; Hedderley, Duncan; Eason, Jocelyn

    2017-03-01

    Corpse morphology, nuclear DNA fragmentation, expression of senescence-associated genes (SAG) and cysteine protease profiles were investigated to understand cell death patterns in a cell cycle-synchronised Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture treated with four physiological stressors in the late G2 phase. Within 4 h of treatment, polyethylene glycol (PEG, 20 %), mannose (100 mM) and hydrogen peroxide (2 mM) caused DNA fragmentation coinciding with cell permeability to Evans Blue (EB) and produced corpse morphology corresponding to apoptosis-like programmed cell death (AL-PCD) with cytoplasmic retraction from the cell wall. Ethylene (8 mL per 250-mL flask) caused permeability of cells to EB without concomitant nuclear DNA fragmentation and cytoplasmic retraction, suggesting necrotic cell death. Mannose inducing glycolysis block and PEG causing dehydration resulted in relatively similar patterns of upregulation of SAG suggesting similar cell death signalling pathways for these two stress factors, whereas hydrogen peroxide caused unique patterns indicating an alternate pathway for cell death induced by oxidative stress. Ethylene did not cause appreciable changes in SAG expression, confirming necrotic cell death. Expression of AtDAD, BoMT1 and AtSAG2 genes, previously shown to be associated with plant senescence, also changed rapidly during AL-PCD in cultured cells. The profiles of nine distinct cysteine protease-active bands ranging in size from ca. 21.5 to 38.5 kDa found in the control cultures were also altered after treatment with the four stressors, with mannose and PEG again producing similar patterns. Results also suggest that cysteine proteases may have a role in necrotic cell death.

  17. Type of cell death induced by seven metals in cultured mouse osteoblastic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, René García; Vilchis, José Rogelio Scougall; Sakagami, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Yuko; Nakamura, Yukio; Hibino, Yasushi; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Shimada, Jun

    2010-01-01

    The use of dental metal alloys in the daily clinic makes it necessary to evaluate the cytotoxicity of eluted metal components against oral cells. However, the cytotoxic mechanism and the type of cell death induced by dental metals in osteoblasts have not been well characterized. This study investigated the cytotoxicity of seven metals against the mouse osteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1. alpha-MEM was used as a culture medium, since this medium provided much superior proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells over DMEM. Ag (NH(3))(2)F was the most cytotoxic, followed by CuCl>CuCl(2) >CoCl(2), NiCl(2)>FeCl(3) and FeCl(2) (least toxic). None of the metals showed any apparent growth stimulating effect (so-called 'hormesis') at lower concentrations. A time course study demonstrated that two hours of contact between oral cells and Ag (NH(3))(2)F, CuCl, CoCl(2) or NiCl(2) induced irreversible cell death. Contact with these metals induced a smear pattern of DNA fragmentation without activation of caspase-3. Preincubation of MC3T3-E1 cells with either a caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK) or autophagy inhibitors (3-methyladenine, bafilomycin) failed to rescue them from metal cytotoxicity. These data suggest the induction of necrotic cell death rather than apoptosis and autophagy by metals in this osteoblastic cell line.

  18. The ER luminal binding protein (BiP) alleviates Cd(2+)-induced programmed cell death through endoplasmic reticulum stress-cell death signaling pathway in tobacco cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hua; Xu, Wenzhong; Xi, Hongmei; Ma, Wenwen; He, Zhenyan; Ma, Mi

    2013-11-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is very toxic to plant cells and Cd(2+) stress induces programmed cell death (PCD) in Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. bright yellow-2 (BY-2) cells. In plants, PCD can be regulated through the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-cell death signaling pathway. However, the mechanism of Cd(2+)-induced PCD remains unclear. In this study, we found that Cd(2+) treatment induced ER stress in tobacco BY-2 cells. The expression of two ER stress markers NtBLP4 and NtPDI and an unfolded protein response related transcription factor NtbZIP60 were upregulated with Cd(2+) stress. Meanwhile, the PCD triggered by prolonged Cd(2+) stress could be relieved by two ER chemical chaperones, 4-phenylbutyric acid and tauroursodeoxycholic acid. These results demonstrate that the ER stress-cell death signaling pathway participates in the mediation of Cd(2+)-induced PCD. Furthermore, the ER chaperone AtBiP2 protein alleviated Cd(2+)-induced ER stress and PCD in BY-2 cells based on the fact that heterologous expression of AtBiP2 in tobacco BY-2 cells reduced the expression of NtBLP4 and a PCD-related gene NtHsr203J under Cd(2+) stress conditions. In summary, these results suggest that the ER stress-cell death signaling pathway regulates Cd(2+)-induced PCD in tobacco BY-2 cells, and that the AtBiP2 protein act as a negative regulator in this process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Involvement of ethylene and lipid signalling in cadmium-induced programmed cell death in tomato suspension cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yakimova, E.T.; Kapchina-Toteva, V.M.; Laarhoven, L.J.J.; Harren, F.J.M.; Woltering, E.J.

    2006-01-01

    Cadmium-induced cell death was studied in suspension-cultured tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cells (line MsK8) treated with CdSO4. Within 24 h, cadmium treatment induced cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. Cell cultures showed recovery after 23 days which indicates the existence

  20. Involvement of ethylene and lipid signalling in cadmium-induced programmed cell death in tomato suspension cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakimova, E.T.; Kapchina-Toteva, V.M.; Laarhoven, L.J.; Harren, F.; Woltering, E.J.

    2006-01-01

    Cadmium-induced cell death was studied in suspension-cultured tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cells (line MsK8) treated with CdSO4. Within 24 h, cadmium treatment induced cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. Cell cultures showed recovery after 2¿3 days which indicates the existence

  1. Cadmium toxicity in cultured tomato cells - Role of ethylene, proteases and oxidative stress in cell death signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakimova, E.T.; Woltering, E.J.; Kapchina-Toteva, V.M.; Harren, F.J.M.; Cristescu, S.M.

    2008-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the ability of cadmium to induce programmed cell death in tomato suspension cells and to determine the involvement of proteolysis, oxidative stress and ethylene. Tomato suspension cells were exposed to treatments with CdSO4 and cell death was calculated after fluorescein

  2. Autophagic vacuoles in cardiomyocytes of dilated cardiomyopathy with initially decompensated heart failure predict improved prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Tsunenori; Asai, Kuniya; Sato, Shigeru; Hayashi, Meiso; Adachi, Akiko; Sasaki, Yoshihiro; Takano, Hitoshi; Mizuno, Kyoichi; Shimizu, Wataru

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a process of bulk protein degradation and organelle turnover, and is a current therapeutic target in several diseases. The present study aimed to clarify the significance of myocardial autophagy of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Left ventricular endomyocardial biopsy was performed in 250 consecutive patients with DCM (54.9±13.9 years; male, 79%), initially presenting with decompensated heart failure (HF). The association of these findings with HF mortality or recurrence was examined. Myofilament changes, which are apparent in the degenerated cardiomyocytes of DCM, were recognized in 164 patients (66%), and autophagic vacuoles in cardiomyocytes were identified in or near the area of myofilament changes in 86 patients (34%). Morphometrically, fibrosis (odds ratio [OR], 0.96; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.93 to 0.99) and mitochondrial abnormality (OR, 2.24; 95% CI, 1.23 to 4.08) were independently related with autophagic vacuoles. During the follow-up period of 4.9±3.9 y, 24 patients (10%) died, including 10 (4%) who died of HF, and 67 (27%) were readmitted for HF recurrence. Multivariate analysis identified a family history of DCM (hazard ratio [HR], 2.117; 95% CI, 1.199 to 3.738), hemoglobin level (HR, 0.845; 95% CI, 0.749 to 0.953), myofilament changes (HR, 13.525; 95% CI, 5.340 to 34.255), and autophagic vacuoles (HR, 0.214; 95% CI, 0.114 to 0.400) as independent predictors of death or readmission due to HF recurrence. In conclusion, autophagic vacuoles in cardiomyocytes are associated with a better HF prognosis in patients with DCM, suggesting autophagy may play a role in the prevention of myocardial degeneration.

  3. An Ursolic Acid Derived Small Molecule Triggers Cancer Cell Death through Hyperstimulation of Macropinocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lin; Li, Bin; Su, Xiaohui; Chen, Ge; Li, Yaqin; Yu, Linqian; Li, Li; Wei, Wanguo

    2017-08-10

    Macropinocytosis is a transient endocytosis that internalizes extracellular fluid and particles into vacuoles. Recent studies suggest that hyperstimulation of macropinocytosis can induce a novel nonapoptotic cell death, methuosis. In this report, we describe the identification of an ursolic acid derived small molecule (compound 17), which induces cancer cell death through hyperstimulation of macropinocytosis. 17 causes the accumulation of vacuoles derived from macropinosomes based on transmission electron microscopy, time-lapse microscopy, and labeling with extracellular fluid phase tracers. The vacuoles induced by 17 separate from other cytoplasmic compartments but acquire some characteristics of late endosomes and lysosomes. Inhibiting hyperstimulation of macropinocytosis with the specific inhibitor amiloride blocks cell death, implicating that 17 leads to cell death via macropinocytosis, which is coincident with methuosis. Our results uncovered a novel cell death pathway involved in the activity of 17, which may provide a basis for further development of natural-product-derived scaffolds for drugs that trigger cancer cell death by methuosis.

  4. Exploiting Cell Death Pathways for Inducible Cell Elimination to Modulate Graft-versus-Host-Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcon, Corey; Al-Obaidi, Mustafa; Di Stasi, Antonio

    2017-06-14

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a potent form of immunotherapy, potentially life-saving for many malignant hematologic diseases. However, donor lymphocytes infused with the graft while exerting a graft versus malignancy effect can also cause potentially fatal graft versus host disease (GVHD). Our group has previously validated the inducible caspase-9 suicide gene in the haploidentical stem cell transplant setting, which proved successful in reversing signs and symptoms of GVHD within hours, using a non-therapeutic dimerizing agent. Cellular death pathways such as apoptosis and necroptosis are important processes in maintaining healthy cellular homeostasis within the human body. Here, we review two of the most widely investigated cell death pathways active in T-cells (apoptosis and necroptosis), as well as the emerging strategies that can be exploited for the safety of T-cell therapies. Furthermore, such strategies could be exploited for the safety of other cellular therapeutics as well.

  5. Exploiting Cell Death Pathways for Inducible Cell Elimination to Modulate Graft-versus-Host-Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey Falcon

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a potent form of immunotherapy, potentially life-saving for many malignant hematologic diseases. However, donor lymphocytes infused with the graft while exerting a graft versus malignancy effect can also cause potentially fatal graft versus host disease (GVHD. Our group has previously validated the inducible caspase-9 suicide gene in the haploidentical stem cell transplant setting, which proved successful in reversing signs and symptoms of GVHD within hours, using a non-therapeutic dimerizing agent. Cellular death pathways such as apoptosis and necroptosis are important processes in maintaining healthy cellular homeostasis within the human body. Here, we review two of the most widely investigated cell death pathways active in T-cells (apoptosis and necroptosis, as well as the emerging strategies that can be exploited for the safety of T-cell therapies. Furthermore, such strategies could be exploited for the safety of other cellular therapeutics as well.

  6. Pathways to ischemic neuronal cell death: are sex differences relevant?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCullough Louise D

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have known for some time that the epidemiology of human stroke is sexually dimorphic until late in life, well beyond the years of reproductive senescence and menopause. Now, a new concept is emerging: the mechanisms and outcome of cerebral ischemic injury are influenced strongly by biological sex as well as the availability of sex steroids to the brain. The principal mammalian estrogen (17 β estradiol or E2 is neuroprotective in many types of brain injury and has been the major focus of investigation over the past several decades. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that although hormones are a major contributor to sex-specific outcomes, they do not fully account for sex-specific responses to cerebral ischemia. The purpose of this review is to highlight recent studies in cell culture and animal models that suggest that genetic sex determines experimental stroke outcome and that divergent cell death pathways are activated after an ischemic insult. These sex differences need to be identified if we are to develop efficacious neuroprotective agents for use in stroke patients.

  7. Coniferyl aldehyde attenuates radiation enteropathy by inhibiting cell death and promoting endothelial cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Ye-Ji; Jung, Myung Gu; Son, Yeonghoon; Jang, Jun-Ho; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Kim, Sung-Ho; Ko, Young-Gyo; Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Hae-June

    2015-01-01

    Radiation enteropathy is a common complication in cancer patients. The aim of this study was to investigate whether radiation-induced intestinal injury could be alleviated by coniferyl aldehyde (CA), an HSF1-inducing agent that increases cellular HSP70 expression. We systemically administered CA to mice with radiation enteropathy following abdominal irradiation (IR) to demonstrate the protective effects of CA against radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury. CA clearly alleviated acute radiation-induced intestinal damage, as reflected by the histopathological data and it also attenuated sub-acute enteritis. CA prevented intestinal crypt cell death and protected the microvasculature in the lamina propria during the acute and sub-acute phases of damage. CA induced HSF1 and HSP70 expression in both intestinal epithelial cells and endothelial cells in vitro. Additionally, CA protected against not only the apoptotic cell death of both endothelial and epithelial cells but also the loss of endothelial cell function following IR, indicating that CA has beneficial effects on the intestine. Our results provide novel insight into the effects of CA and suggest its role as a therapeutic candidate for radiation-induced enteropathy due to its ability to promote rapid re-proliferation of the intestinal epithelium by the synergic effects of the inhibition of cell death and the promotion of endothelial cell function.

  8. Luteoloside induces G0/G1 arrest and pro-death autophagy through the ROS-mediated AKT/mTOR/p70S6K signalling pathway in human non-small cell lung cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Menglu; Shen, Shuying; Zhao, Xin; Gong, Xingguo

    2017-12-09

    Autophagy has attracted a great deal of interest in tumour therapy research in recent years. However, the anticancer effect of luteoloside, a naturally occurring flavonoid isolated from the medicinal plant Gentiana macrophylla, on autophagy remains poorly understood in human lung cells. In the present study, we have investigated the anticancer effects of luteoloside on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and demonstrated that luteoloside effectively inhibited cancer cell proliferation, inducing G 0 /G 1 phase arrest associated with reduced expression of CyclinE, CyclinD1 and CDK4; we further found that treatment with luteoloside did not strongly result in apoptotic cell death in NSCLC (A549 and H292) cells. Interestingly, luteoloside induced autophagy in lung cancer cells, which was correlated with the formation of autophagic vacuoles, breakdown of p62, and the overexpression of Beclin-1 and LC3-II, but not in a human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B). Notably, pretreatment of cancer cells with 3-MA, an autophagy inhibitor, protected against autophagy and promoted cell viability but not apoptosis. To further clarify whether luteoloside-induced autophagy depended on the PI3K/AKT/mTOR/p70S6K signalling pathway, a major autophagy-suppressive cascade, cells were treated with a combination of AKT inhibitor (LY294002) and mTOR inhibitor (Rap). These results demonstrated that luteoloside induced autophagy in lung cancer cell lines by inhibiting the pathway at p-Akt (Ser473), p-mTOR and p-p70S6K (Thr389). Moreover, we observed that luteoloside-induced cell autophagy was correlated with production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). NAC-mediated protection against ROS clearly implicated ROS in the activation of autophagy and cell death. In addition, the results showed that ROS served as an upstream effector of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR/p70S6K pathway. Taken together, the present study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying luteoloside-mediated cell

  9. Cell proliferation and cell death are disturbed during prenatal and postnatal brain development after uranium exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrand, M; Elie, C; Stefani, J; N Florès; Culeux, C; Delissen, O; Ibanez, C; Lestaevel, P; Eriksson, P; Dinocourt, C

    2016-01-01

    The developing brain is more susceptible to neurotoxic compounds than adult brain. It is also well known that disturbances during brain development cause neurological disorders in adulthood. The brain is known to be a target organ of uranium (U) exposure and previous studies have noted that internal U contamination of adult rats induces behavioral disorders as well as affects neurochemistry and neurophysiological properties. In this study, we investigated whether depleted uranium (DU) exposure affects neurogenesis during prenatal and postnatal brain development. We examined the structural morphology of the brain, cell death and finally cell proliferation in animals exposed to DU during gestation and lactation compared to control animals. Our results showed that DU decreases cell death in the cortical neuroepithelium of gestational day (GD) 13 embryos exposed at 40mg/L and 120mg/L and of GD18 fetuses exposed at 120mg/L without modification of the number of apoptotic cells. Cell proliferation analysis showed an increase of BrdU labeling in the dentate neuroepithelium of fetuses from GD18 at 120mg/L. Postnatally, cell death is increased in the dentate gyrus of postnatal day (PND) 0 and PND5 exposed pups at 120mg/L and is associated with an increase of apoptotic cell number only at PND5. Finally, a decrease in dividing cells is observed in the dentate gyrus of PND21 rats developmentally exposed to 120mg/L DU, but not at PND0 and PND5. These results show that DU exposure during brain development causes opposite effects on cell proliferation and cell death processes between prenatal and postnatal development mainly at the highest dose. Although these modifications do not have a major impact in brain morphology, they could affect the next steps of neurogenesis and thus might disrupt the fine organization of the neuronal network. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Mechanisms of cell death induced by the neutrophil antimicrobial peptides alpha-defensins and LL-37.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarbiou, J.; Tjabringa, G.S.; Verhoosel, R.M.; Ninaber, D.K.; White, S.R.; Peltenburg, L.T.; Rabe, K.F.; Hiemstra, P.S.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of cell death mediated by the antimicrobial peptides neutrophil defensins (human neutrophil peptides 1-3 [HNP1-3]) and LL-37. MATERIALS AND METHODS: HNP1-3- and LL-37-mediated cell death was assessed in human lung epithelial cells

  11. Autophagy and metacaspase determine the mode of cell death in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minina, Elena A; Filonova, Lada H; Fukada, Kazutake; Savenkov, Eugene I; Gogvadze, Vladimir; Clapham, David; Sanchez-Vera, Victoria; Suarez, Maria F; Zhivotovsky, Boris; Daniel, Geoffrey; Smertenko, Andrei; Bozhkov, Peter V

    2013-12-23

    Although animals eliminate apoptotic cells using macrophages, plants use cell corpses throughout development and disassemble cells in a cell-autonomous manner by vacuolar cell death. During vacuolar cell death, lytic vacuoles gradually engulf and digest the cytoplasmic content. On the other hand, acute stress triggers an alternative cell death, necrosis, which is characterized by mitochondrial dysfunction, early rupture of the plasma membrane, and disordered cell disassembly. How both types of cell death are regulated remains obscure. In this paper, we show that vacuolar death in the embryo suspensor of Norway spruce requires autophagy. In turn, activation of autophagy lies downstream of metacaspase mcII-Pa, a key protease essential for suspensor cell death. Genetic suppression of the metacaspase–autophagy pathway induced a switch from vacuolar to necrotic death, resulting in failure of suspensor differentiation and embryonic arrest. Our results establish metacaspase-dependent autophagy as a bona fide mechanism that is responsible for cell disassembly during vacuolar cell death and for inhibition of necrosis.

  12. Lipid peroxidation and cell death mechanisms in pulmonary epithelial cells induced by peroxynitrite and nitric oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Yuan-Soon [School of Medical Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei (Taiwan); Liou, Hung-Bin; Lin, Yu-Ping; Guo, How-Ran; Ho, Sheng-Yow; Lee, Ching-Chang; Wang, Ying-Jan [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, National Cheng Kung University Medical College, 138 Sheng-Li Road, Tainan (Taiwan); Lin, Jen-Kun; Pan, Min-Hsiung [Institute of Biochemistry, National Taiwan University, Medical College, Taipei (Taiwan); Jeng, Jiiang-Huei [School of Dentistry, National Taiwan University and Hospital, Medical College, Taipei (Taiwan)

    2002-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an environmental pollutant found in smog and cigarette smoke. Recently, NO has been discovered to act as a molecular messenger, mediating various physiological functions. However, when an excess of NO is present, cytotoxic and mutagenic effects can also be induced. The reaction of NO with superoxide results in the formation of peroxynitrite (ONOO{sup -}), which decomposes into the hydroxyl radical and nitrogen dioxide. Both of them are potent oxidant species that may initiate and propagate lipid peroxidation. In the present study, we examined the effects of NO and ONOO{sup -} on the induction of lipid peroxidation and cell death mechanisms in rats and in A549 pulmonary epithelial cells. The results showed that ONOO{sup -} is able to induce lipid peroxidation in pulmonary epithelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. 8-Epi-prostaglandin F{sub 2{alpha}} can serve as a good biomarker of lipid peroxidation both in vitro and in vivo. Postmitotic apoptosis was found in A549 cells exposed to NO, whereas ONOO{sup -} induced cell death more characteristic of necrosis than apoptosis. Apoptosis that occurred in cells may be related to the dysfunction of mitochondria, the release of cytochrome c into cytosol, and the activation of caspase-9. The relationship between caspase activation and the cleavage of other death substrates during postmitotic apoptosis in A549 cells needs further investigation. (orig.)

  13. Montelukast Induces Apoptosis-Inducing Factor-Mediated Cell Death of Lung Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Ju Tsai

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Developing novel chemo-prevention techniques and advancing treatment are key elements to beating lung cancer, the most common cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Our previous cohort study showed that cysteinyl leukotriene receptor antagonists, mainly montelukast, decreased the lung cancer risk in asthma patients. In the current study, we conducted in vivo and in vitro experiments to demonstrate the inhibiting effect of montelukast on lung cancer and to investigate the underlying mechanisms. Using Lewis lung carcinoma-bearing mice, we showed that feeding montelukast significantly delayed the tumor growth in mice (p < 0.0001. Montelukast inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation and induced the cell death of lung cancer cells. Further investigation showed the down-regulation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2, up-regulation of Bcl-2 homologous antagonist/killer (Bak, and nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF in montelukast-treated lung cancer cells. Montelukast also markedly decreased the phosphorylation of several proteins, such as with no lysine 1 (WNK1, protein kinase B (Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2, MAPK/Erk kinase (MEK, and proline-rich Akt substrate of 40-kDa (PRAS40, which might contribute to cell death. In conclusion, montelukast induced lung cancer cell death via the nuclear translocation of AIF. This study confirmed the chemo-preventive effect of montelukast shown in our previous cohort study. The utility of montelukast in cancer prevention and treatment thus deserves further studies.

  14. Terminalia Chebula provides protection against dual modes of necroptotic and apoptotic cell death upon death receptor ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoonjung; Byun, Hee Sun; Seok, Jeong Ho; Park, Kyeong Ah; Won, Minho; Seo, Wonhyoung; Lee, So-Ra; Kang, Kidong; Sohn, Kyung-Cheol; Lee, Ill Young; Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Son, Chang Gue; Shen, Han-Ming; Hur, Gang Min

    2016-04-27

    Death receptor (DR) ligation elicits two different modes of cell death (necroptosis and apoptosis) depending on the cellular context. By screening a plant extract library from cells undergoing necroptosis or apoptosis, we identified a water extract of Terminalia chebula (WETC) as a novel and potent dual inhibitor of DR-mediated cell death. Investigation of the underlying mechanisms of its anti-necroptotic and anti-apoptotic action revealed that WETC or its constituents (e.g., gallic acid) protected against tumor necrosis factor-induced necroptosis via the suppression of TNF-induced ROS without affecting the upstream signaling events. Surprisingly, WETC also provided protection against DR-mediated apoptosis by inhibition of the caspase cascade. Furthermore, it activated the autophagy pathway via suppression of mTOR. Of the WETC constituents, punicalagin and geraniin appeared to possess the most potent anti-apoptotic and autophagy activation effect. Importantly, blockage of autophagy with pharmacological inhibitors or genetic silencing of Atg5 selectively abolished the anti-apoptotic function of WETC. These results suggest that WETC protects against dual modes of cell death upon DR ligation. Therefore, WETC might serve as a potential treatment for diseases characterized by aberrantly sensitized apoptotic or non-apoptotic signaling cascades.

  15. Prodigiosin activates endoplasmic reticulum stress cell death pathway in human breast carcinoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Mu-Yun; Shen, Yuh-Chiang; Lu, Chien-Hsing; Yang, Shu-Yi; Ho, Tsing-Fen; Peng, Yu-Ta; Chang, Chia-Che

    2012-01-01

    Prodigiosin is a bacterial tripyrrole pigment with potent cytotoxicity against diverse human cancer cell lines. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is initiated by accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the ER lumen and may induce cell death when irremediable. In this study, the role of ER stress in prodigiosin-induced cytotoxicity was elucidated for the first time. Comparable to the ER stress inducer thapsigargin, prodigiosin up-regulated signature ER stress markers GRP78 and CHOP in addition to activating the IRE1, PERK and ATF6 branches of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in multiple human breast carcinoma cell lines, confirming prodigiosin as an ER stress inducer. Prodigiosin transcriptionally up-regulated CHOP, as evidenced by its promoting effect on the CHOP promoter activity. Of note, knockdown of CHOP effectively lowered prodigiosin's capacity to evoke PARP cleavage, reduce cell viability and suppress colony formation, highlighting an essential role of CHOP in prodigiosin-induced cytotoxic ER stress response. In addition, prodigiosin down-regulated BCL2 in a CHOP-dependent manner. Importantly, restoration of BCL2 expression blocked prodigiosin-induced PARP cleavage and greatly enhanced the survival of prodigiosin-treated cells, suggesting that CHOP-dependent BCL2 suppression mediates prodigiosin-elicited cell death. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of JNK by SP600125 or dominant-negative blockade of PERK-mediated eIF2α phosphorylation impaired prodigiosin-induced CHOP up-regulation and PARP cleavage. Collectively, these results identified ER stress-mediated cell death as a mode-of-action of prodigiosin's tumoricidal effect. Mechanistically, prodigiosin engages the IRE1–JNK and PERK–eIF2α branches of the UPR signaling to up-regulate CHOP, which in turn mediates BCL2 suppression to induce cell death. Highlights: ► Prodigiosin is a bacterial tripyrrole pigment with potent anticancer effect. ► Prodigiosin is herein identified as an

  16. Prodigiosin activates endoplasmic reticulum stress cell death pathway in human breast carcinoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Mu-Yun [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Shen, Yuh-Chiang [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); National Research Institute of Chinese Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lu, Chien-Hsing [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yang, Shu-Yi [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Ho, Tsing-Fen [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Peng, Yu-Ta [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chia-Che, E-mail: chia_che@dragon.nchu.edu.tw [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Agricultural Biotechnology Center, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2012-12-15

    Prodigiosin is a bacterial tripyrrole pigment with potent cytotoxicity against diverse human cancer cell lines. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is initiated by accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the ER lumen and may induce cell death when irremediable. In this study, the role of ER stress in prodigiosin-induced cytotoxicity was elucidated for the first time. Comparable to the ER stress inducer thapsigargin, prodigiosin up-regulated signature ER stress markers GRP78 and CHOP in addition to activating the IRE1, PERK and ATF6 branches of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in multiple human breast carcinoma cell lines, confirming prodigiosin as an ER stress inducer. Prodigiosin transcriptionally up-regulated CHOP, as evidenced by its promoting effect on the CHOP promoter activity. Of note, knockdown of CHOP effectively lowered prodigiosin's capacity to evoke PARP cleavage, reduce cell viability and suppress colony formation, highlighting an essential role of CHOP in prodigiosin-induced cytotoxic ER stress response. In addition, prodigiosin down-regulated BCL2 in a CHOP-dependent manner. Importantly, restoration of BCL2 expression blocked prodigiosin-induced PARP cleavage and greatly enhanced the survival of prodigiosin-treated cells, suggesting that CHOP-dependent BCL2 suppression mediates prodigiosin-elicited cell death. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of JNK by SP600125 or dominant-negative blockade of PERK-mediated eIF2α phosphorylation impaired prodigiosin-induced CHOP up-regulation and PARP cleavage. Collectively, these results identified ER stress-mediated cell death as a mode-of-action of prodigiosin's tumoricidal effect. Mechanistically, prodigiosin engages the IRE1–JNK and PERK–eIF2α branches of the UPR signaling to up-regulate CHOP, which in turn mediates BCL2 suppression to induce cell death. Highlights: ► Prodigiosin is a bacterial tripyrrole pigment with potent anticancer effect. ► Prodigiosin is herein identified

  17. Cell death associated with abnormal mitosis observed by confocal imaging in live cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiel, Asher; Visochek, Leonid; Mittelman, Leonid; Zilberstein, Yael; Dantzer, Francoise; Izraeli, Shai; Cohen-Armon, Malka

    2013-08-21

    Phenanthrene derivatives acting as potent PARP1 inhibitors prevented the bi-focal clustering of supernumerary centrosomes in multi-centrosomal human cancer cells in mitosis. The phenanthridine PJ-34 was the most potent molecule. Declustering of extra-centrosomes causes mitotic failure and cell death in multi-centrosomal cells. Most solid human cancers have high occurrence of extra-centrosomes. The activity of PJ-34 was documented in real-time by confocal imaging of live human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells transfected with vectors encoding for fluorescent γ-tubulin, which is highly abundant in the centrosomes and for fluorescent histone H2b present in the chromosomes. Aberrant chromosomes arrangements and de-clustered γ-tubulin foci representing declustered centrosomes were detected in the transfected MDA-MB-231 cells after treatment with PJ-34. Un-clustered extra-centrosomes in the two spindle poles preceded their cell death. These results linked for the first time the recently detected exclusive cytotoxic activity of PJ-34 in human cancer cells with extra-centrosomes de-clustering in mitosis, and mitotic failure leading to cell death. According to previous findings observed by confocal imaging of fixed cells, PJ-34 exclusively eradicated cancer cells with multi-centrosomes without impairing normal cells undergoing mitosis with two centrosomes and bi-focal spindles. This cytotoxic activity of PJ-34 was not shared by other potent PARP1 inhibitors, and was observed in PARP1 deficient MEF harboring extracentrosomes, suggesting its independency of PARP1 inhibition. Live confocal imaging offered a useful tool for identifying new molecules eradicating cells during mitosis.

  18. RSL3 and Erastin differentially regulate redox signaling to promote Smac mimetic-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dächert, Jasmin; Schoeneberger, Hannah; Rohde, Katharina; Fulda, Simone

    2016-09-27

    Redox mechanisms play an important role in the control of various signaling pathways. Here, we report that Second mitochondrial activator of caspases (Smac) mimetic-induced cell death is regulated by redox signaling. We show that RSL3, a glutathione (GSH) peroxidase (GPX) 4 inhibitor, or Erastin, an inhibitor of the cystine/glutamate antiporter, cooperate with the Smac mimetic BV6 to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent cell death in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells. Addition of the caspase inhibitor N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone (zVAD.fmk) fails to rescue ROS-induced cell death, demonstrating that RSL3/BV6- or Erastin/BV6-induced cell death occurs in a caspase-independent manner. Interestingly, the iron chelator Deferoxamine (DFO) significantly inhibits RSL3/BV6-induced cell death, whereas it is unable to rescue cell death by Erastin/BV6, showing that RSL3/BV6-, but not Erastin/BV6-mediated cell death depends on iron. ROS production is required for both RSL3/BV6- and Erastin/BV6-induced cell death, since the ROS scavenger α-tocopherol (α-Toc) rescues RSL3/BV6- and Erastin/BV6-induced cell death. By comparison, genetic or pharmacological inhibition of lipid peroxidation by GPX4 overexpression or ferrostatin (Fer)-1 significantly decreases RSL3/BV6-, but not Erastin/BV6-induced cell death, despite inhibition of lipid peroxidation upon exposure to RSL3/BV6 or Erastin/BV6. Of note, inhibition of lipid peroxidation by Fer-1 protects from RSL3/BV6-, but not from Erastin/BV6-stimulated ROS production, indicating that other forms of ROS besides lipophilic ROS occur during Erastin/BV6-induced cell death. Taken together, RSL3/BV6 and Erastin/BV6 differentially regulate redox signaling and cell death in ALL cells. While RSL3/BV6 cotreatment induces ferroptotic cell death, Erastin/BV6 stimulates oxidative cell death independently of iron. These findings have important implications for the therapeutic targeting of redox signaling to

  19. METHYLMERCURY BUT NOT MERCURIC CHLORIDE INDUCES APOPTOTIC CELL DEATH IN PC12 CELLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normal development of the nervous system requires the process of apoptosis, a form of programmed cell death, to remove superfluous neurons. Abnormal patterns of apoptosis may be a consequence of exposure to environmental neurotoxicants leading to a disruption in the tightly regul...

  20. Alternative pathways of programmed cell death are activated in cells with defective caspase-dependent apoptosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ondroušková, E.; Souček, Karel; Horváth, Viktor; Šmarda, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 4 (2008), s. 599-609 ISSN 0145-2126 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/07/0834 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : apoptosis * autophagy * programmed cell death Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.390, year: 2008

  1. Activation of intracellular angiotensin AT2 receptors induces rapid cell death in human uterine leiomyosarcoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Yi; Lützen, Ulf; Fritsch, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    of apoptosis and cell death in cultured human uterine leiomyosarcoma (SK-UT-1) cells and control human uterine smooth muscle cells (HutSMC). The intracellular levels of the AT2 receptor are low in proliferating SK-UT-1 cells but the receptor is substantially up-regulated in quiescent SK-UT-1 cells with high....... e. down-regulation of the Bcl-2 protein, induction of the Bax protein and activation of caspase-3. All quiescent SK-UT-1 cells died within 5 days after treatment with a single dose of C21. C21 was devoid of cytotoxic effects in proliferating SK-UT-1 cells and in quiescent HutSMC. Our results point...... to a new, unique approach enabling to eliminate non-cycling uterine leiomyosarcoma cells providing that they over-express the AT2 receptor....

  2. Breast cancer cells with acquired antiestrogen resistance are sensitized to cisplatin-induced cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yde, Christina Westmose; Gyrd-Hansen, Mads; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E

    2007-01-01

    for future breast cancer treatment. In this study, we have investigated the effect of the chemotherapeutic compound cisplatin using a panel of antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer cell lines established from the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. We show that the antiestrogen-resistant cells...... with parental MCF-7 cells. Our data show that Bcl-2 can protect antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer cells from cisplatin-induced cell death, indicating that the reduced expression of Bcl-2 in the antiestrogen-resistant cells plays a role in sensitizing the cells to cisplatin treatment.......Antiestrogens are currently used for treating breast cancer patients who have estrogen receptor-positive tumors. However, patients with advanced disease will eventually develop resistance to the drugs. Therefore, compounds effective on antiestrogen-resistant tumors will be of great importance...

  3. Apocynin attenuates cholesterol oxidation product-induced programmed cell death by suppressing NF-κB-mediated cell death process in differentiated PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Da Hee; Nam, Yoon Jeong; Lee, Chung Soo

    2015-10-01

    Cholesterol oxidation products are suggested to be involved in neuronal degeneration. Apocynin has demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects. We assessed the effect of apocynin on the cholesterol oxidation product-induced programmed cell death in neuronal cells using differentiated PC12 cells in relation to NF-κB-mediated cell death process. 7-Ketocholesterol and 25-hydroxycholesterol decreased the levels of Bid and Bcl-2, increased the levels of Bax and p53, and induced loss of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, release of cytochrome c and activation of caspases (-8, -9 and -3). 7-Ketocholesterol caused an increase in the levels of cytosolic and nuclear NF-κB p65, cytosolic NF-κB p50 and cytosolic phospho-IκB-α, which was inhibited by the addition of 0.5 μM Bay11-7085 (an inhibitor of NF-κB activation). Apocynin attenuated the cholesterol oxidation product-induced changes in the programmed cell death-related protein levels, NF-κB activation, production of reactive oxygen species, and depletion of GSH. The results show that apocynin appears to attenuate the cholesterol oxidation product-induced programmed cell death in PC12 cells by suppressing the activation of the mitochondrial pathway and the caspase-8- and Bid-dependent pathways that are mediated by NF-κB activation. The preventive effect appears to be associated with the inhibitory effect on the production of reactive oxygen species and depletion of GSH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The effect of hydroxybenzoate calcium compounds in inducing cell death in epithelial breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada M Merghani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxybenzoate (HB compounds have shown their significance in inducing apoptosis in primary chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL and cancer cell lines, including HT-1080. The current study focuses on assessing the effects of 2-, 3- and 4-hydroxybenzoate calcium (HBCa compounds on MCF-10A, MDA-MB231 and MCF-7 epithelial breast cell lines. The HBCa-treated cells were examined using annexin V, to measure apoptosis in the three epithelial breast cell lines, after 48 h of treatment. The results indicated that 0.5 and 2.5 mmol/L of HBCa induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. The induction of cell death in normal MCF-10A cells was found to be significantly less (p = 0.0003–0.0068, in comparison to the malignant cell lines (MDA-MB231 and MCF-7. HBCa compounds were also found to cause cell cycle arrest in the epithelial breast cells at G1/G0. Furthermore, HBCa compounds induced the upregulation of apoptotic proteins (p53, p21, Bax and caspase-3, as well as the downregulation of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, which may suggest that apoptosis is induced via the intrinsic pathway.

  5. Dying cells protect survivors from radiation-induced cell death in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber Bilak

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a phenomenon wherein induction of cell death by a variety of means in wing imaginal discs of Drosophila larvae resulted in the activation of an anti-apoptotic microRNA, bantam. Cells in the vicinity of dying cells also become harder to kill by ionizing radiation (IR-induced apoptosis. Both ban activation and increased protection from IR required receptor tyrosine kinase Tie, which we identified in a genetic screen for modifiers of ban. tie mutants were hypersensitive to radiation, and radiation sensitivity of tie mutants was rescued by increased ban gene dosage. We propose that dying cells activate ban in surviving cells through Tie to make the latter cells harder to kill, thereby preserving tissues and ensuring organism survival. The protective effect we report differs from classical radiation bystander effect in which neighbors of irradiated cells become more prone to death. The protective effect also differs from the previously described effect of dying cells that results in proliferation of nearby cells in Drosophila larval discs. If conserved in mammals, a phenomenon in which dying cells make the rest harder to kill by IR could have implications for treatments that involve the sequential use of cytotoxic agents and radiation therapy.

  6. Crotamine and crotoxin interact with tumor cells and trigger cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Marcella Araugio; Pujatti, Priscilla Brunelli; Santos, Raquel Gouvea dos [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear CDTN/CNEN-MG, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mails: maso@cdtn.br; santosr@cdtn.br; Dias, Consuelo Latorre Fortes [Fundacao Ezequiel Dias FUNED, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Chavez Olortegui, Carlos Delfin [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais UFMG, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biologicas; Santos, Wagner Gouvea dos [Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, VA (United States). Neurosurgery Dept.

    2007-07-01

    Crotoxin (Crtx) and Crotamine (Crota) are polypeptides isolated from Crotalus durissus terrificus snake venom (CV). Previous reports have been shown therapeutic effects of Crotalus durissus terrificus venom and Crtx on skin, breast and lung tumours, although, the mechanisms of this antitumoral effect are still unknown. The aim of this work was to investigate the antitumoral effect of Crtx and Crota on brain tumours cells (GH3 and RT2) in vitro and their capacity of interaction with these tumour cells membranes. Cell survival after Crtx and Crota treatment was evaluated by MTT assay in different times post-treatment and apoptosis was evaluated by DAPI staining. In order to evaluate the specific interaction of Crtx and Crota, these polypeptides were radiolabelled, using {sup 125}I as radiotracer and binding assays were performed. The results were compared with the binding in nontumoral brain tissue. Crtx and Crota induced apoptosis on both tumour cells lineages but, Crota was more powerful than Crtx 90% and 20% cell death for RT2 cells; 80% and 20% cell death for GH3 cells, respectively). Both {sup 125}I-Crtx and {sup 125}I-Crota bound specifically in glioblastoma membranes. Nonetheless, CV polypeptides recognised glioblastoma cells with higher specificity than normal brain tissue. These results suggest that the Crtx and Crota interactions with the plasmatic membrane of tumour cells may be the first step of the cascade of signalling that trigger their antitumoral effect. (author)

  7. Crotamine and crotoxin interact with tumor cells and trigger cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Marcella Araugio; Pujatti, Priscilla Brunelli; Santos, Raquel Gouvea dos; Dias, Consuelo Latorre Fortes; Chavez Olortegui, Carlos Delfin; Santos, Wagner Gouvea dos

    2007-01-01

    Crotoxin (Crtx) and Crotamine (Crota) are polypeptides isolated from Crotalus durissus terrificus snake venom (CV). Previous reports have been shown therapeutic effects of Crotalus durissus terrificus venom and Crtx on skin, breast and lung tumours, although, the mechanisms of this antitumoral effect are still unknown. The aim of this work was to investigate the antitumoral effect of Crtx and Crota on brain tumours cells (GH3 and RT2) in vitro and their capacity of interaction with these tumour cells membranes. Cell survival after Crtx and Crota treatment was evaluated by MTT assay in different times post-treatment and apoptosis was evaluated by DAPI staining. In order to evaluate the specific interaction of Crtx and Crota, these polypeptides were radiolabelled, using 125 I as radiotracer and binding assays were performed. The results were compared with the binding in nontumoral brain tissue. Crtx and Crota induced apoptosis on both tumour cells lineages but, Crota was more powerful than Crtx 90% and 20% cell death for RT2 cells; 80% and 20% cell death for GH3 cells, respectively). Both 125 I-Crtx and 125 I-Crota bound specifically in glioblastoma membranes. Nonetheless, CV polypeptides recognised glioblastoma cells with higher specificity than normal brain tissue. These results suggest that the Crtx and Crota interactions with the plasmatic membrane of tumour cells may be the first step of the cascade of signalling that trigger their antitumoral effect. (author)

  8. Classification of cancer cell death with spectral dimensionality reduction and generalized eigenvalues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarracino, Mario R; Xanthopoulos, Petros; Pyrgiotakis, Georgios; Tomaino, Vera; Moudgil, Brij M; Pardalos, Panos M

    2011-10-01

    Accurate cell death discrimination is a time consuming and expensive process that can only be performed in biological laboratories. Nevertheless, it is very useful and arises in many biological and medical applications. Raman spectra are collected for 84 samples of A549 cell line (human lung cancer epithelia cells) that has been exposed to toxins to simulate the necrotic and apoptotic death. The proposed data mining approach for the multiclass cell death discrimination problem uses a multiclass regularized generalized eigenvalue algorithm for classification (multiReGEC), together with a dimensionality reduction algorithm based on spectral clustering. The proposed algorithmic scheme can classify A549 lung cancer cells from three different classes (apoptotic death, necrotic death and control cells) with 97.78%± 0.047 accuracy versus 92.22 ± 0.095 without the proposed feature selection preprocessing. The spectrum areas depicted by the algorithm corresponds to the 〉C O bond from the lipids and the lipid bilayer. This chemical structure undergoes different change of state based on cell death type. Further evidence of the validity of the technique is obtained through the successful classification of 7 cell spectra that undergo hyperthermic treatment. In this study we propose a fast and automated way of processing Raman spectra for cell death discrimination, using a feature selection algorithm that not only enhances the classification accuracy, but also gives more insight in the undergoing cell death process. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. RIP1 comes back to life as a cell death regulator in TNFR1 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Marie Anne; Ting, Adrian T

    2011-04-01

    Cell death induction by tumor necrosis factor has been an intensively studied area for the last two decades. Although it may appear that the skeleton should have been picked clean by now, new secrets about tumor necrosis factor death signaling are still being uncovered. In particular, the recent evidence that ubiquitination of the death kinase receptor-interacting protein 1 regulates its participation in apoptotic and necrotic cell death is opening up unexplored avenues in the catacombs of tumor necrosis factor death signaling. In this minireview, we focus on two major cell-death checkpoints that determine whether receptor-interacting protein 1 functions as a pro-survival or pro-death molecule. © 2011 The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 FEBS.

  10. Cell Death and Cell Cycle Arrest of Silene latifolia Stamens and Pistils After Microbotryum lychnidis-dioicae Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Hiroki; Yamanaka, Kaori; Koizumi, Ayako; Hirata, Aiko; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2017-02-01

    Mechanisms of suppression of pistil primordia in male flowers and of stamen primordia in female flowers differ in diclinous plants. In this study, we investigated how cell death and cell cycle arrest are related to flower organ formation in Silene latifolia. Using in situ hybridization and a TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling) assay, we detected both cell cycle arrest and cell death in suppressed stamens of female flowers and suppressed pistils of male flowers in S. latifolia. In female flowers infected with Microbotryum lychnidis-dioicae, developmental suppression of stamens is released, and cell cycle arrest and cell death do not occur. Smut spores are formed in S. latifolia anthers infected with M. lychnidis-dioicae, followed by cell death in the endothelium, middle layer, tapetal cells and pollen mother cells. Cell death is difficult to detect using a fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled TUNEL assay due to strong autofluorescence in the anther. We therefore combined a TUNEL assay in an infrared region with transmission electron microscopy to detect cell death in anthers. We show that following infection by M. lychnidis-dioicae, a TUNEL signal was not detected in the endothelium, middle layer or pollen mother cells, and cell death with outflow of cell contents, including the nucleoplast, was observed in tapetal cells. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Hemeoxygenase-1 Mediates an Adaptive Response to Spermidine-Induced Cell Death in Human Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spermidine (SPD is a ubiquitous polycation that is commonly distributed in living organisms. Intracellular levels of SPD are tightly regulated, and SPD controls cell proliferation and death. However, SPD undergoes oxidation in the presence of serum, producing aldehydes, hydrogen peroxide, and ammonia, which exert cytotoxic effect on cells. Hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1 is thought to have a protective effect against oxidative stress. Upregulation of HO-1 in endothelial cells is considered to be beneficial in the cardiovascular disease. In the present study, we demonstrate that the ubiquitous polyamine, SPD, induces HO-1 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. SPD-induced HO-1 expression was examined by Western blot and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Involvement of reactive oxygen species, serum amine oxidase, PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, and transcription factor Nrf2 in the induction of HO-1 by SPD was also investigated. Furthermore, small interfering RNA knockdown of Nrf2 or HO-1 and treatment with the specific HO-1 inhibitor ZnPP exhibited a noteworthy increase of death of SPD-stimulated HUVECs. In conclusion, these results suggest that SPD induces PI3K/Akt-Nrf2-mediated HO-1 expression in human endothelial cells, which may have a role in cytoprotection of the cells against oxidative stress-induced death.

  12. Cell Death Pathways in Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mroz, Pawel, E-mail: pmroz@partners.org [Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Yaroslavsky, Anastasia [Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Boston University College of Engineering, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Kharkwal, Gitika B [Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Hamblin, Michael R. [Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2011-06-03

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emerging cancer therapy that uses the combination of non-toxic dyes or photosensitizers (PS) and harmless visible light to produce reactive oxygen species and destroy tumors. The PS can be localized in various organelles such as mitochondria, lysosomes, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and plasma membranes and this sub-cellular location governs much of the signaling that occurs after PDT. There is an acute stress response that leads to changes in calcium and lipid metabolism and causes the production of cytokines and stress response mediators. Enzymes (particularly protein kinases) are activated and transcription factors are expressed. Many of the cellular responses center on mitochondria and frequently lead to induction of apoptosis by the mitochondrial pathway involving caspase activation and release of cytochrome c. Certain specific proteins (such as Bcl-2) are damaged by PDT-induced oxidation thereby increasing apoptosis, and a build-up of oxidized proteins leads to an ER-stress response that may be increased by proteasome inhibition. Autophagy plays a role in either inhibiting or enhancing cell death after PDT.

  13. Nanotoxicity: An Interplay of Oxidative Stress, Inflammation and Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puja Khanna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles are emerging as a useful tool for a wide variety of biomedical, consumer and instrumental applications that include drug delivery systems, biosensors and environmental sensors. In particular, nanoparticles have been shown to offer greater specificity with enhanced bioavailability and less detrimental side effects as compared to the existing conventional therapies in nanomedicine. Hence, bionanotechnology has been receiving immense attention in recent years. However, despite the extensive use of nanoparticles today, there is still a limited understanding of nanoparticle-mediated toxicity. Both in vivo and in vitro studies have shown that nanoparticles are closely associated with toxicity by increasing intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS levels and/or the levels of pro-inflammatory mediators. The homeostatic redox state of the host becomes disrupted upon ROS induction by nanoparticles. Nanoparticles are also known to up-regulate the transcription of various pro-inflammatory genes, including tumor necrosis factor-α and IL (interleukins-1, IL-6 and IL-8, by activating nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB signaling. These sequential molecular and cellular events are known to cause oxidative stress, followed by severe cellular genotoxicity and then programmed cell death. However, the exact molecular mechanisms underlying nanotoxicity are not fully understood. This lack of knowledge is a significant impediment in the use of nanoparticles in vivo. In this review, we will provide an assessment of signaling pathways that are involved in the nanoparticle- induced oxidative stress and propose possible strategies to circumvent nanotoxicity.

  14. Nanotoxicity: An Interplay of Oxidative Stress, Inflammation and Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Puja; Ong, Cynthia; Bay, Boon Huat; Baeg, Gyeong Hun

    2015-06-30

    Nanoparticles are emerging as a useful tool for a wide variety of biomedical, consumer and instrumental applications that include drug delivery systems, biosensors and environmental sensors. In particular, nanoparticles have been shown to offer greater specificity with enhanced bioavailability and less detrimental side effects as compared to the existing conventional therapies in nanomedicine. Hence, bionanotechnology has been receiving immense attention in recent years. However, despite the extensive use of nanoparticles today, there is still a limited understanding of nanoparticle-mediated toxicity. Both in vivo and in vitro studies have shown that nanoparticles are closely associated with toxicity by increasing intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and/or the levels of pro-inflammatory mediators. The homeostatic redox state of the host becomes disrupted upon ROS induction by nanoparticles. Nanoparticles are also known to up-regulate the transcription of various pro-inflammatory genes, including tumor necrosis factor-α and IL (interleukins)-1, IL-6 and IL-8, by activating nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling. These sequential molecular and cellular events are known to cause oxidative stress, followed by severe cellular genotoxicity and then programmed cell death. However, the exact molecular mechanisms underlying nanotoxicity are not fully understood. This lack of knowledge is a significant impediment in the use of nanoparticles in vivo . In this review, we will provide an assessment of signaling pathways that are involved in the nanoparticle- induced oxidative stress and propose possible strategies to circumvent nanotoxicity.

  15. Delayed cell death associated with mitotic catastrophe in γ-irradiated stem-like glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firat, Elke; Gaedicke, Simone; Tsurumi, Chizuko; Esser, Norbert