WorldWideScience

Sample records for autonomously replicating sequences

  1. Characterization of human chromosomal DNA sequences which replicate autonomously in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Montiel, J F; Norbury, C. J.; Tuite, M F; Dobson, M J; Mills, J S; Kingsman, A J; Kingsman, S M

    1984-01-01

    We have characterised two restriction fragments, isolated from a "shotgun" collection of human DNA, which function as autonomously replicating sequences (ARSs) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Functional domains of these fragments have been defined by subcloning and exonuclease (BAL 31) deletion analysis. Both fragments contain two spatially distinct domains. One is essential for high frequency transformation and is termed the Replication Sequence (RS) domain, the other, termed the Replication En...

  2. Mechanism of Gene Amplification via Yeast Autonomously Replicating Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelly Sehgal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation was aimed at understanding the molecular mechanism of gene amplification. Interplay of fragile sites in promoting gene amplification was also elucidated. The amplification promoting sequences were chosen from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ARS, 5S rRNA regions of Plantago ovata and P. lagopus, proposed sites of replication pausing at Ste20 gene locus of S. cerevisiae, and the bend DNA sequences within fragile site FRA11A in humans. The gene amplification assays showed that plasmid bearing APS from yeast and human beings led to enhanced protein concentration as compared to the wild type. Both the in silico and in vitro analyses were pointed out at the strong bending potential of these APS. In addition, high mitotic stability and presence of TTTT repeats and SAR amongst these sequences encourage gene amplification. Phylogenetic analysis of S. cerevisiae ARS was also conducted. The combinatorial power of different aspects of APS analyzed in the present investigation was harnessed to reach a consensus about the factors which stimulate gene expression, in presence of these sequences. It was concluded that the mechanism of gene amplification was that AT rich tracts present in fragile sites of yeast serve as binding sites for MAR/SAR and DNA unwinding elements. The DNA protein interactions necessary for ORC activation are facilitated by DNA bending. These specific bindings at ORC promote repeated rounds of DNA replication leading to gene amplification.

  3. Mechanism of gene amplification via yeast autonomously replicating sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Shelly; Kaul, Sanjana; Dhar, M K

    2015-01-01

    The present investigation was aimed at understanding the molecular mechanism of gene amplification. Interplay of fragile sites in promoting gene amplification was also elucidated. The amplification promoting sequences were chosen from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ARS, 5S rRNA regions of Plantago ovata and P. lagopus, proposed sites of replication pausing at Ste20 gene locus of S. cerevisiae, and the bend DNA sequences within fragile site FRA11A in humans. The gene amplification assays showed that plasmid bearing APS from yeast and human beings led to enhanced protein concentration as compared to the wild type. Both the in silico and in vitro analyses were pointed out at the strong bending potential of these APS. In addition, high mitotic stability and presence of TTTT repeats and SAR amongst these sequences encourage gene amplification. Phylogenetic analysis of S. cerevisiae ARS was also conducted. The combinatorial power of different aspects of APS analyzed in the present investigation was harnessed to reach a consensus about the factors which stimulate gene expression, in presence of these sequences. It was concluded that the mechanism of gene amplification was that AT rich tracts present in fragile sites of yeast serve as binding sites for MAR/SAR and DNA unwinding elements. The DNA protein interactions necessary for ORC activation are facilitated by DNA bending. These specific bindings at ORC promote repeated rounds of DNA replication leading to gene amplification. PMID:25685838

  4. Mapping autonomously replicating sequence elements in a 73-kb region of chromosome II of the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vinay Kumar Srivastava; Dharani Dhar Dubey

    2007-08-01

    Autonomously replicating sequence (ARS) elements are the genetic determinants of replication origin function in yeasts. They can be easily identified as the plasmids containing them transform yeast cells at a high frequency. As the first step towards identifying all potential replication origins in a 73-kb region of the long arm of fission yeast chromosome II, we have mapped five new ARS elements using systematic subcloning and transformation assay. 2D analysis of one of the ARS plasmids that showed highest transformation frequency localized the replication origin activity within the cloned genomic DNA. All the new ARS elements are localized in two clusters in centromere proximal 40 kb of the region. The presence of at least six ARS elements, including the previously reported ars727, is suggestive of a higher origin density in this region than that predicted earlier using a computer based search.

  5. Autonomous replicating sequences from mouse cells which can replicate in mouse cells in vivo and in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Ariga, H; Itani, T; Iguchi-Ariga, S M

    1987-01-01

    We have already reported that the cloned mouse DNA fragment (pMU65) could replicate in a simian virus 40 T antigen-dependent system in vivo and in vitro (H. Ariga, Z. Tsuchihashi, M. Naruto, and M. Yamada, Mol. Cell. Biol. 5:563-568, 1985). The plasmid p65-tk, containing the thymidine kinase (tk) gene of herpes simplex virus and the BglII-EcoRI region of pMU65 homologous to the simian virus 40 origin of DNA replication, was constructed. The p65-tk persisted episomally in tk+ transformants aft...

  6. Autonomic Data Replication in Cloud Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhananjaya Gupt,

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is an emerging practice that offers more flexibility in infrastructure and reduces cost than our traditional computing models. Cloud providers offer everything from access to raw storage capacity resources to complete application services. The services that are provided by the cloud can be accessed from anywhere and data flows from one place to another. Since data is moving via network, there are chances of data loss. So we need to keep multiple copies of data and thus data replication is one of the main issues in cloud computing. In this paper we have implemented automatic replication of data from local host to cloud environment. Data replication is implemented by using HADOOP which stores the data at various nodes. If one node goes down then data can be retrieved from other node seamlessly.

  7. In Vivo Accumulation of Cyclin A and Cellular Replication Factors in Autonomous Parvovirus Minute Virus of Mice-Associated Replication Bodies

    OpenAIRE

    Bashir, Tarig; Rommelaere, Jean; Cziepluch, Celina

    2001-01-01

    Autonomous parvovirus minute virus of mice (MVM) DNA replication is strictly dependent on cellular factors expressed during the S phase of the cell cycle. Here we report that MVM DNA replication proceeds in specific nuclear structures termed autonomous parvovirus-associated replication bodies, where components of the basic cellular replication machinery accumulate. The presence of DNA polymerases α and δ in these bodies suggests that MVM utilizes partially preformed cellular replication compl...

  8. Replication of cloned DNA containing the Alu family sequence during cell extract-promoting simian virus 40 DNA synthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Ariga, H

    1984-01-01

    The replicating activity of several cloned DNAs containing putative origin sequences was examined in a cell-free extract that absolutely depends on simian virus 40 (SV40) T antigen promoting initiation of SV40 DNA replication in vitro. Of the three DNAs containing the human Alu family sequence (BLUR8), the origin of (Saccharomyces cerevisiae plasmid 2 micron DNA (pJD29), and the yeast autonomous replicating sequence (YRp7), only BLUR8 was active as a template. Replication in a reaction mixtur...

  9. Drosophila ARSs contain the yeast ARS consensus sequence and a replication enhancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Mills, J S; Kingsman, A J; Kingsman, S M

    1986-01-01

    A number of restriction fragments that function as autonomously replicating sequences (ARSs) in yeast have been isolated from Drosophila melanogaster DNA. The behaviour in yeast of plasmids containing Drosophila ARS elements was studied and compared to that exhibited by the archetypal yeast ARS-1 plasmid. ARS functions were localised by subcloning and BAL-31 deletion analysis. These studies demonstrated the structural and functional complexity of Drosophila ARSs. Each Drosophila ARS element h...

  10. High-frequency transformation of a methylotrophic yeast, Candida boidinii, with autonomously replicating plasmids which are also functional in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Sakai, Y.; Goh, T K; Tani, Y

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a transformation system which uses autonomous replicating plasmids for a methylotrophic yeast, Candida boidinii. Two autonomous replication sequences, CARS1 and CARS2, were newly cloned from the genome of C. boidinii. Plasmids having both a CARS fragment and the C. boidinii URA3 gene transformed C. boidinii ura3 cells to Ura+ phenotype at frequencies of up to 10(4) CFU/micrograms of DNA. From Southern blot analysis, CARS plasmids seemed to exist in polymeric forms as well as...

  11. Viroids, infectious long non-coding RNAs with autonomous replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gago-Zachert, Selma

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptome deep-sequencing studies performed during the last years confirmed that the vast majority of the RNAs transcribed in higher organisms correspond to several types of non-coding RNAs including long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). The study of lncRNAs and the identification of their functions, is still an emerging field in plants but the characterization of some of them indicate that they play an important role in crucial regulatory processes like flowering regulation, and responses to abiotic stress and plant hormones. A second group of lncRNAs present in plants is formed by viroids, exogenous infectious subviral plant pathogens well known since many years. Viroids are composed of circular RNA genomes without protein-coding capacity and subvert enzymatic activities of their hosts to complete its own biological cycle. Different aspects of viroid biology and viroid-host interactions have been elucidated in the last years and some of them are the main topic of this review together with the analysis of the state-of-the-art about the growing field of endogenous lncRNAs in plants. PMID:26319312

  12. Structural properties of replication origins in yeast DNA sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sequence-dependent DNA flexibility is an important structural property originating from the DNA 3D structure. In this paper, we investigate the DNA flexibility of the budding yeast (S. Cerevisiae) replication origins on a genome-wide scale using flexibility parameters from two different models, the trinucleotide and the tetranucleotide models. Based on analyzing average flexibility profiles of 270 replication origins, we find that yeast replication origins are significantly rigid compared with their surrounding genomic regions. To further understand the highly distinctive property of replication origins, we compare the flexibility patterns between yeast replication origins and promoters, and find that they both contain significantly rigid DNAs. Our results suggest that DNA flexibility is an important factor that helps proteins recognize and bind the target sites in order to initiate DNA replication. Inspired by the role of the rigid region in promoters, we speculate that the rigid replication origins may facilitate binding of proteins, including the origin recognition complex (ORC), Cdc6, Cdt1 and the MCM2-7 complex

  13. Sequence and recombination analyses of the geminivirus replication initiator protein

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Vadivukarasi; K R Girish; R Usha

    2007-01-01

    The sequence motifs present in the replication initiator protein (Rep) of geminiviruses have been compared with those present in all known rolling circle replication initiators. The predicted secondary structures of Rep representing each group of organisms have been compared and found to be conserved. Regions of recombination in the Rep gene and the adjoining 5′ intergenic region (IR) of representative species of Geminiviridae have been identified using Recombination Detection Programs. The possible implications of such recombinations on the increasing host range of geminivirus infections are discussed.

  14. Sequence depth, not PCR replication, improves ecological inference from next generation DNA sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan P Smith

    Full Text Available Recent advances in molecular approaches and DNA sequencing have greatly progressed the field of ecology and allowed for the study of complex communities in unprecedented detail. Next generation sequencing (NGS can reveal powerful insights into the diversity, composition, and dynamics of cryptic organisms, but results may be sensitive to a number of technical factors, including molecular practices used to generate amplicons, sequencing technology, and data processing. Despite the popularity of some techniques over others, explicit tests of the relative benefits they convey in molecular ecology studies remain scarce. Here we tested the effects of PCR replication, sequencing depth, and sequencing platform on ecological inference drawn from environmental samples of soil fungi. We sequenced replicates of three soil samples taken from pine biomes in North America represented by pools of either one, two, four, eight, or sixteen PCR replicates with both 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina MiSeq. Increasing the number of pooled PCR replicates had no detectable effect on measures of α- and β-diversity. Pseudo-β-diversity - which we define as dissimilarity between re-sequenced replicates of the same sample - decreased markedly with increasing sampling depth. The total richness recovered with Illumina was significantly higher than with 454, but measures of α- and β-diversity between a larger set of fungal samples sequenced on both platforms were highly correlated. Our results suggest that molecular ecology studies will benefit more from investing in robust sequencing technologies than from replicating PCRs. This study also demonstrates the potential for continuous integration of older datasets with newer technology.

  15. Perinatally Influenced Autonomic System Fluctuations Drive Infant Vocal Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yisi S; Ghazanfar, Asif A

    2016-05-23

    The variable vocal behavior of human infants is the scaffolding upon which speech and social interactions develop. It is important to know what factors drive this developmentally critical behavioral output. Using marmoset monkeys as a model system, we first addressed whether the initial conditions for vocal output and its sequential structure are perinatally influenced. Using dizygotic twins and Markov analyses of their vocal sequences, we found that in the first postnatal week, twins had more similar vocal sequences to each other than to their non-twin siblings. Moreover, both twins and their siblings had more vocal sequence similarity with each other than with non-sibling infants. Using electromyography, we then investigated the physiological basis of vocal sequence structure by measuring respiration and arousal levels (via changes in heart rate). We tested the hypothesis that early-life influences on vocal output are via fluctuations of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) mediated by vocal biomechanics. We found that arousal levels fluctuate at ∼0.1 Hz (the Mayer wave) and that this slow oscillation modulates the amplitude of the faster, ∼1.0 Hz respiratory rhythm. The systematic changes in respiratory amplitude result in the different vocalizations that comprise infant vocal sequences. Among twins, the temporal structure of arousal level changes was similar and therefore indicates why their vocal sequences were similar. Our study shows that vocal sequences are tightly linked to respiratory patterns that are modulated by ANS fluctuations and that the temporal structure of ANS fluctuations is perinatally influenced. PMID:27068420

  16. Plasmid P1 replication: negative control by repeated DNA sequences.

    OpenAIRE

    Chattoraj, D; Cordes, K.; Abeles, A

    1984-01-01

    The incompatibility locus, incA, of the unit-copy plasmid P1 is contained within a fragment that is essentially a set of nine 19-base-pair repeats. One or more copies of the fragment destabilizes the plasmid when present in trans. Here we show that extra copies of incA interfere with plasmid DNA replication and that a deletion of most of incA increases plasmid copy number. Thus, incA is not essential for replication but is required for its control. When cloned in a high-copy-number vector, pi...

  17. Autonomous Reinforcement of Behavioral Sequences in Neural Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Kazerounian S.; Luciw M.; Richter M.; Sandamirskaya Y.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a dynamic neural algorithm called Dynamic Neural (DN) SARSA(\\lambda) for learning a behavioral sequence from delayed reward. DN-SARSA(\\lambda) combines Dynamic Field Theory models of behavioral sequence representation, classical reinforcement learning, and a computational neuroscience model of working memory, called Item and Order working memory, which serves as an eligibility trace. DN-SARSA(\\lambda) is implemented on both a simulated and real robot that must learn a specific re...

  18. Nucleotide sequence analysis of regions of adenovirus 5 DNA containing the origins of DNA replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the investigations described is the determination of nucleotide sequences at the molecular ends of the linear adenovirus type 5 DNA. Knowledge of the primary structure at the termini of this DNA molecule is of particular interest in the study of the mechanism of replication of adenovirus DNA. The initiation- and termination sites of adenovirus DNA replication are located at the ends of the DNA molecule. (Auth.)

  19. Autonomous learning and reproduction of complex sequences: a multimodal architecture for bootstraping imitation games

    OpenAIRE

    Andry, Pierre; Gaussier, Philippe; Nadel, Jacqueline

    2005-01-01

    This paper introduces a control architecture for the learning of complex sequence of gestures applied to autonomous robots. The architecture is designed to exploit the robot internal sensory-motor dynamics generated by visual, proprioceptive, and predictive informations in order to provide intuitive behaviors in the purpose of natural interactions with humans.

  20. Calorie Restriction-Mediated Replicative Lifespan Extension in Yeast Is Non-Cell Autonomous

    OpenAIRE

    Szu-Chieh Mei; Charles Brenner

    2015-01-01

    In laboratory yeast strains with Sir2 and Fob1 function, wild-type NAD+ salvage is required for calorie restriction (CR) to extend replicative lifespan. CR does not significantly alter steady state levels of intracellular NAD+ metabolites. However, levels of Sir2 and Pnc1, two enzymes that sequentially convert NAD+ to nicotinic acid (NA), are up-regulated during CR. To test whether factors such as NA might be exported by glucose-restricted mother cells to survive later generations, we develop...

  1. Segment-specific terminal sequences of Bunyamwera bunyavirus regulate genome replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunyamwera virus (BUNV) is the prototype of both the Orthobunyavirus genus and the Bunyaviridae family of segmented negative sense RNA viruses. The tripartite BUNV genome consists of small (S), medium (M), and large (L) segments that are transcribed to give a single mRNA and replicated to generate an antigenome that is the template for synthesis of further genomic RNA strands. We modified an existing cDNA-derived RNA synthesis system to allow identification of BUNV RNA replication and transcription products by direct metabolic labeling. Direct RNA analysis allowed us to distinguish between template activities that affected either RNA replication or mRNA transcription, an ability that was not possible using previous reporter gene expression assays. We generated genome analogs containing the entire nontranslated terminal sequences of the S, M, and L BUNV segments surrounding a common sequence. Analysis of RNAs synthesized from these templates revealed that the relative abilities of BUNV segments to perform RNA replication was M > L > S. Exchange of segment-specific terminal nucleotides identified a 12-nt region located within both the 3' and 5' termini of the M segment that correlated with its high replication ability

  2. Universal sequence replication, reversible polymerization and early functional biopolymers: a model for the initiation of prebiotic sequence evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Imari Walker

    Full Text Available Many models for the origin of life have focused on understanding how evolution can drive the refinement of a preexisting enzyme, such as the evolution of efficient replicase activity. Here we present a model for what was, arguably, an even earlier stage of chemical evolution, when polymer sequence diversity was generated and sustained before, and during, the onset of functional selection. The model includes regular environmental cycles (e.g. hydration-dehydration cycles that drive polymers between times of replication and functional activity, which coincide with times of different monomer and polymer diffusivity. Template-directed replication of informational polymers, which takes place during the dehydration stage of each cycle, is considered to be sequence-independent. New sequences are generated by spontaneous polymer formation, and all sequences compete for a finite monomer resource that is recycled via reversible polymerization. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that this proposed prebiotic scenario provides a robust mechanism for the exploration of sequence space. Introduction of a polymer sequence with monomer synthetase activity illustrates that functional sequences can become established in a preexisting pool of otherwise non-functional sequences. Functional selection does not dominate system dynamics and sequence diversity remains high, permitting the emergence and spread of more than one functional sequence. It is also observed that polymers spontaneously form clusters in simulations where polymers diffuse more slowly than monomers, a feature that is reminiscent of a previous proposal that the earliest stages of life could have been defined by the collective evolution of a system-wide cooperation of polymer aggregates. Overall, the results presented demonstrate the merits of considering plausible prebiotic polymer chemistries and environments that would have allowed for the rapid turnover of monomer resources and for

  3. DNAskew: Statistical Analysis of Base Compositional Asymmetry and Prediction of Replication Boundaries in the Genome Sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-RuMA; Shao-BoXIAO; Ai-ZhenGUO; Jian-QiangLUE; Huan-ChunCHEN

    2004-01-01

    Sueoka and Lobry declared respectively that, in the absence of bias between the two DNA strands for mutation and selection, the base composition within each strand should be A=T and C=G (this state is called Parity Rule type 2, PR2). However, the genome sequences of many bacteria, vertebrates and viruses showed asymmetries in base composition and gene direction. To determine the relationship of base composition skews with replication orientation, gene function, codon usage biases and phylogenetic evolution,in this paper a program called DNAskew was developed for the statistical analysis of strand asymmetry and codon composition bias in the DNA sequence. In addition, the program can also be used to predict the replication boundaries of genome sequences. The method builds on the fact that there are compositional asymmetries between the leading and the lagging strand for replication. DNAskew was written in Perl script language and implemented on the LINUX operating system. It works quickly with annotated or unannotated sequences in GBFF (GenBank flatfile) or fasta format. The source code is freely available for academic use at http://www.epizooty.com/pub/stat/DNAskew.

  4. Parvovirus B19 promoter at map unit 6 confers autonomous replication competence and erythroid specificity to adeno-associated virus 2 in primary human hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, X S; Yoder, M C; Zhou, S. Z.; A Srivastava

    1995-01-01

    The pathogenic human parvovirus B19 is an autonomously replicating virus with a remarkable tropism for human erythroid progenitor cells. Although the target cell specificity for B19 infection has been suggested to be mediated by the erythrocyte P-antigen receptor (globoside), a number of nonerythroid cells that express this receptor are nonpermissive for B19 replication. To directly test the role of expression from the B19 promoter at map unit 6 (B19p6) in the erythroid cell specificity of B1...

  5. Multiple redundant sequence elements within the fission yeast ura4 replication origin enhancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Dong-Yi

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some origins in eukaryotic chromosomes fire more frequently than others. In the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the relative firing frequencies of the three origins clustered 4-8 kbp upstream of the ura4 gene are controlled by a replication enhancer - an element that stimulates nearby origins in a relatively position-and orientation-independent fashion. The important sequence motifs within this enhancer were not previously localized. Results Systematic deletion of consecutive segments of ~50, ~100 or ~150 bp within the enhancer and its adjacent core origin (ars3002 revealed that several of the ~50-bp stretches within the enhancer contribute to its function in partially redundant fashion. Other stretches within the enhancer are inhibitory. Some of the stretches within the enhancer proved to be redundant with sequences within core ars3002. Consequently the collection of sequences important for core origin function was found to depend on whether the core origin is assayed in the presence or absence of the enhancer. Some of the important sequences in the core origin and enhancer co-localize with short runs of adenines or thymines, which may serve as binding sites for the fission yeast Origin Recognition Complex (ORC. Others co-localize with matches to consensus sequences commonly found in fission yeast replication origins. Conclusions The enhancer within the ura4 origin cluster in fission yeast contains multiple sequence motifs. Many of these stimulate origin function in partially redundant fashion. Some of them resemble motifs also found in core origins. The next step is to identify the proteins that bind to these stimulatory sequences.

  6. The linear plastid chromosomes of maize: terminal sequences, structures, and implications for DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldenburg, Delene J; Bendich, Arnold J

    2016-05-01

    The structure of a chromosomal DNA molecule may influence the way in which it is replicated and inherited. For decades plastid DNA (ptDNA) was believed to be circular, with breakage invoked to explain linear forms found upon extraction from the cell. Recent evidence indicates that ptDNA in vivo consists of linear molecules with discrete termini, although these ends were not characterized. We report the sequences of two terminal regions, End1 and End2, for maize (Zea mays L.) ptDNA. We describe structural features of these terminal regions and similarities found in other plant ptDNAs. The terminal sequences are within inverted repeat regions (leading to four genomic isomers) and adjacent to origins of replication. Conceptually, stem-loop structures may be formed following melting of the double-stranded DNA ends. Exonuclease digestion indicates that the ends in maize are unobstructed, but tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) ends may have a 5'-protein. If the terminal structure of ptDNA molecules influences the retention of ptDNA, the unprotected molecular ends in mature leaves of maize may be more susceptible to degradation in vivo than the protected ends in tobacco. The terminal sequences and cumulative GC skew profiles are nearly identical for maize, wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and rice (Oryza sativa L.), with less similarity among other plants. The linear structure is now confirmed for maize ptDNA and inferred for other plants and suggests a virus-like recombination-dependent replication mechanism for ptDNA. Plastid transformation vectors containing the terminal sequences may increase the chances of success in generating transplastomic cereals. PMID:26650613

  7. Replication error deficient and proficient colorectal cancer gene expression differences caused by 3'UTR polyT sequence deletions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilding, Jennifer L; McGowan, Simon; Liu, Ying;

    2010-01-01

    Replication error deficient (RER+) colorectal cancers are a distinct subset of colorectal cancers, characterized by inactivation of the DNA mismatch repair system. These cancers are typically pseudodiploid, accumulate mutations in repetitive sequences as a result of their mismatch repair deficien...

  8. Ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of nucleic acid by coupling an autonomous cascade target replication and enzyme/gold nanoparticle-based post-amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shufeng; Wei, Wenji; Wang, Yanqun; Fang, Li; Wang, Li; Li, Feng

    2016-06-15

    Owing to the intrinsic importance of nucleic acid as bio-targets, the development of isothermal and ultrasensitive electrochemical DNA biosensor is very essential for biological studies and medical diagnostics. Herein, the autonomous cascade DNA replication strategy was effectively married with the enzyme/gold nanoparticle-based post-amplification strategy to promote the detection performance toward target DNA. A hairpin DNA probe (HP) is designed that consists of an overhang at 3'-end as the recognition unit for target DNA, a recognition site for nicking endonuclease, and an alkane spacer to terminate polymerization reaction. The autonomous DNA replication-scission-displacement reaction operated by the nicking endonuclease/KF polymerase induced the autocatalytic opening of HP, which was then specifically bound by the enzyme/gold nanoparticles for further dual-signal amplification toward target-related sensing events. A low detection limit of 0.065fM with an excellent selectivity toward target DNA could be achieved. The proposed biosensor could be also easily regenerated for target detection. The developed biosensor creates an opportunity for the effective coupling of the target replication with post-amplification strategies and thus opens a promising avenue for the detection of nucleic acid with low abundance in bioanalysis and clinical biomedicine. PMID:26849348

  9. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus replication with linear DNA sequences expressing antiviral micro-RNA shuttles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chattopadhyay, Saket; Ely, Abdullah; Bloom, Kristie; Weinberg, Marc S. [Antiviral Gene Therapy Research Unit, University of the Witwatersrand (South Africa); Arbuthnot, Patrick, E-mail: Patrick.Arbuthnot@wits.ac.za [Antiviral Gene Therapy Research Unit, University of the Witwatersrand (South Africa)

    2009-11-20

    RNA interference (RNAi) may be harnessed to inhibit viral gene expression and this approach is being developed to counter chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV). Compared to synthetic RNAi activators, DNA expression cassettes that generate silencing sequences have advantages of sustained efficacy and ease of propagation in plasmid DNA (pDNA). However, the large size of pDNAs and inclusion of sequences conferring antibiotic resistance and immunostimulation limit delivery efficiency and safety. To develop use of alternative DNA templates that may be applied for therapeutic gene silencing, we assessed the usefulness of PCR-generated linear expression cassettes that produce anti-HBV micro-RNA (miR) shuttles. We found that silencing of HBV markers of replication was efficient (>75%) in cell culture and in vivo. miR shuttles were processed to form anti-HBV guide strands and there was no evidence of induction of the interferon response. Modification of terminal sequences to include flanking human adenoviral type-5 inverted terminal repeats was easily achieved and did not compromise silencing efficacy. These linear DNA sequences should have utility in the development of gene silencing applications where modifications of terminal elements with elimination of potentially harmful and non-essential sequences are required.

  10. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus replication with linear DNA sequences expressing antiviral micro-RNA shuttles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RNA interference (RNAi) may be harnessed to inhibit viral gene expression and this approach is being developed to counter chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV). Compared to synthetic RNAi activators, DNA expression cassettes that generate silencing sequences have advantages of sustained efficacy and ease of propagation in plasmid DNA (pDNA). However, the large size of pDNAs and inclusion of sequences conferring antibiotic resistance and immunostimulation limit delivery efficiency and safety. To develop use of alternative DNA templates that may be applied for therapeutic gene silencing, we assessed the usefulness of PCR-generated linear expression cassettes that produce anti-HBV micro-RNA (miR) shuttles. We found that silencing of HBV markers of replication was efficient (>75%) in cell culture and in vivo. miR shuttles were processed to form anti-HBV guide strands and there was no evidence of induction of the interferon response. Modification of terminal sequences to include flanking human adenoviral type-5 inverted terminal repeats was easily achieved and did not compromise silencing efficacy. These linear DNA sequences should have utility in the development of gene silencing applications where modifications of terminal elements with elimination of potentially harmful and non-essential sequences are required.

  11. Cellular specificity of HIV-1 replication can be controlled by LTR sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two well-established determinants of retroviral tropism are envelope sequences that regulate entry and LTR sequences that can regulate viral expression in a cell-specific manner. Studies with human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) have demonstrated that tropism of this virus maps primarily to variable envelope sequences. Studies have demonstrated that T cell and macrophage-specific transcription factor binding motifs exist in the upstream region of the LTR U3; however, the ability of the core enhancer/promoter proximal elements (two NF-κB and three Sp1 sites) to function well in macrophages and T cells have led many to conclude that HIV LTR sequences are not primary determinants of HIV tropism. To determine if cellular specificity could be imparted to HIV by the core enhancer elements, the enhancer/promoter proximal region of the HIV LTR was substituted with motifs that control gene expression in a myeloid-specific manner. The enhancer region from equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) when substituted for the HIV enhancer/promoter proximal region was found to drive expression in a macrophage-specific manner and was responsive to HIV Tat. The addition of a 5' methylation-dependent binding site (MDBP) and a promoter proximal Sp1 motif increased expression without altering cellular specificity. Spacing between the promoter proximal region and the TATA box was also found to influence LTR activity. Infectivity studies using chimeric LTRs within the context of a dual-tropic infectious molecular clone established that these LTRs directed HIV replication and production of infectious virions in macrophages but not primary T cells or T cell lines. This investigation demonstrates that cellular specificity can be imparted onto HIV-1 replication at the level of viral transcription and not entry

  12. Short DNA Fragments without Sequence Similarity Are Initiation Sites for Replication in the Chromosome of the Yeast Yarrowia lipolytica

    OpenAIRE

    Vernis, Laurence; Chasles, Marion; Pasero, Philippe; Lepingle, Andrée; Gaillardin, Claude; Fournier, Philippe

    1999-01-01

    We have previously shown that both a centromere (CEN) and a replication origin are necessary for plasmid maintenance in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica (Vernis et al., 1997). Because of this requirement, only a small number of centromere-proximal replication origins have been isolated from Yarrowia. We used a CEN-based plasmid to obtain noncentromeric origins, and several new fragments, some unique and some repetitive sequences, were isolated. Some of them were analyzed by two-dimensional gel e...

  13. The Replication Focus Targeting Sequence (RFTS) Domain Is a DNA-competitive Inhibitor of Dnmt1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syeda, Farisa; Fagan, Rebecca L.; Wean, Matthew; Avvakumov, George V.; Walker, John R.; Xue, Sheng; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Brenner, Charles (Iowa); (Toronto)

    2015-11-30

    Dnmt1 (DNA methyltransferase 1) is the principal enzyme responsible for maintenance of cytosine methylation at CpG dinucleotides in the mammalian genome. The N-terminal replication focus targeting sequence (RFTS) domain of Dnmt1 has been implicated in subcellular localization, protein association, and catalytic function. However, progress in understanding its function has been limited by the lack of assays for and a structure of this domain. Here, we show that the naked DNA- and polynucleosome-binding activities of Dnmt1 are inhibited by the RFTS domain, which functions by virtue of binding the catalytic domain to the exclusion of DNA. Kinetic analysis with a fluorogenic DNA substrate established the RFTS domain as a 600-fold inhibitor of Dnmt1 enzymatic activity. The crystal structure of the RFTS domain reveals a novel fold and supports a mechanism in which an RFTS-targeted Dnmt1-binding protein, such as Uhrf1, may activate Dnmt1 for DNA binding.

  14. Localization of non-linearly modeled autonomous mobile robots using out-of-sequence measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besada-Portas, Eva; Lopez-Orozco, Jose A; Lanillos, Pablo; de la Cruz, Jesus M

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a state of the art of the estimation algorithms dealing with Out-of-Sequence (OOS) measurements for non-linearly modeled systems. The state of the art includes a critical analysis of the algorithm properties that takes into account the applicability of these techniques to autonomous mobile robot navigation based on the fusion of the measurements provided, delayed and OOS, by multiple sensors. Besides, it shows a representative example of the use of one of the most computationally efficient approaches in the localization module of the control software of a real robot (which has non-linear dynamics, and linear and non-linear sensors) and compares its performance against other approaches. The simulated results obtained with the selected OOS algorithm shows the computational requirements that each sensor of the robot imposes to it. The real experiments show how the inclusion of the selected OOS algorithm in the control software lets the robot successfully navigate in spite of receiving many OOS measurements. Finally, the comparison highlights that not only is the selected OOS algorithm among the best performing ones of the comparison, but it also has the lowest computational and memory cost. PMID:22736962

  15. Localization of Non-Linearly Modeled Autonomous Mobile Robots Using Out-of-Sequence Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus M. de la Cruz

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a state of the art of the estimation algorithms dealing with Out-of-Sequence (OOS measurements for non-linearly modeled systems. The state of the art includes a critical analysis of the algorithm properties that takes into account the applicability of these techniques to autonomous mobile robot navigation based on the fusion of the measurements provided, delayed and OOS, by multiple sensors. Besides, it shows a representative example of the use of one of the most computationally efficient approaches in the localization module of the control software of a real robot (which has non-linear dynamics, and linear and non-linear sensors and compares its performance against other approaches. The simulated results obtained with the selected OOS algorithm shows the computational requirements that each sensor of the robot imposes to it. The real experiments show how the inclusion of the selected OOS algorithm in the control software lets the robot successfully navigate in spite of receiving many OOS measurements. Finally, the comparison highlights that not only is the selected OOS algorithm among the best performing ones of the comparison, but it also has the lowest computational and memory cost.

  16. Sequence-nonspecific replication of transfected plasmid DNA in poxvirus-infected cells.

    OpenAIRE

    DeLange, A. M.; McFadden, G

    1986-01-01

    A system in which transfected plasmid DNA replicates in the cytoplasm of poxvirus-infected cells is described. A variety of recombinant plasmids was introduced into poxvirus-infected cells by transfection, and replication of input plasmid DNA was monitored by (i) digestion with restriction enzymes that discriminate between input methylated plasmid DNA and unmethylated DNA produced by replication in mammalian cells; (ii) amplification of intracellular plasmid DNA; and (iii) density shift analy...

  17. Genes and sequences involved in the replication of cowpea mosaic virus RNAs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggen, R.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of the studies described in this thesis was to gain more insight in the complex molecular mechanisms underlying the RNA replication of the cowpea mosaic virus genome. Previously the replication of CPMV RNA has been examined extensively with crude membrane fractions prepared from CPMV inf

  18. Genome sequences of SAT 2 foot-and-mouth disease viruses from Egypt and Palestinian Autonomous Territories (Gaza Strip).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdazo-González, Begoña; Knowles, Nick J; Hammond, Jef; King, Donald P

    2012-08-01

    Two foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) genome sequences have been determined for isolates collected from recent field outbreaks in North Africa (Egypt) and the Middle East (Palestinian Autonomous Territories). These data represent the first examples of complete genomic sequences for the FMDV SAT 2 topotype VII, which is thought to be endemic in countries immediately to the south of the Sahara desert. Further studies are now urgently required to provide insights into the epidemiological links between these outbreaks and to define the pathogenicity of this emerging lineage. PMID:22843860

  19. DNAskew:Statistical Analysis of Base Compositional Asymmetry and Prediction of Replication Boundaries in the Genome Sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-Ru MA; Shao-Bo XIAO; Ai-Zhen GUO; Jian-Qiang L(U); Huan-Chun CHEN

    2004-01-01

    Sueoka and Lobry declared respectively that, in the absence of bias between the two DNA strands for mutation and selection, the base composition within each strand should be A=T and C=G (this state is called Parity Rule type 2, PR2). However, the genome sequences of many bacteria, vertebrates and viruses showed asymmetries in base composition and gene direction. To determine the relationship of base composition skews with replication orientation, gene function, codon usage biases and phylogenetic evolution,in this paper a program called DNAskew was developed for the statistical analysis of strand asymmetry and codon composition bias in the DNA sequence. In addition, the program can also be used to predict the replication boundaries of genome sequences. The method builds on the fact that there are compositional asymmetries between the leading and the lagging strand for replication. DNAskew was written in Perl script language and implemented on the LINUX operating system. It works quickly with annotated or unannotated sequences in GBFF (GenBank flatfile) or fasta format. The source code is freely available for academic use at http://www.epizooty.com/pub/stat/DNAskew.

  20. Intramitochondrial localization of universal minicircle sequence-binding protein, a trypanosomatid protein that binds kinetoplast minicircle replication origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Elneel, K; Robinson, D R; Drew, M E; Englund, P T; Shlomai, J

    2001-05-14

    Kinetoplast DNA (kDNA), the mitochondrial DNA of the trypanosomatid Crithidia fasciculata, is a unique structure containing 5,000 DNA minicircles topologically linked into a massive network. In vivo, the network is condensed into a disk-shaped structure. Replication of minicircles initiates at unique origins that are bound by universal minicircle sequence (UMS)-binding protein (UMSBP), a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein. This protein, encoded by a nuclear gene, localizes within the cell's single mitochondrion. Using immunofluorescence, we found that UMSBP localizes exclusively to two neighboring sites adjacent to the face of the kDNA disk nearest the cell's flagellum. This site is distinct from the two antipodal positions at the perimeter of the disk that is occupied by DNA polymerase beta, topoisomerase II, and a structure-specific endonuclease. Although we found constant steady-state levels of UMSBP mRNA and protein and a constant rate of UMSBP synthesis throughout the cell cycle, immunofluorescence indicated that UMSBP localization within the kinetoplast is not static. The intramitochondrial localization of UMSBP and other kDNA replication enzymes significantly clarifies our understanding of the process of kDNA replication. PMID:11352934

  1. Replication Protein A prevents promiscuous annealing between short sequence homologies: Implications for genome integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Sarah K.; Chen, Huan; Symington, Lorraine S.

    2015-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is the main eukaryotic single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein, having essential roles in all DNA metabolic reactions involving ssDNA. RPA binds ssDNA with high affinity, thereby preventing the formation of secondary structures and protecting ssDNA from the action of nucleases, and directly interacts with other DNA processing proteins. Here we discuss recent results supporting the idea that one function of RPA is to prevent annealing between short repeats that can lead to chromosome rearrangements by microhomology-mediated end joining or the formation of hairpin structures that are substrates for structure-selective nucleases. We suggest that replication fork catastrophe caused by depletion of RPA could result from cleavage of secondary structures by nucleases, and that failure to cleave hairpin structures formed at DNA ends could lead to gene amplification. These studies highlight the important role RPA plays in maintaining genome integrity. PMID:25400143

  2. Molecular cloning and DNA sequence analysis of Escherichia coli priA, the gene encoding the primosomal protein replication factor Y.

    OpenAIRE

    Nurse, P; DiGate, R J; Zavitz, K H; Marians, K J

    1990-01-01

    Escherichia coli replication factor Y (protein n') functions in the assembly of a mobile multiprotein replication-priming complex called the primosome. Although the role of factor Y in primosome assembly during replication in vitro of bacteriophage phi X174 and plasmid pBR322 DNA is clear, its role in E. coli chromosomal replication is not. To address this issue, the gene for factor Y has been cloned molecularly and its DNA sequence has been determined. The cloned fragment of DNA contained an...

  3. Fine Mapping of a cis-Acting Sequence Element in Yellow Fever Virus RNA That Is Required for RNA Replication and Cyclization

    OpenAIRE

    Corver, Jeroen; Lenches, Edith; Smith, Kayla; Robison, R. Aaron; Sando, Trisha; Strauss, Ellen G.; Strauss, James H.

    2003-01-01

    We present fine mapping of a cis-acting nucleotide sequence found in the 5' region of yellow fever virus genomic RNA that is required for RNA replication. There is evidence that this sequence interacts with a complementary sequence in the 3' region of the genome to cyclize the RNA. Replicons were constructed that had various deletions in the 5' region encoding the capsid protein and were tested for their ability to replicate. We found that a sequence of 18 nucleotides (residues 146 to 163 of ...

  4. SOVEREIGN: An autonomous neural system for incrementally learning planned action sequences to navigate towards a rewarded goal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnadt, William; Grossberg, Stephen

    2008-06-01

    How do reactive and planned behaviors interact in real time? How are sequences of such behaviors released at appropriate times during autonomous navigation to realize valued goals? Controllers for both animals and mobile robots, or animats, need reactive mechanisms for exploration, and learned plans to reach goal objects once an environment becomes familiar. The SOVEREIGN (Self-Organizing, Vision, Expectation, Recognition, Emotion, Intelligent, Goal-oriented Navigation) animat model embodies these capabilities, and is tested in a 3D virtual reality environment. SOVEREIGN includes several interacting subsystems which model complementary properties of cortical What and Where processing streams and which clarify similarities between mechanisms for navigation and arm movement control. As the animat explores an environment, visual inputs are processed by networks that are sensitive to visual form and motion in the What and Where streams, respectively. Position-invariant and size-invariant recognition categories are learned by real-time incremental learning in the What stream. Estimates of target position relative to the animat are computed in the Where stream, and can activate approach movements toward the target. Motion cues from animat locomotion can elicit head-orienting movements to bring a new target into view. Approach and orienting movements are alternately performed during animat navigation. Cumulative estimates of each movement are derived from interacting proprioceptive and visual cues. Movement sequences are stored within a motor working memory. Sequences of visual categories are stored in a sensory working memory. These working memories trigger learning of sensory and motor sequence categories, or plans, which together control planned movements. Predictively effective chunk combinations are selectively enhanced via reinforcement learning when the animat is rewarded. Selected planning chunks effect a gradual transition from variable reactive exploratory

  5. Sequence analysis and characterization of rolling-circle replicating plasmid pVCM01 from Salmonella enterica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penido, A. F. B.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Characterization of cryptic plasmid pVCM01 (accession number JX133088 isolated from Salmonella enterica Enteritidis. Methodology and results: The complete sequence of pVCM01 was obtained. This plasmid possesses 1981 bp, with G+C content of 57% in agreement of the range of Salmonella genomic DNA. pVCM01 has a high degree of similarity to pB and pJ plasmids. It possesses six main open reading frames, only one have a very high degree of amino acid identity with protein involved in the rolling-circle-like replication (RCR. Based on the sequence similarities, pVCM01 plasmid belonged to the pC194/pUB110 rolling-circle replicating plasmid family. The Rep pVCM01 possesses the motifs: FLTLTVRN, HPHFHTL, SGDGYVKHERW, which were present in all Rep proteins. Conclusion, significance and impact of study: The small size of pVCM01 plasmid and its stability in E. coli cells, make it an attractive candidate to develop new vectors, such as cloning and/or expression vector.

  6. Autonomously generating operations sequences for a Mars Rover using AI-based planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Rob; Mishkin, Andrew; Estlin, Tara; Chien, Steve; Backes, Paul; Cooper, Brian; Maxwell, Scott; Rabideau, Gregg

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses a proof-of-concept prototype for ground-based automatic generation of validated rover command sequences from highlevel science and engineering activities. This prototype is based on ASPEN, the Automated Scheduling and Planning Environment. This Artificial Intelligence (AI) based planning and scheduling system will automatically generate a command sequence that will execute within resource constraints and satisfy flight rules.

  7. On Optimal Control of Non-Autonomous Switched Systems with a Fixed Mode Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamgarpour, Maryam; Tomlin, Claire

    2012-01-01

    We consider differentiability with respect to the switch times of the value function of an optimal control problem for a non-autonomous switched system. The control variables are the switch times between the modes and the input in each mode. We provide a method to compute the derivative of the cost function given a nominal input. Then, we view the optimal control problem as a parametrized optimization problem in which the switch times are the parameters and the optimization is over the set of feasible inputs of each mode. From this point of view, we provide conditions under which the continuity and differentiability of the optimal value function, that is the cost function optimized over the inputs, can be guaranteed.

  8. Residue profile in predivergence sequences as a guide to the origin of DNA replication

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, B K

    1999-01-01

    DNA dependent RNA polymerase core subunits abb' conserved residues at frequencies most closely matched with codons at stage 10.4-11.1 in code evolution. An excess of acidic residues (stage 2 additions) lowered this estimate, but not by more than 2.3 stages. With 1 tryptophan (stage 14 addition) in 529 conserved residues, abb' significantly under-represented this amino acid, consistent with a cut-off in its residue profile before completion of the genetic code. Residue profiles in FEN-1 homologs and DNA topoisomerase I-5' placed their origin at stage 11-13. Prokaryote septation protein, FtsZ, arose earlier, between stage 8-11. Proteolipid in an ATP-driven proton pump served as a marker for cell membrane formation. It indicated this event took place near stage 7. Cell division, DNA replication and transcription were inferred to have originated in a protocell antecedent of the last common ancestor. Late-forming residue profiles characterized RNA dependent RNA replicase, DNA polymerase, reverse transcriptase and ...

  9. Diversity and dynamics of dominant and rare bacterial taxa in replicate sequencing batch reactors operated under different solids retention time

    KAUST Repository

    Bagchi, Samik

    2014-10-19

    In this study, 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing was applied in order to provide a better insight on the diversity and dynamics of total, dominant, and rare bacterial taxa in replicate lab-scale sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) operated at different solids retention time (SRT). Rank-abundance curves showed few dominant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and a long tail of rare OTUs in all reactors. Results revealed that there was no detectable effect of SRT (2 vs. 10 days) on Shannon diversity index and OTU richness of both dominant and rare taxa. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling analysis showed that the total, dominant, and rare bacterial taxa were highly dynamic during the entire period of stable reactor performance. Also, the rare taxa were more dynamic than the dominant taxa despite expected low invasion rates because of the use of sterile synthetic media.

  10. Autonomously Generating Operations Sequences for a Mars Rover Using Artificial Intelligence-Based Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, R.; Mutz, D.; Estlin, T.; Chien, S.; Backes, P.; Norris, J.; Tran, D.; Cooper, B.; Rabideau, G.; Mishkin, A.; Maxwell, S.

    2001-07-01

    This article discusses a proof-of-concept prototype for ground-based automatic generation of validated rover command sequences from high-level science and engineering activities. This prototype is based on ASPEN, the Automated Scheduling and Planning Environment. This artificial intelligence (AI)-based planning and scheduling system will automatically generate a command sequence that will execute within resource constraints and satisfy flight rules. An automated planning and scheduling system encodes rover design knowledge and uses search and reasoning techniques to automatically generate low-level command sequences while respecting rover operability constraints, science and engineering preferences, environmental predictions, and also adhering to hard temporal constraints. This prototype planning system has been field-tested using the Rocky 7 rover at JPL and will be field-tested on more complex rovers to prove its effectiveness before transferring the technology to flight operations for an upcoming NASA mission. Enabling goal-driven commanding of planetary rovers greatly reduces the requirements for highly skilled rover engineering personnel. This in turn greatly reduces mission operations costs. In addition, goal-driven commanding permits a faster response to changes in rover state (e.g., faults) or science discoveries by removing the time-consuming manual sequence validation process, allowing rapid "what-if" analyses, and thus reducing overall cycle times.

  11. An Autonomous System for Grouping Events in a Developing Aftershock Sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, D. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dodge, D. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-03-22

    We describe a prototype detection framework that automatically clusters events in real time from a rapidly unfolding aftershock sequence. We use the fact that many aftershocks are repetitive, producing similar waveforms. By clustering events based on correlation measures of waveform similarity, the number of independent event instances that must be examined in detail by analysts may be reduced. Our system processes array data and acquires waveform templates with a short-term average (STA)/long-term average (LTA) detector operating on a beam directed at the P phases of the aftershock sequence. The templates are used to create correlation-type (subspace) detectors that sweep the subsequent data stream for occurrences of the same waveform pattern. Events are clustered by association with a particular detector. Hundreds of subspace detectors can run in this framework a hundred times faster than in real time. Nonetheless, to check the growth in the number of detectors, the framework pauses periodically and reclusters detections to reduce the number of event groups. These groups define new subspace detectors that replace the older generation of detectors. Because low-magnitude occurrences of a particular signal template may be missed by the STA/LTA detector, we advocate restarting the framework from the beginning of the sequence periodically to reprocess the entire data stream with the existing detectors. We tested the framework on 10 days of data from the Nevada Seismic Array (NVAR) covering the 2003 San Simeon earthquake. One hundred eighty-four automatically generated detectors produced 676 detections resulting in a potential reduction in analyst workload of up to 73%.

  12. Translesion replication by DNA polymerase beta is modulated by sequence context and stimulated by fork-like flap structures in DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daube, S S; Arad, G; Livneh, Z

    2000-01-18

    Mutations in the human genome are clustered in hot-spot regions, suggesting that some sequences are more prone to accumulate mutations than others. These regions are therefore more likely to lead to the development of cancer. Several pathways leading to the creation of mutations may be influenced by the DNA sequence, including sensitivity to DNA damaging agents, and repair mechanisms. We have analyzed sequence context effects on translesion replication, the error-prone repair of single-stranded DNA regions carrying lesions. By using synthetic oligonucleotides containing systematic variations of sequences flanking a synthetic abasic site, we show that translesion replication by the repair polymerase DNA polymerase beta is stimulated to a moderate extent by low stacking levels of the template nucleotides downstream of the lesion, combined with homopolymeric runs flanking the lesion both upstream and downstream. A strong stimulation of translesion replication by DNA polymerase beta was seen when fork-like flap structures were introduced into the DNA substrate downstream of the lesion. Unlike for gapped substrates, this stimulation was independent of the presence of a phosphate group at the 5' terminus of the flap. These results suggest that DNA polymerase beta may participate in cellular DNA transactions involving higher order structures. The significance of these results for in vivo translesion replication is discussed. PMID:10631001

  13. Immunodetection and N-terminal sequencing of DNA replication proteins of bacteriophage BFK20 - lytic phage of Brevibacterium flavum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukovská, G; Halgašová, N; Hromadová, L; Koščová, H; Bukovský, M

    2014-01-01

    Phages are excellent models for studying the mechanism of DNA replication in prokaryotes. Identification of phage proteins involved in phage DNA replication is the first prerequisite for elucidation of the phage replication module. We focused on replication proteins gp41 (a putative helicase from SF2 superfamily), gp43 (a RepA-like protein), and gp44 (a putative DNA polymerase A) of phage BFK20 grown in Brevibacterium flavum. To identify them in the phage-host system, we prepared antibodies to these proteins which were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli as his-tagged recombinant proteins. After purification to homogeneity the recombinant proteins served for raising specific polyclonal antibodies in mice. Using these antibodies in Western blot analysis the phage proteins gp41, gp43 and gp44 were detected during the phage growth cycle. The proteins gp41 and gp43, prepared from cell lysate by ammonium sulphate precipitation, were N-terminally sequenced and found to contain the sequences N-SVKPRELR-C and N-MLGSTML-C, respectively. This means that gp41 starts with serine but not with common methionine. We consider these findings an initial but important step towards more thorough characterization of replication proteins of phage BFK20. PMID:24957720

  14. The minimal sequence essential for replication and movement of Cotton leaf curl Multan betasatellite DNA by a helper virus in plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eini, Omid; Behjatnia, S A Akbar

    2016-10-01

    Betasatellites are single-stranded circular DNAs associated with a number of monopartite begomoviruses. Betasatellites rely on the helper begomoviruses for replication and movement in plant tissues and plant-to-plant transmission by vectors. Their genomes are approximately half the size of the helper viruses and consist of three main regions including the βC1 gene, an adenine-rich (A-rich) region, and the satellite conserved region (SCR). In this study, we investigated the minimal sequences required for Cotton leaf curl Multan betasatellite (CLCuMB) replication and movement. Mutational analysis of CLCuMB DNA genome indicated that βC1 gene and A-rich region were not required for trans-replication and movement of CLCuMB in host plants by a helper virus. Deletion of βC1 gene and a fragment (135 nt in length) upstream of this gene impaired CLCuMB replication. However, CLCuMB mutant with deletion of βC1 gene and a further 163 nucleotides replicated at a lower level as compared to the wild-type betasatellite. This suggests that there are essential elements in the fragment upstream of βC1 gene, which are required for the replication of CLCuMB rather than the size limitation of CLCuMB DNA. PMID:27193570

  15. Replicating Potato spindle tuber viroid mediates de novo methylation of an intronic viroid sequence but no cleavage of the corresponding pre-mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakouras, Athanasios; Dadami, Elena; Bassler, Alexandra; Zwiebel, Michele; Krczal, Gabi; Wassenegger, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In plants, Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) replication triggers post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) and RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) of homologous RNA and DNA sequences, respectively. PTGS predominantly occurs in the cytoplasm, but nuclear PTGS has been also reported. In this study, we investigated whether the nuclear replicating PSTVd is able to trigger nuclear PTGS. Transgenic tobacco plants carrying cytoplasmic and nuclear PTGS sensor constructs were PSTVd-infected resulting in the generation of abundant PSTVd-derived small interfering RNAs (vd-siRNAs). Northern blot analysis revealed that, in contrast to the cytoplasmic sensor, the nuclear sensor transcript was not targeted for RNA degradation. Bisulfite sequencing analysis showed that the nuclear PTGS sensor transgene was efficiently targeted for RdDM. Our data suggest that PSTVd fails to trigger nuclear PTGS, and that RdDM and nuclear PTGS are not necessarily coupled. PMID:25826660

  16. Ubiquitous human ‘master’ origins of replication are encoded in the DNA sequence via a local enrichment in nucleosome excluding energy barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drillon, Guénola; Audit, Benjamin; Argoul, Françoise; Arneodo, Alain

    2015-02-01

    As the elementary building block of eukaryotic chromatin, the nucleosome is at the heart of the compromise between the necessity of compacting DNA in the cell nucleus and the required accessibility to regulatory proteins. The recent availability of genome-wide experimental maps of nucleosome positions for many different organisms and cell types has provided an unprecedented opportunity to elucidate to what extent the DNA sequence conditions the primary structure of chromatin and in turn participates in the chromatin-mediated regulation of nuclear functions, such as gene expression and DNA replication. In this study, we use in vivo and in vitro genome-wide nucleosome occupancy data together with the set of nucleosome-free regions (NFRs) predicted by a physical model of nucleosome formation based on sequence-dependent bending properties of the DNA double-helix, to investigate the role of intrinsic nucleosome occupancy in the regulation of the replication spatio-temporal programme in human. We focus our analysis on the so-called replication U/N-domains that were shown to cover about half of the human genome in the germline (skew-N domains) as well as in embryonic stem cells, somatic and HeLa cells (mean replication timing U-domains). The ‘master’ origins of replication (MaOris) that border these megabase-sized U/N-domains were found to be specified by a few hundred kb wide regions that are hyper-sensitive to DNase I cleavage, hypomethylated, and enriched in epigenetic marks involved in transcription regulation, the hallmarks of localized open chromatin structures. Here we show that replication U/N-domain borders that are conserved in all considered cell lines have an environment highly enriched in nucleosome-excluding-energy barriers, suggesting that these ubiquitous MaOris have been selected during evolution. In contrast, MaOris that are cell-type-specific are mainly regulated epigenetically and are no longer favoured by a local abundance of intrinsic NFRs

  17. In Vivo Replication and Pathogenesis of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Recombinant M40 Containing Ebola Virus L-Domain Sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Takashi Irie; Elena Carnero; Adolfo García-Sastre; Harty, Ronald N.

    2012-01-01

    The M40 VSV recombinant was engineered to contain overlapping PTAP and PPxY L-domain motifs and flanking residues from the VP40 protein of Ebola virus. Replication of M40 in cell culture is virtually indistinguishable from that of control viruses. However, the presence of the Ebola PTAP motif in the M40 recombinant enabled this virus to interact with and recruit host Tsg101, which was packaged into M40 virions. In this brief report, we compared replication and the pathogenic profiles of M40 a...

  18. DNA Replication Origins

    OpenAIRE

    Leonard, Alan C.; Méchali, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    The onset of genomic DNA synthesis requires precise interactions of specialized initiator proteins with DNA at sites where the replication machinery can be loaded. These sites, defined as replication origins, are found at a few unique locations in all of the prokaryotic chromosomes examined so far. However, replication origins are dispersed among tens of thousands of loci in metazoan chromosomes, thereby raising questions regarding the role of specific nucleotide sequences and chromatin envir...

  19. Transmission of human enterovirus 85 recombinants containing new unknown serotype HEV-B donor sequences in Xinjiang Uighur autonomous region, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Sun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human enterovirus 85 (HEV85, whose prototype strain (Strain BAN00-10353/BAN/2000 was isolated in Bangladesh in 2000, is a recently identified serotype within the human enterovirus B (HEV-B species. At present, only one nucleotide sequence of HEV85 (the complete genome sequence of the prototype strain is available in the GenBank database. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we report the genetic characteristics of 33 HEV85 isolates that circulated in the Xinjiang Uighur autonomous region of China in 2011. Sequence analysis revealed that all these Chinese HEV85 isolates belong to 2 transmission chains, and intertypic recombination was found with the new unknown serotype HEV-B donor sequences. Two HEV85 isolates recovered from a patient presenting acute flaccid paralysis and one of his contacts were temperature-insensitive strains, and some nucleotide substitutions in the non-coding regions and in the 2C or 3D coding regions may have affected the temperature sensitivity of HEV85 strains. CONCLUSIONS: The Chinese HEV85 recombinant described in this study trapped a new unknown serotype HEV-B donor sequence, indicating that new unknown HEV-B serotypes exist or circulate in Xinjiang of China. Our study also indicated that HEV85 is a prevalent and common enterovirus serotype in Xinjiang.

  20. A single amino acid change, Q114R, in the cleavage-site sequence of Newcastle disease virus fusion protein attenuates viral replication and pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, Sweety; Kumar, Sachin; Khattar, Sunil K; Samal, Siba K

    2011-10-01

    A key determinant of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) virulence is the amino acid sequence at the fusion (F) protein cleavage site. The NDV F protein is synthesized as an inactive precursor, F(0), and is activated by proteolytic cleavage between amino acids 116 and 117 to produce two disulfide-linked subunits, F(1) and F(2). The consensus sequence of the F protein cleavage site of virulent [(112)(R/K)-R-Q-(R/K)-R↓F-I(118)] and avirulent [(112)(G/E)-(K/R)-Q-(G/E)-R↓L-I(118)] strains contains a conserved glutamine residue at position 114. Recently, some NDV strains from Africa and Madagascar were isolated from healthy birds and have been reported to contain five basic residues (R-R-R-K-R↓F-I/V or R-R-R-R-R↓F-I/V) at the F protein cleavage site. In this study, we have evaluated the role of this conserved glutamine residue in the replication and pathogenicity of NDV by using the moderately pathogenic Beaudette C strain and by making Q114R, K115R and I118V mutants of the F protein in this strain. Our results showed that changing the glutamine to a basic arginine residue reduced viral replication and attenuated the pathogenicity of the virus in chickens. The pathogenicity was further reduced when the isoleucine at position 118 was substituted for valine. PMID:21677091

  1. Genome sequence of foot-and-mouth disease virus outside the 3A region is also responsible for virus replication in bovine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xueqing; Li, Pinghua; Sun, Pu; Lu, Zengjun; Bao, Huifang; Bai, Xingwen; Fu, Yuanfang; Cao, Yimei; Li, Dong; Chen, Yingli; Qiao, Zilin; Liu, Zaixin

    2016-07-15

    The deletion of residues 93-102 in non-structure protein 3A of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is associated with the inability of FMDV to grow in bovine cells and attenuated virulence in cattle.Whereas, a previously reported FMDV strain O/HKN/21/70 harboring 93-102 deletion in 3A protein grew equally well in bovine and swine cells. This suggests that changes inFMDV genome sequence, in addition to 93-102 deletion in 3A, may also affectthe viral growth phenotype in bovine cellsduring infection and replication.However, it is nuclear that changes in which region (inside or outside of 3A region) influences FMDV growth phenotype in bovine cells.In this study, to determine the region in FMDV genomeaffecting viral growth phenotype in bovine cells, we constructed chimeric FMDVs, rvGZSB-HKN3A and rvHN-HKN3A, by introducing the 3A coding region of O/HKN/21/70 into the context of O/SEA/Mya-98 strain O/GZSB/2011 and O Cathay topotype strain O/HN/CHA/93, respectively, since O/GZSB/2011 containing full-length 3A protein replicated well in bovine and swine cells, and O/HN/CHA/93 harboring 93-102 deletion in 3A protein grew poorly in bovine cells.The chimeric virusesrvGZSB-HKN3A and rvHN-HKN3A displayed growth properties and plaque phenotypes similar to those of the parental virus rvGZSB and rv-HN in BHK-21 and primary fetal porcine kidney (FPK) cells. However, rvHN-HKN3A and rv-HN replicated poorly in primary fetal bovine kidney (FBK) cells with no visible plaques, and rvGZSB-HKN3A exhibited lower growth rate and smaller plaque size phenotypes than those of the parental virus in FBK cells, but similar growth properties and plaque phenotypes to those of the recombinant viruses harboring 93-102 deletion in 3A. These results demonstrate that the difference present in FMDV genome sequence outside the 3A coding region also have influence on FMDV replication ability in bovine cells. PMID:27094491

  2. Agent, autonomous

    OpenAIRE

    Luciani, Annie

    2007-01-01

    The expression autonomous agents, widely used in virtual reality, computer graphics, artificial intelligence and artificial life, corresponds to the simulation of autonomous creatures, virtual (i.e. totally computed by a program), or embodied in a physical envelope, as done in autonomous robots.

  3. Early monitoring of the human polyomavirus BK replication and sequencing analysis in a cohort of adult kidney transplant patients treated with basiliximab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mischitelli Monica

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nowadays, better immunosuppressors have decreased the rates of acute rejection in kidney transplantation, but have also led to the emergence of BKV-associated nephropathy (BKVAN. Therefore, we prospectively investigated BKV load in plasma and urine samples in a cohort of kidney transplants, receiving basiliximab combined with a mycophenolate mofetil-based triple immunotherapy, to evaluate the difference between BKV replication during the first 3 months post-transplantation, characterized by the non-depleting action of basiliximab, versus the second 3 months, in which the maintenance therapy acts alone. We also performed sequencing analysis to assess whether a particular BKV subtype/subgroup or transcriptional control region (TCR variants were present. Methods We monitored BK viruria and viremia by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR at 12 hours (Tx, 1 (T1, 3 (T2 and 6 (T3 months post-transplantation among 60 kidney transplant patients. Sequencing analysis was performed by nested-PCR with specific primers for TCR and VP1 regions. Data were statistically analyzed using χ2 test and Student's t-test. Results BKV was detected at Tx in 4/60 urine and in 16/60 plasma, with median viral loads of 3,70 log GEq/mL and 3,79 log GEq/mL, respectively, followed by a significant increase of both BKV-positive transplants (32/60 and median values of viruria (5,78 log GEq/mL and viremia (4,52 log GEq/mL at T2. Conversely, a significantly decrease of patients with viruria and viremia (17/60 was observed at T3, together with a reduction of the median urinary and plasma viral loads (4,09 log GEq/mL and 4,00 log GEq/mL, respectively. BKV TCR sequence analysis always showed the presence of archetypal sequences, with a few single-nucleotide substitutions and one nucleotide insertion that, interestingly, were all representative of the particular subtypes/subgroups we identified by VP1 sequencing analysis: I/b-2 and IV/c-2. Conclusions Our

  4. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transcription and replication by DNA sequence-selective plant lignans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnabre, J N; Brady, J N; Clanton, D J; Ito, Y; Dittmer, J; Bates, R B; Huang, R C

    1995-11-21

    A plant lignan, 3'-O-methyl nordihydroguaiaretic acid (3'-O-methyl NDGA, denoted Malachi 4:5-6 or Mal.4; molecular weigth 316), was isolated from Larrea tridentata and found to be able to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Tat-regulated transactivation in vivo, induce protection of lymphoblastoid CEM-SS cells from HIV (strain IIIB) killing, and suppress the replication of five HIV-1 strains (WM, MN, VS, JR-CSF, and IIIB) in mitogen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells, all in a dose-dependent manner. Mal.4 inhibits both basal transcription and Tat-regulated transactivation in vitro. The target of Mal.4 has been localized to nucleotides -87 to -40 of the HIV long terminal repeat. Mal.4 directly and specifically interferes with the binding of Sp1 to Sp1 sites in the HIV long terminal repeat. By inhibiting proviral expression, Mal.4 may be able to interrupt the life cycles of both wild-type and reverse transcriptase or protease mutant viruses in HIV-infected patients. PMID:7479972

  5. Sequence characteristics required for cooperative binding and efficient in vivo titration of the replication initiator protein DnaA in E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming G.; Christensen, Bjarke Bak; Atlung, Tove

    2007-01-01

    was eliminated by insertion of half a helical turn between any of the DnaA boxes. Titration strongly depends on the presence and orientation of the promoter distal R6 DnaA box located 104 bp upstream of the R5 box as well as neighbouring sequences downstream of R6. Titration depends on the integrity of a 43 bp......Plasmids carrying the mioC promoter region, which contains two DnaA boxes, R5 and R6 with one misfit to the consensus TT(A)/(T)TNCACA, are as efficient in in vivo titration of the DnaA protein as plasmids carrying a replication-inactivated oriC region with its eight DnaA boxes. Three additional Dna...... was located less than 20 bp upstream of the -35 sequence. Thus, the architectural requirements for titration and for repression of transcription are different. A new set of rules for identifying efficiently titrating DnaA box regions was formulated and used to analyse sequences for which good titration data...

  6. Chromosomal context and replication properties of ARS plasmids in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aditya S Pratihar; Vishnu P Tripathi; Mukesh P Yadav; Dharani D Dubey

    2015-12-01

    Short, specific DNA sequences called as Autonomously Replicating Sequence (ARS) elements function as plasmid as well as chromosomal replication origins in yeasts. As compared to ARSs, different chromosomal origins vary greatly in their efficiency and timing of replication probably due to their wider chromosomal context. The two Schizosaccharomyces pombe ARS elements, ars727 and ars2OO4, represent two extremities in their chromosomal origin activity - ars727 is inactive and late replicating, while ars2OO4 is a highly active, early-firing origin. To determine the effect of chromosomal context on the activity of these ARS elements, we have cloned them with their extended chromosomal context as well as in the context of each other in both orientations and analysed their replication efficiency by ARS and plasmid stability assays. We found that these ARS elements retain their origin activity in their extended/altered context. However, deletion of a 133-bp region of the previously reported ars727-associated late replication enforcing element (LRE) caused advancement in replication timing of the resulting plasmid. These results confirm the role of LRE in directing plasmid replication timing and suggest that the plasmid origin efficiency of ars2OO4 or ars727 remains unaltered by the extended chromosomal context.

  7. Conserved sequences in the carboxyl terminus of integrase that are essential for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication.

    OpenAIRE

    Cannon, P M; Byles, E D; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1996-01-01

    We have previously identified a residue in the carboxyl terminus of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase (HIV-1 IN), W-235, the requirement for which is only revealed in viral assays for integrase function (P. M. Cannon, W. Wilson, E. Byles, S. M. Kingsman, and A. J. Kingsman, J. Virol. 68:4768-4775, 1994). Our further analysis of this region of retroviral IN has now identified several sequence motifs which are conserved in all the retroviruses we examined, apart from human spumaretr...

  8. Sequence polymorphism of dotA and mip alleles mediating invasion and intracellular replication of Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumbaugh, Alyssa C; McGraw, Elizabeth A; Page, Kristen L; Selander, Robert K; Whittam, Thomas S

    2002-05-01

    Legionella pneumophila inhabit a variety of natural and man-made aquatic environments, where they live primarily as intracellular parasites of protozoans. Given the proper exposure, however, they can cause opportunistic pneumonic infections in humans. The products of two L. pneumophila genes, dotA and mip, are part of the mechanism mediating the initial invasion of eukaryotic cells, and subsequent intracellular survival and multiplication. In this study, DNA polymorphism of the dotA and mip genes was assessed for 17 clinical and environmental isolates by nucleotide sequencing to determine the level of sequence variation, rates of molecular evolution, and history of gene divergence. The mip gene is highly conserved, whereas dotA is extremely variable, with an average level of nucleotide diversity four times greater than that of mip. Gene trees for each locus support a division of the L. pneumophila isolates into two clonal lineages. There are several disagreements between the gene trees suggesting that although L. pneumophila has a clonal population structure, genetic exchange has contributed to genotypic variation among strains in nature. PMID:11927981

  9. Characterization of the replication and stability regions of Agrobacterium tumefaciens plasmid pTAR.

    OpenAIRE

    Gallie, D R; Zaitlin, D; Perry, K L; Kado, C I

    1984-01-01

    A 5.4-kilobase region containing the origin of replication and stability maintenance of the 44-kilobase Agrobacterium tumefaciens plasmid pTAR has been mapped and characterized. Within this region is a 1.3-kilobase segment that is capable of directing autonomous replication. The remaining segment contains the stability locus for maintenance of pTAR during nonselective growth. Approximately 35% of pTAR shares sequence homology with pAg119, a 44-kilobase cryptic plasmid in grapevine strain 1D11...

  10. Characterizing and controlling intrinsic biases of lambda exonuclease in nascent strand sequencing reveals phasing between nucleosomes and G-quadruplex motifs around a subset of human replication origins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foulk, M. S.; Urban, J. M.; Casella, Cinzia;

    2015-01-01

    Nascent strand sequencing (NS-seq) is used to discover DNA replication origins genome-wide, allowing identification of features for their specification. NS-seq depends on the ability of lambda exonuclease (lambda-exo) to efficiently digest parental DNA while leaving RNA-primer protected nascent...... strands intact. We used genomics and biochemical approaches to determine if lambda-exo digests all parental DNA sequences equally. We report that lambda-exo does not efficiently digest G-quadruplex (G4) structures in a plasmid. Moreover, lambda-exo digestion of nonreplicating genomic DNA (LexoG0) enriches...... GC-rich DNA and G4 motifs genome-wide. We used LexoG0 data to control for nascent strand-independent lambda-exo biases in NSseq and validated this approach at the rDNA locus. The lambda-exo-controlled NS-seq peaks are not GC-rich, and only 35.5% overlap with 6.8% of all G4s, suggesting that G4s...

  11. Conserved sequences in the carboxyl terminus of integrase that are essential for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, P M; Byles, E D; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1996-01-01

    We have previously identified a residue in the carboxyl terminus of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase (HIV-1 IN), W-235, the requirement for which is only revealed in viral assays for integrase function (P. M. Cannon, W. Wilson, E. Byles, S. M. Kingsman, and A. J. Kingsman, J. Virol. 68:4768-4775, 1994). Our further analysis of this region of retroviral IN has now identified several sequence motifs which are conserved in all the retroviruses we examined, apart from human spumaretrovirus. We have made mutations within these motifs in HIV-1 IN and examined their phenotypes when reintroduced into an infectious proviral clone. The deleterious effects of several of these mutations demonstrate the importance of these regions for IN function in vivo. We observed a further discrepancy, at a motif that is only conserved in the lentiviruses, in the ability of mutants to function in in vitro and in vivo assays. Substitutions both in this region and at W-235 abolish HIV-1 infectivity but do not affect particle production, morphology, reverse transcription, or nuclear import in T-cell lines. Taken together with the in vitro data suggesting that neither of these residues is directly involved in the catalytic reactions of IN, it seems likely that we have identified regions of IN that are essential for interactions with other components of the integration machinery. PMID:8523588

  12. Replication domains are self-interacting structural chromatin units of human chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneodo, Alain

    2011-03-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the absence of specific sequence motifs marking the origins of replication has been a serious hindrance to the understanding of the mechanisms that regulate the initiation and the maintenance of the replication program in different cell types. In silico analysis of nucleotide compositional skew has predicted the existence, in the germline, of replication N-domains bordered by putative replication origins and where the skew decreases rather linearly as the signature of a progressive inversion of the average fork polarity. Here, from the demonstration that the average fork polarity can be directly extracted from the derivative of replication timing profiles, we develop a wavelet-based pattern recognition methodology to delineate replication U-domains where the replication timing profile is shaped as a U and its derivative as a N. Replication U-domains are robustly found in seven cell lines as covering a significant portion (40-50%) of the human genome where the replication timing data actually displays some plasticity between cell lines. The early replication initiation zones at U-domains borders are found to be hypersensitive to DNase I cleavage, to be associated with transcriptional activity and to present a significant enrichment in insular-binding proteins CTCF, the hallmark of an open chromatin structure. A comparative analysis of genome-wide chromatin interaction (HiC) data shows that replication-U domains correspond to self-interacting structural high order chromatin units of megabase characteristic size. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that the epigenetic compartmentalization of the human genome into autonomous replication U-domains comes along with an extensive remodelling of the threedimensional chromosome architecture during development or in specific diseases. The observed cell specific conservation of the replication timing between the human and mouse genomes strongly suggests that this chromosome organization into

  13. RepA and DnaA proteins are required for initiation of R1 plasmid replication in vitro and interact with the oriR sequence.

    OpenAIRE

    Masai, H.; Arai, K.

    1987-01-01

    RepA, an initiation protein of R1 plasmid replication, was purified from an Escherichia coli strain overproducing the protein. The purified RepA protein specifically initiated replication in vitro of plasmid DNA bearing the replication origin of R1 plasmid (oriR). The replication, strictly dependent on added RepA protein, was independent of host RNA polymerase but required other host replication functions (DnaB and DnaC proteins, the single-stranded-DNA-binding protein SSB, and DNA gyrase). T...

  14. First independent replication of the involvement of LARS2 in Perrault syndrome by whole-exome sequencing of an Italian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldà, Giulia; Caccia, Sonia; Robusto, Michela; Chiereghin, Chiara; Castorina, Pierangela; Ambrosetti, Umberto; Duga, Stefano; Asselta, Rosanna

    2016-04-01

    Perrault syndrome (MIM #233400) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by ovarian dysgenesis and primary ovarian insufficiency in females, and progressive hearing loss in both genders. Recently, mutations in five genes (HSD17B4, HARS2, CLPP, LARS2 and C10ORF2) were found to be responsible for Perrault syndrome, although they do not account for all cases of this genetically heterogeneous condition. We used whole-exome sequencing to identify pathogenic variants responsible for Perrault syndrome in an Italian pedigree with two affected siblings. Both patients were compound heterozygous for two novel missense variants within the mitochondrial leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LARS2): NM_015340.3:c.899C>T(p.Thr300Met) and c.1912G>A(p.Glu638Lys). Both variants cosegregated with the phenotype in the family. p.Thr300 and p.Glu638 are evolutionarily conserved residues, and are located, respectively, within the editing domain and immediately before the catalytically important KMSKS motif. Homology modeling using as template the E. coli leucyl-tRNA synthetase provided further insights on the possible pathogenic effects of the identified variants. This represents the first independent replication of the involvement of LARS2 mutations in Perrault syndrome, contributing valuable information for the further understanding of this disease. PMID:26657938

  15. Database Replication

    CERN Document Server

    Kemme, Bettina

    2010-01-01

    Database replication is widely used for fault-tolerance, scalability and performance. The failure of one database replica does not stop the system from working as available replicas can take over the tasks of the failed replica. Scalability can be achieved by distributing the load across all replicas, and adding new replicas should the load increase. Finally, database replication can provide fast local access, even if clients are geographically distributed clients, if data copies are located close to clients. Despite its advantages, replication is not a straightforward technique to apply, and

  16. Analysis of a new strain of Euphorbia mosaic virus with distinct replication specificity unveils a lineage of begomoviruses with short Rep sequences in the DNA-B intergenic region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argüello-Astorga Gerardo R

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Euphorbia mosaic virus (EuMV is a member of the SLCV clade, a lineage of New World begomoviruses that display distinctive features in their replication-associated protein (Rep and virion-strand replication origin. The first entirely characterized EuMV isolate is native from Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico; subsequently, EuMV was detected in weeds and pepper plants from another region of Mexico, and partial DNA-A sequences revealed significant differences in their putative replication specificity determinants with respect to EuMV-YP. This study was aimed to investigate the replication compatibility between two EuMV isolates from the same country. Results A new isolate of EuMV was obtained from pepper plants collected at Jalisco, Mexico. Full-length clones of both genomic components of EuMV-Jal were biolistically inoculated into plants of three different species, which developed symptoms indistinguishable from those induced by EuMV-YP. Pseudorecombination experiments with EuMV-Jal and EuMV-YP genomic components demonstrated that these viruses do not form infectious reassortants in Nicotiana benthamiana, presumably because of Rep-iteron incompatibility. Sequence analysis of the EuMV-Jal DNA-B intergenic region (IR led to the unexpected discovery of a 35-nt-long sequence that is identical to a segment of the rep gene in the cognate viral DNA-A. Similar short rep sequences ranging from 35- to 51-nt in length were identified in all EuMV isolates and in three distinct viruses from South America related to EuMV. These short rep sequences in the DNA-B IR are positioned downstream to a ~160-nt non-coding domain highly similar to the CP promoter of begomoviruses belonging to the SLCV clade. Conclusions EuMV strains are not compatible in replication, indicating that this begomovirus species probably is not a replicating lineage in nature. The genomic analysis of EuMV-Jal led to the discovery of a subgroup of SLCV clade viruses that contain in

  17. Comparative analysis of seven viral nuclear export signals (NESs reveals the crucial role of nuclear export mediated by the third NES consensus sequence of nucleoprotein (NP in influenza A virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nopporn Chutiwitoonchai

    Full Text Available The assembly of influenza virus progeny virions requires machinery that exports viral genomic ribonucleoproteins from the cell nucleus. Currently, seven nuclear export signal (NES consensus sequences have been identified in different viral proteins, including NS1, NS2, M1, and NP. The present study examined the roles of viral NES consensus sequences and their significance in terms of viral replication and nuclear export. Mutation of the NP-NES3 consensus sequence resulted in a failure to rescue viruses using a reverse genetics approach, whereas mutation of the NS2-NES1 and NS2-NES2 sequences led to a strong reduction in viral replication kinetics compared with the wild-type sequence. While the viral replication kinetics for other NES mutant viruses were also lower than those of the wild-type, the difference was not so marked. Immunofluorescence analysis after transient expression of NP-NES3, NS2-NES1, or NS2-NES2 proteins in host cells showed that they accumulated in the cell nucleus. These results suggest that the NP-NES3 consensus sequence is mostly required for viral replication. Therefore, each of the hydrophobic (Φ residues within this NES consensus sequence (Φ1, Φ2, Φ3, or Φ4 was mutated, and its viral replication and nuclear export function were analyzed. No viruses harboring NP-NES3 Φ2 or Φ3 mutants could be rescued. Consistent with this, the NP-NES3 Φ2 and Φ3 mutants showed reduced binding affinity with CRM1 in a pull-down assay, and both accumulated in the cell nucleus. Indeed, a nuclear export assay revealed that these mutant proteins showed lower nuclear export activity than the wild-type protein. Moreover, the Φ2 and Φ3 residues (along with other Φ residues within the NP-NES3 consensus were highly conserved among different influenza A viruses, including human, avian, and swine. Taken together, these results suggest that the Φ2 and Φ3 residues within the NP-NES3 protein are important for its nuclear export function

  18. Database replication

    OpenAIRE

    Popov, P. T.; Stankovic, V.

    2014-01-01

    A fault-tolerant node for synchronous heterogeneous database replication and a method for performing a synchronous heterogenous database replication at such a node are provided. A processor executes a computer program to generate a series of database transactions to be carried out at the fault-tolerant node. The fault-tolerant node comprises at least two relational database management systems, each of which are different relational database management system products, each implementing snapsh...

  19. Replication of bacteriophage lambda DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper results of studies on the mechanism of bacteriophage lambda replication using molecular biological and biochemical approaches are reported. The purification of the initiator proteins, O and P, and the role of the O and P proteins in the initiation of lambda DNA replication through interactions with specific DNA sequences are described. 47 references, 15 figures

  20. Involvement of the 5'-leader sequence in coupling the stability of a human H3 histone mRNA with DNA replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two lines of evidence derived from fusion gene constructs indicate that sequences residing in the 5'-nontranslated region of a cell cycle-dependent human H3 histone mRNA are involved in the selective destabilization that occurs when DNA synthesis is terminated. The experimental approach was to construct chimeric genes in which fragments of the mRNA coding regions of the H3 histone gene were fused with fragments of genes not expressed in a cell cycle-dependent manner. After transfection in HeLa S3 cells with the recombinant plasmids, levels of fusion mRNAs were determined by S1 nuclease analysis prior to and following DNA synthesis inhibition. When the first 20 nucleotides of an H3 histone mRNA leader were replaced with 89 nucleotides of the leader from a Drosophila heat-shock (hsp70) mRNA, the fusion transcript remained stable during inhibition of DNA synthesis, in contrast to the rapid destabilization of the endogenous histone mRNA in these cells. In a reciprocal experiment, a histone-globin fusion gene was constructed that produced a transcript with the initial 20 nucleotides of the H3 histone mRNA substituted for the human β-globin mRNA leader. In HeLa cells treated with inhibitors of DNA synthesis and/or protein synthesis, cellular levels of this histone-globin fusion mRNA appeared to be regulated in a manner similar to endogenous histone mRNA levels. These results suggest that the first 20 nucleotides of the leader are sufficient to couple histone mRNA stability with DNA replication

  1. Plastid genome sequence of the cryptophyte alga Rhodomonas salina CCMP1319: lateral transfer of putative DNA replication machinery and a test of chromist plastid phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Hameed; Parks, Natalie; Kozera, Catherine; Curtis, Bruce A; Parsons, Byron J; Bowman, Sharen; Archibald, John M

    2007-08-01

    Cryptophytes are a group of unicellular algae with chlorophyll c-containing plastids derived from the uptake of a secondary (i.e., eukaryotic) endosymbiont. Biochemical and molecular data indicate that cryptophyte plastids are derived from red algae, yet the question of whether or not cryptophytes acquired their red algal plastids independent of those in heterokont, haptophyte, and dinoflagellate algae is of long-standing debate. To better understand the origin and evolution of the cryptophyte plastid, we have sequenced the plastid genome of Rhodomonas salina CCMP1319: at 135,854 bp, it is the largest secondary plastid genome characterized thus far. It also possesses interesting features not seen in the distantly related cryptophyte Guillardia theta or in other red secondary plastids, including pseudogenes, introns, and a bacterial-derived gene for the tau/gamma subunit of DNA polymerase III (dnaX), the first time putative DNA replication machinery has been found encoded in any plastid genome. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that dnaX was acquired by lateral gene transfer (LGT) in an ancestor of Rhodomonas, most likely from a firmicute bacterium. A phylogenomic survey revealed no additional cases of LGT, beyond a noncyanobacterial type rpl36 gene similar to that recently characterized in other cryptophytes and haptophytes. Rigorous concatenated analysis of 45 proteins encoded in 15 complete plastid genomes produced trees in which the heterokont, haptophyte, and cryptophyte (i.e., chromist) plastids were monophyletic, and heterokonts and haptophytes were each other's closest relatives. However, statistical support for chromist monophyly disappears when amino acids are recoded according to their chemical properties in order to minimize the impact of composition bias, and a significant fraction of the concatenate appears consistent with a sister-group relationship between cryptophyte and haptophyte plastids. PMID:17522086

  2. Susceptibility to superhelically driven DNA duplex destabilization: a highly conserved property of yeast replication origins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Strand separation is obligatory for several DNA functions, including replication. However, local DNA properties such as A+T content or thermodynamic stability alone do not determine the susceptibility to this transition in vivo. Rather, superhelical stresses provide long-range coupling among the transition behaviors of all base pairs within a topologically constrained domain. We have developed methods to analyze superhelically induced duplex destabilization (SIDD in genomic DNA that take into account both this long-range stress-induced coupling and sequence-dependent local thermodynamic stability. Here we apply this approach to examine the SIDD properties of 39 experimentally well-characterized autonomously replicating DNA sequences (ARS elements, which function as replication origins in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We find that these ARS elements have a strikingly increased susceptibility to SIDD relative to their surrounding sequences. On average, these ARS elements require 4.78 kcal/mol less free energy to separate than do their immediately surrounding sequences, making them more than 2,000 times easier to open. Statistical analysis shows that the probability of this strong an association between SIDD sites and ARS elements arising by chance is approximately 4 x 10. This local enhancement of the propensity to separate to single strands under superhelical stress has obvious implications for origin function. SIDD properties also could be used, in conjunction with other known origin attributes, to identify putative replication origins in yeast, and possibly in other metazoan genomes.

  3. Replicating vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Early work on fish immunology and disease resistance demonstrated fish (like animals and humans) that survived infection were typically resistant to re-infection with the same pathogen. The concepts of resistance upon reinfection lead to the research and development of replicating (live) vaccines in...

  4. In search of the holy replicator

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, David M.

    2004-01-01

    After 40 years of searching for the eukaryotic replicator sequence, it is time to abandon the concept of ‘the’ replicator as a single genetic entity. Here I propose a ‘relaxed replicon model’ in which a positive initiator–replicator interaction is facilitated by a combination of several complex features of chromatin. An important question for the future is whether the positions of replication origins are simply a passive result of local chromatin structure or are actively localized to coordin...

  5. Mutator phenotypes due to DNA replication infidelity

    OpenAIRE

    Arana, Mercedes E.; Kunkel, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    This article considers the fidelity of DNA replication performed by eukaryotic DNA polymerases involved in replicating the nuclear genome. DNA replication fidelity can vary widely depending on the DNA polymerase, the composition of the error, the flanking sequence, the presence of DNA damage and the ability to correct errors. As a consequence, defects in processes that determine DNA replication fidelity can confer strong mutator phenotypes whose specificity can help determine the molecular na...

  6. Identification of a Single Strand Origin of Replication in the Integrative and Conjugative Element ICEBs1 of Bacillus subtilis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurel D Wright

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We identified a functional single strand origin of replication (sso in the integrative and conjugative element ICEBs1 of Bacillus subtilis. Integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs, also known as conjugative transposons are DNA elements typically found integrated into a bacterial chromosome where they are transmitted to daughter cells by chromosomal replication and cell division. Under certain conditions, ICEs become activated and excise from the host chromosome and can transfer to neighboring cells via the element-encoded conjugation machinery. Activated ICEBs1 undergoes autonomous rolling circle replication that is needed for the maintenance of the excised element in growing and dividing cells. Rolling circle replication, used by many plasmids and phages, generates single-stranded DNA (ssDNA. In many cases, the presence of an sso enhances the conversion of the ssDNA to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA by enabling priming of synthesis of the second DNA strand. We initially identified sso1 in ICEBs1 based on sequence similarity to the sso of an RCR plasmid. Several functional assays confirmed Sso activity. Genetic analyses indicated that ICEBs1 uses sso1 and at least one other region for second strand DNA synthesis. We found that Sso activity was important for two key aspects of the ICEBs1 lifecycle: 1 maintenance of the plasmid form of ICEBs1 in cells after excision from the chromosome, and 2 stable acquisition of ICEBs1 following transfer to a new host. We identified sequences similar to known plasmid sso's in several other ICEs. Together, our results indicate that many other ICEs contain at least one single strand origin of replication, that these ICEs likely undergo autonomous replication, and that replication contributes to the stability and spread of these elements.

  7. Control regions for chromosome replication are conserved with respect to both sequence and location between Escherichia coli strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Charbon, Godefroid; Krogfelt, Karen Angeliki;

    2015-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, chromosome replication is initiated from oriC by the DnaA initiator protein associated with ATP. Three non-coding regions contribute to the activity of DnaA. The datA locus is instrumental in conversion of DnaAATP to DnaAADP (DDAH; datA dependent DnaAATP hydrolysis) whereas Dna...

  8. Selection of functional tRNA primers and primer binding site sequences from a retroviral combinatorial library: identification of new functional tRNA primers in murine leukemia virus replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M; Pedersen, F S

    2000-01-01

    Retroviral reverse transcription is initiated from a cellular tRNA molecule and all known exogenous isolates of murine leukemia virus utilise a tRNA(Pro)molecule. While several studies suggest flexibility in murine leukemia virus primer utilisation, studies on human immunodeficiency virus and avian...... retro-viruses have revealed evidence of molecular adapt-ation towards the specific tRNA isoacceptor used as replication primer. In this study, murine leukemia virus tRNA utilisation is investigated by in vivo screening of a retroviral vector combinatorial library with randomised primer binding sites....... While most of the selected primer binding sites are complementary to the 3'-end of tRNA((Pro)), we also retrieved PBS sequences matching four other tRNA molecules and demonstrate that Akv murine leukemia virus vectors may efficiently replicate using tRNA(Arg(CCU)), tRNA(Phe(GAA))and a hitherto unknown...

  9. Do transcriptional enhancers also augment DNA replication?

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connor, D T; Subramani, S

    1988-01-01

    Enhancers are DNA elements that augment transcription in cis, independent of distance and orientation. Evidence such as hormone dependent neoplastic cell growth and the stimulation of viral replication by sequences present in enhancers suggests that enhancers may also directly affect DNA replication. We tested this hypothesis in recombinant plasmids by asking whether sequences that stimulated DNA replication shared the properties of transcriptional enhancers. The homologous simian virus 40 (S...

  10. Autonomous Search

    CERN Document Server

    Hamadi, Youssef; Saubion, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    Decades of innovations in combinatorial problem solving have produced better and more complex algorithms. These new methods are better since they can solve larger problems and address new application domains. They are also more complex which means that they are hard to reproduce and often harder to fine-tune to the peculiarities of a given problem. This last point has created a paradox where efficient tools are out of reach of practitioners. Autonomous search (AS) represents a new research field defined to precisely address the above challenge. Its major strength and originality consist in the

  11. Pure Autonomic Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drugs GARD Information Navigator FAQs About Rare Diseases Pure autonomic failure Title Other Names: Bradbury Eggleston syndrome; ... Categories: Nervous System Diseases ; RDCRN Summary Summary Listen Pure autonomic failure is characterized by generalized autonomic failure ...

  12. The nucleotide sequence of the right-hand terminus of adenovirus type 5 DNA: Implications for the mechanism of DNA replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbergh, P.H.; Sussenbach, J.S.

    1979-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the right-hand terminal 3% of adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) DNA has been determined, using the chemical degradation technique developed by Maxam and Gilbert (1977). This region of the genome comprises the 1003 basepair long HindIII-I fragment and the first 75 nucleotides of the

  13. Transmission of Human Enterovirus 85 Recombinants Containing New Unknown Serotype HEV-B Donor Sequences in Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region, China

    OpenAIRE

    Qiang Sun; Yong Zhang; Shuangli Zhu; Huifang Tian; Guohong Huang; Hui Cui; Xiaolei Li; Dongmei Yan; Zhen Zhu; Jing Li; Peng Zheng; Huafang Jiang; Bo Zhang; Xiaojuan Tan; Hui Zhu

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human enterovirus 85 (HEV85), whose prototype strain (Strain BAN00-10353/BAN/2000) was isolated in Bangladesh in 2000, is a recently identified serotype within the human enterovirus B (HEV-B) species. At present, only one nucleotide sequence of HEV85 (the complete genome sequence of the prototype strain) is available in the GenBank database. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we report the genetic characteristics of 33 HEV85 isolates that circulated in the Xinjiang Uighur autonomo...

  14. Replication in Economics

    OpenAIRE

    Hamermesh, Daniel S.

    2007-01-01

    This examination of the role and potential for replication in economics points out the paucity of both pure replication -- checking on others' published papers using their data -- and scientific replication -- using data representing different populations in one's own work or in a Comment. Several controversies in empirical economics illustrate how and how not to behave when replicating others' work. The incentives for replication facing editors, authors and potential replicators are examined...

  15. Modular Evolution of TnGBSs, a New Family of Integrative and Conjugative Elements Associating Insertion Sequence Transposition, Plasmid Replication, and Conjugation for Their Spreading

    OpenAIRE

    Guérillot, Romain; Da Cunha, Violette; Sauvage, Elisabeth; Bouchier, Christiane; Glaser, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs) have a major impact on gene flow and genome dynamics in bacteria. The ICEs TnGBS1 and TnGBS2, first identified in Streptococcus agalactiae, use a DDE transposase, unlike most characterized ICEs, which depend on a phage-like integrase for their mobility. Here we identified 56 additional TnGBS-related ICEs by systematic genome analysis. Interestingly, all except one are inserted in streptococcal genomes. Sequence comparison of the proteins conserved a...

  16. Self-replication with magnetic dipolar colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempster, Joshua M.; Zhang, Rui; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2015-10-01

    Colloidal self-replication represents an exciting research frontier in soft matter physics. Currently, all reported self-replication schemes involve coating colloidal particles with stimuli-responsive molecules to allow switchable interactions. In this paper, we introduce a scheme using ferromagnetic dipolar colloids and preprogrammed external magnetic fields to create an autonomous self-replication system. Interparticle dipole-dipole forces and periodically varying weak-strong magnetic fields cooperate to drive colloid monomers from the solute onto templates, bind them into replicas, and dissolve template complexes. We present three general design principles for autonomous linear replicators, derived from a focused study of a minimalist sphere-dimer magnetic system in which single binding sites allow formation of dimeric templates. We show via statistical models and computer simulations that our system exhibits nonlinear growth of templates and produces nearly exponential growth (low error rate) upon adding an optimized competing electrostatic potential. We devise experimental strategies for constructing the required magnetic colloids based on documented laboratory techniques. We also present qualitative ideas about building more complex self-replicating structures utilizing magnetic colloids.

  17. Mrc1 is a replication fork component whose phosphorylation in response to DNA replication stress activates Rad53

    OpenAIRE

    Osborn, Alexander J.; Elledge, Stephen J.

    2003-01-01

    When DNA replication is stalled, a signal transduction pathway is activated that promotes the stability of stalled forks and resumption of DNA synthesis. In budding yeast, this pathway includes the kinases Mec1 and Rad53. Here we report that the Mediator protein Mrc1, which is required for normal DNA replication and for activation of Rad53, is present at replication forks. Mrc1 initially binds early-replicating sequences and moves along chromatin with the replication f...

  18. A highly conserved DNA replication module from Streptococcus thermophilus phages is similar in sequence and topology to a module from Lactococcus lactis phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desiere, F; Lucchini, S; Bruttin, A; Zwahlen, M C; Brüssow, H

    1997-08-01

    A highly conserved DNA region extending over 5 kb was observed in Streptococcus thermophilus bacteriophages. Comparative sequencing of one temperate and 26 virulent phages demonstrated in the most extreme case an 18% aa difference for a predicted protein, while the majority of the phages showed fewer, if any aa changes. The relative degree of aa conservation was not homogeneous over the DNA segment investigated. Sequence analysis of the conserved segment revealed genes possibly involved in DNA transactions. Three predicted proteins (orf 233, 443, and 382 gene product (gp)) showed nucleoside triphosphate binding motifs. Orf 443 gp showed in addition a DEAH box motif, characteristically found in a subgroup of helicases, and a variant zinc finger motif known from a phage T7 helicase/primase. Tree analysis classified orf 443 gp as a distant member of the helicase superfamily. Orf 382 gp showed similarity to putative plasmid DNA primases. Downstream of orf 382 a noncoding repeat region was identified that showed similarity to a putative minus origin from a cryptic S. thermophilus plasmid. Four predicted proteins showed not only high degrees of aa identity (34 to 63%) with proteins from Lactococcus lactis phages, but their genes showed a similar topological organization. We interpret this as evidence for a horizontal gene transfer event between phages of the two bacterial genera in the distant past. PMID:9268169

  19. Replicating chromatin: a tale of histones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Anja

    2009-01-01

    framework of chromatin and carry information to specify higher-order organization and gene expression. When replication forks traverse the chromosomes, nucleosomes are transiently disrupted, allowing the replication machinery to gain access to DNA. Histone recycling, together with new deposition, ensures...... reassembly on nascent DNA strands. The aim of this review is to discuss how histones - new and old - are handled at the replication fork, highlighting new mechanistic insights and revisiting old paradigms.......Chromatin serves structural and functional roles crucial for genome stability and correct gene expression. This organization must be reproduced on daughter strands during replication to maintain proper overlay of epigenetic fabric onto genetic sequence. Nucleosomes constitute the structural...

  20. Autonomic Nervous System Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your autonomic nervous system is the part of your nervous system that controls involuntary actions, such as the beating of your heart ... breathing and swallowing Erectile dysfunction in men Autonomic nervous system disorders can occur alone or as the result ...

  1. Autoimmune Autonomic Ganglionopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Accessed 9/2/2015. Autoimmune Autonomic Ganglionopathy Summary. Dysautonomia International . http://www.dysautonomiainternational.org/page.php?ID= ... page Basic Information In Depth Information Basic Information Dysautonomia International offers an information page on Autoimmune autonomic ...

  2. Archaeal DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelman, Lori M; Kelman, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication is essential for all life forms. Although the process is fundamentally conserved in the three domains of life, bioinformatic, biochemical, structural, and genetic studies have demonstrated that the process and the proteins involved in archaeal DNA replication are more similar to those in eukaryal DNA replication than in bacterial DNA replication, but have some archaeal-specific features. The archaeal replication system, however, is not monolithic, and there are some differences in the replication process between different species. In this review, the current knowledge of the mechanisms governing DNA replication in Archaea is summarized. The general features of the replication process as well as some of the differences are discussed. PMID:25421597

  3. Context based computational analysis and characterization of ARS consensus sequences (ACS) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vinod Kumar; Krishnamachari, Annangarachari

    2016-09-01

    Genome-wide experimental studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveal that autonomous replicating sequence (ARS) requires an essential consensus sequence (ACS) for replication activity. Computational studies identified thousands of ACS like patterns in the genome. However, only a few hundreds of these sites act as replicating sites and the rest are considered as dormant or evolving sites. In a bid to understand the sequence makeup of replication sites, a content and context-based analysis was performed on a set of replicating ACS sequences that binds to origin-recognition complex (ORC) denoted as ORC-ACS and non-replicating ACS sequences (nrACS), that are not bound by ORC. In this study, DNA properties such as base composition, correlation, sequence dependent thermodynamic and DNA structural profiles, and their positions have been considered for characterizing ORC-ACS and nrACS. Analysis reveals that ORC-ACS depict marked differences in nucleotide composition and context features in its vicinity compared to nrACS. Interestingly, an A-rich motif was also discovered in ORC-ACS sequences within its nucleosome-free region. Profound changes in the conformational features, such as DNA helical twist, inclination angle and stacking energy between ORC-ACS and nrACS were observed. Distribution of ACS motifs in the non-coding segments points to the locations of ORC-ACS which are found far away from the adjacent gene start position compared to nrACS thereby enabling an accessible environment for ORC-proteins. Our attempt is novel in considering the contextual view of ACS and its flanking region along with nucleosome positioning in the S. cerevisiae genome and may be useful for any computational prediction scheme. PMID:27508123

  4. Comparison of three replication strategies in complex multicellular organisms: Asexual replication, sexual replication with identical gametes, and sexual replication with distinct sperm and egg gametes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannenbaum, Emmanuel

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies the mutation-selection balance in three simplified replication models. The first model considers a population of organisms replicating via the production of asexual spores. The second model considers a sexually replicating population that produces identical gametes. The third model considers a sexually replicating population that produces distinct sperm and egg gametes. All models assume diploid organisms whose genomes consist of two chromosomes, each of which is taken to be functional if equal to some master sequence, and defective otherwise. In the asexual population, the asexual diploid spores develop directly into adult organisms. In the sexual populations, the haploid gametes enter a haploid pool, where they may fuse with other haploids. The resulting immature diploid organisms then proceed to develop into mature organisms. Based on an analysis of all three models, we find that, as organism size increases, a sexually replicating population can only outcompete an asexually replicating population if the adult organisms produce distinct sperm and egg gametes. A sexual replication strategy that is based on the production of large numbers of sperm cells to fertilize a small number of eggs is found to be necessary in order to maintain a sufficiently low cost for sex for the strategy to be selected for over a purely asexual strategy. We discuss the usefulness of this model in understanding the evolution and maintenance of sexual replication as the preferred replication strategy in complex, multicellular organisms.

  5. Replicative Intermediates of Human Papillomavirus Type 11 in Laryngeal Papillomas: Site of Replication Initiation and Direction of Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auborn, K. J.; Little, R. D.; Platt, T. H. K.; Vaccariello, M. A.; Schildkraut, C. L.

    1994-07-01

    We have examined the structures of replication intermediates from the human papillomavirus type 11 genome in DNA extracted from papilloma lesions (laryngeal papillomas). The sites of replication initiation and termination utilized in vivo were mapped by using neutral/neutral and neutral/alkaline two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis methods. Initiation of replication was detected in or very close to the upstream regulatory region (URR; the noncoding, regulatory sequences upstream of the open reading frames in the papillomavirus genome). We also show that replication forks proceed bidirectionally from the origin and converge 180circ opposite the URR. These results demonstrate the feasibility of analysis of replication of viral genomes directly from infected tissue.

  6. Polyomavirus origin for DNA replication comprises multiple genetic elements.

    OpenAIRE

    Muller, W J; Mueller, C R; Mes, A M; Hassell, J A

    1983-01-01

    To define the minimal cis-acting sequences required for polyomavirus DNA replication (ori), we constructed a number of polyomavirus-plasmid recombinants and measured their replicative capacity after transfection of a permissive mouse cell line capable of providing polyomavirus large T antigen in trans (MOP cells). Recombinant plasmids containing a 251-base-pair fragment of noncoding viral DNA replicate efficiently in MOP cells. Mutational analyses of these viral sequences revealed that they c...

  7. The evolution of replicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szathmáry, E

    2000-11-29

    Replicators of interest in chemistry, biology and culture are briefly surveyed from a conceptual point of view. Systems with limited heredity have only a limited evolutionary potential because the number of available types is too low. Chemical cycles, such as the formose reaction, are holistic replicators since replication is not based on the successive addition of modules. Replicator networks consisting of catalytic molecules (such as reflexively autocatalytic sets of proteins, or reproducing lipid vesicles) are hypothetical ensemble replicators, and their functioning rests on attractors of their dynamics. Ensemble replicators suffer from the paradox of specificity: while their abstract feasibility seems to require a high number of molecular types, the harmful effect of side reactions calls for a small system size. No satisfactory solution to this problem is known. Phenotypic replicators do not pass on their genotypes, only some aspects of the phenotype are transmitted. Phenotypic replicators with limited heredity include genetic membranes, prions and simple memetic systems. Memes in human culture are unlimited hereditary, phenotypic replicators, based on language. The typical path of evolution goes from limited to unlimited heredity, and from attractor-based to modular (digital) replicators. PMID:11127914

  8. Trigeminal autonomic cephalgias

    OpenAIRE

    Benoliel, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    1. Trigeminal autonomic cephalgias (TACs) are headaches/facial pains classified together based on:a suspected common pathophysiology involving the trigeminovascular system, the trigeminoparasympathetic reflex and centres controlling circadian rhythms;a similar clinical presentation of trigeminal pain, and autonomic activation.

  9. Testing for autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1984-01-01

    disease, and may be nonspecific. A number of recently developed quantifiable and reproducible autonomic nerve function tests are reviewed, with emphasis on the physiological basis of the tests and on practical applicability. Finally, diagnostic criteria, based on autonomic nerve function tests, are...

  10. MOLECULAR REPLICATOR DYNAMICS

    OpenAIRE

    BÄRBEL M. R. STADLER; Stadler, Peter F

    2003-01-01

    Template-dependent replication at the molecular level is the basis of reproduction in nature. A detailed understanding of the peculiarities of the chemical reaction kinetics associated with replication processes is therefore an indispensible prerequisite for any understanding of evolution at the molecular level. Networks of interacting self-replicating species can give rise to a wealth of different dynamical phenomena, from competitive exclusion to permanent coexistence, from global stability...

  11. Self-replicating systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clixby, Gregory; Twyman, Lance

    2016-05-01

    Over the past 25 years, there has been a surge of development in research towards self-replication and self-replicating systems. The interest in these systems relates to one of the most fundamental questions posed in all fields of science - How did life on earth begin? Investigating how the self-replication process evolved may hold the key to understanding the emergence and evolution of living systems and, ultimately, gain a clear insight into the origin of life on earth. This introductory review aims to highlight the fundamental prerequisites of self-replication along with the important research that has been conducted over the past few decades. PMID:27086507

  12. Meiotic transmission of an in vitro-assembled autonomous maize minichromosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn R Carlson

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous chromosomes are generated in yeast (yeast artificial chromosomes and human fibrosarcoma cells (human artificial chromosomes by introducing purified DNA fragments that nucleate a kinetochore, replicate, and segregate to daughter cells. These autonomous minichromosomes are convenient for manipulating and delivering DNA segments containing multiple genes. In contrast, commercial production of transgenic crops relies on methods that integrate one or a few genes into host chromosomes; extensive screening to identify insertions with the desired expression level, copy number, structure, and genomic location; and long breeding programs to produce varieties that carry multiple transgenes. As a step toward improving transgenic crop production, we report the development of autonomous maize minichromosomes (MMCs. We constructed circular MMCs by combining DsRed and nptII marker genes with 7-190 kb of genomic maize DNA fragments containing satellites, retroelements, and/or other repeats commonly found in centromeres and using particle bombardment to deliver these constructs into embryogenic maize tissue. We selected transformed cells, regenerated plants, and propagated their progeny for multiple generations in the absence of selection. Fluorescent in situ hybridization and segregation analysis demonstrated that autonomous MMCs can be mitotically and meiotically maintained. The MMC described here showed meiotic segregation ratios approaching Mendelian inheritance: 93% transmission as a disome (100% expected, 39% transmission as a monosome crossed to wild type (50% expected, and 59% transmission in self crosses (75% expected. The fluorescent DsRed reporter gene on the MMC was expressed through four generations, and Southern blot analysis indicated the encoded genes were intact. This novel approach for plant transformation can facilitate crop biotechnology by (i combining several trait genes on a single DNA fragment, (ii arranging genes in a defined

  13. Wireless autonomous device data transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammel, Jr., David W. (Inventor); Cain, James T. (Inventor); Mickle, Marlin H. (Inventor); Mi, Minhong (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of communicating information from a wireless autonomous device (WAD) to a base station. The WAD has a data element having a predetermined profile having a total number of sequenced possible data element combinations. The method includes receiving at the WAD an RF profile transmitted by the base station that includes a triggering portion having a number of pulses, wherein the number is at least equal to the total number of possible data element combinations. The method further includes keeping a count of received pulses and wirelessly transmitting a piece of data, preferably one bit, to the base station when the count reaches a value equal to the stored data element's particular number in the sequence. Finally, the method includes receiving the piece of data at the base station and using the receipt thereof to determine which of the possible data element combinations the stored data element is.

  14. Replicating animal mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. McKinney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA replication has been experiencing incredible progress in recent years, and yet little is certain about the mechanism(s used by animal cells to replicate this plasmid-like genome. The long-standing strand-displacement model of mammalian mtDNA replication (for which single-stranded DNA intermediates are a hallmark has been intensively challenged by a new set of data, which suggests that replication proceeds via coupled leading-and lagging-strand synthesis (resembling bacterial genome replication and/or via long stretches of RNA intermediates laid on the mtDNA lagging-strand (the so called RITOLS. The set of proteins required for mtDNA replication is small and includes the catalytic and accessory subunits of DNA polymerase y, the mtDNA helicase Twinkle, the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein, and the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (which most likely functions as the mtDNA primase. Mutations in the genes coding for the first three proteins are associated with human diseases and premature aging, justifying the research interest in the genetic, biochemical and structural properties of the mtDNA replication machinery. Here we summarize these properties and discuss the current models of mtDNA replication in animal cells.

  15. Autonomous linear lossless systems

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, Shodhan; Rapisarda, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    We define a lossless autonomous system as one having a quadratic differential form associated with it called an energy function, which is positive and which is conserved. We define an oscillatory system as one which has all its trajectories bounded on the entire time axis. In this paper, we show that an autonomous system is lossless if and only if it is oscillatory. Next we discuss a few properties of energy functions of autonomous lossless systems and a suitable way of splitting a given ener...

  16. Autonomous surveillance for biosecurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurdak, Raja; Elfes, Alberto; Kusy, Branislav; Tews, Ashley; Hu, Wen; Hernandez, Emili; Kottege, Navinda; Sikka, Pavan

    2015-04-01

    The global movement of people and goods has increased the risk of biosecurity threats and their potential to incur large economic, social, and environmental costs. Conventional manual biosecurity surveillance methods are limited by their scalability in space and time. This article focuses on autonomous surveillance systems, comprising sensor networks, robots, and intelligent algorithms, and their applicability to biosecurity threats. We discuss the spatial and temporal attributes of autonomous surveillance technologies and map them to three broad categories of biosecurity threat: (i) vector-borne diseases; (ii) plant pests; and (iii) aquatic pests. Our discussion reveals a broad range of opportunities to serve biosecurity needs through autonomous surveillance. PMID:25744760

  17. Therapeutic targeting of replicative immortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaswen, Paul; MacKenzie, Karen L; Keith, W Nicol; Hentosh, Patricia; Rodier, Francis; Zhu, Jiyue; Firestone, Gary L; Matheu, Ander; Carnero, Amancio; Bilsland, Alan; Sundin, Tabetha; Honoki, Kanya; Fujii, Hiromasa; Georgakilas, Alexandros G; Amedei, Amedeo; Amin, Amr; Helferich, Bill; Boosani, Chandra S; Guha, Gunjan; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa; Chen, Sophie; Mohammed, Sulma I; Azmi, Asfar S; Bhakta, Dipita; Halicka, Dorota; Niccolai, Elena; Aquilano, Katia; Ashraf, S Salman; Nowsheen, Somaira; Yang, Xujuan

    2015-12-01

    One of the hallmarks of malignant cell populations is the ability to undergo continuous proliferation. This property allows clonal lineages to acquire sequential aberrations that can fuel increasingly autonomous growth, invasiveness, and therapeutic resistance. Innate cellular mechanisms have evolved to regulate replicative potential as a hedge against malignant progression. When activated in the absence of normal terminal differentiation cues, these mechanisms can result in a state of persistent cytostasis. This state, termed "senescence," can be triggered by intrinsic cellular processes such as telomere dysfunction and oncogene expression, and by exogenous factors such as DNA damaging agents or oxidative environments. Despite differences in upstream signaling, senescence often involves convergent interdependent activation of tumor suppressors p53 and p16/pRB, but can be induced, albeit with reduced sensitivity, when these suppressors are compromised. Doses of conventional genotoxic drugs required to achieve cancer cell senescence are often much lower than doses required to achieve outright cell death. Additional therapies, such as those targeting cyclin dependent kinases or components of the PI3K signaling pathway, may induce senescence specifically in cancer cells by circumventing defects in tumor suppressor pathways or exploiting cancer cells' heightened requirements for telomerase. Such treatments sufficient to induce cancer cell senescence could provide increased patient survival with fewer and less severe side effects than conventional cytotoxic regimens. This positive aspect is countered by important caveats regarding senescence reversibility, genomic instability, and paracrine effects that may increase heterogeneity and adaptive resistance of surviving cancer cells. Nevertheless, agents that effectively disrupt replicative immortality will likely be valuable components of new combinatorial approaches to cancer therapy. PMID:25869441

  18. Autonomous Real Time Requirements Tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattsmier, George; Stetson, Howard

    2014-01-01

    One of the more challenging aspects of software development is the ability to verify and validate the functional software requirements dictated by the Software Requirements Specification (SRS) and the Software Detail Design (SDD). Insuring the software has achieved the intended requirements is the responsibility of the Software Quality team and the Software Test team. The utilization of Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) Auto- Procedures for relocating ground operations positions to ISS automated on-board operations has begun the transition that would be required for manned deep space missions with minimal crew requirements. This transition also moves the auto-procedures from the procedure realm into the flight software arena and as such the operational requirements and testing will be more structured and rigorous. The autoprocedures would be required to meet NASA software standards as specified in the Software Safety Standard (NASASTD- 8719), the Software Engineering Requirements (NPR 7150), the Software Assurance Standard (NASA-STD-8739) and also the Human Rating Requirements (NPR-8705). The Autonomous Fluid Transfer System (AFTS) test-bed utilizes the Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) Language for development of autonomous command and control software. The Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) system has the unique feature of providing the current line of the statement in execution during real-time execution of the software. The feature of execution line number internal reporting unlocks the capability of monitoring the execution autonomously by use of a companion Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) sequence as the line number reporting is embedded inside the Timeliner-TLX(sup TM) execution engine. This negates I/O processing of this type data as the line number status of executing sequences is built-in as a function reference. This paper will outline the design and capabilities of the AFTS Autonomous Requirements Tracker, which traces and logs SRS requirements as they are being met during real-time execution of the

  19. AUTONOMOUS DRIVEN CAR

    OpenAIRE

    Meeshika Arora

    2013-01-01

    In order to achieve autonomous operation of a vehiclein urban situations with unpredictable traffic, several real timesystems must interoperate, including environment perceptionplanning and control. In addition a robust vehicle platform withappropriate sensors, computational hardware, networking andsoftware infrastructure is essential.

  20. Highly Autonomous Systems Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, R.; Rasmussen, R.; Man, G.; Patel, K.

    1998-01-01

    It is our aim by launching a series of workshops on the topic of highly autonomous systems to reach out to the larger community interested in technology development for remotely deployed systems, particularly those for exploration.

  1. Initial amplification of the HPV18 genome proceeds via two distinct replication mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orav, Marit; Geimanen, Jelizaveta; Sepp, Eva-Maria; Henno, Liisi; Ustav, Ene; Ustav, Mart

    2015-01-01

    Determining the mechanism of HPV18 replication is paramount for identifying possible drug targets against HPV infection. We used two-dimensional and three-dimensional gel electrophoresis techniques to identify replication intermediates arising during the initial amplification of HPV18 episomal genomes. We determined that the first rounds of HPV18 replication proceed via bidirectional theta structures; however, a notable accumulation of almost fully replicated HPV18 genomes indicates difficulties with the completion of theta replication. We also observed intermediates that were created by a second replication mechanism during the initial amplification of HPV18 genomes. The second replication mechanism does not utilize specific initiation or termination sequences and proceeds via a unidirectional replication fork. We suggest a significant role for the second replication mechanism during the initial replication of the HPV18 genome and propose that the second replication mechanism is recombination-dependent replication. PMID:26522968

  2. Initial amplification of the HPV18 genome proceeds via two distinct replication mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orav, Marit; Geimanen, Jelizaveta; Sepp, Eva-Maria; Henno, Liisi; Ustav, Ene; Ustav, Mart

    2015-01-01

    Determining the mechanism of HPV18 replication is paramount for identifying possible drug targets against HPV infection. We used two-dimensional and three-dimensional gel electrophoresis techniques to identify replication intermediates arising during the initial amplification of HPV18 episomal genomes. We determined that the first rounds of HPV18 replication proceed via bidirectional theta structures; however, a notable accumulation of almost fully replicated HPV18 genomes indicates difficulties with the completion of theta replication. We also observed intermediates that were created by a second replication mechanism during the initial amplification of HPV18 genomes. The second replication mechanism does not utilize specific initiation or termination sequences and proceeds via a unidirectional replication fork. We suggest a significant role for the second replication mechanism during the initial replication of the HPV18 genome and propose that the second replication mechanism is recombination-dependent replication. PMID:26522968

  3. Engineering Autonomous Driving Software

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, Christian; Rumpe, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    A larger number of people with heterogeneous knowledge and skills running a project together needs an adaptable, target, and skill-specific engineering process. This especially holds for a project to develop a highly innovative, autonomously driving vehicle to participate in the 2007 DARPA Urban Challenge. In this contribution, we present essential elements of a software and systems engineering process to develop a so-called artificial intelligence capable of driving autonomously in complex u...

  4. Autonomous Star Tracker Algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betto, Maurizio; Jørgensen, John Leif; Kilsgaard, Søren;

    1998-01-01

    Proposal, in response to an ESA R.f.P., to design algorithms for autonomous star tracker operations.The proposal also included the development of a star tracker breadboard to test the algorithms performances.......Proposal, in response to an ESA R.f.P., to design algorithms for autonomous star tracker operations.The proposal also included the development of a star tracker breadboard to test the algorithms performances....

  5. Synchronization of DNA array replication kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manturov, Alexey O.; Grigoryev, Anton V.

    2016-04-01

    In the present work we discuss the features of the DNA replication kinetics at the case of multiplicity of simultaneously elongated DNA fragments. The interaction between replicated DNA fragments is carried out by free protons that appears at the every nucleotide attachment at the free end of elongated DNA fragment. So there is feedback between free protons concentration and DNA-polymerase activity that appears as elongation rate dependence. We develop the numerical model based on a cellular automaton, which can simulate the elongation stage (growth of DNA strands) for DNA elongation process with conditions pointed above and we study the possibility of the DNA polymerases movement synchronization. The results obtained numerically can be useful for DNA polymerase movement detection and visualization of the elongation process in the case of massive DNA replication, eg, under PCR condition or for DNA "sequencing by synthesis" sequencing devices evaluation.

  6. Denaturation of the simian virus 40 origin of replication mediated by human replication protein A.

    OpenAIRE

    Iftode, C.; Borowiec, J A

    1997-01-01

    The initiation of simian virus 40 (SV40) replication requires recognition of the viral origin of replication (ori) by SV40 T antigen, followed by denaturation of ori in a reaction dependent upon human replication protein A (hRPA). To understand how origin denaturation is achieved, we constructed a 48-bp SV40 "pseudo-origin" with a central 8-nucleotide (nt) bubble flanked by viral sequences, mimicking a DNA structure found within the SV40 T antigen-ori complex. hRPA bound the pseudo-origin wit...

  7. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation of Replication Factors Moving with the Replication Fork

    OpenAIRE

    Rapp, Jordan B.; Ansbach, Alison B.; Noguchi, Chiaki; Noguchi, Eishi

    2009-01-01

    Replication of chromosomes involves a variety of replication proteins including DNA polymerases, DNA helicases, and other accessory factors. Many of these proteins are known to localize at replication forks and travel with them as components of the replisome complex. Other proteins do not move with replication forks but still play an essential role in DNA replication. Therefore, in order to understand the mechanisms of DNA replication and its controls, it is important to examine localization ...

  8. Growing Through Innovation Replicability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hsuan, Juliana; Lévesque, Moren

    2012-01-01

    We propose a formal model of firm growth through replication that considers the extent of the investment to adapt routines as replication unfolds and the portion of this investment that goes toward innovation in the routines. The use of these two investment constructs brings about four types of...... growth policies. We use a utility function that considers proxies for both growth and failure potential to uncover the role played in selecting these policies by the economic environment of the targeted market for expansion. Our analysis further reveals the importance of the innovation......-relative-to-imitation investment efficiency in adapting the routines to be replicated while selecting a growth policy. The refinement of a replication theory through our analysis of growth policies result in two testable hypotheses....

  9. Modeling DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Recommends the use of a model of DNA made out of Velcro to help students visualize the steps of DNA replication. Includes a materials list, construction directions, and details of the demonstration using the model parts. (DDR)

  10. On the Social Cost of Distributed Selfish Content Replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pollatos, Gerasimos G.; Telelis, Orestis A.; Zissimopoulos, Vassilis

    2008-01-01

    We study distributed content replication networks formed voluntarily by selfish autonomous users, seeking access to information objects that originate form distant servers. Each user caters to minimization of its individual access cost by replicating locally (up to constrained storage capacity) a...... subset of objects, and accessing the rest form the nearest possible location. We show existence of stable networks by proving existence of pure strategy Nash equilibria for a game-theoretic formulation of this situation. Social (overall) cost of stable networks is measured by the average or by the...

  11. DNA Hairpins: Fuel for Autonomous DNA Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Green, Simon J.; Lubrich, Daniel; Turberfield, Andrew J.

    2006-01-01

    We present a study of the hybridization of complementary DNA hairpin loops, with particular reference to their use as fuel for autonomous DNA devices. The rate of spontaneous hybridization between complementary hairpins can be reduced by increasing the neck length or decreasing the loop length. Hairpins with larger loops rapidly form long-lived kissed complexes. Hairpin loops may be opened by strand displacement using an opening strand that contains the same sequence as half of the neck and a...

  12. Architecture of autonomous systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikshit, Piyush; Guimaraes, Katia; Ramamurthy, Maya; Agrawala, Ashok; Larsen, Ronald L.

    1989-01-01

    Automation of Space Station functions and activities, particularly those involving robotic capabilities with interactive or supervisory human control, is a complex, multi-disciplinary systems design problem. A wide variety of applications using autonomous control can be found in the literature, but none of them seem to address the problem in general. All of them are designed with a specific application in mind. In this report, an abstract model is described which unifies the key concepts underlying the design of automated systems such as those studied by the aerospace contractors. The model has been kept as general as possible. The attempt is to capture all the key components of autonomous systems. With a little effort, it should be possible to map the functions of any specific autonomous system application to the model presented here.

  13. Exercise and autonomic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, R L; Bloomfield, D M; Rosenwinkel, E T

    2000-03-01

    The complex interplay between the dichotomous subdivisions of the autonomic nervous system establishes and maintains a delicately tuned homeostasis in spite of an ever-changing environment. Aerobic exercise training can increase activity of the parasympathetic nervous system and decrease sympathetic activity. Conversely, it is well-documented that cardiac disease is often characterized by attenuated parasympathetic activity and heightened sympathetic tone. A correlation between autonomic disequilibrium and disease has led to the hypothesis that exercise training, as a therapy that restores the autonomic nervous system towards normal function, may be associated with, and possibly responsible for, outcome improvements in various populations. This is merely one of the many benefits that is conferred by chronic exercise training and reviewed in this issue. PMID:10758814

  14. Chromatin challenges during DNA replication and repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Anja; Rocha, Walter; Verreault, Alain;

    2007-01-01

    Inheritance and maintenance of the DNA sequence and its organization into chromatin are central for eukaryotic life. To orchestrate DNA-replication and -repair processes in the context of chromatin is a challenge, both in terms of accessibility and maintenance of chromatin organization. To meet the...... challenge of maintenance, cells have evolved efficient nucleosome-assembly pathways and chromatin-maturation mechanisms that reproduce chromatin organization in the wake of DNA replication and repair. The aim of this Review is to describe how these pathways operate and to highlight how the epigenetic...

  15. DNA Sequences Proximal to Human Mitochondrial DNA Deletion Breakpoints Prevalent in Human Disease Form G-quadruplexes, a Class of DNA Structures Inefficiently Unwound by the Mitochondrial Replicative Twinkle Helicase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bharti, S.K.; Sommers, J.A.; Zhou, J.; Kaplan, D.L.; Spelbrink, J.N.; Mergny, J.L.; Brosh, R.M., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA deletions are prominent in human genetic disorders, cancer, and aging. It is thought that stalling of the mitochondrial replication machinery during DNA synthesis is a prominent source of mitochondrial genome instability; however, the precise molecular determinants of defective mit

  16. Hepatitis B virus replication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Hepadnaviruses, including human hepatitis B virus (HBV), replicate through reverse transcription of an RNA intermediate, the pregenomic RNA (pgRNA). Despite this kinship to retroviruses, there are fundamental differences beyond the fact that hepadnavirions contain DNA instead of RNA. Most peculiar is the initiation of reverse transcription: it occurs by protein-priming, is strictly committed to using an RNA hairpin on the pgRNA,ε, as template, and depends on cellular chaperones;moreover, proper replication can apparently occur only in the specialized environment of intact nucleocapsids.This complexity has hampered an in-depth mechanistic understanding. The recent successful reconstitution in the test tube of active replication initiation complexes from purified components, for duck HBV (DHBV),now allows for the analysis of the biochemistry of hepadnaviral replication at the molecular level. Here we review the current state of knowledge at all steps of the hepadnaviral genome replication cycle, with emphasis on new insights that turned up by the use of such cellfree systems. At this time, they can, unfortunately,not be complemented by three-dimensional structural information on the involved components. However, at least for the s RNA element such information is emerging,raising expectations that combining biophysics with biochemistry and genetics will soon provide a powerful integrated approach for solving the many outstanding questions. The ultimate, though most challenging goal,will be to visualize the hepadnaviral reverse transcriptase in the act of synthesizing DNA, which will also have strong implications for drug development.

  17. Psychology, replication & beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Keith R

    2016-01-01

    Modern psychology is apparently in crisis and the prevailing view is that this partly reflects an inability to replicate past findings. If a crisis does exists, then it is some kind of 'chronic' crisis, as psychologists have been censuring themselves over replicability for decades. While the debate in psychology is not new, the lack of progress across the decades is disappointing. Recently though, we have seen a veritable surfeit of debate alongside multiple orchestrated and well-publicised replication initiatives. The spotlight is being shone on certain areas and although not everyone agrees on how we should interpret the outcomes, the debate is happening and impassioned. The issue of reproducibility occupies a central place in our whig history of psychology. PMID:27251381

  18. Overview of the Autonomic Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reversible or progressive. Anatomy of the autonomic nervous system The autonomic nervous system is the part of ... they connect with. Function of the autonomic nervous system The autonomic nervous system controls internal body processes ...

  19. Autonomous parvovirus LuIII encapsidates equal amounts of plus and minus DNA strands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, R.C.; Snyder, C.E.; Banerjee, P.T.; Mitra, S.

    1984-02-01

    Autonomous parvoviruses are thought to uniquely encapsidate single-stranded DNA of minus polarity. In contrast, the defective adeno-associated viruses separately encapsidate equal amounts of plus and minus DNA strands. The uniqueness of minus strand encapsidation is reexamined for the autonomous parvoviruses. Although it was found that Kilham rat virus and H-1 virus encapsidate varying but small amounts of complementary-strand DNA, it was unexpected to find that LuIII virus encapsidated equal amounts of plus and minus DNA. The extracted LuIII DNA possessed properties of double-stranded replicative-form DNA, including insensitivity to S1 endonuclease, cleavage by restriction enzymes, and conversion to unit-length, single-stranded DNA when electrophoresed under denaturing conditions. However, the inability of this DNA to form single-stranded DNA circles when denatured and then renatured in the presence of formamide and the lack of double-stranded DNA circle formation after treatment with exonuclease III and reannealing shows a lack of sequence homology of the 3' and 5' termini of LuIII DNA, in contrast to adeno-associated virus DNA. Digestion of LuIII double-stranded DNA with EcoRI and HincII and separation of plus and minus DNA strands on composite agarose-acrylamide gels identified a heterogeneity present only in the plus DNA strand. These results suggest that strand specificity of viral DNA encapsidation is not a useful property for differentiation between the autonomous and defective parvoviruses. Furthermore, encapsidation by LuIII of equal amounts of complementary DNA strands in contrast to encapsidation of minus strands by H-1 virus, when propagated in the same host cell type, suggests that selection of strands for encapsidation is a virus-coded rather than host-controlled event.

  20. Experimental Autonomous Vehicle Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ole; Andersen, Nils Axel

    1998-01-01

    The paper describes the requirements for and a prototype configuration of a software architecture for control of an experimental autonomous vehicle. The test bed nature of the system is emphasised in the choice of architecture making re-configurability, data logging and extendability simple. The...

  1. ADAM: ADaptive Autonomous Machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosten, van Daan C.; Nijenhuis, Lucas F.J.; Bakkers, André W.P.; Vervoort, Wiek A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a part of the development of an adaptive autonomous machine that is able to move in an unknown world extract knowledge out of the perceived data, has the possibility to reason, and finally has the capability to exchange experiences and knowledge with other agents. The agent is n

  2. Autonomous Security Patrol System

    OpenAIRE

    Erramouspe, Jake

    2010-01-01

    This project provides an efficient and cost-effective solution to building security and active monitoring. The security is monitored and controlled by autonomous patrol robots. Any indication of a security breach will result in an immediate alarm and activation of the robot group to subdue and tranquilize the intruder.

  3. Software Architecture for Autonomous Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Jimmy S.

    1997-01-01

    The thesis objective is to design an autonomous spacecraft architecture to perform both deliberative and reactive behaviors. The Autonomous Small Planet In-Situ Reaction to Events (ASPIRE) project uses the architecture to integrate several autonomous technologies for a comet orbiter mission.

  4. A Straightening Theorem for non-Autonomous Iteration

    OpenAIRE

    Comerford, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The classical straightening theorem as proved by Douady and Hubbard shows that a polynomial-like sequence is hybrid equivalent to a polynomial. We generalize this result to non-autonomous iteration where one considers composition sequences arising from a varying sequence of functions. In order to do this, new techniques are required to control the distortion and quasiconformal dilatation of the hybrid equivalence. In particular, the Caratheodory topology for pointed domains allows us to speci...

  5. A CI-independent form of replicative inhibition: turn off of early replication of bacteriophage lambda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidney Hayes

    Full Text Available Several earlier studies have described an unusual exclusion phenotype exhibited by cells with plasmids carrying a portion of the replication region of phage lambda. Cells exhibiting this inhibition phenotype (IP prevent the plating of homo-immune and hybrid hetero-immune lambdoid phages. We have attempted to define aspects of IP, and show that it is directed to repλ phages. IP was observed in cells with plasmids containing a λ DNA fragment including oop, encoding a short OOP micro RNA, and part of the lambda origin of replication, oriλ, defined by iteron sequences ITN1-4 and an adjacent high AT-rich sequence. Transcription of the intact oop sequence from its promoter, p(O is required for IP, as are iterons ITN3-4, but not the high AT-rich portion of oriλ. The results suggest that IP silencing is directed to theta mode replication initiation from an infecting repλ genome, or an induced repλ prophage. Phage mutations suppressing IP, i.e., Sip, map within, or adjacent to cro or in O, or both. Our results for plasmid based IP suggest the hypothesis that there is a natural mechanism for silencing early theta-mode replication initiation, i.e. the buildup of λ genomes with oop(+oriλ(+ sequence.

  6. Dissection of the beta-globin replication-initiation region reveals specific requirements for replicator elements during gene amplification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya Okada

    Full Text Available Gene amplification plays a pivotal role in malignant transformation of human cells. A plasmid with both a mammalian replication-initiation region (IR/origin/replicator and a nuclear matrix-attachment region (MAR is spontaneously amplified in transfected cells by a mechanism that involves amplification at the extrachromosomal site, followed by amplification at the chromosomal arm, ultimately generating a long homogeneously staining region (HSR. Several observations suggest that replication initiation from IR sequences might mediate amplification. To test this idea, we previously dissected c-myc and DHFR IRs to identify the minimum sequence required to support amplification. In this study, we applied an improved analysis that discriminates between two amplification steps to the ß-globin RepP IR, which contains separate elements already known to be essential for initiation on the chromosome arm. The IR sequence was required at least for the extrachromosomal amplification step. In addition to the vector-encoded MAR, amplification also required an AT-rich region and a MAR-like element, consistent with the results regarding replicator activity on the chromosome. However, amplification did not require the AG-rich tract necessary for replicator activity, but instead required a novel sequence containing another AG-rich tract. The differential sequence requirement might be a consequence of extrachromosomal replication.

  7. Mobile Autonomous Humanoid Assistant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diftler, M. A.; Ambrose, R. O.; Tyree, K. S.; Goza, S. M.; Huber, E. L.

    2004-01-01

    A mobile autonomous humanoid robot is assisting human co-workers at the Johnson Space Center with tool handling tasks. This robot combines the upper body of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Robonaut system with a Segway(TradeMark) Robotic Mobility Platform yielding a dexterous, maneuverable humanoid perfect for aiding human co-workers in a range of environments. This system uses stereo vision to locate human team mates and tools and a navigation system that uses laser range and vision data to follow humans while avoiding obstacles. Tactile sensors provide information to grasping algorithms for efficient tool exchanges. The autonomous architecture utilizes these pre-programmed skills to form human assistant behaviors. The initial behavior demonstrates a robust capability to assist a human by acquiring a tool from a remotely located individual and then following the human in a cluttered environment with the tool for future use.

  8. A mission planner for an autonomous tractor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bochtis, Dionysis; Vougioukas, S.G.; Griepentrog, Hans W.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, a mission planner of field coverage operations for an autonomous agricultural tractor is presented. Missions for a particular autonomous tractor are defined using an XML (extendible markup language) formatted file that can be uploaded to the tractor through the user interface....... Using the tree hierarchy of the mission file, several actions are determined, including the sequence of points the tractor has to follow, the type of motion between successive points (e.g.,straight motion or maneuvering), the type of predefined turning routine used in maneuvering, and the actions...... that should be taken once the tractor reaches the desired point (e.g., raising or lowering the attached tool, turning on or turning off the ower take-off). In order to automatically create the XML mission files, a program was developed using the MATLAB technical programming language. The program uses data...

  9. Functional amyloids as inhibitors of plasmid DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-García, Laura; Gasset-Rosa, Fátima; Moreno-Del Álamo, María; Fernández-Tresguerres, M Elena; Moreno-Díaz de la Espina, Susana; Lurz, Rudi; Giraldo, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    DNA replication is tightly regulated to constrain the genetic material within strict spatiotemporal boundaries and copy numbers. Bacterial plasmids are autonomously replicating DNA molecules of much clinical, environmental and biotechnological interest. A mechanism used by plasmids to prevent over-replication is 'handcuffing', i.e. inactivating the replication origins in two DNA molecules by holding them together through a bridge built by a plasmid-encoded initiator protein (Rep). Besides being involved in handcuffing, the WH1 domain in the RepA protein assembles as amyloid fibres upon binding to DNA in vitro. The amyloid state in proteins is linked to specific human diseases, but determines selectable and epigenetically transmissible phenotypes in microorganisms. Here we have explored the connection between handcuffing and amyloidogenesis of full-length RepA. Using a monoclonal antibody specific for an amyloidogenic conformation of RepA-WH1, we have found that the handcuffed RepA assemblies, either reconstructed in vitro or in plasmids clustering at the bacterial nucleoid, are amyloidogenic. The replication-inhibitory RepA handcuff assembly is, to our knowledge, the first protein amyloid directly dealing with DNA. Built on an amyloid scaffold, bacterial plasmid handcuffs can bring a novel molecular solution to the universal problem of keeping control on DNA replication initiation. PMID:27147472

  10. Autonomous single camera exploration

    OpenAIRE

    Vidal-Calleja, Teresa A.; Sanfeliu, Alberto; Andrade-Cetto, J.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present an active exploration strategy for a mobile robot navigating in 3D. The aim is to control a moving robot that autonomously builds a visual feature map while at the same time optimises its localisation in this map. The technique chooses the most appropriate commands maximising the information gain between prior states and measurements, while performing 6DOF bearing only SLAM at video rate. Maximising the mutual information helps the vehicle avoid ill-conditioned measur...

  11. Autonomous Underwater Vehicle control

    OpenAIRE

    Vidal Morató, Jordi; Gomáriz Castro, Spartacus; Manuel Lázaro, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the system control design stages for an autonomous underwater vehicle are presented. The vehicle must be able to sail on sea surface, following a path without losing its route and once a position is reached, a dive following a perpendicular path to the surface is carried out. A two level system control are proposed. The primary level will control the navigation of the vehicle where a linear controllers are proposed. Whereas in secondary level guidance system, collision system, s...

  12. The autonomous acoustic buoy

    OpenAIRE

    Pellicer, Francisco; Reitsma, Robert; Agüera, Joaquín; Marinas, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    The Acoustic Buoy is a project between the Laboratory of Applied Bioacoustics (LAB) and the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC). In areas that the human activities produce high noise levels, such as oil exploration or construction, there is a need to monitor the environment for the presence of cetaceans. Another need is for fishing, to prevent endangered species from being killed. This can be done with an Autonomous Acoustic Buoy (AAB). Mooring or anchoring at to the seaflo...

  13. Mobile Intelligent Autonomous Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Jitendra R. Raol; Ajith Gopal

    2010-01-01

    Mobile intelligent autonomous systems (MIAS) is a fast emerging research area. Although it can be regarded as a general R&D area, it is mainly directed towards robotics. Several important subtopics within MIAS research are:(i) perception and reasoning, (ii) mobility and navigation,(iii) haptics and teleoperation, (iv) image fusion/computervision, (v) modelling of manipulators, (vi) hardware/software architectures for planning and behaviour learning leadingto robotic architecture, (vii) ve...

  14. Nature's Autonomous Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, H. G.; Yee, J.-H.; Mayr, M.; Schnetzler, R.

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinearity is required to produce autonomous oscillations without external time dependent source, and an example is the pendulum clock. The escapement mechanism of the clock imparts an impulse for each swing direction, which keeps the pendulum oscillating at the resonance frequency. Among nature's observed autonomous oscillators, examples are the quasi-biennial oscillation and bimonthly oscillation of the Earth atmosphere, and the 22-year solar oscillation. The oscillations have been simulated in numerical models without external time dependent source, and in Section 2 we summarize the results. Specifically, we shall discuss the nonlinearities that are involved in generating the oscillations, and the processes that produce the periodicities. In biology, insects have flight muscles, which function autonomously with wing frequencies that far exceed the animals' neural capacity; Stretch-activation of muscle contraction is the mechanism that produces the high frequency oscillation of insect flight, discussed in Section 3. The same mechanism is also invoked to explain the functioning of the cardiac muscle. In Section 4, we present a tutorial review of the cardio-vascular system, heart anatomy, and muscle cell physiology, leading up to Starling's Law of the Heart, which supports our notion that the human heart is also a nonlinear oscillator. In Section 5, we offer a broad perspective of the tenuous links between the fluid dynamical oscillators and the human heart physiology.

  15. Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller, M; Goadsby, P J

    2016-01-01

    The trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs) are a group of primary headache disorders characterised by lateralized symptoms: prominent headache and ipsilateral cranial autonomic features, such as conjunctival injection, lacrimation and rhinorrhea. The TACs are: cluster headache (CH), paroxysmal hemicrania (PH), short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing (SUNCT)/short-lasting neuralgiform headache attacks with cranial autonomic features (SUNA) and hemicrania continua (HC). Their diagnostic criteria are outlined in the International Classification of Headache Disorders, third edition-beta (ICHD-IIIb). These conditions are distinguished by their attack duration and frequency, as well as response to treatment. HC is continuous and by definition responsive to indomethacin. The main differential when considering this headache is chronic migraine. Other TACs are remarkable for their short duration and must be distinguished from other short-lasting painful conditions, such as trigeminal neuralgia and primary stabbing headache. Cluster headache is characterised by exquisitely painful attacks that occur in discrete episodes lasting 15-180 min a few times a day. In comparison, PH occurs more frequently and is of shorter duration, and like HC is responsive to indomethacin. SUNCT/SUNA is the shortest duration and highest frequency TAC; attacks can occur over a hundred times every day. PMID:24888770

  16. The Lysine Residues within the Human Ribosomal Protein S17 Sequence Naturally Inserted into the Viral Nonstructural Protein of a Unique Strain of Hepatitis E Virus Are Important for Enhanced Virus Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Kenney, Scott P.; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an important but extremely understudied human pathogen. Due largely to the lack of an efficient cell culture system for HEV, the molecular mechanisms of HEV replication and pathogenesis are poorly understood. Recently, a unique genotype 3 strain of HEV recovered from a chronically infected patient was adapted for growth in HepG2C3A human hepatoma cells. The adaptation of the Kernow C-1 P6 HEV to propagate in HepG2C3A cells selected for a rare virus recombinant that ...

  17. Hepatitis D Virus Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, John M

    2015-11-01

    This work reviews specific related aspects of hepatitis delta virus (HDV) reproduction, including virion structure, the RNA genome, the mode of genome replication, the delta antigens, and the assembly of HDV using the envelope proteins of its helper virus, hepatitis B virus (HBV). These topics are considered with perspectives ranging from a history of discovery through to still-unsolved problems. HDV evolution, virus entry, and associated pathogenic potential and treatment of infections are considered in other articles in this collection. PMID:26525452

  18. Inhibition of retroviral replication by anti-sense RNA.

    OpenAIRE

    To, R Y; Booth, S C; Neiman, P E

    1986-01-01

    We tested the effect of anti-sense RNA on the replication of avian retroviruses in cultured cells. The replication of a recombinant retrovirus carrying a neomycin resistance gene (neor) in the anti-sense orientation was blocked when the cells expressed high steady-state levels of RNA molecules with neor in sequence in the sense was blocked when the cells expressed high steady-state levels of RNA molecules with neor sequences in the sense orientation, i.e., complementary to the viral sequence....

  19. The X gene of adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2 is involved in viral DNA replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maohua Cao

    Full Text Available Adeno-associated virus (AAV (type 2 is a popular human gene therapy vector with a long active transgene expression period and no reported vector-induced adverse reactions. Yet the basic molecular biology of this virus has not been fully addressed. One potential gene at the far 3' end of the AAV2 genome, previously referred to as X (nt 3929 to 4393, overlapping the 3' end of the cap gene, has never been characterized, although we did previously identify a promoter just up-stream (p81. Computer analysis suggested that X was involved in replication and transcription. The X protein was identified during active AAV2 replication using a polyclonal antibody against a peptide starting at amino acid 98. Reagents for the study of X included an AAV2 deletion mutant (dl78-91, a triple nucleotide substitution mutant that destroys all three 5' AUG-initiation products of X, with no effect on the cap coding sequence, and X-positive-293 cell lines. Here, we found that X up-regulated AAV2 DNA replication in differentiating keratinocytes (without helper virus, autonomous replication and in various forms of 293 cell-based assays with help from wild type adenovirus type 5 (wt Ad5 or Ad5 helper plasmid (pHelper. The strongest contribution by X was seen in increasing wt AAV2 DNA replication in keratinocytes and dl78-91 in Ad5-infected X-positive-293 cell lines (both having multi-fold effects. Mutating the X gene in pAAV-RC (pAAV-RC-3Xneg yielded approximately a ∼33% reduction in recombinant AAV vector DNA replication and virion production, but a larger effect was seen when using this same X-knockout AAV helper plasmid in X-positive-293 cell lines versus normal 293 cells (again, multi-fold. Taken together these data strongly suggest that AAV2 X encodes a protein involved in the AAV life cycle, particularly in increasing AAV2 DNA replication, and suggests that further studies are warranted.

  20. Chromatin replication and epigenome maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Groth, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Stability and function of eukaryotic genomes are closely linked to chromatin structure and organization. During cell division the entire genome must be accurately replicated and the chromatin landscape reproduced on new DNA. Chromatin and nuclear structure influence where and when DNA replication...... initiates, whereas the replication process itself disrupts chromatin and challenges established patterns of genome regulation. Specialized replication-coupled mechanisms assemble new DNA into chromatin, but epigenome maintenance is a continuous process taking place throughout the cell cycle. If DNA...

  1. Replication fork progression is paused in two large chromosomal zones flanking the DNA replication origin in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Masahiro Tatsumi; Oshima, Taku; Chumsakul, Onuma; Ishikawa, Shu; Maki, Hisaji

    2016-08-01

    Although the speed of nascent DNA synthesis at individual replication forks is relatively uniform in bacterial cells, the dynamics of replication fork progression on the chromosome are hampered by a variety of natural impediments. Genome replication dynamics can be directly measured from an exponentially growing cell population by sequencing newly synthesized DNA strands that were specifically pulse-labeled with the thymidine analogue 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). However, a short pulse labeling with BrdU is impracticable for bacteria because of poor incorporation of BrdU into the cells, and thus, the genomewide dynamics of bacterial DNA replication remain undetermined. Using a new thymidine-requiring Escherichia coli strain, eCOMB, and high-throughput sequencing, we succeeded in determining the genomewide replication profile in bacterial cells. We also found that fork progression is paused in two ~200-kb chromosomal zones that flank the replication origin in the growing cells. This origin-proximal obstruction to fork progression was overcome by an increased thymidine concentration in the culture medium and enhanced by inhibition of transcription. These indicate that DNA replication near the origin is sensitive to the impediments to fork progression, namely a scarcity of the DNA precursor deoxythymidine triphosphate and probable conflicts between replication and transcription machineries. PMID:27353572

  2. Replication Research and Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travers, Jason C.; Cook, Bryan G.; Therrien, William J.; Coyne, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Replicating previously reported empirical research is a necessary aspect of an evidence-based field of special education, but little formal investigation into the prevalence of replication research in the special education research literature has been conducted. Various factors may explain the lack of attention to replication of special education…

  3. Jam avoidance with autonomous systems

    OpenAIRE

    Tordeux, Antoine; Lassarre, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Many car-following models are developed for jam avoidance in highways. Two mechanisms are used to improve the stability: feedback control with autonomous models and increasing of the interaction within cooperative ones. In this paper, we compare the linear autonomous and collective optimal velocity (OV) models. We observe that the stability is significantly increased by adding predecessors in interaction with collective models. Yet autonomous and collective approaches are close when the speed...

  4. Chemical Specification of Autonomic Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Banâtre, Jean-Pierre; Fradet, Pascal; Radenac, Yann

    2004-01-01

    Autonomic computing provides a vision of information systems allowing self-management of many predefined properties. Such systems take care of their own behavior and of their interactions with other components without any external intervention. One of the major challenges concerns the expression of properties and constraints of autonomic systems. We believe that the {\\em chemical programming paradigm} (represented here by the Gamma formalism) is well-suited to the specification of autonomic s...

  5. Catecholamines and diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1995-01-01

    plasma catecholamine measurements is not due to changes in the clearance of catecholamines in diabetic autonomic neuropathy. The physiological responses to infused adrenaline and to noradrenaline are enhanced, for noradrenaline mainly cardiovascular responses. Adrenoceptors (alpha and beta adrenoceptors......In diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy plasma noradrenaline concentration, used as an index of sympathetic nervous activity, is low. This decrease is, however, only found in patients with a long duration of diabetes with clinically severe autonomic neuropathy. This apparent insensitivity of...

  6. Replication studies in longevity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varcasia, O; Garasto, S; Rizza, T;

    2001-01-01

    In Danes we replicated the 3'APOB-VNTR gene/longevity association study previously carried out in Italians, by which the Small alleles (less than 35 repeats) had been identified as frailty alleles for longevity. In Danes, neither genotype nor allele frequencies differed between centenarians and 20......-sex interaction relevant to Long alleles (more than 37 repeats). The different findings in Denmark and Italy suggest that gene/longevity associations are population-specific, and heavily affected by the population-specific genetic and environmental history....

  7. Robotics and Autonomous Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides an environment for developing and evaluating intelligent software for both actual and simulated autonomous vehicles. Laboratory computers provide...

  8. Jam avoidance with autonomous systems

    CERN Document Server

    Tordeux, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Many car-following models are developed for jam avoidance in highways. Two mechanisms are used to improve the stability: feedback control with autonomous models and increasing of the interaction within cooperative ones. In this paper, we compare the linear autonomous and collective optimal velocity (OV) models. We observe that the stability is significantly increased by adding predecessors in interaction with collective models. Yet autonomous and collective approaches are close when the speed difference term is taking into account. Within the linear OV models tested, the autonomous models including speed difference are sufficient to maximise the stability.

  9. International Expansion through Flexible Replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, Anna; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    2011-01-01

    aimed at frequent modification of the format for replication. Another finding is that IKEA treats replication as hierarchical: lower-level features (marketing efforts, pricing, etc.) are allowed to vary across IKEA stores in response to market-based learning, while higher-level features (fundamental...... values, vision, etc.) are replicated in a uniform manner across stores, and change only very slowly (if at all) in response to learning (“flexible replication”). We conclude by discussing the factors that influence the approach to replication adopted by an international replicator....

  10. Collaborating with Autonomous Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Anna C.; Cross, Charles D.; Fan, Henry; Hempley, Lucas E.; Motter, Mark A.; Neilan, James H.; Qualls, Garry D.; Rothhaar, Paul M.; Tran, Loc D.; Allen, B. Danette

    2015-01-01

    With the anticipated increase of small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS) entering into the National Airspace System, it is highly likely that vehicle operators will be teaming with fleets of small autonomous vehicles. The small vehicles may consist of sUAS, which are 55 pounds or less that typically will y at altitudes 400 feet and below, and small ground vehicles typically operating in buildings or defined small campuses. Typically, the vehicle operators are not concerned with manual control of the vehicle; instead they are concerned with the overall mission. In order for this vision of high-level mission operators working with fleets of vehicles to come to fruition, many human factors related challenges must be investigated and solved. First, the interface between the human operator and the autonomous agent must be at a level that the operator needs and the agents can understand. This paper details the natural language human factors e orts that NASA Langley's Autonomy Incubator is focusing on. In particular these e orts focus on allowing the operator to interact with the system using speech and gestures rather than a mouse and keyboard. With this ability of the system to understand both speech and gestures, operators not familiar with the vehicle dynamics will be able to easily plan, initiate, and change missions using a language familiar to them rather than having to learn and converse in the vehicle's language. This will foster better teaming between the operator and the autonomous agent which will help lower workload, increase situation awareness, and improve performance of the system as a whole.

  11. A 19-Nucleotide Insertion in the Leader Sequence of Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroup J Contributes to Its Replication in Vitro but Is Not Related to Its Pathogenicity in Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Xiaolin; Wang, Qi; Li, Xiaofei; Qi, Xiaole; Wang, Yongqiang; Gao, Honglei; Gao, Yulong; Wang, Xiaomei

    2014-01-01

    Subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) was first isolated from meat-type chickens that had developed myeloid leukosis and since 2008, ALV-J infections in chickens have become widespread in China. A comparison of the sequence of ALV-J epidemic isolates with HPRS-103, the ALV-J prototype virus, revealed several distinct features, one of which is a 19-nucleotide (nt) insertion in the leader sequence. To determine the role of the 19-nt insertion in ALV-J pathogenicity, a pair of viruses were con...

  12. Autonomous packaging robot

    OpenAIRE

    Vo, Van Thanh

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the autonomous packaging robot application is to replace manual product packaging in food industry with a fully automatic robot. The objective is achieved by using the combination of machine vision, central computer, sensors, microcontroller and a typical ABB robot. The method is to equip the robot with different sensors: camera as “eyes” of robot, distance sensor and microcontroller as “sense of touch” of the robot, central computer as “brain” of the robot. Because the ro...

  13. Autonomous component carrier selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, Luis Guilherme Uzeda; Pedersen, Klaus; Mogensen, Preben

    2009-01-01

    in local areas, basing our study case on LTE-Advanced. We present extensive network simulation results to demonstrate that a simple and robust interference management scheme, called autonomous component carrier selection allows each cell to select the most attractive frequency configuration; improving...... management and efficient system operation. Due to the expected large number of user-deployed cells, centralized network planning becomes unpractical and new scalable alternatives must be sought. In this article, we propose a fully distributed and scalable solution to the interference management problem...

  14. Autonomous mobile robot teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agah, Arvin; Bekey, George A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes autonomous mobile robot teams performing tasks in unstructured environments. The behavior and the intelligence of the group is distributed, and the system does not include a central command base or leader. The novel concept of the Tropism-Based Cognitive Architecture is introduced, which is used by the robots in order to produce behavior transforming their sensory information to proper action. The results of a number of simulation experiments are presented. These experiments include worlds where the robot teams must locate, decompose, and gather objects, and defend themselves against hostile predators, while navigating around stationary and mobile obstacles.

  15. Modeling inhomogeneous DNA replication kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel G Gauthier

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic organisms, DNA replication is initiated at a series of chromosomal locations called origins, where replication forks are assembled proceeding bidirectionally to replicate the genome. The distribution and firing rate of these origins, in conjunction with the velocity at which forks progress, dictate the program of the replication process. Previous attempts at modeling DNA replication in eukaryotes have focused on cases where the firing rate and the velocity of replication forks are homogeneous, or uniform, across the genome. However, it is now known that there are large variations in origin activity along the genome and variations in fork velocities can also take place. Here, we generalize previous approaches to modeling replication, to allow for arbitrary spatial variation of initiation rates and fork velocities. We derive rate equations for left- and right-moving forks and for replication probability over time that can be solved numerically to obtain the mean-field replication program. This method accurately reproduces the results of DNA replication simulation. We also successfully adapted our approach to the inverse problem of fitting measurements of DNA replication performed on single DNA molecules. Since such measurements are performed on specified portion of the genome, the examined DNA molecules may be replicated by forks that originate either within the studied molecule or outside of it. This problem was solved by using an effective flux of incoming replication forks at the model boundaries to represent the origin activity outside the studied region. Using this approach, we show that reliable inferences can be made about the replication of specific portions of the genome even if the amount of data that can be obtained from single-molecule experiments is generally limited.

  16. Role of RNA helicases in HIV-1 replication

    OpenAIRE

    Jeang, Kuan-Teh; Yedavalli, Venkat

    2006-01-01

    Viruses are replication competent genomes which are relatively gene-poor. Even the largest viruses (i.e. Herpesviruses) encode only slightly >200 open reading frames (ORFs). However, because viruses replicate obligatorily inside cells, and considering that evolution may be driven by a principle of economy of scale, it is reasonable to surmise that many viruses have evolved the ability to co-opt cell-encoded proteins to provide needed surrogate functions. An in silico survey of viral sequence ...

  17. Towards autonomous vehicular clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Olariu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The dawn of the 21st century has seen a growing interest in vehicular networking and its myriad potential applications. The initial view of practitioners and researchers was that radio-equipped vehicles could keep the drivers informed about potential safety risks and increase their awareness of road conditions. The view then expanded to include access to the Internet and associated services. This position paper proposes and promotes a novel and more comprehensive vision namely, that advances in vehicular networks, embedded devices and cloud computing will enable the formation of autonomous clouds of vehicular computing, communication, sensing, power and physical resources. Hence, we coin the term, autonomous vehicular clouds (AVCs. A key feature distinguishing AVCs from conventional cloud computing is that mobile AVC resources can be pooled dynamically to serve authorized users and to enable autonomy in real-time service sharing and management on terrestrial, aerial, or aquatic pathways or theaters of operations. In addition to general-purpose AVCs, we also envision the emergence of specialized AVCs such as mobile analytics laboratories. Furthermore, we envision that the integration of AVCs with ubiquitous smart infrastructures including intelligent transportation systems, smart cities and smart electric power grids will have an enormous societal impact enabling ubiquitous utility cyber-physical services at the right place, right time and with right-sized resources.

  18. Nemesis Autonomous Test System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barltrop, Kevin J.; Lee, Cin-Young; Horvath, Gregory A,; Clement, Bradley J.

    2012-01-01

    A generalized framework has been developed for systems validation that can be applied to both traditional and autonomous systems. The framework consists of an automated test case generation and execution system called Nemesis that rapidly and thoroughly identifies flaws or vulnerabilities within a system. By applying genetic optimization and goal-seeking algorithms on the test equipment side, a "war game" is conducted between a system and its complementary nemesis. The end result of the war games is a collection of scenarios that reveals any undesirable behaviors of the system under test. The software provides a reusable framework to evolve test scenarios using genetic algorithms using an operation model of the system under test. It can automatically generate and execute test cases that reveal flaws in behaviorally complex systems. Genetic algorithms focus the exploration of tests on the set of test cases that most effectively reveals the flaws and vulnerabilities of the system under test. It leverages advances in state- and model-based engineering, which are essential in defining the behavior of autonomous systems. It also uses goal networks to describe test scenarios.

  19. Learning for Autonomous Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelova, Anelia; Howard, Andrew; Matthies, Larry; Tang, Benyang; Turmon, Michael; Mjolsness, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Robotic ground vehicles for outdoor applications have achieved some remarkable successes, notably in autonomous highway following (Dickmanns, 1987), planetary exploration (1), and off-road navigation on Earth (1). Nevertheless, major challenges remain to enable reliable, high-speed, autonomous navigation in a wide variety of complex, off-road terrain. 3-D perception of terrain geometry with imaging range sensors is the mainstay of off-road driving systems. However, the stopping distance at high speed exceeds the effective lookahead distance of existing range sensors. Prospects for extending the range of 3-D sensors is strongly limited by sensor physics, eye safety of lasers, and related issues. Range sensor limitations also allow vehicles to enter large cul-de-sacs even at low speed, leading to long detours. Moreover, sensing only terrain geometry fails to reveal mechanical properties of terrain that are critical to assessing its traversability, such as potential for slippage, sinkage, and the degree of compliance of potential obstacles. Rovers in the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission have got stuck in sand dunes and experienced significant downhill slippage in the vicinity of large rock hazards. Earth-based off-road robots today have very limited ability to discriminate traversable vegetation from non-traversable vegetation or rough ground. It is impossible today to preprogram a system with knowledge of these properties for all types of terrain and weather conditions that might be encountered.

  20. Novel parvoviruses in reptiles and genome sequence of a lizard parvovirus shed light on Dependoparvovirus genus evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pénzes, Judit J; Pham, Hanh T; Benkö, Mária; Tijssen, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Here, we report the detection and partial genome characterization of two novel reptilian parvoviruses derived from a short-tailed pygmy chameleon (Rampholeon brevicaudatus) and a corn snake (Pantherophis guttatus) along with the complete genome analysis of the first lizard parvovirus, obtained from four bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps). Both homology searches and phylogenetic tree reconstructions demonstrated that all are members of the genus Dependoparvovirus. Even though most dependoparvoviruses replicate efficiently only in co-infections with large DNA viruses, no such agents could be detected in one of the bearded dragon samples, hence the possibility of autonomous replication was explored. The alternative ORF encoding the full assembly activating protein (AAP), typical for the genus, could be obtained from reptilian parvoviruses for the first time, with a structure that appears to be more ancient than that of avian and mammalian parvoviruses. All three viruses were found to harbour short introns as previously observed for snake adeno-associated virus, shorter than that of any non-reptilian dependoparvovirus. According to the phylogenetic calculations based on full non-structural protein (Rep) and AAP sequences, the monophyletic cluster of reptilian parvoviruses seems to be the most basal out of all lineages of genus Dependoparvovirus. The suspected ability for autonomous replication, results of phylogenetic tree reconstruction, intron lengths and the structure of the AAP suggested that a single Squamata origin instead of the earlier assumed diapsid (common avian-reptilian) origin is more likely for the genus Dependoparvovirus of the family Parvoviridae. PMID:26067293

  1. Molecular analysis of the replication region of the theta-replicating plasmid pUCL287 from Tetragenococcus (Pediococcus) halophilus ATCC33315.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benachour, A; Frère, J; Flahaut, S; Novel, G; Auffray, Y

    1997-08-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the 8.7-kb theta-replicating plasmid pUCL287 from Tetragenococcus halophilus (formerly Pediococcus halophilus) ATCC33315 has been determined. The replication region was identified and analyzed. Its nucleotide sequence contains an untranslated region, the replication origin, followed by two open reading frames (ORFs) encoding two proteins of 311 (RepA287) and 168 (RepB287) amino acids, respectively. Evidence is presented to show that RepA287 represents the plasmid replication protein. RepB287, which is non-essential for replication, is involved in the plasmid copy-number control and segregational stability. The roles of lactococcal proteins homologous to RepB287 have not been defined so far. Nevertheless, the structural organization of the pUCL287 replication region is remarkably similar to those of well known theta-replicating lactococcal plasmids despite the absence of homology of the replication origin and of the replication protein, and this suggests that pUCL287 uses the same mechanism of replication. Nucleotide sequence comparisons show that pSMB74, a pediococcal plasmid encoding bacteriocin production, is a member of the pUCL287 replicon family. PMID:9294035

  2. A New Replicator: A theoretical framework for analysing replication

    OpenAIRE

    Szathmáry Eörs; Zachar István

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Replicators are the crucial entities in evolution. The notion of a replicator, however, is far less exact than the weight of its importance. Without identifying and classifying multiplying entities exactly, their dynamics cannot be determined appropriately. Therefore, it is importance to decide the nature and characteristics of any multiplying entity, in a detailed and formal way. Results Replication is basically an autocatalytic process which enables us to rest on the not...

  3. Expanded Perspectives on Autonomous Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxford, Rebecca L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores two general perspectives on autonomous learners: psychological and sociocultural. These perspectives introduce a range of theoretically grounded facets of autonomous learners, facets such as the self-regulated learner, the emotionally intelligent learner, the self-determined learner, the mediated learner, the socioculturally…

  4. The Escherichia coli Tus-Ter replication fork barrier causes site-specific DNA replication perturbation in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nicolai B; Sass, Ehud; Suski, Catherine;

    2014-01-01

    Replication fork (RF) pausing occurs at both 'programmed' sites and non-physiological barriers (for example, DNA adducts). Programmed RF pausing is required for site-specific DNA replication termination in Escherichia coli, and this process requires the binding of the polar terminator protein, Tus...... utilized as a versatile, site-specific, heterologous DNA replication-perturbing system, with a variety of potential applications......., to specific DNA sequences called Ter. Here, we demonstrate that Tus-Ter modules also induce polar RF pausing when engineered into the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. This heterologous RF barrier is distinct from a number of previously characterized, protein-mediated, RF pause sites in yeast, as it...

  5. Highly Conserved Structural Properties of the C-terminal Tail of HIV-1 gp41 Protein Despite Substantial Sequence Variation among Diverse Clades: IMPLICATIONS FOR FUNCTIONS IN VIRAL REPLICATION*

    OpenAIRE

    Steckbeck, Jonathan D.; Craigo, Jodi K.; Barnes, Christopher O.; Ronald C Montelaro

    2011-01-01

    Although the HIV-1 Env gp120 and gp41 ectodomain have been extensively characterized in terms of structure and function, similar characterizations of the C-terminal tail (CTT) of HIV gp41 remain relatively limited and contradictory. The current study was designed to examine in detail CTT sequence conservation relative to gp120 and the gp41 ectodomain and to examine the conservation of predicted physicochemical and structural properties across a number of divergent HIV clades and groups. Resul...

  6. Replicated Spectrographs in Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, Gary J

    2014-01-01

    As telescope apertures increase, the challenge of scaling spectrographic astronomical instruments becomes acute. The next generation of extremely large telescopes (ELTs) strain the availability of glass blanks for optics and engineering to provide sufficient mechanical stability. While breaking the relationship between telescope diameter and instrument pupil size by adaptive optics is a clear path for small fields of view, survey instruments exploiting multiplex advantages will be pressed to find cost-effective solutions. In this review we argue that exploiting the full potential of ELTs will require the barrier of the cost and engineering difficulty of monolithic instruments to be broken by the use of large-scale replication of spectrographs. The first steps in this direction have already been taken with the soon to be commissioned MUSE and VIRUS instruments for the Very Large Telescope and the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, respectively. MUSE employs 24 spectrograph channels, while VIRUS has 150 channels. We compa...

  7. Chromatin Assembly at Kinetochores Is Uncoupled from DNA Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelby, Richard D.; Monier, Karine; Sullivan, Kevin F.

    2000-01-01

    The specification of metazoan centromeres does not depend strictly on centromeric DNA sequences, but also requires epigenetic factors. The mechanistic basis for establishing a centromeric “state” on the DNA remains unclear. In this work, we have directly examined replication timing of the prekinetochore domain of human chromosomes. Kinetochores were labeled by expression of epitope-tagged CENP-A, which stably marks prekinetochore domains in human cells. By immunoprecipitating CENP-A mononucleosomes from synchronized cells pulsed with [3H]thymidine we demonstrate that CENP-A–associated DNA is replicated in mid-to-late S phase. Cytological analysis of DNA replication further demonstrated that centromeres replicate asynchronously in parallel with numerous other genomic regions. In contrast, quantitative Western blot analysis demonstrates that CENP-A protein synthesis occurs later, in G2. Quantitative fluorescence microscopy and transient transfection in the presence of aphidicolin, an inhibitor of DNA replication, show that CENP-A can assemble into centromeres in the absence of DNA replication. Thus, unlike most genomic chromatin, histone synthesis and assembly are uncoupled from DNA replication at the kinetochore. Uncoupling DNA replication from CENP-A synthesis suggests that regulated chromatin assembly or remodeling could play a role in epigenetic centromere propagation. PMID:11086012

  8. Murine leukemia virus (MLV replication monitored with fluorescent proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bittner Alexandra

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer gene therapy will benefit from vectors that are able to replicate in tumor tissue and cause a bystander effect. Replication-competent murine leukemia virus (MLV has been described to have potential as cancer therapeutics, however, MLV infection does not cause a cytopathic effect in the infected cell and viral replication can only be studied by immunostaining or measurement of reverse transcriptase activity. Results We inserted the coding sequences for green fluorescent protein (GFP into the proline-rich region (PRR of the ecotropic envelope protein (Env and were able to fluorescently label MLV. This allowed us to directly monitor viral replication and attachment to target cells by flow cytometry. We used this method to study viral replication of recombinant MLVs and split viral genomes, which were generated by replacement of the MLV env gene with the red fluorescent protein (RFP and separately cloning GFP-Env into a retroviral vector. Co-transfection of both plasmids into target cells resulted in the generation of semi-replicative vectors, and the two color labeling allowed to determine the distribution of the individual genomes in the target cells and was indicative for the occurrence of recombination events. Conclusions Fluorescently labeled MLVs are excellent tools for the study of factors that influence viral replication and can be used to optimize MLV-based replication-competent viruses or vectors for gene therapy.

  9. SUMO and KSHV Replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small Ubiquitin-related MOdifier (SUMO) modification was initially identified as a reversible post-translational modification that affects the regulation of diverse cellular processes, including signal transduction, protein trafficking, chromosome segregation, and DNA repair. Increasing evidence suggests that the SUMO system also plays an important role in regulating chromatin organization and transcription. It is thus not surprising that double-stranded DNA viruses, such as Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), have exploited SUMO modification as a means of modulating viral chromatin remodeling during the latent-lytic switch. In addition, SUMO regulation allows the disassembly and assembly of promyelocytic leukemia protein-nuclear bodies (PML-NBs), an intrinsic antiviral host defense, during the viral replication cycle. Overcoming PML-NB-mediated cellular intrinsic immunity is essential to allow the initial transcription and replication of the herpesvirus genome after de novo infection. As a consequence, KSHV has evolved a way as to produce multiple SUMO regulatory viral proteins to modulate the cellular SUMO environment in a dynamic way during its life cycle. Remarkably, KSHV encodes one gene product (K-bZIP) with SUMO-ligase activities and one gene product (K-Rta) that exhibits SUMO-targeting ubiquitin ligase (STUbL) activity. In addition, at least two viral products are sumoylated that have functional importance. Furthermore, sumoylation can be modulated by other viral gene products, such as the viral protein kinase Orf36. Interference with the sumoylation of specific viral targets represents a potential therapeutic strategy when treating KSHV, as well as other oncogenic herpesviruses. Here, we summarize the different ways KSHV exploits and manipulates the cellular SUMO system and explore the multi-faceted functions of SUMO during KSHV’s life cycle and pathogenesis

  10. SUMO and KSHV Replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Pei-Ching [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Kung, Hsing-Jien, E-mail: hkung@nhri.org.tw [Institute for Translational Medicine, College of Medical Science and Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); UC Davis Cancer Center, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Division of Molecular and Genomic Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, 35 Keyan Road, Zhunan, Miaoli County 35053, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-29

    Small Ubiquitin-related MOdifier (SUMO) modification was initially identified as a reversible post-translational modification that affects the regulation of diverse cellular processes, including signal transduction, protein trafficking, chromosome segregation, and DNA repair. Increasing evidence suggests that the SUMO system also plays an important role in regulating chromatin organization and transcription. It is thus not surprising that double-stranded DNA viruses, such as Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), have exploited SUMO modification as a means of modulating viral chromatin remodeling during the latent-lytic switch. In addition, SUMO regulation allows the disassembly and assembly of promyelocytic leukemia protein-nuclear bodies (PML-NBs), an intrinsic antiviral host defense, during the viral replication cycle. Overcoming PML-NB-mediated cellular intrinsic immunity is essential to allow the initial transcription and replication of the herpesvirus genome after de novo infection. As a consequence, KSHV has evolved a way as to produce multiple SUMO regulatory viral proteins to modulate the cellular SUMO environment in a dynamic way during its life cycle. Remarkably, KSHV encodes one gene product (K-bZIP) with SUMO-ligase activities and one gene product (K-Rta) that exhibits SUMO-targeting ubiquitin ligase (STUbL) activity. In addition, at least two viral products are sumoylated that have functional importance. Furthermore, sumoylation can be modulated by other viral gene products, such as the viral protein kinase Orf36. Interference with the sumoylation of specific viral targets represents a potential therapeutic strategy when treating KSHV, as well as other oncogenic herpesviruses. Here, we summarize the different ways KSHV exploits and manipulates the cellular SUMO system and explore the multi-faceted functions of SUMO during KSHV’s life cycle and pathogenesis.

  11. Evolutionary Autonomous Health Monitoring System (EAHMS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For supporting NASA's Robotics, Tele-Robotics and Autonomous Systems Roadmap, we are proposing the "Evolutionary Autonomous Health Monitoring System" (EAHMS) for...

  12. Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Lindner, Robert R; Murray, Claire E; Stanimirović, Snežana; Babler, Brian L; Heiles, Carl; Hennebelle, Patrick; Goss, W M; Dickey, John

    2014-01-01

    We present a new algorithm, named Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition (AGD), for automatically decomposing spectra into Gaussian components. AGD uses derivative spectroscopy and machine learning to provide optimized guesses for the number of Gaussian components in the data, and also their locations, widths, and amplitudes. We test AGD and find that it produces results comparable to human-derived solutions on 21cm absorption spectra from the 21cm SPectral line Observations of Neutral Gas with the EVLA (21-SPONGE) survey. We use AGD with Monte Carlo methods to derive the HI line completeness as a function of peak optical depth and velocity width for the 21-SPONGE data, and also show that the results of AGD are stable against varying observational noise intensity. The autonomy and computational efficiency of the method over traditional manual Gaussian fits allow for truly unbiased comparisons between observations and simulations, and for the ability to scale up and interpret the very large data volumes from the up...

  13. Autonomous Flying Controls Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motter, Mark A.

    2005-01-01

    The Flying Controls Testbed (FLiC) is a relatively small and inexpensive unmanned aerial vehicle developed specifically to test highly experimental flight control approaches. The most recent version of the FLiC is configured with 16 independent aileron segments, supports the implementation of C-coded experimental controllers, and is capable of fully autonomous flight from takeoff roll to landing, including flight test maneuvers. The test vehicle is basically a modified Army target drone, AN/FQM-117B, developed as part of a collaboration between the Aviation Applied Technology Directorate (AATD) at Fort Eustis,Virginia and NASA Langley Research Center. Several vehicles have been constructed and collectively have flown over 600 successful test flights.

  14. Mobile Intelligent Autonomous Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra R. Raol

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile intelligent autonomous systems (MIAS is a fast emerging research area. Although it can be regarded as a general R&D area, it is mainly directed towards robotics. Several important subtopics within MIAS research are:(i perception and reasoning, (ii mobility and navigation,(iii haptics and teleoperation, (iv image fusion/computervision, (v modelling of manipulators, (vi hardware/software architectures for planning and behaviour learning leadingto robotic architecture, (vii vehicle-robot path and motionplanning/control, (viii human-machine interfaces for interaction between humans and robots, and (ix application of artificial neural networks (ANNs, fuzzy logic/systems (FLS,probabilistic/approximate reasoning (PAR, Bayesian networks(BN and genetic algorithms (GA to the above-mentioned problems. Also, multi-sensor data fusion (MSDF playsvery crucial role at many levels of the data fusion process:(i kinematic fusion (position/bearing tracking, (ii imagefusion (for scene recognition, (iii information fusion (forbuilding world models, and (iv decision fusion (for tracking,control actions. The MIAS as a technology is useful for automation of complex tasks, surveillance in a hazardousand hostile environment, human-assistance in very difficultmanual works, medical robotics, hospital systems, autodiagnosticsystems, and many other related civil and military systems. Also, other important research areas for MIAScomprise sensor/actuator modelling, failure management/reconfiguration, scene understanding, knowledge representation, learning and decision-making. Examples ofdynamic systems considered within the MIAS would be:autonomous systems (unmanned ground vehicles, unmannedaerial vehicles, micro/mini air vehicles, and autonomousunder water vehicles, mobile/fixed robotic systems, dexterousmanipulator robots, mining robots, surveillance systems,and networked/multi-robot systems, to name a few.Defence Science Journal, 2010, 60(1, pp.3-4,

  15. Efficient usage of Adabas replication

    CERN Document Server

    Storr, Dieter W

    2011-01-01

    In today's IT organization replication becomes more and more an essential technology. This makes Software AG's Event Replicator for Adabas an important part of your data processing. Setting the right parameters and establishing the best network communication, as well as selecting efficient target components, is essential for successfully implementing replication. This book provides comprehensive information and unique best-practice experience in the field of Event Replicator for Adabas. It also includes sample codes and configurations making your start very easy. It describes all components ne

  16. Hepatitis Delta Virus RNA Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hsin Tseng

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis delta virus (HDV is a distant relative of plant viroids in the animal world. Similar to plant viroids, HDV replicates its circular RNA genome using a double rolling-circle mechanism. Nevertheless, the production of hepatitis delta antigen (HDAg, which is indispensible for HDV replication, is a unique feature distinct from plant viroids, which do not encode any protein. Here the HDV RNA replication cycle is reviewed, with emphasis on the function of HDAg in modulating RNA replication and the nature of the enzyme involved.

  17. Kinodynamic Motion Planning for Autonomous Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiwung Choi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a computationally effective motion planning algorithm for autonomous ground vehicles operating in a semi-structured environment with a mission specified by waypoints, corridor widths and obstacles. The algorithm switches between two kinds of planners, (i static planners and (ii moving obstacle avoidance manoeuvre planners, depending on the mobility of any detected obstacles. While the first is broken down into a path planner and a controller, the second generates a sequence of controls without global path planning. Each subsystem is implemented as follows. The path planner produces an optimal piecewise linear path by applying a variant of cell decomposition and dynamic programming. The piecewise linear path is smoothed by Bézier curves such that the maximum curvatures of the curves are minimized. The controller calculates the highest allowable velocity profile along the path, consistent with the limits on both tangential and radial acceleration and the steering command for the vehicle to track the trajectory using a pure pursuit method. The moving obstacle avoidance manoeuvre produces a sequence of time-optimal local velocities, by minimizing the cost as determined by the safety of the current velocity against obstacles in the velocity obstacle paradigm and the deviation of the current velocity relative to the desired velocity, to satisfy the waypoint constraint. The algorithms are shown to be robust and computationally efficient, and to demonstrate a viable methodology for autonomous vehicle control in the presence of unknown obstacles.

  18. Quantifying Emergent Behavior of Autonomous Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martius, Georg; Olbrich, Eckehard

    2015-10-01

    Quantifying behaviors of robots which were generated autonomously from task-independent objective functions is an important prerequisite for objective comparisons of algorithms and movements of animals. The temporal sequence of such a behavior can be considered as a time series and hence complexity measures developed for time series are natural candidates for its quantification. The predictive information and the excess entropy are such complexity measures. They measure the amount of information the past contains about the future and thus quantify the nonrandom structure in the temporal sequence. However, when using these measures for systems with continuous states one has to deal with the fact that their values will depend on the resolution with which the systems states are observed. For deterministic systems both measures will diverge with increasing resolution. We therefore propose a new decomposition of the excess entropy in resolution dependent and resolution independent parts and discuss how they depend on the dimensionality of the dynamics, correlations and the noise level. For the practical estimation we propose to use estimates based on the correlation integral instead of the direct estimation of the mutual information using the algorithm by Kraskov et al. (2004) which is based on next neighbor statistics because the latter allows less control of the scale dependencies. Using our algorithm we are able to show how autonomous learning generates behavior of increasing complexity with increasing learning duration.

  19. Quantifying Emergent Behavior of Autonomous Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Martius

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying behaviors of robots which were generated autonomously from task-independent objective functions is an important prerequisite for objective comparisons of algorithms and movements of animals. The temporal sequence of such a behavior can be considered as a time series and hence complexity measures developed for time series are natural candidates for its quantification. The predictive information and the excess entropy are such complexity measures. They measure the amount of information the past contains about the future and thus quantify the nonrandom structure in the temporal sequence. However, when using these measures for systems with continuous states one has to deal with the fact that their values will depend on the resolution with which the systems states are observed. For deterministic systems both measures will diverge with increasing resolution. We therefore propose a new decomposition of the excess entropy in resolution dependent and resolution independent parts and discuss how they depend on the dimensionality of the dynamics, correlations and the noise level. For the practical estimation we propose to use estimates based on the correlation integral instead of the direct estimation of the mutual information based on next neighbor statistics because the latter allows less control of the scale dependencies. Using our algorithm we are able to show how autonomous learning generates behavior of increasing complexity with increasing learning duration.

  20. Cybersecurity for aerospace autonomous systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Jeremy

    2015-05-01

    High profile breaches have occurred across numerous information systems. One area where attacks are particularly problematic is autonomous control systems. This paper considers the aerospace information system, focusing on elements that interact with autonomous control systems (e.g., onboard UAVs). It discusses the trust placed in the autonomous systems and supporting systems (e.g., navigational aids) and how this trust can be validated. Approaches to remotely detect the UAV compromise, without relying on the onboard software (on a potentially compromised system) as part of the process are discussed. How different levels of autonomy (task-based, goal-based, mission-based) impact this remote characterization is considered.

  1. Autonomous Image Analysis for Future Mars Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulick, V. C.; Morris, R. L.; Ruzon, M. A.; Bandari, E.; Roush, T. L.

    1999-01-01

    To explore high priority landing sites and to prepare for eventual human exploration, future Mars missions will involve rovers capable of traversing tens of kilometers. However, the current process by which scientists interact with a rover does not scale to such distances. Specifically, numerous command cycles are required to complete even simple tasks, such as, pointing the spectrometer at a variety of nearby rocks. In addition, the time required by scientists to interpret image data before new commands can be given and the limited amount of data that can be downlinked during a given command cycle constrain rover mobility and achievement of science goals. Experience with rover tests on Earth supports these concerns. As a result, traverses to science sites as identified in orbital images would require numerous science command cycles over a period of many weeks, months or even years, perhaps exceeding rover design life and other constraints. Autonomous onboard science analysis can address these problems in two ways. First, it will allow the rover to preferentially transmit "interesting" images, defined as those likely to have higher science content. Second, the rover will be able to anticipate future commands. For example, a rover might autonomously acquire and return spectra of "interesting" rocks along with a high-resolution image of those rocks in addition to returning the context images in which they were detected. Such approaches, coupled with appropriate navigational software, help to address both the data volume and command cycle bottlenecks that limit both rover mobility and science yield. We are developing fast, autonomous algorithms to enable such intelligent on-board decision making by spacecraft. Autonomous algorithms developed to date have the ability to identify rocks and layers in a scene, locate the horizon, and compress multi-spectral image data. We are currently investigating the possibility of reconstructing a 3D surface from a sequence of images

  2. Charter School Replication. Policy Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhim, Lauren Morando

    2009-01-01

    "Replication" is the practice of a single charter school board or management organization opening several more schools that are each based on the same school model. The most rapid strategy to increase the number of new high-quality charter schools available to children is to encourage the replication of existing quality schools. This policy guide…

  3. DATABASE REPLICATION IN HETEROGENOUS PLATFORM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendro Nindito

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of diverse database technologies in enterprises today is increasingly a common practice. To provide high availability and survavibality of real-time information, a database replication technology that has capability to replicate databases under heterogenous platforms is required. The purpose of this research is to find the technology with such capability. In this research, the data source is stored in MSSQL database server running on Windows. The data will be replicated to MySQL running on Linux as the destination. The method applied in this research is prototyping in which the processes of development and testing can be done interactively and repeatedly. The key result of this research is that the replication technology applied, which is called Oracle GoldenGate, can successfully manage to do its task in replicating data in real-time and heterogeneous platforms.

  4. LHCb experience with LFC replication

    CERN Document Server

    Carbone, Angelo; Dafonte Perez, Eva; D'Apice, Antimo; dell'Agnello, Luca; Duellmann, Dirk; Girone, Maria; Lo Re, Giuseppe; Martelli, Barbara; Peco, Gianluca; Ricci, Pier Paolo; Sapunenko, Vladimir; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Vitlacil, Dejan

    2007-01-01

    Database replication is a key topic in the framework of the LHC Computing Grid to allow processing of data in a distributed environment. In particular, the LHCb computing model relies on the LHC File Catalog, i.e. database which stores information about files spread across the GRID, their logical names and the physical locations of all the replicas. The LHCb computing model requires the LFC to be replicated at Tier-1s. The LCG 3D project deals with the database replication issue and provides a replication service based on Oracle Streams technology. This paper describes the deployment of the LHC File Catalog replication to the INFN National Center for Telematics and Informations (CNAF) and to other LHCb Tier-1 sites. We performed stress tests designed to evaluate any delay in the propagation of the streams and the scalability of the system. The tests show the robustness of the replica implementation with performance going much beyond the LHCb requirements.

  5. Autonomic Dysregulation in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintér, Alexandra; Cseh, Domonkos; Sárközi, Adrienn; Illigens, Ben M; Siepmann, Timo

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, progressive central neurological disease characterized by inflammation and demyelination. In patients with MS, dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system may present with various clinical symptoms including sweating abnormalities, urinary dysfunction, orthostatic dysregulation, gastrointestinal symptoms, and sexual dysfunction. These autonomic disturbances reduce the quality of life of affected patients and constitute a clinical challenge to the physician due to variability of clinical presentation and inconsistent data on diagnosis and treatment. Early diagnosis and initiation of individualized interdisciplinary and multimodal strategies is beneficial in the management of autonomic dysfunction in MS. This review summarizes the current literature on the most prevalent aspects of autonomic dysfunction in MS and provides reference to underlying pathophysiological mechanisms as well as means of diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26213927

  6. Framework for Autonomous Optimization Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Phoenix Integration and MIT propose to create a novel autonomous optimization tool and application programming interface (API). The API will demonstrate the ability...

  7. Autonomous Mission Operations Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Jeremy David

    2014-01-01

    As light time delays increase, the number of such situations in which crew autonomy is the best way to conduct the mission is expected to increase. However, there are significant open questions regarding which functions to allocate to ground and crew as the time delays increase. In situations where the ideal solution is to allocate responsibility to the crew and the vehicle, a second question arises: should the activity be the responsibility of the crew or an automated vehicle function? More specifically, we must answer the following questions: What aspects of mission operation responsibilities (Plan, Train, Fly) should be allocated to ground based or vehicle based planning, monitoring, and control in the presence of significant light-time delay between the vehicle and the Earth?How should the allocated ground based planning, monitoring, and control be distributed across the flight control team and ground system automation? How should the allocated vehicle based planning, monitoring, and control be distributed between the flight crew and onboard system automation?When during the mission should responsibility shift from flight control team to crew or from crew to vehicle, and what should the process of shifting responsibility be as the mission progresses? NASA is developing a roadmap of capabilities for Autonomous Mission Operations for human spaceflight. This presentation will describe the current state of development of this roadmap, with specific attention to in-space inspection tasks that crews might perform with minimum assistance from the ground.

  8. Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Robert R.; Vera-Ciro, Carlos; Murray, Claire E.; Stanimirović, Snežana; Babler, Brian; Heiles, Carl; Hennebelle, Patrick; Goss, W. M.; Dickey, John

    2015-04-01

    We present a new algorithm, named Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition (AGD), for automatically decomposing spectra into Gaussian components. AGD uses derivative spectroscopy and machine learning to provide optimized guesses for the number of Gaussian components in the data, and also their locations, widths, and amplitudes. We test AGD and find that it produces results comparable to human-derived solutions on 21 cm absorption spectra from the 21 cm SPectral line Observations of Neutral Gas with the EVLA (21-SPONGE) survey. We use AGD with Monte Carlo methods to derive the H i line completeness as a function of peak optical depth and velocity width for the 21-SPONGE data, and also show that the results of AGD are stable against varying observational noise intensity. The autonomy and computational efficiency of the method over traditional manual Gaussian fits allow for truly unbiased comparisons between observations and simulations, and for the ability to scale up and interpret the very large data volumes from the upcoming Square Kilometer Array and pathfinder telescopes.

  9. Semantic Web Meets Autonomic Ubicomp

    OpenAIRE

    Belecheanu, R A; Jawaheer, G; Hoskins, A.; McCann, J; Payne, T.

    2004-01-01

    The placement of autonomic systems’ management functionality into a ubiquitous computing environment is a difficult task due to the lack of systems’ resources and the need for ‘intelligence’ to ensure that the system is selfhealing/ organising or configuring. For such systems to adapt to changes to their current environment they need to be able to (re) configure the workflow of their services. In this paper, we propose the ANS, an autonomic middleware for ubicomp devices. We briefly describe ...

  10. Design of Autonomous Gel Actuators

    OpenAIRE

    Shuji Hashimoto; Shingo Maeda; Yusuke Hara; Satoshi Nakamaru

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce autonomous gel actuators driven by chemical energy. The polymer gels prepared here have cyclic chemical reaction networks. With a cyclic reaction, the polymer gels generate periodical motion. The periodic motion of the gel is produced by the chemical energy of the oscillatory Belouzov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction. We have succeeded in making synthetic polymer gel move autonomously like a living organism. This experimental fact represents the great possibility of the c...

  11. Design of Autonomous Gel Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuji Hashimoto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce autonomous gel actuators driven by chemical energy. The polymer gels prepared here have cyclic chemical reaction networks. With a cyclic reaction, the polymer gels generate periodical motion. The periodic motion of the gel is produced by the chemical energy of the oscillatory Belouzov-Zhabotinsky (BZ reaction. We have succeeded in making synthetic polymer gel move autonomously like a living organism. This experimental fact represents the great possibility of the chemical robot.

  12. Build Autonomic Agents with ABLE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴吉义

    2007-01-01

    The IBM Agent Building and Learning Environment(ABLE) provides a lightweight Java~(TM) agent frame- work,a comprehensive JavaBeansTM library of intelligent software components,a set of development and test tools, and an agent platform.After the introduction to ABLE,classes and interfaces in the ABLE agent framework were put forward.At last an autonomic agent that is an ABLE-based architecture for incrementally building autonomic systems was discussed.

  13. Autonomous vertical profiler data management

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Afzulpurkar, S.; Navelkar, G.S.; Desa, E.S.; Madhan, R.; Dabholkar, N.; Prabhudesai, S.P.; Mascarenhas, A.A.M.Q.

    and reduced data �� Ease in operation and one man deployable 2 Fig.1. Autonomous Vertical Profiler Table 1. Autonomous Vertical Profiler Specifications 2. Communication Communication with the AVP is through the satellite modem... Aluminum alloy, Acetal nose & tail cones Propulsion Single DC thruster Electronics 8051 and ARM7 microcontroller based Communication Radio modem (2.4 GHz) & Satellite Transmission (Iridium) GUI Labview based Energy Source Lithium Ion Polymer batteries...

  14. Regulation of Replication Recovery and Genome Integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colding, Camilla Skettrup

    Preserving genome integrity is essential for cell survival. To this end, mechanisms that supervise DNA replication and respond to replication perturbations have evolved. One such mechanism is the replication checkpoint, which responds to DNA replication stress and acts to ensure replication pausing...

  15. Replication strategy of human hepatitis B virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the replication strategy of the human hepatitis B virus, the 5' end of the RNA pregenome and the initiation sites of DNA plus and minus strands have been mapped. The RNA pregenome was found to be terminally redundant by 120 nucleotides; it is initiated within the pre-C region and may also function as mRNA for synthesis of the major core protein and the hepatitis B virus reverse transcriptase. The hepatitis B virus DNA minus strand is initiated within the direct repeat sequence DR1, it contains a terminal redundancy of up to eight nucleotides, and its synthesis does not require any template switch. The DNA plus strand is primed by a short oligoribonucleotide probably derived from the 5' end of the RNA pregenome, and its synthesis is initiated close to the direct repeat sequence DR2. For its elongation to pass the discontinuity in the DNA minus strand an intramolecular template switch occurs using the terminal redundancy of this template. Thus, the route of reverse transcription and DNA replication of hepatitis B viruses is fundamentally different from that of retroviruses

  16. The hunt for origins of DNA replication in multicellular eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urban, J. M.; Foulk, M. S.; Casella, Cinzia;

    2015-01-01

    Origins of DNA replication (ORIs) occur at defined regions in the genome. Although DNA sequence defines the position of ORIs in budding yeast, the factors for ORI specification remain elusive in metazoa. Several methods have been used recently to map ORIs in metazoan genomes with the hope that fe...

  17. Modification of a loop sequence between α-helices 6 and 7 of virus capsid (CA protein in a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 derivative that has simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac239 vif and CA α-helices 4 and 5 loop improves replication in cynomolgus monkey cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adachi Akio

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 productively infects only humans and chimpanzees but not cynomolgus or rhesus monkeys while simian immunodeficiency virus isolated from macaque (SIVmac readily establishes infection in those monkeys. Several HIV-1 and SIVmac chimeric viruses have been constructed in order to develop an animal model for HIV-1 infection. Construction of an HIV-1 derivative which contains sequences of a SIVmac239 loop between α-helices 4 and 5 (L4/5 of capsid protein (CA and the entire SIVmac239 vif gene was previously reported. Although this chimeric virus could grow in cynomolgus monkey cells, it did so much more slowly than did SIVmac. It was also reported that intrinsic TRIM5α restricts the post-entry step of HIV-1 replication in rhesus and cynomolgus monkey cells, and we previously demonstrated that a single amino acid in a loop between α-helices 6 and 7 (L6/7 of HIV type 2 (HIV-2 CA determines the susceptibility of HIV-2 to cynomolgus monkey TRIM5α. Results In the study presented here, we replaced L6/7 of HIV-1 CA in addition to L4/5 and vif with the corresponding segments of SIVmac. The resultant HIV-1 derivatives showed enhanced replication capability in established T cell lines as well as in CD8+ cell-depleted primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells from cynomolgus monkey. Compared with the wild type HIV-1 particles, the viral particles produced from a chimeric HIV-1 genome with those two SIVmac loops were less able to saturate the intrinsic restriction in rhesus monkey cells. Conclusion We have succeeded in making the replication of simian-tropic HIV-1 in cynomolgus monkey cells more efficient by introducing into HIV-1 the L6/7 CA loop from SIVmac. It would be of interest to determine whether HIV-1 derivatives with SIVmac CA L4/5 and L6/7 can establish infection of cynomolgus monkeys in vivo.

  18. Distance from cohesive end site cos determines the replication requirement for recombination in phage lambda.

    OpenAIRE

    Stahl, F. W.; KOBAYASHI, I.; Stahl, M M

    1982-01-01

    Previous work showed that crossing-over in the middle of the chromosome of phage lambda requires more DNA replication than does crossing-over near the termini. Relocation of cos, the sequence that determines the lambda termini, alters the requirements for replication in a given marked interval, demonstrating that distance from cos determines the amount of DNA replication that is required for genetic exchange. This result supports a break and copy mechanism for recombination mediated by the re...

  19. File Transfer Algorithm for Autonomous Decentralized System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUI Xun; TAN Yong-dong; Qian Qing-quan

    2008-01-01

    A file transfer algorithm based on ADP (autonomous decentralized protocol) was proposed to solve the problem that the ADS (autonomous decentralized system) middleware (NeXUS/Dlink) lacks of file transfer functions for Windows. The algorithm realizes the peer-to-peer file transfer, one-to-N inquiry/multi-response file transfer and one-to-N file distribution in the same data field based on communication patterns provided by the ADP. The peer-to-peer file transfer is implemented through a peer-to-peer communication path, one-to-N inquiry/multi-response file transfer and one-to-N file distribution are implemented through multicast commtmieation. In this algorithm, a file to be transferred is named with a GUID ( global unique identification), every data packet is marked with a sequence number, and file-receiving in parallel is implemented by caching DPOs (data processing objects) and multithread technologies. The algorithm is applied in a simulation system of the decentralized control platform, and the test results and long time stable mrming prove the feasibility of the algorithm.

  20. Replications of software engineering experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Carver, Jeffrey C.; Juristo Juzgado, Natalia; Baldassarre, María Teresa; Vegas Hernández, Sira

    2014-01-01

    There are many open issues that must be addressed before the replication process can be successfully formalized in empirical software engineering research. We define replication as the deliberate repetition of the same empirical study for the purpose of determining whether the results of the first experiment can be reproduced. This definition would appear at first glance to be good. However, it needs several clarifications that have not yet been forthcoming in software engineer...

  1. Where does DNA replication start in archaea?

    OpenAIRE

    Vas, Amit; Leatherwood, Janet

    2000-01-01

    Genome-wide measures of DNA strand composition have been used to find archaeal DNA replication origins. Archaea seem to replicate using a single origin (as do eubacteria) even though archaeal replication factors are more like those of eukaryotes.

  2. Integrated Motion Planning and Autonomous Control Technology for Autonomous ISR Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SSCI and MIT propose to design, implement and test a comprehensive Integrated Mission Planning & Autonomous Control Technology (IMPACT) for Autonomous ISR...

  3. Autonomic control of the eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougal, David H.; Gamlin, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system influences numerous ocular functions. It does this by way of parasympathetic innervation from postganglionic fibers that originate from neurons in the ciliary and pterygopalatine ganglia, and by way of sympathetic innervation from postganglionic fibers that originate from neurons in the superior cervical ganglion. Ciliary ganglion neurons project to the ciliary body and the sphincter pupillae muscle of the iris to control ocular accommodation and pupil constriction, respectively. Superior cervical ganglion neurons project to the dilator pupillae muscle of the iris to control pupil dilation. Ocular blood flow is controlled both via direct autonomic influences on the vasculature of the optic nerve, choroid, ciliary body, and iris, as well as via indirect influences on retinal blood flow. In mammals, this vasculature is innervated by vasodilatory fibers from the pterygopalatine ganglion, and by vasoconstrictive fibers from the superior cervical ganglion. Intraocular pressure is regulated primarily through the balance of aqueous humor formation and outflow. Autonomic regulation of ciliary body blood vessels and the ciliary epithelium is an important determinant of aqueous humor formation; autonomic regulation of the trabecular meshwork and episcleral blood vessels is an important determinant of aqueous humor outflow. These tissues are all innervated by fibers from the pterygopalatine and superior cervical ganglia. In addition to these classical autonomic pathways, trigeminal sensory fibers exert local, intrinsic influences on many of these regions of the eye, as well as on some neurons within the ciliary and pterygopalatine ganglia. PMID:25589275

  4. Autonomous Landing on Moving Platforms

    KAUST Repository

    Mendoza Chavez, Gilberto

    2016-08-01

    This thesis investigates autonomous landing of a micro air vehicle (MAV) on a nonstationary ground platform. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and micro air vehicles (MAVs) are becoming every day more ubiquitous. Nonetheless, many applications still require specialized human pilots or supervisors. Current research is focusing on augmenting the scope of tasks that these vehicles are able to accomplish autonomously. Precise autonomous landing on moving platforms is essential for self-deployment and recovery of MAVs, but it remains a challenging task for both autonomous and piloted vehicles. Model Predictive Control (MPC) is a widely used and effective scheme to control constrained systems. One of its variants, output-feedback tube-based MPC, ensures robust stability for systems with bounded disturbances under system state reconstruction. This thesis proposes a MAV control strategy based on this variant of MPC to perform rapid and precise autonomous landing on moving targets whose nominal (uncommitted) trajectory and velocity are slowly varying. The proposed approach is demonstrated on an experimental setup.

  5. Task-level control for autonomous robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Reid

    1994-01-01

    Task-level control refers to the integration and coordination of planning, perception, and real-time control to achieve given high-level goals. Autonomous mobile robots need task-level control to effectively achieve complex tasks in uncertain, dynamic environments. This paper describes the Task Control Architecture (TCA), an implemented system that provides commonly needed constructs for task-level control. Facilities provided by TCA include distributed communication, task decomposition and sequencing, resource management, monitoring and exception handling. TCA supports a design methodology in which robot systems are developed incrementally, starting first with deliberative plans that work in nominal situations, and then layering them with reactive behaviors that monitor plan execution and handle exceptions. To further support this approach, design and analysis tools are under development to provide ways of graphically viewing the system and validating its behavior.

  6. Autonomous underwater riser inspection tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camerini, Claudio; Marnet, Robson [Petrobras SA, (Brazil); Freitas, Miguel; Von der Weid, Jean Pierre [CPTI/PUC-Rio, Rio de Janeiro, (Brazil); Artigas Lander, Ricardo [EngeMOVI, Curitiba, (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    The detection of damage on the riser is a serious concern for pipeline companies. Visual examinations by remotely operated vehicle (ROV) are presently carried out to detect the defects but this process has limitations and is expensive. This paper presents the development of a new tool to ensure autonomous underwater riser inspection (AURI) that uses the riser itself for guidance. The AURI, which is autonomous in terms of control and power supply, is equipped with several cameras that perform a complete visual inspection of the riser with 100 % coverage of the external surface of the riser. The paper presents the detailed characteristics of the first AURI prototype, describes its launching procedure and provides the preliminary test results from pool testing. The results showed that the AURI is a viable system for autonomous riser inspection. Offshore tests on riser pipelines are scheduled to be performed shortly.

  7. Autonomic Function in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Gertrud Laura; Jennum, Poul Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    involving brain stem areas, which is consistent with the Braak hypothesis. In the narcolepsy patients, it was shown that a reduced HRR to arousals was primarily predicted by hypocretin deficiency in both rapid-eye-movement (REM) and non-REM sleep, independent of cataplexy and other factors. The results......, which includes the cardiac centre and controls autonomic functions, and therefore autonomic dysfunction may be experienced early in the disease course. Sleep disturbances are also common non-motor complications of PD, and therefore PD patients undergo polysomnography at the Danish Center for Sleep...... narcolepsy patients on autonomic function and on the sleep transition rate. The results showed an attenuated heart rate response (HRR) in PD patients compared to controls and early PD (iRBD patients). Also iRBD patients had an attenuated HRR compared to control subjects, and the method to measure the HRR may...

  8. Contrasting actions of pressor agents in severe autonomic failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, J.; Shannon, J. R.; Biaggioni, I.; Norman, R.; Black, B. K.; Robertson, D.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Orthostatic hypotension is the most disabling symptom of autonomic failure. The choice of a pressor agent is largely empiric, and it would be of great value to define predictors of a response. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In 35 patients with severe orthostatic hypotension due to multiple system atrophy or pure autonomic failure, we determined the effect on seated systolic blood pressure (SBP) of placebo, phenylpropanolamine (12.5 mg and 25 mg), yohimbine (5.4 mg), indomethacin (50 mg), ibuprofen (600 mg), caffeine (250 mg), and methylphenidate (5 mg). In a subgroup of patients, we compared the pressor effect of midodrine (5 mg) with the effect of phenylpropanolamine (12.5 mg). RESULTS: There were no significant differences in the pressor responses between patients with multiple system atrophy or pure autonomic failure. When compared with placebo, the pressor response was significant for phenylpropanolamine, yohimbine, and indomethacin. In a subgroup of patients, we confirmed that this pressor effect of phenylpropanolamine, yohimbine, and indomethacin corresponded to a significant increase in standing SBP. The pressor responses to ibuprofen, caffeine, and methylphenidate were not significantly different from placebo. Phenylpropanolamine and midodrine elicited similar pressor responses. There were no significant associations between drug response and autonomic function testing, postprandial hypotension, or plasma catecholamine levels. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that significant increases in systolic blood pressure can be obtained in patients with orthostatic hypotension due to primary autonomic failure with phenylpropanolamine in low doses or yohimbine or indomethacin in moderate doses. The response to a pressor agent cannot be predicted by autonomic function testing or plasma catecholamines. Therefore, empiric testing with a sequence of medications, based on the risk of side effects in the individual patient and the probability of a response, is a useful approach.

  9. The Autonomous Glycosylation of Large DNA Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Piacente

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Glycosylation of surface molecules is a key feature of several eukaryotic viruses, which use the host endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi apparatus to add carbohydrates to their nascent glycoproteins. In recent years, a newly discovered group of eukaryotic viruses, belonging to the Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Large DNA Virus (NCLDV group, was shown to have several features that are typical of cellular organisms, including the presence of components of the glycosylation machinery. Starting from initial observations with the chlorovirus PBCV-1, enzymes for glycan biosynthesis have been later identified in other viruses; in particular in members of the Mimiviridae family. They include both the glycosyltransferases and other carbohydrate-modifying enzymes and the pathways for the biosynthesis of the rare monosaccharides that are found in the viral glycan structures. These findings, together with genome analysis of the newly-identified giant DNA viruses, indicate that the presence of glycogenes is widespread in several NCLDV families. The identification of autonomous viral glycosylation machinery leads to many questions about the origin of these pathways, the mechanisms of glycan production, and eventually their function in the viral replication cycle. The scope of this review is to highlight some of the recent results that have been obtained on the glycosylation systems of the large DNA viruses, with a special focus on the enzymes involved in nucleotide-sugar production.

  10. The Autonomous Glycosylation of Large DNA Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piacente, Francesco; Gaglianone, Matteo; Laugieri, Maria Elena; Tonetti, Michela G

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation of surface molecules is a key feature of several eukaryotic viruses, which use the host endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi apparatus to add carbohydrates to their nascent glycoproteins. In recent years, a newly discovered group of eukaryotic viruses, belonging to the Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Large DNA Virus (NCLDV) group, was shown to have several features that are typical of cellular organisms, including the presence of components of the glycosylation machinery. Starting from initial observations with the chlorovirus PBCV-1, enzymes for glycan biosynthesis have been later identified in other viruses; in particular in members of the Mimiviridae family. They include both the glycosyltransferases and other carbohydrate-modifying enzymes and the pathways for the biosynthesis of the rare monosaccharides that are found in the viral glycan structures. These findings, together with genome analysis of the newly-identified giant DNA viruses, indicate that the presence of glycogenes is widespread in several NCLDV families. The identification of autonomous viral glycosylation machinery leads to many questions about the origin of these pathways, the mechanisms of glycan production, and eventually their function in the viral replication cycle. The scope of this review is to highlight some of the recent results that have been obtained on the glycosylation systems of the large DNA viruses, with a special focus on the enzymes involved in nucleotide-sugar production. PMID:26690138

  11. RNA interference-mediated inhibition of Hepatitis B Virus replication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Ni; ZHANG Bingqiang; YAN Ge; PU Dan; GAO Xiaolin; Tong-Chuan He; HUANG Ailong

    2004-01-01

    Persistent and recurrent infection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) represents one of the most common and severe viral infections of humans, and has caused a formidable health problem in the affected countries. Currently used antiviral drugs have a very limited success on controlling HBV replication and infection. RNA interference (RNAi), a process by which double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) directs sequence-specific degradation of target mRNA in mammalian and plant cells, has recently been used to knockdown gene expression in various species. In this study, we sought to determine whether RNAi-mediated silencing of HBV viral gene expression could lead to the effective inhibition of HBV replication. We first developed RNAi vectors that expressed small interfering RNA (siRNA) and targeted the HBV core or surface gene sequence. Our results demonstrated that these specific siRNAs efficiently reduced the levels of corresponding viral RNAs and proteins, and thus suppressed viral replication. Treatment with siRNA gave the greatest reduction in the levels of HBsAg (92%) and in HBeAg (85%) respectively in the cultured cell medium. Our findings further demonstrated that the RNAi-mediated antiviral effect was sequence-specific and dose-dependent. Therefore, our findings strongly suggest that RNAi-mediated silencing of HBV viral genes could effectively inhibit the replication of HBV, hence RNAi-based strategy should be further explored as a more efficacious antiviral therapy of HBV infection.

  12. Discerning non-autonomous dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemson, Philip T.; Stefanovska, Aneta, E-mail: aneta@lancaster.ac.uk

    2014-09-30

    Structure and function go hand in hand. However, while a complex structure can be relatively safely broken down into the minutest parts, and technology is now delving into nanoscales, the function of complex systems requires a completely different approach. Here the complexity clearly arises from nonlinear interactions, which prevents us from obtaining a realistic description of a system by dissecting it into its structural component parts. At best, the result of such investigations does not substantially add to our understanding or at worst it can even be misleading. Not surprisingly, the dynamics of complex systems, facilitated by increasing computational efficiency, is now readily tackled in the case of measured time series. Moreover, time series can now be collected in practically every branch of science and in any structural scale—from protein dynamics in a living cell to data collected in astrophysics or even via social networks. In searching for deterministic patterns in such data we are limited by the fact that no complex system in the real world is autonomous. Hence, as an alternative to the stochastic approach that is predominantly applied to data from inherently non-autonomous complex systems, theory and methods specifically tailored to non-autonomous systems are needed. Indeed, in the last decade we have faced a huge advance in mathematical methods, including the introduction of pullback attractors, as well as time series methods that cope with the most important characteristic of non-autonomous systems—their time-dependent behaviour. Here we review current methods for the analysis of non-autonomous dynamics including those for extracting properties of interactions and the direction of couplings. We illustrate each method by applying it to three sets of systems typical for chaotic, stochastic and non-autonomous behaviour. For the chaotic class we select the Lorenz system, for the stochastic the noise-forced Duffing system and for the non-autonomous

  13. Autonomous Home Automated Hexapod Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Addanki Purna Ramesh,

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on design and implementation of six legged robot that is capable of monitoring and performing house hold works independently. The Autonomous Home Automated Hexapod is developed with three AT89C52 microcontrollers which functions as brain of the robot to which all operating functions of each module are chronologically programmed in it. The legs of the robot were developed with 2 servo motors to provide two degree for each leg. Several additional sensors like TSOP1738 (IR, RF transmitter andreceiver, DS1307 (Real Time Clock have been embedded into robot in modular form to make it work autonomously.

  14. Progress towards autonomous, intelligent systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Henry; Heer, Ewald

    1987-01-01

    An aggressive program has been initiated to develop, integrate, and implement autonomous systems technologies starting with today's expert systems and evolving to autonomous, intelligent systems by the end of the 1990s. This program includes core technology developments and demonstration projects for technology evaluation and validation. This paper discusses key operational frameworks in the content of systems autonomy applications and then identifies major technological challenges, primarily in artificial intelligence areas. Program content and progress made towards critical technologies and demonstrations that have been initiated to achieve the required future capabilities in the year 2000 era are discussed.

  15. Discerning non-autonomous dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structure and function go hand in hand. However, while a complex structure can be relatively safely broken down into the minutest parts, and technology is now delving into nanoscales, the function of complex systems requires a completely different approach. Here the complexity clearly arises from nonlinear interactions, which prevents us from obtaining a realistic description of a system by dissecting it into its structural component parts. At best, the result of such investigations does not substantially add to our understanding or at worst it can even be misleading. Not surprisingly, the dynamics of complex systems, facilitated by increasing computational efficiency, is now readily tackled in the case of measured time series. Moreover, time series can now be collected in practically every branch of science and in any structural scale—from protein dynamics in a living cell to data collected in astrophysics or even via social networks. In searching for deterministic patterns in such data we are limited by the fact that no complex system in the real world is autonomous. Hence, as an alternative to the stochastic approach that is predominantly applied to data from inherently non-autonomous complex systems, theory and methods specifically tailored to non-autonomous systems are needed. Indeed, in the last decade we have faced a huge advance in mathematical methods, including the introduction of pullback attractors, as well as time series methods that cope with the most important characteristic of non-autonomous systems—their time-dependent behaviour. Here we review current methods for the analysis of non-autonomous dynamics including those for extracting properties of interactions and the direction of couplings. We illustrate each method by applying it to three sets of systems typical for chaotic, stochastic and non-autonomous behaviour. For the chaotic class we select the Lorenz system, for the stochastic the noise-forced Duffing system and for the non-autonomous

  16. Gas House Autonomous System Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Luke; Edsall, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Gas House Autonomous System Monitoring (GHASM) will employ Integrated System Health Monitoring (ISHM) of cryogenic fluids in the High Pressure Gas Facility at Stennis Space Center. The preliminary focus of development incorporates the passive monitoring and eventual commanding of the Nitrogen System. ISHM offers generic system awareness, adept at using concepts rather than specific error cases. As an enabler for autonomy, ISHM provides capabilities inclusive of anomaly detection, diagnosis, and abnormality prediction. Advancing ISHM and Autonomous Operation functional capabilities enhances quality of data, optimizes safety, improves cost effectiveness, and has direct benefits to a wide spectrum of aerospace applications.

  17. Intelligent, autonomous systems in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, H.; Heer, E.

    1988-01-01

    The Space Station is expected to be equipped with intelligent, autonomous capabilities; to achieve and incorporate these capabilities, the required technologies need to be identitifed, developed and validated within realistic application scenarios. The critical technologies for the development of intelligent, autonomous systems are discussed in the context of a generalized functional architecture. The present state of this technology implies that it be introduced and applied in an evolutionary process which must start during the Space Station design phase. An approach is proposed to accomplish design information acquisition and management for knowledge-base development.

  18. Contingency Software in Autonomous Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Robyn; Patterson-Hine, Ann

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the development of contingency software for autonomous systems. Autonomous vehicles currently have a limited capacity to diagnose and mitigate failures. There is a need to be able to handle a broader range of contingencies. The goals of the project are: 1. Speed up diagnosis and mitigation of anomalous situations.2.Automatically handle contingencies, not just failures.3.Enable projects to select a degree of autonomy consistent with their needs and to incrementally introduce more autonomy.4.Augment on-board fault protection with verified contingency scripts

  19. Genome-wide alterations of the DNA replication program during tumor progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneodo, A.; Goldar, A.; Argoul, F.; Hyrien, O.; Audit, B.

    2016-08-01

    Oncogenic stress is a major driving force in the early stages of cancer development. Recent experimental findings reveal that, in precancerous lesions and cancers, activated oncogenes may induce stalling and dissociation of DNA replication forks resulting in DNA damage. Replication timing is emerging as an important epigenetic feature that recapitulates several genomic, epigenetic and functional specificities of even closely related cell types. There is increasing evidence that chromosome rearrangements, the hallmark of many cancer genomes, are intimately associated with the DNA replication program and that epigenetic replication timing changes often precede chromosomic rearrangements. The recent development of a novel methodology to map replication fork polarity using deep sequencing of Okazaki fragments has provided new and complementary genome-wide replication profiling data. We review the results of a wavelet-based multi-scale analysis of genomic and epigenetic data including replication profiles along human chromosomes. These results provide new insight into the spatio-temporal replication program and its dynamics during differentiation. Here our goal is to bring to cancer research, the experimental protocols and computational methodologies for replication program profiling, and also the modeling of the spatio-temporal replication program. To illustrate our purpose, we report very preliminary results obtained for the chronic myelogeneous leukemia, the archetype model of cancer. Finally, we discuss promising perspectives on using genome-wide DNA replication profiling as a novel efficient tool for cancer diagnosis, prognosis and personalized treatment.

  20. Lymphatic endothelial cells are a replicative niche for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Thomas R.; de Souza Carvalho-Wodarz, Cristiane; Repnik, Urska; Russell, Matthew R.G.; Borel, Sophie; Diedrich, Collin R.; Rohde, Manfred; Wainwright, Helen; Collinson, Lucy M.; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Griffiths, Gareth; Gutierrez, Maximiliano G.

    2016-01-01

    In extrapulmonary tuberculosis, the most common site of infection is within the lymphatic system, and there is growing recognition that lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) are involved in immune function. Here, we identified LECs, which line the lymphatic vessels, as a niche for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the lymph nodes of patients with tuberculosis. In cultured primary human LECs (hLECs), we determined that M. tuberculosis replicates both in the cytosol and within autophagosomes, but the bacteria failed to replicate when the virulence locus RD1 was deleted. Activation by IFN-γ induced a cell-autonomous response in hLECs via autophagy and NO production that restricted M. tuberculosis growth. Thus, depending on the activation status of LECs, autophagy can both promote and restrict replication. Together, these findings reveal a previously unrecognized role for hLECs and autophagy in tuberculosis pathogenesis and suggest that hLECs are a potential niche for M. tuberculosis that allows establishment of persistent infection in lymph nodes. PMID:26901813

  1. Lymphatic endothelial cells are a replicative niche for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Thomas R; de Souza Carvalho-Wodarz, Cristiane; Repnik, Urska; Russell, Matthew R G; Borel, Sophie; Diedrich, Collin R; Rohde, Manfred; Wainwright, Helen; Collinson, Lucy M; Wilkinson, Robert J; Griffiths, Gareth; Gutierrez, Maximiliano G

    2016-03-01

    In extrapulmonary tuberculosis, the most common site of infection is within the lymphatic system, and there is growing recognition that lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) are involved in immune function. Here, we identified LECs, which line the lymphatic vessels, as a niche for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the lymph nodes of patients with tuberculosis. In cultured primary human LECs (hLECs), we determined that M. tuberculosis replicates both in the cytosol and within autophagosomes, but the bacteria failed to replicate when the virulence locus RD1 was deleted. Activation by IFN-γ induced a cell-autonomous response in hLECs via autophagy and NO production that restricted M. tuberculosis growth. Thus, depending on the activation status of LECs, autophagy can both promote and restrict replication. Together, these findings reveal a previously unrecognized role for hLECs and autophagy in tuberculosis pathogenesis and suggest that hLECs are a potential niche for M. tuberculosis that allows establishment of persistent infection in lymph nodes. PMID:26901813

  2. A Robust Compositional Architecture for Autonomous Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brat, Guillaume; Deney, Ewen; Farrell, Kimberley; Giannakopoulos, Dimitra; Jonsson, Ari; Frank, Jeremy; Bobby, Mark; Carpenter, Todd; Estlin, Tara

    2006-01-01

    Space exploration applications can benefit greatly from autonomous systems. Great distances, limited communications and high costs make direct operations impossible while mandating operations reliability and efficiency beyond what traditional commanding can provide. Autonomous systems can improve reliability and enhance spacecraft capability significantly. However, there is reluctance to utilizing autonomous systems. In part this is due to general hesitation about new technologies, but a more tangible concern is that of reliability of predictability of autonomous software. In this paper, we describe ongoing work aimed at increasing robustness and predictability of autonomous software, with the ultimate goal of building trust in such systems. The work combines state-of-the-art technologies and capabilities in autonomous systems with advanced validation and synthesis techniques. The focus of this paper is on the autonomous system architecture that has been defined, and on how it enables the application of validation techniques for resulting autonomous systems.

  3. Dynamical role of the degree of intraspecific cooperation: A simple model for prebiotic replicators and ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontich, Ernest; Sardanyés, Josep

    2009-05-01

    We present a simple mean field model to analyze the dynamics of competition between two populations of replicators in terms of the degree of intraspecific cooperation (i.e., autocatalysis) in one of these populations. The first population can only replicate with Malthusian kinetics while the second one can reproduce with Malthusian or autocatalytic replication or with a combination of both reproducing strategies. The model consists of two coupled, nonlinear, autonomous ordinary differential equations. We investigate analytically and numerically the phase plane dynamics and the bifurcation scenarios of this ecologically coupled system, focusing on the outcome of competition for several degrees of intraspecific cooperation, σ, in the second population of replicators. We demonstrate that the dynamics of both populations can not be governed by a limit cycle, and also that once cooperation is considered, the topology of phase space does not allow for coexistence. Even for low values of the degree of intraspecific cooperation, for large enough autocatalytic replication rates, the second population of replicators is able to outcompete the first one, having a wide basin of attraction in state space. We characterize the same power law dependence between the outcompetition extinction times, τ, and the degree of intraspecific cooperation for both populations, given by τ˜ciσ-1. Our results suggest that, under some kinetic conditions, the appearance of autocatalysis might be favorable in a population of replicators growing with Malthusian kinetics competing with another population also reproducing exponentially.

  4. Mimiviruses: Replication, Purification, and Quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahão, Jônatas Santos; Oliveira, Graziele Pereira; Ferreira da Silva, Lorena Christine; Dos Santos Silva, Ludmila Karen; Kroon, Erna Geessien; La Scola, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this protocol is to describe the replication, purification, and titration of mimiviruses. These viruses belong to the Mimiviridae family, the first member of which was isolated in 1992 from a cooling tower water sample collected during an outbreak of pneumonia in a hospital in Bradford, England. In recent years, several new mimiviruses have been isolated from different environmental conditions. These giant viruses are easily replicated in amoeba of the Acanthamoeba genus, its natural host. Mimiviruses present peculiar features that make them unique viruses, such as the particle and genome size and the genome's complexity. The discovery of these viruses rekindled discussions about their origin and evolution, and the genetic and structural complexity opened up a new field of study. Here, we describe some methods utilized for mimiviruses replication, purification, and titration. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27153385

  5. Hazard Map for Autonomous Navigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Troels

    This dissertation describes the work performed in the area of using image analysis in the process of landing a spacecraft autonomously and safely on the surface of the Moon. This is suggested to be done using a Hazard Map. The correspondence problem between several Hazard Maps are investigated...

  6. The Bering Autonomous Target Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif; Denver, Troelz; Betto, Maurizio;

    2003-01-01

    telescopes. The method has proven robust in operation and is well suited for use onboard spacecraft. As development target for the method and the associated instrumentation the asteroid research mission Bering has been used. Onboard a spacecraft, the autonomous detection is centered around the fully...

  7. Computing architecture for autonomous microgrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Steven Y.

    2015-09-29

    A computing architecture that facilitates autonomously controlling operations of a microgrid is described herein. A microgrid network includes numerous computing devices that execute intelligent agents, each of which is assigned to a particular entity (load, source, storage device, or switch) in the microgrid. The intelligent agents can execute in accordance with predefined protocols to collectively perform computations that facilitate uninterrupted control of the .

  8. Autonomous systems for plant protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Griepentrog, Hans W.; Ruckelshausen, Arno; Jørgensen, Rasmus Nyholm;

    2010-01-01

    autonomous operations related to crop protection probably commercially available in the near future. Scouting and monitoring together with the efficient application of chemicals or mechanical treatments are operations which can be successful automated. Drawbacks are that current systems are lacking robust...

  9. Comparison of three filters in asteroid-based autonomous navigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present, optical autonomous navigation has become a key technology in deep space exploration programs. Recent studies focus on the problem of orbit determination using autonomous navigation, and the choice of filter is one of the main issues. To prepare for a possible exploration mission to Mars, the primary emphasis of this paper is to evaluate the capability of three filters, the extended Kalman filter (EKF), unscented Kalman filter (UKF) and weighted least-squares (WLS) algorithm, which have different initial states during the cruise phase. One initial state is assumed to have high accuracy with the support of ground tracking when autonomous navigation is operating; for the other state, errors are set to be large without this support. In addition, the method of selecting asteroids that can be used for navigation from known lists of asteroids to form a sequence is also presented in this study. The simulation results show that WLS and UKF should be the first choice for optical autonomous navigation during the cruise phase to Mars

  10. Autonomous Duffing-Holmes Type Chaotic Oscillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamaševičius, A.; Bumelienė, S.; Kirvaitis, R.; Mykolaitis, G.; Tamaševičiūtė, E.; Lindberg, Erik

    2009-01-01

    We have designed and built a novel Duffing type autonomous 3rd-order chaotic oscillator. In comparison with the common non-autonomous DuffingHolmes type oscillator the autonomous circuit has an internal positive feedback loop instead of an external periodic drive source. In addition, it is...

  11. Indoor Autonomous Airship Control and Navigation System

    OpenAIRE

    Fedorenko Roman; Krukhmalev Victor

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents an automatic control system for autonomous airship. The system is designed to organize autonomous flight of the mini-airship performing flight mission defined from ground control station. Structure, hardware and software implementation of indoor autonomous airship and its navigation and control system as well as experiment results are described.

  12. Indoor Autonomous Airship Control and Navigation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedorenko Roman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an automatic control system for autonomous airship. The system is designed to organize autonomous flight of the mini-airship performing flight mission defined from ground control station. Structure, hardware and software implementation of indoor autonomous airship and its navigation and control system as well as experiment results are described.

  13. New histone supply regulates replication fork speed and PCNA unloading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejlvang, Jakob; Feng, Yunpeng; Alabert, Constance;

    2014-01-01

    Correct duplication of DNA sequence and its organization into chromatin is central to genome function and stability. However, it remains unclear how cells coordinate DNA synthesis with provision of new histones for chromatin assembly to ensure chromosomal stability. In this paper, we show that...... conventional checkpoints, although prolonged histone deficiency generated DNA damage. PCNA accumulated on newly synthesized DNA in cells lacking new histones, possibly to maintain opportunity for CAF-1 recruitment and nucleosome assembly. Consistent with this, in vitro and in vivo analysis showed that PCNA...... replication fork speed is dependent on new histone supply and efficient nucleosome assembly. Inhibition of canonical histone biosynthesis impaired replication fork progression and reduced nucleosome occupancy on newly synthesized DNA. Replication forks initially remained stable without activation of...

  14. Internal RNA Replication Elements are Prevalent in Tombusviridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K AndrewWhite

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Internal replication elements (IREs are RNA structures that are present at internal positions in the genomes of different types of plus-strand RNA viruses. Members of the genus Tombusvirus (family Tombusviridae contain an IRE within the polymerase coding region of their genomes and this RNA element participates in both genome targeting to sites of replication and replicase complex assembly. Here we propose that other members of the virus family Tombusviridae also possess comparable IREs. Through sequence and structural analyses, candidate IREs in several genera of this family were identified, including aureusviruses, necroviruses, carmoviruses and pelarspoviruses. The results from subsequent mutational analysis of selected proposed IREs were consistent with a critical role for these structures in viral genome accumulation during infections. Our study supports the existence of IREs in several genera in Tombusviridae and points to previously unappreciated similarities in genome replication strategies between members of this virus family.

  15. Optimal Placement of Origins for DNA Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Karschau, Jens; Blow, J. Julian; de Moura, Alessandro P. S.

    2012-01-01

    DNA replication is an essential process in biology and its timing must be robust so that cells can divide properly. Random fluctuations in the formation of replication starting points, called origins, and the subsequent activation of proteins lead to variations in the replication time. We analyse these stochastic properties of DNA and derive the positions of origins corresponding to the minimum replication time. We show that under some conditions the minimization of replication time leads to ...

  16. Cellular factors required for papillomavirus DNA replication.

    OpenAIRE

    Melendy, T; Sedman, J; Stenlund, A

    1995-01-01

    In vitro replication of papillomavirus DNA has been carried out with a combination of purified proteins and partially purified extracts made from human cells. DNA synthesis requires the viral E1 protein and the papillomavirus origin of replication. The E2 protein stimulates DNA synthesis in a binding site-independent manner. Papillomavirus DNA replication is also dependent on the cellular factors replication protein A, replication factor C, and proliferating-cell nuclear antigen as well as a ...

  17. A real-time distributed software infrastructure for cooperating mobile autonomous robots

    OpenAIRE

    Frederico Santos; Luis Almeida; Paulo Pedreiras; Luis Seabra Lopes

    2009-01-01

    Cooperating mobile autonomous robots have been generating a growing interest in fields such as rescue, demining and security. These applications require a real time middleware and wireless communication protocol that can effecient and timely support the fusion of the distributed perception and the development of coordinated behaviors. This paper proposes an affordable middleware, based on low-cost and open-source COTS technologies, which relies on a real-time database partially replicated in ...

  18. Replication invariance on NTU games

    OpenAIRE

    Emilio Calvo; Iñaki Garci´a; Zarzuelo, José M.

    2001-01-01

    Two concepts of replication (conflictual and non-conflictual) are extended from the class of pure bargaining games to the class of NTU games. The behavior of the Harsanyi, Shapley NTU, Egalitarian and Maschler-Owen solutions of the replica games is compared with that of the Nash and Egalitarian solutions in pure bargaining games.

  19. The replication-transcription conflict

    OpenAIRE

    Soultanas, Panos

    2011-01-01

    In response to environmental and nutritional stimuli, a whole array of proteins remodel genome architecture, activate or transcribe genes, suppress genes, repair lesions and base-modifications, faithfully replicate and safely separate the parental and daughter genomes during cell division. Negotiating and resolving conflicts of genome trafficking is essential for genome stability.

  20. Crinivirus replication and host interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZsofiaAKiss

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Criniviruses comprise one of the genera within the family Closteroviridae. Members in this family are restricted to the phloem and rely on whitefly vectors of the genera Bemisia and/or Trialeurodes for plant-to-plant transmission. All criniviruses have bipartite, positive-sense ssRNA genomes, although there is an unconfirmed report of one having a tripartite genome. Lettuce infectious yellows virus (LIYV is the type species of the genus, the best studied so far of the criniviruses and the first for which a reverse genetics system was available. LIYV RNA 1 encodes for proteins predicted to be involved in replication, and alone is competent for replication in protoplasts. Replication results in accumulation of cytoplasmic vesiculated membranous structures which are characteristic of most studied members of the Closteroviridae. These membranous structures, often referred to as BYV-type vesicles, are likely sites of RNA replication. LIYV RNA 2 is replicated in trans when co-infecting cells with RNA 1, but is temporally delayed relative to RNA1. Efficient RNA 2 replication also is dependent on the RNA 1-encoded RNA binding protein, P34. No LIYV RNA 2-encoded proteins have been shown to affect RNA replication, but at least four, CP, CPm, Hsp70h, and p59 are virion structural components and CPm is a determinant of whitefly transmissibility. Roles of other LIYV RNA 2-encoded proteins are largely as yet unknown, but P26 is a non-virion protein that accumulates in cells as characteristic plasmalemma deposits which in plants are localized within phloem parenchyma and companion cells over plasmodesmata connections to sieve elements. The two remaining crinivirus-conserved RNA 2-encoded proteins are P5 and P9. P5 is 39 amino acid protein and is encoded at the 5’ end of RNA 2 as ORF1 and is part of the hallmark closterovirus gene array. The orthologous gene in BYV has been shown to play a role in cell-to-cell movement and indicated to be localized to the

  1. Priming DNA Replication from Triple Helix Oligonucleotides: Possible Threestranded DNA in DNA Polymerases

    OpenAIRE

    Lestienne, Patrick P.

    2011-01-01

    Triplex associate with a duplex DNA presenting the same polypurine or polypyrimidine-rich sequence in an antiparallel orientation. So far, triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) are known to inhibit transcription, replication, and to induce mutations. A new property of TFO is reviewed here upon analysis of DNA breakpoint yielding DNA rearrangements; the synthesized sequence of the first direct repeat displays a skewed polypurine- rich sequence. This synthesized sequence can bind the second h...

  2. Autonomic computing enabled cooperative networked design

    CERN Document Server

    Wodczak, Michal

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces the concept of autonomic computing driven cooperative networked system design from an architectural perspective. As such it leverages and capitalises on the relevant advancements in both the realms of autonomic computing and networking by welding them closely together. In particular, a multi-faceted Autonomic Cooperative System Architectural Model is defined which incorporates the notion of Autonomic Cooperative Behaviour being orchestrated by the Autonomic Cooperative Networking Protocol of a cross-layer nature. The overall proposed solution not only advocates for the inc

  3. Autonomous Cryogenics Loading Operations Simulation Software: Knowledgebase Autonomous Test Engineer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehner, Walter S., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Working on the ACLO (Autonomous Cryogenics Loading Operations) project I have had the opportunity to add functionality to the physics simulation software known as KATE (Knowledgebase Autonomous Test Engineer), create a new application allowing WYSIWYG (what-you-see-is-what-you-get) creation of KATE schematic files and begin a preliminary design and implementation of a new subsystem that will provide vision services on the IHM (Integrated Health Management) bus. The functionality I added to KATE over the past few months includes a dynamic visual representation of the fluid height in a pipe based on number of gallons of fluid in the pipe and implementing the IHM bus connection within KATE. I also fixed a broken feature in the system called the Browser Display, implemented many bug fixes and made changes to the GUI (Graphical User Interface).

  4. Global profiling of DNA replication timing and efficiency reveals that efficient replication/firing occurs late during S-phase in S. pombe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Eshaghi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During S. pombe S-phase, initiation of DNA replication occurs at multiple sites (origins that are enriched with AT-rich sequences, at various times. Current studies of genome-wide DNA replication profiles have focused on the DNA replication timing and origin location. However, the replication and/or firing efficiency of the individual origins on the genomic scale remain unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using the genome-wide ORF-specific DNA microarray analysis, we show that in S. pombe, individual origins fire with varying efficiencies and at different times during S-phase. The increase in DNA copy number plotted as a function of time is approximated to the near-sigmoidal model, when considering the replication start and end timings at individual loci in cells released from HU-arrest. Replication efficiencies differ from origin to origin, depending on the origin's firing efficiency. We have found that DNA replication is inefficient early in S-phase, due to inefficient firing at origins. Efficient replication occurs later, attributed to efficient but late-firing origins. Furthermore, profiles of replication timing in cds1Delta cells are abnormal, due to the failure in resuming replication at the collapsed forks. The majority of the inefficient origins, but not the efficient ones, are found to fire in cds1Delta cells after HU removal, owing to the firing at the remaining unused (inefficient origins during HU treatment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our results indicate that efficient DNA replication/firing occurs late in S-phase progression in cells after HU removal, due to efficient late-firing origins. Additionally, checkpoint kinase Cds1p is required for maintaining the efficient replication/firing late in S-phase. We further propose that efficient late-firing origins are essential for ensuring completion of DNA duplication by the end of S-phase.

  5. Visual measurement estimation for autonomous vehicle navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Mario F.; Chaimowicz, Luiz

    1999-07-01

    The autonomous navigation of a mobile vehicle can be described as the task it undertakes to move itself in the environment through a series of positions based on information based on information gathered by its sensors. In order to accomplish this task, the vehicle has to cope with two main subtasks namely obstacle avoidance and self localization. The latter implies in the ability to determine its position and orientation with respect to the environment. This work describes a simple but efficient method that performs pose estimation for a mobile vehicle based on visual information from artificial landmarks using a sequence of frames from an uncalibrated camera. The landmark is segmented from image sequences and the vehicle's localization is computed using landmark geometric properties and vehicle's motion vector. This methodology can be easily extended to be used by different types of mobile agents. One of the key advantages is that it is computationally, efficient making it suitable for real time navigation. Experiments conducted with a Nomad 200 mobile robot equipped with a color camera systems have shown the method to be repeatable and very robust to noise. Visual measurements were compared with readings for other on-board sensors such as ultrasound with excellent consistency.

  6. Analysis of JC virus DNA replication using a quantitative and high-throughput assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jong; Phelan, Paul J.; Chhum, Panharith; Bashkenova, Nazym; Yim, Sung; Parker, Robert [Department of Developmental, Molecular and Chemical Biology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Gagnon, David [Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montreal (IRCM), 110 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H2W 1R7 (Canada); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec (Canada); Gjoerup, Ole [Molecular Oncology Research Institute, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Archambault, Jacques [Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montreal (IRCM), 110 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H2W 1R7 (Canada); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec (Canada); Bullock, Peter A., E-mail: Peter.Bullock@tufts.edu [Department of Developmental, Molecular and Chemical Biology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02111 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) is caused by lytic replication of JC virus (JCV) in specific cells of the central nervous system. Like other polyomaviruses, JCV encodes a large T-antigen helicase needed for replication of the viral DNA. Here, we report the development of a luciferase-based, quantitative and high-throughput assay of JCV DNA replication in C33A cells, which, unlike the glial cell lines Hs 683 and U87, accumulate high levels of nuclear T-ag needed for robust replication. Using this assay, we investigated the requirement for different domains of T-ag, and for specific sequences within and flanking the viral origin, in JCV DNA replication. Beyond providing validation of the assay, these studies revealed an important stimulatory role of the transcription factor NF1 in JCV DNA replication. Finally, we show that the assay can be used for inhibitor testing, highlighting its value for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting JCV DNA replication. - Highlights: • Development of a high-throughput screening assay for JCV DNA replication using C33A cells. • Evidence that T-ag fails to accumulate in the nuclei of established glioma cell lines. • Evidence that NF-1 directly promotes JCV DNA replication in C33A cells. • Proof-of-concept that the HTS assay can be used to identify pharmacological inhibitor of JCV DNA replication.

  7. Analysis of JC virus DNA replication using a quantitative and high-throughput assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) is caused by lytic replication of JC virus (JCV) in specific cells of the central nervous system. Like other polyomaviruses, JCV encodes a large T-antigen helicase needed for replication of the viral DNA. Here, we report the development of a luciferase-based, quantitative and high-throughput assay of JCV DNA replication in C33A cells, which, unlike the glial cell lines Hs 683 and U87, accumulate high levels of nuclear T-ag needed for robust replication. Using this assay, we investigated the requirement for different domains of T-ag, and for specific sequences within and flanking the viral origin, in JCV DNA replication. Beyond providing validation of the assay, these studies revealed an important stimulatory role of the transcription factor NF1 in JCV DNA replication. Finally, we show that the assay can be used for inhibitor testing, highlighting its value for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting JCV DNA replication. - Highlights: • Development of a high-throughput screening assay for JCV DNA replication using C33A cells. • Evidence that T-ag fails to accumulate in the nuclei of established glioma cell lines. • Evidence that NF-1 directly promotes JCV DNA replication in C33A cells. • Proof-of-concept that the HTS assay can be used to identify pharmacological inhibitor of JCV DNA replication

  8. Development of autonomous operation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To enhance operation reliability of nuclear plants by removing human factors, study on an autonomous operation system has been carried out to substitute artificial intelligence (AI) for plant operators and, in addition, traditional controllers used in existing plants. For construction of the AI system, structurization of knowledge on the basis of the principles such as physical laws, function and structure of relevant objects and generalization of problem solving process are intended. A hierarchical distributed cooperative system configuration in employed because it is superior from the viewpoint of dynamical reorganization of system functions. This configuration is realized by an object-oriented multi-agent system. Construction of a prototype system was planned and the conceptual design was made for FBR plant in order to evaluate applicability of AI to the autonomous operation and to have a prospect for the realization of the system. The prototype system executes diagnosis, state evaluation, operation and control for the main plant subsystems. (author)

  9. An Autonomously Reciprocating Transmembrane Nanoactuator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Matthew A; Cockroft, Scott L

    2016-01-22

    Biological molecular machines operate far from equilibrium by coupling chemical potential to repeated cycles of dissipative nanomechanical motion. This principle has been exploited in supramolecular systems that exhibit true machine behavior in solution and on surfaces. However, designed membrane-spanning assemblies developed to date have been limited to simple switches or stochastic shuttles, and true machine behavior has remained elusive. Herein, we present a transmembrane nanoactuator that turns over chemical fuel to drive autonomous reciprocating (back-and-forth) nanomechanical motion. Ratcheted reciprocating motion of a DNA/PEG copolymer threaded through a single α-hemolysin pore was induced by a combination of DNA strand displacement processes and enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Ion-current recordings revealed saw-tooth patterns, indicating that the assemblies operated in autonomous, asymmetric cycles of conformational change at rates of up to one cycle per minute. PMID:26661295

  10. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spallone, Vincenza; Ziegler, Dan; Freeman, Roy;

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular Autonomic Neuropathy (CAN) Subcommittee of Toronto Consensus Panel on Diabetic Neuropathy worked to update CAN guidelines, with regard to epidemiology, clinical impact, diagnosis, usefulness of CAN testing, and management. CAN is the impairment of cardiovascular autonomic control...... in the setting of diabetes after exclusion of other causes. The prevalence of confirmed CAN is around 20%, and increases up to 65% with age and diabetes duration. Established risk factors for CAN are glycaemic control in type 1 and a combination of hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity and glycaemic control...... in type 2 diabetes. CAN is a risk marker of mortality and cardiovascular morbidity, and possibly a progression promoter of diabetic nephropathy. Criteria for CAN diagnosis and staging are: 1. one abnormal cardio-vagal test identifies possible or early CAN; 2. at least two abnormal cardio-vagal tests...

  11. Treatment of gastrointestinal autonomic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Törnblom, Hans

    2016-03-01

    The symptoms caused by gastrointestinal autonomic neuropathy in diabetes mellitus is important to highlight since it affects a large proportion of people with diabetes, regardless of whether this is type 1 or type 2. Gastroparesis and general signs of bowel dysfunction, such as constipation, diarrhoea and abdominal pain are most often encountered and involve both pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment options. This mini-review summarises a presentation given at the 'Diagnosis and treatment of autonomic diabetic neuropathy in the gut' symposium at the 2015 annual meeting of the EASD. It is accompanied by another mini-review on a topic from this symposium (by Azpiroz and Malagelada, DOI: 10.1007/s00125-015-3831-1 ) and a commentary by the Session Chair, Péter Kempler (DOI: 10.1007/s00125-015-3826-y ). PMID:26634570

  12. Learning Objects and Grasp Affordances through Autonomous Exploration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraft, Dirk; Detry, Renaud; Pugeault, Nicolas;

    2009-01-01

    We describe a system for autonomous learning of visual object representations and their grasp affordances on a robot-vision system. It segments objects by grasping and moving 3D scene features, and creates probabilistic visual representations for object detection, recognition and pose estimation......, which are then augmented by continuous characterizations of grasp affordances generated through biased, random exploration. Thus, based on a careful balance of generic prior knowledge encoded in (1) the embodiment of the system, (2) a vision system extracting structurally rich information from stereo...... image sequences as well as (3) a number of built-in behavioral modules on the one hand, and autonomous exploration on the other hand, the system is able to generate object and grasping knowledge through interaction with its environment....

  13. Advancing Autonomous Structural Health Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Grisso, Benjamin Luke

    2007-01-01

    The focus of this dissertation is aimed at advancing autonomous structural health monitoring. All the research is based on developing the impedance method for monitoring structural health. The impedance technique utilizes piezoelectric patches to interrogate structures of interested with high frequency excitations. These patches are bonded directly to the structure, so information about the health of the structure can be seen in the electrical impedance of the piezoelectric patch. However, tr...

  14. Insurance for autonomous underwater vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Griffiths, G; N Bose; Ferguson, J.; Blidberg, D.R.

    2007-01-01

    The background and practice of insurance for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) are examined. Key topics include: relationships between clients, brokers and underwriters; contract wording to provide appropriate coverage; and actions to take when an incident occurs. Factors that affect cost of insurance are discussed, including level of autonomy, team experience and operating environment. Four case studies from industry and academia illustrate how AUV insurance has worked in practice. The p...

  15. Autonomous gliding entry guidance with

    OpenAIRE

    Guo Jie; Wu Xuzhong; Tang Shengjing

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel three-dimensional autonomous entry guidance for relatively high lift-to-drag ratio vehicles satisfying geographic constraints and other path constraints. The guidance is composed of onboard trajectory planning and robust trajectory tracking. For trajectory planning, a longitudinal sub-planner is introduced to generate a feasible drag-versus-energy profile by using the interpolation between upper boundary and lower boundary of entry corridor to get the desired traje...

  16. Robotic perception for autonomous navigation

    OpenAIRE

    Furlan,

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents the research work the author carried on during his PhD on the topic of robotic perception for autonomous navigation. In particular, the efforts focus on the Self-Localization, Scene Understanding and Object Detection and Tracking problems, proposing for each of these three topics one or more approaches that present an improvement over the state-of-the-art. In some cases the proposed approaches mutually exploit the generated information to improve the quality of the final ...

  17. Prototype design for autonomous vehicle

    OpenAIRE

    Lehander, Jacob; Persson, Joel

    2015-01-01

    This thesis describes the mechanical design of a prototype vehicle developed for a company located in California. The project was based on an earlier vehicle located at KTH, Transport Labs, and investigated if the existing concept for the vehicle would work as a concept for an autonomous prototype, with focus on component layout and increased forces. The design of the vehicle is based on a concept with a carbon fiber bottom plate, two separate suspension modules with electric hub motors and s...

  18. Design of Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    OpenAIRE

    Tadahiro Hyakudome

    2011-01-01

    There are concerns about the impact that global warming will have on our environment, and which will inevitably result in expanding deserts and rising water levels. While a lot of underwater vehicles are utilized, AUVs (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle) were considered and chosen, as the most suitable tool for conduction survey concerning these global environmental problems. AUVs can comprehensive survey because the vehicle does not have to be connected to the support vessel by tether cable. Whe...

  19. Autonomous Behavior of Computational Agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaculín, Roman; Neruda, Roman

    Wien : Springer-Verlag, 2005 - (Ribiero, B.; Albrecht, R.; Dobnikar, A.; Pearson, D.; Steele, N.), s. 514-517 ISBN 3-211-24934-6. [ICANNGA'2005 /7./. Coimbra (PT), 21.03.2005-23.03.2005] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET100300419 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : computational agents * autonomous behavior * reasoning Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  20. RNA interference targets arbovirus replication in Culicoides cells

    OpenAIRE

    Schnettler, Esther; Ratinier, Maxime; Watson, Mick; Shaw, Andrew E.; McFarlane, Melanie; Varela, Mariana; Elliott, Richard M.; Palmarini, Massimo; Kohl, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Arboviruses are transmitted to vertebrate hosts by biting arthropod vectors such as mosquitoes, ticks, and midges. These viruses replicate in both arthropods and vertebrates and are thus exposed to different antiviral responses in these organisms. RNA interference (RNAi) is a sequence-specific RNA degradation mechanism that has been shown to play a major role in the antiviral response against arboviruses in mosquitoes. Culicoides midges are important vectors of arboviruses, known to transmit ...

  1. Autonomic neuropathy in diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto eVerrotti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN is a serious and common complication of diabetes, often overlooked and misdiagnosed. It is a systemic-wide disorder that may be asymptomatic in the early stages. The most studied and clinically important form of DAN is cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN defined as the impairment of autonomic control of the cardiovascular system in patients with diabetes after exclusion of other causes. The reported prevalence of DAN varies widely depending on inconsistent definition, different diagnostic method, different patient cohorts studied. The pathogenesis is still unclear and probably multifactorial. Once DAN becomes clinically evident, no form of therapy has been identified which can effectively stop or reverse it. Prevention strategies are based on strict glycemic control with intensive insulin treatment, multifactorial intervention and lifestyle modification including control of hypertension, dyslipidemia, stop smoking, weight loss and adequate physical exercise. The present review summarizes the latest knowledge regarding clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathogenesis and management of DAN, with some mention to childhood and adolescent population.

  2. Semi autonomous mine detection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas Few; Roelof Versteeg; Herman Herman

    2010-04-01

    CMMAD is a risk reduction effort for the AMDS program. As part of CMMAD, multiple instances of semi autonomous robotic mine detection systems were created. Each instance consists of a robotic vehicle equipped with sensors required for navigation and marking, a countermine sensors and a number of integrated software packages which provide for real time processing of the countermine sensor data as well as integrated control of the robotic vehicle, the sensor actuator and the sensor. These systems were used to investigate critical interest functions (CIF) related to countermine robotic systems. To address the autonomy CIF, the INL developed RIK was extended to allow for interaction with a mine sensor processing code (MSPC). In limited field testing this system performed well in detecting, marking and avoiding both AT and AP mines. Based on the results of the CMMAD investigation we conclude that autonomous robotic mine detection is feasible. In addition, CMMAD contributed critical technical advances with regard to sensing, data processing and sensor manipulation, which will advance the performance of future fieldable systems. As a result, no substantial technical barriers exist which preclude – from an autonomous robotic perspective – the rapid development and deployment of fieldable systems.

  3. Hyperthermia stimulates HIV-1 replication.

    OpenAIRE

    Ferdinand Roesch; Oussama Meziane; Anna Kula; Sébastien Nisole; Françoise Porrot; Ian Anderson; Fabrizio Mammano; Ariberto Fassati; Alessandro Marcello; Monsef Benkirane; Olivier Schwartz

    2012-01-01

    International audience HIV-infected individuals may experience fever episodes. Fever is an elevation of the body temperature accompanied by inflammation. It is usually beneficial for the host through enhancement of immunological defenses. In cultures, transient non-physiological heat shock (42-45°C) and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) modulate HIV-1 replication, through poorly defined mechanisms. The effect of physiological hyperthermia (38-40°C) on HIV-1 infection has not been extensively inve...

  4. Biomarkers of replicative senescence revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nehlin, Jan

    2016-01-01

    of telomere length and associated damage, and the accompanying changes that take place elicit signals that have an impact on a number of molecules and downstream events. Precise measurements of replicative senescence biomarkers in biological samples from individuals could be clinically associated...... with their chronological age and present health status, help define their current rate of aging and contribute to establish personalized therapy plans to reduce, counteract or even avoid the appearance of aging biomarkers....

  5. Job replication on multiserver systems

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yusik; Righter, Rhonda; Wolff, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    Parallel processing is a way to use resources efficiently by processing several jobs simultaneously on different servers. In a well-controlled environment where the status of the servers and the jobs are well known, everything is nearly deterministic and replicating jobs on different servers is obviously a waste of resources. However, in a poorly controlled environment where the servers are unreliable and/or their capacity is highly variable, it is desirable to design a system tha...

  6. Roles for Dam methylation in bacterial chromosome replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Koch, Birgit; Skovgaard, Ole;

    these by whole genome sequencing. In one case the suppression was due to deletion of two Ts upstream of the ybfF gene. This led to increased SeqA production and presumably prolonged hemimethylation. The increased SeqA level affected replication initiation in two ways not described previously. First...... about one third of the cell cycle. During sequestration at least three mechanisms operate to lower the activity of the initiator protein, DnaA. First, the dnaA promoter, which also contains an excess of GATC sequences, is sequestered for the same period of time as oriC to prevent de novo DnaA synthesis...

  7. Dynamic replication of Web contents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The phenomenal growth of the World Wide Web has brought huge increase in the traffic to the popular web sites.Long delays and denial of service experienced by the end-users,especially during the peak hours,continues to be the common problem while accessing popular sites.Replicating some of the objects at multiple sites in a distributed web-server environment is one of the possible solutions to improve the response time/Iatency. The decision of what and where to replicate requires solving a constraint optimization problem,which is NP-complete in general.In this paper, we consider the problem of placing copies of objects in a distributed web server system to minimize the cost of serving read and write requests when the web servers have Iimited storage capacity.We formulate the problem as a 0-1 optimization problem and present a polynomial time greedy algorithm with backtracking to dynamically replicate objects at the appropriate sites to minimize a cost function.To reduce the solution search space,we present necessary condi tions for a site to have a replica of an object jn order to minimize the cost function We present simulation resuIts for a variety of problems to illustrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed algorithms and compare them with those of some well-known algorithms.The simulation resuIts demonstrate the superiority of the proposed algorithms.

  8. Replication of micro and nano surface geometries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Hocken, R.J.; Tosello, Guido

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes the state-of-the-art in replication of surface texture and topography at micro and nano scale. The description includes replication of surfaces in polymers, metals and glass. Three different main technological areas enabled by surface replication processes are presented......: manufacture of net-shape micro/nano surfaces, tooling (i.e. master making), and surface quality control (metrology, inspection). Replication processes and methods as well as the metrology of surfaces to determine the degree of replication are presented and classified. Examples from various application areas...... are given including replication for surface texture measurements, surface roughness standards, manufacture of micro and nano structured functional surfaces, replicated surfaces for optical applications (e.g. optical gratings), and process chains based on combinations of repeated surface replication steps....

  9. Evaluating replicability of laboratory experiments in economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camerer, Colin F; Dreber, Anna; Forsell, Eskil; Ho, Teck-Hua; Huber, Jürgen; Johannesson, Magnus; Kirchler, Michael; Almenberg, Johan; Altmejd, Adam; Chan, Taizan; Heikensten, Emma; Holzmeister, Felix; Imai, Taisuke; Isaksson, Siri; Nave, Gideon; Pfeiffer, Thomas; Razen, Michael; Wu, Hang

    2016-03-25

    The replicability of some scientific findings has recently been called into question. To contribute data about replicability in economics, we replicated 18 studies published in the American Economic Review and the Quarterly Journal of Economics between 2011 and 2014. All of these replications followed predefined analysis plans that were made publicly available beforehand, and they all have a statistical power of at least 90% to detect the original effect size at the 5% significance level. We found a significant effect in the same direction as in the original study for 11 replications (61%); on average, the replicated effect size is 66% of the original. The replicability rate varies between 67% and 78% for four additional replicability indicators, including a prediction market measure of peer beliefs. PMID:26940865

  10. Autonomous Cryogenic Load Operations: KSC Autonomous Test Engineer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrading, Nicholas J.

    2012-01-01

    The KSC Autonomous Test Engineer (KATE) program has a long history at KSC. Now a part of the Autonomous Cryogenic Load Operations (ACLO) mission, this software system has been sporadically developed over the past 20+ years. Originally designed to provide health and status monitoring for a simple water-based fluid system, it was proven to be a capable autonomous test engineer for determining sources of failure in. the system, As part.of a new goal to provide this same anomaly-detection capability for a complicated cryogenic fluid system, software engineers, physicists, interns and KATE experts are working to upgrade the software capabilities and graphical user interface. Much progress was made during this effort to improve KATE. A display ofthe entire cryogenic system's graph, with nodes for components and edges for their connections, was added to the KATE software. A searching functionality was added to the new graph display, so that users could easily center their screen on specific components. The GUI was also modified so that it displayed information relevant to the new project goals. In addition, work began on adding new pneumatic and electronic subsystems into the KATE knowledgebase, so that it could provide health and status monitoring for those systems. Finally, many fixes for bugs, memory leaks, and memory errors were implemented and the system was moved into a state in which it could be presented to stakeholders. Overall, the KATE system was improved and necessary additional features were added so that a presentation of the program and its functionality in the next few months would be a success.

  11. Autonomous Cryogenic Load Operations: Knowledge-Based Autonomous Test Engineer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrading, J. Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    The Knowledge-Based Autonomous Test Engineer (KATE) program has a long history at KSC. Now a part of the Autonomous Cryogenic Load Operations (ACLO) mission, this software system has been sporadically developed over the past 20 years. Originally designed to provide health and status monitoring for a simple water-based fluid system, it was proven to be a capable autonomous test engineer for determining sources of failure in the system. As part of a new goal to provide this same anomaly-detection capability for a complicated cryogenic fluid system, software engineers, physicists, interns and KATE experts are working to upgrade the software capabilities and graphical user interface. Much progress was made during this effort to improve KATE. A display of the entire cryogenic system's graph, with nodes for components and edges for their connections, was added to the KATE software. A searching functionality was added to the new graph display, so that users could easily center their screen on specific components. The GUI was also modified so that it displayed information relevant to the new project goals. In addition, work began on adding new pneumatic and electronic subsystems into the KATE knowledge base, so that it could provide health and status monitoring for those systems. Finally, many fixes for bugs, memory leaks, and memory errors were implemented and the system was moved into a state in which it could be presented to stakeholders. Overall, the KATE system was improved and necessary additional features were added so that a presentation of the program and its functionality in the next few months would be a success.

  12. Possible applications for replicating HIV 1 vectors

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Atze T.; Jeeninga, Rienk E.; Berkhout, Ben

    2010-01-01

    Since its discovery some 25 years ago, much has been learned about HIV type 1 and the molecular details of its replication cycle. This insight has been used to develop lentiviral vector systems that have advantages over conventional retroviral vector systems. For safety reasons, the lentiviral vector systems are replication incompetent and the risk of generating a replication competent virus has been minimized. Nevertheless, there may be certain applications for replication competent HIV base...

  13. A comparison of three replication strategies in complex multicellular organisms: Asexual replication, sexual replication with identical gametes, and sexual replication with distinct sperm and egg gametes

    OpenAIRE

    Tannenbaum, Emmanuel

    2007-01-01

    This paper studies the mutation-selection balance in three simplified replication models. The first model considers a population of organisms replicating via the production of asexual spores. The second model considers a sexually replicating population that produces identical gametes. The third model considers a sexually replicating population that produces distinct sperm and egg gametes. All models assume diploid organisms whose genomes consist of two chromosomes, each of which is taken to b...

  14. Asexual and sexual replication in sporulating organisms

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Bohyun; Tannenbaum, Emmanuel

    2006-01-01

    This paper develops models describing asexual and sexual replication in sporulating organisms. Replication via sporulation is the replication strategy for all multicellular life, and may even be observed in unicellular life (such as with budding yeast). We consider diploid populations replicating via one of two possible sporulation mechanisms: (1) Asexual sporulation, whereby adult organisms produce single-celled diploid spores that grow into adults themselves. (2) Sexual sporulation, whereby...

  15. Prokaryotic genes in eukaryotic genome sequences: when to infer horizontal gene transfer and when to suspect an actual microbe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artamonova, Irena I; Lappi, Tanya; Zudina, Liudmila; Mushegian, Arcady R

    2015-07-01

    Assessment of phylogenetic positions of predicted gene and protein sequences is a routine step in any genome project, useful for validating the species' taxonomic position and for evaluating hypotheses about genome evolution and function. Several recent eukaryotic genome projects have reported multiple gene sequences that were much more similar to homologues in bacteria than to any eukaryotic sequence. In the spirit of the times, horizontal gene transfer from bacteria to eukaryotes has been invoked in some of these cases. Here, we show, using comparative sequence analysis, that some of those bacteria-like genes indeed appear likely to have been horizontally transferred from bacteria to eukaryotes. In other cases, however, the evidence strongly indicates that the eukaryotic DNA sequenced in the genome project contains a sample of non-integrated DNA from the actual bacteria, possibly providing a window into the host microbiome. Recent literature suggests also that common reagents, kits and laboratory equipment may be systematically contaminated with bacterial DNA, which appears to be sampled by metagenome projects non-specifically. We review several bioinformatic criteria that help to distinguish putative horizontal gene transfers from the admixture of genes from autonomously replicating bacteria in their hosts' genome databases or from the reagent contamination. PMID:25919787

  16. Exploiting replicative stress to treat cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobbelstein, Matthias; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication in cancer cells is accompanied by stalling and collapse of the replication fork and signalling in response to DNA damage and/or premature mitosis; these processes are collectively known as 'replicative stress'. Progress is being made to increase our understanding of the mechanisms...

  17. DNA Replication Reaches the Breaking Point

    OpenAIRE

    Petrini, John H.J.

    2009-01-01

    DNA strand breaks that result in stalled or damaged replication forks can be detrimental to the DNA replication process. In this issue, Doksani et al. (2009) examine the impact of a single double-stranded DNA break on replication in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  18. Chromosome banding and DNA replication patterns in bird karyotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, M; Enderle, E; Schindler, D; Schempp, W

    1989-01-01

    The karyotypes of the domestic chicken (Gallus domesticus), Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix), and griffon vulture (Gyps fulvus) were studied with a variety of banding techniques. The DNA replication patterns of bird chromosomes, analyzed by incorporation of 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and deoxythymidine (dT), are presented here for the first time. In particular, the time sequence of replication of the ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes throughout the S-phase was meticulously analyzed. BrdU and dT incorporation are very useful methods to identify homoeologies between karyotypes, as well as rearrangements that occurred in the macroautosomes during speciation. The Z chromosomes of the three birds displayed the same replication patterns, indicating a high degree of evolutionary conservation. In the homogametic male, BrdU and dT incorporation revealed no evidence of asynchronous replication between euchromatic bands in the ZZ pair. The same was true of the three Z chromosomes in a triploid-diploid chimeric chicken embryo. Minor replication asynchronies between the homologous ZZ or ZZZ chromosomes were restricted to heterochromatic C-bands. These results confirm that, in the ZZ male/ZW female sex-determining system of birds, dosage compensation for Z-linked genes does not occur by inactivation of one of the two Z chromosomes in the homogametic male. The heterochromatic W chromosomes of the three species showed bright labeling with distamycin A/mithramycin counterstain-enhanced fluorescence and exhibited significantly delayed DNA replication. The nucleolus organizers of birds, frequently located in microchromosomes, were also distinguished by bright distamycin A/mithramycin fluorescence. PMID:2630186

  19. Autonomic Management for Multi-agent Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Nadir kamal Salih; G. K. Viju; Mohamed, Abdelmotalib A.

    2011-01-01

    Autonomic computing is a computing system that can manage itself by self-configuration, self-healing, self-optimizing and self-protection. Researchers have been emphasizing the strong role that multi agent systems can play progressively towards the design and implementation of complex autonomic systems. The important of autonomic computing is to create computing systems capable of managing themselves to a far greater extent than they do today. With the nature of autonomy, reactivity, socialit...

  20. Gastrointestinal autonomic nerve tumor of the stomach

    OpenAIRE

    Meshikhes, Abdul-Wahed N.; Al-Garni, Ayed A.; Sami A Al-Momen; Al-Nahawi, Mamdouh; Abu Subaih, Jawad

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Female, 32 Final Diagnosis: Gastrintestinal Autonomic Nerve Tumor (GANT) Symptoms: anemia • anorexia • fatigue • fever • hearburn • nausea • weight loss Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: Gastrointestinal autonomic nerve tumors (GANT) are extremely rare tumors that are related to gastrointestinal autonomic nervous plexuses. They are distinguished from stromal tumors by their unique ultrastructural feature...

  1. Test and Evaluation of Autonomous Ground Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Sun; Guangming Xiong; Weilong Song; Jianwei Gong; Huiyan Chen

    2014-01-01

    A preestablished test and evaluation system will benefit the development of autonomous ground vehicles. This paper proposes a design method for a scientific and comprehensive test and evaluation system for autonomous ground vehicles competitions. It can better guide and regulate the development of China’s autonomous ground vehicles. The test and evaluation system includes the test contents, the test environment, the test methods, and the evaluation methods. Using a hierarchical design approac...

  2. Obstacle Detection and Avoidance Autonomous Car

    OpenAIRE

    K.Vasavi; M.V.S.Praveen

    2014-01-01

    Driving models are needed by many researchers to improve traffic safety and to advance autonomous vehicle design. To be most useful, a driving model must state specifically what information is needed and how it is processed. So we developed an “Obstacle Avoidance and Detection Autonomous Car” based on sensor application. The essential part of this autonomous car is that it drives taking the energy from solar panel. This paper explains the method of interfacing the solar panel, relay circuit b...

  3. Tele/Autonomous Robot For Nuclear Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backes, Paul G.; Tso, Kam S.

    1994-01-01

    Fail-safe tele/autonomous robotic system makes it unnecessary for human technicians to enter nuclear-fuel-reprocessing facilities and other high-radiation or otherwise hazardous industrial environments. Used to carry out experiments as exchanging equipment modules, turning bolts, cleaning surfaces, and grappling turning objects by use of mixture of autonomous actions and teleoperation with either single arm or two cooperating arms. System capable of fully autonomous operation, teleoperation or shared control.

  4. Self-Adapting Reactive Autonomous Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrecut, M.; Ali, M. K.

    This paper describes a new self-adapting control algorithm for reactive autonomous agents. The architecture of the autonomous agents integrates the reactive behavior with reinforcement learning. We show how these components perform on-line adaptation of the autonomous agents to various complex navigation situations by constructing an internal model of the environment. Also, a discussion on cooperation and coordination of teams of agents is presented.

  5. Autonomous vehicle control systems for safe crossroads

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso Ruiz, Javier; Milanés Montero, Vicente; Pérez, Joshué; Onieva Caracuel, Enrique; González Fernández-Vallejo, Carlos; Pedro Lucio, María Teresa de

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a cooperative manoeuvre among three dual mode cars – vehicles equipped with sensors and actuators, and that can be driven either manually or autonomously. One vehicle is driven autonomously and the other two are driven manually. The main objective is to test two decision algorithms for priority conflict resolution at intersections so that a vehicle autonomously driven can take their own decision about crossing an intersection mingling with manually driven cars without th...

  6. Assessment of the Role of the Central DNA Flap in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Replication by Using a Single-Cycle Replication System

    OpenAIRE

    Ao, Zhujun; Yao, Xiaojian; Éric A Cohen

    2004-01-01

    In this study, reverse transcriptase (RT)- and integrase (IN)-defective human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) was transcomplemented with Vpr-RT-IN fusion proteins to delineate pol sequences important for HIV-1 replication. Our results reveal that a 194-bp sequence encompassing the 3′end of the IN gene and containing the central DNA flap is necessary and sufficient for efficient HIV-1 single-cycle replication in dividing and nondividing cells. Furthermore, we show that the central DNA fl...

  7. Information for Successful Interaction with Autonomous Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Jane T.; Johnson, Kathy A.

    2003-01-01

    Interaction in heterogeneous mission operations teams is not well matched to classical models of coordination with autonomous systems. We describe methods of loose coordination and information management in mission operations. We describe an information agent and information management tool suite for managing information from many sources, including autonomous agents. We present an integrated model of levels of complexity of agent and human behavior, which shows types of information processing and points of potential error in agent activities. We discuss the types of information needed for diagnosing problems and planning interactions with an autonomous system. We discuss types of coordination for which designs are needed for autonomous system functions.

  8. Autonomic dysfunction in primary sleep disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miglis, Mitchell G

    2016-03-01

    The autonomic nervous system plays an important role in the coordination of many important physiologic functions during sleep. Many patients with untreated sleep disorders will describe symptoms of autonomic impairment, and a majority of patients with autonomic impairment have some form of sleep disorder. This article will explore possible explanations for this connection, as well as review the current literature on autonomic impairment in common primary sleep disorders including obstructive sleep apnea, insomnia, restless legs syndrome, periodic limb movement disorder, narcolepsy, and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder. PMID:27198946

  9. Design of a Miniature Autonomous Surveillance Robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Chang-e; HUANG Qiang; HUANG Yuan-can

    2009-01-01

    The small size of miniature robots poses great challenges for the mechanical and deetrieal design and the implementation of autonomous capabilities.In this paper,the mechanical and electrical design for a twowheeled cylindrical miniature autonomous robot ("BMS-1",BIT MicroScout-1) is presented and some autonomous capabilities are implemented by multiple sensors and some arithmetic models.Several experimental results show that BMS-1 is useful for surveillance in confined spaces and suitable for large-scale surveillance due to some autonomous capabilities.

  10. A necessary and sufficient condition for transforming autonomous systems into linear autonomous Birkhoffian systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of transforming autonomous systems into Birkhoffian systems is studied. A reasonable form of linear autonomous Birkhoff equations is given. By combining them with the undetermined tensor method, a necessary and sufficient condition for an autonomous system to have a representation in terms of linear autonomous Birkhoff equations is obtained. The methods of constructing Birkhoffian dynamical functions are given. Two examples are given to illustrate the application of the results. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  11. Autonomic Function in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Gertrud Laura; Jennum, Poul Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    and REM sleep control, indicating that the disorder may serve as a human model for the sleep-wake and REM sleep flip-flop switches. The increased frequency of transitions may cause increased sympathetic activity during sleep and thereby increased heart rate, or the increased heart rate could be caused...... confirm that hypocretin deficiency affects the autonomic nervous system of patients with narcolepsy and that the hypocretin system is important for proper heart rate modulation at rest.Furthermore, it was shown that hypocretin deficiency and cataplexy are associated with signs of destabilized sleep-wake...

  12. Autonomous sensor manager agents (ASMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osadciw, Lisa A.

    2004-04-01

    Autonomous sensor manager agents are presented as an algorithm to perform sensor management within a multisensor fusion network. The design of the hybrid ant system/particle swarm agents is described in detail with some insight into their performance. Although the algorithm is designed for the general sensor management problem, a simulation example involving 2 radar systems is presented. Algorithmic parameters are determined by the size of the region covered by the sensor network, the number of sensors, and the number of parameters to be selected. With straight forward modifications, this algorithm can be adapted for most sensor management problems.

  13. Konstruktion av en autonom vindstation

    OpenAIRE

    Larsson, Joel; Starck, Patrik

    2015-01-01

    Construction of an autonomous wind station was a project with the goal of creating a product that could collect wind data from a sensor and then transfer this data to a server wirelessly over the GSM network. The device would be powered by batteries and solar cells and function fully without requiring external power supply. This required that a small computer was constructed and programmed to store and send data at predetermined cycle times and programming of a server that received the sent d...

  14. BART: The Czech Autonomous Observatory

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nekola, Martin; Hudec, René; Jelínek, M.; Kubánek, P.; Štrobl, Jan; Polášek, Cyril

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 2010, Spec. Is. (2010), 103986/1-103986/5. ISSN 1687-7969. [Workshop on Robotic Autonomous Observatories. Málaga, 18.05.2009-21.05.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/08/1207 Grant ostatní: ESA(XE) ESA-PECS project No. 98023; Spanish Ministry of Education and Science(ES) AP2003-1407 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : robotic telescope * BART * gamma ray bursts Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics http://www.hindawi.com/journals/aa/2010/103986.html

  15. Knowledge acquisition for autonomous systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Henry; Heer, Ewald

    1988-01-01

    Knowledge-based capabilities for autonomous aerospace systems, such as the NASA Space Station, must encompass conflict-resolution functions comparable to those of human operators, with all elements of the system working toward system goals in a concurrent, asynchronous-but-coordinated fashion. Knowledge extracted from a design database will support robotic systems by furnishing geometric, structural, and causal descriptions required for repair, disassembly, and assembly. The factual knowledge for these databases will be obtained from a master database through a technical management information system, and it will in many cases have to be augmented by domain-specific heuristic knowledge acquired from domain experts.

  16. Topological entropy of autonomous flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badii, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    When studying fluid dynamics, especially in a turbulent regime, it is crucial to estimate the number of active degrees of freedom or of localized structures in the system. The topological entropy quantifies the exponential growth of the number of `distinct` orbits in a dynamical system as a function of their length, in the infinite spatial resolution limit. Here, I illustrate a novel method for its evaluation, which extends beyond maps and is applicable to any system, including autonomous flows: these are characterized by lack of a definite absolute time scale for the orbit lengths. (author) 8 refs.

  17. The Autonomous Pathogen Detection System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzenitis, J M; Makarewicz, A J

    2009-01-13

    We developed, tested, and now operate a civilian biological defense capability that continuously monitors the air for biological threat agents. The Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS) collects, prepares, reads, analyzes, and reports results of multiplexed immunoassays and multiplexed PCR assays using Luminex{copyright} xMAP technology and flow cytometer. The mission we conduct is particularly demanding: continuous monitoring, multiple threat agents, high sensitivity, challenging environments, and ultimately extremely low false positive rates. Here, we introduce the mission requirements and metrics, show the system engineering and analysis framework, and describe the progress to date including early development and current status.

  18. Fuzzy control of autonomous robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An autonomous robot which can move and find its own route to a destination by means of fuzzy control is under development. An AI technique is utilized to determine the route to a destination from geographical information gathered through an ITV camera mounted on the robot. Information on robot location is also gained through an ITV camera, and, by applying fuzzy inference operation, the robot's movement is controlled. This paper describes the methods that are used for finding a route and controlling movement. Effectiveness of the proposed methods has been confirmed through actual robot movement tests and through computer simulations. (author)

  19. Autonomous Dome for Robotic Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Akash; Ganesh, Shashikiran

    2016-01-01

    Physical Research Laboratory operates a 50cm robotic observatory at Mount Abu. This Automated Telescope for Variability Studies (ATVS) makes use of Remote Telescope System 2 (RTS2) for autonomous operations. The observatory uses a 3.5m dome from Sirius Observatories. We have developed electronics using Arduino electronic circuit boards with home grown logic and software to control the dome operations. We are in the process of completing the drivers to link our Arduino based dome controller with RTS2. This document is a short description of the various phases of the development and their integration to achieve the required objective.

  20. Rif1 regulates initiation timing of late replication origins throughout the S. cerevisiae genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared M Peace

    Full Text Available Chromosomal DNA replication involves the coordinated activity of hundreds to thousands of replication origins. Individual replication origins are subject to epigenetic regulation of their activity during S-phase, resulting in differential efficiencies and timings of replication initiation during S-phase. This regulation is thought to involve chromatin structure and organization into timing domains with differential ability to recruit limiting replication factors. Rif1 has recently been identified as a genome-wide regulator of replication timing in fission yeast and in mammalian cells. However, previous studies in budding yeast have suggested that Rif1's role in controlling replication timing may be limited to subtelomeric domains and derives from its established role in telomere length regulation. We have analyzed replication timing by analyzing BrdU incorporation genome-wide, and report that Rif1 regulates the timing of late/dormant replication origins throughout the S. cerevisiae genome. Analysis of pfa4Δ cells, which are defective in palmitoylation and membrane association of Rif1, suggests that replication timing regulation by Rif1 is independent of its role in localizing telomeres to the nuclear periphery. Intra-S checkpoint signaling is intact in rif1Δ cells, and checkpoint-defective mec1Δ cells do not comparably deregulate replication timing, together indicating that Rif1 regulates replication timing through a mechanism independent of this checkpoint. Our results indicate that the Rif1 mechanism regulates origin timing irrespective of proximity to a chromosome end, and suggest instead that telomere sequences merely provide abundant binding sites for proteins that recruit Rif1. Still, the abundance of Rif1 binding in telomeric domains may facilitate Rif1-mediated repression of non-telomeric origins that are more distal from centromeres.

  1. Lipid Membranes in Poxvirus Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason P. Laliberte

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Poxviruses replicate in the cytoplasm, where they acquire multiple lipoprotein membranes. Although a proposal that the initial membrane arises de novo has not been substantiated, there is no accepted explanation for its formation from cellular membranes. A subsequent membrane-wrapping step involving modified trans-Golgi or endosomal cisternae results in a particle with three membranes. These wrapped virions traverse the cytoplasm on microtubules; the outermost membrane is lost during exocytosis, the middle one is lost just prior to cell entry, and the remaining membrane fuses with the cell to allow the virus core to enter the cytoplasm and initiate a new infection.

  2. Tus-Ter as a tool to study site-specific DNA replication perturbation in eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nicolai B; Hickson, Ian D; Mankouri, Hocine W

    2014-01-01

    The high-affinity binding of the Tus protein to specific 21-bp sequences, called Ter, causes site-specific, and polar, DNA replication fork arrest in E coli. The Tus-Ter complex serves to coordinate DNA replication with chromosome segregation in this organism. A number of recent and ongoing studies...... have demonstrated that Tus-Ter can be used as a heterologous tool to generate site-specific perturbation of DNA replication when reconstituted in eukaryotes. Here, we review these recent findings and explore the molecular mechanism by which Tus-Ter mediates replication fork (RF) arrest in the budding...... yeast, S. cerevisiae. We propose that Tus-Ter is a versatile, genetically tractable, and regulatable RF blocking system that can be utilized for disrupting DNA replication in a diverse range of host cells....

  3. Automated Search-Based Robustness Testing for Autonomous Vehicle Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin M. Betts

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous systems must successfully operate in complex time-varying spatial environments even when dealing with system faults that may occur during a mission. Consequently, evaluating the robustness, or ability to operate correctly under unexpected conditions, of autonomous vehicle control software is an increasingly important issue in software testing. New methods to automatically generate test cases for robustness testing of autonomous vehicle control software in closed-loop simulation are needed. Search-based testing techniques were used to automatically generate test cases, consisting of initial conditions and fault sequences, intended to challenge the control software more than test cases generated using current methods. Two different search-based testing methods, genetic algorithms and surrogate-based optimization, were used to generate test cases for a simulated unmanned aerial vehicle attempting to fly through an entryway. The effectiveness of the search-based methods in generating challenging test cases was compared to both a truth reference (full combinatorial testing and the method most commonly used today (Monte Carlo testing. The search-based testing techniques demonstrated better performance than Monte Carlo testing for both of the test case generation performance metrics: (1 finding the single most challenging test case and (2 finding the set of fifty test cases with the highest mean degree of challenge.

  4. Epigenetically-inherited centromere and neocentromere DNA replicates earliest in S-phase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amnon Koren

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic centromeres are maintained at specific chromosomal sites over many generations. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, centromeres are genetic elements defined by a DNA sequence that is both necessary and sufficient for function; whereas, in most other eukaryotes, centromeres are maintained by poorly characterized epigenetic mechanisms in which DNA has a less definitive role. Here we use the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans as a model organism to study the DNA replication properties of centromeric DNA. By determining the genome-wide replication timing program of the C. albicans genome, we discovered that each centromere is associated with a replication origin that is the first to fire on its respective chromosome. Importantly, epigenetic formation of new ectopic centromeres (neocentromeres was accompanied by shifts in replication timing, such that a neocentromere became the first to replicate and became associated with origin recognition complex (ORC components. Furthermore, changing the level of the centromere-specific histone H3 isoform led to a concomitant change in levels of ORC association with centromere regions, further supporting the idea that centromere proteins determine origin activity. Finally, analysis of centromere-associated DNA revealed a replication-dependent sequence pattern characteristic of constitutively active replication origins. This strand-biased pattern is conserved, together with centromere position, among related strains and species, in a manner independent of primary DNA sequence. Thus, inheritance of centromere position is correlated with a constitutively active origin of replication that fires at a distinct early time. We suggest a model in which the distinct timing of DNA replication serves as an epigenetic mechanism for the inheritance of centromere position.

  5. Stable DNA replication: interplay between DNA replication, homologous recombination, and transcription.

    OpenAIRE

    Kogoma, T

    1997-01-01

    Chromosome replication in Escherichia coli is normally initiated at oriC, the origin of chromosome replication. E. coli cells possess at least three additional initiation systems for chromosome replication that are normally repressed but can be activated under certain specific conditions. These are termed the stable DNA replication systems. Inducible stable DNA replication (iSDR), which is activated by SOS induction, is proposed to be initiated from a D-loop, an early intermediate in homologo...

  6. Initiation of bacteriophage lambda DNA replication in vitro with purified lambda replication proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Wold, M S; Mallory, J B; Roberts, J D; LeBowitz, J H; McMacken, R

    1982-01-01

    We have developed a soluble enzyme system that replicates exogenously added plasmid DNA (lambda dv) bearing the replication origin of the bacteriophage lambda chromosome. The system contains pure phage lambda O and P replication proteins and a partially purified mixture of Escherichia coli replication proteins [the enzyme system of Fuller, R.S., Kaguni, J.M. & Kornberg, A. (1981) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 78, 7370-7374). The features of lambda dv replication in this system closely resemble t...

  7. Plant Watering Autonomous Mobile Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hema Nagaraja

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Now days, due to busy routine life, people forget to water their plants. In this paper, we present a completely autonomous and a cost-effective system for watering indoor potted plants placed on an even surface. The system comprises of a mobile robot and a temperature-humidity sensing module. The system is fully adaptive to any environment and takes into account the watering needs of the plants using the temperature-humidity sensing module. The paper describes the hardware architecture of the fully automated watering system, which uses wireless communication to communicate between the mobile robot and the sensing module. This gardening robot is completely portable and is equipped with a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID module, a microcontroller, an on-board water reservoir and an attached water pump. It is capable of sensing the watering needs of the plants, locating them and finally watering them autonomously without any human intervention. Mobilization of the robot to the potted plant is achieved by using a predefined path. For identification, an RFID tag is attached to each potted plant. The paper also discusses the detailed implementation of the system supported with complete circuitry. Finally, the paper concludes with system performance including the analysis of the water carrying capacity and time requirements to water a set of plants.

  8. Multi-agent autonomous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Wolfgang (Inventor); Dohm, James (Inventor); Tarbell, Mark A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A multi-agent autonomous system for exploration of hazardous or inaccessible locations. The multi-agent autonomous system includes simple surface-based agents or craft controlled by an airborne tracking and command system. The airborne tracking and command system includes an instrument suite used to image an operational area and any craft deployed within the operational area. The image data is used to identify the craft, targets for exploration, and obstacles in the operational area. The tracking and command system determines paths for the surface-based craft using the identified targets and obstacles and commands the craft using simple movement commands to move through the operational area to the targets while avoiding the obstacles. Each craft includes its own instrument suite to collect information about the operational area that is transmitted back to the tracking and command system. The tracking and command system may be further coupled to a satellite system to provide additional image information about the operational area and provide operational and location commands to the tracking and command system.

  9. Autonomous Robotic Inspection in Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protopapadakis, E.; Stentoumis, C.; Doulamis, N.; Doulamis, A.; Loupos, K.; Makantasis, K.; Kopsiaftis, G.; Amditis, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, an automatic robotic inspector for tunnel assessment is presented. The proposed platform is able to autonomously navigate within the civil infrastructures, grab stereo images and process/analyse them, in order to identify defect types. At first, there is the crack detection via deep learning approaches. Then, a detailed 3D model of the cracked area is created, utilizing photogrammetric methods. Finally, a laser profiling of the tunnel's lining, for a narrow region close to detected crack is performed; allowing for the deduction of potential deformations. The robotic platform consists of an autonomous mobile vehicle; a crane arm, guided by the computer vision-based crack detector, carrying ultrasound sensors, the stereo cameras and the laser scanner. Visual inspection is based on convolutional neural networks, which support the creation of high-level discriminative features for complex non-linear pattern classification. Then, real-time 3D information is accurately calculated and the crack position and orientation is passed to the robotic platform. The entire system has been evaluated in railway and road tunnels, i.e. in Egnatia Highway and London underground infrastructure.

  10. Structured control for autonomous robots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To operate in rich, dynamic environments, autonomous robots must be able to effectively utilize and coordinate their limited physical and occupational resources. As complexity increases, it becomes necessary to impose explicit constraints on the control of planning, perception, and action to ensure that unwanted interactions between behaviors do not occur. This paper advocates developing complex robot systems by layering reactive behaviors onto deliberative components. In this structured control approach, the deliberative components handle normal situations and the reactive behaviors, which are explicitly constrained as to when and how they are activated, handle exceptional situations. The Task Control Architecture (TCA) has been developed to support this approach. TCA provides an integrated set of control constructs useful for implementing deliberative and reactive behaviors. The control constructs facilitate modular and evolutionary system development: they are used to integrate and coordinate planning, perception, and execution, and to incrementally improve the efficiency and robustness of the robot systems. To date, TCA has been used in implementing a half-dozen mobile robot systems, including an autonomous six-legged rover and indoor mobile manipulator

  11. Roles of DNA polymerase epsilon and TopBP1 in DNA replication and damage response

    OpenAIRE

    Hillukkala, T.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract During DNA replication cells accurately copy their DNA to transfer the genetic information to daughter cells. DNA polymerases synthesise the new DNA strand using the old strand as a template. Other functions of DNA polymerases are recombination linked and DNA iamage repair linked DNA synthesis, regulation of replication complex formation and regulation of transcription – a process in which the genetic information is transformed into an RNA sequence needed to guide protein synthesi...

  12. DNA2 Encodes a DNA Helicase Essential for Replication of Eukaryotic Chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Budd, Martin E.; Choe, Won-chae; Campbell, Judith L.

    1995-01-01

    Although a number of eukaryotic DNA helicases have been identified biochemically and still more have been inferred from the amino acid sequences of the products of cloned genes, none of the cellular helicases or putative helicases has to date been implicated in eukaryotic chromosomal DNA replication. By the same token, numerous eukaryotic replication proteins have been identified, but none of these is a helicase. We have recently identified and characterized a temperature-sensitive yeast muta...

  13. Efficient replication bypass of size-expanded DNA base pairs in bacterial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Delaney, James C.; GAO, JIANMIN; Liu, Haibo; Shrivastav, Nidhi; Essigmann, John M.; Kool, Eric T.

    2009-01-01

    Supersize me! Size-expanded DNA bases (xDNA) are able to encode natural DNA sequences in replication. In vitro experiments with a DNA polymerase show nucleotide incorporation opposite the xDNA bases with correct pairing. In vivo experiments using E. coli show that two xDNA bases (xA and xC, see picture) encode the correct replication partners.

  14. Autonomous Control of Space Reactor Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belle R. Upadhyaya; K. Zhao; S.R.P. Perillo; Xiaojia Xu; M.G. Na

    2007-11-30

    Autonomous and semi-autonomous control is a key element of space reactor design in order to meet the mission requirements of safety, reliability, survivability, and life expectancy. Interrestrial nuclear power plants, human operators are avilable to perform intelligent control functions that are necessary for both normal and abnormal operational conditions.

  15. Intelligent autonomous systems 12. Vol. 2. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sukhan [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Gyeonggi-Do (Korea, Republic of). College of Information and Communication Engineering; Yoon, Kwang-Joon [Konkuk Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyungsuck [Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jangmyung (eds.) [Pusan National Univ. (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Electronics Engineering

    2013-02-01

    Recent research in Intelligent and Autonomous Systems. Volume 2 of the proceedings of the 12th International Conference IAS-12, held June 26-29, 2012, jeju Island, Korea. Written by leading experts in the field. Intelligent autonomous systems are emerged as a key enabler for the creation of a new paradigm of services to humankind, as seen by the recent advancement of autonomous cars licensed for driving in our streets, of unmanned aerial and underwater vehicles carrying out hazardous tasks on-site, and of space robots engaged in scientific as well as operational missions, to list only a few. This book aims at serving the researchers and practitioners in related fields with a timely dissemination of the recent progress on intelligent autonomous systems, based on a collection of papers presented at the 12th International Conference on Intelligent Autonomous Systems, held in Jeju, Korea, June 26-29, 2012. With the theme of ''Intelligence and Autonomy for the Service to Humankind, the conference has covered such diverse areas as autonomous ground, aerial, and underwater vehicles, intelligent transportation systems, personal/domestic service robots, professional service robots for surgery/rehabilitation, rescue/security and space applications, and intelligent autonomous systems for manufacturing and healthcare. This volume 2 includes contributions devoted to Service Robotics and Human-Robot Interaction and Autonomous Multi-Agent Systems and Life Engineering.

  16. Autonomic Nervous System and Immune System Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Kenney, MJ; Ganta, CK

    2014-01-01

    The present review assesses the current state of literature defining integrative autonomic-immune physiological processing, focusing on studies that have employed electrophysiological, pharmacological, molecular biological and central nervous system experimental approaches. Central autonomic neural networks are informed of peripheral immune status via numerous communicating pathways, including neural and non-neural. Cytokines and other immune factors affect the level of activity and responsiv...

  17. Autonomous Control of Space Reactor Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autonomous and semi-autonomous control is a key element of space reactor design in order to meet the mission requirements of safety, reliability, survivability, and life expectancy. Interrestrial nuclear power plants, human operators are available to perform intelligent control functions that are necessary for both normal and abnormal operational conditions

  18. Actively replicating West Nile virus is resistant to cytoplasmic delivery of siRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diamond Michael S

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background West Nile virus is an emerging human pathogen for which specific antiviral therapy has not been developed. Recent studies have suggested that RNA interference (RNAi has therapeutic potential as a sequence specific inhibitor of viral infection. Here, we examine the ability of exogenous small interfering RNAs (siRNAs to block the replication of West Nile virus in human cells. Results WNV replication and infection was greatly reduced when siRNA were introduced by cytoplasmic-targeted transfection prior to but not after the establishment of viral replication. WNV appeared to evade rather than actively block the RNAi machinery, as sequence-specific reduction in protein expression of a heterologous transgene was still observed in WNV-infected cells. However, sequence-specific decreases in WNV RNA were observed in cells undergoing active viral replication when siRNA was transfected by an alternate method, electroporation. Conclusion Our results suggest that actively replicating WNV RNA may not be exposed to the cytoplasmic RNAi machinery. Thus, conventional lipid-based siRNA delivery systems may not be adequate for therapy against enveloped RNA viruses that replicate in specialized membrane compartments.

  19. Genetic Elements in the VP Region of Porcine Parvovirus Are Critical to Replication Efficiency in Cell Culture▿

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Sandra; Boisvert, Maude; Tijssen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Factors controlling porcine parvovirus (PPV) replication efficiency are poorly characterized. Two prototype strains of PPV, NADL-2 and Kresse, differ greatly in pathogenic capacity both in vivo and in vitro, yet their genomic sequence is nearly identical (13 single-nucleotide substitutions and a 127-nucleotide noncoding repeated sequence). We have created a series of chimeras of these strains to identify the genetic elements involved in replication efficiency in the host porcine cell line. Wh...

  20. A Practical Approach to Autonomic Dysfunction in Patients with Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailani, Jessica

    2016-05-01

    The presence of autonomic symptoms can make the diagnosis of headache challenging. While commonly seen with the trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias, autonomic dysfunction can also be present in patients with migraine, or with a variety of secondary headaches. The pathophysiology of cranial autonomic symptoms in headache is based between the trigeminal system and the hypothalamus. This article will review the pathophysiology and presence of autonomic dysfunction in headache and will provide techniques to help in headache diagnosis in patients with autonomic dysfunction. PMID:27021770

  1. Self-replication of DNA rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junghoon; Lee, Junwye; Hamada, Shogo; Murata, Satoshi; Ha Park, Sung

    2015-06-01

    Biology provides numerous examples of self-replicating machines, but artificially engineering such complex systems remains a formidable challenge. In particular, although simple artificial self-replicating systems including wooden blocks, magnetic systems, modular robots and synthetic molecular systems have been devised, such kinematic self-replicators are rare compared with examples of theoretical cellular self-replication. One of the principal reasons for this is the amount of complexity that arises when you try to incorporate self-replication into a physical medium. In this regard, DNA is a prime candidate material for constructing self-replicating systems due to its ability to self-assemble through molecular recognition. Here, we show that DNA T-motifs, which self-assemble into ring structures, can be designed to self-replicate through toehold-mediated strand displacement reactions. The inherent design of these rings allows the population dynamics of the systems to be controlled. We also analyse the replication scheme within a universal framework of self-replication and derive a quantitative metric of the self-replicability of the rings.

  2. Autonomic Management for Multi-agent Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadir kamal Salih

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Autonomic computing is a computing system that can manage itself by self-configuration, self-healing, self-optimizing and self-protection. Researchers have been emphasizing the strong role that multi agent systems can play progressively towards the design and implementation of complex autonomic systems. The important of autonomic computing is to create computing systems capable of managing themselves to a far greater extent than they do today. With the nature of autonomy, reactivity, sociality and pro-activity, software agents are promising to make autonomic computing system a reality. This paper mixed multi-agent system with autonomic feature that completely hides its complexity from users/services. Mentioned Java Application Development Framework (JADE as platform example of this environment, could applied to web services as front end to users. With multi agent support it also provides adaptability, intelligence, collaboration, goal oriented interactions, flexibility, mobility and persistence in software systems.

  3. Autonomic Management for Multi-agent Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Salih, Nadir K; Viju, PG K; Mohamed, Abdelmotalib A

    2011-01-01

    Autonomic computing is a computing system that can manage itself by self-configuration, self-healing, self-optimizing and self-protection. Researchers have been emphasizing the strong role that multi agent systems can play progressively towards the design and implementation of complex autonomic systems. The important of autonomic computing is to create computing systems capable of managing themselves to a far greater extent than they do today. With the nature of autonomy, reactivity, sociality and pro-activity, software agents are promising to make autonomic computing system a reality. This paper mixed multi-agent system with autonomic feature that completely hides its complexity from users/services. Mentioned Java Application Development Framework as platform example of this environment, could applied to web services as front end to users. With multi agent support it also provides adaptability, intelligence, collaboration, goal oriented interactions, flexibility, mobility and persistence in software systems

  4. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in the diabetic patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Eugenia Niño Mantilla

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available the dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system is a serious problem in diabetic patients. The cardiovacular autonomic neuropathy is the most important autonomic dysfuntion for it´s implication in the increasesof the mortality rate in diabetis patients. tis ethiopatogenesis is the result of a multifactorial process caused by chronic hyperglycemia, ending up in damage of the autonomic fibers thet innervate the heart and blood vessels, leading to dysfuntional hearth rate control and abnormal vascular dynamics. the associated clinical manifestations include orthotatic hypotension, excecise intolerance, intraoperative cardiovascular liability and silent myocardial ischemia. Being important its recognition, quantitative test to evaluate the cardiovascular funtion, to value its evolution and the effects of the treatment ahould be done, being the most used, the hearth rate response to standing test, and teh valsalva maneuver. the handling of this entity is done improving control of glucose blood levels its the most effective way to prevent the cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in the diabetic patients.

  5. Recombination-dependent DNA replication stimulated by double-strand breaks in bacteriophage T4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuzer, K N; Saunders, M; Weislo, L J; Kreuzer, H W

    1995-12-01

    We analyzed the mechanism of recombination-dependent DNA replication in bacteriophage T4-infected Escherichia coli using plasmids that have sequence homology to the infecting phage chromosome. Consistent with prior studies, a pBR322 plasmid, initially resident in the infected host cell, does not replicate following infection by T4. However, the resident plasmid can be induced to replicate when an integrated copy of pBR322 vector is present in the phage chromosome. As expected for recombination-dependent DNA replication, the induced replication of pBR322 required the phage-encoded UvsY protein. Therefore, recombination-dependent plasmid replication requires homology between the plasmid and phage genomes but does not depend on the presence of any particular T4 DNA sequence on the test plasmid. We next asked whether T4 recombination-dependent DNA replication can be triggered by a double-strand break (dsb). For these experiments, we generated a novel phage strain that cleaves its own genome within the nonessential frd gene by means of the I-TevI endonuclease (encoded within the intron of the wild-type td gene). The dsb within the phage chromosome substantially increased the replication of plasmids that carry T4 inserts homologous to the region of the dsb (the plasmids are not themselves cleaved by the endonuclease). The dsb stimulated replication when the plasmid was homologous to either or both sides of the break but did not stimulate the replication of plasmids with homology to distant regions of the phage chromosome. As expected for recombination-dependent replication, plasmid replication triggered by dsbs was dependent on T4-encoded recombination proteins. These results confirm two important predictions of the model for T4-encoded recombination-dependent DNA replication proposed by Gisela Mosig (p. 120-130, in C. K. Mathews, E. M. Kutter, G. Mosig, and P. B. Berget (ed.), Bacteriophage T4, 1983). In addition, replication stimulated by dsbs provides a site

  6. Linking DNA replication to heterochromatin silencing and epigenetic inheritance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Li; Zhiguo Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Chromatin is organized into distinct functional domains.During mitotic cell division,both genetic information encoded in DNA sequence and epigenetic information embedded in chromatin structure must be faithfully duplicated.The inheritance of epigenetic states is critical in maintaining the genome integrity and gene expression state.In this review,we will discuss recent progress on how proteins known to be involved in DNA replication and DNA replication-coupled nucleosome assembly impact on the inheritance and maintenance of heterochromatin,a tightly compact chromatin structure that silences gene transcription.As heterochromatin is important in regulating gene expression and maintaining genome stability,understanding how heterochromatin states are inherited during S phase of the cell cycle is of fundamental importance.

  7. DNA Replication via Entanglement Swapping

    CERN Document Server

    Pusuluk, Onur

    2010-01-01

    Quantum effects are mainly used for the determination of molecular shapes in molecular biology, but quantum information theory may be a more useful tool to understand the physics of life. Molecular biology assumes that function is explained by structure, the complementary geometries of molecules and weak intermolecular hydrogen bonds. However, both this assumption and its converse are possible if organic molecules and quantum circuits/protocols are considered as hardware and software of living systems that are co-optimized during evolution. In this paper, we try to model DNA replication as a multiparticle entanglement swapping with a reliable qubit representation of nucleotides. In the model, molecular recognition of a nucleotide triggers an intrabase entanglement corresponding to a superposition state of different tautomer forms. Then, base pairing occurs by swapping intrabase entanglements with interbase entanglements.

  8. Autonomous navigation system and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruemmer, David J. [Idaho Falls, ID; Few, Douglas A. [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-09-08

    A robot platform includes perceptors, locomotors, and a system controller, which executes instructions for autonomously navigating a robot. The instructions repeat, on each iteration through an event timing loop, the acts of defining an event horizon based on the robot's current velocity, detecting a range to obstacles around the robot, testing for an event horizon intrusion by determining if any range to the obstacles is within the event horizon, and adjusting rotational and translational velocity of the robot accordingly. If the event horizon intrusion occurs, rotational velocity is modified by a proportion of the current rotational velocity reduced by a proportion of the range to the nearest obstacle and translational velocity is modified by a proportion of the range to the nearest obstacle. If no event horizon intrusion occurs, translational velocity is set as a ratio of a speed factor relative to a maximum speed.

  9. Autonomous Spacecraft Navigation With Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Werner; Jessner, Axel

    2013-01-01

    An external reference system suitable for deep space navigation can be defined by fast spinning and strongly magnetized neutron stars, called pulsars. Their beamed periodic signals have timing stabilities comparable to atomic clocks and provide characteristic temporal signatures that can be used as natural navigation beacons, quite similar to the use of GPS satellites for navigation on Earth. By comparing pulse arrival times measured on-board a spacecraft with predicted pulse arrivals at a reference location, the spacecraft position can be determined autonomously and with high accuracy everywhere in the solar system and beyond. The unique properties of pulsars make clear already today that such a navigation system will have its application in future astronautics. In this paper we describe the basic principle of spacecraft navigation using pulsars and report on the current development status of this novel technology.

  10. Sleep in trigeminal autonomic cephalagias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barløse, Mads; Lund, Nunu; Jensen, Rigmor Højland

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Sleep and cluster headache (CH) are believed to be interconnected but the precise relation to the other trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs) is uncertain and complex. A better understanding of these relations may eventually lead to a clarification of the underlying mechanisms...... and eventually to more effective therapeutic regimens. This review aims to evaluate the existing literature on the subject of TACs and sleep. An association between episodic CH and distinct macrostructural sleep phases, especially the relation to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, has been described in...... some older studies but could not be confirmed in other, more recent studies. Investigations into the microstructure of sleep in these patients are lacking. Only a few case reports exist on the relation between sleep and other TACs. SUMMARY: Recent studies do not find an association between CH and REM...

  11. Digital autonomous terminal access communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novacki, S.

    1987-01-01

    A significant problem for the Bus Monitor Unit is to identify the source of a given transmission. This problem arises from the fact that the label which identifies the source of the transmission as it is put into the bus is intercepted by the Digital Autonomous Terminal Access Communications (DATAC) terminal and removed from the transmission. Thus, a given subsystem will see only data associated with a label and never the identifying label itself. The Bus Monitor must identify the source of the transmission so as to be able to provide some type of error identification/location in the event that some problem with the data transmission occurs. Steps taken to alleviate this problem by modifications to the DATAC terminal are discussed.

  12. An Autonomous Flight Safety System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, James B.; Lanzi, Raymond J.

    2007-01-01

    The Autonomous Flight Safety System (AFSS) being developed by NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center s Wallops Flight Facility and Kennedy Space Center has completed two successful developmental flights and is preparing for a third. AFSS has been demonstrated to be a viable architecture for implementation of a completely vehicle based system capable of protecting life and property in event of an errant vehicle by terminating the flight or initiating other actions. It is capable of replacing current human-in-the-loop systems or acting in parallel with them. AFSS is configured prior to flight in accordance with a specific rule set agreed upon by the range safety authority and the user to protect the public and assure mission success. This paper discusses the motivation for the project, describes the method of development, and presents an overview of the evolving architecture and the current status.

  13. Testbed for an autonomous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikshit, Piyush; Guimaraes, Katia; Ramamurthy, Maya; Agrawala, Ashok K.; Larsen, Ronald L.

    1989-01-01

    In previous works we have defined a general architectural model for autonomous systems, which can easily be mapped to describe the functions of any automated system (SDAG-86-01), and we illustrated that model by applying it to the thermal management system of a space station (SDAG-87-01). In this note, we will further develop that application and design the detail of the implementation of such a model. First we present the environment of our application by describing the thermal management problem and an abstraction, which was called TESTBED, that includes a specific function for each module in the architecture, and the nature of the interfaces between each pair of blocks.

  14. Autonomous Infrastructure for Observatory Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, R.

    This is an era of rapid change from ancient human-mediated modes of astronomical practice to a vision of ever larger time domain surveys, ever bigger "big data", to increasing numbers of robotic telescopes and astronomical automation on every mountaintop. Over the past decades, facets of a new autonomous astronomical toolkit have been prototyped and deployed in support of numerous space missions. Remote and queue observing modes have gained significant market share on the ground. Archives and data-mining are becoming ubiquitous; astroinformatic techniques and virtual observatory standards and protocols are areas of active development. Astronomers and engineers, planetary and solar scientists, and researchers from communities as diverse as particle physics and exobiology are collaborating on a vast range of "multi-messenger" science. What then is missing?

  15. Design of Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadahiro Hyakudome

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available There are concerns about the impact that global warming will have on our environment, and which will inevitably result in expanding deserts and rising water levels. While a lot of underwater vehicles are utilized, AUVs (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle were considered and chosen, as the most suitable tool for conduction survey concerning these global environmental problems. AUVs can comprehensive survey because the vehicle does not have to be connected to the support vessel by tether cable. When such underwater vehicles are made, it is necessary to consider about the following things. 1 Seawater and Water Pressure Environment, 2 Sink, 3 There are no Gas or Battery Charge Stations, 4 Global Positioning System cannot use, 5 Radio waves cannot use. In the paper, outline of above and how deal about it are explained.

  16. Autonomous Industrial Mobile Manipulation (AIMM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilshøj, Mads; Bøgh, Simon; Nielsen, Oluf Skov;

    2012-01-01

    ; sustainability, configuration, adaptation, autonomy, positioning, manipulation and grasping, robot-robot interaction, human-robot interaction, process quality, dependability, and physical properties. Findings - The concise yet comprehensive review provides both researchers (academia) and practitioners (industry......Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the interdisciplinary research field Autonomous Industrial Mobile Manipulation (AIMM), with an emphasis on physical implementations and applications. Design/methodology/approach - Following an introduction to AIMM, this paper...... investigates the missing links and gaps between the research and developments efforts and the real-world application requirements, in order to bring the AIMM technology from laboratories to manufacturing environments. The investigation is based on 12 general application requirements for robotics...

  17. APDS: Autonomous Pathogen Detection System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langlois, R G; Brown, S; Burris, L; Colston, B; Jones, L; Makarewicz, T; Mariella, R; Masquelier, D; McBride, M; Milanovich, F; Masarabadi, S; Venkateswaran, K; Marshall, G; Olson, D; Wolcott, D

    2002-02-14

    An early warning system to counter bioterrorism, the Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS) continuously monitors the environment for the presence of biological pathogens (e.g., anthrax) and once detected, it sounds an alarm much like a smoke detector warns of a fire. Long before September 11, 2001, this system was being developed to protect domestic venues and events including performing arts centers, mass transit systems, major sporting and entertainment events, and other high profile situations in which the public is at risk of becoming a target of bioterrorist attacks. Customizing off-the-shelf components and developing new components, a multidisciplinary team developed APDS, a stand-alone system for rapid, continuous monitoring of multiple airborne biological threat agents in the environment. The completely automated APDS samples the air, prepares fluid samples in-line, and performs two orthogonal tests: immunoassay and nucleic acid detection. When compared to competing technologies, APDS is unprecedented in terms of flexibility and system performance.

  18. Ground Operations Autonomous Control and Integrated Health Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Fernando; Walker, Mark; Wilkins, Kim; Johnson, Robert; Sass, Jared; Youney, Justin

    2014-01-01

    An intelligent autonomous control capability has been developed and is currently being validated in ground cryogenic fluid management operations. The capability embodies a physical architecture consistent with typical launch infrastructure and control systems, augmented by a higher level autonomous control (AC) system enabled to make knowledge-based decisions. The AC system is supported by an integrated system health management (ISHM) capability that detects anomalies, diagnoses causes, determines effects, and could predict future anomalies. AC is implemented using the concept of programmed sequences that could be considered to be building blocks of more generic mission plans. A sequence is a series of steps, and each executes actions once conditions for the step are met (e.g. desired temperatures or fluid state are achieved). For autonomous capability, conditions must consider also health management outcomes, as they will determine whether or not an action is executed, or how an action may be executed, or if an alternative action is executed instead. Aside from health, higher level objectives can also drive how a mission is carried out. The capability was developed using the G2 software environment (www.gensym.com) augmented by a NASA Toolkit that significantly shortens time to deployment. G2 is a commercial product to develop intelligent applications. It is fully object oriented. The core of the capability is a Domain Model of the system where all elements of the system are represented as objects (sensors, instruments, components, pipes, etc.). Reasoning and decision making can be done with all elements in the domain model. The toolkit also enables implementation of failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA), which are represented as root cause trees. FMEA's are programmed graphically, they are reusable, as they address generic FMEA referring to classes of subsystems or objects and their functional relationships. User interfaces for integrated awareness by

  19. Replicating organizational knowledge: principles or templates?

    OpenAIRE

    Baden-Fuller, Charles; Winter, Sidney G.

    2005-01-01

    We discuss how firms can replicate practices and knowledge embedded in practices by following principles, with no direct reference to an extant working example (template). Definitions are provided for the key concepts of templates, principles, and background knowledge. We address the challenges of providing operational measures for successful replication, and for comparing the efficacy of principles and templates. By using two longitudinal case studies of replication across the units of two m...

  20. Federated SPARQL Queries Processing with Replicated Fragments

    OpenAIRE

    Montoya, Gabriela; Skaf-Molli, Hala; Molli, Pascal; Vidal, Maria-Esther

    2015-01-01

    Federated query engines allow to consume linked data from SPARQL endpoints. Replicating data fragments from different sources allows to reorganize data to better fit federated query processing of data consumers. However, existing federated query engines poorly support replication. In this paper, we propose a replication-aware federated query engine that extends state-of-art federated query engine ANAPSID and FedX with Fedra, a source selection strategy that approximates the source selection p...

  1. Persistent HIV-1 replication during antiretroviral therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez-Picado, Javier; Deeks, Steven G

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review The present review will highlight some of the recent findings regarding the capacity of HIV-1 to replicate during antiretroviral therapy (ART). Recent findings Although ART is highly effective at inhibiting HIV replication, it is not curative. Several mechanisms contribute to HIV persistence during ART, including HIV latency, immune dysfunction, and perhaps persistent low-level spread of the virus to uninfected cells (replication). The success in curing HIV will depend on ef...

  2. Controlled rereplication at DNA replication origins

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez, María

    2008-01-01

    No-more-than-once per cell cycle initiation of DNA replication is a golden rule to maintain genome stability and guarantee cell survival. In our recent work we discovered that small genome fragments of about 200 bp are repeatedly synthesised at human DNA replication origins at the time of origin firing during S phase in normal cells. Rereplicated DNA fragments coincide physical and temporarily with replication origin activity, implying that their generation is intimately associated with the i...

  3. Replication licensing and the DNA damage checkpoint

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, Jeanette Gowen

    2009-01-01

    Accurate and timely duplication of chromosomal DNA requires that replication be coordinated with processes that ensure genome integrity. Significant advances in determining how the earliest steps in DNA replication are affected by DNA damage have highlighted some of the mechanisms to establish that coordination. Recent insights have expanded the relationship between the ATM and ATR-dependent checkpoint pathways and the proteins that bind and function at replication origins. These findings sug...

  4. Interaction of perception and gaze control in autonomous vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellkofer, Martin; Luetzeler, Michael; Dickmanns, Ernst D.

    2001-10-01

    For robust and secure behavior in natural environment an autonomous vehicle needs an elaborate vision sensor as main source of information. The vision sensor must be adaptable to the external situation, the mission, the capabilities of the vehicle and the knowledge about the external world accumulated up to the present time. In the EMS-Vision system, this vision sensor consists of four cameras with different focal lengths mounted on a highly dynamic pan-tilt camera head. Image processing, gaze control and behavior decision interact with each other in a closed loop. The image processing experts specify so-called regions of attention (RoAs) for each object in 3D object coordinates. These RoAs should be visible with a resolution as required by the measurement techniques applied. The behavior decision module specifies the relevance of obstacles like road segments, crossings or landmarks in the situation context. The gaze control unit takes all this information in order to plan, optimize and perform a sequence of smooth pursuits, interrupted by saccades. The sequence with the best information gain is performed. The information gain depends on the relevance of objects or object parts, the duration of smooth pursuit maneuvers, the quality of perception and the number of saccades. The functioning of the EMS-Vision system is demonstrated in a complex and scalable autonomous mission with the UBM test vehicle VAMORS.

  5. Cardio-autonomic control and wellbeing due to oscillating color light exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grote, Vincent; Kelz, Christina; Goswami, Nandu; Stossier, Harald; Tafeit, Erwin; Moser, Maximilian

    2013-04-10

    We investigated the cardio-autonomic and psychological effects of colored light cycling with the wavelength of ultradian rhythms. In two consecutive experiments, an explorative, longitudinal test followed by a randomized crossover design, 20 healthy subjects each were exposed to oscillating red, green and blue light. Heart rate, heart rate variability (HRV) and subjective wellbeing were measured. Significant effects of the oscillating color light exposure were observed for heart rate and cardio-autonomic control rhythms, derived from HRV (p≤.001). These effects on HRV were replicated in the second experiment in comparison to a similar white light exposure protocol (p≤.05). Vigilance showed improvement over the two weeks (p≤.001) in the longitudinal study. External color light cycling at the wavelength of blood pressure oscillations appears to amplify the endogenous autonomic oscillations. This leads to an optimization of cardio-autonomic control; an effect that was reflected shortly after the onset of the light exposure sessions by the increase of heart rate variability. From the results, we conclude that it takes repeated light exposure session to foster the positive effects on the psychological aspects, as we observed an increase of subjectively perceived mood only in the longitudinal study, not for the crossover design study. The results of our study imply some possible health effects of a color light exposure that is adjusted to 10 s and 1 min oscillations of humans' ultradian rhythms. These novel results show possible applications of oscillating visual inputs to the activation of processes connected to physiological regulation. PMID:23506685

  6. Cells and prions: a license to replicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuvolone, Mario; Aguzzi, Adriano; Heikenwalder, Mathias

    2009-08-20

    Prion diseases are neurodegenerative, infectious disorders characterized by the aggregation of a misfolded isoform of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)). The infectious agent - termed prion - is mainly composed of misfolded PrP(Sc). In addition to the central nervous system prions can colonize secondary lymphoid organs and inflammatory foci. Follicular dendritic cells are important extraneural sites of prion replication. However, recent data point to a broader range of cell types that can replicate prions. Here, we review the state of the art in regards to peripheral prion replication, neuroinvasion and the determinants of prion replication competence. PMID:19527722

  7. Current challenges in autonomous vehicle development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, J.; Hong, W. S.; Mahoney, R. B., Jr.; Sparrow, D. A.

    2006-05-01

    The field of autonomous vehicles is a rapidly growing one, with significant interest from both government and industry sectors. Autonomous vehicles represent the intersection of artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics, combining decision-making with real-time control. Autonomous vehicles are desired for use in search and rescue, urban reconnaissance, mine detonation, supply convoys, and more. The general adage is to use robots for anything dull, dirty, dangerous or dumb. While a great deal of research has been done on autonomous systems, there are only a handful of fielded examples incorporating machine autonomy beyond the level of teleoperation, especially in outdoor/complex environments. In an attempt to assess and understand the current state of the art in autonomous vehicle development, a few areas where unsolved problems remain became clear. This paper outlines those areas and provides suggestions for the focus of science and technology research. The first step in evaluating the current state of autonomous vehicle development was to develop a definition of autonomy. A number of autonomy level classification systems were reviewed. The resulting working definitions and classification schemes used by the authors are summarized in the opening sections of the paper. The remainder of the report discusses current approaches and challenges in decision-making and real-time control for autonomous vehicles. Suggested research focus areas for near-, mid-, and long-term development are also presented.

  8. Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunctions and sleep disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calandra-Buonaura, Giovanna; Provini, Federica; Guaraldi, Pietro; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Cortelli, Pietro

    2016-04-01

    Animal and human studies have shown that disorders of the autonomic nervous system may influence sleep physiology. Conversely, sleep disorders may be associated with autonomic dysfunctions. The current review describes the clinical presentation, supposed pathogenetic mechanisms and the diagnostic and prognostic implications of impaired cardiovascular autonomic control in sleep disorders. This dysfunction may result from a common pathogenetic mechanism affecting both autonomic cardiovascular control and sleep, as in fatal familial insomnia, or it may be mainly caused by the sleep disorder, as observed in obstructive sleep apnoea. For other sleep disorders, like primary insomnia, restless legs syndrome, narcolepsy type 1 and rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder, the causal link with the autonomic dysfunction and its possible impact on health remains unsettled. Given its clinical implications, most of the data available suggest that a systematic assessment of the association between sleep disorders and impaired autonomic control of the cardiovascular system is warranted. Understanding the mechanism of this association may also yield insights into the interaction between the autonomic nervous system and sleep. PMID:26146026

  9. Autonomous underwater pipeline monitoring navigation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Byrel; Mahmoudian, Nina; Meadows, Guy

    2014-06-01

    This paper details the development of an autonomous motion-control and navigation algorithm for an underwater autonomous vehicle, the Ocean Server IVER3, to track long linear features such as underwater pipelines. As part of this work, the Nonlinear and Autonomous Systems Laboratory (NAS Lab) developed an algorithm that utilizes inputs from the vehicles state of the art sensor package, which includes digital imaging, digital 3-D Sidescan Sonar, and Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers. The resulting algorithms should tolerate real-world waterway with episodic strong currents, low visibility, high sediment content, and a variety of small and large vessel traffic.

  10. Autonomous Demand Response for Primary Frequency Regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnelly, Matt; Trudnowski, Daniel J.; Mattix, S.; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2012-02-28

    The research documented within this report examines the use of autonomous demand response to provide primary frequency response in an interconnected power grid. The work builds on previous studies in several key areas: it uses a large realistic model (i.e., the interconnection of the western United States and Canada); it establishes a set of metrics that can be used to assess the effectiveness of autonomous demand response; and it independently adjusts various parameters associated with using autonomous demand response to assess effectiveness and to examine possible threats or vulnerabilities associated with the technology.

  11. Autonomous Bicycle: The First Self Balanced Ride

    OpenAIRE

    Ånnestad, Dag Christian

    2011-01-01

    The idea of an autonomous bicycle originates from Jens G. Balchen who wanted to make an unmanned autonomous bicycle. The idea was picked up by Amund Skavhaug who extended the idea with the concept of using an inverted pendulum to simulate a leaning rider. The previous attempts to develop a bicycle capable of performing an autonomous ride has so far all ended in failure. The main reason for the Department of Engineering Cybernetics is to develop such a bicycle is for use in recruitment and mot...

  12. Amplified human MYC oncogenes localized to replicating submicroscopic circular DNA molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amplification of genes can sometimes be detected by molecular hybridization but not by cytogenetic methods, suggesting that in some cases the units of amplification may be too small to be detected by light microscopy. The experiments reported here investigate whether submicroscopic amplification units are present in early passages of the human tumor cell lines HL-60 and COLO 320. The results show that such cells do contain submicroscopic, extrachromosomal, supercoiled circular molecules harboring MYC genes. The molecules in HL-60 are ∼250 kilobase pairs (kbp), while those in COLO 320 are 120-160 kbp. The extrachromosomal molecules in HL-60 are shown to replicate semiconservatively and approximately once in one cell cycle. The authors propose that these submicroscopic elements are precursors of double-minute chromosomes, the usual extrachromosomal manifestation of gene amplification, since both are structurally similar and replicate autonomously

  13. Replication initiation at the Escherichia coli chromosomal origin

    OpenAIRE

    Kaguni, Jon M.

    2011-01-01

    To initiate DNA replication, DnaA recognizes and binds to specific sequences within the Escherichia coli chromosomal origin (oriC), and then unwinds a region within oriC. Next, DnaA interacts with DnaB helicase in loading the DnaB-DnaC complex on each separated strand. Primer formation by primase (DnaG) induces the dissociation of DnaC from DnaB, which involves the hydrolysis of ATP bound to DnaC. Recent evidence indicates that DnaC acts as a checkpoint in the transition from initiation to th...

  14. Two E2 binding sites alone are sufficient to function as the minimal origin of replication of human papillomavirus type 18 DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Sverdrup, F; Khan, S. A.

    1995-01-01

    Replication of papillomaviruses requires an origin of replication and two virus-encoded proteins, E1 and E2. Using a transient replication assay for human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV-18) DNA, we have found that two adjacent sequences present within the origin of replication can independently support replication. The first, a 77-bp region, contains one E2 binding site (E2BS) and a 16-bp inverted repeat element that probably corresponds to the E1 binding site (E1BS). The other, an 81-bp region,...

  15. Depletion of Cellular Pre-Replication Complex Factors Results in Increased Human Cytomegalovirus DNA Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Tamara Evans Braun; Emma Poole; John Sinclair

    2012-01-01

    Although HCMV encodes many genes required for the replication of its DNA genome, no HCMV-encoded orthologue of the origin binding protein, which has been identified in other herpesviruses, has been identified. This has led to speculation that HCMV may use other viral proteins or possibly cellular factors for the initiation of DNA synthesis. It is also unclear whether cellular replication factors are required for efficient replication of viral DNA during or after viral replication origin recog...

  16. Development of a Commercially Viable, Modular Autonomous Robotic Systems for Converting any Vehicle to Autonomous Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, David W.; Grabbe, Robert D.; Marzwell, Neville I.

    1994-01-01

    A Modular Autonomous Robotic System (MARS), consisting of a modular autonomous vehicle control system that can be retrofit on to any vehicle to convert it to autonomous control and support a modular payload for multiple applications is being developed. The MARS design is scalable, reconfigurable, and cost effective due to the use of modern open system architecture design methodologies, including serial control bus technology to simplify system wiring and enhance scalability. The design is augmented with modular, object oriented (C++) software implementing a hierarchy of five levels of control including teleoperated, continuous guidepath following, periodic guidepath following, absolute position autonomous navigation, and relative position autonomous navigation. The present effort is focused on producing a system that is commercially viable for routine autonomous patrolling of known, semistructured environments, like environmental monitoring of chemical and petroleum refineries, exterior physical security and surveillance, perimeter patrolling, and intrafacility transport applications.

  17. Completion of DNA replication in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendel, Brian M.; Courcelle, Charmain T.; Courcelle, Justin

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism by which cells recognize and complete replicated regions at their precise doubling point must be remarkably efficient, occurring thousands of times per cell division along the chromosomes of humans. However, this process remains poorly understood. Here we show that, in Escherichia coli, the completion of replication involves an enzymatic system that effectively counts pairs and limits cellular replication to its doubling point by allowing converging replication forks to transiently continue through the doubling point before the excess, over-replicated regions are incised, resected, and joined. Completion requires RecBCD and involves several proteins associated with repairing double-strand breaks including, ExoI, SbcDC, and RecG. However, unlike double-strand break repair, completion occurs independently of homologous recombination and RecA. In some bacterial viruses, the completion mechanism is specifically targeted for inactivation to allow over-replication to occur during lytic replication. The results suggest that a primary cause of genomic instabilities in many double-strand-break-repair mutants arises from an impaired ability to complete replication, independent from DNA damage. PMID:25368150

  18. Replication and Robustness in Developmental Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Greg J.; Engel, Mimi; Claessens, Amy; Dowsett, Chantelle J.

    2014-01-01

    Replications and robustness checks are key elements of the scientific method and a staple in many disciplines. However, leading journals in developmental psychology rarely include explicit replications of prior research conducted by different investigators, and few require authors to establish in their articles or online appendices that their key…

  19. Plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid replication in Streptomyces griseus.

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Y.; Zhuang, Z.; Zhu, Y.; Xu, Y.; Dong, K.

    1981-01-01

    A series of electron micrographs showing the presence of different molecular forms representing various replication stages of plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid from Streptomyces griseus was obtained. Based upon an analysis of these electron micrographs, a tentative model for plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid replication in S. griseus is proposed.

  20. Recommendations for Replication Research in Special Education: A Framework of Systematic, Conceptual Replications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Michael D.; Cook, Bryan G.; Therrien, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Special education researchers conduct studies that can be considered replications. However, they do not often refer to them as replication studies. The purpose of this article is to consider the potential benefits of conceptualizing special education intervention research within a framework of systematic, conceptual replication. Specifically, we…

  1. Autonomic Dysfunction in Patients with Mild to Moderate Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen-Dahm, Christina; Waldemar, Gunhild; Staehelin Jensen, Troels;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Autonomic function has received little attention in Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD pathology has an impact on brain regions which are important for central autonomic control, but it is unclear if AD is associated with disturbance of autonomic function. OBJECTIVE: To investigate autonomic...

  2. Automatic sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Haeseler, Friedrich

    2003-01-01

    Automatic sequences are sequences which are produced by a finite automaton. Although they are not random they may look as being random. They are complicated, in the sense of not being not ultimately periodic, they may look rather complicated, in the sense that it may not be easy to name the rule by which the sequence is generated, however there exists a rule which generates the sequence. The concept automatic sequences has special applications in algebra, number theory, finite automata and formal languages, combinatorics on words. The text deals with different aspects of automatic sequences, in particular:· a general introduction to automatic sequences· the basic (combinatorial) properties of automatic sequences· the algebraic approach to automatic sequences· geometric objects related to automatic sequences.

  3. A Primer on Autonomous Aerial Vehicle Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppejans, Hugo H. G.; Myburgh, Herman C.

    2015-01-01

    There is a large amount of research currently being done on autonomous micro-aerial vehicles (MAV), such as quadrotor helicopters or quadcopters. The ability to create a working autonomous MAV depends mainly on integrating a simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) solution with the rest of the system. This paper provides an introduction for creating an autonomous MAV for enclosed environments, aimed at students and professionals alike. The standard autonomous system and MAV automation are discussed, while we focus on the core concepts of SLAM systems and trajectory planning algorithms. The advantages and disadvantages of using remote processing are evaluated, and recommendations are made regarding the viability of on-board processing. Recommendations are made regarding best practices to serve as a guideline for aspirant MAV designers. PMID:26633410

  4. A Primer on Autonomous Aerial Vehicle Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo H. G. Coppejans

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a large amount of research currently being done on autonomous micro-aerial vehicles (MAV, such as quadrotor helicopters or quadcopters. The ability to create a working autonomous MAV depends mainly on integrating a simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM solution with the rest of the system. This paper provides an introduction for creating an autonomous MAV for enclosed environments, aimed at students and professionals alike. The standard autonomous system and MAV automation are discussed, while we focus on the core concepts of SLAM systems and trajectory planning algorithms. The advantages and disadvantages of using remote processing are evaluated, and recommendations are made regarding the viability of on-board processing. Recommendations are made regarding best practices to serve as a guideline for aspirant MAV designers.

  5. A Primer on Autonomous Aerial Vehicle Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppejans, Hugo H G; Myburgh, Herman C

    2015-01-01

    There is a large amount of research currently being done on autonomous micro-aerial vehicles (MAV), such as quadrotor helicopters or quadcopters. The ability to create a working autonomous MAV depends mainly on integrating a simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) solution with the rest of the system. This paper provides an introduction for creating an autonomous MAV for enclosed environments, aimed at students and professionals alike. The standard autonomous system and MAV automation are discussed, while we focus on the core concepts of SLAM systems and trajectory planning algorithms. The advantages and disadvantages of using remote processing are evaluated, and recommendations are made regarding the viability of on-board processing. Recommendations are made regarding best practices to serve as a guideline for aspirant MAV designers. PMID:26633410

  6. Autonomic html interface generator for web applications

    CERN Document Server

    Bassil, Youssef; 10.5121/ijwest.2012.3104

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in computing systems have led to a new digital era in which every area of life is nearly interrelated with information technology. However, with the trend towards large-scale IT systems, a new challenge has emerged. The complexity of IT systems is becoming an obstacle that hampers the manageability, operability, and maintainability of modern computing infrastructures. Autonomic computing popped up to provide an answer to these ever-growing pitfalls. Fundamentally, autonomic systems are self-configuring, self-healing, self-optimizing, and self-protecting; hence, they can automate all complex IT processes without human intervention. This paper proposes an autonomic HTML web-interface generator based on XML Schema and Style Sheet specifications for self-configuring graphical user interfaces of web applications. The goal of this autonomic generator is to automate the process of customizing GUI web-interfaces according to the ever-changing business rules, policies, and operating environment with th...

  7. An introduction to autonomous control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antsaklis, Panos J.; Passino, Kevin M.; Wang, S. J.

    1991-01-01

    The functions, characteristics, and benefits of autonomous control are outlined. An autonomous control functional architecture for future space vehicles that incorporates the concepts and characteristics described is presented. The controller is hierarchical, with an execution level (the lowest level), coordination level (middle level), and management and organization level (highest level). The general characteristics of the overall architecture, including those of the three levels, are explained, and an example to illustrate their functions is given. Mathematical models for autonomous systems, including 'logical' discrete event system models, are discussed. An approach to the quantitative, systematic modeling, analysis, and design of autonomous controllers is also discussed. It is a hybrid approach since it uses conventional analysis techniques based on difference and differential equations and new techniques for the analysis of the systems described with a symbolic formalism such as finite automata. Some recent results from the areas of planning and expert systems, machine learning, artificial neural networks, and the area restructurable controls are briefly outlined.

  8. AGATE: Autonomous Go and Touch Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation (AGATE, for Autonomous Go And Touch Exploration) will enable single-sol "go and touch" instrument placement from distances of up to five meters for...

  9. Autonomic symptoms in idiopathic REM behavior disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferini-Strambi, Luigi; Oertel, Wolfgang; Dauvilliers, Yves;

    2014-01-01

    Patients with idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder (iRBD) are at very high risk of developing neurodegenerative synucleinopathies, which are disorders with prominent autonomic dysfunction. Several studies have documented autonomic dysfunction in iRBD, but large-scale assessment of autonomic...... symptoms has never been systematically performed. Patients with polysomnography-confirmed iRBD (318 cases) and controls (137 healthy volunteers and 181 sleep center controls with sleep diagnoses other than RBD) were recruited from 13 neurological centers in 10 countries from 2008 to 2011. A validated scale...... to study the disorders of the autonomic nervous system in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, the SCOPA-AUT, was administered to all the patients and controls. The SCOPA-AUT consists of 25 items assessing the following domains: gastrointestinal, urinary, cardiovascular, thermoregulatory, pupillomotor...

  10. Autonomic Closure for Large Eddy Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Ryan; Hamlington, Peter; Dahm, Werner J. A.

    2015-11-01

    A new autonomic subgrid-scale closure has been developed for large eddy simulation (LES). The approach poses a supervised learning problem that captures nonlinear, nonlocal, and nonequilibrium turbulence effects without specifying a predefined turbulence model. By solving a regularized optimization problem on test filter scale quantities, the autonomic approach identifies a nonparametric function that represents the best local relation between subgrid stresses and resolved state variables. The optimized function is then applied at the grid scale to determine unknown LES subgrid stresses by invoking scale similarity in the inertial range. A priori tests of the autonomic approach on homogeneous isotropic turbulence show that the new approach is amenable to powerful optimization and machine learning methods and is successful for a wide range of filter scales in the inertial range. In these a priori tests, the autonomic closure substantially improves upon the dynamic Smagorinsky model in capturing the instantaneous, statistical, and energy transfer properties of the subgrid stress field.

  11. LEO AUTONOMOUS NAVIGATION BASED ON IMAGE MOTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUANFang; LIUJian-ye; YUFeng

    2005-01-01

    A method of LEO autonomous navigation is presented based on the nonlinear satellite velocity relative to the earth. The velocity is detected by a high-speed camera, with the attitude information detected by a star sensor. Compared with traditional autonomous navigation by landmark identification, the satellite velocity relarive to the earth is obtained by correlativity analysis of images. It does not need to recognize ground objects or views. Since it is not necessary to pre-store the database of ground marks, lots of memory space can be saved.The state and observation equations are constructed, and the filtering is processed by the Kalman filter. Simulation results show that the system has high autonomous navigation precision in LEO autonomous navigation.

  12. Rover: Autonomous concepts for Mars exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiget, A.; Castets, B.; Chochon, H.; Hayard, M.; Lamarre, H.; Lamothe, A.

    1993-01-01

    The development of a mobile, autonomous vehicle that will be launched towards an unknown planet is considered. The rover significant constraints are: Ariane 5 compatibility, Earth/Mars transfer capability, 1000 km autonomous moving in Mars environment, on board localization, and maximum science capability. Two different types of subsystem were considered: classical subsystems (mechanical and mechanisms, thermal, telecommunications, power, onboard data processing) and robotics subsystem, (perception/navigation, autonomous displacement generation, autonomous localization). The needs of each subsystem were studied in terms of energy and data handling capability, in order to choose an on board architecture which best use the available capability, by means of specialized parts. A compromise must always be done between every subsystem in order to obtain the real need with respect to the goal, for example: between perception/navigation and the motion capability. A compromise must also be found between mechanical assembly and calibration need, which is a real problem.

  13. Persistent HIV-1 replication during antiretroviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Picado, Javier; Deeks, Steven G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review The present review will highlight some of the recent findings regarding the capacity of HIV-1 to replicate during antiretroviral therapy (ART). Recent findings Although ART is highly effective at inhibiting HIV replication, it is not curative. Several mechanisms contribute to HIV persistence during ART, including HIV latency, immune dysfunction, and perhaps persistent low-level spread of the virus to uninfected cells (replication). The success in curing HIV will depend on efficiently targeting these three aspects. The degree to which HIV replicates during ART remains controversial. Most studies have failed to find any evidence of HIV evolution in blood, even with samples collected over many years, although a recent very intensive study of three individuals suggested that the virus population does shift, at least during the first few months of therapy. Stronger but still not definitive evidence for replication comes from a series of studies in which standard regimens were intensified with an integration inhibitor, resulting in changes in episomal DNA (blood) and cell-associated RNA (tissue). Limited drug penetration within tissues and the presence of immune sanctuaries have been argued as potential mechanisms allowing HIV to spread during ART. Mathematical models suggest that HIV replication and evolution is possible even without the selection of fully drug-resistant variants. As persistent HIV replication could have clinical consequences and might limit the efficacy of curative interventions, determining if HIV replicates during ART and why, should remain a key focus of the HIV research community. Summary Residual viral replication likely persists in lymphoid tissues, at least in a subset of individuals. Abnormal levels of immune activation might contribute to sustain virus replication. PMID:27078619

  14. Registered Replication Report: Hart & Albarracín (2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Language can be viewed as a complex set of cues that shape people's mental representations of situations. For example, people think of behavior described using imperfective aspect (i.e., what a person was doing) as a dynamic, unfolding sequence of actions, whereas the same behavior described using perfective aspect (i.e., what a person did) is perceived as a completed whole. A recent study found that aspect can also influence how we think about a person's intentions (Hart & Albarracín, 2011). Participants judged actions described in imperfective as being more intentional (d between 0.67 and 0.77) and they imagined these actions in more detail (d = 0.73). The fact that this finding has implications for legal decision making, coupled with the absence of other direct replication attempts, motivated this registered replication report (RRR). Multiple laboratories carried out 12 direct replication studies, including one MTurk study. A meta-analysis of these studies provides a precise estimate of the size of this effect free from publication bias. This RRR did not find that grammatical aspect affects intentionality (d between 0 and -0.24) or imagery (d = -0.08). We discuss possible explanations for the discrepancy between these results and those of the original study. PMID:26817732

  15. AcMNPV As A Model for Baculovirus DNA Replication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eric B. Carstens

    2009-01-01

    Baculoviruses were first identified as insect-specific pathogens, and it was this specificity that lead to their use as safe, target specific biological pesticides. For the past 30 years, AcMNPV has served as the subject of intense basic molecular research into the baculovirus infectious cycle including the interaction of the virus with a continuous insect cell line derived from Spodoptera frugiperda. The studies on baculoviruese have led to an in-depth understanding of the physical organization of the viral genomes including many complete genomic sequences, the time course of gene expression, and the application of this basic research to the use of baculoviruses not only as insecticides, but also as a universal eukaryotic protein expression system, and a potential vector in gene therapy. A great deal has also been discovered about the viral genes required for the replication of the baculovirus genome, while much remains to be learned about the mechanism of viral DNA replication. This report outlines the current knowledge of the factors involved in baculovirus DNA replication, using data on AcMNPV as a model for most members of the Baculoviridae.

  16. Autonomous intelligent cruise control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baret, Marc; Bomer, Thierry T.; Calesse, C.; Dudych, L.; L'Hoist, P.

    1995-01-01

    Autonomous intelligent cruise control (AICC) systems are not only controlling vehicles' speed but acting on the throttle and eventually on the brakes they could automatically maintain the relative speed and distance between two vehicles in the same lane. And more than just for comfort it appears that these new systems should improve the safety on highways. By applying a technique issued from the space research carried out by MATRA, a sensor based on a charge coupled device (CCD) was designed to acquire the reflected light on standard-mounted car reflectors of pulsed laser diodes emission. The CCD is working in a unique mode called flash during transfer (FDT) which allows identification of target patterns in severe optical environments. It provides high accuracy for distance and angular position of targets. The absence of moving mechanical parts ensures high reliability for this sensor. The large field of view and the high measurement rate give a global situation assessment and a short reaction time. Then, tracking and filtering algorithms have been developed in order to select the target, on which the equipped vehicle determines its safety distance and speed, taking into account its maneuvering and the behaviors of other vehicles.

  17. Autonomic Findings in Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Kaufmann, Horacio; Martinez, Jose; Katz, Stuart D; Tully, Lisa; Reynolds, Harmony R

    2016-01-15

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) often occurs after emotional or physical stress. Norepinephrine levels are unusually high in the acute phase, suggesting a hyperadrenergic mechanism. Comparatively little is known about parasympathetic function in patients with TC. We sought to characterize autonomic function at rest and in response to physical and emotional stimuli in 10 women with a confirmed history of TC and 10 age-matched healthy women. Sympathetic and parasympathetic activity was assessed at rest and during baroreflex stimulation (Valsalva maneuver and tilt testing), cognitive stimulation (Stroop test), and emotional stimulation (event recall, patients). Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and measurement of brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilation were also performed. TC women (tested an average of 37 months after the event) had excessive pressor responses to cognitive stress (Stroop test: p emotional arousal (recall of TC event: p = 0.03 vs baseline). Pressor responses to hemodynamic stimuli were also amplified (Valsalva overshoot: p <0.05) and prolonged (duration: p <0.01) in the TC women compared with controls. Plasma catecholamine levels did not differ between TC women and controls. Indexes of parasympathetic (vagal) modulation of heart rate induced by respiration and cardiovagal baroreflex gain were significantly decreased in the TC women versus controls. In conclusion, even long after the initial episode, women with previous episode of TC have excessive sympathetic responsiveness and reduced parasympathetic modulation of heart rate. Impaired baroreflex control may therefore play a role in TC. PMID:26743349

  18. Mechanical Autonomous Stochastic Heat Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Garcia, Marc; Foehr, André; Molerón, Miguel; Lydon, Joseph; Chong, Christopher; Daraio, Chiara

    2016-07-01

    Stochastic heat engines are devices that generate work from random thermal motion using a small number of highly fluctuating degrees of freedom. Proposals for such devices have existed for more than a century and include the Maxwell demon and the Feynman ratchet. Only recently have they been demonstrated experimentally, using, e.g., thermal cycles implemented in optical traps. However, recent experimental demonstrations of classical stochastic heat engines are nonautonomous, since they require an external control system that prescribes a heating and cooling cycle and consume more energy than they produce. We present a heat engine consisting of three coupled mechanical resonators (two ribbons and a cantilever) subject to a stochastic drive. The engine uses geometric nonlinearities in the resonating ribbons to autonomously convert a random excitation into a low-entropy, nonpassive oscillation of the cantilever. The engine presents the anomalous heat transport property of negative thermal conductivity, consisting in the ability to passively transfer energy from a cold reservoir to a hot reservoir.

  19. Semi-Autonomous Vehicle Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The primary objective this summer is "evaluating standards for wireless architecture for the internet of things". The Internet of Things is the network of physical objects or "things" embedded with electronics, software, sensors and network connectivity which enables these objects to collect and exchange data and make decisions based on said data. This was accomplished by creating a semi-autonomous vehicle that takes advantage of multiple sensors, cameras, and onboard computers and combined them with a mesh network which enabled communication across large distances with little to no interruption. The mesh network took advantage of what is known as DTN - Disruption Tolerant Networking which according to NASA is the new communications protocol that is "the first step towards interplanetary internet." The use of DTN comes from the fact that it will store information if an interruption in communications is detected and even forward that information via other relays within range so that the data is not lost. This translates well into the project because as the car moves further away from whatever is sending it commands (in this case a joystick), the information can still be forwarded to the car with little to no loss of information thanks to the mesh nodes around the driving area.

  20. Autonomous gliding entry guidance with

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Jie

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel three-dimensional autonomous entry guidance for relatively high lift-to-drag ratio vehicles satisfying geographic constraints and other path constraints. The guidance is composed of onboard trajectory planning and robust trajectory tracking. For trajectory planning, a longitudinal sub-planner is introduced to generate a feasible drag-versus-energy profile by using the interpolation between upper boundary and lower boundary of entry corridor to get the desired trajectory length. The associated magnitude of the bank angle can be specified by drag profile, while the sign of bank angle is determined by lateral sub-planner. Two-reverse mode is utilized to satisfy waypoint constraints and dynamic heading error corridor is utilized to satisfy no-fly zone constraints. The longitudinal and lateral sub-planners are iteratively employed until all of the path constraints are satisfied. For trajectory tracking, a novel tracking law based on the active disturbance rejection control is introduced. Finally, adaptability tests and Monte Carlo simulations of the entry guidance approach are performed. Results show that the proposed entry guidance approach can adapt to different entry missions and is able to make the vehicle reach the prescribed target point precisely in spite of geographic constraints.

  1. Autonomic dysregulation in headache patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gass, Jason J; Glaros, Alan G

    2013-12-01

    To analyze autonomic nervous system activity in headache subjects, measurements of heart rate variability (HRV), skin temperature, skin conductance, and respiration were compared to a matched control group. HRV data were recorded in time and frequency domains. Subjects also completed self-report questionnaires assessing psychological distress, fatigue, and sleep dysfunction. Twenty-one headache and nineteen control subjects participated. In the time domain, the number of consecutive R-to-R intervals that varied by more than 50 ms and the standard deviation of the normalized R-to-R intervals, both indices of parasympathetic nervous system activity, were significantly lower in the headache group than the control group. Groups did not differ statistically on HRV measures in the frequency domain. Self-report measures showed significantly increased somatization, hostility, anxiety, symptom distress, fatigue, and sleep problems in the headache group. The results suggest headache subjects have increased sympathetic nervous system activity and decreased parasympathetic activity compared to non-headache control subjects. Headaches subjects also showed greater emotional distress, fatigue, and sleep problems. The results indicate an association between headaches and cardiovascular functioning suggestive of sympathetic nervous system activation in this sample of mixed migraine and tension-type headache sufferers. PMID:23912525

  2. Autonomous Systems Developments and Trends

    CERN Document Server

    Kyamaky, Kyandoghere; Kacprzyk, Janusz

    2012-01-01

    The Workshops on Autonomous Systems emanated from a gathering with the doctoral students of just three chairs at Fernuniversität in Hagen, which we organise twice per year for a number of years now. Their purpose is to discuss on-going research and to create a community spirit. Furthermore, they serve as a means of structuring the students' research processes. The workshop has grown and matured in several respects. The doctoral students presenting their work do not come from a single university anymore, but from three. Besides them and their supervisors, also other scientists became interested in the event and contribute to its programme. Following the model of Advanced Study Institutes, they are available on the premises for relaxed, informal discussions outside the formal sessions. Finally, with the co-sponsorship of Gesellschaft für Informatik, the German Computer Society, and this surprisingly comprehensive volume of contributions published by Springer-Verlag the workshop turned into a visible scientifi...

  3. Environmental data collection using autonomous Wave Gliders

    OpenAIRE

    Hermsdorfer, Kathryn M.

    2014-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The Sensor Hosting Autonomous Remote Craft (SHARC), also known as Wave Glider, is an autonomous ocean vehicle powered by wave motion. This slow-moving platform makes long-term deployments and environmental data collection feasible, especially in data sparse regions or hazardous environments. The standard SHARC hosts a meteorological station (Airmar PB200) that samples air pressure, temperature, wind speed and wind direction at 1.12 m. ...

  4. A middleware architecture for autonomic software deployment

    OpenAIRE

    Matougui, Mohamed El Amine; LERICHE, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    International audience Autonomic software deployment in open networked environments such as mobile and ad hoc networks is an open issue. Some solutions to software deployment exist; but, they are usable only within static topologies of devices. We propose a middleware architecture providing a constraint-based language guiding the deployment process at a high level and an autonomous agent-based system for establishing and maintaining a software deployment according to a deployment plan. Con...

  5. Tele-robotic/autonomous control using controlshell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhelmsen, K.C.; Hurd, R.L.; Couture, S.

    1996-12-10

    A tele-robotic and autonomous controller architecture for waste handling and sorting has been developed which uses tele-robotics, autonomous grasping and image processing. As a starting point, prior work from LLNL and ORNL was restructured and ported to a special real-time development environment. Significant improvements in collision avoidance, force compliance, and shared control aspects were then developed. Several orders of magnitude improvement were made in some areas to meet the speed and robustness requirements of the application.

  6. Decentralized Coordination of Autonomous Vehicles at intersections

    OpenAIRE

    Makarem, Laleh; Gillet, Denis

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the decentralized coordination of point-mass autonomous vehicles at intersections using navigation functions is considered. As main contribution, the inertia of the vehicles is taken into account to enable on-board energy optimization for crossing. In such a way, heavier vehicles that need more energy and time for acceleration or breaking are given an indirect priority at intersections. The proposed decentralized coordination scheme of autonomous vehicles at intersection is com...

  7. Omnidirectional Stereo Vision for Autonomous Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Schönbein, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    Environment perception with cameras is an important requirement for many applications for autonomous vehicles and robots. This work presents a stereoscopic omnidirectional camera system for autonomous vehicles which resolves the problem of a limited field of view and provides a 360° panoramic view of the environment. We present a new projection model for these cameras and show that the camera setup overcomes major drawbacks of traditional perspective cameras in many applications.

  8. Autonomous navigation and sign detector learning

    OpenAIRE

    Ellis, Liam; Pugeault, Nicolas; Öfjäll, Kristoffer; Hedborg, Johan; Bowden, Richard; Felsberg, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an autonomous robotic system that incorporates novel Computer Vision, Machine Learning and Data Mining algorithms in order to learn to navigate and discover important visual entities. This is achieved within a Learning from Demonstration (LfD) framework, where policies are derived from example state-to-action mappings. For autonomous navigation, a mapping is learnt from holistic image features (GIST) onto control parameters using Random Forest regression. Additionally, vis...

  9. Autonomous Path Following Using Convolutional Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Schmiterlöw, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Autonomous vehicles have many application possibilities within many different fields like rescue missions, exploring foreign environments or unmanned vehicles etc. For such system to navigate in a safe manner, high requirements of reliability and security must be fulfilled. This master's thesis explores the possibility to use the machine learning algorithm convolutional network on a robotic platform for autonomous path following. The only input to predict the steering signal is a monochromati...

  10. Visual navigation for an autonomous mobile vehicle

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, Kevin Robert

    1992-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Image understanding for a mobile robotic vehicle is an important and complex task for ensuring safe navigation and extended autonomous operations. The goal of this work is to implement a working vision-based navigation control mechanism within a known environment onboard the autonomous mobile vehicle Yamabico-II. Although installing a working hardware system was not accomplished, the image processing, model description, pattern match...

  11. Control of the MARES Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno Ferreira; Miguel Pinto; Anibal Matos; Nuno Cruz

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses the control problem of a nonholonomic autonomous underwater vehicle, moving in the tridimensional space. The dynamic of a body in submarine environments is strongly nonlinear. This implies that classical linear controllers are often inadequate whereby Lyapunov theory is here considered. Methods based in this theory are promising tools to design controllers and are applied to the case of MARES, a small-sized autonomous underwater vehicle. Several controllers based only on Ly...

  12. Autonomous vehicle development for vertical submarine observation

    OpenAIRE

    Gomáriz Castro, Spartacus; Prat Tasias, Jordi; Arbós, Alejandro; Viñolo Monzoncillo, Carlos; Pallares, Oriol

    2009-01-01

    This work proposes the development of an ocean observation vehicle. This vehicle, a hybrid between Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV) and Autonomous Surface Vehicles (ASV) moves on the surface of the sea and makes vertical immersions to obtain the profiles of a water column according to a pre-established plan. Its design provides lower production cost and higher efficiency. GPS navigation allows the platform to move along the surface of the water while a radio-modem provid...

  13. Operations on Rigid Formations of Autonomous Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Eren, Tolga; Anderson, Brian D. O.; Morse, A. Stephen; Whiteley, Walter; Belhumeur, Peter N.

    2003-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the maintenance of rigid formations of mobile autonomous agents. A key element in all future multi-agent systems will be the role of sensor and communication networks as an integral part of coordination. Network topologies are critically important for autonomous systems involving mobile underwater, ground and air vehicles and for sensor networks. This paper focuses on developing techniques and strategies for the analysis and design of sensor a...

  14. TRIDENT: A Framework for Autonomous Underwater Intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Sanz Valero, Pedro José; Ridao, Pere; Oliver, Gabriel; Melchiorri, Claudio; Casalino, Giuseppe; Silvestre, Carlos; Petillot, Yvan; Turetta, Alessio

    2011-01-01

    TRIDENT is a STREP project recently approved by the European Commission whose proposal was submitted to the ICT call 4 of the 7th Framework Program. The project proposes a new methodology for multipurpose underwater intervention tasks. To that end, a cooperative team formed with an Autonomous Surface Craft and an Intervention Autonomous Underwater Vehicle will be used. The proposed methodology splits the mission in two stages mainly devoted to survey and intervention tasks, res...

  15. Replication Timing of Human Telomeres is Conserved during Immortalization and Influenced by Respective Subtelomeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piqueret-Stephan, Laure; Ricoul, Michelle; Hempel, William M; Sabatier, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Telomeres are specific structures that protect chromosome ends and act as a biological clock, preventing normal cells from replicating indefinitely. Mammalian telomeres are replicated throughout S-phase in a predetermined order. However, the mechanism of this regulation is still unknown. We wished to investigate this phenomenon under physiological conditions in a changing environment, such as the immortalization process to better understand the mechanism for its control. We thus examined the timing of human telomere replication in normal and SV40 immortalized cells, which are cytogenetically very similar to cancer cells. We found that the timing of telomere replication was globally conserved under different conditions during the immortalization process. The timing of telomere replication was conserved despite changes in telomere length due to endogenous telomerase reactivation, in duplicated homologous chromosomes, and in rearranged chromosomes. Importantly, translocated telomeres, possessing their initial subtelomere, retained the replication timing of their homolog, independently of the proportion of the translocated arm, even when the remaining flanking DNA is restricted to its subtelomere, the closest chromosome-specific sequences (inferior to 500 kb). Our observations support the notion that subtelomere regions strongly influence the replication timing of the associated telomere. PMID:27587191

  16. Anti-HCV RNA Aptamers Targeting the Genomic cis-Acting Replication Element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Berzal-Herranz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV replication is dependent on the existence of several highly conserved functional genomic RNA domains. The cis-acting replication element (CRE, located within the 3' end of the NS5B coding region of the HCV genome, has been shown essential for efficient viral replication. Its sequence and structural features determine its involvement in functional interactions with viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and distant RNA domains of the viral genome. This work reports the use of an in vitro selection strategy to select aptamer RNA molecules against the complete HCV-CRE. After six selection cycles, five potential target sites were identified within this domain. Inhibition assays using a sample of representative aptamers showed that the selected RNAs significantly inhibit the replication (>80% of a subgenomic HCV replicon in Huh-7 cell cultures. These results highlight the potential of aptamer RNA molecules as therapeutic antiviral agents.

  17. Advancing Autonomous Operations for Deep Space Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddock, Angie T.; Stetson, Howard K.

    2014-01-01

    Starting in Jan 2012, the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Autonomous Mission Operations (AMO) Project began to investigate the ability to create and execute "single button" crew initiated autonomous activities [1]. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) designed and built a fluid transfer hardware test-bed to use as a sub-system target for the investigations of intelligent procedures that would command and control a fluid transfer test-bed, would perform self-monitoring during fluid transfers, detect anomalies and faults, isolate the fault and recover the procedures function that was being executed, all without operator intervention. In addition to the development of intelligent procedures, the team is also exploring various methods for autonomous activity execution where a planned timeline of activities are executed autonomously and also the initial analysis of crew procedure development. This paper will detail the development of intelligent procedures for the NASA MSFC Autonomous Fluid Transfer System (AFTS) as well as the autonomous plan execution capabilities being investigated. Manned deep space missions, with extreme communication delays with Earth based assets, presents significant challenges for what the on-board procedure content will encompass as well as the planned execution of the procedures.

  18. Autonomous control systems - Architecture and fundamental issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antsaklis, P. J.; Passino, K. M.; Wang, S. J.

    1988-01-01

    A hierarchical functional autonomous controller architecture is introduced. In particular, the architecture for the control of future space vehicles is described in detail; it is designed to ensure the autonomous operation of the control system and it allows interaction with the pilot and crew/ground station, and the systems on board the autonomous vehicle. The fundamental issues in autonomous control system modeling and analysis are discussed. It is proposed to utilize a hybrid approach to modeling and analysis of autonomous systems. This will incorporate conventional control methods based on differential equations and techniques for the analysis of systems described with a symbolic formalism. In this way, the theory of conventional control can be fully utilized. It is stressed that autonomy is the design requirement and intelligent control methods appear at present, to offer some of the necessary tools to achieve autonomy. A conventional approach may evolve and replace some or all of the `intelligent' functions. It is shown that in addition to conventional controllers, the autonomous control system incorporates planning, learning, and FDI (fault detection and identification).

  19. Inferring Where and When Replication Initiates from Genome-Wide Replication Timing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, A.; Audit, B.; Yang, S. C.-H.; Bechhoefer, J.; Arneodo, A.

    2012-06-01

    Based on an analogy between DNA replication and one dimensional nucleation-and-growth processes, various attempts to infer the local initiation rate I(x,t) of DNA replication origins from replication timing data have been developed in the framework of phase transition kinetics theories. These works have all used curve-fit strategies to estimate I(x,t) from genome-wide replication timing data. Here, we show how to invert analytically the Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami model and extract I(x,t) directly. Tests on both simulated and experimental budding-yeast data confirm the location and firing-time distribution of replication origins.

  20. Data from Investigating Variation in Replicability: A “Many Labs” Replication Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Klein

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This dataset is from the Many Labs Replication Project in which 13 effects were replicated across 36 samples and over 6,000 participants. Data from the replications are included, along with demographic variables about the participants and contextual information about the environment in which the replication was conducted. Data were collected in-lab and online through a standardized procedure administered via an online link. The dataset is stored on the Open Science Framework website. These data could be used to further investigate the results of the included 13 effects or to study replication and generalizability more broadly.

  1. CRISPR-Cas9 Can Inhibit HIV-1 Replication but NHEJ Repair Facilitates Virus Escape

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Gang; Zhao, Na; Berkhout, Ben; Das, Atze T.

    2016-01-01

    Several recent studies demonstrated that the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated endonuclease Cas9 can be used for guide RNA (gRNA)-directed, sequence-specific cleavage of HIV proviral DNA in infected cells. We here demonstrate profound inhibition of HIV-1 replication by harnessing T cells with Cas9 and antiviral gRNAs. However, the virus rapidly and consistently escaped from this inhibition. Sequencing of the HIV-1 escape variants revealed nucleotide...

  2. Targeting DNA Replication Stress for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The human cellular genome is under constant stress from extrinsic and intrinsic factors, which can lead to DNA damage and defective replication. In normal cells, DNA damage response (DDR mediated by various checkpoints will either activate the DNA repair system or induce cellular apoptosis/senescence, therefore maintaining overall genomic integrity. Cancer cells, however, due to constitutive growth signaling and defective DDR, may exhibit “replication stress” —a phenomenon unique to cancer cells that is described as the perturbation of error-free DNA replication and slow-down of DNA synthesis. Although replication stress has been proven to induce genomic instability and tumorigenesis, recent studies have counterintuitively shown that enhancing replicative stress through further loosening of the remaining checkpoints in cancer cells to induce their catastrophic failure of proliferation may provide an alternative therapeutic approach. In this review, we discuss the rationale to enhance replicative stress in cancer cells, past approaches using traditional radiation and chemotherapy, and emerging approaches targeting the signaling cascades induced by DNA damage. We also summarize current clinical trials exploring these strategies and propose future research directions including the use of combination therapies, and the identification of potential new targets and biomarkers to track and predict treatment responses to targeting DNA replication stress.

  3. Study on the micro-replication of shark skin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Direct replication of creatural scarfskins to form biomimetic surfaces with relatively vivid morphology is a new attempt of the bio-replicated forming technology at animal body. Taking shark skins as the replication templates, and the micro-embossing and micro-molding as the material forming methods, the micro-replicating technology of the outward morphology on shark skins was demonstrated. The preliminary analysis on replication precision indicates that the bio-replicated forming technology can replicate the outward morphology of the shark scales with good precision, which validates the application of the bio-replicated forming technology in the direct morphology replication of the firm creatural scarfskins.

  4. Replication Cycle and Molecular Biology of the West Nile Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margo A. Brinton

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV is a member of the genus Flavivirus in the family Flaviviridae. Flaviviruses replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells and modify the host cell environment. Although much has been learned about virion structure and virion-endosomal membrane fusion, the cell receptor(s used have not been definitively identified and little is known about the early stages of the virus replication cycle. Members of the genus Flavivirus differ from members of the two other genera of the family by the lack of a genomic internal ribosomal entry sequence and the creation of invaginations in the ER membrane rather than double-membrane vesicles that are used as the sites of exponential genome synthesis. The WNV genome 3' and 5' sequences that form the long distance RNA-RNA interaction required for minus strand initiation have been identified and contact sites on the 5' RNA stem loop for NS5 have been mapped. Structures obtained for many of the viral proteins have provided information relevant to their functions. Viral nonstructural protein interactions are complex and some may occur only in infected cells. Although interactions between many cellular proteins and virus components have been identified, the functions of most of these interactions have not been delineated.

  5. Improved autonomous star identification algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Li-Yan; Xu, Lu-Ping; Zhang, Hua; Sun, Jing-Rong

    2015-06-01

    The log-polar transform (LPT) is introduced into the star identification because of its rotation invariance. An improved autonomous star identification algorithm is proposed in this paper to avoid the circular shift of the feature vector and to reduce the time consumed in the star identification algorithm using LPT. In the proposed algorithm, the star pattern of the same navigation star remains unchanged when the stellar image is rotated, which makes it able to reduce the star identification time. The logarithmic values of the plane distances between the navigation and its neighbor stars are adopted to structure the feature vector of the navigation star, which enhances the robustness of star identification. In addition, some efforts are made to make it able to find the identification result with fewer comparisons, instead of searching the whole feature database. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can effectively accelerate the star identification. Moreover, the recognition rate and robustness by the proposed algorithm are better than those by the LPT algorithm and the modified grid algorithm. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61172138 and 61401340), the Open Research Fund of the Academy of Satellite Application, China (Grant No. 2014_CXJJ-DH_12), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant Nos. JB141303 and 201413B), the Natural Science Basic Research Plan in Shaanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2013JQ8040), the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20130203120004), and the Xi’an Science and Technology Plan, China (Grant. No CXY1350(4)).

  6. Compact Autonomous Hemispheric Vision System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingree, Paula J.; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Werne, Thomas A.; Eastwood, Michael L.; Walch, Marc J.; Staehle, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Solar System Exploration camera implementations to date have involved either single cameras with wide field-of-view (FOV) and consequently coarser spatial resolution, cameras on a movable mast, or single cameras necessitating rotation of the host vehicle to afford visibility outside a relatively narrow FOV. These cameras require detailed commanding from the ground or separate onboard computers to operate properly, and are incapable of making decisions based on image content that control pointing and downlink strategy. For color, a filter wheel having selectable positions was often added, which added moving parts, size, mass, power, and reduced reliability. A system was developed based on a general-purpose miniature visible-light camera using advanced CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) imager technology. The baseline camera has a 92 FOV and six cameras are arranged in an angled-up carousel fashion, with FOV overlaps such that the system has a 360 FOV (azimuth). A seventh camera, also with a FOV of 92 , is installed normal to the plane of the other 6 cameras giving the system a > 90 FOV in elevation and completing the hemispheric vision system. A central unit houses the common electronics box (CEB) controlling the system (power conversion, data processing, memory, and control software). Stereo is achieved by adding a second system on a baseline, and color is achieved by stacking two more systems (for a total of three, each system equipped with its own filter.) Two connectors on the bottom of the CEB provide a connection to a carrier (rover, spacecraft, balloon, etc.) for telemetry, commands, and power. This system has no moving parts. The system's onboard software (SW) supports autonomous operations such as pattern recognition and tracking.

  7. Restoring chromatin after replication: How new and old histone marks come together

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jasencakova, Zusana; Groth, Anja

    2010-01-01

    In dividing cells genome stability and function rely on faithful transmission of both DNA sequence and its organization into chromatin. In the course of DNA replication chromatin undergoes transient genome-wide disruption followed by restoration on new DNA. This involves tight coordination of DNA...

  8. Replicated Data Management for Mobile Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Douglas, Terry

    2008-01-01

    Managing data in a mobile computing environment invariably involves caching or replication. In many cases, a mobile device has access only to data that is stored locally, and much of that data arrives via replication from other devices, PCs, and services. Given portable devices with limited resources, weak or intermittent connectivity, and security vulnerabilities, data replication serves to increase availability, reduce communication costs, foster sharing, and enhance survivability of critical information. Mobile systems have employed a variety of distributed architectures from client-server

  9. Priming DNA Replication from Triple Helix Oligonucleotides: Possible Threestranded DNA in DNA Polymerases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick P. Lestienne

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Triplex associate with a duplex DNA presenting the same polypurine or polypyrimidine-rich sequence in an antiparallel orientation. So far, triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFOs are known to inhibit transcription, replication, and to induce mutations. A new property of TFO is reviewed here upon analysis of DNA breakpoint yielding DNA rearrangements; the synthesized sequence of the first direct repeat displays a skewed polypurine- rich sequence. This synthesized sequence can bind the second homologous duplex sequence through the formation of a triple helix, which is able to prime further DNA replication. In these case, the d(G-rich Triple Helix Primers (THP bind the homologous strand in a parallel manner, possibly via a RecA-like mechanism. This novel property is shared by all tested DNA polymerases: phage, retrovirus, bacteria, and human. These features may account for illegitimate initiation of replication upon single-strand breakage and annealing to a homologous sequence where priming may occur. Our experiments suggest that DNA polymerases can bind three instead of two polynucleotide strands in their catalytic centre.

  10. Priming DNA replication from triple helix oligonucleotides: possible threestranded DNA in DNA polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestienne, Patrick P

    2011-01-01

    Triplex associate with a duplex DNA presenting the same polypurine or polypyrimidine-rich sequence in an antiparallel orientation. So far, triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) are known to inhibit transcription, replication, and to induce mutations. A new property of TFO is reviewed here upon analysis of DNA breakpoint yielding DNA rearrangements; the synthesized sequence of the first direct repeat displays a skewed polypurine- rich sequence. This synthesized sequence can bind the second homologous duplex sequence through the formation of a triple helix, which is able to prime further DNA replication. In these case, the d(G)-rich Triple Helix Primers (THP) bind the homologous strand in a parallel manner, possibly via a RecA-like mechanism. This novel property is shared by all tested DNA polymerases: phage, retrovirus, bacteria, and human. These features may account for illegitimate initiation of replication upon single-strand breakage and annealing to a homologous sequence where priming may occur. Our experiments suggest that DNA polymerases can bind three instead of two polynucleotide strands in their catalytic centre. PMID:22229092

  11. Autonomous and autonomic systems with applications to NASA intelligent spacecraft operations and exploration systems

    CERN Document Server

    Truszkowski, Walt; Rouff, Christopher; Karlin, Jay; Rash, James; Hinchey, Michael; Sterritt, Roy

    2009-01-01

    This book provides an in-depth discussion of autonomous and autonomic systems, their interdependencies, differences and similarities. Current and pending issues in these evermore increasingly important subjects are highlighted and discussed. Concepts, ideas and experiences are explored in relation to real-life NASA systems in spacecraft control and in the exploration domain.

  12. Supervised autonomous robotic soft tissue surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shademan, Azad; Decker, Ryan S; Opfermann, Justin D; Leonard, Simon; Krieger, Axel; Kim, Peter C W

    2016-05-01

    The current paradigm of robot-assisted surgeries (RASs) depends entirely on an individual surgeon's manual capability. Autonomous robotic surgery-removing the surgeon's hands-promises enhanced efficacy, safety, and improved access to optimized surgical techniques. Surgeries involving soft tissue have not been performed autonomously because of technological limitations, including lack of vision systems that can distinguish and track the target tissues in dynamic surgical environments and lack of intelligent algorithms that can execute complex surgical tasks. We demonstrate in vivo supervised autonomous soft tissue surgery in an open surgical setting, enabled by a plenoptic three-dimensional and near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF) imaging system and an autonomous suturing algorithm. Inspired by the best human surgical practices, a computer program generates a plan to complete complex surgical tasks on deformable soft tissue, such as suturing and intestinal anastomosis. We compared metrics of anastomosis-including the consistency of suturing informed by the average suture spacing, the pressure at which the anastomosis leaked, the number of mistakes that required removing the needle from the tissue, completion time, and lumen reduction in intestinal anastomoses-between our supervised autonomous system, manual laparoscopic surgery, and clinically used RAS approaches. Despite dynamic scene changes and tissue movement during surgery, we demonstrate that the outcome of supervised autonomous procedures is superior to surgery performed by expert surgeons and RAS techniques in ex vivo porcine tissues and in living pigs. These results demonstrate the potential for autonomous robots to improve the efficacy, consistency, functional outcome, and accessibility of surgical techniques. PMID:27147588

  13. Selection of DNA clones with enhancer sequences.

    OpenAIRE

    Asoh, S; Lee-Kwon, W; Mouradian, M M; Nirenberg, M

    1994-01-01

    A method is described for selection of DNA clones that contain enhancer sequences that activate gene expression. An Escherichia coli-rodent cell shuttle vector, pPyE0, was used that contains polyoma viral DNA without the polyoma enhancer region. Replication of pPyE0 DNA in mouse cells is markedly reduced due to deletion of the polyoma enhancer region. Insertion of mouse genomic DNA fragments that contain putative enhancer sequences into pPyE0 adjacent to the polyoma origin of replication rest...

  14. What Should Researchers Expect When They Replicate Studies? A Statistical View of Replicability in Psychological Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Prasad; Peng, Roger D; Leek, Jeffrey T

    2016-07-01

    A recent study of the replicability of key psychological findings is a major contribution toward understanding the human side of the scientific process. Despite the careful and nuanced analysis reported, the simple narrative disseminated by the mass, social, and scientific media was that in only 36% of the studies were the original results replicated. In the current study, however, we showed that 77% of the replication effect sizes reported were within a 95% prediction interval calculated using the original effect size. Our analysis suggests two critical issues in understanding replication of psychological studies. First, researchers' intuitive expectations for what a replication should show do not always match with statistical estimates of replication. Second, when the results of original studies are very imprecise, they create wide prediction intervals-and a broad range of replication effects that are consistent with the original estimates. This may lead to effects that replicate successfully, in that replication results are consistent with statistical expectations, but do not provide much information about the size (or existence) of the true effect. In this light, the results of the Reproducibility Project: Psychology can be viewed as statistically consistent with what one might expect when performing a large-scale replication experiment. PMID:27474140

  15. Surface microstructure replication in injection molding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, Uffe Arlø; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, polymer components with surface microstructures have been in rising demand for applications such as lab-on-a-chip and optical components. Injection molding has proven to be a feasible and efficient way to manufacture such components. In injection molding, the mold surface...... the ability to replicate surface microstructures under normal injection-molding conditions, i.e., with commodity materials within typical process windows. It was found that within typical process windows the replication quality depends significantly on several process parameters, and especially the...... topography is transcribed onto the plastic part through complex mechanisms. This replication, however, is not perfect, and the replication quality depends on the plastic material properties, the topography itself, and the process conditions. This paper describes and discusses an investigation of injection...

  16. LHCb Data Replication During SC3

    CERN Multimedia

    Smith, A

    2006-01-01

    LHCb's participation in LCG's Service Challenge 3 involves testing the bulk data transfer infrastructure developed to allow high bandwidth distribution of data across the grid in accordance with the computing model. To enable reliable bulk replication of data, LHCb's DIRAC system has been integrated with gLite's File Transfer Service middleware component to make use of dedicated network links between LHCb computing centres. DIRAC's Data Management tools previously allowed the replication, registration and deletion of files on the grid. For SC3 supplementary functionality has been added to allow bulk replication of data (using FTS) and efficient mass registration to the LFC replica catalog.Provisional performance results have shown that the system developed can meet the expected data replication rate required by the computing model in 2007. This paper details the experience and results of integration and utilisation of DIRAC with the SC3 transfer machinery.

  17. Improvements Relating to Database Replication Protocols

    OpenAIRE

    Stankovic, V.; Popov, P. T.

    2013-01-01

    The present invention concerns improvements relating to database replication. More specifically, aspects of the present invention relate to a fault-tolerant node and a method for avoiding non-deterministic behaviour in the management of synchronous database systems.

  18. Surface Micro Topography Replication in Injection Moulding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arlø, Uffe Rolf; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Kjær, Erik Michael

    2005-01-01

    carried out with rough EDM (electrical discharge machining) mould surfaces, a PS grade, and by applying established three-dimensional topography parameters. Significant quantitative relationships between process parameters and topography parameters were established. It further appeared that replication...

  19. Road network modeling in open source GIS to manage the navigation of autonomous robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiameli, Michele; Muscato, Giovanni; Mussumeci, Giuseppe

    2013-10-01

    The autonomous navigation of a robot can be accomplished through the assignment of a sequence of waypoints previously identified in the territory to be explored. In general, the starting point is a vector graph of the network consisting of possible paths. The vector graph can be directly available in the case of actual road networks, or it can be modeled, i.e. on the basis of cartographic supports or, even better, of a digital terrain model (DTM). In this paper we present software procedures developed in Grass-GIS, PostGIS and QGIS environments to identify, model, and visualize a road graph and to extract and normalize sequence of waypoints which can be transferred to a robot for its autonomous navigation.

  20. The Anisotropy of Replicated Aluminum Foams

    OpenAIRE

    Furman, Eugeny L.; Arcady B. Finkelstein; Maxim L. Cherny

    2014-01-01

    The replication casting process gives the open-cell aluminum foams that can be used in many industrial applications as well as in filtering technology. The essential requirement for filters is the uniformity of filtering degree which is defined by the minimal pore size. However the structure of replication castings is often inhomogeneous and the minimal pore radius is decreasing in the direction of melt infiltration. The objective of this investigation is to study the dynamics of melt impregn...

  1. Early steps of retrovirus replicative cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Saïb Ali; Nisole Sébastien

    2004-01-01

    Abstract During the last two decades, the profusion of HIV research due to the urge to identify new therapeutic targets has led to a wealth of information on the retroviral replication cycle. However, while the late stages of the retrovirus life cycle, consisting of virus replication and egress, have been partly unraveled, the early steps remain largely enigmatic. These early steps consist of a long and perilous journey from the cell surface to the nucleus where the proviral DNA integrates in...

  2. Database Replication Using Generalized Snapshot Isolation

    OpenAIRE

    Elnikety, Sameh; Pedone, Fernando; Zwaenepoel, Willy

    2005-01-01

    Generalized snapshot isolation extends snapshot isolation as used in Oracle and other databases in a manner suitable for replicated databases. While (conventional) snapshot isolation requires that transactions observe the “latest” snapshot of the database, generalized snapshot isolation allows the use of “older” snapshots, facilitating a replicated implementation. We show that many of the desirable properties of snapshot isolation remain. In particular, read-only transactions never block or a...

  3. Autogenesis: the evolution of replicative systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csányi, V; Kampis, G

    1985-05-21

    Questions concerning the nature and origin of living systems and the hierarchy of their evolutionary processes are considered, and several problems which arise in connection with formerly developed theories--the autopoiesis of Maturana & Varela, the POL theory of Haukioja and the earlier developed evolutionary theory of Csányi--are discussed. The organization of living systems, the use of informational terms and the question how reproduction can enter into their characterization, problems of autonomy and identity are included in the list. It is suggested that replication--a copying process achieved by a special network of interrelatedness of components and component-producing processes that produces the same network as that which produced them--characterizes the living organization. The information "used" in this copying process, whether it is stored by special means or distributed in the whole system, is called replicative information. A theoretical model is introduced for the spontaneous emergence of replicative organization, called autogenesis. Autogenesis commences in a system by an organized "small" subsystem, referred to as AutoGenetic System Precursor (AGSP), which conveys replicative information to the system. During autogenesis, replicative information increases in system and compartment(s) form. A compartment is the co-replicating totality of components. The end state of autogenesis is an invariantly self-replicating organization which is unable to undergo further intrinsic organizational changes. It is suggested that replicative unities--such as living organisms--evolve via autogenesis. Levels of evolution emerge as a consequence of the relative autonomy of the autogenetic unities. On the next level they can be considered as components endowed with functions and a new autogenetic process can commence. Thus evolution proceeds towards its end state through the parallel autogenesis of the various levels. In terms of applications, ontogenesis is dealt with

  4. Highly Efficient Self-Replicating RNA Enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Robertson, Michael P; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2014-01-01

    An RNA enzyme has been developed that catalyzes the joining of oligonucleotide substrates to form additional copies of itself, undergoing self-replication with exponential growth. The enzyme also can cross-replicate with a partner enzyme, resulting in their mutual exponential growth and enabling self-sustained Darwinian evolution. The opportunity for inventive evolution within this synthetic genetic system depends on the diversity of the evolving population, which is limited by the catalytic ...

  5. The conserved structures of the 5' nontranslated region of Citrus tristeza virus are involved in replication and virion assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The genomic RNA of different isolates of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) reveals an unusual pattern of sequence diversity: the 3' halves are highly conserved (homology >90%), while the 5' halves show much more dissimilarity, with the 5' nontranslated region (NTR) containing the highest diversity (homology as low as 42%). Yet, positive-sense sequences of the 5' NTR were predicted to fold into nearly identical structures consisting of two stem-loops (SL1 and SL2) separated by a short spacer region. The predicted most stable secondary structures of the negative-sense sequences were more variable. We introduced mutations into the 5' NTR of a CTV replicon to alter the sequence and/or the predicted secondary structures with or without additional compensatory changes designed to restore predicted secondary structures, and examined their effect on replication in transfected protoplasts. The results suggested that the predicted secondary structures of the 5' NTR were more important for replication than the primary structure. Most mutations that were predicted to disrupt the secondary structures fail to replicate, while compensatory mutations were allowed replication to resume. The 5' NTR mutations that were tolerated by the CTV replicon were examined in the full-length virus for effects on replication and production of the multiple subgenomic RNAs. Additionally, the ability of these mutants to produce virions was monitored by electron microscopy and by passaging the progeny nucleocapsids to another batch of protoplasts. Some of the mutants with compensatory sequence alterations predicted to rebuild similar secondary structures allowed replication at near wild-type levels but failed to passage, suggesting that the 5' NTR contains sequences required for both replication and virion assembly

  6. Autonomous Learning and Improving Communicative Competence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李宝红; 孙晓黎

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, English as a world language becomes more and more important. Consequently, English learning becomes more and more popular. As we know, an important object for English learners is to improve their communicative competence. So autonomous learning is a good way to improve communicative competence. In this paper, two terms, autonomous learning and communicative competence, and their relationship will be introduced from the perspective of English learning. Autonomous learning is self-managed learning, which is contrary to passive learning and mechanical learning, according to intrinsic property of language learning. Communicative competence is a concept introduced by Dell Hymes and is discussed and refined by many oth⁃er linguists. According to Hymes, communicative competence is the ability not only to apply the grammatical rules of language in order to form grammatically correct sentences but also to know when and where to use these sentences and to whom. Communi⁃cative competence includes 4 aspects: Possibility, feasibility, appropriateness and performance. Improving communicative compe⁃tence is the result of autonomous learning, autonomous learning is the motivation of improving communicative competence. English, of course, is a bridge connecting China to the world, and fostering students’communicative competence through auton⁃omous learning is the vital element of improving English learning in China.

  7. Polymorphism and divergence in the beta-globin replication origin initiation region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, S M; Bond, J; Schneider, J A; Hamilton, B; Harding, R M; Boyce, A J; Clegg, J B

    2000-01-01

    DNA sequence polymorphism and divergence was examined in the vicinity of the human beta-globin gene cluster origin of replication initiation region (IR), a 1.3-kb genomic region located immediately 5' of the adult-expressed beta-globin gene. DNA sequence variation in the replication origin IR and 5 kb of flanking DNA was surveyed in samples drawn from two populations, one African (from the Gambia, West Africa) and the other European (from Oxford, England). In these samples, levels of nucleotide and length polymorphism in the IR were found to be more than two times as high as adjacent non-IR-associated regions (estimates of per-nucleotide heterozygosity were 0.30% and 0.12%, respectively). Most polymorphic positions identified in the origin IR fall within or just adjacent to a 52-bp alternating purine-pyrimidine ((RY)n) sequence repeat. Within- and between-populations divergence is highest in this portion of the IR, and interspecific divergence in the same region, determined by comparison with an orthologous sequence from the chimpanzee, is also pronounced. Higher levels of diversity in this subregion are not, however, primarily attributable to slippage-mediated repeat unit changes, as nucleotide substitution contributes disproportionately to allelic heterogeneity. An estimate of helical stability in the sequenced region suggests that the hypervariable (RY)n constitutes the major DNA unwinding element (DUE) of the replication origin IR, the location at which the DNA duplex first unwinds and new strand synthesis begins. These findings suggest that the beta-globin IR experiences a higher underlying rate of neutral mutation than do adjacent genomic regions and that enzyme fidelity associated with the initiation of DNA replication at this origin may be compromised. The significance of these findings for our understanding of eukaryotic replication origin biology is discussed. PMID:10666717

  8. Conditionally replicating HIV and SIV variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Atze T; Berkhout, Ben

    2016-05-01

    Conditionally replicating human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) variants that can be switched on and off at will are attractive tools for HIV and SIV research. We constructed HIV and SIV variants in which the natural transcription control mechanism was replaced by the doxycycline (dox)-inducible Tet-On gene expression mechanism. These HIV-rtTA and SIV-rtTA variants are fully replication-competent, but replication is critically dependent on dox administration. We here describe how the dox-dependent virus variants may improve the safety of live-attenuated virus vaccines and how they can be used to study the immune responses that correlate with vaccine-induced protection. Furthermore, we review how these variants were initially designed and subsequently optimized by spontaneous viral evolution. These efforts yielded efficiently replicating and tightly dox-controlled HIV-rtTA and SIV-rtTA variants that replicate in a variety of cell and tissue culture systems, and in human immune system (HIS) mice and macaques, respectively. These viruses can be used as a tool in HIV and SIV biology studies and in vaccine research. We review how HIV-rtTA and SIV-rtTA were used to study the role of the viral TAR and Tat elements in virus replication. PMID:25982510

  9. Commercial Building Partnerships Replication and Diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonopoulos, Chrissi A.; Dillon, Heather E.; Baechler, Michael C.

    2013-09-16

    This study presents findings from survey and interview data investigating replication efforts of Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) partners that worked directly with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL partnered directly with 12 organizations on new and retrofit construction projects, which represented approximately 28 percent of the entire U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CBP program. Through a feedback survey mechanism, along with personal interviews, PNNL gathered quantitative and qualitative data relating to replication efforts by each organization. These data were analyzed to provide insight into two primary research areas: 1) CBP partners’ replication efforts of technologies and approaches used in the CBP project to the rest of the organization’s building portfolio (including replication verification), and, 2) the market potential for technology diffusion into the total U.S. commercial building stock, as a direct result of the CBP program. The first area of this research focused specifically on replication efforts underway or planned by each CBP program participant. Factors that impact replication include motivation, organizational structure and objectives firms have for implementation of energy efficient technologies. Comparing these factors between different CBP partners revealed patterns in motivation for constructing energy efficient buildings, along with better insight into market trends for green building practices. The second area of this research develops a diffusion of innovations model to analyze potential broad market impacts of the CBP program on the commercial building industry in the United States.

  10. Genome instability induced by structured DNA and replication fork restart

    OpenAIRE

    Schalbetter, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    DNA replication is a central mechanism to all forms of life. Errors occurring during DNA replication can result in mutagenesis and genome rearrangements, which can cause various diseases. In this work I have investigated the stability of direct tandem repeats (TRs) in the context of replication and replication-associated repair mechanisms. During DNA replication the replication fork encounters many obstacles, such as DNA-protein barriers, secondary DNA structures and DNA lesions. How and if r...

  11. Surrounding Moving Obstacle Detection for Autonomous Driving Using Stereo Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Sun

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Detection and tracking surrounding moving obstacles such as vehicles and pedestrians are crucial for the safety of mobile robotics and autonomous vehicles. This is especially the case in urban driving scenarios. This paper presents a novel framework for surrounding moving obstacles detection using binocular stereo vision. The contributions of our work are threefold. Firstly, a multiview feature matching scheme is presented for simultaneous stereo correspondence and motion correspondence searching. Secondly, the multiview geometry constraint derived from the relative camera positions in pairs of consecutive stereo views is exploited for surrounding moving obstacles detection. Thirdly, an adaptive particle filter is proposed for tracking of multiple moving obstacles in surrounding areas. Experimental results from real‐world driving sequences demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed framework.

  12. High-Resolution Profiling of Drosophila Replication Start Sites Reveals a DNA Shape and Chromatin Signature of Metazoan Origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Comoglio

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available At every cell cycle, faithful inheritance of metazoan genomes requires the concerted activation of thousands of DNA replication origins. However, the genetic and chromatin features defining metazoan replication start sites remain largely unknown. Here, we delineate the origin repertoire of the Drosophila genome at high resolution. We address the role of origin-proximal G-quadruplexes and suggest that they transiently stall replication forks in vivo. We dissect the chromatin configuration of replication origins and identify a rich spatial organization of chromatin features at initiation sites. DNA shape and chromatin configurations, not strict sequence motifs, mark and predict origins in higher eukaryotes. We further examine the link between transcription and origin firing and reveal that modulation of origin activity across cell types is intimately linked to cell-type-specific transcriptional programs. Our study unravels conserved origin features and provides unique insights into the relationship among DNA topology, chromatin, transcription, and replication initiation across metazoa.

  13. Phosphoproteomics Identified an NS5A Phosphorylation Site Involved in Hepatitis C Virus Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Weng Man; Hsu, Shih-Chin; Kao, Wei-Ting; Lo, Chieh-Wen; Lee, Kuan-Ying; Shao, Jheng-Syuan; Chen, Yi-Hung; Chang, Justin; Chen, Steve S-L; Yu, Ming-Jiun

    2016-02-19

    The non-structural protein 5A (NS5A) is a hepatitis C virus (HCV) protein indispensable for the viral life cycle. Many prior papers have pinpointed several serine residues in the low complexity sequence I region of NS5A responsible for NS5A phosphorylation; however, the functions of specific phosphorylation sites remained obscure. Using phosphoproteomics, we identified three phosphorylation sites (serines 222, 235, and 238) in the NS5A low complexity sequence I region. Reporter virus and replicon assays using phosphorylation-ablated alanine mutants of these sites showed that Ser-235 dominated over Ser-222 and Ser-238 in HCV replication. Immunoblotting using an Ser-235 phosphorylation-specific antibody showed a time-dependent increase in Ser-235 phosphorylation that correlated with the viral replication activity. Ser-235 phosphorylated NS5A co-localized with double-stranded RNA, consistent with its role in HCV replication. Mechanistically, Ser-235 phosphorylation probably promotes the replication complex formation via increasing NS5A interaction with the human homologue of the 33-kDa vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein. Casein kinase Iα (CKIα) directly phosphorylated Ser-235 in vitro. Inhibition of CKIα reduced Ser-235 phosphorylation and the HCV RNA levels in the infected cells. We concluded that NS5A Ser-235 phosphorylated by CKIα probably promotes HCV replication via increasing NS5A interaction with the 33-kDa vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein. PMID:26702051

  14. Replication protein A: directing traffic at the intersection of replication and repair

    OpenAIRE

    Oakley, Greg G.; Patrick, Steve M.

    2010-01-01

    Since the initial discovery of replication protein A (RPA) as a DNA replication factor, much progress has been made on elucidating critical roles for RPA in other DNA metabolic pathways. RPA has been shown to be required for DNA replication, DNA repair, DNA recombination, and the DNA damage response pathway with roles in checkpoint activation. This review summarizes the current understanding of RPA structure, phosphorylation and protein-protein interactions in mediating these DNA metabolic pr...

  15. The barley EST DNA Replication and Repair Database (bEST-DRRD as a tool for the identification of the genes involved in DNA replication and repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruszka Damian

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high level of conservation of genes that regulate DNA replication and repair indicates that they may serve as a source of information on the origin and evolution of the species and makes them a reliable system for the identification of cross-species homologs. Studies that had been conducted to date shed light on the processes of DNA replication and repair in bacteria, yeast and mammals. However, there is still much to be learned about the process of DNA damage repair in plants. Description These studies, which were conducted mainly using bioinformatics tools, enabled the list of genes that participate in various pathways of DNA repair in Arabidopsis thaliana (L. Heynh to be outlined; however, information regarding these mechanisms in crop plants is still very limited. A similar, functional approach is particularly difficult for a species whose complete genomic sequences are still unavailable. One of the solutions is to apply ESTs (Expressed Sequence Tags as the basis for gene identification. For the construction of the barley EST DNA Replication and Repair Database (bEST-DRRD, presented here, the Arabidopsis nucleotide and protein sequences involved in DNA replication and repair were used to browse for and retrieve the deposited sequences, derived from four barley (Hordeum vulgare L. sequence databases, including the “Barley Genome version 0.05” database (encompassing ca. 90% of barley coding sequences and from two databases covering the complete genomes of two monocot models: Oryza sativa L. and Brachypodium distachyon L. in order to identify homologous genes. Sequences of the categorised Arabidopsis queries are used for browsing the repositories, which are located on the ViroBLAST platform. The bEST-DRRD is currently used in our project during the identification and validation of the barley genes involved in DNA repair. Conclusions The presented database provides information about the Arabidopsis genes involved in

  16. Autonomous driving technical, legal and social aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Gerdes, J; Lenz, Barbara; Winner, Hermann

    2016-01-01

    This book takes a look at fully automated, autonomous vehicles and discusses many open questions: How can autonomous vehicles be integrated into the current transportation system with diverse users and human drivers? Where do automated vehicles fall under current legal frameworks? What risks are associated with automation and how will society respond to these risks? How will the marketplace react to automated vehicles and what changes may be necessary for companies? Experts from Germany and the United States define key societal, engineering, and mobility issues related to the automation of vehicles. They discuss the decisions programmers of automated vehicles must make to enable vehicles to perceive their environment, interact with other road users, and choose actions that may have ethical consequences. The authors further identify expectations and concerns that will form the basis for individual and societal acceptance of autonomous driving. While the safety benefits of such vehicles are tremendous, the auth...

  17. Blood pressure regulation in diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1985-01-01

    Defective blood pressure responses to standing, exercise and epinephrine infusions have been demonstrated in diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy. The circulatory mechanisms underlying blood pressure responses to exercise and standing up in these patients are well characterized: In both...... which may contribute to exercise hypotension in these patients. During hypoglycemia, blood pressure regulation seems intact in patients with autonomic neuropathy. This is probably due to release of substantial amounts of catecholamines during these experiments. During epinephrine infusions a substantial...... blood pressure fall ensues in patients with autonomic neuropathy, probably due to excessive muscular vasodilation. It is unresolved why blood pressure regulation is intact during hypoglycemia and severely impaired--at similar catecholamine concentrations--during epinephrine infusions....

  18. An Autonomous Reference Frame for Relativistic GNSS

    CERN Document Server

    Kostić, Uroš; Carloni, Sante; Delva, Pacôme; Gomboc, Andreja

    2014-01-01

    Current GNSS systems rely on global reference frames which are fixed to the Earth (via the ground stations) so their precision and stability in time are limited by our knowledge of the Earth dynamics. These drawbacks could be avoided by giving to the constellation of satellites the possibility of constituting by itself a primary and autonomous positioning system, without any a priori realization of a terrestrial reference frame. Our work shows that it is possible to construct such a system, an Autonomous Basis of Coordinates, via emission coordinates. Here we present the idea of the Autonomous Basis of Coordinates and its implementation in the perturbed space-time of Earth, where the motion of satellites, light propagation, and gravitational perturbations are treated in the formalism of general relativity.

  19. Autonomous Robot Navigation based on Visual Landmarks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livatino, Salvatore

    2005-01-01

    autonomous navigation and self-localization using automatically selected landmarks. The thesis investigates autonomous robot navigation and proposes a new method which benefits from the potential of the visual sensor to provide accuracy and reliability to the navigation process while relying on naturally...... update of the estimated robot position while the robot is moving. In order to make the system autonomous, both acquisition and observation of landmarks have to be carried out automatically. The thesis consequently proposes a method for learning and navigation of a working environment and it explores......The use of landmarks for robot navigation is a popular alternative to having a geometrical model of the environment through which to navigate and monitor self-localization. If the landmarks are defined as special visual structures already in the environment then we have the possibility of fully...

  20. Elements of Autonomous Self-Reconfigurable Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, David Johan

    In this thesis, we study several central elements of autonomous self-reconfigurable modular robots. Unlike conventional robots such robots are: i) Modular, since robots are assembled from numerous robotic modules. ii) Reconfigurable, since the modules can be combined in a variety of ways. iii) Self......-reconfigurable, since the modules themselves are able to change how they are combined. iv) Autonomous, since robots control themselves without human guidance. Such robots are attractive to study since they in theory have several desirable characteristics, such as versatility, reliability and cheapness. In practice...... however, it is challenging to realize such characteristics since state-of-the-art systems and solutions suffer from several inherent technical and theoretical problems and limitations. In this thesis, we address these challenges by exploring four central elements of autonomous self-reconfigurable modular...

  1. Autonomous forward inference via DNA computing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Yan; Li Gen; Li Yin; Meng Dazhi

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies direct the researchers into building DNA computing machines with intelligence, which is measured by three main points: autonomous, programmable and able to learn and adapt. Logical inference plays an important role in programmable information processing or computing. Here we present a new method to perform autonomous molecular forward inference for expert system.A novel repetitive recognition site (RRS) technique is invented to design rule-molecules in knowledge base. The inference engine runs autonomously by digesting the rule-molecule, using a Class ⅡB restriction enzyme PpiⅠ. Concentration model has been built to show the feasibility of the inference process under ideal chemical reaction conditions. Moreover, we extend to implement a triggering communication between molecular automata, as a further application of the RRS technique in our model.

  2. TSH RECEPTOR GENETIC ALTERATIONS IN THE AUTONOMOUSLY FUNCTIONING THYROID ADENOMAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施秉银; 李雪萍; 李社莉; 薛明战; 王毅; 徐莉

    2004-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship between TSH receptor gene mutations and autonomously functioning thyroid adenomas (AFTAs). Methods The thyroid samples from 14 cases of diagnosed AFTAs were analyzed, with normal thyroid specimens adjacent to the tumors as controls. The 155 base pairs DNA fragments which encompassed the third cytoplasmic loop and the sixth transmembrane segments in the TSH receptor gene exon 10 were amplified by Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and analyzed by the single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). Direct sequencing of the PCR products was performed with Prism Dye Terminator Cycle Sequencing Core Kit. Results 6 of 14 AFTA specimens displayed abnormal migration in SSCP analysis. In sequence analysis of 3 abnormally migrated samples, one base substitution at nucleotide 1957 (A to C) and two same insertion mutations of one adenosine nucleotide between nucleotide 1972 and 1973 were identified. No mutations were found in controls. Conclusion This study confirmed the presence of TSH receptor gene mutations in AFTAs; both one-point substitution mutation and one-base insertion mutation were found to be responsible for the pathogenesis of AFTAs.

  3. Separation of the transcriptional activation and replication functions of the bovine papillomavirus-1 E2 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winokur, P L; McBride, A A

    1992-11-01

    Replication of bovine papillomavirus-1 (BPV-1) DNA requires two viral gene products, the E1 protein and the full-length E2 protein. The 48 kDa E2 protein is a site-specific DNA-binding protein that binds to several sites which lie adjacent to the BPV-1 origin of replication. The 85 amino acid C-terminal domain contains the specific DNA binding and dimerization properties of the protein. The approximately 200 amino acid N-terminal domain is crucial for transcriptional activation. Both of these domains are highly conserved among different papillomaviruses. An internal hinge region separates the two functional domains. The region varies in amino acid sequence and length among the E2 proteins of different papillomaviruses. A series of mutations were constructed within the E2 open reading frame which delete various regions of the conserved DNA binding and transactivation domains as well as the internal hinge region. Two mutated E2 proteins that lack portions of the conserved DNA-binding domain but which support DNA replication were identified using transient replication assays. These mutated E2 proteins were unable to function as transcriptional activators. Conversely, two E2 proteins containing large deletions of the hinge region were able to activate transcription, but were defective for replication. Thus, the replication and transactivation functions of the E2 protein are separable. PMID:1327758

  4. An inhibitor of viral RNA replication is encoded by a plant resistance gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Kazuhiro; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Naito, Satoshi; Meshi, Tetsuo; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2007-08-21

    The tomato Tm-1 gene confers resistance to tomato mosaic virus (ToMV). Here, we report that the extracts of Tm-1 tomato cells (GCR237) have properties that inhibit the in vitro RNA replication of WT ToMV more strongly than that of the Tm-1-resistance-breaking mutant of ToMV, LT1. We purified this inhibitory activity and identified a polypeptide of approximately 80 kDa (p80(GCR237)) using LC-tandem MS. The amino acid sequence of p80(GCR237) had no similarity to any characterized proteins. The p80(GCR237) gene cosegregated with Tm-1; transgenic expression of p80(GCR237) conferred resistance to ToMV within tomato plants; and the knockdown of p80(GCR237) sensitized Tm-1 tomato plants to ToMV, indicating that Tm-1 encodes p80(GCR237) itself. We further show that in vitro-synthesized Tm-1 (p80(GCR237)) protein binds to the replication proteins of WT ToMV and inhibits their function at a step before, but not after, the viral replication complex is formed on the membrane surfaces. Such binding was not observed for the replication proteins of LT1. These results suggest that Tm-1 (p80(GCR237)) inhibits the replication of WT ToMV RNA through binding to the replication proteins. PMID:17699618

  5. Insights into the Determination of the Templating Nucleotide at the Initiation of φ29 DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Prado, Alicia; Lázaro, José M; Longás, Elisa; Villar, Laurentino; de Vega, Miguel; Salas, Margarita

    2015-11-01

    Bacteriophage φ29 from Bacillus subtilis starts replication of its terminal protein (TP)-DNA by a protein-priming mechanism. To start replication, the DNA polymerase forms a heterodimer with a free TP that recognizes the replication origins, placed at both 5' ends of the linear chromosome, and initiates replication using as primer the OH-group of Ser-232 of the TP. The initiation of φ29 TP-DNA replication mainly occurs opposite the second nucleotide at the 3' end of the template. Earlier analyses of the template position that directs the initiation reaction were performed using single-stranded and double-stranded oligonucleotides containing the replication origin sequence without the parental TP. Here, we show that the parental TP has no influence in the determination of the nucleotide used as template in the initiation reaction. Previous studies showed that the priming domain of the primer TP determines the template position used for initiation. The results obtained here using mutant TPs at the priming loop where Ser-232 is located indicate that the aromatic residue Phe-230 is one of the determinants that allows the positioning of the penultimate nucleotide at the polymerization active site to direct insertion of the initiator dAMP during the initiation reaction. The role of Phe-230 in limiting the internalization of the template strand in the polymerization active site is discussed. PMID:26400085

  6. Allele-specific analysis of DNA replication origins in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholdy, Boris; Mukhopadhyay, Rituparna; Lajugie, Julien; Aladjem, Mirit I; Bouhassira, Eric E

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms that control the location and timing of firing of replication origins are poorly understood. Using a novel functional genomic approach based on the analysis of SNPs and indels in phased human genomes, we observe that replication asynchrony is associated with small cumulative variations in the initiation efficiency of multiple origins between the chromosome homologues, rather than with the activation of dormant origins. Allele-specific measurements demonstrate that the presence of G-quadruplex-forming sequences does not correlate with the efficiency of initiation. Sequence analysis reveals that the origins are highly enriched in sequences with profoundly asymmetric G/C and A/T nucleotide distributions and are almost completely depleted of antiparallel triplex-forming sequences. We therefore propose that although G4-forming sequences are abundant in replication origins, an asymmetry in nucleotide distribution, which increases the propensity of origins to unwind and adopt non-B DNA structure, rather than the ability to form G4, is directly associated with origin activity. PMID:25987481

  7. Identification of replication factor C from Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a component of the leading-strand DNA replication complex.

    OpenAIRE

    Fien, K; Stillman, B

    1992-01-01

    A number of proteins have been isolated from human cells on the basis of their ability to support DNA replication in vitro of the simian virus 40 (SV40) origin of DNA replication. One such protein, replication factor C (RFC), functions with the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), replication protein A (RPA), and DNA polymerase delta to synthesize the leading strand at a replication fork. To determine whether these proteins perform similar roles during replication of DNA from origins in...

  8. Rif1 controls DNA replication by directing Protein Phosphatase 1 to reverse Cdc7-mediated phosphorylation of the MCM complex

    OpenAIRE

    Hiraga, Shin-ichiro; Alvino, Gina M.; Chang, FuJung; Lian, Hui-Yong; Sridhar, Akila; Kubota, Takashi; Brewer, Bonita J.; Weinreich, Michael; Raghuraman, M. K.; Donaldson, Anne D.

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence points to a role for Rif1 (Rap1-interacting factor) in DNA replication and genomic stability; however, the mechanism by which Rif1 functions has remained elusive. Hiraga el al. now report that budding yeast Rif1 controls DNA replication genome-wide and describe how Rif1 opposes Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK) function by directing Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1)-mediated dephosphorylation of the MCM complex. PP1 interaction sites are evolutionarily conserved within the Rif1 sequence; ...

  9. Behavioral and biological effects of autonomous versus scheduled mission management in simulated space-dwelling groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roma, Peter G.; Hursh, Steven R.; Hienz, Robert D.; Emurian, Henry H.; Gasior, Eric D.; Brinson, Zabecca S.; Brady, Joseph V.

    2011-05-01

    Logistical constraints during long-duration space expeditions will limit the ability of Earth-based mission control personnel to manage their astronaut crews and will thus increase the prevalence of autonomous operations. Despite this inevitability, little research exists regarding crew performance and psychosocial adaptation under such autonomous conditions. To this end, a newly-initiated study on crew management systems was conducted to assess crew performance effectiveness under rigid schedule-based management of crew activities by Mission Control versus more flexible, autonomous management of activities by the crews themselves. Nine volunteers formed three long-term crews and were extensively trained in a simulated planetary geological exploration task over the course of several months. Each crew then embarked on two separate 3-4 h missions in a counterbalanced sequence: Scheduled, in which the crews were directed by Mission Control according to a strict topographic and temporal region-searching sequence, and Autonomous, in which the well-trained crews received equivalent baseline support from Mission Control but were free to explore the planetary surface as they saw fit. Under the autonomous missions, performance in all three crews improved (more high-valued geologic samples were retrieved), subjective self-reports of negative emotional states decreased, unstructured debriefing logs contained fewer references to negative emotions and greater use of socially-referent language, and salivary cortisol output across the missions was attenuated. The present study provides evidence that crew autonomy may improve performance and help sustain if not enhance psychosocial adaptation and biobehavioral health. These controlled experimental data contribute to an emerging empirical database on crew autonomy which the international astronautics community may build upon for future research and ultimately draw upon when designing and managing missions.

  10. Autonomous operations through onboard artificial intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, R. L.; Chien, S.; Castano, R.; Rabideau, G.

    2002-01-01

    The Autonomous Sciencecraft Experiment (ASE) will fly onboard the Air Force TechSat 21 constellation of three spacecraft scheduled for launch in 2006. ASE uses onboard continuous planning, robust task and goal-based execution, model-based mode identification and reconfiguration, and onboard machine learning and pattern recognition to radically increase science return by enabling intelligent downlink selection and autonomous retargeting. Demonstration of these capabilities in a flight environment will open up tremendous new opportunities in planetary science, space physics, and earth science that would be unreachable without this technology.

  11. Advanced control architecture for autonomous vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Markus; Dickmanns, Ernst D.

    1997-06-01

    An advanced control architecture for autonomous vehicles is presented. The hierarchical architecture consists of four levels: a vehicle level, a control level, a rule-based level and a knowledge-based level. A special focus is on forms of internal representation, which have to be chosen adequately for each level. The control scheme is applied to VaMP, a Mercedes passenger car which autonomously performs missions on German freeways. VaMP perceives the environment with its sense of vision and conventional sensors. It controls its actuators for locomotion and attention focusing. Modules for perception, cognition and action are discussed.

  12. Connecting orbits of autonomous Lagrangian systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In contrast to the time-dependent case, the time-t-section of Mañé set of autonomous Lagrangian systems is independent of time, thus, it is nowhere disconnected. This causes some difference in the study of dynamics, for instance, Mather's c-equivalence cannot exist among different cohomology classes if they are not in a flat of the α-function (cf (Bernard 2002 Ann. Inst. Fourier 52 1533–68.)). In this paper, we show how to construct connecting orbits in autonomous systems, and propose a modified notion of c-equivalence. We also apply the result to construct diffusion orbits in an energy surface

  13. Dynamic biomaterials: toward engineering autonomous feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Eliza; Chavez, Michael; Tan, Cheemeng

    2016-06-01

    Dynamic biomaterials are biocompatible engineered systems capable of sensing and actively responding to their surrounding environment. They are of growing interest, both as models in basic research to understand complex cellular systems and in medical applications. Here, we review recent advances in nano-scale and micro-scale biomaterials, specifically artificial cells consisting of compartmentalized biochemical reactions and biologically compatible hydrogels. These dynamic biomaterials respond to stimuli through triggered reactions, reaction cascades, logic gates, and autonomous feedback loops. We outline the advances and remaining challenges in implementing such 'smart' biomaterials capable of autonomously responding to environmental stimuli. PMID:26974245

  14. Blunted autonomic response in cluster headache patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barloese, Mads; Brinth, Louise; Mehlsen, Jesper;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cluster headache (CH) is a disabling headache disorder with chronobiological features. The posterior hypothalamus is involved in CH pathophysiology and is a hub for autonomic control. We studied autonomic response to the head-up tilt table test (HUT) including heart rate variability...... (HRV) in CH patients and compared results to healthy controls. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Twenty-seven episodic and chronic CH patients and an equal number of age-, sex- and BMI-matched controls were included. We analyzed responses to HUT in the time and frequency domain and by non-linear analysis. RESULTS...

  15. Light Sailboats: Laser driven autonomous microrobots

    CERN Document Server

    Búzás, Anrdás; Mathesz, Anna; Oroszi, László; Vizsnyiczai, Gaszton; Vicsek, Tamás; Ormos, Pál; 10.1063/1.4737646

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a system of light driven microscopic autonomous moving particles that move on a flat surface. The design is simple, yet effective: Micrometer sized objects with wedge shape are produced by photopolymerization, they are covered with a reflective surface. When the area of motion is illuminated perpendicularly from above, the light is deflected to the side by the wedge shaped objects, in the direction determined by the position and orientation of the particles. The momentum change during reflection provides the driving force for an effectively autonomous motion. The system is an efficient tool to study self propelled microscopic robots.

  16. Reflex control for safe autonomous robot operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the design of an autonomous, sonar-based world mapping system for collision prevention in robotic systems. Obstacle detection and mapping is performed as a task that competes with higher-level tasks for the robot's attention. All tasks are integrated within a hierarchy, organized and co-ordinated by schemes analogous to biological reflexes and fixed action patterns. It is illustrated how the existence of low-level reflex behaviours can enhance the survivability and autonomy of complex systems and simplify the design of complex higher-level controls like our autonomous sonar-based world mapping system

  17. Design of an autonomous exterior security robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Scott D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the requirements and preliminary design of robotic vehicle designed for performing autonomous exterior perimeter security patrols around warehouse areas, ammunition supply depots, and industrial parks for the U.S. Department of Defense. The preliminary design allows for the operation of up to eight vehicles in a six kilometer by six kilometer zone with autonomous navigation and obstacle avoidance. In addition to detection of crawling intruders at 100 meters, the system must perform real-time inventory checking and database comparisons using a microwave tags system.

  18. Autonomous control of multi-fingered hand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Li; LIU Hong

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a novel autonomous control strategy of multi-fingered hand based on a modular control system of dexterous manipulation. A simple proportional-integral-derivative(PID) position control with friction compensation, which requires few friction parameters, is used to realize accurate and smooth trajectory tracking in pregrasp phase. In grasp and manipulation phases, an event-driven switcher is adopted to determine the switching between unconstrained position control and constrained torque control, and an improved explicit integral force control strategy is implemented to realize simultaneously stable contact transition and accurate force tracking. Experimental results have verified the effectiveness of the proposed autonomous control strategy of multi-fingered hand.

  19. Evolutionary strategy for achieving autonomous navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Douglas W.

    1999-01-01

    An approach is presented for the evolutionary development of supervised autonomous navigation capabilities for small 'backpackable' ground robots, in the context of a DARPA- sponsored program to provide robotic support to small units of dismounted warfighters. This development approach relies on the implementation of a baseline visual serving navigation capability, including tools to support operator oversight and override, which is then enhanced with semantically referenced commands and a mission scripting structure. As current and future machine perception techniques are able to automatically designate visual serving goal points, this approach should provide a natural evolutionary pathway to higher levels of autonomous operation and reduced requirements for operator intervention.

  20. Emerging Technologies for Autonomous Language Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Warschauer

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Drawing on a lengthier review completed for the US National Institute for Literacy, this paper examines emerging technologies that are applicable to self-access and autonomous learning in the areas of listening and speaking, collaborative writing, reading and language structure, and online interaction. Digital media reviewed include podcasts, blogs, wikis, online writing sites, text-scaffolding software, concordancers, multiuser virtual environments, multiplayer games, and chatbots. For each of these technologies, we summarize recent research and discuss possible uses for autonomous language learning.

  1. New stopping criteria for segmenting DNA sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Li, W

    2001-01-01

    We propose a solution on the stopping criterion in segmenting inhomogeneous DNA sequences with complex statistical patterns. This new stopping criterion is based on Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) in the model selection framework. When this stopping criterion is applied to a left telomere sequence of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the complete genome sequence of bacterium Escherichia coli, borders of biologically meaningful units were identified (e.g. subtelomeric units, replication origin, and replication terminus), and a more reasonable number of domains was obtained. We also introduce a measure called segmentation strength which can be used to control the delineation of large domains. The relationship between the average domain size and the threshold of segmentation strength is determined for several genome sequences.

  2. Sequence assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheibye-Alsing, Karsten; Hoffmann, S.; Frankel, Annett Maria;

    2009-01-01

    Despite the rapidly increasing number of sequenced and re-sequenced genomes, many issues regarding the computational assembly of large-scale sequencing data have remain unresolved. Computational assembly is crucial in large genome projects as well for the evolving high-throughput technologies and...... plays an important role in processing the information generated by these methods. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of the current publicly available sequence assembly programs. We describe the basic principles of computational assembly along with the main concerns, such as repetitive sequences...... in genomic DNA, highly expressed genes and alternative transcripts in EST sequences. We summarize existing comparisons of different assemblers and provide a detailed descriptions and directions for download of assembly programs at: http://genome.ku.dk/resources/assembly/methods.html....

  3. Less can be more: RNA-adapters may enhance coding capacity of replicators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folkert K de Boer

    Full Text Available It is still not clear how prebiotic replicators evolved towards the complexity found in present day organisms. Within the most realistic scenario for prebiotic evolution, known as the RNA world hypothesis, such complexity has arisen from replicators consisting solely of RNA. Within contemporary life, remarkably many RNAs are involved in modifying other RNAs. In hindsight, such RNA-RNA modification might have helped in alleviating the limits of complexity posed by the information threshold for RNA-only replicators. Here we study the possible role of such self-modification in early evolution, by modeling the evolution of protocells as evolving replicators, which have the opportunity to incorporate these mechanisms as a molecular tool. Evolution is studied towards a set of 25 arbitrary 'functional' structures, while avoiding all other (misfolded structures, which are considered to be toxic and increase the death-rate of a protocell. The modeled protocells contain a genotype of different RNA-sequences while their phenotype is the ensemble of secondary structures they can potentially produce from these RNA-sequences. One of the secondary structures explicitly codes for a simple sequence-modification tool. This 'RNA-adapter' can block certain positions on other RNA-sequences through antisense base-pairing. The altered sequence can produce an alternative secondary structure, which may or may not be functional. We show that the modifying potential of interacting RNA-sequences enables these protocells to evolve high fitness under high mutation rates. Moreover, our model shows that because of toxicity of misfolded molecules, redundant coding impedes the evolution of self-modification machinery, in effect restraining the evolvability of coding structures. Hence, high mutation rates can actually promote the evolution of complex coding structures by reducing redundant coding. Protocells can successfully use RNA-adapters to modify their genotype

  4. The V Protein of Canine Distemper Virus Is Required for Virus Replication in Human Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Noriyuki Otsuki; Yuichiro Nakatsu; Toru Kubota; Tsuyoshi Sekizuka; Fumio Seki; Kouji Sakai; Makoto Kuroda; Ryoji Yamaguchi; Makoto Takeda

    2013-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) becomes able to use human receptors through a single amino acid substitution in the H protein. In addition, CDV strains possessing an intact C protein replicate well in human epithelial H358 cells. The present study showed that CDV strain 007Lm, which was isolated from lymph node tissue of a dog with distemper, failed to replicate in H358 cells, although it possessed an intact C protein. Sequence analyses suggested that a cysteine-to-tyrosine substitution at posit...

  5. Analysis of classical swine fever virus RNA replication determinants using replicons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risager, Peter Christian; Fahnøe, Ulrik; Gullberg, Maria;

    2013-01-01

    Self-replicating RNAs (replicons), with or without reporter gene sequences, derived from the genome of the Paderborn strain of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) have been produced. The full-length viral cDNA, propagated within a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC), was modified by targeted...... recombination within E. coli. RNA transcripts were produced in vitro and introduced into cells by electroporation. The translation and replication of the replicon RNAs could be followed by the accumulation of luciferase (from Renilla reniformis or Gaussia princeps) protein expression (where appropriate), as...

  6. Initiating chromosome replication in E. coli: it makes sense to recycle

    OpenAIRE

    Leonard, Alan C.; Grimwade, Julia E.

    2009-01-01

    Initiating new rounds of Escherichia coli chromosome replication requires DnaA-ATP to unwind the replication origin, oriC, and load DNA helicase. In this issue of Genes & Development, Fujimitsu and colleagues (pp. 1221–1233) demonstrate that two chromosomal sites, termed DARS (DnaA-reactivating sequences), recycle inactive DnaA-ADP into DnaA-ATP. Fujimitsu and colleagues propose these sites are necessary to attain the DnaA-ATP threshold during normal growth and are important regulators of ini...

  7. Optical tweezers reveal how proteins alter replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurasiya, Kathy

    Single molecule force spectroscopy is a powerful method that explores the DNA interaction properties of proteins involved in a wide range of fundamental biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, and repair. We use optical tweezers to capture and stretch a single DNA molecule in the presence of proteins that bind DNA and alter its mechanical properties. We quantitatively characterize the DNA binding mechanisms of proteins in order to provide a detailed understanding of their function. In this work, we focus on proteins involved in replication of Escherichia coli (E. coli ), endogenous eukaryotic retrotransposons Ty3 and LINE-1, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). DNA polymerases replicate the entire genome of the cell, and bind both double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) during DNA replication. The replicative DNA polymerase in the widely-studied model system E. coli is the DNA polymerase III subunit alpha (DNA pol III alpha). We use optical tweezers to determine that UmuD, a protein that regulates bacterial mutagenesis through its interactions with DNA polymerases, specifically disrupts alpha binding to ssDNA. This suggests that UmuD removes alpha from its ssDNA template to allow DNA repair proteins access to the damaged DNA, and to facilitate exchange of the replicative polymerase for an error-prone translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerase that inserts nucleotides opposite the lesions, so that bacterial DNA replication may proceed. This work demonstrates a biophysical mechanism by which E. coli cells tolerate DNA damage. Retroviruses and retrotransposons reproduce by copying their RNA genome into the nuclear DNA of their eukaryotic hosts. Retroelements encode proteins called nucleic acid chaperones, which rearrange nucleic acid secondary structure and are therefore required for successful replication. The chaperone activity of these proteins requires strong binding affinity for both single- and double-stranded nucleic

  8. Advances in autonomous systems for space exploration missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, B. D.; Gross, A. R.; Clancy, D. J.; Cannon, H. N.; Barrett, A.; Mjolssness, E.; Muscettola, N.; Chien, S.; Johnson, A.

    2001-01-01

    This paper focuses on new and innovative software for remote, autonomous, space systems flight operation, including distributed autonomous systems, flight test results, and implications and directions for future systems.

  9. Hard-real-time resource management for autonomous spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gat, E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes tickets, a computational mechanism for hard-real-time autonomous resource management. Autonomous spacecraftcontrol can be considered abstractly as a computational process whose outputs are spacecraft commands.

  10. Navigation of autonomous underwater vehicle using extended kalman filter

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ranjan, T.N.; Nherakkol, A.; Navelkar, G.S.

    To navigate the Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) accurately is one of the most important aspects in its application. A truly autonomous vehicle must determine its position which requires the optimal integration of all available attitude...

  11. A Rare Association of Trigeminal Autonomic Cephalgia: Pontine Capillary Telangiectasia

    OpenAIRE

    Gocmen, Rahsan; Kurt, Erdal; Arslan, Sabina; Unal-Cevik, Isin; Karli Oguz, Kader; Tezer, F Irsel

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a case of pontine capillary telangiectasia in a 43-year-old woman with a clinical diagnosis of trigeminal autonomic cephalgia. The possible association with pontine capillary telangiectasia and trigeminal autonomic cephalgia is discussed.

  12. Genome Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sato, Shusei; Andersen, Stig Uggerhøj

    2014-01-01

    The current Lotus japonicus reference genome sequence is based on a hybrid assembly of Sanger TAC/BAC, Sanger shotgun and Illumina shotgun sequencing data generated from the Miyakojima-MG20 accession. It covers nearly all expressed L. japonicus genes and has been annotated mainly based on transcr......The current Lotus japonicus reference genome sequence is based on a hybrid assembly of Sanger TAC/BAC, Sanger shotgun and Illumina shotgun sequencing data generated from the Miyakojima-MG20 accession. It covers nearly all expressed L. japonicus genes and has been annotated mainly based...

  13. Extremal dynamics in random replicator ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kärenlampi, Petri P., E-mail: petri.karenlampi@uef.fi

    2015-10-02

    The seminal numerical experiment by Bak and Sneppen (BS) is repeated, along with computations with replicator models, including a greater amount of features. Both types of models do self-organize, and do obey power-law scaling for the size distribution of activity cycles. However species extinction within the replicator models interferes with the BS self-organized critical (SOC) activity. Speciation–extinction dynamics ruins any stationary state which might contain a steady size distribution of activity cycles. The BS-type activity appears as a dissimilar phenomenon in comparison to speciation–extinction dynamics in the replicator system. No criticality is found from the speciation–extinction dynamics. Neither are speciations and extinctions in real biological macroevolution known to contain any diverging distributions, or self-organization towards any critical state. Consequently, biological macroevolution probably is not a self-organized critical phenomenon. - Highlights: • Extremal Dynamics organizes random replicator ecosystems to two phases in fitness space. • Replicator systems show power-law scaling of activity. • Species extinction interferes with Bak–Sneppen type mutation activity. • Speciation–extinction dynamics does not show any critical phase transition. • Biological macroevolution probably is not a self-organized critical phenomenon.

  14. COPI is required for enterovirus 71 replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmin Wang

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71, a member of the Picornaviridae family, is found in Asian countries where it causes a wide range of human diseases. No effective therapy is available for the treatment of these infections. Picornaviruses undergo RNA replication in association with membranes of infected cells. COPI and COPII have been shown to be involved in the formation of picornavirus-induced vesicles. Replication of several picornaviruses, including poliovirus and Echovirus 11 (EV11, is dependent on COPI or COPII. Here, we report that COPI, but not COPII, is required for EV71 replication. Replication of EV71 was inhibited by brefeldin A and golgicide A, inhibitors of COPI activity. Furthermore, we found EV71 2C protein interacted with COPI subunits by co-immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assay, indicating that COPI coatomer might be directed to the viral replication complex through viral 2C protein. Additionally, because the pathway is conserved among different species of enteroviruses, it may represent a novel target for antiviral therapies.

  15. Extremal dynamics in random replicator ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The seminal numerical experiment by Bak and Sneppen (BS) is repeated, along with computations with replicator models, including a greater amount of features. Both types of models do self-organize, and do obey power-law scaling for the size distribution of activity cycles. However species extinction within the replicator models interferes with the BS self-organized critical (SOC) activity. Speciation–extinction dynamics ruins any stationary state which might contain a steady size distribution of activity cycles. The BS-type activity appears as a dissimilar phenomenon in comparison to speciation–extinction dynamics in the replicator system. No criticality is found from the speciation–extinction dynamics. Neither are speciations and extinctions in real biological macroevolution known to contain any diverging distributions, or self-organization towards any critical state. Consequently, biological macroevolution probably is not a self-organized critical phenomenon. - Highlights: • Extremal Dynamics organizes random replicator ecosystems to two phases in fitness space. • Replicator systems show power-law scaling of activity. • Species extinction interferes with Bak–Sneppen type mutation activity. • Speciation–extinction dynamics does not show any critical phase transition. • Biological macroevolution probably is not a self-organized critical phenomenon

  16. Geometric integration of non-autonomous Hamiltonian problems

    OpenAIRE

    Marthinsen, Håkon; Owren, Brynjulf

    2014-01-01

    Symplectic integration of autonomous Hamiltonian systems is a well-known field of study in geometric numerical integration, but for non-autonomous systems the situation is less clear, since symplectic structure requires an even number of dimensions. We show that one possible extension of symplectic methods in the autonomous setting to the non-autonomous setting is obtained by using canonical transformations. Many existing methods fit into this framework. We also perform experiments which indi...

  17. Engineering an Ontology for Autonomous Systems - The OASys Ontology

    OpenAIRE

    Bermejo Alonso, Julita; Sanz Bravo, Ricardo; Rodríguez, Manuel; Hernández Corbato, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an ontology for autonomous systems, as the initial stage of a research programe on autonomous systems’ engineering within a model-based control approach. The ontology aims at providing a unified conceptual framework for the autonomous systems’ stakeholders, from developers to software engineers. The modular ontology contains both generic and domain-specific concepts for autonomous systems description and engineering. The ontology serves as the basis in a ...

  18. A programming model and execution environment for autonomous systems

    OpenAIRE

    Razafimahefa, Chrislain

    2004-01-01

    This thesis presents the design and implementation of a programming model for autonomous systems. Autonomous systems are distributed systems based on wireless networks, mobile devices and the Internet. They are characterized by the high dynamics with which their configuration evolves. Ad hoc networks, a member of autonomous systems, illustrate this point since in these networks participants can join and leave at any time. Similarly in Peer-to-Peer networks, another member of autonomous system...

  19. College English Students’ Autonomous Learning Motivation and Cultivation Model Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王艳荣; 李娥

    2015-01-01

    Studying the autonomous learning motivation and excitation model can stimulate intrinsic motivation of foreign language learners,develop students self-management strategy evaluation are very necessary.The purpose of this paper is to give students the skills of listening and speaking for their autonomous learning.Then study the cultivation and motivation of college English students autonomous learning,hoping to make students to learn autonomous learning and stimulate their motivation fully.

  20. PTEN Controls the DNA Replication Process through MCM2 in Response to Replicative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiawen Feng

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available PTEN is a tumor suppressor frequently mutated in human cancers. PTEN inhibits the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K-AKT cascade, and nuclear PTEN guards the genome by multiple mechanisms. Here, we report that PTEN physically associates with the minichromosome maintenance complex component 2 (MCM2, which is essential for DNA replication. Specifically, PTEN dephosphorylates MCM2 at serine 41 (S41 and restricts replication fork progression under replicative stress. PTEN disruption results in unrestrained fork progression upon replication stalling, which is similar to the phenotype of cells expressing the phosphomimic MCM2 mutant S41D. Moreover, PTEN is necessary for prevention of chromosomal aberrations under replication stress. This study demonstrates that PTEN regulates DNA replication through MCM2 and loss of PTEN function leads to replication defects and genomic instability. We propose that PTEN plays a critical role in maintaining genetic stability through a replication-specific mechanism, and this is a crucial facet of PTEN tumor suppressor activity.