WorldWideScience

Sample records for automatic home nursing

  1. Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medications & Older Adults Making Your Wishes Known Home & Community Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Nursing Homes Font size A A A Print Share ... home residents than in individuals living in the community. Length of Stay ... is common among nursing home residents, the length of stay varies greatly. ...

  2. Nursing Home Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nursing home checklist Name of nursing home: ____________________________________________________ Address: ________________________________________________________________ Phone number: __________________________________________________________ Date of visit: _____________________________________________________________ Basic information Yes No Notes Is the nursing home Medicare certified? Is the nursing ...

  3. Meals in nursing homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofod, Jens Erik; Birkemose, A.

    2004-01-01

    Undernutrition is present among 33% of nursing home residents in Denmark. Hence, it is relevant to examine the meal situation at nursing homes to single out factors that may increase or reduce the residents' food intake. in the ongoing Danish nursing home debate it is claimed that a new type...... of nursing home improves the residents' meal situation with a positive effect on nutrition. The aim of this work is to test the general hypothesis that (i) residents appreciate the meal situation in these nursing homes and (ii) nutritional status of the residents is improved in this type of nursing home....... This study was carried out in four Danish nursing homes at various locations in Denmark. The methods used are qualitative interviews and observations at four nursing homes in combination with measurement of body mass index (BMI) at two of the four nursing homes. Undernutrition is defined as a BMI below 20...

  4. Alternatives to Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this website may not be available. Alternatives to nursing homes Before you make any decisions about long ... live and what help you may need. A nursing home may not be your only choice. Discharge ...

  5. Community Nursing Home (CNH)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Community Nursing Home (CNH) database contains a list of all Community Nursing Home facilities under local contract to Veterans Health Administration (VHA). CNH...

  6. National Nursing Home Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Nursing Home Survey provides includes characteristics such as size of nursing home facilities, ownership, Medicare/Medicaid certification, occupancy rate, number of days of care provided, and expenses.

  7. Nursing Home Quality Initiative

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This Nursing Home Quality Initiative (NHQI) website provides consumer and provider information regarding the quality of care in nursing homes. NHQI discusses...

  8. Nursing Home Data Compendium

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The compendium contains figures and tables presenting data on all Medicare- and Medicaid-certified nursing homes in the United States as well as the residents in...

  9. Nursing Home Compare

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The data that is used by the Nursing Home Compare tool can be downloaded for public use. This functionality is primarily used by health policy researchers and the...

  10. Nursing Home Compare Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — These are the official datasets used on the Medicare.gov Nursing Home Compare Website provided by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. These data allow...

  11. [Aromatherapy in nursing homes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barré, Lucile

    2015-01-01

    Pierre Delaroche de Clisson hospital uses essential oils as part of its daily organisation for the treatment of pain and the development of palliative care. The setting up of this project, in nursing homes and long-term care units, is the fruit of a complex mission carried out by a multidisciplinary team, which had to take into account the risks involved and overcome a certain amount of reluctance. PMID:26154352

  12. Factor substitution in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, John; Grabowski, David C; Hirth, Richard A

    2006-03-01

    This paper studies factor substitution in one important sector: the nursing home industry. Specifically, we measure the extent to which nursing homes substitute materials for labor when labor becomes relatively more expensive. From a policy perspective, factor substitution in this market is important because materials-intensive methods of care are associated with greater risks of morbidity and mortality among nursing home residents. Studying longitudinal data from 1991 to 2000 on nearly every nursing home in the United States, we use the method of instrumental variables (IV) to address measurement error in nursing home wages. The results from the IV models yield evidence of factor substitution: higher nursing home wages are associated with greater use of psychoactive drugs and lower quality.

  13. NATIONAL NURSING HOME SURVEY (NNHS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Nursing Home Survey (NNHS) is a continuing series of national sample surveys of nursing homes, their residents, and their staff.The survey was conducted in 1973-74, 1977, 1985, 1995, 1997, and 1999. Although each of these surveys emphasized different topics, they all...

  14. Nursing Home Work Practices and Nursing Assistants' Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Christine E.; Squillace, Marie R.; Meagher, Jennifer; Anderson, Wayne L.; Wiener, Joshua M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the impact of nursing home work practices, specifically compensation and working conditions, on job satisfaction of nursing assistants employed in nursing homes. Design and Methods: Data are from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey, responses by the nursing assistants' employers to the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey,…

  15. Nursing Home Nomads: A Study of Transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retsinas, Joan

    Researchers have divided nursing home residents into long-stayers and short-stayers. While long-stayers rarely return home, they do not necessarily stay long in one institution. Instead, they may transfer from nursing home to nursing home. Although many studies have examined the impact of relocation on nursing home residents, few studies have…

  16. Eldercare at Home: Choosing a Nursing Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... decide which home best fits the older person's needs. Hospital social workers usually have experience with several nursing homes ... What type of care would the older person need? Choices include round-the-clock ... recreation, and social services. Here is an example of what you ...

  17. Rehabilitation in the nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, C L; Wanlass, W

    1993-11-01

    Despite the considerable challenges to providing high-quality rehabilitation in a long-term care facility, growing demographic and fiscal pressures are likely to push the nursing home into the forefront of rehabilitation for the frail elderly. Model programs have been implemented in recent years that present alternative ways to increase access to skilled services and improve quality of care in nursing homes without a drastic increase in costs. The teaching nursing home program has supported projects to make longterm care facilities centers for education, innovative clinical care, and research, thus bringing nursing homes into the mainstream of the medical establishment. A majority of US medical schools have recognized the need for training in long-term care and have formed affiliations with nursing homes. The Department of Veterans Affairs has a large national system of nursing homes, which has made a significant contribution to the training of health professionals in many fields. Demonstration projects such as the Social Health Maintenance Organization and On Lok have sought to decrease the fragmentation of health care services for the elderly and bring nursing homes into a continuum of care. The adoption of the OBRA regulations is building a base for comprehensive assessment and improved provision of care in nursing homes nationwide. Nursing home rehabilitation has the potential to decrease institutionalization in the short-term resident, whereas maintenance therapy can improve quality of life and decrease the cost of caring for patients who must be institutionalized. But to achieve this potential, significant barriers must be overcome. Negative attitudes about aging and nursing homes percolate through all levels of health care from lack of reimbursement at the federal and state levels to the professional priorities that continue to favor "high-tech" medicine and stigmatize nursing homes and those who work in them, to low expectations of caregivers and the

  18. Implementing guidelines in nursing homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diehl, Heinz; Graverholt, Birgitte; Espehaug, Birgitte;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Research on guideline implementation strategies has mostly been conducted in settings which differ significantly from a nursing home setting and its transferability to the nursing home setting is therefore limited. The objective of this study was to systematically review the effects...... of interventions to improve the implementation of guidelines in nursing homes. METHODS: A systematic literature search was conducted in the Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Embase, MEDLINE, DARE, HTA, CENTRAL, SveMed + and ISI Web of Science from their inception until August 2015. Reference screening and a citation...... search were performed. Studies were eligible if they evaluated any type of guideline implementation strategy in a nursing home setting. Eligible study designs were systematic reviews, randomised controlled trials, non-randomised controlled trials, controlled before-after studies and interrupted...

  19. Fall prevention in nursing homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Mette; Hauge, Johnny

    2006-01-01

    that the number of hospitalization after a fall injury will become an even greater task for the Danish hospitals, The aim of the study was to show if there is a relationship between physically frail elderly nursing home resident’s subjective evaluation of fall-risk and an objective evaluation of their balance....... Further, to suggest tools for fall prevention in nursing home settings on the basis of the results of this study and the literature. A quantitative method inspired by the survey method was used to give an overview of fall patterns, subjective and objective evaluations of fallrisk. Participants were 16...... physically frail elderly nursing home residents from three different nursing homes. Measures: a small staff-questionnaire about incidences and places where the participants had falling-episodes during a 12 month period, The Falls Effi cacy Scale Swedish version (FES(S)) and Berg Balance Scale (BBS) Results...

  20. Nursing Jobs in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torpey, Elka Maria

    2011-01-01

    The need for practical nurses who focus on caring for older people is growing. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the number of people ages 65 and older is expected to increase from 40 million to 72 million between 2010 and 2030. And the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projects that this increasing population will result in job growth for…

  1. The Natural History of Nursing Home Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Mary Ann; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Former nursing home residents (N=197) were followed for 2 years after discharge. Four subgroups of patients were identified on the basis of different patterns of survival and use of health care resources: those who returned home, died in nursing homes, transferred to hospitals, or transferred to other nursing homes. (NRB)

  2. Clashes At Nursing Homes Not Uncommon

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159335.html Clashes at Nursing Homes Not Uncommon 20 percent of residents affected ... 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Many elderly adults in nursing homes face aggressive or disturbing behavior from their ...

  3. Comparison of nursing home residents admitted from home or hospital.

    OpenAIRE

    Tracey, F.; Crawford, V. L.; Montgomery, E. A.; Gilmore, D. H.; Beringer, T. R.

    1995-01-01

    A growing elderly population coupled with a reduction in hospital long term care has led to an increase in the independent nursing home sector. This is an expensive resource. Proper placement is therefore essential to ensure its efficient use. Prior to the introduction of care management there was no standard assessment procedure for admission to nursing home care from different sources. A nursing home population (n = 624) in North and West Belfast was studied and mental scores, levels of dis...

  4. Assisted Living Facilities - MDC_NursingHome

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Label (point) feature class of Miami-Dade County Nursing Homes Facilities. As of May 2004 the Office of Emergency Management (OEM) will provide updates for Nursing...

  5. Rurality and Nursing Home Quality: Evidence from the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yu; Meng, Hongdao; Miller, Nancy A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: To evaluate the impact of rural geographic location on nursing home quality of care in the United States. Design and Methods: The study used cross-sectional observational design. We obtained resident- and facility-level data from 12,507 residents in 1,174 nursing homes from the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey. We used…

  6. Nursing Home Staff Turnover: Impact on Nursing Home Compare Quality Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Nicholas G.; Engberg, John; Men, Aiju

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: We used data from a large sample of nursing homes to examine the association between staff turnover and quality. Design and Methods: The staff turnover measures came from primary data collected from 2,840 nursing homes in 2004 (representing a 71% response rate). Data collection included measures for nurse aides, licensed practical nurses,…

  7. Family caregivers' experiences in nursing homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohne, Vibeke; Høy, Bente; Wilhelm Rehnsfeldt, Arne;

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study is focusing on dignity in nursing homes from the perspective of family caregivers. Dignity is a complex concept and central to nursing. Dignity in nursing homes is a challenge, according to research. Family caregivers are frequently involved in their family members’ daily...... experiences at the nursing home. This Scandinavian application study has a descriptive and explorative design. Twenty-nine family caregivers were included. A phenomenological-hermeneutic approach was used to understand the meaning of the narrated text. The interpretations revealed two main themes: “One should......, but still important in nursing homes. It seems therefore important to further investigate experiences of family caregivers in the context of nursing homes....

  8. 38 CFR 17.57 - Use of community nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Use of community nursing... MEDICAL Use of Community Nursing Home Care Facilities § 17.57 Use of community nursing homes. (a) Nursing home care in a contract public or private nursing home facility may be authorized for the...

  9. Automatic Battery Swap System for Home Robots

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Wu; Guifang Qiao; Jian Ge; Hongtao Sun; Guangming Song

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of an automatic battery swap system for the prolonged activities of home robots. A battery swap station is proposed to implement battery off‐line recharging and on‐line exchanging functions. It consists of a loading and unloading mechanism, a shifting mechanism, a locking device and a shell. The home robot is a palm‐sized wheeled robot with an onboard camera and a removable battery case in the front. It communicates with the battery swap stati...

  10. Intergrated dental care in nursing homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, P.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    The thesis deals with integrated dental care in nursing homes. First, the dental treatment needs were ascertained of 432 residents in three Dutch nursing homes that offer integrated dental care. Dentist researchers intra-orally examined the residents and found that 72% required dental treatment. How

  11. Stroke and Nursing Home care: a national survey of nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGee Hannah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although stroke is recognised as a major factor in admission to nursing home care, data is lacking on the extent and nature of the disabilities and dependency in nursing homes arising from stroke. A national study conducted in nursing homes can quantify the number of residents with stroke in nursing homes, their disability and levels of dependency. Methods A cross-sectional survey research design was used. A total of 572 public and private nursing homes were identified nationally and a stratified random selection of 60 nursing homes with 3,239 residents was made. In half of the nursing homes (n = 30 efforts were made to interview all residents with stroke Survey instruments were used to collect data from residents with stroke and nursing home managers on demography, patient disability, and treatment. Results Across all nursing homes (n = 60, 18% (n = 570 of the residents had previously had a stroke. In homes (n = 30, where interviews with residents with stroke (n = 257, only 7% (n = 18 residents were capable of answering for themselves and were interviewed. Data on the remaining 93% (n = 239 residents were provided by the nursing home manager. Nurse Managers reported that 73% of residents with stroke had a high level of dependency. One in two residents with stroke was prescribed antidepressants or sedative medication. Only 21% of stroke residents were prescribed anticoagulants, 42% antiplatelets, and 36% cholesterol lowering medications. Stroke rehabilitation guidelines were lacking and 68% reported that there was no formal review process in place. Conclusions This study provides seminal findings on stroke and nursing home services in Ireland. We now know that one in six nursing home residents in a national survey are residents with a stroke, and have a wide range of disabilities. There is currently little or no structured care (beyond generic care for stroke survivors who reside in nursing homes in Ireland.

  12. Stroke and Nursing Home care: a national survey of nursing homes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cowman, Seamus

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although stroke is recognised as a major factor in admission to nursing home care, data is lacking on the extent and nature of the disabilities and dependency in nursing homes arising from stroke. A national study conducted in nursing homes can quantify the number of residents with stroke in nursing homes, their disability and levels of dependency. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey research design was used. A total of 572 public and private nursing homes were identified nationally and a stratified random selection of 60 nursing homes with 3,239 residents was made. In half of the nursing homes (n = 30) efforts were made to interview all residents with stroke Survey instruments were used to collect data from residents with stroke and nursing home managers on demography, patient disability, and treatment. RESULTS: Across all nursing homes (n = 60), 18% (n = 570) of the residents had previously had a stroke. In homes (n = 30), where interviews with residents with stroke (n = 257), only 7% (n = 18) residents were capable of answering for themselves and were interviewed. Data on the remaining 93% (n = 239) residents were provided by the nursing home manager. Nurse Managers reported that 73% of residents with stroke had a high level of dependency. One in two residents with stroke was prescribed antidepressants or sedative medication. Only 21% of stroke residents were prescribed anticoagulants, 42% antiplatelets, and 36% cholesterol lowering medications. Stroke rehabilitation guidelines were lacking and 68% reported that there was no formal review process in place. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides seminal findings on stroke and nursing home services in Ireland. We now know that one in six nursing home residents in a national survey are residents with a stroke, and have a wide range of disabilities. There is currently little or no structured care (beyond generic care) for stroke survivors who reside in nursing homes in Ireland.

  13. Sex and the nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Murray

    2016-01-01

    The current article discusses the case of Henry Rahons. A nearly 80 year old man who was accused by the local district attorney of having unlawful sexual contact with Donna, his second wife of some seven years who had developed Alzheimer's disease in her later years. Under Iowa law, he was accused of having sexually abused her because she had "a mental defect or incapacity which precludes giving consent" to sex acts. A jury acquitted Henry of the charge of sexually abusing his wife. The evidence was equivocal that a sex act occurred on May 23, 2014, the date specified in the indictment. This article addresses the ability to assessed competence to consent to sex in similar situations. The current rules and attitudes about senior sex in nursing homes needs to be reevaluated. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27196391

  14. Nursing Practice Environment and Registered Nurses' Job Satisfaction in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNs…

  15. Reducing energy costs in nursing homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    The handbook presents ideas and techniques for energy conservation in nursing homes. Case studies were developed of nursing homes located in different parts of the US. The typical nursing home assessed was proprietary, of intermediate-care level, medicaid-certified, and had less than 200 beds. Specific energy conservation measures were analyzed to determine the energy and dollar savings that could be realized. These include reducing heat loss through the building shell; reducing hot water costs; recovering the heat generated by dryers; reducing lighting costs; reducing heating and cooling costs, and analyzing fuels and fuel rates. A case for converting electric clothes dryers to gas was analyzed. (MCW)

  16. Automatic Battery Swap System for Home Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Wu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and implementation of an automatic battery swap system for the prolonged activities of home robots. A battery swap station is proposed to implement battery off‐line recharging and on‐line exchanging functions. It consists of a loading and unloading mechanism, a shifting mechanism, a locking device and a shell. The home robot is a palm‐sized wheeled robot with an onboard camera and a removable battery case in the front. It communicates with the battery swap station wirelessly through ZigBee. The influences of battery case deflection and robot docking deflection on the battery swap operations have been investigated. The experimental results show that it takes an average time of 84.2s to complete the battery swap operations. The home robot does not have to wait several hours for the batteries to be fully charged. The proposed battery swap system is proved to be efficient in home robot applications that need the robots to work continuously over a long period.

  17. Home Care Nursing Improves Cancer Symptom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home care nursing (HCN) improves the management of symptoms in breast and colorectal cancer patients who take the oral chemotherapy drug capecitabine, according to a study published online November 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  18. Psychoactive drugs in seven nursing homes

    OpenAIRE

    Krüger, Kjell; Folkestad, Malin; Geitung, Jonn Terje; Eide, Geir Egil; Grimsmo, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Aims: We wanted to pinpoint any differences in treatment between participating nursing homes, investigate which drugs are currently prescribed most frequently for long-term patients in nursing homes, estimate prevalence of administration for the following drug groups: neuroleptics, antidepressants, antidementia agents, opioids and the neuroleptics/anti-Parkinson’s drug combination, and study comorbidity correlations. We also wanted to study differences in the administration of ...

  19. Female labour supply and nursing home prices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Thomas K; Stroka, Magdalena A

    2013-09-01

    Long term care in Germany is provided in nursing homes, by professional ambulatory services and by the patient's relatives at home, with the latter being predominantly provided by women. Given an increasing labour market participation of women, long term care at home by female relatives might become less frequent in the future which in turn may result in rising demand for and hence rising prices for long term care services. This paper builds upon the existing literature on the determinants of nursing home prices and investigates whether the labour market participation and the education level of women are correlated with the prices of nursing homes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study using panel data approaches in this field of research. Based on a full sample of nursing homes in Germany for the years 2001, 2003, 2005 and 2007, our empirical results suggest that a high share of full-time employed women aged 50-65 at the district level is not associated with higher prices of nursing homes. Furthermore, we find only weak evidence for a positive correlation of prices with the local average of women's educational level and a negative correlation with part-time employment indicating that price levels are lower in regions with higher shares of part-time employed women. PMID:23440391

  20. Nursing assistant turnover in nursing homes and need satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudill, M; Patrick, M

    1989-06-01

    1. Level of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs is basic physiological needs measured by salary, adequate housing, and food. Attainment of these needs increased the length of stay of nursing assistants in nursing homes. 2. Safety and security (level 2) influenced length of stay of nursing assistants. Those with benefits of retirement, vacation, and holiday pay tended to have less turnover. 3. Praise by the patient and family was most important to nursing assistants. Belonging to a peer group and praise by charge nurse also decreased turnover of nursing assistants (level 3). 4. Level 4, self-esteem measured by input into decisions and being able to criticize, increased length of stay of nursing assistants.

  1. Reassessing nurse aide job satisfaction in a Texas nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Mark A; Horne, Kathleen K; Huerta, Timothy R

    2011-09-01

    This article reports a study that replicates and extends Castle's 2007 study by examining factors related to satisfaction of nurse aides at Carillon House, a 120-bed nonprofit skilled nursing facility in Lubbock, Texas. The Nursing Home Nurse Aide Job Satisfaction Questionnaire was adapted to allow for the collection of qualitative responses and administered to the nursing staff. The results suggest that satisfaction among nurse aides is related to rewards, workload, and the team environment created among coworkers. These findings differ from what is generally found in the literature and may be related to the higher-than-average satisfaction rating of nurse aides at this facility. The study provides evidence that large-scale surveys may have ignored a stratified effect where higher satisfaction organizations have different driving forces than what has been demonstrated in the literature to date. PMID:21634313

  2. Nursing home closures and quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Nicholas G

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the relationship between quality of care in nursing homes and their likelihood of closure. We hypothesize that lower-quality facilities will be more likely to close than higher-quality facilities. Using the rates of physical restraint use, urethral catheterization, contractures, pressure ulcers, and psychotropic medication use as quality measures from approximately 12,000 facilities from 1992 to 1998, the author examine cross-sectional and change score relationships between these measures and a nursing home's likelihood of closure. The descriptive analysis shows that 621 nursing homes closed in this time period, and the results for physical restraint use were robust in their positive association with closures in most analyses lending some support for this study's hypothesis. However, overall, the author concludes that nursing facility closures are relatively rare events. And the likelihood of closure, even for poor-quality facilities, is low. PMID:15643031

  3. The Role of Hospice Care in the Nursing Home Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Susan C; Mor, Vince N.T.

    2002-01-01

    The last days of life for a substantial proportion of dying older adults are spent in nursing homes. Considering this, the provision of Medicare hospice care in nursing homes would appear to be an equitable use of Medicare expenditures as well as a valid investment in improving the quality of life for dying nursing home residents. However, government concerns regarding possible abuse of the hospice benefit in nursing homes, as well as suggestion that the payment for the benefit in nursing hom...

  4. 38 CFR 59.140 - Nursing home care requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nursing home care... (CONTINUED) GRANTS TO STATES FOR CONSTRUCTION OR ACQUISITION OF STATE HOMES § 59.140 Nursing home care requirements. As a condition for receiving a grant and grant funds for a nursing home facility under this...

  5. Prevalence of violence towards nursing staff in Slovenian nursing homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eržen, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction The purpose of this research was to identify the prevalence of violence towards nursing staff in Slovenian nursing homes. Methods For the purpose of this study, a non-experimental sampling method was employed, using a structured questionnaire as a data collection instrument (n=527). The contents of the questionnaire proved valid and reliable, with a high enough degree of internal consistency (Cronbach Alpha minimum 0.82). Results The nursing staffs working in nursing homes for senior citizens are at high risk of violence. In the last year, the employees were most often faced with verbal violence (71.7%), physical violence (63.8%) and sexual violence (35.5%). 35.5% of employees suffered injuries at their working place. During aggressive outbursts of nursing home residents, employees particularly experience vulnerability, fear and insecurity. Conclusion There is a need for a comprehensive approach to tackle workplace violence. Some psychiatric health care facilities have already introduced certain measures in this field, and reduction of workplace violence proves that it is possible to reduce aggressive outbursts of patients. After conducting further quantitative research, which would expose detailed characteristics and the background of such violence, it would be sensible to develop similar measures in the field of health care in nursing homes. PMID:27703541

  6. Deprivation of Dignity in Nursing Home Residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høy, Bente

    2012-01-01

    deepened knowledge in how to maintain and promote dignity in nursing home residents. The purpose of this paper is to present results concerning the question: How is nursing home residents’ dignity maintained or deprived from the perspective of close family caregivers? In this presentation we only focus...... on deprivation of dignity. Methodology: The overall design of this study is modified clinical application research. The study took place at six different nursing home residences in Sweden, Denmark and Norway. Data collection methods were individual research interviews. All together the sample consisted of 28...... close family caregivers. The empirical data material was analysed and interpreted involving a hermeneutic approach. Results preliminary): The following themes represent the results: Depriving dignity through abandoning, through the feeling of not belonging, through physical and mental humiliation, due...

  7. Losing Items in the Psychogeriatric Nursing Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. van Hoof PhD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Losing items is a time-consuming occurrence in nursing homes that is ill described. An explorative study was conducted to investigate which items got lost by nursing home residents, and how this affects the residents and family caregivers. Method: Semi-structured interviews and card sorting tasks were conducted with 12 residents with early-stage dementia and 12 family caregivers. Thematic analysis was applied to the outcomes of the sessions. Results: The participants stated that numerous personal items and assistive devices get lost in the nursing home environment, which had various emotional, practical, and financial implications. Significant amounts of time are spent on trying to find items, varying from 1 hr up to a couple of weeks. Numerous potential solutions were identified by the interviewees. Discussion: Losing items often goes together with limitations to the participation of residents. Many family caregivers are reluctant to replace lost items, as these items may get lost again.

  8. Certified Nursing Assistants’ Explanatory Models of Nursing Home Resident Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Piven, Mary Lynn; Anderson, Ruth A.; Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S.; Sandelowski, Margarete

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we explored how Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs) understood resident depression. Interviews with 18 CNAs, working in two nursing homes were guided by Kleinman’s Explanatory Models of Illness framework. Interview data were content analyzed and CNAs’ descriptions of depression were compared to the MDS 2.0 Mood Screen and to DSM-IV-TR Depression Criteria. CNAs identified causes, signs, and symptoms of depression, but they were unsure about the duration and normalcy of depressio...

  9. Nursing home diversification requires caution by hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, S M

    1988-12-01

    Hospital executives considering diversifying into long-term care for the elderly need to understand the ways the nursing home acquisition market and the long-term care industry have changed in the past two years and how to best respond to those changes. Diversification into the nursing home business must be carefully planned, taking into account such factors as state Medicaid reimbursement policies; the respective advantages of buying an existing facility or constructing a new one; the need for executives with expertise in long-term care; and the financial requirements of the proposal.

  10. Subsidies, Quality, and Regulation in the Nursing Home Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Gertler, Paul J

    1985-01-01

    This paper analyzes the impact of the Medicaid patient subsidy and Certificate of Need (CON) cost containment programs on nursing home behavior.The analysis is complicated by the fact the both proprietary and "not for profit" nursing homes exist, and by the problem that qualityis not directly observed. Medicaid pays the for the care of the financially indigent by directly reimbursing nursing homes at a predetermined rate. As a result, nursing homes can price discriminate between patients who ...

  11. What Is Nursing Home Quality and How Is It Measured?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Nicholas G.; Ferguson, Jamie C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In this commentary, we examine nursing home quality and indicators that have been used to measure nursing home quality. Design and Methods: A brief review of the history of nursing home quality is presented that provides some context and insight into currently used quality indicators. Donabedian's structure, process, and outcome (SPO)…

  12. Registered Nurse Staffing Mix and Quality of Care in Nursing Homes: A Longitudinal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hongsoo; Harrington, Charlene; Greene, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the relationship between registered nurse (RN) staffing mix and quality of nursing home care measured by regulatory violations. Design and Methods: A retrospective panel data study (1999-2003) of 2 groups of California freestanding nursing homes. One group was 201 nursing homes that consistently met the state's minimum standard…

  13. Occupational Stress Management of Nurses in Elderly Homes

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Rica; Ndungu, Lucy; Zhou, Jie

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to describe what do nurses do to manage occupational stress in elderly homes in Finland. During academic studies in ethical decision-making, experienced nurses shared experiences that nurses go though during nursing care and management in elderly homes. The researchers of this study, who are student nurses, were motivated to look further on the topic about what do nurses do to manage occupational stress in their professional activities. The research question...

  14. Health Information Technology and Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Darren

    2009-01-01

    Nursing homes are considered lagging behind in adopting health information technology (HIT). Many studies have highlighted the use of HIT as a means of improving health care quality. However, these studies overwhelmingly do not provide empirical information proving that HIT can actually achieve these improvements. The main research goal of this…

  15. Malnutrition and mealtime ambiance in nursing homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijs, K.A.N.D.; Graaf, de C.; Staveren, van W.A.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Inadequate nutritional intake is the predominant cause of malnutrition in older persons. It is one of the most common and devastating conditions in nursing home residents. It is multifactorial and treatment or nutrition care plans should try to address the main causes. Such plans often include means

  16. Father attendance in nurse home visitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, John R; Olds, David L

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to examine the rates and predictors of father attendance at nurse home visits in replication sites of the Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP). Early childhood programs can facilitate father involvement in the lives of their children, but program improvements require an understanding of factors that predict father involvement. The sample consisted of 29,109 low-income, first-time mothers who received services from 694 nurses from 80 sites. We conducted mixed-model multiple regression analyses to identify population, implementation, site, and nurse influences on father attendance. Predictors of father attendance included a count of maternal visits (B = 0.12, SE = 0.01, F = 3101.77), frequent contact between parents (B = 0.61, SE = 0.02, F = 708.02), cohabitation (B = 1.41, SE = 0.07, F = 631.51), White maternal race (B = 0.77, SE = 0.06, F = 190.12), and marriage (B = 0.42, SE = 0.08, F = 30.08). Random effects for sites and nurses predicted father-visit participation (2.7 & 6.7% of the variance, respectively), even after controlling for population sociodemographic characteristics. These findings suggest that factors operating at the levels of sites and nurses influence father attendance at home visits, even after controlling for differences in populations served. Further inquiry about these influences on father visit attendance is likely to inform program-improvement efforts. PMID:25521707

  17. Optimizing Antibiotic Use in Nursing Homes Through Antibiotic Stewardship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloane, Philip D; Huslage, Kirk; Kistler, Christine E; Zimmerman, Sheryl

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic stewardship is becoming a requirement for nursing homes. Programs should be interdisciplinary and multifaceted; should have support from nursing home administrators; and should aim to promote antibiotics only when needed, not just in case. Recommended components include use of evidence-based guidelines; ongoing monitoring of antibiotic prescriptions, cultures, and study results; monitoring of health outcomes; use of nursing home-specific antibiograms; regular reporting and feedback to medical providers and nurses; and education of residents and families. PMID:27621341

  18. Effects of the Evidence-Based Nursing Care Algorithm of Dysphagia for Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yeonhwan; Oh, Seieun; Chang, Heekyung; Bang, Hwal Lan

    2015-11-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ARTICLE INSTRUCTIONS 1.2 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded once you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. To obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Effects of the Evidence-Based Nursing Care Algorithm of Dysphagia for Nursing Home Residents" found on pages 30-39, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website listed above to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name; contact information; and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until October 31, 2018. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. ACTIVITY OBJECTIVES 1. Explain the development and testing of the Evidence-Based Nursing Care Algorithm of

  19. Effects of the Evidence-Based Nursing Care Algorithm of Dysphagia for Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yeonhwan; Oh, Seieun; Chang, Heekyung; Bang, Hwal Lan

    2015-11-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ARTICLE INSTRUCTIONS 1.2 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded once you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. To obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Effects of the Evidence-Based Nursing Care Algorithm of Dysphagia for Nursing Home Residents" found on pages 30-39, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website listed above to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name; contact information; and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until October 31, 2018. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. ACTIVITY OBJECTIVES 1. Explain the development and testing of the Evidence-Based Nursing Care Algorithm of

  20. The economies of scale for nursing home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Wu; Shea, Dennis G

    2004-03-01

    Using a modified hybrid short-term operating cost function and a national sample of nursing homes in 1994, the authors examined the scale economies of nursing home care. The results show that scale economies exist for Medicare postacute care, with an elasticity of -0.15 and an optimal scale of around 4,000 patient days annually. However, more than 68 percent of nursing homes in the analytic sample produced Medicare days at a level below the optimal scale. The financial pressures resulting from the implementation of a prospective payment system for Medicare skilled nursing facilities may further reduce the quantity of Medicare days served by nursing homes. In addition, the results show that chain-owned nursing homes do not have lower short-term operating costs than do independent facilities. This indicates that the rationale behind recent increasing horizontal integration among nursing homes may not be seeking greater cost efficiency but some other consideration.

  1. Measuring End-of-Life Care Processes in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkin-Greener, Helena; Zheng, Nan; Norton, Sally A.; Quill, Timothy; Ladwig, Susan; Veazie, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The objectives of this study were to develop measures of end-of-life (EOL) care processes in nursing homes and to validate the instrument for measuring them. Design and Methods: A survey of directors of nursing was conducted in 608 eligible nursing homes in New York State. Responses were obtained from 313 (51.5% response rate) facilities.…

  2. Evaluation of a Nurse-Led Fall Prevention Education Program in Turkish Nursing Home Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uymaz, Pelin E.; Nahcivan, Nursen O.

    2016-01-01

    Falls are a major cause of morbidity and mortality among the elderly living in nursing homes. There is a need to implement and evaluate fall prevention programs in nursing homes to reduce the number of falls. The purpose of this research was to examine the effect of a nurse-led fall prevention education program in a sample of nursing home…

  3. Passive solar nursing home for Northern Kentucky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, J.G.; Ward, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    This project is a 32-bed nursing home designed as an addition to an existing facility. Passive solar strategies included direct gain room windows and clerestories which admit light to phase change salt pouches in the ceilings of patient rooms. Corridors are skykighted; and the heating, ventilating, and conditioning system is comprised of water-source heat pumps and a 5000 gallon storage tank in conjunction with an air to air heat recovery wheel.

  4. Review of the Nursing Home Subvention Scheme

    OpenAIRE

    Department of Health

    2003-01-01

    Review of the Nursing Home Subvention Scheme The government decided in 1997 to approve proposals from the Minister for Finance for a process of expenditure reviews as a key part of the financial management systems that are central to the Strategic Management Initiative and are intended to ensure greater predictability in resource planning. The aims of the expenditure review process are as follows: Click here to download PDF 873kb

  5. Hospital Admissions from Nursing Homes: Rates and Reasons

    OpenAIRE

    Geir Egil Eide; Kristian Jansen; Anders Grimsmo; Kjell Krüger; Jonn Terje Geitung

    2011-01-01

    Hospital admissions from nursing homes have not previously been investigated in Norway. During 12 months all hospital admissions (acute and elective) from 32 nursing homes in Bergen were recorded via the Norwegian ambulance register. The principal diagnosis made during the stay, length of stay, and the ward were sourced from the hospital's data register and data were merged. Altogether 1,311 hospital admissions were recorded during the 12 months. Admissions from nursing homes made up 6.1% of ...

  6. Excess Demand and Cost Relationships Among Kentucky Nursing Homes

    OpenAIRE

    Mark A Davis; Freeman, James W.

    1994-01-01

    This article examines the influence of excess demand on nursing home costs. Previous work indicates that excess demand, reflected in a pervasive shortage of nursing home beds, constrains market competition and patient care expenditures. According to this view, nursing homes located in under-bedded markets can reduce costs and quality with impunity because there is no pressure to compete for residents. Predictions based on the excess demand argument were tested using 1989 data from a sample of...

  7. Thorpe's Nursing Home, Clarina, Limerick.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Shea, Eamon

    2011-02-14

    Abstract Background Current projections indicate that there will be a significant increase in the number of people with dementia in Ireland, from approximately 40,000 at present to 100,000 by 2036. Psychosocial interventions, such as reminiscence, have the potential to improve the quality of life of people with dementia. However, while reminiscence is used widely in dementia care, its impact on the quality of life of people with dementia remains largely undocumented and there is a need for a robust and fair assessment of its overall effectiveness. The DementiA education programme incorporating REminiscence for Staff study will evaluate the effectiveness of a structured reminiscence-based education programme for care staff on the quality of life of residents with dementia in long-stay units. Methods\\/Design The study is a two-group, single-blind cluster randomised trial conducted in public and private long-stay residential settings in Ireland. Randomisation to control and intervention is at the level of the long-stay residential unit. Sample size calculations suggest that 18 residential units each containing 17 people with dementia are required for randomisation to control and intervention groups to achieve power of at least 80% with alpha levels of 0.05. Each resident in the intervention group is linked with a nurse and care assistant who have taken the structured reminiscence-based education programme. Participants in the control group will receive usual care. The primary outcome is quality of life of residents as measured by the Quality of Life-AD instrument. Secondary outcomes include agitation, depression and carer burden. Blinded outcome assessment is undertaken at baseline and at 18-22 weeks post-randomisation. Discussion Trials on reminiscence-based interventions for people with dementia have been scarce and the quality of the information arising from those that have been done has been undermined by methodological problems, particularly in relation to scale

  8. Reliability of home CPAP titration with different automatic CPAP devices

    OpenAIRE

    Lacasse Yves; Plante Julie; Sériès Frédéric

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background CPAP titration may be completed by automatic apparatus. However, differences in pressure behaviour could interfere with the reliability of pressure recommendations. Our objective was to compare pressure behaviour and effective pressure recommendations between three Automatic CPAP machines (Autoset Spirit, Remstar Auto, GK 420). Methods Sixteen untreated obstructive sleep apnea patients were randomly allocated to one of the 3 tested machines for a one-week home titration tr...

  9. Reorganizing the nursing home industry: a proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, D; Galanter, R

    1976-01-01

    This paper proposes a reorganization of the nursing home industry with capital facilities owned by government, but with management conducted through a system of competitive contracts with the private sector. The paper explicity demonstrates in real estate finance terms how the present system of private ownership of capital facilities inherently impedes providing a high quality of care. The authors believe that in the proposed industry reorganization, market forces, instead of working against quality care, would be supportive of quality care in a framework that would involve generally less regulation than exists today. PMID:1272543

  10. Workplace Stress and Ethical Challenges Experienced by Nursing Staff in a Nursing Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vondras, Dean D.; Flittner, Diane; Malcore, Sylvia A.; Pouliot, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    This research explores the workplace stress and ethical challenges reported by healthcare staff in a nursing home. A brief self-report survey was administered to 44 members of the nursing staff in a not-for-profit nursing home. The survey included items that elicited identification of specific workplace stressors and ethical challenges and global…

  11. Diabetes knowledge in nursing homes and home-based care services: a validation study of the Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test adapted for use among nursing personnel

    OpenAIRE

    Haugstvedt, Anne; Aarflot, Morten; Igland, Jannicke; Landbakk, Tilla; Graue, Marit

    2016-01-01

    Background Providing high-quality diabetes care in nursing homes and home-based care facilities requires suitable instruments to evaluate the level of diabetes knowledge among the health-care providers. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test adapted for use among nursing personnel. Methods The study included 127 nursing personnel (32 registered nurses, 69 nursing aides and 26 nursing assistants) at three nursing homes and...

  12. What home healthcare nurses should know about fraud and abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Janet E

    2003-08-01

    Home care nurses provide a critical link in all services provided by a home health agency. This article outlines basic information nurses can use to understand fraud and abuse regulations, see the importance of corporate compliance programs, and recognize the potential impact a focus on fraud and abuse has on their practice.

  13. The silent customers: measuring customer satisfaction in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinsorge, I K; Koenig, H F

    1991-12-01

    Nursing home administrators concerned with customer satisfaction and quality of care need a tool to assess and monitor ongoing satisfaction of nursing home residents and family members. The authors report a preliminary effort to develop such a survey using focus groups. PMID:10115898

  14. Body weight changes in elderly psychogeriatric nursing home residents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoops, K.T.B.; Slump, E.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.; Wouters-Wesseling, W.; Brouwer, M.L.; Staveren, van W.A.

    2005-01-01

    Objective. This study was undertaken to identify predictors of body weight change in nursing home patients with possible to severe dementia. Methods. For 24 weeks, 108 elderly residents of a nursing home were followed. Body weight was measured every 2 weeks. Other anthropometric characteristics, die

  15. The availability of allied health care in Dutch nursing homes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, M.E. de; Leemrijse, C.J.; Ende, C.H.M. van den; Ribbe, M.W.; Dekker, J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the availability of allied health care in nursing homes in the Netherlands, and its dependency on characteristics of the nursing home. Methods. Structured surveys by telephone were carried out in a sample of 100 from a country total of 286 somatic (for somatic patients only) an

  16. The silent customers: measuring customer satisfaction in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinsorge, I K; Koenig, H F

    1991-12-01

    Nursing home administrators concerned with customer satisfaction and quality of care need a tool to assess and monitor ongoing satisfaction of nursing home residents and family members. The authors report a preliminary effort to develop such a survey using focus groups.

  17. Organizational Climate Determinants of Resident Safety Culture in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnetz, Judith E.; Zhdanova, Ludmila S.; Elsouhag, Dalia; Lichtenberg, Peter; Luborsky, Mark R.; Arnetz, Bengt B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: In recent years, there has been an increasing focus on the role of safety culture in preventing costly adverse events, such as medication errors and falls, among nursing home residents. However, little is known regarding critical organizational determinants of a positive safety culture in nursing homes. The aim of this study…

  18. Caring relationships in home-based nursing care - registered nurses' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wälivaara, Britt-Marie; Sävenstedt, Stefan; Axelsson, Karin

    2013-01-01

    The caring relationship between the nurse and the person in need of nursing care has been described as a key concept in nursing and could facilitate health and healing by involving the person's genuine needs. The aim of this study was to explore registered nurses' experiences of their relationships with persons in need of home-based nursing care. Individual interviews with nurses (n=13 registered nurses and 11 district nurses) working in home-based nursing care were performed. A thematic content analysis was used to analyze the transcribed interviews and resulted in the main theme Good nursing care is built on trusting relationship and five sub-themes, Establishing the relationship in home-based nursing care, Conscious efforts maintains the relationship, Reciprocity is a requirement in the relationship, Working in different levels of relationships and Limitations and boundaries in the relationship. A trusting relationship between the nurse and the person in need of healthcare is a prerequisite for good home-based nursing care whether it is based on face-to-face encounters or remote encounters through distance-spanning technology. A trusting relationship could reduce the asymmetry of the caring relationship which could strengthen the person's position. The relationship requires conscious efforts from the nurse and a choice of level of the relationship. The trusting relationship was reciprocal and meant that the nurse had to communicate something about themself as the person needs to know who is entering the home and who is communicating through distance-spanning technology.

  19. Direct costs of dementia in nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilma eCaravau

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dementia represents an economical burden to societies nowadays. Total dementia expenses are calculated by the sum of direct and indirect costs. Through the stages of the diseases, as the patients may require institutionalization or a formal caregiver, the direct costs tend to increase. This study aims to analyze the direct costs of dementia in Portuguese nursing homes in 2012, compare the spending between seniors with and without dementia, and propose a predictive costs model. The expenses analysis was based on (1 the use of emergency rooms and doctor’s appointments, either in public or private institutions; (2 days of hospitalization; (3 medication; (4 social services use; (5 the need for technical support; and (6 the utilization of rehabilitation services. The sample was composed of 72 people, half with dementia and half without. The average annual expense of a patient with dementia was €15,287 thousand, while the cost of a patient without dementia was about €12,289 thousand. The variables ‘ability to make yourself understood’, ‘self-performance: getting dressed’ and ‘thyroid disorders’ were found to be statistically significant in predicting the expenses’ increase. In nursing homes, in 2012, the costs per patient with dementia were 1, 2 times higher than per patient without dementia.

  20. Diversion, transition programs target nursing homes' status quo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhard, Susan C

    2010-01-01

    As millions of Americans age and exercise their preference for long-term care in the least restrictive environment, policymakers search for ways to increase community-based services. A new federal program--Money Follows the Person--is off to a slow but promising start. The program's "downstream" approach moves residents out of nursing homes and into community care settings. For example, states with mature nursing home transition programs have managed to relocate 25-35 percent of their nursing home residents to assisted living. Other programs successfully using "upstream" strategies to keep people out of nursing homes have not been widely copied. The challenge for policymakers is to maintain funding and flexibility so that nursing homes are no longer the default option for older adults and people with disabilities.

  1. Determinants for the use of psychotropics among nursing home residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lisbeth Uhrskov; Foldspang, A; Gulmann, N C;

    2001-01-01

    's Activities of Daily Living (ADL), behavioural problems (Nursing Home Behavior Problem Scale), orientation, communication skills and if the resident had any psychiatric disorder. Multiple logistic regression was used to select the items that determined the use of psychotropics. Results Fifty-six percent......Purpose To characterise the prescription pattern of psychotropics in Danish nursing homes and to identify diagnostic, behavioural, cognitive and performance characteristics associated with prevalent psychotropic drug use. Methods Prescribed daily medication was recorded from nurses' files. Based...

  2. Waiting to go into a Danish Nursing Home - Generations Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofod, Jens Erik

    2006-01-01

    that their relationship toward their home care assistant became increasingly important as they waited to go into the nursing home. Assessments for home care were constrained by municipal authorities and their regulations, and the overall attitude was that the needs of older people were not being appropriately defined...

  3. Nursing Home Resident Symptomatology Triggering Transfer: Avoiding Unnecessary Hospitalizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyce S. Ashcraft

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to describe nursing home resident symptomatology and medical diagnoses associated with nursing home to hospital transfers. A retrospective chart review of documented transfers was conducted at a 120-bed, nonprofit urban Continuing Care Retirement Center nursing home facility located in the southwestern United States. The transferred residents (n=101 had seventy different medical diagnoses prior to hospital transfer with hypertension, coronary artery disease, and congestive heart failure most frequently reported. Most frequently reported symptomatology included fatigue, lethargy or weakness, shortness of breath, and change in level of consciousness. Multiple symptomatology was indicative of a wide variety of medical diagnoses. The diagnoses and symptomatology recorded in this paper identify the importance of strategic planning concerning assessment and communication of common nursing home resident symptomatology and the importance of basic nursing and diagnostic procedures for prevention of potentially avoidable hospitalizations.

  4. Sexual Abuse of Older Residents in Nursing Homes: A Focus Group Interview of Nursing Home Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Helen Iversen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to increase knowledge of sexual abuse against older residents in nursing homes. A qualitative approach was used. Through a focus group interview with staff in nursing homes, the aim was to reveal employees’ thoughts, experiences, and attitudes. Findings from the focus group interview show that sexual abuse of older residents is a taboo topic among health professionals. Acts of sexual abuse are difficult to imagine; it is hard to believe that it occurs. The fact that staff are not aware that it could happen, or have a hard time believing that it actually happens, can amplify the residents’ vulnerable position as potential victims of abuse, and it makes it even more challenging to report or uncover such acts. The study highlights the need for education of all health care workers in Norway as well as more research on sexual abuse against older residents in nursing homes. Furthermore, there is a need for good policies and reporting systems, as an important step towards addressing sexual abuse of the aged in a more appropriate way. Further research must aim to reveal more about this taboo area.

  5. Explaining differences in remuneration rates of nursing homes in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennicken, Roman; Augurzky, Boris; Rothgang, Heinz; Wasem, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    Remuneration rates of German nursing homes are prospectively negotiated between long-term care insurance (LTCI) and social assistance on the one side and nursing homes on the other. They differ considerably across regions while there is no evidence for substantial differences in care provision. This article explains the differences in the remuneration rates by observable characteristics of the nursing home, its residents and its region with a special focus on the largest federal state of North Rhine Westphalia, in which the most expensive nursing homes are located. We use data from the German Federal Statistical Office for 2005 on all nursing homes that offer full-time residential care for the elderly. We find that differences in remuneration rates can partly be explained by exogenous factors. Controls for residents, nursing homes and district characteristics explain roughly 30 % of the price difference; 40 % can be ascribed to a regionally different kind of negotiation between nursing homes and LTCI. Thirty percent of the raw price difference remains unexplained by observable characteristics.

  6. Terminal patients in Belgian nursing homes: a cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoens, Steven; Kutten, Betty; Keirse, Emmanuel; Vanden Berghe, Paul; Beguin, Claire; Desmedt, Marianne; Deveugele, Myriam; Léonard, Christian; Paulus, Dominique; Menten, Johan

    2013-06-01

    Policy makers and health care payers are concerned about the costs of treating terminal patients. This study was done to measure the costs of treating terminal patients during the final month of life in a sample of Belgian nursing homes from the health care payer perspective. Also, this study compares the costs of palliative care with those of usual care. This multicenter, retrospective cohort study enrolled terminal patients from a representative sample of nursing homes. Health care costs included fixed nursing home costs, medical fees, pharmacy charges, other charges, and eventual hospitalization costs. Data sources consisted of accountancy and invoice data. The analysis calculated costs per patient during the final month of life at 2007/2008 prices. Nineteen nursing homes participated in the study, generating a total of 181 patients. Total mean nursing home costs amounted to 3,243 € per patient during the final month of life. Total mean nursing home costs per patient of 3,822 € for patients receiving usual care were higher than costs of 2,456 € for patients receiving palliative care (p = 0.068). Higher costs of usual care were driven by higher hospitalization costs (p < 0.001). This study suggests that palliative care models in nursing homes need to be supported because such care models appear to be less expensive than usual care and because such care models are likely to better reflect the needs of terminal patients.

  7. 42 CFR 431.704 - Nursing homes designated by other terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nursing homes designated by other terms. 431.704... Programs for Licensing Nursing Home Administrators § 431.704 Nursing homes designated by other terms. If a State licensing law does not use the term “nursing home,” the CMS Administrator will determine the...

  8. Medication safety in home care nursing : a systematic litterature review

    OpenAIRE

    Nwoko, Oluchi Jessy

    2011-01-01

    This bachelor’s thesis is part of the Research and Development (R&D) project “Empowering path” at Laurea University of Applied Sciences, in collaboration with Tapiola pharmacy and Espoo home care. The aim of this project is to explore strategies by which medication safety can be promoted by nurses in home care nursing. The purpose: this systematic review is to discuss how resent literature describes medication safety in home care nursing. It also described methods used to promote safety i...

  9. Infections in Nursing Homes: Epidemiology and Prevention Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Ana; Cassone, Marco; Mody, Lona

    2016-08-01

    This review summarizes current literature pertaining to infection prevention in nursing home population including post-acute care patients and long-term care residents. Approximately 2 million infections occur each year and more than one-third of older adults harbor multidrug-resistant organisms in this setting. Surveillance, hand hygiene, isolation precautions, resident and employee health programs, education, and antibiotic stewardship are essential elements of infection prevention and control programs in nursing homes. This article discusses emerging evidence suggesting the usefulness of interactive multimodal bundles in reducing infections and antimicrobial resistance, thereby enhancing safety and quality of care for older adults in nursing homes. PMID:27394025

  10. Job satisfaction of rural public and home health nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhl, N; Dunkin, J W; Stratton, T; Geller, J; Ludtke, R

    1993-03-01

    Based on Vroom's expectancy theory, this study was conducted to identify differences in job satisfaction between nurses working in public health settings, and staff nurses and administrators working in both settings. Questionnaires containing an adaptation of a job satisfaction scale were mailed to all 258 registered nurses practicing in public health and home health settings (response rate 57%) in a rural midwestern state. Respondents were asked to rate their satisfaction with various dimensions of their jobs, as well as how important each aspect was to them. Although both groups of nurses reported low satisfaction with salary, public health nurses were significantly less satisfied with their salaries than were home health nurses (F = 32.96, P < or = 0.001); home health nurses, however, were significantly less satisfied with benefits/rewards (F = 11.85, P < or = 0.001), task requirements (F = 8.37, P < or = 0.05), and professional status (F = 5.30, P < or = 0.05). Although administrators did not differ significantly from staff nurses on job satisfaction, they did perceive organizational climate (F = 4.50, P < or = 0.05) to be an important feature of satisfaction. These differences may be partially explained by divergent salaries, roles, and responsibilities between public health and home health nurses.

  11. Job satisfaction of rural public and home health nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhl, N; Dunkin, J W; Stratton, T; Geller, J; Ludtke, R

    1993-03-01

    Based on Vroom's expectancy theory, this study was conducted to identify differences in job satisfaction between nurses working in public health settings, and staff nurses and administrators working in both settings. Questionnaires containing an adaptation of a job satisfaction scale were mailed to all 258 registered nurses practicing in public health and home health settings (response rate 57%) in a rural midwestern state. Respondents were asked to rate their satisfaction with various dimensions of their jobs, as well as how important each aspect was to them. Although both groups of nurses reported low satisfaction with salary, public health nurses were significantly less satisfied with their salaries than were home health nurses (F = 32.96, P < or = 0.001); home health nurses, however, were significantly less satisfied with benefits/rewards (F = 11.85, P < or = 0.001), task requirements (F = 8.37, P < or = 0.05), and professional status (F = 5.30, P < or = 0.05). Although administrators did not differ significantly from staff nurses on job satisfaction, they did perceive organizational climate (F = 4.50, P < or = 0.05) to be an important feature of satisfaction. These differences may be partially explained by divergent salaries, roles, and responsibilities between public health and home health nurses. PMID:8516258

  12. Multidisciplinary nutritional support for undernutrition in nursing home and home-care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne Marie; Gøgsig Christensen, Annette; Stenbæk Hansen, Birthe;

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of multidisciplinary nutritional support for undernutrition in older adults in nursing home and home-care identified with the validated Eating Validation Scheme (EVS). Methods An 11 wk cluster randomized trial with a home-care (3 clusters) or nursing home (3 clusters......) setting as the unit of randomization. Before starting the study, a train-the-trainer course was performed to educate the nutrition coordinators. In addition to the nutrition coordinator, the participants assigned to the intervention group strategy received multidisciplinary nutrition support. Focus...... means of EuroQol-5D-3L), physical performance (30-seconds chair stand), nutritional status (weight and hand-grip strength), oral care, fall incidents, hospital admissions, rehabilitation stay, moving to nursing homes (participants from home-care), and mortality. Results Respectively, 55 (46 from 2 home-care...

  13. Nursing Home eTool: Occupational Hazards in Long Term Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications Newsroom Small Business Anti-Retaliation eTools Home : Nursing Home Scope | References | Site Map | Credits Nursing Home eTool Bloodborne Pathogens Ergonomics Dietary Laundry Maintenance ...

  14. Can family caregiving substitute for nursing home care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Kerwin Kofi; Sevak, Purvi

    2005-11-01

    Informal care should be a substitute for nursing homes but empirical evidence often suggests the opposite. This may be because informal care receipt is positively correlated with unobserved negative health characteristics. We exploit variation in children's characteristics as instruments for informal care to provide Two-Stage Least Squares (TSLS) estimates of nursing home use among a sample of 6855 individuals from the 1993-2000 waves of the AHEAD survey. While OLS results suggest informal care is associated with greater future nursing home risk, TSLS estimates show that receipt of informal care statistically and substantially reduces the risk of nursing home entry. This finding has implications for Medicaid and private long-term care insurance markets.

  15. Nursing Home - Pain - Percentage of Residents Reporting Pain

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Adequate pain management is an important indicator of quality of care and quality of life. Nursing home staff should check patients regularly to see if they are...

  16. Dangerous Urinary Tract Infections Common in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... UTIs for older adults, and implementing policies in nursing homes and long-term care facilities to prevent and effectively treat these infections, is critical," she concluded. Armellino agreed. "A UTI can also ...

  17. An exploration of occupation in nursing home residents with dementia

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Morgan-Brown, Mark

    2011-05-01

    Objectives: This study evaluated the sitting room environment of two nursing homes in Ireland, using interactive occupation and social engagement as outcome measures and defining these rooms as occupational spaces.\\r\

  18. Experience of Oral Care among Elderly in Nursing Homes

    OpenAIRE

    Buiyan, Salmah; Sheng, Nongfei

    2014-01-01

    Life expectancy among the elderly has been improving for decades and edentulousness is constantly decreasing among the senior citizens. The steady decrease of tooth loss among the elderly is a challenge to the dental profession due to the increased demand of oral care. This study aims to explore the perspectives regarding oral health and oral care among the elderly living in nursing homes. Ten subjects from two nursing homes in Umeå were interviewed based on a defined interview guide. The int...

  19. Heat pumps in nursing homes; Warmtepompen in verzorgingshuizen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dieleman, M. [Erbeko raadgevende ingenieurs, Hilversum (Netherlands)

    1996-04-01

    The most important options for the sector nursing homes to save 20-30% energy are the combined generation of heat and power (CHP or cogeneration) and the use of heat pumps. Cogeneration is cost-effective for a natural gas consumption of 200,000 m{sup 3} per year. The heat pump is a good option for both small and large nursing homes. 2 tabs.

  20. [Training and representation of dementia of workers in nursing homes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Stéphane; Gallin, Aurélie; Stefanuto, Muriel; Treffel, Sylvie; Antoine, Marc; Denormandie, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Training could be a lever for improving the quality of care of residents with dementia in nursing homes by changing social representations. Beyond a simple assessment of acquired knowledge, a change of social representations could be indicative of a true appropriation of the content of the training. A study was carried out to assess the impact of training on nursing home caregivers' representations of dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

  1. [Training and representation of dementia of workers in nursing homes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Stéphane; Gallin, Aurélie; Stefanuto, Muriel; Treffel, Sylvie; Antoine, Marc; Denormandie, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Training could be a lever for improving the quality of care of residents with dementia in nursing homes by changing social representations. Beyond a simple assessment of acquired knowledge, a change of social representations could be indicative of a true appropriation of the content of the training. A study was carried out to assess the impact of training on nursing home caregivers' representations of dementia and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26976314

  2. Educating Home Healthcare Nurses About Heart Failure Self-Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekong, Joyce; Radovich, Patti; Brown, Gina

    2016-10-01

    The ability of home healthcare nurses to effectively educate patients with heart failure (HF) on appropriate self-care is key to lowering the hospital readmission rates and other adverse outcomes. Evidence indicates, however, that nurses often lack current knowledge about HF self-care. Furthermore, patient education often fails to produce health literacy. Thus, this educational intervention for home healthcare nurses included content about key aspects of managing HF (e.g., diet, medications), as well as how to use the teach-back method during patient education. Pre- and posttesting (using the Nurses' Knowledge of HF Education Principles Questionnaire) and role-playing were used to evaluate the intervention delivered to 33 home care nurses. Findings exposed knowledge deficits regarding high-sodium foods, symptoms indicating deterioration, problematic weight gain, fluid management, as well as other topics related to HF. The education was partially effective in addressing these nurses' knowledge gaps. The evidence-based education for home healthcare nurses suggests that not only may nurses lack knowledge essential to teaching HF self-care; they may also lack effective patient education skills such as using the teach-back method. PMID:27677064

  3. The provision of diabetes care in nursing homes in Galway city and county: a survey of nursing homes

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hurley, Lorna

    2014-03-01

    In addition to the increasing prevalence of diabetes, our population is growing older and living longer. This survey aimed to determine the care provided to residents with diabetes in Nursing Homes.\\r\

  4. Lynx: Automatic Elderly Behavior Prediction in Home Telecare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Guede, Jose Manuel; Moreno-Fernandez-de-Leceta, Aitor; Martinez-Garcia, Alexeiw; Graña, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces Lynx, an intelligent system for personal safety at home environments, oriented to elderly people living independently, which encompasses a decision support machine for automatic home risk prevention, tested in real-life environments to respond to real time situations. The automatic system described in this paper prevents such risks by an advanced analytic methods supported by an expert knowledge system. It is minimally intrusive, using plug-and-play sensors and machine learning algorithms to learn the elder's daily activity taking into account even his health records. If the system detects that something unusual happens (in a wide sense) or if something is wrong relative to the user's health habits or medical recommendations, it sends at real-time alarm to the family, care center, or medical agents, without human intervention. The system feeds on information from sensors deployed in the home and knowledge of subject physical activities, which can be collected by mobile applications and enriched by personalized health information from clinical reports encoded in the system. The system usability and reliability have been tested in real-life conditions, with an accuracy larger than 81%. PMID:26783514

  5. Lynx: Automatic Elderly Behavior Prediction in Home Telecare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Manuel Lopez-Guede

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces Lynx, an intelligent system for personal safety at home environments, oriented to elderly people living independently, which encompasses a decision support machine for automatic home risk prevention, tested in real-life environments to respond to real time situations. The automatic system described in this paper prevents such risks by an advanced analytic methods supported by an expert knowledge system. It is minimally intrusive, using plug-and-play sensors and machine learning algorithms to learn the elder’s daily activity taking into account even his health records. If the system detects that something unusual happens (in a wide sense or if something is wrong relative to the user’s health habits or medical recommendations, it sends at real-time alarm to the family, care center, or medical agents, without human intervention. The system feeds on information from sensors deployed in the home and knowledge of subject physical activities, which can be collected by mobile applications and enriched by personalized health information from clinical reports encoded in the system. The system usability and reliability have been tested in real-life conditions, with an accuracy larger than 81%.

  6. A Comparative Analysis of the Relationship between Communication Apprehension and Loneliness for Elderly Nursing Home and Non-Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Valerie C.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Utilizes the socio-environmental perspective to compare feelings of communication apprehension and perceived loneliness between nursing home and non-nursing home residents. Finds that communication apprehension consistently and significantly predicts perceived loneliness for non-nursing home residents, but fails to predict perceived loneliness for…

  7. Job Turnover and Job Satisfaction among Nursing Home Aides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waxman, Howard M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Interviewed 234 aides in seven nursing homes concerning job turnover rate, job satisfaction, and perception of milieu. A positive association found between turnover rate and aides' perceptions of the homes' order, organization, and control suggested that job turnover would lessen with more involvement in the decision-making process. (JAC)

  8. Organizational determinants of service quality in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, T M; Nystrom, P C

    1997-01-01

    This study analyzed four prominent organizational factors thought to influence service quality in nursing homes. Perceptions of service quality were collected from over 400 family members who regularly visited residents in 41 nursing homes. Service quality was measured along five dimensions identified by marketing research on customers in service industries. These five dimensions were responsiveness, reliability, assurance, empathy, and tangibles. Perceptions of service quality exhibited significant associations with each of the four organizational factors: ownership, funding mix, facility size, and nurse staffing. Implications for health services administration are discussed. PMID:10167453

  9. Institutional loyalty and job satisfaction among nurse aides in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, L; Chandler, B; Burton, B; Kolditz, D

    1991-02-01

    The high rate of turnover among nurse aides employed in nursing homes has been associated with the low job status and the poor job benefits accorded workers. However, this is not always the case. Competitive benefit packages and limited labor market opportunities increase the likelihood that nurse aides in some nursing homes may stay on the job despite their dissatisfaction with it. The present study investigated "institutional loyalty," an attitudinal proxy for job turnover, among 219 nurse aides for its relationship to a number of job-related factors. Somewhat unexpectedly, the quality of the social environment of the nursing home was found to be as important as attitudes toward job benefits in accounting for institutional loyalty. PMID:10108823

  10. Working in and around the 'chain of command': power relations among nursing staff in an urban nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jervis, Lori L

    2002-03-01

    By most accounts, the discipline of nursing enjoys considerable hegemony in US nursing homes. Not surprisingly, the ethos of this setting is influenced, in large part, by nursing's value system. This ethos powerfully impacts both the residents who live in nursing homes and the staff who work there. Using ethnographic methods, this project explored power relations among nursing assistants and nurses in an urban nursing home in the United States. Factors contributing to tensions among nursing staff were the stigma attached to nursing homes and those who work in them, as well as the long history of class conflict and power struggles within the discipline of nursing. The latter struggles, in turn, reflected nursing's quest for professional status in the face of medicine's hegemony over health-care. Ultimately, these factors coalesced to produce a local work environment characterized by conflict--and by aides' resistance to nurses' domination.

  11. Nursing home prices and market structure: the effect of assisted living industry expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowblis, John R

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1990s, there has been substantial expansion of facility-based alternatives to nursing home care, such as assisted living facilities. This paper analyzes the relationship between expansion of the assisted living industry, nursing home market structure and nursing home private pay prices using a two-year panel of nursing homes in the State of Ohio. Fixed effect regressions suggest that the expansion of assisted living facilities are associated with increased nursing home concentration, but find no effect on private pay nursing home prices. This would be consistent with assisted livings reducing demand for nursing homes by delaying entry into a nursing home, though assisted livings are not direct competitors of nursing homes.

  12. Nursing home visit impact in puerperium : systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Castro, Ana da Conceição Gomes de; Ribeiro, Taciana; Rocha, Tomé; Alves, Tânia; Vilaça, Simão

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Home visit can be an intervention tool in family’s health and in the continuity of postpartum cares. Objective: Examine the impact of nursing home visit in puerperium and in neonates of occidental countries. Methods: The language used was English and the publication period refers to the last 10 years. Expression used in Web of Knowledge ISI database: ((postpartum periodORpuerper*) AND((Home visit*). Results: From 137 articles, 6 articles were eligible, after th...

  13. Communication skills training in a nursing home: Effects of a brief intervention on residents and nursing aides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Sprangers (Suzan); K. Dijkstra (Katinka); A. Romijn-Luijten (Anna)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractEffective communication by nursing home staff is related to a higher quality of life and a decrease in verbal and physical aggression and depression in nursing home residents. Several communication intervention studies have been conducted to improve communication between nursing home sta

  14. Implementation and Evaluation of LVN LEAD: A Leadership and Supervisory Training Program for Nursing Home Charge Nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Harahan, Mary F.; Sanders, Alisha; Stone, Robyn I.; Bowers, Barbara J.; Nolet, Kimberly A.; Krause, Melanie R.; Gilmore, Andrea L.

    2011-01-01

    Licensed practical/vocational nurses (LVNs) play an important role in U.S. nursing homes with primary responsibility for supervising unlicensed nursing home staff. Research has shown that the relationship between supervisors and nurse aides has a significant impact on nurse aide job satisfaction and turnover as well as quality of care, yet nurses rarely receive supervisory training. The purpose of this project was to develop, pilot, and evaluate a leadership/supervisory training program for L...

  15. Ineffective Staff, Ineffective Supervision, or Ineffective Administration? Why Some Nursing Homes Fail to Provide Adequate Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, John E.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This study involved 530 nursing staff working in 25 for-profit and nonprofit nursing homes, 2 of which failed to meet residential care standards. Nursing home climate in failed homes was perceived as being significantly lower in human relations and higher in laissez-faire and status orientation dimensions that the climate in the successful homes.…

  16. Determinants of staff job satisfaction of caregivers in two nursing homes in Pennsylvania

    OpenAIRE

    Degenholtz Howard; Castle Nicholas G; Rosen Jules

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Job satisfaction is important for nursing home staff and nursing home management, as it is associated with absenteeism, turnover, and quality of care. However, we know little about factors associated with job satisfaction and dissatisfaction for nursing home workers. Methods In this investigation, we use data from 251 caregivers (i.e., Registered Nurses, Licensed Practical Nurses, and Nurse Aides) to examine: job satisfaction scores of these caregivers and what characteris...

  17. Where should Momma go? Current nursing home performance measurement strategies and a less ambitious approach

    OpenAIRE

    Lieberman Trudy; Hawes Catherine; Phillips Charles D; Koren Mary

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Nursing home performance measurement systems are practically ubiquitous. The vast majority of these systems aspire to rank order all nursing homes based on quantitative measures of quality. However, the ability of such systems to identify homes differing in quality is hampered by the multidimensional nature of nursing homes and their residents. As a result, the authors doubt the ability of many nursing home performance systems to truly help consumers differentiate among ho...

  18. Reliability of home CPAP titration with different automatic CPAP devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacasse Yves

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CPAP titration may be completed by automatic apparatus. However, differences in pressure behaviour could interfere with the reliability of pressure recommendations. Our objective was to compare pressure behaviour and effective pressure recommendations between three Automatic CPAP machines (Autoset Spirit, Remstar Auto, GK 420. Methods Sixteen untreated obstructive sleep apnea patients were randomly allocated to one of the 3 tested machines for a one-week home titration trial in a crossover design with a 10 days washout period between trials. Results The median pressure value was significantly lower with machine GK 420 (5.9 +/- 1.8 cm H2O than with the other devices both after one night and one week of CPAP titration (7.4 +/- 1.3 and 6.6 +/- 1.9 cm H2O. The maximal pressure obtained over the one-week titration was significantly higher with Remstar Auto (12.6 +/- 2.4 cm H2O, Mean +/- SD than with the two other ones (10.9 +/- 1.0 and 11.0 +/- 2.4 cm H2O. The variance in pressure recommendation significantly differed between the three machines after one night and between Autoset Spirit and the two other machines after 1 week. Conclusion Pressure behaviour and pressure recommendation significantly differ between Auto CPAP machines both after one night and one week of home titration.

  19. Communication skills training in a nursing home: effects of a brief intervention on residents and nursing aides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprangers, Suzan; Dijkstra, Katinka; Romijn-Luijten, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Effective communication by nursing home staff is related to a higher quality of life and a decrease in verbal and physical aggression and depression in nursing home residents. Several communication intervention studies have been conducted to improve communication between nursing home staff and nursing home residents with dementia. These studies have shown that communication skills training can improve nursing aides' communication with nursing home residents. However, these studies tended to be time-consuming and fairly difficult to implement. Moreover, these studies focused on the communicative benefits for the nursing home residents and their well-being, while benefits and well-being for the nursing aides were neglected. The current study focused on implementing a brief communication skills training program to improve nursing aides' (N=24) communication with residents with dementia (N=26) in a nursing home. The effects of the training on nursing aides' communication, caregiver distress, and job satisfaction and residents' psychopathology and agitation were assessed relative to a control group condition. Nursing aides in the intervention group were individually trained to communicate effectively with residents during morning care by using short instructions, positive speech, and biographical statements. Mixed ANOVAs showed that, after training, nursing aides in the intervention group experienced less caregiver distress. Additionally, the number of short instructions and instances of positive speech increased. Providing nursing aides with helpful feedback during care aids communication and reduces caregiver burden, even with a brief intervention that requires limited time investments for nursing home staff.

  20. Unintentional Discontinuation of Chronic Medications for Seniors in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stall, Nathan M.; Fischer, Hadas D.; Wu, C. Fangyun; Bierman, Arlene S.; Brener, Stacey; Bronskill, Susan; Etchells, Edward; Fernandes, Olavo; Lau, Davina; Mamdani, Muhammad M.; Rochon, Paula; Urbach, David R.; Bell, Chaim M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Transitions of care leave patients vulnerable to the unintentional discontinuation of medications with proven efficacy for treating chronic diseases. Older adults residing in nursing homes may be especially susceptible to this preventable adverse event. The effect of large-scale policy changes on improving this practice is unknown. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of a national medication reconciliation accreditation requirement for nursing homes on rates of unintentional medication discontinuation after hospital discharge. It was a population-based retrospective cohort study that used linked administrative records between 2003 and 2012 of all hospitalizations in Ontario, Canada. We identified nursing home residents aged ≥66 years who had continuous use of ≥1 of the 3 selected medications for chronic disease: levothyroxine, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins), and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). In 2008 medication reconciliation became a required practice for accreditation of Canadian nursing homes. The main outcome measures included the proportion of patients who restarted the medication of interest after hospital discharge at 7 days. We also performed a time series analysis to examine the impact of the accreditation requirement on rates of unintentional medication discontinuation. The study included 113,088 adults aged ≥66 years who were nursing home residents, had an acute hospitalization, and were discharged alive to the same nursing home. Overall rates of discontinuation at 7-days after hospital discharge were highest in 2003–2004 for all nursing homes: 23.9% for thyroxine, 26.4% for statins, and 23.9% for PPIs. In most of the cases, these overall rates decreased annually and were lowest in 2011–2012: 4.0% for thyroxine, 10.6% for statins, and 8.3% for PPIs. The time series analysis found that nursing home accreditation did not significantly lower medication discontinuation rates for any of the 3 drug groups. From 2003

  1. Nursing Staffs' Views on Physical and Psychosocial Care Provision in Slovenian Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habjanić, Ana; Elo, Satu; Micetić-Turk, Dusanka; Isola, Arja

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore nursing staffs' perceptions of the physical and psychological care needs of elderly residents, their views on the relative importance of these needs and their perceived ability to meet them. The literature reveals that the quality of elder care in nursing homes should comprise both physical and psychosocial care. Despite this, the nursing staffs' perceptions of the physical and psychosocial care provision have not often been researched. As a method cross-sectional research design was used, with structured questionnaires and unstructured interviews. Our sample consisted of members of the nursing staff from four nursing homes in Slovenia (survey: N = 148; interview: N = 16). The resulting data was processed by means of statistical analysis and conventional content analysis. The nursing staff reported more knowledge of, skills with and willingness to meet residents'physical needs than psychosocial needs. On the other hand, communication, conversation, self-care and a home-like environment were considered by nursing staff as marking quality elder care. Consequently, nursing home administrators should try to strengthen psychosocial care provision to improve the residents' quality of life. Conversation, as the most often recognised aspect of psychosocial care, should be promoted, since improvements in this area would not be costly, and each nursing staff member may decide individually how best to include more conversation in the daily routines of elder care provision. PMID:26987155

  2. Tetanus immunity in nursing home residents of Bolu, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer Ali

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tetanus is a serious but vaccine-preventable disease and fatality rate of the disease is high in the neonates and the elderly. The aim of this study was to detect the tetanus antibody prevalence in the over sixty-year age residents of the nursing homes in Bolu. Methods A voluntary-based study was done in the residents of two nursing homes in Bolu, Turkey. Blood samples were taken from 71 volunteers residing in there nursing homes. Tetanus IgG antibodies were measured by a commercial ELISA kit. Results Among overall subjects, only 11 (15.7 % had the protective tetanus antibody titers at the time of the study. Totally, 10 subjects were examined in emergency rooms due to trauma or accidents within the last ten years and, four (40% of them had protective antibody levels. Of the remaining 61 subjects only 7 (11% had protective antibody levels (p Conclusions Tetanus antibody level is below the protective level in the majority of the over-sixty-year-age subjects residing in the nursing homes. Each over sixty-year age person in our country should be vaccinated. Until this is accomplished, at least, nursing home residents should be vaccinated during registration.

  3. Teaching home care electronic documentation skills to undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokes, Kathleen M; Aponte, Judith; Nickitas, Donna M; Mahon, Pamela Y; Rodgers, Betsy; Reyes, Nancy; Chaya, Joan; Dornbaum, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Although there is general consensus that nursing students need knowledge and significant skill to document clinical findings electronically, nursing faculty face many barriers in ensuring that undergraduate students can practice on electronic health record systems (EHRS). External funding supported the development of an educational innovation through a partnership between a home care agency staff and nursing faculty. Modules were developed to teach EHRS skills using a case study of a homebound person requiring wound care and the Medicare-required OASIS documentation system. This article describes the development and implementation of the module for an upper-level baccalaureate nursing program located in New York City. Nursing faculty are being challenged to develop creative and economical solutions to expose nursing students to EHRSs in nonclinical settings.

  4. Working experiences of nursing aides in nursing homes: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-ping Wei

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: A reasonable work arrangement, positive psychological intervention, and the strengthening of professional, medical and social supports are recommended to improve the work quality and satisfaction of nursing aides in elderly homes.

  5. Nursing home residents and celebrities: a tale of morality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claessens, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    In contemporary Western societies, characterized by global aging and an omnipresent celebrity culture, little is known about the role of celebrities for older adults. This study bridges gerontology and celebrity studies to explore a social role that celebrities can fulfill for nursing home residents: triggering moral discussions. This potential role is examined in four focus groups with 27 nursing home residents in Flanders (Belgium). Here, 20 celebrity pictures are employed to evoke moral discussions, with a focus on adultery and homosexuality. These discussions are subjected to a framing analysis. Results show that celebrities can trigger moral discussions among the nursing home residents. The residents' adultery and homosexuality frames show that they mostly retain dominant values from their youth, often combining them with contemporary dominant values. Further, the residents' frames prove to be relativistic, which can be linked to their multitude of life experiences and complex emotional skills.

  6. The challenges of a home-based nursing consultation business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulmeister, L

    1999-03-01

    The transition from working in a traditional setting to working at home alone can be challenging for new nurse consultants. Home-based consultants can use a variety of strategies to stay focused and connected, such as having a designated work area, limiting distractions, and networking. Nurse consultants can obtain information about business management from community resources, and computer on-line services offer a means of contacting other small-business owners. Ongoing business evaluations, which include professional accomplishments as well as an examination of income and expenses, help in planning. Home-based nurse consultants can increase the likelihood of business success by setting objectives, working diligently, and networking with others in the business community. PMID:10382409

  7. Valentia House Nursing Home, Camolin, Enniscorthy, Wexford.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moore, Annamarie

    2013-01-02

    PURPOSE: Testicular cancer occurs at a time in a man\\'s life when major social life changes are occurring and when body image, fertility, sexual desire and performance can be central issues. Oncology nurses, as members of the multidisciplinary team, are in an ideal position to address men\\'s concerns. The aim of this study was to investigate oncology nurses\\' self-perceived knowledge and comfort in relation to discussing sexuality concerns with men diagnosed with testicular cancer and to identify the barriers and facilitators to such discussions. METHODS: This study employed a self-completion, anonymous survey design with a sample of registered nurses working in five, randomly chosen, oncology centres in Ireland. RESULTS: In total, 89 questionnaires (45% response rate) were included for analysis. Findings suggest that although nurses were open to addressing concerns, few informed patients they were available to discuss sexual concerns. Nurses reported lacking knowledge of, and discomfort in, discussing the more intimate aspects of sexuality, including: ejaculatory difficulties, erectile dysfunction, impotence, prosthesis options and testicular self examination. CONCLUSIONS: Findings reinforce the need for more comprehensive education on sexuality issues and testicular cancer. Nurses need to take a more proactive approach to sexuality care, as opposed to the \\'passive waiting stance\\' that permeates the current culture of care. Education programmes need to include specific information on sexual issues associated with testicular cancer, and oncology nurses must subsume sexuality as an essential aspect of their role through changes in policies and nursing care planning.

  8. Local Medicaid home- and community-based services spending and nursing home admissions of younger adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kali S; Keohane, Laura; Mor, Vincent

    2014-11-01

    We used fixed-effect models to examine the relationship between local spending on home- and community-based services (HCBSs) for cash-assisted Medicaid-only disabled (CAMOD) adults and younger adult admissions to nursing homes in the United States during 2001 through 2008, with control for facility and market characteristics and secular trends. We found that increased CAMOD Medicaid HCBS spending at the local level is associated with decreased admissions of younger adults to nursing homes. Our findings suggest that states' efforts to expand HCBS for this population should continue.

  9. Leadership, staffing and quality of care in nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Havig Anders

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leadership and staffing are recognised as important factors for quality of care. This study examines the effects of ward leaders' task- and relationship-oriented leadership styles, staffing levels, ratio of registered nurses and ratio of unlicensed staff on three independent measures of quality of care. Methods A cross-sectional survey of forty nursing home wards throughout Norway was used to collect the data. Five sources of data were utilised: self-report questionnaires to 444 employees, interviews with and questionnaires to 13 nursing home directors and 40 ward managers, telephone interviews with 378 relatives and 900 hours of field observations. Separate multi-level analyses were conducted for quality of care assessed by relatives, staff and field observations respectively. Results Task-oriented leadership style had a significant positive relationship with two of the three quality of care indexes. In contrast, relationship-oriented leadership style was not significantly related to any of the indexes. The lack of significant effect for relationship-oriented leadership style was due to a strong correlation between the two leadership styles (r = 0.78. Staffing levels and ratio of registered nurses were not significantly related to any of the quality of care indexes. The ratio of unlicensed staff, however, showed a significant negative relationship to quality as assessed by relatives and field observations, but not to quality as assessed by staff. Conclusions Leaders in nursing homes should focus on active leadership and particularly task-oriented behaviour like structure, coordination, clarifying of staff roles and monitoring of operations to increase quality of care. Furthermore, nursing homes should minimize use of unlicensed staff and address factors related to high ratios of unlicensed staff, like low staff stability. The study indicates, however, that the relationship between staffing levels, ratio of registered nurses

  10. Back Facts: A Training Workbook to Prevent Back Injuries in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A training workbook to prevent back injuries in nursing homes SEIU Education and Support Fund 1313 L ... short and to the point. Activity 1 - Can nursing home work be hazardous to your health? Purpose: ...

  11. 78 FR 75959 - Agency Information Collection (Regulation on Reduction of Nursing Shortages in State Homes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Regulation on Reduction of Nursing Shortages in State Homes....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Regulation on Reduction of Nursing Shortages in State Homes; Application...

  12. 75 FR 62185 - Proposed Information Collection (Regulation on Reduction of Nursing Shortages in State Homes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Regulation on Reduction of Nursing Shortages in State Homes...: Regulation on Reduction of Nursing Shortages in State Homes; Application for Assistance for Hiring...

  13. 75 FR 45207 - Proposed Information Collection (Regulation on Reduction of Nursing Shortages in State Homes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Regulation on Reduction of Nursing Shortages in State Homes...: Regulation on Reduction of Nursing Shortages in State Homes; Application for Assistance for Hiring...

  14. 78 FR 55778 - Proposed Information Collection (Regulation on Reduction of Nursing Shortages in State Homes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Regulation on Reduction of Nursing Shortages in State Homes...: Regulation on Reduction of Nursing Shortages in State Homes; Application for Assistance for Hiring...

  15. Sexual Abuse of Older Nursing Home Residents: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenche Malmedal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite an increasing literature related to elder abuse, sexual abuse of older persons in general and of vulnerable adults living in nursing homes in particular is still sparsely described. The purpose of this study was to assess the state of knowledge on the subject of sexual abuse against older nursing home residents through a literature review. Systematic searches in reference databases including Cinahl, Medline, OVID Nursing Database, ISI Web of Science, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, and SveMed + were conducted. Through several phases of selection of the articles, using strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, six articles were chosen for a deeper examination. Findings from the review show that sexual abuse occurs in nursing homes and that both older women and men are victims of sexual abuse. Perpetrators appear mainly to be staff and other residents and mainly to be men, but also women abuse both older men and older women. Findings from the literature review show that there is a need for knowledge and further research on the topic of sexual abuse against older residents in nursing homes. Furthermore, there is a need for good policies and reporting systems, as an important step in seriously addressing sexual abuse against older persons.

  16. Severity of Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Nursing Home Residents

    OpenAIRE

    Helvik, Anne-Sofie; Engedal, Knut; Wu, Bei; Benth, Jūratė Šaltytė; Corazzini, Kirsten; Røen, Irene; Selbæk, Geir

    2016-01-01

    We aimed at assessing time shift in the severity of neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) in nursing home residents between 2004/2005 and 2010/2011 and associations between NPS and socio-demographic variables, physical health status, dementia severity, and the use of psychotropic drugs. The Neuropsychiatric Inventory Nursing Home Version was used in 2004/2005 (n = 1,163) and 2010/2011 (n = 1,858). Linear mixed model analysis was applied. There was no time shift in the severity of apathy, psychosis,...

  17. Tearmainn Bhride Nursing Home, Brideswell, Athlone, Roscommon.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Yadav, B L

    2015-04-07

    Social skills training, a psychological approach, is used to ameliorate the deficits in social skills among patients with a severe mental illness. For the efficacy of social skills training in schizophrenia, the literature in other core psychiatric disciplines (i.e. psychology, psychiatry, etc) indicates some conflicting evidences and a limited quality of evidence in psychiatric nursing. With the exemption of a few individual nursing studies, no systematic review is available to date in psychiatric nursing literature. This systematic review of literature was undertaken to explore the efficacy of social skills training in schizophrenia.

  18. Time in Care for Older People Living in Nursing Homes

    OpenAIRE

    Sivberg, B. V.; L. Fagerström; B. M. Nordström; Thorsell, K. B. E.

    2010-01-01

    In order to measure actual care needs in relation to resources required to fulfill these needs, an instrument (Time in Care) with which to evaluate care needs and determine the time needed for various care activities has been developed with the aim of assessing nursing intensity in municipal care for older people. Interreliability (ICC = 0.854) of time measurements (n = 10'546) of 32 nursing activities in relation to evaluated care levels in two nursing homes (staff n = 81) has been determine...

  19. 38 CFR 17.60 - Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... nursing home care beyond six months. 17.60 Section 17.60 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Community Nursing Home Care Facilities § 17.60 Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months. Directors of health care facilities may authorize, for...

  20. Nonmotor Symptoms in Nursing Home Residents with Parkinson's Disease : Prevalence and Effect on Quality of Life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerkamp, Nico J.; Tissingh, Gerrit; Poels, Petra J. E.; Zuidema, Systse U.; Munneke, Marten; Koopmans, Raymond T. C. M.; Bloem, Bastiaan R.

    2013-01-01

    ObjectivesTo determine the prevalence of nonmotor symptoms (NMS) in nursing home (NH) residents with Parkinson's disease (PD) and to establish the association with quality of life. DesignCross-sectional. SettingNursing homes in the southeast of the Netherlands. ParticipantsNursing home residents wit

  1. Nonmotor symptoms in nursing home residents with Parkinson's disease: prevalence and effect on quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerkamp, N.J.; Tissingh, G.; Poels, P.J.P.; Zuidema, S.U.; Munneke, M.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Bloem, B.R.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of nonmotor symptoms (NMS) in nursing home (NH) residents with Parkinson's disease (PD) and to establish the association with quality of life. DESIGN: Cross-sectional. SETTING: Nursing homes in the southeast of the Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: Nursing home resid

  2. 42 CFR 422.133 - Return to home skilled nursing facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Return to home skilled nursing facility. 422.133....133 Return to home skilled nursing facility. (a) General rule. MA plans must provide coverage of posthospital extended care services to Medicare enrollees through a home skilled nursing facility if...

  3. Nursing home characteristics associated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Burden and Transmission

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy Courtney R; Quan Victor; Kim Diane; Peterson Ellena; Whealon Matthew; Tan Grace; Evans Kaye; Meyers Hildy; Cheung Michele; Lee Bruce Y; Mukamel Dana B; Huang Susan S

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background MRSA prevalence in nursing homes often exceeds that in hospitals, but reasons for this are not well understood. We sought to measure MRSA burden in a large number of nursing homes and identify facility characteristics associated with high MRSA burden. Methods We performed nasal swabs of residents from 26 nursing homes to measure MRSA importation and point prevalence, and estimate transmissi...

  4. Faith and End of Life in Nursing Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L. Rubinstein

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the role of religious belief in the experiences of dying and death in a Catholic nursing home. The home appeals to residents and their families due to the active religious presence. Thus, religion is a salient element of the “local culture” which exists in this long-term care setting. The preeminence of faith within the organization and the personal religious convictions of staff, residents, and families may drive how death and dying are discussed and experienced in this setting, as well as the meanings that are attached to them. This paper examines the relationship between faith and the experience and meaning of death in this nursing home. We present themes that emerged from open-ended interviews with residents, family members, and staff, gathered between 1996 and 2004. The data indicate that people select the home due to their Catholic faith and the home's religious tone. Themes also show that belief in God and an afterlife helps shape the experience of dying and death for our informants. Our paper does not compare ease of dying with other nursing homes or within other belief systems.

  5. Nursing home negotiations and narrations in challenging, transnational situations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaakilde, Anne Leonora; Swane, Christine E.; Algreen-Petersen, Eva

    and municipalities. However, the migration populations in Denmark do not utilize public help and care in old age at any significant level.This is the reason why the municipality of Copenhagen is developing a specific ‘diversity profile’ in an existing public nursing home in Copenhagen; Peder Lykke Centeret...

  6. Antibiotic prescribing in dutch nursing homes: how appropriate is it?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buul, L.W. van; Veenhuizen, R.B.; Achterberg, W.P.; Schellevis, F.G.; Essink, R.T.; Greeff, S.C. de; Natsch, S.S.; Steen, J.T. van der; Hertogh, C.M.P.M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the appropriateness of decisions to prescribe or withhold antibiotics for nursing home (NH) residents with infections of the urinary tract (UTI), respiratory tract (RTI), and skin (SI). DESIGN: Prospective study. SETTING: Ten NHs in the central-west region of the Netherland

  7. Ciprofloxacin : Use and resistance in Community, Nursing Home and Hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hees, B.C.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the studies described in this thesis was to analyze some aspects of ciprofloxacin use and clinical and (molecular) epidemiology of ciprofloxacin resistance in different settings, both within hospitals (chapter 3,4 and 6), community and nursing homes (chapter 2 and 5). With its broad spect

  8. Antibiotic prescribing in Dutch nursing homes: how appropriate is it?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buul, L.W. van; Veenhuizen, R.B.; Achterberg, W.P.; Schellevis, F.G.; Essink, R.T.G.M.; Greeff, S.C. de; Natsch, S.; Steen, J.T. van der; Hertogh, C.M.P.M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the appropriateness of decisions to prescribe or withhold antibiotics for nursing home (NH) residents with infections of the urinary tract (UTI), respiratory tract (RTI), and skin (SI). Design: Prospective study. Setting: Ten NHs in the central-west region of the Netherland

  9. [Maintaining the proper distance for nurses working in the home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estève, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Health professionals must be able to respond to many different situations which require technical knowledge and self-control. Particularly when working in the patient's home, nurses must know how to maintain a proper distance to protect themselves from burnout. In this respect, the practice analysis constitutes an adapted support tool. PMID:27393988

  10. Understanding Nursing Home Worker Conceptualizations about Good Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Gawon

    2013-01-01

    This study explored how direct care workers in nursing homes conceptualize good care and how their conceptualizations are influenced by external factors surrounding their work environment and the relational dynamics between them and residents. Study participants were drawn from a local service employees' union, and in-depth interviews were…

  11. The Coach Is in: Improving Nutritional Care in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Anna N.; Simmons, Sandra F.; Applebaum, Robert; Lindabury, Kate; Schnelle, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This article describes and evaluates a long distance coaching course aimed at improving nutritional care in nursing homes (NHs). The course was structured to provide more support than traditional training programs offer. Methods: In a series of 6 monthly teleconferences led by an expert in NH nutritional care, participating NH staff…

  12. Nursing Home Care Quality: Insights from a Bayesian Network Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, Justin; Jang, Wooseung; Rantz, Marilyn

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is twofold. The first purpose is to utilize a new methodology (Bayesian networks) for aggregating various quality indicators to measure the overall quality of care in nursing homes. The second is to provide new insight into the relationships that exist among various measures of quality and how such measures…

  13. Nursing Home Aides Experience Increase in Serious Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Personick, Martin E.

    1990-01-01

    Bureau of Labor Statistics' data show that the incidence rate of 15 workplace injuries and illnesses per 100 full-time nursing home workers is well above that for private industry as a whole. Back injuries are most frequently reported. Short tenure and high turnover are correlated with health and safety problems. (SK)

  14. Severity of Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Nursing Home Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Sofie Helvik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed at assessing time shift in the severity of neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS in nursing home residents between 2004/2005 and 2010/2011 and associations between NPS and socio-demographic variables, physical health status, dementia severity, and the use of psychotropic drugs. The Neuropsychiatric Inventory Nursing Home Version was used in 2004/2005 (n = 1,163 and 2010/2011 (n = 1,858. Linear mixed model analysis was applied. There was no time shift in the severity of apathy, psychosis, and affective symptoms, but agitation did exhibit a time shift. Agitation was less severe in 2010/2011 than in 2004/2005 in residents with a Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR sum of boxes score ≤4, and more severe in residents with a CDR sum of boxes score >16. Higher CDR sum of boxes scores and use of psychotropic medication were associated with more severe apathy, agitation, psychosis, and affective symptoms. Poor physical health was associated with more severe apathy, psychosis, and affective symptoms. Women had more severe agitation and less severe affective symptoms than men. A longer stay in a nursing home was associated with more severe agitation and less severe affective symptoms. In conclusion, agitation was less severe in 2010/2011 than in 2004/2005 among nursing home residents with a milder degree of dementia, and more severe in residents with severe dementia.

  15. Restorative Virtual Environment Design for Augmenting Nursing Home Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun-Pedersen, Jon Ram; Serafin, Stefania; Kofoed, Lise

    2016-01-01

    to experience natural surroundings. Augmenting a conventional biking exercise with a recreational virtual environment (RVE) has shown to serve as an intrinsic motivation contributor to exercise for nursing home residents. RVEs might be able to provide some of the health benefits that regular nature experiences...

  16. [The benefits of foot reflexology in nursing homes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonnet, Karine

    2012-01-01

    Massages, following the foot reflexology method, were given to patients in a nursing home suffering from Alzheimer's disease or related disorders. A methodical assessment, on a small sample of patients, showed a significant reduction in neuropsychiatric manifestations, opening up new perspectives for non-medication based therapy for the care of elderly dependent people. PMID:23301302

  17. Serum zinc and pneumonia in nursing home elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinc plays an important role in immune function. The association between serum zinc and pneumonia in the elderly has not been studied. The study aim is to determine if serum zinc concentrations in nursing home elderly are associated with incidence and duration of pneumonia, total and duration of ant...

  18. Needed: Physical Educators on the Nursing Home Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooks, Bettie; Hooks, Edgar W., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Social interaction and physical activity are important aspects of health maintenance for the aged. A holistic approach to the care of the elderly in nursing homes would involve a team of professionals who encourage residents to pursue such tasks as adaptation to loss, and maintenance of physical activity to retain function. (JN)

  19. Water homeostasis, frailty and congnitive function in the nursing home

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this study is to develop and test a practical clinical method to assess frailty in nursing homes and to investigate the relationship between cognitive status of the elderly and the balance between water compartments of their body composition. This is a cross-sectional study, conducted a...

  20. Resident-to-resident violence triggers in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snellgrove, Susan; Beck, Cornelia; Green, Angela; McSweeney, Jean C

    2013-11-01

    Certified nurses' assistants (CNAs) employed by a rural nursing home in Northeast Arkansas described their perceptions of resident-to-resident violence in order to provide insight on factors, including unmet needs, that may trigger the phenomenon. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 11 CNAs. Data were analyzed using content analysis and constant comparison. Two categories of triggers emerged from the data-active and passive. Active triggers involved the actions of other residents that were intrusive in nature, such as wandering into a residents' personal space, taking a resident's belongings, and so forth. Passive triggers did not involve the actions of residents but related to the internal and external environment of the residents. Examples were factors such as boredom, competition for attention and communication difficulties. Results indicate that there are factors, including unmet needs within the nursing home environment that may be identified and altered to prevent violence between residents.

  1. [Skin Care to Prevent Development of Pressure Ulcers in Bedridden Nursing Home Residents from Developing Pressure Ulcers in Nursing Home Residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Chie

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify whether skincare products are effective in preventing development of pressure ulcers in bedridden nursing home residents. The study sample consisted of 21 nursing home residents at a nursing home in Osaka, Japan who use diapers. Participants were assigned to 3 groups and compared to a control group. None of the subjects developed a pressure ulcer and had improved skin condition around the anus. PMID:26809416

  2. Back or neck-pain-related disability of nursing staff in hospitals, nursing homes and home care in seven countries- results from the European NEXT-Study

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, Michael; Tackenberg, Peter; Nienhaus, Albert; Estryn-Behar, Madeleine; Conway, Paul Maurice; Hasselhorn, H.-M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: musculoskeletal disorders are a widespread affliction in the nursing profession. Back or neck-pain-related disability of nursing staff is mainly attributed to physical and psychosocial risk factors. Objectives: to investigate which—and to what extent—physical and psychosocial risk factors are associated with neck/back-pain-related disability in nursing, and to assess the role of the type of health care institution (hospitals, nursing homes and home care institutions) within di...

  3. Back disorders and lumbar load in nursing staff in geriatric care: a comparison of home-based care and nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beck Barbara-Beate

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Back pain is one of the most frequent complaints in the nursing profession. Thus, the 12-month prevalence of pain in the lumbar spine in nursing staff is as high as 76%. Only a few representative studies have assessed the prevalence rates of back pain and its risk factors among nursing staff in nursing homes in comparison to staff in home-based care facilities. The present study accordingly investigates the prevalence in the lumbar and cervical spine and determines the physical workload to lifting and caring in geriatric care. Methods 1390 health care workers in nursing homes and home care participated in this cross sectional survey. The nursing staff members were examined by occupational physicians according to the principals of the multistep diagnosis of musculoskeletal disorders. Occupational exposure to daily care activities with patient transfers was measured by a standardised questionnaire. The lumbar load was calculated with the Mainz-Dortmund dose model. Information on ergonomic conditions were recorded from the management of the nursing homes. Comparisons of all outcome variables were made between both care settings. Results Complete documentation, including the findings from the occupational physicians and the questionnaire, was available for 41%. Staff in nursing homes had more often positive orthopaedic findings than staff in home care. At the same time the values calculated for lumbar load were found to be significant higher in staff in nursing homes than in home-based care: 45% vs. 6% were above the reference value. Nursing homes were well equipped with technical lifting aids, though their provision with assistive advices is unsatisfactory. Situation in home care seems worse, especially as the staff often has to get by without assistance. Conclusions Future interventions should focus on counteracting work-related lumbar load among staff in nursing homes. Equipment and training in handling of assistive devices

  4. Treatment of heart failure in nursing home residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daamen, Mariëlle AMJ; Hamers, Jan PH; Gorgels, Anton PM; Tan, Frans ES; Schols, Jos MGA; Rocca, Hans-Peter Brunner-la

    2016-01-01

    Background For the treatment of chronic heart failure (HF), both pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment should be employed in HF patients. Although HF is highly prevalent in nursing home residents, it is not clear whether the recommendations in the guidelines for pharmacological therapy also are followed in nursing home residents. The aim of this study is to investigate how HF is treated in nursing home residents and to determine to what extent the current treatment corresponds to the guidelines. Methods Nursing home residents of five large nursing home care organizations in the southern part of the Netherlands with a previous diagnosis of HF based on medical records irrespective of the left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) were included in this cross-sectional design study. Data were gathered on the (medical) records, which included clinical characteristics and pharmacological- and non-pharmacological treatment. Echocardiography was used as part of the study to determine the LVEF. Results Out of 501 residents, 112 had a diagnosis of HF at inclusion. One-third of them received an ACE-inhibitor and 40% used a β-blocker. In 66%, there was a prescription of diuretics with a preference of a loop diuretic. Focusing on the residents with a LVEF ≤ 40%, only 46% of the 22 residents used an ACE-inhibitor and 64% a β-blocker. The median daily doses of prescribed medication were lower than those that were recommended by the guidelines. Non-pharmacological interventions were recorded in almost none of the residents with HF. Conclusions The recommended medical therapy of HF was often not prescribed; if prescribed, the dosage was usually far below what was recommended. In addition, non-pharmacological interventions were mostly not used at all. PMID:26918012

  5. Treatment of heart failure in nursing home residents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marille AMJ Daamen; Jan PH Hamers; Anton PM Gorgels; Frans ES Tan; Jos MGA Schols; Hans-Peter Brunner-la Rocca

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundFor the treatment of chronic heart failure (HF), both pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment should be em-ployed in HF patients. Although HF is highly prevalent in nursing home residents, it is not clear whether the recommendations in the guide-lines for pharmacological therapy also are followed in nursing home residents. The aim of this study is to investigate how HF is treated in nursing home residents and to determine to what extent the current treatment corresponds to the guidelines.MethodsNursing home resi-dents of five large nursing home care organizations in the southern part of the Netherlands with a previous diagnosis of HF based on medical records irrespective of the left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) were included in this cross-sectional design study. Data were gathered on the (medical) records, which included clinical characteristics and pharmacological- and non-pharmacological treatment. Echocardiography was used as part of the study to determine the LVEF.ResultsOut of 501 residents, 112 had a diagnosis of HF at inclusion. One-third of them received an ACE-inhibitor and 40% used aβ-blocker. In 66%, there was a prescription of diuretics with a preference of a loop diuretic. Focusing on the residents with a LVEF£ 40%, only 46% of the 22 residents used an ACE-inhibitor and 64% aβ-blocker. The median daily doses of prescribed medication were lower than those that were recommended by the guidelines. Non-pharmacological interventions were recorded in almost none of the residents with HF.ConclusionsThe recommended medical therapy of HF was often not prescribed; if pre-scribed, the dosage was usually far below what was recommended. In addition, non-pharmacological interventions were mostly not used at all.

  6. Mental status testing in the elderly nursing home population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadler, J D; Relkin, N R; Cohen, M S; Hodder, R A; Reingold, J; Plum, F

    1995-07-01

    The clinical utility of selected brief cognitive screening instruments in detecting dementia in an elderly nursing home population was examined. One hundred twenty nursing home residents (mean age 87.9) were administered the Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) and the Modified Mini-Mental State Exam (3MS). The majority of the subjects (75%) were also administered the Dementia Rating Scale (DRS). Both clinically diagnosed demented (n = 57) and non-demented (n = 63) subjects participated in the study. Dementia was diagnosed in accordance with DSM-III-R criteria by physicians specializing in geriatric medicine. Using standard cutoffs for impairment, the 3MS, MMSE, and DRS achieved high sensitivity (82% to 100%) but low specificity (33% to 52%) in the detection of dementia among nursing home residents. Positive predictive values ranged from 52% to 61%, and negative predictive values from 77% to 100%. Higher age, lower education, and history of depression were significantly associated with misclassification of non-demented elderly subjects. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve analyses revealed optimal classification of dementia with cutoff values of 74 for the 3MS, 22 for the MMSE, and 110 for the DRS. The results suggest that the 3MS, MMSE, and DRS do not differ significantly with respect to classification accuracy of dementia in a nursing home population. Elderly individuals of advanced age (i.e., the oldest-old) with lower education and a history of depression appear at particular risk for dementia misclassification with these instruments. Revised cutoff values for impairment should be employed when these instruments are applied to elderly residents of nursing homes and the oldest-old. PMID:7576043

  7. Geothermal greenhouse heating facilities for the Klamath County Nursing Home, Klamath Falls, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-01

    The Klamath County Nursing Home, located in Klamath Falls, Oregon, was constructed in 1976. The building of 55,654 square feet currently houses care facilities for approximately 120 persons. During the initial planning for the nursing home, the present site was selected primarily on the basis of its geothermal resource. This resource currently provides space and domestic hot water heating for the nursing home, Merle West Medical Center and the Oregon Institute of Technology. The feasibility of installing a geothermal heating system in a planned greenhouse for the nursing home is explored. The greenhouse system would be tied directly to the existing hot water heating system for the nursing home.

  8. Characteristics of Absenteeism in Nursing Home Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska; Rosenthal, Alvin S.

    This study investigated factors associated with absenteeism among nursing staff (N=219) at a long-term care facility. Four absenteeism measures were calculated from personnel records for each month of the year: no pay (the sum of unscheduled, unpaid sick, and leave without pay), part day (the sum of arrived late and left early), paid sick, and…

  9. Mennonite Nursing Home passive solar demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-03-01

    A long-term nursing care facility and retirement center was designed for passive solar heating. The system comprises thermal mass, thermal insulation, Trombe walls, and direct gain clerestories. Included here is a topical report, analysis of building performance, owner's perspective, designer's perspective, and summary of information dissemination activities. (MHR)

  10. Low-Quality Nursing Homes Were More Likely Than Other Nursing Homes To Be Bought Or Sold By Chains In 1993-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, David C; Hirth, Richard A; Intrator, Orna; Li, Yue; Richardson, John; Stevenson, David G; Zheng, Qing; Banaszak-Holl, Jane

    2016-05-01

    Two defining features of the nursing home industry are the tremendous churn in chain ownership and the perception of low-quality care at many facilities. We examined whether nursing homes that underwent chain-related transactions, such as mergers and acquisitions, experienced a larger number of health deficiency citations than nursing homes that maintained common ownership over the same period. Using facility-level data for the period 1993-2010, we found that those nursing homes that underwent chain-related transactions had more deficiency citations in the years preceding and following a transaction than those nursing homes that maintained common ownership. Thus, we did not find that these transactions led to a decline in quality. Instead, we found that chains targeted nursing homes that were already having quality problems and that these problems persisted after the transaction. Given the high frequency of nursing home chain transactions, policy makers will need to continue to invest in tracking, reporting, and overseeing these transactions. One important step would be to report more detailed data on chain ownership, transactions, and aggregate chain quality on the Nursing Home Compare website, the federal government's online report card for nursing homes. PMID:27140998

  11. The effect of Channeling on in-home utilization and subsequent nursing home care: a simultaneous equation perspective.

    OpenAIRE

    Rabiner, D J; Stearns, S C; Mutran, E

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study explored the relationship between participation in a home/community-based long-term care case management intervention (known as the Channeling demonstration), use of formal in-home care, and subsequent nursing home utilization. STUDY DESIGN. Structural analysis of the randomized Channeling intervention was conducted to decompose the total effects of Channeling on nursing home use into direct and indirect effects. DATA COLLECTION METHOD. Secondary data analysis of the Nat...

  12. 48 CFR 852.222-70 - Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act-nursing home care contract supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Safety Standards Act-nursing home care contract supplement. 852.222-70 Section 852.222-70 Federal...—nursing home care contract supplement. As prescribed in 822.305, for nursing home care requirements, insert the following clause: Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act—Nursing Home Care...

  13. The experiences on dignity from the perspective of the elderly in nursing homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høy, Bente

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore nursing home residents’ practice experiences on dignity in caring situations and everyday life in order to illuminate the significance for a life in dignity. Elderly living in nursing homes are vulnerable which appeal to nursing care ethics and emphasise the im...... semi-structured interviews with elderly living in six nursing homes in Scandinavian. A total of 28 interviews were transcribed. The findings will be presented at the conference....

  14. St. Jude's Nursing Home, Borrisoleigh, Thurles, Tipperary.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Roche, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    The Haemovigilance speciality defines itself as nursing and subscribes to the overall purpose, functions and ethical standards of nursing. The clinical practice role may be divided into direct and indirect care. Direct care comprises the assessment, planning, delivery and evaluation of care to patients. Indirect care relates to activities that influence others in their provision of direct care. The Haemovigilance Officer as a clinical professional in the Irish healthcare environment is required to maintain professional competency and this is achieved through continuous ongoing education and training, attending in-service study days, conferences locally and nationally. While attending various conferences numerous posters have been presented which have showcased the hospital’s work. Evidence of continuous professional development is contained in Appendix 1.\\r\

  15. Beech Park Nursing Home, Dunmurry East, Kildare.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harnett, P J

    2009-06-01

    The term \\'performance management\\' has an aversive \\'managerial\\' aspect, is unappealing to many public sector staff and has an \\'image problem\\'. Perhaps as a consequence, it has failed to make a significant impact on Irish public sector workers, notably mental health nurses. In this paper, performance management is introduced and examined within an Irish healthcare context and with reference to its use in other countries. Some of the challenges faced by Irish mental health nurses and the potential benefits of working within a performance managed workplace are discussed. The paper concludes that performance management is likely to increasingly affect nurses, either as active agents or as passive recipients of a change that is thrust on them. The authors anticipate that the performance management \\'image problem\\' will give way to recognition that this is a fundamental change which has the potential to enable health services to change. This change will bring high standards of transparency, worker involvement in decision making, an explicit value base for health services and individual teams. It provides the potential for clear practice standards and high standards of transparency as well as worker welfare in all aspects, including supporting employment and career progression.

  16. Cramers Court Nursing Home, Belgooly, Cork.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Fiona

    2010-11-01

    Patient self-testing (PST) of the international normalised ratio (INR) has a positive effect on anticoagulation control. This study investigated whether the benefits of PST (other than increased frequency of testing, e.g. patient education, empowerment, compliance etc.) could be \\'carried-over\\' into usual care management after a period of home-testing has ceased.

  17. JOB SATISFACTION AMONG FOREIGN NURSES IN A PRIVATE NURSING HOME, SOUTHERN FINLAND

    OpenAIRE

    Wanjohi, Nelius; Maringi, Peris

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out the experience of the foreign nurses working in Southern Finland and the factors that influence their job satisfaction. The aim was to provide information that could help improve job satisfaction. The research was carried out in a private nursing home in Southern Finland. The methodology used in this study was qualitative research method. Data was obtained by conducting interviews. A qualitative analysis of the data was applied to identify the fac...

  18. Role for a Labor-Management Partnership in Nursing Home Person-Centered Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leutz, Walter; Bishop, Christine E.; Dodson, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate how a partnership between labor and management works to change the organization and focus of nursing home frontline work, supporting a transition toward person-centered care (PCC) in participating nursing homes. Design and Methods: Using a participatory research approach, we conducted case studies of 2 nursing homes…

  19. Quality assessment in nursing home facilities: measuring customer satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostyn, M M; Race, K E; Seibert, J H; Johnson, M

    2000-01-01

    A national study designed to assess the reliability and validity of a nursing home customer satisfaction survey is summarized. One hundred fifty-nine facilities participated, each responsible for the distribution and collection of 200 questionnaires randomly sent to the home of the resident's responsible party. A total of 9053 completed questionnaires were returned, for an average adjusted response rate of 53%. The factor analysis identified 4 scales: Comfort and Cleanliness, Nursing, Food Services, and Facility Care and Services, each with high reliability. Based on a multiple regression analysis, the scales were shown to have good criterion-related validity, accounting for 64% of the variance in overall quality ratings. Comparisons based on select characteristics indicated significantly different satisfaction ratings among facilities. The results are interpreted as providing evidence for the construct validity of a multidimensional customer satisfaction scale with measured reliability and criterion-related validity. Moreover, the scale can be used to differentiate satisfaction levels among facilities. PMID:10763218

  20. Autonomy among physically frail older people in nursing home settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Mette; Puggaard, Lis

    2008-01-01

    information about the effectiveness of individually tailored programmes according to perceptions of autonomy registered in institutionalised physically frail older people. This will add knowledge to assist response to present and future challenges in relation to health promotion initiatives for this group.......BACKGROUND: Experiencing autonomy is recognised to promote health and well-being for all age groups. Perceived lack of control has been found to be detrimental to physical and mental health. There is a lack of evidence-based knowledge elucidating how frail older people in nursing home settings...... themselves perceive autonomy in daily life. Further, there are no studies on the extent to which this perception can be influenced positively by participating in an individually tailored programme based on residents' own wishes for daily activities. METHODS AND DESIGN: A total of 9 nursing homes and 55...

  1. Visibility and findability of the nursing home compare website.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Darren; Lu, Chi-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Nursing Home Compare (NHC) is a federal government website providing information for selecting a nursing home. However, not many consumers were aware of or can locate the site. This study analyzed 50 official state and District of Columbia websites from September through December 2013. Using Google "inlink:" operator, this study evaluated the visibility and findability of NHC links in each state-level website. The results show that a link to NHC is available in all states except for Connecticut, Florida, and Michigan. Although it took only 4.7 clicks on average to the page with a NHC link, consumers may still have difficulty to find NHC from a state website. This article provides a snapshot of the visibility and findability of NHC and indicates a need for further investigation of promising website dissemination strategies not yet adequately evaluated.

  2. Quality assessment in nursing home facilities: measuring customer satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostyn, M M; Race, K E; Seibert, J H; Johnson, M

    2000-01-01

    A national study designed to assess the reliability and validity of a nursing home customer satisfaction survey is summarized. One hundred fifty-nine facilities participated, each responsible for the distribution and collection of 200 questionnaires randomly sent to the home of the resident's responsible party. A total of 9053 completed questionnaires were returned, for an average adjusted response rate of 53%. The factor analysis identified 4 scales: Comfort and Cleanliness, Nursing, Food Services, and Facility Care and Services, each with high reliability. Based on a multiple regression analysis, the scales were shown to have good criterion-related validity, accounting for 64% of the variance in overall quality ratings. Comparisons based on select characteristics indicated significantly different satisfaction ratings among facilities. The results are interpreted as providing evidence for the construct validity of a multidimensional customer satisfaction scale with measured reliability and criterion-related validity. Moreover, the scale can be used to differentiate satisfaction levels among facilities.

  3. PERCEPTIONS AND EXPERIENCES OF ELDERLY RESIDENTS IN A NURSING HOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Alessandra Evangelista

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the perception of the elderly residents of a long-stay nursing home on the process of institutionalization. We interviewed 14 subjects, five women and nine men, aged between 60 and 92 years. Data collection was conducted with a semi-structured sociodemographic interview, which presented the guiding question: “Tell me about how is your life, what do you do and how did you come to live here”. From the analysis, we found topics related to feelings of abandonment, loneliness, anger, ingratitude, living with chronic pain, satisfaction of property in the nursing home, productivity and social relationship. Given the thematic analysis, it was possible to group them into three categories such as: what the elderly feel, what the elderly perceive and what the elderly desire. As a result, we need public policies that addresses to the service provided by institutions regarding elderly expectations.

  4. Neuropsychiatric symptoms in nursing home patients : factor structure invariance of the Dutch nursing home version of the neuropsychiatric inventory in different stages of dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, Sytse U; de Jonghe, Jos F M; Verhey, Frans R J; Koopmans, Raymond T C M

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: To examine the influence of dementia stage and psychoactive medication use on the factor structure of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Nursing Home version (NPI-NH) in Dutch nursing home patients. METHODS: The NPI-NH was administered to a large sample of 1,437 patients with mild to se

  5. Music in the nursing home: hitting the right note! The provision of music to dementia patients with verbal and vocal agitation in Dutch nursing homes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geer, E.R. van der; Vink, A.C.; Schols, J.M.; Slaets, J.P.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The study aims to provide insight into the type of music being offered in Dutch nursing homes to patients with both dementia and verbal and vocal agitation. It also investigates the degree to which the music offered corresponds to the musical preferences of the nursing home residents. ME

  6. Music in the nursing home : hitting the right note! The provision of music to dementia patients with verbal and vocal agitation in Dutch nursing homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geer, E. R.; Vink, A. C.; Schols, J. M. G. A.; Slaets, J. P. J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The study aims to provide insight into the type of music being offered in Dutch nursing homes to patients with both dementia and verbal and vocal agitation. It also investigates the degree to which the music offered corresponds to the musical preferences of the nursing home residents. Me

  7. Surveillance for outbreaks of respiratory tract infections in nursing homes

    OpenAIRE

    Loeb, M; McGeer, A; McArthur, M; Peeling, R. W.; Petric, M; Simor, A E

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Outbreaks of respiratory tract infections are common in long-term care facilities for older people. The objective of our study was to determine both the frequency of such outbreaks and their clinical and epidemiological features. METHODS: Prospective surveillance for outbreaks of respiratory tract infections and a retrospective audit of surveillance records were conducted in 5 nursing homes in metropolitan Toronto over 3 years. The clinical manifestations of infected residents wer...

  8. [What happened after meprobamate's withdrawal? Survey in two nursing homes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lounis, Yacine; Bonnet-Zamponi, Dominique; Pautas, Éric; Gaubert-Dahan, Marie-Line

    2016-01-01

    We have conducted in two nursing homes a survey to study the impact of meprobamate's withdrawal, at the beginning of 2012, in terms of extent of prescribing to others psychotropic drugs and occurrence of adverse events. After meprobamate's withdrawal, 65 % of residents did not receive alternative medication and within three months after meprobamate stopping, adverse events (drowsiness, falls and hospitalization) decreased while agitation did not increase. PMID:26976315

  9. Perspectives on prescribing in nursing homes in Helsinki

    OpenAIRE

    Hosia-Randell, Helka

    2010-01-01

    Prescribing for older patients is challenging. The prevalence of diseases increases with advancing age and causes extensive drug use. Impairments in cognitive, sensory, social and physical functioning, multimorbidity and comorbidities, as well as age-related changes in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics all add to the complexity of prescribing. This study is a cross-sectional assessment of all long-term residents aged ≥ 65 years in all nursing homes in Helsinki, Finland. The residen...

  10. CPR in the nursing home: fool's errand or looming dilemma?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lyons, D

    2011-09-01

    The indications for CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) have expanded greatly since the technique was introduced and theoretically it can be attempted on all prior to death. Policy initiatives (such as the British Medical Association\\/Royal College of Nursing guidelines) have attempted to provide a clinical rationale for the withholding of inappropriate CPR. Traditionally a care home was felt to be an inappropriate environment to attempt CPR but increased use of advance directives may bring the issue to the fore in this setting.

  11. Atrial fibrillation and heart failure in seven nursing homes

    OpenAIRE

    Krüger, Kjell; Sandli, Marie; Geitung, Jonn Terje; Eide, Geir Egil; Grimsmo, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Previous research suggests that blood-thinning treatment for patients with atrial fibrillation as well as treatment for patients with heart failure is not adequate among the elderly. We tested this among long-term patients in nursing homes. Methods: Information about the patients (n = 513) was collected during the period March-April 2008. Data collection consisted of electrocardiography, particulars of any stroke suffered and copying medication records. A standardized set of blood...

  12. Potential drug therapy problems on an elderly nursing home population

    OpenAIRE

    Dias Junior, Carlos A.C.; Ribeiro, Andréia; Soares, Adriana C; Pereira, Mariana L.; Nascimento, Mariana M.G.

    2011-01-01

    The elderly population and the incidence of chronic diseases are growing rapidly in Brazil. This raises the demand for health services (like Nursing Homes - NH) and drugs, exposing this population to Potential Drug Therapy Problems (PDTP). A cross-sectional study in a Brazilian NH was developed through prescription analyses. PDTP were accounted when one of the following were detected: double therapy (DT); sub-dose; overdose; drug-drug interaction (DDI); food-drug interaction (FDI); Potentiall...

  13. Impact of human resource management practices on nursing home performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondeau, K V; Wagar, T H

    2001-08-01

    Management scholars and practitioners alike have become increasingly interested in learning more about the ability of certain 'progressive' or 'high-performance' human resource management (HRM) practices to enhance organizational effectiveness. There is growing evidence to suggest that the contribution of various HRM practices to impact firm performance may be synergistic in effect yet contingent on a number of contextual factors, including workplace climate. A contingency theory perspective suggests that in order to be effective, HMR policies and practices must be consistent with other aspects of the organization, including its environment. This paper reports on empirical findings from research that examines the relationship between HRM practices, workplace climate and perceptions of organizational performance, in a large sample of Canadian nursing homes. Data from 283 nursing homes were collected by means of a mail survey that included questions on HRM practices, programmes, and policies, on human resource aspects of workplace climate, as well as a variety of indicators that include employee, customer/resident and facility measures of organizational performance. Results derived from ordered probit analysis suggest that nursing homes in our sample which had implemented more 'progressive' HRM practices and which reported a workplace climate that strongly values employee participation, empowerment and accountability tended to be perceived to generally perform better on a number of valued organizational outcomes. Nursing homes in our sample that performed best overall were found to be more likely to not only have implemented more of these HRM practices, but also to report having a workplace climate that reflects the seminal value that it places on its human resources. This finding is consistent with the conclusion that simply introducing HRM practices or programmes, in the absence of an appropriately supportive workplace climate, will be insufficient to attain

  14. Ciprofloxacin : Use and resistance in Community, Nursing Home and Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    van Hees, B.C.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the studies described in this thesis was to analyze some aspects of ciprofloxacin use and clinical and (molecular) epidemiology of ciprofloxacin resistance in different settings, both within hospitals (chapter 3,4 and 6), community and nursing homes (chapter 2 and 5). With its broad spectrum against gram negative organisms and favorable pharmacokinetics, ciprofloxacin use has increased over the last two decades, as did resistance against ciprofloxacin. Chapter 2 describes a nation-...

  15. Medicaid payment policies for nursing home care: A national survey

    OpenAIRE

    Buchanan, Robert J.; Madel, R. Peter; Persons, Dan

    1991-01-01

    This research gives a comprehensive overview of the nursing home payment methodologies used by each State Medicaid program. To present this comprehensive overview, 1988 data were collected by survey from 49 States and the District of Columbia. The literature was reviewed and integrated into the study to provide a theoretical framework to analyze the collected data. The data are organized and presented as follows: payment levels, payment methods, payment of capital-related costs, and incentive...

  16. The Coach Is In: Improving Nutritional Care in Nursing Homes

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman, Anna N.; Simmons, Sandra F.; Applebaum, Robert; Lindabury, Kate; Schnelle, John F.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This article describes and evaluates a long distance coaching course aimed at improving nutritional care in nursing homes (NHs). The course was structured to provide more support than traditional training programs offer. Methods: In a series of 6 monthly teleconferences led by an expert in NH nutritional care, participating NH staff received step-by-step instructions for implementing an evidence-based nutritional management program. After each session, participants were asked to impl...

  17. The changes in caregiver burden following nursing home placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Shu-hui; Johnson, Mary Ann; Wang, Shan-Tair

    2002-08-01

    This longitudinal study explored changes in perceived burden among Taiwanese family caregivers (n=77) from nursing home placement of an elder to four months postadmission. Higher burden at placement was related to the level of dependence of the care recipients (p=0.004), or caregiver's poor health (p<0.01). After nursing home placement for four months, global burden decreased (p<0.01) contributed primarily by lessened burden in three sub-scales: lack of family support, impact of schedule and impact of health. Burden scores on caregiver esteem and impact of finances were not decreased after placement. Duration of caregiving was the only demographic factor predicting change in global burden (p<0.001). Changes in impact on finances, and impact on health were, respectively, predicted by the perceived health (p=0.005), and religious preference (p=0.01). These results provide valuable information to healthcare providers for an understanding of the changes of caregiving burden after nursing home placement and the correlates of these changes, which may help devise an appropriate policy for alleviating the caregiver's burden. PMID:12100870

  18. Modifiable factors related to abusive behaviors in nursing home residents with dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volicer, L.; Kampen, van J.T.; Frijters, D.H.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine modifiable factors related to abusive behaviors in nursing home residents with dementia. DESIGN: Analysis of Minimum Data Set (MDS) of the Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI) information. SETTING: We used MDS-RAI data from 8 Dutch nursing homes and 10 residential homes that

  19. Effects of introducing a nursing guideline on depression in psychogeriatric nursing home residents.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaik, R.; Francke, A.; Berno, M. van; Bensing, J.; Miel, R.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The prevalence rate of depression in psychogeriatric nursing home residents with dementia is recently estimated at 19%. Comorbid depression in dementia has been associated with decreased quality of life, greater health care utilization and higher mortality rates. The effects of introdu

  20. Assessment of dementia in nursing home residents by nurses and assistants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lisbeth Uhrskov; Foldspang, Anders; Gulmann, Nils Christian;

    2001-01-01

    Objectives To describe the criterion validity of nursing home staff's assessment of organic disorder compared with ICD-10 criteria, and to identify determinants of staff assessment of organic disorder. Method Two hundred and eighty-eight residents were diagnosed using the GMS-AGECAT. Nursing staff...... members were interviewed about the residents' activities of Daily Living, behavioural problems, orientation in surroundings and communication skills, and asked if the resident had an organic disorder. Multiple logistic regression was used to select the items that most strongly determined staff assessment...... as under-labelling of residents, a tendency that will affect communication with medical personnel and may lead to inadequate or wrong medical treatment and to negative performance as well as negative role expectations in everyday life in nursing homes....

  1. Breastfeeding status and marketing practices of baby food manufactured in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, G P; Pandey, P K; Mathur, S; Mishra, V K; Singh, K; Bhatt, O P; Loomba, R K; Luthra, C; Taneja, S; Kapoor, R

    1993-11-01

    In January 1993 in Kanpur, India, a survey of 7 private nursing homes revealed that infant formula was given to most newborns (52.4%). The most common brands included Lactogen-I, Milk Care, Raptakos, Dexolac Special Care, and Lactodex. Staff at 5 nursing homes gave prelacteal feeds (water, glucose water, and infant formula) to newborns when they were separated from their mothers. Staff at only 2 nursing homes gave the newborn to the mother immediately after delivery. The longest period between delivery and giving the newborn to the mother was 24 hours. All but one of the nursing homes did not know about the government policy and the recent bill that bars free or low-cost infant formula supplies to hospitals. The administration of the nursing homes did not inform the procurement department, in writing, of the government policy. 4 nursing homes bought low-cost supplies of infant formula from the companies. The companies sold the infant formula to the nursing homes at a price 48.3% to 86.7% lower than the market price. Medical stores inside or outside the nursing homes sold the infant formula to parents at the other 3 homes. The nursing homes used, on average, 2-50 kg/month. Nestle (Lactogen-I) and Dalmia Industries (Milk Care) had a monopoly in infant formula in 4 and 3 nursing homes, respectively. Infant formula was in stock in 5 nursing homes. None of the nursing homes gave mothers free or low-cost infant formula at discharge. Lower than market price and increased number of calls to the hospitals and physicians by company personnel were marketing techniques used by the manufacturers to maintain market share. These results show that, despite government policy and the bill, hospitals continue to use infant formula. The government should use the mass media to increase awareness about its policy on infant foods and the concept of the Baby Friendly Hospital.

  2. Breastfeeding status and marketing practices of baby food manufactured in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, G P; Pandey, P K; Mathur, S; Mishra, V K; Singh, K; Bhatt, O P; Loomba, R K; Luthra, C; Taneja, S; Kapoor, R

    1993-11-01

    In January 1993 in Kanpur, India, a survey of 7 private nursing homes revealed that infant formula was given to most newborns (52.4%). The most common brands included Lactogen-I, Milk Care, Raptakos, Dexolac Special Care, and Lactodex. Staff at 5 nursing homes gave prelacteal feeds (water, glucose water, and infant formula) to newborns when they were separated from their mothers. Staff at only 2 nursing homes gave the newborn to the mother immediately after delivery. The longest period between delivery and giving the newborn to the mother was 24 hours. All but one of the nursing homes did not know about the government policy and the recent bill that bars free or low-cost infant formula supplies to hospitals. The administration of the nursing homes did not inform the procurement department, in writing, of the government policy. 4 nursing homes bought low-cost supplies of infant formula from the companies. The companies sold the infant formula to the nursing homes at a price 48.3% to 86.7% lower than the market price. Medical stores inside or outside the nursing homes sold the infant formula to parents at the other 3 homes. The nursing homes used, on average, 2-50 kg/month. Nestle (Lactogen-I) and Dalmia Industries (Milk Care) had a monopoly in infant formula in 4 and 3 nursing homes, respectively. Infant formula was in stock in 5 nursing homes. None of the nursing homes gave mothers free or low-cost infant formula at discharge. Lower than market price and increased number of calls to the hospitals and physicians by company personnel were marketing techniques used by the manufacturers to maintain market share. These results show that, despite government policy and the bill, hospitals continue to use infant formula. The government should use the mass media to increase awareness about its policy on infant foods and the concept of the Baby Friendly Hospital. PMID:8039859

  3. Falls in nursing home residents receiving pharmacotherapy for anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reardon G

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Gregory Reardon,1 Naushira Pandya,2 Robert A Bailey31Informagenics, LLC and The Ohio State University College of Pharmacy, Columbus, OH, USA; 2Department of Geriatrics, Nova Southeastern University College of Osteopathic Medicine, Ft Lauderdale, FL, USA; 3Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC, Horsham, PA, USAPurpose: Falls are common among nursing home residents and have potentially severe consequences, including fracture and other trauma. Recent evidence suggests anemia may be independently related to these falls. This study explores the relationship between the use of anemia-related pharmacotherapies and falls among nursing home residents.Methods: Forty nursing homes in the United States provided data for analysis. All incidents of falls over the 6-month post-index follow-up period were used to identify the outcomes of falls (≥1 fall and recurrent falls (>1 fall. Logistic regression was used to analyze the relationship between falls and recurrent falls with each of the anemia pharmacotherapies after adjusting for potential confounders.Results: A total of 632 residents were eligible for analysis. More than half (57% of residents were identified as anemic (hemoglobin < 12 g/dL females, or <13 g/dL males. Of anemic residents, 50% had been treated with one or more therapies (14% used vitamin B12, 10% folic acid, 38% iron, 0.3% darbepoetin alfa [DARB], and 1.3% epoetin alfa [EPO]. Rates of falls/recurrent falls were 33%/18% for those receiving vitamin B12, 40%/16% for folic acid, 27%/14% for iron, 38%/8% for DARB, 18%/2% for EPO, and 22%/11% for those receiving no therapy. In the adjusted models, use of EPO or DARB was associated with significantly lower odds of recurrent falls (odds ratio = 0.06; P = 0.001. Other significant covariates included psychoactive medication use, age 75–84 years, age 85+ years, worsened balance score, and chronic kidney disease (P < 0.05 for all.Conclusion: Only half of the anemic residents were found to be using anemia

  4. The Need for Higher Minimum Staffing Standards in U.S. Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Charlene; Schnelle, John F.; McGregor, Margaret; Simmons, Sandra F.

    2016-01-01

    Many U.S. nursing homes have serious quality problems, in part, because of inadequate levels of nurse staffing. This commentary focuses on two issues. First, there is a need for higher minimum nurse staffing standards for U.S. nursing homes based on multiple research studies showing a positive relationship between nursing home quality and staffing and the benefits of implementing higher minimum staffing standards. Studies have identified the minimum staffing levels necessary to provide care consistent with the federal regulations, but many U.S. facilities have dangerously low staffing. Second, the barriers to staffing reform are discussed. These include economic concerns about costs and a focus on financial incentives. The enforcement of existing staffing standards has been weak, and strong nursing home industry political opposition has limited efforts to establish higher standards. Researchers should study the ways to improve staffing standards and new payment, regulatory, and political strategies to improve nursing home staffing and quality. PMID:27103819

  5. Home visits as a strategy for health promotion by nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jucelia Salgueiro Nascimento

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the domiciliary visit performed by nurses in the Family Health Strategy as an activity to promote health. Methods: Exploratory/descriptive study with qualitative approach. The subjects were nine nurses of the Primary Health Units from Health Districts in Maceió-AL. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews in the months from April to August 2012 and were analyzed using content analysis and in light of the theoretical framework of Health Promotion. Results: The nurses recognize that the domiciliary visit can be a way to promote the health of individuals, families and community, but, in daily life, action maintains focus on disease, with curative actions of individual character, which do not take into account the social context where the user and his family are inserted. Conclusion: It is considered that the use of home visits by nurses in the family health strategy as a health promotion activity is still incipient because, although the nurses recognize the need for change in the model of care, in practice, it is observed that the focus of this action is directed to the biological model. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5020/18061230.2013.p513

  6. Knowledge and Attitudes of Nursing Home Staff and Surveyors about the Revised Federal Guidance for Incontinence Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBeau, Catherine E.; Ouslander, Joseph G.; Palmer, Mary H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: We assessed nursing home staff and state nursing home surveyors regarding their knowledge and attitudes about urinary incontinence, its management, and the revised federal Tag F315 guidance for urinary incontinence. Design and Methods: We conducted a questionnaire survey of a convenience sample of nursing home staff and state nursing home…

  7. Designating Smoking Room to Control Environmental Tobacco Smoke in Nursing Homes

    OpenAIRE

    Farhang Akbar-Khanzadeh; Samuel H. Windom; Farideh Golbabaei

    2011-01-01

    This study was initiated to assess the effectiveness of designating smoking rooms to control environmental tobacco smoke in nursing homes. Of the 39 nursing homes located in Toledo (a city in Ohio, USA) included in the preliminary survey, 33 facilities (85%) allowed smoking, 14 facilities (36%) allowed indoor smoking, and 13 facilities (33%) provided a designated smoking area. Three of these 13 nursing homes with similar levels of care agreed to participate in study that was more comprehensiv...

  8. Nursing Home Residents vs. Researcher: Establishing Their Needs while Finding Your Way

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun-Pedersen, Jon Ram

    2016-01-01

    Residents at nursing homes need to exercise to retain self-efficacy. But all the while, many do not seem to want to prioritize exercise routines over leisure activities. The first part of this chapter analyzes the potential reasons for this lack of exercise commitment at a nursing home in Copenha...... that researchers face, when operating and navigating the specific field of nursing homes, due to the inherent characteris- tics of its context and users....

  9. Prevention of urinary tract infections in nursing homes: lack of evidence-based prescription?

    OpenAIRE

    Bergman Jenny; Schjøtt Jan; Blix Hege S

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Urinary tract infections (UTIs, including upper and lower symptomatic) are the most common infections in nursing homes and prevention may reduce patient suffering, antibiotic use and resistance. The spectre of agents used in preventing UTIs in nursing homes is scarcely documented and the aim of this study was to explore which agents are prescribed for this purpose. Methods We conducted a one-day, point-prevalence study in 44 Norwegian nursing homes during April-May 2006. N...

  10. Use of nursing homes by a high-risk long-term care population.

    OpenAIRE

    Manheim, L M; Hughes, S L

    1986-01-01

    Limited information exists concerning lifetime use of nursing home services by the aged. This article examines the longitudinal experience, over four years, of elderly individuals at high risk of institutionalization, and develops a simple model of nursing home use based on these observations. This model allows us to predict future lifetime use under alternative assumptions. The main observations drawn from this sample are that high-risk elderly tend to move from the community to nursing home...

  11. Cooperating with a palliative home-care team: expectations and evaluations of GPs and district nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldschmidt, Dorthe; Groenvold, Mogens; Johnsen, Anna Thit;

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Palliative home-care teams often cooperate with general practitioners (GPs) and district nurses. Our aim was to evaluate a palliative home-care team from the viewpoint of GPs and district nurses. METHODS: GPs and district nurses received questionnaires at the start of home-care and one...... month later. Questions focussed on benefits to patients, training issues for professionals and cooperation between the home-care team and the GP/ district nurse. A combination of closed- and open-ended questions was used. RESULTS: Response rate was 84% (467/553). Benefits to patients were experienced....... Dissatisfaction was caused mainly by lack of information from the home-care team to primary-care professionals. CONCLUSION: GPs and district nurses welcomed the palliative home-care team and most experienced benefits to patients. Strengthened communication, initiated by the home-care team would enhance...

  12. Consequences from use of reminiscenc--a randomised intervention study in ten Danish nursing homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudex, Claire; Horsted, Charlotte; Jensen, Anders Møller;

    2010-01-01

    Reminiscence is the systematic use of memories and recollections to strengthen self-identity and self-worth. The study aim was to investigate the consequences for nursing home residents and staff of integrating reminiscence into daily nursing care.......Reminiscence is the systematic use of memories and recollections to strengthen self-identity and self-worth. The study aim was to investigate the consequences for nursing home residents and staff of integrating reminiscence into daily nursing care....

  13. Do Minimum Quality Standards Improve Quality? A Case Study of the Nursing Home Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Haizhen Lin

    2010-01-01

    This article estimates the impact of minimum staffing requirements on the nursing home market using a unique national panel over the 1996-2005 period. This study reveals that, given a half-hour increase in the minimum nursing hours per resident day for licensed nurses, quality of patient care increases by 25 percent. This quality-increasing effect is mainly driven by low-quality nursing homes increasing their quality of care to meet the new standards. By contrast, minimum staffing requirement...

  14. 77 FR 64386 - Agency Information Collection Activities (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-19

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection Activities (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State... currently approved collection. Abstract: VA pays per diem to State homes providing nursing home and adult day health services care to Veterans. VA requires facilities providing nursing home and adult...

  15. 76 FR 70076 - Technical Revisions To Update Reference to the Required Assessment Tool for State Nursing Homes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-10

    ... State homes providing nursing home care to eligible veterans. 74 FR 19426-01 (Apr. 29, 2009). This... Tool for State Nursing Homes Receiving Per Diem Payments From VA AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs... diem from VA for providing nursing home care to veterans. The proposed rule would require State...

  16. 38 CFR 59.40 - Maximum number of nursing home care and domiciliary care beds for veterans by State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maximum number of nursing... ACQUISITION OF STATE HOMES § 59.40 Maximum number of nursing home care and domiciliary care beds for veterans... increase the total number of state home nursing home and domiciliary beds in that state beyond the...

  17. Ferbane Nursing Home, Main Street, Ferbane, Offaly.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hickey, Anne

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stroke is a leading cause of death and functional impairment. While older people are particularly vulnerable to stroke, research suggests that they have the poorest awareness of stroke warning signs and risk factors. This study examined knowledge of stroke warning signs and risk factors among community-dwelling older adults. METHODS: Randomly selected community-dwelling older people (aged 65+) in Ireland (n = 2,033; 68% response rate). Participants completed home interviews. Questions assessed knowledge of stroke warning signs and risk factors, and personal risk factors for stroke. RESULTS: Of the overall sample, 6% had previously experienced a stroke or transient ischaemic attack. When asked to identify stroke risk factors from a provided list, less than half of the overall sample identified established risk factors (e.g., smoking, hypercholesterolaemia), hypertension being the only exception (identified by 74%). Similarly, less than half identified established warning signs (e.g., weakness, headache), with slurred speech (54%) as the exception. Overall, there were considerable gaps in awareness with poorest levels evident in those with primary level education only and in those living in Northern Ireland (compared with Republic of Ireland). CONCLUSION: Knowledge deficits in this study suggest that most of the common early symptoms or signs of stroke were recognized as such by less than half of the older adults surveyed. As such, many older adults may not recognise early symptoms of stroke in themselves or others. Thus, they may lose vital time in presenting for medical attention. Lack of public awareness about stroke warning signs and risk factors must be addressed as one important contribution to reducing mortality and morbidity from stroke.

  18. Structure, environment and strategic outcome: a study of Pennsylvania nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaronson, W E; Zinn, J S; Rosko, M D

    1995-02-01

    This study applies Porter's model of competitive advantage to the nursing home industry. Discriminant analysis is used to identify organizational and environmental characteristics associated with nursing homes which have demonstrated valued strategic outcomes, and to distinguish the more successful nursing homes from their rivals. The results of the discriminant analysis suggest that nursing homes with superior payer mix outcomes are distinguishable from their less successful rivals in areas associated with a focused generic strategy. The study suggests that nursing homes which are better staffed, of smaller size and lower price are more likely to achieve high levels of self-pay utilization. Independent living units, continuing care retirement communities in particular, are likely to act synergistically with nursing home organizational characteristics to enhance competitive advantage by linking the value chain of the nursing home to that of retirement housing. Nursing homes with higher proportions of Medicare were found to provide a unique product when compared to their rivals. Profit status does not discriminate better self-pay strategic utilization, but for-profit facilities are more likely to pursue a Medicare strategy. Concern was raised that, as nursing homes become more strategically oriented, Medicaid access may become more problematic. PMID:10140596

  19. Prescription drugs in nursing homes: managing costs and quality in a complex environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelson, Dan; Ramchand, Rajeev; Abramson, Richard; Tumlinson, Anne

    2002-11-12

    This brief provides a description of prescription drug use in nursing homes and a summary of current policy issues in this area. The brief first profiles the nursing home pharmaceutical market, outlining the major trends in demographics and drug utilization, the supply chain by which drugs go from manufacturers to pharmacies to nursing home residents, and the alternative arrangements by which prescription drugs in nursing homes are financed. The brief then provides a synopsis of current policy issues, focusing in turn on cost containment and quality improvement initiatives. PMID:12463231

  20. Examining differences in nurses' language, accent, and comprehensibility in nursing home settings based on birth origin and country of education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Laura M; Brush, Barbara L; Castle, Nicholas G; Eaton, Michelle; Capezuti, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    As nursing homes turn abroad to fill vacancies, the diverse linguistic backgrounds of nurse hires are creating new challenges in comprehensibility between nurses, providers, and residents. Accents are a natural part of spoken language that may present difficulty even when the parties involved are speaking the same language. We surveyed 1,629 nurses working in 98 nursing homes (NHs) in five U.S. states to determine if and how language difficulties were perceived by nurses and others (e.g. physicians, residents and family members). We found that when participants were asked how often other care team members and residents/families had difficulty understanding them due to language use or accent, foreign born nurses were significantly more likely to report that they experienced difficulty at least some of the time across all groups. This study supports an assessment of nurses' language, accents, and comprehensibility in these settings.

  1. Pressure ulcers and their associated factors in nursing home inmates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess pressure ulcers and the associated risk factors, among the individuals who stayed at Yozgat Rehabilitation Care Center in Turkey. Study Design: A descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Yozgat Rehabilitation Care Center, Turkey, from August to September 2011. Methodology: One hundred and seventy five individuals participated in the study who received care at the above nursing home and agreed to participate in the study. The data were collected with an information form of descriptive characteristics (the form included a total of 15 questions asked to get information about socio-demographic characteristics) and Braden risk assessment scale. For the data evaluation, Mann-Whitney U-test, Krushall-Wallis Variance analysis, Logistic Regression analysis were used. Statistical significance was defined by a probability level of p < 0.05. Results: The mean score of Braden risk assessment scale of the individuals was 15.0 +- 3.3 and 16.0% were under very high risk. Nine (5.1%) had pressure ulcers. The average duration of stay was 2.17 +- 0.80 years. Participants who were underweight, had lived at the rehabilitation center for a longer time, and were fed on regime 1, had a higher risk of developing pressure ulcers (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Individuals who stayed in nursing home were under very high risk of pressure ulcer. Pressure ulcers are preventable by the elimination of some risk factors and good nursing care. Such individuals should be periodically assessed in terms of risk. (author)

  2. Nightingale Nursing Home, Lowville, Ahascragh, Ballinasloe, Galway.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boland, Michael

    2012-05-14

    AbstractIntroductionRivaroxaban, a new oral anticoagulant, is currently licensed for use in patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. It is more efficacious than other anticoagulants such as low molecular weight heparin and does not require daily monitoring. It has also been shown to be efficacious in patients with venous thromboembolism and acute coronary syndrome. Although hemorrhage is a known side effect of this new anticoagulant, we could find no case reports in the literature of patients suffering severe hemorrhage whilst taking rivaroxaban. Thus, we describe the first case of potentially fatal hemorrhage in a patient taking rivaroxaban.Case presentationWe report the case of a 58-year-old Caucasian man with acute-onset severe per rectal bleeding who had undergone total hip arthroplasty four weeks prior to the onset of symptoms and was taking rivaroxaban in the postoperative period. Rivaroxaban was discontinued immediately but, having required nine units of packed red blood cells in a peripheral hospital due to a rapidly decreasing hemoglobin level, our patient was transferred to our tertiary referral center where he required a further eight units of packed red blood cells over a 48-hour period to manage his ongoing hemorrhage and maintain hemodynamic stability. No source of bleeding was found on computed tomography angiography and our patient’s condition improved over the following 48 hours with cessation of the hemorrhage. Our patient was discharged home well several days later. A follow-up colonoscopy one week after his discharge was normal.ConclusionAlthough advantageous with regard to its oral availability and ongoing use without the need for daily monitoring, rivaroxaban does not come without rare but severe side effects. When severe per rectal bleeding occurs in a patient taking rivaroxaban, discontinuation of the offending agent and aggressive hematological replacement are the mainstays of treatment, especially when no source of bleeding can be found

  3. Effects of Green House nursing homes on residents' families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Terry Y; Kane, Rosalie A; Cutler, Lois J; Yu, Tzy-Chyi

    2008-01-01

    A longitudinal quasi-experimental study with two comparison groups was conducted to test the effects of a Green House (GH) nursing home program on residents' family members. The GHs are individual residences, each serving 10 elders, where certified nursing assistant (CNA)-level resident assistants form primary relationships with residents and family, family is encouraged to visits, and professionals adapted their roles to support the model. GH family were somewhat less involved in providing assistance to their residents although family contact did not differ among the settings at any time period. GH family were more satisfied with their resident's care and with their own experience as family members, and had no greater family burden. Issues in studying family outcomes are discussed as well as implications for roles of various personnel, including social service and activities staff in a GH model.

  4. SmartNursing - a mobile application to improve communication in home care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyborg, Mads; Bashir, Khurram; Maknickaite, Asta

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents SmartNursing system and discusses how increasing capabilities of smartphone could benefit employees in working environment. A SmartNursing system is developed for home nurses working environment to fulfil their needs. The solution helps to improve communication among nurses......, provide customized information and increase work efficiency. Developed system consists of mobile application, web based server and database. This article discusses the solution SmartNursing from design to implementation....

  5. Current marketing practices in the nursing home sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Judith G; Banaszak-Holl, Jane; Hearld, Larry R

    2006-01-01

    Marketing is widely recognized as an essential business function across all industries, including healthcare. While many long-term care facilities adopted basic healthcare marketing practices and hired marketing staff by the early 1990s, a paucity of research on nursing home marketing exists in the literature. This study examines the extent to which nursing homes have developed more formulated marketing and related communication and promotional strategies as market competition has increased in this sector during the past two decades. In addition, we explored managers' perceptions of their control over marketing decision making, the impact of competition on the use of marketing practices, and areas for enhanced competitive positioning. Administrators from 230 nursing homes in 18 Southeastern Michigan counties were surveyed regarding (1) the adoption level of approximately 40 literature-based, best-practice marketing strategies; (2) the types of staff involved with the marketing function; and (3) their perception of their level of control over marketing functions and of local competition. Results from 101 (44 percent) survey participants revealed that although respondents viewed their markets as highly competitive, their marketing practices remained focused on traditional and relatively constrained practices. In relation to the importance of customer relationship management, the majority of the administrators reported intensive efforts being focused on residents and their families, referrers, and staff, with minimal efforts being extended to insurers and other types of payers. A significant positive relation was found between the intensity of marketing initiatives and the size of the facility (number of beds), whereas significant negative correlations were revealed in relation to occupancy and the perceived level of control over the function. PMID:16770906

  6. PERCEPTIONS AND EXPERIENCES OF ELDERLY RESIDENTS IN A NURSING HOME

    OpenAIRE

    Renata Alessandra Evangelista; Alexandre de Assis Bueno; Paulo Alexandre de Castro; Jessica Neto Nascimento; Neilene Teixeira de Araújo; Graciele Pereira Aires

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the perception of the elderly residents of a long-stay nursing home on the process of institutionalization. We interviewed 14 subjects, five women and nine men, aged between 60 and 92 years. Data collection was conducted with a semi-structured sociodemographic interview, which presented the guiding question: “Tell me about how is your life, what do you do and how did you come to live here”. From the analysis, we found topics related to feelings of a...

  7. [A photographic competition on hand hygiene in a nursing home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerre, Graziella; Aho-Glele, Ludwig-Serge; Astruc, Karine

    2016-01-01

    Hand hygiene is often considered as the attribute of caregivers. However, it is the patient who is increasingly targeted by improved communication around hygiene in care notably in the framework of the "Clean Hands Mission". In this sense, the French regional centres for the fight against nosocomial infections in Burgundy has proved itself innovative on two levels by organising a photo competition in nursing homes. The aim was to show residents how to prevent care-related infections through the simple act of handwashing. PMID:26976317

  8. Predictors of neuropsychiatric symptoms in nursing home patients : influence of gender and dementia severity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, Sytse U; de Jonghe, Jos F M; Verhey, Frans R J; Koopmans, Raymond T C M

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of the study was to assess the influence of dementia severity and gender on neuropsychiatric symptoms in demented nursing home patients. METHODS: Neuropsychiatric symptoms were assessed in a large sample of 1319 Dutch nursing home patients using the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation In

  9. Course of neuropsychiatric symptoms in residents with dementia in nursing homes over 2-year period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetzels, Roland B; Zuidema, Sytse U; de Jonghe, Jos F M; Verhey, Frans R J; Koopmans, Raymond T C M

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the course of neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPSs) in nursing home residents with dementia and to determine their variability across diagnosis. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study over 2 years. SETTING: Fourteen dementia special care units in nine nursing homes in The Netherlands. P

  10. Consequences of Empowered CNA Teams in Nursing Home Settings: A Longitudinal Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeatts, Dale E.; Cready, Cynthia M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Recent studies have concluded that there is a lack of "patient-centered" care in nursing homes and subsequently a need for nursing home culture change. As a result, a variety of new, promising initiatives have been introduced, with most of these incorporating the use of "empowered" employees. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the…

  11. [The handling of acute life-threatening choking in geriatric and nursing home patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelgeest, A. van; Melis, R.J.F.; Ritmeijer, C.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.

    2006-01-01

    It is unknown how often choking occurs in geriatric wards and in nursing homes and what the treatment and outcomes are in regular practice. A questionnaire was sent to Dutch geriatricians (N = 130), nursing home physicians (N = 130), and trainees for these disciplines (N = 215), in order to gain inf

  12. Family Support in Nursing Homes Serving Residents with a Mental Health History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frahm, Kathryn; Gammonley, Denise; Zhang, Ning Jackie; Paek, Seung Chun

    2010-01-01

    Using 2003 nursing home data from the Minimum Data Set (MDS) database, this study investigated the role of family support among nursing homes serving residents with a mental health history. Exploratory factor analysis was used to create and test a conceptual model of family support using indicators located within the MDS database. Families were…

  13. Finding a useful conceptual basis for enhancing the quality of life of nursing home residents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, D.L.; Steverink, N.; Ooms, M.E.; Ribbe, M.W.

    2004-01-01

    In this article it is depicted that before nursing home staff can effectively contribute to optimising the quality of life (QOL) of nursing home residents, it has to be clear what exactly QOL is and how it can be enhanced. The aim is to identify a QOL framework that provides tools for optimising QOL

  14. Associations of Special Care Units and Outcomes of Residents with Dementia: 2004 National Nursing Home Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Huabin; Fang, Xiangming; Liao, Youlian; Elliott, Amanda; Zhang, Xinzhi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: We compared the rates of specialized care for residents with Alzheimer's disease or dementia in special care units (SCUs) and other nursing home (NH) units and examined the associations of SCU residence with process of care and resident outcomes. Design and Methods: Data came from the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey. The indicators of…

  15. Coming Together for Change: Workshops for Women in the Nursing Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Janet; Carr, Marylea Benware

    1994-01-01

    Describes series of therapeutic and educational workshops conducted with women nursing home residents with twin goals of improving self-esteem and self-reliance and facilitating community building and networking. Also notes that nursing home staff trainings were conducted whereby staff were encouraged to articulate their needs and those of…

  16. Organizational and Individual Conditions Associated with Depressive Symptoms among Nursing Home Residents over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassie, Kimberly M.; Cassie, William E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the effect of organizational culture and climate on depressive symptoms among nursing home residents. Design and Methods: Using a pooled cross-sectional design, this study examines a sample of 23 nursing homes, 1,114 employees, and 5,497 residents. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Minimum Data Set, Depression Rating…

  17. Psychometric Properties of a Korean Measure of Person-Directed Care in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae-Sung; Lee, Minhong

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the validity and reliability of a person-directed care (PDC) measure for nursing homes in Korea. Method: Managerial personnel from 223 nursing homes in 2010 and 239 in 2012 were surveyed. Results: Item analysis and exploratory factor analysis for the first sample generated a 33-item PDC measure with eight factors.…

  18. Prevention of urinary tract infections in nursing homes: lack of evidence-based prescription?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergman Jenny

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urinary tract infections (UTIs, including upper and lower symptomatic are the most common infections in nursing homes and prevention may reduce patient suffering, antibiotic use and resistance. The spectre of agents used in preventing UTIs in nursing homes is scarcely documented and the aim of this study was to explore which agents are prescribed for this purpose. Methods We conducted a one-day, point-prevalence study in 44 Norwegian nursing homes during April-May 2006. Nursing home residents prescribed any agent for UTI prophylaxis were included. Information recorded was type of agent and dose, patient age and gender, together with nursing home characteristics. Appropriateness of prophylactic prescribing was evaluated with references to evidence in the literature and current national guidelines. Results The study included 1473 residents. 18% (n = 269 of the residents had at least one agent recorded as prophylaxis of UTI, varying between 0-50% among the nursing homes. Methenamine was used by 48% of residents prescribed prophylaxis, vitamin C by 32%, and cranberry products by 10%. Estrogens were used by 30% but only one third was for vaginal administration. Trimethoprim and nitrofurantoin were used as prophylaxis by 5% and 4%, respectively. Conclusions The agents frequently prescribed to prevent UTIs in Norwegian nursing homes lack documented efficacy including methenamine and vitamin C. Recommended agents like trimethoprim, nitrofurantoin and vaginal estrogens are infrequently used. We conclude that prescribing of prophylactic agents for UTIs in nursing homes is not evidence-based.

  19. Prevention of urinary tract infections in nursing homes: lack of evidence-based prescription?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Urinary tract infections (UTIs, including upper and lower symptomatic) are the most common infections in nursing homes and prevention may reduce patient suffering, antibiotic use and resistance. The spectre of agents used in preventing UTIs in nursing homes is scarcely documented and the aim of this study was to explore which agents are prescribed for this purpose. Methods We conducted a one-day, point-prevalence study in 44 Norwegian nursing homes during April-May 2006. Nursing home residents prescribed any agent for UTI prophylaxis were included. Information recorded was type of agent and dose, patient age and gender, together with nursing home characteristics. Appropriateness of prophylactic prescribing was evaluated with references to evidence in the literature and current national guidelines. Results The study included 1473 residents. 18% (n = 269) of the residents had at least one agent recorded as prophylaxis of UTI, varying between 0-50% among the nursing homes. Methenamine was used by 48% of residents prescribed prophylaxis, vitamin C by 32%, and cranberry products by 10%. Estrogens were used by 30% but only one third was for vaginal administration. Trimethoprim and nitrofurantoin were used as prophylaxis by 5% and 4%, respectively. Conclusions The agents frequently prescribed to prevent UTIs in Norwegian nursing homes lack documented efficacy including methenamine and vitamin C. Recommended agents like trimethoprim, nitrofurantoin and vaginal estrogens are infrequently used. We conclude that prescribing of prophylactic agents for UTIs in nursing homes is not evidence-based. PMID:22040144

  20. Family participation in care plan meetings : Promoting a collaborative organizational culture in nursing homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Ate

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the author evaluated a project in The Netherlands that aimed to promote family members' participation in care plan meetings at a psychogeriatric nursing home. The small-scale pilot project, which was conducted in four wards of the nursing home, was designed to involve families in heal

  1. Effectiveness of Advanced Illness Care Teams for Nursing Home Residents with Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Dennis G.; Toseland, Ronald W.

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of advanced illness care teams (AICTs) for nursing home residents with advanced dementia. The AICTs used a holistic approach that focused on four domains: (1) medical, (2) meaningful activities, (3) psychological, and (4) behavioral. The authors recruited 118 residents in two nursing homes for this study and…

  2. Cross-national comparison of prescribing patterns in Australian and dutch nursing homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taxis, Katja; Kochen, Sjoerd; Geerens, Sanne; Wouters, Hans; Boersma, Froukje; Maring, Jan G.; Mulder, Hans; Pavlovic, Jugoslav; Stevens, Gerard; McLachlan, Andrew J.; Pont, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Prescribing quality is a major issue in nursing home patients. Few cross-national comparisons of prescribing patterns have been carried out in this population. Objectives: To compare prevalence of medication use in nursing home patients between Australia and The Netherlands. Methods: An

  3. Influenza Vaccination in dutch Nursing Homes: is tacit consent morally justified?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, M.F.; Hoven, M.A. van den

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: Efficient procedures for obtaining informed (proxy) consent may contribute to high influenza vaccination rates in nursing homes. Yet are such procedures justified? This study’s objective was to gain insight in informed consent policies in Dutch nursing homes; to assess how these may affe

  4. Prevalence and risk indicators of depression in elderly nursing home patients : the AGED study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongenelis, K; Eisses, AMH; Beekman, ATF; Kluiter, H; Ribbe, MW

    2004-01-01

    Background: Depression is a common and disabling psychiatric disorder in later life. Particular frail nursing home patients seem to be at increased risk. Nursing home-based studies on risk indicators of depression are scarce. Methods: Prevalence and risk indicators of depression were assessed in 333

  5. Relationships of Assertiveness, Depression, and Social Support Among Older Nursing Home Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    This study assessed the relationships of assertiveness, depression, and social support among nursing home residents. The sample included 50 older nursing home residents (mean age=75 years; 75% female; 92% Caucasian). There was a significant correlation between assertiveness and depression (r=-.33), but the correlations between social support and…

  6. Evidence-Based Health Promotion in Nursing Homes: A Pilot Intervention to Improve Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadet, Tamara J.; Berrett-Abebe, Julie; Burke, Shanna L.; Bakk, Louanne; Kalenderian, Elsbeth; Maramaldi, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Nursing home residents over the age of 65 years are at high risk for poor oral health and related complications such as pneumonia and adverse diabetes outcomes. A preliminary study found that Massachusetts' nursing homes generally lack the training and resources needed to provide adequate oral health care to residents. In this study, an…

  7. Taste detection ability of elderly nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, T; Uota, M; Ikebe, K; Notomi, Y; Iwamoto, Y; Shirobayashi, I; Kibi, M; Masayasu, S; Sasaki, S; Maeda, Y

    2016-07-01

    Due to the rapid rise of aged populations throughout the world, it is essential to elucidate the cause of taste dysfunction, because it may reduce appetite, leading to inadequate dietary intake. We aimed to compare taste detection ability between dependently and independently living geriatric individuals of nearly the same age with oral status. Forty-three elderly individuals considered to be cognitively eligible and residing in nursing homes in Japan were enrolled (n = 43, 82·3 ± 8·5 years) and were compared with an independently living elderly group (n = 949, 79·9 ± 0·8 years), aiming to compare taste detection ability between dependently and independently living elders of nearly the same age. Information regarding comorbidity and medication was obtained as general health status, and oral status including number of present teeth, denture usage and maximal occlusal force was also noted. In the dependently living group, 69·4%, 14·3%, 16·3% and 8·2% of participants could detect sweet, sour, salty and bitter tastes, respectively, which was significantly lower than the independently living group for each taste (97·9%, 70·8%, 89·6% and 43·8% for sweet, sour, salty and bitter tastes, respectively). The multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that residing in nursing homes was associated with reduced sensitivity for four different tastes. The diseases and the situation of dependent elders were more likely the cause of the decreased taste sensitivity. PMID:27027615

  8. Durham Nursing Home solar project: a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swartman, R.K.; Ali, T. [Solcan Ltd., London, ON (Canada)

    2004-08-01

    Based on an earlier report indicating that an optimal match for solar energy applications is to preheat hot water used in nursing homes, this paper discusses the construction of a solar water pre-heating system at the Rockwood Terrace Nursing Home in Durham, Ontario. Performance of the system, costs and financial viability are predicted with the use of the RETScreen project management tool. In addition, system requirements and load and energy requirements are also taken into consideration with this tool, thereby ensuring the unique nature of each project. Thirty solar collectors were mounted on steel racks 3 stories above the mechanical room. A heat exchanger, heated by antifreeze, circulates to and from the solar collectors. Potable water is circulated from hot water storage tanks to the heat exchanger. Solar pre-heated water is then piped into a hot water storage tank, with a gas fired water heater heating potable hot water in a recirculation loop. The paper concludes that both Watsun 13.2 and RETScreen are both good predictive tools, having only exceeded actual measured performances of the system and its energy savings by 8 and 9 per cent respectively. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Spiritual Needs of Elderly Living in Residential/Nursing Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora-Beata Erichsen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available While the research on spiritual needs of patients with chronic and life-threatening diseases increases, there is limited knowledge about psychosocial and spiritual needs of elderly living in residential/nursing homes. We were interested in which needs were of relevance at all, and how these needs are related to life satisfaction and mood states. For that purpose we enrolled 100 elderly living in residential/nursing homes (mean age years, 82% women and provided standardized questionnaires, that is, Spiritual Needs Questionnaire (SpNQ, Brief Multidimensional Life Satisfaction Scale (BMLSS, Quality of Life in Elders with Multimorbidity (FLQM questionnaire, and a mood states scale (ASTS. Religious needs and Existential needs were of low relevance, while inner peace needs were of some and needs for giving/generativity of highest relevance. Regression analyses revealed that the specific needs were predicted best by religious trust and mood states, particularly tiredness. However, life satisfaction and quality of life were not among the significant predictors. Most had the intention to connect with those who will remember them, although they fear that there is limited interest in their concerns. It remains an open issue how these unmet needs can be adequately supported.

  10. [Behavior profile of psychogeriatric patients in substitute care projects: nursing home care and home for the aged].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boom-Poels, P G

    1994-03-01

    This article describes behaviour profiles of psychogeriatric patients participating in some substitute care projects. The behaviour of 55 patients from five residential homes participating in these projects were rated on the Behaviour Rating Scale for Psychogeriatric Inpatients (GIP). These data were compared with GIP-data of two reference groups: elderly people in residential homes and patients in psychogeriatric nursing homes (supervision, intensive care and nursing care requiring patients). Patients in the projects have, compared to the other people in residential homes, more cognitive and social disabilities. Compared to the patients in nursing homes, the patients in the projects have less social, cognitive and psychomotor disabilities, but more emotional problems, like suspicious, melancholic and dependent behaviour. These results show that patients in substitute care projects have a specific behaviour profile. The profile can be used for careful selection of patients in these projects.

  11. Happy pills in nursing homes in Belgium: A cohort study to determine prescribing patterns and relation to fall risk

    OpenAIRE

    Veronique Verhoeven, MD, PhD; Maja Lopez Hartmann, MScN (Master in Science of Nursing); Johan Wens, MD, PhD; Bernard Sabbe, MD, PhD; Peter Dieleman, MD; Giannoula Tsakitzidis, PT (Physical Therapist); Paul Van Royen, MD, PhD; Roy Remmen, MD, PhD

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mental problems are common in nursing homes, and the medical answer to these conditions is largely pharmacological. However, frail elderly people are particularly vulnerable to psychotropic-related adverse effects. This study documents the current use of psychotropics in Flemish nursing homes, and examines the relation to fall risk. Methods: This is a cohort study in 651 nursing home residents in 53 nursing homes in Flanders, Belgium. The use of antidepressants, anxiolytics, se...

  12. Drivers of change: Learning from the lived experiences of nursing home social workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ahyoung Anna; Lee, Sharon Narae; Armour, Marilyn

    2016-01-01

    In response to the growing attention to integrated health care and the cultural change movement in nursing homes, this study examines the lived experiences of nursing home social workers to better understand their role perceptions, job satisfaction, and relationship with other staff members. Hermeneutic phenomenology was used in order to understand the lived experience of being a nursing home social worker. Ten nursing home social workers were recruited from a southern state and individual interviews were conducted. From the interviews, four themes emerged: challenge, coping, mattering, and rewarding. Guided by identity negotiation theory and social identity theory, these findings are discussed. Also, implications for social work education, nursing home administration, and policy is discussed.

  13. Geothermal greenhouse-heating facilities for the Klamath County Nursing Home, Klamath Falls, Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-02-01

    The Klamath County Nursing Home, located in Klamath Falls, Oregon, was constructed in 1976. The building of 55,654 square feet currently houses care facilities for approximately 120 persons. During the initial planning for the Nursing Home, the present site was selected primarily on the basis of its geothermal resource. This resource (approx. 190/sup 0/F) currently provides space and domestic hot water heating for the Nursing Home, Merle West Medical Center and the Oregon Institute of Technology. The feasibility of installing a geothermal heating system in a planned greenhouse for the Nursing Home is explored. The greenhouse system would be tied directly to the existing hot water heating system for the Nursing Home.

  14. Competitive spillovers across non-profit and for-profit nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, David C; Hirth, Richard A

    2003-01-01

    The importance of non-profit institutions in the health care sector has generated a vast empirical literature examining quality differences between non-profit and for-profit nursing homes. Recent theoretical work has emphasized that much of this empirical literature is flawed in that previous studies rely solely on dummy variables to capture the effects of ownership rather than accounting for the share of non-profit nursing homes in the market. This analysis considers whether competitive spillovers from non-profits lead to higher quality in for-profit nursing homes. Using instrumental variables to account for the potential endogeneity of non-profit market share, this study finds that an increase in non-profit market share improves for-profit and overall nursing home quality. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that non-profits serve as a quality signal for uninformed nursing home consumers.

  15. 77 FR 60128 - Noncompetitive Supplements to Nursing Assistant and Home Health Aide Program Grantees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Noncompetitive Supplements to Nursing... Nursing Assistant and Home Health Aide (NAHHA) Program grantees to develop, implement, and evaluate... Sciences Center (TTUHSC) School of Nursing, 302 Pine Street, Abilene, TX 79601, T51HP20702...

  16. Where should Momma go? Current nursing home performance measurement strategies and a less ambitious approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lieberman Trudy

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nursing home performance measurement systems are practically ubiquitous. The vast majority of these systems aspire to rank order all nursing homes based on quantitative measures of quality. However, the ability of such systems to identify homes differing in quality is hampered by the multidimensional nature of nursing homes and their residents. As a result, the authors doubt the ability of many nursing home performance systems to truly help consumers differentiate among homes providing different levels of quality. We also argue that, for consumers, performance measurement models are better at identifying problem facilities than potentially good homes. Discussion In response to these concerns we present a proposal for a less ambitious approach to nursing home performance measurement than previously used. We believe consumers can make better informed choice using a simpler system designed to pinpoint poor-quality nursing homes, rather than one designed to rank hundreds of facilities based on differences in quality-of-care indicators that are of questionable importance. The suggested performance model is based on five principles used in the development of the Consumers Union 2006 Nursing Home Quality Monitor. Summary We can best serve policy-makers and consumers by eschewing nursing home reporting systems that present information about all the facilities in a city, a state, or the nation on a website or in a report. We argue for greater modesty in our efforts and a focus on identifying only the potentially poorest or best homes. In the end, however, it is important to remember that information from any performance measurement website or report is no substitute for multiple visits to a home at different times of the day to personally assess quality.

  17. Medicare Home Visit Program Associated With Fewer Hospital And Nursing Home Admissions, Increased Office Visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattke, Soeren; Han, Dan; Wilks, Asa; Sloss, Elizabeth

    2015-12-01

    Clinical home visit programs for Medicare beneficiaries are a promising approach to supporting aging in place and avoiding high-cost institutional care. Such programs combine a comprehensive geriatric assessment by a clinician during a home visit with referrals to community providers and health plan resources to address uncovered issues. We evaluated UnitedHealth Group's HouseCalls program, which has been offered to Medicare Advantage plan members in Arkansas, Georgia, Missouri, South Carolina, and Texas since January 2008. We found that, compared to non-HouseCalls Medicare Advantage plan members and fee-for-service beneficiaries, HouseCalls participants had reductions in admissions to hospitals (1 percent and 14 percent, respectively) and lower risk of nursing home admission (0.67 percent and 1.3 percent, respectively). In addition, participants' numbers of office visits--chiefly to specialists--increased 2-6 percent (depending on the comparison group). The program's effects on emergency department use were mixed. These results indicate that a thorough home-based clinical assessment of a member's health and home environment combined with referral services can support aging in place, promote physician office visits, and preempt costly institutional care. PMID:26643635

  18. The Economics of Dementia-Care Mapping in Nursing Homes: A Cluster-Randomised Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Geertje van de Ven; Irena Draskovic; Elke van Herpen; Koopmans, Raymond T C M; Rogier Donders; Zuidema, Sytse U.; Eddy M M Adang; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra J. F. J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dementia-care mapping (DCM) is a cyclic intervention aiming at reducing neuropsychiatric symptoms in people with dementia in nursing homes. Alongside an 18-month cluster-randomized controlled trial in which we studied the effectiveness of DCM on residents and staff outcomes, we investigated differences in costs of care between DCM and usual care in nursing homes. METHODS: Dementia special care units were randomly assigned to DCM or usual care. Nurses from the intervention care hom...

  19. Changes in the personal dignity of nursing home residents: a longitudinal qualitative interview study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariska G Oosterveld-Vlug

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most nursing home residents spend the remainder of their life, until death, within a nursing home. As preserving dignity is an important aim of the care given here, insight into the way residents experience their dignity throughout their entire admission period is valuable. AIM: To investigate if and how nursing home residents' personal dignity changes over the course of time, and what contributes to this. DESIGN: A longitudinal qualitative study. METHODS: Multiple in-depth interviews, with an interval of six months, were carried out with 22 purposively sampled nursing home residents of the general medical wards of four nursing homes in The Netherlands. Transcripts were analyzed following the principles of thematic analysis. RESULTS: From admission onwards, some residents experienced an improved sense of dignity, while others experienced a downward trend, a fluctuating one or no change at all. Two mechanisms were especially important for a nursing home resident to maintain or regain personal dignity: the feeling that one is in control of his life and the feeling that one is regarded as a worthwhile person. The acquirement of both feelings could be supported by 1 finding a way to cope with one's situation; 2 getting acquainted with the new living structures in the nursing home and therefore feeling more at ease; 3 physical improvement (with or without an electric wheelchair; 4 being socially involved with nursing home staff, other residents and relatives; and 5 being amongst disabled others and therefore less prone to exposures of disrespect from the outer world. CONCLUSION: Although the direction in which a resident's personal dignity develops is also dependent on one's character and coping capacities, nursing home staff can contribute to dignity by creating optimal conditions to help a nursing home resident recover feelings of control and of being regarded as a worthwhile person.

  20. The Potential of Wash-and-Dry Toilets to Improve the Toileting Experience for Nursing Home Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska; Biddison, James R.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated the feasibility of using a "wash-and-dry" toilet in the nursing home. Design and Methods: We used a controlled comparison baseline-versus-treatment design with 22 female nursing home residents aged 75 and older living in a 562-bed, not-for-profit nursing home facility in Maryland. The Luscence Luxury Lavage wash-and-dry…

  1. Evaluation of the implementation of an 'oral hygiene protocol' in nursing homes: a 5-year longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visschere, L. de; Baat, C. de; Schols, J.M.; Deschepper, E.; Vanobbergen, J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To explore the long-term effects of the implementation of an oral hygiene protocol in nursing homes. METHODS: Out of 14 nursing homes (Flanders) seven nursing homes were randomly allocated to the intervention group and confirmed to implement an 'oral hygiene protocol'. The remaining nurs

  2. 38 CFR 17.46 - Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from active military, naval, or air service... Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.46 Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home... authorized by 38 U.S.C. 1703 and 38 CFR 17.52; or (2) If the veteran needs non-immediate...

  3. A study of balance, gait and psychotropic drug use in relation to fall risk in nursing home residents with dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.S. Sterke (Carolyn)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractFalls are a major health problem in nursing home residents with dementia. In nursing homes one-third of all falls results in an injury. In order to take tailor-made preventive measures in time, the fall risk profile of each individual nursing home resident should be periodically evaluate

  4. The Effects of Listening Training on Nursing Home Assistants: Residents' Satisfaction with and Perceptions of Assistants' Listening Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trahan, Brenda Comeaux; Rockwell, Patricia

    1999-01-01

    Reports on a study of the level of satisfaction of elderly nursing home residents with the listening behaviors of nursing home assistants, and examines the residents' perceptions regarding the listening behaviors of the assistants. Determines if a listening skills training course for nursing home assistants would prove beneficial in increasing…

  5. An ergonomic evaluation of nursing assistants' job in a nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, A; Owen, B D; Carlson, B

    1992-09-01

    Thirty-eight nursing assistants (NAs) in a nursing home ranked and rated 16 different patient handling tasks for perceived stresses to the low back. The nursing assistants were observed for 79 4 h shifts and were videotaped for 14 4 h shifts to describe a typical workday and to determine the number of patient-handling tasks performed per shift, the use of assistive devices, and biomechanical stresses to the low back. In addition, data were collected on nursing assistants' and patients' characteristics. The top eight ranked tasks included transferring patient from toilet to wheelchair (WC), WC to toilet, WC to bed, bed to WC, bathtub to WC, chairlift to WC, weighing patients and lifting patients up in bed. The mean ratings of perceived exertion for these tasks were between 'somewhat hard' and 'hard'. The estimated compressive force on L5/S1 disc for the 50th percentile patient weight ranged from 3.7 to 4.9 KN. Nursing assistants worked in teams of two and performed 24 patient transfers per 8 h shift by manually lifting and carrying patients. Assistive devices (a hydraulic lift and gait belt) were used less than 2% of the time. Patient safety and comfort, lack of accessibility, physical stresses associated with the devices, lack of skill, increased transfer time, and lack of staffing were some of the reasons for not using these assistive devices. Environmental barriers (such as confined workplaces, an uneven floor surface, lack of adjustability of beds, stationary railings around the toilet, etc.) made the job more difficult. Nursing assistants had a high prevalence of low-back pain and 51% of nursing assistants visited a health care provider in the last three years for work related low-back pain. PMID:1387079

  6. The environmental design of residential care facilities: A sense of home through the eyes of nursing home residents.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijck-Heinen, C.J.M.L.; Wouters, E.J.M.; Janssen, B.M.; van Hoof, J.

    2014-01-01

    C.J.M.L. van Dijck-Heinen, E.J.M. Wouters, B.M. Janssen, J. van Hoof (2014) The environmental design of residential care facilities: A sense of home through the eyes of nursing home residents. International Journal for Innovative Research in Science & Technology 1(4): 57-69

  7. Nursing practice supporting the transition of technology-dependent children from hospital to home

    OpenAIRE

    Kanaizumi, Shiomi; 金泉, 志保美

    2013-01-01

    Backgrounds & aims:The numberofchildren with chronic conditions who receive care at home, particularly those who are dependent on medical technology are rapidly increasing. Systematic studies about nursing practice during the transition of technology-dependent children from hospital to home are very limited in Japan. This study explored the nursing practice supporting the transition of technology-dependent children from hospital to home. Methods:Qualitative descriptive design was used. Data w...

  8. Nursing Assistants' Job Commitment: Effect of Nursing Home Organizational Factors and Impact on Resident Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Christine E.; Weinberg, Dana Beth; Leutz, Walter; Dossa, Almas; Pfefferle, Susan G.; Zincavage, Rebekah M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate (a) whether certified nursing assistants (CNAs) are more committed to nursing home jobs when they perceive their jobs as enhanced (greater autonomy, use of knowledge, teamwork), and (b) whether CNA job commitment affects resident satisfaction. Design and Methods: A qualitative exploration of…

  9. The relation between quality of co-ordination of nursing care and quality of life in Dutch nursing homes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtkamp, C.C.M.; Kerkstra, A.; Ribbe, M.W.; Campen, C. van; Ooms, M.E.

    2000-01-01

    Quality of life of nursing home residents is a critical consideration in international health care policies and health care decisions. Yet, there is little relevant research to support decisions about client-tailored and effective nursing care for this population. Because of the permanency of their

  10. [Equipment at the special nursing homes for the elderly: a workplace survey of new nursing homes in Osaka Prefecture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomioka, Kimiko; Kumagai, Shinji; Kosaka, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Jin; Tabuchi, Takeo; Kosaka, Junko; Arai, Yasutomo

    2006-03-01

    The number of those who need nursing care and the workers who provide it have been increasing year after year. In April 2000, the public nursing care insurance system was enacted by the Japanese government. After its enaction, care equipment came under scrutiny, but the situation regarding the installation of equipment is not fully understood. In order to understand the present state of care equipment in nursing facilities for the elderly, we conducted a workplace and interview survey. The surveyed facilities were 10 special nursing homes for the elderly in Osaka Prefecture which were established after April 2002. The average number of elderly residents was 79.0, the average value of degree of care was 3.52, and the average number of caregivers was 28.3 per facility. We found all facilities had installed some kinds of bathing equipment: stretcher type, 9 facilities; bath-chair type, 8 facilities. In the facilities with bath-chairs, 6 facilities had special bathtubs, and 6 facilities had general bathtubs. However, all facilities had the working principle that transfer should be done manually, and the equipment for transfer such as a lifts, a transfer and roller board were not be installed. In changing diapers, bed height adjustment was not possible. And the Japanese standard type of wheelchair has a non-detachable armrest, creating a structural barrier when transferring elderly people from a wheelchair to a toilet seat. At all facilities the basis of care was that caregivers should do it manually. In particular, all facilities had only a weak recognition of the risks of transfer. This investigation shows that facilities for the elderly should rethink elderly care based on a reduction of care load and most importantly protection of caregivers' health. PMID:16717403

  11. The Factors Influencing the Sense of Home in Nursing Homes: A Systematic Review from the Perspective of Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijnaard, M. D.; van Hoof, J.; Janssen, B. M.; Verbeek, H.; Pocornie, W.; Eijkelenboom, A.; Beerens, H. C.; Molony, S. L.; Wouters, E. J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To provide an overview of factors influencing the sense of home of older adults residing in the nursing home. Methods. A systematic review was conducted. Inclusion criteria were (1) original and peer-reviewed research, (2) qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods research, (3) research about nursing home residents (or similar type of housing), and (4) research on the sense of home, meaning of home, at-homeness, or homelikeness. Results. Seventeen mainly qualitative articles were included. The sense of home of nursing home residents is influenced by 15 factors, divided into three themes: (1) psychological factors (sense of acknowledgement, preservation of one's habits and values, autonomy and control, and coping); (2) social factors (interaction and relationship with staff, residents, family and friends, and pets) and activities; and (3) the built environment (private space and (quasi-)public space, personal belongings, technology, look and feel, and the outdoors and location). Conclusions. The sense of home is influenced by numerous factors related to the psychology of the residents and the social and built environmental contexts. Further research is needed to determine if and how the identified factors are interrelated, if perspectives of various stakeholders involved differ, and how the factors can be improved in practice. PMID:27313892

  12. A Web-Based Model for Diabetes Education and Decision Support for the Home Care Nurse

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Michelle; Kirby, Judy

    1998-01-01

    Diabetes education for the home care population requires expert knowledge to be available at the point-of-care, the patient's home. This poster displays a model for Web-based diabetes education and decision support for the home care nurse. The system utilizes the line of reasoning (LOR) model to organize and represent expert decision-making thought processes.

  13. Identity cues and dementia in nursing home intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vézina, Aline; Robichaud, Line; Voyer, Philippe; Pelletier, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the identity cues that family caregivers and healthcare personnel use with seniors living with dementia and living in nursing homes. The identity cues represent biographical knowledge used to stimulate the dementia sufferer, trigger signals and incite interaction. Our grounded approach hinges on three objectives: to identify and categorize identity cues; to document their uses; and to gain a better understanding of their effectiveness. We interviewed nine family caregivers and 12 healthcare workers. Qualitative data indicates that the participants use identity cues that evoke seniors' sociological, relational and individual characteristics. These identity cues play a central role in communication and constitute important information that the family caregivers can share with healthcare personnel. They sustain memory, facilitate care and reinforce seniors' self-value. These results help to define identity, foster a greater role for family caregivers, and constitute a sound basis for the implementation of personalized interventions.

  14. Indicators of Job Satisfaction of Home Healthcare Nurses in the San Francisco Bay Area of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Canham, Daryl; Wahl, Sharon

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the factors that provide job satisfaction for home healthcare nurses and to determine if the nurses' educational level makes a difference in job satisfaction. Data were collected using Ellenbecker's (2004) 21-item Home Healthcare Nurses Job Satisfaction Scale. The study results indicated the majority of this population of home healthcare nurses was satisfied on all items, except in having the power to change agency policy. Educational level made no significant difference in job satisfaction. Recommendations include encouraging agencies to include clinicians in policy decision-making and management of patient care. Nursing education programs should ensure nurses graduate with the skills necessary for policy development and to make decisions that positively impact patient care. PMID:27243430

  15. Enterostomal therapy nursing in the Canadian home care sector: what is its value?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baich, Linda; Wilson, Donna; Cummings, Greta G

    2010-01-01

    Approximately one-third of all home care patients have wound care needs. Home care patients tend to be older and have multiple chronic diseases rendering them at risk for developing wounds and impairing their ability to heal wounds. Enterostomal therapy (ET) nurses have expertise in wound, ostomy, and continence care, and were recently recognized by the Canadian Nurses Association as a specialty practice. We completed a systematic review in order to identify and synthesize evidence about the value of ET nurses in the Canadian home care sector, focusing on wound care. A literature search was conducted, using 9 computerized library databases. Eight articles were identified for review; each was analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Two themes emerged from our analysis: (1) assessing the outcomes of ET nurse involvement in client care and (2) methods for using ET nurses' expertise. Within these themes, the benefits of ET nurses working in home care were identified: (1) a decreased number of visits, (2) reduced wound-healing times, (3) successful healing, (4) reduced cost of wound care, (5) greater support for nurses and families, (6) fewer emergency department visits, (7) fewer hospital readmissions, (8) increased interest in education in wound care among other nurses, and (9) standardized protocols for wound care. Although only 8 studies were located for this review, their findings provide evidence that ET nurses' contributions to wound care are not only positive but also necessary in the home care sector. PMID:20075693

  16. Acute hospital admissions among nursing home residents: a population-based observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamtvedt Gro

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nursing home residents are prone to acute illness due to their high age, underlying illnesses and immobility. We examined the incidence of acute hospital admissions among nursing home residents versus the age-matched community dwelling population in a geographically defined area during a two years period. The hospital stays of the nursing home population are described according to diagnosis, length of stay and mortality. Similar studies have previously not been reported in Scandinavia. Methods The acute hospitalisations of the nursing home residents were identified through ambulance records. These were linked to hospital patient records for inclusion of demographics, diagnosis at discharge, length of stay and mortality. Incidence of hospitalisation was calculated based on patient-time at risk. Results The annual hospital admission incidence was 0.62 admissions per person-year among the nursing home residents and 0.26 among the community dwellers. In the nursing home population we found that dominant diagnoses were respiratory diseases, falls-related and circulatory diseases, accounting for 55% of the cases. The median length of stay was 3 days (interquartile range = 4. The in-hospital mortality rate was 16% and 30 day mortality after discharge 30%. Conclusion Acute hospital admission rate among nursing home residents was high in this Scandinavian setting. The pattern of diagnoses causing the admissions appears to be consistent with previous research. The in-hospital and 30 day mortality rates are high.

  17. Study protocol: cost-effectiveness of multidisciplinary nutritional support for undernutrition in older adults in nursing home and home-care: cluster randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne Marie; Gøgsig Christensen, Annette; Stenbæk Hansen, Birthe;

    2014-01-01

    to nursing homes (for participants from home-care), use of social services and mortality.An economic evaluation will be conducted to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the multidisciplinary support.Furthermore, interviews with nursing home and home-care management, nursing staff and nutrition coordinators......BACKGROUND: Older adults in nursing home and home-care are a particularly high-risk population for weight loss or poor nutrition. One negative consequence of undernutrition is increased health care costs. Several potentially modifiable nutritional risk factors increase the likelihood of weight loss......-effectiveness of nutritional support among undernourished older adults and none of these have used such a multidisciplinary approach. METHODS: An 11 week cluster randomized trial to assess the cost-effectiveness of multidisciplinary nutritional support for undernutrition in older adults in nursing home and home-care...

  18. Advanced dementia research in the nursing home: the CASCADE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Susan L; Kiely, Dan K; Jones, Richard N; Prigerson, Holly; Volicer, Ladislav; Teno, Joan M

    2006-01-01

    Despite the growing number of persons with advanced dementia, and the need to improve their end-of-life care, few studies have addressed this important topic. The objectives of this report are to present the methodology established in the CASCADE (Choices, Attitudes, and Strategies for Care of Advanced Dementia at the End-of-Life) study, and to describe how challenges specific to this research were met. The CASCADE study is an ongoing, federally funded, 5-year prospective cohort study of nursing [nursing home (NH)] residents with advanced dementia and their health care proxies (HCPs) initiated in February 2003. Subjects were recruited from 15 facilities around Boston. The recruitment and data collection protocols are described. The demographic features, ownership, staffing, and quality of care of participant facilities are presented and compared to NHs nationwide. To date, 189 resident/HCP dyads have been enrolled. Baseline data are presented, demonstrating the success of the protocol in recruiting and repeatedly assessing NH residents with advanced dementia and their HCPs. Factors challenging and enabling implementation of the protocol are described. The CASCADE experience establishes the feasibility of conducting rigorous, multisite dementia NH research, and the described methodology serves as a detailed reference for subsequent CASCADE publications as results from the study emerge. PMID:16917187

  19. Nutritional care in a nursing home in Italy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Maria Donini

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Malnutrition is a clinical condition due to the imbalance among needs, intake and use of nutrients, leading to the increase of morbidity and mortality, and to the impairment of quality of life. Even in industrialized countries undernutrition is becoming an alarming phenomenon, especially involving elderly institutionalized subjects. A multicentric study called PIMAI (Project Iatrogenic MAlnutrition in Italy, was carried out in Italy over 2005. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of malnutrition in hospitals and in nursing care homes (NH, to assess the level of nutritional attention and to measure the perceived quality in food and nutritional care. This paper represents a preliminary analysis of data collected in a NH included in the PIMAI project. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 100 subjects (29 males and 71 females, aged 80.2±10 years, were recruited from January to June 2005 at the Clinical Rehabilitation Institute "Villa delle Querce" in Nemi (Rome, among patients in the NH facility. All the participants underwent a multidimensional geriatric evaluation (considering nutritional, clinical, functional and cognitive parameters, and a survey on "perceived quality" of nutritional care. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: According to nutritional status defined by the Mini Nutritional Assessment®, data analysis showed a high prevalence of malnutrition (36% especially related to advanced age, chewing, cognitive and functional impairments. Patients seemed to consider nutrition to be important for their health; on the other hand, they were not thoroughly satisfied with the quality of food. Particularly, it was observed scarce attention to nutritional status from medical and nursing staff. CONCLUSIONS: Our study confirms the need to pay greater attention to nutritional status in elderly institutionalized subjects. Medical and nursing teams need to be aware of the importance to perform an evaluation of nutritional status in

  20. Improvements in the quality of co-ordination of nursing care following implementation of the Resident Assessment Instrument in Dutch nursing homes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, W.P.; Holtkamp, C.C.M.; Kerkstra, A.; Pot, A.M.; Ooms, M.E.; Ribbe, M.W.

    2001-01-01

    Aim: To study the effect of implementation of the Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI) on the quality of co-ordination of nursing care in Dutch nursing homes. Background: The Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI) was designed to improve the quality of care and quality of life in nursing homes. Until

  1. Fostering dignity in the care of nursing home residents through slow caring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohne, Vibeke; Høy, Bente; Lillestø, Britt;

    2016-01-01

    Background: Physical impairment and dependency on others may be a threat to dignity. Research questions: The purpose of this study was to explore dignity as a core concept in caring, and how healthcare personnel focus on and foster dignity in nursing home residents. Research design: This study has...... a hermeneutic design. Participants and research context: In all, 40 healthcare personnel from six nursing homes in Scandinavia participated in focus group interviews in this study. Ethical considerations: This study has been evaluated and approved by the Regional Ethical Committees and the Social Science Data...... personnel, maintaining human dignity requires slow caring in nursing homes, as an essential approach....

  2. Understanding organizational and cultural premises for quality of care in nursing homes: an ethnographic study

    OpenAIRE

    Nakrem, Sigrid

    2015-01-01

    Background Internationally, there are concerns about the quality of care in nursing homes. The concept of ‘corporate culture’ as an internal variable could be seen as the means to improve quality of care and quality of life for the residents. The aim of this article was to describe the nursing home culture from the staff’s perspective and to include how the residents describe quality of care. Methods An ethnographic design was employed. A purposive sample of four municipal public nursing home...

  3. Indoor air quality, ventilation and respiratory health in elderly residents living in nursing homes in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentayeb, Malek; Norback, Dan; Bednarek, Micha;

    2015-01-01

    European countries. 600 elderly people from 50 nursing homes underwent a medical examination and completed a standardised questionnaire. Air quality and comfort parameters were objectively assessed in situ in the nursing home. Mean concentrations of air pollutants did not exceed the existing standards...... cough. Elderly subjects aged ≥80 years were at higher risk. Pollutant effects were more pronounced in the case of poor ventilation. Even at low levels, indoor air quality affected respiratory health in elderly people permanently living in nursing homes, with frailty increasing with age. The effects were...... modulated by ventilation....

  4. Longevity and admission to nursing home according to age after isolated coronary artery bypass surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Kristinn; Andreasen, Jan Jesper; Torp-Pedersen, Christian;

    2015-01-01

    O5 Longevity and admission to nursing home according to age after isolated coronary artery bypass surgery: A nationwide cohort study Kristinn Thorsteinsson, Jan Jesper Andreasen, Christian Torp Pedersen, Kirsten Fonager, Rikke Nørmark Mortensen, Kristian Kragholm, Gunnar Gislason, Lars Køber....... Aalborg, Denmark Background: Data on nursing home admission in patients >80 years of age after isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) are scarce. Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate longevity and subsequent admission to nursing home stratified by age in a nationwide CABG cohort...

  5. End-of-life expectations and experiences among nursing home patients and their relatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosse, Anette; Schaufel, Margrethe Aase; Ruths, Sabine;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Synthesize research about patients' and relatives' expectations and experiences on how doctors can improve end-of-life care in nursing homes. METHODS: We systematically searched qualitative studies in English in seven databases (Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Ageline, Cochrane....... CONCLUSION: Nursing home patients and their relatives wanted doctors more involved in end-of-life care. They expected doctors to acknowledge their preferences and provide guidance and symptom relief. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: High-quality end-of-life care in nursing homes relies on organization, funding...

  6. Absenteeism- a complex problem: A study on absenteeism in Trondheim’s nursing homes

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Josiane

    2011-01-01

    Absenteeism is a community problem when one looks at the amount of money spent because of it, an amount that could have been used on other more important matters. For this thesis I set out to study absenteeism in nursing homes here in my town, Trondheim. I wanted to study the nursing homes with relatively low absenteeism rate and the nursing homes with relatively high absenteeism rate to see if I could find differences that could explain the differences in their absenteeism rates. Interviews ...

  7. Retrospective review of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and falling in older nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfken, C L; Wilson, J G; Aronson, S M

    2001-03-01

    We compared the rate of falling in older nursing home residents who had been prescribed selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), other classes of antidepressants, and no antidepressants. Data were obtained from pharmacy records, medical records, fall logs, and incidence reports for one nursing home (1995 data). Older adults on SSRIs were more likely to fall than older adults not on antidepressants (p = .003) and were more likely to have an injurious fall (p = .03). The association with falling remained significant even when including potential confounders (p = .007). Older nursing home residents should be treated for depression. However, SSRIs may also carry an increased risk for falling.

  8. Home-based nursing interventions improve knowledge of disease and management in patients with heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina de Oliveira Azzolin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to assess patient knowledge of heart failure by home-based measurement of two NOC Nursing Outcomes over a six-month period and correlate mean outcome indicator scores with mean scores of a heart failure Knowledge Questionnaire.METHODS: in this before-and-after study, patients with heart failure received four home visits over a six-month period after hospital discharge. At each home visit, nursing interventions were implemented, NOC outcomes were assessed, and the Knowledge Questionnaire was administered.RESULTS: overall, 23 patients received home visits. Mean indicator scores for the outcome Knowledge: Medication were 2.27±0.14 at home visit 1 and 3.55±0.16 at home visit 4 (P<0.001; and, for the outcome Knowledge: Treatment Regimen, 2.33±0.13 at home visit 1 and 3.59±0.14 at home visit 4 (P<0.001. The correlation between the Knowledge Questionnaire and the Nursing Outcomes Classification scores was strong at home visit 1 (r=0.7, P<0.01, but weak and non significant at visit 4.CONCLUSION: the results show improved patient knowledge of heart failure and a strong correlation between Nursing Outcomes Classification indicator scores and Knowledge Questionnaire scores. The NOC Nursing Outcomes proved effective as knowledge assessment measures when compared with the validated instrument.

  9. Prevalence and Associated Factors of Insomnia Syndrome in the Elderly Residing in Kahrizak Nursing Home, Tehran, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    B. Golestan; Tabatabaei, R; E Iran-Pour; AA Tavabi; F Mousavi

    2012-01-01

    Background: As insomnia is common, especially among the elderly in the nursing homes, we aimed to estimate insomnia prevalence among the elderly residing in nursing homes as well as to determine factors associated with insomnia in the elderly. Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out in 2009 on 772 elderly residents at Kahrizak Nursing Home, Tehran Iran. The information was gathered through 5-part questionnaires by interviewing either the individuals or the nurses in charge and als...

  10. Perceptions of Home Health Nurses Regarding Suffering, Artificial Nutrition, and Hydration in Late-Stage Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lenora; Amella, Elaine J; Nemeth, Lynne

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore perceptions of home healthcare nurses related to suffering, artificial nutrition and hydration in people with late-stage dementia, and if these perceptions influence care to people with dementia and their families. Part of a mixed-methods study, the qualitative portion examined perceptions of home healthcare nurses in a rural area in the southern United States. Seventeen home healthcare nurses participated in this study. Semistructured focus group interview questions were used. Constant comparative analysis was the method used for coding transcripts. Three themes emerged from the analysis: patient/family comfort, futility, and symbols of suffering. Although many of the nurses reported that artificial nutrition and hydration was of comfort to the patient and family because of the potential for "starving," they also felt it prolonged the patient's suffering due to the invasive procedure, need for restraints, and possibility of fluid overload. Several nurses felt that artificial nutrition and hydration gave a sense of false hope to the family that the patient would live longer. The perceptions of these home healthcare nurses influence their care to people with dementia and their families related to artificial nutrition and hydration, possibly based on experience. Their perceptions could influence family decisions regarding treatment options. Further research and education with home healthcare nurses is vital to ensure nurses are appropriately caring for patients with dementia and their families. PMID:27677061

  11. Advance Care Planning in Norwegian nursing homes-Who is it for?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoresen, Lisbeth; Ahlzén, Rolf; Solbrække, Kari Nyheim

    2016-08-01

    Advance care planning (ACP) is an international concept for improving patient autonomy and communication in the context of anticipated deterioration and end-of-life care. In a preparatory conversation, health care professionals facilitate one or more conversations where nursing home residents are invited to reflect on, and articulate wishes and preferences concerning future medical treatment and end-of-life care. Our aim with this study was to increase knowledge of existing ACP practices in Norwegian nursing homes. We wanted to know how nursing home residents, relatives and nursing home staff take part in the conversations, and to what extent these conversations can be regarded as promoting autonomy, legal rights and individual needs for the residents. We conducted participant observation of seven preparatory conversations, followed by interviews with health care staff (together) and resident and relative (together). In the result section, we present an informative case example of an ACP conversation where common and important characteristics running through our data are present. These are further elaborated under the following headings: Life critical questions, Residents' quiet participation in the conversations, the Dying phase - a clinical issue, Nurses and physicians; different domains and Timing. We find that nursing home staff in our study wants to contribute to open awareness, autonomy and a good death, but there are little reflections about the purpose and content of the conversations, how they should be carried out and when, and what frail nursing home residents are able to understand and express in ACP conversations. PMID:27531449

  12. Cost control in nursing homes by means of economies of scale and care profile optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoess, Victoria; Bachler, Adi; Ostermann, Herwig; Staudinger, Roland

    2009-01-01

    The call to enlarge or merge nursing homes in order to lower costs rests on the assumption that economies of scale exist within the cost structure of these homes. Economies of scale means that an increasing number of residents will reduce the costs per person needing care. However, the existence and the extent of economies of scale as such in nursing homes are the subject of controversy because studies of this issue performed in nursing homes up to now have yielded contradictory results. In this study, researchers demonstrated economies of scale in Tyrolean, Austria, nursing homes and showed that the composition of the nursing home residents in respect to their care needs influences the development of the average costs. Changing the size of the facility and/or influencing the average care level can have a considerable influence on the progression of average costs in nursing homes. Cost reductions can be achieved by increasing the size of the facility or by improved distribution of the care levels of the persons in need of care.

  13. Efficiency and quality of care in nursing homes: an Italian case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garavaglia, Giulia; Lettieri, Emanuele; Agasisti, Tommaso; Lopez, Silvano

    2011-03-01

    This study investigates efficiency and quality of care in nursing homes. By means of Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), the efficiency of 40 nursing homes that deliver their services in the north-western area of the Lombardy Region was assessed over a 3-year period (2005-2007). Lombardy is a very peculiar setting, since it is the only Region in Italy where the healthcare industry is organised as a quasi-market, in which the public authority buys health and nursing services from independent providers-establishing a reimbursement system for this purpose. The analysis is conducted by generating bootstrapped DEA efficiency scores for each nursing home (stage one), then regressing those scores on explanatory variables (stage two). Our DEA model employed two input (i.e. costs for health and nursing services and costs for residential services) and three output variables (case mix, extra nursing hours and residential charges). In the second-stage analysis, Tobit regressions and the Kruskall-Wallis tests of hypothesis to the efficiency scores were applied to define what are the factors that affect efficiency: (a) the ownership (private nursing houses outperform their public counterparts); and (b) the capability to implement strategies for labour cost and nursing costs containment, since the efficiency heavily depends upon the alignment of the costs to the public reimbursement system. Lastly, even though the public institutions are less efficient than the private ones, the results suggest that public nursing homes are moving towards their private counterparts, and thus competition is benefiting efficiency. PMID:20922483

  14. Nurse's Aid And Housekeeping Mobile Robot For Use In The Nursing Home Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sines, John A.

    1987-01-01

    The large nursing home market has several natural characteristics which make it a good applications area for robotics. The environment is already robot accessible and the work functions require large quantities of low skilled services on a daily basis. In the near future, a commercial opportunity for the practical application of robots is emerging in the delivery of housekeeping services in the nursing home environment. The robot systems will assist in food tray delivery, material handling, and security, and will perform activities such as changing a resident's table side drinking water twice a day, and taking out the trash. The housekeeping work functions will generate cost savings of approximately 22,000 per year, at a cost of 6,000 per year. Technical system challenges center around the artificial intelligence required for the robot to map its own location within the facility, to find objects, and to avoid obstacles, and the development of an energy efficient mechanical lifting system. The long engineering and licensing cycles (7 to 12 years) required to bring this type of product to market make it difficult to raise capital for such a venture.

  15. Restraint use in home care: a qualitative study from a nursing perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the growing demand for home care and preliminary evidence suggesting that the use of restraint is common practice in home care, research about restraint use in this setting is scarce. Methods To gain insight into the use of restraints in home care from the perspective of nurses, we conducted a qualitative explorative study. We conducted semi-structured face-to-face interviews of 14 nurses from Wit-Gele Kruis, a home-care organization in Flanders, Belgium. Interview transcripts were analyzed using the Qualitative Analysis Guide of Leuven. Results Our findings revealed a lack of clarity among nurses about the concept of restraint in home care. Nurses reported that cognitively impaired older persons, who sometimes lived alone, were restrained or locked up without continuous follow-up. The interviews indicated that the patient’s family played a dominant role in the decision to use restraints. Reasons for using restraints included “providing relief to the family” and “keeping the patient at home as long as possible to avoid admission to a nursing home.” The nurses stated that general practitioners had no clear role in deciding whether to use restraints. Conclusions These findings suggest that the issue of restraint use in home care is even more complex than in long-term residential care settings and acute hospital settings. They raise questions about the ethical and legal responsibilities of home-care providers, nurses, and general practitioners. There is an urgent need for further research to carefully document the use of restraints in home care and to better understand it so that appropriate guidance can be provided to healthcare workers. PMID:24498859

  16. Automatic provisioning of end-to-end QoS into the home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brewka, Lukasz Jerzy; Skoldström, Pontus; Nelis, Jelle;

    2011-01-01

    Due to a growing number of high bandwidth applications today (such as HDTV), and an increasing amount of network and cloud based applications, service providers need to pay attention to QoS in their networks. We believe there is a need for an end-to-end approach reaching into the home as well....... The Home Gateway (HG) as a key component of the home network is crucial for enabling the end-to-end solutions. UPnP-QoS has been proposed as an inhome solution for resource reservations. In this paper we assess a solution for automatic QoS reservations, on behalf of non-UPnP-QoS aware applications....... Additionally we focus on an integrated end-to-end solution, combining GMPLS-based reservations in e.g., access/metro and UPnP-QoS based reservation in the home network....

  17. Air conditioning in nursing homes; Airco in verpleeghuizen geen overbodige luxe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Bekkum, H. [ed.

    1999-06-01

    Residents of nursing homes suffer considerably from high indoor temperatures. Research has shown that during tropical outdoor temperatures, the indoor temperature has a strong impact on the mortality rate among residents, mainly due to the well-insulated buildings

  18. Is the experience of meaningful activities understood in nursing homes? A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Ceña, Domingo; Gómez-Calero, Cristina; Cachón-Pérez, José Miguel; Velarde-García, Juan Francisco; Martínez-Piedrola, Rosa; Pérez-De-Heredia, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Lack of occupation can lead to boredom, apathy, social exclusion and solitude. Occupation should incorporate meaningful activities. The aim of this study is to describe how Spanish Nursing Home residents experienced and made sense of meaningful activities. A qualitative phenomenological approach was followed. Data were collected over an 18-month period between 2012 and 2014. Purposeful sampling was conducted with Spanish residents in nursing homes in Madrid. Data were collected using unstructured and semi-structured interviews. The data were analyzed using the Giorgi proposal. Thirty-eight residents (20 female and 18 male) participated. Three main themes describing the significance of meaningful activity in nursing homes emerged from the data: Feeling the passage of time, Seeking an occupation, and Living with restrictions. Nursing homes should strive to develop diverse and meaningful activity programs for residents in order to occupy their time and provide them with a greater sense of purpose. PMID:26626463

  19. Association between subjective memory complaints and nursing home placement: a four-year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldorff, Frans Boch; Siersma, Volkert; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In order to evaluate whether elderly persons with subjective memory complaints may be regarded as a group of potentially vulnerable patients who need close follow-up, we investigated the risk of nursing home placement during a 4-year follow-up period. METHODS: Prospective cohort survey...... nursing home placements were observed. Subjective memory complaints were associated with an adjusted Hazard Ratio (HR) of 2.59 for nursing home placement. Other statistical significant covariates were MMSE depression...... (HR = 4.74). The effect of subjective memory complaints is seen to moderate when subjects are older. CONCLUSION: The data of this study indicated that in an elderly primary care population the presence of subjective memory complaints was a significant independent predictor for nursing home placement...

  20. MDS 3.0 for Nursing Homes and Swing Bed Providers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The MDS is a powerful tool for implementing standardized assessment and for facilitating care management in nursing homes (NHs) and non-critical access hospital...

  1. The economics of dementia-care mapping in nursing homes: a cluster-randomised controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geertje van de Ven

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dementia-care mapping (DCM is a cyclic intervention aiming at reducing neuropsychiatric symptoms in people with dementia in nursing homes. Alongside an 18-month cluster-randomized controlled trial in which we studied the effectiveness of DCM on residents and staff outcomes, we investigated differences in costs of care between DCM and usual care in nursing homes. METHODS: Dementia special care units were randomly assigned to DCM or usual care. Nurses from the intervention care homes received DCM training, a DCM organizational briefing day and conducted the 4-months DCM-intervention twice during the study. A single DCM cycle consists of observation, feedback to the staff, and action plans for the residents. We measured costs related to health care consumption, falls and psychotropic drug use at the resident level and absenteeism at the staff level. Data were extracted from resident files and the nursing home records. Prizes were determined using the Dutch manual of health care cost and the cost prices delivered by a pharmacy and a nursing home. Total costs were evaluated by means of linear mixed-effect models for longitudinal data, with the unit as a random effect to correct for dependencies within units. RESULTS: 34 units from 11 nursing homes, including 318 residents and 376 nursing staff members participated in the cost analyses. Analyses showed no difference in total costs. However certain changes within costs could be noticed. The intervention group showed lower costs associated with outpatient hospital appointments over time (p = 0.05 than the control group. In both groups, the number of falls, costs associated with the elderly-care physician and nurse practitioner increased equally during the study (p<0.02. CONCLUSIONS: DCM is a cost-neutral intervention. It effectively reduces outpatient hospital appointments compared to usual care. Other considerations than costs, such as nursing homes' preferences, may determine whether they

  2. Future trends in the legal rights of patients in nursing homes.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffman, B. F.

    1989-01-01

    The author discusses the demographic aging of Canada and outlines how the Canadian Constitution and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms are likely to affect the care and treatment of nursing home residents. Because physical freedom and personal autonomy have been given such a high value in the constitution, civil and legal rights will be protected for all residents in nursing homes, and procedural safeguards will become mandatory in the next few years for patients who refuse treatment and for ...

  3. Prescribing of Psychoactive Drugs for Older People in Nursing Homes: An Analysis of Treatment Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Shaw, Catherine; McCormack, Brendan; Hughes, Carmel M

    2016-01-01

    Background There is increasing interest in how culture may affect the quality of healthcare services, and previous research has shown that ‘treatment culture’—of which there are three categories (resident centred, ambiguous and traditional)—in a nursing home may influence prescribing of psychoactive medications. Objective The objective of this study was to explore and understand treatment culture in prescribing of psychoactive medications for older people with dementia in nursing homes. Metho...

  4. Medication in nursing homes in Alsace: a preferential list of drugs obtained by consensus

    OpenAIRE

    Hannou, Sophia; Rousseau, Amélie; Rybarczyk-Vigouret, Marie-Christine; Michel, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In order to improve patient care, OMEDIT (Observatory of drugs, medical devices and therapeutic innovation) Alsace, conducted a study to develop a Preferential list of Drugs adapted to the Elderly (PDE list) in nursing homes. The study conducted from December 2011 to June 2012 was organized in 4 phases: 1) creation of a preliminary list of drugs from those currently used in nursing homes in Alsace, 2) application of a two-round Delphi process to evaluate the preliminary list involvin...

  5. Connection, Regulation, and Care Plan Innovation: A Case Study of Four Nursing Homes

    OpenAIRE

    Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S.; Lekan-Rutledge, Deborah; Utley-Smith, Queen; Ammarell, Natalie; Bailey, Donald; Piven, Mary L.; Corazzini, Kirsten; Anderson, Ruth A.

    2006-01-01

    We describe how connections among nursing home staff impact the care planning process using a complexity science framework. We completed six-month case studies of four nursing homes. Field observations (n = 274), shadowing encounters (n = 69), and in-depth interviews (n = 122) of 390 staff at all levels were conducted. Qualitative analysis produced a conceptual/thematic description and complexity science concepts were used to produce conceptual insights. We observed that greater levels of sta...

  6. Pharmacy interventions on prescribing in nursing homes: from evidence to practice

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Carmel M; Lapane, Kate L

    2011-01-01

    Prescribing of medicines for older people who live in nursing homes is a very common intervention. Undoubtedly, medicines have contributed to longevity and improved health outcomes in the population, but they are not without their side effects and can give rise to adverse events. The nursing home population is particularly at risk as residents have multiple comorbidities and receive multiple medications. Moreover, the quality of prescribing has been criticised with long-standing concerns abou...

  7. Vitamin B6 deficiency and diseases in elderly people – a study in nursing homes

    OpenAIRE

    Kjeldby Ida K; Fosnes Gunvor S; Ligaarden Solveig C; Farup Per G

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Vitamin deficiency is a cause of health related problems in elderly people. The aims were to study associations between vitamin B6 (B6) and diseases (primarily functional gastrointestinal disorders) in elderly people in nursing homes, the prevalence of B6 deficiency and factors associated with B6 deficiency. Methods This cross-sectional study included residents in nursing homes. Demographics, nutritional status (Mini Nutritional Assessment, MNA® ), physical activity, activ...

  8. Effect of Medicaid Payment on Rehabilitation Care for Nursing Home Residents

    OpenAIRE

    Wodchis, Walter P; Richard A Hirth; Fries, Brant E

    2007-01-01

    There is considerable interest in examining how Medicaid payment affects nursing home care. This study examines the effect of Medicaid payment methods and reimbursement rates on the delivery of rehabilitation therapy to Medicaid nursing home residents in six States from 1992-1995. In States that changed payment from prospective facility-specific to prospective case-mix adjusted payment methods, Medicaid residents received more rehabilitation therapy after the change. While residents in States...

  9. Does empowering resident families or nursing home employees in decision making improve service quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Darla J

    2014-08-01

    This research examines how the empowerment of residents' family members and nursing home employees in managerial decision making is related to service quality. The study was conducted using data from 33 nursing homes in the United States. Surveys were administered to more than 1,000 employees on-site and mailed to the primary-contact family member of each resident. The resulting multilevel data were analyzed using hierarchical linear modeling. The empowerment of families in decision making was positively associated with their perceptions of service quality. The empowerment of nursing staff in decision making was more strongly related to service quality than the empowerment of nonnursing staff. Among nursing staff, the empowerment of nursing assistants improved service quality more than the empowerment of nurses. PMID:24652909

  10. The contributions of the nurse and the machine in home uterine activity monitoring systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkatz, R B; Merkatz, I R

    1991-05-01

    The relative contributions of home tokodynamometry and daily nursing telephone contact to the success of preterm birth prevention programs remains a subject of debate. Because investigators have obtained conflicting data, a reinterpretation of published results was undertaken by proposing a dynamic interface between the nurse and the machine. Experience gained from the technology and the development of nursing expertise with assessment of patient symptoms are presented as interdependent factors, both of which are critical to a therapeutic nurse-patient relationship. It is proposed that this combined interactive expertise increases sensitivity to the early recognition of preterm labor. The nurse's role in providing social support to high-risk pregnant women is then identified as a potential additional independent contributing factor to reported observed reductions in preterm births. Discussion focuses on future research, public policy issues, and the need for expanding nurse-patient interactions into the home.

  11. Prevalence of dementia in a rural nursing home population in Southern Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Hutsteiner

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: We sought to obtain data about the prevalence of dementia in rural nursing homes in Germany. Methods: We conducted our data between 2007 and 2009 in the diocese of Passau, Germany. By using a questionnaire we asked all nursing homes in the area to provide information about patients with dementia. We obtained detailed data from three nursing homes by personal visits, telephone calls and mail. Results: Out of 72 nursing homes, 40 provided the requested data. The 40 facilities included in our study house a total of 3,928 residents, 1,892 of whom are diagnosed with dementia (48%. Three nursing homes provided us with more detailed information. Conclusions: We conclude that the prevalence of dementia in nursing homes in Germany is comparable to those rates reported in other countries. As there is a lack of information globally on rural populations affected by dementia, further international research in this area will give important insights into the risk factors, the variables influencing the course of the disease, and the special care needs of this population.

  12. Nursing interventions in crisis-oriented and long-term psychiatric home care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boomsma, J.; Dassen, T.WN; Dingemans, T.; van den Heuvel, W.J.A.

    1999-01-01

    Psychiatric nurses in The Netherlands are moving out of residential mental health institutions and are pioneering home care for the acutely and chronically mentally ill. The purpose of this study was to identify the interventions nurses currently use and to describe the differences between crisis-or

  13. [Effects of IT usage on the nursing-care stress of stay-at-home caregivers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Masakazu; Kinoshita, Ayae

    2008-12-01

    We examined the effects of blog post on the stress reduction of stay-at-home care givers who posted their nursing-care blog on the Internet. Fourteen bloggers filled out the attached questionnaires. In the examination of questionnaires about intercommunication among the care givers, we suggest that IT literacy is found to be useful for reducing the burden of nursing care.

  14. Top Management Leadership Style and Quality of Care in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Nicholas G.; Decker, Frederic H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the association of Nursing Home Administrator (NHA) leadership style and Director of Nursing (DON) leadership style with quality of care. Design and Methods: Leaders were categorized into 4 groups: consensus managers, consultative autocrats, shareholder managers, or autocrats. This leadership style…

  15. 77 FR 26183 - Technical Revisions To Update Reference to the Required Assessment Tool for State Nursing Homes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-03

    ... (VA) regulations. On November 10, 2011, VA published in the Federal Register (76 FR 70076) a proposal... Tool for State Nursing Homes Receiving Per Diem Payments From VA AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs... State homes that receive per diem from VA for providing nursing home care to veterans. It requires...

  16. Pressure ulcer incidence in Dutch and German nursing homes: design of a prospective multicenter cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lohrmann Christa

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pressure ulcers are a common and serious health care problem in all health care settings. Results from annual national pressure ulcer prevalence surveys in the Netherlands and Germany reveal large differences in prevalence rates between both countries over the past ten years, especially in nursing homes. When examining differences in prevalence and incidence rates, it is important to take into account all factors associated with the development of pressure ulcers. Numerous studies have identified patient related factors, as well as nursing related interventions as risk factors for the development of pressure ulcers. Next to these more process oriented factors, also structural factors such as staffing levels and staff quality play a role in the development of pressure ulcers. This study has been designed to investigate the incidence of pressure ulcers in nursing homes in the Netherlands and Germany and to identify patient related factors, nursing related factors and structural factors associated with pressure ulcer development. The present article describes the protocol for this study. Methods/design A prospective multicenter study is designed in which a cohort of newly admitted nursing home residents in 10 Dutch and 11 German nursing homes will be followed for a period of 12 weeks. Data will be collected by research assistants using questionnaires on four different levels: resident, staff, ward, and nursing home. Discussion The results of the study will provide information on the incidence of pressure ulcers in Dutch and German nursing homes. Furthermore, information will be gathered on the influence of patient related factors, nursing related factors and structural factors on the incidence of pressure ulcers. The present article describes the study design and addresses the study's strengths and weaknesses.

  17. Ethics policies on euthanasia in nursing homes: a survey in Flanders, Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemiengre, Joke; Dierckx de Casterlé, Bernadette; Verbeke, Geert; Van Craen, Katleen; Schotsmans, Paul; Gastmans, Chris

    2008-01-01

    In many European countries there is a public debate about the acceptability and regulation of euthanasia. In 2002, Belgium became the second country after the Netherlands to enact a law on euthanasia. Although euthanasia rarely occurs, the complexity of the clinical-ethical decision making surrounding euthanasia requests and the need for adequate support reported by caregivers, means that healthcare institutions increasingly need to consider how to responsibly handle euthanasia requests. The development of written ethics policies on euthanasia may be important to guarantee and maintain the quality of care for patients requesting euthanasia. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence, development, position, and communication of written ethics policies on euthanasia in Flemish nursing homes. Data were obtained through a cross-sectional mail survey of general directors of all Catholic nursing homes in Flanders, Belgium. Of the 737 nursing homes invited to participate, 612 (83%) completed the questionnaire. Of these, only 15% had a written ethics policy on euthanasia. Presence of an ethics committee and membership of an umbrella organization were independent predictors of whether a nursing home had such a written ethics policy. The Act on Euthanasia and euthanasia guidelines advanced by professional organizations were the most frequent reasons (76% and 56%, respectively) and reference sources (92% and 64%, respectively) for developing ethics policies on euthanasia. Development of ethics policies occurred within a multidisciplinary context. In general, Flemish nursing homes applied the Act on Euthanasia restrictively by introducing palliative procedures in addition to legal due care criteria. The policy was communicated to the consulting general practitioner and nurses in 74% and 89% of nursing homes, respectively. Although the overall prevalence of ethics policies on euthanasia was low in Flemish nursing homes, institution administrators displayed growing

  18. Geriatric Workforce Capacity: A Pending Crisis for Nursing Home Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chen eLee

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The nursing home (NH population in the U.S. has grown to 1.6 million people and is expected to double by 2030. While 88.3% of NH residents are over 65, the elders aged 85 and more have become the principal group. This demographic change has increased the already high rates of chronic diseases and functional disabilities in NH residents. Methods: This study reviewed the supply of geriatricians in addressing the growing healthcare needs of NH residents. Results: English-written articles between 1989 and 2012 were reviewed. Trend data demonstrate that the geriatrician workforce has decreased from 10,270 in 2000 to 8,502 in 2010. Further, the pipeline analysis of physicians projected to receive board certification in geriatrics (and maintain this certification indicates a worsening of the already insufficient supply of geriatricians for this vulnerable population. Conclusion: Strategies to attract and maintain a geriatrician workforce are imperative to avert a mounting crisis in the geriatric care in NH and, by extension, other living settings.

  19. Hospitals, nursing homes turn to 3rd-party financing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaff, J.

    1982-07-05

    Experience is teaching the administrators of hospitals and nursing homes how to make better arrangements for third-party financing of energy-management systems. Accustomed to health-insurance reimbursement for health-care costs, hospitals have lacked incentives for conservation. Plans now used most by hospitals and health-care facilities involve third-party arrangements where: (1) an equipment vendor installs equipment and takes a share of the energy-cost savings; or (2) energy-services firms both install capital-intensive equipment and implement a variety of low-cost conservation measures, again for a percentage of the savings. Although most users think these arrangements are satisfactory, they advise a preliminary low-cost audit and participation in a basic energy-management seminar before employing an energy-services firm. Accurate baseline energy-consumption data should be developed in order to evaluate results, and assurance is needed that staff members understand the accounting formulas. Also recommended are independent audits after installation and attention to the legal clauses in contracts. (DCK)

  20. The Care of Non-English Speaking Background Residents in Mainstream Nursing Homes and Hostels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkons, Rita

    A survey of 104 individuals of non-English-speaking backgrounds (NESBs) living in South Australia nursing homes and personal care homes and staff of 75 institution housing NESB residents is reported. The study's objectives was to determine the culturally-based needs of the residents and the provision of culturally appropriate services to them. The…

  1. Integrating peritoneal and home haemodialysis: a nurse's perspective from a single centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Carol; Beech, Nicola; Chesterton, Lindsay; Fluck, Richard

    2011-12-01

    Home based dialytic therapy is underutilized in most renal centres. This article describes a nurse led and delivered approach to problem solving from a patient perspective, resulting in an increase in prevalent and incident patient numbers on home HD and peritoneal dialysis. Overall, between 2004 and 2010 home-based therapies have risen from 61 to 119 prevalent patients, with a fall in in-centre patient numbers.

  2. Was the Risk from Nursing-Home Evacuation after the Fukushima Accident Higher than the Radiation Risk?

    OpenAIRE

    Michio Murakami; Kyoko Ono; Masaharu Tsubokura; Shuhei Nomura; Tomoyoshi Oikawa; Tosihiro Oka; Masahiro Kami; Taikan Oki

    2015-01-01

    After the 2011 accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, nursing-home residents and staff were evacuated voluntarily from damaged areas to avoid radiation exposure. Unfortunately, the evacuation resulted in increased mortalities among nursing home residents. We assessed the risk trade-off between evacuation and radiation for 191 residents and 184 staff at three nursing homes by using the same detriment indicator, namely loss of life expectancy (LLE), under four scenarios, i.e. "r...

  3. Health Care Segregation and Race Disparities in Infectious Disease: The Case of Nursing Homes and Seasonal Influenza Vaccinations*

    OpenAIRE

    Strully, Kate W.

    2011-01-01

    Examining nursing home segregation and race disparities in influenza vaccinations, this article demonstrates that segregation may increase both susceptibility and exposure to seasonal flu for black Americans. Evidence based on the 2004 U.S. National Nursing Home Survey shows that individuals in nursing homes with a high percentage of black residents have less personal immunity to flu since they are less likely to have been vaccinated against the disease; they may also be more likely to be exp...

  4. Community health nursing: can being self-employed work for you in home care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seri, S F

    1997-09-01

    There is a fine distinction between being an independent contractor and being an employee. The advantages of being self-employed as a community health nurse are many. Self-employment suits new parents, graduate students, people in transition, with more than one profession, and who don't want a fixed schedule. However, this type of nursing is not for everyone. A broker such as CHN can help nurses become successfully self-employed. At a time when hospitals are downsizing and home care is becoming more in demand, brokers such as CHN provide a framework in which busy, experienced, community health nurses can work when and where they want. Good clinical and communication skills and a wish to be autonomous are necessities. A willingness to travel to different agencies and a reliable car are also important. A love for variety, flexibility, and independence make self-employment as a home health nurse a clinician's dream.

  5. Home health nurses: stress, self-esteem, social intimacy, and job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, S; Lindquist, S; Katz, B

    1997-06-01

    A survey of 253 home health care nurses' perceptions of work-related stress, self-esteem, social intimacy, and job satisfaction found that stress has a negative correlation with self-esteem, social intimacy, and job satisfaction. A positive correlation, however, was found between self-esteem and social intimacy and job satisfaction. Health system administrators, owners, and directors had significantly higher levels of self-esteem, nurses with 5 years or more in their home health nursing position had significantly higher levels of self-esteem. The survey found that nurses with less than a baccalaureate degree possessed significantly lower levels of sociability than those with a graduate or baccalaureate degree. Administrators and managers scored significantly higher on sociability than head nurses.

  6. Marie Curie nurses: enabling patients with cancer to die at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginson, Irene J; Wilkinson, Susie

    2002-05-01

    Marie Curie Cancer Care established its nursing service in 1958; however, the service has had little formal evaluation. This study aimed to describe and evaluate the care provided by Marie Curie nurse, and in particular to determine whether patients in their care remained and died at home. Two existing data sets were used: data on all patients referred to the Marie Curie Nursing Services in 147 areas of England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland for 26 months, and data on cancer death registrations in England. A request for a Marie Curie nurse was made for 26,632 patients, 97% of whom had cancer and 11% of whom lived alone. The amount of care provided varied enormously (Marie Curie nurses facilitated home death for many patients. Services need to ensure that mechanisms are in place to achieve data collection. Rigorous prospective evaluation is needed in the future.

  7. Best practices in nursing homes. Clinical supervision, management, and human resource practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellefield, Mary Ellen

    2008-07-01

    Human resource practices including supervision and management are associated with organizational performance. Evidence supportive of such an association in nursing homes is found in the results of numerous research studies conducted during the past 17 years. In this article, best practices related to this topic have been culled from descriptive, explanatory, and intervention studies in a range of interdisciplinary research journals published between 1990 and 2007. Identified best practices include implementation of training programs on supervision and management for licensed nurses, certified nursing assistant job enrichment programs, implementation of consistent nursing assignments, and the use of electronic documentation. Organizational barriers and facilitators of these best practices are described. PMID:20077964

  8. Use Of Nursing Home Compare Website Appears Limited By Lack Of Awareness And Initial Mistrust Of The Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konetzka, R Tamara; Perraillon, Marcelo Coca

    2016-04-01

    In December 2008 the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) launched a five-star rating system of nursing homes as part of Nursing Home Compare, a web-based report card detailing quality of care at all CMS-certified nursing homes. Questions remain, however, as to how well consumers use this rating system as well as other sources of information in choosing nursing home placement. We used a qualitative assessment of how consumers select nursing homes and of the role of information about quality, using semistructured interviews of people who recently placed a family member or friend in a nursing home. We found that consumers were receptive to using Internet-based information about quality as one source of information but that choice was limited by the need for specialized services, proximity to family or health care providers, and availability of Medicaid beds. Consumers had a positive reaction when shown Nursing Home Compare; however, its use appeared to be limited by lack of awareness and, to some extent, initial lack of trust of the data. Our findings suggest that efforts to expand the use of Nursing Home Compare should focus on awareness and trust. Useful additions to Nursing Home Compare might include measures of the availability of activities, information about cost, and consumer satisfaction. PMID:27044972

  9. Maersta Nursing Home energy conservation project. Energisparprojektet Maersta sjukhem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, M.

    1987-01-01

    Maersta Nursing Home consists of an H-shaped ward building with 4x12 beds and a supply building. The design of the ward sections, with four blocks of equal size but incorporating different building methods and different installation services, has permitted comparative investigations of performance, energy savings, operating costs etc. The project has included everything from initial design and construction to performance measurement and assessment. Data from parameters affecting energy consumption has been continuously monitored over a period of more than three years. About ten million hourly mean values have been logged for the production and analysis of energy balances for individual components and for parts of the buildings. The report compares the performance of massive and light building structures with different insulation levels, different types of window design, airborne and waterborne heating systems regenerative and recuperative heat exchangers and other variables. Different types of water-saving taps are compared, as are economy-flush and normal-flush lavatories. The value of waste water heat exchangers, solar collectors for domestic hot water production, recovery of heat from refrigerator condensers, conversion of flushing desinfectors and so on are also considered. The objective has been achieved, and the results indicate that 50% savings can be obtained without any reduction in the standard of either thermal comfort or hygiene. In general, it can be said that well-planned energy conservation measures make it easier to establish a good indoor climate. The report also reveals that an energy-efficient building can be produced without incurring higher building costs. (authors).

  10. Process Mining for Individualized Behavior Modeling Using Wireless Tracking in Nursing Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Traver

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of human behavior patterns is increasingly used for several research fields. The individualized modeling of behavior using classical techniques requires too much time and resources to be effective. A possible solution would be the use of pattern recognition techniques to automatically infer models to allow experts to understand individual behavior. However, traditional pattern recognition algorithms infer models that are not readily understood by human experts. This limits the capacity to benefit from the inferred models. Process mining technologies can infer models as workflows, specifically designed to be understood by experts, enabling them to detect specific behavior patterns in users. In this paper, the eMotiva process mining algorithms are presented. These algorithms filter, infer and visualize workflows. The workflows are inferred from the samples produced by an indoor location system that stores the location of a resident in a nursing home. The visualization tool is able to compare and highlight behavior patterns in order to facilitate expert understanding of human behavior. This tool was tested with nine real users that were monitored for a 25-week period. The results achieved suggest that the behavior of users is continuously evolving and changing and that this change can be measured, allowing for behavioral change detection.

  11. [Nursing care of long-term oxygen individuals in the home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oowan, A

    1992-12-01

    The system and experience of home care for patients with chronic lung disease in Urasoe Sougou hospital was reviewed from nursing points of view. Home oxygen care was started in October, 1984. The Health Care Department (HCD) was established in July, 1988 to provide both various home cares and daycare services for the aged. The number of personnel (public health nurses, registered nurses) were increased year by year to 15, include one physician as a medical director. They worked on a full-time basis in home care. The roles of the HCD in home oxygen care are 1) direct nursing services, medical and psychological assessment, consultation, education for patients in the home. 2) exchange informations, coordination and scheduling among physicians, in-hospital care team and durable medical equipment companies. Quality of care on 65 patients between before and after the establishment of the HCD were compared to assess the efficacy of system. Quality of care were measured by several items; 1, frequency of home visit. 2, medical, psychological assessment. 3, patient's ability to understand and accept the disease state and home care, to do self-responsible procedures (bronchial hygiene, medication, bathing, etc.), and to handle the equipment. 4, assessment on patient's daily activities and environments. After the establishment of the HCD, quality of care has been improved. On 10 patients in the remote locations or islands, the HCD exchanged informations and coordinated with the community public health nurses and local practitioners. These experience suggests full-time home care team like the HCD contribute to improve both quality of care and quality of life of patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1306224

  12. Home care patients in four Nordic capitals – predictors of nursing home admission during one-year followup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liv W Sørbye

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Liv W Sørbye1, Torunn Hamran2, Nils Henriksen2, Astrid Norberg2,31Diakonhjemmet University College, Oslo, Norway; 2Department of Health and Care Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, Norway; 3Umeå University, Umeå, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, SwedenAbstract: The aim was to predict nursing home admission (NHA for home care patients after a 12-month follow-up study. This Nordic study is derived from the aged in home care (AdHOC project conducted in 2001–2003 with patients at 11 sites in Europe. The participants in the cohort study were randomly selected individuals, aged 65 years or older, receiving homecare in Oslo, Stockholm, Copenhagen, and Reykjavik. The Resident Assessment Instrument for Home Care (version 2.0 was used. Epidemiological and medical characteristics of patients and service utilization were recorded for 1508 home care patients (participation rate 74%. In this sample 75% were female. The mean age was 82.1 (6.9 years for men and 84.0 (6.6 for women. The most consistent predictor of NHA was receiving skilled nursing procedures at baseline (help with medication and injections, administration or help with oxygen, intravenous, catheter and stoma care, wounds and skin care (adjusted odds ratio = 3.7, 95% confidence interval: 1.7–7.8; P < 0.001. In this Nordic material, stronger emphasizing on higher qualified nurses in a home care setting could prevent or delay NHA.Keywords: aged, home care, cross-sectional study, self-rated health, level of care, care burden, comprehensive assessment, RAI, Nordic

  13. Identification of the need for home visiting nurse: development of a new assessment tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuko Taguchi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop a Home Visiting Nursing Service Need Assessment Form (HVNS-NAF to standardize the decision about the need for home visiting nursing service. Methods: The sample consisted of older adults who had received coordinated services by care managers. We defined the need for home visiting nursing service by elderly individuals as the decision of the need by a care manager so that the elderly can continue to live independently. Explanatory variables included demographic factors, medical procedure, severity of illness, and caregiver variables. Multiple logistic regression was carried out after univariate analyses to decide the variables to include and the weight of each variable in the HVNS-NAF. We then calculated the sensitivity and specificity of each cut-off value, and defined the score with the highest sensitivityand specificity as the cut-off value. Results: Nineteen items were included in the final HVNS-NAF. When the cut-off value was 2 points, the sensitivity was 77.0%, specificity 68.5%, and positive predictive value 56.8%. Conclusions: HVNS-NAF is the first validated standard based on characteristics of elderly clients who required home visiting nursing service. Using the HVNS-NAF may result in reducing the unmet need for home visiting nursing service and preventing hospitalization.

  14. Designating Smoking Room to Control Environmental Tobacco Smoke in Nursing Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhang Akbar-Khanzadeh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was initiated to assess the effectiveness of designating smoking rooms to control environmental tobacco smoke in nursing homes. Of the 39 nursing homes located in Toledo (a city in Ohio, USA included in the preliminary survey, 33 facilities (85% allowed smoking, 14 facilities (36% allowed indoor smoking, and 13 facilities (33% provided a designated smoking area. Three of these 13 nursing homes with similar levels of care agreed to participate in study that was more comprehensive. The levels of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide (CO2, respirable suspended particulate matter, nicotine, and solanesol were monitored at three locations within three nursing homes: a designated smoking room with an independent ventilation system, the adjacent hallway and outside the building. The concentrations of air contaminants, except CO2, inside the designated smoking rooms were significantly higher than those in the hallways or outside. The concentration of CO2 was similar in the smoking rooms and the hallways but significantly higher than the concentration outside. The levels of ambient air temperature or relative humidity within the three locations were not generally different. The results indicated that the designation of a smoking room with an independent ventilation system was effective in controlling the environmental tobacco smoke in these nursing homes.

  15. The effect of self-transcendence on depression in cognitively intact nursing home patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugan, Gørill; Innstrand, Siw Tone

    2012-01-01

    Aims. This study's aim was to test the effects of self-transcendence on depression among cognitively intact nursing home patients. Background. Depression is considered the most frequent mental disorder among the elderly population. Specifically, the depression rate among nursing home patients is three to four times higher than that among community-dwelling elderly. Therefore, finding new and alternative ways to prevent and decrease depression is of great importance for nursing home patients' well-being. Self-transcendence is related to spiritual as well as nonspiritual factors, and it is described as a correlate and resource for well-being among vulnerable populations and at the end of life. Methods. A two-factor construct of the self-transcendence scale (interpersonal and intrapersonal) and the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) was applied. A sample of 202 cognitively intact nursing home patients in central Norway was selected to respond to the questionnaires in 2008/2009. Results. A hypothesized SEM model demonstrated significant direct relationships and total effects of self-transcendence on depression. Conclusion and Implication for Practice. Facilitating patients' self-transcendence, both interpersonally and intrapersonally, might decrease depression among cognitively intact nursing home patients.

  16. Scale and scope economies in nursing homes: a quantile regression approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Eric W

    2004-04-01

    Nursing homes vary widely between facilities with very few beds and facilities with several hundred beds. Previous studies, which estimate nursing home scale and scope economies, do not account for this heterogeneity and implicitly assume that all nursing homes face the same cost structure. To account for heterogeneity, this paper uses quantile regression to estimate cost functions for skilled and intermediate care nursing homes. The results show that the parameters of nursing home cost functions vary significantly by output mix and across the cost distribution. Estimates show that product-specific scale economies systematically increase across the cost distribution for both skilled and intermediate care facilities, with diseconomies of scale in the lower deciles and no significant scale economies in the higher deciles. As for ray scale economies, estimates show economies of scale in the lower deciles and diseconomies of scale or no significant scale economies at higher deciles. The estimates also show that scope economies exist in the lower cost deciles and that no scope economies exist in the higher cost deciles. Additionally, the degree of scope economies monotonically decreases across the deciles.

  17. Market Conditions and Performance in the Nursing Home Compare Five-Star Rating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ae-Sook

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies have documented that market conditions affect nursing home performance; however, the evidence is inconsistent and conflicting. This study introduces three groups of county market conditions and a peer effect variable, and tests their impacts on the Nursing Home Compare (NHC) Five-Star overall rating. Indiana nursing home data and county characteristics are taken mainly from the NHC and Census Bureau websites. The result of the ordered logistic regression analysis indicates that nursing homes in excess demand markets, namely those that are highly concentrated and have fewer nursing homes, tend to perform better than their counterparts in both excess supply and balanced markets. In addition, a peer effect variable, measured as the average overall rating of the competitors, promotes performance improvement. These findings imply that small markets enable consumers to be well informed about a provider's reputation for quality, consequently enhancing performance. Furthermore, not only consumers but also providers seem to seek performance information on the report card to understand their relative position in the market, which thus affects their market strategies and subsequently performance. PMID:27256809

  18. Market Conditions and Performance in the Nursing Home Compare Five-Star Rating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ae-Sook

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies have documented that market conditions affect nursing home performance; however, the evidence is inconsistent and conflicting. This study introduces three groups of county market conditions and a peer effect variable, and tests their impacts on the Nursing Home Compare (NHC) Five-Star overall rating. Indiana nursing home data and county characteristics are taken mainly from the NHC and Census Bureau websites. The result of the ordered logistic regression analysis indicates that nursing homes in excess demand markets, namely those that are highly concentrated and have fewer nursing homes, tend to perform better than their counterparts in both excess supply and balanced markets. In addition, a peer effect variable, measured as the average overall rating of the competitors, promotes performance improvement. These findings imply that small markets enable consumers to be well informed about a provider's reputation for quality, consequently enhancing performance. Furthermore, not only consumers but also providers seem to seek performance information on the report card to understand their relative position in the market, which thus affects their market strategies and subsequently performance.

  19. Clinical characteristics, diagnostic evaluation, and antibiotic prescribing patterns for skin infections in nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihiro Yogo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The epidemiology and management of skin infections in nursing homes has not been adequately described. We reviewed the characteristics, diagnosis and treatment of skin infections among residents of nursing homes to identify opportunities to improve antibiotic use. Methods: A retrospective study involving 12 nursing homes in the Denver metropolitan area. For residents at participating nursing homes diagnosed with a skin infection between July 1, 2013 and June 30, 2014, clinical and demographic information was collected through manual chart review.Results: Of 100 cases included in the study, the most common infections were non-purulent cellulitis (n=55, wound infection (n=27, infected ulcer (n=8, and cutaneous abscess (n=7. In 26 cases, previously published minimum clinical criteria for initiating antibiotics (Loeb criteria were not met. Most antibiotics (n=52 were initiated as a telephone order following a call from a nurse, and 41 patients were not evaluated by a provider within 48 hours after initiation of antibiotics. Nearly all patients (n=95 were treated with oral antibiotics alone. The median treatment duration was 7 days (interquartile range [IQR] 7-10; 43 patients received treatment courses of ≥ 10 days.Conclusions: Most newly diagnosed skin infections in nursing homes were non-purulent infections treated with oral antibiotics. Antibiotics were initiated by telephone in over half of cases, and lack of a clinical evaluation within 48 hours after starting antibiotics was common. Improved diagnosis through more timely clinical evaluations and decreasing length of therapy are important opportunities for antibiotic stewardship in nursing homes.

  20. Sending money home: a mixed-Methods study of remittances by migrant nurses in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Humphries, Niamh

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: This paper presents data on the remittances sent by migrant nurses to their families "back home". It gives voice to the experiences of migrant nurses and illustrates the financial obligations they maintain while working overseas. Although the international economic recession has decreased global remittance flows, they remain resilient. Drawing on the experiences of migrant nurses in Ireland, this paper indicates how and why migrants strive to maintain remittance flows, even in an economic downturn. METHODS: A mixed-methods approach was employed, and the paper draws on data from qualitative in-depth interviews undertaken with 21 migrant nurses in addition to a quantitative survey of 336 migrant nurses in Ireland. RESULTS: The survey of migrant nurses revealed that 87% (293) of the sample sent remittances on a regular basis. According to respondents, remittances made a huge difference in the lives of their family members back home. Remittances were used to ensure that family members could obtain access to health and education services. They were also used to provide an income source for family members who were unemployed or retired.As remittances played an essential role in supporting family members back home, respondent migrant nurses were reluctant to reduce the level of their remittances, despite the onset of a global recession. Respondents noted that an increased demand for remittances from their families coincided with a reduction in their own net salaries - as a result of increased taxes and reduced availability of overtime - and this was a cause for concern for Ireland\\'s migrant nurses. CONCLUSION: This paper provides insights into the importance of remittances in funding social support for family members in home countries. It also illustrates the sacrifices made by migrant nurses to ensure continuation of the remittances, particularly in the context of an economic recession.

  1. Influenza and pneumococcal vaccine uptake among nursing home residents in Nottingham, England: a postal questionnaire survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivancos Roberto

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have shown influenza vaccine uptake in UK nursing home residents to be low. Very little information exists regarding the uptake of pneumococcal vaccine in this population. The formulation of policies relating to the vaccination of residents has been proposed as a simple step that may help improve vaccine uptake in care homes. Methods A postal questionnaire was sent to matrons of all care homes with nursing within the Greater Nottingham area in January 2006. Non respondents were followed up with up to 3 phone calls. Results 30% (16/53 of respondents reported having a policy addressing influenza vaccination and 15% (8/53 had a policy addressing pneumococcal vaccination. Seasonal influenza vaccine coverage in care homes with a vaccination policy was 87% compared with 84% in care homes without a policy (p = 0.47. The uptake of pneumococcal vaccination was found to be low, particularly in care homes with no vaccination policy. Coverage was 60% and 32% in care homes with and without a vaccination policy respectively (p = 0.06. This result was found to be statistically significant on multivariate analysis (p = 0.03, R = 0.46 Conclusion The uptake of influenza vaccine among care home residents in the Nottingham region is relatively high, although pneumococcal vaccine uptake is low. This study shows that there is an association between pneumococcal vaccine uptake and the existence of a vaccination policy in care homes, and highlights that few care homes have vaccination policies in place.

  2. [EurSafety Health-Net: MRSA Eradication in Nursing Homes and Home Care - A Practice Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen, P; Rocker, D; Claußen, K; Kluba, J; Vogelsang, E; Vogelsang, G

    2016-01-01

    In 2009 the project EurSafety Health-Net, funded by Interreg IVa, was initiated in order to create a cross-border quality alliance to enhance patient safety in the field of infectious diseases. Within this framework, several studies and projects addressing key topics of infection control were carried out. We describe the two-year project "MRSA decolonisation in care settings (MSP)", which aimed at evaluating a simple and economic way of decolonisation of non-hospitalised MRSA carriers in 2 districts in Lower Saxony. In the course of the project 181 decolonisations of MRSA carriers were performed by nursing homes and nursing services for outpatients in cooperation with the local public health authorities of the districts Ammerland and Grafschaft Bentheim. Of 181 cases 134 were eligible for statistical analysis. The project provided protocols for 2 different starting situations: 1) Continuing and completing a decolonisation treatment subsequent to a hospital stay by nursing services for outpatients or in a nursing home. 2) Starting a decolonisation treatment in a nursing home or by nursing services for outpatients. The carriers were provided with the required materials either by the hospitals (situation 1) or by the local public health authorities (situation 2) free of charge. The decolonisation treatment and the testing were offered only to carriers free of properties deemed as decolonisation obstacles and was applied without involvement of the general practitioner. Short- and long-term success of the 5 day decolonisation treatment was tested afterwards by two swabs (14 days and 6 months after the end of the treatment). The results of the 6-month control swabs showed that 45% of the carriers were successfully decolonised in the long term. All parties involved regarded the procedure of the MSP project as effective with respect to the target. Thus, even after the project was finished, both districts continued applying the MSP protocol. PMID:25951112

  3. [Substitution in psychogeriatrics. A comparative study in nursing homes and substitution projects in Drenthe].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, M

    1995-02-01

    Due to a strong increase of the ageing population in the Netherlands there is a growing need for care for psychogeriatric patients. The shortage of beds in psychogeriatric nursing homes has led to the development of substitute care in residential homes for the elderly and in community centers. If substitution is realized in these substitute care projects in the sense that alternative services are delivered for patients who would otherwise have been admitted to nursing homes, the level of impairment and disruptive behaviour should be of the same level in nursing homes and substitute care projects. Groups of patients of three nursing homes, three day-treatment facilities, eight day-care-projects in residential homes for the elderly and seven centers for day-care in the community were compared. Sociodemographic characteristics, behaviour and care-patterns of all 670 patients who were in care on the first of October of 1992 in these services were investigated. An assessment-scale for elderly patients, based on the Stockton Geriatric Rating Scale, was used to investigate behaviour. Substitute care appears to be possible for a limited and specific group of patients. Substitution for the severely disturbed patients (over 40% of the nursing home patients) does not seem to be possible. Due to the development of substitute care for psychogeriatric patients in residential homes for the elderly and centers for day-care in the community, services seem to develop towards more specific and specialized care. We recommend the foundation of a psychogeriatric case register, which allows the study of the transfer of patients across facilities.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Interventions to nurture excellence in the nursing home culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutschman, M

    2001-08-01

    There is no one formula for culcure change. A joint steering committee of staff members can develop plans that will build trust, address each other as equals, and drive out fear as they move the process of change. Training and sharing information help staff recognize this is a process, not an event. New well-screened team members need training to integrate them into the culture. It is important to identify the knowledge and expertise of team members to maximize their energies and talents. Recruitment and retention of those who share the values of this culture are of paramount importance. It is worth the time and effort to secure commitment to these values. One example of this effort is a facility in Pennsylvania that, at its worst, had two thirds of its staff turnover in a year. The national average was 82% in 1995, an increase from 71.5% the year before. They were able to reduce their turnover rate to 27% by examining the hiring records and finding that workers with certain personality traits and attitudes were less likely to leave. They looked for compassion and communication skills, perceptions of older adults, ability to cope with death and dying, and ability to handle the unpleasant tasks of residene hygiene and bathroom visits. Current staff members determined and voted on best fit of candidates (Montague, 1997). Although training and evaluation are an important component of retention and commitment to values in any organization, training and evaluation of nursing home employees may be quite different from other employment. A nurse in a nursing home needs to be evaluated not only on clinical skills, but on communication skills, attitude, and leadership (Meyer, 1995). Then training and employee development programs can be targeted to specific areas for corrective action. What is taught in training and what occurs on the job should correspond, or role conflict occurs increasing the likelihood of turnover (Steffen, Nystrom, O'Connor, 1996). Although occasional

  5. Inter-rater reliability of nursing home quality indicators in the U.S

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Jason

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the US, Quality Indicators (QI's profiling and comparing the performance of hospitals, health plans, nursing homes and physicians are routinely published for consumer review. We report the results of the largest study of inter-rater reliability done on nursing home assessments which generate the data used to derive publicly reported nursing home quality indicators. Methods We sampled nursing homes in 6 states, selecting up to 30 residents per facility who were observed and assessed by research nurses on 100 clinical assessment elements contained in the Minimum Data Set (MDS and compared these with the most recent assessment in the record done by facility nurses. Kappa statistics were generated for all data items and derived for 22 QI's over the entire sample and for each facility. Finally, facilities with many QI's with poor Kappa levels were compared to those with many QI's with excellent Kappa levels on selected characteristics. Results A total of 462 facilities in 6 states were approached and 219 agreed to participate, yielding a response rate of 47.4%. A total of 5758 residents were included in the inter-rater reliability analyses, around 27.5 per facility. Patients resembled the traditional nursing home resident, only 43.9% were continent of urine and only 25.2% were rated as likely to be discharged within the next 30 days. Results of resident level comparative analyses reveal high inter-rater reliability levels (most items >.75. Using the research nurses as the "gold standard", we compared composite quality indicators based on their ratings with those based on facility nurses. All but two QI's have adequate Kappa levels and 4 QI's have average Kappa values in excess of .80. We found that 16% of participating facilities performed poorly (Kappa .75 on 12 or more QI's. No facility characteristics were related to reliability of the data on which Qis are based. Conclusion While a few QI's being used for public reporting

  6. Nursing process and its significance to seniors according the perspective of retirement home nurses

    OpenAIRE

    FRÜHAUFOVÁ, Hana

    2013-01-01

    Modern nursing care is characterized by seeking, planning and satisfying needs of a healthy or an ill person. All this is performed by means of the nursing care process. The nursing care process is considered the basic scientific method of advanced nursing care leading to solution of problems. It has already become an inherent form of individual care planning. Thanks to the nursing care process a nurse has a holistic view of a patient and is able to provide quality care. Nursing care is provi...

  7. Positive effects of experience in terminal care on nursing home staff in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Koji; Ohashi, Akira

    2011-09-01

    This study aimed to examine the psychological effects of terminal care experience on nursing home staff and analyze the differences between staff who are experienced and those who are inexperienced in providing terminal care. A mailed survey was conducted in 2007. A total of 37% (N = 72) of the participants had experience in terminal care in nursing homes. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed that the professional efficacy (a subscale of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey [MBI-GS]) and tenure (duration of service) of the experienced staff were significantly higher than those of the inexperienced staff. The high professional efficacy noted among the experienced staff suggests that the provision of terminal care in nursing homes does not necessarily lead to burnout among caregivers and may in fact serve as an important motivational factor.

  8. The effects of CON repeal on Medicaid nursing home and long-term care expenditures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, David C; Ohsfeldt, Robert L; Morrisey, Michael A

    2003-01-01

    Certificate-of-need (CON) and construction moratorium laws are used widely by states as a potential mechanism for constraining Medicaid nursing home expenditures. However, there is only limited empirical work examining whether these policies are effective at lowering Medicaid spending. Using aggregate state-level data from 1981 through 1998, this study found that states that repealed their CON and moratorium laws had no significant growth in either nursing home or long-term care Medicaid expenditures. In the context of declining occupancy rates within the nursing home market, this study provides strong evidence that states have little to fear in terms of increased expenditures with the repeal of CON and moratorium laws.

  9. Dignity and existential concerns among nursing homes residents from the perspective of their relatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caspari., Synnøve; Høy, Bente; Lohne, Vibeke;

    2014-01-01

    Aims and objectives: The aim of this cross-country Scandinavian study was to explore how residents in nursing homes experience that their dignity is promoted and attended to. This is one part of the Scandinavian project in which we interviewed residents, relatives and staff members. Background......: The main subject concerns the dignity of residents of nursing homes for older people. This article brings forward results from interviews of relatives on how they experience that the dignity is met, promoted and attended to for their next of kin. Design: The study was qualitative with a hermeneutic...... approach. Methods: Qualitative research interviews of 28 relatives of residents at six participating nursing homes in Scandinavia. The results derive from analysis of the interviews using Kvale’s three levels of interpretation; self-understanding, common sense and a theoretical understanding. Results...

  10. Sociability and distinction: An ethnographic study of a French nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brossard, Baptiste

    2016-04-01

    How do residents' previous social positions influence the ways in which they deal with social life in nursing home? Based on observations and interviews in a private nursing home in France, this article describes daily life in the facility, the disability-based distinctions observed among residents, the strategies they use to "find their place," and the references they make about their former social position in collective encounters. It shows that sociability in nursing homes is structured by the intertwining of "levels of disability" among residents, the social composition of the institution and its local surroundings, and the relative value attributed to each type of capital (in the sense of Bourdieu) in this context. The author proposes some assumptions that aim to generalize these specific findings. PMID:27131275

  11. Case-controlled study of nursing home residents referred for treatment of vocally disruptive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, B; Snowdon, J; Meares, S; Turner, J; Gonski, P; McMinn, B; McIntosh, H; Latham, L; Draper, D; Luscombe, G

    2000-09-01

    The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with vocally disruptive behavior (VDB) in nursing home patients referred to aged care services for treatment, using a case-control methodology. Characteristics of the VDB, reasons for referral, perceived causal factors, and psychotropic use were noted. Twenty-five subjects and controls were examined with the Screaming Behavior Mapping Instrument, the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia, the Dementia Behavior Disturbance Scale, and measures of cognition, functional capacity, social activities, and emotional reactions of nursing staff. VDB was associated with other disturbed behaviors, depression, anxiety, severe dementia, functional impairment, communication difficulties, use of psychotropic medication, social isolation, and emotional distress in the nursing staff. Reasons for referral may relate more to the stress experienced by nursing home staff in managing VDB than to specific attributes of the VDB itself. PMID:11081953

  12. The Tower Nursing Home, 94/ 95 Cappaghmore, Clondalkin, Dublin 22.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sermeus, Walter

    2011-04-18

    Abstract Background Current human resources planning models in nursing are unreliable and ineffective as they consider volumes, but ignore effects on quality in patient care. The project RN4CAST aims innovative forecasting methods by addressing not only volumes, but quality of nursing staff as well as quality of patient care. Methods\\/Design A multi-country, multilevel cross-sectional design is used to obtain important unmeasured factors in forecasting models including how features of hospital work environments impact on nurse recruitment, retention and patient outcomes. In each of the 12 participating European countries, at least 30 general acute hospitals were sampled. Data are gathered via four data sources (nurse, patient and organizational surveys and via routinely collected hospital discharge data). All staff nurses of a random selection of medical and surgical units (at least 2 per hospital) were surveyed. The nurse survey has the purpose to measure the experiences of nurses on their job (e.g. job satisfaction, burnout) as well as to allow the creation of aggregated hospital level measures of staffing and working conditions. The patient survey is organized in a sub-sample of countries and hospitals using a one-day census approach to measure the patient experiences with medical and nursing care. In addition to conducting a patient survey, hospital discharge abstract datasets will be used to calculate additional patient outcomes like in-hospital mortality and failure-to-rescue. Via the organizational survey, information about the organizational profile (e.g. bed size, types of technology available, teaching status) is collected to control the analyses for institutional differences. This information will be linked via common identifiers and the relationships between different aspects of the nursing work environment and patient and nurse outcomes will be studied by using multilevel regression type analyses. These results will be used to simulate the impact of

  13. Identifying patients at risk of nursing home admission: The Leeds Elderly Assessment Dependency Screening tool (LEADS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fear Jon

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Discharge from hospital to a nursing home represents a major event in the life of an older person and should only follow a comprehensive functional and medical assessment. A previous study identified 3 dependency scales able to discriminate across outcomes for older people admitted to an acute setting. We wished to determine if a single dependency scale derived from the 3 scales could be created. In addition could this new scale with other predictors be used as a comprehensive tool to identify patients at risk of nursing home admission. Methods Items from the 3 scales were combined and analysed using Rasch Analysis. Sensitivity and specificity analysis and ROC curves were applied to identify the most appropriate cut score. Binary logistic regression using this cut-off, and other predictive variables, were used to create a predictive algorithm score. Sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratio scores of the algorithm scores were used to identify the best predictive score for risk of nursing home placement. Results A 17-item (LEADS scale was derived, which together with four other indicators, had a sensitivity of 88% for patients at risk of nursing home placement, and a specificity of 85% for not needing a nursing home placement, within 2 weeks of admission. Conclusion A combined short 17-item scale of dependency plus other predictive variables can assess the risk of nursing home placement for older people in an acute care setting within 2 weeks of admission. This gives an opportunity for either early discharge planning, or therapeutic intervention to offset the risk of placement.

  14. Nursing home characteristics associated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA Burden and Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy Courtney R

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MRSA prevalence in nursing homes often exceeds that in hospitals, but reasons for this are not well understood. We sought to measure MRSA burden in a large number of nursing homes and identify facility characteristics associated with high MRSA burden. Methods We performed nasal swabs of residents from 26 nursing homes to measure MRSA importation and point prevalence, and estimate transmission. Using nursing home administrative data, we identified facility characteristics associated with MRSA point prevalence and estimated transmission risk in multivariate models. Results We obtained 1,649 admission and 2,111 point prevalence swabs. Mean MRSA point prevalence was 24%, significantly higher than mean MRSA admission prevalence, 16%, (paired t-test, p In multivariate models, higher MRSA point prevalence was associated with higher admission prevalence (p=0.005 and higher proportions of residents with indwelling devices (p=0.01. Higher estimated MRSA transmission risk was associated with higher proportions of residents with diabetes (p=0.01 and lower levels of social engagement (p=0.03. Conclusions MRSA importation was a strong predictor of MRSA prevalence, but MRSA burden and transmission were also associated with nursing homes caring for more residents with chronic illnesses or indwelling devices. Frequent social interaction among residents appeared to be protective of MRSA transmission, suggesting that residents healthy enough to engage in group activities do not incur substantial risks of MRSA from social contact. Identifying characteristics of nursing homes at risk for high MRSA burden and transmission may allow facilities to tailor infection control policies and interventions to mitigate MRSA spread.

  15. Knowledge of Evidence-Based Urinary Catheter Care Practice Recommendations Among Healthcare Workers in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Lona; Saint, Sanjay; Galecki, Andrzej; Chen, Shu; Krein, Sarah L.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives This study assessed the knowledge of recommended urinary catheter care practices among nursing home (NH) healthcare workers (HCWs) in Southeast Michigan. Design A self-administered survey. Setting Seven nursing homes in Southeast Michigan. Participants Three hundred and fifty-six healthcare workers. Methods An anonymous, self-administered survey of HCWs (nurses & nurse aides) in seven NHs in 2006. The survey included questions about respondent characteristics and knowledge about indications, care, and personal hygiene pertaining to urinary catheters. The association of knowledge measures with occupation (nurses vs. aides) was assessed using generalized estimating equations. Results A total of 356 of 440 HCWs (81%) responded. Over 90% of HCWs were aware of measures such as cleaning around the catheter daily, glove use, and hand hygiene with catheter manipulation. They were less aware of research-proven recommendations of not disconnecting the catheter from its bag (59% nurses vs. 30% aides, P < .001), not routinely irrigating the catheter (48% nurses vs. 8% aides, P < .001), and hand hygiene even after casual contact (60% nurses vs. 69% aides, P = .07). HCWs were also unaware of recommendations regarding alcohol-based handrub (27% nurses & 32% aides with correct responses, P = .38). HCWs reported sources, both informal (such as nurse supervisors) and formal (in-services), of knowledge about catheter care. Conclusion Wide discrepancies remain between research-proven recommendations pertaining to urinary catheter care and HCWs' knowledge. Nurses and aides differ in their knowledge of recommendations against harmful practices, such as disconnecting the catheter from the bag and routinely irrigating catheters. Further research should focus on strategies to enhance dissemination of proven infection control practices in NHs. PMID:20662957

  16. Psychotropic drug prescription in nursing home patients with dementia : influence of environmental correlates and staff distress on physicians' prescription behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, Sytse U; de Jonghe, Jos F M; Verhey, Frans R J; Koopmans, Raymond T C M

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to examine whether staff distress and aspects of the nursing home environment were associated with psychotropic drug use (PDU) in patients with dementia. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study of 1289 nursing home patients with dementia from 56 Dementia Specia

  17. Attributions of Agency and the Construction of Moral Order: Dementia, Death, and Dignity in Nursing-Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriquez, Jason

    2009-01-01

    Using evidence gathered during 18 months of participant-observation in 2 nursing homes and 65 interviews with staff, this article examines how nursing-home staff use agency as a rhetorical resource to construct a dignified workplace. Staff attribute agency to dying residents, saying they choose the timing and conditions of their death. Staff…

  18. Effects of integrated dental care on oral treatment needs in residents of nursing homes older than 70 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, Paul; Cune, Marco; van der Bilt, Andries; Abbink, Jan; de Putter, Cornelis

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To determine effects of integrated dental care in older nursing home residents. Methods: In three nursing homes offering integrated dental care, we studied the oral treatment need of 355 residents older than 70 years. To determine effects of integrated care, we discriminated between short-stay

  19. A study of medication reviews to identify drug-related problems of polypharmacy patients in the Dutch nursing home setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finkers, F.; Maring, J. G.; Boersma, F.; Taxis, K.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the extent of drug-related problems of polypharmacy patients in Dutch nursing homes. Objectives: We investigated the feasibility of teams of hospital pharmacists and nursing home physicians carrying out medication reviews. We aimed to identify the number and nature

  20. Process evaluation to explore internal and external validity of the "Act in Case of Depression" care program in nursing homes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leontjevas, R.; Gerritsen, D.L.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Smalbrugge, M.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A multidisciplinary, evidence-based care program to improve the management of depression in nursing home residents was implemented and tested using a stepped-wedge design in 23 nursing homes (NHs): "Act in case of Depression" (AiD). OBJECTIVE: Before effect analyses, to evaluate AiD proc

  1. Reducing turnover and improving health care in nursing homes: the potential effects of self-managed work teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeatts, D E; Seward, R R

    2000-06-01

    This article describes the use of self-managed work teams (SMWTs) in a nursing home, their potential impacts on the provision of health care and employee satisfaction and turnover, and the factors reported to be important to SMWT effectiveness. Three SMWTs in a midsized nursing home in Wisconsin provide examples. Steps for implementing SMWTs are described.

  2. Relationship between Staff-Reported Culture Change and Occupancy Rate and Organizational Commitment among Nursing Homes in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minhong; Choi, Jae-Sung; Lim, Jinseop; Kim, Young Sun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine culture change in nursing homes in South Korea and to identify the outcomes of culture change implementation. Design and Methods: Data were taken from survey responses from 223 top- or mid-level staff among nursing homes in South Korea that were selected through a proportionate random-stratified sampling method…

  3. Quality Improvement in Nursing Homes: Identifying Depressed Residents is Critical to Improving Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crogan, Neval L; Evans, Bronwynne C

    2008-05-01

    The prevalence of depression in nursing home residents is three to five times higher than in older adults from the community.1 Depression is thought to be related to the gloomy institutionalized environment and an assortment of losses, including those associated with function, independence, social roles, friends and relatives, and past leisure activities.2 Despite the public's increased awareness of depression, it remains underrecognized and undertreated by professionals who care for older residents in nursing homes.3 It seems intuitive that depression must be recognized before it can be treated, yet our national long-term care system continues to utilize an unreliable scale from the Minimum Data Set as its foundation for assessment. Warnings of the scale's inadequacy have been sounded repeatedly almost since its conception4,5 and its potential role in lack of recognition and treatment of depression by nursing home staff, nurse practitioners, and physicians is a troubling one.The purpose of this article is to (1) report the prevalence of depression in a sub-sample of residents from a National Institutes of Health study whose depression was not detected by the MDS and, consequently, was previously untreated, (2) compare their nutritional and functional status with residents whose depressive states were previously detected by the MDS and treated, and (3) recommend quality improvement strategies for identification and treatment of depression in nursing home residents.

  4. Changes in the relationship between nursing home financial performance and quality of care under public reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeongyoung; Werner, Rachel M

    2011-07-01

    The relationship between financial performance and quality of care in nursing homes is not well defined and prior work has been mixed. The recent focus on improving the quality of nursing homes through market-based incentives such as public reporting may have changed this relationship, as public reporting provides nursing homes with increased incentives to engage in quality-based competition. If quality improvement activities require substantial production costs, nursing home profitability may become a more important predictor of quality under public reporting. This study explores the relationship between financial performance and quality of care and test whether this relationship changes under public reporting. Using a 10-year (fiscal years 1997-2006) panel data set of 9444 skilled nursing facilities in the US, this study employs a facility fixed-effects with and without instrumental variables approach to test the effect of finances on quality improvement and correct for potential endogeneity. The results show that better financial performance, as reflected by the 1-year lagged total profit margin, is modestly associated with higher quality but only after public reporting is initiated. These findings have important policy implications as federal and state governments use market-based incentives to increase demand for high-quality care and induce providers to compete based on quality. PMID:20578255

  5. [How can the patient's home be changed into a work place for the nurse? Interaction theoretical note on the role of the professional nurse in ambulatory care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, M

    1995-09-01

    In home-care-situations nurses are confronted with the special problem of changing the house of the patients into a nurse's place of work and to play at this "stage" the role of professional nurses. The role-theory of Goffman is the background to outline some structural barriers for the performance of this role. In such and other care-giving-situations the nurse must be able to keep a necessary amount of role-distance, to regain professional autonomy.

  6. The relationship between weight status and the need for health care assistance in nursing home residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne Marie

    2012-01-01

    points. RAI-NH data related to facility staff ratings of residents’ physical functioning (Activities of Daily Living, ADL) status and their need for health care staff assistance related to ADLs were collected at each time point in addition to the resident weight status and experience of weight loss...... of this study suggest that elderly nursing home residents with a low BMI or weight loss may add to the substantial and costly burden of nursing home care due to the associated need for higher levels of ADL assistance....

  7. Testing a two step Nursing intervention focused on decreasing rehospitalizations and nursing home sdmission post discharge from acute care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosted, Elizabeth Emilie; Poulsen, Ingrid; Hendriksen, Carsten;

    2013-01-01

    decline. A randomized controlled study was conducted. Included were 271 patients aged 70 and over admitted to an ED. A brief standardized nursing assessment and intervention was carried out after discharge and at follow-up. No effect was found on readmission to hospital, admission to nursing home......, or death but the intervention group was less likely to be at risk of depression after 180 days. Whether this method can be recommended needs further study as well as knowledge is needed as to the organization and to reveal older adults' experiences on follow-up after ED stay....

  8. Evidence-based practice for pain identification in cognitively impaired nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacoco, Christina; Ishikawa, Sally

    2014-09-01

    Pain identification of cognitively impaired elderly is very challenging. This project aimed to identify best practices for pain assessment in nursing home residents with cognitive impairment and to establish a standardized pain assessment guide to optimize nursing practice and resident outcomes. The Iowa Model of Evidence-Based Practice to Promote Quality of Care guided the project's process. Phase I of the project analyzed data gained from chart reviews on current practices of pain assessment, and Phase II used the results of Phase I to develop, implement, and evaluate an evidence-based practice standard for nursing assessment of pain for cognitively impaired residents. PMID:25155534

  9. 48 CFR 853.215-70 - VA Form 10-1170, Application for Furnishing Nursing Home Care to Beneficiaries of VA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., Application for Furnishing Nursing Home Care to Beneficiaries of VA. 853.215-70 Section 853.215-70 Federal... 853.215-70 VA Form 10-1170, Application for Furnishing Nursing Home Care to Beneficiaries of VA. VA Form 10-1170, Application for Furnishing Nursing Home Care to Beneficiaries of VA, will be used...

  10. Educational interventions to empower nursing home residents: a systematic literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoberer, Daniela; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Breimaier, Helga E; Halfens, Ruud JG; Lohrmann, Christa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of the study Health education is essential to improve health care behavior and self-management. However, educating frail, older nursing home residents about their health is challenging. Focusing on empowerment may be the key to educating nursing home residents effectively. This paper examines educational interventions that can be used to empower nursing home residents. Methods A systematic literature search was performed of the databases PubMed, CINAHL, CENTRAL, PsycINFO, and Embase, screening for clinical trials that dealt with resident education and outcomes in terms of their ability to empower residents. An additional, manual search of the reference lists and searches with SIGLE and Google Scholar were conducted to identify gray literature. Two authors independently appraised the quality of the studies found and assigned levels to the evidence reported. The results of the studies were grouped according to their main empowering outcomes and described narratively. Results Out of 427 identified articles, ten intervention studies that addressed the research question were identified. The main educational interventions used were group education sessions, motivational and encouragement strategies, goal setting with residents, and the development of plans to meet defined goals. Significant effects on self-efficacy and self-care behavior were reported as a result of the interventions, which included group education and individual counseling based on resident needs and preferences. In addition, self-care behavior was observed to significantly increase in response to function-focused care and reasoning exercises. Perceptions and expectations were not improved by using educational interventions with older nursing home residents. Conclusion Individually tailored, interactive, continuously applied, and structured educational strategies, including motivational and encouraging techniques, are promising interventions that can help nursing home residents become more

  11. Factors Associated with Aggressive Behavior among Nursing Home Residents with Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whall, Ann L.; Colling, Kathleen B.; Kolanowski, Ann; Kim, HyoJeong; Hong, Gwi-Ryung Son; DeCicco, Barry; Ronis, David L.; Richards, Kathy C.; Algase, Donna; Beck, Cornelia

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: In an attempt to more thoroughly describe aggressive behavior in nursing home residents with dementia, we examined background and proximal factors as guided by the Need-Driven Dementia-Compromised Behavior model. Design and Methods: We used a multivariate cross-sectional survey with repeated measures; participants resided in nine randomly…

  12. The influence of drug use on fall incidents among nursing home residents: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.S. Sterke (Carolyn); A.P. Verhagen (Arianne); E.F. van Beeck (Ed); T.J.M. van der Cammen (Tischa)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Falls are a major health problem among the elderly, particularly in nursing homes. Abnormalities of balance and gait, psychoactive drug use, and dementia have been shown to contribute to fall risk. Methods: We conducted a systematic review of the literature to investigate whi

  13. Prevalence and predictors of neuropsychiatric symptoms in cognitively impaired nursing home patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, Sytse; Koopmans, Raymond; Verhey, Frans

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms and the influence of predictive factors in cognitively impaired nursing home patients were reviewed. Articles were identified by means of a MEDLINE and PsychInfo literature search. Neuropsychiatric symptoms were present in more than 80% of the cognitively

  14. Prevalence of heart failure in nursing homes : a systematic literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daamen, Marielle A. M. J.; Schols, Jos M. G. A.; Jaarsma, Tiny; Hamers, Jan P. H.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Heart failure is an important problem in western countries. In nursing home residents heart failure is expected to be highly prevalent. However, accurate diagnosis of heart failure in these patients is often hampered due to atypical findings and concomitant co-morbidity. In order to de

  15. Prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms in a large sample of Dutch nursing home patients with dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, Sytse U; Derksen, Els; Verhey, Frans R J; Koopmans, Raymond T C M

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms of dementia patients in Dutch nursing homes. METHODS: Cross-sectional study in a large sample of 1322 demented patients living in 59 dementia special care units (SCUs) in The Netherlands. Symptoms were observed by licensed vocational

  16. Maslow Hierarchy of Needs and OBRA 1987: Toward Need Satisfaction by Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umoren, Joseph A.

    1992-01-01

    To improve well-being of nursing home residents and ensure compliance with the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act, programs aimed at improving quality of life must strive to satisfy higher level needs of the elderly as identified in Maslow's hierarchy. (SK)

  17. Dementia and depression among nursing home residents in Lebanon : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chahine, L. M.; Bijlsma, A.; Hospers, A. P. N.; Chemali, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Background The proportion of elderly in the Lebanese population is 7.1% and this is expected to increase to 10.2% by the year 2025. The nursing home (NH) population in Lebanon has not been studied. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of dementia and depression among a portion of

  18. Radical Redesign of Nursing Homes: Applying the Green House Concept in Tupelo, Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabig, Judith; Thomas, William; Kane, Rosalie A.; Cutler, Lois J.; McAlilly, Steve

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: We present the concept of the Green House, articulated by William Thomas as a radically changed, "deinstitutionalized" nursing home well before its first implementation, and we describe and discuss implications from the first Green Houses in Tupelo, Mississippi. Design and Methods: Green Houses are small, self-contained houses for 10 or…

  19. The Effect of Gambling Activities on Happiness Levels of Nursing Home Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Mark R.; Nastally, Becky L.; Waterman, Amber

    2010-01-01

    The current study evaluated the effect of participating in simulated gambling activities on happiness levels of 3 nursing home residents. A 4-component analysis was used to measure objective responses associated with happiness during baseline, varying durations of engagement in simulated gambling activities, and 2 follow-up periods. Results…

  20. BNP and NT-proBNP, Predictors of 1-Year Mortality in Nursing Home Residents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barents, Maaike; Hillege, Hans H. L.; van der Horst, Iwan C. C.; de Boer, Rudolph A.; Koster, J.; Muskiet, Frits A. J.; de Jongste, Mike J. L.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate 1-year mortality prediction of B type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N terminal-proBNP (NT-proBNP) in institutionalized elderly with multiple morbidities. Design: Prospective cross-sectional study. Setting: One nursing home. Participants: Ninety-three residents (mean age 81

  1. Work-home interference among nurses: reciprocal relationships with job demands and health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, van der Beatrice I.J.M.; Demerouti, Evangelia; Bakker, Arnold B.; Hasselhorn, Hans-Martin

    2008-01-01

    Aims: This paper is a report of a study with three aims: (i) to investigate whether emotional, quantitative and physical demands have a causal, negative impact on nurses' health; (ii) to examine whether work-home interference can explain this effect, by playing a mediating role; and (iii) to test th

  2. How Do People Make Continence Care Happen? An Analysis of Organizational Culture in Two Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Stacie Salsbury

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Although nursing homes (NHs) are criticized for offering poor quality continence care, little is known about the organizational processes that underlie this care. This study investigated the influence of organizational culture on continence care practices in two NHs. Design and Methods: This ethnographic study explored continence care…

  3. Travel Behavior of Nursing Home Residents Perceived as Wanderers and Nonwanderers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino-Saltzman, David; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Used video-based observations to assess travels of 40 nursing home residents, 24 of whom were wanderers. Monitored travel continuously for 30 days, recording over 5,000 unassisted travel events. Observed four basic travel patterns: direct travel, lapping, random travel, and pacing. Travel efficiency was significantly related to cognitive status,…

  4. Inverse relationship between body mass index and mortality in older nursing home residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veronese, N; Cereda, E; Solmi, M;

    2015-01-01

    Body mass index (BMI) and mortality in old adults from the general population have been related in a U-shaped or J-shaped curve. However, limited information is available for elderly nursing home populations, particularly about specific cause of death. A systematic PubMed/EMBASE/CINAHL/SCOPUS...

  5. Observational report with regard to thermal comfort in nursing homes; Signaleringsrapport inzake thermische behaaglijkheid in verpleeghuizen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-08

    A large number of studies on the subject of thermal (dis)comfort for patients in nursing homes in the summer is summarized. [Dutch] In dit signaleringsrapport is een groot aantal onderzoeken samengevat welke door of in opdracht van het Bouwcollege zijn uitgevoerd op het gebied van thermische (on)behaaglijkheid voor patienten (somatisch en psychogeriatrisch) in verpleeghuizen onder zomeromstandigheden.

  6. The effect of depression on social engagement in newly admitted Dutch nursing home residents.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, W.; Pot, A.M.; Kerkstra, A.; Ooms, M.; Muller, M.; Ribbe, M.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To study the effect of depression (high levels of depressive symptoms) on social engagement. Design and Methods: In 65 nursing homes in the Netherlands, 562 newly admitted residents were assessed at admission. Social engagement was measured with the MDS Index of Social Engagement. A multiva

  7. Patterns of Ciprofloxacin-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacteria Colonization in Nursing Home Residents

    OpenAIRE

    Dommeti, Parimala; WANG, Linda; Flannery, Erika L; Symons, Kathleen; Mody, Lona

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the prevalence of colonization with all gram-negative bacilli (GNB) and with ciprofloxacin-resistant GNB among nursing home residents with and without indwelling devices. We found that device presence increases the risk of colonization with all GNB and with ciprofloxacin-resistant GNB. Colonization with ciprofloxacin-resistant GNB increases with decreasing functional status.

  8. Prevalence, Causes, and Treatment of Neuropathic Pain in Dutch Nursing Home Residents : A Retrospective Chart Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kollenburg, Esther G. P.; Lavrijsen, Jan C. M.; Verhagen, Stans C.; Zuidema, Sytse U.; Schalkwijk, Annelies; Vissers, Kris C. P.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To identify the prevalence and causes of neuropathic pain in Dutch nursing home residents; to establish the prevalence of painful and nonpainful diabetic polyneuropathy in a subsample of individuals with diabetes mellitus and central poststroke pain (CPSP) in a subsample of individuals wh

  9. Distance Learning: A Strategy for Improving Incontinence Care in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Anna N.; Schnelle, John F.; Yamashita, Takashi; Patry, Gail; Prasauskas, Ruta

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This article describes a distance learning model designed to help nursing homes implement incontinence management best practices. A basic premise is that translating research into practice requires both a feasible intervention and a dissemination strategy responsive to the target audience's needs. Design and Methods: Over 8 months, nurse…

  10. Rural-Urban Differences in End-of-Life Nursing Home Care: Facility and Environmental Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkin-Greener, Helena; Zheng, Nan Tracy; Mukamel, Dana B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the study: This study examines urban-rural differences in end-of-life (EOL) quality of care provided to nursing home (NH) residents. Data and Methods: We constructed 3 risk-adjusted EOL quality measures (QMs) for long-term decedent residents: in-hospital death, hospice referral before death, and presence of severe pain. We used…

  11. Interdisciplinary Care Planning and the Written Care Plan in Nursing Homes: A Critical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellefield, Mary Ellen

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This article is a critical review of the history, research evidence, and state-of-the-art technology in interdisciplinary care planning and the written plan of care in American nursing homes. Design and Methods: We reviewed educational and empirical literature. Results: Interdisciplinary care planning and the written care plan are…

  12. Learning to care for older patients : hospitals and nursing homes as learning environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huls, Marije; de Rooij, Sophia E; Diepstraten, Annemie; Koopmans, Raymond; Helmich, Esther

    2015-01-01

    CONTEXT: A significant challenge facing health care is the ageing of the population, which calls for a major response in medical education. Most clinical learning takes place within hospitals, but nursing homes may also represent suitable learning environments in which students can gain competencies

  13. Learning to care for older patients: hospitals and nursing homes as learning environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huls, M.; Rooij, S.E. De; Diepstraten, A.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Helmich, E.

    2015-01-01

    CONTEXT: A significant challenge facing health care is the ageing of the population, which calls for a major response in medical education. Most clinical learning takes place within hospitals, but nursing homes may also represent suitable learning environments in which students can gain competencies

  14. Consumer Satisfaction in Long-Term Care: State Initiatives in Nursing Homes and Assisted Living Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Timothy J.; Lucas, Judith A.; Castle, Nicholas G.; Robinson, Joanne P.; Crystal, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: We report the results of a survey of state initiatives that measure resident satisfaction in nursing homes and assisted living facilities, and we describe several model programs for legislators and public administrators contemplating the initiation of their own state programs. Design and Methods: Data on state initiatives and programs…

  15. Correlates of Geriatric Loneliness in Philippine Nursing Homes: A Multiple Regression Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Maravilla, Katrina N.; Maravilla, Veniza Anne M.; Marfil, Jomille D. V.; Marinas, Janine Angelica R.; Marquez, Jorelle Michael B.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have been conducted worldwide about loneliness in older adults living in nursing homes and the factors associated with it. However, only a few studies have focused on social factors that may predispose these older adults to experience loneliness. The purpose of this study was to examine the interplay between and among loneliness,…

  16. Factors Associated with Problematic Vocalizations in Nursing Home Residents with Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Cornelia; Richards, Kathy; Lambert, Corinne; Doan, Rebecca; Landes, Reid D.; Whall, Ann; Algase, Donna; Kolanowski, Ann; Feldman, Zachary

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: Problematic vocalizations (PVs) are the most frequent and persistent disruptive behaviors exhibited by nursing home residents with dementia. Understanding factors associated with these behaviors are important to prevent or reduce them. We used the Need-Driven Dementia-Compromised Behavior model to identify the characteristics…

  17. 75 FR 39641 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Civil Money Penalties for Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-12

    ... Register on November 10, 1994 (59 FR 56116),and on March 18, 1999 (64 FR 13354). These rules are set forth... certain penalties that are intended to motivate a nursing home to maintain continuous compliance with... thus be rewarded for their efforts. Therefore, under the discretion provided to us in this...

  18. [Stroke rehabilitation in nursing homes: intensity of and motivation for physiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wissink, K.S.; Eijk, M. van; Buijck, B.I.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Zuidema, S.U.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Stroke is a frequent and potential invalidating disease, of which recovery can be improved by rehabilitation. In The Netherlands old and frail stroke patients are rehabilitated in nursing homes. Probably, the intensity of and motivation for physiotherapy are important for successful di

  19. High-performance workplace practices in nursing homes: an economic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Christine E

    2014-02-01

    To develop implications for research, practice and policy, selected economics and human resources management research literature was reviewed to compare and contrast nursing home culture change work practices with high-performance human resource management systems in other industries. The organization of nursing home work under culture change has much in common with high-performance work systems, which are characterized by increased autonomy for front-line workers, self-managed teams, flattened supervisory hierarchy, and the aspiration that workers use specific knowledge gained on the job to enhance quality and customization. However, successful high-performance work systems also entail intensive recruitment, screening, and on-going training of workers, and compensation that supports selective hiring and worker commitment; these features are not usual in the nursing home sector. Thus despite many parallels with high-performance work systems, culture change work systems are missing essential elements: those that require higher compensation. If purchasers, including public payers, were willing to pay for customized, resident-centered care, productivity gains could be shared with workers, and the nursing home sector could move from a low-road to a high-road employment system.

  20. Functional level, physical activity and wellbeing in nursing home residents in three Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grönstedt, Helena; Hellström, Karin; Bergland, Astrid;

    2011-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to describe physical and cognitive function and wellbeing among nursing home residents in three Nordic countries. A second aim was to compare groups of differing ages, levels of dependency in daily life activities (ADL), degree of fall-related self-efficacy, wellbeing...

  1. Social well-being and its measurement in the nursing home, the SWON-scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, Debby L.; Steverink, Nardi; Frijters, Dinnus H. M.; Ooms, Marcel E.; Ribbe, Miel W.

    2010-01-01

    Aims and objectives. The aim of this study was to develop an observational scale to measure the social well-being of nursing home residents, by assessing not only the social behaviour of the resident towards others, but also the behaviour of others towards the resident. Background. Traditionally, as

  2. Leadership Styles of Nursing Home Administrators and Their Association with Staff Turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoghue, Christopher; Castle, Nicholas G.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between nursing home administrator (NHA) leadership style and staff turnover. Design and Methods: We analyzed primary data from a survey of 2,900 NHAs conducted in 2005. The Online Survey Certification and Reporting database and the Area Resource File were utilized to extract…

  3. Music therapy for reducing agitation and psychotropic medication in nursing home residents with dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2015-01-01

    Dementia is a neurocognitive disease with a high risk of social isolation and agitation due to loss of cognitive functions. In nursing home residents with dementia, agitation is the most significant symptom causing patient distress and care- giver burden. Agitation is described as abuse...

  4. Learning by Living: Life-Altering Medical Education through Nursing Home-Based Experiential Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugliucci, Marilyn R.; Weiner, Audrey

    2013-01-01

    The University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine Learning by Living Project (referred to as Learning by Living) was piloted in 2006 as an experiential medical education learning model. Since its inception, medical and other health professions students have been "admitted" into nursing homes to live the life of an older adult nursing…

  5. Do Nurse Home-Visiting Programs Have Lasting Benefits for Mothers and Children? Evaluation Science Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Forum on Early Childhood Program Evaluation, 2008

    2008-01-01

    "Evaluation Science Briefs" summarize the findings and implications of a recent study evaluating the effects of an early childhood program or environment. This Brief evaluates the study, "Effects of Nurse Home-Visiting on Maternal and Child Functioning: Age-9 Follow-up of a Randomized Trial" (D. Olds, et al.). States are increasingly turning to…

  6. Determinants of quality of life in nursing home residents with dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetzels, R B; Zuidema, S U; de Jonghe, J F M; Verhey, F R J; Koopmans, R T C M

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: The goal of this study is to assess the relationship between quality of life (QoL), neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS), psychotropic drug use (PDU) and patient characteristics in a large group of nursing home residents with dementia. METHODS: This cross-sectional observational study included 288

  7. A Model-based Assessment of Oseltamivir Prophylaxis Strategies to Prevent Influenza in Nursing Homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Dool, Carline; Hak, Eelko; Bonten, Marc J. M.; Wallinga, Jacco

    2009-01-01

    Prophylaxis with neuraminidase inhibitors is important for controlling seasonal influenza outbreaks in long-term care settings. We used a stochastic individual-based model that simulates influenza virus transmission in a long-term care nursing home department to study the protection offered to patie

  8. Relatedness, autonomy, and competence in the caring relationship: The perspective of nursing home residents.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Custers, A.F.J.; Westerhof, G.J.; Kuin, Y.; Gerritsen, D.L.; Riksen-Walraven, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Based on self-determination theory and person-environment congruence models, this study investigated the importance and experiences of relatedness, autonomy, and competence in the caring relationship from the perspective of residents of somatic nursing homes. Furthermore, discrepancies between the a

  9. Down and drowsy? Do apathetic nursing home residents experience low quality of life?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, DL; Jongenelis, K; Steverink, N; Ooms, ME; Ribbe, MW

    2005-01-01

    This cross-sectional study investigated the relationship between apathy and quality of life (QOL) in nursing home residents (n = 227). In all, 92 residents could be assessed with the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and the Philadelphia Geriatric Centre Mora

  10. Colonization with Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli among Nursing Home Residents and Its Relationship to Fluoroquinolone Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Maslow, Joel N.; Lautenbach, Ebbing; Glaze, Thomas; Bilker, Warren; Johnson, James R.

    2004-01-01

    In a cross-sectional fecal prevalence survey involving 49 residents of a Veterans Affairs nursing home, 59% of subjects were colonized with extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC), 22% were colonized with adhesin-positive E. coli, and 51% were colonized with fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli. Among 80 unique isolates, adhesins correlated negatively and aerobactin correlated positively with fluoroquinolone resistance.

  11. Frequent use of opioids in patients with dementia and nursing home residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen-Dahm, Christina; Gasse, Christiane; Astrup, Aske;

    2015-01-01

    -sectional study in the entire elderly (≥65 years) population in 2010 was conducted. Opioid use among elderly with dementia (N = 35,455) was compared with elderly without (N = 870,645), taking age, sex, comorbidity, and living status into account. RESULTS: Nursing home residents (NHRs) used opioids most frequently......BACKGROUND: Pain is believed to be undertreated in patients with dementia; however, no larger studies have been conducted. The aim was to investigate prevalent use of opioids in elderly with and without dementia in the entire elderly population of Denmark. METHOD: A register-based cross...... (41%), followed by home-living patients with dementia (27.5%) and home-living patients without dementia (16.9%). Buprenorphine and fentanyl (primarily patches) were commonly used among NHRs (18.7%) and home-living patients with dementia (10.7%) but less often by home-living patients without dementia...

  12. Elderly’s Quality of Life in Daycare and Boarding Nursing Homes in Semnan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pahlavanian

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Old age is a period of life in which elderlies face with complications such as increasing risk of chronic diseases, loneliness, isolation, mental and physical disabilities, and reduction of individual independence. These factors cause the quality of life to reduce. Objectives This study compared the quality of life of elderlies in daycare and boarding nursing homes in Semnan, Iran and identified the differences in characteristics of quality of life. It can also help researchers to reduce the problems of elderlies. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study was performed on 30 elderlies living in boarding nursing homes and 43 in daycare nursing homes. Collecting the data was conducted via a special questionnaire (SF-36, measuring different aspects of quality of life. Results On the basis of SF-36 test and comparing various aspects of quality of life among the elderlies residing in boarding and daycare nursing homes, significant differences were observed in domains of quality of life, including physical restrictions (P < 0.001, restrictions in psycho-emotional function (P < 0.001, energy and fatigue (P < 0.008, psycho-emotional function (P < 0.001, social function (P < 0.001, physical pain (P < 0.001, and public health (P < 0.01. However, the difference was not significant in physical function (P = 0.437. Conclusions The results showed that the elderlies living in daycare centers had better qualities of lives physically and mentally. Therefore, to improve their qualities of lives in two general physical and mental domains, items such as providing family communications inside or outside the nursing homes as well as planning to fulfill mental and psychological needs besides physical issues like mobility and balance should be considered.

  13. Nursing home admission during the first year after hospitalization - the contribution of cognitive impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Sofie Helvik

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The importance of cognitive and physical functioning for nursing home admission among medically hospitalized older patients is rarely studied in a one-year follow-up perspective. This study aims to explore the association between patient characteristics and nursing home admission within one year after hospitalization in persons 65 years or more. DESIGN: A one-year longitudinal study. METHODS: We included 463 (234 women persons aged 65 years or more from internal medical wards in a rural area of Norway. Cognitive function was assessed using the Mini Mental State Examination; physical and instrumental functional status was assessed using the physical self-maintenance scale and instrumental activities of daily living scale of Lawton and Brody. Comorbidity was measured with the Charlson index. Admission to nursing home within one year (yes versus no was analyzed using logistic regression analysis and Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. RESULTS: The mean age of the sample was 80.5 (SD 7.4 years, mean Mini Mental State Examination score was 24.1 (SD 3.8 (maximum score is 30. In adjusted analysis participants with cognitive impairment (a Mini Mental State Examination score <25 or impaired physical functioning at baseline had higher risk of admission to nursing home within one year (OR 3.0, 95%CI 1.5-6.2 and OR 3.5, 95%CI 1.8-9.6, respectively. The time before admission was also associated with cognitive impairment and impaired physical functioning in the adjusted analysis (HR 2.6 95%CI 1.4-4.8 and HR 3.7, 95%CI 1.5-8.9, respectively. CONCLUSION: Impaired cognitive and physical functioning increased the risk for nursing home admission within one year after hospitalization. However, putative regressors, such as education and social network were not included in the analysis.

  14. Do non-profit nursing homes separate governance roles? The impact of size and ownership characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewaelheyns, Nico; Eeckloo, Kristof; Van Herck, Gustaaf; Van Hulle, Cynthia; Vleugels, Arthur

    2009-05-01

    Separation between operational responsibilities and those of oversight is an important point of discussion in governance. Novel to the literature, this paper not only offers direct evidence on the degree of separation, but also shows its relationship with size (ceteris paribus efficiency prescribes that large organizations implement more separation) and ownership characteristics of non-profit institutions. Using a sample of Belgian (Flemish) nursing homes, we find that in private nursing homes this separation increases with size while this is not the case in public homes. We document that this lack in flexibility in governance practices explains the micro-monitoring in public institutions. We formulate policy implications and suggest solutions to create more flexibility and likely also better governance. PMID:19026459

  15. Postpartum period: the importance of home visits given by the nurse in Primary Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia dos Santos Medeiros

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to understand the importance given by nurses working in primary health care for the realization of home visits in the puerperal period. Methods: qualitative research held with 38 nurses by applying a semi-structured interview, in which the thematic content analysis technique was used under Bardin’s theoretical light. Results: the majority of interviewees considered the home visit a tool that brings the health unit to the reality experienced by the mother, however, there are still many professionals who omit some precautions when dealing with this population. Conclusion: the home visit is considered essential for contributing to the reduction of morbidity and mortality of the postpartum and newborn, increasing the bond between unit and family, and reducing the risk of postpartum complications, however, the attention turned to these women is still covered with big challenges to achieve a real satisfactory assistance.

  16. Improving Nursing Home Care through Training and Job Redesign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyer, Michael; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Short-term longitudinal study assessed single and combined effects of two interventions designed to affect nursing assistants' (n=193) performance by increasing knowledge and motivation. Four sites included skills training only, job redesign only, both interventions, and control. Significant differences were found in knowledge in comparisons…

  17. Facilitators and barriers to self-management of nursing home residents: perspectives of health-care professionals in Korean nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park YH

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Yeon-Hwan Park,1,2 Hwal Lan Bang,2,3 Ga Hye Kim,1 Ji Yeon Ha1 1College of Nursing, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea; 2The Research Institute of Nursing Science, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea; 3Department of Nursing Science, College of Industry, Sangmyung University, Cheonan, Korea Purpose: To explore facilitators and barriers to self-management from the viewpoint of staff taking care of nursing home (NH residents with chronic diseases in South Korea. Patients and methods: A qualitative content analysis was done using the focus group interview method. A total of 23 health-care professionals (16 registered nurses and 7 social workers were interviewed from three urban NHs, each with more than 100 beds. Results: Five facilitators were identified: grouping the residents; the resident’s awareness of his/her current health status; the willingness of residents to engage in self-management; residence in the facility; and support from the staff. Additionally, seven barriers were identified: deterioration of the resident’s health; the dependency expectations of the resident; hesitation in asking for help; difference in expectations between the staff and the resident’s family; insufficient staffing and time; lack of standardized guidelines; and conservative tendencies of the staff due to rigid policies. Conclusion: The findings of this study can help health-care professionals recognize the factors that influence self-management and provide direction for registered nurses and other health professionals involved in supporting self-management programs for NH residents. Keywords: self-management, aged, focus groups, long-term care

  18. Medical specialist attendance in nursing homes [Beschreibung und Bewertung der fachärztlichen Versorgung von Pflegeheimbewohnern in Deutschland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balzer, Katrin

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available [english] The care in nursing homes was examined based on scientific studies. The analysis focuses on dementia and type II diabetes. There is evidence for deficits in the supply of medical specialist attendance to nursing home residents with these diseases in Germany. Compared with corresponding guidelines the medical care for nursing home residents may be too low or inadequate.[german] Es wird die Versorgung in Pflegeheimen auf Basis wissenschaftlicher Studien untersucht. Schwerpunkte der Analyse sind Demenz und Diabetes. Es gibt Hinweise auf fachärztliche Versorgungsmängel bei Pflegeheimbewohnern mit diesen Krankheiten in Deutschland. Verglichen mit entsprechenden Leitlinien bestehen mögliche Unter- bzw. Fehlversorgungen.

  19. Prevalence of Different Combinations of Antiepileptic Drugs and CNS Drugs in Elderly Home Care Service and Nursing Home Patients in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannessen Landmark, Cecilie; Granas, Anne Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are used to treat different conditions in elderly patients and are among the drug classes most susceptible to be involved in drug-drug interactions (DDI). The aim of the study was to describe and compare use of AEDs between home care service and nursing home patients, as these patients are not included in nationwide databases of drug utilization. In the combined population, we investigate DDI of AEDs with other central nervous system- (CNS-) active drugs and DDIs involving AEDs in general. Materials and Methods. Point-prevalence study of Norwegian patients in home care services and nursing homes in 2009. At the patient level, we screened for different DDIs involving AEDs. Results. In total, 882 patients (7.8%) of 11,254 patients used AEDs and number of users did not differ between home care services and nursing homes (8.2% versus 7.7%). In the combined population, we identified 436 potential DDIs in 45% of the patients. Conclusions. In a large population of elderly, home care service and nursing home patients do not differ with respect to exposure of AEDs but use more AEDs as compared to the general population of similar age. The risk of DDIs with AEDs and other CNS-active drugs should be taken into consideration and individual clinical evaluations are assessed in this population. PMID:27525114

  20. Interior design preferences of residents, families, and staff in two nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D B; Goldman, L E; Woodman, S A

    1985-01-01

    The small number of respondents and the absence of specific demographic data concerning the three categories of respondents represented definite limitations. Further investigation in other long-term care facilities clearly is indicated. However, as a preliminary survey of preferences in nursing home interior design, several interesting findings have emerged: Patients, staff and families all emphasized patient safety and function over aesthetics. Yet, more residents than staff and families were concerned with appearance. Although experts advocate creating a home-like atmosphere in the nursing home, 50% or more of each group applied different criteria for specific design elements for private homes and for long-term care institutions. Design preferences for the three groups were similar, with an emphasis on modern furniture, painted walls, resilient tile rather than carpet, blinds, pastel and warm colors, and the use of paintings as accessories. Contrary to study assumptions, design features that promote patient individuality (e.g., patient artwork) received much greater emphasis from staff than from patients and families. Environmental change was considered an important aspect of interior design. Of the three constituencies, staff was most aware of periodic changes in decor and considered change as "very important" more often than did families or patients. As the nature of the nursing home patient population has changed--with residents presenting more disability and less rehabilitation potential and less likelihood of returning home--the ambiance of facilities has assumed even more importance. Clearly, the design preferences of residents who live in the facility are of paramount importance. However, it is also helpful to have an environment that is pleasing to family members who often experience difficulty in ongoing visitations, particularly to intellectually impaired relatives. Maintaining staff morale at a high level is a constant challenge in a long-term care

  1. Stayers, Leavers, and Switchers among Certified Nursing Assistants in Nursing Homes: A Longitudinal Investigation of Turnover Intent, Staff Retention, and Turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Jules; Stiehl, Emily M.; Mittal, Vikas; Leana, Carrie R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Studies of certified nursing assistant (CNA) turnover in nursing homes are typically cross-sectional and include full-time and part-time workers. We conducted a longitudinal study to evaluate the job factors and work attitudes associated with just full-time staying or leaving. For those who did not stay, we assessed reasons for leaving…

  2. Improving Quality of Life in Nursing Homes: The Structured Resident Interview Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenholtz, Howard B.; Resnick, Abby L.; Chia, Lichun

    2014-01-01

    The quality of life (QOL) of the approximately 1.5 million nursing facility (NF) residents in the US is undoubtedly lower than desired by residents, families, providers, and policy makers. Although there have been important advances in defining and measuring QOL for this population, there is a need for interventions that are tied to standardized measurement and quality improvement programs. This paper describes the development and testing of a structured, tailored assessment and care planning process for improving the QOL of nursing home residents. The Quality of Life Structured Resident Interview and Care Plan (QOL.SRI/CP) builds on a decade of research on measuring QOL and is designed to be easily implemented in any US nursing home. The approach was developed through extensive and iterative pilot testing and then tested in a randomized controlled trial in three nursing homes. Residents were randomly assigned to receive the assessment alone or both the assessment and an individualized QOL care plan task. The results show that residents assigned to the intervention group experienced improved QOL at 90- and 180-day follow-up, while QOL of residents in the control group was unchanged. PMID:25371822

  3. Improving Quality of Life in Nursing Homes: The Structured Resident Interview Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard B. Degenholtz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The quality of life (QOL of the approximately 1.5 million nursing facility (NF residents in the US is undoubtedly lower than desired by residents, families, providers, and policy makers. Although there have been important advances in defining and measuring QOL for this population, there is a need for interventions that are tied to standardized measurement and quality improvement programs. This paper describes the development and testing of a structured, tailored assessment and care planning process for improving the QOL of nursing home residents. The Quality of Life Structured Resident Interview and Care Plan (QOL.SRI/CP builds on a decade of research on measuring QOL and is designed to be easily implemented in any US nursing home. The approach was developed through extensive and iterative pilot testing and then tested in a randomized controlled trial in three nursing homes. Residents were randomly assigned to receive the assessment alone or both the assessment and an individualized QOL care plan task. The results show that residents assigned to the intervention group experienced improved QOL at 90- and 180-day follow-up, while QOL of residents in the control group was unchanged.

  4. Enhancing knowledge and attitudes in pain management: a pain management education program for nursing home staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Mimi Mun Yee; Ho, Suki S K

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effectiveness of a pain management program (PMP) in enhancing the knowledge and attitudes of health care workers in pain management. Many nursing home residents suffer from pain, and treatment of pain is often inadequate. Failure of health care workers to assess pain and their insufficient knowledge of pain management are barriers to adequate treatment. It was a quasiexperimental pretest and posttest study. Four nursing homes were approached, and 88 staff joined the 8-week PMP. Demographics and the knowledge and attitudes regarding pain were collected with the use of the Nurse's Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain-Chinese version (NKASRP-C) before and after the PMP. A deficit in knowledge and attitudes related to pain management was prominent before the PMP, and there was a significant increase in pain knowledge and attitudes from 7.9 ± SD 3.52 to 19.2 ± SD4.4 (p knowledge and attitudes of nursing staff and enable them to provide adequate and appropriate care to older persons in pain. PMPs for nurses and all health care professionals are important in enhancing care for older adults and to inform policy on the provision of pain management.

  5. Promoting infant health through home visiting by a nurse-managed community worker team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes-Boyd, C; Fordham Norr, K; Nacion, K W

    2001-01-01

    This article describes the Resources, Education and Care in the Home program (REACH-Futures), an infant mortality reduction initiative in the inner city of Chicago built on the World Health Organization (WHO) primary health care model and over a decade of experience administering programs to reduce infant mortality through home visits. The program uses a nurse-managed team, which includes community residents selected, trained, and integrated as health advocates. Service participants were predominately African American families. All participants were low-income and resided in inner-city neighborhoods with high unemployment, high teen birth rates, violent crime, and deteriorated neighborhoods. Outcomes for the first 666 participants are compared to a previous home-visiting program that used only nurses. Participant retention rates were equivalent overall and significantly higher in the first months of the REACH-Futures program. There were two infant deaths during the course of the study, a lower death rate than the previous program or the city. Infant health problems and developmental levels were equivalent to the prior program and significantly more infants were fully immunized at 12 months. The authors conclude that the use of community workers as a part of the home-visiting team is as effective as the nurse-only team in meeting the needs of families at high risk of poor infant outcomes. This approach is of national interest because of its potential to achieve the desired outcomes in a cost-effective manner.

  6. Educational interventions to empower nursing home residents: a systematic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schoberer D

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Daniela Schoberer,1 Helena Leino-Kilpi,2 Helga E Breimaier,1 Ruud JG Halfens,3 Christa Lohrmann1 1Institute of Nursing Science, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria; 2Turku University Hospital, University of Turku, Turku, Finland; 3Department of Health Services Research, School for Public Health and Primary Care (CAPHRI, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands Purpose of the study: Health education is essential to improve health care behavior and self-management. However, educating frail, older nursing home residents about their health is challenging. Focusing on empowerment may be the key to educating nursing home residents effectively. This paper examines educational interventions that can be used to empower nursing home residents.Methods: A systematic literature search was performed of the databases PubMed, CINAHL, CENTRAL, PsycINFO, and Embase, screening for clinical trials that dealt with resident education and outcomes in terms of their ability to empower residents. An additional, manual search of the reference lists and searches with SIGLE and Google Scholar were conducted to identify gray literature. Two authors independently appraised the quality of the studies found and assigned levels to the evidence reported. The results of the studies were grouped according to their main empowering outcomes and described narratively.Results: Out of 427 identified articles, ten intervention studies that addressed the research question were identified. The main educational interventions used were group education sessions, motivational and encouragement strategies, goal setting with residents, and the development of plans to meet defined goals. Significant effects on self-efficacy and self-care behavior were reported as a result of the interventions, which included group education and individual counseling based on resident needs and preferences. In addition, self-care behavior was observed to significantly increase in response to

  7. Burnout in the nursing home health care aide: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L. Cooper

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: Factors associated with burnout in health care aides are similar to those reported among nurses, although the level of evidence and low methodological rigor of these studies suggest more robust study designs are warranted. Our findings suggest research focused on this important but largely invisible group of care providers could yield important advances in understanding burnout in this group and yield potential interventions to buffer burnout and its consequences. Without mitigating the effects of burnout on nursing home health care aides, vulnerable older adults in residential care are at risk.

  8. Treating skin tears in nursing home residents: a pilot study comparing four types of dressings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, H; Gaskill, D; Nash, R

    1998-03-01

    A pilot study was conducted to compare four types of dressings used to treat skin tears in nursing home residents. Wounds treated with a non-occlusive dressing healed more quickly than those dressed with occlusive dressings. The results suggest that ease of use and product wastage are important considerations when treating skin tears. The pilot study also highlights the need for further research into skin tear management and the need for ongoing education for nurses regarding skin integrity risk assessment and product information.

  9. Protracted outbreak of S. Enteritidis PT 21c in a large Hamburg nursing home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domke Paul-Gerhard

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During August 2006, a protracted outbreak of Salmonella (S. Enteritidis infections in a large Hamburg nursing home was investigated. Methods A site visit of the home was conducted and food suppliers' premises tested for Salmonella. Among nursing home residents a cohort study was carried out focusing on foods consumed in the three days before the first part of the outbreak. Instead of relying on residents' memory, data from the home's patient food ordering system was used as exposure data. S. Enteritidis isolates from patients and suspected food vehicles were phage typed and compared. Results Within a population of 822 nursing home residents, 94 case patients among residents (1 fatality and 17 among staff members were counted 6 through 29 August. The outbreak peaked 7 through 9 August, two days after a spell of very warm summer weather. S. Enteritidis was consistently recovered from patients' stools throughout the outbreak. Among the food items served during 5 through 7 August, the cohort study pointed to afternoon cake on all three days as potential risk factors for disease. Investigation of the bakery supplying the cake yielded S. Enteritidis from cakes sampled 31 August. Comparison of the isolates by phage typing demonstrated both isolates from patients and the cake to be the exceedingly rare phage type 21c. Conclusion Cake (various types served on various days contaminated with S. Enteritidis were the likely vehicle of the outbreak in the nursing home. While the cakes were probably contaminated with low pathogen dose throughout the outbreak period, high ambient summer temperatures and failure to keep the cake refrigerated led to high pathogen dose in cake on some days and in some of the housing units. This would explain the initial peak of cases, but also the drawn out nature of the outbreak with cases until the end of August. Suggestions are made to nursing homes, aiding in outbreak prevention. Early outbreak detection is

  10. “Everyone else gets ice cream here more often than I do—It burns me up” - Perspectives on Diabetes Care from Nursing Home Residents and their Doctors

    OpenAIRE

    Barnhart, Caroline; McClymont, Keelan; Smith, Alex K.; Au-Yeung, Alvin; Lee, Sei J.

    2016-01-01

    Background To explore the perspectives of nursing home (NH) residents with diabetes and their doctors regarding the burdens of living with diabetes and diabetes treatments. Methods Qualitative study of nursing home residents aged 65 and older with diabetes (n = 14) and nursing home physicians (n = 9) at a Department of Veterans Affairs nursing home (known as the Community Living Center). A semi-structured interview was used to elicit nursing home residents’ and physicians’ perspectives on the...

  11. Integrative psychotherapeutic nursing home program to reduce multiple psychiatric symptoms of cognitively impaired patients and caregiver burden: randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, T.J.; Duivenvoorden, H.J.; Lee, J. van der; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.; Beekman, A.T.; Ribbe, M.W.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the effectiveness of an integrative psychotherapeutic nursing home program (integrative reactivation and rehabilitation [IRR]) to reduce multiple neuropsychiatry symptoms (MNPS) of cognitively impaired patients and caregiver burden (CB). DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. SETTIN

  12. Individual and contextual determinants of resident-on-resident abuse in nursing homes: a random sample telephone survey of adults with an older family member in a nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiamberg, Lawrence B; von Heydrich, Levente; Chee, Grace; Post, Lori A

    2015-01-01

    Few empirical investigations of elder abuse in nursing homes address the frequency and determinants of resident-on-resident abuse (RRA). A random sample of 452 adults with an older adult relative, ≥65 years of age, in a nursing home completed a telephone survey regarding elder abuse experienced by that elder family member. Using a Linear Structural Relations (LISREL) modeling design, the study examined the association of nursing home resident demographic characteristics (e.g., age, gender), health and behavioral characteristics (e.g., diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease, Activities of Daily Living (ADLs), Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs), types of staff abuse (e.g., physical, emotional), and factors beyond the immediate nursing home setting (e.g., emotional closeness of resident with family members) with RRA. Mplus statistical software was used for structural equation modeling. Main findings indicated that resident-on-resident mistreatment of elderly nursing home residents is associated with the age of the nursing home resident, all forms of staff abuse, all ADLs and IADLs, and emotional closeness of the older adult to the family. PMID:26026215

  13. Nursing home staffing and training recommendations for promoting older adults' quality of care and life: Part 1. Deficits in the quality of care due to understaffing and undertraining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Meridean L; Specht, Janet P; Buckwalter, Kathleen C; Gittler, Josephine; Bechen, Kate

    2008-04-01

    Caught between the inability or unwillingness of nursing home corporations and owners to redistribute revenue and the reluctance of federal and state agencies to increase payments to nursing homes, the nation's most vulnerable older adults are not receiving the care they deserve. Widespread recognition of substandard care and quality of life of older adults in nursing homes has existed for decades. In addition, there is substantial evidence that poor quality of care is related to inadequate numbers and training of nursing staff. Still, policy makers and nursing home owners have failed to take needed action. In the first article of this two-part series, major deficits in the care of older adult nursing home residents are reviewed, and research documenting the relationship between nursing home staffing and the quality of care and life of residents is summarized.

  14. Nursing home staffing and training recommendations for promoting older adults' quality of care and life: Part 1. Deficits in the quality of care due to understaffing and undertraining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Meridean L; Specht, Janet P; Buckwalter, Kathleen C; Gittler, Josephine; Bechen, Kate

    2008-04-01

    Caught between the inability or unwillingness of nursing home corporations and owners to redistribute revenue and the reluctance of federal and state agencies to increase payments to nursing homes, the nation's most vulnerable older adults are not receiving the care they deserve. Widespread recognition of substandard care and quality of life of older adults in nursing homes has existed for decades. In addition, there is substantial evidence that poor quality of care is related to inadequate numbers and training of nursing staff. Still, policy makers and nursing home owners have failed to take needed action. In the first article of this two-part series, major deficits in the care of older adult nursing home residents are reviewed, and research documenting the relationship between nursing home staffing and the quality of care and life of residents is summarized. PMID:20078025

  15. Challenges to conducting research with older people living in nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higginson Irene J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although older people are increasingly cared for in nursing homes towards the end of life, there is a dearth of research exploring the views of residents. There are however, a number of challenges and methodological issues involved in doing this. The aim of this paper is to discuss some of these, along with residents' views on taking part in a study of the perceptions of dignity of older people in care homes and make recommendations for future research in these settings. Methods Qualitative interviews were used to obtain the views on maintaining dignity of 18 people aged 75 years and over, living in two private nursing homes in South East London. Detailed field notes on experiences of recruiting and interviewing participants were kept. Results Challenges included taking informed consent (completing reply slips and having a 'reasonable' understanding of their participation; finding opportunities to conduct interviews; involvement of care home staff and residents' families and trying to maintain privacy during the interviews. Most residents were positive about their participation in the study, however, five had concerns either before or during their interviews. Although 15 residents seemed to feel free to air their views, three seemed reluctant to express their opinions on their care in the home. Conclusion Although we experienced many challenges to conducting this study, they were not insurmountable, and once overcome, allowed this often unheard vulnerable group to express their views, with potential long-term benefits for future delivery of care.

  16. Universal and targeted early home visiting: perspectives of public health nurses, managers and mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Aston

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Early home visits provided by public health nurses (PHNs around the world have been proven to positively impact physical, social, emotional and mental health outcomes of mothers and babies. Most of the research has focused on home visiting programs delivered by public health nurses and lay home visitors to support at risk or targeted mothers. Little research has been conducted to examine universal home visiting programs for mothers who are perceived to be lower-risk. The purpose of this research was to explore how universal and targeted early home visiting programs for mothers and babies were organized, delivered and experienced through the everyday practices of PHNs, mothers, and managers in one city in Atlantic Canada. Feminist post-structuralism was used to collect and analyze data through semi-structured face-to-face interviews with 16 PHNs, 16 mothers and 4 managers. Personal, social and institutional discourses of program delivery were examined using discourse analysis. Four main themes of the study include: i understanding targeted and universal programming; ii health outcomes; iii building relationships; and iv exploring a new surveillance. This article will discuss the first theme; understanding targeted and universal programming.

  17. Measurement of overall quality of life in nursing homes through self report: the role of cognitive impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Gerritsen, Debby Lydia; Steverink, Nardi; Ooms, Marcel E.; de Vet, Henrica C. W.; Ribbe, Miel W.

    2007-01-01

    Measuring quality of life is a necessity for adequate interventions. This paper concerns the usefulness of six self-report measures for overall quality of life for nursing home residents with various levels of cognitive impairment. It was investigated which proportion of residents from four cognition groups could complete a scale, and internal consistency and construct validity of the scales were studied. Data collection took place in ten Dutch nursing homes (N = 227). The proportion of resid...

  18. Can a structured electronic medical record with decision-making support improve nursing home quality? Healthcare administration through structured records

    OpenAIRE

    Krüger, Kjell

    2013-01-01

    Background: Nursing homes face challenges in the coming years due to the increased number of elderly. A new law in force from Jan 2012 (“Samhandlingsreformen”) places more responsibilities on the counties running the nursing homes. Quality will come under pressure, expectations of services will rise and clinical complexity will grow. New strategies are needed to meet this situation. Modern clinical information systems with decision-making support may be part of that. In additio...

  19. Quality of care in for-profit and not-for-profit nursing homes: systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Comondore, Vikram R; Devereaux, P.J.; Zhou, Qi; Stone, Samuel B.; Busse, Jason W.; Ravindran, Nikila C; Karen E Burns; Haines, Ted; Stringer, Bernadette; Cook, Deborah J.; Walter, Stephen D.; Sullivan, Terrence; Berwanger, Otavio; Bhandari, Mohit; Banglawala, Sarfaraz

    2009-01-01

    Objective To compare quality of care in for-profit and not-for-profit nursing homes. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies and randomised controlled trials investigating quality of care in for-profit versus not-for-profit nursing homes. Results A comprehensive search yielded 8827 citations, of which 956 were judged appropriate for full text review. Study characteristics and results of 82 articles that met inclusion criteria were summarised, and results for the fo...

  20. Factors associated with high job satisfaction among care workers in Swiss nursing homes – a cross sectional survey study

    OpenAIRE

    Schwendimann, René; Dhaini, Suzanne; Ausserhofer, Dietmar; Engberg, Sandra; Zúñiga, Franziska

    2016-01-01

    Background While the relationship between nurses’ job satisfaction and their work in hospital environments is well known, it remains unclear, which factors are most influential in the nursing home setting. The purpose of this study was to describe job satisfaction among care workers in Swiss nursing homes and to examine its associations with work environment factors, work stressors, and health issues. Methods This cross-sectional study used data from a representative national sample of 162 Sw...

  1. An evaluation of a monitoring system intervention: falls, injuries, and affect in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Douglas; Teresi, Jeanne A; Ramirez, Mildred; Ellis, Julie; Eimicke, Joseph; Jian Kong; Orzechowska, Lucja; Silver, Stephanie

    2007-11-01

    This project assessed the extent to which modern technology (Vigil) can augment or substitute for direct staff intervention in nonacute late-evening and nighttime situations in a nursing home setting. Vigil was implemented for dementia residents of a special care unit (SCU) in a large nursing home. An SCU matched in terms of unit-wide case mix and cognition was used for comparison. Results showed that there was no significant reduction in falls and injuries, but there was a significant improvement in affective disorder in the intervention group as contrasted with the comparison group. There was no significant increase in staff-perceived burden, despite the significant increase in the amount of direct care time logged. Additional time spent in staff care was significantly related to decreased affective disorder. The findings related to Vigil are generally mixed. The question remains as to whether the improvement in affect was due to Vigil or vigilance.

  2. Antiepileptic drug use in a nursing home setting: a retrospective study in older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callegari, Camilla; Ielmini, Marta; Bianchi, Lucia; Lucano, Melissa; Bertù, Lorenza; Vender, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Summary The authors set out to examine qualitatively the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in a population of older adults in a nursing home setting, evaluating aspects such as specialist prescriptions and changes in dosage. This retrospective prevalence study was carried out in a state-funded nursing home that provides care and rehabilitation for elderly people. The first objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of AED use in this population. The second objective was to monitor AED dosage modifications during the fifteen-month study period, focusing on the safety and the tolerability of AEDs. In the period of time considered, 129 of 402 monitored patients received at least one anti-epileptic therapy. The prevalence of AED use was therefore 32%. Gabapentin was found to be the most commonly prescribed drug, with a frequency of 29%, and it was used mainly for anxiety disorders, psychosis, neuropathic pain and mood disorders. PMID:27358221

  3. Indoor environment and installations in nursing home; Binnenmilieu en installaties in het verpleeghuis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hoof, J.; Kort, H.S.M.; Duijnstee, M.S.H. [Kenniscentrum Innovatie van Zorgverlening, Faculteit Gezondheidszorg, Hogeschool Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Hensen, J.L.M.; Rutten, P.G.S. [Unit Building Physics and Systems, Faculteit Bouwkunde, Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2010-04-15

    The majority of nursing home residents are older adults with dementia. People with dementia may have an altered sensitivity for indoor environmental conditions, which can induce problematic behaviour with burdensome symptoms. This paper provides an overview of the ageing of senses and needs of older adults with dementia in relation to the indoor environment. Results can help designers and building services engineers to create optima[ environmental conditions in nursing homes. [Dutch] De verpleeghuizen in Nederland bieden zorg en verblijf aan ouderen met een intensieve zorgvraag. Het grote aantal installaties dat in deze woonvorm aanwezig is dient zo te worden ontworpen en geinstalleerd dat deze optimaal comfort bieden aan bewoners en zorgprofessionals. Ouderen met dementie vormen de grootste groep bewoners en hebben zeer specifieke behoeften voor het binnenmilieu. Door hiervan uit te gaan bij ontwerp en installatie, ontstaat een verpleeghuis dat ten dienste staat van alle bewoners en overige gebouwgebruikers.

  4. Concurrent validity of the GMS-AGECAT (A3) package in a Danish nursing home population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lisbeth; Foldspang, Anders; Gulman, N.C.;

    1998-01-01

    Aim. To validate the Danish version of the GMS–AGECAT (A3), the Standardized Mini Mental State Examination (SMMSE) and the Geriatric Depression Scale-15 (GDS-15) by comparing them to clinical ICD-10 criteria in a Danish nursing home population. Methods. With a participation of 91%, the study....... The prevalence of clinical psychiatric ICD-10 main diagnoses was 56%. The non-accessibles had significantly higher psychiatric morbidity and lower ADL scores (modified Barthel ADL index) compared to those who were able to communicate. With the non-accessibles (N=100) included, the optimal screening...... residents were able to complete the SMMSE and 78% were able to complete the GDS-15. Conclusion. The Danish version of the GMS–AGECAT has relevant diagnostic and screening properties for organic disorders in Danish nursing home populations....

  5. Resuscitation of patients suffering from sudden cardiac arrests in nursing homes is not futile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søholm, Helle; Bro-Jeppesen, John; Lippert, Freddy K;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has increased in recent years, and new data are therefore needed to avoid unsubstantiated statements when debating futility of resuscitation attempts following OHCA in nursing home (NH)-residents. We aimed to investigate the outcome...... of 2541 consecutive OHCA-patients were recorded, 245 (10%) of who were current NH-residents. NH-patients were older, more frequently female, had more witnessed arrests, fewer shockable primary rhythm and assumed cardiac aetiology, but shorter time to the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) compared...... to OHCA in non-nursing homes (non-NH). Overall 30-day survival rate was 9% in NH and 18% in non-NH, parrests 79 (32%) patients were admitted to hospital compared to 937 (41%) from non-NH (p

  6. Multifaceted nutritional intervention among nursing-home residents has a positive influence on nutrition and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne Marie; Damkjær, Karin; Beyer, Nina

    2008-01-01

    Objective: We tested the hypothesis that a multifaceted 11-wk intervention comprising nutrition, group exercise, and oral care would have a significant influence on nutrition and function in elderly ( >= 65 y) nursing-home residents. Methods: The study was an 11-wk randomized controlled...... intervention study with nutrition (chocolate and homemade oral supplements), group exercise twice a week (45-60 min, moderate intensity), and oral care intervention one to two times a week, with the aim of improving nutritional status and function in elderly nursing-home residents. A follow-up visit was made 4...... mo after the end of the intervention. Assessments were weight, body mass index, dietary intake, handgrip strength, Senior Fitness Test, Berg's Balance Scale, and the prevalence of plaque. Results: A total of 121 subjects (61%) accepted the invitation and 62 were randomized to the intervention group...

  7. Consequences from use of reminiscence - a randomised intervention study in ten Danish nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sørensen Jan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reminiscence is the systematic use of memories and recollections to strengthen self-identity and self-worth. The study aim was to investigate the consequences for nursing home residents and staff of integrating reminiscence into daily nursing care. Methods In this randomised study, ten nursing homes were matched into two groups on the basis of location, type and size. In the period August 2006 - August 2007, staff in the Intervention Group were trained and supported in the use of reminiscence, involving individual and group sessions with residents as well as reminiscence boxes, posters and exhibitions. At baseline and again 6 and 12 months after the intervention start, data were collected on residents' cognitive level, agitated behaviour, general functioning and proxy-assessed quality of life, as well as on staff well-being and job satisfaction. Mixed linear modelling was used to analyse differences in outcome between the intervention and control groups. Results Project drop-out rates were 32% for residents and 38% for nursing staff. Most staff in the Intervention Group considered reminiscence a useful tool that improved their communication with residents, and that they would recommend to other nursing homes. There were no significant differences between residents in the Intervention and the Control Group in cognitive level, agitated behaviour or general functioning. Residents in the Intervention Group showed significant higher score at 6 months in quality of life subscale 'Response to surroundings', but there was no significant difference at 12 months. Positive effects of reminiscence were observed for all staff outcome measures, the only exception being SF-12 self-rated physical health. At 6 months after start of reminiscence, staff in the Intervention Group had significantly better scores than those in the Control Group for Personal accomplishment, Emotional exhaustion, Depersonalisation, 'Attitude towards individual

  8. Barriers to home care for terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan migrants, perceived by GPs and nurses: a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Graaff Fuusje M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous qualitative research proved that relatives of elderly terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan immigrants experience several barriers to the use of Dutch professional home care. The aim of this study was to explore how general practitioners and home care nurses perceive the home care for terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan migrants and their families in the Netherlands. Methods Questionnaires were sent to home care organizations and GPs working in areas where most of these migrants are living. 93 nurses and 78 GPs provided information about their experiences and opinions regarding home care for this group of patients. The data were analyzed by descriptive statistics. Results GPs refer relatively few patients from these migrant groups to home care. They often find it difficult to assess the needs of these patients and their families. In 40% of the GPs' cases in which terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan migrants were not referred to home care, the GP regretted this afterwards: the patients had not received sufficient qualified care, and their informal carers had often become overburdened. In addition, home care nurses often express dissatisfaction with the home care given to terminally ill Turkish or Moroccan patients, because of communication problems, the patients' lack of knowledge of the disease, or difficulties in making suitable appointments with the patient or with the family. Conclusion Nurses and GPs cite chiefly similar factors influencing access to and use of home care as family members did in a previous study. However, according to GPs and nurses, the main barrier to the use of home care concerns communication problems, while relatives cited the preference for family care as the main reason for abstaining from the use of home care.

  9. Concept maps for home economics in the secondary school nursing programme

    OpenAIRE

    Goričar, Metka

    2012-01-01

    Concept maps are an effective learning tool in teaching, learning and knowledge testing. The key principle is quality learning where new concepts and subject matter are understood and linked to the existing knowledge. The purpose of the diploma work is examining and organizing concepts; creating concept maps for topics from the subject catalogue for Home Economics in the nursing education programme; finding out if concept maps could be used as a learning tool or learning technique, and w...

  10. Acupressure for agitation in nursing home residents with dementia: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Kwan, Rick Yiu Cho; Leung, Mason Chin Pang; Lai, Claudia Kam Yuk

    2014-01-01

    Background Agitation is prevalent among people with dementia (PWD) in nursing homes. It frustrates both the PWD and their caregivers. Acupressure is a non-pharmacological intervention whose effectiveness is supported by preliminary studies. However, there is still a dearth of evidence to explain its effect for clinical use and further research. The present study is being conducted primarily to investigate the effects of acupressure as compared with sham-acupressure and usual care. Methods/des...

  11. Medicaid and the Cost of Improving Access to Nursing Home Care

    OpenAIRE

    Gertler, Paul J.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper I show that the Medicaid program can improve the access of financially indigent patients to nursing home care by raising the rate of return paid on Medicaid patients' care, but only at the cost of lower quality of care. To quantify the policy tradeoff, I derive expressions for the elasticity of access with respect to total Medicaid expenditures and the elasticity of access with respect to quality. These elasticities expressions are complicated by the fact that Medicaid payment f...

  12. Efficacy of Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) supplement in management of constipation among nursing home residents

    OpenAIRE

    Kim Jung; Kim Mi; Lee Do; Jang Seok; Baek Eun; An Hyang; Lee Kang; Park Jong; Ha Nam

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Constipation is a significant problem in the elderly, specifically nursing home and/or extended-care facility residents are reported to suffer from constipation. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are beneficial probiotic organisms that contribute to improved nutrition, microbial balance, and immuno-enhancement of the intestinal tract, as well as diarrhea and constipation effect. The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of this LAB supplement in the management o...

  13. Sleep disturbance among elderly people in Nursing home: A nonpharmacological approach - Literature Review study

    OpenAIRE

    Ngang, Roland Mbe

    2011-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is a common complaint among elderly people living in nursing home. This phenomenon is usually as a result of a series of related factors including medical, environmental, and behavioral and age related factors. Aims: The purpose of the study is to bring to lime line what needs to be done in promoting health through empowerment strategies among elderly people suffering from sleep disturbance. To research on common sleep assessment tools available to diagnose sleep dis...

  14. Feasibility of a mental practice intervention in stroke patients in nursing homes; a process evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Braun Susy M; van Haastregt Jolanda C; Beurskens Anna J; Gielen Alexandra I; Wade Derick T; Schols Jos M

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Within a multi-centre randomised controlled trial in three nursing homes, a process evaluation of a mental practice intervention was conducted. The main aims were to determine if the intervention was performed according to the framework and to describe the therapists' and participants' experiences with and opinions on the intervention. Methods The six week mental practice intervention was given by physiotherapists and occupational therapists in the rehabilitation teams and...

  15. How Do People Make Continence Care Happen? An Analysis of Organizational Culture in Two Nursing Homes

    OpenAIRE

    Lyons, Stacie Salsbury

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Although nursing homes (NHs) are criticized for offering poor quality continence care, little is known about the organizational processes that underlie this care. This study investigated the influence of organizational culture on continence care practices in two NHs. Design and Methods: This ethnographic study explored continence care from the perspectives of NH stakeholders, including residents and interdisciplinary team members. Data were collected through participant observation, ...

  16. Caregivers’ attitudes, knowledge and practices of oral care at nursing homes in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stančić Ivica

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Within the elderly population, residents in nursing homes, there is a greather risk of caries, periodontal disease and teeth loss. Assistance of caregivers in maintaininig good oral hygiene besides improving oral health can improve of residents general health and the qulity of their lives. The aim of this study was to examine the attitudes of caregivers and knowledge about oral health, as well as the practice regarding oral care they apply at nursing homes in Serbia. Methods. The survey was conducted at the Gerontology Center Belgrade, consisting of four nursing homes located in the urban area. The study included 58 caregivers. They were contacted on working days, in all work shifts, during January, February and March of 2013. They were asked to fill in a self-administered questionnaire consisting of 26 closed-type questions. Results. The caregivers mostly considered that it was very important to take care of oral health of the residents, but 69% responded that the level of their oral health was low or very low. As the main barriers to oral hygiene maintenance, the caregivers indicated lack of time. The caregivers had more knowledge about periodontal disease than about the main cause of caries and its prevention. Formal medical education had the influence on the knowledge about oral diseases. Oral hygiene procedures carried out by the mayority of caregivers were denture cleaning and tooth brushing. Conclusion. The caregivers were aware of the limitations in everyday oral care of nursing homes residents in Serbia, although solving these problems requires the involvement of the entire public health service.

  17. The roles of Medicaid and economic factors in the demand for nursing home care.

    OpenAIRE

    Reschovsky, J D

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine nursing home demand, focusing on how Medicaid affects demand, the role of economic variables, and on important interactions between explanatory factors. DATA SOURCES: From the 1989 National Long Term Care Survey, a nationally representative sample of community-based and institutionalized elderly persons with disabilities (N = 3,837). Survey data are merged with state- and county-level data on Medicaid policy and local market conditions. STUDY DESIGN: Sample members are c...

  18. Physical Examination of Residential Space and Maintenance in a Nursing Home

    OpenAIRE

    HEIDARI, Abbas; Nikpour, Mansour

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. The elderly population are on the rise due to medical advances and reducing mortality and fertility statistics. Therefore, careful planning and preparation should be done to meet the increasing elderly population.Neglecting physical and psychological needs of the elderly leads todisapointment and life satisfaction in elderlyand makes the weakness of old age more tangible. Nursing home is the first and simplest solution proposed to solve the problems of the elderlybut due tosome need...

  19. Nursing Home Staff Adherence to Evidence-Based Pain Management Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Jablonski, Anita; Ersek, Mary

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which nursing home staff adhere to current evidence-based guidelines to assess and manage persistent pain experienced by elderly residents. A retrospective audit was conducted of the medical records of 291 residents of 14 long-term care facilities in western Washington State. Data revealed a gap between actual practice and current best practice. Assessment of persistent pain was limited primarily to intensity and location. Although pres...

  20. Presentation and Management Outcomes of Corneal and Scleral Perforations in Geriatric Nursing Home Residents

    OpenAIRE

    Ying Fong, Yoly Yeuk; Yu, Marco; Young, Alvin Lerrmann; Jhanji, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We compared the clinical presentation and treatment outcomes of corneal and scleral perforations in geriatric nursing home residents, geriatric community residents, and non-geriatric population. The medical records of patients who were treated for corneal and scleral perforations at the Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong between January 1, 2004 and May 1, 2013, were reviewed retrospectively. Of 144 cases, 53 (37%) occurred in the geriatric population, of which 16 (11%) lived in nurs...

  1. The impact of workplace factors on filing of workers’ compensation claims among nursing home workers

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, Jin; Kurowski, Alicia; Gore, Rebecca; Punnett, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Background Injuries reported to workers’ compensation (WC) system are often used to estimate incidence of health outcomes and evaluate interventions in musculoskeletal epidemiology studies. However, WC claims represent a relatively small subset of all musculoskeletal disorders among employed individuals, and perhaps not a representative subset. This study determined the influence of workplace and individual factors on filing of workers’ compensation claims by nursing home employees with back ...

  2. Rates, variability, and associated factors of polypharmacy in nursing home patients

    OpenAIRE

    Beloosesky Y; Nenaydenko O; Gross Nevo RF; Adunsky A; Weiss A.

    2013-01-01

    Yichayaou Beloosesky,1,3 Olga Nenaydenko,2 Revital Feige Gross Nevo,1,3 Abraham Adunsky,2,3 Avraham Weiss1,3 1Department of Geriatrics, Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson Hospital, Petah Tikva, 2Department of Geriatric Rehabilitation, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, 3Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Petah Tikva, Israel Objectives: To determine the rate and variability of polypharmacy in nursing home (NH) residents and investigate its relationship to age, sex, functional stat...

  3. Item selection by an extended Latent Class model: An application to nursing homes evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Bartolucci, Francesco; Giorgio E., Montanari; Pandolfi, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    The evaluation of nursing homes and the assessment of the quality of the health care provided to their patients are usually based on the administration of questionnaires made of a large number of polytomous items. In applications involving data collected by questionnaires of this type, the Latent Class (LC) model represents a useful tool for classifying subjects in homogenous groups. In this paper, we propose an algorithm for item selection, which is based on the LC model. The proposed algori...

  4. Incorporating INTERACT II Clinical Decision Support Tools into Nursing Home Health Information Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Handler, Steven M.; Sharkey, Siobhan S.; Hudak, Sandra; Ouslander, Joseph G.

    2011-01-01

    A substantial reduction in hospitalization rates has been associated with the implementation of the Interventions to Reduce Acute Care Transfers (INTERACT) quality improvement intervention using the accompanying paper-based clinical practice tools (INTERACT II). There is significant potential to further increase the impact of INTERACT by integrating INTERACT II tools into nursing home (NH) health information technology (HIT) via standalone or integrated clinical decision support (CDS) systems...

  5. Resident Complaints About the Nursing Home Food Service: Relationship to Cognitive Status

    OpenAIRE

    Simmons, Sandra F.; Cleeton, Patrick; Porchak, Tracy

    2009-01-01

    Most nursing home (NH) residents are not interviewed about their satisfaction with the food service due to cognitive impairment. The purpose of this study was to determine the proportion of NH residents able to complete a structured interview to assess food complaints when no cognitive status criteria were used to exclude residents from interview. Eighty-nine percent of 163 residents were able and willing to complete the interview, and 65% expressed complaints about the NH food service. Resid...

  6. A comparative study of resident, family, and administrator expectations for service quality in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, J A; Duffy, M; Kilbourne, W E

    2001-01-01

    This article compares the service quality expectations of residents, family, and administrators within a long-term-care context. Expectations for service quality are measured using the SERVQUAL scale. The results support the reliability of the SERVQUAL instrument for nursing home residents. Resident expectations were significantly different from administrators' expectations on all dimensions of quality. The findings are interpreted in terms of expectation formation and the nature of service encounters.

  7. Colonization with Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli among Nursing Home Residents and Its Relationship to Fluoroquinolone Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Joel N.; Lautenbach, Ebbing; Glaze, Thomas; Bilker, Warren; Johnson, James R.

    2004-01-01

    In a cross-sectional fecal prevalence survey involving 49 residents of a Veterans Affairs nursing home, 59% of subjects were colonized with extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC), 22% were colonized with adhesin-positive E. coli, and 51% were colonized with fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli. Among 80 unique isolates, adhesins correlated negatively and aerobactin correlated positively with fluoroquinolone resistance. PMID:15328142

  8. A comparative study of resident, family, and administrator expectations for service quality in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, J A; Duffy, M; Kilbourne, W E

    2001-01-01

    This article compares the service quality expectations of residents, family, and administrators within a long-term-care context. Expectations for service quality are measured using the SERVQUAL scale. The results support the reliability of the SERVQUAL instrument for nursing home residents. Resident expectations were significantly different from administrators' expectations on all dimensions of quality. The findings are interpreted in terms of expectation formation and the nature of service encounters. PMID:11482179

  9. Ambulatory but sedentary : Impact on cognition and the rest-activity rhythm in nursing home residents with dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggermont, Laura H. P.; Scherder, Erik J. A.

    2008-01-01

    Physical activity has been positively associated with cognition and the rest-activity rhythm. In the present study, nursing staff classified ambulatory nursing home residents with moderate dementia either as active (n = 42) or as sedentary (n = 34). We assessed the rest-activity rhythm by means of a

  10. Grip on challenging behaviour : a multidisciplinary care programme for managing behavioural problems in nursing home residents with dementia. Study protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwijsen, Sandra A; Smalbrugge, Martin; Zuidema, Sytse U; Koopmans, Raymond T C M; Bosmans, Judith E; van Tulder, Maurits W; Eefsting, Jan A; Gerritsen, Debby L; Pot, Anne-Margriet

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Behavioural problems are common in nursing home residents with dementia and they often are burdensome for both residents and nursing staff. In this study, the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a new care programme for managing behavioural problems will be evaluated. METHODS/DESIGN:

  11. Most nursing home social service directors lack training in working with lesbian, gay, and bisexual residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Stephanie A; Bern-Klug, Mercedes; Kramer, Katherine W O; Saunders, Jennifer B

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study is to report findings from a nationally representative mail-in survey of nursing home social service directors (n = 1,071) who were asked if they had received at least one hour of training in six different areas of cultural competency in the past five years. Of the six areas, the lowest percentage of directors reported having training in homophobia. Three-fourths of the sample had not received even one hour of homophobia training over the past five years. Directors who were more recently educated were more likely to report having received homophobia training, as were directors with a college degree, and those who worked in nursing homes located in the West and South regions of the United States. Directors with the most experience were less likely to report having received training. Findings call for immediate development and dissemination of heterosexism and homophobia training of social service staff, policy changes within the nursing home, and policy advocacy priorities for social workers. PMID:20938877

  12. Coordinated hospital-home care for kidney patients on hemodialysis from the perspective of nursing personnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz María Tejada-Tayabas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To examine, from the nursing perspective, the needs and challenges of coordinated hospital-home care for renal patients on hemodialysis. METHODS: A qualitative analysis was conducted with an ethnographic approach in a hemodialysis unit in San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Semistructured interviews were conducted with nine nurses, selected by purposeful sampling. Structured content analysis was used. RESULTS: Nurses recounted the needs and challenges involved in caring for renal patients. They also identified barriers that limit coordinated patient care in the hospital and the home, mainly the work overload at the hemodialysis unit and the lack of a systematic strategy for education and lifelong guidance to patients, their families and caregivers. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows the importance and necessity of establishing a strategy that goes beyond conventional guidance provided to caregivers of renal patients, integrating them into the multidisciplinary group of health professionals that provide care for these patients in the hospital to establish coordinated hospital-home care that increases therapeutic adherence, treatment substitution effectiveness and patient quality of life.

  13. Immune biomarkers predictive of respiratory viral infection in elderly nursing home residents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennie Johnstone

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine if immune phenotypes associated with immunosenescence predict risk of respiratory viral infection in elderly nursing home residents. METHODS: Residents ≥ 65 years from 32 nursing homes in 4 Canadian cities were enrolled in Fall 2009, 2010 and 2011, and followed for one influenza season. Following influenza vaccination, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were obtained and analysed by flow cytometry for T-regs, CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subsets (CCR7+CD45RA+, CCR7-CD45RA+ and CD28-CD57+ and CMV-reactive CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells. Nasopharyngeal swabs were obtained and tested for viruses in symptomatic residents. A Cox proportional hazards model adjusted for age, sex and frailty, determined the relationship between immune phenotypes and time to viral infection. RESULTS: 1072 residents were enrolled; median age 86 years and 72% female. 269 swabs were obtained, 87 were positive for virus: influenza (24%, RSV (14%, coronavirus (32%, rhinovirus (17%, human metapneumovirus (9% and parainfluenza (5%. In multivariable analysis, high T-reg% (HR 0.41, 95% CI 0.20-0.81 and high CMV-reactive CD4+ T-cell% (HR 1.69, 95% CI 1.03-2.78 were predictive of respiratory viral infection. CONCLUSIONS: In elderly nursing home residents, high CMV-reactive CD4+ T-cells were associated with an increased risk and high T-regs were associated with a reduced risk of respiratory viral infection.

  14. Vitamin B6 deficiency and diseases in elderly people – a study in nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjeldby Ida K

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vitamin deficiency is a cause of health related problems in elderly people. The aims were to study associations between vitamin B6 (B6 and diseases (primarily functional gastrointestinal disorders in elderly people in nursing homes, the prevalence of B6 deficiency and factors associated with B6 deficiency. Methods This cross-sectional study included residents in nursing homes. Demographics, nutritional status (Mini Nutritional Assessment, MNA® , physical activity, activity of daily living (Katz Index, dietary habits, use of drugs, and psychiatric and somatic diseases were recorded. A blood sample was collected for haematological and biochemical screening, including B6 (p-PLP; p-PLP values Results Sixty-one residents (men/women: 22/39 with an age of 85.3 (6.8 years and BMI 25.7 (4.5 kg/m2 were included. Malnutrition and risk of malnutrition were present in 11.5% and 61% respectively. Dietary intake of B6 (mg/day in men and women were 1.60 (0.30 and 1.18 (0.31 (recommended 1.6 and 1.2 respectively, and 14 (23% used B6 supplements. Median p-PLP was 20.7 (range Conclusions Half of the residents had vitamin B6 deficiency. Vitamin supplement was effective prophylaxis for deficiency and should be recommended to all elderly people in nursing homes.

  15. Home Sweet Home

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A family-run nursing home that gives elderly people the feel of a real of a real home Jiang Shaoju’s three-year-old family-run nursing home for the elderly in Dalian breaks all stereotypes people might attach to traditional homes for the aged.There are no nurses in uniforms,no numbered bedding and there is a lot of laughter. Jiang,56,has given almost every one of the 12 elderly women in her nursing home a nickname.She calls 92-year-old Xuan Shoulan"vice principal"because Xuan likes giving orders to others in the house and

  16. Ros Aoibhinn Nursing Home, Irish Street, Bunclody, Wexford.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moore, C

    2015-02-01

    Accidental ingestion is an important preventable cause of childhood morbidity. All accidental ingestion presentations (n = 478) to a tertiary paediatric ED from January 2010 to December 2011 were analysed. These results were compared with a similar study in the same institution ten years previously in 2001 and showed that while accidental ingestions constituted a higher proportion of presentations (0.5% in this study v 0.45% in 2001), fewer had investigations performed (21% v 35%) and fewer were admitted (7% v 20%). Accidental ingestions account for 0.5% of presentations and are an important focus of home safety information for parents and guardians. Paracetamol (n = 67, 14%) and liquid detergent capsules (n = 44, 9.2%) were the two most common substances implicated in these presentations, and have the potential to cause severe morbidity and mortality.

  17. THE NURSE IN THE OCCUPATIONAL RISKS IN HOME-CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Antunes Cortez

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: identificar os riscos ocupacionais e descrever ações e medidas preventivas para minimizar riscos ao enfermeiro que atua em Home-Care. Método: estudo exploratório e descritivo com abordagem qualitativa, do tipo bibliográfico. Os dados foram coletados do acervo da Biblioteca Virtual da Saúde (BVS, através da base de dados da Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS, a base de dados Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO na Revista Latino Americana de Enfermagem, selecionados como bibliografia potencial 08 estudos dos quais emergiram 02 categorias temáticas: Enfermagem e Riscos ocupacionais; Enfermagem e Home-Care. Resultados: a equipe de enfermagem é uma das principais categorias ocupacionais sujeita aos riscos ocupacionais. O risco de maior destaque foi o ergonômico, seguido do biológico, químico e de acidentes. Dentre as ações/medidas preventivas pode-se citar: utilização de Equipamento de Proteção Individual, orientação quanto ao uso desses equipamentos, e diminuição da carga horária desses trabalhadores. Em relação aos riscos ergonômicos, orientações quanto à postura inadequada, monotonia, repetitividade e estresse ocupacional. Conclusão: Algumas ações/medidas preventivas devem ser implementadas, através de educação permanente, pausas durante as atividades, proporcionar conforto e melhorias das condições de trabalho, melhor distribuição das tarefas, organização do processo de trabalho e ginástica laboral.

  18. Clinical application of the Omaha system with the Nightingale Tracker: a community health nursing student home visit program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Helen L; Delahoussaye, Carolyn P

    2003-01-01

    The application of computer use in the clinical and educational arena needs to be emphasized for both the improved management of patient data and nursing knowledge. Faculty commitment to automation of home visit documentation records was essential to sustain the trial of implementing the Nightingale Trackers in the clinical area. The Nightingale Tracker is a software program that automates the Omaha system, a community-friendly nursing language that encourages a focus on health promotion. A team approach involving students, faculty, and technical support enabled the automation of the patient record of a home visiting program in a community health nursing course.

  19. Swallowing disorders in nursing home residents: how can the problem be explained?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nogueira D

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Dália Nogueira,1 Elizabeth Reis21Speech Therapy Department, Escola Superior de Saúde de Alcoitão, Estoril, Portugal; 2Department of Quantitative Methods, Lisbon University Institute ISCTE/IUL, Lisbon, PortugalBackground: The swallowing mechanism changes significantly as people age, even in the absence of chronic diseases. Presbyphagia, a term that refers to aging-related changes in the swallowing mechanism, may be linked to many health conditions and presents itself in distinct ways. Swallowing disorders are also identified as a major problem amongst the elderly population living in nursing homes.Methods: The study sought to determine the prevalence of swallowing disorders in nursing home residents, to identify the relationship between self-perceived swallowing disorders, cognitive functions, autonomy, and depression, and also to analyze which variables explain the score of the Dysphagia Self-Test (DST. For this purpose, the researchers chose to apply a survey conveying questions on demographic aspects, general health, eating and feeding, as well as instruments to assess functional performance and the 3 ounce Water Swallow Test.Results: The sample consisted of 272 elderly people living in eight nursing homes in Portugal. Six did not sign the informed consent form. Of the total, 29% were totally dependent, 33% were depressed, 45% had cognitive impairment, and 38% needed help with feeding. About 43% of the individuals reported having problems related to eating. Regarding the DST, 40% showed signs of dysphagia. With respect to the 3 ounce Water Swallow Test, 38% revealed at least one of the symptoms, wet voice being the most prevalent. Correlation measures showed that age had no linear association with the DST score although correlation with the Barthel Index and Mini Mental State Examination was found to be significant. A linear regression model was estimated with the DST score as the dependent variable and the MMSE and BI scores, gender, age

  20. Developing a cost-effective home care management support system for small nursing homes in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Ming-Hsiang; Chang, Polun

    2009-01-01

    Home care is important in Taiwan but most of the institutes are small and cannot afford computerization. We develop a support system based on InterRAI case management system using Excel VBA which is the most "free" application in institutes. The prototype system shows promising. PMID:19592932

  1. 77 FR 72738 - Contracts and Provider Agreements for State Home Nursing Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-06

    ... Care; 64.018, Sharing Specialized Medical Resources; 64.019, Veterans Rehabilitation Alcohol and Drug... for services--such as drugs or medical care--that should be provided by the State home as part of the... Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, the Vocational Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Worker Adjustment...

  2. Determining the relevance of a certification exam to home health care nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, D E

    1999-01-01

    Home health care is enjoying increased use and popularity. Unfortunately, in today's cost-cutting environment, home healthcare is also subject to increased scrutiny and inevitable reimbursement limitations. This is borne out by the impact on home healthcare as a result of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997. Berke (1998) reports that those at greatest risk for cutbacks in care are those that can least afford it--the oldest, sickest, poorest, and most frail. Compounding the financial dilemma that home health care clients face are multiple providers of care, an unrealistic media presentation of health care, and less time for anyone to provide psychosocial-focused care (Simmons, 1990). Home health care clients have a desperate need for an advocate to provide expert navigation through the health care system. Home health care providers are aware of and often responsible for bridging gaps in health, medical benefits, and social services. This article describes a process for determining the relevance of a certification to community nursing clinical practice--using the Advanced Certification in Continuity of Care (A-CCC) exam as the example. PMID:10695177

  3. Predictors of Burnout in Professional and Paraprofessional Nurses Working in Hospitals and Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Jan; And Others

    Burnout is a phenomenon in which the cumulative effects of a stressful work environment gradually overwhelm the defenses of staff members, causing them to psychologically withdraw. To understand the experience of professional and paraprofessional nurses suffering from burnout requires a close examination of the environments in which they function.…

  4. An ethnographic study of strategies to support discussions with family members on end-of-life care for people with advanced dementia in nursing homes

    OpenAIRE

    Saini, Geena; Sampson, Elizabeth L.; Davis, Sarah; Kupeli, Nuriye; Harrington, Jane; Leavey, Gerard; Nazareth, Irwin; Jones, Louise; Moore, Kirsten J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Most people with advanced dementia die in nursing homes where families may have to make decisions as death approaches. Discussions about end-of-life care between families and nursing home staff are uncommon, despite a range of potential benefits. In this study we aimed to examine practices relating to end-of-life discussions with family members of people with advanced dementia residing in nursing homes and to explore strategies for improving practice. Methods An ethnographic study ...

  5. Signs of Imminent Dying and Change in Symptom Intensity During Pharmacological Treatment in Dying Nursing Home Patients:A Prospective Trajectory Study

    OpenAIRE

    Sandvik, Reidun K.; Selbaek, Geir; Bergh, Sverre; Aarsland, Dag; Bettina S. Husebo

    2016-01-01

    ObjectivesTo investigate whether it is possible to determine signs of imminent dying and change in pain and symptom intensity during pharmacological treatment in nursing home patients, from day perceived as dying and to day of death.DesignProspective, longitudinal trajectory trial.SettingForty-seven nursing homes within 35 municipalities of Norway.ParticipantsA total of 691 nursing home patients were followed during the first year after admission and 152 were assessed carefully in their last ...

  6. Nursing homes as the perspective and reality of guest workers in old age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubica Milosavljević

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present the results of research conducted as part of the “Ambivalent nostalgia in the cultural heritage of gastarbeiters” project of the Ethnological-anthropological society of Serbia. The research was conducted in Kučevo and Wienna in 2014. The research focused on older guest workers or gastarbeiters who are mostly in the status of disabled pensioners, and seniors whose family members work abroad. An important criterion for determining the gasterbeiter population was entering into the sphere of work in an active capacity, specified by the assumed “temporality” in the country of work; the determination of “seniority” is based on the criteria of exiting the active sphere of work. In this way a new kind of old person, a new kind of pensioner was formed – the foreign currency pensioner whose operating strategies are partly in the focus of this paper. Aside from these strategies, the paper analyzes the strategies employed by the family members of gastarbeiters facing the old age of their relatives who reside in their country of origin either permanently or on a semi-permanent basis; as well as the strategies which the Gerontological Society of Serbia tried to develop in cooperation with the former Ministry of Diaspora RS with the aim of attracting aging gastarbeiters to domestic nursing homes, as well as stimulating the diaspora to invest in such institutions in Serbia. In short, the life experiences and attitudes of 14 pensioners interviewed in Kučevo and Vienna on issues of old age, possible – or ongoing life in a nursing home, the differences and/or similarities between them and other old folks they encountered abroad or at home, as well as experiences with working with the aging gastarbeiter population shared by six employees in a private as well as a public nursing home in Kučevo, will be the object of analysis in this paper.

  7. Study protocol: cost-effectiveness of multidisciplinary nutritional support for undernutrition in older adults in nursing home and home-care: cluster randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Beck, Anne Marie; Gøgsig Christensen, Annette; Stenbæk Hansen, Birthe; Damsbo-Svendsen, Signe; Kreinfeldt Skovgaard Møller, Tina; Boll Hansen, Eigil; Keiding, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Background Older adults in nursing home and home-care are a particularly high-risk population for weight loss or poor nutrition. One negative consequence of undernutrition is increased health care costs. Several potentially modifiable nutritional risk factors increase the likelihood of weight loss or poor nutrition. Hence a structured and multidisciplinary approach, focusing on the nutritional risk factors and involving e.g. dieticians, occupational therapists, and physiotherapist, may be nec...

  8. Ros Aoibhinn Nursing Home, Irish Street, Bunclody, Wexford.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Muller, Ueli C

    2011-04-07

    Abstract Background The International Multi-centre ADHD Genetics (IMAGE) project with 11 participating centres from 7 European countries and Israel has collected a large behavioural and genetic database for present and future research. Behavioural data were collected from 1068 probands with ADHD and 1446 unselected siblings. The aim was to describe and analyse questionnaire data and IQ measures from all probands and siblings. In particular, to investigate the influence of age, gender, family status (proband vs. sibling), informant, and centres on sample homogeneity in psychopathological measures. Methods Conners\\' Questionnaires, Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaires, and Wechsler Intelligence Scores were used to describe the phenotype of the sample. Data were analysed by use of robust statistical multi-way procedures. Results Besides main effects of age, gender, informant, and centre, there were considerable interaction effects on questionnaire data. The larger differences between probands and siblings at home than at school may reflect contrast effects in the parents. Furthermore, there were marked gender by status effects on the ADHD symptom ratings with girls scoring one standard deviation higher than boys in the proband sample but lower than boys in the siblings sample. The multi-centre design is another important source of heterogeneity, particularly in the interaction with the family status. To a large extent the centres differed from each other with regard to differences between proband and sibling scores. Conclusions When ADHD probands are diagnosed by use of fixed symptom counts, the severity of the disorder in the proband sample may markedly differ between boys and girls and across age, particularly in samples with a large age range. A multi-centre design carries the risk of considerable phenotypic differences between centres and, consequently, of additional heterogeneity of the sample even if standardized diagnostic procedures are used. These

  9. Internatos para a terceira idade - dados internacionais Nursing homes for the third age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernestine M. Bastian

    1979-03-01

    Full Text Available Foram inqueridos junto a cidades da Europa, Estados Unidos e do Oriente Médio, dados sobre a população de 65 anos e mais, o número de internatos para esta população, e o número de leitos nestes estabelecimentos. Foi calculada a proporção desta população relativa à população total, e o número de pessoas por leito de internato, comparando-se estes dados com os da cidade de São Paulo.The data on the total population and that of people 65 or older, the number of nursing homes for this latter group, and the number of beds in these homes in cities in Europe, the United States, and the Middle East is compared to equivalent data for the city of São Paulo, Brazil. The rate of the elderly population and number of persons per bed in nursing homes was of special interest to this inquiry.

  10. Intimacy, domesticity and pet therapy with the elderly: expectation and experience among nursing home volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savishinsky, J S

    1992-06-01

    A study of volunteers in three nursing homes revealed that their role had several unexpected consequences for institutional residents and for the volunteers themselves. The research, carried out in geriatric facilities in upstate New York, focused on community members and college students working in a pet therapy program, through which they brought companion animals to various institutions on a weekly basis. Visiting people and pets re-created an aura of domesticity for residents who had been cut off from homes and families by age and illness. Consonant with this domestic perception by residents was the self-image that volunteers developed of their role: most came to see themselves as family and friends to patients rather than as visitors, strangers, or adjunct staff. Volunteering, however, was an emotionally demanding experience that some people handled more successfully than others. While certain individuals found the costs of this unexpected intimacy to be too high, others discovered significant rewards in what one person called its 'selfish altruism.' Several factors were found to mediate how volunteers felt about what they did, and whether or not they continued with their work over a long period of time. These variables included: (a) the motives that people had for becoming volunteers, (b) their prior experience doing this kind of work, (c) their career orientations, and current family and living situation, and (d) the image that they had of the elderly in general and nursing homes in particular. PMID:1529370

  11. Curriculum analysis of home health content in associate degree and baccalaureate degree nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, M R

    1989-03-01

    A statewide study was done with five associate degree (ADN) and five baccalaureate degree (BSN) nursing programs in Georgia to examine the similarities and differences in curriculum based on a nationally used model. From this overall study, select content related to community/home health care was evaluated in the sample programs. Professional standards for community and home health care nursing practice, as well as other published literature on the topic, provided a basis to determine competence to practice. Data were collected through a taped telephone interview to all program chairpersons (N = 10) and mailed questionnaires to faculty involved with all required courses (N = 110). Content analyses of responses allowed for evaluation of frequency of these learning activities between ADN and BSN programs and among BSN programs in the areas of family, teaching, interdisciplinary collaboration, physical assessment, and leadership. Overall, the results indicated lack of conclusive data to support a distinct difference in these educational components between the ADN and BSN sample or among BSN programs. The study was intended to service as a basis for home health care curriculum development in the future.

  12. Development of a nurse home visitation intervention for intimate partner violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Susan M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite an increase in knowledge about the epidemiology of intimate partner violence (IPV, much less is known about interventions to reduce IPV and its associated impairment. One program that holds promise in preventing IPV and improving outcomes for women exposed to violence is the Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP, an evidence-based nurse home visitation program for socially disadvantaged first-time mothers. The present study developed an intervention model and modification process to address IPV within the context of the NFP. This included determining the extent to which the NFP curriculum addressed the needs of women at risk for IPV or its recurrence, along with client, nurse and broader stakeholder perspectives on how best to help NFP clients cope with abusive relationships. Methods Following a preliminary needs assessment, an exploratory multiple case study was conducted to identify the core components of the proposed IPV intervention. This included qualitative interviews with purposeful samples of NFP clients and community stakeholders, and focus groups with nurse home visitors recruited from four NFP sites. Conventional content analysis and constant comparison guided data coding and synthesis. A process for developing complex interventions was then implemented. Results Based on data from 69 respondents, an IPV intervention was developed that focused on identifying and responding to IPV; assessing a client's level of safety risk associated with IPV; understanding the process of leaving and resolving an abusive relationship and system navigation. A need was identified for the intervention to include both universal elements of healthy relationships and those tailored to a woman's specific level of readiness to promote change within her life. A clinical pathway guides nurses through the intervention, with a set of facilitators and corresponding instructions for each component. Conclusions NFP clients, nurses and stakeholders

  13. Social and occupational engagement of staff in two Irish nursing homes for people with dementia

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Morgan-Brown, M

    2011-01-01

    This observational study evaluated the amounts of social and occupational engagement of staff (nurses, care workers, activity coordinators) in two traditional style Irish residential nursing homes for people with dementia. A snapshot observational technique was used to obtain daily quantitative data. Approximately 65% of the time that staff were in communal sitting rooms during the observational periods was spent in work and care tasks, with approximately 25% of the time spent in social engagement and 10% spent in interactive occupational activities with the residents. Staff were absent from the room for over one-third of the observed time. Environmental and operational observations are discussed using narrative descriptions to give a context to the quantitative outcome measures.

  14. Efficacy of Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB supplement in management of constipation among nursing home residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Jung

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Constipation is a significant problem in the elderly, specifically nursing home and/or extended-care facility residents are reported to suffer from constipation. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are beneficial probiotic organisms that contribute to improved nutrition, microbial balance, and immuno-enhancement of the intestinal tract, as well as diarrhea and constipation effect. The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of this LAB supplement in the management of nursing home residents. Methods Nineteen subjects (8M, 11F; mean age 77.1 ± 10.1 suffering with chronic constipation were assigned to receive LAB (3.0 × 1011 CFU/g twice (to be taken 30 minutes after breakfast and dinner a day for 2 weeks in November 2008. Subjects draw up a questionnaire on defecation habits (frequency of defecation, amount and state of stool, and we collected fecal samples from the subjects both before entering and after ending the trial, to investigate LAB levels and inhibition of harmful enzyme activities. Results were tested with SAS and Student's t-test. Results Analysis of questionnaire showed that there was an increase in the frequency of defecation and amount of stool excreted in defecation habit after LAB treatment, but there were no significant changes. And it also affects the intestinal environment, through significantly increase (p p Conclusion LAB, when added to the standard treatment regimen for nursing home residents with chronic constipation, increased defecation habit such as frequency of defecation, amount and state of stool. So, it may be used as functional probiotics to improve human health by helping to prevent constipation.

  15. Decisions to withhold diagnostic investigations in nursing home patients with a clinical suspicion of venous thromboembolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrike J Schouten

    Full Text Available This study aimed to gather insights in physicians' considerations for decisions to either refer for- or to withhold additional diagnostic investigations in nursing home patients with a suspicion of venous thromboembolism.Our study was nested in an observational study on diagnostic strategies for suspected venous thromboembolism in nursing home patients. Patient characteristics, bleeding-complications and mortality were related to the decision to withhold investigations. For a better understanding of the physicians' decisions, 21 individual face-to-face in-depth interviews were performed and analysed using the grounded theory approach.Referal for additional diagnostic investigations was forgone in 126/322 (39.1% patients with an indication for diagnostic work-up. 'Blind' anticoagulant treatment was initiated in 95 (75.4% of these patients. The 3 month mortality rates were higher for patients in whom investigations were withheld than in the referred patients, irrespective of anticoagulant treatment (odds ratio 2.45; 95% confidence interval 1.40 to 4.29 but when adjusted for the probability of being referred (i.e. the propensity score, there was no relation of non-diagnosis decisions to mortality (odds ratio 1.75; 0.98 to 3.11. In their decisions to forgo diagnostic investigations, physicians incorporated the estimated relative impact of the potential disease; the potential net-benefits of diagnostic investigations and whether performing investigations agreed with established management goals in advance care planning.Referral for additional diagnostic investigations is withheld in almost 40% of Dutch nursing home patients with suspected venous thromboembolism and an indication for diagnostic work-up. We propose that, given the complexity of these decisions and the uncertainty regarding their indirect effects on patient outcome, more attention should be focused on the decision to either use or withhold additional diagnostic tests.

  16. Serum zinc concentrations correlate with mental and physical status of nursing home residents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Markiewicz-Żukowska

    Full Text Available Zinc (Zn is one of the most important trace elements in the body. Zn deficiency seems to play a role in the development of age-related diseases and impairment of quality of life. Zn status has been especially studied in free-living or hospitalised people, but data from older residents of nursing homes are scarce. This study aimed to determine the Zn status among the older individuals in correlation to their mental and physical performance.A total of 100 participants aged between 60-102 years were recruited between October 2010 and May 2012 at the nursing home in Bialystok (Poland. Zn status was evaluated by determining the concentration in serum by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Anthropometric variables and fitness score (FS were measured. Abbreviated Mental Test Score (AMTS, Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS, Self-Rated Health (SRH, independence in Activities of Daily Living (ADL were recorded.The mean serum Zn concentration was 0.83 ± 0.20 mg/L, 28% of residents had Zn deficiency. Cognitive functions were impaired (AMTS ≤ 8 in 45% of the studied persons and 48% showed depressive symptoms (GDS ≥ 1. The ability to independently perform activities of daily living (ADL = 6 was found in 61% of participants, but most of them (90% had weak body type (FS < 70, correlating with GDS, SRH and body mass index (BMI. Serum Zn concentration correlated with mental efficiency and was statistically significantly higher in older people with normal cognitive function and without depression than in patients with memory impairment and showing depressive symptoms.Nursing home residents seem at risk of marginal Zn status, which correlates with their mental status as measured by the AMTS and GDS. Their low FS is associated with mental health deterioration and obesity.

  17. What is the impact of policy differences on nursing home utilization? The cases of Germany and the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alders, Peter; Costa-Font, Joan; de Klerk, Mirjam; Frank, Richard

    2015-06-01

    Though need factors would predict a higher rate of institutional use in Germany, in 2004 the percentage of people over 65 in institutions in the Netherlands was almost double the percentage in Germany. The lower nursing home utilization in Germany coincided with lower out-of-pocket costs, de facto means-testing of social assistance for such care, a lower perceived quality of nursing home, and less acceptance of the nursing home as a main care modality for adults experiencing functional impairments. These factors have developed over time and are consistent with a--relatively--large government responsibility toward care for the elderly and a preference for institutional care over home care in the Netherlands. The policy to encourage older adults to move to elderly homes to decrease the housing shortage after WWII might have had long-lasting effects. This paper points out that a key in the success of a reform is a behavioral change in the system. As there seems to be no single factor to decrease the percentage of older adults in nursing homes, a sequence of policies might be a more promising route. PMID:25799174

  18. Analgesic use among nursing homes residents, with and without dementia, in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neumann-Podczaska A

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Agnieszka Neumann-Podczaska,1 Tomasz Nowak,2 Aleksandra Suwalska,3 Dorota Łojko,4 Roma Krzymińska-Siemaszko,2 Elżbieta Kozak-Szkopek,5 Katarzyna Wieczorowska-Tobis2 1Department of Geriatrics and Gerontology, 2Department of Palliative Medicine, Laboratory of Geriatrics, 3Department of Psychiatry, Laboratory of Neuropsychobiology, 4Department of Adult Psychiatry, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, 5Department of Geriatrics, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland Abstract: Many age-associated diseases are accompanied by pain. There is no doubt that pain is underrecognized among elderly nursing home residents and the diagnosing of pain is a real challenge in subjects with dementia. The aim of the study was to characterize analgesic use among nursing home residents and to delineate the putative associations between pain management and cognitive functions of elderly persons. The study involved 392 subjects (males:females – 81:311 with a mean age of 83.6±5.9 years. The residents’ medical files in relation to diagnoses and drug consumption were analyzed, and the screening of cognitive functions was performed using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE. One hundred and thirteen residents (28.8% received some analgesics. Among them 84 (21.4% used them routinely, 25 (6.4% – pro re nata (PRN and four (1.0% – both routinely and PRN. Non-opioid analgesics were taken routinely by 53 residents, weak opioids by nine subjects, and one person was receiving strong opioids. Additionally, three individuals were taking a combination preparation of tramadol and acetaminophen. The rate of subjects who were not receiving any pain treatment was higher in residents with MMSE between 0 and 9 points than in those with MMSE between 24 and 30 points (P=0.0151. Furthermore, ten residents (9.1% with severe dementia were treated with analgesics PRN. The results of our study point to a remarkably low use of analgesics in nursing home residents in

  19. Geothermal heat for Presbyterian Intercommunity Hospital and Klamath County Nursing Home

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, R.L. (Presbyterian Intercommunity Hospital, Klamath Falls, OR); Hubbard, K.; Rosecrans, D.

    1977-08-01

    The geology and hydrology of the Klamath Falls area is discussed briefly. The geothermal heating system which serves the Presbyterian Intercommunity Hospital and the Klamath County Nursing Home is shown in photographs and schematic drawing. The system consists basically of a well, settling tank, various heat exchangers, pumps, piping, and controls to move the water. From the heat exchangers system water is pumped to the terminal units, where it is used for space heating, domestic hot water, and a glycol snow melting system. The operation of the various parts of the system is described. (MHR)

  20. Animal Assisted Therapy and Perception of Loneliness in Geriatric Nursing Home Residents

    OpenAIRE

    Vrbanac, Zoran; Zečević, Iva; Ljubić, Marijana; Belić, Maja; Stanin, Damir; Brkljača Bottegaro, Nika; Jurkić, Gabrijela; Škrlin, Branimir; Bedrica, Ljiljana; Žubčić, Damir

    2013-01-01

    Use of animals for therapeutic purposes, animal assisted therapy or AAT is a method for improving quality of life for long-term inpatients. The object of this paper was to evaluate dog companionship as a form of AAT and its effects on per- ception of loneliness in geriatric nursing home residents. The participants were involved in a six-month program of dog companionship three times weekly for 90 minutes. There were 21 residents included in the program, with a mean age of 80 years. Loneliness...