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Sample records for automatic home nursing

  1. Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medications & Older Adults Making Your Wishes Known Home & Community Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Nursing Homes Font size A A A Print Share ... Research Getting More Help Related Topics Assisted Living Community-Based ... Health of Nursing Home Residents Friday, September 18, 2015 Join our ...

  2. Nursing Home Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nursing home checklist Name of nursing home: ____________________________________________________ Address: ________________________________________________________________ Phone number: __________________________________________________________ Date of visit: _____________________________________________________________ Basic information Yes No Notes Is the nursing home Medicare certified? Is the nursing ...

  3. Nursing Home

    OpenAIRE

    Allocca Hernandez, Giacomo Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Getting old involves a lot of changes in life. Family and social relations change and mobility can decrease. These variations require new settings, and of course special care. A nursing home is a place dedicated to help with this situation. Sometimes nursing homes can be perceived as mere institutions by society, and even by future residents. Inside, senior citizens are suppose to spend the rest of their lives doing the same activities day after day. How can we improve these days? Archite...

  4. Meals in nursing homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofod, Jens Erik; Birkemose, A.

    2004-01-01

    Undernutrition is present among 33% of nursing home residents in Denmark. Hence, it is relevant to examine the meal situation at nursing homes to single out factors that may increase or reduce the residents' food intake. in the ongoing Danish nursing home debate it is claimed that a new type...... of nursing home improves the residents' meal situation with a positive effect on nutrition. The aim of this work is to test the general hypothesis that (i) residents appreciate the meal situation in these nursing homes and (ii) nutritional status of the residents is improved in this type of nursing home....... This study was carried out in four Danish nursing homes at various locations in Denmark. The methods used are qualitative interviews and observations at four nursing homes in combination with measurement of body mass index (BMI) at two of the four nursing homes. Undernutrition is defined as a BMI below 20...

  5. Nursing Home Quality Initiative

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This Nursing Home Quality Initiative (NHQI) website provides consumer and provider information regarding the quality of care in nursing homes. NHQI discusses quality...

  6. Alternatives to Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this website may not be available. Alternatives to nursing homes Before you make any decisions about long ... live and what help you may need. A nursing home may not be your only choice. Discharge ...

  7. Community Nursing Home (CNH)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Community Nursing Home (CNH) database contains a list of all Community Nursing Home facilities under local contract to Veterans Health Administration (VHA). CNH...

  8. National Nursing Home Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Nursing Home Survey provides includes characteristics such as size of nursing home facilities, ownership, Medicare/Medicaid certification, occupancy rate, number of days of care provided, and expenses.

  9. Nursing Home Quality Initiative

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This Nursing Home Quality Initiative (NHQI) website provides consumer and provider information regarding the quality of care in nursing homes. NHQI discusses...

  10. [Nurse home visits in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monguillon, Dominique; Gracia, Pierre-Benjamin

    2011-10-01

    Nurse home visits in France. More and more nurses carry out home visits, either as freelance nurses or employees of a nurse home visits service, a home hospital care structure or a nursing care centre. These home visits are both demanded by patients and encouraged by the health authorities. As a consequence, the service is expanding every year.

  11. Ensuring Quality Nursing Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensuring Quality Nursing Home Care Before you choose a nursing home Expert information from Healthcare Professionals Who Specialize in the Care ... Nearly 1.6 million older Americans live in nursing homes in the United States. The move to ...

  12. Nursing Home Data Compendium

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The compendium contains figures and tables presenting data on all Medicare- and Medicaid-certified nursing homes in the United States as well as the residents in...

  13. Nursing Home Compare

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The data that is used by the Nursing Home Compare tool can be downloaded for public use. This functionality is primarily used by health policy researchers and the...

  14. Nursing Home Compare Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — These are the official datasets used on the Medicare.gov Nursing Home Compare Website provided by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. These data allow...

  15. Legal Issues in Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapp, Marshall B.

    This paper examines the variety of legal rules and processes which have been established to assess and ensure that the quality of care provided in nursing homes satisfies an acceptable level. It begins with a general overview of nursing home law. Areas discussed in this section include: (1) sources of nursing home law; (2) theories of liability;…

  16. [Aromatherapy in nursing homes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barré, Lucile

    2015-01-01

    Pierre Delaroche de Clisson hospital uses essential oils as part of its daily organisation for the treatment of pain and the development of palliative care. The setting up of this project, in nursing homes and long-term care units, is the fruit of a complex mission carried out by a multidisciplinary team, which had to take into account the risks involved and overcome a certain amount of reluctance.

  17. Factor substitution in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, John; Grabowski, David C; Hirth, Richard A

    2006-03-01

    This paper studies factor substitution in one important sector: the nursing home industry. Specifically, we measure the extent to which nursing homes substitute materials for labor when labor becomes relatively more expensive. From a policy perspective, factor substitution in this market is important because materials-intensive methods of care are associated with greater risks of morbidity and mortality among nursing home residents. Studying longitudinal data from 1991 to 2000 on nearly every nursing home in the United States, we use the method of instrumental variables (IV) to address measurement error in nursing home wages. The results from the IV models yield evidence of factor substitution: higher nursing home wages are associated with greater use of psychoactive drugs and lower quality.

  18. Nursing home and nursing home physician: the Dutch experience.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schols, J.M.G.A.; Crebolder, H.F.J.M.; Weel, C. van

    2004-01-01

    Dutch nursing home care today includes a broad range of institutional and outreaching care functions. Medical care is an essential part of this care. Nursing home medicine in The Netherlands has developed as an officially acknowledged medical specialty. This is unique because The Netherlands is the

  19. Nursing Home Nomads: A Study of Transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retsinas, Joan

    Researchers have divided nursing home residents into long-stayers and short-stayers. While long-stayers rarely return home, they do not necessarily stay long in one institution. Instead, they may transfer from nursing home to nursing home. Although many studies have examined the impact of relocation on nursing home residents, few studies have…

  20. Nursing Home Work Practices and Nursing Assistants' Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Christine E.; Squillace, Marie R.; Meagher, Jennifer; Anderson, Wayne L.; Wiener, Joshua M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the impact of nursing home work practices, specifically compensation and working conditions, on job satisfaction of nursing assistants employed in nursing homes. Design and Methods: Data are from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey, responses by the nursing assistants' employers to the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey,…

  1. Rehabilitation in the nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, C L; Wanlass, W

    1993-11-01

    Despite the considerable challenges to providing high-quality rehabilitation in a long-term care facility, growing demographic and fiscal pressures are likely to push the nursing home into the forefront of rehabilitation for the frail elderly. Model programs have been implemented in recent years that present alternative ways to increase access to skilled services and improve quality of care in nursing homes without a drastic increase in costs. The teaching nursing home program has supported projects to make longterm care facilities centers for education, innovative clinical care, and research, thus bringing nursing homes into the mainstream of the medical establishment. A majority of US medical schools have recognized the need for training in long-term care and have formed affiliations with nursing homes. The Department of Veterans Affairs has a large national system of nursing homes, which has made a significant contribution to the training of health professionals in many fields. Demonstration projects such as the Social Health Maintenance Organization and On Lok have sought to decrease the fragmentation of health care services for the elderly and bring nursing homes into a continuum of care. The adoption of the OBRA regulations is building a base for comprehensive assessment and improved provision of care in nursing homes nationwide. Nursing home rehabilitation has the potential to decrease institutionalization in the short-term resident, whereas maintenance therapy can improve quality of life and decrease the cost of caring for patients who must be institutionalized. But to achieve this potential, significant barriers must be overcome. Negative attitudes about aging and nursing homes percolate through all levels of health care from lack of reimbursement at the federal and state levels to the professional priorities that continue to favor "high-tech" medicine and stigmatize nursing homes and those who work in them, to low expectations of caregivers and the

  2. Implementing guidelines in nursing homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diehl, Heinz; Graverholt, Birgitte; Espehaug, Birgitte

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Research on guideline implementation strategies has mostly been conducted in settings which differ significantly from a nursing home setting and its transferability to the nursing home setting is therefore limited. The objective of this study was to systematically review the effects...... of interventions to improve the implementation of guidelines in nursing homes. METHODS: A systematic literature search was conducted in the Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Embase, MEDLINE, DARE, HTA, CENTRAL, SveMed + and ISI Web of Science from their inception until August 2015. Reference screening and a citation...... search were performed. Studies were eligible if they evaluated any type of guideline implementation strategy in a nursing home setting. Eligible study designs were systematic reviews, randomised controlled trials, non-randomised controlled trials, controlled before-after studies and interrupted...

  3. Nursing Jobs in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torpey, Elka Maria

    2011-01-01

    The need for practical nurses who focus on caring for older people is growing. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the number of people ages 65 and older is expected to increase from 40 million to 72 million between 2010 and 2030. And the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projects that this increasing population will result in job growth for…

  4. Nursing home-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Solh, Ali A

    2009-02-01

    Nursing home-acquired pneumonia (NHAP) was first described in 1978. Since then there has been much written regarding NHAP and its management despite the lack of well-designed studies in this patient population. The most characteristic features of patients with NHAP are the atypical presentation, which may lead to delay in diagnosis and therapy. The microbial etiology of pneumonia encompasses a wide spectrum that spans microbes recovered from patients with community-acquired pneumonia to organisms considered specific only to nosocomial settings. Decision to transfer a nursing home patient to an acute care facility depends on a host of factors, which include the level of staffing available at the nursing home, patients' advance directives, and complexity of treatment. The presence of risk factors for multidrug-resistant pathogens dictates approach to therapy. Prevention remains the cornerstone of reducing the incidence of disease. Despite the advance in medical services, mortality from NHAP remains high.

  5. An international definition for "nursing home"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanford, A.M.; Orrell, M.; Tolson, D.; Abbatecola, A.M.; Arai, H.; Bauer, J.M.; Cruz-Jentoft, A.J.; Dong, B.; Ga, H.; Goel, A.; Hajjar, R.; Holmerova, I.; Katz, P.R.; Koopmans, R.T.; Rolland, Y.; Visvanathan, R.; Woo, J.; Morley, J.E.; Vellas, B.

    2015-01-01

    There is much ambiguity regarding the term "nursing home" in the international literature. The definition of a nursing home and the type of assistance provided in a nursing home is quite varied by country. The International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics and AMDA foundation developed a su

  6. Nursing Homes as Teaching Institutions: Legal Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapp, Marshall B.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the trend toward affiliation of nursing homes with educational programs as clinical teaching institutions for medical, nursing, and allied health students. Reviews potential ethical and legal issues for the nursing home administrator, professional staff member, educator, and student, including informed consent, supervisory…

  7. Family caregivers' experiences in nursing homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohne, Vibeke; Høy, Bente; Wilhelm Rehnsfeldt, Arne

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study is focusing on dignity in nursing homes from the perspective of family caregivers. Dignity is a complex concept and central to nursing. Dignity in nursing homes is a challenge, according to research. Family caregivers are frequently involved in their family members’ daily e...

  8. Fall prevention in nursing homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Mette; Hauge, Johnny

    2006-01-01

    that the number of hospitalization after a fall injury will become an even greater task for the Danish hospitals, The aim of the study was to show if there is a relationship between physically frail elderly nursing home resident’s subjective evaluation of fall-risk and an objective evaluation of their balance...... and the main results of this study are to a great extent supported by international research. A multifactor intervention has shown a great effect in the prevention of falls, and we suggest this to be a part of the prevention work in nursing homes. A multifactor intervention is essential in the prevention...... effect on the elderly’s mobility and engagement in physical activities. Being immobile has been found to be the cause of an early dead. In Denmark there is a general lack of studies about the frail elderly. Statistics shows that the number of elderly people over 85 of age is rising, this means...

  9. Assisted Living Facilities - MDC_NursingHome

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Label (point) feature class of Miami-Dade County Nursing Homes Facilities. As of May 2004 the Office of Emergency Management (OEM) will provide updates for Nursing...

  10. Some Aspects of Burnout in Nursing Homes

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Nursing personnel in nursing homes for elderly citizens are exposed to a number of factors that contribute to possible burnout syndrome. For this reason, the set objective of the research was to measure the degree of burnout, check the correlation between the burnout syndrome and satisfaction at work, and psychosomatic symptoms, as well as to figure out the main characteristics of burnout syndrome among the nursing personnel in nursing homes for the elderly in Slovenia.

  11. Action research in nursing homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, John; Bilfeldt, Annette

    2016-01-01

    This article concerns the experiences gained from the action research project, Quality in Elder Care, involving social dimensions of quality in public elder care. The aim of the project was to improve the professional skills and engagement of the care workers and to improve the life quality...... quality in a joint effort between care workers, residents at the nursing home, and researchers. It concludes that the project led to empowerment of the residents and staff and played an important role in the development of democratic knowledge building about better quality and ethics in elder care....

  12. 38 CFR 17.57 - Use of community nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Use of community nursing... MEDICAL Use of Community Nursing Home Care Facilities § 17.57 Use of community nursing homes. (a) Nursing home care in a contract public or private nursing home facility may be authorized for the...

  13. Intergrated dental care in nursing homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, P.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    The thesis deals with integrated dental care in nursing homes. First, the dental treatment needs were ascertained of 432 residents in three Dutch nursing homes that offer integrated dental care. Dentist researchers intra-orally examined the residents and found that 72% required dental treatment. How

  14. Stroke and Nursing Home care: a national survey of nursing homes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cowman, Seamus

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although stroke is recognised as a major factor in admission to nursing home care, data is lacking on the extent and nature of the disabilities and dependency in nursing homes arising from stroke. A national study conducted in nursing homes can quantify the number of residents with stroke in nursing homes, their disability and levels of dependency. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey research design was used. A total of 572 public and private nursing homes were identified nationally and a stratified random selection of 60 nursing homes with 3,239 residents was made. In half of the nursing homes (n = 30) efforts were made to interview all residents with stroke Survey instruments were used to collect data from residents with stroke and nursing home managers on demography, patient disability, and treatment. RESULTS: Across all nursing homes (n = 60), 18% (n = 570) of the residents had previously had a stroke. In homes (n = 30), where interviews with residents with stroke (n = 257), only 7% (n = 18) residents were capable of answering for themselves and were interviewed. Data on the remaining 93% (n = 239) residents were provided by the nursing home manager. Nurse Managers reported that 73% of residents with stroke had a high level of dependency. One in two residents with stroke was prescribed antidepressants or sedative medication. Only 21% of stroke residents were prescribed anticoagulants, 42% antiplatelets, and 36% cholesterol lowering medications. Stroke rehabilitation guidelines were lacking and 68% reported that there was no formal review process in place. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides seminal findings on stroke and nursing home services in Ireland. We now know that one in six nursing home residents in a national survey are residents with a stroke, and have a wide range of disabilities. There is currently little or no structured care (beyond generic care) for stroke survivors who reside in nursing homes in Ireland.

  15. Stroke and Nursing Home care: a national survey of nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGee Hannah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although stroke is recognised as a major factor in admission to nursing home care, data is lacking on the extent and nature of the disabilities and dependency in nursing homes arising from stroke. A national study conducted in nursing homes can quantify the number of residents with stroke in nursing homes, their disability and levels of dependency. Methods A cross-sectional survey research design was used. A total of 572 public and private nursing homes were identified nationally and a stratified random selection of 60 nursing homes with 3,239 residents was made. In half of the nursing homes (n = 30 efforts were made to interview all residents with stroke Survey instruments were used to collect data from residents with stroke and nursing home managers on demography, patient disability, and treatment. Results Across all nursing homes (n = 60, 18% (n = 570 of the residents had previously had a stroke. In homes (n = 30, where interviews with residents with stroke (n = 257, only 7% (n = 18 residents were capable of answering for themselves and were interviewed. Data on the remaining 93% (n = 239 residents were provided by the nursing home manager. Nurse Managers reported that 73% of residents with stroke had a high level of dependency. One in two residents with stroke was prescribed antidepressants or sedative medication. Only 21% of stroke residents were prescribed anticoagulants, 42% antiplatelets, and 36% cholesterol lowering medications. Stroke rehabilitation guidelines were lacking and 68% reported that there was no formal review process in place. Conclusions This study provides seminal findings on stroke and nursing home services in Ireland. We now know that one in six nursing home residents in a national survey are residents with a stroke, and have a wide range of disabilities. There is currently little or no structured care (beyond generic care for stroke survivors who reside in nursing homes in Ireland.

  16. 38 CFR 51.31 - Automatic recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Obtaining Per Diem for Nursing Home Care in... that already is recognized by VA as a State home for nursing home care at the time this part becomes effective, automatically will continue to be recognized as a State home for nursing home care but will...

  17. Long-Term Effects of a Nursing Home Education Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Robert D.; Gurian, Bennett S.

    1976-01-01

    A survey was conducted by a mental health center to evaluate the effects of a nursing home education project which attempted 1) to teach mental health professionals and nursing home staff how to set up in-service education programs in nursing homes, and 2) to teach nursing home staff mental health principles. (Author/EJT)

  18. Organization and financing of home nursing in the European Union.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkstra, A.; Hutten, J.B.F.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide an overview of the organization and financing of home nursing in the 15 member states in the European Union. Home nursing was defined as the nursing care provided at the patients' home by professional home nursing organizations. Data were gathered by means of thr

  19. 77 FR 72738 - Contracts and Provider Agreements for State Home Nursing Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-06

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 51 RIN 2900-AO57 Contracts and Provider Agreements for State Home Nursing Home Care... agreements with State homes for the nursing home care of certain disabled veterans. This rulemaking is... 2900-AO57--Contracts and Provider Agreements for State Home Nursing Home Care.'' Copies of...

  20. Automatic Battery Swap System for Home Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Wu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and implementation of an automatic battery swap system for the prolonged activities of home robots. A battery swap station is proposed to implement battery off‐line recharging and on‐line exchanging functions. It consists of a loading and unloading mechanism, a shifting mechanism, a locking device and a shell. The home robot is a palm‐sized wheeled robot with an onboard camera and a removable battery case in the front. It communicates with the battery swap station wirelessly through ZigBee. The influences of battery case deflection and robot docking deflection on the battery swap operations have been investigated. The experimental results show that it takes an average time of 84.2s to complete the battery swap operations. The home robot does not have to wait several hours for the batteries to be fully charged. The proposed battery swap system is proved to be efficient in home robot applications that need the robots to work continuously over a long period.

  1. Deprivation of Dignity in Nursing Home Residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høy, Bente

    2012-01-01

    deepened knowledge in how to maintain and promote dignity in nursing home residents. The purpose of this paper is to present results concerning the question: How is nursing home residents’ dignity maintained or deprived from the perspective of close family caregivers? In this presentation we only focus...... on deprivation of dignity. Methodology: The overall design of this study is modified clinical application research. The study took place at six different nursing home residences in Sweden, Denmark and Norway. Data collection methods were individual research interviews. All together the sample consisted of 28...

  2. Reducing energy costs in nursing homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    The handbook presents ideas and techniques for energy conservation in nursing homes. Case studies were developed of nursing homes located in different parts of the US. The typical nursing home assessed was proprietary, of intermediate-care level, medicaid-certified, and had less than 200 beds. Specific energy conservation measures were analyzed to determine the energy and dollar savings that could be realized. These include reducing heat loss through the building shell; reducing hot water costs; recovering the heat generated by dryers; reducing lighting costs; reducing heating and cooling costs, and analyzing fuels and fuel rates. A case for converting electric clothes dryers to gas was analyzed. (MCW)

  3. Nursing Practice Environment and Registered Nurses' Job Satisfaction in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNs…

  4. Clinical update on nursing home medicine: 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messinger-Rapport, Barbara J; Gammack, Julie K; Thomas, David R; Morley, John E

    2013-12-01

    This is the seventh article in the series of Clinical Updates on Nursing Home Care. The topics covered are antiresorptive drugs, hip fracture, hypertension, orthostatic hypotension, depression, undernutrition, anorexia, cachexia, sarcopenia, exercise, pain, and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia.

  5. Home Care Nursing Improves Cancer Symptom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home care nursing (HCN) improves the management of symptoms in breast and colorectal cancer patients who take the oral chemotherapy drug capecitabine, according to a study published online November 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  6. [Home nursing care for depressed elderly people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floch, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    The freelance nurse must be adaptable and reactive in order to meet the needs of a depressed or suicidal elderly person. In addition to her own particular relationship with the patient, the nurse must activate a network of other professionals who can carry out home visits.

  7. Nursing assistant beliefs about their roles and nursing home residents: implications for nursing home social work practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Gawon

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine beliefs and assumptions held by nursing assistants working in nursing homes using a qualitative approach. Unchallenged notions about residents and the roles held by nursing assistants influence their way of interacting with residents, which inevitably influences quality of care in nursing homes. When nursing assistants have an opportunity to be heard and mentored by social workers, they can address and resolve the dilemma of providing informal care as a formal caregiver by discussing what is acceptable and appropriate in nursing home care.

  8. Hypertension in the nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronow, Wilbert S

    2008-09-01

    Hypertension in a nursing home patient is a systolic blood pressure of 140 mm Hg or higher and 130 mm Hg or higher in a patient with diabetes mellitus or chronic renal insufficiency, or a diastolic blood pressure of 90 mm Hg or higher and 80 mm Hg or higher in a patient with diabetes mellitus or chronic renal insufficiency. Numerous prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled studies have demonstrated that antihypertensive drug therapy reduces the development of new coronary events, stroke, and congestive heart failure in older persons. The goal of treatment of hypertension in elderly persons is to lower the blood pressure to less than 140/90 mm Hg and to less than 130/80 mm Hg in older persons with diabetes mellitus or chronic renal insufficiency. Elderly persons with diastolic hypertension should have their diastolic blood pressure reduced to 80 to 85 mm Hg. Diuretics should be used as initial drugs in the treatment of older persons with hypertension and no associated medical conditions. The selection of antihypertensive drug therapy in persons with associated medical conditions depends on their associated medical conditions. If the blood pressure is more than 20/10 mm Hg above the goal blood pressure, drug therapy should be initiated with 2 antihypertensive drugs, one of which should be a thiazide-type diuretic. Other coronary risk factors must be treated in patients with hypertension.

  9. Nursing assistant turnover in nursing homes and need satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudill, M; Patrick, M

    1989-06-01

    1. Level of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs is basic physiological needs measured by salary, adequate housing, and food. Attainment of these needs increased the length of stay of nursing assistants in nursing homes. 2. Safety and security (level 2) influenced length of stay of nursing assistants. Those with benefits of retirement, vacation, and holiday pay tended to have less turnover. 3. Praise by the patient and family was most important to nursing assistants. Belonging to a peer group and praise by charge nurse also decreased turnover of nursing assistants (level 3). 4. Level 4, self-esteem measured by input into decisions and being able to criticize, increased length of stay of nursing assistants.

  10. Hospice in the Nursing Home: Perspectives of Front Line Nursing Home Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unroe, Kathleen T.; Cagle, John G.; Dennis, M. E.; Lane, Kathleen A.; Callahan, Christopher M.; Miller, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Objective Use of hospice has been associated with improved outcomes for nursing home residents and attitudes of nursing home staff towards hospice influences hospice referral. The objective of this study is to describe attitudes of certified nursing assistants (CNAs), nurses, and social workers towards hospice care in nursing homes. Design, Setting and Participants We conducted a survey of 1,859 staff from 52 Indiana nursing homes. Measurements Study data include responses to 6 scaled questions and 3 open-ended qualitative prompts. In addition, respondents who cared for a resident on hospice in the nursing home were asked how often hospice: 1) makes their job easier; 2) is responsive when a patient has symptoms or is actively dying; 3) makes care coordination smooth; 4) is needed; 5) taught them something; 6) is appreciated by patients/families. Responses were dichotomized as always/often or sometimes/never. Results 1229 surveys met criteria for inclusion. Of respondents, 48% were CNAs, 49% were nurses, and 3% were social workers; 83% reported caring for a nursing home patient on hospice. The statement with the highest proportion of always/often rating was ‘patient/family appreciate added care’ (84%); the lowest was ‘hospice makes my job easier’ (54%). More social workers responded favorably regarding hospice responsiveness and coordination of care compared with CNAs (p=.03 and p=.05 respectively). Conclusion A majority of staff responded favorably regarding hospice care in nursing homes. About 1/3 of nursing home staff rated coordination of care lower than other aspects, and many qualitative comments highlighted examples of when hospice was not responsive to patient needs, representing important opportunities for improvement. PMID:25239013

  11. Losing Items in the Psychogeriatric Nursing Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. van Hoof PhD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Losing items is a time-consuming occurrence in nursing homes that is ill described. An explorative study was conducted to investigate which items got lost by nursing home residents, and how this affects the residents and family caregivers. Method: Semi-structured interviews and card sorting tasks were conducted with 12 residents with early-stage dementia and 12 family caregivers. Thematic analysis was applied to the outcomes of the sessions. Results: The participants stated that numerous personal items and assistive devices get lost in the nursing home environment, which had various emotional, practical, and financial implications. Significant amounts of time are spent on trying to find items, varying from 1 hr up to a couple of weeks. Numerous potential solutions were identified by the interviewees. Discussion: Losing items often goes together with limitations to the participation of residents. Many family caregivers are reluctant to replace lost items, as these items may get lost again.

  12. From Nursing Home to Hospital and Return

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Hanne

    ½ month the structured interview guide was used to interview 17 nursing home residences when acute admitted to Acute Medical Unit (AMU) at Bispebjerg Hospital and again after discharge. Systematic meaning categorisation was used to analyse the structured interviews. Result: The experience of security...... and confidence is highly prioritised by the elderly. In periods of good health they generally experience high level of security and confidence at the nursing home. However, in periods with acute illness or exacerbation of their chronic disease the elderly finds confidence in being hospitalised and near......Background: In Denmark, approximate 4% of the population nursing homes. Many suffer from several chronic medical conditions including dementia. Hence, their well-being and health depends on the help and care they receive. On average they have two acute hospital admissions...

  13. Common Viruses a Deadly Threat At Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 163048.html Common Viruses a Deadly Threat at Nursing Homes RSV and human metapneumovirus need to be ... News) -- Common viruses pose a serious threat in nursing homes, often sabotaging standard infection control measures, a ...

  14. Sampling Challenges in Nursing Home Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilden, Virginia P.; Thompson, Sarah A.; Gajewski, Byron J.; Buescher, Colleen M.; Bott, Marjorie J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Research on end-of-life care in nursing homes is hampered by challenges in retaining facilities in samples through study completion. Large-scale longitudinal studies in which data are collected on-site can be particularly challenging. Objectives To compare characteristics of nursing homes that dropped from study to those that completed the study. Methods 102 nursing homes in a large geographic 2-state area were enrolled in a prospective study of end-of-life care of residents who died in the facility. The focus of the study was the relationship of staff communication, teamwork, and palliative/end-of-life care practices to symptom distress and other care outcomes as perceived by family members. Data were collected from public data bases of nursing homes, clinical staff on site at each facility at two points in time, and from decedents’ family members in a telephone interview. Results 17 of the 102 nursing homes dropped from the study before completion. These non-completer facilities had significantly more deficiencies and a higher rate of turnover of key personnel compared to completer facilities. A few facilities with a profile typical of non-completers actually did complete the study after an extraordinary investment of retention effort by the research team. Discussion Nursing homes with a high rate of deficiencies and turnover have much to contribute to the goal of improving end-of-life care, and their loss to study is a significant sampling challenge. Investigators should be prepared to invest extra resources to maximize retention. PMID:23041332

  15. Nursing home diversification requires caution by hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, S M

    1988-12-01

    Hospital executives considering diversifying into long-term care for the elderly need to understand the ways the nursing home acquisition market and the long-term care industry have changed in the past two years and how to best respond to those changes. Diversification into the nursing home business must be carefully planned, taking into account such factors as state Medicaid reimbursement policies; the respective advantages of buying an existing facility or constructing a new one; the need for executives with expertise in long-term care; and the financial requirements of the proposal.

  16. Subsidies, Quality, and Regulation in the Nursing Home Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Gertler, Paul J

    1985-01-01

    This paper analyzes the impact of the Medicaid patient subsidy and Certificate of Need (CON) cost containment programs on nursing home behavior.The analysis is complicated by the fact the both proprietary and "not for profit" nursing homes exist, and by the problem that qualityis not directly observed. Medicaid pays the for the care of the financially indigent by directly reimbursing nursing homes at a predetermined rate. As a result, nursing homes can price discriminate between patients who ...

  17. Mental Illness In Nursing Homes: Variations Across States

    OpenAIRE

    Grabowski, David C.; Aschbrenner, Kelly A.; Feng, Zhanlian; Mor, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    The institutionalization of individuals with mental illness in nursing homes is an important policy concern. Using nursing home Minimum Data Set assessments from 2005, we found large cross-state variation in both the rates of mental illness among nursing home admissions and the estimated rates of nursing home admissions among persons with mental illness. We also found that newly admitted individuals with mental illness were younger and more likely to become long-stay residents. Taken together...

  18. Quality management systems and clinical outcomes in Dutch nursing homes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, C.; Klein Ikkink, K.; Wal, G. van der; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Bakker, D.H. de; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the article is to explore the impact quality management systems and quality assurance activities in nursing homes have on clinical outcomes. The results are based on a cross-sectional study in 65 Dutch nursing homes. The management of the nursing homes as well as the residents (N =

  19. Quality management systems and clinical outcomes in Dutch nursing homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, Cordula; Klein Ikkink, Karen; Wal, Gerrit van der; Spreeuwenberg, Peter; Bakker, Dinny Herman de; Groenewegen, Peter Paulus

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the article is to explore the impact quality management systems and quality assurance activities in nursing homes have on clinical outcomes. The results are based on a cross-sectional study in 65 Dutch nursing homes. The management of the nursing homes as well as the residents (N= 1

  20. 38 CFR 59.140 - Nursing home care requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nursing home care... (CONTINUED) GRANTS TO STATES FOR CONSTRUCTION OR ACQUISITION OF STATE HOMES § 59.140 Nursing home care... equipped for adequate nursing care, comfort, and privacy of residents. Resident rooms must: (1)...

  1. Certified Nursing Assistants’ Explanatory Models of Nursing Home Resident Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Piven, Mary Lynn; Anderson, Ruth A.; Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S.; Sandelowski, Margarete

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we explored how Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs) understood resident depression. Interviews with 18 CNAs, working in two nursing homes were guided by Kleinman’s Explanatory Models of Illness framework. Interview data were content analyzed and CNAs’ descriptions of depression were compared to the MDS 2.0 Mood Screen and to DSM-IV-TR Depression Criteria. CNAs identified causes, signs, and symptoms of depression, but they were unsure about the duration and normalcy of depressio...

  2. Registered Nurse Staffing Mix and Quality of Care in Nursing Homes: A Longitudinal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hongsoo; Harrington, Charlene; Greene, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the relationship between registered nurse (RN) staffing mix and quality of nursing home care measured by regulatory violations. Design and Methods: A retrospective panel data study (1999-2003) of 2 groups of California freestanding nursing homes. One group was 201 nursing homes that consistently met the state's minimum standard…

  3. Mountbellew Nursing Home, Mountbellew, Galway.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coffey, Alice

    2016-01-28

    Nurses\\' knowledge regarding advance directives may affect their administration and completion in end-of-life care. Confidence among nurses is a barrier to the provision of quality end-of-life care. This study investigated nurses\\' knowledge of advance directives and perceived confidence in end-of-life care, in Hong Kong, Ireland, Israel, Italy and the USA using a cross-sectional descriptive design (n = 1089). In all countries, older nurses and those who had more professional experience felt more confident managing patients\\' symptoms at end-of-life and more comfortable stopping preventive medications at end-of-life. Nurses in the USA reported that they have more knowledge and experience of advance directives compared with other countries. In addition, they reported the highest levels of confidence and comfort in dealing with end-of-life care. Although legislation for advance directives does not yet exist in Ireland, nurses reported high levels of confidence in end-of-life care.

  4. Is There Evidence of Cream Skimming among Nursing Homes following the Publication of the Nursing Home Compare Report Card?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukamel, Dana B.; Ladd, Heather; Weimer, David L.; Spector, William D.; Zinn, Jacqueline S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: A national quality report card for nursing homes, Nursing Home Compare, has been published since 2002. It has been shown to have some, albeit limited, positive impact on quality of care. The objective of this study was to test empirically the hypothesis that nursing homes have responded to the publication of the report by adopting cream…

  5. Clinical update on nursing home medicine: 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messinger-Rapport, Barbara J; Cruz-Oliver, Dulce M; Thomas, David R; Morley, John E

    2012-09-01

    This article is the sixth in the series of clinical updates on nursing home care. The topics covered are management of hypertension, antidepressant medications in people with dementia, peripheral arterial disease, probiotics in prevention, and treatment of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea, frailty, and falls.

  6. Malnutrition and mealtime ambiance in nursing homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijs, K.A.N.D.; Graaf, de C.; Staveren, van W.A.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Inadequate nutritional intake is the predominant cause of malnutrition in older persons. It is one of the most common and devastating conditions in nursing home residents. It is multifactorial and treatment or nutrition care plans should try to address the main causes. Such plans often include means

  7. Visual functioning in nursing home residents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinoo, Marianne; Kort, Helianthe; Duijnstee, Mia

    2012-01-01

    Older adults experience visual problems owing to biological ageing or eye disease. In the Netherlands, the prevalence of visual impairments is the highest in the subgroup of nursing home residents (41.3%). These impairments influence quality of life in terms of limiting daily activities and particip

  8. [Prevalence of depression and dementia among nursing home residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lolk, Annette; Andersen, Kjeld

    2015-03-16

    The population of older adults will increase in the coming years and the number of elderly in nursing homes is expected to rise considerably. The most frequent psychiatric diseases among nursing home residents are depression and dementia. We examined the prevalence of depression and dementia in nursing home populations reported in literature reviews. The included studies were published from 1986 to 2014. At least one out of ten persons living in a nursing home seems to have depression and more have depressive symptoms. Three out of four residents in nursing homes suffer from dementia.

  9. Loneliness and nursing home admission among rural older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, D W; Cutrona, C E; de la Mora, A; Wallace, R B

    1997-12-01

    In this study, the authors tested the relation between loneliness and subsequent admission to a nursing home over a 4-year time period in a sample of approximately 3,000 rural older Iowans. Higher levels of loneliness were found to increase the likelihood of nursing home admission and to decrease the time until nursing home admission. The influence of extremely high loneliness on nursing home admission remained statistically significant after controlling for other variables, such as age, education, income, mental status, physical health, morale, and social contact, that were also predictive of nursing home admission. Several mechanisms are proposed to explain the link between extreme loneliness and nursing home admission. These include loneliness as a precipitant of declines in mental and physical health and nursing home placement as a strategy to gain social contact with others. Implications for preventative interventions are discussed.

  10. Pressure ulcers: knowledge and attitude of nurses and nursing assistants in Belgian nursing homes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demarre, L.; Vanderwee, K.; Defloor, T.; Verhaeghe, S.; Schoonhoven, L.; Beeckman, D.

    2012-01-01

    AIMS: To gain insight into the knowledge and attitudes of nurses and nursing assistants and to study the correlation between knowledge, attitudes and the compliance with the pressure ulcer prevention guidelines provided to residents at risk of pressure ulcers in nursing homes. BACKGROUND: There is a

  11. Effects of the Evidence-Based Nursing Care Algorithm of Dysphagia for Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yeonhwan; Oh, Seieun; Chang, Heekyung; Bang, Hwal Lan

    2015-11-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ARTICLE INSTRUCTIONS 1.2 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded once you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. To obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Effects of the Evidence-Based Nursing Care Algorithm of Dysphagia for Nursing Home Residents" found on pages 30-39, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website listed above to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name; contact information; and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until October 31, 2018. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. ACTIVITY OBJECTIVES 1. Explain the development and testing of the Evidence-Based Nursing Care Algorithm of

  12. The economies of scale for nursing home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Wu; Shea, Dennis G

    2004-03-01

    Using a modified hybrid short-term operating cost function and a national sample of nursing homes in 1994, the authors examined the scale economies of nursing home care. The results show that scale economies exist for Medicare postacute care, with an elasticity of -0.15 and an optimal scale of around 4,000 patient days annually. However, more than 68 percent of nursing homes in the analytic sample produced Medicare days at a level below the optimal scale. The financial pressures resulting from the implementation of a prospective payment system for Medicare skilled nursing facilities may further reduce the quantity of Medicare days served by nursing homes. In addition, the results show that chain-owned nursing homes do not have lower short-term operating costs than do independent facilities. This indicates that the rationale behind recent increasing horizontal integration among nursing homes may not be seeking greater cost efficiency but some other consideration.

  13. Maintaining dignity. The perspective of nursing home residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høy, Bente

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The overall purpose of this cross-country Nordic study was to gain further knowledge about dignity in nursing homes and the circumstances which may have an impact on it. The aim of this part of the study is to present the results, exploring nursing home residents’ experiences on how...... dignity is maintained. Background. Elderly living in nursing homes are vulnerable which appeal to nursing care ethics and emphasise the importance of care for human dignity. There have been several attempts to define dignity as a theoretical concept, but few studies on how dignity is maintained from...... the perspective of the nursing home residents. Method. This qualitative study has an explorative design, based on qualitative individual research interviews. Twenty-eight nursing home residents were included from six nursing homes in Scandi-navia. A phenomenological-hermeneutic approach, inspired by Ricoeur...

  14. The Roles and Functions of Medical Directors in Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Aman

    2015-03-03

    The medical director is an important member of the healthcare team in a nursing home, and is responsible for overall coordination of care and for implementation of policies related to care of the residents in a nursing home. The residents in nursing homes are frail, medically complex, and have multiple disabilities. The medical director has an important leadership role in assisting nursing home administration in providing quality care that is consistent with current standards of care. This article provides an overview of roles and functions of the medical director, and suggests ways the medical director can be instrumental in achieving excellent care in today's nursing facilities.

  15. Measuring End-of-Life Care Processes in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkin-Greener, Helena; Zheng, Nan; Norton, Sally A.; Quill, Timothy; Ladwig, Susan; Veazie, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The objectives of this study were to develop measures of end-of-life (EOL) care processes in nursing homes and to validate the instrument for measuring them. Design and Methods: A survey of directors of nursing was conducted in 608 eligible nursing homes in New York State. Responses were obtained from 313 (51.5% response rate) facilities.…

  16. Passive solar nursing home for Northern Kentucky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, J.G.; Ward, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    This project is a 32-bed nursing home designed as an addition to an existing facility. Passive solar strategies included direct gain room windows and clerestories which admit light to phase change salt pouches in the ceilings of patient rooms. Corridors are skykighted; and the heating, ventilating, and conditioning system is comprised of water-source heat pumps and a 5000 gallon storage tank in conjunction with an air to air heat recovery wheel.

  17. Family Perceptions of Geriatric Foster Family and Nursing Home Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Kathryn L.; Rose, Charles L.

    1987-01-01

    Relatives (N=62) of matched pairs of patients in geriatric foster homes and nursing homes rated care provided to their relatives. Significantly more foster family patients had positive pre-placement attitudes than did nursing home patients. Upon follow-up, relatives of foster patients reported seeing more patient improvement, satisfaction,…

  18. Hospice Use Among Nursing Home Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unroe, Kathleen Tschantz; Sachs, Greg A.; Hickman, Susan E.; Stump, Timothy E.; Tu, Wanzhu; Callahan, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Among hospice patients who lived in nursing homes, we sought to: (1) report trends in hospice use over time, (2) describe factors associated with very long hospice stays (>6 months), and (3) describe hospice utilization patterns. Design, setting, and participants We conducted a retrospective study from an urban, Midwest cohort of hospice patients, aged ≥65 years, who lived in nursing homes between 1999 and 2008. Measurements Demographic data, clinical characteristics, and health care utilization were collected from Medicare claims, Medicaid claims, and Minimum Data Set assessments. Patients with overlapping nursing home and hospice stays were identified. χ2 and t tests were used to compare patients with less than or longer than a 6-month hospice stay. Logistic regression was used to model the likelihood of being on hospice longer than 6 months. Results A total of 1452 patients received hospice services while living in nursing homes. The proportion of patients with noncancer primary hospice diagnoses increased over time; the mean length of hospice stay (114 days) remained high throughout the 10-year period. More than 90% of all patients had 3 or more comorbid diagnoses. Nearly 20% of patients had hospice stays longer than 6 months. The hospice patients with stays longer than 6 months were observed to have a smaller percentage of cancer (25% vs 30%) as a primary hospice diagnosis. The two groups did not differ by mean cognitive status scores, number of comorbidities, or activities of daily living impairments. The greater than 6 months group was much more likely to disenroll before death: 33.9% compared with 13.8% (P < .0001). A variety of patterns of utilization of hospice across settings were observed; 21 % of patients spent some of their hospice stay in the community. Conclusions Any policy proposals that impact the hospice benefit in nursing homes should take into account the difficulty in predicting the clinical course of these patients, varying

  19. Nursing Home Resident Symptomatology Triggering Transfer: Avoiding Unnecessary Hospitalizations

    OpenAIRE

    Ashcraft, Alyce S.; Jane Dimmitt Champion

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe nursing home resident symptomatology and medical diagnoses associated with nursing home to hospital transfers. A retrospective chart review of documented transfers was conducted at a 120-bed, nonprofit urban Continuing Care Retirement Center nursing home facility located in the southwestern United States. The transferred residents (n = 101) had seventy different medical diagnoses prior to hospital transfer with hypertension, coronary artery disease, a...

  20. Licensed Nurse and Nursing Assistant Recognition of Delirium in Nursing Home Residents With Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steis, Melinda R; Behrens, Liza; Colancecco, Elise M; Mogle, Jacqueline; Mulhall, Paula M; Hill, Nikki L; Fick, Donna M; Kolankowski, Ann M

    2016-01-01

    Many nursing home residents experience delirium. Nursing home personnel, especially nursing assistants, have the opportunity to become familiar with residents’ normal cognitive function and to recognize changes in a resident’s cognitive function over time. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of delirium recognition by licensed nurses and nursing assistants from eight nursing homes over a 12-month period. Participants were asked to complete five case vignette assessments at three different time points (in 6-month intervals) to test their ability to identify different subtypes of delirium and delirium superimposed on dementia (DSD). A total of 760 case vignettes were completed across the different time points. Findings reveal that staff recognition of delirium was poor. The case vignette describing hyperactive DSD was correctly identified by the greatest number participants, and the case vignette describing hypoactive DSD was correctly identified by the least number of participants. Recognition of the case vignette describing hypoactive delirium improved over time. Nursing assistants performed similarly to the licensed nurses, indicating that all licensed nursing home staff require further education to correctly recognize delirium in older adults. PMID:28042285

  1. Experience of a Medicaid nursing home entry cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Wayne A.; Federspiel, Charles F.; Baugh, David K.; Dodds, Suzanne

    1989-01-01

    Long-term care cost-containment policies have focused on reducing the numbers of persons entering nursing homes. To provide insight and background for such efforts, the authors studied the experience of Medicaid nursing home entry cohorts in three individual States. They found substantial interstate variation in rates of nursing home entry and subsequent patterns of discharge, suggesting the operation of fundamentally different policies for provision of Medicaid nursing home services. Analysis of the cost effectiveness and quality of care implications of these policies may provide guidance for future cost-containment efforts. PMID:10313279

  2. The Judaic-Christian origin of nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandeis, Gary H; Oates, Daniel J

    2007-06-01

    Many nursing homes today have a religious heritage. While governmental regulations control how much of the care is delivered, the foundations and goals of many homes predate governmental rules and payment policies. This paper explores the basis of Jewish and Christian thought in providing groundwork for religiously based nursing homes. Although the underlying principles are similar, differences in approach and execution for the formation of these homes exist.

  3. The relationship between nursing staff levels, skill mix, and deficiencies in Maryland nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Nancy B

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this data analysis was to explore whether nurse staffing levels and skill mix influenced the number and severity of nursing home deficiencies in Maryland nursing homes. Nursing staff levels and skill mix in relation to quality outcomes in nursing homes have been explored with inconsistent results. Two multiple regression analyses were done to explore factors influencing deficiencies and the severity of the deficiencies found during the annual survey process. The factors influencing the number of deficiencies were the number of nursing home beds (β = .29), nursing assistant hours per patient-day (β = -.206), and the location of the nursing home (β = -.138). The only factor influencing the severity of the deficiencies was RN hours per patient-day (β = -.199). In conclusion, it was determined that RN staffing, although not associated with the number of deficiencies, is associated with deficiency severity.

  4. Workplace Stress and Ethical Challenges Experienced by Nursing Staff in a Nursing Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vondras, Dean D.; Flittner, Diane; Malcore, Sylvia A.; Pouliot, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    This research explores the workplace stress and ethical challenges reported by healthcare staff in a nursing home. A brief self-report survey was administered to 44 members of the nursing staff in a not-for-profit nursing home. The survey included items that elicited identification of specific workplace stressors and ethical challenges and global…

  5. Body weight changes in elderly psychogeriatric nursing home residents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoops, K.T.B.; Slump, E.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.; Wouters-Wesseling, W.; Brouwer, M.L.; Staveren, van W.A.

    2005-01-01

    Objective. This study was undertaken to identify predictors of body weight change in nursing home patients with possible to severe dementia. Methods. For 24 weeks, 108 elderly residents of a nursing home were followed. Body weight was measured every 2 weeks. Other anthropometric characteristics, die

  6. The silent customers: measuring customer satisfaction in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinsorge, I K; Koenig, H F

    1991-12-01

    Nursing home administrators concerned with customer satisfaction and quality of care need a tool to assess and monitor ongoing satisfaction of nursing home residents and family members. The authors report a preliminary effort to develop such a survey using focus groups.

  7. Organizational Climate Determinants of Resident Safety Culture in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnetz, Judith E.; Zhdanova, Ludmila S.; Elsouhag, Dalia; Lichtenberg, Peter; Luborsky, Mark R.; Arnetz, Bengt B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: In recent years, there has been an increasing focus on the role of safety culture in preventing costly adverse events, such as medication errors and falls, among nursing home residents. However, little is known regarding critical organizational determinants of a positive safety culture in nursing homes. The aim of this study…

  8. Use of Pets in Therapy with Elderly Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Diana M.

    In order to test the effectiveness of the use of pets with the elderly in a nursing home setting, three concurrent studies were conducted. The 29 residents participating in the experiment were selected by nursing home personnel as meeting the criteria of being depressed and withdrawn, and receiving no regular (weekly) visitors. Study I compared…

  9. Patients' Anticipation of Stress in Nursing Home Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Shayna; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Examined anticipation of stresses in 223 patients recently admitted to nursing homes, who completed the stresses in Institutional Care Scale (SIC). Factor analysis revealed five factors significantly related to psychological and physical variables. Suggests using SIC for admission screening in nursing homes. Appendix contains the SIC. (NRB)

  10. What home healthcare nurses should know about fraud and abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Janet E

    2003-08-01

    Home care nurses provide a critical link in all services provided by a home health agency. This article outlines basic information nurses can use to understand fraud and abuse regulations, see the importance of corporate compliance programs, and recognize the potential impact a focus on fraud and abuse has on their practice.

  11. The availability of allied health care in Dutch nursing homes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, M.E. de; Leemrijse, C.J.; Ende, C.H.M. van den; Ribbe, M.W.; Dekker, J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the availability of allied health care in nursing homes in the Netherlands, and its dependency on characteristics of the nursing home. Methods. Structured surveys by telephone were carried out in a sample of 100 from a country total of 286 somatic (for somatic patients only) an

  12. PAYER SOURCE FOR SINGLE, ELDERLY WOMEN IN NURSING HOMES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Sage; O'Lawrence, Henry

    2015-01-01

    This study seeks to determine the payer source for single, elderly women in nursing homes by using secondary data from the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey was extracted and analyzed for the aforementioned hypotheses. By determining the payer source for single, elderly women, the next generation of women can prepare for high nursing home costs by saving earlier or investing in long-term care insurance. The analyses indicated self-pay and Medicaid was the primary sources for elderly women in nursing homes. Marital status did not have an impact on the payer source for elderly women. Single women did not have different payer sources than married elderly women. However, the study did not focus on payer sources for single, elderly women in nursing homes, but the demographic population as a whole.

  13. Diversion, transition programs target nursing homes' status quo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhard, Susan C

    2010-01-01

    As millions of Americans age and exercise their preference for long-term care in the least restrictive environment, policymakers search for ways to increase community-based services. A new federal program--Money Follows the Person--is off to a slow but promising start. The program's "downstream" approach moves residents out of nursing homes and into community care settings. For example, states with mature nursing home transition programs have managed to relocate 25-35 percent of their nursing home residents to assisted living. Other programs successfully using "upstream" strategies to keep people out of nursing homes have not been widely copied. The challenge for policymakers is to maintain funding and flexibility so that nursing homes are no longer the default option for older adults and people with disabilities.

  14. Caring relationships in home-based nursing care - registered nurses' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wälivaara, Britt-Marie; Sävenstedt, Stefan; Axelsson, Karin

    2013-01-01

    The caring relationship between the nurse and the person in need of nursing care has been described as a key concept in nursing and could facilitate health and healing by involving the person's genuine needs. The aim of this study was to explore registered nurses' experiences of their relationships with persons in need of home-based nursing care. Individual interviews with nurses (n=13 registered nurses and 11 district nurses) working in home-based nursing care were performed. A thematic content analysis was used to analyze the transcribed interviews and resulted in the main theme Good nursing care is built on trusting relationship and five sub-themes, Establishing the relationship in home-based nursing care, Conscious efforts maintains the relationship, Reciprocity is a requirement in the relationship, Working in different levels of relationships and Limitations and boundaries in the relationship. A trusting relationship between the nurse and the person in need of healthcare is a prerequisite for good home-based nursing care whether it is based on face-to-face encounters or remote encounters through distance-spanning technology. A trusting relationship could reduce the asymmetry of the caring relationship which could strengthen the person's position. The relationship requires conscious efforts from the nurse and a choice of level of the relationship. The trusting relationship was reciprocal and meant that the nurse had to communicate something about themself as the person needs to know who is entering the home and who is communicating through distance-spanning technology.

  15. Implementing best practice in medication management in a nursing home

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Medication management is one of the major roles of a nurse leader in any health care setting particularly in the nursing homes. Evidence suggests that errors do occur at any stage of the medication use process (prescribing, documenting/transcribing, dispensing, administering and monitoring) and these might pose significant risks to older people in nursing homes. Thus, this change project was carried out to reduce the incidence of medication errors, ensure resident’s safety and promote complia...

  16. 77 FR 45719 - Proposed Information Collection (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State Homes; Per...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    ... Information Collection (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State Homes; Per Diem for Adult Day Care... solicits comments on information needed to ensure that nursing home and adult day health care facilities... services care to Veterans. VA requires facilities providing nursing home and adult day health care...

  17. Waiting to go into a Danish Nursing Home - Generations Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofod, Jens Erik

    2006-01-01

    that their relationship toward their home care assistant became increasingly important as they waited to go into the nursing home. Assessments for home care were constrained by municipal authorities and their regulations, and the overall attitude was that the needs of older people were not being appropriately defined...

  18. Explaining differences in remuneration rates of nursing homes in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennicken, Roman; Augurzky, Boris; Rothgang, Heinz; Wasem, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    Remuneration rates of German nursing homes are prospectively negotiated between long-term care insurance (LTCI) and social assistance on the one side and nursing homes on the other. They differ considerably across regions while there is no evidence for substantial differences in care provision. This article explains the differences in the remuneration rates by observable characteristics of the nursing home, its residents and its region with a special focus on the largest federal state of North Rhine Westphalia, in which the most expensive nursing homes are located. We use data from the German Federal Statistical Office for 2005 on all nursing homes that offer full-time residential care for the elderly. We find that differences in remuneration rates can partly be explained by exogenous factors. Controls for residents, nursing homes and district characteristics explain roughly 30 % of the price difference; 40 % can be ascribed to a regionally different kind of negotiation between nursing homes and LTCI. Thirty percent of the raw price difference remains unexplained by observable characteristics.

  19. Terminal patients in Belgian nursing homes: a cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoens, Steven; Kutten, Betty; Keirse, Emmanuel; Vanden Berghe, Paul; Beguin, Claire; Desmedt, Marianne; Deveugele, Myriam; Léonard, Christian; Paulus, Dominique; Menten, Johan

    2013-06-01

    Policy makers and health care payers are concerned about the costs of treating terminal patients. This study was done to measure the costs of treating terminal patients during the final month of life in a sample of Belgian nursing homes from the health care payer perspective. Also, this study compares the costs of palliative care with those of usual care. This multicenter, retrospective cohort study enrolled terminal patients from a representative sample of nursing homes. Health care costs included fixed nursing home costs, medical fees, pharmacy charges, other charges, and eventual hospitalization costs. Data sources consisted of accountancy and invoice data. The analysis calculated costs per patient during the final month of life at 2007/2008 prices. Nineteen nursing homes participated in the study, generating a total of 181 patients. Total mean nursing home costs amounted to 3,243 € per patient during the final month of life. Total mean nursing home costs per patient of 3,822 € for patients receiving usual care were higher than costs of 2,456 € for patients receiving palliative care (p = 0.068). Higher costs of usual care were driven by higher hospitalization costs (p < 0.001). This study suggests that palliative care models in nursing homes need to be supported because such care models appear to be less expensive than usual care and because such care models are likely to better reflect the needs of terminal patients.

  20. 42 CFR 431.704 - Nursing homes designated by other terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nursing homes designated by other terms. 431.704... Programs for Licensing Nursing Home Administrators § 431.704 Nursing homes designated by other terms. If a State licensing law does not use the term “nursing home,” the CMS Administrator will determine the...

  1. 78 FR 46421 - Proposed Information Collection (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State Homes; Per...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State Homes; Per Diem for Adult Day Care of Veterans in State Homes): Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Health... home and adult day health services care to Veterans. VA requires facilities providing nursing home...

  2. Job satisfaction of rural public and home health nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhl, N; Dunkin, J W; Stratton, T; Geller, J; Ludtke, R

    1993-03-01

    Based on Vroom's expectancy theory, this study was conducted to identify differences in job satisfaction between nurses working in public health settings, and staff nurses and administrators working in both settings. Questionnaires containing an adaptation of a job satisfaction scale were mailed to all 258 registered nurses practicing in public health and home health settings (response rate 57%) in a rural midwestern state. Respondents were asked to rate their satisfaction with various dimensions of their jobs, as well as how important each aspect was to them. Although both groups of nurses reported low satisfaction with salary, public health nurses were significantly less satisfied with their salaries than were home health nurses (F = 32.96, P < or = 0.001); home health nurses, however, were significantly less satisfied with benefits/rewards (F = 11.85, P < or = 0.001), task requirements (F = 8.37, P < or = 0.05), and professional status (F = 5.30, P < or = 0.05). Although administrators did not differ significantly from staff nurses on job satisfaction, they did perceive organizational climate (F = 4.50, P < or = 0.05) to be an important feature of satisfaction. These differences may be partially explained by divergent salaries, roles, and responsibilities between public health and home health nurses.

  3. An exploration of occupation in nursing home residents with dementia

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Morgan-Brown, Mark

    2011-05-01

    Objectives: This study evaluated the sitting room environment of two nursing homes in Ireland, using interactive occupation and social engagement as outcome measures and defining these rooms as occupational spaces.\\r\

  4. Competition, information, and quality: Evidence from nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin

    2016-09-01

    Economic theory suggests that competition and information can both be important for product quality, and yet evidence on how they may interact to affect quality is sparse. This paper estimates the impact of competition between nursing homes on their quality, and how this impact varies when consumers have better access to information. The effect of competition is identified using exogenous variation in the geographical proximity of nursing homes to their potential consumers. The change in information transparency is captured by the launch of the Five-Star Quality Rating System in 2009, which improved access to the quality information of nursing homes. We find that while the effect of competition on nursing home quality is generally rather limited, this effect becomes significantly stronger with increased information transparency. The results suggest that regulations on public quality reporting and on market structure are policy complements, and should be considered jointly to best improve quality.

  5. Can family caregiving substitute for nursing home care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Kerwin Kofi; Sevak, Purvi

    2005-11-01

    Informal care should be a substitute for nursing homes but empirical evidence often suggests the opposite. This may be because informal care receipt is positively correlated with unobserved negative health characteristics. We exploit variation in children's characteristics as instruments for informal care to provide Two-Stage Least Squares (TSLS) estimates of nursing home use among a sample of 6855 individuals from the 1993-2000 waves of the AHEAD survey. While OLS results suggest informal care is associated with greater future nursing home risk, TSLS estimates show that receipt of informal care statistically and substantially reduces the risk of nursing home entry. This finding has implications for Medicaid and private long-term care insurance markets.

  6. Nursing Home - Pain - Percentage of Residents Reporting Pain

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Adequate pain management is an important indicator of quality of care and quality of life. Nursing home staff should check patients regularly to see if they are...

  7. Lynx: Automatic Elderly Behavior Prediction in Home Telecare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Manuel Lopez-Guede

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces Lynx, an intelligent system for personal safety at home environments, oriented to elderly people living independently, which encompasses a decision support machine for automatic home risk prevention, tested in real-life environments to respond to real time situations. The automatic system described in this paper prevents such risks by an advanced analytic methods supported by an expert knowledge system. It is minimally intrusive, using plug-and-play sensors and machine learning algorithms to learn the elder’s daily activity taking into account even his health records. If the system detects that something unusual happens (in a wide sense or if something is wrong relative to the user’s health habits or medical recommendations, it sends at real-time alarm to the family, care center, or medical agents, without human intervention. The system feeds on information from sensors deployed in the home and knowledge of subject physical activities, which can be collected by mobile applications and enriched by personalized health information from clinical reports encoded in the system. The system usability and reliability have been tested in real-life conditions, with an accuracy larger than 81%.

  8. Antidepressant treatment of depression in rural nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerber, Cindy Sullivan; Dyck, Mary J; Culp, Kennith R; Buckwalter, Kathleen

    2008-09-01

    Under-diagnosis and under-treatment of depression are major problems in nursing home residents. The purpose of this study was to determine antidepressant use among nursing home residents who were diagnosed with depression using three different methods: (1) the Geriatric Depression Scale, (2) Minimum Data Set, and (3) primary care provider assessments. As one would expect, the odds of being treated with an antidepressant were about eight times higher for those diagnosed as depressed by the primary care provider compared to the Geriatric Depression Scale or the Minimum Data Set. Men were less likely to be diagnosed and treated with antidepressants by their primary care provider than women. Depression detected by nurses through the Minimum Data Set was treated at a lower rate with antidepressants, which generates issues related to interprofessional communication, nursing staff communication, and the need for geropsychiatric role models in nursing homes.

  9. [Training and representation of dementia of workers in nursing homes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Stéphane; Gallin, Aurélie; Stefanuto, Muriel; Treffel, Sylvie; Antoine, Marc; Denormandie, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Training could be a lever for improving the quality of care of residents with dementia in nursing homes by changing social representations. Beyond a simple assessment of acquired knowledge, a change of social representations could be indicative of a true appropriation of the content of the training. A study was carried out to assess the impact of training on nursing home caregivers' representations of dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Heat pumps in nursing homes; Warmtepompen in verzorgingshuizen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dieleman, M. [Erbeko raadgevende ingenieurs, Hilversum (Netherlands)

    1996-04-01

    The most important options for the sector nursing homes to save 20-30% energy are the combined generation of heat and power (CHP or cogeneration) and the use of heat pumps. Cogeneration is cost-effective for a natural gas consumption of 200,000 m{sup 3} per year. The heat pump is a good option for both small and large nursing homes. 2 tabs.

  11. NURSING HOME CONTROL OF PHYSICIAN RESOURCES (NHCOPR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intrator, Orna; Lima, Julie; Wetle, Terrie Fox

    2014-01-01

    Objective Physician services are increasingly recognized as important contributors to quality care provision in nursing homes (NHs), but knowledge of ways in which NHs manage/ control physician resources is lacking. Data Primary data from surveys of NH Administrators and Directors of Nursing from a nationally representative sample of 1,938 freestanding U.S. NHs in 2009–2010 matched to Online Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR), aggregated NH Minimum Data Set (MDS) assessments and Medicare claims, and data from the Area Resource File (ARF). Methods The concept of NH Control of Physician Resources (NHCOPR) was measured using NH Administrators’ reports of management implementation of rules, policies, and procedures aimed at coordinating work activities. The NHCOPR scale was based on measures of formal relationships, physician oversight and credentialing. Scale values ranged from weakest (0) to tightest (3) control. Several hypotheses of expected associations between NHCOPR and other measures of NH and market characteristics were tested. Principal Findings The full NHCOPR score averaged 1.58 (SD=0.77) on the 0–3 scale. Nearly 30% of NHs had weak control (NHCOPR 2). NHCOPR exhibited good face- and predictive-validity as exhibited by positive associations with more beds, more Medicare services, cross coverage and number of physicians in the market. Conclusions The NHCOPR scale capturing NH’s formal structure of control of physician resources can be useful in studying the impact of NH’s physician resources on residents’ outcomes with potential for targeted interventions by education and promotion of NH administration of physician staff. PMID:24508327

  12. Nursing home negotiations and narrations in challenging, transnational situations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaakilde, Anne Leonora; Swane, Christine E.; Algreen-Petersen, Eva

    Nursing home negotiations and narrations in challenging, transnational situations In the city of Copenhagen a public nursing home is developing a new profile that aims at attracting older migrants and refugees together with other ethnic Danes in order to spend their last months or years in an ins......Nursing home negotiations and narrations in challenging, transnational situations In the city of Copenhagen a public nursing home is developing a new profile that aims at attracting older migrants and refugees together with other ethnic Danes in order to spend their last months or years...... in an institutional setting. For more than 100 years Denmark has offered public nursing homes to frail older persons and hence represents a culture where institutional caretaking is accepted and expected. Today, the major part of homecare and nursing homes in Denmark are public or subsidised by state....... The methodological approach is phenomenological through ethnographic fieldwork and qualitative interviews. The aim is to follow the discourses and practices related to concepts of diversity as they may change during the three years, as well as the everyday life communication, care routines and rituals related...

  13. Effects of introducing a nursing guideline on depression in psychogeriatric nursing home residents.

    OpenAIRE

    Verkaik, R.; Francke, A.; Berno, M. van; Bensing, J.; Miel, R.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The prevalence rate of depression in psychogeriatric nursing home residents with dementia is recently estimated at 19%. Comorbid depression in dementia has been associated with decreased quality of life, greater health care utilization and higher mortality rates. The effects of introducing an evidence based nursing guideline on psychogeriatric nursing home wards were studied. Main principles of the guideline were (1) increasing individualized pleasant activities, (2) decreasing ...

  14. The effects of a nursing guideline on depression in psychogeriatric nursing home residents with dementia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaik, R.; Francke, A.L.; Meijel, B. van; Spreeuwenberg, P.M.M.; Ribbe, M.W.; Bensing, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the effects of introducing a nursing guideline on depression in residents with dementia of psychogeriatric nursing home wards. METHODS: A multi-center controlled clinical trial with randomization at ward level was used to study the effects of the guideline introduction. Nursing t

  15. The provision of diabetes care in nursing homes in Galway city and county: a survey of nursing homes

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hurley, Lorna

    2014-03-01

    In addition to the increasing prevalence of diabetes, our population is growing older and living longer. This survey aimed to determine the care provided to residents with diabetes in Nursing Homes.\\r\

  16. Technology for Improving Medication Monitoring in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Education Foundation. The Geriatric Risk Assessment MedGuide™ (GRAM™) software19 specifically alerts prescribers and nursing facility staff to...developed and delivered inservice programs for nursing staff of the 13 facilities that received the intervention as part of the AHRQ-funded study. The in...Research and Education Foundation who have encouraged innovations in the delivery of quality pharmaceutical care to nursing home residents. Author

  17. A Comparative Analysis of the Relationship between Communication Apprehension and Loneliness for Elderly Nursing Home and Non-Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Valerie C.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Utilizes the socio-environmental perspective to compare feelings of communication apprehension and perceived loneliness between nursing home and non-nursing home residents. Finds that communication apprehension consistently and significantly predicts perceived loneliness for non-nursing home residents, but fails to predict perceived loneliness for…

  18. Influence patterns and determinant attributes in nursing home choice situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarboe, G R; McDaniel, C D

    1985-01-01

    Factor analysis revealed that nursing home characteristics fall roughly into two categories: those relating to the care directly provided by the facility and those which are generally unrelated to the quality of care. Not all influences (doctors, discharge planners, retirement home administrators and responsible parties) respond alike to these characteristics. Therefore, a marketing mix directed uniformly to all segments may be suboptimal.

  19. The effects of a nursing guideline on depression in psychogeriatric nursing home residents with dementia.

    OpenAIRE

    Verkaik, R.; Francke, A.L.; Meijel, B. van; Spreeuwenberg, P.M.M.; Ribbe, M.W.; Bensing, J M

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the effects of introducing a nursing guideline on depression in residents with dementia of psychogeriatric nursing home wards. METHODS: A multi-center controlled clinical trial with randomization at ward level was used to study the effects of the guideline introduction. Nursing teams were trained in applying the guideline to their own residents diagnosed with depression in dementia. Key elements of the nursing guideline are increasing individualized pleasant activities and...

  20. The Factors Influencing the Sense of Home in Nursing Homes: A Systematic Review from the Perspective of Residents

    OpenAIRE

    Rijnaard, M. D.; J. van Hoof; Janssen, B.M.; Verbeek, H.; Pocornie, W.; Eijkelenboom, A; Beerens, H.C.; Molony, S. L.; Wouters, E. J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To provide an overview of factors influencing the sense of home of older adults residing in the nursing home. Methods. A systematic review was conducted. Inclusion criteria were (1) original and peer-reviewed research, (2) qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods research, (3) research about nursing home residents (or similar type of housing), and (4) research on the sense of home, meaning of home, at-homeness, or homelikeness. Results. Seventeen mainly qualitative articles were i...

  1. The introduction of a nursing guideline on depression at psychogeriatric nursing home wards: effects on Certified Nurse Assistants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaik, R.; Francke, A.L.; Meijel, B. van; Spreeuwenberg, P.M.M.; Ribbe, M.W.; Bensing, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: To improve care for residents with depression in dementia, an evidence based nursing guideline was developed. Using the guideline has already shown positive effects on depression in psychogeriatric nursing home residents. Objective: To study the effects of the introduction of the nursing

  2. Ineffective Staff, Ineffective Supervision, or Ineffective Administration? Why Some Nursing Homes Fail to Provide Adequate Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, John E.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This study involved 530 nursing staff working in 25 for-profit and nonprofit nursing homes, 2 of which failed to meet residential care standards. Nursing home climate in failed homes was perceived as being significantly lower in human relations and higher in laissez-faire and status orientation dimensions that the climate in the successful homes.…

  3. An outbreak of Streptococcus pneumoniae in an Italian nursing home.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Papalia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is the main cause of community-acquired pneumonia worldwide; pneumonia occurs sporadically in most cases, but rare outbreaks have been reported. We  describe an outbreak occurred in a 21-guests nursing home for elders in Aosta (Italy; outbreak occurred in april 2014 over a 2 weeks period, resulting in 12 out 20 guests affected (all with high fever and respiratory symptoms, two deaths (at home, nine patients referred  to Hospital Emergency Room, and eight admissions. Urinary streptococcus antigen was positive in seven out of eight patient tested. None of the nursing home guests were vaccinated against Streptococcus pneumoniaeThe Hospital Medical Direction and Public Health Service gave support and adopted strategies to contain the outbreak spread.We underline the need for pneumococcal vaccination in nursing homes/ Long-term care facilities; accurate check of hygiene behaviours in those setting is also mandatory.   

  4. Communication skills training in a nursing home: Effects of a brief intervention on residents and nursing aides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Sprangers (Suzan); K. Dijkstra (Katinka); A. Romijn-Luijten (Anna)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractEffective communication by nursing home staff is related to a higher quality of life and a decrease in verbal and physical aggression and depression in nursing home residents. Several communication intervention studies have been conducted to improve communication between nursing home sta

  5. Where should Momma go? Current nursing home performance measurement strategies and a less ambitious approach

    OpenAIRE

    Lieberman Trudy; Hawes Catherine; Phillips Charles D; Koren Mary

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Nursing home performance measurement systems are practically ubiquitous. The vast majority of these systems aspire to rank order all nursing homes based on quantitative measures of quality. However, the ability of such systems to identify homes differing in quality is hampered by the multidimensional nature of nursing homes and their residents. As a result, the authors doubt the ability of many nursing home performance systems to truly help consumers differentiate among ho...

  6. Working in and around the 'chain of command': power relations among nursing staff in an urban nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jervis, Lori L

    2002-03-01

    By most accounts, the discipline of nursing enjoys considerable hegemony in US nursing homes. Not surprisingly, the ethos of this setting is influenced, in large part, by nursing's value system. This ethos powerfully impacts both the residents who live in nursing homes and the staff who work there. Using ethnographic methods, this project explored power relations among nursing assistants and nurses in an urban nursing home in the United States. Factors contributing to tensions among nursing staff were the stigma attached to nursing homes and those who work in them, as well as the long history of class conflict and power struggles within the discipline of nursing. The latter struggles, in turn, reflected nursing's quest for professional status in the face of medicine's hegemony over health-care. Ultimately, these factors coalesced to produce a local work environment characterized by conflict--and by aides' resistance to nurses' domination.

  7. In pursuit of the common thread : Nursing content in patient records with special reference to nursing home care

    OpenAIRE

    Ehrenberg, Anna

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to study different aspects of nursing content in patient records with special reference to nursing home care. The thesis focused on the content, comprehensiveness, accuracy and auditing of records, as well as the practice and perceptions of nurses in relation to recording. A national sample of nurses was asked to complete a questionnaire. The effects on recording and nurses' practice and perceptions in nursing homes following educational intervention were studie...

  8. Unintentional Discontinuation of Chronic Medications for Seniors in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stall, Nathan M.; Fischer, Hadas D.; Wu, C. Fangyun; Bierman, Arlene S.; Brener, Stacey; Bronskill, Susan; Etchells, Edward; Fernandes, Olavo; Lau, Davina; Mamdani, Muhammad M.; Rochon, Paula; Urbach, David R.; Bell, Chaim M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Transitions of care leave patients vulnerable to the unintentional discontinuation of medications with proven efficacy for treating chronic diseases. Older adults residing in nursing homes may be especially susceptible to this preventable adverse event. The effect of large-scale policy changes on improving this practice is unknown. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of a national medication reconciliation accreditation requirement for nursing homes on rates of unintentional medication discontinuation after hospital discharge. It was a population-based retrospective cohort study that used linked administrative records between 2003 and 2012 of all hospitalizations in Ontario, Canada. We identified nursing home residents aged ≥66 years who had continuous use of ≥1 of the 3 selected medications for chronic disease: levothyroxine, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins), and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). In 2008 medication reconciliation became a required practice for accreditation of Canadian nursing homes. The main outcome measures included the proportion of patients who restarted the medication of interest after hospital discharge at 7 days. We also performed a time series analysis to examine the impact of the accreditation requirement on rates of unintentional medication discontinuation. The study included 113,088 adults aged ≥66 years who were nursing home residents, had an acute hospitalization, and were discharged alive to the same nursing home. Overall rates of discontinuation at 7-days after hospital discharge were highest in 2003–2004 for all nursing homes: 23.9% for thyroxine, 26.4% for statins, and 23.9% for PPIs. In most of the cases, these overall rates decreased annually and were lowest in 2011–2012: 4.0% for thyroxine, 10.6% for statins, and 8.3% for PPIs. The time series analysis found that nursing home accreditation did not significantly lower medication discontinuation rates for any of the 3 drug groups. From 2003

  9. Trajectories of At-Homeness and Health in Usual Care and Small House Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molony, Sheila L.; Evans, Lois K.; Jeon, Sangchoon; Rabig, Judith; Straka, Leslie A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Long-term care providers across the United States are building innovative environments called "Green House" or small-house nursing homes that weave humanistic person-centered philosophies into clinical care, organizational policies, and built environments. Purpose: To compare and contrast trajectories of at-homeness and health over…

  10. Tetanus immunity in nursing home residents of Bolu, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer Ali

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tetanus is a serious but vaccine-preventable disease and fatality rate of the disease is high in the neonates and the elderly. The aim of this study was to detect the tetanus antibody prevalence in the over sixty-year age residents of the nursing homes in Bolu. Methods A voluntary-based study was done in the residents of two nursing homes in Bolu, Turkey. Blood samples were taken from 71 volunteers residing in there nursing homes. Tetanus IgG antibodies were measured by a commercial ELISA kit. Results Among overall subjects, only 11 (15.7 % had the protective tetanus antibody titers at the time of the study. Totally, 10 subjects were examined in emergency rooms due to trauma or accidents within the last ten years and, four (40% of them had protective antibody levels. Of the remaining 61 subjects only 7 (11% had protective antibody levels (p Conclusions Tetanus antibody level is below the protective level in the majority of the over-sixty-year-age subjects residing in the nursing homes. Each over sixty-year age person in our country should be vaccinated. Until this is accomplished, at least, nursing home residents should be vaccinated during registration.

  11. Communication skills training in a nursing home: effects of a brief intervention on residents and nursing aides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprangers, Suzan; Dijkstra, Katinka; Romijn-Luijten, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Effective communication by nursing home staff is related to a higher quality of life and a decrease in verbal and physical aggression and depression in nursing home residents. Several communication intervention studies have been conducted to improve communication between nursing home staff and nursing home residents with dementia. These studies have shown that communication skills training can improve nursing aides' communication with nursing home residents. However, these studies tended to be time-consuming and fairly difficult to implement. Moreover, these studies focused on the communicative benefits for the nursing home residents and their well-being, while benefits and well-being for the nursing aides were neglected. The current study focused on implementing a brief communication skills training program to improve nursing aides' (N=24) communication with residents with dementia (N=26) in a nursing home. The effects of the training on nursing aides' communication, caregiver distress, and job satisfaction and residents' psychopathology and agitation were assessed relative to a control group condition. Nursing aides in the intervention group were individually trained to communicate effectively with residents during morning care by using short instructions, positive speech, and biographical statements. Mixed ANOVAs showed that, after training, nursing aides in the intervention group experienced less caregiver distress. Additionally, the number of short instructions and instances of positive speech increased. Providing nursing aides with helpful feedback during care aids communication and reduces caregiver burden, even with a brief intervention that requires limited time investments for nursing home staff.

  12. Nursing Staffs' Views on Physical and Psychosocial Care Provision in Slovenian Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habjanić, Ana; Elo, Satu; Micetić-Turk, Dusanka; Isola, Arja

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore nursing staffs' perceptions of the physical and psychological care needs of elderly residents, their views on the relative importance of these needs and their perceived ability to meet them. The literature reveals that the quality of elder care in nursing homes should comprise both physical and psychosocial care. Despite this, the nursing staffs' perceptions of the physical and psychosocial care provision have not often been researched. As a method cross-sectional research design was used, with structured questionnaires and unstructured interviews. Our sample consisted of members of the nursing staff from four nursing homes in Slovenia (survey: N = 148; interview: N = 16). The resulting data was processed by means of statistical analysis and conventional content analysis. The nursing staff reported more knowledge of, skills with and willingness to meet residents'physical needs than psychosocial needs. On the other hand, communication, conversation, self-care and a home-like environment were considered by nursing staff as marking quality elder care. Consequently, nursing home administrators should try to strengthen psychosocial care provision to improve the residents' quality of life. Conversation, as the most often recognised aspect of psychosocial care, should be promoted, since improvements in this area would not be costly, and each nursing staff member may decide individually how best to include more conversation in the daily routines of elder care provision.

  13. Teaching home care electronic documentation skills to undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokes, Kathleen M; Aponte, Judith; Nickitas, Donna M; Mahon, Pamela Y; Rodgers, Betsy; Reyes, Nancy; Chaya, Joan; Dornbaum, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Although there is general consensus that nursing students need knowledge and significant skill to document clinical findings electronically, nursing faculty face many barriers in ensuring that undergraduate students can practice on electronic health record systems (EHRS). External funding supported the development of an educational innovation through a partnership between a home care agency staff and nursing faculty. Modules were developed to teach EHRS skills using a case study of a homebound person requiring wound care and the Medicare-required OASIS documentation system. This article describes the development and implementation of the module for an upper-level baccalaureate nursing program located in New York City. Nursing faculty are being challenged to develop creative and economical solutions to expose nursing students to EHRSs in nonclinical settings.

  14. Local Medicaid home- and community-based services spending and nursing home admissions of younger adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kali S; Keohane, Laura; Mor, Vincent

    2014-11-01

    We used fixed-effect models to examine the relationship between local spending on home- and community-based services (HCBSs) for cash-assisted Medicaid-only disabled (CAMOD) adults and younger adult admissions to nursing homes in the United States during 2001 through 2008, with control for facility and market characteristics and secular trends. We found that increased CAMOD Medicaid HCBS spending at the local level is associated with decreased admissions of younger adults to nursing homes. Our findings suggest that states' efforts to expand HCBS for this population should continue.

  15. Working experiences of nursing aides in nursing homes: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-ping Wei

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: A reasonable work arrangement, positive psychological intervention, and the strengthening of professional, medical and social supports are recommended to improve the work quality and satisfaction of nursing aides in elderly homes.

  16. Family Members' Experience With Hospice in Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, L Ashley; Washington, Karla; Oliver, Debra Parker; Kruse, Robin; Lewis, Alexandra; Demiris, George

    2016-05-01

    Research has documented numerous benefits and challenges associated with receipt of hospice care in nursing homes; however, study of this partnership from the perspective of residents' family members has been limited. The purpose of this qualitative investigation was to explore family members' experience with hospice services received in the nursing home setting. Researchers conducted a secondary data analysis of 175 family member interviews using a thematic analytic approach. Findings highlighted the critical role of communication in supporting residents and their family members. Care coordination, support and oversight, and role confusion also impacted family members' experience of hospice care in the nursing home. Efforts directed at enhancing communication and more clearly articulating the roles of members of the health care team are indicated.

  17. Nursing home error and level of staff credentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Cawiezell, Jill; Pepper, Ginette A; Madsen, Richard W; Petroski, Greg; Vogelsmeier, Amy; Zellmer, Dave

    2007-02-01

    Providing safe nursing home care is both a clinical and fiscal challenge in many countries. The fiscal realities result in the addition of other workers, such as medication technicians or aides (CMT/A), to the health care team. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of various levels of credentialing among nursing home staff who deliver medications (RN, LPN, or CMT/A) on medication error. In addition, the impact of distractions and interruptions was explored. Using naïve observation, 39 medication administrators representing various levels of credentialing were unobtrusively observed to determine the number of medication errors, distractions, and interruptions in five nursing homes. There were no differences in medication error rates by level of credential. However, RNs had more interruptions during their medication administration, and these increased interruptions were associated with increased medication error rates when wrong time errors were excluded (p = .0348).

  18. Nursing home residents and celebrities: a tale of morality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claessens, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    In contemporary Western societies, characterized by global aging and an omnipresent celebrity culture, little is known about the role of celebrities for older adults. This study bridges gerontology and celebrity studies to explore a social role that celebrities can fulfill for nursing home residents: triggering moral discussions. This potential role is examined in four focus groups with 27 nursing home residents in Flanders (Belgium). Here, 20 celebrity pictures are employed to evoke moral discussions, with a focus on adultery and homosexuality. These discussions are subjected to a framing analysis. Results show that celebrities can trigger moral discussions among the nursing home residents. The residents' adultery and homosexuality frames show that they mostly retain dominant values from their youth, often combining them with contemporary dominant values. Further, the residents' frames prove to be relativistic, which can be linked to their multitude of life experiences and complex emotional skills.

  19. General practitioners' reasoning about using mobile distance-spanning technology in home care and in nursing home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wälivaara, Britt-Marie; Andersson, Staffan; Axelsson, Karin

    2011-03-01

    The trend for health care and nursing care turns from hospital to health care and nursing care at home. Studies have shown that health care professionals have no access to patient records in home and nursing home settings. Technological development creates opportunities for a host of mobile technology solutions. The aim of this study was to describe the reasoning among general practitioners (GPs) about the use of mobile distance-spanning technology (MDST) in care at home and in nursing homes. Seventeen GPs were divided in five groups for a group interview. The interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. The qualitative content analysis resulted in four areas about the MDST, MDST has an impact on GPs' work, the nurses' profession, and the patient and the family, with nine adherent categories. The findings were interpreted and formulated in the theme: MDST should be used with caution. The results show quite a few expressions about the MDST as useful and valuable in health care at home and in nursing home settings; however, in every category, there were text that we interpreted as caution when using the MDST. The MDST cannot be used in all situations and cannot replace human meetings in health care and nursing care at home and in nursing homes. The MDST should primarily be a tool for the profession, and understanding the professions' reasoning about technology use in health care at home and in nursing home settings must be the base for implementing MDST.

  20. 75 FR 45207 - Proposed Information Collection (Regulation on Reduction of Nursing Shortages in State Homes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Regulation on Reduction of Nursing Shortages in State Homes...: Regulation on Reduction of Nursing Shortages in State Homes; Application for Assistance for Hiring...

  1. 78 FR 75959 - Agency Information Collection (Regulation on Reduction of Nursing Shortages in State Homes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Regulation on Reduction of Nursing Shortages in State Homes....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Regulation on Reduction of Nursing Shortages in State Homes; Application...

  2. 78 FR 55778 - Proposed Information Collection (Regulation on Reduction of Nursing Shortages in State Homes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Regulation on Reduction of Nursing Shortages in State Homes...: Regulation on Reduction of Nursing Shortages in State Homes; Application for Assistance for Hiring...

  3. Leadership, staffing and quality of care in nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Havig Anders

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leadership and staffing are recognised as important factors for quality of care. This study examines the effects of ward leaders' task- and relationship-oriented leadership styles, staffing levels, ratio of registered nurses and ratio of unlicensed staff on three independent measures of quality of care. Methods A cross-sectional survey of forty nursing home wards throughout Norway was used to collect the data. Five sources of data were utilised: self-report questionnaires to 444 employees, interviews with and questionnaires to 13 nursing home directors and 40 ward managers, telephone interviews with 378 relatives and 900 hours of field observations. Separate multi-level analyses were conducted for quality of care assessed by relatives, staff and field observations respectively. Results Task-oriented leadership style had a significant positive relationship with two of the three quality of care indexes. In contrast, relationship-oriented leadership style was not significantly related to any of the indexes. The lack of significant effect for relationship-oriented leadership style was due to a strong correlation between the two leadership styles (r = 0.78. Staffing levels and ratio of registered nurses were not significantly related to any of the quality of care indexes. The ratio of unlicensed staff, however, showed a significant negative relationship to quality as assessed by relatives and field observations, but not to quality as assessed by staff. Conclusions Leaders in nursing homes should focus on active leadership and particularly task-oriented behaviour like structure, coordination, clarifying of staff roles and monitoring of operations to increase quality of care. Furthermore, nursing homes should minimize use of unlicensed staff and address factors related to high ratios of unlicensed staff, like low staff stability. The study indicates, however, that the relationship between staffing levels, ratio of registered nurses

  4. Sexual Abuse of Older Nursing Home Residents: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenche Malmedal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite an increasing literature related to elder abuse, sexual abuse of older persons in general and of vulnerable adults living in nursing homes in particular is still sparsely described. The purpose of this study was to assess the state of knowledge on the subject of sexual abuse against older nursing home residents through a literature review. Systematic searches in reference databases including Cinahl, Medline, OVID Nursing Database, ISI Web of Science, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, and SveMed + were conducted. Through several phases of selection of the articles, using strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, six articles were chosen for a deeper examination. Findings from the review show that sexual abuse occurs in nursing homes and that both older women and men are victims of sexual abuse. Perpetrators appear mainly to be staff and other residents and mainly to be men, but also women abuse both older men and older women. Findings from the literature review show that there is a need for knowledge and further research on the topic of sexual abuse against older residents in nursing homes. Furthermore, there is a need for good policies and reporting systems, as an important step in seriously addressing sexual abuse against older persons.

  5. Working Conditions and Mental Health of Nursing Staff in Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan; Punnett, Laura; Mawn, Barbara; Gore, Rebecca

    2016-07-01

    Nursing staff in nursing homes suffer from poor mental health, probably associated with stressful working conditions. Working conditions may distribute differently among nursing assistants, licensed practical nurses, and registered nurses due to their different levels in the organizational hierarchy. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the association between working conditions and mental health among different nursing groups, and examine the potential moderating effect of job group on this association. Self-administered questionnaires were collected with 1,129 nursing staff in 15 for-profit non-unionized nursing homes. Working conditions included both physical and psychosocial domains. Multivariate linear regression modeling found that mental health was associated with different working conditions in different nursing groups: physical safety (β = 2.37, p work-family conflict (β = -2.44, p work-family conflict (β = -4.17, p working conditions and mental health. Future workplace interventions to improve mental health should reach to nursing staff at different levels and consider tailored working condition interventions in different nursing groups.

  6. Risk of hip fracture in protected and unprotected falls in nursing homes in Norway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forsén, L; Søgaard, A J; Sandvig, S; Schuller, A; Røed, U; Arstad, C

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the probability of hip fracture in protected and unprotected falls in a real world setting in nursing homes. DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING: Seventeen nursing homes (965 beds) in Norway. SUBJECTS: All residents in the nursing homes with at least one fall during the inter

  7. Nursing Home Staff Characteristics and Knowledge Gain from a Didactic Workshop on Depression and Behavior Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, Suzanne; Burton, Elizabeth G.

    2004-01-01

    Depression is a prevalent and serious problem among nursing home residents. Nursing home staff members are gatekeepers for mental health treatment for residents, but may know little about depression and its management. We evaluated a didactic workshop for nursing home staff on depressive symptoms and management. Results for 58 staff participants…

  8. Motor Profile and Drug Treatment of Nursing Home Residents with Parkinson's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerkamp, Nico J.; Zuidema, Sytse U.; Tissingh, Gerrit; Poels, Petra J. E.; Munneke, Marten; Koopmans, Raymond T. C. M.; Bloem, Bastiaan R.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To examine the clinical characteristics, motor impairments, and drug treatments of nursing home residents with Parkinson's disease (PD). Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Nursing homes in the southeast of the Netherlands. Participants Nursing home residents with PD and a Mini-Mental S

  9. 42 CFR 422.133 - Return to home skilled nursing facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Return to home skilled nursing facility. 422.133....133 Return to home skilled nursing facility. (a) General rule. MA plans must provide coverage of posthospital extended care services to Medicare enrollees through a home skilled nursing facility if...

  10. 76 FR 15105 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Civil Money Penalties for Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-18

    ... Services 42 CFR Part 488 Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Civil Money Penalties for Nursing Homes; Final... and Medicaid Programs; Civil Money Penalties for Nursing Homes AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid... nursing homes are not in compliance with Federal participation requirements in accordance with...

  11. Nonmotor Symptoms in Nursing Home Residents with Parkinson's Disease : Prevalence and Effect on Quality of Life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerkamp, Nico J.; Tissingh, Gerrit; Poels, Petra J. E.; Zuidema, Systse U.; Munneke, Marten; Koopmans, Raymond T. C. M.; Bloem, Bastiaan R.

    2013-01-01

    ObjectivesTo determine the prevalence of nonmotor symptoms (NMS) in nursing home (NH) residents with Parkinson's disease (PD) and to establish the association with quality of life. DesignCross-sectional. SettingNursing homes in the southeast of the Netherlands. ParticipantsNursing home residents wit

  12. Nonmotor symptoms in nursing home residents with Parkinson's disease: prevalence and effect on quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerkamp, N.J.; Tissingh, G.; Poels, P.J.P.; Zuidema, S.U.; Munneke, M.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Bloem, B.R.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of nonmotor symptoms (NMS) in nursing home (NH) residents with Parkinson's disease (PD) and to establish the association with quality of life. DESIGN: Cross-sectional. SETTING: Nursing homes in the southeast of the Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: Nursing home resid

  13. 38 CFR 17.60 - Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... nursing home care beyond six months. 17.60 Section 17.60 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Community Nursing Home Care Facilities § 17.60 Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months. Directors of health care facilities may authorize, for...

  14. Faith and End of Life in Nursing Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L. Rubinstein

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the role of religious belief in the experiences of dying and death in a Catholic nursing home. The home appeals to residents and their families due to the active religious presence. Thus, religion is a salient element of the “local culture” which exists in this long-term care setting. The preeminence of faith within the organization and the personal religious convictions of staff, residents, and families may drive how death and dying are discussed and experienced in this setting, as well as the meanings that are attached to them. This paper examines the relationship between faith and the experience and meaning of death in this nursing home. We present themes that emerged from open-ended interviews with residents, family members, and staff, gathered between 1996 and 2004. The data indicate that people select the home due to their Catholic faith and the home's religious tone. Themes also show that belief in God and an afterlife helps shape the experience of dying and death for our informants. Our paper does not compare ease of dying with other nursing homes or within other belief systems.

  15. Tearmainn Bhride Nursing Home, Brideswell, Athlone, Roscommon.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Yadav, B L

    2015-04-07

    Social skills training, a psychological approach, is used to ameliorate the deficits in social skills among patients with a severe mental illness. For the efficacy of social skills training in schizophrenia, the literature in other core psychiatric disciplines (i.e. psychology, psychiatry, etc) indicates some conflicting evidences and a limited quality of evidence in psychiatric nursing. With the exemption of a few individual nursing studies, no systematic review is available to date in psychiatric nursing literature. This systematic review of literature was undertaken to explore the efficacy of social skills training in schizophrenia.

  16. Evaluation of prescribing quality in nursing homes based on drug-specific indicators: The Bergen district nursing home (BEDNURS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Ruths

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available To examine prescribing quality among nursing home patients. Methods: A cross sectional study in 23 nursing homes, based on drug charts. The evaluation of prescribing quality was based on selected drug-specific indicators established by the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine associations between prescribing indicators and predictors related to patient (age, gender, drug number and institution (nurse and physician staff time characteristics. Results: A total of 1513 nursing home patients (76% women, mean age 85 years were included in the study. On average, the patients used 5.1 (SD 2.5 standing medications. Laxatives were most commonly used (58%, followed by loop-diuretics (35%, antidepressants (31%, and anti-thrombotic agents (27%. Altogether 850 (56% patients used at least one potentially inappropriate prescription (PIP, including long-term use of contact laxatives without proper indication (25%, long-acting benzodiazepines (17%, and anticholinergic drugs (16%. The number of drugs used was the most important determinant for any PIP as well as for all individual indicators (p<0.001. Relatively younger patients were more likely to receive any PIP, and in particular anticholinergic drugs, multiple psychotropic drugs, and interacting drugs (p<0.05. Conclusion: Prescribing quality assessment by use of drug-specific indicators revealed great potentials for improving drug therapy in Norwegian nursing homes.

  17. Should Nursing Home Residents be Screened for Thyroid Function?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferit Kerim Küçükler

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Thyroid dysfunctions, especially subclinical forms, which are more frequently seen in older populations, have been linked to increased morbidity and mortality. In the literature, there are few reports of thyroid functions among nursing home residents. Our aim was to investigate whether nursing home residents constitute a priority group for the evaluation of thyroid function. Material and Method: Hundred and ninety-two participants were enrolled in the study, 108 of them were nursing home participant (NP and 84 were dwelling participants (CP. All of the participants were evaluated in terms of thyroid functions and thyroid ultrasonography. Results: In the NP group, 89.8% were euthyroid, 3.7% were found to have subclinical hypothyroidism, 0.9% had overt hypothyroidism, 4.6% had subclinical hyperthyroidism, and 0.9% had overt hyperthyroidism. The corresponding rates in CP group were 83.3%, 9.5%, 0.0%, 7.1%, and 0.0%, respectively. At least one thyroid nodule was present in 64.2% and 78.3% of subjects of NP and CP groups, respectively. Discussion: There was no statistical difference between the two groups in terms of distribution of thyroid dysfunction and thyroid nodules. According to our results, living in nursing home has not any important effect on thyroid dysfunction or nodule.

  18. A Post-Hospital Nursing Home Rehabilitation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petchers, Marcia K.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Describes program of short-term rehabilitation care provided to elderly patients through collaboration between hospital and nursing home. Discusses program planning and implementation experiences, patient satisfaction, and rehabilitation outcomes. Notes that program, although successful, was discontinued due to financial and interorganizational…

  19. How to Plan an Inservice Education for (Your) Nursing Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickman, Irving R., Ed.

    A guide to offer the nursing home administrator and his inservice education coordinator a source of information about the process of program planning in inservice education is presented. To plan a program, the following steps are necessary: (1) Know the problem; (2) Gather the facts; (3) Examine the facts; (4) Select the best solution; (5) Gain…

  20. Restorative Virtual Environment Design for Augmenting Nursing Home Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun-Pedersen, Jon Ram; Serafin, Stefania; Kofoed, Lise

    2017-01-01

    to experience natural surroundings. Augmenting a conventional biking exercise with a recreational virtual environment (RVE) has shown to serve as an intrinsic motivation contributor to exercise for nursing home residents. RVEs might be able to provide some of the health benefits that regular nature experiences...

  1. Nursing Home Care Quality: Insights from a Bayesian Network Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, Justin; Jang, Wooseung; Rantz, Marilyn

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is twofold. The first purpose is to utilize a new methodology (Bayesian networks) for aggregating various quality indicators to measure the overall quality of care in nursing homes. The second is to provide new insight into the relationships that exist among various measures of quality and how such measures…

  2. Remote monitoring of nursing home residents using a humanoid robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäck, Iivari; Kallio, Jouko; Perälä, Sami; Mäkelä, Kari

    2012-09-01

    We studied the feasibility of using a humanoid robot as an assistant in the monitoring of nursing home residents. The robot can receive alarms via its wireless Internet connection and navigate independently to the room where the alarm originated. Once it has entered the room, the robot can transmit near real time images to the staff and also open a voice connection between the resident and the remote caregivers. This way the remote caregiver is able to check the situation in the room, and take appropriate actions. We tested the prototype robot in three private nursing homes in the Finnish county of South Ostrobothnia. During the testing, 2-4 alarms were produced by each participant and there were 29 alarms in total. The robot was able to navigate correctly to the room from which the alarm was sent and open the speech connection, as well as transmit images via the wireless Internet connection. The experiments provided evidence of the feasibility of using autonomous robots as assistants to nursing home staff in remote monitoring. The response from the nursing home residents was uniformly positive.

  3. Psychotropic drug prescriptions in Western European nursing homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janus, Sarah I M; van Manen, Jeannette G; IJzerman, Maarten J; Zuidema, Sytse U

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite the numerous warnings of European and national drug agencies as well as clinical guidelines since the year 2004, psychotropic drugs are still frequently used in dementia. A systematic review comparing the use of psychotropic drugs in nursing homes from different European countrie

  4. Psychotropic drug prescriptions in Western European nursing homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janus, Sarah I. M.; van Manen, Jeannette G.; IJzerman, Maarten J.; Zuidema, Sytse U.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite the numerous warnings of European and national drug agencies as well as clinical guidelines since the year 2004, psychotropic drugs are still frequently used in dementia. A systematic review comparing the use of psychotropic drugs in nursing homes from different European countrie

  5. Water homeostasis, frailty and congnitive function in the nursing home

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this study is to develop and test a practical clinical method to assess frailty in nursing homes and to investigate the relationship between cognitive status of the elderly and the balance between water compartments of their body composition. This is a cross-sectional study, conducted a...

  6. Antibiotic prescribing in dutch nursing homes: how appropriate is it?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buul, L.W. van; Veenhuizen, R.B.; Achterberg, W.P.; Schellevis, F.G.; Essink, R.T.; Greeff, S.C. de; Natsch, S.S.; Steen, J.T. van der; Hertogh, C.M.P.M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the appropriateness of decisions to prescribe or withhold antibiotics for nursing home (NH) residents with infections of the urinary tract (UTI), respiratory tract (RTI), and skin (SI). DESIGN: Prospective study. SETTING: Ten NHs in the central-west region of the Netherland

  7. Ciprofloxacin : Use and resistance in Community, Nursing Home and Hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hees, B.C.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the studies described in this thesis was to analyze some aspects of ciprofloxacin use and clinical and (molecular) epidemiology of ciprofloxacin resistance in different settings, both within hospitals (chapter 3,4 and 6), community and nursing homes (chapter 2 and 5). With its broad spect

  8. Antibiotic prescribing in Dutch nursing homes: how appropriate is it?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buul, L.W. van; Veenhuizen, R.B.; Achterberg, W.P.; Schellevis, F.G.; Essink, R.T.G.M.; Greeff, S.C. de; Natsch, S.; Steen, J.T. van der; Hertogh, C.M.P.M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the appropriateness of decisions to prescribe or withhold antibiotics for nursing home (NH) residents with infections of the urinary tract (UTI), respiratory tract (RTI), and skin (SI). Design: Prospective study. Setting: Ten NHs in the central-west region of the Netherland

  9. The Coach Is in: Improving Nutritional Care in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Anna N.; Simmons, Sandra F.; Applebaum, Robert; Lindabury, Kate; Schnelle, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This article describes and evaluates a long distance coaching course aimed at improving nutritional care in nursing homes (NHs). The course was structured to provide more support than traditional training programs offer. Methods: In a series of 6 monthly teleconferences led by an expert in NH nutritional care, participating NH staff…

  10. Understanding Nursing Home Worker Conceptualizations about Good Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Gawon

    2013-01-01

    This study explored how direct care workers in nursing homes conceptualize good care and how their conceptualizations are influenced by external factors surrounding their work environment and the relational dynamics between them and residents. Study participants were drawn from a local service employees' union, and in-depth interviews were…

  11. Needed: Physical Educators on the Nursing Home Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooks, Bettie; Hooks, Edgar W., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Social interaction and physical activity are important aspects of health maintenance for the aged. A holistic approach to the care of the elderly in nursing homes would involve a team of professionals who encourage residents to pursue such tasks as adaptation to loss, and maintenance of physical activity to retain function. (JN)

  12. [The benefits of foot reflexology in nursing homes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonnet, Karine

    2012-01-01

    Massages, following the foot reflexology method, were given to patients in a nursing home suffering from Alzheimer's disease or related disorders. A methodical assessment, on a small sample of patients, showed a significant reduction in neuropsychiatric manifestations, opening up new perspectives for non-medication based therapy for the care of elderly dependent people.

  13. Poetry Therapy with Frail Elderly in a Nursing Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvermarie, Sue

    1988-01-01

    Describes a poetry group which encouraged the expression of memories and imagination among frail elderly residents of a nursing home over a period of nine months. Shows how it facilitated peer friendship formation, increased expression of affect, resulted in improved staff treatment of residents, and ended with the publication of an anthology. (SR)

  14. Effect of Nursing Home Staff Training on Quality of Patient Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, Margaret W.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Assessed effects of nursing home staff training in care for the dying on quality of life of 306 terminally ill patients in 5 pairs of matched nursing homes assigned randomly to trained and not trained staff groups. Patients in trained homes had less depression and greater satisfaction with care than patients in control homes at 1 and 3 months.…

  15. Determinants for the use of psychotropics among nursing home residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lisbeth Uhrskov; Foldspang, A; Gulmann, N C;

    2001-01-01

    's Activities of Daily Living (ADL), behavioural problems (Nursing Home Behavior Problem Scale), orientation, communication skills and if the resident had any psychiatric disorder. Multiple logistic regression was used to select the items that determined the use of psychotropics. Results Fifty-six percent......Purpose To characterise the prescription pattern of psychotropics in Danish nursing homes and to identify diagnostic, behavioural, cognitive and performance characteristics associated with prevalent psychotropic drug use. Methods Prescribed daily medication was recorded from nurses' files. Based...... of the residents received a psychotropic, 21% received neuroleptics, 38% received benzodiazepines and 24% received antidepressants. In the multivariate analysis, staff assessment of the resident's mental health was a determinant for the use of all types of specific psychotropics, whereas a GMS–AGECAT diagnosis...

  16. Resident-to-resident violence triggers in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snellgrove, Susan; Beck, Cornelia; Green, Angela; McSweeney, Jean C

    2013-11-01

    Certified nurses' assistants (CNAs) employed by a rural nursing home in Northeast Arkansas described their perceptions of resident-to-resident violence in order to provide insight on factors, including unmet needs, that may trigger the phenomenon. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 11 CNAs. Data were analyzed using content analysis and constant comparison. Two categories of triggers emerged from the data-active and passive. Active triggers involved the actions of other residents that were intrusive in nature, such as wandering into a residents' personal space, taking a resident's belongings, and so forth. Passive triggers did not involve the actions of residents but related to the internal and external environment of the residents. Examples were factors such as boredom, competition for attention and communication difficulties. Results indicate that there are factors, including unmet needs within the nursing home environment that may be identified and altered to prevent violence between residents.

  17. Back disorders and lumbar load in nursing staff in geriatric care: a comparison of home-based care and nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beck Barbara-Beate

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Back pain is one of the most frequent complaints in the nursing profession. Thus, the 12-month prevalence of pain in the lumbar spine in nursing staff is as high as 76%. Only a few representative studies have assessed the prevalence rates of back pain and its risk factors among nursing staff in nursing homes in comparison to staff in home-based care facilities. The present study accordingly investigates the prevalence in the lumbar and cervical spine and determines the physical workload to lifting and caring in geriatric care. Methods 1390 health care workers in nursing homes and home care participated in this cross sectional survey. The nursing staff members were examined by occupational physicians according to the principals of the multistep diagnosis of musculoskeletal disorders. Occupational exposure to daily care activities with patient transfers was measured by a standardised questionnaire. The lumbar load was calculated with the Mainz-Dortmund dose model. Information on ergonomic conditions were recorded from the management of the nursing homes. Comparisons of all outcome variables were made between both care settings. Results Complete documentation, including the findings from the occupational physicians and the questionnaire, was available for 41%. Staff in nursing homes had more often positive orthopaedic findings than staff in home care. At the same time the values calculated for lumbar load were found to be significant higher in staff in nursing homes than in home-based care: 45% vs. 6% were above the reference value. Nursing homes were well equipped with technical lifting aids, though their provision with assistive advices is unsatisfactory. Situation in home care seems worse, especially as the staff often has to get by without assistance. Conclusions Future interventions should focus on counteracting work-related lumbar load among staff in nursing homes. Equipment and training in handling of assistive devices

  18. Picture Your Nursing Home: Exploring the Sense of Home of Older Residents through Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoof, J.; Verhagen, M. M.; Wouters, E. J. M.; Marston, H. R.; Rijnaard, M. D.; Janssen, B. M.

    2015-01-01

    The quality of the built environment can impact the quality of life and the sense of home of nursing home residents. This study investigated (1) which factors in the physical and social environment correlate with the sense of home of the residents and (2) which environmental factors are most meaningful. Twelve participants engaged in a qualitative study, in which photography was as a supportive tool for subsequent interviews. The data were analysed based on the six phases by Braun and Clarke. The four themes identified are (1) the physical view; (2) mobility and accessibility; (3) space, place, and personal belongings; and (4) the social environment and activities. A holistic understanding of which features of the built environment are appreciated by the residents can lead to the design and retrofitting of nursing homes that are more in line with personal wishes. PMID:26346975

  19. Picture Your Nursing Home: Exploring the Sense of Home of Older Residents through Photography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. van Hoof

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The quality of the built environment can impact the quality of life and the sense of home of nursing home residents. This study investigated (1 which factors in the physical and social environment correlate with the sense of home of the residents and (2 which environmental factors are most meaningful. Twelve participants engaged in a qualitative study, in which photography was as a supportive tool for subsequent interviews. The data were analysed based on the six phases by Braun and Clarke. The four themes identified are (1 the physical view; (2 mobility and accessibility; (3 space, place, and personal belongings; and (4 the social environment and activities. A holistic understanding of which features of the built environment are appreciated by the residents can lead to the design and retrofitting of nursing homes that are more in line with personal wishes.

  20. Multidisciplinary nutritional support for undernutrition in nursing home and home-care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne Marie; Gøgsig Christensen, Annette; Stenbæk Hansen, Birthe

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of multidisciplinary nutritional support for undernutrition in older adults in nursing home and home-care identified with the validated Eating Validation Scheme (EVS). Methods An 11 wk cluster randomized trial with a home-care (3 clusters) or nursing home (3 clusters......) setting as the unit of randomization. Before starting the study, a train-the-trainer course was performed to educate the nutrition coordinators. In addition to the nutrition coordinator, the participants assigned to the intervention group strategy received multidisciplinary nutrition support. Focus...... was on treatment of the potentially modifiable nutritional risk factors identified with the EVS, by involving the physiotherapist, registered dietitian, and occupational therapist, as relevant and independent of the municipality's ordinary assessment and referral system. Outcome parameters were quality of life (by...

  1. Treatment of heart failure in nursing home residents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marille AMJ Daamen; Jan PH Hamers; Anton PM Gorgels; Frans ES Tan; Jos MGA Schols; Hans-Peter Brunner-la Rocca

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundFor the treatment of chronic heart failure (HF), both pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment should be em-ployed in HF patients. Although HF is highly prevalent in nursing home residents, it is not clear whether the recommendations in the guide-lines for pharmacological therapy also are followed in nursing home residents. The aim of this study is to investigate how HF is treated in nursing home residents and to determine to what extent the current treatment corresponds to the guidelines.MethodsNursing home resi-dents of five large nursing home care organizations in the southern part of the Netherlands with a previous diagnosis of HF based on medical records irrespective of the left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) were included in this cross-sectional design study. Data were gathered on the (medical) records, which included clinical characteristics and pharmacological- and non-pharmacological treatment. Echocardiography was used as part of the study to determine the LVEF.ResultsOut of 501 residents, 112 had a diagnosis of HF at inclusion. One-third of them received an ACE-inhibitor and 40% used aβ-blocker. In 66%, there was a prescription of diuretics with a preference of a loop diuretic. Focusing on the residents with a LVEF£ 40%, only 46% of the 22 residents used an ACE-inhibitor and 64% aβ-blocker. The median daily doses of prescribed medication were lower than those that were recommended by the guidelines. Non-pharmacological interventions were recorded in almost none of the residents with HF.ConclusionsThe recommended medical therapy of HF was often not prescribed; if pre-scribed, the dosage was usually far below what was recommended. In addition, non-pharmacological interventions were mostly not used at all.

  2. [Prevention and treatment of osteoporosis in short stay departments of nursing homes: a nursing home physician's task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nordennen, R.T. van; Vanneste, V.G.G.

    2007-01-01

    This research shows that nursing home physicians might play an important part in the diagnostics and treatment of vitamin-D deficiency. 96 rehabilitating elderly who had undergone a hip operation were investigated. 36% had a vitamin-D deficiency (vitamin-D < 30 nmol/l). Vitamin-D deficiency was 5

  3. 48 CFR 852.222-70 - Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act-nursing home care contract supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Safety Standards Act-nursing home care contract supplement. 852.222-70 Section 852.222-70 Federal...—nursing home care contract supplement. As prescribed in 822.305, for nursing home care requirements, insert the following clause: Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act—Nursing Home Care...

  4. Characteristics of Absenteeism in Nursing Home Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska; Rosenthal, Alvin S.

    This study investigated factors associated with absenteeism among nursing staff (N=219) at a long-term care facility. Four absenteeism measures were calculated from personnel records for each month of the year: no pay (the sum of unscheduled, unpaid sick, and leave without pay), part day (the sum of arrived late and left early), paid sick, and…

  5. Mennonite Nursing Home passive solar demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-03-01

    A long-term nursing care facility and retirement center was designed for passive solar heating. The system comprises thermal mass, thermal insulation, Trombe walls, and direct gain clerestories. Included here is a topical report, analysis of building performance, owner's perspective, designer's perspective, and summary of information dissemination activities. (MHR)

  6. Nursing Home Medication Reconciliation: A Quality Improvement Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Monica; Oh, Hye Young; Thomas, Jennifer; Patel, Sheila; Hardesty, Jennifer L; Brandt, Nicole J

    2017-04-01

    The current quality improvement initiative evaluated the medication reconciliation process within select nursing homes in Washington, DC. The identification of common types of medication discrepancies through monthly retrospective chart reviews of newly admitted patients in two different nursing homes were described. The use of high-risk medications, namely antidiabetic, anticoagulant, and opioid agents, was also recorded. A standardized spreadsheet tool based on multiple medication reconciliation implementation tool kits was created to record the information. The five most common medication discrepancies were incorrect indication (21%), no monitoring parameters (17%), medication name omitted (11%), incorrect dose (10%), and incorrect frequency (8%). Antidiabetic agents in both sites were the most used high-risk medication. This initiative highlights that medication discrepancies on admission are common in nursing homes and may be clinically impactful. More attention needs to be given to work flow processes to improve medication reconciliation considering the increased risk for adverse drug events and hospitalizations. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing and Mental Health Services, 43(4), 9-14.].

  7. The association between the quality of life and depression of elderly in a nursing home institutional setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľubica Ilievová

    2016-12-01

    Conclusions: Obtaining information on depression and the quality of life of elderly in nursing home settings should be introduced as a standard part of nursing activities in order to improve the quality of customer care in the nursing homes.

  8. Cramers Court Nursing Home, Belgooly, Cork.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Fiona

    2010-11-01

    Patient self-testing (PST) of the international normalised ratio (INR) has a positive effect on anticoagulation control. This study investigated whether the benefits of PST (other than increased frequency of testing, e.g. patient education, empowerment, compliance etc.) could be \\'carried-over\\' into usual care management after a period of home-testing has ceased.

  9. Beech Park Nursing Home, Dunmurry East, Kildare.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harnett, P J

    2009-06-01

    The term \\'performance management\\' has an aversive \\'managerial\\' aspect, is unappealing to many public sector staff and has an \\'image problem\\'. Perhaps as a consequence, it has failed to make a significant impact on Irish public sector workers, notably mental health nurses. In this paper, performance management is introduced and examined within an Irish healthcare context and with reference to its use in other countries. Some of the challenges faced by Irish mental health nurses and the potential benefits of working within a performance managed workplace are discussed. The paper concludes that performance management is likely to increasingly affect nurses, either as active agents or as passive recipients of a change that is thrust on them. The authors anticipate that the performance management \\'image problem\\' will give way to recognition that this is a fundamental change which has the potential to enable health services to change. This change will bring high standards of transparency, worker involvement in decision making, an explicit value base for health services and individual teams. It provides the potential for clear practice standards and high standards of transparency as well as worker welfare in all aspects, including supporting employment and career progression.

  10. Communication skills training in a nursing home: effects of a brief intervention on residents and nursing aides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sprangers S

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Suzan Sprangers, Katinka Dijkstra, Anna Romijn-LuijtenInstitute of Psychology, Faculty of Social Sciences, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Rotterdam, the NetherlandsAbstract: Effective communication by nursing home staff is related to a higher quality of life and a decrease in verbal and physical aggression and depression in nursing home residents. Several communication intervention studies have been conducted to improve communication between nursing home staff and nursing home residents with dementia. These studies have shown that communication skills training can improve nursing aides’ communication with nursing home residents. However, these studies tended to be time-consuming and fairly difficult to implement. Moreover, these studies focused on the communicative benefits for the nursing home residents and their well-being, while benefits and well-being for the nursing aides were neglected. The current study focused on implementing a brief communication skills training program to improve nursing aides’ (N=24 communication with residents with dementia (N=26 in a nursing home. The effects of the training on nursing aides’ communication, caregiver distress, and job satisfaction and residents’ psychopathology and agitation were assessed relative to a control group condition. Nursing aides in the intervention group were individually trained to communicate effectively with residents during morning care by using short instructions, positive speech, and biographical statements. Mixed ANOVAs showed that, after training, nursing aides in the intervention group experienced less caregiver distress. Additionally, the number of short instructions and instances of positive speech increased. Providing nursing aides with helpful feedback during care aids communication and reduces caregiver burden, even with a brief intervention that requires limited time investments for nursing home staff.Keywords: dementia, psychopathology, agitation, caregiver

  11. Neuropsychiatric symptoms in nursing home patients : factor structure invariance of the Dutch nursing home version of the neuropsychiatric inventory in different stages of dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, Sytse U; de Jonghe, Jos F M; Verhey, Frans R J; Koopmans, Raymond T C M

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: To examine the influence of dementia stage and psychoactive medication use on the factor structure of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Nursing Home version (NPI-NH) in Dutch nursing home patients. METHODS: The NPI-NH was administered to a large sample of 1,437 patients with mild to se

  12. Music in the nursing home : hitting the right note! The provision of music to dementia patients with verbal and vocal agitation in Dutch nursing homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geer, E. R.; Vink, A. C.; Schols, J. M. G. A.; Slaets, J. P. J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The study aims to provide insight into the type of music being offered in Dutch nursing homes to patients with both dementia and verbal and vocal agitation. It also investigates the degree to which the music offered corresponds to the musical preferences of the nursing home residents. Me

  13. Neuropsychiatric symptoms in nursing home patients: factor structure invariance of the Dutch nursing home version of the neuropsychiatric inventory in different stages of dementia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, S.U.; Jonghe, J.F. de; Verhey, F.R.J.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: To examine the influence of dementia stage and psychoactive medication use on the factor structure of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Nursing Home version (NPI-NH) in Dutch nursing home patients. METHODS: The NPI-NH was administered to a large sample of 1,437 patients with mild to se

  14. Role for a Labor-Management Partnership in Nursing Home Person-Centered Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leutz, Walter; Bishop, Christine E.; Dodson, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate how a partnership between labor and management works to change the organization and focus of nursing home frontline work, supporting a transition toward person-centered care (PCC) in participating nursing homes. Design and Methods: Using a participatory research approach, we conducted case studies of 2 nursing homes…

  15. Quality assessment in nursing home facilities: measuring customer satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostyn, M M; Race, K E; Seibert, J H; Johnson, M

    2000-01-01

    A national study designed to assess the reliability and validity of a nursing home customer satisfaction survey is summarized. One hundred fifty-nine facilities participated, each responsible for the distribution and collection of 200 questionnaires randomly sent to the home of the resident's responsible party. A total of 9053 completed questionnaires were returned, for an average adjusted response rate of 53%. The factor analysis identified 4 scales: Comfort and Cleanliness, Nursing, Food Services, and Facility Care and Services, each with high reliability. Based on a multiple regression analysis, the scales were shown to have good criterion-related validity, accounting for 64% of the variance in overall quality ratings. Comparisons based on select characteristics indicated significantly different satisfaction ratings among facilities. The results are interpreted as providing evidence for the construct validity of a multidimensional customer satisfaction scale with measured reliability and criterion-related validity. Moreover, the scale can be used to differentiate satisfaction levels among facilities.

  16. Visibility and findability of the nursing home compare website.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Darren; Lu, Chi-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Nursing Home Compare (NHC) is a federal government website providing information for selecting a nursing home. However, not many consumers were aware of or can locate the site. This study analyzed 50 official state and District of Columbia websites from September through December 2013. Using Google "inlink:" operator, this study evaluated the visibility and findability of NHC links in each state-level website. The results show that a link to NHC is available in all states except for Connecticut, Florida, and Michigan. Although it took only 4.7 clicks on average to the page with a NHC link, consumers may still have difficulty to find NHC from a state website. This article provides a snapshot of the visibility and findability of NHC and indicates a need for further investigation of promising website dissemination strategies not yet adequately evaluated.

  17. Pneumonia in nursing homes and long-term care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, Mark B

    2005-12-01

    This article reviews the epidemiology of pneumonia in residents of nursing homes and other long-term care facilities (LTCFs). Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most important cause of pneumonia in residents of nursing homes and LTCFs. Factors suggestive of aspiration are the most important risk factors for pneumonia in this population. The clinical presentation of pneumonia among long-term care facility residents is challenging; residents tend to be older and more debilitated than their elderly community-dwelling counterparts. Data on optimal antimicrobial therapy in this setting is sparse. Functional status is an important predictor of outcome in this population. There are key management issues, such as site of care, which remain unresolved. Immunization with influenza and pneumococcal vaccines remains the mainstay of prevention.

  18. Therapeutic robocat for nursing home residents with dementia: preliminary inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libin, Alexander; Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska

    2004-01-01

    Traditional pet therapy enhances individual well-being. However, there are situations where a substitute artificial companion (i.e., robotic pet) may serve as a better alternative because of insufficient available resources to care for a real pet, allergic responses to pets, or other difficulties. This pilot study, which compared the benefits of a robotic cat and a plush toy cat as interventions for elderly persons with dementia, was conducted at a special care unit of a large, not-for-profit nursing home. Various aspects of a person's engagement and affect were assessed through direct observations. Though not identical, similar trends were seen for the two cats. Interacting with the cats was linked with decreased agitation and increased pleasure and interest. The study is intended to pave the way for future research on robotherapy with nursing home residents.

  19. PERCEPTIONS AND EXPERIENCES OF ELDERLY RESIDENTS IN A NURSING HOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Alessandra Evangelista

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the perception of the elderly residents of a long-stay nursing home on the process of institutionalization. We interviewed 14 subjects, five women and nine men, aged between 60 and 92 years. Data collection was conducted with a semi-structured sociodemographic interview, which presented the guiding question: “Tell me about how is your life, what do you do and how did you come to live here”. From the analysis, we found topics related to feelings of abandonment, loneliness, anger, ingratitude, living with chronic pain, satisfaction of property in the nursing home, productivity and social relationship. Given the thematic analysis, it was possible to group them into three categories such as: what the elderly feel, what the elderly perceive and what the elderly desire. As a result, we need public policies that addresses to the service provided by institutions regarding elderly expectations.

  20. CPR in the nursing home: fool's errand or looming dilemma?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lyons, D

    2011-09-01

    The indications for CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) have expanded greatly since the technique was introduced and theoretically it can be attempted on all prior to death. Policy initiatives (such as the British Medical Association\\/Royal College of Nursing guidelines) have attempted to provide a clinical rationale for the withholding of inappropriate CPR. Traditionally a care home was felt to be an inappropriate environment to attempt CPR but increased use of advance directives may bring the issue to the fore in this setting.

  1. Impact of human resource management practices on nursing home performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondeau, K V; Wagar, T H

    2001-08-01

    Management scholars and practitioners alike have become increasingly interested in learning more about the ability of certain 'progressive' or 'high-performance' human resource management (HRM) practices to enhance organizational effectiveness. There is growing evidence to suggest that the contribution of various HRM practices to impact firm performance may be synergistic in effect yet contingent on a number of contextual factors, including workplace climate. A contingency theory perspective suggests that in order to be effective, HMR policies and practices must be consistent with other aspects of the organization, including its environment. This paper reports on empirical findings from research that examines the relationship between HRM practices, workplace climate and perceptions of organizational performance, in a large sample of Canadian nursing homes. Data from 283 nursing homes were collected by means of a mail survey that included questions on HRM practices, programmes, and policies, on human resource aspects of workplace climate, as well as a variety of indicators that include employee, customer/resident and facility measures of organizational performance. Results derived from ordered probit analysis suggest that nursing homes in our sample which had implemented more 'progressive' HRM practices and which reported a workplace climate that strongly values employee participation, empowerment and accountability tended to be perceived to generally perform better on a number of valued organizational outcomes. Nursing homes in our sample that performed best overall were found to be more likely to not only have implemented more of these HRM practices, but also to report having a workplace climate that reflects the seminal value that it places on its human resources. This finding is consistent with the conclusion that simply introducing HRM practices or programmes, in the absence of an appropriately supportive workplace climate, will be insufficient to attain

  2. Nursing Home Medical Staff Organization and 30-Day Rehospitalizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Julie C.; Intrator, Orna; Karuza, Jurgis; Wetle, Terrie; Mor, Vincent; Katz, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine the relationship between features of nursing home (NH) medical staff organization and residents’ 30-day rehospitalizations. Design Cross-sectional study combining primary data collected from a survey of medical directors, NH resident assessment data (minimum data set), Medicare claims, and the Online Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) database. Setting A total of 202 freestanding US nursing homes. Participants Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries who were hospitalized and subsequently admitted to a study nursing home. Measurements Medical staff organization dimensions derived from the survey, NH residents’ characteristics derived from minimum data set data, hospitalizations obtained from Part A Medicare claims, and NH characteristics from the OSCAR database and from www.ltcfocus.org. Study outcome defined within a 30-day window following an index hospitalization: rehospitalized, otherwise died, otherwise survived and not rehospitalized. Results Thirty-day rehospitalizations occurred for 3788 (20.3%) of the 18,680 initial hospitalizations. Death was observed for 884 (4.7%) of residents who were not rehospitalized. Adjusted by hospitalization, resident, and NH characteristics, nursing homes having a more formal appointment process for physicians were less likely to have 30-day rehospitalization (b = −0.43, SE = 0.17), whereas NHs in which a higher proportion of residents were cared for by a single physician were more likely to have rehospitalizations (b = 0.18, SE = 0.08). Conclusion This is the first study to show a direct relationship between features of NH medical staff organization and resident-level process of care. The relationship of a more strict appointment process and rehospitalizations might be a consequence of more formalized and dedicated medical practice with a sense of ownership and accountability. A higher volume of patients per physician does not appear to improve quality of care. PMID:22682694

  3. The Effect of Hospice on Hospitalizations of Nursing Home Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Nan Tracy; Mukamel, Dana B.; Friedman, Bruce; Caprio, Thomas V.; Temkin-Greener, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Hospice enrollment is known to reduce risk of hospitalizations for nursing home residents who use it. We examined whether residing in facilities with a higher hospice penetration: 1) reduces hospitalization risk for non-hospice residents; and 2) decreases hospice-enrolled residents’ hospitalization risk relative to hospice-enrolled residents in facilities with a lower hospice penetration. Method Medicare Beneficiary File, Inpatient and Hospice Claims, Minimum Data Set Version 2.0, Provider of Services File and Area Resource File. Retrospective analysis of long-stay nursing home residents who died during 2005-2007. Overall, 505,851 non-hospice (67.66%) and 241,790 hospice-enrolled (32.34%) residents in 14,030 facilities nationwide were included. We fit models predicting the probability of hospitalization conditional on hospice penetration and resident and facility characteristics. We used instrumental variable method to address the potential endogeneity between hospice penetration and hospitalization. Distance between each nursing home and the closest hospice was the instrumental variable. Main Findings In the last 30 days of life, 37.63% of non-hospice and 23.18% of hospice residents were hospitalized. Every 10% increase in hospice penetration leads to a reduction in hospitalization risk of 5.1% for non-hospice residents and 4.8% for hospice-enrolled residents. Principal Conclusions Higher facility-level hospice penetration reduces hospitalization risk for both non-hospice and hospice-enrolled residents. The findings shed light on nursing home end-of-life care delivery, collaboration among providers and cost benefit analysis of hospice care. PMID:25304181

  4. Psychiatric assessment of a nursing home population using audiovisual telecommunication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grob, P; Weintraub, D; Sayles, D; Raskin, A; Ruskin, P

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that psychiatric assessment of nursing home residents could be reliably carried out remotely via telecommunications. Twenty-seven nursing home residents each had two interviews consisting of the following three rating scales: the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS). The interviews were conducted by three trained psychiatrists, each of whom interviewed two-thirds of the subjects. Subjects were sequentially assigned to have either two in-person interviews (in-person group) or one in-person and one remote interview via telecommunication (remote group). Inter-rater reliability was calculated separately for each condition (in-person vs remote group) for each of the three rating scales. Intraclass correlations on the MMSE were .95 for the remote group and .83 for the in-person group. On the GDS, they were .82 for the remote group and .86 for the in-person group. Finally, on the BPRS, they were .81 for the remote group and .49 for the in-person group. There were no statistically significant differences in intraclass correlation on any of the three scales for the remote group compared with the in-person group, indicating that nursing home residents can be reliably assessed remotely via telecommunication.

  5. Death in nursing homes: a Danish qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorlén, Tanja Fromberg; Gorlén, Thomas; Neergaard, Mette Asbjoern

    2013-05-01

    Little is known about the quality of end-of-life care in Danish nursing homes (NHs). This qualitative descriptive study based on semi-structured group interviews with nursing staff members in three NHs in Copenhagen, Denmark, aimed to describe the participants' perceptions of end-of-life care in Danish NHs, with particular focus on medication administration and collaboration with GPs. Four main categories of problematic issues emerged: medication (problems with 'as needed' medication and lack of knowledge of subcutaneous administration), interpersonal relations (difficulties in cooperation and communication between relatives and GPs), decision making (problems concerning termination of life-prolonging treatment and the need for early planning of end-of-life care), and professional development (documentation and education). Considerable improvements may be achieved primarily by educating and training nursing staff and GPs. More research is warranted to optimise end-of-life care in Danish NHs.

  6. Effects of introducing a nursing guideline on depression in psychogeriatric nursing home residents.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaik, R.; Francke, A.; Berno, M. van; Bensing, J.; Miel, R.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The prevalence rate of depression in psychogeriatric nursing home residents with dementia is recently estimated at 19%. Comorbid depression in dementia has been associated with decreased quality of life, greater health care utilization and higher mortality rates. The effects of introdu

  7. Falls in nursing home residents receiving pharmacotherapy for anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reardon G

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Gregory Reardon,1 Naushira Pandya,2 Robert A Bailey31Informagenics, LLC and The Ohio State University College of Pharmacy, Columbus, OH, USA; 2Department of Geriatrics, Nova Southeastern University College of Osteopathic Medicine, Ft Lauderdale, FL, USA; 3Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC, Horsham, PA, USAPurpose: Falls are common among nursing home residents and have potentially severe consequences, including fracture and other trauma. Recent evidence suggests anemia may be independently related to these falls. This study explores the relationship between the use of anemia-related pharmacotherapies and falls among nursing home residents.Methods: Forty nursing homes in the United States provided data for analysis. All incidents of falls over the 6-month post-index follow-up period were used to identify the outcomes of falls (≥1 fall and recurrent falls (>1 fall. Logistic regression was used to analyze the relationship between falls and recurrent falls with each of the anemia pharmacotherapies after adjusting for potential confounders.Results: A total of 632 residents were eligible for analysis. More than half (57% of residents were identified as anemic (hemoglobin < 12 g/dL females, or <13 g/dL males. Of anemic residents, 50% had been treated with one or more therapies (14% used vitamin B12, 10% folic acid, 38% iron, 0.3% darbepoetin alfa [DARB], and 1.3% epoetin alfa [EPO]. Rates of falls/recurrent falls were 33%/18% for those receiving vitamin B12, 40%/16% for folic acid, 27%/14% for iron, 38%/8% for DARB, 18%/2% for EPO, and 22%/11% for those receiving no therapy. In the adjusted models, use of EPO or DARB was associated with significantly lower odds of recurrent falls (odds ratio = 0.06; P = 0.001. Other significant covariates included psychoactive medication use, age 75–84 years, age 85+ years, worsened balance score, and chronic kidney disease (P < 0.05 for all.Conclusion: Only half of the anemic residents were found to be using anemia

  8. Assessment of dementia in nursing home residents by nurses and assistants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lisbeth Uhrskov; Foldspang, Anders; Gulmann, Nils Christian;

    2001-01-01

    Objectives To describe the criterion validity of nursing home staff's assessment of organic disorder compared with ICD-10 criteria, and to identify determinants of staff assessment of organic disorder. Method Two hundred and eighty-eight residents were diagnosed using the GMS-AGECAT. Nursing staf...... as under-labelling of residents, a tendency that will affect communication with medical personnel and may lead to inadequate or wrong medical treatment and to negative performance as well as negative role expectations in everyday life in nursing homes.......Objectives To describe the criterion validity of nursing home staff's assessment of organic disorder compared with ICD-10 criteria, and to identify determinants of staff assessment of organic disorder. Method Two hundred and eighty-eight residents were diagnosed using the GMS-AGECAT. Nursing staff...... members were interviewed about the residents' activities of Daily Living, behavioural problems, orientation in surroundings and communication skills, and asked if the resident had an organic disorder. Multiple logistic regression was used to select the items that most strongly determined staff assessment...

  9. The Need for Higher Minimum Staffing Standards in U.S. Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Charlene; Schnelle, John F.; McGregor, Margaret; Simmons, Sandra F.

    2016-01-01

    Many U.S. nursing homes have serious quality problems, in part, because of inadequate levels of nurse staffing. This commentary focuses on two issues. First, there is a need for higher minimum nurse staffing standards for U.S. nursing homes based on multiple research studies showing a positive relationship between nursing home quality and staffing and the benefits of implementing higher minimum staffing standards. Studies have identified the minimum staffing levels necessary to provide care consistent with the federal regulations, but many U.S. facilities have dangerously low staffing. Second, the barriers to staffing reform are discussed. These include economic concerns about costs and a focus on financial incentives. The enforcement of existing staffing standards has been weak, and strong nursing home industry political opposition has limited efforts to establish higher standards. Researchers should study the ways to improve staffing standards and new payment, regulatory, and political strategies to improve nursing home staffing and quality. PMID:27103819

  10. 76 FR 70076 - Technical Revisions To Update Reference to the Required Assessment Tool for State Nursing Homes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-10

    ... Tool for State Nursing Homes Receiving Per Diem Payments From VA AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs... diem from VA for providing nursing home care to veterans. The proposed rule would require State nursing... Required Assessment Tool for State Nursing Homes Receiving Per Diem Payments From VA.'' Copies of...

  11. Knowledge and Attitudes of Nursing Home Staff and Surveyors about the Revised Federal Guidance for Incontinence Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBeau, Catherine E.; Ouslander, Joseph G.; Palmer, Mary H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: We assessed nursing home staff and state nursing home surveyors regarding their knowledge and attitudes about urinary incontinence, its management, and the revised federal Tag F315 guidance for urinary incontinence. Design and Methods: We conducted a questionnaire survey of a convenience sample of nursing home staff and state nursing home…

  12. SmartNursing - a mobile application to improve communication in home care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyborg, Mads; Bashir, Khurram; Maknickaite, Asta

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents SmartNursing system and discusses how increasing capabilities of smartphone could benefit employees in working environment. A SmartNursing system is developed for home nurses working environment to fulfil their needs. The solution helps to improve communication among nurses...

  13. Cooperating with a palliative home-care team: expectations and evaluations of GPs and district nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldschmidt, Dorthe; Groenvold, Mogens; Johnsen, Anna Thit

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Palliative home-care teams often cooperate with general practitioners (GPs) and district nurses. Our aim was to evaluate a palliative home-care team from the viewpoint of GPs and district nurses. METHODS: GPs and district nurses received questionnaires at the start of home-care and one...... month later. Questions focussed on benefits to patients, training issues for professionals and cooperation between the home-care team and the GP/ district nurse. A combination of closed- and open-ended questions was used. RESULTS: Response rate was 84% (467/553). Benefits to patients were experienced....... Dissatisfaction was caused mainly by lack of information from the home-care team to primary-care professionals. CONCLUSION: GPs and district nurses welcomed the palliative home-care team and most experienced benefits to patients. Strengthened communication, initiated by the home-care team would enhance...

  14. Longevity and admission to nursing home according to age after isolated coronary artery bypass surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Kristinn; Andreasen, Jan J; Mortensen, Rikke N;

    2016-01-01

    significant predictors for living in a nursing home 1 year postoperatively. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of all patients selected for CABG surgery in Denmark between 1996-2012, including the elderly, were able to live independently at home without the need of home care for many years after CABG. The risk......OBJECTIVES: Data on nursing home admission in patient's ≥80 years after isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) are scarce. The purpose of this study was to evaluate longevity and subsequent admission to a nursing home stratified by age in a nationwide CABG cohort. METHODS: All patients who...... underwent isolated CABG from 1996 to 2012 in Denmark were identified through nationwide registers. The cumulative incidence of admission to a nursing home after CABG was estimated. A Cox regression model was constructed to identify predictors for living in a nursing home 1 year after CABG. Kaplan...

  15. Home visits as a strategy for health promotion by nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jucelia Salgueiro Nascimento

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the domiciliary visit performed by nurses in the Family Health Strategy as an activity to promote health. Methods: Exploratory/descriptive study with qualitative approach. The subjects were nine nurses of the Primary Health Units from Health Districts in Maceió-AL. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews in the months from April to August 2012 and were analyzed using content analysis and in light of the theoretical framework of Health Promotion. Results: The nurses recognize that the domiciliary visit can be a way to promote the health of individuals, families and community, but, in daily life, action maintains focus on disease, with curative actions of individual character, which do not take into account the social context where the user and his family are inserted. Conclusion: It is considered that the use of home visits by nurses in the family health strategy as a health promotion activity is still incipient because, although the nurses recognize the need for change in the model of care, in practice, it is observed that the focus of this action is directed to the biological model. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5020/18061230.2013.p513

  16. The Effect of Self-Transcendence on Depression in Cognitively Intact Nursing Home Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Gørill Haugan; Siw Tone Innstrand

    2012-01-01

    Aims. This study's aim was to test the effects of self-transcendence on depression among cognitively intact nursing home patients. Background. Depression is considered the most frequent mental disorder among the elderly population. Specifically, the depression rate among nursing home patients is three to four times higher than that among community-dwelling elderly. Therefore, finding new and alternative ways to prevent and decrease depression is of great importance for nursing home patients' ...

  17. Use of nursing homes by a high-risk long-term care population.

    OpenAIRE

    Manheim, L M; Hughes, S.L.

    1986-01-01

    Limited information exists concerning lifetime use of nursing home services by the aged. This article examines the longitudinal experience, over four years, of elderly individuals at high risk of institutionalization, and develops a simple model of nursing home use based on these observations. This model allows us to predict future lifetime use under alternative assumptions. The main observations drawn from this sample are that high-risk elderly tend to move from the community to nursing home...

  18. Impact of educational intervention on prescribing inappropriate medication to elderly nursing homes residents

    OpenAIRE

    Ilić Darko; Bukumirić Zoran; Janković Slobodan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Problems with polypharmacy, adverse drug reactions and non-adherence are especially frequent among elderly nursing home residents. Objective. The aim of our study was to evaluate effectiveness of a specific form of staff education on appropriateness of prescribing in a cluster of nursing homes for the elderly. Methods. The study was designed as before-and-after trial of educational intervention on appropriateness of prescribing in nursing home...

  19. The nutritional situation in Swedish nursing homes - a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgström Bolmsjö, Beata; Jakobsson, Ulf; Mölstad, Sigvard; Ostgren, Carl Johan; Midlöv, Patrik

    2015-01-01

    Poor nutritional status is widespread among the elderly and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to longitudinally describe the nutritional status in elderly people living in nursing homes. Nutritional status was recorded longitudinally in elderly people living in 11 different nursing homes in Sweden. Participants were examined at baseline by specially trained nurses who also assisted with questionnaires and collected data for current medical treatment from patient records. Nutritional status was evaluated at baseline and after 24 months with the mini nutritional assessment (MNA). The study included 318 subjects. The mean age of the participants was 85.0 years (range 65-101). At baseline, 41.6% were well nourished, 40.3% at risk of malnutrition, and 17.7% malnourished according to the MNA. Survival was significantly lower in the malnourished group. After 24 months, almost half of the population had died. The group of participants who survived at 24 months represents a population of better nutritional state, where 10.6% were malnourished at baseline increasing to 24.6% after 24 months. After 24 months, 38.7% of the participants showed a decline in nutritional state. The group with deteriorating MNA scores had higher weight, BMI values, and a higher hospitalization rate. The prevalence of malnutrition in nursing home residents increased over time and it is important to evaluate nutritional state regularly. Nutritional interventions should be considered in better nourished groups, as well as in malnourished individuals, to prevent a decline in nutritional state.

  20. 77 FR 26183 - Technical Revisions To Update Reference to the Required Assessment Tool for State Nursing Homes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-03

    ... Tool for State Nursing Homes Receiving Per Diem Payments From VA AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs... State homes that receive per diem from VA for providing nursing home care to veterans. It requires State nursing homes receiving per diem from VA to use the most recent version of the Centers for Medicare...

  1. Job and organizational determinants of nursing home employee commitment, job satisfaction and intent to turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsh, B; Booske, B C; Sainfort, F

    2005-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether job characteristics, the work environment, participation in quality improvement activities and facility quality improvement environment predicted employee commitment and job satisfaction in nursing homes, and whether those same predictors and commitment and satisfaction predicted turnover intention. A total of 6,584 nursing home employees from 76 nursing homes in a midwestern state participated. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect the data. The results supported the hypotheses that job and organizational factors predicted commitment and satisfaction while commitment and satisfaction predicted turnover intentions. The implications for retaining nursing home employees are discussed.

  2. Compensation of home health, public health, and hospital nurses. Extrinsic and intrinsic rewards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, K K; Marcantonio, R J

    1991-11-01

    Despite the proliferation of home health agencies and increased numbers of nurses working in these settings, little is known about home health nurses or how they might differ from their public health and hospital counterparts. The authors discuss differences in monetary compensation and skill usage, as well as the relationship between compensation and retention, among hospital, home health, and public health staff nurses. The results show that these nurses receive different intrinsic and extrinsic rewards and that their reasons for remaining with their employers are similar, yet unique. Implications for nurse administrators and educators are discussed, along with recommendations for further research.

  3. Association between pneumonia and oral care in nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Solh, Ali A

    2011-06-01

    Pneumonia remains the leading cause of death in nursing home residents. The accumulation of dental plaque and colonization of oral surfaces and dentures with respiratory pathogens serves as a reservoir for recurrent lower respiratory tract infections. Control of gingivitis and dental plaques has been effective in reducing the rate of pneumonia but the provision of dental care for institutionalized elderly is inadequate, with treatment often sought only when patients experience pain or denture problems. Direct mechanical cleaning is thwarted by the lack of adequate training of nursing staff and residents' uncooperativeness. Chlorhexidine-based interventions are advocated as alternative methods for managing the oral health of frail older people; however, efficacy is yet to be demonstrated in randomized controlled trials. Development and maintenance of an oral hygiene program is a critical step in the prevention of pneumonia. While resources may be limited in long-term-care facilities, incorporating oral care in daily routine practice helps to reduce systemic diseases and to promote overall quality of life in nursing home residents.

  4. Nightingale Nursing Home, Lowville, Ahascragh, Ballinasloe, Galway.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boland, Michael

    2012-05-14

    AbstractIntroductionRivaroxaban, a new oral anticoagulant, is currently licensed for use in patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. It is more efficacious than other anticoagulants such as low molecular weight heparin and does not require daily monitoring. It has also been shown to be efficacious in patients with venous thromboembolism and acute coronary syndrome. Although hemorrhage is a known side effect of this new anticoagulant, we could find no case reports in the literature of patients suffering severe hemorrhage whilst taking rivaroxaban. Thus, we describe the first case of potentially fatal hemorrhage in a patient taking rivaroxaban.Case presentationWe report the case of a 58-year-old Caucasian man with acute-onset severe per rectal bleeding who had undergone total hip arthroplasty four weeks prior to the onset of symptoms and was taking rivaroxaban in the postoperative period. Rivaroxaban was discontinued immediately but, having required nine units of packed red blood cells in a peripheral hospital due to a rapidly decreasing hemoglobin level, our patient was transferred to our tertiary referral center where he required a further eight units of packed red blood cells over a 48-hour period to manage his ongoing hemorrhage and maintain hemodynamic stability. No source of bleeding was found on computed tomography angiography and our patient’s condition improved over the following 48 hours with cessation of the hemorrhage. Our patient was discharged home well several days later. A follow-up colonoscopy one week after his discharge was normal.ConclusionAlthough advantageous with regard to its oral availability and ongoing use without the need for daily monitoring, rivaroxaban does not come without rare but severe side effects. When severe per rectal bleeding occurs in a patient taking rivaroxaban, discontinuation of the offending agent and aggressive hematological replacement are the mainstays of treatment, especially when no source of bleeding can be found

  5. Nursing Homes That Increased The Proportion Of Medicare Days Achieved Gains In Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepore, Michael; Leland, Natalie E.

    2017-01-01

    Nursing homes are increasingly serving short-stay rehabilitation residents under Medicare skilled nursing facility coverage, which is substantially more generous than Medicaid coverage for long-stay residents. In relation to increasing short-stay resident care, potential exists for beneficial or detrimental effects on long-stay resident outcomes. We employ panel multivariate regression analyses using facility fixed-effects models to determine how increasing the proportion of Medicare days in nursing homes relates to changes in quality outcomes for long-stay residents. We find increasing the proportion of Medicare days in a nursing home is significantly associated with improved quality outcomes for long-stay residents. Findings reinforce prior research indicating that quality outcomes tend to be superior in nursing homes with greater financial resources. This study bolsters arguments for financial investments in nursing homes, including increases in Medicaid payment rates, to support better care. PMID:26643633

  6. Examining differences in nurses' language, accent, and comprehensibility in nursing home settings based on birth origin and country of education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Laura M; Brush, Barbara L; Castle, Nicholas G; Eaton, Michelle; Capezuti, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    As nursing homes turn abroad to fill vacancies, the diverse linguistic backgrounds of nurse hires are creating new challenges in comprehensibility between nurses, providers, and residents. Accents are a natural part of spoken language that may present difficulty even when the parties involved are speaking the same language. We surveyed 1,629 nurses working in 98 nursing homes (NHs) in five U.S. states to determine if and how language difficulties were perceived by nurses and others (e.g. physicians, residents and family members). We found that when participants were asked how often other care team members and residents/families had difficulty understanding them due to language use or accent, foreign born nurses were significantly more likely to report that they experienced difficulty at least some of the time across all groups. This study supports an assessment of nurses' language, accents, and comprehensibility in these settings.

  7. A three perspective study of the sense of home of nursing home residents: the views of residents, care professionals and relatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoof, Joost van; Verbeek, H.; Janssen, B.M.; Eijkelenboom, A.; Felix, E.; Nieboer, K.A.; Zwerts-Verhelst, E.L.M.; Sijstermans, J.J.W.M.; Wouters, Eveline

    2016-01-01

    Background The sense of home of nursing home residents is a multifactorial phenomenon which is important for the quality of living. This purpose of this study is to investigate the factors influencing the sense of home of older adults residing in the nursing home from the perspective of residents, r

  8. Effects of Green House nursing homes on residents' families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Terry Y; Kane, Rosalie A; Cutler, Lois J; Yu, Tzy-Chyi

    2008-01-01

    A longitudinal quasi-experimental study with two comparison groups was conducted to test the effects of a Green House (GH) nursing home program on residents' family members. The GHs are individual residences, each serving 10 elders, where certified nursing assistant (CNA)-level resident assistants form primary relationships with residents and family, family is encouraged to visits, and professionals adapted their roles to support the model. GH family were somewhat less involved in providing assistance to their residents although family contact did not differ among the settings at any time period. GH family were more satisfied with their resident's care and with their own experience as family members, and had no greater family burden. Issues in studying family outcomes are discussed as well as implications for roles of various personnel, including social service and activities staff in a GH model.

  9. Current marketing practices in the nursing home sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Judith G; Banaszak-Holl, Jane; Hearld, Larry R

    2006-01-01

    Marketing is widely recognized as an essential business function across all industries, including healthcare. While many long-term care facilities adopted basic healthcare marketing practices and hired marketing staff by the early 1990s, a paucity of research on nursing home marketing exists in the literature. This study examines the extent to which nursing homes have developed more formulated marketing and related communication and promotional strategies as market competition has increased in this sector during the past two decades. In addition, we explored managers' perceptions of their control over marketing decision making, the impact of competition on the use of marketing practices, and areas for enhanced competitive positioning. Administrators from 230 nursing homes in 18 Southeastern Michigan counties were surveyed regarding (1) the adoption level of approximately 40 literature-based, best-practice marketing strategies; (2) the types of staff involved with the marketing function; and (3) their perception of their level of control over marketing functions and of local competition. Results from 101 (44 percent) survey participants revealed that although respondents viewed their markets as highly competitive, their marketing practices remained focused on traditional and relatively constrained practices. In relation to the importance of customer relationship management, the majority of the administrators reported intensive efforts being focused on residents and their families, referrers, and staff, with minimal efforts being extended to insurers and other types of payers. A significant positive relation was found between the intensity of marketing initiatives and the size of the facility (number of beds), whereas significant negative correlations were revealed in relation to occupancy and the perceived level of control over the function.

  10. Physicians in Nursing Homes: Effectiveness of Physician Accountability and Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Julie C; Intrator, Orna; Wetle, Terrie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To develop a measure of the perceptions of nursing home (NH) Directors of Nursing (DON) on the adequacy of physician care and to examine its variation as well as its construct validity. Design A nationwide cross-sectional study with primary data collection Setting 2043 NHs surveyed August 2009 – April 2011 Participants Directors of Nursing (DONs) and NH Administrators responded to questions pertaining to their perceptions of the care provided by physicians in their NH. Measurements Ten items were used to create three domains: medical staff attentiveness, physician communication, and staff concerns about physician practice. These were combined into an overall summary score measure called “Effectiveness of Physician Accountability and Communication” (EPAC). EPAC construct validity was ascertained from other DON questions and from a complementary survey of NH Administrators. RESULTS The established EPAC score is the first measure to capture specific components of the adequacy of physician care in NHs. EPAC exhibited good construct validity: more effective practices were correlated with greater physician involvement in discussions of Do-Not-Resuscitate orders, the frequency that the Medical Director checked on the medical care delivered by attending physician, the tightness of nursing home's control of its physician resources, and the DON's perception of whether or not avoidable hospitalizations and ER visits could be reduced with greater physician attention to resident needs. Conclusion As increased attention is given to the quality of care provided to vulnerable elders, effective measures of processes of care are essential. The EPAC measure provides an important new metric that can be used in these efforts. The goal is that future studies could use EPAC and its individual domains to shed light on the manner through which physician presence is related to resident outcomes in the NH setting. PMID:25858283

  11. [Behavior profile of psychogeriatric patients in substitute care projects: nursing home care and home for the aged].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boom-Poels, P G

    1994-03-01

    This article describes behaviour profiles of psychogeriatric patients participating in some substitute care projects. The behaviour of 55 patients from five residential homes participating in these projects were rated on the Behaviour Rating Scale for Psychogeriatric Inpatients (GIP). These data were compared with GIP-data of two reference groups: elderly people in residential homes and patients in psychogeriatric nursing homes (supervision, intensive care and nursing care requiring patients). Patients in the projects have, compared to the other people in residential homes, more cognitive and social disabilities. Compared to the patients in nursing homes, the patients in the projects have less social, cognitive and psychomotor disabilities, but more emotional problems, like suspicious, melancholic and dependent behaviour. These results show that patients in substitute care projects have a specific behaviour profile. The profile can be used for careful selection of patients in these projects.

  12. Health smart home for elders - a tool for automatic recognition of activities of daily living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Xuan Hoa Binh; Di Mascolo, Maria; Gouin, Alexia; Noury, Norbert

    2008-01-01

    Elders live preferently in their own home, but with aging comes the loss of autonomy and associated risks. In order to help them live longer in safe conditions, we need a tool to automatically detect their loss of autonomy by assessing the degree of performance of activities of daily living. This article presents an approach enabling the activities recognition of an elder living alone in a home equipped with noninvasive sensors.

  13. Influenza Vaccination in dutch Nursing Homes: is tacit consent morally justified?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, M.F.; Hoven, M.A. van den

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: Efficient procedures for obtaining informed (proxy) consent may contribute to high influenza vaccination rates in nursing homes. Yet are such procedures justified? This study’s objective was to gain insight in informed consent policies in Dutch nursing homes; to assess how these may affe

  14. Inservice Education: Consultation and Related Services for Nursing Home Personnel. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Hospital Fund of New York, NY.

    A project to demonstrate how a team of instructor/consultants could function on a regional basis to help upgrade inservice education programs in nursing homes was conducted. The design of this Nursing Home Training Program was structured to allow for changes in demonstrated services in accordance with reactions of participants. An advisory and an…

  15. Nursing Home Residents vs. Researcher: Establishing Their Needs while Finding Your Way

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun-Pedersen, Jon Ram

    2017-01-01

    Residents at nursing homes need to exercise to retain self-efficacy. But all the while, many do not seem to want to prioritize exercise routines over leisure activities. The first part of this chapter analyzes the potential reasons for this lack of exercise commitment at a nursing home in Copenha...

  16. Effectiveness of Advanced Illness Care Teams for Nursing Home Residents with Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Dennis G.; Toseland, Ronald W.

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of advanced illness care teams (AICTs) for nursing home residents with advanced dementia. The AICTs used a holistic approach that focused on four domains: (1) medical, (2) meaningful activities, (3) psychological, and (4) behavioral. The authors recruited 118 residents in two nursing homes for this study and…

  17. Teaching a Course in Abnormal Psychology and Behavior Intervention Skills for Nursing Home Aides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenwick, David S.; Slutzsky, Mitchel R.; Garfinkel, Eric

    2001-01-01

    Describes an 11-week course given at a nursing home to nursing home aides that focused on abnormal psychology and behavior intervention skills. Discusses the course goals, class composition, and course description. Addresses the problems and issues encountered with teaching this course to a nontraditional population in an unconventional setting.…

  18. [Study on knowledge and practices related to malnutrition in the elderly to the nursing home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brys, Mélissa; Coppieters, Yves; De Breucker, Sandra

    2014-12-01

    The prevalence of malnutrition in nursing homes varies between 50% and 90% in Belgium. There are multiple causes of malnutrition and one of the consequences is the impact on the workload of nursing home staff. The purpose of this study is to better understand the knowledge and the practices of the nursing home staff who would influence the nutritional status of elderly in nursing homes. This study is divided into a quantitative approach with a self-administered questionnaire and a qualitative approach by non-participant observation. We observed that 29% of nursing home staff have good knowledge about the malnutrition and that 64% have good practices in providing nutrition to the elderly. People with good knowledge tend to have better practices. 38% of the nursing home staff engage in continued professional development in the field. There is no systematic screening, nutritional assessment and nutritional intervention in nursing homes. It is of great importance to ensure nursing home staff are aware of this problem through training.

  19. Predictors of neuropsychiatric symptoms in nursing home patients : influence of gender and dementia severity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, Sytse U; de Jonghe, Jos F M; Verhey, Frans R J; Koopmans, Raymond T C M

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of the study was to assess the influence of dementia severity and gender on neuropsychiatric symptoms in demented nursing home patients. METHODS: Neuropsychiatric symptoms were assessed in a large sample of 1319 Dutch nursing home patients using the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation In

  20. Organizational and Individual Conditions Associated with Depressive Symptoms among Nursing Home Residents over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassie, Kimberly M.; Cassie, William E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the effect of organizational culture and climate on depressive symptoms among nursing home residents. Design and Methods: Using a pooled cross-sectional design, this study examines a sample of 23 nursing homes, 1,114 employees, and 5,497 residents. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Minimum Data Set, Depression Rating…

  1. Relationships of Assertiveness, Depression, and Social Support Among Older Nursing Home Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    This study assessed the relationships of assertiveness, depression, and social support among nursing home residents. The sample included 50 older nursing home residents (mean age=75 years; 75% female; 92% Caucasian). There was a significant correlation between assertiveness and depression (r=-.33), but the correlations between social support and…

  2. BE-ACTIV: A Staff-Assisted Behavioral Intervention for Depression in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, Suzanne; Looney, Stephen W.; Van Haitsma, Kimberly; Teri, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This article (a) describes a 10-week, behavioral, activities-based intervention for depression that can be implemented in nursing homes collaboratively with nursing home activities staff and (b) presents data related to its development, feasibility, and preliminary outcomes. Design and Methods: We developed BE-ACTIV, which stands for…

  3. Course of neuropsychiatric symptoms in residents with dementia in nursing homes over 2-year period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetzels, Roland B; Zuidema, Sytse U; de Jonghe, Jos F M; Verhey, Frans R J; Koopmans, Raymond T C M

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the course of neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPSs) in nursing home residents with dementia and to determine their variability across diagnosis. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study over 2 years. SETTING: Fourteen dementia special care units in nine nursing homes in The Netherlands. P

  4. Prevalence and risk indicators of depression in elderly nursing home patients : the AGED study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongenelis, K; Eisses, AMH; Beekman, ATF; Kluiter, H; Ribbe, MW

    2004-01-01

    Background: Depression is a common and disabling psychiatric disorder in later life. Particular frail nursing home patients seem to be at increased risk. Nursing home-based studies on risk indicators of depression are scarce. Methods: Prevalence and risk indicators of depression were assessed in 333

  5. Patients' Perceptions of Nursing Home Stress Related to Quality of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Shayna; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined whether newly admitted nursing home patients' anticipated stresses of institutional care would relate to their experiences of stress one and three months later, and whether patients' experiences of stress would correspond to independent judgments of the quality of the nursing homes. Patients experienced the kinds of stresses they…

  6. Cross-national comparison of prescribing patterns in Australian and dutch nursing homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taxis, Katja; Kochen, Sjoerd; Geerens, Sanne; Wouters, Hans; Boersma, Froukje; Maring, Jan G.; Mulder, Hans; Pavlovic, Jugoslav; Stevens, Gerard; McLachlan, Andrew J.; Pont, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Prescribing quality is a major issue in nursing home patients. Few cross-national comparisons of prescribing patterns have been carried out in this population. Objectives: To compare prevalence of medication use in nursing home patients between Australia and The Netherlands. Methods: An

  7. [The handling of acute life-threatening choking in geriatric and nursing home patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelgeest, A. van; Melis, R.J.F.; Ritmeijer, C.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.

    2006-01-01

    It is unknown how often choking occurs in geriatric wards and in nursing homes and what the treatment and outcomes are in regular practice. A questionnaire was sent to Dutch geriatricians (N = 130), nursing home physicians (N = 130), and trainees for these disciplines (N = 215), in order to gain inf

  8. 75 FR 39641 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Civil Money Penalties for Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-12

    ... and Medicaid Programs; Civil Money Penalties for Nursing Homes AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid... when nursing homes are not in compliance with Federal participation requirements in accordance with the... certified as meeting Federal participation requirements. Long-term care facilities include skilled...

  9. Psychometric Properties of a Korean Measure of Person-Directed Care in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae-Sung; Lee, Minhong

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the validity and reliability of a person-directed care (PDC) measure for nursing homes in Korea. Method: Managerial personnel from 223 nursing homes in 2010 and 239 in 2012 were surveyed. Results: Item analysis and exploratory factor analysis for the first sample generated a 33-item PDC measure with eight factors.…

  10. Diagnostic accuracy of Parkinson's disease and atypical parkinsonism in nursing homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerkamp, N. J.; Tissingh, G.; Poels, P. J. E.; Zuidema, S. U.; Munneke, M.; Koopmans, R. T. C. M.; Bloem, B. R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Management of Parkinson's disease (PD) and atypical parkinsonism in nursing homes depends on a timely and accurate diagnosis. However, little is known about the diagnostic accuracy of these parkinsonian syndromes in nursing homes. We examined this issue in a large group of Dutch nursin

  11. Evidence-Based Health Promotion in Nursing Homes: A Pilot Intervention to Improve Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadet, Tamara J.; Berrett-Abebe, Julie; Burke, Shanna L.; Bakk, Louanne; Kalenderian, Elsbeth; Maramaldi, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Nursing home residents over the age of 65 years are at high risk for poor oral health and related complications such as pneumonia and adverse diabetes outcomes. A preliminary study found that Massachusetts' nursing homes generally lack the training and resources needed to provide adequate oral health care to residents. In this study, an…

  12. Family Support in Nursing Homes Serving Residents with a Mental Health History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frahm, Kathryn; Gammonley, Denise; Zhang, Ning Jackie; Paek, Seung Chun

    2010-01-01

    Using 2003 nursing home data from the Minimum Data Set (MDS) database, this study investigated the role of family support among nursing homes serving residents with a mental health history. Exploratory factor analysis was used to create and test a conceptual model of family support using indicators located within the MDS database. Families were…

  13. Improved education and training for nursing assistants: keys to promoting the mental health of nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaister, Judy A; Blair, Charles

    2008-08-01

    The mental health of older adults contributes to their overall well-being. However, numerous studies have reported substantial prevalence of mental health problems, especially depression, in nursing home residents. Due to the poor quality of education and training provided to nursing home front-line caregivers, most of whom are nursing assistants, many residents experiencing depression are not recognized as such and consequently receive no treatment. Emphasizing the aging process and mental health components in education and training programs for nursing assistants could have a positive impact on the detection and treatment of depression in residents.

  14. Hospice family members’ perceptions and experiences with end-of-life care in the nursing home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Karla; Kruse, Robin L.; Albright, David L; Lewis, Alexandria; Demiris, George

    2014-01-01

    Objective Despite the fact that more than 25% of Americans die in nursing homes, end-of-life care has consistently been found to be less than adequate in this setting. Even for those residents on hospice, end-of-life care has been found to be problematic. This study had two research questions; 1) How do family members of hospice nursing home residents differ in their anxiety, depression, quality of life, social networks, perceptions of pain medication, and health compared to family members of community dwelling hospice patients? 2) What are family members’ perceptions of and experiences with end-of-life care in the nursing home setting? Methods This study is a secondary mixed methods analysis of interviews with family members of hospice nursing home residents and a comparative statistical analysis of standard outcome measures between family members of hospice patients in the nursing home and family member of hospice patients residing in the community. Results Outcome measures for family members of nursing home residents were compared (n=176) with family members of community dwelling hospice patients (n=267). The family members of nursing home residents reported higher quality of life however, levels of anxiety, depression, perceptions of pain medicine, and health were similar for hospice family members in the nursing home and in the community. Lending an understanding to the stress for hospice family members of nursing home residents concerns were found with collaboration between the nursing home and the hospice, nursing home care that did not meet family expectations, communication problems, and resident care concerns including pain management. Some family members reported positive end-of-life care experiences in the nursing home setting. Conclusion These interviews identify a multitude of barriers to quality end-of-life care in the nursing home setting, and demonstrate that support for family members is an essential part of quality end-of-life care for

  15. Analgesic medication errors in North Carolina nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Rishi J; Williams, Charrlotte E; Greene, Sandra B; Pierson, Stephanie; Caprio, Anthony J; Hansen, Richard A

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize analgesic medication errors and to evaluate their association with patient harm. The authors conducted a cross-sectional analysis of individual medication error incidents reported by North Carolina nursing homes to the Medication Error Quality Initiative (MEQI) during fiscal years 2010-2011. Bivariate associations between analgesic medication errors with patient factors, error-related factors, and impact on patients were tested with chi-square tests. A multivariate logistic regression model explored the relationship between type of analgesic medication errors and patient harm, controlling for patient- and error-related factors. A total of 32,176 individual medication error incidents were reported over a 2-year period in North Carolina nursing homes, 12.3% (n = 3949) of which were analgesic medication errors. Of these analgesic medication errors, opioid and nonopioid analgesics were involved in 3105 and 844 errors, respectively. Opioid errors were more likely to be wrong drug errors, wrong dose errors, and administration errors compared with nonopioid errors (P errors were found to have higher odds of patient harm compared with nonopioid errors (odds ratio [OR] = 3, 95% confodence interval [CI]: 1.1-7.8). The authors conclude that opioid analgesics represent the majority of analgesic error reports, and these error reports reflect an increased likelihood of patient harm compared with nonopioid analgesics.

  16. Respecting the Aging Self: Communication in the Nursing Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Tinney

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article draws on findings of an ethnographic nursing home study that explores the role of communication in maintaining residents’ sense of self. These findings suggest that the nursing home can be a site for recovery for the aging self, despite loss and bereavement and the negative effects on self-esteem of pain, illness and loss of function. However, where care privileges the body over social and emotional needs, residents have inadequate opportunities for communication essential to make sense of being old and in care. The key to sustaining the aging self is empathetic communication that recognizes the individuality and value of each older person, no matter how reduced by present illness or incapacity, and at the same time respects residents’ rights of choice and personal control. Harried staff, often well-intentioned but unsupported by management, carry an unfair burden. Frequently called upon to do more with less, they find themselves faced with the competing pressures of work routines and residents’ emotional needs. In trying to balance these competing needs and provide opportunities for residents to exert personal control over their lives, they must protect both the residents and themselves from the results of “wrong” choices.

  17. Spiritual Needs of Elderly Living in Residential/Nursing Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora-Beata Erichsen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available While the research on spiritual needs of patients with chronic and life-threatening diseases increases, there is limited knowledge about psychosocial and spiritual needs of elderly living in residential/nursing homes. We were interested in which needs were of relevance at all, and how these needs are related to life satisfaction and mood states. For that purpose we enrolled 100 elderly living in residential/nursing homes (mean age years, 82% women and provided standardized questionnaires, that is, Spiritual Needs Questionnaire (SpNQ, Brief Multidimensional Life Satisfaction Scale (BMLSS, Quality of Life in Elders with Multimorbidity (FLQM questionnaire, and a mood states scale (ASTS. Religious needs and Existential needs were of low relevance, while inner peace needs were of some and needs for giving/generativity of highest relevance. Regression analyses revealed that the specific needs were predicted best by religious trust and mood states, particularly tiredness. However, life satisfaction and quality of life were not among the significant predictors. Most had the intention to connect with those who will remember them, although they fear that there is limited interest in their concerns. It remains an open issue how these unmet needs can be adequately supported.

  18. Durham Nursing Home solar project: a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swartman, R.K.; Ali, T. [Solcan Ltd., London, ON (Canada)

    2004-08-01

    Based on an earlier report indicating that an optimal match for solar energy applications is to preheat hot water used in nursing homes, this paper discusses the construction of a solar water pre-heating system at the Rockwood Terrace Nursing Home in Durham, Ontario. Performance of the system, costs and financial viability are predicted with the use of the RETScreen project management tool. In addition, system requirements and load and energy requirements are also taken into consideration with this tool, thereby ensuring the unique nature of each project. Thirty solar collectors were mounted on steel racks 3 stories above the mechanical room. A heat exchanger, heated by antifreeze, circulates to and from the solar collectors. Potable water is circulated from hot water storage tanks to the heat exchanger. Solar pre-heated water is then piped into a hot water storage tank, with a gas fired water heater heating potable hot water in a recirculation loop. The paper concludes that both Watsun 13.2 and RETScreen are both good predictive tools, having only exceeded actual measured performances of the system and its energy savings by 8 and 9 per cent respectively. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Where should Momma go? Current nursing home performance measurement strategies and a less ambitious approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lieberman Trudy

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nursing home performance measurement systems are practically ubiquitous. The vast majority of these systems aspire to rank order all nursing homes based on quantitative measures of quality. However, the ability of such systems to identify homes differing in quality is hampered by the multidimensional nature of nursing homes and their residents. As a result, the authors doubt the ability of many nursing home performance systems to truly help consumers differentiate among homes providing different levels of quality. We also argue that, for consumers, performance measurement models are better at identifying problem facilities than potentially good homes. Discussion In response to these concerns we present a proposal for a less ambitious approach to nursing home performance measurement than previously used. We believe consumers can make better informed choice using a simpler system designed to pinpoint poor-quality nursing homes, rather than one designed to rank hundreds of facilities based on differences in quality-of-care indicators that are of questionable importance. The suggested performance model is based on five principles used in the development of the Consumers Union 2006 Nursing Home Quality Monitor. Summary We can best serve policy-makers and consumers by eschewing nursing home reporting systems that present information about all the facilities in a city, a state, or the nation on a website or in a report. We argue for greater modesty in our efforts and a focus on identifying only the potentially poorest or best homes. In the end, however, it is important to remember that information from any performance measurement website or report is no substitute for multiple visits to a home at different times of the day to personally assess quality.

  20. Association between subjective memory complaints and nursing home placement: a four-year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldorff, Frans Boch; Siersma, Volkert; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2009-01-01

    nursing home placements were observed. Subjective memory complaints were associated with an adjusted Hazard Ratio (HR) of 2.59 for nursing home placement. Other statistical significant covariates were MMSE depression......OBJECTIVE: In order to evaluate whether elderly persons with subjective memory complaints may be regarded as a group of potentially vulnerable patients who need close follow-up, we investigated the risk of nursing home placement during a 4-year follow-up period. METHODS: Prospective cohort survey...... with 4-year follow-up in general practice. Cox proportional hazard models were used to examine the influence of risk factors on nursing home placement. RESULTS: A total 758 non-nursing home residents aged 65 years and older consulted the General Practitioners in October and November 2002 of whom 50...

  1. Drivers of change: Learning from the lived experiences of nursing home social workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ahyoung Anna; Lee, Sharon Narae; Armour, Marilyn

    2016-01-01

    In response to the growing attention to integrated health care and the cultural change movement in nursing homes, this study examines the lived experiences of nursing home social workers to better understand their role perceptions, job satisfaction, and relationship with other staff members. Hermeneutic phenomenology was used in order to understand the lived experience of being a nursing home social worker. Ten nursing home social workers were recruited from a southern state and individual interviews were conducted. From the interviews, four themes emerged: challenge, coping, mattering, and rewarding. Guided by identity negotiation theory and social identity theory, these findings are discussed. Also, implications for social work education, nursing home administration, and policy is discussed.

  2. Competitive spillovers across non-profit and for-profit nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, David C; Hirth, Richard A

    2003-01-01

    The importance of non-profit institutions in the health care sector has generated a vast empirical literature examining quality differences between non-profit and for-profit nursing homes. Recent theoretical work has emphasized that much of this empirical literature is flawed in that previous studies rely solely on dummy variables to capture the effects of ownership rather than accounting for the share of non-profit nursing homes in the market. This analysis considers whether competitive spillovers from non-profits lead to higher quality in for-profit nursing homes. Using instrumental variables to account for the potential endogeneity of non-profit market share, this study finds that an increase in non-profit market share improves for-profit and overall nursing home quality. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that non-profits serve as a quality signal for uninformed nursing home consumers.

  3. Expressing sexuality in nursing homes. The experience of older women: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Ceña, Domingo; Martínez-Piedrola, Rosa María; Pérez-de-Heredia, Marta; Huertas-Hoyas, Elisabet; Carrasco-Garrido, Pilar; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, Cesar

    In nursing homes, a number of barriers to the expression of sexuality exist, such as the lack of privacy, certain attitudes on behalf of the staff and the family, the lack of a sexual partner, and physical limitations. The aim of this study was to describe the lived experience of sexuality in elderly Spanish women residing in nursing homes. A qualitative phenomenological approach was followed. Data were collected over an 18-month period between 2013 and 2015. Purposeful sampling was conducted with Spanish residents in nursing homes in Madrid. Data were collected using unstructured and semi-structured interviews. The data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Twenty female residents participated. Three main themes emerged from the data: a) expressing sexuality, b) sexuality as a duty and c) respecting vows. Female residents reported key elements influencing how they manage their sexuality in Nursing Homes. These results serve to improve our understanding regarding the expression of sexuality in older female nursing home residents.

  4. Geothermal greenhouse-heating facilities for the Klamath County Nursing Home, Klamath Falls, Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-02-01

    The Klamath County Nursing Home, located in Klamath Falls, Oregon, was constructed in 1976. The building of 55,654 square feet currently houses care facilities for approximately 120 persons. During the initial planning for the Nursing Home, the present site was selected primarily on the basis of its geothermal resource. This resource (approx. 190/sup 0/F) currently provides space and domestic hot water heating for the Nursing Home, Merle West Medical Center and the Oregon Institute of Technology. The feasibility of installing a geothermal heating system in a planned greenhouse for the Nursing Home is explored. The greenhouse system would be tied directly to the existing hot water heating system for the Nursing Home.

  5. The environmental design of residential care facilities: A sense of home through the eyes of nursing home residents.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijck-Heinen, C.J.M.L.; Wouters, E.J.M.; Janssen, B.M.; van Hoof, J.

    2014-01-01

    C.J.M.L. van Dijck-Heinen, E.J.M. Wouters, B.M. Janssen, J. van Hoof (2014) The environmental design of residential care facilities: A sense of home through the eyes of nursing home residents. International Journal for Innovative Research in Science & Technology 1(4): 57-69

  6. 38 CFR 17.46 - Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from active military, naval, or air service... Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.46 Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from active military, naval, or air service. (a) In...

  7. Evaluation of the implementation of an 'oral hygiene protocol' in nursing homes: a 5-year longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visschere, L. de; Baat, C. de; Schols, J.M.; Deschepper, E.; Vanobbergen, J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To explore the long-term effects of the implementation of an oral hygiene protocol in nursing homes. METHODS: Out of 14 nursing homes (Flanders) seven nursing homes were randomly allocated to the intervention group and confirmed to implement an 'oral hygiene protocol'. The remaining nurs

  8. Home visits by Family Health Strategy nurses and community health agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Valadão Alves Kebian

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article was to describe the practice of nurses and community health agents within the context of the Family Health Strategy home visits. This is a descriptive study with a qualitative approach. Data collection was performed between January and March of 2010, through semi-structured interviews with eight nurses and seven community health agents from two family health units in the city of Rio de Janeiro. Data were submitted to content analysis. Low interaction was observed between nurses and community health agents in the home visits. Work overload and violence are the main hindrances identified for performing home visits. It was found that the home visit planning was unsystematic. Permanent education should be intensified with the purpose to discuss, following a problem-posing approach, the roles and attributions of each team member in the home visit, as well as the systematization of this activity. Descriptors: Family Health; Nursing; Community Health Workers; Home Visit.

  9. Changes in the personal dignity of nursing home residents: a longitudinal qualitative interview study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariska G Oosterveld-Vlug

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most nursing home residents spend the remainder of their life, until death, within a nursing home. As preserving dignity is an important aim of the care given here, insight into the way residents experience their dignity throughout their entire admission period is valuable. AIM: To investigate if and how nursing home residents' personal dignity changes over the course of time, and what contributes to this. DESIGN: A longitudinal qualitative study. METHODS: Multiple in-depth interviews, with an interval of six months, were carried out with 22 purposively sampled nursing home residents of the general medical wards of four nursing homes in The Netherlands. Transcripts were analyzed following the principles of thematic analysis. RESULTS: From admission onwards, some residents experienced an improved sense of dignity, while others experienced a downward trend, a fluctuating one or no change at all. Two mechanisms were especially important for a nursing home resident to maintain or regain personal dignity: the feeling that one is in control of his life and the feeling that one is regarded as a worthwhile person. The acquirement of both feelings could be supported by 1 finding a way to cope with one's situation; 2 getting acquainted with the new living structures in the nursing home and therefore feeling more at ease; 3 physical improvement (with or without an electric wheelchair; 4 being socially involved with nursing home staff, other residents and relatives; and 5 being amongst disabled others and therefore less prone to exposures of disrespect from the outer world. CONCLUSION: Although the direction in which a resident's personal dignity develops is also dependent on one's character and coping capacities, nursing home staff can contribute to dignity by creating optimal conditions to help a nursing home resident recover feelings of control and of being regarded as a worthwhile person.

  10. Facility characteristics as independent prognostic factors of nursing home-acquired pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Che Wan; Choi, Younghoon; An, Chang Hyeok; Park, Sang Joon; Hwang, Hee-Jin; Chung, Jae Ho; Min, Joo-Won

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Recently, the incidence of nursing home-acquired pneumonia (NHAP) has been increasing and is now the leading cause of death among nursing home residents. This study was performed to identify risk factors associated with NHAP mortality, focusing on facility characteristics. Methods: Data on all patients ≥ 70 years of age admitted with newly diagnosed pneumonia were reviewed. To compare the quality of care in nursing facilities, the following three groups were defined: patients...

  11. Medication administration to the diabetic clients of the Helsinki Deaconess's institute nursing homes : Medication administration

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic clients in nursing care homes are among the most vulnerable members of the society, as they depend on their care home staff for almost all of their entire needs. A combination of complex medical conditions may result in the need to take multiple medications with some taking up to eight medications on average. Medication system in nursing home passes through many steps before it actually reaches the client. This may result in an increase in medication error. The purpose of this st...

  12. The Factors Influencing the Sense of Home in Nursing Homes: A Systematic Review from the Perspective of Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Rijnaard

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To provide an overview of factors influencing the sense of home of older adults residing in the nursing home. Methods. A systematic review was conducted. Inclusion criteria were (1 original and peer-reviewed research, (2 qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods research, (3 research about nursing home residents (or similar type of housing, and (4 research on the sense of home, meaning of home, at-homeness, or homelikeness. Results. Seventeen mainly qualitative articles were included. The sense of home of nursing home residents is influenced by 15 factors, divided into three themes: (1 psychological factors (sense of acknowledgement, preservation of one’s habits and values, autonomy and control, and coping; (2 social factors (interaction and relationship with staff, residents, family and friends, and pets and activities; and (3 the built environment (private space and (quasi-public space, personal belongings, technology, look and feel, and the outdoors and location. Conclusions. The sense of home is influenced by numerous factors related to the psychology of the residents and the social and built environmental contexts. Further research is needed to determine if and how the identified factors are interrelated, if perspectives of various stakeholders involved differ, and how the factors can be improved in practice.

  13. [Raising awareness among freelance nurses of infection prevention in home health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, Fabienne; Touati, Samia

    2013-02-01

    An alternative to conventional hospitalisation, home health care involves technical procedures which can carry a high risk of infection. In the home, infection prevention is a central element of safety of care. A home health care structure in the Lille region is working to raise awareness among freelance nursing partners and encourage them to follow a quality improvement approach.

  14. 77 FR 64386 - Agency Information Collection Activities (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-19

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection Activities (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State Homes; Per Diem for Adult Day Care of Veterans in State Homes) Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans Health... day health services care to Veterans. VA requires facilities providing nursing home and adult...

  15. Nurse Preparation and Organizational Support for Supervision of Unlicensed Assistive Personnel in Nursing Homes: A Qualitative Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Elena O.; Young, Heather M.; Mitchell, Pamela H.; Shannon, Sarah E.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Nursing supervision of the routine daily care (e.g., grooming, feeding, and toileting) that is delegated to unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP) is critical to nursing home service delivery. The conditions under which the supervisory role is organized and operationalized at the work-unit level, taking into account workloads, registered…

  16. How to avoid and prevent coercion in nursing homes: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerberg, Elisabeth; Hem, Marit Helene; Førde, Reidun; Pedersen, Reidar

    2013-09-01

    In many Western countries, studies have demonstrated extensive use of coercion in nursing homes, especially towards patients suffering from dementia. This article examines what kinds of strategies or alternative interventions nursing staff in Norway used when patients resist care and treatment and what conditions the staff considered as necessary to succeed in avoiding the use of coercion. The data are based on interdisciplinary focus group interviews with nursing home staff. The study revealed that the nursing home staff usually spent a lot of time trying a wide range of approaches to avoid the use of coercion. The most common strategies were deflecting and persuasive strategies, limiting choices by conscious use of language, different kinds of flexibility and one-to-one care. According to the staff, their opportunities to use alternative strategies effectively are greatly affected by the nursing home's resources, by the organization of care and by the staff's competence.

  17. State of the science: relationship-oriented management practices in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toles, Mark; Anderson, Ruth A

    2011-01-01

    Effective staff interdependence is needed to improve care of older adults in nursing homes. We synthesized research about nursing management practices that help nursing home staff members manage their relationships for better care. We searched PubMed for studies of relationship-oriented management in nursing homes, published in English between 2000 and 2010. We evaluated and synthesized findings from the literature. Thirty-three articles met the inclusion criteria. Analyzing these studies, we identified 3 themes: (a) managing relationships between managers and staff, (b) staff participation in decision-making, and (c) work designs that foster staff interactions. Most studies were descriptive and suggested that relationship-oriented management practices will promote better outcomes. Future intervention research that combines relationship-oriented management and evidenced-based clinical practices will help staff to skillfully manage problems in nursing home care, including complex geriatric syndromes.

  18. Standardised electronic information exchange between nurses in home care and GPs - the medication information processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyngstad, Merete; Melby, Line; Hellesø, Ragnhild

    2012-01-01

    Improving the transfer of medication information between home care nurses and patient's general practitioners (GP) is assessed as essential for ensuring safe care. In this paper, we report on a Norwegian study in which we investigated how home care nurses experienced using standardised electronic messages in their communication with the GPs. Standardised electronic solutions were developed and implemented to resolve gaps in the medication information processes when patients received nursing care in their homes. Data was collected combining focus group interviews and individual interviews with nurses from home care in two municipalities in Norway. The data was analysed using systematic text condensation. We found that the nurses reported mostly advantages, but also some disadvantages regarding accuracy, consistency, availability and efficiency in the medication information process when they used standardised electronic messages. Efforts to refine the electronic messages to achieve better work processes and patient safety should be addressed.

  19. The experiences on dignity from the perspective of the elderly in nursing homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høy, Bente

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore nursing home residents’ practice experiences on dignity in caring situations and everyday life in order to illuminate the significance for a life in dignity. Elderly living in nursing homes are vulnerable which appeal to nursing care ethics and emphasise....... From the literature we have knowledge of how dignity is violated among persons who are sick, weak and helpless; however, the knowledge is limited on how dignity is maintained among vulnerable elderly in nursing homes. A hermeneutic approach was used to interpret the material, which was gathered during...... semi-structured interviews with elderly living in six nursing homes in Scandinavian. A total of 28 interviews were transcribed. The findings will be presented at the conference....

  20. Acute hospital admissions among nursing home residents: a population-based observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamtvedt Gro

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nursing home residents are prone to acute illness due to their high age, underlying illnesses and immobility. We examined the incidence of acute hospital admissions among nursing home residents versus the age-matched community dwelling population in a geographically defined area during a two years period. The hospital stays of the nursing home population are described according to diagnosis, length of stay and mortality. Similar studies have previously not been reported in Scandinavia. Methods The acute hospitalisations of the nursing home residents were identified through ambulance records. These were linked to hospital patient records for inclusion of demographics, diagnosis at discharge, length of stay and mortality. Incidence of hospitalisation was calculated based on patient-time at risk. Results The annual hospital admission incidence was 0.62 admissions per person-year among the nursing home residents and 0.26 among the community dwellers. In the nursing home population we found that dominant diagnoses were respiratory diseases, falls-related and circulatory diseases, accounting for 55% of the cases. The median length of stay was 3 days (interquartile range = 4. The in-hospital mortality rate was 16% and 30 day mortality after discharge 30%. Conclusion Acute hospital admission rate among nursing home residents was high in this Scandinavian setting. The pattern of diagnoses causing the admissions appears to be consistent with previous research. The in-hospital and 30 day mortality rates are high.

  1. Agreeableness and activity engagement in nursing home residents with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Nikki L; Kolanowski, Ann; Kürüm, Esra

    2010-09-01

    Residents with dementia are the least likely to be engaged in the nursing home and often spend most of their time doing nothing at all. However, resident participation in meaningful activities is important to promote both physical and psychological health. Tailoring activities to individual functional abilities and personality preferences improves both the time and level of participation. This pilot study used an analysis of covariance procedure to test the relationship between the personality trait of agreeableness and engagement when activities are ideally tailored to ability and interest. No significant difference was found between the high and low agreeableness groups, indicating that residents were more engaged when activities were individually tailored, regardless of their agreeableness level. Although low agreeableness may pose a challenge when implementing activities for people with dementia, the results of this study suggest that tailoring activities to functional ability and interest may overcome the effects.

  2. Indicators of a new depression diagnosis in nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Lorraine J; Rantz, Marilyn; Petroski, Gregory F

    2011-01-01

    Depression affects approximately 30% to 40% of nursing home residents but frequently goes unrecognized. Using the Missouri Minimum Data Set, we aimed to determine whether changes in clinical status, other than mood changes, were associated with new depression diagnosis in residents 65 and older without a recorded depression diagnosis. Of 127,587 potential participants, 14,371 met inclusion criteria and were not depressed at baseline (Time 0). At the next quarterly assessment (Time 1), 1,342 (9.3%) had acquired a new diagnosis of depression. Residents with new depression were significantly younger and less cognitively impaired. Nearly 30% had a decline in activities of daily living (ADL) performance. The multivariate model predicting depression showed that increased verbal aggression, urinary incontinence, increased pain, weight loss, change in care needs, cognitive decline, and ADL decline significantly increased the likelihood of new depression diagnosis. The pattern of decline identified here may provide additional clues to the presence of underlying depression.

  3. Identity cues and dementia in nursing home intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vézina, Aline; Robichaud, Line; Voyer, Philippe; Pelletier, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the identity cues that family caregivers and healthcare personnel use with seniors living with dementia and living in nursing homes. The identity cues represent biographical knowledge used to stimulate the dementia sufferer, trigger signals and incite interaction. Our grounded approach hinges on three objectives: to identify and categorize identity cues; to document their uses; and to gain a better understanding of their effectiveness. We interviewed nine family caregivers and 12 healthcare workers. Qualitative data indicates that the participants use identity cues that evoke seniors' sociological, relational and individual characteristics. These identity cues play a central role in communication and constitute important information that the family caregivers can share with healthcare personnel. They sustain memory, facilitate care and reinforce seniors' self-value. These results help to define identity, foster a greater role for family caregivers, and constitute a sound basis for the implementation of personalized interventions.

  4. Autonomy among physically frail older people in nursing home settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Mette; Puggaard, Lis

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Experiencing autonomy is recognised to promote health and well-being for all age groups. Perceived lack of control has been found to be detrimental to physical and mental health. There is a lack of evidence-based knowledge elucidating how frail older people in nursing home settings...... participants aged 65 years or older were included in the study. All the participants were restricted in performing at least one P-ADL activity unassisted and had a Mini Mental State Examination-score above 16. Perceived autonomy was measured at baseline, after 12 weeks and after 24 weeks by The Autonomy Sub...... information about the effectiveness of individually tailored programmes according to perceptions of autonomy registered in institutionalised physically frail older people. This will add knowledge to assist response to present and future challenges in relation to health promotion initiatives for this group....

  5. [A motivational approach of cognitive efficiency in nursing home residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, Evelyne; Vivicorsi, Bruno; Altintas, Emin; Guerrien, Alain

    2014-06-01

    Despite a widespread concern with self-determined motivation (behavior is engaged in "out of pleasure" or "out of choice and valued as being important") and psychological adjustment in later life (well-being, satisfaction in life, meaning of life, or self-esteem), very little is known about the existence and nature of the links between self-determined motivation and cognitive efficiency. The aim of the present study was to investigate theses links in nursing home residents in the framework of the Self-determination theory (SDT) (Deci & Ryan, 2002), in which motivational profile of a person is determined by the combination of different kinds of motivation. We hypothesized that self-determined motivation would lead to higher cognitive efficiency. Participants. 39 (32 women and 7 men) elderly nursing home residents (m= 83.6 ± 9.3 year old) without any neurological or psychiatric disorders (DSM IV) or depression or anxiety (Hamilton depression rating scales) were included in the study. Methods. Cognitive efficiency was evaluated by two brief neuropsychological tests, the Mini mental state examination (MMSE) and the Frontal assessment battery (FAB). The motivational profile was assessed by the Elderly motivation scale (Vallerand & 0'Connor, 1991) which includes four subscales assessing self- and non-self determined motivation to engage oneself in different domains of daily life activity. Results. The neuropsychological scores were positively and significantly correlated to self-determined extrinsic motivation (behavior is engaged in "out of choice" and valued as being important), and the global self-determination index (self-determined motivational profile) was the best predictor of the cognitive efficiency. Conclusion. The results support the SDT interest for a qualitative assessment of the motivation of the elderly people and suggest that a motivational approach of cognitive efficiency could help to interpret cognitive performances exhibited during neuropsychological

  6. Residents' Positive and Negative Relationship Networks in a Nursing Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Anne-Nicole S; Low, Lee-Fay; Jeon, Yun-Hee; Brodaty, Henry

    2016-11-01

    Person-centered care involves consideration of long-term care residents' lived experience, including social relationships. The current cross-sectional study investigated co-resident social networks in three units of a 94-bed Australian nursing home, including an 18-bed dementia-specific unit (DSU). Six care staff were interviewed. Chart, self-reported social isolation, and staff-reported social engagement data were collected for 36 residents ages 63 to 94 who consented to full participation. Fifty-five additional residents were included in observations. Median positive-to-negative network size ratios within units were 1.5:1 (Unit 1), 0.7:1 (Unit 3), and 0:1 (DSU). Moderate positive correlations existed between: perceived social support and total positive relationships [ρ(25) = 0.44, p = 0.03]; social withdrawal and total negative relationships [ρ(36) = 0.51, p = 0.002]; and objective social isolation and total negative relationships [ρ(22) = -0.44, p = 0.042]. Number and quality of relationships were associated with resident social withdrawal, perceived support, and isolation. High prevalence of isolation and negative relationships demonstrate the need for interventions. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(11), 9-13.].

  7. Home-based nursing interventions improve knowledge of disease and management in patients with heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina de Oliveira Azzolin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to assess patient knowledge of heart failure by home-based measurement of two NOC Nursing Outcomes over a six-month period and correlate mean outcome indicator scores with mean scores of a heart failure Knowledge Questionnaire.METHODS: in this before-and-after study, patients with heart failure received four home visits over a six-month period after hospital discharge. At each home visit, nursing interventions were implemented, NOC outcomes were assessed, and the Knowledge Questionnaire was administered.RESULTS: overall, 23 patients received home visits. Mean indicator scores for the outcome Knowledge: Medication were 2.27±0.14 at home visit 1 and 3.55±0.16 at home visit 4 (P<0.001; and, for the outcome Knowledge: Treatment Regimen, 2.33±0.13 at home visit 1 and 3.59±0.14 at home visit 4 (P<0.001. The correlation between the Knowledge Questionnaire and the Nursing Outcomes Classification scores was strong at home visit 1 (r=0.7, P<0.01, but weak and non significant at visit 4.CONCLUSION: the results show improved patient knowledge of heart failure and a strong correlation between Nursing Outcomes Classification indicator scores and Knowledge Questionnaire scores. The NOC Nursing Outcomes proved effective as knowledge assessment measures when compared with the validated instrument.

  8. Aspects of indignity in nursing home residences as experienced by family caregivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nåden, Dagfinn; Høy, Bente; Lohne, Vibeke;

    2013-01-01

    The overall purpose of this cross-country Nordic study was to gain further knowledge about maintaining and promoting dignity in nursing home residents. The purpose of this article is to present results pertaining to the following question: How is nursing home residents' dignity maintained, promoted...... or deprived from the perspective of family caregivers? In this article, we focus only on indignity in care. This study took place at six different nursing home residences in Sweden, Denmark and Norway. Data collection methods in this part of this study consisted of individual research interviews. Altogether...

  9. The relationship between weight status and the need for health care assistance in nursing home residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne Marie

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between underweight status and weight loss events on the need for health care assistance among a sample of Danish nursing home residents over 12-months. Design: Longitudinal, repeated measures design with three data collection ...... of this study suggest that elderly nursing home residents with a low BMI or weight loss may add to the substantial and costly burden of nursing home care due to the associated need for higher levels of ADL assistance....

  10. Retrospective review of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and falling in older nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfken, C L; Wilson, J G; Aronson, S M

    2001-03-01

    We compared the rate of falling in older nursing home residents who had been prescribed selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), other classes of antidepressants, and no antidepressants. Data were obtained from pharmacy records, medical records, fall logs, and incidence reports for one nursing home (1995 data). Older adults on SSRIs were more likely to fall than older adults not on antidepressants (p = .003) and were more likely to have an injurious fall (p = .03). The association with falling remained significant even when including potential confounders (p = .007). Older nursing home residents should be treated for depression. However, SSRIs may also carry an increased risk for falling.

  11. Automatic provisioning of end-to-end QoS into the home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brewka, Lukasz Jerzy; Skoldström, Pontus; Nelis, Jelle;

    2011-01-01

    Due to a growing number of high bandwidth applications today (such as HDTV), and an increasing amount of network and cloud based applications, service providers need to pay attention to QoS in their networks. We believe there is a need for an end-to-end approach reaching into the home as well....... The Home Gateway (HG) as a key component of the home network is crucial for enabling the end-to-end solutions. UPnP-QoS has been proposed as an inhome solution for resource reservations. In this paper we assess a solution for automatic QoS reservations, on behalf of non-UPnP-QoS aware applications....... Additionally we focus on an integrated end-to-end solution, combining GMPLS-based reservations in e.g., access/metro and UPnP-QoS based reservation in the home network....

  12. NURSING HOME PRACTICES FOLLOWING RESIDENT DEATH: THE EXPERIENCE OF CERTIFIED NURSING ASSISTANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barooah, Adrita; Boerner, Kathrin; van Riesenbeck, Isabelle; Burack, Orah R.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined certified nursing assistants’ (CNAs) experiences of nursing home practices following resident death. Participants were 140 CNAs who had experienced recent resident death. In semi-structured, in-person interviews, CNAs were asked about their experiences with the removal of the resident's body, filling the bed with a new resident, and how they were notified about the death. The facilities’ practice of filling the bed quickly was most often experienced as negative. Responses to body removal and staff notification varied, but negative experiences were reported by a substantial minority. Being notified prior to returning to work was associated with a more positive experience. Learning about the death by walking into a room to find the bed empty or already filled was the most negative experience. Study findings suggest that more mindful approaches to the transitions related to resident deaths would be valued by CNAs and could improve their work experience. PMID:25554351

  13. Director of Nursing Current Job Tenure and Past Experience and Quality of Care in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Melanie R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Directors of nursing (DON) are central to quality of care in nursing homes (NH) because of their role in coordinating and overseeing nursing care. Research is needed to test the association between DON characteristics and quality using large, representative samples of NHs and global measures of quality. One such measure is the quality measure (QM) rating from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ Five-Star Quality Rating, which aggregates 10 individual QMs into a single rating. Purpose This study examined whether DON current job tenure or past experience (1) differed across levels of the QM rating, (2) was associated with QM ratings, and (3) was associated with any of the individual 10 QM scores that comprise QM ratings. Methodology Data for a nationally representative sample of 1,174 NHs were obtained from the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey, publicly-reported QMs, and an Area Resource File. Wald tests were used to test differences in mean DON current job tenure and past experience across levels of the QM rating. Multinomial logistic and Poisson regression analyses were used to examine the association between DON current job tenure and past experience and QM ratings and QM scores, respectively, controlling for selected market and organizational characteristics. Findings NHs with longer DON current job tenure tended to have higher QM ratings. Longer DON current job tenure was associated with higher QM ratings and lower QM scores for several individual QMs, suggesting higher quality. DON past experience did not differ across levels of the QM rating and was neither associated with QM ratings or QM scores. Practice Implications This study highlights the need for owners and administrators to support DONs as they either transition into the role of the DON for the first time or learn to effectively fulfill their role in a new NH. PMID:21712721

  14. Improvements in the quality of co-ordination of nursing care following implementation of the Resident Assessment Instrument in Dutch nursing homes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, W.P.; Holtkamp, C.C.M.; Kerkstra, A.; Pot, A.M.; Ooms, M.E.; Ribbe, M.W.

    2001-01-01

    Aim: To study the effect of implementation of the Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI) on the quality of co-ordination of nursing care in Dutch nursing homes. Background: The Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI) was designed to improve the quality of care and quality of life in nursing homes. Until

  15. [Consensus on nursing diagnoses, interventions and outcomes for home care of patients with heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzolin, Karina; de Souza, Emiliane Nogueira; Ruschel, Karen Brasil; Mussi, Cláudia Motta; de Lucena, Amália Fátima; Rabelo, Eneida Rejane

    2012-12-01

    This was a consensus study with six cardiology nurses with the objective of selecting nursing diagnoses, outcomes and interventions described by NANDA International (NANDA-I), Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC), Nursing Intervention Classification (NIC), for home care of patients with heart failure (HF). Eight nursing diagnoses (NDs) were pre-selected and a consensus was achieved in three stages, during which interventions/activities and outcomes/indicators of each NDs were validated and those considered valid obtained 70% to 100% consensus. From the eight pre-selected NDs, two were excluded due to the lack of consensus on appropriate interventions for the clinical home care scenario. Eleven interventions were selected from a total of 96 pre-selected ones and seven outcomes were validated out of 71. The practice of consensus among expert nurses provides assistance to the qualifications of the care process and deepens the knowledge about the use of tazonomies in nursing clinical practice.

  16. Cost control in nursing homes by means of economies of scale and care profile optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoess, Victoria; Bachler, Adi; Ostermann, Herwig; Staudinger, Roland

    2009-01-01

    The call to enlarge or merge nursing homes in order to lower costs rests on the assumption that economies of scale exist within the cost structure of these homes. Economies of scale means that an increasing number of residents will reduce the costs per person needing care. However, the existence and the extent of economies of scale as such in nursing homes are the subject of controversy because studies of this issue performed in nursing homes up to now have yielded contradictory results. In this study, researchers demonstrated economies of scale in Tyrolean, Austria, nursing homes and showed that the composition of the nursing home residents in respect to their care needs influences the development of the average costs. Changing the size of the facility and/or influencing the average care level can have a considerable influence on the progression of average costs in nursing homes. Cost reductions can be achieved by increasing the size of the facility or by improved distribution of the care levels of the persons in need of care.

  17. Restraint use in home care: a qualitative study from a nursing perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the growing demand for home care and preliminary evidence suggesting that the use of restraint is common practice in home care, research about restraint use in this setting is scarce. Methods To gain insight into the use of restraints in home care from the perspective of nurses, we conducted a qualitative explorative study. We conducted semi-structured face-to-face interviews of 14 nurses from Wit-Gele Kruis, a home-care organization in Flanders, Belgium. Interview transcripts were analyzed using the Qualitative Analysis Guide of Leuven. Results Our findings revealed a lack of clarity among nurses about the concept of restraint in home care. Nurses reported that cognitively impaired older persons, who sometimes lived alone, were restrained or locked up without continuous follow-up. The interviews indicated that the patient’s family played a dominant role in the decision to use restraints. Reasons for using restraints included “providing relief to the family” and “keeping the patient at home as long as possible to avoid admission to a nursing home.” The nurses stated that general practitioners had no clear role in deciding whether to use restraints. Conclusions These findings suggest that the issue of restraint use in home care is even more complex than in long-term residential care settings and acute hospital settings. They raise questions about the ethical and legal responsibilities of home-care providers, nurses, and general practitioners. There is an urgent need for further research to carefully document the use of restraints in home care and to better understand it so that appropriate guidance can be provided to healthcare workers. PMID:24498859

  18. The Effect of Depression on Social Engagement in Newly Admitted Dutch Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achterberg, Wilco; Pot, Anne Margriet; Kerkstra, Ada; Ooms, Marcel; Muller, Martien; Ribbe, Miel

    2003-01-01

    Studies the effect of depression on social engagement among newly admitted nursing home residents. Results reveal that residents with depression were significantly more often found to have low social engagement. (Contains 26 references and 3 tables.) (GCP)

  19. Optimizing Antibiotic Stewardship in Nursing Homes: A Narrative Review and Recommendations for Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crnich, Christopher J; Jump, Robin; Trautner, Barbara; Sloane, Philip D; Mody, Lona

    2015-09-01

    The emerging crisis in antibiotic resistance and concern that we now sit on the precipice of a post-antibiotic era have given rise to advocacy at the highest levels for widespread adoption of programmes that promote judicious use of antibiotics. These antibiotic stewardship programmes, which seek to optimize antibiotic choice when clinically indicated and discourage antibiotic use when clinically unnecessary, are being implemented in an increasing number of acute care facilities, but their adoption has been slower in nursing homes. The antibiotic prescribing process in nursing homes is fundamentally different from that observed in hospital and clinic settings, with formidable challenges to implementation of effective antibiotic stewardship. Nevertheless, an emerging body of research points towards ways to improve antibiotic prescribing practices in nursing homes. This review summarizes the findings of this research and presents ways in which antibiotic stewardship can be implemented and optimized in the nursing home setting.

  20. Indoor air quality, ventilation and respiratory health in elderly residents living in nursing homes in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentayeb, Malek; Norback, Dan; Bednarek, Micha

    2015-01-01

    European countries. 600 elderly people from 50 nursing homes underwent a medical examination and completed a standardised questionnaire. Air quality and comfort parameters were objectively assessed in situ in the nursing home. Mean concentrations of air pollutants did not exceed the existing standards...... cough. Elderly subjects aged ≥80 years were at higher risk. Pollutant effects were more pronounced in the case of poor ventilation. Even at low levels, indoor air quality affected respiratory health in elderly people permanently living in nursing homes, with frailty increasing with age. The effects were......Few data exist on respiratory effects of indoor air quality and comfort parameters in the elderly. In the context of the GERIE study, we investigated for the first time the relationships of these factors to respiratory morbidity among elderly people permanently living in nursing homes in seven...

  1. Comorbid depression in dementia on psychogeriatric nursing home wards: which symptoms are prominent?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaik, R.; Francke, A.L.; Meijel, B. van; Ribbe, M.W.; Bensing, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide insight into the prevalence and clinically relevant symptoms of comorbid depression among dementia patients in psychogeriatric nursing home wards, to enhance depression recognition. DESIGN: Cross-sectional analyses of multicenter diagnostic data. SETTING: Psychogeriatric wards

  2. MDS 3.0 for Nursing Homes and Swing Bed Providers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The MDS is a powerful tool for implementing standardized assessment and for facilitating care management in nursing homes (NHs) and non-critical access hospital...

  3. Longevity and admission to nursing home according to age after isolated coronary artery bypass surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Kristinn; Andreasen, Jan Jesper; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2015-01-01

    . Methods: All patients who underwent isolated CABG in 1996-2012 in Denmark were identified through nationwide administrative registers and included. The cumulative incidence of admission to a nursing home after CABG was estimated. A cause specific Cox-regression model was constructed to identify predictors......O5 Longevity and admission to nursing home according to age after isolated coronary artery bypass surgery: A nationwide cohort study Kristinn Thorsteinsson, Jan Jesper Andreasen, Christian Torp Pedersen, Kirsten Fonager, Rikke Nørmark Mortensen, Kristian Kragholm, Gunnar Gislason, Lars Køber....... Aalborg, Denmark Background: Data on nursing home admission in patients >80 years of age after isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) are scarce. Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate longevity and subsequent admission to nursing home stratified by age in a nationwide CABG cohort...

  4. 77 FR 60128 - Noncompetitive Supplements to Nursing Assistant and Home Health Aide Program Grantees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Noncompetitive Supplements to Nursing Assistant and Home Health Aide Program Grantees AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA... Services Administration (HRSA) will offer noncompetitive program expansion supplements of $100,000 to...

  5. Is the experience of meaningful activities understood in nursing homes? A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Ceña, Domingo; Gómez-Calero, Cristina; Cachón-Pérez, José Miguel; Velarde-García, Juan Francisco; Martínez-Piedrola, Rosa; Pérez-De-Heredia, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Lack of occupation can lead to boredom, apathy, social exclusion and solitude. Occupation should incorporate meaningful activities. The aim of this study is to describe how Spanish Nursing Home residents experienced and made sense of meaningful activities. A qualitative phenomenological approach was followed. Data were collected over an 18-month period between 2012 and 2014. Purposeful sampling was conducted with Spanish residents in nursing homes in Madrid. Data were collected using unstructured and semi-structured interviews. The data were analyzed using the Giorgi proposal. Thirty-eight residents (20 female and 18 male) participated. Three main themes describing the significance of meaningful activity in nursing homes emerged from the data: Feeling the passage of time, Seeking an occupation, and Living with restrictions. Nursing homes should strive to develop diverse and meaningful activity programs for residents in order to occupy their time and provide them with a greater sense of purpose.

  6. Air conditioning in nursing homes; Airco in verpleeghuizen geen overbodige luxe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Bekkum, H. [ed.

    1999-06-01

    Residents of nursing homes suffer considerably from high indoor temperatures. Research has shown that during tropical outdoor temperatures, the indoor temperature has a strong impact on the mortality rate among residents, mainly due to the well-insulated buildings

  7. Health smart home: towards an assistant tool for automatic assessment of the dependence of elders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Xuan Hoa Binh; Di Mascolo, Maria; Gouin, Alexia; Noury, Norbert

    2007-01-01

    In order to help elders living alone to age in place independently and safely, it can be useful to have an assistant tool that can automatically assess their dependence and issue an alert if there is any loss of autonomy. The dependence can be assessed by the degree of performance, by the elders, of activities of daily living. This article presents an approach enabling the activity recognition for an elder living alone in a Health Smart Home equipped with noninvasive sensors.

  8. Nurse's Aid And Housekeeping Mobile Robot For Use In The Nursing Home Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sines, John A.

    1987-01-01

    The large nursing home market has several natural characteristics which make it a good applications area for robotics. The environment is already robot accessible and the work functions require large quantities of low skilled services on a daily basis. In the near future, a commercial opportunity for the practical application of robots is emerging in the delivery of housekeeping services in the nursing home environment. The robot systems will assist in food tray delivery, material handling, and security, and will perform activities such as changing a resident's table side drinking water twice a day, and taking out the trash. The housekeeping work functions will generate cost savings of approximately 22,000 per year, at a cost of 6,000 per year. Technical system challenges center around the artificial intelligence required for the robot to map its own location within the facility, to find objects, and to avoid obstacles, and the development of an energy efficient mechanical lifting system. The long engineering and licensing cycles (7 to 12 years) required to bring this type of product to market make it difficult to raise capital for such a venture.

  9. The economics of dementia-care mapping in nursing homes: a cluster-randomised controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geertje van de Ven

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dementia-care mapping (DCM is a cyclic intervention aiming at reducing neuropsychiatric symptoms in people with dementia in nursing homes. Alongside an 18-month cluster-randomized controlled trial in which we studied the effectiveness of DCM on residents and staff outcomes, we investigated differences in costs of care between DCM and usual care in nursing homes. METHODS: Dementia special care units were randomly assigned to DCM or usual care. Nurses from the intervention care homes received DCM training, a DCM organizational briefing day and conducted the 4-months DCM-intervention twice during the study. A single DCM cycle consists of observation, feedback to the staff, and action plans for the residents. We measured costs related to health care consumption, falls and psychotropic drug use at the resident level and absenteeism at the staff level. Data were extracted from resident files and the nursing home records. Prizes were determined using the Dutch manual of health care cost and the cost prices delivered by a pharmacy and a nursing home. Total costs were evaluated by means of linear mixed-effect models for longitudinal data, with the unit as a random effect to correct for dependencies within units. RESULTS: 34 units from 11 nursing homes, including 318 residents and 376 nursing staff members participated in the cost analyses. Analyses showed no difference in total costs. However certain changes within costs could be noticed. The intervention group showed lower costs associated with outpatient hospital appointments over time (p = 0.05 than the control group. In both groups, the number of falls, costs associated with the elderly-care physician and nurse practitioner increased equally during the study (p<0.02. CONCLUSIONS: DCM is a cost-neutral intervention. It effectively reduces outpatient hospital appointments compared to usual care. Other considerations than costs, such as nursing homes' preferences, may determine whether they

  10. Medication in nursing homes in Alsace: a preferential list of drugs obtained by consensus

    OpenAIRE

    Hannou, Sophia; Rousseau, Amélie; Rybarczyk-Vigouret, Marie-Christine; Michel,Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In order to improve patient care, OMEDIT (Observatory of drugs, medical devices and therapeutic innovation) Alsace, conducted a study to develop a Preferential list of Drugs adapted to the Elderly (PDE list) in nursing homes. The study conducted from December 2011 to June 2012 was organized in 4 phases: 1) creation of a preliminary list of drugs from those currently used in nursing homes in Alsace, 2) application of a two-round Delphi process to evaluate the preliminary list involvin...

  11. Future trends in the legal rights of patients in nursing homes.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffman, B. F.

    1989-01-01

    The author discusses the demographic aging of Canada and outlines how the Canadian Constitution and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms are likely to affect the care and treatment of nursing home residents. Because physical freedom and personal autonomy have been given such a high value in the constitution, civil and legal rights will be protected for all residents in nursing homes, and procedural safeguards will become mandatory in the next few years for patients who refuse treatment and for ...

  12. Validation of a method for identifying nursing home admissions using administrative claims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu Van Doren

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently there is no standard algorithm to identify whether a subject is residing in a nursing home from administrative claims. Our objective was to develop and validate an algorithm that identifies nursing home admissions at the resident-month level using the MarketScan Medicare Supplemental and Coordination of Benefit (COB database. Methods The computer algorithms for identifying nursing home admissions were created by using provider type, place of service, and procedure codes from the 2000 – 2002 MarketScan Medicare COB database. After the algorithms were reviewed and refined, they were compared with a detailed claims review by an expert reviewer. A random sample of 150 subjects from the claims was selected and used for the validity analysis of the algorithms. Contingency table analysis, comparison of mean differences, correlations, and t-test analyses were performed. Percentage agreement, sensitivity, specificity, and Kappa statistics were analyzed. Results The computer algorithm showed strong agreement with the expert review (99.9% for identification of the first month of nursing home residence, with high sensitivity (96.7%, specificity (100% and a Kappa statistic of 0.97. Weighted Pearson correlation coefficient between the algorithm and the expert review was 0.97 (p Conclusion A reliable algorithm indicating evidence of nursing home admission was developed and validated from administrative claims data. Our algorithm can be a useful tool to identify patient transitions from and to nursing homes, as well as to screen and monitor for factors associated with nursing home admission and nursing home discharge.

  13. Depression training in nursing homes: lessons learned from a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marianne; Stolder, Mary Ellen; Jaggers, Benjamin; Liu, Megan Fang; Haedtke, Chris

    2013-02-01

    Late-life depression is common among nursing home residents, but often is not addressed by nurses. Using a self-directed CD-based depression training program, this pilot study used mixed methods to assess feasibility issues, determine nurse perceptions of training, and evaluate depression-related outcomes among residents in usual care and training conditions. Of 58 nurses enrolled, 24 completed the training and gave it high ratings. Outcomes for 50 residents include statistically significant reductions in depression severity over time (p Depression training is an important vehicle to improve depression recognition and daily nursing care, but diverse factors must be addressed to assure optimal outcomes.

  14. The integration of oral health care into day-to-day care in nursing homes: a qualitative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visschere, L. De; Baat, C. de; Meyer, L.; Putten, G.J. van der; Peeters, B.; Soderfelt, B.; Vanobbergen, J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This qualitative study explored barriers and enabling factors to the implementation of an oral hygiene protocol in nursing homes. BACKGROUND: Oral health care in nursing homes in Flanders (Belgium) is inadequate. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Qualitative data were obtained from nurses employed i

  15. Elementary Rehabilitation Nursing Care; a Manual for Nurses and Ancillary Workers in Nursing Homes, Hospitals, Convalescent Facilities, and Public Health Agencies. Public Health Service Publication No. 1436.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorado State Dept. of Public Health, Denver. Public Health Nursing Section.

    This guide for teacher and student use presents a comprehensive program of physical rehabilitation for aged and physically disabled patients. Developed by the Public Health Nursing Section, the manual was tested by state health department personnel and persons doing inservice teaching in their respective nursing homes. The program is designed to…

  16. Nursing Homes Appeals of Deficiency Citations: The Informal Dispute Resolution Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukamel, Dana B.; Weimer, David L.; Li, Yue; Bailey, Lauren; Spector, William D.; Harrington, Charlene

    2012-01-01

    Objective Nursing homes found to be not meeting quality standards are cited for deficiencies. Before 1995, their only recourse was a formal appeal process, which is lengthy and costly. In 1995, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) instituted the Informal Dispute Resolution (IDR) process. This study presents for the first time national statistics about the IDR process and an analysis of the factors that influence nursing homes’ decisions to request an IDR. Design Retrospective study including descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic hierarchical models. Setting U.S. nursing homes in 2005 to 2008. Participant 15,916 Medicaid and Medicare certified nursing homes nationally, with 94,188 surveys and 9,388 IDRs. Measures The unit of observation was an annual survey or a complaint survey that generated at least one deficiency. The dependent variable was dichotomous and indicated whether the annual or a complaint survey triggered an IDR request. Independent variables included characteristics of the nursing home, the deficiency, the market, and the state regulatory environment. Results Ten percent of all annual surveys and complaint surveys resulted in IDRs. There was substantial variation across states, which persisted over time. Multivariate results suggest that nursing homes’ decisions to request an IDR depend on their assessment of the probability of success and assessment of the benefits of the submission. Conclusions Nursing homes avail themselves of the IDR process. Their propensity to do so depends on a number of factors, including the state regulatory system and the market environment in which they operate. PMID:22402171

  17. Technical efficiency of nursing homes: do five-star quality ratings matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulal, Rajendra

    2017-02-28

    This study investigates associations between five-star quality ratings and technical efficiency of nursing homes. The sample consists of a balanced panel of 338 nursing homes in California from 2009 through 2013 and uses two-stage data envelopment (DEA) analysis. The first-stage applies an input oriented variable returns to scale DEA analysis. The second-stage uses a left censored random-effect Tobit regression model. The five-star quality ratings i.e., health inspections, quality measures, staffing available on the Nursing Home Compare website are divided into two categories: outcome and structure form of quality. Results show that quality measures ratings and health inspection ratings, used as outcome form of quality, are not associated with mean technical efficiency. These quality ratings, however, do affect the technical efficiency of a particular nursing home and hence alter the ranking of nursing homes based on efficiency scores. Staffing rating, categorized as a structural form of quality, is negatively associated with mean technical efficiency. These findings show that quality dimensions are associated with technical efficiency in different ways, suggesting that multiple dimensions of quality should be included in the efficiency analysis of nursing homes. They also suggest that patient care can be enhanced through investing more in improving care delivery rather than simply raising the number of staff per resident.

  18. [The handling of acute life-threatening choking in geriatric and nursing home patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Poelgeest, A; Melis, R J F; Ritmeijer, C; Olde Rikkert, M G M

    2006-09-01

    It is unknown how often choking occurs in geriatric wards and in nursing homes and what the treatment and outcomes are in regular practice. A questionnaire was sent to Dutch geriatricians (N = 130), nursing home physicians (N = 130), and trainees for these disciplines (N = 215), in order to gain information about the experience, practice and competence of physicians in choking in geriatric and nursing home patients. We also analysed to what extent geriatric and nursing home wards were prepared for accurate handling of choking. The response rate was 30%. More than half of the responders had experienced an episode of food choking at least once in the past five years. The mortality rate in the reported cases was high (30%). The majority of the patients who died of choking had not received the Heimlich-manoeuvre. Physicians who had attended resuscitation training long ago felt as competent to manage a choking episode as physicians that had recently attended resuscitation training. Of all geriatric wards and nursing homes, the majority lacked a guideline on how to handle in acute food choking. Geriatric wards and nursing homes do not seem to be well prepared for acute food choking in several aspects. Despite methodological shortcomings of this study, the results underline the necessity of clarification of the terms used, and development and implementation of guidelines for this important problem.

  19. Prevalence of dementia in a rural nursing home population in Southern Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Hutsteiner

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: We sought to obtain data about the prevalence of dementia in rural nursing homes in Germany. Methods: We conducted our data between 2007 and 2009 in the diocese of Passau, Germany. By using a questionnaire we asked all nursing homes in the area to provide information about patients with dementia. We obtained detailed data from three nursing homes by personal visits, telephone calls and mail. Results: Out of 72 nursing homes, 40 provided the requested data. The 40 facilities included in our study house a total of 3,928 residents, 1,892 of whom are diagnosed with dementia (48%. Three nursing homes provided us with more detailed information. Conclusions: We conclude that the prevalence of dementia in nursing homes in Germany is comparable to those rates reported in other countries. As there is a lack of information globally on rural populations affected by dementia, further international research in this area will give important insights into the risk factors, the variables influencing the course of the disease, and the special care needs of this population.

  20. 38 CFR 59.40 - Maximum number of nursing home care and domiciliary care beds for veterans by State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ACQUISITION OF STATE HOMES § 59.40 Maximum number of nursing home care and domiciliary care beds for veterans... projection of demand for nursing home and domiciliary care by veterans who at such time are 65 years of age... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maximum number of...

  1. Top Management Leadership Style and Quality of Care in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Nicholas G.; Decker, Frederic H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the association of Nursing Home Administrator (NHA) leadership style and Director of Nursing (DON) leadership style with quality of care. Design and Methods: Leaders were categorized into 4 groups: consensus managers, consultative autocrats, shareholder managers, or autocrats. This leadership style…

  2. [Effects of IT usage on the nursing-care stress of stay-at-home caregivers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Masakazu; Kinoshita, Ayae

    2008-12-01

    We examined the effects of blog post on the stress reduction of stay-at-home care givers who posted their nursing-care blog on the Internet. Fourteen bloggers filled out the attached questionnaires. In the examination of questionnaires about intercommunication among the care givers, we suggest that IT literacy is found to be useful for reducing the burden of nursing care.

  3. Geriatric rehabilitation of stroke patients in nursing homes: a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geurts Alexander CH

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geriatric patients are typically underrepresented in studies on the functional outcome of rehabilitation after stroke. Moreover, most geriatric stroke patients do probably not participate in intensive rehabilitation programs as offered by rehabilitation centers. As a result, very few studies have described the successfulness of geriatric stroke rehabilitation in nursing home patients, although it appears that the majority of these patients are being discharged back to the community, rather than being transferred to residential care. Nevertheless, factors associated with the successfulness of stroke rehabilitation in nursing homes or skilled nursing facilities are largely unknown. The primary goal of this study is, therefore, to assess the factors that uniquely contribute to the successfulness of rehabilitation in geriatric stroke patients that undergo rehabilitation in nursing homes. A secondary goal is to investigate whether these factors are similar to those associated with the outcome of stroke rehabilitation in the literature. Methods/Design This study is part of the Geriatric Rehabilitation in AMPutation and Stroke (GRAMPS study in the Netherlands. It is a longitudinal, observational, multicenter study in 15 nursing homes in the Southern part of the Netherlands that aims to include at least 200 patients. All participating nursing homes are selected based on the existence of a specialized rehabilitation unit and the provision of dedicated multidisciplinary care. Patient characteristics, disease characteristics, functional status, cognition, behavior, and caregiver information, are collected within two weeks after admission to the nursing home. The first follow-up is at discharge from the nursing home or one year after inclusion, and focuses on functional status and behavior. Successful rehabilitation is defined as discharge from the nursing home to an independent living situation within one year after admission. The

  4. The relationship between home nursing coverage, sleep, and daytime functioning in parents of ventilator-assisted children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, Lisa J; Boroughs, Deborah S; Downes, John J

    2010-08-01

    This descriptive study examined the relationship between home-care nursing support, sleep, and daytime functioning in familial caregivers of ventilator-assisted children. Thirty-six primary caregivers (27 mothers, 7 fathers, 1 foster mother, and 1 grandmother) of ventilator-assisted children completed measures of home nursing support, sleep, depression, fatigue, and daytime sleepiness. Daytime nursing coverage was not related to caregiver sleep or daytime functioning, but caregivers with less nighttime nursing coverage had significantly shorter sleep onset latency than caregivers with some night nursing (16-48 hours/week). Caregivers with regular night nursing (>48 hours/week) had a total sleep time of almost 1 hour more than caregivers without regular night nursing (depression and sleepiness received significantly fewer hours of night nursing per week than caregivers without significant symptoms of depression or sleepiness. Home nursing support, in particular night nursing, is important for the health and well-being of familial caregivers of ventilator-assisted children.

  5. Ethics policies on euthanasia in nursing homes: a survey in Flanders, Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemiengre, Joke; Dierckx de Casterlé, Bernadette; Verbeke, Geert; Van Craen, Katleen; Schotsmans, Paul; Gastmans, Chris

    2008-01-01

    In many European countries there is a public debate about the acceptability and regulation of euthanasia. In 2002, Belgium became the second country after the Netherlands to enact a law on euthanasia. Although euthanasia rarely occurs, the complexity of the clinical-ethical decision making surrounding euthanasia requests and the need for adequate support reported by caregivers, means that healthcare institutions increasingly need to consider how to responsibly handle euthanasia requests. The development of written ethics policies on euthanasia may be important to guarantee and maintain the quality of care for patients requesting euthanasia. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence, development, position, and communication of written ethics policies on euthanasia in Flemish nursing homes. Data were obtained through a cross-sectional mail survey of general directors of all Catholic nursing homes in Flanders, Belgium. Of the 737 nursing homes invited to participate, 612 (83%) completed the questionnaire. Of these, only 15% had a written ethics policy on euthanasia. Presence of an ethics committee and membership of an umbrella organization were independent predictors of whether a nursing home had such a written ethics policy. The Act on Euthanasia and euthanasia guidelines advanced by professional organizations were the most frequent reasons (76% and 56%, respectively) and reference sources (92% and 64%, respectively) for developing ethics policies on euthanasia. Development of ethics policies occurred within a multidisciplinary context. In general, Flemish nursing homes applied the Act on Euthanasia restrictively by introducing palliative procedures in addition to legal due care criteria. The policy was communicated to the consulting general practitioner and nurses in 74% and 89% of nursing homes, respectively. Although the overall prevalence of ethics policies on euthanasia was low in Flemish nursing homes, institution administrators displayed growing

  6. Results from the Evaluation of the Massachusetts Nursing Home Connection Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-10-01

    Utilization and Expenditures," Inquiry, Vol. 24, Summer 1987, pp. 157-172. Holahan , J., J. Cohen, and W. Scanlon, Nursing Home Costs and Reimbursement Policy...Evi- dence from the 1977 National Home Survey, Working Paper No. 1466-22 (Revised), The Urban Institute, Washington, D.C., July 1983. Holahan , J

  7. Pressure ulcer incidence in Dutch and German nursing homes: design of a prospective multicenter cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lohrmann Christa

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pressure ulcers are a common and serious health care problem in all health care settings. Results from annual national pressure ulcer prevalence surveys in the Netherlands and Germany reveal large differences in prevalence rates between both countries over the past ten years, especially in nursing homes. When examining differences in prevalence and incidence rates, it is important to take into account all factors associated with the development of pressure ulcers. Numerous studies have identified patient related factors, as well as nursing related interventions as risk factors for the development of pressure ulcers. Next to these more process oriented factors, also structural factors such as staffing levels and staff quality play a role in the development of pressure ulcers. This study has been designed to investigate the incidence of pressure ulcers in nursing homes in the Netherlands and Germany and to identify patient related factors, nursing related factors and structural factors associated with pressure ulcer development. The present article describes the protocol for this study. Methods/design A prospective multicenter study is designed in which a cohort of newly admitted nursing home residents in 10 Dutch and 11 German nursing homes will be followed for a period of 12 weeks. Data will be collected by research assistants using questionnaires on four different levels: resident, staff, ward, and nursing home. Discussion The results of the study will provide information on the incidence of pressure ulcers in Dutch and German nursing homes. Furthermore, information will be gathered on the influence of patient related factors, nursing related factors and structural factors on the incidence of pressure ulcers. The present article describes the study design and addresses the study's strengths and weaknesses.

  8. Geriatric Workforce Capacity: A Pending Crisis for Nursing Home Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chen eLee

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The nursing home (NH population in the U.S. has grown to 1.6 million people and is expected to double by 2030. While 88.3% of NH residents are over 65, the elders aged 85 and more have become the principal group. This demographic change has increased the already high rates of chronic diseases and functional disabilities in NH residents. Methods: This study reviewed the supply of geriatricians in addressing the growing healthcare needs of NH residents. Results: English-written articles between 1989 and 2012 were reviewed. Trend data demonstrate that the geriatrician workforce has decreased from 10,270 in 2000 to 8,502 in 2010. Further, the pipeline analysis of physicians projected to receive board certification in geriatrics (and maintain this certification indicates a worsening of the already insufficient supply of geriatricians for this vulnerable population. Conclusion: Strategies to attract and maintain a geriatrician workforce are imperative to avert a mounting crisis in the geriatric care in NH and, by extension, other living settings.

  9. Hospitals, nursing homes turn to 3rd-party financing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaff, J.

    1982-07-05

    Experience is teaching the administrators of hospitals and nursing homes how to make better arrangements for third-party financing of energy-management systems. Accustomed to health-insurance reimbursement for health-care costs, hospitals have lacked incentives for conservation. Plans now used most by hospitals and health-care facilities involve third-party arrangements where: (1) an equipment vendor installs equipment and takes a share of the energy-cost savings; or (2) energy-services firms both install capital-intensive equipment and implement a variety of low-cost conservation measures, again for a percentage of the savings. Although most users think these arrangements are satisfactory, they advise a preliminary low-cost audit and participation in a basic energy-management seminar before employing an energy-services firm. Accurate baseline energy-consumption data should be developed in order to evaluate results, and assurance is needed that staff members understand the accounting formulas. Also recommended are independent audits after installation and attention to the legal clauses in contracts. (DCK)

  10. [Cleaning and disinfection in nursing homes. Data on quality of structure, process and outcome in nursing homes in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, 2011].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heudorf, U; Gasteyer, S; Samoiski, Y; Voigt, K

    2012-08-01

    Due to the Infectious Disease Prevention Act, public health services in Germany are obliged to check the infection prevention in hospitals and other medical facilities as well as in nursing homes. In Frankfurt/Main, Germany, standardized control visits have been performed for many years. In 2011 focus was laid on cleaning and disinfection of surfaces. All 41 nursing homes were checked according to a standardized checklist covering quality of structure (i.e. staffing, hygiene concept), quality of process (observation of the cleaning processes in the homes) and quality of output, which was monitored by checking the cleaning of fluorescent marks which had been applied some days before and should have been removed via cleaning in the following days before the final check. In more than two thirds of the homes, cleaning personnel were salaried, in one third external personnel were hired. Of the homes 85% provided service clothing and all of them offered protective clothing. All homes had established hygiene and cleaning concepts, however, in 15% of the homes concepts for the handling of Norovirus and in 30% concepts for the handling of Clostridium difficile were missing. Regarding process quality only half of the processes observed, i.e. cleaning of hand contact surfaces, such as handrails, washing areas and bins, were correct. Only 44% of the cleaning controls were correct with enormous differences between the homes (0-100%). The correlation between quality of process and quality of output was significant. There was good quality of structure in the homes but regarding quality of process and outcome there was great need for improvement. This was especially due to faults in communication and coordination between cleaning personnel and nursing personnel. Quality outcome was neither associated with the number of the places for residents nor with staffing. Thus, not only quality of structure but also quality of process and outcome should be checked by the public health

  11. Advancing nursing home practice: the International Association of Geriatrics and Gerontology Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolson, Debbie; Morley, John E; Rolland, Yves; Vellas, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    Recognition of the urgent need to improve the provision of long-term care, as well as the known variations in standards of nursing home care around the world, prompted the International Association of Geriatrics and Gerontology (IAGG), in association with the World Health Organization (WHO), to form a task force. This task force was charged with the identification of the key concerns, research priorities, and actions that would enhance the care provided to older people in nursing homes. Nurses are equipped with the knowledge to take a leadership role in the IAGG/WHO initiative, and the task force eagerly seeks their input.

  12. Integrating peritoneal and home haemodialysis: a nurse's perspective from a single centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Carol; Beech, Nicola; Chesterton, Lindsay; Fluck, Richard

    2011-12-01

    Home based dialytic therapy is underutilized in most renal centres. This article describes a nurse led and delivered approach to problem solving from a patient perspective, resulting in an increase in prevalent and incident patient numbers on home HD and peritoneal dialysis. Overall, between 2004 and 2010 home-based therapies have risen from 61 to 119 prevalent patients, with a fall in in-centre patient numbers.

  13. My father's experience with macular degeneration: implications for the home healthcare nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schexnaydre, Mary; Carruth, Ann K

    2008-01-01

    Macular degeneration has become a problem of substantial proportions for older adults. This article can help the home health nurse gain a greater understanding of macular degeneration and therefore be more effective in the home setting. The addition of vision rehabilitation also can prolong older adults' independent years and enhance their satisfaction with life. Using Parse's human-becoming theory as a theoretical framework, the home health nurse can coparticipate in the older adult's experience of living and thus enhance the probability that the last years will be a rewarding time of life.

  14. Development of an Applied Framework for Understanding Health Information Technology in Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenholtz, Howard B; Resnick, Abby; Lin, Michael; Handler, Steven

    2016-05-01

    There is growing evidence that Health Information Technology (HIT) can play a role in improving quality of care and increasing efficiency in the nursing home setting. Most research in this area, however, has examined whether nursing homes have or use any of a list of available technologies. We sought to develop an empirical framework for understanding the intersection between specific uses of HIT and clinical care processes. Using the nominal group technique, we conducted a series of focus groups with different types of personnel who work in nursing homes (administrators, directors of nursing, physicians, mid-level practitioners, consultant pharmacists, and aides). The resulting framework identified key domain areas that can benefit from HIT: transfer of data, regulatory compliance, quality improvement, structured clinical documentation, medication use process, and communication. The framework can be used to guide both descriptive and normative research.

  15. Three Policy Issues in Deciding the Cost of Nursing Home Care: Provincial Differences and How They Influence Elderly Couples' Experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Stadnyk, Robin L.

    2009-01-01

    Nursing home care is subsidized in all Canadian provinces, but residents must personally contribute to the cost. This paper explores policy issues that have led to differences in costs of nursing home care among provinces, and how policy and cost differences influence the experiences of married couples when one spouse requires nursing home care. The paper is based on a multiple-case study of three Canadian provinces, each of which had a different system for determining personal contributions ...

  16. Nursing people at home is a special skill that requires support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Rosemary

    2012-02-01

    Nursing people at home has always been a special skill. It is very different from nursing people in hospital beds, or in clinical type settings outside of hospital, such as GP surgeries and health centres. The real point at which care changes fundamentally is when it crosses the patient's doorstep. To provide high quality nursing care to people in their own homes requires particular skills, knowledge and approaches - and the development of these has been seriously neglected in recent years. These are the basic tenets of the new report from the Queen's Nursing Institute (QNI) (2011), which was launched at the House of Lords in November 2011. The evidence for the report was gathered throughout the first year of the QNI's Right Nurse, Right Skills campaign, which was supported by BJCN. As part of the campaign, both nurses and members of the public were invited to leave stories and comments on a special webpage, and hundreds of people did so. The nurses talked about the replacement of registered nurses with health-care assistants, and the influx of inexperienced nurses who were not given the support they needed to develop community skills. Patients and carers spoke of their experiences of care - most of the time, these were good or excellent. However, too often, care was delivered by nurses or assistants who lacked the right skills to prevent harm or deliver care properly. The results were sometimes discomfort, sometimes unnecessary suffering, and occasionally very serious.

  17. High prevalence of Clostridium difficile colonization among nursing home residents in Hesse, Germany.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardjan Arvand

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is the most common cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea in hospitals and other healthcare facilities. The elderly are particularly susceptible and at increased risk for adverse outcome as a result of C. difficile infection. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of C. difficile colonization among residents of nursing homes in Hesse and to compare it with the prevalence in the general population living outside long-term care facilities (LTCF. We assessed possible risk factors for C. difficile colonization and determined the genotype of circulating strains. C. difficile was isolated from 11/240 (4.6% nursing home residents and 2/249 (0.8% individuals living outside LTCF (p = 0.02. Ten of 11 (90.9% isolates from nursing homes and one of two isolates from the population outside LTCF were toxigenic. The prevalence of C. difficile colonization varied from 0% to 10% between different nursing homes. Facilities with known actual or recent CDI cases were more likely to have colonized residents than facilities without known CDI cases. C. difficile PCR-ribotypes 014 and 001 were the most prevalent genotypes and accounted for 30% and 20% of toxigenic isolates in nursing homes, respectively. Interestingly, no individuals carried the epidemic strain PCR-ribotype 027. Our results suggest that residents of nursing homes in Germany are at high risk for colonization by virulent C. difficile strains. The high prevalence of C. difficile colonization in nursing homes underscores the importance of good adherence to standard infection control precautions even in the absence of a diagnosed infection. They also emphasize the need for specific programs to increase the awareness of healthcare professionals in LTCF for CDI.

  18. Hazel Hall Nursing Home, Prosperous Road, Clane, Kildare.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sheehan, Aisling

    2015-02-01

    Nursing is experiencing a significant deficit in research capacity needed to meet future global healthcare demands-there is a call to double the number of nurses and healthcare professionals with a doctorate.

  19. Use Of Nursing Home Compare Website Appears Limited By Lack Of Awareness And Initial Mistrust Of The Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konetzka, R Tamara; Perraillon, Marcelo Coca

    2016-04-01

    In December 2008 the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) launched a five-star rating system of nursing homes as part of Nursing Home Compare, a web-based report card detailing quality of care at all CMS-certified nursing homes. Questions remain, however, as to how well consumers use this rating system as well as other sources of information in choosing nursing home placement. We used a qualitative assessment of how consumers select nursing homes and of the role of information about quality, using semistructured interviews of people who recently placed a family member or friend in a nursing home. We found that consumers were receptive to using Internet-based information about quality as one source of information but that choice was limited by the need for specialized services, proximity to family or health care providers, and availability of Medicaid beds. Consumers had a positive reaction when shown Nursing Home Compare; however, its use appeared to be limited by lack of awareness and, to some extent, initial lack of trust of the data. Our findings suggest that efforts to expand the use of Nursing Home Compare should focus on awareness and trust. Useful additions to Nursing Home Compare might include measures of the availability of activities, information about cost, and consumer satisfaction.

  20. Marie Curie nurses: enabling patients with cancer to die at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginson, Irene J; Wilkinson, Susie

    2002-05-01

    Marie Curie Cancer Care established its nursing service in 1958; however, the service has had little formal evaluation. This study aimed to describe and evaluate the care provided by Marie Curie nurse, and in particular to determine whether patients in their care remained and died at home. Two existing data sets were used: data on all patients referred to the Marie Curie Nursing Services in 147 areas of England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland for 26 months, and data on cancer death registrations in England. A request for a Marie Curie nurse was made for 26,632 patients, 97% of whom had cancer and 11% of whom lived alone. The amount of care provided varied enormously (Marie Curie nurses facilitated home death for many patients. Services need to ensure that mechanisms are in place to achieve data collection. Rigorous prospective evaluation is needed in the future.

  1. Community health nursing: can being self-employed work for you in home care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seri, S F

    1997-09-01

    There is a fine distinction between being an independent contractor and being an employee. The advantages of being self-employed as a community health nurse are many. Self-employment suits new parents, graduate students, people in transition, with more than one profession, and who don't want a fixed schedule. However, this type of nursing is not for everyone. A broker such as CHN can help nurses become successfully self-employed. At a time when hospitals are downsizing and home care is becoming more in demand, brokers such as CHN provide a framework in which busy, experienced, community health nurses can work when and where they want. Good clinical and communication skills and a wish to be autonomous are necessities. A willingness to travel to different agencies and a reliable car are also important. A love for variety, flexibility, and independence make self-employment as a home health nurse a clinician's dream.

  2. Home health nurses: stress, self-esteem, social intimacy, and job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, S; Lindquist, S; Katz, B

    1997-06-01

    A survey of 253 home health care nurses' perceptions of work-related stress, self-esteem, social intimacy, and job satisfaction found that stress has a negative correlation with self-esteem, social intimacy, and job satisfaction. A positive correlation, however, was found between self-esteem and social intimacy and job satisfaction. Health system administrators, owners, and directors had significantly higher levels of self-esteem, nurses with 5 years or more in their home health nursing position had significantly higher levels of self-esteem. The survey found that nurses with less than a baccalaureate degree possessed significantly lower levels of sociability than those with a graduate or baccalaureate degree. Administrators and managers scored significantly higher on sociability than head nurses.

  3. Recommendations From the International Consortium on Professional Nursing Practice in Long-Term Care Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGilton, Katherine S; Bowers, Barbara J; Heath, Hazel; Shannon, Kay; Dellefield, Mary Ellen; Prentice, Dawn; Siegel, Elena O; Meyer, Julienne; Chu, Charlene H; Ploeg, Jenny; Boscart, Veronique M; Corazzini, Kirsten N; Anderson, Ruth A; Mueller, Christine A

    2016-02-01

    In response to the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics' global agenda for clinical research and quality of care in long-term care homes (LTCHs), the International Consortium on Professional Nursing Practice in Long Term Care Homes (the Consortium) was formed to develop nursing leadership capacity and address the concerns regarding the current state of professional nursing practice in LTCHs. At its invitational, 2-day inaugural meeting, the Consortium brought together international nurse experts to explore the potential of registered nurses (RNs) who work as supervisors or charge nurses within the LTCHs and the value of their contribution in nursing homes, consider what RN competencies might be needed, discuss effective educational (curriculum and practice) experiences, health care policy, and human resources planning requirements, and to identify what sustainable nurse leadership strategies and models might enhance the effectiveness of RNs in improving resident, family, and staff outcomes. The Consortium made recommendations about the following priority issues for action: (1) define the competencies of RNs required to care for older adults in LTCHs; (2) create an LTCH environment in which the RN role is differentiated from other team members and RNs can practice to their full scope; and (3) prepare RN leaders to operate effectively in person-centered care LTCH environments. In addition to clear recommendations for practice, the Consortium identified several areas in which further research is needed. The Consortium advocated for a research agenda that emphasizes an international coordination of research efforts to explore similar issues, the pursuit of examining the impact of nursing and organizational models, and the showcasing of excellence in nursing practice in care homes, so that others might learn from what works. Several studies already under way are also described.

  4. Maersta Nursing Home energy conservation project. Energisparprojektet Maersta sjukhem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, M.

    1987-01-01

    Maersta Nursing Home consists of an H-shaped ward building with 4x12 beds and a supply building. The design of the ward sections, with four blocks of equal size but incorporating different building methods and different installation services, has permitted comparative investigations of performance, energy savings, operating costs etc. The project has included everything from initial design and construction to performance measurement and assessment. Data from parameters affecting energy consumption has been continuously monitored over a period of more than three years. About ten million hourly mean values have been logged for the production and analysis of energy balances for individual components and for parts of the buildings. The report compares the performance of massive and light building structures with different insulation levels, different types of window design, airborne and waterborne heating systems regenerative and recuperative heat exchangers and other variables. Different types of water-saving taps are compared, as are economy-flush and normal-flush lavatories. The value of waste water heat exchangers, solar collectors for domestic hot water production, recovery of heat from refrigerator condensers, conversion of flushing desinfectors and so on are also considered. The objective has been achieved, and the results indicate that 50% savings can be obtained without any reduction in the standard of either thermal comfort or hygiene. In general, it can be said that well-planned energy conservation measures make it easier to establish a good indoor climate. The report also reveals that an energy-efficient building can be produced without incurring higher building costs. (authors).

  5. Belt restraint reduction in nursing homes: design of a quasi-experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Rossum Erik

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of physical restraints still is common practice in the nursing home care. Since physical restraints have been shown to be an ineffective and sometimes even hazardous measure, interventions are needed to reduce their usage. Several attempts have been made to reduce the use of physical restraints. Most studies used educational approaches and introduced a nurse specialist as a consultant. However, the success rate of these interventions has been inconsistent. We developed a new multi-component intervention (EXBELT comprising an educational intervention for nursing home staff in combination with a policy change (belt use is prohibited by the nursing home management, availability of a nurse specialist and nursing home manager as consultants, and availability of alternative interventions. The first aim of this study is to further develop and test the effectiveness of EXBELT on belt restraint reduction in Dutch psychogeriatric nursing homes. However, the reduction of belts should not result in an increase of other restrictive restraints (such as a chair with locked tray table or psychoactive drug use. The overall aim is an effective and feasible intervention that can be employed on a large scale in Dutch nursing homes. Methods and design Effects of EXBELT will be studied in a quasi-experimental longitudinal study design. Alongside the effect evaluation, a process evaluation will be carried out in order to further develop EXBELT. Data regarding age, gender, use of physical restraints, the number of falls and fall related injuries, psychoactive drug use, and the use of alternative interventions will be collected at baseline and after four and eight months of follow-up. Data regarding the process evaluation will be gathered in a period of eight months between baseline and the last measurement. Furthermore, changing attitudes will become an important addition to the educational part of EXBELT. Discussion A quasi

  6. Evaluation of the psychoeducation given to the elderly at nursing homes for a healthy lifestyle and developing life satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambağ, Hatice; Öz, Fatma

    2013-12-01

    The research was carried out as a pre-test, post-test patterned intervention with one group in order to evaluate the psychoeducation given to older people at nursing homes for a healthy lifestyle and developing life satisfaction. The research was done with 21 female and 21 male older people staying at the state-owned Seyran Bağlari Nursing Home/Elderly Caring Rehabilitation Center and the Ümitköy Nursing Home. In the psychoeducation program, each session was conducted for a duration of 60-90 min in the nursing homes' education classrooms. After the psychoeducation program, the life satisfaction index, the health promotion lifestyle profile total, and the subscale (nutrition, health responsibility, self realization, stress management, interpersonal support, and exercise) mean scores, significantly increased statistically. It is suggested that the nursing homes' health workers, and especially nurses who work full-time, should promote such psychoeducation.

  7. Associations Between Family Ratings on Experience With Care and Clinical Quality-of-Care Measures for Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue; Li, Qinghua; Tang, Yi

    2016-02-01

    Several states are currently collecting and publicly reporting nursing home resident and/or family member ratings of experience with care in an attempt to improve person-centered care in nursing homes. Using the 2008 Maryland nursing home family survey reports and other data, this study performed both facility- and resident-level analyses, and estimated the relationships between family ratings of care and several long-term care quality measures (pressure ulcers, overall and potentially avoidable hospitalizations, and mortality) after adjustment for resident characteristics. We found that better family evaluations of overall and specific aspects of care may be associated with reduced rates of risk-adjusted measures at the facility level (range of correlation coefficients: -.01 to -.31). Associations of overall experience ratings tended to persist after further adjustment for common nursing home characteristics such as nurse staffing levels. We conclude that family ratings of nursing home care complement other types of performance measures such as risk-adjusted outcomes.

  8. An Evaluation of the Usability of a Computerized Decision Support System for Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossum, M.; Ehnfors, M.; Fruhling, A.; Ehrenberg, A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Computerized decision support systems (CDSSs) have the potential to significantly improve the quality of nursing care of older people by enhancing the decision making of nursing personnel. Despite this potential, health care organizations have been slow to incorporate CDSSs into nursing home practices. Objective This study describes facilitators and barriers that impact the ability of nursing personnel to effectively use a clinical CDSS for planning and treating pressure ulcers (PUs) and malnutrition and for following the suggested risk assessment guidelines for the care of nursing home residents. Methods We employed a qualitative descriptive design using varied methods, including structured group interviews, cognitive walkthrough observations and a graphical user interface (GUI) usability evaluation. Group interviews were conducted with 25 nursing personnel from four nursing homes in southern Norway. Five nursing personnel participated in cognitive walkthrough observations and the GUI usability evaluation. Text transcripts were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results Group interview participants reported that ease of use, usefulness and a supportive work environment were key facilitators of CDSS use. The barriers identified were lack of training, resistance to using computers and limited integration of the CDSS with the facility’s electronic health record (EHR) system. Key findings from the usability evaluation also identified the difficulty of using the CDSS within the EHR and the poorly designed GUI integration as barriers. Conclusion Overall, we found disconnect between two types of nursing personnel. Those who were comfortable with computer technology reported positive feedback about the CDSS, while others expressed resistance to using the CDSS for various reasons. This study revealed that organizations must invest more resources in educating nursing personnel on the seriousness of PUs and poor nutrition in the elderly, providing

  9. A palliative care educational intervention for frontline nursing home staff: the IMPRESS project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Aida; Gatchell, Greg; Tachibana, Yukako; Tin, Maung Maung; Bell, Christina; Koijane, Jeannette; Zeri, Kenneth; Masaki, Kamal

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine nursing home staff perceptions of end-of-life (EOL) care skills after an educational intervention. IMPRESS (IMproving PRofessional Education and Sustaining Support) was a quality improvement EOL care educational intervention (six lectures on core palliative care concepts) for frontline nursing home staff at five community nursing homes. Questionnaires were completed to evaluate frequency of application of palliative care skills before and after the educational series. Nursing home staff reported applying palliative care skills significantly more frequently after the intervention. A significant dose-response association was noted between number of inservice sessions attended and improvement in scores: Scores increased 0.04 points for staff who attended two of the six sessions, 0.12 for four sessions attended, and 0.46 for five to six sessions attended (p = 0.03). The results indicate that frontline nursing home staff who attend inservice sessions on core palliative care topics can significantly increase self-reported application of palliative care skills.

  10. Pneumonia care and the nursing home: a qualitative descriptive study of resident and family member perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loeb Mark

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nursing home residents are frequently sent to hospital for diagnostic tests or to receive acute health care services. These transfers are both costly and for some, associated with increased risks. Although improved technology allows long-term care facilities to deliver more complex health care on site, if this is to become a trend then residents and family members must see the value of such care. This qualitative study examined resident and family member perspectives on in situ care for pneumonia. Methods A qualitative descriptive study design was used. Participants were residents and family members of residents treated for pneumonia drawn from a larger randomized controlled trial of a clinical pathway to manage nursing home-acquired pneumonia on-site. A total of 14 in-depth interviews were conducted. Interview data were analyzed using the editing style, described by Miller and Crabtree, to identify key themes. Results Both residents and family members preferred that pneumonia be treated in the nursing home, where possible. They both felt that caring and attention are key aspects of care which are more easily accessible in the nursing home setting. However, residents felt that staff or doctors should make the decision whether to hospitalize them, whereas family members wanted to be consulted or involved in the decision-making process. Conclusion These findings suggest that interventions to reduce hospitalization of nursing home residents with pneumonia are consistent with resident and family member preferences.

  11. Identification of the need for home visiting nurse: development of a new assessment tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuko Taguchi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop a Home Visiting Nursing Service Need Assessment Form (HVNS-NAF to standardize the decision about the need for home visiting nursing service. Methods: The sample consisted of older adults who had received coordinated services by care managers. We defined the need for home visiting nursing service by elderly individuals as the decision of the need by a care manager so that the elderly can continue to live independently. Explanatory variables included demographic factors, medical procedure, severity of illness, and caregiver variables. Multiple logistic regression was carried out after univariate analyses to decide the variables to include and the weight of each variable in the HVNS-NAF. We then calculated the sensitivity and specificity of each cut-off value, and defined the score with the highest sensitivityand specificity as the cut-off value. Results: Nineteen items were included in the final HVNS-NAF. When the cut-off value was 2 points, the sensitivity was 77.0%, specificity 68.5%, and positive predictive value 56.8%. Conclusions: HVNS-NAF is the first validated standard based on characteristics of elderly clients who required home visiting nursing service. Using the HVNS-NAF may result in reducing the unmet need for home visiting nursing service and preventing hospitalization.

  12. Coping with the Obligation Dilemma: Prototypes of Social Workers in the Nursing Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Sagit; Ayalon, Liat

    2016-07-01

    We examined the ways in which the social worker is coping with obligation dilemma in an Israeli nursing home. The research was conducted using semi-structured, in-depth interviews carried out with fifteen social workers employed in nursing homes. The interviews were analysed thematically, using constant comparisons. The three themes were concerned with the social worker's place in the nursing home, her relationship with the management and staff, and her coping with the obligation dilemma. These themes highlighted the difference between the interviewees. On the background of this difference, four prototypes of nursing home's social workers were defined: the managerial, the contented, the fighter and the frustrated. From analysing the findings, the significant place of the personal and environmental factors that influence the ways in which the social worker deals with these four themes emerges. Our findings suggest that the strengthening, empowerment and support of social workers in institutions can directly enhance the health, security, emotional well-being and quality of life of nursing home residents.

  13. The effect of self-transcendence on depression in cognitively intact nursing home patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugan, Gørill; Innstrand, Siw Tone

    2012-01-01

    Aims. This study's aim was to test the effects of self-transcendence on depression among cognitively intact nursing home patients. Background. Depression is considered the most frequent mental disorder among the elderly population. Specifically, the depression rate among nursing home patients is three to four times higher than that among community-dwelling elderly. Therefore, finding new and alternative ways to prevent and decrease depression is of great importance for nursing home patients' well-being. Self-transcendence is related to spiritual as well as nonspiritual factors, and it is described as a correlate and resource for well-being among vulnerable populations and at the end of life. Methods. A two-factor construct of the self-transcendence scale (interpersonal and intrapersonal) and the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) was applied. A sample of 202 cognitively intact nursing home patients in central Norway was selected to respond to the questionnaires in 2008/2009. Results. A hypothesized SEM model demonstrated significant direct relationships and total effects of self-transcendence on depression. Conclusion and Implication for Practice. Facilitating patients' self-transcendence, both interpersonally and intrapersonally, might decrease depression among cognitively intact nursing home patients.

  14. Parents' descriptions of ideal home nursing care for their technology-dependent children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Michele A

    2013-01-01

    Home care for technology-dependent children is one of the fastest growing segments of the U.S. health care industry, but nursing literature lacks clear directions to guide home care nurses in planning a family-centered practice. The purpose of this study was to address this gap in the literature by eliciting descriptions of ideal home nursing care for technology-dependent children from the perspective of their parents. A qualitative, descriptive design with formal, semi-structured interviews was used. Seven participants (three couples and one mother) were interviewed. Data analysis revealed four components of ideal home nursing care: 1) competence in technical, assessment, clinical decision-making, and problem-solving skills; 2) a caring manner; 3) relinquishing control of the child's care to the parents; and 4) fitting in with the family and their routines. These findings have implications for both home care nurses and the care managers who supervise the care of children who are technology dependent and their families.

  15. Nursing homes: Development of elderly care management in the Buddhist way

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warakorn Poolswat

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to study the historical background and current situation of care management in nursing homes for the elderly in Western Thailand and develop care management according to Buddhist principles. This qualitative research analyzes three nursing homes using interview, observation, focus group discussion and workshop as data collection tools. The researchers used a snowball sampling method to identify 109 respondents, made up of 35 key informants, 34 casual informants and 40 general informants. The researchers verified data with a triangulation method and analyzed information descriptively. Results found that the most eminent problems in care management of elderly nursing homes are the image of experts, environment and activity management. Nursing homes do not respond to spiritual requests because of a lack of social and spiritual development. It is necessary to find a new way to emphasize responsibility and respond to spiritual requests by Buddhist means. In this paper, the researchers propose a set of guidelines for the care management of nursing homes in Western Thailand.

  16. Scale and scope economies in nursing homes: a quantile regression approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Eric W

    2004-04-01

    Nursing homes vary widely between facilities with very few beds and facilities with several hundred beds. Previous studies, which estimate nursing home scale and scope economies, do not account for this heterogeneity and implicitly assume that all nursing homes face the same cost structure. To account for heterogeneity, this paper uses quantile regression to estimate cost functions for skilled and intermediate care nursing homes. The results show that the parameters of nursing home cost functions vary significantly by output mix and across the cost distribution. Estimates show that product-specific scale economies systematically increase across the cost distribution for both skilled and intermediate care facilities, with diseconomies of scale in the lower deciles and no significant scale economies in the higher deciles. As for ray scale economies, estimates show economies of scale in the lower deciles and diseconomies of scale or no significant scale economies at higher deciles. The estimates also show that scope economies exist in the lower cost deciles and that no scope economies exist in the higher cost deciles. Additionally, the degree of scope economies monotonically decreases across the deciles.

  17. Market Conditions and Performance in the Nursing Home Compare Five-Star Rating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ae-Sook

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies have documented that market conditions affect nursing home performance; however, the evidence is inconsistent and conflicting. This study introduces three groups of county market conditions and a peer effect variable, and tests their impacts on the Nursing Home Compare (NHC) Five-Star overall rating. Indiana nursing home data and county characteristics are taken mainly from the NHC and Census Bureau websites. The result of the ordered logistic regression analysis indicates that nursing homes in excess demand markets, namely those that are highly concentrated and have fewer nursing homes, tend to perform better than their counterparts in both excess supply and balanced markets. In addition, a peer effect variable, measured as the average overall rating of the competitors, promotes performance improvement. These findings imply that small markets enable consumers to be well informed about a provider's reputation for quality, consequently enhancing performance. Furthermore, not only consumers but also providers seem to seek performance information on the report card to understand their relative position in the market, which thus affects their market strategies and subsequently performance.

  18. Clinical characteristics, diagnostic evaluation, and antibiotic prescribing patterns for skin infections in nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihiro Yogo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The epidemiology and management of skin infections in nursing homes has not been adequately described. We reviewed the characteristics, diagnosis and treatment of skin infections among residents of nursing homes to identify opportunities to improve antibiotic use. Methods: A retrospective study involving 12 nursing homes in the Denver metropolitan area. For residents at participating nursing homes diagnosed with a skin infection between July 1, 2013 and June 30, 2014, clinical and demographic information was collected through manual chart review.Results: Of 100 cases included in the study, the most common infections were non-purulent cellulitis (n=55, wound infection (n=27, infected ulcer (n=8, and cutaneous abscess (n=7. In 26 cases, previously published minimum clinical criteria for initiating antibiotics (Loeb criteria were not met. Most antibiotics (n=52 were initiated as a telephone order following a call from a nurse, and 41 patients were not evaluated by a provider within 48 hours after initiation of antibiotics. Nearly all patients (n=95 were treated with oral antibiotics alone. The median treatment duration was 7 days (interquartile range [IQR] 7-10; 43 patients received treatment courses of ≥ 10 days.Conclusions: Most newly diagnosed skin infections in nursing homes were non-purulent infections treated with oral antibiotics. Antibiotics were initiated by telephone in over half of cases, and lack of a clinical evaluation within 48 hours after starting antibiotics was common. Improved diagnosis through more timely clinical evaluations and decreasing length of therapy are important opportunities for antibiotic stewardship in nursing homes.

  19. Managers’ Compensation in a Mixed Ownership Industry: Evidence from Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sean Shenghsiu; Hirth, Richard A.; Smith, Dean G.

    2016-01-01

    An extensive literature is devoted to differences between for-profit and non-profit health-care providers’ prices, utilization, and quality. Less is known about for-profit and non-profit managers’ compensation and its relationship with financial and quality performance. The aim of this study is to examine whether for-profit and non-profit nursing homes place differential weights on financial and quality performance in determining managers’ compensation. Using a unique 8-year dataset on Ohio nursing homes, fixed-effect regression models of managers’ compensation include financial and quality performance as well as other explanatory variables concerning firm and market characteristics and manager qualifications. Among for-profit nursing homes, compensation of owner-managers and non-owner managers are compared. Compensation of for-profit managers is significantly positively associated with profit margin and return-on-assets, while compensation of non-profit managers does not exhibit any consistent relationship with financial measures. Compensation of neither for-profit nor non-profit managers is significantly related to quality measures. Nursing home size and managers’ years of experience are the only consistent determinants of compensation. Owner-managers earn significantly higher compensation than non-owner managers and their compensation is less related to nursing home performance. Finding that home size and experience are strong determinants of compensation, and the association with ownership and financial performance for for-profit nursing homes are as expected. The insignificant relationship between compensation and quality performance is potentially troublesome. PMID:28083528

  20. The nursing assistants' communication style and the behavioral symptoms of dementia in Korean-American nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Haesook; Woods, Diana Lynn; Mentes, Janet C; Martin, Jennifer L; Moon, Ailee; Phillips, Linda R

    2014-01-01

    Few studies examined the association between communication style and behavioral symptoms of dementia (BSD). The communication style of Nursing Assistants' (NAs), whose ethnic background is different from the residents, may contribute to BSD. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between non-Korean NAs' communication style and BSD in Korean-American (KA) nursing home residents with dementia. Twenty eight NAs and 20 KA residents were recruited from an ethno-specific nursing home. Research assistants observed and recorded NAs' communication style and residents' behavior simultaneously during routine care for 3 days. This study shows a trend that NAs' dementia and culturally appropriate communication style influenced the decreased behavioral symptoms. This finding suggests the need for training for NAs in dementia and culturally appropriate communication.

  1. The effect of a "surveillance nurse" telephone support intervention in a home care program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ronald; Godin, Lori

    2015-01-01

    This study is an evaluation of a unique "surveillance nurse" telephone support intervention for community-dwelling elderly individuals in a home care program. A combined propensity-based covariate-matching procedure was used to pair each individual who received the intervention ("treatment" condition, nT = 930) to a similar individual who did not receive the intervention ("control" condition, nC1 = 930) from among a large pool of potential control individuals (nC0 = 4656). The intervention consisted of regularly scheduled telephone calls from a surveillance nurse to proactively assess the individual's well-being, care plan status, use of and need for services (home support, adult day program, physiotherapy, etc.) and home environment (e.g., informal caregiver support). Treatment and control conditions were compared with respect to four service utilization outcomes: (1) rate of survival in the community before institutionalization in an assisted living or nursing home facility or death, (2) rate of emergency room registrations, (3) rate of acute care hospitalizations, and (4) rate of days in hospital, during home care enrollment. Results indicated a beneficial effect of the surveillance nurse intervention on reducing rate of service utilization by increasing the duration of the home care episode.

  2. Sending money home: a mixed-Methods study of remittances by migrant nurses in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Humphries, Niamh

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: This paper presents data on the remittances sent by migrant nurses to their families "back home". It gives voice to the experiences of migrant nurses and illustrates the financial obligations they maintain while working overseas. Although the international economic recession has decreased global remittance flows, they remain resilient. Drawing on the experiences of migrant nurses in Ireland, this paper indicates how and why migrants strive to maintain remittance flows, even in an economic downturn. METHODS: A mixed-methods approach was employed, and the paper draws on data from qualitative in-depth interviews undertaken with 21 migrant nurses in addition to a quantitative survey of 336 migrant nurses in Ireland. RESULTS: The survey of migrant nurses revealed that 87% (293) of the sample sent remittances on a regular basis. According to respondents, remittances made a huge difference in the lives of their family members back home. Remittances were used to ensure that family members could obtain access to health and education services. They were also used to provide an income source for family members who were unemployed or retired.As remittances played an essential role in supporting family members back home, respondent migrant nurses were reluctant to reduce the level of their remittances, despite the onset of a global recession. Respondents noted that an increased demand for remittances from their families coincided with a reduction in their own net salaries - as a result of increased taxes and reduced availability of overtime - and this was a cause for concern for Ireland\\'s migrant nurses. CONCLUSION: This paper provides insights into the importance of remittances in funding social support for family members in home countries. It also illustrates the sacrifices made by migrant nurses to ensure continuation of the remittances, particularly in the context of an economic recession.

  3. [Substitution in psychogeriatrics. A comparative study in nursing homes and substitution projects in Drenthe].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, M

    1995-02-01

    Due to a strong increase of the ageing population in the Netherlands there is a growing need for care for psychogeriatric patients. The shortage of beds in psychogeriatric nursing homes has led to the development of substitute care in residential homes for the elderly and in community centers. If substitution is realized in these substitute care projects in the sense that alternative services are delivered for patients who would otherwise have been admitted to nursing homes, the level of impairment and disruptive behaviour should be of the same level in nursing homes and substitute care projects. Groups of patients of three nursing homes, three day-treatment facilities, eight day-care-projects in residential homes for the elderly and seven centers for day-care in the community were compared. Sociodemographic characteristics, behaviour and care-patterns of all 670 patients who were in care on the first of October of 1992 in these services were investigated. An assessment-scale for elderly patients, based on the Stockton Geriatric Rating Scale, was used to investigate behaviour. Substitute care appears to be possible for a limited and specific group of patients. Substitution for the severely disturbed patients (over 40% of the nursing home patients) does not seem to be possible. Due to the development of substitute care for psychogeriatric patients in residential homes for the elderly and centers for day-care in the community, services seem to develop towards more specific and specialized care. We recommend the foundation of a psychogeriatric case register, which allows the study of the transfer of patients across facilities.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Interventions to nurture excellence in the nursing home culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutschman, M

    2001-08-01

    There is no one formula for culcure change. A joint steering committee of staff members can develop plans that will build trust, address each other as equals, and drive out fear as they move the process of change. Training and sharing information help staff recognize this is a process, not an event. New well-screened team members need training to integrate them into the culture. It is important to identify the knowledge and expertise of team members to maximize their energies and talents. Recruitment and retention of those who share the values of this culture are of paramount importance. It is worth the time and effort to secure commitment to these values. One example of this effort is a facility in Pennsylvania that, at its worst, had two thirds of its staff turnover in a year. The national average was 82% in 1995, an increase from 71.5% the year before. They were able to reduce their turnover rate to 27% by examining the hiring records and finding that workers with certain personality traits and attitudes were less likely to leave. They looked for compassion and communication skills, perceptions of older adults, ability to cope with death and dying, and ability to handle the unpleasant tasks of residene hygiene and bathroom visits. Current staff members determined and voted on best fit of candidates (Montague, 1997). Although training and evaluation are an important component of retention and commitment to values in any organization, training and evaluation of nursing home employees may be quite different from other employment. A nurse in a nursing home needs to be evaluated not only on clinical skills, but on communication skills, attitude, and leadership (Meyer, 1995). Then training and employee development programs can be targeted to specific areas for corrective action. What is taught in training and what occurs on the job should correspond, or role conflict occurs increasing the likelihood of turnover (Steffen, Nystrom, O'Connor, 1996). Although occasional

  5. Inter-rater reliability of nursing home quality indicators in the U.S

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Jason

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the US, Quality Indicators (QI's profiling and comparing the performance of hospitals, health plans, nursing homes and physicians are routinely published for consumer review. We report the results of the largest study of inter-rater reliability done on nursing home assessments which generate the data used to derive publicly reported nursing home quality indicators. Methods We sampled nursing homes in 6 states, selecting up to 30 residents per facility who were observed and assessed by research nurses on 100 clinical assessment elements contained in the Minimum Data Set (MDS and compared these with the most recent assessment in the record done by facility nurses. Kappa statistics were generated for all data items and derived for 22 QI's over the entire sample and for each facility. Finally, facilities with many QI's with poor Kappa levels were compared to those with many QI's with excellent Kappa levels on selected characteristics. Results A total of 462 facilities in 6 states were approached and 219 agreed to participate, yielding a response rate of 47.4%. A total of 5758 residents were included in the inter-rater reliability analyses, around 27.5 per facility. Patients resembled the traditional nursing home resident, only 43.9% were continent of urine and only 25.2% were rated as likely to be discharged within the next 30 days. Results of resident level comparative analyses reveal high inter-rater reliability levels (most items >.75. Using the research nurses as the "gold standard", we compared composite quality indicators based on their ratings with those based on facility nurses. All but two QI's have adequate Kappa levels and 4 QI's have average Kappa values in excess of .80. We found that 16% of participating facilities performed poorly (Kappa .75 on 12 or more QI's. No facility characteristics were related to reliability of the data on which Qis are based. Conclusion While a few QI's being used for public reporting

  6. End-of-life expectations and experiences among nursing home patients and their relatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosse, Anette; Schaufel, Margrethe Aase; Ruths, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Synthesize research about patients' and relatives' expectations and experiences on how doctors can improve end-of-life care in nursing homes. METHODS: We systematically searched qualitative studies in English in seven databases (Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Ageline, Cochrane...... Systematic Reviews and Cochrane Trials). We included 14 publications in the analysis with meta-ethnography. RESULTS: Patients and families emphasized the importance of health personnel anticipating illness trajectories and recognizing the information and palliation needed. Family members who became proxy....... CONCLUSION: Nursing home patients and their relatives wanted doctors more involved in end-of-life care. They expected doctors to acknowledge their preferences and provide guidance and symptom relief. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: High-quality end-of-life care in nursing homes relies on organization, funding...

  7. Running between the raindrops: the obligation dilemma of the social worker in the nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Sagit; Ayalon, Liat

    2015-02-01

    The authors examined perspectives of social workers working in nursing homes concerning their obligation to the older adult, the family, and the facility, and identified the dilemmas and difficulties that arise from these sometimes conflicting obligations. Authors conducted semistructured in-depth interviews with 15 social workers employed in nursing homes in Israel. Inter-theme consistencies and contradictions were elucidated, and descriptive and then interpretive categories were created to represent interview data. Social workers acknowl- edged their multiple, often contradictory loyalties to the older resident, the management of the institution, the staff, and the resident's family. The obligation dilemma was particularly evident in relocation decisions and suspected cases of elder abuse. The findings highlight the importance of the obligation dilemma in the work experience of social workers. Potential, implications for the care provided to older adults in nursing homes are discussed.

  8. Increasing enjoyable activities to treat depression in nursing home residents with dementia: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travers, Catherine

    2017-02-01

    This pilot study aimed to assess the feasibility and acceptability of a behavioral activities intervention (BE-ACTIV) in Australian nursing homes. BE-ACTIV was developed by researchers at the University of Louisville, USA, to improve mood and quality of life (QOL) in nursing home residents with mild to moderate dementia. An eight-week trial was conducted and 10 residents with mild to moderate dementia received the BE-ACTIV intervention while eight residents received a Walking and Talking intervention. Measures of depression (GDS-12R) and QOL (QOL-AD-NH) were administered prior to and following the interventions. Qualitative feedback indicated residents benefited from BE-ACTIV, evident by improved mood, although no statistically significant treatment effect was found. Moreover, the intervention was found to be feasible and acceptable to Australian nursing home staff and our findings highlight the importance of individualizing activities for people with dementia, of which 1:1 staff attention was a key component.

  9. Weight loss, Mortality and associated potentially modifiable nutritional risk factors among nursing home residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne Marie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this follow-up study is to assess the association between different potentially modifiable nutritional risk factors; weight loss after six and 12 months and mortality. Design and setting A one year follow-up project among Danish nursing home residents. Participants...... A total of 441 nursing home resident living in 11 nursing homes. Measurements Odds ratio was calculated and used to assess the strength of association between different potentially modifiable nutritional risk factors and nutritional status of the participants. The difference in mortality between those who...... died versus survivors was assessed by means of Fishers Exact Test Results Almost half experienced a loss of weight during the follow-up period. The nutritional risk factors significantly or borderline significantly associated with weight loss were; eating dependency, leaves 25% or more of food uneaten...

  10. Positive effects of experience in terminal care on nursing home staff in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Koji; Ohashi, Akira

    2011-09-01

    This study aimed to examine the psychological effects of terminal care experience on nursing home staff and analyze the differences between staff who are experienced and those who are inexperienced in providing terminal care. A mailed survey was conducted in 2007. A total of 37% (N = 72) of the participants had experience in terminal care in nursing homes. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed that the professional efficacy (a subscale of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey [MBI-GS]) and tenure (duration of service) of the experienced staff were significantly higher than those of the inexperienced staff. The high professional efficacy noted among the experienced staff suggests that the provision of terminal care in nursing homes does not necessarily lead to burnout among caregivers and may in fact serve as an important motivational factor.

  11. Re-emergence of posttraumatic stress disorder nightmares with nursing home admission: treatment with prazosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kim G; Rosen, Jules

    2013-02-01

    Seniors with a history of emotional trauma decades earlier can experience a recurrence of posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms when transitioning to a nursing home. We present the case of an 86-year-old male Holocaust survivor admitted to a nursing home for physical therapy and rehabilitation 6 weeks after the death of his wife; the patient was expressing a persistent death wish. Despite the multiple risk factors for depression, his distress was specifically related to the reemergence of nightly posttraumatic nightmares. Over the course of 1 week of treatment with 1 mg prazosin at bedtime, his nightmares and his death wish completely resolved. He achieved his rehabilitation goals and was discharged to a community setting. This report highlights the importance of considering posttraumatic stress disorder in nursing home residents with a history of emotional trauma, and understanding how to address these symptoms pharmacologically and nonpharmacologically.

  12. The effects of CON repeal on Medicaid nursing home and long-term care expenditures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, David C; Ohsfeldt, Robert L; Morrisey, Michael A

    2003-01-01

    Certificate-of-need (CON) and construction moratorium laws are used widely by states as a potential mechanism for constraining Medicaid nursing home expenditures. However, there is only limited empirical work examining whether these policies are effective at lowering Medicaid spending. Using aggregate state-level data from 1981 through 1998, this study found that states that repealed their CON and moratorium laws had no significant growth in either nursing home or long-term care Medicaid expenditures. In the context of declining occupancy rates within the nursing home market, this study provides strong evidence that states have little to fear in terms of increased expenditures with the repeal of CON and moratorium laws.

  13. Dignity and existential concerns among nursing homes residents from the perspective of their relatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caspari., Synnøve; Høy, Bente; Lohne, Vibeke

    2014-01-01

    Aims and objectives: The aim of this cross-country Scandinavian study was to explore how residents in nursing homes experience that their dignity is promoted and attended to. This is one part of the Scandinavian project in which we interviewed residents, relatives and staff members. Background......: The main subject concerns the dignity of residents of nursing homes for older people. This article brings forward results from interviews of relatives on how they experience that the dignity is met, promoted and attended to for their next of kin. Design: The study was qualitative with a hermeneutic...... approach. Methods: Qualitative research interviews of 28 relatives of residents at six participating nursing homes in Scandinavia. The results derive from analysis of the interviews using Kvale’s three levels of interpretation; self-understanding, common sense and a theoretical understanding. Results...

  14. Identifying patients at risk of nursing home admission: The Leeds Elderly Assessment Dependency Screening tool (LEADS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fear Jon

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Discharge from hospital to a nursing home represents a major event in the life of an older person and should only follow a comprehensive functional and medical assessment. A previous study identified 3 dependency scales able to discriminate across outcomes for older people admitted to an acute setting. We wished to determine if a single dependency scale derived from the 3 scales could be created. In addition could this new scale with other predictors be used as a comprehensive tool to identify patients at risk of nursing home admission. Methods Items from the 3 scales were combined and analysed using Rasch Analysis. Sensitivity and specificity analysis and ROC curves were applied to identify the most appropriate cut score. Binary logistic regression using this cut-off, and other predictive variables, were used to create a predictive algorithm score. Sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratio scores of the algorithm scores were used to identify the best predictive score for risk of nursing home placement. Results A 17-item (LEADS scale was derived, which together with four other indicators, had a sensitivity of 88% for patients at risk of nursing home placement, and a specificity of 85% for not needing a nursing home placement, within 2 weeks of admission. Conclusion A combined short 17-item scale of dependency plus other predictive variables can assess the risk of nursing home placement for older people in an acute care setting within 2 weeks of admission. This gives an opportunity for either early discharge planning, or therapeutic intervention to offset the risk of placement.

  15. Health-related profile and quality of life among nursing home residents: does pain matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Mimi M Y; Wan, Vanessa T C; Vong, Sinfia K S

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this exploratory cross-sectional study was to explore the health-related profile and quality of life among older persons living with and without pain in nursing homes. Ten nursing homes were approached, and 535 older persons were invited to join the study from 2009 to 2011. The nursing home residents' demographic information and information regarding their pain situation and the use of oral analgesic drug and nondrug therapy among the older residents with chronic pain were also collected. Residents' physical health (using the Barthel Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and Elderly Mobility Scores); psychologic health, including happiness, life satisfaction, depression, and loneliness (using the Happiness Scale, the Life Satisfaction Scale, the Geriatric Depression Scale, and the UCLA Loneliness Scale); and quality of life were investigated. Among the 535 nursing home residents, 396 (74%) of them suffered from pain, with mean pain scores of 4.09 ± 2.19, indicating medium pain intensity a remaining 139 (26%) reported no pain. The location of pain was mainly in the knees, back and shoulders. Our results demonstrated that, with the exception of the no-pain group (p nursing home residents' pain affected both their psychologic health, including happiness, life satisfaction, and depression, and their physical quality of life. Nevertheless, only one-half of the older persons with pain used oral analgesic drug or nondrug therapy to relieve their pain. Pain had a significant impact on their mobility and ADL, was positively correlated with happiness and life satisfaction, and was negatively correlated with loneliness and depression. Pain management is a high priority in elderly care; as such, innovative and interdisciplinary strategies are necessary to enhance quality of life particularly for older persons living in nursing homes.

  16. Trends in Postacute Care and Staffing in US Nursing Homes, 2001–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Denise A.; Feng, Zhanlian; Leland, Natalie E.; Gozalo, Pedro; Intrator, Orna; Mor, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to document the growth of postacute care and contemporaneous staffing trends in US nursing homes over the decade 2001 to 2010. Design We integrated data from all US nursing homes longitudinally to track annual changes in the levels of postacute care intensity, therapy staffing and direct-care staffing separately for freestanding and hospital-based facilities. Setting All Medicare/Medicaid-certified nursing homes from 2001 to 2010 based on the Online Survey Certification and Reporting System database merged with facility-level case mix measures aggregated from resident-level information from the Minimum Data Set and Medicare Part A claims. Measurements We created a number of aggregate case mix measures to approximate the intensity of postacute care per facility per year, including the proportion of SNF-covered person days, number of admissions per bed, and average RUG-based case mix index. We also created measures of average hours per resident day for physical and occupational therapists, PT/OT assistants, PT/OT aides, and direct-care nursing staff. Results In freestanding nursing homes, all postacute care intensity measures increased considerably each year throughout the study period. In contrast, in hospital-based facilities, all but one of these measures decreased. Similarly, therapy staffing has risen substantially in freestanding homes but declined in hospital-based facilities. Postacute care case mix acuity appeared to correlate reasonably well with therapy staffing levels in both types of facilities. Conclusion There has been a marked and steady shift toward postacute care in the nursing home industry in the past decade, primarily in freestanding facilities, accompanied by increased therapy staffing. PMID:23810390

  17. Construction and validation of a patient- and user-friendly nursing home version of the Geriatric Depression Scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongenelis, K.; Gerritsen, D. L.; Beekman, A. T. F.; Eisses, A. M. H.; Kluiter, H.; Ribbe, M. W.

    2007-01-01

    Objective To construct a patient- and user-friendly shortened version of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) that is especially suitable for nursing home patients. Methods The study was carried out on two different data bases including 23 Dutch nursing homes. Data on the GDS (n = 410), the Mini Men

  18. Diagnostic accuracy of the original 30-item and shortened versions of the Geriatric Depression Scale in nursing home patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongenelis, K; Eisses, AMH; Gerritsen, DL; Beekman, ATF; Kluiter, H; Ribbe, MW

    2005-01-01

    Objective To determine the diagnostic accuracy of the 30-item and shortened versions of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) in diagnosing depression in older nursing home patients. Method Three hundred and thirty-three older nursing home patients participated in a prospective cross-sectional study

  19. Psychotropic drug prescription in nursing home patients with dementia : influence of environmental correlates and staff distress on physicians' prescription behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, Sytse U; de Jonghe, Jos F M; Verhey, Frans R J; Koopmans, Raymond T C M

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to examine whether staff distress and aspects of the nursing home environment were associated with psychotropic drug use (PDU) in patients with dementia. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study of 1289 nursing home patients with dementia from 56 Dementia Specia

  20. Study of the effect of a liquid nutrition supplement on the nutritional status of psycho-geriatric nursing home patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters-Wesseling, W.; Wouters, A.E.J.; Kleijer, C.N.; Bindels, J.G.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.; Staveren, van W.A.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the acceptance of a multinutrient liquid nutrition supplement in psycho-geriatric nursing home patients and the effect on weight, plasma nutrients and activities of daily life. Design: Double-blind, placebo-controlled 12-week intervention study. Setting: Two nursing homes in

  1. Attributions of Agency and the Construction of Moral Order: Dementia, Death, and Dignity in Nursing-Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriquez, Jason

    2009-01-01

    Using evidence gathered during 18 months of participant-observation in 2 nursing homes and 65 interviews with staff, this article examines how nursing-home staff use agency as a rhetorical resource to construct a dignified workplace. Staff attribute agency to dying residents, saying they choose the timing and conditions of their death. Staff…

  2. Relationship between Staff-Reported Culture Change and Occupancy Rate and Organizational Commitment among Nursing Homes in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minhong; Choi, Jae-Sung; Lim, Jinseop; Kim, Young Sun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine culture change in nursing homes in South Korea and to identify the outcomes of culture change implementation. Design and Methods: Data were taken from survey responses from 223 top- or mid-level staff among nursing homes in South Korea that were selected through a proportionate random-stratified sampling method…

  3. The quality of nursing home care : do the opinions of family members change after implementation of emotion-oriented care?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finnema, E; de Lange, J; Droes, RM; Ribbe, M; van Tilburg, W

    2001-01-01

    Objective. The present study focuses on opinions on the quality of nursing home care of family members of nursing home residents with dementia. Furthermore, we examined whether family members' appreciation of the care increased as a result of the implementation of emotion-oriented care. Design. Rand

  4. Study protocol: cost-effectiveness of multidisciplinary nutritional support for undernutrition in older adults in nursing home and home-care: cluster randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne Marie; Gøgsig Christensen, Annette; Stenbæk Hansen, Birthe

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Older adults in nursing home and home-care are a particularly high-risk population for weight loss or poor nutrition. One negative consequence of undernutrition is increased health care costs. Several potentially modifiable nutritional risk factors increase the likelihood of weight loss......-effectiveness of nutritional support among undernourished older adults and none of these have used such a multidisciplinary approach. METHODS: An 11 week cluster randomized trial to assess the cost-effectiveness of multidisciplinary nutritional support for undernutrition in older adults in nursing home and home...... older adults in home-care and nursing home and contribute to important research. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov 2013 NCT01873456....

  5. Adherence of Pain Assessment to the German National Standard for Pain Management in 12 Nursing Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Osterbrink

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pain is very common among nursing home residents. The assessment of pain is a prerequisite for effective multiprofessional pain management. Within the framework of the German health services research project, ‘Action Alliance Pain-Free City Muenster’, the authors investigated pain assessment adherence according to the German national Expert Standard for Pain Management in Nursing, which is a general standard applicable to all chronic/acute pain-affected persons and highly recommended for practice.

  6. Fostering Activities of Daily Living by Intact Nursing Home Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Charles E.; Glaister, Judy; Brown, Alston; Phillips, Carolyn

    2007-01-01

    We assessed effectiveness of four education programs in providing nursing assistants with ability to produce a therapeutic milieu supportive of intact residents' activities of daily living, positive self-esteem and mood: (1) a combination of Orem's Systems of Nursing Care and Skinner's Applied Behavioral Analysis, (2) Applied Behavioral Analysis,…

  7. Advertising expenditures in the nursing home sector: evaluating the need for and purpose of advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kash, Bita A; Boyer, Gregory J

    2008-01-01

    Marketing and advertising activities in the nursing home sector have increased in recent years, following the example of hospitals and health systems. The reasons for this trend may be related to the growth in competition but are not clearly identified yet. Theoretically, advertising becomes necessary to gain an advantage over the competition. The purpose of this study was to identify the reasons for the variation in advertising expenditures among nursing homes in Texas. For this study, we merged 2003 data from the Texas Medicaid Nursing Facility Cost Report, the Texas Nursing Home Quality Reporting System, and the Area Resource File for Texas. Using the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index, we then examined the correlations between advertising expenses and the level of market concentration. We evaluated the association between advertising expenditures and market competition using two logistic and four linear regression models. Total advertising expenses in Texas nursing homes ranged from $0 to $165,000 per year. Higher advertising expenditures were associated with larger facilities, higher occupancy, and high Medicare census. Market competition, however, was not a significant predictor of such expenses. Advertising seems to be more resource-driven than market-driven. Therefore, some advertising expenditures may be unnecessary, may lack impact, and may even be wasteful. Reducing unnecessary advertising costs could free up resources, which may be allocated to necessary resident care activities.

  8. [Dementia-friendly architecture. Environments that facilitate wayfinding in nursing homes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquardt, G; Schmieg, P

    2009-10-01

    Spatial disorientation is among the first manifestations of dementia and a prime reason for institutionalization. However, the autonomy of residents and their quality of live are strongly linked with their ability to reach certain places within the nursing home. Also affected is the efficiency of the institutions and the quality of care provided.The physical environment has a great potential for supporting resident's residual wayfinding abilities. Until now little systematic research has been carried out to identify supportive architectural characteristics.For this exploratory study, extensive data on resident's spatial capabilities were collected in 30 German nursing homes. The architectural structure of the buildings was also analyzed. Within the nursing homes five identical, ADL-related wayfinding tasks were identified. Skilled nurses rated the resident's ability to perform those tasks on a three-point scale. The impact of the different architectural characteristics on the resulting scores was tested for statistical significance.Results show that people with advancing dementia are increasingly dependent on a compensating environment. Significant influencing factors are the number of residents per living area, the layout of the circulation system and the characteristics of the living/dining room. Smaller units facilitate wayfinding but larger entities may also provide good results, if they feature a straight circulation system without any changes in direction. Repetitive elements, such as several living/dining rooms, interfere with a resident's wayfinding abilities. These and further results were transformed into architectural policies and guidelines which can be used in the planning and remodelling of nursing homes.

  9. Quality Improvement in Nursing Homes: Identifying Depressed Residents is Critical to Improving Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crogan, Neval L; Evans, Bronwynne C

    2008-05-01

    The prevalence of depression in nursing home residents is three to five times higher than in older adults from the community.1 Depression is thought to be related to the gloomy institutionalized environment and an assortment of losses, including those associated with function, independence, social roles, friends and relatives, and past leisure activities.2 Despite the public's increased awareness of depression, it remains underrecognized and undertreated by professionals who care for older residents in nursing homes.3 It seems intuitive that depression must be recognized before it can be treated, yet our national long-term care system continues to utilize an unreliable scale from the Minimum Data Set as its foundation for assessment. Warnings of the scale's inadequacy have been sounded repeatedly almost since its conception4,5 and its potential role in lack of recognition and treatment of depression by nursing home staff, nurse practitioners, and physicians is a troubling one.The purpose of this article is to (1) report the prevalence of depression in a sub-sample of residents from a National Institutes of Health study whose depression was not detected by the MDS and, consequently, was previously untreated, (2) compare their nutritional and functional status with residents whose depressive states were previously detected by the MDS and treated, and (3) recommend quality improvement strategies for identification and treatment of depression in nursing home residents.

  10. Changes in the relationship between nursing home financial performance and quality of care under public reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeongyoung; Werner, Rachel M

    2011-07-01

    The relationship between financial performance and quality of care in nursing homes is not well defined and prior work has been mixed. The recent focus on improving the quality of nursing homes through market-based incentives such as public reporting may have changed this relationship, as public reporting provides nursing homes with increased incentives to engage in quality-based competition. If quality improvement activities require substantial production costs, nursing home profitability may become a more important predictor of quality under public reporting. This study explores the relationship between financial performance and quality of care and test whether this relationship changes under public reporting. Using a 10-year (fiscal years 1997-2006) panel data set of 9444 skilled nursing facilities in the US, this study employs a facility fixed-effects with and without instrumental variables approach to test the effect of finances on quality improvement and correct for potential endogeneity. The results show that better financial performance, as reflected by the 1-year lagged total profit margin, is modestly associated with higher quality but only after public reporting is initiated. These findings have important policy implications as federal and state governments use market-based incentives to increase demand for high-quality care and induce providers to compete based on quality.

  11. Trends in family ratings of experience with care and racial disparities among Maryland nursing homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue; Ye, Zhiqiu; Glance, Laurent G.; Temkin-Greener, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Background Providing equitable and patient-centered care is critical to ensuring high quality of care. Although racial/ethnic disparities in quality are widely reported for nursing facilities, it is unknown whether disparities exist in consumer experiences with care and how public reporting of consumer experiences affects facility performance and potential racial disparities. Methods We analyzed trends of consumer ratings publicly reported for Maryland nursing homes during 2007–2010, and determined whether racial/ethnic disparities in experiences with care changed during this period. Multivariate longitudinal regression models controlled for important facility and county characteristics and tested changes overall and by facility groups (defined based on concentrations of black residents). Consumer ratings were reported for: overall care; recommendation of the facility; staff performance; care provided; food & meals; physical environment; and autonomy & personal rights. Results Overall ratings on care experience remained relatively high (mean=8.3 on a one-to-ten scale) during 2007–2010. Ninety percent of survey respondents each year would recommend the facility to someone who needs nursing home care. Ratings on individual domains of care improved among all nursing homes in Maryland (p0.2 for trends in disparities). Conclusions Although Maryland nursing homes showed maintained or improved consumer ratings during the first 4 years of public reporting, gaps persisted between facilities with high versus low concentrations of minority residents. PMID:24926712

  12. Elmhurst Nursing Home, Hampstead Avenue, Glasnevin, Dublin 9.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sermeus, Walter

    2011-04-18

    Abstract Background Current human resources planning models in nursing are unreliable and ineffective as they consider volumes, but ignore effects on quality in patient care. The project RN4CAST aims innovative forecasting methods by addressing not only volumes, but quality of nursing staff as well as quality of patient care. Methods\\/Design A multi-country, multilevel cross-sectional design is used to obtain important unmeasured factors in forecasting models including how features of hospital work environments impact on nurse recruitment, retention and patient outcomes. In each of the 12 participating European countries, at least 30 general acute hospitals were sampled. Data are gathered via four data sources (nurse, patient and organizational surveys and via routinely collected hospital discharge data). All staff nurses of a random selection of medical and surgical units (at least 2 per hospital) were surveyed. The nurse survey has the purpose to measure the experiences of nurses on their job (e.g. job satisfaction, burnout) as well as to allow the creation of aggregated hospital level measures of staffing and working conditions. The patient survey is organized in a sub-sample of countries and hospitals using a one-day census approach to measure the patient experiences with medical and nursing care. In addition to conducting a patient survey, hospital discharge abstract datasets will be used to calculate additional patient outcomes like in-hospital mortality and failure-to-rescue. Via the organizational survey, information about the organizational profile (e.g. bed size, types of technology available, teaching status) is collected to control the analyses for institutional differences. This information will be linked via common identifiers and the relationships between different aspects of the nursing work environment and patient and nurse outcomes will be studied by using multilevel regression type analyses. These results will be used to simulate the impact of

  13. The Tower Nursing Home, 94/ 95 Cappaghmore, Clondalkin, Dublin 22.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sermeus, Walter

    2011-04-18

    Abstract Background Current human resources planning models in nursing are unreliable and ineffective as they consider volumes, but ignore effects on quality in patient care. The project RN4CAST aims innovative forecasting methods by addressing not only volumes, but quality of nursing staff as well as quality of patient care. Methods\\/Design A multi-country, multilevel cross-sectional design is used to obtain important unmeasured factors in forecasting models including how features of hospital work environments impact on nurse recruitment, retention and patient outcomes. In each of the 12 participating European countries, at least 30 general acute hospitals were sampled. Data are gathered via four data sources (nurse, patient and organizational surveys and via routinely collected hospital discharge data). All staff nurses of a random selection of medical and surgical units (at least 2 per hospital) were surveyed. The nurse survey has the purpose to measure the experiences of nurses on their job (e.g. job satisfaction, burnout) as well as to allow the creation of aggregated hospital level measures of staffing and working conditions. The patient survey is organized in a sub-sample of countries and hospitals using a one-day census approach to measure the patient experiences with medical and nursing care. In addition to conducting a patient survey, hospital discharge abstract datasets will be used to calculate additional patient outcomes like in-hospital mortality and failure-to-rescue. Via the organizational survey, information about the organizational profile (e.g. bed size, types of technology available, teaching status) is collected to control the analyses for institutional differences. This information will be linked via common identifiers and the relationships between different aspects of the nursing work environment and patient and nurse outcomes will be studied by using multilevel regression type analyses. These results will be used to simulate the impact of

  14. Evidence-based practices for the prevention of weight loss in nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyck, Mary J; Schumacher, Julie Raeder

    2011-03-01

    Weight loss is common among nursing home residents. Food intake is often inadequate for elderly residents but is only one of several factors contributing to potential weight loss. Three common issues resulting in weight loss include starvation (or wasting), cachexia, and sarcopenia. Significant weight loss leads to increased mortality, increased morbidity, and decreased quality of life. The purpose of this article is to discuss the geriatric syndrome of weight loss in elderly nursing home residents and provide recommendations to decrease and prevent weight loss. A list of available evidence-based protocols related to weight loss issues is provided.

  15. Multifaceted nutritional intervention among nursing-home residents has a positive influence on nutrition and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne Marie; Damkjær, Karin; Beyer, Nina

    2008-01-01

    intervention study with nutrition (chocolate and homemade oral supplements), group exercise twice a week (45-60 min, moderate intensity), and oral care intervention one to two times a week, with the aim of improving nutritional status and function in elderly nursing-home residents. A follow-up visit was made 4......-home residents by means of a multifaceted intervention consisting of chocolate, homemade supplements, group exercise, and oral care. (C) 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved....

  16. 48 CFR 853.215-70 - VA Form 10-1170, Application for Furnishing Nursing Home Care to Beneficiaries of VA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., Application for Furnishing Nursing Home Care to Beneficiaries of VA. 853.215-70 Section 853.215-70 Federal... 853.215-70 VA Form 10-1170, Application for Furnishing Nursing Home Care to Beneficiaries of VA. VA Form 10-1170, Application for Furnishing Nursing Home Care to Beneficiaries of VA, will be used...

  17. Efficacy and effectiveness as aspects of cluster randomized trials with nursing home residents: methodological insights from a pneumonia prevention trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ness, Peter H; Peduzzi, Peter N; Quagliarello, Vincent J

    2012-11-01

    This report discusses how methodological aspects of study efficacy and effectiveness combine in cluster randomized trials in nursing homes. Discussion focuses on the relationships between these study aspects in the Pneumonia Reduction in Institutionalized Disabled Elders (PRIDE) trial, an ongoing cluster randomized clinical trial of pneumonia prevention among nursing home residents launched in October 2009 in Greater New Haven, Connecticut. This clinical trial has enrolled long-term care nursing home residents, over 65years in age, who have either inadequate oral care or swallowing difficulty, previously identified risk factors for pneumonia. It has used a multicomponent intervention consisting of manual tooth/gum brushing, 0.12% chlorhexidine oral rinse administered twice daily by nurses, and upright feeding positioning at meals to reduce rates of radiographically documented pneumonia. Cluster randomization is attractive for nursing home intervention studies because physical proximity and administrative arrangements make it difficult to deliver different interventions to residents of the same nursing home. Implementing an intervention in an entire home requires integration into the daily life of residents and into the administrative procedures of the nursing home. This characteristic of nursing home cluster randomized trials makes them approximate "real-world" research contexts, but implementation can be challenging. The PRIDE trial of pneumonia prevention utilized specific methodological choices that include both efficacy and effectiveness elements. Cluster randomized trials in nursing homes having elements of both efficacy and effectiveness (i.e., hybrid designs) can address some of the methodological challenges of conducting clinical research in nursing homes; they have distinctive advantages and some limitations.

  18. Educational interventions to empower nursing home residents: a systematic literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoberer, Daniela; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Breimaier, Helga E; Halfens, Ruud JG; Lohrmann, Christa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of the study Health education is essential to improve health care behavior and self-management. However, educating frail, older nursing home residents about their health is challenging. Focusing on empowerment may be the key to educating nursing home residents effectively. This paper examines educational interventions that can be used to empower nursing home residents. Methods A systematic literature search was performed of the databases PubMed, CINAHL, CENTRAL, PsycINFO, and Embase, screening for clinical trials that dealt with resident education and outcomes in terms of their ability to empower residents. An additional, manual search of the reference lists and searches with SIGLE and Google Scholar were conducted to identify gray literature. Two authors independently appraised the quality of the studies found and assigned levels to the evidence reported. The results of the studies were grouped according to their main empowering outcomes and described narratively. Results Out of 427 identified articles, ten intervention studies that addressed the research question were identified. The main educational interventions used were group education sessions, motivational and encouragement strategies, goal setting with residents, and the development of plans to meet defined goals. Significant effects on self-efficacy and self-care behavior were reported as a result of the interventions, which included group education and individual counseling based on resident needs and preferences. In addition, self-care behavior was observed to significantly increase in response to function-focused care and reasoning exercises. Perceptions and expectations were not improved by using educational interventions with older nursing home residents. Conclusion Individually tailored, interactive, continuously applied, and structured educational strategies, including motivational and encouraging techniques, are promising interventions that can help nursing home residents become more

  19. Nurses speak out for home care: winning the last great civil rights battle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halamandaris, Val J

    2009-06-01

    In closing, it is clear that home care nurses are a very special breed. They are missionaries, committed to the goal of helping vulnerable Americans manage their health care needs and to preserving the freedoms and the independence that everyone cherishes. As is clear from the vignettes above, their first and last thoughts each day are for the well-being of their patients. They are so busy providing sophisticated care for a raft of complex medical problems common to their patients and filling out Medicare forms that they sometimes forget to take care of themselves. There is no doubt that they make a difference in the lives of patients and their families. Historically, nurses have been reluctant to take time away from caring for patients to take part in politics. As is evident from the summaries above and the stories of nurses from all 50 states that follow, nurses have had a change of heart. They have reached the conclusion that they must advocate for the aged, infirm, disabled and dying patients because patients cannot speak out for themselves. More and more nurses are becoming involved. One out of every 44 voters today is a nurse. Nurses show up at the polls; home care nurses have made it their responsibility to help make sure that homebound person vote by absentee ballot. They are also committed to march, to speak out for home care and hospice in what more and more are coming to call The Last Great Civil Rights Battle. They are also pushing for the inclusion of home and community based long-term care as part of national health care reform. They believe that home care is the answer to keeping the 12 percent of Americans who suffer from multiple chronic diseases and generate 75 percent of U.S. health care costs out of the hospital. The historian Arnold Toynbee put all these issues in perspective when he wrote that it is possible to measure the longevity and the accomplishment of any society by a common yardstick. I heard President John F. Kennedy quote Toynbee in

  20. Barriers to home care for terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan migrants, perceived by GPs and nurses: a survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaff, F.M.; Francke, A.L.

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous qualitative research proved that relatives of elderly terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan immigrants experience several barriers to the use of Dutch professional home care. The aim of this study was to explore how general practitioners and home care nurses perceive the home care

  1. Barriers to home care for terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan migrants, perceived by GPs and nurses: a survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, F.M. de; Francke, A.L.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous qualitative research proved that relatives of elderly terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan immigrants experience several barriers to the use of Dutch professional home care. The aim of this study was to explore how general practitioners and home care nurses perceive the home care

  2. Exploring the Cost and Value of Private versus Shared Bedrooms in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, Margaret; Cassella, Christine

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: There is debate about the relative merits and costs of private versus shared bedrooms in nursing homes, particularly in light of the current efforts at creating both cost-efficient and person-centered care facilities. The purpose of this project was to explore the extent to which there is evidence-based information that supports the…

  3. BNP and NT-proBNP, Predictors of 1-Year Mortality in Nursing Home Residents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barents, Maaike; Hillege, Hans H. L.; van der Horst, Iwan C. C.; de Boer, Rudolph A.; Koster, J.; Muskiet, Frits A. J.; de Jongste, Mike J. L.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate 1-year mortality prediction of B type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N terminal-proBNP (NT-proBNP) in institutionalized elderly with multiple morbidities. Design: Prospective cross-sectional study. Setting: One nursing home. Participants: Ninety-three residents (mean age 81

  4. The Effect of Gambling Activities on Happiness Levels of Nursing Home Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Mark R.; Nastally, Becky L.; Waterman, Amber

    2010-01-01

    The current study evaluated the effect of participating in simulated gambling activities on happiness levels of 3 nursing home residents. A 4-component analysis was used to measure objective responses associated with happiness during baseline, varying durations of engagement in simulated gambling activities, and 2 follow-up periods. Results…

  5. How Do People Make Continence Care Happen? An Analysis of Organizational Culture in Two Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Stacie Salsbury

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Although nursing homes (NHs) are criticized for offering poor quality continence care, little is known about the organizational processes that underlie this care. This study investigated the influence of organizational culture on continence care practices in two NHs. Design and Methods: This ethnographic study explored continence care…

  6. [Animal assisted therapy in a long-term care nursing home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudzyk, Agnés; Bourque, Monique; Guilbert, Héléne; Seguin, Anne Dahaba; Savoye, Marie-Jo

    2011-01-01

    Animal assisted therapy sessions have been set up at the Bellevaux nursing home in Besançon. The project has required a number of specific procedures and training courses to be put in place as well as the involvement of different departments. The sessions give real pleasure to the residents and produce interesting results.

  7. Distance Learning: A Strategy for Improving Incontinence Care in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Anna N.; Schnelle, John F.; Yamashita, Takashi; Patry, Gail; Prasauskas, Ruta

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This article describes a distance learning model designed to help nursing homes implement incontinence management best practices. A basic premise is that translating research into practice requires both a feasible intervention and a dissemination strategy responsive to the target audience's needs. Design and Methods: Over 8 months, nurse…

  8. The association of Nursing Home Compare quality measures with market competition and occupancy rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Nicholas G; Liu, Darren; Engberg, John

    2008-01-01

    Since 2002, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services have reported quality measures on the Nursing Home Compare Web site. It has been assumed that nursing homes are able to make improvements on these measures. In this study researchers examined nursing homes to see whether they have improved their quality scores, after accounting for regression to the mean. Researchers also examined whether gains varied according to market competition or market occupancy rates. They identified some regression to the mean for the quality measure scores over time; nevertheless, they also determined that some nursing homes had indeed made small improvements in their quality measure scores. As would be predicted based on the market-driven mechanism underlying quality improvements using report cards, the greatest improvements occurred in the most competitive markets and in those with the Lowest average occupancy rates. As policies to promote more competition in Long-term care proceed, further reducing occupancy rates, further, albeit small, quality gains will likely be made in the future.

  9. Learning to care for older patients : hospitals and nursing homes as learning environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huls, Marije; de Rooij, Sophia E; Diepstraten, Annemie; Koopmans, Raymond; Helmich, Esther

    2015-01-01

    CONTEXT: A significant challenge facing health care is the ageing of the population, which calls for a major response in medical education. Most clinical learning takes place within hospitals, but nursing homes may also represent suitable learning environments in which students can gain competencies

  10. Learning to care for older patients: hospitals and nursing homes as learning environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huls, M.; Rooij, S.E. De; Diepstraten, A.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Helmich, E.

    2015-01-01

    CONTEXT: A significant challenge facing health care is the ageing of the population, which calls for a major response in medical education. Most clinical learning takes place within hospitals, but nursing homes may also represent suitable learning environments in which students can gain competencies

  11. Consumer Satisfaction in Long-Term Care: State Initiatives in Nursing Homes and Assisted Living Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Timothy J.; Lucas, Judith A.; Castle, Nicholas G.; Robinson, Joanne P.; Crystal, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: We report the results of a survey of state initiatives that measure resident satisfaction in nursing homes and assisted living facilities, and we describe several model programs for legislators and public administrators contemplating the initiation of their own state programs. Design and Methods: Data on state initiatives and programs…

  12. Family Perspectives on End-of-Life Care Experiences in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetle, Terrie; Shield, Renee; Teno, Joan; Miller, Susan C.; Welch, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to expand knowledge regarding end-of-life care received in nursing homes through the use of narrative interviews with family members close to the decedents. Design and Methods: We conducted follow-up qualitative interviews with 54 respondents who had participated in an earlier national survey of 1,578…

  13. A Framework for Categorizing Social Interactions Related to End-of-Life Care in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bern-Klug, Mercedes

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Almost half of people age 85 and older who die annually in the United States die as nursing home residents, yet because it is not always clear who is close to death, not all residents who might benefit from end-of-life care receive it. The purpose of this study is to develop a framework for organizing social interactions related to…

  14. Model medication management process in Australian nursing homes using business process modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Siyu; Yu, Ping

    2013-01-01

    One of the reasons for end user avoidance or rejection to use health information systems is poor alignment of the system with healthcare workflow, likely causing by system designers' lack of thorough understanding about healthcare process. Therefore, understanding the healthcare workflow is the essential first step for the design of optimal technologies that will enable care staff to complete the intended tasks faster and better. The often use of multiple or "high risk" medicines by older people in nursing homes has the potential to increase medication error rate. To facilitate the design of information systems with most potential to improve patient safety, this study aims to understand medication management process in nursing homes using business process modeling method. The paper presents study design and preliminary findings from interviewing two registered nurses, who were team leaders in two nursing homes. Although there were subtle differences in medication management between the two homes, major medication management activities were similar. Further field observation will be conducted. Based on the data collected from observations, an as-is process model for medication management will be developed.

  15. Lethality of Alzheimer disease and its impact on nursing home placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, Henry Michael; Neumann, Peter J; Lieberburg, Ivan M; Townsend, Raymond J

    2010-01-01

    This analysis evaluates the progression of Alzheimer disease (AD) severity and compares the life expectancy and nursing home placement rates for AD patients with the same measures in the general population. Data from the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer Disease were analyzed to estimate expected survival, time spent in each Clinical Dementia Rating stage, and nursing home admission rate for a hypothetical cohort of patients aged 70 years with new-onset AD. Corresponding estimates for the US general population were calculated from the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey and the 2003 life table estimates from the US Census Bureau. Deaths from all causes by age 80 years are expected in 61% of AD patients and in 30% of the general population. From the age of 70 to 80 years, a typical AD patient spends 4 years at Clinical Dementia Rating stage 3 (severe), 3 years at stage 2 (moderate), and 3 years at stage 1 (mild). Nursing home admission by the age of 80 years is expected for approximately 75% of surviving AD patients, but for only 4% of the general population. Among persons aged > or =65 years, reported age-adjusted and sex-adjusted mortality rates for AD increased to 33% from 1999 to 2004.

  16. Dementia and depression among nursing home residents in Lebanon : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chahine, L. M.; Bijlsma, A.; Hospers, A. P. N.; Chemali, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Background The proportion of elderly in the Lebanese population is 7.1% and this is expected to increase to 10.2% by the year 2025. The nursing home (NH) population in Lebanon has not been studied. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of dementia and depression among a portion of

  17. Factors Related to Social-Emotional Problem Behavior in Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergus, Esther O.; And Others

    Data on demographics, physical capability and social-emotional behavioral variables for 134 residents between the ages of 50 and 96 were collected in four nursing homes to examine the dimensions related to problem behaviors. Social-emotional behaviors related on six scales of reliabilities ranging from .90 to .74. The scales included depression,…

  18. Hospice Use among Urban Black and White U.S. Nursing Home Decedents in 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepore, Michael J.; Miller, Susan C.; Gozalo, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Medicare hospice is a valuable source of quality care at the end of life, but its lower use by racial minority groups is of concern. This study identifies factors associated with hospice use among urban Black and White nursing home (NH) decedents in the United States. Design and Methods: Multiple data sources are combined and multilevel…

  19. The effect of depression on social engagement in newly admitted Dutch nursing home residents.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, W.; Pot, A.M.; Kerkstra, A.; Ooms, M.; Muller, M.; Ribbe, M.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To study the effect of depression (high levels of depressive symptoms) on social engagement. Design and Methods: In 65 nursing homes in the Netherlands, 562 newly admitted residents were assessed at admission. Social engagement was measured with the MDS Index of Social Engagement. A multiva

  20. Variation in the Use of Federal and State Civil Money Penalties for Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Charlene; Tsoukalas, Theodore; Rudder, Cynthia; Mollot, Richard J.; Carrillo, Helen

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The study examined factors associated with state variations in the use of federal and state civil money penalties (CMPs) for nursing homes. Design and Methods: We collected federal and state CMP data from state survey and certification agencies for 2004. We also used federal CMP data from the federal enforcement action database for…

  1. The influence of drug use on fall incidents among nursing home residents: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.S. Sterke (Carolyn); A.P. Verhagen (Arianne); E.F. van Beeck (Ed); T.J.M. van der Cammen (Tischa)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Falls are a major health problem among the elderly, particularly in nursing homes. Abnormalities of balance and gait, psychoactive drug use, and dementia have been shown to contribute to fall risk. Methods: We conducted a systematic review of the literature to investigate whi

  2. Prevalence and predictors of neuropsychiatric symptoms in cognitively impaired nursing home patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, Sytse; Koopmans, Raymond; Verhey, Frans

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms and the influence of predictive factors in cognitively impaired nursing home patients were reviewed. Articles were identified by means of a MEDLINE and PsychInfo literature search. Neuropsychiatric symptoms were present in more than 80% of the cognitively

  3. Prevalence of heart failure in nursing homes : a systematic literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daamen, Marielle A. M. J.; Schols, Jos M. G. A.; Jaarsma, Tiny; Hamers, Jan P. H.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Heart failure is an important problem in western countries. In nursing home residents heart failure is expected to be highly prevalent. However, accurate diagnosis of heart failure in these patients is often hampered due to atypical findings and concomitant co-morbidity. In order to de

  4. Prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms in a large sample of Dutch nursing home patients with dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, Sytse U; Derksen, Els; Verhey, Frans R J; Koopmans, Raymond T C M

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms of dementia patients in Dutch nursing homes. METHODS: Cross-sectional study in a large sample of 1322 demented patients living in 59 dementia special care units (SCUs) in The Netherlands. Symptoms were observed by licensed vocational

  5. Rural-Urban Differences in End-of-Life Nursing Home Care: Facility and Environmental Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkin-Greener, Helena; Zheng, Nan Tracy; Mukamel, Dana B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the study: This study examines urban-rural differences in end-of-life (EOL) quality of care provided to nursing home (NH) residents. Data and Methods: We constructed 3 risk-adjusted EOL quality measures (QMs) for long-term decedent residents: in-hospital death, hospice referral before death, and presence of severe pain. We used…

  6. High-performance workplace practices in nursing homes: an economic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Christine E

    2014-02-01

    To develop implications for research, practice and policy, selected economics and human resources management research literature was reviewed to compare and contrast nursing home culture change work practices with high-performance human resource management systems in other industries. The organization of nursing home work under culture change has much in common with high-performance work systems, which are characterized by increased autonomy for front-line workers, self-managed teams, flattened supervisory hierarchy, and the aspiration that workers use specific knowledge gained on the job to enhance quality and customization. However, successful high-performance work systems also entail intensive recruitment, screening, and on-going training of workers, and compensation that supports selective hiring and worker commitment; these features are not usual in the nursing home sector. Thus despite many parallels with high-performance work systems, culture change work systems are missing essential elements: those that require higher compensation. If purchasers, including public payers, were willing to pay for customized, resident-centered care, productivity gains could be shared with workers, and the nursing home sector could move from a low-road to a high-road employment system.

  7. Identifying Changeable Barriers to Family Involvement in the Nursing Home for Cognitively Impaired Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Port, Cynthia Lindman

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Barriers to family involvement in the nursing home with the potential for change through intervention are examined, including transportation, caregiver health, relationships with staff, and resident characteristics. Design and Methods: Data were collected for 93 family caregiver-resident pairs by means of telephone interviews and chart…

  8. Social interactions between people with dementia: pilot evaluation of an observational instrument in a nursing home

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mabire, J.B.; Gay, M.C.; Vrignaud, P.; Garitte, C.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In dementia, cognitive and psychological disorders might interfere with maintaining social interactions. We have little information about the nature of these interactions of people with dementia in nursing homes. The aim of this study is to investigate social interactions between people

  9. Learning by Living: Life-Altering Medical Education through Nursing Home-Based Experiential Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugliucci, Marilyn R.; Weiner, Audrey

    2013-01-01

    The University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine Learning by Living Project (referred to as Learning by Living) was piloted in 2006 as an experiential medical education learning model. Since its inception, medical and other health professions students have been "admitted" into nursing homes to live the life of an older adult nursing…

  10. Determinants of quality of life in nursing home residents with dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetzels, R B; Zuidema, S U; de Jonghe, J F M; Verhey, F R J; Koopmans, R T C M

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: The goal of this study is to assess the relationship between quality of life (QoL), neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS), psychotropic drug use (PDU) and patient characteristics in a large group of nursing home residents with dementia. METHODS: This cross-sectional observational study included 288

  11. Reactions and Interventions for Delusions in Nursing Home Residents with Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska; Golander, Hava; Arnheim, Giora; Cohen, Rinat

    2014-06-01

    This is a qualitative and quantitative study examining institutional staff members' reactions to delusions experienced by nursing home residents. Participants were 38 nursing home residents aged 65 and older, diagnosed with dementia. Data were collected from 8 nursing homes in Israel between June 2007 and January 2009. Assessments included Behavioral Pathology in Alzheimer's Disease Rating Scale, Neuropsychiatric Inventory: Nursing Home version, Etiological Assessment of Psychotic Symptoms In Dementia, Activities of Daily Living, and Mini-Mental State Examination. A wide variety of interventions with dementia-related symptoms was found to be effective to varying degrees. This included general approaches for a variety of symptoms as well as symptom-specific interventions. Caregivers do not always seem to be aware that multiple approaches are available to them when dealing with dementia. The most effective approaches may be those tailored to the individual. Combining interventions may increase overall effectiveness. Caregiver's experience and the institutional culture may affect the choice of intervention used, either positively or negatively.

  12. Interdisciplinary Care Planning and the Written Care Plan in Nursing Homes: A Critical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellefield, Mary Ellen

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This article is a critical review of the history, research evidence, and state-of-the-art technology in interdisciplinary care planning and the written plan of care in American nursing homes. Design and Methods: We reviewed educational and empirical literature. Results: Interdisciplinary care planning and the written care plan are…

  13. Work-home interference among nurses: reciprocal relationships with job demands and health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, van der Beatrice I.J.M.; Demerouti, Evangelia; Bakker, Arnold B.; Hasselhorn, Hans-Martin

    2008-01-01

    Aims: This paper is a report of a study with three aims: (i) to investigate whether emotional, quantitative and physical demands have a causal, negative impact on nurses' health; (ii) to examine whether work-home interference can explain this effect, by playing a mediating role; and (iii) to test th

  14. Anthropometric measurements may be informative for nursing home-acquired pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yardimci, Bulent; Aksoy, Sevki Murat; Ozkaya, Ismail; Demir, Tarik; Tezcan, Gulsen; Kaptanoglu, Aysegul Yildirim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the relationship between anthropometric measurements and Nursing Home-Acquired Pneumonia (NHAP) risk. Methods: Consecutive patients of 65 years or elderly who were living in the Balikli Rum Hospital Nursing Homes were included in this prospective study. At the beginning of this study, the patients’ anthropometrics values were measured. The patients were followed for one year, and any incidences of pneumonia attacks were recorded. The relationship between the anthropometric measurements and pneumonia occurrences was analyzed. Results: There were 133 inmates at the initial assessments. Of 108 patients who were eligible for the study, 77 (72.2%) were female and 37 (27.8%) were male. The mean age of the group was 79.8±10.5. Patients were assigned to a group according to the presence of pneumonia during the one -year follow-up. There were 74 (55.6%) patients who had suffered from at least one attack of pneumonia during the follow-up period. The mean triceps skinfold was significantly thinner in the pneumonia group, and the mean handgrip measurements in both the dominant and non-dominant hands were significantly weaker in the pneumonia group. Furthermore, the frequency of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases (COPD) was significantly higher in this group (p < 0.001). Conclusions: The risk of pneumonia was high in the elderly population who live in nursing homes. Simple anthropometric values may be predictive of the potential for Nursing Home-Acquired Pneumonia. PMID:27375716

  15. Radical Redesign of Nursing Homes: Applying the Green House Concept in Tupelo, Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabig, Judith; Thomas, William; Kane, Rosalie A.; Cutler, Lois J.; McAlilly, Steve

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: We present the concept of the Green House, articulated by William Thomas as a radically changed, "deinstitutionalized" nursing home well before its first implementation, and we describe and discuss implications from the first Green Houses in Tupelo, Mississippi. Design and Methods: Green Houses are small, self-contained houses for 10 or…

  16. Maslow Hierarchy of Needs and OBRA 1987: Toward Need Satisfaction by Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umoren, Joseph A.

    1992-01-01

    To improve well-being of nursing home residents and ensure compliance with the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act, programs aimed at improving quality of life must strive to satisfy higher level needs of the elderly as identified in Maslow's hierarchy. (SK)

  17. [Stroke rehabilitation in nursing homes: intensity of and motivation for physiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wissink, K.S.; Eijk, M. van; Buijck, B.I.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Zuidema, S.U.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Stroke is a frequent and potential invalidating disease, of which recovery can be improved by rehabilitation. In The Netherlands old and frail stroke patients are rehabilitated in nursing homes. Probably, the intensity of and motivation for physiotherapy are important for successful di

  18. Patient Safety Culture and the Association with Safe Resident Care in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kali S.; Hyer, Kathryn; Castle, Nicholas G.; Branch, Laurence G.; Andel, Ross; Weech-Maldonado, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the study: Studies have shown that patient safety culture (PSC) is poorly developed in nursing homes (NHs), and, therefore, residents of NHs may be at risk of harm. Using Donabedian's Structure-Process-Outcome (SPO) model, we examined the relationships among top management's ratings of NH PSC, a process of care, and safety outcomes.…

  19. Down and drowsy? Do apathetic nursing home residents experience low quality of life?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, DL; Jongenelis, K; Steverink, N; Ooms, ME; Ribbe, MW

    2005-01-01

    This cross-sectional study investigated the relationship between apathy and quality of life (QOL) in nursing home residents (n = 227). In all, 92 residents could be assessed with the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and the Philadelphia Geriatric Centre Mora

  20. The link between individual expectations and savings: Do nursing home expectations matter?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleinjans, Kristin J.; Lee, Jinkook

    Preparing for the end of life, especially for the prospect of needing long-term care, is an important issue facing older Americans. Those who reach age 65 have a 40% chance of going into a nursing home in their remaining lifetime, and about 10% of those who do will stay there for at least five ye...

  1. Translating Research into Practice in Nursing Homes: Can We Close the Gap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Anna N.; Applebaum, Robert A.; Schnelle, John F.; Simmons, Sandra F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: A gap between research and practice in many nursing home (NH) care areas persists despite efforts by researchers, policy makers, advocacy groups, and NHs themselves to close it. The reasons are many, but two factors that have received scant attention are the dissemination process itself and the work of the disseminators or change agents.…

  2. Knowledge and perspectives of Dutch home heathcare nurses regarding medication frequently used by older people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sino, Carolien; Munnik, Aukje; Schuurmans, Marieke

    2013-01-01

    Home healthcare nurses in their roles as caregivers, educators and administrators of medications are particularly well positioned to act on a preventive way to be alert of adverse drug reactions. However, knowledge about medication and a professional attitude is required. To describe medication-rela

  3. Factors Associated with Problematic Vocalizations in Nursing Home Residents with Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Cornelia; Richards, Kathy; Lambert, Corinne; Doan, Rebecca; Landes, Reid D.; Whall, Ann; Algase, Donna; Kolanowski, Ann; Feldman, Zachary

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: Problematic vocalizations (PVs) are the most frequent and persistent disruptive behaviors exhibited by nursing home residents with dementia. Understanding factors associated with these behaviors are important to prevent or reduce them. We used the Need-Driven Dementia-Compromised Behavior model to identify the characteristics…

  4. Observational report with regard to thermal comfort in nursing homes; Signaleringsrapport inzake thermische behaaglijkheid in verpleeghuizen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-08

    A large number of studies on the subject of thermal (dis)comfort for patients in nursing homes in the summer is summarized. [Dutch] In dit signaleringsrapport is een groot aantal onderzoeken samengevat welke door of in opdracht van het Bouwcollege zijn uitgevoerd op het gebied van thermische (on)behaaglijkheid voor patienten (somatisch en psychogeriatrisch) in verpleeghuizen onder zomeromstandigheden.

  5. Connection, regulation, and care plan innovation: a case study of four nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S; Lekan-Rutledge, Deborah; Utley-Smith, Queen; Ammarell, Natalie; Bailey, Donald; Piven, Mary L; Corazzini, Kirsten; Anderson, Ruth A

    2006-01-01

    We describe how connections among nursing home staff impact the care planning process using a complexity science framework. We completed six-month case studies of four nursing homes. Field observations (n = 274), shadowing encounters (n = 69), and in-depth interviews (n = 122) of 390 staff at all levels were conducted. Qualitative analysis produced a conceptual/thematic description and complexity science concepts were used to produce conceptual insights. We observed that greater levels of staff connection were associated with higher care plan specificity and innovation. Connection of the frontline nursing staff was crucial for (1) implementation of the formal care plan and (2) spontaneous informal care planning responsive to changing resident needs. Although regulations could theoretically improve cognitive diversity and information flow in care planning, we observed instances of regulatory oversight resulting in less specific care plans and abandonment of an effective care planning process. Interventions which improve staff connectedness may improve resident outcomes.

  6. Testing a two step Nursing intervention focused on decreasing rehospitalizations and nursing home sdmission post discharge from acute care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosted, Elizabeth Emilie; Poulsen, Ingrid; Hendriksen, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Older adults are at high risk of readmission on discharge from the Acute Medical and Emergency Department (ED). This study examines the effect of a two-stage nursing assessment and intervention to address older adults' uncompensated problems and thus intend to prevent readmission and functional...... decline. A randomized controlled study was conducted. Included were 271 patients aged 70 and over admitted to an ED. A brief standardized nursing assessment and intervention was carried out after discharge and at follow-up. No effect was found on readmission to hospital, admission to nursing home......, or death but the intervention group was less likely to be at risk of depression after 180 days. Whether this method can be recommended needs further study as well as knowledge is needed as to the organization and to reveal older adults' experiences on follow-up after ED stay....

  7. Automatic control with fuzzy logic of home-made beer production in maceration and cooking stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano Luján Corro

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The process of home-made beer production in the malt maceration and cooking stages was controlled automatically with fuzzy logic, across different performers considering the time and temperature of the process, using 2009LabVIEW. The equipment was mainly composed of three 20 L capacity stainless steel containers (water supply, maceration and cooking, an additional hops container, a data acquisition card (PIC 16F877a micro controller, three LM35 temperature sensors and 11 on/off type performers, which were governed by a total of 47 Mandani type fuzzy rules with trapezoidal membership functions, using the method of center area for the defuzzification. The performers: electrovalves (5, pumps (2, heaters (3 and a stirrer, in approximately 4 hours, were adequately controlled in their early maceration and cooking stages. The beer obtained by automatic control with fuzzy logic in the maceration and cooking stages, had the following characteristics: 0.98 g/cm3 of density, 3.9 of pH, total acidity expressed as 0.87% of lactic acid, 6.2ºGL of alcoholic degree and 0.91% w/v of CO2 percentage.

  8. Promoting nursing students' understanding and reflection on cultural awareness with older adults in home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mager, Diana R; Grossman, Sheila

    2013-01-01

    It is important for nursing programs to use culturally focused activities to increase student preparation in caring for diverse older adults in their homes. The purpose of this study was to examine strategies that promote students' reflection on cultural awareness using home care-focused case studies, simulations, and self-reflective writing activities. Cases and simulations were designed to depict diverse patients living at home with a variety of demographic characteristics, such as health history, age, culture, religion, dietary preferences, marital status, family involvement, and socioeconomic status. Qualitative data regarding student perceptions of cultural awareness was gathered via written surveys, and findings suggest that junior- and senior-year nursing students enhanced the depth and breadth of how they defined "cultural competence" after participating in culturally focused classroom and clinical laboratory activities. Levels of reflective writing using framework also improved by the semester's end for both groups of students.

  9. Status of Biomedical Waste Management in Nursing Homes of Delhi, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, Jugal; Agarwal, Ravindra; Kohli, Charu; Sharma, Pramod Kumar; Kamat, NV; Tyagi, SC

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Improper management of biomedical waste (BMW) poses a risk for health and environment. Healthcare workers have an important responsibility to properly segregate and train the staff in its disposal. Objective: To study the awareness, attitude and practices of health care workers in biomedical waste management and to observe the appropriateness of the same in the private nursing homes in Delhi, India. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among private nursing homes in Delhi. In both south and east zones, 116 nursing homes were selected by random sampling method. Data was collected using a validated questionnaire of WHO. Data was analysed using SPSS software (version 16). Chi-square or fisher tests were used and accepted statistically significant if p-value was less than 0.05. Results: 41.7% of the workers in south zone and 25% in east zone had no knowledge about BMW generation (χ2=24.26, p=0.001). 57 (95%) workers in south zone and 55 (98.2%) in east zone agreed strongly that BMW management is helpful in reducing spread diseases in the community (χ2=1.22, p=0.5). On observation, it was found that 13 (21.7%) nursing homes in south zone and 15 (26.8%) in east zone did not have black bags. Practice of biomedical waste management in nursing homes in both the zones of Delhi was poor. Conclusion: The study concluded that the awareness regarding biomedical waste management was not satisfactory among health care workers in private sector. There is a need of strict implementation of guidelines of BMW management. PMID:24783081

  10. Elderly’s Quality of Life in Daycare and Boarding Nursing Homes in Semnan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pahlavanian

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Old age is a period of life in which elderlies face with complications such as increasing risk of chronic diseases, loneliness, isolation, mental and physical disabilities, and reduction of individual independence. These factors cause the quality of life to reduce. Objectives This study compared the quality of life of elderlies in daycare and boarding nursing homes in Semnan, Iran and identified the differences in characteristics of quality of life. It can also help researchers to reduce the problems of elderlies. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study was performed on 30 elderlies living in boarding nursing homes and 43 in daycare nursing homes. Collecting the data was conducted via a special questionnaire (SF-36, measuring different aspects of quality of life. Results On the basis of SF-36 test and comparing various aspects of quality of life among the elderlies residing in boarding and daycare nursing homes, significant differences were observed in domains of quality of life, including physical restrictions (P < 0.001, restrictions in psycho-emotional function (P < 0.001, energy and fatigue (P < 0.008, psycho-emotional function (P < 0.001, social function (P < 0.001, physical pain (P < 0.001, and public health (P < 0.01. However, the difference was not significant in physical function (P = 0.437. Conclusions The results showed that the elderlies living in daycare centers had better qualities of lives physically and mentally. Therefore, to improve their qualities of lives in two general physical and mental domains, items such as providing family communications inside or outside the nursing homes as well as planning to fulfill mental and psychological needs besides physical issues like mobility and balance should be considered.

  11. The composition of old age homes in South Africa in relation to the residents and nursing personnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Perold

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available This research project is the first phase of a larger study aimed at describing and exploring the cost-effective utilisation of nursing personnel in old age homes in South Africa. The aim in the first phase was to describe the composition of the residents and nursing personnel of old age homes in South Africa. An exploratory and descriptive survey was conducted and the data was collected by means of a questionnaire. The questionnaire also included data on the financial implications of utilising professional nursing personnel to manage the care of the frail residents/older persons in old age homes in South Africa. The questionnaires were mailed to 612 old age homes published in the Hospital and Nursing Yearbook of 1997 (100% sample. A total of 145 (23.69% questionnaires were returned and included in the descriptive data analysis. The residents are mainly female (77%, older than 85 years of age, belong to the white race group (83,74% and are highly dependent on nursing care and supervision (69,7%. Old age homes are mainly managed/ controlled by welfare organisations and lay health care workers are utilised to a large extent (42,22% of the nursing workforce to render nursing care to the frail residents. The cost-effective utilisation of nursing personnel (registered and enrolled, as well as the utilisation of lay health workers in old age homes, needs to be critically examined.

  12. Using conflict theory to explore the role of nursing home social workers in home- and community-based service utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogler, Sarah

    2009-11-01

    Nursing home social work (NHSW) practitioners are central to home- and community-based service (HCBS) utilization. They assist residents with long-term care (LTC) decision-making and coordinate community-based LTC supports and services for older adults transitioning back into the community after a rehabilitative nursing home (NH) stay. As members of multiple groups, they must simultaneously balance the needs of NH residents, the NH organization, and social policies related to LTC. To date, policy research on HCBS has been atheoretical in that it has not accounted for the possible inherent conflicts that adversely affect the discharge planning practices of NHSW practitioners. This article applies the Conflict Theory to (a) explore the competing interests of the NH industry and the nation's government, (b) examine the potential effect of these competing interests on the effectiveness of NHSW discharge planning practices, and (c) present a conceptual framework to further investigate the relationship between NHSW and both individual LTC outcomes and national policy initiatives aimed at increasing HCBS utilization.

  13. 38 CFR 36.4226 - Withdrawal of authority to close manufactured home loans on the automatic basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... maintain $50,000 working capital and/or failure to file required financial statements. For supervised....C. 3702(e), the authority of any lender to close manufactured home loans on the automatic basis may... both supervised and nonsupervised lenders may be withdrawn for engaging in practices which...

  14. Risk factors associated with malnutrition in older adults living in Italian nursing homes: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papparotto, Carla; Bidoli, Ettore; Palese, Alvisa

    2013-07-01

    Malnutrition is a significant problem among older adults living in nursing homes: Malnourished residents are at increased risk of hospitalization and mortality. Multiple factors determine malnutrition, and the extant literature has focused attention on individual factors such as aging, sex, and dependence in activities of daily living. However, little evidence is available on factors influenced by nursing care. Exploring the relationship between the nutritional status of nursing home residents and certain individual factors, including those potentially influenced by nursing care, was the aim of this cross-sectional study. A total of 186 nursing home residents was enrolled in the study; in addition, 18 nurses were involved in the data collection process. Twenty-one percent of the residents had an adequate nutritional status, 43% were at risk of malnutrition, and 36% were malnourished. Multivariate analysis revealed that those independent factors associated with malnutrition, once adjusted for age, sex, and dependence in activities of daily living, were: having had a stroke, being dependent in activities of daily living, eating half or less of food provided at mealtimes, and having their weight checked only every 3 months or longer. Nursing care projects may be effective in reducing the risk of malnutrition among nursing home residents. However, further research is needed to develop knowledge of the factors associated with malnutrition and those influenced by care delivered in nursing homes.

  15. Improving Nursing Home Care through Training and Job Redesign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyer, Michael; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Short-term longitudinal study assessed single and combined effects of two interventions designed to affect nursing assistants' (n=193) performance by increasing knowledge and motivation. Four sites included skills training only, job redesign only, both interventions, and control. Significant differences were found in knowledge in comparisons…

  16. Development of a brief survey to measure nursing home residents' perceptions of pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teno, Joan M; Dosa, David; Rochon, Therese; Casey, Virginia; Mor, Vincent

    2008-12-01

    Persistent severe pain in nursing home residents remains an important public health problem. One major key to quality improvement efforts is the development of tools to assist in auditing and monitoring the quality of health care delivery to these patients. A qualitative synthesis of existing pain guidelines, and input from focus groups and an expert panel, were used to develop a 10-item instrument, the Resident Assessment of Pain Management (RAPM). The psychometric properties of the RAPM were examined in a sample of 107 (82% female, average age 85) cognitively intact nursing home residents living in six Rhode Island nursing homes. Reliability and internal consistency were evaluated with test-retest and Cronbach's alpha, respectively, and validity was examined against independent assessment of pain management by research nurses. After comparing the results of RAPM with the independent pain assessment and examining a frequency distribution and factor analysis, five of the 10 items were retained. Internal reliability of the final instrument was 0.55. The rate of reported concerns ranged from 8% stating that they were not receiving enough pain medication to 43% stating that pain interfered with their sleep. The median pain problem score (i.e., the count of the number of opportunities to improve) was 1, with 23% of residents reporting three or more concerns. Overall, RAPM was moderately correlated (Spearman correlation coefficient r=0.43) with an independent expert nurse assessment of the quality of pain management. Evidence of construct validity for RAPM is based on the correlation of the pain problem score with nursing home resident satisfaction with pain management (r=0.26), reported average pain intensity (r=0.41), research nurse completion of the Minimum Data Set pain items (r=0.52), and the quality of pain documentation in the medical record (r=0.28). In conclusion, RAPM is a brief survey tool easily administered to nursing home residents that identifies

  17. Home-based nursing interventions improve knowledge of disease and management in patients with heart failure 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzolin, Karina de Oliveira; Lemos, Dayanna Machado; Lucena, Amália de Fátima; Rabelo-Silva, Eneida Rejane

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to assess patient knowledge of heart failure by home-based measurement of two NOC Nursing Outcomes over a six-month period and correlate mean outcome indicator scores with mean scores of a heart failure Knowledge Questionnaire. METHODS: in this before-and-after study, patients with heart failure received four home visits over a six-month period after hospital discharge. At each home visit, nursing interventions were implemented, NOC outcomes were assessed, and the Knowledge Questionnaire was administered. RESULTS: overall, 23 patients received home visits. Mean indicator scores for the outcome Knowledge: Medication were 2.27±0.14 at home visit 1 and 3.55±0.16 at home visit 4 (P<0.001); and, for the outcome Knowledge: Treatment Regimen, 2.33±0.13 at home visit 1 and 3.59±0.14 at home visit 4 (P<0.001). The correlation between the Knowledge Questionnaire and the Nursing Outcomes Classification scores was strong at home visit 1 (r=0.7, P<0.01), but weak and non significant at visit 4. CONCLUSION: the results show improved patient knowledge of heart failure and a strong correlation between Nursing Outcomes Classification indicator scores and Knowledge Questionnaire scores. The NOC Nursing Outcomes proved effective as knowledge assessment measures when compared with the validated instrument. PMID:25806630

  18. Medical specialist attendance in nursing homes [Beschreibung und Bewertung der fachärztlichen Versorgung von Pflegeheimbewohnern in Deutschland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balzer, Katrin

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available [english] The care in nursing homes was examined based on scientific studies. The analysis focuses on dementia and type II diabetes. There is evidence for deficits in the supply of medical specialist attendance to nursing home residents with these diseases in Germany. Compared with corresponding guidelines the medical care for nursing home residents may be too low or inadequate.[german] Es wird die Versorgung in Pflegeheimen auf Basis wissenschaftlicher Studien untersucht. Schwerpunkte der Analyse sind Demenz und Diabetes. Es gibt Hinweise auf fachärztliche Versorgungsmängel bei Pflegeheimbewohnern mit diesen Krankheiten in Deutschland. Verglichen mit entsprechenden Leitlinien bestehen mögliche Unter- bzw. Fehlversorgungen.

  19. Toward integrating a common nursing data set in home care to facilitate monitoring outcomes across settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Gail; Stocker, Julia; Barkauskas, Violet; Treder, Marcy; Heath, Crystal

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of our research is to identify a realistic subset of North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA), Nursing Outcome Classification (NOC), and Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) terms specific to the home care (HC) setting. A subset of 89 NOC outcomes were identified for study in HC through a baseline survey. Three research assistants then observed the care of 258 patients to whom the 89 NOC outcomes applied and recorded the associated NANDA and NIC terms. Follow-up surveys and focus groups were conducted with the nurses and research assistants. There were 81 different NANDA and 226 NIC labels used to describe study patients' care. Only 36 of the 89 NOC labels studied were deemed clinically useful for HC. We found that expert opinion about terminology usage before actual experience under practice conditions is unreliable.

  20. Interior design preferences of residents, families, and staff in two nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D B; Goldman, L E; Woodman, S A

    1985-01-01

    The small number of respondents and the absence of specific demographic data concerning the three categories of respondents represented definite limitations. Further investigation in other long-term care facilities clearly is indicated. However, as a preliminary survey of preferences in nursing home interior design, several interesting findings have emerged: Patients, staff and families all emphasized patient safety and function over aesthetics. Yet, more residents than staff and families were concerned with appearance. Although experts advocate creating a home-like atmosphere in the nursing home, 50% or more of each group applied different criteria for specific design elements for private homes and for long-term care institutions. Design preferences for the three groups were similar, with an emphasis on modern furniture, painted walls, resilient tile rather than carpet, blinds, pastel and warm colors, and the use of paintings as accessories. Contrary to study assumptions, design features that promote patient individuality (e.g., patient artwork) received much greater emphasis from staff than from patients and families. Environmental change was considered an important aspect of interior design. Of the three constituencies, staff was most aware of periodic changes in decor and considered change as "very important" more often than did families or patients. As the nature of the nursing home patient population has changed--with residents presenting more disability and less rehabilitation potential and less likelihood of returning home--the ambiance of facilities has assumed even more importance. Clearly, the design preferences of residents who live in the facility are of paramount importance. However, it is also helpful to have an environment that is pleasing to family members who often experience difficulty in ongoing visitations, particularly to intellectually impaired relatives. Maintaining staff morale at a high level is a constant challenge in a long-term care

  1. Space invaders - A netnographic study of how artefacts in nursing home environments exercise disciplining structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to present culturally situated artefacts as depicted in nursing home environments and to analyse the underlying understandings of disciplining structures that are manifested in these kinds of places. Our personal geographies are often taken for granted, but when moving to a nursing home, geographies are glaringly rearranged. The study design is archival and cross-sectional observational, and the data are comprised of 38 photographs and 13 videos showing environments from nursing homes. The analysis was inspired by the methodological steps in Roper's and Shapira's description of conducting ethnography. The results are presented in four categories: (i) public areas, (ii) orderliness, (iii) staff's places and (iv) devices. The rearrangement of geography implies a degrading of agency and loss of authority over one's place. The places should be understood in their relation to the agents and their temporarily claims upon them. The material and immaterial artefacts, that is the items, people and behaviours, transform the nursing staff into 'space invaders'. Future inquiries may take into consideration the ways that space invasion in participative space intersect and construct the identities of the agents it invades upon.

  2. Improving Quality of Life in Nursing Homes: The Structured Resident Interview Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard B. Degenholtz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The quality of life (QOL of the approximately 1.5 million nursing facility (NF residents in the US is undoubtedly lower than desired by residents, families, providers, and policy makers. Although there have been important advances in defining and measuring QOL for this population, there is a need for interventions that are tied to standardized measurement and quality improvement programs. This paper describes the development and testing of a structured, tailored assessment and care planning process for improving the QOL of nursing home residents. The Quality of Life Structured Resident Interview and Care Plan (QOL.SRI/CP builds on a decade of research on measuring QOL and is designed to be easily implemented in any US nursing home. The approach was developed through extensive and iterative pilot testing and then tested in a randomized controlled trial in three nursing homes. Residents were randomly assigned to receive the assessment alone or both the assessment and an individualized QOL care plan task. The results show that residents assigned to the intervention group experienced improved QOL at 90- and 180-day follow-up, while QOL of residents in the control group was unchanged.

  3. Improving Quality of Life in Nursing Homes: The Structured Resident Interview Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenholtz, Howard B.; Resnick, Abby L.; Chia, Lichun

    2014-01-01

    The quality of life (QOL) of the approximately 1.5 million nursing facility (NF) residents in the US is undoubtedly lower than desired by residents, families, providers, and policy makers. Although there have been important advances in defining and measuring QOL for this population, there is a need for interventions that are tied to standardized measurement and quality improvement programs. This paper describes the development and testing of a structured, tailored assessment and care planning process for improving the QOL of nursing home residents. The Quality of Life Structured Resident Interview and Care Plan (QOL.SRI/CP) builds on a decade of research on measuring QOL and is designed to be easily implemented in any US nursing home. The approach was developed through extensive and iterative pilot testing and then tested in a randomized controlled trial in three nursing homes. Residents were randomly assigned to receive the assessment alone or both the assessment and an individualized QOL care plan task. The results show that residents assigned to the intervention group experienced improved QOL at 90- and 180-day follow-up, while QOL of residents in the control group was unchanged. PMID:25371822

  4. "Study on Nutrition Status and Urinary Tract Infection in Elderly People at Nursing Home"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Nowroozi

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Malnutrition is a common problem among nursing home residents and encompasses adverse outcomes. This study was conducted to determine malnutrition and urinary tract infections as well as antibiotic resistance of isolated bacteria at Kahrisak nursing home in Tehran city, capital of Iran. Nutritional status was determined by direct detection of kitchen, checking the menue of weekly foods, quality and quantity of each meal for each person. The mean age of patients in this descriptive study was 77.2 years old, (ranging from 60 to 103. Samples of midstream urine from these patients were collected and bacteria were identified by standard bacteriological methods. Then, antibiotic resistance of bacteria was determined. On the basis of nutritional status, the quality and quantity of food for each meal was good and enough. From 520 samples of urine, bacteria were grown only from 81 samples. E. coli was the most common bacteria and the other bacteria were Proteus, Klebsiella, Staphylococci aureus, Alcaligenes faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Providencia. All of bacteria were resistant at different rate to ampicillin, tetracycline, cephalothin and co-trimoxazol, but sensitive to ciprofloxacin and nitrofurantoin. Malnutrition in this study was less than 30%. This may be due to people helping, qualified foods, well nursing and suitable facility at Kahrizak nursing home.

  5. Rivervale Nursing Home, Old Birr Road, Rathnaleen, Tipperary.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Fiona

    2010-11-01

    Patient self-testing (PST) of the international normalised ratio (INR) has a positive effect on anticoagulation control. This study investigated whether the benefits of PST (other than increased frequency of testing, e.g. patient education, empowerment, compliance etc.) could be \\'carried-over\\' into usual care management after a period of home-testing has ceased.

  6. Technical and scale efficiency in public and private Irish nursing homes - a bootstrap DEA approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni Luasa, Shiovan; Dineen, Declan; Zieba, Marta

    2016-10-27

    This article provides methodological and empirical insights into the estimation of technical efficiency in the nursing home sector. Focusing on long-stay care and using primary data, we examine technical and scale efficiency in 39 public and 73 private Irish nursing homes by applying an input-oriented data envelopment analysis (DEA). We employ robust bootstrap methods to validate our nonparametric DEA scores and to integrate the effects of potential determinants in estimating the efficiencies. Both the homogenous and two-stage double bootstrap procedures are used to obtain confidence intervals for the bias-corrected DEA scores. Importantly, the application of the double bootstrap approach affords true DEA technical efficiency scores after adjusting for the effects of ownership, size, case-mix, and other determinants such as location, and quality. Based on our DEA results for variable returns to scale technology, the average technical efficiency score is 62 %, and the mean scale efficiency is 88 %, with nearly all units operating on the increasing returns to scale part of the production frontier. Moreover, based on the double bootstrap results, Irish nursing homes are less technically efficient, and more scale efficient than the conventional DEA estimates suggest. Regarding the efficiency determinants, in terms of ownership, we find that private facilities are less efficient than the public units. Furthermore, the size of the nursing home has a positive effect, and this reinforces our finding that Irish homes produce at increasing returns to scale. Also, notably, we find that a tendency towards quality improvements can lead to poorer technical efficiency performance.

  7. Getting the basics right. Care delivery in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantz, Marilyn J; Grando, Victoria; Conn, Vicki; Zwygart-Staffacher, Mary; Hicks, Lanis; Flesner, Marcia; Scott, Jill; Manion, Pam; Minner, Donna; Porter, Rose; Maas, Meridean

    2003-11-01

    In this study, the key exemplar processes of care in facilities with good resident outcomes were described. It follows that with description of these processes, it is feasible to teach facilities about the basics of care and the ways to systematically approach care so they can adopt these care processes and improve resident outcomes. However, for this to happen key organizational commitments must be in place for staff to consistently provide the basics of care. Nursing leadership must have a consistent presence over time, they must be champions of using team and group processes involving staff throughout the facility, and they must actively guide quality improvement processes. Administrative leadership must be present and express the expectation that high quality care is expected for residents, and that workers are expected to contribute to the quality improvement effort. If facilities are struggling with achieving average or poor resident outcomes, they must first make an effort to find nursing and administrative leaders who are willing to stay with the organization. These leaders must be skilled with team and group processes for decision-making and how to implement and use a quality improvement program to improve care. These leaders must be skilled at building employee relations and at retention strategies so residents are cared for by consistent staff who know them. The results of this study illustrate the simplicity of the basics of care that residents in nursing facilities need. The results also illustrate the complexity of the care processes and the organizational systems that must be in place to achieve good outcomes. Achieving these outcomes is the challenge facing those currently working in and leading nursing facilities.

  8. The effect of integrated emotion-oriented care versus usual care on elderly persons with dementia in the nursing home and on nursing assistants: a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finnema, E.J.; Dr�es, R.M.; Ettema, T.P.; Ooms, M.E.; Adèr, H.J.; Ribbe, M.W.; Tilburg, van W.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the effect of integrated emotion-oriented care on nursing home residents with dementia and nursing assistants. DESIGN: A multi-site randomized clinical trial with matched groups, and measurements at baseline and after seven months. SETTING: Sixteen psychogeriatric wards in fou

  9. Enhancing knowledge and attitudes in pain management: a pain management education program for nursing home staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Mimi Mun Yee; Ho, Suki S K

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effectiveness of a pain management program (PMP) in enhancing the knowledge and attitudes of health care workers in pain management. Many nursing home residents suffer from pain, and treatment of pain is often inadequate. Failure of health care workers to assess pain and their insufficient knowledge of pain management are barriers to adequate treatment. It was a quasiexperimental pretest and posttest study. Four nursing homes were approached, and 88 staff joined the 8-week PMP. Demographics and the knowledge and attitudes regarding pain were collected with the use of the Nurse's Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain-Chinese version (NKASRP-C) before and after the PMP. A deficit in knowledge and attitudes related to pain management was prominent before the PMP, and there was a significant increase in pain knowledge and attitudes from 7.9 ± SD 3.52 to 19.2 ± SD4.4 (p knowledge and attitudes of nursing staff and enable them to provide adequate and appropriate care to older persons in pain. PMPs for nurses and all health care professionals are important in enhancing care for older adults and to inform policy on the provision of pain management.

  10. [Inefficient management of personal health in oral anticoagulation. Home nursing care in primary health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Castañón, Lorena

    2012-01-01

    This case report describes an 83 year-old immobilised patient with multiple diseases and on polypharmacy. Nursing care is developed at home. The patient is included in patient care programs for the anticoagulated and polymedicated patient. Nursing assessments were made using the Marjory Gordon functional health patterns, by which we identified, among others, problems related to non-compliance with the pharmacological treatment. The Nurse's Diagnosis was: Ineffective Management of own health. With the support of NANDA, NOC and NIC taxonomy we determined the nursing objectives and interventions. The expected results of the Care Plan were achieved. Polypharmacy in the elderly can lead to treatment problems, increasing hospital admissions, morbidity and mortality and health expenditure Nursing care at home is a continuous development process and is increasing due to aging of the population, the prevalence of chronic diseases, as well as the increased life expectancy. It is estimated that in 2030, 24% of the Spanish population will be over 64 years. The physical, sensory, cognitive and chronic disabilities of aging make this type of care necessary. It is a major element in the comprehensive care of these patients, by checking the correct use of medication, symptom control, helping them to be autonomous in managing their disease and establishing a fluid relationship between the patients and their family.

  11. Educational interventions to empower nursing home residents: a systematic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schoberer D

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Daniela Schoberer,1 Helena Leino-Kilpi,2 Helga E Breimaier,1 Ruud JG Halfens,3 Christa Lohrmann1 1Institute of Nursing Science, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria; 2Turku University Hospital, University of Turku, Turku, Finland; 3Department of Health Services Research, School for Public Health and Primary Care (CAPHRI, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands Purpose of the study: Health education is essential to improve health care behavior and self-management. However, educating frail, older nursing home residents about their health is challenging. Focusing on empowerment may be the key to educating nursing home residents effectively. This paper examines educational interventions that can be used to empower nursing home residents.Methods: A systematic literature search was performed of the databases PubMed, CINAHL, CENTRAL, PsycINFO, and Embase, screening for clinical trials that dealt with resident education and outcomes in terms of their ability to empower residents. An additional, manual search of the reference lists and searches with SIGLE and Google Scholar were conducted to identify gray literature. Two authors independently appraised the quality of the studies found and assigned levels to the evidence reported. The results of the studies were grouped according to their main empowering outcomes and described narratively.Results: Out of 427 identified articles, ten intervention studies that addressed the research question were identified. The main educational interventions used were group education sessions, motivational and encouragement strategies, goal setting with residents, and the development of plans to meet defined goals. Significant effects on self-efficacy and self-care behavior were reported as a result of the interventions, which included group education and individual counseling based on resident needs and preferences. In addition, self-care behavior was observed to significantly increase in response to

  12. Home Sweet Home

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A family-run nursing home that gives elderly people the feel of a real of a real home Jiang Shaoju’s three-year-old family-run nursing home for the elderly in Dalian breaks all stereotypes people might attach to traditional homes for the aged.There are no nurses in uniforms,no numbered bedding and there is a lot of laughter. Jiang,56,has given almost every one of the 12 elderly women in her nursing home a nickname.She calls 92-year-old Xuan Shoulan"vice principal"because Xuan likes giving orders to others in the house and

  13. Treating skin tears in nursing home residents: a pilot study comparing four types of dressings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, H; Gaskill, D; Nash, R

    1998-03-01

    A pilot study was conducted to compare four types of dressings used to treat skin tears in nursing home residents. Wounds treated with a non-occlusive dressing healed more quickly than those dressed with occlusive dressings. The results suggest that ease of use and product wastage are important considerations when treating skin tears. The pilot study also highlights the need for further research into skin tear management and the need for ongoing education for nurses regarding skin integrity risk assessment and product information.

  14. Burnout in the nursing home health care aide: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L. Cooper

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: Factors associated with burnout in health care aides are similar to those reported among nurses, although the level of evidence and low methodological rigor of these studies suggest more robust study designs are warranted. Our findings suggest research focused on this important but largely invisible group of care providers could yield important advances in understanding burnout in this group and yield potential interventions to buffer burnout and its consequences. Without mitigating the effects of burnout on nursing home health care aides, vulnerable older adults in residential care are at risk.

  15. Protracted outbreak of S. Enteritidis PT 21c in a large Hamburg nursing home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domke Paul-Gerhard

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During August 2006, a protracted outbreak of Salmonella (S. Enteritidis infections in a large Hamburg nursing home was investigated. Methods A site visit of the home was conducted and food suppliers' premises tested for Salmonella. Among nursing home residents a cohort study was carried out focusing on foods consumed in the three days before the first part of the outbreak. Instead of relying on residents' memory, data from the home's patient food ordering system was used as exposure data. S. Enteritidis isolates from patients and suspected food vehicles were phage typed and compared. Results Within a population of 822 nursing home residents, 94 case patients among residents (1 fatality and 17 among staff members were counted 6 through 29 August. The outbreak peaked 7 through 9 August, two days after a spell of very warm summer weather. S. Enteritidis was consistently recovered from patients' stools throughout the outbreak. Among the food items served during 5 through 7 August, the cohort study pointed to afternoon cake on all three days as potential risk factors for disease. Investigation of the bakery supplying the cake yielded S. Enteritidis from cakes sampled 31 August. Comparison of the isolates by phage typing demonstrated both isolates from patients and the cake to be the exceedingly rare phage type 21c. Conclusion Cake (various types served on various days contaminated with S. Enteritidis were the likely vehicle of the outbreak in the nursing home. While the cakes were probably contaminated with low pathogen dose throughout the outbreak period, high ambient summer temperatures and failure to keep the cake refrigerated led to high pathogen dose in cake on some days and in some of the housing units. This would explain the initial peak of cases, but also the drawn out nature of the outbreak with cases until the end of August. Suggestions are made to nursing homes, aiding in outbreak prevention. Early outbreak detection is

  16. Universal and targeted early home visiting: perspectives of public health nurses, managers and mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Aston

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Early home visits provided by public health nurses (PHNs around the world have been proven to positively impact physical, social, emotional and mental health outcomes of mothers and babies. Most of the research has focused on home visiting programs delivered by public health nurses and lay home visitors to support at risk or targeted mothers. Little research has been conducted to examine universal home visiting programs for mothers who are perceived to be lower-risk. The purpose of this research was to explore how universal and targeted early home visiting programs for mothers and babies were organized, delivered and experienced through the everyday practices of PHNs, mothers, and managers in one city in Atlantic Canada. Feminist post-structuralism was used to collect and analyze data through semi-structured face-to-face interviews with 16 PHNs, 16 mothers and 4 managers. Personal, social and institutional discourses of program delivery were examined using discourse analysis. Four main themes of the study include: i understanding targeted and universal programming; ii health outcomes; iii building relationships; and iv exploring a new surveillance. This article will discuss the first theme; understanding targeted and universal programming.

  17. Achieving quality improvement in the nursing home: influence of nursing leadership on communication and teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelsmeier, Amy; Scott-Cawiezell, Jill

    2011-01-01

    Leadership, communication, and teamwork are essential elements of organizational capacity and are linked to organizational performance. How those organizations actually achieve improved performance, however, is not clearly understood. In this comparative case study, nursing leadership who facilitated open communication and teamwork achieved improvement while nursing leadership who impeded open communication and teamwork did not.

  18. Nursing Aides' Attitudes to Elder Abuse in Nursing Homes: The Effect of Work Stressors and Burnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinan-Altman, Shiri; Cohen, Miri

    2009-01-01

    Background: Nursing aides' attitudes condoning elder abuse are a possible risk factor for executing abusive behaviors against elder residents of long-term care facilities but have been studied infrequently. Purpose: The purpose of the study was to assess nursing aides' attitudes that condone abusive behaviors toward elderly people, as well as the…

  19. Integrative psychotherapeutic nursing home program to reduce multiple psychiatric symptoms of cognitively impaired patients and caregiver burden: randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, T.J.; Duivenvoorden, H.J.; Lee, J. van der; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.; Beekman, A.T.; Ribbe, M.W.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the effectiveness of an integrative psychotherapeutic nursing home program (integrative reactivation and rehabilitation [IRR]) to reduce multiple neuropsychiatry symptoms (MNPS) of cognitively impaired patients and caregiver burden (CB). DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. SETTIN

  20. Nursing home staffing and training recommendations for promoting older adults' quality of care and life: Part 1. Deficits in the quality of care due to understaffing and undertraining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Meridean L; Specht, Janet P; Buckwalter, Kathleen C; Gittler, Josephine; Bechen, Kate

    2008-04-01

    Caught between the inability or unwillingness of nursing home corporations and owners to redistribute revenue and the reluctance of federal and state agencies to increase payments to nursing homes, the nation's most vulnerable older adults are not receiving the care they deserve. Widespread recognition of substandard care and quality of life of older adults in nursing homes has existed for decades. In addition, there is substantial evidence that poor quality of care is related to inadequate numbers and training of nursing staff. Still, policy makers and nursing home owners have failed to take needed action. In the first article of this two-part series, major deficits in the care of older adult nursing home residents are reviewed, and research documenting the relationship between nursing home staffing and the quality of care and life of residents is summarized.

  1. Efficacy and effectiveness as aspects of cluster randomized trials with nursing home residents: Methodological insights from a pneumonia prevention trial

    OpenAIRE

    Van Ness, Peter H.; Peduzzi, Peter N.; Quagliarello, Vincent J.

    2012-01-01

    This report discusses how methodological aspects of study efficacy and effectiveness combine in cluster randomized trials in nursing homes. Discussion focuses on the relationships between these study aspects in the Pneumonia Reduction in Institutionalized Disabled Elders (PRIDE) trial, an ongoing cluster randomized clinical trial of pneumonia prevention among nursing home residents launched in October 2009 in Greater New Haven, Connecticut. This clinical trial has enrolled long-term care nurs...

  2. Fecal carriage of CTX-M β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in nursing homes in the Kinki region of Japan

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Ulzii-Orshikh Luvsansharav,1 Itaru Hirai,1 Marie Niki,1 Arisa Nakata,1 Aya Yoshinaga,1 Akira Yamamoto,2 Mayumi Yamamoto,3 Hiroyuki Toyoshima,4,† Fusao Kawakami,5 Nariaki Matsuura,6 Yoshimasa Yamamoto1,7,8 1Department of Bioinformatics, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, 2Blueberry, Amagasaki Health Care Facilities for the Elderly, Hyogo, 3Health Administration Center, Gifu University, Gifu, 4Nursing home Minoh, Osaka, 5Nursing home Itami, Hyogo, 6Department of Mol...

  3. Adaptation of oral medication in people institutionalized in nursing homes for whom medication is crushed: The ADECUA Study

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of pharmacist interventions in the adaptation of pharmaceutical forms in elders institutionalized in nursing homes whose medicines are crushed, which may have a clinical relevance. Methods: Quasi-experimental, multicenter, transversal and prospective study carried out in 10 nursing homes. Subjects for whom drugs were being crushed were identified. Their treatments were reviewed in order to identify drugs that should not be crushed. In these cases,...

  4. Barriers to home care for terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan migrants, perceived by GPs and nurses: a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Graaff Fuusje M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous qualitative research proved that relatives of elderly terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan immigrants experience several barriers to the use of Dutch professional home care. The aim of this study was to explore how general practitioners and home care nurses perceive the home care for terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan migrants and their families in the Netherlands. Methods Questionnaires were sent to home care organizations and GPs working in areas where most of these migrants are living. 93 nurses and 78 GPs provided information about their experiences and opinions regarding home care for this group of patients. The data were analyzed by descriptive statistics. Results GPs refer relatively few patients from these migrant groups to home care. They often find it difficult to assess the needs of these patients and their families. In 40% of the GPs' cases in which terminally ill Turkish and Moroccan migrants were not referred to home care, the GP regretted this afterwards: the patients had not received sufficient qualified care, and their informal carers had often become overburdened. In addition, home care nurses often express dissatisfaction with the home care given to terminally ill Turkish or Moroccan patients, because of communication problems, the patients' lack of knowledge of the disease, or difficulties in making suitable appointments with the patient or with the family. Conclusion Nurses and GPs cite chiefly similar factors influencing access to and use of home care as family members did in a previous study. However, according to GPs and nurses, the main barrier to the use of home care concerns communication problems, while relatives cited the preference for family care as the main reason for abstaining from the use of home care.

  5. Antiepileptic drug use in a nursing home setting: a retrospective study in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callegari, Camilla; Ielmini, M; Bianchi, L; Lucano, M; Bertù, L; Vender, Simone

    2016-05-13

    The authors set out to examine qualitatively the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in a population of older adults in a nursing home setting, evaluating aspects such as specialist prescriptions and changes in dosage. This retrospective prevalence study was carried out in a state-funded nursing home that provides care and rehabilitation for elderly people. The first objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of AED use in this population. The second objective was to monitor AED dosage modifications during the fifteen-month study period, focusing on the safety and the tolerability of AEDs. In the period of time considered, 129 of 402 monitored patients received at least one anti-epileptic therapy. The prevalence of AED use was therefore 32%. Gabapentin was found to be the most commonly prescribed drug, with a frequency of 29%, and it was used mainly for anxiety disorders, psychosis, neuropathic pain and mood disorders.

  6. Fostering dignity in the care of nursing home residents through slow caring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohne, Vibeke; Høy, Bente; Lillestø, Britt;

    2016-01-01

    Services in the respective Scandinavian countries. Findings: Two main themes emerged: dignity as distinction (I), and dignity as influence and participation (II). Discussion: A common understanding was that stress and business was a daily challenge. Conclusion: Therefore, and according to the health......Background: Physical impairment and dependency on others may be a threat to dignity. Research questions: The purpose of this study was to explore dignity as a core concept in caring, and how healthcare personnel focus on and foster dignity in nursing home residents. Research design: This study has...... a hermeneutic design. Participants and research context: In all, 40 healthcare personnel from six nursing homes in Scandinavia participated in focus group interviews in this study. Ethical considerations: This study has been evaluated and approved by the Regional Ethical Committees and the Social Science Data...

  7. Anticoagulant medication errors in nursing homes: characteristics, causes, outcomes, and association with patient harm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Rishi J; Williams, Charlotte E; Greene, Sandra B; Pierson, Stephanie; Hansen, Richard A

    2013-01-01

    Appropriate and safe use of medications is an important aspect of quality of care in nursing home patients. Because of their complex medication use process, anticoagulants are prone to medication errors in the frail elderly. Therefore, we designed this study to characterize anticoagulant medication errors and to evaluate their association with patient harm using individual medication error incidents reported by all North Carolina nursing homes to the Medication Error Quality Initiative (MEQI) during fiscal years 2010-2011. Characteristics, causes, and specific outcomes of harmful anticoagulant medication errors were reported as frequencies and proportions and compared between anticoagulant errors and other medication errors using chi-square tests. A multivariate logistic regression model explored the relationship between anticoagulant medication errors and patient harm, controlling for patient- and error-related factors.

  8. Physical and functional implications of aquatic exercise for nursing home residents with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henwood, Tim; Neville, Christine; Baguley, Chantelle; Clifton, Karen; Beattie, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Exercise has reported benefits for those with dementia. In the current study we investigated the feasibility of delivery and the physical and functional benefits of an innovative aquatic exercise program for adults with moderate to severe dementia living in a nursing home aged care facility. Ten adults (88.4 years, inter quartile range 12.3) participated twice weekly for 12 weeks. Anthropometric and grip strength data, and measures of physical function and balance were collected at baseline and post-intervention. Feasibility was assessed by attendance, participation, enjoyment and recruitment. Following exercise, participant's left hand grip strength had improved significantly (p = .017). Small to moderate effect sizes were observed for other measures. A number of delivery challenges emerged, but participant enjoyment, benefits and attendance suggest feasibility. Aquatic exercise shows promise as an intervention among those with dementia who live in a nursing home aged care facility. Greater program investigation is warranted.

  9. An evaluation of a monitoring system intervention: falls, injuries, and affect in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Douglas; Teresi, Jeanne A; Ramirez, Mildred; Ellis, Julie; Eimicke, Joseph; Jian Kong; Orzechowska, Lucja; Silver, Stephanie

    2007-11-01

    This project assessed the extent to which modern technology (Vigil) can augment or substitute for direct staff intervention in nonacute late-evening and nighttime situations in a nursing home setting. Vigil was implemented for dementia residents of a special care unit (SCU) in a large nursing home. An SCU matched in terms of unit-wide case mix and cognition was used for comparison. Results showed that there was no significant reduction in falls and injuries, but there was a significant improvement in affective disorder in the intervention group as contrasted with the comparison group. There was no significant increase in staff-perceived burden, despite the significant increase in the amount of direct care time logged. Additional time spent in staff care was significantly related to decreased affective disorder. The findings related to Vigil are generally mixed. The question remains as to whether the improvement in affect was due to Vigil or vigilance.

  10. Inverse relationship between body mass index and mortality in older nursing home residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veronese, N; Cereda, E; Solmi, M

    2015-01-01

    Body mass index (BMI) and mortality in old adults from the general population have been related in a U-shaped or J-shaped curve. However, limited information is available for elderly nursing home populations, particularly about specific cause of death. A systematic PubMed/EMBASE/CINAHL/SCOPUS sea......Body mass index (BMI) and mortality in old adults from the general population have been related in a U-shaped or J-shaped curve. However, limited information is available for elderly nursing home populations, particularly about specific cause of death. A systematic Pub......Med/EMBASE/CINAHL/SCOPUS search until 31 May 2014 without language restrictions was conducted. As no published study reported mortality in standard BMI groups (

  11. Frailty decreases physical health domain of quality of life in nursing home elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Suzy Handajani

    2016-04-01

    The percentages of respondents with pre-frail, frail, and non-frail status were 30.4%, 52.2%, and 17.4%, respectively. A decline in QOL scores of pre-frail and frail respondents was found for almost all QOL domains (physical, psychological and environment domains, except social relationships. The subdomains most influenced were “energy and fatigue” in the physical health domain, “thinking, learning, memory and concentration” in psychological health, and “opportunities for acquiring new information and skills” in the environment domain. CONCLUSIONS More than half of the nursing home elderly were frail and one-third were pre-frail. The main factor of frailty was weakness. The frailty syndrome in the elderly has a negative impact on QOL, especially in the physical health, psychological and environment domains in nursing home elderly.

  12. Sexuality in the nursing home, part 1: attitudes and barriers to sexual expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjar, Ramzi R; Kamel, Hosam K

    2004-01-01

    Sexuality is a basic human need that begins at birth and continues throughout life. The sexual needs of the elderly are similar to those of the young, but with variations in frequency, intensity, and mode of expression. Regardless of age, every individual has a need for love, intimacy, and companionship. Unfortunately, however, stereotypical thinking, ignorance, and prejudice dominate Western society's view on sexuality in the elderly. In a youth-oriented culture, sexuality is attributed to the young, healthy, and beautiful, and the myth that the elderly are asexual beings predominates. Consequently, the sexual needs of the elderly are frequently overlooked and ignored. Nowhere is this more emphatic than in the nursing home setting. This article explores barriers to sexual expression in the nursing home setting and discusses strategies to overcome them.

  13. Indoor environment and installations in nursing home; Binnenmilieu en installaties in het verpleeghuis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hoof, J.; Kort, H.S.M.; Duijnstee, M.S.H. [Kenniscentrum Innovatie van Zorgverlening, Faculteit Gezondheidszorg, Hogeschool Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Hensen, J.L.M.; Rutten, P.G.S. [Unit Building Physics and Systems, Faculteit Bouwkunde, Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2010-04-15

    The majority of nursing home residents are older adults with dementia. People with dementia may have an altered sensitivity for indoor environmental conditions, which can induce problematic behaviour with burdensome symptoms. This paper provides an overview of the ageing of senses and needs of older adults with dementia in relation to the indoor environment. Results can help designers and building services engineers to create optima[ environmental conditions in nursing homes. [Dutch] De verpleeghuizen in Nederland bieden zorg en verblijf aan ouderen met een intensieve zorgvraag. Het grote aantal installaties dat in deze woonvorm aanwezig is dient zo te worden ontworpen en geinstalleerd dat deze optimaal comfort bieden aan bewoners en zorgprofessionals. Ouderen met dementie vormen de grootste groep bewoners en hebben zeer specifieke behoeften voor het binnenmilieu. Door hiervan uit te gaan bij ontwerp en installatie, ontstaat een verpleeghuis dat ten dienste staat van alle bewoners en overige gebouwgebruikers.

  14. Identifying potentially preventable emergency department visits by nursing home residents in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Robert E.; Rooks, Sean P.; Levy, Cari; Schwartz, Robert; Ginde, Adit A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify and describe potentially preventable emergency department (ED) visits by nursing home (NH) residents in the United States. These visits are important because they are common, frequently lead to hospitalization, and can be associated with significant cost to the patient and the health care system. Design Retrospective analysis of the 2005-2010 National Hospital Ambulatory Care Survey (NHAMCS), comparing ED visits by nursing home residents that did not lead to hospital admission (potentially preventable) to those that led to admission (less likely preventable). Setting Nationally representative sample of United States EDs; Federal hospitals and hospitals with less than six beds were excluded. Participants Older (age ≥65 years) nursing home residents with an ED visit during this time period. Measurements Patient demographics, ED visit information including testing performed, interventions (both procedures and medications) provided, and diagnoses treated. Results Older NH residents accounted for 3,857 of 208,956 ED visits during the time period of interest (1.8%). When weighted to be nationally representative, these represent 13.97 million ED visits, equivalent to 1.8 ED visits annually per NH resident in the United States. More than half of visits (53.5%) did not lead to hospital admission; of those discharged from the ED, 62.8% had normal vital signs on presentation and 18.9% did not have any diagnostic testing prior to ED discharge. Injuries were 1.78 times more likely to be discharged than admitted (44.8% versus 25.3%, respectively, p<0.001), while infections were 2.06 times as likely to be admitted as discharged (22.9% versus 11.1%, respectively). CT scans were performed in 25.4% and 30.1% of older NH residents who were discharged from the ED and admitted to the hospital, respectively, and more than 70% of these were CTs of the head. NH residents received centrally acting, sedating medications prior to ED discharge in 9.4% of visits

  15. Consequences from use of reminiscence - a randomised intervention study in ten Danish nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sørensen Jan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reminiscence is the systematic use of memories and recollections to strengthen self-identity and self-worth. The study aim was to investigate the consequences for nursing home residents and staff of integrating reminiscence into daily nursing care. Methods In this randomised study, ten nursing homes were matched into two groups on the basis of location, type and size. In the period August 2006 - August 2007, staff in the Intervention Group were trained and supported in the use of reminiscence, involving individual and group sessions with residents as well as reminiscence boxes, posters and exhibitions. At baseline and again 6 and 12 months after the intervention start, data were collected on residents' cognitive level, agitated behaviour, general functioning and proxy-assessed quality of life, as well as on staff well-being and job satisfaction. Mixed linear modelling was used to analyse differences in outcome between the intervention and control groups. Results Project drop-out rates were 32% for residents and 38% for nursing staff. Most staff in the Intervention Group considered reminiscence a useful tool that improved their communication with residents, and that they would recommend to other nursing homes. There were no significant differences between residents in the Intervention and the Control Group in cognitive level, agitated behaviour or general functioning. Residents in the Intervention Group showed significant higher score at 6 months in quality of life subscale 'Response to surroundings', but there was no significant difference at 12 months. Positive effects of reminiscence were observed for all staff outcome measures, the only exception being SF-12 self-rated physical health. At 6 months after start of reminiscence, staff in the Intervention Group had significantly better scores than those in the Control Group for Personal accomplishment, Emotional exhaustion, Depersonalisation, 'Attitude towards individual

  16. Identifying at-risk dementia caregivers following institutionalization: the nursing home admission-burden and nursing home admission-depression prognostic tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaugler, Joseph E; Mittelman, Mary S; Hepburn, Kenneth; Newcomer, Robert

    2014-08-01

    The current study developed prognostic tools to identify dementia caregivers at-risk for clinically relevant burden or depressive symptoms following nursing home admission (NHA) of their family members. A retrospective, longitudinal design was used that included 1,610 dementia caregivers who provided data prior to and up to 6 months following nursing home admission. Response operant characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed to test and validate two prognostic tools: the NHA-Burden and NHA-Depression tools. An ROC curve yielded a sensitivity of 77% and a specificity of 62.5% at a cutoff score of 5.41 for the NHA-Burden Prognostic tool. A second ROC curve indicated a sensitivity of 75.4% and a specificity of 62.5% at a cutoff score of 7.45 for the NHA-Depression tool. Clinicians may wish to utilize cutpoints on the NHA-Burden and NHA-Depression tools to ensure that more persons who are at-risk for clinically significant burden or depression during NHA are identified.

  17. Diet quality in elderly nursing home residents evaluated by Diet Quality Index Revised (DQI-R).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumbak, Ivana; Satalić, Zvonimir; Keser, Irena; Krbavcić, Ines Panjkota; Giljević, Zlatko; Zadro, Zvonko; Barić, Irena Colić

    2010-06-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate diet quality in elderly nursing home residents and to point out the critical dietary components. The participants (277 females and 62 males) were recruited from all elderly nursing homes in Zagreb and each of elderly nursing homes was equally represented in this study. The age of subjects was ranging from 61 to 93 years; most of the females (53.4%) and males (53.2%) were between 70 and 80 years old. The dietary data from the multi pass 24-hour recall were used to compute the Diet Quality Index Revised (DQI-R). DQI-R is an instrument that provides a summary assessment of a diet's overall healthfulness and is based on ten different aspects, including recommendations for both nutrient and food types. Pearson correlation analysis was used to compare the total DQI-R score with dietetic parameters and t-test was calculated between mean values of all the components of DQI-R as well as for total DQI-R score for men and women. The mean DQI-R score for the 339 sample was 62.1 +/- 11.7. The biggest number of participants satisfied recommendations about dietary cholesterol intake (88.5% of participants) and dietary moderation score (71.1% of participants) but nobody satisfied recommendation about dietary diversity score. Only 3.2% of subjects had an adequate calcium intake (6.5% of male participants and only 2.5% of female participants). Recommended servings of fruit intake were satisfied by 19.8% of population, 30.4% satisfied vegetables recommendations and 38.6% recommendations for grains. According to DQI-R, beside positive dietary habits regarding dietary moderation and dietary cholesterol intake the population of elderly nursing home residents in the capital of Croatia needs improvement in other dietary habits in order to enhance successful aging.

  18. Pneumonia care and the nursing home: a qualitative descriptive study of resident and family member perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Loeb Mark; Chan Carusone Soo; Lohfeld Lynne

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Nursing home residents are frequently sent to hospital for diagnostic tests or to receive acute health care services. These transfers are both costly and for some, associated with increased risks. Although improved technology allows long-term care facilities to deliver more complex health care on site, if this is to become a trend then residents and family members must see the value of such care. This qualitative study examined resident and family member perspectives on in...

  19. Under-detection of pain in elderly nursing home residents with moderate to severe dementia

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    D.K.Y. Miu, MBBS (HK MRCP (UK MPH (CUHK FRCP (Glasgow and Edinburgh

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: Pain is highly prevalent among nursing home residents with moderate to severe dementia and is associated with the use of restraints. However, only half of the patients in this study were treated with analgesic drugs. An improvement in the caregivers' knowledge of pain assessment together with the provision of adequate treatment for pain is necessary in the care of these groups of patients with dementia.

  20. Caregivers’ attitudes, knowledge and practices of oral care at nursing homes in Serbia

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    Stančić Ivica

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Within the elderly population, residents in nursing homes, there is a greather risk of caries, periodontal disease and teeth loss. Assistance of caregivers in maintaininig good oral hygiene besides improving oral health can improve of residents general health and the qulity of their lives. The aim of this study was to examine the attitudes of caregivers and knowledge about oral health, as well as the practice regarding oral care they apply at nursing homes in Serbia. Methods. The survey was conducted at the Gerontology Center Belgrade, consisting of four nursing homes located in the urban area. The study included 58 caregivers. They were contacted on working days, in all work shifts, during January, February and March of 2013. They were asked to fill in a self-administered questionnaire consisting of 26 closed-type questions. Results. The caregivers mostly considered that it was very important to take care of oral health of the residents, but 69% responded that the level of their oral health was low or very low. As the main barriers to oral hygiene maintenance, the caregivers indicated lack of time. The caregivers had more knowledge about periodontal disease than about the main cause of caries and its prevention. Formal medical education had the influence on the knowledge about oral diseases. Oral hygiene procedures carried out by the mayority of caregivers were denture cleaning and tooth brushing. Conclusion. The caregivers were aware of the limitations in everyday oral care of nursing homes residents in Serbia, although solving these problems requires the involvement of the entire public health service.