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Sample records for autologous dendritic cells

  1. Phenotype and polarization of autologous T cells by biomaterial-treated dendritic cells.

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    Park, Jaehyung; Gerber, Michael H; Babensee, Julia E

    2015-01-01

    Given the central role of dendritic cells (DCs) in directing T-cell phenotypes, the ability of biomaterial-treated DCs to dictate autologous T-cell phenotype was investigated. In this study, we demonstrate that differentially biomaterial-treated DCs differentially directed autologous T-cell phenotype and polarization, depending on the biomaterial used to pretreat the DCs. Immature DCs (iDCs) were derived from human peripheral blood monocytes and treated with biomaterial films of alginate, agarose, chitosan, hyaluronic acid, or 75:25 poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), followed by co-culture of these biomaterial-treated DCs and autologous T cells. When autologous T cells were co-cultured with DCs treated with biomaterial film/antigen (ovalbumin, OVA) combinations, different biomaterial films induced differential levels of T-cell marker (CD4, CD8, CD25, CD69) expression, as well as differential cytokine profiles [interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-12p70, IL-10, IL-4] in the polarization of T helper (Th) types. Dendritic cells treated with agarose films/OVA induced CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ (T regulatory cells) expression, comparable to untreated iDCs, on autologous T cells in the DC-T co-culture system. Furthermore, in this co-culture, agarose treatment induced release of IL-12p70 and IL-10 at higher levels as compared with DC treatment with other biomaterial films/OVA, suggesting Th1 and Th2 polarization, respectively. Dendritic cells treated with PLGA film/OVA treatment induced release of IFN-γ at higher levels compared with that observed for co-cultures with iDCs or DCs treated with all other biomaterial films. These results indicate that DC treatment with different biomaterial films has potential as a tool for immunomodulation by directing autologous T-cell responses.

  2. IT-24DEVELOPMENT OF A NOVEL AUTOLOGOUS DENDRITIC CELL / ALLOGENEIC GLIOBLASTOMA LYSATE VACCINE PROTOCOL

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    Parney, Ian; Peterson, Timothy; Gustafson, Michael; Dietz, Allan

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dendritic cell (DC) vaccines for glioblastoma (GBM) are promising but significant conceptual shortcomings may have limited their clinical efficacy. First, most trials have not employed optimal DC culture techniques resulting in large numbers of immature (immunosuppressive) DC's. Second, most have used autologous tumor lysate. While highly personalized, this limits vaccine availability and precludes antigen-specific response testing. Finally, GBM-mediated immunosuppression has been...

  3. Clinical Benefit of Allogeneic Melanoma Cell Lysate-Pulsed Autologous Dendritic Cell Vaccine in MAGE-Positive Colorectal Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toh, Han Chong; Wang, Who-Whong; Chia, Whay Kuang

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: We evaluated the clinical benefit of an allogeneic melanoma cell lysate (MCL)-pulsed autologous dendritic cell (DC) vaccine in advanced colorectal cancer patients expressing at least one of six MAGE-A antigens overexpressed by the cell line source of the lysate. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: DCs ...

  4. Autologous Dendritic Cells Prolong Allograft Survival Through Tmem176b-Dependent Antigen Cross-Presentation

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    Charnet, P.; Savina, A.; Tilly, G.; Gautreau, L.; Carretero-Iglesia, L.; Beriou, G.; Cebrian, I.; Cens, T.; Hepburn, L.; Chiffoleau, E.; Floto, R. A.; Anegon, I.; Amigorena, S.; Hill, M.; Cuturi, M. C.

    2015-01-01

    The administration of autologous (recipient-derived) tolerogenic dendritic cells (ATDCs) is under clinical evaluation. However, the molecular mechanisms by which these cells prolong graft survival in a donor-specific manner is unknown. Here, we tested mouse ATDCs for their therapeutic potential in a skin transplantation model. ATDC injection in combination with anti-CD3 treatment induced the accumulation of CD8+CD11c+ T cells and significantly prolonged allograft survival. TMEM176B is an intracellular protein expressed in ATDCs and initially identified in allograft tolerance. We show that Tmem176b−/− ATDCs completely failed to trigger both phenomena but recovered their effect when loaded with donor peptides before injection. These results strongly suggested that ATDCs require TMEM176B to cross-present antigens in a tolerogenic fashion. In agreement with this, Tmem176b−/− ATDCs specifically failed to cross-present male antigens or ovalbumin to CD8+ T cells. Finally, we observed that a Tmem176b-dependent cation current controls phagosomal pH, a critical parameter in cross-presentation. Thus, ATDCs require TMEM176B to cross-present donor antigens to induce donor-specific CD8+CD11c+ T cells with regulatory properties and prolong graft survival. PMID:24731243

  5. Monitoring the initiation and kinetics of human dendritic cell-induced polarization of autologous naive CD4+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tammy Oth

    Full Text Available A crucial step in generating de novo immune responses is the polarization of naive cognate CD4+ T cells by pathogen-triggered dendritic cells (DC. In the human setting, standardized DC-dependent systems are lacking to study molecular events during the initiation of a naive CD4+ T cell response. We developed a TCR-restricted assay to compare different pathogen-triggered human DC for their capacities to instruct functional differentiation of autologous, naive CD4+ T cells. We demonstrated that this methodology can be applied to compare differently matured DC in terms of kinetics, direction, and magnitude of the naive CD4+ T cell response. Furthermore, we showed the applicability of this assay to study the T cell polarizing capacity of low-frequency blood-derived DC populations directly isolated ex vivo. This methodology for addressing APC-dependent instruction of naive CD4+ T cells in a human autologous setting will provide researchers with a valuable tool to gain more insight into molecular mechanisms occurring in the early phase of T cell polarization. In addition, it may also allow the study of pharmacological agents on DC-dependent T cell polarization in the human system.

  6. Dendritic Cell

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    Sevda Söker

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells, a member of family of antigen presenting cells, are most effective cells in the primary immune response. Dendritic cells originated from dendron, in mean of tree in the Greek, because of their long and elaborate cytoplasmic branching processes. Dendritic cells constitute approximately 0.1 to 1 percent of the blood’s mononuclear cell. Dendritic cells are widely distributed, and specialized for antigen capture and T cell stimulation. In this article, structures and functions of...

  7. Influence of autologous dendritic cells on cytokine-induced killer cell proliferation, cell phenotype and antitumor activity in vitro.

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    Cao, Jingsong; Chen, Cong; Wang, Yuhuan; Chen, Xuecheng; Chen, Zeying; Luo, Xiaoling

    2016-09-01

    Dendritic cell (DCs) are essential antigen processing and presentation cells that play a key role in the immune response. In this study, DCs were co-cultured with cytokine-induced killer cells (DC-CIKs) in vitro to detect changes in cell proliferation, cell phenotype and cell cytotoxicity. The results revealed that the DCs were suitable for co-culture with CIKs at day 7, and that cell quantity of DC-CIKs was lower than that of CIKs until day 11, but it was significantly improved to 1.17-fold that of CIKs at day 13. Flow cytometry was used to detect the cell phenotype of CIKs and DC-CIKs. Compared with CIKs at day 13, the percentage of CD3(+), CD3(+)CD4(+), CD3(+)CD8(+) and CD3(+)CD56(+) T cells in DC-CIKs was significantly improved 1.02, 1.79, 1.26 and 2.44-fold, respectively. In addition, trypan blue staining analysis demonstrated that the cell viability of CIKs and DC-CIKs was 96% and 98%, respectively. Furthermore, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) analysis verified that CIK and DC-CIK cytotoxicity in Hela cells was 58% and 80%, respectively, with a significant difference. Taken together, our results indicate that the cell proliferation, cell phenotype and antitumor activity of CIKs were all enhanced following co-culture with DCs in vitro. These results are likely to be useful for DC-CIK application in antitumor therapies.

  8. Autologous aldrithiol-2-inactivated HIV-1 combined with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid-poly-L-lysine carboxymethylcellulose as a vaccine platform for therapeutic dendritic cell immunotherapy.

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    Miller, Elizabeth; Spadaccia, Meredith; Sabado, Rachel; Chertova, Elena; Bess, Julian; Trubey, Charles Mac; Holman, Rose Marie; Salazar, Andres; Lifson, Jeffrey; Bhardwaj, Nina

    2015-01-03

    Therapeutic interventions for HIV-1 that successfully augment adaptive immunity to promote killing of infected cells may be a requisite component of strategies to reduce latent cellular reservoirs. Adoptive immunotherapies utilizing autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) that have been activated and antigen loaded ex vivo may serve to circumvent defects in DC function that are present during HIV infection in order to enhance adaptive immune responses. Here we detail the clinical preparation of DCs loaded with autologous aldrithiol-2 (AT-2)-inactivated HIV that have been potently activated with the viral mimic, Polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid-poly-l-lysine carboxymethylcellulose (Poly-ICLC). HIV is first propagated from CD4+ T cells from HIV-infected donors and then rendered non-replicative by chemical inactivation with aldrithiol-2 (AT-2), purified, and quantified. Viral inactivation is confirmed through measurement of Tat-regulated β-galactosidase reporter gene expression following infection of TZM-bl cells. In-process testing for sterility, mycoplasma, LPS, adventitious agents, and removal of AT-2 is performed on viral preparations. Autologous DCs are generated and pulsed with autologous AT-2-inactivated virus and simultaneously stimulated with Poly-ICLC to constitute the final DC vaccine product. Phenotypic identity, maturation, and induction of HIV-specific adaptive immune responses are confirmed via flow cytometric analysis of DCs and cocultured autologous CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Lot release criteria for the DC vaccine have been defined in accordance with Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) guidelines. The demonstrated feasibility of this approach has resulted in approval by the FDA for investigational use in antiretroviral (ART) suppressed individuals. We discuss how this optimized DC formulation may enhance the quality of anti-HIV adaptive responses beyond what has been previously observed during DC immunotherapy trials for HIV infection.

  9. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) immune response related with EBV-DNA in nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with autologous dendritic cell vaccination after radiotherapy.

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    Li, Feng; Song, Dan; Lu, Yue; Zhu, Huanfeng; Chen, Zhenzhang; He, Xia

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the outcome of an autologous dendritic cell (DC) vaccination in patients with stage II/III nasopharyngeal carcinomas (NPC). From 38 patients with stage II/III Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated NPCs after a radiotherapy, 16 human leukocyte antigen-A2 (HLA-A2)-positive patients were enrolled and medicated with autologous DCs, which were pulsed with HLA-A2-restricted EBV-encoded latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) peptides. The lymphocyte subsets, serum cytokines, and EBV-DNA levels as well as the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses were determined after vaccination combined with a radiotherapy/chemotherapy. The serum levels of interleukin-2 and interferon-γ (PEBV LMP2A peptides in a DTH test. The serum EBV-DNA level decreased significantly from 1519 ± 384 to 1214 ± 211 copies/mL in the 9 DTH-positive patients (P=0.0310). No unanticipated or serious toxicity was observed and the vaccine was well tolerated. In conclusion, in NPC patients vaccinated after radiotherapy with autologous DCs, which were pulsed with EBV LMP2A peptides, Th1-specific immune responses were elicited particularly in DTH test positive individuals. The clinical results obtained are encouraging and the EBV-specific HLA-A2-restricted DC vaccination is a promising treatment for EBV-related NPCs.

  10. Sensitive detection of human papillomavirus type 16 E7-specific T cells by ELISPOT after multiple in vitro stimulations of CD8+ T cells with peptide-pulsed autologous dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Tendeloo Viggo FI

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cervical cancer is the second most common gynecological cancer amongst women world-wide. Despite optimized protocols, standard treatments still face several disadvantages. Therefore, research aims at the development of immune-based strategies using tumor antigen-loaded dendritic cells for the induction of cellular anti-tumor immunity. Results In this study, we used dendritic cells loaded with the HLA-A2-restricted HPV type 16 E711–20 peptide in order to induce an in vitro CD8+ T cell response. For this purpose, peptide-pulsed dendritic cells were co-cultured with autologous CD8+ T cells. After 5 weekly stimulations with peptide-pulsed mature dendritic cells, cultured T cells were analyzed for antigen specificity by an IFN-γ ELISPOT assay. Using this ELISPOT assay, we were able to detect E7-specific IFN-γ-secreting CD8+ T cells in 5/5 healthy donors. Conclusion We show that peptide-pulsed mature dendritic cells are able to stimulate a HPV type 16 E7 peptide-specific immune response in vitro. These experiments describe an efficient culture protocol for antigen-specific T cells for use in pre-clinical vaccination research and confirm the need for sensitive T cell assays for detection of tumor-specific immune responses in vitro.

  11. [Inflammatory dendritic cells].

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    Segura, Elodie; Amigorena, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells are a rare and heterogeneous population of professional antigen-presenting cells. Several murine dendritic cell subpopulations have been identified that differ in their phenotype and functional properties. In the steady state, committed dendritic cell precursors differentiate into lymphoid organ-resident dendritic cells and migratory tissue dendritic cells. During inflammation appears an additional dendritic cell subpopulation that has been termed « inflammatory dendritic cells ». Inflammatory dendritic cells differentiate in situ from monocytes recruited to the site of inflammation. Here, we discuss how mouse inflammatory dendritic cells differ from macrophages and from other dendritic cell populations. Finally, we review recent work on human inflammatory dendritic cells.

  12. Autologous tumor lysate-pulsed dendritic cell immunotherapy for pediatric patients with newly diagnosed or recurrent high-grade gliomas.

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    Lasky, Joseph L; Panosyan, Eduard H; Plant, Ashley; Davidson, Tom; Yong, William H; Prins, Robert M; Liau, Linda M; Moore, Theodore B

    2013-05-01

    Immunotherapy has the potential to improve clinical outcomes with little toxicity for pediatric patients with brain tumors. We conducted a pilot feasibility study of tumor lysate-pulsed dendritic cell (DC) vaccination in pediatric patients (1 to 18 years old) with newly diagnosed or recurrent high-grade glioma (HGG). A total of nine DC vaccine doses, each containing 1 × 10(6) cells per dose were administered to three out of the seven originally enrolled patients. Toxicities were limited to mild side-effects, except in one case of elevated alkaline phosphatase, which resolved without clinical consequences. Two patients with primary lesions amongst the three vaccinated were alive at the time of writing, both without evidence of disease. Pre- and post-vaccination tumor samples from a patient with an anaplastic oligoastrocytoma that recurred failed to demonstrate immune cell infiltration by immunohistochemistry. Peripheral cytokine levels were evaluated in one patient following DC vaccination and demonstrated some changes in relation to vaccination. DC vaccine is tolerable and feasible with some limitations for pediatric patients with HGG. Dendritic cell based immunotherapy may provide some clinical benefit in pediatric patients with glioma, especially for patients with minimal residual disease, but further investigation of this modality is required.

  13. Vaccination of metastatic melanoma patients with autologous dendritic cell (DC derived-exosomes: results of thefirst phase I clinical trial

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    Piperno Sophie

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DC derived-exosomes are nanomeric vesicles harboring functional MHC/peptide complexes capable of promoting T cell immune responses and tumor rejection. Here we report the feasability and safety of the first Phase I clinical trial using autologous exosomes pulsed with MAGE 3 peptides for the immunization of stage III/IV melanoma patients. Secondary endpoints were the monitoring of T cell responses and the clinical outcome. Patients and methods Exosomes were purified from day 7 autologous monocyte derived-DC cultures. Fifteen patients fullfilling the inclusion criteria (stage IIIB and IV, HLA-A1+, or -B35+ and HLA-DPO4+ leukocyte phenotype, tumor expressing MAGE3 antigen were enrolled from 2000 to 2002 and received four exosome vaccinations. Two dose levels of either MHC class II molecules (0.13 versus 0.40 × 1014 molecules or peptides (10 versus 100 μg/ml were tested. Evaluations were performed before and 2 weeks after immunization. A continuation treatment was performed in 4 cases of non progression. Results The GMP process allowed to harvest about 5 × 1014 exosomal MHC class II molecules allowing inclusion of all 15 patients. There was no grade II toxicity and the maximal tolerated dose was not achieved. One patient exhibited a partial response according to the RECIST criteria. This HLA-B35+/A2+ patient vaccinated with A1/B35 defined CTL epitopes developed halo of depigmentation around naevi, a MART1-specific HLA-A2 restricted T cell response in the tumor bed associated with progressive loss of HLA-A2 and HLA-BC molecules on tumor cells during therapy with exosomes. In addition, one minor, two stable and one mixed responses were observed in skin and lymph node sites. MAGE3 specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses could not be detected in peripheral blood. Conclusion The first exosome Phase I trial highlighted the feasibility of large scale exosome production and the safety of exosome administration.

  14. Melanoma immunotherapy: dendritic cell vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Lozada-Requena, Ivan; Laboratorios de Inmunología #108, Laboratorio de investigación y Desarrollo, Facultad de Ciencieas y Filosofía, Universidad Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú Empresa de Investigación y Desarrollo en Cáncer (EMINDES) SAC. Lima, Perú.; Núñez, César; Empresa de Investigación y Desarrollo en Cáncer (EMINDES) SAC. Lima, Perú.; Aguilar, José Luis; Laboratorios de Inmunología #108, Laboratorio de investigación y Desarrollo, Facultad de Ciencieas y Filosofía, Universidad Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú.

    2015-01-01

    This is a narrative review that shows accessible information to the scientific community about melanoma and immunotherapy.Dendritic cells have the ability to participate in innate and adaptive immunity, but are not unfamiliar to the immune evasion oftumors. Knowing the biology and role has led to generate in vitro several prospects of autologous cell vaccines against diversetypes of cancer in humans and animal models. However, given the low efficiency they have shown, we must implementstrateg...

  15. Advanced glycation end products inhibit both infection and transmission in trans of HIV-1 from monocyte-derived dendritic cells to autologous T cells.

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    Nasreddine, Nadine; Borde, Chloé; Gozlan, Joël; Bélec, Laurent; Maréchal, Vincent; Hocini, Hakim

    2011-05-15

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy is associated with carbohydrate metabolic alterations that may lead to diabetes. One consequence of hyperglycemia is the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) that are involved in diabetes complications. We investigated the impact of AGEs on the infection of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) by HIV-1 and the ability of MDDCs to transmit the virus to T cells. We showed that AGEs could inhibit infection of MDDCs with primary R5-tropic HIV-1(Ba-L) by up to 85 ± 9.2% and with primary X4-tropic HIV-1(VN44) by up to 60 ± 8.5%. This inhibitory effect of AGEs was not prevented by a neutralizing anti-receptor for advanced glycation end products (anti-RAGE) Ab, demonstrating a RAGE-independent mechanism. Moreover, AGEs inhibited by 70-80% the transmission in trans of the virus to CD4 T cells. Despite the inhibitory effect of AGEs on both MDDC infection and virus transmission in trans, no inhibition of virus attachment to cell membrane was observed, confirming that attachment and transmission of the virus involve independent mechanisms. The inhibitory effect of AGEs on infection was associated with a RAGE-independent downregulation of CD4 at the cell membrane and by a RAGE-dependent repression of the CXCR4 and CCR5 HIV-1 receptors. AGEs induce the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-12, but not RANTES or MIP-1α, and did not lead to MDDC maturation as demonstrated by the lack of expression of the CD83 molecule. Taken together, our results suggest that AGEs can play an inhibiting role in HIV-1 infection in patients who accumulate circulating AGEs, including patients treated with protease inhibitors that developed diabetes.

  16. Sensitive detection of human papillomavirus type 16 E7-specific T cells by ELISPOT after multiple in vitro stimulations of CD8+ T cells with peptide-pulsed autologous dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Van Tendeloo Viggo FI; Van Bockstaele Dirk R; Nijs Griet; Lenjou Marc; Ponsaerts Peter; Cools Nathalie; Berneman Zwi N

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Cervical cancer is the second most common gynecological cancer amongst women world-wide. Despite optimized protocols, standard treatments still face several disadvantages. Therefore, research aims at the development of immune-based strategies using tumor antigen-loaded dendritic cells for the induction of cellular anti-tumor immunity. Results In this study, we used dendritic cells loaded with the HLA-A2-restricted HPV type 16 E711–20 peptide in order to induce an in vitro ...

  17. A Model of Cytotoxic T Antitumor Activation Stimulated by Pulsed Dendritic Cells

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    Pennisi, Marzio; Pappalardo, Francesco; Chiacchio, Ferdinando; Motta, Santo

    2011-09-01

    We present a preliminary ODE model to sketch the immune response of cytotoxic T cells against cancer through the use of pulsed autologous dendritic cells. The model is partially based on data coming from experiments that are presently in progress in the wet lab of our collaborators, but it can be applied in principle to different tumors. To this end, we show the immune response of cytotoxic T cells stimulated by autologous dendritic cells for different cancers.

  18. Immune Monitoring Using mRNA-Transfected Dendritic Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Troels Holz; Svane, Inge Marie; Met, Özcan

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells are known to be the most potent antigen presenting cell in the immune system and are used as cellular adjuvants in therapeutic anticancer vaccines using various tumor-associated antigens or their derivatives. One way of loading antigen into the dendritic cells is by m......RNA electroporation, ensuring presentation of antigen through major histocompatibility complex I and potentially activating T cells, enabling them to kill the tumor cells. Despite extensive research in the field, only one dendritic cell-based vaccine has been approved. There is therefore a great need to elucidate...... and understand the immunological impact of dendritic cell vaccination in order to improve clinical benefit. In this chapter, we describe a method for performing immune monitoring using peripheral blood mononuclear cells and autologous dendritic cells transfected with tumor-associated antigen-encoding mRNA....

  19. Improvement of human dendritic cell culture for immunotoxicological investigations.

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    Hymery, N; Sibiril, Y; Parent-Massin, D

    2006-07-01

    A toxic injury such as a decrease in the number of immature dendritic cells caused by a cytotoxic effect or a disturbance in their maturation process can be responsible for immunodepression. There is a need to improve in vitro assays on human dendritic cells used to detect and evaluate adverse effects of xenobiotics. Two aspects were explored in this work: cytotoxic effects of xenobiotics on immature dendritic cells, and the interference of xenobiotics with dendritic cell maturation. Dendritic cells of two different origins were tested. Dendritic cells obtained either from umbilical cord blood CD34(+) cells or, for the first time, from umbilical cord blood monocytes. The cytotoxicity assay on immature dendritic cells has been improved. For the study of the potential adverse effects of xenobiotics on the maturation process of dendritic cells, several parameters were selected such as expression of markers (CD86, CD83, HLA-DR), secretion of interleukins 10 and 12, and proliferation of autologous lymphocytes. The relevance and the efficiency of the protocol applied were tested using two mycotoxins, T-2 toxin and deoxynivalence, DON, which are known to be immunosuppressive, and one phycotoxin, domoic acid, which is known not to have any immunotoxic effect. Assays using umbilical cord monocyte dendritic cell cultures with the protocol defined in this work, which involves a cytotoxicity study followed by evaluation of several markers of adverse effects on the dendritic cell maturation process, revealed their usefulness for investigating xenobiotic immunotoxicity toward immune primary reactions.

  20. 异体肿瘤mRNA电转染DC瘤苗的特异性抗骨肉瘤免疫学效应%Anti-osteosarcoma effects of autologous dendritic cells electrotransfected with allogeneic mRNA in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于哲; 耿捷; 戴霞; 靳雷; 范清宇

    2013-01-01

    Vaccination with dendritic cells (DCs) transfected with tumor-derived mRNA antigen has emerged as a promising strategy for generating protective immune responses in mammals. However, the integration of allogeneic osteosarcoma mRNA and autologous DCs has not been fully examined. This study was designed to investigate the antitumor effects of tumor vaccine produced by autologous DCs transfected with allogeneic osteosarcoma mRNA through electroporation in tumor-bearing rats model. In the present study, extraction of rat tumor-mRNA was performed as a two-step procedure. First, total-RN A was extracted by use of Trizol, and then mRNA purification was performed by use of polyT -coated magnetic beads. Then we transfected the allogeneic tumor mRNA to SD rat bone marrow-derived DCs through electroporation. The tumor vaccine was applied to tumor-bearing rat model and the specific antitumor effects of the tumor vaccine were observed. We found that the immunization using autologous DCs electrotransfected with allogeneic osteosarcoma mRNA induced specific CTL responses significantly (P〈0.05) and the cytotoxic activity was confirmed in cold target inhibition assays and using mAbs blocking MHC class Ⅰ molecules. In vivo preimmunized and active therapeutic experiments demonstrated that 70% of the rats immunized with allogeneic osteosarcoma mRNA-transfected DCs were typically able to reject tumor challenge and remained tumor-free. In conclusion, we demonstrated that allogeneic tumor mRNA, isolated from rat osteosarcoma cell line, could be applied to produce tumor vaccine inducing specific antitumor effects, especially in DC-based immunotherapy strategy. This study also provides the foundations for an effective and broadly applicable treatment of a wide range of cancer indications for which tumor -associated antigens have not been identified.%目的 应用肿瘤细胞来源的mRNA转染至树突状细胞(dendritic cells,DCs)已逐渐成为一种颇具潜能的抗肿瘤免疫治

  1. Autologous antibodies that bind neuroblastoma cells.

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    Sun, Yujing; Sholler, Giselle S; Shukla, Girja S; Pero, Stephanie C; Carman, Chelsea L; Zhao, Ping; Krag, David N

    2015-11-01

    Antibody therapy of neuroblastoma is promising and our goal is to derive antibodies from patients with neuroblastoma for developing new therapeutic antibodies. The feasibility of using residual bone marrow obtained for clinical indications as a source of tumor cells and a source of antibodies was assessed. From marrow samples, neuroblastoma cells were recovered, grown in cell culture and also implanted into mice to create xenografts. Mononuclear cells from the marrow were used as a source to generate phage display antibody libraries and also hybridomas. Growth of neuroblastoma patient cells was possible both in vitro and as xenografts. Antibodies from the phage libraries and from the monoclonal hybridomas bound autologous neuroblastoma cells with some selectivity. It appears feasible to recover neuroblastoma cells from residual marrow specimens and to generate human antibodies that bind autologous neuroblastoma cells. Expansion of this approach is underway to collect more specimens, optimize methods to generate antibodies, and to evaluate the bioactivity of neuroblastoma-binding antibodies.

  2. Characterization of CD8+ T-Cell Responses in the Peripheral Blood and Skin Injection Sites of Melanoma Patients Treated with mRNA Electroporated Autologous Dendritic Cells (TriMixDC-MEL

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    Daphné Benteyn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of melanoma patients with mRNA electroporated dendritic cells (TriMixDC-MEL stimulates T-cell responses against the presented tumor-associated antigens (TAAs. In the current clinical trials, melanoma patients with systemic metastases are treated, requiring priming and/or expansion of preexisting TAA-specific T cells that are able to migrate to both the skin and internal organs. We monitored the presence of TAA-specific CD8+ T cells infiltrating the skin at sites of intradermal TriMixDC-MEL injection (SKILs and within the circulation of melanoma patients treated in two clinical trials. In 10 out of fourteen (71% patients screened, CD8+ T cells recognizing any of the four TAA presented by TriMixDC-MEL cellular vaccine were found in both compartments. In total, 30 TAA-specific T-cell responses were detected among the SKILs and 29 among peripheral blood T cells, of which 24 in common. A detailed characterization of the antigen specificity of CD8+ T-cell populations in four patients indicates that the majority of the epitopes detected were only recognized by CD8+ T cells derived from either skin biopsies or peripheral blood, indicating that some compartmentalization occurs after TriMix-DC therapy. To conclude, functional TAA-specific CD8+ T cells distribute both to the skin and peripheral blood of patients after TriMixDC-MEL therapy.

  3. Cryptococcal meningitis post autologous stem cell transplantation.

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    Chaaban, S; Wheat, L J; Assi, M

    2014-06-01

    Disseminated Cryptococcus disease occurs in patients with defective T-cell immunity. Cryptococcal meningitis following autologous stem cell transplant (SCT) has been described previously in only 1 patient, 4 months post SCT and while off antifungal prophylaxis. We present a unique case of Cryptococcus meningitis pre-engraftment after autologous SCT, while the patient was receiving fluconazole prophylaxis. A 41-year-old man with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma underwent autologous SCT. Post-transplant prophylaxis consisted of fluconazole 400 mg daily, levofloxacin 500 mg daily, and acyclovir 800 mg twice daily. On day 9 post transplant, he developed fever and headache. Peripheral white blood cell count (WBC) was 700/μL. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed lesions consistent with meningoencephalitis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis revealed a WBC of 39 with 77% lymphocytes, protein 63, glucose 38, CSF pressure 20.5 cmH2 O, and a positive cryptococcal antigen. CSF culture confirmed Cryptococcus neoformans. The patient was treated with liposomal amphotericin B 5 mg/kg intravenously daily, and flucytosine 37.5 mg/kg orally every 6 h. He was switched to fluconazole 400 mg daily after 3 weeks of amphotericin therapy, with sterilization of the CSF with negative CSFCryptococcus antigen and negative CSF culture. Review of the literature revealed 9 cases of cryptococcal disease in recipients of SCT. Median time of onset was 64 days post transplant. Only 3 meningitis cases were described; 2 of them after allogeneic SCT. Fungal prophylaxis with fluconazole post autologous SCT is recommended at least through engraftment, and for up to 100 days in high-risk patients. A high index of suspicion is needed to diagnose and treat opportunistic infections, especially in the face of immunosuppression and despite adequate prophylaxis. Infection is usually fatal without treatment, thus prompt diagnosis and therapy might be life saving.

  4. Plerixafor for autologous CD34+ cell mobilization

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    Huda Salman

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Huda Salman, Hillard M LazarusDivision of Hematology-Oncology, Blood and Marrow Transplant Program, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: High-dose chemotherapy and autologous transplantation of hematopoietic cells is a crucial treatment option for hematologic malignancy patients. Current mobilization regimes often do not provide adequate numbers of CD34+ cells. The chemokine receptor CXCR4 and ligand SDF-1 are integrally involved in homing and mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. Disruption of the CXCR4/SDF-1 axis by the CXCR4 antagonist, plerixafor, has been demonstrated in Phase II and Phase III trials to improve mobilization when used in conjunction with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF. This approach is safe with few adverse events and produces significantly greater numbers of CD34+ cells when compared to G-CSF alone. New plerixafor initiatives include use in volunteer donors for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant and in other disease targets.Keywords: plerixafor, autologous hematopoietic cell transplant, CD34, lymphoma, myeloma, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF

  5. Clinical responses in patients with advanced colorectal cancer to a dendritic cell based vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgdorf, Stefan K; Fischer, Anders; Myschetzky, Peter S

    2008-01-01

    Patients with disseminated colorectal cancer have a poor prognosis. Preliminary studies have shown encouraging results from vaccines based on dendritic cells. The aim of this phase II study was to evaluate the effect of treating patients with advanced colorectal cancer with a cancer vaccine based...... on dendritic cells pulsed with an allogenic tumor cell lysate. Twenty patients with advanced colorectal cancer were consecutively enrolled. Dendritic cells (DC) were generated from autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells and pulsed with allogenic tumor cell lysate containing high levels of cancer...

  6. The Deterministic Dendritic Cell Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie

    2010-01-01

    The Dendritic Cell Algorithm is an immune-inspired algorithm orig- inally based on the function of natural dendritic cells. The original instantiation of the algorithm is a highly stochastic algorithm. While the performance of the algorithm is good when applied to large real-time datasets, it is difficult to anal- yse due to the number of random-based elements. In this paper a deterministic version of the algorithm is proposed, implemented and tested using a port scan dataset to provide a controllable system. This version consists of a controllable amount of parameters, which are experimented with in this paper. In addition the effects are examined of the use of time windows and variation on the number of cells, both which are shown to influence the algorithm. Finally a novel metric for the assessment of the algorithms output is introduced and proves to be a more sensitive metric than the metric used with the original Dendritic Cell Algorithm.

  7. Dendritic cells star in Vancouver

    OpenAIRE

    Klechevsky, Eynav; Kato, Hiroki; Sponaas, Anne-Marit

    2005-01-01

    The fast-moving field of dendritic cell (DC) biology is hard to keep pace with. Here we report on advances from the recent Keystone Symposium, “Dendritic Cells at the Center of Innate and Adaptive Immunity,” organized in Vancouver, BC on Feb. 1–7, 2005 by Anne O'Garra, Jacques Banchereau, and Alan Sher. New insights into the molecular mechanisms of DC function and their influence on immune regulation, their role in infectious and autoimmune disease, and new clinical applications are highlight...

  8. 人卵巢癌细胞与自体或同种异体树突状细胞融合诱导抗肿瘤免疫%Induction of anti-tumor activity by immunization with fusion of human ovarian carcinoma cellsto autologous or allogeneic dendritic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴尚辉; 陈明雄; 朱斌

    2003-01-01

    目的探讨人卵巢癌(OVCA)细胞与自体或同种异体树突状细胞(DC)融合后体外诱导特异性CTL的作用.方法用PEG法将OVCA细胞与自体或异体DC融合,在含GM-CSF的RPNH-1640完全培养基中继续培养7~14d,然后将融合细胞与CA-125特异性T细胞共同培养,用细胞内细胞素染色法检测其诱导CTL活性.结果人类OVCA细胞表达CA-125、HER2A/neu、MUC1肿瘤相关抗原及MHC-Ⅰ类分子和粘附分子(ICAM),但不表达MHC-Ⅱ类分子、B7-1和B7-2;DC则表达MHC-Ⅰ类和Ⅱ类分子、共刺激分子和ICAM,但不表达DF3/MUC1或CA-125等OVCA相关抗原,而OVCA细胞与自体或异体DC融合细胞则表达CA-125及MUC1肿瘤相关抗原、MHC-Ⅰ类和Ⅱ类分子、B7-1、B7-2及ICAM.结论人OVCA与自体或异体DC融合细胞能诱导由MHC-Ⅰ类分子限制的CTL活性和自体肿瘤细胞的溶解作用.%Objective:To study the effect of activation of specific anti-tumor cytotoxic T lymphocytes in vitro by fusion of human ovarian carcinoma cells with autologous or allogeneic dendritic cells.Methods:The human dendritic cells with ovarian carcinoma cells were fused by PEG and were cultivated in complete RPMI-1640 media containing 10% FCS, GM-CSF for 7~14 days,and then co-cultured fusion cells with CA-125 Specific T cells. The activation of anti-tumor CTL elicited by the fusion cells was detected by intracellular cytokine staining.Results:The human ovarian carcinoma cells expressed the CA-125,MUC1,MHC classⅠand ICAM, but not MHCclassⅡ,B7-1 or B7-2.In contrast, the DCs expressed MHC classⅠand class Ⅱ molecules, co-stimulative molecules and ICAM, but not CA-125 or MUC1 carcinoma-associated Ags. Fusion of the OVCA cells to autologous or allogeneic DCs resulted in the generation of heterokaryons that expressed the CA-125 and MUC1 Ags, MHC class Ⅰand classⅡ molecules,B7-1 and B7-2.Conclusions:The fusions of autologous or allogeneic DCs with ovarian carcinoma cells can induce cytotoxic T cell

  9. Bone marrow-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roney, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    While much is understood about dendritic cells and their role in the immune system, the study of these cells is critical to gain a more complete understanding of their function. Dendritic cell isolation from mouse body tissues can be difficult and the number of cells isolated small. This protocol describes the growth of large number of dendritic cells from the culture of mouse bone marrow cells. The dendritic cells grown in culture facilitate experiments that may require large number of dendritic cells without great expense or use of large number of mice.

  10. Autologous Stem Cell Transplant for AL Amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Roy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available AL amyloidosis is caused by clonal plasma cells that produce immunoglobulin light chains which misfold and get deposited as amyloid fibrils. Therapy directed against the plasma cell clone leads to clinical benefit. Melphalan and corticosteroids have been the mainstay of treatment for a number of years and the recent availability of other effective agents (IMiDs and proteasome inhibitors has increased treatment options. Autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT has been used in the treatment of AL amyloidosis for many years. It is associated with high rates of hematologic response and improvement in organ function. However, transplant carries considerable risks. Careful patient selection is important to minimize transplant related morbidity and mortality and ensure optimal patient outcomes. As newer more affective therapies become available the role and timing of ASCT in the overall treatment strategy of AL amyloidosis will need to be continually reassessed.

  11. Dendritic cells and contact dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Yoshinori; Aiba, Setsuya

    2007-10-01

    Contact dermatitis is a biological response to simple chemicals in the skin. Although it is well known that allergic contact dermatitis is mediated by the immune system, it is still uncertain whether it is a kind of protective response or it is simply an unnecessary response. We have demonstrated the following: (1) haptens activate Langerhans cells in the initiation phase of murine allergic contact dermatitis in vivo, (2) haptens activate human monocyte-derived dendritic cells in vitro, (3) the activation of dendritic cells by haptens is primarily mediated by the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and (4) the activation of p38 MAPK is mediated by stimulation related to an imbalance of intracellular redox. Based on these observations, we will discuss the biological significance of contact dermatitis. In addition, we will review some up-to-date findings on Langerhans cell biology.

  12. Development of Dendritic Cell System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wu; Aleksandar Dakic

    2004-01-01

    The dendritic cell system contains conventional dendritic cells (DCs) and plasmacytoid pre-dendritic cells (pDCs). Both DCs and pDCs are bone marrow derived cells. Although the common functions of DCs are antigen-processing and T-lymphocyte activation, they differ in surface markers, migratory patterns, and cytokine output. These differences can determine the fate of the T cells they activate. Several subsets of mature DCs have been described in both mouse and human and the developmental processes of these specialized DC subsets have been studied extensively. The original concept that all DCs were of myeloid origin was questioned by several recent studies, which demonstrated that in addition to the DCs derived from myeloid precursors,some DCs could also be efficiently generated from lymphoid-restricted precursors. Moreover, it has been shown recently that both conventional DCs and pDCs can be generated by the Flt3 expressing hemopoietic progenitors regardless of their myeloid- or lymphoid-origin. These findings suggest an early developmental flexibility of precursors for DCs and pDCs. This review summarizes some recent observations on the development of DC system in both human and mouse.

  13. Development of Dendritic Cell System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiWu; AleksandarDakic

    2004-01-01

    The dendritic cell system contains conventional dendritic cells (DCs) and plasmacytoid pre-dendritic cells (pDCs). Both DCs and pDCs are bone marrow derived calls. Although the common functions of DCs are antigen-processing and T-lymphocyte activation, they differ in surface markers, migratory patterns, and cytokine output. These differences can determine the fate of the T cells they activate. Several subsets of mature DCs have been described in both mouse and human and the developmental processes of these specialized DC subsets have been studied extensively. The original concept that all DCs were of myeloid origin was questioned by several recent studies, which demonstrated that in addition to the DCs derived from myeloid precursors, some DCs could also be efficiently generated from lymphoid-restricted precursors. Moreover, it has been shown recently that both conventional DCs and pDCs can be generated by the Fit3 expressing hemopoietic progenitors regardless of their myeloid- or lymphoid-origin. These findings suggest an early developmental flexibility of precursors for DCs and pDCs. This review summarizes some recent observations on the development of DC system in both human and mouse. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(2):112-118.

  14. 异体大鼠骨肉瘤细胞RNA电转染树突状细胞瘤苗诱导的特异性抗骨肉瘤免疫学效应%Specific antitumor effects of tumor vaccine produced by autologous dendritic cells transfected of al-logeneie osteosarcoma total RNA through electroporation in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于哲; 张婷; 张云飞; 马保安; 范清宇

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antitumor effects of tumor vaccine produced by autologous dendritic cells transfected of allogeneic osteosarcoma total RNA through electroporation in tumor-bearing rats model. Methods In the present study, the tumor vaccine was got by transfecting UMRI08 cells total RNA to SD rat bone marrow-derived DCs through electroporation, and was applied to in tumor-bearing rats model and the specific antitumor effects of the tumor vaccine were observed. Then CTL activity was evaluated one week after the first immunization of SD rats with electroporated DCs. Results The immunization using au-tologous DCs electrotransfected with allogeneic osteosarcoma total RNA induced UMRlO6-specific CTL re-sponses which were statistically significant. In in vivo experiments, 80% of the rats immunized with allo-geneic osteosarcoma RNA transfected to DCs were typically able to reject tumor challenge and remained tu-mor-free. Vaccinated survivors developed long immunological memory and were able to reject a subsequent rechallenge with the same tumor cells but not a syngeneic unrelated tumor line. Conclusion The present study provides valid evidence of integration of autologous rat DCs electroporated with allogeneie tumor cell derived total RNA and reveales the effective potential of activation of CTLs. The research also confirmes the therapeutic effectiveness of positive immunization through corresponding animal experiment. This technique and its products may thus represent a promising strategy for DC-based immunotherapy of patients with os-teosarcoma.%目的 本研究旨在探讨异体大鼠骨肉瘤细胞RNA电转染树突状细胞(dendritic cells,DC)瘤苗在大鼠肿瘤动物模型诱导的抗骨肉瘤免疫学效应.方法 本研究采用UMR108细胞RNA通过电穿孔的方法 转染至SD大鼠骨髓来源的DCs制备瘤苗.将该瘤苗应用于骨肉瘤荷瘤大鼠,观察其特异性抗肿瘤效应,并对瘤苗诱导的细胞毒性T淋巴细胞(cytotoxic T

  15. 自体DC-CIK细胞联合索拉非尼治疗晚期肾癌的临床效果%Clinical effect of autologous dendritic cells and cytokine induced killer cells combined with Sorafenib in the treatment of advanced renal cell car-cinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    艾月琴; 赵华; 江龙委; 贾绍昌

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the safety and efficacy of autologous dendritic cells (DC) and cytokine induced killer (CIK) cells combined with Sorafenib in the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma. Methods Twenty four cases of patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma who were failed by traditional therapy admitted to No.81st Hospi-tal of PLA from December 2011 to March 2014 were selected. The peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were collected by blood cell separator, DC and CIK cells were amplified from PBMCs through induction in v itro. Autologous DC and CIK cells combined with Sorafenib were taken to treat patients. Results After treatment, the detection of pe-ripheral blood lymphocyte subsets showed that CD3+was (67.80±8.50)%, CD4+was (40.40±7.71)%, CD4+/CD8+was (1.89±0.53)%, which were higher than before treatment [(55.97±11.71)%, (30.18±8.33)%, (1.08±0.60)%], the differences were statistically significant (P=0.018, 0.021, 0.011). After treatment, the ratio of CD8+T leukomonocyte was (17.34±4.52)%, the ratio of CD4+CD25+Treg was (4.57±1.56)%, which were lower than before treatment [(25.41±6.22)%, (7.12±1.71)%], the differences were statistically significant (P= 0.005, 0.034). Among 24 patients, there were 2 cases (8.3%) of com-plete remission (CR), 4 cases (16.7%) of partial remission (PR), 15 cases (62.5%) of stable disease (SD), 3 cases (12.5%) of progressive disease (PD); the response rate (RR) was 25.0%, the disease control rate (DCR) was 87.5%. Conclusion Sorafenib combined with autologous DC and CIK cells immunotherapy in treating advanced renal cell car-cinoma is safe, which can achieve certain clinical benefit even when the efficacy of traditional therapy is poor or failed.%目的:探讨自体树突状细胞(DC)与细胞因子诱导的杀伤细胞(CIK)联合索拉非尼治疗晚期肾癌的安全性和有效性。方法选择2011年12月~2014年3月解放军第八一医院经传统治疗失败后的晚期肾癌患者24例,经

  16. Dendritic Cells, New Tools for Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Review Dendritic cells , new tools for vaccination Jesus Colino, Clifford M. Snapper * Department of Pathology, Uniformed Services University of the...2003 Éditions scientifiques et médicales Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved. Keywords: Vaccines; Immunotherapy; Dendritic cells 1. Introduction During...DATE 2003 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2003 to 00-00-2003 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dendritic cells , new tools for vaccination 5a

  17. Neoplasms derived from plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchetti, Fabio; Cigognetti, Marta; Fisogni, Simona; Rossi, Giuseppe; Lonardi, Silvia; Vermi, William

    2016-02-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasms manifest in two clinically and pathologically distinct forms. The first variant is represented by nodular aggregates of clonally expanded plasmacytoid dendritic cells found in lymph nodes, skin, and bone marrow ('Mature plasmacytoid dendritic cells proliferation associated with myeloid neoplasms'). This entity is rare, although likely underestimated in incidence, and affects predominantly males. Almost invariably, it is associated with a myeloid neoplasm such as chronic myelomonocytic leukemia or other myeloid proliferations with monocytic differentiation. The concurrent myeloid neoplasm dominates the clinical pictures and guides treatment. The prognosis is usually dismal, but reflects the evolution of the associated myeloid leukemia rather than progressive expansion of plasmacytoid dendritic cells. A second form of plasmacytoid dendritic cells tumor has been recently reported and described as 'blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm'. In this tumor, which is characterized by a distinctive cutaneous and bone marrow tropism, proliferating cells derive from immediate CD4(+)CD56(+) precursors of plasmacytoid dendritic cells. The diagnosis of this form can be easily accomplished by immunohistochemistry, using a panel of plasmacytoid dendritic cells markers. The clinical course of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm is characterized by a rapid progression to systemic disease via hematogenous dissemination. The genomic landscape of this entity is currently under intense investigation. Recurrent somatic mutations have been uncovered in different genes, a finding that may open important perspectives for precision medicine also for this rare, but highly aggressive leukemia.

  18. Fate mapping of dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Ursula Schraml

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are a heterogeneous group of mononuclear phagocytes with versatile roles in immunity. They are classified predominantly based on phenotypic and functional properties, namely their stellate morphology, expression of the integrin CD11c and major histocompatibility class II molecules, as well as their superior capacity to migrate to secondary lymphoid organs and stimulate naïve T cells. However, these attributes are not exclusive to DCs and often change within inflammatory or infectious environments. This led to debates over cell identification and questioned even the mere existence of DCs as distinct leukocyte lineage. Here, we review experimental approaches taken to fate map DCs and discuss how these have shaped our understanding of DC ontogeny and lineage affiliation. Considering the ontogenetic properties of DCs will help to overcome the inherent shortcomings of purely phenotypic- and function-based approaches to cell definition and will yield a more robust way of DC classification.

  19. A Case of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Köpeczi Judit Beáta

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Plasmacytoid dendritic cell leukemia is a rare subtype of acute leukemia, which has recently been established as a distinct pathologic entity that typically follows a highly aggressive clinical course in adults. The aim of this report is to present a case of plasmacytoid dendritic cell leukemia due to its rarity and difficulty to recognize and diagnose it.

  20. Contact-dependent Stimulation and Inhibition of Dendritic Cells by Natural Killer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Piccioli, Diego; Sbrana, Silverio; Melandri, Emiliano; Valiante, Nicholas M.

    2002-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells and dendritic cells (DCs) are two distinct cell types of innate immunity. It is known that the in vitro interaction of human NK cells with autologous DCs results in DC lysis. Here we show that contact-dependent interactions between activated human NK cells and immature DCs (iDCs) provides a “control switch” for the immune system. At low NK/DC ratios, this interaction dramatically amplifies DC responses, whereas at high ratios it completely turns off their responses. ...

  1. Dendritic Cells for Anomaly Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie; Aickelin, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    Artificial immune systems, more specifically the negative selection algorithm, have previously been applied to intrusion detection. The aim of this research is to develop an intrusion detection system based on a novel concept in immunology, the Danger Theory. Dendritic Cells (DCs) are antigen presenting cells and key to the activation of the human signals from the host tissue and correlate these signals with proteins know as antigens. In algorithmic terms, individual DCs perform multi-sensor data fusion based on time-windows. The whole population of DCs asynchronously correlates the fused signals with a secondary data stream. The behaviour of human DCs is abstracted to form the DC Algorithm (DCA), which is implemented using an immune inspired framework, libtissue. This system is used to detect context switching for a basic machine learning dataset and to detect outgoing portscans in real-time. Experimental results show a significant difference between an outgoing portscan and normal traffic.

  2. Therapeutic Potential of Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation for Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaitanya Purandare

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cerebral palsy (CP is a severe disabling disease with worldwide incidence being 2 to 3 per 1000 live births. CP was considered as a noncurable, nonreparative disorder, but stem cell therapy offers a potential treatment for CP. Objective. The present study evaluates the safety and efficacy of autologous bone-marrow-derived mononuclear cell (BMMNCs transplantation in CP patient. Material and Methods. In the present study, five infusions of autologous stem cells were injected intrathecally. Changes in neurological deficits and improvements in function were assessed using Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS-E&R scale. Results. Significant motor, sensory, cognitive, and speech improvements were observed. Bowel and bladder control has been achieved. On the GMFCS-E&R level, the patient was promoted from grade III to I. Conclusion. In this study, we report that intrathecal infusion of autologous BMMNCs seems to be feasible, effective, and safe with encouraging functional outcome improvements in CP patient.

  3. Dendritic Cell-Based Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanka Jähnisch

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs, which display an extraordinary capacity to induce, sustain, and regulate T-cell responses providing the opportunity of DC-based cancer vaccination strategies. Thus, clinical trials enrolling prostate cancer patients were conducted, which were based on the administration of DCs loaded with tumor-associated antigens. These clinical trials revealed that DC-based immunotherapeutic strategies represent safe and feasible concepts for the induction of immunological and clinical responses in prostate cancer patients. In this context, the administration of the vaccine sipuleucel-T consisting of autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells including APCs, which were pre-exposed in vitro to the fusion protein PA2024, resulted in a prolonged overall survival among patients with metastatic castration-resistent prostate cancer. In April 2010, sipuleucel-T was approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for prostate cancer therapy.

  4. Dendritic cells are stressed out in tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, Tomasz; Zou, Weiping

    2015-09-01

    A recently paper published in Cell reports that dendritic cells (DCs) are dysfunctional in the tumor environment. Tumor impairs DC function through induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress response and subsequent disruption of lipid metabolic homeostasis.

  5. Hematopoietic progenitor cell mobilization for autologous transplantation - a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurélio Salvino

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The use of high-dose chemotherapy with autologous support of hematopoietic progenitor cells is an effective strategy to treat various hematologic neoplasms, such as non-Hodgkin lymphomas and multiple myeloma. Mobilized peripheral blood progenitor cells are the main source of support for autologous transplants, and collection of an adequate number of hematopoietic progenitor cells is a critical step in the autologous transplant procedure. Traditional strategies, based on the use of growth factors with or without chemotherapy, have limitations even when remobilizations are performed. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor is the most widely used agent for progenitor cell mobilization. The association of plerixafor, a C-X-C Chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4 inhibitor, to granulocyte colony stimulating factor generates rapid mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. A literature review was performed of randomized studies comparing different mobilization schemes in the treatment of multiple myeloma and lymphomas to analyze their limitations and effectiveness in hematopoietic progenitor cell mobilization for autologous transplant. This analysis showed that the addition of plerixafor to granulocyte colony stimulating factor is well tolerated and results in a greater proportion of patients with non-Hodgkin lymphomas or multiple myeloma reaching optimal CD34+ cell collections with a smaller number of apheresis compared the use of granulocyte colony stimulating factor alone.

  6. Targeting vaccines to dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foged, Camilla; Sundblad, Anne; Hovgaard, Lars

    2002-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are specialized antigen presenting cells (APC) with a remarkable ability to take up antigens and stimulate major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted specific immune responses. Recent discoveries have shown that their role in initiating primary immune responses seems to be far superior to that of B-cells and macrophages. DC are localized at strategic places in the body at sites used by pathogens to enter the organism, and are thereby in an optimal position to capture antigens. In general, vaccination strategies try to mimic the invasiveness of the pathogens. DC are considered to play a central role for the provocation of primary immune responses by vaccination. A rational way of improving the potency and safety of new and already existing vaccines could therefore be to direct vaccines specifically to DC. There is a need for developing multifunctional vaccine drug delivery systems (DDS) with adjuvant effect that target DC directly and induce optimal immune responses. This paper will review the current knowledge of DC physiology as well as the progress in the field of novel vaccination strategies that directly or indirectly aim at targeting DC.

  7. Bortezomib consolidation after autologous stem cell transplantation in multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellqvist, Ulf-Henrik; Gimsing, Peter; Hjertner, Oyvind

    2013-01-01

    The Nordic Myeloma Study Group conducted an open randomized trial to compare bortezomib as consolidation therapy given after high-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) with no consolidation in bortezomib-naive patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. Overall, 370...

  8. Immunisation of colorectal cancer patients with autologous tumour cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Axel Cosmus Pyndt; Stenholm, A C; Kronborg, O

    1998-01-01

    Patients with colorectal cancer were entered into a clinical phase I trial of immunotherapy with an autologous tumour cell/bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine. We attempted to describe the possible effects and side effects of the immunisation, and further to investigate whether expression...

  9. Artificial Dendritic Cells: Multi-faceted Perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells are the crime scene investigators of the human immune system. Their function is to correlate potentially anomalous invading entities with observed damage to the body. The detection of such invaders by dendritic cells results in the activation of the adaptive immune system, eventually leading to the removal of the invader from the host body. This mechanism has provided inspiration for the development of a novel bio-inspired algorithm, the Dendritic Cell Algorithm. This algorithm processes information at multiple levels of resolution, resulting in the creation of information granules of variable structure. In this chapter we examine the multi-faceted nature of immunology and how research in this field has shaped the function of the resulting Dendritic Cell Algorithm. A brief overview of the algorithm is given in combination with the details of the processes used for its development. The chapter is concluded with a discussion of the parallels between our understanding of the human immune system a...

  10. Regeneration of Tissues and Organs Using Autologous Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony Atala

    2010-04-28

    The Joint Commission for Health Care Organizations recently declared the shortage of transplantable organs and tissues a public health crisis. As such, there is about one death every 30 seconds due to organ failure. Complications and rejection are still significant albeit underappreciated problems. It is often overlooked that organ transplantation results in the patient being placed on an immune suppression regimen that will ultimate shorten their life span. Patients facing reconstruction often find that surgery is difficult or impossible due to the shortage of healthy autologous tissue. In many cases, autografting is a compromise between the condition and the cure that can result in substantial diminution of quality of life. The national cost of caring for persons who might benefit from engineered tissues or organs has reached $600 billion annually. Autologous tissue technologies have been developed as an alternative to transplantation or reconstructive surgery. Autologous tissues derived from the patient's own cells are capable of correcting numerous pathologies and injuries. The use of autologous cells eliminates the risks of rejection and immunological reactions, drastically reduces the time that patients must wait for lifesaving surgery, and negates the need for autologous tissue harvest, thereby eliminating the associated morbidities. In fact, the use of autologous tissues to create functional organs is one of the most important and groundbreaking steps ever taken in medicine. Although the basic premise of creating tissues in the laboratory has progressed dramatically, only a limited number of tissue developments have reached the patients to date. This is due, in part, to the several major technological challenges that require solutions. To that end, we have been in pursuit of more efficient ways to expand cells in vitro, methods to improve vascular support so that relevant volumes of engineered tissues can be grown, and constructs that can mimic the

  11. Rapid cell separation with minimal manipulation for autologous cell therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alban J.; O’Rorke, Richard D.; Kale, Akshay; Rimsa, Roberts; Tomlinson, Matthew J.; Kirkham, Jennifer; Davies, A. Giles; Wälti, Christoph; Wood, Christopher D.

    2017-02-01

    The ability to isolate specific, viable cell populations from mixed ensembles with minimal manipulation and within intra-operative time would provide significant advantages for autologous, cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine. Current cell-enrichment technologies are either slow, lack specificity and/or require labelling. Thus a rapid, label-free separation technology that does not affect cell functionality, viability or phenotype is highly desirable. Here, we demonstrate separation of viable from non-viable human stromal cells using remote dielectrophoresis, in which an electric field is coupled into a microfluidic channel using shear-horizontal surface acoustic waves, producing an array of virtual electrodes within the channel. This allows high-throughput dielectrophoretic cell separation in high conductivity, physiological-like fluids, overcoming the limitations of conventional dielectrophoresis. We demonstrate viable/non-viable separation efficacy of >98% in pre-purified mesenchymal stromal cells, extracted from human dental pulp, with no adverse effects on cell viability, or on their subsequent osteogenic capabilities.

  12. Rapid cell separation with minimal manipulation for autologous cell therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alban J.; O’Rorke, Richard D.; Kale, Akshay; Rimsa, Roberts; Tomlinson, Matthew J.; Kirkham, Jennifer; Davies, A. Giles; Wälti, Christoph; Wood, Christopher D.

    2017-01-01

    The ability to isolate specific, viable cell populations from mixed ensembles with minimal manipulation and within intra-operative time would provide significant advantages for autologous, cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine. Current cell-enrichment technologies are either slow, lack specificity and/or require labelling. Thus a rapid, label-free separation technology that does not affect cell functionality, viability or phenotype is highly desirable. Here, we demonstrate separation of viable from non-viable human stromal cells using remote dielectrophoresis, in which an electric field is coupled into a microfluidic channel using shear-horizontal surface acoustic waves, producing an array of virtual electrodes within the channel. This allows high-throughput dielectrophoretic cell separation in high conductivity, physiological-like fluids, overcoming the limitations of conventional dielectrophoresis. We demonstrate viable/non-viable separation efficacy of >98% in pre-purified mesenchymal stromal cells, extracted from human dental pulp, with no adverse effects on cell viability, or on their subsequent osteogenic capabilities. PMID:28150746

  13. 自体热休克凋亡细胞负载树突状细胞治疗大肠癌的疗效观察%Vaccination with apoptosis colorectal cancer cell pulsed autologous dendritic cells in advanced colorectal cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金成; 鲍传庆; 许炳华; 沈晓明; 张淳; 陆晓

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨自体热休克凋亡细胞负载的树突状细胞(dendritic cells,DC)治疗大肠癌的临床疗效.方法:采用酶消化法从手术切除的14例大肠癌新鲜组织获得单细胞悬液,热休克处理后用桦脂酸诱导其凋亡制备成细胞抗原;采集外周静脉血,分离单个核细胞,经GM-CSF与IL-4体外诱导成未成熟树突状细胞,负载细胞抗原后制备成DC肿瘤疫苗;对14例大肠癌患者进行4个疗程的DC免疫治疗,观察患者不良反应、敏感程度、生存质量、生存时间、癌胚抗原等临床指标.结果:DC治疗大肠癌未出现明显不良反应,5例患者的DTH检测阳性;14例患者的平均CEA水平由治疗前的99.5ng/ml降至治疗后的71.4ng/ml(P<0.05);治疗后血清中IL-2、IL-12及IFN-γ浓度均显著高于治疗前,具有统计学差异(P<0.05);所有患者均生存1年,其中1例患者出现了短暂的后腹膜淋巴结缩小,持续3个月,第2年由于肿瘤的进展生存率下降,由80%降至20%;患者的KPS评分上升,与治疗前比较有所改善(P<0.05).结论:自体热休克凋亡细胞负载的DC治疗大肠癌在临床治疗中具较高安全性,可改善患者免疫功能,临床观察显示患者近期临床效果明显;为大肠癌的临床综合治疗提供了一种新方法.%Objective: To study vaccination with apoptosis colorectal cancer cell pulsed autologous DCs in advanced colorectal cancer ( CRC ) patients. Methods : Dendritic cells( DCs )isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cell of the patients with advanced colorectal cancer ( CRC ) were cultured and proliferated in vitro by using rhGM CSF and rhIL - 4 , and then were loaded with heat shock - induced apoptotic colorectal cancer cell . In this study, 14 patients with advanced CRC were enrolled and treated with DCs vaccine to assess toxicity , tolerability and clinical responses to the vaccine. Results : No severe toxicity was observed and the vaccine was well tolerated. The levels of IL -2,IL - 12

  14. Dendritic cells in melanoma - immunohistochemical study and research trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedelcu, Roxana Ioana; Ion, Daniela Adriana; Holeab, Cosmin Adrian; Cioplea, Mirela Daniela; Brînzea, Alice; Zurac, Sabina Andrada

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous dendritic cells play multiple physiological roles and are involved in various pathophysiological processes. Research studies of dendritic cells abound in the medical literature. Nevertheless, the role of dendritic cells in melanoma regression phenomenon is not completely understood. We conducted a scientometric analysis in order to highlight the current state on research regarding dendritic cells and melanoma. We also performed an immunohistochemical study, using specific markers for dendritic cells (CD1a, langerin). We evaluated the frequency and distribution of dendritic cells in areas of tumor regression compared to the areas of inflammatory infiltrate of melanoma without regression. The immunohistochemical study we performed revealed that dendritic cells are more frequent in the regressed areas, comparing with non-regressed ones. In regressed areas, dendritic cells have a predominant nodular pattern (19 cases), followed by diffuse isolate pattern (eight cases) and mixed pattern (diffuse and nodular) (three cases). In melanoma without regression, most cases presented a diffuse pattern (27 cases) of dendritic cells distribution. In conclusion, our immunohistochemical study stressed differences between frequency and distribution of dendritic cells located in the melanoma with regression and melanoma without regression. These data suggest that dendritic cells are involved in the regression phenomenon. Following the literature analysis we obtained, we observed that dendritic cells profile in melanoma with regression was poorly studied. Insights into antitumor immune response and dendritic cells may be essential for the understanding of the potential prognostic role of dendritic cells in melanoma and for the development of new promising therapeutic strategies for melanoma.

  15. Dendritic cells modified by vitamin D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ayako Wakatsuki; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Zocca, Mai-Britt

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), the most potent antigen-presenting cells of the immune system, express nuclear receptors for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (VD3) and they are one of its main targets. In the presence of VD3, DCs differentiate into a phenotype that resembles semimature DCs, with reduced T cell...

  16. Dendritic cells in peripheral tolerance and immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Monika; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Pedersen, Anders Elm

    2003-01-01

    Dendritic cells capable of influencing immunity exist as functionally distinct subsets, T cell-tolerizing and T cell-immunizing subsets. The present paper reviews how these subsets of DCs develop, differentiate and function in vivo and in vitro at the cellular and molecular level. In particular...

  17. The role of dendritic cells in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2017-01-01

    Though present in low numbers, dendritic cells (DCs) are recognized as major players in the control of cancer by adaptive immunity. The roles of cytotoxic CD8+ T-cells and Th1 helper CD4+ T-cells are well-documented in murine models of cancer and associated with a profound prognostic impact when...... treatment regimens against cancer....

  18. Cell manipulation in autologous chondrocyte implantation: from research to cleanroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseti, Livia; Serra, Marta; Tigani, Domenico; Brognara, Irene; Lopriore, Annamaria; Bassi, Alessandra; Fornasari, Pier Maria

    2008-04-01

    In the field of orthopaedics, autologous chondrocyte implantation is a technique currently used for the regeneration of damaged articular cartilage. There is evidence of the neo-formation of tissue displaying characteristics similar to hyaline cartilage. In vitro chondrocyte manipulation is a crucial phase of this therapeutic treatment consisting of different steps: cell isolation from a cartilage biopsy, expansion in monolayer culture and growth onto a three-dimensional biomaterial to implant in the damaged area. To minimise the risk of in vitro cell contamination, the manipulation must be performed in a controlled environment such as a cleanroom. Moreover, the choice of reagents and raw material suitable for clinical use in humans and the translation of research protocols into standardised production processes are important. In this study we describe the preliminary results obtained by the development of chondrocyte manipulation protocols (isolation and monolayer expansion) in cleanrooms for the application of autologous implantation.

  19. Synaptic development in the injured spinal cord cavity following co-transplantation of fetal spinal cord cells and autologous activated Schwann cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wendong Ruan; Yuan Xue; Ninghua Li; Xiaotao Zhao; Huajian Zhao; Peng Li

    2010-01-01

    Transplantation of activated transgenic Schwann cells or a fetal spinal cord cell suspension has been widely used to treat spinal cord injury. However, little is known regarding the effects of co-transplantation. In the present study, autologous Schwann cells in combination with a fetal spinal cord cell suspension were transplanted into adult Wistar rats with spinal cord injury, and newly generated axonal connections were observed ultrastructurally. Transmission electron microscopic observations showed that the neuroblast first presented cytoplasmic processes, followed by pre- and postsynaptic membranes with low electron density forming a dense projection. The number and types of synaptic vesicles were increased. Synaptic connections developed from single cell body-dendritic synapses into multiple cell body-dendritic anddendrite-dendritic synapses. In addition, the cell organs of the transplanted neuroblast, oligodendroblast and astroblast matured gradually. The blood-brain barrier appeared subsequently. Moreover, neurofilament, histamine, calcitonin-gene-related peptides, and glial fibrillary acidic protein positive fibers were observed in the transplant region. These findings demonstrate that fetal spinal cord cells in the presence of autologous activated Schwann cells can develop into mature synapses in the cavity of injured spinal cords, suggesting the possibility of information exchange through the reconstructed synapse between fetal spinal cord cells and the host.

  20. Dendritic Cells Stimulated by Cationic Liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitor, Micaela Tamara; Bergami-Santos, Patrícia Cruz; Cruz, Karen Steponavicius Piedade; Pinho, Mariana Pereira; Barbuto, José Alexandre Marzagão; De La Torre, Lucimara Gaziola

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy of cancer aims to harness the immune system to detect and destroy cancer cells. To induce an immune response against cancer, activated dendritic cells (DCs) must present tumor antigens to T lymphocytes of patients. However, cancer patients' DCs are frequently defective, therefore, they are prone to induce rather tolerance than immune responses. In this context, loading tumor antigens into DCs and, at the same time, activating these cells, is a tempting goal within the field. Thus, we investigated the effects of cationic liposomes on the DCs differentiation/maturation, evaluating their surface phenotype and ability to stimulate T lymphocytes proliferation in vitro. The cationic liposomes composed by egg phosphatidylcholine, 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium propane and 1,2-dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (50/25/25% molar) were prepared by the thin film method followed by extrusion (65 nm, polydispersity of 0.13) and by the dehydration-rehydration method (95% of the population 107 nm, polydispersity of 0.52). The phenotypic analysis of dendritic cells and the analysis of T lymphocyte proliferation were performed by flow cytometry and showed that both cationic liposomes were incorporated and activated dendritic cells. Extruded liposomes were better incorporated and induced higher CD86 expression for dendritic cells than dehydrated-rehydrated vesicles. Furthermore, dendritic cells which internalized extruded liposomes also provided stronger T lymphocyte stimulation. Thus, cationic liposomes with a smaller size and polydispersity seem to be better incorporated by dendritic cells. Hence, these cationic liposomes could be used as a potential tool in further cancer immunotherapy strategies and contribute to new strategies in immunotherapy.

  1. Detecting Danger: The Dendritic Cell Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie; Cayzer, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The Dendritic Cell Algorithm (DCA) is inspired by the function of the dendritic cells of the human immune system. In nature, dendritic cells are the intrusion detection agents of the human body, policing the tissue and organs for potential invaders in the form of pathogens. In this research, and abstract model of DC behaviour is developed and subsequently used to form an algorithm, the DCA. The abstraction process was facilitated through close collaboration with laboratory- based immunologists, who performed bespoke experiments, the results of which are used as an integral part of this algorithm. The DCA is a population based algorithm, with each agent in the system represented as an 'artificial DC'. Each DC has the ability to combine multiple data streams and can add context to data suspected as anomalous. In this chapter the abstraction process and details of the resultant algorithm are given. The algorithm is applied to numerous intrusion detection problems in computer security including the detection of p...

  2. ISOLATION OF CHICKEN FOLLICULAR DENDRITIC CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of the present study was to isolate chicken follicular dendritic cells (FDC). A combination of methods involving panning, iodixanol density gradient centrifugation, and magnetic cell separation technology made it possible to obtain functional FDC from the cecal tonsils from chickens, which h...

  3. Infection of Dendritic Cells by the Maedi-Visna Lentivirus

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, Susanna; Tiley, Laurence; McConnell, Ian; Blacklaws, Barbara

    2000-01-01

    The early stages of lentivirus infection of dendritic cells have been studied in an in vivo model. Maedi-visna virus (MVV) is a natural pathogen of sheep with a tropism for macrophages, but the infection of dendritic cells has not been proven, largely because of the difficulties of definitively distinguishing the two cell types. Afferent lymphatic dendritic cells from sheep have been phenotypically characterized and separated from macrophages. Dendritic cells purified from experimentally infe...

  4. Importance of mesenchymal stem cells in autologous fat grafting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trojahn Kølle, Stig-Frederik; Oliveri, Roberto S; Glovinski, Peter Viktor

    2012-01-01

    Autologous fat grafting (lipofilling) enables repair and augmentation of soft tissues and is increasingly used both in aesthetic and reconstructive surgery. Autologous fat has several advantages, including biocompatibility, versatility, natural appearance, and low donor site morbidity. The main...... the fat graft with adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASC) before transplantation. We have reviewed original studies published on fat transplantation enriched with ASC. We found four murine and three human studies that investigated the subject after a sensitive search of publications...... limitation is unpredictable graft resorption, which ranges from 25%-80%, probably as a result of ischaemia and lack of neoangiogenesis. To obviate these disadvantages, several studies have searched for new ways of increasing the viability of the transplanted tissue. One promising approach has been to enrich...

  5. Autologous stem cells in neurology: is there a future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Munter, Johannes P J M; Wolters, Erik C

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells seem very promising in the treatment of degenerative neurological diseases for which there are currently no or limited therapeutic strategies. However, their clinical application meets many regulatory hurdles. This article gives an overview of stem cells, their potential healing capacities as well as their identified and potential risks, such as tumor formation, unwanted immune responses and the transmission of adventitious agents. As there is no clinical experience with embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells (as the result of their unacceptable risk on tumor formation), most attention will be paid to fresh autologous adult stem cells (ASCs). To evaluate eventual clinical benefits, preclinical studies are essential, though their value is limited as in these studies, various types of stem cells, with different histories of procurement and culturing, are applied in various concentrations by various routes of administration. On top of that, in most animal studies allogenic human, thus non-autologous, stem cells are applied, which might mask the real effects. More reliable, though small-sized, clinical trials with autologous ASCs did show satisfying clinical benefits in regenerative medicine, without major health concerns. One should wonder, though, why it is so hard to get compelling evidence for the healing and renewing capacities of these stem cells when these cells indeed are really essential for tissue repair during life. Why so many hurdles have to be taken before health authorities such as the European Medicine Agency (EMA) and/or the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approve stem cells in the treatment of (especially no-option) patients.

  6. Transplantation of Reprogrammed Autologous Stem Cells for Chronic Pain and Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-11-1-0673 TITLE: Transplantation of Reprogrammed Autologous Stem Cells for Chronic Pain and Drug Abuse PRINCIPAL...CONTRACT NUMBER Transplantation of Reprogrammed Autologous Stem Cells for Chronic Pain and Drug Abuse 5b. GRANT NUMBER: W81XWH-11-1-0673 5c. PROGRAM...Tolerance, Drug abuse , Cell cultures, Spinal transplantation of autologous stem cells, Animal behavioral tests 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17

  7. In Situ Observation of Cell-to-Dendrite Transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Xiu-Hong; HONG Yong; JIN Wei-Qing

    2005-01-01

    @@ The cell-to-dendrite transition of succinonitrile melt suspended on a loop-shaped Pt heater is observed in real time by a differential interference microscope coupled with Schlieren technique. The transition is divided into two parts: a dendrite coalition process and a subsequent dendrite elimination process. Firstly the dendrites from the same cell are united into a single dendrite. Secondly the competitive growth of dendrites from different cells leads to the elimination of dendrites. The two processes can be understood when involving crystallographic orientation. In addition, the tip velocity and primary spacing of a cell/dendrite are also measured. It turns out that the primary spacing has a significant jump, whereas the growth velocity has no abrupt change during the cell-to-dendrite transition.

  8. Characterization of monocyte-derived dendritic cells maturated with IFN-alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, I M; Nikolajsen, K; Walter, M R;

    2006-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are promising candidates for cancer immunotherapy. These cells can be generated from peripheral blood monocytes cultured with granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-4 (IL-4). In order to obtain full functional capacity, maturation is required......, maturation with IFN-alpha has only a small effect on induction of autologous T-cell stimulatory capacity of the DC. However, an increase in DC allogeneic T-cell stimulatory capacity was observed. These data suggest that IFN-alpha has a potential as a maturation agent used in DC-based cancer vaccine trials...

  9. Ventricular fibrillation following autologous intramyocardial cell therapy for inherited cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytel, Peter; Husain, Aliya; Moskowitz, Ivan; Raman, Jai; MacLeod, Heather; Anderson, Allen S; Burke, Martin; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2010-01-01

    A 41-year-old male with cardiomyopathy from an inherited beta myosin heavy-chain mutation underwent treatment for heart failure with intramyocardial cell transplantation. He received direct injections into his heart of autologous precursor cells isolated from his blood. He immediately suffered ventricular fibrillation. Although he was resuscitated, he experienced a prolonged downward course that prohibited his undergoing transplantation. His autopsy revealed marked fibrosis throughout the myocardium with areas of mononuclear cell infiltrate. This case highlights the potential adverse effects associated with intramyocardial therapy in the cardiomyopathic heart.

  10. Ventricular fibrillation following autologous intramyocardial cell therapy for inherited cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytel, Peter; Husain, Aliya; Moskowitz, Ivan; Raman, Jai; MacLeod, Heather; Anderson, Allen S.; Burke, Martin; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2010-01-01

    A 41 year old male with cardiomyopathy from an inherited β myosin heavy chain mutation underwent treatment for heart failure with intramyocardial cell transplantation. He received direct injections into his heart of autologous precursor cells isolated from his blood. He immediately suffered ventricular fibrillation. Although he was resuscitated, he experienced a prolonged downward course that prohibited his undergoing transplantation. His autopsy revealed marked fibrosis throughout the myocardium with areas of mononuclear cell infiltrate. This case highlights the potential adverse effects associated with intramyocardial therapy in the cardiomyopathic heart. PMID:19026577

  11. Macrophages, Dendritic Cells, and Regression of Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan E. Feig

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is the number one cause of death in the Western world. It results from the interaction between modified lipoproteins and monocyte-derived cells such as macrophages, dendritic cells, T cells, and other cellular elements of the arterial wall. This inflammatory process can ultimately lead to the development of complex lesions, or plaques, that protrude into the arterial lumen. Ultimately, plaque rupture and thrombosis can occur leading to the clinical complications of myocardial infarction or stroke. Although each of the cell types plays roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, in this review, the focus will be primarily on the monocyte derived cells- macrophages and dendritic cells. The roles of these cell types in atherogenesis will be highlighted. Finally, the mechanisms of atherosclerosis regression as it relates to these cells will be discussed.

  12. Differentiation of apical and basal dendrites in pyramidal cells and granule cells in dissociated hippocampal cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, You Kure; Fujishima, Kazuto; Kengaku, Mineko

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampal pyramidal cells and dentate granule cells develop morphologically distinct dendritic arbors, yet also share some common features. Both cell types form a long apical dendrite which extends from the apex of the cell soma, while short basal dendrites are developed only in pyramidal cells. Using quantitative morphometric analyses of mouse hippocampal cultures, we evaluated the differences in dendritic arborization patterns between pyramidal and granule cells. Furthermore, we observed and described the final apical dendrite determination during dendritic polarization by time-lapse imaging. Pyramidal and granule cells in culture exhibited similar dendritic patterns with a single principal dendrite and several minor dendrites so that the cell types were not readily distinguished by appearance. While basal dendrites in granule cells are normally degraded by adulthood in vivo, cultured granule cells retained their minor dendrites. Asymmetric growth of a single principal dendrite harboring the Golgi was observed in both cell types soon after the onset of dendritic growth. Time-lapse imaging revealed that up until the second week in culture, final principal dendrite designation was not stabilized, but was frequently replaced by other minor dendrites. Before dendritic polarity was stabilized, the Golgi moved dynamically within the soma and was repeatedly repositioned at newly emerging principal dendrites. Our results suggest that polarized growth of the apical dendrite is regulated by cell intrinsic programs, while regression of basal dendrites requires cue(s) from the extracellular environment in the dentate gyrus. The apical dendrite designation is determined from among multiple growing dendrites of young developing neurons.

  13. Dendritic Cells Endocytose Bacillus Anthracis Spores: Implications for Anthrax Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Dendritic Cells Endocytose Bacillus anthracis Spores: Implications for Anthrax Pathogenesis1 Katherine C. Brittingham,* Gordon Ruthel,* Rekha G...germination and dissemination of spores. Found in high frequency throughout the respiratory track, dendritic cells (DCs) routinely take up foreign...COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dendritic cells endocytose Bacillus anthracis spores: implications for anthrax pathogenesis, The Journal of

  14. Human induced pluripotent stem cells on autologous feeders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutoshi Takahashi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: For therapeutic usage of induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS cells, to accomplish xeno-free culture is critical. Previous reports have shown that human embryonic stem (ES cells can be maintained in feeder-free condition. However, absence of feeder cells can be a hostile environment for pluripotent cells and often results in karyotype abnormalities. Instead of animal feeders, human fibroblasts can be used as feeder cells of human ES cells. However, one still has to be concerned about the existence of unidentified pathogens, such as viruses and prions in these non-autologous feeders. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This report demonstrates that human induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS cells can be established and maintained on isogenic parental feeder cells. We tested four independent human skin fibroblasts for the potential to maintain self-renewal of iPS cells. All the fibroblasts tested, as well as their conditioned medium, were capable of maintaining the undifferentiated state and normal karyotypes of iPS cells. Furthermore, human iPS cells can be generated on isogenic parental fibroblasts as feeders. These iPS cells carried on proliferation over 19 passages with undifferentiated morphologies. They expressed undifferentiated pluripotent cell markers, and could differentiate into all three germ layers via embryoid body and teratoma formation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that autologous fibroblasts can be not only a source for iPS cells but also be feeder layers. Our results provide a possibility to solve the dilemma by using isogenic fibroblasts as feeder layers of iPS cells. This is an important step toward the establishment of clinical grade iPS cells.

  15. “Dermal dendritic cells” comprise two distinct populations: CD1+ dendritic cells and CD209+ macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Ochoa,Maria Teresa; Loncaric, Anya; Krutzik, Stephan R.; Becker, Todd C.; Modlin, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    A key cell type of the resident skin immune system is the dendritic cell, which in normal skin is located in two distinct microanatomical compartments: Langerhans cells (LC) mainly in the epidermis and dermal dendritic cells (DDC) in the dermis. Here, the lineage of dermal dendritic cells was investigated using monoclonal antibodies and immunohistology. We provide evidence that “dermal dendritic cells” comprise at least two major phenotypic populations of dendritic appearing cells: immature D...

  16. Characterization of chicken dendritic cell markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Animal and Natural Resources Institute, ARS-USDA, Beltsville, MD, USA. New mouse monoclonal antibodies which detect CD80 and CD83 were developed to characterize chicken dendritic cells (DCs). The characteristics of these molecules have been studied in human, swine, ovine, feline, and canine but not ...

  17. Clinical and Immunological Effects in Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung-Cancer after Vaccination with Dendritic Cells Exposed to an Allogeneic Tumor Cell Lysate*

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engell-Noerregaard, Lotte; Kvistborg, Pia; Zocca, Mai-Britt

    2013-01-01

    Background: We evaluated the clinical and immunological effects of dendritic cell (DC) vaccination of patients with NSCLC. Autologous DCs were pulsed with a MAGE containing allogeneic melanoma cell lysate (MelCancerVac®, Dandrit Biotech, Copenhagen, Denmark). Imiquimod cream, proleukin......-layed effect of DC vaccination after completion of the treatment. A prospective randomized phase-IIb or -III is needed to further evaluate the use of MelCancerVac® vaccine treatment in patients with progressive NSCLC....

  18. Divergent Effects of Dendritic Cells on Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    cells, Gr1+ inflammatory monocytes and neutrophils, or TNF production were induced to develop chronic pancreatitis in the context of DC overexpansion...Z. Yao, W. Cao, and Y.J. Liu. 2005. TSLP-activated dendritic cells induce an inflammatory T helper type 2 cell response through OX40 ligand. J. Exp...Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response , including the time for reviewing instructions

  19. CTLA-4 blockade during dendritic cell based booster vaccination influences dendritic cell survival and CTL expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders E; Ronchese, Franca

    2007-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells and critical for the priming of CD8+ T cells. Therefore the use of these cells as adjuvant cells has been tested in a large number of experimental and clinical vaccination studies, in particular cancer vaccine studies. A number of protocols...

  20. Comparison of dendritic cell-mediated immune responses among canine malignant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Kyoichi; Arai, Hiroyoshi; Ueno, Emi; Saito, Chie; Yagihara, Hiroko; Isotani, Mayu; Ono, Kenichiro; Washizu, Tsukimi; Bonkobara, Makoto

    2007-09-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) vaccination is one of the most attractive immunotherapies for malignancies in dogs. To examine the differences in DC-mediated immune responses from different types of malignancies in dogs, we vaccinated dogs using autologous DCs pulsed with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and cell lysate prepared from squamous cell carcinoma SCC2/88 (SCC-KLH-DC), histiocytic sarcoma CHS-5 (CHS-KLH-DC), or B cell leukemia GL-1 (GL-KLH-DC) in vitro. In vivo inductions of immune responses against these tumor cells were compared by the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin test. The DTH response against SCC2/88 cells were observed in dogs vaccinated with autologous SCC-KLH-DC, while the response was undetectable against CHS-5 and GL-1 cells in dogs vaccinated with autologous CHS-KLH-DC and GL-KLH-DC. Skin biopsies taken from DTH challenge sites were then examined for immunohistochemistry, and recruitment of CD8 and CD4 T cells was detected at the site where SCC2/88 cells were inoculated in dogs vaccinated with SCC-KLH-DC. By contrast, neither CD8 nor CD4 T cell infiltration was found at the DTH challenge site in the dogs vaccinated with CHS-KLH-DC or GL-KLH-DC. These findings may reflect that the efficacy of immune induction by DC vaccination varies among tumor types and that immune responses could be inducible in squamous cell carcinoma. Our results encouraged further investigation of therapeutic vaccination for dogs with advanced squamous cell carcinoma in clinical trials.

  1. Effect of insulin on functional status of cord blood-derived dendritic cells and on dendritic cell-induced CTL cytotoxicity against pancreatic cancer cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiu-Liang Liu; Yi-Sheng Wang; Jia-Xiang Wang

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most important antigen-presenting cells in the human body, and DCs with different mature status possess different or even opposite functions. This study was designed to explore the influence of insulin on the functional status of cord blood-derived DCs and on DC-induced cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity against pancreatic cancer cell lines. METHODS: Mononuclear cells were isolated from fresh cord blood. Interleukin-4 (IL-4) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) were used to induce or stimulate the mononuclear cells. Insulin at different concentrations served to modify DCs, and then DC morphology, number, and growth status were assessed. The DC immunophenotype was detected with a flow cytometer. The IL-12 in DC supernatant was determined by ELISA. DC functional status was evaluated by the autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction. T lymphocytes were induced by insulin-modified DCs to become CTLs. The CTL cytotoxicity against pancreatic cancer cell lines was determined. RESULTS:  Mononuclear cells from cord blood can be differentiated into DCs by cytokine induction and insulin modification. With the increase in insulin concentration (2.5-25 mg/L), the expression of DC HLA-DR, CD1α, CD80, and CD83 was significantly increased, the DC ability to secrete IL-12 was significantly improved, DC function to activate autologous lymphocytes was significantly enhanced, and the cytotoxicity of CTLs induced by insulin-modified DCs against pancreatic cancer cell lines was significantly strengthened. CONCLUSIONS: Insulin may facilitate DC induction and maturation, and improve the reproductive activity of autologous lymphocytes. The cytotoxicity of CTLs induced by insulin-modified DCs against pancreatic cancer cell lines was significantly enhanced. Insulin may serve as a factor modifying DCs and inducing CTLs in vitro in insulin biotherapy.

  2. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, Afonso José Pereira; Dulley, Frederico Luiz; Saboya, Rosaura; Mendrone Júnior, Alfredo; Amigo Filho, Ulisses; Coracin, Fabio Luiz; Buccheri, Valéria; Linardi, Camila da Cruz Gouveia; Ruiz, Milton Artur; Chamone, Dalton de Alencar Fischer

    2011-01-01

    Background Hodgkin's lymphoma has high rates of cure, but in 15% to 20% of general patients and between 35% and 40% of those in advanced stages, the disease will progress or will relapse after initial treatment. For this group, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is considered one option of salvage therapy. Objectives To evaluate a group of 106 patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma, who suffered relapse or who were refractory to treatment, submitted to autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a single transplant center. Methods A retrospective study was performed with data collected from patient charts. The analysis involved 106 classical Hodgkin's lymphoma patients who were consecutively submitted to high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous transplants in a single institution from April 1993 to December 2006. Results The overall survival rates of this population at five and ten years were 86% and 70%, respectively. The disease-free survival was approximately 60% at five years. Four patients died of procedure-related causes but relapse of classical Hodgkin's lymphoma after transplant was the most frequent cause of death. Univariate analysis shows that sensitivity to pre-transplant treatment and hemoglobin < 10 g/dL at diagnosis had an impact on patient survival. Unlike other studies, B-type symptoms did not seem to affect overall survival. Lactic dehydrogenase and serum albumin concentrations analyzed at diagnosis did not influence patient survival either. Conclusion Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is an effective treatment strategy for early and late relapse in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma for cases that were responsive to pre-transplant chemotherapy. Refractory to treatment is a sign of worse prognosis. Additionally, a hemoglobin concentration below 10 g/dL at diagnosis of Hodgkin's lymphoma has a negative impact on the survival of patients after transplant. As far as we know this relationship has not been previously reported

  3. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afonso José Pereira Cortez

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hodgkin's lymphoma has high rates of cure, but in 15% to 20% of general patients and between 35% and 40% of those in advanced stages, the disease will progress or will relapse after initial treatment. For this group, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is considered one option of salvage therapy. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate a group of 106 patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma, who suffered relapse or who were refractory to treatment, submitted to autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a single transplant center. METHODS: A retrospective study was performed with data collected from patient charts. The analysis involved 106 classical Hodgkin's lymphoma patients who were consecutively submitted to high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous transplants in a single institution from April 1993 to December 2006. RESULTS: The overall survival rates of this population at five and ten years were 86% and 70%, respectively. The disease-free survival was approximately 60% at five years. Four patients died of procedure-related causes but relapse of classical Hodgkin's lymphoma after transplant was the most frequent cause of death. Univariate analysis shows that sensitivity to pre-transplant treatment and hemoglobin < 10 g/dL at diagnosis had an impact on patient survival. Unlike other studies, B-type symptoms did not seem to affect overall survival. Lactic dehydrogenase and serum albumin concentrations analyzed at diagnosis did not influence patient survival either. CONCLUSION: Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is an effective treatment strategy for early and late relapse in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma for cases that were responsive to pre-transplant chemotherapy. Refractory to treatment is a sign of worse prognosis. Additionally, a hemoglobin concentration below 10 g/dL at diagnosis of Hodgkin's lymphoma has a negative impact on the survival of patients after transplant. As far as we know this relationship has not

  4. Autologous Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells Intrathecal Transplantation in Chronic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell therapy is being widely explored in the management of stroke and has demonstrated great potential. It has been shown to assist in the remodeling of the central nervous system by inducing neurorestorative effect through the process of angiogenesis, neurogenesis, and reduction of glial scar formation. In this study, the effect of intrathecal administration of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs is analyzed on the recovery process of patients with chronic stroke. 24 patients diagnosed with chronic stroke were administered cell therapy, followed by multidisciplinary neurorehabilitation. They were assessed on functional independence measure (FIM objectively, along with assessment of standing and walking balance, ambulation, and hand functions. Out of 24 patients, 12 improved in ambulation, 10 in hand functions, 6 in standing balance, and 9 in walking balance. Further factor analysis was done. Patients of the younger groups showed higher percentage of improvement in all the areas. Patients who underwent cell therapy within 2 years after the stroke showed better changes. Ischemic type of stroke had better recovery than the hemorrhagic stroke. This study demonstrates the potential of autologous BMMNCs intrathecal transplantation in improving the prognosis of functional recovery in chronic stage of stroke. Further clinical trials are recommended. This trial is registered with NCT02065778.

  5. Sensitivity of Dendritic Cells to Microenvironment Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, Juliana Maria; Rumjanek, Vivian Mary

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells are antigen-presenting cells capable of either activating the immune response or inducing and maintaining immune tolerance. They do this by integrating stimuli from the environment and changing their functional status as a result of plasticity. The modifications suffered by these cells have consequences in the way the organism may respond. In the present work two opposing situations known to affect dendritic cells are analyzed: tumor growth, leading to a microenvironment that favors the induction of a tolerogenic profile, and organ transplantation, which leads to a proinflammatory profile. Lessons learned from these situations may help to understand the mechanisms of modulation resulting not only from the above circumstances, but also from other pathologies. PMID:27088097

  6. Sensitivity of Dendritic Cells to Microenvironment Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Maria Motta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are antigen-presenting cells capable of either activating the immune response or inducing and maintaining immune tolerance. They do this by integrating stimuli from the environment and changing their functional status as a result of plasticity. The modifications suffered by these cells have consequences in the way the organism may respond. In the present work two opposing situations known to affect dendritic cells are analyzed: tumor growth, leading to a microenvironment that favors the induction of a tolerogenic profile, and organ transplantation, which leads to a proinflammatory profile. Lessons learned from these situations may help to understand the mechanisms of modulation resulting not only from the above circumstances, but also from other pathologies.

  7. Dendritic Cells for SYN Scan Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Artificial immune systems have previously been applied to the problem of intrusion detection. The aim of this research is to develop an intrusion detection system based on the function of Dendritic Cells (DCs). DCs are antigen presenting cells and key to activation of the human immune system, behaviour which has been abstracted to form the Dendritic Cell Algorithm (DCA). In algorithmic terms, individual DCs perform multi-sensor data fusion, asynchronously correlating the the fused data signals with a secondary data stream. Aggregate output of a population of cells, is analysed and forms the basis of an anomaly detection system. In this paper the DCA is applied to the detection of outgoing port scans using TCP SYN packets. Results show that detection can be achieved with the DCA, yet some false positives can be encountered when simultaneously scanning and using other network services. Suggestions are made for using adaptive signals to alleviate this uncovered problem.

  8. Plasmacytoid dendritic cell role in cutaneous malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadeh, Dana; Kurban, Mazen; Abbas, Ossama

    2016-07-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) correspond to a specialized dendritic cell population that exhibit plasma cell morphology, express CD4, CD123, HLA-DR, blood-derived dendritic cell antigen-2 (BDCA-2), and Toll-like receptor (TLR)7 and TLR9 within endosomal compartments. Through their production of type I interferons (IFNs) and other pro-inflammatory cytokines, pDCs provide anti-viral resistance and link the innate and adaptive immunity by controlling the function of myeloid DCs, lymphocytes, and natural killer (NK) cells. While lacking from normal skin, pDCs are usually recruited to the skin in several cutaneous pathologies where they appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of several infectious, inflammatory/autoimmune, and neoplastic entities. Among the latter group, pDCs have the potential to induce anti-tumour immunity; however, the complex interaction of pDCs with tumor cells and their micro-environment appears to contribute to immunologic tolerance. In this review, we aim at highlighting the role played by pDCs in cutaneous malignancies with special emphasis on the underlying mechanisms.

  9. Generation of dendritic cells and macrophages from human induced pluripotent stem cells aiming at cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senju, S; Haruta, M; Matsumura, K; Matsunaga, Y; Fukushima, S; Ikeda, T; Takamatsu, K; Irie, A; Nishimura, Y

    2011-09-01

    This report describes generation of dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages from human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. iPS cell-derived DC (iPS-DC) exhibited the morphology of typical DC and function of T-cell stimulation and antigen presentation. iPS-DC loaded with cytomegalovirus (CMV) peptide induced vigorous expansion of CMV-specific autologous CD8+ T cells. Macrophages (iPS-MP) with activity of zymosan phagocytosis and C5a-induced chemotaxis were also generated from iPS cells. Genetically modified iPS-MPs were generated by the introduction of expression vectors into undifferentiated iPS cells, isolation of transfectant iPS cell clone and subsequent differentiation. By this procedure, we generated iPS-MP expressing a membrane-bound form of single chain antibody (scFv) specific to amyloid β (Aβ), the causal protein of Alzheimer's disease. The scFv-transfectant iPS-MP exhibited efficient Aβ-specific phagocytosis activity. iPS-MP expressing CD20-specific scFv engulfed and killed BALL-1 B-cell leukemia cells. Anti-BALL-1 effect of iPS-MP in vivo was demonstrated in a xeno-transplantation model using severe combined immunodeficient mice. In addition, we established a xeno-free culture protocol to generate iPS-DC and iPS-MP. Collectively, we demonstrated the possibility of application of iPS-DC and macrophages to cell therapy.

  10. Pulmonary heart valve replacement using stabilized acellular xenogeneic scaffolds; effects of seeding with autologous stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpa Marius Mihai

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: We hypothesized that an ideal heart valve replacement would be acellular valve root scaffolds seeded with autologous stem cells. To test this hypothesis, we prepared porcine acellular pulmonary valves, seeded them with autologous adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs and implanted them in sheep and compared them to acellular valves.

  11. Persistent seropositivity for yellow fever in a previously vaccinated autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Kayoko; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Tsunemine, Hiroko; Kanagawa, Shuzo; Kutsuna, Satoshi; Takeshita, Nozomi; Mawatari, Momoko; Fujiya, Yoshihiro; Yamamoto, Kei; Ohmagari, Norio; Kato, Yasuyuki

    2015-08-01

    The duration of a protective level of yellow fever antibodies after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a previously vaccinated person is unclear. The case of a patient who had previously been vaccinated for yellow fever and who remained seropositive for 22 months after autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for malignant lymphoma is described herein.

  12. Crosstalk between dendritic cell subsets and implications for dendritic cell-based anticancer immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakdash, G.; Schreurs, I.; Schreibelt, G.; Tel, J.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a family of professional antigen-presenting cells that have an indispensable role in the initiation of innate and adaptive immune responses against pathogens and tumor cells. The DC family is very heterogeneous. Two main types of naturally occurring DCs circulate in periphe

  13. Dendritic Cells as Danger-Recognizing Biosensors

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    Seokmann Hong

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are antigen presenting cells that are characterized by a potent capacity to initiate immune responses. DCs comprise several subsets with distinct phenotypes. After sensing any danger(s to the host via their innate immune receptors such as Toll-like receptors, DCs become mature and subsequently present antigens to CD4+ T cells. Since DCs possess the intrinsic capacity to polarize CD4+ helper cells, it is critical to understand the immunological roles of DCs for clinical applications. Here, we review the different DC subsets, their danger-sensing receptors and immunological functions. Furthermore, the cytokine reporter mouse model for studying DC activation is introduced.

  14. Phenotypic and functional characteristics of dendritic cells derived from human peripheral blood monocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Ling-ling; ZHANG Zhe; ZHENG Jie-sheng; SHENG Ji-fang; LIU Ke-zhou

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This study is aimed at developing a simple and easy way to generate dendritic cells (DCs) from human peripheral blood monocytes (PBMCs) in vitro. Methods: PBMCs were isolated directly from white blood cell rather than whole blood and purified by patching methods (collecting the attached cell and removing the suspension cell). DCs were then generated by culturing PBMCs for six days with 30 ng/ml recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) and 20 ng/ml recombinant human interleukin-4 (rhIL-4) in vitro. On the sixth day, TNF-alpha (TNFα) 30 ng/ml was added into some DC cultures, which were then incubated for two additional days. The morphology was monitored by light microscopy and transmission electronic microscopy, and the phenotypes were determined by flow cytometry. Autologous mixed leukocyte reactions (MLR) were used to characterize DC function after TNFα or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulations for 24 h. Results: After six days of culture, the monocytes developed significant dendritic morphology and a portion of cells expressed CD 1 a, CD80 and CD86, features of DCs. TNFα treatment induced DCs maturation and up-regulation of CD80, CD86 and CD83. Autologous MLR demonstrated that these DCs possess potent T-cell stimulatory capacity. Conclusion: This study developed a simple and easy way to generate DCs from PBMCs exposed to rhGM-CSF and rhIL-4. The DCs produced by this method acquired morphologic and antigenic characteristics of DCs.

  15. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1997-01-01

    Specific aims include: (1) Application of the bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC); (2) Based on clues from spaceflight: compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients; and (3) Initiate studies on the efficiency of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in animal models of experimental fungal infections.

  16. Semiautomated analysis of dendrite morphology in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Eric S; Langhammer, Chris L; Kutzing, Melinda K; Firestein, Bonnie L

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying dendrite morphology is a method for determining the effect of biochemical pathways and extracellular agents on neuronal development and differentiation. Quantification can be performed using Sholl analysis, dendrite counting, and length quantification. These procedures can be performed on dendrite-forming cell lines or primary neurons grown in culture. In this protocol, we describe the use of a set of computer programs to assist in quantifying many aspects of dendrite morphology, including changes in total and localized arbor complexity.

  17. Remodeling of monoplanar Purkinje cell dendrites during cerebellar circuit formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megumi Kaneko

    Full Text Available Dendrite arborization patterns are critical determinants of neuronal connectivity and integration. Planar and highly branched dendrites of the cerebellar Purkinje cell receive specific topographical projections from two major afferent pathways; a single climbing fiber axon from the inferior olive that extend along Purkinje dendrites, and parallel fiber axons of granule cells that contact vertically to the plane of dendrites. It has been believed that murine Purkinje cell dendrites extend in a single parasagittal plane in the molecular layer after the cell polarity is determined during the early postnatal development. By three-dimensional confocal analysis of growing Purkinje cells, we observed that mouse Purkinje cells underwent dynamic dendritic remodeling during circuit maturation in the third postnatal week. After dendrites were polarized and flattened in the early second postnatal week, dendritic arbors gradually expanded in multiple sagittal planes in the molecular layer by intensive growth and branching by the third postnatal week. Dendrites then became confined to a single plane in the fourth postnatal week. Multiplanar Purkinje cells in the third week were often associated by ectopic climbing fibers innervating nearby Purkinje cells in distinct sagittal planes. The mature monoplanar arborization was disrupted in mutant mice with abnormal Purkinje cell connectivity and motor discoordination. The dendrite remodeling was also impaired by pharmacological disruption of normal afferent activity during the second or third postnatal week. Our results suggest that the monoplanar arborization of Purkinje cells is coupled with functional development of the cerebellar circuitry.

  18. Cytotoxicity of lymphocytes from melanoma patients against autologous tumor cells and its potentiation in vitro

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    Bykovskaya, S.N.; Iobadze, M.S.; Kupriyanova, T.A.; Demidov, L.V.

    1987-06-01

    The specific and natural cytotoxicity of peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients with melanomas was compared and stimulation with autologous tumor cells or a pool of allogeneic lymphocytes from five healthy blood donors also was used to potentiate the specific antitumor activity of the patients' lymphocytes. To assess cytolytic ability, cells of an autologous tumor, cells of the K-562 line, autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes, and blast cells obtained from these lymphocytes after stimulation by phytohemagglutinin were used as the target cells. The target cells were incubated in a medium containing sodium chromate and were labelled with the chromium 51 isotope.

  19. [State of the art about new therapeutic vaccines in prostate cancer: dendritic cells, engineered tumor cells and recombinant virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eymard, Jean-Christophe; Gervais, Alban; Jarcau, Rosana; Bernard, Jacky

    2007-07-01

    Therapeutic vaccines for prostate cancer were initially reported as limited with low immunological responses and uncertain clinical benefit. Recently, new methods become available, such preparations of well-characterized autologous dendritic cells, and use of gene therapy tools to increase whole-tumor cells or host tissue immunogenicity. These are able to enhance and diversify therapeutic options. Indeed, several vaccinal approaches are being investigated, including optimized mature dendritic cells, allogeneic genetically modified tumor cells, or viral vectors. Due to the description of immunological and clinical responses, large phase III randomized trials are now conducted. After summarizing the mechanistic basis for these approaches, this review describes the experience with the most recent and promising clinical studies and introduces short-term perspectives that could lead to improvement in healthcare offer for prostate cancer patients.

  20. Inducible expression of endomorphins in murine dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaohuai; Xia, Hui; Chen, Yong; Liu, Xiaofen; Zhou, Cheng; Gao, Qin; Li, Zhenghong

    2012-12-15

    Bone marrow precursor cells were extracted from C57BL/6J mice aged 7-8 weeks, and dendritic cells were purified using anti-CD11c (a specific marker for dendritic cells) antibody-coated magnetic beads. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that the expression levels of endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 were upregulated in dendritic cells activated by lipopolysaccharide. An enzyme immunoassay showed that lipopolysaccharide and other Toll-like receptor ligands promoted the secretion of endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 from activated dendritic cells. [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation demonstrated that endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 both inhibited the proliferation of T lymphocyte induced by activated dendritic cells. Furthermore, this immunosuppressive effect was blocked by CTOP, a specific antagonist of µ-opioid receptors. Our experimental findings indicate that activated dendritic cells can induce the expression and secretion of endomorphins, and that endomorphins suppress T lymphocyte proliferation through activation of µ-opioid receptors.

  1. Inducible expression of endomorphins in murine dendritic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaohuai Yang; Hui Xia; Yong Chen; Xiaofen Liu; Cheng Zhou; Qin Gao; Zhenghong Li

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow precursor cells were extracted from C57BL/6J mice aged 7–8 weeks, and dendritic cells were purified using anti-CD11c (a specific marker for dendritic cells) antibody-coated magnetic beads. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that the expression levels of endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 were upregulated in dendritic cells activated by lipopolysaccharide. An enzyme immunoassay showed that lipopolysaccharide and other Toll-like receptor ligands promoted the secretion of endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 from activated dendritic cells. [3H]-thymidine incorporation demonstrated that endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 both inhibited the proliferation of T lymphocyte induced by activated dendritic cells. Furthermore, this immunosuppressive effect was blocked by CTOP, a specific antagonist of μ-opioid receptors. Our experimental findings indicate that activated dendritic cells can induce the expression and secretion of endomorphins, and that endomorphins suppress T lymphocyte proliferation through activation of μ-opioid receptors.

  2. Membranous nephropathy in autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant: autologous graft-versus-host disease or autoimmunity induction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abudayyeh, Ala; Truong, Luan D.; Beck, Laurence H.; Weber, Donna M.; Rezvani, Katy; Abdelrahim, Maen

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing utility of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT) as a treatment for cancer and noncancerous disorders, more challenges and complications associated with SCT have emerged. Renal injury immediately after transplant is common and well understood, but long-term renal injury is becoming more evident. Chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a known long-term complication of SCT, and membranous nephropathy (MN) is emerging as the most common cause of SCT-associated glomerular pathology. In this case report, we present a patient who developed features of anti-PLA2R antibody-negative MN following autologous SCT. The renal injury responded well to steroids and further response to rituximab therapy was noted, suggesting antibody-mediated autoimmune glomerular disease. We also present a review of the literature on autologous GVHD and the role of T and B cells in induction of autoimmunity by SCT. PMID:26251713

  3. Effectiveness of autologous serum as an alternative to fetal bovine serum in adipose-derived stem cell engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jaehoon; Chung, Jee-Hyeok; Kwon, Geun-Yong; Kim, Ki-Wan; Kim, Sukwha; Chang, Hak

    2013-09-01

    In cell culture, medium supplemented with fetal bovine serum is commonly used, and it is widely known that fetal bovine serum supplies an adequate environment for culture and differentiation of stem cells. Nevertheless, the use of xenogeneic serum can cause several problems. We compared the effects of four different concentrations of autologous serum (1, 2, 5, and 10%) on expansion and adipogenic differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells using 10% fetal bovine serum as a control. The stem cells were grafted on nude mice and the in vivo differentiation capacity was evaluated. The isolation of adipose-derived stem cells was successful irrespective of the culture medium. The proliferation potential was statistically significant at passage 2, as follows: 10% autologous serum > 10% fetal bovine serum = 5% autologous serum > 2% autologous serum = 1% autologous serum. The differentiation capacity appeared statistically significant at passage 4, as follows: 10% fetal bovine serum > 10% autologous serum = 5% autologous serum > 2% autologous serum = 1% autologous serum. Ten percent autologous serum and 10% fetal bovine serum had greater differentiation capacity than 1 and 2% autologous serum in vivo, and no significant difference was observed between the groups at ≥ 5% concentration at 14 weeks. In conclusion, 10% autologous serum was at least as effective as 10% fetal bovine serum with respect to the number of adipose-derived stem cells at the end of both isolation and expansion, whereas 1 and 2% autologous serum was inferior.

  4. Autologous serum can induce mesenchymal stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Yi; Huo Jianhua; Qu Bo; Wu Shenli; Zhang Mingyu; Wang Zuoren

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether the rabbit serum after radiofrequency ablation to liver tumor can induce mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiating into hepatocyte-like cells in order to find a new source and culture process for repairing liver injury. Methods: A tumor piece of 1 mm×1 mm×1 mm was transplanted into a tunnel at right liver of rabbits. The model of liver tumor was established after 2-3 weeks. The serum was collected from rabbits 72 h after being subjected to radiofrequency ablation of the liver tumor. Mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from rabbit bone marrow and cultured in DMEM containing autologous rabbit serum. Three kinds of media (L-DMEM) were tested respectively: ① containing 10% fetal calf serum (FCS);② containing 30% rabbit autologous serum after radiofrequency ablation of the liver tumor (ASRF); ③ containing 30% rabbit autologous serum (AS). MSCs were cultured on 12-well plates until passage 2 and examined under the light and electron microscopy at indicted intervals. The expression of albumin and CK18 was detected using immunofluorescence to identify the characteristics of differentiated cells. Results: MSCs performed differently in the presence of fetal calf serum, rabbit autologous serum and rabbit autologous serum after radiofrequency ablation of the liver tumor. Induced by the serum after radiofrequency ablation to liver tumor for 7 d, the spindle-shaped MSCs turned into round shaped and resembled hepatocyte-like cells. The reactions were not found in MSCs cultured in FCS and AS groups. After induction for 14 d, slender microvilli, cell-cell junction structure and cholangiole emerged, and the differentiated cells expressed albumin and CK18. All those could not been observed in 10% FCS and 30% autologous serum groups. Conclusion: Mesenchymal stem cells differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells in the serum after radiofrequency ablation of liver tumor, providing us a potential cell source and culture process for clinical

  5. Dendritic Cells in vivo and in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Wan; Marcel Dupasquier

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are crucial cells of the immune system, and bridged the essential connection between innate and adaptive immunity. They reside in the periphery as sentinels where they take up antigens. Upon activation,they migrate to lymphoid organs and present there the processed antigens to T cells, thereby activating them and eliciting a potent immune response. Dendritic cells are bone marrow-derived cells, still big controversies exist about their in vivo development. In vitro, DC can be generated from multiple precursor cells, among them lymphoid and myeloid committed progenitors. Although it remains unknown how DC are generated in vivo,studying the functions of in vitro generated DC results in fundamental knowledge of the DC biology with promising applications for future medicine. Therefore, in this review, we present current protocols for the generation of DC from precursors in vitro. We will do this for the mouse system, where most research occurs and for the human system, where research concentrates on implementing DC biology in disease treatments.

  6. Dendritic Cells in vivo and in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuiWan; MarcelDupasquier

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are crucial cells of the immune system, and bridged the essential connection between innate and adaptive immunity. They reside in the periphery as sentinels where they take up antigens. Upon activation, they migrate to lymphoid organs and present there the processed antigens to T cells, thereby activating them and eliciting a potent immune response. Dendritic cells are bone marrow-derived cells, still big controversies exist about their in vivo development. In vitro, DC can be generated from multiple precursor cells, among them lymphoid and myeloid committed progenitors. Although it remains unknown how DC are generated in vivo, studying the functions of in vitro generated DC results in fundamental knowledge of the DC biology with promising applications for future medicine. Therefore, in this review, we present current protocols for the generation of DC from precursors in vitro. We will do this for the mouse system, where most research occurs and for the human system, where research concentrates on implementing DC biology in disease treatments. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2005;2(1):28-35.

  7. Dendritic planarity of Purkinje cells is independent of Reelin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinkyung; Park, Tae-Ju; Kwon, Namseop; Lee, Dongmyeong; Kim, Seunghwan; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Kim, Kyong-Tai; Curran, Tom; Je, Jung Ho

    2015-07-01

    The dendritic planarity of Purkinje cells is critical for cerebellar circuit formation. In the absence of Crk and CrkL, the Reelin pathway does not function resulting in partial Purkinje cell migration and defective dendritogenesis. However, the relationships among Purkinje cell migration, dendritic development and Reelin signaling have not been clearly delineated. Here, we use synchrotron X-ray microscopy to obtain 3-D images of Golgi-stained Purkinje cell dendrites. Purkinje cells that failed to migrate completely exhibited conical dendrites with abnormal 3-D arborization and reduced dendritic complexity. Furthermore, their spines were fewer in number with a distorted morphology. In contrast, Purkinje cells that migrated successfully displayed planar dendritic and spine morphologies similar to normal cells, despite reduced dendritic complexity. These results indicate that, during cerebellar formation, Purkinje cells migrate into an environment that supports development of dendritic planarity and spine formation. While Reelin signaling is important for the migration process, it does not make a direct major contribution to dendrite formation.

  8. Homophilic Protocadherin Cell-Cell Interactions Promote Dendrite Complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Molumby

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Growth of a properly complex dendrite arbor is a key step in neuronal differentiation and a prerequisite for neural circuit formation. Diverse cell surface molecules, such as the clustered protocadherins (Pcdhs, have long been proposed to regulate circuit formation through specific cell-cell interactions. Here, using transgenic and conditional knockout mice to manipulate γ-Pcdh repertoire in the cerebral cortex, we show that the complexity of a neuron’s dendritic arbor is determined by homophilic interactions with other cells. Neurons expressing only one of the 22 γ-Pcdhs can exhibit either exuberant or minimal dendrite complexity, depending only on whether surrounding cells express the same isoform. Furthermore, loss of astrocytic γ-Pcdhs, or disruption of astrocyte-neuron homophilic matching, reduces dendrite complexity cell non-autonomously. Our data indicate that γ-Pcdhs act locally to promote dendrite arborization via homophilic matching, and they confirm that connectivity in vivo depends on molecular interactions between neurons and between neurons and astrocytes.

  9. Harnessing Dendritic Cells for Tumor Antigen Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nierkens, Stefan [Department of Tumor Immunology, Nijmegen Centre for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein 28, Nijmegen 6525 GA (Netherlands); Janssen, Edith M., E-mail: edith.janssen@cchmc.org [Division of Molecular Immunology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Research Foundation, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States)

    2011-04-26

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen presenting cells that are crucial for the induction of anti-tumor T cell responses. As a consequence, research has focused on the harnessing of DCs for therapeutic interventions. Although current strategies employing ex vivo-generated and tumor-antigen loaded DCs have been proven feasible, there are still many obstacles to overcome in order to improve clinical trial successes and offset the cost and complexity of customized cell therapy. This review focuses on one of these obstacles and a pivotal step for the priming of tumor-specific CD8{sup +} and CD4{sup +} T cells; the in vitro loading of DCs with tumor antigens.

  10. Fast generation of dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvistborg, P; Bøgh, Marie; Claesson, M H

    2009-01-01

    we have developed fast DC protocol by comparing two different fast DC protocols with SDDC. DC were evaluated by FACS analysis, and the optimal profile was considered: CD14(low), CD80(high), CD83(high), CD86(high), CCR7(high), HLA class I and II(high). FACS profiles were used as the selection criteria...... together with yield and morphology. Two fast DC protocols fulfilled these criteria and were selected for functional analysis. Our results demonstrate that DC generated within 5days or 48h are comparable with SDDC both phenotypically and functionally. However, we found that 48h DC were more susceptible than...... SDDC to the IL-10 inducing stimulus of TLR ligands (R848 and LPS). Thus to determine the clinical relevance of fast DC protocols in cancer settings, small phase I trials should be conducted monitoring regulatory T cells carefully....

  11. Differentiation of apical and basal dendrites in pyramidal cells and granule cells in dissociated hippocampal cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Kure Wu

    Full Text Available Hippocampal pyramidal cells and dentate granule cells develop morphologically distinct dendritic arbors, yet also share some common features. Both cell types form a long apical dendrite which extends from the apex of the cell soma, while short basal dendrites are developed only in pyramidal cells. Using quantitative morphometric analyses of mouse hippocampal cultures, we evaluated the differences in dendritic arborization patterns between pyramidal and granule cells. Furthermore, we observed and described the final apical dendrite determination during dendritic polarization by time-lapse imaging. Pyramidal and granule cells in culture exhibited similar dendritic patterns with a single principal dendrite and several minor dendrites so that the cell types were not readily distinguished by appearance. While basal dendrites in granule cells are normally degraded by adulthood in vivo, cultured granule cells retained their minor dendrites. Asymmetric growth of a single principal dendrite harboring the Golgi was observed in both cell types soon after the onset of dendritic growth. Time-lapse imaging revealed that up until the second week in culture, final principal dendrite designation was not stabilized, but was frequently replaced by other minor dendrites. Before dendritic polarity was stabilized, the Golgi moved dynamically within the soma and was repeatedly repositioned at newly emerging principal dendrites. Our results suggest that polarized growth of the apical dendrite is regulated by cell intrinsic programs, while regression of basal dendrites requires cue(s from the extracellular environment in the dentate gyrus. The apical dendrite designation is determined from among multiple growing dendrites of young developing neurons.

  12. Up-front autologous stem-cell transplantation in peripheral T-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    d'Amore, Francesco; Relander, Thomas; Lauritzsen, Grete F;

    2012-01-01

    Systemic peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) respond poorly to conventional therapy. To evaluate the efficacy of a dose-dense approach consolidated by up-front high-dose chemotherapy (HDT) and autologous stem-cell transplantation (ASCT) in PTCL, the Nordic Lymphoma Group (NLG) conducted a large p...

  13. Tissue engineering bone using autologous progenitor cells in the peritoneum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhui Shen

    Full Text Available Despite intensive research efforts, there remains a need for novel methods to improve the ossification of scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Based on a common phenomenon and known pathological conditions of peritoneal membrane ossification following peritoneal dialysis, we have explored the possibility of regenerating ossified tissue in the peritoneum. Interestingly, in addition to inflammatory cells, we discovered a large number of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in the peritoneal lavage fluid from mice with peritoneal catheter implants. The osteogenic potential of these peritoneal progenitor cells was demonstrated by their ability to easily infiltrate decalcified bone implants, produce osteocalcin and form mineralized bone in 8 weeks. Additionally, when poly(l-lactic acid scaffolds loaded with bone morphogenetic protein-2 (a known osteogenic differentiation agent were implanted into the peritoneum, signs of osteogenesis were seen within 8 weeks of implantation. The results of this investigation support the concept that scaffolds containing BMP-2 can stimulate the formation of bone in the peritoneum via directed autologous stem and progenitor cell responses.

  14. Regeneration of Cartilage in Human Knee Osteoarthritis with Autologous Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells and Autologous Extracellular Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaewoo Pak

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This clinical case series demonstrates that percutaneous injections of autologous adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs and homogenized extracellular matrix (ECM in the form of adipose stromal vascular fraction (SVF, along with hyaluronic acid (HA and platelet-rich plasma (PRP activated by calcium chloride, could regenerate cartilage-like tissue in human knee osteoarthritis (OA patients. Autologous lipoaspirates were obtained from adipose tissue of the abdominal origin. Afterward, the lipoaspirates were minced to homogenize the ECM. These homogenized lipoaspirates were then mixed with collagenase and incubated. The resulting mixture of ADSCs and ECM in the form of SVF was injected, along with HA and PRP activated by calcium chloride, into knees of three Korean patients with OA. The same affected knees were reinjected weekly with additional PRP activated by calcium chloride for 3 weeks. Pretreatment and post-treatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI data, functional rating index, range of motion (ROM, and pain score data were then analyzed. All patients' MRI data showed cartilage-like tissue regeneration. Along with MRI evidence, the measured physical therapy outcomes in terms of ROM, subjective pain, and functional status were all improved. This study demonstrates that percutaneous injection of ADSCs with ECM contained in autologous adipose SVF, in conjunction with HA and PRP activated by calcium chloride, is a safe and potentially effective minimally invasive therapy for OA of human knees.

  15. Viruses, dendritic cells and the lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Barney S

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The interaction between viruses and dendritic cells (DCs is varied and complex. DCs are key elements in the development of a host response to pathogens such as viruses, but viruses have developed survival tactics to either evade or diminish the immune system that functions to kill and eliminate these micro-organisms. In the present review we summarize current concepts regarding the function of DCs in the immune system, our understanding of how viruses alter DC function to attenuate both the virus-specific and global immune response, and how we may be able to exploit DC function to prevent or treat viral infections.

  16. Metamaterial absorber with random dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weiren; Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2010-05-01

    The metamaterial absorber composed of random dendritic cells has been investigated at microwave frequencies. It is found that the absorptivities come to be weaker and the resonant frequency get red shift as the disordered states increasing, however, the random metamaterial absorber still presents high absorptivity more than 95%. The disordered structures can help understanding of the metamaterial absorber and may be employed for practical design of infrared metamaterial absorber, which may play important roles in collection of radiative heat energy and directional transfer enhancement.

  17. Effect of growth hormone on the immune function of dendritic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Qiu-liang; WANG Yi-sheng; WANG Jia-xiang

    2010-01-01

    Background Dendritic cells (DCs) are one of the most important antigen presenting cells in the human body, and DCs at various stages of maturation possess different or even opposite functions. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of growth hormones on the functional status of cord blood-derived DCs encompassing immunophenotype, ability to excrete interleukin (IL)-12 and provoke autologous leukomonocyte.Methods Mononuclear cells were isolated from fresh cord blood, with IL-4 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) used to induce and stimulate the mononuclear cells. Growth hormone at different concentrations was used to modify DCs, and then DCs morphology, number and growth status were observed. The immunophenotype of DCs was detected with a flow cytometer. The concentration of IL-12 in the DCs supernatant was determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and DCs functional status was evaluated by autologous mixed lymphocyte reactions. Results Mononuclear cells from cord blood can be differentiated into DCs by cytokine induction and growth hormone modification. With the increase in growth hormone concentrations (5-100 μ g/L), the expression of DCs HLA-DR, CD1α, CD80 and CD83 were significantly increased (P<0.05). The ability of DCs to secrete IL-12 was significantly improved (P <0.05), and the ability of DCs to activate autologous lymphocytes was significantly enhanced (P <0.05). Pegvisomant was able to ablate the effects of growth hormone on DCs.Conclusions Growth hormone may facilitate DCs induction and maturation, and improve the reproductive activity of autologous lymphocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Growth hormone may serve as a factor of modifying DCs to achieving maturity.

  18. Dendritic cell-tumor cell hybrids and immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cathelin, Dominique; Nicolas, Alexandra; Bouchot, André

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen-presenting cells currently being used as a cellular adjuvant in cancer immunotherapy strategies. Unfortunately, DC-based vaccines have not demonstrated spectacular clinical results. DC loading with tumor antigens and DC differentiation and activation...

  19. In vivo evidence for dendritic cell lysis by NK cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ferlazzo, Guido

    2012-01-01

    By using an experimental model of anticancer vaccination, we have recently lent support to the assumption, so far only sustained by in vitro data, that natural killer cells can restrain less immunogenic, allegedly tolerogenic, dendritic cells (DCs). This in vivo selection of immunogenic DCs appears to depend on perforin and to be associated with a more protective tumor-specific T lymphocyte response.

  20. Mature dendritic cells derived from human monocytes within 48 hours: a novel strategy for dendritic cell differentiation from blood precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauer, Marc; Obermaier, Bianca; Herten, Jan; Haerle, Carola; Pohl, Katrin; Rothenfusser, Simon; Schnurr, Max; Endres, Stefan; Eigler, Andreas

    2003-04-15

    It is widely believed that generation of mature dendritic cells (DCs) with full T cell stimulatory capacity from human monocytes in vitro requires 5-7 days of differentiation with GM-CSF and IL-4, followed by 2-3 days of activation. Here, we report a new strategy for differentiation and maturation of monocyte-derived DCs within only 48 h of in vitro culture. Monocytes acquire immature DC characteristics by day 2 of culture with GM-CSF and IL-4; they down-regulate CD14, increase dextran uptake, and respond to the inflammatory chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha. To accelerate DC development and maturation, monocytes were incubated for 24 h with GM-CSF and IL-4, followed by activation with proinflammatory mediators for another 24 h (FastDC). FastDC expressed mature DC surface markers as well as chemokine receptor 7 and secreted IL-12 (p70) upon CD40 ligation in the presence of IFN-gamma. The increase in intracellular calcium in response to 6Ckine showed that chemokine receptor 7 expression was functional. When FastDC were compared with mature monocyte-derived DCs generated by a standard 7-day protocol, they were equally potent in inducing Ag-specific T cell proliferation and IFN-gamma production as well as in priming autologous naive T cells using tetanus toxoid as a model Ag. These findings indicate that FastDC are as effective as monocyte-derived DCs in stimulating primary, Ag-specific, Th 1-type immune responses. Generation of FastDC not only reduces labor, cost, and time required for in vitro DC development, but may also represent a model more closely resembling DC differentiation from monocytes in vivo.

  1. Transplantation of autologous noncultured epidermal cell suspension in treatment of patients with stable vitiligo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ai-e; WEI Xiao-dong; CHENG Dong-qing; ZHOU He-fen; QIAN Guo-pei

    2005-01-01

    @@ Treatment of vitiligo by transplantation of noncultured melanocytes containing keratino-cytes has been successful since 1992,1 We report the encouraging results of autologous epidermal cell suspension in the treatment of 24 patients with stable vitiligo since 1998.

  2. Busulfan,cyclophosphamide and etoposide as conditioning for autologous stem cell transplantation in multiple myeloma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张春阳

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of dose-reduced intravenous busulfan,cyclophosphamide and etoposide(BCV)as conditioning for autologous stem cell transplantation(ASCT)in multiple myeloma(MM)

  3. Human plasmacytoid dendritic cells: from molecules to intercellular communication network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathan, T.S.M.; Figdor, C.G.; Buschow, S.I.

    2013-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are a specific subset of naturally occurring dendritic cells, that secrete large amounts of Type I interferon and play an important role in the immune response against viral infection. Several studies have highlighted that they are also effective antigen presentin

  4. Autologous Intravenous Mononuclear Stem Cell Therapy in Chronic Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhasin A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The regenerative potential of brain has led to emerging therapies that can cure clinico-motor deficits after neurological diseases. Bone marrow mononuclear cell therapy is a great hope to mankind as these cells are feasible, multipotent and aid in neurofunctional gains in Stroke patients. Aims: This study evaluates safety, feasibility and efficacy of autologous mononuclear (MNC stem cell transplantation in patients with chronic ischemic stroke (CIS using clinical scores and functional imaging (fMRI and DTI. Design: Non randomised controlled observational study Study: Twenty four (n=24 CIS patients were recruited with the inclusion criteria as: 3 months–2years of stroke onset, hand muscle power (MRC grade at least 2; Brunnstrom stage of recovery: II-IV; NIHSS of 4-15, comprehendible. Fugl Meyer, modified Barthel Index (mBI and functional imaging parameters were used for assessment at baseline, 8 weeks and at 24 weeks. Twelve patients were administered with mean 54.6 million cells intravenously followed by 8 weeks of physiotherapy. Twelve patients served as controls. All patients were followed up at 24 weeks. Outcomes: The laboratory and radiological outcome measures were within normal limits in MNC group. Only mBI showed statistically significant improvement at 24 weeks (p<0.05 whereas the mean FM, MRC, Ashworth tone scores in the MNC group were high as compared to control group. There was an increased number of cluster activation of Brodmann areas BA 4, BA 6 post stem cell infusion compared to controls indicating neural plasticity. Cell therapy is safe and feasible which may facilitate restoration of function in CIS.

  5. Information Fusion for Anomaly Detection with the Dendritic Cell Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie; Tedesco, Gianni

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells are antigen presenting cells that provide a vital link between the innate and adaptive immune system, providing the initial detection of pathogenic invaders. Research into this family of cells has revealed that they perform information fusion which directs immune responses. We have derived a Dendritic Cell Algorithm based on the functionality of these cells, by modelling the biological signals and differentiation pathways to build a control mechanism for an artificial immune system. We present algorithmic details in addition to experimental results, when the algorithm was applied to anomaly detection for the detection of port scans. The results show the Dendritic Cell Algorithm is sucessful at detecting port scans.

  6. Regeneration of Tissues and Organs Using Autologous Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony Atala, M D

    2012-10-11

    The proposed work aims to address three major challenges to the field of regenerative medicine: 1) the growth and expansion of regenerative cells outside the body in controlled in vitro environments, 2) supportive vascular supply for large tissue engineered constructs, and 3) interactive biomaterials that can orchestrate tissue development in vivo. Toward this goal, we have engaged a team of scientists with expertise in cell and molecular biology, physiology, biomaterials, controlled release, nanomaterials, tissue engineering, bioengineering, and clinical medicine to address all three challenges. This combination of resources, combined with the vast infrastructure of the WFIRM, have brought to bear on projects to discover and test new sources of autologous cells that can be used therapeutically, novel methods to improve vascular support for engineered tissues in vivo, and to develop intelligent biomaterials and bioreactor systems that interact favorably with stem and progenitor cells to drive tissue maturation. The Institute's ongoing programs are aimed at developing regenerative medicine technologies that employ a patient's own cells to help restore or replace tissue and organ function. This DOE program has provided a means to solve some of the vexing problems that are germane to many tissue engineering applications, regardless of tissue type or target disease. By providing new methods that are the underpinning of tissue engineering, this program facilitated advances that can be applied to conditions including heart disease, diabetes, renal failure, nerve damage, vascular disease, and cancer, to name a few. These types of conditions affect millions of Americans at a cost of more than $400 billion annually. Regenerative medicine holds the promise of harnessing the body's own power to heal itself. By addressing the fundamental challenges of this field in a comprehensive and focused fashion, this DOE program has opened new opportunities to treat

  7. Modulation of tolerogenic dendritic cells and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Jung; Diamond, Betty

    2015-05-01

    A key function of dendritic cells (DCs) is to induce either immune tolerance or immune activation. Many new DC subsets are being recognized, and it is now clear that each DC subset has a specialized function. For example, different DC subsets may express different cell surface molecules and respond differently to activation by secretion of a unique cytokine profile. Apart from intrinsic differences among DC subsets, various immune modulators in the microenvironment may influence DC function; inappropriate DC function is closely related to the development of immune disorders. The most exciting recent advance in DC biology is appreciation of human DC subsets. In this review, we discuss functionally different mouse and human DC subsets both in lymphoid organs and non-lymphoid organs, the molecules that regulate DC function, and the emerging understanding of the contribution of DCs to autoimmune diseases.

  8. The Use of Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Cell Therapy of Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in Belarus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushkevich, Yu N; Kosmacheva, S M; Zabrodets, G V; Ignatenko, S I; Goncharova, N V; Severin, I N; Likhachev, S A; Potapnev, M P

    2015-08-01

    We studied a new method of treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with autologous mesenchymal stem cells. Autologous mesenchymal stem cells were injected intravenously (intact cells) or via lumbar puncture (cells committed to neuronal differentiation). Evaluation of the results of cell therapy after 12-month follow-up revealed slowing down of the disease progression in 10 patients in comparison with the control group consisting of 15 patients. The cell therapy was safe for the patients.

  9. CD163 positive subsets of blood dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan; Møller, Holger Jon; Moestrup, Søren Kragh

    2006-01-01

    expression in dendritic cells (DCs) was investigated using multicolor flow cytometry in peripheral blood from 31 healthy donors and 15 HIV-1 patients in addition to umbilical cord blood from 5 newborn infants. Total RNA was isolated from MACS purified DCs and CD163 mRNA was determined with real-time reverse...... transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The effect of glucocorticoid and phorbol ester stimulation on monocyte and dendritic cell CD163 and CD91 expression was investigated in cell culture of mononuclear cells using multicolor flow cytometry. We identified two CD163+ subsets in human blood with dendritic cell...

  10. Endocrinopathies after Allogeneic and Autologous Transplantation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Orio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Early and late endocrine disorders are among the most common complications in survivors after hematopoietic allogeneic- (allo- and autologous- (auto- stem cell transplant (HSCT. This review summarizes main endocrine disorders reported in literature and observed in our center as consequence of auto- and allo-HSCT and outlines current options for their management. Gonadal impairment has been found early in approximately two-thirds of auto- and allo-HSCT patients: 90–99% of women and 60–90% of men. Dysfunctions of the hypothalamus-pituitary-growth hormone/insulin growth factor-I axis, hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis, and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis were documented as later complicances, occurring in about 10, 30, and 40–50% of transplanted patients, respectively. Moreover, overt or subclinical thyroid complications (including persistent low-T3 syndrome, chronic thyroiditis, subclinical hypo- or hyperthyroidism, and thyroid carcinoma, gonadal failure, and adrenal insufficiency may persist many years after HSCT. Our analysis further provides evidence that main recognized risk factors for endocrine complications after HSCT are the underlying disease, previous pretransplant therapies, the age at HSCT, gender, total body irradiation, posttransplant derangement of immune system, and in the allogeneic setting, the presence of graft-versus-host disease requiring prolonged steroid treatment. Early identification of endocrine complications can greatly improve the quality of life of long-term survivors after HSCT.

  11. Autologous cytokine-induced killer cell therapy in clinical trial phase I is safe in patients with primary hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Shi; Bing Zhang; Zi-Rong Tang; Zhou-Yun Lei; Hui-Fen Wang; Yong-Yi Feng; Zhen-Ping Fan; Dong-Ping Xu; Fu-Sheng Wang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: TO investigate the influence of autologous cytokineinduced killer (CIK) cells on the phenotypes of CIK effector cells, peripheral T lymphocyte subsets and dendritic cell subsets in patients with primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).METHODS: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC)were collected by a blood cell separator from 13 patients with HCC, then expanded by priming them with interferongamma (IFN-γ) followed by monoclonal antibody (mAb)against CD3 and interleukin-2 (IL-2) the next day. The phenotypic patterns of CIK cells were characterized by flow cytometry on d 0, 4, 7, 10, 13 and 15 of incubation,respectively. Then, 5 mL of venous blood was obtained from HCC patients before or 8-10 d after CIK cells were transfused into patients to assess the influence of CIK cells on the percentages of effector cells, and proportions of DC1 or DC2in peripheral blood by flow cytometry.RESULTS: After two weeks of in vitro incubation, the percentages of CD3+CD8+, CD3+CD56+, and CD25+ cells increased significantly from 33.5±10.1%, 7.7±2.8%, and 12.3±4.5% to 36.6±9.0% (P<0.05), 18.9±6.9% (P<0.01),and 16.4±5.9% (P<0.05), respectively. However, the percentages of CD3+CD4+ and NK cells had no significant difference. The percentages of CD3+ and CD3+CD8+ cells were kept at high levels during the whole incubation period, but those of CD25+, and CD3+CD56+ cells began to decrease on d 7 and 13, respectively. The proportions of type Ⅰ dendritic cell (DC1) and type Ⅱ dendriticcell (DC2) subsets increased from 0.59±0.23% and 0.26±0.12% before CIK cell therapy to 0.85±0.27% and 0.43±0.19% (all P<0.01) after CIK cell transfusion, respectively. The symptoms and characteristics of HCC patients were relieved without major side effects.CONCLUSION: Our results indicated that autologous CIK cells can efficiently improve the immunological status in HCC patients, and may provide a potent approach for HCC patients as the adoptive immunotherapy.

  12. Triggering of dendritic cell apoptosis by xanthohumol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Nguyen Thi; Shumilina, Ekaterina; Gulbins, Erich; Gu, Shuchen; Götz, Friedrich; Lang, Florian

    2010-07-01

    Xanthohumol, a flavonoid from beer with anticancer activity is known to trigger apoptosis in a variety of tumor cells. Xanthohumol further has anti-inflammatory activity. However, little is known about the effect of xanthohumol on survival and function of immune cells. The present study thus addressed the effect of xanthohumol on dendritic cells (DCs), key players in the regulation of innate and adaptive immunity. To this end, mouse bone marrow-derived DCs were treated with xanthohumol with subsequent assessment of enzymatic activity of acid sphingomyelinase (Asm), ceramide formation determined with anti-ceramide antibodies in FACS and immunohistochemical analysis, caspase activity utilizing FITC conjugated anti-active caspase 8 or caspase 3 antibodies in FACS and by Western blotting, DNA fragmentation by determining the percentage of cells in the sub-G1 phase and cell membrane scrambling by annexin V binding in FACS analysis. As a result, xanthohumol stimulated Asm, enhanced ceramide formation, activated caspases 8 and 3, triggered DNA fragmentation and led to cell membrane scrambling, all effects virtually absent in DCs from gene targeted mice lacking functional Asm or in wild-type cells treated with sphingomyelinase inhibitor amitriptyline. In conclusion, xanthohumol stimulated Asm leading to caspase activation and apoptosis of bone marrow-derived DCs.

  13. A novel cell subset:Interferon-producing killer dendritic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Recent reports introduce a novel cell subset of DCs with antigenic phenotypes shared by both NK cells and B cells, but without surface markers of pDCs and T cells, appearing to be a chimera of NK cells and DCs, namely interferon-producing killer dendritic cells(IKDCs).IKDCs not only secret type I and type II interferons to recognize and kill tumor cells effectively, but also express MHC-II molecules to present antigens.Thus, IKDCs are considered as important immunosurveilance cells for tumors, providing a link between innate and adaptive immunity.

  14. CD56 marks human dendritic cell subsets with cytotoxic potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roothans, D.; Smits, E.; Lion, E.; Tel, J.; Anguille, S.

    2013-01-01

    Human plasmacytoid and myeloid dendritic cells (DCs), when appropriately stimulated, can express the archetypal natural killer (NK)-cell surface marker CD56. In addition to classical DC functions, CD56+ DCs are endowed with an unconventional cytotoxic capacity.

  15. Equine dendritic cells generated with horse serum have enhanced functionality in comparison to dendritic cells generated with fetal bovine serum

    OpenAIRE

    Ziegler, A; Everett, H.; Hamza, E; Garbani, M; Gerber, V.; Marti, E; Steinbach, F

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dendritic cells are professional antigen-presenting cells that play an essential role in the initiation and modulation of T cell responses. They have been studied widely for their potential clinical applications, but for clinical use to be successful, alternatives to xenogeneic substances like fetal bovine serum (FBS) in cell culture need to be found. Protocols for the generation of dendritic cells ex vivo from monocytes are well established for several species, including horses. ...

  16. Harnessing dendritic cells in inflammatory skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chung-Ching; Di Meglio, Paola; Nestle, Frank O

    2011-02-01

    The skin immune system harbors a complex network of dendritic cells (DCs). Recent studies highlight a diverse functional specialization of skin DC subsets. In addition to generating cellular and humoral immunity against pathogens, skin DCs are involved in tolerogenic mechanisms to ensure the maintenance of immune homeostasis, as well as in pathogenesis of chronic inflammation in the skin when excessive immune responses are initiated and unrestrained. Harnessing DCs by directly targeting DC-derived molecules or selectively modulate DC subsets is a convincing strategy to tackle inflammatory skin diseases. In this review we discuss recent advances underlining the functional specialization of skin DCs and discuss the potential implication for future DC-based therapeutic strategies.

  17. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1998-01-01

    The specific aims of the project were: (1) Application of the NASA bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC). (2) Compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients. (3) Analyze the effectiveness of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in a murine model of experimental fungal disease. Our investigations have provided new insight into DC immunobiology and have led to the development of methodology to evaluate DC in blood of normal donors and patients. Information gained from these studies has broadened our understanding of possible mechanisms involved in the immune dysfunction of space travelers and earth-bound cancer patients, and could contribute to the design of novel therapies to restore/preserve immunity in these individuals. Several new avenues of investigation were also revealed. The results of studies completed during Round 2 are summarized.

  18. Hepatitis B-related events in autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    zcan; eneli; Zübeyde; Nur; zkurt; Kadir; Acar; Seyyal; Rota; Sahika; Zeynep; Aki; Zeynep; Arzu; Yegin; Münci; Yagci; Seren; zenirler; Gülsan; Türkz; Sucak

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the frequency of occult hepatitis B, the clinical course of hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation and reverse seroconversion and associated risk factors in autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients. METHODS: This study was conducted in 90 patients undergoing autologous HSCT. Occult HBV infection was investigated by HBV-DNA analysis prior to transplantation, while HBV serology and liver function tests were screened prior to and serially after transplantation. HBV...

  19. Therapeutic Efficacy of Fresh, Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Severe Refractory Gingivostomatitis in Cats

    OpenAIRE

    Arzi, Boaz; Mills-Ko, Emily; Frank J.M. Verstraete; Kol, Amir; Walker, Naomi J.; Badgley, Megan R.; Fazel, Nasim; William J. Murphy; Vapniarsky, Natalia; Borjesson, Dori L.

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a promising therapy for immune-mediated and inflammatory disorders, because of their potent immunomodulatory properties. In this study, we investigated the use of fresh, autologous, adipose-derived MSCs (ASCs) for feline chronic gingivostomatitis (FCGS), a chronic, debilitating, idiopathic, oral mucosal inflammatory disease. Nine cats with refractory FCGS were enrolled in this pilot study. Each cat received 2 intravenous injections of 20 million autologous AS...

  20. Differentiation within autologous fibrin scaffolds of porcine dermal cells with the mesenchymal stem cell phenotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puente, Pilar de la, E-mail: pilardelapuentegarcia@gmail.com [Tissue Bank, San Francisco Clinic Foundation, Av./Facultad 51, 5°, 24004 León (Spain); Ludeña, Dolores [Pathology Service, University Hospital of Salamanca, P/San Vicente 58-182, 37007 Salamanca (Spain); López, Marta; Ramos, Jennifer; Iglesias, Javier [Tissue Bank, San Francisco Clinic Foundation, Av./Facultad 51, 5°, 24004 León (Spain)

    2013-02-01

    Porcine mesenchymal stem cells (pMSCs) are an attractive source of cells for tissue engineering because their properties are similar to those of human stem cells. pMSCs can be found in different tissues but their dermal origin has not been studied in depth. Additionally, MSCs differentiation in monolayer cultures requires subcultured cells, and these cells are at risk of dedifferentiation when implanting them into living tissue. Following this, we attempted to characterize the MSCs phenotype of porcine dermal cells and to evaluate their cellular proliferation and differentiation in autologous fibrin scaffolds (AFSs). Dermal biopsies and blood samples were obtained from 12 pigs. Dermal cells were characterized by flow cytometry. Frozen autologous plasma was used to prepare AFSs. pMSC differentiation was studied in standard structures (monolayers and pellets) and in AFSs. The pMSCs expressed the CD90 and CD29 markers of the mesenchymal lineage. AFSs afforded adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. The porcine dermis can be proposed to be a good source of MSCs with adequate proliferative capacity and a suitable expression of markers. The pMSCs also showed optimal proliferation and differentiation in AFSs, such that these might serve as a promising autologous and implantable material for use in tissue engineering. -- Highlights: ► Low fibrinogen concentration provides a suitable matrix for cell migration and differentiation. ► Autologous fibrin scaffolds is a promising technique in tissue engineering. ► Dermal cells are an easily accessible mesenchymal stem cell source. ► Fibrin scaffolds afforded adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation.

  1. Macrophages and Dendritic Cells: Partners in Atherogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulsky, Myron I; Cheong, Cheolho; Robbins, Clinton S

    2016-02-19

    Atherosclerosis is a complex chronic disease. The accumulation of myeloid cells in the arterial intima, including macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), is a feature of early stages of disease. For decades, it has been known that monocyte recruitment to the intima contributes to the burden of lesion macrophages. Yet, this paradigm may require reevaluation in light of recent advances in understanding of tissue macrophage ontogeny, their capacity for self-renewal, as well as observations that macrophages proliferate throughout atherogenesis and that self-renewal is critical for maintenance of macrophages in advanced lesions. The rate of atherosclerotic lesion formation is profoundly influenced by innate and adaptive immunity, which can be regulated locally within atherosclerotic lesions, as well as in secondary lymphoid organs, the bone marrow and the blood. DCs are important modulators of immunity. Advances in the past decade have cemented our understanding of DC subsets, functions, hematopoietic origin, gene expression patterns, transcription factors critical for differentiation, and provided new tools for study of DC biology. The functions of macrophages and DCs overlap to some extent, thus it is important to reassess the contributions of each of these myeloid cells taking into account strict criteria of cell identification, ontogeny, and determine whether their key roles are within atherosclerotic lesions or secondary lymphoid organs. This review will highlight key aspect of macrophage and DC biology, summarize how these cells participate in different stages of atherogenesis and comment on complexities, controversies, and gaps in knowledge in the field.

  2. Dendritic Cells in the Cancer Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Ma, Galina V. Shurin, Zhu Peiyuan, Michael R. Shurin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of the tumor immunoenvironment is underscored by the emergence and discovery of different subsets of immune effectors and regulatory cells. Tumor-induced polarization of immune cell differentiation and function makes this unique environment even more intricate and variable. Dendritic cells (DCs represent a special group of cells that display different phenotype and activity at the tumor site and exhibit differential pro-tumorigenic and anti-tumorigenic functions. DCs play a key role in inducing and maintaining the antitumor immunity, but in the tumor environment their antigen-presenting function may be lost or inefficient. DCs might be also polarized into immunosuppressive/tolerogenic regulatory DCs, which limit activity of effector T cells and support tumor growth and progression. Although various factors and signaling pathways have been described to be responsible for abnormal functioning of DCs in cancer, there are still no feasible therapeutic modalities available for preventing or reversing DC malfunction in tumor-bearing hosts. Thus, better understanding of DC immunobiology in cancer is pivotal for designing novel or improved therapeutic approaches that will allow proper functioning of DCs in patients with cancer.

  3. Derivation and Utilization of Functional CD8(+) Dendritic Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigni, Matteo; Ashok, Devika; Acha-Orbea, Hans

    2016-01-01

    It is notoriously difficult to obtain large quantities of non-activated dendritic cells ex vivo. For this reason, we produced and characterized a mouse model expressing the large T oncogene under the CD11c promoter (Mushi mice), in which CD8α(+) dendritic cells transform after 4 months. We derived a variety of stable cell lines from these primary lines. These cell lines reproducibly share with freshly isolated dendritic cells most surface markers, mRNA and protein expression, and all tested biological functions. Cell lines can be derived from various strains and knockout mice and can be easily transduced with lentiviruses. In this article, we describe the derivation, culture, and lentiviral transduction of these dendritic cell lines.

  4. Iron acquisition by Mycobacterium tuberculosis residing within myeloid dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olakanmi, Oyebode; Kesavalu, Banurekha; Abdalla, Maher Y; Britigan, Bradley E

    2013-12-01

    The pathophysiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) infection is linked to the ability of the organism to grow within macrophages. Lung myeloid dendritic cells are a newly recognized reservoir of M.tb during infection. Iron (Fe) acquisition is critical for M.tb growth. In vivo, extracellular Fe is chelated to transferrin (TF) and lactoferrin (LF). We previously reported that M.tb replicating in human monocyte-dervied macrophages (MDM) can acquire Fe bound to TF, LF, and citrate, as well as from the MDM cytoplasm. Access of M.tb to Fe may influence its growth in macrophages and dendritic cells. In the present work we confirmed the ability of different strains of M.tb to grow in human myeloid dendritic cells in vitro. Fe acquired by M.tb replicating within dendritic cells from externally added Fe chelates varied with the Fe chelate present in the external media: Fe-citrate > Fe-LF > Fe-TF. Fe acquisition rates from each chelate did not vary over 7 days. M.tb within dendritic cells also acquired Fe from the dendritic cell cytoplasm, with the efficiency of Fe acquisition greater from cytoplasmic Fe sources, regardless of the initial Fe chelate from which that cytoplasmic Fe was derived. Growth and Fe acquisition results with human MDM were similar to those with dendritic cells. M.tb grow and replicate within myeloid dendritic cells in vitro. Fe metabolism of M.tb growing in either MDM or dendritic cells in vitro is influenced by the nature of Fe available and the organism appears to preferentially access cytoplasmic rather than extracellular Fe sources. Whether these in vitro data extend to in vivo conditions should be examined in future studies.

  5. Transplantation of autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jindou Jiang; Xingyao Bu; Meng Liu; Peixun Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Results from the present study demonstrated that transplantation of autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells into the lesion site in rat brain significantly ameliorated brain tissue pathological changes and brain edema, attenuated glial cell proliferation, and increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression. In addition, the number of cells double-labeled for 5-bromodeoxyuridine/glial fibrillary acidic protein and cells expressing nestin increased. Finally, blood vessels were newly generated, and the rats exhibited improved motor and cognitive functions. These results suggested that transplantation of autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells promoted brain remodeling and improved neurological functions following traumatic brain injury.

  6. Metabolism Is Central to Tolerogenic Dendritic Cell Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Jing Sim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunological tolerance is a fundamental tenant of immune homeostasis and overall health. Self-tolerance is a critical component of the immune system that allows for the recognition of self, resulting in hyporeactivity instead of immunogenicity. Dendritic cells are central to the establishment of dominant immune tolerance through the secretion of immunosuppressive cytokines and regulatory polarization of T cells. Cellular metabolism holds the key to determining DC immunogenic or tolerogenic cell fate. Recent studies have demonstrated that dendritic cell maturation leads to a shift toward a glycolytic metabolic state and preferred use of glucose as a carbon source. In contrast, tolerogenic dendritic cells favor oxidative phosphorylation and fatty acid oxidation. This dichotomous metabolic reprogramming of dendritic cells drives differential cellular function and plays a role in pathologies, such as autoimmune disease. Pharmacological alterations in metabolism have promising therapeutic potential.

  7. Transcriptional profiling of dendritic cells matured in different osmolarities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Chessa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Tissue-specific microenvironments shape the fate of mononuclear phagocytes [1–3]. Interstitial osmolarity is a tissue biophysical parameter which considerably modulates the phenotype and function of dendritic cells [4]. In the present report we provide a detailed description of our experimental workflow and bioinformatic analysis applied to our gene expression dataset (GSE72174, aiming to investigate the influence of different osmolarity conditions on the gene expression signature of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. We established a cell culture system involving murine bone marrow cells, cultured under different NaCl-induced osmolarity conditions in the presence of the dendritic cell growth factor GM-CSF. Gene expression analysis was applied to mature dendritic cells (day 7 developed in different osmolarities, with and without prior stimulation with the TLR2/4 ligand LPS.

  8. Follicular Dendritic Cell Sarcoma of the Abdomen: the Imaging Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Tae Wook; Lee, Soon Jin; Song, Hye Jong [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma is a rare neoplasm that originates from follicular dendritic cells in lymphoid follicles. This disease usually involves the lymph nodes, and especially the head and neck area. Rarely, extranodal sites may be affected, including tonsil, the oral cavity, liver, spleen and the gastrointestinal tract. We report here on the imaging findings of follicular dendritic cell sarcoma of the abdomen that involved the retroperitoneal lymph nodes and colon. It shows as a well-defined, enhancing homogenous mass with internal necrosis and regional lymphadenopathy.

  9. Dendritic cells and their role in periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilensky, A; Segev, H; Mizraji, G; Shaul, Y; Capucha, T; Shacham, M; Hovav, A-H

    2014-03-01

    T cells, particularly CD4+ T cells, play a central role in both progression and control of periodontal disease, whereas the contribution of the various CD4+ T helper subsets to periodontal destruction remains controversial, the activation, and regulation of these cells is orchestrated by dendritic cells. As sentinels of the oral mucosa, dendritic cells encounter and capture oral microbes, then migrate to the lymph node where they regulate the differentiation of CD4+ T cells. It is thus clear that dendritic cells are of major importance in the course of periodontitis, as they hold the immunological cues delivered by the pathogen and the surrounding environment, allowing them to induce destructive immunity. In recent years, advanced immunological techniques and new mouse models have facilitated in vivo studies that have provided new insights into the developmental and functional aspects of dendritic cells. This progress has also benefited the characterization of oral dendritic cells, as well as to their function in periodontitis. Here, we provide an overview of the various gingival dendritic cell subsets and their distribution, while focusing on their role in periodontal bone loss.

  10. Differential Gene Expression in Thrombomodulin (TM; CD141)+ and TM− Dendritic Cell Subsets

    OpenAIRE

    Masaaki Toda; Zhifei Shao; Yamaguchi, Ken D.; Takehiro Takagi; Corina N D'Alessandro-Gabazza; Osamu Taguchi; Hugh Salamon; Leung, Lawrence L. K.; Gabazza, Esteban C.; John Morser

    2013-01-01

    Previously we have shown in a mouse model of bronchial asthma that thrombomodulin can convert immunogenic conventional dendritic cells into tolerogenic dendritic cells while inducing its own expression on their cell surface. Thrombomodulin(+) dendritic cells are tolerogenic while thrombomodulin(-) dendritic cells are pro-inflammatory and immunogenic. Here we hypothesized that thrombomodulin treatment of dendritic cells would modulate inflammatory gene expression. Murine bone marrow-derived de...

  11. Selective purging of human multiple myeloma cells from autologous stem cell transplant grafts using oncolytic myxoma virus

    OpenAIRE

    Bartee, Eric; Chan, Winnie S.; Moreb, Jan S.; Cogle, Christopher R.; McFadden, Grant

    2012-01-01

    Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) and novel therapies have improved overall survival of patients with multiple myeloma; however, most patients relapse and eventually succumb to their disease. Evidence indicates that residual cancer cells contaminate autologous grafts and may contribute to early relapses after ASCT. Here, we demonstrate that ex vivo treatment with an oncolytic poxvirus called myxoma virus results in specific elimination of human myeloma cells by inducing rapid cellul...

  12. Transcriptional regulation of dendritic cell diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopin, Michaël; Allan, Rhys S; Belz, Gabrielle T

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized antigen presenting cells that are exquisitely adapted to sense pathogens and induce the development of adaptive immune responses. They form a complex network of phenotypically and functionally distinct subsets. Within this network, individual DC subsets display highly specific roles in local immunosurveillance, migration, and antigen presentation. This division of labor amongst DCs offers great potential to tune the immune response by harnessing subset-specific attributes of DCs in the clinical setting. Until recently, our understanding of DC subsets has been limited and paralleled by poor clinical translation and efficacy. We have now begun to unravel how different DC subsets develop within a complex multilayered system. These findings open up exciting possibilities for targeted manipulation of DC subsets. Furthermore, ground-breaking developments overcoming a major translational obstacle - identification of similar DC populations in mouse and man - now sets the stage for significant advances in the field. Here we explore the determinants that underpin cellular and transcriptional heterogeneity within the DC network, how these influence DC distribution and localization at steady-state, and the capacity of DCs to present antigens via direct or cross-presentation during pathogen infection.

  13. Deciphering dendritic cell heterogenity in immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaël eChopin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are specialized antigen presenting cells that are exquisitely adapted to sense pathogens and induce the development of adaptive immune responses. They form a complex network of phenotypically and functionally distinct subsets. Within this network, individual DC subsets display highly specific roles in local immunosurveillance, migration and antigen presentation. This division of labor amongst DCs offers great potential to tune the immune response by harnessing subset-specific attributes of DCs in the clinical setting. Until recently, our understanding of DC subsets has been limited and paralleled by poor clinical translation and efficacy. We have now begun to unravel how different DC subsets develop within a complex multilayered system. These finding open up exciting possibilities for targeted manipulation of DC subsets. Furthermore, ground-breaking developments overcoming a major translational obstacle – identification of similar DC populations in mouse and man – now set the stage for significant advances in the field. Here we explore the determinants that underpin cellular and transcriptional heterogeneity within the DC network, how these influence DC distribution and localization at steady-state, and the capacity of DCs to present antigens via direct or cross-presentation during pathogen infection.

  14. Mycobacterium avium subspecies impair dendritic cell maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basler, Tina; Brumshagen, Christina; Beineke, Andreas; Goethe, Ralph; Bäumer, Wolfgang

    2013-10-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) causes Johne's disease, a chronic, granulomatous enteritis of ruminants. Dendritic cells (DC) of the gut are ideally placed to combat invading mycobacteria; however, little is known about their interaction with MAP. Here, we investigated the interaction of MAP and the closely related M. avium ssp. avium (MAA) with murine DC and the effect of infected macrophages on DC maturation. The infection of DC with MAP or MAA induced DC maturation, which differed to that of LPS as maturation was accompanied by higher production of IL-10 and lower production of IL-12. Treatment of maturing DC with supernatants from mycobacteria-infected macrophages resulted in impaired DC maturation, leading to a semi-mature, tolerogenic DC phenotype expressing low levels of MHCII, CD86 and TNF-α after LPS stimulation. Though the cells were not completely differentiated they responded with an increased IL-10 and a decreased IL-12 production. Using recombinant cytokines we provide evidence that the semi-mature DC phenotype results from a combination of secreted cytokines and released antigenic mycobacterial components of the infected macrophage. Our results indicate that MAP and MAA are able to subvert DC function directly by infecting and indirectly via the milieu created by infected macrophages.

  15. Dendritic Cells, Viruses, and the Development of Atopic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan S. Tam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are important residents of the lung environment. They have been associated with asthma and other inflammatory diseases of the airways. In addition to their antigen-presenting functions, dendritic cells have the ability to modulate the lung environment to promote atopic disease. While it has long been known that respiratory viral infections associate with the development and exacerbation of atopic diseases, the exact mechanisms have been unclear. Recent studies have begun to show the critical importance of the dendritic cell in this process. This paper focuses on these data demonstrating how different populations of dendritic cells are capable of bridging the adaptive and innate immune systems, ultimately leading to the translation of viral illness into atopic disease.

  16. Activated protein C modulates the proinflammatory activity of dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsumoto T

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Takahiro Matsumoto,1,2* Yuki Matsushima,1* Masaaki Toda,1 Ziaurahman Roeen,1 Corina N D'Alessandro-Gabazza,1,5 Josephine A Hinneh,1 Etsuko Harada,1,3 Taro Yasuma,4 Yutaka Yano,4 Masahito Urawa,1,5 Tetsu Kobayashi,5 Osamu Taguchi,5 Esteban C Gabazza1 1Department of Immunology, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsu, Mie Prefecture, 2BONAC Corporation, BIO Factory 4F, Fukuoka, 3Iwade Research Institute of Mycology, 4Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, 5Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsu, Mie Prefecture, Japan *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Previous studies have demonstrated the beneficial activity of activated protein C in allergic diseases including bronchial asthma and rhinitis. However, the exact mechanism of action of activated protein C in allergies is unclear. In this study, we hypothesized that pharmacological doses of activated protein C can modulate allergic inflammation by inhibiting dendritic cells. Materials and methods: Dendritic cells were prepared using murine bone marrow progenitor cells and human peripheral monocytes. Bronchial asthma was induced in mice that received intratracheal instillation of ovalbumin-pulsed dendritic cells. Results: Activated protein C significantly increased the differentiation of tolerogenic plasmacytoid dendritic cells and the secretion of type I interferons, but it significantly reduced lipopolysaccharide-mediated maturation and the secretion of inflammatory cytokines in myeloid dendritic cells. Activated protein C also inhibited maturation and the secretion of inflammatory cytokines in monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Activated protein C-treated dendritic cells were less effective when differentiating naïve CD4 T-cells from Th1 or Th2 cells, and the cellular effect of activated protein C was mediated by its receptors. Mice that received adoptive transfer of activated protein C

  17. Supplement of autologous ooplasm into porcine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos does not alter embryo development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W-J; Lee, J-H; Jeon, R-H; Jang, S-J; Lee, S-C; Park, J-S; Lee, S-L; King, W-A; Rho, G-J

    2017-02-13

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is considered as the technique in which a somatic cell is introduced into an enucleated oocyte to make a cloned animal. However, it is unavoidable to lose a small amount of the ooplasm during enucleation step during SCNT procedure. The present study was aimed to uncover whether the supplement of autologous ooplasm could ameliorate the oocyte competence so as to improve low efficiency of embryo development in porcine SCNT. Autologous ooplasm-transferred (AOT) embryos were generated by the supplementation with autologous ooplasm into SCNT embryos. They were comparatively evaluated with respect to embryo developmental potential, the number of apoptotic body formation and gene expression including embryonic lineage differentiation, apoptosis, epigenetics and mitochondrial activity in comparison with parthenogenetic, in vitro-fertilized (IVF) and SCNT embryos. Although AOT embryos showed perfect fusion of autologous donor ooplasm with recipient SCNT embryos, the supplement of autologous ooplasm could not ameliorate embryo developmental potential in regard to the rate of blastocyst formation, total cell number and the number of apoptotic body. Furthermore, overall gene expression of AOT embryos was presented with no significant alterations in comparison with that of SCNT embryos. Taken together, the results of AOT demonstrated inability to make relevant values improved from the level of SCNT embryos to their IVF counterparts.

  18. Dendritic cell-nerve clusters are sites of T cell proliferation in allergic airway inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veres, Tibor Z; Shevchenko, Marina; Krasteva, Gabriela; Spies, Emma; Prenzler, Frauke; Rochlitzer, Sabine; Tschernig, Thomas; Krug, Norbert; Kummer, Wolfgang; Braun, Armin

    2009-03-01

    Interactions between T cells and dendritic cells in the airway mucosa precede secondary immune responses to inhaled antigen. The purpose of this study was to identify the anatomical locations where dendritic cell-T cell interactions occur, resulting in T cells activation by dendritic cells. In a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation, we applied whole-mount immunohistology and confocal microscopy to visualize dendritic cells and T cells together with nerves, epithelium, and smooth muscle in three dimensions. Proliferating T cells were identified by the detection of the incorporation of the nucleotide analogue 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine into the DNA. We developed a novel quantification method that enabled the accurate determination of cell-cell contacts in a semi-automated fashion. Dendritic cell-T cell interactions occurred beneath the smooth muscle layer, but not in the epithelium. Approximately 10% of the dendritic cells were contacted by nerves, and up to 4% of T cells formed clusters with these dendritic cells. T cells that were clustered with nerve-contacting dendritic cells proliferated only in the airways of mice with allergic inflammation but not in the airways of negative controls. Taken together, these results suggest that during the secondary immune response, sensory nerves influence dendritic cell-driven T cell activation in the airway mucosa.

  19. T Cells Capture Bacteria by Transinfection from Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Adalia, Aranzazu; Ramírez-Santiago, Guillermo; Torres-Torresano, Mónica; Garcia-Ferreras, Raquel; Veiga Chacón, Esteban

    2016-01-13

    Recently, we have shown, contrary to what is described, that CD4(+) T cells, the paradigm of adaptive immune cells, capture bacteria from infected dendritic cells (DCs) by a process called transinfection. Here, we describe the analysis of the transinfection process, which occurs during the course of antigen presentation. This process was unveiled by using CD4(+) T cells from transgenic OTII mice, which bear a T cell receptor (TCR) specific for a peptide of ovoalbumin (OVAp), which therefore can form stable immune complexes with infected dendritic cells loaded with this specific OVAp. The dynamics of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing bacteria during DC-T cell transmission can be monitored by live-cell imaging and the quantification of bacterial transinfection can be performed by flow cytometry. In addition, transinfection can be quantified by a more sensitive method based in the use of gentamicin, a non-permeable aminoglycoside antibiotic killing extracellular bacteria but not intracellular ones. This classical method has been used previously in microbiology to study the efficiency of bacterial infections. We hereby explain the protocol of the complete process, from the isolation of the primary cells to the quantification of transinfection.

  20. Organ-derived dendritic cells have differential effects on alloreactive T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Theo D.; Terwey, Theis H.; Zakrzewski, Johannes L; Suh, David; Kochman, Adam A.; Chen, Megan E.; King, Chris G.; Borsotti, Chiara; Grubin, Jeremy; Smith, Odette M.; Heller, Glenn; Liu, Chen; Murphy, George F.; Alpdogan, Onder; Marcel R. M. van den Brink

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are considered critical for the induction of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after bone marrow transplantation (BMT). In addition to their priming function, dendritic cells have been shown to induce organ-tropism through induction of specific homing molecules on T cells. Using adoptive transfer of CFSE-labeled cells, we first demonstrated that alloreactive T cells differentially up-regulate specific homing molecules in vivo. Host-type dendritic cells from the GVHD targe...

  1. Tandem autologous/reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic stem-cell transplantation versus autologous transplantation in myeloma: long-term follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bjorkstrand, B.; Iacobelli, S.; Hegenbart, U.; Gruber, A.; Greinix, H.; Volin, L.; Narni, F.; Musto, P.; Beksac, M.; Bosi, A.; Milone, G.; Corradini, P.; Goldschmidt, H.; Witte, T.J.M. de; Morris, C.; Niederwieser, D.; Gahrton, G.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: Results of allogeneic stem-cell transplantation (allo) in myeloma are controversial. In this trial autologous stem-cell transplantation (auto) followed by reduced-intensity conditioning matched sibling donor allo (auto-allo) was compared with auto only in previously untreated multiple myelo

  2. Autologous somatic cell nuclear transfer in pigs using recipient oocytes and donor cells from the same animal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunsong; Song, Kilyoung

    2007-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine the feasibility of the production of autologous porcine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) blastocysts using oocytes and donor cells from slaughtered ovaries. Therefore, we attempted to optimize autologous SCNT by examining the effects of electrical fusion conditions and donor cell type on cell fusion and the development of SCNT embryos. Four types of donor cells were used: 1) denuded cumulus cells (DCCs) collected from in vitro-matured (IVM) oocytes; 2) cumulus cells collected from oocytes after 22 h of IVM and cultured for 18 h (CCCs); 3) follicular cells obtained from follicular contents and cultured for 40 h (CFCs); and 4) adult skin fibroblasts. The DCCs showed a significantly (p cells before SCNT enhances cell fusion with oocytes and that CFCs are superior to CCCs in the production of higher numbers of autologous SCNT blastocysts.

  3. Autologous CD34~+ and CD133~+ stem cells transplantation in patients with end stage liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hosny; Salama; Abdel-Rahman; N; Zekri; Abeer; A; Bahnassy; Eman; Medhat; Hanan; A; Halim; Ola; S; Ahmed; Ghada; Mohamed; Sheren; A; Al; Alim; Ghada; M; Sherif

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To assess the utility of an autologous CD34 + and CD133 + stem cells infusion as a possible therapeutic modality in patients with end-stage liver diseases.METHODS:One hundred and forty patients with endstage liver diseases were randomized into two groups.Group 1,comprising 90 patients,received granulocyte colony stimulating factor for five days followed by autologous CD34 + and CD133 + stem cell infusion in the portal vein.Group 2,comprising 50 patients,received regular liver treatment only and served a...

  4. Autologous stem cell transplantation as first line treatment after incomplete excision of pancreatoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, Clarice Franco; Osório, Carolina Dame; de Castro Junior, Claudio Galvão; Brunetto, Algemir Lunardi

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatoblastoma is a rare tumor and surgery with complete resection is the main treatment approach. Prognosis for patients with residual disease after surgery is usually dismal. A 14-year-old girl with pancreatoblastoma in the pancreatic body and tail was submitted to preoperative chemotherapy. She underwent surgery and the tumor was resected with microscopic margins. Postoperative chemotherapy was followed by high dose chemotherapy and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. After four years she remains very well with no evidence of disease. This is the first case reported of pancreatoblastoma that was treated with autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation as first line treatment without radiotherapy at the site of the microscopic disease.

  5. Autologous Bone Marrow Stem Cell Infusion (AMBI therapy for Chronic Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajkumar JS

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver Cirrhosis is the end stage of chronic liver disease which may happen due to alcoholism, viral infections due to Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C viruses and is difficult to treat. Liver transplantation is the only available definitive treatment which is marred by lack of donors, post operative complications such as rejection and high cost. Autologous bone marrow stem cells have shown a lot of promise in earlier reported animal studies and clinical trials. We have in this study administered in 22 patients with chronic liver disease, autologous bone marrow stem cell whose results are presented herewith.

  6. Kicking off adaptive immunity: the discovery of dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Katsnelson, Alla

    2006-01-01

    In 1973, Ralph Steinman and Zanvil Cohn discovered an unusual looking population of cells with an unprecedented ability to activate naive T cells. Dubbed “dendritic cells,” these cells are now known as the primary instigators of adaptive immunity.

  7. Nomenclature of monocytes and dendritic cells in blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Ziegler-Heitbrock (Loems); P. Ancuta (Petronela); S. Crowe (Suzanne); M. Dalod (Marc); V. Grau (Veronika); D.N. Hart (Derek); P.J. Leenen (Pieter); Y.J. Liu; G. MacPherson (Gordon); G.J. Randolph (Gwendalyn); J. Scherberich (Juergen); J. Schmitz (Juergen); K. Shortman (Ken); S. Sozzani (Silvano); H. Strobl (Herbert); M. Zembala (Marek); J.M. Austyn (Jonathan); M.B. Lutz (Manfred)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractMonocytes and cells of the dendritic cell lineage circulate in blood and eventually migrate into tissue where they further mature and serve various functions, most notably in immune defense. Over recent years these cells have been characterized in detail with the use of cell surface mark

  8. Hematopoietic progenitor cell mobilization for autologous transplantation – a literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvino, Marco Aurélio; Ruiz, Jefferson

    2015-01-01

    The use of high-dose chemotherapy with autologous support of hematopoietic progenitor cells is an effective strategy to treat various hematologic neoplasms, such as non-Hodgkin lymphomas and multiple myeloma. Mobilized peripheral blood progenitor cells are the main source of support for autologous transplants, and collection of an adequate number of hematopoietic progenitor cells is a critical step in the autologous transplant procedure. Traditional strategies, based on the use of growth factors with or without chemotherapy, have limitations even when remobilizations are performed. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor is the most widely used agent for progenitor cell mobilization. The association of plerixafor, a C-X-C Chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) inhibitor, to granulocyte colony stimulating factor generates rapid mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. A literature review was performed of randomized studies comparing different mobilization schemes in the treatment of multiple myeloma and lymphomas to analyze their limitations and effectiveness in hematopoietic progenitor cell mobilization for autologous transplant. This analysis showed that the addition of plerixafor to granulocyte colony stimulating factor is well tolerated and results in a greater proportion of patients with non-Hodgkin lymphomas or multiple myeloma reaching optimal CD34+ cell collections with a smaller number of apheresis compared the use of granulocyte colony stimulating factor alone. PMID:26969772

  9. A Model of Dendritic Cell Therapy for Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ami eRadunskaya

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are a promising immunotherapy tool for boosting an individual's antigen specific immune response to cancer. We develop a mathematical model using differential and delay-differential equations to describe the interactions between dendritic cells, effector-immune cells and tumor cells. We account for the trafficking of immune cells between lymph, blood, and tumor compartments. Our model reflects experimental results both for dendritic-cell trafficking and for immune suppression of tumor growth in mice. In addition, in silico experiments suggest more effective immunotherapy treatment protocols can be achieved by modifying dose location and schedule. A sensitivity analysis of the model reveals which patient-specific parameters have the greatest impact on treatment efficacy.

  10. Induction of an antitumor response using dendritic cells transfected with DNA constructs encoding the HLA-A*02:01-restricted epitopes of tumor-associated antigens in culture of mononuclear cells of breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennikov, Sergey Vital'evich; Shevchenko, Julia Alexandrovna; Kurilin, Vasilii Vasil'evich; Khantakova, Julia Nikolaevna; Lopatnikova, Julia Anatol'evna; Gavrilova, Elena Vasil'evna; Maksyutov, Rinat Amirovich; Bakulina, Anastasiya Yur'evna; Sidorov, Sergey Vasil'evich; Khristin, Alexander Alexandrovich; Maksyutov, Amir Zakievich

    2016-02-01

    Advances in oncoimmunology related to the definition of the basic mechanisms of the formation of antitumor immune response, as well as the opening of tumor-associated antigens recognized by immune cells, allowed to start developing ways to influence the effector cells of the immune system to generate effective antitumor cytotoxic response. We investigated the possibility to stimulate an antitumor response in a culture of mononuclear cells of breast cancer patients by dendritic cells transfected with HLA-A*02:01-restricted DNA constructs. We isolated dendritic cells from peripheral blood monocytes and delivered our constructs to these cells by magnetic transfection. Additionally, a series of experiments with loading of dendritic cells with autologous tumor cell lysate antigens was conducted. We have shown that dendritic cells transfected with the HLA-A*02:01-restricted DNA constructs are effective in inducing an antitumor response in a culture of mononuclear cells of breast cancer patients. Dendritic cells transfected with DNA constructor dendritic cells loaded with lysate antigens revealed a comparable stimulated cytotoxic response of mononuclear cells to these two ways of antigen delivery. We conclude that using DNA constructs in conjunction with patient stratification by HLA type allows the application of transfected DCs as an effective method to stimulate antitumor immunity in vitro.

  11. Human intestinal dendritic cells as controllers of mucosal immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, David

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells are the most potent, professional antigen-presenting cells in the body; following antigen presentation they control the type (proinflammatory/regulatory) of immune response that will take place, as well as its location. Given their high plasticity and maturation ability in response to local danger signals derived from innate immunity, dendritic cells are key actors in the connection between innate immunity and adaptive immunity responses. In the gut dendritic cells control immune tolerance mechanisms against food and/or commensal flora antigens, and are also capable of initiating an active immune response in the presence of invading pathogens. Dendritic cells are thus highly efficient in controlling the delicate balance between tolerance and immunity in an environment so rich in antigens as the gut, and any factor involving these cells may impact their function, ultimately leading to the development of bowel conditions such as celiac disease or inflammatory bowel disease. In this review we shall summarize our understanding of human intestinal dendritic cells, their ability to express and induce migration markers, the various environmental factors modulating their properties, their subsets in the gut, and the problems entailed by their study, including identification strategies, differences between humans and murine models, and phenotypical variations along the gastrointestinal tract.

  12. Human intestinal dendritic cells as controllers of mucosal immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Bernardo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are the most potent, professional antigen-presenting cells in the body; following antigen presentation they control the type (proinflammatory/regulatory of immune response that will take place, as well as its location. Given their high plasticity and maturation ability in response to local danger signals derived from innate immunity, dendritic cells are key actors in the connection between innate immunity and adaptive immunity responses. In the gut dendritic cells control immune tolerance mechanisms against food and/or commensal flora antigens, and are also capable of initiating an active immune response in the presence of invading pathogens. Dendritic cells are thus highly efficient in controlling the delicate balance between tolerance and immunity in an environment so rich in antigens as the gut, and any factor involving these cells may impact their function, ultimately leading to the development of bowel conditions such as celiac disease or inflammatory bowel disease. In this review we shall summarize our understanding of human intestinal dendritic cells, their ability to express and induce migration markers, the various environmental factors modulating their properties, their subsets in the gut, and the problems entailed by their study, including identification strategies, differences between humans and murine models, and phenotypical variations along the gastrointestinal tract.

  13. Dendritic cell editing by activated natural killer cells results in a more protective cancer-specific immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Morandi

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, several studies have extensively reported that activated natural killer (NK cells can kill autologous immature dendritic cells (DCs in vitro, whereas they spare fully activated DCs. This led to the proposal that activated NK cells might select a more immunogenic subset of DCs during a protective immune response. However, there is no demonstration that autologous DC killing by NK cells is an event occurring in vivo and, consequently, the functional relevance of this killing remains elusive. Here we report that a significant decrease of CD11c(+ DCs was observed in draining lymph nodes of mice inoculated with MHC-devoid cells as NK cell targets able to induce NK cell activation. This in vivo DC editing by NK cells was perforin-dependent and it was functionally relevant, since residual lymph node DCs displayed an improved capability to induce T cell proliferation. In addition, in a model of anti-cancer vaccination, the administration of MHC-devoid cells together with tumor cells increased the number of tumor-specific CTLs and resulted in a significant increase in survival of mice upon challenge with a lethal dose of tumor cells. Depletion of NK cells or the use of perforin knockout mice strongly decreased the tumor-specific CTL expansion and its protective role against tumor cell challenge. As a whole, our data support the hypothesis that NK cell-mediated DC killing takes place in vivo and is able to promote expansion of cancer-specific CTLs. Our results also indicate that cancer vaccines could be improved by strategies aimed at activating NK cells.

  14. Macrophages as APC and the dendritic cell myth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, David A

    2008-11-01

    Dendritic cells have been considered an immune cell type that is specialized for the presentation of Ag to naive T cells. Considerable effort has been applied to separate their lineage, pathways of differentiation, and effectiveness in Ag presentation from those of macrophages. This review summarizes evidence that dendritic cells are a part of the mononuclear phagocyte system and are derived from a common precursor, responsive to the same growth factors (including CSF-1), express the same surface markers (including CD11c), and have no unique adaptation for Ag presentation that is not shared by other macrophages.

  15. Murid herpesvirus-4 exploits dendritic cells to infect B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Miguel; May, Janet S; Sukla, Soumi; Frederico, Bruno; Gill, Michael B; Smith, Christopher M; Belz, Gabrielle T; Stevenson, Philip G

    2011-11-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a central role in initiating immune responses. Some persistent viruses infect DCs and can disrupt their functions in vitro. However, these viruses remain strongly immunogenic in vivo. Thus what role DC infection plays in the pathogenesis of persistent infections is unclear. Here we show that a persistent, B cell-tropic gamma-herpesvirus, Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4), infects DCs early after host entry, before it establishes a substantial infection of B cells. DC-specific virus marking by cre-lox recombination revealed that a significant fraction of the virus latent in B cells had passed through a DC, and a virus attenuated for replication in DCs was impaired in B cell colonization. In vitro MuHV-4 dramatically altered the DC cytoskeleton, suggesting that it manipulates DC migration and shape in order to spread. MuHV-4 therefore uses DCs to colonize B cells.

  16. Aminobisphosphonate-pretreated dendritic cells trigger successful Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cell amplification for immunotherapy in advanced cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabillic, Florian; Toutirais, Olivier; Lavoué, Vincent; de La Pintière, Cécile Thomas; Daniel, Pascale; Rioux-Leclerc, Nathalie; Turlin, Bruno; Mönkkönen, Hannu; Mönkkönen, Jukka; Boudjema, Karim; Catros, Véronique; Bouet-Toussaint, Françoise

    2010-11-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and colorectal carcinoma with hepatic metastases (mCRC) are cancers with poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options. New approaches are needed and adoptive immunotherapy with Vgamma9Vdelta2 T lymphocytes represents an attractive strategy. Indeed, Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells were shown to exhibit efficient lytic activity against various human tumor cell lines, and in vitro Vgamma9Vdelta2 T expansion protocol based on single phosphoantigen stimulation could be easily performed for healthy donors. However, a low proliferative response of Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells was observed in about half of the cancer patients, leading to an important limitation in the development of Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cell-based immunotherapy. Here, for the first time in the context of cancer patients, Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cell expansions were performed by co-culturing peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMCs) with autologous dendritic cells (DCs) pretreated with aminobisphosphonate zoledronate. For patients not responding to the conventional culture protocol, co-culture of PBMC with zoledronate-pretreated DCs induced strong cell expansion and allowed reaching a minimal rate of purity of 70% of Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells. The potent immunostimulatory activity of zoledronate-treated DCs was associated with higher amount of isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) in the culture and was correlated with better ability to activate Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells as measured by IFN-gamma production. Moreover, we demonstrated that the cytotoxic level of Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells against freshly autologous tumor cells isolated from patients could be significantly increased by pretreating the tumor cells with zoledronate. Thus, this method of generating Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells leads eligible for Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cell adoptive immunotherapy the HCC and mCRC patients.

  17. Avian dendritic cells: Phenotype and ontogeny in lymphoid organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Nándor; Bódi, Ildikó; Oláh, Imre

    2016-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are critically important accessory cells in the innate and adaptive immune systems. Avian DCs were originally identified in primary and secondary lymphoid organs by their typical morphology, displaying long cell processes with cytoplasmic granules. Several subtypes are known. Bursal secretory dendritic cells (BSDC) are elongated cells which express vimentin intermediate filaments, MHC II molecules, macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R), and produce 74.3+ secretory granules. Avian follicular dendritic cells (FDC) highly resemble BSDC, express the CD83, 74.3 and CSF1R molecules, and present antigen in germinal centers. Thymic dendritic cells (TDC), which express 74.3 and CD83, are concentrated in thymic medulla while interdigitating DC are found in T cell-rich areas of secondary lymphoid organs. Avian Langerhans cells are a specialized 74.3-/MHC II+ cell population found in stratified squamous epithelium and are capable of differentiating into 74.3+ migratory DCs. During organogenesis hematopoietic precursors of DC colonize the developing lymphoid organ primordia prior to immigration of lymphoid precursor cells. This review summarizes our current understanding of the ontogeny, cytoarchitecture, and immunophenotype of avian DC, and offers an antibody panel for the in vitro and in vivo identification of these heterogeneous cell types.

  18. The graft of autologous adipose-derived stem cells in the corneal stromal after mechanic damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yun Ma

    Full Text Available This study was designed to explore the feasibility of using autologous rabbit adipose derived stem cells (rASCs as seed cells and polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA as a scaffold for repairing corneal stromal defects. rASCs isolated from rabbit nape adipose tissue were expanded and seeded on a PLGA scaffold to fabricate cell-scaffold constructs. After 1 week of cultivation in vitro, the cell-scaffold complexes were transplanted into corneal stromal defects in rabbits. In vivo, the autologous rASCs-PLGA constructed corneal stroma gradually became transparent without corneal neovascularization after 12 weeks. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and transmission electron microscopy examination revealed that their histological structure and collagen fibril distribution at 24 weeks after implantation were similar to native counterparts. As to the defect treated with PLGA alone, the stromal defects remained. And scar tissue was observed in the untreated-group. The implanted autologous ASCs survived up to 24 weeks post-transplantation and differentiated into functional keratocytes, as assessed by the expression of aldehyde-3-dehydrogenase1A1 (ALDH1A1 and cornea-specific proteoglycan keratocan. Our results revealed that autologous rASCs could be one of the cell sources for corneal stromal restoration in diseased corneas or for tissue engineering of a corneal equivalent.

  19. Stimulation by means of dendritic cells followed by Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B cells as antigen-presenting cells is more efficient than dendritic cells alone in inducing Aspergillus f16-specific cytotoxic T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, F; Ramadan, G; Davies, B; Margolis, D A; Keever-Taylor, C A

    2008-02-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with in vitro expanded antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) may be an effective approach to prevent, or even treat, Aspergillus (Asp) infections. Such lines can be generated using monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) as antigen-presenting cells (APC) but requires a relatively high volume of starting blood. Here we describe a method that generates Asp-specific CTL responses more efficiently using a protocol of antigen presented on DC followed by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B lymphoblastoid cell lines (BLCL) as APC. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated weekly (2-5x) with a complete pool of pentadecapeptides (PPC) spanning the coding region of Asp f16 pulsed onto autologous mature DC. Cultures were split and stimulated subsequently with either PPC-DC or autologous PPC-pulsed BLCL (PPC-BLCL). Lines from the DC/BLCL arm demonstrated Asp f16-specific cytotoxicity earlier and to a higher degree than lines generated with PPC-DC alone. The DC/BLCL-primed lines showed a higher frequency of Asp f16-specific interferon (IFN)-gamma producing cells but an identical effector cell phenotype and peptide specificity compared to PPC-DC-only-primed lines. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, but not IL-10, appeared to play a role in the effectiveness of BLCL as APC. These results demonstrate that BLCL serve as highly effective APC for the stimulation of Asp f16-specific T cell responses and that a culture approach using initial priming with PPC-DC followed by PPC-BLCL may be a more effective method to generate Asp f16-specific T cell lines and requires less starting blood than priming with PPC-DC alone.

  20. In vivo migration of labeled autologous natural killer cells to liver metastases in patients with colon carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satolli Maria A

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Besides being the effectors of native anti-tumor cytotoxicity, NK cells participate in T-lymphocyte responses by promoting the maturation of dendritic cells (DC. Adherent NK (A-NK cells constitute a subset of IL-2-stimulated NK cells which show increased expression of integrins and the ability to adhere to solid surface and to migrate, infiltrate, and destroy cancer. A critical issue in therapy of metastatic disease is the optimization of NK cell migration to tumor tissues and their persistence therein. This study compares localization to liver metastases of autologous A-NK cells administered via the systemic (intravenous, i.v. versus locoregional (intraarterial, i.a. routes. Patients and methods A-NK cells expanded ex-vivo with IL-2 and labeled with 111In-oxine were injected i.a. in the liver of three colon carcinoma patients. After 30 days, each patient had a new preparation of 111In-A-NK cells injected i.v. Migration of these cells to various organs was evaluated by SPET and their differential localization to normal and neoplastic liver was demonstrated after i.v. injection of 99mTc-phytate. Results A-NK cells expressed a donor-dependent CD56+CD16+CD3- (NK or CD56+CD16+CD3+ (NKT phenotype. When injected i.v., these cells localized to the lung before being visible in the spleen and liver. By contrast, localization of i.a. injected A-NK cells was virtually confined to the spleen and liver. Binding of A-NK cells to liver neoplastic tissues was observed only after i.a. injections. Conclusion This unique study design demonstrates that A-NK cells adoptively transferred to the liver via the intraarterial route have preferential access and substantial accumulation to the tumor site.

  1. Comparison Between Transepicardial Cell Transplantations: Autologous Undifferentiated Versus Differentiated Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Azmoudeh Ardalan

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have been heralded as a source of great promise for the regeneration of the infarcted heart. There are no clear data as to whether or not in vitro differentiation of MSCs into major myocardial cells can increase the beneficial effects of MSCs. The aim of this study was to address this issue.Methods: To induce MSCs to transdifferentiate into cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells, 5-Azacytidine and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF were used, respectively. Myocardial infarction in rabbits was generated by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery. The animals were divided into three experimental groups: I control group, II undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cell transplantation group, and III differentiated mesenchymal stem cell transplantation group. The three groups received peri-infarct injections of culture media, autologous undifferentiated MSCs, and autologous differentiated MSCs, respectively. Echocardiography and pathology were performed in order to search for improvement in the cardiac function and reduction in the infarct size. Results: Improvements in the left ventricular function and reductions in the infarcted area were observed in both cell transplanted groups (Groups II and III to the same degree. Conclusions: There is no need for prior differentiation induction of marrow-derived MSCs before transplantation, and peri-infarct implantation of MSCs can effectively reduce the size of the infarct and improve the cardiac function.

  2. Intratumoral Dendritic Cells and Chemoradiation for the Treatment of Murine Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Moyer, Jeffrey S.; Li, Ji; Wei, Shuang; Teitz-Tennenbaum, Seagal; Chang, Alfred E

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells are potent antigen presenting cells that have been shown to have significant antitumor effects in vitro and in vivo. However, the therapeutic efficacy of dendritic cells as an immunotherapeutic treatment has been limited by both immunologic tolerance and active immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment. To address this problem, we examined the ability of concurrent systemic chemotherapy and local, fractionated radiation to augment intratumoral dendritic cell injections i...

  3. The Power and the Promise of Cell Reprogramming: Personalized Autologous Body Organ and Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Belen Alvarez Palomo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Reprogramming somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs or direct reprogramming to desired cell types are powerful and new in vitro methods for the study of human disease, cell replacement therapy, and drug development. Both methods to reprogram cells are unconstrained by the ethical and social questions raised by embryonic stem cells. iPSC technology promises to enable personalized autologous cell therapy and has the potential to revolutionize cell replacement therapy and regenerative medicine. Potential applications of iPSC technology are rapidly increasing in ambition from discrete cell replacement applications to the iPSC assisted bioengineering of body organs for personalized autologous body organ transplant. Recent work has demonstrated that the generation of organs from iPSCs is a future possibility. The development of embryonic-like organ structures bioengineered from iPSCs has been achieved, such as an early brain structure (cerebral organoids, bone, optic vesicle-like structures (eye, cardiac muscle tissue (heart, primitive pancreas islet cells, a tooth-like structure (teeth, and functional liver buds (liver. Thus, iPSC technology offers, in the future, the powerful and unique possibility to make body organs for transplantation removing the need for organ donation and immune suppressing drugs. Whilst it is clear that iPSCs are rapidly becoming the lead cell type for research into cell replacement therapy and body organ transplantation strategies in humans, it is not known whether (1 such transplants will stimulate host immune responses; and (2 whether this technology will be capable of the bioengineering of a complete and fully functional human organ. This review will not focus on reprogramming to iPSCs, of which a plethora of reviews can be found, but instead focus on the latest developments in direct reprogramming of cells, the bioengineering of body organs from iPSCs, and an analysis of the immune response induced by i

  4. Intrathecal application of autologous bone marrow cell preparations in parkinsonian syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storch, Alexander; Csoti, Ilona; Eggert, Karla

    2012-01-01

    A growing number of patients is treated with intrathecal application of autologous bone marrow cells (aBMCs), but clinical data are completely lacking in movement disorders. We provide first clinical data on efficacy and safety of this highly experimental treatment approach in parkinsonian...

  5. Autologous stem cell transplantation in treatment of aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke

    2002-01-01

    There is no doubt that autologous stem cell transplantation is useful for patients with relapsed aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma if they are responsive to the chemotherapy given before the transplantation. A small subset of patients with primary refractory disease still profits from this high dose

  6. Trichoderma species fungemia after high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festuccia, M; Giaccone, L; Gay, F; Brunello, L; Maffini, E; Ferrando, F; Talamo, E; Boccadoro, M; Serra, R; Barbui, A; Bruno, B

    2014-08-01

    We present a case of Trichoderma fungemia with pulmonary involvement in a multiple myeloma patient, who was severely immunocompromised and heavily treated with high-dose melphalan, and underwent autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of proven Trichoderma fungemia, defined by published criteria, successfully treated with voriconazole.

  7. Influence of cell quality on clinical outcome after autologous chondrocyte implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemeyer, Philipp; Pestka, Jan M; Salzmann, Gian M;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several factors influence clinical outcome after autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) for the treatment of cartilage defects of the knee joint. HYPOTHESIS/PURPOSE: The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of cell quality on clinical outcome after ACI. The hyp...

  8. Clinical outcomes after cell-seeded autologous chondrocyte implantation of the knee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pestka, Jan M; Bode, Gerrit; Salzmann, Gian;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) has been associated with satisfying results. Still, it remains unclear when success or failure after ACI can be estimated. PURPOSE: To evaluate the clinical outcomes of cell-seeded collagen matrix-supported ACI (ACI-Cs) for the treatment of ca...

  9. Severe encephalopathy after high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell support for brain tumours.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkmortel, F. van den; Gidding, C.E.M.; Kanter, M. De; Punt, C.J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Recurrent medulloblastoma carries a poor prognosis. Long-term survival has been obtained with high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplantation and secondary irradiation. A 21-year-old woman with recurrent medulloblastoma after previous chemotherapy and radiotherapy is presented. The

  10. Involvement of dendritic cells in autoimmune diseases in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed Ann M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dendritic cells (DCs are professional antigen-presenting cells that are specialized in the uptake of antigens and their transport from peripheral tissues to the lymphoid organs. Over the last decades, the properties of DCs have been intensely studied and much knowledge has been gained about the role of DCs in various diseases and health conditions where the immune system is involved, particularly in cancer and autoimmune disorders. Emerging clues in autoimmune diseases, suggest that dendritic cell dysregulation might be involved in the development of various autoimmune disorders in both adults and children. However, studies investigating a possible contribution of DCs in autoimmune diseases in the pediatric population alone are scanty. The purpose of this review is to give a general overview of the current literature on the relevance of dendritic cells in the most common autoimmune conditions of childhood.

  11. Enrichment of autologous fat grafts with ex-vivo expanded adipose tissue-derived stem cells for graft survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kølle, Stig-Frederik Trojahn; Fischer-Nielsen, Anne; Mathiasen, Anders Bruun

    2013-01-01

    Autologous fat grafting is increasingly used in reconstructive surgery. However, resorption rates ranging from 25% to 80% have been reported. Therefore, methods to increase graft viability are needed. Here, we report the results of a triple-blind, placebo-controlled trial to compare the survival...... of fat grafts enriched with autologous adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) versus non-enriched fat grafts....

  12. Dendritic Cells in Kidney Transplant Biopsy Samples Are Associated with T Cell Infiltration and Poor Allograft Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batal, Ibrahim; De Serres, Sacha A; Safa, Kassem; Bijol, Vanesa; Ueno, Takuya; Onozato, Maristela L; Iafrate, A John; Herter, Jan M; Lichtman, Andrew H; Mayadas, Tanya N; Guleria, Indira; Rennke, Helmut G; Najafian, Nader; Chandraker, Anil

    2015-12-01

    Progress in long-term renal allograft survival continues to lag behind the progress in short-term transplant outcomes. Dendritic cells are the most efficient antigen-presenting cells, but surprisingly little attention has been paid to their presence in transplanted kidneys. We used dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin as a marker of dendritic cells in 105 allograft biopsy samples from 105 kidney transplant recipients. High dendritic cell density was associated with poor allograft survival independent of clinical variables. Moreover, high dendritic cell density correlated with greater T cell proliferation and poor outcomes in patients with high total inflammation scores, including inflammation in areas of tubular atrophy. We then explored the association between dendritic cells and histologic variables associated with poor prognosis. Multivariate analysis revealed an independent association between the densities of dendritic cells and T cells. In biopsy samples with high dendritic cell density, electron microscopy showed direct physical contact between infiltrating lymphocytes and cells that have the ultrastructural morphologic characteristics of dendritic cells. The origin of graft dendritic cells was sought in nine sex-mismatched recipients using XY fluorescence in situ hybridization. Whereas donor dendritic cells predominated initially, the majority of dendritic cells in late allograft biopsy samples were of recipient origin. Our data highlight the prognostic value of dendritic cell density in allograft biopsy samples, suggest a new role for these cells in shaping graft inflammation, and provide a rationale for targeting dendritic cell recruitment to promote long-term allograft survival.

  13. Dendritic cell SIRPα regulates homeostasis of dendritic cells in lymphoid organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washio, Ken; Kotani, Takenori; Saito, Yasuyuki; Respatika, Datu; Murata, Yoji; Kaneko, Yoriaki; Okazawa, Hideki; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Fukunaga, Atsushi; Nishigori, Chikako; Matozaki, Takashi

    2015-06-01

    Signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα), an immunoglobulin superfamily protein that is expressed predominantly in myeloid lineage cells such as dendritic cells (DCs) or macrophages, mediates cell-cell signaling. In the immune system, SIRPα is thought to be important for homeostasis of DCs, but it remains unclear whether SIRPα intrinsic to DCs is indeed indispensable for such functional role. Thus, we here generated the mice, in which SIRPα was specifically ablated in CD11c(+) DCs (Sirpa(Δ) (DC) ). Sirpa(Δ) (DC) mice manifested a marked reduction of CD4(+) CD8α(-) conventional DCs (cDCs) in the secondary lymphoid organs, as well as of Langerhans cells in the epidermis. Such reduction of cDCs in Sirpa(Δ) (DC) mice was comparable to that apparent with the mice, in which SIRPα was systemically ablated. Expression of SIRPα in DCs was well correlated with that of either endothelial cell-selective adhesion molecule (ESAM) or Epstein-Barr virus-induced molecule 2 (EBI2), both of which were also implicated in the regulation of DC homeostasis. Indeed, ESAM(+) or EBI2(+) cDCs were markedly reduced in the spleen of Sirpa(Δ) (DC) mice. Thus, our results suggest that SIRPα intrinsic to CD11c(+) DCs is essential for homeostasis of cDCs in the secondary lymphoid organs and skin.

  14. Autologous stem cell transplantation versus alternative allogeneic donor transplants in adult acute leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claude Gorin, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    The availability of alternative sources of stem cells including most recently T-replete haploidentical marrow or peripheral blood, and the increasing use of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC), renders feasible an allogeneic transplant to almost all patients with acute leukemia up to 70 years of age. Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) for consolidation of complete remission (CR), however, offers in some circumstances an alternative option. Although associated with a higher relapse rate, autologous transplant benefits from a lower non-relapse mortality, the absence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and a better quality of life for long-term survivors. The recent use of intravenous busulfan (IVBU) with high-dose melphalan, better monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD), and maintenance therapy post autografting bring new interest. Few retrospective studies compared the outcome following alternative donor versus autologous transplants for remission consolidation. Genoidentical and phenoidentical allogeneic stem cell transplantations are undisputed gold standards, but there are no data showing the superiority of alternative allogeneic donor over autologous transplantation, at the time of undetectable MRD, in patients with good- and intermediate-1 risk acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1), acute promyelocytic leukemia in second complete remission (CR2), and Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL).

  15. Adoptive transfer of MART-1 T cell receptor transgenic lymphocytes and dendritic cell vaccination in patients with metastatic melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodon, Thinle; Comin-Anduix, Begonya; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Koya, Richard C; Wu, Zhongqi; Auerbach, Martin; Ng, Charles; Avramis, Earl; Seja, Elizabeth; Villanueva, Arturo; McCannel, Tara A.; Ishiyama, Akira; Czernin, Johannes; Radu, Caius G.; Wang, Xiaoyan; Gjertson, David W.; Cochran, Alistair J.; Cornetta, Kenneth; Wong, Deborah J.L.; Kaplan-lefko, Paula; Hamid, Omid; Samlowski, Wolfram; Cohen, Peter A.; Daniels, Gregory A.; Mukherji, Bijay; Yang, Lili; Zack, Jerome A.; Kohn, Donald B.; Heath, James R.; Glaspy, John A.; Witte, Owen N.; Baltimore, David; Economou, James S.; Ribas, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Purpose It has been demonstrated that large numbers of tumor-specific T cells for adoptive cell transfer (ACT) can be manufactured by retroviral genetic engineering of autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes and expanding them over several weeks. In mouse models, this therapy is optimized when administered with dendritic cell (DC) vaccination. We developed a short one-week manufacture protocol to determine the feasibility, safety and antitumor efficacy of this double cell therapy. Experimnetal Design A clinical trial (NCT00910650) adoptively transferring MART-1 T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic lymphocytes together with MART-1 peptide pulsed DC vaccination in HLA-A2.1 patients with metastatic melanoma. Autologous TCR transgenic cells were manufactured in 6 to 7 days using retroviral vector gene transfer, and re-infused with (n = 10) or without (n = 3) prior cryopreservation. Results 14 patients with metastatic melanoma were enrolled and nine out of 13 treated patients (69%) showed evidence of tumor regression. Peripheral blood reconstitution with MART-1-specific T cells peaked within two weeks of ACT indicating rapid in vivo expansion. Administration of freshly manufactured TCR transgenic T cells resulted in a higher persistence of MART-1-specific T cells in the blood as compared to cryopreserved. Evidence that DC vaccination could cause further in vivo expansion was only observed with ACT using non-cryopreserved T cells. Conclusion Double cell therapy with ACT of TCR engineered T cells with a very short ex vivo manipulation and DC vaccines is feasible and results in antitumor activity, but improvements are needed to maintain tumor responses. PMID:24634374

  16. Bone marrow concentrate for autologous transplantation in minipigs. Characterization and osteogenic potential of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herten, M; Grassmann, J P; Sager, M; Benga, L; Fischer, J C; Jäger, M; Betsch, M; Wild, M; Hakimi, M; Jungbluth, P

    2013-01-01

    Autologous bone marrow plays an increasing role in the treatment of bone, cartilage and tendon healing disorders. Cell-based therapies display promising results in the support of local regeneration, especially therapies using intra-operative one-step treatments with autologous progenitor cells. In the present study, bone marrow-derived cells were concentrated in a point-of-care device and investigated for their mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) characteristics and their osteogenic potential. Bone marrow was harvested from the iliac crest of 16 minipigs. The mononucleated cells (MNC) were concentrated by gradient density centrifugation, cultivated, characterized by flow cytometry and stimulated into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Cell differentiation was investigated by histological and immunohistological staining of relevant lineage markers. The proliferation capacity was determined via colony forming units of fibroblast and of osteogenic alkaline-phosphatase-positive-cells. The MNC could be enriched 3.5-fold in nucleated cell concentrate in comparison to bone marrow. Flow cytometry analysis revealed a positive signal for the MSC markers. Cells could be differentiated into the three lines confirming the MSC character. The cellular osteogenic potential correlated significantly with the percentage of newly formed bone in vivo in a porcine metaphyseal long-bone defect model. This study demonstrates that bone marrow concentrate from minipigs display cells with MSC character and their osteogenic differentiation potential can be used for osseous defect repair in autologous transplantations.

  17. A Biological Pacemaker Restored by Autologous Transplantation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Xiao-qing; PU Jie-lin; ZHANG Shu; MENG Liang; WANG Fang-zheng

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To restore cardiac autonomic pace function by autologous transplantation and committed differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, and explore the technique for the treatment of sick sinus syndrome. Methods:Mesenchymal stem cells isolated from canine bone marrow were culture-expanded and differentiated in vitro by 5-azacytidine. The models of sick sinus syndrome in canines were established by ablating sinus node with radio-frequency technique. Differentiated mesenchymal stem cells labeled by BrdU were autologously transplanted into sinus node area through direct injection. The effects of autologous transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells on cardiac autonomic pace function in sick sinus syndrome models were evaluated by electrocardiography, pathologic and immunohistochemical staining technique.Results:There was distinct improvement on pace function of sick sinus syndrome animal models while differentiated mesenchymal stem cells were auto-transplanted into sinus node area. Mesenchymal stem cells transplanted in sinus node area were differentiated into similar sinus node cells and endothelial cells in vivo, and established gap junction with native cardiomyocytes. Conclusion:The committed-induced mesenchymal stem cells transplanted into sinus node area can differentiate into analogous sinus node cells and improve pace function in canine sick sinus syndrome models.

  18. Phenotypical and functional characterization of clinical-grade dendritic cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, I.J.M. de; Adema, G.J.; Punt, C.J.A.; Figdor, C.G.

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are the most potent antigen-presenting cells and form a promising new treatment modality. Fully activated DC loaded with antigen are very useful in stimulating immune responses, in particular those to combat cancer. Immature DC can either cause immunological tolerance or induce

  19. IL-10 control of dendritic cells in the skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.E. Clausen (Bjorn); M.J.H. Girard-Madoux (Mathilde)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractInterleukin-10 (IL-10) is a potent immunomodulatory cytokine, whose cellular targets have not yet been precisely identified. Mice bearing a dendritic cell (DC)-specific defect in the IL-10 receptor mice exhibit exaggerated T-cell reactivation in the skin, highlighting a key function of D

  20. Dendritic cells and their role in tumor immunosurveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strioga, M.M.; Schijns, V.E.J.C.; Powell, D.J.; Pasukoniene, V.; Dobrovolskiene, N.T.; Michalek, J.

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) comprise a heterogeneous population of cells that play a key role in initiating, directing and regulating adaptive immune responses, including those critically involved in tumor immunosurveillance. As a riposte to the central role of DCs in the generation of antitumor immune re

  1. Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Human Dendritic Cell Development, Survival and Function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. van de Laar (Lianne)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractDendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen presenting cells (APC) with a dual function in the immune system. On the one hand, these specialized leukocytes are equipped to alert the immune system to invading pathogens or other danger signals. On the other, DC can promote tolerogenic re

  2. Dendritic cell maturation results in pronounced changes in glycan expression affecting recognition by siglecs and galectins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bax, Marieke; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J.; Jang-Lee, Jihye; North, Simon J.; Gilmartin, Tim J.; Hernandez, Gilberto; Crocker, Paul R.; Leffler, Hakon; Head, Steven R.; Haslam, Stuart M.; Dell, Anne; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2007-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are the most potent APC in the organism. Immature dendritic cells (iDC) reside in the tissue where they capture pathogens whereas mature dendritic cells (mDC) are able to activate T cells in the lymph node. This dramatic functional change is mediated by an important genetic repr

  3. Allogeneic and autologous mode of stem cell transplantation in regenerative medicine: which way to go?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamidi, Murali Krishna; Dutta, Susmita; Bhonde, Ramesh; Das, Anjan Kumar; Pal, Rajarshi

    2014-12-01

    Stem cell transplantation is a generic term covering different techniques. However there is argument over the pros and cons of autologous and allogeneic transplants of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for regenerative therapy. Given that the MSCs have already been proven to be safe in patients, we hypothesize that allogeneic transplantation could be more effective and cost-effective as compared to autologous transplantation specifically in older subjects who are the likely victims of degenerative diseases. This analysis is based on the scientific logic that allogeneic stem cells extracted in large numbers from young and healthy donors could be physiologically, metabolically and genetically more stable. Therefore stem cells from young donors may be expected to exhibit higher vigor in secreting trophic factors leading to activation of host tissue-specific stem cells and also be more efficient in remodeling the micro-environmental niche of damaged tissue.

  4. [Monomorphic post-transplant T-lymphoproliferative disorder after autologous stem cell transplantation for multiple myeloma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Takei, Toshifumi; Koya, Hiroko; Iriuchishima, Hirono; Hosiho, Takumi; Hirato, Junko; Kojima, Masaru; Handa, Hiroshi; Nojima, Yoshihisa; Murakami, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    We report a rare case of T cell type monomorphic post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) after autologous stem cell transplantation. A 53-year-old man with multiple myeloma received autologous stem cell transplantation and achieved a very good partial response. Nine months later, he developed a high fever and consciousness disturbance, and had multiple swollen lymph nodes and a high titer of Epstein-Barr (EB) virus DNA in his peripheral blood. Neither CT nor MRI of the brain revealed any abnormalities. Cerebrospinal fluid contained no malignant cells, but the EB virus DNA titer was high. Lymph node biopsy revealed T cell type monomorphic PTLD. Soon after high-dose treatment with methotrexate and cytosine arabinoside, the high fever and consciousness disturbance subsided, and the lymph node swelling and EB virus DNA disappeared. Given the efficacy of chemotherapy in this case, we concluded that the consciousness disturbance had been induced by central nervous system involvement of monomorphic PTLD.

  5. Untested, unproven, and unethical: the promotion and provision of autologous stem cell therapies in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Alison K; Stewart, Cameron; Kerridge, Ian

    2015-02-09

    An increasing number of private clinics in Australia are marketing and providing autologous stem cell therapies to patients. Although advocates point to the importance of medical innovation and the primacy of patient choice, these arguments are unconvincing. First, it is a stark truth that these clinics are flourishing while the efficacy and safety of autologous stem cell therapies, outside of established indications for hematopioetic stem cell transplantation, are yet to be shown. Second, few of these therapies are offered within clinical trials. Third, patients with chronic and debilitating illnesses, who are often the ones who take up these therapies, incur significant financial burdens in the expectation of benefiting from these treatments. Finally, the provision of these stem cell therapies does not follow the established pathways for legitimate medical advancement. We argue that greater regulatory oversight and professional action are necessary to protect vulnerable patients and that at this time the provision of unproven stem cell therapies outside of clinical trials is unethical.

  6. Specific Factors Influence the Success of Autologous and Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thissiane L. Gonçalves

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Successful hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT, both autologous and allogeneic, requires a rapid and durable engraftment, with neutrophil (>500/µL and platelet (>20,000/µL reconstitution. Factors influencing engraftment after autologous or allogeneic HSCT were investigated in 65 patients: 25 autologous peripheral stem cell transplantation (PBSCT and 40 allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT patients. The major factor affecting engraftment was the graft source for HSCT. Neutrophil and platelet recovery were more rapid in autologous PBSCT than in allogeneic BMT [neutrophil occurring in median on day 10.00 (09.00/11.00 and 19.00 (16.00/23.00 and platelet on day 11.00 (10.00/13.00 and 21.00 (18.00/25.00, respectively; p < 0.0001]. The type of disease also affected engraftment, where multiple myeloma (MM and lymphoma showed faster engraftment when compared with leukemia, syndrome myelodysplastic (SMD and aplastic anemia (AA and MM presented the best overall survival (OS in a period of 12 months. Other factors included the drug used in the conditioning regimen (CR, where CBV, melphalan (M-200 and FluCy showed faster engraftment and M-200 presented the best OS, in a period of 12 months and age, where 50–59 years demonstrated faster engraftment. Sex did not influence neutrophil and platelet recovery.

  7. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm with absolute monocytosis at presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaworski JM

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Joseph M Jaworski,1,2 Vanlila K Swami,1 Rebecca C Heintzelman,1 Carrie A Cusack,3 Christina L Chung,3 Jeremy Peck,3 Matthew Fanelli,3 Micheal Styler,4 Sanaa Rizk,4 J Steve Hou1 1Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 2Department of Pathology, Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital, Darby, PA, USA; 3Department of Dermatology, Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 4Department of Hematology/Oncology, Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm is an uncommon malignancy derived from precursors of plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Nearly all patients present initially with cutaneous manifestations, with many having extracutaneous disease additionally. While response to chemotherapy initially is effective, relapse occurs in most, with a leukemic phase ultimately developing. The prognosis is dismal. While most of the clinical and pathologic features are well described, the association and possible prognostic significance between peripheral blood absolute monocytosis (>1.0 K/µL and blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm have not been reported. We report a case of a 68-year-old man who presented with a rash for 4–5 months. On physical examination, there were multiple, dull-pink, indurated plaques on the trunk and extremities. Complete blood count revealed thrombocytopenia, absolute monocytosis of 1.7 K/µL, and a negative flow cytometry study. Biopsy of an abdominal lesion revealed typical features of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm. Patients having both hematologic and nonhematologic malignancies have an increased incidence of absolute monocytosis. Recent studies examining Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients have suggested that this is a negative prognostic factor. The association between

  8. Characterization of canine monocyte-derived dendritic cells with phenotypic and functional differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Shan; Chi, Kwan-Hwa; Liao, Kuang-Wen; Liu, Cheng-Chi; Cheng, Chiao-Lei; Lin, Yi-Chun; Cheng, Chiung-Hsiang; Chu, Rea-Min

    2007-07-01

    For therapeutic purposes, large numbers of dendritic cells (DCs) are essential. In this study, we used 2% autologous canine plasma, granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L), and interleukin 4 (IL-4) in generating monocyte-derived DCs from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of dogs. The plasma enriched the population of CD14-positive monocytes by greatly enhancing the efficiency of monocyte adherence, the proportion of adherent cells increasing from 6.6% with 10% fetal bovine serum to 15.3% with 2% autologous canine plasma. Culturing the adherent monocytes for 6 d with human GM-CSF, canine IL-4, and human Flt3L significantly increased the yield of DCs, more than 90% of which were CD14-negative. Because, in the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), monocytes that were CD14-positive expressed tumor necrosis factor ac much more than DCs with low levels of CD14, it is important to decrease the numbers of CD14-positive cells in generating monocyte-derived DCs. With flow cytometry and real-time reverse-transcriptase-mediated polymerase chain reaction assays, we found that in canine immature DCs (iDCs) the expression of DLA class II molecules, CD1a, CD11c, CD40, and CD86 was high and the expression of CD80, CD83, and CD14 either low or negative. During maturation (stimulated by LPS), the expression of CDla, CD40, CD83, and CD80 was upregulated. However, the expression of DLA class II molecules, CD11c, and CD86 was not increased in mature DCs. Incubating the iDCs with LPS decreased antigen uptake and increased the cells' immunostimulatory capacity (assessed by the allogeneic mixed-lymphocyte reaction), indicating that LPS accelerates the functional maturation of DCs. This protocol may facilitate the use of DCs in cellular immunotherapy.

  9. Autologous bone marrow Th cells can support multiple myeloma cell proliferation in vitro and in xenografted mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D; Fløisand, Y; Myklebust, C V; Bürgler, S; Parente-Ribes, A; Hofgaard, P O; Bogen, B; Tasken, K; Tjønnfjord, G E; Schjesvold, F; Dalgaard, J; Tveita, A; Munthe, L A

    2017-02-24

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell malignancy where MM cell growth is supported by the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment with poorly defined cellular and molecular mechanisms. MM cells express CD40, a receptor known to activate autocrine secretion of cytokines and elicit proliferation. Activated T helper (Th) cells express CD40 ligand (CD40L) and BM Th cells are significantly increased in MM patients. We hypothesized that activated BM Th cells could support MM cell growth. We here found that activated autologous BM Th cells supported MM cell growth in a contact- and CD40L-dependent manner in vitro. MM cells had retained the ability to activate Th cells that reciprocated and stimulated MM cell proliferation. Autologous BM Th cells supported MM cell growth in xenografted mice and were found in close contact with MM cells. MM cells secreted chemokines that attracted Th cells, secretion was augmented by CD40-stimulation. Within 14 days of culture of whole bone marrow aspirates in autologous serum, MM cells and Th cells mutually stimulated each other, and MM cells required Th cells for further expansion in vitro and in mice. The results suggest that Th cells may support the expansion of MM cells in patients.Leukemia accepted article preview online, 24 February 2017. doi:10.1038/leu.2017.69.

  10. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for autoimmune disease--is it now ready for prime time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Harold L; Muraro, Paolo A; van Laar, Jacob M; Pavletic, Steven Z

    2012-01-01

    Current systemic therapies are rarely curative for patients with severe life-threatening forms of autoimmune disease (AID). During the past 15 years, autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) has been demonstrated to cure some patients with severe AID refractory to all other available therapies, and thus AID has become an emerging indication for cell therapy. The sustained clinical effects after autologous HCT are better explained by qualitative change in the reconstituted immune repertoire rather than transient depletion of immune cells. Since 1996, more than 1300 AID patients have been registered by the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) and almost 500 patients by the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR). Autologous HCT is most commonly performed for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) or systemic sclerosis (SSc). Systemic lupus, Crohn's disease, type I diabetes, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis are other common indications. Allogeneic transplants are still considered too toxic for use in AID, except for cases of immune cytopenia. Although biologic therapies have been effective at controlling the manifestations of the disease, they require continuous administration, thus raising questions about their increasing costs, morbidity, and mortality related to prolonged therapy. Perhaps it is a reasonable time to ask, "Is autologous HCT for severe AID now ready for prime time?" Yet, the paucity of controlled studies, the short-term toxicities, and the upcoming availability of second-generation biologic and targeted immunotherapies argues that perhaps HCT for AID should be still limited to clinical trials. In this article, we focus on the results of autologous HCT for MS and SSc because these are the two most commonly transplanted diseases. The promising data that is emerging may establish these diseases as standard indications for HCT.

  11. Comparison of alpha-Type-1 polarizing and standard dendritic cell cytokine cocktail for maturation of therapeutic monocyte-derived dendritic cell preparations from cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trepiakas, Redas; Pedersen, Anders Elm; Met, Ozcan

    2008-01-01

    The current "gold standard" for generation of dendritic cell (DC) used in DC-based cancer vaccine studies is maturation of monocyte-derived DCs with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)/IL-1beta/IL-6 and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). Recently, a protocol for producing so-called alpha-Type-1...... of alphaDC1 maturation cocktail to a protocol for clinical grade DC generation from cancer patients performed in X-VIVO 15 medium. We showed that alphaDC1 in this protocol induce lower up-regulation of CD83 and several other maturation markers, co-stimulatory molecules and CCR7 together with higher up......-regulation of inhibitory molecules such as PD-L1, ILT2, ILT3 as compared to sDC. Although alphaDC1 matured DCs secreted more IL-12p70 and IL-23 these DCs had lower or similar stimulatory capacity compared to sDCs when used as stimulating cells in mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) or for induction of autologous influenza...

  12. NK cell subgroups, phenotype and functions after autologous stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt eJacobs

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available High-dose chemotherapy with consecutive autologous stem cell transplantation (autoSCT is a well-established treatment option for patients suffering from malignant lymphoma or multiple myeloma. Natural killer (NK cells are an important part of the immune surveillance, and their cell number after autoSCT is predictive for progression-free and overall survival. To improve knowledge about the role of NK cells after autoSCT, we investigated different NK cell subgroups, their phenotypes and their functions in patients treated with autoSCT. Directly after leukocyte regeneration (>1000 leukocytes/μl following autoSCT, CD56++ NK cells were the major NK cell subset. Surprisingly, these cells showed unusually high surface expression levels of CD57 and KIR compared to expression levels before or at later time points after autoSCT. Moreover, these NK cells strongly up-regulated KIR2DL2/3 and KIR3DL1, whereas KIR2DL1 remained constant, indicating that this cell population arose from more immature NK cells instead of from activated mature ones. Remarkably, NK cells were already able to degranulate and produce IFN-γ and MIP-1β upon tumor interaction early after leukocyte regeneration.In conclusion, we describe an unusual up-regulation of CD57 and KIRs on CD56++ NK cells shortly after autoSCT. Importantly, these NK cells were functionally competent upon tumor interaction at this early time point.

  13. Immunity and Tolerance Induced by Intestinal Mucosal Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Julio Aliberti

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells present in the digestive tract are constantly exposed to environmental antigens, commensal flora, and invading pathogens. Under steady-state conditions, these cells have high tolerogenic potential, triggering differentiation of regulatory T cells to protect the host from unwanted proinflammatory immune responses to innocuous antigens or commensals. On the other hand, these cells must discriminate between commensal flora and invading pathogens and mount powerful immune response...

  14. Dendritic cells and immuno-modulation in autoimmune arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Spiering, R.

    2013-01-01

    The immune system consists of a broad array of immune cells to protect the body against invasive pathogenic microorganisms. Immune responses should however, be tightly controlled to ensure tolerance to the body’s own cells and proteins in order to limit damage to the host own cells and tissue. Autoimmune diseases can arise when the balance between pathogen-driven immunity (inflammatory immune response) and tolerance (regulatory immune response) to self products is dysregulated. Dendritic cell...

  15. Intra-arterial Autologous Bone Marrow Cell Transplantation in a Patient with Upper-extremity Critical Limb Ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madaric, Juraj, E-mail: jurmad@hotmail.com [National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases (NUSCH) and Slovak Medical University, Department of Cardiology and Angiology (Slovakia); Klepanec, Andrej [National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Slovakia); Mistrik, Martin [Clinic of Hematology and Transfusiology, Faculty Hospital (Slovakia); Altaner, Cestmir [Slovak Academy of Science, Institute of Experimental Oncology (Slovakia); Vulev, Ivan [National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Slovakia)

    2013-04-15

    Induction of therapeutic angiogenesis by autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplantation has been identified as a potential new option in patients with advanced lower-limb ischemia. There is little evidence of the benefit of intra-arterial cell application in upper-limb critical ischemia. We describe a patient with upper-extremity critical limb ischemia with digital gangrene resulting from hypothenar hammer syndrome successfully treated by intra-arterial autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplantation.

  16. Autologous Skin Cell Spray for Massive Soft Tissue War Injuries: A Prospective, Case-Control, Multicenter Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    AD______________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-2-0031 TITLE: Autologous Skin Cell Spray for Massive Soft Tissue War Injuries: A Prospective, Case...DATES COVERED 15Mar2013-31Oct2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Autologous Skin Cell Spray for Massive Soft Tissue War Injuries: A Prospective, Case-Control...assess the success of skin cell spray combined with a biocomposite subcutaneous (INTEGRA) layer for repair of large open wounds. The objective is the

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  15. Application of autologous tumor cell vaccine and NDV vaccine in treatment of tumors of digestive tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Liang; Hui Wang; Tie-Mie Sun; Wen-Qing Yao; Li-Li Chen; Yu Jin; Chun-Ling Li; Fan-Juan Meng

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To treat patients with stage Ⅰ-Ⅳ malignant tumors of digestive tract using autologous tumor cell vaccine and NDV (Newcastle disease virus) vaccine, and observe the survival period and curative effect.METHODS: 335 patients with malignant tumors of digestive tract were treated with autologous tumor cell vaccine and NDV vaccine. The autologous tumor cell vaccine were assigned for long-term survival observation. While these failed to obtain the autologous tumor tissue were given with NDV vaccine for a short-term observation on curative effect.RESULTS: The colorectal cancer patients treated with autologous tumor cell vaccine were divided into two groups:the controlled group (subjected to resection alone) (n=257),the vaccine group (subjected to both resection and immunotherapy) (n=310). 25 patients treated with NDV immunotherapy were all at stage Ⅳ without having resection.In postoperation adjuvant therapy patients, the 5, 6 and 7-year survival rates were 66.51%, 60.52 %, 56.50 %respectively; whereas in patients with resection alone, only 45.57 %, 44.76 % and 43.42 % respectively. The average survival period was 5.13 years (resection alone group 4.15years), the median survival period was over 7 years (resection alone group 4.46 years). There were significant differences between the two groups. The patients treated with resection plus vaccine were measured delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions after vaccination, (indurative scope >5 mm).The magnitude of DTH was related to the prognosis. The 5-year survival rate was 80 % for those with indurations greater than 5 mm, compared with 30 % for those with indurations less than 5 mm. The 1-year survival rate was 96 % for 25patients treated with NDV immunotherapy. The total effective rate (CR+PR) was 24.00 % in NDV immunotherapy; complete remission (CR) in 1 case (4.00 %), partial remission (PR) in 5 cases (20.00 %), stabilizedin in 16 cases (64.00 %),progression (PD) in 1 case (4.00 %). After NDV vaccine

  16. Immature dendritic cell-derived exosomes: a promise subcellular vaccine for autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Weifan; Ouyang, Song; Li, Yi; Xiao, Bo; Yang, Huan

    2013-02-01

    Exosomes, 60-90-nm-sized vesicles, are produced by a large number of cell types, including tumor cells, neurons, astrocytes, hemocytes, intestinal epithelial cells, and so on. Dendritic cell (DC), the most potent professional antigen-presenting cell in the immune system, produces exosomes in the course of maturation. Mature DCs produce exosomes with the ability to elicit potent immunoactivation, resulting in tumor eradication and bacterial or virus elimination. Given the notion that exosomes are stable and easy to be modified artificially, autologous mature DC-derived exosomes have been vaccinated into patients with malignant diseases. In clinical trials utilizing exosomes as therapeutic approaches, researchers observed considerable curative effect with little side effect. However, immature or suppressive DC-derived exosomes harbor anti-inflammatory properties distinct from mature DC-derived exosomes. In murine models of autoimmune disease and transplantation, immature DC-derived exosomes reduced T cell-dependent immunoactivation, relieved clinical manifestation of autoimmune disease, and prolonged survival time of transplantation. Although the exact mechanism of how immature DC-derived exosomes function in vivo is still unclear, and there are no clinical trials regarding application of exosome vaccine into patients with autoimmune disease, we will analyze the promise of immature DC-derived exosomes as a subcellular vaccine in autoimmunity in this review.

  17. [Autologous stem cell transplantation for autoimmune diseases: recommendations from the SFGM-TC].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farge, D; Terriou, L; Badoglio, M; Cras, A; Desreumaux, P; Hadj-Khelifa, S; Marjanovic, Z; Moisan, A; Dulery, R; Faucher, C; Hij, A; Martin, T; Vermersch, P; Yakoub-Agha, I

    2014-08-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a valid alternative to immunosuppressive treatment in patients with auto-immune disease; however, the role of this approach remains subject to debate. In the attempt to harmonize clinical practices between different French transplantation centers, the French Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cell Therapies (SFGM-TC) set up its fourth annual series of workshops which brought together practitioners from all of its member centers. These workshops took place in September 2013 in Lille. In this article we give an overview regarding the indications of autologous stem cell transplantation in auto-immune diseases as well as recommendations regarding post-transplant follow-up of patients.

  18. Safety Concern between Autologous Fat Graft, Mesenchymal Stem Cell and Osteosarcoma Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrot, Pierre; Rousseau, Julie; Bouffaut, Anne-Laure; Rédini, Françoise; Cassagnau, Elisabeth; Deschaseaux, Frédéric; Heymann, Marie-Françoise; Heymann, Dominique; Duteille, Franck; Trichet, Valérie; Gouin, François

    2010-01-01

    Background Osteosarcoma is the most common malignant primary bone tumour in young adult treated by neo adjuvant chemotherapy, surgical tumor removal and adjuvant multidrug chemotherapy. For correction of soft tissue defect consecutive to surgery and/or tumor treatment, autologous fat graft has been proposed in plastic and reconstructive surgery. Principal Findings We report here a case of a late local recurrence of osteosarcoma which occurred 13 years after the initial pathology and 18 months after a lipofilling procedure. Because such recurrence was highly unexpected, we investigated the possible relationship of tumor growth with fat injections and with mesenchymal stem/stromal cell like cells which are largely found in fatty tissue. Results obtained in osteosarcoma pre-clinical models show that fat grafts or progenitor cells promoted tumor growth. Significance These observations and results raise the question of whether autologous fat grafting is a safe reconstructive procedure in a known post neoplasic context. PMID:20544017

  19. UPDATE ON THE ROLE OF AUTOLOGOUS HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION IN MULTIPLE MYELOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Tosi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Autologous stem cell transplantation is considered the standard of care for multiple myeloma patients aged < 65 years with no relevant comorbidities. The addition of drugs acting both on bone marrow microenvironment and on neoplastic plasma cells has significantly increased the proportion of patients achieving a complete remission after induction therapy, and these results are mantained after high-dose melphalan, leading to a prolonged disease control. Studies are being carried out in order to evaluate whether short term consolidation or long-term maintenance therapy can result into disease eradication at the molecular level thus increasing also patients survival. The efficacy of these new drugs has raised the issue of deferring the transplant after achivng a second response upon relapse. Another controversial point is the optimal treatment strategy for high-risk patients, that do not benefit from autologous stem cell transplantation and for whom the efficacy of new drugs is still matter of debate.

  20. Recognition of enteroinvasive Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri by dendritic cells: distinct dendritic cell activation states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Ramos Moreno

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The innate and adaptive immune responses of dendritic cells (DCs to enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC infection were compared with DC responses to Shigella flexneri infection. EIEC triggered DCs to produce interleukin (IL-10, IL-12 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α, whereas S. flexneri induced only the production of TNF-α. Unlike S. flexneri, EIEC strongly increased the expression of toll like receptor (TLR-4 and TLR-5 in DCs and diminished the expression of co-stimulatory molecules that may cooperate to inhibit CD4+ T-lymphocyte proliferation. The inflammation elicited by EIEC seems to be related to innate immunity both because of the aforementioned results and because only EIEC were able to stimulate DC transmigration across polarised Caco-2 cell monolayers, a mechanism likely to be associated with the secretion of CC chemokine ligands (CCL20 and TNF-α. Understanding intestinal DC biology is critical to unravelling the infection strategies of EIEC and may aid in the design of treatments for infectious diseases.

  1. Pre-emptive treatment with rituximab of molecular relapse after autologous stem cell transplantation in mantle cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Niels S; Pedersen, Lone B; Laurell, Anna

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Minimal residual disease (MRD) is predictive of clinical progression in mantle-cell lymphoma (MCL). According to the Nordic MCL-2 protocol we prospectively analyzed the efficacy of pre-emptive treatment using rituximab to MCL patients in molecular relapse after autologous stem cell...

  2. Slowing down light using a dendritic cell cluster metasurface waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Z. H.; Chen, H.; Yang, F. S.; Luo, C. R.; Zhao, X. P.

    2016-11-01

    Slowing down or even stopping light is the first task to realising optical information transmission and storage. Theoretical studies have revealed that metamaterials can slow down or even stop light; however, the difficulty of preparing metamaterials that operate in visible light hinders progress in the research of slowing or stopping light. Metasurfaces provide a new opportunity to make progress in such research. In this paper, we propose a dendritic cell cluster metasurface consisting of dendritic structures. The simulation results show that dendritic structure can realise abnormal reflection and refraction effects. Single- and double-layer dendritic metasurfaces that respond in visible light were prepared by electrochemical deposition. Abnormal Goos-Hänchen (GH) shifts were experimentally obtained. The rainbow trapping effect was observed in a waveguide constructed using the dendritic metasurface sample. The incident white light was separated into seven colours ranging from blue to red light. The measured transmission energy in the waveguide showed that the energy escaping from the waveguide was zero at the resonant frequency of the sample under a certain amount of incident light. The proposed metasurface has a simple preparation process, functions in visible light, and can be readily extended to the infrared band and communication wavelengths.

  3. Multimodal imaging of nanovaccine carriers targeted to human dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cruz, L.J.; Tacken, P.J.; Bonetto, F.J.; Buschow, S.I.; Croes, H.J.E.; Wijers-Rouw, M.J.P.; Vries, I.J.M. de; Figdor, C.G.

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key players in the initiation of adaptive immune responses and are currently exploited in immunotherapy against cancer and infectious diseases. The targeted delivery of nanovaccine particles (NPs) to DCs in vivo is a promising strategy to enhance immune responses. Here, tar

  4. Lung Dendritic cells: Targets for therapy in allergic disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.N.M. Lambrecht (Bart)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractDendritic cells are crucial in determining the functional outcome of allergen encounter in the lung. Antigen presentation by myeloid DCs leads to Th2 sensitization typical of allergic disease, whereas antigen presentation by plasmacytoid DCs serves to dampen inflammation. It is increasin

  5. Harnessing human plasmacytoid dendritic cells as professional APCs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tel, J.; Leun, A.M. van der; Figdor, C.G.; Torensma, R.; Vries, I.J.M. de

    2012-01-01

    The plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC) constitutes a unique DC subset that links the innate and adaptive arm of the immune system. Whereas the unique capability of pDCs to produce large amounts of type I IFNs in response to pathogen recognition is generally accepted,their antigen-presenting function

  6. Semaphorin 7A Promotes Chemokine-Driven Dendritic Cell Migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Anoek; Paulis, Leonie; te Riet, Joost; Vasaturo, Angela; Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; van der Schaaf, Alie; Kuipers, Arthur J.; Schulte, Luuk P.; Jongbloets, Bart C.; Pasterkamp, R. Jeroen; Figdor, Carl G.; van Spriel, Annemiek B.; Buschow, Sonja I.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) migration is essential for efficient host defense against pathogens and cancer, as well as for the efficacy of DC-based immunotherapies. However, the molecules that induce the migratory phenotype of DCs are poorly defined. Based on a largescale proteome analysis of maturing DCs,

  7. Interaction of classical swine fever virus with dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carrasco, C.P.; Rigden, R.C.; Vincent, I.E.; Balmelli, C.; Ceppi, M.; Bauhofer, O.; Tache, V.; Hjertner, B.; McNeilly, F.; Gennip, van H.G.P.; McCullough, K.C.; Summerfield, A.

    2004-01-01

    Functional disruption of dendritic cells (DCs) is an important strategy for viral pathogens to evade host defences. Monocytotropic viruses such as classical swine fever virus (CSFV) could employ such a mechanism, since the virus can suppress immune responses and induce apoptosis without infecting ly

  8. Acute myeloid dendritic cell leukaemia with specific cutaneous involvement: a diagnostic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferran, M; Gallardo, F; Ferrer, A M; Salar, A; Pérez-Vila, E; Juanpere, N; Salgado, R; Espinet, B; Orfao, A; Florensa, L; Pujol, R M

    2008-05-01

    Myeloid or type 1 dendritic cell leukaemia is an exceedingly rare haematopoietic neoplasm characterized by a specific immunophenotypic profile close to plasmacytoid dendritic cell and acute myelogenous leukaemia. A 77-year-old man presenting specific cutaneous infiltration by myeloid dendritic cell leukaemia is reported. The clinical features as well as the cutaneous histopathological and immunohistochemical features led to the initial diagnosis of CD4+/CD56+ haematodermic neoplasm. However, extensive immunophenotypic studies performed from peripheral blood blasts disclosed that leukaemic cells expressed myeloid dendritic cell markers, confirming the diagnosis. The diagnostic difficulties of specific cutaneous involvement by myeloid dendritic cell leukaemia on the basis of routine histopathological and immunohistochemical features are highlighted.

  9. Cancer Vaccine by Fusions of Dendritic and Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shigeo Koido; Eiichi Hara; Sadamu Homma; Yoshihisa Namiki; Toshifumi Ohkusa; Jianlin Gong; Hisao Tajiri

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells and play a central role in the initiation and regulation of primary immune responses. Therefore, their use for the active immunotherapy against cancers has been studied with considerable interest. The fusion of DCs with whole tumor cells represents in many ways an ideal approach to deliver, process, and subsequently present a broad array of tumor-associated antigens, including those yet to be unidentified, in the context of DCs-derived...

  10. Dendritic web - A viable material for silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidensticker, R. G.; Scudder, L.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The dendritic web process is a technique for growing thin silicon ribbon from liquid silicon. The material is suitable for solar cell fabrication and, in fact, cells fabricated on web material are equivalent in performance to cells fabricated on Czochralski-grown material. A recently concluded study has delineated the thermal requirements for silicon web crucibles, and a detailed conceptual design has been developed for a laboratory growth apparatus.

  11. Loss of CD103~+ intestinal dendritic cells during colonic inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ulrike; G; Strauch; Nicole; Grunwald; Florian; Obermeier; Sonja; Gürster; Heiko; C; Rath

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate possible differences in dendritic cells(DC)within intestinal tissue of mice before and after induction of colitis. METHODS:Mucosal DC derived from intestinal tissue,as well as from mesenteric lymph nodes and spleen,were analyzed by fluorescence activated cell sorting(FACS) analysis.Supernatants of these cells were analyzed for secretion of different pro-and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence were performed on cryosections of mucosal tissue derived fro...

  12. Analysis of the efficacy and prognosis on first-line autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation of patients with multiple myeloma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹徳慧

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the efficacy and prognosis of first-line autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation(ASCT) for newly diagnosed patients with multiple myeloma(MM).Methods From January 2005 to

  13. Autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudesh Prabhakar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a neurodegenerative disorder with no effective treatment. Stem cell therapy may be one of the promising treatment options for such patients. Aim: To assess the feasibility, efficacy and safety of autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells in patients of ALS. Settings and Design: We conducted an open-label pilot study of autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells in patients with ALS attending the Neurology Clinic of a tertiary care referral centre. Materials and Methods: Ten patients with ALS with mean revised ALS Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS-R score of 30.2 (± 10.58 at baseline received intrathecal autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells. Primary end point was improvement in the ALSFRS-R score at 90, 180, 270 and 365 days post therapy. Secondary endpoints included ALSFRS-R subscores, time to 4-point deterioration, median survival and reported adverse events. Paired t-test was used to compare changes in ALSFRS-R from baseline and Kaplan-Meier analysis was used for survival calculations. Results: There was no significant deterioration in ALSFRS-R composite score from baseline at one-year follow-up (P=0.090. The median survival post procedure was 18.0 months and median time to 4-point deterioration was 16.7 months. No significant adverse events were reported. Conclusion: Autologous bone marrow-derived stem cell therapy is safe and feasible in patients of ALS. Short-term follow-up of ALSFRS-R scores suggests a trend towards stabilization of disease. However, the benefit needs to be confirmed in the long-term follow-up period.

  14. The quality and quantity of leukemia-derived dendritic cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome are a predictive factor for the lytic potential of dendritic cells-primed leukemia-specific T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabrucker, Christine; Liepert, Anja; Dreyig, Julia; Kremser, Andreas; Kroell, Tanja; Freudenreich, Markus; Schmid, Christoph; Schweiger, Cornelia; Tischer, Johanna; Kolb, Hans-Jochen; Schmetzer, Helga

    2010-06-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy is an important therapy option to reduce relapse rates after stem-cell transplantation in patients suffering from acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes. Myeloid leukemic cells can regularly be induced to differentiate into leukemia-derived dendritic cells (DC(leu)), regaining the stimulatory capacity of professional dendritic cells (DCs) while presenting the known/unknown leukemic antigen repertoire. So far, induced antileukemic T-cell responses are variable or even mediate opposite effects. To further elicit DC/DC(leu)-induced T-cell-response patterns, we generated DC from 17 Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and 2 myelodysplastic syndrome cases and carried out flowcytometry and (functional) nonradioactive fluorolysis assays before/after mixed lymphocyte cultures of matched (allogeneic) donor T cells (n=6), T cells prepared at relapse after stem-cell transplantation (n=4) or (autologous) patients' T cells (n=7) with blast containing mononuclear cells ("MNC") or DC(leu) ("DC"). Compared with "MNC", "DC" were better mediators of antileukemic-activity, although not in every case effective. We could define DC subtypes and cut-off proportions of DC subtypes/qualities (mature DC/DC(leu)) after "DC" priming, which were predictive for an antileukemic activity of primed T cells and the clinical course of the disease after immunotherapy (allogeneic stem-cell transplantation/donor lymphocytes infusion/therapy). In summary, our data show that the composition and quality of DC after a mixed lymphocyte culture-priming phase is predictive for a successful ex vivo antileukemic response, especially with respect to proportions of mature and leukemia-derived DC. These data contribute not only to predict DC-mediated functions or the clinical course of the diseases but also to develop and refine DC-vaccination strategies that may pave the way to develop and modify adoptive immunotherapy, especially for patients at relapse after allogeneic stem-cell

  15. Dendritic Cell Apoptosis and the Pathogenesis of Dengue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lysangela R. Alves

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Dengue viruses and other members of the Flaviviridae family are emerging human pathogens. Dengue is transmitted to humans by Aedes aegypti female mosquitoes. Following infection through the bite, cells of the hematopoietic lineage, like dendritic cells, are the first targets of dengue virus infection. Dendritic cells (DCs are key antigen presenting cells, sensing pathogens, processing and presenting the antigens to T lymphocytes, and triggering an adaptive immune response. Infection of DCs by dengue virus may induce apoptosis, impairing their ability to present antigens to T cells, and thereby contributing to dengue pathogenesis. This review focuses on general mechanisms by which dengue virus triggers apoptosis, and possible influence of DC-apoptosis on dengue disease severity.

  16. Human plasmacytoid dendritic cells: from molecules to intercellular communication network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Till Sebastian Manuel Mathan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells (pDCs are a specific subset of naturally occurring dendritic cells, that secrete large amounts of Type I interferon and play an important role in the immune response against viral infection. Several studies have highlighted that they are also effective antigen presenting cells (APCs, making them an interesting target for immunotherapy against cancer. However, the modes of action of pDCs are not restricted to antigen presentation and IFN secretion alone. In this review we will highlight a selection of cell surface proteins expressed by human pDCs that may facilitate communication with other immune cells, and we will discuss the implications of these molecules for pDC-driven immune responses.

  17. Direction selectivity is computed by active dendritic integration in retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivyer, Benjamin; Williams, Stephen R

    2013-12-01

    Active dendritic integration is thought to enrich the computational power of central neurons. However, a direct role of active dendritic processing in the execution of defined neuronal computations in intact neural networks has not been established. Here we used multi-site electrophysiological recording techniques to demonstrate that active dendritic integration underlies the computation of direction selectivity in rabbit retinal ganglion cells. Direction-selective retinal ganglion cells fire action potentials in response to visual image movement in a preferred direction. Dendritic recordings revealed that preferred-direction moving-light stimuli led to dendritic spike generation in terminal dendrites, which were further integrated and amplified as they spread through the dendritic arbor to the axon to drive action potential output. In contrast, when light bars moved in a null direction, synaptic inhibition vetoed neuronal output by directly inhibiting terminal dendritic spike initiation. Active dendritic integration therefore underlies a physiologically engaged circuit-based computation in the retina.

  18. T-cell-replete haploidentical transplantation versus autologous stem cell transplantation in adult acute leukemia: a matched pair analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorin, Norbert-Claude; Labopin, Myriam; Piemontese, Simona; Arcese, William; Santarone, Stella; Huang, He; Meloni, Giovanna; Ferrara, Felicetto; Beelen, Dietrich; Sanz, Miguel; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Ciceri, Fabio; Mailhol, Audrey; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2015-04-01

    Adult patients with acute leukemia in need of a transplant but without a genoidentical donor are usually considered upfront for transplantation with stem cells from any other allogeneic source, rather than autologous stem cell transplantation. We used data from the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation and performed a matched pair analysis on 188 T-cell-replete haploidentical and 356 autologous transplants done from January 2007 to December 2012, using age, diagnosis, disease status, cytogenetics, and interval from diagnosis to transplant as matching factors. "Haploidentical expert" centers were defined as having reported more than five haploidentical transplants for acute leukemia (median value for the study period). The median follow-up was 28 months. Multivariate analyses, including type of transplant categorized into three classes ("haploidentical regular", "haploidentical expert" and autologous), conditioning intensity (reduced intensity versus myeloablative conditioning) and the random effect taking into account associations related to matching, showed that non-relapse mortality was higher following haploidentical transplants in expert (HR: 4.7; P=0.00004) and regular (HR: 8.98; Ptransplants was lower in expert centers (HR:0.39; P=0.0003) but in regular centers was similar to that for autologous transplants. Leukemia-free survival and overall survival rates were higher following autologous transplantation than haploidentical transplants in regular centers (HR: 1.63; P=0.008 and HR: 2.31; P=0.0002 respectively) but similar to those following haploidentical transplants in expert centers. We conclude that autologous stem cell transplantation should presently be considered as a possible alternative to haploidentical transplantation in regular centers that have not developed a specific expert program.

  19. Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia: a Single-Centre Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kakucs Enikő

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Autologous haemopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT is an important treatment modality for patients with acute myeloid leukemia with low and intermediate risk disease. It has served advantages over allogenic transplantation, because it does not need a matched donor, there is no graft versus host disease, there are less complications and a faster immune reconstitution than in the allo-setting. The disadvantage is the lack of the graft versus leukaemia effect.

  20. Cytomegalovirus Reactivation in Adult Recipients of Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation: a Single Center Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Rawi, Omar; Abdel-Rahman, Fawzi; Al-Najjar, Rula; Abu-Jazar, Husam; Salam, Mourad; Saad, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation and infection are well-recognized complications after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Only a few studies have addressed CMV reactivation after autologous SCT (ASCT). Methods We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 210 adult patients who underwent ASCT for lymphoma or multiple myeloma (MM) at a single center from January 1st, 2007 until December 31st, 2012. All patients were monitored weekly with CMV antigenemia test till day 4...

  1. Autologous Transplantation of Lentivector/Acid Ceramidase–Transduced Hematopoietic Cells in Nonhuman Primates

    OpenAIRE

    Walia, Jagdeep S; Neschadim, Anton; Lopez-Perez, Orlay; Alayoubi, Abdulfatah; Fan, Xin; Carpentier, Stéphane; Madden, Melissa; Lee, Chyan-Jang; Cheung, Fred; Jaffray, David A.; Levade, Thierry; McCart, J. Andrea; Medin, Jeffrey A

    2011-01-01

    Farber disease is a rare lysosomal storage disorder (LSD) that manifests due to acid ceramidase (AC) deficiencies and ceramide accumulation. We present a preclinical gene therapy study for Farber disease employing a lentiviral vector (LV-huAC/huCD25) in three enzymatically normal nonhuman primates. Autologous, mobilized peripheral blood (PB) cells were transduced and infused into fully myelo-ablated recipients with tracking for at least 1 year. Outcomes were assessed by measuring the AC speci...

  2. Human autologous serum as a substitute for fetal bovine serum in human Schwann cell culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Goodarzi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, cell -based and tissue engineered products have opened new horizons in treatment of incurable nervous system disorders. The number of studies on the role of Schwann cells (SC in treating nervous disorders is higher than other cell types. Different protocols have been suggested for isolation and expansion of SC which most of them have used multiple growth factors, mitogens and fetal bovine sera (FBS in culture medium. Because of potential hazards of animal-derived reagents, this study was designed to evaluate the effect of replacing FBS with human autologous serum (HAS on SC's yield and culture parameters. Samples from 10 peripheral nerve biopsies were retrieved and processed under aseptic condition. The isolated cells cultured in FBS (1st group or autologous serum (2nd group. After primary culture the cells were seeded at 10000 cell/cm2 in a 12 wells cell culture plate for each group. At 100% confluency, the cell culture parameters (count, viability, purity and culture duration of 2 groups were compared using paired t-test. The average donors' age was 35.80 (SD=13.35 and except for 1 sample the others cultured successfully. In first group, the averages of cell purity, viability and culture duration were 97% (SD=1.32, 97/33% (SD=1.22 and 11.77 (SD=2.58 days respectively. This parameters were 97.33% (SD=1.00, 97.55% (SD=1.33 and 10.33 days (SD=1.65 in second group. The difference of cell count, purity and viability were not significant between 2 groups (P>0.05. The cells of second group reached to 100% confluency in shorter period of time (P=0.03. The results of this study showed that autologous serum can be a good substitute for FBS in human SC culture. This can reduce the costs and improve the safety of cell product for clinical application.

  3. Immunohistochemical analysis of small plaque parapsoriasis: involvement of dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeybek, N Dilara; Asan, Esin; Erbil, A Hakan; Dagdeviren, Attila

    2008-01-01

    Small plaque parapsoriasis (SPP) is one of the cutaneous T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. The aim of the present study was to show the antigenic profile of a subset of dendritic cells and lymphocytes in SPP in comparison with normal cells to provide data on the role of these two cell types in the pathogenesis of SPP. Skin biopsy specimens of lesions were obtained from 8 patients with SPP. Biopsies of the healthy skin from 9 control individuals were also analyzed. Immunohistochemistry was performed on the frozen tissue sections to reveal binding of anti-HLA Class II, anti-CD1a, anti-CD4, anti-CD8, anti-CD44, anti-CD45, and anti-CD68 monoclonal antibodies. There was a statistically significant increase in the number of CD1a(+), Langerhans cells (LCs), HLA-DR-immunoreactive and, CD1a-positive dermal dendritic cells and CD68(+) macrophages in the SPP group (p=0.008, 0.008, 0.002 and <0.0009, respectively). The number of lymphocytes positive for CD4, CD8 and CD45 was significantly higher than normal in the SPP group (p=0.015, <0.0009 and <0.0009, respectively). Our study demonstrates that both peptide- and lipid-based antigens are involved in the persistent antigenic exposure in SPP. Dendritic cells play a pivotal role in SPP by presenting antigens by both LC and dermal dendritic cells via MHC Class II and CD1a molecules. The CD68(+) macrophages are thought to be involved in the immune response in this pathology as an antigen-presenting cell.

  4. Two cases of extranodal follicular dendritic cell sarcoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王坚; 孔蕴仪; 陆洪芬; 许越香

    2003-01-01

    @@ Follicular dendritic cell (FDC) is an essential component of the nonlymphoid, nonphagocytic immunoaccessory reticulum cells of the peripheral lymphoid tissue.1 Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma (FDCs) are confined largely to the primary and secondary B-cell follicles, where they form a tight interlacing meshwork. They play a role in the capture and presentation of antigens, generation and regulation of immune complexes. FDCs can be recognized morphologically by their indistinct cellular borders, pale eosinophilic cytoplasm, round-to-ovoid nuclei with delicate nuclear membranes and clear-to-vesicular chromatin with inconspicuous or small nucleoli. FDCs are best identified through immunostaining using CD21, CD35, R4/23, KiM4, KiM4p and Ki-FDC1p.

  5. Cysticerci Drive Dendritic Cells to Promote In Vitro and In Vivo Tregs Differentiation

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    Laura Adalid-Peralta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs play a crucial role in immune homeostasis. Treg induction is a strategy that parasites have evolved to modulate the host’s inflammatory environment, facilitating their establishment and permanence. In human Taenia solium neurocysticercosis (NC, the concurrence of increased peripheral and central Treg levels and their capacity to inhibit T cell activation and proliferation support their role in controlling neuroinflammation. This study is aimed at identifing possible mechanisms of Treg induction in human NC. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC from healthy human donors, cocultivated with autologous CD4+ naïve cells either in the presence or absence of cysticerci, promoted CD25highFoxp3+ Treg differentiation. An increased Treg induction was observed when cysticerci were present. Moreover, an augmentation of suppressive-related molecules (SLAMF1, B7-H1, and CD205 was found in parasite-induced DC differentiation. Increased Tregs and a higher in vivo DC expression of the regulatory molecules SLAMF1 and CD205 in NC patients were also found. SLAMF1 gene was downregulated in NC patients with extraparenchymal cysticerci, exhibiting higher inflammation levels than patients with parenchymal parasites. Our findings suggest that cysticerci may modulate DC to favor a suppressive environment, which may help parasite establishment, minimizing the excessive inflammation, which may lead to tissue damage.

  6. Cytokine-based log-scale expansion of functional murine dendritic cells.

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    Yui Harada

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Limitations of the clinical efficacy of dendritic cell (DC-based immunotherapy, as well as difficulties in their industrial production, are largely related to the limited number of autologous DCs from each patient. We here established a possible breakthrough, a simple and cytokine-based culture method to realize a log-scale order of functional murine DCs (>1,000-fold, which cells were used as a model before moving to human studies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Floating cultivation of lineage-negative hematopoietic progenitors from bone marrow in an optimized cytokine cocktail (FLT3-L, IL-3, IL-6, and SCF led to a stable log-scale proliferation of these cells, and a subsequent differentiation study using IL-4/GM-CSF revealed that 3-weeks of expansion was optimal to produce CD11b+/CD11c+ DC-like cells. The expanded DCs had typical features of conventional myeloid DCs in vitro and in vivo, including identical efficacy as tumor vaccines. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The concept of DC expansion should make a significant contribution to the progress of DC-based immunotherapy.

  7. Penile urethra replacement with autologous cell-seeded tubularized collagen matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippo, Roger E; Kornitzer, Benjamin S; Yoo, James J; Atala, Anthony

    2015-03-01

    Acellular collagen matrices have been used as an onlay material for urethral reconstruction. However, cell-seeded matrices have been recommended for tubularized urethral repairs. In this study we investigated whether long segmental penile urethral replacement using autologous cell-seeded tubularized collagen-based matrix is feasible. Autologous bladder epithelial and smooth muscle cells from nine male rabbits were grown and seeded onto preconfigured tubular matrices constructed from decellularized bladder matrices obtained from lamina propria. The entire anterior penile urethra was resected in 15 rabbits. Urethroplasties were performed with tubularized matrices seeded with cells in nine animals, and with matrices without cells in six. Serial urethrograms were performed at 1, 3 and 6 months. Retrieved urethral tissues were analysed using histo- and immunohistochemistry, western blot analyses and organ bath studies. The urethrograms showed that animals implanted with cell-seeded matrices maintained a wide urethral calibre without strictures. In contrast, the urethras with unseeded scaffolds collapsed and developed strictures. Histologically, a transitional cell layer surrounded by muscle was observed in the cell-seeded constructs. The epithelial and smooth muscle phenotypes were confirmed with AE1/AE3 and α-actin antibodies. Organ bath studies of the neourethras confirmed both physiological contractility and the presence of neurotransmitters. Tubularized collagen matrices seeded with autologous cells can be used successfully for long segmental penile urethra replacement, while implantation of tubularized collagen matrices without cells leads to poor tissue development and stricture formation. The cell-seeded collagen matrices are able to form new tissue, which is histologically similar to native urethra.

  8. Dendritic Kv3.3 potassium channels in cerebellar purkinje cells regulate generation and spatial dynamics of dendritic Ca2+ spikes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagha, Edward; Manita, Satoshi; Ross, William N; Rudy, Bernardo

    2010-06-01

    Purkinje cell dendrites are excitable structures with intrinsic and synaptic conductances contributing to the generation and propagation of electrical activity. Voltage-gated potassium channel subunit Kv3.3 is expressed in the distal dendrites of Purkinje cells. However, the functional relevance of this dendritic distribution is not understood. Moreover, mutations in Kv3.3 cause movement disorders in mice and cerebellar atrophy and ataxia in humans, emphasizing the importance of understanding the role of these channels. In this study, we explore functional implications of this dendritic channel expression and compare Purkinje cell dendritic excitability in wild-type and Kv3.3 knockout mice. We demonstrate enhanced excitability of Purkinje cell dendrites in Kv3.3 knockout mice, despite normal resting membrane properties. Combined data from local application pharmacology, voltage clamp analysis of ionic currents, and assessment of dendritic Ca(2+) spike threshold in Purkinje cells suggest a role for Kv3.3 channels in opposing Ca(2+) spike initiation. To study the physiological relevance of altered dendritic excitability, we measured [Ca(2+)](i) changes throughout the dendritic tree in response to climbing fiber activation. Ca(2+) signals were specifically enhanced in distal dendrites of Kv3.3 knockout Purkinje cells, suggesting a role for dendritic Kv3.3 channels in regulating propagation of electrical activity and Ca(2+) influx in distal dendrites. These findings characterize unique roles of Kv3.3 channels in dendrites, with implications for synaptic integration, plasticity, and human disease.

  9. Modulation of respiratory dendritic cells during Klebsiella pneumonia infection

    OpenAIRE

    Hackstein, Holger; Kranz, Sabine; Lippitsch, Anne; Wachtendorf, Andreas; Kershaw, Olivia; Achim D Gruber; Michel, Gabriela; Lohmeyer, Jürgen; Bein, Gregor; Baal, Nelli; Herold, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Background: Klebsiella pneumoniae is a leading cause of severe hospital-acquired respiratory tract infections and death but little is known regarding the modulation of respiratory dendritic cell (DC) subsets. Plasmacytoid DC (pDC) are specialized type 1 interferon producing cells and considered to be classical mediators of antiviral immunity. Method: By using multiparameter flow cytometry analysis we have analysed the modulation of respiratory DC subsets after intratracheal Klebsi...

  10. Molecular Characterization of Dendritic Cell-Derived Exosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Théry, Clotilde; Regnault, Armelle; Garin, Jérôme; Wolfers, Joseph; Zitvogel, Laurence; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola; Raposo, Graça; Amigorena, Sebastian

    1999-01-01

    Exosomes are membrane vesicles secreted by hematopoietic cells upon fusion of late multivesicular endosomes with the plasma membrane. Dendritic cell (DC)-derived exosomes induce potent antitumor immune responses in mice, resulting in the regression of established tumors (Zitvogel, L., A. Regnault, A. Lozier, J. Wolfers, C. Flament, D. Tenza, P. Ricciardi-Castagnoli, G. Raposo, and S. Amigorena. 1998. Nat. Med. 4:594–600). To unravel the molecular basis of exosome-induced immune stimulation, w...

  11. The role of the vascular dendritic cell network in atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Alberts-Grill, Noah; Denning, Timothy L.; Rezvan, Amir; Jo, Hanjoong

    2013-01-01

    A complex role has been described for dendritic cells (DCs) in the potentiation and control of vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis. Resident vascular DCs are found in the intima of atherosclerosis-prone vascular regions exposed to disturbed blood flow patterns. Several phenotypically and functionally distinct vascular DC subsets have been described. The functional heterogeneity of these cells and their contributions to vascular homeostasis, inflammation, and atherosclerosis are only rec...

  12. Dendritic Cells for Real-Time Anomaly Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic Cells (DCs) are innate immune system cells which have the power to activate or suppress the immune system. The behaviour of human of human DCs is abstracted to form an algorithm suitable for anomaly detection. We test this algorithm on the real-time problem of port scan detection. Our results show a significant difference in artificial DC behaviour for an outgoing portscan when compared to behaviour for normal processes.

  13. Generation of autologous tumor-specific T cells for adoptive transfer based on vaccination, in vitro restimulation and CD3/CD28 dynabead-induced T cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimnes, Marie Klinge; Gang, Anne Ortved; Donia, Marco; Thor Straten, Per; Svane, Inge Marie; Hadrup, Sine Reker

    2012-08-01

    Adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of in vitro expanded autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) has been shown to exert therapeutic efficacy in melanoma patients. We aimed to develop an ACT protocol based on tumor-specific T cells isolated from peripheral blood and in vitro expanded by Dynabeads® ClinExVivo™CD3/CD28. We show here that the addition of an in vitro restimulation step with relevant peptides prior to bead expansion dramatically increased the proportion of tumor-specific T cells in PBMC-cultures. Importantly, peptide-pulsed dendritic cells (DCs) as well as allogeneic tumor lysate-pulsed DCs from the DC vaccine preparation could be used with comparable efficiency to peptides for in vitro restimulation, to increase the tumor-specific T-cell response. Furthermore, we tested the use of different ratios and different types of Dynabeads® CD3/CD28 and CD3/CD28/CD137 T-cell expander, for optimized expansion of tumor-specific T cells. A ratio of 1:3 of Dynabeads® CD3/CD28 T-cell expander to T cells resulted in the maximum number of tumor-specific T cells. The addition of CD137 did not improve functionality or fold expansion. Both T-cell expansion systems could generate tumor-specific T cells that were both cytotoxic and effective cytokine producers upon antigen recognition. Dynabeads®-expanded T-cell cultures shows phenotypical characteristics of memory T cells with potential to migrate and expand in vivo. In addition, they possess longer telomeres compared to TIL cultures. Taken together, we demonstrate that in vitro restimulation of tumor-specific T cells prior to bead expansion is necessary to achieve high numbers of tumor-specific T cells. This is effective and easily applicable in combination with DC vaccination, by use of vaccine-generated DCs, either pulsed with peptide or tumor-lysate.

  14. Cigarette smoke promotes dendritic cell accumulation in COPD; a Lung Tissue Research Consortium study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Eunhee S

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormal immune responses are believed to be highly relevant in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Dendritic cells provide a critical checkpoint for immunity by their capacity to both induce and suppress immunity. Although evident that cigarette smoke, the primary cause of COPD, significantly influences dendritic cell functions, little is known about the roles of dendritic cells in the pathogenesis of COPD. Methods The extent of dendritic cell infiltration in COPD tissue specimens was determined using immunohistochemical localization of CD83+ cells (marker of matured myeloid dendritic cells, and CD1a+ cells (Langerhans cells. The extent of tissue infiltration with Langerhans cells was also determined by the relative expression of the CD207 gene in COPD versus control tissues. To determine mechanisms by which dendritic cells accumulate in COPD, complimentary studies were conducted using monocyte-derived human dendritic cells exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE, and dendritic cells extracted from mice chronically exposed to cigarette smoke. Results In human COPD lung tissue, we detected a significant increase in the total number of CD83+ cells, and significantly higher amounts of CD207 mRNA when compared with control tissue. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells exposed to CSE (0.1-2% exhibited enhanced survival in vitro when compared with control dendritic cells. Murine dendritic cells extracted from mice exposed to cigarette smoke for 4 weeks, also demonstrated enhanced survival compared to dendritic cells extracted from control mice. Acute exposure of human dendritic cells to CSE induced the cellular pro-survival proteins heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1, and B cell lymphoma leukemia-x(L (Bcl-xL, predominantly through oxidative stress. Although activated human dendritic cells conditioned with CSE expressed diminished migratory CCR7 expression, their migration towards the CCR7 ligand CCL21 was not

  15. CD1c+ blood dendritic cells have Langerhans cell potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Paul; Bigley, Venetia; Gunawan, Merry; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Collin, Matthew

    2015-01-15

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are self-renewing in the steady state but repopulated by myeloid precursors after injury. Human monocytes give rise to langerin-positive cells in vitro, suggesting a potential precursor role. However, differentiation experiments with human lineage-negative cells and CD34(+) progenitors suggest that there is an alternative monocyte-independent pathway of LC differentiation. Recent data in mice also show long-term repopulation of the LC compartment with alternative myeloid precursors. Here we show that, although monocytes are able to express langerin, when cultured with soluble ligands granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), transforming growth factor β (TGFβ), and bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP7), CD1c(+) dendritic cells (DCs) become much more LC-like with high langerin, Birbeck granules, EpCAM, and E-cadherin expression under the same conditions. These data highlight a new potential precursor function of CD1c(+) DCs and demonstrate an alternative pathway of LC differentiation that may have relevance in vivo.

  16. Biosimilar Filgrastim in Autologous Peripheral Blood Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization and Post-Transplant Hematologic Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesi, Francesco; Mengarelli, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    To date, two kinds of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factors (G-CSF) have been approved for autologous peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell (PBSCs) mobilization and posttransplant hematologic recovery after high-dose chemotherapy: filgrastim (originator and biosimilar) and lenograstim. Biosimilar filgrastim has been approved on the basis of comparable efficacy and safety in clinical studies where it has been used as chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia prophylaxis, but no specific pre-registration studies have been published in the transplant setting. Hence, there is still general skepticism about the role of biosimilar G-CSFs in this setting of patients. This review of biochemical, pre-clinical and clinical data suggests significant comparability of biosimilar filgrastim with both originator filgrastim and lenograstim in autologous PBSCs mobilization and post-autograft hematologic recovery.

  17. Murine and Human Model Systems for the Study of Dendritic Cell Immunobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargadon, Kristian M

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells are a population of innate immune cells that possess their own effector functions as well as numerous regulatory properties that shape the activity of other innate and adaptive cells of the immune system. Following their development from either lymphoid or myeloid progenitors, the function of dendritic cells is tightly linked to their maturation and activation status. Differentiation into specialized subsets of dendritic cells also contributes to the diverse immunologic functions of these cells. Because of the key role played by dendritic cells in the regulation of both immune tolerance and activation, significant efforts have been focused on understanding dendritic cell biology. This review highlights the model systems currently available to study dendritic cell immunobiology and emphasizes the advantages and disadvantages to each system in both murine and human settings. In particular, in vitro cell culture systems involving immortalized dendritic cell lines, ex vivo systems for differentiating and expanding dendritic cells from their precursor populations, and systems for expanding, ablating, and manipulating dendritic cells in vivo are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the contribution of these systems to our current understanding of the development, function, and immunotherapeutic applications of dendritic cells, and insights into how these models might be extended in the future to answer remaining questions in the field are discussed.

  18. Autologous mesenchymal stem cells transplantation in adriamycin-induced cardiomyopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jing; LI Geng-shan; LI Guo-cao; ZHOU Qing; LI Wen-qiang; XU Hong-xin

    2005-01-01

    @@ Recent studies have suggested benefits of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transplantation for the regeneration of cardiac tissue and function improvement of regionally infracted myocardium, but its effects on global heart failure is still little known. This study suggested the capacity of MSCs to transdifferentiate to cardiac cells in a nonischemic cardiomyopathic setting, and the effect of the cells on heart function.

  19. Improved Activation toward Primary Colorectal Cancer Cells by Antigen-Specific Targeting Autologous Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Schlimper

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive therapy of malignant diseases with cytokine-induced killer (CIK cells showed promise in a number of trials; the activation of CIK cells from cancer patients towards their autologous cancer cells still needs to be improved. Here, we generated CIK cells ex vivo from blood lymphocytes of colorectal cancer patients and engineered those cells with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR with an antibody-defined specificity for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA. CIK cells thereby gained a new specificity as defined by the CAR and showed increase in activation towards CEA+ colon carcinoma cells, but less in presence of CEA− cells, indicated by increased secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Redirected CIK activation was superior by CAR-mediated CD28-CD3ζ than CD3ζ signaling only. CAR-engineered CIK cells from colon carcinoma patients showed improved activation against their autologous, primary carcinoma cells from biopsies resulting in more efficient tumour cell lysis. We assume that adoptive therapy with CAR-modified CIK cells shows improved selectivity in targeting autologous tumour lesions.

  20. Therapeutic dendritic-cell vaccine for simian AIDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu,W; Wu,XX; Lu,YZ; Guo,WZ; Andrieu,JM

    2005-01-01

    An effective immune response against human immunodeficiency virus or simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) is critical in achieving control of viral replication. Here, we show in SIV-infected rhesus monkeys that an effective and durable SIV-specific cellular and humoral immunity is elicited by a vaccination with chemically inactivated SIV-pulsed dendritic cells. After three immunizations made at two-week intervals, the animals exhibited a 50-fold decrease of SIV DNA and a 1,000-fold decrease of SIV RNA in peripheral blood. Such reduced viral load levels were maintained over the remaining 34 weeks of the study. Molecular and cellular analyses of axillary and inguinal node lymphocytes of vaccinated monkeys revealed a correlation between decreased SIV DNA and RNA levels and increased SIV-specific T-cell responses. Neutralizing antibody responses were augmented and remained elevated. Inactivated whole virus-pulsed dendritic cell vaccines are promising means to control diseases caused by immunodeficiency viruses.

  1. AUTOLOGOUS HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION FOR LYMPHOMA: AN EVALUATION OF GRAFTS SOURCE AND MINIMAL RESIDUAL DISEASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Shu-ling; ZHANG Qiao-hua; HAN Wei-e; GUI Wei; WANG Yu-luan

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether the source of autologous hematopoietic stem cells altered the clinical outcomes of patients undergoing high dose chemotherapy and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) for aggressive lymphoma and to study the problem of minimal residual disease (MRD). Methods: 14 lymphoma patients who had lymphoma with high risk factors, relapsed lymphoma or refractory lymphoma received autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT). 14 lymphoma patients who were similar to ABMT group received autologous peripheral blood stem cells transplantation (APBSCT). Regimen of CBV (cyclophos phamide 50~60 mg/kg/d×2 d, carmustine 15 mg/kg/d×1 d,etoposide 45~60 mg/kg/d×1 d) was received by all the patients as conditioning regimen in the transplant pretreatment followed by ABMT or APBSCT. Autologous peripheral blood stem cell (APBSC) was mobilized by CTX 2g~3g/m2/d×2 d iv and G-CSF 5 μg/kg/d for five to seven days. MRD was continually supervised by PCR in bone marrow before and after transplantation. Cellular immunocyte function, such as natural killer cell (NK), CD3, CD4, CD8 and sIL-2R was tested before and twenty days after transplantation. Results: In ABMT group, the median time for hematopoietic recovery of absolute neutrophilia counts ≥0.5×109/L and platelet counts ≥20×109/L was +18 days and +20 days respectively. In contrast, the APBSCT group was both at 12 days. Patients who have undergone ABMT all got complete remission (CR), while 81.8% patients in APBSCT group got CR. The 3-year disease free survival (DFS) in APBSCT and ABMT group was 75% and 72.7% respectively (P>0.05). The mean days of immunity recovering in APBSCT was ±20 days. After transplantation, MRD in 11 patients were positive, in whom 6 patients died. Conclusion: Aggressive lymphoma patients' hemapoiesis recovered more rapidly in APBSCT group than that in ABMT group, but 3-year DFS had no statistical difference. Patients positive for IgH/TCR-γ by

  2. Platelet-rich plasma-induced bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells versus autologous nerve grafting for sciatic nerve repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changsuo Xia; Yajuan Li; Wen Cao; Zhaohua Yu

    2010-01-01

    Autologous nerve grafting is the gold standard of peripheral nerve repair.We previously showed that autologous platelet-rich plasma(PRP)contains high concentrations of growth factors and can induce in vitro cultured bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells(BMSCs)to differentiate into Schwann cells.Here we used PRP-induced BMSCs combined with chemically extracted acellular nerves to repair sciatic nerve defects and compared the effect with autologous nerve grafting.The BMSCs and chemically extracted acellular nerve promoted target muscle wet weight restoration,motor nerve conduction velocity,and axonal and myelin sheath regeneration,with similar effectiveness to autologous nerve grafting.This finding suggests that PRP induced BMSCs can be used to repair peripheral nerve defects.

  3. A question of ethics: selling autologous stem cell therapies flaunts professional standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munsie, Megan; Hyun, Insoo

    2014-11-01

    The idea that the body's own stem cells could act as a repair kit for many conditions, including cardiac repair, underpins regenerative medicine. While progress is being made, with hundreds of clinical trials underway to evaluate possible autologous cell-based therapies, some patients and physicians are not prepared to wait and are pursuing treatments without evidence that the proposed treatments are effective, or even safe. This article explores the inherent tension between patients, practitioners and the need to regulate the development and commercialization of new cellular therapies--even when the cells come from the patient.

  4. The Current Immune Function of Hepatic Dendritic Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Willy Hsu; Shang-An Shu; Eric Gershwin; Zhe-Xiong Lian

    2007-01-01

    While only a small percentage of the liver as dendritic cells, they play a major role in the regulation of liver immunity. Four major types of dendritic cell subsets include myeloid CD8α-B220-, lymphoid CD8α+B220-,plasmacytoid CD8α-B220+, and natural killer dendritic cell with CD8α-B220-NK1.1+ phenotype. Although these subsets have slightly different characteristics, they are all poor na(i)ve T cell stimulators. In exchange for their reduced capacity for allostimulation, hepatic DCs are equipped with an enhanced ability to secrete cytokines in response to TLR stimulation. In addition, they have increased level of phagocytosis. Both of these traits suggest hepatic DC as part of the innate immune system. With such a high rate of exposure to the dietary and commensal antigens, it is important for the hepatic DCs to have an enhanced innate response while maintaining a tolerogenic state to avoid chronic inflammation. Only upon secondary infectivity does the hepatic DC activate memory T cells for rapid eradication of recurring pathogen. On the other hand, overly tolerogenic characteristics of hepatic DC may be responsible for the increase prevalence of autoimmunity or liver malignancies.

  5. Immunotherapy of intracranial G422 glioblastoma with dendritic cells pulsed with tumor extract or RNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张哲; 汤灵玲; 詹仁雅; 童鹰; 姚航平; 杜理安

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the anti-tumor efficacy of dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccines pulsed with tumor extracts or RNA in a mouse model of intracranial G422 glioblastoma. Methods: Bone marrow-derived DCs were pulsed ex vivo with tumor extracts or RNA. Ninety female mice harboring 4-day-old intracranial G422 glioblastomas and 126 normal mice were treated with three spaced one week apart subcutaneous injections either with PBS, unpulsed DCs, G422 tumor extracts, RNA, DCs pulsed with G422 tumor extracts (DC/extract) or with RNA (DC/RNA). Seven days after the third immunization of normal mice, the spleens of 36 of them were harvested for cytotoxic T lyphocyte (CTL) assays and the others were challenged in the brain with G422 tumor cells. All the treated mice were followed for survival. Some mice brains were removed and examined pathologically when they died. Results: Immunization using DC/extract or DC/RNA significantly induced G422-specific CTL responses compared with control groups (P<0.01). Vaccination with DC/extract or DC/RNA, either prior to G422 tumor challenge or in tumor-harboring mice, significantly prolonged survival compared with other control groups (P<0.01). Conclusion: DCs pulsed with tumor extracts or RNA derived from autologous tumors has potential antitumor effects via activation of cell-mediated immunity. Our results suggest a useful therapeutic strategy against gliomas.

  6. Immunotherapy of intracranial G422 glioblastoma with dendritic cells pulsed with tumor extract or RNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张哲; 汤灵玲; 詹仁雅; 童鹰; 姚航平; 杜理安

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the anti-tumor efficacy of dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccines pulsed with tumor extracts or RNA in a mouse model of intracranial G422 glioblastoma. Methods: Bone marrow-derived DCs were pulsed ex vivo with tumor extracts or RNA. Ninety female mice harboring 4-day-old intracranial G422 glioblastomas and 126 normal mice were treated with three spaced one week apart subcutaneous injections either with PBS, unpulsed DCs, G422 tumor extracts, RNA, DCs pulsed with G422 tumor extracts (DC/extract) or with RNA (DC/RNA). Seven days after the third immunization of normal mice, the spleens of 36 of them were harvested for cytotoxic T lyphocyte (CTL) assays and the others were challenged in the brain with G422 tumor cells. All the treated mice were followed for survival. Some mice brains were removed and examined pathologically when they died. Results: Immunization using DC/extract or DC/RNA significantly induced G422-specific CTL responses compared with control groups (P<0.01). Vaccination with DC/extract or DC/RNA, either prior to G422 tumor challenge or in tumor-harboring mice, significantly prolonged survival compared with other control groups (P<0.01). Conclusion: DCs pulsed with tumor extracts or RNA derived from autologous tumors has potential antitumor effects via activation of cell-mediated immunity. Our results suggest a useful therapeutic strategy against gliomas.

  7. Generation of feline dendritic cells derived from peripheral blood monocytes for in vivo use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freer, Giulia; Matteucci, Donatella; Mazzetti, Paola; Bozzacco, Leonia; Bendinelli, Mauro

    2005-10-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells that can prime T cells and polarize the cellular immune response. Because Th1-type immune responses have been connected to success in combating viral infection, a promising therapeutic application of DCs would be their differentiation in vitro and injection back into the host to boost an immune response in infected animals. This study was aimed both at developing a protocol to cultivate feline DCs in the absence of exogenous proteins for their use in vivo and at investigating what might be the most appropriate stimulus to induce their maturation in vitro and finding correlates of maturation. We generated DCs from peripheral blood monocytes in the presence of feline interleukin-4 and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor, and after 5 days their maturation was induced with either lipopolysaccharide, human recombinant tumor necrosis factor alpha, poly(I:C), or activated feline platelets. After 48 h, their CD14, CD1a, major histocompatibility complex class II, and B7.1 surface expression was analyzed in parallel with their ability to uptake antigen or prime a mixed leukocyte reaction. The results presented show that feline DCs cultured in autologous plasma differentiate and are able to mature in the presence of stimuli similar to the ones currently used for other species. The present work sets the grounds for future use of DCs obtained by the protocol described for in vivo vaccination and immunotherapy of feline immunodeficiency virus-infected cats.

  8. Serine-Rich Repeat Adhesins Contribute to Streptococcus gordonii-Induced Maturation of Human Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Eun Byeol; Kim, Sun Kyung; Seo, Ho Seong; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a pivotal role in the induction of immunity by recognition, capture, process, and presentation of antigens from infectious microbes. Streptococcus gordonii is able to cause life-threatening systemic diseases such as infective endocarditis. Serine-rich repeat (SRR) glycoproteins of S. gordonii are sialic acid-binding adhesins mediating the bacterial adherence to the host and the development of infective endocarditis. Thus, the SRR adhesins are potentially involved in the bacterial adherence to DCs and the maturation and activation of DCs required for the induction of immunity to S. gordonii. Here, we investigated the phenotypic and functional changes of human monocyte-derived DCs treated with wild-type S. gordonii or the SRR adhesin-deficient mutant. The mutant poorly bound to DCs and only weakly increased the expression of CD83, CD86, MHC class II, and PD-L1 on DCs compared with the wild-type. In addition, the mutant induced lower levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-12 than the wild-type in DCs. When DCs sensitized with the mutant were co-cultured with autologous T cells, they induced weaker proliferation and activation of T cells than DCs stimulated with the wild-type. Blockade of SRR adhesin with 3′-sialyllactose markedly reduced S. gordonii binding and internalization, causing attenuation of the bacterial immunostimulatory potency in DC maturation. Collectively, our results suggest that SRR adhesins of S. gordonii are important for maturation and activation of DCs.

  9. Immunohistochemical patterns of follicular dendritic cell meshwork and Ki-67 in small B-cell lymphomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    时云飞

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify the immunohistochemical patterns of follicular dendritic cell(FDC)meshwork and Ki-67labeling index in small B-cell lymphomas(SBLs) and their significance in differential diagnosis.Methods

  10. Vaccination with melanoma lysate-pulsed dendritic cells, of patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma: report from a phase I study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgdorf, S K; Fischer, A; Claesson, M H;

    2006-01-01

    Immune therapy have shown new and exciting perspectives for cancer treatment. Aim of our study was to evaluate toxicity and possible adverse effects from vaccination of patients with advanced colorectal cancer with autologous dendritic cells (DC) pulsed with lysate from a newly developed melanoma...... and selected melanoma cell line enriched in expression of MAGE-A antigens and deficient in expression of melanoma differentiation antigens: tyrosinase, MART-1 and gp100. Vaccinations were administered intradermally on the proximal thigh with a total of five given vaccines at 2 weeks intervals. Each vaccine...... contained 3-5 x 10(6) DCs. Five of the six patients received all five vaccines. The treatment was well tolerated in all patients without any observed vaccine-correlated adverse effects. Treatment with this DC-based cancer vaccine proved safe and non-toxic....

  11. Large-Scale mRNA Transfection of Dendritic Cells by Electroporation in Continuous Flow Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmeczi, Dávid; Hansen, Thomas Steen; Met, Özcan

    2016-01-01

    Electroporation is well established for transient mRNA transfection of many mammalian cells, including immune cells such as dendritic cells used in cancer immunotherapy. Therapeutic application requires methods to efficiently electroporate and transfect millions of immune cells in a fast process...... the instrumentation and methods needed for the efficient transfection by electroporation of millions of dendritic cells in one continuous flow process....... with high cell survival. Continuous flow of suspended dendritic cells through a channel incorporating spatially separated microporous meshes with a synchronized electrical pulsing sequence can yield dendritic cell transfection rates of >75 % with survival rates of >90 %. This chapter describes...

  12. A general principle governs vision-dependent dendritic patterning of retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hong-Ping; Sun, Jin Hao; Tian, Ning

    2014-10-15

    Dendritic arbors of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) collect information over a certain area of the visual scene. The coverage territory and the arbor density of dendrites determine what fraction of the visual field is sampled by a single cell and at what resolution. However, it is not clear whether visual stimulation is required for the establishment of branching patterns of RGCs, and whether a general principle directs the dendritic patterning of diverse RGCs. By analyzing the geometric structures of RGC dendrites, we found that dendritic arbors of RGCs underwent a substantial spatial rearrangement after eye-opening. Light deprivation blocked both the dendritic growth and the branch patterning, suggesting that visual stimulation is required for the acquisition of specific branching patterns of RGCs. We further showed that vision-dependent dendritic growth and arbor refinement occurred mainly in the middle portion of the dendritic tree. This nonproportional growth and selective refinement suggest that the late-stage dendritic development of RGCs is not a passive stretching with the growth of eyes, but rather an active process of selective growth/elimination of dendritic arbors of RGCs driven by visual activity. Finally, our data showed that there was a power law relationship between the coverage territory and dendritic arbor density of RGCs on a cell-by-cell basis. RGCs were systematically less dense when they cover larger territories regardless of their cell type, retinal location, or developmental stage. These results suggest that a general structural design principle directs the vision-dependent patterning of RGC dendrites.

  13. Novel murine dendritic cell lines: a powerful auxiliary tool for dendritic cell research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia A Fuertes Marraco

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Research in vitro facilitates discovery, screening and pilot experiments, often preceding research in vivo. Several technical difficulties render Dendritic Cell (DC research particularly challenging, including the low frequency of DC in vivo, thorough isolation requirements, and the vulnerability of DC ex vivo. Critically, there is not as yet a widely accepted human or murine DC line and in vitro systems of DC research are limited. In this study, we report the generation of new murine DC lines, named MutuDC, originating from cultures of splenic CD8α conventional DC (cDC tumors. By direct comparison to normal WT splenic cDC subsets, we describe the phenotypic and functional features of the MutuDC lines and show that they have retained all the major features of their natural counterpart in vivo, the splenic CD8α cDC. These features include expression of surface markers Clec9A, DEC205, and CD24, positive response to TLR3 and TLR9 but not TLR7 stimuli, secretion of cytokines and chemokines upon activation, as well as cross-presentation capacity. In addition to the close resemblance to normal splenic CD8α cDC, a major advantage is the ease of derivation and maintenance of the MutuDC lines, using standard culture medium and conditions, importantly without adding supplementary growth factors or maturation-inducing stimuli to the medium. Furthermore, genetically modified MutuDC lines have been successfully obtained either by lentiviral transduction or by culture of DC tumors originating from genetically modified mice.In view of the current lack of stable and functional DC lines, these novel murine DC lines have the potential to serve as an important auxiliary tool for DC research.

  14. The autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplantation by intracoronary route treat patients with severe heart failure after myocardial infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高连如

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the chronic effects of intracoronary autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell (BM-MNCs) transplantation in patients with refractory heart failure (RIHF) after myocardial infarction. Methods Thirty patients with RIHF (LVEF<40%) were enrolled in this nonrandomized study, autologous BM-MNCs (5.0±0.7)×107 were transplanted with via infarct-related coronary artery in 16 patients and 14 patients received

  15. The analysis of purkinje cell dendritic morphology in organotypic slice cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapfhammer, Josef P; Gugger, Olivia S

    2012-03-21

    Purkinje cells are an attractive model system for studying dendritic development, because they have an impressive dendritic tree which is strictly oriented in the sagittal plane and develops mostly in the postnatal period in small rodents (3). Furthermore, several antibodies are available which selectively and intensively label Purkinje cells including all processes, with anti-Calbindin D28K being the most widely used. For viewing of dendrites in living cells, mice expressing EGFP selectively in Purkinje cells (11) are available through Jackson labs. Organotypic cerebellar slice cultures cells allow easy experimental manipulation of Purkinje cell dendritic development because most of the dendritic expansion of the Purkinje cell dendritic tree is actually taking place during the culture period (4). We present here a short, reliable and easy protocol for viewing and analyzing the dendritic morphology of Purkinje cells grown in organotypic cerebellar slice cultures. For many purposes, a quantitative evaluation of the Purkinje cell dendritic tree is desirable. We focus here on two parameters, dendritic tree size and branch point numbers, which can be rapidly and easily determined from anti-calbindin stained cerebellar slice cultures. These two parameters yield a reliable and sensitive measure of changes of the Purkinje cell dendritic tree. Using the example of treatments with the protein kinase C (PKC) activator PMA and the metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1) we demonstrate how differences in the dendritic development are visualized and quantitatively assessed. The combination of the presence of an extensive dendritic tree, selective and intense immunostaining methods, organotypic slice cultures which cover the period of dendritic growth and a mouse model with Purkinje cell specific EGFP expression make Purkinje cells a powerful model system for revealing the mechanisms of dendritic development.

  16. The correlation between T regulatory cells and autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation in multiple myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Pınar Erçetin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Multiple myeloma (MM is characterized by malignant proliferation of plasmocytes and their precursors. T regulatory cells (Tregs have a role in immunosuppression and control of autoimmunity, and are currently an important topic in the study of immune response to tumor cells. The correlation between Tregs and autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (APBSCT in MM has not been studied. The aim of this study was to compare CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ Treg, CD200, and PD-1 levels in MM patients that did and did not undergo APBSCT. Materials and Methods: Peripheral blood samples were collected from 28 MM patients ranging in age from 41 to 78 years for analysis of CD4CD25+ FOXP3+ Tregs, PD-1 (CD279, and CD200. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated via density gradient centrifugation. Four-color flow cytometry was performed. Using a sequential gating strategy, Tregs were identified as CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ T-cells. Results were analyzed using the Mann Whitney U non-parametric test and a compare means test. p values 0.05. Conclusion: Treg levels were higher in the patients that underwent APBSCT. Tregs are crucial for the induction and maintenance of peripheral tolerance to self-antigens. In addition, Tregs can suppress immune responses to tumor antigens; however, APBSCT and Treg levels were not correlated with CD200 or PD-1 expression. Relationship of Tregs with prognosis needs to be determined by studies that include larger cohorts.

  17. Dextromethorphan Inhibits Activations and Functions in Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Der-Yuan Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs play an important role in connecting innate and adaptive immunity. Thus, DCs have been regarded as a major target for the development of immunomodulators. In this study, we examined the effect of dextromethorphan (DXM, a common cough suppressant with a high safety profile, on the activation and function of DCs. In the presence of DXM, the LPS-induced expression of the costimulatory molecules in murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs was significantly suppressed. In addition, DXM treatment reduced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, proinflammatory cytokines, and chemokines in maturing BMDCs that were activated by LPS. Therefore, DXM abrogated the ability of LPS-stimulated DCs to induce Ag-specific T-cell activation, as determined by their decreased proliferation and IFN-γ secretion in mixed leukocyte cultures. Moreover, the inhibition of LPS-induced MAPK activation and NF-κB translocation may contribute to the suppressive effect of DXM on BMDCs. Remarkably, DXM decreased the LPS-induced surface expression of CD80, CD83, and HLA-DR and the secretion of IL-6 and IL-12 in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs. These findings provide a new insight into the impact of DXM treatment on DCs and suggest that DXM has the potential to be used in treating DC-related acute and chronic diseases.

  18. Dextromethorphan Inhibits Activations and Functions in Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Der-Yuan; Song, Pei-Shan; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Chu, Ching-Liang; Pan, I-Horng; Chen, Yi-Ming; Lin, Ching-Hsiung; Lin, Sheng-Hao; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play an important role in connecting innate and adaptive immunity. Thus, DCs have been regarded as a major target for the development of immunomodulators. In this study, we examined the effect of dextromethorphan (DXM), a common cough suppressant with a high safety profile, on the activation and function of DCs. In the presence of DXM, the LPS-induced expression of the costimulatory molecules in murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) was significantly suppressed. In addition, DXM treatment reduced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), proinflammatory cytokines, and chemokines in maturing BMDCs that were activated by LPS. Therefore, DXM abrogated the ability of LPS-stimulated DCs to induce Ag-specific T-cell activation, as determined by their decreased proliferation and IFN-γ secretion in mixed leukocyte cultures. Moreover, the inhibition of LPS-induced MAPK activation and NF-κB translocation may contribute to the suppressive effect of DXM on BMDCs. Remarkably, DXM decreased the LPS-induced surface expression of CD80, CD83, and HLA-DR and the secretion of IL-6 and IL-12 in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs). These findings provide a new insight into the impact of DXM treatment on DCs and suggest that DXM has the potential to be used in treating DC-related acute and chronic diseases. PMID:23781253

  19. Epidermal cells are the primary phagocytes in the fragmentation and clearance of degenerating dendrites in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chun; Song, Yuanquan; Xiao, Hui; Wang, Denan; Franc, Nathalie C; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh-Nung

    2014-02-05

    During developmental remodeling, neurites destined for pruning often degenerate on-site. Physical injury also induces degeneration of neurites distal to the injury site. Prompt clearance of degenerating neurites is important for maintaining tissue homeostasis and preventing inflammatory responses. Here we show that in both dendrite pruning and dendrite injury of Drosophila sensory neurons, epidermal cells rather than hemocytes are the primary phagocytes in clearing degenerating dendrites. Epidermal cells act via Draper-mediated recognition to facilitate dendrite degeneration and to engulf and degrade degenerating dendrites. Using multiple dendritic membrane markers to trace phagocytosis, we show that two members of the CD36 family, croquemort (crq) and debris buster (dsb), act at distinct stages of phagosome maturation for dendrite clearance. Our finding reveals the physiological importance of coordination between neurons and their surrounding epidermis, for both dendrite fragmentation and clearance.

  20. Human XCR1+ Dendritic Cells Derived In Vitro from CD34+ Progenitors Closely Resemble Blood Dendritic Cells, Including Their Adjuvant Responsiveness, Contrary to Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    S. Balan; Ollion, V.; Colletti, N.; Chelbi, R.; Montanana-Sanchis, F.; LIU, H.; Vu Manh, T.-P.; Sanchez, C.; Savoret, J.; Perrot, I.; Doffin, A.-C.; Fossum, E.; Bechlian, D.; Chabannon, C.; Bogen, B

    2014-01-01

    Human monocyte-derived dendritic cell (MoDC) have been used in the clinic with moderately encouraging results. Mouse XCR1+ DC excel at cross-presentation, can be targeted in vivo to induce protective immunity, and share characteristics with XCR1+ human DC. Assessment of the immunoactivation potential of XCR1+ human DC is hindered by their paucity in vivo and by their lack of a well-defined in vitro counterpart. We report in this study a protocol generating both XCR1+ and XCR1− human DC in CD3...

  1. Isoflavones, genistein and daidzein, regulate mucosal immune response by suppressing dendritic cell function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Wei

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, a component of gram-negative bacterial cell walls, has been shown to have a strong adjuvant effect towards inhaled antigens contributing to airway inflammation. Isoflavones are anti-inflammatory molecules present in abundant quantities in soybeans. We investigated the effect of isoflavones on human dendritic cell (DC activation via LPS stimulation and subsequent DC-mediated effector cell function both in vitro and in a mouse model of upper airway inflammation. Human monocyte-derived DCs (MDDC were matured with LPS (or TNF-α +/- isoflavones (genistein or daidzein. The surface expression levels of DC activation markers were analyzed by flow cytometry. Mature DCs +/- isoflavones were washed and cultured with freshly-isolated allogenic naïve CD4⁺ T cells for 5 days or with autologous natural killer (NK cells for 2 hours. The percentages of proliferating IFN-γ⁺ CD4⁺ T cells and cytokine levels in culture supernatants were assessed. NK cell degranulation and DC cytotoxicity were measured by flow cytometry. Isoflavones significantly suppressed the activation-induced expression of DC maturation markers (CD83, CD80, CD86 and MHC class I but not MHC class II molecules in vitro. Isoflavone treatment inhibited the ability of LPS-DCs to induce IFN-γ in CD4⁺ T cells. NK cell degranulation and the percentage of dead DCs were significantly increased in isoflavone-treated DC-NK co-culture experiments. Dietary isoflavones suppressed the mucosal immune response to intra-nasal sensitization of mice to ovalbumin. Similar results were obtained when isoflavones were co-administered during sensitization. These results demonstrate that soybean isoflavones suppress immune sensitization by suppressing DC-maturation and its subsequent DC-mediated effector cell functions.

  2. Viral piracy: HIV-1 targets dendritic cells for transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekkerkerker, Annemarie N; van Kooyk, Yvette; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B H

    2006-04-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), the professional antigen presenting cells, are critical for host immunity by inducing specific immune responses against a broad variety of pathogens. Remarkably the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) subverts DC function leading to spread of the virus. At an early phase of HIV-1 transmission, DCs capture HIV-1 at mucosal surfaces and transmit the virus to T cells in secondary lymphoid tissues. Capture of the virus on DCs takes place via C-type lectins of which the dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 (ICAM-3) grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) is the best studied. DC-SIGN-captured HIV-1 particles accumulate in CD81(+) multivesicular bodies (MVBs) in DCs and are subsequently transmitted to CD4+ T cells resulting in infection of T cells. The viral cell-to-cell transmission takes place at the DC-T cell interface termed the infectious synapse. Recent studies demonstrate that direct infection of DCs contributes to the transmission to T cells at a later phase. Moreover, the infected DCs may function as cellular reservoirs for HIV-1. This review discusses the different processes that govern viral piracy of DCs by HIV-1, emphasizing the intracellular routing of the virus from capture on the cell surface to egress in the infectious synapse.

  3. Atypical protein kinase C regulates primary dendrite specification of cerebellar Purkinje cells by localizing Golgi apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Koji; Kani, Shuichi; Shimizu, Takashi; Bae, Young-Ki; Abe, Takaya; Hibi, Masahiko

    2010-12-15

    Neurons have highly polarized structures that determine what parts of the soma elaborate the axon and dendrites. However, little is known about the mechanisms that establish neuronal polarity in vivo. Cerebellar Purkinje cells extend a single primary dendrite from the soma that ramifies into a highly branched dendritic arbor. We used the zebrafish cerebellum to investigate the mechanisms by which Purkinje cells acquire these characteristics. To examine dendritic morphogenesis in individual Purkinje cells, we marked the cell membrane using a Purkinje cell-specific promoter to drive membrane-targeted fluorescent proteins. We found that zebrafish Purkinje cells initially extend multiple neurites from the soma and subsequently retract all but one, which becomes the primary dendrite. In addition, the Golgi apparatus specifically locates to the root of the primary dendrite, and its localization is already established in immature Purkinje cells that have multiple neurites. Inhibiting secretory trafficking through the Golgi apparatus reduces dendritic growth, suggesting that the Golgi apparatus is involved in the dendritic morphogenesis. We also demonstrated that in a mutant of an atypical protein kinase C (aPKC), Prkci, Purkinje cells retain multiple primary dendrites and show disrupted localization of the Golgi apparatus. Furthermore, a mosaic inhibition of Prkci in Purkinje cells recapitulates the aPKC mutant phenotype. These results suggest that the aPKC cell autonomously controls the Golgi localization and thereby regulates the specification of the primary dendrite of Purkinje cells.

  4. Clinical application of dendritic cells in cancer vaccination therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Inge Marie; Soot, Mette Line; Buus, Søren

    2003-01-01

    During the last decade use of dendritic cells (DC) has moved from murine and in vitro studies to clinical trials as adjuvant in cancer immunotherapy. Here they function as delivery vehicles for exogenous tumor antigens, promoting an efficient antigen presentation. The development of protocols...... for large-scale generation of dendritic cells for clinical applications has made possible phase I/II studies designed to analyze the toxicity, feasibility and efficacy of this approach. In clinical trials, DC-based vaccination of patients with advanced cancer has in many cases led to immunity...... endpoints, including toxicity and response evaluation. This paper aims to review the technical aspects and clinical impact of vaccination trials, focusing on the generation of DC-based vaccines, evaluation of immunologic parameters and design of clinical trials necessary to meet the need for good laboratory...

  5. Colored visible light metamaterials based on random dendritic cells

    CERN Document Server

    Song, K; Liu, B Q; Zhao, X P

    2011-01-01

    Optical metamaterials(OMs) at visible wavelengths have been extensively developed. OMs reported presently are all composed of periodic structure, and fabricated by top-down approaches. Here, the colored visible light frequencies metamaterials composed of double layer array disordered and geometrical variational dendritic cells are demonstrated, fabricating by a novel bottom-up approach. The experiment demonstrated that the OMs composed of random silver dendritic cells caused the appearance of multiple transmission passbands at red and yellow light frequencies. The slab focusing experiment reveals a clear point image in the range of half-wavelength with an intensity of 5% higher than that of the light source. Proposed colored OMs will open a new way to prepare the cloak and the perfect lens suitable for optical frequency.

  6. Dendritic thickness: a morphometric parameter to classify mouse retinal ganglion cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.D. Loopuijt

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available To study the dendritic morphology of retinal ganglion cells in wild-type mice we intracellularly injected these cells with Lucifer yellow in an in vitro preparation of the retina. Subsequently, quantified values of dendritic thickness, number of branching points and level of stratification of 73 Lucifer yellow-filled ganglion cells were analyzed by statistical methods, resulting in a classification into 9 groups. The variables dendritic thickness, number of branching points per cell and level of stratification were independent of each other. Number of branching points and level of stratification were independent of eccentricity, whereas dendritic thickness was positively dependent (r = 0.37 on it. The frequency distribution of dendritic thickness tended to be multimodal, indicating the presence of at least two cell populations composed of neurons with dendritic diameters either smaller or larger than 1.8 µm ("thin" or "thick" dendrites, respectively. Three cells (4.5% were bistratified, having thick dendrites, and the others (95.5% were monostratified. Using k-means cluster analysis, monostratified cells with either thin or thick dendrites were further subdivided according to level of stratification and number of branching points: cells with thin dendrites were divided into 2 groups with outer stratification (0-40% and 2 groups with inner (50-100% stratification, whereas cells with thick dendrites were divided into one group with outer and 3 groups with inner stratification. We postulate, that one group of cells with thin dendrites resembles cat ß-cells, whereas one group of cells with thick dendrites includes cells that resemble cat a-cells.

  7. Direct contact between dendritic cells and bronchial epithelial cells inhibits T cell recall responses towards mite and pollen allergen extracts in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papazian, D; Wagtmann, V R; Hansen, S; Würtzen, P A

    2015-08-01

    Airway epithelial cells (AECs) form a polarized barrier along the respiratory tract. They are the first point of contact with airborne antigens and are able to instruct resident immune cells to mount appropriate immune responses by either soluble or contact-dependent mechanisms. We hypothesize that a healthy, polarized epithelial cell layer inhibits inflammatory responses towards allergens to uphold homeostasis. Using an in-vitro co-culture model of the airway epithelium, where a polarized cell layer of bronchial epithelial cells can interact with dendritic cells (DCs), we have investigated recall T cell responses in allergic patients sensitized to house dust mite, grass and birch pollen. Using allergen extract-loaded DCs to stimulate autologous allergen-specific T cell lines, we show that AEC-imprinted DCs inhibit T cell proliferation significantly of Bet v 1-specific T cell lines as well as decrease interleukin (IL)-5 and IL-13 production, whereas inhibition of Phl p 5-specific T cells varied between different donors. Stimulating autologous CD4(+) T cells from allergic patients with AEC-imprinted DCs also inhibited proliferation significantly and decreased production of both T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th2 cytokines upon rechallenge. The inhibitory effects of AECs' contact with DCs were absent when allergen extract-loaded DCs had been exposed only to AECs supernatants, but present after direct contact with AECs. We conclude that direct contact between DCs and AECs inhibits T cell recall responses towards birch, grass and house dust mite allergens in vitro, suggesting that AECs-DC contact in vivo constitute a key element in mucosal homeostasis in relation to allergic sensitisation.

  8. Receptor-Dependent Coronavirus Infection of Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Brian C.; Hemmila, Erin M.; Beauchemin, Nicole; Holmes, Kathryn V.

    2004-01-01

    In several mammalian species, including humans, coronavirus infection can modulate the host immune response. We show a potential role of dendritic cells (DC) in murine coronavirus-induced immune modulation and pathogenesis by demonstrating that the JAW SII DC line and primary DC from BALB/c mice and p/p mice with reduced expression of the murine coronavirus receptor, murine CEACAM1a, are susceptible to murine coronavirus infection by a receptor-dependent pathway. PMID:15113927

  9. Articulation and Clarification of the Dendritic Cell Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie; Twycross, Jamie

    2009-01-01

    The Dendritic Cell algorithm (DCA) is inspired by recent work in innate immunity. In this paper a formal description of the DCA is given. The DCA is described in detail, and its use as an anomaly detector is illustrated within the context of computer security. A port scan detection task is performed to substantiate the influence of signal selection on the behaviour of the algorithm. Experimental results provide a comparison of differing input signal mappings.

  10. Preliminary Study of Local Immunotherapy with Autologous Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells for Glioma Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Lin; Yonggao Mu; Zhongping Chen

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells are T-cells that display effective anti-tumor activity. In this study, we investigated the anti-tumor activity of CIK cells in vitro, and conducted a preliminary investigation using autologous CIK cells to treat glioma patients through local administration.METHODS The CIK cells were derived from peripheral blood monocytes (PBMCs) of the glioma patients. The anti-tumor activity of the CIK cells against human T98-G glioma cell was tested In vitro. In addition, the autologous CIK cells were locally administrated into the tumor cavity in the malignant glioma patients through an Ommaya reservoir which was pre-inserted during tumor resection. The 4×108 CIK cells in a 5 ml suspension were injected once a week 2 times per cycle. Five hundreds KU of IL-2 was injected every other day.RESULTS (I) With incubation, the CIK cells showed dual staining of CD3+CD56+ with a positive rate of 3.45% on day 10 and 55.2% on day 30. In vitro anti-tumor activity (againstT98-G cells) of the CIK cells reached the highest level after 18 days of incubation with different effector/target (E:T) ratios. (ii)Six patients received autologous CIK cell treatment (10 cycles).Two patients showed no recurrence and are still alive (24 and 10 months), while 4 cases had a recurrence 3 of which have died. The mean survival time from the first CIK cell treatment to the end of follow-up was 12.5 months. The main side-effects of the local CIK cell treatment was brain edema, which was controlled by mannitol in most of the cases. However for one patient injection of CIK cells and IL-2 had to be discontinued.CONCLUSION In vitro CIK cells are effective anti-glioma T-cells. Local therapy with CIK cells has potential anti-glioma efficacy and tolerable side-effects.

  11. Induction and identification of rabbit peripheral blood derived dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing; Yang, FuYuan; Chen, WenLi

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To study a method of the induction of dendritic cells (DCs) from rabbit peripheral blood. Methods: Peripheral blood cells were removed from rabbit, filtered through nylon mesh. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from the blood cells by Ficoll-Hypaque centrifugation (density of 1.077g/cm3).To obtain DCs, PBMC were cultured in RPMI1640 medium containing 10% fetal calf serum, 50U/mL penicillin and streptomycin, referred to subsequently as complete medium, at 37°C in 5% CO2 atmosphere for 4 hours. Nonadherent cells were aspirated, adherent cells were continued incubated in complete medium, supplemented with granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, 50ng/ml),and interleukin 4 (IL-4, 50ng/ml) for 9 days. Fluorescein labeled antibodies(anti-CD14, anti-HLA-DR, anti-CD86) were used to sign cells cultured for 3,6,9 days respectively, Then flow cytometry was performed. Results: Ratio of anti-HLA-DR and anti-CD86 labeled cells increased with induction time extension, in contrast with anti-CD14. Conclusion: Dendritic cells can be effectively induced by the method of this experiment, cell maturation status increased with induction time extension.

  12. Molecular signatures of maturing dendritic cells: implications for testing the quality of dendritic cell therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dendritic cells (DCs are often produced by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF and interleukin-4 (IL-4 stimulation of monocytes. To improve the effectiveness of DC adoptive immune cancer therapy, many different agents have been used to mature DCs. We analyzed the kinetics of DC maturation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS and interferon-γ (IFN-γ induction in order to characterize the usefulness of mature DCs (mDCs for immune therapy and to identify biomarkers for assessing the quality of mDCs. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were collected from 6 healthy subjects by apheresis, monocytes were isolated by elutriation, and immature DCs (iDCs were produced by 3 days of culture with GM-CSF and IL-4. The iDCs were sampled after 4, 8 and 24 hours in culture with LPS and IFN-γ and were then assessed by flow cytometry, ELISA, and global gene and microRNA (miRNA expression analysis. Results After 24 hours of LPS and IFN-γ stimulation, DC surface expression of CD80, CD83, CD86, and HLA Class II antigens were up-regulated. Th1 attractant genes such as CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11 and CCL5 were up-regulated during maturation but not Treg attractants such as CCL22 and CXCL12. The expression of classical mDC biomarker genes CD83, CCR7, CCL5, CCL8, SOD2, MT2A, OASL, GBP1 and HES4 were up-regulated throughout maturation while MTIB, MTIE, MTIG, MTIH, GADD45A and LAMP3 were only up-regulated late in maturation. The expression of miR-155 was up-regulated 8-fold in mDCs. Conclusion DCs, matured with LPS and IFN-γ, were characterized by increased levels of Th1 attractants as opposed to Treg attractants and may be particularly effective for adoptive immune cancer therapy.

  13. Molecular programming of steady-state dendritic cells: impact on autoimmunity and tumor immune surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Dylan J; Ohashi, Pamela S

    2013-05-01

    Dendritic cells are master regulators of immunity. Immature dendritic cells are essential for maintaining self-tolerance, while mature dendritic cells initiate a variety of specialized immune responses. Dendritic cell quiescence is often viewed as a default state that requires exogenous stimuli to induce maturation. However, recent studies have identified dendritic cell quiescence factors that actively program dendritic cells to an immature state. In the absence of these factors, dendritic cells spontaneously become immunogenic and can induce autoimmune responses. Herein we discuss two such factors, NF-κB1 and A20, that preserve dendritic cell immaturity through their regulation of NF-κB signaling. Loss of either of these factors increases dendritic cell immunogenicity, suggesting that they may be important targets for enhancing dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapies. Alternatively, defects in molecules critical for maintaining steady-state DCs may provide novel biomarkers that identify patients who have enhanced natural antitumor immunity or that correlate with better responses to various immunotherapies.

  14. Immature monocyte derived dendritic cells gene expression profile in response to Virus-Like Particles stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marincola Francesco M

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have recently developed a candidate HIV-1 vaccine model based on HIV-1 Pr55gag Virus-Like Particles (HIV-VLPs, produced in a baculovirus expression system and presenting a gp120 molecule from an Ugandan HIV-1 isolate of the clade A (HIV-VLPAs. The HIV-VLPAs induce in Balb/c mice systemic and mucosal neutralizing Antibodies as well as cytotoxic T lymphocytes, by intra-peritoneal as well as intra-nasal administration. Moreover, we have recently shown that the baculovirus-expressed HIV-VLPs induce maturation and activation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs which, in turn, produce Th1- and Th2-specific cytokines and stimulate in vitro a primary and secondary response in autologous CD4+ T cells. In the present manuscript, the effects of the baculovirus-expressed HIV-VLPAs on the genomic transcriptional profile of MDDCs obtained from normal healthy donors have been evaluated. The HIV-VLPA stimulation, compared to both PBS and LPS treatment, modulate the expression of genes involved in the morphological and functional changes characterizing the MDDCs activation and maturation. The results of gene profiling analysis here presented are highly informative on the global pattern of gene expression alteration underlying the activation of MDDCs by HIV-VLPAs at the early stages of the immune response and may be extremely helpful for the identification of exclusive activation markers.

  15. Autologous transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on diabetic patients with lower limb ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Debin; Jiang Youzhao; Liang Ziwen; Li Xiaoyan; Zhang Zhonghui; Chen Bing

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the efficacy and safety of autologous transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on diabetic patients with lower limb ischemia. Methods: Fifty Type 2 diabetic patients with lower limb ischemia were enrolled and randomized to either transplanted group or control group. Patients in both group received the same conventional treatment. Meanwhile, 20 ml bone marrow from each transplanted patient were collected, and the mesenchymal stem cells were separated by density gradient centrifugation and cultured in the medium with autologous serum. After three-weeks adherent culture in vitro, 7.32×108-5.61×109 mesenchymal stern cells were harvested and transplanted by multiple intramuscular and hypodermic injections into the impaired lower limbs. Results: At the end of 12-week follow-up, 5 patients were excluded from this study because of clinical worsening or failure of cell culture. Main ischemic symptoms, including rest pain and intermittent claudication, were improved significantly in transplanted patients. The ulcer healing rate of the transplanted group (15 of 18, 83.33%) was significantly higher than that of the control group (9 of 20, 45.00%, P=0.012).The mean of resting ankle-brachial index (ABI) in transplanted group significantly was increased from 0.61±0.09 to 0.74±0.11 (P<0.001). Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) demonstrated that there were more patients whose score of new vessels exceeded or equaled to 2 in the transplant patients (11 of 15) than in control patients (2 of 14, P=0.001). Lower limb amputation rate was significantly lower in transplanted group than in the control group (P=0.040). No adverse effects was observed in transplanted group. Conclusion: These results indicate that the autologous transplantation of bone marrow mesenehymal stem cells relieves critical lower limb ischemia and promotes ulcers healing in Type 2 diabetic patients.

  16. Autologous peripheral hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation in a patient with refractory pemphigus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the effectiveness of autologous peripheral hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation in the treatment of refractory pemphigus.A 35-year-old male patient presented with a 4-year history of recurrent bullae on his trunk and extremities.The diagnosis of pemphigus was made on the basis of the clinical,histologic and immunofluorescence findings.The patient had shown resistance to conventional therapy with glucocorticoid and immunosuppressive agents.Two months before admission,he complained of hip joint pain.X-ray and CT scan revealed aseptic necrosis of the femoral head.Stem-cell mobilization was achieved by treatment with cyclophosphamide,granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)and rituximab.Peripheral blood stem cells were collected via leukapheresis and cryopreserved for later use.Immunoablation was accomplished by using cyclophosphamide(200 mg/kg;divided into 50 mg/kg on days-5,-4,-3,and-2),antithymocyte globulin(ATG;10 mg/kg;divided into 2.5 mg/kg on days-6,-5,-4,and-3),and rituximab (1200 mg/d;divided into 600 mg/d on days 0 and 7).Autologous peripheral hematopoietic stem cell transplantation was followed by reconstitution of the immune system which was monitored by flow cytometry.The glucocorticoid was withdrawn immediately after transplantation.The pemphigus titer turned negative 6 weeks after transplantation and remained negative.The patient was in complete drug-free remission with no evidence of residual clinical or serological activity of pemphigus during 1 year of followup.The patient's response suggests that autologous peripheral hematopoietic stem cell transplantation may be a potential "cure" for refractory pemphigus.However,further studies are needed to evaluate the risk-benefit ratio of this approach in patients with pemphigus showing resistance to conventional therapy.

  17. Dynamic Range of Vertebrate Retina Ganglion Cells: Importance of Active Dendrites and Coupling by Electrical Synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Publio, Rodrigo; Ceballos, Cesar Celis; Roque, Antonio C.

    2012-01-01

    The vertebrate retina has a very high dynamic range. This is due to the concerted action of its diverse cell types. Ganglion cells, which are the output cells of the retina, have to preserve this high dynamic range to convey it to higher brain areas. Experimental evidence shows that the firing response of ganglion cells is strongly correlated with their total dendritic area and only weakly correlated with their dendritic branching complexity. On the other hand, theoretical studies with simple neuron models claim that active and large dendritic trees enhance the dynamic range of single neurons. Theoretical models also claim that electrical coupling between ganglion cells via gap junctions enhances their collective dynamic range. In this work we use morphologically reconstructed multi-compartmental ganglion cell models to perform two studies. In the first study we investigate the relationship between single ganglion cell dynamic range and number of dendritic branches/total dendritic area for both active and passive dendrites. Our results support the claim that large and active dendrites enhance the dynamic range of a single ganglion cell and show that total dendritic area has stronger correlation with dynamic range than with number of dendritic branches. In the second study we investigate the dynamic range of a square array of ganglion cells with passive or active dendritic trees coupled with each other via dendrodendritic gap junctions. Our results suggest that electrical coupling between active dendritic trees enhances the dynamic range of the ganglion cell array in comparison with both the uncoupled case and the coupled case with cells with passive dendrites. The results from our detailed computational modeling studies suggest that the key properties of the ganglion cells that endow them with a large dynamic range are large and active dendritic trees and electrical coupling via gap junctions. PMID:23144767

  18. Dynamic range of vertebrate retina ganglion cells: importance of active dendrites and coupling by electrical synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Publio, Rodrigo; Ceballos, Cesar Celis; Roque, Antonio C

    2012-01-01

    The vertebrate retina has a very high dynamic range. This is due to the concerted action of its diverse cell types. Ganglion cells, which are the output cells of the retina, have to preserve this high dynamic range to convey it to higher brain areas. Experimental evidence shows that the firing response of ganglion cells is strongly correlated with their total dendritic area and only weakly correlated with their dendritic branching complexity. On the other hand, theoretical studies with simple neuron models claim that active and large dendritic trees enhance the dynamic range of single neurons. Theoretical models also claim that electrical coupling between ganglion cells via gap junctions enhances their collective dynamic range. In this work we use morphologically reconstructed multi-compartmental ganglion cell models to perform two studies. In the first study we investigate the relationship between single ganglion cell dynamic range and number of dendritic branches/total dendritic area for both active and passive dendrites. Our results support the claim that large and active dendrites enhance the dynamic range of a single ganglion cell and show that total dendritic area has stronger correlation with dynamic range than with number of dendritic branches. In the second study we investigate the dynamic range of a square array of ganglion cells with passive or active dendritic trees coupled with each other via dendrodendritic gap junctions. Our results suggest that electrical coupling between active dendritic trees enhances the dynamic range of the ganglion cell array in comparison with both the uncoupled case and the coupled case with cells with passive dendrites. The results from our detailed computational modeling studies suggest that the key properties of the ganglion cells that endow them with a large dynamic range are large and active dendritic trees and electrical coupling via gap junctions.

  19. EBI2 augments Tfh cell fate by promoting interaction with IL-2-quenching dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianhua; Lu, Erick; Yi, Tangsheng; Cyster, Jason G

    2016-05-05

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are a subset of T cells carrying the CD4 antigen; they are important in supporting plasma cell and germinal centre responses. The initial induction of Tfh cell properties occurs within the first few days after activation by antigen recognition on dendritic cells, although how dendritic cells promote this cell-fate decision is not fully understood. Moreover, although Tfh cells are uniquely defined by expression of the follicle-homing receptor CXCR5 (refs 1, 2), the guidance receptor promoting the earlier localization of activated T cells at the interface of the B-cell follicle and T zone has been unclear. Here we show that the G-protein-coupled receptor EBI2 (GPR183) and its ligand 7α,25-dihydroxycholesterol mediate positioning of activated CD4 T cells at the interface of the follicle and T zone. In this location they interact with activated dendritic cells and are exposed to Tfh-cell-promoting inducible co-stimulator (ICOS) ligand. Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a cytokine that has multiple influences on T-cell fate, including negative regulation of Tfh cell differentiation. We demonstrate that activated dendritic cells in the outer T zone further augment Tfh cell differentiation by producing membrane and soluble forms of CD25, the IL-2 receptor α-chain, and quenching T-cell-derived IL-2. Mice lacking EBI2 in T cells or CD25 in dendritic cells have reduced Tfh cells and mount defective T-cell-dependent plasma cell and germinal centre responses. These findings demonstrate that distinct niches within the lymphoid organ T zone support distinct cell fate decisions, and they establish a function for dendritic-cell-derived CD25 in controlling IL-2 availability and T-cell differentiation.

  20. Lipid-laden dendritic cells fail to function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Philip C Calder

    2010-01-01

    @@ Dendritic cells(DCs)are professional antigen-acquiring,-processing and-presenting cells[1-4].As such,DCs form the key link between the innate and acquired immune responses playing a role in host defence and in immune tolerance[1-4].Accordingly,defects in the ability of DCs to function can lead to increased susceptibility to infection,loss of tolerance,autoimmunity and tumour growth[1-4].Sub-classes of DCs are defined and discriminated by the expression of different cell surface markers.

  1. Dendritic cell-development in steady-state and inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Schmid, Michael Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC), the major antigen-presenting cells, continuously need to be regenerated from bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). What intermediate progenitors exist on the way to DC generation and what external factors act on these in steady-state and during inflammation, has not been addressed in detail. Flt3L is a non-redundant cytokine in DC development and the generation of DCs was shown to proceed along both Flt3+ common lymphoid and common myeloid prog...

  2. Suppressing The Growth Of Dendrites In Secondary Li Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Evan D.; Perrone, David E.; Shen, David H.

    1996-01-01

    Proposed technique for suppressing growth of lithium dendrites in rechargeable lithium electrochemical power cells involves periodic interruption of steady charging current with short, high-current discharge pulses. Technique applicable to lithium cells of several different types, including Li/TiS(2), Li/NbSe(3), Li/CoO(2), Li/MoS(2), Li/Vo(x), and Li/MnO(2). Cells candidates for use in spacecraft, military, communications, automotive, and other applications in which high-energy-density rechargeable batteries needed.

  3. Targeting dendritic cells in vivo for cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina eCaminschi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies that recognise cell surface molecules have been used deliver antigenic cargo to dendritic cells (DC for induction of immune responses. The encouraging anti-tumour immunity elicited using this immunisation strategy suggests its suitability for clinical trials. This review discusses the complex network of DC, the functional specialisation of DC-subsets, the immunological outcomes of targeting different DC-subsets and their cell surface receptors, and the requirements for the induction of effective anti-tumour immunity. Finally, we review preclinical experiments and the progress towards targeting human DC in vivo.

  4. Influence of organophosphate poisoning on human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Marina; Koppe, Franziska; Stenger, Bernhard; Brochhausen, Christoph; Schmidt, Annette; Steinritz, Dirk; Thiermann, Horst; Kirkpatrick, Charles James; Pohl, Christine

    2013-12-05

    Organophosphourus compounds (OPC, including nerve agents and pesticides) exhibit acute toxicity by inhibition of acetylcholinesterase. Lung affections are frequent complications and a risk factor for death. In addition, epidemiological studies reported immunological alterations after OPC exposure. In our experiments we investigated the effects of organophosphourus pesticides dimethoate and chlorpyrifos on dendritic cells (DC) that are essential for the initial immune response, especially in the pulmonary system. DC, differentiated from the monocyte cell line THP-1 by using various cytokines (IL-4, GM-CSF, TNF-α, Ionomycin), were exposed to organophosphourus compounds at different concentrations for a 24h time period. DC were characterized by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence using typical dendritic cell markers (e.g., CD11c, CD209 and CD83). After OPC exposure we investigated cell death, the secretion profile of inflammatory mediators, changes of DC morphology, and the effect on protein kinase signalling pathways. Our results revealed a successful differentiation of THP-1 into DC. OPC exposure caused a significant concentration-dependent influence on DC: Dendrites of the DC were shortened and damaged, DC-specific cell surface markers (i.e., CD83and CD209) decreased dramatically after chlorpyrifos exposure. Interestingly, the effects caused by dimethoate were in general less pronounced. The organophosphourus compounds affected the release of inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1ß and IL-8. The anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was significantly down regulated. Protein kinases like the Akt family or ERK, which are essential for cell survival and proliferation, were inhibited by both OPC. These findings indicate that the tested organophosphourus compounds induced significant changes in cell morphology, inhibited anti-inflammatory cytokines and influenced important protein signalling pathways which are involved in regulation of apoptosis. Thus our results highlight

  5. Generation of Th17 cells in response to intranasal infection requires TGF-β1 from dendritic cells and IL-6 from CD301b+ dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linehan, Jonathan L; Dileepan, Thamotharampillai; Kashem, Sakeen W; Kaplan, Daniel H; Cleary, Patrick; Jenkins, Marc K

    2015-10-13

    Intranasal (i.n.) infections preferentially generate Th17 cells. We explored the basis for this anatomic preference by tracking polyclonal CD4(+) T cells specific for an MHC class II-bound peptide from the mucosal pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes. S. pyogenes MHC class II-bound peptide-specific CD4(+) T cells were first activated in the cervical lymph nodes following i.n. inoculation and then differentiated into Th17 cells. S. pyogenes-induced Th17 formation depended on TGF-β1 from dendritic cells and IL-6 from a CD301b(+) dendritic cell subset located in the cervical lymph nodes but not the spleen. Thus, the tendency of i.n. infection to induce Th17 cells is related to cytokine production by specialized dendritic cells that drain this site.

  6. Transplantation of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells for patients with lower limb ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Yong-quan; LI Xue-feng; YU Heng-xi; CUI Shi-jun; WANG Zhong-gao; ZHANG Jian; GUO Lian-rui; QI Li-xing; ZHANG Shu-wen; XU Juan; LI Jian-xin; LUO Tao; JI Bing-xin

    2008-01-01

    Background Many treatment options for lower limb ischemia are difficult to apply for the patients with poor arterial outflow or with poor general conditions.The effect of medical treatment alone is far from ideal.especially in patients with diabetic foot.A high level amputation is inevitable in these patients.This study aimed to explore the effect of transplantation of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells on the treatment of lower limb ischemia and to compare the effect of intra-artedal transplantation with that of intra-muscular transplantation.Methods In this clinical trial,32 patients with lower limb ischemia were divided into two groups.Group 1 (16 patients with 18 affected limbs) received transplantation of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells by intra-muscular injection into the affected limbs;and group 2(16 patients with 17 affected limbs)received transplantation of autologous bone marrow mononucJear cells by intra-arterial injection into the affected limbs.Rest pain,coldness,ankle/brachial index (ABI),claudication,transcutaneous oxygen pressure(tcPO2)and angiography(15 limbs of 14 patients)were evaluated before and after the mononuclear cell transplantation to determine the effect of the treatment.Results Two patients died from heart failure.The improvement of rest pain was seen in 76.5%(13/17)of group 1 and 93.3%(14/15)of group 2.The improvement of coldness was 100%in both groups.The increase of ABI was 44.4%(8/18)in group 1 and 41.2%(7,17)in group 2.The value of tcPO2 increased to 20 mmHg or more in 20 limbs.Nine of 15 limbs which underwent angiography showed rich collaterals.Limb salvage rate was 83.3%(15,18)in group 1 and 94.1%(16/17)in group 2.There was no statistically significant difference in the effectiveness of the treatment between the two groups.Conclusions Transplantation of autologous bone marrow mononucJear cells is a simple,safe and effective method for the treatment of lower limb ischemia,and the two approaches for the implantation

  7. Unique immunomodulatory effects of azelastine on dendritic cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, S; Kietzmann, M; Stark, H; Bäumer, W

    2014-11-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis and atopic dermatitis are among the most common inflammatory skin diseases in western countries, and antigen-presenting cells like dendritic cells (DC) are key players in their pathophysiology. Histamine, an important mediator of allergic reactions, influences DC maturation and cytokine secretion, which led us to investigate the immunomodulatory potential of the well-known histamine H1 receptor antagonists: azelastine, olopatadine, cetirizine, and pyrilamine. Unlike other H1 antihistamines, azelastine decreased lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin-12 secretion from murine bone marrow-derived DC. This effect was independent of histamine receptors H1, H2, or H4 and may be linked to inhibition of the nuclear factor kappa B pathway. Moreover, only azelastine reduced proliferation of allogenic T cells in a mixed leukocyte reaction. We then tested topical application of the H1 antihistamines on mice sensitized against toluene-2,4-diisocyanate, a model of Th2-mediated allergic contact dermatitis. In contrast to the in vitro results, all investigated substances were efficacious in reducing allergic ear swelling. Azelastine has unique effects on dendritic cells and T cell interaction in vitro. However, this did not translate into superior in vivo efficacy for Th2-mediated allergic dermatitis, possibly due to the effects of the antihistamines on other cell types involved in skin inflammation. Future research will have to clarify whether these properties are relevant to in vivo models of allergic inflammation with a different T cell polarization.

  8. Co-transplantation of macaque autologous Schwann cells and human embryonic nerve stem cells in treatment of macaque Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Xia; Chengchuan Jiang; Zuowei Cao; Keshan Shi; Yang Wang

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the therapeutic effects of co-transplantation with Schwann cells (SCs) and human embryonic nerve stem cells (NSCs) on macaque Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods:Macaque autologous SCs and human embryonic NSCs were adopted for the treatment of macaque PD. Results: Six months after transplantation, positron emission computerized tomography showed that 18F-FP-β-CIT was significantly concentrated in the injured striatum in the co-transplanted group. Immunohistochemical staining of transplanted area tissue showed migration of tyroxine hydroxylase positive cells from the transplant area to the surrounding area was significantly increased in the co-transplanted group. Conclusions: Co-transplantation of SCs and NSCs could effectively cure PD in macaques. SCs harvested from the autologous peripheral nerves can avoid rejection and the ethics problems, so it is expected to be applied clinically.

  9. Dendritic cell podosome dynamics does not depend on the F-actin regulator SWAP-70.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Götz

    Full Text Available In addition to classical adhesion structures like filopodia or focal adhesions, dendritic cells similar to macrophages and osteoclasts assemble highly dynamic F-actin structures called podosomes. They are involved in cellular processes such as extracellular matrix degradation, bone resorption by osteoclasts, and trans-cellular diapedesis of lymphocytes. Besides adhesion and migration, podosomes enable dendritic cells to degrade connective tissue by matrix metalloproteinases. SWAP-70 interacts with RhoGTPases and F-actin and regulates migration of dendritic cells. SWAP-70 deficient osteoclasts are impaired in F-actin-ring formation and bone resorption. In the present study, we demonstrate that SWAP-70 is not required for podosome formation and F-actin turnover in dendritic cells. Furthermore, we found that toll-like receptor 4 ligand induced podosome disassembly and podosome-mediated matrix degradation is not affected by SWAP-70 in dendritic cells. Thus, podosome formation and function in dendritic cells is independent of SWAP-70.

  10. Comparative assessment of lipid based nano-carrier systems for dendritic cell based targeting of tumor re-initiating cells in gynecological cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Arpit; Mishra, Dinesh K; Jain, Subodh K; Srivastava, Rupesh K; Lohiya, Nirmal K; Mishra, Pradyumna K

    2016-11-01

    We aimed to identify an optimum nano-carrier system to deliver tumor antigen to dendritic cells (DCs) for efficient targeting of tumor reinitiating cells (TRICs) in gynecological malignancies. Different lipid based nano-carrier systems i.e. liposomes, ethosomes and solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNPs) were examined for their ability to activate DCs in allogeneic settings. Out of these three, the most optimized formulation was subjected for cationic and mannosylated surface modification and pulsed with DCs for specific targeting of tumor cells. In both allogeneic and autologous trials, SLNPs showed a strong ability to activate DCs and orchestrate specific immune responses for targeting TRICs in gynecological malignancies. Our findings suggest that the mannosylated form of SLNPs is a suitable molecular vector for DC based therapeutics. DCs pulsed with mannosylated SLNPs may be utilized as adjuvant therapy for specific removal of TRICs to benefit patients from tumor recurrence.

  11. Neck Rhabdoid Tumors: Clinical Features and Consideration of Autologous Stem Cell Transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Adam D; Capitini, Christian M; Salamat, Shahriar M; DeSantes, Kenneth; Bradley, Kristin A; Kennedy, Tabassum; Dehner, Louis P; Patel, Neha J

    2017-04-03

    Extrarenal malignant rhabdoid tumors (MRT) have a poor prognosis despite aggressive therapy. Adding high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell rescue (HDC-ASCR) as consolidative therapy for MRT is controversial. We describe 2 patients, age 13 years and 19 months, with unresectable neck MRT. After chemotherapy and radiotherapy, both underwent HDC-ASCR and remain in remission over 4 years later. We reviewed all published cases of neck MRT, and found poorer outcomes and more variable age of presentation and time to progression than MRT at other sites. Neck MRT may represent a higher-risk subset of MRT, and addition of HDC-ASCR merits consideration.

  12. Tetanus toxoid and CCL3 improve dendritic cell vaccines in mice and glioblastoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Duane A; Batich, Kristen A; Gunn, Michael D; Huang, Min-Nung; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Nair, Smita K; Congdon, Kendra L; Reap, Elizabeth A; Archer, Gary E; Desjardins, Annick; Friedman, Allan H; Friedman, Henry S; Herndon, James E; Coan, April; McLendon, Roger E; Reardon, David A; Vredenburgh, James J; Bigner, Darell D; Sampson, John H

    2015-03-19

    After stimulation, dendritic cells (DCs) mature and migrate to draining lymph nodes to induce immune responses. As such, autologous DCs generated ex vivo have been pulsed with tumour antigens and injected back into patients as immunotherapy. While DC vaccines have shown limited promise in the treatment of patients with advanced cancers including glioblastoma, the factors dictating DC vaccine efficacy remain poorly understood. Here we show that pre-conditioning the vaccine site with a potent recall antigen such as tetanus/diphtheria (Td) toxoid can significantly improve the lymph node homing and efficacy of tumour-antigen-specific DCs. To assess the effect of vaccine site pre-conditioning in humans, we randomized patients with glioblastoma to pre-conditioning with either mature DCs or Td unilaterally before bilateral vaccination with DCs pulsed with Cytomegalovirus phosphoprotein 65 (pp65) RNA. We and other laboratories have shown that pp65 is expressed in more than 90% of glioblastoma specimens but not in surrounding normal brain, providing an unparalleled opportunity to subvert this viral protein as a tumour-specific target. Patients given Td had enhanced DC migration bilaterally and significantly improved survival. In mice, Td pre-conditioning also enhanced bilateral DC migration and suppressed tumour growth in a manner dependent on the chemokine CCL3. Our clinical studies and corroborating investigations in mice suggest that pre-conditioning with a potent recall antigen may represent a viable strategy to improve anti-tumour immunotherapy.

  13. Enhanced lentiviral transduction of monocyte-derived dendritic cells in the presence of conditioned medium from dying monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masurier, C; Boutin, S; Veron, P; Bernard, J; Danos, O; Davoust, J

    2007-02-01

    Lentiviral vectors (LVs) are attractive vehicles for the transduction of human dendritic cells (DCs) in order to mobilize their endogenous antigen presentation pathways. We analyzed here how to improve the efficiency of LV transduction, which we performed at the initial stages of the differentiation of purified monocytes into dendritic cells (Mo-DCs). Using LVs pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus envelope G glycoprotein (VSV-G), we found that a conditioned medium derived from dying monocytes (MCM) improved by 2- to 10- fold the proportion of transduced Mo-DCs. This enhanced transduction efficiency requires the presence of MCM during the initial stage of LV transduction and does not affect the phenotype and antigen presentation function of terminally differentiated Mo-DCs. Importantly, we found that MCM derived from a human acute monocytic leukemia cell line, THP-1, was equally effective. The MCM activity was heat stable (56 degrees C) and was present in the soluble fraction after high-speed centrifugation. Altogether our results show that a soluble factor present in dying monocyte cultures can replace advantageously facilitating agents such as Polybrene, to achieve high LV transductions levels. This protocol can be performed with autologous monocytes and is therefore applicable in clinical settings.

  14. Cross-Presentation in Mouse and Human Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Elodie; Amigorena, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Cross-presentation designates the presentation of exogenous antigens on major histocompatibility complex class I molecules and is essential for the initiation of cytotoxic immune responses. It is now well established that dendritic cells (DCs) are the best cross-presenting cells. In this chapter, we will discuss recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of cross-presentation. We will also describe the different DC subsets identified in mouse and human, and their functional specialization for cross-presentation. Finally, we will summarize the current knowledge of the role of cross-presentation in pathological situations.

  15. Methamphetamine Enhances HIV-1 Infectivity in Monocyte Derived Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The US is currently experiencing an epidemic of methamphetamine (Meth) use as a recreational drug. Recent studies also show a high prevalence of HIV-1 infection among Meth users. We report that Meth enhances HIV-1 infectivity of dendritic cells as measured by multinuclear activation of a galactosidase indicator (MAGI) cell assay, p24 assay, and LTR-RU5 amplification. Meth induces increased HIV-1 infection in association with an increase in the HIV-1 coreceptors, CXCR4 and CCR5, and infection ...

  16. Self-antigen presentation by dendritic cells in autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Katrin eHopp

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The operation of both central and peripheral tolerance ensures the prevention of autoimmune diseases. The maintenance of peripheral tolerance requires self-antigen presentation by professional antigen presenting cells (APCs. Dendritic cells (DCs are considered as major APCs involved in this process. The current review discusses the role of DCs in autoimmune diseases, the various factors involved in the induction and maintenance of tolerogenic DC phenotype and pinpoints their therapeutic capacity as well as potential novel targets for future clinical studies.

  17. Preliminary Observation on the Influence of Tumor Osseous Metastasis on Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Collection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoming Si; Wenchao Liu; Yan Xue; Hongmei Zhang; Rong Sheng; Ying Huang; Jie Cheng

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the influence of tumor osseous metastasis on the patients undergoing autologous peripheral blood stem cell collection. METHODS A total of 36 patients with malignant diseases who received an autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation, during a period from April 2004 to June 2006, were chosen. The patients were divided into two groups, I.e. Group A were patients with a complication of tumor osseous metastasis, and group B were without metastasis. Both groups were treated with Taxotere 120 mg/m2 plus granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) 5 ug/kg/d, for a mobilization regimen. A blood cell separator was used to collect the mononuclear cells. The proportion of harvested CD34+ cells in the peripheral blood and the collected mononuclear cells were detected by flow cytometry. The number of CD34+ cells was used to determine the difference in the nature of the collections between the two groups. RESULTS After mobilization in groups A and B, the number of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was 39.3 ±14.7% and 41.±12.4 % and the proportion of CD34 + cells was 0.16±0.07% and 0.17 ± 0.10%, respectively. Following administration of the drugs, there was no significant difference between the number of harvested PBMC and CD34+ cells of the two groups, I.e., 3.47 ± 1.16 x 108/Kg and 2.52 ± 1.43 × 106/Kg in group A and 4.02 ± 1.31 × 108/Kg and 2.73 ± 1.87 x 108/Kg in group B, respectively. CONCLUSION Osseous metastasis, as a single factor, may have no impact on mobilization and harvesting of hematopoietic stem cells and their engraftment after autotransplantation.

  18. SUBTYPE CHARACTERICS OF DENDRITIC CELLS FROM PERIPHERAL BLOOD OF PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Falaleeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Characteristics of myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells from peripheral blood were studied in healthy donors and patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. We evaluated relative amounts of dendritic cell by their subtypes, degree of their maturity, and ability to respond to the maturation factors (toll-like receptor 4, 7 and 8 agonists. The results of in vitro experiments have shown that the patients with rheumatoid arthritis exhibited a significant reduction in numbers of plasmacytoid dendritic cells from peripheral blood. A sufficient decrease in CD83, CD80 expression on dendritic cell subtypes in RA patients was significantly less, than in healthy donors. In patients with RA, a significant increase in the number of CCR7-expressing plasmacytoid dendritic cells was shown in peripheral blood. In stimulated cultures, maturation of dendritic cells expressing maturation markers (CD83, CD80, CCR7 proved to be increased up to normal values. It should be noted that the counts of plasmacytoid dendritic cells in peripheral blood of RA patients expressing CCR7 was significantly higher than among healthy donors. Meanwhile, expression of CD83 and CD80 increased tovalues of healthy donors.Hence, we have found a significant reduction in relative counts of blood-derived myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells expressing markers of mature dendritic cells (CD83, CD80 in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Upon stimulated in vitro maturation, the counts of myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells expressing CD83 and CD80 increased to the values corresponding to those of control group. RA patients showed significantly higher numbers of plasmacytoid dendritic cells expressing CCR7. This could indicate some changes in functional activity of dendritic cells in peripheral blood of patients with RA.

  19. The Analysis of Purkinje Cell Dendritic Morphology in Organotypic Slice Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Kapfhammer, Josef P.; Gugger, Olivia S.

    2012-01-01

    Purkinje cells are an attractive model system for studying dendritic development, because they have an impressive dendritic tree which is strictly oriented in the sagittal plane and develops mostly in the postnatal period in small rodents 3. Furthermore, several antibodies are available which selectively and intensively label Purkinje cells including all processes, with anti-Calbindin D28K being the most widely used. For viewing of dendrites in living cells, mice expressing EGFP selectively i...

  20. The serotonin receptor 5-HT₇R regulates the morphology and migratory properties of dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, Katrin; Guseva, Daria; Schindler, Susann; Sixt, Michael; Braun, Armin; Chopra, Himpriya; Pabst, Oliver; Ponimaskin, Evgeni

    2015-08-01

    Dendritic cells are potent antigen-presenting cells endowed with the unique ability to initiate adaptive immune responses upon inflammation. Inflammatory processes are often associated with an increased production of serotonin, which operates by activating specific receptors. However, the functional role of serotonin receptors in regulation of dendritic cell functions is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that expression of serotonin receptor 5-HT7 (5-HT7R) as well as its downstream effector Cdc42 is upregulated in dendritic cells upon maturation. Although dendritic cell maturation was independent of 5-HT7R, receptor stimulation affected dendritic cell morphology through Cdc42-mediated signaling. In addition, basal activity of 5-HT7R was required for the proper expression of the chemokine receptor CCR7, which is a key factor that controls dendritic cell migration. Consistent with this, we observed that 5-HT7R enhances chemotactic motility of dendritic cells in vitro by modulating their directionality and migration velocity. Accordingly, migration of dendritic cells in murine colon explants was abolished after pharmacological receptor inhibition. Our results indicate that there is a crucial role for 5-HT7R-Cdc42-mediated signaling in the regulation of dendritic cell morphology and motility, suggesting that 5-HT7R could be a new target for treatment of a variety of inflammatory and immune disorders.

  1. Dendritic Cell Cancer Vaccines: From the Bench to the Bedside

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    Tamar Katz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The recognition that the development of cancer is associated with acquired immunodeficiency, mostly against cancer cells themselves, and understanding pathways inducing this immunosuppression, has led to a tremendous development of new immunological approaches, both vaccines and drugs, which overcome this inhibition. Both “passive” (e.g. strategies relying on the administration of specific T cells and “active” vaccines (e.g. peptide-directed or whole-cell vaccines have become attractive immunological approaches, inducing cell death by targeting tumor-associated antigens. Whereas peptide-targeted vaccines are usually directed against a single antigen, whole-cell vaccines (e.g. dendritic cell vaccines are aimed to induce robust responsiveness by targeting several tumor-related antigens simultaneously. The combination of vaccines with new immuno-stimulating agents which target “immunosuppressive checkpoints” (anti-CTLA-4, PD-1, etc. is likely to improve and maintain immune response induced by vaccination.

  2. UPDATE ON THE ROLE OF AUTOLOGOUS HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION IN MULTIPLE MYELOMA

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    Patrizia Tosi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Autologous stem cell transplantation is considered the standard of care for multiple myeloma patients aged < 65 years with no relevant comorbidities. The addition of drugs acting both on bone marrow microenvironment and on neoplastic plasma cells has significantly increased the proportion of patients achieving a complete remission after induction therapy, and these results are mantained after high-dose melphalan, leading to a prolonged disease control. Studies are being carried out in order to evaluate whether short term consolidation or long-term maintenance therapy can result into disease eradication at the molecular level thus increasing also patients survival. The efficacy of these new drugs has raised the issue of deferring the transplant after achivng a second response upon relapse. Another controversial point is the optimal treatment strategy for high-risk patients, that do not benefit from autologous stem cell transplantation and for whom the efficacy of new drugs is still matter of debate.

  3. Comparison of the Fenwal Amicus and Fresenius Com.Tec cell separators for autologous peripheral blood progenitor cell collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altuntas, Fevzi; Kocyigit, Ismail; Ozturk, Ahmet; Kaynar, Leylagul; Sari, Ismail; Oztekin, Mehmet; Solmaz, Musa; Eser, Bulent; Cetin, Mustafa; Unal, Ali

    2007-04-01

    Peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC) are commonly used as a stem cell source for autologous transplantation. This study was undertaken to evaluate blood cell separators with respect to separation results and content of the harvest. Forty autologous PBPC collections in patients with hematological malignancies were performed with either the Amicus or the COM.TEC cell separators. The median product volume was lower with the Amicus compared to the COM.TEC (125 mL vs. 300 mL; p COM.TEC (3.0 x 10(6) vs. 4.1 x 10(6); p = 0.129). There was a statistically higher mean volume of ACD used in collections on the Amicus compared to the COM.TEC (1040 +/- 241 mL vs. 868 +/- 176 mL; p = 0.019). There was a statistical difference in platelet (PLT) contamination of the products between the Amicus and the COM.TEC (0.3 x 10(11) vs. 1.1 x 10(11); p COM.TEC compared to the Amicus instruments (18.5% vs. 9.5%; p = 0.028). In conclusion, both instruments collected PBPCs efficiently. However, Amicus has the advantage of lower PLT contamination in the product, and less decrease in PB platelet count with lower product volume in autologous setting.

  4. Gene expression profile correlates with T cell infiltration and relative survival in glioblastoma patients vaccinated with dendritic cell immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Robert M.; Soto, Horacio; Konkankit, Vera; Odesa, Sylvia K.; Eskin, Ascia; Yong, William H.; Nelson, Stanley F.; Liau, Linda M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To assess the feasibility, safety, and toxicity of autologous tumor lysate-pulsed dendritic cell (DC) vaccination and toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists in patients with newly diagnosed and recurrent glioblastoma. Clinical and immune responses were monitored and correlated with tumor gene expression profiles. Experimental Design Twenty-three patients with glioblastoma (WHO grade IV) were enrolled in this dose-escalation study and received three biweekly injections of glioma lysate-pulsed DCs followed by booster vaccinations with either imiquimod or poly-ICLC adjuvant every three months until tumor progression. Gene expression profiling, IHC, FACS, and cytokine bead arrays were performed on patient tumors and PBMC. Results DC vaccinations are safe and not associated with any dose-limiting toxicity. The median overall survival from the time of initial surgical diagnosis of glioblastoma was 31.4 months, with a one-, two-, and three-year survival rate of 91%, 55% and 47%, respectively. Patients whose tumors had mesenchymal gene expression signatures exhibited increased survival following DC vaccination compared to historical controls of the same genetic subtype. Tumor samples with a mesenchymal gene expression signature had a higher number of CD3+ and CD8+ tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) compared with glioblastomas of other gene expression signatures (p = 0.006). Conclusion Autologous tumor lysate-pulsed DC vaccination in conjunction with TLR agonists is safe as adjuvant therapy in newly diagnosed and recurrent glioblastoma patients. Our results suggest that the mesenchymal gene expression profile may identify an immunogenic subgroup of glioblastoma that may be more responsive to immune-based therapies. PMID:21135147

  5. Redefining the role of dendritic cells in periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Gomathinayagam; Uppoor, Ashita; Naik, Dilip G

    2013-11-01

    A properly functioning adaptive immune system signifies the best features of life. It is diverse beyond compare, tolerant without fail, and capable of behaving appropriately with a myriad of infections and other challenges. Dendritic cells (DCs) are required to explain how this remarkable system is energized and directed. DCs consist of a family of antigen presenting cells, which are bone-marrow-derived cells that patrol all tissues of the body with the possible exceptions of the brain and testes. DCs function to capture bacteria and other pathogens for processing and presentation to T cells in the secondary lymphoid organs. They serve as an essential link between innate and adaptive immune systems and induce both primary and secondary immune responses. As a result of progress worldwide, there is now evidence of a central role for dendritic cells in initiating antigen-specific immunity and tolerance. This review addresses the origins and migration of DCs to target sites, their basic biology and plasticity in playing a key role in periodontal diseases, and finally, selected strategies being pursued to harness its ability to prevent periodontal diseases.

  6. Allergen recognition by innate immune cells: critical role of dendritic and epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian eSalazar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Allergy is an exacerbated response of the immune system against non-self-proteins called allergens and is typically characterized by biased type-2 T helper cell and deleterious IgE mediated immune responses. The allergic cascade starts with the recognition of allergens by antigen presenting cells, mainly dendritic cells, culminating in mast cell sensitization and triggering. Dendritic cells have been demonstrated to play a crucial role in orchestrating allergic diseases. Using different C-type lectin receptors dendritic cells are able to recognize and internalize a number of allergens from diverse sources leading to sensitization. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence highlighting the role of epithelial cells in triggering and modulating immune responses to allergens. As well as providing a physical barrier, epithelial cells can interact with allergens and influence dendritic cells behaviour through the release of a number of Th2 promoting cytokines. In this review we will summarise current understanding of how allergens are recognised by dendritic cells and epithelial cells and what are the consequences of such interaction in the context of allergic sensitisation and downstream events leading to allergic inflammation. Better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of allergen recognition and associated signalling pathways could enable developing more effective therapeutic strategies that target the initial steps of allergic sensitisation hence hindering development or progression of allergic diseases.

  7. Regulatory T cells, dendritic cells and neutrophils in patients with renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minárik, Ivo; Lašťovička, Jan; Budinský, Vít; Kayserová, Jana; Spíšek, Radek; Jarolím, Ladislav; Fialová, Anna; Babjuk, Marek; Bartůňková, Jiřina

    2013-05-01

    We evaluated dendritic cells (DC), regulatory T lymphocytes (Treg) and neutrophils in 37 patients with newly diagnosed renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in the tumor and peripheral blood (PB) and correlated these parameters with tumor staging (early-T1, 2, late-T3, 4 and metastatic disease). The number of myeloid and plasmacytoid DC in blood of RCC patients was higher than in healthy controls. The percentage of myeloid dendritic cells (mDC) from CD45+ cells in tumors was higher in comparison with peripheral blood irrespective of disease stage. Higher percentage of these cells expressed a maturation marker in the periphery in the early stage (CD83 expressing cells). The number of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) in PB was similar in both early and late stage groups, but the early group displayed a significantly higher percentage of pDC in tumor cell suspension. Neutrophil counts in the peripheral blood of RCC patients were higher than in healthy controls, but the counts in both tumor stage groups were similar. The proportion of neutrophils from CD45+ cells was higher in late stage tumors. Higher percentage of Treg from CD4+ cells was detected in renal carcinoma tissue in comparison to PB with no difference between stages of the disease. Our results reflect the complex interplay between various cells of the immune system and the tumor microenvironment. Activation of dendritic cell subpopulations at early stages of the disease course is counterbalanced by the early appearance of T regulatory cells both in the periphery and tumor tissue. Later stages are characterized by the accumulation of neutrophils in the tumor. Appropriate timing of anticancer strategies, especially immunotherapy, should take these dynamics of the immune response in RCC patients into account.

  8. Functional changes of dendritic cells in hypersensivity reactions to amoxicillin

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    C.M.F. Lima

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A better understanding of dendritic cell (DC involvement in responses to haptenic drugs is needed, because it represents a possible approach to the development of an in vitro test, which could identify patients prone to drug allergies. There are two main DC subsets: plasmacytoid DC (pDC and myeloid DC (mDC. β-lactams form hapten-carrier conjugates and may provide a suitable model to study DC behavior in drug allergy reactions. It has been demonstrated that drugs interact differently with DC in drug allergic and non-allergic patients, but there are no studies regarding these subsets. Our aim was to assess the functional changes of mDC and pDC harvested from an amoxicillin-hypersensitive 32-year-old woman who experienced a severe maculopapular exanthema as reflected in interleukin-6 (IL-6 production after stimulation with this drug and penicillin. We also aim to demonstrate, for the first time, the feasibility of this method for dendritic cell isolation followed by in vitro stimulation for studies of drug allergy physiopathology. DC were harvested using a double Percoll density gradient, which generates a basophil-depleted cell (BDC suspension. Further, pDC were isolated by blood DC antigen 4-positive magnetic selection and gravity filtration through magnetized columns. After stimulation with amoxicillin, penicillin and positive and negative controls, IL-6 production was measured by ELISA. A positive dose-response curve for IL-6 after stimulation with amoxicillin and penicillin was observed for pDC, but not for mDC or BDC suspension. These preliminary results demonstrate the feasibility of this methodology to expand the knowledge of the effect of dendritic cell activation by drug allergens.

  9. Investigating evolutionary conservation of dendritic cell subset identity and functions

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    Thien-Phong eVu Manh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC were initially defined as mononuclear phagocytes with a dendritic morphology and an exquisite efficiency for naïve T cell activation. DC encompass several subsets initially identified by their expression of specific cell surface molecules and later shown to excel in distinct functions and to develop under the instruction of different transcription factors or cytokines. Very few cell surface molecules are expressed in a specific manner on any immune cell type. Hence, to identify cell types, the sole use of a small number of cell surface markers in classical flow cytometry can be deceiving. Moreover, the markers currently used to define mononuclear phagocyte subsets vary depending on the tissue and animal species studied and even between laboratories. This has led to confusion in the definition of DC subset identity and in their attribution of specific functions. There is a strong need to identify a rigorous and consensus way to define mononuclear phagocyte subsets, with precise guidelines potentially applicable throughout tissues and species. We will discuss the advantages, drawbacks and complementarities of different methodologies: cell surface phenotyping, ontogeny, functional characterization and molecular profiling. We will advocate that gene expression profiling is a very rigorous, largely unbiased and accessible method to define the identity of mononuclear phagocyte subsets, which strengthens and refines surface phenotyping. It is uniquely powerful to yield new, experimentally testable, hypotheses on the ontogeny or functions of mononuclear phagocyte subsets, their molecular regulation and their evolutionary conservation. We propose defining cell populations based on a combination of cell surface phenotyping, expression analysis of hallmark genes and robust functional assays, in order to reach a consensus and integrate faster the huge but scattered knowledge accumulated by different laboratories on different cell types

  10. GM-CSF Controls Nonlymphoid Tissue Dendritic Cell Homeostasis but Is Dispensable for the Differentiation of Inflammatory Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Greter, Melanie; Helft, Julie; Chow, Andrew; Hashimoto, Daigo; Mortha, Arthur; Agudo-Cantero, Judith; Bogunovic, Milena; Gautier, Emmanuel L.; Miller, Jennifer; Leboeuf, Marylene; Lu, Geming; Aloman, Costica; Brown, Brian D.; Pollard, Jeffrey W.; Xiong, Huabao

    2012-01-01

    GM-CSF (Csf-2) is a critical cytokine for the in vitro generation of dendritic cells (DCs) and is thought to control the development of inflammatory DCs and resident CD103(+) DCs in some tissues. Here we showed that in contrast to the current understanding, Csf-2 receptor acts in the steady state to promote the survival and homeostasis of nonlymphoid tissue-resident CD103(+) and CD11b(+) DCs. Absence of Csf-2 receptor on lung DCs abrogated the induction of CD8(+) T cell immunity after immuniz...

  11. Polyelectrolyte coating of ferumoxytol nanoparticles for labeling of dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celikkin, Nehar; Jakubcová, Lucie; Zenke, Martin; Hoss, Mareike; Wong, John Erik; Hieronymus, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Engineered magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are emerging to be used as cell tracers, drug delivery vehicles, and contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for enhanced theragnostic applications in biomedicine. In vitro labeling of target cell populations with MNPs and their implantation into animal models and patients shows promising outcomes in monitoring successful cell engraftment, differentiation and migration by using MRI. Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells that initiate adaptive immune responses. Thus, DCs have been the focus of cellular immunotherapy and are increasingly applied in clinical trials. Here, we addressed the coating of different polyelectrolytes (PE) around ferumoxytol particles using the layer-by-layer technique. The impact of PE-coated ferumoxytol particles for labeling of DCs and Flt3+ DC progenitors was then investigated. The results from our studies revealed that PE-coated ferumoxytol particles can be readily employed for labeling of DC and DC progenitors and thus are potentially suitable as contrast agents for MRI tracking.

  12. Radiation tolerance of boron doped dendritic web silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohatgi, A.

    1980-01-01

    The potential of dendritic web silicon for giving radiation hard solar cells is compared with the float zone silicon material. Solar cells with n(+)-p-P(+) structure and approximately 15% (AMl) efficiency were subjected to 1 MeV electron irradiation. Radiation tolerance of web cell efficiency was found to be at least as good as that of the float zone silicon cell. A study of the annealing behavior of radiation-induced defects via deep level transient spectroscopy revealed that E sub v + 0.31 eV defect, attributed to boron-oxygen-vacancy complex, is responsible for the reverse annealing of the irradiated cells in the temperature range of 150 to 350 C.

  13. Immune modulation by dendritic-cell-based cancer vaccines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CHAITANYA KUMAR; SAKSHI KOHLI; POONAMALLE PARTHASARATHY BAPSY; ASHOK KUMAR VAID; MINISH JAIN; VENKATA SATHYA SURESH ATTILI; BANDANA SHARAN

    2017-03-01

    The interplay between host immunity and tumour cells has opened the possibility of targeting tumour cells bymodulation of the human immune system. Cancer immunotherapy involves the treatment of a tumour by utilizing therecombinant human immune system components to target the pro-tumour microenvironment or by revitalizing theimmune system with the ability to kill tumour cells by priming the immune cells with tumour antigens. In this review,current immunotherapy approaches to cancer with special focus on dendritic cell (DC)-based cancer vaccines arediscussed. Some of the DC-based vaccines under clinical trials for various cancer types are highlighted. Establishingtumour immunity involves a plethora of immune components and pathways; hence, combining chemotherapy,radiation therapy and various arms of immunotherapy, after analysing the benefits of individual therapeutic agents,might be beneficial to the patient.

  14. Autologous bone marrow stem cell intralesional transplantation repairing bisphosphonate related osteonecrosis of the jaw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cella Luigi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Bisphosphonate - related osteonecrosis of the JAW (BRONJ is a well known side effect of bisphosphonate therapies in oncologic and non oncologic patients. Since to date no definitive consensus has been reached on the treatment of BRONJ, novel strategies for the prevention, risk reduction and treatment need to be developed. We report a 75 year old woman with stage 3 BRONJ secondary to alendronate and pamidronate treatment of osteoporosis. The patient was unresponsive to recommended treatment of the disease, and her BRONJ was worsening. Since bone marrow stem cells are know as being multipotent and exhibit the potential for differentiation into different cells/tissue lineages, including cartilage, bone and other tissue, we performed autologous bone marrow stem cell transplantation into the BRONJ lesion of the patient. Methods Under local anesthesia a volume of 75 ml of bone marrow were harvested from the posterior superior iliac crest by aspiration into heparinized siringes. The cell suspension was concentrated, using Ficoll - Hypaque® centrifugation procedures, in a final volume of 6 ml. Before the injection of stem cells into the osteonecrosis, the patient underwent surgical toilet, local anesthesia was done and spongostan was applied as a carrier of stem cells suspension in the bone cavity, then 4 ml of stem cells suspension and 1 ml of patient's activated platelet-rich plasma were injected in the lesion of BRONJ. Results A week later the residual spongostan was removed and two weeks later resolution of symptoms was obtained. Then the lesion improved with progressive superficialization of the mucosal layer and CT scan, performed 15 months later, shows improvement also of bone via concentric ossification: so complete healing of BRONJ (stage 0 was obtained in our patient, and 30 months later the patient is well and without signs of BRONJ. Conclusion To our knowledge this is the first case of BRONJ successfully treated with

  15. High dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplantation in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

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    Popp, Henning

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: High-dose chemotherapy (HDT with autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT plays an important role in the treatment of aggressive non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL. We report on a retrospective analysis of all patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma who were consecutively treated with HDT followed by ASCT at the University Hospital of Bonn, Germany, between 1996 and 2004. Methods: A total of 25 patients were transplanted for biopsy-proven diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL. Eight patients received up-front HDT as first-line therapy, four patients received HDT due to incomplete response to conventional induction chemotherapy, and six patients were treated for primary refractory disease. Seven patients had recurrent lymphoma. Results: A complete remission (CR was achieved in 14 of 25 patients (56%. Estimated 3-year survival for patients treated with upfront HDT, chemosensitive patients with incomplete response to first line therapy, and patients with chemosensitive relapsed disease was 87.5%, 50.0% and 60.0%, respectively. In contrast, no patient with primary refractory disease or relapsed disease lacking chemosensitivity lived longer than 8 months. Chemosensitivity was the only significant prognostic factor for overall survival (OS in multivariate analysis. Conclusions: Our results confirm that HDT and ASCT is a highly effective therapy in patients with DLBCL leading to long-term survival in a substantial proportion of patients. Patients treated upfront for high-risk disease, incomplete response to conventional first-line therapy, or for chemosensitive relapse have a good prognosis. In contrast, patients with primary chemorefractory disease and patients with relapsed disease lacking chemosensitivity do not benefit from HDT with ASCT.

  16. Influence of lipid rafts on CD1d presentation by dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Wei; Martaresche, Cecile; Escande-Beillard, Nathalie;

    2011-01-01

    Our main objective was to analyze the role of lipid rafts in the activation of Valpha-14(-) and Valpha-14(+) T hybridomas by dendritic cells. We showed that activation of Valpha-14(+) hybridomas by dendritic cells or other CD1d-expressing cells was altered by disruption of lipid rafts...

  17. Dendritic Cell Regulation by Cannabinoid-Based Drugs

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    Mattias Svensson

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoid pharmacology has made important advances in recent years after the cannabinoid system was discovered. Studies in experimental models and in humans have produced promising results using cannabinoid-based drugs for the treatment of obesity and cancer, as well as neuroinflammatory and chronic inflammatory diseases. Moreover, as we discuss here, additional studies also indicates that these drugs have immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory properties including modulation of immune cell function. Thus, manipulation of the endocannabinoid system in vivo may provide novel therapeutic strategies against inflammatory disorders. At least two types of cannabinoid receptors, cannabinoid 1 and cannabinoid 2 receptors are expressed on immune cells such as dendritic cells (DC. Dendritic cells are recognized for their critical role in initiating and maintaining immune responses. Therefore, DC are potential targets for cannabinoid-mediated modulation. Here, we review the effects of cannabinoids on DC and provide some perspective concerning the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids for the treatment of human diseases involving aberrant inflammatory processes.

  18. Peripheral blood CD34+ cell count as a predictor of adequacy of hematopoietic stem cell collection for autologous transplantation

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    Combariza, Juan F.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In order to carry out an autologous transplantation, hematopoietic stem cells should be mobilized to peripheral blood and later collected by apheresis. The CD34+ cell count is a tool to establish the optimal time to begin the apheresis procedure. Objective: To evaluate the association between peripheral blood CD34+ cell count and the successful collection of hematopoietic stem cells. Materials and methods: A predictive test evaluation study was carried out to establish the usefulness of peripheral blood CD34+ cell count as a predictor of successful stem cell collection in patients that will receive an autologous transplantation. Results: 77 patients were included (median age: 49 years; range: 5-66. The predominant baseline diagnosis was lymphoma (53.2 %. The percentage of patients with successful harvest of hematopoietic stem cells was proportional to the number of CD34+cells in peripheral blood at the end of the mobilization procedure. We propose that more than 15 CD34+cells/μL must be present in order to achieve an adequate collection of hematopoietic stem cells. Conclusion: Peripheral blood CD34+ cell count is a useful tool to predict the successful collection of hematopoietic stem cells.

  19. Cord blood mesenchymal stem cells propel human dendritic cells to an intermediate maturation state and boost interleukin-12 production by mature dendritic cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berk, L.C.J. van den; Roelofs, H.; Huijs, T.; Siebers-Vermeulen, K.G.C.; Raymakers, R.A.P.; Kogler, G.; Figdor, C.G.; Torensma, R.

    2009-01-01

    Pathogen-derived entities force the tissue-resident dendritic cells (DCs) towards a mature state, followed by migration to the draining lymph node to present antigens to T cells. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) modulate the differentiation, maturation and function of DCs. In umbilical cord

  20. GABAergic interneurons targeting dendrites of pyramidal cells in the CA1 area of the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klausberger, Thomas

    2009-09-01

    The dendrites of pyramidal cells are active compartments capable of independent computations, input/output transformation and synaptic plasticity. Pyramidal cells in the CA1 area of the hippocampus receive 92% of their GABAergic input onto dendrites. How does this GABAergic input participate in dendritic computations of pyramidal cells? One key to understanding their contribution to dendritic computation lies in the timing of GABAergic input in relation to excitatory transmission, back-propagating action potentials, Ca(2+) spikes and subthreshold membrane dynamics. The issue is further complicated by the fact that dendritic GABAergic inputs originate from numerous distinct sources operating with different molecular machineries and innervating different subcellular domains of pyramidal cell dendrites. The GABAergic input from distinct sources is likely to contribute differentially to dendritic computations. In this review, I describe four groups of GABAergic interneuron according to their expression of parvalbumin, cholecystokinin, axonal arborization density and long-range projections. These four interneuron groups contain at least 12 distinct cell types, which innervate mainly or exclusively the dendrites of CA1 pyramidal cells. Furthermore, I summarize the different spike timing of distinct interneuron types during gamma, theta and ripple oscillations in vivo, and I discuss some of the open questions on how GABAergic input modulates dendritic operations in CA1 pyramidal cells.

  1. Toll-like receptor activation enhances cell-mediated immunity induced by an antibody vaccine targeting human dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berger Marc A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Previously, we have successfully targeted the mannose receptor (MR expressed on monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs using a fully human MR-specific antibody, B11, as a vehicle to deliver whole protein tumor antigens such as the human chorionic gonadotropin hormone (hCGβ. Since MRs play a role in bridging innate immunity with adaptive immunity we have explored several toll-like receptor (TLR-specific ligands that may synergize with MR targeting and be applicable as adjuvants in the clinic. We demonstrate that antigen-specific helper and cytolytic T cells from both healthy donors and cancer patients were effectively primed with B11-hCGβ-treated autologous DCs when a combination of one or several TLR ligands is used. Specifically, concomitant signaling of DCs via TLR3 with dsRNA (poly I:C and DC TLR 7/8 with Resiquimod (R-848, respectively, elicited efficient antigen presentation-mediated by MR-targeting. We demonstrate that MR and TLRs contribute towards maturation and activation of DCs by a mechanism that may be driven by a combination of adjuvant and antibody vaccines that specifically deliver antigenic targets to DCs.

  2. Multicenter phase II study of matured dendritic cells pulsed with melanoma cell line lysates in patients with advanced melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernandez Jackie

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several single center studies have provided evidence of immune activation and antitumor activity of therapeutic vaccination with dendritic cells (DC in patients with metastatic melanoma. The efficacy of this approach in patients with favorable prognosis metastatic melanoma limited to the skin, subcutaneous tissues and lung (stages IIIc, M1a, M1b was tested in a multicenter two stage phase 2 study with centralized DC manufacturing. Methods The vaccine (IDD-3 consisted 8 doses of autologous monocyte-derived matured DC generated in serum-free medium with granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF and interleukin-13 (IL-13, pulsed with lysates of three allogeneic melanoma cell lines, and matured with interferon gamma. The primary endpoint was antitumor activity. Results Among 33 patients who received IDD-3 there was one complete response (CR, two partial responses (PR, and six patients had stable disease (SD lasting more than eight weeks. The overall prospectively defined tumor growth control rate was 27% (90% confidence interval of 13-46%. IDD-3 administration had minimal toxicity and it resulted in a high frequency of immune activation to immunizing melanoma antigens as assessed by in vitro immune monitoring assays. Conclusions The administration of matured DC loaded with tumor lysates has significant immunogenicity and antitumor activity in patients with limited metastatic melanoma. Clinical trial registration NCT00107159.

  3. Exosomes from B cells and Dendritic cells: mechanisms of formation, secretion and targeting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buschow, S.I.

    2006-01-01

    Many cell types, including dendritic cells (DC) and B cells, secrete small vesicles called exosomes. Exosomes from immune cells are thought to have immuno-regulatory functions but their precise role remains unresolved. The aim of the studies presented in this thesis was to get more insight into the

  4. Manufacturing models permitting roll out/scale out of clinically led autologous cell therapies: regulatory and scientific challenges for comparability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourd, Paul; Ginty, Patrick; Chandra, Amit; Williams, David J

    2014-08-01

    Manufacturing of more-than-minimally manipulated autologous cell therapies presents a number of unique challenges driven by complex supply logistics and the need to scale out production to multiple manufacturing sites or near the patient within hospital settings. The existing regulatory structure in Europe and the United States imposes a requirement to establish and maintain comparability between sites. Under a single market authorization, this is likely to become an unsurmountable burden beyond two or three sites. Unless alternative manufacturing approaches can be found to bridge the regulatory challenge of comparability, realizing a sustainable and investable business model for affordable autologous cell therapy supply is likely to be extremely demanding. Without a proactive approach by the regulators to close this "translational gap," these products may not progress down the development pipeline, threatening patient accessibility to an increasing number of clinician-led autologous cellular therapies that are already demonstrating patient benefits. We propose three prospective manufacturing models for the scale out/roll out of more-than-minimally manipulated clinically led autologous cell therapy products and test their prospects for addressing the challenge of product comparability with a selected expert reference panel of US and UK thought leaders. This paper presents the perspectives and insights of the panel and identifies where operational, technological and scientific improvements should be prioritized. The main purpose of this report is to solicit feedback and seek input from key stakeholders active in the field of autologous cell therapy in establishing a consensus-based manufacturing approach that may permit the roll out of clinically led autologous cell therapies.

  5. Autologous Stem Cells Transplantation in Egyptian Patients with Liver Cirrhosis on Top of Hepatitis C Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Tayeb, Hoda; El Dorry, Ahmed; Amer, Nehad; Mowafy, Nadia; Zimaity, Maha; Bayoumy, Essam; Saleh, Shereen A.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Use of pluripotent stem cells is an ideal solution for liver insufficiencies. This work aims is to evaluate the safety and feasibility of autologous stem cells transplantation (SCT) in Egyptian patients of liver cirrhosis on top of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Subjects and Results 20 patients with HCV induced liver cirrhosis were divided into 2 groups. Group I: included 10 patients with liver cirrhosis Child score ≥9, for whom autologous stem cell transplantation was done using granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) for stem cells mobilization. Separation and collection of the peripheral blood stem cells was done by leukapheresis. G-CSF mobilized peripheral blood mononuclear cells (G-CSF PB-MNCs) were counted by flow cytometry. Stem cell injection into the hepatic artery was done. Group II: included 10 patients with HCV induced liver cirrhosis as a control group. Follow up and comparison between both groups were done over a follow up period of 6 months. The procedure was well tolerated. Mobilization was successful and the total number of G-CSF PB-MNCs in the harvests ranged from 25×106 to 191×106. There was improvement in the quality of life, serum albumin, total bilirubin, liver enzymes and the Child-Pugh score of group I over the first two-three months after the procedure. Conclusion SCT in HCV induced liver cirrhosis is a safe procedure. It can improve the quality of life and hepatic functions transiently with no effect on the life expectancy or the fate of the liver cirrhosis. PMID:26634069

  6. Functional identification of dendritic cells in the teleost model, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Bassity

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are specialized antigen presenting cells that bridge innate and adaptive immunity in mammals. This link between the ancient innate immune system and the more evolutionarily recent adaptive immune system is of particular interest in fish, the oldest vertebrates to have both innate and adaptive immunity. It is unknown whether dendritic cells co-evolved with the adaptive response, or if the connection between innate and adaptive immunity relied on a fundamentally different cell type early in evolution. We approached this question using the teleost model organism, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, with the aim of identifying dendritic cells based on their ability to stimulate naïve T cells. Adapting mammalian protocols for the generation of dendritic cells, we established a method of culturing highly motile, non-adherent cells from trout hematopoietic tissue that had irregular membrane processes and expressed surface MHCII. When side-by-side mixed leukocyte reactions were performed, these cells stimulated greater proliferation than B cells or macrophages, demonstrating their specialized ability to present antigen and therefore their functional homology to mammalian dendritic cells. Trout dendritic cells were then further analyzed to determine if they exhibited other features of mammalian dendritic cells. Trout dendritic cells were found to have many of the hallmarks of mammalian DCs including tree-like morphology, the expression of dendritic cell markers, the ability to phagocytose small particles, activation by toll-like receptor-ligands, and the ability to migrate in vivo. As in mammals, trout dendritic cells could be isolated directly from the spleen, or larger numbers could be derived from hematopoietic tissue and peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro.

  7. Functional identification of dendritic cells in the teleost model, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassity, Elizabeth; Clark, Theodore G

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells are specialized antigen presenting cells that bridge innate and adaptive immunity in mammals. This link between the ancient innate immune system and the more evolutionarily recent adaptive immune system is of particular interest in fish, the oldest vertebrates to have both innate and adaptive immunity. It is unknown whether dendritic cells co-evolved with the adaptive response, or if the connection between innate and adaptive immunity relied on a fundamentally different cell type early in evolution. We approached this question using the teleost model organism, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), with the aim of identifying dendritic cells based on their ability to stimulate naïve T cells. Adapting mammalian protocols for the generation of dendritic cells, we established a method of culturing highly motile, non-adherent cells from trout hematopoietic tissue that had irregular membrane processes and expressed surface MHCII. When side-by-side mixed leukocyte reactions were performed, these cells stimulated greater proliferation than B cells or macrophages, demonstrating their specialized ability to present antigen and therefore their functional homology to mammalian dendritic cells. Trout dendritic cells were then further analyzed to determine if they exhibited other features of mammalian dendritic cells. Trout dendritic cells were found to have many of the hallmarks of mammalian DCs including tree-like morphology, the expression of dendritic cell markers, the ability to phagocytose small particles, activation by toll-like receptor-ligands, and the ability to migrate in vivo. As in mammals, trout dendritic cells could be isolated directly from the spleen, or larger numbers could be derived from hematopoietic tissue and peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro.

  8. The known unknowns of the human dendritic cell network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mélanie eDurand

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC initiate and orient immune responses and comprise several subsets that display distinct phenotypes and properties. Most of our knowledge of DC subsets biology is based on mouse studies. In the past few years, the alignment of the human DC network with the mouse DC network has been the focus of much attention. Although comparative phenotypic and transcriptomic analysis have shown a high level of homology between mouse and human DC subsets, significant differences in phenotype and function have also been evidenced. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of the human DC network and discuss some remaining gaps and future challenges of the human DC field.

  9. Dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Saito, Keisuke; Takami, Shinichiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Although systemic therapy is the standard care for patients with recurrent or metastatic CRC, the prognosis is extremely poor. The optimal sequence of therapy remains unknown. Therefore, alternative strategies, such as immunotherapy, are needed for patients with advanced CRC. This review summarizes evidence from dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy strategies that are currently in clinical trials. In addition, we discuss the possibility of antitumor immune responses through immunoinhibitory PD-1/PD-L1 pathway blockade in CRC patients.

  10. First Genomic Analysis of Dendritic Cells from Lung and Draining Lymph Nodes in Murine Asthma

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    Thomas Tschernig

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is the consequence of allergic inflammation in the lung compartments and lung-draining lymph nodes. Dendritic cells initiate and promote T cell response and drive it to immunity or allergy. However, their modes of action during asthma are poorly understood. In this study, an allergic inflammation with ovalbumin was induced in 38 mice versus 42 control animals. After ovalbumin aerosol challenge, conventional dendritic cells (CD11c/MHCII/CD8 were isolated from the lungs and the draining lymph nodes by means of magnetic cell sorting followed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. A comparative transcriptional analysis was performed using gene arrays. In general, many transcripts are up- and downregulated in the CD8− dendritic cells of the allergic inflamed lung tissue, whereas few genes are regulated in CD8+ dendritic cells. The dendritic cells of the lymph nodes also showed minor transcriptional changes. The data support the relevance of the CD8− conventional dendritic cells but do not exclude distinct functions of the small population of CD8+ dendritic cells, such as cross presentation of external antigen. So far, this is the first approach performing gene arrays in dendritic cells obtained from lung tissue and lung-draining lymph nodes of asthmatic-like mice.

  11. HIV-1 Nef enhances dendritic cell-mediated viral transmission to CD4+ T cells and promotes T-cell activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corine St Gelais

    Full Text Available HIV-1 Nef enhances dendritic cell (DC-mediated viral transmission to CD4(+ T cells, but the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. It is also unknown whether HIV-1 infected DCs play a role in activating CD4(+ T cells and enhancing DC-mediated viral transmission. Here we investigated the role of HIV-1 Nef in DC-mediated viral transmission and HIV-1 infection of primary CD4(+ T cells using wild-type HIV-1 and Nef-mutated viruses. We show that HIV-1 Nef facilitated DC-mediated viral transmission to activated CD4(+ T cells. HIV-1 expressing wild-type Nef enhanced the activation and proliferation of primary resting CD4(+ T cells. However, when co-cultured with HIV-1-infected autologous DCs, there was no significant trend for infection- or Nef-dependent proliferation of resting CD4(+ T cells. Our results suggest an important role of Nef in DC-mediated transmission of HIV-1 to activated CD4(+ T cells and in the activation and proliferation of resting CD4(+ T cells, which likely contribute to viral pathogenesis.

  12. Apoptosis and systemic autoimmunity: the dendritic cell connection

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    AA Manfredi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Much effort has been devoted in recent years to the events linking recognition and disposal of apoptotic cells to sustained immunity towards the antigens they contain. Programmed death via apoptosis indeed provides most of the raw material the immune system exploits to establish self tolerance, i.e. to learn how to distinguish between self constituents and foreign antigens, belonging to invading pathogens. In parallel, events occurring during cell death may enable a restricted array of molecules endowed with diverse structure, function and intracellular distribution to satisfy the requirement to evoke and maintain autoimmune responses. Dendritic cells (DCs, the most potent antigen presenting cells, appear to play a crucial role. Here we will discuss some of the constrains regulating the access of dying cells’ antigens to DCs, as well as censorship mechanisms that prevent their maturation and the full explication of their antigen presenting function.

  13. Uptake of antigen-antibody complexes by human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanger, N A; Guyre, P M; Graziano, R F

    2001-01-01

    Fc receptors specific for IgG (FcγR) potentiate the immune response by facilitating the interaction between myeloid cells and antibody-coated targets (1-3). Monocyte and neutrophil FcyR engagement can lead to the induction of lytic-type mechanisms associated with innate responses. FcyR triggering can also play a key role in adaptive immune responses. For example, FcyR-directed capture and uptake of antigens (Ag) by dendritic cells (DC) results in processing and presentation to naive Ag-specific T cells, leading to their expansion and maturation into effector T-cell populations. This chapter describes methodology currently in use to explore and manipulate antigen-antibody (Ag-Ab) uptake by FcyR expressed on DC.

  14. The impact of extracellular acidosis on dendritic cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Mónica Elba; Gamberale, Romina; Trevani, Analía Silvina; Martínez, Diego; Ceballos, Ana; Sabatte, Juan; Giordano, Mirta; Geffner, Jorge Raúl

    2004-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most efficient antigen-presenting cells. They are activated in the periphery by conserved pathogen molecules and by inflammatory mediators produced by a variety of cell types in response to danger signals. It is widely appreciated that inflammatory responses in peripheral tissues are usually associated with the development of acidic microenvironments. Surprisingly, there are relatively few studies directed to analyze the effect of extracellular acidosis on the immune response. We focus on the influence of extracellular acidosis on the function of immature DCs. The results presented here show that acidosis activates DCs. It increases the acquisition of extracellular antigens for MHC class I-restricted presentation and the ability of antigen-pulsed DCs to induce both specific CD8+ CTL and B-cell responses. These findings may have important implications to our understanding of the mechanisms through which DCs sense the presence of infection or inflammation in nonlymphoid tissues.

  15. Topical vaccination with functionalized particles targeting dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baleeiro, Renato B; Wiesmüller, Karl-Heinz; Reiter, Yoran; Baude, Barbara; Dähne, Lars; Patzelt, Alexa; Lademann, Jürgen; Barbuto, José A; Walden, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Needle-free vaccination, for reasons of safety, economy, and convenience, is a central goal in vaccine development, but it also needs to meet the immunological requirements for efficient induction of prophylactic and therapeutic immune responses. Combining the principles of noninvasive delivery to dendritic cells (DCs) through skin and the immunological principles of cell-mediated immunity, we developed microparticle-based topical vaccines. We show here that the microparticles are efficient carriers for coordinated delivery of the essential vaccine constituents to DCs for cross-presentation of the antigens and stimulation of T-cell responses. When applied to the skin, the microparticles penetrate into hair follicles and target the resident DCs, the immunologically most potent cells and site for induction of efficient immune responses. The microparticle vaccine principle can be applied to different antigen formats such as peptides and proteins, or nucleic acids coding for the antigens.

  16. Autologous transplantation of bone marrow mononuclear cells improved heart function after myocardial infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-sheng LIN; Jing-jun L(U); Xue-jun JIANG; Xiao-yan LI; Geng-shan LI

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether autologous transplantation of adult stem cells could improve post-infarcted heart function. METHODS: Bone marrow mononuclear cells (MNCs) were isolated from adult rabbits' tibias after coronary ligation. These cells were exposed to 5-azacytidine 10 μmol/L for 24 h on the third day of culture. After being labeled with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), the cells were auto-transplanted into bordering zone of the infarcted area at 2 weeks after injury. The animals were killed at 3 days, 2 weeks, 1 month, and 2 months after transplantation,respectively. The left ventricular functions, capillary density, and cardiac nerve density were measured and the differentiation of the engrafted cells was determined by immunostaining. RESULTS: BrdU-labeled MNCs were well aligned with the host cardiomyocytes. Parts of them were incorporated into capillary and arteriolar vessel walls. In addition to inducing angiogenic ligands (basic fibroblast growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor) and imflammation cytokines (interleukin 1-β) during the early period of MNCs implantation, MNCs induced 2.0-fold increase in capillary density as well. Moreover, GAP43-positive and TH-positive nerve density were markedly higher in the MNCs-treated groups than that in the non-treated hearts. Left ventricular ejection fraction,LV+dp/dt and LV-dp/dtmax were 47 %, 67 %, and 55 % in MNCs-treated heart respectively, which was higher than that of the control heart, whereas left ventricular end-diastolic volume, left ventricular end-diastolic diameter,and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure were 45 %, 22 %, and 50 % respectively in MNCs-treated heart, which was lower than that of the control heart at 2 months after cell transplantation. CONCLUSION: Autologous transplantation of MNCs induced angiogenesis and nerve sprouting and improved left ventricular diastolic function.

  17. Myeloid dendritic cells: Development, functions, and role in atherosclerotic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Sobenin, Igor A; Orekhov, Alexander N; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2015-06-01

    Myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) comprise a heterogeneous population of professional antigen-presenting cells, which are responsible for capture, processing, and presentation of antigens on their surface to T cells. mDCs serve as a bridge linking adaptive and innate immune responses. To date, the development of DC lineage in bone marrow is better characterized in mice than in humans. DCs and macrophages share the common myeloid progenitor called macrophage-dendritic cell progenitor (MDP) that gives rise to monocytoid lineage and common DC progenitors (CDPs). CDP in turn gives rise to plasmacytoid DCs and predendritic cells (pre-mDCs) that are common precursor of myeloid CD11b+ and CD8α(+) DCs. The development and commitment of mDCs is regulated by several transcription and hematopoietic growth factors of which CCr7, Zbtb46, and Flt3 represent 'core' genes responsible for development and functional and phenotypic maintenance of mDCs. mDCs were shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of many autoimmune and inflammatory diseases including atherosclerosis. In atherogenesis, different subsets of mDCs could possess both proatherogenic (e.g. proinflammatory) and atheroprotective (e.g. anti-inflammatory and tolerogenic) activities. The proinflammatory role of mDCs is consisted in production of inflammatory molecules and priming proinflammatory subsets of effector T cells. In contrast, tolerogenic mDCs fight against inflammation through arrest of activity of proinflammatory T cells and macrophages and induction of immunosuppressive regulatory T cells. Microenvironmental conditions trigger differentiation of mDCs to acquire proinflammatory or regulatory properties.

  18. A multifunctional core-shell nanoparticle for dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Nam-Hyuk; Cheong, Taek-Chin; Min, Ji Hyun; Wu, Jun Hua; Lee, Sang Jin; Kim, Daehong; Yang, Jae-Seong; Kim, Sanguk; Kim, Young Keun; Seong, Seung-Yong

    2011-10-01

    Dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy requires tumour antigens to be delivered efficiently into dendritic cells and their migration to be monitored in vivo. Nanoparticles have been explored as carriers for antigen delivery, but applications have been limited by the toxicity of the solvents used to make nanoparticles, and by the need to use transfection agents to deliver nanoparticles into cells. Here we show that an iron oxide-zinc oxide core-shell nanoparticle can deliver carcinoembryonic antigen into dendritic cells while simultaneously acting as an imaging agent. The nanoparticle-antigen complex is efficiently taken up by dendritic cells within one hour and can be detected in vitro by confocal microscopy and in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging. Mice immunized with dendritic cells containing the nanoparticle-antigen complex showed enhanced tumour antigen specific T-cell responses, delayed tumour growth and better survival than controls.

  19. Naive helper T cells from BCG-vaccinated volunteers produce IFN-gamma and IL-5 to mycobacterial antigen-pulsed dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JoĂŤl Pestel

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-GuĂŠrin (BCG is a live vaccine that has been used in routine vaccination against tuberculosis for nearly 80 years. However, its efficacy is controversial. The failure of BCG vaccination may be at least partially explained by the induction of poor or inappropriate host responses. Dendritic cells (DCs are likely to play a key role in the induction of immune response to mycobacteria by polarizing the reactivity of T lymphocytes toward a Th1 profile, contributing to the generation of protective cellular immunity against mycobacteria. In this study we aimed to investigate the production of Th1 and Th2 cytokines by naive CD4+ T cells to mycobacterial antigen-pulsed DCs in the group of young, healthy BCG vaccinated volunteers. The response of naive helper T cells was compared with the response of total blood lymphocytes. Our present results clearly showed that circulating naive CD45RA+CD4+ lymphocytes from BCG-vaccinated subjects can become effector helper cells producing IFN-gamma and IL-5 under the stimulation by autologous dendritic cells presenting mycobacterial protein antigen-PPD or infected with live M. bovis BCG bacilli.

  20. Selective purging of human multiple myeloma cells from autologous stem cell transplant grafts using oncolytic myxoma virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartee, Eric; Chan, Winnie S.; Moreb, Jan S.; Cogle, Christopher R.; McFadden, Grant

    2012-01-01

    Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) and novel therapies have improved overall survival of patients with multiple myeloma; however, most patients relapse and eventually succumb to their disease. Evidence indicates that residual cancer cells contaminate autologous grafts and may contribute to early relapses after ASCT. Here, we demonstrate that ex vivo treatment with an oncolytic poxvirus called myxoma virus results in specific elimination of human myeloma cells by inducing rapid cellular apoptosis while fully sparing normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). The specificity of this elimination is based on strong binding of the virus to myeloma cells coupled with an inability of the virus to bind or infect CD34+ HSPCs. These two features allow myxoma to readily identify and distinguish even low levels of myeloma cells in complex mixtures. This ex vivo MYXV treatment also effectively inhibits systemic in vivo engraftment of human myeloma cells into immunodeficient mice and results in efficient elimination of primary CD138+ myeloma cells contaminating patient hematopoietic cell products. We conclude that ex vivo myxoma treatment represents a safe and effective method to selectively eliminate myeloma cells from hematopoietic autografts prior to reinfusion. PMID:22516053

  1. Cryptococcus neoformans activates bone marrow-derived conventional dendritic cells rather than plasmacytoid dendritic cells and down-regulates macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegemund, Sabine; Alber, Gottfried

    2008-04-01

    Induction of IL-12 and IL-23 is essential for protective immunity against Cryptococcusneoformans. The contribution of dendritic cells vs. macrophages to IL-12/23 production in response to C. neoformans infection is unclear. Activation of conventional bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC), plasmacytoid BMDC, and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMPhi) was assessed by analyzing cytokine responses and the expression of MHC-II, CD86, and CD80 in each cell type. Cryptococcus neoformans induced the release of IL-12/23p40 by BMDC, but not by BMMPhi, in a TLR2- and TLR4-independent but MyD88-dependent manner. Conventional BMDC rather than plasmacytoid BMDC up-regulated MHC-II and CD86, while BMMPhi down-regulated MHC-II and CD86 in response to C. neoformans. The up-regulation of MHC-II and CD86 on BMDC required MyD88. Our data point to conventional DC as critical IL-12/23-producing antigen-presenting cells during cryptococcosis.

  2. Early Results of Autologous Cultivated Limbal Stem Cell Transplantation in Total Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Javadi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    PURPOSE: To report the early results of transplantation of autologous limbal stem cells cultivated on amniotic membrane (AM in patients with total unilateral limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD. METHODS: Four eyes of 4 patients with total unilateral LSCD confirmed with impression cytology underwent transplantation of autologous limbal stem cell cultivated on AM. At each follow up visit, a complete eye examination with special attention to recurrence or regression of vascularization, corneal opacification, and epithelial defect healing was performed. Digital imaging was performed at each follow up visit. Impression cytology was repeated in all cases after surgery. RESULTS: The patients were followed for 5-13 months. Visual acuity improved in all cases. Decrease in corneal opacification and vascularization was obvious in 3 cases with coverage of the cornea with corneal epithelium. Sectoral conjunctivalization was evident in these 3 cases, however the corneas were ready for transplantation. The procedure failed in one case with total corneal conjunctivalization. CONCLUSION: Transplantation of autologous stem cells cultivated on AM seems to be an effective way for total LSCD. More definite judgment needs longer follow up together with long-term results of corneal transplantation in these patients.

  1. Large-scale monocyte enrichment coupled with a closed culture system for the generation of human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullarkat, Vinod; Lau, Roy; Lee, Sun-Min; Bender, James G; Weber, Jeffrey S

    2002-09-15

    Conventional methods for generating monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) for clinical trials utilize the property of plastic adherence to select monocytes from leukapheresis samples. This method is labor-intensive and has the potential for contamination at various steps. We evaluated a large-scale monocyte enrichment procedure using a cell selector (Isolex 300i(R)) followed by culture in a sterile bag system (Stericell(R)) for generation of DC. DC generated in tissue culture flasks after monocyte selection by plastic adherence were compared to those generated in Stericell(R) bags after monocyte enrichment by negative selection with the Isolex(R) 300i. DC were matured with lipopolysaccharide and pulsed with a peptide derived from the melanoma antigen gp100. Peptide-pulsed DC cultured by the two techniques were evaluated for phenotype, viability, ability to induce allogeneic and peptide-specific autologous proliferative responses as well as peptide-specific cytotoxic T-cell responses. The mean monocyte yield from leukapheresis collections was 17+/-2.4%, which increased to 52+/-11% after Isolex(R) selection. The DC yield of plated mononuclear cells from flasks or bags was 2.7+/-0.96% and 4.84+/-2.65%, respectively. DC cultured by both methods expressed high levels of CD86, CD80, CD40, CD83, CD44, CD11c and CD58, and was comparable in their ability to induce allogeneic and peptide-specific autologous proliferative responses as well as gp100 peptide-specific cytotoxic T-cell responses. These results indicate that potent monocyte-derived DC can be generated in a closed culture bag system after monocyte enrichment by immunomagnetic negative selection. Due to the closed nature of the enrichment and culture systems, the potential for contamination is minimized. This protocol is well suited for culturing large numbers of DC for clinical immunotherapy trials.

  2. THE IMPROVEMENT OF INFARCTED MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTILE FORCE AFTER AUTOLOGOUS SKELETAL MUSCLE SATELLITE CELL IMPLANTATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟竑; 朱洪生; 张臻

    2002-01-01

    Objective To study the improvement of infarcted myocardial contractile force after autologous skeletal muscle satellite cell implantation via intracoronary arterial perfusion. Methods Skeletal muscle cells were harvested from gluteus max of adult mongrel dogs and the cells were cultured and expanded before being labeled with DAPI (4, 6-diamidino-2-phenylindone). The labeled cells were then implanted into the acute myocardial infarct site via the ligated left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery. Specimens were taken at 2nd, 4th, 8th week after myoblast implantation for histologic and contractile force evaluation, respectively. Results The satellite cells with fluorescence had been observed in the infarct site and also in papi-llary muscle with consistent oriented direction of host myocardium. A portion of the implanted cells had differen-tiated into muscle fibers. Two weeks after implantation, the myocardial contractile force showed no significant difference between the cell implant group and control group. At 4 and 8 week, the contractile force in the cell implant group was better than that in control group. Conclusion The skeletal muscle satellite cells, implanted into infarct myocardium by intracoronary arterial perfusion, could disseminate through the entire infarcted zone with myocardial regeneration and improve the contractile function of the infarcted myocardium.

  3. Vaccination with experimental feline immunodeficiency virus vaccines, based on autologous infected cells, elicits enhancement of homologous challenge infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Karlas (Jos); C.H.J. Siebelink (Kees); M.A. van Peer (Maartje); W. Huisman (Willem); A.M. Cuisinier; G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractCats were vaccinated with fixed autologous feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-infected cells in order to present viral proteins to the immune system of individual cats in an MHC-matched fashion. Upon vaccination, a humoral response against Gag was induced. Furthermore, virus-neutralizin

  4. Vaccination with experimental feline immunodeficiency virus vaccines, based on autologous infected cells, elicits enhancement of homologous challenge infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Karlas (Jos); C.H.J. Siebelink (Kees); M.A. Peer; W. Huisman (Willem); A.M. Cuisinier; G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Ab)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractCats were vaccinated with fixed autologous feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-infected cells in order to present viral proteins to the immune system of individual cats in an MHC-matched fashion. Upon vaccination, a humoral response against Gag was induced. Furthermore,

  5. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation vs intravenous pulse cyclophosphamide in diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis: a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laar, J.M. van; Farge, D.; Sont, J.K.; Naraghi, K.; Marjanovic, Z.; Larghero, J.; Schuerwegh, A.J.; Marijt, E.W.; Vonk, M.C.; Schattenberg, A.V.M.B.; Matucci-Cerinic, M.; Voskuyl, A.E.; Loosdrecht, A.A. van de; Daikeler, T.; Kotter, I.; Schmalzing, M.; Martin, T.; Lioure, B.; Weiner, S.M.; Kreuter, A.; Deligny, C.; Durand, J.M.; Emery, P.; Machold, K.P.; Sarrot-Reynauld, F.; Warnatz, K.; Adoue, D.F.; Constans, J.; Tony, H.P.; Papa, N. Del; Fassas, A.; Himsel, A.; Launay, D. de; Monaco, A. Lo; Philippe, P.; Quere, I.; Rich, E.; Westhovens, R.; Griffiths, B.; Saccardi, R.; Hoogen, F.H.J. van den; Fibbe, W.E.; Socie, G.; Gratwohl, A.; Tyndall, A.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: High-dose immunosuppressive therapy and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) have shown efficacy in systemic sclerosis in phase 1 and small phase 2 trials. OBJECTIVE: To compare efficacy and safety of HSCT vs 12 successive monthly intravenous pulses of cyclophosphami

  6. Autologous stem cell transplantation versus novel drugs or conventional chemotherapy for patients with relapsed multiple myeloma after previous ASCT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grövdal, M; Nahi, H; Gahrton, G;

    2015-01-01

    High-dose therapy (HDT) followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is the most common first-line treatment for patients with multiple myeloma (MM) under 65 years of age. A second ASCT at first relapse is frequently used but is challenged by the use of novel drugs. We retrospectively...

  7. Outcome of burns treated with autologous cultured proliferating epidermal cells: a prospective randomized multicenter intrapatient comparative trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gardien, K.L.M.; Marck, R.E.; Bloemen, M.C.T.; Waaijman, T.; Gibbs, S.; Uhlrich, M.M.W.; Middelkoop, E.

    2016-01-01

    Standard treatment for large burns is transplantation with meshed split skin autografts (SSGs). A disadvantage of this treatment is that healing is accompanied by scar formation. Application of autologous epidermal cells (keratinocytes and melanocytes) may be a suitable therapeutic alternative, sinc

  8. Bone Marrow Very Small Embryonic-Like Stem Cells: New Generation of Autologous Cell Therapy Soon Ready for Prime Time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smadja, David M

    2017-01-18

    Very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs) are major pluripotent stem cells described in human and mouse. In this issue of Stem Cell Reviews and Reports, Shaikh and colleagues show in a valuable work that mouse bone marrow collected after 5FU treatment contains VSELs able to undergo in vitro multi-lineage differentiation into cells from all three germ layers and also in germ and hematopoietic cells. These findings are robust since no confounding factor such as feeder cell fusion with VSELs can occur here. This paper allows one to better appreciate bone marrow-VSELs differentiation potential and opens new perspectives for autologous cell therapy. Furthermore, it might help explaining lots of contradictive data from the past 20 years, in particular related to ability of bone marrow cells to differentiate into cardiomyocytes.

  9. Feasibility of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Autologous Transplantation for Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Cheng; YANG Chenyuan; XIAO Shiliang; FEI Hongwen

    2007-01-01

    The feasibility of bone marrow stromal cells autologous transplantation for rabbit model of dilated cardiomyopathy induced by adriamycin was studied. Twenty rabbits received 2 mg/kg of adriamycin intravenously once a week for 8 weeks (total dose, 16 mg/kg) to induce the cardiomyopathy model with the monitoring of cardiac function by transthoracic echocardiography. Marrow stromal cells were isolated from cell-transplanted group rabbits and were culture-expanded on the 8th week. On the 10th week, cells were labeled with 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), and then injected into the myocardium of the same rabbits. The results showed that viable cells labeled with DAPI could be identified in myocardium at 2nd week after transplantation. Histological findings showed the injury of the myocardium around the injection site was relieved with less apoptosis and more expression of bcl-2. The echocardiography found the improvement of local tissue movement from (2.12±0.51) cm/s to (3.81±0.47) cm/s (P<0.05) around the inject site, but no improvement of heart function as whole. It was concluded bone marrow stromal cells transplantation for dilated cardiomyopathy was feasibe. The management of cells in vitro, the quantity and the pattern of the cells transplantation and the action mechanism still need further research.

  10. Potential Use of Autologous Renal Cells from Diseased Kidneys for the Treatment of Renal Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Sunil K; Abolbashari, Mehran; Jackson, John D; Aboushwareb, Tamer; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) occurs when certain conditions cause the kidneys to gradually lose function. For patients with CKD, renal transplantation is the only treatment option that restores kidney function. In this study, we evaluated primary renal cells obtained from diseased kidneys to determine whether their normal phenotypic and functional characteristics are retained, and could be used for cell therapy. Primary renal cells isolated from both normal kidneys (NK) and diseased kidneys (CKD) showed similar phenotypic characteristics and growth kinetics. The expression levels of renal tubular cell markers, Aquaporin-1 and E-Cadherin, and podocyte-specific markers, WT-1 and Nephrin, were similar in both NK and CKD kidney derived cells. Using fluorescence- activated cell sorting (FACS), specific renal cell populations were identified and included proximal tubular cells (83.1% from NK and 80.3% from CKD kidneys); distal tubular cells (11.03% from NK and 10.9% from CKD kidneys); and podocytes (1.91% from NK and 1.78% from CKD kidneys). Ultra-structural analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed microvilli on the apical surface of cultured cells from NK and CKD samples. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis showed a similar organization of tight junctions, desmosomes, and other intracellular structures. The Na+ uptake characteristics of NK and CKD derived renal cells were also similar (24.4 mmol/L and 25 mmol/L, respectively) and no significant differences were observed in the protein uptake and transport characteristics of these two cell isolates. These results show that primary renal cells derived from diseased kidneys such as CKD have similar structural and functional characteristics to their counterparts from a normal healthy kidney (NK) when grown in vitro. This study suggests that cells derived from diseased kidney may be used as an autologous cell source for renal cell therapy, particularly in patients with CKD or end

  11. Expanded autologous adipose derived stem cell transplantation for type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuong Thi-Bich Le

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D is the most common form of diabetes mellitus, accounting for 90% of diabetes mellitus in patients. At the present time, althoughT2D can be treated by various drugs and therapies using insulin replacement, reports have shown that complications including microvascular, macrovascular complications and therapy resistance can occur in patients on long term treatment. Stem cell therapy is regarded as a promising therapy for diabetes mellitus, including T2D. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and therapeutic effect of expanded autologous adipose derived stem cell (ADSC transplantation for T2D treatment; the pilot study included 3 patients who were followed for 3 months. Methods: The ADSCs were isolated from stromal vascular fractions, harvested from the belly of the patient,and expanded for 21 days per previously published studies. Before transplantation, ADSCs were evaluated for endotoxin, mycoplasma contamination, and karyotype.All patients were transfused with ADSCs at 1-2x106 cells/kg of body weight.Patients were evaluated for criteria related to transplantation safety and therapeutic effects; these included fever, blood glucose level before transplantation of ADSCs, and blood glucose level after transplantation (at 1, 2 and 3 months. Results: The results showed that all samples of ADSCs exhibited the MSC phenotype with stable karyotype (2n=46, there was no contamination of mycoplasma, and endotoxin levels were low (<0.25 EU/mL. No adverse effects were detected after 3 months of transplantation. Decreases of blood glucose levels were recorded in all patients. Conclusion: The findings from this initial study show that expanded autologous ADSCs may be a promising treatment for T2D.

  12. Immunological Characterization of Whole Tumour Lysate-Loaded Dendritic Cells for Cancer Immunotherapy.

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    Veronica Rainone

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells play a key role as initiators of T-cell responses, and even if tumour antigen-loaded dendritic cells can induce anti-tumour responses, their efficacy has been questioned, suggesting a need to enhance immunization strategies.We focused on the characterization of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells pulsed with whole tumour lysate (TAA-DC, as a source of known and unknown antigens, in a mouse model of breast cancer (MMTV-Ras. Dendritic cells were evaluated for antigen uptake and for the expression of MHC class I/II and costimulatory molecules and markers associated with maturation.Results showed that antigen-loaded dendritic cells are characterized by a phenotypically semi-mature/mature profile and by the upregulation of genes involved in antigen presentation and T-cell priming. Activated dendritic cells stimulated T-cell proliferation and induced the production of high concentrations of IL-12p70 and IFN-γ but only low levels of IL-10, indicating their ability to elicit a TH1-immune response. Furthermore, administration of Antigen loaded-Dendritic Cells in MMTV-Ras mice evoked a strong anti-tumour response in vivo as demonstrated by a general activation of immunocompetent cells and the release of TH1 cytokines.Data herein could be useful in the design of antitumoral DC-based therapies, showing a specific activation of immune system against breast cancer.

  13. Dendritic cells take up and present antigens from viable and apoptotic polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

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    Carlos Alfaro

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC are endowed with the ability to cross-present antigens from other cell types to cognate T cells. DC are poised to meet polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs as a result of being co-attracted by interleukin-8 (IL-8, for instance as produced by tumor cells or infected tissue. Human monocyte-derived and mouse bone marrow-derived DC can readily internalize viable or UV-irradiated PMNs. Such internalization was abrogated at 4°C and partly inhibited by anti-CD18 mAb. In mice, DC which had internalized PMNs containing electroporated ovalbumin (OVA protein, were able to cross-present the antigen to CD8 (OT-1 and CD4 (OT-2 TCR-transgenic T cells. Moreover, in humans, tumor cell debris is internalized by PMNs and the tumor-cell material can be subsequently taken up from the immunomagnetically re-isolated PMNs by DC. Importantly, if human neutrophils had endocytosed bacteria, they were able to trigger the maturation program of the DC. Moreover, when mouse PMNs with E. coli in their interior are co-injected in the foot pad with DC, many DC loaded with fluorescent material from the PMNs reach draining lymph nodes. Using CT26 (H-2(d mouse tumor cells, it was observed that if tumor cells are intracellularly loaded with OVA protein and UV-irradiated, they become phagocytic prey of H-2(d PMNs. If such PMNs, that cannot present antigens to OT-1 T cells, are immunomagnetically re-isolated and phagocytosed by H-2(b DC, such DC productively cross-present OVA antigen determinants to OT-1 T cells. Cross-presentation to adoptively transferred OT-1 lymphocytes at draining lymph nodes also take place when OVA-loaded PMNs (H-2(d are coinjected in the footpad of mice with autologous DC (H-2(b. In summary, our results indicate that antigens phagocytosed by short-lived PMNs can be in turn internalized and productively cross-presented by DC.

  14. Dendritic cell maturation and cross-presentation: timing matters!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alloatti, Andrés; Kotsias, Fiorella; Magalhaes, Joao Gamelas; Amigorena, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    As a population, dendritic cells (DCs) appear to be the best cross-presenters of internalized antigens on major histocompatibility complex class I molecules in the mouse. To do this, DCs have developed a number of unique and dedicated means to control their endocytic and phagocytic pathways: among them, the capacity to limit acidification of their phagosomes, to prevent proteolytic degradation, to delay fusion of phagosomes to lysosomes, to recruit ER proteins to phagosomes, and to export phagocytosed antigens to the cytosol. The regulation of phagocytic functions, and thereby of antigen processing and presentation by innate signaling, represents a critical level of integration of adaptive and innate immune responses. Understanding how innate signals control antigen cross-presentation is critical to define effective vaccination strategies for CD8(+) T-cell responses.

  15. Dendritic branching of olfactory bulb mitral and tufted cells: regulation by TrkB.

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    Fumiaki Imamura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Projection neurons of mammalian olfactory bulb (OB, mitral and tufted cells, have dendrites whose morphologies are specifically differentiated for efficient odor information processing. The apical dendrite extends radially and arborizes in single glomerulus where it receives primary input from olfactory sensory neurons that express the same odor receptor. The lateral dendrites extend horizontally in the external plexiform layer and make reciprocal dendrodendritic synapses with granule cells, which moderate mitral/tufted cell activity. The molecular mechanisms regulating dendritic development of mitral/tufted cells is one of the unsolved important problems in the olfactory system. Here, we focused on TrkB receptors to test the hypothesis that neurotrophin-mediate mechanisms contributed to dendritic differentiation of OB mitral/tufted cells. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: With immunohistochemical analysis, we found that the TrkB neurotrophin receptor is expressed by both apical and lateral dendrites of mitral/tufted cells and that expression is evident during the early postnatal days when these dendrites exhibit their most robust growth and differentiation. To examine the effect of TrkB activation on mitral/tufted cell dendritic development, we cultured OB neurons. When BDNF or NT4 were introduced into the cultures, there was a significant increase in the number of primary neurites and branching points among the mitral/tufted cells. Moreover, BDNF facilitated filopodial extension along the neurites of mitral/tufted cells. SIGNIFICANCE: In this report, we show for the first time that TrkB activation stimulates the dendritic branching of mitral/tufted cells in developing OB. This suggests that arborization of the apical dendrite in a glomerulus is under the tight regulation of TrkB activation.

  16. Tumour tissue microenvironment can inhibit dendritic cell maturation in colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Michielsen, Adriana J

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory mediators in the tumour microenvironment promote tumour growth, vascular development and enable evasion of anti-tumour immune responses, by disabling infiltrating dendritic cells. However, the constituents of the tumour microenvironment that directly influence dendritic cell maturation and function are not well characterised. Our aim was to identify tumour-associated inflammatory mediators which influence the function of dendritic cells. Tumour conditioned media obtained from cultured colorectal tumour explant tissue contained high levels of the chemokines CCL2, CXCL1, CXCL5 in addition to VEGF. Pre-treatment of monocyte derived dendritic cells with this tumour conditioned media inhibited the up-regulation of CD86, CD83, CD54 and HLA-DR in response to LPS, enhancing IL-10 while reducing IL-12p70 secretion. We examined if specific individual components of the tumour conditioned media (CCL2, CXCL1, CXCL5) could modulate dendritic cell maturation or cytokine secretion in response to LPS. VEGF was also assessed as it has a suppressive effect on dendritic cell maturation. Pre-treatment of immature dendritic cells with VEGF inhibited LPS induced upregulation of CD80 and CD54, while CXCL1 inhibited HLA-DR. Interestingly, treatment of dendritic cells with CCL2, CXCL1, CXCL5 or VEGF significantly suppressed their ability to secrete IL-12p70 in response to LPS. In addition, dendritic cells treated with a combination of CXCL1 and VEGF secreted less IL-12p70 in response to LPS compared to pre-treatment with either cytokine alone. In conclusion, tumour conditioned media strongly influences dendritic cell maturation and function.

  17. Enhanced activation of dendritic cells by autologous apoptotic microvesicles in MRL/lpr mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieker, J.W.; Hilbrands, L.B.; Thielen, A.; Dijkman, H.B.P.M.; Berden, J.H.M.; Vlag, J. van der

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Systemic lupus erythematosus is associated with a persistent circulation of modified autoantigen-containing apoptotic debris that might be capable of breaking tolerance. We aimed to evaluate apoptotic microvesicles obtained from lupus or control mice for the presence of apoptosis-assoc

  18. Durable Complete Response from Metastatic Melanoma after Transfer of Autologous T Cells Recognizing 10 Mutated Tumor Antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prickett, Todd D; Crystal, Jessica S; Cohen, Cyrille J; Pasetto, Anna; Parkhurst, Maria R; Gartner, Jared J; Yao, Xin; Wang, Rong; Gros, Alena; Li, Yong F; El-Gamil, Mona; Trebska-McGowan, Kasia; Rosenberg, Steven A; Robbins, Paul F

    2016-08-01

    Immunotherapy treatment of patients with metastatic cancer has assumed a prominent role in the clinic. Durable complete response rates of 20% to 25% are achieved in patients with metastatic melanoma following adoptive cell transfer of T cells derived from metastatic lesions, responses that appear in some patients to be mediated by T cells that predominantly recognize mutated antigens. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of the reactivity of T cells administered to a patient with metastatic melanoma who exhibited a complete response for over 3 years after treatment. Over 4,000 nonsynonymous somatic mutations were identified by whole-exome sequence analysis of the patient's autologous normal and tumor cell DNA. Autologous B cells transfected with 720 mutated minigenes corresponding to the most highly expressed tumor cell transcripts were then analyzed for their ability to stimulate the administered T cells. Autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes recognized 10 distinct mutated gene products, but not the corresponding wild-type products, each of which was recognized in the context of one of three different MHC class I restriction elements expressed by the patient. Detailed clonal analysis revealed that 9 of the top 20 most prevalent clones present in the infused T cells, comprising approximately 24% of the total cells, recognized mutated antigens. Thus, we have identified and enriched mutation-reactive T cells and suggest that such analyses may lead to the development of more effective therapies for the treatment of patients with metastatic cancer. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(8); 669-78. ©2016 AACR.

  19. Mannosylated biodegradable polyethyleneimine for targeted DNA delivery to dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun X

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Xun Sun, Simu Chen, Jianfeng Han, Zhirong ZhangKey Laboratory of Drug Targeting and Drug Delivery System, Ministry of Education, West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Chengdu, People’s Republic of ChinaBackground: To establish a potential gene-delivery system with the ability to deliver plasmid DNA to dendritic cells (DCs more efficiently and specifically, we designed and synthesized a low-molecular-weight polyethyleneimine and triethyleneglycol polymer (PEI–TEG and a series of its mannosylated derivatives.Methods: PEI–TEG was synthesized from PEI2000 and PEI600 with TEG as the cross-linker. PEI–TEG was then linked to mannose via a phenylisothiocyanate bridge to obtain man-PEI–TEG conjugates. The DNA conveyance abilities of PEI–TEG, man-PEI–TEG, as well as control PEI25k were evaluated by measuring their zeta potential, particle size, and DNA-binding abilities. The in vitro cytotoxicity, cell uptake, and transfection efficiency of these PEI/DNA complexes were examined on the DC2.4 cell line. Finally, a maturation experiment evaluated the effect of costimulatory molecules CD40, CD80, and CD86 on murine bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs using flow cytometry.Results: PEI–TEG and man-PEI–TEG were successfully synthesized and were shown to retain the excellent properties of PEI25k for condensing DNA. Compared with PEI–TEG as well as PEI25k, the man-PEI–TEG had less cytotoxicity and performed better in both cellular uptake and transfection assays in vitro. The results of the maturation experiment showed that all the PEI/DNA complexes induced an adequate upregulation of surface markers for DC maturation.Conclusion: These results demonstrated that man-PEI–TEG can be employed as a DC-targeting gene-delivery system.Keywords: dendritic cells, DCs, mannose, polyethyleneimine, PEI, gene delivery

  20. Artificial Polymeric Scaffolds as Extracellular Matrix Substitutes for Autologous Conjunctival Goblet Cell Expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Min; Storr-Paulsen, Thomas; Wang, Annie L.; Ghezzi, Chiara E.; Wang, Siran; Fullana, Matthew; Karamichos, Dimitrios; Utheim, Tor P.; Islam, Rakibul; Griffith, May; Islam, M. Mirazul; Hodges, Robin R.; Wnek, Gary E.; Kaplan, David L.; Dartt, Darlene A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We fabricated and investigated polymeric scaffolds that can substitute for the conjunctival extracellular matrix to provide a substrate for autologous expansion of human conjunctival goblet cells in culture. Methods We fabricated two hydrogels and two silk films: (1) recombinant human collagen (RHC) hydrogel, (2) recombinant human collagen 2-methacryloylxyethyl phosphorylcholine (RHC-MPC) hydrogel, (3) arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) modified silk, and (4) poly-D-lysine (PDL) coated silk, and four electrospun scaffolds: (1) collagen, (2) poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), (3) poly(caprolactone) (PCL), and (4) poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA). Coverslips and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) were used for comparison. Human conjunctival explants were cultured on scaffolds for 9 to 15 days. Cell viability, outgrowth area, and the percentage of cells expressing markers for stratified squamous epithelial cells (cytokeratin 4) and goblet cells (cytokeratin 7) were determined. Results Most of cells grown on all scaffolds were viable except for PCL in which only 3.6 ± 2.2% of the cells were viable. No cells attached to PVA scaffold. The outgrowth was greatest on PDL-silk and PET. Outgrowth was smallest on PCL. All cells were CK7-positive on RHC-MPC while 84.7 ± 6.9% of cells expressed CK7 on PDL-silk. For PCL, 87.10 ± 3.17% of cells were CK7-positive compared to PET where 67.10 ± 12.08% of cells were CK7-positive cells. Conclusions Biopolymer substrates in the form of hydrogels and silk films provided for better adherence, proliferation, and differentiation than the electrospun scaffolds and could be used for conjunctival goblet cell expansion for eventual transplantation once undifferentiated and stratified squamous cells are included. Useful polymer scaffold design characteristics have emerged from this study. PMID:27832279

  1. Autologous peripheral blood stem cell harvest: Collection efficiency and factors affecting it

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    Aseem K Tiwari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Harvest of hematopoietic progenitor cells via leukapheresis is being used increasingly for transplants in India. Adequate yield of cells per kilogram body weight of recipient is required for successful engraftment. Collection efficiency (CE is an objective quality parameter used to assess the quality of leukapheresis program. In this study, we calculated the CE of the ComTec cell separator (Fresenius Kabi, Germany using two different formulae (CE1 and CE2 and analyzed various patient and procedural factors, which may affect it. Materials and Methods: One hundred and one consecutive procedures in 77 autologous donors carried out over 3 years period were retrospectively reviewed. Various characteristics like gender, age, weight, disease status, hematocrit, preprocedure total leukocyte count, preprocedure CD34 positive (CD34+ cells count, preprocedure absolute CD34+ cell count and processed apheresis volume effect on CE were compared. CE for each procedure was calculated using two different formulae, and results were compared using statistical correlation and regression analysis. Results: The mean CE1 and CE2 was 41.2 and 49.1, respectively. CE2 appeared to be more accurate indicator of overall CE as it considered the impact of continued mobilization of stem cells during apheresis procedure, itself. Of all the factors affecting CE, preprocedure absolute CD34+ was the only independent factor affecting CE. Conclusion: The only factor affecting CE was preprocedure absolute CD34+ cells. Though the mean CE2 was higher than CE1, it was not statistically significant.

  2. Brief report: reconstruction of joint hyaline cartilage by autologous progenitor cells derived from ear elastic cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Mitsuru; Kobayashi, Shinji; Takebe, Takanori; Kan, Hiroomi; Yabuki, Yuichiro; Matsuzaki, Takahisa; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y; Nakabayashi, Seiichiro; Ik, Lee Jeong; Maegawa, Jiro; Taniguchi, Hideki

    2014-03-01

    In healthy joints, hyaline cartilage covering the joint surfaces of bones provides cushioning due to its unique mechanical properties. However, because of its limited regenerative capacity, age- and sports-related injuries to this tissue may lead to degenerative arthropathies, prompting researchers to investigate a variety of cell sources. We recently succeeded in isolating human cartilage progenitor cells from ear elastic cartilage. Human cartilage progenitor cells have high chondrogenic and proliferative potential to form elastic cartilage with long-term tissue maintenance. However, it is unknown whether ear-derived cartilage progenitor cells can be used to reconstruct hyaline cartilage, which has different mechanical and histological properties from elastic cartilage. In our efforts to develop foundational technologies for joint hyaline cartilage repair and reconstruction, we conducted this study to obtain an answer to this question. We created an experimental canine model of knee joint cartilage damage, transplanted ear-derived autologous cartilage progenitor cells. The reconstructed cartilage was rich in proteoglycans and showed unique histological characteristics similar to joint hyaline cartilage. In addition, mechanical properties of the reconstructed tissues were higher than those of ear cartilage and equal to those of joint hyaline cartilage. This study suggested that joint hyaline cartilage was reconstructed from ear-derived cartilage progenitor cells. It also demonstrated that ear-derived cartilage progenitor cells, which can be harvested by a minimally invasive method, would be useful for reconstructing joint hyaline cartilage in patients with degenerative arthropathies.

  3. Chemoresistance of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells is regulated by IL-17A.

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    Selma Olsson Åkefeldt

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells initiate adaptive immune responses, leading either to control cancer by effector T cells or to exacerbate cancer by regulatory T cells that inhibit IFN-γ-mediated Th1-type response. Dendritic cells can also induce Th17-type immunity, mediated by IL-17A. However, the controversial role of this cytokine in cancer requires further investigations. We generated dendritic cells from peripheral blood monocytes to investigate lifespan, phenotype and chemoresistance of dendritic cells, treated with IL-17A with or without IFN-γ. Studying the expression of Bcl-2 family members, we demonstrated that dendritic cells constitutively express one pro-survival Bcl-2 member: MCL1. Immature dendritic cells were CD40(lowHLADR(low CD1a(+ MCL1(+, did not express CD14, CD68 or BCL2A1, and displayed a short 2-day lifespan. IL-17A-treated DC exhibited a semi-mature (CD40(high HLADR(low pre-M2 (CCL22(+ CD206(+ CD163(+ IL1RN(+ IL-10(- CXCL10(- IL-12(- mixed (CD1a(+ CD14+ CD68(+ macrophage-dendritic cell phenotype. They efficiently exerted mannose receptor-mediated endocytosis and did not produce superoxide anions, in the absence of TLR engagement. Interestingly, IL-17A promoted a long-term survival of dendritic cells, beyond 12 days, that correlated to BCL2A1 induction, a pro-survival Bcl-2 family member. BCL2A1 transcription was activated by NF-κB, downstream of IL-17A transduction. Thus, immature dendritic cells only express MCL1, whereas IL-17A-treated dendritic cells concomitantly expressed two pro-survival Bcl-2 family members: MCL1 and BCL2A1. These latter developed chemoresistance to 11 of the 17 chemotherapy agents tested. However, high doses of either vinblastine or cytarabine decreased MCL1 expression and induced dendritic cell death. When IL-17A is produced in vivo, administration of anti-IL-17A biotherapy may impair dendritic cell survival by targeting BCL2A1 expression. Consequently, depending on the effector or regulatory role of dendritic

  4. Interactions between airway epithelial cells and dendritic cells during viral infections using an in vitro co-culture model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rationale: Historically, single cell culture models have been limited in pathological and physiological relevance. A co-culture model of dendritic cells (DCs) and differentiated human airway epithelial cells was developed to examine potential interactions between these two cell t...

  5. UPDATE ON THE ROLE OF AUTOLOGOUS HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANT IN FOLLICULAR LYMPHOMAS

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    Mónica Cabrero

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Follicular lymphoma (FL remains incurable despite advances in new strategies of treatment, including monoclonal antibodies (MoAb. Except for early stages, FL is characterized by responses to treatments and systematic relapses. The main objective in this disease is to achieve a better progression free survival (PFS and to increase overall survival (OS, mainly in young patients. In order to improve the results of conventional chemotherapy, autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT is a feasible treatment in these patients. In this moment, ASCT is not recommended as first line treatment, except for transformed FL, but is a good strategy as salvage therapy with an improved PFS and OS. New drugs have been introduced to enhance responses of ASCT, but nowadays they are not part of conventional conditioning regimen.

  6. UPDATE ON THE ROLE OF AUTOLOGOUS HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANT IN FOLLICULAR LYMPHOMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Cabrero

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Follicular lymphoma (FL remains incurable despite advances in new strategies of treatment, including monoclonal antibodies (MoAb. Except for early stages, FL is characterized by responses to treatments and systematic relapses. The main objective in this disease is to achieve a better progression free survival (PFS and to increase overall survival (OS, mainly in young patients. In order to improve the results of conventional chemotherapy, autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT is a feasible treatment in these patients. In this moment, ASCT is not recommended as first line treatment, except for transformed FL, but is a good strategy as salvage therapy with an improved PFS and OS. New drugs have been introduced to enhance responses of ASCT, but nowadays they are not part of conventional conditioning regimen.

  7. Update on the Role of Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Follicular Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrero, Mónica; Redondo, Alba; Martin, Alejandro; Caballero, Dolores

    2012-01-01

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) remains incurable despite advances in new strategies of treatment, including monoclonal antibodies (MoAb). Except for early stages, FL is characterized by responses to treatments and systematic relapses. The main objective in this disease is to achieve a better progression free survival (PFS) and to increase overall survival (OS), mainly in young patients. In order to improve the results of conventional chemotherapy, autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) is a feasible treatment in these patients. In this moment, ASCT is not recommended as first line treatment, except for transformed FL, but is a good strategy as salvage therapy with an improved PFS and OS. New drugs have been introduced to enhance responses of ASCT, but nowadays they are not part of conventional conditioning regimen. PMID:23205262

  8. Autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation in patients with relapsed lymphoma results in accelerated haematopoietic reconstitution, improved quality of life and cost reduction compared with bone marrow transplantation : the Hovon 22 study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vellenga, E; van Agthoven, M; Croockewit, AJ; Verdonck, LF; Wijermans, PJ; van Oers, MHJ; Volkers, CP; van Imhoff, GW; Kingma, T; Uyl-de Groot, CA; Fibbe, WE

    2001-01-01

    The present study analysed whether autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PSCT) improves engraftment, quality of life and cost-effectiveness when compared with autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT). Relapsing progressive lymphoma patients (n = 204; non-Hodgkin's lymphoma n =

  9. Uptake and intracellular trafficking of superantigens in dendritic cells.

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    María B Ganem

    Full Text Available Bacterial superantigens (SAgs are exotoxins produced mainly by Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes that can cause toxic shock syndrome (TSS. According to current paradigm, SAgs interact directly and simultaneously with T cell receptor (TCR on the T cell and MHC class II (MHC-II on the antigen-presenting cell (APC, thereby circumventing intracellular processing to trigger T cell activation. Dendritic cells (DCs are professional APCs that coat nearly all body surfaces and are the most probable candidate to interact with SAgs. We demonstrate that SAgs are taken up by mouse DCs without triggering DC maturation. SAgs were found in intracellular acidic compartment of DCs as biologically active molecules. Moreover, SAgs co-localized with EEA1, RAB-7 and LAMP-2, at different times, and were then recycled to the cell membrane. DCs loaded with SAgs are capable of triggering in vitro lymphocyte proliferation and, injected into mice, stimulate T cells bearing the proper TCR in draining lymph nodes. Transportation and trafficking of SAgs in DCs might increase the local concentration of these exotoxins where they will produce the highest effect by promoting their encounter with both MHC-II and TCR in lymph nodes, and may explain how just a few SAg molecules can induce the severe pathology associated with TSS.

  10. Cancer Vaccine by Fusions of Dendritic and Cancer Cells

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    Shigeo Koido

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are potent antigen-presenting cells and play a central role in the initiation and regulation of primary immune responses. Therefore, their use for the active immunotherapy against cancers has been studied with considerable interest. The fusion of DCs with whole tumor cells represents in many ways an ideal approach to deliver, process, and subsequently present a broad array of tumor-associated antigens, including those yet to be unidentified, in the context of DCs-derived costimulatory molecules. DCs/tumor fusion vaccine stimulates potent antitumor immunity in the animal tumor models. In the human studies, T cells stimulated by DC/tumor fusion cells are effective in lysis of tumor cells that are used as the fusion partner. In the clinical trials, clinical and immunological responses were observed in patients with advanced stage of malignant tumors after being vaccinated with DC/tumor fusion cells, although the antitumor effect is not as vigorous as in the animal tumor models. This review summarizes recent advances in concepts and techniques that are providing new impulses to DCs/tumor fusions-based cancer vaccination.

  11. Unique proteomic signatures distinguish macrophages and dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lev Becker

    Full Text Available Monocytes differentiate into heterogeneous populations of tissue macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs that regulate inflammation and immunity. Identifying specific populations of myeloid cells in vivo is problematic, however, because only a limited number of proteins have been used to assign cellular phenotype. Using mass spectrometry and bone marrow-derived cells, we provided a global view of the proteomes of M-CSF-derived macrophages, classically and alternatively activated macrophages, and GM-CSF-derived DCs. Remarkably, the expression levels of half the plasma membrane proteins differed significantly in the various populations of cells derived in vitro. Moreover, the membrane proteomes of macrophages and DCs were more distinct than those of classically and alternatively activated macrophages. Hierarchical cluster and dual statistical analyses demonstrated that each cell type exhibited a robust proteomic signature that was unique. To interrogate the phenotype of myeloid cells in vivo, we subjected elicited peritoneal macrophages harvested from wild-type and GM-CSF-deficient mice to mass spectrometric and functional analysis. Unexpectedly, we found that peritoneal macrophages exhibited many features of the DCs generated in vitro. These findings demonstrate that global analysis of the membrane proteome can help define immune cell phenotypes in vivo.

  12. Autologous adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells are involved in rat liver regeneration following repeat partial hepatectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Tao; MU, HONG; Shen, Zhongyang; SONG, ZHUOLUN; Chen, Xiaobo; Wang, Yuliang

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs) have been considered to be attractive and readily available adult mesenchymal stem cells, and they are becoming increasingly popular for use in regenerative cell therapy, as they are readily accessible through minimally invasive techniques. The present study investigated whether autologous ADSC transplantation promoted liver regeneration following a repeat partial hepatectomy in rats. The rats were divided into three groups as follows: 70%...

  13. Properties of mouse retinal ganglion cell dendritic growth during postnatal development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The property of dendritic growth dynamics during development is a subject of intense interest.Here,we investigated the dendritic motility of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) during different developmental stages,using ex vivo mouse retina explant culture,Semliki Forest Virus transfection and time-lapse observations.The results illustrated that during development,the dendritic motility underwent a change from rapid growth to a relatively stable state,i.e.,at P0 (day of birth),RGC dendrites were in a highly active state,whereas at postnatal 13 (P13) they were more stable,and at P3 and P8,the RGCs were in an intermediate state.At any given developmental stage,RGCs of different types displayed the same dendritic growth rate and extent.Since the mouse is the most popular mammalian model for genetic manipulation,this study provided a methodological foundation for further exploring the regulatory mechanisms of dendritic development.

  14. Muscarinic regulation of Kenyon cell dendritic arborizations in adult worker honey bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrin, Scott E; Herlihy, J Daniel; Robinson, Gene E; Fahrbach, Susan E

    2011-09-01

    The experience of foraging under natural conditions increases the volume of mushroom body neuropil in worker honey bees. A comparable increase in neuropil volume results from treatment of worker honey bees with pilocarpine, an agonist for muscarinic-type cholinergic receptors. A component of the neuropil growth induced by foraging experience is growth of dendrites in the collar region of the calyces. We show here, via analysis of Golgi-impregnated collar Kenyon cells with wedge arborizations, that significant increases in standard measures of dendritic complexity were also found in worker honey bees treated with pilocarpine. This result suggests that signaling via muscarinic-type receptors promotes the increase in Kenyon cell dendritic complexity associated with foraging. Treatment of worker honey bees with scopolamine, a muscarinic inhibitor, inhibited some aspects of dendritic growth. Spine density on the Kenyon cell dendrites varied with sampling location, with the distal portion of the dendritic field having greater total spine density than either the proximal or medial section. This observation may be functionally significant because of the stratified organization of projections from visual centers to the dendritic arborizations of the collar Kenyon cells. Pilocarpine treatment had no effect on the distribution of spines on dendrites of the collar Kenyon cells.

  15. Autologous, allogeneic, induced pluripotent stem cell or a combination stem cell therapy? Where are we headed in cartilage repair and why: a concise review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, L.A.; Windt, de T.S.; Slaper-Cortenbach, Ineke C.M.; Saris, D.B.F.

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of articular cartilage repair procedures has resulted in a variety of cell-based therapies that use both autologous and allogeneic mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). As these cells are increasingly available and show promising results both in vitro and in vivo, cell-based strategies, wh

  16. Clinical significance of circulating dendritic cells in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Robak

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available DENDRITIC cells are a complex group of mainly bone-marrow-derived leukocytes that play a role in autoimmune diseases. The total number of circulating dendritic cells (tDC, and their plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC and myeloid dendritic cell (mDC1 and mDC2 subpopulations were assessed using flow cytometry. The number of tDC and their subsets were significantly lower in systemic lupus erythematosus patients than in the control group. The count of tDC and their subsets correlated with the number of T cells. The number of tDC and pDC subpopulation were lower in the patients with lymphopenia and leucopoenia than in the patients without these symptoms. Our data suggest that fluctuations in blood dendritic cell count in systemic lupus erythematosus patients are much more significant in pDC than in mDC, what may be caused by their migration to the sites of inflammation including skin lesions. Positive correlation between dendritic cell number and TCD4+, TCD8+ and CD19+ B cells, testify of their interactions and influence on SLE pathogenesis. The association between dendritic cell number and clinical features seems to be less clear.

  17. Modulation of dendritic cell function by Trichomonas vaginalis-derived secretory products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Min-Ji; Lee, Jong-Joo; Nam, Young Hee; Kim, Tae-Gyun; Chung, Youn Wook; Kim, Mikyoung; Choi, Ye-Eun; Shin, Myeong Heon; Kim, Hyoung-Pyo

    2015-02-01

    Trichomoniasis caused by the parasitic protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis is the most common sexually transmitted disease in the world. Dendritic cells are antigen presenting cells that initiate immune responses by directing the activation and differentiation of naïve T cells. In this study, we analyzed the effect of Trichomonas vaginalis-derived Secretory Products on the differentiation and function of dendritic cells. Differentiation of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells in the presence of T. vaginalis-derived Secretory Products resulted in inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced maturation of dendritic cells, down-regulation of IL-12, and up-regulation of IL-10. The protein components of T. vaginalis-derived Secretory Products were shown to be responsible for altered function of bone marrow- derived dendritic cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that IL-12 expression was regulated at the chromatin level in T. vaginalis-derived Secretory Productstreated dendritic cells. Our results demonstrated that T. vaginalis- derived Secretory Products modulate the maturation and cytokine production of dendritic cells leading to immune tolerance.

  18. Study on biological characters of SGC7901 gastric cancer cell-dendritic cell fusion vaccines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kun Zhang; Peng-Fen Gao; Pei-Wu Yu; Yun Rao; Li-Xin Zhou

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To detect the biological characters of the SGC7901 gastric cancer cell-dendritic cell fusion vaccines.METHODS: The suspending living SGC7901 gastric cancer cells and dendritic cells were induced to be fusioned by polyethylene glycol. Pure fusion cells were obtained by selective culture with the HAT/HT culture systems.The fusion cells were counted at different time points of culture and their growth curves were drawn to reflect their proliferative activities. The fusion cells were also cultured in culture medium to investigate whether they could grow into cell clones. MTT method was used to test the stimulating abilities of the fusion cells on T lymphocytes' proliferations. Moreover, the fusion cells were planted into nude mice to observe whether they could grow into new planted tumors in this kind of immunodeficiency animals.RESULTS: The fusion cells had weaker proliferative activity and clone abilities than their parental cells. When they were cultured, the counts of cells did not increase remarkably, nor could they grow into cell clones in culture medium. The fusion cells could not grow into new planted tumors after planted into nude mice. The stimulating abilities of the fusion cells on T lymphocytes' proliferations were remarkably increased than their parental dendritic cells.CONCLUSION: The SGC7901 gastric cancer cell-dendritic cell fusion vaccines have much weaker proliferative abilities than their parental cells, but they keep strong abilities to irritate the T lymphocytes and have no abilities to grow into new planted tumors in immunodeficiency animals. These are the biological basis for their antitumor biotherapies.

  19. Activated T cells recruit exosomes secreted by dendritic cells via LFA-1.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nolte-'t Hoen, E.N.; Buschow, S.I.; Anderton, S.M.; Stoorvogel, W.; Wauben, M.H.M.

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are known to secrete exosomes that transfer membrane proteins, like major histocompatibility complex class II, to other DCs. Intercellular transfer of membrane proteins is also observed during cognate interactions between DCs and CD4(+) T cells. The acquired proteins are functi

  20. Probiotic modulation of dendritic cells and T cell responses in the intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijerink, M.; Wells, J.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade it has become clear that probiotic and commensal interactions with mucosal dendritic cells in the lamina propria or epithelial cells lining the mucosa can modulate specific functions of the mucosal immune system. Innate pattern-recognition receptors such as TLRs, NLRs and CLRs p

  1. The Comparison of Biologic Characteristics between Mice Embryonic Stem Cells and Bone Marrow Derived Dendritic Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junfeng Liu; Zhixu He; Dong Shen; Jin Huang; Haowen Wang

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This research was to induce dendritic cells (DCs)from mice embryonic stem cells and bone marrow mononuclear cells in vitro, and then compare the biologic characteristics of them.METHODS Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) suspending cultured in petri dishes were induced to generate embryonic bodies (EBs).Fourteen-day well-developed EBs were transferred to histological culture with the same medium and supplemented 25 ng/ml GM-CSF and 25 ng/ml IL-3. In the next 2 weeks, there were numerous immature DCs outgrown. Meantime, mononuclear cells isolated from mice bone marrow were induced to derive dendritic cells by supplementing 25 ng/ml GM-CSF and 25 ng/ml IL-4, and then the morphology, phenotype and function of both dendritic cells from different origins were examined.RESULTS Growing mature through exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), both ESC-DCs and BM-DCs exhibited dramatic veils of cytoplasm and extensive dendrites on their surfaces, highly expressed CD11c, MHC-Ⅱ and CD86 with strong capacity to stimulate primary T cell responses in mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR).CONCLUSION ESC-DC has the same biologic characteristics as BM-DC, and it provides a new, reliable source for the functional research of DC and next produce corresponding anti-tumor vaccine.

  2. Human XCR1+ dendritic cells derived in vitro from CD34+ progenitors closely resemble blood dendritic cells, including their adjuvant responsiveness, contrary to monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Sreekumar; Ollion, Vincent; Colletti, Nicholas; Chelbi, Rabie; Montanana-Sanchis, Frédéric; Liu, Hong; Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Sanchez, Cindy; Savoret, Juliette; Perrot, Ivan; Doffin, Anne-Claire; Fossum, Even; Bechlian, Didier; Chabannon, Christian; Bogen, Bjarne; Asselin-Paturel, Carine; Shaw, Michael; Soos, Timothy; Caux, Christophe; Valladeau-Guilemond, Jenny; Dalod, Marc

    2014-08-15

    Human monocyte-derived dendritic cell (MoDC) have been used in the clinic with moderately encouraging results. Mouse XCR1(+) DC excel at cross-presentation, can be targeted in vivo to induce protective immunity, and share characteristics with XCR1(+) human DC. Assessment of the immunoactivation potential of XCR1(+) human DC is hindered by their paucity in vivo and by their lack of a well-defined in vitro counterpart. We report in this study a protocol generating both XCR1(+) and XCR1(-) human DC in CD34(+) progenitor cultures (CD34-DC). Gene expression profiling, phenotypic characterization, and functional studies demonstrated that XCR1(-) CD34-DC are similar to canonical MoDC, whereas XCR1(+) CD34-DC resemble XCR1(+) blood DC (bDC). XCR1(+) DC were strongly activated by polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid but not LPS, and conversely for MoDC. XCR1(+) DC and MoDC expressed strikingly different patterns of molecules involved in inflammation and in cross-talk with NK or T cells. XCR1(+) CD34-DC but not MoDC efficiently cross-presented a cell-associated Ag upon stimulation by polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid or R848, likewise to what was reported for XCR1(+) bDC. Hence, it is feasible to generate high numbers of bona fide XCR1(+) human DC in vitro as a model to decipher the functions of XCR1(+) bDC and as a potential source of XCR1(+) DC for clinical use.

  3. Autologous Doping with Cryopreserved Red Blood Cells - Effects on Physical Performance and Detection by Multivariate Statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malm, Christer B; Khoo, Nelson S; Granlund, Irene; Lindstedt, Emilia; Hult, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of erythropoietin (EPO) simplified blood doping in sports, but improved detection methods, for EPO has forced cheating athletes to return to blood transfusion. Autologous blood transfusion with cryopreserved red blood cells (RBCs) is the method of choice, because no valid method exists to accurately detect such event. In endurance sports, it can be estimated that elite athletes improve performance by up to 3% with blood doping, regardless of method. Valid detection methods for autologous blood doping is important to maintain credibility of athletic performances. Recreational male (N = 27) and female (N = 11) athletes served as Transfusion (N = 28) and Control (N = 10) subjects in two different transfusion settings. Hematological variables and physical performance were measured before donation of 450 or 900 mL whole blood, and until four weeks after re-infusion of the cryopreserved RBC fraction. Blood was analyzed for transferrin, iron, Hb, EVF, MCV, MCHC, reticulocytes, leucocytes and EPO. Repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and pattern recognition using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Orthogonal Projections of Latent Structures (OPLS) discriminant analysis (DA) investigated differences between Control and Transfusion groups over time. Significant increase in performance (15 ± 8%) and VO2max (17 ± 10%) (mean ± SD) could be measured 48 h after RBC re-infusion, and remained increased for up to four weeks in some subjects. In total, 533 blood samples were included in the study (Clean = 220, Transfused = 313). In response to blood transfusion, the largest change in hematological variables occurred 48 h after blood donation, when Control and Transfused groups could be separated with OPLS-DA (R2 = 0.76/Q2 = 0.59). RBC re-infusion resulted in the best model (R2 = 0.40/Q2 = 0.10) at the first sampling point (48 h), predicting one false positive and one false negative. Over all, a 25% and 86% false positives ratio was

  4. Myeloid dendritic cells are potential players in human neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola eBossù

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s (AD and Parkinson’s (PD diseases are devastating neurodegenerative disturbances wherein neuroinflammation is a chronic pathogenic process with high therapeutic potential. Major mediators of AD/PD neuroimmune processes are resident immune cells, but immune cells derived from periphery may also participate and to some extent modify neuroinflammation. Specifically, blood borne myeloid cells emerge as crucial components of AD/PD progression and susceptibility. Among these, dendritic cells (DCs are key immune orchestrators and players of brain immune surveillance: we candidate them as potential mediators of both AD and PD and as relevant cell model for unraveling myeloid cell role in neurodegeneration. Hence, we recapitulate and discuss emerging data suggesting that blood-derived DCs play a role in experimental and human neurodegenerative diseases. In humans, in particular, DCs are modified by in vitro culture with neurodegeneration-associated pathogenic factors and dysregulated in AD patients, while the levels of DC precursors are decreased in AD and PD patients’ blood, possibly as an index of their recruitment to the brain. Overall, we emphasize the need to explore the impact of DCs on neurodegeneration to uncover peripheral immune mechanisms of pathogenic importance, recognize potential biomarkers and improve therapeutic approaches for neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. Dendritic cell targeted vaccines: Recent progresses and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pengfei; Liu, Xinsheng; Sun, Yuefeng; Zhou, Peng; Wang, Yonglu; Zhang, Yongguang

    2016-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are known to be a set of morphology, structure and function of heterogeneous professional antigen presenting cells (APCs), as well as the strongest functional antigen presenting cells, which can absorb, process and present antigens. As the key regulators of innate and adaptive immune responses, DCs are at the center of the immune system and capable of interacting with both B cells and T cells, thereby manipulating the humoral and cellular immune responses. DCs provide an essential link between the innate and adaptive immunity, and the strong immune activation function of DCs and their properties of natural adjuvants, make them a valuable target for antigen delivery. Targeting antigens to DC-specific endocytic receptors in combination with the relevant antibodies or ligands along with immunostimulatory adjuvants has been recently recognized as a promising strategy for designing an effective vaccine that elicits a strong and durable T cell response against intracellular pathogens and cancer. This opinion article provides a brief summary of the rationales, superiorities and challenges of existing DC-targeting approaches.

  6. Group 2 innate lymphoid cells license dendritic cells to potentiate memory TH2 cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Timotheus Y F; Hwang, You Yi; Scanlon, Seth T; Zaghouani, Habib; Garbi, Natalio; Fallon, Padraic G; McKenzie, Andrew N J

    2016-01-01

    Rapid activation of memory CD4(+) T helper 2 (TH2) cells during allergic inflammation requires their recruitment into the affected tissue. Here we demonstrate that group 2 innate lymphoid (ILC2) cells have a crucial role in memory TH2 cell responses, with targeted depletion of ILC2 cells profoundly impairing TH2 cell localization to the lungs and skin of sensitized mice after allergen re-challenge. ILC2-derived interleukin 13 (IL-13) is critical for eliciting production of the TH2 cell-attracting chemokine CCL17 by IRF4(+)CD11b(+)CD103(-) dendritic cells (DCs). Consequently, the sentinel function of DCs is contingent on ILC2 cells for the generation of an efficient memory TH2 cell response. These results elucidate a key innate mechanism in the regulation of the immune memory response to allergens.

  7. Molecular Mechanisms of Induction of Tolerant and Tolerogenic Intestinal Dendritic Cells in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steimle, Alex; Frick, Julia-Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    How does the host manage to tolerate its own intestinal microbiota? A simple question leading to complicated answers. In order to maintain balanced immune responses in the intestine, the host immune system must tolerate commensal bacteria in the gut while it has to simultaneously keep the ability to fight pathogens and to clear infections. If this tender equilibrium is disturbed, severe chronic inflammatory reactions can result. Tolerogenic intestinal dendritic cells fulfil a crucial role in balancing immune responses and therefore creating homeostatic conditions and preventing from uncontrolled inflammation. Although several dendritic cell subsets have already been characterized to play a pivotal role in this process, less is known about definite molecular mechanisms of how intestinal dendritic cells are converted into tolerogenic ones. Here we review how gut commensal bacteria interact with intestinal dendritic cells and why this bacteria-host cell interaction is crucial for induction of dendritic cell tolerance in the intestine. Hereby, different commensal bacteria can have distinct effects on the phenotype of intestinal dendritic cells and these effects are mainly mediated by impacting toll-like receptor signalling in dendritic cells.

  8. Caspases regulate VAMP-8 expression and phagocytosis in dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Yong Hou Sunny; Cai, Deyu Tarika; Huang, Dachuan; Wang, Cheng Chun; Wong, Siew Heng

    2009-09-18

    During an inflammation and upon encountering pathogens, immature dendritic cells (DC) undergo a maturation process to become highly efficient in presenting antigens. This transition from immature to mature state is accompanied by various physiological, functional and morphological changes including reduction of caspase activity and inhibition of phagocytosis in the mature DC. Caspases are cysteine proteases which play essential roles in apoptosis, necrosis and inflammation. Here, we demonstrate that VAMP-8, (a SNARE protein of the early/late endosomes) which has been shown previously to inhibit phagocytosis in DC, is a substrate of caspases. Furthermore, we identified two putative conserved caspase recognition/cleavage sites on the VAMP-8 protein. Consistent with the up-regulation of VAMP-8 expression upon treatment with caspase inhibitor (CI), immature DC treated with CI exhibits lower phagocytosis activity. Thus, our results highlight the role of caspases in regulating VAMP-8 expression and subsequently phagocytosis during maturation of DC.

  9. Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells and the Control of Herpesvirus Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Baranek

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Type-I interferons (IFN-I are cytokines essential for vertebrate antiviral defense, including against herpesviruses. IFN-I have potent direct antiviral activities and also mediate a multiplicity of immunoregulatory functions, which can either promote or dampen antiviral adaptive immune responses. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs are the professional producers of IFN-I in response to many viruses, including all of the herpesviruses tested. There is strong evidence that pDCs could play a major role in the initial orchestration of both innate and adaptive antiviral immune responses. Depending on their activation pattern, pDC responses may be either protective or detrimental to the host. Here, we summarize and discuss current knowledge regarding pDC implication in the physiopathology of mouse and human herpesvirus infections, and we discuss how pDC functions could be manipulated in immunotherapeutic settings to promote health over disease.

  10. Functional RNA delivery targeted to dendritic cells by synthetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Kenneth C; Bassi, Isabelle; Démoulins, Thomas; Thomann-Harwood, Lisa J; Ruggli, Nicolas

    2012-09-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are essential to many aspects of immune defense development and regulation. They provide important targets for prophylactic and therapeutic delivery. While protein delivery has had considerable success, RNA delivery is still expanding. Delivering RNA molecules for RNAi has shown particular success and there are reports on successful delivery of mRNA. Central, therein, is the application of cationic entities. Following endocytosis of the delivery vehicle for the RNA, cationic entities should promote vesicular membrane perturbation, facilitating cytosolic release. The present review explains the diversity of DC function in immune response development and control. Promotion of delivered RNA cytosolic release is discussed, relating to immunoprophylactic and therapeutic potential, and DC endocytic machinery is reviewed, showing how DC endocytic pathways influence the handling of internalized material. The potential advantages for application of replicating RNA are presented and discussed, in consideration of their value and development in the near future.

  11. Cytokine-producing dendritic cells in the pathogenesis of inflammatory skin diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson-Huang, Leanne M.; McNutt, N. Scott; Krueger, James G.; Lowes, Michelle A.

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory skin diseases can be examined from many viewpoints. In this review, we consider three distinct cutaneous inflammatory diseases from the point of view of their major lesional dendritic cell (DC) subpopulations. The DC populations considered are Langerhans cells, myeloid DCs, and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs), with specific attention to the presence and role of the inflammatory counterparts of these cells. From such a “dendritic cell-centric” focus, psoriasis, atopic dermatitis (AD), and...

  12. Reconstruction of beagle hemi-mandibular defects with allogenic mandibular scaffolds and autologous mesenchymal stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ChangKui Liu

    Full Text Available Massive bone allografts are frequently used in orthopedic reconstructive surgery, but carry a high failure rate of approximately 25%. We tested whether treatment of graft with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can increase the integration of massive allografts (hemi-mandible in a large animal model.Thirty beagle dogs received surgical left-sided hemi-mandibular defects, and then divided into two equal groups. Bony defects of the control group were reconstructed using allografts only. Those of the experimental group were reconstructed using allogenic mandibular scaffold-loaded autologous MSCs. Beagles from each group were killed at 4 (n = 4, 12 (n = 4, 24 (n = 4 or 48 weeks (n = 3 postoperatively. CT and micro-CT scans, histological analyses and the bone mineral density (BMD of transplants were used to evaluate defect reconstruction outcomes.Gross and CT examinations showed that the autologous bone grafts had healed in both groups. At 48 weeks, the allogenic mandibular scaffolds of the experimental group had been completely replaced by new bone, which has a smaller surface area to that of the original allogenic scaffold, whereas the scaffold in control dogs remained the same size as the original allogenic scaffold throughout. At 12 weeks, the BMD of the experimental group was significantly higher than the control group (p<0.05, and all micro-architectural parameters were significantly different between groups (p<0.05. Histological analyses showed almost all transplanted allogeneic bone was replaced by new bone, principally fibrous ossification, in the experimental group, which differed from the control group where little new bone formed.Our study demonstrated the feasibility of MSC-loaded allogenic mandibular scaffolds for the reconstruction of hemi-mandibular defects. Further studies are needed to test whether these results can be surpassed by the use of allogenic mandibular scaffolds loaded with a combination of MSCs and osteoinductive growth

  13. Polyelectrolyte coating of ferumoxytol nanoparticles for labeling of dendritic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celikkin, Nehar; Jakubcová, Lucie; Zenke, Martin [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Cell Biology, RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Helmholtz Institute for Biomedical Engineering, RWTH Aachen University, Pauwelsstrasse 20, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Hoss, Mareike [Institute of Pathology, Electron Microscopy Facility, RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Wong, John Erik, E-mail: John.Wong@avt.rwth-aachen.de [Chemical Process Engineering, RWTH Aachen University, Turmstrasse 46, 52056 Aachen (Germany); DWI – Leibniz Institute for Interactive Materials Research, Forckenbeckstrasse 50, Aachen (Germany); Hieronymus, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.hieronymus@rwth-aachen.de [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Cell Biology, RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Helmholtz Institute for Biomedical Engineering, RWTH Aachen University, Pauwelsstrasse 20, 52074 Aachen (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    Engineered magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are emerging to be used as cell tracers, drug delivery vehicles, and contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for enhanced theragnostic applications in biomedicine. In vitro labeling of target cell populations with MNPs and their implantation into animal models and patients shows promising outcomes in monitoring successful cell engraftment, differentiation and migration by using MRI. Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells that initiate adaptive immune responses. Thus, DCs have been the focus of cellular immunotherapy and are increasingly applied in clinical trials. Here, we addressed the coating of different polyelectrolytes (PE) around ferumoxytol particles using the layer-by-layer technique. The impact of PE-coated ferumoxytol particles for labeling of DCs and Flt3{sup +} DC progenitors was then investigated. The results from our studies revealed that PE-coated ferumoxytol particles can be readily employed for labeling of DC and DC progenitors and thus are potentially suitable as contrast agents for MRI tracking.

  14. Heat Shock Protein 96 Induces Maturation of Dendritic Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunxia Cao; Wei Yang; Yonglie Chu; Qingguang Liu; Liang Yu; Cheng'en Pan

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Heat shock protein (HSP) has the promiscuous abilities to chaperone and present a broad repertoire of tumor antigens to antigen presenting cells including DCs. In this report, we analyzed the modulation of immature DC by HSP 96 (gp96).Method: Murine bone marrow-derived DC was induced by GM-CSF plus IL-4, which aped the immunostimulatory effects of DC.Cocultured DC and gp96-peptide complexes (gp96-PC) or inactivated H22 cells, the expression of MHC class Ⅱ, CD40, CD80 was quantified by flow cytometry. The concentration of IL-12 and TNF- in culture supernatants were determined by ELISA.[51] Cr release assay was used to test specific cytotoxic T cell. Results: Our study demonstrated that the extent of DC maturation induced by gp96-PC, which was reflected in surface density of costimulatory and MHC Ⅱ molecules, was correlated with the secretion of IL-12 and with the T cellactivating potential in vitro. Conclusion: Heat shock protein 96 could be isolated and purified from H22 cells and could induce maturation of dendritic cell. Our findings might be relevance to the use of DC vaccine in therapy of human tumors.

  15. Spatial distribution of excitatory synapses on the dendrites of ganglion cells in the mouse retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yin-Peng; Chiao, Chuan-Chin

    2014-01-01

    Excitatory glutamatergic inputs from bipolar cells affect the physiological properties of ganglion cells in the mammalian retina. The spatial distribution of these excitatory synapses on the dendrites of retinal ganglion cells thus may shape their distinct functions. To visualize the spatial pattern of excitatory glutamatergic input into the ganglion cells in the mouse retina, particle-mediated gene transfer of plasmids expressing postsynaptic density 95-green fluorescent fusion protein (PSD95-GFP) was used to label the excitatory synapses. Despite wide variation in the size and morphology of the retinal ganglion cells, the expression of PSD95 puncta was found to follow two general rules. Firstly, the PSD95 puncta are regularly spaced, at 1-2 µm intervals, along the dendrites, whereby the presence of an excitatory synapse creates an exclusion zone that rules out the presence of other glutamatergic synaptic inputs. Secondly, the spatial distribution of PSD95 puncta on the dendrites of diverse retinal ganglion cells are similar in that the number of excitatory synapses appears to be less on primary dendrites and to increase to a plateau on higher branch order dendrites. These observations suggest that synaptogenesis is spatially regulated along the dendritic segments and that the number of synaptic contacts is relatively constant beyond the primary dendrites. Interestingly, we also found that the linear puncta density is slightly higher in large cells than in small cells. This may suggest that retinal ganglion cells with a large dendritic field tend to show an increased connectivity of excitatory synapses that makes up for their reduced dendrite density. Mapping the spatial distribution pattern of the excitatory synapses on retinal ganglion cells thus provides explicit structural information that is essential for our understanding of how excitatory glutamatergic inputs shape neuronal responses.

  16. Dendritic Arborization Patterns of Small Juxtaglomerular Cell Subtypes within the Rodent Olfactory Bulb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bywalez, Wolfgang G.; Ona-Jodar, Tiffany; Lukas, Michael; Ninkovic, Jovica; Egger, Veronica

    2017-01-01

    Within the glomerular layer of the rodent olfactory bulb, numerous subtypes of local interneurons contribute to early processing of incoming sensory information. Here we have investigated dopaminergic and other small local juxtaglomerular cells in rats and mice and characterized their dendritic arborization pattern with respect to individual glomeruli by fluorescent labeling via patching and reconstruction of dendrites and glomerular contours from two-photon imaging data. Dopaminergic neurons were identified in a transgenic mouse line where the expression of dopamine transporter (DAT) was labeled with GFP. Among the DAT+ cells we found a small short-axon cell (SAC) subtype featuring hitherto undescribed dendritic specializations. These densely ramifying structures clasped mostly around somata of other juxtaglomerular neurons, which were also small, non-dopaminergic and to a large extent non-GABAergic. Clasping SACs were observed also in wild-type mice and juvenile rats. In DAT+ SAC dendrites, single backpropagating action potentials evoked robust calcium entry throughout both clasping and non-clasping compartments. Besides clasping SACs, most other small neurons either corresponded to the classical periglomerular cell type (PGCs), which was never DAT+, or were undersized cells with a small dendritic tree and low excitability. Aside from the presence of clasps in SAC dendrites, many descriptors of dendritic morphology such as the number of dendrites and the extent of branching were not significantly different between clasping SACs and PGCs. However, a detailed morphometric analysis in relation to glomerular contours revealed that the dendrites of clasping SACs arborized mostly in the juxtaglomerular space and never entered more than one glomerulus (if at all), whereas most PGC dendrites were restricted to their parent glomerulus, similar to the apical tufts of mitral cells. These complementary arborization patterns might underlie a highly complementary functional

  17. Dendritic differentiation of cerebellar Purkinje cells is promoted by ryanodine receptors expressed by Purkinje and granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Ryo; Sakata, Shin-ichi; Naito, Asami; Hirashima, Naohide; Tanaka, Masahiko

    2014-04-01

    Cerebellar Purkinje cells have the most elaborate dendritic trees among neurons in the brain. We examined the roles of ryanodine receptor (RyR), an intracellular Ca(2+) release channel, in the dendrite formation of Purkinje cells using cerebellar cell cultures. In the cerebellum, Purkinje cells express RyR1 and RyR2, whereas granule cells express RyR2. When ryanodine (10 µM), a blocker of RyR, was added to the culture medium, the elongation and branching of Purkinje cell dendrites were markedly inhibited. When we transferred small interfering RNA (siRNA) against RyR1 into Purkinje cells using single-cell electroporation, dendritic branching but not elongation of the electroporated Purkinje cells was inhibited. On the other hand, transfection of RyR2 siRNA into granule cells also inhibited dendritic branching of Purkinje cells. Furthermore, ryanodine reduced the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the culture medium. The ryanodine-induced inhibition of dendritic differentiation was partially rescued when BDNF was exogenously added to the culture medium in addition to ryanodine. Overall, these results suggest that RyRs expressed by both Purkinje and granule cells play important roles in promoting the dendritic differentiation of Purkinje cells and that RyR2 expressed by granule cells is involved in the secretion of BDNF from granule cells.

  18. DMPD: Proximal effects of Toll-like receptor activation in dendritic cells. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17142025 Proximal effects of Toll-like receptor activation in dendritic cells. Watt...) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Proximal effects of Toll-like receptor activation in dendritic cells. PubmedID... 17142025 Title Proximal effects of Toll-like receptor activation in dendritic ce

  19. Exosomes from B cells and Dendritic cells: mechanisms of formation, secretion and targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Buschow, S.I.

    2006-01-01

    Many cell types, including dendritic cells (DC) and B cells, secrete small vesicles called exosomes. Exosomes from immune cells are thought to have immuno-regulatory functions but their precise role remains unresolved. The aim of the studies presented in this thesis was to get more insight into the factors that determine exosome formation, composition and secretion as well as to learn more about their physiological relevance. Exosomes are equivalent to Luminal Vesicles (LV) of Multi Vesicular...

  20. Novel immunomodulatory effects of adiponectin on dendritic cell functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Julia Yuen Shan; Li, Daxu; Ho, Derek; Peng, Jiao; Xu, Aimin; Lamb, Jonathan; Chen, Yan; Tam, Paul Kwong Hang

    2011-05-01

    Adiponectin (ADN) is an adipocytokine with anti-inflammatory properties. Although it has been reported that ADN can inhibit the immunostimulatory function of monocytes and macrophages, little is known of its effect on dendritic cells (DC). Recent data suggest that ADN can regulate immune responses. DCs are uniquely specialised antigen presenting cells that play a central role in the initiation of immunity and tolerance. In this study, we have investigated the immuno- modulatory effects of ADN on DC functions. We found that ADN has only moderate effect on the differentiation of murine bone marrow (BM) derived DCs but altered the phenotype of DCs. The expression of major histocompatibilty complex class II (MHCII), CD80 and CD86 on ADN conditioned DCs (ADN-DCs) was lower than that on untreated cells. The production of IL-12p40 was also suppressed in ADN-DCs. Interestingly, ADN treated DCs showed an increase in the expression of the inhibitory molecule, programmed death-1 ligand (PDL-1) compared to untreated cells. In vitro co-culture of ADN-DCs with allogeneic T cells led to a decrease in T cell proliferation and reduction of IL-2 production. Concomitant with that, a higher percentage of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) was detected in co-cultures of T cells and ADN-DCs. Blocking PD-1/PDL-1 pathway could partially restore T cell function. These findings suggest that the immunomodulatory effect of ADN on immune responses could be at least partially be mediated by its ability to alter DC function. The PD-1/PDL-1 pathway and the enhancement of Treg expansion are implicated in the immunomodulatory mechanisms.

  1. Tumor-derived death receptor 6 modulates dendritic cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRosa, David C; Ryan, Paul J; Okragly, Angela; Witcher, Derrick R; Benschop, Robert J

    2008-06-01

    Studies in murine models of cancer as well as in cancer patients have demonstrated that the immune response to cancer is often compromised. This paradigm is viewed as one of the major mechanisms of tumor escape. Many therapies focus on employing the professional antigen presenting dendritic cells (DC) as a strategy to overcome immune inhibition in cancer patients. Death receptor 6 (DR6) is an orphan member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF21). It is overexpressed on many tumor cells and DR6(-/-) mice display altered immunity. We investigated whether DR6 plays a role in tumorigenesis by negatively affecting the generation of anti-tumor activity. We show that DR6 is uniquely cleaved from the cell surface of tumor cell lines by the membrane-associated matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-14, which is often overexpressed on tumor cells and is associated with malignancy. We also demonstrate that >50% of monocytes differentiating into DC die when the extracellular domain of DR6 is present. In addition, DR6 affects the cell surface phenotype of the resulting immature DC and changes their cytokine production upon stimulation with LPS/IFN-gamma. The effects of DR6 are mostly amended when these immature DC are matured with IL-1beta/TNF-alpha, as measured by cell surface phenotype and their ability to present antigen. These results implicate MMP-14 and DR6 as a mechanism tumor cells can employ to actively escape detection by the immune system by affecting the generation of antigen presenting cells.

  2. SK2 channel modulation contributes to compartment-specific dendritic plasticity in cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuki, Gen; Piochon, Claire; Adelman, John P; Hansel, Christian

    2012-07-12

    Small-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (SK channels) modulate excitability and curtail excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) in neuronal dendrites. Here, we demonstrate long-lasting plasticity of intrinsic excitability (IE) in dendrites that results from changes in the gain of this regulatory mechanism. Using dendritic patch-clamp recordings from rat cerebellar Purkinje cells, we find that somatic depolarization or parallel fiber (PF) burst stimulation induce long-term amplification of synaptic responses to climbing fiber (CF) or PF stimulation and enhance the amplitude of passively propagated sodium spikes. Dendritic plasticity is mimicked and occluded by the SK channel blocker apamin and is absent in Purkinje cells from SK2 null mice. Triple-patch recordings from two dendritic sites and the soma and confocal calcium imaging studies show that local stimulation limits dendritic plasticity to the activated compartment of the dendrite. This plasticity mechanism allows Purkinje cells to adjust the SK2-mediated control of dendritic excitability in an activity-dependent manner.

  3. Recombinant human collagen III gel for transplantation of autologous skin cells in porcine full-thickness wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuutila, Kristo; Peura, Matti; Suomela, Sari; Hukkanen, Mika; Siltanen, Antti; Harjula, Ari; Vuola, Jyrki; Kankuri, Esko

    2015-12-01

    Complex skin wounds, such as chronic ulcers and deep burns, require lengthy treatments and cause extensive burdens on healthcare and the economy. Use of biomaterials and cell transplantation may improve traditional treatments and promote the healing of difficult-to-treat wounds. In this study, we investigated the use of recombinant human collagen III (rhCol-III) gel as a delivery vehicle for cultured autologous skin cells (keratinocytes only or keratinocyte-fibroblast mixtures). We examined its effect on the healing of full-thickness wounds in a porcine wound-healing model. Two Landrace pigs were used for the study. Fourteen deep dermal wounds were created on the back of each pig with an 8 mm biopsy punch. Syringes containing acellular rhCol-III gel (n = 8) or rhCol-III gel with autologous keratinocytes (n = 8) or rhCol-III gel with autologous keratinocytes and fibroblasts (n = 8) were applied into wounds. Untreated wounds were used as controls for the treatment groups (n = 4). We used rhCol-III gel to manufacture a cell-delivery syringe containing autologous skin cells. In a full-thickness wound-healing model, we observed that rhCol-III gel enhances early granulation tissue formation. Interestingly, we found cell type-dependent differences in the stability of rhCol-III in vivo. Fibroblast-containing gel was effectively removed from the wound, whereas gels without cells or with keratinocytes only remained intact. Our results demonstrate that the properties of rhCol-III gel for skin cell transplantation can be significantly altered in a cell type-dependent manner.

  4. Impact of Dendritic Size and Dendritic Topology on Burst Firing in Pyramidal Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Elburg, Ronald A. J.; van Ooyen, Arjen

    2010-01-01

    Neurons display a wide range of intrinsic firing patterns. A particularly relevant pattern for neuronal signaling and synaptic plasticity is burst firing, the generation of clusters of action potentials with short interspike intervals. Besides ion-channel composition, dendritic morphology appears to

  5. Ex vivo generation of dendritic cells from cryopreserved, post-induction chemotherapy, mobilized leukapheresis from pediatric patients with medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Smita K; Driscoll, Timothy; Boczkowski, David; Schmittling, Robert; Reynolds, Renee; Johnson, Laura A; Grant, Gerald; Fuchs, Herbert; Bigner, Darell D; Sampson, John H; Gururangan, Sridharan; Mitchell, Duane A

    2015-10-01

    Generation of patient-derived, autologous dendritic cells (DCs) is a critical component of cancer immunotherapy with ex vivo-generated, tumor antigen-loaded DCs. An important factor in the ability to generate DCs is the potential impact of prior therapies on DC phenotype and function. We investigated the ability to generate DCs using cells harvested from pediatric patients with medulloblastoma for potential evaluation of DC-RNA based vaccination approach in this patient population. Cells harvested from medulloblastoma patient leukapheresis following induction chemotherapy and granulocyte colony stimulating factor mobilization were cryopreserved prior to use in DC generation. DCs were generated from the adherent CD14+ monocytes using standard procedures and analyzed for cell recovery, phenotype and function. To summarize, 4 out of 5 patients (80%) had sufficient monocyte recovery to permit DC generation, and we were able to generate DCs from 3 out of these 4 patient samples (75%). Overall, we successfully generated DCs that met phenotypic requisites for DC-based cancer therapy from 3 out of 5 (60%) patient samples and met both phenotypic and functional requisites from 2 out of 5 (40%) patient samples. This study highlights the potential to generate functional DCs for further clinical treatments from refractory patients that have been heavily pretreated with myelosuppressive chemotherapy. Here we demonstrate the utility of evaluating the effect of the currently employed standard-of-care therapies on the ex vivo generation of DCs for DC-based clinical studies in cancer patients.

  6. Generation of functional monocyte-derived fast dendritic cells suitable for clinical application in the absence of interleukin-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Gamal

    2011-10-01

    To develop dendritic cells (DCs)-based immunotherapy for cancer patients, it is necessary to have a standardized, reproducible, fast, and easy to use protocol for in vitro generation of fully functional DCs. Recently, a new strategy was described for differentiation and maturation of human monocyte (Mo)-derived fast-DCs with full T cell stimulatory capacity within only 48-72 h of in vitro culture. Interleukin (IL)-6 plus tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-1β, and prostaglandin (PG)-E(2) were used in this strategy to induce maturation of the generated DCs. The present study further modifies this strategy by excluding IL-6 from the cytokines cocktail used for DCs maturation. The results showed that maturation of fast-DCs without IL-6 did not significantly alter the morphology, phenotype and the yield of mature DCs (P > 0.05, compared with those generated with IL-6). Moreover, fast-DCs generated without IL-6 are functional antigen presenting cells, have the ability to induce tetanus toxoid-specific autologous T cell proliferation, and are suitable for gene delivery through adenoviral vector transduction as those generated with IL-6 (P > 0.05). In conclusion, the present study proves that fully mature and functional Mo-derived fast-DCs can be generated in vitro without adding IL-6, which not only reduces the number of required recombinant cytokines, but may also resemble DCs development in vivo more closely.

  7. Plerixafor as preemptive strategy results in high success rates in autologous stem cell mobilization failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worel, Nina; Fritsch, Gerhard; Agis, Hermine; Böhm, Alexandra; Engelich, Georg; Leitner, Gerda C; Geissler, Klaus; Gleixner, Karoline; Kalhs, Peter; Buxhofer-Ausch, Veronika; Keil, Felix; Kopetzky, Gerhard; Mayr, Viktor; Rabitsch, Werner; Reisner, Regina; Rosskopf, Konrad; Ruckser, Reinhard; Zoghlami, Claudia; Zojer, Niklas; Greinix, Hildegard T

    2016-08-31

    Plerixafor in combination with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is approved for autologous stem cell mobilization in poor mobilizing patients with multiple myeloma or malignant lymphoma. The purpose of this study was to evaluate efficacy and safety of plerixafor in an immediate rescue approach, administrated subsequently to G-CSF alone or chemotherapy and G-CSF in patients at risk for mobilization failure. Eighty-five patients mobilized with G-CSF alone or chemotherapy were included. Primary endpoint was the efficacy of the immediate rescue approach of plerixafor to achieve ≥2.0 × 10(6) CD34(+) cells/kg for a single or ≥5 × 10(6) CD34(+) cells/kg for a double transplantation and potential differences between G-CSF and chemotherapy-based mobilization. Secondary objectives included comparison of stem cell graft composition including CD34(+) cell and lymphocyte subsets with regard to the mobilization regimen applied. No significant adverse events were recorded. A median 3.9-fold increase in CD34(+) cells following plerixafor was observed, resulting in 97% patients achieving at least ≥2 × 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg. Significantly more differentiated granulocyte and monocyte forming myeloid progenitors were collected after chemomobilization whereas more CD19(+) and natural killer cells were collected after G-CSF. Fifty-two patients underwent transplantation showing rapid and durable engraftment, irrespectively of the stem cell mobilization regimen used. The addition of plerixafor in an immediate rescue model is efficient and safe after both, G-CSF and chemomobilization and results in extremely high success rates. Whether the differences in graft composition have a clinical impact on engraftment kinetics, immunologic recovery, and graft durability have to be analysed in larger prospective studies.

  8. Dendritic Cells as Pharmacological Tools for Cancer Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguille, Sébastien; Smits, Evelien L; Bryant, Christian; Van Acker, Heleen H; Goossens, Herman; Lion, Eva; Fromm, Phillip D; Hart, Derek N; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F; Berneman, Zwi N

    2015-10-01

    Although the earliest—rudimentary—attempts at exploiting the immune system for cancer therapy can be traced back to the late 18th Century, it was not until the past decade that cancer immunotherapeutics have truly entered mainstream clinical practice. Given their potential to stimulate both adaptive and innate antitumor immune responses, dendritic cells (DCs) have come under intense scrutiny in recent years as pharmacological tools for cancer immunotherapy. Conceptually, the clinical effectiveness of this form of active immunotherapy relies on the completion of three critical steps: 1) the DCs used as immunotherapeutic vehicles must properly activate the antitumor immune effector cells of the host, 2) these immune effector cells must be receptive to stimulation by the DCs and be competent to mediate their antitumor effects, which 3) requires overcoming the various immune-inhibitory mechanisms used by the tumor cells. In this review, following a brief overview of the pivotal milestones in the history of cancer immunotherapy, we will introduce the reader to the basic immunobiological and pharmacological principles of active cancer immunotherapy using DCs. We will then discuss how current research is trying to define the optimal parameters for each of the above steps to realize the full clinical potential of DC therapeutics. Given its high suitability for immune interventions, acute myeloid leukemia was chosen here to showcase the latest research trends driving the field of DC-based cancer immunotherapy.

  9. Targeting Dendritic Cell Function during Systemic Autoimmunity to Restore Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan P. Mackern-Oberti

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Systemic autoimmune diseases can damage nearly every tissue or cell type of the body. Although a great deal of progress has been made in understanding the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, current therapies have not been improved, remain unspecific and are associated with significant side effects. Because dendritic cells (DCs play a major role in promoting immune tolerance against self-antigens (self-Ags, current efforts are focusing at generating new therapies based on the transfer of tolerogenic DCs (tolDCs during autoimmunity. However, the feasibility of this approach during systemic autoimmunity has yet to be evaluated. TolDCs may ameliorate autoimmunity mainly by restoring T cell tolerance and, thus, indirectly modulating autoantibody development. In vitro induction of tolDCs loaded with immunodominant self-Ags and subsequent cell transfer to patients would be a specific new therapy that will avoid systemic immunosuppression. Herein, we review recent approaches evaluating the potential of tolDCs for the treatment of systemic autoimmune disorders.

  10. Role of mucosal dendritic cells in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jan Hendrik Niess

    2008-01-01

    The gastrointestinal innate and adaptive immune system continuously faces the challenge of potent stimuli from the commensal microflora and food constituents.These local immune responses require a tight control,the outcome of which is in most cases the induction of tolerance.Local T cell immunity is an important compartment of the specific intestinal immune system.T cell reactivity is programmed during the initial stage of its activation by professional presenting cells.Mucosal dendritic cells(DCs)are assumed to play key roles in regulating immune responses in the antigen-rich gastrointestinal environment.Mucosal DCs are a heterogeneous population that can either initiate(innate and adaptive)immune responses,or control intestinal inflammation and maintain tolerance.Defects in this regulation are supposed to lead to the two major forms of inflammatory bowel disease(IBD),Crohn's disease(CD)and ulcerative colitis(UC).This review will discuss the emerging role of mucosal DCs in regulating intestinal inflammation and immune responses.(C)2008 The WJG Press.All rights reserved.

  11. Candida albicans mannoprotein influences the biological function of dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrella, Donatella; Bistoni, Giovanni; Corbucci, Cristina; Perito, Stefano; Vecchiarelli, Anna

    2006-04-01

    Cell wall components of fungi involved in induction of host immune response are predominantly proteins and glycoproteins, the latter being mainly mannoproteins (MP). In this study we analyse the interaction of the MP from Candida albicans (MP65) with dendritic cells (DC) and demonstrate that MP65 stimulates DC and induces the release of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and the activation of IL-12 gene, with maximal value 6 h post treatment. MP65 induces DC maturation by increasing costimulatory molecules and decreasing CD14 and FcgammaR molecule expression. The latter effect is partly mediated by toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and TLR4, and the MyD88-dependent pathway is involved in the process. MP65 enables DC to activate T cell response, its protein core is essential for induction of T cell activation, while its glycosylated portion primarily promotes cytokine production. The mechanisms involved in induction of protective response against C. albicans could be mediated by the MP65 antigen, suggesting that MP65 may be a suitable candidate vaccine.

  12. Exploration Of The Dendritic Cell Algorithm Using The Duration Calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Feng; Aickelin, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    As one of the newest members in Artificial Immune Systems (AIS), the Dendritic Cell Algorithm (DCA) has been applied to a range of problems. These applications mainly belong to the field of anomaly detection. However, real-time detection, a new challenge to anomaly detection, requires improvement on the real-time capability of the DCA. To assess such capability, formal methods in the research of rea-time systems can be employed. The findings of the assessment can provide guideline for the future development of the algorithm. Therefore, in this paper we use an interval logic based method, named the Duration Calculus (DC), to specify a simplified single-cell model of the DCA. Based on the DC specifications with further induction, we find that each individual cell in the DCA can perform its function as a detector in real-time. Since the DCA can be seen as many such cells operating in parallel, it is potentially capable of performing real-time detection. However, the analysis process of the standard DCA constrict...

  13. Mammal-derived respiratory lipocalin allergens do not exhibit dendritic cell-activating capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parviainen, S; Kinnunen, T; Rytkönen-Nissinen, M; Nieminen, A; Liukko, A; Virtanen, T

    2013-03-01

    Most mammal-derived respiratory allergens belong to the lipocalin family of proteins. Determinants of their allergenic capacity are still unknown. Innate immune cells, in particular dendritic cells, have been shown to be involved in the allergenicity of some proteins. As recognition by dendritic cells is one of the few plausible mechanisms for the allergenicity of proteins, we wanted to investigate their role in the allergenicity of lipocalin allergens. Therefore, we first incubated human monocyte-derived dendritic cells with immunologically functional recombinant allergens mouse Mus m 1, dog Can f 1 and 2, cow Bos d 2, horse Equ c 1 and natural Bos d 2. Then, the surface marker expression and cytokine production of dendritic cells and their capacity to promote T cell proliferation and Th2 immune deviation in naïve CD4(+) T cells were examined in vitro. We found that near to endotoxin-free lipocalin allergens had no effect on the activation, allostimulatory capacity or cytokine production of dendritic cells. The dendritic cells could not induce immune deviation in naïve CD4(+) T cells. In contrast, lipopolysaccharide activated the dendritic cells efficiently. However, lipocalin allergens were not able to modify the lipopolysaccharide-induced responses. We conclude that an important group of mammal-derived respiratory allergens, lipocalins, appear not to be able to activate dendritic cells, a major component involved in the allergenicity of some proteins. It is conceivable that this incapacity of lipocalin allergens to arouse innate immunity may be associated with their poor capacity to induce a strong T cell response, verified in several studies.

  14. Structured Dendritic Inhibition Supports Branch-Selective Integration in CA1 Pyramidal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloss, Erik B; Cembrowski, Mark S; Karsh, Bill; Colonell, Jennifer; Fetter, Richard D; Spruston, Nelson

    2016-03-02

    Neuronal circuit function is governed by precise patterns of connectivity between specialized groups of neurons. The diversity of GABAergic interneurons is a hallmark of cortical circuits, yet little is known about their targeting to individual postsynaptic dendrites. We examined synaptic connectivity between molecularly defined inhibitory interneurons and CA1 pyramidal cell dendrites using correlative light-electron microscopy and large-volume array tomography. We show that interneurons can be highly selective in their connectivity to specific dendritic branch types and, furthermore, exhibit precisely targeted connectivity to the origin or end of individual branches. Computational simulations indicate that the observed subcellular targeting enables control over the nonlinear integration of synaptic input or the initiation and backpropagation of action potentials in a branch-selective manner. Our results demonstrate that connectivity between interneurons and pyramidal cell dendrites is more precise and spatially segregated than previously appreciated, which may be a critical determinant of how inhibition shapes dendritic computation.

  15. Dendritic Cells under Hypoxia: How Oxygen Shortage Affects the Linkage between Innate and Adaptive Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winning, Sandra; Fandrey, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are considered as one of the main regulators of immune responses. They collect antigens, process them, and present typical antigenic structures to lymphocytes, thereby inducing an adaptive immune response. All these processes take place under conditions of oxygen shortage (hypoxia) which is often not considered in experimental settings. This review highlights how deeply hypoxia modulates human as well as mouse immature and mature dendritic cell functions. It tries to link in vitro results to actual in vivo studies and outlines how hypoxia-mediated shaping of dendritic cells affects the activation of (innate) immunity.

  16. Dendritic Cells under Hypoxia: How Oxygen Shortage Affects the Linkage between Innate and Adaptive Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Winning

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are considered as one of the main regulators of immune responses. They collect antigens, process them, and present typical antigenic structures to lymphocytes, thereby inducing an adaptive immune response. All these processes take place under conditions of oxygen shortage (hypoxia which is often not considered in experimental settings. This review highlights how deeply hypoxia modulates human as well as mouse immature and mature dendritic cell functions. It tries to link in vitro results to actual in vivo studies and outlines how hypoxia-mediated shaping of dendritic cells affects the activation of (innate immunity.

  17. Modulation of Dendritic Cell Responses by Parasites: A Common Strategy to Survive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César A. Terrazas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Parasitic infections are one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in our planet and the immune responses triggered by these organisms are critical to determine their outcome. Dendritic cells are key elements for the development of immunity against parasites; they control the responses required to eliminate these pathogens while maintaining host homeostasis. However, there is evidence showing that parasites can influence and regulate dendritic cell function in order to promote a more permissive environment for their survival. In this review we will focus on the strategies protozoan and helminth parasites have developed to interfere with dendritic cell activities as well as in the possible mechanisms involved.

  18. HIV-1-infected monocyte-derived dendritic cells do not undergo maturation but can elicit IL-10 production and T cell regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granelli-Piperno, Angela; Golebiowska, Angelika; Trumpfheller, Christine; Siegal, Frederick P.; Steinman, Ralph M.

    2004-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) undergo maturation during virus infection and thereby become potent stimulators of cell-mediated immunity. HIV-1 replicates in immature DCs, but we now find that infection is not accompanied by many components of maturation in either infected cells or uninfected bystanders. The infected cultures do not develop potent stimulating activity for the mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR), and the DCs producing HIV-1 gag p24 do not express CD83 and DC-lysosome-associated membrane protein maturation markers. If different maturation stimuli are applied to DCs infected with HIV-1, the infected cells selectively fail to mature. When DCs from HIV-1-infected patients are infected and cultured with autologous T cells, IL-10 was produced in 6 of 10 patients. These DC-T cell cocultures could suppress another immune response, the MLR. The regulation was partially IL-10-dependent and correlated in extent with the level of IL-10 produced. Suppressor cells only developed from infected patients, rather than healthy controls, and the DCs had to be exposed to live virus rather than HIV-1 gag peptides or protein. These results indicate that HIV-1-infected DCs have two previously unrecognized means to evade immune responses: maturation can be blocked reducing the efficacy of antigen presentation from infected cells, and T cell-dependent suppression can be induced.

  19. Technologies enabling autologous neural stem cell-based therapies for neurodegenerative disease and injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhru, Sasha H.

    The intrinsic abilities of mammalian neural stem cells (NSCs) to self-renew, migrate over large distances, and give rise to all primary neural cell types of the brain offer unprecedented opportunity for cell-based treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and injuries. This thesis discusses development of technologies in support of autologous NSC-based therapies, encompassing harvest of brain tissue biopsies from living human patients; isolation of NSCs from harvested tissue; efficient culture and expansion of NSCs in 3D polymeric microcapsule culture systems; optimization of microcapsules as carriers for efficient in vivo delivery of NSCs; genetic engineering of NSCs for drug-induced, enzymatic release of transplanted NSCs from microcapsules; genetic engineering for drug-induced differentiation of NSCs into specific therapeutic cell types; and synthesis of chitosan/iron-oxide nanoparticles for labeling of NSCs and in vivo tracking by cellular MRI. Sub-millimeter scale tissue samples were harvested endoscopically from subventricular zone regions of living patient brains, secondary to neurosurgical procedures including endoscopic third ventriculostomy and ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement. On average, 12,000 +/- 3,000 NSCs were isolated per mm 3 of subventricular zone tissue, successfully demonstrated in 26 of 28 patients, ranging in age from one month to 68 years. In order to achieve efficient expansion of isolated NSCs to clinically relevant numbers (e.g. hundreds of thousands of cells in Parkinson's disease and tens of millions of cells in multiple sclerosis), an extracellular matrix-inspired, microcapsule-based culture platform was developed. Initial culture experiments with murine NSCs yielded unprecedented expansion folds of 30x in 5 days, from initially minute NSC populations (154 +/- 15 NSCs per 450 mum diameter capsule). Within 7 days, NSCs expanded as almost perfectly homogenous populations, with 94.9% +/- 4.1% of cultured cells staining positive for

  20. Dendritic cell function in vivo during the steady state: a role in peripheral tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Ralph M; Hawiger, Daniel; Liu, Kang; Bonifaz, Laura; Bonnyay, David; Mahnke, Karsten; Iyoda, Tomonori; Ravetch, Jeffrey; Dhodapkar, Madhav; Inaba, Kayo; Nussenzweig, Michel

    2003-04-01

    The avoidance of autoimmunity requires mechanisms to actively silence or tolerize self reactive T cells in the periphery. During infection, dendritic cells are not only capturing microbial antigens, but also are processing self antigens from dying cells as well as innocuous environmental proteins. Since the dendritic cells are maturing in response to microbial and other stimuli, peptides will be presented from both noxious and innocuous antigens. Therefore it would be valuable to have mechanisms whereby dendritic cells, prior to infection, establish tolerance to those self and environmental antigens that can be processed upon pathogen encounter. In the steady state, prior to acute infection and inflammation, dendritic cells are in an immature state and not fully differentiated to carry out their known roles as inducers of immunity. These immature cells are not inactive, however. They continuously circulate through tissues and into lymphoid organs, capturing self antigens as well as innocuous environmental proteins. Recent experiments have provided direct evidence that antigen-loaded immature dendritic in vivo silence T cells either by deleting them or by expanding regulatory T cells. In this way, it is proposed that the immune system overcomes at least some of the risk of developing autoimmunity and chronic inflammation. It is proposed that dendritic cells play a major role in defining immunologic self, not only centrally in the thymus but also in the periphery.