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Sample records for autologous chondrocyte implantation

  1. Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation in Osteoarthritic Surroundings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ossendorff, Robert; Grad, Sibylle; Stoddart, Martin J

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) fails in up to 20% of cases. Advanced intra-articular degeneration paired with an inflammatory environment may be closely related to implantation failure. Certain cytokines have been identified to play a major role during early osteoarthritis....... PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and its potential inhibition by adalimumab on cartilage regeneration in an in vitro model of ACI. STUDY DESIGN: Controlled laboratory study. METHODS: Bovine articular chondrocytes were cultivated and transferred at passage 3 to fibrin...

  2. Autologous chondrocyte implantation: superior biologic properties of hyaline cartilage repairs.

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    Henderson, Ian; Lavigne, Patrick; Valenzuela, Herminio; Oakes, Barry

    2007-02-01

    Information regarding the quality of autologous chondrocyte implantation repair is needed to determine whether the current autologous chondrocyte implantation surgical technology and the subsequent biologic repair processes are capable of reliably forming durable hyaline or hyaline-like cartilage in vivo. We report and analyze the properties and qualities of autologous chondrocyte implantation repairs. We evaluated 66 autologous chondrocyte implantation repairs in 57 patients, 55 of whom had histology, indentometry, and International Cartilage Repair Society repair scoring at reoperation for mechanical symptoms or pain. International Knee Documentation Committee scores were used to address clinical outcome. Maximum stiffness, normalized stiffness, and International Cartilage Repair Society repair scoring were higher for hyaline articular cartilage repairs compared with fibrocartilage, with no difference in clinical outcome. Reoperations revealed 32 macroscopically abnormal repairs (Group B) and 23 knees with normal-looking repairs in which symptoms leading to arthroscopy were accounted for by other joint disorders (Group A). In Group A, 65% of repairs were either hyaline or hyaline-like cartilage compared with 28% in Group B. Autologous chondrocyte repairs composed of fibrocartilage showed more morphologic abnormalities and became symptomatic earlier than hyaline or hyaline-like cartilage repairs. The hyaline articular cartilage repairs had biomechanical properties comparable to surrounding cartilage and superior to those associated with fibrocartilage repairs.

  3. In-vitro chondrogenic potential of synovial stem cells and chondrocytes allocated for autologous chondrocyte implantation

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    Kubosch, Eva Johanna; Heidt, Emanuel; Niemeyer, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The use of passaged chondrocytes is the current standard for autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). De-differentiation due to amplification and donor site morbidity are known drawbacks highlighting the need for alternative cell sources. Methods: Via clinically validated flow cytometry...... analysis, we compared the expression of human stem cell and cartilage markers (collagen type 2 (Col2), aggrecan (ACAN), CD44) of chondrocytes (CHDR), passaged chondrocytes for ACI (CellGenix™), bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC), and synovial derived stem cells (SDSC). Results: Primary...

  4. MR imaging of autologous chondrocyte implantation of the knee

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    James, S.L.J.; Connell, D.A.; Saifuddin, A.; Skinner, J.A.; Briggs, T.W.R. [RNOH Stanmore, Department of Radiology, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2006-05-15

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is a surgical technique that is increasingly being used in the treatment of full-thickness defects of articular cartilage in the knee. It involves the arthroscopic harvesting and in vitro culture of chondrocytes that are subsequently implanted into a previously identified chondral defect. The aim is to produce a repair tissue that closely resembles hyaline articular cartilage that gradually becomes incorporated, restoring joint congruity. Over the long term, it is hoped that this will prevent the progression of full-thickness articular cartilage defects to osteoarthritis. This article reviews the indications and operative procedure performed in ACI. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences that provide optimal visualization of articular cartilage in the post-operative period are discussed. Normal appearances of ACI on MRI are presented along with common complications that are encountered with this technique. (orig.)

  5. Is gender influencing the biomechanical results after autologous chondrocyte implantation?

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    Kreuz, Peter C; Müller, Sebastian; Erggelet, Christoph; von Keudell, Arvind; Tischer, Thomas; Kaps, Christian; Niemeyer, Philipp; Hirschmüller, Anja

    2014-01-01

    The influence of gender on the biomechanical outcome after autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) including isokinetic muscle strength measurements has not been investigated. The present prospective study was performed to evaluate gender-specific differences in the biomechanical function 48 months after ACI. Fifty-two patients (mean age 35.6 ± 8.5 years) that met our inclusion criteria, underwent ACI with Bioseed C(®) and were evaluated with the KOOS score preoperatively, 6, 12 and 48 months after surgery. At final follow-up, 44 out of the 52 patients underwent biomechanical evaluation with isokinetic strength measurements of both knees. All data were evaluated separately for men and women and compared for each time interval using the Mann-Whitney U test. Clinical scores improved significantly over the whole study period (p genders. Isokinetic muscle strength measures are significantly worse in women (p role for the explanation of gender-specific results after ACI.

  6. The role of autologous chondrocyte implantation in the treatment of symptomatic chondromalacia patellae.

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    Macmull, Simon; Jaiswal, Parag K; Bentley, George; Skinner, John A; Carrington, Richard W J; Briggs, Tim W R

    2012-07-01

    Chondromalacia patella is a distinct clinical entity of abnormal softening of the articular cartilage of the patella, which results in chronic retropatellar pain. Its aetiology is still unclear but the process is thought to be a due to trauma to superficial chondrocytes resulting in a proteolytic enzymic breakdown of the matrix. Our aim was to assess the effectiveness of autologous chondrocyte implantation on patients with a proven symptomatic retropatellar lesion who had at least one failed conventional marrow-stimulating therapy. We performed chondrocyte implantation on 48 patients: 25 received autologous chondrocyte implantation with a type I/III membrane (ACI-C) method (Geistlich Biomaterials, Wolhusen, Switzerland), and 23 received the Matrix-assisted Chondrocyte Implantation (MACI) technique (Genzyme, Kastrup, Denmark). Over a mean follow-up period of 40.3 months, there was a statistically significant improvement in subjective pain scoring using the visual analogue scale (VAS) and objective functional scores using the Modified Cincinnati Rating System (MCS) in both groups. Chondromalacia patellae lesions responded well to chondrocyte implantation. Better results occurred with MACI than with ACI-C. Excellent and good results were achieved in 40% of ACI-C patients and 57% of MACI patients, but success of chondrocyte implantation was greater with medial/odd-facet lesions. Given that the MACI procedure is technically easier and less time consuming, we consider it to be useful for treating patients with symptomatic chondral defects secondary to chondromalacia patellae.

  7. Characteristic complications after autologous chondrocyte implantation for cartilage defects of the knee joint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemeyer, Philipp; Pestka, Jan M; Kreuz, Peter C

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is a well-established therapy for the treatment of isolated cartilage defects of the knee joint, little is known about typical complications and their treatment after ACI. HYPOTHESIS: Unsatisfactory outcome after ACI is associated...

  8. Sporting Activity Is Reduced 11 Years After First-Generation Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation in the Knee Joint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erdle, Benjamin; Herrmann, Simon; Porichis, Stella

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about long-term sporting activity after periosteal autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI-P) and its correlation to clinical, morphological, and ultrastructural cartilage characteristics on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). PURPOSE: To evaluate long-term sporting...

  9. Viability of chondrocytes seeded onto a collagen I/III membrane for matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation.

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    Hindle, Paul; Hall, Andrew C; Biant, Leela C

    2014-11-01

    Cell viability is crucial for effective cell-based cartilage repair. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of handling the membrane during matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation surgery on the viability of implanted chondrocytes. Images were acquired under five conditions: (i) Pre-operative; (ii) Handled during surgery; (iii) Cut edge; (iv) Thumb pressure applied; (v) Heavily grasped with forceps. Live and dead cell stains were used. Images were obtained for cell counting and morphology. Mean cell density was 6.60 × 10(5) cells/cm(2) (5.74-7.11 × 10(5) ) in specimens that did not have significant trauma decreasing significantly in specimens that had been grasped with forceps (p < 0.001) or cut (p = 0.004). Cell viability on delivery grade membrane was 75.1%(72.4-77.8%). This dropped to 67.4%(64.1-69.7%) after handling (p = 0.002), 56.3%(51.5-61.6%) after being thumbed (p < 0.001) and 28.8%(24.7-31.2%) after crushing with forceps (p < 0.001). When cut with scissors there was a band of cell death approximately 275 µm in width where cell viability decreased to 13.7%(10.2-18.2%, p < 0.001). Higher magnification revealed cells without the typical rounded appearance of chondrocytes. We found that confocal laser-scanning microscope (CLSM) can be used to quantify and image the fine morphology of cells on a matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI) membrane. Careful handling of the membrane is essential to minimise chondrocyte death during surgery. © 2014 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Deciphering chondrocyte behaviour in matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation to undergo accurate cartilage repair with hyaline matrix.

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    Demoor, M; Maneix, L; Ollitrault, D; Legendre, F; Duval, E; Claus, S; Mallein-Gerin, F; Moslemi, S; Boumediene, K; Galera, P

    2012-06-01

    Since the emergence in the 1990s of the autologous chondrocytes transplantation (ACT) in the treatment of cartilage defects, the technique, corresponding initially to implantation of chondrocytes, previously isolated and amplified in vitro, under a periosteal membrane, has greatly evolved. Indeed, the first generations of ACT showed their limits, with in particular the dedifferentiation of chondrocytes during the monolayer culture, inducing the synthesis of fibroblastic collagens, notably type I collagen to the detriment of type II collagen. Beyond the clinical aspect with its encouraging results, new biological substitutes must be tested to obtain a hyaline neocartilage. Therefore, the use of differentiated chondrocytes phenotypically stabilized is essential for the success of ACT at medium and long-term. That is why researchers try now to develop more reliable culture techniques, using among others, new types of biomaterials and molecules known for their chondrogenic activity, giving rise to the 4th generation of ACT. Other sources of cells, being able to follow chondrogenesis program, are also studied. The success of the cartilage regenerative medicine is based on the phenotypic status of the chondrocyte and on one of its essential component of the cartilage, type II collagen, the expression of which should be supported without induction of type I collagen. The knowledge accumulated by the scientific community and the experience of the clinicians will certainly allow to relief this technological challenge, which influence besides, the validation of such biological substitutes by the sanitary authorities. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Treatment of articular cartilage lesions of the knee by microfracture or autologous chondrocyte implantation: a systematic review.

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    Oussedik, Sam; Tsitskaris, Konstantinos; Parker, David

    2015-04-01

    We performed a systematic review of the treatment of articular cartilage lesions of the knee by microfracture or autologous chondrocyte implantation to determine the differences in patient outcomes after these procedures. We searched PubMed/Medline, Embase, and The Cochrane Library databases in the period from January 10 through January 20, 2013, and included 34 articles in our qualitative analysis. All studies showed improvement in outcome scores in comparison with baseline values, regardless of the treatment modality. The heterogeneity of the results presented in the studies precluded a meta-analysis. Microfracture appears to be effective in smaller lesions and is usually associated with a greater proportion of fibrocartilage production, which may have an effect on durability and eventual failure. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is an effective treatment that may result in a greater proportion of hyaline-like tissue at the repair site, which may in turn have a beneficial effect on durability and failure; it appears to be effective in larger lesions. Autologous chondrocyte implantation with periosteum has been shown to be associated with symptomatic cartilage hypertrophy more frequently than autologous chondrocyte implantation with collagen membrane. Matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte implantation is technically less challenging than the other techniques available, and in lesions greater than 4 cm(2), it has been shown to be more effective than microfracture. Level IV, systematic review of Level I-IV studies. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Gel-type autologous chondrocyte (Chondron™ implantation for treatment of articular cartilage defects of the knee

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    Chun Chung-Woo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gel-type autologous chondrocyte (Chondron™ implantations have been used for several years without using periosteum or membrane. This study involves evaluations of the clinical results of Chondron™ at many clinical centers at various time points during the postoperative patient follow-up. Methods Data from 98 patients with articular cartilage injury of the knee joint and who underwent Chondron™ implantation at ten Korean hospitals between January 2005 and November 2008, were included and were divided into two groups based on the patient follow-up period, i.e. 13~24-month follow-up and greater than 25-month follow-up. The telephone Knee Society Score obtained during telephone interviews with patients, was used as the evaluation tool. Results On the tKSS-A (telephone Knee Society Score-A, the score improved from 43.52 ± 20.20 to 89.71 ± 13.69 (P Conclusion Gel-type autologous chondrocyte implantation for chondral knee defects appears to be a safe and effective method for both decreasing pain and improving knee function.

  13. Advances in the Surgical Management of Articular Cartilage Defects: Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation Techniques in the Pipeline.

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    Stein, Spencer; Strauss, Eric; Bosco, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to gain insight into the latest methods of articular cartilage implantation (ACI) and to detail where they are in the Food and Drug Administration approval and regulatory process. A PubMed search was performed using the phrase "Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation" alone and with the words second generation and third generation. Additionally, clinicaltrials.gov was searched for the names of the seven specific procedures and the parent company websites were referenced. Two-Stage Techniques: BioCart II uses a FGF2v1 culture and a fibrinogen, thrombin matrix, whereas Hyalograft-C uses a Hyaff 11 matrix. MACI uses a collagen I/III matrix. Cartipatch consists of an agarose-alginate hydrogel. Neocart uses a high-pressure bioreactor for culturing with a type I collagen matrix. ChondroCelect makes use of a gene expression analysis to predict chondrocyte proliferation and has demonstrated significant clinical improvement, but failed to show superiority to microfracture in a phase III trial. One Step Technique: CAIS is an ACI procedure where harvested cartilage is minced and implanted into a matrix for defect filling. As full thickness defects in articular cartilage continue to pose a challenge to treat, new methods of repair are being researched. Later generation ACI has been developed to address the prevalence of fibrocartilage with microfracture and the complications associated with the periosteal flap of first generation ACI such as periosteal hypertrophy. The procedures and products reviewed here represent advances in tissue engineering, scaffolds and autologous chondrocyte culturing that may hold promise in our quest to alter the natural history of symptomatic chondral disease.

  14. Matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation for a large chondral defect in a professional football player: a case report

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    Beyzadeoglu Tahsin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte implantation is a well-known procedure for the treatment of cartilage defects, which aims to establish a regenerative milieu and restore hyaline cartilage. However, much less is known about third-generation autologous chondrocyte implantation application in high-level athletes. We report on the two-year follow-up outcome after matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte implantation to treat a large cartilage lesion of the lateral femoral condyle in a male Caucasian professional football player. Case presentation A 27-year-old male Caucasian professional football player was previously treated for cartilage problems of his left knee with two failed microfracture procedures resulting in a 9 cm2 Outerbridge Grade 4 chondral lesion at his lateral femoral condyle. Preoperative Tegner-Lysholm and Brittberg-Peterson scores were 64 and 58, and by the second year they were 91 and 6. An evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated filling of the defect with the signal intensity of the repair tissue resembling healthy cartilage. Second-look arthroscopy revealed robust, smooth cartilage covering his lateral femoral condyle. He returned to his former competitive level without restrictions or complaints one year after the procedure. Conclusions This case illustrates that robust cartilage tissue can be obtained with a matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte implantation procedure even after two failed microfracture procedures in a large (9 cm2 cartilage defect. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report on the application of the third-generation cell therapy treatment technique, matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte implantation, in a professional football player.

  15. Autologous chondrocyte implantation for cartilage injury treatment in Chiang Mai University Hospital: a case report.

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    Wongtriratanachai, Prasit; Pruksakorn, Dumnoensun; Pothacharoen, Peraphan; Nimkingratana, Puwapong; Pattamapaspong, Nuttaya; Phornphutkul, Chanakarn; Setsitthakun, Sasiwariya; Fongsatitkul, Ladda; Phrompaet, Sureeporn

    2013-11-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) has become one of the standard procedures for articular cartilage defect treatment. This technique provides a promising result. However the procedural process requires an approach of several steps from multidisciplinary teams. Although the success of this procedure has been reported from Srinakharinvirot University since 2007, the application of ACI is still limited in Thailand due to the complexity of processes and stringent quality control. This report is to present the first case of the cartilage defect treatment using the first generation-ACI under Chiang Mai University's (CMU) own facility and Ethics Committee. This paper also reviews the process of biotechnology procedures, patient selection, surgical, and rehabilitation techniques. The success of the first case is an important milestone for the further development of the CMU Human Translational Research Laboratory in near future.

  16. In vitro cell quality of articular chondrocytes assigned for autologous implantation in dependence of specific patient characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pestka, Jan M; Schmal, Hagen; Salzmann, Gian

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is a well-established therapeutic option for the treatment of cartilage defects of the knee joint. Since information concerning the cellular aspects of ACI is still limited, the aim of the present study was to investigate relevant differences...... between chondrocyte quality after in vitro cultivation and possible correlations with patient-specific factors. DESIGN: Cell quality of 252 consecutive ACI patients was assessed after chondrocyte in vitro expansion by determination of the expression of cartilage relevant surface marker CD44 and cartilage......, aggrecan or collagen type II nor cell density or viability after proliferation seemed to correlate with the grade of joint degeneration, defect aetiology or patient gender. However, chondrocytes harvested from the knee joints of patients at less than 20 years of age showed significantly higher expression...

  17. Cell Seeding Densities in Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation Techniques for Cartilage Repair.

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    Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Gomoll, Andreas H; Lind, Martin; Spector, Myron

    2012-04-01

    Cartilage repair techniques have been among the most intensively investigated treatments in orthopedics for the past decade, and several different treatment modalities are currently available. Despite the extensive research effort within this field, the generation of hyaline cartilage remains a considerable challenge. There are many parameters attendant to each of the cartilage repair techniques that can affect the amount and types of reparative tissue generated in the cartilage defect, and some of the most fundamental of these parameters have yet to be fully investigated. For procedures in which in vitro-cultured autologous chondrocytes are implanted under a periosteal or synthetic membrane cover, or seeded onto a porous membrane or scaffold, little is known about how the number of cells affects the clinical outcome. Few published clinical studies address the cell seeding density that was employed. The principal objective of this review is to provide an overview of the cell seeding densities used in cell-based treatments currently available in the clinic for cartilage repair. Select preclinical studies that have informed the use of specific cell seeding densities in the clinic are also discussed.

  18. Intralesional Osteophyte Regrowth Following Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation after Previous Treatment with Marrow Stimulation Technique.

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    Demange, Marco Kawamura; Minas, Tom; von Keudell, Arvind; Sodha, Sonal; Bryant, Tim; Gomoll, Andreas H

    2017-04-01

    Objective Bone marrow stimulation surgeries are frequent in the treatment of cartilage lesions. Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) may be performed after failed microfracture surgery. Alterations to subchondral bone as intralesional osteophytes are commonly seen after previous microfracture and removed during ACI. There have been no reports on potential recurrence. Our purpose was to evaluate the incidence of intralesional osteophyte development in 2 cohorts: existing intralesional osteophytes and without intralesional osteophytes at the time of ACI. Study Design We identified 87 patients (157 lesions) with intralesional osteophytes among a cohort of 497 ACI patients. Osteophyte regrowth was analyzed on magnetic resonance imaging and categorized as small or large (less or more than 50% of the cartilage thickness). Twenty patients (24 defects) without intralesional osteophytes at the time of ACI acted as control. Results Osteophyte regrowth was observed in 39.5% of lesions (34.4% of small osteophytes and 5.1% of large osteophytes). In subgroup analyses, regrowth was observed in 45.8% of periosteal-covered defects and in 18.9% of collagen membrane-covered defects. Large osteophyte regrowth occurred in less than 5% in either group. Periosteal defects showed a significantly higher incidence for regrowth of small osteophytes. In the control group, intralesional osteophytes developed in 16.7% of the lesions. Conclusions Even though intralesional osteophytes may regrow after removal during ACI, most of them are small. Small osteophyte regrowth occurs almost twice in periosteum-covered ACI. Large osteophytes occur only in 5% of patients. Intralesional osteophyte formation is not significantly different in preexisting intralesional osteophytes and control groups.

  19. Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation for Bipolar Chondral Lesions in the Tibiofemoral Compartment.

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    Ogura, Takahiro; Bryant, Tim; Mosier, Brian A; Minas, Tom

    2018-05-01

    Treating bipolar chondral lesions in the tibiofemoral (TF) compartment with cartilage repair procedures is challenging, and a suitable treatment remains unclear. To evaluate clinical outcomes after autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) for the treatment of bipolar chondral lesions in the TF compartment. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. We evaluated 57 patients who underwent ACI for the treatment of symptomatic bipolar chondral lesions in the TF compartment by a single surgeon between October 1995 and June 2014. One patient did not return for follow-up. Thus, 56 patients (58 knees) were included with a minimum of 2 years' follow-up. A mean of 3.1 lesions per knee were treated, representing a mean total surface area of 16.1 cm 2 (range, 3.2-44.5 cm 2 ) per knee. Bipolar lesions were present in the medial compartment (32 knees) and in the lateral compartment (26 knees). Patients were evaluated with the modified Cincinnati Knee Rating Scale, visual analog scale for pain, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, and Short Form-36. Patients also answered questions regarding self-rated knee function and satisfaction with the procedure. Standard radiographs were evaluated with the Kellgren-Lawrence grading system. The survival rate was 80% at 5 years and 76% at 10 years. A significantly better survival rate was found in patients with the use of a collagen membrane than periosteum (97% vs 61% at 5 years, respectively; P = .0014). Of 46 knees with retained grafts, all functional scores significantly improved postoperatively, with a very high satisfaction rate (91%) at a mean of 8.3 ± 5.1 years (range, 2-20 years) after ACI. At last follow-up, 24 of 46 successful knees were radiographically assessed (mean, 5.5 ± 4.0 years [range, 2.0-18.7 years]) and showed no significant osteoarthritis progression ( P = .3173). Outcomes for 12 patients were considered as failures at a mean of 4.1 years. Of these, 9 patients were converted to partial or total

  20. Cartilage repair: Generations of autologous chondrocyte transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marlovits, Stefan; Zeller, Philip; Singer, Philipp; Resinger, Christoph; Vecsei, Vilmos

    2006-01-01

    Articular cartilage in adults has a limited capacity for self-repair after a substantial injury. Surgical therapeutic efforts to treat cartilage defects have focused on delivering new cells capable of chondrogenesis into the lesions. Autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) is an advanced cell-based orthobiologic technology used for the treatment of chondral defects of the knee that has been in clinical use since 1987 and has been performed on 12,000 patients internationally. With ACT, good to excellent clinical results are seen in isolated post-traumatic lesions of the knee joint in the younger patient, with the formation of hyaline or hyaline-like repair tissue. In the classic ACT technique, chondrocytes are isolated from small slices of cartilage harvested arthroscopically from a minor weight-bearing area of the injured knee. The extracellular matrix is removed by enzymatic digestion, and the cells are then expanded in monolayer culture. Once a sufficient number of cells has been obtained, the chondrocytes are implanted into the cartilage defect, using a periosteal patch over the defect as a method of cell containment. The major complications are periosteal hypertrophy, delamination of the transplant, arthrofibrosis and transplant failure. Further improvements in tissue engineering have contributed to the next generation of ACT techniques, where cells are combined with resorbable biomaterials, as in matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT). These biomaterials secure the cells in the defect area and enhance their proliferation and differentiation

  1. Cartilage repair: Generations of autologous chondrocyte transplantation

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    Marlovits, Stefan [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: stefan.marlovits@meduniwien.ac.at; Zeller, Philip [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Singer, Philipp [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Resinger, Christoph [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Vecsei, Vilmos [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2006-01-15

    Articular cartilage in adults has a limited capacity for self-repair after a substantial injury. Surgical therapeutic efforts to treat cartilage defects have focused on delivering new cells capable of chondrogenesis into the lesions. Autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) is an advanced cell-based orthobiologic technology used for the treatment of chondral defects of the knee that has been in clinical use since 1987 and has been performed on 12,000 patients internationally. With ACT, good to excellent clinical results are seen in isolated post-traumatic lesions of the knee joint in the younger patient, with the formation of hyaline or hyaline-like repair tissue. In the classic ACT technique, chondrocytes are isolated from small slices of cartilage harvested arthroscopically from a minor weight-bearing area of the injured knee. The extracellular matrix is removed by enzymatic digestion, and the cells are then expanded in monolayer culture. Once a sufficient number of cells has been obtained, the chondrocytes are implanted into the cartilage defect, using a periosteal patch over the defect as a method of cell containment. The major complications are periosteal hypertrophy, delamination of the transplant, arthrofibrosis and transplant failure. Further improvements in tissue engineering have contributed to the next generation of ACT techniques, where cells are combined with resorbable biomaterials, as in matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT). These biomaterials secure the cells in the defect area and enhance their proliferation and differentiation.

  2. Matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation for the treatment of chondral defects of the knees in Chinese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang ZW

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Zhongwen Zhang,1 Xin Zhong,2 Huiru Ji,1 Zibin Tang,1 Jianpeng Bai,1 Minmin Yao,1 Jianlei Hou,1 Minghao Zheng,3 David J Wood,3 Jiazhi Sun,4 Shu-Feng Zhou,4,5 Aibing Liu6 1Department of Orthopedics, General Hospital of Chinese People’s Armed Police Forces (CAPF, Beijing; 2Department of MRI Center, General Hospital of CAPF, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 3Center for Orthopedic Research, School of Surgery and Pathology, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia; 4Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; 5Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering Research Center and Sino–US Joint Laboratory for Medical Sciences, Guiyang Medical University, Guiyang, Guizhou; 6Medical Research Center, General Hospital of Chinese People’s Armed Police Forces (CAPF, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Articular cartilage injury is the most common type of damage seen in clinical orthopedic practice. The matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implant (MACI was developed to repair articular cartilage with an advance on the autologous chondrocyte implant procedure. This study aimed to evaluate whether MACI is a safe and efficacious cartilage repair treatment for patients with knee cartilage lesions. The primary outcomes were the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS domains and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI results, compared between baseline and postoperative months 3, 6, 12, and 24. A total of 15 patients (20 knees, with an average age of 33.9 years, had a mean defect size of 4.01 cm2. By 6-month follow-up, KOOS results demonstrated significant improvements in symptoms and knee-related quality of life. MRI showed significant improvements in four individual graft scoring parameters at 24 months postoperatively. At 24 months, 90% of MACI grafts had filled completely and 10% had good

  3. MR appearance of autologous chondrocyte implantation in the knee: correlation with the knee features and clinical outcome

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    Takahashi, Tomoki [Department of Radiology and Institute of Orthopaedics, Oswestry, Shropshire (United Kingdom); Kumamoto University, Department of Orthopaedic and Neuro-Musculoskeletal Surgery, Kumamoto (Japan); Tins, Bernhard; McCall, Iain W.; Ashton, Karen [Department of Radiology and Institute of Orthopaedics, Oswestry, Shropshire (United Kingdom); Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Oswestry, Shropshire (United Kingdom); Richardson, James B. [Department of Radiology and Institute of Orthopaedics, Oswestry, Shropshire (United Kingdom); RJAH Orthopaedic Hospital, Institute of Orthopaedics, Oswestry, Shropshire (United Kingdom); Takagi, Katsumasa [Department of Radiology and Institute of Orthopaedics, Oswestry, Shropshire (United Kingdom); Kumamoto Aging Research Institute, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2006-01-01

    To relate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) in the knee in the 1st postoperative year with other knee features on MRI and with clinical outcome. Forty-nine examinations were performed in 49 patients at 1 year after ACI in the knee. Forty-one preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) examinations were also available. The grafts were assessed for smoothness, thickness in comparison with that of adjacent cartilage, signal intensity, integration to underlying bone and adjacent cartilage, and congruity of subchondral bone. Presence of overgrowth and bone marrow appearance beneath the graft were also assessed. Presence of osteophyte formation, further cartilage defects, appearance of the cruciate ligaments and the menisci were also recorded. An overall graft score was constructed, using the graft appearances. This was correlated with the knee features and the Lysholm score, a clinical self-assessment score. The data were analysed by a Kruskal-Wallis H test followed by a Mann-Whitney U test with Bonferroni correction as post-hoc test. Of 49 grafts, 32 (65%) demonstrated complete defect filling 1 year postoperatively. General overgrowth was seen in eight grafts (16%), and partial overgrowth in 13 grafts (26%). Bone marrow change underneath the graft was seen; oedema was seen in 23 grafts (47%), cysts in six grafts (12%) and sclerosis in two grafts (4%). Mean graft score was 8.7 (of maximal 12) (95% CI 8.0-9.5). Knees without osteophyte formation or additional other cartilage defects (other than the graft site) had a significantly higher graft score than knees with multiple osteophytes (P=0.0057) or multiple further cartilage defects (P=0.014). At 1 year follow-up improvement in the clinical scores was not significantly different for any subgroup. (orig.)

  4. Correlation Between Clinical and Radiological Outcomes After Matrix-Induced Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation in the Femoral Condyles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Jay R; Smith, Anne; Fallon, Michael; Wood, David J; Ackland, Timothy R

    2014-08-01

    Matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI) is an established technique for the repair of knee chondral defects, although the correlation between clinical and radiological outcomes after surgery is poorly understood. To determine the correlation between clinical and radiological outcomes throughout the postoperative timeline to 5 years after MACI. Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 3. This retrospective study was undertaken in 83 patients (53 male, 30 female) with complete clinical and radiological follow-up at 1, 2, and 5 years after MACI. The mean age of patients was 38.9 years (range, 13-62 years), with a mean body mass index (BMI) of 26.6 kg/m(2) (range, 16.8-34.8 kg/m(2)), mean defect size of 3.3 cm(2) (range, 1-9 cm(2)), and mean preoperative duration of symptoms of 9.2 years (range, 1-46 years). Patients indicated for MACI in this follow-up were 13 to 65 years of age, although they were excluded if they had a BMI >35 kg/m(2), had undergone prior extensive meniscectomy, or had ongoing progressive inflammatory arthritis. Patients were assessed clinically using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to evaluate the graft using a 1.5-T or 3-T clinical scanner; the MRI assessment included 8 parameters of graft repair (infill, signal intensity, border integration, surface contour, structure, subchondral lamina, subchondral bone, and effusion) based on the magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) score as well as an MRI composite score. The degree of an association between the MRI parameters and the KOOS subscales at each postoperative time point was assessed with the Spearman correlation coefficient (SCC), and significance was determined at P correlations over time and statistically significant associations at 5 years with KOOS-Pain (SCC, 0.25; P = .020), KOOS-Activities of Daily Living (SCC, 0.26; P = .018), and KOOS-Sport (SCC, 0.32; P = .003). Apart

  5. Clinical outcomes after cell-seeded autologous chondrocyte implantation of the knee: when can success or failure be predicted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestka, Jan M; Bode, Gerrit; Salzmann, Gian; Steinwachs, Mathias; Schmal, Hagen; Südkamp, Norbert P; Niemeyer, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) has been associated with satisfying results. Still, it remains unclear when success or failure after ACI can be estimated. To evaluate the clinical outcomes of cell-seeded collagen matrix-supported ACI (ACI-Cs) for the treatment of cartilage defects of the knee at 36 months and to determine a time point after ACI-Cs at which success or failure can be estimated. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 80 patients with isolated full-thickness cartilage defects of the knee joint treated with ACI-Cs were prospectively assessed before surgery as well as postoperatively by use of the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score and Lysholm knee score. Preoperative IKDC and Lysholm scores increased from 49.6 and 59.5, respectively, to 79.1 and 83.5, respectively, at 36 months. Only half the patients (46.6%) with poor IKDC scores (ie, <70) at 6 months postoperatively showed continued poor or fair scores at 36 months' follow-up. The probability of poor scores at 36 months after surgery further increased to 0.61 and 0.81, respectively, when scores were persistent at 12 and 24 months. All 3 patients (100%) with good IKDC scores (ie, 81-90) at 6 months after surgery showed constant or even improved scores at 36 months' follow-up. Ninety-one percent of patients with good and excellent scores at 12 months and 83% of patients with good and excellent scores at 24 months (a total of 23 and 37 patients, respectively) were able to maintain these scores at 36 months' follow-up. Similar results were obtained for the Lysholm score. With regard to the improvements in functional outcomes after ACI-Cs at 36 months after surgery, the technique described here appears to lead to satisfying and stable clinical results. This study helps the treating physician to predict the likeliness of further clinical improvements or constant unsatisfactory results after ACI. In patients with good/excellent scores shortly after surgery

  6. Treatment of a Focal Articular Cartilage Defect of the Talus with Polymer-Based Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation: A 12-Year Follow-Up Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuz, Peter Cornelius; Kalkreuth, Richard Horst; Niemeyer, Philipp; Uhl, Markus; Erggelet, Christoph

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is a first-line treatment option for large articular cartilage defects. Although well-established for cartilage defects in the knee, studies of the long-term outcomes of matrix-assisted ACI to treat cartilage defects in the ankle are rare. In the present report, we describe for the first time the long-term clinical and radiologic results 12 years after polymer-based matrix-assisted ACI treat a full-thickness talar cartilage defect in a 25-year-old male patient. The clinical outcome was assessed using the visual analog scale and Freiburg ankle score, magnetic resonance imaging evaluation using the Henderson-Kreuz scoring system and T2 mapping. Clinical assessment revealed improved visual analog scale and Freiburg ankle scores. The radiologic analysis and T2 relaxation time values indicated the formation of hyaline-like repair tissue. Polymer-based autologous chondrocytes has been shown to be a safe and clinically effective long-term treatment of articular cartilage defects in the talus. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Sporting Activity Is Reduced 11 Years After First-Generation Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation in the Knee Joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdle, Benjamin; Herrmann, Simon; Porichis, Stella; Uhl, Markus; Ghanem, Nadir; Schmal, Hagen; Suedkamp, Norbert; Niemeyer, Philipp; Salzmann, Gian M

    2017-10-01

    Little is known about long-term sporting activity after periosteal autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI-P) and its correlation to clinical, morphological, and ultrastructural cartilage characteristics on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To evaluate long-term sporting activity after ACI-P and to correlate with clinical and MRI findings. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Patients who underwent ACI-P for isolated cartilage defects of the knee joint between 1997 and 2001 were analyzed for sporting ability for 3 different time points: lifetime until the onset of pain, the year before ACI-P, and 11 years (range, 9.0-13.4 years) postoperatively. Sporting activity was assessed and patients' level of activity scaled using standardized questionnaires. MRI scans of the affected knee joint at follow-up were analyzed using the MOCART (magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue) score and T2 mapping. Seventy of 86 patients (81% follow-up rate) consisting of 25 female and 45 male patients, with a mean age of 33.3 ± 10.2 years at the time of surgery, mean defect size of 6.5 ± 4.0 cm 2 , and 1.17 treated defects per patient, agreed to participate in the study at a mean 10.9 ± 1.1 years after ACI-P. Fifty-nine patients (69% of total; 84% of follow-up) agreed to MRI, allowing the complete evaluation of 71 transplant sites. Before the onset of symptoms (lifetime), 95.7% of patients played a mean 6.0 sporting activities at a competitive level. In the year before ACI-P, 81.4% of patients played a mean 3.4 sporting activities in 2.4 sessions during 5.4 hours per week at a recreational level. At follow-up, 82.9% of the patients played a mean 3.0 sporting activities in 1.8 sessions during 3.0 hours per week at a recreational level. In contrast to objective factors, 65.6% of the patients felt that their subjective sporting ability had improved or strongly improved after ACI-P, whereas 12.9% felt that their situation had declined or strongly declined, and 21.4% stated

  8. Clinical outcome 3 years after autologous chondrocyte implantation does not correlate with the expression of a predefined gene marker set in chondrocytes prior to implantation but is associated with critical signaling pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stenberg, Johan; de Windt, Tommy S.; Synnergren, Jane; Hynsjö, Lars; van der Lee, Josefine; Saris, Daniël B.F.; Brittberg, Mats; Peterson, Lars; Lindahl, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is a need for tools to predict the chondrogenic potency of autologous cells for cartilage repair. Purpose: To evaluate previously proposed chondrogenic biomarkers and to identify new biomarkers in the chondrocyte transcriptome capable of predicting clinical success or failure after

  9. [Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) for cartilage defects of the knee: a guideline by the working group "Tissue Regeneration" of the German Society of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology (DGOU)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeyer, P; Andereya, S; Angele, P; Ateschrang, A; Aurich, M; Baumann, M; Behrens, P; Bosch, U; Erggelet, C; Fickert, S; Fritz, J; Gebhard, H; Gelse, K; Günther, D; Hoburg, A; Kasten, P; Kolombe, T; Madry, H; Marlovits, S; Meenen, N M; Müller, P E; Nöth, U; Petersen, J P; Pietschmann, M; Richter, W; Rolauffs, B; Rhunau, K; Schewe, B; Steinert, A; Steinwachs, M R; Welsch, G H; Zinser, W; Albrecht, D

    2013-02-01

    Autologous chondrocyte transplantation/implantation (ACT/ACI) is an established and recognised procedure for the treatment of localised full-thickness cartilage defects of the knee. The present review of the working group "Clinical Tissue Regeneration" of the German Society of Orthopaedics and Traumatology (DGOU) describes the biology and function of healthy articular cartilage, the present state of knowledge concerning potential consequences of primary cartilage lesions and the suitable indication for ACI. Based on current evidence, an indication for ACI is given for symptomatic cartilage defects starting from defect sizes of more than 3-4 cm2; in the case of young and active sports patients at 2.5 cm2. Advanced degenerative joint disease is the single most important contraindication. The review gives a concise overview on important scientific background, the results of clinical studies and discusses advantages and disadvantages of ACI. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Presence of subchondral bone marrow edema at the time of treatment represents a negative prognostic factor for early outcome after autologous chondrocyte implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemeyer, Philipp; Salzmann, Gian; Steinwachs, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Since introduction of autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI), various factors have been described that influence the clinical outcome. The present paper investigates the influence of bone marrow edema at time of treatment on clinical function before and in the early clinical course...... after ACI. METHODS: 67 patients treated with ACI for cartilage defects of the knee joint were included. Presence of subchondral bone marrow edema was graded as absent (1), mild (2), moderate (3) or severe (4) using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging before surgery. All patients were assessed in terms...... of clinical function before surgery and 6 as well as 12 months after ACI using IKDC and Lysholm scores. Presence of subchondral edema was correlated with functional outcome. RESULTS: In 18 patients edema on initial MRI was graded as "absent", while 17 patients had grade 2 edema, 19 patients had grade 3 edema...

  11. Autologous chondrocyte implantation: Is it likely to become a saviour of large-sized and full-thickness cartilage defect in young adult knee?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Cai, You-Zhi; Lin, Xiang-Jin

    2016-05-01

    A literature review of the first-, second- and third-generation autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) technique for the treatment of large-sized (>4 cm(2)) and full-thickness knee cartilage defects in young adults was conducted, examining the current literature on features, clinical scores, complications, magnetic resonance image (MRI) and histological outcomes, rehabilitation and cost-effectiveness. A literature review was carried out in the main medical databases to evaluate the several studies concerning ACI treatment of large-sized and full-thickness knee cartilage defects in young adults. ACI technique has been shown to relieve symptoms and improve functional assessment in large-sized (>4 cm(2)) and full-thickness knee articular cartilage defect of young adults in short- and medium-term follow-up. Besides, low level of evidence demonstrated its efficiency and durability at long-term follow-up after implantation. Furthermore, MRI and histological evaluations provided the evidence that graft can return back to the previous nearly normal cartilage via ACI techniques. Clinical outcomes tend to be similar in different ACI techniques, but with simplified procedure, low complication rate and better graft quality in the third-generation ACI technique. ACI based on the experience of cell-based therapy, with the high potential to regenerate hyaline-like tissue, represents clinical development in treatment of large-sized and full-thickness knee cartilage defects. IV.

  12. T2 mapping and dGEMRIC after autologous chondrocyte implantation with a fibrin-based scaffold in the knee: Preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domayer, S.E.; Welsch, G.H.; Nehrer, S.; Chiari, C.; Dorotka, R.; Szomolanyi, P.; Mamisch, T.C.; Yayon, A.; Trattnig, S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess repair tissue (RT) after the implantation of BioCart TM II, an autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) technique with a fibrin-hyaluronan polymer as scaffold. T2 mapping and delayed Gadolinium Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage (dGEMRIC) were used to gain first data on the biochemical properties of BioCart TM II RT in vivo. Methods: T2 mapping and dGEMRIC were performed at 3 T in five patients (six knee joints) who had undergone ACI 15-27 months before. T2 maps were obtained using a pixel wise, mono-exponential non-negative least squares fit analysis. For quantitative T1 mapping a dual flip angle 3D GRE sequence was used and T1 maps were calculated pre- and post-contrast using IDL software. Subsequent region of interest analysis was carried out in comparison with morphologic MRI. Results: A spatial variation of T2 values in both hyaline, normal cartilage (NC) and RT was found. Mean RT T2 values and mean NC T2 values did not differ significantly. Relative T2 values were calculated from global RT and NC T2 and showed a small range (0.84-1.07). The relative delta relaxation rates (rΔR1) obtained from the T1 maps had a wider range (0.77-4.91). Conclusion: T2 mapping and dGEMRIC provided complementary information on the biochemical properties of the repair tissue. BioCart TM II apparently can provide RT similar to hyaline articular cartilage and may become a less-invasive alternative to ACI with a periosteal flap.

  13. T2 mapping and dGEMRIC after autologous chondrocyte implantation with a fibrin-based scaffold in the knee: Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domayer, S.E. [Department of Orthopedics, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A 1090 Vienna (Austria); MR Centre of Excellence, Department of Radiodiagnostics, Medical University of Vienna, Lazarettgasse 14, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: stephan.domayer@meduniwien.ac.at; Welsch, G.H. [MR Centre of Excellence, Department of Radiodiagnostics, Medical University of Vienna, Lazarettgasse 14, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Nehrer, S. [Centre of Regenerative Medicine, Danube University of Krems, Dr.-Karl-Dorrek-Strasse, 30 A-3500 Krems (Austria)], E-mail: stefan.nehrer@donau-uni.ac.at; Chiari, C.; Dorotka, R. [Department of Orthopedics, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A 1090 Vienna (Austria); Szomolanyi, P. [MR Centre of Excellence, Department of Radiodiagnostics, Medical University of Vienna, Lazarettgasse 14, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Institute of Measurement Science, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, 841 04 Bratislava (Slovakia); Mamisch, T.C. [Department of Orthopedics, Inselspital, University of Bern, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); Yayon, A. [ProChon Biotech Ltd., Weizmann Science Park, Nes Ziona (Israel); Trattnig, S. [MR Centre of Excellence, Department of Radiodiagnostics, Medical University of Vienna, Lazarettgasse 14, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: siegfried.trattnig@meduniwien.ac.at

    2010-03-15

    Objective: To assess repair tissue (RT) after the implantation of BioCart{sup TM}II, an autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) technique with a fibrin-hyaluronan polymer as scaffold. T2 mapping and delayed Gadolinium Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage (dGEMRIC) were used to gain first data on the biochemical properties of BioCart{sup TM}II RT in vivo. Methods: T2 mapping and dGEMRIC were performed at 3 T in five patients (six knee joints) who had undergone ACI 15-27 months before. T2 maps were obtained using a pixel wise, mono-exponential non-negative least squares fit analysis. For quantitative T1 mapping a dual flip angle 3D GRE sequence was used and T1 maps were calculated pre- and post-contrast using IDL software. Subsequent region of interest analysis was carried out in comparison with morphologic MRI. Results: A spatial variation of T2 values in both hyaline, normal cartilage (NC) and RT was found. Mean RT T2 values and mean NC T2 values did not differ significantly. Relative T2 values were calculated from global RT and NC T2 and showed a small range (0.84-1.07). The relative delta relaxation rates (r{delta}R1) obtained from the T1 maps had a wider range (0.77-4.91). Conclusion: T2 mapping and dGEMRIC provided complementary information on the biochemical properties of the repair tissue. BioCart{sup TM}II apparently can provide RT similar to hyaline articular cartilage and may become a less-invasive alternative to ACI with a periosteal flap.

  14. Matrix-based autologous chondrocyte implantation for cartilage repair with Hyalograft(R)C: Two-year follow-up by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trattnig, S.; Pinker, K.; Krestan, C.; Plank, C.; Millington, S.; Marlovits, S.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Monitoring of articular cartilage repair after matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte implantation with Hyalograft ( R)C by a new grading system based on non-invasive high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. Patients and methods: In 23 patients, postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed between 76 and 120 weeks. In nine of these patients, five MRI examinations were performed at 4, 12, 24, 52 and 104 weeks after Hyalograft ( R)C implant. The repair tissue was described with separate variables: degree of defect repair in width and length, signal intensity of the repair tissue and status of the subchondral bone. For these variables a grading system with point scale evaluation was applied. Results: A complete filling of the defect by repair tissue was found in 15 patients. A moderate hypertrophy of the repair tissue was found in two patients. An underfilling of the defect by repair tissue was observed in four patients. In one patient, a partial detachment of the implant with associated subchondral cyst and edema was seen, and in one patient, a complete detachment of the graft was observed. The filling of the defect parallel to cartilage surface (integration) was complete in 18 cases. A split-like incomplete integration was present in one patient. Incomplete integration was found in four patients. The signal intensity of the implant on FSE and on 3D-GRE+FS was isointense compared to native normal cartilage in all cases after 12 months. The subchondral bone was normal in 14 patients. An edema-like signal alteration was found in three cases. In six patients, a non-edema abnormality of the subchondral bone (granulation tissue, cysts or sclerosis) was present. On follow-up exams performed in nine patients at the same postoperative intervals dynamic processes such as filling of partial defects, vanishing of hypertrophies and change of signal intensity of implant to isointensity with native articular cartilage were observed. A comparison

  15. Biophysical stimulation improves clinical results of matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte implantation in the treatment of chondral lesions of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collarile, Marco; Sambri, Andrea; Lullini, Giada; Cadossi, Matteo; Zorzi, Claudio

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) on clinical outcome in patients who underwent arthroscopic matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI) for chondral lesions of the knee. Thirty patients affected by grade III and IV International Cartilage Repair Society chondral lesions of the knee underwent MACI. After surgery, patients were randomly assigned to either experimental group (PEMFs 4 h per day for 60 days) or control group . Clinical outcome was evaluated through International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective knee evaluation form, Visual Analog Scale, Short Form-36 (SF-36) and EuroQoL before surgery and 1, 2, 6, and 60 months postoperative. Mean size of chondral lesion was 2.4 ± 0.6 cm 2 in the PEMFs group and 2.5 ± 0.5 cm 2 in the control one. No differences were found between groups at baseline. IKDC score increased in both groups till 6 months, but afterward improvement was observed only in the experimental group with a significant difference between groups at 60 months (p = 0.001). A significant difference between groups was recorded at 60 months for SF-36 (p = 0.006) and EuroQol (p = 0.020). A significant pain reduction was observed in the experimental group at 1-, 2- and 60-month follow-up. Biophysical stimulation with PEMFs improves clinical outcome after arthroscopic MACI for chondral lesions of the knee in the short- and long-term follow-up. Biophysical stimulation should be considered as an effective tool in order to ameliorate clinical results of regenerative medicine. The use of PEMFs represents an innovative therapeutic approach for the survival of cartilage-engineered constructs and consequently the success of orthopaedic surgery. II.

  16. Chondrocyte-seeded type I/III collagen membrane for autologous chondrocyte transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemeyer, Philipp; Lenz, Philipp; Kreuz, Peter C

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: We report the 2-year clinical results and identify prognostic factors in patients treated with autologous chondrocyte transplantation by use of a collagen membrane to seed the chondrocytes (ACT-CS). METHODS: This is a prospective study of 59 patients who were treated with ACT......-CS represents a technical modification of membrane-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation that combines easy handling and attractive application properties with reliable clinical results 24 months after surgery, especially in patients with isolated cartilage defects. Even though the failure rate...

  17. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage and T2 mapping for evaluation of reparative cartilage-like tissue after autologous chondrocyte implantation associated with Atelocollagen-based scaffold in the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadenuma, Taku; Uchio, Yuji; Kumahashi, Nobuyuki; Iwasa, Junji [Shimane University School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Izumo-shi, Shimane-ken (Japan); Fukuba, Eiji; Kitagaki, Hajime [Shimane University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Izumo-shi, Shimane-ken (Japan); Ochi, Mitsuo [Hiroshima University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Integrated Health Sciences, Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Minami-ku, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2016-10-15

    To elucidate the quality of tissue-engineered cartilage after an autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) technique with Atelocollagen gel as a scaffold in the knee in the short- to midterm postoperatively, we assessed delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cartilage (dGEMRIC) and T2 mapping and clarified the relationship between T1 and T2 values and clinical results. In this cross-sectional study, T1 and T2 mapping were performed on 11 knees of 8 patients (mean age at ACI, 37.2 years) with a 3.0-T MRI scanner. T1{sub implant} and T2{sub implant} values were compared with those of the control cartilage region (T1{sub control} and T2{sub control}). Lysholm scores were also assessed for clinical evaluation. The relationships between the T1 and T2 values and the clinical Lysholm score were also assessed. There were no significant differences in the T1 values between the T1{sub implant} (386.64 ± 101.78 ms) and T1{sub control} (375.82 ± 62.89 ms) at the final follow-up. The implants showed significantly longer T2 values compared to the control cartilage (53.83 ± 13.89 vs. 38.21 ± 4.43 ms). The postoperative Lysholm scores were significantly higher than the preoperative scores. A significant correlation was observed between T1{sub implant} and clinical outcomes, but not between T2{sub implant} and clinical outcomes. Third-generation ACI implants might have obtained an almost equivalent glycosaminoglycan concentration compared to the normal cartilage, but they had lower collagen density at least 3 years after transplantation. The T1{sub implant} value, but not the T2 value, might be a predictor of clinical outcome after ACI. (orig.)

  18. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage and T2 mapping for evaluation of reparative cartilage-like tissue after autologous chondrocyte implantation associated with Atelocollagen-based scaffold in the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadenuma, Taku; Uchio, Yuji; Kumahashi, Nobuyuki; Iwasa, Junji; Fukuba, Eiji; Kitagaki, Hajime; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    To elucidate the quality of tissue-engineered cartilage after an autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) technique with Atelocollagen gel as a scaffold in the knee in the short- to midterm postoperatively, we assessed delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cartilage (dGEMRIC) and T2 mapping and clarified the relationship between T1 and T2 values and clinical results. In this cross-sectional study, T1 and T2 mapping were performed on 11 knees of 8 patients (mean age at ACI, 37.2 years) with a 3.0-T MRI scanner. T1 implant and T2 implant values were compared with those of the control cartilage region (T1 control and T2 control ). Lysholm scores were also assessed for clinical evaluation. The relationships between the T1 and T2 values and the clinical Lysholm score were also assessed. There were no significant differences in the T1 values between the T1 implant (386.64 ± 101.78 ms) and T1 control (375.82 ± 62.89 ms) at the final follow-up. The implants showed significantly longer T2 values compared to the control cartilage (53.83 ± 13.89 vs. 38.21 ± 4.43 ms). The postoperative Lysholm scores were significantly higher than the preoperative scores. A significant correlation was observed between T1 implant and clinical outcomes, but not between T2 implant and clinical outcomes. Third-generation ACI implants might have obtained an almost equivalent glycosaminoglycan concentration compared to the normal cartilage, but they had lower collagen density at least 3 years after transplantation. The T1 implant value, but not the T2 value, might be a predictor of clinical outcome after ACI. (orig.)

  19. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage and T2 mapping for evaluation of reparative cartilage-like tissue after autologous chondrocyte implantation associated with Atelocollagen-based scaffold in the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadenuma, Taku; Uchio, Yuji; Kumahashi, Nobuyuki; Fukuba, Eiji; Kitagaki, Hajime; Iwasa, Junji; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2016-10-01

    To elucidate the quality of tissue-engineered cartilage after an autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) technique with Atelocollagen gel as a scaffold in the knee in the short- to midterm postoperatively, we assessed delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cartilage (dGEMRIC) and T2 mapping and clarified the relationship between T1 and T2 values and clinical results. In this cross-sectional study, T1 and T2 mapping were performed on 11 knees of 8 patients (mean age at ACI, 37.2 years) with a 3.0-T MRI scanner. T1implant and T2implant values were compared with those of the control cartilage region (T1control and T2control). Lysholm scores were also assessed for clinical evaluation. The relationships between the T1 and T2 values and the clinical Lysholm score were also assessed. There were no significant differences in the T1 values between the T1implant (386.64 ± 101.78 ms) and T1control (375.82 ± 62.89 ms) at the final follow-up. The implants showed significantly longer T2 values compared to the control cartilage (53.83 ± 13.89 vs. 38.21 ± 4.43 ms). The postoperative Lysholm scores were significantly higher than the preoperative scores. A significant correlation was observed between T1implant and clinical outcomes, but not between T2implant and clinical outcomes. Third-generation ACI implants might have obtained an almost equivalent glycosaminoglycan concentration compared to the normal cartilage, but they had lower collagen density at least 3 years after transplantation. The T1implant value, but not the T2 value, might be a predictor of clinical outcome after ACI.

  20. Autologous chondrocytes as a novel source for neo-chondrogenesis in haemophiliacs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocco, Elena; Barbon, Silvia; Radossi, Paolo; Rajendran, Senthilkumar; Dalzoppo, Daniele; Bortolami, Marina; Bagno, Andrea; Grandi, Francesca; Gamba, Pier Giorgio; Parnigotto, Pier Paolo; Tagariello, Giuseppe; Grandi, Claudio

    2016-10-01

    Haemophilic arthropathy is the major cause of disability in patients with haemophilia and, despite prophylaxis with coagulation factor concentrates, some patients still develop articular complications. We evaluate the feasibility of a tissue engineering approach to improve current clinical strategies for cartilage regeneration in haemophiliacs by using autologous chondrocytes (haemophilic chondrocytes; HaeCs). Little is known about articular chondrocytes from haemophilic patients and no characterisation has as yet been performed. An investigation into whether blood exposure alters HaeCs should be interesting from the perspective of autologous implants. The typical morphology and expression of specific target genes and surface markers were therefore assessed by optical microscopy, reverse transcription plus the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), real-time PCR and flow-cytometry. We then considered chondrocyte behaviour on a bio-hybrid scaffold (based on polyvinyl alcohol/Wharton's jelly) as an in vitro model of articular cartilage prosthesis. Articular chondrocytes from non-haemophilic donors were used as controls. HaeC morphology and the resulting immunophenotype CD44(+)/CD49c(+)/CD49e(+)/CD151(+)/CD73(+)/CD49f(-)/CD26(-) resembled those of healthy donors. Moreover, HaeCs were active in the transcription of genes involved in the synthesis of the extracellular matrix proteins of the articular cartilage (ACAN, COL1A, COL2A, COL10A, COL9A, COMP, HAS1, SOX9), although the over-expression of COL1A1, COL10A1, COMP and HAS was observed. In parallel, the composite scaffold showed adequate mechanical and biological properties for cartilage tissue engineering, promoting chondrocyte proliferation. Our preliminary evidence contributes to the characterisation of HaeCs, highlighting the opportunity of using them for autologous cartilage implants in patients with haemophilia.

  1. Evolution of Autologous Chondrocyte Repair and Comparison to Other Cartilage Repair Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashvin K. Dewan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage defects have been addressed using microfracture, abrasion chondroplasty, or osteochondral grafting, but these strategies do not generate tissue that adequately recapitulates native cartilage. During the past 25 years, promising new strategies using assorted scaffolds and cell sources to induce chondrocyte expansion have emerged. We reviewed the evolution of autologous chondrocyte implantation and compared it to other cartilage repair techniques. Methods. We searched PubMed from 1949 to 2014 for the keywords “autologous chondrocyte implantation” (ACI and “cartilage repair” in clinical trials, meta-analyses, and review articles. We analyzed these articles, their bibliographies, our experience, and cartilage regeneration textbooks. Results. Microfracture, abrasion chondroplasty, osteochondral grafting, ACI, and autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis are distinguishable by cell source (including chondrocytes and stem cells and associated scaffolds (natural or synthetic, hydrogels or membranes. ACI seems to be as good as, if not better than, microfracture for repairing large chondral defects in a young patient’s knee as evaluated by multiple clinical indices and the quality of regenerated tissue. Conclusion. Although there is not enough evidence to determine the best repair technique, ACI is the most established cell-based treatment for full-thickness chondral defects in young patients.

  2. Clinical Outcomes of Characterized Chondrocyte Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huylebroek, José; Van Der Bauwhede, Jan; Saris, Daniël; Veeckman, Geert; Bobic, Vladimir; Victor, Jan; Almqvist, Karl Fredrik; Verdonk, Peter; Fortems, Yves; Van Lommel, Nel; Haazen, Ludo

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical outcome of patients treated with autologous chondrocyte implantation using ChondroCelect in daily practice. Methods: The study is a cross-sectional analysis of an open-label, noninterventional cohort. The setting was a compassionate use program, involving 43 orthopaedic centers in 7 European countries. The participants were patients treated with ChondroCelect between October 13, 2004 and July 2, 2008. The measurements used were Clinical Global Impression–Improvement and –Efficacy and solicited adverse event reports. Results: Safety data were collected from 334 patients (90.3%), and effectiveness data were from 282 (76.2%) of the 370 patients treated. Mean age at baseline was 33.6 years (range, 12-57 years), 57% were male, and mean body mass index was 25 kg/m2. Mean follow-up was 2.2 years (range, 0.4-4.1 years). A femoral condyle lesion was reported in 66% (288/379) and a patellar lesion in 19% (84/379). Mean lesion size was 3.5 cm2; a collagen membrane was used in 92.4% (328/355). A therapeutic effect was reported in 89% (234/264) of patients overall and in 87% (40/46) of patellar lesion patients. Rates of much or very much improved patients were similar in patients with short- (18 months: 68% [70/103]) (P = 0.68) and were independent of lesion size (>4 cm2: 75.5% [37/49]; ≤4 cm2: 67.7% [111/164]) (P = 0.38). Adverse events were similar to those reported in the randomized trial with the same product, with more arthrofibrosis, more reduced joint mobility, and more crepitations reported in patellar lesions. Overall, less cartilage hypertrophy was noted, probably due to the use of a biological membrane cover. Conclusions: Implantation of ChondroCelect appeared to result in a positive benefit/risk ratio when used in an unselected heterogenous population, irrespective of the follow-up period, lesion size, and type of lesion treated. PMID:26069630

  3. Increasing the Dose of Autologous Chondrocytes Improves Articular Cartilage Repair: Histological and Molecular Study in the Sheep Animal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillén-García, Pedro; Rodríguez-Iñigo, Elena; Guillén-Vicente, Isabel; Caballero-Santos, Rosa; Guillén-Vicente, Marta; Abelow, Stephen; Giménez-Gallego, Guillermo; López-Alcorocho, Juan Manuel

    2014-04-01

    We hypothesized that implanting cells in a chondral defect at a density more similar to that of the intact cartilage could induce them to synthesize matrix with the features more similar to that of the uninjured one. We compared the implantation of different doses of chondrocytes: 1 million (n = 5), 5 million (n = 5), or 5 million mesenchymal cells (n = 5) in the femoral condyle of 15 sheep. Tissue generated by microfracture at the trochlea, and normal cartilage from a nearby region, processed as the tissues resulting from the implantation, were used as references. Histological and molecular (expression of type I and II collagens and aggrecan) studies were performed. The features of the cartilage generated by implantation of mesenchymal cells and elicited by microfractures were similar and typical of a poor repair of the articular cartilage (presence of fibrocartilage, high expression of type I collagen and a low mRNA levels of type II collagen and aggrecan). Nevertheless, in the samples obtained from tissues generated by implantation of chondrocytes, hyaline-like cartilage, cell organization, low expression rates of type I collagen and high levels of mRNA corresponding to type II collagen and aggrecan were observed. These histological features, show less variability and are more similar to those of the normal cartilage used as control in the case of 5 million cells implantation than when 1 million cells were used. The implantation of autologous chondrocytes in type I/III collagen membranes at high density could be a promising tool to repair articular cartilage.

  4. Repair of experimentally produced defects in rabbit articular cartilage by autologous chondrocyte transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grande, D.A.; Pitman, M.I.; Peterson, L.; Menche, D.; Klein, M.

    1989-01-01

    Using the knee joints of New Zealand White rabbits, a baseline study was made to determine the intrinsic capability of cartilage for healing defects that do not fracture the subchondral plate. A second experiment examined the effect of autologous chondrocytes grown in vitro on the healing rate of these defects. To determine whether any of the reconstituted cartilage resulted from the chondrocyte graft, a third experiment was conducted involving grafts with chondrocytes that had been labeled prior to grafting with a nuclear tracer. Results were evaluated using both qualitative and quantitative light microscopy. Macroscopic results from grafted specimens displayed a marked decrease in synovitis and other degenerative changes. In defects that had received transplants, a significant amount of cartilage was reconstituted (82%) compared to ungrafted controls (18%). Autoradiography on reconstituted cartilage showed that there were labeled cells incorporated into the repair matrix

  5. One-stage focal cartilage defect treatment with bone marrow mononuclear cells and chondrocytes leads to better macroscopic cartilage regeneration compared to microfracture in goats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, J.E.J.; Creemers, L.B.; Tsuchida, A.I.; van Rijen, M.H.P.; Custers, R.J.H.; Dhert, W.J.A.; Saris, Daniël B.F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The combination of chondrocytes and mononuclear fraction (MNF) cells might solve the expansion induced dedifferentiation problem of reimplanted cells in autologous chondrocytes implantation as sufficient cells would be available for direct, one-stage, implantation. Earlier in vitro work

  6. Lymphoscintigraphy and autologous stem cell implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peña, Yamile; Batista, Juan F.; Perera, Alejandro; Torres, Leonel A.; Sánchez, Elvia L.; Sánchez, Yolaine; Ducat, Luis; Prats, Anais; Hernández, Porfirio; Romero, Susana; Goicochea, Pedro; Quintela, Ana M.

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoscintigraphy is the criterion standard technique for the diagnosis of lymphedema. Advances of the application of autologous hematopoietic stem cells in ischemic disorders of lower limbs have increased the attention of researchers in this field. Aim: To determine the usefulness of lymphoscintigraphy for the assessment the efficacy of autologous stem cell implantation in patients with chronic lymphedema of the upper and lower limbs. Methods: Sixty-five patients were included. Clinical evaluation and lymphoscintigraphy were performed before and six months after stem cells implantation. The stem cells implantations were carried out by multiple superficial and deep injections in the trajectory of the lymphatic vessels and also in the inguinal region. A volume of 0.75 to 1.00 mL of cell suspension (1.0-2.2 x 109 stem cells) was administered in each injection site. Lymphoscintigraphy: Whole-body scans were acquired at 20 minutes, 1 hour, and 3 hours after administration of 185 to 259 MBq (5–7mCi) of 99m Tc-albumin nanocolloids in the interdigital space of both limbs. The anatomy and function of the lymphatic system were evaluated. Results: Functional assessment before implantation of stem cells showed that 69.2% of the patients had severe lymphatic insufficiency. The 61.5% of patients showed clinical improvement, confirmed by the results of the lymphoscintigraphy. The 46.1% of the cases evaluated showed a clear improvement. The study showed that the isotopic lymphography can evaluate the therapeutic response and its intensity. Conclusion: Lymphoscintigraphy is a useful technique for the evaluation and monitoring of autologous stem cell transplantation in patients with chronic lymphedema. (author)

  7. Tissue engineering applications: cartilage lesions repair by the use of autologous chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. De Franceschi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Promising new therapies based on tissue engineering have been recently developed for cartilage repair. The association of biomaterials with autologous chondrocytes expanded in vitro can represent a useful tool to regenerate this tissue. The scaffolds utilised in such therapeutical applications should provide a pre-formed three-dimensional shape, prevent cells from floating out of the defect, have sufficient mechanical strength, facilitate uniform spread of cells and stimulate the phenotype of transplanted cells. Hyaff®-11 is a hyaluronic-acid based biodegradable polymer, that has been shown to provide successful cell carrier for tissue-engineered repair. From our findings we can state that human chondrocytes seeded on Hyaff®-11 are able to maintain in vitro the characteristic of differentiated cells, expressing and producing collagen type II and aggrecan which are the main markers of cartilage phenotype, down-regulating collagen type I. Moreover, it seems to be a useful scaffold for cartilage repair both in animal models and clinical trials in humans, favouring the formation of a hyaline-like tissue. In the light of these data, we can hypothesise, for the future, the use of autologous chondrocyte transplantation together with gene therapy as a treatment for rheumatic diseases such as osteoarthritis.

  8. Study on human chondrocyte culture viability for autologous transplantation in clinical application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Lombello

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The limited regenerative capacity of the cartilage tissuemakes the treatment of chondral lesions difficult. The techniquescurrently available to treat cartilage lesions may relieve symptoms,but do not regenerate the injured tissue. Autologous chondrocytetransplantation uses cell biology and cell culture techniques toregenerate the hyaline cartilage. Methods: In this study, we analyzechondrocyte biopsy collection and culture for autologoustransplantation. Ultrastructural analyses of hyaline cartilage biopsieswere performed 0, 6, 24 and 48 hours after collection. The tissue evenafter 48 hours. Eleven cell culture assays were performed to evaluateisolation, viability, morphology, proliferation and absence ofcontaminants. Results: The cell culture techniques used allowedchondrocyte proliferation. Rates on cell viability were maintained abovethe acceptable patterns (above 90. Control of cell culture laboratoryconditions showed absence of contaminants, assuring safety of theprocess. The chondrocytes obtained presented the morphology typicalof cultured cell monolayers. Conclusion: The results indicate viabilityof chondrocyte culture technique for clinical application in autologoustransplantation.

  9. Nasal chondrocyte-based engineered autologous cartilage tissue for repair of articular cartilage defects: an observational first-in-human trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumme, Marcus; Barbero, Andrea; Miot, Sylvie; Wixmerten, Anke; Feliciano, Sandra; Wolf, Francine; Asnaghi, Adelaide M; Baumhoer, Daniel; Bieri, Oliver; Kretzschmar, Martin; Pagenstert, Geert; Haug, Martin; Schaefer, Dirk J; Martin, Ivan; Jakob, Marcel

    2016-10-22

    Articular cartilage injuries have poor repair capacity, leading to progressive joint damage, and cannot be restored predictably by either conventional treatments or advanced therapies based on implantation of articular chondrocytes. Compared with articular chondrocytes, chondrocytes derived from the nasal septum have superior and more reproducible capacity to generate hyaline-like cartilage tissues, with the plasticity to adapt to a joint environment. We aimed to assess whether engineered autologous nasal chondrocyte-based cartilage grafts allow safe and functional restoration of knee cartilage defects. In a first-in-human trial, ten patients with symptomatic, post-traumatic, full-thickness cartilage lesions (2-6 cm 2 ) on the femoral condyle or trochlea were treated at University Hospital Basel in Switzerland. Chondrocytes isolated from a 6 mm nasal septum biopsy specimen were expanded and cultured onto collagen membranes to engineer cartilage grafts (30 × 40 × 2 mm). The engineered tissues were implanted into the femoral defects via mini-arthrotomy and assessed up to 24 months after surgery. Primary outcomes were feasibility and safety of the procedure. Secondary outcomes included self-assessed clinical scores and MRI-based estimation of morphological and compositional quality of the repair tissue. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01605201. The study is ongoing, with an approved extension to 25 patients. For every patient, it was feasible to manufacture cartilaginous grafts with nasal chondrocytes embedded in an extracellular matrix rich in glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen. Engineered tissues were stable through handling with forceps and could be secured in the injured joints. No adverse reactions were recorded and self-assessed clinical scores for pain, knee function, and quality of life were improved significantly from before surgery to 24 months after surgery. Radiological assessments indicated variable degrees of

  10. Comparison of Regenerative Tissue Quality following Matrix-Associated Cell Implantation Using Amplified Chondrocytes Compared to Synovium-Derived Stem Cells in a Rabbit Model for Cartilage Lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, Hagen; Kowal, Justyna M; Kassem, Moustapha

    2018-01-01

    Known problems of the autologous chondrocyte implantation motivate the search for cellular alternatives. The aim of the study was to test the potential of synovium-derived stem cells (SMSC) to regenerate cartilage using a matrix-associated implantation. In an osteochondral defect model of the med......Known problems of the autologous chondrocyte implantation motivate the search for cellular alternatives. The aim of the study was to test the potential of synovium-derived stem cells (SMSC) to regenerate cartilage using a matrix-associated implantation. In an osteochondral defect model...... of the medial femoral condyle in a rabbit, a collagen membrane was seeded with either culture-expanded allogenic chondrocytes or SMSC and then transplanted into the lesion. A tailored piece synovium served as a control. Rabbit SMSC formed typical cartilage in vitro. Macroscopic evaluation of defect healing...... and the thickness of the regenerated tissue did not reveal a significant difference between the intervention groups. However, instantaneous and shear modulus, reflecting the biomechanical strength of the repair tissue, was superior in the implantation group using allogenic chondrocytes (p

  11. High throughput generated micro-aggregates of chondrocytes stimulate cartilage formation in vitro and in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreira Teixeira, Liliana; Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; Sobral, J.; Jin, R.; van Apeldoorn, Aart A.; Feijen, Jan; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Dijkstra, Pieter J.; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Cell-based cartilage repair strategies such as matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI) could be improved by enhancing cell performance. We hypothesised that micro-aggregates of chondrocytes generated in high-throughput prior to implantation in a defect could stimulate cartilaginous

  12. Chondrocytes co-cultured with Stromal Vascular Fraction of adipose tissue present more intense chondrogenic characteristics than with Adipose Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Ling; Prins, H.J.; Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; Helder, M.; Evseenko, D.; Moroni, L; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Lin, Y.; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Partly replacement of chondrocytes by stem cells has been proposed to improve the performance of autologous chondrocytes implantation (ACI). Our previous studies showed that the increased cartilage production in pellet co-cultures of chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is due to a trophic

  13. Second-generation autologous chondrocyte transplantation: MRI findings and clinical correlations at a minimum 5-year follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kon, E.; Di Martino, A.; Filardo, G.; Tetta, C.; Busacca, M.; Iacono, F.; Delcogliano, M.; Albisinni, U.; Marcacci, M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical outcome of hyaluronan-based arthroscopic autologous chondrocyte transplantation at a minimum of 5 years of follow-up and to correlate it with the MRI evaluation parameters. Methods: Fifty consecutive patients were included in the study and evaluated clinically using the Cartilage Standard Evaluation Form as proposed by ICRS and the Tegner score. Forty lesions underwent MRI evaluation at a minimum 5-year follow-up. For the description and evaluation of the graft, we employed the MOCART-scoring system. Results: A statistically significant improvement in all clinical scores was observed at 2 and over 5 years. The total MOCART score and the signal intensity (3D-GE-FS) of the repair tissue were statistically correlated to the IKDC subjective evaluation. Larger size of the treated cartilage lesions had a negative influence on the degree of defect repair and filling, the integration to the border zone and the subchondral lamina integrity, whereas more intensive sport activity had a positive influence on the signal intensity of the repair tissue, the repair tissue surface, and the clinical outcome. Conclusion: Our findings confirm the durability of the clinical results obtained with Hyalograft C and the usefulness of MRI as a non-invasive method for the evaluation of the repaired tissue and the outcome after second-generation autologous transplantation over time.

  14. Second-generation autologous chondrocyte transplantation: MRI findings and clinical correlations at a minimum 5-year follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kon, E. [Biomechanics Laboratory, III Clinic, Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Via Di Barbiano 1/10, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Di Martino, A., E-mail: a.dimartino@biomec.ior.it [Biomechanics Laboratory, III Clinic, Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Via Di Barbiano 1/10, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Filardo, G. [Biomechanics Laboratory, III Clinic, Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Via Di Barbiano 1/10, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Tetta, C.; Busacca, M. [Radiology, Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Bologna (Italy); Iacono, F. [Biomechanics Laboratory, III Clinic, Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Via Di Barbiano 1/10, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Delcogliano, M. [Orthopaedic Departement San Carlo di Nancy Hospital, Rome (Italy); Albisinni, U. [Radiology, Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Bologna (Italy); Marcacci, M. [Biomechanics Laboratory, III Clinic, Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Via Di Barbiano 1/10, 40136 Bologna (Italy)

    2011-09-15

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical outcome of hyaluronan-based arthroscopic autologous chondrocyte transplantation at a minimum of 5 years of follow-up and to correlate it with the MRI evaluation parameters. Methods: Fifty consecutive patients were included in the study and evaluated clinically using the Cartilage Standard Evaluation Form as proposed by ICRS and the Tegner score. Forty lesions underwent MRI evaluation at a minimum 5-year follow-up. For the description and evaluation of the graft, we employed the MOCART-scoring system. Results: A statistically significant improvement in all clinical scores was observed at 2 and over 5 years. The total MOCART score and the signal intensity (3D-GE-FS) of the repair tissue were statistically correlated to the IKDC subjective evaluation. Larger size of the treated cartilage lesions had a negative influence on the degree of defect repair and filling, the integration to the border zone and the subchondral lamina integrity, whereas more intensive sport activity had a positive influence on the signal intensity of the repair tissue, the repair tissue surface, and the clinical outcome. Conclusion: Our findings confirm the durability of the clinical results obtained with Hyalograft C and the usefulness of MRI as a non-invasive method for the evaluation of the repaired tissue and the outcome after second-generation autologous transplantation over time.

  15. [3T magnetic resonance T2 mapping for evaluation of cartilage repair after matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Xu, Xian; Li, Xue; Chen, Min; Dong, Tian-Ming; Zuo, Pan-Li; An, Ning-Yu

    2015-01-01

    To assess the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T2 mapping in quantitative evaluation of cartilage repair following matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT). Six patients (with 9 plug cartilages) following MACT underwent MRI on a 3.0 Tesla MR scan system at 3, 6 and 12 months after the surgery. The full-thickness and zonal areas (deep and superficial layers) T2 values were calculated for the repaired cartilage and control cartilage. The mean T2 values of the repaired cartilage after MACT were significantly higher than that of the control cartilages at 3 and 6 months (PT2 values of the superficial layers were significantly higher than those of the deep layers in the repaired cartilages (PT2 values of the repaired cartilages decreased significantly over time at 6 and 12 months as compared to those at 3 months after the surgery (PT2 mapping can serve as an important modality for assessing the repair of the articular cartilage following MACT.

  16. Magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) for the evaluation of autologous chondrocyte transplantation: Determination of interobserver variability and correlation to clinical outcome after 2 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marlovits, Stefan; Singer, Philipp; Zeller, Philip; Mandl, Irena; Haller, Joerg; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2006-01-01

    In an observational study, the validity and reliability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) in the knee joint was determined. Two years after implantation, high-resolution MRI was used to analyze the repair tissue with nine pertinent variables. A complete filling of the defect was found in 61.5%, and a complete integration of the border zone to the adjacent cartilage in 76.9%. An intact subchondral lamina was present in 84.6% and an intact subchondral bone was present in 61.5%. Isointense signal intensities of the repair tissue compared to the adjacent native cartilage were seen in 92.3%. To evaluate interobserver variability, a reliability analysis with the determination of the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated. An 'almost perfect' agreement, with an ICC value >0.81, was calculated in 8 of 9 variables. The clinical outcome after 2 years showed the visual analog score (VAS) at 2.62 (S.D. ±0.65). The values for the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) subgroups were 68.29 (±23.90) for pain, 62.09 (±14.62) for symptoms, 75.45 (±21.91) for ADL function, 52.69 (±28.77) for sport and 70.19 (±22.41) for knee-related quality of life. The clinical scores were correlated with the MRI variables. A statistically significant correlation was found for the variables 'filling of the defect,' 'structure of the repair tissue,' 'changes in the subchondral bone,' and 'signal intensities of the repair issue'. High resolution MRI and well-defined MRI variables are a reliable, reproducible and accurate tool for assessing cartilage repair tissue

  17. Magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) for the evaluation of autologous chondrocyte transplantation: Determination of interobserver variability and correlation to clinical outcome after 2 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marlovits, Stefan [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: stefan.marlovits@meduniwien.ac.at; Singer, Philipp [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Zeller, Philip [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Mandl, Irena [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Haller, Joerg [Department of Radiology, Hanusch Hospital, Heinrich-Collin-Strasse, A-1140 Vienna (Austria); Trattnig, Siegfried [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2006-01-15

    In an observational study, the validity and reliability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) in the knee joint was determined. Two years after implantation, high-resolution MRI was used to analyze the repair tissue with nine pertinent variables. A complete filling of the defect was found in 61.5%, and a complete integration of the border zone to the adjacent cartilage in 76.9%. An intact subchondral lamina was present in 84.6% and an intact subchondral bone was present in 61.5%. Isointense signal intensities of the repair tissue compared to the adjacent native cartilage were seen in 92.3%. To evaluate interobserver variability, a reliability analysis with the determination of the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated. An 'almost perfect' agreement, with an ICC value >0.81, was calculated in 8 of 9 variables. The clinical outcome after 2 years showed the visual analog score (VAS) at 2.62 (S.D. {+-}0.65). The values for the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) subgroups were 68.29 ({+-}23.90) for pain, 62.09 ({+-}14.62) for symptoms, 75.45 ({+-}21.91) for ADL function, 52.69 ({+-}28.77) for sport and 70.19 ({+-}22.41) for knee-related quality of life. The clinical scores were correlated with the MRI variables. A statistically significant correlation was found for the variables 'filling of the defect,' 'structure of the repair tissue,' 'changes in the subchondral bone,' and 'signal intensities of the repair issue'. High resolution MRI and well-defined MRI variables are a reliable, reproducible and accurate tool for assessing cartilage repair tissue.

  18. Diffusion-weighted imaging for the follow-up of patients after matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, Klaus M.; Mamisch, Tallal C.; Plank, Christina; Langs, Georg; Marlovits, Stefan; Salomonowitz, Erich; Trattnig, Siegfried; Welsch, Goetz

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the use of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for the assessment of cartilage maturation in patients after matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT). Materials and methods: Fifteen patients after MACT were examined by 3.0-T magnetic-resonance-tomography; the examination was up to 13 month after surgery in group 1, and later than 13 month after surgery in group 2. Both groups had a follow-up one-year later. DWI was acquired using a steady-state gradient-echo sequence. Mean values of the diffusion quotients of regions of interest within cartilage repair tissue and of reference regions were assessed. Each region-of-interest was subdivided into a deep, and a superficial area. Results: Mean diffusion quotients of cartilage repair tissues were 1.44 (baseline), and 1.44 (follow-up). Mean diffusion quotients of reference tissues were 1.29 (baseline) and 1.28 (follow-up). At the follow-up diffusion quotients of cartilage repair tissue were significantly higher than those of reference cartilage. In group 1 the diffusion quotients were significantly lower at the follow-up (1.45 versus 1.65); in group 2 no statistically significant differences between follow-up (1.39) and baseline (1.41) were found. Reference cartilages and cartilage repair tissues of group 2 showed a decrease of diffusion quotients from the deep to the superficial area being stable at the follow-up. In group 1 initially a significant increase (1.49 versus 1.78) of the diffusion quotients from deep to superficial area of the cartilage repair tissue was found changing into a decrease (1.65 versus 1.52) at the follow-up. Conclusions: DWI detected changes of diffusion within cartilage repair tissue that may reflect cartilage maturation. Changes in diffusity occurred up to two years after surgery and were stable later. Zonal variations within cartilage could be measured.

  19. Applications of Chondrocyte-Based Cartilage Engineering: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul-Rehman Phull

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chondrocytes are the exclusive cells residing in cartilage and maintain the functionality of cartilage tissue. Series of biocomponents such as different growth factors, cytokines, and transcriptional factors regulate the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs differentiation to chondrocytes. The number of chondrocytes and dedifferentiation are the key limitations in subsequent clinical application of the chondrocytes. Different culture methods are being developed to overcome such issues. Using tissue engineering and cell based approaches, chondrocytes offer prominent therapeutic option specifically in orthopedics for cartilage repair and to treat ailments such as tracheal defects, facial reconstruction, and urinary incontinence. Matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte transplantation/implantation is an improved version of traditional autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT method. An increasing number of studies show the clinical significance of this technique for the chondral lesions treatment. Literature survey was carried out to address clinical and functional findings by using various ACT procedures. The current study was conducted to study the pharmacological significance and biomedical application of chondrocytes. Furthermore, it is inferred from the present study that long term follow-up studies are required to evaluate the potential of these methods and specific positive outcomes.

  20. Esthetic evaluation of single-tooth implants in the anterior maxilla following autologous bone augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hof, M; Pommer, B; Strbac, G D; Sütö, D; Watzek, G; Zechner, W

    2013-08-01

    Autologous bone augmentation to rebuild compromised alveolar ridge contour prior to implant placement allows for favorable three-dimensional implant positioning to achieve optimum implant esthetics. The aim of the present study was to evaluate peri-implant soft tissue conditions around single-tooth implants following bone grafts in the esthetic zone of the maxilla. Sixty patients underwent autologous bone augmentation of deficient maxillary sites prior to placement of 85 implants in the esthetic zone. In case of multiple implants per patient, one implant was randomly selected. Objective evaluation of 60 single-tooth implants was performed using the Pink-Esthetic-Score (PES) and Papilla Index (PI) and supplemented by subjective patient evaluation, as well as clinical and radiologic examination. Objective ratings of implant esthetics were satisfactory (median PES: 11, median PI: 2) and significantly correlated with high patient satisfaction (mean VAS score: 80%). Both esthetic indices demonstrated respectable levels of inter- as well as intra-observer agreement. Poor implant esthetics (low PES and PI ratings) were significantly associated with increased anatomic crown height, while no influence of horizontal implant-tooth distance could be found. The present investigation indicates that favorable esthetic results may be achieved in the augmented anterior maxilla. However, bony reconstruction of compromised alveolar ridges does not guarantee optimum implant esthetics. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Ectopic bone formation during tissue-engineered cartilage repair using autologous chondrocytes and novel plasma-derived albumin scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robla Costales, David; Junquera, Luis; García Pérez, Eva; Gómez Llames, Sara; Álvarez-Viejo, María; Meana-Infiesta, Álvaro

    2016-10-01

    The aims of this study were twofold: first, to evaluate the production of cartilaginous tissue in vitro and in vivo using a novel plasma-derived scaffold, and second, to test the repair of experimental defects made on ears of New Zealand rabbits (NZr) using this approach. Scaffolds were seeded with chondrocytes and cultured in vitro for 3 months to check in vitro cartilage production. To evaluate in vivo cartilage production, a chondrocyte-seeded scaffold was transplanted subcutaneously to a nude mouse. To check in vivo repair, experimental defects made in the ears of five New Zealand rabbits (NZr) were filled with chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds. In vitro culture produced mature chondrocytes with no extracellular matrix (ECM). Histological examination of redifferentiated in vitro cultures showed differentiated chondrocytes adhered to scaffold pores. Subcutaneous transplantation of these constructs to a nude mouse produced cartilage, confirmed by histological study. Experimental cartilage repair in five NZr showed cartilaginous tissue repairing the defects, mixed with calcified areas of bone formation. It is possible to produce cartilaginous tissue in vivo and to repair experimental auricular defects by means of chondrocyte cultures and the novel plasma-derived scaffold. Further studies are needed to determine the significance of bone formation in the samples. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Salmonella sepsis following posttraumatic splenectomy and implantation of autologous splenic tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, H M; Hovendal, C

    1985-01-01

    A severe complication following implantation of autologous splenic tissue occurred in a 51-year-old man. Indirect injury to abdomen resulted in a lesion of the splenic artery. Following splenectomy and reimplantation of splenic tissue into three pouches, a severe Salmonella sepsis developed withi...... 24 hours. At second look laparotomy two pouches were infected. Recently there had been moderate signs of gastroenteritis and the same bacteria was cultivated from feces. Modifications of the implantation procedure are discussed....

  3. MRI evaluation of a new scaffold-based allogenic chondrocyte implantation for cartilage repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhollander, A.A.M.; Huysse, W.C.J.; Verdonk, P.C.M.; Verstraete, K.L.; Verdonk, R.; Verbruggen, G.; Almqvist, K.F.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The present study was designed to evaluate the implantation of alginate beads containing human mature allogenic chondrocytes for the treatment of symptomatic cartilage defects of the knee. MRI was used for the morphological analysis of cartilage repair. The correlation between MRI findings and clinical outcome was also studied. Methods: A biodegradable, alginate-based biocompatible scaffold containing human mature allogenic chondrocytes was used for the treatment of symptomatic chondral and osteochondral lesions in the knee. Twenty-one patients were prospectively evaluated with use of the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for pain preoperatively and at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months of follow-up. Of the 21 patients, 12 had consented to follow the postoperative MRI evaluation protocol. MRI data were analyzed based on the original MOCART (Magnetic Resonance Observation of Cartilage Repair Tissue) and modified MOCART scoring system. The correlation between the clinical outcome and MRI findings was evaluated. Results: A statistically significant clinical improvement became apparent after 6 months and patients continued to improve during the 12 months of follow-up. One of the two MRI scoring systems that were used, showed a statistically significant deterioration of the repair tissue at 1 year of follow-up. Twelve months after the operation complete filling or hypertrophy was found in 41.6%. Bone-marrow edema and effusion were seen in 41.7% and 25% of the study patients, respectively. We did not find a consistent correlation between the MRI criteria and the clinical results. Discussion: The present study confirmed the primary role of MRI in the evaluation of cartilage repair. Two MOCART-based scoring systems were used in a longitudinal fashion and allowed a practical and morphological evaluation of the repair tissue. However, the correlation between clinical outcome and MRI findings was poor. Further

  4. MRI evaluation of a new scaffold-based allogenic chondrocyte implantation for cartilage repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhollander, A.A.M., E-mail: Aad.Dhollander@Ugent.b [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 1P5, B9000 Gent (Belgium); Huysse, W.C.J., E-mail: Wouter.Huysse@Ugent.b [Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, -1K12 IB, B9000 Gent (Belgium); Verdonk, P.C.M., E-mail: pverdonk@yahoo.co [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 1P5, B9000 Gent (Belgium); Verstraete, K.L., E-mail: Koenraad.Verstraete@Ugent.b [Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, -1K12 IB, B9000 Gent (Belgium); Verdonk, R., E-mail: Rene.Verdonk@Ugent.b [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 1P5, B9000 Gent (Belgium); Verbruggen, G., E-mail: Gust.Verbruggen@Ugent.b [Laboratory of Connective Tissue Biology, Department of Rheumatology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, Ghent (Belgium); Almqvist, K.F., E-mail: Fredrik.Almqvist@Ugent.b [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 1P5, B9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2010-07-15

    Aim: The present study was designed to evaluate the implantation of alginate beads containing human mature allogenic chondrocytes for the treatment of symptomatic cartilage defects of the knee. MRI was used for the morphological analysis of cartilage repair. The correlation between MRI findings and clinical outcome was also studied. Methods: A biodegradable, alginate-based biocompatible scaffold containing human mature allogenic chondrocytes was used for the treatment of symptomatic chondral and osteochondral lesions in the knee. Twenty-one patients were prospectively evaluated with use of the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for pain preoperatively and at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months of follow-up. Of the 21 patients, 12 had consented to follow the postoperative MRI evaluation protocol. MRI data were analyzed based on the original MOCART (Magnetic Resonance Observation of Cartilage Repair Tissue) and modified MOCART scoring system. The correlation between the clinical outcome and MRI findings was evaluated. Results: A statistically significant clinical improvement became apparent after 6 months and patients continued to improve during the 12 months of follow-up. One of the two MRI scoring systems that were used, showed a statistically significant deterioration of the repair tissue at 1 year of follow-up. Twelve months after the operation complete filling or hypertrophy was found in 41.6%. Bone-marrow edema and effusion were seen in 41.7% and 25% of the study patients, respectively. We did not find a consistent correlation between the MRI criteria and the clinical results. Discussion: The present study confirmed the primary role of MRI in the evaluation of cartilage repair. Two MOCART-based scoring systems were used in a longitudinal fashion and allowed a practical and morphological evaluation of the repair tissue. However, the correlation between clinical outcome and MRI findings was poor. Further

  5. Management of vocal fold scar with autologous fat implantation: perceptual results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuenschwander, M C; Sataloff, R T; Abaza, M M; Hawkshaw, M J; Reiter, D; Spiegel, J R

    2001-06-01

    Vocal fold scar disrupts the mucosal wave and interferes with glottic closure. Treatment involves a multidisciplinary approach that includes voice therapy, medical management, and sometimes surgery. We reviewed the records of the first eight patients who underwent autologous fat implantation for vocal fold scar. Information on the etiology of scar, physical findings, and prior interventions were collected. Videotapes of videostroboscopic findings and perceptual voice ratings [Grade, Roughness, Breathiness, Asthenia, Strain (GRBAS)] were randomized and analyzed independently by four blinded observers. Etiology of scar included mass excision (7), vocal fold stripping (3), congenital sulcus (2), and hemorrhage (1). Prior surgical procedures performed included thyroplasty (1), autologous fat injection (9), excision of scar (2), and lysis of adhesions (2). Strobovideolaryngoscopy: Statistically significant improvement was found in glottic closure, mucosal wave, and stiffness (P = 0.05). Perceptual ratings (GRBAS): Statistically significant improvement was found in all five parameters, including overall Grade, Roughness, Breathiness, Asthenia, and Strain (P = 0.05). Patients appear to have improved vocal fold function and quality of voice after autologous fat implantation in the vocal fold. Autologous fat implantation is an important adjunctive procedure in the management of vocal fold scar, and a useful addition to the armamentarium of the experienced phonomicrosurgeon.

  6. Cost-effectiveness analysis of implants versus autologous perforator flaps using the BREAST-Q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matros, Evan; Albornoz, Claudia R; Razdan, Shantanu N; Mehrara, Babak J; Macadam, Sheina A; Ro, Teresa; McCarthy, Colleen M; Disa, Joseph J; Cordeiro, Peter G; Pusic, Andrea L

    2015-04-01

    Reimbursement has been recognized as a physician barrier to autologous reconstruction. Autologous reconstructions are more expensive than prosthetic reconstructions, but provide greater health-related quality of life. The authors' hypothesis is that autologous tissue reconstructions are cost-effective compared with prosthetic techniques when considering health-related quality of life and patient satisfaction. A cost-effectiveness analysis from the payer perspective, including patient input, was performed for unilateral and bilateral reconstructions with deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flaps and implants. The effectiveness measure was derived using the BREAST-Q and interpreted as the cost for obtaining 1 year of perfect breast health-related quality-adjusted life-year. Costs were obtained from the 2010 Nationwide Inpatient Sample. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was generated. A sensitivity analysis for age and stage at diagnosis was performed. BREAST-Q scores from 309 patients with implants and 217 DIEP flap reconstructions were included. The additional cost for obtaining 1 year of perfect breast-related health for a unilateral DIEP flap compared with implant reconstruction was $11,941. For bilateral DIEP flaps compared with implant reconstructions, the cost for an additional breast health-related quality-adjusted life-year was $28,017. The sensitivity analysis demonstrated that the cost for an additional breast health-related quality-adjusted life-year for DIEP flaps compared with implants was less for younger patients and earlier stage breast cancer. DIEP flaps are cost-effective compared with implants, especially for unilateral reconstructions. Cost-effectiveness of autologous techniques is maximized in women with longer life expectancy. Patient-reported outcomes findings can be incorporated into cost-effectiveness analyses to demonstrate the relative value of reconstructive procedures.

  7. Effect of Collagen Type I or Type II on Chondrogenesis by Cultured Human Articular Chondrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutgers, M.; Saris, Daniël B.F.; Vonk, L.A.; van Rijen, M.H.P.; Akrum, V.; Langeveld, D.; van Boxtel, A.; Dhert, W.J.A.; Creemers, L.B.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Current cartilage repair procedures using autologous chondrocytes rely on a variety of carriers for implantation. Collagen types I and II are frequently used and valuable properties of both were shown earlier in vitro, although a preference for either was not demonstrated. Recently,

  8. Immediate breast reconstruction using autologous skin graft associated with breast implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra, A K; Andrade, W P; Carvalho, S M T; Makdissi, F B A; Yoshimatsu, E K; Domingues, M C; Maciel, M S

    2012-02-01

    Immediate breast reconstruction with skin graft is still little mentioned in the literature. Follow-up studies regarding the technique aspects are particularly scarce. The objective was to detail immediate breast reconstruction using autologous skin graft. Patients (n = 49) who underwent mastectomies and autologous immediate breast reconstruction with skin graft associated with a breast implant at A. C. Camargo Hospital (São Paulo, Brazil) between January 2007 and July 2010 were included. Information on clinical data, technique details and clinical outcome were prospectively collected. Following mastectomy, the autologous full-thickness skin graft was obtained through an inframammary fold incision along the contralateral breast in most patients. The skin graft was placed on the surface of the pectoralis major muscle after adjustments to conform to the mastectomy defect. A minimum of 10-month follow-up period was established. Patients' age ranged from 35 to 55 years and all received a silicone gel textured surface implant to obtain the necessary breast mound. The mean surgical time was 45 min, and the mean amount of skin resection was 4.5 cm in the largest diameter. Follow-up ranged from 10 to 35 months (median 23). All patients had silicone-gel textured surface implants to perform the breast mound reconstruction. No complications were observed in 87.8% of reconstructions. Forty-six patients (94%) had no complaints about the donor-site aesthetics. The result was a breast mound with a central ellipse of healed skin graft. Three (6%) poor results were observed. Thirty-six patients (67%) reported the results as good or very good. Our results lead us to conclude that autologous skin graft provided a reliable option in immediate breast reconstruction to skin-sparing mastectomy defects. The technique accomplished a single-stage implant breast reconstruction when there is inadequate skin coverage. Copyright © 2011 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and

  9. Mastectomy Skin Necrosis After Breast Reconstruction: A Comparative Analysis Between Autologous Reconstruction and Implant-Based Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sue, Gloria R; Lee, Gordon K

    2018-05-01

    Mastectomy skin necrosis is a significant problem after breast reconstruction. We sought to perform a comparative analysis on this complication between patients undergoing autologous breast reconstruction and patients undergoing 2-stage expander implant breast reconstruction. A retrospective review was performed on consecutive patients undergoing autologous breast reconstruction or 2-stage expander implant breast reconstruction by the senior author from 2006 through 2015. Patient demographic factors including age, body mass index, history of diabetes, history of smoking, and history of radiation to the breast were collected. Our primary outcome measure was mastectomy skin necrosis. Fisher exact test was used for statistical analysis between the 2 patient cohorts. The treatment patterns of mastectomy skin necrosis were then analyzed. We identified 204 patients who underwent autologous breast reconstruction and 293 patients who underwent 2-stage expander implant breast reconstruction. Patients undergoing autologous breast reconstruction were older, heavier, more likely to have diabetes, and more likely to have had prior radiation to the breast compared with patients undergoing implant-based reconstruction. The incidence of mastectomy skin necrosis was 30.4% of patients in the autologous group compared with only 10.6% of patients in the tissue expander group (P care in the autologous group, only 3.2% were treated with local wound care in the tissue expander group (P skin necrosis is significantly more likely to occur after autologous breast reconstruction compared with 2-stage expander implant-based breast reconstruction. Patients with autologous reconstructions are more readily treated with local wound care compared with patients with tissue expanders, who tended to require operative treatment of this complication. Patients considering breast reconstruction should be counseled appropriately regarding the differences in incidence and management of mastectomy skin

  10. Destiny of autologous bone marrow-derived stromal cells implanted in the vocal fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanemaru, Shin-ichi; Nakamura, Tatsuo; Yamashita, Masaru; Magrufov, Akhmar; Kita, Tomoko; Tamaki, Hisanobu; Tamura, Yoshihiro; Iguchi, Fuku-ichiro; Kim, Tae Soo; Kishimoto, Masanao; Omori, Koichi; Ito, Juichi

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the destiny of implanted autologous bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BSCs) containing mesenchymal stem cells. We previously reported the successful regeneration of an injured vocal fold through implantation of BSCs in a canine model. However, the fate of the implanted BSCs was not examined. In this study, implanted BSCs were traced in order to determine the type of tissues resulting at the injected site of the vocal fold. After harvest of bone marrow from the femurs of green fluorescent transgenic mice, adherent cells were cultured and selectively amplified. By means of a fluorescence-activated cell sorter, it was confirmed that some cells were strongly positive for mesenchymal stem cell markers, including CD29, CD44, CD49e, and Sca-1. These cells were then injected into the injured vocal fold of a nude rat. Immunohistologic examination of the resected vocal folds was performed 8 weeks after treatment. The implanted cells were alive in the host tissues and showed positive expression for keratin and desmin, markers for epithelial tissue and muscle, respectively. The implanted BSCs differentiated into more than one tissue type in vivo. Cell-based tissue engineering using BSCs may improve the quality of the healing process in vocal fold injuries.

  11. The Safety and Predictability of Implanting Autologous Lenticule Obtained by SMILE for Hyperopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ling; Yao, Peijun; Li, Meiyan; Shen, Yang; Zhao, Jing; Zhou, Xingtao

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the safety, effectiveness, stability, and predictability of implanting autologous lenticules obtained from small incision lenticule extraction for the treatment of hyperopia. Five patients (10 eyes) with one myopic eye and one hyperopic eye were enrolled. The myopic eye was treated with small incision lenticule extraction; a lenticule was extracted and subsequently implanted in the hyperopic eye. Follow-up was at 1 day, 1, 3, 6, and 9 months, and 1 year postoperatively. Patients received a complete ophthalmologic examination at each visit, including uncorrected distance visual acuity, corrected distance visual acuity, anterior segment optical coherence tomography, and corneal topography. There were no complications in any eye during follow-up. Compared with preoperative levels, at the last follow-up visit the eyes with lenticule implantation showed mean spherical equivalent reduced by 5.53 diopters (residual spherical equivalent was +1.13 to -2.63 diopters), mean uncorrected distance visual acuity increased approximately two lines (approximately 20/63 to 20/40 Snellen), and corrected distance visual acuity in 4 (80%) eyes gained one line, 2 (40%) eyes gained two lines, and 1 (20%) eye gained more than two lines. There was no significant difference (P > .05) in spherical equivalent compared with 1 day postoperatively and the last follow-up visit. Corneal topography showed that the lenticule was uniform and located well; anterior segment optical coherence tomography images showed that the lenticule was transparent and the demarcation line was visible. Implanting an autologous lenticule obtained by small incision lenticule extraction for hyperopia might be safe, effective, and stable, but its predictability should be improved in the future. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. The properties of bioengineered chondrocyte sheets for cartilage regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ota Naoshi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the clinical results of autologous chondrocyte implantation for articular cartilage defects have recently improved as a result of advanced techniques based on tissue engineering procedures, problems with cell handling and scaffold imperfections remain to be solved. A new cell-sheet technique has been developed, and is potentially able to overcome these obstacles. Chondrocyte sheets applicable to cartilage regeneration can be prepared with this cell-sheet technique using temperature-responsive culture dishes. However, for clinical application, it is necessary to evaluate the characteristics of the cells in these sheets and to identify their similarities to naive cartilage. Results The expression of SOX 9, collagen type 2, 27, integrin α10, and fibronectin genes in triple-layered chondrocyte sheets was significantly increased in comparison to those in conventional monolayer culture and in a single chondrocyte sheet, implying a nature similar to ordinary cartilage. In addition, immunohistochemistry demonstrated that collagen type II, fibronectin, and integrin α10 were present in the triple-layered chondrocyte sheets. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that these chondrocyte sheets with a consistent cartilaginous phenotype and adhesive properties may lead to a new strategy for cartilage regeneration.

  13. In vivo evaluation of biomechanical properties in the patellofemoral joint after matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation by means of quantitative T2 MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachowsky, M L; Trattnig, S; Wondrasch, B; Apprich, S; Marlovits, S; Mauerer, A; Welsch, Goetz H; Blanke, M

    2014-06-01

    To determine in vivo biomechanical properties of articular cartilage and cartilage repair tissue of the patella, using biochemical MRI by means of quantitative T2 mapping. Twenty MR scans were achieved at 3T MRI, using a new 8-channel multi-function coil allowing controlled bending of the knee. Multi-echo spin-echo T2 mapping was prepared in healthy volunteers and in age- and sex-matched patients after matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) of the patella. MRI was performed at 0° and 45° of flexion of the knee after 0 min and after 1 h. A semi-automatic region-of-interest analysis was performed for the whole patella cartilage. To allow stratification with regard to the anatomical (collagen) structure, further subregional analysis was carried out (deep-middle-superficial cartilage layer). Statistical analysis of variance was performed. During 0° flexion (decompression), full-thickness T2 values showed no significant difference between volunteers (43 ms) and patients (41 ms). Stratification was more pronounced for healthy cartilage compared to cartilage repair tissue. During 45° flexion (compression), full-thickness T2 values within volunteers were significantly increased (54 ms) compared to patients (44 ms) (p T2 values measured in straight position and in bended position. There was no significant difference between the 0- and the 60-min MRI examination. T2 values in the patient group increased between the 0- and the 60-min examination. However, the increase was only significant in the superior cartilage layer of the straight position (p = 0.021). During compression (at 45° flexion), healthy patellar cartilage showed a significant increase in T2-values, indicating adaptations of water content and collagen fibril orientation to mechanical load. This could not be observed within the patella cartilage after cartilage repair (MACT) of the patella, most obvious due to a lack of biomechanical adjustment. III.

  14. T2 and T2* mapping in patients after matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation: initial results on clinical use with 3.0-Tesla MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welsch, Goetz H.; Trattnig, Siegfried; Quirbach, Sebastian; Hughes, Timothy; Olk, Alexander; Blanke, Matthias; Marlovits, Stefan; Mamisch, Tallal C.

    2010-01-01

    To use T2 and T2* mapping in patients after matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) of the knee, and to compare and correlate both methodologies. 3.0-Tesla MRI was performed on 30 patients (34.6 ± 9.9 years) with a follow-up period of 28.1 ± 18.8 months after MACT. Multi-echo, spin-echo-based T2 mapping using six echoes and gradient-echo-based T2* mapping using six echoes were prepared. T2 and T2* maps were obtained using a pixel-wise, mono-exponential, non-negative least-squares fit analysis. Region-of-interest analysis was performed for mean (full-thickness) as well as deep and superficial aspects of the cartilage repair tissue and control cartilage sites. Mean T2 values (ms) were comparable for the control cartilage (53.4 ± 11.7) and the repair tissue (55.5 ± 11.6) (p > 0.05). Mean T2* values (ms) for control cartilage (30.9 ± 6.6) were significantly higher than those of the repair tissue (24.5 ± 8.1) (p < 0.001). Zonal stratification was more pronounced for T2* than for T2. The correlation between T2 and T2* was highly significant (p < 0.001), with a Pearson coefficient between 0.276 and 0.433. T2 and T2* relaxation time measurements in the evaluation of cartilage repair tissue and its zonal variation show promising results, although the properties visualised by T2 and T2* may differ. (orig.)

  15. Rapid Chondrocyte Isolation for Tissue Engineering Applications: The Effect of Enzyme Concentration and Temporal Exposure on the Matrix Forming Capacity of Nasal Derived Chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srujana Vedicherla

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory based processing and expansion to yield adequate cell numbers had been the standard in Autologous Disc Chondrocyte Transplantation (ADCT, Allogeneic Juvenile Chondrocyte Implantation (NuQu®, and Matrix-Induced Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation (MACI. Optimizing cell isolation is a key challenge in terms of obtaining adequate cell numbers while maintaining a vibrant cell population capable of subsequent proliferation and matrix elaboration. However, typical cell yields from a cartilage digest are highly variable between donors and based on user competency. The overall objective of this study was to optimize chondrocyte isolation from cartilaginous nasal tissue through modulation of enzyme concentration exposure (750 and 3000 U/ml and incubation time (1 and 12 h, combined with physical agitation cycles, and to assess subsequent cell viability and matrix forming capacity. Overall, increasing enzyme exposure time was found to be more detrimental than collagenase concentration for subsequent viability, proliferation, and matrix forming capacity (sGAG and collagen of these cells resulting in nonuniform cartilaginous matrix deposition. Taken together, consolidating a 3000 U/ml collagenase digest of 1 h at a ratio of 10 ml/g of cartilage tissue with physical agitation cycles can improve efficiency of chondrocyte isolation, yielding robust, more uniform matrix formation.

  16. A Preliminary Study of Human Amniotic Membrane as a Potential Chondrocyte Carrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Boo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the feasibility of using processed human amniotic membrane (HAM to support the attachment and proliferation of chondrocytes in vitro which in turn can be utilised as a cell delivery vehicle in tissue engineering applications. METHODS: Fresh HAM obtained from patients undergoing routine elective caesarean sections was harvested, processed and dried using either freeze drying (FD or air drying (AD methods prior to sterilisation by gamma irradiation. Isolated, processed and characterised rabbit autologous chondrocytes were seeded on processed HAM and cultured for up to three weeks. Cell attachment and proliferation were examined qualitatively using inverted brightfield microscopy. RESULTS: Processed HAM appeared to allow cell attachment when implanted with chondrocytes. Although cells seeded on AD and FD HAM did not appear to attach as strongly as those seeded on glycerol preserved intact human amniotic membrane, these cells to be proliferated in cell culture conditions. CONCLUSION: Preliminary results show that processed HAM promotes chondrocyte attachment and proliferation.

  17. Initial results of in vivo high-resolution morphological and biochemical cartilage imaging of patients after matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quirbach, Sebastian; Trattnig, Siegfried; Marlovits, Stefan; Zimmermann, Valentin; Domayer, Stephan; Dorotka, Ronald; Mamisch, Tallal C.; Bohndorf, Klaus; Welsch, Goetz H.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use morphological as well as biochemical (T2 and T2* relaxation times and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI)) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the evaluation of healthy cartilage and cartilage repair tissue after matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) of the ankle joint. Ten healthy volunteers (mean age, 32.4 years) and 12 patients who underwent MACT of the ankle joint (mean age, 32.8 years) were included. In order to evaluate possible maturation effects, patients were separated into short-term (6-13 months) and long-term (20-54 months) follow-up cohorts. MRI was performed on a 3.0-T magnetic resonance (MR) scanner using a new dedicated eight-channel foot-and-ankle coil. Using high-resolution morphological MRI, the magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) score was assessed. For biochemical MRI, T2 mapping, T2* mapping, and DWI were obtained. Region-of-interest analysis was performed within native cartilage of the volunteers and control cartilage as well as cartilage repair tissue in the patients subsequent to MACT. The overall MOCART score in patients after MACT was 73.8. T2 relaxation times (∝50 ms), T2* relaxation times (∝16 ms), and the diffusion constant for DWI (∝1.3) were comparable for the healthy volunteers and the control cartilage in the patients after MACT. The cartilage repair tissue showed no significant difference in T2 and T2* relaxation times (p≥0.05) compared to the control cartilage; however, a significantly higher diffusivity (∝1.5; p<0.05) was noted in the cartilage repair tissue. The obtained results suggest that besides morphological MRI and biochemical MR techniques, such as T2 and T2* mapping, DWI may also deliver additional information about the ultrastructure of cartilage and cartilage repair tissue in the ankle joint using high-field MRI, a dedicated multichannel coil, and sophisticated sequences. (orig.)

  18. Utility of T2 mapping and dGEMRIC for evaluation of cartilage repair after allograft chondrocyte implantation in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, J; Watanabe, A; Sasho, T; Yamaguchi, S; Saito, M; Akagi, R; Muramatsu, Y; Mukoyama, S; Katsuragi, J; Akatsu, Y; Fukawa, T; Okubo, T; Osone, F; Takahashi, K

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of quantitative Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for evaluating the quality of cartilage repair over time following allograft chondrocyte implantation using a three-dimensional scaffold for osteochondral lesions. Thirty knees from 15 rabbits were analyzed. An osteochondral defect (diameter, 4 mm; depth, 1 mm) was created on the patellar groove of the femur in both legs. The defects were filled with a chondrocyte-seeded scaffold in the right knee and an empty scaffold in the left knee. Five rabbits each were euthanized at 4, 8, and 12 weeks and their knees were examined via macroscopic inspection, histological and biochemical analysis, and quantitative MRI (T2 mapping and dGEMRIC) to assess the state of tissue repair following allograft chondrocyte implantation with a three-dimensional scaffold for osteochondral lesions. Comparatively good regenerative cartilage was observed both macroscopically and histologically. In both chondrocyte-seeded and control knees, the T2 values of repair tissues were highest at 4 weeks and showed a tendency to decrease with time. ΔR1 values of dGEMRIC also tended to decrease with time in both groups, and the mean ΔR1 was significantly lower in the CS-scaffold group than in the control group at all time points. ΔR1 = 1/r (R1post - R1pre), where r is the relaxivity of Gd-DTPA(2-), R1 = 1/T1 (longitudinal relaxation time). T2 mapping and dGEMRIC were both effective for evaluating tissue repair after allograft chondrocyte implantation. ΔR1 values of dGEMRIC represented good correlation with histologically and biochemically even at early stages after the implantation. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. High throughput generated micro-aggregates of chondrocytes stimulate cartilage formation in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LS Moreira Teixeira

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Cell-based cartilage repair strategies such as matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI could be improved by enhancing cell performance. We hypothesised that micro-aggregates of chondrocytes generated in high-throughput prior to implantation in a defect could stimulate cartilaginous matrix deposition and remodelling. To address this issue, we designed a micro-mould to enable controlled high-throughput formation of micro-aggregates. Morphology, stability, gene expression profiles and chondrogenic potential of micro-aggregates of human and bovine chondrocytes were evaluated and compared to single-cells cultured in micro-wells and in 3D after encapsulation in Dextran-Tyramine (Dex-TA hydrogels in vitro and in vivo. We successfully formed micro-aggregates of human and bovine chondrocytes with highly controlled size, stability and viability within 24 hours. Micro-aggregates of 100 cells presented a superior balance in Collagen type I and Collagen type II gene expression over single cells and micro-aggregates of 50 and 200 cells. Matrix metalloproteinases 1, 9 and 13 mRNA levels were decreased in micro-aggregates compared to single-cells. Histological and biochemical analysis demonstrated enhanced matrix deposition in constructs seeded with micro-aggregates cultured in vitro and in vivo, compared to single-cell seeded constructs. Whole genome microarray analysis and single gene expression profiles using human chondrocytes confirmed increased expression of cartilage-related genes when chondrocytes were cultured in micro-aggregates. In conclusion, we succeeded in controlled high-throughput formation of micro-aggregates of chondrocytes. Compared to single cell-seeded constructs, seeding of constructs with micro-aggregates greatly improved neo-cartilage formation. Therefore, micro-aggregation prior to chondrocyte implantation in current MACI procedures, may effectively accelerate hyaline cartilage formation.

  20. High throughput generated micro-aggregates of chondrocytes stimulate cartilage formation in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira Teixeira, L S; Leijten, J C H; Sobral, J; Jin, R; van Apeldoorn, A A; Feijen, J; van Blitterswijk, C; Dijkstra, P J; Karperien, M

    2012-06-05

    Cell-based cartilage repair strategies such as matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI) could be improved by enhancing cell performance. We hypothesised that micro-aggregates of chondrocytes generated in high-throughput prior to implantation in a defect could stimulate cartilaginous matrix deposition and remodelling. To address this issue, we designed a micro-mould to enable controlled high-throughput formation of micro-aggregates. Morphology, stability, gene expression profiles and chondrogenic potential of micro-aggregates of human and bovine chondrocytes were evaluated and compared to single-cells cultured in micro-wells and in 3D after encapsulation in Dextran-Tyramine (Dex-TA) hydrogels in vitro and in vivo. We successfully formed micro-aggregates of human and bovine chondrocytes with highly controlled size, stability and viability within 24 hours. Micro-aggregates of 100 cells presented a superior balance in Collagen type I and Collagen type II gene expression over single cells and micro-aggregates of 50 and 200 cells. Matrix metalloproteinases 1, 9 and 13 mRNA levels were decreased in micro-aggregates compared to single-cells. Histological and biochemical analysis demonstrated enhanced matrix deposition in constructs seeded with micro-aggregates cultured in vitro and in vivo, compared to single-cell seeded constructs. Whole genome microarray analysis and single gene expression profiles using human chondrocytes confirmed increased expression of cartilage-related genes when chondrocytes were cultured in micro-aggregates. In conclusion, we succeeded in controlled high-throughput formation of micro-aggregates of chondrocytes. Compared to single cell-seeded constructs, seeding of constructs with micro-aggregates greatly improved neo-cartilage formation. Therefore, micro-aggregation prior to chondrocyte implantation in current MACI procedures, may effectively accelerate hyaline cartilage formation.

  1. Autologous bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cell implantation and endothelial function in a rabbit ischemic limb model.

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    Shinsuke Mikami

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to determine whether autologous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs implantation improves endothelial dysfunction in a rabbit ischemic limb model. METHODS: We evaluated the effect of MSC implantation on limb blood flow (LBF responses to acetylcholine (ACh, an endothelium-dependent vasodilator, and sodium nitroprusside (SNP, an endothelium-independent vasodilator, in rabbits with limb ischemia in which cultured MSCs were implanted (n = 20 or saline was injected as a control group (n = 20. LBF was measured using an electromagnetic flowmeter. A total of 10(6 MSCs were implanted into each ischemic limb. RESULTS: Histological sections of ischemic muscle showed that capillary index (capillary/muscle fiber was greater in the MSC implantation group than in the control group. Laser Doppler blood perfusion index was significantly increased in the MSC implantation group compared with that in the control group. LBF response to ACh was greater in the MSC group than in the control group. After administration of N(G-nitro-L-arginine, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, LBF response to ACh was similar in the MSC implantation group and control group. Vasodilatory effects of SNP in the two groups were similar. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that MSC implantation induces angiogenesis and augments endothelium-dependent vasodilation in a rabbit ischemic model through an increase in nitric oxide production.

  2. Autologous implantation of BMP2-expressing dermal fibroblasts to improve bone mineral density and architecture in rabbit long bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Akikazu; Weisbrode, Steve E; Bertone, Alicia L

    2015-10-01

    Cell-mediated gene therapy may treat bone fragility disorders. Dermal fibroblasts (DFb) may be an alternative cell source to stem cells for orthopedic gene therapy because of their rapid cell yield and excellent plasticity with bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) gene transduction. Autologous DFb or BMP2-expressing autologous DFb were administered in twelve rabbits by two delivery routes; a transcortical intra-medullar infusion into tibiae and delayed intra-osseous injection into femoral drill defects. Both delivery methods of DFb-BMP2 resulted in a successful cell engraftment, increased bone volume, bone mineral density, improved trabecular bone microarchitecture, greater bone defect filling, external callus formation, and trabecular surface area, compared to non-transduced DFb or no cells. Cell engraftment within trabecular bone and bone marrow tissue was most efficiently achieved by intra-osseous injection of DFb-BMP2. Our results suggested that BMP2-expressing autologous DFb have enhanced efficiency of engraftment in target bones resulting in a measurable biologic response by the bone of improved bone mineral density and bone microarchitecture. These results support that autologous implantation of DFb-BMP2 warrants further study on animal models of bone fragility disorders, such as osteogenesis imperfecta and osteoporosis to potentially enhance bone quality, particularly along with other gene modification of these diseases. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Autologous Cell Delivery to the Skin-Implant Interface via the Lumen of Percutaneous Devices in vitro

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    Antonio Peramo

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Induced tissue regeneration around percutaneous medical implants could be a useful method to prevent the failure of the medical device, especially when the epidermal seal around the implant is disrupted and the implant must be maintained over a long period of time. In this manuscript, a novel concept and technique is introduced in which autologous keratinocytes were delivered to the interfacial area of a skin-implant using the hollow interior of a fixator pin as a conduit. Full thickness human skin explants discarded from surgeries were cultured at the air-liquid interface and were punctured to fit at the bottom of hollow cylindrical stainless steel fixator pins. Autologous keratinocytes, previously extracted from the same piece of skin and cultured separately, were delivered to the specimens thorough the interior of the hollow pins. The delivered cells survived the process and resembled undifferentiated epithelium, with variations in size and shape. Viability was demonstrated by the lack of morphologic evidence of necrosis or apoptosis. Although the cells did not form organized epithelial structures, differentiation toward a keratinocyte phenotype was evident immunohistochemically. These results suggest that an adaptation of this technique could be useful for the treatment of complications arising from the contact between skin and percutaneous devices in vivo.

  4. Sellar Floor Reconstruction with the Medpor Implant Versus Autologous Bone After Transnasal Transsphenoidal Surgery: Outcome in 200 Consecutive Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebelt, Brandon D; Huang, Meng; Baskin, David S

    2015-08-01

    The Medpor porous polyethylene implant provides benefits to perform sellar floor reconstruction when indicated. This material has been used for cranioplasty and reconstruction of skull base defects and facial fractures. We present the most extensive use of this implant for sellar floor reconstruction and document the safety and benefits provided by this unique implant. The medical charts for 200 consecutive patients undergoing endonasal transsphenoidal surgery from April 2008 through December 2011 were reviewed. Material used for sellar floor reconstruction, pathologic diagnosis, immediate inpatient complications, and long-term complications were documented and analyzed. Outpatient follow-up was documented for a minimum of 1-year duration, extending in some patients up to 5 years. Of the 200 consecutive patients, 136 received sellar floor cranioplasty using the Medpor implant. Postoperative complications included 6 complaints of sinus irritation or drainage, 1 postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak requiring operative re-exploration, 1 event of tension pneumocephalus requiring operative decompression, 1 case of aseptic meningitis, 1 subdural hematoma, and 1 case of epistaxis. The incidence of these complications did not differ from the autologous nasal bone group in a statistically significant manner. Sellar floor reconstruction remains an important part of transsphenoidal surgery to prevent postoperative complications. Various autologous and synthetic options are available to reconstruct the sellar floor, and the Medpor implant is a safe and effective option. The complication rate after surgery is equivalent to or less frequent than other methods of reconstruction and the implant is readily incorporated into host tissue after implantation, minimizing infectious risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. BMP-2, hypoxia, and COL1A1/HtrA1 siRNAs favor neo-cartilage hyaline matrix formation in chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollitrault, David; Legendre, Florence; Drougard, Carole; Briand, Mélanie; Benateau, Hervé; Goux, Didier; Chajra, Hanane; Poulain, Laurent; Hartmann, Daniel; Vivien, Denis; Shridhar, Vijayalakshmi; Baldi, Alfonso; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric; Boumediene, Karim; Demoor, Magali; Galera, Philippe

    2015-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is an irreversible pathology that causes a decrease in articular cartilage thickness, leading finally to the complete degradation of the affected joint. The low spontaneous repair capacity of cartilage prevents any restoration of the joint surface, making OA a major public health issue. Here, we developed an innovative combination of treatment conditions to improve the human chondrocyte phenotype before autologous chondrocyte implantation. First, we seeded human dedifferentiated chondrocytes into a collagen sponge as a scaffold, cultured them in hypoxia in the presence of a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), BMP-2, and transfected them with small interfering RNAs targeting two markers overexpressed in OA dedifferentiated chondrocytes, that is, type I collagen and/or HtrA1 serine protease. This strategy significantly decreased mRNA and protein expression of type I collagen and HtrA1, and led to an improvement in the chondrocyte phenotype index of differentiation. The effectiveness of our in vitro culture process was also demonstrated in the nude mouse model in vivo after subcutaneous implantation. We, thus, provide here a new protocol able to favor human hyaline chondrocyte phenotype in primarily dedifferentiated cells, both in vitro and in vivo. Our study also offers an innovative strategy for chondrocyte redifferentiation and opens new opportunities for developing therapeutic targets.

  6. Impact of human platelet lysate on the expansion and chondrogenic capacity of cultured human chondrocytes for cartilage cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, J G; Kuiper, J H; Richardson, J B; Roberts, S; Wright, K T; Kuiper, N J

    2018-05-01

    High hopes have been pinned on regenerative medicine strategies in order to prevent the progression of cartilage damage to osteoarthritis, particularly by autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). The loss of chondrocyte phenotype during in vitro monolayer expansion, a necessary step to obtain sufficient cell numbers, may be a key limitation in ACI. In this study, it was determined whether a shorter monolayer expansion approach could improve chondrogenic differentiation. The effects of two supplement types, foetal bovine serum (FBS) and Stemulate™ (a commercial source of human platelet lysate), on the expansion and re-differentiation potential of human chondrocytes, isolated from five individuals, were compared. Chondrocytes were expanded with 10 % FBS or 10 % Stemulate™. Pellets were cultured for 28 d in chondrogenic differentiation medium and assessed for the presence of cartilage matrix molecules and genes associated with chondrogenicity. Stemulate™ significantly enhanced the proliferation rate [average population doubling times: FBS, 25.07 ± 6.98 d (standard error of the mean, SEM) vs. Stemulate™, 13.10 ± 2.57 d (SEM)]. Sulphated glycosaminoglycans (sGAG), total collagen and qRT-PCR analyses of cartilage genes showed that FBS-expanded chondrocytes demonstrated significantly better chondrogenic capacity than Stemulate™-expanded chondrocytes. Histologically, FBS-expanded chondrocyte pellets appeared to be more stable, with a more intense staining for toluidine blue, indicating a greater chondrogenic capacity. Although Stemulate™ positively influenced chondrocyte proliferation, it had a negative effect on chondrogenic differentiation potential. This suggested that, in the treatment of cartilage defects, Stemulate™ might not be the ideal supplement for expanding chondrocytes (which maintained a chondrocyte phenotype) and, hence, for cell therapies (including ACI).

  7. Impact of human platelet lysate on the expansion and chondrogenic capacity of cultured human chondrocytes for cartilage cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JG Sykes

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available High hopes have been pinned on regenerative medicine strategies in order to prevent the progression of cartilage damage to osteoarthritis, particularly by autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI. The loss of chondrocyte phenotype during in vitro monolayer expansion, a necessary step to obtain sufficient cell numbers, may be a key limitation in ACI. In this study, it was determined whether a shorter monolayer expansion approach could improve chondrogenic differentiation. The effects of two supplement types, foetal bovine serum (FBS and Stemulate™ (a commercial source of human platelet lysate, on the expansion and re-differentiation potential of human chondrocytes, isolated from five individuals, were compared. Chondrocytes were expanded with 10 % FBS or 10 % Stemulate™. Pellets were cultured for 28 d in chondrogenic differentiation medium and assessed for the presence of cartilage matrix molecules and genes associated with chondrogenicity. Stemulate™ significantly enhanced the proliferation rate [average population doubling times: FBS, 25.07 ± 6.98 d (standard error of the mean, SEM vs. Stemulate™, 13.10 ± 2.57 d (SEM]. Sulphated glycosaminoglycans (sGAG, total collagen and qRT-PCR analyses of cartilage genes showed that FBS-expanded chondrocytes demonstrated significantly better chondrogenic capacity than Stemulate™-expanded chondrocytes. Histologically, FBS-expanded chondrocyte pellets appeared to be more stable, with a more intense staining for toluidine blue, indicating a greater chondrogenic capacity. Although Stemulate™ positively influenced chondrocyte proliferation, it had a negative effect on chondrogenic differentiation potential. This suggested that, in the treatment of cartilage defects, Stemulate™ might not be the ideal supplement for expanding chondrocytes (which maintained a chondrocyte phenotype and, hence, for cell therapies (including ACI.

  8. Assessment of functional recovery after autologous implantation of neural progenitor cells for the treatment of traumatic brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xing; Zhang Dong; Zuo Zhuantao; Ge Feng; Zhu Jianhong; Zhou Liangfu

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess the functional recovery in the patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) after autologous implantation of neural progenitor cells, and 7 counterparts with matched age, injury location and extent were chosen as the control. Methods: Neural progenitor cells were isolated from exposed brain tissue and propagated for 25 to 30 d, then implanted the autologous neural progenitor cells at seven points around the traumatic regions with MRI-stereotactic guiding device for 7 patients. All recruited patients underwent 18 F-fluorodeox-yglucose (FDG) PET imaging, function MRI (fMRI) and assessment of Glasgow outcome scale extended (GOSE) after operation for open brain trauma. The examinations were repeated one month after neural progenitor cell implantation and then repeated every 3 months during follow-up in the first year, and every 6 months in the second year. The same examinations were performed on untreated counterparts at similar intervals for avoiding deviations of spontaneous recovery. The data were analyzed with region of interest (ROI) and statistical parametric mapping (SPM). Results: At the third month of follow-up, mean tracer uptake in the damaged territory in implantation group increased significantly (P 18 F-FDG in the top of precentral gyrus was significantly increased in implantation group, and the metabolism of 18 F-FDG in the frontal lobe was significantly elevated postoperation according to paired SPM analysis. The activation in fMRI maps was seen in the motor cortex since the third month after implantation, whereas no active signals were detected before implantation or in control group. At the 6th month of follow-up, mean score of GOSE in the group of implantation was 6.63±0.52, whereas the mean score was 4.50 ±0.76 in control group (P 18 F-FDG uptake in the injured area was 3 months prior to the elevation of GOSE. Conclusions: The results of the study show that 18 F-FDG PET and fMRI both showed significantly increased neurological

  9. Isolation and characterization of human articular chondrocytes from surgical waste after total knee arthroplasty (TKA

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    Jakob Naranda

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Cartilage tissue engineering is a fast-evolving field of biomedical engineering, in which the chondrocytes represent the most commonly used cell type. Since research in tissue engineering always consumes a lot of cells, simple and cheap isolation methods could form a powerful basis to boost such studies and enable their faster progress to the clinics. Isolated chondrocytes can be used for autologous chondrocyte implantation in cartilage repair, and are the base for valuable models to investigate cartilage phenotype preservation, as well as enable studies of molecular features, nature and scales of cellular responses to alterations in the cartilage tissue. Methods Isolation and consequent cultivation of primary human adult articular chondrocytes from the surgical waste obtained during total knee arthroplasty (TKA was performed. To evaluate the chondrogenic potential of the isolated cells, gene expression of collagen type 2 (COL2, collagen 1 (COL1 and aggrecan (ACAN was evaluated. Immunocytochemical staining of all mentioned proteins was performed to evaluate chondrocyte specific production. Results Cartilage specific gene expression of COL2 and ACAN has been shown that the proposed protocol leads to isolation of cells with a high chondrogenic potential, possibly even specific phenotype preservation up to the second passage. COL1 expression has confirmed the tendency of the isolated cells dedifferentiation into a fibroblast-like phenotype already in the second passage, which confirms previous findings that higher passages should be used with care in cartilage tissue engineering. To evaluate the effectiveness of our approach, immunocytochemical staining of the evaluated chondrocyte specific products was performed as well. Discussion In this study, we developed a protocol for isolation and consequent cultivation of primary human adult articular chondrocytes with the desired phenotype from the surgical waste obtained during TKA. TKA is a

  10. Cellular automata model for human articular chondrocytes migration, proliferation and cell death: An in vitro validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaca-González, J J; Gutiérrez, M L; Guevara, J M; Garzón-Alvarado, D A

    2017-01-01

    Articular cartilage is characterized by low cell density of only one cell type, chondrocytes, and has limited self-healing properties. When articular cartilage is affected by traumatic injuries, a therapeutic strategy such as autologous chondrocyte implantation is usually proposed for its treatment. This approach requires in vitro chondrocyte expansion to yield high cell number for cell transplantation. To improve the efficiency of this procedure, it is necessary to assess cell dynamics such as migration, proliferation and cell death during culture. Computational models such as cellular automata can be used to simulate cell dynamics in order to enhance the result of cell culture procedures. This methodology has been implemented for several cell types; however, an experimental validation is required for each one. For this reason, in this research a cellular automata model, based on random-walk theory, was devised in order to predict articular chondrocyte behavior in monolayer culture during cell expansion. Results demonstrated that the cellular automata model corresponded to cell dynamics and computed-accurate quantitative results. Moreover, it was possible to observe that cell dynamics depend on weighted probabilities derived from experimental data and cell behavior varies according to the cell culture period. Thus, depending on whether cells were just seeded or proliferated exponentially, culture time probabilities differed in percentages in the CA model. Furthermore, in the experimental assessment a decreased chondrocyte proliferation was observed along with increased passage number. This approach is expected to having other uses as in enhancing articular cartilage therapies based on tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  11. Effect of Cell Sheet Manipulation Techniques on the Expression of Collagen Type II and Stress Fiber Formation in Human Chondrocyte Sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongin, Sopita; Waikakul, Saranatra; Chotiyarnwong, Pojchong; Siriwatwechakul, Wanwipa; Viravaidya-Pasuwat, Kwanchanok

    2018-03-01

    Cell sheet technology is applied to human articular chondrocytes to construct a tissue-like structure as an alternative treatment for cartilage defect. The effect of a gelatin manipulator, as a cell sheet transfer system, on the quality of the chondrocyte sheets was investigated. The changes of important chondrogenic markers and stress fibers, resulting from the cell sheet manipulation, were also studied. The chondrocyte cell sheets were constructed with patient-derived chondrocytes using a temperature-responsive polymer and a gelatin manipulator as a transfer carrier. The properties of the cell sheets, including sizes, expression levels of collagen type II and I, and the localization of the stress fibers, were assessed and compared with those of the cell sheets harvested without the gelatin manipulator. Using the gelatin manipulator, the original size of the chondrocyte cell sheets was retained with abundant stress fibers, but with a decrease in the expression of collagen type II. Without the gelatin manipulator, although the cell shrinkage occurred, the cell sheet with suppressed stress fiber formation showed significantly higher levels of collagen type II. These results support our observations that stress fiber formation in chondrocyte cell sheets affected the production of chondrogenic markers. These densely packed tissue-like structures possessed a good chondrogenic activity, indicating their potential for use in autologous chondrocyte implantation to treat cartilage defects.

  12. Comparative study of the chondrogenic potential of human bone marrow stromal cells, neonatal chondrocytes and adult chondrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, Sushmita; Kirkham, Jennifer; Wood, David; Curran, Stephen; Yang, Xuebin

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → This study has characterised three different cell types under conditions similar to those used for autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) for applications in cartilage repair/regeneration. → Compared for the first time the chondrogenic potential of neonatal chondrocytes with human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs) and adult chondrocytes. → Demonstrated that adult chondrocytes hold greatest potential for use in ACI based on their higher proliferation rates, lower alkaline phosphatise activity and enhanced expression of chondrogenic genes. → Demonstrated the need for chondroinduction as a necessary pre-requisite to efficient chondrogenesis in vitro and, by extrapolation, for cell based therapy (e.g. ACI or cartilage tissue engineering). -- Abstract: Cartilage tissue engineering is still a major clinical challenge with optimisation of a suitable source of cells for cartilage repair/regeneration not yet fully addressed. The aims of this study were to compare and contrast the differences in chondrogenic behaviour between human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs), human neonatal and adult chondrocytes to further our understanding of chondroinduction relative to cell maturity and to identify factors that promote chondrogenesis and maintain functional homoeostasis. Cells were cultured in monolayer in either chondrogenic or basal medium, recapitulating procedures used in existing clinical procedures for cell-based therapies. Cell doubling time, morphology and alkaline phosphatase specific activity (ALPSA) were determined at different time points. Expression of chondrogenic markers (SOX9, ACAN and COL2A1) was compared via real time polymerase chain reaction. Amongst the three cell types studied, HBMSCs had the highest ALPSA in basal culture and lowest ALPSA in chondrogenic media. Neonatal chondrocytes were the most proliferative and adult chondrocytes had the lowest ALPSA in basal media. Gene expression analysis revealed a difference in the

  13. Comparative study of the chondrogenic potential of human bone marrow stromal cells, neonatal chondrocytes and adult chondrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Sushmita [Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Group, Leeds Dental Institute, University of Leeds, LS29LU (United Kingdom); Kirkham, Jennifer [Biomineralisation Group, Leeds Dental Institute, University of Leeds, LS29LU (United Kingdom); NIHR Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, University of Leeds, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Leeds LS74SA (United Kingdom); Wood, David [Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Group, Leeds Dental Institute, University of Leeds, LS29LU (United Kingdom); Curran, Stephen [Smith and Nephew Research Centre, YO105DF (United Kingdom); Yang, Xuebin, E-mail: X.B.Yang@leeds.ac.uk [Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Group, Leeds Dental Institute, University of Leeds, LS29LU (United Kingdom); NIHR Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, University of Leeds, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Leeds LS74SA (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} This study has characterised three different cell types under conditions similar to those used for autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) for applications in cartilage repair/regeneration. {yields} Compared for the first time the chondrogenic potential of neonatal chondrocytes with human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs) and adult chondrocytes. {yields} Demonstrated that adult chondrocytes hold greatest potential for use in ACI based on their higher proliferation rates, lower alkaline phosphatise activity and enhanced expression of chondrogenic genes. {yields} Demonstrated the need for chondroinduction as a necessary pre-requisite to efficient chondrogenesis in vitro and, by extrapolation, for cell based therapy (e.g. ACI or cartilage tissue engineering). -- Abstract: Cartilage tissue engineering is still a major clinical challenge with optimisation of a suitable source of cells for cartilage repair/regeneration not yet fully addressed. The aims of this study were to compare and contrast the differences in chondrogenic behaviour between human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs), human neonatal and adult chondrocytes to further our understanding of chondroinduction relative to cell maturity and to identify factors that promote chondrogenesis and maintain functional homoeostasis. Cells were cultured in monolayer in either chondrogenic or basal medium, recapitulating procedures used in existing clinical procedures for cell-based therapies. Cell doubling time, morphology and alkaline phosphatase specific activity (ALPSA) were determined at different time points. Expression of chondrogenic markers (SOX9, ACAN and COL2A1) was compared via real time polymerase chain reaction. Amongst the three cell types studied, HBMSCs had the highest ALPSA in basal culture and lowest ALPSA in chondrogenic media. Neonatal chondrocytes were the most proliferative and adult chondrocytes had the lowest ALPSA in basal media. Gene expression analysis revealed

  14. Xiphoid Process-Derived Chondrocytes: A Novel Cell Source for Elastic Cartilage Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Seungwoo; Cho, Wheemoon; Cho, Hyunji; Lee, Jungsun

    2014-01-01

    Reconstruction of elastic cartilage requires a source of chondrocytes that display a reliable differentiation tendency. Predetermined tissue progenitor cells are ideal candidates for meeting this need; however, it is difficult to obtain donor elastic cartilage tissue because most elastic cartilage serves important functions or forms external structures, making these tissues indispensable. We found vestigial cartilage tissue in xiphoid processes and characterized it as hyaline cartilage in the proximal region and elastic cartilage in the distal region. Xiphoid process-derived chondrocytes (XCs) showed superb in vitro expansion ability based on colony-forming unit fibroblast assays, cell yield, and cumulative cell growth. On induction of differentiation into mesenchymal lineages, XCs showed a strong tendency toward chondrogenic differentiation. An examination of the tissue-specific regeneration capacity of XCs in a subcutaneous-transplantation model and autologous chondrocyte implantation model confirmed reliable regeneration of elastic cartilage regardless of the implantation environment. On the basis of these observations, we conclude that xiphoid process cartilage, the only elastic cartilage tissue source that can be obtained without destroying external shape or function, is a source of elastic chondrocytes that show superb in vitro expansion and reliable differentiation capacity. These findings indicate that XCs could be a valuable cell source for reconstruction of elastic cartilage. PMID:25205841

  15. Use of autologous blood-derived endothelial progenitor cells at point-of-care to protect against implant thrombosis in a large animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantzen, Alexandra E; Lane, Whitney O; Gage, Shawn M; Jamiolkowski, Ryan M; Haseltine, Justin M; Galinat, Lauren J; Lin, Fu-Hsiung; Lawson, Jeffrey H; Truskey, George A; Achneck, Hardean E

    2011-11-01

    Titanium (Ti) is commonly utilized in many cardiovascular devices, e.g. as a component of Nitinol stents, intra- and extracorporeal mechanical circulatory assist devices, but is associated with the risk of thromboemboli formation. We propose to solve this problem by lining the Ti blood-contacting surfaces with autologous peripheral blood-derived late outgrowth endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) after having previously demonstrated that these EPCs adhere to and grow on Ti under physiological shear stresses and functionally adapt to their environment under flow conditions ex vivo. Autologous fluorescently-labeled porcine EPCs were seeded at the point-of-care in the operating room onto Ti tubes for 30 min and implanted into the pro-thrombotic environment of the inferior vena cava of swine (n = 8). After 3 days, Ti tubes were explanted, disassembled, and the blood-contacting surface was imaged. A blinded analysis found all 4 cell-seeded implants to be free of clot, whereas 4 controls without EPCs were either entirely occluded or partially thrombosed. Pre-labeled EPCs had spread and were present on all 4 cell-seeded implants while no endothelial cells were observed on control implants. These results suggest that late outgrowth autologous EPCs represent a promising source of lining Ti implants to reduce thrombosis in vivo. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. In-vitro interactions of human chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells, and of mouse macrophages with phospholipid-covered metallic implant materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Willumeit

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Phospholipid-coatings on metallic implant surfaces were evaluated in terms of adhesion, proliferation and matrix production of skeletal cells, and of macrophage stimulation. The working hypothesis is that mimicking a model biomembrane by phospholipids on surfaces to which cells adhere, the surface recognition by surrounding cells is altered. In this study, 1 mirror-like polished Ti-6Al-7Nb and 2 porous Ti-6Al-4V specimens were covered with the phospholipids POPE (palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidyl-ethanolamine and POPC (palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidyl-choline, and the interactions of a human articular chondrocytes (HAC, b human mesenchymal stem cells (HMSC, and c mouse macrophages (RAW 264.7 were tested in vitro. On POPE-covered polished surfaces adherence of HAC (42% of seeded cells after 2 hrs and metabolic activity (MTT after 3 days were reduced, while on porous surfaces 99% HAC adhered, and metabolic activity was significantly increased, compared to respective native surfaces. On both POPE-covered surfaces the chondrocyte phenotype was present. After 3 weeks of chondrogenic differentiation, cartilage matrix production (measuring chondroitin sulphate per HAC number was significantly increased by about 30% on both POPE-covered metallic surfaces. On both POPC-covered surfaces nearly no adhering and surviving HAC were found. HMSC grown on POPE-covered porous substrates showed osteogenic differentiation by improved osteopontin and collagen I expression in RT-PCR, and osteocalcin fluorescence and bone nodule formation was only detectable on POPE-covered porous surfaces. In contrast to POPC and other phospholipids used as positive controls, POPE did not stimulate the NO production in mouse macrophage cultures. We therefore conclude that a phospholipid coating by POPE shows potential as surface modification for metallic implant materials.

  17. One stage rescue procedure after capsular contracture of breast implants with autologous fat grafts collected by water assisted liposuction (“BEAULI Method”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ueberreiter, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With increasing number of patients with silicone implants for breast augmentation or reconstruction we are confronted with more and more cases of capsular contracture. Not every case is resolved by resection of the capsule and exchange of implants. Many patients rather bear the consequences of severe fibrosis than to have their implants removed. The one stage procedure of implant removal and lipofilling proved to be highly efficient with good to excellent results and high patient satisfaction. Between January 2008 and October 2012 a total of 64 patients (124 breasts with capsular fibrosis Baker III to IV were treated with autologous fat grafts collected with the body-jet by water-assisted liposuction (“BEAULI Method”. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the breasts was performed in 5 patients preoperatively and 6 month postoperatively, a clinical examination and photo documentation of all patients was done on day 1 and after 4 weeks, 12 weeks and 6 months postoperatively. The procedure included implant removal and lipofilling of the subcutaneous and intramuscular space in a single procedure by means of the BEAULI Method. The average gross amount of grafted fat was 260 ml. The average drainage time was one day. The shape of the breast changed to a more natural and ptotic form. Negative side effects like oily cysts or infections were not observed. The time of the overall procedure including liposuction was 70±15 min. Reoccurring capsular contracture is one of the hazards in plastic surgery. Until now the treatment of choice after more than two failed implant changes combined with resection of the capsule is usually the final removal of implants with or without possible additional autologous tissue transfer (microvascular flaps. We could add a relatively simple and efficient procedure to resolve and improve those cases by autologous fat transfer using water-assisted liposuction and the BEAULI Method.

  18. Enhanced hyaline cartilage matrix synthesis in collagen sponge scaffolds by using siRNA to stabilize chondrocytes phenotype cultured with bone morphogenetic protein-2 under hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legendre, Florence; Ollitrault, David; Hervieu, Magalie; Baugé, Catherine; Maneix, Laure; Goux, Didier; Chajra, Hanane; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric; Boumediene, Karim; Galera, Philippe; Demoor, Magali

    2013-07-01

    Cartilage healing by tissue engineering is an alternative strategy to reconstitute functional tissue after trauma or age-related degeneration. However, chondrocytes, the major player in cartilage homeostasis, do not self-regenerate efficiently and lose their phenotype during osteoarthritis. This process is called dedifferentiation and also occurs during the first expansion step of autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). To ensure successful ACI therapy, chondrocytes must be differentiated and capable of synthesizing hyaline cartilage matrix molecules. We therefore developed a safe procedure for redifferentiating human chondrocytes by combining appropriate physicochemical factors: hypoxic conditions, collagen scaffolds, chondrogenic factors (bone morphogenetic protein-2 [BMP-2], and insulin-like growth factor I [IGF-I]) and RNA interference targeting the COL1A1 gene. Redifferentiation of dedifferentiated chondrocytes was evaluated using gene/protein analyses to identify the chondrocyte phenotypic profile. In our conditions, under BMP-2 treatment, redifferentiated and metabolically active chondrocytes synthesized a hyaline-like cartilage matrix characterized by type IIB collagen and aggrecan molecules without any sign of hypertrophy or osteogenesis. In contrast, IGF-I increased both specific and noncharacteristic markers (collagens I and X) of chondrocytes. The specific increase in COL2A1 gene expression observed in the BMP-2 treatment was shown to involve the specific enhancer region of COL2A1 that binds the trans-activators Sox9/L-Sox5/Sox6 and Sp1, which are associated with a decrease in the trans-inhibitors of COL2A1, c-Krox, and p65 subunit of NF-kappaB. Our procedure in which BMP-2 treatment under hypoxia is associated with a COL1A1 siRNA, significantly increased the differentiation index of chondrocytes, and should offer the opportunity to develop new ACI-based therapies in humans.

  19. Hybrid approach of ventricular assist device and autologous bone marrow stem cells implantation in end-stage ischemic heart failure enhances myocardial reperfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khayat Andre

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We challenge the hypothesis of enhanced myocardial reperfusion after implanting a left ventricular assist device together with bone marrow mononuclear stem cells in patients with end-stage ischemic cardiomyopathy. Irreversible myocardial loss observed in ischemic cardiomyopathy leads to progressive cardiac remodelling and dysfunction through a complex neurohormonal cascade. New generation assist devices promote myocardial recovery only in patients with dilated or peripartum cardiomyopathy. In the setting of diffuse myocardial ischemia not amenable to revascularization, native myocardial recovery has not been observed after implantation of an assist device as destination therapy. The hybrid approach of implanting autologous bone marrow stem cells during assist device implantation may eventually improve native cardiac function, which may be associated with a better prognosis eventually ameliorating the need for subsequent heart transplantation. The aforementioned hypothesis has to be tested with well-designed prospective multicentre studies.

  20. Three-year clinical outcome after chondrocyte transplantation using a hyaluronan matrix for cartilage repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nehrer, S. [Department of Orthopedics, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: stefan.nehrer@meduniwien.ac.at; Domayer, S. [Department of Orthopedics, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Dorotka, R. [Department of Orthopedics, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Schatz, K. [Department of Orthopedics, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Bindreiter, U. [Department of Orthopedics, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Kotz, R. [Department of Orthopedics, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2006-01-15

    Repair of articular cartilage represents a significant clinical problem and although various new techniques - including the use of autologous chondrocytes - have been developed within the last century the clinical efficacy of these procedures is still discussed controversially. Although autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) has been widely used with success, it has several inherent limitations, including its invasive nature and problems related to the use of the periosteal flap. To overcome these problems autologous chondrocytes transplantation combined with the use of biodegradable scaffolds has received wide attention. Among these, a hyaluronan-based scaffold has been found useful for inducing hyaline cartilage regeneration. In the present study, we have investigated the mid-term efficacy and safety of Hyalograft[reg] C grafts in a group of 36 patients undergoing surgery for chronic cartilage lesions of the knee. Clinical Outcome was assessed prospectively before and at 12, 24, and 36 months after surgery. No major adverse events have been reported during the 3-year follow-up. Significant improvements of the evaluated scores were observed (P < 0.02) at 1 year and a continued increase of clinical performance was evident at 2 and 3 years follow-up. Patients under 30 years of age with single lesions showed statistically significant improvements at all follow-up visits compared to those over 30 with multiple defects (P < 0.01). Hyalograft[reg] C compares favorably with classic ACT and is particularly indicated in younger patients with single lesions. The graft can be implanted through a miniarthrotomy and needs no additional fixation with sutures except optional fibrin gluing at the defect borders. These results suggest that Hyalograft[reg] C is a valid alternative to ACT.

  1. Autologous Dermis Graft Implantation: A Novel Approach to Reinforcement in Giant Hiatal Hernias

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    Balázs Kovács

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Nonreinforced tensile repair of giant hiatal hernias is susceptible to recurrence, and the role of mesh graft implantation remains controversial. Creating a new and viable choice without the use of high-cost biological allografts is desirable. This study presents the application of dermis graft reinforcement, a cost-efficient, easily adaptable alternative, in graft reinforcement of giant hiatal hernia repairs. Methods. A 62-year-old female patient with recurrent giant hiatal hernia (9 × 11 cm and upside down stomach, immediately following the Belsey repair done in another department, was selected for the pilot procedure. The standard three-stitch nonabsorbable reconstruction of diaphragmatic crura was undertaken via laparoscopic approach. A 12 × 6 cm dermis autograft was harvested from the loose abdominal skin. “U” figure onlay reinforcement of diaphragm closure was secured with titanium staples. The procedure was completed with a standard Dor fundoplication. One- and seven-month follow-ups were conducted. Results. No short-term postoperative complications were observed. One-month follow-up showed normal anatomical location of abdominal viscera on computed tomography imaging. High-resolution manometry showed normal lower esophageal sphincter pressure. Preoperative abdominal complaints were resolved. Procedural costs were lower than the average cost following mesh graft reinforcement. Conclusion. Dermis graft reinforcement is a cheap, easily adaptable procedure in the repair of giant hiatal hernias, even in the setting of laparoscopic reoperative procedure.

  2. Improvement of myocardial perfusion reserve detected by cardiovascular magnetic resonance after direct endomyocardial implantation of autologous bone marrow cells in patients with severe coronary artery disease

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    Lau Chu-Pak

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies suggested that bone marrow (BM cell implantation in patients with severe chronic coronary artery disease (CAD resulted in modest improvement in symptoms and cardiac function. This study sought to investigate the functional changes that occur within the chronic human ischaemic myocardium after direct endomyocardial BM cells implantation by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR. Methods and Results We compared the interval changes of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF, myocardial perfusion reserve and the extent of myocardial scar by using late gadolinium enhancement CMR in 12 patients with severe CAD. CMR was performed at baseline and at 6 months after catheter-based direct endomyocardial autologous BM cell (n = 12 injection to viable ischaemic myocardium as guided by electromechanical mapping. In patients randomized to receive BM cell injection, there was significant decrease in percentage area of peri-infarct regions (-23.6%, P = 0.04 and increase in global LVEF (+9.0%, P = 0.02, the percentage of regional wall thickening (+13.1%, P= 0.04 and MPR (+0.25%, P = 0.03 over the target area at 6-months compared with baseline. Conclusions Direct endomyocardial implantation of autologous BM cells significantly improved global LVEF, regional wall thickening and myocardial perfusion reserve, and reduced percentage area of peri-infarct regions in patients with severe CAD.

  3. PPAR-δ Agonist With Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induces Type II Collagen-Producing Chondrocytes in Human Arthritic Synovial Fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Bruce E; Park, Joshua J; Makani, Vishruti; Kim, Eun-Cheol; Kim, Dong Hyun

    2017-08-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is an inflammatory joint disease characterized by degeneration of articular cartilage within synovial joints. An estimated 27 million Americans suffer from OA, and the population is expected to reach 67 million in the United States by 2030. Thus, it is urgent to find an effective treatment for OA. Traditional OA treatments have no disease-modifying effect, while regenerative OA therapies such as autologous chondrocyte implantation show some promise. Nonetheless, current regenerative therapies do not overcome synovial inflammation that suppresses the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to chondrocytes and the expression of type II collagen, the major constituent of functional cartilage. We discovered a synergistic combination that overcame synovial inflammation to form type II collagen-producing chondrocytes. The combination consists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) δ agonist, human bone marrow (hBM)-derived MSCs, and hyaluronic acid (HA) gel. Interestingly, those individual components showed their own strong enhancing effects on chondrogenesis. GW0742, a PPAR-δ agonist, greatly enhanced MSC chondrogenesis and the expression of type II collagen and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) in hBM-MSC-derived chondrocytes. GW0742 also increased the expression of transforming growth factor β that enhances chondrogenesis and suppresses cartilage fibrillation, ossification, and inflammation. HA gel also increased MSC chondrogenesis and GAG production. However, neither GW0742 nor HA gel could enhance the formation of type II collagen-producing chondrocytes from hBM-MSCs within human OA synovial fluid. Our data demonstrated that the combination of hBM-MSCs, PPAR-δ agonist, and HA gel significantly enhanced the formation of type II collagen-producing chondrocytes within OA synovial fluid from 3 different donors. In other words, the novel combination of PPAR-δ agonist, hBM-MSCs, and HA gel can overcome synovial inflammation to form

  4. Culture temperature affects human chondrocyte messenger RNA expression in monolayer and pellet culture systems.

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    Akira Ito

    Full Text Available Cell-based therapy has been explored for articular cartilage regeneration. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is a promising cell-based technique for repairing articular cartilage defects. However, there are several issues such as chondrocyte de-differentiation. While numerous studies have been designed to overcome some of these issues, only a few have focused on the thermal environment that can affect chondrocyte metabolism and phenotype. In this study, the effects of different culture temperatures on human chondrocyte metabolism- and phenotype-related gene expression were investigated in 2D and 3D environments. Human chondrocytes were cultured in a monolayer or in a pellet culture system at three different culture temperatures (32°C, 37°C, and 41°C for 3 days. The results showed that the total RNA level, normalized to the threshold cycle value of internal reference genes, was higher at lower temperatures in both culture systems. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH and citrate synthase (CS, which are involved in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle, respectively, were expressed at similar levels at 32°C and 37°C in pellet cultures, but the levels were significantly lower at 41°C. Expression of the chondrogenic markers, collagen type IIA1 (COL2A1 and aggrecan (ACAN, was higher at 37°C than at 32°C and 41°C in both culture systems. However, this phenomenon did not coincide with SRY (sex-determining region Y-box 9 (SOX9, which is a fundamental transcription factor for chondrogenesis, indicating that a SOX9-independent pathway might be involved in this phenomenon. In conclusion, the expression of chondrocyte metabolism-related genes at 32°C was maintained or enhanced compared to that at 37°C. However, chondrogenesis-related genes were further induced at 37°C in both culture systems. Therefore, manipulating the culture temperature may be an advantageous approach for regulating human chondrocyte metabolic activity and

  5. Culture temperature affects human chondrocyte messenger RNA expression in monolayer and pellet culture systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Akira; Nagai, Momoko; Tajino, Junichi; Yamaguchi, Shoki; Iijima, Hirotaka; Zhang, Xiangkai; Aoyama, Tomoki; Kuroki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based therapy has been explored for articular cartilage regeneration. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is a promising cell-based technique for repairing articular cartilage defects. However, there are several issues such as chondrocyte de-differentiation. While numerous studies have been designed to overcome some of these issues, only a few have focused on the thermal environment that can affect chondrocyte metabolism and phenotype. In this study, the effects of different culture temperatures on human chondrocyte metabolism- and phenotype-related gene expression were investigated in 2D and 3D environments. Human chondrocytes were cultured in a monolayer or in a pellet culture system at three different culture temperatures (32°C, 37°C, and 41°C) for 3 days. The results showed that the total RNA level, normalized to the threshold cycle value of internal reference genes, was higher at lower temperatures in both culture systems. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and citrate synthase (CS), which are involved in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle, respectively, were expressed at similar levels at 32°C and 37°C in pellet cultures, but the levels were significantly lower at 41°C. Expression of the chondrogenic markers, collagen type IIA1 (COL2A1) and aggrecan (ACAN), was higher at 37°C than at 32°C and 41°C in both culture systems. However, this phenomenon did not coincide with SRY (sex-determining region Y)-box 9 (SOX9), which is a fundamental transcription factor for chondrogenesis, indicating that a SOX9-independent pathway might be involved in this phenomenon. In conclusion, the expression of chondrocyte metabolism-related genes at 32°C was maintained or enhanced compared to that at 37°C. However, chondrogenesis-related genes were further induced at 37°C in both culture systems. Therefore, manipulating the culture temperature may be an advantageous approach for regulating human chondrocyte metabolic activity and chondrogenesis.

  6. Long-term ultrasound appearance of concomitant autologous blood and dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer implants: is it associated with successful correction of vesicoureteral reflux?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad; Aryan, Zahra; Tourchi, Ali; Alizadeh, Houman

    2013-02-01

    To find the association between mound appearance on ultrasound imaging and successful correction of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). We retrospectively reviewed the ultrasound and voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) results of patients who underwent dextranomer/hyaluronic acid injection via the hydrodistention injection technique (HIT) or HIT with concomitant autologous blood injection (HABIT) for 5 years postoperatively. VUR resolution at postoperative VCUG was considered as a success. Retained volumes of implants were measured and compared between HABIT and HIT and successful and failed treatments. Presence of mound on ultrasound imaging was also evaluated as a predictor of VUR resolution on VCUG. Measured mound volume was significantly higher in treatments that were successful than in those that were failures (P <.05). During 5-year follow-up, measured mound volumes in the HABIT group were significantly higher than in the HIT group (P <.05). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of mound visualization on the first-month sonography to predict success were 97.7%, 21.5%, 89.6%, and 60%, respectively. These results were dramatically changed for the 50 patients with further VCUG after 1 year of follow-up, with 95.7% sensitivity, 37.0% specificity, 54.0% positive predictive value, and 90.9% negative predictive value. Reduction or absence of the mound after implantation is more frequent among failed treatments in which visualization of the mound on postoperative sonography can predict VUR resolution. Autologous blood injection concomitant with dextranomer/hyaluronic acid implantation results in better immediate and long-term mound preservation, which could possibly be the reason for the higher success rate in HABIT group. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Low‑dose halofuginone inhibits the synthesis of type I collagen without influencing type II collagen in the extracellular matrix of chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zeng; Fei, Hao; Wang, Zhen; Zhu, Tianyi

    2017-09-01

    Full‑thickness and large area defects of articular cartilage are unable to completely repair themselves and require surgical intervention, including microfracture, autologous or allogeneic osteochondral grafts, and autologous chondrocyte implantation. A large proportion of regenerative cartilage exists as fibrocartilage, which is unable to withstand impacts in the same way as native hyaline cartilage, owing to excess synthesis of type I collagen in the matrix. The present study demonstrated that low‑dose halofuginone (HF), a plant alkaloid isolated from Dichroa febrifuga, may inhibit the synthesis of type I collagen without influencing type II collagen in the extracellular matrix of chondrocytes. In addition, HF was revealed to inhibit the phosphorylation of mothers against decapentaplegic homolog (Smad)2/3 and promoted Smad7 expression, as well as decrease the synthesis of type I collagen synthesis. Results from the present study indicated that HF treatment suppressed the synthesis of type I collagen by inhibiting the transforming growth factor‑β signaling pathway in chondrocytes. These results may provide an alternative solution to the problems associated with fibrocartilage, and convert fibrocartilage into hyaline cartilage at the mid‑early stages of cartilage regeneration. HF may additionally be used to improve monolayer expansion or 3D cultures of seed cells for the tissue engineering of cartilage.

  8. Expansion of bovine chondrocytes on microcarriers enhances redifferentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malda, J.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Grojec, M.; Martens, D.E.; Tramper, J.; Riesle, J.U.

    2003-01-01

    Functional cartilage implants for orthopedic surgery or in vitro tissue evaluation can be created from expanded chondrocytes and biodegradable scaffolds. Expansion of chondrocytes in two-dimensional culture systems results in their dedifferentiation. The hallmark of this process is the switch of

  9. Importance of Donor Chondrocyte Viability for Osteochondral Allografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, James L; Stannard, James P; Stoker, Aaron M; Bozynski, Chantelle C; Kuroki, Keiichi; Cook, Cristi R; Pfeiffer, Ferris M

    2016-05-01

    Osteochondral allograft (OCA) transplantation provides a biological treatment option for functional restoration of large articular cartilage defects in multiple joints. While successful outcomes after OCA transplantation have been linked to viable donor chondrocytes, the importance of donor cell viability has not been comprehensively validated. To use a canine model to determine the importance of donor chondrocyte viability at the time of implantation with respect to functional success of femoral condylar OCAs based on radiographic, gross, cell viability, histologic, biochemical, and biomechanical outcome measures. Controlled laboratory study. After approval was obtained from the institutional animal care and use committee, adult female dogs (N = 16) were implanted with 8-mm cylindrical OCAs from male dogs in the lateral and medial femoral condyles of 1 knee. OCAs were preserved for 28 or 60 days after procurement, and chondrocyte viability was quantified before implantation. Two different storage media, temperatures, and time points were used to obtain a spectrum of percentage chondrocyte viability at the time of implantation. A successful outcome was defined as an OCA that was associated with graft integration, maintenance of hyaline cartilage, lack of associated cartilage disorder, and lack of fibrillation, fissuring, or fibrous tissue infiltration of the allograft based on subjective radiographic, gross, and histologic assessments at 6 months after implantation. Chondrocyte viability ranged from 23% to 99% at the time of implantation. All successful grafts had >70% chondrocyte viability at the time of implantation, and no graft with chondrocyte viability <70% was associated with a successful outcome. Live-dead stained sections and histologic findings with respect to cell morphological features suggested that successful grafts were consistently composed of viable chondrocytes in lacunae, while grafts that were not successful were composed of nonviable

  10. Elastic cartilage reconstruction by transplantation of cultured hyaline cartilage-derived chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, M; Takebe, T; Kobayashi, S; Kimura, S; Masutani, M; Lee, S; Jo, Y H; Lee, J I; Taniguchi, H

    2014-05-01

    Current surgical intervention of craniofacial defects caused by injuries or abnormalities uses reconstructive materials, such as autologous cartilage grafts. Transplantation of autologous tissues, however, places a significant invasiveness on patients, and many efforts have been made for establishing an alternative graft. Recently, we and others have shown the potential use of reconstructed elastic cartilage from ear-derived chondrocytes or progenitors with the unique elastic properties. Here, we examined the differentiation potential of canine joint cartilage-derived chondrocytes into elastic cartilage for expanding the cell sources, such as hyaline cartilage. Articular chondrocytes are isolated from canine joint, cultivated, and compared regarding characteristic differences with auricular chondrocytes, including proliferation rates, gene expression, extracellular matrix production, and cartilage reconstruction capability after transplantation. Canine articular chondrocytes proliferated less robustly than auricular chondrocytes, but there was no significant difference in the amount of sulfated glycosaminoglycan produced from redifferentiated chondrocytes. Furthermore, in vitro expanded and redifferentiated articular chondrocytes have been shown to reconstruct elastic cartilage on transplantation that has histologic characteristics distinct from hyaline cartilage. Taken together, cultured hyaline cartilage-derived chondrocytes are a possible cell source for elastic cartilage reconstruction. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Improvement of the Chondrocyte-Specific Phenotype upon Equine Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation: Influence of Culture Time, Transforming Growth Factors and Type I Collagen siRNAs on the Differentiation Index

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    Thomas Branly

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage is a tissue characterized by its poor intrinsic capacity for self-repair. This tissue is frequently altered upon trauma or in osteoarthritis (OA, a degenerative disease that is currently incurable. Similar musculoskeletal disorders also affect horses and OA incurs considerable economic loss for the equine sector. In the view to develop new therapies for humans and horses, significant progress in tissue engineering has led to the emergence of new generations of cartilage therapy. Matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte implantation is an advanced 3D cell-based therapy that holds promise for cartilage repair. This study aims to improve the autologous chondrocyte implantation technique by using equine mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from bone marrow differentiated into chondrocytes that can be implanted in the chondral lesion. The optimized protocol relies on culture under hypoxia within type I/III collagen sponges. Here, we explored three parameters that influence MSC differentiation: culture times, growth factors and RNA interference strategies. Our results suggest first that an increase in culture time from 14 to 28 or 42 days lead to a sharp increase in the expression of chondrocyte markers, notably type II collagen (especially the IIB isoform, along with a concomitant decrease in HtrA1 expression. Nevertheless, the expression of type I collagen also increased with longer culture times. Second, regarding the growth factor cocktail, TGF-β3 alone showed promising result but the previously tested association of BMP-2 and TGF-β1 better limits the expression of type I collagen. Third, RNA interference targeting Col1a2 as well as Col1a1 mRNA led to a more significant knockdown, compared with a conventional strategy targeting Col1a1 alone. This chondrogenic differentiation strategy showed a strong increase in the Col2a1:Col1a1 mRNA ratio in the chondrocytes derived from equine bone marrow MSCs, this ratio being considered as an

  12. Improvement of the Chondrocyte-Specific Phenotype upon Equine Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation: Influence of Culture Time, Transforming Growth Factors and Type I Collagen siRNAs on the Differentiation Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branly, Thomas; Contentin, Romain; Desancé, Mélanie; Jacquel, Thibaud; Bertoni, Lélia; Jacquet, Sandrine; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric; Denoix, Jean-Marie; Audigié, Fabrice; Demoor, Magali; Galéra, Philippe

    2018-02-01

    Articular cartilage is a tissue characterized by its poor intrinsic capacity for self-repair. This tissue is frequently altered upon trauma or in osteoarthritis (OA), a degenerative disease that is currently incurable. Similar musculoskeletal disorders also affect horses and OA incurs considerable economic loss for the equine sector. In the view to develop new therapies for humans and horses, significant progress in tissue engineering has led to the emergence of new generations of cartilage therapy. Matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte implantation is an advanced 3D cell-based therapy that holds promise for cartilage repair. This study aims to improve the autologous chondrocyte implantation technique by using equine mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from bone marrow differentiated into chondrocytes that can be implanted in the chondral lesion. The optimized protocol relies on culture under hypoxia within type I/III collagen sponges. Here, we explored three parameters that influence MSC differentiation: culture times, growth factors and RNA interference strategies. Our results suggest first that an increase in culture time from 14 to 28 or 42 days lead to a sharp increase in the expression of chondrocyte markers, notably type II collagen (especially the IIB isoform), along with a concomitant decrease in HtrA1 expression. Nevertheless, the expression of type I collagen also increased with longer culture times. Second, regarding the growth factor cocktail, TGF-β3 alone showed promising result but the previously tested association of BMP-2 and TGF-β1 better limits the expression of type I collagen. Third, RNA interference targeting Col1a2 as well as Col1a1 mRNA led to a more significant knockdown, compared with a conventional strategy targeting Col1a1 alone. This chondrogenic differentiation strategy showed a strong increase in the Col2a1 : Col1a1 mRNA ratio in the chondrocytes derived from equine bone marrow MSCs, this ratio being considered as an index of the

  13. In vitro precultivation alleviates post-implantation inflammation and enhances development of tissue-engineered tubular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo Xusong; Zhou Guangdong; Liu Wei; Zhang Wenjie; Cui Lei; Cao Yilin [Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Tissue Engineering, Shanghai 9th People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200011 (China); Cen Lian, E-mail: guangdongzhou@126.co, E-mail: yilincao@yahoo.co [National Tissue Engineering Center of China, Shanghai 200011 (China)

    2009-04-15

    Tissue-engineered tubular cartilage is a promising graft for tracheal reconstruction. But polylactic acid/polyglycolic acid (PLA/PGA) fibers, the frequently used scaffolds for cartilage engineering, often elicit an obvious inflammation response following implantation into immunocompetent animals. We propose that the inflammation could be alleviated by in vitro precultivation. In this study, after in vitro culture for either 2 days (direct implantation group (DI)) or for 2 weeks (precultivation implantation group (PI)), autologous tubular chondrocyte-PLA/PGA constructs were subcutaneously implanted into rabbits. In the PI group, after 2 weeks of precultivation, most of the fibers were found to be completely embedded in an extracellular matrix (ECM) produced by the chondrocytes. Importantly, no obvious inflammatory reaction was observed after in vivo implantation and homogeneous cartilage-like tissue was formed with biomechanical properties close to native tracheal cartilage at 4 weeks post-implantation. In the DI group, however, an obvious inflammatory reaction was observed within and around the cell-scaffold constructs at 1 week implantation and only sporadic cartilage islands separated by fibrous tissue were observed at 4 weeks. These results demonstrated that the post-implantation inflammatory reaction could be alleviated by in vitro precultivation, which contributes to the formation of satisfactory tubular cartilage for tracheal reconstruction.

  14. [Construction of porous hydroxyapatite (HA) block loaded with cultured chondrocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, M; Dang, G

    1999-07-01

    To construct a kind of bone healing enhancing implant with cultured chondrocytes bound to hydroxyapatite (HA). Chondrocytes were obtained from the costicartilage of rat and were cultured on the porous HA blocks, 3 mm x 3 mm x 4 mm size, for three and seven days. Scanning electron micrograph was taken to show whether the cells grew outside and inside the pore of HA block. The cells cultured on tiny glass sheet for 2 days were used to prove where the cells come from by in situ hybridization technique with alpha1 (II) cDNA probe. Scanning electron micrographs showed that the pores of the HA surface and inside of the blocks are filled with cultured cells, especially the longer cultured block. The cells were chondrocytes confirmed by in situ hybridization. The porous HA can be used as cell cultured substrate and chondrocyte can adhere and proliferate inside the porous HA block.

  15. Implante de condrócitos homólogos em defeitos osteocondrais de cães: padronização da técnica e avaliação histopatológica Homologous articular chondrocytes implantation in osteochondral defects of dogs: technique and histopathological evaluation standardization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Iamaguti

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Padronizou-se a metodologia para cultura de condrócitos em cães e avaliou-se seu implante em lesões osteocondrais, utilizando-se a membrana biossintética de celulose (MBC como revestimento. Dez cães, adultos e clinicamente sadios, foram submetidos à artrotomia das articulações fêmoro-tíbio-patelares. Defeitos de 4mm de diâmetro e profundidade foram induzidos no sulco troclear de ambos os membros. MBC foi aplicada na base e na superfície das lesões. Os defeitos do membro direito foram preenchidos com condrócitos homólogos cultivados formando o grupo-tratado (GT; os do membro esquerdo, sem implante celular, foram designados grupo-controle (GC. A evolução pós-operatória foi analisada com especial interesse nos processos de reparação da lesão, por meio de histomorfometria e imuno-histoquímica para colágeno tipo II e sulfato de condroitina. A cultura de condrócitos homólogos apresentou alta densidade e taxa de viabilidade. Observou-se integridade do tecido neoformado com a cartilagem adjacente na avaliação histológica, em ambos os grupos. Na imuno-histoquímica, verificou-se predomínio de colágeno tipo II no GT. Morfometricamente, não houve diferença significativa entre o tecido fibroso e o fibrocartilaginoso entre os grupos. A cultura de condrócitos homólogos de cães foi exequível. O tecido neoformado apresentou qualidade discretamente superior associado ao implante homólogo de condrócitos, contudo não promoveu reparação por cartilagem hialina.The aim of the study is to standardize the methodology to achieve canine chondrocytes culture, and evaluate its implant on osteochondral defects made in the femoral trochlear sulcus of dogs, using the cellulose biosynthetic membrane (CBM as coating. Ten healthy adult dogs without locomotor disorders were used. All animals were submitted to arthrotomy of stifle joints and defects of four millimeters in diameter x four millimeters deep were done in the femoral trochlear

  16. Mechanical properties and structure-function relationships of human chondrocyte-seeded cartilage constructs after in vitro culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middendorf, Jill M; Griffin, Darvin J; Shortkroff, Sonya; Dugopolski, Caroline; Kennedy, Stephen; Siemiatkoski, Joseph; Cohen, Itai; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2017-10-01

    Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation (ACI) is a widely recognized method for the repair of focal cartilage defects. Despite the accepted use, problems with this technique still exist, including graft hypertrophy, damage to surrounding tissue by sutures, uneven cell distribution, and delamination. Modified ACI techniques overcome these challenges by seeding autologous chondrocytes onto a 3D scaffold and securing the graft into the defect. Many studies on these tissue engineered grafts have identified the compressive properties, but few have examined frictional and shear properties as suggested by FDA guidance. This study is the first to perform three mechanical tests (compressive, frictional, and shear) on human tissue engineered cartilage. The objective was to understand the complex mechanical behavior, function, and changes that occur with time in these constructs grown in vitro using compression, friction, and shear tests. Safranin-O histology and a DMMB assay both revealed increased sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content in the scaffolds with increased maturity. Similarly, immunohistochemistry revealed increased lubricin localization on the construct surface. Confined compression and friction tests both revealed improved properties with increased construct maturity. Compressive properties correlated with the sGAG content, while improved friction coefficients were attributed to increased lubricin localization on the construct surfaces. In contrast, shear properties did not improve with increased culture time. This study suggests the various mechanical and biological properties of tissue engineered cartilage improve at different rates, indicating thorough mechanical evaluation of tissue engineered cartilage is critical to understanding the performance of repaired cartilage. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:2298-2306, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Feasibility of autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell-derived extracellular matrix scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Cheng; Xu, Yan; Jin, Chengzhe; Min, Byoung-Hyun; Li, Zhiyong; Pei, Xuan; Wang, Liming

    2013-12-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) materials are widely used in cartilage tissue engineering. However, the current ECM materials are unsatisfactory for clinical practice as most of them are derived from allogenous or xenogenous tissue. This study was designed to develop a novel autologous ECM scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering. The autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell-derived ECM (aBMSC-dECM) membrane was collected and fabricated into a three-dimensional porous scaffold via cross-linking and freeze-drying techniques. Articular chondrocytes were seeded into the aBMSC-dECM scaffold and atelocollagen scaffold, respectively. An in vitro culture and an in vivo implantation in nude mice model were performed to evaluate the influence on engineered cartilage. The current results showed that the aBMSC-dECM scaffold had a good microstructure and biocompatibility. After 4 weeks in vitro culture, the engineered cartilage in the aBMSC-dECM scaffold group formed thicker cartilage tissue with more homogeneous structure and higher expressions of cartilaginous gene and protein compared with the atelocollagen scaffold group. Furthermore, the engineered cartilage based on the aBMSC-dECM scaffold showed better cartilage formation in terms of volume and homogeneity, cartilage matrix content, and compressive modulus after 3 weeks in vivo implantation. These results indicated that the aBMSC-dECM scaffold could be a successful novel candidate scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation.

  18. Multi-membrane chitosan hydrogels as chondrocytic cell bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladet, S G; Tahiri, K; Montembault, A S; Domard, A J; Corvol, M-T M

    2011-08-01

    We investigated the bioactivity of new chitosan-based multi-membrane hydrogel (MMH) architectures towards chondrocyte-like cells. The microstructure of the hydrogels constituting the membranes precludes any living cell penetration, whereas their lower scale architecture allows the protein diffusion. The biological behavior of chondrocytes implanted within the MMH inter-membrane spaces was studied for 45 days in culture. Chondrocytes formed cell aggregates and proliferated without loosing their chondrogenic phenotype as illustrated by collagen II and aggrecan expressions at the mRNA and protein levels. Cells produced neo-formed alcyan blue matrix proteins filling MMH interspaces. The HiF-2α/SOX9 pattern of expression suggested that the elevated chondrocytic phenotype in MMH could be related to a better hypoxic local environment than in classical culture conditions. Pro-inflammatory markers were not expressed during the period of culture. The low level of nitric oxide accumulation within the inter-membrane spaces and in the incubation medium implied that chitosan consumed nitrites produced by entrapped chondrocytes, in relation with the decrease of its molecular weight of 50%. Our data suggest that MMH structures may be considered as complex chondrocytic cell bioreactors; "active decoys of biological media", potentially promising for various biomedical applications like the inter-vertebral disk replacement. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Chondrocyte survival in osteochondral transplant cylinders depends on the harvesting technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafke, Benedikt; Petri, Maximilian; Suero, Eduardo; Neunaber, Claudia; Kwisda, Sebastian; Krettek, Christian; Jagodzinski, Michael; Omar, Mohamed

    2016-07-01

    In autologous osteochondral transplantation, the edges of the harvested plug are particularly susceptible to mechanical or thermal damage to the chondrocytes. We hypothesised that the applied harvesting device has an impact on chondrocyte vitality. Both knees of five blackhead sheep (ten knees) underwent open osteochondral plug harvesting with three different circular harvesting devices (osteoarticular transfer system harvester [OATS; diameter 8 mm; Arthrex, Munich, Germany], diamond cutter [DC; diameter 8.35 mm; Karl Storz, Tuttlingen, Germany] and hollow reamer with cutting crown [HRCC; diameter 7 mm; Dannoritzer, Tuttlingen, Germany]) from distinctly assigned anatomical sites of the knee joint. The rotary cutters (DC and HRCC) were either used with (+) or without cooling (-). Surgical cuts of the cartilage with a scalpel blade were chosen as control method. After cryotomy cutting, chondrocyte vitality was assessed using fluorescence microscopy and a Live/Dead assay. There were distinct patterns of chondrocyte vitality, with reproducible accumulations of dead chondrocytes along the harvesting edge. No statistical difference in chondrocyte survivorship was seen between the OATS technique and the control method, or between the HRCC+ technique and the control method (P > 0.05). The DC+, HRCC- and DC- techniques yielded significantly lower chondrocyte survival rates compared with the control method (P vitality.

  20. Investigation of Peri-Implant Bone Healing Using Autologous Plasma Rich in Growth Factors in the Canine Mandible After 12 Weeks: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birang, Reza; Tavakoli, Mohammad; Shahabouei, Mohammad; Torabi, Alireza; Dargahi, Ali; Soolari, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Faster reconstruction of patients’ masticatory systems is the aim of modern dentistry. A number of studies have indicated that application of growth factors to the surface of a dental implant leads to accelerated and enhanced osseointegration. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of plasma rich in growth factors on peri-implant bone healing. Materials and Methods: For the purpose of this study, two healthy, mixed-breed canines were selected, and the premolars were extracted from both sides of the mandible. Three months after premolar removal, 12 implants, each 5 mm in diameter and 10 mm in length, were placed in osteotomy sites on both sides of the mandible. Prior to placement, plasma rich in growth factors was applied to the surfaces of six implants, while the other six were used without plasma rich in growth factors. The implants were removed after 12 weeks along with the bone surrounding the sites using a trephine bur. One mesiodistal section containing the surrounding bone from each implant block, 50 µm in diameter, was prepared for histologic and histomorphometric investigation with an optical microscope. Results: The sites with implants treated with plasma rich in growth factors showed more bone-to-implant contact compared to control sites. Also, higher values for bone trabecular thickness and bone maturity were recorded for the PRGF-treated sites than for the control sites. Conclusion: Application of plasma rich in growth factors to the surface of an implant may enhance the bone healing process as well as bone-to-implant contact, thereby helping to achieve faster osseointegration. PMID:22145011

  1. Chondrocyte differentiation for auricular cartilage reconstruction using a chitosan based hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-López, J; Garciadiego-Cázares, D; Melgarejo-Ramírez, Y; Sánchez-Sánchez, R; Solís-Arrieta, L; García-Carvajal, Z; Sánchez-Betancourt, J I; Ibarra, C; Luna-Bárcenas, G; Velasquillo, C

    2015-12-01

    Tissue engineering with the use of biodegradable and biocompatible scaffolds is an interesting option for ear repair. Chitosan-Polyvinyl alcohol-Epichlorohydrine hydrogel (CS-PVA-ECH) is biocompatible and displays appropriate mechanical properties to be used as a scaffold. The present work, studies the potential of CS-PVA-ECH scaffolds seeded with chondrocytes to develop elastic cartilage engineered-neotissues. Chondrocytes isolated from rabbit and swine elastic cartilage were independently cultured onto CS-PVA-ECH scaffolds for 20 days to form the appropriate constructs. Then, in vitro cell viability and morphology were evaluated by calcein AM and EthD-1 assays and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) respectively, and the constructs were implanted in nu/nu mice for four months, in order to evaluate the neotissue formation. Histological analysis of the formed neotissues was performed by Safranin O, Toluidine blue (GAG's), Verhoeff-Van Gieson (elastic fibers), Masson's trichrome (collagen) and Von Kossa (Calcium salts) stains and SEM. Results indicate appropriate cell viability, seeded with rabbit or swine chondrocyte constructs; nevertheless, upon implantation the constructs developed neotissues with different characteristics depending on the animal species from which the seeded chondrocytes came from. Neotissues developed from swine chondrocytes were similar to auricular cartilage, while neotissues from rabbit chondrocytes were similar to hyaline cartilage and eventually they differentiate to bone. This result suggests that neotissue characteristics may be influenced by the animal species source of the chondrocytes isolated.

  2. [Regeneration of autologous tissue-engineered cartilage by using basic-fibroblast growth factor in vitro culture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiao-bang; Cheng, Ning-xin; Chen, Bing; Xia, Wan-yao; Cui, Lei; Liu, Wei; Cao, Yi-lin

    2004-05-01

    To investigate the effect of the basic fibroblast growth factor (b-FGF) to regenerate an autologous tissue-engineered cartilage in vitro. The Cells were harvested from the elastic auricular cartilage of swine,and were plated at the concentration of 1 x 10(4) cells/cm2 , studied in vitro at two different media enviroments: Group I contained Ham's F-12 with supplements and b-FGF, Group II contained Ham's F-12 only with supplements. The passage 2 cells (after 12.75 +/- 1.26 days) were harvested and mixed with 30% pluronic F-127/Ham's F-12 at the concentration of 50 x 10(6) cells/ml. It was injected subcutaneously at 0.5 ml per implant. The implants were harvested 8 weeks after the vivo culture and examined with the histological stains. The chondrocytes displayed morphologically similar to the fibroblasts in the media containing basic-FGF. The number of cell doublings (after 12.75 +/- 1.26 days) in vitro culture was as the following: Group I, 70; Group II, 5.4. Eight 8 weeks after the vivo autologous implantation, the average weight (g) and volume (cm3) in each group was as the following: Group I, 0.371 g/0.370 cm3 Group II, 0.179 g/0.173 cm3 (P < 0.01). With the b-FGF in vitro culture, the cells were expanded by 70 times after 2 weeks. Histologically, all of the engineered cartilage in the two groups were similar to the native elastic cartilage. These results indicate that the basic-FGF could be used positively to enhance the quality and quantity of the seeding cells for the generation of the well-engineered cartilage.

  3. Chondrocytic Potential of Allogenic Mesenchymal Stem Cells Transplanted without Immunosuppression to Regenerate Physeal Defect in Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Gál

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from bone marrow are multipotent cells capable of forming cartilage, bone, and other connective tissues. The objective of this study was to determine whether the use of allogenic mesenchymal stem cells could functionally heal a defect in the distal femoral physis in rabbits without the use of immunosuppressive therapy. A iatrogenic defect was created in the lateral femoral condyle of thirty-two New Zealand white rabbits, 7 weeks old, weighing 2.25 ± 0.24 kg. Each defect, 3.5 mm in width and 12 mm in length, in the right distal femoral physis was treated with allogenic mesenchymal stem cells in new composite hyaluronate/collagen type I/fibrin scaffold. The healing response was evaluated radiographically, by MRI (three weeks and four months after implantation and also histologically, by Pearl’s reaction and with immunofluorescence (four months after implantation. The results were compared with the data for the control defects (without stem cell implantation in left distal femoral physes. On average, right femurs with a damaged distal physis and transplanted MSCs grew more in length (0.55 ± 0.21 cm compared with left femurs with a physeal defect without stem cell transplantation (0.46 ± 0.23 cm. Valgus deformity of right femurs with a physeal defect and transplanted MSCs was mild (0.2 ± 0.1 °. On the contrary, left femurs with a physeal defect without transplanted MSCs showed a significant valgus deformity (2.7 ± 1.6 °. For defects treated with allogenic mesenchymal stem cell implants, no adverse immune response and implant rejection were detected in this model. Histologically, no lymphocytic infiltration occurred. At four months after transplantation, hyaline cartilage had formed throughout the defects treated with allogenic MSCs. Labelled mesenchymal stem cells/differentiated chondrocytes were detected in the physeal defects based on magnetic resonance imaging and immunofluorescence. The results of this study

  4. Cartilage Repair With Autologous Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation: Review of Preclinical and Clinical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Shinya; Mera, Hisashi; Itokazu, Maki; Hashimoto, Yusuke; Wakitani, Shigeyuki

    2014-10-01

    Clinical trials of various procedures, including bone marrow stimulation, mosaicplasty, and autologous chondrocyte implantation, have been explored to treat articular cartilage defects. However, all of them have some demerits. We focused on autologous culture-expanded bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC), which can proliferate without losing their capacity for differentiation. First, we transplanted BMSC into the defective articular cartilage of rabbit and succeeded in regenerating osteochondral tissue. We then applied this transplantation in humans. Our previous reports showed that treatment with BMSC relieves the clinical symptoms of chondral defects in the knee and elbow joint. We investigated the efficacy of BMSC for osteoarthritic knee treated with high tibial osteotomy, by comparing 12 BMSC-transplanted patients with 12 cell-free patients. At 16-month follow-up, although the difference in clinical improvement between both groups was not significant, the arthroscopic and histological grading score was better in the cell-transplanted group. At the over 10-year follow-up, Hospital for Special Surgery knee scores improved to 76 and 73 in the BMSC-transplanted and cell-free groups, respectively, which were better than preoperative scores. Additionally, neither tumors nor infections were observed in all patients, and in the clinical study, we have never observed hypertrophy of repaired tissue, thereby guaranteeing the clinical safety of this therapy. Although we have never observed calcification above the tidemark in rabbit model and human histologically, the repair cartilage was not completely hyaline cartilage. To elucidate the optimum conditions for cell therapy, other stem cells, culture conditions, growth factors, and gene transfection methods should be explored.

  5. Biostable scaffolds of polyacrylate polymers implanted in the articular cartilage induce hyaline-like cartilage regeneration in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho-Tello, María; Forriol, Francisco; Martín de Llano, José J; Antolinos-Turpin, Carmen; Gómez-Tejedor, José A; Gómez Ribelles, José L; Carda, Carmen

    2017-07-05

    To study the influence of scaffold properties on the organization of in vivo cartilage regeneration. Our hypothesis was that stress transmission to the cells seeded inside the pores of the scaffold or surrounding it, which is highly dependent on the scaffold properties, determines the differentiation of both mesenchymal cells and dedifferentiated autologous chondrocytes. 4 series of porous scaffolds made of different polyacrylate polymers, previously seeded with cultured rabbit chondrocytes or without cells, were implanted in cartilage defects in rabbits. Subchondral bone was injured during the surgery to allow blood to reach the implantation site and fill the scaffold pores. At 3 months after implantation, excellent tissue regeneration was obtained, with a well-organized layer of hyaline-like cartilage at the condylar surface in most cases of the hydrophobic or slightly hydrophilic series. The most hydrophilic material induced the poorest regeneration. However, no statistically significant difference was observed between preseeded and non-preseeded scaffolds. All of the materials used were biocompatible, biostable polymers, so, in contrast to some other studies, our results were not perturbed by possible effects attributable to material degradation products or to the loss of scaffold mechanical properties over time due to degradation. Cartilage regeneration depends mainly on the properties of the scaffold, such as stiffness and hydrophilicity, whereas little difference was observed between preseeded and non-preseeded scaffolds.

  6. Fate of Meckel's cartilage chondrocytes in ocular culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richman, J.M.; Diewert, V.M.

    1988-01-01

    Modulation of the chondrocyte phenotype was observed in an organ culture system using Meckel's cartilage. First branchial arch cartilage was dissected from fetal rats of 16- and 17-day gestation. Perichondrium was mechanically removed, cartilage was split at the rostral process, and each half was grafted into the anterior chamber of an adult rat eye. The observed pattern of development in nonirradiated specimens was the following: hypertrophy of the rostral process and endochondral-type ossification, fibrous atrophy in the midsection, and mineralization of the malleus and incus. A change in matrix composition of the implanted cartilage was demonstrated with immunofluorescence staining for cartilage-specific proteoglycan (CSPG). After 15 days of culture, CSPG was found in the auricular process but not in the midsection or rostral process. In order to mark the implanted cells and follow their fate, cartilage was labeled in vitro with [3H]thymidine [3H]TdR). Immediately after labeling 20% of the chondrocytes contained [3H]TdR. After culturing for 5 days, 20% of the chondrocytes were still labeled and 10% of the osteogenic cells also contained radioactive label. The labeling index decreased in both cell types with increased duration of culture. Multinucleated clast-type cells did not contain label. Additional cartilages not labeled with [3H]TdR were exposed to between 20000 and 6000 rad of gamma irradiation before ocular implantation. Irradiated cartilage did not hypertrophy or form bone but a fibrous region developed in the midsection. Cells of the host animal were not induced to form bone around the irradiated cartilage. Our studies suggest that fully differentiated chondrocytes of Meckel's cartilage have the capacity to become osteocytes, osteoblasts, and fibroblasts

  7. RhoA activation and nuclearization marks loss of chondrocyte phenotype in crosstalk with Wnt pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Ece; Despot-Slade, Evelin; Pichler, Michael; Zenobi-Wong, Marcy

    2017-11-15

    De-differentiation comprises a major drawback for the use of autologous chondrocytes in cartilage repair. Here, we investigate the role of RhoA and canonical Wnt signaling in chondrocyte phenotype. Chondrocyte de-differentiation is accompanied by an upregulation and nuclear localization of RhoA. Effectors of canonical Wnt signaling including β-catenin and YAP/TAZ are upregulated in de-differentiating chondrocytes in a Rho-dependent manner. Inhibition of Rho activation with C3 transferase inhibits nuclear localization of RhoA, induces expression of chondrogenic markers on 2D and enhances the chondrogenic effect of 3D culturing. Upregulation of chondrogenic markers by Rho inhibition is accompanied by loss of canonical Wnt signaling markers in 3D or on 2D whereas treatment of chondrocytes with Wnt-3a abrogates this effect. However, induction of canonical Wnt signaling inhibits chondrogenic markers on 2D but enhances chondrogenic re-differentiation on 2D with C3 transferase or in 3D. These data provide insights on the context-dependent role of RhoA and Wnt signaling in de-differentiation and on mechanisms to induce chondrogenic markers for therapeutic approaches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Deproteinized Bovine Bone Mineral or Autologous Bone at Dehiscence Type Defects at Implants Installed Immediately into Extraction Sockets: An Experimental Study in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Flavia Priscila; De Santis, Enzo; Hochuli-Vieira, Eduardo; de Souza Faco, Eduardo F; Pantani, Fabio; Salata, Luiz A; Botticelli, Daniele

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate bone regeneration at surgically created dehiscence buccal defects at implants placed immediately into extraction sockets (IPIES) of small dimensions filled with autogenous bone or deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM) associated with a collagen membrane. Eight Labrador dogs were used and implants were placed immediately into the extraction sockets of the second premolar. The buccal wall was subsequently removed to create a standardized defect, 4 mm wide coronally, 2 mm wide apically, and 6 mm high. Autogenous bone particles (AB) or DBBM granules were used to fill the defects. All surgical sites were subsequently covered by a resorbable collagen membrane and a non-submerged healing was allowed. After 4 months, the animals were euthanized and bone blocks harvested and processed for histomorphometric analysis. The bony crest at the buccal aspect (C) was located 2.3 ± 0.8 mm and 1.7 ± 0.7 mm apically to the implant shoulder (IS) at the AB and DBBM sites, respectively. The coronal levels of osseointegration at the buccal aspect (B) were located 2.7 ± 0.7 mm and 2.2 ± 1.0 mm apically to IS at the AB and DBBM sites, respectively. At the AB sites, the peri-implant mucosa was located 4.3 ± 0.9 mm, 4.7 ± 0.9 mm, and 2.0 ± 1.6 mm coronally to C, B, and IS, respectively. The corresponding values at the DBBM sites were 4.3 ± 0.6 mm, 4.8 ± 0.6 mm, and 2.5 ± 0.8 mm, respectively. No statistically significant differences were found. The treatment of surgically created buccal defects at IPIES sites using Bio-Oss® (Geistlich Biomaterials, Wolhusen, LU, Switzerland) or autogenous bone, concomitantly with a collagen membrane, engenders bone regeneration to a similar extent after 4 months of healing. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Regulative mechanisms of chondrocyte adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, Hagen; Mehlhorn, Alexander T; Fehrenbach, Miriam

    2006-01-01

    Interaction between chondrocytes and extracellular matrix is considered a key factor in the generation of grafts for matrix-associated chondrocyte transplantation. Therefore, our objective was to study the influence of differentiation status on cellular attachment. Adhesion of chondrocytes...... to collagen type II increased after removal from native cartilage up to the third day in monolayer in a dose-dependent manner. Following dedifferentiation after the second passage, adhesion to collagen types I (-84%) and II (-46%) decreased, whereas adhesion to fibrinogen (+59%) and fibronectin (+43......%) increased. A cartilage construct was developed based on a clinically established collagen type I scaffold. In this matrix, more than 80% of the cells could be immobilized by mechanisms of adhesion, filtration, and cell entrapment. Confocal laser microscopy revealed focal adhesion sites as points of cell...

  10. The biocompatibility of titanium cardiovascular devices seeded with autologous blood-derived endothelial progenitor cells: EPC-seeded antithrombotic Ti implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achneck, Hardean E; Jamiolkowski, Ryan M; Jantzen, Alexandra E; Haseltine, Justin M; Lane, Whitney O; Huang, Jessica K; Galinat, Lauren J; Serpe, Michael J; Lin, Fu-Hsiung; Li, Madison; Parikh, Amar; Ma, Liqiao; Chen, Tao; Sileshi, Bantayehu; Milano, Carmelo A; Wallace, Charles S; Stabler, Thomas V; Allen, Jason D; Truskey, George A; Lawson, Jeffrey H

    2011-01-01

    Implantable and extracorporeal cardiovascular devices are commonly made from titanium (Ti) (e.g. Ti-coated Nitinol stents and mechanical circulatory assist devices). Endothelializing the blood-contacting Ti surfaces of these devices would provide them with an antithrombogenic coating that mimics the native lining of blood vessels and the heart. We evaluated the viability and adherence of peripheral blood-derived porcine endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), seeded onto thin Ti layers on glass slides under static conditions and after exposure to fluid shear stresses. EPCs attached and grew to confluence on Ti in serum-free medium, without preadsorption of proteins. After attachment to Ti for 15 min, less than 5% of the cells detached at a shear stress of 100 dyne / cm(2). Confluent monolayers of EPCs on smooth Ti surfaces (Rq of 10 nm), exposed to 15 or 100 dyne/cm(2) for 48 h, aligned and elongated in the direction of flow and produced nitric oxide dependent on the level of shear stress. EPC-coated Ti surfaces had dramatically reduced platelet adhesion when compared to uncoated Ti surfaces. These results indicate that peripheral blood-derived EPCs adhere and function normally on Ti surfaces. Therefore EPCs may be used to seed cardiovascular devices prior to implantation to ameliorate platelet activation and thrombus formation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Mesenchymal stem cell-derived extracellular matrix enhances chondrogenic phenotype of and cartilage formation by encapsulated chondrocytes in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuanheng; Lin, Hang; Shen, He; Wang, Bing; Lei, Guanghua; Tuan, Rocky S

    2018-03-15

    Mesenchymal stem cell derived extracellular matrix (MSC-ECM) is a natural biomaterial with robust bioactivity and good biocompatibility, and has been studied as a scaffold for tissue engineering. In this investigation, we tested the applicability of using decellularized human bone marrow derived MSC-ECM (hBMSC-ECM) as a culture substrate for chondrocyte expansion in vitro, as well as a scaffold for chondrocyte-based cartilage repair. hBMSC-ECM deposited by hBMSCs cultured on tissue culture plastic (TCP) was harvested, and then subjected to a decellularization process to remove hBMSCs. Compared with chondrocytes grown on TCP, chondrocytes seeded onto hBMSC-ECM exhibited significantly increased proliferation rate, and maintained better chondrocytic phenotype than TCP group. After being expanded to the same cell number and placed in high-density micromass cultures, chondrocytes from the ECM group showed better chondrogenic differentiation profile than those from the TCP group. To test cartilage formation ability, composites of hBMSC-ECM impregnated with chondrocytes were subjected to brief trypsin treatment to allow cell-mediated contraction, and folded to form 3-dimensional chondrocyte-impregnated hBMSC-ECM (Cell/ECM constructs). Upon culture in vitro in chondrogenic medium for 21 days, robust cartilage formation was observed in the Cell/ECM constructs. Similarly prepared Cell/ECM constructs were tested in vivo by subcutaneous implantation into SCID mice. Prominent cartilage formation was observed in the implanted Cell/ECM constructs 14 days post-implantation, with higher sGAG deposition compared to controls consisting of chondrocyte cell sheets. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that hBMSC-ECM is a superior culture substrate for chondrocyte expansion and a bioactive matrix potentially applicable for cartilage regeneration in vivo. Current cell-based treatments for focal cartilage defects face challenges, including chondrocyte dedifferentiation, need for

  12. Hyaline cartilage degenerates after autologous osteochondral transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibesku, C O; Szuwart, T; Kleffner, T O; Schlegel, P M; Jahn, U R; Van Aken, H; Fuchs, S

    2004-11-01

    Autologous osteochondral grafting is a well-established clinical procedure to treat focal cartilage defects in patients, although basic research on this topic remains sparse. The aim of the current study was to evaluate (1) histological changes of transplanted hyaline cartilage of osteochondral grafts and (2) the tissue that connects the transplanted cartilage with the adjacent cartilage in a sheep model. Both knee joints of four sheep were opened surgically and osteochondral grafts were harvested and simultaneously transplanted to the contralateral femoral condyle. The animals were sacrificed after three months and the received knee joints were evaluated histologically. Histological evaluation showed a complete ingrowth of the osseous part of the osteochondral grafts. A healing or ingrowth at the level of the cartilage could not be observed. Histological evaluation of the transplanted grafts according to Mankin revealed significantly more and more severe signs of degeneration than the adjacent cartilage, such as cloning of chondrocytes and irregularities of the articular surface. We found no connecting tissue between the transplanted and the adjacent cartilage and histological signs of degeneration of the transplanted hyaline cartilage. In the light of these findings, long-term results of autologous osteochondral grafts in human beings have to be followed critically.

  13. Chondrocytes and stem cells in 3D-bioprinted structures create human cartilage in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apelgren, Peter; Amoroso, Matteo; Lindahl, Anders; Brantsing, Camilla; Rotter, Nicole; Gatenholm, Paul; Kölby, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Cartilage repair and replacement is a major challenge in plastic reconstructive surgery. The development of a process capable of creating a patient-specific cartilage framework would be a major breakthrough. Here, we described methods for creating human cartilage in vivo and quantitatively assessing the proliferative capacity and cartilage-formation ability in mono- and co-cultures of human chondrocytes and human mesenchymal stem cells in a three-dimensional (3D)-bioprinted hydrogel scaffold. The 3D-bioprinted constructs (5 × 5 × 1.2 mm) were produced using nanofibrillated cellulose and alginate in combination with human chondrocytes and human mesenchymal stem cells using a 3D-extrusion bioprinter. Immediately following bioprinting, the constructs were implanted subcutaneously on the back of 48 nude mice and explanted after 30 and 60 days, respectively, for morphological and immunohistochemical examination. During explantation, the constructs were easy to handle, and the majority had retained their macroscopic grid appearance. Constructs consisting of human nasal chondrocytes showed good proliferation ability, with 17.2% of the surface areas covered with proliferating chondrocytes after 60 days. In constructs comprising a mixture of chondrocytes and stem cells, an additional proliferative effect was observed involving chondrocyte production of glycosaminoglycans and type 2 collagen. This clinically highly relevant study revealed 3D bioprinting as a promising technology for the creation of human cartilage.

  14. Chondrocytes and stem cells in 3D-bioprinted structures create human cartilage in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Apelgren

    Full Text Available Cartilage repair and replacement is a major challenge in plastic reconstructive surgery. The development of a process capable of creating a patient-specific cartilage framework would be a major breakthrough. Here, we described methods for creating human cartilage in vivo and quantitatively assessing the proliferative capacity and cartilage-formation ability in mono- and co-cultures of human chondrocytes and human mesenchymal stem cells in a three-dimensional (3D-bioprinted hydrogel scaffold. The 3D-bioprinted constructs (5 × 5 × 1.2 mm were produced using nanofibrillated cellulose and alginate in combination with human chondrocytes and human mesenchymal stem cells using a 3D-extrusion bioprinter. Immediately following bioprinting, the constructs were implanted subcutaneously on the back of 48 nude mice and explanted after 30 and 60 days, respectively, for morphological and immunohistochemical examination. During explantation, the constructs were easy to handle, and the majority had retained their macroscopic grid appearance. Constructs consisting of human nasal chondrocytes showed good proliferation ability, with 17.2% of the surface areas covered with proliferating chondrocytes after 60 days. In constructs comprising a mixture of chondrocytes and stem cells, an additional proliferative effect was observed involving chondrocyte production of glycosaminoglycans and type 2 collagen. This clinically highly relevant study revealed 3D bioprinting as a promising technology for the creation of human cartilage.

  15. Passaged adult chondrocytes can form engineered cartilage with functional mechanical properties: a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kenneth W; Lima, Eric G; Bian, Liming; O'Conor, Christopher J; Jayabalan, Prakash S; Stoker, Aaron M; Kuroki, Keiichi; Cook, Cristi R; Ateshian, Gerard A; Cook, James L; Hung, Clark T

    2010-03-01

    It was hypothesized that previously optimized serum-free culture conditions for juvenile bovine chondrocytes could be adapted to generate engineered cartilage with physiologic mechanical properties in a preclinical, adult canine model. Primary or passaged (using growth factors) adult chondrocytes from three adult dogs were encapsulated in agarose, and cultured in serum-free media with transforming growth factor-beta3. After 28 days in culture, engineered cartilage formed by primary chondrocytes exhibited only small increases in glycosaminoglycan content. However, all passaged chondrocytes on day 28 elaborated a cartilage matrix with compressive properties and glycosaminoglycan content in the range of native adult canine cartilage values. A preliminary biocompatibility study utilizing chondral and osteochondral constructs showed no gross or histological signs of rejection, with all implanted constructs showing excellent integration with surrounding cartilage and subchondral bone. This study demonstrates that adult canine chondrocytes can form a mechanically functional, biocompatible engineered cartilage tissue under optimized culture conditions. The encouraging findings of this work highlight the potential for tissue engineering strategies using adult chondrocytes in the clinical treatment of cartilage defects.

  16. Efficiency of Human Epiphyseal Chondrocytes with Differential Replication Numbers for Cellular Therapy Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiyo Nasu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cell-based therapy for cartilage or bone requires a large number of cells; serial passages of chondrocytes are, therefore, needed. However, fates of expanded chondrocytes from extra fingers remain unclarified. The chondrocytes from human epiphyses morphologically changed from small polygonal cells to bipolar elongated spindle cells and to large polygonal cells with degeneration at early passages. Gene of type II collagen was expressed in the cells only at a primary culture (Passage 0 and Passage 1 (P1 cells. The nodules by implantation of P0 to P8 cells were composed of cartilage and perichondrium. The cartilage consisted of chondrocytes with round nuclei and type II collagen-positive matrix, and the perichondrium consisted of spindle cells with type I collage-positive matrix. The cartilage and perichondrium developed to bone with marrow cavity through enchondral ossification. Chondrogenesis and osteogenesis by epiphyseal chondrocytes depended on replication number in culture. It is noteworthy to take population doubling level in correlation with pharmaceutical efficacy into consideration when we use chondrocytes for cell-based therapies.

  17. Pulmonary heart valve replacement using stabilized acellular xenogeneic scaffolds; effects of seeding with autologous stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpa Marius Mihai

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: We hypothesized that an ideal heart valve replacement would be acellular valve root scaffolds seeded with autologous stem cells. To test this hypothesis, we prepared porcine acellular pulmonary valves, seeded them with autologous adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs and implanted them in sheep and compared them to acellular valves.

  18. Tumescent mastectomy technique in autologous breast reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Christina R; Koolen, Pieter G L; Ho, Olivia A; Ricci, Joseph A; Tobias, Adam M; Lin, Samuel J; Lee, Bernard T

    2015-10-01

    Use of the tumescent mastectomy technique has been reported to facilitate development of a hydrodissection plane, reduce blood loss, and provide adjunct analgesia. Previous studies suggest that tumescent dissection may contribute to adverse outcomes after immediate implant reconstruction; however, its effect on autologous microsurgical reconstruction has not been established. A retrospective review was conducted of all immediate microsurgical breast reconstruction procedures at a single academic center between January 2004 and December 2013. Records were queried for age, body mass index, mastectomy weight, diabetes, hypertension, smoking, preoperative radiation, reconstruction flap type, and autologous flap weight. Outcomes of interest were mastectomy skin necrosis, complete and partial flap loss, return to the operating room, breast hematoma, seroma, and infection. There were 730 immediate autologous breast reconstructions performed during the study period; 46% with the tumescent dissection technique. Groups were similar with respect to baseline patient and procedural characteristics. Univariate analysis revealed no significant difference in the incidence of mastectomy skin necrosis, complete or partial flap loss, return to the operating room, operative time, estimated blood loss, recurrence, breast hematoma, seroma, or infection in patients undergoing tumescent mastectomy. Multivariate analysis also demonstrated no significant association between the use of tumescent technique and postoperative breast mastectomy skin necrosis (P = 0.980), hematoma (P = 0.759), or seroma (P = 0.340). Use of the tumescent dissection technique during mastectomy is not significantly associated with adverse outcomes after microsurgical breast reconstruction. Despite concern for its impact on implant reconstruction, our findings suggest that this method can be used safely preceding autologous procedures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Resorbable screws for fixation of autologous bone grafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raghoebar, GM; Liem, RSB; Bos, RRM; van der Wal, JE; Vissink, A

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the suitability of resorbable screws made of poly (D,L-lactide) acid (PDLLA) for fixation of autologous bone grafts related to graft regeneration and osseointegration of dental implants. In eight edentulous patients suffering from insufficient retention of their

  20. Bone marrow extract as a growth supplement for human iliac apophyseal chondrocyte culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasubramanian Balakumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Human bone marrow is rich in various growth factors which may support the chondrocyte growth. This study was conducted to compare the culture characteristics of human growth plate chondrocyte in foetal bovine serum (FBS and human autologous bone marrow extract (BME in monolayer culture. Methods: Iliac crest apophyseal cartilage was harvested from four donors, aged between two and nine years, undergoing hip surgery. Chondrocytes were propagated under two culture conditions, with 10 per cent FBS and 10 per cent autologous BME harvested from the same donors. Cells were harvested at 7, 14 and 21 days to assess viability, morphology, cell count and immunocytochemistry. Results: With an initial seeding density of 2500 cells/cm 2 , the average yield in monolayer cultured with FBS was 3.35 × 10 5 , 5.9 × 10 5 , 14.1 × 10 5 and BME was 0.66 × 10 5 , 1.57 × 10 5 and 3.48 × 10 5 at 7, 14 and 21 days, respectively. Viability was 98.21 per cent with FBS and 97.45 per cent with BME at 21 days. In BME supplemented cultures, hyaline phenotype was maintained up to 21 days. The yield was higher in the FBS supplemented group; however, the phenotype could not be maintained by the FBS group as long as BME group. Interpretation & conclusions: Autologous BME was found to be a safer alternative to FBS for human studies. BME could maintain the hyaline phenotype for a longer time. Ways to enhance the cell yield needs to be explored in future studies.

  1. In Vitro Expression of the Extracellular Matrix Components Aggrecan, Collagen Types I and II by Articular Cartilage-Derived Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneevoigt, J; Fabian, C; Leovsky, C; Seeger, J; Bahramsoltani, M

    2017-02-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of hyaline cartilage is perfectly suited to transmit articular pressure load to the subchondral bone. Pressure is transferred by a high amount of aggrecan-based proteoglycans and collagen type II fibres in particular. After any injury, the hyaline cartilage is replaced by fibrocartilage, which is low in proteoglycans and contains collagen type I predominantly. Until now, long-term results of therapeutic procedures including cell-based therapies like autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) lead to a replacement tissue meeting the composition of fibrocartilage. Therefore, it is of particular interest to discover how and to what extent isolation and in vitro cultivation of chondrocytes affect the cells and their expression of ECM components. Hyaline cartilage-derived chondrocytes were cultivated in vitro and observed microscopically over a time period of 35 days. The expression of collagen type I, collagen type II and aggrecan was analysed using RT-qPCR and Western blot at several days of cultivation. Chondrocytes presented a longitudinal shape for the entire cultivation period. While expression of collagen type I prevailed within the first days, only prolonged cultivation led to an increase in collagen type II and aggrecan expression. The results indicate that chondrocyte isolation and in vitro cultivation lead to a dedifferentiation at least to the stage of chondroprogenitor cells. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  2. Articular chondrocyte metabolism and osteoarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leipold, H.R.

    1989-01-01

    The three main objectives of this study were: (1) to determine if depletion of proteoglycans from the cartilage matrix that occurs during osteoarthritis causes a measurable increase of cartilage proteoglycan components in the synovial fluid and sera, (2) to observe what effect intracellular cAMP has on the expression of matrix components by chondrocytes, and (3) to determine if freshly isolated chondrocytes contain detectable levels of mRNA for fibronectin. Canine serum keratan sulfate and hyaluronate were measured to determine if there was an elevation of these serum glycosaminoglycans in a canine model of osteoarthritis. A single intra-articular injection of chymopapain into a shoulder joint increased serum keratan sulfate 10 fold and hyaluronate less than 2 fold in 24 hours. Keratan sulfate concentrations in synovial fluids of dogs about one year old were unrelated to the presence of spontaneous cartilage degeneration in the joints. High keratan sulfate in synovial fluids correlated with higher keratan sulfate in serum. The mean keratan sulfate concentration in sera of older dogs with osteoarthritis was 37% higher than disease-free controls, but the difference between the groups was not statistically significant. Treatment of chondrocytes with 0.5 millimolar (mM) dibutyryl cAMP (DBcAMP) caused the cells to adopt a more rounded morphology. There was no difference between the amount of proteins synthesized by cultures treated with DBcAMP and controls. The amount of fibronectin (FN) in the media of DBcAMP treated cultures detected by an ELISA was specifically reduced, and the amount of {sup 35}S-FN purified by gelatin affinity chromatography decreased. Moreover, the percentage of FN containing the extra domain. A sequence was reduced. Concomitant with the decrease in FN there was an increase in the concentration of keratan sulfate.

  3. Autologous Matrix-Induced Chondrogenesis: A Systematic Review of the Clinical Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liang; Orth, Patrick; Cucchiarini, Magali; Madry, Henning

    2017-11-01

    The addition of a type I/III collagen membrane in cartilage defects treated with microfracture has been advocated for cartilage repair, termed "autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis" (AMIC). To examine the current clinical evidence regarding AMIC for focal chondral defects. Systematic review. A systematic review was performed by searching PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Cochrane Library databases. Inclusion criteria were clinical studies of AMIC for articular cartilage repair, written in English. Relative data were extracted and critically analyzed. PRISMA guidelines were applied, the methodological quality of the included studies was assessed by the modified Coleman Methodology Score (CMS), and aggregate data were generated. Twenty-eight clinical articles were included: 12 studies (245 patients) of knee cartilage defects, 12 studies (214 patients) of ankle cartilage defects, and 4 studies (308 patients) of hip cartilage defects. The CMS demonstrated a suboptimal study design in the majority of published studies (knee, 57.8; ankle, 55.3; hip, 57.7). For the knee, 1 study reported significant clinical improvements for AMIC compared with microfracture for medium-sized cartilage defects (mean defect size 3.6 cm 2 ) after 5 years (level of evidence, 1). No study compared AMIC with matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) in the knee. For the ankle, no clinical trial was available comparing AMIC versus microfracture or ACI. In the hip, only one analysis (level of evidence, 3) compared AMIC with microfracture for acetabular lesions. For medium-sized acetabular defects, one study (level of evidence, 3) found no significant differences between AMIC and ACI at 5 years. Specific aspects not appropriately discussed in the currently available literature include patient-related factors, membrane fixation, and defect properties. No treatment-related adverse events were reported. This systematic review reveals a paucity of high-quality, randomized controlled

  4. Linkage of chondroitin-sulfate to type I collagen scaffolds stimulates the bioactivity of seeded chondrocytes in vitro.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Susante, J.L.C. van; Pieper, J.S.; Buma, P.; Kuppevelt, A.H.M.S.M. van; Beuningen, H.M. van; Kraan, P.M. van der; Veerkamp, J.H.; Berg, W.B. van den; Veth, R.P.H.

    2001-01-01

    An increasing amount of interest is focused on the potential use of tissue-engineered articular cartilage implants, for repair of defects in the joint surface. In this perspective, various biodegradable scaffolds have been evaluated as a vehicle to deliver chondrocytes into a cartilage defect. This

  5. ROCK inhibitor prevents the dedifferentiation of human articular chondrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Emi; Furumatsu, Takayuki; Kanazawa, Tomoko; Tamura, Masanori; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► ROCK inhibitor stimulates chondrogenic gene expression of articular chondrocytes. ► ROCK inhibitor prevents the dedifferentiation of monolayer-cultured chondrocytes. ► ROCK inhibitor enhances the redifferentiation of cultured chondrocytes. ► ROCK inhibitor is useful for preparation of un-dedifferentiated chondrocytes. ► ROCK inhibitor may be a useful reagent for chondrocyte-based regeneration therapy. -- Abstract: Chondrocytes lose their chondrocytic phenotypes in vitro. The Rho family GTPase ROCK, involved in organizing the actin cytoskeleton, modulates the differentiation status of chondrocytic cells. However, the optimum method to prepare a large number of un-dedifferentiated chondrocytes is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of ROCK inhibitor (ROCKi) on the chondrogenic property of monolayer-cultured articular chondrocytes. Human articular chondrocytes were subcultured in the presence or absence of ROCKi (Y-27632). The expression of chondrocytic marker genes such as SOX9 and COL2A1 was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Cellular morphology and viability were evaluated. Chondrogenic redifferentiation potential was examined by a pellet culture procedure. The expression level of SOX9 and COL2A1 was higher in ROCKi-treated chondrocytes than in untreated cells. Chondrocyte morphology varied from a spreading form to a round shape in a ROCKi-dependent manner. In addition, ROCKi treatment stimulated the proliferation of chondrocytes. The deposition of safranin O-stained proteoglycans and type II collagen was highly detected in chondrogenic pellets derived from ROCKi-pretreated chondrocytes. Our results suggest that ROCKi prevents the dedifferentiation of monolayer-cultured chondrocytes, and may be a useful reagent to maintain chondrocytic phenotypes in vitro for chondrocyte-based regeneration therapy.

  6. ROCK inhibitor prevents the dedifferentiation of human articular chondrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Emi [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Science of Functional Recovery and Reconstruction, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikatacho, Kitaku, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Furumatsu, Takayuki, E-mail: matino@md.okayama-u.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Science of Functional Recovery and Reconstruction, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikatacho, Kitaku, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Kanazawa, Tomoko; Tamura, Masanori; Ozaki, Toshifumi [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Science of Functional Recovery and Reconstruction, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikatacho, Kitaku, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan)

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor stimulates chondrogenic gene expression of articular chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor prevents the dedifferentiation of monolayer-cultured chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor enhances the redifferentiation of cultured chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor is useful for preparation of un-dedifferentiated chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor may be a useful reagent for chondrocyte-based regeneration therapy. -- Abstract: Chondrocytes lose their chondrocytic phenotypes in vitro. The Rho family GTPase ROCK, involved in organizing the actin cytoskeleton, modulates the differentiation status of chondrocytic cells. However, the optimum method to prepare a large number of un-dedifferentiated chondrocytes is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of ROCK inhibitor (ROCKi) on the chondrogenic property of monolayer-cultured articular chondrocytes. Human articular chondrocytes were subcultured in the presence or absence of ROCKi (Y-27632). The expression of chondrocytic marker genes such as SOX9 and COL2A1 was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Cellular morphology and viability were evaluated. Chondrogenic redifferentiation potential was examined by a pellet culture procedure. The expression level of SOX9 and COL2A1 was higher in ROCKi-treated chondrocytes than in untreated cells. Chondrocyte morphology varied from a spreading form to a round shape in a ROCKi-dependent manner. In addition, ROCKi treatment stimulated the proliferation of chondrocytes. The deposition of safranin O-stained proteoglycans and type II collagen was highly detected in chondrogenic pellets derived from ROCKi-pretreated chondrocytes. Our results suggest that ROCKi prevents the dedifferentiation of monolayer-cultured chondrocytes, and may be a useful reagent to maintain chondrocytic phenotypes in vitro for chondrocyte

  7. Autologous fat graft in irradiated orbit postenucleation for retinoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, Francesco; Maione, Luca; Vinci, Valeriano; Lisa, Andrea; Barbera, Federico; Balia, Laura; Caviggioli, Fabio; Di Maria, Alessandra

    2018-01-05

    Autologous fat grafting has been extensively and successfully adopted in a number of pathologic conditions in regenerative surgery especially on irradiated fields in order to improve pain symptoms and tissue trophism promoting scar release. In the present study, we report our experience with autologous fat grafting for the treatment of postirradiation fibrosis and pain on three consecutive patients undergoing orbital enucleation for locally advanced retinoblastoma (RB) and subsequent radiotherapy. We selected three consecutive patients who underwent orbital enucleation for locally advanced RB and subsequent local radiotherapy showing severe reduction in orbital volume and eyelid length and retraction due to fibrosis, spontaneous local pain exacerbated after digital pressure with no possibility to place an ocular implant. They underwent autologous fat grafting in the orbital cavity and results were evaluated by clinical examination at 5 and 14 days, and 1, 3, 6 months, and 1 year after surgery. A significant release of scar retraction, reduction of fibrosis and orbital rim contraction together with an important improvement of pain symptoms was observed in all patients. The local changes observed enabled an ease placement of an ocular prosthetic implant (implant). No local or systemic complication occurred. Fat grafting is a promising treatment for patients showing radiotherapy related complication in the orbital area and it should be adopted by all oculoplastic surgeon in order to improve pain syndrome creating the ideal local conditions for the placement of an ocular prosthetic implant.

  8. Bioluminescence imaging of chondrocytes in rabbits by intraarticular injection of D-luciferin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Sung Min; Min, Jung Joon; Kim, Sung Mi; Bom, Hee Seung [Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Suk Jung; Kang, Han Saem; Kim, Kwang Yoon [ECOBIO INC., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Ho [College of Natural Science, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-02-15

    Luciferase is one of the most commonly used reporter enzymes in the field of in vivo optical imaging. D-luciferin, the substrate for firefly luciferase has very high cost that allows this kind of experiment limited to small animals such as mice and rats. In this current study, we validated local injection of D-luciferin in the articular capsule for bioluminescence imaging in rabbits. Chondrocytes were cultured and infected by replication-defective adenoviral vector encoding firefly luciferase (Fluc). Chondrocytes expressing Fluc were injected or implanted in the left knee joint. The rabbits underwent optical imaging studies after local injection of D-luciferin at 1, 5, 7, 9 days after cellular administration. We sought whether optimal imaging signals was could be by a cooled CCD camera after local injection of D-luciferin. Imaging signal was not observed from the left knee joint after intraperitoneal injection of D-luciferin (15 mg/kg), whereas it was observed after intraarticular injection. Photon intensity from the left knee joint of rabbits was compared between cell injected and implanted groups after intraarticular injection of D-luciferin. During the period of imaging studies, photon intensity of the cell implanted group was 5-10 times higher than that of the cell injected group. We successfully imaged chondrocytes expressing Fluc after intraarticular injection of D-luciferin. This technique may be further applied to develop new drugs for knee joint disease.

  9. Use of collagen scaffold and autologous bone marrow concentrate as a one-step cartilage repair in the knee: histological results of second-look biopsies at 1 year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigante, A; Calcagno, S; Cecconi, S; Ramazzotti, D; Manzotti, S; Enea, D

    2011-01-01

    Chondral articular defects are a key concern in orthopaedic surgery. To overcome the disadvantages of autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and to improve the outcomes of autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC), the latter technique is currently augmented with bone marrow concentrate injected under or seeded onto the scaffold. However, to date, only a little is known about histological outcomes of either the AMIC technique or AMIC associated with bone marrow concentrate. This study aimed to evaluate the quality of the repair tissue obtained from biopsies harvested during second-look arthroscopy after arthroscopic AMIC augmented with bone marrow concentrate. We analysed five second-look core biopsies harvested at 12 months follow-up. At the time of biopsy the surgeon reported the quality of the repair tissue using the standard ICRS Cartilage Repair Assessment (CRA). Every biopsy together with patient data was sent to our centre to undergo blind histological evaluation (ICRS II Visual Histological Assessment Scale) and data analysis. Five asymptomatic patients (mean age 43.4 years) had isolated lesions (mean size was 3.7 cm2) at the medial femoral condyle. All the implants appeared nearly normal (ICRS CRA) at arthroscopic evaluation and had a mean overall histological (ICRS II) of 59.8±14,5. Hyaline-like matrix was found in only one case, a mixture of hyaline/fibrocartilage was found in one case and fibrocartilage was found three cases. Our clinical and histological data suggest that this procedure achieved a nearly normal arthroscopic appearance and a satisfactory repair tissue, which was possibly still maturing at 12 months follow-up. Further studies are needed to understand the true potential of one-step procedures in the repair of focal chondral lesions in the knee.

  10. Sarpogrelate hydrochloride, a selective 5-hydroxytryptamine(2A) antagonist, augments autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell implantation-induced improvement in endothelium-dependent vasodilation in patients with critical limb ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Yukihito; Miyazaki, Masanori; Goto, Chikara; Sanada, Hiroaki; Sueda, Taijiro; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a combination of bone marrow mononuclear cell (BM-MNC) implantation and sarpogrelate, a selective 5-HT(2A) antagonist, on endothelial function in patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI). We evaluated the leg blood flow (LBF) responses to acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside before and after BM-MNC implantation in 16 patients with CLI. We divided patients with CLI into 2 groups: those cotreated with sarpogrelate orally for 12 weeks (sarpogrelate group, n = 8) and those who remained on conventional therapy (control group, n = 8). LBF was measured by strain gauge plethysmography. BM-MNC implantation improved ankle brachial pressure index, transcutaneous oxygen pressure, and pain-free walking time. There was no significant difference in these parameters between the 2 groups. Before BM-MNC implantation, LBF responses to ACh were similar in the sarpogrelate group and control group. Twelve weeks of BM-MNC implantation enhanced LBF responses to ACh in the sarpogrelate and control groups. After 12 weeks of BM-MNC implantation, LBF response to ACh was significantly greater in the sarpogrelate group than in the control group. BM-MNC implantation did not alter the LBF responses to sodium nitroprusside in either group. These findings suggest that BM-MNC implantation improved not only limb ischemic symptoms but also endothelium-dependent vasodilation in patients with CLI. A combination of BM-MNC implantation and sarpogrelate had a more beneficial effect on vascular function in these patients.

  11. Latissimus Dorsi and Immediate Fat Transfer (LIFT for Complete Autologous Breast Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M. Economides, MD

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion:. Autologous augmentation of the LD flap with lipotransfer has been used to avoid placement of an implant. We improve the technique by performing lipotransfer during index reconstruction. Furthermore, we perform lipotransfer prior to disorigination of the LD muscle to minimize trauma to the flap and increase the efficiency of fat grafting. Our experience demonstrates that this technique is a viable autologous alternative to microsurgical breast reconstruction.

  12. Oxygen effects on senescence in chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells: consequences for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussavi-Harami, Farid; Duwayri, Yazan; Martin, James A; Moussavi-Harami, Farshid; Buckwalter, Joseph A

    2004-01-01

    Primary isolates of chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells are often insufficient for cell-based autologous grafting procedures, necessitating in vitro expansion of cell populations. However, the potential for expansion is limited by cellular senescence, a form of irreversible cell cycle arrest regulated by intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Intrinsic mechanisms common to most somatic cells enforce senescence at the so-called "Hayflick limit" of 60 population doublings. Termed "replicative senescence", this mechanism prevents cellular immortalization and suppresses oncogenesis. Although it is possible to overcome the Hayflick limit by genetically modifying cells, such manipulations are regarded as prohibitively dangerous in the context of tissue engineering. On the other hand, senescence associated with extrinsic factors, often called "stress-induced" senescence, can be avoided simply by modifying culture conditions. Because stress-induced senescence is "premature" in the sense that it can halt growth well before the Hayflick limit is reached, growth potential can be significantly enhanced by minimizing culture related stress. Standard culture techniques were originally developed to optimize the growth of fibroblasts but these conditions are inherently stressful to many other cell types. In particular, the 21% oxygen levels used in standard incubators, though well tolerated by fibroblasts, appear to induce oxidative stress in other cells. We reasoned that chondrocytes and MSCs, which are adapted to relatively low oxygen levels in vivo, might be sensitive to this form of stress. To test this hypothesis we compared the growth of MSC and chondrocyte strains in 21% and 5% oxygen. We found that incubation in 21% oxygen significantly attenuated growth and was associated with increased oxidant production. These findings indicated that sub-optimal standard culture conditions sharply limited the expansion of MSC and chondrocyte populations and suggest that cultures for

  13. From gristle to chondrocyte transplantation: treatment of cartilage injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Anders

    2015-10-19

    This review addresses the progress in cartilage repair technology over the decades with an emphasis on cartilage regeneration with cell therapy. The most abundant cartilage is the hyaline cartilage that covers the surface of our joints and, due to avascularity, this tissue is unable to repair itself. The cartilage degeneration seen in osteoarthritis causes patient suffering and is a huge burden to society. The surgical approach to cartilage repair was non-existing until the 1950s when new surgical techniques emerged. The use of cultured cells for cell therapy started as experimental studies in the 1970s that developed over the years to a clinical application in 1994 with the introduction of the autologous chondrocyte transplantation technique (ACT). The technology is now spread worldwide and has been further refined by combining arthroscopic techniques with cells cultured on matrix (MACI technology). The non-regenerating hypothesis of cartilage has been revisited and we are now able to demonstrate cell divisions and presence of stem-cell niches in the joint. Furthermore, cartilage derived from human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells could be the base for new broader cell treatments for cartilage injuries and the future technology base for prevention and cure of osteoarthritis. © 2015 The Author(s).

  14. From gristle to chondrocyte transplantation: treatment of cartilage injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This review addresses the progress in cartilage repair technology over the decades with an emphasis on cartilage regeneration with cell therapy. The most abundant cartilage is the hyaline cartilage that covers the surface of our joints and, due to avascularity, this tissue is unable to repair itself. The cartilage degeneration seen in osteoarthritis causes patient suffering and is a huge burden to society. The surgical approach to cartilage repair was non-existing until the 1950s when new surgical techniques emerged. The use of cultured cells for cell therapy started as experimental studies in the 1970s that developed over the years to a clinical application in 1994 with the introduction of the autologous chondrocyte transplantation technique (ACT). The technology is now spread worldwide and has been further refined by combining arthroscopic techniques with cells cultured on matrix (MACI technology). The non-regenerating hypothesis of cartilage has been revisited and we are now able to demonstrate cell divisions and presence of stem-cell niches in the joint. Furthermore, cartilage derived from human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells could be the base for new broader cell treatments for cartilage injuries and the future technology base for prevention and cure of osteoarthritis. PMID:26416680

  15. Effect of Cyclic Dynamic Compressive Loading on Chondrocytes and Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Co-Cultured in Highly Elastic Cryogel Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hao Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we first used gelatin/chondroitin-6-sulfate/hyaluronan/chitosan highly elastic cryogels, which showed total recovery from large strains during repeated compression cycles, as 3D scaffolds to study the effects of cyclic dynamic compressive loading on chondrocyte gene expression and extracellular matrix (ECM production. Dynamic culture of porcine chondrocytes was studied at 1 Hz, 10% to 40% strain and 1 to 9 h/day stimulation duration, in a mechanical-driven multi-chamber bioreactor for 14 days. From the experimental results, we could identify the optimum dynamic culture condition (20% and 3 h/day to enhance the chondrocytic phenotype of chondrocytes from the expression of marker (Col I, Col II, Col X, TNF-α, TGF-β1 and IGF-1 genes by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions (qRT-PCR and production of ECM (GAGs and Col II by biochemical analysis and immunofluorescence staining. With up-regulated growth factor (TGF-β1 and IGF-1 genes, co-culture of chondrocytes with porcine adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs was employed to facilitate chondrogenic differentiation of ASCs during dynamic culture in cryogel scaffolds. By replacing half of the chondrocytes with ASCs during co-culture, we could obtain similar production of ECM (GAGs and Col II and expression of Col II, but reduced expression of Col I, Col X and TNF-α. Subcutaneous implantation of cells/scaffold constructs in nude mice after mono-culture (chondrocytes or ASCs or co-culture (chondrocytes + ASCs and subject to static or dynamic culture condition in vitro for 14 days was tested for tissue-engineering applications. The constructs were retrieved 8 weeks post-implantation for histological analysis by Alcian blue, Safranin O and Col II immunohistochemical staining. The most abundant ectopic cartilage tissue was found for the chondrocytes and chondrocytes + ASCs groups using dynamic culture, which showed similar neo-cartilage formation capability with half of the

  16. Electrospun gelatin/polycaprolactone nanofibrous membranes combined with a coculture of bone marrow stromal cells and chondrocytes for cartilage engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He X

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Xiaomin He,1,* Bei Feng,1,2,* Chuanpei Huang,1 Hao Wang,1 Yang Ge,1 Renjie Hu,1 Meng Yin,1 Zhiwei Xu,1 Wei Wang,1 Wei Fu,1,2 Jinghao Zheng1 1Department of Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery, 2Institute of Pediatric Translational Medicine, Shanghai Children’s Medical Center School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Electrospinning has recently received considerable attention, showing notable potential as a novel method of scaffold fabrication for cartilage engineering. The aim of this study was to use a coculture strategy of chondrocytes combined with electrospun gelatin/polycaprolactone (GT/PCL membranes, instead of pure chondrocytes, to evaluate the formation of cartilaginous tissue. We prepared the GT/PCL membranes, seeded bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC/chondrocyte cocultures (75% BMSCs and 25% chondrocytes in a sandwich model in vitro, and then implanted the constructs subcutaneously into nude mice for 12 weeks. Gross observation, histological and immunohistological evaluation, glycosaminoglycan analyses, Young’s modulus measurement, and immunofluorescence staining were performed postimplantation. We found that the coculture group formed mature cartilage-like tissue, with no statistically significant difference from the chondrocyte group, and labeled BMSCs could differentiate into chondrocyte-like cells under the chondrogenic niche of chondrocytes. This entire strategy indicates that GT/PCL membranes are also a suitable scaffold for stem cell-based cartilage engineering and may provide a potentially clinically feasible approach for cartilage repairs. Keywords: electrospinning, nanocomposite, cartilage tissue engineering, nanomaterials, stem cells

  17. Stable subcutaneous cartilage regeneration of bone marrow stromal cells directed by chondrocyte sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Zhu, Lian; Liu, Yu; Yin, Zongqi; Liu, Yi; Liu, Fangjun; He, Aijuan; Feng, Shaoqing; Zhang, Yixin; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Wenjie; Liu, Wei; Cao, Yilin; Zhou, Guangdong

    2017-05-01

    In vivo niche plays an important role in regulating differentiation fate of stem cells. Due to lack of proper chondrogenic niche, stable cartilage regeneration of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in subcutaneous environments is always a great challenge. This study explored the feasibility that chondrocyte sheet created chondrogenic niche retained chondrogenic phenotype of BMSC engineered cartilage (BEC) in subcutaneous environments. Porcine BMSCs were seeded into biodegradable scaffolds followed by 4weeks of chondrogenic induction in vitro to form BEC, which were wrapped with chondrocyte sheets (Sheet group), acellular small intestinal submucosa (SIS, SIS group), or nothing (Blank group) respectively and then implanted subcutaneously into nude mice to trace the maintenance of chondrogenic phenotype. The results showed that all the constructs in Sheet group displayed typical cartilaginous features with abundant lacunae and cartilage specific matrices deposition. These samples became more mature with prolonged in vivo implantation, and few signs of ossification were observed at all time points except for one sample that had not been wrapped completely. Cell labeling results in Sheet group further revealed that the implanted BEC directly participated in cartilage formation. Samples in both SIS and Blank groups mainly showed ossified tissue at all time points with partial fibrogenesis in a few samples. These results suggested that chondrocyte sheet could create a chondrogenic niche for retaining chondrogenic phenotype of BEC in subcutaneous environment and thus provide a novel research model for stable ectopic cartilage regeneration based on stem cells. In vivo niche plays an important role in directing differentiation fate of stem cells. Due to lack of proper chondrogenic niche, stable cartilage regeneration of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in subcutaneous environments is always a great challenge. The current study demonstrated that chondrocyte sheet generated by

  18. Redifferentiation of in vitro expanded adult articular chondrocytes by combining the hanging-drop cultivation method with hypoxic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Inigo; Elvenes, Jan; Olsen, Randi; Bertheussen, Kjell; Johansen, Oddmund

    2008-01-01

    attractive alternative to the currently used autologous chondrocyte transplantation for cartilage repair.

  19. Transplantation of autologous endothelial progenitor cells in porous PLGA scaffolds create a microenvironment for the regeneration of hyaline cartilage in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, N-J; Lam, C-F; Lin, C-C; Chen, W-L; Li, C-F; Lin, Y-T; Yeh, M-L

    2013-10-01

    Repairing articular cartilage is clinically challenging. We investigated a simple, effective and clinically feasible cell-based therapeutic approach using a poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) scaffold seeded with autologous endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) to repair a full-thickness osteochondral defect in rabbits using a one-step surgery. EPC obtained by purifying a small amount of peripheral blood from rabbits were seeded into a highly porous, biocompatible PLGA scaffold, namely, EPC-PLGA, and implanted into the osteochondral defect in the medial femoral condyle. Twenty two rabbits were randomized into one of three groups: the empty defect group (ED), the PLGA-only group or the EPC-PLGA group. The defect sites were evaluated 4 and 12 weeks after implantation. At the end of testing, only the EPC-PLGA group showed the development of new cartilage tissue with a smooth, transparent and integrated articular surface. Moreover, histological analysis showed obvious differences in cartilage regeneration. At week 4, the EPC-PLGA group showed considerably higher TGF-β2 and TGF-β3 expression, a greater amount of synthesized glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content, and a higher degree of osteochondral angiogenesis in repaired tissues. At week 12, the EPC-PLGA group showed enhanced hyaline cartilage regeneration with a normal columnar chondrocyte arrangement, higher SOX9 expression, and greater GAG and collagen type II (COLII) content. Moreover, the EPC-PLGA group showed organized osteochondral integration, the formation of vessel-rich tubercular bone and significantly higher bone volume per tissue volume and trabecular thickness (Tb.Th). The present EPC-PLGA cell delivery system generates a suitable in situ microenvironment for osteochondral regeneration without the supplement of exogenous growth factors. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Reconstruction of Hyaline Cartilage Deep Layer Properties in 3-Dimensional Cultures of Human Articular Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanduri, Vibudha; Tattikota, Surendra Mohan; T, Avinash Raj; Sriramagiri, Vijaya Rama Rao; Kantipudi, Suma; Pande, Gopal

    2014-06-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) injuries and malformations are commonly noticed because of trauma or age-related degeneration. Many methods have been adopted for replacing or repairing the damaged tissue. Currently available AC repair methods, in several cases, fail to yield good-quality long-lasting results, perhaps because the reconstructed tissue lacks the cellular and matrix properties seen in hyaline cartilage (HC). To reconstruct HC tissue from 2-dimensional (2D) and 3-dimensional (3D) cultures of AC-derived human chondrocytes that would specifically exhibit the cellular and biochemical properties of the deep layer of HC. Descriptive laboratory study. Two-dimensional cultures of human AC-derived chondrocytes were established in classical medium (CM) and newly defined medium (NDM) and maintained for a period of 6 weeks. These cells were suspended in 2 mm-thick collagen I gels, placed in 24-well culture inserts, and further cultured up to 30 days. Properties of chondrocytes, grown in 2D cultures and the reconstructed 3D cartilage tissue, were studied by optical and scanning electron microscopic techniques, immunohistochemistry, and cartilage-specific gene expression profiling by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and were compared with those of the deep layer of native human AC. Two-dimensional chondrocyte cultures grown in NDM, in comparison with those grown in CM, showed more chondrocyte-specific gene activity and matrix properties. The NDM-grown chondrocytes in 3D cultures also showed better reproduction of deep layer properties of HC, as confirmed by microscopic and gene expression analysis. The method used in this study can yield cartilage tissue up to approximately 1.6 cm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness that satisfies the very low cell density and matrix composition properties present in the deep layer of normal HC. This study presents a novel and reproducible method for long-term culture of AC-derived chondrocytes and reconstruction of cartilage

  1. Autologous orbicularis muscle for filling facial folds-an experimental and clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellini, Silvana Artioli; Hirai, Flavio Eduardo; Hoyama, Erika; Mattos, Maila Karina; Chaves, Fernando Rodrigo; Pellizon, Claudia Helena; Padovani, Carlos Roberto

    2009-01-01

    To present a technique for filling facial folds by using autologous orbicularis oculi muscle, based on an experimental model. two studies are presented: (1) an experimental study using 15 albino guinea-pigs from which a strip of the sural triceps muscle was removed and implanted in the subcutaneous tissue of the dorsal area. The animals were sacrificed 7, 30 and 60 days after the implantation, and the material was histologically evaluated. And (2) an interventional prospective clinical trial carried out on 20 patients referred to blepharoplasty surgery. They received autologous preseptal orbicularis muscle for filling facial folds. The results where evaluated by patients satisfaction and clinical exam. the sural tricep muscle, when implanted in the subcutaneous tissue, resulted in fibrosis. The patients whom received autologous orbicularis muscle implanted for filling facial folds showed that the procedure can be successfully carried out. autologous preseptal orbicularis muscle is a good material for filling facial folds. Cicatricial tissue will be formed on its implantation site, filling the tissue gap that forms the folds on the skin.

  2. Avoidance of Total Knee Arthroplasty in Early Osteoarthritis of the Knee with Intra-Articular Implantation of Autologous Activated Peripheral Blood Stem Cells versus Hyaluronic Acid: A Randomized Controlled Trial with Differential Effects of Growth Factor Addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thana Turajane

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this randomized controlled trial, in early osteoarthritis (OA that failed conservative intervention, the need for total knee arthroplasty (TKA and WOMAC scores were evaluated, following a combination of arthroscopic microdrilling mesenchymal cell stimulation (MCS and repeated intra-articular (IA autologous activated peripheral blood stem cells (AAPBSCs with growth factor addition (GFA and hyaluronic acid (HA versus IA-HA alone. Leukapheresis-harvested AAPBSCs were administered as three weekly IA injections combined with HA and GFA (platelet-rich plasma [PRP] and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor [hG-CSF] and MCS in group 1 and in group 2 but without hG-CSF while group 3 received IA-HA alone. Each group of 20 patients was evaluated at baseline and at 1, 6, and, 12 months. At 12 months, all patients in the AAPBSC groups were surgical intervention free compared to three patients needing TKA in group 3 (p<0.033. Total WOMAC scores showed statistically significant improvements at 6 and 12 months for the AAPBSC groups versus controls. There were no notable adverse events. We have shown avoidance of TKA in the AAPBSC groups at 12 months and potent, early, and sustained symptom alleviation through GFA versus HA alone. Differential effects of hG-CSF were noted with an earlier onset of symptom alleviation throughout.

  3. Avoidance of Total Knee Arthroplasty in Early Osteoarthritis of the Knee with Intra-Articular Implantation of Autologous Activated Peripheral Blood Stem Cells versus Hyaluronic Acid: A Randomized Controlled Trial with Differential Effects of Growth Factor Addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turajane, Thana; Chaveewanakorn, Ukrit; Fongsarun, Warachaya; Aojanepong, Jongjate

    2017-01-01

    In this randomized controlled trial, in early osteoarthritis (OA) that failed conservative intervention, the need for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and WOMAC scores were evaluated, following a combination of arthroscopic microdrilling mesenchymal cell stimulation (MCS) and repeated intra-articular (IA) autologous activated peripheral blood stem cells (AAPBSCs) with growth factor addition (GFA) and hyaluronic acid (HA) versus IA-HA alone. Leukapheresis-harvested AAPBSCs were administered as three weekly IA injections combined with HA and GFA (platelet-rich plasma [PRP] and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor [hG-CSF]) and MCS in group 1 and in group 2 but without hG-CSF while group 3 received IA-HA alone. Each group of 20 patients was evaluated at baseline and at 1, 6, and, 12 months. At 12 months, all patients in the AAPBSC groups were surgical intervention free compared to three patients needing TKA in group 3 (p < 0.033). Total WOMAC scores showed statistically significant improvements at 6 and 12 months for the AAPBSC groups versus controls. There were no notable adverse events. We have shown avoidance of TKA in the AAPBSC groups at 12 months and potent, early, and sustained symptom alleviation through GFA versus HA alone. Differential effects of hG-CSF were noted with an earlier onset of symptom alleviation throughout. PMID:29056974

  4. Stromal cell-derived factor 1 regulates the actin organization of chondrocytes and chondrocyte hypertrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Murata

    Full Text Available Stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1/CXCL12/PBSF plays important roles in the biological and physiological functions of haematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells. This chemokine regulates the formation of multiple organ systems during embryogenesis. However, its roles in skeletal development remain unclear. Here we investigated the roles of SDF-1 in chondrocyte differentiation. We demonstrated that SDF-1 protein was expressed at pre-hypertrophic and hypertrophic chondrocytes in the newly formed endochondral callus of rib fracture as well as in the growth plate of normal mouse tibia by immunohistochemical analysis. Using SDF-1(-/- mouse embryo, we histologically showed that the total length of the whole humeri of SDF-1(-/- mice was significantly shorter than that of wild-type mice, which was contributed mainly by shorter hypertrophic and calcified zones in SDF-1(-/- mice. Actin cytoskeleton of hypertrophic chondrocytes in SDF-1(-/- mouse humeri showed less F-actin and rounder shape than that of wild-type mice. Primary chondrocytes from SDF-1(-/- mice showed the enhanced formation of philopodia and loss of F-actin. The administration of SDF-1 to primary chondrocytes of wild-type mice and SDF-1(-/- mice promoted the formation of actin stress fibers. Organ culture of embryonic metatarsals from SDF-1(-/- mice showed the growth delay, which was recovered by an exogenous administration of SDF-1. mRNA expression of type X collagen in metatarsals and in primary chondrocytes of SDF-1(-/- mouse embryo was down-regulated while the administration of SDF-1 to metatarsals recovered. These data suggests that SDF-1 regulates the actin organization and stimulates bone growth by mediating chondrocyte hypertrophy.

  5. Stromal cell-derived factor 1 regulates the actin organization of chondrocytes and chondrocyte hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Koichi; Kitaori, Toshiyuki; Oishi, Shinya; Watanabe, Naoki; Yoshitomi, Hiroyuki; Tanida, Shimei; Ishikawa, Masahiro; Kasahara, Takashi; Shibuya, Hideyuki; Fujii, Nobutaka; Nagasawa, Takashi; Nakamura, Takashi; Ito, Hiromu

    2012-01-01

    Stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1/CXCL12/PBSF) plays important roles in the biological and physiological functions of haematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells. This chemokine regulates the formation of multiple organ systems during embryogenesis. However, its roles in skeletal development remain unclear. Here we investigated the roles of SDF-1 in chondrocyte differentiation. We demonstrated that SDF-1 protein was expressed at pre-hypertrophic and hypertrophic chondrocytes in the newly formed endochondral callus of rib fracture as well as in the growth plate of normal mouse tibia by immunohistochemical analysis. Using SDF-1(-/-) mouse embryo, we histologically showed that the total length of the whole humeri of SDF-1(-/-) mice was significantly shorter than that of wild-type mice, which was contributed mainly by shorter hypertrophic and calcified zones in SDF-1(-/-) mice. Actin cytoskeleton of hypertrophic chondrocytes in SDF-1(-/-) mouse humeri showed less F-actin and rounder shape than that of wild-type mice. Primary chondrocytes from SDF-1(-/-) mice showed the enhanced formation of philopodia and loss of F-actin. The administration of SDF-1 to primary chondrocytes of wild-type mice and SDF-1(-/-) mice promoted the formation of actin stress fibers. Organ culture of embryonic metatarsals from SDF-1(-/-) mice showed the growth delay, which was recovered by an exogenous administration of SDF-1. mRNA expression of type X collagen in metatarsals and in primary chondrocytes of SDF-1(-/-) mouse embryo was down-regulated while the administration of SDF-1 to metatarsals recovered. These data suggests that SDF-1 regulates the actin organization and stimulates bone growth by mediating chondrocyte hypertrophy.

  6. Autologous Adipose-Derived Tissue Matrix Part I: Biologic Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schendel, Stephen A

    2017-10-01

    Autologous collagen is an ideal soft tissue filler and may serve as a matrix for stem cell implantation and growth. Procurement of autologous collagen has been limited, though, secondary to a sufficient source. Liposuction is a widely performed and could be a source of autologous collagen. The amount of collagen and its composition in liposuctioned fat remains unknown. The purpose of this research was to characterize an adipose-derived tissue-based product created using ultrasonic cavitation and cryo-grinding. This study evaluated the cellular and protein composition of the final product. Fat was obtained from individuals undergoing routine liposuction and was processed by a 2 step process to obtain only the connective tissue. The tissue was then evaluated by scanning electronic microscope, Western blot analysis, and flow cytometry. Liposuctioned fat was obtained from 10 individuals with an average of 298 mL per subject. After processing an average of 1 mL of collagen matrix was obtained from each 100 mL of fat. Significant viable cell markers were present in descending order for adipocytes > CD90+ > CD105+ > CD45+ > CD19+ > CD144+ > CD34+. Western blot analysis showed collagen type II, III, IV, and other proteins. Scanning electronic microscope study showed a regular pattern of cross-linked, helical collagen. Additionally, vital staing demonstrated that the cells were still viable after processing. Collagen and cells can be easily obtained from liposuctioned fat by ultrasonic separation without alteration of the overall cellular composition of the tissue. Implantation results in new collagen and cellular growth. Collagen matrix with viable cells for autologous use can be obtained from liposuctioned fat and may provide long term results. 5. © 2017 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com

  7. A preclinical evaluation of an autologous living hyaline-like cartilaginous graft for articular cartilage repair: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Yvonne Peck; Pengfei He; Geetha Soujanya V. N. Chilla; Chueh Loo Poh; Dong-An Wang

    2015-01-01

    In this pilot study, an autologous synthetic scaffold-free construct with hyaline quality, termed living hyaline cartilaginous graft (LhCG), was applied for treating cartilage lesions. Implantation of autologous LhCG was done at load-bearing regions of the knees in skeletally mature mini-pigs for 6 months. Over the course of this study, significant radiographical improvement in LhCG treated sites was observed via magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, macroscopic repair was effected by LhCG...

  8. Multiple congenitally missing teeth: treatment outcome with autologous transplantation and orthodontic space closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, Giuseppe; Vecchione, Pietro

    2007-11-01

    Treatment for patients with congenitally missing teeth can be challenging. The treatment options include retaining the deciduous teeth, extracting the deciduous teeth and allowing the space to close spontaneously, implant replacement, autotransplantation, prosthetic replacement, and orthodontic space closure. Autologous transplantation and space closure with orthodontic appliances are demonstrated in this case report.

  9. Screening for autologous blood transfusions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørkeberg, J; Belhage, B; Ashenden, M

    2009-01-01

    parameter in the screening for autologous blood doping. Three bags of blood (approximately 201+/-11 g of Hb) were withdrawn from 16 males and stored at either -80 degrees C (-80 T, n=8) or +4 degrees C (+4 T, n=8) and reinfused 10 weeks or 4 weeks later, respectively. Seven subjects served as controls...

  10. Autologous mesenchymal stem cells: clinical applications in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzini, Letizia; Mareschi, Katia; Ferrero, Ivana; Vassallo, Elena; Oliveri, Giuseppe; Boccaletti, Riccardo; Testa, Lucia; Livigni, Sergio; Fagioli, Franca

    2006-07-01

    Our study was aimed to evaluate the feasibility and safety of intraspinal cord implantation of autologous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in a few well-monitored amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. Seven patients affected by definite ALS were enrolled in the study and two patients were treated for compassionate use and monitored for at least 3 years. Bone marrow was collected from the posterior iliac crest according to the standard procedure and MSCs were expanded ex vivo according to Pittenger's protocol. The cells were suspended in 2 ml autologous cerebrospinal fluid and transplanted into the spinal cord by a micrometric pump injector. The in vitro expanded MSCs did not show any bacterial o fungal contamination, hemopoietic cell contamination, chromosomic alterations and early cellular senescence. No patient manifested major adverse events such as respiratory failure or death. Minor adverse events were intercostal pain irradiation and leg sensory dysesthesia, both reversible after a mean period of 6 weeks. No modification of the spinal cord volume or other signs of abnormal cell proliferation were observed. A significant slowing down of the linear decline of the forced vital capacity was evident in four patients 36 months after MSCs transplantation. Our results demonstrate that direct injection of autologous expanded MSCs into the spinal cord of ALS patients is safe, with no significant acute or late toxicity, and well tolerated. The clinical results seem to be encouraging.

  11. Considerations on the use of ear chondrocytes as donor chondrocytes for cartilage tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Osch, Gerjo J. V. M.; Mandl, Erik W.; Jahr, Holger; Koevoet, Wendy; Nolst-Trenité, Gilbert; Verhaar, Jan A. N.

    2004-01-01

    Articular cartilage is often used for research on cartilage tissue engineering. However, ear cartilage is easier to harvest, with less donor-site morbidity. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether adult human ear chondrocytes were capable of producing cartilage after expansion in monolayer

  12. Chondrocyte-specific ablation of Osterix leads to impaired endochondral ossification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jung-Hoon [Department of Molecular Medicine, Cell and Matrix Research Institute, BK21 Medical Education Program for Human Resources, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seung-Yoon [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Dongguk University, Gyeongju 780-714 (Korea, Republic of); Crombrugghe, Benoit de [Department of Genetics, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston (United States); Kim, Jung-Eun, E-mail: kjeun@knu.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Medicine, Cell and Matrix Research Institute, BK21 Medical Education Program for Human Resources, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conditional ablation of Osterix (Osx) in chondrocytes leads to skeletal defects. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Osx regulates chondrocyte differentiation and bone growth in growth plate chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Osx has an autonomous function in chondrocytes during endochondral ossification. -- Abstract: Osterix (Osx) is an essential transcription factor required for osteoblast differentiation during both intramembranous and endochondral ossification. Endochondral ossification, a process in which bone formation initiates from a cartilage intermediate, is crucial for skeletal development and growth. Osx is expressed in differentiating chondrocytes as well as osteoblasts during mouse development, but its role in chondrocytes has not been well studied. Here, the in vivo function of Osx in chondrocytes was examined in a chondrocyte-specific Osx conditional knockout model using Col2a1-Cre. Chondrocyte-specific Osx deficiency resulted in a weak and bent skeleton which was evident in newborn by radiographic analysis and skeletal preparation. To further understand the skeletal deformity of the chondrocyte-specific Osx conditional knockout, histological analysis was performed on developing long bones during embryogenesis. Hypertrophic chondrocytes were expanded, the formation of bone trabeculae and marrow cavities was remarkably delayed, and subsequent skeletal growth was reduced. The expression of several chondrocyte differentiation markers was reduced, indicating the impairment of chondrocyte differentiation and endochondral ossification in the chondrocyte-specific Osx conditional knockout. Taken together, Osx regulates chondrocyte differentiation and bone growth in growth plate chondrocytes, suggesting an autonomous function of Osx in chondrocytes during endochondral ossification.

  13. Tantalum coating of porous carbon scaffold supplemented with autologous bone marrow stromal stem cells for bone regeneration in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaowei; Zhao, Dewei; Wang, Benjie; Wang, Wei; Kang, Kai; Xie, Hui; Liu, Baoyi; Zhang, Xiuzhi; Zhang, Jinsong; Yang, Zhenming

    2016-03-01

    Porous tantalum metal with low elastic modulus is similar to cancellous bone. Reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) can provide three-dimensional pore structure and serves as the ideal scaffold of tantalum coating. In this study, the biocompatibility of domestic porous tantalum was first successfully tested with bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs) in vitro and for bone tissue repair in vivo. We evaluated cytotoxicity of RVC scaffold and tantalum coating using BMSCs. The morphology, adhesion, and proliferation of BMSCs were observed via laser scanning confocal microscope and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, porous tantalum rods with or without autologous BMSCs were implanted on hind legs in dogs, respectively. The osteogenic potential was observed by hard tissue slice examination. At three weeks and six weeks following implantation, new osteoblasts and new bone were observed at the tantalum-host bone interface and pores. At 12 weeks postporous tantalum with autologous BMSCs implantation, regenerated trabecular equivalent to mature bone was found in the pore of tantalum rods. Our results suggested that domestic porous tantalum had excellent biocompatibility and could promote new bone formation in vivo. Meanwhile, the osteogenesis of porous tantalum associated with autologous BMSCs was more excellent than only tantalum implantation. Future clinical studies are warranted to verify the clinical efficacy of combined implantation of this domestic porous tantalum associated with autologous BMSCs implantation and compare their efficacy with conventional autologous bone grafting carrying blood vessel in patients needing bone repairing. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  14. Autologous blood transfusion in total knee replacement surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkanović, Mirka Lukić; Gvozdenović, Ljiljana; Savić, Dragan; Ilić, Miroslav P; Jovanović, Gordana

    2013-03-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) surgery is one of the most frequent and the most extensive procedures in orthopedic surgery, accompanied with some serious complications. Perioperative blood loss is one of the most serious losses, so it is vital to recognize and treat such losses properly. Autologous blood transfusion is the only true alternative for the allogeneic blood. The aim of this study was to to examine if autologous blood transfusion reduces usage of allogenic blood in total knee replacement surgery, as well as to examine possible effect of autologous blood transfusion on postoperative complications, recovery and hospital stay of patients after total knee replacement surgery. During the controlled, prospective, randomised study we compared two groups of patients (n = 112) with total prosthesis implanted in their knee. The group I consisted of the patients who received the transfusion of other people's (allogeneic) blood (n = 57) and the group II of the patients whose blood was collected postoperatively and then given them [their own (autologous) blood] (n = 55). The transfusion trigger for both groups was hemoglobin level of 85 g/L. In the group of patients whose blood was collected perioperatively only 9 (0.9%) of the patients received transfusion of allogeneic blood, as opposed to the control group in which 98.24% of the patients received the transfusion of allogeneic blood (p blood was collected stayed in hospital for 6.18 days, while the patients of the control group stayed 7.67 days (p blood transfusion is a very effective method for reducing consumption of allogenic blood and thus, indirectly for reducing all complications related to allogenic blood transfusion. There is also a positive influence on postoperative recovery after total knee replacement surgery due to the reduction of hospital stay, and indirectly on the reduction of hospital costs.

  15. Cell compaction influences the regenerative potential of passaged bovine articular chondrocytes in an ex vivo cartilage defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmutzer, Michael; Aszodi, Attila

    2017-04-01

    The loss and degradation of articular cartilage tissue matrix play central roles in the process of osteoarthritis (OA). New models for evaluating cartilage repair/regeneration are thus of great value for transferring various culture systems into clinically relevant situations. The repair process can be better monitored in ex vivo systems than in in vitro cell cultures. I have therefore established an ex vivo defect model prepared from bovine femoral condyles for evaluating cartilage repair by the implantation of cells cultured in various ways, e.g., monolayer-cultured cells or suspension or pellet cultures of articular bovine chondrocytes representing different cell compactions with variable densities of chondrocytes. I report that the integrin subunit α10 was significantly upregulated in suspension-cultured bovine chondrocytes at passage P2 compared with monolayer-cultured cells at P1 (p = 0.0083) and P2 (p innovation of this system over in vitro differentiation (e.g., micromass, pellet) assays is the possibility of examining and evaluating cartilage regeneration in an environment in which implanted cells are embedded within native surrounding tissue at the defect site. Such ex vivo explants might serve as a better model system to mimic clinical situations. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Chondrocyte behavior on nanostructured micropillar polypropylene and polystyrene surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prittinen, Juha [Department of Applied Physics, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio (Finland); Jiang, Yu [Department of Chemistry, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu (Finland); Ylärinne, Janne H. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio (Finland); Pakkanen, Tapani A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu (Finland); Lammi, Mikko J., E-mail: mikko.lammi@uef.fi [Department of Applied Physics, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio (Finland); Qu, Chengjuan [Department of Applied Physics, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio (Finland)

    2014-10-01

    This study was aimed to investigate whether patterned polypropylene (PP) or polystyrene (PS) could enhance the chondrocytes' extracellular matrix (ECM) production and phenotype maintenance. Bovine primary chondrocytes were cultured on smooth PP and PS, as well as on nanostructured micropillar PP (patterned PP) and PS (patterned PS) for 2 weeks. Subsequently, the samples were collected for fluorescein diacetate-based cell viability tests, for immunocytochemical assays of types I and II collagen, actin and vinculin, for scanning electronic microscopic analysis of cell morphology and distribution, and for gene expression assays of Sox9, aggrecan, procollagen α{sub 1}(II), procollagen α{sub 1}(X), and procollagen α{sub 2}(I) using quantitative RT-PCR assays. After two weeks of culture, the bovine primary chondrocytes had attached on both patterned PP and PS, while practically no adhesion was observed on smooth PP. However, the best adhesion of the cells was on smooth PS. The cells, which attached on patterned PP and PS surfaces synthesized types I and II collagen. The chondrocytes' morphology was extended, and an abundant ECM network formed around the attached chondrocytes on both patterned PP and PS. Upon passaging, no significant differences on the chondrocyte-specific gene expression were observed, although the highest expression level of aggrecan was observed on the patterned PS in passage 1 chondrocytes, and the expression level of procollagen α{sub 1}(II) appeared to decrease in passaged chondrocytes. However, the expressions of procollagen α{sub 2}(I) were increased in all passaged cell cultures. In conclusion, the bovine primary chondrocytes could be grown on patterned PS and PP surfaces, and they produced extracellular matrix network around the adhered cells. However, neither the patterned PS nor PP could prevent the dedifferentiation of chondrocytes. - Highlights: • Methods to avoid chondrocyte dedifferentiation would be useful for cartilage

  17. Biomarkers of Chondrocyte Apoptosis and Autophagy in Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Castrogiovanni, Paola; Trovato, Francesca Maria; Weinberg, Annelie Martina; Al-Wasiyah, Mohammad K.; Alqahtani, Mohammed H.; Mobasheri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Cell death with morphological and molecular features of apoptosis has been detected in osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage, which suggests a key role for chondrocyte death/survival in the pathogenesis of OA. Identification of biomarkers of chondrocyte apoptosis may facilitate the development of novel therapies that may eliminate the cause or, at least, slow down the degenerative processes in OA. The aim of this review was to explore the molecular markers and signals that induce chondrocyte apoptosis in OA. A literature search was conducted in PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Google Scholar using the keywords chondrocyte death, apoptosis, osteoarthritis, autophagy and biomarker. Several molecules considered to be markers of chondrocyte apoptosis will be discussed in this brief review. Molecular markers and signalling pathways associated with chondroycte apoptosis may turn out to be therapeutic targets in OA and approaches aimed at neutralizing apoptosis-inducing molecules may at least delay the progression of cartilage degeneration in OA. PMID:26334269

  18. MSX2 stimulates chondrocyte maturation by controlling Ihh expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Katsuhiko; Ichida, Fumitaka; Sugita, Atsushi; Hata, Kenji; Wada, Masahiro; Takigawa, Yoko; Nakanishi, Masako; Kogo, Mikihiko; Nishimura, Riko; Yoneda, Toshiyuki

    2008-10-24

    Several studies indicated that a homeobox gene, Msx2, is implicated in regulation of skeletal development by controlling enchondral ossification as well as membranous ossification. However, the molecular basis by which Msx2 conducts chondrogenesis is currently unclear. In this study, we examined the role of Msx2 in chondrocyte differentiation using mouse primary chondrocytes and embryonic metatarsal explants. Treatment with BMP2 up-regulated the expression of Msx2 mRNA along with chondrocyte differentiation in murine primary chondrocytes. Overexpression of wild-type Msx2 stimulated calcification of primary chondrocytes in the presence of BMP2. We also found that constitutively active Msx2 (caMsx2) enhanced BMP2-dependent calcification more efficiently than wild-type Msx2. Consistently, caMsx2 overexpression up-regulated the expression of alkaline phosphatase and collagen type X induced by BMP2. Furthermore, organ culture experiments using mouse embryonic metatarsals indicated that caMsx2 clearly stimulated the maturation of chondrocytes into the prehypertrophic and hypertrophic stages in the presence of BMP2. In contrast, knockdown of Msx2 inhibited maturation of primary chondrocytes. The stimulatory effect of Msx2 on chondrocyte maturation was enhanced by overexpression of Smad1 and Smad4 but inhibited by Smad6, an inhibitory Smad for BMP2 signaling. These data suggest that Msx2 requires BMP2/Smad signaling for its chondrogenic action. In addition, caMsx2 overexpression induced Ihh (Indian hedgehog) expression in mouse primary chondrocytes. Importantly, treatment with cyclopamine, a specific inhibitor for hedgehogs, blocked Msx2-induced chondrogenesis. Collectively, our results indicated that Msx2 promotes the maturation of chondrocytes, at least in part, through up-regulating Ihh expression.

  19. 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine acts as a modulator of chondrocyte hypertrophy and maturation in chick caudal region chondrocytes in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Samina Hyder

    2016-06-01

    This study was carried out to explore the effect of DNA hypomethylation on chondrocytes phenotype, in particular the effect on chondrocyte hypertrophy, maturation, and apoptosis. Chondrocytes derived from caudal region of day 17 embryonic chick sterna were pretreated with hypomethylating drug 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine for 48 hours and then maintained in the normal culture medium for up to 14 days. Histological studies showed distinct morphological changes occurred in the pretreated cultures when compared to the control cultures. The pretreated chondrocytes after 7 days in culture became bigger in size and acquired more flattened fibroblastic phenotype as well as a loss of cartilage specific extracellular matrix. Scanning electron microscopy at day 7 showed chondrocytes to have increased in cell volume and at day 14 in culture the extracellular matrix of the pretreated cultures showed regular fibrillar structure heavily embedded with matrix vesicles, which is the characteristic feature of chondrocyte hypertrophy. Transmission electron microscopic studies indicated the terminal fate of the hypertrophic cells in culture. The pretreated chondrocytes grown for 14 days in culture showed two types of cells: dark cells which had condense chromatin in dark patches and dark cytoplasm. The other light chondrocytes appeared to be heavily loaded with endoplasmic reticulum indicative of very active protein and secretory activity; their cytoplasm had large vacuoles and disintegrating cytoplasm. The biosynthetic profile showed that the pretreated cultures were actively synthesizing and secreting type X collagen and alkaline phosphatase as a major biosynthetic product.

  20. Autologous Fat Injection for Augmented Mammoplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Eul Sik; Seo, Bo Kyoung; Yi, Ann; Cho, Kyu Ran

    2008-01-01

    Autologous fat injection is one of the methods utilized for augmented mammoplasty methods. In this surgical procedure, the fat for transfer is obtained from the donor site of the patient's own body by liposuction and the fat is then injected into the breast. We report here cases of three patients who underwent autologous fat injection. Two of the patients had palpable masses that were present after surgery. The serial imaging findings and surgical method of autologous fat transfer are demonstrated

  1. Unphysiologically high magnesium concentrations support chondrocyte proliferation and redifferentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyerabend, Frank; Witte, Frank; Kammal, Michael; Willumeit, Regine

    2006-12-01

    The effect of unphysiologically high extracellular magnesium concentrations on chondrocytes, induced by the supplementation of magnesium sulfate, was studied using a 3-phase tissue engineering model. The experiments showed that chondrocyte proliferation and redifferentiation, on the gene and protein expression level, are enhanced. A negative influence was found during chondrogenesis where an inhibition of extracellular matrix formation was observed. In addition, a direct impact on chondrocyte metabolism, elevated magnesium concentrations also affected growth factor effectiveness by consecutive influences during chondrogenesis. All observations were dosage dependent. The results of this study indicate that magnesium may be a useful tool for cartilage tissue engineering.

  2. Which Breast Is the Best? Successful Autologous or Alloplastic Breast Reconstruction : Patient-Reported Quality-of-Life Outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eltahir, Yassir; Werners, Lisanne L. C. H.; Dreise, Marieke M.; Zeiffmans van Emmichoven, Ingeborg A.; Werker, Paul M. N.; de Bock, Geertruida H.

    Background: Breast reconstruction is an appropriate option offered to women who are diagnosed with breast cancer or gene mutations. It may be accomplished with implants or autologous procedures. This cross-sectional study evaluated the satisfaction and quality of life in addition to complications

  3. [Autologous fat grafting in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, C; Bertrand, B; Philandrianos, C; Degardin, N; Casanova, D

    2016-10-01

    Lipofilling or fat grafting transfer is defined as a technique of filling soft tissue by autologous fat grafting. The basic principle of lipofilling is based on a harvest of adipose tissue, followed by a reinjection after treatment. Lipofilling main objective is a volume defect filling, but also improving cutaneous trophicity. Lipofilling specificities among children is mainly based on these indications. Complications of autologous fat grafting among children are the same as those in adults: we distinguish short-term complications (intraoperative and perioperative) and the medium and long-term complications. The harvesting of fat tissue is the main limiting factor of the technique, due to low percentage of body fat of children. Indications of lipofilling among children may be specific or similar to those in adults. There are two types of indications: cosmetic, in which the aim of lipofilling is correcting a defect density, acquired (iatrogenic, post-traumatic scar) or malformation (otomandibular dysplasia, craniosynostosis, Parry Romberg syndrom, Poland syndrom, pectus excavatum…). The aim of functional indications is correcting a velar insufficiency or lagophthalmos. In the paediatric sector, lipofilling has become an alternative to the conventional techniques, by its reliability, safety, reproducibility, and good results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. bFGF influences human articular chondrocyte differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, H; Zwingmann, J; Fehrenbach, M

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The possible functional role of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in regulating the mitotic and metabolic activity of primary human articular chondrocytes was investigated. METHODS: [EF1]Chondrocytes were enzymatically isolated from femoral head cartilage, and were cultured in vitro......FGF concentrations in supernatants of primary human articular chondrocytes peaked immediately after isolation and then declined. In a dose-dependent manner, bFGF enhanced cell amplification and viability. BFGF induced a decrease in the apoptotic cell population, while the number of proliferating cells remained...... by 53%, which was correlated with diminished mRNA production. Monolayer cultured chondrocytes secreted significant amounts of aggrecan that decreased over time. Secretion of this cartilage-specific marker was further reduced by the addition of bFGF. DISCUSSION: These findings highlight the potential...

  5. Msx2 Stimulates Chondrocyte Maturation by Controlling Ihh Expression*

    OpenAIRE

    Amano, Katsuhiko; Ichida, Fumitaka; Sugita, Atsushi; Hata, Kenji; Wada, Masahiro; Takigawa, Yoko; Nakanishi, Masako; Kogo, Mikihiko; Nishimura, Riko; Yoneda, Toshiyuki

    2008-01-01

    Several studies indicated that a homeobox gene, Msx2, is implicated in regulation of skeletal development by controlling enchondral ossification as well as membranous ossification. However, the molecular basis by which Msx2 conducts chondrogenesis is currently unclear. In this study, we examined the role of Msx2 in chondrocyte differentiation using mouse primary chondrocytes and embryonic metatarsal explants. Treatment with BMP2 up-regulated the expression of Msx2 mRNA...

  6. Rabbit articular cartilage defects treated by allogenic chondrocyte transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Boopalan, P. R. J. V. C.; Sathishkumar, Solomon; Kumar, Senthil; Chittaranjan, Samuel

    2006-01-01

    Articular cartilage defects have a poor capacity for repair. Most of the current treatment options result in the formation of fibro-cartilage, which is functionally inferior to normal hyaline articular cartilage. We studied the effectiveness of allogenic chondrocyte transplantation for focal articular cartilage defects in rabbits. Chondrocytes were cultured in vitro from cartilage harvested from the knee joints of a New Zealand White rabbit. A 3 mm defect was created in the articular cartilag...

  7. Inhibition of Chondrocyte Hypertrophy of Osteoarthritis by Disruptor Peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    with PTHR and inhibits the pathogenic beta-catenin- mediated PTHR signaling switch. In Aim 2, we will define the role of disruptor peptide in...confirmed that disruptor peptide conjugated to penetratin can enter cells. Importantly, disruptor peptide can reverse the beta-catenin- mediated PTH... mediated PTHR signaling switch in chondrocytes. Mouse primary chondrocytes express both β-catenin and PTHR. Our data showed that Pen-dis- pep

  8. Antioxidant effect of bisphosphonates and simvastatin on chondrocyte lipid peroxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dombrecht, E.J.; De Tollenaere, C.B.; Aerts, K.; Cos, P.; Schuerwegh, A.J.; Bridts, C.H.; Van Offel, J.F.; Ebo, D.G.; Stevens, W.J.; De Clerck, L.S.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of bisphosphonates (BPs) and simvastatin on chondrocyte lipid peroxidation. For this purpose, a flow cytometrical method using C11-BODIPY 581/591 was developed to detect hydroperoxide-induced lipid peroxidation in chondrocytes. Tertiary butylhydroperoxide (t-BHP) induced a time and concentration dependent increase in chondrocyte lipid peroxidation. Addition of a Fe 2+ /EDTA complex to t-BHP or hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) clearly enhanced lipid peroxidation. The lipophilic simvastatin demonstrated a small inhibition in the chondrocyte lipid peroxidation. None of three tested BPs (clodronate, pamidronate, and risedronate) had an effect on chondrocyte lipid peroxidation induced by t-BHP. However, when Fe 2+ /EDTA complex was added to t-BHP or H 2 O 2 , BPs inhibited the lipid peroxidation process varying from 25% to 58%. This study demonstrates that BPs have antioxidant properties as iron chelators, thereby inhibiting the chondrocyte lipid peroxidation. These findings add evidence to the therapeutic potential of bisphosphonates and statins in rheumatoid arthritis

  9. Endogenous versus Exogenous Growth Factor Regulation of Articular Chondrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shuiliang; Chan, Albert G.; Mercer, Scott; Eckert, George J.; Trippel, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Anabolic growth factors that regulate the function of articular chondrocytes are candidates for articular cartilage repair. Such factors may be delivered by pharmacotherapy in the form of exogenous proteins, or by gene therapy as endogenous proteins. It is unknown whether delivery method influences growth factor effectiveness in regulating articular chondrocyte reparative functions. We treated adult bovine articular chondrocytes with exogenous recombinant insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1), or with the genes encoding these growth factors for endogenous production. Treatment effects were measured as change in chondrocyte DNA content, glycosaminoglycan production, and aggrecan gene expression. We found that IGF-I stimulated chondrocyte biosynthesis similarly when delivered by either exogenous or endogenous means. In contrast, exogenous TGF-ß1 stimulated these reparative functions, while endogenous TGF-ß1 had little effect. Endogenous TGF-ß1 became more bioactive following activation of the transgene protein product. These data indicate that effective mechanisms of growth factor delivery for articular cartilage repair may differ for different growth factors. In the case of IGF-I, gene therapy or protein therapy appear to be viable options. In contrast, TGF-ß1 gene therapy may be constrained by a limited ability of chondrocytes to convert latent complexes to an active form. PMID:24105960

  10. Sphingosine-1-phosphate stimulates rat primary chondrocyte proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mi-Kyoung; Lee, Ha Young; Kwak, Jong-Young; Park, Joo-In; Yun, Jeanho; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2006-01-01

    Rat primary chondrocytes express the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor, S1P 2 , S1P 3 , S1P 4 , but not S1P 1 . When chondrocytes were stimulated with S1P or phytosphingosine-1-phosphate (PhS1P, an S1P 1 - and S1P 4 -selective agonist), phospholipase C-mediated cytosolic calcium increase was dramatically induced. S1P and PhS1P also stimulated two kinds of mitogen-activated protein kinases, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38 kinase in chondrocytes. In terms of the two phospholipids-mediated functional modulation of chondrocytes, S1P and PhS1P stimulated cellular proliferation. The two phospholipids-induced chondrocyte proliferations were almost completely blocked by PD98059 but not by SB203580, suggesting that ERK but not p38 kinase is essentially required for the proliferation. Pertussis toxin almost completely inhibited the two phospholipids-induced cellular proliferation and ERK activation, indicating the crucial role of G i protein. This study demonstrates the physiological role of two important phospholipids (S1P and PhS1P) on the modulation of rat primary chondrocyte proliferation, and the crucial role played by ERK in the process

  11. Endogenous versus exogenous growth factor regulation of articular chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shuiliang; Chan, Albert G; Mercer, Scott; Eckert, George J; Trippel, Stephen B

    2014-01-01

    Anabolic growth factors that regulate the function of articular chondrocytes are candidates for articular cartilage repair. Such factors may be delivered by pharmacotherapy in the form of exogenous proteins, or by gene therapy as endogenous proteins. It is unknown whether delivery method influences growth factor effectiveness in regulating articular chondrocyte reparative functions. We treated adult bovine articular chondrocytes with exogenous recombinant insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1), or with the genes encoding these growth factors for endogenous production. Treatment effects were measured as change in chondrocyte DNA content, glycosaminoglycan production, and aggrecan gene expression. We found that IGF-I stimulated chondrocyte biosynthesis similarly when delivered by either exogenous or endogenous means. In contrast, exogenous TGF-β1 stimulated these reparative functions, while endogenous TGF-β1 had little effect. Endogenous TGF-β1 became more bioactive following activation of the transgene protein product. These data indicate that effective mechanisms of growth factor delivery for articular cartilage repair may differ for different growth factors. In the case of IGF-I, gene therapy or protein therapy appear to be viable options. In contrast, TGF-β1 gene therapy may be constrained by a limited ability of chondrocytes to convert latent complexes to an active form. Published 2013 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the Orthopaedic Research Society. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  12. Snorc is a novel cartilage specific small membrane proteoglycan expressed in differentiating and articular chondrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinonen, J; Taipaleenmäki, H; Roering, P

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Maintenance of chondrocyte phenotype is a major issue in prevention of degeneration and repair of articular cartilage. Although the critical pathways in chondrocyte maturation and homeostasis have been revealed, the in-depth understanding is deficient and novel modifying components...... subgroups. Cartilage specific expression was highest in proliferating and prehypertrophic zones during development, and in adult articular cartilage, expression was restricted to the uncalcified zone, including chondrocyte clusters in human osteoarthritic cartilage. Studies with experimental chondrogenesis...... chondrocytes and adult articular chondrocytes with possible functions associated with development and maintenance of chondrocyte phenotype....

  13. Autologous blood preparations rich in platelets, fibrin and growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioravanti, C; Frustaci, I; Armellin, E; Condò, R; Arcuri, C; Cerroni, L

    2015-01-01

    Bone regeneration is often needed prior to dental implant treatment due to the lack of adequate quantity and quality after infectious diseases. The greatest regenerative power was obtained with autologous tissue, primarily the bone alive, taken from the same site or adjacent sites, up to the use centrifugation of blood with the selection of the parts with the greatest potential regenerative. In fact, various techniques and technologies were chronologically successive to cope with an ever better preparation of these concentrates of blood. Our aim is to review these advances and discuss the ways in which platelet concentrates may provide such unexpected beneficial therapeutic effects. The research has been carried out in the MEDLINE and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials database by choosing keywords as "platelet rich plasma", "platelet rich fibrin", "platelet growth factors", and "bone regeneration" and "dentistry". Autologous platelet rich plasma is a safe and low cost procedure to deliver growth factors for bone and soft tissue healing. The great heterogeneity of clinical outcomes can be explained by the different PRP products with qualitative and quantitative difference among substance.

  14. Autogenous cultured growth plate chondrocyte transplantation in the treatment of physeal injury in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszewski, R; Bohosiewicz, J; Gap, A; Bursig, H; Wysocka, A

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this experimental study on New Zealand's white rabbits was to investigate the transplantation of autogenous growth plate cells in order to treat the injured growth plate. They were assessed in terms of measurements of radiological tibial varus and histological characteristics. An experimental model of plate growth medial partial resection of the tibia in 14 New Zealand white rabbits was created. During this surgical procedure the plate growth cells were collected and cultured. While the second surgery was being performed, the autologous cultured growth plate cells were grafted at the right tibia, whereas the left tibia was used as a control group. Histological examinations showed that the grafted right tibia presented the regular shape of the plate growth with hypertrophic maturation, chondrocyte columniation and endochondral calcification. Radiological study shows that the mean tibial deformity at the left angle was 20.29° (6.25 to 33) and 7.21° (5 to 10) in the right angle. This study has demonstrated that grafting of autogenous cultured growth plate cells into a defect of the medial aspect of the proximal tibial physis can prevent bone bridge formation, growth arrest and the development of varus deformity. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:310-16. ©2014 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  15. Autologous implant of bone marrow mononuclear stem-cells as treatment for equine bicipital tendonitis: case report Implante autólogo de células mononucleares de médula ósea como tratamiento de tendinitis bicipital equina: reporte de caso clínico

    OpenAIRE

    BC Menarim; GA Fortini; PS Álvarez; J Gómez; CD Jarrín; A Ramírez; JS Galecio

    2012-01-01

    Bicipital bursitis in the horse, the inflammation of the bicipital tendon and its surrounding bursa, has been reported to represent a low percentage of lameness cause. However, it is the main cause of lameness associated to the shoulder region and it has been under diagnosed. Due to high recurrence in different types of tendon injuries, treatments aiming to re-establish tendon functionality have been a focus of research. The aim of this study is to report the implant of a bone marrow mononucl...

  16. Chondrocytic Atf4 regulates osteoblast differentiation and function via Ihh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiguang; Lian, Na; Ma, Yun; Li, Lingzhen; Gallant, Richard C; Elefteriou, Florent; Yang, Xiangli

    2012-02-01

    Atf4 is a leucine zipper-containing transcription factor that activates osteocalcin (Ocn) in osteoblasts and indian hedgehog (Ihh) in chondrocytes. The relative contribution of Atf4 in chondrocytes and osteoblasts to the regulation of skeletal development and bone formation is poorly understood. Investigations of the Atf4(-/-);Col2a1-Atf4 mouse model, in which Atf4 is selectively overexpressed in chondrocytes in an Atf4-null background, demonstrate that chondrocyte-derived Atf4 regulates osteogenesis during development and bone remodeling postnatally. Atf4 overexpression in chondrocytes of the Atf4(-/-);Col2a1-Atf4 double mutants corrects the reduction in stature and limb in Atf4(-/-) embryos and rectifies the decrease in Ihh expression, Hh signaling, proliferation and accelerated hypertrophy that characterize the Atf4(-/-) developing growth plate cartilages. Unexpectedly, this genetic manipulation also restores the expression of osteoblastic marker genes, namely Ocn and bone sialoprotein, in Atf4(-/-) developing bones. In Atf4(-/-);Col2a1-Atf4 adult mice, all the defective bone parameters found in Atf4(-/-) mice, including bone volume, trabecular number and thickness, and bone formation rate, are rescued. In addition, the conditioned media of ex vivo cultures from wild-type or Atf4(-/-);Col2a1-Atf4, but not Atf4(-/-) cartilage, corrects the differentiation defects of Atf4(-/-) bone marrow stromal cells and Ihh-blocking antibody eliminates this effect. Together, these data indicate that Atf4 in chondrocytes is required for normal Ihh expression and for its paracrine effect on osteoblast differentiation. Therefore, the cell-autonomous role of Atf4 in chondrocytes dominates the role of Atf4 in osteoblasts during development for the control of early osteogenesis and skeletal growth.

  17. The chondrocytic journey in endochondral bone growth and skeletal dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung Tsang, Kwok; Wa Tsang, Shun; Chan, Danny; Cheah, Kathryn S E

    2014-03-01

    The endochondral bones of the skeleton develop from a cartilage template and grow via a process involving a cascade of chondrocyte differentiation steps culminating in formation of a growth plate and the replacement of cartilage by bone. This process of endochondral ossification, driven by the generation of chondrocytes and their subsequent proliferation, differentiation, and production of extracellular matrix constitute a journey, deviation from which inevitably disrupts bone growth and development, and is the basis of human skeletal dysplasias with a wide range of phenotypic severity, from perinatal lethality to progressively deforming. This highly coordinated journey of chondrocyte specification and fate determination is controlled by a myriad of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. SOX9 is the master transcription factor that, in concert with varying partners along the way, directs the different phases of the journey from mesenchymal condensation, chondrogenesis, differentiation, proliferation, and maturation. Extracellular signals, including bone morphogenetic proteins, wingless-related MMTV integration site (WNT), fibroblast growth factor, Indian hedgehog, and parathyroid hormone-related peptide, are all indispensable for growth plate chondrocytes to align and organize into the appropriate columnar architecture and controls their maturation and transition to hypertrophy. Chondrocyte hypertrophy, marked by dramatic volume increase in phases, is controlled by transcription factors SOX9, Runt-related transcription factor, and FOXA2. Hypertrophic chondrocytes mediate the cartilage to bone transition and concomitantly face a live-or-die situation, a subject of much debate. We review recent insights into the coordination of the phases of the chondrocyte journey, and highlight the need for a systems level understanding of the regulatory networks that will facilitate the development of therapeutic approaches for skeletal dysplasia. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals

  18. Formation of Hyaline Cartilage Tissue by Passaged Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Vanessa J; Weber, Joanna F; Waldman, Stephen D; Backstein, David; Kandel, Rita A

    2017-02-01

    When serially passaged in standard monolayer culture to expand cell number, articular chondrocytes lose their phenotype. This results in the formation of fibrocartilage when they are used clinically, thus limiting their use for cartilage repair therapies. Identifying a way to redifferentiate these cells in vitro is critical if they are to be used successfully. Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) family members are known to be crucial for regulating differentiation of fetal limb mesenchymal cells and mesenchymal stromal cells to chondrocytes. As passaged chondrocytes acquire a progenitor-like phenotype, the hypothesis of this study was that TGFβ supplementation will stimulate chondrocyte redifferentiation in vitro in serum-free three-dimensional (3D) culture. Human articular chondrocytes were serially passaged twice (P2) in monolayer culture. P2 cells were then placed in high-density (3D) culture on top of membranes (Millipore) and cultured for up to 6 weeks in chemically defined serum-free redifferentiation media (SFRM) in the presence or absence of TGFβ. The tissues were evaluated histologically, biochemically, by immunohistochemical staining, and biomechanically. Passaged human chondrocytes cultured in SFRM supplemented with 10 ng/mL TGFβ3 consistently formed a continuous layer of articular-like cartilage tissue rich in collagen type 2 and aggrecan and lacking collagen type 1 and X in the absence of a scaffold. The tissue developed a superficial zone characterized by expression of lubricin and clusterin with horizontally aligned collagen fibers. This study suggests that passaged human chondrocytes can be used to bioengineer a continuous layer of articular cartilage-like tissue in vitro scaffold free. Further study is required to evaluate their ability to repair cartilage defects in vivo.

  19. Autologous serum therapy in chronic urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmila Patil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autologous serum therapy is a promising therapy for treatment resistant urticaria. This is useful in developing countries as this is economical option. Minimum instruments like centrifuge, syringe and needles are required for the procedure.

  20. Intraurethral Injection of Autologous Minced Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gräs, Søren; Klarskov, Niels; Lose, Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    noted. CONCLUSIONS: Intraurethral injection of minced autologous muscle tissue is a simple surgical procedure that appears safe and moderately effective in women with uncomplicated stress urinary incontinence. It compares well to a more complicated regenerative strategy using in vitro expanded muscle......PURPOSE: Intraurethral injection of in vitro expanded autologous skeletal muscle derived cells is a new regenerative therapy for stress urinary incontinence. We examined the efficacy and safety of a simpler alternative strategy using freshly harvested, minced autologous skeletal muscle tissue...... with its inherent content of regenerative cells. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 20 and 15 women with uncomplicated and complicated stress urinary incontinence, respectively, received intraurethral injections of minced autologous skeletal muscle tissue and were followed for 1 year. Efficacy was assessed...

  1. Hemifacial atrophy treated with autologous fat transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gandhi Vijay

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A 23-year-old male developed right hemifacial atrophy following marphea profunda. Facial asymmetry due to residual atrophy was treated with autologous fat harvested from buttocks with marked cosmetic improvement.

  2. Laser solder welding of articular cartilage: tensile strength and chondrocyte viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Züger, B J; Ott, B; Mainil-Varlet, P; Schaffner, T; Clémence, J F; Weber, H P; Frenz, M

    2001-01-01

    The surgical treatment of full-thickness cartilage defects in the knee joint remains a therapeutic challenge. Recently, new techniques for articular cartilage transplantation, such as mosaicplasty, have become available for cartilage repair. The long-term success of these techniques, however, depends not only on the chondrocyte viability but also on a lateral integration of the implant. The goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of cartilage welding by using albumin solder that was dye-enhanced to allow coagulation with 808-nm laser diode irradiation. Conventional histology of light microscopy was compared with a viability staining to precisely determine the extent of thermal damage after laser welding. Indocyanine green (ICG) enhanced albumin solder (25% albumin, 0.5% HA, 0.1% ICG) was used for articular cartilage welding. For coagulation, the solder was irradiated through the cartilage implant by 808-nm laser light and the tensile strength of the weld was measured. Viability staining revealed a thermal damage of typically 500 m in depth at an irradiance of approximately 10 W/cm(2) for 8 seconds, whereas conventional histologies showed only half of the extent found by the viability test. Heat-bath investigations revealed a threshold temperature of minimum 54 degrees C for thermal damage of chondrocytes. Efficient cartilage bonding was obtained by using bovine albumin solder as adhesive. Maximum tensile strength of more than 10 N/cm(2) was achieved. Viability tests revealed that the thermal damage is much greater (up to twice) than expected after light microscopic characterization. This study shows the feasibility to strongly laser weld cartilage on cartilage by use of a dye-enhanced albumin solder. Possibilities to reduce the range of damage are suggested. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Autologous fat transplantation for labia majora reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, P M; Herold, C; Rennekampff, H O

    2011-10-01

    A case of autologous fat transplantation for labia majora augmentation after ablative surgery is presented. The patient reported pain and deformity of the left labium majus after resection for Bowen's disease. The symptoms had not been solved by classic plastic surgical reconstructions including a pudendal thigh fasciocutaneous flap. Use of autologous fat transplantation facilitated an improved aesthetic result while preserving residual sensation to the external genitalia and improving symptoms of mucosal exposure and dryness.

  4. Autologous bone marrow purging with LAK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliodori, L; Moretti, L; Stramigioli, S; Luchetti, F; Annibali, G M; Baldi, A

    1993-12-01

    In this study we will demonstrate that LAK cells, in vitro, can lyse hematologic neoplastic cells with a minor toxicity of the staminal autologous marrow cells. In fact, after bone marrow and LAK co-culture at a ratio of 1/1 for 8 hours, the inhibition on the GEMM colonies resulted to be 20% less compared to the untreated marrow. These data made LAK an inviting agent for marrow purging in autologous bone marrow transplantation.

  5. Current status of grafts and implants in rhinoplasty: Part II. Homologous grafts and allogenic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajjadian, Ali; Naghshineh, Nima; Rubinstein, Roee

    2010-03-01

    After reading this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Understand the challenges in restoring volume and structural integrity in rhinoplasty. 2. Identify the appropriate uses of various homologous grafts and allogenic implants in reconstruction, including: (a) freeze-dried acellular allogenic cadaveric dermis grafts, (b) irradiated cartilage grafts, (c) hydroxyapatite mineral matrix, (d) silicone implants, (e) high-density polyethylene implants, (f) polytetrafluoroethylene implants, and (g) injectable filler materials. 3. Identify the advantages and disadvantages of each of these biomaterials. 4. Understand the specific techniques that may aid in the use these grafts or implants. This review specifically addresses the use of homologous grafts and allogenic implants in rhinoplasty. It is important to stress that autologous materials remain the preferred graft material for use in rhinoplasty, owing to their high biocompatibility and low risk of infection and extrusion. However, concerns of donor-site morbidity, graft availability, and graft resorption have motivated the development and use of homologous and allogenic implants.

  6. Characterization of collagenase-3 binding and internalization by rabbit chondrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raggatt, L.J.; Choundhury, I.; Williams, S.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Collagenase-3 (MMP-13) is an extracellular matrix metalloproteinase that cleaves type II collagen, the major protein component of cartilage, with high specificity. Several studies have identified increased levels of MMP-13 in arthritic synovial fluid where it may contribute to matrix destruction in this disease. Our laboratory has previously documented a process where by osteoblastic cells remove MMP-13 from the surrounding milieu by binding the enzyme to a specific receptor. The enzyme is then internalized and degraded through the actions of the endocytotic receptor, the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP). Such a mechanism provides for a controlled elimination of a potentially destructive enzyme from the extracellular environment. This process of MMP-13 internalization also occurs in chondrocytes and is significantly reduced in OA chondrocytes. We are currently characterizing the internalization of MMP-13 in normal rabbit chondrocytes. Primary rabbit chondrocytes were harvested and cultured in monolayers for three passages. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to asses the cell phenotype during the culture period and the rabbit chondrocytes were found to express the cartilage specific genes aggrecan and type II collagen throughout this time. 125I-MMP-13 was used to assess the ability of the rabbit chondrocytes to bind MMP-13. Appreciable specific cell-association of MMP-13 was detected after 10 mm of exposure to the ligand and equilibrium was obtained after 2 h. After identifying the time to equilibrium we determined whether binding was saturable by incubating the chondrocytes with increasing concentrations of 125I-MMP-13 ranging from 0 to 100 nM at 4 deg C for 2h. The amount of specifically associated MMP-13 approached saturation at 75 nM, allowing assessment of the receptor kinetics. Finally, we have assessed the ability of rabbit chondrocytes to internalize a single cohort of 125I-MMP-13 over time at

  7. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound affects human articular chondrocytes in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korstjens, C.M.; van der Rijt, R.H.H.; Albers, G.H.; Semeins, C.M.; Klein-Nulend, J.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated whether low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) stimulates chondrocyte proliferation and matrix production in explants of human articular cartilage obtained from donors suffering from unicompartimental osteoarthritis of the knee, as well as in isolated human chondrocytes in vitro.

  8. Pronounced biomaterial dependency in cartilage regeneration using nonexpanded compared with expanded chondrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsuchida, A.I.; Bekkers, J.E.J.; Beekhuizen, M.; Vonk, L.A.; Dhert, W.J.A.; Saris, Daniël B.F.; Creemers, L.B.

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to investigate freshly isolated compared with culture-expanded chondrocytes with respect to early regenerative response, cytokine production and cartilage formation in response to four commonly used biomaterials. Materials & methods: Chondrocytes were both directly and after expansion to

  9. TGF-β2 is involved in the preservation of the chondrocyte phenotype under hypoxic conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, R.; Timur, U. T.; Edip, S.; Haak, E.; Wruck, C.; Weinans, H.; Jahr, H.

    2015-01-01

    Culturing chondrocytes under oxygen tension closely resembling their in vivo environment has been shown to have positive effects on matrix synthesis. In redifferentiation of expanded chondrocytes, hypoxia increased collagen type II expression. However, the mechanism by which hypoxia enhances

  10. The Signaling Pathways Involved in Chondrocyte Differentiation and Hypertrophic Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmei Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chondrocytes communicate with each other mainly via diffusible signals rather than direct cell-to-cell contact. The chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs is well regulated by the interactions of varieties of growth factors, cytokines, and signaling molecules. A number of critical signaling molecules have been identified to regulate the differentiation of chondrocyte from mesenchymal progenitor cells to their terminal maturation of hypertrophic chondrocytes, including bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs, SRY-related high-mobility group-box gene 9 (Sox9, parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP, Indian hedgehog (Ihh, fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3, and β-catenin. Except for these molecules, other factors such as adenosine, O2 tension, and reactive oxygen species (ROS also have a vital role in cartilage formation and chondrocyte maturation. Here, we outlined the complex transcriptional network and the function of key factors in this network that determine and regulate the genetic program of chondrogenesis and chondrocyte differentiation.

  11. Roles of Chondrocytes in Endochondral Bone Formation and Fracture Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, R.J.; Jing, Y.; Jing, J.; Feng, J.Q.

    2016-01-01

    The formation of the mandibular condylar cartilage (MCC) and its subchondral bone is an important but understudied topic in dental research. The current concept regarding endochondral bone formation postulates that most hypertrophic chondrocytes undergo programmed cell death prior to bone formation. Under this paradigm, the MCC and its underlying bone are thought to result from 2 closely linked but separate processes: chondrogenesis and osteogenesis. However, recent investigations using cell lineage tracing techniques have demonstrated that many, perhaps the majority, of bone cells are derived via direct transformation from chondrocytes. In this review, the authors will briefly discuss the history of this idea and describe recent studies that clearly demonstrate that the direct transformation of chondrocytes into bone cells is common in both long bone and mandibular condyle development and during bone fracture repair. The authors will also provide new evidence of a distinct difference in ossification orientation in the condylar ramus (1 ossification center) versus long bone ossification formation (2 ossification centers). Based on our recent findings and those of other laboratories, we propose a new model that contrasts the mode of bone formation in much of the mandibular ramus (chondrocyte-derived) with intramembranous bone formation of the mandibular body (non-chondrocyte-derived). PMID:27664203

  12. Articular chondrocyte alignment in the rat after surgically induced osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hideaki; Tamaki, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Noriaki; Onishi, Hideaki

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] Chondrocytes in articular cartilage are aligned as columns from the joint surface. Notably, loss of chondrocyte and abnormalities of differentiation factors give rise to osteoarthritis (OA). However, the relationship between chondrocyte alignment and OA progression remains unclear. This study was performed to investigate temporal alterations in surgically-induced OA rats. [Subjects and Methods] Thirteen-week-old Wistar rats (n=30) underwent destabilized medial meniscus surgery in their right knee and sham surgery in their left knee. Specimens (n=5) were collected at 0, 1, 2, 4 and 8 weeks after surgery. Histological analysis with Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) scores, cell density ratios, cell alignments and correlation between OARSI scores and cell density/alignment was performed. [Results] OARSI scores were significantly higher at 1, 2, 4 and 8 weeks in the DMM group than in the control. Cell density ratios were decreased significantly in the DMM group at 2, 4 and 8 weeks compared with the control. Chondrocyte alignment was decreased significantly in the DMM group at 4 and 8 weeks. There were negative correlations between OA severity and cell density / cell alignment. [Conclusion] The results suggest a relationship between chondrocyte alignment and cartilage homeostasis, which plays an important role in OA progression. PMID:28533592

  13. CARTILAGE CONSTRUCTS ENGINEERED FROM CHONDROCYTES OVEREXPRESSING IGF-I IMPROVE THE REPAIR OF OSTEOCHONDRAL DEFECTS IN A RABBIT MODEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madry, Henning; Kaul, Gunter; Zurakowski, David; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering combined with gene therapy is a promising approach for promoting articular cartilage repair. Here, we tested the hypothesis that engineered cartilage with chondrocytes over expressing a human insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) gene can enhance the repair of osteochondral defects, in a manner dependent on the duration of cultivation. Genetically modified chondrocytes were cultured on biodegradable polyglycolic acid scaffolds in dynamic flow rotating bioreactors for either 10 or 28 d. The resulting cartilaginous constructs were implanted into osteochondral defects in rabbit knee joints. After 28 weeks of in vivo implantation, immunoreactivity to ß-gal was detectable in the repair tissue of defects that received lacZ constructs. Engineered cartilaginous constructs based on IGF-I-over expressing chondrocytes markedly improved osteochondral repair compared with control (lacZ) constructs. Moreover, IGF-I constructs cultivated for 28 d in vitro significantly promoted osteochondral repair vis-à-vis similar constructs cultivated for 10 d, leading to significantly decreased osteoarthritic changes in the cartilage adjacent to the defects. Hence, the combination of spatially defined overexpression of human IGF-I within a tissue-engineered construct and prolonged bioreactor cultivation resulted in most enhanced articular cartilage repair and reduction of osteoarthritic changes in the cartilage adjacent to the defect. Such genetically enhanced tissue engineering provides a versatile tool to evaluate potential therapeutic genes in vivo and to improve our comprehension of the development of the repair tissue within articular cartilage defects. Insights gained with additional exploration using this model may lead to more effective treatment options for acute cartilage defects. PMID:23588785

  14. Cartilage constructs engineered from chondrocytes overexpressing IGF-I improve the repair of osteochondral defects in a rabbit model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Madry

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering combined with gene therapy is a promising approach for promoting articular cartilage repair. Here, we tested the hypothesis that engineered cartilage with chondrocytes overexpressing a human insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I gene can enhance the repair of osteochondral defects, in a manner dependent on the duration of cultivation. Genetically modified chondrocytes were cultured on biodegradable polyglycolic acid scaffolds in dynamic flow rotating bioreactors for either 10 or 28 d. The resulting cartilaginous constructs were implanted into osteochondral defects in rabbit knee joints. After 28 weeks of in vivo implantation, immunoreactivity to ß-gal was detectable in the repair tissue of defects that received lacZ constructs. Engineered cartilaginous constructs based on IGF-I-overexpressing chondrocytes markedly improved osteochondral repair compared with control (lacZ constructs. Moreover, IGF-I constructs cultivated for 28 d in vitro significantly promoted osteochondral repair vis-à-vis similar constructs cultivated for 10 d, leading to significantly decreased osteoarthritic changes in the cartilage adjacent to the defects. Hence, the combination of spatially defined overexpression of human IGF-I within a tissue-engineered construct and prolonged bioreactor cultivation resulted in most enhanced articular cartilage repair and reduction of osteoarthritic changes in the cartilage adjacent to the defect. Such genetically enhanced tissue engineering provides a versatile tool to evaluate potential therapeutic genes in vivo and to improve our comprehension of the development of the repair tissue within articular cartilage defects. Insights gained with additional exploration using this model may lead to more effective treatment options for acute cartilage defects.

  15. Autopoiesis: Autology, Autotranscendence and Autonomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    and 1990s – particularly in a French context. While his work has remained (to date) at distance from the rising number of suggestions, especi- ally regarding social and cultural theory, that have come out of these debates on self-organization, Castoriadis made a speci¿c and original contribution to them...... ‘reality-modeling’ (John Casti) – whether via cognitive frameworks or models of society and culture. Secondly, attempts to adapt debates within the humanities, e.g. in philosophy, social theory and cultural studies, have tended to end in anti-humanism, ranging from Deleuze and Guattari’s ‘abstract machine......’s philosophy. She argues that a focus on the self-organization of the living being implies not only a distinct move towards an ontology of radical physis in Castoriadis’s later work, but also, along with it, a revised version of his project of autonomy. Autonomy, like autology and the other theme of this issue...

  16. THE EFFECT OF PIROXICAM ON THE METABOLISM OF ISOLATED HUMAN CHONDROCYTES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BULSTRA, SK; KUIJER, R; BUURMAN, WA; TERWINDTROUWENHORST, E; GUELEN, PJM; VANDERLINDEN, AJ

    The effect of piroxicam on the metabolism of healthy and osteoarthrotic (OA) chondrocytes was studied in vitro. The chondrocytes were obtained from five healthy, five moderately OA, and four severely OA hips or knees. The chondrocytes were cultured in a high-density, short-term in vitro model. In

  17. Remoção da cartilagem articular associada ou não a implante homógeno ou enxerto autógeno de osso esponjoso em cães submetidos à artrodese atlantoaxial Joint cartilage removal associated or not to homologous implant or autologous cancellous bone graft in dogs submitted to atlantoaxial arthrodesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Festugatto

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar o grau de fusão articular e formação óssea na articulação atlantoaxial de cães submetidos à artrodese após a remoção da cartilagem articular associada ou não ao implante homógeno ou enxerto autógeno de osso esponjoso. Foram utilizados 12 cães, adultos, distribuídos aleatoriamente em três grupos iguais. Grupo I (GI: realizada apenas a remoção da cartilagem articular e imobilização articular com pinos e resina acrílica. Grupo II (GII: feita a remoção da cartilagem articular e imobilização da articulação, seguida da colocação e modelagem do implante ósseo esponjoso homógeno entre as superfícies articulares. Grupo III (GIII: foi realizado o mesmo procedimento do GII, mais o enxerto ósseo esponjoso autógeno no local determinado. Realizaram-se exames radiográficos em todos os animais aos 30, 60 e 90 dias de pós-operatório (PO. Aos 90 dias de PO foi feita a eutanásia para o emprego do teste de palpação manual, avaliação tomográfica e histopatológica. Para análise estatística da associação entre o grau de fusão articular, aplicou-se o Teste Qui-quadrado de independência. Os resultados dos testes foram avaliados pela significância exata e considerados significantes a 5% (PThe aim of this study was to evaluate the degree of joint fusion and bone formation in dogs undergoing atlantoaxial arthrodesis after removal of articular cartilage associated or not to implant homogenous or autogenous cancellous bone. Twelve dogs, weighing between 8 and 12kg were randomly divided into three groups. Group I (GI performed only the removal of joint cartilage and joint immobilization with acrylic resin and pins. Group II (GII: after removel of joint cartilage and articular immobilization was performed modeling and placement of homogenous cancellous bone at the given location. The volume of homograft placed in the joint was measured using a precision balance and all animals received the

  18. Chondrocyte activity is increased in psoriatic arthritis and axial spondyloarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmann, Natasja Stæhr; Munk, Heidi Lausten; Christensen, Anne Friesgaard

    2016-01-01

    . There is a need for biomarkers reflecting core disease pathways for diagnosis and disease mapping. Pro-C2 reflects mature cartilage collagen type IIB formation, while C-Col10 represents turnover of type X collagen, which is exclusively expressed by hypertrophic chondrocytes. The objectives of this study were......SpA undergoing TNFi treatment may reflect that hypertrophic chondrocytes in axSpA are targeted by TNFi. ROC curve analysis showed a diagnostic potential for Pro-C2 in axSpA and PsA....

  19. Autologous stem cell transplantation in refractory Asherman′s syndrome: A novel cell based therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeta Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : There is substantial evidence that adult stem cell populations exist in human endometrium, and hence it is suggested that either endogenous endometrial stem/progenitor cells can be activated or bone marrow derived stem cells can be transplanted in the uterine cavity for endometrial regeneration in Asherman′s syndrome (AS. Aims and Objectives : The objective was to evaluate the role of sub-endometrial autologous stem cell implantation in women with refractory AS in attaining menstruation and fertility. Setting : Tertiary care referral center. DESIGN: Prospective case series. Materials and Methods : Six cases of refractory AS with failed standard treatment option of hysteroscopic adhesiolysis in the past were included. Mononuclear stem cells (MNCs were implanted in sub-endometrial zone followed by exogenous oral estrogen therapy. Endometrial thickness (ET was assessed at 3, 6, and 9 months. RESULTS: Descriptive statistics and statistical analysis of study variables was carried out using STATA version 9.0. The mean MNC count was 103.3 × 106 (±20.45 with mean CD34+ count being 203,642 (±269,274. Mean of ET (mm at 3 months (4.05 ± 1.40, 6 months (5.46 ± 1.36 and 9 months (5.48 ± 1.14 were significantly (P < 0.05 increased from pretreatment level (1.38 ± 0.39. Five out of six patients resumed menstruation. Conclusion : The autologous stem cell implantation leads to endometrial regeneration reflected by restoration of menstruation in five out of six cases. Autologous stem cell implantation is a promising novel cell based therapy for refractory AS.

  20. Ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearnaley, Geoffrey

    1975-01-01

    First, ion implantation in semiconductors is discussed: ion penetration, annealing of damage, gettering, ion implanted semiconductor devices, equipement requirements for ion implantation. The importance of channeling for ion implantation is studied. Then, some applications of ion implantation in metals are presented: study of the corrosion of metals and alloys; influence or ion implantation on the surface-friction and wear properties of metals; hyperfine interactions in implanted metals

  1. Impact of Postoperative Antibiotic Prophylaxis Duration on Surgical Site Infections in Autologous Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Kerry E; Lanier, Steven T; Khavanin, Nima; Hume, Keith M; Gutowski, Karol A; Thornton, Brian P; Hansen, Nora M; Murphy, Robert X; Fine, Neil A; Kim, John Y S

    2016-02-01

    Although some surgeons prescribe prolonged postoperative antibiotics after autologous breast reconstruction, evidence is lacking to support this practice. We used the Tracking Operations and Outcomes for Plastic Surgeons database to evaluate the association between postoperative antibiotic duration and the rate of surgical site infection (SSI) in autologous breast reconstruction. The intervention of interest for this study was postoperative duration of antibiotic prophylaxis: either discontinued 24 hours after surgery or continued beyond 24 hours. The primary outcome variable of interest for this study was the presence of SSI within 30 days of autologous breast reconstruction. Cohort characteristics and 30-day outcomes were compared using χ² and Fischer exact tests for categorical variables and Student t tests for continuous variables. Multivariate logistic regression was used to control for confounders. A total of 1036 patients met inclusion criteria for our study. Six hundred fifty-nine patients (63.6%) received antibiotics for 24 hours postoperatively, and 377 patients (36.4%) received antibiotics for greater than 24 hours. The rate of SSI did not differ significantly between patients given antibiotics for only 24 hours and those continued on antibiotics beyond the 24-hour postoperative time period (5.01% vs 2.92%, P = 0.109). Furthermore, antibiotic duration was not predictive of SSI in multivariate regression modeling. We did not find a statistically significant difference in the rate of SSI in patients who received 24 hours of postoperative antibiotics compared to those that received antibiotics for greater than 24 hours. These findings held for both purely autologous reconstruction as well as latissimus dorsi reconstruction in conjunction with an implant. Thus, our study does not support continuation of postoperative antibiotics beyond 24 hours after autologous breast reconstruction.

  2. Trophic effects of adipose-tissue-derived and bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells enhance cartilage generation by chondrocytes in co-culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleumeekers, M M; Nimeskern, L; Koevoet, J L M; Karperien, M; Stok, K S; van Osch, G J V M

    2018-01-01

    Combining mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and chondrocytes has great potential for cell-based cartilage repair. However, there is much debate regarding the mechanisms behind this concept. We aimed to clarify the mechanisms that lead to chondrogenesis (chondrocyte driven MSC-differentiation versus MSC driven chondroinduction) and whether their effect was dependent on MSC-origin. Therefore, chondrogenesis of human adipose-tissue-derived MSCs (hAMSCs) and bone-marrow-derived MSCs (hBMSCs) combined with bovine articular chondrocytes (bACs) was compared. hAMSCs or hBMSCs were combined with bACs in alginate and cultured in vitro or implanted subcutaneously in mice. Cartilage formation was evaluated with biochemical, histological and biomechanical analyses. To further investigate the interactions between bACs and hMSCs, (1) co-culture, (2) pellet, (3) Transwell® and (4) conditioned media studies were conducted. The presence of hMSCs-either hAMSCs or hBMSCs-increased chondrogenesis in culture; deposition of GAG was most evidently enhanced in hBMSC/bACs. This effect was similar when hMSCs and bAC were combined in pellet culture, in alginate culture or when conditioned media of hMSCs were used on bAC. Species-specific gene-expression analyses demonstrated that aggrecan was expressed by bACs only, indicating a predominantly trophic role for hMSCs. Collagen-10-gene expression of bACs was not affected by hBMSCs, but slightly enhanced by hAMSCs. After in-vivo implantation, hAMSC/bACs and hBMSC/bACs had similar cartilage matrix production, both appeared stable and did not calcify. This study demonstrates that replacing 80% of bACs by either hAMSCs or hBMSCs does not influence cartilage matrix production or stability. The remaining chondrocytes produce more matrix due to trophic factors produced by hMSCs.

  3. Differentiation within autologous fibrin scaffolds of porcine dermal cells with the mesenchymal stem cell phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puente, Pilar de la; Ludeña, Dolores; López, Marta; Ramos, Jennifer; Iglesias, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Porcine mesenchymal stem cells (pMSCs) are an attractive source of cells for tissue engineering because their properties are similar to those of human stem cells. pMSCs can be found in different tissues but their dermal origin has not been studied in depth. Additionally, MSCs differentiation in monolayer cultures requires subcultured cells, and these cells are at risk of dedifferentiation when implanting them into living tissue. Following this, we attempted to characterize the MSCs phenotype of porcine dermal cells and to evaluate their cellular proliferation and differentiation in autologous fibrin scaffolds (AFSs). Dermal biopsies and blood samples were obtained from 12 pigs. Dermal cells were characterized by flow cytometry. Frozen autologous plasma was used to prepare AFSs. pMSC differentiation was studied in standard structures (monolayers and pellets) and in AFSs. The pMSCs expressed the CD90 and CD29 markers of the mesenchymal lineage. AFSs afforded adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. The porcine dermis can be proposed to be a good source of MSCs with adequate proliferative capacity and a suitable expression of markers. The pMSCs also showed optimal proliferation and differentiation in AFSs, such that these might serve as a promising autologous and implantable material for use in tissue engineering. -- Highlights: ► Low fibrinogen concentration provides a suitable matrix for cell migration and differentiation. ► Autologous fibrin scaffolds is a promising technique in tissue engineering. ► Dermal cells are an easily accessible mesenchymal stem cell source. ► Fibrin scaffolds afforded adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation.

  4. Widespread epigenomic, transcriptomic and proteomic differences between hip osteophytic and articular chondrocytes in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Julia; Brooks, Roger A; Southam, Lorraine; Bhatnagar, Sahir; Roumeliotis, Theodoros I; Hatzikotoulas, Konstantinos; Zengini, Eleni; Wilkinson, J Mark; Choudhary, Jyoti S; McCaskie, Andrew W; Zeggini, Eleftheria

    2018-05-08

    To identify molecular differences between chondrocytes from osteophytic and articular cartilage tissue from OA patients. We investigated genes and pathways by combining genome-wide DNA methylation, RNA sequencing and quantitative proteomics in isolated primary chondrocytes from the cartilaginous layer of osteophytes and matched areas of low- and high-grade articular cartilage across nine patients with OA undergoing hip replacement surgery. Chondrocytes from osteophytic cartilage showed widespread differences to low-grade articular cartilage chondrocytes. These differences were similar to, but more pronounced than, differences between chondrocytes from osteophytic and high-grade articular cartilage, and more pronounced than differences between high- and low-grade articular cartilage. We identified 56 genes with significant differences between osteophytic chondrocytes and low-grade articular cartilage chondrocytes on all three omics levels. Several of these genes have known roles in OA, including ALDH1A2 and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein, which have functional genetic variants associated with OA from genome-wide association studies. An integrative gene ontology enrichment analysis showed that differences between osteophytic and low-grade articular cartilage chondrocytes are associated with extracellular matrix organization, skeletal system development, platelet aggregation and regulation of ERK1 and ERK2 cascade. We present a first comprehensive view of the molecular landscape of chondrocytes from osteophytic cartilage as compared with articular cartilage chondrocytes from the same joints in OA. We found robust changes at genes relevant to chondrocyte function, providing insight into biological processes involved in osteophyte development and thus OA progression.

  5. Extra-anatomic transplantations in autologous adult cell therapies aiding anatomical regeneration and physiological recovery – An insight and categorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial

    2015-12-01

    analysis of the functional uniqueness of the source vs target across these criteria of germ layers, organs, tissues and sites have to be thoroughly studied. Until pluripotent stem cell-derived clinical applications come into regular practice, such extra-anatomic adult cell therapies either IECT or TECT are worth studying as novel solutions to tissue regeneration. These are likely to evolve in the coming years and existing solutions could be enhanced using the principles behind IECT or TECT for diseases that do not have a definitive treatment. References Knutsen G, Drogset JO, Engebretsen L, Grøntvedt T, Isaksen V, Ludvigsen TC, Roberts S, Solheim E, Strand T, Johansen O. A randomized trial comparing autologous chondrocyte implantation with microfracture. Findings at five years. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2007;89(10:2105-12. Tsai RJ, Li LM, Chen JK. Reconstruction of damaged corneas by transplantation of autologous limbal epithelial cells. N Engl J Med. 2000;343(2:86-93. Siltanen A, Nuutila K, Imanishi Y, Uenaka H, Mäkelä J, Pätilä T, Vento A, Miyagawa S, Sawa Y, Harjula A, Kankuri E. The paracrine effect of skeletal myoblasts is cardioprotective against oxidative stress and involves EGFR-ErbB4 signaling, cystathionase, and the unfolded protein response. Cell Transplant.2015. [Epub ahead of print] Burman S, Sangwan V. Cultivated limbal stem cell transplantation for ocular surface reconstruction. Clin Ophthalmol. 2008;2(3:489-502. Tabakow P, Jarmundowicz W, Czapiga B, Fortuna W, Miedzybrodzki R, Czyz M, Huber J, Szarek D, Okurowski S, Szewczyk P, Gorski A, Raisman G. Transplantation of autologous olfactory ensheathing cells in complete human spinal cord injury.Cell Transplant. 2013;22(9:1591-612. Vaddi S, Godala C, Reddy V, Senthilkumar R, Srinivasan T, Reena H, Preethy S, Abraham S. Role of tissue engineered buccal mucosa for treatment of urethral stricture. Proceedings of the Annual Symposium & Plenary Session on Regenerative Medicine (PASRM. J Stem Cells Regen Med. 2013

  6. The role of PTHrP in chondrocyte differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendam, Jakomijn

    2006-01-01

    Longitudinal growth is the key characteristic that distinguishes children from adults. Growth is regulated in the growth plates, which are layers of cartilage located at the ends of the long bones. The cartilage cells are called chondrocytes and go through a coordinated program of proliferation,

  7. Effect of donor age on DNA repair by articular chondrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipman, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    The hypothesis that aging of articular chondrocytes at a cellular level results from loss of DNA repair capability was studied by two different measures: unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) and O 6 -methylguanine acceptor protein (MGAP) activity. UDS following damage by 254 nm ultraviolet irradiation (20J/m 2 ) was examined in intact articular cartilage from rabbits of different ages. Semiconservative DNA synthesis was suppressed with hydroxurea and repair followed by the incorporation of [ 3 H]-thymidine ([ 3 H]-dThd). After repair the cartilage was digested in proteinase K (0.5mg/ml) with dodecyl sodium sulfate (0.2%) and DNA determined with Hoechst 33258 dye. UDS (dpm [ 3 H]-dThd/μg DNA) was greater in articular cartilage from 3- than 39-month-old rabbits. MGAP was studied in cell extracts of cultured human and rabbit chondrocytes by transfer of [ 3 H] O 6 -methyl groups from exogenous DNA to protein. It was significantly less in rabbit than in human cells on a per protein or DNA basis. There was no decline in this activity in human chondrocytes from newborn to 60 years of age; and rabbits from 3- to 36-months-old. The data indicate that in the two different repair mechanisms, age differences are found with resting but not dividing chondrocytes

  8. Mechanical confinement regulates cartilage matrix formation by chondrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hong-Pyo; Gu, Luo; Mooney, David J.; Levenston, Marc E.; Chaudhuri, Ovijit

    2017-12-01

    Cartilage tissue equivalents formed from hydrogels containing chondrocytes could provide a solution for replacing damaged cartilage. Previous approaches have often utilized elastic hydrogels. However, elastic stresses may restrict cartilage matrix formation and alter the chondrocyte phenotype. Here we investigated the use of viscoelastic hydrogels, in which stresses are relaxed over time and which exhibit creep, for three-dimensional (3D) culture of chondrocytes. We found that faster relaxation promoted a striking increase in the volume of interconnected cartilage matrix formed by chondrocytes. In slower relaxing gels, restriction of cell volume expansion by elastic stresses led to increased secretion of IL-1β, which in turn drove strong up-regulation of genes associated with cartilage degradation and cell death. As no cell-adhesion ligands are presented by the hydrogels, these results reveal cell sensing of cell volume confinement as an adhesion-independent mechanism of mechanotransduction in 3D culture, and highlight stress relaxation as a key design parameter for cartilage tissue engineering.

  9. No effect of platelet-rich plasma with frozen or processed bone allograft around noncemented implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T B; Rahbek, O; Overgaard, S

    2005-01-01

    by isolating the buffy coat from autologous blood samples. Bone allograft was used fresh-frozen or processed by defatting, freeze drying, and irradiation. Cylindrical hydroxyapatite-coated titanium implants were inserted bilaterally in the femoral condyles of eight dogs. Each implant was surrounded by a 2.5-mm...

  10. An additive manufacturing-based PCL-alginate-chondrocyte bioprinted scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Joydip; Shim, Jin-Hyung; Jang, Jinah; Kim, Sung-Won; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-11-01

    Regenerative medicine is targeted to improve, restore or replace damaged tissues or organs using a combination of cells, materials and growth factors. Both tissue engineering and developmental biology currently deal with the process of tissue self-assembly and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition. In this investigation, additive manufacturing (AM) with a multihead deposition system (MHDS) was used to fabricate three-dimensional (3D) cell-printed scaffolds using layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition of polycaprolactone (PCL) and chondrocyte cell-encapsulated alginate hydrogel. Appropriate cell dispensing conditions and optimum alginate concentrations for maintaining cell viability were determined. In vitro cell-based biochemical assays were performed to determine glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), DNA and total collagen contents from different PCL-alginate gel constructs. PCL-alginate gels containing transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) showed higher ECM formation. The 3D cell-printed scaffolds of PCL-alginate gel were implanted in the dorsal subcutaneous spaces of female nude mice. Histochemical [Alcian blue and haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining] and immunohistochemical (type II collagen) analyses of the retrieved implants after 4 weeks revealed enhanced cartilage tissue and type II collagen fibril formation in the PCL-alginate gel (+TGFβ) hybrid scaffold. In conclusion, we present an innovative cell-printed scaffold for cartilage regeneration fabricated by an advanced bioprinting technology. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Dynamic Mechanical Compression of Chondrocytes for Tissue Engineering: A Critical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Devon E; Johnstone, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Articular cartilage functions to transmit and translate loads. In a classical structure-function relationship, the tissue resides in a dynamic mechanical environment that drives the formation of a highly organized tissue architecture suited to its biomechanical role. The dynamic mechanical environment includes multiaxial compressive and shear strains as well as hydrostatic and osmotic pressures. As the mechanical environment is known to modulate cell fate and influence tissue development toward a defined architecture in situ , dynamic mechanical loading has been hypothesized to induce the structure-function relationship during attempts at in vitro regeneration of articular cartilage. Researchers have designed increasingly sophisticated bioreactors with dynamic mechanical regimes, but the response of chondrocytes to dynamic compression and shear loading remains poorly characterized due to wide variation in study design, system variables, and outcome measurements. We assessed the literature pertaining to the use of dynamic compressive bioreactors for in vitro generation of cartilaginous tissue from primary and expanded chondrocytes. We used specific search terms to identify relevant publications from the PubMed database and manually sorted the data. It was very challenging to find consensus between studies because of species, age, cell source, and culture differences, coupled with the many loading regimes and the types of analyses used. Early studies that evaluated the response of primary bovine chondrocytes within hydrogels, and that employed dynamic single-axis compression with physiologic loading parameters, reported consistently favorable responses at the tissue level, with upregulation of biochemical synthesis and biomechanical properties. However, they rarely assessed the cellular response with gene expression or mechanotransduction pathway analyses. Later studies that employed increasingly sophisticated biomaterial-based systems, cells derived from different

  12. Dynamic Mechanical Compression of Chondrocytes for Tissue Engineering: A Critical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devon E. Anderson

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage functions to transmit and translate loads. In a classical structure–function relationship, the tissue resides in a dynamic mechanical environment that drives the formation of a highly organized tissue architecture suited to its biomechanical role. The dynamic mechanical environment includes multiaxial compressive and shear strains as well as hydrostatic and osmotic pressures. As the mechanical environment is known to modulate cell fate and influence tissue development toward a defined architecture in situ, dynamic mechanical loading has been hypothesized to induce the structure–function relationship during attempts at in vitro regeneration of articular cartilage. Researchers have designed increasingly sophisticated bioreactors with dynamic mechanical regimes, but the response of chondrocytes to dynamic compression and shear loading remains poorly characterized due to wide variation in study design, system variables, and outcome measurements. We assessed the literature pertaining to the use of dynamic compressive bioreactors for in vitro generation of cartilaginous tissue from primary and expanded chondrocytes. We used specific search terms to identify relevant publications from the PubMed database and manually sorted the data. It was very challenging to find consensus between studies because of species, age, cell source, and culture differences, coupled with the many loading regimes and the types of analyses used. Early studies that evaluated the response of primary bovine chondrocytes within hydrogels, and that employed dynamic single-axis compression with physiologic loading parameters, reported consistently favorable responses at the tissue level, with upregulation of biochemical synthesis and biomechanical properties. However, they rarely assessed the cellular response with gene expression or mechanotransduction pathway analyses. Later studies that employed increasingly sophisticated biomaterial-based systems, cells

  13. Influence of cell printing on biological characters of chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Miao; Gao, Xiaoyan; Hou, Yikang; Shen, Congcong; Xu, Yourong; Zhu, Ming; Wang, Hengjian; Xu, Haisong; Chai, Gang; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    To establish a two-dimensional biological printing technique of chondrocytes and compare the difference of related biological characters between printed chondrocytes and unprinted cells so as to control the cell transfer process and keep cell viability after printing. Primary chondrocytes were obtained from human mature and fetal cartilage tissues and then were regularly sub-cultured to harvest cells at passage 2 (P2), which were adjusted to the single cell suspension at a density of 1×10(6)/mL. The experiment was divided into 2 groups: experimental group P2 chondrocytes were transferred by rapid prototype biological printer (driving voltage value 50 V, interval in x-axis 300 μm, interval in y-axis 1500 μm). Afterwards Live/Dead viability Kit and flow cytometry were respectively adopted to detect cell viability; CCK-8 Kit was adopted to detect cell proliferation viability; immunocytochemistry, immunofluorescence and RT-PCR was employed to identify related markers of chondrocytes; control group steps were the same as the printing group except that cell suspension received no printing. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry analyses showed that there was no significant difference between experimental group and control group in terms of cell viability. After 7-day in vitro culture, control group exhibited higher O.D values than experimental group from 2nd day to 7th day but there was no distinct difference between these two groups (P>0.05). Inverted microscope observation demonstrated that the morphology of these two groups had no significant difference either. Similarly, Immunocytochemistry, immunofluorescence and RT-PCR assays also showed that there was no significant difference in the protein and gene expression of type II collagen and aggrecan between these two groups (P>0.05). Conclusion Cell printing has no distinctly negative effect on cell vitality, proliferation and phenotype of chondrocytes. Biological printing technique may provide a novel approach

  14. RAGE, receptor of advanced glycation endoproducts, negatively regulates chondrocytes differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Kosaka

    Full Text Available RAGE, receptor for advanced glycation endoproducts (AGE, has been characterized as an activator of osteoclastgenesis. However, whether RAGE directly regulates chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation is unclear. Here, we show that RAGE has an inhibitory role in chondrocyte differentiation. RAGE expression was observed in chondrocytes from the prehypertrophic to hypertrophic regions. In cultured cells, overexpression of RAGE or dominant-negative-RAGE (DN-RAGE demonstrated that RAGE inhibited cartilaginous matrix production, while DN-RAGE promoted production. Additionally, RAGE regulated Ihh and Col10a1 negatively but upregulated PTHrP receptor. Ihh promoter analysis and real-time PCR analysis suggested that downregulation of Cdxs was the key for RAGE-induced inhibition of chondrocyte differentiation. Overexpression of the NF-κB inhibitor I-κB-SR inhibited RAGE-induced NF-κB activation, but did not influence inhibition of cartilaginous matrix production by RAGE. The inhibitory action of RAGE was restored by the Rho family GTPases inhibitor Toxin B. Furthermore, inhibitory action on Ihh, Col10a1 and Cdxs was reproduced by constitutively active forms, L63RhoA, L61Rac, and L61Cdc42, but not by I-κB-SR. Cdx1 induced Ihh and Col10a1 expressions and directly interacted with Ihh promoter. Retinoic acid (RA partially rescued the inhibitory action of RAGE. These data combined suggests that RAGE negatively regulates chondrocyte differentiation at the prehypertrophic stage by modulating NF-κB-independent and Rho family GTPases-dependent mechanisms.

  15. Nanosized fibers' effect on adult human articular chondrocytes behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenhamre, Hanna; Thorvaldsson, Anna; Enochson, Lars; Walkenström, Pernilla; Lindahl, Anders; Brittberg, Mats; Gatenholm, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Tissue engineering with chondrogenic cell based therapies is an expanding field with the intention of treating cartilage defects. It has been suggested that scaffolds used in cartilage tissue engineering influence cellular behavior and thus the long-term clinical outcome. The objective of this study was to assess whether chondrocyte attachment, proliferation and post-expansion re-differentiation could be influenced by the size of the fibers presented to the cells in a scaffold. Polylactic acid (PLA) scaffolds with different fiber morphologies were produced, i.e. microfiber (MS) scaffolds as well as nanofiber-coated microfiber scaffold (NMS). Adult human articular chondrocytes were cultured in the scaffolds in vitro up to 28 days, and the resulting constructs were assessed histologically, immunohistochemically, and biochemically. Attachment of cells and serum proteins to the scaffolds was affected by the architecture. The results point toward nano-patterning onto the microfibers influencing proliferation of the chondrocytes, and the overall 3D environment having a greater influence on the re-differentiation. In the efforts of finding the optimal scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering, studies as the current contribute to the knowledge of how to affect and control chondrocytes behavior. - Highlights: ► Chondrocyte behavior in nanofiber-coated microfiber versus microfiber scaffolds ► High porosity (> 90%) and large pore sizes (a few hundred μm) of nanofibrous scaffolds ► Proliferation enhanced by presence of nanofibers ► Differentiation not significantly affected ► Cell attachment improved in presence of both nanofibers and serum

  16. In-vitro-Studie zum Einfluss von Fibrin in Knorpelkonstrukten auf der Basis von PGA-Vliesstoffen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, H; Mehlhorn, A T; Kurze, C

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The matrix component in autologous chondrocyte implantation plays an important role. In this study the influence of an additional fibrin component in cartilage constructs based on polyglycolide polymers (PGA) was investigated. METHODS: Human chondrocytes of femoral heads were isolated....... CONCLUSION: Cartilage constructs based on carbohydrate matrices are suitable for matrix-associated chondrocyte implantation. The results of this study suggest a partially inhibitory effect of an additional fibrin component in PGA constructs for chondrogenic differentiation....

  17. Cord Blood Banking Standards: Autologous Versus Altruistic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Cord blood (CB) is either donated to public CB banks for use by any patient worldwide for whom it is a match or stored in a private bank for potential autologous or family use. It is a unique cell product that has potential for treating life-threatening diseases. The majority of CB products used today are for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and are accessed from public banks. CB is still evolving as a hematopoietic stem cell source, developing as a source for cellular immunotherapy products, such as natural killer, dendritic, and T-cells, and fast emerging as a non-hematopoietic stem cell source in the field of regenerative medicine. This review explores the regulations, standards, and accreditation schemes that are currently available nationally and internationally for public and private CB banking. Currently, most of private banking is under regulated as compared to public banking. Regulations and standards were initially developed to address the public arena. Early responses from the medical field regarding private CB banking was that at the present time, because of insufficient scientific data to support autologous banking and given the difficulty of making an accurate estimate of the need for autologous transplantation, private storage of CB as "biological insurance" should be discouraged (1, 2, 3). To ensure success and the true realization of the full potential of CB, whether for autologous or allogeneic use, it is essential that each and every product provided for current and future treatments meets high-quality, international standards.

  18. Perivascular Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Sheep: Characterization and Autologous Transplantation in a Model of Articular Cartilage Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Paul; Baily, James; Khan, Nusrat; Biant, Leela C; Simpson, A Hamish R; Péault, Bruno

    2016-11-01

    Previous research has indicated that purified perivascular stem cells (PSCs) have increased chondrogenic potential compared to conventional mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived in culture. This study aimed to develop an autologous large animal model for PSC transplantation and to specifically determine if implanted cells are retained in articular cartilage defects. Immunohistochemistry and fluorescence-activated cell sorting were used to ascertain the reactivity of anti-human and anti-ovine antibodies, which were combined and used to identify and isolate pericytes (CD34 - CD45 - CD146 + ) and adventitial cells (CD34 + CD45 - CD146 - ). The purified cells demonstrated osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic potential in culture. Autologous ovine PSCs (oPSCs) were isolated, cultured, and efficiently transfected using a green fluorescence protein (GFP) encoding lentivirus. The cells were implanted into articular cartilage defects on the medial femoral condyle using hydrogel and collagen membranes. Four weeks following implantation, the condyle was explanted and confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated the presence of oPSCs in the defect repaired with the hydrogel. These data suggest the testability in a large animal of native MSC autologous grafting, thus avoiding possible biases associated with xenotransplantation. Such a setting will be used in priority for indications in orthopedics, at first to model articular cartilage repair.

  19. The hydroxylapatite-bone interface: 10 years after implant installation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekmans, H.C.; Meijer, G.J.; Barkhuysen, R.; Blijdorp, P.A.; Merkx, M.A.W.; Jansen, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Reconstruction of a severely atrophied maxilla by sinus augmentation with a mixture of hydroxylapatite (HA) granules and autologous cancellous bone is claimed to be a predictable means to facilitate implant placement. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first human histological case report of

  20. The inhibitory roles of Ihh downregulation on chondrocyte growth and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Ang; Zhang, Hongqi; Hu, Minyu; Liu, Shaohua; Wang, Yuxiang; Gao, Qile; Guo, Chaofeng

    2018-01-01

    The proliferative rate of chondrocytes affects bone elongation. Chondrocyte hypertrophy is required for endochondral bone formation as chondrocytes secrete factors required for osteoblast differentiation and maturation. Previous studies have demonstrated that the Indian hedgehog (Ihh) signaling pathway is a key regulator of skeletal development and homeostasis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the function of Ihh in chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation, as well as the underlying mechanisms. Ihh was knocked down in mouse chondrocyte cells using short hairpin RNA. Chondrocyte apoptosis and cell cycle arrest were assessed using flow cytometry and the results indicated that knockdown of Ihh significantly inhibited cell growth (PIhh also resulted in cell cycle arrest at G1 to S phase in chondrocytes. It was also observed that knockdown of Ihh decreased alkaline phosphatase activity and mineral deposition of chondrocytes. The inhibitory roles of Ihh downregulation on chondrocyte growth and differentiation may be associated with the transforming growth factor-β/mothers against decapentaplegic and osteoprotegerin/receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand signaling pathway. The results of the present study suggest that chondrocyte-derived Ihh is essential for maintaining bone growth plates and that manipulation of Ihh expression or its signaling components may be a novel therapeutic technique for the treatment of skeletal diseases, including achondroplasia.

  1. RHEB: a potential regulator of chondrocyte phenotype for cartilage tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, S; Ahn, J; Cha, B-H; Kim, J-S; Han, I; Park, H; Lee, S-H

    2017-09-01

    As articular cartilage has a limited ability to self-repair, successful cartilage regeneration requires clinical-grade chondrocytes with innate characteristics. However, cartilage regeneration via chondrocyte transplantation is challenging, because chondrocytes lose their innate characteristics during in vitro expansion. Here, we investigated the mechanistic underpinning of the gene Ras homologue enriched in brain (RHEB) in the control of senescence and dedifferentiation through the modulation of oxidative stress in chondrocytes, a hallmark of osteoarthritis. Serial expansion of human chondrocytes led to senescence, dedifferentiation and oxidative stress. RHEB maintained the innate characteristics of chondrocytes by regulating senescence, dedifferentiation and oxidative stress, leading to the upregulation of COL2 expression via SOX9 and the downregulation of p27 expression via MCL1. RHEB also decreased the expression of COL10. RHEB knockdown mimics decreased the expression of SOX9, COL2 and MCL1, while abrogating the suppressive function of RHEB on p27 and COL10 in chondrocytes. RHEB-overexpressing chondrocytes successfully formed cartilage tissue in vitro as well as in vivo, with increased expression of GAG matrix and chondrogenic markers. RHEB induces a distinct gene expression signature that maintained the innate chondrogenic properties over a long period. Therefore, RHEB expression represents a potentially useful mechanism in terms of cartilage tissue regeneration from chondrocytes, by which chondrocyte phenotypic and molecular characteristics can be retained through the modulation of senescence, dedifferentiation and oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Role of interleukin-1 in antigen presentation by normal articular chondrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiku, M.L.; Liu, S.; Tiku, K.

    1986-01-01

    Recently the authors have described that normal articular chondrocytes of rabbits present antigen to immune T cells. In the present study the authors investigated the role of interleukin-1 (IL-1) on antigen presentation by chondrocytes. For these experiments the antigen pulsed chondroyctes were either untreated or fixed with paraformaldehyde and then co-cultured with immune T cells. T cell proliferation was measured by 3 H-thymidine incorporation. Pulsed non-fixed chondrocytes presented antigen, as expected, but pulsed and fixed cells failed to present antigen to T cells. The 3 H-TdR incorporation was partially restored by addition of purified human IL-1. Next, IL-1 activity was measured in primary chondrocyte culture supernatants stimulated with or without lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in comitogen thymocyte assay. No activity was detected in chondrocyte supernatants. Propagated chondrocyte culture supernatants also lacked IL-1 activity when stimulated with LPS in the presence of increasing concentration of indomethacin. On the other hand the authors observed that chondrocyte culture supernatants in a dose dependent manner inhibited human IL-1 induced 3 H-TdR incorporation of murine thymocytes. This suggested that these cells may produce an inhibitor of IL-1 and IL-1 production by chondrocytes may be essential for T cell proliferation by these cells. Inability to detect IL-1 in chondrocyte supernatants may be due to the presence of an inhibitor to IL-1. These findings may help in elucidating the immunological mechanisms in situations where chondrocytes and T cell interact, such as in arthritis

  3. Indian hedgehog signaling triggers Nkx3.2 protein degradation during chondrocyte maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung-Won; Jeong, Da-Un; Kim, Jeong-Ah; Lee, Boyoung; Joeng, Kyu Sang; Long, Fanxin; Kim, Dae-Won

    2015-01-01

    The Indian hedgehog (Ihh) pathway plays an essential role in facilitating chondrocyte hypertrophy and bone formation during skeletal development. Nkx3.2 is initially induced in chondrocyte precursor cells, maintained in early-stage chondrocytes, and down-regulated in terminal-stage chondrocytes. Consistent with these expression patterns, Nkx3.2 has been shown to enhance chondrocyte differentiation and cell survival, while inhibiting chondrocyte hypertrophy and apoptosis. Thus, in this work, we investigate whether Nkx3.2, an early stage chondrogenic factor, can be regulated by Ihh, a key regulator for chondrocyte hypertrophy. Here, we show that Ihh signaling can induce proteasomal degradation of Nkx3.2. In addition, we found that Ihh can suppress levels of Lrp (Wnt co-receptor) and Sfrp (Wnt antagonist) expression, which, in turn, may selectively enhance Lrp-independent non-canonical Wnt pathways in chondrocyte. In agreement with these findings, Ihh-induced Nkx3.2 degradation requires Wnt5a, which is capable of triggering Nkx3.2 degradation. Finally, we found that Nkx3.2 protein levels in chondrocytes are remarkably elevated in mice defective in Ihh signaling by deletion of either Ihh or Smoothened. Thus, these results suggest that Ihh/Wnt5a signaling may play a role in negative regulation of Nkx3.2 for appropriate progression of chondrocyte hypertrophy during chondrogenesis. PMID:22507129

  4. Conditional expression of constitutively active estrogen receptor {alpha} in chondrocytes impairs longitudinal bone growth in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Kazuhiro [Division of Gene Regulation and Signal Transduction, Research Center for Genomic Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Saitama (Japan); Tsukui, Tohru [Experimental Animal Laboratory, Research Center for Genomic Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Saitama (Japan); Imazawa, Yukiko; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko [Division of Gene Regulation and Signal Transduction, Research Center for Genomic Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Saitama (Japan); Inoue, Satoshi, E-mail: INOUE-GER@h.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Division of Gene Regulation and Signal Transduction, Research Center for Genomic Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Saitama (Japan); Department of Geriatric Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Anti-Aging Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conditional transgenic mice expressing constitutively active estrogen receptor {alpha} (caER{alpha}) in chondrocytes were developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of caER{alpha} in chondrocytes impaired longitudinal bone growth in mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer caER{alpha} affects chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This mouse model is useful for understanding the physiological role of ER{alpha}in vivo. -- Abstract: Estrogen plays important roles in the regulation of chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation, which are essential steps for longitudinal bone growth; however, the mechanisms of estrogen action on chondrocytes have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we generated conditional transgenic mice, designated as caER{alpha}{sup ColII}, expressing constitutively active mutant estrogen receptor (ER) {alpha} in chondrocytes, using the chondrocyte-specific type II collagen promoter-driven Cre transgenic mice. caER{alpha}{sup ColII} mice showed retardation in longitudinal growth, with short bone lengths. BrdU labeling showed reduced proliferation of hypertrophic chondrocytes in the proliferating layer of the growth plate of tibia in caER{alpha}{sup ColII} mice. In situ hybridization analysis of type X collagen revealed that the maturation of hypertrophic chondrocytes was impaired in caER{alpha}{sup ColII} mice. These results suggest that ER{alpha} is a critical regulator of chondrocyte proliferation and maturation during skeletal development, mediating longitudinal bone growth in vivo.

  5. Conditional expression of constitutively active estrogen receptor α in chondrocytes impairs longitudinal bone growth in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Tsukui, Tohru; Imazawa, Yukiko; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Inoue, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Conditional transgenic mice expressing constitutively active estrogen receptor α (caERα) in chondrocytes were developed. ► Expression of caERα in chondrocytes impaired longitudinal bone growth in mice. ► caERα affects chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation. ► This mouse model is useful for understanding the physiological role of ERαin vivo. -- Abstract: Estrogen plays important roles in the regulation of chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation, which are essential steps for longitudinal bone growth; however, the mechanisms of estrogen action on chondrocytes have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we generated conditional transgenic mice, designated as caERα ColII , expressing constitutively active mutant estrogen receptor (ER) α in chondrocytes, using the chondrocyte-specific type II collagen promoter-driven Cre transgenic mice. caERα ColII mice showed retardation in longitudinal growth, with short bone lengths. BrdU labeling showed reduced proliferation of hypertrophic chondrocytes in the proliferating layer of the growth plate of tibia in caERα ColII mice. In situ hybridization analysis of type X collagen revealed that the maturation of hypertrophic chondrocytes was impaired in caERα ColII mice. These results suggest that ERα is a critical regulator of chondrocyte proliferation and maturation during skeletal development, mediating longitudinal bone growth in vivo.

  6. [Research of repairing rabbit knee joint cartilage defect by compound material of fibrin glue and decalcified bone matrix (DBM) and chondrocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jie; Yang, Xiang; Yue, Peng-ju; Wang, Guan-yu; Guo, Ting; Zhao, Jian-ning

    2009-07-01

    To investigate the feasibility and effectivity of using compound material of fibrin glue and DBM as scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering. Chondrocytes isolated from articular cartilage were seeded into prepared scaffolds, after incubation for 4 weeks in vitro. Chondrocytes and fibrin glue and DBM constructs were implanted in the joint cave of rabbit. The specimens were excised at the 4th, 8th, 12th week, examined grossly analyzed by haematoxylin cosine, toluidine blues staining and type II collagen immunohistochemistry reaction. Wakitani score was counted to evaluate the repairing effect. Grossly analysis showed some ivory tissue filled the caves after 4 weeks and the caves were full filled with smooth surface after 12 weeks. The microscope showed a good deal of chondrocytes appeared after 8 weeks and more type II collagen than 4 weeks. Twelve weeks later, cartilage lacuna could be observed. The cells arrangement and the amount of type II collagen both showed the same as the natural one. Complicated material of fibrin glue and DBM as scaffolds can be used as scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

  7. A Comparison of the Outcomes for Cartilage Defects of the Knee Treated With Biologic Resurfacing Versus Focal Metallic Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Daley, Erika; Verma, Nikhil N; Cole, Brian J

    2017-02-01

    To compare the results of focal metallic resurfacing with biologic procedures in patients more than 35 years of age with isolated, full thickness defects of the femoral condyle. A total of 61 patients met the selection criteria resulting in 30 patients treated with biological procedures, including debridement, microfracture, osteochondral autograft transplantation, osteochondral allograft, and autologous chondrocyte implantation (BIO group), and 32 patients treated with focal metallic resurfacing (CAP group). The BIO and CAP groups were matched according to treatment location, defect grade and size, and age profile. Outcomes included Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), Short Form-12, and satisfaction. The primary combination endpoint was determined as a 20% improvement (minimum clinically important difference-20) on WOMAC pain and function at 2 years and no additional index lesion-related surgical intervention. Safety and effectiveness were also reported. Thirty patients in the BIO group (mean age of 44.6, range 35-64) had an average follow-up of 2.6 years and 32 patients in the CAP group (mean age 47.9, range 37-68) were followed for 2.0 years. Fifty-three percent in the BIO group and 75% in the CAP group achieved success per the endpoint definition. The mean total WOMAC score improved significantly for both groups (BIO: 57-78; P metal resurfacing procedures for the treatment of isolated focal chondral lesions of the femoral condyle in the knee. Focal metallic resurfacing results in similar clinical outcomes and provides excellent success rates at short-term follow-up. Level III comparative study. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Can microcarrier-expanded chondrocytes synthesize cartilaginous tissue in vitro?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surrao, Denver C; Khan, Aasma A; McGregor, Aaron J; Amsden, Brian G; Waldman, Stephen D

    2011-08-01

    Tissue engineering is a promising approach for articular cartilage repair; however, it is challenging to produce adequate amounts of tissue in vitro from the limited number of cells that can be extracted from an individual. Relatively few cell expansion methods exist without the problems of de-differentiation and/or loss of potency. Recently, however, several studies have noted the benefits of three-dimensional (3D) over monolayer expansion, but the ability of 3D expanded chondrocytes to synthesize cartilaginous tissue constructs has not been demonstrated. Thus, the purpose of this study was to compare the properties of engineered cartilage constructs from expanded cells (monolayer and 3D microcarriers) to those developed from primary chondrocytes. Isolated bovine chondrocytes were grown for 3 weeks in either monolayer (T-Flasks) or 3D microcarrier (Cytodex 3) expansion culture. Expanded and isolated primary cells were then seeded in high density culture on Millicell™ filters for 4 weeks to evaluate the ability to synthesize cartilaginous tissue. While microcarrier expansion was twice as effective as monolayer expansion (microcarrier: 110-fold increase, monolayer: 52-fold increase), the expanded cells (monolayer and 3D microcarrier) were not effectively able to synthesize cartilaginous tissue in vitro. Tissues developed from primary cells were substantially thicker and accumulated significantly more extracellular matrix (proteoglycan content: 156%-292% increase; collagen content: 70%-191% increase). These results were attributed to phenotypic changes experienced during the expansion phase. Monolayer expanded chondrocytes lost their native morphology within 1 week, whereas microcarrier-expanded cells were spreading by 3 weeks of expansion. While the use of 3D microcarriers can lead to large cellular yields, preservation of chondrogenic phenotype during expansion is required in order to synthesize cartilaginous tissue.

  9. Statins do not inhibit the FGFR signaling in chondrocytes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fafílek, B.; Hampl, Marek; Říčánková, N.; Veselá, Iva; Bálek, L.; Kunová Bosáková, M.; Gudernová, I.; Vařecha, M.; Buchtová, Marcela; Krejčí, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 9 (2017), s. 1522-1530 ISSN 1063-4584 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-31540S Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LH12004 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : statins * FGF signaling * chondrocytes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Developmental biology Impact factor: 4.742, year: 2016

  10. Regulation of collagenase inhibitor production in chondrosarcoma chondrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, J.; Harper, E.

    1987-01-01

    Swarm rat chondrosarcoma chondrocytes produce an inhibitor of collagenase. This inhibitor is similar to those isolated from normal cartilage tissues. These cells will synthesize proteins in the absence of serum. Since serum contains inhibitors of collagenase, it is necessary to culture cells without serum in order to obtain accurate measurements of enzyme and inhibitor levels. They examined the effect of insulin on inhibitor secretion by cultures of Swarm rat chondrosarcoma chondrocytes. They observed a 2.5 to 3.5 fold stimulation of inhibitory activity in the presence of as little as 10 ng/ml insulin as compared to controls in serum free Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium supplemented with 4.5 g/l glucose. The units of inhibitor were determined over a 7 day culture period. Medium was harvested daily and assayed for collagenase activity and for inhibition of a known collagenase from rabbit skin or human skin, using the 14 C-glycine peptide release assay. The amount of inhibitor obtained from days 2 through 7 were: 1.4 unit (control), 3.8 units (10 ng/ml insulin), 5.2 units (1 μg/ml insulin). The addition of 1 mM dibutyryl cyclic AMP to these chondrocytes in the presence of 1 μg/ml insulin caused a decrease in the level of inhibitor, suggesting that a dephosphorylation event may be necessary for this stimulation by insulin to occur

  11. Hydrostatic Pressure Influences HIF-2 Alpha Expression in Chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Inoue

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-2α is considered to play a major role in the progression of osteoarthritis. Recently, it was reported that pressure amplitude influences HIF-2α expression in murine endothelial cells. We examined whether hydrostatic pressure is involved in expression of HIF-2α in articular chondrocytes. Chondrocytes were cultured and stimulated by inflammation or hydrostatic pressure of 0, 5, 10, or 50 MPa. After stimulation, heat shock protein (HSP 70, HIF-2α, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-13, MMP-3, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF gene expression were evaluated. The levels of all gene expression were increased by inflammatory stress. When chondrocytes were exposed to a hydrostatic pressure of 5 MPa, HIF-2α, MMP-13, and MMP-3 gene expression increased significantly although those of HSP70 and NF-κB were not significantly different from the control group. In contrast, HIF-2α gene expression did not increase under a hydrostatic pressure of 50 MPa although HSP70 and NF-κB expression increased significantly compared to control. We considered that hydrostatic pressure of 5 MPa could regulate HIF-2α independent of NF-κB, because the level of HIF-2α gene expression increased significantly without upregulation of NF-κB expression at 5 MPa. Hydrostatic pressure may influence cartilage degeneration, inducing MMP-13 and MMP-3 expression through HIF-2α.

  12. Hydrostatic pressure influences HIF-2 alpha expression in chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Hiroaki; Arai, Yuji; Kishida, Tsunao; Terauchi, Ryu; Honjo, Kuniaki; Nakagawa, Shuji; Tsuchida, Shinji; Matsuki, Tomohiro; Ueshima, Keiichirou; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2015-01-05

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2α is considered to play a major role in the progression of osteoarthritis. Recently, it was reported that pressure amplitude influences HIF-2α expression in murine endothelial cells. We examined whether hydrostatic pressure is involved in expression of HIF-2α in articular chondrocytes. Chondrocytes were cultured and stimulated by inflammation or hydrostatic pressure of 0, 5, 10, or 50 MPa. After stimulation, heat shock protein (HSP) 70, HIF-2α, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, MMP-3, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene expression were evaluated. The levels of all gene expression were increased by inflammatory stress. When chondrocytes were exposed to a hydrostatic pressure of 5 MPa, HIF-2α, MMP-13, and MMP-3 gene expression increased significantly although those of HSP70 and NF-κB were not significantly different from the control group. In contrast, HIF-2α gene expression did not increase under a hydrostatic pressure of 50 MPa although HSP70 and NF-κB expression increased significantly compared to control. We considered that hydrostatic pressure of 5 MPa could regulate HIF-2α independent of NF-κB, because the level of HIF-2α gene expression increased significantly without upregulation of NF-κB expression at 5 MPa. Hydrostatic pressure may influence cartilage degeneration, inducing MMP-13 and MMP-3 expression through HIF-2α.

  13. Doublecortin May Play a Role in Defining Chondrocyte Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongxia Ge

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic development of articular cartilage has not been well understood and the role of doublecortin (DCX in determination of chondrocyte phenotype is unknown. Here, we use a DCX promoter-driven eGFP reporter mouse model to study the dynamic gene expression profiles in mouse embryonic handplates at E12.5 to E13.5 when the condensed mesenchymal cells differentiate into either endochondral chondrocytes or joint interzone cells. Illumina microarray analysis identified a variety of genes that were expressed differentially in the different regions of mouse handplate. The unique expression patterns of many genes were revealed. Cytl1 and 3110032G18RIK were highly expressed in the proximal region of E12.5 handplate and the carpal region of E13.5 handplate, whereas Olfr538, Kctd15, and Cited1 were highly expressed in the distal region of E12.5 and the metacarpal region of E13.5 handplates. There was an increasing gradient of Hrc expression in the proximal to distal direction in E13.5 handplate. Furthermore, when human DCX protein was expressed in human adipose stem cells, collagen II was decreased while aggrecan, matrilin 2, and GDF5 were increased during the 14-day pellet culture. These findings suggest that DCX may play a role in defining chondrocyte phenotype.

  14. IGF1 regulates RUNX1 expression via IRS1/2: Implications for antler chondrocyte differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Zhan-Qing; Zhang, Hong-Liang; Duan, Cui-Cui; Geng, Shuang; Wang, Kai; Yu, Hai-Fan; Yue, Zhan-Peng; Guo, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Although IGF1 is important for the proliferation and differentiation of chondrocytes, its underlying molecular mechanism is still unknown. Here we addressed the physiologic function of IGF1 in antler cartilage and explored the interplay of IGF1, IRS1/2 and RUNX1 in chondrocyte differentiation. The results showed that IGF1 was highly expressed in antler chondrocytes. Exogenous rIGF1 could increase the proliferation of chondrocytes and cell proportion in the S phase, whereas IGF1R inhibitor PQ4...

  15. Autologous patch graft in tube shunt surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanides, I M; Spaeth, G L; Schmidt, C M; Lanzl, I M; Gandham, S B

    1999-10-01

    To evaluate an alternate method of covering the subconjunctival portion of the tube in aqueous shunt surgery. Evidence of tube erosion, graft-related infection, graft melting, or other associated intraocular complications were evaluated. A retrospective study of 16 patients (17 eyes) who underwent tube shunt surgery at Wills Eye Hospital between July 1991 and October 1996 was conducted. An autologous either "free" or "rotating" scleral lamellar graft was created to cover the subconjunctival portion of the tube shunt. All patients were evaluated for at least 6 months, with a mean follow-up of 14.8 months (range 6-62 months). All eyes tolerated the autologous graft well, with no clinical evidence of tube erosion, or graft-related or intraocular complications. Autologous patch graft in tube shunt surgery appears--in selected cases--to be an effective, safe and inexpensive surgical alternative to allogenic graft materials. It also offers ease of availability, and eliminates the risk of transmitting infectious disease.

  16. A low percentage of autologous serum can replace bovine serum to engineer human nasal cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Wolf

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available For the generation of cell-based therapeutic products, it would be preferable to avoid the use of animal-derived components. Our study thus aimed at investigating the possibility to replace foetal bovine serum (FBS with autologous serum (AS for the engineering of cartilage grafts using expanded human nasal chondrocytes (HNC. HNC isolated from 7 donors were expanded in medium containing 10% FBS or AS at different concentrations (2%, 5% and 10% and cultured in pellets using serum-free medium or in Hyaff®-11 meshes using medium containing FBS or AS. Tissue forming capacity was assessed histologically (Safranin O, immunohistochemically (type II collagen and biochemically (glycosaminoglycans -GAG- and DNA. Differences among experimental groups were assessed by Mann Whitney tests. HNC expanded under the different serum conditions proliferated at comparable rates and generated cartilaginous pellets with similar histological appearance and amounts of GAG. Tissues generated by HNC from different donors cultured in Hyaff®-11 had variable quality, but the accumulated GAG amounts were comparable among the different serum conditions. Staining intensity for collagen type II was consistent with GAG deposition. Among the different serum conditions tested, the use of 2% AS resulted in the lowest variability in the GAG contents of generated tissues. In conclusion, a low percentage of AS can replace FBS both during the expansion and differentiation of HNC and reduce the variability in the quality of the resulting engineered cartilage tissues.

  17. Single-Stage Cell-Based Cartilage Regeneration Using a Combination of Chondrons and Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Comparison With Microfracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, J.E.J.; Tsuchida, A.I.; van Rijen, M.H.P.; Vonk, L.A.; Dhert, W.J.A.; Saris, Daniël B.F.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is traditionally a 2-step procedure used to repair focal articular cartilage lesions. With use of a combination of chondrons (chondrocytes in their own territorial matrix) and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), ACI could be innovated and performed

  18. Culture of bovine articular chondrocytes in funnel-like collagen-PLGA hybrid sponges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Hongxu; Ko, Young-Gwang; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen Guoping

    2011-01-01

    Three-dimensional porous scaffolds play an important role in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Structurally, these porous scaffolds should have an open and interconnected porous architecture to facilitate a homogeneous cell distribution. Moreover, the scaffolds should be mechanically strong to support new tissue formation. We developed a novel type of funnel-like collagen sponge using embossing ice particulates as a template. The funnel-like collagen sponges could promote the homogeneous cell distribution, ECM production and chondrogenesis. However, the funnel-like collagen sponges deformed during cell culture due to their weak mechanical strength. To solve this problem, we reinforced the funnel-like collagen sponges with a knitted poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) mesh by hybridizing these two types of materials. The hybrid scaffolds were used to culture bovine articular chondrocytes. The cell adhesion, distribution, proliferation and chondrogenesis were investigated. The funnel-like structure promoted the even cell distribution and homogeneous ECM production. The PLGA knitted mesh protected the scaffold from deformation during cell culture. Histological and immunohistochemical staining and cartilaginous gene expression analyses revealed the cartilage-like properties of the cell/scaffold constructs after in vivo implantation. The hybrid scaffold, composed of a funnel-like collagen sponge and PLGA mesh, would be a useful tool for cartilage tissue engineering.

  19. Culture of bovine articular chondrocytes in funnel-like collagen-PLGA hybrid sponges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Hongxu; Ko, Young-Gwang; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen Guoping, E-mail: Guoping.Chen@nims.go.jp [Tissue Regeneration Materials Unit, International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2011-08-15

    Three-dimensional porous scaffolds play an important role in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Structurally, these porous scaffolds should have an open and interconnected porous architecture to facilitate a homogeneous cell distribution. Moreover, the scaffolds should be mechanically strong to support new tissue formation. We developed a novel type of funnel-like collagen sponge using embossing ice particulates as a template. The funnel-like collagen sponges could promote the homogeneous cell distribution, ECM production and chondrogenesis. However, the funnel-like collagen sponges deformed during cell culture due to their weak mechanical strength. To solve this problem, we reinforced the funnel-like collagen sponges with a knitted poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) mesh by hybridizing these two types of materials. The hybrid scaffolds were used to culture bovine articular chondrocytes. The cell adhesion, distribution, proliferation and chondrogenesis were investigated. The funnel-like structure promoted the even cell distribution and homogeneous ECM production. The PLGA knitted mesh protected the scaffold from deformation during cell culture. Histological and immunohistochemical staining and cartilaginous gene expression analyses revealed the cartilage-like properties of the cell/scaffold constructs after in vivo implantation. The hybrid scaffold, composed of a funnel-like collagen sponge and PLGA mesh, would be a useful tool for cartilage tissue engineering.

  20. Reduction of Environmental Temperature Mitigates Local Anesthetic Cytotoxicity in Bovine Articular Chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarik Onur, Alexis Dang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess whether reducing environmental temperature will lead to increased chondrocyte viability following injury from a single-dose of local anesthetic treatment. Bovine articular chondrocytes from weight bearing portions of femoral condyles were harvested and cultured. 96-well plates were seeded with 15,000 chondrocytes per well. Chondrocytes were treated with one of the following conditions: ITS Media, 1x PBS, 2% lidocaine, 0.5% bupivacaine, or 0.5% ropivacaine. Each plate was then incubated at 37°C, 23°C, or 4°C for one hour and then returned to media at 37°C. Chondrocyte viability was assessed 24 hours after treatment. Chondrocyte viability is presented as a ratio of the fluorescence of the treatment group over the average of the media group at that temperature (ratio ± SEM. At 37°C, lidocaine (0.35 ± 0.04 and bupivacaine (0.30 ± 0.05 treated chondrocytes show low cell viability when compared to the media (1.00 ± 0.03 control group (p < 0.001. Lidocaine treated chondrocytes were significantly more viable at 23°C (0.84 ± 0.08 and 4°C (0.86±0.085 than at 37°C (p < 0.001. Bupivacaine treated chondrocytes were significantly more viable at 4°C (0.660 ± 0.073 than at 37°C or 23°C (0.330 ± 0.069 (p < 0.001 and p = 0.002 respectively. Reducing the temperature from 37°C to 23°C during treatment with lidocaine increases chondrocyte viability following injury. Chondrocytes treated with bupivacaine can be rescued by reducing the temperature to 4°C.

  1. SHP2 regulates chondrocyte terminal differentiation, growth plate architecture and skeletal cell fates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margot E Bowen

    Full Text Available Loss of PTPN11/SHP2 in mice or in human metachondromatosis (MC patients causes benign cartilage tumors on the bone surface (exostoses and within bones (enchondromas. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying cartilage tumor formation, we investigated the role of SHP2 in the specification, maturation and organization of chondrocytes. Firstly, we studied chondrocyte maturation by performing RNA-seq on primary chondrocyte pellet cultures. We found that SHP2 depletion, or inhibition of the ERK1/2 pathway, delays the terminal differentiation of chondrocytes from the early-hypertrophic to the late-hypertrophic stage. Secondly, we studied chondrocyte maturation and organization in mice with a mosaic postnatal inactivation of Ptpn11 in chondrocytes. We found that the vertebral growth plates of these mice have expanded domains of early-hypertrophic chondrocytes that have not yet terminally differentiated, and their enchondroma-like lesions arise from chondrocytes displaced from the growth plate due to a disruption in the organization of maturation and ossification zones. Furthermore, we observed that lesions from human MC patients also display disorganized chondrocyte maturation zones. Next, we found that inactivation of Ptpn11 in Fsp1-Cre-expressing fibroblasts induces exostosis-like outgrowths, suggesting that loss of SHP2 in cells on the bone surface and at bone-ligament attachment sites induces ectopic chondrogenesis. Finally, we performed lineage tracing to show that exostoses and enchondromas in mice likely contain mixtures of wild-type and SHP2-deficient chondrocytes. Together, these data indicate that in patients with MC, who are heterozygous for inherited PTPN11 loss-of-function mutations, second-hit mutations in PTPN11 can induce enchondromas by disrupting the organization and delaying the terminal differentiation of growth plate chondrocytes, and can induce exostoses by causing ectopic chondrogenesis of cells on the bone surface. Furthermore, the

  2. Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... implant, including: • How long a person has been deaf, •The number of surviving auditory nerve fibers, and • ... Implant, Severe Sensoryneurial Hearing Loss Get Involved Professional Development Practice Management ENT Careers Marketplace Privacy Policy Terms ...

  3. Atf4 regulates chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation during endochondral ossification by activating Ihh transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiguang; Lian, Na; Li, Lingzhen; Moss, Heather E; Wang, Weixi; Perrien, Daniel S; Elefteriou, Florent; Yang, Xiangli

    2009-12-01

    Activating transcription factor 4 (Atf4) is a leucine-zipper-containing protein of the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) family. Ablation of Atf4 (Atf4(-/-)) in mice leads to severe skeletal defects, including delayed ossification and low bone mass, short stature and short limbs. Atf4 is expressed in proliferative and prehypertrophic growth plate chondrocytes, suggesting an autonomous function of Atf4 in chondrocytes during endochondral ossification. In Atf4(-/-) growth plate, the typical columnar structure of proliferative chondrocytes is disturbed. The proliferative zone is shortened, whereas the hypertrophic zone is transiently expanded. The expression of Indian hedgehog (Ihh) is markedly decreased, whereas the expression of other chondrocyte marker genes, such as type II collagen (Col2a1), PTH/PTHrP receptor (Pth1r) and type X collagen (Col10a1), is normal. Furthermore, forced expression of Atf4 in chondrocytes induces endogenous Ihh mRNA, and Atf4 directly binds to the Ihh promoter and activates its transcription. Supporting these findings, reactivation of Hh signaling pharmacologically in mouse limb explants corrects the Atf4(-/-) chondrocyte proliferation and short limb phenotypes. This study thus identifies Atf4 as a novel transcriptional activator of Ihh in chondrocytes that paces longitudinal bone growth by controlling growth plate chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation.

  4. Curcumin Inhibits Chondrocyte Hypertrophy of Mesenchymal Stem Cells through IHH and Notch Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhen; Dou, Ce; Dong, Shiwu

    2017-01-01

    Using tissue engineering technique to repair cartilage damage caused by osteoarthritis is a promising strategy. However, the regenerated tissue usually is fibrous cartilage, which has poor mechanical characteristics compared to hyaline cartilage. Chondrocyte hypertrophy plays an important role in this process. Thus, it is very important to find out a suitable way to maintain the phenotype of chondrocytes and inhibit chondrocyte hypertrophy. Curcumin deriving from turmeric was reported with anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor pharmacological effects. However, the role of curcumin in metabolism of chondrocytes, especially in the chondrocyte hypertrophy remains unclear. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are widely used in cartilage tissue engineering as seed cells. So we investigated the effect of curcumin on chondrogenesis and chondrocyte hypertrophy in MSCs through examination of cell viability, glycosaminoglycan synthesis and specific gene expression. We found curcumin had no effect on expression of chondrogenic markers including Sox9 and Col2a1 while hypertrophic markers including Runx2 and Col10a1 were down-regulated. Further exploration showed that curcumin inhibited chondrocyte hypertrophy through Indian hedgehog homolog (IHH) and Notch signalings. Our results indicated curcumin was a potential agent in modulating cartilage homeostasis and maintaining chondrocyte phenotype.

  5. Nicotine promotes proliferation and collagen synthesis of chondrocytes isolated from normal human and osteoarthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Xiaozhou; Cheng, Shaowen; Shen, Yue; Cheng, Xiaojie; An Rompis, Ferdinand; Wang, Wei; Lin, Zhongqin; Chen, Qingyu; Zhang, Wei; Kou, Dongquan; Peng, Lei; Tian, Xin Qiao; Lu, Chuan Zhu

    2012-01-01

    The aims of the study were to show the direct effect of nicotine with different concentrations (0, 25, 50, and 100 ng/ml) on chondrocytes isolated from normal human and osteoarthritis patients, respectively. Microscopic observation was performed during the culture with an inverted microscope. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay method was adopted to observe the influence of nicotine on the proliferation of chondrocytes, and real-time PCR and ELISA were used to assay the mRNA and protein expression of type II collagen and aggrecan, respectively. We discovered that the OA chondrocytes were similar to fibroblasts in shape and grow slower than normal chondrocytes. The proliferation of the two kinds of chondrocytes was increased in a concentration-dependent manner and in a time-dependent manner (P<0.05). Also, we found that the mRNA level of type II collagen were upregulated under 25-100 ng/ml nicotine doses both in the two kinds of chondrocytes compared with control. The expression of protein levels of type II collagen were synthesized in line with the increase in mRNA. No effect was observed on aggrecan synthesis with any nicotine dose. We concluded that nicotine has the same effect on both chondrocytes, obtained either from osteoarthritis patients or from normal human, and the positive effect of smoking in OA may relate to the alteration in metabolism of chondrocytes.

  6. Modulation of Hyaluronan Synthesis by the Interaction between Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Antonioli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs are considered a good source for cellular therapy in cartilage repair. But, their potential to repair the extracellular matrix, in an osteoarthritic environment, is still controversial. In osteoarthritis (OA, anti-inflammatory action and extracellular matrix production are important steps for cartilage healing. This study examined the interaction of BM-MSC and OA-chondrocyte on the production of hyaluronan and inflammatory cytokines in a Transwell system. We compared cocultured BM-MSCs and OA-chondrocytes with the individually cultured controls (monocultures. There was a decrease in BM-MSCs cell count in coculture with OA-chondrocytes when compared to BM-MSCs alone. In monoculture, BM-MSCs produced higher amounts of hyaluronan than OA-chondrocytes and coculture of BM-MSCs with OA-chondrocytes increased hyaluronan production per cell. Hyaluronan synthase-1 mRNA expression was upregulated in BM-MSCs after coculture with OA-chondrocytes, whereas hyaluronidase-1 was downregulated. After coculture, lower IL-6 levels were detected in BM-MSCs compared with OA-chondrocytes. These results indicate that, in response to coculture with OA-chondrocytes, BM-MSCs change their behavior by increasing production of hyaluronan and decreasing inflammatory cytokines. Our results indicate that BM-MSCs per se could be a potential tool for OA regenerative therapy, exerting short-term effects on the local microenvironment even when cell:cell contact is not occurring.

  7. Engineering Cartilage Tissue by Pellet Coculture of Chondrocytes and Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Ling; Post, Janine Nicole; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes; Westendorf, Jennifer J.; van Wijnen, Andre J.

    2015-01-01

    Coculture of chondrocytes and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in pellets has been shown to be beneficial in engineering cartilage tissue in vitro. In these cultures trophic effects of MSCs increase the proliferation and matrix deposition of chondrocytes. Thus, large cartilage constructs can be made

  8. RAGE and activation of chondrocytes and fibroblast-like synoviocytes in joint diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenvoorden, Marjan Maria Claziena

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation describes a new model in which cartilage degradation can be studied. New cartilage is formed by bovine chondrocytes obtained from the slaughterhouse and cocultured with synovial cells from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients to study the interaction between the chondrocytes and

  9. IFT88 influences chondrocyte actin organization and biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z; Wann, A K T; Thompson, C L; Hassen, A; Wang, W; Knight, M M

    2016-03-01

    Primary cilia are microtubule based organelles which control a variety of signalling pathways important in cartilage development, health and disease. This study examines the role of the intraflagellar transport (IFT) protein, IFT88, in regulating fundamental actin organisation and mechanics in articular chondrocytes. The study used an established chondrocyte cell line with and without hypomorphic mutation of IFT88 (IFT88(orpk)). Confocal microscopy was used to quantify F-actin and myosin IIB organisation. Viscoelastic cell and actin cortex mechanics were determined using micropipette aspiration with actin dynamics visualised in live cells transfected with LifeACT-GFP. IFT88(orpk) cells exhibited a significant increase in acto-myosin stress fibre organisation relative to wild-type (WT) cells in monolayer and an altered response to cytochalasin D. Rounded IFT88(orpk) cells cultured in suspension exhibited reduced cortical actin expression with reduced cellular equilibrium modulus. Micropipette aspiration resulted in reduced membrane bleb formation in IFT88(orpk) cells. Following membrane blebbing, IFT88(orpk) cells exhibited slower reformation of the actin cortex. IFT88(orpk) cells showed increased actin deformability and reduced cortical tension confirming that IFT regulates actin cortex mechanics. The reduced cortical tension is also consistent with the reduced bleb formation. This study demonstrates for the first time that the ciliary protein IFT88 regulates fundamental actin organisation and the stiffness of the actin cortex leading to alterations in cell deformation, mechanical properties and blebbing in an IFT88 chondrocyte cell line. This adds to the growing understanding of the role of primary cilia and IFT in regulating cartilage biology. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. R-spondin 2 facilitates differentiation of proliferating chondrocytes into hypertrophic chondrocytes by enhancing Wnt/β-catenin signaling in endochondral ossification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takegami, Yasuhiko; Ohkawara, Bisei; Ito, Mikako; Masuda, Akio; Nakashima, Hiroaki; Ishiguro, Naoki; Ohno, Kinji

    2016-01-01

    Endochondral ossification is a crucial process for longitudinal growth of bones. Differentiating chondrocytes in growth cartilage form four sequential zones of proliferation, alignment into column, hypertrophy, and substitution of chondrocytes with osteoblasts. Wnt/β-catenin signaling is essential for differentiation of proliferating chondrocytes into hypertrophic chondrocytes in growth cartilage. R-spondin 2 (Rspo2), a member of R-spondin family, is an agonist for Wnt signaling, but its role in chondrocyte differentiation remains unknown. Here we report that growth cartilage of Rspo2-knockout mice shows a decreased amount of β-catenin and increased amounts collagen type II (CII) and Sox9 in the abnormally extended proliferating zone. In contrast, expression of collagen type X (CX) in the hypertrophic zone remains unchanged. Differentiating chondrogenic ATDC5 cells, mimicking proliferating chondrocytes, upregulate Rspo2 and its putative receptor, Lgr5, in parallel. Addition of recombinant human Rspo2 to differentiating ATDC5 cells decreases expressions of Col2a1, Sox9, and Acan, as well as production of proteoglycans. In contrast, lentivirus-mediated knockdown of Rspo2 has the opposite effect. The effect of Rspo2 on chondrogenic differentiation is mediated by Wnt/β-catenin signaling, and not by Wnt/PCP or Wnt/Ca 2+ signaling. We propose that Rspo2 activates Wnt/β-catenin signaling to reduce Col2a1 and Sox9 and to facilitate differentiation of proliferating chondrocytes into hypertrophic chondrocytes in growth cartilage. - Highlights: • Rspo2 is a secreted activator of Wnt, and its knockout shows extended proliferating chondrocytes in endochondral ossification. • In proliferating chondrocytes of Rspo2-knockout mice, Sox9 and collagen type 2 are increased and β-catenin is decreased. • Rspo2 and its receptor Lgr5, as well as Sox9 and collagen type 2, are expressed in differentiating ATDC5 chondrogenic cells. • In ATDC5 cells, Rspo2 decreases expressions

  11. R-spondin 2 facilitates differentiation of proliferating chondrocytes into hypertrophic chondrocytes by enhancing Wnt/β-catenin signaling in endochondral ossification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takegami, Yasuhiko [Division of Neurogenetics, Center of Neurological Disease and Cancer, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nagoya University School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Ohkawara, Bisei; Ito, Mikako; Masuda, Akio [Division of Neurogenetics, Center of Neurological Disease and Cancer, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Nakashima, Hiroaki; Ishiguro, Naoki [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nagoya University School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Ohno, Kinji, E-mail: ohnok@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Division of Neurogenetics, Center of Neurological Disease and Cancer, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan)

    2016-04-22

    Endochondral ossification is a crucial process for longitudinal growth of bones. Differentiating chondrocytes in growth cartilage form four sequential zones of proliferation, alignment into column, hypertrophy, and substitution of chondrocytes with osteoblasts. Wnt/β-catenin signaling is essential for differentiation of proliferating chondrocytes into hypertrophic chondrocytes in growth cartilage. R-spondin 2 (Rspo2), a member of R-spondin family, is an agonist for Wnt signaling, but its role in chondrocyte differentiation remains unknown. Here we report that growth cartilage of Rspo2-knockout mice shows a decreased amount of β-catenin and increased amounts collagen type II (CII) and Sox9 in the abnormally extended proliferating zone. In contrast, expression of collagen type X (CX) in the hypertrophic zone remains unchanged. Differentiating chondrogenic ATDC5 cells, mimicking proliferating chondrocytes, upregulate Rspo2 and its putative receptor, Lgr5, in parallel. Addition of recombinant human Rspo2 to differentiating ATDC5 cells decreases expressions of Col2a1, Sox9, and Acan, as well as production of proteoglycans. In contrast, lentivirus-mediated knockdown of Rspo2 has the opposite effect. The effect of Rspo2 on chondrogenic differentiation is mediated by Wnt/β-catenin signaling, and not by Wnt/PCP or Wnt/Ca{sup 2+} signaling. We propose that Rspo2 activates Wnt/β-catenin signaling to reduce Col2a1 and Sox9 and to facilitate differentiation of proliferating chondrocytes into hypertrophic chondrocytes in growth cartilage. - Highlights: • Rspo2 is a secreted activator of Wnt, and its knockout shows extended proliferating chondrocytes in endochondral ossification. • In proliferating chondrocytes of Rspo2-knockout mice, Sox9 and collagen type 2 are increased and β-catenin is decreased. • Rspo2 and its receptor Lgr5, as well as Sox9 and collagen type 2, are expressed in differentiating ATDC5 chondrogenic cells. • In ATDC5 cells, Rspo2 decreases

  12. Detecting new microRNAs in human osteoarthritic chondrocytes identifies miR-3085 as a human, chondrocyte-selective, microRNA

    OpenAIRE

    Crowe, N.; Swingler, T.E.; Le, L.T.T.; Barter, M.J.; Wheeler, G.; Pais, H.; Donell, S.T.; Young, D.A.; Dalmay, T.; Clark, I.M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective To use deep sequencing to identify novel microRNAs (miRNAs) in human osteoarthritic cartilage which have a functional role in chondrocyte phenotype or function. Design A small RNA library was prepared from human osteoarthritic primary chondrocytes using in-house adaptors and analysed by Illumina sequencing. Novel candidate miRNAs were validated by northern blot and qRT-PCR. Expression was measured in cartilage models. Targets of novel candidates were identified by microarray...

  13. Cyclic Equibiaxial Tensile Strain Alters Gene Expression of Chondrocytes via Histone Deacetylase 4 Shuttling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chongwei Chen

    Full Text Available This paper aims to investigate whether equibiaxial tensile strain alters chondrocyte gene expression via controlling subcellular localization of histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4.Murine chondrocytes transfected with GFP-HDAC4 were subjected to 3 h cyclic equibiaxial tensile strain (CTS, 6% strain at 0.25 Hz by a Flexcell® FX-5000™ Tension System. Fluorescence microscope and western blot were used to observe subcellular location of HDAC4. The gene expression was analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. The concentration of Glycosaminoglycans in culture medium was quantified by bimethylmethylene blue dye; Collagen II protein was evaluated by western blot. Cells phenotype was identified by immunohistochemistry. Cell viability was evaluated by live-dead cell detect kit. Okadaic acid, an inhibitor of HDAC4 nuclear relocation, was used to further validate whether HDAC4 nuclear relocation plays a role in gene expression in response to tension stimulation.87.5% of HDAC4 was located in the cytoplasm in chondrocytes under no loading condition, but it was relocated to the nucleus after CTS. RT-PCR analysis showed that levels of mRNA for aggrecan, collagen II, LK1 and SOX9 were all increased in chondrocytes subjected to CTS as compared to no loading control chondrocytes; in contrast, the levels of type X collagen, MMP-13, IHH and Runx2 gene expression were decreased in the chondrocytes subjected to CTS as compared to control chondrocytes. Meanwhile, CTS contributed to elevation of glycosaminoglycans and collagen II protein, but did not change collagen I production. When Okadaic acid blocked HDAC4 relocation from the cytoplasm to nucleus, the changes of the chondrocytes induced by CTS were abrogated. There was no chondrocyte dead detected in this study in response to CTS.CTS is able to induce HDAC4 relocation from cytoplasm to nucleus. Thus, CTS alters chondrocytes gene expression in association with the relocation of HDAC4 induced by CTS.

  14. Inflammation induction of Dickkopf-1 mediates chondrocyte apoptosis in osteoarthritic joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, L-H; Wang, C-J; Ko, J-Y; Sun, Y-C; Su, Y-S; Wang, F-S

    2009-07-01

    Dysregulated Wnt signaling appears to modulate chondrocyte fate and joint disorders. Dickkopf-1 (DKK1) regulates the pathogenesis of skeletal tissue by inhibiting Wnt actions. This study examined whether DKK1 expression is linked to chondrocyte fate in osteoarthritis (OA). Articular cartilage specimens harvested from nine patients with knee OA and from six controls with femoral neck fracture were assessed for DKK1, interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), Bad, Bax, Bcl2 and caspase-3 expression by real time-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry. Apoptotic chondrocytes were detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate-biotin nick end-labelling (TUNEL) and 4', 6-dianidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride (DAPI) staining. Human chondrocyte cultures were treated with recombinant IL-1beta and monoclonal DKK1 antibody to determine whether DKK1 impairs chondrocyte survival. Expression of DKK1 correlated with inflammatory cytokine levels (IL-1beta and TNF-alpha expressions), proapoptosis regulators (Bad and caspase-3 expressions) and TUNEL staining in OA cartilage tissues. The IL-1beta induced expressions of DKK1, Bax, Bad and caspase-3-dependent apoptosis of chondrocyte cultures. Neutralization of DKK1 by monoclonal DKK1 antibody significantly abrogated IL-1beta-mediated caspase-3 cleavage and apoptosis and reversed chondrocyte proliferation. Recombinant DKK1 treatment impaired chondrocyte growth and promoted apoptosis. By suppressing nuclear beta-catenin accumulation and Akt phosphorylation, DKK1 mediated IL-1beta promotion of chondrocyte apoptosis. Chondrocyte apoptosis correlates with joint OA. Expression of DKK1 contributes to cartilage deterioration and is a potent factor in OA pathogenesis. Attenuating DKK1 may reduce cartilage deterioration in OA.

  15. Scaffold-assisted cartilage tissue engineering using infant chondrocytes from human hip cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuz, P C; Gentili, C; Samans, B; Martinelli, D; Krüger, J P; Mittelmeier, W; Endres, M; Cancedda, R; Kaps, C

    2013-12-01

    Studies about cartilage repair in the hip and infant chondrocytes are rare. The aim of our study was to evaluate the use of infant articular hip chondrocytes for tissue engineering of scaffold-assisted cartilage grafts. Hip cartilage was obtained from five human donors (age 1-10 years). Expanded chondrocytes were cultured in polyglycolic acid (PGA)-fibrin scaffolds. De- and re-differentiation of chondrocytes were assessed by histological staining and gene expression analysis of typical chondrocytic marker genes. In vivo, cartilage matrix formation was assessed by histology after subcutaneous transplantation of chondrocyte-seeded PGA-fibrin scaffolds in immunocompromised mice. The donor tissue was heterogenous showing differentiated articular cartilage and non-differentiated tissue and considerable expression of type I and II collagens. Gene expression analysis showed repression of typical chondrocyte and/or mesenchymal marker genes during cell expansion, while markers were re-induced when expanded cells were cultured in PGA-fibrin scaffolds. Cartilage formation after subcutaneous transplantation of chondrocyte loaded PGA-fibrin scaffolds in nude mice was variable, with grafts showing resorption and host cell infiltration or formation of hyaline cartilage rich in type II collagen. Addition of human platelet rich plasma (PRP) to cartilage grafts resulted robustly in formation of hyaline-like cartilage that showed type II collagen and regions with type X collagen. These results suggest that culture of expanded and/or de-differentiated infant hip cartilage cells in PGA-fibrin scaffolds initiates chondrocyte re-differentiation. The heterogenous donor tissue containing immature chondrocytes bears the risk of cartilage repair failure in vivo, which may be possibly overcome by the addition of PRP. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cost effectiveness of autologous blood transfusion – A developing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An autologous blood donation program was set up at National Orthopaedic Hospital, Igbobi Lagos in 1992 in response to the rising sero prevalence of HIV observed in our “relative replacement” donors. A retrospective batch analysis of patients who received autologous transfusion and those who received homologous ...

  17. Proteoglycon synthesis by articular chondrocytes in agarose culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweet, M.B.E.; Grisillo, A.; Coehlo, A.; Schnitzler, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    Articular chondrocytes were isolated from knee joints of full-term bovine foetuses and grown in long-term agarose cultures. At intervals, cultures were labelled with 35 S-[sulphate] or D[6- 3 H] glucosamine. Newly synthesized proteoglycans were extracted with 4 M guanidine HCl and purified by isopycnic density gradient centrifugation or on DEAE cellulose in the presence of 8 M urea. Characterization of the proteoglycans revealed them to be identical in size to those present in the tissue and to be similarly capable of aggregation with hyaluronate. Newly synthesized chondroitin sulphate chains were identical in size, but newly synthesized keratan sulphate chains were somewhat larger than those present in the tissue. The newly synthesized proteoglycans were shown to contain the same range of O-linked oligosaccharides identified in proteoglycans of the Swarm rat chondrosarcoma. Cartilage-specific proteoglycan continued to be synthesized by the chondrocytes for up to 60 days; however, with time, proportionately more of a small non-aggregating proteoglycan appeared

  18. Autologous proliferative therapies in recalcitrant lateral epicondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetschke, Elisa; Rudolf, Margit; Lohmann, Christoph H; Stärke, Christian

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates the clinical effects of autologous conditioned plasma (ACP) injections and low-level laser application as therapy options for chronic lateral epicondylitis. A total of 52 patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis were evaluated in this study; 26 of these patients received three ACP injections and the control group, with 26 patients, received 12 laser applications, with standardized physical therapy for all patients afterward. Control examinations took place before treatment, after 2 and 6 mos, and in the 1 yr final follow-up. The control examination included the visual analog scale for pain and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand outcome measure scores. The analysis at final follow-up after 1 yr showed that both treatment options resulted in successful therapy outcome for the patients. In total, 63.5 % were successfully treated. Successful treatment was defined as more than 30% improvement in the visual analog score and more than 10.2 points in the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score. Both groups showed a significant improvement in time response. This study demonstrates the beneficial effects of autologous proliferative therapies in the treatment of lateral epicondylitis. The data show that laser application and ACP therapy lead to a clinical improvement in epicondylopathia. Especially the new treatment with ACP can be highlighted as an alternative and as an easy-to-apply therapy option for clinical practice.

  19. Complications Following Autologous Latissimus Flap Breast Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mufid Burgić

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Use of an autologous latissimus flap in breast reconstruction accounts for a supple and natural look of reconstructed breast. Most common postoperative complication, seroma, became more of a rule then an exception when it comes to postoperative evaluation of the patients who underwent this reconstructive procedure. A retrospective study analysing and evaluating different complication rates in 20 patients who underwent breast reconstruction by autologous latissimus flap, was conducted. All patients included in the study were operated at the Department of plastic surgery of Hôpital Civil in Strasbourg, France, between 1996 and 2008. The complication rates were noted as follows: seroma in 19 of our 20 patients (95%, late hypertrophic scarring in 3 patients (15%, postoperative surgical site hematoma in 3 patients (15%, and 2 patients (10% presented postoperative chronic back pain. Different options used in seroma treatment and prevention (subcutaneous-fascia anchor sutures of donor site, application of corticosteroids by injection into donor site postoperatively, passive drainage can reduce seroma formation and thus overall complication rates, leading to much faster patient’s recovery time and return to normal daily activities.

  20. Centrifugation assay for measuring adhesion of serially passaged bovine chondrocytes to polystyrene surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, David S; Hitchins, Victoria M; Vegella, Thomas J; Malinauskas, Richard A; Ferlin, Kimberly M; Fisher, John P; Frondoza, Carmelita G

    2012-07-01

    A major obstacle in chondrocyte-based therapy for cartilage repair is the limited availability of cells that maintain their original phenotype. Propagation of chondrocytes as monolayer cultures on polystyrene surfaces is used extensively for amplifying cell numbers. However, chondrocytes undergo a phenotypic shift when propagated in this manner and display characteristics of more adherent fibroblastic cells. Little information is available about the effect of this phenotypic shift on cellular adhesion properties. We evaluated changes in adhesion property as bovine chondrocytes were serially propagated up to five passages in monolayer culture using a centrifugation cell adhesion assay, which was based on counting of cells before and after being exposed to centrifugal dislodgement forces of 120 and 350 g. Chondrocytes proliferated well in a monolayer culture with doubling times of 2-3 days, but they appeared more fibroblastic and exhibited elongated cell morphology with continued passage. The centrifugation cell adhesion assay showed that chondrocytes became more adhesive with passage as the percentage of adherent cells after centrifugation increased and was not statistically different from the adhesion of the fibroblast cell line, L929, starting at passage 3. This increased adhesiveness correlated with a shift to a fibroblastic morphology and increased collagen I mRNA expression starting at passage 2. Our findings indicate that the centrifugation cell adhesion assay may serve as a reproducible tool to track alterations in chondrocyte phenotype during their extended propagation in culture.

  1. Smad6/Smurf1 overexpression in cartilage delays chondrocyte hypertrophy and causes dwarfism with osteopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiki, Mitsuru; Imamura, Takeshi; Okamoto, Mina; Hayashi, Makoto; Murai, Junko; Myoui, Akira; Ochi, Takahiro; Miyazono, Kohei; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Tsumaki, Noriyuki

    2004-01-01

    Biochemical experiments have shown that Smad6 and Smad ubiquitin regulatory factor 1 (Smurf1) block the signal transduction of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). However, their in vivo functions are largely unknown. Here, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing Smad6 in chondrocytes. Smad6 transgenic mice showed postnatal dwarfism with osteopenia and inhibition of Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation in chondrocytes. Endochondral ossification during development in these mice was associated with almost normal chondrocyte proliferation, significantly delayed chondrocyte hypertrophy, and thin trabecular bone. The reduced population of hypertrophic chondrocytes after birth seemed to be related to impaired bone growth and formation. Organ culture of cartilage rudiments showed that chondrocyte hypertrophy induced by BMP2 was inhibited in cartilage prepared from Smad6 transgenic mice. We then generated transgenic mice overexpressing Smurf1 in chondrocytes. Abnormalities were undetectable in Smurf1 transgenic mice. Mating Smad6 and Smurf1 transgenic mice produced double-transgenic pups with more delayed endochondral ossification than Smad6 transgenic mice. These results provided evidence that Smurf1 supports Smad6 function in vivo. PMID:15123739

  2. Culture temperature affects redifferentiation and cartilaginous extracellular matrix formation in dedifferentiated human chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Akira; Aoyama, Tomoki; Iijima, Hirotaka; Tajino, Junichi; Nagai, Momoko; Yamaguchi, Shoki; Zhang, Xiangkai; Kuroki, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    To date, there have been few studies on how temperature affects the phenotype and metabolism of human chondrocytes. Thus, the purpose of this study was to elucidate the effects of culture temperature on chondrocyte redifferentiation and extracellular matrix (ECM) formation using dedifferentiated mature human chondrocytes in vitro. Dedifferentiated chondrocytes were cultured in a pellet culture system for up to 21 days. The pellets were randomly divided into three groups with different culture temperature (32, 37, and 41°C). Chondrocyte redifferentiation and ECM formation were evaluated by wet weight, messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA), histological, and biochemical analyses. The results showed that the wet weight and the mRNA expressions of collagen type II A1 and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein at 37°C were higher than the corresponding values at 32°C. The histological and biochemical analyses revealed that the syntheses of type II collagen and proteoglycan were promoted at 37°C compared to those at 32°C, whereas they were considerably inhibited at 41°C. In conclusion, the results obtained herein indicated that temperature affects chondrocyte redifferentiation and ECM formation, and modulation of temperature might thus represent an advantageous means to regulate the phenotype and biosynthetic activity of chondrocytes. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Effects of intermittent versus continuous parathyroid hormone administration on condylar chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Qi; Wan, Qilong; Yang, Rongtao; Zhou, Haihua; Li, Zubing

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Different PTH administration exerts different effects on condylar chondrocyte. ► Intermittent PTH administration suppresses condylar chondrocyte proliferation. ► Continuous PTH administration maintains condylar chondrocyte proliferating. ► Intermittent PTH administration enhances condylar chondrocyte differentiation. -- Abstract: Endochondral ossification is a complex process involving chondrogenesis and osteogenesis regulated by many hormones and growth factors. Parathyroid hormone (PTH), one of the key hormones regulating bone metabolism, promotes osteoblast differentiation and osteogenesis by intermittent administration, whereas continuous PTH administration inhibits bone formation. However, the effects of PTH on chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation are still unclear. In this study, intermittent PTH administration presented enhanced effects on condylar chondrocyte differentiation and bone formation, as demonstrated by increased mineral nodule formation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, up-regulated runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), ALP, collagen type X (COL10a1), collagen type I (COL1a1), osteocalcin (OCN), bone sialoprotein (BSP), bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and osterix (OSX) mRNA and/or protein expression. On the contrary, continuous PTH administration promoted condylar chondrocyte proliferation and suppressed its differentiation, as demonstrated by up-regulated collagen type II (COL2a1) mRNA expression, reduced mineral nodule formation and down-regulated expression of the mRNAs and/or proteins mentioned above. Our data suggest that PTH can regulate condylar chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation, depending on the type of PTH administration. These results provide new insight into the effects of PTH on condylar chondrocytes and new evidence for using local PTH administration to cure mandibular asymmetry.

  4. Effects of intermittent versus continuous parathyroid hormone administration on condylar chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qi; Wan, Qilong; Yang, Rongtao; Zhou, Haihua [The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) and Key Laboratory of Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, 237 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430079 (China); Li, Zubing, E-mail: lizubing0827@163.com [The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) and Key Laboratory of Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, 237 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430079 (China); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, 237 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430079 (China)

    2012-07-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different PTH administration exerts different effects on condylar chondrocyte. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Intermittent PTH administration suppresses condylar chondrocyte proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Continuous PTH administration maintains condylar chondrocyte proliferating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Intermittent PTH administration enhances condylar chondrocyte differentiation. -- Abstract: Endochondral ossification is a complex process involving chondrogenesis and osteogenesis regulated by many hormones and growth factors. Parathyroid hormone (PTH), one of the key hormones regulating bone metabolism, promotes osteoblast differentiation and osteogenesis by intermittent administration, whereas continuous PTH administration inhibits bone formation. However, the effects of PTH on chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation are still unclear. In this study, intermittent PTH administration presented enhanced effects on condylar chondrocyte differentiation and bone formation, as demonstrated by increased mineral nodule formation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, up-regulated runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), ALP, collagen type X (COL10a1), collagen type I (COL1a1), osteocalcin (OCN), bone sialoprotein (BSP), bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and osterix (OSX) mRNA and/or protein expression. On the contrary, continuous PTH administration promoted condylar chondrocyte proliferation and suppressed its differentiation, as demonstrated by up-regulated collagen type II (COL2a1) mRNA expression, reduced mineral nodule formation and down-regulated expression of the mRNAs and/or proteins mentioned above. Our data suggest that PTH can regulate condylar chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation, depending on the type of PTH administration. These results provide new insight into the effects of PTH on condylar chondrocytes and new evidence for using local PTH administration to cure mandibular

  5. Predeposit autologous blood transfusion: Do we require to promote it?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurjit Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Safest blood a patient can receive is his own. Quest for safe blood transfusion has remained of prime concern. To meet this aspiration, various forms of autologous blood transfusions can be practiced. It is especially suitable for patients with rare blood groups and religious sects such as Jehovah′s witness autologous transfusion is extremely safe. Cross matching is not required; iso-immunization to a foreign body is excluded. Fear of transfusion transmissible disease can be ignored. Therefore, autologous blood transfusion is required to be revisited. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective study carried out at Padmashree Dr. D. Y. Patil Medical College, Hospital and Research Centre, Pune between July 2010 and May 2012. Study comprised of 100 patients divided into two groups, autologous and homologous. Benefits of autologous transfusion were studied. Results: There was no significant change in hematocrit and blood parameters after blood donation. That is mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (P < 0.001 after blood donation. Only one complication of vasovagal syncope was observed at the time of blood donation. Conclusion: Autologous blood transfusion is safe. Easy alternative to be practiced in elective surgeries, especially in patients with rare blood group or believers of Jehovah′s witness faith. It helps to reduce the shortfall in national blood inventory. Autologous blood donation should be practiced whenever possible.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of hyaline cartilage regeneration in neocartilage graft implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, C F; Ng, K K; Ng, S H; Cheung, Y C

    2003-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the regenerative potential of hyaline cartilage in a neocartilage graft implant with the aid of MR cartilage imaging using a rabbit model. Surgical osteochondral defects were created in the femoral condyles of 30 mature New Zealand rabbits. The findings of neocartilage in autologous cartilage grafts packed into osteochondral defects were compared with control group of no implant to the osteochondral defect. The outcome of the implantations was correlated with histologic and MR cartilage imaging findings over a 3-month interval. Neocartilage grafts packed into osteochondral defects showed regeneration of hyaline cartilage at the outer layer of the implant using MR cartilage imaging. Fibrosis of fibrocartilage developed at the outer layer of the autologous cartilage graft together with an inflammatory reaction within the osteochondral defect. This animal study provides evidence of the regenerative ability of hyaline cartilage in neocartilage transplants to repair articular cartilage.

  7. Autologous breast reconstruction using the immediately lipofilled extended latissimus dorsi flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, N; Fairbairn, N; Trail, M; Ewing, A; Yong, L; Raine, C; Dixon, J M

    2018-02-01

    The latissimus dorsi flap is a popular choice for autologous breast reconstruction. To dramatically improve volume, we report our experience of using the immediately lipofilled extended latissimus dorsi (ELD) flap and show it as a valid option for autologous breast reconstruction. Patients undergoing the procedure between December 2013 and June 2016 were included. Demographic, clinical and operative factors were analysed, together with in-hospital morbidity and duration of postoperative hospital stay. A total of 71 ELD flaps with immediate lipofilling were performed. Forty-five reconstructions were immediate and the remaining 26 delayed. Median (range) volume of autologous fat injected immediately was 171 ml (40-630 ml). Contralateral reductions were performed in 25 patients with the median reduction volume 185 g (89-683 g). Median duration of admission was 6.5 (3-18) days and patients were followed up for 12 months (1-37). Three total flap failures occurred and had to be excised (4%). One haematoma occurred requiring drainage (1%). Signs of infection requiring intravenous antibiotics occurred in five patients (7%). In 5 patients wound dehiscence occurred, and only two of these required resuturing (3%). In total, 7 patients developed a seroma requiring repeated drainage (10%). Three reconstructions experienced mild mastectomy flap necrosis with no needing reoperation (4%). Our experience represents the largest series to date and shows that in carefully selected patients the technique is safe, can avoid the requirement for implants, and has the potential to streamline the reconstructive journey. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Pretreatment with platelet derived growth factor-BB modulates the ability of costochondral resting zone chondrocytes incorporated into PLA/PGA scaffolds to form new cartilage in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, C H; Schwartz, Z; Niederauer, G G; Carnes, D L; Dean, D D; Boyan, B D

    2000-01-01

    Optimal repair of chondral defects is likely to require both a suitable population of chondrogenic cells and a biodegradable matrix to provide a space-filling structural support during the early stages of cartilage formation. This study examined the ability of chondrocytes to support cartilage formation when incorporated into biodegradable scaffolds constructed from copolymers (PLG) of polylactic acid (PLA) and polyglycolic acid (PGA) and implanted in the calf muscle of nude mice. Scaffolds were fabricated to be more hydrophilic (PLG-H) or were reinforced with 10% PGA fibers (PLG-FR), increasing the stiffness of the implant by 20-fold. Confluent primary cultures of rat costochondral resting zone chondrocytes (RC) were loaded into PLG-H foams and implanted intramuscularly. To determine if growth factor pretreatment could modulate the ability of the cells to form new cartilage, RC cells were pretreated with recombinant human platelet derived growth factor-BB IPDGF-BB) for 4 or 24 h prior to implantation. To assess whether scaffold material properties could affect the ability of chondrogenic cells to form cartilage, RC cells were also loaded into PLG-FR scaffolds. To determine if the scaffolds or treatment with PDGF-BB affected the rate of chondrogenesis, tissue at the implant site was harvested at four and eight weeks post-operatively, fixed, decalcified and embedded in paraffin. Sections were obtained along the transverse plane of the lower leg, stained with haematoxylin and eosin, and then assessed by morphometric analysis for area of cartilage, area of residual implant, and area of fibrous connective tissue formation (fibrosis). Whether or not the cartilage contained hypertrophic cells was also assessed. The amount of residual implant did not change with time in any of the implanted tissues. The area occupied by PLG-FR implants was greater than that occupied by PLG-H implants at both time points. All implants were surrounded by fibrous connective tissue, whether

  9. Nuclear deformation and expression change of cartilaginous genes during in vitro expansion of chondrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshiba, Takashi; Yamada, Tomoe; Lu, Hongxu; Kawazoe, Naoki; Tateishi, Tetsuya; Chen, Guoping

    2008-01-01

    Cartilaginous gene expression decreased when chondrocytes were expanded on cell-culture plates. Understanding the dedifferentiation mechanism may provide valuable insight into cartilage tissue engineering. Here, we demonstrated the relationship between the nuclear shape and gene expression during in vitro expansion culture of chondrocytes. Specifically, the projected nuclear area increased and cartilaginous gene expressions decreased during in vitro expansion culture. When the nuclear deformation was recovered by cytochalasin D treatment, aggrecan expression was up-regulated and type I collagen (Col1a2) expression was down-regulated. These results suggest that nuclear deformation may be one of the mechanisms for chondrocyte dedifferentiation during in vitro expansion culture

  10. Autologous Stem Cell Transplant for AL Amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Roy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available AL amyloidosis is caused by clonal plasma cells that produce immunoglobulin light chains which misfold and get deposited as amyloid fibrils. Therapy directed against the plasma cell clone leads to clinical benefit. Melphalan and corticosteroids have been the mainstay of treatment for a number of years and the recent availability of other effective agents (IMiDs and proteasome inhibitors has increased treatment options. Autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT has been used in the treatment of AL amyloidosis for many years. It is associated with high rates of hematologic response and improvement in organ function. However, transplant carries considerable risks. Careful patient selection is important to minimize transplant related morbidity and mortality and ensure optimal patient outcomes. As newer more affective therapies become available the role and timing of ASCT in the overall treatment strategy of AL amyloidosis will need to be continually reassessed.

  11. Use of autologous tissue engineered skin to treat porcine full-thickness skin defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Xia; CAO Yi-lin; CUI Lei; LIU Wei; GUAN Wen-xiang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore a feasible method to repair full-thickness skin defects utilizing tissue engineered techniques. Methods: The Changfeng hybrid swines were used and the skin specimens were cut from the posterior limb girdle region, from which the keratinocytes and fibroblasts were isolated and harvested by trypsin, EDTA, and type II collagenase. The cells were seeded in Petri dishes for primary culture. When the cells were in logarithmic growth phase, they were treated with trypsin to separate them from the floor of the tissue culture dishes. A biodegradable material, Pluronic F-127, was prefabricated and mixed with these cells, and then the cell-Pluronic compounds were seeded evenly into a polyglycolic acid (PGA). Then the constructs were replanted to the autologous animals to repair the full-thickness skin defects. Histology and immunohistochemistry of the neotissue were observed in 1, 2, 4, and 8 postoperative weeks. Results: The cell-Pluronic F-127-PGA compounds repaired autologous full-thickness skin defects 1 week after implantation. Histologically, the tissue engineered skin was similar to the normal skin with stratified epidermis overlying a moderately thick collageneous dermis. Three of the structural proteins in the epidermal basement membrane zone, type IV collagen, laminin, and type VII collagen were detected using immunohistochemical methods. Conclusions: By studying the histology and immunohistochemistry of the neotissue, the bioengineered skin graft holds great promise for improving healing of the skin defects.

  12. Ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.

    1986-01-01

    It is the purpose of the present paper to give a review of surface alloy processing by ion implantation. However, rather than covering this vast subject as a whole, the survey is confined to a presentation of the microstructures that can be found in metal surfaces after ion implantation. The presentation is limited to alloys processed by ion implantation proper, that is to processes in which the alloy compositions are altered significantly by direct injection of the implanted ions. The review is introduced by a presentation of the processes taking place during development of the fundamental event in ion implantation - the collision cascade, followed by a summary of the various microstructures which can be formed after ion implantation into metals. This is compared with the variability of microstructures that can be achieved by rapid solidification processing. The microstructures are subsequently discussed in the light of the processes which, as the implantations proceed, take place during and immediately after formation of the individual collision cascades. These collision cascades define the volumes inside which individual ions are slowed down in the implanted targets. They are not only centres for vigorous agitation but also the sources for formation of excess concentrations of point defects, which will influence development of particular microstructures. A final section presents a selection of specific structures which have been observed in different alloy systems. (orig./GSCH)

  13. Hyperpolarisation of cultured human chondrocytes following cyclical pressure-induced strain: evidence of a role for alpha 5 beta 1 integrin as a chondrocyte mechanoreceptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, M O; Nishida, K; Bavington, C; Godolphin, J L; Dunne, E; Walmsley, S; Jobanputra, P; Nuki, G; Salter, D M

    1997-09-01

    Mechanical stimuli influence chondrocyte metabolism, inducing changes in intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate and proteoglycan production. We have previously demonstrated that primary monolayer cultures of human chondrocytes have an electrophysiological response after intermittent pressure-induced strain characterised by a membrane hyperpolarisation of approximately 40%. The mechanisms responsible for these changes are not fully understood but potentially involve signalling molecules such as integrins that link extracellular matrix with cytoplasmic components. The results reported in this paper demonstrate that the transduction pathways involved in the hyperpolarisation response of human articular chondrocytes in vitro after cyclical pressure-induced strain involve alpha 5 beta 1 integrin. We have demonstrated, using pharmacological inhibitors of a variety of intracellular signalling pathways, that the actin cytoskeleton, the phospholipase C calmodulin pathway, and both tyrosine protein kinase and protein kinase C activities are important in the transduction of the electrophysiological response. These results suggest that alpha 5 beta 1 is an important chondrocyte mechanoreceptor and a potential regulator of chondrocyte function.

  14. Growth factor effects on costal chondrocytes for tissue engineering fibrocartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, D.E.; Athanasiou, K.A.

    2010-01-01

    Tissue engineered fibrocartilage could become a feasible option for replacing tissues like the knee meniscus or temporomandibular joint disc. This study employed five growth factors insulin-like growth factor-I, transforming growth factor-β1, epidermal growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor-BB, and basic fibroblast growth factor in a scaffoldless approach with costal chondrocytes, attempting to improve biochemical and mechanical properties of engineered constructs. Samples were quantitatively assessed for total collagen, glycosaminoglycans, collagen type I, collagen type II, cells, compressive properties, and tensile properties at two time points. Most treated constructs were worse than the no growth factor control, suggesting a detrimental effect, but the IGF treatment tended to improve the constructs. Additionally, the 6wk time point was consistently better than 3wks, with total collagen, glycosaminoglycans, and aggregate modulus doubling during this time. Further optimization of the time in culture and exogenous stimuli will be important in making a more functional replacement tissue. PMID:18597118

  15. Streptococcus pyogenes degrades extracellular matrix in chondrocytes via MMP-13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Atsuo; Okahashi, Nobuo; Maruyama, Fumito; Ooshima, Takashi; Hamada, Shigeyuki; Nakagawa, Ichiro

    2008-01-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) causes a wide range of human diseases, including bacterial arthritis. The pathogenesis of arthritis is characterized by synovial proliferation and the destruction of cartilage and subchondral bone in joints. We report here that GAS strain JRS4 invaded a chondrogenic cell line ATDC5 and induced the degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM), whereas an isogenic mutant of JRS4 lacking a fibronectin-binding protein, SAM1, failed to invade the chondrocytes or degrade the ECM. Reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot analysis revealed that the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 was strongly elevated during the infection with GAS. A reporter assay revealed that the activation of the AP-1 transcription factor and the phosphorylation of c-Jun terminal kinase participated in MMP-13 expression. These results suggest that MMP-13 plays an important role in the destruction of infected joints during the development of septic arthritis

  16. The Effect of Intra-articular Injection of Autologous Microfragmented Fat Tissue on Proteoglycan Synthesis in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damir Hudetz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is one of the leading musculoskeletal disorders in the adult population. It is associated with cartilage damage triggered by the deterioration of the extracellular matrix tissue. The present study explores the effect of intra-articular injection of autologous microfragmented adipose tissue to host chondrocytes and cartilage proteoglycans in patients with knee OA. A prospective, non-randomized, interventional, single-center, open-label clinical trial was conducted from January 2016 to April 2017. A total of 17 patients were enrolled in the study, and 32 knees with osteoarthritis were assessed. Surgical intervention (lipoaspiration followed by tissue processing and intra-articular injection of the final microfragmented adipose tissue product into the affected knee(s was performed in all patients. Patients were assessed for visual analogue scale (VAS, delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage (dGEMRIC and immunoglobulin G (IgG glycans at the baseline, three, six and 12 months after the treatment. Magnetic resonance sequence in dGEMRIC due to infiltration of the anionic, negatively charged contrast gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA2− into the cartilage indicated that the contents of cartilage glycosaminoglycans significantly increased in specific areas of the treated knee joint. In addition, dGEMRIC consequently reflected subsequent changes in the mechanical axis of the lower extremities. The results of our study indicate that the use of autologous and microfragmented adipose tissue in patients with knee OA (measured by dGEMRIC MRI increased glycosaminoglycan (GAG content in hyaline cartilage, which is in line with observed VAS and clinical results.

  17. Bone tissue engineering for spine fusion : An experimental study on ectopic and orthotopic implants in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gaalen, SM; Dhert, WJA; van den Muysenberg, A; Oner, FC; van Blitterswijk, C; Verbout, AJ; de Bruijn, J.D.

    2004-01-01

    Alternatives to the use of autologous bone as a bone graft in spine surgery are needed. The purpose of this study was to examine tissue-engineered bone constructs in comparison with control scaffolds without cells in a posterior spinal implantation model in rats. Syngeneic bone marrow cells were

  18. New perspectives in the treatment of damaged myocardium using autologous skeletal myoblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigatelli, Gianluca; Rossini, Katia; Vindigni, Vincenzo; Mazzoleni, Francesco; Rigatelli, Giorgio; Carraro, Ugo

    2004-01-01

    Autologous skeletal myoblast transplantation may be used to ameliorate the healing process following myocardium infarct and, hopefully, cardiomyopathies. Despite successful animal experimentation, several issues need to be addressed in clinical settings, i.e., the impact of the delivery route, the extent of short- and long-term survival, and differentiation of the injected skeletal myoblasts. The authors offer some new hypotheses resulting from basic research, i.e., where and when to inject the myogenic cells, whatever their source, how to decrease new myofiber atrophy and improve their regeneration. Although these new hypotheses still need to be tested in humans, they may be decisive for future experimental studies and will lead to making endovascular cell implantation a more effective way to treat ischemic heart disease and failure

  19. The Regulatory Role of Signaling Crosstalk in Hypertrophy of MSCs and Human Articular Chondrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhong, Leilei; Huang, X; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes; Post, Janine Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes is a main barrier in application of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for cartilage repair. In addition, hypertrophy occurs occasionally in osteoarthritis (OA). Here we provide a comprehensive review on recent literature describing signal pathways in the

  20. Effects of scaffold composition and architecture on human nasal chondrocyte redifferentiation and cartilaginous matrix deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miot, Sylvie; Woodfield, T.B.F.; Daniels, Alma U.; Suetterlin, Rosemarie; Peterschmitt, Iman; Heberer, Michael; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Riesle, J.U.; Martin, Ivan

    2005-01-01

    We investigated whether the post-expansion redifferentiation and cartilage tissue formation capacity of adult human nasal chondrocytes can be regulated by controlled modifications of scaffold composition and architecture. As a model system, we used poly(ethylene

  1. Synthesis of collagen by bovine chondrocytes cultured in alginate; posttranslational modifications and cell-matrix interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekman, B.; Verzijl, N.; Bank, R.A.; Von Der Mark, K.; TeKoppele, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The extracellular matrix synthesized by articular chondrocytes cultured in alginate beads was investigated. Collagen levels increased sigmoidally with time and remained constant after 2 weeks of culture. The presence of cartilage-specific type II collagen was confirmed immunohistochemically.

  2. Beta1 integrins regulate chondrocyte rotation, G1 progression, and cytokinesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aszodi, Attila; Hunziker, Ernst B; Brakebusch, Cord

    2003-01-01

    Beta1 integrins are highly expressed on chondrocytes, where they mediate adhesion to cartilage matrix proteins. To assess the functions of beta1 integrin during skeletogenesis, we inactivated the beta1 integrin gene in chondrocytes. We show here that these mutant mice develop a chondrodysplasia...... of various severity. beta1-deficient chondrocytes had an abnormal shape and failed to arrange into columns in the growth plate. This is caused by a lack of motility, which is in turn caused by a loss of adhesion to collagen type II, reduced binding to and impaired spreading on fibronectin, and an abnormal F......-actin organization. In addition, mutant chondrocytes show decreased proliferation caused by a defect in G1/S transition and cytokinesis. The G1/S defect is, at least partially, caused by overexpression of Fgfr3, nuclear translocation of Stat1/Stat5a, and up-regulation of the cell cycle inhibitors p16 and p21...

  3. ADAM12-S stimulates bone growth in transgenic mice by modulating chondrocyte proliferation and maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kveiborg, Marie; Albrechtsen, Reidar; Rudkjaer, Lise

    2006-01-01

    ADAM12-S transgenic mice exhibit a pronounced increase in the length of bones, such as femur, tibia, and vertebrae. The effect of ADAM12-S on longitudinal bone growth involves the modulation of chondrocyte proliferation and maturation, likely through proteolytic activities and altered cell......: Transgenic mice expressing the secreted form of human ADAM12, ADAM12-S, or a truncated metalloprotease-deficient form of ADAM12-S in the circulation were used to study the effects of ADAM12 on the skeleton. In addition, murine chondrocyte cultures were used to study the effect of ADAM12-S on cell...... studies showed that ADAM12-S inhibits chondrocyte adhesion to fibronectin and collagen type II. CONCLUSIONS: ADAM12-S stimulates bone growth in mice by modulating chondrocyte proliferation and maturation through mechanisms probably involving both metalloprotease and adhesion activities....

  4. Exploration of mechanisms underlying the strain-rate-dependent mechanical property of single chondrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Trung Dung; Gu, YuanTong, E-mail: yuantong.gu@qut.edu.au [School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2014-05-05

    Based on the characterization by Atomic Force Microscopy, we report that the mechanical property of single chondrocytes has dependency on the strain-rates. By comparing the mechanical deformation responses and the Young's moduli of living and fixed chondrocytes at four different strain-rates, we explore the deformation mechanisms underlying this dependency property. We found that the strain-rate-dependent mechanical property of living cells is governed by both of the cellular cytoskeleton and the intracellular fluid when the fixed chondrocytes are mainly governed by their intracellular fluid, which is called the consolidation-dependent deformation behavior. Finally, we report that the porohyperelastic constitutive material model which can capture the consolidation-dependent behavior of both living and fixed chondrocytes is a potential candidature to study living cell biomechanics.

  5. Hyaluronan Protects Bovine Articular Chondrocytes against Cell Death Induced by Bupivacaine under Supraphysiologic Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sen; Zhang, Qing-Song; Hester, William; O’Brien, Michael J.; Savoie, Felix H.; You, Zongbing

    2013-01-01

    Background Bupivacaine and supraphysiologic temperature can independently reduce cell viability of articular chondrocytes. In combination these two deleterious factors could further impair cell viability. Hypothesis Hyaluronan may protect chondrocytes from death induced by bupivacaine at supraphysiologic temperatures. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods Bovine articular chondrocytes were treated with hyaluronan at physiologic (37°C) and supraphysiologic temperatures (45°C and 50°C) for one hour, and then exposed to bupivacaine for one hour at room temperature. Cell viability was assessed at three time points: immediately after treatment, six hours later, and twenty-four hours later using flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. The effects of hyaluronan on the levels of sulfated glycosaminoglycan in the chondrocytes were determined using Alcian blue staining. Results (1) Bupivacaine alone did not induce noticeable chondrocyte death at 37°C; (2) bupivacaine and temperature synergistically increased chondrocyte death, that is, when the chondrocytes were conditioned to 45°C and 50°C, 0.25% and 0.5% bupivacaine increased the cell death rate by 131% to 383% in comparison to the phosphate-buffered saline control group; and, (3) addition of hyaluronan reduced chondrocyte death rates to approximately 14% and 25% at 45°C and 50°C, respectively. Hyaluronan’s protective effects were still observed at six and twenty-four hours after bupivacaine treatment at 45°C. However, at 50°C, hyaluronan delayed but did not prevent the cell death caused by bupivacaine. One-hour treatment with hyaluronan significantly increased sulfated glycosaminoglycan levels in the chondrocytes. Conclusions Bupivacaine and supraphysiologic temperature synergistically increase chondrocyte death and hyaluronan may protect articular chondrocytes from death caused by bupivacaine. Clinical Relevance This study provides a rationale to perform pre-clinical and clinical studies to

  6. Autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell delivery to dilated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell delivery to dilated cardiomyopathy patients: A clinical trial. PLN Kaparthi, G Namita, LK Chelluri, VSP Rao, PK Shah, A Vasantha, SK Ratnakar, K Ravindhranath ...

  7. Effect of microcavitary alginate hydrogel with different pore sizes on chondrocyte culture for cartilage tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, Lei; Yao, Yongchang; Wang, Dong-an; Chen, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    In our previous work, a novel microcavitary hydrogel was proven to be effective for proliferation of chondrocytes and maintenance of chondrocytic phenotype. In present work, we further investigated whether the size of microcavity would affect the growth and the function of chondrocytes. By changing the stirring rate, gelatin microspheres in different sizes including small size (80–120 μm), middle size (150–200 μm) and large size (250–300 μm) were prepared. And then porcine chondrocytes were encapsulated into alginate hydrogel with various sizes of gelatin microspheres. Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8), Live/dead staining and real-time PCR were used to analyze the effect of the pore size on cell proliferation and expression of specific chondrocytic genes. According to all the data, cells cultivated in microcavitary hydrogel, especially in small size, had preferable abilities of proliferation and higher expression of cartilaginous markers including type II collagen, aggrecan and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP). Furthermore, it was shown by western blot assay that the culture of chondrocytes in microcavitary hydrogel could improve the proliferation of cells potentially by inducing the Erk1/2-MAPK pathway. Taken together, this study demonstrated that chondrocytes favored microcavitary alginate hydrogel with pore size within the range of 80–120 μm for better growth and ECM synthesis, in which Erk1/2 pathway was involved. This culture system would be promising for cartilage tissue engineering. - Highlights: • A novel model with microcavitary structure was set up to study the interaction between cells and materials. • Microcavitary alginate hydrogel could enhance the proliferation of chondrocytes and promote the expression of cartilaginous genes as compared with plain alginate hydrogel. • Cells in microcavitary alginate hydrogel with pore size within the range of 80–120 μm were capable of better growth and ECM synthesis

  8. Subchondral Bone Plate Thickening Precedes Chondrocyte Apoptosis and Cartilage Degradation in Spontaneous Animal Models of Osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Zamli, Zaitunnatakhin; Robson Brown, Kate; Tarlton, John F.; Adams, Mike A.; Torlot, Georgina E.; Cartwright, Charlie; Cook, William A.; Vassilevskaja, Kristiina; Sharif, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disorder characterised by bone remodelling and cartilage degradation and associated with chondrocyte apoptosis. These processes were investigated at 10, 16, 24, and 30 weeks in Dunkin Hartley (DH) and Bristol Strain 2 (BS2) guinea pigs that develop OA spontaneously. Both strains had a more pronounced chondrocyte apoptosis, cartilage degradation, and subchondral bone changes in the medial than the lateral side of the tibia, and between strains, the ...

  9. Secondary chondrocyte-derived Ihh stimulates proliferation of periosteal cells during chick development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, Paul G; Hall, Brian; Archer, Charles W; Francis-West, Philippa

    2003-10-01

    The development of the skull is characterised by its dependence upon epigenetic influences. One of the most important of these is secondary chondrogenesis, which occurs following ossification within certain membrane bone periostea, as a result of biomechanical articulation. We have studied the genesis, character and function of the secondary chondrocytes of the quadratojugal of the chick between embryonic days 11 and 14. Analysis of gene expression revealed that secondary chondrocytes formed coincident with Sox9 upregulation from a precursor population expressing Cbfa1/Runx2: a reversal of the normal sequence. Such secondary chondrocytes rapidly acquired a phenotype that is a compound of prehypertrophic and hypertrophic chondrocytes, exited from the cell cycle and upregulated Ihh. Pulse and pulse/chase experiments with BrdU confirmed the germinal region as the highly proliferative source of the secondary chondrocytes, which formed by division of chondrocyte-committed precursors. By blocking Hh signalling in explant cultures we show that the enhanced proliferation of the germinal region surrounding the secondary chondrocytes derives from this Ihh source. Additionally, in vitro studies on membrane bone periosteal cells (non-germinal region) demonstrated that these cells can also respond to Ihh, and do so both by enhanced proliferation and precocious osteogenesis. Despite the pro-osteogenic effects of Ihh on periosteal cell differentiation, mechanical articulation of the quadratojugal/quadrate joint in explant culture revealed a negative role for articulation in the regulation of osteocalcin by germinal region descendants. Thus, the mechanical stimulus that is the spur to secondary chondrocyte formation appears able to override the osteogenic influence of Ihh on the periosteum, but does not interfere with the cell cycle-promoting component of Hh signalling.

  10. Changes in the expression of collagen genes show two stages in chondrocyte differentiation in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    This report deals with the quantitation of both mRNA and transcription activity of type I collagen gene and of three cartilage-specific collagens (types II, IX, and X) during in vitro differentiation of chick chondrocytes. Differentiation was obtained by transferal to suspension culture of dedifferentiated cells passaged for 3 wk as adherent cells. The type I collagen mRNA, highly represented in the dedifferentiated cells, rapidly decreased during chondrocyte differentiation. On the contrary,...

  11. Dynamic compression of chondrocyte-agarose constructs reveals new candidate mechanosensitive genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carole Bougault

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage is physiologically exposed to repeated loads. The mechanical properties of cartilage are due to its extracellular matrix, and homeostasis is maintained by the sole cell type found in cartilage, the chondrocyte. Although mechanical forces clearly control the functions of articular chondrocytes, the biochemical pathways that mediate cellular responses to mechanical stress have not been fully characterised. The aim of our study was to examine early molecular events triggered by dynamic compression in chondrocytes. We used an experimental system consisting of primary mouse chondrocytes embedded within an agarose hydrogel; embedded cells were pre-cultured for one week and subjected to short-term compression experiments. Using Western blots, we demonstrated that chondrocytes maintain a differentiated phenotype in this model system and reproduce typical chondrocyte-cartilage matrix interactions. We investigated the impact of dynamic compression on the phosphorylation state of signalling molecules and genome-wide gene expression. After 15 min of dynamic compression, we observed transient activation of ERK1/2 and p38 (members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways and Smad2/3 (members of the canonical transforming growth factor (TGF-β pathways. A microarray analysis performed on chondrocytes compressed for 30 min revealed that only 20 transcripts were modulated more than 2-fold. A less conservative list of 325 modulated genes included genes related to the MAPK and TGF-β pathways and/or known to be mechanosensitive in other biological contexts. Of these candidate mechanosensitive genes, 85% were down-regulated. Down-regulation may therefore represent a general control mechanism for a rapid response to dynamic compression. Furthermore, modulation of transcripts corresponding to different aspects of cellular physiology was observed, such as non-coding RNAs or primary cilium. This study provides new insight into how

  12. Role of Insulin-Transferrin-Selenium in Auricular Chondrocyte Proliferation and Engineered Cartilage Formation in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to determine the effects of Insulin-Transferrin-Selenium (ITS on proliferation of auricular chondrocytes and formation of engineered cartilage in vitro. Pig auricular monolayer chondrocytes and chondrocyte pellets were cultured in media containing 1% ITS at different concentrations of fetal bovine serum (FBS, 10%, 6%, 2%, 0%, or 10% FBS alone as a control for four weeks. Parameters including cell proliferation in monolayer, wet weight, collagen type I/II/X (Col I, II, X and glycosaminoglycan (GAG expression, GAG content of pellets and gene expression associated with cartilage formation/dedifferentiation (lost cartilage phenotype/hypertrophy within the chondrocyte pellets were assessed. The results showed that chondrocytes proliferation rates increased when FBS concentrations increased (2%, 6%, 10% FBS in ITS supplemented groups. In addition, 1% ITS plus 10% FBS significantly promoted cell proliferation than 10% FBS alone. No chondrocytes grew in ITS alone medium. 1% ITS plus 10% FBS enhanced cartilage formation in terms of size, wet weight, cartilage specific matrices, and homogeneity, compared to 10% FBS alone group. Furthermore, ITS prevented engineered cartilage from dedifferentiation (i.e., higher index of Col II/Col I mRNA expression and expression of aggrecan and hypertrophy (i.e., lower mRNA expression of Col X and MMP13. In conclusion, our results indicated that ITS efficiently enhanced auricular chondrocytes proliferation, retained chondrogenic phenotypes, and promoted engineered cartilage formation when combined with FBS, which is potentially used as key supplementation in auricular chondrocytes and engineered cartilage culture.

  13. Effect of microcavitary alginate hydrogel with different pore sizes on chondrocyte culture for cartilage tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Lei; Yao, Yongchang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Tissue Restoration and Reconstruction, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Wang, Dong-an, E-mail: DAWang@ntu.edu.sg [National Engineering Research Center for Tissue Restoration and Reconstruction, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Division of Bioengineering, School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637457 (Singapore); Chen, Xiaofeng, E-mail: chenxf@scut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Tissue Restoration and Reconstruction, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2014-01-01

    In our previous work, a novel microcavitary hydrogel was proven to be effective for proliferation of chondrocytes and maintenance of chondrocytic phenotype. In present work, we further investigated whether the size of microcavity would affect the growth and the function of chondrocytes. By changing the stirring rate, gelatin microspheres in different sizes including small size (80–120 μm), middle size (150–200 μm) and large size (250–300 μm) were prepared. And then porcine chondrocytes were encapsulated into alginate hydrogel with various sizes of gelatin microspheres. Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8), Live/dead staining and real-time PCR were used to analyze the effect of the pore size on cell proliferation and expression of specific chondrocytic genes. According to all the data, cells cultivated in microcavitary hydrogel, especially in small size, had preferable abilities of proliferation and higher expression of cartilaginous markers including type II collagen, aggrecan and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP). Furthermore, it was shown by western blot assay that the culture of chondrocytes in microcavitary hydrogel could improve the proliferation of cells potentially by inducing the Erk1/2-MAPK pathway. Taken together, this study demonstrated that chondrocytes favored microcavitary alginate hydrogel with pore size within the range of 80–120 μm for better growth and ECM synthesis, in which Erk1/2 pathway was involved. This culture system would be promising for cartilage tissue engineering. - Highlights: • A novel model with microcavitary structure was set up to study the interaction between cells and materials. • Microcavitary alginate hydrogel could enhance the proliferation of chondrocytes and promote the expression of cartilaginous genes as compared with plain alginate hydrogel. • Cells in microcavitary alginate hydrogel with pore size within the range of 80–120 μm were capable of better growth and ECM synthesis.

  14. Tissue engineering penoplasty with biodegradable scaffold Maxpol-T cografted autologous fibroblasts for small penis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhe; Wu, Yi-Guang; Yuan, Yi-Ming; Peng, Jing; Gong, Yan-Qing; Li, Guang-Yong; Song, Wei-Dong; Cui, Wan-Shou; He, Xue-You; Xin, Zhong-Cheng

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the safety and efficacy of a poly acid-co-glycolide biodegradable scaffold (Maxpol-T) coated by autologous fibroblasts (AF) for penile girth enlargement in small penis syndrome (SPS). Eighty patients with SPS were enrolled in a clinical study at 2 medical centers; 69 patients completed the study protocol. Scrotal skin was harvested under local anesthesia, and AFs were cultured and seeded on a Maxpol-T scaffold; the cografted scaffold was implanted under the Buck's fascia of penile shaft via a circumcising incision. Patients were followed up at 1, 3, and 6 months to evaluate penile girth changes. Patient satisfaction was assessed via Visual Analogue Scale and scored on the International Index of Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5). Mean preoperative penile girth in the flaccid and erect state was 8.18 ± 0.83 cm and 10.26 ± 1.22 cm, respectively. At the 6-month postoperative follow-up, mean penile girth in the flaccid and erect state was increased to 12.19 ± 1.27 cm and 13.18 ± 1.31 cm, respectively (P < .001 for change in both flaccid and erect state). Sixty-five patients (94.2%) reported satisfaction with the procedure. Among them, 4 cases (5.8%) were dissatisfied, 7 cases (10.1%) were satisfied, 26 cases (37.7%) were very satisfied, and 32 cases (46.4%) were extremely satisfied. All men maintained IIEF-5 scores of more than 22. Complications included prolonged subcutaneous edema in 3 patients (4.3%) and pinpoint erosion at the suture area in 3 patients (4.3%). Implantation of autologous fibroblasts seeded on a Maxpol-T collagen scaffold holds promise as a safe and novel technique for penile girth enhancement in patients with SPS.

  15. NF-kappaB specifically activates BMP-2 gene expression in growth plate chondrocytes in vivo and in a chondrocyte cell line in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jian Q; Xing, Lianping; Zhang, Jiang-Hong; Zhao, Ming; Horn, Diane; Chan, Jeannie; Boyce, Brendan F; Harris, Stephen E; Mundy, Gregory R; Chen, Di

    2003-08-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) regulates growth plate chondrogenesis during development and postnatal bone growth, but the control mechanisms of BMP-2 expression in growth plate chondrocytes are unknown. Here we have used both in vitro and in vivo approaches to demonstrate that transcription factor, NF-kappaB, regulates BMP-2 gene expression in chondrocytes. Two putative NF-kappaB response elements were found in the -2712/+165 region of the BMP-2 gene. Cotransfection of mutant I-kappaBalpha expression plasmids with BMP-2 promoter-luciferase reporters into TMC-23 chondrocyte cell line suppressed BMP-2 transcription. Mutations in NF-kappaB response elements in the BMP-2 gene lead to decreases in BMP-2 promoter activity. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay using nuclear extracts from TMC-23 chondrocytic cells revealed that the NF-kappaB subunits p50 and p65 bound to the NF-kappaB response elements of the BMP-2 gene. Thus, NF-kappaB may positively regulate BMP-2 gene transcription. Consistent with these findings, expression of BMP-2 mRNA was significantly reduced in growth plate chondrocytes in NF-kappaB p50/p52 dKO mice, which associated with decreased numbers of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdUrd)-positive cells in the proliferating zone of growth plate in these mice. Therefore, in postnatal growth plate chondrocytes, expression of BMP-2 is regulated by NF-kappaB, which may play an important role in chondrogenesis.

  16. The Ihh signal is essential for regulating proliferation and hypertrophy of cultured chicken chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, R S; Zhou, Z L; Luo, J W; Zhang, H; Hou, J F

    2013-10-01

    The Indian hedgehog (Ihh) signal plays a vital role in regulating proliferation and hypertrophy of chondrocytes. To investigate its function in postnatal chicken (Gallus gallus) chondrocytes, cyclopamine was used to inhibit Ihh signaling. The MTT and ALP assays revealed the downgrade-proliferation and upgrade-differentiation of chondrocytes. To further elucidate the mechanism, the mRNA expression levels of Ihh, parathyroid hormone related protein (PTHrP), Gli-2, Bcl-2, Bone Morphogenetic Protein 6 (BMP-6), type X collagen (Col X) and type II collagen (Col II) were detected by quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis, and the protein expressions of Ihh, Col X, and Col II were determined using Western blot analysis. After the Ihh signal was blocked, chondrocytes demonstrated high expression levels of PTHrP and Col X and low levels of Gli-2, BMP-6, Bcl-2 and Col II although Ihh expression was increased. Based on these results, the Ihh signal is essential for balancing chicken chondrocyte proliferation and hypertrophy, and the regulatory function of PTHrP acts in an Ihh-dependent manner. Furthermore, BMP-6 and Bcl-2 played roles in maintaining the development of chondrocytes and may be downstream regulatory factors of Ihh signaling. © 2013.

  17. Enhanced chondrocyte culture and growth on biologically inspired nanofibrous cell culture dishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Garima; Webster, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Chondral and osteochondral defects affect a large number of people in which treatment options are currently limited. Due to its ability to mimic the natural nanofibrous structure of cartilage, this current in vitro study aimed at introducing a new scaffold, called XanoMatrix™, for cartilage regeneration. In addition, this same scaffold is introduced here as a new substrate onto which to study chondrocyte functions. Current studies on chondrocyte functions are limited due to nonbiologically inspired cell culture substrates. With its polyethylene terephthalate and cellulose acetate composition, good mechanical properties and nanofibrous structure resembling an extracellular matrix, XanoMatrix offers an ideal surface for chondrocyte growth and proliferation. This current study demonstrated that the XanoMatrix scaffolds promote chondrocyte growth and proliferation as compared with the Corning and Falcon surfaces normally used for chondrocyte cell culture. The XanoMatrix scaffolds also have greater hydrophobicity, three-dimensional surface area, and greater tensile strength, making them ideal candidates for alternative treatment options for chondral and osteochondral defects as well as cell culture substrates to study chondrocyte functions.

  18. Histone Deacetylase 3 Suppresses Erk Phosphorylation and Matrix Metalloproteinase (Mmp)-13 Activity in Chondrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpio, Lomeli R.; Bradley, Elizabeth W.; Westendorf, Jennifer J.

    2017-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors are emerging therapies for many diseases including cancers and neurological disorders; however, these drugs are teratogens to the developing skeleton. Hdac3 is essential for proper endochondral ossification as its deletion in chondrocytes increases cytokine signaling and the expression of matrix remodeling enzymes. Here we explored the mechanism by which Hdac3 controls Mmp13 expression in chondrocytes. In Hdac3-depleted chondrocytes, Erk1/2 as well as its downstream substrate, Runx2, were hyperphosphorylated as a result of decreased expression and activity of the Erk1/2 specific phosphatase, Dusp6. Erk1/2 kinase inhibitors and Dusp6 adenoviruses reduced Mmp13 expression and partially rescued matrix production in Hdac3-deficient chondrocytes. Postnatal chondrocyte-specific deletion of Hdac3 with an inducible Col2a1-Cre caused premature production of pErk1/2 and Mmp13 in the growth plate. Thus, Hdac3 controls the temporal and spatial expression of tissue-remodeling genes in chondrocytes to ensure proper endochondral ossification during development. PMID:27662443

  19. Stimulation of chondrocyte proliferation following photothermal, thermal, and mechanical injury in ex-vivo cartilage grafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandoh, Nidhi S.; Truong, Mai T.; Diaz-Valdes, Sergio H.; Gardiner, David M.; Wong, Brian J.

    2002-06-01

    Laser irradiation may stimulate chondrocytes proliferation in the peripheral region surrounding a photothermally-heated area in rabbit nasal septal cartilage. In this study, ex- vivo rabbit nasal septal cartilages maintained in culture were irradiated with an Nd:YAG laser ((lambda) equals1.32 micrometers , 4-16 sec, 10-45 W/cm2) to examine the relationship between the diameter of replicating cells and irradiation time. Also, this study investigated whether proliferation occurs following heating (by immersion in hot saline baths, with a heated metal rod, and a soldering iron) and mechanical modification (crushing with a metal stamp and scoring with a scalpel). Replicating chondrocytes were identified using a Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) double antibody detection system in whole mount tissue. Light microscopy was used to confirm the presence of BrdU stained chondrocytes. The mechanical and thermal stressors used failed to produce a proliferative response in chondrocytes as previously seen with laser irradiation. We suspect that chondrocyte proliferation may be induced as a response to alteration in matrix structure produced by photothermal, thermal, or mechanical modification of the matrix. Heat generated by a laser to stimulate chondrocyte proliferation may lead to new treatment options for degenerative articular diseases and disorders. Laser technology can be adapted for use with minimally invasive surgical instrumentation to deliver light into otherwise inaccessible regions of the body.

  20. Anterior debridement and fusion followed by posterior pedicle screw fixation in pyogenic spondylodiscitis: autologous iliac bone strut versus cage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pee, Yong Hun; Park, Jong Dae; Choi, Young-Geun; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2008-05-01

    An anterior approach for debridement and fusion with autologous bone graft has been recommended as the gold standard for surgical treatment of pyogenic spondylodiscitis. The use of anterior foreign body implants at the site of active infection is still a challenging procedure for spine surgeons. Several authors have recently introduced anterior grafting with titanium mesh cages instead of autologous bone strut in the treatment of spondylodiscitis. The authors present their experience of anterior fusion with 3 types of cages followed by posterior pedicle screw fixation. They also compare their results with the use of autologous iliac bone strut. The authors retrospectively reviewed the cases of 60 patients with pyogenic spondylodiscitis treated by anterior debridement between January 2003 and April 2005. Fusion using either cages or iliac bone struts was performed during the same course of anesthesia followed by posterior fixation. Twenty-three patients underwent fusion with autologous iliac bone strut, and 37 patients underwent fusion with 1 of the 3 types of cages. The infections resolved in all patients, as noted by normalization of their erythrocyte sedimentation rates and C-reactive protein levels. Patients in both groups were evaluated in terms of their preoperative and postoperative clinical and imaging findings. Single-stage anterior debridement and cage fusion followed by posterior pedicle screw fixation can be effective in the treatment of pyogenic spondylodiscitis. There was no difference in clinical and imaging outcomes between the strut group and cage group except for the subsidence rate. The subsidence rate was higher in the strut group than in the cage group. The duration until subsidence was also shorter in the strut group than in the cage group.

  1. The use of autologous concentrated growth factors to promote syndesmosis fusion in the Agility total ankle replacement. A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzee, J Chris; Pomeroy, Gregory C; Watts, J David; Barrow, Craig

    2005-10-01

    The Agility (DePuy, Warsaw, Indiana) total ankle replacement has been in use since 1984. One of the most common complications continues to be delayed union or nonunions of the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis. In the reported studies on the Agility ankle the delayed union and nonunion rate can be as high as 38%. Since 1999, 114 Agility total ankle replacements were done at two centers in the United States without the use of autologous concentrated growth factors. Since July of 2001, 66 Agility ankles were implanted with Symphony (DePuy, Warsaw, Indiana) augmented bone grafting. The standard operative technique was followed in all the patients. Prospective data was collected on all patients. The standard ankle radiographs were taken preoperatively and postoperative at 8 weeks, 12 weeks, 16 weeks, 6 months, and yearly. CT scans were obtained at 6 months if fusion at the syndesmosis was questionable. The Graphpad Instat software (Graphpad Software Inc., San Diego, CA) was used for statistical analysis. The two-tailed unpaired t-test was used, and the value ankle replacements without autologous concentrated growth factors 70 fused at 8 weeks (61%), 14 fused at 12 weeks (12%), 13 fused at 6 months (12%). There were 17 nonunions (15%); delayed unions (3 to 6 months) and nonunions, therefore, equaled 27%. The syndesmosis fused in 50 of the 66 ankle replacements (76%) that had autologous concentrated growth fractures at 8 weeks (76%); 12 fused at 3 months (18%), 2 fused at 6 months (3%), 2 had nonunions (3%). Delayed unions (3 to 6 months) and nonunions equaled 6%. There was a statistically significant improvement in the 8- and 12-week fusion rates, and a statistically significant reduction in delayed unions and nonunions. Autologous concentrated growth factors appear to make a significant positive difference in the syndesmosis union rate in total ankle replacements.

  2. Carnosol Inhibits Pro-Inflammatory and Catabolic Mediators of Cartilage Breakdown in Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes and Mediates Cross-Talk between Subchondral Bone Osteoblasts and Chondrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle Sanchez

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of carnosol, a rosemary polyphenol, on pro-inflammatory and catabolic mediators of cartilage breakdown in chondrocytes and via bone-cartilage crosstalk.Osteoarthritic (OA human chondrocytes were cultured in alginate beads for 4 days in presence or absence of carnosol (6 nM to 9 μM. The production of aggrecan, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-3, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1, interleukin (IL-6 and nitric oxide (NO and the expression of type II collagen and ADAMTS-4 and -5 were analyzed. Human osteoblasts from sclerotic (SC or non-sclerotic (NSC subchondral bone were cultured for 3 days in presence or absence of carnosol before co-culture with chondrocytes. Chondrocyte gene expression was analyzed after 4 days of co-culture.In chondrocytes, type II collagen expression was significantly enhanced in the presence of 3 μM carnosol (p = 0.008. MMP-3, IL-6, NO production and ADAMTS-4 expression were down-regulated in a concentration-dependent manner by carnosol (p<0.01. TIMP-1 production was slightly increased at 3 μM (p = 0.02 and ADAMTS-5 expression was decreased from 0.2 to 9 μM carnosol (p<0.05. IL-6 and PGE2 production was reduced in the presence of carnosol in both SC and NSC osteoblasts while alkaline phosphatase activity was not changed. In co-culture experiments preincubation of NSC and SC osteoblasts wih carnosol resulted in similar effects to incubation with anti-IL-6 antibody, namely a significant increase in aggrecan and decrease in MMP-3, ADAMTS-4 and -5 gene expression by chondrocytes.Carnosol showed potent inhibition of pro-inflammatory and catabolic mediators of cartilage breakdown in chondrocytes. Inhibition of matrix degradation and enhancement of formation was observed in chondrocytes cocultured with subchondral osteoblasts preincubated with carnosol indicating a cross-talk between these two cellular compartments, potentially mediated via inhibition of IL-6 in

  3. ACTIVITY OF CANONICAL WNT SIGNAL SYSTEM IN HYALINE CARTILAGE ARTICULAR CHONDROCYTES IN PROCESS OF SYNOVIAL JOINT DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.O. Molotkov

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Canonical and non-canonical Wnt systems are essential regulators of chondrogenesis and bone development. However, the roles of these systems in synovial joint development are not well studied. To determine if canonical Wnt system is active in developing articular chondrocytes we used immunohistochemistry for в-galactosidase and doublecortin (cell-type specific marker for articular chondrocytes to double label sections through joint regions of E14.5, E18.5, P10 and adult mice. Here the following results are presented. Canonical Wnt signal system does not work in developing articular chondrocytes at early embryonic stages (E14.5; it is active in the articular chondrocytes at late embryonic stages (E16.5-E18.5 and during postnatal development (P7-P10, but is turned off again in the adult articular chondrocytes. These results suggest that canonical Wnt signaling is being regulated during articular chondrocytes differentiation and joint formation.

  4. Carmustine Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... works by slowing or stopping the growth of cancer cells in your body. ... are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while receiving carmustine implant, call your doctor. Carmustine may harm the fetus.

  5. Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NIDCD A cochlear implant is a small, complex electronic device that can help to provide a sense ... Hearing Aids Retinitis Pigmentosa - National Eye Institute Telecommunications Relay Services Usher Syndrome Your Baby's Hearing Screening News ...

  6. Autologous fat grafting: use of closed syringe microcannula system for enhanced autologous structural grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander RW

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Robert W Alexander,1 David Harrell2 1Department of Surgery, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; 2Harvest-Terumo Inc, Plymouth, MA, USA Objectives: Provide background for use of acquiring autologous adipose tissue as a tissue graft and source of adult progenitor cells for use in cosmetic plastic surgery. Discuss the background and mechanisms of action of closed syringe vacuum lipoaspiration, with emphasis on accessing adipose-derived mesenchymal/stromal cells and the stromal vascular fraction (SVF for use in aesthetic, structural reconstruction and regenerative applications. Explain a proven protocol for acquiring high-quality autologous fat grafts (AFG with use of disposable, microcannula systems. Design: Explain the components and advantage of use of the patented super luer-lock and microcannulas system for use with the closed-syringe system. A sequential explanation of equipment selection for minimally traumatic lipoaspiration in small volumes is presented, including use of blunt injection cannulas to reduce risk of embolism. Results: Thousands of AFG have proven safe and efficacious for lipoaspiration techniques for large and small structural fat grafting procedures. The importance and advantages of gentle harvesting of the adipose tissue complex has become very clear in the past 5 years. The closed-syringe system offers a minimally invasive, gentle system with which to mobilize subdermal fat tissues in a suspension form. Resulting total nuclear counting of undifferentiated cells of the adipose-derived -SVF suggests that the yield achieved is better than use of always-on, constant mechanical pump applied vacuum systems. Conclusion: Use of a closed-syringe lipoaspiration system featuring disposable microcannulas offers a safe and effective means of harvesting small volumes of nonmanipulated adipose tissues and its accompanying progenitor cells within the SVF. Closed syringes and microcannulas are

  7. Inflammatory effects of autologous, genetically modified autologous, allogeneic, and xenogeneic mesenchymal stem cells after intra-articular injection in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigott, J H; Ishihara, A; Wellman, M L; Russell, D S; Bertone, A L

    2013-01-01

    To compare the clinical and inflammatory joint responses to intra-articular injection of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) including autologous, genetically modified autologous, allogeneic, or xenogeneic cells in horses. Six five-year-old Thoroughbred mares had one fetlock joint injected with Gey's balanced salt solution as the vehicle control. Each fetlock joint of each horse was subsequently injected with 15 million MSC from the described MSC groups, and were assessed for 28 days for clinical and inflammatory parameters representing synovitis, joint swelling, and pain. There were not any significant differences between autologous and genetically modified autologous MSC for synovial fluid total nucleated cell count, total protein, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, fetlock circumference, oedema score, pain-free range-of-motion, and soluble gene products that were detected for at least two days. Allogeneic and xenogeneic MSC produced a greater increase in peak of inflammation at 24 hours than either autologous MSC group. Genetically engineered MSC can act as vehicles to deliver gene products to the joint; further investigation into the therapeutic potential of this cell therapy is warranted. Intra-articular MSC injection resulted in a moderate acute inflammatory joint response that was greater for allogeneic and xenogeneic MSC than autologous MSC. Clinical management of this response may minimize this effect.

  8. Type II collagen peptide is able to accelerate embryonic chondrocyte differentiation: an association with articular cartilage matrix resorption in osteoarthrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Vasil'evna Chetina

    2010-01-01

    Conclusion. The effect of CP on gene expression and collagen decomposition activity depends on the morphotype of embryonic chondrocytes. Lack of effect of CP on collagen decomposition activity in both the embryonic hypertrophic chondrocytes and the cartilage explants from OA patients supports the hypothesis that the hypertrophic morphotype is a dominant morphotype of articular chondrocytes in OA. Moreover, collagen decomposition products can be involved in the resorption of matrix in OA and in the maintenance of chronic nature of the pathology.

  9. Normal age-related viscoelastic properties of chondrons and chondrocytes isolated from rabbit knee

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Wang-ping; SUN Zhen-wei; LI Qi; LI Chun-jiang; WANG Li; CHEN Wei-yi; Jennifer Tickner; ZHENG Ming-hao; WEI Xiao-chun

    2012-01-01

    Background The mechanical microenvironment of the chondrocytes plays an important role in cartilage homeostasis and in the health of the joint.The pericellular matrix,cellular membrane of the chondrocytes,and their cytoskeletal structures are key elements in the mechanical environment.The aims of this study are to measure the viscoelastic properties of isolated chondrons and chondrocytes from rabbit knee cartilage using micropipette aspiration and to determine the effect of aging on these properties.Methods Three age groups of rabbit knees were evaluated:(1) young (2 months,n=10);(2) adult (8 months,n=10);and (3) old (31 months,n=10).Chondrocytes were isolated from the right knee cartilage and chondrons were isolated from left knees using enzymatic methods.Micropipette aspiration combined with a standard linear viscoelastic solid model was used to quantify changes in the viscoelastic properties of chondrons and chondrocytes within 2 hours of isolation.The morphology and structure of isolated chondrons were evaluated by optical microscope using hematoxylin and eosin staining and collagen-6 immunofluorescence staining.Results In response to an applied constant 0.3-0.4 kPa of negative pressure,all chondrocytes exhibited standard linear viscoelastic solid properties.Model predictions of the creep data showed that the average equilibrium modulus (E∞),instantaneous modulus (E0).and apparent viscosity (μ) of old chondrocytes was significantly lower than the young and adult chondrocytes (P<0.001);however,no difference was found between young and adult chondrocytes (P>0.05).The adult and old chondrons generally possessed a thicker pericellular matrix (PCM) with more enclosed cells.The young and adult chondrons exhibited the same viscoelastic creep behavior under a greater applied pressure (1.0-1.1kPa) without the deformation seen in the old chondrons.The viscoelastic properties (E∞,E0,and u) of young and adult chondrons were significantly greater than that observed

  10. Autologous blood transfusion during emergency trauma operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Carlos V R; Foulkrod, Kelli H; Sadler, Holli T; Richards, E Kalem; Biggan, Dennis P; Czysz, Clea; Manuel, Tony

    2010-07-01

    Intraoperative cell salvage (CS) of shed blood during emergency surgical procedures provides an effective and cost-efficient resuscitation alternative to allogeneic blood transfusion, which is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in trauma patients. Retrospective matched cohort study. Level I trauma center. All adult trauma patients who underwent an emergency operation and received CS as part of their intraoperative resuscitation. The CS group was matched to a no-CS group for age, sex, Injury Severity Score, mechanism of injury, and operation performed. Amount and cost of allogeneic transfusion of packed red blood cells and plasma. The 47 patients in the CS group were similar to the 47 in the no-CS group for all matched variables. Patients in the CS group received an average of 819 mL of autologous CS blood. The CS group received fewer intraoperative (2 vs 4 U; P = .002) and total (4 vs 8 U; P blood cells. The CS group also received fewer total units of plasma (3 vs 5 U; P = .03). The cost of blood product transfusion (including the total cost of CS) was less in the CS group ($1616 vs $2584 per patient; P = .004). Intraoperative CS provides an effective and cost-efficient resuscitation strategy as an alternative to allogeneic blood transfusion in trauma patients undergoing emergency operative procedures.

  11. Autologous Blood Transfusion for Postpartum Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenawalt, Julia A; Zernell, Denise

    Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is a leading contributor to maternal morbidity and mortality in the United States and globally. Although the rate of PPH is generally decreasing nationally, severity of PPH appears to be increasing, potentially related to the various comorbidities associated with women of childbearing age. There is increasing evidence of risks associated with allogeneic blood transfusion, which has historically been the classic therapeutic approach for treatment to PPH. Pregnant women are particularly susceptible to the implications of sensitization to red cell antigens, a common sequela to allogenic blood transfusion. Autologous blood transfusion eliminates the potential of communicable disease transmission as well as the conceivable threat of a blood transfusion reaction. Recent technological advances allow cell salvage coupled with the use of a leukocyte filter to be used as an alternative approach for improving the outcome for women experiencing a PPH. Modest changes in standard operating procedure and continued training in use and application of cell salvaged blood may assist in minimizing negative outcomes from PPH. Salvaged blood has been demonstrated to be at least equal and often superior to banked blood. We discuss nursing implications for application of this technology for women with PPH. Continued research is warranted to evaluate the impact that application of cell salvage with filtration has on the patient experiencing a PPH.

  12. Biological and Chemical Removal of Primary Cilia Affects Mechanical Activation of Chondrogenesis Markers in Chondroprogenitors and Hypertrophic Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deren, Matthew E; Yang, Xu; Guan, Yingjie; Chen, Qian

    2016-02-04

    Chondroprogenitors and hypertrophic chondrocytes, which are the first and last stages of the chondrocyte differentiation process, respectively, are sensitive to mechanical signals. We hypothesize that the mechanical sensitivity of these cells depends on the cell surface primary cilia. To test this hypothesis, we removed the primary cilia by biological means with transfection with intraflagellar transport protein 88 (IFT88) siRNA or by chemical means with chloral hydrate treatment. Transfection of IFT88 siRNA significantly reduced the percentage of ciliated cells in both chondroprogenitor ATDC5 cells as well as primary hypertrophic chondrocytes. Cyclic loading (1 Hz, 10% matrix deformation) of ATDC5 cells in three-dimensional (3D) culture stimulates the mRNA levels of chondrogenesis marker Type II collagen (Col II), hypertrophic chondrocyte marker Type X collagen (Col X), and a molecular regulator of chondrogenesis and chondrocyte hypertrophy bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2). The reduction of ciliated chondroprogenitors abolishes mechanical stimulation of Col II, Col X, and BMP-2. In contrast, cyclic loading stimulates Col X mRNA levels in hypertrophic chondrocytes, but not those of Col II and BMP-2. Both biological and chemical reduction of ciliated hypertrophic chondrocytes reduced but failed to abolish mechanical stimulation of Col X mRNA levels. Thus, primary cilia play a major role in mechanical stimulation of chondrogenesis and chondrocyte hypertrophy in chondroprogenitor cells and at least a partial role in hypertrophic chondrocytes.

  13. Biological and Chemical Removal of Primary Cilia Affects Mechanical Activation of Chondrogenesis Markers in Chondroprogenitors and Hypertrophic Chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew E. Deren

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Chondroprogenitors and hypertrophic chondrocytes, which are the first and last stages of the chondrocyte differentiation process, respectively, are sensitive to mechanical signals. We hypothesize that the mechanical sensitivity of these cells depends on the cell surface primary cilia. To test this hypothesis, we removed the primary cilia by biological means with transfection with intraflagellar transport protein 88 (IFT88 siRNA or by chemical means with chloral hydrate treatment. Transfection of IFT88 siRNA significantly reduced the percentage of ciliated cells in both chondroprogenitor ATDC5 cells as well as primary hypertrophic chondrocytes. Cyclic loading (1 Hz, 10% matrix deformation of ATDC5 cells in three-dimensional (3D culture stimulates the mRNA levels of chondrogenesis marker Type II collagen (Col II, hypertrophic chondrocyte marker Type X collagen (Col X, and a molecular regulator of chondrogenesis and chondrocyte hypertrophy bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2. The reduction of ciliated chondroprogenitors abolishes mechanical stimulation of Col II, Col X, and BMP-2. In contrast, cyclic loading stimulates Col X mRNA levels in hypertrophic chondrocytes, but not those of Col II and BMP-2. Both biological and chemical reduction of ciliated hypertrophic chondrocytes reduced but failed to abolish mechanical stimulation of Col X mRNA levels. Thus, primary cilia play a major role in mechanical stimulation of chondrogenesis and chondrocyte hypertrophy in chondroprogenitor cells and at least a partial role in hypertrophic chondrocytes.

  14. The effects of monosodium urate monohydrate crystals on chondrocyte viability and function: implications for development of cartilage damage in gout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhana, Ashika; Callon, Karen E; Pool, Bregina; Naot, Dorit; Gamble, Gregory D; Dray, Michael; Pitto, Rocco; Bentley, Jarome; McQueen, Fiona M; Cornish, Jillian; Dalbeth, Nicola

    2013-12-01

    Cartilage damage is frequently observed in advanced destructive gout. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of monosodium urate monohydrate (MSU) crystals on chondrocyte viability and function. The alamarBlue assay and flow cytometry were used to assess the viability of primary human chondrocytes and cartilage explants following culture with MSU crystals. The number of dead chondrocytes in cartilage explants cultured with MSU crystals was quantified. Real-time PCR was used to determine changes in the relative mRNA expression levels of chondrocytic genes. The histological appearance of cartilage in joints affected by gout was also examined. MSU crystals rapidly reduced primary human chondrocyte and cartilage explant viability in a dose-dependent manner (p gout, normal cartilage architecture was lost, with empty chondrocyte lacunae observed. MSU crystals have profound inhibitory effects on chondrocyte viability and function. Interactions between MSU crystals and chondrocytes may contribute to cartilage damage in gout through reduction of chondrocyte viability and promotion of a catabolic state.

  15. Implantation, recoil implantation, and sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, R.

    1984-01-01

    The implantation and sputtering mechanisms which are relevant to ion bombardment of surfaces are described. These are: collision, thermal, electronic and photon-induced sputtering. 135 refs.; 36 figs.; 9 tabs

  16. Preoperative autologous plateletpheresis in patients undergoing open heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Akhlesh S; Tempe, Deepak K; Banerjee, Amit; Hegde, Radhesh; Cooper, Andrea; Khanna, S K

    2003-07-01

    Blood conservation is an important aspect of care provided to the patients undergoing cardiac operations with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). It is even more important in patients with anticipated prolonged CPB, redo cardiac surgery, patients having negative blood group and in patients undergoing emergency cardiac surgery. In prolonged CPB the blood is subjected to more destruction of important coagulation factors, in redo surgery the separation of adhesions leads to increased bleeding and difficulty in achieving the haemostasis and in patients with negative blood group and emergency operations, the availability of sufficient blood can be a problem. Harvesting the autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP) can be a useful method of blood conservation in these patients. The above four categories of patients were prospectively studied, using either autologous whole blood donation or autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP) harvest in the immediate pre-bypass period. Forty two patients were included in the study and randomly divided into two equal groups of 21 each, control group (Group I) in which one unit of whole blood was withdrawn, and PRP group (Group II) where autologous plateletpheresis was utilised. After reversal of heparin, autologous whole blood was transfused in the control group and autologous PRP was transfused in the PRP group. The chest tube drainage and the requirement of homologous blood and blood products were recorded. Average PRP harvest was 643.33 +/- 133.51 mL in PRP group and the mean whole blood donation was 333.75 +/- 79.58 mL in the control group. Demographic, preoperative and intra operative data showed no statistically significant differences between the two groups. The PRP group patients drained 26.44% less (pblood products (pconservation in terms of better haemostasis, and less requirement of blood and blood products in the postoperative period as compared with the autologous whole blood donation. This technique can be especially useful in the

  17. Activation of Indian Hedgehog Promotes Chondrocyte Hypertrophy and Upregulation of MMP-13 in Human Osteoarthritic Cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Fangyuan; Zhou, Jingming; Wei, Xiaochun; Zhang, Juntao; Fleming, Braden C.; Terek, Richard; Pei, Ming; Chen, Qian; Liu, Tao; Wei, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Objective The objectives of this study were to 1) determine the correlation between osteoarthritis (OA) and Ihh expression, and 2) establish the effects of Ihh on expression of markers of chondrocyte hypertrophy and MMP-13 in human OA cartilage. Design OA cartilage and synovial fluid samples were obtained during total knee arthroplasty. Normal cartilage samples were obtained from intra-articular tumor resections, and normal synovial fluid samples were obtained from healthy volunteers and the contralateral uninjured knee of patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. OA was graded using the Mankin score. Expression of Ihh in synovial fluid was determined by western blot. Ihh, type X collagen and MMP-13 mRNA were determined by real time PCR. Protein expression of type X collagen and MMP-13 in cartilage samples were analyzed with immunohistochemistry. Chondrocyte size was measured using image analysis. Results Ihh expression was increased 2.6 fold in OA cartilage and 37% in OA synovial fluid when compared to normal control samples. Increased expression of Ihh was associated with the severity of OA and expression of markers of chondrocyte hypertrophy: type X collagen and MMP-13, and chondocyte size. Chondrocytes were more spherical with increasing severity of OA. There was a significant correlation between Mankin score and cell size (r2= 0.80) and Ihh intensity (r2 = 0.89). Exogenous Ihh induced a 6.8 fold increase of type X collagen and 2.8 fold increase of MMP-13 mRNA expression in cultured chondrocytes. Conversely, knockdown of Ihh by siRNA and Hh inhibitor Cyclopamine had the opposite effect. Conclusions Ihh expression correlates with OA progression and changes in chondrocyte morphology and gene expression consistent with chondrocyte hypertrophy and cartilage degradation seen in OA cartilage. Thus, Ihh may be a potential therapeutic target to prevent OA progression. PMID:22469853

  18. Investigation of the Effects of Extracellular Osmotic Pressure on Morphology and Mechanical Properties of Individual Chondrocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Trung Dung; Oloyede, Adekunle; Singh, Sanjleena; Gu, YuanTong

    2016-06-01

    It has been demonstrated that most cells of the body respond to osmotic pressure in a systematic manner. The disruption of the collagen network in the early stages of osteoarthritis causes an increase in water content of cartilage which leads to a reduction of pericellular osmolality in chondrocytes distributed within the extracellular environment. It is therefore arguable that an insight into the mechanical properties of chondrocytes under varying osmotic pressure would provide a better understanding of chondrocyte mechanotransduction and potentially contribute to knowledge on cartilage degeneration. In this present study, the chondrocyte cells were exposed to solutions with different osmolality. Changes in their dimensions and mechanical properties were measured over time. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to apply load at various strain-rates and the force-time curves were logged. The thin-layer elastic model was used to extract the elastic stiffness of chondrocytes at different strain-rates and at different solution osmolality. In addition, the porohyperelastic (PHE) model was used to investigate the strain-rate-dependent responses under the loading and osmotic pressure conditions. The results revealed that the hypo-osmotic external environment increased chondrocyte dimensions and reduced Young's modulus of the cells at all strain-rates tested. In contrast, the hyper-osmotic external environment reduced dimensions and increased Young's modulus. Moreover, using the PHE model coupled with inverse FEA simulation, we established that the hydraulic permeability of chondrocytes increased with decreasing extracellular osmolality which is consistent with previous work in the literature. This could be due to a higher intracellular fluid volume fraction with lower osmolality.

  19. Study of differential properties of fibrochondrocytes and hyaline chondrocytes in growing rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, L; Li, M; Li, H; Yang, C; Cai, X

    2015-02-01

    We aimed to build a culture model of chondrocytes in vitro, and to study the differential properties between fibrochondrocytes and hyaline chondrocytes. Histological sections were stained with haematoxylin and eosin so that we could analyse the histological structure of the fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage. Condylar fibrochondrocytes and femoral hyaline chondrocytes were cultured from four, 4-week-old, New Zealand white rabbits. The production of COL2A1, COL1OA1, SOX9 and aggrecan was detected by real time-q polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and immunoblotting and the differences between them were compared statistically. Histological structures obviously differed between fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage. COL2A1 and SOX9 were highly expressed within cell passage 2 (P2) of both fibrochondrocytes and hyaline chondrocytes, and reduced significantly after cell passage 4 (P4). The mRNA expressions of COL2A1 (p=0.05), COL10A1 (p=0.04), SOX9 (p=0.03), and aggrecan (p=0.04) were significantly higher in hyaline chondrocytes than in fibrochondrocytes, whereas the expression of COL1A1 (p=0.02) was the opposite. Immunoblotting showed similar results. We have built a simple and effective culture model of chondrocytes in vitro, and the P2 of chondrocytes is recommended for further studies. Condylar fibrocartilage and femoral hyaline cartilage have unique biological properties, and the regulatory mechanisms of endochondral ossification for the condyle should be studied independently in the future. Copyright © 2014 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Primary chondrocytes enhance cartilage tissue formation upon co-culture with expanded chondrocytes, dermal fibroblasts, 3T3 feeder cells and embryonic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, J.A.A.; Miclea, Razvan L.; Schotel, Roka; de Bruijn, Ewart; Moroni, Lorenzo; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes; Riesle, J.U.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens

    2010-01-01

    Co-culture models have been increasingly used in tissue engineering applications to understand cell–cell interactions and consequently improve regenerative medicine strategies. Aiming at further elucidating cartilage tissue formation, we co-cultured bovine primary chondrocytes (BPCs) with human

  1. Mathematical modelling of tissue formation in chondrocyte filter cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catt, C J; Schuurman, W; Sengers, B G; van Weeren, P R; Dhert, W J A; Please, C P; Malda, J

    2011-12-17

    In the field of cartilage tissue engineering, filter cultures are a frequently used three-dimensional differentiation model. However, understanding of the governing processes of in vitro growth and development of tissue in these models is limited. Therefore, this study aimed to further characterise these processes by means of an approach combining both experimental and applied mathematical methods. A mathematical model was constructed, consisting of partial differential equations predicting the distribution of cells and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), as well as the overall thickness of the tissue. Experimental data was collected to allow comparison with the predictions of the simulation and refinement of the initial models. Healthy mature equine chondrocytes were expanded and subsequently seeded on collagen-coated filters and cultured for up to 7 weeks. Resulting samples were characterised biochemically, as well as histologically. The simulations showed a good representation of the experimentally obtained cell and matrix distribution within the cultures. The mathematical results indicate that the experimental GAG and cell distribution is critically dependent on the rate at which the cell differentiation process takes place, which has important implications for interpreting experimental results. This study demonstrates that large regions of the tissue are inactive in terms of proliferation and growth of the layer. In particular, this would imply that higher seeding densities will not significantly affect the growth rate. A simple mathematical model was developed to predict the observed experimental data and enable interpretation of the principal underlying mechanisms controlling growth-related changes in tissue composition.

  2. Chimeric autologous/allogeneic constructs for skin regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Cathy Ann; Tam, Joshua; Steiglitz, Barry M; Bauer, Rebecca L; Peters, Noel R; Wang, Ying; Anderson, R Rox; Allen-Hoffmann, B Lynn

    2014-08-01

    The ideal treatment for severe cutaneous injuries would eliminate the need for autografts and promote fully functional, aesthetically pleasing autologous skin regeneration. NIKS progenitor cell-based skin tissues have been developed to promote healing by providing barrier function and delivering wound healing factors. Independently, a device has recently been created to "copy" skin by harvesting full-thickness microscopic tissue columns (MTCs) in lieu of autografts traditionally harvested as sheets. We evaluated the feasibility of combining these two technologies by embedding MTCs in NIKS-based skin tissues to generate chimeric autologous/allogeneic constructs. Chimeric constructs have the potential to provide immediate wound coverage, eliminate painful donor site wounds, and promote restoration of a pigmented skin tissue possessing hair follicles, sweat glands, and sebaceous glands. After MTC insertion, chimeric constructs and controls were reintroduced into air-interface culture and maintained in vitro for several weeks. Tissue viability, proliferative capacity, and morphology were evaluated after long-term culture. Our results confirmed successful MTC insertion and integration, and demonstrated the feasibility of generating chimeric autologous/allogeneic constructs that preserved the viability, proliferative capacity, and structure of autologous pigmented skin. These feasibility studies established the proof-of-principle necessary to further develop chimeric autologous/allogeneic constructs for the treatment of complex skin defects. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  3. Autologous Blood Transfusion in Sports: Emerging Biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamin, Olivier; De Angelis, Sara; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Saugy, Martial; Leuenberger, Nicolas

    2016-07-01

    Despite being prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency, blood doping through erythropoietin injection or blood transfusion is frequently used by athletes to increase oxygen delivery to muscles and enhance performance. In contrast with allogeneic blood transfusion and erythropoietic stimulants, there is presently no direct method of detection for autologous blood transfusion (ABT) doping. Blood reinfusion is currently monitored with individual follow-up of hematological variables via the athlete biological passport, which requires further improvement. Microdosage is undetectable, and suspicious profiles in athletes are often attributed to exposure to altitude, heat stress, or illness. Additional indirect biomarkers may increase the sensitivity and specificity of the longitudinal approach. The emergence of "-omics" strategies provides new opportunities to discover biomarkers for the indirect detection of ABT. With the development of direct quantitative methods, transcriptomics based on microRNA or messenger RNA expression is a promising approach. Because blood donation and blood reinfusion alter iron metabolism, quantification of proteins involved in metal metabolism, such as hepcidin, may be applied in an "ironomics" strategy to improve the detection of ABT. As red blood cell (RBC) storage triggers changes in membrane proteins, proteomic methods have the potential to identify the presence of stored RBCs in blood. Alternatively, urine matrix can be used for the quantification of the plasticizer di(2-ethyhexyl)phthalate and its metabolites that originate from blood storage bags, suggesting recent blood transfusion, and have an important degree of sensitivity and specificity. This review proposes that various indirect biomarkers should be applied in combination with mathematical approaches for longitudinal monitoring aimed at improving ABT detection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Downregulation of protein kinase CK2 activity facilitates tumor necrosis factor-α-mediated chondrocyte death through apoptosis and autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Won Lee

    Full Text Available Despite the numerous studies of protein kinase CK2, little progress has been made in understanding its function in chondrocyte death. Our previous study first demonstrated that CK2 is involved in apoptosis of rat articular chondrocytes. Recent studies have suggested that CK2 downregulation is associated with aging. Thus examining the involvement of CK2 downregulation in chondrocyte death is an urgently required task. We undertook this study to examine whether CK2 downregulation modulates chondrocyte death. We first measured CK2 activity in articular chondrocytes of 6-, 21- and 30-month-old rats. Noticeably, CK2 activity was downregulated in chondrocytes with advancing age. To build an in vitro experimental system for simulating tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α-induced cell death in aged chondrocytes with decreased CK2 activity, chondrocytes were co-treated with CK2 inhibitors and TNF-α. Viability assay demonstrated that CK2 inhibitors facilitated TNF-α-mediated chondrocyte death. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, nuclear staining, flow cytometry, TUNEL staining, confocal microscopy, western blot and transmission electron microscopy were conducted to assess cell death modes. The results of multiple assays showed that this cell death was mediated by apoptosis. Importantly, autophagy was also involved in this process, as supported by the appearance of a punctuate LC3 pattern and autophagic vacuoles. The inhibition of autophagy by silencing of autophage-related genes 5 and 7 as well as by 3-methyladenine treatment protected chondrocytes against cell death and caspase activation, indicating that autophagy led to the induction of apoptosis. Autophagic cells were observed in cartilage obtained from osteoarthritis (OA model rats and human OA patients. Our findings indicate that CK2 down regulation facilitates TNF-α-mediated chondrocyte death through apoptosis and autophagy. It should be clarified in the future if autophagy observed is a consequence

  5. Hip Implant Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Implants and Prosthetics Metal-on-Metal Hip Implants Hip Implants Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Hip implants are medical devices intended to restore mobility ...

  6. Breast reconstruction - implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast implants surgery; Mastectomy - breast reconstruction with implants; Breast cancer - breast reconstruction with implants ... harder to find a tumor if your breast cancer comes back. Getting breast implants does not take as long as breast reconstruction ...

  7. Mechanical and hypoxia stress can cause chondrocytes apoptosis through over-activation of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ziwei; Zhou, Min; Wang, Qian; Zhu, Mengjiao; Chen, Sheng; Li, Huang

    2017-12-01

    To examine the role of mechanical force and hypoxia on chondrocytes apoptosis and osteoarthritis (OA)-liked pathological change on mandibular cartilage through over-activation of endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS). We used two in vitro models to examine the effect of mechanical force and hypoxia on chondrocytes apoptosis separately. The mandibular condylar chondrocytes were obtained from three-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats. Flexcell 5000T apparatus was used to produce mechanical forces (12%, 0.5Hz, 24h vs 20%, 0.5Hz, 24h) on chondrocytes. For hypoxia experiment, the concentration of O 2 was down regulated to 5% or 1%. Cell apoptosis rates were quantified by annexin V and propidium iodide (PI) double staining and FACS analysis. Quantitative real-time PCR and western blot were performed to evaluate the activation of ERS and cellular hypoxia. Then we used a mechanical stress loading rat model to verify the involvement of ERS in OA-liked mandibular cartilage pathological change. Histological changes in mandibular condylar cartilage were assessed via hematoxylin & eosin (HE) staining. Immunohistochemistry of GRP78, GRP94, HIF-1α, and HIF-2α were performed to evaluate activation of the ERS and existence of hypoxia. Apoptotic cells were detected by the TUNEL method. Tunicamycin, 20% mechanical forces and hypoxia (1% O 2 ) all significantly increased chondrocytes apoptosis rates and expression of ERS markers (GRP78, GRP94 and Caspase 12). However, 12% mechanical forces can only increase the apoptotic sensitivity of chondrocytes. Mechanical stress resulted in OA-liked pathological change on rat mandibular condylar cartilage which included thinning cartilage and bone erosion. The number of apoptotic cells increased. ERS and hypoxia markers expressions were also enhanced. Salubrinal, an ERS inhibitor, can reverse these effects in vitro and in vivo through the down-regulation of ERS markers and hypoxia markers. We confirmed that mechanical stress and local hypoxia both

  8. Prognostic trend in advanced implant surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demitri, V; Polini, F; Robiony, M; Politi, M

    2002-03-01

    Implant surgery in association with bone grafting is generally considered less predictive than primary implant surgery. Many reports have been published about implant rehabilitation with bone grafts in atrophic patients. Most of these papers showed a lower implant success rate than primary implantology. The aim of this study is to verify if it's possible to warrant similar results between the two types of implantology, if such procedures are performed following effective protocols and criteria. From 1995 to 1999, 43 severely atrophic edentulous patients were treated in our Clinic with 63 autologous bone grafts and delayed implantology; 45 patients were treated with traditional implantology. 284 fixtures were positioned. The success rate in grafted implantology versus traditional implantology was compared for every maxillary and mandibular region. Furthermore, success rate in implantology of the anterior maxilla versus the poster maxilla in grafted patients was compared. The statistical considerations were performed with c2 test (p<0.05). The statistical analysis evidenced not significative difference in the implant success rate between grafted and not grafted patients in the anterior (p=0.23) and in the posterior maxilla (p=0.35). There was not significative difference in the implant success rate between grafted and not grafted patients in the anterior mandible (p=0.54) and in the posterior mandible (p=0.54). There was not significative difference in the implant success rate between the anterior and posterior grafted maxilla (p=0.21). The results obtained show that if close surgical protocol is performed it is possible to obtain no prognostic difference between the two METHODS.

  9. The Regulatory Role of Signaling Crosstalk in Hypertrophy of MSCs and Human Articular Chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leilei Zhong

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes is a main barrier in application of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs for cartilage repair. In addition, hypertrophy occurs occasionally in osteoarthritis (OA. Here we provide a comprehensive review on recent literature describing signal pathways in the hypertrophy of MSCs-derived in vitro differentiated chondrocytes and chondrocytes, with an emphasis on the crosstalk between these pathways. Insight into the exact regulation of hypertrophy by the signaling network is necessary for the efficient application of MSCs for articular cartilage repair and for developing novel strategies for curing OA. We focus on articles describing the role of the main signaling pathways in regulating chondrocyte hypertrophy-like changes. Most studies report hypertrophic differentiation in chondrogenesis of MSCs, in both human OA and experimental OA. Chondrocyte hypertrophy is not under the strict control of a single pathway but appears to be regulated by an intricately regulated network of multiple signaling pathways, such as WNT, Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP/Transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ, Parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP, Indian hedgehog (IHH, Fibroblast growth factor (FGF, Insulin like growth factor (IGF and Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF. This comprehensive review describes how this intricate signaling network influences tissue-engineering applications of MSCs in articular cartilage (AC repair, and improves understanding of the disease stages and cellular responses within an OA articular joint.

  10. Subchondral Bone Plate Thickening Precedes Chondrocyte Apoptosis and Cartilage Degradation in Spontaneous Animal Models of Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaitunnatakhin Zamli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is the most common joint disorder characterised by bone remodelling and cartilage degradation and associated with chondrocyte apoptosis. These processes were investigated at 10, 16, 24, and 30 weeks in Dunkin Hartley (DH and Bristol Strain 2 (BS2 guinea pigs that develop OA spontaneously. Both strains had a more pronounced chondrocyte apoptosis, cartilage degradation, and subchondral bone changes in the medial than the lateral side of the tibia, and between strains, the changes were always greater and faster in DH than BS2. In the medial side, a significant increase of chondrocyte apoptosis and cartilage degradation was observed in DH between 24 and 30 weeks of age preceded by a progressive thickening and stiffening of subchondral bone plate (Sbp. The Sbp thickness consistently increased over the 30-week study period but the bone mineral density (BMD of the Sbp gradually decreased after 16 weeks. The absence of these changes in the medial side of BS2 may indicate that the Sbp of DH was undergoing remodelling. Chondrocyte apoptosis was largely confined to the deep zone of articular cartilage and correlated with thickness of the subchondral bone plate suggesting that cartilage degradation and chondrocyte apoptosis may be a consequence of continuous bone remodelling during the development of OA in these animal models of OA.

  11. Treatment of osteoarthritis using a helper-dependent adenoviral vector retargeted to chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merry ZC Ruan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a joint disease characterized by degeneration of the articular cartilage, subchondral bone remodeling, and secondary inflammation. It is among the top three causes of chronic disability, and currently there are no treatment options to prevent disease progression. The localized nature of OA makes it an ideal candidate for gene and cell therapy. However, gene and cell therapy of OA is impeded by inefficient gene transduction of chondrocytes. In this study, we developed a broadly applicable system that retargets cell surface receptors by conjugating antibodies to the capsid of helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDVs. Specifically, we applied this system to retarget chondrocytes by conjugating an HDV to an α-10 integrin monoclonal antibody (a10mab. We show that a10mab-conjugated HDV (a10mabHDV-infected chondrocytes efficiently in vitro and in vivo while detargeting other cell types. The therapeutic index of an intra-articular injection of 10mabHDV-expressing proteoglycan 4 (PRG4 into a murine model of post-traumatic OA was 10-fold higher than with standard HDV. Moreover, we show that PRG4 overexpression from articular, superficial zone chondrocytes is effective for chondroprotection in postinjury OA and that α-10 integrin is an effective protein for chondrocyte targeting.

  12. Normal proliferation and differentiation of Hoxc-8 transgenic chondrocytes in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mello Maria

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hox genes encode transcription factors that are involved in pattern formation in the skeleton, and recent evidence suggests that they also play a role in the regulation of endochondral ossification. To analyze the role of Hoxc-8 in this process in more detail, we applied in vitro culture systems, using high density cultures of primary chondrocytes from neonatal mouse ribs. Results Cultured cells were characterized on the basis of morphology (light microscopy and production of cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (sulfated proteoglycans and type II Collagen. Hypertrophy was demonstrated by increase in cell size, alkaline phosphatase activity and type X Collagen immunohistochemistry. Proliferation was assessed by BrdU uptake and flow cytometry. Unexpectedly, chondrocytes from Hoxc-8 transgenic mice, which exhibit delayed cartilage maturation in vivo 1, were able to proliferate and differentiate normally in our culture systems. This was the case even though freshly isolated Hoxc-8 transgenic chondrocytes exhibited significant molecular differences as measured by real-time quantitative PCR. Conclusions The results demonstrate that primary rib chondrocytes behave similar to published reports for chondrocytes from other sources, validating in vitro approaches for studies of Hox genes in the regulation of endochondral ossification. Our analysis of cartilage-producing cells from Hoxc-8 transgenic mice provides evidence that the cellular phenotype induced by Hoxc-8 overexpression in vivo is reversible in vitro.

  13. Single Cell Confocal Raman Spectroscopy of Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A great deal of effort has been focused on exploring the underlying molecular mechanism of osteoarthritis (OA especially at the cellular level. We report a confocal Raman spectroscopic investigation on human osteoarthritic chondrocytes. The objective of this investigation is to identify molecular features and the stage of OA based on the spectral signatures corresponding to bio-molecular changes at the cellular level in chondrocytes. In this study, we isolated chondrocytes from human osteoarthritic cartilage and acquired Raman spectra from single cells. Major spectral differences between the cells obtained from different International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS grades of osteoarthritic cartilage were identified. During progression of OA, a decrease in protein content and an increase in cell death were observed from the vibrational spectra. Principal component analysis and subsequent cross-validation was able to associate osteoarthritic chondrocytes to ICRS Grade I, II and III with specificity 100.0%, 98.1%, and 90.7% respectively, while, sensitivity was 98.6%, 82.8%, and 97.5% respectively. The overall predictive efficiency was 92.2%. Our pilot study encourages further use of Raman spectroscopy as a noninvasive and label free technique for revealing molecular features associated with osteoarthritic chondrocytes.

  14. Effects of tofacitinib on nucleic acid metabolism in human articular chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Hideki; Arito, Mitsumi; Endo, Wataru; Kurokawa, Manae S; Okamoto, Kazuki; Omoteyama, Kazuki; Suematsu, Naoya; Beppu, Moroe; Kato, Tomohiro

    2015-07-01

    In our previous screening of chondrocyte protein profiles, the amount of adenosine monophosphate deaminase (AMPD) 2 was found to be decreased by tofacitinib. Extending the study, here we confirmed the decrease of AMPD2 by tofacitinib and further investigated effects of tofacitinib on purine nucleotide metabolism. Human articular chondrocytes and a chondrosarcoma cell line: OUMS-27 were stimulated with tofacitinib. Then the levels of AMPD2 and its related enzymes were investigated by Western blot. The levels of AMP and adenosine were assessed by mass spectrometry. We confirmed the significant decrease of AMPD2 by tofacitinib in chondrocytes (p = 0.025). The levels of adenosine kinase and 5'-nucleotidase were decreased in chondrocytes, although they did not meet statistical significance (p = 0.067 and p = 0.074, respectively). The results from OUMS-27 were similar to those from the chondrocytes. The cellular adenosine levels were significantly decreased by tofacitinib in OUMS-27 (p = 0.014). The cellular AMP levels were increased, although they did not meet statistical significance in OUMS-27 (p = 0.066). Our data indicate that tofacitinib increases the cellular levels of adenosine, which is known to have anti-inflammatory activity, through the downregulation of AMPD2. This would be a novel functional aspect of tofacitinib.

  15. Comparing effects of perfusion and hydrostatic pressure on gene profiles of human chondrocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ge; Mayer-Wagner, Susanne; Schröder, Christian; Woiczinski, Matthias; Blum, Helmut; Lavagi, Ilaria; Krebs, Stefan; Redeker, Julia I; Hölzer, Andreas; Jansson, Volkmar; Betz, Oliver; Müller, Peter E

    2015-09-20

    Hydrostatic pressure and perfusion have been shown to regulate the chondrogenic potential of articular chondrocytes. In order to compare the effects of hydrostatic pressure plus perfusion (HPP) and perfusion (P) we investigated the complete gene expression profiles of human chondrocytes under HPP and P. A simplified bioreactor was constructed to apply loading (0.1 MPa for 2 h) and perfusion (2 ml) through the same piping by pressurizing the medium directly. High-density monolayer cultures of human chondrocytes were exposed to HPP or P for 4 days. Controls (C) were maintained in static cultures. Gene expression was evaluated by sequencing (RNAseq) and quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Both treatments changed gene expression levels of human chondrocytes significantly. Specifically, HPP and P increased COL2A1 expression and decreased COL1A1 and MMP-13 expression. Despite of these similarities, RNAseq revealed a list of cartilage genes including ACAN, ITGA10 and TNC, which were differentially expressed by HPP and P. Of these candidates, adhesion related molecules were found to be upregulated in HPP. Both HPP and P treatment had beneficial effects on chondrocyte differentiation and decreased catabolic enzyme expression. The study provides new insight into how hydrostatic pressure and perfusion enhance cartilage differentiation and inhibit catabolic effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Analysis of human articular chondrocyte CD44 isoform expression and function in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, D M; Godolphin, J L; Gourlay, M S; Lawson, M F; Hughes, D E; Dunne, E

    1996-08-01

    Interactions between articular chondrocytes and components of the extracellular matrix are of potential importance in the normal function of cartilage and in the pathophysiology of arthritis. Little is known of the basis of these interactions, but cell adhesive molecules such as CD44 are likely to be involved. Immunohistology using six well-characterized anti-CD44 monoclonal antibodies demonstrated standard CD44 isoform (CD44H) expression by all chondrocytes in normal and osteoarthrotic (OA) cartilage but absence of the CD44E variant. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of reverse transcribed mRNA from monolayer cultures of normal and OA chondrocytes using primer sequences which span the region containing variably spliced exons produced a predominant band representing the standard form of CD44, which lacks the variable exons 6-15 (v1-v10). No product was seen at the expected size of the epithelial variant of CD44 (CD44v8-10). Use of exon-specific primers, however, showed expression of variant exons resulting in multiple minor isoforms. Standard CD44 was also shown to be the predominantly expressed isoform identified by immunoprecipitation, but human articular chondrocytes did not adhere to hyaluronan in vitro. Chondrocyte CD44 may function as an adhesion receptor for other matrix molecules such as fibronectin or collagen.

  17. Effectiveness of autologous transfusion system in primary total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Schneider, Marco M

    2014-01-01

    Autologous transfusion has become a cost-efficient and useful option in the treatment of patients with high blood loss following major orthopaedic surgery. However, the effectiveness of autologous transfusion in total joint replacement remains controversial.

  18. Treatment of Refractory Filamentary Keratitis With Autologous Serum Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Sarah P; Rodriguez, Marianeli; Dubovy, Sander; Karp, Carol L; Galor, Anat

    2017-09-01

    To report a case of filamentary keratitis (FK) successfully treated with autologous serum tears and to review the pathogenesis and management of FK. Case report including high-resolution anterior segment optical coherence tomography and filament histopathology. A 61-year-old Hispanic man presented with pain and photophobia of the right eye. He was found to have a corneal epithelial defect and a small peripheral infiltrate 4 months after Laser Assisted in situ Keratomileusis. After resolution of the epithelial defect, he developed FK. Over a 4-month period, conservative management with aggressive lubrication, lid hygiene, topical corticosteroids, topical cyclosporine, bandage contact lenses, and oral doxycycline failed to resolve the corneal filaments. Notably, treatment with 20% autologous serum tears, four times daily, led to a sustained resolution of the FK within 1 week. This case demonstrates the complexity of FK management and introduces autologous serum tears as a viable management option when conservative approaches to this condition fail.

  19. Culture of chondrocytes in alginate surrounded by fibrin gel: characteristics of the cells over a period of eight weeks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Almqvist, K. F.; Wang, L.; Wang, J.; Baeten, D.; Cornelissen, M.; Verdonk, R.; Veys, E. M.; Verbruggen, G.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To produce tissue engineered cartilage by human articular chondrocytes in vitro for further use in in vivo manipulations for the treatment of cartilage defects. METHODS: Human articular chondrocytes were cultured in 0.5%, 1.0%, and 2.0% of alginate for up to four weeks. The optimal

  20. Trophic Effects of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Chondrocyte Co-Cultures are Independent of Culture Conditions and Cell Sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Ling; Prins, H.J.; Helder, M.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Earlier, we have shown that the increased cartilage production in pellet co-cultures of chondrocytes and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) is due to a trophic role of the MSC in stimulating chondrocyte proliferation and matrix production rather than MSCs actively undergoing

  1. Trophic effects of mesenchymal stem cells in chondrocyte co-cultures are independent of culture conditions and cell sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, L.; Prins, H.J.; Helder, M.N.; van Blitterswijk, C.A.; Karperien, M.

    2012-01-01

    Earlier, we have shown that the increased cartilage production in pellet co-cultures of chondrocytes and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) is due to a trophic role of the MSC in stimulating chondrocyte proliferation and matrix production rather than MSCs actively undergoing

  2. Comparison of Efficacy of Endogenous and Exogenous IGF-I in Stimulating Matrix Production in Neonatal and Mature Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Izath N; Trippel, Stephen B; Shi, Shuiliang; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the efficacy of endogenous upregulation of IGF-I by gene therapy and exogenous addition of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) in enhancing proteoglycan synthesis by skeletally mature and neonatal chondrocytes. Chondrocyte transplantation therapy is a common treatment for focal cartilage lesions, with both mature and neonatal chondrocytes used as a cell source. Additionally, gene therapy strategies to upregulate growth factors such as IGF-I have been proposed to augment chondrocyte transplantation therapies. Both skeletally mature and neonatal chondrocytes were exposed to either an adeno-associated virus-based plasmid containing the IGF-I gene or exogenous IGF-I. Analysis of IGF-I and glycosaminoglycan production using a 4-parameter dose-response model established a clear connection between the amount of IGF-I produced by cells and their biosynthetic response. Both neonatal and mature chondrocytes showed this relationship, but the sensitivities were quite different, with EC50 of 0.57 ng/mL for neonatal chondrocytes and EC50 of 8.70 ng/mL IGF-I for skeletally mature chondrocytes. These data suggest that IGF-I gene therapy may be more effective with younger cell sources. Both cell types were less sensitive to exogenous IGF-I than endogenous IGF-I.

  3. Differences in Cartilage-Forming Capacity of Expanded Human Chondrocytes From Ear and Nose and Their Gene Expression Profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellingman, C.A.; Verwiel, E.T.P.; Slagt, I.; Koevoet, W.; Poublon, R.M.L.; Nolst-Trenite, G.J.; de Jong, R.J.B.; Jahr, H.; van Osch, G.J.V.M.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of culture-expanded human auricular and nasoseptal chondrocytes as cell source for regeneration of stable cartilage and to analyze the differences in gene expression profile of expanded chondrocytes from these specific locations. Auricular

  4. Differences in cartilage-forming capacity of expanded human chondrocytes from ear and nose and their gene expression profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellingman, Catharine A.; Verwiel, Eugène T. P.; Slagt, Inez; Koevoet, Wendy; Poublon, René M. L.; Nolst-Trenité, Gilbert J.; Baatenburg de Jong, Robert J.; Jahr, Holger; van Osch, Gerjo J. V. M.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of culture-expanded human auricular and nasoseptal chondrocytes as cell source for regeneration of stable cartilage and to analyze the differences in gene expression profile of expanded chondrocytes from these specific locations. Auricular

  5. Overexpression of hsa-miR-148a promotes cartilage production and inhibits cartilage degradation by osteoarthritic chondrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, L A; Kragten, A H M; Dhert, W J A; Saris, D B F; Creemers, L B

    OBJECTIVE: Hsa-miR-148a expression is decreased in Osteoarthritis (OA) cartilage, but its functional role in cartilage has never been studied. Therefore, our aim was to investigate the effects of overexpressing hsa-miR-148a on cartilage metabolism of OA chondrocytes. DESIGN: OA chondrocytes were

  6. Overexpression of hsa-miR-148a promotes cartilage production and inhibits cartilage degradation by osteoarthritic chondrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, Lucienne A.; Kragten, Angela H.M.; Dhert, Wouter J.; Saris, Daniël B.F.; Creemers, Laura B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Hsa-miR-148a expression is decreased in OA cartilage, but its functional role in cartilage has never been studied. Therefore, our aim was to investigate the effects of overexpressing hsa-miR-148a on cartilage metabolism of OA chondrocytes. Design OA chondrocytes were transfected with a

  7. Preoperative autologous plateletpheresis in patients undergoing open heart surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomar Akhlesh

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood conservation is an important aspect of care provided to the patients undergoing cardiac operations with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB. It is even more important in patients with anticipated prolonged CPB, redo cardiac surgery, patients having negative blood group and in patients undergoing emergency cardiac surgery. In prolonged CPB the blood is subjected to more destruction of important coagulation factors, in redo surgery the separation of adhesions leads to increased bleeding and difficulty in achieving the haemostasis and in patients with negative blood group and emergency operations, the availability of sufficient blood can be a problem. Harvesting the autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP can be a useful method of blood conservation in these patients. The above four categories of patients were prospectively studied, using either autologous whole blood donation or autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP harvest in the immediate pre-bypass period. Forty two patients were included in the study and randomly divided into two equal groups of 21 each, control group (Group I in which one unit of whole blood was withdrawn, and PRP group (Group II where autologous plateletpheresis was utilised. After reversal of heparin, autologous whole blood was transfused in the control group and autologous PRP was transfused in the PRP group. The chest tube drainage and the requirement of homologous blood and blood products were recorded. Average PRP harvest was 643.33 +/- 133.51 mL in PRP group and the mean whole blood donation was 333.75 +/- 79.58 mL in the control group. Demographic, preoperative and intra operative data showed no statistically significant differences between the two groups. The PRP group patients drained 26.44% less (p<0.001 and required 38.5% less homologous blood and blood products (p<0.05, in the postoperative period. Haemoglobin levels on day zero (day of operation and day three were statistically not different between the two groups. We

  8. Andrographolide Enhances Proliferation and Prevents Dedifferentiation of Rabbit Articular Chondrocytes: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-ke Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As the main active constituent of Andrographis paniculata that was applied in treatment of many diseases including inflammation in ancient China, andrographolide (ANDRO was found to facilitate reduction of edema and analgesia in arthritis. This suggested that ANDRO may be promising anti-inflammatory agent to relieve destruction and degeneration of cartilage after inflammation. In this study, the effect of ANDRO on rabbit articular chondrocytes in vitro was investigated. Results showed that not more than 8 μM ANDRO did no harm to chondrocytes (P0.05. The viability assay, hematoxylin-eosin, safranin O, and immunohistochemical staining also showed better performances in ANDRO groups. As to the doses, 3 μM ANDRO showed the best performance. The results indicate that ANDRO can accelerate proliferation of rabbit articular chondrocytes in vitro and meanwhile maintain the phenotype, which may provide valuable references for further exploration on arthritis.

  9. Stress relaxation analysis of single chondrocytes using porohyperelastic model based on AFM experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trung Dung Nguyen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on atomic force microscopytechnique, we found that the chondrocytes exhibits stress relaxation behavior. We explored the mechanism of this stress relaxation behavior and concluded that the intracellular fluid exuding out from the cells during deformation plays the most important role in the stress relaxation. We applied the inverse finite element analysis technique to determine necessary material parameters for porohyperelastic (PHE model to simulate stress relaxation behavior as this model is proven capable of capturing the non-linear behavior and the fluid-solid interaction during the stress relaxation of the single chondrocytes. It is observed that PHE model can precisely capture the stress relaxation behavior of single chondrocytes and would be a suitable model for cell biomechanics.

  10. ICAM-1 expression on chondrocytes in rheumatoid arthritis: induction by synovial cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Davies

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 was found by immunostaining chondrocytes in cartilage from three patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Expression of ICAM-1 was restricted to chondrocytes in areas of erodedcartilage adjacent to the invading synovial tissue. Toluidine blue staining of these areas demonstrated severe depletion of the cartilage extracellular matrix. In areas of undamaged cartilage there was no ICAM-1 expression. Since ICAM-1 is not constitutively expressed on normal human articular cartilage, but could be induced in vitro by exogenous IL-1α, TNFα and IFNγ or by co-culturing cartilage with inflammatory rheumatoid synovium, we conclude that the induction of ICAM-1 on rheumatoid chondrocytes results from the synergistic action of a variety of cytokines produced by the inflammatory cells of the invading pannus.

  11. Fluoroquinolone's effect on growth of human chondrocytes and chondrosarcomas. In vitro and in vivo correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Multhaupt, H A; Alvarez, J C; Rafferty, P A

    2001-01-01

    Clinical and in vitro studies have demonstrated that fluoroquinolones are toxic to chondrocytes; however, the exact mechanism of fluoroquinolone arthropathy is unknown. We investigated the toxicity of ciprofloxacin on normal cartilage and on cartilaginous tumors. Normal human cartilage, enchondroma...... with use of conventional light microscopy, electron microscopy, and immunohistochemistry to identify extracellular matrix, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. Cultures of normal chondrocytes expressed type-II collagen. Electron microscopy revealed a large amount of glycogen in the cells; the presence of fat...... of vimentin filaments. The treated chondrocytes showed a decrease in cell proliferation, but there was no induction of apoptosis or effect on the expression of extracellular matrix proteins. Ciprofloxacin-treated chondrosarcoma cultures and tissue samples showed changes in cartilage matrix composition...

  12. Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Chronic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashu Bhasin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cell transplantation is a ‘hype and hope’ in the current scenario. It is in the early stage of development with promises to restore function in chronic diseases. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC transplantation in stroke patients has shown significant improvement by reducing clinical and functional deficits. They are feasible and multipotent and have homing characteristics. This study evaluates the safety, feasibility and efficacy of autologous MSC transplantation in patients with chronic stroke using clinical scores and functional imaging (blood oxygen level-dependent and diffusion tensor imaging techniques. Methods: Twelve chronic stroke patients were recruited; inclusion criteria were stroke lasting 3 months to 1 year, motor strength of hand muscles of at least 2, and NIHSS of 4–15, and patients had to be conscious and able to comprehend. Fugl Meyer (FM, modified Barthel index (mBI, MRC, Ashworth tone grade scale scores and functional imaging scans were assessed at baseline, and after 8 and 24 weeks. Bone marrow was aspirated under aseptic conditions and expansion of MSC took 3 weeks with animal serum-free media (Stem Pro SFM. Six patients were administered a mean of 50–60 × 106 cells i.v. followed by 8 weeks of physiotherapy. Six patients served as controls. This was a non-randomized experimental controlled trial. Results: Clinical and radiological scanning was normal for the stem cell group patients. There was no mortality or cell-related adverse reaction. The laboratory tests on days 1, 3, 5 and 7 were also normal in the MSC group till the last follow-up. The FM and mBI showed a modest increase in the stem cell group compared to controls. There was an increased number of cluster activation of Brodmann areas BA 4 and BA 6 after stem cell infusion compared to controls, indicating neural plasticity. Conclusion: MSC therapy aiming to restore function in stroke is safe and feasible. Further randomized controlled trials are needed

  13. Efficacy of Octacalcium Phosphate Collagen Composite for Titanium Dental Implants in Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Kawai

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Previous studies showed that octacalcium (OCP collagen composite (OCP/Col can be used to repair human jaw bone defects without any associated abnormalities. The present study investigated whether OCP/Col could be applied to dental implant treatment using a dog tooth extraction socket model. Methods: The premolars of dogs were extracted; each extraction socket was extended, and titanium dental implants were placed in each socket. OCP/Col was inserted in the space around a titanium dental implant. Autologous bone was used to fill the other sockets, while the untreated socket (i.e., no bone substitute material served as a control. Three months after the operation, these specimens were analyzed for the osseointegration of each bone substitute material with the surface of the titanium dental implant. Results: In histomorphometric analyses, the peri-implant bone areas (BA% and bone-implant contact (BIC% were measured. There was no difference in BA% or BIC% between OCP/Col and autologous bone. Conclusion: These results suggested that OCP/Col could be used for implant treatment as a bone substitute.

  14. Alternatives to Autologous Bone Graft in Alveolar Cleft Reconstruction: The State of Alveolar Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Fan; Leland, Hyuma; Jedrzejewski, Breanna; Auslander, Allyn; Maniskas, Seija; Swanson, Jordan; Urata, Mark; Hammoudeh, Jeffrey; Magee, William

    2018-05-01

    Alveolar cleft reconstruction has historically relied on autologous iliac crest bone grafting (ICBG), but donor site morbidity, pain, and prolonged hospitalization have prompted the search for bone graft substitutes. The authors evaluated bone graft substitutes with the highest levels of evidence, and highlight the products that show promise in alveolar cleft repair and in maxillary augmentation. This comprehensive review guides the craniofacial surgeon toward safe and informed utilization of biomaterials in the alveolar cleft.A literature search was performed to identify in vitro human studies that fulfilled the following criteria: Level I or Level II of evidence, ≥30 subjects, and a direct comparison between a autologous bone graft and a bone graft substitute. A second literature search was performed that captured all studies, regardless of level of evidence, which evaluated bone graft substitutes for alveolar cleft repair or alveolar augmentation for dental implants. Adverse events for each of these products were tabulated as well.Sixteen studies featuring 6 bone graft substitutes: hydroxyapatite, demineralized bone matrix (DBM), β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP), calcium phosphate, recombinant human bone morphogenic protein-2 (rhBMP-2), and rhBMP7 fit the inclusion criteria for the first search. Through our second search, the authors found that DBM, TCP, rhBMP-2, and rhBMP7 have been studied most extensively in the alveolar cleft literature, though frequently in studies using less rigorous methodology (Level III evidence or below). rhBMP-2 was the best studied and showed comparable efficacy to ICBG in terms of volume of bone regeneration, bone density, and capacity to accommodate tooth eruption within the graft site. Pricing for products ranged from $290 to $3110 per 5 mL.The balance between innovation and safety is a complex process requiring constant vigilance and evaluation. Here, the authors profile several bone graft substitutes that demonstrate the most

  15. Biological and mechanical evaluation of a Bio-Hybrid scaffold for autologous valve tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahnavi, S [Stem Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, TN 600036 (India); Tissue Culture Laboratory, Biomedical Technology Wing, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Poojappura, Trivandrum, Kerala 695012 (India); Saravanan, U [Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, TN 600036 (India); Arthi, N [Stem Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, TN 600036 (India); Bhuvaneshwar, G S [Department of Engineering Design, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, TN 600036 (India); Kumary, T V [Tissue Culture Laboratory, Biomedical Technology Wing, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Poojappura, Trivandrum, Kerala 695012 (India); Rajan, S [Madras Medical Mission, Institute of Cardio-Vascular Diseases, Mogappair, Chennai, Tamil Nadu 600037 (India); Verma, R S, E-mail: vermars@iitm.ac.in [Stem Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, TN 600036 (India)

    2017-04-01

    Major challenge in heart valve tissue engineering for paediatric patients is the development of an autologous valve with regenerative capacity. Hybrid tissue engineering approach is recently gaining popularity to design scaffolds with desired biological and mechanical properties that can remodel post implantation. In this study, we fabricated aligned nanofibrous Bio-Hybrid scaffold made of decellularized bovine pericardium: polycaprolactone-chitosan with optimized polymer thickness to yield the desired biological and mechanical properties. CD44{sup +}, αSMA{sup +}, Vimentin{sup +} and CD105{sup −} human valve interstitial cells were isolated and seeded on these Bio-Hybrid scaffolds. Subsequent biological evaluation revealed interstitial cell proliferation with dense extra cellular matrix deposition that indicated the viability for growth and proliferation of seeded cells on the scaffolds. Uniaxial mechanical tests along axial direction showed that the Bio-Hybrid scaffolds has at least 20 times the strength of the native valves and its stiffness is nearly 3 times more than that of native valves. Biaxial and uniaxial mechanical studies on valve interstitial cells cultured Bio-Hybrid scaffolds revealed that the response along the axial and circumferential direction was different, similar to native valves. Overall, our findings suggest that Bio-Hybrid scaffold is a promising material for future development of regenerative heart valve constructs in children. - Highlights: • We report detailed biological and mechanical investigations of a Bio-Hybrid scaffold. • Optimized polymer thickness yielded desired biological and mechanical properties. • Bio-Hybrid scaffold revealed hVIC proliferation with dense ECM deposition. • Biaxial testing indicated that Bio-Hybrid scaffolds are mechanically stronger than native valves. • Bio-Hybrid scaffold is a promising material for autologous valve tissue engineering.

  16. Beneficial Effects of Autologous Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Naturally Occurring Tendinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Roger Kenneth Whealands; Werling, Natalie Jayne; Dakin, Stephanie Georgina; Alam, Rafiqul; Goodship, Allen E.; Dudhia, Jayesh

    2013-01-01

    Tendon injuries are a common age-related degenerative condition where current treatment strategies fail to restore functionality and normal quality of life. This disease also occurs naturally in horses, with many similarities to human tendinopathy making it an ideal large animal model for human disease. Regenerative approaches are increasingly used to improve outcome involving mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), supported by clinical data where injection of autologous bone marrow derived MSCs (BM-MSCs) suspended in marrow supernatant into injured tendons has halved the re-injury rate in racehorses. We hypothesized that stem cell therapy induces a matrix more closely resembling normal tendon than the fibrous scar tissue formed by natural repair. Twelve horses with career-ending naturally-occurring superficial digital flexor tendon injury were allocated randomly to treatment and control groups. 1X107 autologous BM-MSCs suspended in 2 ml of marrow supernatant were implanted into the damaged tendon of the treated group. The control group received the same volume of saline. Following a 6 month exercise programme horses were euthanized and tendons assessed for structural stiffness by non-destructive mechanical testing and for morphological and molecular composition. BM-MSC treated tendons exhibited statistically significant improvements in key parameters compared to saline-injected control tendons towards that of normal tendons and those in the contralateral limbs. Specifically, treated tendons had lower structural stiffness (ptendon repair in enhancing normalisation of biomechanical, morphological, and compositional parameters. These data in natural disease, with no adverse findings, support the use of this treatment for human tendon injuries. PMID:24086616

  17. Regulation of human mesenchymal stem cells differentiation into chondrocytes in extracellular matrix-based hydrogel scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Mingchun; Liang, Hui; Mou, Chenchen; Li, Xiaoran; Sun, Jie; Zhuang, Yan; Xiao, Zhifeng; Chen, Bing; Dai, Jianwu

    2014-02-01

    To induce human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to differentiate into chondrocytes in three-dimensional (3D) microenvironments, we developed porous hydrogel scaffolds using the cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) components of chondroitin sulfate (CS) and collagen (COL). The turbidity and viscosity experiments indicated hydrogel could form through pH-triggered co-precipitation when pH=2-3. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) confirmed the hydrogel scaffolds could controllably release growth factors as envisaged. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) was released to stimulate hMSCs differentiation into chondrocytes; and then collagen binding domain-basic fibroblast growth factor (CBD-bFGF) was released to improve the differentiation and preserve the chondrocyte phenotype. In in vitro cell culture experiments, the differentiation processes were compared in different microenvironments: 2D culture in culture plate as control, 3D culture in the fabricated scaffolds without growth factors (CC), the samples with CBD-bFGF (CC-C), the samples with TGF-β (CC-T), the samples with CBD-bFGF/TGF-β (CC-CT). Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed the hMSC marker genes of CD44 and CD105 decreased; at the same time the chondrocyte marker genes of collagen type II and aggrecan increased, especially in the CC-CT sample. Immunostaining results further confirmed the hMSC marker protein of CD 44 disappeared and the chondrocyte marker protein of collagen type II emerged over time in the CC-CT sample. These results imply the ECM-based hydrogel scaffolds with growth factors can supply suitable 3D cell niches for hMSCs differentiation into chondrocytes and the differentiation process can be regulated by the controllably released growth factors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. [Stimulation of maturing and terminal differentiation by concanavalin A in rabbit permanent chondrocyte cultures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, W Q; Yang, T S; Hou, L Z; Susuki, F; Kato, Y

    1994-12-01

    The effect of concanavalin A (Con A) on maturing and terminal differentiation in permanent chondrocyte cultures were examined. Chondrocytes isolated from permanent cartilage were seeded at low density and grown in MEM medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum, 50 micrograms/ml of ascorbic acid and antibiotics, at 37 degrees C under 50% CO2 in air. At 0.3% of low serum concentration, addition of Con A to the culture medium increased by 3- to 4-fold the incorporation of [35S] sulfate into large chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan that characteristically found in cartilage. Chemical analysis showed a 4-fold increase in the accumulation of macromolecular containing hexuronic acid in Con A-maintained cultures. The effect of Con A on [35S]sulfate incorporation into proteoglycan was greater than that of various growth factor or hormones. Brief exposure of the permanent chondrocytes to Con A (5 micrograms/ml) for 24 hours and subsequent incubation in its absence for 5-10 days resulted in 10- to 100-fold increase in alkaline phosphatase and binding of 1.25 (OH)2 vitamin D3 to cells. Treatment with Con A also resulted in 10- to 20-fold increase in calcium content and 45Ca incorporation into insoluble material. Methyl-D-mannopyranoside reversed the effect of Con A on [35S]sulfate incorporation into proteoglycan and alkaline phosphatase activity. Since other lectins, such as wheat germ agglutinin, lentil lectin, phytohemagglutinin, Ulex europeasu agglutinin and garden pea lectin had been tested to have little effect on [35S]sulfate incorporation into proteoglycans and induction of alkaline phosphatase activity, the Con A action on chondrocytes seems specific. These results indicate that Con A is a potent modulator of differentiation of chondrocytes, which induces the onset on a maturing and a terminal differentiation in chondrocytes, leading to extensive calcification of the extracellular matrix.

  19. High fat-diet and saturated fatty acid palmitate inhibits IGF-1 function in chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazli, S A; Loeser, R F; Chubinskaya, S; Willey, J S; Yammani, R R

    2017-09-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) promotes matrix synthesis and cell survival in cartilage. Chondrocytes from aged and osteoarthritic cartilage have a reduced response to IGF-1. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of free fatty acids (FFA) present in a high-fat diet on IGF-1 function in cartilage and the role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. C57BL/6 male mice were maintained on either a high-fat (60% kcal from fat) or a low-fat (10% kcal from fat) diet for 4 months. Mice were then sacrificed; femoral head cartilage caps were collected and treated with IGF-1 to measure proteoglycan (PG) synthesis. Cultured human chondrocytes were treated with 500 μM FFA palmitate or oleate, followed by stimulation with (100 ng/ml) IGF-1 overnight to measure CHOP (a protein marker for ER stress) and PG synthesis. Human chondrocytes were pre-treated with palmitate or 1 mM 4-phenyl butyric acid (PBA) or 1 μM C-Jun N terminal Kinase (JNK) inhibitor, and IGF-1 function (PG synthesis and signaling) was measured. Cartilage explants from mice on the high fat-diet showed reduced IGF-1 mediated PG synthesis compared to a low-fat group. Treatment of human chondrocytes with palmitate induced expression of CHOP, activated JNK and inhibited IGF-1 function. PBA, a small molecule chemical chaperone that alleviates ER stress rescued IGF-1 function and a JNK inhibitor rescued IGF-1 signaling. Palmitate-induced ER stress inhibited IGF-1 function in chondrocytes/cartilage via activating the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase JNK. This is the first study to demonstrate that ER stress is metabolic factor that regulates IGF-1 function in chondrocytes. Copyright © 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Curcumin Inhibits Apoptosis of Chondrocytes through Activation ERK1/2 Signaling Pathways Induced Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Li

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is an inflammatory disease of load-bearing synovial joints that is currently treated with drugs that exhibit numerous side effects and are only temporarily effective in treating pain, the main symptom of the disease. Consequently, there is an acute need for novel, safe, and more effective chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of osteoarthritis and related arthritic diseases. Curcumin, the principal curcuminoid and the most active component in turmeric, is a biologically active phytochemical. Evidence from several recent in vitro studies suggests that curcumin may exert a chondroprotective effect through actions such as anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative stress, and anti-catabolic activity that are critical for mitigating OA disease pathogenesis and symptoms. In the present study, we investigated the protective mechanisms of curcumin on interleukin 1β (IL-1β-stimulated primary chondrocytes in vitro. The treatment of interleukin (IL-1β significantly reduces the cell viability of chondrocytes in dose and time dependent manners. Co-treatment of curcumin with IL-1β significantly decreased the growth inhibition. We observed that curcumin inhibited IL-1β-induced apoptosis and caspase-3 activation in chondrocytes. Curcumin can increase the expression of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2, autophagy marker light chain 3 (LC3-II, and Beclin-1 in chondrocytes. The expression of autophagy markers could be decreased when the chondrocytes were incubated with ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126. Our results suggest that curcumin suppresses apoptosis and inflammatory signaling through its actions on the ERK1/2-induced autophagy in chondrocytes. We propose that curcumin should be explored further for the prophylactic treatment of osteoarthritis in humans and companion animals.

  1. The Results of Fetal Chondrocytes Transplantation in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya Krivoruchko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Nowadays anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive therapy has significantly improved the quality of life and prognosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Nevertheless, there are still many patients with progressive rheumatoid inflammation, resulting in the destruction of joints. Cell therapy seems like a promising direction in rheumatology. The aim of our research was to evaluate the efficacy of fetal chondrocyte transplantation in patients with RA.Methods. We examined 60 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (I - III stages between 20 and 63 years of age. They were divided into 2 groups: the first group underwent the fetal chondrocytes transplantation (n = 40, and the second was a control group who got conservative therapy (n = 20. Donor cells were taken from the chondrogenic layer of the humerus or femur heads and hip condyles of human embryos in gestation for 17-20 weeks. A suspension of fetal chondrocytes injected into affected areas of the articular surfaces under X-ray control. Cell viability was determined before the injection. Efficacy of the therapy was assessed by clinical, instrumental, and laboratory tests. This clinical trial was allowed by The Ministry of Public Health and Ethics Committee. All of our patients gave informed consent for the fetal chondrocytes transplantation.Results. Evaluation of the clinical manifestations of RA in the first group of patients showed 3.7 times decrease in pain and 1.6 times relief of synovitis. Complete reduction of contracture was observed in 82% of patients in the first group. Morphometric changes in X-ray demonstrated inhibition of the destruction in articular cartilage and surfaces of bones after transplantation of fetal chondrocytes. The dynamics of morphological changes in synovium showed 2.5 times reduction of the inflammatory reaction. Transplantation of fetal chondrocytes led to a significant reduction in ESR, CRP, fibrinogen , γ-globulin after a period of 12 months (p < 0

  2. CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein β Regulates Expression of Indian Hedgehog during Chondrocytes Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushijima, Takahiro; Okazaki, Ken; Tsushima, Hidetoshi; Ishihara, Kohei; Doi, Toshio; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2014-01-01

    Background CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ) is a transcription factor that promotes hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes. Indian hedgehog (Ihh) also stimulates the hypertrophic transition of chondrocytes. Furthermore, runt-related transcription factor-2 (RUNX2) was reported to regulate chondrocyte maturation during skeletal development and to directly regulate transcriptional activity of Ihh. In this study, we investigated whether the interaction of C/EBPβ and RUNX2 regulates the expression of Ihh during chondrocyte differentiation. Methodology/Results Immunohistochemistry of embryonic growth plate revealed that both C/EBPβ and Ihh were strongly expressed in pre-hypertrophic and hypertrophic chondrocytes. Overexpression of C/EBPβ by adenovirus vector in ATDC5 cells caused marked stimulation of Ihh and Runx2. Conversely, knockdown of C/EBPβ by lentivirus expressing shRNA significantly repressed Ihh and Runx2 in ATDC5 cells. A reporter assay revealed that C/EBPβ stimulated transcriptional activity of Ihh. Deletion and mutation analysis showed that the C/EBPβ responsive element was located between −214 and −210 bp in the Ihh promoter. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay also revealed the direct binding of C/EBPβ to this region. Moreover, reporter assays demonstrated that RUNX2 failed to stimulate the transcriptional activity of the Ihh promoter harboring a mutation at the C/EBPβ binding site. EMSA and ChIP assays showed that RUNX2 interacted to this element with C/EBPβ. Immunoprecipitation revealed that RUNX2 and C/EBPβ formed heterodimer complex with each other in the nuclei of chondrocytes. These data suggested that the C/EBPβ binding element is also important for RUNX2 to regulate the expression of Ihh. Ex vivo organ culture of mouse limbs transfected with C/EBPβ showed that the expression of Ihh and RUNX2 was increased upon ectopic C/EBPβ expression. Conclusions C

  3. CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β regulates expression of Indian hedgehog during chondrocytes differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Ushijima

    Full Text Available CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ is a transcription factor that promotes hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes. Indian hedgehog (Ihh also stimulates the hypertrophic transition of chondrocytes. Furthermore, runt-related transcription factor-2 (RUNX2 was reported to regulate chondrocyte maturation during skeletal development and to directly regulate transcriptional activity of Ihh. In this study, we investigated whether the interaction of C/EBPβ and RUNX2 regulates the expression of Ihh during chondrocyte differentiation.Immunohistochemistry of embryonic growth plate revealed that both C/EBPβ and Ihh were strongly expressed in pre-hypertrophic and hypertrophic chondrocytes. Overexpression of C/EBPβ by adenovirus vector in ATDC5 cells caused marked stimulation of Ihh and Runx2. Conversely, knockdown of C/EBPβ by lentivirus expressing shRNA significantly repressed Ihh and Runx2 in ATDC5 cells. A reporter assay revealed that C/EBPβ stimulated transcriptional activity of Ihh. Deletion and mutation analysis showed that the C/EBPβ responsive element was located between -214 and -210 bp in the Ihh promoter. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA and a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assay also revealed the direct binding of C/EBPβ to this region. Moreover, reporter assays demonstrated that RUNX2 failed to stimulate the transcriptional activity of the Ihh promoter harboring a mutation at the C/EBPβ binding site. EMSA and ChIP assays showed that RUNX2 interacted to this element with C/EBPβ. Immunoprecipitation revealed that RUNX2 and C/EBPβ formed heterodimer complex with each other in the nuclei of chondrocytes. These data suggested that the C/EBPβ binding element is also important for RUNX2 to regulate the expression of Ihh. Ex vivo organ culture of mouse limbs transfected with C/EBPβ showed that the expression of Ihh and RUNX2 was increased upon ectopic C/EBPβ expression.C/EBPβ and RUNX2 cooperatively stimulate

  4. Gli3 acts as a repressor downstream of Ihh in regulating two distinct steps of chondrocyte differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziel, Lydia; Wuelling, Manuela; Schneider, Sabine; Vortkamp, Andrea

    2005-12-01

    During endochondral ossification, the secreted growth factor Indian hedgehog (Ihh) regulates several differentiation steps. It interacts with a second secreted factor, parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), to regulate the onset of hypertrophic differentiation, and it regulates chondrocyte proliferation and ossification of the perichondrium independently of PTHrP. To investigate how the Ihh signal is translated in the different target tissues, we analyzed the role of the zinc-finger transcription factor Gli3, which acts downstream of hedgehog signals in other organs. Loss of Gli3 in Ihh mutants restores chondrocyte proliferation and delays the accelerated onset of hypertrophic differentiation observed in Ihh-/- mutants. Furthermore the expression of the Ihh target genes patched (Ptch) and PTHrP is reactivated in Ihh-/-;Gli3-/- mutants. Gli3 seems thus to act as a strong repressor of Ihh signals in regulating chondrocyte differentiation. In addition, loss of Gli3 in mice that overexpress Ihh in chondrocytes accelerates the onset of hypertrophic differentiation by reducing the domain and possibly the level of PTHrP expression. Careful analysis of chondrocyte differentiation in Gli3-/- mutants revealed that Gli3 negatively regulates the differentiation of distal, low proliferating chondrocytes into columnar, high proliferating cells. Our results suggest a model in which the Ihh/Gli3 system regulates two distinct steps of chondrocyte differentiation: (1) the switch from distal into columnar chondrocytes is repressed by Gli3 in a PTHrP-independent mechanism; (2) the transition from proliferating into hypertrophic chondrocytes is regulated by Gli3-dependent expression of PTHrP. Furthermore, by regulating distal chondrocyte differentiation, Gli3 seems to position the domain of PTHrP expression.

  5. Immune responses to implanted human collagen graft in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quteish, D.; Dolby, A.E.

    1991-01-01

    Immunity to collagen implants may be mediated by cellular and humoral immune responses. To examine the possibility of such immunological reactivity and crossreactivity to collagen, 39 Sprague-Dawley rats (female, 10 weeks old, approximately 250 g wt) were implanted subcutaneously at thigh sites with crosslinked, freeze-dried human placental type I collagen grafts (4x4x2 mm) which had been irradiated (520 Gray) or left untreated. Blood was obtained by intracardiac sampling prior to implantation or from normal rats, and at various times afterwards when the animals were sacrificed. The sera from these animals were examined for circulating antibodies to human, bovine and rat tail (type I) collagens by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Also, the lymphoblastogenic responses of spleen lymphocytes from the irradiated collagen-implanted animals were assessed in culture by measuring thymidine uptake with autologous and normal rat sera in the presence of human bovine type I collagens. Implantation of the irradiated and non-irradiated collagen graft in rats led to a significant increase in the level of circulating antibodies to human collagen. Also antibody to bovine and rat tail collagens was detectable in the animals implanted with irradiated collagen grafts but at a lower level than the human collagen. There was a raised lymphoblastogenic response to both human and bovine collagens. The antibody level and lymphoblastogenesis to the tested collagens gradually decreased towards the end of the post-implantation period. (author)

  6. A glass fiber-reinforced composite - bioactive glass cranioplasty implant: A case study of an early development stage implant removed due to a late infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posti, Jussi P; Piitulainen, Jaakko M; Hupa, Leena; Fagerlund, Susanne; Frantzén, Janek; Aitasalo, Kalle M J; Vuorinen, Ville; Serlo, Willy; Syrjänen, Stina; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2015-03-01

    This case study describes the properties of an early development stage bioactive glass containing fiber-reinforced composite calvarial implant with histology that has been in function for two years and three months. The patient is a 33-year old woman with a history of substance abuse, who sustained a severe traumatic brain injury later unsuccessfully treated with an autologous bone flap and a custom-made porous polyethylene implant. She was thereafter treated with developmental stage glass fiber-reinforced composite - bioactive glass implant. After two years and three months, the implant was removed due to an implant site infection. The implant was analyzed histologically, mechanically, and in terms of chemistry and dissolution of bioactive glass. Mechanical integrity of the load bearing fiber-reinforced composite part of the implant was not affected by the in vivo period. Bioactive glass particles demonstrated surface layers of hydroxyapatite like mineral and dissolution, and related increase of pH was considerably less after two and three months period than that for fresh bioactive glass. There was a difference in the histology of the tissues inside the implant areas near to the margin of the implant that absorbed blood during implant installation surgery, showed fibrous tissue with blood vessels, osteoblasts, collagenous fibers with osteoid formation, and tiny clusters of more mature hard tissue. In the center of the implant, where there was less absorbed blood, only fibrous tissue was observed. This finding is in line with the combined positron emission tomography - computed tomography examination with (18F)-fluoride marker, which demonstrated activity of the mineralizing bone by osteoblasts especially at the area near to the margin of the implant 10 months after implantation. Based on these promising reactions found in the bioactive glass containing fiber-reinforced composite implant that has been implanted for two years and three months, calvarial

  7. Determinants of the Use of Autologous Blood in Elective General ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The study reports the 7 year experience of the authors with autologous blood transfusion in elective general surgery using the predeposit method. Material and Method: Patients aged 18 years and older, presenting for elective surgery and for whom blood donation was required were encouraged to predonate one ...

  8. Osteoarthritis treatment using autologous conditioned serum after placebo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutgers, Marijn; Creemers, Laura B; Auw Yang, Kiem Gie; Raijmakers, Natasja J H; Dhert, Wouter J A; Saris, Daniel B F

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Autologous conditioned serum (ACS) is a disease-modifying drug for treatment of knee osteoarthritis, and modest superiority over placebo was reported in an earlier randomized controlled trial (RCT). We hypothesized that when given the opportunity, placebo-treated patients

  9. Bortezomib consolidation after autologous stem cell transplantation in multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellqvist, Ulf-Henrik; Gimsing, Peter; Hjertner, Oyvind

    2013-01-01

    The Nordic Myeloma Study Group conducted an open randomized trial to compare bortezomib as consolidation therapy given after high-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) with no consolidation in bortezomib-naive patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. Overall, 370...

  10. Experience with predonated autologous blood transfusion in open ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To find out the practicability, the acceptability, the effectiveness and the safety level of pre-donated, autologous blood transfusion (ABT) in patients who underwent open prostatectomy. Study design: Prospective. Patients and methods: It was a prospective study carried out in Nigeria over a 5-year period.

  11. Review of autologous blood transfusion at the Kenyatta National ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study was performed over a three- month period to establish the pattern of autologous blood transfusion with specific focus on age, sex, type of surgery, duration of hospital stay and religious beliefs. Design: Hospital based prospective study. Setting: The study was conducted at the Kenyatta National Hospital ...

  12. Surgical Patients\\' Knowledge and Acceptance of Autologous Blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Homologous blood transfusion carries a well-documented array of risks especially in an HIV endemic environment like Nigeria. It is therefore imperative to consider other forms of restoring blood volume in surgical patients. Autologous blood transfusion (ABT) is one of the ways the problem of HIV transmission ...

  13. Vaccination with apoptosis colorectal cancer cell pulsed autologous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To investigate vaccination with apoptosis colorectal cancer (CRC) cell pulsed autologous dendritic cells (DCs) in advanced CRC, 14 patients with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) were enrolled and treated with DCs vaccine to assess toxicity, tolerability, immune and clinical responses to the vaccine. No severe toxicity ...

  14. Regeneration of Tissues and Organs Using Autologous Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony Atala

    2010-04-28

    The Joint Commission for Health Care Organizations recently declared the shortage of transplantable organs and tissues a public health crisis. As such, there is about one death every 30 seconds due to organ failure. Complications and rejection are still significant albeit underappreciated problems. It is often overlooked that organ transplantation results in the patient being placed on an immune suppression regimen that will ultimate shorten their life span. Patients facing reconstruction often find that surgery is difficult or impossible due to the shortage of healthy autologous tissue. In many cases, autografting is a compromise between the condition and the cure that can result in substantial diminution of quality of life. The national cost of caring for persons who might benefit from engineered tissues or organs has reached $600 billion annually. Autologous tissue technologies have been developed as an alternative to transplantation or reconstructive surgery. Autologous tissues derived from the patient's own cells are capable of correcting numerous pathologies and injuries. The use of autologous cells eliminates the risks of rejection and immunological reactions, drastically reduces the time that patients must wait for lifesaving surgery, and negates the need for autologous tissue harvest, thereby eliminating the associated morbidities. In fact, the use of autologous tissues to create functional organs is one of the most important and groundbreaking steps ever taken in medicine. Although the basic premise of creating tissues in the laboratory has progressed dramatically, only a limited number of tissue developments have reached the patients to date. This is due, in part, to the several major technological challenges that require solutions. To that end, we have been in pursuit of more efficient ways to expand cells in vitro, methods to improve vascular support so that relevant volumes of engineered tissues can be grown, and constructs that can mimic the

  15. TNF/TNFR1 pathway and endoplasmic reticulum stress are involved in ofloxacin-induced apoptosis of juvenile canine chondrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Fu-Tao; Ding, Yi; Shah, Zahir; Xing, Dan; Gao, Yuan; Liu, Dong Ming; Ding, Ming-Xing

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: Quinolones cause obvious cartilaginous lesions in juvenile animals by chondrocyte apoptosis, which results in the restriction of their use in pediatric and adolescent patients. Studies showed that chondrocytes can be induced to produce TNFα, and the cisternae of the endoplasmic reticulum in quinolone-treated chondrocytes become dilated. We investigated whether TNF/TNFR 1 pathway and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERs) are involved in ofloxacin (a typical quinolone)-induced apoptosis of juvenile canine chondrocytes. Experimental approach: Canine juvenile chondrocytes were treated with ofloxacin. Cell survival and apoptosis rates were determined with MTT method and flow cytometry, respectively. The gene expression levels of the related signaling molecules (TNFα, TNFR 1 , TRADD, FADD and caspase-8) in death receptor pathways and main apoptosis-related molecules (calpain, caspase-12, GADD153 and GRP78) in ERs were measured by qRT-PCR. The gene expression of TNFR 1 was suppressed with its siRNA. The protein levels of TNFα, TNFR 1 and caspase-12 were assayed using Western blotting. Key results: The survival rates decreased while apoptosis rates increased after the chondrocytes were treated with ofloxacin. The mRNA levels of the measured apoptosis-related molecules in death receptor pathways and ERs, and the protein levels of TNFα, TNFR 1 and caspase-12 increased after the chondrocytes were exposed to ofloxacin. The downregulated mRNA expressions of TNFR 1 , Caspase-8 and TRADD, and the decreased apoptosis rates of the ofloxacin-treated chondrocytes occurred after TNFR 1 –siRNA interference. Conclusions and implications: Ofloxacin-induced chondrocyte apoptosis in a time- and concentration-dependent fashion. TNF/TNFR 1 pathway and ERs are involved in ofloxacin-induced apoptosis of juvenile canine chondrocytes in the early stage. - Highlights: • Chondrocyte apoptosis is induced by ofloxacin in a time- and concentration-dependent manners.

  16. Short Implants: New Horizon in Implant Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Neha; Gulati, Manisha; Garg, Meenu; Pathak, Chetan

    2016-09-01

    The choice of implant length is an essential factor in deciding the survival rates of these implants and the overall success of the prosthesis. Placing an implant in the posterior part of the maxilla and mandible has always been very critical due to poor bone quality and quantity. Long implants can be placed in association with complex surgical procedures such as sinus lift and bone augmentation. These techniques are associated with higher cost, increased treatment time and greater morbidity. Hence, there is need for a less invasive treatment option in areas of poor bone quantity and quality. Data related to survival rates of short implants, their design and prosthetic considerations has been compiled and structured in this manuscript with emphasis on the indications, advantages of short implants and critical biomechanical factors to be taken into consideration when choosing to place them. Studies have shown that comparable success rates can be achieved with short implants as those with long implants by decreasing the lateral forces to the prosthesis, eliminating cantilevers, increasing implant surface area and improving implant to abutment connection. Short implants can be considered as an effective treatment alternative in resorbed ridges. Short implants can be considered as a viable treatment option in atrophic ridge cases in order to avoid complex surgical procedures required to place long implants. With improvement in the implant surface geometry and surface texture, there is an increase in the bone implant contact area which provides a good primary stability during osseo-integration.

  17. Autologous serum eye drops for dry eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Qing; Angelina, Adla; Marrone, Michael; Stark, Walter J; Akpek, Esen K

    2017-01-01

    Background Theoretically, autologous serum eye drops (AS) offer a potential advantage over traditional therapies on the assumption that AS not only serve as a lacrimal substitute to provide lubrication but contain other biochemical components that allow them to mimic natural tears more closely. Application of AS has gained popularity as second-line therapy for patients with dry eye. Published studies on this subject indicate that autologous serum could be an effective treatment for dry eye. Objectives We conducted this review to evaluate the efficacy and safety of AS given alone or in combination with artificial tears as compared with artificial tears alone, saline, placebo, or no treatment for adults with dry eye. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Trials Register) (2016, Issue 5), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to July 2016), Embase (January 1980 to July 2016), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to July 2016), the ISRCTN registry (www.isrctn.com/editAdvancedSearch), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We also searched the Science Citation Index Expanded database (December 2016) and reference lists of included studies. We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 5 July 2016. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared AS versus artificial tears for treatment of adults with dry eye. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently screened all titles and abstracts and assessed full-text reports of potentially eligible trials. Two review authors extracted data and assessed risk of bias and characteristics of included

  18. Influence of bone morphogenetic protein-2 on the extracellular matrix, material properties, and gene expression of long-term articular chondrocyte cultures: loss of chondrocyte stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczak, David A; Westendorf, Jennifer J; Carlson, Cathy S; Lewis, Jack L

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) on articular chondrocyte tissues grown as monolayers in vitro for up to 8 weeks. Articular chondrocytes were isolated from New Zealand White rabbits and plated in monolayer cultures. The cultures were supplemented with 100 ng/mL of BMP-2 for up to 8 weeks and the extracellular matrix (ECM) composition, material properties, and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression were analyzed. mRNA expression of cartilage-specific genes, type II collagen, and aggrecan showed that BMP-2 enhanced chondrocyte stability for up to 3 weeks. After 3 weeks in culture, there was substantially more type I collagen expression and more osteopontin and runt-related transcription factor 2 expression in 5- and 8-week cultures treated with BMP-2 than in controls. Additionally, matrix metalloproteinase-13 and ADAMTS-5 (A disintegrin-like and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin 5) were upregulated in 5- and 8-week cultures treated with BMP-2, coinciding with a loss of ECM density, collagen, and proteoglycan. Eight-week tissue stimulated with BMP-2 was more fragile and tore more easily when removed from the culture dish as compared to controls, suggesting temporal limitations to the effectiveness of BMP-2 in monolayer systems and perhaps other models to enhance the generation of a cartilage-like tissue for tissue engineering purposes.

  19. Use of containers with sterilizing filter in autologous serum eyedrops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-García, José S; García-Lozano, Isabel

    2012-11-01

    To assess the effect of the use of containers with an adapted sterilizing filter on the contamination of autologous serum eyedrops. Prospective, consecutive, comparative, and randomized study. Thirty patients with Sjögren syndrome. One hundred seventy-six autologous serum containers used in home therapy were studied; 48 of them included an adapted filter (Hyabak; Thea, Clermont-Ferrand, France), and the other 128 were conventional containers. Containers equipped with a filter were tested at 7, 14, 21, and 28 days of use, whereas conventional containers were studied after 7 days of use. In addition, testing for contamination was carried out in 14 conventional containers used during in-patient therapy every week for 4 weeks. In all cases, the preparation of the autologous serum was similar. Blood agar and chocolate agar were used as regular culture media for the microbiologic studies, whereas Sabouraud agar with chloramphenicol was the medium for fungal studies. Microbiologic contamination of containers with autologous serum eyedrops. Only one of the containers with an adapted sterilizing filter (2.1%) became contaminated with Staphylococcus epidermidis after 1 month of treatment, whereas the contamination rate among conventional containers reached 28.9% after 7 days of treatment. The most frequent germs found in the samples were coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (48.6%). With regard the containers used in the in-patient setting, 2 (14.3%) became contaminated after 2 weeks, 5 (35.7%) became contaminated after 3 weeks, and 5 (50%) became contaminated after 4 weeks, leaving 7 (50%) that did not become contaminated after 1 month of treatment. Using containers with an adapted filter significantly reduces the contamination rates in autologous serum eyedrops, thus extending the use of such container by the patients for up to 4 weeks with virtually no contamination risks. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Implantation, recoil implantation, and sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, R.

    1984-01-01

    Underlying ion-beam modification of surfaces is the more basic subject of particle-surface interaction. The ideas can be grouped into forward and backward features, i.e. those affecting the interior of the target and those leading to particle expulsion. Forward effects include the stopping of the incident particles and the deposition of energy, both governed by integral equations which are easily set up but difficult to solve. Closely related is recoil implantation where emphasis is placed not on the stopping of the incident particles but on their interaction with target atoms with resulting implantation of these atoms. Backward effects, all of which are denoted as sputtering, are in general either of collisional, thermal, electronic, or exfoliational origin. (Auth.)

  1. Surviving endoplasmic reticulum stress is coupled to altered chondrocyte differentiation and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok Yeung Tsang

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available In protein folding and secretion disorders, activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress signaling (ERSS protects cells, alleviating stress that would otherwise trigger apoptosis. Whether the stress-surviving cells resume normal function is not known. We studied the in vivo impact of ER stress in terminally differentiating hypertrophic chondrocytes (HCs during endochondral bone formation. In transgenic mice expressing mutant collagen X as a consequence of a 13-base pair deletion in Col10a1 (13del, misfolded alpha1(X chains accumulate in HCs and elicit ERSS. Histological and gene expression analyses showed that these chondrocytes survived ER stress, but terminal differentiation is interrupted, and endochondral bone formation is delayed, producing a chondrodysplasia phenotype. This altered differentiation involves cell-cycle re-entry, the re-expression of genes characteristic of a prehypertrophic-like state, and is cell-autonomous. Concomitantly, expression of Col10a1 and 13del mRNAs are reduced, and ER stress is alleviated. ERSS, abnormal chondrocyte differentiation, and altered growth plate architecture also occur in mice expressing mutant collagen II and aggrecan. Alteration of the differentiation program in chondrocytes expressing unfolded or misfolded proteins may be part of an adaptive response that facilitates survival and recovery from the ensuing ER stress. However, the altered differentiation disrupts the highly coordinated events of endochondral ossification culminating in chondrodysplasia.

  2. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 impacts chondrocyte hypertrophic differentiation during endochondral ossification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TJM Welting

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Skeletogenesis and bone fracture healing involve endochondral ossification, a process during which cartilaginous primordia are gradually replaced by bone tissue. In line with a role for cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 in the endochondral ossification process, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs were reported to negatively affect bone fracture healing due to impaired osteogenesis. However, a role for COX-2 activity in the chondrogenic phase of endochondral ossification has not been addressed before. We show that COX-2 activity fulfils an important regulatory function in chondrocyte hypertrophic differentiation. Our data reveal essential cross-talk between COX-2 and bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2 during chondrocyte hypertrophic differentiation. BMP-2 mediated chondrocyte hypertrophy is associated with increased COX-2 expression and pharmacological inhibition of COX-2 activity by NSAIDs (e.g., Celecoxib decreases hypertrophic differentiation in various chondrogenic models in vitro and in vivo, while leaving early chondrogenic development unaltered. Our findings demonstrate that COX-2 activity is a novel factor partaking in chondrocyte hypertrophy in the context of endochondral ossification and these observations provide a novel etiological perspective on the adverse effects of NSAIDs on bone fracture healing and have important implications for the use of NSAIDs during endochondral skeletal development.

  3. Effects of Bauhinia championii (Benth.) Benth. polysaccharides on the proliferation and cell cycle of chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Liangliang; Ye, Hongzhi; Yu, Fangrong; Li, Huiting; Chen, Jiashou; Liu, Xianxiang

    2013-05-01

    It has been recently shown that polysaccharides isolated from plants exhibit a number of beneficial therapeutic properties. Bauhinia championii (Benth.) Benth. has been widely used for the clinical treatment of knee osteoarthritis (OA) in China. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of knee OA treatment have yet to be elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effects of Bauhinia championii (Benth.) Benth. polysaccharides (BCBPs) on the proliferation and cell cycle of chondrocytes on 4-week-old male Sprague Dawley rats. Immunohistochemical staining was used to identify chondrocytes and an MTT assay was used to evaluate cell viability. Flow cytometry was used for cell cycle analysis. The mRNA and protein expression levels of cyclin D1, CDK4 and CDK6 in chondrocytes were detected using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analysis, respectively. The data demonstrate that BCBP treatment increased the viability of chondrocytes. In addition, BCBP treatment reduced the cell population in the G0/G1 phase, whereas the cell population was increased in the S phase. Furthermore, BCBP treatment enhanced the expression of cyclin D1, CDK4 and CDK6. These results indicate that BCBP treatment promotes cell proliferation by accelerating the G1/S transition.

  4. Topographic variation in redifferentiation capacity of chondrocytes in the adult human knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenhamre, H; Slynarski, K; Petrén, C; Tallheden, T; Lindahl, A

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the topographic variation in matrix production and cell density in the adult human knee joint. Additionally, we have examined the redifferentiation potential of chondrocytes expanded in vitro from the different locations. Full thickness cartilage-bone biopsies were harvested from seven separate anatomical locations of healthy knee joints from deceased adult human donors. Chondrocytes were isolated, expanded in vitro and redifferentiated in a pellet mass culture. Biochemical analysis of total collagen, proteoglycans and cellular content as well as histology and immunohistochemistry were performed on biopsies and pellets. In the biochemical analysis of the biopsies, we found lower proteoglycan to collagen (GAG/HP) ratio in the non-weight bearing (NWB) areas compared to the weight bearing (WB) areas. The chondrocytes harvested from different locations in femur showed a significantly better attachment and proliferation ability as well as good post-expansion chondrogenic capacity in pellet mass culture compared with the cells harvested from tibia. These results demonstrate that there are differences in extra cellular content within the adult human knee in respect to GAG/HP ratio. Additionally, the data show that clear differences between chondrocytes harvested from femur and tibia from healthy human knee joints exist and that the differences are not completely abolished during the process of de- and redifferentiation. These findings emphasize the importance of the understanding of topographic variation in articular cartilage biology when approaching new cartilage repair strategies.

  5. Oxidative Stress Promotes Peroxiredoxin Hyperoxidation and Attenuates Pro-survival Signaling in Aging Chondrocytes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, John A.; Wood, Scott T.; Nelson, Kimberly J.; Rowe, Meredith A.; Carlson, Cathy S.; Chubinskaya, Susan; Poole, Leslie B.; Furdui, Cristina M.; Loeser, Richard F.

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress-mediated post-translational modifications of redox-sensitive proteins are postulated as a key mechanism underlying age-related cellular dysfunction and disease progression. Peroxiredoxins (PRX) are critical intracellular antioxidants that also regulate redox signaling events. Age-related osteoarthritis is a common form of arthritis that has been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of aging and oxidative stress on chondrocyte intracellular signaling, with a specific focus on oxidation of cytosolic PRX2 and mitochondrial PRX3. Menadione was used as a model to induce cellular oxidative stress. Compared with chondrocytes isolated from young adult humans, chondrocytes from older adults exhibited higher levels of PRX1–3 hyperoxidation basally and under conditions of oxidative stress. Peroxiredoxin hyperoxidation was associated with inhibition of pro-survival Akt signaling and stimulation of pro-death p38 signaling. These changes were prevented in cultured human chondrocytes by adenoviral expression of catalase targeted to the mitochondria (MCAT) and in cartilage explants from MCAT transgenic mice. Peroxiredoxin hyperoxidation was observed in situ in human cartilage sections from older adults and in osteoarthritic cartilage. MCAT transgenic mice exhibited less age-related osteoarthritis. These findings demonstrate that age-related oxidative stress can disrupt normal physiological signaling and contribute to osteoarthritis and suggest peroxiredoxin hyperoxidation as a potential mechanism. PMID:26797130

  6. Melatonin protects chondrocytes from impairment induced by glucocorticoids via NAD+-dependent SIRT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Kang, Xiaomin; Qin, Na; Li, Feng; Jin, Xinxin; Ma, Zhengmin; Qian, Zhuang; Wu, Shufang

    2017-10-01

    Intra-articular injection of glucocorticoids is used to relieve pain and inflammation in osteoarthritis patients, which is occasionally accompanied with the serious side effects of glucocorticoids in collagen-producing tissue. Melatonin is the major hormone released from the pineal gland and its beneficial effects on cartilage has been suggested. In the present study, we investigated the protective role of melatonin on matrix degeneration in chondrocytes induced by dexamethasone (Dex). The chondrocytes isolated from mice knee joint were treated with Dex, melatonin, EX527 and siRNA targeted for SIRT6, respectively. Dex treatment induced the loss of the extracellular matrix, NAD + /NADH ratio and NADPH concentration in chondrocytes. Melatonin alone have no effect on the quantity of proteoglycans and collagen type IIa1, however, the pretreatment of melatonin reversed the negative effects induced by Dex. Meanwhile, the significant decrease in NAD + /NADH ratio and NADPH concentration in Dex group were up-regulated by pretreatment of melatonin. Furthermore, it was revealed that inhibition of SIRT1 blocked the protective effects of melatonin. The enhancement of NAD + -dependent SIRT1 activity contributes to the chondroprotecfive effects of melatonin, which has a great benefit to prevent dexamethasone-induced chondrocytes impairment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Transforming growth factor-beta predominantly stimulates phenotypically changed chondrocytes in osteoarthritic human cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lafeber, F. P.; van Roy, H. L.; van der Kraan, P. M.; van den Berg, W. B.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    One of the most prominent alterations that characterizes osteoarthritic cartilage damage is a reduction of proteoglycan content, reflecting an imbalance between synthesis and release of proteoglycans. Both synthesis and release depend on the activity of cartilage cells. Chondrocytes in the upper

  8. HIF-1α-induced HSP70 regulates anabolic responses in articular chondrocytes under hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchida, Shinji; Arai, Yuji; Takahashi, Kenji A; Kishida, Tsunao; Terauchi, Ryu; Honjo, Kuniaki; Nakagawa, Shuji; Inoue, Hiroaki; Ikoma, Kazuya; Ueshima, Keiichiro; Matsuki, Tomohiro; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2014-08-01

    We assessed whether heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is involved in hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α)-dependent anabolic pathways in articular chondrocytes under hypoxic conditions. Primary rabbit chondrocytes were cultured under normoxia (20% oxygen condition) or hypoxia (1% oxygen condition). Alternatively, cells cultured under normoxia were treated with CoCl2 , which induces HIF-1α, to simulate hypoxia, or transfected with siRNAs targeting HIF-1α (si-HIF-1α) and HSP70 (si-HSP70) under hypoxia. HSP70 expression was enhanced by the increased expression of HIF-1α under hypoxia or simulated hypoxia, but not in the presence of si-HIF-1α. Hypoxia-induced overexpression of ECM genes was significantly suppressed by si-HIF-1α or si-HSP70. Cell viability positively correlated with hypoxia, but transfection with si-HIF-1α or si-HSP70 abrogated the chondroprotective effects of hypoxia. Although LDH release from sodium nitroprusside-treated cells and the proportion of TUNEL positive cells were decreased under hypoxia, transfection with si-HIF-1α or si-HSP70 almost completely blocked these effects. These findings indicated that HIF-1α-induced HSP70 overexpression increased the expression levels of ECM genes and cell viability, and protected chondrocytes from apoptosis. HIF-1α may regulate the anabolic effects of chondrocytes under hypoxic conditions by regulating HSP70 expression. © 2014 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Effect of ceramic calcium-phosphorus ratio on chondrocyte-mediated biosynthesis and mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boushell, Margaret K; Khanarian, Nora T; LeGeros, Raquel Z; Lu, Helen H

    2017-10-01

    The osteochondral interface functions as a structural barrier between cartilage and bone, maintaining tissue integrity postinjury and during homeostasis. Regeneration of this calcified cartilage region is thus essential for integrative cartilage healing, and hydrogel-ceramic composite scaffolds have been explored for calcified cartilage formation. The objective of this study is to test the hypothesis that Ca/P ratio of the ceramic phase of the composite scaffold regulates chondrocyte biosynthesis and mineralization potential. Specifically, the response of deep zone chondrocytes to two bioactive ceramics with different calcium-phosphorus ratios (1.35 ± 0.01 and 1.41 ± 0.02) was evaluated in agarose hydrogel scaffolds over two weeks in vitro. It was observed that the ceramic with higher calcium-phosphorus ratio enhanced chondrocyte proliferation, glycosaminoglycan production, and induced an early onset of alkaline phosphorus activity, while the ceramic with lower calcium-phosphorus ratio performed similarly to the ceramic-free control. These results underscore the importance of ceramic bioactivity in directing chondrocyte response, and demonstrate that Ca/P ratio is a key parameter to be considered in osteochondral scaffold design. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 2694-2702, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Sprifermin (rhFGF18) enables proliferation of chondrocytes producing a hyaline cartilage matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigout, A; Guehring, H; Froemel, D; Meurer, A; Ladel, C; Reker, D; Bay-Jensen, A C; Karsdal, M A; Lindemann, S

    2017-11-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 18 has been shown to increase cartilage volume when injected intra-articularly in animal models of osteoarthritis (OA) and in patients with knee OA (during clinical development of the recombinant human FGF18, sprifermin). However, the exact nature of this effect is still unknown. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of sprifermin at the cellular level. A combination of different chondrocyte culture systems was used and the effects of sprifermin on proliferation, the phenotype and matrix production were evaluated. The involvement of MAPKs in sprifermin signalling was also studied. In monolayer, we observed that sprifermin promoted a round cell morphology and stimulated both cellular proliferation and Sox9 expression while strongly decreasing type I collagen expression. In 3D culture, sprifermin increased the number of matrix-producing chondrocytes, improved the type II:I collagen ratio and enabled human OA chondrocytes to produce a hyaline extracellular matrix (ECM). Furthermore, we found that sprifermin displayed a 'hit and run' mode of action, with intermittent exposure required for the compound to fully exert its anabolic effect. Finally, sprifermin appeared to signal through activation of ERK. Our results indicate that intermittent exposure to sprifermin leads to expansion of hyaline cartilage-producing chondrocytes. These in vitro findings are consistent with the increased cartilage volume observed in the knees of OA patients after intra-articular injection with sprifermin in clinical studies. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Biochemical alterations in inflammatory reactive chondrocytes: evidence for intercellular network communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Skiöldebrand

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chondrocytes are effectively involved in the pathophysiological processes of inflammation in joints. They form cellular processes in the superficial layer of the articular cartilage and form gap junction coupled syncytium to facilitate cell-to-cell communication. However, very little is known about their physiological cellular identity and communication. The aim with the present work is to evaluate the physiological behavior after stimulation with the inflammatory inducers interleukin-1β and lipopolysaccharide. The cytoskeleton integrity and intracellular Ca2+ release were assessed as indicators of inflammatory state. Cytoskeleton integrity was analyzed through cartilage oligomeric matrix protein and actin labeling with an Alexa 488-conjugated phalloidin probe. Ca2+ responses were assessed through the Ca2+ sensitive fluorophore Fura-2/AM. Western blot analyses of several inflammatory markers were performed. The results show reorganization of the actin filaments. Glutamate, 5-hydoxytryptamine, and ATP evoked intracellular Ca2+ release changed from single peaks to oscillations after inflammatory induction in the chondrocytes. The expression of toll-like receptor 4, the glutamate transporters GLAST and GLT-1, and the matrix metalloproteinase-13 increased. This work demonstrates that chondrocytes are a key part in conditions that lead to inflammation in the cartilage. The inflammatory inducers modulate the cytoskeleton, the Ca2+ signaling, and several inflammatory parameters. In conclusion, our data show that the cellular responses to inflammatory insults from healthy and inflammatory chondrocytes resemble those previously observed in astrocyte and cardiac fibroblasts networks.

  12. Latexin is involved in bone morphogenetic protein-2-induced chondrocyte differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadouchi, Ichiro; Sakamoto, Kei; Tangjiao, Liu; Murakami, Takashi; Kobayashi, Eiji; Hoshino, Yuichi; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2009-01-01

    Latexin is the only known carboxypeptidase A inhibitor in mammals. We previously demonstrated that BMP-2 significantly induced latexin expression in Runx2-deficient mesenchymal cells (RD-C6 cells), during chondrocyte and osteoblast differentiation. In this study, we investigated latexin expression in the skeleton and its role in chondrocyte differentiation. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that proliferating and prehypertrophic chondrocytes expressed latexin during skeletogenesis and bone fracture repair. In the early phase of bone fracture, latexin mRNA expression was dramatically upregulated. BMP-2 upregulated the expression of the mRNAs of latexin, Col2a1, and the gene encoding aggrecan (Agc1) in a micromass culture of C3H10T1/2 cells. Overexpression of latexin additively stimulated the BMP-2-induced expression of the mRNAs of Col2a, Agc1, and Col10a1. BMP-2 treatment upregulated Sox9 expression, and Sox9 stimulated the promoter activity of latexin. These results indicate that latexin is involved in BMP-2-induced chondrocyte differentiation and plays an important role in skeletogenesis and skeletal regeneration.

  13. Acquiring Chondrocyte Phenotype from Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells under Inflammatory Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Kondo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available An inflammatory milieu breaks down the cartilage matrix and induces chondrocyte apoptosis, resulting in cartilage destruction in patients with cartilage degenerative diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis. Because of the limited regenerative ability of chondrocytes, defects in cartilage are irreversible and difficult to repair. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are expected to be a new tool for cartilage repair because they are present in the cartilage and are able to differentiate into multiple lineages of cells, including chondrocytes. Although clinical trials using MSCs for patients with cartilage defects have already begun, its efficacy and repair mechanisms remain unknown. A PubMed search conducted in October 2014 using the following medical subject headings (MeSH terms: mesenchymal stromal cells, chondrogenesis, and cytokines resulted in 204 articles. The titles and abstracts were screened and nine articles relevant to “inflammatory” cytokines and “human” MSCs were identified. Herein, we review the cell biology and mechanisms of chondrocyte phenotype acquisition from human MSCs in an inflammatory milieu and discuss the clinical potential of MSCs for cartilage repair.

  14. Upregulation of matrix synthesis in chondrocyte-seeded agarose following sustained bi-axial cyclic loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda Pingguan-Murphy

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The promotion of extracellular matrix synthesis by chondrocytes is a requisite part of an effective cartilage tissue engineering strategy. The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the effect of bi-axial cyclic mechanical loading on cell proliferation and the synthesis of glycosaminoglycans by chondrocytes in threedimensional cultures. METHOD: A strain comprising 10% direct compression and 1% compressive shear was applied to bovine chondrocytes seeded in an agarose gel during two 12-hour conditioning periods separated by a 12-hour resting period. RESULTS: The bi-axial-loaded chondrocytes demonstrated a significant increase in glycosaminoglycan synthesis compared with samples exposed to uni-axial or no loading over the same period (p<0.05. The use of a free-swelling recovery period prior to the loading regime resulted in additional glycosaminoglycan production and a significant increase in DNA content (p<0.05, indicating cell proliferation. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate that the use of a bi-axial loading regime results in increased matrix production compared with uni-axial loading.

  15. Chondrogenic differentiation of human articular chondrocytes differs in biodegradable PGA/PLA scaffolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwingmann, Joern; Mehlhorn, Alexander T; Südkamp, Norbert

    2007-01-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering is applied clinically to cover and regenerate articular cartilage defects. Two bioresorbable nonwoven scaffolds, polyglycolic acid (PGA) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) (90/10 copolymer of L-lactide and glycolide), were seeded with human chondrocytes after in...

  16. CCN2/CTGF is required for matrix organization and to protect growth plate chondrocytes from cellular stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall-Glenn, Faith; Aivazi, Armen; Akopyan, Lusi; Ong, Jessica R; Baxter, Ruth R; Benya, Paul D; Goldschmeding, Roel; van Nieuwenhoven, Frans A; Hunziker, Ernst B; Lyons, Karen M

    2013-08-01

    CCN2 (connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2)) is a matricellular protein that utilizes integrins to regulate cell proliferation, migration and survival. The loss of CCN2 leads to perinatal lethality resulting from a severe chondrodysplasia. Upon closer inspection of Ccn2 mutant mice, we observed defects in extracellular matrix (ECM) organization and hypothesized that the severe chondrodysplasia caused by loss of CCN2 might be associated with defective chondrocyte survival. Ccn2 mutant growth plate chondrocytes exhibited enlarged endoplasmic reticula (ER), suggesting cellular stress. Immunofluorescence analysis confirmed elevated stress in Ccn2 mutants, with reduced stress observed in Ccn2 overexpressing transgenic mice. In vitro studies revealed that Ccn2 is a stress responsive gene in chondrocytes. The elevated stress observed in Ccn2-/- chondrocytes is direct and mediated in part through integrin α5. The expression of the survival marker NFκB and components of the autophagy pathway were decreased in Ccn2 mutant growth plates, suggesting that CCN2 may be involved in mediating chondrocyte survival. These data demonstrate that absence of a matricellular protein can result in increased cellular stress and highlight a novel protective role for CCN2 in chondrocyte survival. The severe chondrodysplasia caused by the loss of CCN2 may be due to increased chondrocyte stress and defective activation of autophagy pathways, leading to decreased cellular survival. These effects may be mediated through nuclear factor κB (NFκB) as part of a CCN2/integrin/NFκB signaling cascade.

  17. A Tumor Suppressor Gene Product, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor Receptor-Like Protein Controls Chondrocyte Proliferation and Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, Kazumi; Kubota, Satoshi; Eguchi, Takanori; Aoyama, Eriko; Moritani, Norifumi H; Oka, Morihiko; Kawaki, Harumi; Takigawa, Masaharu

    2017-11-01

    The platelet-derived growth factor receptor-like (PDGFRL) gene is regarded as a tumor suppressor gene. However, nothing is known about the molecular function of PDGFRL. In this study, we initially clarified its function in chondrocytes. Among all cell lines examined, the PDGFRL mRNA level was the highest in chondrocytic HCS-2/8 cells. Interestingly, the proliferation of chondrocytic HCS-2/8 cells was promoted by PDGFRL overexpression, whereas that of the breast cancer-derived MDA-MB-231 cells was inhibited. Of note, in PDGFRL-overexpressing HCS-2/8 cells, the expression of chondrocyte differentiation marker genes, SOX9, ACAN, COL2A1, COL10A1, and ALP, was decreased. Moreover, we confirmed the expression of PDGFRL mRNA in normal cartilage tissue and chondrocytes. Eventually, the expression of PDGFRL mRNA in condrocytes except in the case of hypertrophic chondrocytes was demonstrated in vivo and in vitro. These findings suggest that PDGFRL plays the different roles, depending upon cell types. Particularly, in chondrocytes, PDGFRL may play a new and important role which is distinct from the function previously reported. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 4033-4044, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A preclinical evaluation of an autologous living hyaline-like cartilaginous graft for articular cartilage repair: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Yvonne; He, Pengfei; Chilla, Geetha Soujanya V N; Poh, Chueh Loo; Wang, Dong-An

    2015-11-09

    In this pilot study, an autologous synthetic scaffold-free construct with hyaline quality, termed living hyaline cartilaginous graft (LhCG), was applied for treating cartilage lesions. Implantation of autologous LhCG was done at load-bearing regions of the knees in skeletally mature mini-pigs for 6 months. Over the course of this study, significant radiographical improvement in LhCG treated sites was observed via magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, macroscopic repair was effected by LhCG at endpoint. Microscopic inspection revealed that LhCG engraftment restored cartilage thickness, promoted integration with surrounding native cartilage, produced abundant cartilage-specific matrix molecules, and re-established an intact superficial tangential zone. Importantly, the repair efficacy of LhCG was quantitatively shown to be comparable to native, unaffected cartilage in terms of biochemical composition and biomechanical properties. There were no complications related to the donor site of cartilage biopsy. Collectively, these results imply that LhCG engraftment may be a viable approach for articular cartilage repair.

  19. Lithium Chloride Dependent Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 Inactivation Links Oxidative DNA Damage, Hypertrophy and Senescence in Human Articular Chondrocytes and Reproduces Chondrocyte Phenotype of Obese Osteoarthritis Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Guidotti

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests that GSK3 activity is chondroprotective in osteoarthritis (OA, but at the same time, its inactivation has been proposed as an anti-inflammatory therapeutic option. Here we evaluated the extent of GSK3β inactivation in vivo in OA knee cartilage and the molecular events downstream GSK3β inactivation in vitro to assess their contribution to cell senescence and hypertrophy.In vivo level of phosphorylated GSK3β was analyzed in cartilage and oxidative damage was assessed by 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine staining. The in vitro effects of GSK3β inactivation (using either LiCl or SB216763 were evaluated on proliferating primary human chondrocytes by combined confocal microscopy analysis of Mitotracker staining and reactive oxygen species (ROS production (2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate staining. Downstream effects on DNA damage and senescence were investigated by western blot (γH2AX, GADD45β and p21, flow cytometric analysis of cell cycle and light scattering properties, quantitative assessment of senescence associated β galactosidase activity, and PAS staining.In vivo chondrocytes from obese OA patients showed higher levels of phosphorylated GSK3β, oxidative damage and expression of GADD45β and p21, in comparison with chondrocytes of nonobese OA patients. LiCl mediated GSK3β inactivation in vitro resulted in increased mitochondrial ROS production, responsible for reduced cell proliferation, S phase transient arrest, and increase in cell senescence, size and granularity. Collectively, western blot data supported the occurrence of a DNA damage response leading to cellular senescence with increase in γH2AX, GADD45β and p21. Moreover, LiCl boosted 8-oxo-dG staining, expression of IKKα and MMP-10.In articular chondrocytes, GSK3β activity is required for the maintenance of proliferative potential and phenotype. Conversely, GSK3β inactivation, although preserving chondrocyte survival, results in functional impairment via

  20. Lithium Chloride Dependent Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 Inactivation Links Oxidative DNA Damage, Hypertrophy and Senescence in Human Articular Chondrocytes and Reproduces Chondrocyte Phenotype of Obese Osteoarthritis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidotti, Serena; Minguzzi, Manuela; Platano, Daniela; Cattini, Luca; Trisolino, Giovanni; Mariani, Erminia; Borzì, Rosa Maria

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that GSK3 activity is chondroprotective in osteoarthritis (OA), but at the same time, its inactivation has been proposed as an anti-inflammatory therapeutic option. Here we evaluated the extent of GSK3β inactivation in vivo in OA knee cartilage and the molecular events downstream GSK3β inactivation in vitro to assess their contribution to cell senescence and hypertrophy. In vivo level of phosphorylated GSK3β was analyzed in cartilage and oxidative damage was assessed by 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine staining. The in vitro effects of GSK3β inactivation (using either LiCl or SB216763) were evaluated on proliferating primary human chondrocytes by combined confocal microscopy analysis of Mitotracker staining and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production (2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate staining). Downstream effects on DNA damage and senescence were investigated by western blot (γH2AX, GADD45β and p21), flow cytometric analysis of cell cycle and light scattering properties, quantitative assessment of senescence associated β galactosidase activity, and PAS staining. In vivo chondrocytes from obese OA patients showed higher levels of phosphorylated GSK3β, oxidative damage and expression of GADD45β and p21, in comparison with chondrocytes of nonobese OA patients. LiCl mediated GSK3β inactivation in vitro resulted in increased mitochondrial ROS production, responsible for reduced cell proliferation, S phase transient arrest, and increase in cell senescence, size and granularity. Collectively, western blot data supported the occurrence of a DNA damage response leading to cellular senescence with increase in γH2AX, GADD45β and p21. Moreover, LiCl boosted 8-oxo-dG staining, expression of IKKα and MMP-10. In articular chondrocytes, GSK3β activity is required for the maintenance of proliferative potential and phenotype. Conversely, GSK3β inactivation, although preserving chondrocyte survival, results in functional impairment via induction of

  1. Radiographic analysis of pasteurized autologous bone graft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Adel Refaat; Manabe, Jun; Kawaguchi, Noriyoshi; Matsumoto, Seiichi; Matsushita, Yasushi

    2003-01-01

    Local malignant bone tumor excision followed by pasteurization and subsequent reimplantation is a unique technique for reconstruction after resection of primary bone sarcomas. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the normal and abnormal long-term radiographic findings of intercalary and osteo-chondral pasteurized bone graft/implant composite. The long-term radiographic findings of pasteurized bone grafts used in reconstruction after resection of bone and soft tissue sarcomas in relation to patients' clinical data were reviewed retrospectively. Thirty-one patients (18 females, 13 males; age range 7-77 years, mean 30 years) who underwent surgery between April 1990 and January 1997 at the authors' institute constituted the material of this study. They were followed up for at least 3 years or until the patient's death (mean 69 months). The International Society of Limb Salvage graft evaluation method that assesses the fusion, resorption, fracture, graft shortening, fixation, subluxation, joint narrowing and subchondral bone was used for evaluation of the radiographs. Twenty-one patients (68%) showed complete incorporation of graft and eight patients (26%) had partial incorporation. The overall radiographic evaluation rate was 81%. Fracture (10%) and infection (16%) were the main complications. No local recurrence was detected. These results indicate that pasteurization of bone is a useful option for reconstruction after resection of malignant bone tumors. (orig.)

  2. Radiographic analysis of pasteurized autologous bone graft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Adel Refaat [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Cancer Institute Hospital, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Kamiikebukuro 1-37-1, Toshima-ku, 170-0012, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Alexandria University, Alexandria (Egypt); Manabe, Jun; Kawaguchi, Noriyoshi; Matsumoto, Seiichi; Matsushita, Yasushi [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Cancer Institute Hospital, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Kamiikebukuro 1-37-1, Toshima-ku, 170-0012, Tokyo (Japan)

    2003-08-01

    Local malignant bone tumor excision followed by pasteurization and subsequent reimplantation is a unique technique for reconstruction after resection of primary bone sarcomas. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the normal and abnormal long-term radiographic findings of intercalary and osteo-chondral pasteurized bone graft/implant composite. The long-term radiographic findings of pasteurized bone grafts used in reconstruction after resection of bone and soft tissue sarcomas in relation to patients' clinical data were reviewed retrospectively. Thirty-one patients (18 females, 13 males; age range 7-77 years, mean 30 years) who underwent surgery between April 1990 and January 1997 at the authors' institute constituted the material of this study. They were followed up for at least 3 years or until the patient's death (mean 69 months). The International Society of Limb Salvage graft evaluation method that assesses the fusion, resorption, fracture, graft shortening, fixation, subluxation, joint narrowing and subchondral bone was used for evaluation of the radiographs. Twenty-one patients (68%) showed complete incorporation of graft and eight patients (26%) had partial incorporation. The overall radiographic evaluation rate was 81%. Fracture (10%) and infection (16%) were the main complications. No local recurrence was detected. These results indicate that pasteurization of bone is a useful option for reconstruction after resection of malignant bone tumors. (orig.)

  3. Bauhinia championi (Benth.) Benth. polysaccharides upregulate Wnt/β-catenin signaling in chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiting; Li, Xihai; Liu, Guozhong; Chen, Jiashou; Weng, Xiaping; Liu, Fayuan; Xu, Huifeng; Liu, Xianxiang; Ye, Hongzhi

    2013-12-01

    Bauhinia championi (Benth.) Benth. polysaccharides (BCBPs), extracted from Bauhinia championi (Benth.) Benth., which has been used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA), are the bioactive constituents of Bauhinia championi (Benth.) rattan. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for their effects on OA are poorly understood. The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway plays an important role in the proliferation of chondrocytes. In the present study, the effects of BCBPs on Wnt/β-catenin signaling in chondrocytes were investigated. BCBPs were obtained by hot-water extraction and identified by the modified high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. Chondrocytes were isolated from the knees of Sprague‑Dawley rats and identified by type II collagen immunohistochemistry. The chondrocytes were treated with or without BCBPs for 48 h. Cell viability was evaluated by MTT assay. The mRNA and protein levels of Wnt-4, β-catenin, Frizzled-2, glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β, cyclin D1 and collagen II were detected by western blot analysis and reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR), respectively. We found that the BCBPs contained at least seven monosaccharides, including D-mannose, rhamnose, D-(+) glucuronic acid, D-(+) galacturonic acid, D-glucose, galactose and arabinose. The cell viability of the chondrocytes treated with 50, 100 and 200 µg/ml BCBPs was significantly higher than that of the chondroctyes in the control group (treated with 0 µg/ml BCBPs). Furthermore, compared with the control group, the mRNA and protein expression of Wnt-4, β-catenin, Frizzled-2 and cyclin D1 in the BCBP-treated groups markedly increased, whereas the mRNA and protein expression of GSK-3β significantly decreased. Of note, the dose of 100 µg/ml BCBPs was more effective than the dose of 50 µg/ml BCBPs and 200 µg/ml BCBPs. In addition, we found that treatment with BCBPs upregulated the protein levels of collagen II in the

  4. Increased adipogenesis in cultured embryonic chondrocytes and in adult bone marrow of dominant negative Erg transgenic mice.

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    Sébastien Flajollet

    Full Text Available In monolayer culture, primary articular chondrocytes have an intrinsic tendency to lose their phenotype during expansion. The molecular events underlying this chondrocyte dedifferentiation are still largely unknown. Several transcription factors are important for chondrocyte differentiation. The Ets transcription factor family may be involved in skeletal development. One family member, the Erg gene, is mainly expressed during cartilage formation. To further investigate the potential role of Erg in the maintenance of the chondrocyte phenotype, we isolated and cultured chondrocytes from the rib cartilage of embryos of transgenic mice that express a dominant negative form of Erg (DN-Erg during cartilage formation. DN-Erg expression in chondrocytes cultured for up to 20 days did not affect the early dedifferentiation usually observed in cultured chondrocytes. However, lipid droplets accumulated in DN-Erg chondrocytes, suggesting adipocyte emergence. Transcriptomic analysis using a DNA microarray, validated by quantitative RT-PCR, revealed strong differential gene expression, with a decrease in chondrogenesis-related markers and an increase in adipogenesis-related gene expression in cultured DN-Erg chondrocytes. These results indicate that Erg is involved in either maintaining the chondrogenic phenotype in vitro or in cell fate orientation. Along with the in vitro studies, we compared adipocyte presence in wild-type and transgenic mice skeletons. Histological investigations revealed an increase in the number of adipocytes in the bone marrow of adult DN-Erg mice even though no adipocytes were detected in embryonic cartilage or bone. These findings suggest that the Ets transcription factor family may contribute to the homeostatic balance in skeleton cell plasticity.

  5. Long Intergenic Noncoding RNAs Mediate the Human Chondrocyte Inflammatory Response and Are Differentially Expressed in Osteoarthritis Cartilage.

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    Pearson, Mark J; Philp, Ashleigh M; Heward, James A; Roux, Benoit T; Walsh, David A; Davis, Edward T; Lindsay, Mark A; Jones, Simon W

    2016-04-01

    To identify long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), including long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs), antisense RNAs, and pseudogenes, associated with the inflammatory response in human primary osteoarthritis (OA) chondrocytes and to explore their expression and function in OA. OA cartilage was obtained from patients with hip or knee OA following joint replacement surgery. Non-OA cartilage was obtained from postmortem donors and patients with fracture of the neck of the femur. Primary OA chondrocytes were isolated by collagenase digestion. LncRNA expression analysis was performed by RNA sequencing (RNAseq) and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Modulation of lncRNA chondrocyte expression was achieved using LNA longRNA GapmeRs (Exiqon). Cytokine production was measured with Luminex. RNAseq identified 983 lncRNAs in primary human hip OA chondrocytes, 183 of which had not previously been identified. Following interleukin-1β (IL-1β) stimulation, we identified 125 lincRNAs that were differentially expressed. The lincRNA p50-associated cyclooxygenase 2-extragenic RNA (PACER) and 2 novel chondrocyte inflammation-associated lincRNAs (CILinc01 and CILinc02) were differentially expressed in both knee and hip OA cartilage compared to non-OA cartilage. In primary OA chondrocytes, these lincRNAs were rapidly and transiently induced in response to multiple proinflammatory cytokines. Knockdown of CILinc01 and CILinc02 expression in human chondrocytes significantly enhanced the IL-1-stimulated secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. The inflammatory response in human OA chondrocytes is associated with widespread changes in the profile of lncRNAs, including PACER, CILinc01, and CILinc02. Differential expression of CILinc01 and CIinc02 in hip and knee OA cartilage, and their role in modulating cytokine production during the chondrocyte inflammatory response, suggest that they may play an important role in mediating inflammation-driven cartilage degeneration in

  6. Indian hedgehog signaling promotes chondrocyte differentiation in enchondral ossification in human cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament.

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    Sugita, Daisuke; Yayama, Takafumi; Uchida, Kenzo; Kokubo, Yasuo; Nakajima, Hideaki; Yamagishi, Atsushi; Takeura, Naoto; Baba, Hisatoshi

    2013-10-15

    Histological, immunohistochemical, and immunoblot analyses of the expression of Indian hedgehog (Ihh) signaling in human cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). To examine the hypothesis that Ihh signaling in correlation with Sox9 and parathyroid-related peptide hormone (PTHrP) facilitates chondrocyte differentiation in enchondral ossification process in human cervical OPLL. In enchondral ossification, certain transcriptional factors regulate cell differentiation. OPLL is characterized by overexpression of these factors and disturbance of the normal cell differentiation process. Ihh signaling is essential for enchondral ossification, especially in chondrocyte hypertrophy. Samples of ossified ligaments were harvested from 45 patients who underwent anterior cervical decompressive surgery for symptomatic OPLL, and 6 control samples from patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy/radiculopathy without OPLL. The harvested sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and toluidine blue, examined by transmission electron microscopy, and immunohistochemically stained for Ihh, PTHrP, Sox9, type X, XI collagen, and alkaline phosphatase. Immunoblot analysis was performed in cultured cells derived from the posterior longitudinal ligaments in the vicinity of the ossified plaque and examined for the expression of these factors. The ossification front in OPLL contained chondrocytes at various differentiation stages, including proliferating chondrocytes in fibrocartilaginous area, hypertrophic chondrocytes around the calcification front, and apoptotic chondrocytes near the ossified area. Immunoreactivity for Ihh and Sox9 was evident in proliferating chondrocytes and was strongly positive for PTHrP in hypertrophic chondrocytes. Mesenchymal cells with blood vessel formation were positive for Ihh, PTHrP, and Sox9. Cultured cells from OPLL tissues expressed significantly higher levels of Ihh, PTHrP, and Sox9 than those in non-OPLL cells. Our results

  7. Effect of chondrocyte-derived early extracellular matrix on chondrogenesis of placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

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    Park, Yong-Beom; Seo, Sinji; Kim, Jin-A; Heo, Jin-Chul; Lim, Young-Cheol; Ha, Chul-Won

    2015-06-24

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) surrounding cells contains a variety of proteins that provide structural support and regulate cellular functions. Previous studies have shown that decellularized ECM isolated from tissues or cultured cells can be used to improve cell differentiation in tissue engineering applications. In this study we evaluated the effect of decellularized chondrocyte-derived ECM (CDECM) on the chondrogenesis of human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hPDMSCs) in a pellet culture system. After incubation with or without chondrocyte-derived ECM in chondrogenic medium for 1 or 3 weeks, the sizes and wet masses of the cell pellets were compared with untreated controls (hPDMSCs incubated in chondrogenic medium without chondrocyte-derived ECM). In addition, histologic analysis of the cell pellets (Safranin O and collagen type II staining) and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis of chondrogenic markers (aggrecan, collagen type II, and SOX9) were carried out. Our results showed that the sizes and masses of hPDMSC pellets incubated with chondrocyte-derived ECM were significantly higher than those of untreated controls. Differentiation of hPDMSCs (both with and without chondrocyte-derived ECM) was confirmed by Safranin O and collagen type II staining. Chondrogenic marker expression and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) levels were significantly higher in hPDMSC pellets incubated with chondrocyte-derived ECM compared with untreated controls, especially in cells precultured with chondrocyte-derived ECM for 7 d. Taken together, these results demonstrate that chondrocyte-derived ECM enhances the chondrogenesis of hPDMSCs, and this effect is further increased by preculture with chondrocyte-derived ECM. This preculture method for hPDMSC chondrogenesis represents a promising approach for cartilage tissue engineering.

  8. The identification of CD163 expressing phagocytic chondrocytes in joint cartilage and its novel scavenger role in cartilage degradation.

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    Kai Jiao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cartilage degradation is a typical characteristic of arthritis. This study examined whether there was a subset of phagocytic chondrocytes that expressed the specific macrophage marker, CD163, and investigated their role in cartilage degradation. METHODS: Cartilage from the knee and temporomandibular joints of Sprague-Dawley rats was harvested. Cartilage degradation was experimentally-induced in rat temporomandibular joints, using published biomechanical dental methods. The expression levels of CD163 and inflammatory factors within cartilage, and the ability of CD163(+ chondrocytes to conduct phagocytosis were investigated. Cartilage from the knees of patients with osteoarthritis and normal cartilage from knee amputations was also investigated. RESULTS: In the experimentally-induced degrading cartilage from temporomandibular joints, phagocytes were capable of engulfing neighboring apoptotic and necrotic cells, and the levels of CD163, TNF-α and MMPs were all increased (P0.05. CD163(+ chondrocytes were found in the cartilage mid-zone of temporomandibular joints and knee from healthy, three-week old rats. Furthermore, an increased number of CD163(+ chondrocytes with enhanced phagocytic activity were present in Col-II(+ chondrocytes isolated from the degraded cartilage of temporomandibular joints in the eight-week experimental group compared with their age-matched controls. Increased number with enhanced phagocytic activity of CD163(+ chondrocytes were also found in isolated Col-II(+ chondrocytes stimulated with TNF-α (P<0.05. Mid-zone distribution of CD163(+ cells accompanied with increased expression of CD163 and TNF-α were further confirmed in the isolated Col-II(+ chondrocytes from the knee cartilage of human patients with osteoarthritis, in contrast to the controls (both P<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: An increased number of CD163(+ chondrocytes with enhanced phagocytic activity were discovered within degraded joint cartilage, indicating a

  9. An Autologous Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell–Derived Extracellular Matrix Scaffold Applied with Bone Marrow Stimulation for Cartilage Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Cheng; Jin, Chengzhe; Du, Xiaotao; Yan, Chao; Min, Byoung-Hyun; Xu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: It is well known that implanting a bioactive scaffold into a cartilage defect site can enhance cartilage repair after bone marrow stimulation (BMS). However, most of the current scaffolds are derived from xenogenous tissue and/or artificial polymers. The implantation of these scaffolds adds risks of pathogen transmission, undesirable inflammation, and other immunological reactions, as well as ethical issues in clinical practice. The current study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of implanting autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell–derived extracellular matrix (aBMSC-dECM) scaffolds after BMS for cartilage repair. Methods: Full osteochondral defects were performed on the trochlear groove of both knees in 24 rabbits. One group underwent BMS only in the right knee (the BMS group), and the other group was treated by implantation of the aBMSC-dECM scaffold after BMS in the left knee (the aBMSC-dECM scaffold group). Results: Better repair of cartilage defects was observed in the aBMSC-dECM scaffold group than in the BMS group according to gross observation, histological assessments, immunohistochemistry, and chemical assay. The glycosaminoglycan and DNA content, the distribution of proteoglycan, and the distribution and arrangement of type II and I collagen fibers in the repaired tissue in the aBMSC-dECM scaffold group at 12 weeks after surgery were similar to that surrounding normal hyaline cartilage. Conclusions: Implanting aBMSC-dECM scaffolds can enhance the therapeutic effect of BMS on articular cartilage repair, and this combination treatment is a potential method for successful articular cartilage repair. PMID:24666429

  10. * Comparison of Autologous, Allogeneic, and Cell-Free Scaffold Approaches for Engineered Tendon Repair in a Rabbit Model-A Pilot Study.

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    Wang, Wenbo; Deng, Dan; Wang, Bin; Zhou, Guangdong; Zhang, WenJie; Cao, Yilin; Zhang, Peihua; Liu, Wei

    2017-08-01

    Tendons are subjected to high strength dynamic mechanical forces in vivo. Mechanical strength is an essential requirement for tendon scaffold materials. A composite scaffold was used in this study to provide mechanical strength, which was composed of an inter part of nonwoven polyglycolic acid (PGA) fibers and an outer part of the net knitted with PGA and polylactic acid (PLA) fibers in a ratio of 4:2. This study compared three different approaches for in vivo tendon engineering, that is, cell-free scaffold and allogeneic and autologous cell seeded scaffolds, using a rabbit Achilles tendon repair model. Dermal fibroblasts were, respectively, isolated from the dermis of regular rabbits or green fluorescence protein transgenic rabbits as the autologous and the allogeneic cell sources, respectively. The cell scaffolds and cell-free scaffolds were implanted to bridge a partial segmental defect of rabbit Achilles tendon. The engineered tendons were harvested at 7 and 13 months postsurgery for various examinations. The results showed that all three groups could achieve in vivo tendon regeneration similarly with slightly better tissue formation in autologous group than in other two groups, including better scaffold degradation and relatively thicker collagen fibrils. There were no statistically significant differences in mechanical parameters among three groups. This work demonstrated that allogeneic fibroblasts and scaffold alone are likely to be used for tendon tissue engineering.

  11. Articular chondrocyte network mediated by gap junctions: role in metabolic cartilage homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayan, Maria D; Gago-Fuentes, Raquel; Carpintero-Fernandez, Paula; Fernandez-Puente, Patricia; Filgueira-Fernandez, Purificacion; Goyanes, Noa; Valiunas, Virginijus; Brink, Peter R; Goldberg, Gary S; Blanco, Francisco J

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study investigated whether chondrocytes within the cartilage matrix have the capacity to communicate through intercellular connections mediated by voltage-gated gap junction (GJ) channels. Methods Frozen cartilage samples were used for immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry assays. Samples were embedded in cacodylate buffer before dehydration for scanning electron microscopy. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments and mass spectrometry (MS) were performed to identify proteins that interact with the C-terminal end of Cx43. GJ communication was studied through in situ electroporation, electrophysiology and dye injection experiments. A transwell layered culture system and MS were used to identify and quantify transferred amino acids. Results Microscopic images revealed the presence of multiple cellular projections connecting chondrocytes within the matrix. These projections were between 5 and 150 μm in length. MS data analysis indicated that the C-terminus of Cx43 interacts with several cytoskeletal proteins implicated in Cx trafficking and GJ assembly, including α-tubulin and β-tubulin, actin, and vinculin. Electrophysiology experiments demonstrated that 12-mer oligonucleotides could be transferred between chondrocytes within 12 min after injection. Glucose was homogeneously distributed within 22 and 35 min. No transfer was detected when glucose was electroporated into A549 cells, which have no GJs. Transwell layered culture systems coupled with MS analysis revealed connexins can mediate the transfer of L-lysine and L-arginine between chondrocytes. Conclusions This study reveals that intercellular connections between chondrocytes contain GJs that play a key role in cell-cell communication and a metabolic function by exchange of nutrients including glucose and essential amino acids. A three-dimensional cellular network mediated through GJs might mediate metabolic and physiological homeostasis to maintain cartilage tissue. PMID:24225059

  12. Interleukin-1 Acts via the JNK-2 Signaling Pathway to Induce Aggrecan Degradation by Human Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Heba M; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Vincent, Tonia L; Nagase, Hideaki; Troeberg, Linda; Saklatvala, Jeremy

    2015-07-01

    Aggrecan enables articular cartilage to bear load and resist compression. Aggrecan loss occurs early in osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis and can be induced by inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 (IL-1). IL-1 induces cleavage of specific aggrecans characteristic of the ADAMTS proteinases. The aim of this study was to identify the intracellular signaling pathways by which IL-1 causes aggrecan degradation by human chondrocytes and to investigate how aggrecanase activity is controlled by chondrocytes. We developed a cell-based assay combining small interfering RNA (siRNA)-induced knockdown with aggrecan degradation assays. Human articular chondrocytes were overlaid with bovine aggrecan after transfection with siRNAs against molecules of the IL-1 signaling pathway. After IL-1 stimulation, released aggrecan fragments were detected with AGEG and ARGS neoepitope antibodies. Aggrecanase activity and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 3 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1) shedding was analyzed by Western blotting. ADAMTS-5 is a major aggrecanase in human chondrocytes, regulating aggrecan degradation in response to IL-1. The tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated 6 (TRAF-6)/transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 (TAK-1)/MKK-4 signaling axis is essential for IL-1-induced aggrecan degradation, while NF-κB is not. Of the 3 MAPKs (ERK, p38, and JNK), only JNK-2 showed a significant role in aggrecan degradation. Chondrocytes constitutively secreted aggrecanase, which was continuously endocytosed by LRP-1, keeping the extracellular level of aggrecanase low. IL-1 induced aggrecanase activity in the medium in a JNK-2-dependent manner, possibly by reducing aggrecanase endocytosis, because IL-1 caused JNK-2-dependent shedding of LRP-1. The signaling axis TRAF-6/TAK-1/MKK-4/JNK-2 mediates IL-1-induced aggrecanolysis. The level of aggrecanase is controlled by its

  13. Engineering zonal cartilage through bioprinting collagen type II hydrogel constructs with biomimetic chondrocyte density gradient.

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    Ren, Xiang; Wang, Fuyou; Chen, Cheng; Gong, Xiaoyuan; Yin, Li; Yang, Liu

    2016-07-20

    Cartilage tissue engineering is a promising approach for repairing and regenerating cartilage tissue. To date, attempts have been made to construct zonal cartilage that mimics the cartilaginous matrix in different zones. However, little attention has been paid to the chondrocyte density gradient within the articular cartilage. We hypothesized that the chondrocyte density gradient plays an important role in forming the zonal distribution of extracellular matrix (ECM). In this study, collagen type II hydrogel/chondrocyte constructs were fabricated using a bioprinter. Three groups were created according to the total cell seeding density in collagen type II pre-gel: Group A, 2 × 10(7) cells/mL; Group B, 1 × 10(7) cells/mL; and Group C, 0.5 × 10(7) cells/mL. Each group included two types of construct: one with a biomimetic chondrocyte density gradient and the other with a single cell density. The constructs were cultured in vitro and harvested at 0, 1, 2, and 3 weeks for cell viability testing, reverse-transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), biochemical assays, and histological analysis. We found that total ECM production was positively correlated with the total cell density in the early culture stage, that the cell density gradient distribution resulted in a gradient distribution of ECM, and that the chondrocytes' biosynthetic ability was affected by both the total cell density and the cell distribution pattern. Our results suggested that zonal engineered cartilage could be fabricated by bioprinting collagen type II hydrogel constructs with a biomimetic cell density gradient. Both the total cell density and the cell distribution pattern should be optimized to achieve synergistic biological effects.

  14. [Study on the method of two dimensional polycrylamide gel electrophoresis on rat condylar chondrocyte].

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    Wu, Tuo-jiang; Li, Huang; Ma, Qiao-lin; Wang, Wen-mei

    2010-08-01

    To investigate the protein profile by two dimensional polycrylamide gel electrophoresis on the rat condylar chondrocyte in vitro. The third-passage chondrocytes were harvested from the mandibular condyles of 2-day-old rats in this study. The protein profile of the rat mandibular condylar chondrocytes was examined by two dimensional polycrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE-PAGE). The 2-DE gel maps on different pH gradients were obtained. The result of modified coomassi blue-sliver staining and sliver staining was compared using Pdquest 7.1 image analysis software. The results showed that the good protein profile of the condylar chondrocytes was obtained by standard Bio-Rad manual. The protein was mainly in the field from pH4 to pH7. The 1203±86 protein points were examined on 2-DE gel map by modified coomassi blue-sliver staining, and 1769±97 protein points was examined by sliver staining. The silver staining map showed more distinctly but higher background than modified coomassi blue-sliver staining. The protein profile of the condylar chondrocytes enriches the proteomic database and gives evidence to further proteomic research. The 2-DE map obtained by modified coomassi blue-sliver staining is more suitable for MALDI-TOF mass identification. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. C30700963), China Postdoctoral Science Foundation(Grant No.20090461088), Jiangsu Provincial Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No.0802003C) and Nanjing City's Science and Technology Foundation (Grant No.200905011).

  15. Biotechnological Chondroitin a Novel Glycosamminoglycan With Remarkable Biological Function on Human Primary Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellavato, Antonietta; Tirino, Virginia; de Novellis, Francesca; Della Vecchia, Antonella; Cinquegrani, Fabio; De Rosa, Mario; Papaccio, Gianpaolo; Schiraldi, Chiara

    2016-09-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering, with in vitro expansion of autologus chondrocytes, is a promising technique for tissue regeneration and is a new potential strategy to prevent and/or treat cartilage damage (e.g., osteoarthritis). The aim of this study was (i) to investigate and compare the effects of new biotechnological chondroitin (BC) and a commercial extractive chondroitin sulfate (CS) on human chondrocytes in vitro culture; (ii) to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effects of the innovative BC compared to extractive CS. A chondrogenic cell population was isolated from human nasoseptal cartilage and in vitro cultures were studied through time-lapse video microscopy (TLVM), immunohistochemical staining and cytometry. In order to investigate the effect of BC and CS on phenotype maintainance, chondrogenic gene expression of aggrecan (AGN), of the transcriptor factor SOX9, of the types I and II collagen (COL1A1 and COL1A2), were quantified through transcriptional and protein evaluation at increasing cultivation time and passages. In addition to resemble the osteoarthritis-like in vitro model, chondrocytes were treated with IL-1β and the anti-inflammatory activity of BC and CS was assessed using cytokines quantification by multiplex array. BC significantly enhances cell proliferation also preserving chondrocyte phenotype increasing type II collagen expression up to 10 days of treatment and reduces inflammatory response in IL-1β treated chondrocytes respect to CS treated cells. Our results, taken together, suggest that this new BC is of foremost importance in translational medicine because it can be applied in novel scaffolds and pharmaceutical preparations aiming at cartilage pathology treatments such as the osteoarthritis. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2158-2169, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Chondrocyte heterogeneity: immunohistologically defined variation of integrin expression at different sites in human fetal knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, D M; Godolphin, J L; Gourlay, M S

    1995-04-01

    During development and at maturity different forms of cartilage vary in morphology and macromolecular content. This reflects heterogeneity of chondrocyte activity, in part involving differential interactions with the adjacent extracellular matrix via specialized cell surface receptors such as integrins. We undertook an immunohistological study on a series of human fetal knee joints to assess variation in the expression of integrins by chondrocytes and potential matrix ligands in articular, epiphyseal, growth plate, and meniscal cartilage. The results show that articular chondrocytes (beta 1+, beta 5 alpha V+, alpha 1+, alpha 2+/-, alpha 5+, weakly alpha 6+, alpha V+) differed from epiphyseal (beta 1+, beta 5 alpha V+, alpha 1+/-, alpha 2+/-, alpha 5+, alpha 6+, alpha V+) growth plate (beta 1+, beta 5 alpha V+, alpha 1-, alpha 2-, alpha 5+, alpha 6+, alpha V+), and meniscal cells (beta 1+, beta 5 alpha V+, alpha 1+, strongly alpha 2+, alpha 5+, alpha 6+, alpha V+ in expression of integrin subunits. There was no expression of beta 3, beta 4, beta 6, or alpha 3 by chondrocytes. These results differ from previous reports on the expression of integrins by adult articular cartilage, where alpha 2 and alpha 6 are not seen. Variation in distribution of matrix ligands was also seen. Fibronectin, laminin and Type VI collagen were expressed in all cartilages but there was restricted expression of tenascin, ED-A and ED-B fibronectin isoforms (articular cartilage and meniscus), and vitronectin (absent from growth plate cartilage). Regulated expression of integrins by chondrocytes, associated with changes in the pericellular matrix composition, is of potential importance in control of cartilage differentiation and function in health and disease.

  17. Nanosized fibers' effect on adult human articular chondrocytes behavior

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    Stenhamre, Hanna [Biopolymer Technology, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Thorvaldsson, Anna, E-mail: anna.thorvaldsson@swerea.se [Biopolymer Technology, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden); Swerea IVF, Mölndal (Sweden); Enochson, Lars [Department of Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Walkenström, Pernilla [Swerea IVF, Mölndal (Sweden); Lindahl, Anders [Department of Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Brittberg, Mats [Cartilage Research Unit, University of Gothenburg, Department Orthopaedics, Kungsbacka Hospital, Kungsbacka (Sweden); Gatenholm, Paul [Biopolymer Technology, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2013-04-01

    Tissue engineering with chondrogenic cell based therapies is an expanding field with the intention of treating cartilage defects. It has been suggested that scaffolds used in cartilage tissue engineering influence cellular behavior and thus the long-term clinical outcome. The objective of this study was to assess whether chondrocyte attachment, proliferation and post-expansion re-differentiation could be influenced by the size of the fibers presented to the cells in a scaffold. Polylactic acid (PLA) scaffolds with different fiber morphologies were produced, i.e. microfiber (MS) scaffolds as well as nanofiber-coated microfiber scaffold (NMS). Adult human articular chondrocytes were cultured in the scaffolds in vitro up to 28 days, and the resulting constructs were assessed histologically, immunohistochemically, and biochemically. Attachment of cells and serum proteins to the scaffolds was affected by the architecture. The results point toward nano-patterning onto the microfibers influencing proliferation of the chondrocytes, and the overall 3D environment having a greater influence on the re-differentiation. In the efforts of finding the optimal scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering, studies as the current contribute to the knowledge of how to affect and control chondrocytes behavior. - Highlights: ► Chondrocyte behavior in nanofiber-coated microfiber versus microfiber scaffolds ► High porosity (> 90%) and large pore sizes (a few hundred μm) of nanofibrous scaffolds ► Proliferation enhanced by presence of nanofibers ► Differentiation not significantly affected ► Cell attachment improved in presence of both nanofibers and serum.

  18. IKKα/CHUK regulates extracellular matrix remodeling independent of its kinase activity to facilitate articular chondrocyte differentiation.

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    Eleonora Olivotto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The non-canonical NF-κB activating kinase IKKα, encoded by CHUK (conserved-helix-loop-helix-ubiquitous-kinase, has been reported to modulate pro- or anti- inflammatory responses, cellular survival and cellular differentiation. Here, we have investigated the mechanism of action of IKKα as a novel effector of human and murine chondrocyte extracellular matrix (ECM homeostasis and differentiation towards hypertrophy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: IKKα expression was ablated in primary human osteoarthritic (OA chondrocytes and in immature murine articular chondrocytes (iMACs derived from IKKα(f/f:CreERT2 mice by retroviral-mediated stable shRNA transduction and Cre recombinase-dependent Lox P site recombination, respectively. MMP-10 was identified as a major target of IKKα in chondrocytes by mRNA profiling, quantitative RT-PCR analysis, immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. ECM integrity, as assessed by type II collagen (COL2 deposition and the lack of MMP-dependent COL2 degradation products, was enhanced by IKKα ablation in mice. MMP-13 and total collagenase activities were significantly reduced, while TIMP-3 (tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3 protein levels were enhanced in IKKα-deficient chondrocytes. IKKα deficiency suppressed chondrocyte differentiation, as shown by the quantitative inhibition of.Alizarin red staining and the reduced expression of multiple chondrocyte differentiation effectors, including Runx2, Col10a1 and Vegfa,. Importantly, the differentiation of IKKα-deficient chondrocytes was rescued by a kinase-dead IKKα protein mutant. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: IKKα acts independent of its kinase activity to help drive chondrocyte differentiation towards a hypertrophic-like state. IKKα positively modulates ECM remodeling via multiple downstream targets (including MMP-10 and TIMP-3 at the mRNA and post-transcriptional levels, respectively to maintain maximal MMP-13 activity, which is required for ECM

  19. Dental Implant Surgery

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    ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, ... to find out more. Wisdom Teeth Management Wisdom Teeth Management An impacted wisdom tooth can damage neighboring ...

  20. Cochlear Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnaz Karimi

    1992-04-01

    Full Text Available People with profound hearing loss are not able to use some kinds of conventional amplifiers due to the nature of their loss . In these people, hearing sense is stimulated only when the auditory nerve is activated via electrical stimulation. This stimulation is possible through cochlear implant. In fact, for the deaf people who have good mental health and can not use surgical and medical treatment and also can not benefit from air and bone conduction hearing aids, this device is used if they have normal central auditory system. The basic parts of the device included: Microphone, speech processor, transmitter, stimulator and receiver, and electrode array.

  1. Full-thickness skin wound healing using autologous keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts with fibrin: bilayered versus single-layered substitute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrus, Ruszymah Bt Hj; Rameli, Mohd Adha bin P; Low, Kiat Cheong; Law, Jia Xian; Chua, Kien Hui; Latiff, Mazlyzam Bin Abdul; Saim, Aminuddin Bin

    2014-04-01

    Split-skin grafting (SSG) is the gold standard treatment for full-thickness skin defects. For certain patients, however, an extensive skin lesion resulted in inadequacies of the donor site. Tissue engineering offers an alternative approach by using a very small portion of an individual's skin to harvest cells for propagation and biomaterials to support the cells for implantation. The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of autologous bilayered tissue-engineered skin (BTES) and single-layer tissue-engineered skin composed of only keratinocytes (SLTES-K) or fibroblasts (SLTES-F) as alternatives for full-thickness wound healing in a sheep model. Full-thickness skin biopsies were harvested from adult sheep. Isolated fibroblasts we