WorldWideScience

Sample records for autoimmune type atrophic

  1. Autoimmune atrophic gastritis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minalyan A

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Artem Minalyan,1 Jihane N Benhammou,1 Aida Artashesyan,1 Michael S Lewis,2 Joseph R Pisegna1 1Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Parenteral Nutrition, 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: At present there is no universally accepted classification for gastritis. The first successful classification (The Sydney System that is still commonly used by medical professionals was first introduced by Misiewicz et al in Sydney in 1990. In fact, it was the first detailed classification after the discovery of Helicobacter pylori by Warren and Marshall in 1982. In 1994, the Updated Sydney System was proposed during the International Workshop on the Histopathology of Gastritis followed by the publication in The American Journal of Surgical Pathology by Dixon et al. Using the new classification, distinction between atrophic and nonatrophic gastritis was revised, and the visual scale grading was incorporated. According to the Updated Sydney System Classification, atrophic gastritis is categorized into multifocal (H. pylori, environmental factors, specific diet and corpus-predominant (autoimmune. Since metaplasia is a key histological characteristic in patients with atrophic gastritis, it has been recommended to use the word “metaplastic” in both variants of atrophic gastritis: autoimmune metaplastic atrophic gastritis (AMAG and environmental metaplastic atrophic gastritis. Although there are many overlaps in the course of the disease and distinction between those two entities may be challenging, the aim of this review article was to describe the etiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, clinical manifestations and treatment in patients with AMAG. However, it is important to mention that H. pylori is the most common etiologic factor for the development of gastritis in the world. Keywords: autoimmune gastritis, pernicious anemia, gastric carcinoid

  2. Comparison of the human gastric microbiota in hypochlorhydric states arising as a result of Helicobacter pylori-induced atrophic gastritis, autoimmune atrophic gastritis and proton pump inhibitor use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryony N Parsons

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Several conditions associated with reduced gastric acid secretion confer an altered risk of developing a gastric malignancy. Helicobacter pylori-induced atrophic gastritis predisposes to gastric adenocarcinoma, autoimmune atrophic gastritis is a precursor of type I gastric neuroendocrine tumours, whereas proton pump inhibitor (PPI use does not affect stomach cancer risk. We hypothesised that each of these conditions was associated with specific alterations in the gastric microbiota and that this influenced subsequent tumour risk. 95 patients (in groups representing normal stomach, PPI treated, H. pylori gastritis, H. pylori-induced atrophic gastritis and autoimmune atrophic gastritis were selected from a cohort of 1400. RNA extracted from gastric corpus biopsies was analysed using 16S rRNA sequencing (MiSeq. Samples from normal stomachs and patients treated with PPIs demonstrated similarly high microbial diversity. Patients with autoimmune atrophic gastritis also exhibited relatively high microbial diversity, but with samples dominated by Streptococcus. H. pylori colonisation was associated with decreased microbial diversity and reduced complexity of co-occurrence networks. H. pylori-induced atrophic gastritis resulted in lower bacterial abundances and diversity, whereas autoimmune atrophic gastritis resulted in greater bacterial abundance and equally high diversity compared to normal stomachs. Pathway analysis suggested that glucose-6-phospahte1-dehydrogenase and D-lactate dehydrogenase were over represented in H. pylori-induced atrophic gastritis versus autoimmune atrophic gastritis, and that both these groups showed increases in fumarate reductase. Autoimmune and H. pylori-induced atrophic gastritis were associated with different gastric microbial profiles. PPI treated patients showed relatively few alterations in the gastric microbiota compared to healthy subjects.

  3. Comparison of the human gastric microbiota in hypochlorhydric states arising as a result of Helicobacter pylori-induced atrophic gastritis, autoimmune atrophic gastritis and proton pump inhibitor use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eccles, Richard; Duckworth, Carrie A.; Varro, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Several conditions associated with reduced gastric acid secretion confer an altered risk of developing a gastric malignancy. Helicobacter pylori-induced atrophic gastritis predisposes to gastric adenocarcinoma, autoimmune atrophic gastritis is a precursor of type I gastric neuroendocrine tumours, whereas proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use does not affect stomach cancer risk. We hypothesised that each of these conditions was associated with specific alterations in the gastric microbiota and that this influenced subsequent tumour risk. 95 patients (in groups representing normal stomach, PPI treated, H. pylori gastritis, H. pylori-induced atrophic gastritis and autoimmune atrophic gastritis) were selected from a cohort of 1400. RNA extracted from gastric corpus biopsies was analysed using 16S rRNA sequencing (MiSeq). Samples from normal stomachs and patients treated with PPIs demonstrated similarly high microbial diversity. Patients with autoimmune atrophic gastritis also exhibited relatively high microbial diversity, but with samples dominated by Streptococcus. H. pylori colonisation was associated with decreased microbial diversity and reduced complexity of co-occurrence networks. H. pylori-induced atrophic gastritis resulted in lower bacterial abundances and diversity, whereas autoimmune atrophic gastritis resulted in greater bacterial abundance and equally high diversity compared to normal stomachs. Pathway analysis suggested that glucose-6-phospahte1-dehydrogenase and D-lactate dehydrogenase were over represented in H. pylori-induced atrophic gastritis versus autoimmune atrophic gastritis, and that both these groups showed increases in fumarate reductase. Autoimmune and H. pylori-induced atrophic gastritis were associated with different gastric microbial profiles. PPI treated patients showed relatively few alterations in the gastric microbiota compared to healthy subjects. PMID:29095917

  4. A case with atrophic autoimmune thyroiditis-related hypothyroidism causing multisystem involvement in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnaz, Erdal; Savaş-Erdeve, Şenay; Keskin, Melikşah; Doğan, Vehbi; Çetinkaya, Semra; Aycan, Zehra

    2016-01-01

    The most common reason of acquired hypothyroidism is autoimmune (Hashimoto) thyroiditis. Autoimmune thyroiditis can be atrophic or goitrogenic. Atrophic autoimmune thyroiditis (ATT) related acquired hypothyroidism causes interruption of growth, obesity, and bone age retardation in early ages while goitrogenic thyroiditis has a higher incidence rate and mostly presents with diffuse goiter. We discuss the effects of hypothyroidism on various systems through a case found to have pericardial effusion during the echocardiography performed after cardiac murmur was detected and later diagnosed with ATT related hypothyroidism.

  5. Atrophic type of morphea profundus – an Indian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Raveendra

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Localized scleroderma (also called morphea is a term encompassing a spectrum of sclerotic autoimmune diseases that primarily affect the skin, but might also involve underlying structures such as the fat, fascia, muscle, and bones. Morphea profundus presenting with atrophic lesions has rarely been reported in the literature. Here we report two cases of morphea profundus presenting with noninflammatory depressed plaques, without any significant skin induration, pigmentation or textural change. Histopathology was confirmatory for morphea profundus.

  6. Study on histogenesis of enterochromaffin-like carcinoid in autoimmune atrophic gastritis associated with pernicious anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mačukanović-Golubović Lana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Autoimmune atrophic fundic gastritis induces the pernicious anemia (PA, as well as the changes in both epithelium and endocrine cells of gastric mucosa. The most important complications are: achlorhydria, hypergastrinemia, gastric cancer and enterochromaffin-like ( ECL carcinoid. The aim of this study was to examine ECL carcinoid histogenesis in A-gastritis associated with PA. Methods. During the period from 2000−2006, 65 patients with PA and 30 patients of the control group were examined. Histopathological examination was done in endoscopical biopsies of gastric mucosa fixed in 10% formaldehyde. Paraffin sections were stained with classic hematoxylin-eosin (HE; histochemical AB-PAS (pH 2.5, cytochemical argyrophilic Servier-Munger′s and immunocytochemical PAP methods for G cell identification and chromogranin A antibodies - specific marker for neuroendocrine ECL cells. Both G and ECL cells were counted per 20 fields, of surface 0.0245312 mm2 by a field. Basal gastrin serum levels were also examined by using radioimmunoassay (RIA method. The obtained results were statisticaly calculated by using Student΄s t test. Results. Marked antral G cell hyperplasia associated with corporal ECL hyperplasia was found. ECL cell hyperplasia was of simplex, linear, adenomatoid type to the pattern of intramucous ECL cell carcinoid. An average number of G cells was statistically significant in the patients with PA as compared to the control group (p < 0.05 as well as an average number of ECL cells. Conclusion. We concluded that antral G cell hyperplasia accompanied by gastrinemia induces ECL hyperplasia and ECL corporal carcinoid in A-gastritis and that their histogenesis develops trough simple, linear and adenomatoide hyperplasia. .

  7. Chronic autoimmune atrophic gastritis associated with primary hyperparathyroidism: a transversal prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massironi, Sara; Cavalcoli, Federica; Rossi, Roberta Elisa; Conte, Dario; Spampatti, Matilde Pia; Ciafardini, Clorinda; Verga, Uberta; Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Peracchi, Maddalena

    2013-05-01

    The coexistence of chronic autoimmune atrophic gastritis (CAAG) and primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) has been described previously, even if its extent and underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We therefore prospectively evaluated this association in two series of patients, one with CAAG and the other with sporadic PHPT. From January 2005 to March 2012, 107 histologically confirmed CAAG patients and 149 PHPT patients were consecutively enrolled. Routine laboratory assays included serum calcium, parathyroid hormone (PTH), plasma gastrin and chromogranin A (CgA). In CAAG patients with high PTH levels, ionized calcium and 25(OH)-vitamin D were evaluated. All CAAG and hypergastrinemic PHPT patients received an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Exclusion criteria were familial PHPT, MEN1 syndrome, treatment with proton pump inhibitor drugs, Helicobacter pylori infection and renal failure. Of the 107 CAAG patients, nine (8.4%) had PHPT and 13 (12.1%) had secondary hyperparathyroidism stemming from vitamin D deficiency. Among the 149 PHPT patients, 11 (7.4%) had CAAG. Gastrin and CgA levels were similar in the CAAG patients with vs those without hyperparathyroidism (either primary or secondary), and calcium and PTH levels were similar in the PHPT patients with vs those without CAAG. This study confirms a non-casual association between PHPT and CAAG. The prevalence of PHPT in CAAG patients is threefold that of the general population (8.4 vs 1-3%), and the prevalence of CAAG in PHPT patients is fourfold that of the general population (7.4 vs 2%). The mechanisms underlying this association remain unknown, but a potential role for autoimmunity is suggested.

  8. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zen, Yoh; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2011-12-07

    Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP) has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney) and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of regulatory T-cells are assumed

  9. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zen Yoh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of

  10. [Type 2 autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS-2)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vialettes, Bernard; Dubois-Leonardon, Noémie

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS-2) are the most frequent disorders associating several organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Their high prevalence is due to the fact that the main manifestations of APS-2, such as thyroidal autoimmunity, type 1 diabetes, autoimmune gastric atrophy and vitiligo, are common diseases. APS-2 represents a clinical model that can serve to help unravel the mechanisms underlying autoimmunity. Diagnosis of APS-2 is a challenge for the clinician, especially in poorly symptomatic forms, and may require systematic screening based on measurement of autoantibodies and functional markers.

  11. Esophageal chemical clearance and baseline impedance values in patients with chronic autoimmune atrophic gastritis and gastro-esophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenca, Andrea; de Bortoli, Nicola; Mauro, Aurelio; Frazzoni, Marzio; Savarino, Edoardo; Massironi, Sara; Russo, Salvatore; Bertani, Lorenzo; Marchi, Santino; Penagini, Roberto

    2017-09-01

    The factors influencing new markers of gastro-esophageal reflux disease detected by impedance-pH monitoring - mean nocturnal baseline impedance (MNBI) and post-reflux swallow-induced peristaltic wave (PSPW) index - need to be evaluated. To compare endoscopy-negative heartburn with chronic autoimmune atrophic gastritis (CAAG). 24 patients with CAAG, 25 with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) and 25 with functional heartburn (FH) were included. In all patients the main impedance-pH monitoring parameters were calculated. CAAG and NERD patients had a number of reflux events (non-acid ones being more common among the former group) which was higher than that found in FH (p3000Ohm), CAAG (>2000Ohm) and NERD (reflux based on the high number of reflux events and confirmed by low values of MNBI and PSPW index. MNBI is a strong marker of acid/non-acid reflux-induced mucosal damage, whereas the PSPW index can reliably discriminate patients with reflux from those with FH, independently of the acidity of refluxate. Copyright © 2017 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1 autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Chiriboga, A. Sebastian; Komorowski, Lars; Kümpfel, Tania; Probst, Christian; Hinson, Shannon R.; Pittock, Sean J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe retrospectively the clinical associations of immunoglobulin G (IgG) targeting metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1-IgG). Methods: Specimens of 9 patients evaluated on a service basis in the Mayo Clinic Neuroimmunology Laboratory by tissue-based immunofluorescence assay (IFA) yielded a robust, synaptic immunostaining pattern consistent with mGluR1-IgG (serum, 9; CSF, 2 available). Transfected HEK293 cell-based assay (CBA) confirmed mGluR1 specificity in all 11 specimens. A further 2 patients were detected in Germany primarily by CBA. Results: The median symptom onset age for the 11 patients was 58 years (range 33–81 years); 6 were male. All 9 Mayo Clinic patients had subacute onset of cerebellar ataxia, 4 had dysgeusia, 1 had psychiatric symptoms, and 1 had cognitive impairment. All were evaluated for malignancy, but only 1 was affected (cutaneous T-cell lymphoma). One developed ataxia post–herpes zoster infection. Head MRIs were generally atrophic or normal-appearing, and CSF was inflammatory in just 1 of 5 tested, though mGluR1-IgG was detected in both specimens submitted. Five patients improved (attributable to immunotherapy in 4, spontaneously in 1), 3 stabilized (attributable to immunotherapy in 2, cancer therapy in 1), and 1 progressively declined (untreated). The 2 German patients had ataxia, but fulfilled multiple sclerosis diagnostic criteria (1 relapsing-remitting, 1 progressive). However, both had histories of hematologic malignancy (acute lymphocytic leukemia and mantle cell lymphoma), and had mGluR1-IgG detected in serum by CBA (weakly positive on tissue-based IFA). Conclusions: mGluR1 autoimmunity represents a treatable form of cerebellar ataxia. Dysgeusia may be a diagnostic clue. Paraneoplastic, parainfectious, or idiopathic causes may occur. PMID:26888994

  13. Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 2 in patient with severe allergic asthma treated with omalizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rams, Anna; Żółciński, Marek; Zastrzeżyńska, Weronika; Polański, Stanisław; Serafin, Agnieszka; Wilańska, Joanna; Musiał, Jacek; Bazan-Socha, Stanisława

    2018-01-04

    Asthma therapy with monoclonal antibodies is a promising and effective approach for those with a severe and refractory type of disease. Although such a targeted therapy is considered to be safe, unusual complications may occur. We present a case of a 45 year-old female patient with severe allergic asthma and chronic spontaneous urticaria, who developed autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 2 (APS-2) after 26 months of omalizumab administration. The patient was diagnosed with primary adrenal insufficiency (Addison's disease) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis accompanied by autoimmune atrophic gastritis. According to our knowledge this is the first description of APS-2 that developed in conjunction with omalizumab treatment, although we have no evidence that the observed phenomenon indicated a cause-effect relationship to omalizumab.

  14. [Coexistence of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 with diabetes insipidus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysiak, Robert; Okopień, Bogusław

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndromes are conditions characterized by the combination of two or more organ-specific disorders. The underestimation oftheir real frequency probable results from physicians' inadequate knowledge of these clinical entities and sometimes their atypical clinical presentation. Because they comprise a wide spectrum of autoimmune disorders, autoimmune polyglandular syndromes are divided into four types, among which type-3 is the most common one. In this article, we report the case of a young female, initially diagnosed with diabetes mellitus who several years later developed full-blown autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 consisting of autoimmune thyroid disorder and latent autoimmune diabetes in adults.The discussed case suggests that in selected patients diabetes insipidus may coexist with autoimmune endocrinopathies and nonendocrine autoimmunopathies, as well as that in some patients idiopathic diabetes insipidus may be secondary to lymphocytic infiltration and destruction of the hypothalamic supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei and/or the supraoptic-hypophyseal tract

  15. Gastro-esophageal reflux and antisecretory drugs use among patients with chronic autoimmune atrophic gastritis: a study with pH-impedance monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenca, A; Massironi, S; Pugliese, D; Consonni, D; Mauro, A; Cavalcoli, F; Franchina, M; Spampatti, M; Conte, D; Penagini, R

    2016-02-01

    Patients with chronic autoimmune atrophic gastritis (CAAG) often refer digestive symptoms and are prescribed antisecretory medications. Aims were to investigate: (i) gastro-esophageal reflux (GER), (ii) psychopathological profile, (iii) frequency of use and clinical benefit of antisecretory drugs. Prospective observational study on 41 CAAG patients who underwent: 24 h multichannel intra-luminal impedance-pH (MII-pH) monitoring off-therapy, standardized medical interview and psychological questionnaire (i.e., SCL-90R). The medical interview was repeated at least 1 month after MII-pH in patients who were using antisecretory drugs. Statistical analysis was performed calculating median (10th-90th percentiles) and risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence interval. Median intra-gastric pH was 6.2 (4.6-7.0). One patient had acid reflux (AC) associated with symptoms, five had increased total reflux number and four had symptoms associated to non-acid reflux (NA) (patients referred as 'GER positive'). Using patients 'GER negative' with normal SCL-90R as reference, the RR of being symptomatic in patients GER positive was 2.1 (1.1-4.1) if SCL-90R was normal and 0.9 (0.5-1.7) if it was altered (difference in RR significant being p = 0.04). Seventeen/28 (61%) symptomatic patients were on antisecretory drugs, which were stopped in 16 of them according to results of MII-pH and clinical evaluation after 574 days (48-796) showed that symptoms were unchanged. In patients with CAAG (i) AC reflux rarely occurred whereas increased NA reflux was not infrequent both being related to symptoms in some patients, (ii) psychopathological profile has a role in symptoms' occurrence, (iii) antisecretory drugs were generally inappropriately used and clinically ineffective. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Achalasia in a Patient with Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome Type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashar S. Amr

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Achalasia is a rare disease characterized by aperistalsis of the esophageal body and failure of the lower esophageal sphincter to relax. The etiology of this disease remains unknown. Polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type II is a well-identified disease characterized by the occurrence of autoimmune Addison's disease in combination with autoimmune thyroid disease and/or type 1 diabetes mellitus. We report a case that suggests autoimmunity and immunogenicity as a probable contributing factor for association of these two rare disorders.

  17. Type 1 diabetes and polyglandular autoimmune syndrome: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Martin P; Matheis, Nina; Kahaly, George J

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disorder caused by inflammatory destruction of the pancreatic tissue. The etiopathogenesis and characteristics of the pathologic process of pancreatic destruction are well described. In addition, the putative susceptibility genes for T1D as a monoglandular disease and the relation to polyglandular autoimmune syndrome (PAS) have also been well explored. The incidence of T1D has steadily increased in most parts of the world, especially in industrialized nations. T1D is frequently associated with autoimmune endocrine and non-endocrine diseases and patients with T1D are at a higher risk for developing several glandular autoimmune diseases. Familial clustering is observed, which suggests that there is a genetic predisposition. Various hypotheses pertaining to viral- and bacterial-induced pancreatic autoimmunity have been proposed, however a definitive delineation of the autoimmune pathomechanism is still lacking. In patients with PAS, pancreatic and endocrine autoantigens either colocalize on one antigen-presenting cell or are expressed on two/various target cells sharing a common amino acid, which facilitates binding to and activation of T cells. The most prevalent PAS phenotype is the adult type 3 variant or PAS type III, which encompasses T1D and autoimmune thyroid disease. This review discusses the findings of recent studies showing noticeable differences in the genetic background and clinical phenotype of T1D either as an isolated autoimmune endocrinopathy or within the scope of polyglandular autoimmune syndrome. PMID:25685279

  18. Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome Type III with Primary Hypoparathyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Jin Kim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Polyglandular autoimmune syndrome is defined as multiple endocrine gland insufficiencies accompanied by autoimmune diseases of the endocrine and nonendocrine system. After Schmidt introduced a case of nontuberculosis adrenal gland dysfunction with thyroiditis in 1926, Neufeld defined polyglandular autoimmune syndrome by I, II, and III subtypes in 1980 by their presentation of occurrence age, heredity methods, relationship with human leukocyte antigen, and accompanying diseases. We report a case of a 32-year-old female with polyglandular autoimmune syndrome III accompanied by type 1 diabetes mellitus that was treated with insulin (36 units per day for 11 years. She had insulin deficiency and Hashimoto thyroiditis as an autoimmune disorder. In addition, she had several features similar to Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy including short stature, truncal obesity, round face, short neck, low intelligence (full IQ 84, and decreased memory. Although Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy is morphological evidence of pseudohypoparathyroidism or pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism, she had primary hypoparathyroidism on laboratory results. Here, we report a case of polyglandular autoimmune syndrome III with type 1 diabetes mellitus, autoimmune thyroiditis, and primary hypoparathyroidism, accompanied by clinical features similar to Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy.

  19. [SPECIFIC CLINICAL FEATURES OF TYPE 1 AUTOIMMUNE POLYGLANDULAR SYNDROME].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhina, M S; Molashenko, N V; Troshina, E A; Orlova, E M; Sozaeva, L S; Eystein, S H; Breivik, S

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome is a primary autoimmune disorder affecting two or more peripheral endocrine glands and responsible for their incompetence. It is frequently combined with various organ-specific non-endocrine diseases. Patients with this pathology need life-long replacement therapy and dynamic observation by endocrinologists and other specialists to monitor the effectiveness of the treatment and detect new components of the disease. We report a variant of type 1 autoimmune polyglandular syndrome. Special emphasis is laid on the importance of succession of actions of endocrinologists and specialists in related medical disciplines dealing with children and adult patients.

  20. [Oral diseases in auto-immune polyendocrine syndrome type 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proust-Lemoine, Emmanuelle; Guyot, Sylvie

    2017-09-01

    Auto-immune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS1) also called Auto-immune Polyendocrinopathy Candidiasis Ectodermal Dystrophy (APECED) is a rare monogenic childhood-onset auto-immune disease. This autosomal recessive disorder is caused by mutations in the auto-immune regulator (AIRE) gene, and leads to autoimmunity targeting peripheral tissues. There is a wide variability in clinical phenotypes in patients with APSI, with auto-immune endocrine and non-endocrine disorders, and chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis. These patients suffer from oral diseases such as dental enamel hypoplasia and candidiasis. Both are frequently described, and in recent series, enamel hypoplasia and candidiasis are even the most frequent components of APS1 together with hypoparathyroidism. Both often occur during childhood (before 5 years old for canrdidiasis, and before 15 years old for enamel hypoplasia). Oral candidiasis is recurrent all life long, could become resistant to azole antifungal after years of treatment, and be carcinogenic, leading to severe oral squamous cell carcinoma. Oral components of APS1 should be diagnosed and rigorously treated. Dental enamel hypoplasia and/or recurrent oral candidiasis in association with auto-immune diseases in a young child should prompt APS1 diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome, type 2 associated with myasthenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejin Radoslav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 is defined as adrenal insufficiency associated with autoimmune primary hypothyroidism and/or with autoimmune type 1 diabetes mellitus, but very rare with myasthenia gravis. Case report. We presented a case of an autoimmune polyglandular syndrome, type 2 associated with myasthenia gravis. A 49-year-old female with symptoms of muscle weakness and low serum levels of cortisol and aldosterone was already diagnosed with primary adrenal insufficiency. Primary hypothyroidism was identified with low values of free thyroxine 4 (FT4 and raised values of thyroidstumulating hormone (TSH. The immune system as a cause of hypothyroidism was confirmed by the presence of thyroid antibodies to peroxidase and TSH receptors. Myasthenia gravis was diagnosed on the basis of a typical clinical feature, positive diagnostic tests and an increased titre of antibodies against the acetylcholine receptors. It was not possible to confirm the immune nature of adrenal insufficiency by the presence of antibodies to 21- hydroxylase. The normal morphological finding of the adrenal glands was an indirect confirmation of the condition as well as the absence of other diseases that might have led to adrenal insufficiency and low levels of both serum cortisol and aldosterone. Hormone replacement therapy, anticholinergic therapy and corticosteroid therapy for myasthenia gravis improved the patient’s general state of health and muscle weakness. Conclusion. This case report indicates a need to examine each patient with an autoimmune disease carefully as this condition may be associated with another autoimmune diseases.

  2. Autoimmune Hypoglycemia in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambigapathy, Jayakumar; Sahoo, Jayaprakash; Kamalanathan, Sadishkumar

    2017-07-15

    Antibodies against exogenous insulin are common in type 1 diabetes mellitus patients. They can cause hypoglycemia, albeit uncommonly. A 14-year-old girl with type 1 diabetes mellitus presented with recurrent hypoglycemia. High insulin, low C-peptide and raised insulin antibody levels documented during hypoglycemia. Plasmapheresis led to remission of hypoglycemia. Antibodies to exogenous insulin should be considered as a cause of recurrent refractory hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes mellitus patients.

  3. Netazepide, a gastrin receptor antagonist, normalises tumour biomarkers and causes regression of type 1 gastric neuroendocrine tumours in a nonrandomised trial of patients with chronic atrophic gastritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R Moore

    Full Text Available Autoimmune chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG causes hypochlorhydria and hypergastrinaemia, which can lead to enterochromaffin-like (ECL cell hyperplasia and gastric neuroendocrine tumours (type 1 gastric NETs. Most behave indolently, but some larger tumours metastasise. Antrectomy, which removes the source of the hypergastrinaemia, usually causes tumour regression. Non-clinical and healthy-subject studies have shown that netazepide (YF476 is a potent, highly selective and orally-active gastrin/CCK-2 receptor antagonist. Also, it is effective in animal models of ECL-cell tumours induced by hypergastrinaemia.To assess the effect of netazepide on tumour biomarkers, number and size in patients with type I gastric NETs.We studied 8 patients with multiple tumours and raised circulating gastrin and chromogranin A (CgA concentrations in an open trial of oral netazepide for 12 weeks, with follow-up 12 weeks later. At 0, 6, 12 and 24 weeks, we carried out gastroscopy, counted and measured tumours, and took biopsies to assess abundances of several ECL-cell constituents. At 0, 3, 6, 9, 12 and 24 weeks, we measured circulating gastrin and CgA and assessed safety and tolerability.Netazepide was safe and well tolerated. Abundances of CgA (p<0.05, histidine decarboxylase (p<0.05 and matrix metalloproteinase-7(p<0.10 were reduced at 6 and 12 weeks, but were raised again at follow-up. Likewise, plasma CgA was reduced at 3 weeks (p<0.01, remained so until 12 weeks, but was raised again at follow-up. Tumours were fewer and the size of the largest one was smaller (p<0.05 at 12 weeks, and remained so at follow-up. Serum gastrin was unaffected.The reduction in abundances, plasma CgA, and tumour number and size by netazepide show that type 1 NETs are gastrin-dependent tumours. Failure of netazepide to increase serum gastrin further is consistent with achlorhydria. Netazepide is a potential new treatment for type 1 NETs. Longer, controlled trials are justified

  4. Comparative Study of the Use of Trichloroacetic Acid and Phenolic Acid in the Treatment of Atrophic-Type Acne Scars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalpizzol, Mariana; Weber, Magda B; Mattiazzi, Anna Paula F; Manzoni, Ana Paula D

    2016-03-01

    Many therapies involving varying degrees of complexity have been used to treat acne scars, but none is considered the gold standard treatment. A comparative evaluation of 88% phenol and 90% trichloroacetic acid (TCA) applied using the chemical reconstruction of skin scars (CROSS) technique. A nonrandomized, single-blinded self-controlled clinical trial was conducted among patients with ice pick-type and boxcar-type atrophic acne scars. Using 88% phenol on the left hemiface and 90% TCA on the right hemiface was adopted as the standard practice of the CROSS technique. The dermatological quality of life index (DLQI) questionnaire, acne scar grading scale Échelle d´Evaluation Clinique des Cicatrices d'Acne (ECCA), and evaluation of improvement were performed pretreatment and post-treatment. Regarding ECCA, significant differences were found in pretreatment and post-treatment (p < .001). Regarding tolerance to pain, it was found that the discomfort felt with 90% TCA was significantly less than that felt with 88% phenol (p = .020). Regarding the quality of life measured with the DLQI, the results showed that the mean score in post-treatment assessment was significantly lower than that in the pretreatment assessment (p < .05). Hypochromia and enlargement scar were only seen after the use of 90% TCA. This study confirmed the efficacy of both TCA and phenol for treating such scars, with less severe complications from the use of phenol.

  5. Stomach microbiota composition varies between patients with non-atrophic gastritis and patients with intestinal type of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviles-Jimenez, Francisco; Vazquez-Jimenez, Flor; Medrano-Guzman, Rafael; Mantilla, Alejandra; Torres, Javier

    2014-02-26

    We aimed to characterize microbiota of the gastric mucosa as it progress to intestinal type of cancer. Study included five patients each of non-atrophic gastritis (NAG), intestinal metaplasia (IM) and intestinal-type gastric cancer (GC). Gastric tissue was obtained and DNA extracted for microbiota analyses using the microarray G3 PhyloChip. Bacterial diversity ranged from 8 to 57, and steadily decreased from NAG to IM to GC (p = 0.004). A significant microbiota difference was observed between NAG and GC based on Unifrac-presence/absence and weighted-Unifrac-abundance metrics of 283 taxa (p < 0.05). HC-AN analyses based on presence/absence of 238 taxa revealed that GC and NAG grouped apart, whereas IM overlapped with both. An ordinated analyses based on weighted-Unifrac distance given abundance of 44 taxa showing significance across categories revealed significant microbiota separation between NAG and GC. This study is the first to show a gradual shift in gastric microbiota profile from NAG to IM to GC.

  6. Type 1 diabetes : The autoimmune process and islet transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobson, Stella

    2010-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the selective loss of the insulin-producing β-cells residing in the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas. Cytokines are involved in diabetes development in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse model. NOD mice over-expressing the suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS-1) specifically in the β-cells are protected from T1D. Previous studies showed that immune cells infiltrated the pancreas of SOCS-1-transgenic (tg)...

  7. A rare combination of type 3 autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome (APS-3) or multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS-3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betterle, Corrado; Garelli, Silvia; Coco, Graziella; Burra, Patrizia

    2014-06-01

    Type 3 autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome (APS-3) is defined by the presence of an autoimmune thyroid disease and another autoimmune illness, excluding Addison's disease; this is a frequent combination. We report the case of a 55 years old female patient with APS-3, with seven clinical or latent autoimmune manifestations. At 49 years of age she was admitted at the General Hospital for leukopenia, weight loss, tremors, anxiety and diarrhea. The personal history revealed ulcerative colitis and, during the last year, episodes of fever with migrant arthralgia and cutaneous lesions. The patient was evaluated for thyroid function and imaging, mielobiopsy, glycaemic control, gastrointestinal and rheumatologic disorders with specific biochemical tests, imaging and endoscopic procedures. We concluded that the patient was affected by APS-3, characterized by the association of Graves' disease, autoimmune leukopenia, latent autoimmune diabetes of the adult (LADA), autoimmune gastritis, ulcerative colitis, Sjögren's and anti-phospholipid syndromes. The patient started low doses of corticosteroid drugs for leukopenia, underwent (131)I therapy for hyperthyroidism and later started substitutive thyroid therapy with l-thyroxine, insulin therapy for LADA, mesalazine for ulcerative colitis and artificial tears for Sjögren's syndrome. In this article we report a complex case of APS-3, characterized by the association of seven different autoimmune diseases, which required a complex therapeutic strategy.

  8. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 in a 12-year-old ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 in a 12-year-old Ugandan girl. ... Journal of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes of South Africa ... Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 (APS-1), also known as autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasisectodermal dystrophy syndrome, is a very rare disorder of ...

  9. Tight Junctions, Intestinal Permeability, and Autoimmunity Celiac Disease and Type 1 Diabetes Paradigms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Jeroen; Rozing, Jan; Sapone, Anna; Lammers, Karen; Fasano, Alessio; Fromm, M; Schulzke, JD

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by tissue damage and loss of function due to an immune response that is directed against specific organs. This review is focused on celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune enteropathy, and type I diabetes (TID), a hyperglycosaemia caused by a destructive autoimmune

  10. HLA class II influences humoral autoimmunity in patients with type 2 autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djilali-Saiah, Idriss; Fakhfakh, Amin; Louafi, Hamida; Caillat-Zucman, Sophie; Debray, Dominique; Alvarez, Fernando

    2006-12-01

    Type 2 autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is characterized by the presence of anti-liver kidney microsome (anti-LKM-1) and/or anti-liver cytosol type 1 (anti-LC1) autoantibodies. However, the correlation between these autoantibodies and the genetic background has not been studied. Frequencies of HLA class II alleles were compared between the 60 Caucasian children with type 2 AIH and 313 control subjects. The anti-LKM1 antibody reactivity directed against antigenic sites of CYP2D6 was analysed by ELISA. HLA-DQB1 *0201 allele was found to be the primary genetic determinant of susceptibility to type 2 AIH by conferring the highest odd-ratio (OR = 6.4). HLA-DRB1 *03 allele was significantly increased (P LKM1 and anti-LC1 autoantibodies as well as in those with only anti-LC1(+) compared to those with anti-LKM1(+) alone. In contrast, HLA-DRB1 *07 allele was significantly associated (P LKM1(+) alone compared to groups with both anti-LKM and anti-LC1 or with LC1+ alone. Children with the DRB1 *07 allele develop anti-LKM1 autoantibodies having a more restricted specificity (2 epitopes) than to those having HLA-DRB1 *03 allele (5 epitopes). The HLA-DR locus is involved in autoantibody expression, while the DQ locus appears to be a critical determinant for the development of type 2 AIH.

  11. Autoimmune gastritis: Pathologist's viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coati, Irene; Fassan, Matteo; Farinati, Fabio; Graham, David Y; Genta, Robert M; Rugge, Massimo

    2015-11-14

    Western countries are seeing a constant decline in the incidence of Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis, coupled with a rising epidemiological and clinical impact of autoimmune gastritis. This latter gastropathy is due to autoimmune aggression targeting parietal cells through a complex interaction of auto-antibodies against the parietal cell proton pump and intrinsic factor, and sensitized T cells. Given the specific target of this aggression, autoimmune gastritis is typically restricted to the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa. In advanced cases, the oxyntic epithelia are replaced by atrophic (and metaplastic) mucosa, creating the phenotypic background in which both gastric neuroendocrine tumors and (intestinal-type) adenocarcinomas may develop. Despite improvements in our understanding of the phenotypic changes or cascades occurring in this autoimmune setting, no reliable biomarkers are available for identifying patients at higher risk of developing a gastric neoplasm. The standardization of autoimmune gastritis histology reports and classifications in diagnostic practice is a prerequisite for implementing definitive secondary prevention strategies based on multidisciplinary diagnostic approaches integrating endoscopy, serology, histology and molecular profiling.

  12. Association of STAT4 polymorphisms with susceptibility to type-1 autoimmune hepatitis in the Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migita, Kiyoshi; Nakamura, Minoru; Abiru, Seigo; Jiuchi, Yuka; Nagaoka, Shinya; Komori, Atsumasa; Hashimoto, Satoru; Bekki, Shigemune; Yamasaki, Kazumi; Komatsu, Tatsuji; Shimada, Masaaki; Kouno, Hiroshi; Hijioka, Taizo; Kohjima, Motoyuki; Nakamuta, Makoto; Kato, Michio; Yoshizawa, Kaname; Ohta, Hajime; Nakamura, Yoko; Takezaki, Eiichi; Nishimura, Hideo; Sato, Takeaki; Ario, Keisuke; Hirashima, Noboru; Oohara, Yukio; Naganuma, Atsushi; Muro, Toyokichi; Sakai, Hironori; Mita, Eiji; Sugi, Kazuhiro; Yamashita, Haruhiro; Makita, Fujio; Yatsuhashi, Hiroshi; Ishibashi, Hiromi; Yasunami, Michio

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrated an association of STAT4 polymorphisms with autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis, indicating multiple autoimmune diseases share common susceptibility genes. We therefore investigated the influence of STAT4 polymorphisms on the susceptibility and phenotype of type-1 autoimmune hepatitis in a Japanese National Hospital Organization (NHO) AIH multicenter cohort study. Genomic DNA from 460 individuals of Japanese origin including 230 patients with type-1 autoimmune hepatitis and 230 healthy controls was analyzed for two single nucleotide polymorphisms in the STAT4 gene (rs7574865, rs7582694). The STAT4 rs7574865T allele conferred risk for type-1 autoimmune hepatitis (OR = 1.61, 95% CI = 1.23-2.11; P = 0.001), and patients without accompanying autoimmune diseases exhibited an association with the rs7574865T allele (OR = 1.50, 95%CI = 1.13-1.99; P = 0.005). Detailed genotype-phenotype analysis of type-1 autoimmune hepatitis patients with (n = 44) or without liver cirrhosis (n = 186) demonstrated that rs7574865 was not associated with the development of liver cirrhosis and phenotype (biochemical data and the presence of auto-antibodies). This is the first study to show a positive association between a STAT4 polymorphism and type-1 autoimmune hepatitis, suggesting that autoimmune hepatitis shares a gene commonly associated with risk for other autoimmune diseases.

  13. Genetic homogeneity of autoimmune polyglandular disease type I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjoerses, P.; Aaltonen, J.; Vikman, A. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular disease type I (APECED) is an autosomal recessive autoimmune disease (MIM 240300) characterized by hypoparathyroidism, primary adrenocortical failure, and chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis. The disease is highly prevalent in two isolated populations, the Finnish population and the Iranian Jewish one. Sporadic cases have been identified in many other countries, including almost all European countries. The APECED locus has previously been assigned to chromosome 21q22.3 by linkage analyses in 14 Finnish families. Locus heterogeneity is a highly relevant question in this disease affecting multiple tissues and with great phenotypic diversity. To solve this matter, we performed linkage and haplotype analyses on APECED families rising from different populations. Six microsatellite markers on the critical chromosomal region of 2.6 cM on 21q22.3 were analyzed. Pair-wise linkage analyses revealed significant LOD scores for all these markers, maximum LOD score being 10.23. The obtained haplotype data and the geographic distribution of the great-grandparents of the Finnish APECED patients suggest the presence of one major, relatively old mutation responsible for {approximately}90% of the Finnish cases. Similar evidence for one founder mutation was also found in analyses of Iranian Jewish APECED haplotypes. These haplotypes, however, differed totally from the Finnish ones. The linkage analyses in 21 non-Finnish APECED families originating from several European countries provided independent evidence for linkage to the same chromosomal region on 21q22.3 and revealed no evidence for locus heterogeneity. The haplotype analyses of APECED chromosomes suggest that in different populations APECED is due to a spectrum of mutations in a still unknown gene on chromosome 21. 21 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Racial and ethnic differences among children with new-onset autoimmune type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    To compare demographic and clinical characteristics among children from ethnic minorities and non-Hispanic white children with new-onset autoimmune Type 1 diabetes. We analyzed a single-center series of 712 children with new-onset autoimmune Type 1 diabetes between January 2008 and March 2011. The m...

  15. Accelerated progression from islet autoimmunity to diabetes is causing the escalating incidence of type 1 diabetes in young children

    OpenAIRE

    Ziegler, Anette-G.; Pflueger, Maren; Winkler, Christiane; Achenbach, Peter; Akolkar, Beena; Krischer, Jeffrey P.; Bonifacio, Ezio

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of type 1 diabetes is rising worldwide, particularly in young children. Since type 1 diabetes is preceded by autoimmunity to islet antigens, there must be a consequent increase in the incidence of islet autoimmunity in young children or a more rapid rate of progression to diabetes once islet autoimmunity initiates. This study was to determine whether the incidence of islet autoimmunity or the rate of progression from autoimmunity to diabetes onset has changed over a 20-year peri...

  16. Hepatitis C virus infection can mimic type 1 (antinuclear antibody positive) autoimmune chronic active hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlotsky, J M; Deforges, L; Bretagne, S; André, C; Métreau, J M; Thiers, V; Zafrani, E S; Goossens, M; Duval, J; Mavier, J P

    1993-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been shown to induce anti-liver-kidney microsomal-1 (LKM1) antibody positive chronic active hepatitis, simulating type 2 autoimmune chronic active hepatitis. The cases of five patients presenting with features of type 1 (antinuclear antibody positive) autoimmune chronic active hepatitis and extrahepatic autoimmune manifestations, in whom immunosuppressive treatment had no effect on liver disease are presented. In these patients, HCV infection could be shown by the presence in serum of anti-HCV antibodies and HCV-RNA detected by polymerase chain reaction. These cases suggest the following: (a) chronic HCV infection can mimic type 1, as well as type 2, autoimmune chronic active hepatitis; (b) HCV infection might be systematically sought in patients presenting with features of type 1 autoimmune chronic active hepatitis, with special care in patients who are unresponsive to immunosuppressive treatment. Images Figure PMID:7686122

  17. Clinical features of type 1 autoimmune hepatitis in elderly Italian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granito, A; Muratori, L; Pappas, G; Muratori, P; Ferri, S; Cassani, F; Lenzi, M; Bianchi, F B

    2005-05-15

    The usual onset of type 1 autoimmune hepatitis occurs at puberty or around menopause, whereas disease presentation in the advanced age is less often reported. To assess the clinical, immunological and histological features of Type 1 autoimmune hepatitis in elderly Italian patients. We assessed, at diagnosis, the clinical and immunological features of 76 consecutive Italian patients with type 1 autoimmune hepatitis, focusing particularly on a subgroup of 20 patients presenting at > or = 65 years (females 95%, median age 72 years, range 65-82). In comparison with the younger group, at the time of autoimmune hepatitis diagnosis, elderly Italian patients are more often asymptomatic (25% vs. 7%; P = 0.04), are more frequently positive for antinuclear autoantibodies (95% vs. 52%; P = 0.0004) and HLA-DR4 (45% vs. 18%; P = 0.03); among the extra-hepatic manifestations, autoimmune thyroid disorders are prevalent in the elderly group (25% vs. 5%; P = 0.02). However, no difference was observed in the histological/biochemical expression of the liver disease and response to immunosuppression. In elderly Italian patients, autoimmune hepatitis has typical serological and genetic characteristics, is more frequently asymptomatic, although prognosis and response to therapy is similar to that of younger patients. As a concomitant autoimmune thyroid disorder is common, autoimmune hepatitis should be suspected and investigated in elderly patients with autoimmune thyroid disorder and abnormal liver function tests.

  18. Toward molecular pathogenesis of an autoimmune disease: Refined genetic mapping of autoimmune polyglandular disease type I (APECED)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, J.; Bjoerses, P.; Peltonen, L. [National Public Health Institute, Helsinki (Finland)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Autoimmune reactions encoupled to many human diseases are still only partially understood. Unravelling the molecular pathogenesis of inherited diseases with a strong autoimmune component in their clinical expression could help to dissect individual components in the molecular background of abnormal immune response. One such genetic disorder is autosomal recessive autoimmune polyglandular disease type I (PGD I), also known as autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED, MIM 240300). The disease is especially enriched in the genetically isolated population of Finland and we have assigned the APECED locus to human chromosome 21q22.3 in 14 Finnish families by linkage analyses. The best positional lod score of 6.49 was observed with marker D21S49. Based on the history of the Finns, the gene pool of this population clearly demonstrates the consequences of a founder effect and consequent isolation. In the Finnish population, we can take advantage of linkage disequilibrium and allelic association studies to more precisely define the critical DNA region for our disease gene of interest than would be possible by linkage analyses alone. We are now able to define the chromosomal region of interest between two flanking markers locating 1 cM apart. Linkage disequilibrium is observed with three of the markers used in the analyses and this suggests a distance of less than 500 kb to the disease locus, well approachable with molecular cloning techniques. Overlapping YAC and cosmid clones spanning our region of interest will facilitate the cloning of APECED gene in the near future.

  19. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 in a 12-year-old ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-12-20

    Dec 20, 2011 ... hypoparathyroidism, which may be asymptomatic or which typically presents with tetany and seizures. Adrenal insufficiency often develops later. Other conditions which are associated with APS-1 include autoimmune thyroid disease, type 1 diabetes, hypo- gonadism, alopecia, vitiligo, autoimmune hepatitis,.

  20. Smooth muscle antibodies and type 1 autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Paolo; Muratori, Luigi; Agostinelli, Daniela; Pappas, Georgios; Veronesi, Lorenza; Granito, Alessandro; Cassani, Fabio; Terlizzi, Paolo; Lenzi, Marco; Bianchi, Francesco B

    2002-12-01

    Smooth muscle antibodies (SMA) characterize type 1 autoimmune hepatitis. Our aim was to evaluate sensitivity and specificity of different immunofluorescence substrates for the detection of SMA. Sera from 55 patients with type 1 AIH 20 with primary biliary cirrhosis, 20 with HCV-related chronic hepatitis and 25 blood donors were studied for SMA and anti-microfilaments reactivity by immunofluorescence on rat tissue sections, cultured fibroblasts and commercially available HEp-2 cells (collectively revealing the so called anti-actin pattern), and for the XR1 system by counterimmunoelectrophoresis. SMA was classified on the basis of its immunofluorescence pattern (V--vessels, G--glomerular, T--tubular). As further control group, we studied 26 patients with a diagnosis other than AIH, selected on the basis of a SMA-non-T/XR1 positivity. In patients with AIH the SMA-T pattern on rodent tissue, and anti-MF on fibroblasts and on HEp-2 cells were present in 80, 82 and 80%, respectively. Five out of 11 SMA-non T positive AIH patients were anti-MF positive. None of the pathological and healthy controls was positive for SMA-T or anti-MF reactivity. XR1 system was present in 84% of AIH patients and in 5% of pathological controls (p = 0.01). Two out of 26 SMA-non-T/XR1 positive sera were positive for anti-MF by fibroblasts and HEp-2 cells. A significant correlation was found between SMA-T pattern and anti-MF reactivity; no correlation was found between XR1 system and SMA-T pattern or anti-MF reactivity. SMA-T pattern is highly sensitive and specific first diagnostic test for type 1 AIH; anti-MF can be used as additional tool for the diagnosis, particularly when, despite the absence of the SMA-T pattern, AIH is strongly suspected.

  1. Tight Junctions, Intestinal Permeability, and Autoimmunity Celiac Disease and Type 1 Diabetes Paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Jeroen; Rozing, Jan; Sapone, Anna; Lammers, Karen; Fasano, Alessio

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by tissue damage and loss of function due to an immune response that is directed against specific organs. This review is focused on celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune enteropathy, and type 1 diabetes (T1D), a hyperglycosaemia caused by a destructive autoimmune process targeting the insulin-producing pancreatic islet cells. Even if environmental factors and genetic susceptibility are clearly involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity, for most autoimmune disorders there is no or little knowledge about the causing agent or genetic makeup underlying the disease. In this respect, CD represents a unique autoimmune disorder because a close genetic association with HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 haplotypes and, more importantly, the environmental trigger (the gliadin fraction of gluten-containing grains wheat, barley, and rye) are known. Conversely, the trigger for autoimmune destruction of pancreatic ß cells in T1D is unclear. Interestingly, recent data suggest that gliadin is also involved in the pathogenesis of T1D. There is growing evidence that increased intestinal permeability plays a pathogenic role in various autoimmune diseases including CD and T1D. Therefore, we hypothesize that besides genetic and environmental factors, loss of intestinal barrier function is necessary to develop autoimmunity. In this review, each of these components will be briefly reviewed. PMID:19538307

  2. Obesity, islet cell autoimmunity, and cardiovascular risk factors in youth at onset of type 1 autoimmune diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedillo, Maribel; Libman, Ingrid M; Arena, Vincent C; Zhou, Lei; Trucco, Massimo; Ize-Ludlow, Diego; Pietropaolo, Massimo; Becker, Dorothy J

    2015-01-01

    The current increase in childhood type 1 diabetes (T1D) and obesity has led to two conflicting hypotheses and conflicting reports regarding the effects of overweight on initiation and spreading of islet cell autoimmunity vs earlier clinical manifestation of preexisting autoimmune β-cell damage driven by excess weight. The objective of the study was to address the question of whether the degree of β-cell autoimmunity and age are related to overweight at diabetes onset in a large cohort of T1D youth. This was a prospective cross-sectional study of youth with autoimmune T1D consecutively recruited at diabetes onset. The study was conducted at a regional academic pediatric diabetes center. Two hundred sixty-three consecutive children younger than 19 years at onset of T1D participated in the study. Relationships between body mass index and central obesity (waist circumference and waist to height ratio) and antigen spreading (islet cell autoantibody number), age, and cardiovascular (CVD) risk factors examined at onset and/or 3 months after the diagnosis were measured. There were no significant associations between number of autoantibodies with measures of adiposity. Age relationships revealed that a greater proportion of those with central obesity (21%) were in the youngest age group (0-4 y) compared with those without central obesity (6%) (P = .001). PATIENTS with central obesity had increased CVD risk factors and higher onset C-peptide levels (P obesity accelerates progression of autoantibody spreading once autoimmunity, marked by standard islet cell autoantibody assays, is present. Central obesity was present in almost one-third of the subjects and was associated with early CVD risk markers already at onset.

  3. Association of STAT4 polymorphisms with susceptibility to type-1 autoimmune hepatitis in the Japanese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoshi Migita

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/AIMS: Recent studies demonstrated an association of STAT4 polymorphisms with autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis, indicating multiple autoimmune diseases share common susceptibility genes. We therefore investigated the influence of STAT4 polymorphisms on the susceptibility and phenotype of type-1 autoimmune hepatitis in a Japanese National Hospital Organization (NHO AIH multicenter cohort study. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Genomic DNA from 460 individuals of Japanese origin including 230 patients with type-1 autoimmune hepatitis and 230 healthy controls was analyzed for two single nucleotide polymorphisms in the STAT4 gene (rs7574865, rs7582694. The STAT4 rs7574865T allele conferred risk for type-1 autoimmune hepatitis (OR = 1.61, 95% CI = 1.23-2.11; P = 0.001, and patients without accompanying autoimmune diseases exhibited an association with the rs7574865T allele (OR = 1.50, 95%CI = 1.13-1.99; P = 0.005. Detailed genotype-phenotype analysis of type-1 autoimmune hepatitis patients with (n = 44 or without liver cirrhosis (n = 186 demonstrated that rs7574865 was not associated with the development of liver cirrhosis and phenotype (biochemical data and the presence of auto-antibodies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first study to show a positive association between a STAT4 polymorphism and type-1 autoimmune hepatitis, suggesting that autoimmune hepatitis shares a gene commonly associated with risk for other autoimmune diseases.

  4. Hyperthyroidism from autoimmune thyroiditis in a man with type 1 diabetes mellitus: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirsch Irl B

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The presentation, diagnosis, clinical course and treatment of a man with hyperthyroidism secondary to autoimmune thyroiditis in the setting of type 1 diabetes mellitus has not previously been described. Case presentation A 32-year-old European-American man with an eight-year history of type 1 diabetes mellitus presented with an unintentional 22-pound weight loss but an otherwise normal physical examination. Laboratory studies revealed a suppressed thyroid-stimulating hormone concentration and an elevated thyroxine level, which are consistent with hyperthyroidism. His anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies were positive, and his thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin test was negative. Uptake of radioactive iodine by scanning was 0.5% at 24 hours. The patient was diagnosed with autoimmune thyroiditis. Six weeks following his initial presentation he became clinically and biochemically hypothyroid and was treated with thyroxine. Conclusion This report demonstrates that autoimmune thyroiditis presenting as hyperthyroidism can occur in a man with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Autoimmune thyroiditis may be an isolated manifestation of autoimmunity or may be part of an autoimmune polyglandular syndrome. Among patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus who present with hyperthyroidism, Graves' disease and other forms of hyperthyroidism need to be excluded as autoimmune thyroiditis can progress quickly to hypothyroidism, requiring thyroid hormone replacement therapy.

  5. Insulin gene polymorphisms in type 1 diabetes, Addison's disease and the polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hahner Stefanie

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphisms within the insulin gene can influence insulin expression in the pancreas and especially in the thymus, where self-antigens are processed, shaping the T cell repertoire into selftolerance, a process that protects from β-cell autoimmunity. Methods We investigated the role of the -2221Msp(C/T and -23HphI(A/T polymorphisms within the insulin gene in patients with a monoglandular autoimmune endocrine disease [patients with isolated type 1 diabetes (T1D, n = 317, Addison's disease (AD, n = 107 or Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT, n = 61], those with a polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type II (combination of T1D and/or AD with HT or GD, n = 62 as well as in healthy controls (HC, n = 275. Results T1D patients carried significantly more often the homozygous genotype "CC" -2221Msp(C/T and "AA" -23HphI(A/T polymorphisms than the HC (78.5% vs. 66.2%, p = 0.0027 and 75.4% vs. 52.4%, p = 3.7 × 10-8, respectively. The distribution of insulin gene polymorphisms did not show significant differences between patients with AD, HT, or APS-II and HC. Conclusion We demonstrate that the allele "C" of the -2221Msp(C/T and "A" -23HphI(A/T insulin gene polymorphisms confer susceptibility to T1D but not to isolated AD, HT or as a part of the APS-II.

  6. Lupus erythematosus, thyroiditis, alopecia areata and vitiligo – A multiple autoimmune syndrome type 3 case presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alin Laurentiu Tatu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The combination of at least three autoimmune diseases in the same patient has defined as multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS. Abnormalities of T cell-mediated immunity and humoral immunity have been described previously in the literature. Aims of work were to investigate the 22 years old patient with lupus erythematosus for three years and autoimune thyroiditis for one year, regardind other possible autoimmune conditions and to establish a treatment to control the diseases. The clinical exam revealed some circular hairless patches on the beard appeared about three months ago and white depigmented disseminated areas started one month ago and the laboratory investigations were performed. The modified laboratory findings were total IgE 530 UI/mL, Anti-SSA (anti-RO antibodies> 200 IU/mL, SSB negative, Antinuclear antibodies (ANA positive and fine speckled, Lupus anticoagulant testing positive, Anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies 951 UI/ml, TSH 4,7 µUI/mL. The diagnosis of multiple autoimmune syndrome(MAS type 3 including Lupus erythematosus, autoimune Thyroiditis, Alopecia Areata and Vitiligo was established. Endocrine autoimmunities are associated with autoantibodies that react to specific antigens, whereas patients with collagen diseases synthesize immunoglobulins that recognize nonorgan-specific cellular targets, such as nucleoproteins and nucleic acids. Cellular autoimmunity is important in the pathogenesis MAS. The existence of one autoimmune disorder helps lead to the discovery of other autoimmune conditions.

  7. Pulmonary autoimmunity as a feature of autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 and identification of KCNRG as a bronchial autoantigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimohammadi, Mohammad; Dubois, Noémie; Sköldberg, Filip; Hallgren, Asa; Tardivel, Isabelle; Hedstrand, Håkan; Haavik, Jan; Husebye, Eystein S; Gustafsson, Jan; Rorsman, Fredrik; Meloni, Antonella; Janson, Christer; Vialettes, Bernard; Kajosaari, Merja; Egner, William; Sargur, Ravishankar; Pontén, Fredrik; Amoura, Zahir; Grimfeld, Alain; De Luca, Filippo; Betterle, Corrado; Perheentupa, Jaakko; Kämpe, Olle; Carel, Jean-Claude

    2009-03-17

    Patients with autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1) suffer from multiple organ-specific autoimmunity with autoantibodies against target tissue-specific autoantigens. Endocrine and nonendocrine organs such as skin, hair follicles, and liver are targeted by the immune system. Despite sporadic observations of pulmonary symptoms among APS-1 patients, an autoimmune mechanism for pulmonary involvement has not been elucidated. We report here on a subset of APS-1 patients with respiratory symptoms. Eight patients with pulmonary involvement were identified. Severe airway obstruction was found in 4 patients, leading to death in 2. Immunoscreening of a cDNA library using serum samples from a patient with APS-1 and obstructive respiratory symptoms identified a putative potassium channel regulator (KCNRG) as a pulmonary autoantigen. Reactivity to recombinant KCNRG was assessed in 110 APS-1 patients by using immunoprecipitation. Autoantibodies to KCNRG were present in 7 of the 8 patients with respiratory symptoms, but in only 1 of 102 APS-1 patients without respiratory symptoms. Expression of KCNRG messenger RNA and protein was found to be predominantly restricted to the epithelial cells of terminal bronchioles. Autoantibodies to KCNRG, a protein mainly expressed in bronchial epithelium, are strongly associated with pulmonary involvement in APS-1. These findings may facilitate the recognition, diagnosis, characterization, and understanding of the pulmonary manifestations of APS-1.

  8. Intestinal lymphangiectasia in a patient with autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Bipul Kumar; Saiki, Uma Kaimal; Sarm, Dipti; Choudhury, Bikash Narayan; Choudhury, Sarojini Dutta; Saharia, Dhiren; Saikia, Mihir

    2011-11-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndromes (APS) comprise a wide clinical spectrum of autoimmune disorders. APS is divided into Type I, Type II, Type I and Type IV depending upon the pattern of disease combination. Ghronic diarrhoea is one of the many manifestations of APS and many aetiological factors have been suggested for it. Apart from the established aetiological factors, intestinal lymphangiectasia may be responsible for chronic diarrhea in some cases.Intestinal lymphangiectasia has been reported in Type I APS. We report a case of Type III APS with hypocalcaemia and hypothyroidism who had chronic diarrhea of long duration and was finally diagnosed to have intestinal lymphangiectasia.

  9. Association of Helicobacter pylori infection with chronic atrophic gastritis: Meta-analyses according to type of disease definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weck, Melanie N; Brenner, Hermann

    2008-08-15

    Helicobacter pylori is a major risk factor for chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG). A large variety of definitions of CAG have been used in epidemiologic studies in the past. The aim of this work was to systematically review and summarize estimates of the association between H. pylori infection and CAG according to the various definitions of CAG. Articles on the association between H. pylori infection and CAG published until July 2007 were identified. Separate meta-analyses were carried out for studies defining CAG based on gastroscopy with biopsy, serum pepsinogen I (PG I) only, the pepsinogen I/pepsinogen II ratio (PG I/PG II ratio) only, or a combination of PG I and the PG I/PG II ratio. Numbers of identified studies and summary odds ratios (OR) (95% confidence intervals) were as follows: gastroscopy with biopsy: n = 34, OR = 6.4 (4.0-10.1); PG I only: n = 13, OR = 0.9 (0.7-1.2); PG I/PG II ratio: n = 8, OR = 7.2 (3.1-16.8); combination of PG I and the PG I/PG II ratio: n = 20, OR = 5.7 (4.4-7.5). Studies with CAG definitions based on gastroscopy with biopsy or the PG I/PG II ratio (alone or in combination with PG I) yield similarly strong associations of H. pylori with CAG. The association is missed entirely in studies where CAG is defined by PG I only. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. The role of monocytes and monocyte-derived dendritic cells in type 1 diabetes mellitus and autoimmune thyroid disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.K. Lam-Tse

    2003-01-01

    textabstractType 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) and autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) are organ specific autoimmune diseases in which the immune system is directed against the ß cells and the thyrocytes respectively. The etio-pathogenesis of organ-specific or endocrine autoimmune diseases is complex,

  11. Liver/kidney microsomal antibody type 1 and liver cytosol antibody type 1 concentrations in type 2 autoimmune hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Muratori, L; Cataleta, M; Muratori, P; Lenzi, M; Bianchi, F

    1998-01-01

    Background—Liver/kidney microsomal antibody type 1 (LKM1) and liver cytosol antibody type 1 (LC1) are the serological markers of type 2 autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). 
Aims—Since LKM1 and LC1 react against two distinct liver specific autoantigens (cytochrome P450IID6 (CYP2D6) and a 58 kDa cytosolic polypeptide respectively), the aim was to see whether LKM1 and LC1 concentrations correlate with liver disease activity. 
Patients—Twenty one patients with type 2 AIH were studied. 
Methods—A...

  12. Fifteen-Year-Old Male with Type 2 Autoimmune Pancreatitis: An Argument for Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan T. Kolasinski

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 autoimmune pancreatitis, an increasingly recognized etiology of pancreatitis in patients less than 20 years old, has characteristically been diagnosed with the histological finding of duct-centric pancreatitis in a patient who lacks elevated serum immunoglobulin G4. We present the case of a nonobese 15-year-old male, without any chronic medical conditions, who presented with the chief complaint of abdominal pain. The laboratory study results were remarkable for a lipase level of 5,419 U/L and a γ-glutamyl transferase level of 373 U/L. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography revealed delayed contrast enhancement of the pancreas, diffuse parenchymal enlargement, and lack of normal lobulation. The patient’s serum immunoglobulin G4 level was found to be 66 mg/dL, which was within normal limits and supportive of a diagnosis of type 2 autoimmune pancreatitis. Despite the absence of intestinal complaints, the patient underwent subsequent endoscopy due to the correlation of type 2 autoimmune pancreatitis with inflammatory bowel disease that has been described in recent literature. Pan-colonic mild colitis was visualized, and the patient began treatment with steroids, to which he quickly responded. Performing endoscopy on this patient allowed for confident initiation of early therapy for both autoimmune pancreatitis and inflammatory bowel disease, and may have limited further surgical intervention and disease progression. For these reasons, this case highlights the utility of endoscopy in pediatric patients with suspected type 2 autoimmune pancreatitis, even in the absence of intestinal symptoms.

  13. Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Associated With Autoimmune Thyroid Disorders in Iranian Children: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Zamanfar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Type one diabetes mellitus (T1DM is an autoimmune disorder that is yet the most common type of diabetes in children and adolescents. Several genetic risk factors have been associated with T1DM, auto immune thyroiditis and other autoimmune disorder. Among autoimmune disorders, autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD is the most frequent disorder associated with T1DM. Its prevalence varies depending on age, sex and ethnic origin of the subjects and is considerably higher than the general population and increases with duration of T1DM. The aim of this study was to review the prevalence of ATD in Iranian children with T1DM compared with other countries. Evidence Acquisition: We conducted a review on all papers published on the association between autoimmune thyroiditis and T1DM, which was available on Google Scholar, Scientific Information Database (SID, Magiran and Iran Medex databases up to June 2014. Both Persian and English articles were checked. The searched terms were: diabetes mellitus, autoimmune thyroiditis, prevalence, frequency, Iranian children and adolescents. All papers which were done on patients with age under 20 years old and have used Anti-TPO and Anti-TG to evaluate patients were included. Results: Six papers met all the criteria. A total of 736 participants were included in this review. After review of all the papers, the prevalence of Anti-TPO was reported between 8% and 30% and Anti-TG was reported 6.06% to 23.6% in diabetic children in Iran. Conclusions: Autoimmune thyroid disorders are the most prevalent immunological diseases in patients with type 1 diabetes. All these studies have shown a higher prevalence of the disorder in patients with T1DM compared to the Iranian healthy population. Anti-TPO reported between 8% and 30% and Anti-TG reported 6.06% to 23.6% in diabetic children in Iran that was similar to the studies in other countries.

  14. Addison's disease in a patient with hypothyroidism: autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Anna; Stewart, Munro; Mwamure, Peter; Nirmalaraj, Kingsley

    2015-08-03

    A 57-year-old Caucasian woman with known autoimmune hypothyroidism diagnosed in 2006 presented to hospital with flu-like symptoms and circulatory collapse. She reported weight loss and gradual increase in her skin pigmentation over a 1-year period. Aggressive fluid resuscitation was instituted. Hormonal tests showed primary adrenal insufficiency. Appropriate steroid replacement was started with rapid clinical response. Subsequent antibody tests confirmed the diagnosis of autoimmune polyglandular type 2 (Schmidt's) syndrome. The adrenal crisis had been precipitated by influenza virus type B infection. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  15. The immunobiology and clinical features of type 1 autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Can-Jie; Leung, Patrick S C; Zhang, Weici; Ma, Xiong; Gershwin, M Eric

    2018-01-01

    Autoimmune Polyglandular Syndrome type 1 (APS-1) is a subtype of the autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome characterized by the simultaneous or sequential dysfunction of multiple endocrine or non-endocrine glands. A clinical diagnosis of APS-1 is typically based on the presence of at least two of three following criteria: chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism and adrenal insufficiency. The first identified causative mutated gene for APS-1 is autoimmune regulator (AIRE) encoding a critical transcription factor, which is primarily expressed in the medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) for generating central immune tolerance. A wide range of chronic, debilitating complications, with no obvious correlation with genetics, makes a diagnosis of APS-1 challenging early in the disease course. Managing APS-1 is difficult due to its complexity, especially the intricate relationships within manifestations and genetic mutations. The past decades have witnessed dramatic progress in elucidating the function of AIRE and conducting large-scale cohort studies in APS-1. However, no clear evidence-based guidelines have been established in APS-1. In this review, we provide a detailed critical overview of the study history, epidemiology, clinical features, and related mechanisms of autoimmunity in APS-1, as well as currently available therapies for this autoimmune disorder. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Preclinical carotid atherosclerosis in patients with latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA), type 2 diabetes and classical type 1 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Hern?ndez, Marta; L?pez, Carolina; Real, Jordi; Valls, Joan; Ortega-Martinez de Victoria, Emilio; V?zquez, Federico; Rubinat, Esther; Granado-Casas, Minerva; Alonso, Nuria; Mol?, Teresa; Betriu, Angels; Lecube, Albert; Fern?ndez, Elvira; Leslie, Richard David; Mauricio, D?dac

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND LADA is probably the most prevalent form of autoimmune diabetes. Nevertheless, there are few data about cardiovascular disease in this group of patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of carotid atherosclerotic plaques in patients with LADA as compared with patients with classic type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. METHODS Patients with LADA were matched for age and gender in different proportions to patients with type 2 diabetes, and classic type 1 diabete...

  17. Screening markers for chronic atrophic gastritis in Chiapas, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, C; Mohar, A; Guarner, J; Herrera-Goepfert, R; Figueroa, L S; Halperin, D; Parsonnet, J

    2001-02-01

    Intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinomas usually are preceded by chronic atrophic gastritis. Studies of gastric cancer prevention often rely on identification of this condition. In a clinical trial, we sought to determine the best serological screening method for chronic atrophic gastritis and compared our findings to the published literature. Test characteristics of potential screening tests (antibodies to Helicobacter pyloni or CagA, elevated gastrin, low pepsinogen, increased age) alone or in combination were examined among consecutive subjects enrolled in a study of H. pylori and preneoplastic gastric lesions in Chiapas, Mexico; 70% had chronic atrophic gastritis. English-language articles concerning screening for chronic atrophic gastritis were also reviewed. Sensitivity for chronic atrophic gastritis was highest for antibodies to H. pylori (92%) or CagA, or gastrin levels >25 ng/l (both 83%). Specificity, however, was low for these tests (18, 41, and 22%, respectively). Pepsinogen levels were highly specific but insensitive markers of chronic atrophic gastritis (for pepsinogen I gastritis screening. However, no screening test was both highly sensitive and highly specific for chronic atrophic gastritis.

  18. Autoimmune gastritis: Pathologist’s viewpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coati, Irene; Fassan, Matteo; Farinati, Fabio; Graham, David Y; Genta, Robert M; Rugge, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Western countries are seeing a constant decline in the incidence of Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis, coupled with a rising epidemiological and clinical impact of autoimmune gastritis. This latter gastropathy is due to autoimmune aggression targeting parietal cells through a complex interaction of auto-antibodies against the parietal cell proton pump and intrinsic factor, and sensitized T cells. Given the specific target of this aggression, autoimmune gastritis is typically restricted to the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa. In advanced cases, the oxyntic epithelia are replaced by atrophic (and metaplastic) mucosa, creating the phenotypic background in which both gastric neuroendocrine tumors and (intestinal-type) adenocarcinomas may develop. Despite improvements in our understanding of the phenotypic changes or cascades occurring in this autoimmune setting, no reliable biomarkers are available for identifying patients at higher risk of developing a gastric neoplasm. The standardization of autoimmune gastritis histology reports and classifications in diagnostic practice is a prerequisite for implementing definitive secondary prevention strategies based on multidisciplinary diagnostic approaches integrating endoscopy, serology, histology and molecular profiling. PMID:26576102

  19. Metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1 autoimmunity: Clinical features and treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Chiriboga, A Sebastian; Komorowski, Lars; Kümpfel, Tania; Probst, Christian; Hinson, Shannon R; Pittock, Sean J; McKeon, Andrew

    2016-03-15

    To describe retrospectively the clinical associations of immunoglobulin G (IgG) targeting metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1-IgG). Specimens of 9 patients evaluated on a service basis in the Mayo Clinic Neuroimmunology Laboratory by tissue-based immunofluorescence assay (IFA) yielded a robust, synaptic immunostaining pattern consistent with mGluR1-IgG (serum, 9; CSF, 2 available). Transfected HEK293 cell-based assay (CBA) confirmed mGluR1 specificity in all 11 specimens. A further 2 patients were detected in Germany primarily by CBA. The median symptom onset age for the 11 patients was 58 years (range 33-81 years); 6 were male. All 9 Mayo Clinic patients had subacute onset of cerebellar ataxia, 4 had dysgeusia, 1 had psychiatric symptoms, and 1 had cognitive impairment. All were evaluated for malignancy, but only 1 was affected (cutaneous T-cell lymphoma). One developed ataxia post-herpes zoster infection. Head MRIs were generally atrophic or normal-appearing, and CSF was inflammatory in just 1 of 5 tested, though mGluR1-IgG was detected in both specimens submitted. Five patients improved (attributable to immunotherapy in 4, spontaneously in 1), 3 stabilized (attributable to immunotherapy in 2, cancer therapy in 1), and 1 progressively declined (untreated). The 2 German patients had ataxia, but fulfilled multiple sclerosis diagnostic criteria (1 relapsing-remitting, 1 progressive). However, both had histories of hematologic malignancy (acute lymphocytic leukemia and mantle cell lymphoma), and had mGluR1-IgG detected in serum by CBA (weakly positive on tissue-based IFA). mGluR1 autoimmunity represents a treatable form of cerebellar ataxia. Dysgeusia may be a diagnostic clue. Paraneoplastic, parainfectious, or idiopathic causes may occur. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  20. Hyperthyroidism from autoimmune thyroiditis in a man with type 1 diabetes mellitus: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Hirsch Irl B; Amory John K

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction The presentation, diagnosis, clinical course and treatment of a man with hyperthyroidism secondary to autoimmune thyroiditis in the setting of type 1 diabetes mellitus has not previously been described. Case presentation A 32-year-old European-American man with an eight-year history of type 1 diabetes mellitus presented with an unintentional 22-pound weight loss but an otherwise normal physical examination. Laboratory studies revealed a suppressed thyroid-stimulating hor...

  1. Use of autoantigen-loaded phosphatidylserine-liposomes to arrest autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Pujol-Autonell

    Full Text Available The development of new therapies to induce self-tolerance has been an important medical health challenge in type 1 diabetes. An ideal immunotherapy should inhibit the autoimmune attack, avoid systemic side effects and allow β-cell regeneration. Based on the immunomodulatory effects of apoptosis, we hypothesized that apoptotic mimicry can help to restore tolerance lost in autoimmune diabetes.To generate a synthetic antigen-specific immunotherapy based on apoptosis features to specifically reestablish tolerance to β-cells in type 1 diabetes.A central event on the surface of apoptotic cells is the exposure of phosphatidylserine, which provides the main signal for efferocytosis. Therefore, phosphatidylserine-liposomes loaded with insulin peptides were generated to simulate apoptotic cells recognition by antigen presenting cells. The effect of antigen-specific phosphatidylserine-liposomes in the reestablishment of peripheral tolerance was assessed in NOD mice, the spontaneous model of autoimmune diabetes. MHC class II-peptide tetramers were used to analyze the T cell specific response after treatment with phosphatidylserine-liposomes loaded with peptides.We have shown that phosphatidylserine-liposomes loaded with insulin peptides induce tolerogenic dendritic cells and impair autoreactive T cell proliferation. When administered to NOD mice, liposome signal was detected in the pancreas and draining lymph nodes. This immunotherapy arrests the autoimmune aggression, reduces the severity of insulitis and prevents type 1 diabetes by apoptotic mimicry. MHC class II tetramer analysis showed that peptide-loaded phosphatidylserine-liposomes expand antigen-specific CD4+ T cells in vivo. The administration of phosphatidylserine-free liposomes emphasizes the importance of phosphatidylserine in the modulation of antigen-specific CD4+ T cell expansion.We conclude that this innovative immunotherapy based on the use of liposomes constitutes a promising strategy for

  2. [Type 1 polyglandular autoimmune syndrome associated with C322fsx372 mutation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncalés-Samanes, P; de Arriba Muñoz, A; Lou Francés, G M; Ferrer Lozano, M; Justa Roldán, M L; Labarta Aizpun, J I

    2015-01-01

    Polyglandular autoimmune syndromes are rare diseases based on autoimmune mechanisms in which endocrine and non-endocrine disorders coexist. In type 1 the characteristic manifestations are chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism and adrenal insufficiency. A case is presented of a patient with typical clinical sequence, along with other changes, and in whom a mutation in homozygosis, C322fsX372, was detected after performing a molecular analysis of autoimmunity regulator gene (AIRE). Inheritance is autosomal recessive, associated with mutations in the AIRE gene, which encodes a protein involved in autoimmunity and immunodeficiency. For diagnosis, At least two of the three major clinical manifestations are required for a diagnosis. However, only one of them is necessary in the study of relatives of affected patients. These syndromes must be diagnosed early, given their high morbidity and mortality. Every manifestation needs to be treated, in order to maintain the quality of life. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. CD4+ CD25+ cells in type 1 diabetic patients with other autoimmune manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalia S. Abd Elaziz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The existence of multiple autoimmune disorders in diabetics may indicate underlying primary defects of immune regulation. The study aims at estimation of defects of CD4+ CD25+high cells among diabetic children with multiple autoimmune manifestations, and identification of disease characteristics in those children. Twenty-two cases with type 1 diabetes associated with other autoimmune diseases were recruited from the Diabetic Endocrine and Metabolic Pediatric Unit (DEMPU, Cairo University along with twenty-one normal subjects matched for age and sex as a control group. Their anthropometric measurements, diabetic profiles and glycemic control were recorded. Laboratory investigations included complete blood picture, glycosylated hemoglobin, antithyroid antibodies, celiac antibody panel and inflammatory bowel disease markers when indicated. Flow cytometric analysis of T-cell subpopulation was performed using anti-CD3, anti-CD4, anti-CD8, anti-CD25 monoclonal antibodies. Three cases revealed a proportion of CD4+ CD25+high below 0.1% and one case had zero counts. However, this observation did not mount to a significant statistical difference between the case and control groups neither in percentage nor absolute numbers. Significant statistical differences were observed between the case and the control groups regarding their height, weight centiles, as well as hemoglobin percentage, white cell counts and the absolute lymphocytic counts. We concluded that, derangements of CD4+ CD25+high cells may exist among diabetic children with multiple autoimmune manifestations indicating defects of immune controllers.

  4. "PREVALENCE OF AUTOANTIBODIES TO THYROID PEROXIDASE AND AUTOIMMUNE THYROID DISEASE IN TYPE I DIABETES MELLITUS"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Moayeri A. Rabbani

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Type I diabetes mellitus (DM is frequently associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD. Association of ATD and type I DM has been described with varying frequencies but there is still debate about the situation in the Iranian population. We investigated the prevalence of anti thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO antibodies and ATD in children and adolescents with type I DM. A total of 145 patients with type I DM were participated in this study. They were screened for anti-TPO antibodies and TSH levels. Signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism and the presence of goiter were sought. A group of 50 healthy unrelated girls and boys aged 11-16 years served as controls. Anti-TPO antibodies were found in 34 (23.4% diabetic patients and 1 subject (2% in the control group (P<0.001. Frequency of anti TPO antibodies was significantly higher in girls than boys (P<0.05. We failed to show any significant correlation between thyroid autoimmunity and duration of DM. We found that younger patients at diagnosis are more likely to be anti-TPO negative (P<0.001. Out of 145 diabetic patients, 32 (22% had visible goiter. Subclinical hypothyroidism, hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis occurred in 1, 9 and 1 patients, respectively. Visible goiter was found in 2 subjects (4% of the control group, but all of them were euthyroid. In conclusion, the evaluation of thyroid autoimmunity in type I diabetic patients may improve the diagnosis of thyroid disease in early stages. Yearly examination of anti-TPO antibodies allows identifying diabetic patients with thyroid autoimmunity.

  5. Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 – a case report from Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahniyah Haq

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of a 26 years old man who presented with adrenocortical insufficiency followed by hypoparathyroidism and subsequently mucocutaneous candidiasis. He also had nail dystrophy, cataract and alopecia, but no other endocrinopathies. He was diagnosed as a case of autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1(APS 1. APS1 is a rare endocrine disorder and only a few cases have been reported from Bangladesh. IMC J Med Sci 2016; 10(1: 33-35

  6. Neurofibromatosis type 1 and autoimmune hyperthyroidism in a 10,5 years-old girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Demirbilek

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 is an autosomal dominant inherited multisystem disease associated with several endocrine disorders. Association of NF1 and hyperthyroidism is extremely rare. All previously reported cases were in adult age group. Herein, we present autoimmune thyrotoxicosis associated to NF1 in a pediatric patient presenting with goiter and symptoms of thyrotoxicosis. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(4.000: 805-808

  7. Type II NKT Cells in Inflammation, Autoimmunity, Microbial Immunity, and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Idania; Ware, Randle; Kumar, Vipin

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer T cells (NKT) recognize self and microbial lipid antigens presented by non-polymorphic CD1d molecules. Two major NKT cell subsets, type I and II, express different types of antigen receptors (TCR) with distinct mode of CD1d/lipid recognition. Though type II NKT cells are less frequent in mice and difficult to study, they are predominant in human. One of the major subsets of type II NKT cells reactive to the self-glycolipid sulfatide is the best characterized and has been shown to induce a dominant immune regulatory mechanism that controls inflammation in autoimmunity and in anti-cancer immunity. Recently, type II NKT cells reactive to other self-glycolipids and phospholipids have been identified suggesting both promiscuous and specific TCR recognition in microbial immunity as well. Since the CD1d pathway is highly conserved, a detailed understanding of the biology and function of type II NKT cells as well as their interplay with type I NKT cells or other innate and adaptive T cells will have major implications for potential novel interventions in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, microbial immunity, and cancer.

  8. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 (APS-3) among patients with premature ovarian insufficiency (POI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szlendak-Sauer, Katarzyna; Jakubik, Daniel; Kunicki, Michał; Skórska, Jolanta; Smolarczyk, Roman

    2016-08-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 - (APS-3), is defined as the coexistence of autoimmune thyroiditis with other non-ovarian autoimmune diseases without primary adrenal insufficiency. Additionally the definition of APS-3 also includes primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) coexistence with autoimmune thyroiditis. The main goal of that study is to assess the prevalence of APS-3 defined as coexistence of autoimmune thyroiditis with POI in population of 46 XX karyotype women with primary ovarian insufficiency (POI). The second goal is to investigate hormonal profile and insulin sensitivity in women with POI and subgroups of women with APS-3 - POI/APS-3(+) and without APS 3 - POI/APS-3(-). Anthropometric measurements, coexistence of autoimmune diseases, androgens, fasting glucose and insulin, glucose and insulin at 60' and 120' of oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and homeostasis model for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), were determine in 98 patients aged between 18 and 39 with spontaneous 46 XX primary ovarian insufficiency (POI), in 33 POI/APS-3(+), 65 POI/APS-3(-), and 75 healthy controls. Continuous data were summarized by the mean±standard deviation (SD), and categorical data by number (percentages). Data were checked for normality using Shapiro-Wilk test, the comparison between groups were performed using non-parametric Mann-Whitney or Kruskall-Wallis test. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to assess the relationships between parameters. Statistical significance was defined as p values APS-3(+) and POI/APS-3(-) showed significantly lower serum androgens in comparison to controls. Additionally women with POI/APS-3(+) showed hyperinsulinemia after 1h of OGTT; No significant differences in serum fasting glucose, insulin and during 2h OGTT between groups were observed. The prevalence of APS-3 is 33.7% in patients with spontaneous 46 XX primary ovarian insufficiency. Women with POI, POI/APS-3(+) and POI/APS-3(-) feature lower testosterone, androstendione

  9. Antibodies against human cytochrome P-450db1 in autoimmune hepatitis type II.

    OpenAIRE

    Zanger, U M; Hauri, H P; Loeper, J; Homberg, J C; Meyer, U A

    1988-01-01

    In a subgroup of children with chronic active hepatitis, circulating autoantibodies occur that bind to liver and kidney endoplasmic reticulum (anti-liver/kidney microsome antibody type I or anti-LKM1). Anti-LKM1 titers follow the severity of the disease and the presence of these antibodies serves as a diagnostic marker for this autoimmune hepatitis type II. We demonstrate that anti-LKM1 IgGs specifically inhibit the hydroxylation of bufuralol in human liver microsomes. Using two assay systems...

  10. Genetic and immunologic aspects of autoimmune poliendocrine syndrome type I: review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Rachel Bandeira de Araújo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndrome type 1 (APS-1, also known as candidiasis ectodermal-autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-dystrophy (APECED, it is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator gene (AIRE. Therefore, it is immunologically characterized by cell attack and / or antibodymediated generating the destruction of target organs. Furthermore, it is characterized by the pathognomonic triad chronic candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism and Addison's disease with many other endocrine and non-endocrine events. Soon, the diagnosis is made based on the presence of two of the three classic features and treatment aims to control the numerous deficiencies that patients may present. This literature review was aimed at understanding the involvement of AIRE gene in relation to immunological aspects present and, consequently, clinical manifestations of this disease. Thus, evidence of the need to broaden the discussion about this disease, in order to improve the quality of life of patients by early diagnosis and treatment and are in accordance with the clinical manifestations of each patient. Thereby, qualitative research involved scientific articles from electronic journals LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean, SCIELO (Scientific Electronic Library Online and NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information, between the years 2009 and 2016. Pursuant to, there is the relevance of this review, it is noted that, although the authors converge on views on this syndrome, there are still many unclear matters with regard to the mechanisms of the disease. This highlights the need to promote more discussion on this topic.

  11. Organ-specific autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes mellitus: Screening with respect to glycemic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ghada A

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes (T1D is a tissue-specific autoimmune disease and often associated with other autoimmune diseases; so our study aimed to define the occurrence of thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb and thyroglobulin antibody (TGAb in autoimmune thyroid disease (AIT, tissue transglutaminase antibody (TTGAb in celiac disease, And to evaluate the relationship between the presence of these antibodies and glycemic control. Our retrospective study included 60 Kuwaiti patients with T1D who attended and follow in Diabetes outpatient clinics of Kuwait primary health care centers during the period of 2014-2015. For them, recorded data for age, sex, duration of diabetes, Body Mass Index (BMI, HbA1c was reviewed. Patients were screened for the presence of Specific antibodies to islet antigens (ICAb, glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibodies (GADAb, insulin autoantibodies (IAA, TPOAb, TGAb, TTGAb and also thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH were measured by ELISA. Of the total 60 patients (20 men, 40women, mean age was17.95 ± (5.44 y; the mean duration of diabetes was 6.63 ± (4.27 y; mean HbA1c was 10.41± (1.96 %. Only 58 (96.7% wer e positive for GADAb, 32 (53.3% were positive for ICAb, and 48 (80% were positive for IAA, 14 (23.3% patients were positive for TPOAb, 11 (18.3% were positive for TGAb, 10 (16.7 % were positive for both TPOAb and TGAb; furthermore 8 (13.3% patients were positive for TTGAb. Neither organ-specific autoimmune disease (AIT and celiac disease nor pancreatic β cells autoantibodies had a significant association with the glycemic control. In our study, we confirmed the high prevalence of a second organ-specific autoimmune disease in individuals with type 1 diabetes. Also Subclinical forms of these disorders have no influence on diabetes control. Further research will be necessary to test these relationships in a prospective follow-up study

  12. Effect of Associated Autoimmune Diseases on Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Incidence and Metabolic Control in Children and Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Krzewska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is one of the most common chronic diseases developing in childhood. The incidence of the disease in children increases for unknown reasons at a rate from 3 to 5% every year worldwide. The background of T1DM is associated with the autoimmune process of pancreatic beta cell destruction, which leads to absolute insulin deficiency and organ damage. Complex interactions between environmental and genetic factors contribute to the development of T1DM in genetically predisposed patients. The T1DM-inducing autoimmune process can also affect other organs, resulting in development of additional autoimmune diseases in the patient, thereby impeding diabetes control. The most common T1DM comorbidities include autoimmune thyroid diseases, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis; additionally, diabetes can be a component of PAS (Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome. The aim of this review is to assess the prevalence of T1DM-associated autoimmune diseases in children and adolescents and their impact on the course of T1DM. We also present suggestions concerning screening tests.

  13. Autoimmunity and Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzaro, Nicola; Antico, Antonio; Villalta, Danilo

    2018-01-01

    Alterations in the immune response of patients with autoimmune diseases may predispose to malignancies, and a link between chronic autoimmune gastritis and gastric cancer has been reported in many studies. Intestinal metaplasia with dysplasia of the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa and hyperplasia of chromaffin cells, which are typical features of late-stage autoimmune gastritis, are considered precursor lesions. Autoimmune gastritis has been associated with the development of two types of gastric neoplasms: intestinal type and type I gastric carcinoid. Here, we review the association of autoimmune gastritis with gastric cancer and other autoimmune features present in gastric neoplasms. PMID:29373557

  14. TNF blockade induces a dysregulated type I interferon response without autoimmunity in paradoxical psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Curdin; Di Domizio, Jeremy; Mylonas, Alessio; Belkhodja, Cyrine; Demaria, Olivier; Navarini, Alexander A; Lapointe, Anne-Karine; French, Lars E; Vernez, Maxime; Gilliet, Michel

    2018-01-02

    Although anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents are highly effective in the treatment of psoriasis, 2-5% of treated patients develop psoriasis-like skin lesions called paradoxical psoriasis. The pathogenesis of this side effect and its distinction from classical psoriasis remain unknown. Here we show that skin lesions from patients with paradoxical psoriasis are characterized by a selective overexpression of type I interferons, dermal accumulation of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC), and reduced T-cell numbers, when compared to classical psoriasis. Anti-TNF treatment prolongs type I interferon production by pDCs through inhibition of their maturation. The resulting type I interferon overexpression is responsible for the skin phenotype of paradoxical psoriasis, which, unlike classical psoriasis, is independent of T cells. These findings indicate that paradoxical psoriasis represents an ongoing overactive innate inflammatory process, driven by pDC-derived type I interferon that does not lead to T-cell autoimmunity.

  15. The effect of types I and III interferons on adrenocortical cells and its possible implications for autoimmune Addison's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellesen, A; Edvardsen, K; Breivik, L; Husebye, E S; Bratland, E

    2014-06-01

    Autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) is caused by selective destruction of the hormone-producing cells of the adrenal cortex. As yet, little is known about the potential role played by environmental factors in this process. Type I and/or type III interferons (IFNs) are signature responses to virus infections, and have also been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune endocrine disorders such as type 1 diabetes and autoimmune thyroiditis. Transient development of AAD and exacerbation of established or subclinical disease, as well as the induction of autoantibodies associated with AAD, have been reported following therapeutic administration of type I IFNs. We therefore hypothesize that exposure to such IFNs could render the adrenal cortex susceptible to autoimmune attack in genetically predisposed individuals. In this study, we investigated possible immunopathological effects of type I and type III IFNs on adrenocortical cells in relation to AAD. Both types I and III IFNs exerted significant cytotoxicity on NCI-H295R adrenocortical carcinoma cells and potentiated IFN-γ- and polyinosine-polycytidylic acid [poly (I : C)]-induced chemokine secretion. Furthermore, we observed increased expression of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules and up-regulation of 21-hydroxylase, the primary antigenic target in AAD. We propose that these combined effects could serve to initiate or aggravate an ongoing autoimmune response against the adrenal cortex in AAD. © 2014 British Society for Immunology.

  16. Liver/kidney microsomal antibody type 1 and liver cytosol antibody type 1 concentrations in type 2 autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, L; Cataleta, M; Muratori, P; Lenzi, M; Bianchi, F B

    1998-05-01

    Liver/kidney microsomal antibody type 1 (LKM1) and liver cytosol antibody type 1 (LC1) are the serological markers of type 2 autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). Since LKM1 and LC1 react against two distinct liver specific autoantigens (cytochrome P450IID6 (CYP2D6) and a 58 kDa cytosolic polypeptide respectively), the aim was to see whether LKM1 and LC1 concentrations correlate with liver disease activity. Twenty one patients with type 2 AIH were studied. All sera were tested by indirect immunofluorescence, counterimmunoelectrophoresis, and immunoblotting visualised by enhanced chemiluminescence. To evaluate LKM1 and LC1 levels, the 50 kDa microsomal reactivity (corresponding to CYP2D6) and the 58 kDa cytosolic reactivity were quantified by densitometric analysis. Seven patients were positive for LKM1, nine for LC1, and five for both. Serial serum samples at onset and during immunosuppressive treatment were analysed in 13 patients (four positive for LKM1, six positive for LC1 and three positive for both). During remission, LKM1 concentration remained essentially unchanged in six of seven patients, and decreased in only one. Conversely, in two of nine patients, LC1 was completely lost, and, in the remaining seven, LC1 concentration was reduced by more than 50%. After immunosuppression tapering or withdrawal, flare ups of liver necrosis ensued with increasing LC1 concentration, but not LKM1. LC1 concentration, at variance with that of LKM1, parallels liver disease activity, and its participation in the pathogenic mechanisms of liver injury can be hypothesised.

  17. Ingested Type I Interferon—State of the Art as Treatment for Autoimmunity Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staley A. Brod

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We have proposed a unifying hypothesis of the etiopathogenesis of autoimmunity that defines autoimmunity as a type I interferon (IFN immunodeficiency syndrome. We have examined toxicity and potential efficacy in two phase I (type 1 diabetes [T1D], multiple sclerosis [MS] and phase II clinical trials in T1D and MS. In a phase I open label trial in T1D, ingested IFN-alpha preserved residual beta-cell function in recent onset patients. In a second phase I trial in MS, there was a significant decrease in peripheral blood mononuclear cell IL-2 and IFN-gamma production after ingesting IFN-alpha. In a phase II randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial in MS, 10,000 IU ingested IFN-alpha significantly decreased gadolinium enhancements compared to the placebo group at month 5. TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma cytokine secretion in the 10,000 IU group at month 5 showed a significant decrease that corresponded with the effect of ingested IFN-alpha on decreasing gadolinium enhancements. In a phase II randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial in T1D, patients in the 5,000 unit hrIFN-alpha treatment group maintained more beta-cell function one year after study enrollment compared to individuals in the placebo group. Ingested IFN-alpha was not toxic in these clinical trials. These studies suggest that ingested IFN-alpha may have a potential role in the treatment of autoimmunity.

  18. A Longitudinal Follow-up of Autoimmune Polyendocrine Syndrome Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruserud, Øyvind; Oftedal, Bergithe E.; Landegren, Nils; Erichsen, Martina M.; Bratland, Eirik; Lima, Kari; Jørgensen, Anders P.; Myhre, Anne G.; Svartberg, Johan; Fougner, Kristian J.; Bakke, Åsne; Nedrebø, Bjørn G.; Mella, Bjarne; Breivik, Lars; Viken, Marte K.; Knappskog, Per M.; Marthinussen, Mihaela C.; Løvås, Kristian; Kämpe, Olle; Wolff, Anette B.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS1) is a childhood-onset monogenic disease defined by the presence of two of the three major components: hypoparathyroidism, primary adrenocortical insufficiency, and chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC). Information on longitudinal follow-up of APS1 is sparse. Objective: To describe the phenotypes of APS1 and correlate the clinical features with autoantibody profiles and autoimmune regulator (AIRE) mutations during extended follow-up (1996–2016). Patients: All known Norwegian patients with APS1. Results: Fifty-two patients from 34 families were identified. The majority presented with one of the major disease components during childhood. Enamel hypoplasia, hypoparathyroidism, and CMC were the most frequent components. With age, most patients presented three to five disease manifestations, although some had milder phenotypes diagnosed in adulthood. Fifteen of the patients died during follow-up (median age at death, 34 years) or were deceased siblings with a high probability of undisclosed APS1. All except three had interferon-ω) autoantibodies, and all had organ-specific autoantibodies. The most common AIRE mutation was c.967_979del13, found in homozygosity in 15 patients. A mild phenotype was associated with the splice mutation c.879+1G>A. Primary adrenocortical insufficiency and type 1 diabetes were associated with protective human leucocyte antigen genotypes. Conclusions: Multiple presumable autoimmune manifestations, in particular hypoparathyroidism, CMC, and enamel hypoplasia, should prompt further diagnostic workup using autoantibody analyses (eg, interferon-ω) and AIRE sequencing to reveal APS1, even in adults. Treatment is complicated, and mortality is high. Structured follow-up should be performed in a specialized center. PMID:27253668

  19. Individual behavioral characteristics of wild-type rats predict susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kavelaars, A; Heijnen, CJ; Tennekes, R; Bruggink, JE; Koolhaas, JM

    1999-01-01

    Neuroendocrine-immune interactions are thought to be important in determining susceptibility to autoimmune disease. Animal studies have revealed that differences in susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) are related to:reactivity in the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis.

  20. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia as a component of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type I: a report of 2 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makharia, Govind K; Tandon, Nikhil; Stephen, Neil de Jesus Rangel; Gupta, Siddhartha Datta; Tandon, Rakesh K

    2007-01-01

    Chronic diarrhea and steatorrhea occur frequently in patients with autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS) type I. Intestinal lymphangiectasia has been reported earlier as a cause of steatorrhea in a young girl with APS Type I. We describe 2 patients with APS Type I who were found to have intestinal lymphangiectasia, one of whom had symptomatic protein-losing enteropathy.

  1. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davorin Dajčman

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autoimmune pancreatitis is a recently described type of pancreatitis of presumed autoimmune etiology. Autoimmune pancreatitis is often misdiagnosed as pancreatic cancer difficult, since their clinical presentations are often similar. The concept of autoimmune pancreatitis was first published in 1961. Since then, autoimmune pancreatitis has often been treated not as an independent clinical entity but rather as a manifestation of systemic disease. The overall prevalence and incidence of the disease have yet to be determined, but three series have reported the prevalence as between 5 and 6 % of all patients with chronic pancreatitis. Patient vary widely in age, but most are older than 50 years. Patients with autoimmune pancreatitis usually complain of the painless jaundice, mild abdominal pain and weight loss. There is no laboratory hallmark of the disease, even if cholestatic profiles of liver dysfunction with only mild elevation of amylase and lipase levels have been reported.Conclusions: Proposed diagnostic criteria contains: (1 radiologic imaging, diffuse enlargement of the pancreas and diffusely irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct, (2 laboratory data, elevated levels of serum ã-globulin and/or IgG, specially IgG4, or the presence of autoantibodies and (3 histopathologic examination, fibrotic change with dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltration in the pancreas. For correct diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis, criterion 1 must be present with criterion 2 and/or 3. Autoimmune pancreatitis is frequently associated with rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren’s syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, tubulointersticial nephritis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis. Pancreatic biopsy using an endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy is the most important diagnostic method today. Treatment with corticosteroids leads to the and resolution of pancreatic inflamation, obstruction and

  2. Cell-specific type I IFN signatures in autoimmunity and viral infection: what makes the difference?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieko Kyogoku

    Full Text Available Gene expression profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs has revealed a crucial role for type I interferon (IFN in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. However, it is unclear how particular leucocyte subsets contribute to the overall type I IFN signature of PBMCs and whole blood samples.Furthermore, a detailed analysis describing the differences in the IFN signature in autoimmune diseases from that observed after viral infection has not been performed to date. Therefore, in this study, the transcriptional responses in peripheral T helper cells (CD4(+ and monocyte subsets (CD16(- inflammatory and CD16(+ resident monocytes isolated from patients with SLE, healthy donors (ND immunised with the yellow fever vaccine YFV-17Dand untreated controls were compared by global gene expression profiling.It was striking that all of the transcripts that were regulated in response to viral exposure were also found to be differentially regulated in SLE, albeit with markedly lower fold-change values. In addition to this common IFN signature, a pathogenic IFN-associated gene signature was detected in the CD4(+ T cells and monocytes from the lupus patients. IL-10, IL-9 and IL-15-mediated JAK/STAT signalling was shown to be involved in the pathological amplification of IFN responses observed in SLE. Type I IFN signatures identified were successfully applied for the monitoring of interferon responses in PBMCs of an independent cohort of SLE patients and virus-infected individuals. Moreover, these cell-type specific gene signatures allowed a correct classification of PBMCs independent from their heterogenic cellular composition. In conclusion, our data show for the first time that monocytes and CD4 cells are sensitive biosensors to monitor type I interferon response signatures in autoimmunity and viral infection and how these transriptional responses are modulated in a cell- and disease-specific manner.

  3. A murine model of type 2 autoimmune hepatitis: Xenoimmunization with human antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapierre, Pascal; Djilali-Saiah, Idriss; Vitozzi, Susana; Alvarez, Fernando

    2004-04-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is characterized by an immune-mediated injury of the hepatic parenchyma of unknown pathogenesis. Type 2 AIH is identified by the presence of anti-liver-kidney microsomes type 1 (anti-LKM1) and anti-liver cytosol type 1 (anti-LC1) autoantibodies. The current study shows that a murine model of AIH can be generated by DNA immunization against type 2 AIH self-antigens (P450 2D6 and formiminotransferase-cyclodeaminase). A pCMV plasmid containing the N-terminal region of mouse CTLA-4 and the antigenic region of human CYP2D6 (672-1,377 bp) and human formiminotransferase cyclodeaminase (FTCD; 1,232-1,668 bp) was used for DNA immunization of C57BL/6 female mice. Immunized mice showed elevated levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), with peaks at 4 and 7 months postinjection. Periportal, portal, and intralobular liver inflammatory infiltrates were observed at histology. Mainly CD4+ lymphocytes, but also CD8+ and B lymphocytes, were found in the liver. Cytotoxic-specific T cells were found in both the liver and spleen of these animals. Mice developed anti-LKM1 and anti-LC1 antibodies of immunoglobulin G2 (IgG2) subclass, against specific mouse autoantigens. The ALT levels correlated with both the presence of anti-LKM1/anti-LC1 antibodies and the presence of liver necroinflammation. In conclusion, in mice, DNA immunization against human autoantigens breaks tolerance and induces an autoimmune liver disease. Molecular mimicry between foreign and self-antigens explains the liver injury. This model of AIH resembles human type 2 AIH and will be helpful for the study of its pathogenesis.

  4. Microscopic findings in EUS-guided fine needle (SharkCore) biopsies with type 1 and type 2 autoimmune pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Detlefsen, Sönke; Joergensen, Maiken Thyregod; Mortensen, Michael Bau

    2017-01-01

    The International Consensus Diagnostic Criteria (ICDC) for the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) include the histological criterion that is based on either pancreatic core needle biopsies (CNBs) or surgical specimens. However, CNBs are difficult to obtain by endoscopic ultrasound (EUS......). EUS fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) cytology is usually not sufficient for the diagnosis of AIP, but may sometimes contain tissue microfragments. Another approach is EUS-guided histological fine-needle biopsy (EUS-FNB), using needles such as the SharkCore or ProCore needle. Published data regarding...... EUS-guided SharkCore FNB for the diagnosis of AIP are lacking. We aimed to describe our histological findings in one type 1 and two type 2 AIP patients who underwent EUS SharkCore FNB. The EUS-FNBs of two patients fulfilled the histological level 2 ICDC for type 1 AIP or type 2 AIP. The EUS-FNB of one...

  5. Basophils activated via TLR signaling may contribute to pathophysiology of type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, Masato; Uchida, Kazushige; Ando, Yugo; Tomiyama, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Ikeura, Tsukasa; Fukui, Toshiro; Nishio, Akiyoshi; Uemura, Yoshiko; Miyara, Takayuki; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Satoi, Souhei; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2018-03-01

    Pathophysiology of type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is still unclear. We previously reported that M2 macrophages might play an important role in type 1 AIP. Recently, it has been reported that basophils regulate differentiation to M2 macrophages. In this study, we investigated basophils from the pancreatic tissue and peripheral blood of individuals with type 1 AIP. By using immunohistochemistry, we investigated basophils in pancreatic tissue from 13 patients with type 1 AIP and examined expression of toll-like receptors (TLRs) by these cells. Additionally, we obtained peripheral blood samples from 27 healthy subjects, 40 patients with type 1 AIP, 8 patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis, 10 patients with bronchial asthma, and 10 patients with atopic dermatitis, and analyzed activation of basophils by stimulating them with ligands of TLR1-9. We also compared TLR expression in basophils from the tissue and blood samples. Basophils were detected in pancreatic tissues from 10 of 13 patients with type 1 AIP. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the ratios of basophils activated by TLR4 stimulation in type 1 AIP (9.875 ± 1.148%) and atopic dermatitis (11.768 ± 1.899%) were significantly higher than those in healthy subjects (5.051 ± 0.730%; P pathophysiology of type 1 AIP.

  6. A functional alternative splicing mutation in AIRE gene causes autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyu Zhang

    Full Text Available Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1 is a rare autosomal recessive disease defined by the presence of two of the three conditions: mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and Addison's disease. Loss-of-function mutations of the autoimmune regulator (AIRE gene have been linked to APS-1. Here we report mutational analysis and functional characterization of an AIRE mutation in a consanguineous Chinese family with APS-1. All exons of the AIRE gene and adjacent exon-intron sequences were amplified by PCR and subsequently sequenced. We identified a homozygous missense AIRE mutation c.463G>A (p.Gly155Ser in two siblings with different clinical features of APS-1. In silico splice-site prediction and minigene analysis were carried out to study the potential pathological consequence. Minigene splicing analysis and subsequent cDNA sequencing revealed that the AIRE mutation potentially compromised the recognition of the splice donor of intron 3, causing alternative pre-mRNA splicing by intron 3 retention. Furthermore, the aberrant AIRE transcript was identified in a heterozygous carrier of the c.463G>A mutation. The aberrant intron 3-retaining transcript generated a truncated protein (p.G155fsX203 containing the first 154 AIRE amino acids and followed by 48 aberrant amino acids. Therefore, our study represents the first functional characterization of the alternatively spliced AIRE mutation that may explain the pathogenetic role in APS-1.

  7. A New Mutation Causing Progressive Familiar Intrahepatic Cholestasis Type 3 in Association with Autoimmune Hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo M Oliveira

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Some patients exhibit features of both autoimmune hepatitis (AIH and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC. Similarly, patients with progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 3 (PFIC3 may share histological features with PSC. Case report: We report the case of a 22-year-old man who, since he was 5 years of age, has presented with pruritus, an approximately ninefold elevation of aminotransferases, and γ-glutamyl transferase levels ~10 times the upper limit. Initially he was diagnosed with an overlap syndrome of small duct PSC plus AIH. However, fluctuations in liver enzymes were observed over the following years. Analysis of the ABCB4 gene indicated the diagnosis of PFIC3, revealing a mutation not previously reported. Conclusion: With this case report we aim to describe a new mutation, raise awareness of this rare pathology and highlight the importance of genetic testing of the ABCB4 gene in patients with autoimmune liver disease (mainly small duct PSC with incomplete response to immunosuppressive treatment.

  8. Racial and ethnic differences among children with new-onset autoimmune Type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, K; Tosur, M; Schaub, R; Haymond, M W; Redondo, M J

    2017-10-01

    To compare demographic and clinical characteristics among children from ethnic minorities and non-Hispanic white children with new-onset autoimmune Type 1 diabetes. We analysed a single-centre series of 712 children with new-onset autoimmune Type 1 diabetes between January 2008 and March 2011. The median (range) age was 9.7 (0.3-18.1) years, the mean (sd) BMI percentile was 69.7 (25.4) and 48.3% of the cohort were girls. The cohort comprised 57.3% non-Hispanic white, 20.5% Hispanic and 14.8% African-American children, and 7.4% were of other, mixed or unknown race. The Hispanic subgroup, compared with non-Hispanic white subgroup, had a higher mean (sd) C-peptide level [0.82 (1.62) vs 0.55 (0.47) ng/ml; P=0.004), and a greater proportion of children with elevated BMI (overweight or obesity; 49.6% vs 32.5%; P1) and diabetic ketoacidosis (51.8% vs 38.2%; P=0.006). The African-American group had a higher mean (sd) glucose level [24.4 (12.8) vs 21.4 (10.7) mmol/l; P=0.017], a greater proportion of children with ketoacidosis (56.7% vs 38.2%; P=0.001), a greater proportion with elevated BMI (52.9% vs 32.5%; P1), and a lower proportion of children at pre-pubertal stage (49.0% vs 61.6%; P=0.01), and tended to have higher C-peptide levels [0.65 (0.59) vs 0.55 [0.47] ng/ml; P=0.079) compared with the non-Hispanic white children. The differences in C-peptide levels compared with non-Hispanic white children persisted for Hispanic (P=0.01) but not African-American children (P=0.29) after adjustment for age, sex, BMI, ketoacidosis, glucose, Tanner stage and autoantibody number. At the onset of paediatric autoimmune Type 1 diabetes, Hispanic, but not African-American children had higher C-peptide levels, after adjustment for potential confounders, compared with non-Hispanic white children. These findings suggest that ethnicity may contribute to the heterogeneity of Type 1 diabetes pathogenesis, with possible implications for intervention. © 2017 Diabetes UK.

  9. Genome-wide association study identifies variants associated with autoimmune hepatitis type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Ynto S; van Gerven, Nicole M F; Zwiers, Antonie; Verwer, Bart J; van Hoek, Bart; van Erpecum, Karel J; Beuers, Ulrich; van Buuren, Henk R; Drenth, Joost P H; den Ouden, Jannie W; Verdonk, Robert C; Koek, Ger H; Brouwer, Johannes T; Guichelaar, Maureen M J; Vrolijk, Jan M; Kraal, Georg; Mulder, Chris J J; van Nieuwkerk, Carin M J; Fischer, Janett; Berg, Thomas; Stickel, Felix; Sarrazin, Christoph; Schramm, Christoph; Lohse, Ansgar W; Weiler-Normann, Christina; Lerch, Markus M; Nauck, Matthias; Völzke, Henry; Homuth, Georg; Bloemena, Elisabeth; Verspaget, Hein W; Kumar, Vinod; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Wijmenga, Cisca; Franke, Lude; Bouma, Gerd

    2014-08-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is an uncommon autoimmune liver disease of unknown etiology. We used a genome-wide approach to identify genetic variants that predispose individuals to AIH. We performed a genome-wide association study of 649 adults in The Netherlands with AIH type 1 and 13,436 controls. Initial associations were further analyzed in an independent replication panel comprising 451 patients with AIH type 1 in Germany and 4103 controls. We also performed an association analysis in the discovery cohort using imputed genotypes of the major histocompatibility complex region. We associated AIH with a variant in the major histocompatibility complex region at rs2187668 (P = 1.5 × 10(-78)). Analysis of this variant in the discovery cohort identified HLA-DRB1*0301 (P = 5.3 × 10(-49)) as a primary susceptibility genotype and HLA-DRB1*0401 (P = 2.8 × 10(-18)) as a secondary susceptibility genotype. We also associated AIH with variants of SH2B3 (rs3184504, 12q24; P = 7.7 × 10(-8)) and CARD10 (rs6000782, 22q13.1; P = 3.0 × 10(-6)). In addition, strong inflation of association signal was found with single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with other immune-mediated diseases, including primary sclerosing cholangitis and primary biliary cirrhosis, but not with single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with other genetic traits. In a genome-wide association study, we associated AIH type 1 with variants in the major histocompatibility complex region, and identified variants of SH2B3and CARD10 as likely risk factors. These findings support a complex genetic basis for AIH pathogenesis and indicate that part of the genetic susceptibility overlaps with that for other immune-mediated liver diseases. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ethnic differences in progression of islet autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes in relatives at risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosur, Mustafa; Geyer, Susan M; Rodriguez, Henry; Libman, Ingrid; Baidal, David A; Redondo, Maria J

    2018-06-21

    We hypothesised that progression of islet autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes mellitus differs among races/ethnicities in at-risk individuals. In this study, we analysed the data from the Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet Pathway to Prevention Study. We studied 4873 non-diabetic, autoantibody-positive relatives of individuals with type 1 diabetes followed prospectively (11% Hispanic, 80.9% non-Hispanic white [NHW], 2.9% non-Hispanic black [NHB] and 5.2% non-Hispanic other [NHO]). Primary outcomes were time from single autoantibody positivity confirmation to multiple autoantibody positivity, and time from multiple autoantibody positivity to type 1 diabetes mellitus diagnosis. Conversion from single to multiple autoantibody positivity was less common in Hispanic individuals than in NHW individuals (HR 0.66 [95% CI 0.46, 0.96], p = 0.028) adjusting for autoantibody type, age, sex, Diabetes Prevention Trial Type 1 Risk Score and HLA-DR3-DQ2/DR4-DQ8 genotype. In participants who screened positive for multiple autoantibodies (n = 2834), time to type 1 diabetes did not differ by race/ethnicity overall (p = 0.91). In children who were <12 years old when multiple autoantibody positivity was determined, being overweight/obese had differential effects by ethnicity: type 1 diabetes risk was increased by 36% in NHW children (HR 1.36 [95% CI 1.04, 1.77], p = 0.024) and was nearly quadrupled in Hispanic children (HR 3.8 [95% CI 1.6, 9.1], p = 0.0026). We did not observe this interaction in participants who were ≥12 years old at determination of autoantibody positivity, although this group size was limited. No significant differential risks were observed between individuals of NHB and NHW ethnicity. The risk and rate of progression of islet autoimmunity were lower in Hispanic compared with NHW at-risk individuals, while significant differences in the development of type 1 diabetes were limited to children <12 years old and were modified by BMI.

  11. Alkaptonuria in a boy with type 1 diabetes mellitus, vitiligo, autoimmune thyroiditis and immunoglobulin A deficiency - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogendorf, Anna; Pietrzak, Iwona; Antosik, Karolina; Borowiec, Maciej; Młynarski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    We present a 15-year-old Caucasian boy with an exceptional coincidence of a rare monogenic metabolic disease - alkaptonuria (AKU) and a cluster of autoimmune disorders: type 1 diabetes (T1DM), autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT), vitiligo, insulin infusion induced lipoatrophy and immunoglobulin A deficiency (IgAD) Alkaptonuria and type 1 diabetes in a child, especially in such an interesting coincidence with other autoimmune conditions, has not been reported so far. Our investigation, including comprehensive genetic evaluation using next generation sequencing technology, shows that alkaptonuria and T1DM were independently inherited. We also show that alkaptonuria in its pre-ochronotic phase seems to have no effect on the course of diabetes. © Polish Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology.

  12. Syncytial giant-cell hepatitis due to autoimmune hepatitis type II (LKM1+) presenting as subfulminant hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Z; Broida, E; Monselise, Y; Kazatsker, A; Baruch, J; Pappo, O; Skappa, E; Tur-Kaspa, R

    2000-03-01

    Giant cell hepatitis (GCH) in adults is a rare event. The diagnosis of GCH is based on findings of syncytial giant hepatocytes. It is commonly associated with either viral infection or autoimmune hepatitis type I. A patient with GCH due to autoimmune hepatitis type II (LKM1+) is described, a combination that has not been previously reported. Corticosteroid therapy was effective in decreasing serum liver enzymes; however, the patient deteriorated rapidly and developed subfulminant hepatic failure. Although an emergency orthotopic liver transplantation was performed, the patient died because of reperfusion injury. Interestingly, only a few giant hepatocytes were noted in the explanted liver. This case stresses the association of GCH with autoimmune disorders, the possible immune mechanism involved in the formation of giant cell hepatocytes, and illustrates the rapidly progressive course and unfavorable prognosis that these patients can develop.

  13. Contrasting Roles of Islet Resident Immunoregulatory Macrophages and Dendritic Cells in Experimental Autoimmune Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornley, Thomas B.; Ma, Lingzhi; Chipashvili, Vaja; Aker, Jonathan E.; Korniotis, Sarantis; Csizmadia, Eva; Strom, Terry B.; Koulmanda, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The innate immune system critically shapes diabetogenic adaptive immunity during type 1 diabetes (T1D) pathogenesis. While the role of tissue-infiltrating monocyte-derived macrophages in T1D is well established, the role of their tissue-resident counterparts remains undefined. We now demonstrate that islet resident macrophages (IRMs) from non-autoimmune mice have an immunoregulatory phenotype and powerfully induce FoxP3+ Tregs in vitro. The immunoregulatory phenotype and function of IRMs is compromised by TLR4 activation in vitro. Moreover, as T1D approaches in NOD mice, the immunoregulatory phenotype of IRMs is diminished as is their relative abundance compared to immunostimulatory DCs. Our findings suggest that maintenance of IRM abundance and their immunoregulatory phenotype may constitute a novel therapeutic strategy to prevent and/or cure T1D. PMID:26943809

  14. Contrasting Roles of Islet Resident Immunoregulatory Macrophages and Dendritic Cells in Experimental Autoimmune Type 1 Diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas B Thornley

    Full Text Available The innate immune system critically shapes diabetogenic adaptive immunity during type 1 diabetes (T1D pathogenesis. While the role of tissue-infiltrating monocyte-derived macrophages in T1D is well established, the role of their tissue-resident counterparts remains undefined. We now demonstrate that islet resident macrophages (IRMs from non-autoimmune mice have an immunoregulatory phenotype and powerfully induce FoxP3+ Tregs in vitro. The immunoregulatory phenotype and function of IRMs is compromised by TLR4 activation in vitro. Moreover, as T1D approaches in NOD mice, the immunoregulatory phenotype of IRMs is diminished as is their relative abundance compared to immunostimulatory DCs. Our findings suggest that maintenance of IRM abundance and their immunoregulatory phenotype may constitute a novel therapeutic strategy to prevent and/or cure T1D.

  15. Prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity in children with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adlercreutz, Emma H; Svensson, Jannet; Hansen, Dorte

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim was to determine the prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity in children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) diagnosed in Denmark and Sweden. METHODS: A total of 662 Swedish children with T1D were matched with 1080 Danish children with T1D and 309 healthy children from Sweden and 283...... was equally distributed among 89 children with T1D positive for both IgAG-DGP/tTG and IgG-tTG. CONCLUSION: The discrepancy in levels of IgAG-DGP/tTG and IgG-tTG between Swedish and Danish T1D cohorts was independent of HLA and suggests that regional variations in comorbidity of celiac disease in T1D is caused...

  16. Autoimmune pancreatitis type-1 associated with intraduct papillary mucinous neoplasm: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquero, Eva C; Salcedo, Maria T; Cuatrecasas, Míriam; De León, Hannah; Merino, Xavier; Navarro, Salvador; Ginès, Angels; Abu-Suboh, Monder; Balsells, Joaquim; Fernández-Cruz, Laureano; Molero, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis lesions usually embrace both intraduct papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Patients at genetically-determined high risk of PDAC often harbor IPMN and/or chronic pancreatitis, suggesting IPMN, chronic pancreatitis and PDAC may share pathogenetic mechanisms. Chronic autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) may also herald PDAC. Concurrent IPMN and AIP have been reported in few patients. Here we describe two patients with IPMN who developed type-1 AIP fulfilling the Honolulu and Boston diagnostic criteria. AIP diffusively affected the whole pancreas, as well as peripancreatic lymph nodes and the gallbladder. Previous pancreatic resection of focal IPMN did not show features of AIP. One of the patients carried a CFTR class-I mutation. Of notice, serum IgG4 levels gradually decreased to normal values after IPMN excision. Common risk factors to IPMN and AIP may facilitate its coincidental generation. Copyright © 2014 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Morphological and immunohistochemical comparison of intrapancreatic nerves between chronic pancreatitis and type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kota; Ikeura, Tsukasa; Yanagawa, Masato; Tomiyama, Takashi; Fukui, Toshiro; Uchida, Kazushige; Takaoka, Makoto; Nishio, Akiyoshi; Uemura, Yoshiko; Satoi, Sohei; Yamada, Hisao; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    The abdominal pain associated with chronic pancreatitis (CP) may be related to the increased number and size of intrapancreatic nerves. On the other hand, patients with type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) rarely suffer from the pain syndrome, and there are no previous studies concerning the histopathological findings of intrapancreatic nerves in patients with type 1 AIP. The current study is aimed at investigating the differences in the histopathological and immunohistochemical findings of intrapancreatic nerves in patients with CP and type 1 AIP. Neuroanatomical differences between CP and type 1 AIP were assessed by immunostaining with a pan-neuronal marker, protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5). The number (neural density) and area (neural hypertrophy) of PGP9.5-immunopositive nerves were quantitatively analyzed. Furthermore, the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF), and a high affinity receptor for NGF, tyrosine kinase receptor A (TrkA), was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Both neural density and hypertrophy were significantly greater in pancreatic tissue samples from patients with CP than those with normal pancreas or type 1 AIP. NGF expression was stronger in type 1 AIP than in CP, whereas TrkA expression in type 1 AIP was poorer than in CP. Although CP and type 1 AIP are both characterized by the presence of sustained pancreatic inflammation, they are different in terms of the density and hypertrophy of intrapancreatic nerve fibers. It is possible that this may be related to the difference in the activity of the NGF/TrkA-pathway between the two types of pancreatitis. Copyright © 2017 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The association between Helicobacter pylori infection, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and autoimmune thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekry, Osama A; Abd Elwahid, Hassan A

    2013-12-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) can be associated with an increased prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection, which could contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroiditis observed in this disease. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between H. pylori infection and T1DM and to identify of the interconnection between H. pylori infection and autoimmune thyroiditis in patients with T1DM. A case-control design was used. The study group included 60 children and adolescents with T1DM who were selected from the pediatric outpatient clinic of Suez Canal University Hospital by a systematic random sampling method. The control group included 60 healthy children and adolescents matched for age and sex and selected from among relatives (brothers or cousins) of the patients with T1DM. The study participants were subjected to several investigations including estimation of levels of HbA1c, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), T3, T4, anti-thyroglobulin (anti-Tg), and anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO). The mean age of the patients with T1DM was 12.53±2.35 years, whereas that of the control group was 12.30±1.98 years, with no statistically significant difference between the two groups. The patients with diabetes had significantly higher levels of H. pylori IgG, TSH, anti-TPO, and anti-Tg (20.43±14.84  μ/ml, 4.03±1.53 mIu/l, 14.98 ±5.04 Iu/ml, and 5.66±3.37 Iu/ml, respectively) and significantly lower levels of T3 and T4 (120±15.86 μg/dl and 4.93±0.93 μg/dl, respectively) compared with the control group. In addition, the seroprevalence rate of H. pylori, anti-Tg, and anti-TPO was significantly higher in diabetic patients, and the duration of diabetes was significantly longer in H. pylori-positive patients with higher levels of HbA1c, insulin requirement, TSH, anti-TPO, and anti-Tg. The association between H. pylori infection and autoimmune thyroiditis in patients with T1DM was revealed in this study. Hence, screening and treatment of

  19. [New research progress on atrophic nonunion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jun-Qiang; Zhang, Bo-Xun; Chen, Hua; Tang, Pei-Fu; Wang, Yan

    2012-12-01

    Occurance of atrophic nonunion is a complex process. Previous studies suggested that atrophic nonunion was mainly due to lack of blood supply of fracture fragments, but recent studies found that blood supply was not deficiency in middle and late stages, indicating that decreased osteogenic factors and blood supply in early stages might play an important role in morbidity. Current effective treatment measures for atrophic nonunion mainly include bone graft and fixation,physical therapy, local injection therapy. All-round preventive could reduce incidence of atrophic nonunion. Atrophic nonunion is still a troublesome complication of fractures in orthopaedics, and more attention should be paid for its effective prevention and treatment. The paper summarized recent original articles about atrophic nonunion and reviewed the occurrence mechanisms, diagnosis, prevention and treatment measures of this disease.

  20. Role of major histocompatibility complex class II in the development of autoimmune type 1 diabetes and thyroiditis in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, N; Hidaka, S; Tanabe, S; Ohya, M; Ishima, M; Takagi, Y; Masui, N; Seino, S

    2012-01-01

    Although the MHC class II ‘u' haplotype is strongly associated with type 1 diabetes (T1D) in rats, the role of MHC class II in the development of tissue-specific autoimmune diseases including T1D and autoimmune thyroiditis remains unclear. To clarify this, we produced a congenic strain carrying MHC class II ‘a' and ‘u' haplotypes on the Komeda diabetes-prone (KDP) genetic background. The u/u homozygous animals developed T1D similar to the original KDP rat; a/u heterozygous animals did develop T1D but with delayed onset and low frequency. In contrast, none of the a/a homozygous animals developed T1D; about half of the animals with a/u heterozygous or a/a homozygous genotypes showed autoimmune thyroiditis. To investigate the role of genetic background in the development of thyroiditis, we also produced a congenic strain carrying Cblb mutation of the KDP rat on the PVG.R23 genetic background (MHC class II ‘a' haplotype). The congenic rats with homozygous Cblb mutation showed autoimmune thyroiditis without T1D and slight to severe alopecia, a clinical symptom of hypothyroidism such as Hashimoto's thyroiditis. These data indicate that MHC class II is involved in the tissue-specific development of autoimmune diseases, including T1D and thyroiditis. PMID:21918539

  1. New splice site acceptor mutation in AIRE gene in autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireia Mora

    Full Text Available Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 (APS-1, OMIM 240300 is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, characterized by the presence of at least two of three major diseases: hypoparathyroidism, Addison's disease, and chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis. We aim to identify the molecular defects and investigate the clinical and mutational characteristics in an index case and other members of a consanguineous family. We identified a novel homozygous mutation in the splice site acceptor (SSA of intron 5 (c.653-1G>A in two siblings with different clinical outcomes of APS-1. Coding DNA sequencing revealed that this AIRE mutation potentially compromised the recognition of the constitutive SSA of intron 5, splicing upstream onto a nearby cryptic SSA in intron 5. Surprisingly, the use of an alternative SSA entails the uncovering of a cryptic donor splice site in exon 5. This new transcript generates a truncated protein (p.A214fs67X containing the first 213 amino acids and followed by 68 aberrant amino acids. The mutation affects the proper splicing, not only at the acceptor but also at the donor splice site, highlighting the complexity of recognizing suitable splicing sites and the importance of sequencing the intron-exon junctions for a more precise molecular diagnosis and correct genetic counseling. As both siblings were carrying the same mutation but exhibited a different APS-1 onset, and one of the brothers was not clinically diagnosed, our finding highlights the possibility to suspect mutations in the AIRE gene in cases of childhood chronic candidiasis and/or hypoparathyroidism otherwise unexplained, especially when the phenotype is associated with other autoimmune diseases.

  2. Autoantibody detection in type 2 autoimmune hepatitis using a chimera recombinant protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitozzi, Susana; Lapierre, Pascal; Djilali-Saiah, Idriss; Alvarez, Fernando

    2002-04-01

    Autoantibodies against cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6), known as anti-liver/kidney microsome type 1 (LKM1) and/or anti-human formiminotransferase cyclodeaminase, formally known as anti-liver cytosol type 1 (LC1) define type 2 autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). The aims of this work are to develop a sensitive and specific test to detect anti-LKM1 and/or anti-LC1 autoantibodies and to establish the prevalence of anti-LC1. Sera from children with type 2 AIH (n=48) and those from a control group (n=100) were evaluated for anti-LKM1 and anti-LC1 by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) and Western blotting. Each serum sample was assayed for reactivity against formiminotransferase cyclodeaminase and CYP2D6 alone or as part of a recombinant chimera protein. By ELISA with recombinant chimera protein, 50 serum samples were positive, 48 from patients with type 2 AIH and 2 from patients with chronic hepatitis C. Twenty-five of 48 (52%) patients studied were positive for both CYP2D6 and LC1 autoantibodies. Anti-LC1, either as the only marker or associated with anti-LKM1, was positive in 34/48 (71%). By Western blotting, anti-LC1 was found in 27/48 (56%) patients. This ELISA technique has proven to be antigen-specific and more sensitive than Western blot for the detection of anti-LC1 and anti-LKM1 autoantibodies. The prevalence of anti-LC1 (71%) confirms it as an important immunomarker in type 2 AIH.

  3. Antibodies against human cytochrome P-450db1 in autoimmune hepatitis type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanger, U M; Hauri, H P; Loeper, J; Homberg, J C; Meyer, U A

    1988-11-01

    In a subgroup of children with chronic active hepatitis, circulating autoantibodies occur that bind to liver and kidney endoplasmic reticulum (anti-liver/kidney microsome antibody type I or anti-LKM1). Anti-LKM1 titers follow the severity of the disease and the presence of these antibodies serves as a diagnostic marker for this autoimmune hepatitis type II. We demonstrate that anti-LKM1 IgGs specifically inhibit the hydroxylation of bufuralol in human liver microsomes. Using two assay systems with different selectivity for the two cytochrome P-450 isozymes catalyzing bufuralol metabolism in human liver, we show that anti-LKM1 exclusively recognizes cytochrome P-450db1. Immunopurification of the LKM1 antigen from solubilized human liver microsomes resulted in an electrophoretically homogenous protein that had the same molecular mass (50 kDa) as purified P-450db1 and an identical N-terminal amino acid sequence. Recognition of both purified P-450db1 and the immunoisolated protein on western blots by several monoclonal antibodies confirmed the identity of the LKM1 antigen with cytochrome P-450db1. Cytochrome P-450db1 has been identified as the target of a common genetic polymorphism of drug oxidation. However, the relationship between the polymorphic cytochrome P-450db1 and the appearance of anti-LKM1 autoantibodies as well as their role in the pathogenesis of chronic active hepatitis remains speculative.

  4. Autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergani, D; Mieli-Vergani, G

    2004-06-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is characterised histologically by interface hepatitis, and serologically by the presence of non-organ and liver specific autoantibodies and increased levels of immunoglobulin G. Its onset is often ill-defined, frequently mimicing acute hepatitis. AIH usually responds to immunosuppressive treatment, which should be instituted as soon as diagnosis is made. Two types of AIH are recognized according to seropositivity for smooth muscle and/or antinuclear antibody (SMA/ANA, type 1 AIH) or liver kidney microsomal type 1 antibody (LKM1, type 2 AIH). There is a female predominance in both. LKM1 positive patients tend to present more acutely, at a younger age and commonly have immunoglobulin A deficiency, while duration of symptoms before diagnosis, clinical signs, family history of autoimmunity, presence of associated autoimmune disorders, response to treatment and long-term prognosis are similar in the 2 groups. Susceptibility to AIH type 1 is conferred by possession of HLA DR3 and DR4, while to AIH type 2 by possession of HLA DR7. Liver damage is likely to derive from an immune reaction to liver cell antigens, possibly triggered by a mechanism of molecular mimicry, where immune responses to external pathogens, e.g. viruses, become directed towards structurally similar self-components. In AIH this process would be perpetuated by impairment in immune regulation.

  5. Antibodies to filamentous actin (F-actin) in type 1 autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granito, A; Muratori, L; Muratori, P; Pappas, G; Guidi, M; Cassani, F; Volta, U; Ferri, A; Lenzi, M; Bianchi, F B

    2006-03-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic significance of anti-filamentous actin antibodies (A-FAA) assessed with a commercial ELISA in comparison with immunofluorescence reactivity and patterns of anti-smooth muscle antibodies (SMA); and to correlate A-FAA positivity with clinical, immunogenetic, laboratory, and histological features in patients with autoimmune hepatitis type 1 (AIH-1). We studied 78 consecutive untreated AIH-1 patients and 160 controls: 22 with autoimmune hepatitis type 2 (AIH-2), 51 with hepatitis C, 17 with coeliac disease (CD), 20 with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and 50 blood donors. SMA was evaluated by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) on frozen sections of rat tissues, and A-FAA with a modified commercial ELISA. SMA was detected by IIF in 61 (78%) of 78 AIH-1 patients, of whom 47 (60%) had the SMA-T/G and 14 (18%) the SMA-V pattern. Of the pathological controls, 32 (20%) had the SMA-V pattern (25 with hepatitis C, 2 with AIH-2, 2 with PBC, 3 with CD). A-FAA were present in 55 AIH-1 patients (70.5%; 46 with SMA-T/G, 7 with SMA-V, and 2 SMA-negative), and in 10 controls (6%), of whom five had hepatitis C, two AIH-2, two PBC and one CD. The association between A-FAA and the SMA-T/G pattern was statistically significant (p<0.0001). A-FAA levels were higher in SMA-T/G positive than SMA-V positive AIH-1 patients and controls (p<0.0001). A-FAA positivity was significantly associated with higher gamma-globulin and IgG levels, but did not correlate with other considered parameters. The modified A-FAA ELISA strictly correlates with the SMA-T/G pattern and is a reliable and operator independent assay for AIH-1. Detection of A-FAA, even if devoid of prognostic relevance, may be useful when interpretative doubts of standard IIF arise.

  6. Antibodies to filamentous actin (F‐actin) in type 1 autoimmune hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granito, A; Muratori, L; Muratori, P; Pappas, G; Guidi, M; Cassani, F; Volta, U; Ferri, A; Lenzi, M; Bianchi, F B

    2006-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the diagnostic significance of anti‐filamentous actin antibodies (A‐FAA) assessed with a commercial ELISA in comparison with immunofluorescence reactivity and patterns of anti‐smooth muscle antibodies (SMA); and to correlate A‐FAA positivity with clinical, immunogenetic, laboratory, and histological features in patients with autoimmune hepatitis type 1 (AIH‐1). Methods We studied 78 consecutive untreated AIH‐1 patients and 160 controls: 22 with autoimmune hepatitis type 2 (AIH‐2), 51 with hepatitis C, 17 with coeliac disease (CD), 20 with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and 50 blood donors. SMA was evaluated by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) on frozen sections of rat tissues, and A‐FAA with a modified commercial ELISA. Results SMA was detected by IIF in 61 (78%) of 78 AIH‐1 patients, of whom 47 (60%) had the SMA‐T/G and 14 (18%) the SMA‐V pattern. Of the pathological controls, 32 (20%) had the SMA‐V pattern (25 with hepatitis C, 2 with AIH‐2, 2 with PBC, 3 with CD). A‐FAA were present in 55 AIH‐1 patients (70.5%; 46 with SMA‐T/G, 7 with SMA‐V, and 2 SMA‐negative), and in 10 controls (6%), of whom five had hepatitis C, two AIH‐2, two PBC and one CD. The association between A‐FAA and the SMA‐T/G pattern was statistically significant (p<0.0001). A‐FAA levels were higher in SMA‐T/G positive than SMA‐V positive AIH‐1 patients and controls (p<0.0001). A‐FAA positivity was significantly associated with higher γ‐globulin and IgG levels, but did not correlate with other considered parameters. Conclusion The modified A‐FAA ELISA strictly correlates with the SMA‐T/G pattern and is a reliable and operator independent assay for AIH‐1. Detection of A‐FAA, even if devoid of prognostic relevance, may be useful when interpretative doubts of standard IIF arise. PMID:16505279

  7. A rare association of localized scleroderma type morphea, vitiligo, autoimmune hypothyroidism, pneumonitis, autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura and central nervous system vasculitis. Case report.

    OpenAIRE

    Bonilla Abadía, Fabio; Muñoz Buitrón, Evelyn; Ochoa, Carlos D.; Carrascal, Edwin; Cañas Dávila, Carlos Alberto

    2012-01-01

    The localized scleroderma (LS) known as morphea, presents a variety of clinical manifestations that can include systemic involvement. Current classification schemes divide morphea into categories based solely on cutaneous morphology, without reference to systemic disease or autoimmune phenomena. This classification is likely incomplete. Autoimmune phenomena such as vitiligo and Hashimoto thyroiditis associated with LS have been reported in some cases suggesting an autoimmune basis. To our kno...

  8. A rare association of localized scleroderma type morphea, vitiligo, autoimmune hypothyroidism, pneumonitis, autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura and central nervous system vasculitis. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla-Abadía, Fabio; Muñoz-Buitrón, Evelyn; Ochoa, Carlos D; Carrascal, Edwin; Cañas, Carlos A

    2012-12-20

    The localized scleroderma (LS) known as morphea, presents a variety of clinical manifestations that can include systemic involvement. Current classification schemes divide morphea into categories based solely on cutaneous morphology, without reference to systemic disease or autoimmune phenomena. This classification is likely incomplete. Autoimmune phenomena such as vitiligo and Hashimoto thyroiditis associated with LS have been reported in some cases suggesting an autoimmune basis. To our knowledge this is the first case of a morphea forming part of a multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS) and presenting simultaneously with autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura and central nervous system vasculitis. We report an uncommon case of a white 53 year old female patient with LS as part of a multiple autoimmune syndrome associated with pneumonitis, autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura and central nervous system vasculitis presenting a favorable response with thrombopoietin receptor agonists, pulses of methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide. Is likely that LS have an autoimmune origin and in this case becomes part of MAS, which consist on the presence of three or more well-defined autoimmune diseases in a single patient.

  9. A rare association of localized scleroderma type morphea, vitiligo, autoimmune hypothyroidism, pneumonitis, autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura and central nervous system vasculitis. Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonilla-Abadía Fabio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The localized scleroderma (LS known as morphea, presents a variety of clinical manifestations that can include systemic involvement. Current classification schemes divide morphea into categories based solely on cutaneous morphology, without reference to systemic disease or autoimmune phenomena. This classification is likely incomplete. Autoimmune phenomena such as vitiligo and Hashimoto thyroiditis associated with LS have been reported in some cases suggesting an autoimmune basis. To our knowledge this is the first case of a morphea forming part of a multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS and presenting simultaneously with autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura and central nervous system vasculitis. Case presentation We report an uncommon case of a white 53 year old female patient with LS as part of a multiple autoimmune syndrome associated with pneumonitis, autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura and central nervous system vasculitis presenting a favorable response with thrombopoietin receptor agonists, pulses of methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide. Conclusion Is likely that LS have an autoimmune origin and in this case becomes part of MAS, which consist on the presence of three or more well-defined autoimmune diseases in a single patient.

  10. Effects of Non-HLA Gene Polymorphisms on Development of Islet Autoimmunity and Type 1 Diabetes in a Population With High-Risk HLA-DR,DQ Genotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steck, Andrea K.; Wong, Randall; Wagner, Brandie; Johnson, Kelly; Liu, Edwin; Romanos, Jihane; Wijmenga, Cisca; Norris, Jill M.; Eisenbarth, George S.; Rewers, Marian J.

    We assessed the effects of non-HLA gene polymorphisms on the risk of islet autoimmunity (IA) and progression to type 1 diabetes in the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young. A total of 1,743 non-Hispanic, white children were included: 861 first-degree relatives and 882 general population children

  11. Autoimmune Polyendocrine Syndrome 3 Onset with Severe Ketoacidosis in a 74-Year-Old Woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Benedini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D, autoimmune thyroid disease, and autoimmune gastritis often occur together forming the so-called autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 3 (APS3. We here report a clinical case of a 74-year-old woman who presented for the first time with severe hyperglycemia and ketoacidosis diagnosed as T1D. Further clinical investigations revealed concomitant severe hypothyroidism with autoimmune thyroid disease and severe cobalamin deficiency due to chronic atrophic gastritis. The diagnosis of type 1 diabetes mellitus was confirmed by the detection of autoantibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, islet cell antibodies, and anti-insulin autoantibodies. Anti-thyroperoxidase, anti-thyroglobulin, and anti-gastric parietal cell antibodies were also clearly positive. The case emphasized that new onset diabetic ketoacidosis, hypothyroidism, and cobalamin deficiency may simultaneously occur, and one disease can mask the features of the other, thereby making diagnosis difficult. It is noteworthy that an APS3 acute episode occurred in an asymptomatic elder woman for any autoimmune diseases.

  12. Rate of positive autoimmune markers in Human T lymphotropic virus type 1 carriers: a case-control study from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi Ghezeldasht, Sanaz; Hedayati-Moghaddam, Mohammad Reza; Habibi, Meysam; Mollahosseini, Farzad; Rafatpanah, Houshang; Miri, Rahele; Hatef Fard, MohammadReza; Sahebari, Maryam

    2018-01-01

    Human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection with high prevalence in the north-east of Iran, particularly in Mashhad, can lead to adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) and a variety of autoimmune diseases. The aim of the study was to examine the presence of autoimmune markers in HTLV carries. Serum samples were obtained from blood donors in Mashhad, northeastern Iran. One hundred and five HTLV-1 positive (cases) and 104 age- and sex-matched HTLV-1 negative donors (controls) were assessed for presence of serum autoimmune markers by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The mean ages of cases and controls were 40.8 ± 9.4 and 41.5 ± 9.3 years, respectively (P = 0.5). In the case group, 81.9% and in the control group 83.7% were male (P = 0.74). The frequency of positive antinuclear antibodies and anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies in the serum of the two groups were not significantly different (P = 0.68 and P = 0.62, respectively). Only one antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-positive case (1%) was observed in the group and no anti-phospholipid immunoglobulin G positivity was observed. The frequency of rheumatoid factor (RF) was greater in case group than in the control group, although the difference was not significant (P = 0.08). The amount of RF in all 12 RF positive sera were higher than normal levels (33-37 IU/mL). Because we failed to detect any significant relation between serum autoimmune markers and HTLV-1 infection, and because of the relatively low prevalence of autoimmune diseases, it could be concluded that healthy HTLV-1 carriers do not produce rheumatologic-related auto-antibodies more than the healthy population. © 2017 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  13. Two different cytochrome P450 enzymes are the adrenal antigens in autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type I and Addison's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Winqvist, O; Gustafsson, J; Rorsman, F; Karlsson, F A; Kämpe, O

    1993-01-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type I (APS I) and idiopathic Addison's disease are both disorders with adrenal insufficiency but with differences in genetic background, clinical presentation, and extent of extraadrenal manifestations. In this study the major adrenal autoantigen identified with sera from patients with APS I was characterized by analyses using indirect immunofluorescence, Western blots of adrenal subcellular fractions and of recombinant proteins, immunoprecipitations of [35S...

  14. Difference in clinical presentation, immunology profile and treatment response of type 1 autoimmune hepatitis between United Kingdom and Singapore patients

    OpenAIRE

    Than, Nwe Ni; Ching, Doreen Koay Siew; Hodson, James; McDowell, Patrick; Mann, Jake; Gupta, Ravi; Salazar, Ennaliza; Ngu, Jing Hieng; Oo, Ye Htun

    2016-01-01

    Background Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is an immune-mediated liver disease of unknown etiology. Increasing incidence of AIH in Asian patients has been reported. However, the phenotypic difference of Asian patients in Europe and Asia has still not been explored. Aim To evaluate the clinical presentation, biochemical and immunological profiles, treatment response and survival outcome of type 1 AIH from two tertiary liver transplant centres (United Kingdom and Singapore). Method Patients who fulf...

  15. Autoimmune liver disease and therapy in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Homan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic immune-mediated disease of the liver. In childhood, autoimmune liver disorders include autoimmune hepatitis type I and II, autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis, Coombs-positive giant cell hepatitis, and de novo autoimmune hepatitis after liver transplantation. Autoimmune liver disease has a more aggressive course in children, especially autoimmune hepatitis type II. Standard therapy is a combination of corticosteroids and azathioprine. Around 80 % of children with autoimmune liver disease show a rapid response to combination therapy. The non-responders are treated with more potent drugs, otherwise autoimmune disease progresses to cirrhosis of the liver and the child needs liver transplantation as rescue therapy.

  16. A Case of Autoimmune Polyglandular Syndrome (APS) Type II with Hypothyroidism, Hypoadrenalism, and Celiac Disease - A Rare Combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhotia, Manoj; Pahadia, Hans Raj; Kumar, Harish; Singh, Jagdish; Tak, Sandeep

    2015-04-01

    Autoimmune Polyglandular syndrome (APS) are rare condition characterised by presence of immune dysfunction of two or more endocrine glands and other non-endocrine organs. APS is divided into 2 major subtypes based on age of presentation, pattern of disease combinations and mode of inheritance. APS 1(juvenile) usually manifest in early adolescence or in infancy. It is characterised by multiple endocrinal deficiency with mucocutaneous candidiasis and ectodermal dystrophy. Of the endocrine diseases, hypoparathyroidism form an important component followed by Addison's disease, type 1A diabetes, hypogonadism and thyroid disease. On the other hand APS II usually manifest in 3rd or 4th decade of life with female preponderance. Endocrine diseases commonly include autoimmune thyroid disease (graves or autoimmune thyroiditis), type 1A diabetes, and Addison's disease. Hypoparathyroidism is of rare occurrence and there is no mucocutaneous candidiasis. We report here a case of APS type II in a 29-year-old male who initially presented with hypothyroidism, which was soon followed by Addison's disease. The involvement of thyroid gland preceding the involvement of adrenal is of rare occurrence. The patient also had celiac disease which makes the combination further uncommon.

  17. Autoimmune hepatitis-specific antibodies against soluble liver antigen and liver cytosol type 1 in patients with chronic viral hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Rigopoulou, Eirini I; Mytilinaiou, Maria; Romanidou, Ourania; Liaskos, Christos; Dalekos, George N

    2007-01-01

    Background Non-organ specific autoantibodies are highly prevalent in patients with chronic hepatitis C (HCV). Among them, anti-liver kidney microsomal type 1 (LKM1) antibody – the serological marker of type 2 autoimmune hepatitis (AIH-2)- is detected in up to 11% of the HCV-infected subjects. On the other hand, anti-liver cytosol type 1 antibodies (anti-LC1) – either in association with anti-LKM1, or in isolation- and anti-soluble liver antigen antibodies (anti-SLA) have been considered as us...

  18. Bioinformatics analysis of the factors controlling type I IFN gene expression in autoimmune disease and virus-induced immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di eFeng

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and Sjögren's syndrome (SS display increased levels of type I IFN-induced genes. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDCs are natural interferon producing cells and considered to be a primary source of IFN-α in these two diseases. Differential expression patterns of type I IFN inducible transcripts can be found in different immune cell subsets and in patients with both active and inactive autoimmune disease. A type I IFN gene signature generally consists of three groups of IFN-induced genes - those regulated in response to virus-induced type I IFN, those regulated by the IFN-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK pathway, and those by the IFN-induced phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI-3K pathway. These three groups of type I IFN-regulated genes control important cellular processes such as apoptosis, survival, adhesion, and chemotaxis, that when dysregulated, contribute to autoimmunity. With the recent generation of large datasets in the public domain from next-generation sequencing and DNA microarray experiments, one can perform detailed analyses of cell type-specific gene signatures as well as identify distinct transcription factors that differentially regulate these gene signatures. We have performed bioinformatics analysis of data in the public domain and experimental data from our lab to gain insight into the regulation of type I IFN gene expression. We have found that the genetic landscape of the IFNA and IFNB genes are occupied by transcription factors, such as insulators CTCF and cohesin, that negatively regulate transcription, as well as IRF5 and IRF7, that positively and distinctly regulate IFNA subtypes. A detailed understanding of the factors controlling type I IFN gene transcription will significantly aid in the identification and development of new therapeutic strategies targeting the IFN pathway in autoimmune disease.

  19. Clinical features of type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis: an analysis of 13 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MO Xue

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the clinical features of type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP, and to deepen the understanding of this disease, reduce false positive rate, and enhance people′s awareness of this disease. MethodsA retrospective analysis was performed for the clinical data of 13 patients with type 1 AIP who were admitted to The First Hospital of Jilin University from January 2012 to December 2016, including general status, clinical manifestations, laboratory serological examination, imaging findings, histopathological findings, treatment, and prognosis. ResultsOf all 13 patients, there were 9 male and 4 female patients with a mean age of 60.08±9.47 years. Major clinical manifestations included jaundice (69.2%, abdominal pain (61.5%, and weight loss (61.5%. The most common organ involved was bile duct (462%, and 30.8% of the patients had sclerosing cholangitis. Of all patients, 23.1% had diabetes. As for serological markers, 92.30% patients had more than 2 times increase in IgG4, and 7.69% had 1-2 times increase in IgG4, 53.85% patients had an increase in CA19-9, 69.23% patients had an increase in total bilirubin, more than two thirds of the patients had an increase in aminotransferases or gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase. As for imaging findings, 53.8% patients had diffuse enlargement of the pancreas on CT, 46.2% had focal enlargement of the pancreas, and 46.2% patients had low-density cyst-like shadow in pancreatic lesions. Pathological examination showed fibrous connective tissue proliferation with infiltration of lymphocytes and plasma cells. All patients were given standard glucocorticoid therapy (initial dose of prednisone: 30-40 mg/d and the remission rate of glucocorticoid therapy was 100%. The follow-up time was 12 months, and one patient experienced multiple recurrences in the course of the disease. ConclusionType 1 AIP is the local manifestation of IgG4-associated disease in the pancreas, which often occurs in middle-aged and

  20. [Myasthenia gravis, Graves-Basedow disease and other autoimmune diseases in patient with diabetes type 1 - APS-3 case report, therapeutic complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenczar, Karolina; Deja, Grażyna; Kalina-Faska, Barbara; Jarosz-Chobot, Przemysława

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes type 1(T1D) is the most frequent form of diabetes in children and young people, which essence is autoimmune destruction of pancreatic B cells islet. Co-occurrence of other autoimmune diseases is observed in children with T1D, the most often are: Hashimoto disease or coeliac disease. We report the case of the patient, who presents coincidence of T1D with other rare autoimmune diseases such as: Graves - Basedow disease, myasthenia gravis, vitiligo and IgA deficiency. All mentioned diseases significantly complicated both endocrine and diabetic treatment of our patient and they negatively contributed her quality of life. The clinical picture of the case allows to recognize one of the autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes: APS-3 and is associated with still high risk of developing another autoimmune disease. © Polish Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology.

  1. Meta-analysis of STAT4 and IFIH1 polymorphisms in type 1 diabetes mellitus patients with autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Azevêdo Silva, J; Tavares, N A C; Santos, M M S; Moura, R; Guimarães, R L; Araújo, J; Crovella, S; Brandão, L A C

    2015-12-22

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is an organ-specific autoimmune disease characterized by T-cell mediated self-destruction of insulin-producing β cells in the pancreas. T1D patients are prone to develop other glandular autoimmune disorders, such as autoimmune thyroid disease that occurs simultaneously with autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type III (APSIII). Signal transducer and activator of transcription 4 (STAT4) is a well-known regulator of proinflammatory cytokines, and interferon-induced with helicase C domain 1 (IFIH1) is activated in the interferon type I response. Both genes have been examined separately in autoimmune diseases and, in this study, we assessed their joint role in T1D and APSIII. We conducted a case-control study, enrolling 173 T1D patients and 191 healthy controls from northeastern Brazil, to assess the distribution of the rs7574865 and rs3024839 SNPs in STAT4 and the rs3747517 and rs1990760 SNPs in IFIH1 in T1D and APSIII patients. Additionally, we conducted a meta-analysis with the rs7574865 SNP in STAT4 (1392 T1D patients and 1629 controls) and the rs1990760 SNP in IFIH1 (25092 T1D patients and 28544 controls) to examine their association with T1D. Distribution of STAT4 and IFIH1 allelic frequencies did not show statistically significant differences between T1D patients and controls in our study population; however, the meta-analysis indicated that SNPs in STAT4 and IFIH1 are associated with T1D worldwide. Our findings indicate that although STAT4 and IFIH1 SNPs are not associated with T1D in a Brazilian population, they might play a role in susceptibility to T1D on a larger worldwide scale.

  2. Insulin resistance is associated with larger thyroid volume in adults with type 1 diabetes independently from presence of thyroid autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogowicz-Frontczak, Anita; Pilacinski, Stanislaw; Chwialkowska, Anna Teresa; Naskret, Dariusz; Zozulinska-Ziolkiewicz, Dorota

    2018-04-19

    To investigate the effect of insulin resistance (IR) on thyroid function, thyroid autoimmunity (AIT) and thyroid volume in type 1 diabetes (T1DM). 100 consecutive patients with T1DM aged 29 (±6) years with diabetes duration 13 (±6) years were included. Exclusion criteria were: history of thyroid disease, current treatment with L-thyroxin or anti-thyroid drugs. Evaluation of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroid hormones and anti-thyroid antibodies was performed. Thyroid volume was measured by ultrasonography. IR was assessed using the estimated glucose disposal rate (eGDR) formula. In the study group 22% of subjects had insulin resistance defined as eGDR lower or equal to 7.5 mg/kg/min. The prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity (positivity for ATPO or ATg or TRAb) in the study group was 37%. There were no significant differences in the concentration of TSH, FT3, FT4, the prevalence of AIT and hypothyroidism between IR and insulin sensitive (IS) group. Mean (±SD) thyroid volume was 15.6 (±6.2) mL in patients with IR and 11.7 (±4.7) mL in IS subjects (p = .002). Thyroid volume correlated inversely with eGDR (r = -0.35, p < .001). In a multivariate linear regression model the association between thyroid volume and eGDR was independent of sex, age, duration of diabetes, daily insulin dose, BMI, cigarette smoking, TSH value and presence of thyroid autoimmunity (beta: -0.29, p = .012). Insulin resisance is associated with larger thyroid volume in patients with type 1 diabetes independently of sex, body mass index, TSH value and presence of autoimmune thyroid disease.

  3. A coding polymorphism in NALP1 confers risk for autoimmune Addison's disease and type 1 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magitta, N. F.; Wolff, A. S. Boe; Johansson, S.; Skinningsrud, B.; Lie, B. A.; Myhr, K-M; Undlien, D. E.; Joner, G.; Njolstad, P. R.; Kvien, T. K.; Forre, O.; Knappskog, P. M.; Husebye, E. S.

    Variants in the gene encoding NACHT leucine-rich-repeat protein 1 (NALP1), an important molecule in innate immunity, have recently been shown to confer risk for vitiligo and associated autoimmunity. We hypothesized that sequence variants in this gene may be involved in susceptibility to a wider

  4. Deep vein thrombosis, an unreported first manifestation of polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Horsey

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A 71-year-old woman with severe right lower leg pain, edema and erythema was presented to the Emergency Department and was found to have an extensive deep vein thrombosis (DVT confirmed by ultrasound. She underwent an extensive evaluation due to her prior history of malignancy and new hypercoagulable state, but no evidence of recurrent disease was detected. Further investigation revealed pernicious anemia (PA, confirmed by the presence of a macrocytic anemia (MCV=115.8fL/red cell, Hgb=9.0g/dL, decreased serum B12 levels (56pg/mL, with resultant increased methylmalonic acid (5303nmol/L and hyperhomocysteinemia (131μmol/L, the presumed etiology of the DVT. The patient also suffered from autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD, and both antithyroglobulin and anti-intrinsic factor antibodies were detected. She responded briskly to anticoagulation with heparin and coumadin and treatment of PA with intramuscular vitamin B12 injections. Our case suggests that a DVT secondary to hyperhomocystenemia may represent the first sign of polyglandular autoimmune syndrome III-B (PAS III-B, defined as the coexistent autoimmune conditions AITD and PA. It is important to recognize this clinical entity, as patients may not only require acute treatment with vitamin B12 supplementation and prolonged anticoagulation, as in this patient, but may also harbor other autoimmune diseases.

  5. [Autoimmune hepatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Färkkilä, Martti

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is chronic liver disease with two subtypes, type 1 with anti nuclear or smooth muscle antibodies and type 2 with LKM1 or LC1 antibodies, and both with hypergammaglobulinemia and typical histology. Prevalence of AIH is between 10 to 17 per 100000 in Europe. Up to 20-40 % of cases present with acute hepatitis. Budesonide can be used as a first line induction therapy in non-cirrhotic patients, and tiopurines, mercaptopurine or mycophenolic acid as maintenance therapies. Patients not responding to conventional therapy can be treated with ciclosporin, tacrolimus or rituximab or finally with liver transplantation.

  6. Immediate Oral Rehabilitation of Atrophic Mandible

    OpenAIRE

    Batista Mendes GC; Padovan LEM; da Silva WS; Ribeiro-Junior PD

    2016-01-01

    The oral rehabilitation using osseointegrated implants in atrophic mandibles (AM) with severe bone resorption remains a surgical and prosthetic challenge, due to the risk of mandible fracture during implant surgery or under functional loading, paresthesia and pain. A patient with severe atrophic mandible was treated using a 2.0 locking system reconstruction plate combined with dental implants, in immediate loading system. Surgery was performed through intraoral approach and preserving mental ...

  7. T Cell-Mediated Beta Cell Destruction: Autoimmunity and Alloimmunity in the Context of Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam L. Burrack

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes (T1D results from destruction of pancreatic beta cells by T cells of the immune system. Despite improvements in insulin analogs and continuous blood glucose level monitoring, there is no cure for T1D, and some individuals develop life-threatening complications. Pancreas and islet transplantation have been attractive therapeutic approaches; however, transplants containing insulin-producing cells are vulnerable to both recurrent autoimmunity and conventional allograft rejection. Current immune suppression treatments subdue the immune system, but not without complications. Ideally a successful approach would target only the destructive immune cells and leave the remaining immune system intact to fight foreign pathogens. This review discusses the autoimmune diabetes disease process, diabetic complications that warrant a transplant, and alloimmunity. First, we describe the current understanding of autoimmune destruction of beta cells including the roles of CD4 and CD8 T cells and several possibilities for antigen-specific tolerance induction. Second, we outline diabetic complications necessitating beta cell replacement. Third, we discuss transplant recognition, potential sources for beta cell replacement, and tolerance-promoting therapies under development. We hypothesize that a better understanding of autoreactive T cell targets during disease pathogenesis and alloimmunity following transplant destruction could enhance attempts to re-establish tolerance to beta cells.

  8. The role of dendritic cell subsets and innate immunity in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes and other autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey D. Price

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are key antigen presenting cells that have an important role in autoimmune pathogenesis. DCs control both steady-state T cell tolerance and activation of pathogenic responses. The balance between these two outcomes depends on several factors, including genetic susceptibility, environmental signals that stimulate varied innate responses, and which DC subset is presenting antigen. Although the specific DC phenotype can diverge depending on the tissue location and context, there are 4 main subsets identified in both mouse and human: conventional cDC1 and cDC2, plasmacytoid DCs, and monocyte-derived DCs. In this review, we will discuss the role of these subsets in autoimmune pathogenesis and regulation, as well as the genetic and environmental signals that influence their function. Specific topics to be addressed include: impact of susceptibility loci on DC subsets, alterations in DC subset development, the role of infection- and host-derived innate inflammatory signals, and the role of the intestinal microbiota on DC phenotype. The effects of these various signals on disease progression and the relative effects of DC subset composition and maturation level of DCs will be examined. These areas will be explored using examples from several autoimmune diseases but will focus mainly on type 1 diabetes.

  9. Serum adiposity-induced biomarkers in obese and lean children with recently diagnosed autoimmune type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, M J; Rodriguez, L M; Haymond, M W; Hampe, C S; Smith, E O; Balasubramanyam, A; Devaraj, S

    2014-12-01

    Obesity increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetic complications in type 1 diabetes. Adipokines, which regulate obesity-induced inflammation, may contribute to this association. We compared serum adipokines and inflammatory cytokines in obese and lean children with new-onset autoimmune type 1 diabetes. We prospectively studied 32 lean and 18 obese children (age range: 2-18 yr) with new-onset autoimmune type 1 diabetes and followed them for up to 2 yr. Serum adipokines [leptin, total and high molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin, omentin, resistin, chemerin, visfatin], cytokines [interferon (IFN)-gamma, interleukin (IL)-10, IL-12, IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha] and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured at a median of 7 wk after diagnosis (range: 3-16 wk). Lean children were 71.9% non-Hispanic White, 21.9% Hispanic, and 6.3% African-American, compared with 27.8, 55.6, and 16.7%, respectively, for obese children (p = 0.01). Compared with lean children, obese children had significantly higher serum leptin, visfatin, chemerin, TNF-alpha and CRP, and lower total adiponectin and omentin after adjustment for race/ethnicity and Tanner stage. African-American race was independently associated with higher leptin among youth ≥10 yr (p = 0.007). Leptin levels at onset positively correlated with hemoglobin A1c after 1-2 yr (p = 0.0001) independently of body mass index, race/ethnicity, and diabetes duration. Higher TNF-alpha was associated with obesity and female gender, after adjustment for race/ethnicity (p = 0.0003). Obese children with new-onset autoimmune type 1 diabetes have a proinflammatory profile of circulating adipokines and cytokines that may contribute to the development of cardiovascular disease and diabetic complications. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. [Prevalence of autoimmune diseases and microangiopathy in children with diabetes type 1 over the years 2000-2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Głowińska-Olszewska, Barbara; Ordowska, Urszula; Golonko, Magdalena; Tobiaszewska, Monika; Florys, Bożena; Jabłońska, Jolanta; Otocka, Agnieszka; Łuczyński, Włodzimierz; Zasim, Aneta; Jakubowska, Ewa; Michalak, Justyna; Bossowski, Artur

    2013-01-01

    In the past decade the number of patients with type 1 diabetes treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) has increased rapidly. Treatment of the disease is focused on proper physical development and the prevention of complications. Aim of the study was to analyze changes in the treatment and clinical picture of type 1 diabetes in children over the years 2000 to 2010 with particular emphasis on the presence of autoimmune diseases and microangiopathy. The study included 567 children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes under the care of outpatient diabetes clinic. We compared 251 children, diabetes outpatient clinic patients in 2000, with 316 children in 2010. Data were obtained from the outpatient and hospital records. We compared baseline demographic, anthropometric data, treatment regimen, type of insulin, metabolic control, prevalence of autoimmune diseases and microangipathy. In 2010 there was a reduction in the age of diagnosis of diabetes from 10 to 8 years (p=0.039). Significantly increased the proportion of children treated with CSII (up to 60.1%) and decreased the percentage of children using conventional insulin for the benefit of insulin analogs. The increase in HbA1c from 7.4 to 8.0% (p7.5% in 2010. The percentage of children with obesity increased from 5.2 to 13.7% (p=0.004) and there was a significant increase in SDS-BMI. The percentage of children with autoimmune diseases such as celiac (from 0,4 to 7,3%, p<0,001) and thyroid (from 6.9 to 21.3%, p<0.001) has increased. The incidence of retinopathy decreased from 6 to 1% (p=0.04), and albuminuria decreased insignificantly. Over the last decade, a significant change in the method of treatment in children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes has occurred. The deterioration of metabolic control, despite the frequent use in the treatment of CSII, may be due to increased frequency of obesity and additional autoimmune diseases in today´s patients. More similar to physiologic way of insulin infusion

  11. Erythema elevatum et diutinum in a young man coexisting with autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 – case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Tupikowska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Erythema elevatum et diutinum (EED is classified as a variant of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. The etiology of this disease is unknown. Erythema elevatum et diutinum may coexist with several systemic disorders including hematologic and rheumatologic diseases as well as type 1 diabetes, thyroid diseases and other endocrinopathies. Autoimmune polyglandular syndromes (APS are rarely diagnosed conditions characterized by the coexistence of at least two autoimmune endocrinopathies and non-endocrine autoimmunopathies. Objective. Presentation of a patient with EED coexisting with APS type 3. Case report. A 23-year-old male patient was admitted to our department due to nodular lesions lasting for 5 months, located on the extremities, which were diagnosed clinically and confirmed histopathologically as EED. In spite of skin lesions the patient suffered from diabetes mellitus type 1, hyperthyroidism, celiac disease, myopathy and idiopathic urticaria – abnormalities characteristic for APS type 3. Substantial clinical improvement was observed after systemic administration of dapsone and, due to upper respiratory tract infection, a few weeks of antibiotic therapy. Conclusions . We present this case due to the rarity of EED, especially coexisting with APS, and the good effect of therapy with dapsone and oral antibiotics.

  12. Thyrotropin-secreting pituitary adenoma in an 11-year-old boy with type 1 autoimmune polyglandular syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazerkina, Nadia; Trunin, Yuri; Gorelyshev, Sergey; Golanov, Andrey; Kadashev, Boris; Shishkina, Liudmila; Rotin, Daniil; Karmanov, Maxim; Orlova, Elizabet

    2016-02-01

    Thyrotropinomas (TSHomas) are rare pituitary adenomas, particularly in childhood. We present here the case of an 11-year-old boy with type 1 autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS1) and TSHoma which was diagnosed by elevated thyroid - stimulating hormone and thyroid hormones levels without evident clinical signs of hyperthyroidism. He was underwent partial resection of the tumor via transsphenoidal approach and subsequently radiation therapy. Consequently, 1 year after radiotherapy, the patient developed growth hormone deficiency, three and half years after radiation became euthyroid, and five and half years after treatment - hypothyroid. This is the first case of the coexistence of these two rare endocrine diseases in one patient.

  13. AUTOIMMUNE HEPATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusri Dianne Jurnalis

    2010-05-01

    ; Aetiopathogenesis; Lymphocyte disease; Cellular immune attack; Histocompatibility lymphocyte antigen, Immunosuppressive therapy, Cyclosporine, transplantasi hatiAbstractAutoimmune hepatitis is a severe and inflammatory disease of the liver of unknown etiology carrying high morbidity and mortality. All ages and genders are concerned with a peak of incidence in girls in prepubertal age, even if the diseaseTINJAUAN PUSTAKA2has been diagnosed as early as 6 months. Autoimmune hepatitis may be classified in two major subgroups on a presence of a specific set of autoantibodies: smooth muscle antibody (SMA mostly with anti-actin specificity and/or by antinuclear antibody (ANA in type 1 and liver-kidney microsome antibody (LKM1 and/or the anti-liver cytosol in type 2. The histological hallmark is “interface hepatitis”, with a mononuclear cell infiltrate in the portal tracts, variable degrees of necrosis, and progressive fibrosis. The disease follows a chronic but fluctuating course usually progressing to cirrhosis and liver failure.The most frequent type onset is similar to that of an acute viral hepatitis with acute liver failure in some patients; about a third of patients have an insidious onset with progressive fatigue and jaundice while 10-15% are asymptomatic and are accidentally discovered by the finding of hepatomegaly and/or an increase of serum aminotransferase activity. There is a female predominance in both. LKM1-positive patients tend to present more acutely, at a younger age, and commonly have immunoglobulin A (IgA deficiency, while duration of symptoms before diagnosis, clinical signs, family history of autoimmunity, presence of associated autoimmune disorders, response to treatment and long-term prognosis are similar in both groups.Corticosteroids alone or in conjunction with azathioprine are the treatment of choice inducing remission in over 90% of patients. An alternative therapeutic strategy is cyclosporine. Withdrawal of immunosuppression is associated with high risk

  14. Liver cytosolic 1 antigen-antibody system in type 2 autoimmune hepatitis and hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzi, M; Manotti, P; Muratori, L; Cataleta, M; Ballardini, G; Cassani, F; Bianchi, F B

    1995-01-01

    Within the multiform liver/kidney microsomal (LKM) family, a subgroup of sera that reacts with a liver cytosolic (LC) protein has been isolated and the new antigen-antibody system is called LC1. Unlike LKM antibody type 1 (anti-LKM1), anti-LC1 is said to be unrelated to hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and has therefore been proposed as a marker of 'true' autoimmune hepatitis type 2. Altogether 100 LKM1 positive sera were tested by immunodiffusion (ID). Twenty five gave a precipitation line with human liver cytosol; 17 of the 25 also reacted with rat liver cytosol. Thirteen of the 25 sera were anti-HCV positive by second generation ELISA: anti-HCV positive patients were significantly older (p LKM1, and that it is an additional marker of juvenile autoimmune hepatitis type 2. It does not, however, discriminate between patients with and without HCV infection. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7797126

  15. Thyroid autoimmunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersinga, Wilmar M.

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) is a multifactorial disease in which autoimmunity against thyroid antigens develops against a particular genetic background facilitated by exposure to environmental factors. Immunogenicity of the major thyroid antigens thyroid peroxidase, thyroglobulin (TG) and

  16. Clinical characteristics of non-obese children with type 2 diabetes mellitus without involvement of β-cell autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urakami, Tatsuhiko; Kuwabara, Remi; Habu, Masako; Okuno, Misako; Suzuki, Junichi; Takahashi, Shori; Mugishima, Hideo

    2013-02-01

    We examined the clinical characteristics of non-obese Japanese children with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) not associated with β-cell autoimmunity. Of 218 children who were diagnosed as having T2DM by a school urine glucose screening program in Tokyo, 24 were identified as being non-obese and were enrolled in this study. None of the children had any evidence of β-cell autoimmunity or genetic disorders. The mean ages at diagnosis and at the study were 12.5 ± 1.7 and 22.4 ± 5.7 years, respectively. Females were predominant (M/F ratio: 4/20). Family history of T2DM, mostly of the non-obese type, was present in 62.5% of the cases. In regard to the birth weight, 20.8% had a history of low birth weight, and 8.3% were large for gestational age. The mean fasting insulin level, HOMA-R, HOMA-β, and an insulinogenic index on the OGTT at the time of diagnosis were 11.8 ± 7.8 μU/ml, 5.4 ± 3.8, 96.1 ± 55.0 and 0.16 ± 0.14, respectively. Most patients were treated by either oral hypoglycemic drug (45.8%) or insulin (50.0%) therapy at the study, with the mean interval to the start of pharmacological treatment of 3.1 ± 2.3 years. Non-obese children with T2DM seemed to show lower insulin secretory capacities with mild, but evident, insulin resistance even from the time of diagnosis, and also earlier requirement of pharmacological therapies during the clinical course. Some genetic factors not associated with autoimmunity may play a role in the etiology of T2DM in non-obese children. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Key metalloproteinases are expressed by specific cell types in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft-Hansen, Henrik; Nuttall, Robert K; Edwards, Dylan R

    2004-01-01

    animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We used real-time RT-PCR to profile the expression of all 22 known mouse MMPs, seven ADAMs, and all four known TIMPs in spinal cord from SJL/J mice and mice with adoptively transferred myelin basic protein (MBP)-specific EAE. A significant...... cellular sources of these strongly affected proteins in the inflamed CNS, we isolated macrophages, granulocytes, microglia, and T cells by cell sorting from the CNS of mice with EAE and analyzed their expression by real-time RT-PCR. This identified macrophages as a major source of MMP-12 and TIMP-1...

  18. Chinese herbal decoction as a complementary therapy for atrophic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... in the treatment of atrophic gastritis (AG) in China and other Far Eastern countries. ... However, the H. pylori eradication effect of CHD was not supported by the ... Keywords: atrophic gastritis; Helicobacter pylori; Chinese herbal decoction; ...

  19. Update in endocrine autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark S

    2008-10-01

    The endocrine system is a common target in pathogenic autoimmune responses, and there has been recent progress in our understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of autoimmune endocrine diseases. Rapid progress has recently been made in our understanding of the genetic factors involved in endocrine autoimmune diseases. Studies on monogenic autoimmune diseases that include endocrine phenotypes like autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 and immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked have helped reveal the role of key regulators in the maintenance of immune tolerance. Highly powered genetic studies have found and confirmed many new genes outside of the established role of the human leukocyte antigen locus with these diseases, and indicate an essential role of immune response pathways in these diseases. Progress has also been made in identifying new autoantigens and the development of new animal models for the study of endocrine autoimmunity. Finally, although hormone replacement therapy is still likely to be a mainstay of treatment in these disorders, there are new agents being tested for potentially treating and reversing the underlying autoimmune process. Although autoimmune endocrine disorders are complex in etiology, these recent advances should help contribute to improved outcomes for patients with, or at risk for, these disorders.

  20. Severe hypoglycaemia in a person with insulin autoimmune syndrome accompanied by insulin receptor anomaly type B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, T; Itoh, M; Hanashita, J; Itoi, T; Matsumoto, T; Ono, Y; Imamura, S; Hayakawa, N; Suzuki, A; Mizutani, Y; Uchigata, Y; Oda, N

    2007-11-01

    A rare case of the insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS) accompanied by insulin receptor anomaly is reported. Antibodies to insulin and insulin receptor were determined in the patient with severe hypoglycaemia before and after the treatment with prednisolone. Titers of antibody to insulin and insulin receptors were 73.0% and 41.5%, respectively. Drug-induced lymphocyte stimulation tests were all negative for the suspicious drugs. Her HLA-DR was DRB1*0403/04051. Following steroid therapy, the formation of antibodies was suppressed and alleviated her symptoms. Scatchard analysis yielded findings specific to polyclonal antibodies. The changes in autoantibodies resulted in alleviation of the hypoglycemic symptoms as a result of steroid therapy.

  1. IL-8 Expression in Granulocytic Epithelial Lesions of Idiopathic Duct-centric Pancreatitis (Type 2 Autoimmune Pancreatitis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Yuna; Hong, Seung-Mo; Fujikura, Kohei; Kim, Sung Joo; Akita, Masayuki; Abe-Suzuki, Shiho; Shiomi, Hideyuki; Masuda, Atsuhiro; Itoh, Tomoo; Azuma, Takeshi; Kim, Myung-Hwan; Zen, Yoh

    2017-08-01

    Type 2 autoimmune pancreatitis (type 2 AIP) develops in isolation or sometimes in association with ulcerative colitis. Its diagnosis requires the histologic confirmation of granulocytic epithelial lesions (GELs) with no diagnostic biomarker currently available. This study aimed to elucidate the tissue expression of cytokines and their diagnostic value in this condition. In quantitative polymerase chain reaction for multiple cytokines using tissue-derived mRNA, the expression level of interleukin (IL)-8 was markedly higher in type 2 AIP than in type 1 AIP (Ppancreatitis adjacent to pancreatic cancers (peritumoral pancreatitis) exhibited IL-8 expression in the epithelium (3/12; 25%) and inflammatory cells (10/12; 83%), expression levels were significantly lower than those in type 2 AIP (Ppancreatitis with 92% sensitivity and 92% to 100% specificity. Furthermore, CD3/IL-8-coexpressing lymphocytes were almost restricted to type 2 AIP. Interestingly, a similar pattern of IL-8 expression was also observed in colonic biopsies of ulcerative colitis. In conclusion, the overexpression of IL-8 may underlie the development of GELs in type 2 AIP, and IL-8 immunostaining or IL-8/CD3 double staining may become an ancillary method for its diagnosis. The similar expression pattern of IL-8 in ulcerative colitis also suggests a pathogenetic link between the 2 conditions.

  2. Nonsegmental Vitiligo and Autoimmune Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Oiso

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonsegmental vitiligo is a depigmented skin disorder showing acquired, progressive, and depigmented lesions of the skin, mucosa, and hair. It is believed to be caused mainly by the autoimmune loss of melanocytes from the involved areas. It is frequently associated with other autoimmune diseases, particularly autoimmune thyroid diseases including Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Graves' disease, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, psoriasis, pernicious anemia, systemic lupus erythematosus, Addison's disease, and alopecia areata. This indicates the presence of genetically determined susceptibility to not only vitiligo but also to other autoimmune disorders. Here, we summarize current understanding of autoimmune pathogenesis in non-segmental vitiligo.

  3. Autoantibodies in Autoimmune Hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Luigi; Deleonardi, Gaia; Lalanne, Claudine; Barbato, Erica; Tovoli, Alessandra; Libra, Alessia; Lenzi, Marco; Cassani, Fabio; Muratori, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The detection of diagnostic autoantibodies such as antinuclear antibodies (ANA), anti-smooth muscle antibodies (SMA), anti-liver/kidney microsomal type 1 (anti-LKM1), anti-liver cytosol type 1 (anti-LC1) and anti-soluble liver antigen (anti-SLA) is historically associated with the diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis. When autoimmune hepatitis is suspected, the detection of one or any combination of diagnostic autoantibodies, by indirect immunofluorescence or immuno-enzymatic techniques with recombinant antigens, is a pivotal step to reach a diagnostic score of probable or definite autoimmune hepatitis. Diagnostic autoantibodies (ANA, SMA, anti-LKM1, anti-LC1, anti-SLA) are a cornerstone in the diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis. Other ancillary autoantibodies, associated with peculiar clinical correlations, appear to be assay-dependent and institution-specific, and validation studies are needed. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. A Case of Autoimmune Pancreatitis Presenting as a Deterioration in Glycaemic Control in a Patient with Pre-Existing Type 2 Diabetes

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Forde, H

    2017-05-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was first described in 1961 and accounts for 5-6% of cases of chronic pancreatitis, though the prevalence is increasing with increasing awareness of the disease1,2. There are two types of autoimmune pancreatitis with different clinical and pathological features. Type 1 AIP is an IgG4 related disease and tends to occur in elderly patients in the 7th decade, with a male preponderance3. Type 1 AIP is associated with other organ involvement and commonly affects the biliary system3. In contrast, Type 2 AIP occurs in patients in the 5th-6th decade of life and other organ involvement is uncommon3. Both types of AIP respond well to steroids with reported remission rates of 99% and 92% for Type 1 and Type 2 AIP respectively4.\\r\

  5. Atrophic pityriasis versicolor occurring in a patient with Sjögren's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinello, Elena; Piaserico, Stefano; Alaibac, Mauro

    2017-01-18

    Pityriasis versicolor is one of the most frequent epidermal mycotic infections in the world, but its atrophic variant is rarely described. The aetiology of the atrophy is still unknown, and two main hypotheses have been formulated, one suggesting a correlation with long-term use of topical steroids and the other a delayed type hypersensitivity to epicutaneous antigens derived from components of the fungus. Atrophic pityriasis versicolor is a benign disease, but needs to be distinguished from other more severe skin diseases manifesting with cutaneous atrophy. The diagnosis can be easily confirmed by direct microscopic observation of the scales soaked in 15% potassium hydroxide, which reveals the typical 'spaghetti and meatball' appearance, or by a skin biopsy in doubtful cases. Here, we describe a case of extensive atrophic pityriasis versicolor occurring in a woman affected by Sjögren's syndrome which completely resolved after topical antifungal treatment. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  6. A multifaceted imbalance of T cells with regulatory function characterizes type 1 autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Silvia; Longhi, Maria Serena; De Molo, Chiara; Lalanne, Claudine; Muratori, Paolo; Granito, Alessandro; Hussain, Munther J; Ma, Yun; Lenzi, Marco; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Bianchi, Francesco B; Vergani, Diego; Muratori, Luigi

    2010-09-01

    Immunotolerance is maintained by regulatory T cells (Tregs), including CD4(+)CD25(hi), CD8(+)CD28(-), gammadelta, and CD3(+)CD56(+) [natural killer T (NKT)] cells. CD4(+)CD25(hi) cells are impaired in children with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). Little is known about Tregs in adults with AIH. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency and function of Treg subsets in adult patients with AIH during periods of active disease and remission. Forty-seven AIH patients (16 with active disease and 31 in remission) and 28 healthy controls were studied. Flow cytometry was used to evaluate surface markers and function-related intracellular molecules in gammadelta, CD8(+)CD28(-), NKT, and CD4(+)CD25(hi) cells. CD4(+)CD25(hi) T cell function was determined by the ability to suppress proliferation and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) production by CD4(+)CD25(-) target cells. Liver forkhead box P3-positive (FOXP3(+)) cells were sought by immunohistochemistry. In AIH patients, particularly during active disease, CD4(+)CD25(hi) T cells were fewer, expressed lower levels of FOXP3, and were less effective at inhibiting target cell proliferation versus healthy controls. Moreover, although the numbers of CD8(+)CD28(-) T cells were similar in AIH patients and healthy controls, NKT cells were numerically reduced, especially during active disease, and produced lower quantities of the immunoregulatory cytokine interleukin-4 versus controls. In contrast, gammadelta T cells in AIH patients were more numerous versus healthy controls and had an inverted Vdelta1/Vdelta2 ratio and higher IFN-gamma and granzyme B production; the latter was correlated to biochemical indices of liver damage. There were few FOXP3(+) cells within the portal tract inflammatory infiltrate. Our data show that the defect in immunoregulation in adult AIH is complex, and gammadelta T cells are likely to be effectors of liver damage.

  7. Insulin autoantibodies: evidence of autoimmune disease among a group of Puerto Rican children with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González de Pijem, L; Nieves-Rivera, F

    2001-06-01

    Type 1 diabetes is a chronic disease caused by a cell-specific destruction of the insulin producing cells of the pancreas. Although Puerto Rico has the highest incidence of type 1 diabetes among Latin American countries, there is scanty data on the presence of antibodies against insulin producing cells. To this end, 20 children (8 males, 12 females), ages 1-15 years, admitted to the University Pediatric Hospital with type 1 diabetes de novo between November 2000 and April 2001 were prospectively studied to determine the presence of serum antibodies against Islet cells (ICA), glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD-65) and insulin autoantibodies (IAA). IAA was found to be present in 45% of the subjects with 85% of positive rate in subjects under age 5. GAD-65 was present in 66% and ICA was present in 23% of the subjects. We found evidence of autoimmunity against islet cell surface and intracellular components among a cohort of Puerto Rican children with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes. These findings compared favorably with reports from other ethnicities.

  8. A unique combination of autoimmune limbic encephalitis, type 1 diabetes, and Stiff person syndrome associated with GAD-65 antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Mohan Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies to GAD-65 have been implicated in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes , limbic encephalitis and Stiff person syndrome, however these diseases rarely occur concurrently. We intend to present a rare case of 35 year old female who was recently diagnosed as having type 1 diabetes presented with 1½ month history of recurrent seizures, subacute onset gait ataxia, dysathria, psychiatric disturbance and cognitive decline. No tumor was found on imaging and the classic paraneoplastic panel was negative. Cerebrospinal fluid and blood was positive for GAD-65 antibodies.Patient showed significant improvement with immunomodulatory therapy. Association of GAD-65 antibodies has been found with various disorders including type 1 diabetes, limbic encephalitis, Stiff person syndrome,cerebellar ataxia and palatal myoclonus.This case presents with unique combination of type 1 diabetes, Stiff person syndrome and limbic encephalitis associated with GAD-65 antibodies that is responsive to immunotherapy. It also highlights the emerging concept of autoimmunity in the causation of various disorders and there associations.

  9. Vaccinations in early life are not associated with development of islet autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes high-risk children: Results from prospective cohort data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyerlein, Andreas; Strobl, Andreas N; Winkler, Christiane; Carpus, Michaela; Knopff, Annette; Donnachie, Ewan; Ankerst, Donna P; Ziegler, Anette-G

    2017-03-27

    Vaccinations in early childhood potentially stimulate the immune system and may thus be relevant for the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes (T1D). We determined the association of vaccination burden with T1D-associated islet autoimmunity in children with high familial risk followed prospectively from birth. A total of 20,570 certified vaccination records from 1918 children were correlated with time to onset of T1D-associated islet autoimmunity using Cox regression, considering multiple time periods up until age two years and vaccination types, and adjusting for HLA genotype, sex, delivery mode, season of birth, preterm delivery and maternal T1D status. Additionally, prospective claims data of 295,420 subjects were used to validate associations for the tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) vaccination. Most vaccinations were not associated with a significantly increased hazard ratio (HR) for islet autoimmunity (e.g. HR [95% confidence interval]: 1.08 [0.96-1.21] per additional vaccination against measles, mumps and rubella at age 0-24months). TBE vaccinations within the first two years of life were nominally associated with a significantly increased autoimmunity risk (HR: 1.44 [1.06-1.96] per additional vaccination at age 0-24months), but this could not be confirmed with respect to outcome T1D in the validation cohort (HR: 1.02 [0.90-1.16]). We found no evidence that early vaccinations increase the risk of T1D-associated islet autoimmunity development. The potential association with early TBE vaccinations could not be confirmed in an independent cohort and appears to be a false positive finding. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Extensive Atrophic Gastritis Increases Intraduodenal Hydrogen Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihisa Urita

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Gastric acid plays an important part in the prevention of bacterial colonization of the gastrointestinal tract. If these bacteria have an ability of hydrogen (H2 fermentation, intraluminal H2 gas might be detected. We attempted to measure the intraluminal H2 concentrations to determine the bacterial overgrowth in the gastrointestinal tract. Patients and methods. Studies were performed in 647 consecutive patients undergoing upper endoscopy. At the time of endoscopic examination, we intubated the stomach and the descending part of the duodenum without inflation by air, and 20 mL of intraluminal gas samples of both sites was collected through the biopsy channel. Intraluminal H2 concentrations were measured by gas chromatography. Results. Intragastric and intraduodenal H2 gas was detected in 566 (87.5% and 524 (81.0% patients, respectively. The mean values of intragastric and intraduodenal H2 gas were 8.5±15.9 and 13.2±58.0 ppm, respectively. The intraduodenal H2 level was increased with the progression of atrophic gastritis, whereas the intragastric H2 level was the highest in patients without atrophic gastritis. Conclusions. The intraduodenal hydrogen levels were increased with the progression of atrophic gastritis. It is likely that the influence of hypochlorhydria on bacterial overgrowth in the proximal small intestine is more pronounced, compared to that in the stomach.

  11. Autoimmune gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2016-10-01

    Autoimmune gastritis is a chronic inflammatory disease with destruction of parietal cells of the corpus and fundus of the stomach. The known consequence is vitamin B12 deficiency and, consequently, pernicious anemia. However, loss of parietal cells reduces secretion of gastric acid which is also required for absorption of inorganic iron; thus, iron deficiency is commonly found in patients with autoimmune gastritis. This usually precedes vitamin B12 deficiency and is found mainly in young women. Patients with chronic iron deficiency, especially those refractory to oral iron therapy, should therefore be evaluated for the presence of autoimmune gastritis.

  12. Clinical features and relapse rates after surgery in type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis differ from type 2: a study of 114 surgically treated European patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detlefsen, Sönke; Zamboni, Giuseppe; Frulloni, Luca; Feyerabend, Bernd; Braun, Felix; Gerke, Oke; Schlitter, Anna Melissa; Esposito, Irene; Klöppel, Günter

    2012-01-01

    At the recent consensus conference on autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) in Honolulu, we presented preliminary data from our study of surgically treated AIP patients. Our data strongly supported the separation of AIP into type 1 and type 2. Our study is based on a total of 114 surgically treated European AIP patients. Our aims were to elucidate serum IgG4 elevation, other organ involvement, relapse of disease, steroid treatment and diabetes after surgery in 114 surgically treated European AIP patients. 88 pancreaticoduodenectomies, 22 left-sided resections and 4 total pancreatectomies were examined. All cases were graded for granulocytic epithelial lesions, IgG4-positive cells, storiform fibrosis, phlebitis and eosinophilic granulocytes. Follow-up data were obtained from 102/114 patients, mean follow-up was 5.3 years. Histologically, 63 (55.3%) of the 114 patients fulfilled the criteria of type 1 AIP, while 51 (44.7%) patients fulfilled the criteria of type 2 AIP. Type 1 AIP patients were older and more often males than type 2 AIP patients. Elevation of serum IgG4, involvement of extrapancreatic organs, disease relapse, systemic steroid treatment and diabetes after surgery were noted more often in type 1 AIP, while inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) was observed mainly in type 2 AIP. Histological typing of AIP is clinically important because type 1 AIP is part of the IgG4-related disease and type 2 AIP is associated with IBD. Our data also show that relapse of disease and steroid treatment after surgery occur more frequently in type 1 than in type 2 AIP. Copyright © 2012 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Linking chronic infection and autoimmune diseases: Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, SLC11A1 polymorphisms and type-1 diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Paccagnini

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is still unknown; numerous studies are performed to unravel the environmental factors involved in triggering the disease. SLC11A1 is a membrane transporter that is expressed in late endosomes of antigen presenting cells involved in the immunopathogenic events leading to T1DM. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP has been reported to be a possible trigger in the development of T1DM.Fifty nine T1DM patients and 79 healthy controls were genotyped for 9 polymorphisms of SLC11A1 gene, and screened for the presence of MAP by PCR. Differences in genotype frequency were evaluated for both T1DM patients and controls. We found a polymorphism in the SLC11A1 gene (274C/T associated to type 1 diabetic patients and not to controls. The presence of MAP DNA was also significantly associated with T1DM patients and not with controls.The 274C/T SCL11A1 polymorphism was found to be associated with T1DM as well as the presence of MAP DNA in blood. Since MAP persists within macrophages and it is also processed by dendritic cells, further studies are necessary to evaluate if mutant forms of SLC11A1 alter the processing or presentation of MAP antigens triggering thereby an autoimmune response in T1DM patients.

  14. Treated Autoimmune Thyroid Disease Is Associated with a Decreased Quality of Life among Young Persons with Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Spirkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes (T1D in children and adolescents is relatively often accompanied by other immunopathological diseases, autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD or celiac disease (CD. Our aim was to assess whether these conditions are associated with changes in the health-related quality of life (HRQOL in pediatric patients with T1D. In a cross-sectional study we identified eligible 332 patients with T1D aged 8–18 years, of whom 248 (75% together with their parents responded to the PedsQL Generic and Diabetes Modules. Compared to 143 patients without thyroid autoantibodies, 40 patients with a thyroxine-treated AITD scored lower in the overall generic HRQOL (P=0.014, as well as in the overall diabetes-specific HRQOL (P=0.013. After adjustment for age, gender, duration of diabetes, type of diabetes treatment, and diabetes control, this association remained statistically significant for the generic HRQOL (P=0.023. Celiac disease was not associated with a change in the generic or diabetes-specific HRQOL (P=0.07  and   P=0.63, resp.. Parental scores showed no association with AITD or celiac disease, except a marginally significant decrease in the overall generic HRQOL (P=0.039 in the T1D + AITD compared to T1D group. Our study indicates that, in pediatric patients with T1D, concomitant thyroxine-treated AITD is associated with lower quality of life.

  15. The predictive value of mean platelet volume, plateletcrit and red cell distribution width in the differentiation of autoimmune gastritis patients with and without type I gastric carcinoid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüzün, Ali; Keskin, Onur; Yakut, Mustafa; Kalkan, Cagdas; Soykan, Irfan

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune gastritis is an autoimmune and inflammatory condition that may predispose to gastric carcinoid tumors or adenocarcinomas. The early diagnosis of these tumors is important in order to decrease morbidity and mortality. Platelet indices such as mean platelet volume and plateletcrit levels increase in inflammatory, infectious and malign conditions. The primary aim of this study was to explore wheter platelet indices and red cell distribution width have any predictive role in the discrimination of autoimmune gastritis patients with and without gastric carcinoid tumors. Also secondary aim of this study was to investigate whether any changes exist betwenn autoimmune gastritis and functional dyspepsia patients by means of platelet indices. Plateletcrit (0.22 ± 0.06 vs. 0.20 ± 0.03%, p gastritis patients compared to control group. Receiver operating curve analysis suggested that optimum plateletcrit cut-off point was 0.20% (AUC: 0.646), and 13.95% as the cut off value for red cell distribution width (AUC: 0.860). Although plateletcrit (0.22 ± 0.06 vs. 0.21 ± 0.04%, p = 0.220) and mean platelet volume (8.94 ± 1.44 vs. 8.68 ± 0.89 fl, p = 0.265) were higher in autoimmune gastritis patients without carcinoid tumor compared to patients with carcinoid tumors, these parameters were not statistically significant. Changes in plateletcrit and red cell distribution width values may be used as a marker in the discrimination of autoimmune gastritis and fucntional dyspepsia patients but not useful in patients with gastric carcinoid tumor type I.

  16. Autoimmune disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... exact cause of autoimmune disorders is unknown. One theory is that some microorganisms (such as bacteria or ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  17. HYPERAUTOFLUORESCENT RING IN AUTOIMMUNE RETINOPATHY

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIMA, LUIZ H.; GREENBERG, JONATHAN P.; GREENSTEIN, VIVIENNE C.; SMITH, R. THEODORE; SALLUM, JULIANA M. F.; THIRKILL, CHARLES; YANNUZZI, LAWRENCE A.; TSANG, STEPHEN H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report the presence of a hyperautofluorescent ring and corresponding spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) features seen in patients with autoimmune retinopathy. Methods All eyes were evaluated by funduscopic examination, full-fleld electroretinography, fundus autofluorescence, and SD-OCT. Further confirmation of the diagnosis was obtained with immunoblot and immunohistochemistry testing of the patient’s serum. Humphrey visual fields and microperimetry were also performed. Results Funduscopic examination showed atrophic retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) associated with retinal artery narrowing but without pigment deposits. The scotopic and photopic full-field electroretinograms were nondetectable in three patients and showed a cone–rod pattern of dysfunction in one patient. Fundus autofluorescence revealed a hyperautofluorescent ring in the parafoveal region, and the corresponding SD-OCT demonstrated loss of the photoreceptor inner segment–outer segment junction with thinning of the outer nuclear layer from the region of the hyperautofluorescent ring toward the retinal periphery. The retinal layers were generally intact within the hyperautofluorescent ring, although the inner segment–outer segment junction was disrupted, and the outer nuclear layer and photoreceptor outer segment layer were thinned. Conclusion This case series revealed the structure of the hyperautofluorescent ring in autoimmune retinopathy using SD-OCT. Fundus autofluorescence and SD-OCT may aid in the diagnosis of autoimmune retinopathy and may serve as a tool to monitor its progression. PMID:22218149

  18. Antibody to liver cytosol (anti-LC1) in patients with autoimmune chronic active hepatitis type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, E; Abuaf, N; Cavalli, F; Durand, V; Johanet, C; Homberg, J C

    1988-01-01

    A new autoantibody was detected by immunoprecipitation in the serum of 21 patients with chronic active hepatitis. The antibody reacted against a soluble cytosolic antigen in liver. The antibody was organ specific but not species specific and was therefore called anti-liver cytosol antibody Type 1 (anti-LC1). In seven of 21 cases, no other autoantibody was found; the remaining 14 cases had anti-liver/kidney microsome antibody Type 1 (anti-LKM1). With indirect immunofluorescence, a distinctive staining pattern was observed with the seven sera with anti-LC1 and without anti-LKM1. The antibody stained the cytoplasm of hepatocytes from four different animal species and spared the cellular layer around the central veins of mouse and rat liver that we have called juxtavenous hepatocytes. The immunofluorescence pattern disappeared after absorption of sera by a liver cytosol fraction. The 14 sera with both antibodies displayed anti-LC1 immunofluorescent pattern after absorption of anti-LKM1 by the liver microsomal fraction. The anti-LC1 was found in the serum only in patients with chronic active hepatitis of unknown cause. Anti-LC1 antibody was not found in sera from 100 patients with chronic active hepatitis associated with anti-actin antibody classic chronic active hepatitis Type 1, 100 patients with primary biliary cirrhosis, 157 patients with drug-induced hepatitis and a large number of patients with liver and nonliver diseases. This new antibody was considered a second marker of chronic active hepatitis associated with anti-LKM1 (anti-LKM1 chronic active hepatitis) or autoimmune chronic active hepatitis Type 2.

  19. Prevalence of thyroid dysfunction and autoimmunity in pregnant women with gestational diabetes and diabetes type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velkoska Nakova, V; Krstevska, B; Dimitrovski, Ch; Simeonova, S; Hadzi-Lega, M; Serafimoski, V

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of abnormal thyroid function and antithyroid antibodies during pregnancy in women with diabetes type 1 and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The study group included 83 pregnant women who attended the Outpatient Department of the Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolic Disorders Clinic in the period from 05.2009 to 11.2009. The one hundred-g. oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was conducted on the pregnant women except for women with diabetes type 1. Thyroid functions were evaluated in all the pregnant women. After routine screening for GDM, thirty of the pregnant women were healthy and GDM was diagnosed in forty of them. The rest, thirteen women, had diabetes type 1. The women who developed GDM showed a mean free thyroxin concentration (fT4) significantly lower than that observed in the healthy pregnant women and women with diabetes type 1. Among the pregnant women with GDM, 10 women or 25% had fT4 concentrations below the lower cut-off with normal thyroid-stimulating hormone concentrations (TSH). A statistically significant difference was found in the prevalence of antithyroid antibodies (anti-TPO) between the (30%) women with diabetes type 1 and (10%) healthy pregnant women (p<0.05). In the women positive for anti-TPO, TSH was significantly higher (p<0.05). The significantly higher prevalence of hypothyroxinemia in GDM pregnancies and anti-TPO titres in pregnancies with diabetes type 1, than in healthy pregnant women warrants routine screening for thyroid abnormalities in these groups of pregnant women.

  20. Predictors of associated autoimmune diseases (AAID) in families with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Results from the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wägner, Ana M; Santana, Ángelo; Hernández, Marta; Wiebe, Julia C; Nóvoa, Javier; Mauricio, Didac

    2011-01-01

    Background Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a clinically heterogeneous disease. The presence of associated autoimmune diseases (AAID) may represent a distinct form of autoimmune diabetes, with involvement of specific mechanisms. The aim of this study was to find predictors of AAID in the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC) data set. Methods 3263 families with at least 2 siblings with T1D were included. Clinical information was obtained using questionnaires, anti-GAD and anti-IA-2 were measured and HLA-genotyping was performed. Siblings with T1D with and without AAID were compared and a multivariate regression analysis was performed to find predictors of AAID. T1D-associated HLA haplotypes were defined as the 4 most susceptible and protective, respectively. Results AAID was present in 14.4% of the T1D affected siblings. Age of diabetes onset, current age and time since diagnosis were higher, and there was a female predominance and more family history of AAID in the group with AAID, as well as more frequent anti-GAD and less frequent anti-IA2 positivity. Risk and protective HLA haplotype distributions were similar, though DRB1*0301-DQA1*0501-DQB1*0201 was more frequent in the group with AAID. In the multivariate analysis, female gender, age of onset, family history of AAID, time since diagnosis and anti-GAD positivity were significantly associated with AAID. Conclusions In patients with T1D, the presence of AAID is associated with female predominance, more frequent family history of AAID, later onset of T1D and more anti-GAD antibodies, despite longer duration of the disease. The predominance of certain HLA haplotypes suggests that specific mechanisms of disease may be involved. PMID:21744463

  1. Differentiation of focal-type autoimmune pancreatitis from pancreatic carcinoma: assessment by multiphase contrast-enhanced CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuhashi, Naohiro; Suzuki, Kojiro; Sakurai, Yusuke; Naganawa, Shinji [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Nagoya (Japan); Ikeda, Mitsuru [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiological Technology, Nagoya (Japan); Kawai, Yuichi [Japanese Red Cross Nagoya Daiichi Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Nagoya (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the utility of multiphase contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) findings alone and in combination for differentiating focal-type autoimmune pancreatitis (f-AIP) from pancreatic carcinoma (PC). The study group comprised 22 f-AIP lesions and 61 PC lesions. Two radiologists independently evaluated CT findings. Frequencies of findings were compared between f-AIP and PC. Statistical, univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Homogeneous enhancement during the portal phase (AIP, 59 % vs. PC, 3 %; P < 0.001), dotted enhancement during the pancreatic phase (50 % vs. 7 %; P < 0.001), duct-penetrating sign (46 % vs. 2 %; P < 0.001), enhanced duct sign (36 % vs. 2 %; P < 0.001) and capsule-like rim (46 % vs. 3 %; P < 0.001) were more frequently observed in AIP. Ring-like enhancement during the delayed phase (5 % vs. 46 %; P < 0.001) and peripancreatic strands with a length of at least 10 mm (5 % vs. 39 %; P = 0.001) were more frequently observed in PC. AIP was identified with 82 % sensitivity and 98 % specificity using four of these seven findings. Multivariate analysis revealed significant differences in dotted enhancement (P = 0.004), duct-penetrating sign (P < 0.001) and capsule-like rim (P = 0.007). The combination of CT findings may allow improvements in differentiating f-AIP from PC. (orig.)

  2. Association of sarcopenia with both latent autoimmune diabetes in adults and type 2 diabetes: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchi, Ryotaro; Fukuda, Tatsuya; Takeuchi, Takato; Nakano, Yujiro; Murakami, Masanori; Minami, Isao; Izumiyama, Hajime; Hashimoto, Koshi; Yoshimoto, Takanobu; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the association of both latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) with muscle mass and function (sarcopenia). Japanese patients with LADA (N=20), T2DM (N=208), and control subjects (N=41) were included in this cross-sectional study. The definition of LADA was based on age of onset (≥30), positive glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibodies, and insulin requirement within the first 6months after diagnosis. Sarcopenia was diagnosed by the criteria for Asians, using skeletal muscle index (male sarcopenia was higher in LADA (35.0%) than in either T2DM (13.3%) or control subjects (9.8%). LADA was significantly associated with an increased risk for sarcopenia in a multivariate model in which age and body mass index were incorporated (OR: 9.57, 95% CI: 1.86-49.27). In contrast, T2DM tended to be associated with an increased risk for sarcopenia (OR: 2.99, 95% CI: 0.83-10.80). This study provides evidence that patients with LADA are at a high risk for sarcopenia compared to those with T2DM or to control subjects. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Interleukin 6 -174(G>C) gene polymorphism is related to celiac disease and autoimmune thyroiditis coincidence in diabetes type 1 children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myśliwiec, Małgorzata; Myśliwska, Jolanta; Zorena, Katarzyna; Balcerska, Anna; Malinowska, Ewa; Wiśniewski, Piotr

    2008-10-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the relationship between IL-6 gene polymorphism at -174(G>C) and the coincidence of celiac and autoimmune thyroid diseases with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) in children. 200 children with DM1 aged 13.23+/-3.54 years and 172 healthy controls were analyzed. The IL-6 gene -174(G>C) polymorphism at the promoter region of the gene was analyzed by the PCR-RFLP method. The genotype distribution was significantly different in diabetic children as compared to the healthy controls (p=0.01). In DM1 patients GC heterozygotes were the most common (52.5%), while CC homozygotes accuted for 29% and GG homozygotes only for 18% of cases. In contrast, GG homozygotes were much more frequent among healthy children (31%). Besides, the GG homozygotes were significantly more frequent among diabetic children with celiac disease (p=0.04) in relation to those without autoimmune complications. In children with autoimmune thyroiditis, the distribution of the IL-6 genotypes was similar to that seen in diabetic patients without autoimmune complications (p=0.24). The results of our study suggest that the diabetic children, who have IL-6 gene -174GG genotype may have an increased risk for celiac disease development.

  4. Myasthenia gravis in a patient affected by glycogen storage disease type Ib: a further manifestation of an increased risk for autoimmune disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, D; Balivo, F; Della Casa, R; Romano, A; Taurisano, R; Capaldo, B; Riccardi, G; Monsurrò, M R; Parenti, G; Andria, G

    2008-12-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ib (GSD Ib, OMIM 232220) is an inborn disorder of glucose metabolism, caused by mutations in the G6PT gene, encoding a glucose 6-phosphate transporter (G6PT). GSD Ib is mainly associated with fasting hypoglycaemia and hepatomegaly. Most GSD Ib patients also show neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction and therefore are at risk of developing severe infections and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). An increased risk for autoimmune disorders, such as thyroid autoimmunity and Crohn-like disease, has also been demonstrated, but no systematic study on the prevalence of autoimmune disorders in GSD Ib patients has ever been performed. We describe a 25-year-old patient affected by GSD Ib who developed 'seronegative' myasthenia gravis (MG), presenting with bilateral eyelid ptosis, diplopia, dysarthria, severe dysphagia, dyspnoea and fatigue. The repetitive stimulation of peripheral nerves test showed signs of exhaustion of neuromuscular transmission, particularly evident in the cranial area. Even in the absence of identifiable anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies, seronegative MG is considered an autoimmune disorder and may be related to the disturbed immune function observed in GSD Ib patients.

  5. TRAF6 is essential for maintenance of regulatory T cells that suppress Th2 type autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Go Muto

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs maintain immune homeostasis by limiting inflammatory responses. TRAF6 plays a key role in the regulation of innate and adaptive immunity by mediating signals from various receptors including the T-cell receptor (TCR. T cell-specific deletion of TRAF6 has been shown to induce multiorgan inflammatory disease, but the role of TRAF6 in Tregs remains to be investigated. Here, we generated Treg-specific TRAF6-deficient mice using Foxp3-Cre and TRAF6-flox mice. Treg-specific TRAF6-deficient (cKO mice developed allergic skin diseases, arthritis, lymphadenopathy and hyper IgE phenotypes. Although TRAF6-deficient Tregs possess similar in vitro suppression activity compared to wild-type Tregs, TRAF6-deficient Tregs did not suppress colitis in lymphopenic mice very efficiently due to reduced number of Foxp3-positive cells. In addition, the fraction of TRAF6-deficient Tregs was reduced compared with wild-type Tregs in female cKO mice without inflammation. Moreover, adoptive transfer of Foxp3 (+ Tregs into Rag2(-/- mice revealed that TRAF6-deficient Tregs converted into Foxp3(- cells more rapidly than WT Tregs under lymphopenic conditions. Fate-mapping analysis also revealed that conversion of Tregs from Foxp3(+ to Foxp3(- (exFoxp3 cells was accelerated in TRAF6-deficient Tregs. These data indicate that TRAF6 in Tregs plays important roles in the maintenance of Foxp3 in Tregs and in the suppression of pathogenic Th2 type conversion of Tregs.

  6. Anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia presenting as atrophic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Debasis; Mandal, Satadal; Nandi, Santanu; Banerjee, Pranabashish; Rashid, M A

    2011-11-01

    Ectodermal dysplasia is a complex group of familial disorders with numerous clinical characteristics, with an incidence of 7 in 10000 born alive children. Ectodermal dysplasia affects structures of ectodermal origin like the skin and its appendages as well as other non-ectodermal structures. The most common sites of involvement are the defects in the skin, hair, teeth, nails and sweat glands,which are of ectodermal origin. Though the dermatologists and paediatricians often manage such cases, we report one case of ectodermal dysplasia presenting with atrophic rhinitis.

  7. Overdenture locator attachments for atrophic mandible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neerja Mahajan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Implant-supported overdentures provide a good opportunity for dentists to improve oral health and quality-of-life of patients. Atrophic mandible poses a significant challenge to successful oral rehabilitation with dental implants. In this article, the fabrication of lower overdenture by two narrow platform implants is described with dual retentive, resilient, self-locating locator attachment system. The locator attachment system has the lowest profile in comparison with the ball and bar attachments and is versatile up to 40΀ of divergence between two implants. By using locators as attachments, we can meet functional, economic and social expectation of patients with ease and satisfaction.

  8. Multiple Autoimmune Syndromes Associated with Psoriasis: A Rare Clinical Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadia Masood

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases are known to have association with each other but it is very rare to see multiple autoimmune diseases in one patient. The combination of at least three autoimmune diseases in the same patient is referred to as multiple autoimmune syndrome. The case we are reporting features multiple autoimmune syndrome with five different conditions. The patient had type 1 diabetes mellitus, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, systemic lupus erythematosus, vitiligo, and psoriasis. Psoriasis has rarely been reported previously under the spectrum of autoimmune syndrome. Although the relationship of autoimmune conditions with each other has been explored in the past, this case adds yet another dimension to the unique evolution of autoimmune pathologies. The patient presented with a combination of five autoimmune diseases, which makes it consistent type three multiple autoimmune syndromes with the addition of psoriasis. The current case is unique in this aspect that the combination of these five autoimmune disorders has never been reported in the past.

  9. [Diabetes and autoimmune diseases: prevalence of celiac disease in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mont-Serrat, Camila; Hoineff, Claudio; Meirelles, Ricardo M R; Kupfer, Rosane

    2008-12-01

    Determine the prevalence of celiac disease in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) in attendance in Instituto Estadual de Diabetes e Endocrinologia Luiz Capriglione (IEDE). Blood samples were analyzed in 120 children and adolescents with DM1 from IEDE Diabetes Clinic for the IgA antitissue-transglutaminase antibody and dosage of the seric IgA. Those with positive serology were guided for upper endoscopy with small-bowel biopsy to confirm the celiac disease. The antibody was positive in 3 of the 120 patients. The small-bowel biopsy was confirmatory in all of the positive patients, leading to a prevalence of celiac disease of 2.5% in the studied group. The prevalence of celiac disease is increased in children and adolescents with DM1 when compared with normality. As most are asymptomatic, it is recommended periodical screening of celiac disease in children with DM1.

  10. Prognosis of type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis after corticosteroid therapy-induced remission in terms of relapse and diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Miyazawa

    Full Text Available Relapse and diabetes mellitus (DM are major problems for the prognosis of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP. We examined the prognosis of type 1 AIP after corticosteroid therapy (CST-induced remission in terms of relapse and DM.The study enrolled 82 patients diagnosed with type 1 AIP who achieved remission with CST. We retrospectively evaluated the relapse rate in terms of the administration period of CST, clinical factors associated with relapse, and the temporal change in glucose tolerance.During follow-up, 32 patients (39.0% experienced relapse. There was no significant clinical factor that could predict relapse before beginning CST. AIP patients who ceased CST within 2 or 3 years experienced significantly earlier relapse than those who had the continuance of CST (p = 0.050 or p = 0.020. Of the 37 DM patients, 15 patients (40.5% had pre-existing DM, 17 (45.9% showed new-onset DM, and 5 (13.5% developed CST-induced DM. Patients with new-onset DM were significantly more likely to show improvement (p = 0.008 than those with pre-existing DM.It was difficult to predict relapse of AIP based on clinical parameters before beginning CST. Relapse was likely to occur within 3 years after the beginning of CST and maintenance of CST for at least 3 years reduced the risk of relapse. The early initiation of CST for AIP with impaired glucose tolerance is desirable because pre-existing DM is refractory to CST.

  11. Autoimmune diseases in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirosh, Amir; Mandel, Dror; Mimouni, Francis B; Zimlichman, Eyal; Shochat, Tzippora; Kochba, Ilan

    2006-06-20

    Previous research has suggested an inverse relationship between T-helper 2-related atopic disorders, such as asthma, and T-helper 1-related autoimmune diseases. One controversial hypothesis postulates that asthma provides a protective effect for the development of autoimmune-related disorders. To assess the rate of newly diagnosed autoimmune disorders in a large cohort of young adults. Using cross-sectional data from the Israeli Defense Force database, the authors analyzed the prevalence of autoimmune disorders in asthmatic and nonasthmatic military personnel between 1980 and 2003. A follow-up study traced newly diagnosed autoimmune disorders among asthmatic and nonasthmatic individuals from the time of enrollment in military service until discharge (22 and 36 months for women and men, respectively). General community. 307,367 male and 181,474 female soldiers in compulsory military service who were between 18 and 21 years of age. Cases of type 1 diabetes mellitus, vasculitis, immune thrombocytopenic purpura, inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and the antiphospholipid syndrome. Of 488,841 participants at enrollment, significantly more women than men had autoimmune disorders. Compared with asthmatic women, nonasthmatic women had a significantly higher prevalence of all autoimmune disorders except for the antiphospholipid syndrome. Type 1 diabetes mellitus, vasculitis, and rheumatoid arthritis were less prevalent in men with asthma than in those without. During the follow-up period, vasculitis and rheumatoid arthritis were more frequently diagnosed in nonasthmatic persons of both sexes. There was a significantly higher incidence of immune thrombocytopenic purpura, inflammatory bowel disease, and the antiphospholipid syndrome in nonasthmatic women and a statistically significantly higher incidence of type 1 diabetes mellitus in nonasthmatic men. The study was limited to a population of young military recruits; therefore, its findings are not necessarily

  12. A novel cell-based assay for measuring neutralizing autoantibodies against type I interferons in patients with autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breivik, Lars; Oftedal, Bergithe E V; Bøe Wolff, Anette S; Bratland, Eirik; Orlova, Elizaveta M; Husebye, Eystein S

    2014-07-01

    An important characteristic of autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS 1) is the existence of neutralizing autoantibodies (nAbs) against the type I interferons (IFN) -α2 and -ω at frequencies close to 100%. Type 1 IFN autoantibodies are detected by antiviral neutralizing assays (AVA), binding assays with radiolabelled antigens (RLBA), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), or by reporter-based cell assays. We here present a simple and reliable version of the latter utilizing a commercially available cell line (HEK-Blue IFN-α/β). All 67 APS 1 patients were positive for IFN-ω nAbs, while 90% were positive for IFN-α2 nAbs, a 100% and 96% correlation with RLBA, respectively. All blood donors and non-APS 1 patients were negative. The dilution titer required to reduce the effect of IFN-ω nAbs correlated with the RLBA index. This cell-based autoantibody assay (CBAA) is easy to perform, suitable for high throughput, while providing high specificity and sensitivity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. COEXISTENCE OF ADDISON'S DISEASE AND PERNICIOUS ANEMIA: IS THE NEW CLASSIFICATION OF AUTOIMMUNE POLYGLANDULAR SYNDROME APPROPRIATE?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrkljan, Ana Marija; Pašalić, Ante; Strinović, Mateja; Perić, Božidar; Kruljac, Ivan; Miroševć, Gorana

    2015-06-01

    A case of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS) is presented. A 45-year-old man was admitted due to fatigue, malaise and inappetence. He had a history of primary hypothyroidism and was on levothyroxine substitution therapy. One year before, he was diagnosed with normocytic anemia and vitamin B12 deficiency, which was treated with vitamin B12 substitution therapy. Physical examination revealed hypotension and marked hyperpigmentation. Laboratory testing showed hyponatremia, hyperkaliemia and severe normocytic anemia. Endocrinological evaluation disclosed low morning cortisol and increased adrenocorticotropic hormone levels. Hence, the diagnosis of Addison's disease was established. Additional laboratory workup showed positive parietal cell antibodies. However, his vitamin B12 levels were increased due to vitamin B12 supplementation therapy, which was initiated earlier. Gastroscopy and histopathology of gastric mucosa confirmed atrophic gastritis. Based on prior low serum vitamin B12 levels, positive parietal cell antibodies and atrophic gastritis, the patient was diagnosed with pernicious anemia. Hydrocortisone supplementation therapy was administered and titrated according to urinary-free cortisol levels. Electrolyte disbalance and red blood cell count were normalized. This case report demonstrates rather unique features of pernicious anemia in a patient with Addison's disease. It also highlights the link between type II and type III APS. Not only do they share the same etiological factors, but also overlap in pathophysiological and clinical characteristics. This case report favors older classification of APS, which consolidates all endocrine and other organ-specific autoimmune diseases into one category. This is important since it might help avoid pitfalls in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with APS.

  14. Successful Management of Insulin Allergy and Autoimmune Polyendocrine Syndrome Type 4 with Desensitization Therapy and Glucocorticoid Treatment: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joselyn Rojas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Insulin allergy is a rare complication of insulin therapy, especially in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM. Key manifestations are hypersensitivity-related symptoms and poor metabolic control. T1DM, as well as insulin allergy, may develop in the context of autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome (APS, further complicating management. Case Report. A 17-year-old male patient, diagnosed with T1DM, was treated with various insulin therapy schemes over several months, which resulted in recurrent anaphylactoid reactions and poor glycemic control, after which he was referred to our Endocrinology and Immunology Department. A prick test was carried out for all commercially available insulin presentations and another insulin scheme was designed but proved unsuccessful. A desensitization protocol was started with Glargine alongside administration of Prednisone, which successfully induced tolerance. Observation of skin lesions typical of vitiligo prompted laboratory workup for other autoimmune disorders, which returned positive for autoimmune gastritis/pernicious anemia. These findings are compatible with APS type 4. Discussion. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of insulin allergy in type 4 APS, as well as this particular combination in APS. Etiopathogenic components shared by insulin allergy and APS beg for further research in immunogenetics to further comprehend pathophysiologic aspects of these diseases.

  15. Serological markers of enterocyte damage and apoptosis in patients with celiac disease, autoimmune diabetes mellitus and diabetes mellitus type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmanová, I; Sánchez, D; Hábová, V; Anděl, M; Tučková, L; Tlaskalová-Hogenová, H

    2015-01-01

    Impairment of mucosal barrier integrity of small intestine might be causative in immune-mediated gastrointestinal diseases. We tested the markers of epithelial apoptosis - cytokeratin 18 caspase-cleaved fragment (cCK-18), and enterocyte damage - intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP) and soluble CD14 (sCD14) in sera of patients with untreated celiac disease (CLD), those on gluten-free diet (CLD-GFD), patients with autoimmune diabetes mellitus (T1D), T1D with insulitis (T1D/INS), and diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2D). We found elevated levels of cCK-18 (PCLD when compared to healthy controls. However, the levels of cCK-18 (PCLD-GFD were higher when compared with controls. Interestingly, elevated levels of cCK-18 and I-FABP were found in T2D and T1D (PCLD patients were seropositive for cCK-18, 19/43 for I-FABP and 11/43 for sCD14; 9/30 of T2D patients were positive for cCK-18 and 5/20 of T1D/INS for sCD14, while in controls only 3/41 were positive for cCK-18, 3/41 for I-FABP and 1/41 for sCD14. We documented for the first time seropositivity for sCD14 in CLD and potential usefulness of serum cCK-18 and I-FABP as markers of gut damage in CLD, CLD-GFD, and diabetes.

  16. Immunological cross-reactivity to multiple autoantigens in patients with liver kidney microsomal type 1 autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhuri, K; Gregorio, G V; Mieli-Vergani, G; Vergani, D

    1998-11-01

    We describe two patients with liver kidney microsomal antibody type 1 (LKM1)-positive autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) with associated endocrinopathies. The first patient had insulin-dependent diabetes (IDDM), and the second patient had Addison's disease and hypoparathyroidism, and is also positive for islet cell antibodies, without overt diabetes. To account for the existence of multiple endocrinopathy in these patients, we investigated whether there is sequence similarity between the target of LKM1 antibodies, cytochrome P4502D6 (CYP2D6), and other human proteins, and if so, whether this structural similarity produces a detectable cross-reactive immune response. Our database search identified two proteins, carboxypeptidase H, an autoantigen in insulin-dependent diabetes, and 21-hydroxylase, the major autoantigen in Addison's disease, that share sequence similarity to the second major LKM1 epitope on CYP2D6. We tested the reactivity of sera from these patients to the homologous regions of the three autoantigens using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The cut-off for positivity was established by testing sera from 22 healthy children. To determine the significance of reactivity to the peptide homologues of the three autoantigens, we investigated 16 additional patients with LKM1 AIH and 20 children with chronic hepatitis B virus infection as pathological controls. We found that reactivity to the second major epitope of CYP2D6 is significantly associated with reactivity to the homologous regions of carboxypeptidase H (CPH) and 21-hydroxylase (21-OHase) in patients with LKM1 AIH, and that this simultaneous recognition is cross-reactive. We suggest that a cross-reactive immune response between homologous autoantigens may contribute to the development of multiple endocrinopathies in LKM1 AIH.

  17. Curcumin and autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, John J

    2007-01-01

    The immune system has evolved to protect the host from microbial infection; nevertheless, a breakdown in the immune system often results in infection, cancer, and autoimmune diseases. Multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, myocarditis, thyroiditis, uveitis, systemic lupus erythromatosis, and myasthenia gravis are organ-specific autoimmune diseases that afflict more than 5% of the population worldwide. Although the etiology is not known and a cure is still wanting, the use of herbal and dietary supplements is on the rise in patients with autoimmune diseases, mainly because they are effective, inexpensive, and relatively safe. Curcumin is a polyphenolic compound isolated from the rhizome of the plant Curcuma longa that has traditionally been used for pain and wound-healing. Recent studies have shown that curcumin ameliorates multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and inflammatory bowel disease in human or animal models. Curcumin inhibits these autoimmune diseases by regulating inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-12, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma and associated JAK-STAT, AP-1, and NF-kappaB signaling pathways in immune cells. Although the beneficial effects of nutraceuticals are traditionally achieved through dietary consumption at low levels for long periods of time, the use of purified active compounds such as curcumin at higher doses for therapeutic purposes needs extreme caution. A precise understanding of effective dose, safe regiment, and mechanism of action is required for the use of curcumin in the treatment of human autoimmune diseases.

  18. Dendritic cells and anergic type I NKT cells play a crucial role in sulfatide-mediated immune regulation in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maricic, Igor; Halder, Ramesh; Bischof, Felix; Kumar, Vipin

    2014-08-01

    CD1d-restricted NKT cells can be divided into two groups: type I NKT cells use a semi-invariant TCR, whereas type II express a relatively diverse set of TCRs. A major subset of type II NKT cells recognizes myelin-derived sulfatides and is selectively enriched in the CNS tissue during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We have shown that activation of sulfatide-reactive type II NKT cells by sulfatide prevents induction of EAE. In this article, we have addressed the mechanism of regulation, as well as whether a single immunodominant form of synthetic sulfatide can treat ongoing chronic and relapsing EAE in SJL/J mice. We have shown that the activation of sulfatide-reactive type II NKT cells leads to a significant reduction in the frequency and effector function of myelin proteolipid proteins 139-151/I-A(s)-tetramer(+) cells in lymphoid and CNS tissues. In addition, type I NKT cells and dendritic cells (DCs) in the periphery, as well as CNS-resident microglia, are inactivated after sulfatide administration, and mice deficient in type I NKT cells are not protected from disease. Moreover, tolerized DCs from sulfatide-treated animals can adoptively transfer protection into naive mice. Treatment of SJL/J mice with a synthetic cis-tetracosenoyl sulfatide, but not α-galactosylceramide, reverses ongoing chronic and relapsing EAE. Our data highlight a novel immune-regulatory pathway involving NKT subset interactions leading to inactivation of type I NKT cells, DCs, and microglial cells in suppression of autoimmunity. Because CD1 molecules are nonpolymorphic, the sulfatide-mediated immune-regulatory pathway can be targeted for development of non-HLA-dependent therapeutic approaches to T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  19. Immunoproteomics of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with atrophic body gastritis, a predisposing condition for gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahner, Edith; Bernardini, Giulia; Possenti, Silvia; Renzone, Giovanni; Scaloni, Andrea; Santucci, Annalisa; Annibale, Bruno

    2011-02-01

    Atrophic body gastritis is considered an outcome of H. pylori infection at high risk for gastric cancer. Immunoproteomics has been used to detect H. pylori antigens, which may act as potential markers for neoplastic disease and may be used in specific serological tests. We used immunoproteome technology to identify H. pylori antigens, recognized by sera from patients with atrophic body gastritis. Here, we performed 2DE protein maps of H. pylori strain 10K, probed against single sera from 3 groups of H. pylori-positive patients (atrophic body gastritis; intestinal-type gastric cancer; peptic ulcer) and negative controls. Immunoreactive spots were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS. A total of 155 immunoreactive spots were detected corresponding to 14.1% of total spots detected in our reference map of H. pylori strain 10K. Sera from atrophic body gastritis (40.5±2%) and gastric cancer patients (25.9±1.8%) showed a significantly higher and stronger mean immunoreactivity versus H. pylori antigens compared to peptic ulcer patients (11.2±1.3%). The average intensity of immunoreactivity of sera from atrophic body gastritis and gastric cancer patients was significantly stronger compared to peptic ulcer patients. Sera from atrophic body gastritis and gastric cancer patients differentially recognized 17 H. pylori spots. Immunoproteome technology may discriminate between different H. pylori-related disease phenotypes showing a serological immunorecognition pattern common to patients with gastric cancer and atrophic body gastritis, its precursor condition. This tool may be promising for developing specific serological tests to identify patients with gastritis at high risk for gastric cancer, to be evaluated in prospective investigations. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Autoimmune hepatitis-specific antibodies against soluble liver antigen and liver cytosol type 1 in patients with chronic viral hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigopoulou, Eirini I; Mytilinaiou, Maria; Romanidou, Ourania; Liaskos, Christos; Dalekos, George N

    2007-02-04

    Non-organ specific autoantibodies are highly prevalent in patients with chronic hepatitis C (HCV). Among them, anti-liver kidney microsomal type 1 (LKM1) antibody--the serological marker of type 2 autoimmune hepatitis (AIH-2)--is detected in up to 11% of the HCV-infected subjects. On the other hand, anti-liver cytosol type 1 antibodies (anti-LC1)--either in association with anti-LKM1, or in isolation--and anti-soluble liver antigen antibodies (anti-SLA) have been considered as useful and specific diagnostic markers for AIH. However, their specificity for AIH has been questioned by some recent studies, which have shown the detection of anti-LC1 and anti-SLA by immunoprecipitation assays in HCV patients irrespective of their anti-LKM1 status. The aim of the present study was to test the anti-LC1 and anti-SLA presence by specific enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), in a large group of Greek HCV-infected patients with or without anti-LKM1 reactivity as firstly, immunoprecipitation assays are limited to few specialized laboratories worldwide and cannot be used routinely and secondly, to assess whether application of such tests has any relevance in the context of patients with viral hepatitis since antibody detection based on such ELISAs has not been described in detail in large groups of HCV patients. One hundred and thirty eight consecutive HCV patients (120 anti-LKM1 negative and 18 anti-LKM1 positive) were investigated for the presence of anti-LC1 and anti-SLA by commercial ELISAs. A similar number (120) of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infected patients seronegative for anti-LKM1 was also tested as pathological controls. Six out of 18 (33%) anti-LKM(pos)/HCV(pos) patients tested positive for anti-LC1 compared to 1/120 (0.83%) anti-LKM(neg)/HCV(pos) patients and 0/120 (0%) of the anti-LKM1(neg)/HBV(pos) patients (p LKM1) or HBV-infected patients. We showed that anti-LC1 and anti-SLA autoantibodies are not detected by conventional assays in a large group of

  1. Autoimmun hypophysitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Therese; Hagen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    during pregnancy or postpartum, but also occurs in males and children. AH is often associated with other autoimmune diseases, most frequently with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The symptoms are caused by enlargement of the pituitary gland and disturbances of the hormone function. Treatment is either...

  2. Imaging dynamics of CD11c+ cells and Foxp3+ cells in progressive autoimmune insulitis in the NOD mouse model of type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt-Christensen, Anja; Hansen, Lisbeth; Ilegems, Erwin

    2013-01-01

    the endocrine pancreas during initiation and progression of insulitis in the NOD mouse. Individual, ACE-transplanted islets of Langerhans were longitudinally and repetitively imaged by stereomicroscopy and two-photon microscopy to follow fluorescently labelled leucocyte subsets. Results We demonstrate that......, in spite of the immune privileged status of the eye, the ACE-transplanted islets develop infiltration and beta cell destruction, recapitulating the autoimmune insulitis of the pancreas, and exemplify this by analysing reporter cell populations expressing green fluorescent protein under the Cd11c or Foxp3......Aims/hypothesis The aim of this study was to visualise the dynamics and interactions of the cells involved in autoimmune-driven inflammation in type 1 diabetes. Methods We adopted the anterior chamber of the eye (ACE) transplantation model to perform non-invasive imaging of leucocytes infiltrating...

  3. Therapeutic Challenge in a Severely Atrophic Mandible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edvard Janev

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: After tooth loss, however, severely atrophic residual alveolar ridges are fairly common, especially in patients who have been edentulous for a long period. Anterior area of the mandible is areas where clinicians have greater anatomical limitations. Reduced alveolar bone height very often represents a contraindication to implant therapy, unless a procedure such as a ridge augmentation is performed. CASE REPORT: This study aims to present two separate cases in highly selected edentulous anterior mandibular sites, where one stage, mini implants were used to support total prostheses. Small diameter implants have been used for retention of complete removable mandibular overdentures. This is an excellent option for those who suffer from the inconvenience and embarrassment of loose lower dentures and are tired of having to use sticky pastes and creams to make their dentures stay in place. CONCLUSION: Small diameter implants, when used multiples may offer adequate support for a removable prosthesis and overcome this problem.

  4. Therapeutic Challenge in a Severely Atrophic Mandible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janev, Edvard; Janeva, Nadica; Peeva–Petreska, Marija; Mitic, Kristina

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: After tooth loss, however, severely atrophic residual alveolar ridges are fairly common, especially in patients who have been edentulous for a long period. Anterior area of the mandible is areas where clinicians have greater anatomical limitations. Reduced alveolar bone height very often represents a contraindication to implant therapy, unless a procedure such as a ridge augmentation is performed. CASE REPORT: This study aims to present two separate cases in highly selected edentulous anterior mandibular sites, where one stage, mini implants were used to support total prostheses. Small diameter implants have been used for retention of complete removable mandibular overdentures. This is an excellent option for those who suffer from the inconvenience and embarrassment of loose lower dentures and are tired of having to use sticky pastes and creams to make their dentures stay in place. CONCLUSION: Small diameter implants, when used multiples may offer adequate support for a removable prosthesis and overcome this problem. PMID:29610621

  5. Association of STAT4 and PTPN22 polymorphisms and their interactions with type-1 autoimmune hepatitis susceptibility in Chinese Han children

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiaofeng; Chen, Huiqin; Cai, Yun; Zhang, Pingping; Chen, Zhuanggui

    2017-01-01

    Aims To investigate the impact of signal transducer and activator of transcription 4 (STAT4) and the protein tyrosine phosphatase N22 (PTPN22) gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), gene–gene interactions and haplotype on type-1 Autoimmune Hepatitis (AIH) risk. Results Logistic regression analysis showed that type 1 AIH was significantly higher in carriers of T allele of rs7574865 than those with GG genotype (P- value less than 0.001), higher in carriers of C allele of rs7582694 than th...

  6. Current topics in autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Luigi; Muratori, Paolo; Granito, Alessandro; Pappas, Giorgios; Cassani, Fabio; Lenzi, Marco

    2010-11-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic liver disease of unknown aetiology characterized by interface hepatitis, hypergammaglobulinaemia and circulating autoantibodies. In the last decade a number of advancements have been made in the field of clinical and basic research: the simplified diagnostic criteria, the complete response defined as normalization of transaminase levels, the molecular identification of the antigenic targets of anti-liver cytosol antibody type 1 and anti-soluble liver antigen, the detection of anti-actin antibodies, the description of de novo autoimmune hepatitis after liver transplantation for non-autoimmune liver diseases, the characterization of autoimmune hepatitis with overlapping features of primary biliary cirrhosis or primary sclerosing cholangitis, the preliminary experience with novel treatment strategies based on cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil and budesonide, the role played by "impaired" regulatory T cells and the development of novel animal models of autoimmune hepatitis. Copyright © 2010 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. TISSUE INHIBITOR OF METALLOPROTEINASE 1, MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASE 9, ALPHA-1 ANTITRYPSIN, METALLOTHIONEIN AND UROKINASE TYPE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR RECEPTOR IN SKIN BIOPSIES FROM PATIENTS AFFECTED BY AUTOIMMUNE BLISTERING DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Proteinases and proteinase inhibitors have been described to play a role in autoimmune skin blistering diseases. We studied skin lesional biopsies from patients affected by several autoimmune skin blistering diseases for proteinases and proteinase inhibitors. Methods: We utilized immunohistochemistry to evaluate biopsies for alpha-1-antitrypsin, human matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9, human tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP-1, metallothionein and urokinase type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR. We tested 30 patients affected by endemic pemphigus, 30 controls from the endemic area, and 15 normal controls. We also tested 30 biopsies from patients with bullous pemphigoid (BP, 20 with pemphigus vulgaris (PV, 8 with pemphigus foliaceus, and 14 with dermatitis herpetiformis (DH. Results: Contrary to findings in the current literature, most autoimmune skin blistering disease biopsies were negative for uPAR and MMP9. Only some chronic patients with El Bagre-EPF were positive to MMP9 in the dermis, in proximity to telocytes. TIMP-1 and metallothionein were positive in half of the biopsies from BP patients at the basement membrane of the skin, within several skin appendices, in areas of dermal blood vessel inflammation and within dermal mesenchymal-epithelial cell junctions.

  8. Autoimmune paediatric liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Vergani, Diego

    2008-06-07

    Liver disorders with a likely autoimmune pathogenesis in childhood include autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC), and de novo AIH after liver transplantation. AIH is divided into two subtypes according to seropositivity for smooth muscle and/or antinuclear antibody (SMA/ANA, type 1) or liver kidney microsomal antibody (LKM1, type 2). There is a female predominance in both. LKM1 positive patients tend to present more acutely, at a younger age, and commonly have partial IgA deficiency, while duration of symptoms before diagnosis, clinical signs, family history of autoimmunity, presence of associated autoimmune disorders, response to treatment, and long-term prognosis are similar in both groups. The most common type of paediatric sclerosing cholangitis is ASC. The clinical, biochemical, immunological, and histological presentation of ASC is often indistinguishable from that of AIH type 1. In both, there are high IgG, non-organ specific autoantibodies, and interface hepatitis. Diagnosis is made by cholangiography. Children with ASC respond to immunosuppression satisfactorily and similarly to AIH in respect to remission and relapse rates, times to normalization of biochemical parameters, and decreased inflammatory activity on follow up liver biopsies. However, the cholangiopathy can progress. There may be evolution from AIH to ASC over the years, despite treatment. De novo AIH after liver transplantation affects patients not transplanted for autoimmune disorders and is strikingly reminiscent of classical AIH, including elevated titres of serum antibodies, hypergammaglobulinaemia, and histological findings of interface hepatitis, bridging fibrosis, and collapse. Like classical AIH, it responds to treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine. De novo AIH post liver transplantation may derive from interference by calcineurin inhibitors with the intrathymic physiological mechanisms of T-cell maturation and selection. Whether this condition is a

  9. [Autoimmune hepatitis: Immunological diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahim, Imane; Brahim, Ikram; Hazime, Raja; Admou, Brahim

    2017-11-01

    Autoimmune hepatopathies (AIHT) including autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and autoimmune cholangitis (AIC), represent an impressive entities in clinical practice. Their pathogenesis is not perfectly elucidated. Several factors are involved in the initiation of hepatic autoimmune and inflammatory phenomena such as genetic predisposition, molecular mimicry and/or abnormalities of T-regulatory lymphocytes. AIHT have a wide spectrum of presentation, ranging from asymptomatic forms to severe acute liver failure. The diagnosis of AIHT is based on the presence of hyperglobulinemia, cytolysis, cholestasis, typical even specific circulating auto-antibodies, distinctive of AIH or PBC, and histological abnormalities as well as necrosis and inflammation. Anti-F actin, anti-LKM1, anti-LC1 antibodies permit to distinguish between AIH type 1 and AIH type 2. Anti-SLA/LP antibodies are rather associated to more severe hepatitis, and particularly useful for the diagnosis of seronegative AIH for other the antibodies. Due to the relevant diagnostic value of anti-M2, anti-Sp100, and anti-gp210 antibodies, the diagnosis of PBC is more affordable than that of PSC and AIC. Based on clinical data, the immunological diagnosis of AIHT takes advantage of the various specialized laboratory techniques including immunofluorescence, immunodot or blot, and the Elisa systems, provided of a closer collaboration between the biologist and the physician. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Is glycated albumin useful for differential diagnosis between fulminant type 1 diabetes mellitus and acute-onset autoimmune type 1 diabetes mellitus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Masafumi; Kanehara, Hideo; Bando, Yukihiro; Morita, Shinya; Kasayama, Soji

    2015-12-07

    Markedly elevated plasma glucose and relatively low HbA1c compared to plasma glucose is one diagnostic criterion for fulminant type 1 diabetes mellitus (FT1DM). Glycated albumin (GA) is a glycemic control marker that reflects glycemic control in shorter period than HbA1c. This study investigated whether GA is useful for differential diagnosis between FT1DM and acute-onset autoimmune type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1ADM) or not. This study included 38 FT1DM patients and 31 T1ADM patients in whom both HbA1c and GA were measured at the time of diagnosis. In FT1DM patients, as compared to T1ADM patients, both HbA1c and GA were significantly lower (HbA1c; 6.6±0.9% vs. 11.7±2.6%, P1, GA; 22.9±4.8% vs. 44.3±8.3%, P1). For differential diagnosis between FT1DM and T1ADM, ROC analysis showed that the optimum cut-off value for GA was 33.5% with sensitivity and specificity of 97.4% and 96.8%, respectively, while the optimum cut-off value for HbA1c was 8.7% with sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 83.9%, respectively. GA also may be useful for the differential diagnosis between FT1DM and T1ADM when the cut-off value can be set at 33.5%. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Association of STAT4 and PTPN22 polymorphisms and their interactions with type-1 autoimmune hepatitis susceptibility in Chinese Han children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofeng; Chen, Huiqin; Cai, Yun; Zhang, Pingping; Chen, Zhuanggui

    2017-09-22

    To investigate the impact of signal transducer and activator of transcription 4 (STAT4) and the protein tyrosine phosphatase N22 (PTPN22) gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), gene-gene interactions and haplotype on type-1 Autoimmune Hepatitis (AIH) risk. Logistic regression analysis showed that type 1 AIH was significantly higher in carriers of T allele of rs7574865 than those with GG genotype ( P - value less than 0.001), higher in carriers of C allele of rs7582694 than those with GG genotype ( P - value rs7574865-T alleles were associated with a statistically increased type 1 AIH risk ( P rs7574865 and rs7582694 in STAT4 gene minor alleles, interaction between rs7582694 and rs2476601, and haplotype containing the rs7582694-C and rs7574865-T alleles are associated with increased type 1 AIH risk, but rs2476601 in PTPN22 gene minor allele is associated with decreased type 1 AIH risk.

  12. Autoimmune liver disease 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Paolo; Granito, Alessandro; Pappas, Georgios; Muratori, Luigi; Lenzi, Marco; Bianchi, Francesco B

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune liver disease (ALD) includes a spectrum of diseases which comprises both cholestatic and hepatitic forms: autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and the so called "overlap" syndromes where hepatitic and cholestatic damage coexists. All these diseases are characterized by an extremely high heterogeneity of presentation, varying from asymptomatic, acute (as in a subset of AIH) or chronic (with aspecific symptoms such as fatigue and myalgia in AIH or fatigue and pruritus in PBC and PSC). The detection and characterization of non organ specific autoantibodies plays a major role in the diagnostic approach of autoimmune liver disease; anti nuclear reactivities (ANA) and anti smooth muscle antibodies (SMA) mark type 1 AIH, liver kidney microsomal antibody type 1 (LKM1) and liver cytosol type 1 (LC1) are the serological markers of type 2 AIH; antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) are associated with PBC, while no specific marker is found in PSC, since anticytoplasmic neutrophil antibodies with perinuclear pattern (atypical p-ANCA or p-ANNA) are also detected in a substantial proportion of type 1 AIH cases. Treatment options rely on immunosoppressive therapy (steroids and azathioprine) in AIH and on ursodeoxycholic acid in cholestatic conditions; in all these diseases liver transplantation remains the only therapeutical approach for the end stage of liver disease.

  13. Skin lesion resembling malignant atrophic papulosis in lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doutre, M S; Beylot, C; Bioulac, P; Busquet, M; Conte, M

    1987-01-01

    This case demonstrates, as do the 3 others reported in literature, that a diagnosis of malignant atrophic papulosis can only be made once the possibility of a lupus erythematosus has been totally excluded.

  14. Similar weight-adjusted insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity in short-duration late autoimmune diabetes of adulthood (LADA) and Type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, C B; Bradley, U; Holst, Jens Juul

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: To explore insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in people with latent autoimmune diabetes in adulthood (LADA) compared with that in people with Type 2 diabetes. METHODS: A total of 12 people with LADA, defined as glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibody positivity and > 1 year...... of insulin independency (group A) were age-matched pairwise to people with Type 2 diabetes (group B) and to six people with Type 2 diabetes of similar age and BMI (group C). β-cell function (first-phase insulin secretion and assessment of insulin pulsatility), insulin sensitivity (hyperinsulinemic......-euglycemic clamp) and metabolic response during a mixed meal were studied. RESULTS: Both first-phase insulin secretion and insulin release during the meal were greater (P = 0.05 and P = 0.009, respectively) in Type 2 diabetes as compared with LADA; these differences were lost on adjustment for BMI (group C...

  15. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cholangitis (formerly called primary biliary cirrhosis). This group of tests ...

  16. A Rare Multifocal Pattern of Type 2 Autoimmune Pancreatitis with Negative IgG4: A Potential Diagnostic Pitfall That May Mimic Multifocal Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha Hota

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP is an increasingly recognized form of acute pancreatitis characterized by obstructive jaundice with a rapid and dramatic treatment response to steroid therapy. Recently, AIP has been divided into two distinct phenotypes: lymphoplasmocytic sclerosing pancreatitis AIP (type 1 and idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis AIP (type 2; each of which have their own distinct demographics, diagnostic criteria, and histopathological features. We report, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of a multifocal pattern of type 2 AIP characterized with both CT and MR imaging. This rare imaging pattern of AIP may mimic the appearance of more worrisome malignant etiologies such as multifocal pancreatic adenocarcinoma or lymphoma, with overlapping imaging characteristics potentially complicating or delaying diagnosis. Therefore, recognition of this atypical pattern of AIP and avoidance of this potential diagnostic pitfall is crucial.

  17. Update in Endocrine Autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2008-01-01

    Context: The endocrine system is a common target in pathogenic autoimmune responses, and there has been recent progress in our understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of autoimmune endocrine diseases.

  18. Atrophic Vaginitis in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Difficult Survivorship Issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Lester

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Management of breast cancer includes systematic therapies including chemotherapy and endocrine therapy can lead to a variety of symptoms that can impair the quality of life of many breast cancer survivors. Atrophic vaginitis, caused by decreased levels of circulating estrogen to urinary and vaginal receptors, is commonly experienced by this group. Chemotherapy induced ovarian failure and endocrine therapies including aromatase inhibitors and selective estrogen receptor modulators can trigger the onset of atrophic vaginitis or exacerbate existing symptoms. Symptoms of atrophic vaginitis include vaginal dryness, dyspareunia, and irritation of genital skin, pruritus, burning, vaginal discharge, and soreness. The diagnosis of atrophic vaginitis is confirmed through patient-reported symptoms and gynecological examination of external structures, introitus, and vaginal mucosa. Lifestyle modifications can be helpful but are usually insufficient to significantly improve symptoms. Non-hormonal vaginal therapies may provide additional relief by increasing vaginal moisture and fluid. Systemic estrogen therapy is contraindicated in breast cancer survivors. Continued investigations of various treatments for atrophic vaginitis are necessary. Local estrogen-based therapies, DHEA, testosterone, and pH-balanced gels continue to be evaluated in ongoing studies. Definitive results are needed pertaining to the safety of topical estrogens in breast cancer survivors.

  19. Autoimmune liver disease in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieli-Vergani, G; Vergani, D

    2003-03-01

    Autoimmune liver disorders are characterised by an inflammatory liver histology, circulating non-organ specific autoantibodies and increased levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG) in the absence of a known aetiology. They respond to immunosuppressive treatment, which should be instituted as soon as diagnosis is made. Liver disorders with a likely autoimmune pathogenesis include autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC). Two types of AIH are recognised according to seropositivity for smooth muscle and/or antinuclear antibody (SMA/ANA, type 1) or liver kidney microsomal antibody (LKM1, type 2). There is a female predominance in both. LKM1-positive patients tend to present more acutely, at a younger age, and commonly have immunoglobulin A (IgA) deficiency, while duration of symptoms before diagnosis, clinical signs, family history of autoimmunity, presence of associated autoimmune disorders, response to treatment and long-term prognosis are similar in both groups. The most common type of paediatric sclerosing cholangitis is ASC. The clinical, biochemical, immunological and histological presentation of ASC is often indistinguishable from that of AIH. In both, there are high IgG, non-organ specific autoantibodies and interface hepatitis. Diagnosis is made by cholangiography. Children with ASC respond to immunosuppression satisfactorily and similarly to AIH in respect to remission and relapse rates, times to normalisation of biochemical parameters and decreased inflammatory activity on follow-up liver biopsies. However, the cholangiopathy can progress and there may be an evolution from AIH to ASC over the years, despite treatment. Whether the juvenile autoimmune form of sclerosing cholangitis and AIH are 2 distinct entities, or different aspects of the same condition, remains to be elucidated.

  20. Luminescent Immunoprecipitation System (LIPS) for Detection of Autoantibodies Against ATP4A and ATP4B Subunits of Gastric Proton Pump H+,K+-ATPase in Atrophic Body Gastritis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahner, Edith; Brigatti, Cristina; Marzinotto, Ilaria; Carabotti, Marilia; Scalese, Giulia; Davidson, Howard W; Wenzlau, Janet M; Bosi, Emanuele; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Annibale, Bruno; Lampasona, Vito

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Circulating autoantibodies targeting the H+/K+-ATPase proton pump of gastric parietal cells are considered markers of autoimmune gastritis, whose diagnostic accuracy in atrophic body gastritis, the pathological lesion of autoimmune gastritis, remains unknown. This study aimed to assess autoantibodies against ATP4A and ATP4B subunits of parietal cells H+, K+-ATPase in atrophic body gastritis patients and controls. Methods: One-hundred and four cases with atrophic body gastritis and 205 controls were assessed for serological autoantibodies specific for ATP4A or ATP4B subunits using luminescent immunoprecipitation system (LIPS). Recombinant luciferase-reporter-fused-antigens were expressed by in vitro transcription-translation (ATP4A) or after transfection in Expi293F cells (ATP4B), incubated with test sera, and immune complexes recovered using protein-A-sepharose. LIPS assays were compared with a commercial enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for parietal cell autoantibodies. Results: ATP4A and ATP4B autoantibody titers were higher in cases compared to controls (Pgastritis. Both assays had the highest sensitivity, at the cost of diagnostic accuracy (89 and 90% specificity), outperforming traditional EIA. Once validated, these LIPS assays should be valuable screening tools for detecting biomarkers of damaged atrophic oxyntic mucosa. PMID:28102858

  1. Celiac disease and endocrine autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahaly, George J; Schuppan, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a small-intestinal inflammatory disease that is triggered by the ingestion of the storage proteins (gluten) of wheat, barley and rye. Endocrine autoimmunity is prevalent in patients with CD and their relatives. The genes that predispose to endocrine autoimmune diseases, e.g. type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid diseases, and Addison's disease, i.e. DR3-DQ2 and DR4-DQ8, are also the major genetic determinants of CD, which is the best understood HLA-linked disease. Thus, up to 30% of first-degree relatives both of patients with CD and/or endocrine autoimmunity are affected by the other disease. In CD, certain gluten proteins bind with high affinity to HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 in the small-intestinal mucosa, to activate gluten-specific T cells which are instrumental in the destruction of the resorptive villi. Here, the autoantigen tissue transglutaminase increases the T cell response by generating deamidated gluten peptides that bind more strongly to DQ2 or DQ8. Classical symptoms such as diarrhea and consequences of malabsorption like anemia and osteoporosis are often absent in patients with (screening-detected) CD, but this absence does not significantly affect these patients' incidence of endocrine autoimmunity. Moreover, once autoimmunity is established, a gluten-free diet is not able to induce remission. However, ongoing studies attempt to address how far a gluten-free diet may prevent or retard the development of CD and endocrine autoimmunity in children at risk. The close relationship between CD and endocrine autoimmunity warrants a broader immune genetic and endocrine screening of CD patients and their relatives. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Shounak; Takahashi, Naoki; Chari, Suresh T

    2017-07-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a chronic fibroinflammatory disease of the pancreas that belongs to the spectrum of immunoglobulin G-subclass4-related diseases (IgG4-RD) and typically presents with obstructive jaundice. Idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) is a closely related but distinct disease that mimics AIP radiologically but manifests clinically most commonly as recurrent acute pancreatitis in young individuals with concurrent inflammatory bowel disease. IgG4 levels are often elevated in AIP and normal in IDCP. Histologically, lymphoplasmacytic acinar inflammation and storiform fibrosis are seen in both. In addition, the histologic hallmark of IDCP is the granulocyte epithelial lesion: intraluminal and intraepithelial neutrophils in medium-sized and small ducts with or without granulocytic acinar inflammation often associated with destruction of ductal architecture. Initial treatment of both AIP and IDCP is with oral corticosteroids for duration of 4 weeks followed by a gradual taper. Relapses are common in AIP and relatively uncommon in IDCP, a relatively rare disease for which the natural history is not well understood. For patients with relapsing AIP, treatment with immunomodulators and more recently rituximab has been recommended. Although rare instances of pancreaticobiliary malignancy has been reported in patients with AIP, overall the lifetime risk of developing pancreatic cancer does not appear to be elevated.

  3. MiR-27a rs895819 is involved in increased atrophic gastritis risk, improved gastric cancer prognosis and negative interaction with Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qian; Chen, Tie-jun; He, Cai-yun; Sun, Li-ping; Liu, Jing-wei; Yuan, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    MiR-27a rs895819 is a loop-stem structure single nucleotide polymorphism affecting mature miR-27a function. In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis about the association of rs895819 with gastric cancer risk and prognosis, atrophic gastritis risk, as well as the interactions with environmental factors. A total of 939 gastric cancer patients, 1,067 atrophic gastritis patients and 1,166 healthy controls were screened by direct sequencing and MALDI-TOF-MS. The association of rs895819 with clinical pathological parameters and prognostic survival in 357 gastric cancer patients was also been analyzed. The rs895819 variant genotype increased the risk for atrophic gastritis (1.58-fold) and gastric cancer (1.24-fold). While in stratified analysis, the risk effect was demonstrated more significantly in the female, age >60y, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) negative and non-drinker subgroups. Rs895819 and H. pylori showed an interaction effect for atrophic gastritis risk. In the survival analysis, the rs895819 AG heterozygosis was associated with better survival than the AA wild-type in the TNM stage I–II subgroup. In vitro study by overexpressing miR-27a, cells carrying polymorphic-type G allele expressed lower miR-27a than wild-type A allele. In conclusion, miR-27a rs895819 is implicated as a biomarker for gastric cancer and atrophic gastritis risk, and interacts with H. pylori in gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:28150722

  4. Evidence of Stage- and Age-Related Heterogeneity of Non-HLA SNPs and Risk of Islet Autoimmunity and Type 1 Diabetes: The Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittni N. Frederiksen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we examined 20 non-HLA SNPs for association with islet autoimmunity (IA and/or progression to type 1 diabetes (T1D. Our objective was to investigate fourteen additional non-HLA T1D candidate SNPs for stage- and age-related heterogeneity in the etiology of T1D. Of 1634 non-Hispanic white DAISY children genotyped, 132 developed IA (positive for GAD, insulin, or IA-2 autoantibodies at two or more consecutive visits; 50 IA positive children progressed to T1D. Cox regression was used to analyze risk of IA and progression to T1D in IA positive children. Restricted cubic splines were used to model SNPs when there was evidence that risk was not constant with age. C1QTNF6 (rs229541 predicted increased IA risk (HR: 1.57, CI: 1.20–2.05 but not progression to T1D (HR: 1.13, CI: 0.75–1.71. SNP (rs10517086 appears to exhibit an age-related effect on risk of IA, with increased risk before age 2 years (age 2 HR: 1.67, CI: 1.08–2.56 but not older ages (age 4 HR: 0.84, CI: 0.43–1.62. C1QTNF6 (rs229541, SNP (rs10517086, and UBASH3A (rs3788013 were associated with development of T1D. This prospective investigation of non-HLA T1D candidate loci shows that some SNPs may exhibit stage- and age-related heterogeneity in the etiology of T1D.

  5. [Diagnostic utility of endoscopic ultrasonography elastography and contrast-enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasonography in a patient with type 2 autoimmune pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokode, Masataka; Shiomi, Hideyuki; Itai, Ryosuke; Mikami, Sakae; Yamashita, Yukimasa; Nakano, Ryota; Ezaki, Takeshi; Masuda, Atsuhiro; Zen, Yoh

    2018-01-01

    A referring hospital diagnosed a 57-year-old man with a pancreatic head mass. The initial endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) was inconclusive because of the small sample size. Endoscopic ultrasonography elastography (EUS-EG) and contrast-enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasonography (CE-EUS), conducted at our institute, raised the possibility of mass-forming pancreatitis or autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). A repeat EUS-FNA revealed inflammatory changes, including a neutrophilic duct injury suggestive of type 2 AIP. The pancreatic lesion responded well to the steroid therapy. The present case suggests that EUS-EG and CE-EUS may be useful for diagnostic exclusion of pancreatic cancers, and the combined use of EUS-EG and CE-EUS, with EUS-FNA, may help characterize inflammatory pancreatic lesions.

  6. Fractional ablative CO2 laser treatment versus scar subcision and autologous fat transfer in the treatment of atrophic acne scars: New technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available There are different modalities for management of atrophic acne scars which include lasers. Ablative fractional CO2 laser was developed to address the shortcomings of traditional ablative lasers, with superior results to non-ablative fractional lasers. Autologous fat transfer has been utilized for nearly a decade in tissue augmentation and reconstruction.Present studies were designed to compare ablative fractional CO2 laser treatment with scar subcision and autologous fat transfer in the treatment of atrophic acne scars. 20 patients with atrophic acne scars were recruited: 10 patients were treated by three sessions of ablative fractional CO2 laser therapy, and 10 patients treated by subcision and autologous fat transfer. All patients were followed up for three months, and were assessed by digital photograph before and after treatment through the application of Goodman and Baron quantitative and qualitative grading systems, in addition to reports by three physicians committees and reports of patients’ satisfaction. Analysis of both groups showed significant improvements in all types of atrophic acne scars. The mean percentage of total quantitative improvement was more significant in the case of autologous fat transfer with regard to ice-pick and total number of scars. Therefore, scar subcision with autologous fat transfer proved to be as effective as, or even more effective than, ablative fractional CO2 laser in the treatment of atrophic acne scars with regard to the total number of scars as well as ice-pick type.

  7. Improvement of Atrophic Acne Scars in Skin of Color Using Topical Synthetic Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) Serum: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, Marie Alexia; Herrmann, Jennifer; Moy, Lauren; Moy, Ronald

    2017-04-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrophic scarring in skin of color is a common, permanent, and distressing result of uncontrolled acne vulgaris. Ablative lasers and chemical peels are frequently used to improve the appearance of atrophic scars, primarily through the stimulation of collagen and elastin; however, these treatment modalities are associated with risks, such as dyspigmentation and hypertrophic scarring, especially in patients with darker skin. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the efficacy of topically applied synthetic epidermal growth factor (EGF) serum in reducing the appearance of atrophic acne scars in skin of color. METHODS: A single-center clinical trial was performed on twelve healthy men and women (average age 32.5) with Fitzpatrick Type IV-V skin and evidence of facial grade II-IV atrophic acne scars. Subjects applied topical EGF serum to the full-face twice daily for 12 weeks. Scar improvement was investigated at each visit using an Investigator Global Assessment (IGA), a Goodman grade, clinical photography, and patient self-assessment. RESULTS: Eleven subjects completed the trial. Compared to baseline, there was an improvement in mean IGA score from 3.36 (SEM = 0.15) to 2.18 (SEM = 0.33). Mean Goodman grade was reduced from 2.73 (SEM = 0.19) to 2.55 (SEM = 0.21). Of the eleven pairs of before and after photographs, nine were correctly chosen as the post-treatment image by a blind investigator. On self-assessment, 81% reported a "good" to "excellent" improvement in their scars compared to baseline (P = 0.004). CONCLUSION: Topical EGF may improve the appearance of atrophic acne scars in skin of color. Additional, larger studies should be conducted to better characterize improvement. J Drugs Dermatol. 2017;16(4):322-326..

  8. Helicobacter pylori infection and atrophic gastritis | Ebule | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Helicobacter pylori-infection associated gastritis is known to be a significant risk factor of gastric cancer. Serum levels of Gastrin-17 and Pepsinogen1which are respectively biomarkers of gastric antral and corpus mucosal activity are well known parameters of atrophic gastritis. Objectives: To determine the ...

  9. Endocrine autoimmune disease: genetics become complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebolt, Janneke; Koeleman, Bobby P C; van Haeften, Timon W

    2010-12-01

    The endocrine system is a frequent target in pathogenic autoimmune responses. Type 1 diabetes and autoimmune thyroid disease are the prevailing examples. When several diseases cluster together in one individual, the phenomenon is called autoimmune polyglandular syndrome. Progress has been made in understanding the genetic factors involved in endocrine autoimmune diseases. Studies on monogenic autoimmune diseases such as autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1, immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked and primary immune deficiencies helped uncover the role of key regulators in the preservation of immune tolerance. Alleles of the major histocompatibility complex have been known to contribute to the susceptibility to most forms of autoimmunity for more than 3 decades. Furthermore, sequencing studies revealed three non-major histocompatibility complex loci and some disease specific loci, which control T lymphocyte activation or signalling. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have enabled acceleration in the identification of novel (non-HLA) loci and hence other relevant immune response pathways. Interestingly, several loci are shared between autoimmune diseases, and surprisingly some work in opposite direction. This means that the same allele which predisposes to a certain autoimmune disease can be protective in another. Well powered GWAS in type 1 diabetes has led to the uncovering of a significant number of risk variants with modest effect. These studies showed that the innate immune system may also play a role in addition to the adaptive immune system. It is anticipated that next generation sequencing techniques will uncover other (rare) variants. For other autoimmune disease (such as autoimmune thyroid disease) GWAS are clearly needed. © 2010 The Authors. European Journal of Clinical Investigation © 2010 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  10. Experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis may occur in the context of a polarized Th1- or Th2-type immune response in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saoudi, A; Bernard, I; Hoedemaekers, A

    1999-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) is a T cell-dependent, Ab-mediated autoimmune disease induced in rats by a single immunization with acetylcholine receptor (AChR). Although polarized Th1 responses have been shown to be crucial for the development of mouse EAMG, the role of Th cell...

  11. A Patient with Autoimmune Pancreatitis Type 1 with Previously Known Lymphadenopathy, Both in the Context of IgG4-related Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Alidjan, Fazil M.; Karim, Faiz; Verdijk, Rob M.; van Esser, Joost W.; van Heerde, Marianne J.

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 62 Final Diagnosis: Auto-immune pancreatitis Symptoms: Jaundice ? lymfadenopathy Medication: ? Clinical Procedure: Laboratory ? imaging Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is an important clinical pathologic concept of IgG-4-related disease. AIP is a rare cause of chronic pancreatitis, characterized by a fibroinflammatory process by lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates, storiform fibrosis, obliterative...

  12. Regulation of apoptosis is impaired in atrophic gastritis associated with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosania, R; Varbanova, M; Wex, T; Langner, C; Bornschein, J; Giorgio, F; Ierardi, E; Malfertheiner, P

    2017-06-29

    Gastric premalignant conditions, atrophic gastritis (AG) and intestinal metaplasia (IM) are characterized by an increase of proliferation and a reduction of apoptosis in epithelial cells. The epithelial cell kinetics in AG and IM in gastric mucosa adjacent to gastric cancer is still unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the epithelial cell turnover and expression of proliferation and apoptosis-related genes in gastric cancer (GC) and adjacent mucosa with atrophic gastritis or intestinal metaplasia (AG/IM GC+), as well as in atrophic gastritis or intestinal metaplasia mucosa of patients without GC (AG/IM GC-) and in control biopsy samples of non-transformed gastric mucosa (Control). We selected 58 patients (M: F = 34:24; age range 20-84 years, median 61.06 years) with 4 well defined histological conditions: 20 controls with histological finding of non-transformed gastric mucosa, 20 patients with AG or IM (AG/IM GC-), and 18 patients with intestinal type gastric adenocarcinoma (GC) and AG or IM in the adjacent mucosa (3 cm from the macroscopic tumour margin, AG/IM GC+). We performed an immunohistochemical staining of Ki67 and TUNEL and quantitative RT-PCR to determine the expression of PCNA and Bax/Bcl-2. The immunohistochemical expression of Ki67 and TUNEL in AG/IM GC- was significantly increased compared to not transformed gastric mucosa (p gastritis and IM in presence of cancer, as well as intestinal type gastric adenocarcinoma.

  13. Specific inulin-type fructan fibers protect against autoimmune diabetes by modulating gut immunity, barrier function, and microbiota homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Kang; Chen, Hao; Faas, Marijke M; de Haan, Bart J; Li, Jiahong; Xiao, Ping; Zhang, Hao; Diana, Julien; de Vos, Paul; Sun, Jia

    Scope: Dietary fibers capable of modifying gut barrier and microbiota homeostasis affect the progression of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Here, we aim to compare modulatory effects of inulin-type fructans (ITFs), natural soluble dietary fibers with different degrees of fermentability from chicory root, on

  14. Autoimmune Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hepatitis is the most common form in North America. Type 1 can occur at any age; however, ... eastern time, M-F Follow Us NIH… Turning Discovery Into Health ® Research & Funding Current Funding Opportunities Research ...

  15. ASSESSMENT OF MICRONEEDLING THERAPY IN THE MANAGEMENT OF ATROPHIC FACIAL ACNE SCARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available STUDY BACKGROUND Post acne scars are always a challenge to treat, especially the ones which are deep seated. There are many treatment options like laser resurfacing, dermabrasion, microdermabrasion and non-ablative laser resurfacing but with considerable morbidity and interference with the daily activities of the patient in the post-treatment period. Microneedling or dermaroller therapy is one of the new treatment options in the management of acne scars with satisfactory improvement and no significant side effect. The aim of the present study is to perform an objective evaluation the efficacy of microneedling in the treatment of atrophic acne scars. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty patients of skin type III-V having atrophic facial acne scars presenting to our dermatology OPD. were received multiple sittings of microneedling (dermaroller treatment with an interval of 6 weeks between each session. Goodman & Baron’s acne scar grading system was used for assessment of their scars and was evaluated clinically by serial photography at the start as well as at two months after the conclusion of the treatment. Patients on anticoagulant therapy, of keloidal tendency, with bleeding disorders, vitiligo patients, pregnant and lactating mothers and patients with active acne lesions were excluded from the study. The duration of this study was for ten months-from January 2014 to October 2014. RESULTS Any change in the grading of scars after the end of treatment and follow-up period was noted down. The efficacy and improvement of dermaroller treatment was assessed by Goodman and Baron’s Global Acne Scarring System. Out of 30 patients, 26(80.64% patients achieved a reduction in the severity of their scarring by one or two grades. Quantitative assessment showed that 13.3% of patients had minimal, 16.6% had good and 70% showed very good improvement. Adverse effects were limited to transient pain, erythema and edema. CONCLUSION Microneedling therapy seems to be

  16. Fractional CO 2 laser resurfacing as monotherapy in the treatment of atrophic facial acne scars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Majid

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: While laser resurfacing remains the most effective treatment option for atrophic acne scars, the high incidence of post-treatment adverse effects limits its use. Fractional laser photothermolysis attempts to overcome these limitations of laser resurfacing by creating microscopic zones of injury to the dermis with skip areas in between. Aim: The aim of the present study is to assess the efficacy and safety of fractional CO 2 laser resurfacing in atrophic facial acne scars. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients with moderate to severe atrophic facial acne scars were treated with 3-4 sessions of fractional CO 2 laser resurfacing at 6-week intervals. The therapeutic response to treatment was assessed at each follow up visit and then finally 6 months after the last laser session using a quartile grading scale. Response to treatment was labelled as ′excellent′ if there was >50% improvement in scar appearance and texture of skin on the grading scale while 25-50% response and <25% improvement were labelled as ′good′ and ′poor′ response, respectively. The overall satisfaction of the patients and any adverse reactions to the treatment were also noted. Results: Most of the patients showed a combination of different morphological types of acne scars. At the time of final assessment 6 months after the last laser session, an excellent response was observed in 26 patients (43.3% while 15 (25% and 19 patients (31.7% demonstrated a good and poor response respectively. Rolling and superficial boxcar scars responded the best while pitted scars responded the least to fractional laser monotherapy. The commonest reported adverse effect was transient erythema and crusting lasting for an average of 3-4 and 4-6 days, respectively while three patients developed post-inflammatory pigmentation lasting for 8-12 weeks. Conclusions: Fractional laser resurfacing as monotherapy is effective in treating acne scars especially rolling and superficial boxcar

  17. [Morphological alterations in nailfold capillaroscopy and the clinical picture of vascular involvement in autoimmune diseases: systemic lupus erythematosus and type 1 diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuryliszyn-Moskal, Anna; Ciołkiewicz, Mariusz; Dubicki, Artur

    2010-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) belong to the group of autoimmune diseases presenting with a wide range of organ manifestations. Microvascular abnormalities seem to play a crucial role in the development of persistent multi-organ complications in both diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between microvascular changes examined with nailfold capillaroscopy and organ involvement. We eurolled 76 SLE patients, 106 patients with type 1 diabetes, and 40 healthy controls. Morphological changes were observed with nailfold capillaroscopy in 86 (81%) diabetics and in 70 (92.1%) SLE patients. Severe capillaroscopic changes were disclosed in 32 out of 54 (59%) diabetic patients with microangiopathy and in only 7 out of 52 (13%) patients without microangiopathy. In the SLE group, severe capillaroscopic abnormalities were found in 18 out of 34 (52.9%) patients with organ involvement and in 9 out of 42 (21.4%) patients without organ involvement. The capillaroscopic score was significantly higher in diabetic patients with microangiopathic complications in comparison to patients without microangiopathy (p nailfold capillaroscopy reflect the extent of microvascular involvement and are associated with organ involvement in SLE and diabetes.

  18. Decreased A20 mRNA and protein expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in patients with type 2 diabetes and latent autoimmune diabetes in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Liqing; Zhang, Dongmei; Jiang, Youzhao; Deng, Wuquan; Wu, Qi'nan; Jiang, Xiaoyan; Chen, Bing

    2014-12-01

    A20 is a negative regulator of nuclear factor kappa B activation and the central gatekeeper in inflammation and immunity. While its role in type 1 diabetes has been widely studied, its expression level in immune cells from type 2 diabetes (T2D) and latent autoimmune diabetes in adult (LADA) patients remains unclear. This study aimed to clarify whether the expression of A20 is altered in patients with T2D or LADA. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were utilized to determine the expression of A20 mRNA and protein respectively in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with T2D (n=36) or LADA (n=17) and sex- and age-matched healthy controls (n=34). The mRNA and protein expression of A20 in PBMCs from T2D and LADA patients was significantly decreased compared with healthy controls (P1 year since diagnosis) (P<0.05). Our results suggest that decreased expression of A20 in PBMCs may be involved in the pathogenesis of diabetes, and targeting A20 may offer a potential therapeutic tool in the treatment of diabetes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Latent Autoimmune Diabetes Mellitus in Adults (LADA and it’s characteristics in a subset of Nigerians initially managed for type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeleye Olufunmilayo O

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA is an entity characterized by the presence of GAD autoantibodies. LADA is largely understudied and underreported amongst Nigerians with Diabetes Mellitus (DM. We undertook to document the Prevalence, clinical and biochemical characteristics of LADA in a subset of Nigerians who hitherto had been treated for type 2 DM. Methods This is a cross-sectional study conducted on 235 patients being managed for type 2 DM. The diagnosis of LADA was made in the presence of Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase autoantibody (GADA positivity in the study subjects. Thereafter persons with LADA were compared with those without LADA. Clinical parameters such as demographic data, history of diabetes mellitus (DM and its complications were obtained, biochemical parameters including Fasting blood glucose (FBG, C-peptide, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c and lipid parameters were compared in both groups of Study subject. Test statistics used were Student t- test and χ 2. SPSS was used for data analysis. Results Thirty three out of 235 of the Study subjects were GADA positive, giving a prevalence of 14%. The mean age (SD of the subjects with LADA is 53.24(7.22 with an age range of 30–63 years. Majority (48% of LADA subjects were in the 50–59 age category. There was no significant difference in the proportion of males and females with LADA (p = 0.3. 37% of patients with LADA were on insulin for glycaemic control. Three (3 LADA subjects had history/clinical evidence of autoimmune thyroid disease. 66% of LADA were in the overweight/obese category. LADA subjects had significant poor long term glycaemic control compared with anti-GAD negative subjects (p = 0.026. About half of LADA subjects were insulinopaenic. LADA subjects had lower levels of total cholesterol than GADA-ve subjects (p = 0.03. A higher proportion of LADA had evidence of microvascular complications of DM compared with antiGAD negative individuals

  20. Beneficial Autoimmunity at Body Surfaces – Immune Surveillance and Rapid Type 2 Immunity Regulate Tissue Homeostasis and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalessandri, Tim; Strid, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial cells (ECs) line body surface tissues and provide a physicochemical barrier to the external environment. Frequent microbial and non-microbial challenges such as those imposed by mechanical disruption, injury or exposure to noxious environmental substances including chemicals, carcinogens, ultraviolet-irradiation, or toxins cause activation of ECs with release of cytokines and chemokines as well as alterations in the expression of cell-surface ligands. Such display of epithelial stress is rapidly sensed by tissue-resident immunocytes, which can directly interact with self-moieties on ECs and initiate both local and systemic immune responses. ECs are thus key drivers of immune surveillance at body surface tissues. However, ECs have a propensity to drive type 2 immunity (rather than type 1) upon non-invasive challenge or stress – a type of immunity whose regulation and function still remain enigmatic. Here, we review the induction and possible role of type 2 immunity in epithelial tissues and propose that rapid immune surveillance and type 2 immunity are key regulators of tissue homeostasis and carcinogenesis. PMID:25101088

  1. Beneficial autoimmunity at body surfaces - immune surveillance and rapid type 2 immunity regulate tissue homeostasis and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalessandri, Tim; Strid, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial cells (ECs) line body surface tissues and provide a physicochemical barrier to the external environment. Frequent microbial and non-microbial challenges such as those imposed by mechanical disruption, injury or exposure to noxious environmental substances including chemicals, carcinogens, ultraviolet-irradiation, or toxins cause activation of ECs with release of cytokines and chemokines as well as alterations in the expression of cell-surface ligands. Such display of epithelial stress is rapidly sensed by tissue-resident immunocytes, which can directly interact with self-moieties on ECs and initiate both local and systemic immune responses. ECs are thus key drivers of immune surveillance at body surface tissues. However, ECs have a propensity to drive type 2 immunity (rather than type 1) upon non-invasive challenge or stress - a type of immunity whose regulation and function still remain enigmatic. Here, we review the induction and possible role of type 2 immunity in epithelial tissues and propose that rapid immune surveillance and type 2 immunity are key regulators of tissue homeostasis and carcinogenesis.

  2. Establishment of a vascular endothelial cell-reactive type II NKT cell clone from a rat model of autoimmune vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iinuma, Chihiro; Waki, Masashi; Kawakami, Ai; Yamaguchi, Madoka; Tomaru, Utano; Sasaki, Naomi; Masuda, Sakiko; Matsui, Yuki; Iwasaki, Sari; Baba, Tomohisa; Kasahara, Masanori; Yoshiki, Takashi; Paletta, Daniel; Herrmann, Thomas; Ishizu, Akihiro

    2015-02-01

    We previously generated a rat model that spontaneously developed small vessel vasculitis (SVV). In this study, a T cell clone reactive with rat vascular endothelial cells (REC) was established and named VASC-1. Intravenous injection of VASC-1 induced SVV in normal recipients. VASC-1 was a TCRαβ/CD3-positive CD4/CD8 double-negative T cell clone with expression of NKG2D. The cytokine mRNA profile under unstimulated condition was positive for IL-4 and IFN-γ but negative for IL-2 and IL-10. After interaction with REC, the mRNA expression of IL-2, IL-5 and IL-6 was induced in VASC-1, which was inhibited by blocking of CD1d on the REC surface. Although the protein levels of these cytokines seemed to be lower than the detection limit in the culture medium, IFN-γ was detectable. The production of IFN-γ from the VASC-1 stimulated with LPS-pre-treated REC was inhibited by the CD1d blockade on the REC. These findings indicated VASC-1 as an NKT cell clone. The NKT cell pool includes two major subsets, namely types I and II. Type I NKT cells are characterized by expression of semi-invariant TCRs and the potential to bind to marine sponge-derived α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) loaded on CD1d; whereas, type II NKT cells do not manifest these characteristics. VASC-1 exhibited a usage of TCR other than the type I invariant TCR α chain and did not bind to α-GalCer-loaded CD1d; therefore, it was determined as a type II NKT cell clone. The collective evidence suggested that REC-reactive type II NKT cells could be involved in the pathogenesis of SVV in rats. © The Japanese Society for Immunology. 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Monogenic autoimmune diseases of the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew B; Hattersley, Andrew T; Flanagan, Sarah E

    2016-10-01

    The most common endocrine diseases, type 1 diabetes, hyperthyroidism, and hypothyroidism, are the result of autoimmunity. Clustering of autoimmune endocrinopathies can result from polygenic predisposition, or more rarely, may present as part of a wider syndrome due to a mutation within one of seven genes. These monogenic autoimmune diseases show highly variable phenotypes both within and between families with the same mutations. The average age of onset of the monogenic forms of autoimmune endocrine disease is younger than that of the common polygenic forms, and this feature combined with the manifestation of other autoimmune diseases, specific hallmark features, or both, can inform clinicians as to the relevance of genetic testing. A genetic diagnosis can guide medical management, give an insight into prognosis, inform families of recurrence risk, and facilitate prenatal diagnoses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Induction of endogenous Type I interferon within the central nervous system plays a protective role in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khorooshi, Reza; Mørch, Marlene Thorsen; Holm, Thomas Hellesøe

    2015-01-01

    show elevated levels of Type I IFNs in the central nervous system (CNS), suggesting a role for endogenous Type I IFN during inflammation. However, the therapeutic benefit of Type I IFN produced in the CNS remains to be established. The aim of this study was to examine whether experimentally induced CNS......-endogenous Type I IFN influences EAE. Using IFN-β reporter mice, we showed that direct administration of polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), a potent inducer of IFN-β, into the cerebrospinal fluid induced increased leukocyte numbers and transient upregulation of IFN-β in CD45/CD11b-positive cells located...... in the meninges and choroid plexus, as well as enhanced IFN-β expression by parenchymal microglial cells. Intrathecal injection of poly I:C to mice showing first symptoms of EAE substantially increased the normal disease-associated expression of IFN-α, IFN-β, interferon regulatory factor-7 and IL-10 in CNS...

  5. Atrophic Gastritis and the Risk of Incident Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laiyemo, Adeyinka O.; Kamangar, Farin; Marcus, Pamela M.; Taylor, Philip R.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Albanes, Demetrius; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Previous studies evaluating whether risk factors for gastric cancer are also associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) have shown inconsistent results. We prospectively examined the association of atrophic gastritis, a pre-malignant condition for gastric cancer and long-term sequelae common to many exposure factors, and the risk of incident CRC. Methods A total of 20,928 Finnish male smokers, aged 50–69, who were participants in the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study (ATBC) had serum pepsinogen I (SPGI) levels measured. Participants with low SPGI levels (gastritis was histologically confirmed in 1,006 (95.0%) participants. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to evaluate the risk of incident CRC. Results During a mean follow-up of 11.3 years (236,258 person-years), 425 incident CRC were diagnosed. The incidence rates were 1.82, 1.48, and 1.82 per 1,000 person-years of follow-up for participants with normal SPGI (≥25 µg/l), low SPGI, and histologically-confirmed atrophic gastritis, respectively. Compared to subjects with normal SPGI, there was no increased risk of CRC among subjects with low SPGI (Adjusted Hazard Ratio (HR) = 0.71; 95%CI: 0.47–1.05) and among those with histologically-confirmed atrophic gastritis (Adjusted HR = 0.86; 95%CI: 0.55–1.34). Conclusions Atrophic gastritis is not associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer among male smokers. PMID:19838812

  6. A Patient with Autoimmune Pancreatitis Type 1 with Previously Known Lymphadenopathy, Both in the Context of IgG4-related Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alidjan, Fazil M; Karim, Faiz; Verdijk, Rob M; van Esser, Joost W; van Heerde, Marianne J

    2015-11-05

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is an important clinical pathologic concept of IgG-4-related disease. AIP is a rare cause of chronic pancreatitis, characterized by a fibroinflammatory process by lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates, storiform fibrosis, obliterative phlebitis, and increased IgG4+ plasma cells, leading to dysfunction of the pancreas. Affected patients with AIP frequently have disease affecting other organs or sites with similar histologic changes, elevated IgG4+ plasma cell infiltrate, and good response to corticosteroid therapy. These diseases often are not limited to the pancreas and the pancreas may not be involved at all. We report a 62-year-old man with obstructive jaundice with pre-existent submandibular lymphadenopathy. Diagnosis of AIP was based on diagnostic criteria by the HISORT-criteria in combination with elevated IgG-4 serum levels. CT revealed a focal enlargement of the head of the pancreas, as well as mesenteric peripancreatic and mediastinal lymphadenopathy. He was treated with high-dose steroid in combination with azathioprine and showed good clinical response. We report a case with pre-existent submandibular lymphadenopathy and obstructive jaundice based on AIP type 1, both in the context of IgG4-related disease.

  7. Combination therapy in the management of atrophic acne scars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Garg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atrophic acne scars are difficult to treat. The demand for less invasive but highly effective treatment for scars is growing. Objective: To assess the efficacy of combination therapy using subcision, microneedling and 15% trichloroacetic acid (TCA peel in the management of atrophic scars. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients with atrophic acne scars were graded using Goodman and Baron Qualitative grading. After subcision, dermaroller and 15% TCA peel were performed alternatively at 2-weeks interval for a total of 6 sessions of each. Grading of acne scar photographs was done pretreatment and 1 month after last procedure. Patients own evaluation of improvement was assessed. Results: Out of 16 patients with Grade 4 scars, 10 (62.5% patients improved to Grade 2 and 6 (37.5% patients improved to Grade 3 scars. Out of 22 patients with Grade 3 scars, 5 (22.7% patients were left with no scars, 2 (9.1% patients improved to Grade 1and 15 (68.2% patients improved to Grade 2. All 11 (100% patients with Grade 2 scars were left with no scars. There was high level of patient satisfaction. Conclusion: This combination has shown good results in treating not only Grade 2 but also severe Grade 4 and 3 scars.

  8. Galectin-3 in autoimmunity and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Felipe L; Gatto, Mariele; Bassi, Nicola; Luisetto, Roberto; Ghirardello, Anna; Punzi, Leonardo; Doria, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    Galectin-3 (gal-3) is a β-galactoside-binding lectin, which regulates cell-cell and extracellular interactions during self/non-self-antigen recognition and cellular activation, proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis. It plays a significant role in cellular and tissue pathophysiology by organizing niches that drive inflammation and immune responses. Gal-3 has some therapeutic potential in several diseases, including chronic inflammatory disorders, cancer and autoimmune diseases. Gal-3 exerts a broad spectrum of functions which differs according to its intra- or extracellular localization. Recombinant gal-3 strategy has been used to identify potential mode of action of gal-3; however, exogenous gal-3 may not reproduce the functions of the endogenous gal-3. Notably, gal-3 induces monocyte-macrophage differentiation, interferes with dendritic cell fate decision, regulates apoptosis on T lymphocytes and inhibits B-lymphocyte differentiation into immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells. Considering the influence of these cell populations in the pathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases, gal-3 seems to play a role in development of autoimmunity. Gal-3 has been suggested as a potential therapeutic agent in patients affected with some autoimmune disorders. However, the precise role of gal-3 in driving the inflammatory process in autoimmune or immune-mediated disorders remains elusive. Here, we reviewed the involvement of gal-3 in cellular and tissue events during autoimmune and immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. © 2015 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  9. Specific inulin-type fructan fibers protect against autoimmune diabetes by modulating gut immunity, barrier function, and microbiota homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kang; Chen, Hao; Faas, Marijke M; de Haan, Bart J; Li, Jiahong; Xiao, Ping; Zhang, Hao; Diana, Julien; de Vos, Paul; Sun, Jia

    2017-08-01

    Dietary fibers capable of modifying gut barrier and microbiota homeostasis affect the progression of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Here, we aim to compare modulatory effects of inulin-type fructans (ITFs), natural soluble dietary fibers with different degrees of fermentability from chicory root, on T1D development in nonobese diabetic mice. Female nonobese diabetic mice were weaned to long- and short-chain ITFs [ITF(l) and ITF(s), 5%] supplemented diet up to 24 weeks. T1D incidence, pancreatic-gut immune responses, gut barrier function, and microbiota composition were analyzed. ITF(l) but not ITF(s) supplementation dampened the incidence of T1D. ITF(l) promoted modulatory T-cell responses, as evidenced by increased CD25 + Foxp3 + CD4 + regulatory T cells, decreased IL17A + CD4 + Th17 cells, and modulated cytokine production profile in the pancreas, spleen, and colon. Furthermore, ITF(l) suppressed NOD like receptor protein 3 caspase-1-p20-IL-1β inflammasome in the colon. Expression of barrier reinforcing tight junction proteins occludin and claudin-2, antimicrobial peptides β-defensin-1, and cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide as well as short-chain fatty acid production were enhanced by ITF(l). Next-generation sequencing analysis revealed that ITF(l) enhanced Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio to an antidiabetogenic balance and enriched modulatory Ruminococcaceae and Lactobacilli. Our data demonstrate that ITF(l) but not ITF(s) delays the development of T1D via modulation of gut-pancreatic immunity, barrier function, and microbiota homeostasis. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. HLA-DRB1*03:01 and HLA-DRB1*04:01 modify the presentation and outcome in autoimmune hepatitis type-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gerven, N M F; de Boer, Y S; Zwiers, A; Verwer, B J; Drenth, J P H; van Hoek, B; van Erpecum, K J; Beuers, U; van Buuren, H R; den Ouden, J W; Verdonk, R C; Koek, G H; Brouwer, J T; Guichelaar, M M J; Vrolijk, J M; Coenraad, M J; Kraal, G; Mulder, C J J; van Nieuwkerk, C M J; Bloemena, E; Verspaget, H W; Kumar, V; Zhernakova, A; Wijmenga, C; Franke, L; Bouma, G

    2015-06-01

    The classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1*03:01 and HLA-DRB1*04:01 alleles are established autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) risk alleles. To study the immune-modifying effect of these alleles, we imputed the genotypes from genome-wide association data in 649 Dutch AIH type-1 patients. We therefore compared the international AIH group (IAIHG) diagnostic scores as well as the underlying clinical characteristics between patients positive and negative for these HLA alleles. Seventy-five percent of the AIH patients were HLA-DRB1*03:01/HLA-DRB1*04:01 positive. HLA-DRB1*03:01/HLA-DRB1*04:01-positive patients had a higher median IAIHG score than HLA-DRB1*03:01/HLA-DRB1*04:01-negative patients (P<0.001). We did not observe associations between HLA alleles and alanine transaminase levels (HLA-DRB1*03:01: P=0.2; HLA-DRB1*04:01; P=0.5); however, HLA-DRB1*03:01 was independently associated with higher immunoglobulin G levels (P=0.04). The HLA-DRB1*04:01 allele was independently associated with presentation at older age (P=0.03) and a female predominance (P=0.04). HLA-DRB1*03:01-positive patients received immunosuppressive medication and liver transplantation. In conclusion, the HLA-DRB1*03:01 and HLA-DRB1*04:01 alleles are both independently associated with the aggregate diagnostic IAIHG score in type-1 AIH patients, but are not essential for AIH development. HLA-DRB1*03:01 is the strongest genetic modifier of disease severity in AIH.

  11. The Clinical Significance of Glycoprotein Phospholipase D Levels in Distinguishing Early Stage Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults and Type 2 Diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Qin

    Full Text Available Autoantibodies have been widely used as markers of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA; however, the specificity and sensitivity of autoantibodies as markers of LADA are weak compared with those found in type 1 diabetes (T1DM. In this study, we aimed to identify other plasma proteins as potential candidates that can be used effectively to determine early stage LADA and type 2 diabetes (T2DM to facilitate early diagnosis and treatment. These issues were addressed by studying new-onset 'classic' T1DM (n = 156, LADA (n = 174, T2DM (n = 195 and healthy cohorts (n = 166. Plasma samples were obtained from the four cohorts. We employed isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ together with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS to identify plasma proteins with significant changes in LADA. The changes were validated by Western blot and ELISA analyses. Among the four cohorts, 311 unique proteins were identified in three iTRAQ runs, with 157 present across the three data sets. Among them, 49/311 (16.0% proteins had significant changes in LADA compared with normal controls, including glycoprotein phospholipase D (GPLD1, which was upregulated in LADA. Western blot and ELISA analyses showed that GPLD1 levels were higher in both LADA and T1DM cohorts than in both T2DM and healthy cohorts, while there were no significant differences in the plasma concentrations of GPLD1 between the LADA and T1DM cohorts. GPLD1 is implicated as a potential candidate plasma protein for determining early stage LADA and T2DM.

  12. Autoimmune hepatitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Vergani, Diego

    2002-08-01

    AIH, ASC, and de novo AIH after liver transplantation are childhood liver diseases of an autoimmune nature. The mode of presentation of AIH in childhood is variable, and the disease should be suspected and excluded in all children presenting with symptoms and signs of prolonged or severe acute liver disease. Although corticosteroids are effective in all types of childhood AIH, patients with LKM1 have a higher frequency of acute hepatic failure and relapse after corticosteroid withdrawal than do patients with ANA/SMA. ASC occurs commonly in the absence of inflammatory bowel disease, requires cholangiography for diagnosis, and improves during corticosteroid therapy. The development of AIH de novo in children who undergo liver transplantation for nonautoimmune liver disease may reflect interference with the maturation of T cells by immunosuppressive drugs.

  13. Clinical and Endoscopic Features of Undifferentiated Gastric Cancer in Patients with Severe Atrophic Gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishino, Maiko; Nakamura, Shinichi; Shiratori, Keiko

    2016-01-01

    Differentiated gastric cancer generally develops in the atrophic gastric mucosa, although undifferentiated cancer is sometimes encountered in patients with severe atrophic gastritis. We characterized the endoscopic features of undifferentiated gastric cancer in patients with severe atrophic gastritis. Stage IA early gastric cancer was diagnosed in 501 patients who were admitted to our hospital between April 2003 and March 2012. The endoscopic and pathological findings were compared among 29 patients with undifferentiated cancer and severe atrophic gastritis, 104 patients with undifferentiated cancer and mild/moderate atrophic gastritis and 223 patients with well-differentiated cancer and severe atrophic gastritis. Endoscopic atrophic gastritis was classified according to the Kimura-Takemoto classification as no gastritis, C-1 and C-2 (mild), C-3 and O-1 (moderate) or O-2 and O-3 (severe). The tumors were larger and showed deeper mural invasion in the patients with undifferentiated cancer and severe atrophic gastritis than in those with well-differentiated cancer and severe gastritis or undifferentiated cancer and mild/moderate gastritis. On endoscopy, undifferentiated cancer associated with severe gastritis was often red in color. It is often difficult to diagnose early undifferentiated gastric cancer, especially in patients with severe atrophic gastritis. The present study characterized the important endoscopic features of such tumors.

  14. No higher risk for colorectal cancer in atrophic gastritis-related hypergastrinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahner, Edith; Sbrozzi-Vanni, Andrea; Vannella, Lucy; Corleto, Vito Domenico; Di Giulio, Emilio; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; Annibale, Bruno

    2012-09-01

    Atrophic gastritis of the corporal mucosa is a frequent cause of hypergastrinemia. Hypergastrinemia is implicated in colorectal cancer development. To assess whether hypergastrinemic atrophic gastritis is associated with a higher risk of neoplastic colorectal lesions. Among 441 hypergastrinemic atrophic gastritis patients, 160 who were aged >40 and underwent colonoscopy for anaemia, diarrhoea or colorectal cancer-screening were retrospectively selected. Each patient was age- and gender-matched with a normogastrinemic control with healthy stomach. Controls had colonoscopy, gastroscopy with biopsies and gastrin assessment. 160 hypergastrinemic atrophic gastritis patients and 160 controls were included. 28 atrophic gastritis patients and 36 controls had neoplastic colorectal lesions (p=0.33). Patients and controls did not differ for frequency of colorectal adenomas (10.6% vs. 13.1%, p=0.60) or cancer (6.9% vs. 9.4%, p=0.54). Hypergastrinemic atrophic gastritis was not associated with a higher probability of developing colorectal cancer (OR 1.03, 95% CI 0.34-3.16). Age >50 years (OR 3.86) but not hypergastrinemia (OR 0.61) was associated with colorectal cancer. Hypergastrinemic atrophic gastritis is not associated with higher risk for colorectal cancer. Atrophic gastritis-related hypergastrinemia is not associated with an increased risk of neoplastic colorectal lesions. Closer surveillance of colonic neoplasia in atrophic gastritis patients seems not appropriate. Copyright © 2012 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome in a 13-year old girl

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgwardt, L.; Pedersen, P.; Peitersen, B.

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS) is an entity, defined by autoimmunity towards two or more endocrine organs. APS is classified in 3 subgroups (type-1, type-2a, type-2b), according to the organs involved. A case is presented of a 13-year old girl referred to the Department of Paediatrics...

  16. Usefulness of postmortem biochemistry in identification of ketosis: Diagnosis of ketoacidosis at the onset of autoimmune type 1 diabetes in an autopsy case with cold exposure and malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Naoto; Michiue, Tomomi; Chen, Jian-Hua; Oritani, Shigeki; Ishikawa, Takaki

    2016-09-01

    A severely malnourished, Japanese female in her twenties was found dead in her apartment. On autopsy, most of the findings from the internal examination were suggestive of hypothermia. Postmortem biochemistry, however, showed severely increased levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and blood and urine glucose levels. Levels of acetone, 3-hydroxybutyric acid, and acetoacetate in various body fluids were also highly increased, indicating ketosis. The serum insulin and c-peptide levels were severely low, and subsequent testing was positive for anti-GAD antibodies. Immunohistochemical examination of the pancreatic islet cells revealed few insulin-positive cells but many glucagon-positive cells on staining. Furthermore, slight invasion of CD8-positive lymphocytes in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans was observed. Results of immunostaining of the pancreatic and bronchial epithelial tissues were partly positive for the Influenza A virus. We concluded that severe ketoacidosis associated with rapid-onset hyperglycemia due to autoimmune type 1 diabetes (AT1D) had occurred shortly before death. However, the ketosis was accompanied by hypothermia and malnutrition as well as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Therefore, we retrospectively collected biochemical data on cases of hypothermia and malnutrition and compared them with the present case. Serum glucose, acetone, 3-hydroxybutyric acid, and acetoacetic acid can be used for screening and diagnosis to distinguish DKA from ketosis due to hypothermia and malnutrition. Therefore, in the present case, we diagnosed that the natural cause of death was due to AT1D. In conclusion, screening investigations for relevant biochemical markers can provide essential information for the diagnosis of metabolic disturbances, which fail to demonstrate characteristic autopsy findings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. High Risk First Degree Relatives of Type 1 Diabetics: An Association with Increases in CXCR3+ T Memory Cells Reflecting an Enhanced Activity of Th1 Autoimmune Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Milicic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the level of (a CXCR3+ (Th1 and CCR4+ (Th2 T memory cells (b interferon-γ inducible chemokine (IP-10(Th1 and thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC(Th2, in 51 first degree relatives (FDRs of type 1 diabetics (T1D (17 high risk FDRs (GADA+, IA-2+ and 34 low risk FDRs (GADA−, IA-2−, 24 recent-onset T1D (R-T1D, and 18 healthy subjects. T memory subsets were analyzed by using four-color immunofluorescence staining and flowcytometry. IP-10 and TARC were determined by ELISA. High risk FDRs showed higher levels of CXCR3+ and lower level of CCR4+ T memory cells compared to low risk FDRs (64.98 ± 5.19 versus 42.13 ± 11.11; 29.46 ± 2.83 versus 41.90 ± 8.58%, resp., P<0.001. Simultaneously, both IP-10 and TARC levels were increased in high risk versus low risk FDRs (160.12 ± 73.40 versus 105.39 ± 71.30; 438.83 ± 120.62 versus 312.04 ± 151.14 pg/mL, P<0.05. Binary logistic regression analysis identified the level of CXCR3+ T memory cells as predictors for high risk FDRs, together with high levels of IP-10. The results imply that, in FDRs, the risk for T1D might be strongly influenced by enhanced activity of Th1 and diminished activity of Th2 autoimmune response.

  18. Type 1 Autoimmune Pancreatitis and IgG4-Related Sclerosing Cholangitis Is Associated With Extrapancreatic Organ Failure, Malignancy, and Mortality in a Prospective UK Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M.; Hurst, J.M.; Rodriguez-Justo, M.; Chapman, M.H.; Johnson, G.J.; Pereira, S.P.; Chapman, R.W.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Type I autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) and IgG4-related sclerosing cholangitis (IgG4-related SC) are now recognized as components of a multisystem IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD). We aimed to define the clinical course and long-term outcomes in patients with AIP/IgG4-SC recruited from two large UK tertiary referral centers. METHODS Data were collected from 115 patients identified between 2004 and 2013, and all were followed up prospectively from diagnosis for a median of 33 months (range 1–107), and evaluated for response to therapy, the development of multiorgan involvement, and malignancy. Comparisons were made with national UK statistics. RESULTS Although there was an initial response to steroids in 97%, relapse occurred in 50% of patients. IgG4-SC was an important predictor of relapse (P IgG4-RD, including three hepatopancreaticobiliary cancers. The risk of any cancer at diagnosis or during follow-up when compared with matched national statistics was increased (odds ratio = 2.25, CI = 1.12–3.94, P = 0.02). Organ dysfunction occurred within the pancreas, liver, kidney, lung, and brain. Mortality occurred in 10% of patients during follow-up. The risk of death was increased compared with matched national statistics (odds ratio = 2.07, CI = 1.07–3.55, P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS Our findings suggest that AIP and IgG4-SC are associated with significant morbidity and mortality owing to extrapancreatic organ failure and malignancy. Detailed clinical evaluation for evidence of organ dysfunction and associated malignancy is required both at first presentation and during long-term follow-up. PMID:25155229

  19. Autoimmunity and inflammation are independent of class II transactivator type PIV-dependent class II major histocompatibility complex expression in peripheral tissues during collagen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldburger, Jean-Marc; Palmer, Gaby; Seemayer, Christian; Lamacchia, Celine; Finckh, Axel; Christofilopoulos, Panayiotis; Baeten, Dominique; Reith, Walter; Gabay, Cem

    2011-11-01

    To determine the regulation of class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) expression in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) in order to investigate their role as nonprofessional antigen-presenting cells in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Expression of class II MHC, class II MHC transactivator (CIITA), and Ciita isoforms PI, PIII, and PIV was examined by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and flow cytometry in human synovial tissues, arthritic mouse joints, and human and murine FLS. CIA was induced in mice in which isoform PIV of Ciita was knocked out (PIV(-/-) ), in PIV(-/-) mice transgenic for CIITA in the thymus (K14 CIITA), and in their control littermates. HLA-DRA, total CIITA, and CIITA PIII messenger RNA levels were significantly increased in synovial tissue samples from patients with rheumatoid arthritis compared with the levels in tissue from patients with osteoarthritis. Human FLS expressed surface class II MHC via CIITA PIII and PIV, while class II MHC expression in murine FLS was entirely mediated by PIV. Mice with a targeted deletion of CIITA PIV lack CD4+ T cells and were protected against CIA. The expression of CIITA was restored in the thymus of PIV(-/-) K14 CIITA-transgenic mice, which had a normal CD4+ T cell repertoire and normal surface levels of class II MHC on professional antigen-presenting cells, but did not induce class II MHC on FLS. Synovial inflammation and immune responses against type II collagen were similar in PIV(-/-) K14 CIITA-transgenic mice and control mice with CIA, but bone erosion was significantly reduced in the absence of PIV. Overexpression of class II MHC is tightly correlated with CIITA expression in arthritic synovium and in FLS. Selective targeting of Ciita PIV in peripheral tissues abrogates class II MHC expression by murine FLS but does not protect against inflammation and autoimmune responses in CIA. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  20. Therapeutic Potential of Invariant Natural Killer T Cells in Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Van Kaer

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Tolerance against self-antigens is regulated by a variety of cell types with immunoregulatory properties, such as CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells. In many experimental models of autoimmunity, iNKT cells promote self-tolerance and protect against autoimmunity. These findings are supported by studies with patients suffering from autoimmune diseases. Based on these studies, the therapeutic potential of iNKT cells in autoimmunity has been explored. Many of these studies have been performed with the potent iNKT cell agonist KRN7000 or its structural variants. These findings have generated promising results in several autoimmune diseases, although mechanisms by which iNKT cells modulate autoimmunity remain incompletely understood. Here, we will review these preclinical studies and discuss the prospects for translating their findings to patients suffering from autoimmune diseases.

  1. Association of serum microRNAs with islet autoimmunity, disease progression and metabolic impairment in relatives at risk of type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowhite, Isaac V; Allende, Gloria; Sosenko, Jay; Pastori, Ricardo L; Messinger Cayetano, Shari; Pugliese, Alberto

    2017-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators of gene expression and novel biomarkers for many diseases. We investigated the hypothesis that serum levels of some miRNAs would be associated with islet autoimmunity and/or progression to type 1 diabetes. We measured levels of 93 miRNAs most commonly detected in serum. This retrospective cohort study included 150 autoantibody-positive and 150 autoantibody-negative family-matched siblings enrolled in the TrialNet Pathway to Prevention Study. This was a young cohort (mean age = 11 years), and most autoantibody-positive relatives were at high risk because they had multiple autoantibodies, with 39/150 (26%, progressors) developing type 1 diabetes within an average 8.7 months of follow-up. We analysed miRNA levels in relation to autoantibody status, future development of diabetes and OGTT C-peptide and glucose indices of disease progression. Fifteen miRNAs were differentially expressed when comparing autoantibody-positive/negative siblings (range -2.5 to 1.3-fold). But receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis indicated low specificity and sensitivity. Seven additional miRNAs were differentially expressed among autoantibody-positive relatives according to disease progression; ROC returned significant AUC values and identified miRNA cut-off levels associated with an increased risk of disease in both cross-sectional and survival analyses. Levels of several miRNAs showed significant correlations (r values range 0.22-0.55) with OGTT outcomes. miR-21-3p, miR-29a-3p and miR-424-5p had the most robust associations. Serum levels of selected miRNAs are associated with disease progression and confer additional risk of the development of type 1 diabetes in young autoantibody-positive relatives. Further studies, including longitudinal assessments, are warranted to further define miRNA biomarkers for prediction of disease risk and progression.

  2. The Autoimmune Ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Ramirez-Santana, Carolina; Alzate, Maria A; Molano-Gonzalez, Nicolas; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (ADs) represent a heterogeneous group of disorders that affect specific target organs or multiple organ systems. These conditions share common immunopathogenic mechanisms (i.e., the autoimmune tautology), which explain the clinical similarities they have among them as well as their familial clustering (i.e., coaggregation). As part of the autoimmune tautology, the influence of environmental exposure on the risk of developing ADs is paramount (i.e., the autoimmune ecology). In fact, environment, more than genetics, shapes immune system. Autoimmune ecology is akin to exposome, that is all the exposures - internal and external - across the lifespan, interacting with hereditary factors (both genetics and epigenetics) to favor or protect against autoimmunity and its outcomes. Herein, we provide an overview of the autoimmune ecology, focusing on the immune response to environmental agents in general, and microbiota, cigarette smoking, alcohol and coffee consumption, socioeconomic status (SES), gender and sex hormones, vitamin D, organic solvents, and vaccines in particular. Inclusion of the autoimmune ecology in disease etiology and health will improve the way personalized medicine is currently conceived and applied.

  3. Bistability in autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas; Mosekilde, Erik; Lund, Ole

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases damage host tissue, which, in turn, may trigger a stronger immune response. Systems characterized by such positive feedback loops can display co-existing stable steady states. In a mathematical model of autoimmune disease, one steady state may correspond to the healthy state...

  4. THE AUTOIMMUNE ECOLOGY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Manuel eAnaya

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (ADs represent a heterogeneous group of disorders that affect specific target organs or multiple organ systems. These conditions share common immunopathogenic mechanisms (i.e., the autoimmune tautology, which explain the clinical similarities they have among them as well as their familial clustering (i.e., coaggregation. As part of the autoimmune tautology, the influence of environmental exposure on the risk of developing ADs is paramount (i.e., the autoimmune ecology. In fact, environment, more than genetics, shapes immune system. Autoimmune ecology is akin to exposome, that is all the exposures - internal and external - across the lifespan, interacting with hereditary factors (both genetics and epigenetics to favor or protect against autoimmunity and its outcomes. Herein we provide an overview of the autoimmune ecology, focusing on the immune response to environmental agents in general, and microbiota, cigarette smoking, alcohol and coffee consumption, socioeconomic status, gender and sex hormones, vitamin D, organic solvents and vaccines in particular. Inclusion of the autoimmune ecology in disease etiology and health will improve the way personalized medicine is currently conceived and applied.

  5. Autoimmune hepatitis in Italy: the Bologna experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Paolo; Granito, Alessandro; Quarneti, Chiara; Ferri, Silvia; Menichella, Rita; Cassani, Fabio; Pappas, Georgios; Bianchi, Francesco B; Lenzi, Marco; Muratori, Luigi

    2009-06-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis affects mainly women. It is subdivided into type 1 and type 2 according to the autoantibody profile and without immunosuppression usually evolves to cirrhosis and end-stage liver failure. We evaluated clinical, biochemical, immunological and genetic features and treatment response of 163 consecutive Italian patients with autoimmune hepatitis. At diagnosis, type 1 autoimmune hepatitis showed more inflamed liver histology and more pronounced cholestasis, whereas type 2 was more common in children. Male and female patients shared similar clinical, biochemical and immunological features. Of 89 patients with 5-year follow-up or longer, 23 patients irrespective of presenting clinical, biochemical and immunological features achieved complete remission (normal transaminases and gammaglobulin levels) which was maintained with minimal steroid dosage; attempt at treatment withdrawal led to disease exacerbation. Complete responders had more often HLA DRB1*0401 (p = 0.011) and their risk of disease progression was lower (p < 0.0001). Type 1 and type 2 autoimmune hepatitis is one and the same disease. Autoimmune hepatitis has similar features in male and female patients. HLA DRB1*0401 positive patients are more likely to achieve complete remission. Continuous low-dose steroids are necessary to maintain remission, significantly reducing the risk of disease progression.

  6. Auto-immune hepatitis following delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Vandana; Gupta, Mamta; Mishra, S K

    2013-05-01

    Auto-immune hepatitis first presenting in the early postpartum period is rare. Immunosuppressive effects of pregnancy result in delayed manifestation of auto-immune hepatitis, and in established cases, the spontaneous improvements are there. Auto-immune hepatitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of liver dysfunction first presenting in the early postpartum period. A case of postpartum hepatitis of auto-immune aetiology is being presented here. It is disease of unknown aetiology, characterised by inflammation of liver (as evidenced by raised serum transaminases, presence of interface hepatitis on histological examination), hypergammaglobulinaemia (> 1.5 times normal), presence of auto-antibodies [(antinuclear antibodies (ANA)], smooth muscle antibody (SMA) and antibody to liver-kidney microsome type 1 (LKM1) in the absence of viral markers ie, hepatitis B (HBsAg) and C (AntiHCV) and excellent response to corticosteroid therapy.

  7. Management strategies for autoimmune pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamisawa, Terumi; Takuma, Kensuke; Hara, Seiichi; Tabata, Taku; Kuruma, Sawako; Inaba, Yoshihiko; Gopalakrishna, Rajesh; Egawa, Naoto; Itokawa, Fumihide; Itoi, Takao

    2011-10-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a newly developed concept for a peculiar type of pancreatitis, and at present is recognized as a pancreatic lesion reflecting IgG4-related systemic disease. It is of utmost importance to differentiate AIP from pancreatic cancer to avoid unnecessary surgery. The current management strategies for AIP, including its clinical features, diagnostic criteria, clinical subtypes, steroid therapy and prognosis are discussed, based on our 66 AIP cases and papers searched in PubMed from 1992 to March 2011, using the term 'autoimmune pancreatitis'. A new clinicopathological entity, an 'IgG4-related sclerosing disease' is also mentioned. AIP should be considered in the differential diagnosis in elderly male patients presented with obstructive jaundice and pancreatic mass. Steroids are a standard therapy for AIP, but their regimen including maintenance therapy should be evaluated in prospective trials.

  8. Autoimmune liver disease in Noonan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loddo, Italia; Romano, Claudio; Cutrupi, Maria Concetta; Sciveres, Marco; Riva, Silvia; Salpietro, Annamaria; Ferraù, Valeria; Gallizzi, Romina; Briuglia, Silvana

    2015-03-01

    Noonan Syndrome (NS) is characterized by short stature, typical facial dysmorphology and congenital heart defects. The incidence of NS is estimated to be between 1:1000 and 1:2500 live births. The syndrome is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. In approximately 50% of cases, the disease is caused by missense mutations in the PTPN11 gene on chromosome 12, resulting in a gain of function of the non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 protein. Autoimmune Hepatitis (AIH) is a cryptogenic, chronic and progressive necroinflammatory liver disease. Common features of AIH are hypergammaglobulinemia (IgG), presence of circulating autoantibodies, histological picture of interface hepatitis and response to immunosuppressant drugs. Conventional treatment with Prednisone and Azathioprine is effective in most patients. We describe the case of a 6 years-old girl with Noonan Syndrome and Autoimmune Hepatitis type 1. Molecular analysis of PTPN11 gene showed heterozygous mutation c.923A>G (Asn308Ser) in exon 8. Though association between NS and autoimmune disorders is known, this is the second case of association between Noonan Syndrome and Autoimmune Hepatitis type 1 described in literature. In the management of NS, an accurate clinical evaluation would be recommended. When there is a clinical suspicion of autoimmune phenomena, appropriate laboratory tests should be performed with the aim of clarifying whether the immune system is involved in NS. We think that autoimmunity represents a characteristic of NS, even if the etiopathogenesis is still unknown. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Paradigm Shift in the Management of the Atrophic Posterior Maxilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabah Nedir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available When the posterior maxilla is atrophic, the reference standard of care would be to perform sinus augmentation with an autologous bone graft through the lateral approach and delayed implant placement. However, placement of short implants with the osteotome sinus floor elevation technique and without graft can be proposed for an efficient treatment of clinical cases with a maxillary residual bone height of 4 to 8 mm. The use of grafting material is recommended only when the residual bone height is ≤4 mm. Indications of the lateral sinus floor elevation are limited to cases with a residual bone height ≤ 2 mm and fused corticals, uncompleted healing of the edentulous site, and absence of flat cortical bone crest or when the patient wishes to wear a removable prosthesis during the healing period. The presented case report illustrates osteotome sinus floor elevation with and without grafting and simultaneous implant placement in extreme conditions: atrophic maxilla, short implant placement, reduced healing time, and single crown rehabilitation. After 6 years, all placed implants were functional with an endosinus bone gain.

  10. [Non-autoimmune thyroiditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Leonardo F L; Mana, Daniela L; Bruno, Oscar D

    2014-01-01

    The term thyroiditis comprises a group of thyroid diseases characterized by the presence of inflammation, including autoimmune and non-autoimmune entities. It may manifest as an acute illness with severe thyroid pain (subacute thyroiditis and infectious thyroiditis), and conditions in which the inflammation is not clinically evident evolving without pain and presenting primarily thyroid dysfunction and/or goiter (drug-induced thyroiditis and Riedel thyroiditis). The aim of this review is to provide an updated approach on non-autoimmune thyroiditis and its clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects.

  11. Stress proteins, autoimmunity, and autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfield, J B; Jarjour, W N

    1991-01-01

    At birth, the immune system is biased toward recognition of microbial antigens in order to protect the host from infection. Recent data suggest that an important initial line of defense in this regard involves autologous stress proteins, especially conserved peptides of hsp60, which are presented to T cells bearing gamma delta receptors by relatively nonpolymorphic class lb molecules. Natural antibodies may represent a parallel B cell mechanism. Through an evolving process of "physiological" autoreactivity and selection by immunodominant stress proteins common to all prokaryotes, B and T cell repertoires expand during life to meet the continuing challenge of infection. Because stress proteins of bacteria are homologous with stress proteins of the host, there exists in genetically susceptible individuals a constant risk of autoimmune disease due to failure of mechanisms for self-nonself discrimination. That stress proteins actually play a role in autoimmune processes is supported by a growing body of evidence which, collectively, suggests that autoreactivity in chronic inflammatory arthritis involves, at least initially, gamma delta cells which recognize epitopes of the stress protein hsp60. Alternate mechanisms for T cell stimulation by stress proteins undoubtedly also exist, e.g., molecular mimicry of the DR beta third hypervariable region susceptibility locus for rheumatoid arthritis by a DnaJ stress protein epitope in gram-negative bacteria. While there still is confusion with respect to the most relevant stress protein epitopes, a central role for stress proteins in the etiology of arthritis appears likely. Furthermore, insight derived from the work thus far in adjuvant-induced arthritis already is stimulating analyses of related phenomena in autoimmune diseases other than those involving joints. Only limited data are available in the area of humoral autoimmunity to stress proteins. Autoantibodies to a number of stress proteins have been identified in SLE and

  12. Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy and hypophysitis after Puumala hantavirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene Tarvainen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Puumala hantavirus (PUUV infection causes nephropathia epidemica (NE, a relatively mild form of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS. Hypophyseal haemorrhage and hypopituitarism have been described in case reports on patients with acute NE. Chronic hypopituitarism diagnosed months or years after the acute illness has also been reported, without any signs of a haemorrhagic aetiology. The mechanisms leading to the late-onset hormonal defects remain unknown. Here, we present a case of NE-associated autoimmune polyendocrinopathy and hypopituitarism presumably due to autoimmune hypophysitis. Thyroid peroxidase antibody seroconversion occurred between 6 and 12 months, and ovarian as well as glutamate decarboxylase antibodies were found 18 months after acute NE. Brain MRI revealed an atrophic adenohypophysis with a heterogeneous, low signal intensity compatible with a sequela of hypophysitis. The patient developed central (or mixed central and peripheral hypothyroidism, hypogonadism and diabetes insipidus, all requiring hormonal replacement therapy. This case report suggests that late-onset hormonal defects after PUUV infection may develop by an autoimmune mechanism. This hypothesis needs to be confirmed by prospective studies with sufficient numbers of patients.

  13. Vitamin D and autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Potrokhova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The review discusses the effect of vitamin D on the tolerogenic modulation of an immune response, its relationship to cells of the monocyte-macrophage series, including dendritic cells, monocytes, and macrophages, in the context of the impact of the expression of anti-inflammatory proinflammatory cytokines in some autoimmune diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, systemic scleroderma, multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, systemic lupus erythematosus, and Crohn`s disease. It discusses the role of vitamin D in the development of innate and adaptive immunity. Despite some conflicting evidence, the immune regulatory function of vitamin D is generally directed toward inhibition of the components of innate and acquired immunity, which are responsible for the induction of autoimmune reactions; in this connection there are a growing number of publications devoted to the issues of vitamin D supplementation in patients with autoimmune diseases, the preventive effect of vitamin D intake on the risk of an abnormality and that of therapeutic doses of the vitamin on its course. The maintenance of the threshold value for serum 25(OHD3 at least 30 ng/ml, which is achieved by the intake of about 2000 IU of vitamin D, is shown to be required for its immune regulatory function. The data given raise the question as to whether it is necessity to revise the Russian recommended daily dietary allowances for vitamin D through its infant food fortification.

  14. Regulatory T-cells and autoimmunity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ni Choileain, Niamh

    2012-02-03

    Approximately 20% of the population is affected by autoimmune or inflammatory diseases mediated by an abnormal immune response. A characteristic feature of autoimmune disease is the selective targeting of a single cell type, organ or tissue by certain populations of autoreactive T-cells. Examples of such diseases include rheumatoid arthritis, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), all of which are characterized by chronic inflammation, tissue destruction and target organ malfunction. Although strong evidence links most autoimmune diseases to specific genes, considerable controversy prevails regarding the role of regulatory T-cell populations in the disease process. These cells are now also believed to play a key role in mediating transplantation tolerance and inhibiting the induction of tumor immunity. Though the concept of therapeutic immune regulation aimed at treating autoimmune pathology has been validated in many animal models, the development of strategies for the treatment of human autoimmune disorders remains in its infancy. The main obstacles to this include the conflicting findings of different model systems, as well as the contrasting functions of regulatory T-cells and cytokines involved in the development of such disorders. This review examines the role of regulatory T-cells in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity and describes the therapeutic potential of these cells for the prevention of immune-mediated pathologies in the future. Although much remains to be learned about such pathologies, a clearer understanding of the mechanisms by which regulatory T-cells function will undoubtedly lead to exciting new possibilities for immunotherapeutics.

  15. Vaccines, adjuvants and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Luísa Eça; Baker, Britain; Perricone, Carlo; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-10-01

    Vaccines and autoimmunity are linked fields. Vaccine efficacy is based on whether host immune response against an antigen can elicit a memory T-cell response over time. Although the described side effects thus far have been mostly transient and acute, vaccines are able to elicit the immune system towards an autoimmune reaction. The diagnosis of a definite autoimmune disease and the occurrence of fatal outcome post-vaccination have been less frequently reported. Since vaccines are given to previously healthy hosts, who may have never developed the disease had they not been immunized, adverse events should be carefully accessed and evaluated even if they represent a limited number of occurrences. In this review of the literature, there is evidence of vaccine-induced autoimmunity and adjuvant-induced autoimmunity in both experimental models as well as human patients. Adjuvants and infectious agents may exert their immune-enhancing effects through various functional activities, encompassed by the adjuvant effect. These mechanisms are shared by different conditions triggered by adjuvants leading to the autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA syndrome). In conclusion, there are several case reports of autoimmune diseases following vaccines, however, due to the limited number of cases, the different classifications of symptoms and the long latency period of the diseases, every attempt for an epidemiological study has so far failed to deliver a connection. Despite this, efforts to unveil the connection between the triggering of the immune system by adjuvants and the development of autoimmune conditions should be undertaken. Vaccinomics is a field that may bring to light novel customized, personalized treatment approaches in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Progranulin antibodies in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurner, Lorenz; Preuss, Klaus-Dieter; Fadle, Natalie; Regitz, Evi; Klemm, Philipp; Zaks, Marina; Kemele, Maria; Hasenfus, Andrea; Csernok, Elena; Gross, Wolfgang L; Pasquali, Jean-Louis; Martin, Thierry; Bohle, Rainer Maria; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Systemic vasculitides constitute a heterogeneous group of diseases. Autoimmunity mediated by B lymphocytes and their humoral effector mechanisms play a major role in ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) as well as in non-ANCA associated primary systemic vasculitides and in the different types of autoimmune connective tissue disorders and rheumatoid arthritis. In order to detect autoantibodies in systemic vasculitides, we screened protein macroarrays of human cDNA expression libraries with sera from patients with ANCA-associated and ANCA-negative primary systemic vasculitides. This approach led to the identification of antibodies against progranulin, a 88 kDA secreted glycoprotein with strong anti-inflammatory activity in the course of disease of giant-cell arteritis/polymyalgia rheumatica (14/65), Takayasu's arteritis (4/13), classical panarteritis nodosa (4/10), Behcet's disease (2/6) and in the course of disease in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (31/75), Churg-Strauss syndrome (7/23) and in microscopic polyangiitis (7/19). In extended screenings the progranulin antibodies were also detected in other autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (39/91) and rheumatoid arthritis (16/44). Progranulin antibodies were detected only in 1 of 97 healthy controls. Anti-progranulin positive patients with systemic vasculitides, systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis had significant lower progranulin plasma levels, indicating a neutralizing effect. In light of the anti-inflammatory effects of progranulin, progranulin antibodies might exert pro-inflammatory effects thus contributing to the pathogenesis of the respective autoimmune diseases and might serve as a marker for disease activity. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that a positive progranulin antibody status was associated with active disease in granulomatosis with polyangiitis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Eosinophils in Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Čiháková

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophils are multifunctional granulocytes that contribute to initiation and modulation of inflammation. Their role in asthma and parasitic infections has long been recognized. Growing evidence now reveals a role for eosinophils in autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize the function of eosinophils in inflammatory bowel diseases, neuromyelitis optica, bullous pemphigoid, autoimmune myocarditis, primary biliary cirrhosis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and other autoimmune diseases. Clinical studies, eosinophil-targeted therapies, and experimental models have contributed to our understanding of the regulation and function of eosinophils in these diseases. By examining the role of eosinophils in autoimmune diseases of different organs, we can identify common pathogenic mechanisms. These include degranulation of cytotoxic granule proteins, induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, release of proteases degrading extracellular matrix, immune modulation through cytokines, antigen presentation, and prothrombotic functions. The association of eosinophilic diseases with autoimmune diseases is also examined, showing a possible increase in autoimmune diseases in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis, hypereosinophilic syndrome, and non-allergic asthma. Finally, we summarize key future research needs.

  18. Eosinophils in Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diny, Nicola L.; Rose, Noel R.; Čiháková, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional granulocytes that contribute to initiation and modulation of inflammation. Their role in asthma and parasitic infections has long been recognized. Growing evidence now reveals a role for eosinophils in autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize the function of eosinophils in inflammatory bowel diseases, neuromyelitis optica, bullous pemphigoid, autoimmune myocarditis, primary biliary cirrhosis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and other autoimmune diseases. Clinical studies, eosinophil-targeted therapies, and experimental models have contributed to our understanding of the regulation and function of eosinophils in these diseases. By examining the role of eosinophils in autoimmune diseases of different organs, we can identify common pathogenic mechanisms. These include degranulation of cytotoxic granule proteins, induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, release of proteases degrading extracellular matrix, immune modulation through cytokines, antigen presentation, and prothrombotic functions. The association of eosinophilic diseases with autoimmune diseases is also examined, showing a possible increase in autoimmune diseases in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis, hypereosinophilic syndrome, and non-allergic asthma. Finally, we summarize key future research needs. PMID:28496445

  19. New Atrophic Acne Scar Classification: Reliability of Assessments Based on Size, Shape, and Number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sewon; Lozada, Vicente Torres; Bettoli, Vincenzo; Tan, Jerry; Rueda, Maria Jose; Layton, Alison; Petit, Lauren; Dréno, Brigitte

    2016-06-01

    Post-acne atrophic scarring is a major concern for which standardized outcome measures are needed. Traditionally, this type of scar has been classified based on shape; but survey of practicing dermatologists has shown that atrophic scar morphology has not been well enough defined to allow good agreement in clinical classification. Reliance on clinical assessment is still needed at the current time, since objective tools are not yet available in routine practice. Evaluate classification for atrophic acne scars by shape, size, and facial location and establish reliability in assessments. We conducted a non-interventional study with dermatologists performing live clinical assessments of atrophic acne scars. To objectively compare identification of lesions, individual lesions were marked on a high-resolution photo of the patient that was displayed on a computer during the clinical evaluation. The Jacob clinical classification system was used to define three primary shapes of scars 1) icepick, 2) boxcar, and 3) rolling. To determine agreement for classification by size, independent technicians assessed the investigators' markings on digital images. Identical localization of scars was denoted if the maximal distance between their centers was ≤ 60 pixels (approximately 3 mm). Raters assessed scars on the same patients twice (morning/afternoon). Aggregate models of rater assessments were created and analyzed for agreement. Raters counted a mean scar count per subject ranging from 15.75 to 40.25 scars. Approximately 50% of scars were identified by all raters and ~75% of scars were identified by at least 2 of 3 raters (weak agreement, Kappa pairwise agreement 0.30). Agreement between consecutive counts was moderate, with Kappa index ranging from 0.26 to 0.47 (after exclusion of one outlier investigator who had significantly higher counts than all others). Shape classifications of icepick, boxcar, and rolling differed significantly between raters and even for same raters at

  20. Atrophic thyroiditis in long-term Segment III beagles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, L.C.; Norrdin, R.W.; Benjamin, S.A.; Brewster, R.D.; Brooks, R.K.

    1981-01-01

    Lymphocytic thyroiditis associated with progressive thyroid atrophy is described in CRHL beagles. Depressed thyroid function was present in many of these dogs, as evidenced by clinical signs of hypothyroidism, elevation of serum cholesterol levels, depressed serum triiodothyronine levels, and alteration of basophils of the antero-medial region and/or unilateral or bilateral obliteration of the thyroid glands by neoplasia. Microscopic changes in the thyroid glands included lymphocytic thyroiditis, thyroid follicular atrophy, adenomatous hyperplasia of follicula cells and C-cells, and follicular cells neoplasia. This disease occurred with no sex predisposition in dogs 2 through 11 years of age. The disease does not appear to be influenced by previous radiation exposure but may be familial. In contrast to thyroid disease in some other beagle colonies, the disease in CRHL beagles more closely resembles atrophic thyroiditis of man rather than human Hashimoto's thyroiditis

  1. Cerebral atrophic and degenerative changes following various cerebral diseases, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kino, Masao; Anno, Izumi; Yano, Yuhiko; Anno, Yasuro.

    1980-01-01

    Patients having cerebral atrophic and degenerative changes following hypoglycemia, cerebral contusion, or cerebral hypoxia including cerebrovascular disorders were reported. Description was made as to cerebral changes visualized on CT images and clinical courses of a patient who revived 10 minutes after heart stoppage during neurosurgery, a newborn with asphyxia, a patient with hypoglycemia, a patient who suffered from asphyxia by an accident 10 years before, a patient with carbon monoxide poisoning at an acute stage, a patient who had carbon monoxide poisoning 10 years before, a patient with diffuse cerebral ischemic changes, a patient with cerebral edema around metastatic tumor, a patient with respiration brain, a patient with neurological sequelae after cerebral contusion, a patient who had an operation to excise right parietal lobe artery malformation, and a patient who was shooted by a machine gun and had a lead in the brain for 34 years. (Tsunoda, M.)

  2. Enterovirus RNA in longitudinal blood samples and risk of islet autoimmunity in children with a high genetic risk of type 1 diabetes: the MIDIA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinek, Ondrej; Stene, Lars C; Kramna, Lenka; Tapia, German; Oikarinen, Sami; Witsø, Elisabet; Rasmussen, Trond; Torjesen, Peter A; Hyöty, Heikki; Rønningen, Kjersti S

    2014-10-01

    Only a few longitudinal molecular studies of enterovirus and islet autoimmunity have been reported, and positive results seem to be limited to Finland. We aimed to investigate an association between enterovirus RNA in blood and islet autoimmunity in the MIDIA study from Norway, a country which largely shares environmental and economic features with Finland. We analysed serial blood samples collected at ages 3, 6, and 9 months and then annually from 45 children who developed confirmed positivity for at least two autoantibodies (against insulin, GAD65 and IA-2) and 92 matched controls, all from a cohort of children with a single high-risk HLA-DQ-DR genotype. Enterovirus was tested in RNA extracted from frozen blood cell pellets, using real-time RT-PCR with stringent performance control. Out of 807 blood samples, 72 (8.9%) were positive for enterovirus. There was no association between enterovirus RNA and islet autoimmunity in samples obtained strictly before (7.6% cases, 10.0% controls, OR 0.75 [95% CI 0.36, 1.57]), or strictly after the first detection of islet autoantibodies (10.5% case, 5.8% controls, OR 2.00 [95% CI 0.64, 6.27]). However, there was a tendency towards a higher frequency of enterovirus detection in the first islet autoantibody-positive sample (15.8%) compared with the corresponding time point in matched controls (3.2%, OR 8.7 [95% CI 0.97, 77]). Neither of these results was changed by adjusting for potential confounders, restricting to various time intervals or employing various definitions of enterovirus positivity. Positivity for enterovirus RNA in blood did not predict the later induction of islet autoantibodies, but enterovirus tended to be detected more often at the islet autoantibody seroconversion stage.

  3. Risk of Celiac Disease Autoimmunity is Modified by Non-HLA Genetic Markers During the First Year of Clinical Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adlercreutz, Emma H.; Hansen, Dorthe; Mortensen, Henrik B.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: This study plotted the prevalence of celiac disease associated antibodies in relation to demographic patterns, genetic and metabolic markers during the first year after diagnosis in a multinational cohort of children with T1D. Material and Methods: Sera from a total of 261 children (128 males...... measuring IgG-tTG. Children positive in both assays in two consecutive samples were defined as having celiac disease autoimmunity (CDA). Associations between CDA and genotypes of HLA, IL18 rap, CCR 5, PTPN2 and correlations with islet autoantibodies (ICA, GADA, IA2 and IA) and HbA1C and C-peptide were...

  4. Clinical implications of shared genetics and pathogenesis in autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhernakova, Alexandra; Withoff, Sebo; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2013-01-01

    Many endocrine diseases, including type 1 diabetes mellitus, Graves disease, Addison disease and Hashimoto disease, originate as an autoimmune reaction that affects disease-specific target organs. These autoimmune diseases are characterized by the development of specific autoantibodies and by the

  5. Headache in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Seby; Hajj-Ali, Rula A

    2014-03-01

    Autoimmune diseases are a group of heterogeneous inflammatory disorders characterized by systemic or localized inflammation, leading to ischemia and tissue destruction. These include disorders like systemic lupus erythematosus and related diseases, systemic vasculitides, and central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis (primary or secondary). Headache is a very common manifestation of CNS involvement of these diseases. Although headache characteristics can be unspecific and often non-diagnostic, it is important to recognize because headache can be the first manifestation of CNS involvement. Prompt recognition and treatment is necessary not only to treat the headache, but also to help prevent serious neurological sequelae that frequently accompany autoimmune diseases. In this review, we discuss headache associated with autoimmune diseases along with important mimics. © 2014 American Headache Society.

  6. [Autoimmune thyroid disease and other non-endocrine autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilas, Ljiljana Todorović; Icin, Tijana; Paro, Jovanka Novaković; Bajkin, Ivana

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are chronic conditions initiated by the loss of immunological tolerance to self-antigens. They constitute heterogeneous group of disorders, in which multiple alterations in the immune system result in a spectrum of syndromes that either target specific organs or affect the body systematically. Recent epidemiological studies have shown a possible shift of one autoimmune disease to another or the fact that more than one autoimmune disease may coexist in a single patient or in the same family. Numerous autoimmune diseases have been shown to coexist frequently with thyroid autoimmune diseases. AUTOIMMNUNE THYROID DISEASE AND OTHER ORGAN SPECIFIC NON-ENDOCRINE AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES: This part of the study reviews the prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease coexisting with: pernicious anaemia, vitiligo, celiac disease, autoimmune liver disease, miastenia gravis, alopecia areata and sclerosis multiplex, and several recommendations for screening have been given. AUTOIMMUNE THYROID DISEASE AND OTHER ORGAN NON-SPECIFIC NON-ENDOCRINE AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES: Special attention is given to the correlation between autoimmune thyroid disease and rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, syndrome Sjögren, systemic sclerosis and mixed connective tissue disease. Screening for autoimmune thyroid diseases should be recommended in everyday clinical practice, in patients with primary organ-specific or organ non-specific autoimmune disease. Otherwise, in patients with primary thyroid autoimmune disease, there is no good reason of seeking for all other autoimmune diseases, although these patients have a greater risk of developing other autoimmune disease. Economic aspects of medicine require further analyzing of these data, from cost/benefit point of view to justified either mandatory screening or medical practitioner judgment.

  7. Comparisons of CVID and IgGSD: Referring Physicians, Autoimmune Conditions, Pneumovax Reactivity, Immunoglobulin Levels, Blood Lymphocyte Subsets, and HLA-A and -B Typing in 432 Adult Index Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James C. Barton

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID and immunoglobulin (Ig G subclass deficiency (IgGSD are heterogeneous disorders characterized by respiratory tract infections, selective Ig isotype deficiencies, and impaired antibody responses to polysaccharide antigens. Using univariable analyses, we compared observations in 34 CVID and 398 IgGSD adult index patients (81.9% women referred to a hematology/oncology practice. Similarities included specialties of referring physicians, mean ages, proportions of women, reactivity to Pneumovax, median serum IgG3 and IgG4 levels, median blood CD56+/CD16+ lymphocyte levels, positivity for HLA-A and -B types, and frequencies of selected HLA-A, -B haplotypes. Dissimilarities included greater prevalence of autoimmune conditions, lower median IgG, IgA, and IgM, and lower median CD19+, CD3+/CD4+, and CD3+/CD8+ blood lymphocytes in CVID patients. Prevalence of Sjögren’s syndrome and hypothyroidism was significantly greater in CVID patients. Combined subnormal IgG1/IgG3 occurred in 59% and 29% of CVID and IgGSD patients, respectively. Isolated subnormal IgG3 occurred in 121 IgGSD patients (88% women. Logistic regression on CVID (versus IgGSD revealed a significant positive association with autoimmune conditions and significant negative associations with IgG1, IgG3, and IgA and CD56+/CD16+ lymphocyte levels, but the odds ratio was increased for autoimmune conditions alone (6.9 (95% CI 1.3, 35.5.

  8. Comparisons of CVID and IgGSD: referring physicians, autoimmune conditions, pneumovax reactivity, immunoglobulin levels, blood lymphocyte subsets, and HLA-A and -B typing in 432 adult index patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, James C; Bertoli, Luigi F; Barton, J Clayborn

    2014-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) and immunoglobulin (Ig) G subclass deficiency (IgGSD) are heterogeneous disorders characterized by respiratory tract infections, selective Ig isotype deficiencies, and impaired antibody responses to polysaccharide antigens. Using univariable analyses, we compared observations in 34 CVID and 398 IgGSD adult index patients (81.9% women) referred to a hematology/oncology practice. Similarities included specialties of referring physicians, mean ages, proportions of women, reactivity to Pneumovax, median serum IgG3 and IgG4 levels, median blood CD56+/CD16+ lymphocyte levels, positivity for HLA-A and -B types, and frequencies of selected HLA-A, -B haplotypes. Dissimilarities included greater prevalence of autoimmune conditions, lower median IgG, IgA, and IgM, and lower median CD19+, CD3+/CD4+, and CD3+/CD8+ blood lymphocytes in CVID patients. Prevalence of Sjögren's syndrome and hypothyroidism was significantly greater in CVID patients. Combined subnormal IgG1/IgG3 occurred in 59% and 29% of CVID and IgGSD patients, respectively. Isolated subnormal IgG3 occurred in 121 IgGSD patients (88% women). Logistic regression on CVID (versus IgGSD) revealed a significant positive association with autoimmune conditions and significant negative associations with IgG1, IgG3, and IgA and CD56+/CD16+ lymphocyte levels, but the odds ratio was increased for autoimmune conditions alone (6.9 (95% CI 1.3, 35.5)).

  9. Acute large bowel pseudo-obstruction due to atrophic visceral myopathy: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean M. Wrenn

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Atrophic visceral neuropathy is a rare cause of intestinal pseudo-obstruction. While often presenting with chronic obstruction in younger populations, we present a rare late-onset acute presentation that may have been secondary to underlying hypothyroidism.

  10. Thrombospondin-1 expression may be implicated in liver atrophic mechanism due to obstructed portal venous flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Hiromitsu; Kuroki, Hideyuki; Higashi, Takaaki; Takeyama, Hideaki; Yokoyama, Naomi; Okabe, Hirohisa; Nitta, Hidetoshi; Beppu, Toru; Takamori, Hiroshi; Baba, Hideo

    2017-07-01

    Liver is an amazing organ that can undergo regenerative and atrophic changes inversely, depending on blood flow conditions. Although the regenerative mechanism has been extensively studied, the atrophic mechanism remains to be elucidated. To assess the molecular mechanism of liver atrophy due to reduced portal blood flow, we analyzed the gene expressions between atrophic and hypertrophic livers induced by portal vein embolization in three human liver tissues using microarray analyses. Thrombospondin (TSP)-1 is an extracellular protein and a negative regulator of liver regeneration through its activation of the transforming growth factor-β/Smad signaling pathway. TSP-1 was extracted as the most upregulated gene in atrophic liver compared to hypertrophic liver due to portal flow obstruction in human. Liver atrophic and hypertrophic changes were confirmed by HE and proliferating cell nuclear antigen staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated digoxigenin-dUTP nick-end labeling. In an in vivo model with portal ligation, TSP-1 and phosphorylated Smad2 expression were continuously induced at 6 h and thereafter in the portal ligated liver, whereas the induction was transient at 6 h in the portal non-ligated liver. Indeed, while cell proliferation represented by proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression at 48 h was induced in the portal ligated liver, the sinusoidal dilatation and hepatocyte cell death with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated digoxigenin-dUTP nick-end labeling was detectable at 48 h in the portal ligated liver. Obstructed portal flow induces persistent TSP-1 expression and transforming growth factor-β/Smad signal activation in atrophic liver. Thrombospondin-1 may be implicated in the liver atrophic change due to obstructed portal flow as a pro-atrophic factor. © 2016 The Japan Society of Hepatology.

  11. Sugar residues content and distribution in atrophic and hyperplastic postmenopausal human endometrium: lectin histochemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Gheri, G.; Gheri Bryk, S.; Taddei, G.; Moncini, D.; Noci, I.

    1996-01-01

    A lectin histochemical study was performed to investigate the glycoconjugate saccharidic moieties of the human postmenopausal endometrium (14 atrophic and 15 hyperplastic). For this purpose a battery of seven horseradish peroxidase-conjugated lectins (PNA, SBA, DBA, WGA, ConA, LTA and UEA I) was used. No differences in lectin binding between atrophic and hyperplastic endometria were observed. This investigation allowed us to provide a basic picture of the oligo...

  12. Positive Result by Serology Indicates Active Helicobacter pylori Infection in Patients with Atrophic Gastritis

    OpenAIRE

    Kokkola, Arto; Rautelin, Hilpi; Puolakkainen, Pauli; Sipponen, Pentti; Färkkilä, Martti; Haapiainen, Reijo; Kosunen, Timo U.

    1998-01-01

    Patients with atrophic corpus gastritis and elevated Helicobacter pylori antibody titers but 13C-urea breath test (13C-UBT) and histology results negative for H. pylori were randomized into eradication therapy or follow-up only. Antibody levels decreased significantly in six out of seven patients in the eradication group, while in the follow-up group, the titers declined in only one out of eight patients. In patients with atrophic corpus gastritis, positive serology results may indicate an on...

  13. Molecular role of TGF-beta, secreted from a new type of CD4+ suppressor T cell, NY4.2, in the prevention of autoimmune IDDM in NOD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, H S; Jun, H S; Utsugi, T; Yoon, J W

    1997-06-01

    A new type of CD4+ T cell clone (NY4.2) isolated from pancreatic islet-infiltrated lymphocytes of acutely diabetic non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice prevents the development of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) in NOD mice, as well as the recurrence of autoimmune diabetes in syngeneic islet-transplanted NOD mice. It has been demonstrated that the cytokine TGF-beta, secreted from the cells of this clone, is the substance which prevents autoimmune IDDM. This investigation was initiated to determine the molecular role TGF-beta plays in the prevention of autoimmune IDDM by determining its effect on IL-2-induced signal transduction in Con A-activated NOD mouse splenocytes and HT-2 cells. First, we determined whether TGF-beta, secreted from NY4.2 T cells, inhibits IL-2-dependent T cell proliferation in HT-2 cells (IL-2-dependent T cell line) and NOD splenocytes. We found that TGF-beta suppresses IL-2-dependent T cell proliferation. Second, we determined whether TGF-beta inhibits the activation of Janus kinases (JAKs), as well as signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) proteins, involved in an IL-2-induced signalling pathway that normally leads to the proliferation of T cells. We found that TGF-beta inhibited tyrosine phosphorylation of JAK1, JAK3, STAT3 and STAT5 in Con A blasts from NOD splenocytes and HT-2 cells. Third, we examined whether TGF-beta inhibits the cooperation between STAT proteins and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), especially extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2). We found that TGF-beta inhibited the association of STAT3 and STAT5 with ERK2 in Con A blasts from NOD splenocytes and HT-2 cells. On the basis of these observations, we conclude that TGF-beta may interfere with signal transduction via inhibition of the IL-2-induced JAK/STAT pathway and inhibition of the association of STAT proteins with ERK2 in T cells from NOD splenocytes, resulting in the inhibition of IL-2-dependent T cell proliferation. TGF

  14. Comparative examinations of serum pepsinogen I, II and gastric area using computed radiography in the atrophic gastritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatsu, Yoshimitsu; Ogura, Yasuharu; Yamazaki, Kouichi [Osaka Medical Coll., Takatsuki (Japan)] [and others

    1995-11-01

    The relationship between serum PG I, PG II levels and extent of atrophic gastritis was examined. The subjects were 64 patients (male: 32, female: 32, 51.9 years old on average) with established diagnosis of either atrophic gastritis or normal. In the X-ray gastric examination, Fuji Computed Radiography (FCR) was used to obtain clear-cut images of the gastric area. Concerning the serum PG I level, patients in the group with atrophic gastritis showed lower levels than those of the people in the group with no atrophic change, but the variation was wide, and no definite tendency was seen in the relationship between the atrophic change and the serum PG I levels. Concerning the serum PG II level, as the atrophic change progresses, the serum PG II level tended to increase gradually. A significant reduction in the PG I/II ratio was seen in the group with atrophic changes (p<0.01) in comparison with the group with no atrophic changes, and the PG I/II value tended to decrease. In conclusion, as a relationship between the atrophic change and the serum PG levels had a wide variation, we considered it to be difficult to understand the presence and extent of the atrophic gastritis by measuring serum PG levels. (author).

  15. Comparative examinations of serum pepsinogen I, II and gastric area using computed radiography in the atrophic gastritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatsu, Yoshimitsu; Ogura, Yasuharu; Yamazaki, Kouichi

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between serum PG I, PG II levels and extent of atrophic gastritis was examined. The subjects were 64 patients (male: 32, female: 32, 51.9 years old on average) with established diagnosis of either atrophic gastritis or normal. In the X-ray gastric examination, Fuji Computed Radiography (FCR) was used to obtain clear-cut images of the gastric area. Concerning the serum PG I level, patients in the group with atrophic gastritis showed lower levels than those of the people in the group with no atrophic change, but the variation was wide, and no definite tendency was seen in the relationship between the atrophic change and the serum PG I levels. Concerning the serum PG II level, as the atrophic change progresses, the serum PG II level tended to increase gradually. A significant reduction in the PG I/II ratio was seen in the group with atrophic changes (p<0.01) in comparison with the group with no atrophic changes, and the PG I/II value tended to decrease. In conclusion, as a relationship between the atrophic change and the serum PG levels had a wide variation, we considered it to be difficult to understand the presence and extent of the atrophic gastritis by measuring serum PG levels. (author)

  16. Gender and autoimmune comorbidity in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magyari, Melinda; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Pfleger, Claudia C

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The female preponderance in incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS) calls for investigations into sex differences in comorbidity with other autoimmune diseases (ADs). OBJECTIVES: To determine whether male and female patients with MS have a higher frequency of autoimmune comorbidity than...... controls, and to describe the type and frequency of ADs that are associated with MS. METHODS: Our database was established by linkage of the Danish MS Registry to The Danish National Patient Register and consisted of 1403 patients of both sexes with clinical onset of MS between 2000 and 2004, and 25...

  17. HTLV-1, Immune Response and Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juarez A S Quaresma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1 infection is associated with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL. Tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1-associated myelopathy (PET/HAM is involved in the development of autoimmune diseases including Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE, and Sjögren’s Syndrome (SS. The development of HTLV-1-driven autoimmunity is hypothesized to rely on molecular mimicry, because virus-like particles can trigger an inflammatory response. However, HTLV-1 modifies the behavior of CD4+ T cells on infection and alters their cytokine production. A previous study showed that in patients infected with HTLV-1, the activity of regulatory CD4+ T cells and their consequent expression of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines are altered. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms underlying changes in cytokine release leading to the loss of tolerance and development of autoimmunity.

  18. The thyroid and autoimmunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drexhage, H.A.; Wiersinga, W.M.

    1986-01-01

    These proceedings give an almost complete picture of what is presently known on the autoimmune aspects of both functional and growth disturbances of the thyroid gland. It comprises 12 reviews on main areas of present research, each followed by shorter communications of work in progress relevant to the topic. (Auth.)

  19. Paraneoplastic autoimmune movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Thien Thien

    2017-11-01

    To provide an overview of paraneoplastic autoimmune disorders presenting with various movement disorders. The spectrum of paraneoplastic autoimmune disorders has been expanding with the discovery of new antibodies against cell surface and intracellular antigens. Many of these paraneoplastic autoimmune disorders manifest as a form of movement disorder. With the discovery of new neuronal antibodies, an increasing number of idiopathic or neurodegenerative movement disorders are now being reclassified as immune-mediated movement disorders. These include anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis which may present with orolingual facial dyskinesia and stereotyped movements, CRMP-5 IgG presenting with chorea, anti-Yo paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration presenting with ataxia, anti-VGKC complex (Caspr2 antibodies) neuromyotonia, opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia syndrome, and muscle rigidity and episodic spasms (amphiphysin, glutamic acid decarboxylase, glycine receptor, GABA(A)-receptor associated protein antibodies) in stiff-person syndrome. Movement disorders may be a presentation for paraneoplastic autoimmune disorders. Recognition of these disorders and their common phenomenology is important because it may lead to the discovery of an occult malignancy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Autoimmune pancreatitis. An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmberger, T.

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare disease, the pathophysiological understanding of which has been greatly improved over the last years. The most common form, type 1 AIP belongs to the IgG4-related diseases and must be distinguished from type 2 AIP, which is a much rarer entity associated with chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Clinically, there is an overlap with pancreatic cancer. Imaging and further criteria, such as serological and histological parameters are utilized for a differentiation between both entities in order to select the appropriate therapy and to avoid the small but ultimately unnecessary number of pancreatectomies. The diagnostics of AIP are complex, whereby the consensus criteria of the International Association of Pancreatology have become accepted as the parameters for discrimination. These encompass five cardinal criteria and one therapeutic criterion. By applying these criteria AIP can be diagnosed with a sensitivity of 84.9 %, a specificity of 100 % and an accuracy of 93.8 %. The diagnosis of AIP is accomplished by applying several parameters of which two relate to imaging. As for the routine diagnostics of the pancreas these are ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Important for the differential diagnosis is the exclusion of signs of local and remote tumor spread for which CT and MRI are established. The essential diagnostic parameter of histology necessitates sufficient sample material, which cannot usually be acquired by a fine needle biopsy. CT or MRI are the reference standard methods for identification of the optimal puncture site and imaging-assisted (TruCut) biopsy. In patients presenting with unspecific upper abdominal pain, painless jaundice combined with the suspicion of a pancreatic malignancy in imaging but a mismatch of secondary signs of malignancy, AIP should also be considered as a differential diagnosis. As the diagnosis of AIP only partially relies on imaging radiologists also

  1. The Diagnostic Value of Gastrin-17 Detection in Atrophic Gastritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Ling, Li; Li, Shanshan; Qin, Guiping; Cui, Wei; Li, Xiang; Ni, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A meta-analysis was performed to assess the diagnostic value of gastrin-17 (G-17) for the early detection of chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG). An extensive literature search was performed, with the aim of selecting publications that reported the accuracy of G-17 in predicting CAG, in the following databases: PubMed, Science Direct, Web of Science, Chinese Biological Medicine, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang, and VIP. To assess the diagnostic value of G-17, the following statistics were estimated and described: sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic odds ratios (DOR), summary receiver operating characteristic curves, area under the curve (AUC), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Thirteen studies that met the inclusion criteria were included in this meta-analysis, comprising 894 patients and 1950 controls. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of these studies were 0.48 (95% CI: 0.45–0.51) and 0.79 (95% CI: 0.77–0.81), respectively. The DOR was 5.93 (95% CI: 2.93–11.99), and the AUC was 0.82. G-17 may have potential diagnostic value because it has good specificity and a moderate DOR and AUC for CAG. However, more studies are needed to improve the sensitivity of this diagnostic tool in the future. PMID:27149493

  2. Issues in quantifying atrophic macular disease using retinal autofluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunness, Janet S; Ziegler, Matthias D; Applegate, Carol A

    2006-01-01

    To demonstrate the potential and limits of autofluorescence imaging in identifying and delineating areas of atrophy. Fundus photographs and infrared scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) imaging, SLO macular perimetry, and SLO autofluorescence imaging results were compared for two patients with geographic atrophy (GA) from age-related macular degeneration, one patient with pigmentary alteration of the retina, and two patients with Stargardt disease. The main outcome measure in this case series was the presence of reduced autofluorescence. Drusen may become undetectable during autofluorescence imaging for some patients, allowing simple identification of areas of GA with areas of reduced autofluorescence. In other patients, drusen themselves have decreased autofluorescence, despite having intact retinal function in the retina overlying them. Some patients may have areas of reduced autofluorescence that persist for many years, without evidence of the development of atrophy. In Stargardt disease, decreased autofluorescence can easily detect and delineate areas of scotoma. Areas with mottled autofluorescence may have overlying function, but the function may not be adequate to support a fixation locus in that area. Using decreased autofluorescence to delineate areas of atrophy may be helpful in atrophic macular disorders. For GA, correlation with fundus photographs or macular perimetry findings may be necessary to differentiate between drusen and atrophy. For Stargardt disease, the nature of areas of decreased autofluorescence may help explain visual function of those areas.

  3. Simultaneous Sinus Lifting and Alveolar Distraction of a Severely Atrophic Posterior Maxilla for Oral Rehabilitation with Dental Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Takahiro; Mitsugi, Masaharu; Paeng, Jun-Young; Sukegawa, Shintaro; Furuki, Yoshihiko; Ohwada, Hiroyuki; Nariai, Yoshiki; Ishibashi, Hiroaki; Katsuyama, Hideaki; Sekine, Joji

    2012-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed a new preimplantation regenerative augmentation technique for a severely atrophic posterior maxilla using sinus lifting with simultaneous alveolar distraction, together with long-term oral rehabilitation with implants. We also analyzed the regenerated bone histomorphologically. This study included 25 maxillary sinus sites in 17 patients. The technique consisted of alveolar osteotomy combined with simultaneous sinus lifting. After sufficient sinus lifting, a track-type vertical alveolar distractor was placed. Following a latent period, patient self-distraction was started. After the required augmentation was achieved, the distractor was left in place to allow consolidation. The distractor was then removed, and osseointegrated implants (average of 3.2 implants per sinus site, 80 implants) were placed. Bone for histomorphometric analysis was sampled from six patients and compared with samples collected after sinus lifting alone as controls (n = 4). A sufficient alveolus was regenerated, and all patients achieved stable oral rehabilitation. The implant survival rate was 96.3% (77/80) after an average postloading followup of 47.5 months. Good bone regeneration was observed in a morphological study, with no significant difference in the rate of bone formation compared with control samples. This new regenerative technique could be a useful option for a severely atrophic maxilla requiring implant rehabilitation. PMID:22792105

  4. Simultaneous Sinus Lifting and Alveolar Distraction of a Severely Atrophic Posterior Maxilla for Oral Rehabilitation with Dental Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Kanno

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We retrospectively reviewed a new preimplantation regenerative augmentation technique for a severely atrophic posterior maxilla using sinus lifting with simultaneous alveolar distraction, together with long-term oral rehabilitation with implants. We also analyzed the regenerated bone histomorphologically. This study included 25 maxillary sinus sites in 17 patients. The technique consisted of alveolar osteotomy combined with simultaneous sinus lifting. After sufficient sinus lifting, a track-type vertical alveolar distractor was placed. Following a latent period, patient self-distraction was started. After the required augmentation was achieved, the distractor was left in place to allow consolidation. The distractor was then removed, and osseointegrated implants (average of 3.2 implants per sinus site, 80 implants were placed. Bone for histomorphometric analysis was sampled from six patients and compared with samples collected after sinus lifting alone as controls (n=4. A sufficient alveolus was regenerated, and all patients achieved stable oral rehabilitation. The implant survival rate was 96.3% (77/80 after an average postloading followup of 47.5 months. Good bone regeneration was observed in a morphological study, with no significant difference in the rate of bone formation compared with control samples. This new regenerative technique could be a useful option for a severely atrophic maxilla requiring implant rehabilitation.

  5. Do we really need to differentiate mesenchymal stem cells into insulin-producing cells for attenuation of the autoimmune responses in type 1 diabetes: immunoprophylactic effects of precursors to insulin-producing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anshu; Rani, Rajni

    2017-07-12

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a multifactorial autoimmune disorder where pancreatic beta cells are lost before the clinical manifestations of the disease. Administration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or MSCs differentiated into insulin-producing cells (IPCs) have yielded limited success when used therapeutically. We have evaluated the immunoprophylactic potentials of precursors to insulin-producing cells (pIPCs) and IPCs in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice to ask a basic question: do we need to differentiate MSCs into IPCs or will pIPCs suffice to attenuate autoimmune responses in T1D? Bone marrow-derived MSCs from Balb/c mice were characterized following the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) guidelines. MSCs cultured in high-glucose media for 11 to 13 passages were characterized for the expression of pancreatic lineage genes using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Expression of the PDX1 gene in pIPCs was assessed using Western blot and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Triple-positive MSCs were differentiated into IPCs using a three-step protocol after sorting them for cell surface markers, i.e. CD29, CD44, and SCA-1. Nonobese diabetic mice were administered pIPCs, IPCs, or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) into the tail vein at weeks 9 or 10 and followed-up for 29-30 weeks for fasting blood glucose levels. Two consecutive blood sugar levels of more than 250 mg/dl were considered diabetic. MSCs grown in high-glucose media for 11 to 13 passages expressed genes of the pancreatic lineage such as PDX1, beta2, neurogenin, PAX4, Insulin, and glucagon. Furthermore, Western blot and FACS analysis for PDX-1, a transcription factor necessary for beta cell maturation, confirmed that these cells were precursors of insulin-producing cells (pIPCs). NOD mice administered with pIPCs were better protected from developing diabetes with a protective efficacy of 78.4% (p cells seem to have better potential to arrest autoimmune response in type 1 diabetes when

  6. Abdominal manifestations of autoimmune disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triantopoulou, C.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: Immunoglobulin G4-related disease was recognized as a systemic disease since various extrapancreatic lesions were observed in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). The real etiology and pathogenesis of IgG4-RD is still not clearly understood. Moreover the exact role of IgG4 or IgG4-positive plasma cells in this disease has not yet been elucidated. only some inconsistent biological features such as hypergammaglobulinemia or hypocomplementemia support the autoimmune nature of the disease process. various names have been ascribed to this clinicopathological entity including IgG4-related sclerosing disease, IgG4-related systemic sclerosing disease, IgG4-related disease, IgG4-related autoimmune disease, hyper-IgG4 disease and IgG4-related systemic disease. The extrapancreatic lesions of IgG4-RD also exhibit the same characteristic histologic features including dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, massive storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis as seen in IgG4-related pancreatitis. Abdominal manifestations include the following organs/systems: Bile ducts: Sclerosing cholangitis; Gallbladder and liver: Acalculous sclerosis cholecytitis with diffuse wall thickening; hepatic inflammatory pseudotumorts; Kidneys: round or wedge-shaped renal cortical nodules, peripheral cortical; lesions, mass like lesions or renal pelvic involvement; Prostate, urethra, seminal vesicle, vas deferens, uterine cervix; Autoimmune prostatitis; Retroperitoneum: Retroperitoneal fibrosis. thin or mildly thick homogeneous soft tissue lesion surrounding the abdominal aorta and its branches but also bulky masses causing hydronephroureterosis; Mesentery: Sclerosing mesenteritis usually involving the root of the mesentery; Bowel: Inflammatory bowel diseases mimicking Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis. various types of sclerosing nodular lesions of the bowel wall; Stomach: Gastritis, gastric ulcers and focal masses mimicking submucosal tumor; omentum: Infiltration mimicking

  7. Finite element analysis of dental implant loading on atrophic and non-atrophic cancellous and cortical mandibular bone - a feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcián, P.; Borák, L.; Valášek, J.; Kaiser, J.; Florian, Z.; Wolff, J.

    2014-01-01

    The first aim of this study was to assess displacements and micro-strain induced on different grades of atrophic cortical and trabecular mandibular bone by axially loaded dental implants using finite element analysis (FEA). The second aim was to assess the micro-strain induced by different implant

  8. Finite element analysis of dental implant loading on atrophic and non-atrophic cancellous and cortical mandibular bone – a feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcian, P.; Borak, L.; Valasek, J.; Kaiser, J.; Florian, Z.; Wolff, J.E.H.

    2014-01-01

    The first aim of this study was to assess displacements and micro-strain induced on different grades of atrophic cortical and trabecular mandibular bone by axially loaded dental implants using finite element analysis (FEA). The second aim was to assess the micro-strain induced by different implant

  9. Effect of ERCC8 tagSNPs and their association with H. pylori infection, smoking, and alcohol consumption on gastric cancer and atrophic gastritis risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Jing-Jing; Sun, Li-Ping; Xu, Qian; Yuan, Yuan

    2015-12-01

    Excision repair cross-complementing group 8 (ERCC8) plays a critical role in DNA repair. Genetic polymorphisms in ERCC8 may contribute to the risk of cancer development. We selected tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (tagSNPs) in Chinese patients from the HapMap database to investigate associations with gastric cancer and its precursors. Genomic DNA was extracted from 394 controls, 394 atrophic gastritis, and 394 gastric cancer cases in northern Chinese patients, and genotypes were identified using the Sequenom MassARRAY system. We found that the ERCC8 rs158572 GG+GA genotype showed a 1.651-fold (95 % confidence interval (CI) = 1.109-2.457, P = 0.013) increased risk of gastric cancer compared with the AA genotype, especially in diffuse type. Stratified analysis comparing the common genotype revealed significantly increased gastric cancer risk in males and individuals older than 50 years with rs158572 GA/GG/GG+GA genotypes, while individuals older than 50 years with rs158916 CT/CC+CT genotypes were less susceptible to atrophic gastritis. Haplotype analysis showed that the G-T haplotype was associated with increased risk of gastric cancer. Statistically significant interactions between the two ERCC8 tagSNPs and Helicobacter pylori infection were observed for gastric cancer and atrophic gastritis risk (P cancer compared with non-smokers and non-drinkers homozygous for AA. Our findings suggested that ERCC8 rs158572 and rs158916, alone or together with environmental factors, might be associated with gastric cancer and atrophic gastritis susceptibility. Further validation of our results in larger populations along with additional studies evaluating the underlying molecular function is required.

  10. Clinical significance of autoantibodies in autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Vergani, Diego

    2013-10-01

    The accurate diagnosis and classification of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) rely upon the detection of characteristic autoantibodies. Positivity for anti-nuclear (ANA) and/or anti-smooth muscle (SMA) autoantibodies defines AIH type 1 (AIH-1), whereas anti-liver kidney microsomal type 1 (anti-LKM1) and/or anti-liver cytosol type 1 (anti-LC1) define AIH type 2 (AIH-2). ANA and SMA, and less commonly anti-LKM1, have also been detected in de-novo autoimmune hepatitis developing after liver transplantation, a condition that may affect patients transplanted for non-autoimmune liver disease. The diagnostic autoantibodies associated with AIH-1 are also detected in the paediatric AIH/sclerosing cholangitis overlap syndrome, referred to as autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC). ASC, like adult primary sclerosing cholangitis, is often associated with atypical perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (p-ANCA), although p-ANCA are also detected in other autoimmune liver diseases. These associations highlight the necessity for simple and prompt diagnostic autoantibody testing, and the requirement for the accurate interpretation of the results of the tests in the clinical context. Fine-mapping of antigenic autoantibody targets has facilitated the development of rapid molecular assays that have the potential to revolutionise the field if properly standardised and when used in combination with classical immunofluorescence. Despite their diagnostic significance, the pathogenic role of the various autoantibodies and the mechanisms by which they can potentially inflict damage onto the liver cell remain a topic for further research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Apigenin has anti-atrophic gastritis and anti-gastric cancer progression effects in Helicobacter pylori-infected Mongolian gerbils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chao-Hung; Weng, Bi-Chuang; Wu, Chun-Chieh; Yang, Sheau-Fang; Wu, Deng-Chang; Wang, Yuan-Chuen

    2014-02-12

    Apigenin, one of the most common flavonoids, is abundant in celery, parsley, chamomile, passionflower, and other vegetables and fruits. Celery is recognized as a medicinal vegetable in Oriental countries to traditionally treat inflammation, swelling, blood pressure, serum lipid, and toothache. In this study, we investigated apigenin treatment effects on Helicobacter pylori-induced atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer progression in Mongolian gerbils. Five to eight-week-old Mongolian gerbils were inoculated with Helicobacter pylori for four weeks without (atrophic gastritis group) or with N'-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitroso-guanidine (MNNG) (gastric cancer group) in drinking water, and were then rested for two weeks. During the 7th-32th (atrophic gastritis group) or the 7th-52th (gastric cancer group) weeks, they were given various doses (0-60 mg/kgbw/day) of apigenin. At the end of the 32th (atrophic gastritis group) or the 52th (atrophic gastritis group) week, all Mongolian gerbils were sacrificed using the CO2 asphyxia method. The histological changes of Helicobacter pylori colonization, neutrophil and monocyte infiltrations, and atrophic gastritis in both atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer Mongolian gerbils were examined using immunohistochemistry stain and Sydney System scoring. Apigenin treatments (30-60 mg/kgbw/day) effectively decreased atrophic gastritis (atrophic gastritis group) and dysplasia/gastric cancer (gastric cancer group) rates in Mongolian gerbils. Apigenin treatment (60 mg/kgbw/day) significantly decreased Helicobacter pylori colonization and Helicobacter pylori-induced histological changes of neutrophil and monocyte infiltrations and atrophic gastritis in both atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer Mongolian gerbils. Apigenin has the remarkable ability to inhibit Helicobacter pylori-induced atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer progression as well as possessing potent anti-gastric cancer activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  12. Atrophic and Metaplastic Progression in the Background Mucosa of Patients with Gastric Adenoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Kyong Na

    Full Text Available In patients with adenoma, assessing premalignant changes in the surrounding mucosa is important for surveillance. This study evaluated atrophic and metaplastic progression in the background mucosa of adenoma or early gastric cancer (EGC cases.Among 146 consecutive patients who underwent endoscopic resection for intestinal-type gastric neoplasia, the adenoma group included 56 patients with low-grade dysplasia and the ECG group included 90 patients with high-grade dysplasia or invasive carcinoma. For histology, 3 paired biopsies were obtained from the antrum, corpus lesser curvature (CLC, and corpus greater curvature (CGC. Serological atrophy was determined based on pepsinogen A (PGA, progastricsin (PGC, gastrin-17, and total ghrelin levels. Topographic progression of atrophy and/or metaplasia was staged using the operative link on gastritis assessment (OLGA and operative link on gastric intestinal metaplasia assessment (OLGIM systems.Rates of moderate-to-marked histological atrophy/metaplasia in patients with adenoma were 52.7%/78.2% at the antrum (vs. 58.8%/76.4% in EGC group, 63.5%/75.0% at the CLC (vs. 60.2%/69.7% in EGC group, and 10.9%/17.9% at the CGC (vs. 5.6%/7.8% in EGC group. Serological atrophy indicated by PGA and PGC occurred in 23.2% and 15.6% of cases in the adenoma and ECG groups, respectively (p = 0.25. Mean serum gastrin-17 concentrations of the adenoma group and EGC group were 10.4 and 9.0 pmol/L, respectively (p = 0.54. Mean serum total ghrelin levels were 216.6 and 209.5 pg/mL, respectively (p = 0.71. Additionally, between group rates of stage III-IV OLGA and OLGIM were similar (25.9% vs. 25.0%, p = 0.90; 41.8% vs. 44.9%, p = 0.71, respectively.Atrophic and metaplastic progression is extensive and severe in gastric adenoma patients. A surveillance strategy for metachronous tumors should be applied similarly for patients with adenoma or EGC.

  13. Autoimmune gastritis: histology phenotype and OLGA staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugge, M; Fassan, M; Pizzi, M; Zorzetto, V; Maddalo, G; Realdon, S; De Bernard, M; Betterle, C; Cappellesso, R; Pennelli, G; de Boni, M; Farinati, F

    2012-06-01

    Among Western populations, the declining incidence of Helicobacter pylori infection coincides with a growing clinical impact of autoimmune gastritis. To describe the histological phenotype of autoimmune gastritis, also to test the prognostic impact of OLGA staging in the autoimmune setting. A single-institutional series (spanning the years 2003-2011) of 562 consecutive patients (M:F ratio: 1:3.7; mean age = 57.6 ± 14.4 years) with serologically confirmed autoimmune gastritis underwent histology review and OLGA staging. Helicobacter pylori infection was ascertained histologically in 44/562 cases (7.8%). Forty six biopsy sets (8.2%) featured OLGA stages III-IV; they included all four cases of incidental epithelial neoplasia (three intraepithelial and one invasive; three of these four cases had concomitant H. pylori infection). There were 230 (40.9%) and 139 (24.7%) cases, respectively, of linear and micro-nodular enterochromaffin-like cell hyperplasia; 19 (3.4%) type I carcinoids were detected. The series included 116 patients who underwent repeated endoscopy/biopsy sampling (mean time elapsing between the two procedures = 54 months; range 24-108). Paired histology showed a significant (P = 0.009) trend towards a stage progression [the stage increased in 25/116 cases (22%); it remained unchanged in 87/116 cases (75%)]. In autoimmune gastritis, the cancer risk is restricted to high-risk gastritis stages (III-IV), and is associated mainly with concomitant H. pylori infection. OLGA staging consistently depicts the time-dependent organic progression of the autoimmune disease and provides key information for secondary gastric cancer prevention strategies. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Celiac Disease Autoimmunity in Patients with Autoimmune Diabetes and Thyroid Disease among Chinese Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyuan Zhao

    Full Text Available The prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity or tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (TGA amongst patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D and autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD in the Chinese population remains unknown. This study examined the rate of celiac disease autoimmunity amongst patients with T1D and AITD in the Chinese population. The study included 178 patients with type 1 diabetes and 119 with AITD where 36 had both T1D and AITD, classified as autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 variant (APS3v. The study also included 145 patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D, 97 patients with non-autoimmune thyroid disease (NAITD, and 102 healthy controls. Serum islet autoantibodies, thyroid autoantibodies and TGA were measured by radioimmunoassay. TGA positivity was found in 22% of patients with either type 1 diabetes or AITD, much higher than that in patients with T2D (3.4%; p< 0.0001 or NAITD (3.1%; P < 0.0001 or healthy controls (1%; p<0.0001. The patients with APS3v having both T1D and AITD were 36% positive for TGA, significantly higher than patients with T1D alone (p = 0.040 or with AITD alone (p = 0.017. T1D and AITD were found to have a 20% and 30% frequency of overlap respectively at diagnosis. In conclusion, TGA positivity was high in the Chinese population having existing T1D and/or AITD, and even higher when both diseases were present. Routine TGA screening in patients with T1D or AITD will be important to early identify celiac disease autoimmunity for better clinical care of patients.

  15. Autoimmune hepatitis in children: what is different from adult AIH?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Vergani, Diego

    2009-08-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is characterized by inflammatory liver histology, circulating non-organ-specific autoantibodies, and increased levels of immunoglobulin (Ig) G in the absence of a known etiology. Two types of childhood AIH are recognized according to seropositivity: smooth muscle antibody (SMA) and/or antinuclear antibody (ANA), which is AIH type 1; and antibodies to liver-kidney microsome type 1 (anti-LKM1), which is AIH type 2. There is a female predominance in both. Autoimmune hepatitis type 2 presents more acutely, at a younger age, and commonly with IgA deficiency; however, duration of symptoms before diagnosis, clinical signs, family history of autoimmunity, presence of associated autoimmune disorders, response to treatment, and long-term prognosis are similar in the two groups. Immunosuppressive treatment with steroids and azathioprine, which should be instituted promptly to avoid progression to cirrhosis, induces remission in 80% of cases. Relapses are common, often due to nonadherence. Drugs effective in refractory cases include cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil. Long-term treatment is usually required, with only some 20% of AIH type 1 patients able to discontinue therapy successfully. In childhood, sclerosing cholangitis with strong autoimmune features, including interface hepatitis and serological features identical to AIH type 1, is as prevalent as AIH, but it affects boys and girls equally. The differential diagnosis relies on cholangiographic studies. In autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis, liver parenchymal damage responds satisfactorily to immunosuppressive treatment, whereas bile duct disease tends to progress. Copyright Thieme Medical Publishers.

  16. Peptides Against Autoimmune Neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, Alexey; Lomakin, Yakov; Gabibov, Alexander; Belogurov, Alexey

    2017-01-01

    The mammalian immune system is a nearly perfect defensive system polished by a hundred million years of evolution. Unique flexibility and adaptivity have created a virtually impenetrable barrier to numerous exogenous pathogens that are assaulting us every moment. Unfortunately, triggers that remain mostly enigmatic will sometimes persuade the immune system to retarget against self-antigens. This civil war remains underway, showing no mercy and taking no captives, eventually leading to irreversible pathological changes in the human body. Research that has emerged during the last two decades has given us hope that we may have a chance to overcome autoimmune diseases using a variety of techniques to "reset" the immune system. In this report, we summarize recent advances in utilizing short polypeptides - mostly fragments of autoantigens - in the treatment of autoimmune neurodegeneration. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Sarcoidosis and Thyroid Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piera Fazzi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Most of the studies have shown a higher risk for subclinical and clinical hypothyroidism, antithyroid autoantibodies [overall antithyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb], and in general, thyroid autoimmunity, overall in the female gender in patients with sarcoidosis (S. A significantly higher prevalence of clinical hypothyroidism and Graves’ disease was also described in female S patients with respect to controls. Gallium-67 (Ga-67 scyntigraphy in S patients, in the case of thyroid uptake, suggests the presence of aggressive autoimmune thyroiditis and hypothyroidism. For this reason, ultrasonography and thyroid function should be done in the case of Ga-67 thyroid uptake. In conclusion, thyroid function, TPOAb measurement, and ultrasonography should be done to assess the clinical profile in female S patients, and the ones at high risk (female individuals, with TPOAb positivity, and hypoechoic and small thyroid should have periodically thyroid function evaluations and suitable treatments.

  18. Malignant atrophic papulosis (Köhlmeier-Degos disease - A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodoridis Athanasios

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Definition of the disease Malignant atrophic papulosis (MAP, described independently by Köhlmeier and Degos et al., is a rare, chronic, thrombo-obliterative vasculopathy characterized by papular skin lesions with central porcelain-white atrophy and surrounding teleangiectatic rim. Epidemiology Less than 200 cases have been described in the literature. The first manifestation of MAP usually occurs between the 20th and 50th year of life. Clinical description The cutaneous clinical picture is almost pathognomonic. The histology is not consistent but in most cases it shows a wedge-shaped connective tissue necrosis in the deep corium due to a thrombotic occlusion of the small arteries. In the systemic variant, manifestations mostly occur at the intestine and central nervous system. Etiology The etiopathogenesis of the disease remains unknown, a genetic predisposition may occur. Vasculitis, coagulopathy or primary dysfunction of the endothelial cells have been implicated. Diagnostic methods Diagnosis is only based on the characteristic skin lesions. Differrential diagnosis It depends on the clinical presentation of MAP, but systemic lupus erythematosus and other connective tissue diseases need to be considered. Management No effective treatment exists for the systemic manifestations, while compounds that facilitate blood perfusion have achieved a partial regression of the skin lesions in single cases. Prognosis An apparently idiopathic, monosymptomatic, cutaneous, benign variant and a progressive, visceral one with approx. 50% lethality within 2–3 years have been reported. Systemic manifestations can develop years after the occurrence of skin lesions leading to bowel perforation and peritonitis, thrombosis of the cerebral arteries or massive intracerebral hemorrhage, meningitis, encephalitis, radiculopathy, myelitis.

  19. Primary biliary cirrhosis--autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome associated with dermatomyositis, autoimmune thyroiditis and antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamfil, Cristina; Candrea, Elisabeta; Berki, Emese; Popov, Horațiu I; Radu, Pompilia I; Rednic, Simona

    2015-03-01

    Autoimmune liver diseases may be associated with extrahepatic autoimmune pathology. We report the case of a 52-year old woman who initially presented to the gastroenterology department for extreme fatigue, pale stools, dark urine and pruritus. Laboratory tests showed significant cholestasis and elevation of aminotransferase levels. Immunological tests revealed positive antinuclear (ANA=1:320) and antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA=1:40) with negative anti-smooth muscle and liver kidney microsomal type 1 antibodies. The biopsy was compatible with overlap syndrome type 1. The patient was commenced on immunosuppressive therapy according to standard of care (azathioprine 50mg, ursodeoxycholic acid and prednisone 0.5mg/kg), with moderate biochemical improvement. She subsequently developed proximal symmetrical weakness and cutaneous involvement and was diagnosed with biopsy-proven dermatomyositis. The immunosuppressive regimen was intensified to 150 mg azathioprine. At the three-month follow-up, her symptoms subsided and aminotransferases and muscle enzymes normalized. Upon further investigation the patient was diagnosed with autoimmune thyroiditis and antiphospholipid syndrome. To our knowledge, this is the first case of primary biliary cirrhosis - autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome associated with dermatomyositis, autoimmune thyroiditis and antiphospholipid syndrome.

  20. Round atrophic holes in lattice degeneration--an important cause of phakic retinal detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillery, W V; Lucier, A C

    1976-01-01

    Round atrophic holes in lattice degeneration are an important cause of phakic retinal detachment. Detachments due solely to round holes in lattice accounted for almost 2.8% of all retinal detachments treated at Wills Eye Hospital from January 1970 to August 1973. These detachments had the following important characteristics: 1. One of the patients were under the age of 30 years. 2. Over 75% of the patients had refractive errors more myopic than -3 D spherical equivalent. 3. Inferior detachments were slightly more common than superior detachments. When located inferiorly, there was a tendency for slow progression as indicated by the frequent presence of pigmented demarcation lines. 4. Surgical repair with standard scleral buckling techniques was successful in 98% of these detachments. Young, moderate to highly myopic patients with round holes in areas of lattice degeneration seem to have a greater risk of developing this type of detachment. Patients with the triad of youth, myopia, and round holes in lattice degeneration deserve close observation.

  1. Autoimmune Addison's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napier, Catherine; Pearce, Simon H S

    2012-12-01

    Addison's disease is a rare autoimmune disorder. In the developed world, autoimmune adrenalitis is the commonest cause of primary adrenal insufficiency, where the majority of patients have circulating antibodies against the key steroidogenic enzyme 21-hydroxylase. A complex interplay of genetic, immunological and environmental factors culminates in symptomatic adrenocortical insufficiency, with symptoms typically developing over months to years. Biochemical evaluation and further targeted investigations must confirm primary adrenal failure and establish the underlying aetiology. The diagnosis of adrenocortical insufficiency will necessitate lifelong glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid replacement therapy, aiming to emulate physiological patterns of hormone secretion to achieve well-being and good quality of life. Education of patients and healthcare professionals is essential to minimise the risk of a life-threatening adrenal crisis, which must be promptly recognised and aggressively managed when it does occur. This article provides an overview of our current understanding of the natural history and underlying genetic and immunological basis of this condition. Future research may reveal novel therapeutic strategies for patient management. Until then, optimisation of pharmacological intervention and continued emphasis on education and empowerment of patients should underpin the management of individuals with autoimmune Addison's disease. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  2. Autoimmune thyrotoxicosis: diagnostic challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponto, Katharina A; Kahaly, George J

    2012-09-01

    Autoimmune thyrotoxicosis or Graves' disease (GD) is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism in the United States (full text available online: http://education.amjmed.com/pp1/249). GD occurs more often in women (ratio 5:1) and has a population prevalence of 1-2%. A genetic determinant to the susceptibility to GD is suspected because of familial clustering of the disease, a high sibling recurrence risk, and the familial occurrence of thyroid autoantibodies. GD is a systemic autoimmune thyroid disorder characterized by the infiltration of immune effector cells and thyroid-antigen-specific T cells into the thyroid and thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) expressing tissues, i.e. orbit, skin, with the production of autoantibodies to well-defined thyroidal antigens. Stimulatory autoantibodies in GD activate the TSHR leading to thyroid hyperplasia and unregulated thyroid hormone production and secretion. Diagnosis of GD is straightforward in a patient with a diffusely enlarged, heterogeneous, hypervascular (increased Doppler flow on neck ultrasound) thyroid gland, associated orbitopathy, biochemically confirmed thyrotoxicosis, positive TSHR autoantibodies, and often a family history of autoimmune disorders. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. [Seric 21-hydroxilase antibodies in patients with anti-microsomal fraction antibodies. Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botta, Silvia; Roveto, Silvana; Rimoldi, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome (APS) is the association of autoimmune endocrine diseases, with other autoimmune nonendocrine disorders. APS types 1, 2 and 4 include autoimmune adrenalitis; this suggests the presence of autoantibodies. A specific serological marker for these is the anti 21- hydroxilase autoantibody (a21-OH). APS type 2 is the association of autoimmune adrenalitis, to autoimmune thyroid disease and/or diabetes mellitus, all these are induced by autoantibodies. Alopecia, vitiligo, myasthenia and other manifestations can be minor components. We sought to establish the prevalence of seric a21-OH in patients with positive anti-microsomal fraction autoantibodies, autoimmune thyroid disease and/or non-endocrine autoimmune diseases. We also aimed to diagnose incomplete forms of APS and to follow up patients at risk of progression to complete forms of APS. A population of 72 patients and another of 60 controls with negative anti-microsomal fraction autoantibodies were studied. Elevated seric a21-OH were found in two patients. Patient A with 47 U/ml had autoimmune hypothyroidism and myasthenia; and patient B with 8.75 U/ml had autoimmune hypothyrodism and vitiligo; they both lacked adrenal insufficiency. Seric a21-OH had a prevalence of 2.8%. Regarding the adrenal component, patients A and B had an incomplete and latent APS type 2. Considering a21-OH as markers of latent endocrine autoimmune diseases and taking into account the eventual risk of developing clinical manifestations, periodic biochemical and clinical follow-ups are recommended.

  4. Occurrence of gastric cancer and carcinoids in atrophic gastritis during prospective long-term follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahner, Edith; Esposito, Gianluca; Pilozzi, Emanuela; Purchiaroni, Flaminia; Corleto, Vito D; Di Giulio, Emilio; Annibale, Bruno

    2015-07-01

    Atrophic gastritis (AG) is a risk condition for gastric cancer and type I gastric carcinoids. Recent studies assessing the overall risk of gastric cancer and carcinoids in AG at long-term follow up are lacking. This study aimed to investigate in a prospective cohort of AG patients the occurrence of gastric cancer and carcinoids at long-term follow up. A total of 200 AG patients from a prospective cohort (67% female, median age 55 years) with a follow up of 7.5 (range: 4-23.4) years were included. Inclusion criteria were presence of AG and at least one follow-up gastroscopy with biopsies at ≥4 years after AG diagnosis. Follow-up gastroscopies at 4-year intervals were performed. Overall, 22 gastric neoplastic lesions were detected (crude incidence 11%). Gastric cancer was diagnosed in four patients at a median follow up of 7.2 years (crude incidence 2%). Eleven type I gastric carcinoids were detected at a median follow up of 5.1 years (crude incidence of 5.5%). In seven patients, six low-grade and one high-grade dysplasia were found. The annual incidence rate person-year were 0.25% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.067-0.63%), 0.43% (95% CI: 0.17-0.89%), and 0.68% (95% CI: 0.34-1.21%) for gastric cancer, dysplasia, and type I-gastric carcinoids, respectively. The incidence rates of gastric cancer and carcinoids were not different (p = 0.07). This study shows an annual incidence rate of 1.36% person-year for gastric neoplastic lesions in AG patients at long-term follow up. AG patients are similarly exposed to gastric cancer and type I gastric carcinoids.

  5. Comparative proteomics analysis of chronic atrophic gastritis: changes of protein expression in chronic atrophic gastritis with out Helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Lin; Hou, Yanhong; Wu, Kai; Li, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) is a very common gastritis and one of the major precursor lesions of gastric cancer, one of the most common cancers worldwide. The molecular mechanism underlying CAG is unclear, but its elucidation is essential for the prevention and early detection of gastric cancer and appropriate intervention. A combination of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry was used in the present study to analyze the differentially expressed proteins. Samples from 21 patients (9 females and 12 males; mean age: 61.8 years) were used. We identified 18 differentially expressed proteins in CAG compared with matched normal mucosa. Eight proteins were up-regulated and 10 down-regulated in CAG when compared with the same amounts of proteins in individually matched normal gastric mucosa. Two novel proteins, proteasome activator subunit 1 (PSME1), which was down-regulated in CAG, and ribosomal protein S12 (RPS12), which was up-regulated in CAG, were further investigated. Their expression was validated by Western blot and RT-PCR in 15 CAG samples matched with normal mucosa. The expression level of RPS12 was significantly higher in CAG than in matched normal gastric mucosa (P < 0.05). In contrast, the expression level of PSME1 in CAG was significantly lower than in matched normal gastric mucosa (P < 0.05). This study clearly demonstrated that there are some changes in protein expression between CAG and normal mucosa. In these changes, down-regulation of PSME1 and up-regulation of RPS12 could be involved in the development of CAG. Thus, the differentially expressed proteins might play important roles in CAG as functional molecules

  6. Comparative proteomics analysis of chronic atrophic gastritis: changes of protein expression in chronic atrophic gastritis with out Helicobacter pylori infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lin; Hou, Yanhong; Wu, Kai; Li, Dan [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, The 309 Hospital of People' s Liberation Army, Beijing (China)

    2012-03-02

    Chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) is a very common gastritis and one of the major precursor lesions of gastric cancer, one of the most common cancers worldwide. The molecular mechanism underlying CAG is unclear, but its elucidation is essential for the prevention and early detection of gastric cancer and appropriate intervention. A combination of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry was used in the present study to analyze the differentially expressed proteins. Samples from 21 patients (9 females and 12 males; mean age: 61.8 years) were used. We identified 18 differentially expressed proteins in CAG compared with matched normal mucosa. Eight proteins were up-regulated and 10 down-regulated in CAG when compared with the same amounts of proteins in individually matched normal gastric mucosa. Two novel proteins, proteasome activator subunit 1 (PSME1), which was down-regulated in CAG, and ribosomal protein S12 (RPS12), which was up-regulated in CAG, were further investigated. Their expression was validated by Western blot and RT-PCR in 15 CAG samples matched with normal mucosa. The expression level of RPS12 was significantly higher in CAG than in matched normal gastric mucosa (P < 0.05). In contrast, the expression level of PSME1 in CAG was significantly lower than in matched normal gastric mucosa (P < 0.05). This study clearly demonstrated that there are some changes in protein expression between CAG and normal mucosa. In these changes, down-regulation of PSME1 and up-regulation of RPS12 could be involved in the development of CAG. Thus, the differentially expressed proteins might play important roles in CAG as functional molecules.

  7. The prevalence of autoimmune disease in patients with esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booy, J D; Takata, J; Tomlinson, G; Urbach, D R

    2012-04-01

    Achalasia is a rare disease of the esophagus that has an unknown etiology. Genetic, infectious, and autoimmune mechanisms have each been proposed. Autoimmune diseases often occur in association with one another, either within a single individual or in a family. There have been separate case reports of patients with both achalasia and one or more autoimmune diseases, but no study has yet determined the prevalence of autoimmune diseases in the achalasia population. This paper aims to compare the prevalence of autoimmune disease in patients with esophageal achalasia to the general population. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 193 achalasia patients who received treatment at Toronto's University Health Network between January 2000 and May 2010 to identify other autoimmune diseases and a number of control conditions. We determined the general population prevalence of autoimmune diseases from published epidemiological studies. The achalasia sample was, on average, 10-15 years older and had slightly more men than the control populations. Compared to the general population, patients with achalasia were 5.4 times more likely to have type I diabetes mellitus (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5-19), 8.5 times as likely to have hypothyroidism (95% CI 5.0-14), 37 times as likely to have Sjögren's syndrome (95% CI 1.9-205), 43 times as likely to have systemic lupus erythematosus (95% CI 12-154), and 259 times as likely to have uveitis (95% CI 13-1438). Overall, patients with achalasia were 3.6 times more likely to suffer from any autoimmune condition (95% CI 2.5-5.3). Our findings are consistent with the impression that achalasia's etiology has an autoimmune component. Further research is needed to more conclusively define achalasia as an autoimmune disease. © 2011 Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  8. [Treatment of autoimmune hepatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueverov, A O

    2004-01-01

    The immunosuppresive drugs, primarily glucocorticosteroids, serve as the basis for the pathogenetic treatment of autoimmune diseases of the liver. In autoimmune hepatitis, immunosuppressive therapy induces and maintains persistent remission in most patients while in primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis, its capacities are substantially limited. Ursodeoxycholic acid is used as the basic drug in predominantly occurring intrahepatic cholestasis. The treatment of cross autoimmune syndromes generally requires the choice of a combination of drugs.

  9. TNF Receptor Type II as an Emerging Drug Target for the Treatment of Cancer, Autoimmune Diseases, and Graft-Versus-Host Disease: Current Perspectives and In Silico Search for Small Molecule Binders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faraz Shaikh

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available There is now compelling evidence that TNF receptor type II (TNFR2 is predominantly expressed on CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs, and plays a major role in the expansion and function of Tregs and MDSCs. Consequently, targeting of TNFR2 by either antagonists or agonists may represent a novel strategy in the treatment of cancer and autoimmune diseases, by downregulating or upregulating suppressor cell activity. The advance in the understanding of complex structure of TNFR2 and its binding with TNF at molecular levels offers opportunity for structure-guided drug discovery. This article reviews the current evidences regarding the decisive role of TNFR2 in immunosuppressive function of Tregs and MDSCs, and the current effort to develop novel TNFR2-targeting therapeutic agents in the treatment of cancer, autoimmune diseases, and graft-versus-host disease. To shed light on the potential TNFR2-targeting small molecules, we for the first time performed virtual screening of 400,000 natural compounds against the two TNF-binding sites, regions 3 and 4, of TNFR2. Our result showed that the top hits at region 4 had slightly higher docking energies than those at region 3. Nevertheless, free energy calculation from the TNF–TNFR2 molecular dynamics simulation revealed that the binding strength of TNF in region 3 is only one-tenth of that in region 4. This suggests that region 3 is a potentially more viable binding site to be targeted by small molecules than region 4. Therefore, the effectiveness in targeting region 3 of TNFR2 deserves further investigation.

  10. Mechanism of action and efficacy of RX-111, a thieno[2,3-c]pyridine derivative and small molecule inhibitor of protein interaction with glycosaminoglycans (SMIGs), in delayed-type hypersensitivity, TNBS-induced colitis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Nicholas; Koppel, Juraj; Zsila, Ferenc; Juhas, Stefan; Il'kova, Gabriela; Kogan, Faina Yurgenzon; Lahmy, Orly; Wildbaum, Gizi; Karin, Nathan; Zhuk, Regina; Gregor, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Elucidate the mechanism of action of the small molecule inhibitor of protein binding to glycosaminoglycans, RX-111 and assay its anti-inflammatory activity in animal models of inflammatory disease. The glycosaminoglycan, heparin, was used in the mechanism of action study of RX-111. Human T lymphocytes and umbilical vein endothelial cells were used to assay the in vitro activity of RX-111. Mouse and rat models of disease were used to assay the anti-inflammatory activity of RX-111 in vivo. Circular dichroism and UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy were used to study the binding of RX-111 to the glycosaminoglycan, heparin. T lymphocyte rolling on endothelial cells under shear flow was used to assay RX-111 activity in vitro. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and tri-nitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in mice and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in rats were used to assay anti-inflammatory activity of RX-111 in vivo. RX-111 was shown to bind directly to heparin. It inhibited leukocyte rolling on endothelial cells under shear flow and reduced inflammation in the mouse model of DTH. RX-111 was efficacious in the mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease, TNBS-induced colitis and the rat model of multiple sclerosis, EAE. RX-111 exercises its broad spectrum anti-inflammatory activity by a singular mechanism of action, inhibition of protein binding to the cell surface GAG, heparan sulfate. RX-111 and related thieno[2,3-c]pyridine derivatives are potential therapeutics for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  11. Autoimmune gastritis presenting as iron deficiency anemia in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Cristina; Oliveira, Maria Emília; Palha, Ana M; Ferrão, Anabela; Morais, Anabela; Lopes, Ana Isabel

    2014-11-14

    corpus atrophic gastritis with lymphocytic infiltration (5/5), patchy oxyntic gland mononuclear cell infiltration (5/5), intestinal and/or pseudo-pyloric metaplasia in corpus mucosa (4/5), and enterochromaffin cell hyperplasia (4/5). Immunochemistry for gastrin on corpus biopsies was negative in all cases. Duodenal histology was normal. All biopsies were negative for H. pylori (Giemsa staining and cultural examination). We highlight autoimmune gastritis as a diagnosis to be considered when investigating refractory iron deficiency anemia in children, particularly in the setting of a personal/familial history of autoimmune disease, as well as the diagnostic contribution of a careful immunohistological evaluation.

  12. Helicobacter pylori infection, atrophic gastritis, and pancreatic cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong; Chen, Yue-Tong; Wang, Rui; Chen, Xin-Zu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: To investigate the associations of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection and atrophic gastritis (AG) with pancreatic cancer risk. Methods: A literature search in PubMed was performed up to July 2017. Only prospective cohort and nested case–control studies enrolling cancer-free participants were eligible. Incident pancreatic cancer cases were ascertained during the follow-up. The risks of pancreatic cancer were compared between persons infected and noninfected with Hp, or between those with and without AG status at baseline. Odds ratios (ORs) or hazard ratios were combined. Subgroup and sensitivity analyses were performed, and publication bias was estimated. Results: Three cohort studies and 6 nested case–control studies, including 65,155 observations, were analyzed. The meta-analyses did not confirm the association between pancreatic cancer risk and Hp infection (OR = 1.09, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.81–1.47) or AG status (OR = 1.18, 95% CI = 0.80–1.72). However, particular subpopulations potentially had increased risks of pancreatic cancer. Cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA)-negative strains of Hp might be a causative factor of pancreatic cancer (OR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.05–1.62), but a sensitivity analysis by leave-one-out method did not fully warrant it (OR = 1.20, 95% CI = 0.93–1.56). In 1 nested case–control study, AG at stomach corpus in Hp-negative subpopulation might have increased risk of pancreatic cancer, but with a poor test power = 0.56. Publication biases were nonsignificant in the present meta-analysis. Conclusion: Based on current prospective epidemiologic studies, the linkage of pancreatic cancer to Hp infection or AG status was not warranted on the whole. Nevertheless, prospective studies only focusing on those specific subpopulations are further required to obtain better power. PMID:28816977

  13. Infection of Helicobacter pylori and Atrophic Gastritis Influence Lactobacillus in Gut Microbiota in a Japanese Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chikara Iino

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSuppression of gastric acid by proton pump inhibitors is associated with the increase of Lactobacillus in human gut microbiota. Gastric acid secretion is also suppressed by Helicobacter pylori infection and following atrophic gastritis. However, few studies have examined the association between H. pylori infection and Lactobacillus species in gut microbiota particularly in Japan.MethodsA total of 1,123 adult subjects who participated in a health survey in Hirosaki City were studied. Infection of H. pylori was defined by both serum antibody and stool antigen test. The presence and the severity of atrophic gastritis were defined by the serum level of serum pepsinogens. Using 16S ribosomal RNA amplification from fecal samples, the relative abundance of Lactobacillus was calculated, and the composition ratio of each Lactobacillus species was surveyed.ResultsThe relative abundance of the Lactobacillus in H. pylori-infected subjects with severe atrophic gastritis was higher comparing with those in subjects with mild atrophic gastritis and without atrophic gastritis (0.591 vs 0.068% and 0.033%, respectively; p < 0.001 and also that of non-infected subjects (0.033%; p < 0.001. In H. pylori non-infected subjects, both gender and age were not associated with the relative abundance of Lactobacillus in fecal samples. The proportion of Lactobacillus salivarius was high in H. pylori-infected subjects while that of Lactobacillus acidophilus was high in non-infected subjects.ConclusionLactobacillus in human gut microbiota could be influenced by H. pylori infection and severity of atrophic gastritis in Japanese subjects.

  14. Autoimmune hepatitis vs. pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Adamczyk-Gruszka

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH is a disease of unknown etiology. In pregnancy, it may have mild clinical course as well as can lead to liver failure, or exacerbation of clinical symptoms. In pregnant women the severity of symptoms is often observed between the second and third trimester, and in the puerperium. The disease is marked by enhanced activity of Th lymphocytes, which hepatocytes recognize as foreign antigens. This results in interleukin production activating B lymphocytes, and the production of specific antibodies attacking and destroying the hepatocytes. Case report A 35-year old patient, CII PII, 7 Hbd, with autoimmune hepatitis reported for a check-up. Her first pregnancy was 18 years ago, without history of underlying disease, carried to term without complications. The woman gave birth to a baby-son weighing 3,280g, 10 points Apgar. The delivery was spontaneous and uneventful. The patient got pregnant after an 18-year break. When she twice-tested positively for pregnancy, the treatment with azathioprine was switched to prednisolone. Over the pregnancy the patient was hospitalized 4 times, in 25, 29, 35, and 37 week of gestation due to a threat of preterm delivery, and pregnancy-related cholestasis associated with AIH. In 37 week of gestation, delivery was induced, and she gave birth to a healthy male, weighing 2,650 g, body height of 49 cm, 10 points Apgar scale. The liver function improved and stabilized after the delivery. Treatment with prednisolone has been continued, and the patient’s condition is still controlled. Pregnant patients with autoimmune hepatitis often experience exacerbation of the disease, especially in the third trimester, and in the postpartum period. This case shows that with proper care it is possible to continue and terminate pregnancy safely for the mother and her newly born baby.

  15. [Medicine-syndrome research and analysis of professor Li Dian-gui in treating chronic atrophic gastritis with intestinal metaplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Fa; Li, Dian-Gui; Liu, Jian-Ping; Du, Yan-Ru; Bai, Hai-Yan

    2017-05-01

    In this article, medication characteristics of professor Li Dian-gui in treating chronic atrophic gastritis with intestinal metaplasia(CAGIM) were analyzed through traditional Chinese medicine inheritance support system(version 2.5). 276 cases and 625 prescriptions were collected to analyze five types of traditional Chinese medicine(TCM) syndromes and the medicine-syndrome correlation. The results showed that medication characteristics of professor Li Dian-gui in treating CAGIM included drug combination of aromatic medicine bitter-cold herbs, preferring to activating to invigorate the spleen and good at using the qi-regulating drugs. It demonstrated that we can adopt the therapy of Huazhuo Jiedu and Xingpi Xingqi therapies in treating CAGIM in addition to the traditional approach of nourishing Yin and activating blood circulation, opening up a novel approach for TCM in healing the pathema. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  16. Promoter polymorphisms in trefoil factor 2 and trefoil factor 3 genes and susceptibility to gastric cancer and atrophic gastritis among Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qian; Chen, Mo-Ye; He, Cai-Yun; Sun, Li-Ping; Yuan, Yuan

    2013-10-15

    The polymorphisms in trefoil factor (TFF) gene family that protect gastrointestinal epithelium might influence individual vulnerability to gastric cancer (GC) and atrophic gastritis. We used the Sequenom MassARRAY platform to identify the genotypes of TFF2 rs3814896 and TFF3 rs9981660 polymorphisms in 478 GC patients, 652 atrophic gastritis patients, and 724 controls. For the TFF2 rs3814896 polymorphism, in the subgroup aged ≤ 50 years, we found that AG+GG genotypes were associated with a 0.746-fold decreased risk of atrophic gastritis [p=0.023, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.580-0.960], a 0.626-fold decreased risk of GC (p=0.005, 95% CI=0.451-0.868), and a 0.663-fold decreased risk of diffuse-type GC (p=0.034, 95% CI=0.452-0.970) compared with the common AA genotype. For the TFF3 rs9981660 polymorphism, in the male subgroup, individuals with variant AG+AA genotype were associated with a 0.761-fold decreased risk of diffuse-type GC compared with the common GG genotype (p=0.043, 95% CI=0.584-0.992). Additionally, we found that in subjects aged ≤ 50 years compared with common AA genotype, TFF2 rs3814896 AG+GG genotypes were associated with increased TFF2 mRNA levels in the total gastric cancer specimens and in the diffuse-type gastric cancer specimens; and in males aged ≤ 50 years compared with common GG genotype, TFF3 rs9981660 AA+AG genotypes were associated with TFF3 mRNA levels in diffuse-type gastric cancer tissues and their corresponding non-cancerous tissues. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an association between the TFF2 rs3814896 AG+GG genotypes and decreased risks of GC, diffuse-type GC, and atrophic gastritis in younger people aged ≤ 50 years, and an association between TFF3 rs9981660 AG+AA genotype and decreased risk of diffuse-type GC in men. Moreover, we found that TFF2 rs3814896 AG+GG genotypes in people aged ≤ 50 years and TFF3 rs9981660 AG+AA genotypes in younger males with diffuse-type GC were associated with higher levels of

  17. [Treatment and results of therapy in autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasić, J; Macukanović, L; Pavlović, M; Koraćević, S; Govedarević, N; Kitić, Lj; Tijanić, I; Bakić, M

    1994-01-01

    Basic principles in the therapy of idiopathic autoimmune hemolytic anemia induced by warm antibody were glucocorticoides and splenectomy. Immunosupresive drugs, plasmaferesis and intravenous high doses gamma globulin therapy are also useful. In secundary autoimmune hemolytic anemia induced by warm antibody we treated basic illness. During the period of 1990-1992 we treated 21 patients with primary autoimmune hemolytic anemia and 6 patients with secondary /4 CLL and 2 Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma/. Complete remission we found as a normalisation of reticulocites and hemoglobin level respectively. Complete remission by corticoides we got in 14/21 patients, partial response in 2/21 respectively. Complete response by splenectomy we got in 2/3 splenoctomized patients (idiopathic type). For successful treatment secondary hemolytic anemias we treated primary diseases (CLL and malignant lymphoma) and we got in 4/6 patients complete remission. Our results were standard in both type of autoimmune hemolytic anaemias induced by warm antibody.

  18. Radioimmunoassay of gastrin level in duodenal ulcer, atrophic gostritis and Addison-Biermer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasik, J.; Kozal, H.; Kosowicz, J.; Hansz, J.

    1975-01-01

    Radioimmunoassay of gastrin level in the blood was performed in 20 controls, 12 patients with duodenal ulcer, 13 patients with atrophic gastritis and 14 patients with Addison-Biermer's disease. Gastrin level in the serum of the patients with duodenal ulcer did not differ significantly from that of controls. In atrophic gastritis and particularly in Addison-Biermer's disease gastrin level was found to be several times higher. This is probably a result of chronic gastrin secretion stimulation which is normally inhibited by gastric juice. (author)

  19. Phakic retinal detachment associated with atrophic hole of lattice degeneration of the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami-Nagasako, F; Ohba, N

    1983-01-01

    Forty patients with phakic nontraumatic retinal detachment caused by atrophic retinal hole of lattice degeneration were reviewed. The condition was characterized by insidious, slowly developing shallow detachment, with frequent formation of demarcation lines. Often, the patients did not recognize their visual problems until the detachment had extended to the macular region. Young patients under 40 years of age were more common than older patients. Myopic refractive errors were frequently associated. The results of surgical repair were favorable. The risk of retinal detachment in lattice degeneration with atrophic holes was estimated to be about 1 in 90 patients, and prophylactic treatment for this common anomaly is not readily recommended.

  20. Adaptive immunity in autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhi, Maria Serena; Ma, Yun; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Vergani, Diego

    2010-01-01

    The histological lesion of interface hepatitis, with its dense portal cell infiltrate consisting of lymphocytes, monocytes/macrophages and plasma cells, was the first to suggest an autoaggressive cellular immune attack in the pathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). Immunohistochemical studies, focused on the phenotype of inflammatory cells infiltrating the liver parenchyma, have shown a predominance of alphabeta-T cells. Amongst these cells, the majority have been CD4 helper/inducers, while a sizeable minority have consisted of CD8 cytotoxic/suppressors. Lymphocytes on non-T cell lineage included natural killer cells, monocytes/macrophages and B lymphocytes. For autoimmunity to arise, the self-antigenic peptide, embraced by an human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II molecule, must be presented to an uncommitted T helper (T(H)0) lymphocyte by professional antigen-presenting cells. Once activated and according to the presence in the milieu of interleukin 12 (IL-12) or IL-4, T(H)0 lymphocytes can differentiate into T(H)1 cells, which are pivotal to macrophage activation; enhance HLA class I expression, rendering liver cells vulnerable to CD8 T-cell attack; and induce HLA class II expression on hepatocytes; or they can differentiate into T(H)2 cells, which produce IL-4, IL-10 and IL-13, cytokines favouring autoantibody production by B lymphocytes. Autoantigen recognition is tightly controlled by regulatory mechanisms, such as those exerted by CD4+CD25(high) regulatory T cells. Numerical and functional regulatory T cell impairment characterises AIH and permits the perpetuation of effector immune responses with ensuing persistent liver destruction. Advances in the study of autoreactive T cells stem mostly from AIH type 2, where the main autoantigen, cytochrome P450IID6 (CYP2D6), is known to enable characterisation of antigen-specific immune responses. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Progress in diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YIN Tao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP is a special type of chronic pancreatitis that originates from an autoimmune-mediated mechanism. AIP has unique radiological, serological, and histopathological features, often accompanied by peripancreatic lesions. AIP may be easily confused with pancreatic cancer and cholangiocarcinoma. It is necessary to diagnose AIP while integrating a variety of clinical indicators. Steroid therapy should be performed for patients diagnosed with AIP, and surgical treatment can be selected if necessary.

  2. Steroids and Autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombetta, Amelia Chiara; Meroni, Marianna; Cutolo, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    From the middle of the 19th century, it is known that endocrine and immune systems interact bi-directionally in different processes that ensure organism homeostasis. Endocrine and nervous systems have a pivotal role in the balancing of pro- and anti-inflammatory functions of immune system, and constitute a complex circadian neuroendocrine network. Autoimmune diseases have in fact a complex pathogenic origin in which the importance of endocrine system was demonstrated. In this chapter, we will mention the structure and function of steroidal hormones involved in the neuroendocrine immune network and we will address the ways in which endocrine and immune systems influence each other, in a bi-directional fashion. Adrenal hormones, sex hormones, vitamin D, and melatonin and prolactin importantly all contribute to the homeostasis of the immune system. Indeed, some of the steroidal hormone activities determine inhibition or stimulation of immune system components, in both physiological (i.e. suppression of an unwanted response in pregnancy, or stimulation of a protective response in infections) and pathological conditions. We will finally mention the rationale for optimization of exogenous administration of glucocorticoids in chronic autoimmune diseases, and the latest developments concerning these drugs. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. AUTOIMMUNE DISEASE DURING PREGNANCY AND THE MICROCHIMERISM LEGACY OF PREGNANCY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams Waldorf, Kristina M.; Nelson, J. Lee

    2009-01-01

    Pregnancy has both short-term effects and long-term consequences. For women who have an autoimmune disease and subsequently become pregnant, pregnancy can induce amelioration of the mother’s disease, such as in rheumatoid arthritis, while exacerbating or having no effect on other autoimmune diseases like systemic lupus erythematosus. That pregnancy also leaves a long-term legacy has recently become apparent by the discovery that bi-directional cell trafficking results in persistence of fetal cells in the mother and of maternal cells in her offspring for decades after birth. The long-term persistence of a small number of cells (or DNA) from a genetically disparate individual is referred to as microchimerism. While microchimerism is common in healthy individuals and is likely to have health benefits, microchimerism has been implicated in some autoimmune diseases such as systemic sclerosis. In this paper, we will first discuss short-term effects of pregnancy on women with autoimmune disease. Pregnancy-associated changes will be reviewed for selected autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and autoimmune thyroid disease. The pregnancy-induced amelioration of rheumatoid arthritis presents a window of opportunity for insights into both immunological mechanisms of fetal-maternal tolerance and pathogenic mechanisms in autoimmunity. A mechanistic hypothesis for the pregnancy-induced amelioration of rheumatoid arthritis will be described. We will then discuss the legacy of maternal-fetal cell transfer from the perspective of autoimmune diseases. Fetal and maternal microchimerism will be reviewed with a focus on systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), autoimmune thyroid disease, neonatal lupus and type I diabetes mellitus. PMID:18716941

  4. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome in a 13-year old girl

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgwardt, L.; Pedersen, P.; Peitersen, B.

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS) is an entity, defined by autoimmunity towards two or more endocrine organs. APS is classified in 3 subgroups (type-1, type-2a, type-2b), according to the organs involved. A case is presented of a 13-year old girl referred to the Department of Paediatrics...... with hypothyroidism, subsequently diagnosed adrenocortical insufficiency and impending Addison crisis, typical for APS-type 2a. In the paper we discuss the need for more attention to APS in clinical work Udgivelsesdato: 2008/9/29...

  5. Autologous fat transplantation for depressed linear scleroderma-induced facial atrophic scars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Mi Ryung; Jung, Jin Young; Chung, Kee Yang

    2008-12-01

    Facial linear scleroderma results in depressed atrophic scars. Autologous fat transplantation has been widely used, and fat appears to be an ideal material for filling depressed atrophic scars and contour deformities, but long-term results for autologous fat transplantation are controversial. To review the short- and long-term results of 20 patients who underwent multiple autologous fat transplantations for depressed atrophic scar correction. Twenty patients with clinically inactive facial linear scleroderma were included. They received at least two transplantations and had a 12-month follow-up evaluation. On the forehead, 51% to 75% improvement (average grading scale: 2.4) was achieved when observed at least 12 months after the last treatment. For the chin, correction was poor (average grading scale: 0.7) with less than 25% improvement. The infraorbital area showed fair correction, but the nose showed poor correction. Two of three patients with scalp reduction surgery showed excellent results, showing only slight scar widening. Autologous fat transplantation is an effective method for long-term correction of depressed atrophic scars left by linear scleroderma on the forehead but is less effective for corrections on the nose, infraorbital area, and chin.

  6. The serological gastric biopsy in primary care : studies on atrophic gastritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korstanje, Andries

    2006-01-01

    This thesis sheds light on the clinical utility of serum markers of gastric atrophy, pepsinogen and gastrin, in general practice in the Dutch province of Zeeland. The biomarkers were used in studies on atrophic corpus gastritis, as surrogate outcome of gastric cancer. Attention was paid to

  7. Atrophic femoral nonunion with bone loss: treatment with monorail transport: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, David M; Voss, Frank R

    2004-08-01

    Nonunions are an uncommon outcome of femoral fractures. Atrophic nonunions with a leg length discrepancy secondary to bone loss are often the most difficult to treat, and the treatment options are limited. We present a case that uses concomitant monolateral external fixation and intramedullary nailing to heal a nonunion and perform a simultaneous 7-cm lengthening procedure in a 33-year-old female.

  8. Dominant inherited distal spinal muscular atrophy with atrophic and hypertrophic calves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, R J; Sie, O G; van Weerden, T W

    The clinical, electrophysiological, radiological and morphological data of 3 members of a family with autosomal dominant distal spinal muscular atrophy (DSMA) are reported. One patient has the clinical picture of peroneal muscular atrophy with atrophic calves. His father and sister suffer from

  9. Treatment of a traumatic atrophic depressed scar with hyaluronic acid fillers: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain SN

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Syed Nazim Hussain,1 Greg J Goodman,2,3 Eqram Rahman4 1Royal Lush Skin Hair & Laser Clinic, Saket, New Delhi, India; 2Department of Primary Care, Monash University, Clayton, 3Skin and Cancer Foundation Inc, Carlton, VIC, Australia; 4Faculty of Medical Science, Postgraduate Medical Institute, Anglia Ruskin University, Chelmsford, UK Background: Hyaluronic acid filler has been documented in the treatment of atrophic depressed acne scars relatively frequently in the literature but rarely in chronic depressed traumatic atrophic facial scars.Methods: This case report discusses the use of hyaluronic acid fillers in the correction of a post-traumatic facial atrophic scar on the right cheek.Results: The right cheek scar was substantially corrected with one session of two different hyaluronic acids injected in a deep and superficial plane.Conclusion: Relatively accurate, simple and effective correction of this atrophic traumatic scar may suggest that fillers are a suitable alternative to surgery for such scars. Keywords: scarring, scar correction, filler, hyaluronic acid, facial scar

  10. Positive relationship between p42.3 gene and inflammation in chronic non-atrophic gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ping; Cui, Yun; Fu, Qing Yan; Lu, You Yong; Fang, Jing Yuan; Chen, Xiao Yu

    2015-10-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is a typical type of inflammation-related tumor. The p42.3 gene is shown to be highly expressed in GC, but its association with gastritis remains unknown. We aimed to explore the relationship between gastric inflammation and p42.3 gene in vitro and in vivo. Normal gastric epithelial cells (GES-1) were treated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Total cell mRNA and protein were extracted and collected, and polymerase chain reaction and Western blot were performed to determine the relative expression of p42.3 gene. In total, 291 biopsy samples from patients with chronic non-atrophic gastritis were collected and immunohistochemistry was used to measure the p42.3 protein expression. The association between p42.3 protein expression and the clinicopathological characteristics of these patients were analyzed. Both H. pylori and TNF-α significantly enhanced the p42.3 protein expression in GES-1 cells in a time and dose-dependent manner. In addition, p42.3 gene expression was positively associated with the severity of gastric mucosal inflammation and H. pylori infection (P = 0.000). Its expression was significantly more common in severe gastric inflammation and in H. pylori-infected cases. p42.3 gene expression is associated with gastric mucosal inflammation that can be upregulated by TNF-α and H. pylori infection. © 2015 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Correlation between serum vitamin B12 level and peripheral neuropathy in atrophic gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guo-Tao; Zhao, Hong-Ying; Kong, Yu; Sun, Ning-Ning; Dong, Ai-Qin

    2018-03-28

    To explore the correlation between serum vitamin B12 level and peripheral neuropathy in patients with chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG). A total of 593 patients diagnosed with chronic gastritis by gastroscopy and pathological examination from September 2013 to September 2016 were selected for this study. The age of these patients ranged within 18- to 75-years-old. Blood pressure, height and weight were measured in each patient, and the body mass index value was calculated. Furthermore, gastric acid, serum gastrin, serum vitamin and serum creatinine tests were performed, and peripheral nerve conduction velocity and Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) were detected. In addition, the type of gastritis was determined by gastroscopy. The above factors were used as independent variables to analyze chronic gastritis with peripheral neuropathy and vitamin B12 deficiency risk factors, and to analyze the relationship between vitamin B12 levels and peripheral nerve conduction velocity. In addition, in the treatment of CAG on the basis of vitamin B12, patients with peripheral neuropathy were observed. Age, H. pylori infection, CAG, vitamin B9 and vitamin B12 were risk factors for the occurrence of peripheral nerve degeneration. Furthermore, CAG and H. pylori infection were risk factors for chronic gastritis associated with vitamin B12 deficiency. Serum vitamin B12 level was positively correlated with sensory nerve conduction velocity in the tibial nerve ( R = 0.463). After vitamin B12 supplementation, patients with peripheral neuropathy improved. Serum vitamin B12 levels in patients with chronic gastritis significantly decreased, and the occurrence of peripheral neuropathy had a certain correlation. CAG and H. pylori infection are risk factors for vitamin B12 deficiency and peripheral neuropathy. When treating CAG, vitamin B12 supplementation can significantly reduce peripheral nervous system lesions. Therefore, the occurrence of peripheral neuropathy associated with vitamin B12

  12. [Allergy and autoimmunity: Molecular diagnostics, therapy, and presumable pathogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arefieva, A S; Smoldovskaya, O V; Tikhonov, A A; Rubina, A Yu

    2017-01-01

    Allergic and autoimmune diseases represent immunopathological reactions of an organism to antigens. Despite that the allergy is a result of exaggerated immune response to foreign antigens (allergens) and autoimmune diseases are characterized by the pathological response to internal antigens (autoantigens), the underlying mechanisms of these diseases are probably common. Thus, both types of diseases represent variations in the hypersensitivity reaction. A large percentage of both the adult and pediatric population is in need of early diagnostics of these pathologies of the immune system. Considering the diversity of antibodies produced in allergic and autoimmune disease and the difficulties accompanying clinical diagnosing, molecular diagnostics of these pathological processes should be carried out in several stages, including screening and confirmatory studies. In this review, we summarize the available data on the molecular diagnostics and therapy of allergic and autoimmune diseases and discuss the basic similarities and differences in the mechanisms of their development.

  13. Autoimmune premature ovarian failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Komorowska

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Premature ovarian failure (POF, also termed as primary ovarian insufficiency (POI, is a highly heterogenous condition affecting 0.5-3.0% of women in childbearing age. These young women comprise quite a formidable group with unique physical and psychological needs that require special attention. Premature ovarian senescence (POS in all of its forms evolves insidiously as a basically asymptomatic process, leading to complete loss of ovarian function, and POI/POF diagnoses are currently made at relatively late stages. Well-known and well-documented risk factors exist, and the presence or suspicion of autoimmune disorder should be regarded as an important one. Premature ovarian failure is to some degree predictable in its occurrence and should be considered while encountering young women with loss of menstrual regularity, especially when there is a concomitant dysfunction in the immune system.

  14. Psychoneuroimmunology - psyche and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemssen, Tjalf

    2012-01-01

    Psychoneuroimmunology is a relatively young field of research that investigates interactions between central nervous and immune system. The brain modulates the immune system by the endocrine and autonomic nervous system. Vice versa, the immune system modulates brain activity including sleep and body temperature. Based on a close functional and anatomical link, the immune and nervous systems act in a highly reciprocal manner. From fever to stress, the influence of one system on the other has evolved in an intricate manner to help sense danger and to mount an appropriate adaptive response. Over recent decades, reasonable evidence has emerged that these brain-to-immune interactions are highly modulated by psychological factors which influence immunity and autoimmune disease. For several diseases, the relevance of psychoneuroimmunological findings has already been demonstrated.

  15. Increased prevalence of autoimmunity in Turner syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, K H; Cleemann, L; Hjerrild, B E

    2009-01-01

    and karyotype. In conclusion, TS girls and women face a high prevalence of autoimmunity and associated disease with a preponderance towards hypothyroidism and CD. Thus, health care providers dealing with this patient group should be observant and test liberally for these conditions even before clinical symptoms......Individuals with Turner syndrome (TS) are prone to develop autoimmune conditions such as coeliac disease (CD), thyroiditis and type 1 diabetes (T1DM). The objective of the present study was to examine TS of various karyotypes for autoantibodies and corresponding diseases. This was investigated...... hypothyroid. Overall, 18% (19) presented with CD autoantibodies, of whom 26% (five) had CD. Anti-TPO and CD autoantibodies co-existed in 9% (10). Immunoglobulin A deficiency was found in 3% (three) of patients, who all had CD autoantibodies without disease. Among four patients with anti-GAD-65 none had T1DM...

  16. Differential expression of phospholipase C epsilon 1 is associated with chronic atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic inflammation plays a causal role in gastric tumor initiation. The identification of predictive biomarkers from gastric inflammation to tumorigenesis will help us to distinguish gastric cancer from atrophic gastritis and establish the diagnosis of early-stage gastric cancer. Phospholipase C epsilon 1 (PLCε1 is reported to play a vital role in inflammation and tumorigenesis. This study was aimed to investigate the clinical significance of PLCε1 in the initiation and progression of gastric cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Firstly, the mRNA and protein expression of PLCε1 were analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blotting in normal gastric mucous epithelial cell line GES-1 and gastric cancer cell lines AGS, SGC7901, and MGC803. The results showed both mRNA and protein levels of PLCε1 were up-regulated in gastric cancer cells compared with normal gastric mucous epithelial cells. Secondly, this result was confirmed by immunohistochemical detection in a tissue microarray including 74 paired gastric cancer and adjacent normal tissues. Thirdly, an independence immunohistochemical analysis of 799 chronic atrophic gastritis tissue specimens demonstrated that PLCε1 expression in atrophic gastritis tissues were down-regulated since PLCε1 expression was negative in 524 (65.6% atrophic gastritis. In addition, matched clinical tissues from atrophic severe gastritis and gastric cancer patients were used to further confirm the previous results by analyzing mRNA and protein levels expression of PLCε1 in clinical samples. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCES: Our results suggested that PLCε1 protein may be a potential biomarker to distinguish gastric cancer from inflammation lesion, and could have great potential in applications such as diagnosis and pre-warning of early-stage gastric cancer.

  17. Differential expression of phospholipase C epsilon 1 is associated with chronic atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Tao; Ji, Jiajia; Qian, Qirong; Lu, Lungeng; Fu, Hualin; Jin, Weilin; Cui, Daxiang

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inflammation plays a causal role in gastric tumor initiation. The identification of predictive biomarkers from gastric inflammation to tumorigenesis will help us to distinguish gastric cancer from atrophic gastritis and establish the diagnosis of early-stage gastric cancer. Phospholipase C epsilon 1 (PLCε1) is reported to play a vital role in inflammation and tumorigenesis. This study was aimed to investigate the clinical significance of PLCε1 in the initiation and progression of gastric cancer. Firstly, the mRNA and protein expression of PLCε1 were analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blotting in normal gastric mucous epithelial cell line GES-1 and gastric cancer cell lines AGS, SGC7901, and MGC803. The results showed both mRNA and protein levels of PLCε1 were up-regulated in gastric cancer cells compared with normal gastric mucous epithelial cells. Secondly, this result was confirmed by immunohistochemical detection in a tissue microarray including 74 paired gastric cancer and adjacent normal tissues. Thirdly, an independence immunohistochemical analysis of 799 chronic atrophic gastritis tissue specimens demonstrated that PLCε1 expression in atrophic gastritis tissues were down-regulated since PLCε1 expression was negative in 524 (65.6%) atrophic gastritis. In addition, matched clinical tissues from atrophic severe gastritis and gastric cancer patients were used to further confirm the previous results by analyzing mRNA and protein levels expression of PLCε1 in clinical samples. Our results suggested that PLCε1 protein may be a potential biomarker to distinguish gastric cancer from inflammation lesion, and could have great potential in applications such as diagnosis and pre-warning of early-stage gastric cancer.

  18. [Mining analysis and experience summary for chronic atrophic gastritis cases treated by Professor LIU Feng-bin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Zheng-kun; Liu, Feng-bin; Li, Pei-wu; Zhuang, Kun-hai

    2015-06-01

    To summarize Professor LIU Feng-bin's clinical experience and theoretical thoughts on chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG), the study group designed a retrospective study on his case series and expert interview. First of all, the data of CAG patients treated in the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine between 2009 and 2013, e. g. herbs, diseases, syndrome type, prescription amount and number of herbs, was collected and processed. The statistical description and binary logistic regression were used to determined the syndrome type, initial basic remedy and modification. During the statistics, a complete and sub-group analysis was performed simultaneously. After the expert interview, the syndrome type and medication were finalized. As a result, a total of 228 CAG patients aged at (50.30 ± 10.18) were collected, including 151 males (66.23%). Of them, the TCM diagnosis and syndrome type were extracted from the information of 157 patients, including 115 cases with gastric stuffiness, 23 cases with gastric pain, 19 missing cases, 2 cases with spleen-stomach weakness syndrome, 57 cases with spleen deficiency and dampness-heat syndrome, 18 cases with spleen-stomach disharmony syndrome, 23 cases with syndrome of liver depression syndrome, 21 cases with liver qi invading stomach syndrome and 26 qi and yin deficiency syndrome, respectively. All of the 228 patients used totally 104 herbs, while the subgroups with 157 patients used 94 herbs. The most frequently used 15 herbs used in each groups were analyzed to determine the initial basic remedy and modification. Subsequently, based on the information of the sub-groups with 157 patients, with the syndrome type as the dependent variable, the logistic regression analysis was made on the most frequently used 32 herbs, in order to determined the modification in herbs for different syndrome types. After experts reviewed and modified, they believed the main causes of CAG were dietary irregularities

  19. Recent advances in understanding autoimmune thyroid disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliddal, Sofie; Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) is often observed together with other autoimmune diseases. The coexistence of two or more autoimmune diseases in the same patient is referred to as polyautoimmunity, and AITD is the autoimmune disease most frequently involved. The occurrence of polyautoimmunity h...

  20. Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae autoantibodies in autoimmune diseases: from bread baking to autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Maurizio; Perricone, Roberto; Blank, Miri; Perricone, Carlo; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2013-10-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is best known as the baker's and brewer's yeast, but its residual traces are also frequent excipients in some vaccines. Although anti-S. cerevisiae autoantibodies (ASCAs) are considered specific for Crohn's disease, a growing number of studies have detected high levels of ASCAs in patients affected with autoimmune diseases as compared with healthy controls, including antiphospholipid syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and rheumatoid arthritis. Commensal microorganisms such as Saccharomyces are required for nutrition, proper development of Peyer's aggregated lymphoid tissue, and tissue healing. However, even the commensal nonclassically pathogenic microbiota can trigger autoimmunity when fine regulation of immune tolerance does not work properly. For our purposes, the protein database of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) was consulted, comparing Saccharomyces mannan to several molecules with a pathogenetic role in autoimmune diseases. Thanks to the NCBI bioinformation technology tool, several overlaps in molecular structures (50-100 %) were identified when yeast mannan, and the most common autoantigens were compared. The autoantigen U2 snRNP B″ was found to conserve a superfamily protein domain that shares 83 % of the S. cerevisiae mannan sequence. Furthermore, ASCAs may be present years before the diagnosis of some associated autoimmune diseases as they were retrospectively found in the preserved blood samples of soldiers who became affected by Crohn's disease years later. Our results strongly suggest that ASCAs' role in clinical practice should be better addressed in order to evaluate their predictive or prognostic relevance.

  1. The expression of the beta cell-derived autoimmune ligand for the killer receptor nkp46 is attenuated in type 2 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chamutal Gur

    Full Text Available NK cells rapidly kill tumor cells, virus infected cells and even self cells. This is mediated via killer receptors, among which NKp46 (NCR1 in mice is prominent. We have recently demonstrated that in type 1 diabetes (T1D NK cells accumulate in the diseased pancreas and that they manifest a hyporesponsive phenotype. In addition, we found that NKp46 recognizes an unknown ligand expressed by beta cells derived from humans and mice and that blocking of NKp46 activity prevented diabetes development. Here we investigated the properties of the unknown NKp46 ligand. We show that the NKp46 ligand is mainly located in insulin granules and that it is constitutively secreted. Following glucose stimulation the NKp46 ligand translocates to the cell membrane and its secretion decreases. We further demonstrate by using several modalities that the unknown NKp46 ligand is not insulin. Finally, we studied the expression of the NKp46 ligand in type 2 diabetes (T2D using 3 different in vivo models and 2 species; mice and gerbils. We demonstrate that the expression of the NKp46 ligand is decreased in all models of T2D studied, suggesting that NKp46 is not involved in T2D.

  2. [Stress and auto-immunity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delévaux, I; Chamoux, A; Aumaître, O

    2013-08-01

    The etiology of auto-immune disorders is multifactorial. Stress is probably a participating factor. Indeed, a high proportion of patients with auto-immune diseases report uncommon stress before disease onset or disease flare. The biological consequences of stress are increasingly well understood. Glucocorticoids and catecholamines released by hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis during stress will alter the balance Th1/Th2 and the balance Th17/Treg. Stress impairs cellular immunity, decreases immune tolerance and stimulates humoral immunity exposing individuals to autoimmune disease among others. The treatment for autoimmune disease should include stress management. Copyright © 2012 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Exacerbation of autoimmune neuro-inflammation in mice cured from blood-stage Plasmodium berghei infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Thomé

    Full Text Available The thymus plays an important role shaping the T cell repertoire in the periphery, partly, through the elimination of inflammatory auto-reactive cells. It has been shown that, during Plasmodium berghei infection, the thymus is rendered atrophic by the premature egress of CD4+CD8+ double-positive (DP T cells to the periphery. To investigate whether autoimmune diseases are affected after Plasmodium berghei NK65 infection, we immunized C57BL/6 mice, which was previously infected with P. berghei NK65 and treated with chloroquine (CQ, with MOG35-55 peptide and the clinical course of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE was evaluated. Our results showed that NK65+CQ+EAE mice developed a more severe disease than control EAE mice. The same pattern of disease severity was observed in MOG35-55-immunized mice after adoptive transfer of P. berghei-elicited splenic DP-T cells. The higher frequency of IL-17+- and IFN-γ+-producing DP lymphocytes in the Central Nervous System of these mice suggests that immature lymphocytes contribute to disease worsening. To our knowledge, this is the first study to integrate the possible relationship between malaria and multiple sclerosis through the contribution of the thymus. Notwithstanding, further studies must be conducted to assert the relevance of malaria-induced thymic atrophy in the susceptibility and clinical course of other inflammatory autoimmune diseases.

  4. Collagen-induced arthritis in nonhuman primates: multiple epitopes of type II collagen can induce autoimmune-mediated arthritis in outbred cynomolgus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimozuru, Y; Yamane, S; Fujimoto, K; Terao, K; Honjo, S; Nagai, Y; Sawitzke, A D; Terato, K

    1998-03-01

    To define which regions of the type II collagen (CII) molecule result in anticollagen antibody production and the subsequent development of autoantibodies in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) nonhuman primate model. Male and female cynomolgus monkeys (2-6 of each sex per group) were immunized with either chicken (Ch), human, or monkey (Mk) CII, or with cyanogen bromide (CB)-generated peptide fragments of ChCII emulsified in Freund's complete adjuvant. Monkeys were observed for the development of arthritis, and sera were collected and analyzed for anticollagen antibody specificity by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Overt arthritis developed in all groups of monkeys immunized with intact CII and with all major CB peptide fragments of ChCII except CB8. Onset and severity of arthritis correlated best with serum anti-MkCII antibody levels. The levels of IgG autoantibody to MkCII were a result of the cross-reactivity rate of anti-heterologous CII antibodies with MkCII, which was based on the genetic background of individual monkeys rather than on sex differences. CII from several species and disparate regions of the CII molecule were able to induce autoantibody-mediated arthritis in outbred cynomolgus monkeys. The strong anti-MkCII response suggests that epitope spreading or induction of broad-based CII cross-reactivity occurred in these animals. Autoantibody levels to MkCII were higher in CIA-susceptible monkeys than in resistant monkeys, despite comparable antibody levels in response to the various immunizations of CII. These results closely parallel the type of anticollagen responses found in sera from rheumatoid arthritis patients. Perhaps this can be accounted for by similar major histocompatibility complex heterogenicity associated with an outbred population, or maybe this is a primate-specific pattern of reactivity to CII.

  5. Stem cell therapy for severe autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marmont Alberto M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Intense immunosuppresion followed by alogenic or autogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a relatively recent procedure which was used for the first time in severe, refractory cases of systemic lupus erythematosus. Currently three agressive procedures are used in the treatment of autoimmune diseases: high dose chemotherapy without stem cell rescue, intense immunosuppression with subsequent infusion of the alogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation combined with or without the selection of CD34+ cells, and the autogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Proof of the graft-versus-leukemia effect observed define SCT as a form of immunotherapy, with additional evidence of an similar Graft-vs-Autoimmunity effect which is suggestive of a cure for autoimmune diseases in this type of therapy. The use of alogenic SCT improved due to its safety compared to autogenic transplantations. In this report, data of multiply sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus are reported, with the conclusion that Immunoablation followed by SCT is clearly indicated in such cases.

  6. What affects the quality of life in autoimmune Addison's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, G; Hackemann, A; Penna-Martinez, M; Badenhoop, K

    2013-02-01

    Several studies have shown a reduced quality of life in patients with Addison's disease, but little is known about the potential influences. We determined the quality of life in 200 patients with Addison's disease using an Addison's disease-specific quality-of-life questionnaire. Data about first symptoms, time to diagnosis and current medication were collected by questionnaires. With increasing latency between first symptoms and diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency, the quality of life decreased in highly significant manner (pdisease (p=0.05), atrophic gastritis (p=0.01) and primary ovarian failure (p=0.01) were highly correlated with reduced scores. Quality of life was significantly lower in female patients and in those with manifestation at older ages. With more autoimmune comorbidities, the quality of life scores dropped. The most important factor, however, was latency between first symptoms and diagnosis that affected patients' quality of life even years after manifestation of the disease. These results confirm and extend previous observations and emphasize the importance of a timely diagnosis. Therefore, medical awareness for this rare but easily treatable disorder needs to be sharpened. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Establishment of a novel radioligand assay using eukaryotically expressed cytochrome P4502D6 for the measurement of liver kidney microsomal type 1 antibody in patients with autoimmune hepatitis and hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Y; Gregorio, G; Gäken, J; Muratori, L; Bianchi, F B; Mieli-Vergani, G; Vergani, D

    1997-06-01

    Liver kidney microsomal type 1 antibody (LKM1) is the diagnostic marker of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) type 2 and is also found in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Cytochrome P4502D6 (CYP2D6) is the documented target antigen of LKM1 in AIH, but not in HCV infection. To compare the reactivity in the two conditions, we established a radioligand assay using eukaryotically expressed CYP2D6 as target. A 1.2-kb human CYP2D6 cDNA was isolated from a human liver cDNA library and subcloned into an in vitro transcription vector pSP64 Poly(A). Recombinant CYP2D6 was then produced by in vitro transcription/translation, metabolically labelled with 35S methionine and used in the immunoprecipitation assay. Antibodies that bound radiolabelled CYP2D6 were immunoprecipitated and their levels assessed as cpm. Sera from 50 LKM1-positive patients (26 with AIH; 24 with HCV infection), 128 LKM1-negative patients and 57 normal controls were tested. Reactivity to 35S labelled CYP2D6 was observed in all LKM1-positive sera from patients with AIH and HCV infection, but in none of the controls. The cpm in both conditions were significantly higher than in normal controls (pLKM1 (r 0.87, p<0.001 and r=0.64, p<0.001 for AIH and HCV infection, respectively). Reactivity to 35S labelled CYP2D6 was inhibited by addition of an excess of eukaryotically expressed CYP2D6. CYP2D6 is a major target antigen of both AIH and HCV infection. The novel radioligand assay is highly sensitive and specific.

  8. Investigation of mucosal pattern of gastric antrum using magnifying narrow-band imaging in patients with chronic atrophic fundic gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Yasushi; Uedo, Noriya; Kanzaki, Hiromitsu; Kato, Minoru; Hamada, Kenta; Aoi, Kenji; Tonai, Yusuke; Matsuura, Noriko; Kanesaka, Takashi; Yamashina, Takeshi; Akasaka, Tomofumi; Hanaoka, Noboru; Takeuchi, Yoji; Higashino, Koji; Ishihara, Ryu; Tomita, Yasuhiko; Iishi, Hiroyasu

    2017-01-01

    Magnifying narrow-band imaging (M-NBI) can reportedly help predict the presence and distribution of atrophy and intestinal metaplasia in the gastric corpus. However, the micro-mucosal pattern of the antrum shown by M-NBI differs from that of the corpus. We studied the distribution and histology of the micro-mucosal pattern in the antrum based on magnifying endoscopy. Endoscopic images of the greater curvature of the antrum were evaluated in 50 patients with chronic atrophic fundic gastritis (CAFG). The extent of CAFG was evaluated by autofluorescence imaging. The micro-mucosal pattern was evaluated by M-NBI and classified into groove and white villiform types. The localization of white villiform type mucosa was classified into three types in relation to the areae gastricae : null, central, and segmental types. Biopsies were taken from regions showing different micro-mucosal patterns. Associations among the extent of CAFG, micro-mucosal pattern, and histology were examined. As the extent of CAFG increased, the proportion of white villiform type mucosa increased, whereas that of groove type mucosa decreased (P=0.022). In patients with extensive CAFG, most of the areae gastricae was composed of the segmental or central type of white villiform type mucosa (P=0.044). The white villiform type mucosa had significantly higher grades of atrophy (P=0.002) and intestinal metaplasia (P<0.001) than did the groove type mucosa. White villiform type mucosa is indicative of atrophy and intestinal metaplasia in the gastric antrum. It extends to the whole or central part of the areae gastricae as CAFG becomes more extensive.

  9. Autoimmune Thyroiditis and Glomerulopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Santoro

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT is generally associated with hypothyroidism. It affects ~2% of the female population and 0.2% of the male population. The evidence of thyroid function- and thyroid autoantibody-unrelated microproteinuria in almost half of patients with AIT and sometimes heavy proteinuria as in the nephrotic syndrome point to a link of AIT with renal disease. The most common renal diseases observed in AIT are membranous nephropathy, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, minimal change disease, IgA nephropathy, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA vasculitis, and amyloidosis. Different hypotheses have been put forward regarding the relationship between AIT and glomerulopathies, and several potential mechanisms for this association have been considered. Glomerular deposition of immunocomplexes of thyroglobulin and autoantibodies as well as the impaired immune tolerance for megalin (a thyrotropin-regulated glycoprotein expressed on thyroid cells are the most probable mechanisms. Cross-reactivity between antigens in the setting of genetic predisposition has been considered as a potential mechanism that links the described association between ANCA vasculitis and AIT.

  10. The staging of gastritis with the OLGA system by using intestinal metaplasia as an accurate alternative for atrophic gastritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Capelle, Lisette G.; de Vries, Annemarie C.; Haringsma, Jelle; Ter Borg, Frank; de Vries, Richard A.; Bruno, Marco J.; van Dekken, Herman; Meijer, Jos; van Grieken, Nicole C. T.; Kuipers, Ernst J.

    Background: The OLGA (operative link on gastritis assessment) staging system is based on severity of atrophic gastritis (AG). AG remains a difficult histopathologic diagnosis with low interobserver agreement, whereas intestinal metaplasia (IM) is associated with high interobserver agreement.

  11. 3H-TdR autoradiography in vitro incubation for the evaluation of the therapeutic effect in chronic atrophic gastritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Jie

    1988-01-01

    This paper discussed with the feasibility of using 3 H-TdR autoraoiography in vitro incubation to evaluate the therapeutic effect of atrophic gastritis. The results showed that gastric mucosa labelling indices measured by autoradiography can reflect the property, severity and clincal conditions of chronic gastritis quantitatively. The methodology is raliable and reproducible. It was suggested that labelling indices may serve as a cytokinetic parameter to evaluate the therapeutic effect of atrophic gastritis

  12. IL-1β a potential factor for discriminating between thyroid carcinoma and atrophic thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammoun-Krichen, Maha; Bougacha-Elleuch, Noura; Mnif, Mouna; Bougacha, Fadia; Charffedine, Ilhem; Rebuffat, Sandra; Rebai, Ahmed; Glasson, Emilie; Abid, Mohamed; Ayadi, Fatma; Péraldi-Roux, Sylvie; Ayadi, Hammadi

    2012-01-01

    Interactions between cytokines and others soluble factors (hormones, antibodies...) can play an important role in the development of thyroid pathogenesis. The purpose of the present study was to examine the possible correlation between serum cytokine concentrations, thyroid hormones (FT4 and TSH) and auto-antibodies (Tg and TPO), and their usefulness in discriminating between different thyroid conditions. In this study, we investigated serum from 115 patients affected with a variety of thyroid conditions (44 Graves' disease, 17 Hashimoto's thyroiditis, 11 atrophic thyroiditis, 28 thyroid nodular goitre and 15 papillary thyroid cancer), and 30 controls. Levels of 17 cytokines in serum samples were measured simultaneously using a multiplexed human cytokine assay. Thyroid hormones and auto-antibodies were measured using ELISA. Our study showed that IL-1β serum concentrations allow the discrimination between atrophic thyroiditis and papillary thyroid cancer groups (p = 0.027).

  13. Major motor atrophic patterns in the face and neck: CT evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harnsberger, H.R.; Dillon, W.P.

    1985-01-01

    Cranial nerve deficits from various pathologic processes of the head and neck may result in characteristic patterns of denervation muscular atrophy. Such atrophic patterns may be clues to the location and extent of the lesion, particularly when cranial nerves are involved early in the course of the disease process. Thirty-six patients with computed tomographic (CT) evidence of muscular atrophy secondary to pathologic conditions involving the motor division of cranial nerves were examined. Five characteristic denervation muscular atrophy patterns seen on CT scans were identified. Recognition of these atrophic patterns can prevent misinterpretation of their CT appearance and direct the CT examination to the course of the compromised cranial nerve from the brainstem to its peripheral innervation

  14. AUTOIMMUNE EPIDERMAL BLISTERING DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune bullous skin diseases (ABDs are uncommon, potentially fatal diseases of skin and mucous membranes which are associated with deposits of autoantibodies and complement against distinct molecules of the epidermis and dermal/epidermal basement membrane zone (BMZ. These autoantibodies lead to a loss in skin molecular integrity, which manifests clinically as formation of blisters or erosions. In pemphigus vulgaris, loss of adhesion occurs within the epidermis. The pioneering work of Ernst H. Beutner, Ph.D. and Robert E. Jordon, M.D. confirmed the autoimmune nature of these diseases. Walter F. Lever, M.D. contributed significantly to our understanding of the histopathologic features of these diseases. Walter Lever, M.D. and Ken Hashimoto, M.D. contributed electron microscopic studies of these diseases, especially in pemphigus vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid. In bullous pemphigoid (BP, linear IgA bullous dermatosis, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA and dermatitis herpetiformis (DH, loss of adhesion takes place within or underneath the BMZ. Classic EBA demonstrates extensive skin fragility; DH is commonly associated with gluten-sensitive enteropathy, and manifests clinically with pruritic papulovesicles on the extensor surfaces of the extremities and the lumbosacral area. The clinical spectrum of bullous pemphigoid includes tense blisters, urticarial plaques, and prurigo-like eczematous lesions. Pemphigoid gestationis mostly occurs during the last trimester of pregnancy, and mucous membrane pemphigoid primarily involves the oral mucosa and conjunctivae and leads to scarring. Linear IgA bullous dermatosis manifests with tense blisters in a „cluster of jewels”-like pattern in childhood (chronic bullous disease of childhood and is more clinically heterogeneous in adulthood. Many of the autoantigens in these disorders are known and have been well characterized. ABDs may be influenced by both genetic and exogenous factors. The diagnoses of

  15. Calculation of cut-off values based on the Autoimmune Bullous Skin Disorder Intensity Score (ABSIS) and Pemphigus Disease Area Index (PDAI) pemphigus scoring systems for defining moderate, significant and extensive types of pemphigus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulard, C; Duvert Lehembre, S; Picard-Dahan, C; Kern, J S; Zambruno, G; Feliciani, C; Marinovic, B; Vabres, P; Borradori, L; Prost-Squarcioni, C; Labeille, B; Richard, M A; Ingen-Housz-Oro, S; Houivet, E; Werth, V P; Murrell, D F; Hertl, M; Benichou, J; Joly, P

    2016-07-01

    Two pemphigus severity scores, Autoimmune Bullous Skin Disorder Intensity Score (ABSIS) and Pemphigus Disease Area Index (PDAI), have been proposed to provide an objective measure of disease activity. However, the use of these scores in clinical practice is limited by the absence of cut-off values that allow differentiation between moderate, significant and extensive types of pemphigus. To calculate cut-off values defining moderate, significant and extensive pemphigus based on the ABSIS and PDAI scores. In 31 dermatology departments in six countries, consecutive patients with newly diagnosed pemphigus were assessed for pemphigus severity, using ABSIS, PDAI, Physician's Global Assessment (PGA) and Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) scores. Cut-off values defining moderate, significant and extensive subgroups were calculated based on the 25th and 75th percentiles of the ABSIS and PDAI scores. The median ABSIS, PDAI, PGA and DLQI scores of the three severity subgroups were compared in order to validate these subgroups. Ninety-six patients with pemphigus vulgaris (n = 77) or pemphigus foliaceus (n = 19) were included. The median PDAI activity and ABSIS total scores were 27·5 (range 3-84) and 34·8 points (range 0·5-90·5), respectively. The respective cut-off values corresponding to the first and third quartiles of the scores were 15 and 45 for the PDAI, and 17 and 53 for ABSIS. The moderate, significant and extensive subgroups were thus defined, and had distinguishing median ABSIS (P cut-off values of 15 and 45 for PDAI and 17 and 53 for ABSIS, to distinguish moderate, significant and extensive pemphigus forms. Identifying these pemphigus activity subgroups should help physicians to classify and manage patients with pemphigus. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  16. High maternal expression of SIGLEC1 on monocytes as a surrogate marker of a type I interferon signature is a risk factor for the development of autoimmune congenital heart block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisney, Anna R; Szelinski, Franziska; Reiter, Karin; Burmester, Gerd R; Rose, Thomas; Dörner, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    Autoimmune congenital heart block (CHB) is associated with placental transcytosis of maternal autoantibodies directed against Ro/SS-A and La/SS-B. However, only about 2% of children born to mothers with the respective antibodies are affected, indicating that further risk factors exist, which are not yet fully understood. In this study, we investigated whether a maternal type I interferon (IFN) signature represents a risk factor for the development of CHB. Blood samples, clinical data and serological parameters from 9 women with CHB pregnancies, 14 pregnant women with antibodies against Ro/SS-A but without a CHB complication and another 30 healthy pregnant women as controls were studied. SIGLEC1 expression was measured by flow cytometry and was correlated to plasma IFN-α levels measured by ELISA, and IFN-γ-induced protein 10 (IP-10) levels measured by Bio-Plex technique. Mothers of affected children had a significantly higher expression of SIGLEC1 (p=0.0034) and IFN-α (p=0.014), but not of IP-10 (p=0.14, all MWU) compared to mothers of unaffected children. SIGLEC1 and IFN-α expression were reduced by hydroxychloroquine and oral glucocorticoids. High expression of SIGLEC1 in pregnant women with autoantibodies against Ro/SS-A indicates an enhanced risk for CHB development, and these women may benefit especially from IFN-α directed therapy, for example with hydroxychloroquine. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Insulin gene VNTR polymorphisms -2221MspI and -23HphI are associated with type 1 diabetes and latent autoimmune diabetes in adults: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Na; Huang, Weihuang; Dong, Fang; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Baohuan; Jing, Lipeng; Wang, Man; Yang, Guang; Jing, Chunxia

    2015-12-01

    A variable number of tandem repeat (VNTRs) region in the insulin gene (INS) possibly influences the progression of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA). However, effects of INS VNTR polymorphisms in these contexts remain inconclusive. We performed a systematic review of work on the INS VNTR -2221MspI and -23HphI polymorphisms to estimate the overall effects thereof on disease susceptibility; we included 17,498 T1D patients and 24,437 controls, and 1960 LADA patients and 5583 controls. For T1D, the C allele at -2221MspI and the A allele at -23HphI were associated with estimated relative risks of 2.13 (95 % CI 1.94, 2.35) and 0.46 (95 % CI 0.44, 0.48), which contributed to absolute increases of 46.76 and 46.98 % in the risk of all T1D, respectively. The estimated lambda values were 0.44 and 0.42, respectively, suggesting that a co-dominant model most likely explained the effects of -2221MspI and -23HphI on T1D. For -23HphI, the A allele carried an estimated relative risk of 0.55 (95 % CI 0.50, 0.61) for LADA and increased the risk of all LADA by 36.94 %. The λ value was 0.43, suggesting that a co-dominant model most likely explained the effect of -23HphI on LADA. Our results support the existence of associations of INS with T1D and LADA.

  18. Fractional CO2 Laser Resurfacing as Monotherapy in the Treatment of Atrophic Facial Acne Scars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, Imran; Imran, Saher

    2014-04-01

    While laser resurfacing remains the most effective treatment option for atrophic acne scars, the high incidence of post-treatment adverse effects limits its use. Fractional laser photothermolysis attempts to overcome these limitations of laser resurfacing by creating microscopic zones of injury to the dermis with skip areas in between. The aim of the present study is to assess the efficacy and safety of fractional CO2 laser resurfacing in atrophic facial acne scars. Sixty patients with moderate to severe atrophic facial acne scars were treated with 3-4 sessions of fractional CO2 laser resurfacing at 6-week intervals. The therapeutic response to treatment was assessed at each follow up visit and then finally 6 months after the last laser session using a quartile grading scale. Response to treatment was labelled as 'excellent' if there was >50% improvement in scar appearance and texture of skin on the grading scale while 25-50% response and resurfacing as monotherapy is effective in treating acne scars especially rolling and superficial boxcar scars with minimal adverse effects.

  19. Implant-supported rehabilitation after treatment of atrophic mandibular fractures: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Leandro Benetti de; Gabrielli, Marisa Aparecida Cabrini; Gabrielli, Mario Francisco Real; Pereira-Filho, Valfrido Antonio Pereira

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this article is to present options of rehabilitation with dental implants in two cases of severely atrophic mandibles (fractures. Two patients who sustained fractures in severely atrophic mandibles with less than 10 mm of bone height were treated by open reduction and internal fixation through a transcervical access. Internal fixation was obtained with 2.4-mm locking reconstruction plates. The first patient presented satisfactory bone height at the area between the mental foramens and after 2 years, received flapless guided implants in the anterior mandible and an immediate protocol prosthesis. The second patient received a tent pole iliac crest autogenous graft after 2 years of fracture treatment and immediate implants. After 5 months, a protocol prosthesis was installed in the second patient. In both cases, the internal fixation followed AO principles for load-bearing osteosynthesis. Both prosthetic devices were Branemark protocol prosthesis. The mandibular reconstruction plates were not removed. Both patients are rehabilitated without complications and satisfied with esthetic and functional results. With the current techniques of internal fixation, grafting, and guided implants, the treatment of atrophic mandible fractures can achieve very good results, which were previously not possible.

  20. Overlapping but distinct specificities of anti-liver-kidney microsome antibodies in autoimmune hepatitis type II and hepatitis C revealed by recombinant native CYP2D6 and novel peptide epitopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, R; Zanger, U M; Berg, T; Hopf, U; Berg, P A

    1999-01-01

    Anti-liver-kidney microsome antibodies (anti-LKM) occur in autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) type II and in a subset of patients with hepatitis C. Anti-LKM1 in AIH are directed against cytochrome P4502D6 (CYP2D6), but conflicting data exist concerning the specificity of anti-LKM in hepatitis C. The aim of this study was to evaluate binding specificities of anti-LKM antibodies in both diseases using novel test antigens as well as their inhibitory capacity on CYP2D6 enzyme activity. Sera from 22 patients with AIH type II and 17 patients with hepatitis C being anti-LKM-positive in the immunofluorescence test were investigated for binding to native recombinant CYP2D6 and liver microsomes by ELISA and immunoblotting, and to synthetic peptides covering the region 254–339 (254–273, 257–269, 270–294, 291–310, 307–324, 321–339, 373–389) as well as the novel peptide 196–218 by ELISA. Furthermore, all sera were tested for inhibition of CYP2D6-dependent bufuralol 1′-hydroxylase activity. Twenty of the 22 AIH type II sera (91%) and nine of the 17 hepatitis C sera (53%) were positive for CYP2D6 by ELISA and/or immunoblotting. The previously described major peptide epitope comprising CYP2D6 amino acids 257–269 was recognized by 16 of the 22 AIH sera but by only one hepatitis C serum. A further epitope, 196–218, could be defined for the first time as another immunodominant epitope for AIH because it was recognized by 15 of the 22 AIH (68%) but only three of the 17 hepatitis C sera (18%). With the exception of the peptide 254–273, the other peptides showed no significant reactivity. Analysing the inhibitory properties of anti-LKM antibodies it emerged that 95% of AIH sera and 88% of hepatitis C sera inhibited enzyme function. These data indicate that anti-LKM antibodies in AIH and hepatitis C react with CYP2D6, as shown by their inhibitory activity, and that besides the known epitope 257–269 a further immunodominant epitope exists on CYP2D6 which is recognized

  1. MHC class II polymorphisms, autoreactive T-cells and autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue eTsai

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex (MHC genes, also known as human leukocyte antigen genes (HLA in humans, are the prevailing contributors of genetic susceptibility to autoimmune diseases such as Type 1 Diabetes (T1D, Multiple Sclerosis (MS, and Rheumatoid arthritis (RA, among others (Todd and Wicker, 2001;MacKay et al., 2002;Hafler et al., 2007. Although the pathways through which MHC molecules afford autoimmune risk or resistance remain to be fully mapped out, it is generally accepted that they do so by shaping the central and peripheral T cell repertoires of the host towards autoimmune proclivity or resistance, respectively. Disease-predisposing MHC alleles would both spare autoreactive thymocytes from central tolerance and bias their development towards a pathogenic phenotype. Protective MHC alleles, on the other hand, would promote central deletion of autoreactive thymocytes and skew their development towards non-pathogenic phenotypes. This interpretation of the data is at odds with two other observations: that in MHC-heterozygous individuals, resistance is dominant over susceptibility; and that it is difficult to understand how deletion of one or a few clonal autoreactive T cell types would suffice to curb autoimmune responses driven by hundreds if not thousands of autoreactive T cell specificities. This review provides an update on current advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying MHC class II-associated autoimmune disease susceptibility and/or resistance and attempts to reconcile these seemingly opposing concepts.

  2. Intraocular inflammation in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pras, Eran; Neumann, Ron; Zandman-Goddard, Gisele; Levy, Yair; Assia, Ehud I; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Langevitz, Pnina

    2004-12-01

    The uveal tract represents the vascular organ of the eye. In addition to providing most of the blood supply to the intraocular structures, it acts as a conduit for immune cells, particularly lymphocytes, to enter the eye. Consequently, the uveal tract is represented in many intraocular inflammatory processes. Uveitis is probably a misnomer unless antigens within the uvea are the direct targets of the inflammatory process. A better term of the condition is "intraocular inflammation" (IOI). To review the presence of IOI in autoimmune diseases, the immunopathogenic mechanisms leading to disease, and treatment. We reviewed the English medical literature by using MEDLINE (1984-2003) employing the terms "uveitis," "intraocular inflammation," and "autoimmune diseases." An underlying autoimmune disease was identified in up to 40% of patients with IOI, and included spondyloarthropathies, Behcets disease, sarcoidosis, juvenile chronic arthritis, Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome (an inflammatory syndrome including uveitis with dermatologic and neurologic manifestations), immune recovery syndrome, and uveitis with tubulointerstitial disease. The immunopathogenesis of IOI involves enhanced T-cell response. Recently, guidelines for the use of immunosuppressive drugs for inflammatory eye disease were established and include: corticosteroids, azathioprine, methotrexate, mycophenolate mofetil, cyclosporine, tacrolimus, cyclophosphamide, and chlorambucil. New therapies with limited experience include the tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors, interferon alfa, monoclonal antibodies against lymphocyte surface antigens, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), and the intraocular delivery of immunosuppressive agents. An underlying autoimmune disease was identified in up to 40% of patients with IOI. Immunosuppressive drugs, biologic agents, and IVIG are employed for the treatment of IOI in autoimmune diseases.

  3. Autoimmune hepatitis in association with lymphocytic colitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, Edmond M

    2012-02-03

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a rare, chronic inflammatory disorder which has been associated with a number of other auto-immune conditions. However, there are no reports in the medical literature of an association with microscopic (lymphocytic) colitis. We report the case of a 53-year-old woman with several autoimmune conditions, including lymphocytic colitis, who presented with an acute hepatitis. On the basis of the clinical features, serology, and histopathology, we diagnosed autoimmune hepatitis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of autoimmune hepatitis in association with lymphocytic colitis, and lends support to the theory of an autoimmune etiology for lymphocytic colitis.

  4. Correlation between serum vitamin B12 level and peripheral neuropathy in atrophic gastritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guo-Tao; Zhao, Hong-Ying; Kong, Yu; Sun, Ning-Ning; Dong, Ai-Qin

    2018-01-01

    AIM To explore the correlation between serum vitamin B12 level and peripheral neuropathy in patients with chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG). METHODS A total of 593 patients diagnosed with chronic gastritis by gastroscopy and pathological examination from September 2013 to September 2016 were selected for this study. The age of these patients ranged within 18- to 75-years-old. Blood pressure, height and weight were measured in each patient, and the body mass index value was calculated. Furthermore, gastric acid, serum gastrin, serum vitamin and serum creatinine tests were performed, and peripheral nerve conduction velocity and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) were detected. In addition, the type of gastritis was determined by gastroscopy. The above factors were used as independent variables to analyze chronic gastritis with peripheral neuropathy and vitamin B12 deficiency risk factors, and to analyze the relationship between vitamin B12 levels and peripheral nerve conduction velocity. In addition, in the treatment of CAG on the basis of vitamin B12, patients with peripheral neuropathy were observed. RESULTS Age, H. pylori infection, CAG, vitamin B9 and vitamin B12 were risk factors for the occurrence of peripheral nerve degeneration. Furthermore, CAG and H. pylori infection were risk factors for chronic gastritis associated with vitamin B12 deficiency. Serum vitamin B12 level was positively correlated with sensory nerve conduction velocity in the tibial nerve (R = 0.463). After vitamin B12 supplementation, patients with peripheral neuropathy improved. CONCLUSION Serum vitamin B12 levels in patients with chronic gastritis significantly decreased, and the occurrence of peripheral neuropathy had a certain correlation. CAG and H. pylori infection are risk factors for vitamin B12 deficiency and peripheral neuropathy. When treating CAG, vitamin B12 supplementation can significantly reduce peripheral nervous system lesions. Therefore, the occurrence of peripheral neuropathy

  5. Free radical theory of autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kannan Subburaj

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite great advances in clinical oncology, the molecular mechanisms underlying the failure of chemotherapeutic intervention in treating lymphoproliferative and related disorders are not well understood. Hypothesis A hypothetical scheme to explain the damage induced by chemotherapy and associated chronic oxidative stress is proposed on the basis of published literature, experimental data and anecdotal observations. Brief accounts of multidrug resistance, lymphoid malignancy, the cellular and molecular basis of autoimmunity and chronic oxidative stress are assembled to form a basis for the hypothesis and to indicate the likelihood that it is valid in vivo. Conclusion The argument set forward in this article suggests a possible mechanism for the development of autoimmunity. According to this view, the various sorts of damage induced by chemotherapy have a role in the pattern of drug resistance, which is associated with the initiation of autoimmunity.

  6. RNAi Therapeutics in Autoimmune Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seunghee Cha

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of RNA interference (RNAi, excitement has grown over its potential therapeutic uses. Targeting RNAi pathways provides a powerful tool to change biological processes post-transcriptionally in various health conditions such as cancer or autoimmune diseases. Optimum design of shRNA, siRNA, and miRNA enhances stability and specificity of RNAi-based approaches whereas it has to reduce or prevent undesirable immune responses or off-target effects. Recent advances in understanding pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases have allowed application of these tools in vitro as well as in vivo with some degree of success. Further research on the design and delivery of effectors of RNAi pathway and underlying molecular basis of RNAi would warrant practical use of RNAi-based therapeutics in human applications. This review will focus on the approaches used for current therapeutics and their applications in autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and Sjögren’s syndrome.

  7. Thyroid dysfunction: an autoimmune aspect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Farah Aziz; Al-Jameil, Noura; Khan, Mohammad Fareed; Al-Rashid, May; Tabassum, Hajera

    2015-01-01

    Auto immune thyroid disease (AITD) is the common organ specific autoimmune disorder, Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) and Grave's disease (GD) are its well-known sequelae. It occurs due to loss of tolerance to autoantigens thyroid peroxidase (TPO), thyroglobulin (Tg), thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSH-R) which leads to the infiltration of the gland. T cells in chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (cAIT) induce apoptosis in thyroid follicular cells and cause destruction of the gland. Presences of TPO antibodies are common in HT and GD, while Tg has been reported as an independent predictor of thyroid malignancy. Cytokines are small proteins play an important role in autoimmunity, by stimulating B and T cells. Various cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IL-14, TNF-α and IFN-γ are found in thyroid follicular cells which enhance inflammatory response with nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandins.

  8. Autoimmune pancreatitis in Japan: overview and perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimosegawa, Tooru; Kanno, Atsushi

    2009-01-01

    Since the rediscovery and definition of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) by Yoshida et al. in 1995, the disease has been attracting attention because of its unique clinical features and practical issues. This disease shows very impressive imaging findings, serological changes, and characteristic histopathology. It occurs most commonly in elderly males with painless jaundice or mild abdominal pain; resemblance in imaging findings between AIP and pancreatobiliary cancers poses an important practical issue of differentiation. With increasing recognition of AIP and accumulation of cases, another important feature of this disease has been revealed, i.e., association of extrapancreatic organ involvements. Initially misunderstood because it can be accompanied by other autoimmune disorders, such as Sjögren's syndrome or primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), AIP is now known to be associated with unique types of sialadenitis and cholangitis distinct from Sjögren's syndrome or PSC. Now the concept of "IgG4-related sclerosing disease" has become widely accepted and the list of organs involved continues to increase. With worldwide recognition, an emerging issue is the clinical definition of other possible types of autoimmune-related pancreatitis called "idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis (IDCP)" and "AIP with granulocyte epithelial lesion (GEL)" and their relation to AIP with lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP). The time has arrived to establish clinical diagnostic criteria of AIP based on international consensus and to discuss regional and racial differences in the clinicopathological features of AIP. Consensus guidelines are also required for the ideal use of steroids in the treatment of AIP to suppress recurrence efficiently with minimal side effects. There are many issues to be settled in AIP; international collaboration of experts in the pancreas field is necessary to clarify the entire picture of this unique and important disease.

  9. Autoimmune pancreatitis in Japan. Overview and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimosegawa, Tooru; Kanno, Atsushi

    2009-01-01

    Since the rediscovery and definition of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) by Yoshida et al. in 1995, the disease has been attracting attention because of its unique clinical features and practical issues. This disease shows very impressive imaging findings, serological changes, and characteristic histopathology. It occurs most commonly in elderly males with painless jaundice or mild abdominal pain; resemblance in imaging findings between AIP and pancreatobiliary cancers poses an important practical issue of differentiation. With increasing recognition of AIP and accumulation of cases, another important feature of this disease has been revealed, id est (i.e.), association of extrapancreatic organ involvements. Initially misunderstood because it can be accompanied by other autoimmune disorders, such as Sjogren's syndrome or primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), AIP is now known to be associated with unique types of sialadenitis and cholangitis distinct from Sjogren's syndrome or PSC. Now the concept of 'IgG4-related sclerosing disease' has become widely accepted and the list of organs involved continues to increase. With worldwide recognition, an emerging issue is the clinical definition of other possible types of autoimmune-related pancreatitis called 'idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis (IDCP)' and AIP with granulocyte epithelial lesion (GEL)' and their relation to AIP with lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP). The time has arrived to establish clinical diagnostic criteria of AIP based on international consensus and to discuss regional and racial differences in the clinicopathological features of AIP. Consensus guidelines are also required for the ideal use of steroids in the treatment of AIP to suppress recurrence efficiently with minimal side effects. There are many issues to be settled in AIP; international collaboration of experts in the pancreas field is necessary to clarify the entire picture of this unique and important disease. (author)

  10. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with latent autoimmune diabetes secrete higher levels of pro- & anti-inflammatory cytokines compared to those with type-1 diabetes mellitus following in vitro stimulation with β-cell autoantigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darshan Badal

    2017-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: There are differences in the portfolio of cytokine secretion in diabetic subjects with varying rates of β-cell destruction as LADA subjects secrete higher levels of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines on exposure to β-cell autoantigens, thus highlighting another distinguishing feature in the pathophysiology of the two forms of autoimmune diabetes.

  11. Mechanism of action and efficacy of RX-111, a thieno[2,3-c]pyridine derivative and small molecule inhibitor of protein interaction with glycosaminoglycans (SMIGs), in delayed-type hypersensitivity, TNBS-induced colitis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Harris, N.; Koppel, J.; Zsila, F.; Juhás, Štefan; Ilková, G.; Kogan, F. Y.; Lahmy, O.; Wildbaum, G.; Karin, N.; Zhuk, R.; Gregor, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 4 (2016), s. 285-294 ISSN 1023-3830 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : small molecule drug * glycosaminoglycan * heparin binding protein * heparan sulfate * inflammation * autoimmune disease Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.659, year: 2016

  12. A minimum number of autoimmune T cells to induce autoimmunity?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bosch, A.J.T.; Bolinger, B.; Keck, S.; Štěpánek, Ondřej; Ozga, A.J.; Galati-Fournier, V.; Stein, J.V.; Palmer, E.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 316, jaro (2017), s. 21-31 ISSN 0008-8749 R&D Projects: GA ČR GJ16-09208Y Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : T cell * Tolerance * Autoimmunity Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Immunology Impact factor: 3.172, year: 2016

  13. Multiplex autoantibody detection for autoimmune liver diseases and autoimmune gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderlocht, Joris; van der Cruys, Mart; Stals, Frans; Bakker-Jonges, Liesbeth; Damoiseaux, Jan

    2017-09-01

    Autoantibody detection for autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and autoimmune gastritis (AIG) is traditionally performed by IIF on a combination of tissues. Multiplex line/dot blots (LIA/DIA) offer multiple advantages, i.e. automation, objective reading, no interfering reactivities, no coincidental findings. In the current study we evaluated automated DIA (D-Tek) for detecting autoantibodies related to autoimmune diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. We tested samples of the Dutch EQC program and compared the results with the consensus of the participating labs. For the autoimmune liver diseases and AIG, respectively, 64 and 36 samples were tested. For anti-mitochondrial and anti-smooth muscle antibodies a concordance rate of 97% and 88% was observed, respectively. The concordance rate for anti-parietal cell antibodies was 92% when samples without EQC consensus (n=15) were excluded. For antibodies against intrinsic factor a concordance of 96% was observed. For all these antibodies discrepancies were identified that relate to the different test characteristics and the preponderance of IIF utilizing labs in the EQC program. In conclusion, we observed good agreement of the tested DIA blots with the consensus results of the Dutch EQC program. Taken together with the logistic advantages these blots are a good alternative for autoantibody detection in the respective diseases. A large prospective multicenter study is warranted to position these novel tests further in the whole spectrum of assays for the detection of these antibodies in a routine autoimmune laboratory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Combined treatment with lisofylline and exendin-4 reverses autoimmune diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zandong; Chen Meng; Carter, Jeffrey D.; Nunemaker, Craig S.; Garmey, James C.; Kimble, Sarah D.; Nadler, Jerry L.

    2006-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is an autoimmune disease leading to near complete pancreatic β-cell destruction. New evidence suggests that β-cell regeneration is possible, but ongoing autoimmune damage prevents restoration of β-cell mass. We tested the hypothesis that simultaneously blocking autoimmune cytokine damage and supplying a growth-promoting stimulus for β-cells would provide a novel approach to reverse T1DM. Therefore, in this study we combined lisofylline to suppress autoimmunity and exendin-4 to enhance β-cell proliferation for treating autoimmune-mediated diabetes in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model. We found that this combined therapy effectively reversed new-onset diabetes within a week of therapy, and even maintained euglycemia up to 145 days after treatment withdrawal. The therapeutic effect of this regimen was associated with improved β-cell metabolism and insulin secretion, while reducing β-cell apoptosis. It is possible that such combined therapy could become a new strategy to defeat T1DM in humans

  15. Are human endogenous retroviruses triggers of autoimmune diseases?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexø, Bjørn A; Villesen, Palle; Nissen, Kari K

    2016-01-01

    factors. Viruses including human endogenous retroviruses have long been linked to the occurrence of autoimmunity, but never proven to be causative factors. Endogenous viruses are retroviral sequences embedded in the host germline DNA and transmitted vertically through successive generations in a Mendelian...... manner. In this study by means of genetic epidemiology, we have searched for the involvement of endogenous retroviruses in three selected autoimmune diseases: multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and rheumatoid arthritis. We found that at least one human endogenous retroviral locus...

  16. Segmental vitiligo with segmental morphea: An autoimmune link?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravesh Yadav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An 18-year old girl with segmental vitiligo involving the left side of the trunk and left upper limb with segmental morphea involving the right side of trunk and right upper limb without any deeper involvement is illustrated. There was no history of preceding drug intake, vaccination, trauma, radiation therapy, infection, or hormonal therapy. Family history of stable vitiligo in her brother and a history of type II diabetes mellitus in the father were elicited. Screening for autoimmune diseases and antithyroid antibody was negative. An autoimmune link explaining the co-occurrence has been proposed. Cutaneous mosiacism could explain the presence of both the pathologies in a segmental distribution.

  17. Localized granuloma annulare and autoimmune thyroiditis in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The association of granuloma annulare (GA) and autoimmune thyroiditis has been documented in the literature in 13 previous cases. However, the pathogenesis of GA remains obscure. Possible pathogenetic factors suggested include: humoral and delayed type hypersensitivity, vascular damage, metabolic disorder, or, ...

  18. Review Article: Diagnosis and Management of Igg4 Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed Salem; Diaa Hamouda; Alyssa Parian

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare form of chronic pancreatitis that has only recently been recognized as a separate type of pancreatitis in the last two decades. The histopathological features of this distinct form of pancreatitis was first described as early as 1961 when the French Henry Sarles.

  19. Toll-Like Receptors in the Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad Hosseini, Akbar; Majidi, Jafar; Baradaran, Behzad; Yousefi, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Human Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a family of transmembrane receptors, which play a key role in both innate and adaptive immune responses. Beside of recognizing specific molecular patterns that associated with different types of pathogens, TLRs may also detect a number of self-proteins and endogenous nucleic acids. Activating TLRs lead to the heightened expression of various inflammatory genes, which have a protective role against infection. Data rising predominantly from human patients and animal models of autoimmune disease indicate that, inappropriate triggering of TLR pathways by exogenous or endogenous ligands may cause the initiation and/or perpetuation of autoimmune reactions and tissue damage. Given their important role in infectious and non-infectious disease process, TLRs and its signaling pathways emerge as appealing targets for therapeutics. In this review, we demonstrate how TLRs pathways could be involved in autoimmune disorders and their therapeutic application. PMID:26793605

  20. Autoimmune pancreatitis: case series and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakov, Rada; DePasquale, Joseph R; Elfarra, Hossam; Spira, Robert S

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AuP) is a chronic pancreatic inflammation secondary to an underlying autoimmune mechanism. After early reports of a particular type of pancreatitis associated with hypergammaglobulinemia, others asserted that there is an autoimmune mechanism involved in some patients with chronic pancreatitis. In 1995 AuP was first described as a distinct clinical entity. Since then, there have been many documented cases of AuP in Japan, and now, perhaps due to increased awareness, more cases are being reported in Europe and the United States. Herein we present our experience with 3 cases of AuP and we review the relevant literature. These 3 cases demonstrate the difficulties that exist in making the diagnosis of AuP and the impact that the diagnosis can have on patient management.

  1. Autoimmune Diabetes and Thyroiditis Complicating Treatment with Nivolumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1 ligand inhibitors have gained popularity in the treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer. The immune system is regulated by stimulatory and inhibitory signaling and aims to achieve the balance between activation and inhibition. Treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors enhances immune response, but is also known to diminish immune tolerance and increase autoimmune toxicity. Here we present a case of a patient with advanced squamous cell lung cancer who developed type I diabetes and thyroiditis after treatment with PD-1 checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab. The presence of autoimmune diabetes mellitus and thyroiditis were confirmed by markedly elevated titers of the glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody and thyroid peroxidase antibody, respectively. This report serves to heighten awareness of potential autoimmune toxicities related to anti-PD-1 therapy, especially as these toxicities are manageable if identified in a timely manner.

  2. Myocarditis in auto-immune or auto-inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comarmond, Cloé; Cacoub, Patrice

    2017-08-01

    Myocarditis is a major cause of heart disease in young patients and a common precursor of heart failure due to dilated cardiomyopathy. Some auto-immune and/or auto-inflammatory diseases may be accompanied by myocarditis, such as sarcoidosis, Behçet's disease, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, myositis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. However, data concerning myocarditis in such auto-immune and/or auto-inflammatory diseases are sparse. New therapeutic strategies should better target the modulation of the immune system, depending on the phase of the disease and the type of underlying auto-immune and/or auto-inflammatory disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Biomimetic Nanosponges for Treating Antibody-Mediated Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yao; Fang, Ronnie H; Zhang, Liangfang

    2018-04-18

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by overactive immunity, where the body's defense system launches an attack against itself. If left unchecked, this can result in the destruction of healthy tissue and significantly affect patient well-being. In the case of type II autoimmune hypersensitivities, autoreactive antibodies attack the host's own cells or extracellular matrix. Current clinical treatment modalities for managing this class of disease are generally nonspecific and face considerable limitations. In this Topical Review, we cover emerging therapeutic strategies, with an emphasis on novel nanomedicine platforms. Specifically, the use of biomimetic cell membrane-coated nanosponges that are capable of specifically binding and neutralizing pathological antibodies will be explored. There is significant untapped potential in the application of nanotechnology for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, and continued development along this line may help to eventually change the clinical landscape.

  4. Leaky gut and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, Alessio

    2012-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by tissue damage and loss of function due to an immune response that is directed against specific organs. This review is focused on the role of impaired intestinal barrier function on autoimmune pathogenesis. Together with the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and the neuroendocrine network, the intestinal epithelial barrier, with its intercellular tight junctions, controls the equilibrium between tolerance and immunity to non-self antigens. Zonulin is the only physiologic modulator of intercellular tight junctions described so far that is involved in trafficking of macromolecules and, therefore, in tolerance/immune response balance. When the zonulin pathway is deregulated in genetically susceptible individuals, autoimmune disorders can occur. This new paradigm subverts traditional theories underlying the development of these diseases and suggests that these processes can be arrested if the interplay between genes and environmental triggers is prevented by re-establishing the zonulin-dependent intestinal barrier function. Both animal models and recent clinical evidence support this new paradigm and provide the rationale for innovative approaches to prevent and treat autoimmune diseases.

  5. Vitiligo and Autoimmune Thyroid Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enke Baldini

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Vitiligo represents the most common cause of acquired skin, hair, and oral depigmentation, affecting 0.5–1% of the population worldwide. It is clinically characterized by the appearance of disfiguring circumscribed skin macules following melanocyte destruction by autoreactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Patients affected by vitiligo usually show a poorer quality of life and are more likely to suffer from depressive symptoms, particularly evident in dark-skinned individuals. Although vitiligo is a non-fatal disease, exposure of affected skin to UV light increases the chance of skin irritation and predisposes to skin cancer. In addition, vitiligo has been associated with other rare systemic disorders due to the presence of melanocytes in other body districts, such as in eyes, auditory, nervous, and cardiac tissues, where melanocytes are thought to have roles different from that played in the skin. Several pathogenetic models have been proposed to explain vitiligo onset and progression, but clinical and experimental findings point mainly to the autoimmune hypothesis as the most qualified one. In this context, it is of relevance the strong association of vitiligo with other autoimmune diseases, in particular with autoimmune thyroid disorders, such as Hashimoto thyroiditis and Graves’ disease. In this review, after a brief overview of vitiligo and its pathogenesis, we will describe the clinical association between vitiligo and autoimmune thyroid disorders and discuss the possible underlying molecular mechanism(s.

  6. The Effect of Pimecrolimus Cream 1% Compared with Triamcinolone Acetonide Paste in Treatment of Atrophic-Erosive Oral Lichen Planus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atessa Pakfetrat

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oral lichen planus (OLP is a common chronic mucocutaneous disease. Patients with atrophic and erosive types of OLP often have symptoms of soreness, and require proper treatment. The main treatment for OLP has been the administration of topical or systemic corticosteroids. The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of adcortyl cream (triamcinolone acetonide in orabase with topical pimecrolimus cream for the treatment of erosive OLP.   Materials and Methods: Twenty-eight patients with OLP were enrolled in a single blind clinical trial and assigned to either a pimecrolimus 1% cream group or an adcortyl 0.1% cream group. The medication was applied every day for 2 months and patients were assessed every 2 weeks.   Results: The mean lesion size and mean pain and burning sensation scores did not differ between the pimecrolimus and adcortyl cream groups. The pimecrolimus cream was well tolerated. No clinical drug-related adverse events were observed.   Conclusion:  Topical pimecrolimus cream may be recommended as a safe and effective alternative therapy in the treatment of OLP. Pimecrolimus cream is as effective as adcortyl cream in managing the signs and symptoms of OLP.

  7. Factors associated with elevated serum chromogranin A levels in patients with autoimmune gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Çağdaş; Karakaya, Fatih; Soykan, İrfan

    2016-11-01

    Chromogranin A is an important tool in the diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumors. Autoimmune gastritis is an autoimmune disorder marked by hypergastrinemia, which stimulates enterochromaffin-like cell proliferation. Chromogranin A is also elevated in autoimmune gastritis patients with a different level of increase in each patient. The goal of this study is to explore constituents that influence serum chromogranin A levels in autoimmune gastritis patients. One hundred and eighty-eight autoimmune gastritis patients and 20 patients with type I gastric carcinoid tumors were analyzed retrospectively and compared to 110 functional dyspepsia patients in terms of factors that might affect serum chromogranin A levels. The mean serum chromogranin A level was 171.17±67.3 ng/mL in autoimmune gastritis patients (n=62) without enterochromaffin-like cell hyperplasia, and 303.3±102.82 ng/mL in patients (n=126) with enterochromaffin-like cell hyperplasia (pgastritis were the presence of ECL cell hyperplasia and serum gastrin levels. Serum chromogranin A levels maybe helpful in distinguishing autoimmune gastritis patients and gastric carcinoid type I from the control group, but not useful in the differentiation of individuals with autoimmune gastritis from patients with gastric carcinoids.

  8. De novo autoimmune hepatitis after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Ansgar W; Weiler-Norman, Christina; Burdelski, Martin

    2007-10-01

    The Kings College group was the first to describe a clinical syndrome similar to autoimmune hepatitis in children and young adults transplanted for non-immune mediated liver diseases. They coined the term "de novo autoimmune hepatitis". Several other liver transplant centres confirmed this observation. Even though the condition is uncommon, patients with de novo AIH are now seen in most of the major transplant centres. The disease is usually characterized by features of acute hepatitis in otherwise stable transplant recipients. The most characteristic laboratory hallmark is a marked hypergammaglobulinaemia. Autoantibodies are common, mostly ANA. We described also a case of LKM1-positivity in a patients transplanted for Wilson's disease, however this patients did not develop clinical or histological features of AIH. Development of SLA/LP-autoantibodies is also not described. Therefore, serologically de novo AIH appears to correspond to type 1 AIH. Like classical AIH patients respond promptly to treatment with increased doses of prednisolone and azathioprine, while the calcineurin inhibitors cyclosporine or tacrolimus areof very limited value - which is not surprising, as almost all patients develop de novo AIH while receiving these drugs. Despite the good response to treatment, most patients remain a clinical challenge as complete stable remissions are uncommon and flares, relapses and chronic disease activity can often occur. Pathogenetically this syndrome is intriguing. It is not clear, if the immune response is directed against allo-antigens, neo-antigens in the liver, or self-antigens, possibly shared by donor and host cells. It is very likely that the inflammatory milieu due to alloreactive cells in the transplanted organ contribute to the disease process. Either leading to aberrant antigen presentation, or providing co-stimulatory signals leading to the breaking of self-tolerance. The development of this disease in the presence of treatment with calcineurin

  9. The role of the autoimmunity laboratory in autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SS Hasson

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory testing is of great value when evaluating a patient with a suspected autoimmune disease. The results can confirm a diagnosis, estimate disease severity, aid in assessing prognosis and are useful to follow disease activity. Components of the laboratory exam include complete blood count with differential, comprehensive metabolic panel, inflammatory markers, autoantibodies, and flow cytometry. Currently, autoimmunity laboratories are very vibrant owing to the constant and increasing availability of new tests, mainly due to the detection of new autoantibodies. The main characteristic that differentiates the autoimmunity laboratory from other laboratories is the use of immunoassays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, as basic techniques which determines antibodies (autoantibodies and not antigens. For this reason, immunoassay techniques must employ antigens as reagents. However, over the last few years, a significant trend at autoimmunity laboratories has been the gradual replacement of immunofluorescence microscopy by immunoassay. Nowadays the revolution of new technology has taken place significantly, for examples; recombinant DNA technology has allowed the production of large quantities of antigens for autoantibody analysis. Flow cytometry for the analysis of microsphere-based immunoassays allows the simultaneous measurement of several autoantibodies. In the same way, autoantigen microarrays provide a practical means to analyse biological fluids in the search for a high number of autoantibodies. We are now at the beginning of an era of multiplexed analysis, with a high capacity of autoantibody specificities. The future tendency in this field will include immunoassays with greater analytical sensitivity, specificity, simultaneous multiplexed capability, the use of protein microarrays, and the use of other technologies such as microfluidics.

  10. Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into ordinary chronic pancreatitis resembling alcoholic pancreatitis over a long-term course based on several clinical findings, most notably frequent pancreatic stone formation. In this review article, we describe a series of study results to confirm our hypothesis and clarify that: 1) pancreatic calcification in AIP is closely associated with disease recurrence; 2) advanced stage AIP might have earlier been included in ordinary chronic pancreatitis; 3) approximately 40% of AIP patients experience pancreatic stone formation over a long-term course, for which a primary risk factor is narrowing of both Wirsung’s and Santorini’s ducts; and 4) nearly 20% of AIP patients progress to confirmed chronic pancreatitis according to the revised Japanese Clinical Diagnostic Criteria, with independent risk factors being pancreatic head swelling and non-narrowing of the pancreatic body duct. PMID:24884922

  11. Advances in treatment of autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Ji

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP is a type of chronic pancreatitis characterized by an autoimmune inflammatory process. Treatment protocols for AIP are still evolving. According to the articles about AIP treatment in recent years, the indications for steroid therapy include specific clinical manifestations (jaundice, abdominal pain, etc., markedly abnormal imaging findings, and extrapancreatic organ involvement. The initial dose of steroid (prednisone is usually 0.6 mg·kg-1·d-1 or 30-40 mg/d; after 3 weeks to 1 month of treatment with the initial dose, the dose is decreased by 5-10 mg every 1-2 weeks until it drops to 2.5-5 mg/d; this dose is maintained for 6 months to 3 years. No consensus has been reached on the adverse effect of steroid on diabetes mellitus complicating AIP. Immunosuppressive agents should be used for the patients with disease relapses or with important extrapancreatic organs involved. Rituximab might become one of the therapies for refractory AIP. Although some patients achieved remission after surgical treatment, surgery is still not recommended as a routine treatment protocol due to the complications after surgery.

  12. [Autoimmune Encephalitis Associated with Malignant Tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inuzuka, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    Autoimmune encephalitis consists of limbic symptoms and signs associated with antibodies against neuronal cell-surface antigens or intracellular antigens. Some cases are known to be associated with anti-channel or anti-receptor-related molecule antibodies. Whether these cases are paraneoplastic depends on the kinds of antigens that the antibodies are produced against. Other cases due to well-characterized onco-neural antibodies are almost always paraneoplastic and are generally resistant to anti-tumor therapy and/or immunotherapy. An exception is anti-Ma2 antibody-positive encephalitis associated with a testicular tumor. Antibodies for intracellular antigens are considered not to be pathogenic. Rather, the T-cell response is thought to be responsible. These antibodies are useful markers for the diagnosis of paraneoplastic disorders and in the search for underlying cancer, as neurological symptoms often precede tumor diagnosis. There is a relationship among onco-neural antibodies, clinical features, tumor types, and response to immunotherapy. Here we describe the characteristics of autoimmune encephalitis cases with antibodies against different intracellular antigens, such as Hu, Ma2, CRMP5, or amphiphysin.

  13. Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Masahiro; Watanabe, Takayuki; Kanai, Keita; Oguchi, Takaya; Asano, Jumpei; Ito, Tetsuya; Ozaki, Yayoi; Muraki, Takashi; Hamano, Hideaki; Arakura, Norikazu; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2014-05-21

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into ordinary chronic pancreatitis resembling alcoholic pancreatitis over a long-term course based on several clinical findings, most notably frequent pancreatic stone formation. In this review article, we describe a series of study results to confirm our hypothesis and clarify that: 1) pancreatic calcification in AIP is closely associated with disease recurrence; 2) advanced stage AIP might have earlier been included in ordinary chronic pancreatitis; 3) approximately 40% of AIP patients experience pancreatic stone formation over a long-term course, for which a primary risk factor is narrowing of both Wirsung's and Santorini's ducts; and 4) nearly 20% of AIP patients progress to confirmed chronic pancreatitis according to the revised Japanese Clinical Diagnostic Criteria, with independent risk factors being pancreatic head swelling and non-narrowing of the pancreatic body duct.

  14. Antibodies to actin in autoimmune haemolytic anaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritzmann Mathias

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA, autoreactive antibodies directed against red blood cells are up-regulated, leading to erythrocyte death. Mycoplasma suis infections in pigs induce AIHA of both the warm and cold types. The aim of this study was to identify the target autoantigens of warm autoreactive IgG antibodies. Sera from experimentally M. suis-infected pigs were screened for autoreactivity. Results Actin-reactive antibodies were found in the sera of 95% of all animals tested. The reactivity was species-specific, i.e. reactivity with porcine actin was significantly higher than with rabbit actin. Sera of animals previously immunised with the M. suis adhesion protein MSG1 showed reactivity with actin prior to infection with M. suis indicating that molecular mimicry is involved in the specific autoreactive mechanism. A potentially cross-reactive epitope was detected. Conclusions This is the first report of autoreactive anti-actin antibodies involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune haemolytic anaemia.

  15. The role of melatonin in autoimmune and atopic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.R. Calvo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin is the main secretory product synthesized and secreted by the pineal gland during the night. Melatonin is a pleitropic molecule with a wide distribution within phylogenetically distant organisms and has a great functional versatility, including the regulation of circadian and seasonal rhythms and antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. It also possesses the capacity to modulate immune responses by regulation of the TH1/TH2 balance and cytokine production. Immune system eradicates infecting organisms without serious injury to host tissues, but sometimes these responses are inadequately controlled, giving rise to called hypersensitivity diseases, or inappropriately targeted to host tissues, causing the autoimmune diseases. In clinical medicine, the hypersensitivity diseases include the allergic or atopic diseases and the hallmarks of these diseases are the activation of TH2 cells and the production of IgE antibody. Regarding autoimmunity, at the present time we know that the key events in the development of autoimmunity are a failure or breakdown of the mechanisms normally responsible for maintaining self-tolerance in B lymphocytes, T lymphocytes, or both, the recognition of self-antigens by autoreactive lymphocytes, the activation of these cells to proliferate and differentiate into effector cells, and the tissue injury caused by the effector cells and their products. Melatonin treatment has been investigated in atopic diseases, in several animal models of autoimmune diseases, and has been also evaluated in clinical autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes the role of melatonin in atopic diseases (atopic dermatitis and asthma and in several autoimmune diseases, such as arthritis rheumatoid, multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and inflammatory bowel diseases.

  16. Immunogenetics of type 1 diabetes mellitus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EL-HAKIM

    to other autoimmune diseases, the etiology of T1D remains obscure but ..... T1D, type 1 diabetes; AIT, autoimmune thyroiditis; CD, celiac disease; AD, Addison's disease. Table 5. .... (GAD65Ab) in prediabetic adults developing diabetes.

  17. Autoimmune encephalitis and sleep disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan HUANG

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Research shows that autoimmune encephalitis is associated with sleep disorders. Paraneoplastic neurological syndrome (PNS with Ma2 antibodies can cause sleep disorders, particularly narcolepsy and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD. Limbic encephalitis (LE and Morvan syndrome, associated with voltage - gated potassium channel (VGKC-complex antibodies, which include leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1 antibody and contactin-associated protein 2 (Caspr2, can result in profound insomnia and other sleep disorders. Central neurogenic hypoventilation are found in patients with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor encephalitis, whereas obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, stridor and parasomnia are prominent features of encephalopathy associated with IgLON5 antibodies. Sleep disorders are cardinal manifestations in patients with autoimmune encephalitis. Immunotherapy possiblely can improve clinical symptoms and prognosis in a positive way. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.10.004

  18. Gene polymorphisms of micrornas in Helicobacter pylori-induced high risk atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juozas Kupcinskas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: MicroRNAs (miRNAs are known for their function as translational regulators of tumor suppressor or oncogenes. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in miRNAs related genes have been shown to affect the regulatory capacity of miRNAs and were linked with gastric cancer (GC and premalignant gastric conditions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate potential associations between miRNA-related gene polymorphisms (miR-27a, miR-146a, miR-196a-2, miR-492 and miR-608 and the presence of GC or high risk atrophic gastritis (HRAG in European population. METHODS: Gene polymorphisms were analyzed in 995 subjects (controls: n = 351; GC: n = 363; HRAG: n = 281 of European descent. MiR-27a T>C (rs895819, miR-146a G>C (rs2910164, miR-196a-2 C>T (rs11614913, miR-492 G>C (rs2289030 and miR-608 C>G (rs4919510 SNPs were genotyped by RT-PCR. RESULTS: Overall, SNPs of miRNAs were not associated with the presence of GC or HRAG. We observed a tendency for miR-196a-2 CT genotype to be associated with higher risk of GC when compared to CC genotype, however, the difference did not reach the adjusted P-value (odds ratio (OR - 1.46, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.03-2.07, P = 0.032. MiR-608 GG genotype was more frequent in GC when compared to controls (OR -2.34, 95% CI 1.08-5.04, but significance remained marginal (P = 0.029. A similar tendency was observed in a recessive model for miR-608, where CC + CG vs GG genotype comparison showed a tendency for increased risk of GC with OR of 2.44 (95% CI 1.14-5.22, P = 0.021. The genotypes and alleles of miR-27a, miR-146a, miR-196a-2, miR-492 and miR-608 SNPs had similar distribution between histological subtypes of GC and were not linked with the presence of diffuse or intestinal-type GC. CONCLUSIONS: Gene polymorphisms of miR-27a, miR-146a, miR-196a-2, miR-492, miR-492a and miR-608 were not associated with the presence of HRAG, GC or different histological subtypes of GC in European

  19. Clonally Expanding Thymocytes Having Lineage Capability in Gamma-Ray-Induced Mouse Atrophic Thymus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Takashi; Morita, Shin-ichi; Go, Rieka; Obata, Miki; Katsuragi, Yoshinori; Fujita, Yukari; Maeda, Yoshitaka; Yokoyama, Minesuke; Aoyagi, Yutaka; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Mishima, Yukio; Kominami, Ryo

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize, in the setting of γ-ray-induced atrophic thymus, probable prelymphoma cells showing clonal growth and changes in signaling, including DNA damage checkpoint. Methods and Materials: A total of 111 and 45 mouse atrophic thymuses at 40 and 80 days, respectively, after γ-irradiation were analyzed with polymerase chain reaction for D-J rearrangements at the TCRβ locus, flow cytometry for cell cycle, and Western blotting for the activation of DNA damage checkpoints. Results: Limited D-J rearrangement patterns distinct from normal thymus were detected at high frequencies (43 of 111 for 40-day thymus and 21 of 45 for 80-day thymus). Those clonally expanded thymocytes mostly consisted of CD4 + CD8 + double-positive cells, indicating the retention of lineage capability. They exhibited pausing at a late G1 phase of cell cycle progression but did not show the activation of DNA damage checkpoints such as γH2AX, Chk1/2, or p53. Of interest is that 17 of the 52 thymuses showing normal D-J rearrangement patterns at 40 days after irradiation showed allelic loss at the Bcl11b tumor suppressor locus, also indicating clonal expansion. Conclusion: The thymocytes of clonal growth detected resemble human chronic myeloid leukemia in possessing self-renewal and lineage capability, and therefore they can be a candidate of the lymphoma-initiating cells.

  20. Early Regenerative Modifications of Human Postmenopausal Atrophic Vaginal Mucosa Following Fractional CO2 Laser Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Salvatore

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Postmenopausal women experience undesired symptoms that adversely affect their quality of life. In the recent years, a specific 12 - week fractional CO2 laser treatment has been introduced, with highly significant relief of symptoms. AIM: The aim of this paper is the identification of the early modifications of structural components of atrophic vaginal mucosa induced by laser irradiation, which is responsible for the restorative processes. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We investigated by microscopical, ultrastructural and biochemical methods the modifications of the structural components of postmenopausal atrophic vaginal mucosa tissues after 1 hour following a single fractional laser CO2 application. RESULTS: In one hour, the mucosal epithelium thickens, with the maturation of epithelial cells and desquamation at the epithelial surface. In the connective tissue, new papillae indenting the epithelium with newly formed vessels penetrating them, new thin fibrils of collagen III are also formed in a renewed turnover of components due to the increase of metalloproteinase - 2. Specific features of fibroblasts support stimulation of their activity responsible of the renewal of the extracellular matrix, with an increase of mechanical support as connective tissue and stimulation of growth and maturation to epithelium thanks to new vessels and related factors delivered. CONCLUSION: We found the activation of regenerative mechanisms expressed both in the connective tissue - with the formation of new vessels, new papillae, and new collagen - and in the epithelium with the associated thickening and desquamation of cells at the mucosal surface.

  1. Detection and characterization of stomach cancer and atrophic gastritis with fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaozhou; Lin, Junxiu; Jia, Chunde; Wang, Rong

    2003-12-01

    In this paper, we attempt to find a valid method to distinguish gastric cancer and atrophic gastritis. Auto-fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy of laser induced (514.5 nm and 488.0 nm) was measured. The serum spectrum is different between normal and cancer. Average value of diagnosis parameter for normal serum, red shift is less than 12 nm and Raman relative intensity of peak C by 514.5 nm excited is stronger than that of 488.0 nm. To gastric cancer, its red shift of average is bigger than 12 nm and relative intensity of Raman peak C by 514.5 nm excited is weaker than that by 488.0 nm. To atrophic gastritis, the distribution state of Raman peaks is similar with normal serum and auto-fluorescence spectrum's shape is similar to that of gastric cancer. Its average Raman peak red shift is bigger than 12 nm and the relative intensity of peak C by 514.5 excited is stronger than that of by 488.0. We considered it as a criterion and got an accuracy of 85.6% for diagnosis of gastric cancer compared with the result of clinical diagnosis.

  2. Prevalence of chronic atrophic gastritis in different parts of the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weck, Melanie Nicole; Brenner, Hermann

    2006-06-01

    Chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) is a well-established precursor of intestinal gastric cancer, but epidemiologic data about its occurrence are sparse. We provide an overview on studies that examined the prevalence of CAG in different parts of the world. Articles containing data about the prevalence of chronic atrophic gastritis in unselected population samples and published until November 2005 were identified by searching the MEDLINE database. Furthermore, the references in the identified publications were screened for additional suitable studies. Studies comprising at least 50 subjects were included. Forty-one studies providing data on the prevalence of CAG in unselected population samples could be identified. CAG was determined by gastroscopy in 15 studies and by pepsinogen serum levels in 26 studies. Although results are difficult to compare due to the various definitions of CAG used, a strong increase with age, the lack of major gender differences, and strong variations between populations and population groups (in particular, relatively high rates in certain Asian populations) could be observed quite consistently. We conclude that CAG is relatively common among older adults in different parts of the world, but large variations exist. Large-scale international comparative studies with standardized methodology to determine CAG are needed to provide a coherent picture of the epidemiology of CAG in various populations. Noninvasive measurements of CAG by pepsinogen levels may be particularly suited for that purpose.

  3. Visualization of nasal airflow patterns in a patient affected with atrophic rhinitis using particle image velocimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, G J M [Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, NC (United States); Mitchell, G [The Queens University of Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Bailie, N [The Queens University of Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Thornhill, D [The Queens University of Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Watterson, J [The Queens University of Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Kimbell, J S [Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, NC (United States)

    2007-10-15

    The relationship between airflow patterns in the nasal cavity and nasal function is poorly understood. This paper reports an experimental study of the interplay between symptoms and airflow patterns in a patient affected with atrophic rhinitis. This pathology is characterized by mucosal dryness, fetor, progressive atrophy of anatomical structures, a spacious nasal cavity, and a paradoxical sensation of nasal congestion. A physical replica of the patient's nasal geometry was made and particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used to visualize and measure the flow field. The nasal replica was based on computed tomography (CT) scans of the patient and was built in three steps: three-dimensional reconstruction of the CT scans; rapid prototyping of a cast; and sacrificial use of the cast to form a model of the nasal passage in clear silicone. Flow patterns were measured by running a water-glycerol mixture through the replica and evaluating the displacement of particles dispersed in the liquid using PIV. The water-glycerol flow rate used corresponded to an air flow rate representative of a human breathing at rest. The trajectory of the flow observed in the left passage of the nose (more affected by atrophic rhinitis) differed markedly from what is considered normal, and was consistent with patterns of epithelial damage observed in cases of the condition. The data are also useful for validation of computational fluid dynamics predictions.

  4. Sugar residues content and distribution in atrophic and hyperplastic postmenopausal human endometrium: lectin histochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheri, G; Bryk, S G; Taddei, G; Moncini, D; Noci, I

    1996-10-01

    A lectin histochemical study was performed to investigate the glycoconjugate saccharidic moieties of the human postmenopausal endometrium (14 atrophic and 15 hyperplastic). For this purpose a battery of seven horseradish peroxidase-conjugated lectins (PNA, SBA, DBA, WGA, ConA, LTA and UEA I) was used. No differences in lectin binding between atrophic and hyperplastic endometria were observed. This investigation allowed us to provide a basic picture of the oligosaccharidic distribution in postmenopausal endometria. The data on the saccharidic distribution at the postmenopausal endometria showed a large amount of sugar residues at all the investigated sites, i.e. the lining and glandular epithelium, the stroma and the vessels (capillary and large vessels). Furthermore, at the endometrial lining epithelium, at the glands and at the wall of the blood vessels of some postmenopausal women the presence of alpha-L-fucosyl residues which bind via alpha (1-6) linkage to penultimate glucosaminyl residues and/or difucosylated oligosaccharides was demonstrated for the first time.

  5. Progressive atrophic rhinitis in a medium-scale pig farm in Kiambu, Kenya : case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.K. Wabacha

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Forty-two pigs in a herd of 117 displayed various clinical signs of progressive atrophic rhinitis. The main signs included sneezing, coughing, lachrymation, serous to muco-purulent nasal discharge, and nasal bleeding in 1 pig. Three pigs had lateral deviation of the snout, while 4 had brachygnathia superior with obvious deformation of the face. Four acutely affected weaner pigs appeared weak, while the 7 chronically-affected pigs appeared smaller than their apparently unaffected penmates of the same age. Treatment of the acutely affected pigs with long-acting oxytetracycline at 20 mg/kg body weight intra-muscularly, repeated once after 7 days, reduced the severity but did not clear the sneezing from all the pigs. Fifteen pigs were slaughtered 2 months after the clinical diagnosis was made. The carcasses of the chronically affected pigs were about 15 % lighter than those of the apparently normal pigs of the same age and from the same pen, which translated to a loss of 921.00 Kenya shillings per pig (US$13.7. Diagnosis of progressive atrophic rhinitis was confirmed by sectioning the snouts of randomly selected slaughtered pigs with obvious deformation of the snout. Sections were madeat the level of the 1st/2nd upper premolar tooth. Varying degrees of turbinate atrophy, from mild to complete, were noted. Histopathology of the turbinates revealed metaplasia of nasal epithelium and fibrosis in the lamina propria.

  6. Expression of AQP3 gene in chronic atrophic and chronic superficial gastritis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijun Zhang

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most studies about aquaporin 3 (AQP3 in the gastrointestinal tract were carried out on both in vivo and in vitro. The role of AQP3-mediated water transport in human gastrointestinal tract is still unclear. Our aim in this study was to explore the expression of AQP3 gene in chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG and chronic superficial gastritis (CSG atients and to determine its possible function in the development of gastritis.
    METHODS: Twenty-two outpatients diagnosed as CSG and 12 outpatients diagnosed as CAG were selected randomly. Ten cases of healthy individuals were selected as normal control group. In all cases, AQP3 gene expression of gastric mucosa was detected by fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction (FQ-PCR.
    RESULTS: The AQP3 gene expression was significantly higher in gastric mucosa of CSG and healthy individuals than that in CAG (P<0.01. However, there was no significant difference in the AQP3 gene expression between helicobacter pylori positive patients and helicobacter pylori negative patients (P>0.05.
    CONCLUSIONS: AQP3 expression might play certain role in the occurrence and development of gastritis.
    KEY WORDS: Aquaporin 3, chronic superficial gastritis, chronic atrophic gastritis.

  7. Autoimmune Thyroiditis and Myasthenia Gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Lopomo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (AIDs are the result of specific immune responses directed against structures of the self. In normal conditions, the molecules recognized as “self” are tolerated by immune system, but when the self-tolerance is lost, the immune system could react against molecules from the body, causing the loss of self-tolerance, and subsequently the onset of AID that differs for organ target and etiology. Autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD is caused by the development of autoimmunity against thyroid antigens and comprises Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and Graves disease. They are frequently associated with other organ or non-organ specific AIDs, such as myasthenia gravis (MG. In fact, ATD seems to be the most associated pathology to MG. The etiology of both diseases is multifactorial and it is due to genetic and environmental factors, and each of them has specific characteristics. The two pathologies show many commonalities, such as the organ-specificity with a clear pathogenic effect of antibodies, the pathological mechanisms, such as deregulation of the immune system and the implication of the genetic predisposition. They also show some differences, such as the mode of action of the antibodies and therapies. In this review that focuses on ATD and MG, the common features and the differences between the two diseases are discussed.

  8. Pancreatic Tuberculosis or Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayesha Salahuddin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Isolated pancreatic and peripancreatic tuberculosis is a challenging diagnosis due to its rarity and variable presentation. Pancreatic tuberculosis can mimic pancreatic carcinoma. Similarly, autoimmune pancreatitis can appear as a focal lesion resembling pancreatic malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration provides an effective tool for differentiating between benign and malignant pancreatic lesions. The immune processes involved in immunoglobulin G4 related systemic diseases and tuberculosis appear to have some similarities. Case Report. We report a case of a 59-year-old Southeast Asian male who presented with fever, weight loss, and obstructive jaundice. CT scan revealed pancreatic mass and enlarged peripancreatic lymph nodes. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration confirmed the presence of mycobacterium tuberculosis. Patient also had high immunoglobulin G4 levels suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. He was started on antituberculosis medications and steroids. Clinically, he responded to treatment. Follow-up imaging showed findings suggestive of chronic pancreatitis. Discussion. Pancreatic tuberculosis and autoimmune pancreatitis can mimic pancreatic malignancy. Accurate diagnosis is imperative as unnecessary surgical intervention can be avoided. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration seems to be the diagnostic test of choice for pancreatic masses. Long-term follow-up is warranted in cases of chronic pancreatitis.

  9. Autoimmune Thyroiditis and Myasthenia Gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopomo, Angela; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AIDs) are the result of specific immune responses directed against structures of the self. In normal conditions, the molecules recognized as “self” are tolerated by immune system, but when the self-tolerance is lost, the immune system could react against molecules from the body, causing the loss of self-tolerance, and subsequently the onset of AID that differs for organ target and etiology. Autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) is caused by the development of autoimmunity against thyroid antigens and comprises Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and Graves disease. They are frequently associated with other organ or non-organ specific AIDs, such as myasthenia gravis (MG). In fact, ATD seems to be the most associated pathology to MG. The etiology of both diseases is multifactorial and it is due to genetic and environmental factors, and each of them has specific characteristics. The two pathologies show many commonalities, such as the organ-specificity with a clear pathogenic effect of antibodies, the pathological mechanisms, such as deregulation of the immune system and the implication of the genetic predisposition. They also show some differences, such as the mode of action of the antibodies and therapies. In this review that focuses on ATD and MG, the common features and the differences between the two diseases are discussed. PMID:28751878

  10. Efficacy of fractionated microneedle radiofrequency with and without adding subcision for the treatment of atrophic facial acne scars: A randomized split-face clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Gita; Poostiyan, Nazila; Asilian, Ali; Abtahi-Naeini, Bahareh; Shahbazi, Masoom; Iraji, Fariba; Fatemi Naeini, Farahnaz; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad Ali

    2017-06-01

    There is no gold standard treatment for facial acne scars, and overall, little literature exists about the combination therapy for treatment of acne scar. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of fractionated microneedle radiofrequency (FMR) vs FMR combined with subcision for the treatment of atrophic acne scars. This was a randomized, split-face clinical study of 25 patients with II-IV Fitzpatrick skin types with moderate to severe facial atrophic acne scars. Initially, standard subcision by Nokor needle was performed on one side. Two weeks after subcision, FMR treatment was performed on both cheeks of each participant. Second and third FMR treatment sessions were performed within 4-week intervals. Two-blinded dermatologists performed clinical assessments using a quartile grading scale, and patients were also asked to judge their satisfaction using a visual analog scale (VAS) scoring system. The age of the patients varied from 24 to 40 years (mean: 30.08±4.94 years). Only nine patients (36%) were males. Clinical assessment by two-blinded dermatologists showed statistically significant improvement in the combination (FMR+subcision) group (P=.009). Patient satisfaction was statistically significantly better in the combination group (P=.001). A darkening of skin phototype was associated with a decrease in patient's satisfaction VAS score (P=.07). The combination of subcision and FMR is a safe and effective modality for mixed type acne scars. Additional randomized clinical study with long-term follow-up is necessary for further evaluation of FMR in combination with other procedures. The full trial protocol can be accessed in: http://www.irct.ir/searchresult.php?keyword=%20%20IRCT2016103130597N1&id=30597&number=1&field=a&prt=1&total=1&m=1. The clinical trial registration number is IRCT2016103130597N1. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Autoimmunity in dengue pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Wen Wan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue is one of the most important vector-borne viral diseases. With climate change and the convenience of travel, dengue is spreading beyond its usual tropical and subtropical boundaries. Infection with dengue virus (DENV causes diseases ranging widely in severity, from self-limited dengue fever to life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Vascular leakage, thrombocytopenia, and hemorrhage are the major clinical manifestations associated with severe DENV infection, yet the mechanisms remain unclear. Besides the direct effects of the virus, immunopathogenesis is also involved in the development of dengue disease. Antibody-dependent enhancement increases the efficiency of virus infection and may suppress type I interferon-mediated antiviral responses. Aberrant activation of T cells and overproduction of soluble factors cause an increase in vascular permeability. DENV-induced autoantibodies against endothelial cells, platelets, and coagulatory molecules lead to their abnormal activation or dysfunction. Molecular mimicry between DENV proteins and host proteins may explain the cross-reactivity of DENV-induced autoantibodies. Although no licensed dengue vaccine is yet available, several vaccine candidates are under development. For the development of a safe and effective dengue vaccine, the immunopathogenic complications of dengue disease need to be considered.

  12. The role of parvovirus B19 in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity and autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Jonathan R

    2016-04-01

    Human parvovirus B19 is a single-stranded DNA virus which preferentially targets the erythroblasts in the bone marrow. B19 infection commonly causes erythema infectiosum, arthralgia, fetal death, transient aplastic crisis in patients with shortened red cell survival, and persistent infection in people who are immunocompromised. Less common clinical manifestations include atypical skin rashes, neurological syndromes, cardiac syndromes, and various cytopenias. B19 infection has also been associated with development of a variety of different autoimmune diseases, including rheumatological, neurological, neuromuscular, cardiovascular, haematological, nephrological and metabolic. Production of a variety of autoantibodies has been demonstrated to occur during B19 infection and these have been shown to be key to the pathogenesis of the particular disease process in a significant number of cases, for example, production of rheumatoid factor in cases of B19-associated rheumatoid arthritis and production of anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in patients with B19-associated type 1 diabetes mellitus. B19 infection has also been associated with the development of multiple autoimmune diseases in 12 individuals. Documented mechanisms in B19-associated autoimmunity include molecular mimicry (IgG antibody to B19 proteins has been shown to cross react with a variety of recognised human autoantigens, including collagen II, keratin, angiotensin II type 1 receptor, myelin basic protein, cardiolipin, and platelet membrane glycoprotein IIb/IIIa), B19-induced apoptosis with presentation of self-antigens to T lymphocytes, and the phospholipase activity of the B19 unique VP1 protein. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. Production of interleukin (IL)-5 and IL-10 accompanies T helper cell type 1 (Th1) cytokine responses to a major thyroid self-antigen, thyroglobulin, in health and autoimmune thyroid disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Hegedüs, L; Rieneck, K

    2007-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interferon (IFN)-gamma exert detrimental effects in organ-specific autoimmune disease, while both destructive and protective roles have been demonstrated for interleukin (IL)-10, IL-4 and IL-5. We examined the production of these cytokines by peripheral blood...... appeared to promote the production of IL-2 and particularly IL-5, the levels of which were reduced by neutralization of complement by heat- or zymosan treatment. The production of IFN-gamma and IL-2 of the three groups together correlated directly with the serum anti-Tg activity. Moreover, TNF-alpha, IFN...

  14. The first childhood case with coexisting Hashimoto thyroiditis, vitiligo and autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Melikşah; Savaş-Erdeve, Şenay; Özbay-Hoşnut, Ferda; Kurnaz, Erdal; Çetinkaya, Semra; Aycan, Zehra

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) is the most common pediatric autoimmune endocrine disorder. It results in autoimmune-mediated thyroid gland destruction and is an organ-specific, typical autoimmune disease. The presence of antithyroid antibodies and the typical pattern on ultrasonography indicate the diagnosis. It is also frequently seen together with other autoimmune disorders including type 1 insulin-dependent diabetes, celiac disease, alopecia and vitiligo. Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic type of liver injury with an immune etiology that can frequently cause end-stage liver disease if left untreated. Autoimmune hepatitis patients may present with hepatitis, and the laboratory tests in the absence of other etiology usually reveal a positive immune serology together with elevated immunoglobulins and abnormal liver histology. It is interesting that HT and AIH are rarely seen together although both have an autoimmune etiology. 14-year-old male who was being followed-up for vitiligo presented with symptoms of a swelling at the neck and fatigue. He was diagnosed with HT after the tests and the liver enzymes were found to be high. The patient was also diagnosed with AIH after tests revealed that the liver enzyme elevation had continued for longer than six months. The thyroid functions and liver enzymes returned to normal and the symptoms decreased after sodium L-thyroxine replacement together with steroid and azathioprine treatment. We present this case as we believe it is the first pediatric patient diagnosed with HT, AIH and vitiligo.

  15. Finite element analysis of dental implant loading on atrophic and non-atrophic cancellous and cortical mandibular bone - a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcián, Petr; Borák, Libor; Valášek, Jiří; Kaiser, Jozef; Florian, Zdeněk; Wolff, Jan

    2014-12-18

    The first aim of this study was to assess displacements and micro-strain induced on different grades of atrophic cortical and trabecular mandibular bone by axially loaded dental implants using finite element analysis (FEA). The second aim was to assess the micro-strain induced by different implant geometries and the levels of bone-to-implant contact (BIC) on the surrounding bone. Six mandibular bone segments demonstrating different grades of mandibular bone atrophy and various bone volume fractions (from 0.149 to 0.471) were imaged using a micro-CT device. The acquired bone STL models and implant (Brånemark, Straumann, Ankylos) were merged into a three-dimensional finite elements structure. The mean displacement value for all implants was 3.1 ±1.2 µm. Displacements were lower in the group with a strong BIC. The results indicated that the maximum strain values of cortical and cancellous bone increased with lower bone density. Strain distribution is the first and foremost dependent on the shape of bone and architecture of cancellous bone. The geometry of the implant, thread patterns, grade of bone atrophy and BIC all affect the displacement and micro-strain on the mandible bone. Preoperative finite element analysis could offer improved predictability in the long-term outlook of dental implant restorations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Diagnosing autoimmune pancreatitis with the Unifying-Autoimmune-Pancreatitis-Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Alexander; Michaely, Henrik; Rückert, Felix; Weiss, Christel; Ströbel, Philipp; Belle, Sebastian; Hirth, Michael; Wilhelm, Torsten J; Haas, Stephan L; Jesenofsky, Ralf; Schönberg, Stefan; Marx, Alexander; Singer, Manfred V; Ebert, Matthias P; Pfützer, Roland H; Löhr, J Matthias

    We had developed the Unifying-Autoimmune-Pancreatitis-Criteria (U-AIP) to diagnose autoimmune pancreatitis (AiP) within the M-ANNHEIM classification of chronic pancreatitis. In 2011, International-Consensus-Diagnostic-Criteria (ICDC) to diagnose AiP have been published. We had applied the U-AIP long before the ICDC were available. The aims of the study were, first, to describe patients with AiP diagnosed by the U-AIP; second, to compare diagnostic accuracies of the U-AIP and other diagnostic systems; third, to evaluate the clinical applicability of the U-AIP. From 1998 until 2008, we identified patients with AiP using U-AIP, Japanese-, Korean-, Asian-, Mayo-HISORt-, Revised-Mayo-HISORt- and Italian-criteria. We retrospectively verified the diagnosis by ICDC and Revised-Japanese-2011-criteria, compared diagnostic accuracies of all systems and evaluated all criteria in consecutive patients with pancreatitis (2009 until 2010, Pancreas-Outpatient-Clinic-Cohort, n = 84). We retrospectively validated our diagnostic approach in consecutive patients with a pancreatic lesion requiring surgery (Surgical-Cohort, n = 98). Overall, we identified 21 patients with AiP. Unifying-Autoimmune-Pancreatitis-Criteria and ICDC presented the highest diagnostic accuracies (each 98.8%), highest Youden indices (each 0.95238), and highest proportions of diagnosed patients (each n = 20/21, U-AIP/ICDC vs. other diagnostic systems, p Pancreatitis-Criteria revealed a satisfactory clinical applicability and offered an additional approach to diagnose AiP. Copyright © 2017 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. [Antibodies and physiopathogeny of autoimmune hepatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Leiva, Jorge; Ríos-Vaca, Aurelio; Torre-Delgadillo, Aldo

    2003-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is an inflammatory disease of unknown cause characterized by periportal hepatitis, increased serum globulins and the presence of certain antibodies. The disorder can be classified in three types. Type 1 AIH is characterized by the presence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and smooth muscle autoantibodies (SMA) in up to 70-80% of patients. ANA and SMA can be the only antibodies present in 13 and 33% of cases respectively. Type 2 AIH is defined by the presence of liver and kidney antimicrosomal antibodies (LKM1). Type 2 AIH is the only form of the disease in which the autoantigen has been identified: cytochrome mono-oxygenase (P-450 IID6) CYP2D6. In type 3 AIH the presence of anti-SLA/LP (soluble liver antigen/liver pancreas) targets a cytosolic protein involved in the incorporation of selenocysteine into peptidic chains. The pathophysiology of AIH is complex and involves genetic predisposition, previous exposure to antigens (autoantigens), presence of triggering factors and defects in immunoregulation. In spite of the advances in the understanding of AIH, the role of autoantibodies in the pathophysiology of this disease has not been fully established and their presence does not clearly distinguish any prognostic groups. Further investigations will help in the diagnosis of this disorder, the comprehension of its origins and the establishment of new forms of treatment.

  18. Toll-Like Receptor Pathways in Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ji-Qing; Szodoray, Peter; Zeher, Margit

    2016-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases are a family of chronic systemic inflammatory disorders, characterized by the dysregulation of the immune system which finally results in the break of tolerance to self-antigen. Several studies suggest that Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an essential role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. TLRs belong to the family of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that recognize a wide range of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). TLRs are type I transmembrane proteins and located on various cellular membranes. Two main groups have been classified based on their location; the extracelluar group referred to the ones located on the plasma membrane while the intracellular group all located in endosomal compartments responsible for the recognition of nucleic acids. They are released by the host cells and trigger various intracellular pathways which results in the production of proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, as well as the expression of co-stimulatory molecules to protect against invading microorganisms. In particular, TLR pathway-associated proteins, such as IRAK, TRAF, and SOCS, are often dysregulated in this group of diseases. TLR-associated gene expression profile analysis together with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assessment could be important to explain the pathomechanism driving autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize recent findings on TLR pathway regulation in various autoimmune diseases, including Sjögren's syndrome (SS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), multiple sclerosis (MS), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic sclerosis (SSc), and psoriasis.

  19. T cells in multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fletcher, J M

    2012-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system (CNS), which involves autoimmune responses to myelin antigens. Studies in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for MS, have provided convincing evidence that T cells specific for self-antigens mediate pathology in these diseases. Until recently, T helper type 1 (Th1) cells were thought to be the main effector T cells responsible for the autoimmune inflammation. However more recent studies have highlighted an important pathogenic role for CD4(+) T cells that secrete interleukin (IL)-17, termed Th17, but also IL-17-secreting gammadelta T cells in EAE as well as other autoimmune and chronic inflammatory conditions. This has prompted intensive study of the induction, function and regulation of IL-17-producing T cells in MS and EAE. In this paper, we review the contribution of Th1, Th17, gammadelta, CD8(+) and regulatory T cells as well as the possible development of new therapeutic approaches for MS based on manipulating these T cell subtypes.

  20. Role of inflammasomes in inflammatory autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Young-Su

    2018-01-01

    Inflammasomes are intracellular multiprotein complexes that coordinate anti-pathogenic host defense during inflammatory responses in myeloid cells, especially macrophages. Inflammasome activation leads to activation of caspase-1, resulting in the induction of pyroptosis and the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18. Although the inflammatory response is an innate host defense mechanism, chronic inflammation is the main cause of rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and Sjögren's syndrome (SS). Since rheumatic diseases are inflammatory/autoimmune disorders, it is reasonable to hypothesize that inflammasomes activated during the inflammatory response play a pivotal role in development and progression of these diseases. Indeed, previous studies have provided important observations that inflammasomes are actively involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory/autoimmune rheumatic diseases. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on several types of inflammasomes during macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses and discuss recent research regarding the role of inflammasomes in the pathogenesis of inflammatory/autoimmune rheumatic diseases. This avenue of research could provide new insights for the development of promising therapeutics to treat inflammatory/autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

  1. Intestinal Microbiota Influences Non-intestinal Related Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opazo, Maria C.; Ortega-Rocha, Elizabeth M.; Coronado-Arrázola, Irenice; Bonifaz, Laura C.; Boudin, Helene; Neunlist, Michel; Bueno, Susan M.; Kalergis, Alexis M.; Riedel, Claudia A.

    2018-01-01

    The human body is colonized by millions of microorganisms named microbiota that interact with our tissues in a cooperative and non-pathogenic manner. These microorganisms are present in the skin, gut, nasal, oral cavities, and genital tract. In fact, it has been described that the microbiota contributes to balancing the immune system to maintain host homeostasis. The gut is a vital organ where microbiota can influence and determine the function of cells of the immune system and contributes to preserve the wellbeing of the individual. Several articles have emphasized the connection between intestinal autoimmune diseases, such as Crohn's disease with dysbiosis or an imbalance in the microbiota composition in the gut. However, little is known about the role of the microbiota in autoimmune pathologies affecting other tissues than the intestine. This article focuses on what is known about the role that gut microbiota can play in the pathogenesis of non-intestinal autoimmune diseases, such as Grave's diseases, multiple sclerosis, type-1 diabetes, systemic lupus erythematosus, psoriasis, schizophrenia, and autism spectrum disorders. Furthermore, we discuss as to how metabolites derived from bacteria could be used as potential therapies for non-intestinal autoimmune diseases. PMID:29593681

  2. Intestinal Microbiota Influences Non-intestinal Related Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria C. Opazo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The human body is colonized by millions of microorganisms named microbiota that interact with our tissues in a cooperative and non-pathogenic manner. These microorganisms are present in the skin, gut, nasal, oral cavities, and genital tract. In fact, it has been described that the microbiota contributes to balancing the immune system to maintain host homeostasis. The gut is a vital organ where microbiota can influence and determine the function of cells of the immune system and contributes to preserve the wellbeing of the individual. Several articles have emphasized the connection between intestinal autoimmune diseases, such as Crohn's disease with dysbiosis or an imbalance in the microbiota composition in the gut. However, little is known about the role of the microbiota in autoimmune pathologies affecting other tissues than the intestine. This article focuses on what is known about the role that gut microbiota can play in the pathogenesis of non-intestinal autoimmune diseases, such as Grave's diseases, multiple sclerosis, type-1 diabetes, systemic lupus erythematosus, psoriasis, schizophrenia, and autism spectrum disorders. Furthermore, we discuss as to how metabolites derived from bacteria could be used as potential therapies for non-intestinal autoimmune diseases.

  3. A new combination of multiple autoimmune syndrome? Coexistence of vitiligo, autoimmune thyroid disease and ulcerative colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firdevs Topal

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of three or more autoimmune disorders in one patient defines multiple autoimmune syndrome. The pathogenesis of multiple autoimmune syndrome is not known yet and environmental triggers and genetic susceptibility have been suggested to be involved. Herein, we report a 47-year-old woman who had Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, vitiligo and newly diagnosed ulcerative colitis. Diagnosis of ulcerative colitis was confirmed with histopathologic examination. This case presents a new combination of multiple autoimmune syndrome.

  4. Epidemiology of autoimmune diseases in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eaton, William W.; Rose, N.R.; Kalaydijan, A.

    2007-01-01

    An epidemiologic study of the autoimmune diseases taken together has not been done heretofore. The National Patient Register of Denmark is used to estimate the population prevalence of 31 possible or probable autoimmune diseases. Record linkage is used to estimate 465 pairwise co-morbidities in i......An epidemiologic study of the autoimmune diseases taken together has not been done heretofore. The National Patient Register of Denmark is used to estimate the population prevalence of 31 possible or probable autoimmune diseases. Record linkage is used to estimate 465 pairwise co...

  5. Efficacy of Punch Elevation Combined with Fractional Carbon Dioxide Laser Resurfacing in Facial Atrophic Acne Scarring: A Randomized Split-face Clinical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Gita; Nouraei, Saeid; Asilian, Ali; Keyvan, Shima; Abtahi-Naeini, Bahareh; Rakhshanpour, Mehrdad; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Hosseini, Sayed Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Background: A number of treatments for reducing the appearance of acne scars are available, but general guidelines for optimizing acne scar treatment do not exist. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical effectiveness and side effects of fractional carbon dioxide (CO2) laser resurfacing combined with punch elevation with fractional CO2 laser resurfacing alone in the treatment of atrophic acne scars. Materials and Methods: Forty-two Iranian subjects (age range 18–55) with Fitzpatrick skin types III to IV and moderate to severe atrophic acne scars on both cheeks received randomized split-face treatments: One side received fractional CO2 laser treatment and the other received one session of punch elevation combined with two sessions of laser fractional CO2 laser treatment, separated by an interval of 1 month. Two dermatologists independently evaluated improvement in acne scars 4 and 16 weeks after the last treatment. Side effects were also recorded after each treatment. Results: The mean ± SD age of patients was 23.4 ± 2.6 years. Clinical improvement of facial acne scarring was assessed by two dermatologists blinded to treatment conditions. No significant difference in evaluation was observed 1 month after treatment (P = 0.56). Their evaluation found that fractional CO2 laser treatment combined with punch elevation had greater efficacy than that with fractional CO2 laser treatment alone, assessed 4 months after treatment (P = 0.02). Among all side effects, coagulated crust formation and pruritus at day 3 after fractional CO2 laser treatment was significant on both treatment sides (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Concurrent use of fractional laser skin resurfacing with punch elevation offers a safe and effective approach for the treatment of acne scarring. PMID:26538695

  6. Efficacy of punch elevation combined with fractional carbon dioxide laser resurfacing in facial atrophic acne scarring: A randomized split-face clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gita Faghihi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A number of treatments for reducing the appearance of acne scars are available, but general guidelines for optimizing acne scar treatment do not exist. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical effectiveness and side effects of fractional carbon dioxide (CO 2 laser resurfacing combined with punch elevation with fractional CO 2 laser resurfacing alone in the treatment of atrophic acne scars. Materials and Methods: Forty-two Iranian subjects (age range 18-55 with Fitzpatrick skin types III to IV and moderate to severe atrophic acne scars on both cheeks received randomized split-face treatments: One side received fractional CO 2 laser treatment and the other received one session of punch elevation combined with two sessions of laser fractional CO 2 laser treatment, separated by an interval of 1 month. Two dermatologists independently evaluated improvement in acne scars 4 and 16 weeks after the last treatment. Side effects were also recorded after each treatment. Results: The mean ± SD age of patients was 23.4 ± 2.6 years. Clinical improvement of facial acne scarring was assessed by two dermatologists blinded to treatment conditions. No significant difference in evaluation was observed 1 month after treatment (P = 0.56. Their evaluation found that fractional CO 2 laser treatment combined with punch elevation had greater efficacy than that with fractional CO 2 laser treatment alone, assessed 4 months after treatment (P = 0.02. Among all side effects, coagulated crust formation and pruritus at day 3 after fractional CO 2 laser treatment was significant on both treatment sides (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Concurrent use of fractional laser skin resurfacing with punch elevation offers a safe and effective approach for the treatment of acne scarring.

  7. Treatment of facial atrophic scars with Esthélis, a hyaluronic acid filler with polydense cohesive matrix (CPM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasson, Ariel; Romero, William A

    2010-12-01

    The treatment of atrophic scars is difficult and dermal filler materials provide a simple alternative with immediate results. Esthélis® is an injectable non-animal crosslinked hyaluronic acid of Swiss origin characterized by a polydense cohesive matrix (CPM®) which produces a gel of uniform consistency with better biointegration to the tissues and a longer duration. To evaluate Esthélis in the treatment of atrophic scars. Twelve patients aged 18-56 years with facial atrophic scars caused by acne vulgaris, dog bite, piercing, basal cell carcinoma and leishmaniasis were treated with Esthélis. The injection technique was linear threading, serial puncture or a combination of both. Clinical efficacy was assessed independently by the authors and by patients immediately, one week and one month after the injection. Adverse events were registered. Authors described the results as moderate (27%), good (57%) and excellent (17%), immediately, one week and one month after the injection. Patients evaluated the cosmetic improvement as good (42%) or excellent (58%) one month after the treatment. Pain during the injection was described as slight or moderate. Only mild erythema was observed immediately after injection, which spontaneously resolved within few hours. Esthélis showed good or excellent results in most patients with atrophic scars, and these were perceived as even better when patients evaluated the cosmetic improvement. The best results were observed in patients with more deforming scars such as surgical scars or trauma.

  8. Implication of the intestinal microbiome as a potential surrogate marker of immune responsiveness to experimental therapies in autoimmune diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Needell, J.C.; Dinarello, C.A.; Ir, D.; Robertson, C.E.; Ryan, S.M.; Kroehl, M.E.; Frank, D.N.; Zipris, D.

    2017-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune proinflammatory disease with no effective intervention. A major obstacle in developing new immunotherapies for T1D is the lack of means for monitoring immune responsiveness to experimental therapies. The LEW1.WR1 rat develops autoimmunity following infection

  9. Immunoglobulin E-Mediated Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Maurer

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The study of autoimmunity mediated by immunoglobulin E (IgE autoantibodies, which may be termed autoallergy, is in its infancy. It is now recognized that systemic lupus erythematosus, bullous pemphigoid (BP, and chronic urticaria, both spontaneous and inducible, are most likely to be mediated, at least in part, by IgE autoantibodies. The situation in other conditions, such as autoimmune uveitis, rheumatoid arthritis, hyperthyroid Graves’ disease, autoimmune pancreatitis, and even asthma, is far less clear but evidence for autoallergy is accumulating. To be certain of an autoallergic mechanism, it is necessary to identify both IgE autoantibodies and their targets as has been done with the transmembrane protein BP180 and the intracellular protein BP230 in BP and IL-24 in chronic spontaneous urticaria. Also, IgE-targeted therapies, such as anti-IgE, must have been shown to be of benefit to patients as has been done with both of these conditions. This comprehensive review of the literature on IgE-mediated autoallergy focuses on three related questions. What do we know about the prevalence of IgE autoantibodies and their targets in different diseases? What do we know about the relevance of IgE autoantibodies in different diseases? What do we know about the cellular and molecular effects of IgE autoantibodies? In addition to providing answers to these questions, based on a broad review of the literature, we outline the current gaps of knowledge in our understanding of IgE autoantibodies and describe approaches to address them.

  10. Prevalences of autoimmune diseases in schizophrenia, bipolar I and II disorder, and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremaschi, Laura; Kardell, Mathias; Johansson, Viktoria; Isgren, Anniella; Sellgren, Carl M; Altamura, A Carlo; Hultman, Christina M; Landén, Mikael

    2017-12-01

    Previous studies on the relationship between autoimmune diseases, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder are mainly based on hospital discharge registers with insufficient coverage of outpatient data. Furthermore, data is scant on the prevalence of autoimmune diseases in bipolar subgroups. Here we estimate the self-reported prevalences of autoimmune diseases in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder type I and II, and controls. Lifetime prevalence of autoimmune diseases was assessed through a structured interview in a sample of 9076 patients (schizophrenia N = 5278, bipolar disorder type I N = 1952, type II N = 1846) and 6485 controls. Comparative analyses were performed using logistic regressions. The prevalence of diabetes type 1 did not differ between groups. Hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism regardless of lithium effects, rheumatoid arthritis, and polymyalgia rheumatica were most common in bipolar disorder. Systemic lupus erythematosus was less common in bipolar disorder than in the other groups. The rate of autoimmune diseases did not differ significantly between bipolar subgroups. We conclude that prevalences of autoimmune diseases show clear differences between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, but not between the bipolar subgroups. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Diagnosis and therapy of autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granito, Alessandro; Muratori, Paolo; Ferri, Silvia; Pappas, Georgios; Quarneti, Chiara; Lenzi, Marco; Bianchi, Francesco B; Muratori, Luigi

    2009-06-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic progressive hepatitis, characterized by interface hepatitis with lymphoplasmacellular infiltrates on liver biopsy, high serum globulin level and circulating autoantibodies. It is classified into two types, according to autoantibody profile: type 1 is characterized by anti-nuclear (ANA) and/or anti-smooth muscle (SMA) antibodies; type 2 by anti-liver kidney microsomal type 1 (anti-LKM-1) antibodies. AIH affects all ages, may be asymptomatic, frequently has an acute onset, and can present as fulminant hepatitis. The diagnosis of AIH is based on a scoring system codified by an international consensus. Corticosteroids alone or in conjunction with azathioprine is the treatment of choice in patients with AIH and results in remission induction in over 80% of patients. Alternative proposed strategies in patients who have failed to achieve remission on standard therapy or patients with drug toxicity include the use of cyclosporine, tacrolimus, budesonide or mycophenolate mofetil. Liver transplantation is the treatment of choice in managing decompensated disease, however AIH can recur or develop de novo after liver transplantation.

  12. Autoantibodies and their antigens in autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Vergani, Diego

    2009-08-01

    Autoantibody detection assists in the diagnosis and allows differentiation of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) type 1 (AIH-1), characterized by antinuclear antibody (ANA) and/or smooth muscle antibody (SMA), and type 2 (AIH-2), distinguished by the presence of antibodies to liver-kidney microsome type 1 (anti-LKM1) and/or antibodies to liver cytosol type 1 (anti-LC1). Detection of atypical perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (pANCA) and anti-soluble liver antigen (SLA) antibodies can act as an additional pointer toward the diagnosis of AIH, particularly in the absence of the conventional autoantibodies. Routine autoantibody testing by indirect immunofluorescence has been recently complemented by molecular assays based on purified or recombinant antigens. Although the AIH-1-specific ANA and SMA targets need better definition, those of anti-LKM1 and anti-LC1 in AIH-2 have been clearly identified; the fine specificity of antibody reactivity and its clinical relevance to disease pathogenesis are the focus of ongoing investigation. This article critically discusses the current knowledge of the diagnostic and clinical significance of AIH-related autoantibody reactivities, focusing on key issues that the physician needs to be aware of to be able to request the appropriate testing and to interpret correctly the laboratory results within the clinical context of the patient. Copyright Thieme Medical Publishers.

  13. Surveillance strategy of atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia in a country with a high prevalence of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Woon Geon; Kim, Heung Up; Song, Ho June; Hong, Su Jin; Shim, Ki-Nam; Sung, In-Kyung; Kim, Jae Gyu

    2012-03-01

    It is not clear which screening examinations are best suited for gastric cancer prevention, especially in patients with atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia. Therefore, we investigated the gastric cancer screening methods and intervals that are performed in clinical practice in an area with a high prevalence of gastric cancer. Eighty-seven physicians voted by keypad and discussed the consistency of endoscopic diagnosis of atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia at the Annual Symposium of the Korean College of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research. Additionally, 100 core members of this academic society were asked via e-mail to complete the questionnaires related to screening strategies for gastric cancer. The most common recommendation for the subjects with intestinal metaplasia was an annual endoscopic follow-up (95.5% vs. 80.4% in the expert and non-expert groups, respectively; P = 0.118). Annual endoscopic follow-up was also the most predominant recommendation for atrophic gastritis (95.5% vs. 76.5%; P = 0.092), regardless of the physicians' endoscopic experience, position, and degree of the hospital. However, the correct answer rate for the diagnosis of normal endoscopic findings was only 16.7 and 14.1% in the expert and non-expert groups, respectively (P = 0.883). The most common practical screening strategy for patients with atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia in Korea was annual endoscopic examination. However, a new program estimating individualized gastric cancer risk might be needed because of the low inter-observer agreement in the endoscopic diagnosis of atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia.

  14. Restoration of an atrophic eye socket with custom made eye prosthesis, utilizing digital photography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav P Jayaswal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ocular defects may cause several ocular and orbital disorders, which require surgical intervention. These defects are psychologically disturbing for the patients, and therefore, they require immediate management and rehabilitation by a team of specialist. Ocular prosthesis may be either readymade (stock or custom made. Fabrication of a custom ocular prosthesis allows for a range of variations during construction. The iris can also be custom made by ocular painting or by digital photography. The optimum cosmetic and functional results of a custom-made prosthesis enhance the patient′s rehabilitation to a normal life style. This paper elaborates the technique for fabrication of a custom-made ocular prosthesis for an atrophic eye socket utilizing digital photography.

  15. Autoimmune Cytopenias In Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshini Sarah Abraham

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID is a humoral immunodeficiency whose primary diagnostic features include hypogammaglobulinemia involving two or more immunoglobulin isotypes and impaired functional antibody responses in the majority of patients. While increased susceptibility to respiratory and other infections is a common thread that binds a large cross-section of CVID patients, the presence of autoimmune complications in this immunologically and clinically heterogeneous disorder is recognized in up to two-thirds of patients. Among the autoimmune manifestations reported in CVID (20-50%(Chapel et al., 2008;Cunningham-Rundles, 2008, autoimmune cytopenias are by far the most common occurring variably in 4-20% (Michel et al., 2004;Chapel et al., 2008 of these patients who have some form of autoimmunity. Association of autoimmune cytopenias with granulomatous disease and splenomegaly has been reported. The spectrum of autoimmune cytopenias includes thrombocytopenia, anemia and neutropenia. While it may seem paradoxical prima facie that autoimmunity is present in patients with primary immune deficiencies, in reality, it could be considered two sides of the same coin, each reflecting a different but inter-connected facet of immune dysregulation. The expansion of CD21low B cells in CVID patients with autoimmune cytopenias and other autoimmune features has also been previously reported. It has been demonstrated that this unique subset of B cells is enriched for autoreactive germline antibodies. Further, a correlation has been observed between various B cell subsets, such as class-switched memory B cells and plasmablasts, and autoimmunity in CVID. This review attempts to explore the most recent concepts and highlights, along with treatment of autoimmune hematological manifestations of CVID.

  16. In vivo 31P-NMR studies on the energy metabolism of atrophic muscles in rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagiwa, Tetsuo

    1988-01-01

    Using P-31 NMR spectra, energy metabolism in the rat calf muscle was examined. The body weight in the atrophy and control groups did not differ significantly. Both the wet weight and dry weight of the calf muscle were significantly lower in the atrophy group than the control group. The muscle weight relative to the body weight was significantly lower in the atrophy group as well than the control group. There was no significant difference in the P-31 NMR spectral pattern before tourniquet ischemia between the atrophy and control groups. Rapid decrease in phosphocreatine (PCr) and rapid increase in inorganic phosphate (Pi) were observed in both groups immediately after application of the tourniquet; however, the rates of these changes were slightly greater and the PCr/Pi ratio in the peak values was significantly smaller in the atrophy group than the control group. The pH value before the ischemia was 7.15 ± 0.02 for the control group and 7.16 ± 0.02 for the atrophy group, with no significant difference between the groups. During ischemia, the pH value decreased progressively in the two groups; however, it became significantly decreased in the atrophy group from 10 to 60 min after application of tourniquet. The decrease in pH became gradual 60 min later. Since the decrease in pH was more rapid in the atrophic muscle than the intact muscle, this buffering capacity seems to be reduced in the atrophic muscle. (N.K.)

  17. Vitamin D Proliferates Vaginal Epithelium through RhoA Expression in Postmenopausal Atrophic Vagina tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Arum; Lee, Man Ryul; Lee, Hae-Hyeog; Kim, Yeon-Suk; Kim, Jun-Mo; Enkhbold, Temuulee; Kim, Tae-Hee

    2017-09-30

    Postmenopausal atrophic vagina (PAV) is the thinning of the walls of the vagina and decreased lugae of the vagina. PAV is caused by decreased estrogen levels in postmenopausal women. However, the harmful effects of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) have resulted in considerable caution in its use. Various estrogen agonist treatment options are available. Vitamin D is influences the regulation of differentiation and proliferation of various cells, especially tissues lining stratified squamous epithelium, such as the vaginal epithelium. In this study, we hypothesized that vitamin D could provide an alternative and a safe treatment option for PAV by promoting the proliferation and differentiation of the vaginal epithelium. Thirty six patients were enrolled in this case-control study. Vitamin D associated proteins in a vitamin D and sex hormone treated vaginal epithelial cell line as well as normal and PAV tissues were measured. To confirm of cell-to-cell junction protein expression, cell line and tissue studies included RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry staining, and immunoblot analyses. The expression of cell-to-cell junction proteins was higher in women with symptoms of atrophic vagina tissue compared to women without the symptoms. Vitamin D stimulated the proliferation of the vaginal epithelium by activating p-RhoA and Erzin through the vitamin D receptor (VDR). The results suggest that vitamin D positively regulates cell-to-cell junction by increasing the VDR/p-RhoA/p-Ezrin pathway. This is the first study to verify the relationship of the expression of RhoA and Ezrin proteins in vaginal tissue of PAV.

  18. Fractional Carbon Dioxide Laser and its Combination with Subcision in Improving Atrophic Acne Scars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Faghihi, Gita; Jaffary, Fariba; Haftbaradaran, Elaheh; Hoseini, Sayed Mohsen; Mazaheri, Nafiseh

    2017-01-01

    Acne is a very common skin disease in which scars are seen in 95% of the patients. Although numerous treatments have been recommended, researchers are still searching for a single modality to treat the complication due to its variety in shape and depth. We compared the effects of fractional carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) laser alone and in combination with subcision in the treatment of atrophic acne scars. This clinical trial study was performed in Skin Diseases and Leishmaniasis Research Center (Isfahan, Iran) during 2011-2012. Eligible patients with atrophic acne scars were treated with fractional CO 2 laser alone (five sessions with 3-week interval) on the right side of the face and fractional CO 2 laser plus subcision (one session using both with four sessions of fractional CO 2 laser, with 3-week interval) on the left side. The subjects were visited 1, 2, and 6 months after the treatment. Patient satisfaction rate was analyzed using SPSS 20 software. The average of recovery rate was 54.7% using the combination method and 43.0% using laser alone ( P < 0.001). The mean patient satisfaction was significantly higher with the combination method than laser alone (6.6 ± 1.2 vs. 5.2 ± 1.8; P < 0.001). Bruising was only seen with the combination method and lasted for 1 week in 57.0% and for 2 weeks in 43.0%. Erythema was seen in both methods. Postinflammatory pigmentation and hyperpigmentation were associated with combination method. No persistent side effects were seen after 6 months. Using a combination of subcision and laser had suitable results regarding scar recovery and satisfaction rate.

  19. Serum OPN expression for identification of gastric cancer and atrophic gastritis and its influencing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tiejun; Sun, Liping; He, Caiyun; Gong, Yuehua; Xu, Qian; Yuan, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Most studies have found that osteopontin (OPN) expression level is related to the poor prognosis of gastric cancer. However, few studies have examined the relationship between OPN expression and gastric precancerous diseases, and the potential role of OPN in the formation and development of GC. We investigated the relationships between serum OPN levels and the risks of gastric cancer (GC) and its precancerous disease, to explore the diagnostic efficacy of serum OPN level for GC and atrophic gastritis and its influencing factors. A total of 1,452 patients were enrolled, including 609 with mild superficial gastritis (SG), 594 with atrophic gastritis (AG) and 249 with GC. The levels of serum OPN and serum Helicobacter pylori IgG antibody were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Serum OPN levels increased from mild SG (1.99 ± 1.91 ng/ml) to AG (2.37 ± 2.27 ng/ml) to GC (5.94 ± 4.52 ng/ml) (P ≤ 0.002), along with increasing severity of gastric disease. OPN levels were significantly higher in patients with GC compared with the non-cancer population (2.17 ± 2.10, P < 0.0001). Serum OPN level was positively correlated with age and was higher in men than women, but was not correlated with H. pylori infection status. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.805, the optimal cutoff was 2.56 ng/ml and the sensitivity and specificity were 74.3% and 71.8%, respectively, for the ability of serum OPN to discriminate GC. Serum OPN expression was closely related to the risks of GC and AG, and it might be a useful marker for the discrimination of GC. OPN level was positively correlated with age and male sex, but was not affected by H. pylori infection, and it was promoted by smoking and drinking, in patients with mild SG.

  20. Cystic Lesions in Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macarena Gompertz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP can be chronic or recurrent, but frequently completely reversible after steroid treatment. A cystic lesion in AIP is a rare finding, and it can mimic a pancreatic cystic neoplasm. Difficulties in an exact diagnosis interfere with treatment, and surgery cannot be avoided in some cases. We report the history of a 63-year-old male presenting with jaundice and pruritus. AIP was confirmed by imaging and elevated IgG4 blood levels, and the patient completely recovered after corticosteroid therapy. One year later, he presented with a recurrent episode of AIP with elevated IgG4 levels, accompanied by the appearance of multiple intrapancreatic cystic lesions. All but 1 of these cysts disappeared after steroid treatment, but the remaining cyst in the pancreatic head was even somewhat larger 1 year later. Pancreatoduodenectomy was finally performed. Histology showed the wall of the cystic lesion to be fibrotic; the surrounding pancreatic tissue presented fibrosis, atrophy and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration by IgG4-positive cells, without malignant elements. Our case illustrates the rare possibility that cystic lesions can be part of AIP. These pseudocysts appear in the pancreatic segments involved in the autoimmune disease and can be a consequence of the local inflammation or related to ductal strictures. Steroid treatment should be initiated, after which these cysts can completely disappear with recovery from AIP. Surgical intervention may be necessary in some exceptional cases.

  1. Susceptibility Genes in Thyroid Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Ban

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD are complex diseases which are caused by an interaction between susceptibility genes and environmental triggers. Genetic susceptibility in combination with external factors (e.g. dietary iodine is believed to initiate the autoimmune response to thyroid antigens. Abundant epidemiological data, including family and twin studies, point to a strong genetic influence on the development of AITD. Various techniques have been employed to identify the genes contributing to the etiology of AITD, including candidate gene analysis and whole genome screening. These studies have enabled the identification of several loci (genetic regions that are linked with AITD, and in some of these loci, putative AITD susceptibility genes have been identified. Some of these genes/loci are unique to Graves' disease (GD and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT and some are common to both the diseases, indicating that there is a shared genetic susceptibility to GD and HT. The putative GD and HT susceptibility genes include both immune modifying genes (e.g. HLA, CTLA-4 and thyroid specific genes (e.g. TSHR, Tg. Most likely, these loci interact and their interactions may influence disease phenotype and severity.

  2. Autoimmune diseases in adults with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Yuki M.F.; Egeberg, Alexander; Gislason, Gunnar H.

    2017-01-01

    Background An increased susceptibility to autoimmune disease has been shown in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), but data remain scarce and inconsistent. Objective We examined the co-occurrence of selected autoimmune diseases in adult patients with AD. Methods Nationwide health registers were...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: autoimmune Addison disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... common in particular ethnic groups? Genetic Changes The cause of autoimmune Addison disease is complex and not completely understood. A combination ... is not caused by an autoimmune reaction. Other causes include infections that ... adrenal glands. Addison disease can also be one of several features of ...

  4. Interferon-¿ regulates oxidative stress during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espejo, C.; Penkowa, Milena; Saez-Torres, I.

    2002-01-01

    Neurobiology, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis IFN-d, multiple sclerosis, neurodegeneration, oxidative stress......Neurobiology, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis IFN-d, multiple sclerosis, neurodegeneration, oxidative stress...

  5. Autoimmune diseases in women with Turner's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kristian T; Rostgaard, Klaus; Bache, Iben

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In terms of number of X chromosomes, women with Turner's syndrome cytogenetically resemble men. An increased risk of autoimmune diseases has been observed among women with Turner's syndrome. This study was undertaken to investigate whether the autoimmune disease profile in women...... with Turner's syndrome is characterized by diseases with a female or male predominance. METHODS: Using the Danish Cytogenetic Central Register, the Danish National Patient Register, and the Danish Civil Registration System, we estimated relative risk of 46 different autoimmune diseases in a cohort of 798...... Danish women with Turner's syndrome followed up for 12,461 person-years between 1980 and 2004. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of first hospitalization for autoimmune disease and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were used as measures of relative risk. RESULTS: The overall risk of autoimmune...

  6. Collagen-Induced Arthritis: A model for Murine Autoimmune Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Pietrosimone, K. M.; Jin, M.; Poston, B.; Liu, P.

    2015-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is a common autoimmune animal model used to study rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The development of CIA involves infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils into the joint, as well as T and B cell responses to type II collagen. In murine CIA, genetically susceptible mice (DBA/1J) are immunized with a type II bovine collagen emulsion in complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA), and receive a boost of type II bovine collagen in incomplete Freund’s adjuvant (IFA) 21 days aft...

  7. Management of Autoimmune Status Epilepticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batool F. Kirmani

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Status epilepticus is a neurological emergency with increased morbidity and mortality. Urgent diagnosis and treatment are crucial to prevent irreversible brain damage. In this mini review, we will discuss the recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune status epilepticus (ASE, a rare form of the disorder encountered in the intensive care unit. ASE can be refractory to anticonvulsant therapy and the symptoms include subacute onset of short-term memory loss with rapidly progressive encephalopathy, psychiatric symptoms with unexplained new-onset seizures, imaging findings, CSF pleocytosis, and availability of antibody testing makes an earlier diagnosis of ASE possible. Neuroimmunomodulatory therapies are the mainstay in the treatment of ASE. The goal is to maximize the effectiveness of anticonvulsant agents and find an optimal combination of therapies while undergoing immunomodulatory therapy to reduce morbidity and mortality.

  8. Helminth Immunomodulation in Autoimmune Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Miles

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Helminths have evolved to become experts at subverting immune surveillance. Through potent and persistent immune tempering, helminths can remain undetected in human tissues for decades. Redirecting the immunomodulating “talents” of helminths to treat inflammatory human diseases is receiving intensive interest. Here, we review therapies using live parasitic worms, worm secretions, and worm-derived synthetic molecules to treat autoimmune disease. We review helminth therapy in both mouse models and clinical trials and discuss what is known on mechanisms of action. We also highlight current progress in characterizing promising new immunomodulatory molecules found in excretory/secretory products of helminths and their potential use as immunotherapies for acute and chronic inflammatory diseases.

  9. Antiretinal antibody- proven autoimmune retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharanya Abraham

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A young female presented with bilateral subacute onset of progressive decrease in night vision and reduced peripheral field of vision. The short duration and rapid progression of symptoms along with the lack of family history of night blindness prompted a diagnosis of autoimmune retinopathy (AIR. Fundus fluorescein angiography, optical coherence tomography, visual fields, and electroretinogram were suggestive of AIR. A differential diagnosis of retinitis pigmentosa (RP was also made. Antiretinal autoantibodies were detected in the blood sample. Treatment was with oral steroids and subsequently oral immunosuppressive agents. Visual acuity was maintained, fundus examination reverted to normal, and investigations repeated at every visit were stable with improvement in visual fields. Our case suggests that AIR, if diagnosed early and treated appropriately, may have a good outcome and should be considered in patients with an atypical presentation of RP.

  10. [Multiorgan autoimmune syndrome: case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiringhelli, Paolo; Chelazzi, Paolo; Chelazzi, Giovanni; Bellintani, Claudio; Rania, Simone

    2003-01-01

    The present case report refers to a multiorgan autoimmune disease manifesting following thymectomy performed for a benign thymoma. This disease is characterized by hypothyroidism, severe myasthenia, polymyositis and alopecia which are organ-specific diseases probably with a different time of onset but which are all an expression of the same immunopathologic process occurring in individuals who have a genetic predisposition. Characteristic of the present case is not only the association of the different immunopathologic clinical pictures but also the rather difficult differential diagnosis between a hypothyroidism-related myopathy and polymyositis. It was possible to formulate the diagnosis by integrating the results of clinical and laboratory evaluation with the therapeutic outcome. The onset of the syndrome was attributed to the withdrawal, following surgery, of the inhibitory effects of the thymoma on some clones of autoreactive lymphocytes.

  11. Insulin autoimmune syndrome: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Oliveira Moreira

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS, Hirata disease is a rare cause of hypoglycemia in Western countries. It is characterized by hypoglycemic episodes, elevated insulin levels, and positive insulin antibodies. Our objective is to report a case of IAS identified in South America. CASE REPORT: A 56-year-old Caucasian male patient started presenting neuroglycopenic symptoms during hospitalization due to severe trauma. Biochemical evaluation confirmed hypoglycemia and abnormally high levels of insulin. Conventional imaging examinations were negative for pancreatic tumor. Insulin antibodies were above the normal range. Clinical remission of the episodes was not achieved with verapamil and steroids. Thus, a subtotal pancreatectomy was performed due to the lack of response to conservative treatment and because immunosuppressants were contraindicated due to bacteremia. Histopathological examination revealed diffuse hypertrophy of beta cells. The patient continues to have high insulin levels but is almost free of hypoglycemic episodes.

  12. Does genomic imprinting play a role in autoimmunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camprubí, Cristina; Monk, David

    2011-01-01

    In the 19th century Gregor Mendel defined the laws of genetic inheritance by crossing different types of peas. From these results arose his principle of equivalence: the gene will have the same behaviour whether it is inherited from the mother or the father. Today, several key exceptions to this principle are known, for example sex-linked traits and genes in the mitochondrial genome, whose inheritance patterns are referred to as 'non mendelian'. A third, important exception in mammals is that of genomic imprinting, where transcripts are expressed in a monoallelic fashion from only the maternal or the paternal chromosome. In this chapter, we discuss how parent-of-origin effects and genomic imprinting may play a role in autoimmunity and speculate how imprinted miRNAs may influence the expression of many target autoimmune associated genes.

  13. Therapeutic applications of nanomedicine in autoimmune diseases: from immunosuppression to tolerance induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharagozloo, Marjan; Majewski, Slawomir; Foldvari, Marianna

    2015-05-01

    Autoimmune diseases are chronic, destructive diseases that can cause functional disability and multiple organ failure. Despite significant advances in the range of therapeutic agents, especially biologicals, limitations of the routes of administration, requirement for frequent long-term dosing and inadequate targeting options often lead to suboptimal effects, systemic adverse reactions and patient non-compliance. Nanotechnology offers promising strategies to improve and optimize autoimmune disease treatment with the ability to overcome many of the limitations common to the current immunosuppressive and biological therapies. Here we focus on nanomedicine-based delivery strategies of biological immunomodulatory agents for the treatment of autoimmune disorders including psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematous, scleroderma, multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes. This comprehensive review details the concepts and clinical potential of novel nanomedicine approaches for inducing immunosuppression and immunological tolerance in autoimmune diseases in order to modulate aberrant and pathologic immune responses. The treatment of autoimmune diseases remains a significant challenge. The authors here provided a comprehensive review, focusing on the current status and potential of nanomedicine-based delivery strategies of immunomodulatory agents for the treatment of autoimmune disorders including psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematous, scleroderma, multiple sclerosis, and type 1 diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cutting-edge issues in autoimmune orchitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Clovis A; Cocuzza, Marcello; Borba, Eduardo F; Bonfá, Eloísa

    2012-04-01

    Autoimmune orchitis is a relevant cause of decreased fecundity in males, and it is defined as a direct aggression to the testis with the concomitant presence of anti-sperm antibodies (ASA). The presence of these specific antibodies has been observed in approximately 5-12% of infertile male partners. Primary autoimmune orchitis is defined by isolated infertility with ASA but without evidence of a systemic disease. Secondary causes of orchitis and/or testicular vasculitis are uniformly associated with autoimmune diseases, mainly in primary vasculitis such as polyarteritis nodosa, Behçet's disease, and Henoch-Schönlein purpura. The overall frequencies of acute orchitis and ASA in rheumatic diseases are 2-31% and 0-50%, respectively. The pathogenesis of primary/secondary autoimmune orchitis is not completely understood but probably involves the access of immune cells to the testicular microenvironment due to inflammation, infection or trauma, leading to apoptosis of spermatocytes and spermatids. Glucocorticoids and immunosuppressive drugs are indicated in autoimmune orchitis-associated active systemic autoimmune diseases. However, there are no standardized treatment options, and the real significance of ASA in infertile men is still controversial. Assisted reproductive technologies such as intrauterine insemination, in vitro fertilization, and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) are therapeutic options for male infertility associated with these autoantibodies. ICSI is considered to be the best choice for patients with severe sperm autoimmunity, particularly in males with low semen counts or motility.

  15. Diagnosis and classification of autoimmune orchitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, C A; Cocuzza, M; Carvalho, J F; Bonfá, E

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune orchitis is characterized by testis inflammation and the presence of specific antisperm antibodies (ASA). It is classified in two categories. Primary autoimmune orchitis is defined by infertility and asymptomatic orchitis associated with ASA (100%) directed to the basement membrane or seminiferous tubules in infertile men, without any systemic disease and usually asymptomatic. Secondary autoimmune orchitis is characterized by symptomatic orchitis and/or testicular vasculiti`s associated with a systemic autoimmune disease, particularly vasculitis. These patients typically demonstrate testicular pain, erythema and/or swelling. ASA in secondary autoimmune orchitis have been reported in up to 50% of patients, especially in systemic lupus erythematosus patients. The pathogenesis of primary as well as secondary autoimmune orchitis is still unknown. Although the etiology is likely to be multifactorial, testicular inflammation, infection or trauma may induce T cell response with pro-inflammatory cytokine production with a consequent blood-testis-barrier permeability alteration, ASA production and apoptosis of spermatocytes and spermatids. ASA is known to cause immobilization and/or agglutination of spermatozoa, which may block sperm-egg interaction resulting in infertility. Assisted reproduction has been used as an efficient option in primary cases and immunosuppressive therapy for secondary autoimmune orchitis, although there is no double-blind, randomized trial to confirm the efficacy of any treatment regimens for these conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Incidence and Characteristics of Autoimmune Hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Rivera, Carolina; Ling, Simon C; Ahmed, Najma; Yap, Jason; Aglipay, Mary; Barrowman, Nick; Graitson, Samantha; Critch, Jeff; Rashid, Mohsin; Ng, Vicky L; Roberts, Eve A; Brill, Herbert; Dowhaniuk, Jenna K; Bruce, Garth; Bax, Kevin; Deneau, Mark; Guttman, Orlee R; Schreiber, Richard A; Martin, Steven; Alvarez, Fernando

    2015-11-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a progressive inflammatory liver disease of unknown etiology, with limited population-based estimates of pediatric incidence. We reported the incidence of pediatric AIH in Canada and described its clinical characteristics. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients aged <18 years diagnosed with AIH between 2000-2009 at all pediatric centers in Canada. A total of 159 children with AIH (60.3% female, 13.2% type 2 AIH) were identified. Annual incidence was 0.23 per 100000 children. Median age at presentation for type 1 was 12 years (interquartile range: 11-14) versus 10 years for type 2 (interquartile range: 4.5-13) (P = .03). Fatigue (58%), jaundice (54%), and abdominal pain (49%) were the most common presenting symptoms. Serum albumin (33 vs 38 g/L; P = .03) and platelet count (187 000 vs 249 000; P <.001) were significantly lower and the international normalized ratio (1.4 vs 1.2; P <.001) was higher in cirrhotic versus noncirrhotic patients. Initial treatment included corticosteroids (80%), azathioprine (32%), and/or cyclosporine (13%). Response to treatment at 1 year was complete in 90%, and partial in 3%. 3% of patients had no response, and 3% responded and later relapsed. Nine patients underwent liver transplantation, and 4 patients died at a mean follow-up of 4 years. AIH is uncommon in children and adolescents in Canada. Type 1 AIH was diagnosed 5.5 times more frequently than type 2 AIH. Most patients respond well to conventional therapy, diminishing the need for liver transplantation. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  17. The comparison of hyaluronic acid vaginal tablets with estradiol vaginal tablets in the treatment of atrophic vaginitis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekin, Murat; Yaşar, Levent; Savan, Kadir; Temur, Muzaffer; Uhri, Mehmet; Gencer, Işıl; Kıvanç, Esra

    2011-03-01

    To compare the effectiveness of the vaginal tablets of hyaluronic acid and estrodiol for the treatment of atrophic vaginitis. Forty-two postmenopausal women with symptoms of atrophic vaginitis were randomized to take vaginal tablets of 25 μg estradiol (n = 21) (group I) or 5 mg hyaluronic acid sodium salt (n = 21) (group II) for 8 weeks. The symptoms of atrophic vaginitis were evaluated by a self-assessed 4-point scale of composite score and the degree of epithelial atrophy was determined as, none, mild, moderate and severe. Vaginal pH and maturation index were measured and compared in both the groups. The symptoms were relieved significantly in both the groups (P Hyaluronic acid vaginal tablets can be used in patients with atrophic vaginitis who do not want to or can not take local estrogen treatment.

  18. Metabolic disorders and nutritional status in autoimmune thyroid diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kawicka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the authors of epidemiological studies have documented that autoimmune diseases are a major problem of modern society and are classified as diseases of civilization. Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs are caused by an abnormal immune response to autoantigens present in the thyroid gland – they often coexist with other autoimmune diseases. The most common dysfunctions of the thyroid gland are hypothyroidism, Graves-Basedow disease and Hashimoto’s disease. Hashimoto’s thyroiditis can be the main cause of primary hypothyroidism of the thyroid gland. Anthropometric, biochemical and physicochemical parameters are used to assess the nutritional status during the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid diseases. Patients with hypothyroidism are often obese, whereas patients with hyperthyroidism are often afflicted with rapid weight loss. The consequence of obesity is a change of the thyroid hormones’ activity; however, weight reduction leads to their normalization. The activity and metabolic rate of thyroid hormones are modifiable. ATDs are associated with abnormalities of glucose metabolism and thus increased risk of developing diabetes mellitus type 1 and type 2. Celiac disease (CD also increases the risk of developing other autoimmune diseases. Malnutrition or the presence of numerous nutritional deficiencies in a patient’s body can be the cause of thyroid disorders. Coexisting deficiencies of such elements as iodine, iron, selenium and zinc may impair the function of the thyroid gland. Other nutrient deficiencies usually observed in patients suffering from ATD are: protein deficiencies, vitamin deficiencies (A, C, B6, B5, B1 and mineral deficiencies (phosphorus, magnesium, potassium, sodium, chromium. Proper diet helps to reduce the symptoms of the disease, maintains a healthy weight and prevents the occurrence of malnutrition. This article presents an overview of selected documented studies and scientific reports on the

  19. [Metabolic disorders and nutritional status in autoimmune thyroid diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawicka, Anna; Regulska-Ilow, Bożena; Regulska-Ilow, Bożena

    2015-01-02

    In recent years, the authors of epidemiological studies have documented that autoimmune diseases are a major problem of modern society and are classified as diseases of civilization. Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs) are caused by an abnormal immune response to autoantigens present in the thyroid gland - they often coexist with other autoimmune diseases. The most common dysfunctions of the thyroid gland are hypothyroidism, Graves-Basedow disease and Hashimoto's disease. Hashimoto's thyroiditis can be the main cause of primary hypothyroidism of the thyroid gland. Anthropometric, biochemical and physicochemical parameters are used to assess the nutritional status during the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid diseases. Patients with hypothyroidism are often obese, whereas patients with hyperthyroidism are often afflicted with rapid weight loss. The consequence of obesity is a change of the thyroid hormones' activity; however, weight reduction leads to their normalization. The activity and metabolic rate of thyroid hormones are modifiable. ATDs are associated with abnormalities of glucose metabolism and thus increased risk of developing diabetes mellitus type 1 and type 2. Celiac disease (CD) also increases the risk of developing other autoimmune diseases. Malnutrition or the presence of numerous nutritional deficiencies in a patient's body can be the cause of thyroid disorders. Coexisting deficiencies of such elements as iodine, iron, selenium and zinc may impair the function of the thyroid gland. Other nutrient deficiencies usually observed in patients suffering from ATD are: protein deficiencies, vitamin deficiencies (A, C, B6, B5, B1) and mineral deficiencies (phosphorus, magnesium, potassium, sodium, chromium). Proper diet helps to reduce the symptoms of the disease, maintains a healthy weight and prevents the occurrence of malnutrition. This article presents an overview of selected documented studies and scientific reports on the relationship of metabolic

  20. No association of psoriasis with autoimmune thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilatou, E; Papadavid, E; Papastamatakis, P; Alexakos, D; Koumaki, D; Katsimbri, P; Hadjidakis, D; Dimitriadis, G; Rigopoulos, D

    2017-01-01

    Common autoimmune diseases tend to coexist in the same patients. Few studies have examined the possible association between autoimmune thyroiditis and psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis (PsA), with inconsistent results. To investigate the prevalence of autoimmune thyroiditis in psoriatic patients with or without PsA, living in an iodine-sufficient area. We studied prospectively, 114 psoriatic patients with disease duration of 5-38 years, 30 of them with PsA, and 286 age- and body mass index (BMI)-matched subjects without psoriasis or known thyroid disease or autoimmune disease. A detailed medical history was obtained from all participants and clinical examination and laboratory evaluation was performed. Psoriasis severity was assessed with Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI). Autoimmune thyroiditis was defined by the presence of positive autoantibodies to thyroid peroxidase and/or thyroglobulin. There was no difference in the prevalence of autoimmune thyroiditis between psoriatic patients and controls (20.2% vs. 19.6%). The prevalence of autoimmune thyroiditis in male and female psoriatic patients was similar (9.6% and 10.5% respectively), in contrast to the increased, as expected, prevalence in female vs. male controls (14.7% vs. 4.9%, P thyroiditis were similar in psoriatic patients and controls (7.9% and 7.0% respectively). Autoimmune thyroiditis in psoriatic patients was not related with age of psoriasis onset, psoriasis duration, PASI score, PsA and obesity. These data support that psoriatic patients with or without PsA do not have an increased risk for autoimmune thyroiditis. © 2016 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  1. Eating Disorders, Autoimmune, and Autoinflammatory Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zerwas, Stephanie; Larsen, Janne Tidselbak; Petersen, Liselotte

    2017-01-01

    higher hazards of eating disorders for children and adolescents with autoimmune or autoinflammatory diseases: 36% higher hazard for anorexia nervosa, 73% for bulimia nervosa, and 72% for an eating disorder not otherwise specified. The association was particularly strong in boys. Parental autoimmune...... or autoinflammatory disease history was associated with significantly increased odds for anorexia nervosa (odds ratio [OR] = 1.13, confidence interval [CI] = 1.01-1.25), bulimia nervosa (OR = 1.29; CI = 1.08-1.55) and for an eating disorder not otherwise specified (OR = 1.27; CI = 1.13-1.44). CONCLUSIONS: Autoimmune...

  2. Retinal phlebitis associated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Fiona L M; Tajunisah, Iqbal

    2009-01-01

    To describe a case of retinal phlebitis associated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Observational case report. A 44-year-old Indian man diagnosed with autoimmune hemolytic anemia presented with a 1-week history of blurred vision in both eyes. Fundus biomicroscopy revealed bilateral peripheral retinal venous sheathing and cellophane maculopathy. Fundus fluorescent angiogram showed bilateral late leakage from the peripheral venous arcades and submacular fluid accumulation. The retinal phlebitis resolved following a blood transfusion and administration of systemic steroids. Retinopathy associated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia is not well known. This is thought to be the first documentation of retinal phlebitis occurring in this condition.

  3. Presence of Autoimmune Antibody in Chikungunya Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wirach Maek-a-nantawat

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya infection has recently re-emerged as an important arthropod-borne disease in Thailand. Recently, Southern Thailand was identified as a potentially endemic area for the chikungunya virus. Here, we report a case of severe musculoskeletal complication, presenting with muscle weakness and swelling of the limbs. During the investigation to exclude autoimmune muscular inflammation, high titers of antinuclear antibody were detected. This is the report of autoimmunity detection associated with an arbovirus infection. The symptoms can mimic autoimmune polymyositis disease, and the condition requires close monitoring before deciding to embark upon prolonged specific treatment with immunomodulators.

  4. Altered B cell homeostasis and Toll-like receptor 9-driven response in patients affected by autoimmune polyglandular syndrome Type 1: Altered B cell phenotype and dysregulation of the B cell function in APECED patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perri, Valentina; Gianchecchi, Elena; Scarpa, Riccardo; Valenzise, Mariella; Rosado, Maria Manuela; Giorda, Ezio; Crinò, Antonino; Cappa, Marco; Barollo, Susi; Garelli, Silvia; Betterle, Corrado; Fierabracci, Alessandra

    2017-02-01

    APECED is a T-cell mediated disease with increased frequencies of CD8+ effector and reduction of FoxP3+ T regulatory cells. Antibodies against affected organs and neutralizing to cytokines are found in the peripheral blood. The contribution of B cells to multiorgan autoimmunity in Aire-/- mice was reported opening perspectives on the utility of anti-B cell therapy. We aimed to analyse the B cell phenotype of APECED patients compared to age-matched controls. FACS analysis was conducted on PBMC in basal conditions and following CpG stimulation. Total B and switched memory (SM) B cells were reduced while IgM memory were increased in patients. In those having more than 15 years from the first clinical manifestation the defect included also mature and transitional B cells; total memory B cells were increased, while SM were unaffected. In patients with shorter disease duration, total B cells were unaltered while SM and IgM memory behaved as in the total group. A defective B cell proliferation was detected after 4day-stimulation. In conclusion APECED patients show, in addition to a significant alteration of the B cell phenotype, a dysregulation of the B cell function involving peripheral innate immune mechanisms particularly those with longer disease duration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Impact of Helicobacter pylori Immunoglobulin G Levels and Atrophic Gastritis Status on Risk of Metabolic Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Takeoka

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (HP infection is implicated in gastric and extra-gastric diseases. While gastritis-related chronic inflammation represents a known trigger of metabolic disturbances, whether metabolic syndrome (MetS is affected by gastritis status remains unclear. We aimed to clarify the effect of HP-related gastritis on the risk of MetS.We retrospectively enrolled patients undergoing screening for MetS between 2014 and 2015. Investigations included HP-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG antibody assays to detect HP infection, and serum pepsinogen assays to evaluate atrophic gastritis status. The risk of MetS was evaluated via multiple logistic regression analyses with two covariates: serum HP infection status (IgG levels and atrophic gastritis status (two criteria were applied; pepsinogen I/II ratio < 3 or both pepsinogen I levels ≤ 70 μg/L and pepsinogen I/II ratio < 3.Of 1,044 participants, 247 (23.7% were HP seropositive, and 62 (6.0% had MetS. HP seronegative and seropositive patients had similar risks of MetS. On the other hand, AG (defined in terms of serum PG I/II <3 was significant risk of MetS (OR of 2.52 [95% CI 1.05-7.52]. After stratification according to HP IgG concentration, patients with low HP infection status had the lowest MetS risk (defined as an odds ratio [OR] adjusted for age, sex, smoking, drinking and physical activity status. Taking this result as a reference, patients with negative, moderate, and high HP infection status had ORs (with 95% confidence intervals [CI] of 2.15 (1.06-4.16, 3.69 (1.12-16.7, and 4.05 (1.05-26.8.HP-associated gastritis represents a risk factor for MetS. Research should determine why low and not negative HP infection status is associated with the lowest MetS risk.

  6. Nasal Floor Augmentation for the Reconstruction of the Atrophic Maxilla: A Case Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ghareeb, Moustafa; Pi-Anfruns, Joan; Khosousi, Mohammed; Aghaloo, Tara; Moy, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The severely atrophic edentulous maxilla imposes a challenge for dental implant rehabilitation. Nasal floor augmentation (NFA) is a method of augmenting bone height in the anterior maxilla. Autogenous bone has been commonly used as a graft material. Because of variations in results and lack of insufficient studies reporting the use of bone substitutes to graft the nasal floor, this study aims to evaluate the survival and success of dental implants placed in nasally grafted maxillae with osteoconductive bone substitutes. Materials and Methods Six patients with completely edentulous maxillae and inadequate height in the anterior to support implants underwent NFA. The nasal floor was exposed through an intraoral approach and grafted with osteoconductive bone graft substitutes. Twenty-four dental implants were placed, restored with a bar-retained implant-supported overdenture after a traditional healing period, and followed up after prosthetic loading. Patient satisfaction was evaluated with a questionnaire, and responses were expressed on a visual analog scale from 1 to 10. Bone levels were quantified radiographically based on a score ranging from 1 to 3, where 3 represented the highest bone support. Implants were evaluated for thread exposure and soft tissue health and were considered successful if the following criteria were met: absence of mobility; lack of symptoms; bone score of 3; and healthy peri-implant soft tissue without thread exposure. Results The age of patients ranged from 48 to 84 years, with a mean of 71.2 years. Three patients underwent NFA and simultaneous implant placement, whereas the other 3 had a mean healing period of 6.5 months before implant placement. Post-loading follow-up ranged from 4 to 29 months, with a mean of 14.2 months. The implant survival rate was 100%, with no complications. Ninety-three percent of the responses to the treatment satisfaction questionnaire had a score of 7 or greater. Bone scores ranged from 2 to 3, with 87

  7. liver cirrhosis from autoimmune hepatitis in a nigerian woman

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    like autoimmune thyroiditis, celiac disease and ulcerative colitis, with about 25% having cirrhosis at ... to immunosuppressive therapy. Keywords: Autoimmune hepatitis, Autoimmune liver disease, Chronic liver disease, Nigeria ... who is also exposed to environmental triggering factors.2,5,8 Subsequently, the autoimmune.

  8. Molecular genotyping of anisakis larvae in Middle Eastern Japan and endoscopic evidence for preferential penetration of normal over atrophic mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshio Arai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anisakiasis is a parasitic disease caused primarily by Anisakis spp. larvae in Asia and in Western countries. The aim of this study was to investigate the genotype of Anisakis larvae endoscopically removed from Middle Eastern Japanese patients and to determine whether mucosal atrophy affects the risk of penetration in gastric anisakiasis. METHODS: In this study, 57 larvae collected from 44 patients with anisakiasis (42 gastric and 2 colonic anisakiasis were analyzed retrospectively. Genotyping was confirmed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP analysis of ITS regions and by sequencing the mitochondrial small subunit (SSU region. In the cases of gastric anisakiasis, correlation analyses were conducted between the frequency of larval penetration in normal/atrophic area and the manifestation of clinical symptoms. RESULTS: Nearly all larvae were A. simplex seusu stricto (s.s. (99%, and one larva displayed a hybrid genotype. The A. simplex larvae penetrated normal mucosa more frequently than atrophic area (p = 0.005. Finally, patients with normal mucosa infection were more likely to exhibit clinical symptoms than those with atrophic mucosa infection (odds ratio, 6.96; 95% confidence interval, 1.52-31.8. CONCLUSIONS: In Japan, A. simplex s.s. is the main etiological agent of human anisakiasis and tends to penetrate normal gastric mucosa. Careful endoscopic examination of normal gastric mucosa, particularly in the greater curvature of the stomach will improve the detection of Anisakis larvae.

  9. Molecular Genotyping of Anisakis Larvae in Middle Eastern Japan and Endoscopic Evidence for Preferential Penetration of Normal over Atrophic Mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Toshio; Akao, Nobuaki; Seki, Takenori; Kumagai, Takashi; Ishikawa, Hirofumi; Ohta, Nobuo; Hirata, Nobuto; Nakaji, So; Yamauchi, Kenji; Hirai, Mitsuru; Shiratori, Toshiyasu; Kobayashi, Masayoshi; Fujii, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Eiji; Naito, Mikio; Saitoh, Shin-ichi; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Shibata, Nobumitsu; Shimo, Masamune; Tokiwa, Toshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Background Anisakiasis is a parasitic disease caused primarily by Anisakis spp. larvae in Asia and in Western countries. The aim of this study was to investigate the genotype of Anisakis larvae endoscopically removed from Middle Eastern Japanese patients and to determine whether mucosal atrophy affects the risk of penetration in gastric anisakiasis. Methods In this study, 57 larvae collected from 44 patients with anisakiasis (42 gastric and 2 colonic anisakiasis) were analyzed retrospectively. Genotyping was confirmed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of ITS regions and by sequencing the mitochondrial small subunit (SSU) region. In the cases of gastric anisakiasis, correlation analyses were conducted between the frequency of larval penetration in normal/atrophic area and the manifestation of clinical symptoms. Results Nearly all larvae were A. simplex seusu stricto (s.s.) (99%), and one larva displayed a hybrid genotype. The A. simplex larvae penetrated normal mucosa more frequently than atrophic area (p = 0.005). Finally, patients with normal mucosa infection were more likely to exhibit clinical symptoms than those with atrophic mucosa infection (odds ratio, 6.96; 95% confidence interval, 1.52–31.8). Conclusions In Japan, A. simplex s.s. is the main etiological agent of human anisakiasis and tends to penetrate normal gastric mucosa. Careful endoscopic examination of normal gastric mucosa, particularly in the greater curvature of the stomach will improve the detection of Anisakis larvae. PMID:24586583

  10. Etiology of Organ-Specific Autoimmunity: Basic Research and Clinical Implications in IBD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George S Eisenbarth

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmunity develops in the setting of genetic susceptibility and can be monogenic (eg, autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type I with Addison’s disease, mucocutaneous candidiasis and hypoparathyroidism, which is autosomal recessive with the causative gene on the tip of chromosome 21 or polygenic (usually with important alleles within the major histocompatibility complex [eg, type I diabetes]. In addition to genetic susceptibility, many autoimmune disorders can be classified into etiological categories (oncogenic, drug-induced, diet-induced, infectious or idiopathic. For most autoimmune disorders there are multiple target autoantigens and, for type I diabetes, a combinatorial approach (eg, expression of at least two autoantibodies of insulin, glutamic acid decarboxylase and/or ICA512/IA-2 is the best predictor of diabetes risk. Finally, antigen-specific therapies hold promise for the prevention and therapy of autoimmunity, eg, parenteral or oral therapy with insulin delays or prevents type I diabetes in animal models, and a small pilot trial of parenteral insulin in humans suggests that such therapy may similarly prevent diabetes in humans.

  11. Autoimmune pancreatitis : Diagnostic and immunological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. van Heerde (Marianne)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractAutoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is the pancreatic manifestation of a systemic fibro- inflammatory disease, characterized by infiltration with lymphoplasmacytic cells and extensive fibrosis, which leads to morphological changes (swelling, mass forming) and organ dysfunction. Often, but

  12. Th17 Response and Inflammatory Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janelle C. Waite

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The proinflammatory activity of T helper 17 (Th17 cells can be beneficial to the host during infection. However, uncontrolled or inappropriate Th17 activation has been linked to several autoimmune and autoinflammatory pathologies. Indeed, preclinical and clinical data show that Th17 cells are associated with several autoimmune diseases such as arthritis, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, and lupus. Furthermore, targeting the interleukin-17 (IL-17 pathway has attenuated disease severity in preclinical models of autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, a recent report brings to light a potential role for Th17 cells in the autoinflammatory disorder adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD. Whether Th17 cells are the cause or are directly involved in AOSD remains to be shown. In this paper, we discuss the biology of Th17 cells, their role in autoimmune disease development, and in AOSD in particular, as well as the growing interest of the pharmaceutical industry in their use as therapeutic targets.

  13. Autoimmune Response Confers Decreased Cardiac Function in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    inflammatory response; rather, autoimmune response would keep affecting decreased heart function in. RHD patients who ... untreated children. Nearly 30 - 45 % of the affected children could ..... Technology Department of Anhui Province (PR.

  14. Humanized in vivo Model for Autoimmune Diabetes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nepom, Gerald T; Gebe, John A

    2008-01-01

    The CD4+ T cell response is critical for cellular autoimmunity in human T1D, but incomplete understanding of issues of specific cell frequency, avidity, function, and correlation with disease status presents...

  15. [Autoimmune diseases of the thyroid gland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allelein, S; Feldkamp, J; Schott, M

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases of the thyroid gland are considered to be the most frequent cause of thyroid gland disorders. Autoimmune thyroid diseases consist of two subgroups: autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT) and Graves' disease. The AIT is the most common human autoimmune disease. Infiltration of the thyroid gland with cytotoxic T‑cells can lead to an initial thyrotoxicosis und during the course to hypothyroidism due to destruction of the thyroid gland. Substitution with Levothyroxine is indicated for manifest hypothyroidism and subclinical hypothyroidism with increased thyroid antibodies with the intention of normalizing the serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). Graves' disease is characterized by the appearance of stimulating TSH receptor antibodies leading to hyperthyroidism. Endocrine ophthalmopathy may also occur. Ablative therapy with radioiodine therapy or thyroidectomy is administered to patients with Graves' disease without remission after at least 1 year of antithyroid drug therapy.

  16. Transalveolar sinus floor lift without bone grafting in atrophic maxilla: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Mingdong; Liu, Ruimin; Bai, Shuting; Wang, Min; Xia, Haibin; Chen, Jiang

    2018-01-23

    We performed a meta-analysis aimed to assess the clinical results after transalveolar sinus floor lift without bone grafting in the atrophic maxilla. A systematic electronic literature search was conducted in PubMed, Embase and The Cochrane Library, followed by a manual search. Two reviewers independently extracted study data and conducted quality assessments. Ten non-controlled studies including 1484 implants and eight controlled studies (5 RCTs and 3 prospective studies) including 817 implants (451 implants in the non-graft group) were enrolled in this study. The survival rate of implants via the graft-free method was 98% (95%CI 96% to 100%). There was no significant difference in the survival rate between the non-graft group and the graft group (RR: 1.02; p = 0.18). No statistically significant difference in marginal bone loss was detected between the groups at 12 months (0.57, p = 0.07) or 36 months (0.05, p = 0.61). The endo-sinus bone gain in the non-graft group was significantly lower than in the graft group at 12 months (-1.10, p = 0.0001) and 36 months (-0.74, p = 0.02). Hence, the available evidence suggests that predictable results could be acquired through transalveolar sinus floor lift without bone grafting, while there may be a trend toward more endo-sinus bone gain with bone grafts.

  17. On the Feasibility of Utilizing Allogeneic Bone Blocks for Atrophic Maxillary Augmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Monje

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This systematic review was aimed at assessing the feasibility by means of survival rate, histologic analysis, and causes of failure of allogeneic block grafts for augmenting the atrophic maxilla. Material and Methods. A literature search was conducted by one reviewer in several databases. Articles were included in this systematic review if they were human clinical trials in which outcomes of allogeneic bone block grafts were studied by means of survival rate. In addition other factors were extracted in order to assess their influence upon graft failure. Results. Fifteen articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria and subsequently were analyzed in this systematic review. A total of 361 block grafts could be followed 4 to 9 months after the surgery, of which 9 (2.4% failed within 1 month to 2 months after the surgery. Additionally, a weighed mean 4.79 mm (95% CI: 4.51–5.08 horizontal bone gain was computed from 119 grafted sites in 5 studies. Regarding implant cumulative survival rate, the weighed mean was 96.9% (95% CI: 92.8–98.7%, computed from 228 implants over a mean follow-up period of 23.9 months. Histologic analysis showed that allogeneic block grafts behave differently in the early stages of healing when compared to autogenous block grafts. Conclusion. Atrophied maxillary reconstruction with allogeneic bone block grafts represents a reliable option as shown by low block graft failure rate, minimal resorption, and high implant survival rate.

  18. Time Trends in Helicobacter pylori Infection and Atrophic Gastritis Over 40 Years in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, Tomoari; Haruma, Ken; Ito, Masanori; Inoue, Kazuhiko; Manabe, Noriaki; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Kusunoki, Hiroaki; Hata, Jiro; Yoshihara, Masaharu; Sumii, Koji; Akiyama, Takashi; Tanaka, Shinji; Shiotani, Akiko; Graham, David Y

    2015-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection produces progressive mucosal damage that may eventually result in gastric cancer. We studied the changes that occurred in the presence and severity of atrophic gastritis and the prevalence of H. pylori infection that occurred coincident with improvements in economic and hygienic conditions in Japan since World War II. The prevalence of H. pylori infection and histologic grades of gastric damage were retrospectively evaluated using gastric biopsy specimens obtained over a 40-year period. Gastric atrophy and intestinal metaplasia were scored using the updated Sydney classification system. The prevalence of H. pylori and severity of atrophy were examined in 1381 patients including 289 patients examined in the 1970s (158 men; mean age, 44.9 years), 787 in the 1990s (430 men; 44.2 years), and 305 in the 2010s (163 men; 53.2 years). Overall, the prevalence of H. pylori infection decreased significantly from 74.7% (1970s) to 53% (1990s) and 35.1% (2010s) (p pylori infection. There has been a progressive and rapid decline in the prevalence of H. pylori infection as well a fall in the rate of progression of gastric atrophy among H. pylori-infected Japanese coincident with the westernization and improvements in economic and hygienic conditions in Japan since World War II. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. NMR-based metabonomics and correlation analysis reveal potential biomarkers associated with chronic atrophic gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jiajia; Liu, Yuetao; Hu, Yinghuan; Tong, Jiayu; Li, Aiping; Qu, Tingli; Qin, Xuemei; Du, Guanhua

    2017-01-05

    Chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) is one of the most important pre-cancerous states with a high prevalence. Exploring of the underlying mechanism and potential biomarkers is of significant importance for CAG. In the present work, 1 H NMR-based metabonomics with correlative analysis was performed to analyze the metabolic features of CAG. 19 plasma metabolites and 18 urine metabolites were enrolled to construct the circulatory and excretory metabolome of CAG, which was in response to alterations of energy metabolism, inflammation, immune dysfunction, as well as oxidative stress. 7 plasma biomarkers and 7 urine biomarkers were screened to elucidate the pathogenesis of CAG based on the further correlation analysis with biochemical indexes. Finally, 3 plasma biomarkers (arginine, succinate and 3-hydroxybutyrate) and 2 urine biomarkers (α-ketoglutarate and valine) highlighted the potential to indicate risks of CAG in virtue of correlation with pepsin activity and ROC analysis. Here, our results paved a way for elucidating the underlying mechanisms in the development of CAG, and provided new avenues for the diagnosis of CAG and presented potential drug targets for treatment of CAG. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Review of Atrophic Gastritis and Intestinal Metaplasia as a Premalignant Lesion of Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yo Han; Kim, Nayoung

    2015-01-01

    Atrophic gastritis (AG) and intestinal metaplasia (IM) are the main precursor lesions of gastric cancer as the incidence of gastric cancer increases in the gastric mucosa involved with AG and IM. The prevalence of AG and IM vary depending on countries, even it represents diverse results in the same nation. Usually AG is antecedent of IM but the etiologies of AG and IM are not always the same. The sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic methods to detect AG and IM are different. Furthermore, the management strategy of AG and IM has not been established, yet. Helicobacter pylori infection has been proved as the most important cause of AG and IM. Thus the eradication of H. pylori is very important to prevent the progression to gastric cancer which is still placed in the high rank in morbidity and mortality among cancers. However, the reversibility of AG and IM by eradication of H. pylori which was assumed to be certain by meta-analysis is; however, controversial now. Therefore, the understanding and early diagnosis of AG and IM are very important, especially, in high incidence area of gastric cancer such as Republic of Korea. PMID:25853101

  1. Chinese Classical Formula Sijunzi Decoction and Chronic Atrophic Gastritis: Evidence for Treatment Approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Aili; Du, Hongbo

    2017-01-01

    Objective This aim is to evaluate the effect of Sijunzi decoction (SJZD) treating chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG). Methods We performed searches in seven databases. The randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing SJZD with standard medical care or inactive intervention for CAG were enrolled. Combined therapy of SJZD plus conventional therapies compared with conventional therapies alone was also retrieved. The primary outcome included the incidence of gastric cancer and the improvement of atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, and dysplasia based on the gastroscopy and pathology. The secondary outcomes were Helicobacter pylori clearance rate, quality of life, and adverse event/adverse drug reaction. Results Six RCTs met the inclusion criteria. The research quality was low in the trials. For the overall effect rate, pooled analysis from 4 trials showed that modified SJZD plus conventional medications exhibited a significant improvement (OR = 4.86; 95% CI: 2.80 to 8.44; P < 0.00001) and without significant heterogeneity compared with the conventional medications alone. None reported the adverse effect. Conclusions Modified SJZD combined with conventional western medicines appears to have benefits for CAG. Due to the limited number and methodological flaw, the beneficial and harmful effects of SJZD for CAG could not be identified. More high-quality clinical trials are needed to confirm the results. PMID:29138645

  2. Progression from Chronic Atrophic Gastritis to Gastric Cancer; Tangle, Toggle, Tackle with Korea Red Ginseng

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon Jae; Chung, Jun Won; Lee, So Jung; Choi, Ki Seok; Kim, Ju Hyun; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2010-01-01

    Key molecular players that link inflammation to carcinogenesis are prostaglandins, cytokines, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), chemokines, angiogenic growth factors, and free radicals, all of which lead to increased mutations and altered functions of important enzymes and proteins, for example, activation of oncogenic products and/or inhibition of tumor suppressor proteins, in inflamed tissues, thus contributing to multi-stage carcinogenesis process. Interpreted reversely, the identification of the molecular mechanisms by which chronic inflammation increases cancer risk or optimal intervention of targeted drugs or agents during the inflammation-associated carcinogenic process could be a necessary basis for developing new strategy of cancer prevention at many sites. In this review, we discuss the possibilities for cancer prevention by controlling inflammation process in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-associated inflamed stomach with Korea red ginseng. Korea red ginseng is a good example of a natural herb that has ubiquitous properties that are conductive to stop inflammatory carcinogenesis that is un wanted outcome of H. pylori infection, rendering rejuvenation of chronic atrophic gastritis. PMID:20490314

  3. Can atrophic-erosive oral lichen planus promote cardiovascular diseases? A population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrotto, D; Barattero, R; Carbone, M; Gambino, A; Sciannameo, V; Ricceri, F; Conrotto, F; Broccoletti, R; Arduino, P-G

    2018-03-01

    Lichen planus has been recently associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). The oral manifestations can be divided into white hyperkeratotic lesions (WL) and atrophic and erosive lesions (RL). The aim of this report was to compare the presence of CVDs between patients affected by WL or RL, to test the hypothesis that RL are associated with an increased incidence of CVDs. Patients were analysed through a complete collection of all the risk factors for CVDs. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of a cardiovascular event-acute coronary syndrome (ACS), any revascularization or stroke/TIA. A multivariable logistic regression model, adjusted for age at diagnosis, body mass index, smoking, alcohol consumption, diabetes, hypertension, CVDs familiarity and periodontitis, was performed. A prospective cohort of 307 patients has been evaluated; 185 (60.3%) had WL and 122 RL (39.7%). Twenty-four patients had a CVD. ACS occurred more frequently in RL (adjusted odds ratio 5.83; 95% CI: 1.16-29.39), mainly due to the higher risk of it after the histological diagnosis of Oral lichen planus OLP (odds ratio 4.23; 95% CI: 0.66-27.23). Patients with RL could possibly have a higher risk of developing ACS. Further analysis on larger cohort is however warranted. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Rationale in diagnosis and screening of atrophic gastritis with stomach-specific plasma biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agréus, Lars; Kuipers, Ernst J; Kupcinskas, Limas; Malfertheiner, Peter; Di Mario, Francesco; Leja, Marcis; Mahachai, Varocha; Yaron, Niv; Van Oijen, Martijn; Perez, Guillermo Perez; Rugge, Massimo; Ronkainen, Jukka; Salaspuro, Mikko; Sipponen, Pentti; Sugano, Kentaro; Sung, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Atrophic gastritis (AG) results most often from Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. AG is the most important single risk condition for gastric cancer that often leads to an acid-free or hypochlorhydric stomach. In the present paper, we suggest a rationale for noninvasive screening of AG with stomach-specific biomarkers. Methods The paper summarizes a set of data on application of the biomarkers and describes how the test results could be interpreted in practice. Results In AG of the gastric corpus and fundus, the plasma levels of pepsinogen I and/or the pepsinogen I/pepsinogen II ratio are always low. The fasting level of gastrin-17 is high in AG limited to the corpus and fundus, but low or non-elevated if the AG occurs in both antrum and corpus. A low fasting level of G-17 is a sign of antral AG or indicates high intragastric acidity. Differentiation between antral AG and high intragastric acidity can be done by assaying the plasma G-17 before and after protein stimulation, or before and after administration of the proton pump inhibitors (PPI). Amidated G-17 will rise if the antral mucosa is normal in structure. H. pylori antibodies are a reliable indicator of helicobacter infection, even in patients with AG and hypochlorhydria. Conclusions Stomach-specific biomarkers provide information about the stomach health and about the function of stomach mucosa and are a noninvasive tool for diagnosis and screening of AG and acid-free stomach. PMID:22242613

  5. Chinese Classical Formula Sijunzi Decoction and Chronic Atrophic Gastritis: Evidence for Treatment Approach?