WorldWideScience

Sample records for autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura

  1. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura concomitant with autoimmune thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Bay

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP is characterized by disseminated thrombotic occlusions located in the microcirculation, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, fever, and renal and neurologic abnormalities. A 14 year old girl admitted to our hospital complaining bruising on her body and prolonged menstrual bleeding. On her physical examination there were very common bruising on four extremities. On the laboratory studies, Hemoglobin was 9 g/dL; Hematocrit, 24%; white blood count 11600/mm3 and thrombocyte count, 9.000/mm3. According to these findings our first diagnose was idiopatic thrombocytopenic purpura so intravenous immunoglobulin was given to patient for two days. Bone marrow aspiration was performed because of persisting thrombocytopenia despite two days IVIG therapy. Increased number of megakaryocytes was seen in bone marrow. Some accompanying symptoms like headache, numbness in per oral region and extremities, difficulty in speaking, and fluctuation in consciousness for short time occurred. The patient was reevaluated; because thrombocytopenia persisted and some neurological symptoms was observed. Due to these findings we thought that TTP was the diagnosed and plasma exchange was started. Increase was seen in platelet count in the second days of treatment. TTP should be considered in children presenting with atypical thrombocytopenia.

  2. Risk Factors for Autoimmune Diseases Development After Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roriz, Mélanie; Landais, Mickael; Desprez, Jonathan; Barbet, Christelle; Azoulay, Elie; Galicier, Lionel; Wynckel, Alain; Baudel, Jean-Luc; Provôt, François; Pène, Frédéric; Mira, Jean-Paul; Presne, Claire; Poullin, Pascale; Delmas, Yahsou; Kanouni, Tarik; Seguin, Amélie; Mousson, Christiane; Servais, Aude; Bordessoule, Dominique; Perez, Pierre; Chauveau, Dominique; Veyradier, Agnès; Halimi, Jean-Michel; Hamidou, Mohamed; Coppo, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) can be associated with other autoimmune disorders, but their prevalence following autoimmune TTP remains unknown. To assess the prevalence of autoimmune disorders associated with TTP and to determine risk factors for and the time course of the development of an autoimmune disorder after a TTP episode, we performed a cross sectional study. Two-hundred sixty-one cases of autoimmune TTP were included in the French Reference Center registry between October, 2000 and May, 2009. Clinical and laboratory data available at time of TTP diagnosis were recovered. Each center was contacted to collect the more recent data and diagnosis criteria for autoimmunity. Fifty-six patients presented an autoimmune disorder in association with TTP, 9 years before TTP (median; min: 2 yr, max: 32 yr) (26 cases), at the time of TTP diagnosis (17 cases) or during follow-up (17 cases), up to 12 years after TTP diagnosis (mean, 22 mo). The most frequent autoimmune disorder reported was systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (26 cases) and Sjögren syndrome (8 cases). The presence of additional autoimmune disorders had no impact on outcomes of an acute TTP or the occurrence of relapse. Two factors evaluated at TTP diagnosis were significantly associated with the development of an autoimmune disorder during follow-up: the presence of antidouble stranded (ds)DNA antibodies (hazard ratio (HR): 4.98; 95% confidence interval (CI) [1.64–15.14]) and anti-SSA antibodies (HR: 9.98; 95% CI [3.59–27.76]). A follow-up across many years is necessary after an acute TTP, especially when anti-SSA or anti-dsDNA antibodies are present on TTP diagnosis, to detect autoimmune disorders early before immunologic events spread to prevent disabling complications. PMID:26496263

  3. Genotype and Phenotype Correlation in Hereditary Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (Upshaw-Schulman Syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-12

    Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Congenital Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Familial Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura, Congenital; Upshaw-Schulman Syndrome

  4. Drug-induced thrombocytopenic purpura

    OpenAIRE

    Sathiasekar, Anisha Cynthia; Deepthi, D. Angeline; Sathia Sekar, G. Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced thrombocytopenic purpura is a skin condition result from a low platelet count due to drug-induced anti-platelet antibodies caused by drugs. Drug-induced thrombocytopenic purpura should be suspected when a patient, child or adult, has sudden, severe thrombocytopenia. Drug-induced thrombocytopenic purpura is even more strongly suspected when a patient has repeated episodes of sudden, severe thrombocytopenia

  5. Platelet destruction in autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura: kinetics and clearance of indium-111-labeled autologous platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratton, J.R.; Ballem, P.J.; Gernsheimer, T.; Cerqueira, M.; Slichter, S.J.

    1989-05-01

    Using autologous /sup 111/In-labeled platelets, platelet kinetics and the sites of platelet destruction were assessed in 16 normal subjects (13 with and three without spleens), in 17 studies of patients with primary autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura (AITP), in six studies of patients with secondary AITP, in ten studies of patients with AITP following splenectomy, and in five thrombocytopenic patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. In normal subjects, the spleen accounted for 24 +/- 4% of platelet destruction and the liver for 15 +/- 2%. Untreated patients with primary AITP had increased splenic destruction (40 +/- 14%, p less than 0.001) but not hepatic destruction (13 +/- 5%). Compared with untreated patients, prednisone treated patients did not have significantly different spleen and liver platelet sequestration. Patients with secondary AITP had similar platelet counts, platelet survivals, and increases in splenic destruction of platelets as did patients with primary AITP. In contrast, patients with myelodysplastic syndromes had a normal pattern of platelet destruction. In AITP patients following splenectomy, the five nonresponders all had a marked increase (greater than 45%) in liver destruction compared to five responders (all less than 40%). Among all patients with primary or secondary AITP, there was an inverse relationship between the percent of platelets destroyed in the liver plus spleen and both the platelet count (r = 0.75, p less than 0.001) and the platelet survival (r = 0.86, p less than 0.001). In a stepwise multiple linear regression analysis, total liver plus spleen platelet destruction, the platelet survival and the platelet turnover were all significant independent predictors of the platelet count. Thus platelet destruction is shifted to the spleen in primary and secondary AITP. Failure of splenectomy is associated with a marked elevation in liver destruction.

  6. Thrombocytopenic purpura as first manifestation of human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollak, C. E.; Kersten, M. J.; van der Lelie, J.; Lange, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    We report three cases of thrombocytopenic purpura associated with HIV-1 infection. The clinical picture is indistinguishable from classic autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura (AITP). All three patients initially responded to treatment with high dose methylprednisolone. One patient had an incomplete

  7. Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura in children. Integral Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Tamara González Fernández

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura or ITP is an autoimmune bleeding disorder more common in children. The Nursing Care Process, from a holistic perspective, will hold the child care with ITP. The main nursing objetives to these processes are control and reduce the number of hemorrhagic episodes besides the family health education.

  8. A rare association of localized scleroderma type morphea, vitiligo, autoimmune hypothyroidism, pneumonitis, autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura and central nervous system vasculitis. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla-Abadía, Fabio; Muñoz-Buitrón, Evelyn; Ochoa, Carlos D; Carrascal, Edwin; Cañas, Carlos A

    2012-12-20

    The localized scleroderma (LS) known as morphea, presents a variety of clinical manifestations that can include systemic involvement. Current classification schemes divide morphea into categories based solely on cutaneous morphology, without reference to systemic disease or autoimmune phenomena. This classification is likely incomplete. Autoimmune phenomena such as vitiligo and Hashimoto thyroiditis associated with LS have been reported in some cases suggesting an autoimmune basis. To our knowledge this is the first case of a morphea forming part of a multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS) and presenting simultaneously with autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura and central nervous system vasculitis. We report an uncommon case of a white 53 year old female patient with LS as part of a multiple autoimmune syndrome associated with pneumonitis, autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura and central nervous system vasculitis presenting a favorable response with thrombopoietin receptor agonists, pulses of methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide. Is likely that LS have an autoimmune origin and in this case becomes part of MAS, which consist on the presence of three or more well-defined autoimmune diseases in a single patient.

  9. A rare association of localized scleroderma type morphea, vitiligo, autoimmune hypothyroidism, pneumonitis, autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura and central nervous system vasculitis. Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonilla-Abadía Fabio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The localized scleroderma (LS known as morphea, presents a variety of clinical manifestations that can include systemic involvement. Current classification schemes divide morphea into categories based solely on cutaneous morphology, without reference to systemic disease or autoimmune phenomena. This classification is likely incomplete. Autoimmune phenomena such as vitiligo and Hashimoto thyroiditis associated with LS have been reported in some cases suggesting an autoimmune basis. To our knowledge this is the first case of a morphea forming part of a multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS and presenting simultaneously with autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura and central nervous system vasculitis. Case presentation We report an uncommon case of a white 53 year old female patient with LS as part of a multiple autoimmune syndrome associated with pneumonitis, autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura and central nervous system vasculitis presenting a favorable response with thrombopoietin receptor agonists, pulses of methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide. Conclusion Is likely that LS have an autoimmune origin and in this case becomes part of MAS, which consist on the presence of three or more well-defined autoimmune diseases in a single patient.

  10. Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Kayal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP is defined as a hematologic disorder, characterized by isolated thrombocytopenia without a clinically apparent cause. The major causes of accelerated platelet consumption include immune thrombocytopenia, decreased bone marrow production, and increased splenic sequestration. The clinical presentation may be acute with severe bleeding, or insidious with slow development with mild or no symptoms. The initial laboratory tests useful at the first visit to predict future diagnosis were erythrocyte count, leukocyte count, anti-glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antibodies, reticulated platelets, plasma thrombopoietin level. Treatment should be restricted to those patients with moderate or severe thrombocytopenia who are bleeding or at risk of bleeding. We present a case report on ITP with clinical presentation, diagnosis and management.

  11. Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... they may include: Easy or excessive bruising (purpura) Superficial bleeding into the skin that appears as a ... shield Mayo Clinic logo are trademarks of Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. © 1998-2018 Mayo ...

  12. Diagnosis and Treatment of Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abe Olugbenga

    Ginsburg D, Tsai HM. Mutations in a member of the ADAMTS gene family cause thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Nature. 2001. 4;413(6855):488-94. 18. Tsai HM, Lian EC. Antibodies to von willebrand factor-cleaving protease in acute thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. N Engl J Med . 1998;339(22):1585-1594. 19.

  13. Haemolytic uraemic syndrome and thrombocytopenic thrombotic purpura

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, JG

    Haemolytic uraemic syndrome thrombocytopenic thrombotic purpura (HUS/TTP) remains an incompletely understood complex disease process that involves many organs. It was first described, as thrombocytopenic purpura, by Moschcowitz in 1924 (1). Since that time the prognosis of this disease has improved

  14. Tuberculosis presenting as immune thrombocytopenic purpura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahadir-Erdogan Beril

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although various hematologic abnormalities are seen in tuberculosis, immune thrombocytopenic purpura is a rare event. Case Presentation We report a case of a 29 year-old male who was presented with immune thrombocytopenia-induced hemoptysis, macroscopic hematuria and generalized petechiae. The patient was found to have clinical, microbiological and radiological evidence of active pulmonary tuberculosis. The immune thrombocytopenic purpura was successfully treated with anti-tuberculous drugs combined with corticosteroids and high dose immune globulin therapy. Conclusion Immune thrombocytopenic purpura can be one of the hematological manifestations of tuberculosis which has a global prevalence with increasing incidence secondary to HIV infection.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to paleness, yellowing of the eyes and skin (jaundice), fatigue, shortness of breath, and a rapid heart ... 81. Review. Citation on PubMed Tsai HM. Current concepts in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Annu Rev Med. 2006; ...

  16. Rituximab in a child with autoimmune thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura refractory to plasma exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Parameswaran; Jayaraman, Aparna; Rustagi, Rashi S; Mahadevan, S; Parameswaran, Sreejith

    2012-07-01

    A nine-year-old girl presented with headache, purpura and mild left hemiparesis. Laboratory evaluation revealed thrombotic microangiopathy with ADAMTS13 deficiency, with auto-antibodies to ADAMTS13. She was treated with plasma exchange and steroids, following which she improved transiently, relapsing within 2 months. The relapse was refractory to conventional therapy and rituximab was tried. She had good response to rituximab and has been in remission for the past 12 months. Rituximab may be a promising option for children with acquired TTP refractory to plasma exchange and steroids.

  17. [New marker in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillarp, A.; Lindblom, A.; Bjork, P.

    2008-01-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathy can be caused by several conditions which are difficult to diagnose from the clinical presentation alone. Deficient enzyme activity of a newly-discovered enzyme, ADAMTS-13, can lead to thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Lack of ADAMTS-13 activity causes increase...

  18. [New marker in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillarp, A.; Lindblom, A.; Bjork, P.

    2008-01-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathy can be caused by several conditions which are difficult to diagnose from the clinical presentation alone. Deficient enzyme activity of a newly-discovered enzyme, ADAMTS-13, can lead to thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Lack of ADAMTS-13 activity causes increased...

  19. Diagnosis and Treatment of Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a rare clinical emergency that is characterized by features of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. The availability of effective therapy with therapeutic plasma exchange has decreased the mortality rate from 90 % to approximately 20%. The historical ...

  20. Coma in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J. de Jong (Fransina); P.A.W. te Boekhorst (Peter); D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); B.C. Jacobs (Bart)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThrombotic thrombocy topenic purpura (TTP) is characterised by a thrombotic, haemolytic microangiopathy leading to microvascular occlusion, haemolysis and ischaemic dysfunction of various organs including the brain. TTP may present with a variety of neurological symptoms, including

  1. Low-dose autologous in vitro opsonized erythrocytes. Radioimmune method and autologous opsonized erythrocytes for refractory autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura in adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambriz, R.; Munoz, R.; Pizzuto, J.; Quintanar, E.; Morales, M.; Aviles, A.

    1987-01-01

    Adult patients with chronic autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura (ATP), which proved refractory to various treatments, received a single dose of autologous in vitro opsonized erythrocytes with 100 micrograms of anti-D IgG. In 1983, 30 of these patients were treated with autologous erythrocytes that had been opsonized and labeled with 25 mCi (740 MBq) of technetium Tc 99m; this treatment was designated as the radioimmune method. Favorable responses were noted in 36% of patients so treated. In 1985, another group of 16 patients with refractory ATP received therapy with autologous opsonized erythrocytes (AOPE) and 55% of these patients showed favorable responses. Five (17%) of the patients treated using the radioimmune method attained a complete, long-term (greater than 35 months) remission of their ATP, and five (31%) of the patients treated using AOPE remained in complete remission over 270 days after cessation of therapy. Major complications were not seen. We concluded that the interaction of macrophages with low-dose AOPE is a successful therapeutic approach in ATP refractory to standard treatment.

  2. The Use of Vincristine in Refractory Auto-immune Thrombocytopenic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two patients with auto-immune thrombocytopenic purpura are reported who continued to bleed despite high doses of corticosteroids, immunosuppressive therapy and splenec- tomy. The addition of vincristine to their therapeutic regimen produced a response in each case and both patients are now off all therapy without ...

  3. The use of vincristine in refractory auto-immune thrombocytopenic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two patients with auto-immune thrombocytopenic purpura are reported who continued to bleed despite high doses of corticosteroids, immunosuppressive therapy and splenectomy. The addition of vincristine to their therapeutic regimen produced a response in each case and both patients are now off all therapy without ...

  4. Human neutrophil peptides and complement factor Bb in pathogenesis of acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wenjing; Pham, Huy P; Williams, Lance A; McDaniel, Jenny; Siniard, Rance C; Lorenz, Robin G; Marques, Marisa B; Zheng, X Long

    2016-11-01

    Acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura is primarily caused by the deficiency of plasma ADAMTS13 activity resulting from autoantibodies against ADAMTS13. However, ADAMTS13 deficiency alone is often not sufficient to cause acute thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Infections or systemic inflammation may precede acute bursts of the disease, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Herein, 52 patients with acquired autoimmune thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and 30 blood donor controls were recruited for the study. The plasma levels of human neutrophil peptides 1-3 and complement activation fragments (i.e. Bb, iC3b, C4d, and sC5b-9) were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Univariate analyses were performed to determine the correlation between each biomarker and clinical outcomes. We found that the plasma levels of human neutrophil peptides 1-3 and Bb in patients with acute thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura were significantly higher than those in the control (Ppurpura patients and the control. We conclude that innate immunity, i.e. neutrophil and complement activation via the alternative pathway, may play a role in the pathogenesis of acute autoimmune thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, and a therapy targeted at these pathways may be considered in a subset of these patients. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  5. Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Misdiagnosed as Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Michelle Fog; Bygum, Anette

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is a rare, but potentially life-threatening genetic disorder that results from an autosomal dominant trait. It is characterized by acute, recurrent attacks of severe local edema, most commonly affecting the skin and mucosa. Swelling in hereditary angioedema patients does...... however not always have to be caused by angioedema but can relate to other concomitant disorders. In this report we are focusing on misdiagnosis in a patient with known hereditary angioedema, whose bleeding episode caused by idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura was mistaken for an acute attack...... of hereditary angioedema. The case illustrates how clinicians can have difficulties in handling patients with rare diseases, especially in the emergency care setting....

  6. Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura as Initial Manifestation of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Bağcıer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a chronic autoimmune disease that can affect almost any organ system. Its presentation and course are highly variable. The classic presentation of SLE in a woman of childbearing age is fever, arthritis, and malar rash triad. However, patients may present rare types of manifestations such as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

  7. A case of immune thrombocytopenic purpura presenting with intracranial hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinan Akbayram

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune thrombocytopenic purpura is an acute, generally considered a self-limiting benign disorder with a 60%-80% change of spontaneous recovery occurring usually within a few months after onset. Intracranial hemorrhage is a rare but life-threatening complication of childhood immune thrombocytopenic purpura. We report a 4-year-old girl who admitted with headache, vomiting, bleeding from noise and bruises on the extremities. Her neurological examination was normal. Based on laboratory finding she was diagnosed immune thrombocytopenic purpura and intracranial hemorrhage. We suggest that cranial imaging should be perform in patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura admitted with bleeding symptoms, vomiting and headache even if they had no abnormal neurological signs.

  8. Childhood thrombocytopenic purpura--review and a case report.

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy V; Rawal Y

    1996-01-01

    Childhood idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura is a rare condition seen in children. A case of a 10 year old female child is reported. Bleeding from the gingiva and petechiae on the tongue were observed. The blood picture was normocytic normochromic with neutrophilia and thrombocytopenia. Bone marrow study was suggestive of marrow changes in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. Dental extractions were postponed. Recognition of the disease by the dental profession is stressed.

  9. A rare combination of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viner, Maya; Murakhovskaya, Irina

    2017-07-01

    : Thrombocytopenia, in the setting of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombotic events, is characteristic of both thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and primary antiphospholipid syndrome. Clinically, it is difficult to distinguish between these two syndromes. We present a 41-year-old woman with chronic, relapsing thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura in the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. She had clinical manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome without meeting laboratory criteria of the Sydney classification system. In the literature, there have only been nine cases of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura associated with primary antiphospholipid syndrome. Seven of the nine cases suffered from one or multiple strokes, a common feature in antiphospholipid syndrome, but an uncommon finding in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. We introduce the possibility of an association between thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. Systematic testing of ADAMTS13 activity and anti-ADAMTS13 antibodies in patients who present with neurological symptoms and thrombocytopenia, in the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies, may help with the diagnosis of the rare thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura-antiphospholipid syndrome combination.

  10. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura: the treatment paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasi, Roberto

    2009-03-01

    Immune (idiopathic) thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a heterogeneous disease with highly variable severity and an unpredictable response to therapy. This heterogeneity presents a range of problems to the clinician when deciding who should receive pharmacological treatment and when such interventions should be initiated. Treatment guidelines are available but, given the current small amount of data from research and randomized, controlled trials, the guidelines are largely based on expert opinion rather than on evidence. At the moment, it is only recommended that those patients with severe bleeding and/or extremely low platelet counts (<10 x 10(9)/L) definitely require treatment. In all other patients the decision to treat must be made based on a careful evaluation of disease severity, patient characteristics, and the possibility of treatment-related adverse events. This article describes a structured approach to the management of adults with ITP.

  11. Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: Overview with report of a case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Sunitha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP is a disorder associated with a decrease in the number of circulating platelets due to abnormal increased platelet destruction attributed to an autoimmune phenomenon. It is a common cause of thrombocytopenia resulting in bleeding complications in children and adults. ITP is a disorder where the patient may present with oral manifestations, like bleeding, petechia, ecchymosis, hematomas and may report initially to the dentist. It is important for the practitioner to evaluate patients with bleeding disorders and subject them to appropriate laboratory investigatory procedures. A knowledge of dental treatment modifications and use of various local hemostatic measures is a must for the general dental practitioner. This article reports a case of thrombocytopenia in an adult male who reported with a complaint of hemorrhagic bullae and spontaneous bleeding in the oral cavity along with an overview of diagnosis, treatment modalities and dental considerations for such patents.

  12. An unusual occurrence of Kleine-Levin syndrome in a man with refractory immune thrombocytopenic purpura: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirifard, Hamed; Barzkar, Farzaneh; Fazeli, Seyed Amirhossein; Hashemi, Seyed Mehdi

    2015-04-01

    Kleine-Levin syndrome is an extremely rare neurological entity characterized by recurrent episodes of hypersomnia which are sometimes associated with compulsive hyperphagia and behavioral changes. Autoimmunity has recently been proposed as a factor contributing to its pathogenesis. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura is a relatively common autoimmune disease showing a lot of complexity and uncertainty regarding its treatment regimens and its refractory nature in some cases. A 32-year-old Persian White man visited his private hematologist complaining of recent episodes of epistaxis and appearance of petechial lesions 24 hours after receiving a meningococcal vaccine. He had a history of immune thrombocytopenic purpura 13 years before his presentation. Based on his history and laboratory findings, his condition was diagnosed as a relapse of immune thrombocytopenic purpura and was managed accordingly. He did not respond to first-line corticosteroid regimens and later developed neurological symptoms as recurrent episodes of hypersomnia and hyperphagia. After a complete clinical and paraclinical evaluation and ruling out other possible conditions, he was given a diagnosis of Kleine-Levin syndrome. He was followed up for his immune thrombocytopenic purpura and received different treatment regimens none of which were adequately successful except intravenous immunoglobulin that was only temporarily effective. He has had 4 documented self-limited episodes of Kleine-Levin syndrome since his initial presentation. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura may be associated with meningococcal vaccination in adulthood. Responses to treatment in immune thrombocytopenic purpura vary among patients. Our patient only had a transient acceptable response to intravenous immunoglobulin while all other options failed to improve his platelet count. Concurrence of immune thrombocytopenic purpura and Kleine-Levin syndrome supports the role of autoimmunity as the proposed pathophysiological mechanism of

  13. Immunologic thrombocytopenic purpura in patients at risk for AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpatkin, S

    1987-06-01

    HIV-seropositive homosexuals, narcotic addicts and hemophiliacs develop a new syndrome of immunologic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) which is clinically indistinguishable from classic autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura (ATP) with respect to increased megakaryocytes in the bone marrow, peripheral destruction of antibody-coated platelets, negative serology for SLE, response to treatment with prednisone and/or splenectomy. Eleven of 79 homosexual patients have developed AIDS 2 to 43 months after the diagnosis of ITP (mean, 22 months). The mechanism of the ITP appears to be different in homosexuals and narcotic addicts when compared to classic ATP. Homosexuals and narcotic addicts have markedly elevated platelet-bound IgG and C3C4 (2.5-4-fold ATP levels), PEG-precipitable circulating immune complexes and anti-F(ab')2 antibodies (absent in ATP). There is no inverse relationship between platelet-bound IgG and platelet count and platelet antibody is usually not elutable from washed platelets as is the case with classic ATP. Homosexual patients do not have 7S platelet antibody in their sera as do classic ATP patients, but appear to have immune complex deposition on their platelets, possibly due to the presence of anti-F(ab')2 antibodies. Narcotic addict patients do have detectable 7S platelet antibody but also appear to have immune complex deposition on their platelets, possibly due to anti-F(ab')2 antibodies. The anti-F(ab')2 antibodies are of the IgG class. They react with autologous, homologous patient and healthy control F(ab')2 fragments. Some anti-F(ab')2 antibodies have broad reactivity, others are more limited. It is postulated that some of the anti-F(ab')2 antibodies may be responsible for the thrombocytopenia.

  14. Incidence of childhood primary immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashigawa, Masamune; Maeyama, Takatoshi; Yoshino, Ayako; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Ito, Mitsue; Maji, Tomoaki; Ichimi, Ryouji

    2015-10-01

    There is a discrepancy in the reported incidence of childhood immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) between Europe (2.9-5.3 per 100 000 persons) and Japan (1.91). Ise district is a suitable area in which to conduct epidemiological study because there is little fluctuation in the sociodemographic factors. We performed a retrospective population-based study to clarify the incidence of primary childhood ITP. We calculated person-years for children aged <15 years based on the Ise district demographics between 2002 and 2012. The calculated person-years were 298 533. The number of hospitalized patients in Ise district was 25 (M/F, 14/11) during the study period. The calculated incidence was therefore 8.4 per 100 000 person-years. It is possible that the difference in incidence between the present calculation and that of the European studies is due to variation in accuracy and/or registration criteria between the studies. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  15. Hand-assisted laparoscopic splenectomy for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwase, K; Higaki, J; Yoon, H E; Mikata, S; Tanaka, Y; Takahashi, T; Hatanaka, K; Tamaki, T; Hori, S; Mitsuda, N; Kamiike, W

    2001-02-01

    A successful case of a hand-assisted laparoscopic splenectomy with low-pressure pneumoperitoneum for autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura in a patient at 23 weeks' gestation is reported. Preoperative splenic arterial embolization was performed on the same day as the operation using painless contour embolic material and super-absorbent polymer microspheres. The abdominal wall retraction method first was applied to avoid the effects of pneumoperitoneum on systemic hemodynamic alterations. However, a sufficient surgical view could not be obtained, as the intra-abdominal organs were elevated because of the enlarged uterus. A surgical view with 4 to 6-mm Hg pneumoperitoneum was available for the hand-assisted splenectomy. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient vaginally delivered a healthy infant. A hand-assisted laparoscopic splenectomy with low-pressure pneumoperitoneum after splenic arterial embolization would be feasible for patients with autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura during a relatively advanced pregnancy.

  16. A dengue infection without bleeding manifestations in an adult with immune thrombocytopenic purpura

    OpenAIRE

    Ehelepola, N. D. B.; Gunawardhana, M. B. K.; Sudusinghe, T. N.; Sooriyaarachchi, S. K. D.; Manchanayake, S. P.; Kalupahana, K. L. R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dengue is the most prevalent and fast spreading arboviral infection affecting people. No specific drug is available to treat dengue. Thrombocytopenia with potential of serious hemorrhages is one of the hall mark features of dengue. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura is an autoimmune disease causing thrombocytopenia. If a patient with that gets dengue, we expect severe thrombocytopenia with bleeding manifestations. Only a handful of such cases were reported before, and they were manage...

  17. A rare association of localized scleroderma type morphea, vitiligo, autoimmune hypothyroidism, pneumonitis, autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura and central nervous system vasculitis. Case report.

    OpenAIRE

    Bonilla Abadía, Fabio; Muñoz Buitrón, Evelyn; Ochoa, Carlos D.; Carrascal, Edwin; Cañas Dávila, Carlos Alberto

    2012-01-01

    The localized scleroderma (LS) known as morphea, presents a variety of clinical manifestations that can include systemic involvement. Current classification schemes divide morphea into categories based solely on cutaneous morphology, without reference to systemic disease or autoimmune phenomena. This classification is likely incomplete. Autoimmune phenomena such as vitiligo and Hashimoto thyroiditis associated with LS have been reported in some cases suggesting an autoimmune basis. To our kno...

  18. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura: MR demonstration of reversible brain abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Aprile, P.; Carella, A.; Pagliarulo, R. (Univ. of Bari (Italy)); Farchi, G. (Oncology Institute, Bari (Italy))

    1994-01-01

    We report a case of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura evaluated by MR, Multiple hyperintense foci on the TS-weighted images, observed principally in the brain stem and in the region of the basal nuclei, and neurologic signs disappeared after 15 days of therapy. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  19. H. pylori infection in childhood chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neefjes, Veronica M. E.; Heijboer, Harriët; Tamminga, Rienk Y. J.

    2007-01-01

    Several studies have reported remission of immune thrombocytopenic purpura ( ITP) after eradication of a coexistent Helicobacter pylori infection in adults. Data in children are limited. Here we report the results of a prospective study of Helicobacter pylori determination and eradication in

  20. Psychosocial impact of chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura : A parents' view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamminga, RYJ; Kamps, WA; Poortman, G.H.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose To collect information from the parents on the psychosocial impact of childhood chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) and to improve the counseling of these parents. Patients and methods Parents of 31 children with chronic ITP completed a mail questionnaire; parents of 28 out of

  1. A survey of the management of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-11-04

    Nov 4, 2008 ... Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is the most common bleeding disorder of childhood. It consists of a persistent decrease in the platelet count to less than 150X109/l, caused by autoantibodies that bind to thrombocytes and thus trigger their premature destruction by the reticuloendothelial system ...

  2. A survey of the management of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-11-04

    Nov 4, 2008 ... ournalof Child. H e alth. Introduction. Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is the most common bleeding disorder of childhood. Aim. To describe the management of ITP in South Africa. Methods. A survey was sent to 410 doctors in the country, describing four different scenarios in children newly ...

  3. A case of refractory thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura treated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a rare, life-threaten- ing disorder that occurs due to deficiency of ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with a thrombospondin type 1 motif, member. 13), which is a von Willebrand factor (VWF) cleaving protein.[1]. The absent or severely reduced activity ...

  4. Splenectomy for the treatment of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kappers-Klunne, MC; Wijermans, P; Fijnheer, R; Croockewit, AJ; van der Holt, B; de Wolf, JTM; Lowenberg, B; Brand, A

    Plasma exchange is the treatment of choice for patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and results in remission in >80% of the cases. Treatment of patients who are refractory to plasma therapy or have relapsing disease is difficult. Splenectomy has been a therapeutic option in these

  5. Sirolimus for Autoimmune Disease of Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-02

    Autoimmune Pancytopenia; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS); Evans Syndrome; Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune; Autoimmune Neutropenia; Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic; Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Rheumatoid Arthritis

  6. High P-glycoprotein-mediated export observed in patients with a history of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Adam S; Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna; Mazza, BethAnne; Simm, Maciej; Gorlick, Richard; Bussel, James

    2002-09-01

    Studies have suggested that high P-glycoprotein expression in lymphocytes from patients with autoimmune disorders may affect disease outcome. Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) and Evans' syndrome are widely thought to be autoimmune processes, however, the precise mechanisms remain unknown. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with refractory or recurrent ITP or Evans' syndrome were studied using the rhodamine 123 flow cytometric assay to investigate functional export levels. Lymphocytes from ITP and Evans' syndrome patients showed a significantly decreased ability to retain rhodamine, suggesting increased export protein function. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction distinguished P-glycoprotein as the likely export protein.

  7. Acquired Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura in a Patient with Pernicious Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Kumar Pandey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP has been associated with different autoimmune disorders. However, its association with pernicious anemia is rarely reported. Case Report. A 46-year-old male presented with blood in sputum and urine for one day. The vitals were stable. The physical examination was significant for icterus. Lab tests’ results revealed leukocytosis, macrocytic anemia, severe thrombocytopenia, renal dysfunction, and unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. He had an elevated LDH, low haptoglobin levels with many schistocytes, nucleated RBCs, and reticulocytes on peripheral smear. Low ADAMTS13 activity (<10% with elevated ADAMTS13 antibody clinched the diagnosis of severe acquired TTP, and plasmapheresis was started. There was an initial improvement in his hematological markers, which were however not sustained on discontinuation of plasmapheresis. For his refractory TTP, he was resumed on daily plasmapheresis and Rituximab was started. Furthermore, the initial serum Vitamin B12 and reticulocyte index were low in the presence of anti-intrinsic factor antibody. So with the concomitant diagnosis of pernicious anemia, Vitamin B12 was supplemented. The rest of the immunological workups were negative. Subsequently, his symptoms resolved and his hematological parameters improved. Discussion. While pernicious anemia can masquerade as TTP, an actual association between the two can also occur and needs further evaluation and characterization.

  8. Vertebral Artery Thrombosis in Chronic Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakaria Hindi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP is an autoimmune hematological disorder that causes decreased production and destruction of platelets leading to thrombocytopenia. Although thrombocytopenia usually causes hemorrhagic problems, thrombotic events like strokes, although rare, can still occur. Management of thrombotic events in patients with ITP differs from that of patients with normal platelet count function and count. Case Description. A 32-year-old female with a history of ITP presented with ischemic stroke. The patient was treated in the hospital with IV immunoglobulin, discharged to a rehabilitation facility, and had complete resolution of symptoms when examined at a follow-up visit 3 months later. Conclusion. Although stroke in patients with ITP is very rare due to thrombocytopenia, it has been reported in several other published cases and is likely associated with increased platelet microparticle levels, a byproduct of platelet destruction. While usage of antiplatelet therapy in such patients is debated, immunosuppression therapy has been the mainstay treatment in all published cases.

  9. Congenital ADAMTS13 deficiency: a rare mimicker of immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero, Victor; Garcia-Pose, Araceli; Barrios-Tascon, Ana; Pacheco-Cumani, Monica

    2014-11-01

    Congenital ADAMTS13 deficiency is a rare disease that leads to recurrent episodes of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. We report a case that mimicked a recurring immune thrombocytopenic purpura in a child. Mild cases of ADAMTS13 deficiency may be initially confused with immune thrombocytopenic purpura if hemolytic anemia is not severe and renal or neurological symptoms are not present. Fresh frozen plasma is the treatment of choice in acute thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura in ADAMTS13-deficient patients. The best long-term treatment for slightly symptomatic cases remains to be elucidated. Recombinant human ADAMTS13 factor will be a promising option when commercially available.

  10. Spontaneous intracranial haemorrhage in children with chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muda, Z; Ibrahim, H; Abdulrahman, E J; Mahfuzah, M; Othman, I S; Asohan, T; Menon, B S

    2014-12-01

    Spontaneous intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) is a rare complication of chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) in children. We report four patients with cITP who developed ICH. The latency between onset of ITP and ICH varied from 1-8 years. All our patients were profoundly thrombocytopenic (platelet count of <10 x 109/l) at the time of their intracranial bleed. The presenting features and management are discussed. All patients survived, three had complete neurological recovery while one had a minimal residual neurological deficit.

  11. Recurrent Acute Myocardial Infarction in Patients with Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengyi Shen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP, also known as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, is an acquired immune-mediated disease of adults and children characterized by a transient or persistent decrease of platelets and, depending upon the degree of thrombocytopenia, an increased risk of bleeding. The use of standard treatments for acute myocardial infarction (AMI, such as antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants, pose serious problems in patients with ITP due to the potential higher risk of bleeding complications. There are no current guidelines available for management of ITP patients with AMI. In this brief review of the limited available literature, we discuss the proposed pathophysiological link between ITP and arterial thrombosis and the challenging medical and interventional treatment of these patients.

  12. Chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) in Kenyan Africans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukiibi, J M; Kyobe, J

    1982-08-01

    Forty-two African patients with chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) seen at the Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya between June 1975 and June 1981 were used in this study. The disease appears to behave no differently from that in Western populations with regard to clinical and haematological features. Specific problems related to the disease in an African setting and the clinical significance of recognizing the disorder especially in a tropical environment are briefly pointed out.

  13. Platelet survival in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and response to splenectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, M.E.; Verhaeghe, R.; Devos, P.

    Platelet survival combined with surface counting was performed in 9 patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, resistent to steroid therapy. All patients had a markedly enhanced platelet turnover, five of them showed an augmented trapping of radioactivity over the spleen compared to liver and heart. These five patients underwent splenectomy: the platelet count increased in all of them but this increase was not always sustained. (Author) [pt

  14. Young Ischemic Stroke as Presentation of Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Najib Azmi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP is a rare disorder with an estimated incidence of 3 - 7/1,000,000. It is an autoimmune disorder characterized by fever, neurological signs, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and renal failure. This case report will describe a young lady who presented with acute middle cerebral artery infarct and was subsequently diagnosed to have TTP. Therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE did not improve the neurological deficit. This case highlights the importance of recognizing TTP as a possible differential diagnosis in young onset stroke.

  15. Severe Thrombocytopenic Purpura in a Child with Brucellosis: Case Presentation and Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perogiannaki, Aikaterini; Chaliasos, Nikolaos

    2017-01-01

    Brucellosis is still endemic and a significant public health problem in many Mediterranean countries, including Greece. It is a multisystemic disease with a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations including hematological disorders, such as anemia, pancytopenia, leucopenia, and thrombocytopenia. Thrombocytopenia is usually moderate and attributed to bone marrow suppression or hypersplenism. Rarely, autoimmune stimulation can cause severe thrombocytopenia with clinically significant hemorrhagic manifestations. We present the case of a girl with severe thrombocytopenic purpura as one of the presenting symptoms of Brucella melitensis infection. Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin and the appropriate antimicrobial agents promptly resolved the thrombocyte counts. A review of similar published cases is also presented. PMID:28127481

  16. Severe Thrombocytopenic Purpura in a Child with Brucellosis: Case Presentation and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandros Makis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is still endemic and a significant public health problem in many Mediterranean countries, including Greece. It is a multisystemic disease with a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations including hematological disorders, such as anemia, pancytopenia, leucopenia, and thrombocytopenia. Thrombocytopenia is usually moderate and attributed to bone marrow suppression or hypersplenism. Rarely, autoimmune stimulation can cause severe thrombocytopenia with clinically significant hemorrhagic manifestations. We present the case of a girl with severe thrombocytopenic purpura as one of the presenting symptoms of Brucella melitensis infection. Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin and the appropriate antimicrobial agents promptly resolved the thrombocyte counts. A review of similar published cases is also presented.

  17. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura in ulcerative colitis: a case report and systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhash Chandra

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Over 100 extraintestinal manifestations are reported in ulcerative colitis (UC. A commonly reported hematological manifestation is autoimmune hemolytic anemia. On rare occasions, immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP has been reported with UC. The presence of thrombocytopenia can complicate the clinical scenario as the number of bloody bowel movements is an important indicator of disease activity in UC. A proposed theory for this association is antigenic mimicry between a platelet surface antigen and bacterial glycoprotein. We are reporting a case of UC and associated ITP managed successfully with anti-TNF therapy. We also performed a systemic review of case reports and a case series reporting this association.

  18. Severe Staphylococcus aureus Endocarditis Presenting as Peripartum Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Kieran L; Osmond, Mark; Badiwala, Mitesh; Sermer, Mathew; Lapinsky, Stephen E

    2016-11-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a life-threatening illness that occurs in both pregnant and non-pregnant women. Several other conditions can mimic the disease, which makes the diagnosis challenging. We describe a case of severe Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis that initially presented as peripartum TTP in a 39-year-old woman at 29+6 weeks' gestation. We give an overview of the diagnostic considerations and management of thrombocytopenia in pregnancy and review the literature related to TTP and peripartum infective endocarditis. Given the significant differences in definitive therapies for the spectrum of thrombocytopenic conditions that occur in pregnancy, timely and accurate diagnosis of TTP is critical for optimal management. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada/La Société des obstétriciens et gynécologues du Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Celiac Disease Presenting with Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Sarbay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is an immunological disorder. Clinical manifestations occur as a result of intestinal mucosa damage and malabsorption. CD is also associated with extraintestinal manifestations and autoimmune disorders. The coexistence of CD and autoimmune diseases has been described before. In this article, a patient with CD presenting with thrombocytopenia is discussed.

  20. Accessory spleen compromising response to splenectomy for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambriz, P.; Munoz, R.; Quintanar, E.; Sigler, L.; Aviles, A.; Pizzuto, J.

    1985-01-01

    Accessory spleens were sought in 28 patients who had undergone splenectomy for chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), using a variety of techniques. Abdominal scintigraphy with autologous erythrocytes labeled with Tc-99m and opsonized with anit-D IgG (radioimmune method) proved to be most useful, clearly demonstrating one or more accessory spleens in 12 cases (43%). Computed tomography (CT) was also helpful. Four out of five patients demonstrated an increased platelet count following surgery, the effectiveness of which was illustrated by the radioimmune scan. Patients who have had splenectomy for chronic ITP should be scanned using radioimmune techniques and CT to determine whether an accessory spleen is present

  1. A case of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura induced by acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arimoto M

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Miyoko Arimoto1, Yutaka Komiyama2, Fumiko Okamae1, Akemi Ichibe1, Setsuko Teranishi1, Hirohiko Tokunaga1, Keiko Nakaya3, Michie Fujiwara3, Manabu Yamaoka4, Shuji Onishi4, Rie Miyamoto5, Naoto Nakamichi5, Shosaku Nomura51Blood Transfusion Unit, Kansai Medical University Takii Hospital, 2Department of Clinical Sciences and Laboratory Medicine, Kansai Medical University, 3Clinical Medical Technology Unit, Kansai Medical University Takii Hospital, 4Blood Transfusion Unit, Kansai Medical University Hirakata Hospital, 5First Department of Internal Medicine, Kansai Medical University, Moriguchi, JapanAbstract: Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP is a multisystemic microvascular disorder that may be caused by an imbalance between unusually large von Willebrand factor multimers and the cleaving protease ADAMTS13. In acquired TTP, especially in secondary TTP with various underlying diseases, the diagnosis is difficult because there are many cases that do not exhibit severe deficiency of ADAMTS13 or raised levels of ADAMST13 inhibitors. It is well known that collagen disease, malignancy, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation can be underlying conditions that induce TTP. However, TTP induced by acute pancreatitis, as experienced by our patient, has rarely been reported. Our patient completely recovered with treatments using steroids and plasma exchange (PE only. In cases where patients develop acute pancreatitis with no apparent causes for hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia, the possibility of TTP should be considered. Treatments for TTP including PE should be evaluated as soon as a diagnosis is made.Keywords: thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, ADAMTS13, acute pancreatitis, plasma exchange

  2. Pituitary apoplexy with optic tract oedema and haemorrhage in a patient with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenthall, R.; Jaspan, T. [Univ. Hospital Nottingham (United Kingdom). Dept. of Radiology; Gonugunta, V. [Department of Neurosurgery, Univ. Hospital Nottingham, Queen' s Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2001-02-01

    Bilateral optic tract oedema, left optic tract haemorrhage and subarachnoid haemorrhage occurred in a 70-year-old man with pituitary apoplexy associated with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. Left optic tract haemorrhage was confirmed on MRI. (orig.)

  3. Acute Kidney Injury, Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura, and the Infection That Binds Them Together: Disseminated Histoplasmosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Pooja; Treece, Jennifer; Onweni, Chidinma; Pai, Vandana; Arikapudi, Sowminya; Kallur, Lakshmi; Moorman, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Untreated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can be complicated by opportunistic infections, including disseminated histoplasmosis (DH). Although endemic to portions of the United States and usually benign, DH can rarely act as an opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patients presenting with uncommon complications such as acute kidney injury and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. We report a rare presentation of DH presenting with acute kidney injury and immune thrombocytopenic purpura in an immunocompromised patient with HIV. PMID:29276711

  4. [Bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia associated with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presas, J L; Piriz, J; Serra, S L; Paz, E D; Allievi, A; Kartin, D; Olmedo, G

    1998-01-01

    We report a case of a 35 year-old woman with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) who, under treatment with immunosuppressive drugs, developed bilateral interstitial pulmonary disease. Previously she had been splenectomized and treated with corticosteroids and cyclosporin. During the clinical course, the patient developed alterations of the hepatogram and presented a positive serology for Epstein-Barr virus. The lung biopsy showed the histologic pattern of obliterative bronchiolitis, interstitial inflammatory infiltration and intraalveolar pneumonia (BOOP). We could not find in the literature a previous report in which ITP was associated with BOOP. Of interest was the spontaneous remission of the pulmonary disease after suppression of cyclosporin and positive serology for Epstein-Barr virus.

  5. Classical management of refractory adult immune (idiopathic) thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, R

    2002-03-01

    Treatment of chronic immune (idiopathic) thrombocytopenic purpura with corticosteroids and/or splenectomy results in safe platelet counts in over 70% of patients without additional treatment. Therapy of patients who are refractory to these two treatments may be difficult. The treatment approach to refractory ITP patients, described in this report, is arbitrarily divided into four levels: levels 1 through 3 represent treatments with increasing side effects; level 4 therapy may be tried when the others have failed. Patients undergoing these treatments may require concomitant intravenous gammaglobulin, high-dose corticosteroids or platelets, to maintain the platelet count in the setting of mucosal bleeding or severe thrombocytopenia. Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. ADAMTS13 and von Willebrand Factor in Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, X. Long

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenesis of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) was a mystery for over half a century until the discovery of ADAMTS13. ADAMTS13 is primarily synthesized in the liver, and its main function is to cleave von Willebrand factor (VWF) anchored on the endothelial surface, in circulation, and at the sites of vascular injury. Deficiency of plasma ADAMTS13 activity (20%) in other forms of thrombotic microangiopathy secondary to hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation, infection, and disseminated malignancy or in hemolytic uremic syndrome. Plasma infusion or exchange remains the initial treatment of choice to date, but novel therapeutics such as recombinant ADAMTS13 and gene therapy are under development. Moreover, ADAMTS13 deficiency has been shown to be a risk factor for the development of myocardial infarction, stroke, cerebral malaria, and preeclampsia. PMID:25587650

  7. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura secondary to cytomegalovirus infection: A case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bessy S Flores Chang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP is defined as an acquired thrombocytopenia with antibodies detected against platelet surface antigens, and it is the most common form of thrombocytopenia in otherwise asymptomatic adults. ITP secondary to an underlying condition is a diagnosis of exclusion that is essential to establish for treatment efficacy. Secondary thrombocytopenia caused by Cytomegalovirus (CMV is common, however case reports associated with diagnosis in immunocompetent adults are rare, and to the best of our knowledge only 20 publications have been associated with this diagnosis. Our report is based on a clinical presentation of a 37 year old female complaining of petechiae, heavy menses, shortness of breath and a platelet count of 1 X 109 /L. Treatment with IVIG and steroids failed to improve platelet count. Subsequently, an infectious laboratory workup was performed, detecting CMV infection, and treatment with antiviral agents was initiated, causing platelet count to increase as viral load decreased.

  8. Adenocarcinoma of the lung presenting as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Dirweesh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP usually presents as severe microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA and thrombocytopenia in a previously healthy individual. It occurs in approximately three in one million adults and 1 in 10 million children annually. The incidence is increased in females and blacks. Diagnosing TTP and initiating therapy with plasma exchange is a must to avoid preventable complications. Acquired thromotic microangiopathy has been linked to collagen vascular diseases, use of certain medications, organ transplants, infections, pregnancy and cancer. We report a rare case of a 56-year-old African American male diagnosed with TTP who found to have an asymptomatic adenocarcinoma of the lung. Prompt cancer management resulted in completed remission of the thrombotic microangiopathy.

  9. Childhood hepatitis A virus infection associated with immune thrombocytopenic purpura: Report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswajit Biswas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis A virus (HAV infection is a benign, self-limited gastrointestinal infection of the children belonging to the developing countries. Extra-intestinal, especially autoimmune hematological manifestations rarely develop during the course of infection in children. We describe two children, aged 8 months and 5 years who developed immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP during the course of otherwise uncomplicated HAV infection. In both children, bleeding secondary to thrombocytopenia was the initial presentation. An 8-month-old infant was anicteric at presentation and HAV infection was discovered during the course of investigations. Both were treated with platelet concentrates and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy successfully. HAV should be included in the differentials in any child (including infants who presents with ITP, even in the absence of well-recognized features of the disease.

  10. TPO receptor agonist for chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yan; Duan, Xin; Xu, Jiajun; Ni, Xun

    2011-07-06

    Chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an acquired autoimmune disorder that is characterized predominantly by a low platelet count. Thrombopoietin (TPO) receptor agonists increase production of platelets by stimulating the TPO receptor in people with chronic ITP. To determine the efficacy and safety of TPO receptor agonists in chronic ITP patients. We searched MEDLINE (from 1950 to March 2011), EMBASE (from 1974 to March 2011), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 3) to identify all randomized trials in chronic ITP. We also contacted authors of included studies and TPO receptor agonists manufacturers. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing TPO receptor agonists alone, or in combination with other drugs, to placebo, no treatment, other drugs, splenectomy or another TPO receptor agonist in patients with chronic ITP. Two review authors independently screened papers, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias in the included studies. Six trials with 808 patients were included. Five studies compared TPO receptor agonists with placebo (romiplostim: 100, eltrombopag: 299, placebo: 175); one study compared TPO receptor agonists with standard of care (SOC) (romiplostim: 157; SOC: 77). SOC included a variety of therapies, such as glucocorticoid, anti-D immune globulin, intravenous immune globulin, rituximab, azathioprine, and so on. Overall survival, one of our primary outcomes, was not studied by these RCTs and we could not estimate number needed to treat (NNT). Another primary outcome, improving significant bleeding events, did not reveal any significant differences between the TPO receptor agonists group and the control group (placebo or SOC) (versus placebo risk ratio (RR) 0.48, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.20 to 1.15; versus SOC RR 0.49, 95% CI 0.15 to 1.63).For secondary outcomes, TPO receptor agonists statistically significantly improved overall platelet response (versus placebo RR

  11. Evidence for a role of anti-ADAMTS13 autoantibodies despite normal ADAMTS13 activity in recurrent thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Froehlich-Zahnd, Rahel; George, James N.; Vesely, Sara K.; Terrell, Deirdra R.; Aboulfatova, Khatira; Dong, Jing-Fei; Luken, Brenda M.; Voorberg, Jan; Budde, Ulrich; Sulzer, Irmela; Lämmle, Bernhard; Kremer Hovinga, Johanna A.

    2012-01-01

    Severe ADAMTS13 deficiency is a critical component of the pathogenesis of idiopathic thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura but is found only in about 60% of patients clinically diagnosed with this disease. Over a period of 8 years and six episodes of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura we studied the

  12. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura: pathogenesis, diagnosis and potential novel therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, M; McDaniel, J K; Zheng, X L

    2017-10-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), a potentially fatal clinical syndrome, is primarily caused by autoantibodies against the von Willebrand factor (VWF)-cleaving metalloprotease ADAMTS-13. In general, severe deficiency of plasma ADAMTS-13 activity ( 10 IU dL -1 ) in a similar clinical context supports an alternative diagnosis such as atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) or other types of TMA. Prompt differentiation of TTP from other causes of TMA is crucial for the initiation of an appropriate therapy to reduce morbidity and mortality. Although plasma infusion is often sufficient for prophylaxis or treatment of hereditary TTP due to ADAMTS-13 mutations, daily therapeutic plasma exchange remains the initial treatment of choice for acquired TTP with demonstrable autoantibodies. Immunomodulatory therapies, including corticosteroids, rituximab, vincristine, cyclosporine, cyclophosphamide and splenectomy, etc., should be considered to eliminate autoantibodies for a sustained remission. Other emerging therapeutic modalities, including recombinant ADAMTS-13, adeno-associated virus (AAV) 8-mediated gene therapy, platelet-delivered ADAMTS-13, and antagonists targeting the interaction between platelet glycoprotein 1b and VWF are under investigation. This review highlights the recent progress in our understanding of the pathogenesis and diagnosis of, and current and potential novel therapies for, hereditary and acquired TTP. © 2017 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  13. Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Induced Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlos Z. Oregel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 21-year-old male presented to the emergency department after a 5-day history of recurrent vomiting and decreased urine output. History revealed ingestion of ibuprofen. During the diagnostic workup, the following was identified: white blood cell count 13.4 (x10(3/mcL, hemoglobin 11.9 (x10(6/mcL with an MCV of 73 fL, hematocrit 34% and platelets were 31,000/mcL, sodium of 130 mmol/L, potassium of 5.1 mmol/L, chloride of 83 mmol/L, bicarbonate of 21 mmol/L, blood urea nitrogen of 184 mg/dL and creatinine of 19.1 mg/dL. He was later diagnosed with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP based on the fact that he presented with most components of the TTP pentad (except for fever, which included altered mental status, acute kidney injury, thrombocytopenia, and evidence of red cell fragmentation and his ADAMTS13 level was found to be less than 10% prior to therapy. The patient then received plasma exchange, oral corticosteroids, and hemodialysis, which led to a full recovery of platelet count and renal function.

  14. Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura in a Child with Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Mostofizadeh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP secondary to diabetic ketoacidosis has been rarely reported and is considered as a rare complication. If left untreated, this condition could be life threatening with considerable morbidity and mortality. Herein, we report a 6-year-old girl with reduced consciousness and respiratory distress with a history of polydipsia and polyuria in the 2 weeks before hospitalization. The patient was initially diagnosed as diabetic ketoacidosis based on clinical and laboratory findings and treated accordingly. After treatment and during hospitalization although she had gained relative consciousness, she experienced seizure and reduced consciousness again. Considering laboratory and clinical findings and the patient's underlying conditions (thrombocytopenia, renal failure, and high lactate dehydrogenase, TTP was suspected although ADAMTS13 test could not be done. Treatment with plasmapheresis was initiated, and after 48 h, the patient was conscious, and laboratory indices became normal within a few days. The patient was discharged after full recovery. TTP should be considered as a rare complication of diabetic ketoacidosis in patients with thrombocytopenia, renal failure, and reduced consciousness and should be immediately treated.

  15. Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura in a Child with Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostofizadeh, Neda; Arefnia, Serajaddin; Hashemipour, Mahin; Dehkordi, Elham Hashemi

    2018-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) secondary to diabetic ketoacidosis has been rarely reported and is considered as a rare complication. If left untreated, this condition could be life threatening with considerable morbidity and mortality. Herein, we report a 6-year-old girl with reduced consciousness and respiratory distress with a history of polydipsia and polyuria in the 2 weeks before hospitalization. The patient was initially diagnosed as diabetic ketoacidosis based on clinical and laboratory findings and treated accordingly. After treatment and during hospitalization although she had gained relative consciousness, she experienced seizure and reduced consciousness again. Considering laboratory and clinical findings and the patient's underlying conditions (thrombocytopenia, renal failure, and high lactate dehydrogenase), TTP was suspected although ADAMTS13 test could not be done. Treatment with plasmapheresis was initiated, and after 48 h, the patient was conscious, and laboratory indices became normal within a few days. The patient was discharged after full recovery. TTP should be considered as a rare complication of diabetic ketoacidosis in patients with thrombocytopenia, renal failure, and reduced consciousness and should be immediately treated. PMID:29531931

  16. [Treatment and results of therapy in chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasić, J; Milenović, M; Drasković, S; Vukicević, T; Macukanović, L; Kitić, Lj; Bakić, M

    1994-01-01

    Basic principles in the therapy of chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura are glucocorticoides and splenectomy. Other measures: Intravenous high doses gamma globulin therapy, attenuated androgenes, immunosupresive drugs and plasmaferesis are less effective. During the period of 1989-1992 we treated 34 patients. From 34 patients, 23 were women and 11 were men. We treated patients primarily by prednisolon approximaly for 2 - 4 weeks. Rarely we use doses of 3 mg/kg per day for short periods of time (5 to 10 days) or "pulse therapy" of 500 mg per day. Those doses may be effective in elevating platelet count if the response is poor. If response occurs, high dosages of steroides should be tareped to determine the amount that will maintain the platelet count in the range of 30x10(9)/l to 50x10(9)/l (to minimaze the toxic sade effects of steroides). If steroides are ineffective, we perform splenectomy. From 34 treated patients by glucocorticoides, in 16 we got remission and in 11 partial response. We discussed in detailes relationship duration of treatment with glucocorticoides and level of platelets, and also correlation duration of treatment with prognosis. From 6 splenectomized patients 3 were successful. In two patients we applied intravenous gamma globulin therapy and attenuated androgen successfuly. In one patients therapy with gamma globulin, immunosupresive drugs, androgen and other measures was ineffective. In one patients without splenectomy we administrated successfuly gamma globulin therapy and androgen for peroid of two years.

  17. Dapsone for immune thrombocytopenic purpura in children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ashwin P; Patil, Amit S

    2015-01-01

    Dapsone is one of the second line treatments of immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Dapsone is cheap and has response rates comparable to other second line treatment options like azathioprine, danazol, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporine, and vincristine. This retrospective analysis includes 38 patients (out of total 313 patients) of ITP treated with dapsone from 2004 to 2012. All male patients were screened for G6PD deficiency before starting dapsone. Out of 38 patients (12 children and 26 adults), one was newly diagnosed ITP, seven were persistent ITP, and 30 were chronic ITP. Five patients had side effects of dapsone; two required discontinuation due to skin rashes. The average dose of dapsone was 1.57 mg/kg/day and time to response was 57 days (19-108 days). The response was irrespective of previous treatments and response to them. The response rate was 48.6% (complete response = 40.5%). Only two adult patients had sustained response (> 6 months) after dapsone discontinuation. There were no predictors identified for dapsone response. Dapsone is a safe and cheap second-line therapy for ITP with a response rate of about 50% (majority being CR). A response to dapsone is slow, sustained, and relapses are uncommon on therapy. Dapsone withdrawal leads to relapse in most of the patients.

  18. Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura: Etiopathogenesis, Diagnostics and Basic Principles of Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todorović Željko

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP is a clinical syndrome that manifests with thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia and symptoms and signs of kidney and brain damage, but it rarely involves other organs. The main pathophysiological cause of TTP is diminished metalloproteinase ADAMTS13 activity; the main function of ADAMTS13 is to degrade large multimers of the von Willebrand factor. Diminished activity of ADAMTS13 is caused either by a genetic mutation in the gene that codes ADAMTS13 (congenital TTP or by antibodies that block ADAMTS13 enzyme activity or accelerate the degradation of ADAMTS13 (acquired TTP. Clinically, TTP presents most frequently with signs and symptoms of brain and kidney damage with concomitant haemorrhagic syndrome. TTP is suspected when a patient presents with a low platelet count, microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia (negative Coombs tests, low haptoglobine concentration, increased serum concentration of indirect bilirubin and lactate dehydrogenase, increased number of schysocytes in peripheral blood and the typical clinical presentation. A definitive diagnose can be made only by measuring the ADAMTS13 activity. The differential diagnosis in such cases includes both typical and atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome, disseminated intravascular coagulation, HELLP syndrome in pregnant women and other thrombotic microangiopathies. The first line therapy for TTP is plasma exchange. In patients with acquired TTP, in addition to plasma exchange, immunosuppressive medications are used (corticosteroids and rituximab. In patients with hereditary TTP, the administration of fresh frozen plasma is sometimes required.

  19. Interferon-α is not elevated in idiopathic thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanaboonyongcharoen, Phandee; Whinna, Herbert C; Park, Yara A

    2014-12-01

    Idiopathic thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) patients have ADAMTS13 deficiency, which is usually caused by ADAMTS13 autoantibodies. However, the triggering factors for the autoantibody production remain unclear. Interferon-α (IFN-α) is a cytokine involved with many autoimmune processes such as inducing the activation of peripheral dendritic cells and stimulating T cells and B cells. It also plays an important role in some autoimmune diseases. Elevated IFN-α levels have been observed in some TTP patients and previous case reports have shown the occurrence of TTP after IFN-α treatment. Thus, we hypothesized that high levels of IFN-α would correlate with presence of ADAMTS13 autoantibodies. However, we did not observe elevated IFN-α levels in 36 TTP patients (mean 5.29 pg/ml, standard deviation (SD) 26.56 pg/ml) compared to healthy controls (mean 0 pg/ml, SD 0 pg/ml), P = 0.59. IFN-α levels of most patients (94%) were undetectable. Only two patients had increased IFN-α levels and ADAMTS13 autoantibodies were detected in these two patients. Interestingly, both the patients had an underlying autoimmune disease. Although there have been cases of secondary TTP following IFN-α treatment, no evidence supports a role of IFN-α in the development of idiopathic TTP in our patient population. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP or Moschowitz syndrome: a true hematologic emergency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Melis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP is a thrombotic microangiopathy caused by congenital or inherited disorders involving the processing of the ultra-large forms of von Willebrand factor. As a result, platelet-rich microthrombi form in the small arterial vessels of various organs, particularly those of the brain, heart, and kidneys. The idiopathic autoimmune form of TTP is the most common. There are various subgroups of acquired TTP associated with HIV infection, sepsis, pregnancy, autoimmune disease, various disseminated malignancies, and drugs. If not promptly treated, TTP is associated with high mortality, making it a true medical emergency. Materials and methods: The article is based on a review of the literature published between January and October of 2009. Its aim is to clarify the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of TTP. Results: Diagnostic criteria include the presence of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia associated with thrombocytopenia in the absence of other obvious causes. Assays of ADAMTS13 activity and titration of acquired antibodies against this enzyme are indicated in the follow-up of disease and as prognostic indicators. Treatment centers around daily plasma exchange associated with immunosuppressant drug therapy, particularly steroids and more recently the monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody rituximab. Discussion: Despite improved treatment, TTP is still associated with significant mortality (10—20%, particularly when plasma exchange is initiated late. Relapse also occurs in a substantial proportion of patients (10—40% although the frequency of this outcome may be reduced by rituximab therapy.

  1. Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Associated with Mixed Connective Tissue Disease: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Tadeu Damian Souto Filho

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP is a multisystemic disorder characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia, which may be accompanied by fever, renal, or neurologic abnormalities. Cases are divided into acute idiopathic TTP and secondary TTP. Autoimmune diseases, especially systemic lupus erythematosus, in association with TTP have been described so far in many patients. In contrast, TTP occurring in a patient with mixed connected tissue disease (MCTD is extremely rare and has only been described in nine patients. We describe the case of a 42-year-old female with MCTD who developed thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, fever, and neurological symptoms. The patient had a good clinical evolution with infusion of high volume of fresh frozen plasma, steroid therapy, and support in an intensive care unit. Although the occurrence of TTP is rare in MCTD patients, it is important to recognize TTP as a cause of thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia in any patient with autoimmune diseases. Prompt institution of treatment remains the cornerstone of treatment of TTP even if plasma exchange is not available like what frequently happens in developing countries.

  2. [Thymoma with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura preceded by mediastinal hemorrhage; report of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuge, S; Hosokawa, Y; Murakami, Y; Satoh, K

    2002-09-01

    A 62-year-old female with chest and right shoulder pain admitted to a hospital. The chest computed tomography (CT) scan showed a large anterior mediastinum mass with pleural effusion. Thymoma was suspected by percutaneous aspiration biopsy of it. She was referred to our hospital for operation with decreased serum platelet count (7.0 x 10(4)/microliter) and high platelet associated IgG (PA IgG) level (119.5 ng/10(7) cells). Result of bone marrow examination was normal, splenomegaly was not seen and no other autoimmune disease was not detected, so she was thought to have ITP. After giving her intravenous high-dose gamma-globulin and her platelet count increased to normal, operation was done. Extended thymectomy was performed and postoperative course was uneventful. Pathological finding showed the mass mediastinum hematoma in thymus and there found a small thymoma. The hemorrhage was thought to occur from the thymoma. After the operation, her platelet count has not been changed to normal but remained lower level. Though myasthenia gravis, one of the autoimmune disease, improve after total thymectomy, it is thought that idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) could not improve after thymectomy.

  3. A Parturient with Chronic Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura: Anaesthetic Management for Caesarean Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma KS

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP accounts for 4-5% of cases of pregnancy with thrombocytopenia. Their clinical condition may deteriorate during pregnancy subjecting these patients at high risk of bleeding. We report anaesthetic management of a parturient with chronic ITP for caesarean section.

  4. Control of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura by sirolimus in a child with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia and somatic N-RAS mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschan, Michael; Bobrynina, Vlasta; Khachatryan, Lili; Kalinina, Irina; Solopova, Galina; Avdonin, Pavel; Nasedkina, Tatiana; Novichkova, Galina; Maschan, Alexei

    2014-10-01

    We describe an infant who developed juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) at the age of 6 months. Myeloproliferation was effectively controlled by low-dose cytosine arabinoside and 13-cis retinoic acid therapy. Two years after therapy for JMML was stopped, at the age of 5 years, the patient developed autoimmune thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). TTP was transiently controlled by plasma exchange, prednisolone, rituximab, and cyclophosphamide, but relapsed within a short time. Long-term control of TTP was established by sirolimus. Somatic N-RAS G38A→Gly13Asp substitution was restricted to hematopoietic cells. The somatic N-RAS mutation may link myeloproliferation and autoimmunity. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura or immune thrombocytopenia in a sickle cell/β+-thalassemia patient: a rare and challenging condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachaki, Efthymia; Agapidou, Aleka; Neokleous, Nikolaos; Adamidou, Despoina; Vetsiou, Evaggelia; Boura, Panagiota

    2014-10-01

    The diagnosis of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura is one of the possible diagnosis when a patient is admitted with unexpected micro-angiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. The combination of sickle cell/β(+)-thalassemia and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura is rare and triggering. This article describes the poor outcome of a patient with sickle cell/β(+)-thalassemia presenting with gingival bleeding, severe thrombocytopenia and anemia. The patient had normal renal function, no neurological deficit and he was initially treated as immune thrombocytopenic purpura. He eventually died due to multi-organ failure and brain hemorrhage even though he had started plasma exchange sessions. The co-existence of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and sickle cell anemia is making the diagnosis of the former difficult. Early and rapid intervention is critical to the outcome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Hematological long-term results of laparoscopic splenectomy for patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: a case control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berends, F. J.; Schep, N.; Cuesta, M. A.; Bonjer, H. J.; Kappers-Klunne, M. C.; Huijgens, P.; Kazemier, G.

    2004-01-01

    Laparoscopic splenectomy (LS) for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) appears, when compared to open splenectomy (OS), associated with immediate important advantages. However, in a number of patients splenectomy does not lead to an adequate response, or after initial adequate response a

  7. Splenectomy in children with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura : A prospective study of 134 children from the Intercontinental Childhood ITP Study Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuehne, Thomas; Blanchette, Victor; Buchanan, George R.; Ramenghi, Ugo; Donato, Hugo; Tamminga, Rienk Y. J.; Rischewski, Johannes; Berchtold, Willi; Imbach, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Background. Splenectomy is an effective procedure for children and adults with severe or refractory idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Data regarding pediatric patients are limited. Procedure. Sixty-eight Intercontinental Childhood ITP Study Group (ICIS) investigators from 57 institutions in

  8. Platelet Kinetics in Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Patients Treated with Thrombopoietin Receptor Agonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Oliver; Herzig, Eric; Salama, Abdulgabar

    2012-01-01

    Aim Thrombopoietin receptor agonists (Tpo RA) increase platelet counts in the majority of chronic autoimmune thrombocytopenia (idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura; ITP) patients. It is unknown whether this treatment may also improve platelet survival (PS) in these patients. Methods In order to determine platelet survival (PS), autologous platelets were labeled with 111In oxine and retransfused in six patients under treatment with Tpo RA (romiplostim n = 3; eltrombopag n = 3). Results Stable platelet counts of greater than 100 × 103/μl were observed in all 6 patients. Platelet survival was decreased in all cases (mean 2.10 days; range 0.13–3.73 days). No correlation was found between platelet count and PS. Similarly, there was no significant relationship between platelet turnover and platelet count. However, a high platelet turnover, exceeding 25 or three times the norm was observed in 2 patients who presented the lowest PS (0.13 or 0.83 days). Two patients had a moderately shortened PS (1.91 or 2.42 days), and, correspondingly, a moderately increased platelet turnover rate (63,072 or 72,872 platelets/μl/day). Conclusion These results indicate that Tpo RA may not only overcompensate platelet destruction in ITP, but may interfere with other mechanisms, which, in some cases, results in a reduced platelet destruction rate. PMID:22896760

  9. Impact of Helicobacter pylori Eradication Therapy on Platelet Counts in Patients With Chronic Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Mohamadreza

    2015-11-03

    This study was a before and after clinical evaluation of Helicobacter pylori eradication on platelet counts in a group of 23 patients with chronic Idiopathic (Autoimmune) thrombocytopenic purpura (CITP). H. pylori infection was identified in patients by a (13)C-urea breath test and confirmed by an H. pylori stool antigen test. Eradication was conducted in patients testing positive. Infected (n = 10) and uninfected (n = 13) patient groups did not differ with respect to age, gender, history of previous splenectomy, treatment with anti-D, current treatment with corticosteroids, or initial platelet counts. H pylori eradication was successful in eight infected CITP patients, with two patients not responsive to treatment. Compared to the uninfected group, patients in the infected group who responded to eradication therapy had significantly increased platelet counts after six months (56.2 ± 22.2 vs. 233 ± 85.6 ×10(3) million cells/L; P pylori eradication promotes significant platelet count improvement in patients with CITP. Thus, all patients with CITP should be tested and treated for H. pylori infections.

  10. Child-onset and adolescent-onset acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura with severe ADAMTS13 deficiency: a cohort study of the French national registry for thrombotic microangiopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, Bérangère S; Stepanian, Alain; Leblanc, Thierry; Hajage, David; Chambost, Hervé; Harambat, Jérôme; Fouyssac, Fanny; Guigonis, Vincent; Leverger, Guy; Ulinski, Tim; Kwon, Thérésa; Loirat, Chantal; Coppo, Paul; Veyradier, Agnès

    2016-11-01

    %) of 45 patients were given plasma therapy and 21 (47%) received additional rituximab. Four (9%) children died after the first thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura episode. Long-term follow up of the 41 survivors showed that ten (24%) patients relapsed and systemic lupus erythematosus occurred in two (5%) patients. Preemptive rituximab was used in seven (17%) of 41 patients with acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Our study shows that child-onset and adolescent-onset acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura have specific clinical, biological and therapeutic features. Long-term follow-up is crucial to prevent relapses of the disease, to identify the occurrence of autoimmune disorders, and to evaluate consequences on social life. Child-onset and adolescent-onset acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura is a crucial diagnosis in the field of paediatric haematologic cytopenias because it is a life-threatening disease requiring a specific management. Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, France. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of a prototype electronic personal health record for patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiche L

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Laurent Chiche,1 Alessandra Brescianini,1 Julien Mancini,2 Hervé Servy,3 Jean-Marc Durand11Service de Médecine Interne, Centre de Compétence pour la prise en charge des Cytopénies Auto-immunes, Hôpital de la Conception, Marseille, 2Service de Santé Publique, Hôpital de la Timone, Marseille, 3Association AIMSU, Maison des Associations, La Ciotat, FranceBackground: Patients with rare diseases often lack information about the disease itself and appropriate health care, leading to poor quality of life. Personal health records provide health information which can then be shared between multiple health care providers. Personal health records may also offer a tool for capturing patients' reported outcomes, thus enhancing their empowerment and improving communication with health care professionals. We conducted a pilot study to evaluate the usability of Sanoia, a freely accessible personal health record, which was customized for patients with the rare disease, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP.Methods: The Sanoia interface was expanded with ITP-specific tools. A prospective study was conducted at the referent center to evaluate the usability of this new interface (referred to here as the “tool” by patients. Forty-three patients were randomized into groups to use or to not use the tool. Its use was evaluated by a specific questionnaire and by surveying individual patient adherence profiles. Evaluation of health-related quality of life using the ITP patient assessment questionnaire, was performed at baseline and after 1, 3, and 6 months via postal mail.Results: The groups were similar at inclusion in terms of characteristics, including global quality of life. During the study period, the tool was used to update the personal records of 19/28 patients (68%, with a median of two connections to the tool (range 1–12 plus access by various health care professionals (n = 22. In addition, 15/19 (78% patients used the "personal notes" section

  12. CLINICAL FEATURES AND TREATMENT RESPONSE OF IMMUNE THROMBOCYTOPENIC PURPURA IN INFANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ramyar N. Kalantari

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available To determine the clinical features and treatment outcomes of infant with immune thrombo-cytopenic purpura (ITP. Retrospective analysis of 96 infant ITP patients treated from 1995 to 2005. The data abstracted comprised age, gender, clinical features, and treatment outcomes. The 56 male and 40 female infants had a median age of 3 months. Eighty presented with purpura, sixteen with active mucosal bleeding. The median platelet count was 13000 /l. Seventy-seven infants received intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG, eighteen steroids and one patient was observed. Ninty-sex (96% responds to a single course of treatment. Infant with ITP respond favorably to treatment.

  13. Immunochip analysis identifies novel susceptibility loci in the human leukocyte antigen region for acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, I; Ricaño-Ponce, I; Pappalardo, E; Cairo, A; Gorski, M M; Casoli, G; Ferrari, B; Alberti, M; Mikovic, D; Noris, M; Wijmenga, C; Peyvandi, F

    2016-12-01

    Essentials Genetic predisposition to acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (aTTP) is mainly unknown. Genetic risk factors for aTTP were studied by Immunochip analysis and replication study. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) variant rs6903608 conferred a 2.5-fold higher risk of developing aTTP. rs6903608 and HLA-DQB1*05:03 may explain most of the HLA association signal in aTTP. Click to hear Dr Cataland's presentation on acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura SUMMARY: Background Acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a rare, life-threatening thrombotic microangiopathy associated with the development of autoantibodies against the von Willebrand factor-cleaving protease ADAMTS-13. Similarly to what has been found for other autoimmune disorders, there is evidence of a genetic contribution, including the association of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II complex with disease risk. Objective To identify novel genetic risk factors in acquired TTP. Patients/Methods We undertook a case-control genetic association study in 190 European-origin TTP patients and 1255 Italian healthy controls by using the Illumina Immunochip. Replication analysis in 88 Italian cases and 456 controls was performed with single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) TaqMan assays. Results and conclusion We identified one common variant (rs6903608) located within the HLA class II locus that was independently associated with acquired TTP at genome-wide significance and conferred a 2.6-fold increased risk of developing a TTP episode (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.02-3.27, P = 1.64 × 10 -14 ). We also found five non-HLA variants mapping to chromosomes 2, 6, 8 and X that were suggestively associated with the disease: rs9490550, rs115265285, rs5927472, rs7823314, and rs1334768 (nominal P-values ranging from 1.59 × 10 -5 to 7.60 × 10 -5 ). Replication analysis confirmed the association of HLA variant rs6903608 with acquired TTP (pooled P = 3.95 × 10 -19 ). Imputation of classic

  14. Novel platelet-agglutinating protein from a thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura plasma.

    OpenAIRE

    Siddiqui, F A; Lian, E C

    1985-01-01

    A novel platelet-agglutinating protein (PAP) was purified approximately 2,000-fold from the plasma of a patient with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) by ammonium sulfate fractionation, DEAE-Sephacel and concanavalin A-Sepharose chromatographies. On sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, with and without reduction, this preparation revealed a major protein band with a molecular weight of 37,000, and a minor band with a molecular weight of 32,000-34,000. After eluti...

  15. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura: MRI demonstration of persistent small cerebral infarcts after clinical recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruber, O.; Cramon, D.Y. von [Day-Care Clinic for Cognitive Neurology, University of Leipzig (Germany); Max Planck Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, Leipzig (Germany); Wittig, I. [Day-Care Clinic for Cognitive Neurology, University of Leipzig (Germany); Wiggins, C.J. [Max Planck Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, Leipzig (Germany)

    2000-08-01

    Abnormalities in the brain of patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) are infrequent on MRI, often reversible and mainly limited to symptomatic stages of the disease. We report a case in which high-resolution MRI demonstrated multiple persistent small cortical infarcts after clinical remission. High-resolution MRI investigations may detect clinically latent but permanent brain damage, and complement clinical judgement in guiding therapeutic decisions. (orig.)

  16. [Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura in a child with low ADAMTS13 enzyme level].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangenberg, Katrine Bredsdorff; Clasen-Linde, Erik; Poulsen, Anja

    2014-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a rare condition, but important to consider in case of thrombocytopenia and haemolysis. It is imperative to proceed with the correct treatment, in order to ensure a satisfactory outcome. TTP is either acquired or idiopathic. This case report shows that a 14-year-old boy has acquired TTP due to an infection with Campylobacter jejuni and Samonella szentes. Plasma exchange plays an essential role in the treatment of TTP.

  17. Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) in Ethiopian children: clinical findings and response to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedri, A; Abebe, E

    1995-04-01

    This retrospective study provides information on the clinical findings and response to therapy in Ethiopian children with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. Forty-nine cases of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura admitted to the teaching hospital, Ethio-Swedish Children's Hospital (ESCH) in Addis Abeba, Ethiopia between January 1982 and December 1993 were studied. Among these were 31 females and 18 males with a female to male ratio of 1.9:1. The age range was three to 12 years with a mean of seven years. The commonest presenting clinical features were petechiae, epistaxis, gingival and gastro-intestinal bleeding. Twenty-nine patients were treated with prednisolone, out of whom, 27 attained absolute remission. Twenty patients were observed and managed conservatively and attained spontaneous remission. One child went on to develop chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and underwent splenectomy after immunosuppressive treatment failure, while another child is still being followed up with recurrent episodes of thrombocytopenia and epistaxis. No mortality was noted in the review of these series of patients.

  18. Ribosomal and immune transcripts associate with relapse in acquired ADAMTS13-deficient thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Contessa E Edgar

    Full Text Available Approximately 40% of patients who survive acute episodes of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP associated with severe acquired ADAMTS13 deficiency experience one or more relapses. Risk factors for relapse other than severe ADAMTS13 deficiency and ADAMTS13 autoantibodies are unknown. ADAMTS13 autoantibodies, TTP episodes following infection or type I interferon treatment and reported ensuing systemic lupus erythematosus in some patients suggest immune dysregulation. This cross-sectional study asked whether autoantibodies against RNA-binding proteins or peripheral blood gene expression profiles measured during remission are associated with history of prior relapse in acquired ADAMTS13-deficient TTP. Peripheral blood from 38 well-characterized patients with autoimmune ADAMTS13-deficient TTP in remission was examined for autoantibodies and global gene expression. A subset of TTP patients (9 patients, 24% exhibited a peripheral blood gene signature composed of elevated ribosomal transcripts that associated with prior relapse. A non-overlapping subset of TTP patients (9 patients, 24% displayed a peripheral blood type I interferon gene signature that associated with autoantibodies to RNA-binding proteins but not with history of relapse. Patients who had relapsed bimodally expressed higher HLA transcript levels independently of ribosomal transcripts. Presence of any one potential risk factor (ribosomal gene signature, elevated HLA-DRB1, elevated HLA-DRB5 associated with relapse (OR = 38.4; p = 0.0002 more closely than any factor alone or all factors together. Levels of immune transcripts typical of natural killer (NK and T lymphocytes positively correlated with ribosomal gene expression and number of prior episodes but not with time since the most recent episode. Flow cytometry confirmed elevated expression of cell surface markers encoded by these transcripts on T and/or NK cell subsets of patients who had relapsed. These data associate elevated

  19. Helicobacter pylori Eradication in Patients with Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura: A Review and the Role of Biogeography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydman, Galit H.; Davis, Nick; Beck, Paul L.; Fox, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is typically a diagnosis of exclusion, assigned by clinicians after ruling out other identifiable etiologies. Since a report by Gasbarrini et al. in 1998, an accumulating body of evidence has proposed a pathophysiological link between ITP and chronic Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Clinical reports have described a spontaneous resolution of ITP symptoms in about 50% of chronic ITP patients following empirical treatment of H. pylori infection, but response appears to be geography dependent. Studies have also documented that ITP patients in East Asian countries are more likely to express positive antibody titers against H. pylori-specific cytotoxic-associated gene A (CagA), a virulence factor that is associated with an increased risk for gastric diseases including carcinoma. While a definitive mechanism by which H. pylori may induce thrombocytopenia remains elusive, proposed pathways include molecular mimicry of CagA by host autoantibodies against platelet surface glycoproteins, as well as perturbations in the phagocytic activity of monocytes. Traditional treatments of ITP have been largely empirical, involving the use of immunosuppressive agents and immunoglobulin therapy. However, based on the findings of clinical reports emerging over the past 20 years, health organizations around the world increasingly suggest the detection and eradication of H. pylori as a treatment for ITP. Elucidating the exact molecular mechanisms of platelet activation in H. pylori-positive ITP patients, while considering biogeographical differences in response rates, could offer insight into how best to use clinical H. pylori eradication to treat ITP, but will require well-designed studies to confirm the suggested causative relationship between bacterial infection and an autoimmune disease state. PMID:25728540

  20. Helicobacter pylori Eradication in Patients with Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura: A Review and the Role of Biogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydman, Galit H; Davis, Nick; Beck, Paul L; Fox, James G

    2015-08-01

    Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is typically a diagnosis of exclusion, assigned by clinicians after ruling out other identifiable etiologies. Since a report by Gasbarrini et al. in 1998, an accumulating body of evidence has proposed a pathophysiological link between ITP and chronic Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Clinical reports have described a spontaneous resolution of ITP symptoms in about 50% of chronic ITP patients following empirical treatment of H. pylori infection, but response appears to be geography dependent. Studies have also documented that ITP patients in East Asian countries are more likely to express positive antibody titers against H. pylori-specific cytotoxic-associated gene A (CagA), a virulence factor that is associated with an increased risk for gastric diseases including carcinoma. While a definitive mechanism by which H. pylori may induce thrombocytopenia remains elusive, proposed pathways include molecular mimicry of CagA by host autoantibodies against platelet surface glycoproteins, as well as perturbations in the phagocytic activity of monocytes. Traditional treatments of ITP have been largely empirical, involving the use of immunosuppressive agents and immunoglobulin therapy. However, based on the findings of clinical reports emerging over the past 20 years, health organizations around the world increasingly suggest the detection and eradication of H. pylori as a treatment for ITP. Elucidating the exact molecular mechanisms of platelet activation in H. pylori-positive ITP patients, while considering biogeographical differences in response rates, could offer insight into how best to use clinical H. pylori eradication to treat ITP, but will require well-designed studies to confirm the suggested causative relationship between bacterial infection and an autoimmune disease state. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Open heart surgery for cyanotic heart disease in a child with immune thrombocytopenic purpura:a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minati Choudhury

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute immune thrombocytopenic purpura in children, though a benign self limiting condition, at times complicated with life threatening haemorrhage. In spite of bleeding episode it is inevitable that surgical procedure will be performed on patients with this disease. The anaesthetic implications therefore need to be addressed. Although few reports describing the perioperative management of patients with chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura are available, literature regarding open heart surgery for cyanotic heart disease is lacking. We describe the management course and raise some anaesthetic considerations for a two year old child with acute immune thrombocytopenic purpura and tetralogy of Fallot′s who underwent emergency surgical correction of the cardiac problem under extracorporeal circulation.

  2. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and myoglobinuric acute renal failure following radiation therapy in a patient with polymyositis and cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makino, Hirofumi; Nagake, Yoshio; Moriwaki, Kazuhiko; Hirakawa, Shuzo; Katayama, Takaaki; Yanai, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Kiyoshi; Akagi, Tadaatsu; Ota, Zensuke

    1995-01-01

    A 73-year-old woman was admitted to receive radiation treatment for uterine cervical cancer, however a complex series of events ensued, leading to death. She developed an acute exacerbation of polymyositis complicated by thrombocytopenic purpura, rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure. Radiation therapy may have produced an immune disturbance leading to the acute exacerbation of polymyositis. Auto-immune-mediated endothelial damage might have triggered a series of events leading to thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Rhabdomyolysis seemed to be the main cause of acute renal failure. (author)

  3. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and myoglobinuric acute renal failure following radiation therapy in a patient with polymyositis and cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makino, Hirofumi; Nagake, Yoshio; Moriwaki, Kazuhiko; Hirakawa, Shuzo; Katayama, Takaaki; Yanai, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Kiyoshi; Akagi, Tadaatsu; Ota, Zensuke [Okayama Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1995-01-01

    A 73-year-old woman was admitted to receive radiation treatment for uterine cervical cancer, however a complex series of events ensued, leading to death. She developed an acute exacerbation of polymyositis complicated by thrombocytopenic purpura, rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure. Radiation therapy may have produced an immune disturbance leading to the acute exacerbation of polymyositis. Auto-immune-mediated endothelial damage might have triggered a series of events leading to thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Rhabdomyolysis seemed to be the main cause of acute renal failure. (author).

  4. Thyroid and celiac diseases autoantibodies in patients with adult chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Abdullah; Pasa, Semir; Cil, Timucin; Bayan, Kadim; Gokalp, Deniz; Ayyildiz, Orhan

    2008-06-01

    The association of chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (cITP) and thyroid autoimmune diseases (TAD) is a known but an uncommon condition. Celiac disease (CD), which is characterized by malabsorption and villous atrophy that occur as a consequence of the ingestion of wheat gluten may also be related to other autoimmune disorders. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of thyroid anti-microsomal (TAMA) and anti-thyroglobulin (TATA) auto antibodies, anti-gliadin (AGA) IgG, IgA, anti-endomisium (EMA) IgG and IgA antibodies in 74 patients with cITP and in 162 healthy controls. TATA positivity was found in 29, and TAMA positivity in 19 out of 74 patients; and in 16 and 18 out of 162 controls respectively (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.005, respectively). TAD was diagnosed in 29 of cITP patients. AGA IgG positivity was found in 17, and IgA was present in five out of 74 patients; and AGA IgG was found in 19, and IgA was detected in 4 out of 162 controls (p = 0.032 and p = 0.143, respectively). EMA IgG positivity was found in six out of 74 patients and in nine out of 162 control subjects (p = 0.566). EMA IgA positivity was found in two out of 74 patients and in one out of 162 controls (p = 0.232). We showed that the prevalence of TAD and related autoantibodies are higher in patients with cITP. We suggest that, patients with cITP should be followed up for development of TAD. In addition, all CD related auto antibodies were found to be more frequent in patients with cITP, but only the AGA IgG reached to the clinical significance. None of the CD related auto antibody positive patients developed clinically manifested CD. Large-scale designed studies are needed to clarify the long-term impact and importance of these CD related auto antibodies in patients with cITP.

  5. Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma: Bilateral pulmonary nodules associated with chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satti, Mohamed B.; Batouk, Abdelnasir; Ahmad, Mohamed F.; Abdelaal, Mohamed A.; Abdelaziz, Muntasir M.

    2005-01-01

    We report a case of a 30-year-old female who had been treated periodically with steroids for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura ICTP over the last 10 years. Recently, during the course of investigation, she was found to have incidental asymptomatic multiple pulmonary nodules on chest CT. Following a needle biopsy to exclude malignancy, 2 nodules were excised and were histologically confirmed as pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma PHG. The remaining 2 nodules regressed on increasing her dose of steroids. The case is discussed with emphasis on the histological and radiological differential diagnosis, in addition to including ITP among the spectrum of immunologic conditions associated with PHG. (author)

  6. A report of three cases with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) secondary to an occult gastric adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forat, Y.M.; Hashemian, Z.; Nazmieh, H.; Ghadimi, H.R.

    2009-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a disseminated form of thrombotic microangiopathy with clinical findings consisting of fever, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA), thrombocytopenia, fluctuating neurologic impairment and renal dysfunction. However, Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia has been described in association with disseminated malignancies, most commonly adenocarcinoma of the breast or stomach. We present three patients with microangiopathic anemia in whom metastatic cancer was finally diagnosed; however, they died of refractory hemolytic anemia in the end. The occurrence of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia in patients with disseminated malignant in gastric adenocarsinoma is well documented. Therefore, the diagnosis of tumor-associated TTP should be considered in unresponsive TTP patient treated with plasmapheresis. (author)

  7. Surgical treatment of chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: results in 107 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cola, B.; Tonielli, E.; Sacco, S.; Brulatti, M.; Franchini, A.

    1986-07-01

    Between 1972 and 1985, 107 patients with chronic Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura underwent splenectomy. Platelet life span and sites of sequestration were studied with labelled platelets and external scanning. Medical treatment was always of scarce and transient effectiveness and had considerable side effects. Splenectomy had minimal complications and mortality and caused no hazard of overwhelming sepsis in adults. The results of splenectomy were very satisfying, especially when platelet sequestration was mainly splenic (remission in about 90% of patients). Surgical treatment is at present the most effective in patients with chronic ITP.

  8. Fournier's gangrene in a patient receiving treatment for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuda, Junichiro; Honma, Riko; Yahagi, Tomoyasu; Omoto, Eijiro

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of a 68-year-old man who was diagnosed with Fournier's gangrene (FG), which developed during immunosuppresive treatment for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). The patient was administered steroids for ITP but on the 36th day, he developed FG and septic shock. We initiated antibiotic treatment and drained a periproctal abscess immediately. On day 53, extensive drainage to progressive FG and a splenectomy was performed, following which both FG and thrombocytopenia improved. This is the first case of FG has developing in a ITP patient. It appears that high-dose immunoglobulin therapy and splenectomy should be considered earlier especially for a patient complicated with FG.

  9. Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty in a patient with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    OpenAIRE

    Marques, Luis Gustavo M.; Furukawa, Murillo Kenji; Leitão, Thenyson Pereira; Quiñones, José Luis A.; Queiroz, Fernando César de; Tiossi, Rogerio Felippe; Franco Jr, Virgílio Ribeiro; Domingues, Carlos Eduardo M.; Salvadori Jr, Decio

    2005-01-01

    A associação entre a doença arterial coronariana e a púrpura trombocitopênica é rara e implica em algumas dificuldades quando a revascularização se faz necessária. Relatamos um caso dessa associação, com importante comprometimento coronariano, tratado percutaneamente com o implante de stent.The association between coronary heart disease and thrombocytopenic purpura is rare and poses some difficulties when myocardial revascularization is necessary. We report a case with this association and si...

  10. Surgical treatment of chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: results in 107 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cola, B.; Tonielli, E.; Sacco, S.; Brulatti, M.; Franchini, A.

    1986-01-01

    Between 1972 and 1985, 107 patients with chronic Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura underwent splenectomy. Platelet life span and sites of sequestration were studied with labelled platelets and external scanning. Medical treatment was always of scarce and transient effectiveness and had considerable side effects. Splenectomy had minimal complications and mortality and caused no hazard of overwhelming sepsis in adults. The results of splenectomy were very satisfying, especially when platelet sequestration was mainly splenic (remission in about 90% of patients). Surgical treatment is at present the most effective in patients with chronic ITP

  11. Long-term outcomes of laparoscopic splenectomy versus open splenectomy for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yikun; Xu, Jian; Jiao, Chengbin; Cheng, Zhuoxin; Ren, Shiyan

    2014-01-01

    The long-term outcomes of laparoscopic splenectomy (LS) versus open splenectomy (OS) in patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) are not known. A retrospective analysis of 73 patients who underwent splenectomy (32 LS and 41 OS) for refractory ITP between April 2003 and June 2012 was conducted. LS was associated with shorter hospital stay (P = 0.01), less blood loss and blood transfusion during surgery, quicker resumption of oral diet (P splenectomy is not different from that of open splenectomy for patients with ITP.

  12. Tumor necrosis factor-α -308G/A gene polymorphism in Egyptian children with immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sissy, Maha H; El Sissy, A H; Elanwary, Sherif

    2014-07-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an autoimmune disease characterized by increased platelet destruction. Although the cause of ITP remains unclear, it is accepted that both environmental and genetic factors play an important role in the development of the disease. Children with ITP have a T-helper 1-type cytokine pattern with elevated levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) as in most autoimmune diseases. Researchers have shown that polymorphism in the TNF-α gene at position -308 affects gene transcriptions with increased TNF-α production. The current case-control study aimed at detecting the frequency of TNF-α -308G/A gene polymorphism as genetic markers in Egyptian children with ITP, and to clear out their possible role in choosing the treatment protocols of therapy, using PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism assay. Ninety-two ITP patients and 100 age and sex-matched healthy controls were recruited in the study. The results obtained revealed that the frequency of TNF-α -308A/A homotype in ITP patients was significantly higher than that of the controls, and conferred almost six-fold increased risk of ITP acquisition. The polymorphic A allele frequency was significantly higher in ITP patients than in the controls, conferring almost two-fold increased ITP risk. In conclusion, our study suggests the possibility that TNF-α -308 gene polymorphism may contribute to the susceptibility of childhood ITP in Egyptian children.

  13. Quantifying the reduction in immunoglobulin use over time in patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura receiving romiplostim (AMG 531)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pullarkat, Vinod A.; Gernsheirner, Terry B.; Wasser, Jeffrey S.; Newland, Adrian; Guthrie, Troy H.; de Wolf, Joost Th. M.; Stewart, Ron; Berger, Dietmar

    Patients with Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) often require immunoglobulin (Ig) therapy with intravenous 19 (IVIG) or anti-D to prevent or treat the serious bleeding events. Because the thrombopoietin (TPO) mimetic romiplostim (AMG 531; Nplate) elevates platelet counts in patients with chronic

  14. Effects of prednisone and splenectomy in patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura : only splenectomy induces a complete remission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwes, H; Vellenga, E; Houwerzijl, EJ; de Wolf, JTM

    2001-01-01

    Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a heterogeneous disease, whereby it is unclear if and in which way prednisone and splenectomy affect the platelet kinetics leading to a complete remission. To determine the effects of prednisone and splenectomy on the mean platelet life (MPL) and platelet

  15. Multicentric Castleman’s Disease, Associated with Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Sood

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common cause of a neck mass in young adults is hyperplastic lymphadenopathy consequent to infection and inflammation. Castleman’s disease (CD, an unusual benign lymphoproliferative disorder, infrequently causes neck masses. It occurs in unicentric (UCD and multicentric (MCD forms and is associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8, and Kaposi's sarcoma. We present the third known association between MCD and previous immune thrombocytopenia in the absence of HIV and HHV-8 infection and review its association with other autoimmune disorders and attendant implications for pathogenesis. Finally, we summarize the current approach to therapy.

  16. Splenectomy in patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: Analysis of 109 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enver Ay

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Splenectomy is performed in order to provide the treatment in the patients with severe idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, refractory to medical treatment. In this study, we aimed to investigate the postoperatif and longterm outcomes in the patients who underwent splenectomy with the diagnosis of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.Materials and Methods: Between 2001-2010 at Dicle University Medical Faculty, General Surgery Department, a retrospective review of the 109 patients who had undergone splenectomy for ITP was reviewed. Age, gender, presence of accessory spleens and location, duration of the operation, number of preoperative platelet tranfusion, number of preoperative and postoperative blood transfusion, length of hospital stay, long-term outcomes, morbidity and mortality were recorded.Results: The mean age was 37.10 ± 16.62 (16-72, and there were 88 (80.7% female and 21 (19.3% male patients. The mean operation time was 44.87 ± 10:32 (30-120 minutes. The average postoperative blood and preoperative platelet transfusion were 1.63 ± 0.85 (0-3 and 2.01 ± 0.71 (1-3 units, respectively. The accessory spleens were encountered in 20 (18.3% patients at the ultrasonographic examination. And also the accessory spleens were encountered in 23 (21.1% patients during operation and confirmed with histopathologic examination. The most common localization of accessory spleens were splenic hilus. The postoperative complications were occurred in 16 patients (14.7% and the most complication was atelectasia. The mean length of hospital stay was 4:56 ± 2:45 (2-12 days. Patients were followed for an average of 28 (9-48 months. At the follow-up period, 1 (0.9 % patient had died.Conclusion: Splenectomy can be performed safely in the treatment of the patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura unresponsive to medical treatment. Long-term good results can be obtained with splenectomy in these patients. The accessory spleens should not be

  17. Nocardia transvalensis Disseminated Infection in an Immunocompromised Patient with Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge García-Méndez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nocardia transvalensis complex includes a wide range of microorganisms with specific antimicrobial resistance patterns. N. transvalensis is an unusual Nocardia species. However, it must be differentiated due to its natural resistance to aminoglycosides while other Nocardia species are susceptible. The present report describes a Nocardia species involved in an uncommon clinical case of a patient with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and pulmonary nocardiosis. Microbiological and molecular techniques based on the sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene allowed diagnosis of Nocardia transvalensis sensu stricto. The successful treatment was based on trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and other drugs. We conclude that molecular identification of Nocardia species is a valuable technique to guide good treatment and prognosis and recommend its use for daily bases diagnosis.

  18. Acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura: new therapeutic options and their optimal use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataland, S R; Wu, H M

    2015-06-01

    Advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of both congenital and acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) have led to both an increased understanding of the disease and novel approaches to therapy. The efficacy of rituximab in acquired TTP has led to consideration of rituximab as a prophylactic therapy to prevent relapse of TTP. Novel therapies that target the A1 domain of von Willebrand factor (VWF) to block the formation of microthrombotic disease have also entered clinical study and have demonstrated promise as potential therapeutic options. Additionally, a recombinant ADAMTS13 protease has been developed which may be an important therapeutic option for both congenital and acquired TTP. The development of these new therapeutic options for patients diagnosed with TTP has increased the importance of conducting prospective, randomized studies with these agents to both confirm their efficacy and more importantly understand their most appropriate role in the treatment of patients with TTP. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  19. Pregnancy shortly after an acute episode of severe acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panaitescu, Anca M; Stoia, Razvan; Ciobanu, Anca M; Demetrian, Mihaela; Peltecu, Gheorghe

    2016-12-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a rare but potentially fatal condition. In women with a previous history of TTP there is increased risk of recurrence during pregnancy and the puerperium. There is some evidence that the risk of relapse during pregnancy is increased if the interval between the event and conception is short. We present a case in which pregnancy was achieved a few days after full recovery from an acute episode of severe acquired TTP (ADAMTS13 activity <0.1%) which was successfully treated with four courses of plasma exchange. There was no relapse of TTP during pregnancy and a healthy baby was delivered at term; the puerperium was uneventful. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Peliosis hepatis presenting with massive hepatomegaly in a patient with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Bean Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Peliosis hepatis is a rare condition that can cause hepatic hemorrhage, rupture, and ultimately liver failure. Several authors have reported that peliosis hepatis develops in association with chronic wasting disease or prolonged use of anabolic steroids or oral contraceptives. In this report we describe a case in which discontinuation of steroid therapy improved the condition of a patient with peliosis hepatis. Our patient was a 64-year-old woman with a history of long-term steroid treatment for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura . Her symptoms included abdominal pain and weight loss; the only finding of a physical examination was hepatomegaly. We performed computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the liver and a liver biopsy. Based on these findings plus clinical observations, she was diagnosed with peliosis hepatis and her steroid treatment was terminated. The patient recovered completely 3 months after steroid discontinuation, and remained stable over the following 6 months.

  1. Double lung cancer combined with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonami, Y; Yamashiro, T; Yamamoto, A; Kume, M; Hisa, N; Yoshida, S; Taguchi, H

    1999-12-01

    A 68-year-old woman was admitted because of two abnormal lung shadows, which later proved to be differentiated double cancer. Preoperative hematology tests showed a low platelet count and the result of bone marrow aspiration was compatible with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). A normal platelet count was once obtained by preoperative percutaneous partial splenic arterial embolization (PSE). However, as there was a tendency for the platelet count to decrease just before surgery, one shot high-dose immunoglobulin (Ig) was administered, which is thought to have a short term effect. The operation was performed successfully. After resection of lung cancer, her platelet count was maintained at around 15x10(4) mm3 without taking drugs for ITP. These findings suggest a relationship between lung cancer and ITP.

  2. Response to rituximab in a refractory case of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura associated with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niaz Faraz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP is a serious disorder with a significant morbidity and mortality. Majority of cases of TTP are idiopathic, but some cases may be secon-dary to connective tissue diseases. TTP has been rarely associated with systemic lupus erythe-matosus (SLE and may be refractory to treatment with plasma exchange, requiring immuno-suppressive therapy. We describe a patient with TTP and SLE who was refractory to plasma exchange and corticosteroids but responded to anti-CD20 antibody rituximab with continued re-mission after eight months of follow-up. Rituximab appears to be an effective treatment in re-fractory cases of TTP associated with SLE.

  3. Two novel heterozygote missense mutations of the ADAMTS13 gene in a child with recurrent thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossio, Raffaella; Ferrari, Barbara; Cairo, Andrea; Mancini, Ilaria; Pisapia, Giovanni; Palazzo, Giulia; Peyvandi, Flora

    2013-04-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura is a rare, life-threatening disease characterised by microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia, thrombocytopenia and symptoms related to organ ischaemia, mainly involving the brain and the kidney. It is associated with a deficiency of ADAMTS13, a plasma metalloprotease that cleaves von Willebrand factor. The congenital form (Upshaw-Schulman syndrome) is rare and is associated with mutations of the ADAMTS13 gene on chromosome 9q34. The clinical symptoms of congenital thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura are variable, with some patients developing their first episode during the neonatal period or childhood and others becoming symptomatic in adulthood. We describe a case of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, who presented to our attention with a relapsing form of the disease: the first episode occurred at the age of 13 months. Phenotype and genotype tests were performed in the patient and his family. The undetectable level of ADAMTS13 in the patient was caused by two novel heterozygote missense mutations on the ADAMTS13 gene: one mutation is c.788C > T (p.Ser263Phe) on exon 7 and the second is c.3251G > A (p.Cys1084Tyr) on exon 25 of the ADAMTS13 gene. All the relatives who have been investigated were found to carry one of these missense mutations in a heterozygous state. Although Upshaw-Schulman syndrome is a rare disease, it should be considered in all children with thrombocytopenia and jaundice in the neonatal period. In fact, once a child is confirmed to carry mutations of the ADAMTS13 gene causing early thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, prophylactic treatment should be started to avoid recurrence of symptoms. Genotype tests of relatives would also be important for those women in the family who could be carriers of ADAMTS13 mutations, particularly during pregnancy.

  4. ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction treated with thrombolytic therapy in a patient with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Jacob A; Kelly, Jacob P

    2014-07-01

    Acute myocardial infarction is a common complication of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), but rarely the presenting manifestation. Anti-thrombotic therapy for myocardial infarction is rarely utilized in the setting of TTP because of elevated bleeding risk. We report a case of TTP presenting with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and treated with thrombolytic therapy. The resultant cardiac and neurological complications highlight the challenges of using evidence-based therapy for myocardial infarction in the setting of TTP.

  5. Fatal case of chikungunya and concomitant thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura in French Guiana during air flight medical evacuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epelboin, Loïc; Bidaud, Bastien; Mosnier, Emilie; Le Turnier, Paul; Vesin, Guillaume; Walter, Gaëlle; Abboud, Philippe; Houcke, Stéphanie; Forgues, Maïa; Egmann, Gérald; Stepanian, Alain; Djossou, Félix

    2017-09-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a thrombotic microangiopathy associated to severe ADAMTS13 deficiency. It has been linked to various viral infections. Among arboviruses, only Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever and dengue fever have been linked to this severe disease. We report the first documented case of TTP concomitant to Chikungunya virus infection. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Impact of serum immunoglobulins level and IL-18 promoter gene polymorphism among Egyptian patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aref, Salah; El-Ghonemy, Mohamed Sabry; El-Aziz, Sherin Abd; Abouzeid, Tarek; Talaab, Mona; El-Sabbagh, Amr

    2017-03-01

    Based on the concept of immune dysregulation in immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) and that Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is an inflammatory cytokine that plays an important role in autoimmune disease by inducing interferon-γ secretion; this study aimed to assess a possible association between the IL-18 promoter polymorphisms (-607 C/A site) and genetic susceptibility to ITP and the impact of the immunoglobulins (Igs) concentrations level on disease severity and response to therapy. A cross-section study was done on 105 patients' age range from 10 to 28 years, with newly diagnosed ITP at the Oncology Center Mansoura University over the past 2 years and 100 healthy subjects as a control group. For all patients and controls, the IL-18 promoter polymorphism (-607 C/A site) as well as serum Ig (IgG, IgM, IgA) concentration was determined. The IL-18 promoter polymorphism (-607 C/A site) was not significantly different between ITP patients and normal controls. The number of patients respond to standard line of therapy was significantly higher in those with low IgA levels as compared to those with high IgA levels (P = 0.02). On the other hand, the number of patients respond to standard therapy was significantly higher in those patients with high IgM levels as compared to those with low IgM levels (54.7 vs. 36.5%) (P genetic susceptibility to ITP. High IgA and low IgM levels are a bad index for treatment response to standard therapy.

  7. Acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Development of an autoimmune response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaller, M.; Studt, J.-D.; Voorberg, J.; Kremer Hovinga, J. A.

    2013-01-01

    The von Willebrand factor (VWF)-cleaving metalloprotease, ADAMTS13 (adisintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type 1 motifs-13) is the only known target of the dysregulated immune response in acquired TTP. Autoantibodies to ADAMTS13 either neutralize its activity or accelerate its

  8. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and systemic lupus erythematosus: a rare and life-threatening association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Khayat, Selma Siham; Medkouri, Ghislaine; Etomba, Armel Mbourou; Zamd, Mohamed; Gharbi, Mohamed Benghanem; Ramadani, Benyounes

    2012-05-01

    The association between thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is uncommon. Diagnosis is often difficult because of their clinical and biological similarities. The presence of TTP in SLE worsens the prognosis and causes high mortality in the absence of early therapeutic interventions. We report the case of a 20 year-old man, admitted with nephrotic range proteinuria, hematuria and rapidly progressive renal failure. He also had anemia, thrombocytopenia and pericardial effusion. The diagnosis of SLE was made based on these clinical findings along with positive antinuclear and anti dsDNA antibodies. Renal biopsy revealed class IV/ V lupus nephritis (LN) with active lesions of thrombotic microangiopathy. The evolution of neurological deficit, persistent thrombocytopenia and active microangiopathic changes suggested the diagnosis of associated TTP. The patient was treated initially with corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide. Plasmapheresis could only be started 16 days later. Mycophenolate mofetil and rituximab were successively tried in the absence of improvement in renal function and persistent thrombocytopenia. The patient's neurological condition deteriorated necessitating transfer to the intensive care unit and mechanical ventilation. There he developed pneumonia and died of septic shock two months after presentation. The coexistence of TTP and SLE needs to be considered early in SLE patients with complicated course. It may not respond to the conventional immunosuppressive treatment of SLE.

  9. Splenic dynamics of indium-111 labeled platelets in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syrjaelae, M.T.Sa.; Savolainen, S.; Nieminen, U.; Gripenberg, J.; Liewendahl, K.; Ikkala, E. (Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland))

    1989-09-01

    Splenic dynamics of {sup 111}In-labeled platelets and platelet-associated IgG in 33 patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) were studied. Two half-lives were calculated for the biexponential splenic time-activity curve after i.v. injection of {sup 111}In-labeled platelets. There was no difference in the mean half-life of the rapid component of the splenic curve (ST1) when patients with negative or slightly positive platelet suspension immunofluorescence test (PSIFT) were compared to those with strongly positive PSIFT (3.0 {plus minus} 0.7 min vs. 3.6 {plus minus} 0.4, p greater than 0.05). Mean half-life of the slow component of the splenic curve (ST2) was found to be longer in patients with a strongly positive than a negative or weakly positive PSIFT (26 {plus minus} 5 min vs. 13.2 {plus minus} 1.0 min, p less than 0.01). It seems that determination of the two components of the splenic time-activity curve provides a useful method for studying platelet kinetics in ITP.

  10. [Management of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura in two French centers: A series of 27 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deroux, A; Sirodot, M; Daguindau, N; Barro, C; Coppo, P; Bouillet, L

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a thrombotic microangiopathy due to platelet microthrombosis involved in multiple systems associated with multiple organ dysfunctions and often severe disease course. In order to enhance the understanding of TTP, the clinical features, laboratory characteristics, treatment and outcome of 27 patients with TTP were retrospectively analyzed and investigated in two centres (Annecy and Grenoble). All the 27 patients presented with haemolytic anemia and decreased platelet counts. Eight patients had fever. Thirteen patients had kidney involvement including proteinuria and renal function abnormalities. Eighteen patients had neurological manifestations. Association of the 5 characteristic features of TTP was rarely found (11%) which could lead to diagnosis delay. The von Willebrand factor-cleaving protease (ADAMTS13) activity was less than 10% in all patients. At the same time, plasma ADAMTS13 inhibitors were detected in 20 patients out of the 27. After treatment with plasma exchange, glucocorticoid and rituximab, 23 patients (85%) achieved complete remission. Four patients died, in which two cases were secondary to late diagnosis. TTP is a thrombotic microangiopathy often associated with multiple organ dysfunctions. Salvage therapy, based on some studies experiences and discussed with the Reference Center, could help getting answers in most severe cases. Awareness of physicians is an important step to further limit any delay in medical care, and to further improve the prognosis of patients with TTP. Copyright © 2015 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Life after acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura: morbidity, mortality, and risks during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesely, S K

    2015-06-01

    Patients who have recovered from their acute episode of acquired ADAMTS13-deficient thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) were once thought to have complete recovery except for risk of relapse. Data from previous publications from the Oklahoma TTP-hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) Registry are summarized. Patients have decreased cognitive function and increased prevalence of hypertension, systemic lupus erythematosus, major depression, and albuminuria as compared to the expected values from the US population. The proportion of patients that died during the follow-up period was greater than expected based on the US population reference population. Among women who had a pregnancy following recovery from TTP, relapse during pregnancy or postpartum is uncommon, but the occurrence of preeclampsia may be increased. Thirteen of 16 pregnancies in these women resulted in healthy children. Increased morbidity and mortality in TTP patients following recovery suggest that TTP may be more of a chronic disorder than a disorder with acute episodes and complete recovery. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  12. Platelet production, clearance and distribution in patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaka, Yoshinari (Osaka National Hospital (Japan)); Kambayashi, Junichi; Kimura, Kazufumi (and others)

    1990-08-01

    We have studied 8 normal subjects, and 12 patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura whose platelet counts ranged from 9x10{sup 9}/L to 40x10{sup 9}/L. Autologous platelets labeled with {sup 111}In-tropolone were used for evaluation of mean platelet survival, platelet turnover, platelet sequestration sites, and platelet production (turnover) to clearance (sum of platelet uptake in the liver and the spleen) ratio. Platelet survival correlated directly with platelet counts. There was no significant correlation between the platelet sequestration pattern and platelet count, survival, or turnover. Sum of platelet uptake in the liver and the spleen showed a significant inverse correlation with platelet survival. No significant correlation was found between platelet turnover and platelet count. There was a significant correlation between the platelet production and clearance index when all subjects were analyzed. The distribution of platelet turnover showed considerable individual variation; eight of twelve patients showed platelet turnover less than mean minus 2SD of the control value, but others showed normal range. We conclude that although platelet destruction mechanism in RES shows a primary role of thrombocytopenia, impaired rate of effective thrombopoiesis may also contribute to disease severity in ITP. (author).

  13. Favorable Response of Chronic Refractory Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura to Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Baijun; Mai, Ling; Li, Ning

    2012-01-01

    Seven patients with chronic refractory immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) received adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AMSC) from haplo-identical family donors. The AMSC dose was 2.0×106/kg. No side effects were noted after the AMSC infusions. Overall responses were reached in all patients and sustained response rate was 57.1% (4/7). The serum levels of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), interleukin (IL)-4, and IL-10 were significantly elevated, whereas those of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and IL-2 were significantly decreased after AMSC administration, compared with those in the patients with active ITP. During follow-up, the cytokine profiles in patients maintaining sustained response remained stable compared with the post-treatment level, but IFN-γ and IL-2 levels were significantly increased, and those of TGF-β1, IL-4, and IL-10 were significantly reduced again in relapsed patients. AMSC therapy seems to represent reasonable salvage treatment in severe, chronic refractory ITP by causing a shift in the Th1/Th2 cytokine balance to the same levels as normal controls. PMID:21711157

  14. [Acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura after vascular prosthesis implantation for impending rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Chiaki; Ogawa, Yoshiyuki; Yanagisawa, Kunio; Ishizaki, Takuma; Mihara, Masahiro; Handa, Hiroshi; Isonishi, Ayami; Hayakawa, Masaki; Matsumoto, Masanori; Nojima, Yoshihisa

    2016-03-01

    Acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is caused by autoantibodies against ADAMTS13. TTP patients run a rapidly fatal course unless immediate plasma exchange (PEX) is initiated upon diagnosis. Herein, we report a 72-year-old man with TTP, which developed after he underwent artificial blood vessel replacement surgery for an abdominal aneurysm with impending rupture. In the perioperative period, the patient received several platelet transfusions for severe thrombocytopenia (minimum platelet count: 0.6×10(4)/μl). Thereafter, he was admitted to our department for rapidly progressing coma with multiple cerebral infarctions, and was transferred to the ICU. Based on the tentative diagnosis of TTP, we immediately began PEX and steroid pulse therapy. The diagnosis was confirmed thereafter by markedly reduced ADAMTS13 activity (<0.5%) and his being positive for the ADAMTS13 inhibitor. We performed PEX for five consecutive days and administered high-dose prednisolone (PSL). On the second hospital day (HD), his platelet count rose along with improvement of his consciousness level. The ADAMTS13 inhibitor was not detected on the 10th HD. TTP did not relapse and his general condition improved despite tapering of PSL. In this case, by closely monitoring ADAMTS13-related parameters and minimizing the number of plasma exchanges, the patient was able to achieve a remission without the use of boosting inhibitors.

  15. Vaccine administration and the development of immune thrombocytopenic purpura in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecinati, Valerio; Principi, Nicola; Brescia, Letizia; Giordano, Paola; Esposito, Susanna

    2013-05-01

    The most important reasons cited by the opponents of vaccines are concerns about vaccine safety. Unlike issues such as autism for which no indisputable documentation of direct relationship with vaccine use is available, immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an adverse event that can really follow vaccine administration, and may limit vaccine use because little is known about which vaccines it may follow, its real incidence and severity, the risk of chronic disease, or the possibility of recurrences after new doses of the same vaccine. The main aim of this review is to clarify the real importance of thrombocytopenia as an adverse event and discuss how it may interfere with recommended vaccination schedules. The available data clearly indicate that ITP is very rare and the only vaccine for which there is a demonstrated cause-effect relationship is the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine that can occur in 1 to 3 children every 100,000 vaccine doses. However, also in this case, the incidence of ITP is significantly lower than that observed during the natural diseases that the vaccine prevents. Consequently, ITP cannot be considered a problem limiting vaccine use except in the case of children suffering from chronic ITP who have to receive MMR vaccine. In these subjects, the risk-benefit ratio of the vaccine should be weighed against the risk of measles in the community.

  16. [Variety of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura clinical course in Polish family members with ADAMTS 13 gene mutation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyla-Klekot, Lidia; Kucharska, Grazyna; Słonka, Karina

    2013-03-01

    The congenital form of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (Upshaw-Schulman syndrom) is a result of genetically conditioned dysfunction of protease ADAMTS 13 enzyme which is responsible for von Wiellebrand factor multimer disintegration. The disease is inherited autosomally and recessively. The decrease of ADAMTS 13 activity results in intravascular clotting process activation with rapid lowering of platelet count, haemolytic anaemia, and occurence of schistocytes. Clinically, the disease is characterized by a range of symptoms such as severe jaundice in neonatal period, embolicthrombotic incidents of nervous system and progressive dysfunction of kidneys and other organs. Delaying diagnosis and hence administering of freshly frozen plasma leads to death. Molecular diagnosis allows for identification of genetical profile of the patient, and showing lowered enzyme activity is a basis for regular prophylactic plasma administration which is the protease donor. In our study we present members of a Polish family identified with ADAMTS 13 mutation. 52 old male with heterozygotic mutation of exon 29 (4143_4144insA) and in exon 19 (c2281G>A; Gly761Ser), experienced a few episodes of ischaemic stroke with ongoing neurological deficiency and developed chronic kidney disease. His 16-year old daughter with double homozygotic mutation in exon 29 (4143_4144insA) after severe episode of TTP at the age of 4 has been receiving plasma every 2 weeks for 12 years, which prevented her from other disorders. Target treatment introduced to clinical practice by means of ADAMTS 13 obtained by genetic recombination technology raises hopes.

  17. Platelet production, clearance and distribution in patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaka, Yoshinari; Kambayashi, Junichi; Kimura, Kazufumi

    1990-01-01

    We have studied 8 normal subjects, and 12 patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura whose platelet counts ranged from 9x10 9 /L to 40x10 9 /L. Autologous platelets labeled with 111 In-tropolone were used for evaluation of mean platelet survival, platelet turnover, platelet sequestration sites, and platelet production (turnover) to clearance (sum of platelet uptake in the liver and the spleen) ratio. Platelet survival correlated directly with platelet counts. There was no significant correlation between the platelet sequestration pattern and platelet count, survival, or turnover. Sum of platelet uptake in the liver and the spleen showed a significant inverse correlation with platelet survival. No significant correlation was found between platelet turnover and platelet count. There was a significant correlation between the platelet production and clearance index when all subjects were analyzed. The distribution of platelet turnover showed considerable individual variation; eight of twelve patients showed platelet turnover less than mean minus 2SD of the control value, but others showed normal range. We conclude that although platelet destruction mechanism in RES shows a primary role of thrombocytopenia, impaired rate of effective thrombopoiesis may also contribute to disease severity in ITP. (author)

  18. Does Helicobacter pylori play a role in the pathogenesis of childhood chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Maghbool

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP is an acute self-limited bleeding disorder that can progress to chronic form in 10-15% of the cases. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection is a possible cause of chronic ITP. We studied 30 children with resistant chronic ITP for H. pylori infection based on the detection of H. pylori fecal antigen. This retrospective study was based on data obtained from medical records of 30 children aged between five and 17 years (median age at ITP diagnosis was ten years. A specially-designed data sheet was used to record information on age, sex, duration of disease, family history of bleeding disorders, previous treatments and median platelet count. In patients with H. pylori infection, antimicrobial treatment consisted of amoxicillin, metronidazol and omeprazol. Response was assessed every month for one year and defined as complete (platelet count >150x109/L or partial (platelet count between 50 and 150x109/L. We detected H. pylori infection in 5 patients. In 4 of them increased platelet count was seen during one year of follow-up and in one patient the platelet count was acceptable during six months. Although the pathological mechanism of H. pylori-induced thrombocytopenia was unclear in our patient sample, the assessment of H. pylori infection and use of eradication therapy should be attempted in chronic and resistant ITP patients.

  19. Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura in Black People: Impact of Ethnicity on Survival and Genetic Risk Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suella Martino

    Full Text Available Black people are at increased risk of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP. Whether clinical presentation of TTP in Black patients has specific features is unknown. We assessed here differences in TTP presentation and outcome between Black and White patients. Clinical presentation was comparable between both ethnic groups. However, prognosis differed with a lower death rate in Black patients than in White patients (2.7% versus 11.6%, respectively, P = .04. Ethnicity, increasing age and neurologic involvement were retained as risk factors for death in a multivariable model (P < .05 all. Sixty-day overall survival estimated by the Kaplan-Meier curves and compared with the Log-Rank test confirmed that Black patients had a better survival than White patients (P = .03. Salvage therapies were similarly performed between both groups, suggesting that disease severity was comparable. The comparison of HLA-DRB1*11, -DRB1*04 and -DQB1*03 allele frequencies between Black patients and healthy Black individuals revealed no significant difference. However, the protective allele against TTP, HLA-DRB1*04, was dramatically decreased in Black individuals in comparison with White individuals. Black people with TTP may have a better survival than White patients despite a comparable disease severity. A low natural frequency of HLA-DRB1*04 in Black ethnicity may account for the greater risk of TTP in this population.

  20. Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura in Black People: Impact of Ethnicity on Survival and Genetic Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Suella; Jamme, Mathieu; Deligny, Christophe; Busson, Marc; Loiseau, Pascale; Azoulay, Elie; Galicier, Lionel; Pène, Frédéric; Provôt, François; Dossier, Antoine; Saheb, Samir; Veyradier, Agnès; Coppo, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Black people are at increased risk of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Whether clinical presentation of TTP in Black patients has specific features is unknown. We assessed here differences in TTP presentation and outcome between Black and White patients. Clinical presentation was comparable between both ethnic groups. However, prognosis differed with a lower death rate in Black patients than in White patients (2.7% versus 11.6%, respectively, P = .04). Ethnicity, increasing age and neurologic involvement were retained as risk factors for death in a multivariable model (P Black patients had a better survival than White patients (P = .03). Salvage therapies were similarly performed between both groups, suggesting that disease severity was comparable. The comparison of HLA-DRB1*11, -DRB1*04 and -DQB1*03 allele frequencies between Black patients and healthy Black individuals revealed no significant difference. However, the protective allele against TTP, HLA-DRB1*04, was dramatically decreased in Black individuals in comparison with White individuals. Black people with TTP may have a better survival than White patients despite a comparable disease severity. A low natural frequency of HLA-DRB1*04 in Black ethnicity may account for the greater risk of TTP in this population.

  1. A Case Report of Successful Treatment of HELLP Syndrome and Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura by Plasmapheresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vafaeemanesh J.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: HELLP syndrome was described in 1982 by Weinstein as a triad of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and thrombocytopenia. This syndrome develops antepartum in 70% and postpartum in 30% of cases. HELLP syndrome occurs in 0.5 to 0.9% of all pregnancies and is accompanied by disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC in 38% of patients. Maternal mortality rate is reported to be 1.1%. Although thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP is rare, it is one of the most important differential diagnoses for HELLP syndrome, which may be lethal without appropriate treatment. Plasmapheresis is one of the recommended treatments in complicated and/or resistant to treatment cases. Case Report: In this article we introduce a 22 years old primiparous woman with a term pregnancy that developed HELLP syndrome and DIC after delivery. Due to the lack of improvement, an accompany of TTP was diagnosed. So, she underwent plasmapheresis treatment and was discharged with full recovery after 22 sessions of treatments.

  2. Acute pancreatitis-induced thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura with recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Yasuhisa; Inoue, Yoshihiro; Onodera, Makoto; Kikuchi, Satoshi; Sato, Masayuki; Kojika, Masahiro; Sato, Hisaho; Suzuki, Keijiro; Matsumoto, Masanori

    2016-04-01

    Recent successive reports on acute pancreatitis-induced thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) have revealed that TTP-related microvascular damage is an aggravating factor of acute pancreatitis. Here, we report the case of a 26-year-old man diagnosed with acute pancreatitis due to high alcohol consumption. The patient was unconscious as he had taken an overdose of medication, and presented with fever and renal failure due to acute pancreatitis on admission. Although the pancreatitis subsequently improved, the symptoms were still observed; on the next day, he exhibited hemoglobinuria, anemia, and thrombocytopenia. Moreover, general blood examinations indicated the presence of schistocytes and reduced activity of ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin-like metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type 1 motif 13) to 47 %. Thus, the patient was diagnosed with TTP, and plasma exchange was performed. After the development of TTP, the acute pancreatitis recurred, but a severe pathogenesis was prevented by plasma exchange. Thus, ADAMTS13 activity may be useful for predicting a severe pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. In ADAMTS13-deficient cases, plasma exchange may be an effective technique for preventing aggravation of acute pancreatitis.

  3. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and other thrombotic microangiopathic hemolytic anemias: diagnosis and classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenkman, Boris; Einav, Yulia

    2014-01-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs) include several diseases, most prominently are thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). TMAs are characterized by profound thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and organ ischemia. In most cases TTP results from deficiency of ADAMTS13, the von Willebrand factor-cleaving protease leading to increase of ultra-large von Willebrand factor (ULVWF) multimers. Congenital TTP is due to mutations in the gene of ADAMTS13 whereas acquired TTP is due to production of autoantibodies against ADAMTS13. In both cases severe deficiency of ADAMTS13 exists. However, the presence of ADAMTS13 activity does not rule out TTP. Diagnostic criteria of TTP are based on clinical features of neurologic and renal disfunction along with anemia and thrombocytopenia, low ADAMTS13 activity, and the presence of ULVWF. The standard treatment of TTP includes plasma exchange, protein A immunoabsobtion, immunosuppressive drugs, CD20 antibodies against B cells, and splenectomy. HUS is commonly caused by infection with Shiga-toxin produced by Escherichia coli. HUS is characterized by thrombocytopenia, anemia, renal impairment and diarrhea. Rarely, atypical HUS appears as a consequence of mutations related to the alternative pathway for the compliment system. Plasmapheresis in HUS is not efficient. Alternatively, plasma therapy and in some cases dialysis are used. TMA diseases may be associated with other infections, bone marrow transplantation, pregnancy, systemic vasculitis, and certain drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Acute renal failure and severe rhabdomyolysis in a patient with resistant thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Qahtani S

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Saad Al Qahtani Intensive Care Department, Critical Care Response Team, King Abdulaziz Medical City (KAMC, National Guard Health Affairs; King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, College of Medicine, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Abstract: Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP is a rare, life-threatening disorder. This paper describes the case of a 39-year-old Sudanese male who presented to the emergency room with fever, jaundice, decreased level of consciousness, and worsening kidney function for 7 days, a high lactate dehydrogenase level (1947, severe thrombocytopenia (platelets 8, and numerous schistocytes in the peripheral blood smear. The patient was admitted with a diagnosis of TTP for plasma exchange. Fourteen days later, his creatinine kinase (CK level rose to >50,000 IU; rhabdomyolysis was suggested. Continuous venovenous hemodialysis (CVVHD was started. The patient's CK level remained high, despite CVVHD, until the 6th day, after which this parameter gradually started to decrease. This report highlights a resistant case of TTP that presented with concomitant severe rhabdomyolysis, which demanded aggressive, continuous intervention. Keywords: TTP, CVVHD, continuous venovenous hemodialysis

  5. Platelet count evolution as a predictor of outcome after splenectomy for immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moonhwan; Park, Keun Myoung; Shin, Woo Young; Choe, Yun-Mee; Lee, Keon-Young; Ahn, Seung-Ik

    2017-04-01

    Splenectomy is the definitive second-line therapy for refractory immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), and has a reported response rate of 50-80%. Medical attention should be reconsidered when there is no evidence of accessory spleen in refractory ITP patients after splenectomy. The purpose of this study was to determine whether platelet count evolution differs between patients with a successful or unsuccessful result after splenectomy for ITP. Archived records of 104 consecutive patients that underwent splenectomy for ITP were reviewed. Patients were divided into two groups (failures and successes) using a final follow-up platelet count of 100,000/μL as a cut-off. Platelet count evolutions in these two groups were compared using the Student's t test. Successes and failures were found to have significantly different platelet counts from two days postoperatively (P = 0.016). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.630 (95% confidence interval, 0.518-0.741, P = 0.030), and when a cut-off value of 100,000/μL was used, sensitivity and specificity were 68.2 and 51.2%, respectively. To obtain positive and negative predictive values exceeding 50%, additional platelet counts were required at one week and one month after splenectomy. We propose a protocol for ITP follow-up after splenectomy.

  6. Successful Outcome in a Rare Condition in Pregnancy - Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura-Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babita Vaswani

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura-Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (TTP-HUS is a rare occurrence in pregnancy. It is similar in its clinical profile to other more common pregnancy related conditions like preeclampsia, eclampsia, and Hemolysis, Elevated Liver Enzymes, Low Platelets (HELLP syndrome. This makes diagnosis a challenge thus hampering maternal and fetal outcome if the disease is not diagnosed in time and managed appropriately in the early course of the disease. Here, we report a case of successful management of this rare and potentially hazardous disorder during pregnancy in due course of time and thereby achieving a healthy mother and a healthy baby.

  7. Dapsone treatment in a girl with severe chronic thrombocytopenic purpura. Does it work? Do not touch it!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusiol, A; Nocerino, A; Passone, E; Tenore, A

    2012-10-01

    Dapsone has been shown to be effective in treating immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) in adults. In children the experience is limited. We describe our experience using dapsone in a female with refractory, symptomatic ITP who suffered intracranic haemorrhage and massive gastric bleeding. After treatment platelet counts was more than 100 x 103/μL, and reached 1000x103/μL. Discontinuation resulted in a rapid decrease in platelet counts, with severe intracranial haemorrhage (ICH). The recovery of dapsone led the platelets count to lower values. We suggest that treatment should not be discontinued in responders, at least in children with symptomatic ITP. Additional studies of dapsone in children are warranted.

  8. CD16 and CD32 Gene Polymorphisms May Contribute to Risk of Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiannan; Zhao, Liyun; Zhang, Yan; Guo, Qingxu; Chen, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies have evaluated the associations of CD16 158F>V and CD32 131H>R gene polymorphisms with the risk of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Material/Methods Published studies on CD16 158F>V and CD32 131H>R polymorphisms with susceptibility to ITP were systematically reviewed until April 1, 2014. The Cochrane Library Database, Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Chinese Biomedical Database (CBM) were used to search for relevant studies and then a meta-analysis was conducted by using Stata 12.0 software in order to produce consistent statistical results. Results In total, 10 clinical case-control studies with 741 ITP patients and 1092 healthy controls were enrolled for quantitative data analysis. Results of this meta-analysis suggest that CD16 158F>V polymorphism had strong correlations with the susceptibility to ITP under 5 genetic models (all PR polymorphism and the susceptibility to ITP (all P>0.05). Subgroup analysis by ethnicity revealed that CD16 158F>V polymorphism was associated with the increased risk of ITP among both Caucasian and non-Caucasian populations. Nevertheless, no statistically significant correlations between CD32 131H>R polymorphism and the risk of ITP were observed among Caucasians and non-Caucasians (all P>0.05). Conclusions Our findings indicate that CD16 158F>V polymorphism may contribute to the increased risk of ITP, whereas CD32 131H>R polymorphism may not be an important risk factor for ITP. PMID:27315784

  9. Retrospective analysis of rituximab therapy and splenectomy in childhood chronic and refractory immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ay, Yilmaz; Karapinar, Tuba H; Oymak, Yesim; Toret, Ersin; Demirag, Bengu; Ince, Dilek; Ozcan, Esin; Moueminoglou, Nergial; Koker, Sultan A; Vergin, Canan

    2016-06-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) results from accelerated platelet destruction mediated by autoantibodies to platelet glycoproteins. Some patients with chronic ITP are refractory to all therapies [steroids, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), anti-D and immunosuppresive drugs] and have chronic low platelet counts and episodic bleeding. We retrospectively evaluated the efficacy and safety of rituximab treatment and splenectomy in paediatric patients diagnosed with chronic and refractory ITP who were unresponsive to steroids, IVIG, cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil. Records of patients with chronic and refractory ITP in 459 patients with primary ITP who were followed up in our hospital from January 2005 to December 2014 were reviewed. Fifteen of patients received rituximab and/or applied splenectomy. Fifteen chronic ITP patients (10 boys, five girls) with a mean age of 10 years were enrolled in the study. Two of these patients were suffering from Evans syndrome. The median time since diagnosis of ITP was 10 years. The median follow-up duration after starting Rituximab and splenectomy were 13 and 9.5 months, respectively.None of the seven patients who were treated with rituximab achieved a response. A splenectomy was performed in six of the seven patients who had been treated with rituximab. Complete and partial responses were achieved in 67 and 33% of the patients, respectively. We evaluated the clinical characteristics and responses of chronic ITP patients who did not receive rituximab therapy and underwent a splenectomy. The success rate was 100% in the eight patients with chronic and refractory ITP. Rituximab therapy might not be beneficial for some children with severe chronic ITP who are refractory to standard agents. A splenectomy might be useful and preferable to rituximab.

  10. ADAMTS13-binding IgG are present in patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Han-Mou; Raoufi, Mojgan; Zhou, Wenhua; Guinto, Enriqueta; Grafos, Nickolas; Ranzurmal, Safi; Greenfield, Robert S; Rand, Jacob H

    2006-05-01

    Functional assays are commonly used to measure the antibodies of ADAMTS13 found in patients of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). In this study we used an enzyme-linked immunoassay to analyze the ADAMTS13-binding IgG levels in six groups of individuals: normal, random hospitalized patients, acute TTP, TTP after receiving plasma therapy, TTP in remission, and other types of thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). The results showed that ADAMTS13-binding IgG levels were elevated in 100% of the acute TTP group, 75% of the TTP group after receiving plasma therapy, and 40% of the remission group. Overall, the ADAMTS13-binding IgG levels correlated with the inhibitory activity levels againstADAMTS13 (r = -0.69, P < 0.0001). The assay also detected elevated IgG binding levels in 5% - 15% of the normal, random, and other TMA control groups. Addition of purified ADAMTS13 protein to the plasma samples suppressed the IgG binding in each of the acute TTP patients, but in none of the non-TTP groups. Serial measurement in a patient that had two exacerbations of TTP within the first three weeks revealed that the ADAMTS13 activity levels remained <0.1 U/ml during this period, and the ADAMTS13-binding IgG remained elevated, suggesting that ADAMTS13 analysis may provide valuable insight to the disease status during the course of therapy. Analysis of ADAMTS13-binding IgG is helpful for the diagnosis and management of TTP.

  11. The immunophenotype of bone marrow lymphocytes in children with immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Samin; Aryan, Zahra; Ghazizadeh, Farid; Arabi, Nahid; Nikougoftar, Mahin; Ebadi, Maryam

    2014-09-01

    Primary immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), caused by immune system dysfunction, is recognized as the leading cause of thrombocytopenia in pediatric population. Nonetheless, inadequate studies have been performed on bone marrow immunophenotyping of children with ITP. In this study, we aimed to investigate the immunophenotype of bone marrow lymphocytes in these children. Between 2008 and 2012, 35 children with ITP and 26 age and sex matched healthy controls were recruited. All participants underwent bone marrow aspiration. Appropriate B-cell, T-cell, and myeloid lineage monoclonal antibodies were employed to determine the immunophenotype of these patients. CD10, CD19, and CD20, all indicative of premature B-cell markers, were significantly greater in children with ITP. CD22, mainly expressed on mature B cells was slightly, but not significantly reduced in the patients' group (P = .42). On the other hand, T cell markers including CD2, CD3, CD5, and CD7 were underexpressed. CD33, a specific marker for myeloid lineage, was underexpressed in the patients' group (5.6 ± 4.7 vs. 12.9 ± 7.3, P < .001). Noteworthy, the immunophenotype did not significantly differ between acute and persistent cases. Overall, a phenotype characterized by increased pre-B-cell markers along with decreased T cell immunophenotypic markers was observed in bone marrow lymphocytes of children with ITP in the present study. Further larger scale studies are recommended to confirm our findings, as precise mapping of the immunophenotype of lymphocytes in these patients would pave the road to improved diagnosis and treatment.

  12. A case report of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenic purpura: the importance of correct diagnosis for future pregnancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Fontão-Wendel

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenic purpura (NAITP is a neonatal disorder characterized by maternal alloimmunization against fetal platelet antigens inherited from the father. Intracranial hemorrhage leading to death or permanent neurological disability may occur in the fetus. CASE REPORT: A healthy 30-year-old woman gave birth to her first baby by cesarean after an uneventful 36-week pregnancy. Ten hours after birth, the infant presented severe petechiae, with platelet count of 8 x 10³/µl. The mother’s platelet count was normal (180 x 10³/µl. The infant received intravenous immunoglobulin and was discharged 18 days later, with platelet count of 100 x 10³/µl. The cause of thrombocytopenia was not elucidated at that time. One year later, the infant died of neuroblastoma. Since the parents wanted another child, they were referred for investigation of this thrombocytopenia. Platelet genotyping and platelet antibody screening were performed, showing total HPA-1 system mismatch between mother (HPA-1b1b and father (HPA-1a1a, with anti-HPA-1a antibodies in the mother’s serum. We concluded that the first baby was born with NAITP. Thus, in the second pregnancy, the mother was treated with several infusions of intravenous immunoglobulin. Careful ultrasound monitoring was performed, with normal results for mother and fetus throughout the pregnancy. The second baby was born by cesarean at 39 weeks, presenting 92x10³ platelets/µl six hours after birth. The baby’s platelets were genotyped as HPA-1a1b and the mother’s serum again showed anti-HPA-1a antibodies. No clinical bleeding was observed. Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy was an effective treatment for preventing NAITP in the second baby.

  13. Clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes in patients with Helicobacter pylori-positive chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teawtrakul, Nattiya; Sawadpanich, Kookwan; Sirijerachai, Chittima; Chansung, Kanchana; Wanitpongpun, Chinadol

    2014-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is the condition caused by increased platelet destruction and or decreased platelet production. Previous studies have demonstrated the association and efficacy of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication therapy in patients with chronic ITP. Data in Thai patients, however, are limited. A prospective cross-sectional analytic study was conducted in adult patients with chronic ITP to determine the prevalence and clinical predictive factors of H. pylori infection and evaluate the efficacy of H. pylori eradication therapy. H. pylori-infected patients received eradication therapy (omeprazole 40 mg/day, clarithromycin 1000 mg/day, amoxicillin 2000 mg/day) for 2 weeks. The platelet counts at baseline and monthly for 6 months after the end of treatment were evaluated. Of the 25 patients, 9 patients (36%) had H.pylori infection. H. pylori infection is higher among women than men. There were two clinical factors included 1) relapsed ITP 2) response after the first-line treatment statistically proven to be associated with H. pylori infection with an odds ratio and p value of 7.7, p = 0.035 and ND (not determined due to small sample size), p pylori infection is modest in Thai adult patients with chronic ITP. A history of relapsed ITP and high quality of response after first-line treatment indicated H. pylori infection. Therefore, the urea breath test should be recommended in patients who have a relapsed ITP condition with a history of good response after first-line therapy.

  14. Preclinical assessment of a new recombinant ADAMTS-13 drug product (BAX930) for the treatment of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopić, A; Benamara, K; Piskernik, C; Plaimauer, B; Horling, F; Höbarth, G; Ruthsatz, T; Dietrich, B; Muchitsch, E-M; Scheiflinger, F; Turecek, M; Höllriegl, W

    2016-07-01

    Essentials ADAMTS-13-deficiency is a cause of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Preclinical safety of recombinant human ADAMTS-13 (BAX930) was shown in animal models. Preclinical efficacy of BAX930 was shown in a mouse model of TTP. BAX930 showed advantageous efficacy over fresh frozen plasma, the current standard of care. Click to hear Dr Cataland and Prof. Lämmle present a seminar on Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (TTP): new Insights in Pathogenesis and Treatment Modalities. Background Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a rare blood disorder characterized by microthrombosis in small blood vessels of the body, resulting in a low platelet count. Baxalta has developed a new recombinant ADAMTS-13 (rADAMTS-13) product (BAX930) for on-demand and prophylactic treatment of patients with hereditary TTP (hTTP). Objectives To evaluate the pharmacokinetics, efficacy and safety of BAX930 in different species, by use of an extensive preclinical program. Methods The prophylactic and therapeutic efficacies of BAX930 were tested in a previously established TTP mouse model. Pharmacokinetics were evaluated after single intravenous bolus injection in mice and rats, and after repeated dosing in cynomolgus monkeys. Toxicity was assessed in rats and monkeys, safety pharmacology in monkeys, and local tolerance in rabbits. Results BAX930 was shown to be efficacious, as demonstrated by a stabilized platelet count in ADAMTS-13 knockout mice that were thrombocytopenic when treated. Prophylactic efficacy was dose-dependent and comparable with that achieved by treatment with fresh frozen plasma, the mainstay of hTTP treatment. Therapeutic efficacy was treatment interval-dependent. Safety pharmacology evaluation did not show any deleterious effects of BAX930 on cardiovascular and respiratory functions in monkeys. The compound's pharmacokinetics were similar and dose-proportional in mice, rats, and monkeys. BAX930 was well tolerated in rats, monkeys, and rabbits, even

  15. Induction of Regulatory t Cells by Low Dose il2 in Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-10

    Rheumatoid Arthritis; Ankylosing Spondylitis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Psoriasis; Behcet's Disease; Wegener's Granulomatosis; Takayasu's Disease; Crohn's Disease; Ulcerative Colitis; Autoimmune Hepatitis; Sclerosing Cholangitis; Gougerot-sjögren; Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Systemic Sclerosis

  16. Impact of chronic Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP on health-related quality of life: a conceptual model starting with the patient perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George James N

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP, a condition characterized by autoimmune-mediated platelet destruction and suboptimal platelet production, is associated with symptoms such as bruising, epistaxis, menorrhagia, mucosal bleeding from the gastrointestinal and urinary tracts and, rarely central nervous system bleeding. The aim of this research is to develop a conceptual model to describe the impact of ITP and its treatment on patients' health-related quality of life (HRQoL. Methods A literature search and focus groups with adult ITP patients were conducted to identify areas of HRQoL affected by ITP. Published literature was reviewed to identify key HRQoL issues and existing questionnaires used to assess HRQoL. Focus group transcripts were reviewed, and common themes were extracted by grouping conceptual categories that described the impact on HRQoL. Results The literature synthesis and themes from the focus group data suggest that decreased platelet counts, disease symptoms, and treatment side effects influence multiple domains of HRQoL for ITP patients. Key areas affected by ITP and its treatments include emotional and functional health, work life, social and leisure activities, and reproductive health. Conclusion ITP affects various areas of HRQoL. This conceptual model will help inform the evaluation of therapeutic strategies for ITP.

  17. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TPP) successfully rescued by plasma exchange in the ICU: A report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xiuli; Wu, Tiejun; Zhang, Xihong; Qu, Aijun; Tian, Suochen

    2016-07-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a rare, life-threatening disorder, which is characterized by thrombus formation in small blood vessels. The present study retrospectively analyzed the clinical data from two patients with severe TTP, who were treated successfully in the intensive care unit (ICU) at the Liaocheng People's Hospital in 2013. Comprehensive therapies were administered to the patients, including plasma exchange (PE), mechanical ventilation (case 1 only), steroid therapy, blood transfusion and anti-inflammatory treatment (case 2 only). The two patients returned to a stable state and were transferred back to the hematology department following PE. The positive outcome achieved for these patients suggests that early intervention involving bedside PE in the ICU may reduce the mortality rate of patients with severe TTP who have concurrent respiratory or circulatory failure and cannot be treated in the dialysis unit.

  18. ADAMTS13 and anti-ADAMTS13 autoantibodies in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura - current perspectives and new treatment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tersteeg, Claudia; Verhenne, Sebastien; Roose, Elien; Schelpe, An-Sofie; Deckmyn, Hans; De Meyer, Simon F; Vanhoorelbeke, Karen

    2016-01-01

    A deficiency in ADAMTS13 (A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease with ThromboSpondin type-1 repeats, member 13) is associated with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Congenital TTP is caused by a defect in the ADAMTS13 gene resulting in decreased or absent enzyme activity; acquired TTP results from autoantibodies that either inhibit the activity or increase the clearance of ADAMTS13. Despite major progress in recent years in our understanding of the disease, many aspects around the pathophysiology of TTP are still unclear. Newer studies expanded the TTP field from ADAMTS13 and inhibitory antibodies to immune complexes, cloned autoantibodies, and a possible involvement of other proteases. Additionally, several new treatment strategies supplementing plasma-exchange and infusion are under investigation for a better and more specific treatment of TTP patients. In this review, we discuss the recent insights in TTP pathophysiology and describe upcoming therapeutic opportunities.

  19. Púrpura trombocitopênica imunológica como manifestação inicial de lúpus eritematoso sistêmico juvenil Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura as initial manifestation of juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefina Aparecida Pellegrini Braga

    2003-12-01

    salientar a importância da determinação de auto-anticorpos para lúpus eritematoso sistêmico nas crianças com a forma crônica desta patologia.Patients with Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP present a high trend to develop Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE, especially those with chronic presentation. Some authors observed that female gender, older patients and familial history of autoimmune disease in patients with Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura are factors that lead to increased susceptibility for the development of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. Based on these facts, we decided to study 5 children with chronic Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura and late Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. In this paper, we describe the clinical and laboratorial features of 5 female children with Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura that later developed Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. All patients were girls, 3 Caucasian, with Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura onset age ranged between 6 years and 3 months and 12 years and 1 month (mean - 9 years and 2 months. The age at Systemic Lupus Erythematosus diagnosis ranged between 8 years and 13 years and 8 months (mean - 10 years and 10 months. Though, the gap between Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus diagnosis ranged between 11 months and 2 years and 9 months (mean - 1 year and 10 months. All patients presented chronic Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (thrombocytopenia lasts longer than 6 months. The Systemic Lupus Erythematosus classification criteria were (in decreasing frequency: malar erythema and positivity of ANA in 5 patients; arthritis, hematological (thrombocytopenia and immunological alterations (positivity of anti-DNA in 4 patients; photosensitivity and positivity of anti-cardiolipin in 3 patients. Other manifestations included oral ulcers, renal involvement, leukopenia and auto-immune hemolytic anemia, serositis (pericarditis, neurological involvement and positivity of anti-Sm antibody

  20. Zdravljenje trombotične trombocitopenične purpure - naše izkušnje: Treatment of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura - our experience:

    OpenAIRE

    Sever, Matjaž

    2008-01-01

    Background Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a rare disease. It develops as a consequence of abnormal metabolism of a disintegrin and matalloproteinase with thrombospondin components (ADAMTS13). Its clinical picture is heterogenous. Exchange plasmapheresis and various modes of immunosupression are essential for remission induction. Inspite of treatment only 90% of patients survive. The purpose of this paper is to present patientsć data, clinical picture, treatment and outcome of pa...

  1. Platelet count response to H. pylori treatment in patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura with and without H. pylori infection: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Donald M.; Bernotas, Ashley; Nazi, Ishac; Stasi, Roberto; Kuwana, Masataka; Liu, Yang; Kelton, John G.; Crowther, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Eradication of H. pylori improves thrombocytopenia in some patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura by mechanisms that remain obscure. Platelet count responses may occur independently of H. pylori infection as a result of the immune modulating effects of macrolide antimicrobials or the removal of other commensal bacteria. We performed a systematic review of the literature to determine the effect of H. pylori eradication therapy in patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura by comparing the platelet response in patients who were, and who were not infected with H. pylori. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane central registry and abstracts from the American Society of Hematology (from 2003) were searched in duplicate and independently without language or age restrictions. Eleven studies, 8 from Japan, were included enrolling 282 patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura who received eradication therapy; 205 were H. pylori-positive and 77 were H. pylori-negative. The odds of achieving a platelet count response following eradication therapy were 14.5 higher (95% confidence interval 4.2 to 83.0) in patients with H. pylori infection (51.2% vs. 8.8%). No study reported bleeding or quality of life. Adverse events were reported in 12 patients. H. pylori eradication therapy was of little benefit for H. pylori-negative patients. These findings strengthen the causal association between H. pylori infection and immune thrombocytopenia in some patients. Randomized trials are needed to determine the applicability of H. pylori eradication therapy across diverse geographical regions. PMID:19483158

  2. Limitations of ADAMTS-13 activity level in diagnosing thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehsanipoor, Robert M; Rajan, Priya; Holcombe, Randall F; Wing, Deborah A

    2009-10-01

    In pregnancy, it may be difficult to differentiate the syndrome of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets from thrombotic thrombocytopenia purpura. Severely depressed (present a case of a patient that presented at 20 weeks gestation with elevated liver enzymes and thrombocytopenia. The diagnosis was unclear at the time of presentation. She underwent induction of labor, and during the postpartum course, she was eventually diagnosed with thrombotic thrombocytopenia purpura; however, her activity level of a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs-13 was only moderately depressed at 15% (normal pregnancy value 41%-105%).

  3. Presence of Antiphospholipid Antibodies as a Risk Factor for Thrombotic Events in Patients with Connective Tissue Diseases and Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habe, Koji; Wada, Hideo; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Ohishi, Kohshi; Ikejiri, Makoto; Matsubara, Kimiko; Morioka, Tatsuhiko; Kamimoto, Yuki; Ikeda, Tomoaki; Katayama, Naoyuki; Mizutani, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a well-known complication of habitual abortion and/or thrombosis and is frequently associated with autoimmune diseases. We retrospectively investigated the relationships between the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs) and the incidence of thrombotic events (THEs) in 147 patients with various connective tissue diseases (CTD) suspected of having APS and 86 patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). THEs were observed in 41 patients, including 14 cases of venous thrombosis, 21 cases of arterial thrombosis and eight cases of complications of pregnancy. The prevalence of THE was significantly high in the systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients compared with the other CTD patients and ITP patients. The frequency of lupus anticoagulant (LA), anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL)-β2-glycoprotein (GPI) complex IgG and aPL was significantly high in the SLE patients compared with the ITP patients. Subsequently, the rate of development of THE was significantly high in the patients with aPLs. In particular, the incidence of THE was significantly high in the SLE or ITP patients with LA, aCL-β2GPI IgG or aPL. The optimal cut-off values for LA, aCL IgG and aCL-β2GPI complex IgG for the risk of THEs were higher in the SLE patients in comparison to the values obtained when using the kit provided by the manufacturer. Although aPLs is frequently associated with SLE and is a causative factor for thrombosis, the optimal cut-off value for aPL for predicting the occurrence of THEs varies among different underlying diseases.

  4. Clinical significance of detecting soluble glycocalicin and thrombopoietin in the differential diagnosis of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and aplstic anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yiming; He Yang; Xu Haiyan; Ruan Changgeng

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical significance of detecting soluble platelet glycocalicin (sGC) and thrombopoietin (TPO) in the differential diagnosis of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) and aplastic anemia (AA). Methods: Plasma sGC and serum TPO in 83 patients with ITP, 47 patients with AA and 50 normal individuals were detected by iminunoradiometric assay (IRMA) and enzymelinked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. Statistical analysis was performed using Q test and P value of 0.05). But serum TPO level in AA group was significantly higher than that in ITP and normal groups: (857.43 ± 228.43) ng/L vs (90.32 ± 39.43) ng/L and (70.29 ± 25.16) ng/L, and they were considered statistically significant (Q=24.45 and 18.25, both P < 0.01). Conclusion: Detecting plasma sGC and serum TPO might be helpful for differentiating ITP and AA and for understanding the pathophysiology of thrombocytopenia. (authors)

  5. Comparison of anti-D immunoglobulin, methylprednisolone, or intravenous immunoglobulin therapy in newly diagnosed pediatric immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Muhittin; Bulbul, Ali; Aydogan, Gönül; Tugcu, Deniz; Can, Emrah; Uslu, Sinan; Dursun, Mesut

    2013-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy, cost, and effects of anti-D immunoglobulin (anti-D Ig), methylprednisolone, or intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy on the development of chronic disease in children who are Rh-positive with diagnosed immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Children with newly diagnosed ITP and platelet count D Ig (50 μg/kg), methylprednisolone (2 mg/kg/day), or IVIG (0.4 g/kg/day, 5 days). Sixty children with a mean age of 6.7 years were divided into three equal groups. No difference was observed between platelet counts before treatment and on day 3 of treatment. However, platelet counts at day 7 were lower in the methylprednisolone group than in the IVIG group (P = 0.03). In the anti-D Ig group, hemoglobin and hematocrit levels were significantly lower at the end of treatment (P D Ig group, 35% of the methylprednisolone group, and 25% of the IVIG group, but no significant difference was noted among the groups. The cost analysis revealed that the mean cost of IVIG was 7.4 times higher than anti-D Ig and 10.9 times higher than methylprednisolone. In the treatment of ITP in childhood, one 50 μg/kg dose of anti-D Ig has similar effects to IVIG and methylprednisolone. Among patients who were treated with anti-D Ig, serious anemia was not observed, and the cost of treatment was less than that of IVIG treatment.

  6. Mathematical models for the study of the dynamics of indium-111-labelled platelets in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savolainen, S.

    1992-01-01

    Platelet kinetics in patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) was investigated by applying various models (compartmental and open models, and functional and uptake analyses) to data on indium-111 labelled platelets monitored with a gamma camera following intravenous injection of labelled platelets. The usefulness of the selected models was tested by relating kinetic data to pathophysiological phenomena. A comparison of the results of platelet and colloid kinetics showed that the splenic platelet kinetics in ITP patients does not seem to be primarily dependent on the reticuloendothelial system. Although closed three-compartmental analysis seemed to be superior to the other models applied, none of the methods of analysis tested in this study appears to provide a complete description of short-lived platelet dynamics, as for every model certain assumptions that are not entirely relevant have to be made; this stresses the importance of combining various methods for a comprehensive analysis of a complex phenomenon. Conclusions concerning the function of biological systems should be based on more than one dynamic model or calculation method, since applying only one model (or calculation method) may give artifactual results due to poor statistics of observed data or to inexactness of the assumptions concerning the model.

  7. An improved flow cytometric immunobead array to detect autoantibodies in plasma from patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunxiao; Zhu, Mingqing; Jiang, Miao; Zuo, Bin; Wu, Qingyu; Ruan, Changgeng; He, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Autoantibodies against platelet glycoproteins (GPs) play an important role in immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). This study was to develop an improved flow cytometric immunobead array (FCIA) assay to detect platelet autoantibodies in ITP patient plasma. Plasma samples were isolated from 71 ITP patients and 136 non-ITP controls and incubated with platelets from normal individuals. After washing, platelets were lysed and the platelet lysates were incubated with polystyrene microbeads coupled with monoclonal antibodies against human GPs IX (SZ1), Ib (SZ2), IIIa (SZ21), IIb (SZ22), and P-selectin (SZ51). Platelet GP-autoantibody complexes were detected by flow cytometry using a FITC-labeled secondary antibody. Autoantibodies against platelet GPIb, GPIIb, GPIIIa, GPIX and P-selectin were detected in plasma from ITP patients, as indicated by high mean fluorescent intensity values when microbeads with antibodies SZ1, SZ2, SZ21, SZ22, and SZ51 were used. In ROC analysis, values of the area under the curve were 0.74, 0.83, 0.80, 0.79 and 0.87, respectively. Compared with the previously reported assays, this new FCIA eliminated the need of isolating platelets from ITP patients without compromising assay sensitivity and accuracy in predicting ITP. This simplified FICA assay may be more suitable for ITP diagnosis in clinical laboratory settings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. [Management of childhood idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: a survey of members of the French Society of Pediatric Hematology and Immunology (SHIP)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, P; Villega, F; Ducassou, S; Entz-Werle, N; Michel, G

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to report in acute childhood idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) the current practices of French paediatric hematologists and to compare them to recent publications of American and British teams. A questionnaire was sent online to the members of the French Society of Pediatric Hematology/Immunology (SHIP). This questionnaire, adapted from a similar american study conducted in 2001, asked 16 questions based on the clinical presentation of a 5-year-old boy referred for an acute ITP. 59/123 SHIP members responded to the survey. In response to question regarding initial treatment, 86% of physicians would be given active treatments and only 9% would rarely or never administer any drug. When asked which agent would be used in case of treatment, 68% would choose to prescribe intravenous immunoglobulins and 32% corticosteroids, nobody recommended the use of anti-D immunoglobulins. Furthermore, 83% would usually hospitalize such a child. Finally, this study allowed us to update the current French management of treating pediatric ITP which is almost comparable among this subset of pediatric hematologists, but showed some discrepancies comparatively to the American and British studies.

  9. Splenectomy vs. rituximab as a second-line therapy in immune thrombocytopenic purpura: a single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Askar, Ahmed S; Shaheen, Naila A; Al Zahrani, Mohsen; Al Otaibi, Mohammed G; Al Qahtani, Bader S; Ahmed, Faris; Al Zughaibi, Mohand; Kamran, Ismat; Mendoza, May Anne; Khan, Altaf

    2018-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a common hematological disease treated primarily by corticosteroids. The aim of the present study was to compare response rate between patients, underwent splenectomy vs. rituximab as second-line therapy. Adult patients diagnosed with ITP who did not respond to corticosteroids or relapsed during the period 1990-2014 were included in a quasi-experimental study. Categorical variables were compared using Fisher exact test. Response to treatment was compared using logistic regression. Data were analyzed using SAS V9.2. One-hundred and forty-three patients with ITP were identified through medical records. Of 62 patients treated, 30 (48.38%) required second-line therapy. 19 (63%) patients received rituximab, and 11 (37%) underwent splenectomy. Platelets at diagnosis were not different between study groups (p = 0.062). Splenectomy group patients were younger (p = 0.011). Response to second-line therapy showed no significant difference between two groups (OR 2.03, 95% CI (0.21-22.09), p = 0.549). Results did not show a statistically significant difference in platelet counts over time between treatment groups (p = 0.101). When used exclusively as a second-line therapy for steroid-refractory ITP, the response rate was not statistically different between rituximab and splenectomy. However, further large studies are needed to assess the response rates for these treatment modalities as a second-line therapy.

  10. Congenital Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura: Atypical Presentation and New ADAMTS 13 Mutation in a Tunisian Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgi, A.; Khemiri, M.; Veyradier, A.; Kazdaghli, K.; Barsaoui, S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Congenital deficiency of ADAMTS13 is characterized by systemic platelet clumping, hemolytic anemia and multiorgan failure. Although, more than 100 mutations have been reported, atypical clinical presentation may be involved in diagnostic difficulties. Case report A 2 year old Tunisian child presented with chronic thrombopenic purpura which failed to respond to corticosteroids. Hemolytic anemia with schistocytes, occurred ten months later, with no previous history of diarrhea or any neurological abnormality. Renal function and coagulation screening tests were normal. The count of platelet improved after fresh frozen infusion (FFP). Extensive investigations revealed a severe deficiency of ADAMTS 13 activity (level< 5%). Gene sequencing identified mutation in exon 18 of ADAMTS 13 gene. Prophylactic regimen with regular infusions of FFP was associated to favorable outcome. Conclusion Early ADAMTS 13 activity testing and gene sequencing associated to precocious plasmatherapy are recommended to reduce morbidity and mortality of congenital TTP. PMID:23795279

  11. Congenital Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura: Atypical Presentation And First ADAMTS 13 Mutation In A Tunisian Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    aida borgi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Congenital deficiency of ADAMTS13 is characterized by systemic platelet clumping, hemolytic anemia and multiorgan failure. Although, more than 100 mutations have been reported, atypical clinical presentation may be involved in diagnostic difficulties. Case report: A 2 year old Tunisian child presented with chronic thrombopenic purpura which failed to respond to corticosteroids. Hemolytic anemia with schizocytes, occurred ten months later, with no previous history of diarrhea or any neurological abnormality.  Renal function, coagulation screening tests and complement assay were normal. The count of platelet improved after fresh frozen infusion (FFP. Extensive investigations revealed a severe deficiency of ADAMTS 13 activity (level< 5%. Gene sequencing identified mutation in exon 18 of ADAMTS 13 gene. Prophylactic regimen with regular infusions of FFP was associated to favorable outcome. Conclusion: Early ADAMTS 13 activity testing and gene sequencing associated to precocious plasmatherapy are crucial to reduce morbidity and mortality of congenital TTP.

  12. FATAL OUTCOME OF INFECTION BY DENGUE 4 IN A PATIENT WITH THROMBOCYTOPENIC PURPURA AS A COMORBID CONDITION IN BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico Figueiredo Amâncio

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Dengue is currently a major public-health problem. Dengue virus (DENV is classified into four distinct serotypes, DENV 1-4. After 28 years of absence, DENV-4 was again detected in Brazil in 2010 in Roraima State, and one year later, the virus was identified in the northern Brazilian states of Amazonas and Pará, followed by Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo. In Minas Gerais, the first confirmed case of DENV-4 occurred in the municipality of Frutal in 2011 and has now been isolated from a growing number of patients. Although DENV-2 is associated with the highest risk of severe forms of the disease and death due to the infection, DENV-4 has also been associated with severe forms of the disease and an increasing risk of hemorrhagic manifestations. Herein, the first fatal case of confirmed DENV-4 in Brazil is reported. The patient was an 11-year-old girl from the municipality of Montes Claros in northern Minas Gerais State, Brazil. She had idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura as a comorbid condition and presented with a fulminant course of infection, leading to death due to hemorrhagic complications. Diagnosis was confirmed by detection of Dengue-specific antibodies using IgM capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and semi-nested RT-PCR. Primary care physicians and other health-care providers should bear in mind that DENV-4 can also result in severe forms of the disease and lead to hemorrhagic complications and death, mainly when dengue infection is associated with coexisting conditions.

  13. Low incidence of ADAMTS13 missense mutation R1060W in adult Egyptian patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sissy, Maha H; El Hafez, A Abd; El Sissy, A H

    2014-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is an acute life-threatening disorder, characterized by thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, widespread microvascular thrombi and consequent clinical sequelae due to ischemic organ damage. TTP is most commonly associated with deficiency or inhibition of von Willebrand factor-cleaving protease (ADAMTS13) activity. ADAMTS13 mutations and polymorphisms have been reported in childhood congenital TTP, but their significance in adult-onset TTP is still under investigation. Two mutations stand out: the single base insertion 4143insA in exon 29 and the missense mutation R1060W in exon 24 have both been observed in several unrelated families, mainly in adult-onset TTP, and over a wide geographic area. Our objective in this study is to identify the prevalence of R1060W missense mutation in exon 24 ADAMTS13 in a sample of adult Egyptian TTP patients. Thirty-one adult-onset TTP patients were included in this study, with a male/female ratio of 1:4. Twenty-six cases (84%) presented with acute idiopathic TTP, 2 cases were drug abusers and 3 cases were pregnant. None of the study cases provided a history of suspicious TTP symptoms during childhood (2 cases gave a history of episodes of thrombocytopenia during childhood). All cases showed statistically significant decreased ADAMTS13 activity compared to normal controls (p < 0.001). The study revealed a high statistical difference regarding the ADAMTS13 inhibitor level in primary versus secondary cases (p = 0.003). None of our Egyptian cases or of the healthy normal controls are positive for exon 24 missense mutation. Larger studies and regional and national TTP registries are recommended. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Efficacy and safety of a nanofiltered liquid intravenous immunoglobulin product in patients with primary immunodeficiency and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, J W M; van Beem, R T; Robak, T; Deptala, A; Strengers, P F W

    2011-08-01

    In the production process of a new 5% liquid intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG-L) product (Nanogam(®) ), a combined pepsin/pH 4·4 treatment/15-nm filtration (pH 4·4/15NF) step and a solvent-detergent (SD) treatment step were incorporated to improve the virus inactivating/reducing capacity of the manufacturing process. Two prospective uncontrolled multicentre studies were performed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of this product. Efficacy, including pharmacokinetics, of IVIG-L was studied for 6 months in 18 primary immunodeficiency (PID) patients, succeeded by a long-term follow-up study (mean 2·2 years, n=17). Second, in 24 patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), IVIG-L was studied for efficacy for 14 days. In both studies, adverse events and vital signs were recorded to study safety. In PID patients treated with IVIG-L, 0·60 and 0·38 severe infections per patient per year were reported during, respectively, the short-term and long-term follow-up. Pharmacokinetic studies resulted in an IgG half-life of 30·9 ± 11·3 days and a mean IgG trough level of 6·8 ± 1·2 g/l. In the ITP study, all patients showed an increase in platelet counts after infusion with IVIG-L, and 20/24 patients responded with a platelet count >50 × 10(9) /l (83·3%) within 1 week. IVIG-L infusions did not cause clinical relevant changes in laboratory parameters or vital signs. In clinical studies, IVIG-L (Nanogam®) demonstrated to be efficacious, well tolerated and safe. © 2011 The Author(s). Vox Sanguinis © 2011 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  15. Health-related quality of life of immune thrombocytopenic purpura patients: results from a web-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Claire F; Mathias, Susan D; Cella, David; Isitt, John J; Wu, Albert W; Young, Joan

    2008-10-01

    To assess the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) patients. This was a cross-sectional, descriptive study comparing ITP patients' HRQOL to age and gender matched controls. ITP patients from the Platelet Disorder Support Association were recruited until 1000 surveys had been completed. Controls were randomly sampled from the Harris Interactive Online Panel. ITP patients and controls completed a one-time web-based survey, including a comprehensive HRQOL assessment. ITP patients completed the SF-36, the EQ-5D, and the ITP-Patient Assessment Questionnaire (ITP-PAQ). Controls completed the SF-36 and EQ-5D only. ITP patients' SF-36 and EQ-5D scores were compared to controls in unadjusted and adjusted analyses. Associations between splenectomy status, duration of illness, and platelet count with ITP patients' HRQOL scores were also examined. This analysis included 1002 ITP patients and 1031 controls. ITP patients scored worse on seven of eight SF-36 domains and the Physical and Mental Summary scores (all p PAQ scales: Bother, Psychological, Fear, Social Activity, and Work (all p PAQ scales. Lower platelet count was consistently associated with worse ITP-PAQ scores and had weaker associations with SF-36 and EQ-5D scores. ITP was associated with consistent and statistically significant deficits on generic HRQOL measures. The ITP-PAQ demonstrated differences based on disease severity and treatments. The self-selection bias in the two samples limits the generalizability of the results to all patients with ITP. Further research is needed in more generalizable samples.

  16. Does the site of platelet sequestration predict the response to splenectomy in adult patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navez, Julie; Hubert, Catherine; Gigot, Jean-François; Navez, Benoit; Lambert, Catherine; Jamar, François; Danse, Etienne; Lannoy, Valérie; Jabbour, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Splenectomy is the only potentially curative treatment for chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) in adults. However, one-third of the patients relapse without predictive factors identified. We evaluate the predictive value of the site of platelet sequestration on the response to splenectomy in patients with ITP. Eighty-two consecutive patients with ITP treated by splenectomy between 1992 and 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Platelet sequestration site was studied by (111)Indium-oxinate-labeled platelets in 93% of patients. Response to splenectomy was defined at last follow-up as: complete response (CR) for platelet count (PC) ≥100 × 10(9)/L, response (R) for PC≥30 × 10(9)/L and splenectomy was performed in 81 patients (conversion rate of 16%), and open approach in one patient. Median follow-up was 57 months (range, 1-235). Platelet sequestration study was performed in 93% of patients: 50 patients (61%) exhibited splenic sequestration, 9 (11%) hepatic sequestration and 14 patients (17%) mixed sequestration. CR was obtained in 72% of patients, R in 25% and NR in 4% (two with splenic sequestration, one with hepatic sequestration). Preoperative PC, age at diagnosis, hepatic sequestration and male gender were significant for predicting CR in univariate analysis, but only age (HR = 1.025 by one-year increase, 95% CI [1.004-1.047], p = 0.020) and pre-operative PC (HR = 0.112 for > 100 versus splenectomy was independent of the site of platelet sequestration in patients with ITP. Pre-operative platelet sequestration study in these patients cannot be recommended.

  17. The D173G mutation in ADAMTS-13 causes a severe form of congenital thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

    KAUST Repository

    Lancellotti, S.

    2015-08-13

    Congenital thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a rare form of thrombotic microangiopathy, inherited with autosomal recessive mode as a dysfunction or severe deficiency of ADAMTS-13 (A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease with ThromboSpondin 1 repeats Nr. 13), caused by mutations in the ADAMTS-13 gene. About 100 mutations of the ADAMTS-13 gene were identified so far, although only a few characterised by in vitro expression studies. A new Asp to Gly homozygous mutation at position 173 of ADAMTS-13 sequence was identified in a family of Romanian origin, with some members affected by clinical signs of TTP. In two male sons, this mutation caused a severe (< 3 %) deficiency of ADAMTS-13 activity and antigen level, associated with periodic thrombocytopenia, haemolytic anaemia and mild mental confusion. Both parents, who are cousins, showed the same mutation in heterozygous form. Expression studies of the mutant ADAMTS-13, performed in HEK293 cells, showed a severe decrease of the enzyme’s activity and secretion, although the protease was detected inside the cells. Molecular dynamics found that in the D173G mutant the interface area between the metalloprotease domain and the disintegrin-like domain significantly decreases during the simulations, while the proline-rich 20 residues linker region (LR, 285–304) between them undergoes extensive conformational changes. Inter-domain contacts are also significantly less conserved in the mutant compared to the wild-type. Both a decrease of the inter-domain contacts along with a substantial conformational rearrangement of LR interfere with the proper maturation and folding of the mutant ADAMTS-13, thus impairing its secretion.

  18. TXRF analysis of low Z elements in serum of patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura using X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canellas, Catarine G.L.; Leitao, Roberta G.; Lopes, Ricardo T., E-mail: catarine@lin.ufrj.b, E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear; Carvalho, Silvia M.F., E-mail: silvia@hemorio.rj.gov.b [State Institute of Hematology Arthur de Siqueira Cavalcanti (HEMORIO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Bellido, Alfredo Victor B., E-mail: alfredo@ien.gov.b [Federal Fluminense University (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Chemistry Inst.; Anjos, Marcelino J., E-mail: marcelin@lin.ufrj.b [State University of Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Physics Inst.

    2011-07-01

    Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a blood disorder characterized by an abnormal decrease in the number of platelets in the blood. ITP results from development of an antibody directed against a structural platelet antigen (an autoantibody). Platelets are also called thrombocytes, meaning cells that form clots. The cause of ITP is not known and their diagnosis requires that other disorders be excluded through selective tests. In this work, forty patients suffering from ITP and sixty healthy volunteers (Control Group) were analyzed. All the serum samples had been collected from people who live in the urban area of Rio de Janeiro City/Brazil. Blood was collected into vacutainers without additives. The measurements were performed at the X-ray fluorescence beamline at Brazilian National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), in Campinas, Sao Paulo using a monochromatic beam with maximum energy of 20 keV for the excitation and an Ultra-LEGe detector with resolution of 148 eV at 5.9 keV. Standard solutions with Vanadium as internal standard were prepared for calibration system. It was possible to determine the elemental concentrations of the following six elements: Na, P, S, Cl, K and Ca. The Student's t-test was used to analyze significant differences ({alpha} = 0.05) between group of patients with ITP and control group. The elements that presented significant differences for the mean of their concentrations between each one of the ITP group and control group in {mu}g.g-1 were: phosphorous (136{+-}12 and 92{+-}12), Sulphur (1077{+-}97 and 847{+-}80), Chlorine (2905{+-}385 and 2266{+-}378), Potassium (137{+-}118 and 82{+-}15) and Calcium (64{+-}7 and 44{+-}6) respectively. These results will help the biomedical field with regard to early diagnosis and improved medical treatment. Thus, our findings indicate that these elements can be related to the important biochemical processes in ITP. (author)

  19. The first deletion mutation in the TSP1-6 repeat domain of ADAMTS13 in a family with inherited thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palla, Roberta; Lavoretano, Silvia; Lombardi, Rossana; Garagiola, Isabella; Karimi, Mehran; Afrasiabi, Abdolreza; Ramzi, Mani; De Cristofaro, Raimondo; Peyvandi, Flora

    2009-01-01

    The inherited deficiency of ADAMTS13 is usually associated with severe forms of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Among the mutations identified in the ADAMTS13 gene, none have been described on the TSP1-6 repeat domain. We investigated an Iranian family with a history of chronic recurrent thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, severe ADAMTS13 deficiency and a heterogeneous pattern of clinical symptoms among affected members. Genetic analysis revealed a homozygous deletion of nucleotides 2930–2935 (GTGCCC) in exon 23 of ADAMTS13, leading to the replacement of Cys977 by a Trp and the deletion of Ala978 and Arg979 in the TSP1-6 repeat domain. To explore the mechanism of ADAMTS13 deficiency, in vitro expression studies were performed. Western blotting, pulse-chase labeling and immunofluorescence studies demonstrated a secretion pathway defect of the mutant protein, with no intracellular accumulation. This finding is consistent with the severe ADAMTS13 deficiency but does not explain the heterogeneous clinical picture of the 3 siblings carrying the same mutation. PMID:19116307

  20. Adenosine Triphosphate-sensitive Micro-reentrant Atrial Tachycardia Originating from the Crista Terminalis in a Patient with Chronic Renal Failure due to Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Sugiura, MD

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A 57-year-old woman with chronic renal failure due to the thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura complained of palpitation. A 12-lead ECG showed supraventricular tachycardia with a cycle length of 375 ms. During the electrophysiological study, a tachycardia with a cycle length of 375 ms was reproducibly induced and terminated by atrial extrastimulation. The tachycardia exhibited an inverse relationship between the coupling interval of extrastimulus initiating the tachycardia, and the first postpacing return cycle, as well as an increasing pattern of resetting the tachycardia with an atrial extrastimulus. Ventricular burst pacing during tachycardia produced AV dissociation. Intravenous injections of a low dose (4 mg of adenosine triphosphate (ATP terminated the tachycardia without a preceding atrio-His bundle block. The tachycardia was diagnosed as an ATP-sensitive micro-reentrant atrial tachycardia. Real-time endocardial activation mapping using an electroanatomical mapping system revealed that the earliest activation site of the tachycardia was located at the midlateral portion of the crista terminalis. The tachycardia was abolished by focal ablation targeting the earliest activation site during tachycardia. This is the first reported case of an ATP-sensitive micro-reentrant atrial tachycardia associated with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

  1. Acute childhood idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: AIEOP consensus guidelines for diagnosis and treatment. Associazione Italiana di Ematologia e Oncologia Pediatrica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mattia, D; Del Principe, D; Del Vecchio, G C; Jankovic, M; Arrighini, A; Giordano, P; Menichelli, A; Mori, P; Zecca, M; Pession, A

    2000-04-01

    A recent evaluation carried out by the Associazione Italiana di Ematologia e Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP) about practice management of acute childhood idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) revealed a remarkable difference of behaviors among the different AIEOP centers. A need for common practice guidelines for this frequent illness arose from this observation. Our aim was to make the diagnosis and treatment of childhood ITP uniform. In the future we will evaluate the influence of these guidelines on practice behaviors. Our main reference was the 1996 document produced by the American Society of Hematology (ASH). Their recommendations were updated with information from literature searched for in the MEDLINE database (June 1996-October 1998); search terms included: thrombocytopenia, ITP, diagnosis, therapy, children. The computerized search retrieved 83 articles. the scientific validity of the literature was evaluated by a panel of members using published guidelines. The strength of the evidence was assessed using level of evidence criteria. Only data from level I and level II studies were taken in account. Only one study out of the 83 retrieved articles met these selection criteria and it was considered in addition to the 11 out of 581 articles selected in the ASH ITP guidelines. This preliminary work pointed out each issue about ITP not addressed by clinical studies and all participants in a Consensus Conference expressed their opinion about these issues. Diagnosis is essentially based on history, physical examination, a complete blood count and an examination of the peripheral blood smear. Treatment is recommended taking into account the clinical picture and number of platelets. The main difference between these guidelines and those from ASH are: AIEOP guidelines rely on the opinion of the members of the consensus conference, ASH ones on a panel of experts; therapeutic options include only products available in Italy; the indications to treatment rely more on

  2. ADAMTS13 Secretion and Residual Activity among Patients with Congenital Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura with and without Renal Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rurali, Erica; Banterla, Federica; Donadelli, Roberta; Bresin, Elena; Galbusera, Miriam; Gastoldi, Sara; Peyvandi, Flora; Underwood, Mary; Noris, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Acute renal impairment is observed in 11%–23% of patients with congenital thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and deficiency of a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin motifs 13 (ADAMTS13, a metalloprotease that cleaves von Willebrand factor [VWF] multimers), a substantial percentage of whom develop CKD during follow-up. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Here we investigated whether, in 18 patients with congenital recruited from 1996 to 2013 who fulfilled inclusion criteria, acute renal involvement occurred during bouts segregated with lower secretion and activity levels of ADAMTS13 mutants. We performed expression studies and a sensitive recombinant VWF (rVWF) A1-A2-A3 cleavage test (detection limit, 0.78% of normal ADAMTS13 activity). Results A higher risk of acute renal impairment during bouts was observed in patients with childhood (<18 years) onset (odds ratio [OR], 24.6 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.11 to 542.44]) or a relapsing (≥1 episode per year) disease (OR, 54.6 [95% CI, 2.25 to 1326.28]) than in patients with adulthood onset or long-lasting remission, respectively. Whatever the age at onset, patients with acute renal impairment had mutations different from those in patients without renal involvement. Moreover, mutations in patients with acute renal impairment compared with those in patients without renal involvement caused lower in vitro rADAMTS13 secretion (1.33% versus 12.5%; P<0.001) and residual activity (0.11% versus 3.47%; P=0.003). rADAMTS13 secretion ≤3.75% and residual activity ≤0.4% best discriminated patients with renal impairment (receiver-operating characteristic curve sensitivity, 100% and 100%; specificity, 100% and 83.3%, respectively; logistic regression OR, 325 [95% CI, 6 to 18339] and 91.7 [95% CI, 3.2 to 2623.5], respectively). All mutations found in patients with childhood onset or relapsing disease were associated with acute renal impairment during bouts

  3. Non-thrombocytopenic purpura in familial Mediterranean fever-comorbidity with Henoch-Schönlein purpura or an additional rare manifestation of familial Mediterranean fever?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Chetrit, Eldad; Yazici, Hasan

    2016-07-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura is a relatively common vasculitis mainly affecting children. It is characterized by purpuric skin rash, abdominal cramping, and haematuria. Skin biopsies taken from Henoch-Schönlein purpura lesions disclose perivascular IgA deposits. FMF is an autoinflammatory disease characterized by recurrent attacks of fever lasting 2-3 days which resolve spontaneously. Typical manifestations of the disease are peritonitis, pleuritis, pericarditis, arthritis and erysipelas-like erythema usually affecting the lower limbs. Over the years many reviews emphasized the clinical impression that Henoch-Schönlein purpura is more common among FMF patients than in healthy control population. In this review we summarize these reports and show that sometimes Henoch-Schönlein purpura associated with FMF differs from typical isolated Henoch-Schönlein purpura, and this is also the case with polyarteritis nodosa and SpA associated with FMF. It is suggested that these clinical manifestations (polyarteritis nodosa, Henoch-Schönlein purpura and SpA) should be considered to be associated with FMF as part of what we call FMF rather than as co-existing additional separate clinical entities. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Safety and efficacy of a 10% intravenous immunoglobulin preparation in patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura: results of two international, multicenter studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleva, Lidia; Apte, Shashikant; Damodar, Sharat; Ramanan, Vijay; Loriya, Svetlana; Navarro-Puerto, Jordi; Khojasteh, Ali

    2016-12-01

    To assess safety and efficacy of a 10% intravenous immunoglobulin in patients with primary immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). ITP patients in two multicenter studies (Trials A/B) were treated with 2 g/kg Flebogamma ® 10% DIF (over 2-5 days) and were followed up to 1-3 months. 18 patients in Trial A and 58 in Trial B were enrolled (12 children in Trial B). The response rate (platelet count ≥50 × 10 9 /l) was 72.2% (Trial A) and 76.1/100% (adults/children; Trial B). Most patients improved bleedings (83.3% Trial A; 88.9% Trial B). Potential treatment-related adverse events were reported by 38.9% (Trial A) and 30.4/83.3% (adults/children; Trial B) of patients. All serious adverse events (five patients) resolved without sequelae. Flebogamma 10% DIF was effective and safe in patients with primary ITP.

  5. Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may include: Some diseases and conditions, such as pregnancy, cancer, HIV, lupus, and infections Some medical procedures, such as surgery ... may include: Some diseases and conditions, such as pregnancy, cancer, HIV, lupus, and infections Some medical procedures, such as surgery ...

  6. Rozrolimupab, symphobodies against rhesus D, for the potential prevention of hemolytic disease of the newborn and the treatment of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasi, Roberto

    2010-12-01

    Currently under codevelopment by Symphogen and Swedish Orphan Biovitrum, rozrolimupab is the first in a new class of recombinant polyclonal antibodies, known as symphobodies, produced using a proprietary technology from Symphogen. Rozrolimupab is being investigated for the prevention of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) and for the treatment of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Rozrolimupab comprises 25 genetically unique IgG1 antibodies, all of which are specific for the rhesus D (RhD) erythrocyte protein. In preclinical studies, rozrolimupab demonstrated binding to erythrocytes that was comparable with that of two plasma-derived anti-D Ig preparations. In a phase I clinical trial in healthy male volunteers, treatment with rozrolimupab was not associated with serious adverse events. In a phase II clinical trial of rozrolimupab in healthy, male, RhD-negative volunteers, rozrolimupab dose-dependently cleared RhD-positive erythrocytes from the circulation. Phase II clinical trials in ITP and HDFN are currently ongoing. Phase III clinical trials are necessary to establish the efficacy and safety profile of rozrolimupab compared with standard plasma-derived anti-D Ig preparations.

  7. Platelet turnover and kinetics in immune thrombocytopenic purpura: results with autologous 111In-labeled platelets and homologous 51Cr-labeled platelets differ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heyns A du, P.; Badenhorst, P.N.; Loetter, M.G.P.; Pieters, H.; Wessels, P.; Kotze, H.F.

    1986-01-01

    Mean platelet survival and turnover were simultaneously determined with autologous 111In-labeled platelets (111In-AP) and homologous 51Cr-labeled platelets (51Cr-HP) in ten patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). In vivo redistribution of the 111In-AP was quantitated with a scintillation camera and computer-assisted image analysis. The patients were divided into two groups: those with splenic platelet sequestration (spleen-liver 111In activity ratio greater than 1.4), and those with diffuse sequestration in the reticuloendothelial system. The latter patients had more severe ITP reflected by pronounced thrombocytopenia, decreased platelet turnover, and prominent early hepatic platelet sequestration. Mean platelet life span estimated with 51Cr-HP was consistently shorter than that of 111In-AP. Platelet turnover determined with 51Cr-HP was thus over-estimated. The difference in results with the two isotope labels was apparently due to greater in vivo elution of 51Cr. Although the limitations of the techniques should be taken into account, these findings indicate that platelet turnover is not always normal or increased in ITP, but is low in severe disease. We suggest that this may be ascribed to damage to megakaryocytes by antiplatelet antibody. The physical characteristics in 111In clearly make this radionuclide superior to 51Cr for the study of platelet kinetics in ITP.

  8. Micromegakaryocytes in a patient with partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11 [del(11)(q24.2qter)] and chronic thrombocytopenic purpura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangarossa, S.; Mattina, T.; Romano, V.; Milana, G.; Mollica, F.; Schiliro, G. [Universita di Catania (Italy)

    1996-03-15

    Thrombocytopenia or pancytopenia is frequently reported in patients with partial 11q deletion but there are no reports on bone marrow morphology of these patients. We report on a patient with partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11 [del(11)(q24.2qter)] and its classical clinical manifestations including chronic thrombocytopenic purpura in whom micromegakaryocytes were found in the bone marrow aspirate. This is the first report of the presence of micromegakaryocytes in the bone marrow of a patient with 11q deletion. Accurate examination of the bone marrow of other patients with the 11q deletion may clarify whether the observation of micromegakaryocytes is common in these patients. Micromegakaryocytes may indicate a defect of development. Two genes for two DNA binding proteins that are likely to be involved in hematopoiesis map in the 11q region: Ets-1, that maps to 11q24, close to D11S912, and the nuclear-factor-related-kB gene that maps to 11q24-q25. It is possible that these genes, when present in only one copy, result in thrombocytopenia or pancytopenia as observed in this patient. 23 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. The diagnostic dilemma of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura/hemolytic uremic syndrome in the obstetric triage and emergency department: lessons from 4 tertiary hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Caroline L; Dacus, John; Guzman, Edwin; Dhillon, Pushpinder; Coppage, Kristin; How, Helen; Sibai, Baha

    2009-04-01

    We report a series of occurrences of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP)/hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) in pregnancy that emphasizes early diagnosis. Fourteen pregnancies with TTP (n = 12) or HUS (n = 2) were studied. Analysis focused on clinical and laboratory findings on examination, initial diagnosis, and treatment. There were 14 pregnancies in 12 patients; 2 cases of TTP were diagnosed as recurrent. Five women were admitted to the emergency department (ED), and 7 patients were admitted to an obstetrics triage. Patients who were evaluated by an obstetrician were treated initially for hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelets syndrome/preeclampsia, whereas patients who were seen in the ED had a diagnosis that is commonplace in the ED (panic attack, domestic violence, gastroenteritis). Latency from the onset of symptoms to diagnosis ranged from 1-7 days. Plasmapheresis treatments in early gestation resulted in favorable maternal-neonatal outcome. Maternal and perinatal mortality rates were 25% each. TTP/HUS is a challenging diagnosis in obstetric triage and ED areas. We propose a management scheme that suggests how to triage patients for early diagnosis in pregnancy.

  10. Platelet turnover and kinetics in immune thrombocytopenic purpura: results with autologous 111In-labeled platelets and homologous 51Cr-labeled platelets differ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyns A du, P.; Badenhorst, P.N.; Loetter, M.G.P.; Pieters, H.; Wessels, P.; Kotze, H.F.

    1986-01-01

    Mean platelet survival and turnover were simultaneously determined with autologous 111In-labeled platelets (111In-AP) and homologous 51Cr-labeled platelets (51Cr-HP) in ten patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). In vivo redistribution of the 111In-AP was quantitated with a scintillation camera and computer-assisted image analysis. The patients were divided into two groups: those with splenic platelet sequestration (spleen-liver 111In activity ratio greater than 1.4), and those with diffuse sequestration in the reticuloendothelial system. The latter patients had more severe ITP reflected by pronounced thrombocytopenia, decreased platelet turnover, and prominent early hepatic platelet sequestration. Mean platelet life span estimated with 51Cr-HP was consistently shorter than that of 111In-AP. Platelet turnover determined with 51Cr-HP was thus over-estimated. The difference in results with the two isotope labels was apparently due to greater in vivo elution of 51Cr. Although the limitations of the techniques should be taken into account, these findings indicate that platelet turnover is not always normal or increased in ITP, but is low in severe disease. We suggest that this may be ascribed to damage to megakaryocytes by antiplatelet antibody. The physical characteristics in 111In clearly make this radionuclide superior to 51Cr for the study of platelet kinetics in ITP

  11. Relapse of congenital thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, after spontaneous remission, in a second-trimester primigravida: case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donavan de Souza Lúcio

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT CONTEXT: Thrombotic microangiopathy syndrome or thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura-hemolytic uremic syndrome (TTP-HUS describes distinct diseases sharing common pathological features: microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia, without any other apparent cause. CASE REPORT: An 18-year-old second-trimester primigravida presented with a history of fifteen days of intense weakness, followed by diarrhea over the past six days. She reported having had low platelets since childhood, but said that she had never had bleeding or menstrual abnormalities. Laboratory investigation showed anemia with schistocytes, thrombocytopenia and hypohaptoglobulinemia. Red blood cell concentrate and platelet transfusions were performed. The hypothesis of TTP or HUS was put forward and ADAMTS13 enzyme activity was investigated. The patient evolved with increasing platelet counts, even without specific treatment, and she was discharged. One month afterwards, she returned presenting weakness and swollen face and legs, which had developed one day earlier. The ADAMTS13 activity was less than 5%, without presence of autoantibodies. Regarding the two previous admissions (at 9 and 16 years of age, with similar clinical features, there was spontaneous remission on the first occasion and, on the second, the diagnosis of TTP was suspected and plasmapheresis was performed, but ADAMTS13 activity was not investigated. CONCLUSION: To date, this is the only report of congenital TTP with two spontaneous remissions in the literature This report reveals the importance of suspicion of this condition in the presence of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia without any other apparent cause.

  12. Ticlopidine-, clopidogrel-, and prasugrel-associated thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura: a 20-year review from the Southern Network on Adverse Reactions (SONAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Sony; Dunn, Brianne L; Qureshi, Zaina P; Bandarenko, Nicholas; Kwaan, Hau C; Pandey, Dilip K; McKoy, June M; Barnato, Sara E; Winters, Jeffrey L; Cursio, John F; Weiss, Ivy; Raife, Thomas J; Carey, Patricia M; Sarode, Ravindra; Kiss, Joseph E; Danielson, Constance; Ortel, Thomas L; Clark, William F; Rock, Gail; Matsumoto, Masanori; Fujimura, Yoshihiro; Zheng, X Long; Chen, Hao; Chen, Fei; Armstrong, John M; Raisch, Dennis W; Bennett, Charles L

    2012-11-01

    Thienopyridine-derivatives (ticlopidine, clopidogrel, and prasugrel) are the primary antiplatelet agents. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a rare drug-associated syndrome, with the thienopyridines being the most common drugs implicated in this syndrome. We reviewed 20 years of information on clinical, epidemiologic, and laboratory findings for thienopyridine-associated TTP. Four, 11, and 11 cases of thienopyridine-associated TTP were reported in the first year of marketing of ticlopidine (1989), clopidogrel (1998), and prasugrel (2010), respectively. As of 2011, the FDA received reports of 97 ticlopidine-, 197 clopidogrel-, and 14 prasugrel-associated TTP cases. Severe deficiency of ADAMTS-13 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with a thrombospondin type 1 motif, member 13) was present in 80% and antibodies to 100% of these TTP patients on ticlopidine, 0% of the patients with clopidogrel-associated TTP (p < 0.05), and an unknown percentage of patients with prasugrel-associated TTP. TTP is associated with use of each of the three thienopyridines, although the mechanistic pathways may differ. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  13. Recurrent Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura-Like Syndrome as a Paraneoplastic Phenomenon in Malignant Peritoneal Mesothelioma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Socola

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of an African American male with no significant past medical history presenting with recurrent, rapidly relapsing episodes of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP despite aggressive treatment with several lines of treatment. Incidentally, these episodes were associated with severe abdominal pain which eventually developed into acute abdomen and prompted exploratory laparotomy, revealing diffuse carcinomatosis with a tumor located on the left pelvis that was encasing the distal sigmoid colon. Pathology made a final diagnosis of peritoneal mesothelioma. TTP-like syndrome (TTP-LS has been described as a paraneoplastic phenomenon in several malignancies but never before in the setting of malignant mesothelioma. Paraneoplastic TTP-like syndrome has historically been associated with a dismal prognosis and particular clinical and laboratory abnormalities described in this paper. It is of utmost importance to make a prompt determination whether TTP is idiopathic or secondary to an underlying condition because of significant differences in their prognosis, treatment, and response. This paper also reviews the current literature regarding this challenging condition.

  14. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia, as part of Evans' syndrome, caused by cold reactive IgG autoantibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaarsma, AS; Muis, N; DeGraaf, SSN

    1996-01-01

    We describe a boy with Evans' syndrome, consisting of immune thrombocytopenic purpura at age 2 and autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) at age 4. AIHA was caused by cold Ige autoantibodies. This is unusual because AIHA is generally associated with either warm IgG antibodies or cold IgM antibodies.

  15. The Relationship between Self-esteem and Quality of Life of Patients with Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura at Isfahan's Sayed Al-Shohada Hospital, Iran, in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemati, Zeinab; Kiani, Davood

    2016-04-01

    Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a chronic disease which is accompanied with hopelessness and loss of the sense of well-being due to its symptoms and treatment. It also affects patients' sense of social and spiritual well-being. This disorder decreases patients' self-esteem and their quality of life by changing their mental image and self-confidence. This study was performed to find the relationship between self-esteem and quality of life of patients with ITP. This was a descriptive-analytical study on 64 patients with ITP who referred to Isfahan's Sayed Al-Shohada Hospital, Iran. In this study, patients with ITP were selected randomly using a random number chart. The data collection tools consisted of the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL)-BREF and Coopersmith Self-esteem Inventory (CSEI). Data were analyzed using SPSS and chi-square and Mann-Whitney tests and the Pearson and Spearman's rank correlation coefficients. In total, 64 patients completed the questionnaires. RESULTS showed that 32% of subjects were over 36 years of age and 59% were women. In addition, 29.7% of ITP patients had low self-esteem and quality of life. Chi-square test showed a significant relationship between self-esteem and quality of life of patients with ITP. The results of the present study showed that considerable attention must be paid to self-esteem, as one of the most important factors influencing the promotion of quality of life. Therefore, it is suggested that patient's self-esteem be improved by the implementation of educational and psychological programs in order to decrease the consequences of poor quality of life.

  16. Evaluating the impact of the ABO blood group on the clinical outcome of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura associated with severe ADAMTS13 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, E; Teruya, J

    2017-07-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is caused by the decrease of ADAMTS13, leading to the accumulation of ultra large von Willebrand factor (ULVWF). It was proposed that the distribution of blood group O among TTP patients may be potentially lower than expected because of the lower levels of VWF. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between various blood groups and the clinical outcome in TTP. Thirty-three patients with TTP with severe ADAMTS13 deficiency were studied. Data on blood group, relapse, number of plasma exchange sessions, replacement fluid and mortality were analysed. Mortality rate was 15·2% and it was not impacted by blood group. The distribution of group O among patients with idiopathic TTP was lower (12%) than expected (30%). Patients with blood group O required more sessions to achieve remission than did those with group B (P = 0·02). Cryo-supernatant was used in three refractory patients with group O, who failed to respond to fresh-frozen plasma and complete remission was achieved. The overall number of relapsing episodes was 7 of 33 (21·2%), and it was not impacted by blood group. Although blood group O appeared to provide protection against TTP, more sessions were required to achieve remission. Cryo-supernatant improved the clinical outcome in refractory patients with group O. Future studies may be warranted to determine whether higher baseline VWF can be a trigger for TTP, or can confer protection by competing with a newly secreted ULVWF for platelet binding. © 2017 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  17. The D173G mutation in ADAMTS-13 causes a severe form of congenital thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. A clinical, biochemical and in silico study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancellotti, Stefano; Peyvandi, Flora; Pagliari, Maria Teresa; Cairo, Andrea; Abdel-Azeim, Safwat; Chermak, Edrisse; Lazzareschi, Ilaria; Mastrangelo, Stefano; Cavallo, Luigi; Oliva, Romina; De Cristofaro, Raimondo

    2016-01-01

    Congenital thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a rare form of thrombotic microangiopathy, inherited with autosomal recessive mode as a dysfunction or severe deficiency of ADAMTS-13 (A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease with ThromboSpondin 1 repeats Nr. 13), caused by mutations in the ADAMTS-13 gene. About 100 mutations of the ADAMTS-13 gene were identified so far, although only a few characterised by in vitro expression studies. A new Asp to Gly homozygous mutation at position 173 of ADAMTS-13 sequence was identified in a family of Romanian origin, with some members affected by clinical signs of TTP. In two male sons, this mutation caused a severe (< 3%) deficiency of ADAMTS-13 activity and antigen level, associated with periodic thrombocytopenia, haemolytic anaemia and mild mental confusion. Both parents, who are cousins, showed the same mutation in heterozygous form. Expression studies of the mutant ADAMTS-13, performed in HEK293 cells, showed a severe decrease of the enzyme's activity and secretion, although the protease was detected inside the cells. Molecular dynamics found that in the D173G mutant the interface area between the metalloprotease domain and the disintegrin-like domain significantly decreases during the simulations, while the proline-rich 20 residues linker region (LR, 285-304) between them undergoes extensive conformational changes. Inter-domain contacts are also significantly less conserved in the mutant compared to the wild-type. Both a decrease of the inter-domain contacts along with a substantial conformational rearrangement of LR interfere with the proper maturation and folding of the mutant ADAMTS-13, thus impairing its secretion.

  18. Cardiac troponin-I on diagnosis predicts early death and refractoriness in acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Experience of the French Thrombotic Microangiopathies Reference Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhamou, Y; Boelle, P-Y; Baudin, B; Ederhy, S; Gras, J; Galicier, L; Azoulay, E; Provôt, F; Maury, E; Pène, F; Mira, J-P; Wynckel, A; Presne, C; Poullin, P; Halimi, J-M; Delmas, Y; Kanouni, T; Seguin, A; Mousson, C; Servais, A; Bordessoule, D; Perez, P; Hamidou, M; Cohen, A; Veyradier, A; Coppo, P

    2015-02-01

    Cardiac involvement is a major cause of mortality in patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). However, diagnosis remains underestimated and delayed, owing to subclinical injuries. Cardiac troponin-I measurement (cTnI) on admission could improve the early diagnosis of cardiac involvement and have prognostic value. To assess the predictive value of cTnI in patients with TTP for death or refractoriness. The study involved a prospective cohort of adult TTP patients with acquired severe ADAMTS-13 deficiency ( 0.1 μg L(-1) ) was present in 78 patients (59%), of whom 46 (59%) had no clinical cardiac involvement. The main outcomes were death (25%) and refractoriness (17%). Age (P = 0.02) and cTnI level (P = 0.002) showed the greatest impact on survival. A cTnI level of > 0.25 μg L(-1) was the only independent factor in predicting death (odds ratio [OR] 2.87; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13-7.22; P = 0.024) and/or refractoriness (OR 3.03; 95% CI 1.27-7.3; P = 0.01). A CTnI level of > 0.25 μg L(-1) at presentation in patients with TTP appears to be an independent factor associated with a three-fold increase in the risk of death or refractoriness. Therefore, cTnI level should be considered as a prognostic indicator in patients diagnosed with TTP. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  19. Púrpura trombocitopênica trombótica associada à gravidez: relato de caso Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura associated with pregnancy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Silva Marques Filho

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A púrpura trombocitopênica trombótica (PTT é uma entidade rara em pacientes críticos. Relatamos um caso clínico de paciente gestante admitida em unidade de terapia intensiva obstétrica com quadro de alteração de sensório, atribuído inicialmente à doença hipertensiva da gravidez. Evoluiu com piora do quadro geral caracterizada por anemia e plaquetopenia grave, suscitando a investigação diagnóstica de púrpura trombocitopênica trombótica após o reconhecimento do perfil hematológico. Os autores enfatizam a importância do conhecimento da doença como marcador de prognóstico para pacientes obstétricas, em vista da semelhança com outras patologias comuns ao ciclo gravídico-puerperal e o fato do diagnóstico e tratamento precoce serem determinantes para o desfecho.Case report of a patient with 37-week gestational age admitted to an obstetric intensive care unit with an altered level of consciousness, related primarily to the pregnancy-induced hypertension. The patient presented a worsening clinical course characterized by, anemia and severe thrombocytopenia, Investigation led to a diagnostic of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura after the hematological profile was assessed. The authors emphasize the importance of the disease recognition as a prognostic marker for obstetric patients, in view of the similarity with other common morbidities during pregnancy and the importance of timely diagnosis and early treatment as determinant factors for the outcome.

  20. Downregulation of T-bet/GATA-3 ratio induced by IL-11 treatment is responsible for Th1/Th2 balance restoration in human immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Rongxin; Lin, Ying; Li, Qianqian; Zhou, Xieming; Pan, Xiahui; Bao, Yunhua; He, Muqing; Zhu, Baoling; Guo, Wenjian; Lin, Xiaoji; Jin, Limin

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal cellular immunity induced by deranged Th1/Th2 profile has been revealed to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Correction of the shifted Th1/Th2 balance represents a potential therapeutic approach to treat ITP. Here, we investigated the effects of IL-11 on the restoration of Th1/Th2 balance in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from adult ITP patients. As shown here, we observed a higher ratio of T-bet/GATA-3 gene expression by quantitative real-time PCR in the PBMCs from ITP patients, consistent with the presence of an abnormally high Th1/Th2 ratio. Remarkably, upon IL-11 treatment, a reversal of T-bet/GATA-3 ratio in ITP was achieved and was shown to be responsible for the restoration of Th1/Th2 balance, with IL-11 at 100 ng/ml demonstrating the highest efficiency. T-bet and GATA-3 are the two transcriptional factors that have been indicated to be the master regulators for Th1 and Th2 lineage commitment, respectively. In the presence of 100 ng/ml IL-11, GATA-3 transcript abundance rose up to ~85-fold of that measured in untreated cells, whereas T-bet transcripts were lowered merely to ~41%, suggesting that GATA-3 was the major contributor for the reversal of T-bet/GATA-3 ratio. Thus, our findings may very well encourage the development of novel medicines that specifically target and correct the T-bet/GATA-3 imbalance identified in ITP.

  1. Effect of eltrombopag on platelet counts and bleeding during treatment of chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussel, James B; Provan, Drew; Shamsi, Tahir; Cheng, Gregory; Psaila, Bethan; Kovaleva, Lidia; Salama, Abdulgabar; Jenkins, Julian M; Roychowdhury, Debasish; Mayer, Bhabita; Stone, Nicole; Arning, Michael

    2009-02-21

    Eltrombopag is an oral, non-peptide, thrombopoietin-receptor agonist that stimulates thrombopoiesis, leading to increased platelet production. This study assessed the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of once daily eltrombopag 50 mg, and explored the efficacy of a dose increase to 75 mg. In this phase III, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, adults from 63 sites in 23 countries with chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), platelet counts less than 30 000 per muL of blood, and one or more previous ITP treatment received standard care plus once-daily eltrombopag 50 mg (n=76) or placebo (n=38) for up to 6 weeks. Patients were randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio of eltrombopag:placebo by a validated randomisation system. After 3 weeks, patients with platelet counts less than 50 000 per microL could increase study drug to 75 mg. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients achieving platelet counts 50 000 per microL or more at day 43. All participants who received at least one dose of their allocated treatment were included in the analysis. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00102739. 73 patients in the eltrombopag group and 37 in the placebo group were included in the efficacy population and were evaluable for day-43 analyses. 43 (59%) eltrombopag patients and six (16%) placebo patients responded (ie, achieved platelet counts >/=50 000 per microL; odds ratio [OR] 9.61 [95% CI 3.31-27.86]; pevents during treatment (eltrombopag, two [3%]; placebo, one [3%]) and adverse events leading to study discontinuation (eltrombopag, three [4%]; placebo, two [5%]), were similar in both groups. Eltrombopag is an effective treatment for managment of thrombocytopenia in chronic ITP.

  2. Length of stay, hospitalization cost, and in-hospital mortality in US adult inpatients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura, 2006-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Ruopeng; Wang, Peizhong Peter

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we examined the length of stay, hospitalization cost, and risk of in-hospital mortality among US adult inpatients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). We analyzed nationally representative data obtained from Nationwide/National Inpatient Sample database of discharges from 2006 to 2012. In the US, there were an estimated 296,870 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 284,831-308,909) patient discharges recorded for ITP from 2006 to 2012, during which ITP-related hospitalizations had increased steadily by nearly 30%. The average length of stay for an ITP-related hospitalization was found to be 6.02 days (95% CI: 5.93-6.10), which is 28% higher than that of the overall US discharge population (4.70 days, 95% CI: 4.66-4.74). The average cost of ITP-related hospitalizations was found to be US$16,594 (95% CI: US$16,257-US$16,931), which is 48% higher than that of the overall US discharge population (US$11,200; 95% CI: US$11,033-US$11,368). Gender- and age-adjusted mortality risk in inpatients with ITP was 22% (95% CI: 19%-24%) higher than that of the overall US discharge population. Across diagnosis related groups, length of stay for ITP-related hospitalizations was longest for septicemia (7.97 days, 95% CI: 7.55-8.39) and splenectomy (7.40 days, 95% CI: 6.94-7.86). Splenectomy (US$25,262; 95% CI: US$24,044-US$26,481) and septicemia (US$18,430; 95% CI: US$17,353-US$19,507) were associated with the highest cost of hospitalization. The prevalence of mortality in ITP-related hospitalizations was highest for septicemia (11.11%, 95% CI: 9.60%-12.63%) and intracranial hemorrhage (9.71%, 95% CI: 7.65%-11.77%). Inpatients with ITP had longer hospital stay, bore higher costs, and faced greater risk of mortality than the overall US discharge population.

  3. A disease-specific measure of health-related quality of life for use in adults with immune thrombocytopenic purpura: Its development and validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McMillan Robert

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background No validated disease-specific measures are available to assess health-related quality of life (HRQoL in adult subjects with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP. Therefore, we sought to develop and validate the ITP-Patient Assessment Questionnaire (ITP-PAQ for adult subjects with ITP. Methods Information from literature reviews, focus groups with subjects, and clinicians were used to develop 50 ITP-PAQ items. Factor analyses were conducted to develop the scale structure and reduce the number of items. The final 44-item ITP-PAQ, which includes ten scales [Symptoms (S, Bother-Physical Health (B, Fatigue/Sleep (FT, Activity (A, Fear (FR, Psychological Health (PH, Work (W, Social Activity (SA, Women's Reproductive Health (RH, and Overall (QoL], was self-administered to adult ITP subjects at baseline and 7–10 days later. Test-retest reliability, internal consistency reliability, construct and known groups validity of the final ITP-PAQ were evaluated. Results Seventy-three subjects with ITP completed the questionnaire twice. Test-retest reliability, as measured by the intra-class correlation, ranged from 0.52–0.90. Internal consistency reliability was demonstrated with Cronbach's alpha for all scales above the acceptable level of 0.70 (range: 0.71–0.92, except for RH (0.66. Construct validity, assessed by correlating ITP-PAQ scales with established measures (Short Form-36 v.1, SF-36 and Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, CES-D, was demonstrated through moderate correlations between the ITP-PAQ SA and SF-36 Social Function scales (r = 0.67, and between ITP-PAQ PH and SF-36 Mental Health Scales (r = 0.63. Moderate to strong inter-scale correlations were reported between ITP-PAQ scales and the CES-D, except for the RH scale. Known groups validity was evaluated by comparing mean scores for groups that differed clinically. Statistically significant differences (p Conclusion Results provide preliminary evidence of

  4. A disease-specific measure of health-related quality of life for use in adults with immune thrombocytopenic purpura: its development and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Susan D; Bussel, James B; George, James N; McMillan, Robert; Okano, Gary J; Nichol, Janet L

    2007-02-22

    No validated disease-specific measures are available to assess health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in adult subjects with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Therefore, we sought to develop and validate the ITP-Patient Assessment Questionnaire (ITP-PAQ) for adult subjects with ITP. Information from literature reviews, focus groups with subjects, and clinicians were used to develop 50 ITP-PAQ items. Factor analyses were conducted to develop the scale structure and reduce the number of items. The final 44-item ITP-PAQ, which includes ten scales [Symptoms (S), Bother-Physical Health (B), Fatigue/Sleep (FT), Activity (A), Fear (FR), Psychological Health (PH), Work (W), Social Activity (SA), Women's Reproductive Health (RH), and Overall (QoL)], was self-administered to adult ITP subjects at baseline and 7-10 days later. Test-retest reliability, internal consistency reliability, construct and known groups validity of the final ITP-PAQ were evaluated. Seventy-three subjects with ITP completed the questionnaire twice. Test-retest reliability, as measured by the intra-class correlation, ranged from 0.52-0.90. Internal consistency reliability was demonstrated with Cronbach's alpha for all scales above the acceptable level of 0.70 (range: 0.71-0.92), except for RH (0.66). Construct validity, assessed by correlating ITP-PAQ scales with established measures (Short Form-36 v.1, SF-36 and Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, CES-D), was demonstrated through moderate correlations between the ITP-PAQ SA and SF-36 Social Function scales (r = 0.67), and between ITP-PAQ PH and SF-36 Mental Health Scales (r = 0.63). Moderate to strong inter-scale correlations were reported between ITP-PAQ scales and the CES-D, except for the RH scale. Known groups validity was evaluated by comparing mean scores for groups that differed clinically. Statistically significant differences (p PAQ in adult subjects with ITP. Further work should be conducted to assess the responsiveness

  5. Enhancing global vaccine pharmacovigilance: Proof-of-concept study on aseptic meningitis and immune thrombocytopenic purpura following measles-mumps containing vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Vilar, Silvia; Weibel, Daniel; Sturkenboom, Miriam; Black, Steven; Maure, Christine; Castro, Jose Luis; Bravo-Alcántara, Pamela; Dodd, Caitlin N; Romio, Silvana A; de Ridder, Maria; Nakato, Swabra; Molina-León, Helvert Felipe; Elango, Varalakshmi; Zuber, Patrick L F

    2018-01-08

    New vaccines designed to prevent diseases endemic in low and middle-income countries (LMICs) are now being introduced without prior record of utilization in countries with robust pharmacovigilance systems. To address this deficit, our objective was to demonstrate feasibility of an international hospital-based network for the assessment of potential epidemiological associations between serious and rare adverse events and vaccines in any setting. This was done through a proof-of-concept evaluation of the risk of immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) and aseptic meningitis (AM) following administration of the first dose of measles-mumps-containing vaccines using the self-controlled risk interval method in the primary analysis. The World Health Organization (WHO) selected 26 sentinel sites (49 hospitals) distributed in 16 countries of the six WHO regions. Incidence rate ratios (IRR) of 5.0 (95% CI: 2.5-9.7) for ITP following first dose of measles-containing vaccinations, and of 10.9 (95% CI: 4.2-27.8) for AM following mumps-containing vaccinations were found. The strain-specific analyses showed significantly elevated ITP risk for measles vaccines containing Schwarz (IRR: 20.7; 95% CI: 2.7-157.6), Edmonston-Zagreb (IRR: 11.1; 95% CI: 1.4-90.3), and Enders'Edmonston (IRR: 8.5; 95% CI: 1.9-38.1) strains. A significantly elevated AM risk for vaccines containing the Leningrad-Zagreb mumps strain (IRR: 10.8; 95% CI: 1.3-87.4) was also found. This proof-of-concept study has shown, for the first time, that an international hospital-based network for the investigation of rare vaccine adverse events, using common standardized procedures and with high participation of LMICs, is feasible, can produce reliable results, and has the potential to characterize differences in risk between vaccine strains. The completion of this network by adding large reference hospitals, particularly from tropical countries, and the systematic WHO-led implementation of this approach, should permit the

  6. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor decreases the Th1/Th2 ratio in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Fei; Zhang, Zhuo; Hou, Jinxiao; Cao, Fenglin; Zhang, Yingmei; Wang, Ping; Wei, Hong; Zhou, Jin

    2016-12-01

    Chronic immune thrombocytopenia purpura (ITP) is an autoimmune disease that exhibits an abnormally high Th1/Th2 ratio. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been shown to decrease the Th1/Th2 ratio in healthy donors. In this study, we investigated the effects of G-CSF treatment on the Th1/Th2 cells and the underlying mechanisms in patients with ITP in vitro. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from patients with ITP and healthy controls were treated with G-CSF. Expression levels of interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, and IL-13 in supernatants were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The expression of IFN-γ, IL-4, and G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR) on Th1 and Th2 cells were examined by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. The mRNA expression of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4, IL-13, and T-box expressed in T cells (T-bet) and GATA-binding protein 3 (GATA-3) in PBMCs was evaluated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that G-CSF could significantly reduce the Th1/Th2 ratio in PBMCs from patients with ITP in vitro. As the concentration of G-CSF increased, Th1/Th2 ([IFN-γ+IL-2]/[IL-4+IL-13]) cytokine ratios and T-bet/GATA-3 mRNA ratios decreased in a concentration-dependent manner. Th1 cells and Th2 cells both expressed G-CSFR. These results suggest that G-CSF could decrease the Th1/Th2 ratio in the context of ITP, and elucidate the direct and indirect immunomodulatory mechanisms underlying G-CSF functions in Th1/Th2 cells, thus supporting the therapeutic potential of G-CSF in the treatment of patients with ITP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A disease-specific measure of health-related quality of life in adults with chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura: psychometric testing in an open-label clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Susan D; Bussel, James B; George, James N; McMillan, Robert; Okano, Gary J; Nichol, Janet L

    2007-05-01

    The Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura Patient Assessment Questionnaire (ITP-PAQ) was developed to assess disease-specific quality of life (QoL) in adults with ITP. It is a 44-item questionnaire that includes scales for physical health (symptoms, fatigue/sleep, bother, and activity), emotional health (psychological and fear), overall QoL, social activity, women's reproductive health, and work. A previous study reported preliminary evidence of its reliability and validity. The present study was conducted to ascertain the responsiveness (ability to detect a clinically important treatment effect), reliability, and validity of the ITP-PAQ and to corroborate the earlier findings. The women's reproductive health scale was evaluated for psychometric evidence of the existence of separate menstrual symptoms and fertility subscales. The ITP-PAQ was evaluated in the context of an ongoing open-label extension study assessing the tolerability and durability of increases in the platelet count with AMG 531 (a thrombopoiesis peptibody that increases platelet production by targeting the thrombopoietin receptor) administered by subcutaneous injection once weekly in adult patients with ITP It was self-administered at baseline and at weeks 4, 12, and 24. The responsiveness of the questionnaire was evaluated by calculating and comparing the change scores of patients who showed clinical improvement-categorized as platelet responders (those with a platelet count > or =50 x 10(9) cells/L and a doubling of baseline values at week 24) and durable platelet responders (those with a platelet count > or =50 x 10(9) cells/L and a doubling of baseline values on > or =6 occasions during weeks 17-24)-with the change scores of patients wh did not show clinical improvement. The reliability (internal consistency and test-retest) and validity (convergent, discriminant, and known groups) of the questionnaire were also evaluated. Validity was examined in terms of correlations between the ITP-PAQ and the 36

  8. Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis: Case report with history of urticaria, petechiae and palpable pinpoint purpura triggered by medical abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbonile, Lumuli

    2016-03-17

    Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis (APD) is a rare autoimmune response to raised endogenous progesterone levels that occur during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Cutaneous, mucosal lesions and other systemic manifestations develop cyclically during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle when progesterone levels are elevated. APD symptoms usually start 3 - 10 days before menstruation and resolve 1 - 2 days after menstruation ceases. A 30-year-old woman presented with urticaria, petechiae and palpable pinpoint purpura lesions of the legs, forearms, neck and buttocks 1 week prior to her menses starting and 2 months after a medical abortion. She was diagnosed with allergic contact dermatitis and topical steroids were prescribed. Her skin conditions did not improve and were associated with her menstrual cycle. We performed an intradermal test using progesterone, which was positive. She was treated with oral contraceptive pills and the symptoms were resolved. This is a typical case of APD triggered by increased sensitivity to endogenous progesterone induced a few months after medical abortion.

  9. Aortic Root Rupture during Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation in a Patient with Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura: Utility of Transesophageal Echocardiography in Early Detection and Description of a Semiconservative Surgical Management Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar, Jaya; Ruel, Marc; Nicholson, Donna; Labinaz, Marino

    2016-12-01

    An 87-year-old man with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and platelet count of 56 × 10 9 /L underwent transesophageal echocardiography (TEE)-guided transcatheter aortic valve implantation using a femoral approach. Post valve deployment, a new pericardial effusion was noted which was successfully drained. Despite this, the patient became hypotensive needing vasopressor support with reaccumulation of pericardial fluid. Emergent sternotomy was performed and a perforation of the right ventricular apex was noted which was sealed with a pledgeted suture. Continued bleeding prompted further exploration; the aorta was seen to be mottled in conjunction with clear aortic root hematoma on TEE and a diagnosis of root rupture was made. This was semiconservatively managed without conversion to a full aortic root repair or replacement procedure. Multiple sutures were applied to the periaortic space and the bleeding sealed with use of BioGlue (Cryolife Inc., Kennesaw, GA) and Surgicel (Ethicon Inc., Somerville, NJ). The postoperative course was stable and the patient remained well at 3-month follow-up.

  10. [Metastatic prostate cancer complicated with chronic disseminated intravascular coagulopathy causing acute renal failure, mimicking thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and hemolytic uremic syndrome: pathomechanism, differential diagnosis and therapy related to a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deme, Dániel; Ragán, Márton; Kalmár, Katalin; Kovács, Lajos; Varga, Erzsébet; Varga, Tünde; Rakonczai, Ervin

    2010-12-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC) is characterized as activation of the clotting system resulting in fibrin thrombi, gradually diminishing levels of clotting factors with increased risk of bleeding. Basically two types of DIC are distinguished: (1) chronic (compensated) - with alteration of laboratory values and (2) acute (non-compensated) - with severe clinical manifestations: bleeding, shock, acute renal failure (ARF), transient focal neurologic deficit, delirium or coma. Chronic DIC related to metastatic neoplasia is caused by pancreatic, gastric or prostatic carcinoma in most of the cases. Incidence rate of DIC is 13-30% in prostate cancer, among those only 0.4-1.65% of patients had clinical signs and symptoms of DIC. In other words, chronic DIC is developed in one of eight patients with prostate cancer. DIC is considered as a poor prognostic factor in prostatic carcinoma. The similar clinical and laboratory findings of TTP-HUS (thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura - hemolytic uremic syndrome) and DIC makes it difficult to differentiate between them. A 71 years old male patient with known chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, benign prostatic hyperplasia, significant carotid artery stenosis, gastric ulcer and alcoholic liver disease was admitted to another hospital with melena. Gastroscopy revealed intact gastric mucosa and actually non-bleeding duodenal ulcer covered by clots. Laboratory results showed hyperkalemia, elevated kidney function tests, indirect hyperbilirubinemia, increased liver function tests, leukocytosis, anemia, thrombocytopenia and elevated international normalized ratio (INR). He was treated with saline infusions, four units of red blood cells and one unit of fresh frozen plasma transfusions. Four days later he was transported to our Institution with ARF. Physical examination revealed dyspnoe, petechiae, hemoptoe, oliguria, chest-wall pain and aggressive behavior. Thrombocytopenia, signs of MAHA (fragmentocytes and helmet cells

  11. The role of tumor necrosis factor-alpha -308 G/A and transforming growth factor-beta 1 -915 G/C polymorphisms in childhood idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emel Okulu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To increase our understanding of the etiology of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP some cytokine gene polymorphisms were analyzed for susceptibility to the disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α -308 G/A and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1 –915 G/C polymorphisms in the development and clinical progression of childhood ITP.Materials and Methods: In all, 50 pediatric patients with ITP (25 with acute ITP and 25 with chronic ITP and 48 healthy controls were investigated via LightCycler® PCR analysis for TNF-α -308 G/A and TGF-β1 -915 G/C polymorphisms.Results: The frequency of TNF-α -308 G/A polymorphism was 20%, 16%, and 22.9% in the acute ITP patients, chronic ITP patients, and controls, respectively (p>0.05. The frequency of TGF-β1 -915 G/C polymorphism was 16%, 8%, and 8.3% in the acute ITP patients, chronic ITP patients, and controls, respectively (p>0.05. The risk of developing ITP and clinical progression were not associated with TNF-α -308 G/A (OR: 0.738, 95% CI: 0.275-1.981, and OR: 0.762, 95% CI: 0.179-3.249 or TGF-β1 -915 G/C (OR: 1.5, 95% CI: 0.396-5.685, and OR: 0.457, 95% CI: 0.076-2.755 polymorphisms. Conclusion: The frequency of TNF-α -308 G/A and TGF-β1 -915 G/C polymorphisms did not differ between pediatric ITP patients and healthy controls, and these polymorphisms were not associated with susceptibility to the development and clinical progression of the disease.

  12. A comparison of intravenous immunoglobulin (2 g/kg totally) and single doses of anti-D immunoglobulin at 50 μg/kg, 75 μg/kg in newly diagnosed children with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: Ankara hospital experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alioglu, Bulent; Ercan, Sirma; Tapci, Ayse Esra; Zengin, Tugba; Yazarli, Esra; Dallar, Yildiz

    2013-07-01

    We conducted this prospective randomized trial of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) treatment in children with newly diagnosed immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) to compare the efficacy of IVIG to standard and higher doses of anti-D IVIG. Seventy-eight patients who were previously untreated and between the age of 1 and 18 years with newly diagnosed acute ITP and a platelet concentration less than 20×10/l were eligible for enrollment. In this study IVIG treatment was compared with two different doses of anti-D. Study patients were randomized to receive treatment according to one of the two single anti-D IVIG doses [50 μg/kg (n=19) or 75 μg/kg (n=20)] or 2 g/kg (400 mg/kg per day, 5 day) total dose of IVIG (n=39). There is a significant increase of 24th hour, 48th hour, 72nd hour, 7th day and 30th day platelet counts in IVIG (2 g/kg, total dose) group compared to anti-D IVIG 50 μg/kg and anti-D IVIG 75 μg/kg groups. However, there were no difference between 24th hour, 48th hour, 72nd hour, 7th day and 30th day platelet counts across anti-D IVIG 50 μg/kg and anti-D IVIG 75 μg/kg groups. In conclusion, this study suggests that IVIG is well tolerated and significantly more effective than standard and high-dose anti-D IVIG for the treatment of newly diagnosed ITP in children. Apart from this, we believe that IVIG might be the first-line treatment of these patients. Regarding this issue further prospective studies comparing different IVIG treatment regimens with anti-D IVIG treatment regimens are needed.

  13. Microangiopatias trombóticas: púrpura trombocitopênica trombótica e síndrome hemolítico-urêmica Thrombotic microangiopathies: thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura / hemolytic uremic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Goretti Polito

    2010-09-01

    complemento. Uma série de mutações e polimorfismo em genes que codificam proteínas reguladoras do complemento sozinhas ou em combinação podem levar a SHU atípica. Aproximadamente 60% dos casos de SHU atípica têm mutações do tipo "perda da função" em genes que codificam as proteínas reguladoras do complemento, as quais protegem as células hospedeiras da ativação do complemento: fator H do complemento (FHC, fator I (FIC e proteína cofator de membrana (PCM ou CD46, ou mutações do tipo "ganho da função" em genes que codificam o FHC ou C3. Além disso, aproximadamente 10% dos pacientes com SHU atípica têm deficiência na função do FHC devido a anticorpos anti-FHC. Mesmo que as MATs sejam condições altamente heterogêneas, um terço dos pacientes tem deficiência severa da ADA-MTS13. Transfusões de plaquetas são contraindicadas nesses pacientes. Infusão de plasma ou plasma exchange (PE é o único tratamento eficiente.Thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs are pathological conditions characterized by generalized microvascular occlusion by platelet thrombi, thrombocytopenia, and microangiopathic hemolytic anemia. Two typical phenotypes of TMAs are hemolytic- uremic syndrome (HUS and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP. Other disorders occasionally present with similar manifestations. Depending on whether renal or brain lesions prevail, two pathologically indistinguishable but somehow clinically different disorders have been described: HUS and TTP. Injury to the endothelial cell is the central and likely inciting factor in the sequence of events leading to TMA. Loss of physiological thromboresistance, leukocyte adhesion to damaged endothelium, complement consumption, abnormal von Willebrand factor release and fragmentation, and increased vascular shear stress may then sustain and amplify the microangiopathic process. Intrinsic abnormalities of the complement system and of the von Willebrand factor pathway may account for a genetic predisposition to the

  14. Púrpura trombocitopênica imune da criança: experiência de 12 anos em uma única instituição brasileira Childhood immune thrombocytopenic purpura: 12-year experience of a single Brazilian institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel B. Delgado

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi determinar a frequência dos quadros clínicos da púrpura trombocitopênica imune e sua associação com contagem de plaquetas, taxa de resposta à esplenectomia e fatores preditivos do desfecho e da evolução para a cronicidade. Realizou-se estudo retrospectivo com 187 crianças diagnosticadas no Hospital das Clínicas da UFMG, entre 04/1988 e 12/2001. Quadros assintomáticos e leves corresponderam a 76% do total. Hemorragias exclusivamente cutâneas ocorreram em 96% dos casos sintomáticos. A gravidade dos sintomas associou-se à intensidade da plaquetopenia. Evolução aguda foi apresentada por 123 pacientes (70,7% e crônica por 51 (29,3%. A apresentação insidiosa (26,2% associou-se a um maior número de esplenectomias (p=4x10-7, a uma menor taxa de resposta à corticoterapia (p=0,003 e constituiu-se, juntamente com a ausência de resposta à corticoterapia (pThe objective of this work was to determine the frequency of clinical manifestations of immune thrombocytopenic purpura and its association with platelet count, response to splenectomy and predictive factors for response and chronicity. This retrospective study included 187 children diagnosed at Hospital das Clínicas, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil, between April 1988 and December 2001. About 76% of the cases had asymptomatic or clinically mild disease. Cutaneous bleeding alone was seen in 96% of the symptomatic cases. Severity of symptoms was associated with low platelet count. The acute disease was observed in 123 patients (70.7% and 51 (29.3% developed the chronic disease. Insidious presentation (26.2% was associated with a larger number of splenectomies (p=4x10-7 and with a reduced response to steroids (p=0.003. Additionally, the lack of response to steroids (p<1x10-7 and insidious presentation were predictive factors for chronicity (p=1x10-7. Splenectomy resulted in remission in 74.5%. Remission was the final outcome for 80.2% of

  15. Autoimmune diseases and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komrokji, Rami S; Kulasekararaj, Austin; Al Ali, Najla H; Kordasti, Shahram; Bart-Smith, Emily; Craig, Benjamin M; Padron, Eric; Zhang, Ling; Lancet, Jeffrey E; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; List, Alan F; Mufti, Ghulam J; Epling-Burnette, Pearlie K

    2016-05-01

    Immune dysregulation and altered T-cell hemostasis play important roles in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Recent studies suggest an increased risk of MDS among patients with autoimmune diseases. Here, we investigated the prevalence of autoimmune diseases among MDS patients, comparing characteristics and outcomes in those with and without autoimmune diseases. From our study group of 1408 MDS patients, 391 (28%) had autoimmune disease, with hypothyroidism being the most common type, accounting for 44% (n = 171) of patients (12% among all MDS patients analyzed). Other autoimmune diseases with ≥5% prevalence included idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in 12% (n = 46), rheumatoid arthritis in 10% (n = 41), and psoriasis in 7% (n = 28) of patients. Autoimmune diseases were more common in female MDS patients, those with RA or RCMD WHO subtype, and those who were less dependent on red blood cell transfusion. Median overall survival (OS) was 60 months (95% CI, 50-70) for patients with autoimmune diseases versus 45 months (95% CI, 40-49) for those without (log-rank test, P = 0.006). By multivariate analysis adjusting for revised IPSS and age >60 years, autoimmune diseases were a statistically significant independent factor for OS (HR 0.78; 95% CI, 0.66-0.92; P = 0.004). The rate of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) transformation was 23% (n = 89) in MDS patients with autoimmune disease versus 30% (n = 301) in those without (P = 0.011). Patient groups did not differ in response to azacitidine or lenalidomide treatment. Autoimmune diseases are prevalent among MDS patients. MDS patients with autoimmune diseases have better OS and less AML transformation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Helicobacter pylori and autoimmune disease: Cause or bystander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyk, Daniel S; Koutsoumpas, Andreas L; Mytilinaiou, Maria G; Rigopoulou, Eirini I; Sakkas, Lazaros I; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the main cause of chronic gastritis and a major risk factor for gastric cancer. This pathogen has also been considered a potential trigger of gastric autoimmunity, and in particular of autoimmune gastritis. However, a considerable number of reports have attempted to link H. pylori infection with the development of extra-gastrointestinal autoimmune disorders, affecting organs not immediately relevant to the stomach. This review discusses the current evidence in support or against the role of H. pylori as a potential trigger of autoimmune rheumatic and skin diseases, as well as organ specific autoimmune diseases. We discuss epidemiological, serological, immunological and experimental evidence associating this pathogen with autoimmune diseases. Although over one hundred autoimmune diseases have been investigated in relation to H. pylori, we discuss a select number of papers with a larger literature base, and include Sjögrens syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitides, autoimmune skin conditions, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, autoimmune thyroid disease, multiple sclerosis, neuromyelitis optica and autoimmune liver diseases. Specific mention is given to those studies reporting an association of anti-H. pylori antibodies with the presence of autoimmune disease-specific clinical parameters, as well as those failing to find such associations. We also provide helpful hints for future research. PMID:24574735

  17. RhIL-11 treatment normalized Th1/Th2 and T-bet/GATA-3 imbalance in in human immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying; Zhou, Xieming; Guo, Wenjian; Li, Qianqian; Pan, Xiahui; Bao, Yunhua; He, Muqing; Zhu, Baoling; Lin, Xiaoji; Jin, Limin; Yao, Rongxin

    2016-09-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune hemorrhagic disorder characterized by reduction in platelet counts. T helper 1 (Th1) cells polarization with an increased shift of Th1/Th2 ratio has been reported in ITP. This shift is associated with transcription factor T-box expressed in T cells (T-bet) upregulation and GATA-binding protein 3 (GATA-3) downregulation, leading to an increased T-bet/GATA-3 ratio. Our previous in vitro study showed that recombinant human interleukin-11 (rhIL-11) could normalize Th1/Th2 imbalance in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from adult ITP patients, which co-occurred with T-bet/GATA-3 ratio restoration. In this report, we investigated whether rhIL-11 had therapeutic effect in clinical ITP patients and whether rhIL-11 treatment could normalize Th1/Th2 and T-bet/GATA-3 levels in vivo. We found rhIL-11 treatment had a response rate of 67.7% and significantly decreased Th1 and T-bet levels but increased Th2 and GATA-3 levels in ITP patients who showed good response, normalizing Th1/Th2 and T-bet/GATA-3 ratios similar to that in healthy controls. Thus our study suggested rhIL-11 was effective with tolerable adverse effects in ITP. The treatment strategy warrants further clinical investigation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Presenting as Thrombotic Thrombocytopenia Purpura: How Close Is Close Enough?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar A. Perez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP is an uncommon life-threatening disease characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia, commonly associated with infections, malignancy, drugs, and autoimmune diseases. We report a case of 19-year-old previously healthy female that presents with anemia and thrombocytopenia diagnosed with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura that was treated successfully with plasmapheresis and corticosteroids. Laboratory findings also revealed antinuclear antibodies and antibodies to double-stranded DNA. Two weeks after presentation developed inflammatory arthritis, fulfilling diagnostic criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Prompt diagnosis and treatment with plasma exchange and corticosteroids should be instituted as soon as the diagnosis of TTP is suspected, even if other diagnoses, including lupus, are possible. When present, the coexistence of these two etiologies can have a higher mortality than either disease alone. An underlying diagnosis of SLE should be considered in all patients presenting TTP and the study of this association may provide a better understanding of their immune-mediated pathophysiology.

  19. High dose Intravenous Anti-D Immune Globulin is More Effective and Safe in Indian Paediatric Patients of Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Trupti Rekha; Jena, Rabindra Kumar; Swain, Kali Prasanna

    2016-12-01

    Immune Thrombocytopenia (ITP) is characterised by an autoimmune antibody-mediated destruction of platelets and impaired platelet production. Few controlled trials exist to guide management of patients with ITP in Indian scenario for which patients require an individualized approach. Anti-D (Rho (D) immune globulin) at a higher dose can prove to be a cost effective and safe alternative for Indian patients with ITP. To compare the safety and efficacy of higher dose (75μg/kg) intravenous Anti-D immune globulin against the standard dose of 50μg/kg for the management of ITP in Indian patients. One hundred and sixty four children with newly diagnosed ITP between 4-14 years were randomly selected for inclusion and were treated with 50μg/kg (standard dose) or 75μg /kg (higher dose) of Anti-D to compare the efficacy and safety of higher dose intravenous anti-D immune globulin. Efficacy of Anti-D was measured in terms of rate of response and median time to response for increase in platelet counts. Any adverse event was noted. A decrease in haemoglobin concentration suggested accompanying haemolysis. Seventy one out of 84 patients treated with Anti-D at 75μg/kg produced complete response (85%) with median time of response being 2.5 days. On the contrary, 45 patients (70%) patients treated with 50μg/kg had complete response. However, there was no significant increase in haemolysis with higher dose. A significant correlation was found between dose and peak increase in platelet count measured at 7 th day following administration. However, there was no relationship between the decrease in haemoglobin and the dose given, or between the increase in platelet count and fall in haemoglobin. A 75μg/kg dose of Anti-D is more effective with acceptable side effect in comparison to 50μg dose for treatment of newly diagnosed Indian patients of ITP.

  20. [Sports purpura].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluger, Nicolas

    2012-10-01

    Recreational or regular physical and sport activities may be responsible for a wide range of cutaneous complications. Among them, "sports purpura" is a peculiar symptom that can occur during a large number of sports. "Effort purpura" defines any purpura occurring within the context of physical exercise irrespective of its cause. Therefore this clinical diagnosis includes various aetiologies. Diagnosis of traumatic purpura is often easy if the sport is mentioned in the anamnesis; cutaneous exercise - induced vasculitis must be also noted. Purpura can reveal systemic diseases or internal haemorrhage, such as spleen rupture, thrombopathies or systemic vasculitis, and other effort purpuras must be taken into account, including those related to the environment (cold, sun exposure...). Knowledge of a physical activity before the occurrence of purpura should be known by practitioner to avoid unnecessary and costly explorations in most of the cases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Púrpura trombocitopênica trombótica na apresentação de pacientes com lúpus eritematoso sistêmico juvenil Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura at presentation of juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia M. A. Campos

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Púrpura trombocitopênica trombótica (PTT é uma alteração hematológica rara e com risco de morte, caracterizada por trombocitopenia, anemia hemolítica microangiopática e alterações neurológicas e/ou renais. A PTT foi descrita em raros pacientes com lúpus eritematoso sistêmico juvenil (LESJ e, até onde se sabe, a prevalência dessa manifestação em uma população de lúpus pediátrico ainda não foi estudada. Assim, entre janeiro de 1983 e dezembro de 2010, revisamos os prontuários de 5.508 pacientes acompanhados na Unidade de Reumatologia Pediátrica do nosso hospital universitário. Foram identificados 279 (5,1% casos de LESJ que preencheram os critérios de classificação do American College of Rheumatology. Dois destes (0,7% apresentavam PTT, ambos no início do LESJ, e foram aqui descritos. Os dois pacientes tinham febre, anemia hemolítica microangiopática (com esquizócitos no sangue periférico e trombocitopenia. O paciente do gênero masculino apresentava hemiparesia e proteinúria, e a paciente do gênero feminino tinha cefaleia persistente e hematúria. Ambos foram tratados com metilprednisolona endovenosa e plasmaferese quando do diagnóstico de PPT. Após tratamento, não houve recidiva da PTT, e hematócritos, contagens de plaquetas e níveis de desidrogenase lática permaneceram normais. Em conclusão, a PTT é uma rara e grave manifestação no início do LESJ. Os casos relatados reforçam a importância de um diagnóstico precoce e de uma terapia agressiva em pacientes com PTT, devido à sua alta morbidade.Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP is a rare and life-threatening hematological abnormality characterized by thrombocytopenia and microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, with neurological abnormalities and/or renal disease. TTP has been rarely reported in juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE patients and, to our knowledge, its prevalence in a paediatric lupus population has not been studied. Therefore

  2. Púrpura trombocitopênica trombótica: o papel do fator von Willebrand e da ADAMTS13 Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura: the role of von Willebrand factor and ADAMTS13

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro C. Tonaco

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A púrpura trombocitopênica trombótica (PTT instala-se de modo abrupto e é caracterizada pela oclusão difusa de arteríolas e capilares da microcirculação, levando à isquemia de tecidos. A oclusão é causada por microtrombos compostos basicamente de plaquetas e fator von Willebrand (FvW. O FvW é uma glicoproteína de estrutura multimérica sintetizada exclusivamente por células endoteliais e megacariócitos. Este fator promove a adesão das plaquetas ao endotélio lesado, participa do processo de agregação plaquetária e é a proteína carreadora do fator VIII na circulação. Em condições fisiológicas, os grandes multímeros do FvW encontram-se dentro das células endoteliais e nas plaquetas e não estão presentes no plasma. Tão logo estes grandes multímeros são liberados da célula endotelial, são clivados e removidos da circulação pela enzima ADAMTS13 (A Desintegrin And Metalloprotease with eight Thrombo Spondin-1-like. A deficiência funcional ou quantitativa de ADAMTS13 resulta no acúmulo de grandes multímeros de FvW no plasma, propiciando a agregação das plaquetas e oclusão difusa das arteríolas e capilares. A maioria dos casos de PTT está associada à deficiência da ADAMTS13 e já estão disponíveis no mercado internacional conjuntos diagnósticos para a determinação dos níveis de antígenos desta enzima, da de sua atividade e dos anticorpos anti-ADAMTS13. A avaliação laboratorial da ADAMTS13 parece constituir um avanço para o diagnóstico precoce da PTT. No entanto, a interpretação dos resultados exige cautela e um conhecimento do princípio do método, bem como das etapas das reações envolvidas.Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP starts abruptly and is characterized by diffuse occlusion of microcirculation arterioles and capillaries, leading to ischemia of tissues. Occlusion is caused by microscopic clots primarily composed of platelets and von Willebrand factor (VWF. VWF is a multimeric

  3. Case of twin pregnancy complicated by idiopathic thrombocytopenic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an acquired thrombocytopenia without other clear cause of thrombocytopenia. It is not common in a singleton pregnancy and less common in twin pregnancy. We report a 33‑year‑old ITP pluripara whose first pregnancy was uneventful. She carried twin pregnancy, complicated ...

  4. case Report: A case of refractory thrombotic thrombocytopenic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a rare, life-threatening disorder with no prevalence or incidence studies in sub-Saharan Africa. Acquired TTP has several causes, all of which lead to decreased activity of von Willebrand factor cleaving protease (ADAMTS13) due to autoantibodies that are directed towards ...

  5. Case of twin pregnancy complicated by idiopathic thrombocytopenic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-05-09

    May 9, 2016 ... Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an acquired thrombocytopenia without other clear cause of thrombocytopenia. It is not common in a singleton pregnancy and less common in twin pregnancy. We report a 33‑year‑old ITP pluripara whose first pregnancy was uneventful. She carried twin ...

  6. Rituximab in autoimmune hematologic diseases: not just a matter of B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasi, Roberto

    2010-04-01

    Rituximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody that depletes B cells by binding to the CD20 cell-surface antigen, has been investigated extensively in autoimmune disorders. Following the encouraging results in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), the use of this agent was explored in other autoimmune hematologic diseases, most notably autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), characterized by the presence of pathogenetic autoantibodies. Although randomized clinical trials are lacking, the cumulative data would suggest that rituximab has a beneficial role in their treatment. Response to B-cell-depleting therapy is actually associated with a significant decrease of circulating autoantibodies. However, several lines of evidence indicate that the T-cell compartment may also be modulated by these interventions. The doses and the duration of rituximab treatment in patients with autoimmune diseases are still unclear. The incidence of severe side effects is low but not insignificant. In particular, the risk of systemic infections and viral reactivation is a major concern.

  7. Neonatal alloimmun trombocytopenisk purpura (NAITP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjørn Skogen

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available  SAMMENDRAGNeonatal alloimmun trombocytopenisk purpura (NAITP opptrer før eller like etter fødselen, og erforårsaket av maternell alloimmunisering mot paternelle (føtale antigener som ikke er tilstede på morenstrombocytter. Incidensen er 1 pr. 2000/3000 nyfødte. Det finnes ikke noe screening-opplegg for å avsløremødre som kommer til å føde barn med NAITP. Derfor fins det heller ikke noe man kan gjøre før enkvinne føder sitt første barn med tilstanden. I påfølgende svangerskap kan moren følges, og man kanplanlegge tiltak for å redusere risikoen for skade på barnet.Skogen B. Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenic purpura. Nor J Epidemiol 1997; 7 (1: 69-72. ENGLISH SUMMARYNeonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenic purpura (NAITP manifests itself before or shortly after birthand is caused by maternal alloimmunization to a paternal (fetal antigen not present on the mother’splatelets. The incidence of the condition in the fetus and neonate is 1 in 2000/3000 live births. There areno screening programs for detecting mothers at risk of delivering infants affected with NAITP. Therefore,no antenatal management is possible in first pregnancies. In subsequent pregnancies there is an opportunityto detect affected fetuses and plan perinatal therapy.

  8. Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Systemic Lupus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The patient's neurological condition deteriorated necessitating transfer to the intensive care unit and mechanical ventilation. There he developed pneumonia and died of septic shock two months after presentation. Conclusion: The coexistence of TTP and SLE needs to be considered early in SLE patients with complicated ...

  9. Púrpura trombocitopênica e anemia hemolítica auto-imune em pacientes internados com lúpus eritematoso sistêmico juvenil Trombocytopenic purpura and autoimmune hemolytic anemia in hospitalized patients with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochebed Kyoung Kim

    2007-02-01

    esplenectomia. CONCLUSÕES: o CHE isolado foi uma manifestação grave em pacientes internados com LESJ, habitualmente associado a uma doença ativa e sistêmica.OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the hematological involvement (HI in hospitalized patients with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE. METHODS: from 1994 to 2005, 195 admissions occurred in 77 JSLE patients (American College of Rheumatology criteria and were followed by the Pediatric Rheumatology Unit of the Instituto da Criança - University of São Paulo. These admissions were evaluated according to the presence of HI at onset or during the evolution of the disease: autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AHA or thrombocytopenic purpura. All patients performed at least two complete blood counts. AHA was defined by a fall in hemoglobin levels (beyond 2 g/dl, reticulocytosis, increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and indirect bilirubin levels, and a positive Coombs test. The hematologic manifestations associated with infection, neoplasia and aplastic anemia were excluded. RESULTS: HI occurred in 14 patients (18.9%, with 15 admissions. Among these patients, 11 were female, 7 had trombocytopenic purpura, 5 AHA and 2 Evans syndrome. HI as onset and single manifestation of JSLE was observed in three patients. All the patients with trombocytopenic purpura presented cutaneous bleeding (petechia and/or ecchymosis. All had disease activity and simultaneously presented other manifestations of JSLE, particularly nephritis and vasculitis. Initially, all patients received pulsetherapy with methylprednisolone and prednisone later. In three patients the treatment aimed predominantly the control of hematologic manifestations, with intravenous gammaglobulin. The most used immunossupressive therapies were intravenous cyclophosphamide, cyclosporine and azathioprine. One patient died of central nervous system bleeding. No patient needed splenectomy. CONCLUSIONS: isolated HI was a severe manifestation in hospitalized patients with JSLE, generally

  10. Autoimmune diseases in a Nigerian woman--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talabi, O A; Owolabi, M O; Osotimehin, B O

    2003-12-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AD) are conditions in which there is the development of antibodies against self cells/ organs. AD could either be organ-specific or non-organ specific (systemic) in clinical presentation. Commonly reported ADs includes: Myasthenia gravis, Hashimoto thyroiditis, Guillian-Barre syndrome, vitiligo, type 1 diabetes mellitus, Graves diseases, Goodpastures syndrome, pemphigus, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosis, Addisons disease, multiple sclerosis, pernicious anaemia, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia, chronic active hepatitis, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. There is paucity of locally documented information on the occurrence of AD in same patient in our environment. We therefore report the case of a 66 year old woman who presented at the University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan, with a spectrum of the AD, Vitiligo, rheumatoid arthritis, myasthenia gravis, impaired glucose tolerance.

  11. Ny markør ved trombotisk trombocytopenisk purpura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtze, Jens Peter; Hillarp, Andreas; Lindblom, Anders

    2008-01-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathy can be caused by several conditions which are difficult to diagnose from the clinical presentation alone. Deficient enzyme activity of a newly-discovered enzyme, ADAMTS-13, can lead to thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Lack of ADAMTS-13 activity causes increased...

  12. Trombotisk trombocytopenisk purpura hos barn med lavt ADAMTS13 enzymniveau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spangenberg, Katrine Bredsdorff; Clasen-Linde, Erik; Poulsen, Anja

    2014-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a rare condition, but important to consider in case of thrombocytopenia and haemolysis. It is imperative to proceed with the correct treatment, in order to ensure a satisfactory outcome. TTP is either acquired or idiopathic. This case report shows...

  13. Factitious purpura in a 10-year-old girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kayo; Sakurai, Yoshihiko; Shibata, Mari; Miyagawa, Sachiko; Yoshioka, Akira

    2009-01-01

    We describe a 10-year-old girl who presented with bizarre purpura. Both congenital and autoimmune hemorrhagic disorders were excluded based on her past medical history and physical and laboratory findings. Child abuse was also ruled out as purpura continued to develop after child-family separation. Histologic examination of the skin lesions revealed disruption of collagen fiber bundles. This finding indicated application of external force, leading to a definitive diagnosis of factitious purpura. Although it is very rare in school-age children, the diagnosis of factitious purpura should be included in the differential diagnosis of purpura in children. Histologic analysis of skin biopsies may aid in establishing the diagnosis.

  14. Progressive Pigmentary Purpura

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Category: Share: Yes No, Keep Private Progressive Pigmentary Purpura Share | Progressive pigmentary purpura (we will call it PPP) is a group ... conditions ( Schamberg's disease , Lichenoid dermatitis of Gourgerot-Blum, purpura annularis telangiectodes of Majocchi and Lichen aureus). Schamberg's ...

  15. Purpura fulminans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordan, Karina; Kristensen, Kim

    2010-01-01

    Varicella-associated purpura fulminans (PF) is a rare complication to varicella infection. The condition is due to autoantibodies directed against protein S which forms part of the anticoagulation system. Lack of protein S leads to disseminated intravascular coagulation in the small vessels, which...

  16. Purpura fulminans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seagle, M B; Bingham, H G

    1988-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to call attention to an unusual syndrome that may lead to a major loss of soft tissue, limb, and life. The application of principles learned from trauma and burn care may substantially reduce the morbidity and mortality, which in the past have been associated with purpura fulminans.

  17. Hyperglobulinemic purpura in the course of multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalit, M; Bar-Sela, S; Leviatan, A; Naparstek, Y

    1980-01-01

    Secondary hyperglobulinemic purpura of Waldenström is characterized by polyclonal gammopathy associated mainly with autoimmune diseases. Its occurrence with multiple myeloma is very rare. We described a patient who developed characteristic lesions of hyperglobulinemic purpura in the course of IgA myeloma. Skin biopsy revealed deposition of IgA in the blood vessels.

  18. Acute ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction in Patients With Immune Thrombocytopenia Purpura: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, Sandeep K; Lee, Edwin; Fox, John; Rachko, Maurice

    2011-02-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is rare. We describe a case of AMI in patient with ITP. An 81-year-old woman presented with acute inferoposterior MI with low platelet count on admission (34,000/µl). Coronary angiography revealed significant mid right coronary artery (RCA) stenosis with thrombus, subsequently underwent successful percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). In some patients with immune thrombocytopenia purpura and acute myocardial infarction, percutaneous coronary intervention is a therapeutic option.

  19. Preoperative embolization of the splenic artery in patients that underwent splenectomy for immune thrombocytopenic purpura Embolização pré-operatória da artéria esplênica em pacientes submetidos à esplenectomia por púrpura trombocitopênica immune

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PlínioCarlos Baú

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Transfusion of platelets, red blood cells, or both is usually necessary immediately after splenic artery ligature in patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura who undergo splenectomy. PURPOSE: To investigate whether preoperative embolization of the splenic artery reduced the need for transfusion of platelets, red blood cells, or both. METHODS: Twenty- seven consecutive patients that underwent splenectomy for purpura between October 1999 and March 2006 performed by the same surgical team were enrolled. The first 17 patients did not undergo embolization and were compared with the next 10 patients, who composed the embolization group. RESULTS: The platelet count in the embolization group rose from a mean 7000 u/µl before to 75000 u/µl after the procedure. There was no need for platelet or red blood cell transfusion in the embolization group; in the group without preoperative embolization, 11 patients (p=0.001 required platelet transfusion and 8 (p=0.01, red blood cell transfusion. CONCLUSION: Embolization of the splenic artery before splenectomy is a safe method to avoid blood transfusions in patients with ITP.A transfusão de plaquetas e ou hemácias geralmente é realizada em pacientes submetidos a esplenectomia por Purpura Trombocitopênia Imune (PTI. OBJETIVO: Investigar se a embolização pré-operatória da artéria esplênica é eficaz na redução da necessidade de transfusão de hemácias ou plaquetas. MÉTODOS: Vinte e sete pacientes foram submetidos a esplenectomia por PTI de Outubro de 1999 a Março de 2006 pela mesma equipe cirúrgica. Os primeiros 17 pacientes não foram submetidos a embolização e foram comparados com os outros 10 individuos nos quais a embolização foi realizada. RESULTADOS: A contagem de plaquetas no grupo em que a embolização foi realizada subiu de uma média de 7000u/µl antes do procedimento, para 75000 u/µl após. Não foi necessário transfundir plaquetas ou glóbulos vermelhos no grupo submetido a

  20. Fireogfyrre svangerskaber med idiopatisk trombocytopenisk purpura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Tine Dalsgaard; Jønsson, Viggo; Wiik, Allan

    2002-01-01

    with thrombocytopenia, severe maternal thrombocytopenia, male gender. The nadir platelet count in the newborn infants was seen up to seven days after delivery. The presence of an older sibling with neonatal ITP is a risk factor for neonatal ITP in subsequent pregnancies. A significant association was found between......INTRODUCTION: The aim of this project was to describe the course of pregnancy with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) and to estimate risk factors and indications for treatment. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Birth, haematological, and neonatal files were examined retrospectively. RESULTS: Forty...... three days after delivery (p risk factors for perinatal thrombocytopenia were found: a sibling...

  1. Deterioration of autoimmune condition associated with repeated injection of dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuto Suda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 6-year-old girl underwent ureterocystoneostomy (UCN because of left flank pain due to delayed onset of ureteral stenosis one and a half years after endoscopic dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer (Deflux injection for the treatment of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR. Histopathological examination indicated chronic inflammation with abundant eosinophils characteristic of a reaction to Deflux. Several autoimmune diseases developed during the treatment for ureteral stenosis. First, 2 weeks prior to the onset of left flank pain, she was diagnosed as having systemic lupus erythematosus. Finally, she died of pulmonary hemorrhage due to thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura 4 months after UCN. The fatal outcome in this case was suspected to be caused by autoimmune syndrome induced by adjuvants, which in this case was the hyaluronic acid polymer injected into the ureteric orifice for the treatment of VUR.

  2. Laparoscopic versus open splenectomy in children with benign ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-06-28

    Jun 28, 2017 ... Thalassemia was present in 36 cases, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura ... hemoglobinopathies) and extracellular defects particu- larly autoimmune .... Thalassemia. 2. 2. Spherocytosis. 1. 0. ITP, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura; LS, laparoscopic splenectomy;. OS, open splenectomy. Laparoscopic ...

  3. Forskelle i behandling af børn med idiopatisk trombocytopenisk purpura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edslev, Pernille Wendtland; Kjærsgaard, Mimi; Rosthøj, Steen

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a rare immune-mediated bleeding disorder that usually takes a self-limiting and benign course. Due to the risk of intracranial haemorrhage, treatment regimens tend to be active. We present treatment data from 17 paediatric departments...

  4. Púrpura trombocitopênica trombótica - remissão completa em paciente com mau prognóstico após tratamento com plasmaférese terapêutica e rituximabe Successful outcome in poor-prognostic acute thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura treated with plasma exchange and rituximab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar de Almeida Neto

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available A púrpura trombocitopênica trombótica (PTT é uma doença rara e fatal que deve ser diagnosticada e tratada prontamente a fim de se obter melhor resposta terapêutica. Apresentamos um caso de PTT aguda grave tratada com plasmaférese e rituximabe. Ao diagnóstico, a paciente apresentava anemia hemolítica microangiopática, icterícia, febre, convulsões, seguidas por coma e choque hipovolêmico. Os exames laboratoriais iniciais mostravam DHL=2.860 IU/L, contagem de plaquetas de 37 x 10(9/L, hemoglobina de 5,1 g/dL e no esfregaço de sangue periférico havia a presença de esquizócitos. Iniciado tratamento para PTT com pulsoterapia com metilprednisolona e plasmaféreses terapêuticas diárias com troca de uma volemia plasmática e substituição com plasma fresco congelado. Após cinco sessões de plasmaférese, houve piora no quadro neurológico, acompanhado por aumento importante de DHL, ALT, AST e a contagem de plaquetas era de 72 x 10(9/L. Iniciamos o uso de rituximabe na dose padrão de 375mg/m²/semana/4 semanas e passamos a utilizar plasma pobre em crioprecipitado como reposição durante as plasmaféreses. Dois dias após a mudança na conduta terapêutica, houve importante melhora do quadro neurológico, estabilização da contagem de plaquetas e queda acentuada de DHL. Após 23 procedimentos de plasmaférese e quatro doses de rituximabe, a paciente apresentou remissão completa, mantida há 34 meses. A plasmaférese terapêutica com plasma pobre em crioprecipitado e o uso concomitante de rituximabe foi uma estratégia útil no tratamento deste caso de PTT aguda grave. Porém, ensaios clínicos prospectivos e randomizados são necessários para confirmar estes achados.Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP is a rare severe disease that must be diagnosed and treated promptly for a successful outcome. We report a case of severe acute TTP treated with plasma exchange and rituximab. The patient presented at diagnosis with severe

  5. Treatment of Actinic Purpura

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Mature skin is prone to bruising, resulting in a condition known as actinic purpura, characterized by unsightly ecchymosis and purple patches. Similar to other skin conditions, the incidence of actinic purpura increases with advancing age and occurs with equal frequency among men and women. The unsightly appearance of actinic purpura may be a source of emotional distress among the elderly. A new product has been formulated specifically for the treatment of actinic purpura. This product contains retinol, α-hydroxy acids, arnica oil, ceramides, niacinamide, and phytonadione, which effectively treat actinic purpura by improving local circulation, thickening the skin, and repairing the skin barrier. The objective of this paper is to review the beneficial properties of these ingredients and their respective roles in the treatment of actinic purpura. PMID:28979656

  6. Ludwig's angina after severe thrombocytopenic purpura associated with dengue fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Antonia Campos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report a case of Ludwig's angina, which required surgery because of toothache. The patient had dengue and severe thrombocytopenia as confirmed by clinical and laboratory diagnoses. However, dengue is not included among the predisposing factors for Ludwig's angina.

  7. [Multi-facetted clinical presentation of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, C.U.; Jurlander, J.; Daugaard, G.

    2009-01-01

    smears. Determination of the ADAMTS13-activity is now becoming available as a routine analysis. We present two cases that illustrate the multi-facetted clinical presentation under which TTP occurs. The importance of access to ADAMTS13 measurements is stressed Udgivelsesdato: 2009/1/26...

  8. Eltrombopag for the treatment of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasi, Roberto

    2008-12-01

    Strategies aimed at stimulating platelet production are a rational approach to the treatment of patients with primary immune thrombocytopenia, as, for many of them, the low platelet count is a consequence of ineffective megakaryopoiesis. Recently, intense clinical trial activity in immune thrombocytopenia has been reported for second-generation thrombopoietic agents. These novel molecules bear no structural resemblance to thrombopoietin, but still bind and activate the thrombopoietin receptor. One of these agents is eltrombopag (formerly SB497115), an orally available, small organic compound. Randomized trials have shown the short-term efficacy of eltrombopag in elevating the platelet count of most adult patients with immune thrombocytopenia unresponsive to at least one standard treatment. No significant adverse events were observed, but long-term safety data are still lacking. Ongoing studies will reveal the potential of this agent in the management of immune thrombocytopenia for long-term maintenance therapy, as well as its relative benefit compared with standard-of-care treatment.

  9. Epidemiologi, sygdomspræsentation og forløb af idiopatisk trombocytopenisk purpura hos børn i Danmark 1998-2000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaersgaard, Mimi; Edslev, Pernille Wendtland; Rosthøj, Steen

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Idopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP) is a condition with isolated thrombocytopenia and bleeding symptoms in skin and mucous membranes. It is easy to establish the diagnosis, but treatment is controversial, possibly due to different estimates of the risk for serious bleeding. We...

  10. Autoimmune diseases in Adult Life after Childhood Cancer in Scandinavia (ALiCCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmqvist, Anna Sällfors; Olsen, Jørgen H; Mellemkjaer, Lene; Garwicz, Stanislaw; Hjorth, Lars; Moëll, Christian; Månsson, Bengt; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Hasle, Henrik; Winther, Jeanette Falck

    2016-09-01

    The pattern of autoimmune diseases in childhood cancer survivors has not been investigated previously. We estimated the risk for an autoimmune disease after childhood cancer in a large, population-based setting with outcome measures from comprehensive, nationwide health registries. From the national cancer registries of Denmark, Iceland and Sweden, we identified 20 361 1-year survivors of cancer diagnosed before the age of 20 between the start of cancer registration in the 1940s and 1950s through 2008; 125 794 comparison subjects, matched by age, gender and country, were selected from national population registers. Study subjects were linked to the national hospital registers. Standardised hospitalisation rate ratios (SHRRs) and absolute excess risks (AERs) were calculated. Childhood cancer survivors had a significantly increased SHRR of 1.4 (95% CI 1.3 to 1.5) of all autoimmune diseases combined, corresponding to an AER of 67 per 100 000 person-years. The SHRRs were significantly increased for autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (16.3), Addison's disease (13.9), polyarteritis nodosa (5.8), chronic rheumatic heart disease (4.5), localised scleroderma (3.6), idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (3.4), Hashimoto's thyroiditis (3.1), pernicious anaemia (2.7), sarcoidosis (2.2), Sjögren's syndrome (2.0) and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (1.6). The SHRRs for any autoimmune disease were significantly increased after leukaemia (SHRR 1.6), Hodgkin's lymphoma (1.6), renal tumours (1.6) and central nervous system neoplasms (1.4). Childhood cancer survivors are at increased risk for certain types of autoimmune diseases. These findings underscore the need for prolonged follow-up of these survivors. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Atypical course of Henoch-Schonlein purpura in an adult patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górnikiewicz-Brzezicka, Bożena; Brzezicki, Jan; Rymko, Marcin; Jeka, Sławomir

    2015-01-01

    Henoch-Schonlein purpura is vasculitis of small blood vessels characterized by deposits of IgA immune complexes and also non-thrombocytopenic purpura, abdominal pain, arthritis and renal involvement. It affects people of all ages, but most cases occur in children between 2 and 11 years old, more frequently in boys. The disease is much less common in adults, who often have a more severe course of the disease. The paper presents the case of a 38-year-old female patient with insidious course of the disease, initially dominant skin symptoms and joint pain without signs of inflammation. Symptoms of the disease were initially uncharacteristic and mild, and did not suggest severe and rapid course of the disease. The patient required hospitalization in several departments before final diagnosis of Henoch-Schonlein purpura. The patient was treated with corticosteroids and immunosuppression. Despite the rapid course of the disease, treatment was effective. The patient was discharged in good condition. PMID:27407252

  12. New insights into childhood autoimmune hemolytic anemia: a French national observational study of 265 children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aladjidi, Nathalie; Leverger, Guy; Leblanc, Thierry; Picat, Marie Quitterie; Michel, Gérard; Bertrand, Yves; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Robert, Alain; Nelken, Brigitte; Gandemer, Virginie; Savel, Hélène; Stephan, Jean Louis; Fouyssac, Fanny; Jeanpetit, Julien; Thomas, Caroline; Rohrlich, Pierre; Baruchel, André; Fischer, Alain; Chêne, Geneviève; Perel, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Background Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare condition in children. Little is known about its initial presentation and the subsequent progression of the disease. Design and Methods Since 2004, a national observational study has been aiming to thoroughly describe cases and identify prognostic factors. Patients from all French hematologic pediatric units have been included if they had a hemoglobin concentration less than 11 g/dL, a positive direct antiglobulin test and hemolysis. Evans’ syndrome was defined by the association of autoimmune hemolytic anemia and immunological thrombocytopenic purpura. Data from patients’ medical records were registered from birth to last follow-up. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia was classified as primary or secondary. Remission criteria, qualifying the status of anemia at last follow-up, were used with the aim of identifying a subgroup with a favorable prognosis in continuous complete remission. Results The first 265 patients had a median age of 3.8 years at diagnosis. In 74% of cases the direct antiglobulin test was IgG/IgG+C3d. Consanguinity was reported in 8% of cases and first degree familial immunological diseases in 15% of cases. Evans’ syndrome was diagnosed in 37% of cases. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia was post-infectious in 10%, immunological in 53% and primary in 37% of cases. After a median follow-up of 3 years, 4% of children had died, 28% were still treatment-dependent and 39% were in continuous complete remission. In multivariate analysis, IgG and IgG+C3d direct antiglobulin tests were associated with a lower rate of survival with continuous complete remission (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.43; 95% confidence interval, 0.21–0.86). Conclusions This nationwide French cohort is the largest reported study of childhood autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The rarity of this condition is confirmed. Subgroups with genetic predisposition and underlying immune disorders were identified. PMID:21228033

  13. Immune ablation and stem-cell therapy in autoimmune disease. Clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyndall, A; Gratwohl, A

    2000-01-01

    In the past 5 years, around 350 patients have received haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation for an autoimmune disease, with 275 of these registered in an international data base in Basel under the auspices of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) and the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation(EBMT). Most patients had either a progressive form of multiple sclerosis (MS; n = 88) or scleroderma (now called systemic sclerosis; n = 55). Other diseases were rheumatoid arthritis (Ra n = 40), juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA; n = 30), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; n = 20), idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP; n = 7) and others. The procedure-related mortality was around 9%, with between-disease differences, being higher in systemic sclerosis and JIA and lower in RA (one death only). Benefit has been seen in around two-thirds of cases. No one regimen was clearly superior to another, with a trend toward more infectious complications with more intense regimens. Prospective, controlled randomized trials are indicated and being planned.

  14. Association between interferon-γ +874 T/A polymorphism and susceptibility to autoimmune diseases: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y H; Bae, S-C

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore whether the interferon (IFN)-γ +874 T/A polymorphism plays a role in modifying the risk of autoimmune diseases. A meta-analysis was conducted on the association between the IFN-γ +874 T/A polymorphism and autoimmune diseases. Eighteen studies with a total of 2952 patients and 3832 controls were included in the meta-analysis. The meta-analysis revealed no association between autoimmune diseases and the IFN-γ +874 T allele in all study subjects (odds ratio (OR)=1.023, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.894-1.171, p = 0.738), but stratification by ethnicity indicated an association between the IFN-γ +874 T allele and autoimmune diseases in Latin American subjects (OR = 0.780, 95% CI = 0.629-0.953, p = 0.015). Meta-analysis also revealed an association between autoimmune diseases and the IFN-γ +874 T/A polymorphism in Caucasian and Middle Eastern subjects under a dominant inheritance model (OR = 0.686, 95% CI = 0.489-0.964, p = 0.003; OR = 1.414, 95% CI = 1.102-1.813, p = 0.006). Meta-analysis by autoimmune disease type indicated an association between ITP and the IFN-γ +874 T allele (OR = 1.753, 95% CI = 1.228-2.503, p = 0.002), but not for vasculitis, vitiligo, and auto-immune thyroid disease. Meta-analysis also showed a significant association between the IFN-γ +874 T/A polymorphism and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) under the dominant model (OR = 1.668, 95% CI = 1.114-2.497, p = 0.013). This meta-analysis indicates that the IFN-γ +874 T/A polymorphism may play a significant role in modifying the risk of autoimmune diseases in Caucasian, Latin American, and Middle Eastern subjects, and in particular shows that the IFN-γ +874 T/A polymorphism is associated with increased genetic susceptibility to idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and SLE. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Thrombocytopenia during pregnancy in women with HIV infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    liver enzymes and low platelet count), and microangiopathies such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, (auto)immune thrombocytopenic purpura, haemolytic uraemic syndrome and haemolysis are likely. Viral infections such as viral hepatitis and infection with cytomegalovirus and HIV may also cause TCP. In the era ...

  16. Powerlifter's purpura: a valsalva-associated phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Joseph C; Suh, Philip S

    2002-08-01

    The causes of purpura can be classified into intravascular, vascular, and extravascular mechanisms. We describe a case of cervicofacial purpura in a powerlifter attributed to the accompanying Valsalva-associated increased arterial pressure. Powerlifting should be added to the list of activities that may cause purpura.

  17. Refractory Immunological Thrombocytopenia Purpura and Splenectomy in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Bernal-Macías

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thrombocytopenia is defined as a platelet count of less than 100,000 platelets per microlitre (mcL. Thrombocytopenia develops in approximately 6-7% of women during pregnancy and at least 3% of these cases are caused by immunological platelet destruction. Herein, we present a pregnant woman who develops at the first trimester autoimmune thrombocytopenia purpura associated with positive antiphospholipid antibodies. The disease was refractory to pharmacological treatments but had a favourable response to splenectomy. The patient carried the pregnancy to term without complication and gave birth to a healthy baby girl.

  18. Bir olgu nedeniyle immün trombositopenik purpura ve çocuğun fiziksel istismarı

    OpenAIRE

    Çolak, Başar; Karakaya, Işık; Şentürk, Ekrem; Yanal, Servet; Şişmanlar, Şahika G.; Biçer, Ümit

    2014-01-01

    To the Editor Physical abuse of children can be diagnosed more easily compared to other cases of abuse On the other hand difficulties may be experienced in the diagnosis in cases where multidiciplinary evaluation is not made A 8 year old girl with immune thrombocytopenic purpura ITP who had ecchymoses on the body and a history of falling in the school was diagnosed as physical abuse as a result of evaluation by the departments of pediatric psychiatry and forensic medicine We decided to discus...

  19. Autoimmune Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with type 1 autoimmune hepatitis commonly have other autoimmune disorders, such as celiac disease, an autoimmune disease in ... 2 can also have any of the above autoimmune disorders. What are the symptoms of autoimmune hepatitis? The ...

  20. A case of palpable purpura and nephropathy: Occam's Razor or Hickam's Dictum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandhadi, Ranadeep; Kodumuri, Vamsi; Arora, Rohit; Puneet Singh, Param; Adigopula, Shashi; Chua, Serafin

    2013-01-01

    Vasculitis causing palpable purpura, nephropathy, and hematologic abnormalities is a well-known entity. However, sometimes, vasculitis may not be the primary cause but is part of a systemic disease. Literature suggests that infections like HIV can induce nephropathy and antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody-positive vasculitis, which is different from the well-known entity of "antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis." We present a 46-year-old female patient with a history of intravenous drug abuse who reported with a rash, swelling, and palpable purpura of the lower extremities. Peripheral smear showed no evidence of disseminated intravascular coagulation or thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura; metabolic profile showed acute kidney injury. She was found to be HIV- and hepatitis C-positive. Immunologic workup was positive for both MPO and PR3 antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibodies and negative for cryoglobulins; complement levels were low. Skin biopsy showed leukocytoclastic vasculitis but kidney biopsy was negative for any immunologic involvement; it showed only glomerulosclerosis. Thus, it was thought that nephropathy and vasculitis, in this case, are two distinct pathologic processes, both induced by infection (HIV and/or hepatitis C). The patient responded to low-dose steroid therapy. She was later started on the definitive therapy, the highly active antiretroviral therapy regimen. This case illustrates the fact that low-dose steroids can still be a good alternative in acute situations in patients at risk from immunosuppression.

  1. Refractor y thrombotic thrombocytopenic pur pura following acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebisa Bekele

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP is a rare blood disorder with an estimated incidence of 4–5 cases per million people per year. It is characterized by small-vessel platelet-rich thrombi that cause thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and organ damage. There are reports in literature that TTP and acute pancreatitis are associated, indicating each can be the cause of the other. However, acute pancreatitis triggering TTP is very rare. A 71 years old female presented with abdominal pain of 3 days, followed by dark urine. She had icteric sclera, petechial rash and mild epigastric tenderness. Lab findings were significant for hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and elevated lipase. CT of abdomen showed evidence of pancreatitis and cholelithiasis. After admission, patient developed symptoms of stroke. Further investigation showed elevated lactate dehydrogenase and normal coagulation studied with peripheral blood smear showed 5–6 schistocytes/high power field. Disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs-13 (ADAMTS13 activity showed less than 3% with high ADAMTS13 inhibitor 2.2. Patient required 6–7 weeks of daily plasmapheresis until she showed complete response. Our patient presented with clinical features of pancreatitis prior to having dark urine and petechial rash. Therefore, we strongly believe that our patient had pancreatitis which was followed by TTP. Patient's ADMTS13 activity was 6% after 10 plasma exchanges, signifying refractory TTP and higher risk for morbidity and mortality. There are limited data and consensus on the management of refractory TTP. TTP and acute pancreatitis are associated. However, refractory TTP following acute pancreatitis is rarely mentioned in the literature. We would like to emphasize the importance of having higher clinical suspicion of the association of both disease entities.

  2. Lesões microscopicas do baço na purpura trombocitopenica idiopatica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Riveros

    1947-09-01

    Full Text Available Histopathological changes strikingly similar were found in the spleen of four cases (young female subjects of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura hemorrhagica in which splenectomy was performed. The chief changes reported are enlargement of the marginal zone of the malpighian corpuscles, proliferation and mobilization of the reticulo-endothelial cells, myeloid metaplasia, local (tissue eosinophilia, and stoppage of the circulation or stasis of platelets from which results a filling of the spelenic sinuses by such elements. The latter phenomenon will possibly present some bearing with thrombocytopenia which is such a characteristic feature in this disease and will perhaps account for the rapid increase in blood platelets which usually follows splenectomy and or the finding of increased megakaryocytes in the bone marrow.

  3. Nye behandlingsmuligheder ved primær immun trombocytopeni

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudbrandsdottir, Sif; Frederiksen, Henrik; Birgens, Henrik Sverre

    2011-01-01

    Primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP)--formerly known as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura--is an autoimmune disorder characterized by immune mediated thrombocytopenia. The aetiology of ITP remains unknown, but studies have shown that multiple immunological mechanisms are involved...

  4. Patofysiologien ved primær immun trombocytopeni

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudbrandsdottir, Sif; Frederiksen, Henrik; Birgens, Henrik Sverre

    2011-01-01

    Primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP)--formerly known as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura--is an autoimmune disorder characterized by immune-mediated thrombocytopenia. The aetiology of ITP remains unknown, but studies have shown that multiple immunological mechanisms are involved...

  5. Nye behandlingsmuligheder ved primær immun trombocytopeni

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudbrandsdottir, Sif; Frederiksen, Henrik; Birgens, Henrik Sverre

    2011-01-01

    Primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP)--formerly known as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura--is an autoimmune disorder characterized by immune mediated thrombocytopenia. The aetiology of ITP remains unknown, but studies have shown that multiple immunological mechanisms are involved in the pathog...

  6. Idiopathic thromobocytopenic purpura in two mothers of children with DiGeorge sequence: A new component manifestation of deletion 22q11?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, A.; Philip, N. [Hopital d`Enfants de la Timone, Marseilles (France); Michel, G. [Hopital d`Enfants de la Timone, Marseilles (France)] [and others

    1997-04-14

    The phenotypic spectrum caused by the microdeletion of chromosome 22q11 region is known to be variable. Nearly all patients with DiGeorge sequence (DGS) and approximately 60% of patients with velocardiofacial syndrome exhibit the deletion. Recent papers have reported various congenital defects in patients with 22q11 deletions. Conversely, some patients have minimal clinical expression. Ten to 25% of parents of patients with DGS exhibit the deletion and are nearly asymptomatic. Two female patients carrying a 22q11 microdeletion and presenting with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura are reported. Both had children with typical manifestations of DGS. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Thrombocytopenic thrombotic purpura: severe clinic with no CT, minor MRI, but a SPECT correlate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baron, Y. [Radiologische Abteilung, Staedtisches Krankenhaus Kiel, Chemnitzstr. 33, Kiel 24116 (Germany); Bargemann, T. [Abteilung Internistische Intensivmedizin und Dialyse am Staedtischen Krankenhaus Kiel, Chemnitzstr. 33, Kiel 24116 (Germany); Harten, P. [Zweite Medizinische Universitaetsklinik und Poliklinik der Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet zu Kiel, Chemnitzstr. 33, Kiel 24116 (Germany); Gutschmidt, H.-J. [Abteilung Internistische Intensivmedizin und Dialyse am Staedtischen Krankenhaus Kiel, Chemnitzstr. 33, Kiel 24116 (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    A 28-year-old woman with primarily therapy refractory TTP was followed neuroradiologically over 6 months. Despite pronounced neurological and neuropsychiatric symptoms including hemiparesis and aphasia she had unremarkable CT scans on two occasions. Three MRI exams showed no correlate for her neurological symptoms except a small petechial cortical hemorrhage in the right parietooccipital gyrus which may account for her TTP-related anxiety disorder. A cerebral HMPAO-SPECT showed long-standing right-sided hypoperfusion compatible with residual vasculature changes. The possible causes for the clinico-neuroradiological discrepancies are discussed in view of the literature.

  8. Pathogenicity of Anti-ADAMTS13 Autoantibodies in Acquired Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari R. Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Conclusions: Anti-spacer domain autoantibodies are the major inhibitory antibodies in acquired TTP. However, depletion of ADAMTS13 antigen (rather than enzyme inhibition is a dominant pathogenic mechanism. ADAMTS13 antigen levels at presentation have prognostic significance. Taken together, our results provide new insights into the pathophysiology of acquired TTP.

  9. Congenital thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura caused by new compound heterozygous mutations of the ADAMTS13 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rank, Cecilie Utke; Kremer Hovinga, Johanna; Taleghani, Magnus Mansouri

    2014-01-01

    Upshaw-Schulman syndrome (USS) is due to severe congenital deficiency of von Willebrand factor (VWF)-cleaving protease ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type 1 domains, nr 13) activity resulting in the presence of unusually large forms of VWF in the circulation, caus...

  10. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura at presentation of juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    OpenAIRE

    Campos, Lucia M. A.; Spadoni, Maria Silvia; Michelin, Cintia M.; Jesus, Adriana A.; Carneiro, Jorge D. A.; Silva, Clovis Artur Almeida da

    2013-01-01

    Púrpura trombocitopênica trombótica (PTT) é uma alteração hematológica rara e com risco de morte, caracterizada por trombocitopenia, anemia hemolítica microangiopática e alterações neurológicas e/ou renais. A PTT foi descrita em raros pacientes com lúpus eritematoso sistêmico juvenil (LESJ) e, até onde se sabe, a prevalência dessa manifestação em uma população de lúpus pediátrico ainda não foi estudada. Assim, entre janeiro de 1983 e dezembro de 2010, revisamos os prontuários de 5.508 pacient...

  11. Thrombocytopenic thrombotic purpura: severe clinic with no CT, minor MRI, but a SPECT correlate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, Y.; Bargemann, T.; Harten, P.; Gutschmidt, H.-J.

    1999-01-01

    A 28-year-old woman with primarily therapy refractory TTP was followed neuroradiologically over 6 months. Despite pronounced neurological and neuropsychiatric symptoms including hemiparesis and aphasia she had unremarkable CT scans on two occasions. Three MRI exams showed no correlate for her neurological symptoms except a small petechial cortical hemorrhage in the right parietooccipital gyrus which may account for her TTP-related anxiety disorder. A cerebral HMPAO-SPECT showed long-standing right-sided hypoperfusion compatible with residual vasculature changes. The possible causes for the clinico-neuroradiological discrepancies are discussed in view of the literature

  12. Management of chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura: targeting insufficient megakaryopoiesis as a novel therapeutic principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Rank

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Andreas Rank, Oliver Weigert, Helmut OstermannMedizinische Klinik III – Grosshadern, Klinikum der Ludwig Maximilians-Universitaet Munich, Munich, GermanyAbstract: Traditionally, anti-platelet autoantibodies accelerating platelet clearance from the peripheral circulation have been recognized as the primary pathopysiological mechanism in chronic immune thrombocytopenia (ITP. Recently, increasing evidence supports the co-existence of insufficient megakaryopoiesis. Inadequate low thrombopoietin (TPO levels are associated with insufficient proliferation and differentiation of megakaryocytes, decreased proplatelet formation, and subsequent platelet release. Recently two novel activators of TPO receptors have been made available: romiplostim and eltrombopag. In several phase III studies, both agents demonstrated increase of platelet counts in about 80% of chronic ITP patients within 2 to 3 weeks. These agents substantially broaden the therapeutic options for patients with chronic ITP although long-term results are still pending. This review will provide an update on the current conception of underlying mechanisms in ITP and novel, pathophysiologically based treatment options.Keywords: immune thrombocytopenia, romiplostim, eltrombopag, megakaryopoiesis

  13. Rituximab chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody treatment for adult refractory idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braendstrup, Peter; Bjerrum, Ole W; Nielsen, Ove J

    2005-01-01

    , 25 patients had been treated with high-dose IgG, and in 16 patients a splenectomy had been performed. Sixteen patients had been treated with azathioprine. Other treatments included, e.g., cyclosporine, danazol, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, interferon, and dexamethasone. The patients were treated...

  14. Chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP): site of platelet sequestration and results of splenectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gugliotta, L.; Guarini, A.; Motta, M.R.; Bachetti, G.; Tura, S.; Isacchi, G.; Ciccone, F.; Lattarini, C.; Mazzucconi, M.G.; Mandelli, F.; Baccarani, M.

    1981-01-01

    51 Cr-platelet kinetics study was performed in 197 patients with chronic ITP after corticosteroid therapy had failed to induce a long lasting remission. The incidence of splenic, spleno-hepatic, hepatic and diffuse platelet sequestration site was 58%, 17%, 6% and 19%, respectively. Splenic and spleno-hepatic sequestration sites were more frequent in patients less than 30 years old and in patients with a platelet count lower than 50 x 10 9 /l. 111 patients were splenectomized shortly after the study. Normalization of the platelet count was obtained more frequently in patients with splenic and spleno-hepatic sequestration than in the others. Labelled platelet sequestration site was the best predictor of the outcome of splenectomy. Platelet kinetics is a non-invasive investigation that should be performed early after the diagnosis of chronic ITP in all patients eligible for splenectomy. (author)

  15. Nye behandlingsmuligheder ved primær immun trombocytopeni

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudbrandsdottir, Sif; Frederiksen, Henrik; Birgens, Henrik Sverre

    2011-01-01

    Primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP)--formerly known as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura--is an autoimmune disorder characterized by immune mediated thrombocytopenia. The aetiology of ITP remains unknown, but studies have shown that multiple immunological mechanisms are involved in the pathog......Primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP)--formerly known as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura--is an autoimmune disorder characterized by immune mediated thrombocytopenia. The aetiology of ITP remains unknown, but studies have shown that multiple immunological mechanisms are involved...

  16. Patofysiologien ved primær immun trombocytopeni

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudbrandsdottir, Sif; Frederiksen, Henrik; Birgens, Henrik Sverre

    2011-01-01

    Primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP)--formerly known as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura--is an autoimmune disorder characterized by immune-mediated thrombocytopenia. The aetiology of ITP remains unknown, but studies have shown that multiple immunological mechanisms are involved in the pathog......Primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP)--formerly known as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura--is an autoimmune disorder characterized by immune-mediated thrombocytopenia. The aetiology of ITP remains unknown, but studies have shown that multiple immunological mechanisms are involved...

  17. Is automated platelet counting still a problem in thrombocytopenic blood?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimundo Antônio Gomes Oliveira

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Reliable platelet counting is crucial for indicating prophylactic platelet transfusion in thrombocytopenic patients. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the precision and accuracy of platelet counting for thrombocytopenic patients, using four different automated counters in comparison with the Brecher & Cronkite reference method recommended by the International Committee for Standardization in Hematology (ICSH. TYPE OF STUDY: Automated platelet counting assessment in thrombocytopenic patients. SETTING: Hematology Laboratory, Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual de São Paulo, and the Hematology Division of Instituto Adolfo Lutz, São Paulo, SP, Brazil. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: Brecher & Cronkite reference method and four different automated platelet counters. PARTICIPANTS: 43 thrombocytopenic patients with platelet counts of less than 30,000/µl RESULTS: The ADVIA-120 (Bayer, Coulter STKS, H1 System (Technicom-Bayer and Coulter T-890 automatic instruments presented great precision and accuracy in relation to laboratory thrombocytopenic samples obtained by diluting blood from normal donors. However, when thrombocytopenic patients were investigated, all the counters except ADVIA (which is based on volume and refraction index showed low accuracy when compared to the Brecher & Cronkite reference method (ICSH. The ADVIA counter showed high correlation (r = 0.947. However, all counters showed flags in thrombocytopenic samples. CONCLUSION: The Brecher & Cronkite reference method should always be indicated in thrombocytopenic patients for platelet counts below 30,000 plt /µl obtained in one dimensional counters.

  18. Oral Ecchymosis in elderly: Senile purpura

    OpenAIRE

    Srikanth H Srivathsa

    2015-01-01

    Senile purpura is the clinical condition where purpuric spots and ecchymosis develop at the site of minimal injury. It occurs due to laxity of the connective tissue. Oral manifestation of this disease is rare and when one encounters such a case, proper examination with extensive differential diagnosis should be considered along with appropriate investigations. A case of senile purpura in an elderly patient who had developed oral ecchymosis secondary to denture injury is being reported.

  19. Rapid update on childhood immune thrombocytopenic purpure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Catherine H

    2012-05-01

    Most childhood immune thrombocytopenic purpure is benign, self-limiting and requires no therapy. However, questions remain: (i) to treat or not; (ii) bone marrow examination or not; and (iii) admit to hospital or not. These questions have dominated the literature and we still need a prospective large multi-centre study of these issues to determine a useful bleeding score, quality of life measure and a measure of parental anxiety. © 2011 The Author. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2011 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  20. Purpura

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... up in tissues and organs) Blood clotting disorders Congenital cytomegalovirus (condition in which an infant is infected with a virus called cytomegalovirus before birth) Congenital rubella syndrome Drugs that affect platelet function or ...

  1. Autoimmune disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000816.htm Autoimmune disorders To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An autoimmune disorder occurs when the body's immune system attacks and ...

  2. [Clinicopathological study of purpura: Is a skin biopsy necessary for palpable purpura?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, A-J; Schaeffer, M; Mitcov, M; Scrivener, Y; Cribier, B; Lipsker, D

    2016-05-01

    For many physicians, palpable purpura is synonymous with vasculitis. However, a skin biopsy is almost always performed in common clinical practice in order to confirm the diagnosis. The aim of our study was to assess whether palpable purpura is always indicative of an inflammatory infiltrate in a vessel wall. Eighty-seven patients were included in this prospective monocentric study, 45 of whom were presenting a palpable purpura. Patients were classified in two categories: "leukocytoclastic vasculitis" or "other diagnosis". The clinical and histopathological features of patients with a palpable purpura were studied. The mean age of patients presenting a palpable purpura was 69 years. There were 26 men and 19 women. Of the 43 patients biopsied, 37 were included in the vasculitis group. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for a diagnosis of vasculitis in patients with palpable purpura were respectively 82, 65, 86 and 58 %. The Odds ratio was 8.48 (95 % CI, 2.52-31.80; Ppurpuras examined were indeed related to leukocytoclastic vasculitis. In the remaining cases, biopsy did not contribute to the diagnosis since it only showed purpura without vessel wall inflammation. In our opinion, a skin biopsy is thus not essential where the clinical presentation is typical. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Severe Henoch-Schönlein purpura with infliximab for ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang; Shi, Yan-Hong; He, Chong; Liu, Chang-Qin; Wang, Jun-Shan; Zhao, Yu-Jie; Guo, Yan-Min; Wu, Rui-Jin; Feng, Xiao-Yue; Liu, Zhan-Ju

    2015-05-21

    Infliximab (IFX) is an anti-tumor necrosis factor chimeric antibody that is effective for treatment of autoimmune disorders such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis (UC). IFX is well tolerated with a low incidence of adverse effects such as infections, skin reactions, autoimmunity, and malignancy. Dermatological manifestations can appear as infusion reaction, vasculitis, cutaneous infections, psoriasis, eczema, and skin cancer. Here, we present an unusual case of extensive and sporadic subcutaneous ecchymosis in a 69-year-old woman with severe UC, partial colectomy and cecostomy, following her initial dose of IFX. The reaction occurred during infliximab infusion, and withdrawal of IFX led to gradual alleviation of her symptoms. We concluded that Henoch-Schönlein purpura, a kind of leukocytoclastic vasculitis, might have contributed to the development of the bruising. Although the precise mechanisms of the vasculitis are still controversial, such a case highlights the importance of subcutaneous adverse effects in the management of UC with IFX.

  4. Purpura Fulminans with Disseminated Intravascular Coagulopathy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Umar LW

    Purpura fulminans is a rare consequence of sepsis that could be complicated by DIC and gangrene. We report the case of a 2-months-old infant who developed gangrenous limbs. He presented with fever, diarrhoea, vomiting and irritability for 5 days and was dehydrated and unconscious with global hypertonia. With a ...

  5. Purpura Fulminans with Disseminated Intravascular Coagulopathy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite blood transfusions and supportive care gangrene emerged and progressively ascended towards the knees. Parents however rejected offer for surgical amputation and left against medical advice. The coexistence of purpura fulminans with multiple triggers for DIC should alert clinicians of a potential risk of peripheral ...

  6. [Thrombotic thrombocytopenia purpura in Martinique: Retrospective study between 2008 and 2015].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patient, M; Fuseau, P; Deligny, C

    2017-08-01

    Some studies suggest that thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) occurs more often in African Americans. However there is low evidence for this in the literature. The aim of our study was to describe the clinical and biological characteristics of TTP in the Afro-Caribbean population of Martinique. We retrospectively analysed all patients with TTP diagnosed at the Fort-de-France hospital between 2008, January 1st and 2015, December 31st. Diagnosis was confirmed if ADAMTS-13 activity wasClassical management including corticosteroids and plasma exchanges allowed clinical remission in 6 out of the 10 cases. If necessary, rituximab or cyclophosphamide was used. The overall survival rate was 90 %. In Martinique, the incidence of TTP is twice that reported in similar studies in France. Clinical manifestations seem to differ by more common and more severe neurological involvement. Mortality is low, in part, due to optimal care. Copyright © 2017 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Postsplenectomy recurrence of idiopathic thrombocitopenic purpura: role of laparoscopic splenectomy in the treatment of accessory spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, C A; Pravisani, R; Bidinost, S; Baccarani, U; Bresadola, V; Risaliti, A; Terrosu, G

    2015-01-01

    Idiopatic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is the most common indication for splenectomy. The failure rate of surgery is about 8% and the failure rate after splenectomy is approximately 28% for all patients. When the presence of an accessory spleen is diagnosed, splenectomy is recommended. Laparoscopic approach is considered the first choice. At our Department, between July and November 2011 two patients underwent laparoscopic accessory splenectomy for recurrence of ITP. Both patients had a previously laparoscopic splenectomy. Preoperative Magnetic Resonance (MR) was performed in both the cases revealing the presence of an accessory spleen. The operative time was 105 and 100 minutes respectively. No perioperative complications occured. Hospital stay was four days in both cases. The first patient had a disease free period of two months; the second one of one month. Both patients restarted immunosuppressive therapy. The relapse of thrombocytopenia post-splenectomy can be associated with the presence of an accessory spleen. The laparoscopic accessory splenectomy should be considered the first choice approach. Surgical accessory splenectomy allows a transitory remission of the disease.

  8. [Glycosylation of autoantibodies in autoimmunes diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulabchand, R; Batteux, F; Guilpain, P

    2013-12-01

    Protein glycosylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications, involved in the well described protein biosynthesis process. Protein glycosylation seems to play a major role in the pathogenesis of auto-immune diseases. Herein are described the main alterations of autoantibody glycosylation associated with autoimmunes diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, IgA glomerulonephritis, Schoenlein-Henoch purpura, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic scleroderma, systemic lupus erythematosus, myasthenia gravis and granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener). Molecular identification of altered immunoglobulin glycosylation could lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of those diseases, might allow an evaluation of their biological activity and could even be a new therapeutic target. Copyright © 2013 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Autoimmune gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2016-10-01

    Autoimmune gastritis is a chronic inflammatory disease with destruction of parietal cells of the corpus and fundus of the stomach. The known consequence is vitamin B12 deficiency and, consequently, pernicious anemia. However, loss of parietal cells reduces secretion of gastric acid which is also required for absorption of inorganic iron; thus, iron deficiency is commonly found in patients with autoimmune gastritis. This usually precedes vitamin B12 deficiency and is found mainly in young women. Patients with chronic iron deficiency, especially those refractory to oral iron therapy, should therefore be evaluated for the presence of autoimmune gastritis.

  10. Anemia hemolítica auto-imune e outras manifestações imunes da leucemia linfocítica crônica Autoimmune hemolytic anemia and other autoimmune diseases related to chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José O. Bordin

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A leucemia linfocítica crônica (LLC é freqüentemente associada a manifestações auto-imunes principalmente relacionadas às células do sistema hematopoético causando anemia hemolítica auto-imune (AHAI, púrpura trombocitopênica imune (PTI, aplasia pura de série vermelha (APSV, e neutropenia imune. A LLC é diagnosticada em até 15% dos pacientes com AHAI, e em cerca de 50% dos pacientes com AHAI secundária a doença maligna. A PTI ocorre em 2%, e a APSV em 1% dos pacientes com LLC. Prednisona é o tratamento inicial de escolha para a citopenia imune associada à LLC. Para cerca de 60% dos pacientes que apresentam recidiva da manifestação auto-imune tem sido utilizada esplenectomia, imunoglobulina endovenosa, ou ciclosporina. Embora as evidências sobre fisiopatologia sejam limitadas, os mecanismos fisiopatológicos da auto-imunidade na LLC estão relacionados à atividade dos linfócitos B leucêmicos que atuam como células apresentadoras de antígeno aberrantes, e são eficientes em processar e apresentar proteínas da membrana de hemácias e de plaquetas às células TH auto-reativas. Linfócitos TH específicos para certos auto-antígenos podem escapar de mecanismos de controle de auto-tolerância, e, se ativados, podem causar doença auto-imune. O diagnóstico de AHAI contra-indica o uso de fludarabina em pacientes com LLC, pois esse análogo da purina tem sido associado ao desenvolvimento de AHAI grave e fatal, com risco consideravelmente mais alto para pacientes mais imunossuprimidos devido a vários tratamentos anteriores.Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL is frequently associated with autoimmune diseases directed against hematopoietic cells, including autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA, immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP, pure red cell aplasia (PRCA, and immune neutropenia. CLL represents the diagnosis in up to 15% of the patients with AIHA, and in 50% of the patients with AIHA secondary to malignancy. ITP occurs in 2% and

  11. Erlotinib induced target-like purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rungtrakulchai, R; Rerknimitr, P

    2014-02-18

    Erlotinib is an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor, used as a treatment for advanced stage cancer. The most common side effect is cutaneous toxicity including the already known papulopustular reaction. We herein report a case of erlotinib induced target-like purpura, a peculiar cutaneous adverse event. A 57-year-old patient with advanced non-small cell lung cancer was treated by erolotinib 150 mg daily. After taking the drug for three days, an unusual target-like purpura developed on her lower legs. Skin biopsy specimen taken from the lesion revealed an extravasation of erythrocytes in the upper dermis without destruction of blood vessel walls. This skin eruption cleared after the drug was withdrawn and recurred after erlotinib was re-challenged. The mechanism underlying this cutaneous adverse event remains to be elucidated. Physicians should be aware of the rare side effect of this increasingly used drug.

  12. Henoch-Schönlein Purpura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hetland, Liv Eline; Susrud, Kjærsti Sørensen; Lindahl, Kim Hein

    2017-01-01

    to arise from IgA depositions in blood vessel walls in the affected organs, mostly skin, gastrointestinal tract, joints and kidneys. Corticosteroids may be effective in rapid resolution of renal manifestations and treating joint and abdominal pain, but they are not proven effective for treating organ......Henoch-Schönlein purpura is the most common childhood vasculitis, but may also affect adults. This article reviews the literature since 2011 on advances in diagnosis, clinical disease manifestations, pathophysiology and treatment of Henoch-Schönlein purpura. The clinical manifestations are thought...... manifestations and complications, such as glomerulonephritis, bowel infarction or intussusception. Mycophenolate mofetil or cyclosporine A may be better treatment choices in case of renal involvement. Other immunosuppressive and immunomodulating drugs, such as rituximab and dapsone, are promising, but larger...

  13. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davorin Dajčman

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autoimmune pancreatitis is a recently described type of pancreatitis of presumed autoimmune etiology. Autoimmune pancreatitis is often misdiagnosed as pancreatic cancer difficult, since their clinical presentations are often similar. The concept of autoimmune pancreatitis was first published in 1961. Since then, autoimmune pancreatitis has often been treated not as an independent clinical entity but rather as a manifestation of systemic disease. The overall prevalence and incidence of the disease have yet to be determined, but three series have reported the prevalence as between 5 and 6 % of all patients with chronic pancreatitis. Patient vary widely in age, but most are older than 50 years. Patients with autoimmune pancreatitis usually complain of the painless jaundice, mild abdominal pain and weight loss. There is no laboratory hallmark of the disease, even if cholestatic profiles of liver dysfunction with only mild elevation of amylase and lipase levels have been reported.Conclusions: Proposed diagnostic criteria contains: (1 radiologic imaging, diffuse enlargement of the pancreas and diffusely irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct, (2 laboratory data, elevated levels of serum ã-globulin and/or IgG, specially IgG4, or the presence of autoantibodies and (3 histopathologic examination, fibrotic change with dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltration in the pancreas. For correct diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis, criterion 1 must be present with criterion 2 and/or 3. Autoimmune pancreatitis is frequently associated with rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren’s syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, tubulointersticial nephritis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis. Pancreatic biopsy using an endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy is the most important diagnostic method today. Treatment with corticosteroids leads to the and resolution of pancreatic inflamation, obstruction and

  14. A generalized case of purpura annularis telangiectoides of Majocchi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seray Külcü Çakmak

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpura annularis telangiectoides is a rare form of pigmented purpuric dermatoses which usually presents as annular patches with central clearing on the lower extremities. We present an atypical presentation of purpura annularis telangiectoides with generalized lesions in an elderly woman

  15. [Henoch-Schönlein purpura in a cocaine consumer man with HIV infection and ANCA-p positivity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paoli, María C; Moretti, Dino; Scolari Pasinato, Carlos M; Buncuga, Martín G

    The Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is a small vessel vasculitis with IgA immune complex deposition. The presentation in adults is rare and severe. Reported cases of HSP in patients infected with HIV are scarce. Neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are commonly found in other systemic vasculitis, but rarely in HSP and even more unusual the perinuclear pattern. Beside small vessel vasculitis, positivity of ANCA can be detected in a number of different pathological conditions in association with infectious processes, including HIV, or cocaine use, and especially the pattern of ANCA-p, associated with drugs, inflammatory bowel or autoimmune diseases. We report the case of a 35 years old man with toxic habits (cocaine, marijuana) who consulted for abdominal pain, hematochezia and purpura on lower extremities, and later fever, joint pain and progression of purpura associated with nephritic syndrome and ANCA-p (+). During hospitalization HIV infection was detected. Renal biopsy showed IgA nephropathy with favorable response to corticosteroid and antiproteinuric treatment. The communication of the case is due to the rarity of the presentation and therapeutic diagnostic challenge. It remains to elucidate the role of ANCA in the pathogenesis and management of adult PSH.

  16. Platelet associated IgG, platelet mean life span and treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieminen, U.; Syrjaelae, M.; Ikkala, E.; Myllylae, G.

    1988-01-01

    The clinical significance of platelet associated IgG in ITP detected by direct platelet suspension immunofluorescence test (PSIFT) was studied. The platelet mean life span (MLS) was measured with /sup 111/In-labelled platelets in 17 adult patients. All the patients had shortened platelet MLS. The direct PSIFT was positive in 14 patients. Patients were initially treated with prednisone; 12 patients with poor response to the drug were splenectomised. 8 of these 12 patients were treated with intravenous immunoglobulin (IvIg) before splenectomy. The response to IvIg was as good or better in the 3 patients with negative PSIFT, than in the 5 patients with positive PSIFT.

  17. Efficacy and safety of a nanofiltered liquid intravenous immunoglobulin product in patients with primary immunodeficiency and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, J.W. van der; Beem, R.T. van; Robak, T.; Deptala, A.; Strengers, P.F.W.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In the production process of a new 5% liquid intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG-L) product (Nanogam((R)) ), a combined pepsin/pH 4.4 treatment/15-nm filtration (pH 4.4/15NF) step and a solvent-detergent (SD) treatment step were incorporated to improve the virus

  18. Quantitative kinetics of In-111 autologous (In-AP) and homologous (Cr-HP) platelets in immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotter, M.G.; Heyns, A.D.P.; Badenhorst, P.N.; Minnaar, P.C.

    1984-01-01

    Contrary to the accepted view, the authors have found that platelet turnover is not always increased in ITP if the mean platelet survival time (PS) is measured with In-AP. The authors investigated the possible cause of the discrepancy by comparing kinetics of In-AP with those of Cr-HP in 10 patients with ITP. PS was estimated with the multiple hit model. The equilibrium and final in vivo distribution of In-AP was quantitated with the geometrical mean method. The patients could be divided into either those with splenic or diffuse RES platelet destruction. The authors conclude that in ITP platelet survival of In-AP is significantly (P < .05) longer than that of Cr-HP. Platelet turnover measured with In-AP is only normal in patients with mainly splenic platelet sequestration. Results with Cr-HP give a false impression of PS. It seems that in ITP those patients with severe disease also have a platelet production defect

  19. Massive subgaleal hematoma seen together with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP: A case report and review - First case in the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem Akgun

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on a case of a 9 year old girl patient brought to the Emergency Room because of swelling of her head without a history of serious trauma but coagulopathy, we aim to discuss spontaneous subgaleal hematomas seen in association with coagulopathy disorders.

  20. Understanding Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What are they? Points To Remember About Autoimmune Diseases Autoimmune diseases refer to problems with the immune system, ... Infectious Diseases Website: https://www.niaid.nih.gov/diseases-conditions/autoimmune-diseases American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association Website: https:// ...

  1. Autoimmun hypophysitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Therese; Hagen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    during pregnancy or postpartum, but also occurs in males and children. AH is often associated with other autoimmune diseases, most frequently with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The symptoms are caused by enlargement of the pituitary gland and disturbances of the hormone function. Treatment is either......Autoimmune hypophysitis (AH) - often referred to as lymphocytic hypophysitis - is a rare disease that affects the pituitary gland and causes inflammation. The disease enlarges the pituitary gland and the clinical presentations are lack of pituitary function and headaches. AH is mostly seen in women...

  2. Autoimmun hypophysitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Therese; Hagen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    during pregnancy or postpartum, but also occurs in males and children. AH is often associated with other autoimmune diseases, most frequently with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The symptoms are caused by enlargement of the pituitary gland and disturbances of the hormone function. Treatment is either......Autoimmune hypophysitis (AH) - often referred to as lymphocytic hypophysitis - is a rare disease that affects the pituitary gland and causes inflammation. The disease enlarges the pituitary gland and the clinical presentations are lack of pituitary function and headaches. AH is mostly seen in women...... immunosuppressive treatment or surgery....

  3. Idiopathic Seidlmayer's Purpura: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Maggio

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy (AHEI was considered a rare form of Henoch-Schönlein purpura; however, it is now regarded as an independent disease typically involving patients aged 4-24 months. The authors describe the clinical case of a toddler aged 8 months, with skin erythematous pomphoid lesions, treated at home with topical steroids without benefits. The appearance of new lesions and the worsening of the previous skin signs induced the parents to drive the child to the hospital. The medical history revealed the administration of a vaccine dose 2 months before.

  4. [Clinical investigation and mutation analysis of a child with citrin deficiency complicated with purpura, convulsive seizures and methioninemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Peng-qiang; Wang, Guo-bing; Chen, Zhan-ling; Liu, Xiao-hong; Cui, Dong; Shang, Yue; Li, Cheng-rong

    2013-12-01

    To analyze the clinical features and SLC25A13 gene mutations of a child with citrin deficiency complicated with purpura, convulsive seizures and methioninemia. The patient was subjected to physical examination and routine laboratory tests. Blood amino acids and acylcarnitines, and urine organic acids and galactose were analyzed respectively with tandem mass spectrometry and gas chromatographic mass spectrometry. SLC25A13 gene mutation screening was conducted by high resolution melt (HRM) analysis. The petechiae on the patient's face and platelet count (27×10(9)/L, reference range 100×10(9)/L-300×10(9)/L) supported the diagnosis of immunologic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Laboratory tests found that the patient have abnormal coagulation, cardiac enzyme, liver function and liver enzymes dysfunction. Tandem mass spectrometry also found methionine to be increased (286 μmol/L, reference ranges 8-35 μmol/L). The patient did not manifest any galactosemia, citrullinemia and tyrosinemia. Analysis of SLC25A13 gene mutation found that the patient has carried IVS16ins3kb, in addition with abnormal HRM result for exon 6. Direct sequencing of exon 6 revealed a novel mutation c.495delA. The same mutation was not detected in 100 unrelated healthy controls. Further analysis of her family has confirmed that the c.495delA mutation has derived from her farther, and that the IVS16ins3kb was derived from her mother. The clinical features and metabolic spectrum of citrin deficiency can be variable. The poor prognosis and severity of clinical symptoms of the patient may be attributed to the novel c.495delA mutation.

  5. Treatment of severe henoch-schonlein purpura nephritis with mycophenolate mofetil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ali Nikibakhsh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Henoch-Schonlein purpura (HSP is the most common childhood vasculitis. Renal involvement in HSP is one of the major causes of chronic renal failure in children. It is important to start effective and relatively safe medication to prevent end-stage renal disease (ESRD. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF appears to be a promising therapeutic agent in many autoimmune diseases such as lupus nephritis and vasculitis. Herein, we describe the treatment with MMF of three patients with HSP nephritis. In two cases with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis without response to steroid, after treatment with MMF, significant improvement in kidney function and proteinuria were observed. In another patient with HSP nephritic-nephrotic syn-drome who showed resistance to steroid, MMF offered a favorable effect. MMF seems to be a promising therapeutic agent in the treatment of the severe HSP nephritis.

  6. Henoch-Schönlein purpura in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trnka, Peter

    2013-12-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura is the most common systemic vasculitis of childhood. In the majority of children, the outcome of Henoch-Schönlein purpura is excellent with spontaneous resolution of symptoms and signs. However, a small subset of patients will develop long-term sequelae in the form of chronic kidney disease. While the clinical presentation and diagnosis of Henoch-Schönlein purpura is straightforward, treatment of Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis and long-term renal outcomes of more severely affected children are less certain. This review article gives a general overview of Henoch-Schönlein purpura with emphasis on recently published information, including the new classification of childhood vasculitis, insights into pathogenesis of Henoch-Schönlein purpura and a summary of various treatments of established Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis. © 2013 The Author. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2013 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  7. Henoch Schönlein purpura associated with pulmonary adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuka Takafumi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Henoch-Schönlein purpura is a common immunoglobulin A-mediated vasculitis syndrome in children. Henoch-Schönlein purpura can also affect adults and is probably related to malignancy. Case presentation We report the case of a 61-year-old Japanese man who presented for examination after an abnormal shadow was detected by chest radiography. He received a diagnosis of pulmonary adenocarcinoma, stage IV. Purpura on the legs, abdominal pain, diarrhea, hematuria and proteinuria developed at this time. Henoch-Schönlein purpura was diagnosed, base on the clinical symptoms and histological findings of biopsy specimens of the skin, which showed vasculitis with immunoglobulin A deposits. Our patient received chemotherapy with gemcitabine after successful steroid therapy for the Henoch-Schönlein purpura. Conclusion Although hematological malignancies are well-known causes of vasculitides, cases of Henoch-Schönlein purpura associated with lung adenocarcinoma are rare. Our patient was treated with corticosteroid therapy, which cleared the purpura and cytotoxic chemotherapy for the non-small cell lung cancer. However, he died from heart failure due to cardiac tamponade.

  8. Autoimmun hypophysitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Therese; Hagen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    during pregnancy or postpartum, but also occurs in males and children. AH is often associated with other autoimmune diseases, most frequently with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The symptoms are caused by enlargement of the pituitary gland and disturbances of the hormone function. Treatment is either...

  9. Autoimmune sialadenitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guntinas-Lichius, O.; Vissink, A.; Ihrler, S.

    Using the European-American classification criteria the diagnosis of autoimmune sialadenitis in Sjogren's syndrome can generally be easily established or excluded. In addition, sonography performed by the ENT physician is helpful in diagnosing and especially in follow-up screening for MALT

  10. [Management of purpura fulminans lesions in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquesoone, L; Belkhou, A; Gottrand, L; Guerreschi, P; Duquennoy-Martinot, V

    2016-10-01

    Purpura fulminans is a pediatric life-threatening emergency with a significant mortality, combining: septic shock, extensive purpuric lesions and disseminated intravascular coagulation. The most frequent bacterial pathogen is the meningococcus. The medical management includes antibiotics, corticoids, vascular filling and catecholamines. Purpura fulminans is characterized by the extent of hemorrhagic and mainly thrombotic lesions, attributed to the alteration in the vascular endothelium functions. Damage of soft tissues combines large necrotic areas and more or less extensive distal ischemic lesions. Necrotic lesions can be deep, reaching skin, subcutaneous tissue, fascia, muscle and sometimes even the bone. The importance of the aesthetic and functional sequelae as well as future quality of life, depend on the quality of surgical management for these wide and deep lesions. Fasciotomy is sometimes urgently needed in the case of a clinical compartment syndrome, confirmed by a high-pressure measurement in the muscle compartments. Debridement of necrotic lesions and amputations are only performed after a clear delineation of necrotic areas, between 10 days and 3 weeks of evolution. If an amputation is necessary, it must focus on the residual bone length, considering the child's growth potential. The coverage of tissue loss uses all the plastic surgery techniques, more or less complex, in order to reduce scars to minimum for these children. Rehabilitation follow-up includes physical and psychological care, which are essential until adulthood. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Medical image of the week: purpura fulminans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Power EP

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 54-year-old man with coronary artery disease, fibromyalgia and chronic sacral ulcers was brought to the emergency department due to acute changes in mentation and hypotension. He suffered a cardiac arrest shortly after arrival to the emergency department during emergent airway management. After successful resuscitation, he was admitted to the medical intensive care unit and treated for septic shock with fluid resuscitation, vasopressors and broad spectrum antibiotics. Laboratory results were significant for disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC- thrombocytopenia, decreased fibrinogen and elevated PT, PTT and D-dimer levels. Profound metabolic acidosis and lactate elevation was also seen. Blood Cultures later revealed a multi-drug resistant E. coli bacteremia. Images of the lower extremities (Figure 1 were obtained at initial assessment and are consistent with purpura fulminans. He did not survive the stay. Purpura fulminans, also referred to as skin mottling, is an evolving skin condition which is characterized by an acutely worsening reticular …

  12. Henoch–Schonlein purpura presenting sequentially as nodular rash, erythema nodosum, and palpable purpura

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamurugesan, Kandan; Viswanathan, Stalin

    2014-01-01

    We describe a 26-year-old woman who presented with a nodular rash on the elbows following an insect bite. Two days later, she developed erythema nodosum. Both these lesions were treated symptomatically. One week later, she had purpura, abdominal pain, hematuria, and arthralgias, following which steroids were administered. Her investigations revealed only microscopic hematuria that disappeared with therapy. This pattern of sequential appearance of rash and a nodular morphology are both unique features not previously reported. PMID:24696039

  13. [Autoimmune channelopathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, M; Delrieu, J; Astudillo, L

    2011-12-01

    Autoimmune channelopathies are rare neuromuscular diseases that have been characterized clinically for several decades but for which the evidence of associated antibodies has only been recently demonstrated. Ion channels have an important role of activation, inhibition and regulation in neuromuscular transmission. Myasthenia gravis, generally associated with the presence of anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody, is the best-known channelopathy. Other anti-channel antibodies, including voltage-dependent, are associated with several neurological diseases, as illustrated by anti-voltage-gated calcium channels found in Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome and paraneoplastic cerebellar ataxia, and anti-voltage-gated potassium channels found in neuromyotonia, Morvan's syndrome and limbic encephalitis. The treatment of autoimmune channelopathies is logically based on corticosteroids, immunosuppressant drugs, intravenous immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis. Copyright © 2011 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Autoimmun pankreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjordside, Eva; Novovic, Srdan; Schmidt, Palle Nordblad

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare inflammatory disease. AIP has characteristic histology, serology and imaging findings. Two types of AIP exist, type 1, which is a part of the systemic immunoglobulin G4-related disease, and type 2, which is only localized to the pancreas. Patients with type...... are predominantly older men, have involvement of other organs and more often experience relapse than patients with type 2. Both types respond well to steroid treatment. The most important differential diagnose is pancreatic cancer....

  15. Association of Mycoplasma Pneumoniae Infection with Henoch-Schonlein Purpura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Yiallouros

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available  We present a  child with Henoch-Schonlein purpura and Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection, an association that was rarely described in  the literature. The infection was confirmed serologically and by using PCR.

  16. Faktor Prediktor Nefritis pada Anak dengan Purpura Henoch-Schonlein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Wisnu Wardhana

    2017-01-01

    Kesimpulan. Gejala abdomen berat merupakan faktor prediktor pada kejadian nefritis PHS dan meningkatkan risiko 3,75 kali terjadinya nefritis PHS. Usia ≥10 tahun, purpura persisten, dan relaps tidak terbukti berpengaruh pada kejadian nefritis PHS.

  17. Faktor Prediktor Nefritis pada Anak dengan Purpura Henoch-Schonlein

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Wisnu Wardhana; Cahya Dewi Satria; Sunartini Hapsara

    2017-01-01

    Latar belakang. Penyakit purpura Henoch-Schonlein (PHS) dapat menyebabkan komplikasi nefritis. Nefritis PHS dapat membaik sendiri atau berkembang menjadi penyakit ginjal kronik. Beberapa faktor prediktor telah diketahui berhubungan dengan kejadian nefritis PHS. Tujuan. Menentukan usia ≥10 tahun, purpura persisten, gejala abdomen berat dan relaps sebagai faktor prediktor nefritis pada PHS. Metode. Dilakukan studi kohort retrospektif. Sampel penelitian adalah anak berusia 1 tahun – 18 tah...

  18. [Localized purpura revealing vascular prosthetic graft infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boureau, A S; Lescalie, F; Cassagnau, E; Clairand, R; Connault, J

    2013-07-01

    Prosthetic graft infection after vascular reconstruction is a rare but serious complication. We report a case of infection occurring late after implantation of an iliofemoral prosthetic vascular graft. The Staphylococcus aureus infection was revealed by vascular purpura localized on the right leg 7 years after implantation of a vascular prosthesis. This case illustrates an uncommonly late clinical manifestation presenting as an acute infection 7 years after the primary operation. In this situation, the presentation differs from early infection, which generally occurs within the first four postoperative months. Diagnosis and treatment remain a difficult challenge because prosthetic graft infection is a potentially life-threatening complication. Morbidity and mortality rates are high. Here we detail specific aspects of the clinical and radiological presentation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Purpura Fulminans Secondary to Streptococcus pneumoniae Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick F. Alvarez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpura fulminans (PF is a rare skin disorder with extensive areas of blueblack hemorrhagic necrosis. Patients manifest typical laboratory signs of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC. Our case describes a 37-year-old previously healthy man who presented with 3 days of generalized malaise, headache, vomiting, photophobia, and an ecchymotic skin rash. Initial laboratory workup revealed DIC without obvious infectious trigger including unremarkable cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biochemical analysis. There was further progression of the skin ecchymosis and multiorgan damage consistent with PF. Final CSF cultures revealed Streptococcus pneumoniae. Despite normal initial CSF biochemical analysis, bacterial meningitis should always be considered in patients with otherwise unexplained DIC as this may be an early manifestation of infection. PF is a clinical diagnosis that requires early recognition and prompt empirical treatment, especially, in patients with progressive altered mental status, ecchymotic skin rash, and DIC.

  20. AUTOIMMUNE HEPATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusri Dianne Jurnalis

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakHepatitis autoimun merupakan penyakit inflamasi hati yang berat dengan penyebab pasti yang tidak diketahui yang mengakibatkan morbiditas dan mortalitas yang tinggi. Semua usia dan jenis kelamin dapat dikenai dengan insiden tertinggi pada anak perempuan usia prepubertas, meskipun dapat didiagnosis pada usia 6 bulan. Hepatitis autoimun dapat diklasifikasikan menjadi 2 bagian berdasarkan adanya antibodi spesifik: Smooth Muscle Antibody (SMA dengan anti-actin specificity dan/atau Anti Nuclear Antibody (ANA pada tipe 1 dan Liver-Kidney Microsome antibody (LKM1 dan/atau anti-liver cytosol pada tipe 2. Gambaran histologisnya berupa “interface hepatitis”, dengan infiltrasi sel mononuklear pada saluran portal, berbagai tingkat nekrosis, dan fibrosis yang progresf. Penyakit berjalan secara kronik tetapi keadaan yang berat biasanya menjadi sirosis dan gagal hati.Tipe onset yang paling sering sama dengan hepatitis virus akut dengan gagal hati akut pada beberapa pasien; sekitar sepertiga pasien dengan onset tersembunyi dengan kelemahan dan ikterik progresif ketika 10-15% asimptomatik dan mendadak ditemukan hepatomegali dan/atau peningkatan kadar aminotransferase serum. Adanya predominasi perempuan pada kedua tipe. Pasien LKM1 positif menunjukkan keadaan lebih akut, pada usia yang lebih muda, dan biasanya dengan defisiensi Immunoglobulin A (IgA, dengan durasi gejala sebelum diagnosis, tanda klinis, riwayat penyakit autoimun pada keluarga, adanya kaitan dengan gangguan autoimun, respon pengobatan dan prognosis jangka panjang sama pada kedua tipe.Kortikosteroid yang digunakan secara tunggal atau kombinasi azathioprine merupakan terapi pilihan yang dapat menimbulkan remisi pada lebih dari 90% kasus. Strategi terapi alternatif adalah cyclosporine. Penurunan imunosupresi dikaitkan dengan tingginya relap. Transplantasi hati dianjurkan pada penyakit hati dekom-pensata yang tidak respon dengan pengobatan medis lainnya.Kata kunci : hepatitis Autoimmune

  1. Associated Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... celiac disease are type 1 diabetes and autoimmune thyroid disease. The tendency to develop autoimmune diseases is believed ... confusion, weight loss, and coma (if left untreated). Thyroid Disease There are two common forms of autoimmune thyroid ...

  2. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cholangitis (formerly called primary biliary cirrhosis). This group of tests ...

  3. Update in Endocrine Autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2008-01-01

    Context: The endocrine system is a common target in pathogenic autoimmune responses, and there has been recent progress in our understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of autoimmune endocrine diseases.

  4. Acute thrombocytopenic crisis following burns complicated by staphylococcal septicaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, A; Bang, R L; Lari, A R; Gang, R K

    2001-02-01

    The pathophysiological changes in a burn patient can at times manifest as severe complications, the management of which can be extremely challenging to the burn surgeon. A case report of an adult male with burns (18% total body surface area) who developed an acute unexpected thrombocytopenia crisis (2x10(9) l(-1)) on day 3 followed by disseminated intravascular coagulation is presented. The various etiological factors and possible mechanisms leading to thrombocytopenia in burns are discussed. Minor burns may present acute major complications in the presence of other thrombocytopenic factors like trauma and sepsis and thrombocytopenia by it self can be a good indicator of sub-clinical infection.

  5. Henoch-Schönlein purpura in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluman, Joel; Goldman, Ran D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Question A child recently presented to my office with lower limb petechiae, arthralgia, and abdominal pain characteristic of Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP). Will systemic corticosteroids help relieve these symptoms and prevent potential HSP complications such as intussusception and nephritis? Answer Henoch-Schönlein purpura is a common and self-limiting disease in children. Current evidence does not support universal treatment of HSP with corticosteroids. Recent trials and meta-analyses found that corticosteroids do not prevent the onset of renal disease or abdominal complications. However, corticosteroids are effective as treatment of abdominal pain, arthralgia, and purpura. Clinicians are advised to use their discretion in choosing which patients might benefit most from oral corticosteroid treatment. PMID:25551129

  6. Hemothorax associated with Henoch–Schönlein purpura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Hu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Hemothorax is an extremely rare complication of Henoch–Schönlein purpura. In this report, we encountered a 9-year-old girl who suffered from nonthrombocytopenic purpura on her eyelids, buttocks, and lower limbs with hypertension, heme-positive stools, high serum immunoglobulin A, and low serum complement component 3. Her skin biopsy revealed leukocytoclastic vasculitis with immunoglobulin A deposition. In addition, physical examination showed dullness on percussion and quiet breath sounds on the left chest. Chest X-ray showed a large pleural effusion on the left hemithorax. Computed tomography of her thorax revealed massive left-sided hemothorax with mediastinal shift to the right side. Most critically, pleural fluid evacuated by the chest tube was bloody. The patient was diagnosed as having Henoch–Schönlein purpura in combination with hemothorax, and treated with pulse methylprednisolone followed by oral corticosteroids plus cyclophosphamide. Fortunately, we achieved excellent outcomes and the patient recovered gradually within a week.

  7. Petechiae/purpura in well-appearing infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Melissa Huilin; Barnett, Peter L J

    2012-06-01

    Well infants with petechiae and/or purpura can present to emergency departments, and their management can be difficult. Many will have extensive investigations and treatment that may not be necessary. This was a retrospective and descriptive audit investigating well infants (purpura in the absence of fever to a pediatric emergency department over a 9½-year period. All presenting problems of petechiae or purpura were reviewed. Patients were excluded if they appeared unwell, were febrile or have a history of fever, or had eccyhmoses on presentation. Thirty-six babies were identified. The average age was 3.8 months (range, 1-7 months). The majority of the infants had localized purpura/petechiae to the lower limbs (92%) with two thirds of these patients having bilateral signs. None had generalized signs. Most infants had a full blood count (94%), coagulation profile (59%) and C-reactive protein (59%), and blood cultures (59%), with all being normal (except for mild elevation in platelets). Nine patients were admitted for observation, with only 1 patient having progression of signs. This patient had a diagnosis of acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy. The rest of the patients were thought to have either a mechanical reason for their petechiae/purpura (tourniquet phenomena) or a formal diagnosis was not specified. Well infants with localized purpura and/or petechiae with an absence of fever are more likely to have a benign etiology. Further study is required to determine if a full blood count and coagulation profile is necessary, or a period of observation (4 hours) is all that is required. If there is no progression of signs, it is likely that they can be safely discharged. The likely cause may be due to a tourniquet phenomenon (eg, diaper).

  8. Successful Corticosteroid Treatment for Purpura Fulminans Associated with Quinolone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Ikue; Nakamura, Yukitsugu; Katsurada, Yuka; Sato, Ken; Ikeda, Takashi; Kimura, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    Purpura fulminans (PF) is a life-threatening syndrome comprising progressive hemorrhagic necrosis due to disseminated intravascular coagulation and dermal vascular thrombosis that leads to purpura and tissue necrosis. Various therapies have been used to arrest the progression of this disease, however, there is no established treatment because of the variety of underlying causes. We herein present an adult case of PF associated with leukocytoclastic vasculitis triggered by antibiotic (levofloxacin) intake. As a result of our rapid and accurate identification of the underlying cause, corticosteroid therapy successfully repressed the inflammatory process. As far as we know, this is the first report of levofloxacin-associated PF. PMID:27746448

  9. Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Shounak; Takahashi, Naoki; Chari, Suresh T

    2017-07-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a chronic fibroinflammatory disease of the pancreas that belongs to the spectrum of immunoglobulin G-subclass4-related diseases (IgG4-RD) and typically presents with obstructive jaundice. Idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) is a closely related but distinct disease that mimics AIP radiologically but manifests clinically most commonly as recurrent acute pancreatitis in young individuals with concurrent inflammatory bowel disease. IgG4 levels are often elevated in AIP and normal in IDCP. Histologically, lymphoplasmacytic acinar inflammation and storiform fibrosis are seen in both. In addition, the histologic hallmark of IDCP is the granulocyte epithelial lesion: intraluminal and intraepithelial neutrophils in medium-sized and small ducts with or without granulocytic acinar inflammation often associated with destruction of ductal architecture. Initial treatment of both AIP and IDCP is with oral corticosteroids for duration of 4 weeks followed by a gradual taper. Relapses are common in AIP and relatively uncommon in IDCP, a relatively rare disease for which the natural history is not well understood. For patients with relapsing AIP, treatment with immunomodulators and more recently rituximab has been recommended. Although rare instances of pancreaticobiliary malignancy has been reported in patients with AIP, overall the lifetime risk of developing pancreatic cancer does not appear to be elevated.

  10. A Case of Thrombotic Thrombocytopenia Purpura Associated with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Diagnostic Utility of ADAMTS-13 Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risa Yamada

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Thrombotic thrombocytopenia purpura (TTP caused by a deficiency in ADAMTS-13 activity is considered to involve a subset of thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA. Although concept of TTP is included under the umbrella of TMA, discrimination of TTP from TMA is occasionally difficult in an autoimmune disorder. Herein, we report a case with TTP associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. In this case, it was difficult to discriminate TTP from TMA and the measurement of ADAMTS-13 activity was useful for obtaining an accurate diagnosis. SLE patients having thrombocytopenia in complication with anemia should be considered a monitoring of ADAMTS-13 activity even though the patients lacked symptoms of TTP related to the microvascular coagulation.

  11. Lenalidomide-Associated ITP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina I. Herold

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lenalidomide is a potent immunomodulatory agent being used increasingly for treatment of hematologic malignancies including multiple myeloma and myelodysplasia. The common toxicities of lenalidomide, including dose-limiting myelosuppression, are well described. However, the immunomodulatory properties of lenalidomide may give rise to unexpected autoimmune complications. Herein, we describe a case of immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP associated with use of lenalidomide.

  12. Detection of Antineutrophil Autoantibodies by Flow Cytometry: Use of Unfixed Neutrophils as Antigenic Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura have used unfixed cells as antigenic targets for these studies. (ITP), human immunodeficiency virus disease (HIV...chronic neutropenia 8/29 (28%) 4:4 I (0-2) 330(50-800) Immune thrombocytopenic purpura 6/12 (50%) 5:1 10 (1-17) 270 (0-880) Other diagnosis; includes HIV...Boxer LA. Baehner RL: The use and limitation of staph- fant with autoimmune neutropenia. Am J Dis Child 136:718-722, 1982. ylococcal protein A for

  13. Autoimmunity and Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzaro, Nicola; Antico, Antonio; Villalta, Danilo

    2018-01-01

    Alterations in the immune response of patients with autoimmune diseases may predispose to malignancies, and a link between chronic autoimmune gastritis and gastric cancer has been reported in many studies. Intestinal metaplasia with dysplasia of the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa and hyperplasia of chromaffin cells, which are typical features of late-stage autoimmune gastritis, are considered precursor lesions. Autoimmune gastritis has been associated with the development of two types of gastric neoplasms: intestinal type and type I gastric carcinoid. Here, we review the association of autoimmune gastritis with gastric cancer and other autoimmune features present in gastric neoplasms. PMID:29373557

  14. Autoimmunity and Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Bizzaro

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in the immune response of patients with autoimmune diseases may predispose to malignancies, and a link between chronic autoimmune gastritis and gastric cancer has been reported in many studies. Intestinal metaplasia with dysplasia of the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa and hyperplasia of chromaffin cells, which are typical features of late-stage autoimmune gastritis, are considered precursor lesions. Autoimmune gastritis has been associated with the development of two types of gastric neoplasms: intestinal type and type I gastric carcinoid. Here, we review the association of autoimmune gastritis with gastric cancer and other autoimmune features present in gastric neoplasms.

  15. Immune thrombocytopaenic purpura in pregnancy: a case of near ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thrombocytopenia occurs in pregnancy like in the non-pregnant state and can be due to immune thrombocytopaenic purpura (ITP). The hyperoestrogenic state of pregnancy has been identified as a precipitating factor. This is a case report of a thirty year old Nigerian lady, who at a gestational age of 26 weeks developed ...

  16. Purpura fulminans associated with acute West Nile virus encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sheevam; Fite, Laura Paul; Lane, Natalie; Parekh, Palak

    2016-02-01

    Purpura fulminans is a progressive thrombotic disorder that presents with widespread purpura due to deficiency or dysfunction of protein C or protein S. Lesions present as well-demarcated erythematous macules that progress to irregular areas of hemorrhagic necrosis.West Nile virus is a member of the Flaviviridae family transmitted to humans through the bite of various mosquito species. It manifests as West Nile fever in 25% of those infected and less commonly as neuroinvasive disease. An African American man in his fortiespresented with altered mental status and was noted to have evidence of disseminated intravascular coagulation according to his lab data. He then developed dusky skin discoloration and systemic flaccid bullae with desquamation. Biopsy was consistent with purpura fulminans and the patient eventually developed symmetric peripheral gangrene, requiring amputations of all four extremities. Infectious work up revealed positive testing for IgM and IgG antibodies in serum and cerebrospinal fluid leading to the diagnosis of acute West Nile Virus encephalitis. We present this case to describe the rarely reported association of purpura fulminans with West Nile Virus infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Purpura fulminans due to acquired protein C deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devdeep Mukherjee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpura fulminans (PF may be the presenting symptom in a patient with protein C (PC deficiency. It is a hematological emergency and presents with extensive areas of hemorrhagic necrosis of the skin. PC deficiency is usually genetically inherited. However, we report a 1 year and 4 months boy, who presented with acquired PC deficiency possibly of postinfectious etiology and developed PF.

  18. Henoch Schonlein Purpura in children: clinical analysis of 120 cases

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Henoch Schonlein Purpura (HSP) is a systemic vasculitic disease which is common in children. It is very important to understand the clinical features of this disease for doctors and nurses. Objectives: To study the clinical characteristics of HSP in children. Methods: Collect the clinical data of the HSP children, ...

  19. Abdominal ultrasonographic manifestation of Henoch-schonlein purpura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eun, Hyo Won; Kim, Mi Sung; Kang, Beoung Chul; Lee, Sun Wha [Ewha Womans Univ., College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the ultrasonographic features and assess the diagnostic value of sonography in the evaluation of children with Henoch-Schonlein purpura. Between October 1993, and Febuary 1998, 67 children with Henoch-Schonlein purpura underwent abdominal ultrasonography, which in 13 was used for follow up. Bowel wall thickness and location, pattern of color Doppler signal in the thickened bowel wall, the size and location of enlarged mesenteric lymph node and the presence of ascites were evaluated. In 42 cases(63%), sonographic findings were positive, and indicated mesenteric lymphadenopathy(n=3D21), small bowel wall thickening(n=3D20), and ascites(n=3D17). Thickened bowels were demonstrated at the ileum in 11 cases, the jejunum in five, the duodenum in one, and combined wall thickening at the duodenum and jejunum in two;thickening of the duodenum and ileum was seen in one case. Thickness varied from 3 to 10 mm(mean:6.5 mm). On follow-up sonography, regression of bowel wall thickening was observed earlier than that of mesenteric lymphadenopathy or ascites, and correlated well with improved abdominal symptoms. Abdominal ultrasonographic manifestations of Henoch-Schonlein purpura were bowel wall thickening, mesentric lymphadenopathy and ascites. Sonography was a simple and useful method for the evaluation of gastrointestinal manifestation of Henoch-Schonlein purpura.=20.

  20. Le purpura de Schamberg | Akazane | Pan African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Le purpura de Schamberg. A Akazane, B Hassam. Abstract. No Abstract. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use · Contact AJOL · News. OTHER RESOURCES... for Researchers · for ...

  1. Acrally distributed dermatoses: Vascular dermatoses (purpura and vasculitis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazandjieva, Jana; Antonov, Dimitar; Kamarashev, Jivko; Tsankov, Nikolai

    Purpuric lesions appear in acral distribution in a variety of conditions and often provide clues to the clinical diagnosis. Purpuric means "hemorrhagic"-that is, the lesions do not blanch from pressure. This review focuses on dermatoses that produce hemorrhagic lesions in acral distribution from the large groups of the vasculitic diseases and their mimics. Cutaneous small vessel vasculitis is confined to the skin, involves mainly postcapillary venules, and has the hallmark manifestation of palpable purpura. Henoch-Schönlein purpura is an immune complex-mediated systemic vasculitis of the small vessels with manifestations from the skin, joints, kidneys, and gastrointestinal system. Only cases where the immune complexes contain immunoglobulin A type are classified as Henoch-Schönlein purpura. Cryoglobulinemic vasculitis is induced by the deposition of cold-precipitated immune complexes in the small vessels. Urticarial vasculitis comprises a spectrum of conditions with the characteristic course of chronic urticaria, with wheals that persist longer than 24 hours, leave hyperpigmentation, and have leukocytoclastic vasculitis on histologic examination. Polyarteritis nodosa is a rare multisystem, segmental necrotizing vasculitis of mainly the medium-sized vessels. Pigmented purpuric dermatoses are chronic benign dermatoses characterized by petechiae, purpura, and increased skin pigmentation. The hallmark of pigmented purpuric dermatoses is their orange-brown, speckled, cayenne pepper-like discoloration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Henoch-Schonlein purpura associated with primary active Epstein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is the most common form of childhood vasculitis. Various viral and bacterial infections, drugs, vaccines, food allergy and even insect bites have been considered as triggering factors in pathogenesis of HSP. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, which is associated with HSP, have been rarely ...

  3. Klebsiella-induced purpura fulminans in a Nigerian child: Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpura fulminans (PPF) is a very sever but rare acute thrombohaemorrhagic illness of infants and young children. It occurs mainly, in patients with either congenital or acquired deficiencies of proteins C and S and antithrombin III. Features of PPF include disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, symmetrical necrotic ...

  4. Suspecion de purpura rhumatoide post vaccination antigrippale A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Suspecion de purpura rhumatoide post vaccination antigrippale A (H1N1) compliqué d'invagination intestinal aiguë chez un enfant de quatre ans. L Chater, K Khattala, H Bouamama, M Rami, MA Afifi, Y Bouabdallah ...

  5. Autoimmunity and Gastric Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Nicola Bizzaro; Antonio Antico; Danilo Villalta

    2018-01-01

    Alterations in the immune response of patients with autoimmune diseases may predispose to malignancies, and a link between chronic autoimmune gastritis and gastric cancer has been reported in many studies. Intestinal metaplasia with dysplasia of the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa and hyperplasia of chromaffin cells, which are typical features of late-stage autoimmune gastritis, are considered precursor lesions. Autoimmune gastritis has been associated with the development of two types of gastri...

  6. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebman, Howard A; Weitz, Ilene C

    2017-03-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is an acquired autoimmune disorder resulting in the production of antibodies directed against red blood cell antigens causing shortened erythrocyte survival. The disorders can present as a primary disorder (idiopathic) or secondary to other autoimmune disorders, malignancies, or infections. Treatment involves immune modulation with corticosteroids and other agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Henoch-Schönlein Purpura with Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefek, Bryan; Beck, Michael; Ioffreda, Michael; Gardner, Lyndsay; Stefanski, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura is a common small-vessel vasculitis that presents in children as nonthrombocytopenic, nontender, and palpable purpura, arthritis/arthralgia, and abdominal pain. Central nervous system involvement is a reported, but likely, under-recognized complication. We present an 8-year-old boy with Henoch-Schönlein purpura and posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, after proposed mechanism and treatment considerations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Unilateral purpura annularis telangiectodes of majocchi in an elderly male: an atypical presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Apphia; Shuja, Fareesa; Chan, Audrey; Wasko, Carina

    2013-08-15

    Purpura annularis telangiectodes (PAT), also known as Majocchi purpura, is a rare form of pigmented purpuric dermatosis characterized by non-palpable red-brown, occasionally pruritic patches which progress to hyperpigmented halos. Purpura annularis telangiectodes usually presents in female adolescents as benign symmetric lesions with a predilection for the lower extremities. We present an atypical case of unilateral PAT in an elderly male. To our knowledge, our patient at 85-years-old is the oldest PAT and first unilateral purpura annularis telangiectodes case described in the literature.

  9. Clinical indications and biological mechanisms of splenic irradiation in autoimmune diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinmann, M.; Becker, G.; Einsele, H.; Bamberg, M.

    2001-01-01

    Background: Splenic irradiation (SI) is a fairly unknown treatment modality in autoimmune disorders like autoimmune thrombocytopenia (AIT) or autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), which may provide an effective, low toxic and cost-effective treatment for selected patients. Patients, Materials and Methods: This article reviews the limited experiences on splenic irradiation in autoimmune thrombocytopenia by analyzing the current studies including 71 patients and some preliminary reports on splenic irradiation in autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Results: In autoimmune thrombocytopenia between 40 and 90% of all patients responded, but most of them relapsed within 4 to 6 months after splenic irradiation. Between 10 and 20% of all patients had a sustained response. The efficacy of splenic irradiation in HIV-associated cases of thrombocytopenia is probably lower than in other forms of autoimmune thrombocytopenia, but especially in this group immunosuppressive drug treatment of autoimmune thrombocytopenia exposes some problems. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia there are some case reports about efficacy of splenic irradiation. Toxicity of splenic irradiation in both diseases was very moderate. Conclusions: For HIV patients, for elderly patients or patients at high risk for complications following splenectomy splenic irradiation might be a treatment option. Splenic irradiation as preoperative treatment in patients not responding to or not suitable for immunosuppressive drugs prior to splenectomy may be a promising new application of splenic irradiation to reduce adverse effects of splenectomy in thrombocytopenic patients. A further analysis of the biological mechanisms underlying splenic irradiation may help to improve patient selection, to optimize dose concepts and treatment schedules and will improve understanding of radiotherapy as an immunomodulatory treatment modality. (orig.) [de

  10. [IgA vasculitis (Henoch-Schönlein purpura)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dylewska, Magdalena; Wieliczko, Monika

    IgA vasculitis (Schönlein-Henoch purpura) is a systemic inflammation of the small vessels associated with the deposition of IgA antibodies in the vascular wall. Typical clinical symptoms are: skin lesions (purpura), joint pain, abdominal discomfort and renal disorder (most common haematuria/proteinuria). The disease affects usually the pediatric population; in those patients its course is benign and usually not associated with permanent complications. However, adults often present severe symptoms of organ damage, and the risk of complications, especially chronic renal failure is high. The diagnosis is based on clinical signs and skin biopsy. In mild cases the treatment is symptomatic. In cases with severe clinical symptoms corticosteroids are the basis of the therapy.

  11. [Bilateral stenosing ureteritis in Henoch-Schnlein purpura].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maherzi, A; Kaabar, N; Boussetta, K; Salem, M; Hammou, A; Chaouachi, B; Bousnina, S

    1997-01-01

    Ureteral complications in Henoch-Schonlein's purpura are rare. They may post difficult problems of diagnosis. Bilateral uretal stenosis revealed by low back pain, macroscopic hematuria, leukocyturia and renal failure appeared 15 days after the onset of Henoch-Schönlein purpura in a 14-year-old boy. It was confirmed by ultrasonography; intravenous pyelography showed stenosis of both proximal uretera associated to bilateral hydronephrosis. Treatment with corticosteroids relieved the symptoms and normalized the renal function in restoring patency of both ureters. Nevertheless, the patient was still suffering from mild bilateral hydronephrosis and bilateral renal lithiasis, 2 years later. Macroscopic hematuria and renal failure, usually indicative of renal involvement in Henoch-Schönlein syndrome can be the first manifestations of the ureteritis exceptionally seen in this vasculitis.

  12. Galectin-3 in autoimmunity and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Felipe L; Gatto, Mariele; Bassi, Nicola; Luisetto, Roberto; Ghirardello, Anna; Punzi, Leonardo; Doria, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    Galectin-3 (gal-3) is a β-galactoside-binding lectin, which regulates cell-cell and extracellular interactions during self/non-self-antigen recognition and cellular activation, proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis. It plays a significant role in cellular and tissue pathophysiology by organizing niches that drive inflammation and immune responses. Gal-3 has some therapeutic potential in several diseases, including chronic inflammatory disorders, cancer and autoimmune diseases. Gal-3 exerts a broad spectrum of functions which differs according to its intra- or extracellular localization. Recombinant gal-3 strategy has been used to identify potential mode of action of gal-3; however, exogenous gal-3 may not reproduce the functions of the endogenous gal-3. Notably, gal-3 induces monocyte-macrophage differentiation, interferes with dendritic cell fate decision, regulates apoptosis on T lymphocytes and inhibits B-lymphocyte differentiation into immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells. Considering the influence of these cell populations in the pathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases, gal-3 seems to play a role in development of autoimmunity. Gal-3 has been suggested as a potential therapeutic agent in patients affected with some autoimmune disorders. However, the precise role of gal-3 in driving the inflammatory process in autoimmune or immune-mediated disorders remains elusive. Here, we reviewed the involvement of gal-3 in cellular and tissue events during autoimmune and immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. © 2015 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  13. [Thymoma and autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamilloux, Y; Frih, H; Bernard, C; Broussolle, C; Petiot, P; Girard, N; Sève, P

    2018-01-01

    The association between thymoma and autoimmunity is well known. Besides myasthenia gravis, which is found in 15 to 20% of patients with thymoma, other autoimmune diseases have been reported: erythroblastopenia, systemic lupus erythematosus, inflammatory myopathies, thyroid disorders, Isaac's syndrome or Good's syndrome. More anecdotally, Morvan's syndrome, limbic encephalitis, other autoimmune cytopenias, autoimmune hepatitis, and bullous skin diseases (pemphigus, lichen) have been reported. Autoimmune diseases occur most often before thymectomy, but they can be discovered at the time of surgery or later. Two situations require the systematic investigation of a thymoma: the occurrence of myasthenia gravis or autoimmune erythroblastopenia. Nevertheless, the late onset of systemic lupus erythematosus or the association of several autoimmune manifestations should lead to look for a thymoma. Neither the characteristics of the patients nor the pathological data can predict the occurrence of an autoimmune disease after thymectomy. Thus, thymectomy usefulness in the course of the autoimmune disease, except myasthenia gravis, has not been demonstrated. This seems to indicate the preponderant role of self-reactive T lymphocytes distributed in the peripheral immune system prior to surgery. Given the high infectious morbidity in patients with thymoma, immunoglobulin replacement therapy should be considered in patients with hypogammaglobulinemia who receive immunosuppressive therapy, even in the absence of prior infection. Copyright © 2017 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Bistability in autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas; Mosekilde, Erik; Lund, Ole

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases damage host tissue, which, in turn, may trigger a stronger immune response. Systems characterized by such positive feedback loops can display co-existing stable steady states. In a mathematical model of autoimmune disease, one steady state may correspond to the healthy state...... and another to an autoimmune steady state characterized by widespread tissue damage and immune activation. We show how a triggering event may move the system from the healthy to the autoimmune state and how transient immunosuppressive treatment can move the system back to the healthy state....

  15. Longbloedingen met respiratoire insufficiëntie bij Henoch-Schönlein-purpura

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stienstra, Y.; Fijen, J.W.; Cohen Tervaert, J.W.; Dankbaar, H.; Zijlstra, J.G.; van der Werf, T.S.

    2000-01-01

    A 20-year-old woman presented with abdominal pain, purpura on the extremities, and arthralgia. The diagnosis of Henoch-Schönlein purpura was made based on granular IgA deposits in the vessels in a skin biopsy. Three weeks after onset of these symptoms, she developed glomerulonephritis and diffuse

  16. Gestational Thrombocytopenic Patients in Our Center: Analysis of the Patients and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emel Ebru Özçimen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Gestational thrombocytopenia is the most common cause of the thrombocytopenia in pregnancy. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of gestational thrombocytopenia (GT among pregnant women in our center. STUDY DESIGN: Platelet count was analyzed in 452 pregnant women. The patients were divided according to severity of thrombocytopenia. RESULTS: Forty-five patients were thrombocytopenic. Six patients were severe, 16 patients were moderate and 23 patients were mild thrombocytopenic. The prevalence of GT was found 9.9 %. CONCLUSION: Gestational thrombocytopenia is usually observed as mild form.

  17. American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... List Common Thread Women & Autoimmunity Diagnosis Tips Coping Tools Support Groups Education Modules Caregivers Patient/Caregiver Relationship The Male Caregiver AD Knowledge Base Autoimmune Disease List Common ...

  18. THE AUTOIMMUNE ECOLOGY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Manuel eAnaya

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (ADs represent a heterogeneous group of disorders that affect specific target organs or multiple organ systems. These conditions share common immunopathogenic mechanisms (i.e., the autoimmune tautology, which explain the clinical similarities they have among them as well as their familial clustering (i.e., coaggregation. As part of the autoimmune tautology, the influence of environmental exposure on the risk of developing ADs is paramount (i.e., the autoimmune ecology. In fact, environment, more than genetics, shapes immune system. Autoimmune ecology is akin to exposome, that is all the exposures - internal and external - across the lifespan, interacting with hereditary factors (both genetics and epigenetics to favor or protect against autoimmunity and its outcomes. Herein we provide an overview of the autoimmune ecology, focusing on the immune response to environmental agents in general, and microbiota, cigarette smoking, alcohol and coffee consumption, socioeconomic status, gender and sex hormones, vitamin D, organic solvents and vaccines in particular. Inclusion of the autoimmune ecology in disease etiology and health will improve the way personalized medicine is currently conceived and applied.

  19. Update in endocrine autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark S

    2008-10-01

    The endocrine system is a common target in pathogenic autoimmune responses, and there has been recent progress in our understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of autoimmune endocrine diseases. Rapid progress has recently been made in our understanding of the genetic factors involved in endocrine autoimmune diseases. Studies on monogenic autoimmune diseases that include endocrine phenotypes like autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 and immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked have helped reveal the role of key regulators in the maintenance of immune tolerance. Highly powered genetic studies have found and confirmed many new genes outside of the established role of the human leukocyte antigen locus with these diseases, and indicate an essential role of immune response pathways in these diseases. Progress has also been made in identifying new autoantigens and the development of new animal models for the study of endocrine autoimmunity. Finally, although hormone replacement therapy is still likely to be a mainstay of treatment in these disorders, there are new agents being tested for potentially treating and reversing the underlying autoimmune process. Although autoimmune endocrine disorders are complex in etiology, these recent advances should help contribute to improved outcomes for patients with, or at risk for, these disorders.

  20. Regulation of non-classical immune parameters in immune thrombocytopenic purpura mice by a spleen-invigorating, qi-replenishing and blood-containing formula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiantian Li

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: The SQBF had a similar effect to prednisone with regards to enhancing peripheral blood platelet counts in ITP mice. Furthermore, it decreased β-EP levels and increased VIP and SIgA, and protected the thymus. This shows that, on base of the brain-gut axis functions, some non-classical immune vascular active factors or neurotransmitters are also involved in immune responses, and also have relationship with the onset of ITP and bleeding and/or hemostasis. It needs further study to determine whether a change in these active factors is related to immediate hemostasis.

  1. Acute renal failure in a child with thrombocytopenic purpura caused by acute Epstein-Barr virus infection after treatment with anti-D immunoglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossiva, Lydia; Kyriakou, Dimitrios; Mitsioni, Andromachi; Garoufi, Anastasia

    2013-06-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) in children is usually a benign, self-limiting disorder. An acute Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection usually causes atypical lymphocytosis and mild decrease in platelets. Severe thrombocytopenia is an extremely rare complication. Anti-D immunoglobulin has been used for treatment of ITP in Rh(D)-positive nonsplenectomized patients. Severe hemolysis and acute renal failure are extremely rare complications that may be aggravated by the presence of an acute EBV infection. It is believed that anti-D immunoglobulin triggers an unusual virus-induced immune response causing hemolysis. We present a 4-year-old girl with ITP caused by an acute EBV infection that developed acute kidney injury following treatment with anti-D immunoglobulin. The patient recovered completely from thrombocytopenia and renal dysfunction. Intravascular hemolysis and acute kidney injury are consistent with anti-D immunoglobulin mechanism of action. Pediatric patients treated with anti-D immunoglobulin for ITP should be closely monitored for signs and symptoms of hemolysis that may be aggravated by the presence of EBV infection leading to impaired renal function.

  2. [Pseudo-adult Still's disease, anasarca, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and dysautonomia: An atypical presentation of multicentric Castleman's disease. Discussion of TAFRO syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouvray, M; Terriou, L; Meignin, V; Bouchindhomme, B; Jourdain, M; Lambert, M; Lefevre, G; Hachulla, E; Hatron, P-Y; Galicier, L; Launay, D

    2016-01-01

    Multicentric Castleman's disease can mimic adult-onset Still disease. It is exceptionally associated with anasarca, thrombotic microangiopathy and dysautonomia. We report a 32-year-old woman with an association of oligoanuria, anasarca, thrombotic microangiopathy with features compatible with adult-onset Still disease. The outcome was initially favorable with corticosteroids, immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis but with the persistence of relapses marked by severe autonomic syndrome and necessity of high dose corticosteroids. The diagnosis of mixed type Castleman's disease, HHV8 and HIV negative, was obtained four years after the onset of symptoms by a lymph node biopsy. The outcome was favorable after tocilizumab and corticosteroids but tocilizumab had to be switched to anakinra to ensure a proper and long-lasting control of the disease. Our patient partially fits the description of TAFRO syndrome (Thrombocytopenia, Anasarca, myeloFibrosis, Renal dysfunction, Organomegaly), a MCM rare variant, recently described in Japanese patients. Copyright © 2015 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Alloimmunization against Iy, a low-frequency antigen on platelet glycoprotein Ib/IX as a cause of severe neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefel, V; Vicariot, M; Giovangrandi, Y; Kroll, H; Böhringer, M; Greinacher, A; Breitfeld, C; Santoso, S; Mueller-Eckhardt, C

    1995-01-01

    Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT) is usually induced by platelet-specific antibodies against HPA-1a (Zwa) or HPA-5b (Bra). Recently, low-frequency alloantigens on the platelet glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa complex have been discovered as a cause for NAIT. In this report, a new low-frequency platelet-specific alloantigen, Iy, is described which induced severe NAIT. The corresponding antigen was detected in 1/249 unrelated German blood donors. Antibody binding assays with trypsin-digested platelets (ELISA, immunoprecipitation with biotin-labelled platelets) indicate that the antigen is not localized on the glycocalicin moiety of GP Ib alpha, but may be situated on the remnant moiety of GP Ib alpha, GP IX or GPIb beta. Apparently, Iy is not related to the HPA-2 (Ko) antigen system.

  4. Post-Renal Transplant Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (TTP): Attributable to Immunosuppression or Graft Rejection? Report of Three Cases and Literature Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pelletier, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    The immunomodulatory drug FK-506 (Tacrolimus) is a calcineurin inhibitor that, as such, indirectly inhibits the transcription of a gene encoding interleukin 2, a cytokine that is vital to the immune response process...

  5. Purpura fulminans in a patient with mixed connective tissue disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murad, Aizuri A

    2013-01-01

    A 43-year-old lady was admitted to the intensive care unit with sepsis. She had a history of mixed connective tissue disease, Raynaud\\'s syndrome and hypothyroidism. 2 days later, she developed a purpuric rash on her face and extremities with a livedoid background. Few days later, her distal fingers and toes became gangrenous which then had to be amputated. Laboratory investigations showed that she was coagulopathic and had multiple organ dysfunctions. Antiphospholipid antibodies were negative; however, protein C and antithrombin III levels were low. A skin biopsy showed fibrinoid necrosis in the vessel wall with microthrombi and red-cell extravasation. A diagnosis of purpura fulminans was made.

  6. Psoriasis and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sticherling, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Psoriasis is one of the most common chronic inflammatory human skin diseases. Though clinically well characterized, the exact etiological and pathogenic mechanisms are still not known in detail. Current knowledge indicates distinct overlap to other inflammatory as well as autoimmune disorders. However, the one or more relevant autoantigens could not be characterized so-far. On the other side, several autoimmune diseases were shown to be associated with psoriasis. In addition, serological autoimmune phenomena, namely diverse circulating specific autoantibodies could be demonstrated in the past. A matter of current debate is if psoriasis is a primary autoimmune disease or secondarily evolving into autoimmunity as seen in other chronic inflammatory diseases. Related to this aspect is the concept of autoinflammation versus autoimmunity where psoriasis shares mechanisms of both entities. Though T-cells remain among the most important cellular players in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and current therapeutic strategies successfully target these cells or their products irrespective of these concepts, autoimmunity if relevant will add to the treatment armamentarium by using protective and prophylactic antigen-specific modalities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A case of eczematid-like purpura of Doucas and Kapetanakis in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedak, Priyanka; Nazarian, Rosalynn M; Kroshinsky, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Eczematid-like purpura of Doucas and Kapetanakis is a subtype of the pigmented purpuric dermatoses, a group of uncommon dermatoses of unclear etiology characterized by purpura, petechiae, and hyperpigmentation. The Doucas and Kapetanakis subtype is rare in children, and its subtle findings can initially be overlooked and mistaken for other, more common dermatologic disorders in this age group. We present a case eczematid-like purpura of Doucas and Kapetanakis in an 11-year-old boy initially treated as eczema. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Stress proteins, autoimmunity, and autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfield, J B; Jarjour, W N

    1991-01-01

    At birth, the immune system is biased toward recognition of microbial antigens in order to protect the host from infection. Recent data suggest that an important initial line of defense in this regard involves autologous stress proteins, especially conserved peptides of hsp60, which are presented to T cells bearing gamma delta receptors by relatively nonpolymorphic class lb molecules. Natural antibodies may represent a parallel B cell mechanism. Through an evolving process of "physiological" autoreactivity and selection by immunodominant stress proteins common to all prokaryotes, B and T cell repertoires expand during life to meet the continuing challenge of infection. Because stress proteins of bacteria are homologous with stress proteins of the host, there exists in genetically susceptible individuals a constant risk of autoimmune disease due to failure of mechanisms for self-nonself discrimination. That stress proteins actually play a role in autoimmune processes is supported by a growing body of evidence which, collectively, suggests that autoreactivity in chronic inflammatory arthritis involves, at least initially, gamma delta cells which recognize epitopes of the stress protein hsp60. Alternate mechanisms for T cell stimulation by stress proteins undoubtedly also exist, e.g., molecular mimicry of the DR beta third hypervariable region susceptibility locus for rheumatoid arthritis by a DnaJ stress protein epitope in gram-negative bacteria. While there still is confusion with respect to the most relevant stress protein epitopes, a central role for stress proteins in the etiology of arthritis appears likely. Furthermore, insight derived from the work thus far in adjuvant-induced arthritis already is stimulating analyses of related phenomena in autoimmune diseases other than those involving joints. Only limited data are available in the area of humoral autoimmunity to stress proteins. Autoantibodies to a number of stress proteins have been identified in SLE and

  9. Risk of Epidural Hematoma after Neuraxial Techniques in Thrombocytopenic Parturients : A Report from the Multicenter Perioperative Outcomes Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Linden O.; Bateman, Brian T.; Kheterpal, Sachin; Klumpner, Thomas T.; Housey, Michelle; Aziz, Michael F.; Hand, Karen W.; MacEachern, Mark; Goodier, Christopher G.; Bernstein, Jeffrey; Bauer, Melissa E.; Lirk, Philip; Wilczak, Janet; Soto, Roy; Tom, Simon; Cuff, Germaine; Biggs, Daniel A.; Coffman, Traci; Saager, Leif; Levy, Warren J.; Godbold, Michael; Pace, Nathan L.; Wethington, Kevin L.; Paganelli, William C.; Durieux, Marcel E.; Domino, Karen B.; Nair, Bala; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M.; Wanderer, Jonathan P.; Schonberger, Robert B.; Berris, Joshua; Lins, Steven; Coles, Peter; Cummings, Kenneth C.; Maheshwari, Kamal; Berman, Mitchell F.; Wedeven, Christopher; LaGorio, John; Fleishut, Peter M.; Ellis, Terri A.; Molina, Susan; Carl, Curtis; Kadry, Bassam; van Klei, Wilton A A; Pasma, Wietze; Jameson, Leslie C.; Helsten, Daniel L.; Avidan, Michael S.

    BACKGROUND:: Thrombocytopenia has been considered a relative or even absolute contraindication to neuraxial techniques due to the risk of epidural hematoma. There is limited literature to estimate the risk of epidural hematoma in thrombocytopenic parturients. The authors reviewed a large

  10. Vasculitic purpura in vinyl chloride disease: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnavita, N.; Bergamaschi, A.; Garcovich, A.; Giuliano, G.

    1986-05-01

    Vinyl chloride (VC), a volatile substance mostly used for polyvinyl chloride (PVC) synthesis, is a systemic toxicant particularly noxious to endothelium. Angiosarcoma of the liver, Raynaud's phenomenon, scleroderma-like lesions, acroosteolysis and neuritis are known to be typical vinyl chloride-associated manifestations (VC disease). A so far unknown feature of the disease is purpura. This was first observed by the authors in a worker of a PVC-producing plant. The skin eruption was characterized by small purpuric maculae with tiny, palpable spots and papulae, mostly concentrated on the lower part of the legs, changing into bullae, pustules and crusts and tending to spontaneous regression after withdrawal from VC exposure. A skin biopsy revealed marked inflammatory reaction with a mostly lymphocytic and histiocytic infiltration around and in the walls of dermal arterioles. The finding of increased circulating immune complexes and anti-smooth muscle autoantibodies strengthens the hypothesis that immunologic changes play a role in the appearance of ''vinylic purpura.''

  11. Vaccines, adjuvants and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Luísa Eça; Baker, Britain; Perricone, Carlo; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-10-01

    Vaccines and autoimmunity are linked fields. Vaccine efficacy is based on whether host immune response against an antigen can elicit a memory T-cell response over time. Although the described side effects thus far have been mostly transient and acute, vaccines are able to elicit the immune system towards an autoimmune reaction. The diagnosis of a definite autoimmune disease and the occurrence of fatal outcome post-vaccination have been less frequently reported. Since vaccines are given to previously healthy hosts, who may have never developed the disease had they not been immunized, adverse events should be carefully accessed and evaluated even if they represent a limited number of occurrences. In this review of the literature, there is evidence of vaccine-induced autoimmunity and adjuvant-induced autoimmunity in both experimental models as well as human patients. Adjuvants and infectious agents may exert their immune-enhancing effects through various functional activities, encompassed by the adjuvant effect. These mechanisms are shared by different conditions triggered by adjuvants leading to the autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA syndrome). In conclusion, there are several case reports of autoimmune diseases following vaccines, however, due to the limited number of cases, the different classifications of symptoms and the long latency period of the diseases, every attempt for an epidemiological study has so far failed to deliver a connection. Despite this, efforts to unveil the connection between the triggering of the immune system by adjuvants and the development of autoimmune conditions should be undertaken. Vaccinomics is a field that may bring to light novel customized, personalized treatment approaches in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Eosinophils in Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diny, Nicola L; Rose, Noel R; Čiháková, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional granulocytes that contribute to initiation and modulation of inflammation. Their role in asthma and parasitic infections has long been recognized. Growing evidence now reveals a role for eosinophils in autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize the function of eosinophils in inflammatory bowel diseases, neuromyelitis optica, bullous pemphigoid, autoimmune myocarditis, primary biliary cirrhosis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and other autoimmune diseases. Clinical studies, eosinophil-targeted therapies, and experimental models have contributed to our understanding of the regulation and function of eosinophils in these diseases. By examining the role of eosinophils in autoimmune diseases of different organs, we can identify common pathogenic mechanisms. These include degranulation of cytotoxic granule proteins, induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, release of proteases degrading extracellular matrix, immune modulation through cytokines, antigen presentation, and prothrombotic functions. The association of eosinophilic diseases with autoimmune diseases is also examined, showing a possible increase in autoimmune diseases in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis, hypereosinophilic syndrome, and non-allergic asthma. Finally, we summarize key future research needs.

  13. Prolactin and Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vânia Vieira Borba

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The great asymmetry of autoimmune diseases between genders represents one of the most enigmatic observations among the mosaic of autoimmunity. Sex hormones are believed to play a crucial role on this dimorphism. The higher prevalence of autoimmunity among women at childbearing ages, disease onset/relapses during pregnancy, and post-partum are some of the arguments that support this hypothesis. Certainly, motherhood represents one of the most remarkable challenges for the immune system, which not only has to allow for the conceptus, but also has to deal with complex endocrine alterations. Hormonal homeostasis is known to exert a crucial influence in achieving a competent and healthy immune system. Prolactin (PRL has a bioactive function acting as a hormone and a cytokine. It interferes with immune system modulation, mainly inhibiting the negative selection of autoreactive B lymphocytes. Likewise, hyperprolactinemia has been described in relation to the pathogenesis and activity of several autoimmune disorders. Dopamine is an effective inhibitor of PRL secretion due to either a direct influence on the hypophysis or stimulation of postsynaptic dopamine receptors in the hypothalamus, arousing the release of the PRL inhibitory factor. Hence, dopamine agonists have proven to offer clinical benefits among autoimmune patients and represent a promising therapy to be explored. In this review, we attempt to provide a critical overview of the link between PRL, autoimmune diseases, and motherhood.

  14. Eosinophils in Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Čiháková

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophils are multifunctional granulocytes that contribute to initiation and modulation of inflammation. Their role in asthma and parasitic infections has long been recognized. Growing evidence now reveals a role for eosinophils in autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize the function of eosinophils in inflammatory bowel diseases, neuromyelitis optica, bullous pemphigoid, autoimmune myocarditis, primary biliary cirrhosis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and other autoimmune diseases. Clinical studies, eosinophil-targeted therapies, and experimental models have contributed to our understanding of the regulation and function of eosinophils in these diseases. By examining the role of eosinophils in autoimmune diseases of different organs, we can identify common pathogenic mechanisms. These include degranulation of cytotoxic granule proteins, induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, release of proteases degrading extracellular matrix, immune modulation through cytokines, antigen presentation, and prothrombotic functions. The association of eosinophilic diseases with autoimmune diseases is also examined, showing a possible increase in autoimmune diseases in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis, hypereosinophilic syndrome, and non-allergic asthma. Finally, we summarize key future research needs.

  15. Autoimmune myelofibrosis accompanied by Sjögren's syndrome in a 47, XXX/46, XX mosaic woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tohru

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a patient with autoimmune myelofibrosis accompanied by Sjögren's syndrome (SS). A 36-year-old woman was admitted due to petechiae, purpura, gingival bleeding, dyspnea on exertion, and a lack of concentration. She had pancytopenia and was diagnosed with SS. A bone marrow study showed hypercellular marrow with reticulin fibrosis. Lymphocytic infiltrates and aggregates composed of a mixture of T and B cells in the marrow were also observed. A chromosomal analysis of the marrow cells showed 47, XXX and an analysis of peripheral lymphocytes revealed 47, XXX/46, XX mosaic results. The patient's cytopenia resolved following treatment with oral prednisolone.

  16. Spectrum of purpura fulminans: Report of three classical prototypes and review of management strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankur Talwar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpura fulminans is a rare syndrome of intravascular thrombosis and hemorrhagic infarction of the skin that is rapidly progressive and is accompanied by vascular collapse and disseminated intravascular coagulation. It usually occurs in children, but this syndrome has also been noted in adults. The three forms of this disease are classified by the triggering mechanisms. We describe three classical cases of purpura fulminans of the three classical prototypes treated at our center and their varied clinical outcomes. We also describe a case of acute infectious purpura fulminans secondary to systemic leptospirosis which to our best knowledge is the first reported case in world literature. The various treatment options for purpura fulminans have also been reviewed.

  17. Spectrum of purpura fulminans: report of three classical prototypes and review of management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talwar, Ankur; Kumar, Sharath; Gopal, M G; Nandini, A S

    2012-01-01

    Purpura fulminans is a rare syndrome of intravascular thrombosis and hemorrhagic infarction of the skin that is rapidly progressive and is accompanied by vascular collapse and disseminated intravascular coagulation. It usually occurs in children, but this syndrome has also been noted in adults. The three forms of this disease are classified by the triggering mechanisms. We describe three classical cases of purpura fulminans of the three classical prototypes treated at our center and their varied clinical outcomes. We also describe a case of acute infectious purpura fulminans secondary to systemic leptospirosis which to our best knowledge is the first reported case in world literature. The various treatment options for purpura fulminans have also been reviewed.

  18. Pregabalin- and azithromycin-induced rhabdomyolysis with purpura: An unrecognized interaction: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuya Kato, MD

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: We report an extremely rare case of rhabdomyolysis with purpura caused by a drug interaction between pregabalin and azithromycin. However, the mechanisms of the interactions between azithromycin on the pregabalin are still unknown.

  19. Purpura thrombopénique amégacaryocytaire acquis: Penser au ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    L'amegacaryocytose acquise est exceptionnellement décrite au cours d'un Lupus Erythémateux Systémique (LES) à Madagascar. Nous rapportons la première observation d'un Purpura Thrombopénique Amegacaryocytaire Acquis (PTAA) simulant un Purpura Thrombopénique Idiopathique (PTI) révélateur d'un LES.

  20. The profile of adult onset Henoch-Schönlein purpura in an Asian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Adeline Mei-Yen; Lee, Shan-Xian; Tay, Yong-Kwang

    2015-11-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is less common in adults and has been linked with a more severe clinical syndrome as well as a higher frequency of renal disease and internal malignancy. Renal involvement in adult HSP has been significantly associated with antecedent infections, pyrexia at time of first presentation, and purpura above the waist. We aim to evaluate the frequency of cutaneous and extra-cutaneous features and identify the predictive factors for renal involvement in Asian adults with HSP. We performed a retrospective study of 48 adult Asian patients diagnosed with HSP based on the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria at a tertiary hospital in Singapore between January 2000 and December 2011. The most common cutaneous manifestations were palpable purpura (73%), papules (31%), and petechiae (27%). Forty-percent had cutaneous lesions extending above the waist. Fifteen patients (31%) had gastrointestinal symptoms, 21 (44%) had joint involvement, and 27 (56%) had renal disease. Seventy-percent of patients with pyrexia at presentation experienced renal disease, whereas only 30% without pyrexia had renal involvement (P = 0.018). Sixty-six percent of patients with purpura had renal involvement as compared to 31% in those without purpura (P = 0.049). The frequency of renal involvement in patients with purpura above the waist (52%) was similar to those with purpura below the waist (55%). Our study confirms that HSP in adults tends to be more severe with a high incidence of extracutaneous manifestations, especially renal disease. Pyrexia at presentation and the presence of purpura were significant predictive factors for renal involvement. © 2015 The International Society of Dermatology.

  1. Purpura vasculaire révélant une granulomatose avec polyangéite: à ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nous rapportons une observation originale par la survenue d'un purpura vasculaire s'intégrant dans le tableau clinique inaugural d'une granulomatose avec polyangeite. Il s'agit d'une patiente âgée de 52 ans, admise pour bilan étiologique d'un purpura vasculaire nécrotique, infiltré prédominant au niveau des deux ...

  2. Purpura vasculaire récidivant et syndrome de Sjögren: quel lien ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Le purpura hypergammaglobulinémique de Waldenstrom (PHGGW) est un syndrome caractérisé par un purpura vasculaire récidivant associé à une hypergammaglobulinémie. Il peut être isolé ou plus fréquemment associé à une hémopathie maligne ou à une connectivite essentiellement le syndrome de Gougerot Sjögren ...

  3. Expansion of Circulating T Follicular Helper Cells in Children with Acute Henoch-Schönlein Purpura

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jue; Liu, Yan; Wang, Lei; Ruan, Guoxiang; Yuan, Huiming; Fang, Hong; Wu, Jianyong; Cui, Dawei

    2015-01-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is a common systemic small vessel vasculitis in children with disorder autoimmune responses. T follicular helper (TFH) cells play crucial roles in regulating immune responses. The aim of our study was to investigate the probable role of TFH cells in the pathogenesis of children with HSP. In this study, the frequency of circulating CXCR5+CD4+TFH cells with inducible costimulator (ICOS) expression in the children with acute HSP was significantly higher than that in healthy controls (HCs) but not CXCR5+CD4+TFH cells with programmed death-1 (PD-1) expression. Moreover, serum levels of IL-21 and IL-6 cytokines, IgA, and C3 in HSP children were also significantly higher than those in HCs. A positive correlation was observed between the frequencies of circulating ICOS+CXCR5+CD4+TFH cells and the serum IL-21 or IgA levels of acute HSP children, respectively. Additionally, the mRNA expression levels of interleukin- (IL-) 21, IL-6, and transcriptional factors (B-cell lymphoma-6, Bcl-6) were also significantly increased in peripheral blood from acute HSP children compared to HCs. Taken together, these findings suggest that TFH cells and associated molecules might play critical roles in the pathogenesis of HSP, which are possible therapeutic targets in HSP children. PMID:26491701

  4. [A stereotypical clinical presentation of childhood linear purpura of the arms: Analysis of six cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosteing, S; Uthurriague, C; Boralevi, F; Mazereeuw-Hautier, J

    2017-01-01

    Among causes of childhood purpura, other- or self-induced mechanical purpura, such as factitious purpura, needs to be considered. This cause is unfamiliar to pediatricians, usually compromising early diagnosis. We report on the cases of six children, seen between 1998 and 2014 at the Toulouse and Bordeaux Departments of Dermatology, presenting with a stereotypical linear purpura on the arms. All were females, aged 6-14 years. One patient had a psychiatric history, whereas the others were undergoing a stressful time period. All had several relapses and diagnosis was delayed in all. The patients presented with multiple oval or square purpuric macules, forming a discontinuous linear band. Some patients reported functional discomfort such as pain or pruritus. Lesions were always located on the arms and sometimes on other areas of the body. Biological assessments were normal and there was no vasculitis at skin histology. We retained the diagnosis of induced mechanical purpura. Psychological support was offered to four patients. One of them declared that the lesions were induced by classmates using suction. Another child declared that she caused the lesions herself, without explaining the mechanism. Outcome was favorable in five children (one was lost to follow-up), 1-4 years after diagnosis. In conclusion, induced mechanical purpura in children, although rarely described in the medical literature, must be kept in mind. Investigations should be carried out in cases with uncertain diagnosis. Underlying psychological distress should be sought. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Imatinib-induced postoperative periorbital purpura: GASP (Gleevec-Associated Surgical Purpura) in a woman with imatinib-treated chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzalone, C Lane; Cohen, Philip R; Kurzrock, Razelle; Cortes, Jorge E

    2014-01-15

    Imatinib mesylate is a selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor used in the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia. Ocular side effects of imatinib include periorbital edema, which may become so severe as to obstruct the visual field. The purpose of this case study is to describe the clinical characteristics of imatinib- induced postoperative periorbital purpura. We retrospectively reviewed the medical literature using PubMed, searching the terms edema, Gleevec, imatinib, periorbital, postoperative and purpura. Patient reports and previous reviews of the subject were critically assessed and the salient features are presented. Three patients have undergone surgery to reduce the imatinib-induced periorbital edema; two of these individuals have developed imatinib-induced postoperative periorbital purpura. We recommend discontinuing imatinib usage one week prior to periorbital surgery and not resuming therapy until the eighth postoperative day.

  6. Autoimmune gastritis: Pathologist's viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coati, Irene; Fassan, Matteo; Farinati, Fabio; Graham, David Y; Genta, Robert M; Rugge, Massimo

    2015-11-14

    Western countries are seeing a constant decline in the incidence of Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis, coupled with a rising epidemiological and clinical impact of autoimmune gastritis. This latter gastropathy is due to autoimmune aggression targeting parietal cells through a complex interaction of auto-antibodies against the parietal cell proton pump and intrinsic factor, and sensitized T cells. Given the specific target of this aggression, autoimmune gastritis is typically restricted to the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa. In advanced cases, the oxyntic epithelia are replaced by atrophic (and metaplastic) mucosa, creating the phenotypic background in which both gastric neuroendocrine tumors and (intestinal-type) adenocarcinomas may develop. Despite improvements in our understanding of the phenotypic changes or cascades occurring in this autoimmune setting, no reliable biomarkers are available for identifying patients at higher risk of developing a gastric neoplasm. The standardization of autoimmune gastritis histology reports and classifications in diagnostic practice is a prerequisite for implementing definitive secondary prevention strategies based on multidisciplinary diagnostic approaches integrating endoscopy, serology, histology and molecular profiling.

  7. Nutrition, geoepidemiology, and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmi, Carlo; Tsuneyama, Koichi

    2010-03-01

    As well represented by the impaired immune function of malnourished individuals encountered in developing countries and the incidence of specific diseases following local nutrient deficiencies, nutrition and immunity have been linked to each other for centuries while the specific connection between dietary factors and autoimmunity onset or modulation is a more recent acquisition. Autoimmune diseases manifest limited prevalence rates in developing countries while numerous immunity-related claims have been proposed in the field of functional foods. Nevertheless, over the past years multiple lines of evidence have supported a major role for specific dietary factors (including vitamin D, vitamin A, selenium, zinc, omega-3 fatty acids, probiotics, and flavanols) in determining the immune responses involved in infections, allergies, and autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, the link between nutrition and autoimmunity may well contribute to the geoepidemiology observed for numerous conditions. In general terms, most data that will be discussed herein were obtained in experimental or animal models while human data from real-life clinical settings or randomized clinical trials remain largely unsatisfactory. Our current knowledge on the beneficial impact of nutrition on autoimmunity prompts us to encourage the search for evidence-based nutrition to support the everyday diet choices of patients. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. [Autoimmune thyroid disease and other non-endocrine autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilas, Ljiljana Todorović; Icin, Tijana; Paro, Jovanka Novaković; Bajkin, Ivana

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are chronic conditions initiated by the loss of immunological tolerance to self-antigens. They constitute heterogeneous group of disorders, in which multiple alterations in the immune system result in a spectrum of syndromes that either target specific organs or affect the body systematically. Recent epidemiological studies have shown a possible shift of one autoimmune disease to another or the fact that more than one autoimmune disease may coexist in a single patient or in the same family. Numerous autoimmune diseases have been shown to coexist frequently with thyroid autoimmune diseases. AUTOIMMNUNE THYROID DISEASE AND OTHER ORGAN SPECIFIC NON-ENDOCRINE AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES: This part of the study reviews the prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease coexisting with: pernicious anaemia, vitiligo, celiac disease, autoimmune liver disease, miastenia gravis, alopecia areata and sclerosis multiplex, and several recommendations for screening have been given. AUTOIMMUNE THYROID DISEASE AND OTHER ORGAN NON-SPECIFIC NON-ENDOCRINE AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES: Special attention is given to the correlation between autoimmune thyroid disease and rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, syndrome Sjögren, systemic sclerosis and mixed connective tissue disease. Screening for autoimmune thyroid diseases should be recommended in everyday clinical practice, in patients with primary organ-specific or organ non-specific autoimmune disease. Otherwise, in patients with primary thyroid autoimmune disease, there is no good reason of seeking for all other autoimmune diseases, although these patients have a greater risk of developing other autoimmune disease. Economic aspects of medicine require further analyzing of these data, from cost/benefit point of view to justified either mandatory screening or medical practitioner judgment.

  9. Itching Papules in a child; Scabies or Henoch Schonlein Purpura?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Soheili Rad

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Henoch schonlein purpura (HSP is a self-limited systemic disease with multiorgan involvement. While cutaneous involvement may wary, presenting as itching papules is not a common manifestation. In this report we discuss a case of HSP which was presented solely with itching papules; mistaken for scabies. Case presentation: A 7 year old boy presented with itchy palpable papules without any gastrointestinal or urinary problem which was primary taught to be an ectoparasitic infestation. During the hospitalization the patient developed abdominal pain as well as hematuria and the diagnosis became more evident. The skin biopsy showed perivascular inflammatory cells infiltration in epidermis, perivascular fibrinoid necrosis and leukocytoclastic vasculitis. The patient received corticosteroids and discharged healthy.Conclusion: While HSP may have different cutaneous manifestation, presenting as only itchy papules may complicate the diagnosis and physicians should always keep in mind that HSP might be presented as other common infestations unresponsive to treatment.

  10. Sertraline-induced periorbital purpura: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayhan, Fatih; Eken, Zahide Eriş; Uguz, Faruk

    2015-08-01

    The incidence of mild to severe levels of spontaneous bleeding due to the usage of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is relatively low. Although the exact mechanism is not known, it is thought that inhibition of the serotonin transporter together with a decrease in platelet serotonin could be responsible for the bleeding. Therefore, the use of SSRIs in conjunction with anti-aggregants may predispose to or exacerbate the risk of bleeding. In this case report, we describe a 44-year-old female patient with a diagnosis of anxiety disorder who spontaneously developed periorbital purpura during treatment with sertraline. Abnormal bleeding after treatment with an SSRI should be kept in mind, and alternative non-SSRI drugs of choice in such cases would be more appropriate. More extensive and comprehensive studies focusing on hemostasis and bleeding disorders are needed for SSRIs such as sertraline. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  11. [Management of chicken pox purpura fulminans: a pediatric case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domergue, S; Rodiere, M; Bigorre, M; Guye, E; Captier, G

    2006-06-01

    The authors report a case of a 4 years old girl who had presented a chicken-pox purpura fulminans. Lesions appeared 5 days after chicken-pox start and were quickly evoluted in cutaneous and sub-cutaneous necrosis on external side of thighs and behind side of right calf. A medical management was done with fresh plasma, blood, antithrombine 3, and fibrin. Specifics treatments were done: heparin and activated C protein. Surgical treatment was realised 5 weeks later. It consisted of clean necrosis areas and put a thin skin graft witch was took on the scalp. The evolution was fast good. The follow-up is 3 years without big esthetic and functional consequences. Some cases of this pathology were described in literature with serious lesions. The management should be multidisciplinary. Surgical treatment should be realised when lesions are stabilized. Scalp is a donor site for skin graft very interesting because of big quantity of skin and not esthetic consequence.

  12. Neonatal purpura fulminans caused by rare Citrobacter species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjiv Vijay Choudhary

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A 23-day-old neonate, born of nonconsangious marriage, admitted to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit for hypernatremic dehydration with petechiae and ecchymotic patches and necrotic skin lesions for 10–12 days was referred to dermatology department. On the general examination, pulse was 158/min, and respiratory rate was 52/min, and systemic examination was normal. Hematological investigations showed pancytopenia. Bleeding time was normal but prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time reports were prolonged. D-dimer levels were elevated. Urine and stool were normal. Blood culture and sensitivity report revealed the growth of Citrobacter species with sensitivity to ciprofloxacin, amikacin, tetracycline, and resistance to Imipenem. Histopathology revealed epidermal hyperkeratosis with epidermal-dermal splitting, vessels showing fibrin occlusion with red blood cell extravasation into the perivascular areas in dermis along with dermal necrosis. To the best of our knowledge, this might be the first case of purpura fulminans in a neonate caused by rare Citrobacter species.

  13. Epigenetics and Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero-Ronderos, Paula; Montoya-Ortiz, Gladis

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetics is defined as the study of all inheritable and potentially reversible changes in genome function that do not alter the nucleotide sequence within the DNA. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone modification, nucleosome positioning, and microRNAs (miRNAs) are essential to carry out key functions in the regulation of gene expression. Therefore, the epigenetic mechanisms are a window to understanding the possible mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of complex diseases such as autoimmune diseases. It is noteworthy that autoimmune diseases do not have the same epidemiology, pathology, or symptoms but do have a common origin that can be explained by the sharing of immunogenetic mechanisms. Currently, epigenetic research is looking for disruption in one or more epigenetic mechanisms to provide new insights into autoimmune diseases. The identification of cell-specific targets of epigenetic deregulation will serve us as clinical markers for diagnosis, disease progression, and therapy approaches. PMID:22536485

  14. Headache in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Seby; Hajj-Ali, Rula A

    2014-03-01

    Autoimmune diseases are a group of heterogeneous inflammatory disorders characterized by systemic or localized inflammation, leading to ischemia and tissue destruction. These include disorders like systemic lupus erythematosus and related diseases, systemic vasculitides, and central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis (primary or secondary). Headache is a very common manifestation of CNS involvement of these diseases. Although headache characteristics can be unspecific and often non-diagnostic, it is important to recognize because headache can be the first manifestation of CNS involvement. Prompt recognition and treatment is necessary not only to treat the headache, but also to help prevent serious neurological sequelae that frequently accompany autoimmune diseases. In this review, we discuss headache associated with autoimmune diseases along with important mimics. © 2014 American Headache Society.

  15. Bell's palsy and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, A; Gallo, A; Fusconi, M; Marinelli, C; Macri, G F; de Vincentiis, M

    2012-12-01

    To review our current knowledge of the etiopathogenesis of Bell's palsy, including viral infection or autoimmunity, and to discuss disease pathogenesis with respect to pharmacotherapy. Relevant publications on the etiopathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis and histopathology of Bell's palsy from 1975 to 2012 were analysed. Bell's palsy is an idiopathic peripheral nerve palsy involving the facial nerve. It accounts for 60 to 75% of all cases of unilateral facial paralysis. The annual incidence of Bell's palsy is 15 to 30 per 100,000 people. The peak incidence occurs between the second and fourth decades (15 to 45 years). The aetiology of Bell's palsy is unknown but viral infection or autoimmune disease has been postulated as possible pathomechanisms. Bell's palsy may be caused when latent herpes viruses (herpes simplex, herpes zoster) are reactivated from cranial nerve ganglia. A cell-mediated autoimmune mechanism against a myelin basic protein has been suggested for the pathogenesis of Bell's palsy. Bell's palsy may be an autoimmune demyelinating cranial neuritis, and in most cases, it is a mononeuritic variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome, a neurologic disorder with recognised cell-mediated immunity against peripheral nerve myelin antigens. In Bell's palsy and GBS, a viral infection or the reactivation of a latent virus may provoke an autoimmune reaction against peripheral nerve myelin components, leading to the demyelination of cranial nerves, especially the facial nerve. Given the safety profile of acyclovir, valacyclovir, and short-course oral corticosteroids, patients who present within three days of the onset of symptoms should be offered combination therapy. However it seems logical that in fact, steroids exert their beneficial effect via immunosuppressive action, as is the case in some other autoimmune disorders. It is to be hoped that (monoclonal) antibodies and/or T-cell immunotherapy might provide more specific treatment guidelines in the

  16. Psychosis: an autoimmune disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Diwani, Adam A J; Pollak, Thomas A; Irani, Sarosh R; Lennox, Belinda R

    2017-11-01

    Psychotic disorders are common and disabling. Overlaps in clinical course in addition to epidemiological and genetic associations raise the possibility that autoimmune mechanisms may underlie some psychoses, potentially offering novel therapeutic approaches. Several immune loci including the major histocompatibility complex and B-cell markers CD19 and CD20 achieve genome-wide significance in schizophrenia. Emerging evidence suggests a potential role via neurodevelopment in addition to classical immune pathways. Additionally, lymphocyte biology is increasingly investigated. Some reports note raised peripheral CD19 + and reduced CD3 + lymphocyte counts, with altered CD4 : CD8 ratios in acute psychosis. Also, post-mortem studies have found CD3 + and CD20 + lymphocyte infiltration in brain regions that are of functional relevance to psychosis. More specifically, the recent paradigm of neuronal surface antibody-mediated (NSAb) central nervous system disease provides an antigen-specific model linking adaptive autoimmunity to psychopathology. NSAbs bind extracellular epitopes of signalling molecules that are classically implicated in psychosis such as NMDA and GABA receptors. This interaction may cause circuit dysfunction leading to psychosis among other neurological features in patients with autoimmune encephalitis. The detection of these cases is crucial as autoimmune encephalitis is ameliorated by commonly available immunotherapies. Meanwhile, the prevalence and relevance of these antibodies in people with isolated psychotic disorders is an area of emerging scientific and clinical interest. Collaborative efforts to achieve larger sample sizes, comparison of assay platforms, and placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials are now needed to establish an autoimmune contribution to psychosis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. [Polyglandular autoimmune syndromes : An overview].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komminoth, P

    2016-05-01

    Polyglandular autoimmune syndromes (PGAS), also known as autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndromes (APS), are a heterogeneous group of rare, genetically caused diseases of the immune system which lead to inflammatory damage of various endocrine glands resulting in malfunctions. In addition, autoimmune diseases of non-endocrine organs may also be found. Early diagnosis of PGAS is often overlooked because of heterogeneous symptoms and the progressive occurrence of the individual diseases. The two most important forms of PGAS are the juvenile and adult types. The juvenile type (PGAS type 1) is caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene on chromosome 21, exhibits geographic variations in incidence and is defined by the combination of mucocutaneous candidiasis, Addison's disease and hypoparathyroidism. In addition, autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) syndrome and other autoimmune diseases can also occur. The adult form of PGAS (PGAS type 2) is a multigenetic disorder associated with some HLA haplotypes, is more common than the juvenile type, shows female predominance and exhibits the combination of type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid disease, Addison's disease and other autoimmune disorders. The histological alterations in affected organs of PGAS patients are similar to findings in sporadically occurring autoimmune diseases of these organs but there are no pathognomic fine tissue findings. If patients exhibit autoimmune changes in two different endocrine glands or if there are indications of several autoimmune disorders from the patient history, it is important to consider PGAS and inform the clinicians of this suspicion.

  18. [Changes in 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 level in children with Henoch-Schönlein purpura].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan-Da; Dong, Qing-Wei; Li, Rong-Min; Ji, Chao-Yu; Chu, Yong-Tao; Ma, Lei; Zhang, Yu

    2017-03-01

    To examine the changes in 25-hydroxyvitamin D 3 [25-(OH)D 3 ] level in children with Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) and its clinical significance. A total of 92 HSP children were included in this study, and were divided into HSP nephritis (HSPN) group (31 cases) and HSP group (61 cases) based on the presence or absence of HSPN. Alternatively, the patients were divided into purpura alone group (22 cases), purpura with joint symptoms group (joint symptom group, 24 cases), purpura with gastrointestinal symptoms group (gastrointestinal symptom group, 20 cases), and purpura with joint and gastrointestinal symptoms (mixed group, 26 cases) based on their clinical symptoms. In addition, 42 healthy children were selected as healthy control group. The level of 25-(OH)D 3 in each group was measured using enzyme-linked immunoassay. The 25-(OH)D 3 level in the HSP and HSPN groups was significantly lower than that in the healthy control group (Ppurpura alone group (P<0.05). The level of 25-(OH)D 3 is reduced in children with HSP, particularly those with HSPN or with joint and gastrointestinal symptoms. Therefore, the reduction in 25-(OH)D 3 level may serve as a predictor of whether HSP is associated with other impairments.

  19. Disease: H00225 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AL ... Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program 415-20 (2006) DOI:10.1182/asheducation-2006.1.415 ... H00225 Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura; Moschcowitz disease; Schulman-Upshaw syndrome Thrombotic... thrombocytopenic purpura is caused by mutation in the ADAMTS13 gene and characterized by ...ID:18574040 ... AUTHORS ... Sadler JE ... TITLE ... Von Willebrand factor, ADAMTS13, and thrombotic thrombocytopen...MID:17124092 ... AUTHORS ... Sadler JE ... TITLE ... Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura: a moving target. ... JOURN

  20. Clinical indications and biological mechanisms of splenic irradiation in autoimmune diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinmann, M.; Becker, G. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Strahlenonkologie; Einsele, H.; Bamberg, M. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Innere Medizin 2

    2001-02-01

    Background: Splenic irradiation (SI) is a fairly unknown treatment modality in autoimmune disorders like autoimmune thrombocytopenia (AIT) or autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), which may provide an effective, low toxic and cost-effective treatment for selected patients. Patients, Materials and Methods: This article reviews the limited experiences on splenic irradiation in autoimmune thrombocytopenia by analyzing the current studies including 71 patients and some preliminary reports on splenic irradiation in autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Results: In autoimmune thrombocytopenia between 40 and 90% of all patients responded, but most of them relapsed within 4 to 6 months after splenic irradiation. Between 10 and 20% of all patients had a sustained response. The efficacy of splenic irradiation in HIV-associated cases of thrombocytopenia is probably lower than in other forms of autoimmune thrombocytopenia, but especially in this group immunosuppressive drug treatment of autoimmune thrombocytopenia exposes some problems. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia there are some case reports about efficacy of splenic irradiation. Toxicity of splenic irradiation in both diseases was very moderate. Conclusions: For HIV patients, for elderly patients or patients at high risk for complications following splenectomy splenic irradiation might be a treatment option. Splenic irradiation as preoperative treatment in patients not responding to or not suitable for immunosuppressive drugs prior to splenectomy may be a promising new application of splenic irradiation to reduce adverse effects of splenectomy in thrombocytopenic patients. A further analysis of the biological mechanisms underlying splenic irradiation may help to improve patient selection, to optimize dose concepts and treatment schedules and will improve understanding of radiotherapy as an immunomodulatory treatment modality. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund: Die Bestrahlung der Milz zur Behandlung von haematologischen

  1. Recent advances in understanding autoimmune thyroid disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliddal, Sofie; Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) is often observed together with other autoimmune diseases. The coexistence of two or more autoimmune diseases in the same patient is referred to as polyautoimmunity, and AITD is the autoimmune disease most frequently involved. The occurrence of polyautoimmunity has...... led to the hypothesis that the affected patients suffer from a generalized dysregulation of their immune system. The present review summarizes recent discoveries unravelling the immunological mechanisms involved in autoimmunity, ranging from natural autoimmunity to disease-specific autoimmunity...

  2. Sarcoidosis and Thyroid Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piera Fazzi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Most of the studies have shown a higher risk for subclinical and clinical hypothyroidism, antithyroid autoantibodies [overall antithyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb], and in general, thyroid autoimmunity, overall in the female gender in patients with sarcoidosis (S. A significantly higher prevalence of clinical hypothyroidism and Graves’ disease was also described in female S patients with respect to controls. Gallium-67 (Ga-67 scyntigraphy in S patients, in the case of thyroid uptake, suggests the presence of aggressive autoimmune thyroiditis and hypothyroidism. For this reason, ultrasonography and thyroid function should be done in the case of Ga-67 thyroid uptake. In conclusion, thyroid function, TPOAb measurement, and ultrasonography should be done to assess the clinical profile in female S patients, and the ones at high risk (female individuals, with TPOAb positivity, and hypoechoic and small thyroid should have periodically thyroid function evaluations and suitable treatments.

  3. Gangliosides and autoimmune diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misasi, R; Dionisi, S; Farilla, L; Carabba, B; Lenti, L; Di Mario, U; Dotta, F

    1997-09-01

    Gangliosides are sialic acid-containing glycolipids which are formed by a hydrophobic portion, the ceramide, and a hydrophilic part, i.e. the oligosaccharide chain. First described in neural tissue, several studies have shown that gangliosides are almost ubiquitous molecules expressed in all vertebrate tissues. Within cells, gangliosides are usually associated with plasma membranes, where they can act as receptors for a variety of molecules and have been shown to take part in cell-to-cell interaction and in signal transduction. In addition, gangliosides are expressed in cytosol membranes like those of secretory granules of some endocrine cells (adrenal medulla, pancreatic islets). As far as the role of gangliosides in diseases is concerned, there are some cases in which an aberrant ganglioside expression plays a crucial role in the disease pathogenetic process. These diseases include two major forms of ganglioside storage, namely GM2-gangliosidosis (Tay-Sachs and its beta-hexosaminidase deficiency) and GM1-gangliosidosis (beta-galactosidase deficiency), where the most prominent pathological characteristic is the lysosomal ganglioside accumulation in neurons. Other inflammatory or degenerative diseases both within and outside the nervous system have been shown to be associated with an altered pattern of ganglioside expression in the target organ. Since monoclonal antibodies have been discovered and used in immunology, a large variety of ganglioside antigens has been described both as blood group antigens and as tumour-related antigens. Several studies have also indicated that gangliosides can act not only as antigens, but also as autoantigens. As a matter of fact, auto-antibodies to gangliosides, detected by immunostaining methods performed directly on TLC plates or by ELISA, have been described in several autoimmune disorders such as Guillain-Barré syndrome, multiple sclerosis, lupus erythematosus, Hashimoto's thyroiditis and, last but not least, insulin

  4. Thymoma and autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Shelly, Shahar; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Altman, Arie; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2011-01-01

    The thymus is a central lymphatic organ that is responsible for many immunological functions, including the production of mature, functional T cells and the induction of self-tolerance. Benign or malignant tumors may originate from the thymus gland, with thymoma being the most common and accounting for 50% of anterior mediastinal tumors. Malignancies linked to thymoma include the loss of self-tolerance and the presence of autoimmunity. In this review, we compiled the current scientific eviden...

  5. Autoimmune liver disease 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Paolo; Granito, Alessandro; Pappas, Georgios; Muratori, Luigi; Lenzi, Marco; Bianchi, Francesco B

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune liver disease (ALD) includes a spectrum of diseases which comprises both cholestatic and hepatitic forms: autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and the so called "overlap" syndromes where hepatitic and cholestatic damage coexists. All these diseases are characterized by an extremely high heterogeneity of presentation, varying from asymptomatic, acute (as in a subset of AIH) or chronic (with aspecific symptoms such as fatigue and myalgia in AIH or fatigue and pruritus in PBC and PSC). The detection and characterization of non organ specific autoantibodies plays a major role in the diagnostic approach of autoimmune liver disease; anti nuclear reactivities (ANA) and anti smooth muscle antibodies (SMA) mark type 1 AIH, liver kidney microsomal antibody type 1 (LKM1) and liver cytosol type 1 (LC1) are the serological markers of type 2 AIH; antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) are associated with PBC, while no specific marker is found in PSC, since anticytoplasmic neutrophil antibodies with perinuclear pattern (atypical p-ANCA or p-ANNA) are also detected in a substantial proportion of type 1 AIH cases. Treatment options rely on immunosoppressive therapy (steroids and azathioprine) in AIH and on ursodeoxycholic acid in cholestatic conditions; in all these diseases liver transplantation remains the only therapeutical approach for the end stage of liver disease.

  6. [Autoimmune blistering diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvert-Lehembre, S; Joly, P

    2014-03-01

    Autoimmune blistering diseases are characterized by the production of pathogenic autoantibodies that are responsible for the formation of epidermal blisters. Major advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of these disorders have allowed the development of new therapeutic agents. Recent epidemiologic data showed that bullous pemphigoid mainly affects elderly patients. Bullous pemphigoid is often associated with degenerative neurologic disorders. A major increase in the incidence of bullous pemphigoid has been observed in France. Treatment of bullous pemphigoid is mainly based on superpotent topical corticosteroids. The role of desmosomal proteins has been demonstrated in the initiation, propagation and persistence of the autoimmune response in pemphigus. Several studies have shown a correlation between anti-desmoglein antibody titers and disease activity. Pemphigus susceptibility genes have been identified. Oral corticosteroids remain the mainstay of pemphigus treatment. Dramatic and long-lasting improvement has been recently obtained with rituximab in recalcitrant types of pemphigus. Other autoimmune junctional blistering diseases are rare entities, whose prognosis can be severe. Their diagnosis has been improved by the use of new immunological assays and immunoelectronic microscopy. Immunosupressants are widely used in severe types in order to prevent mucosal sequelae. Copyright © 2013 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Thymoma and autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelly, Shahar; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Altman, Arie; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2011-01-01

    The thymus is a central lymphatic organ that is responsible for many immunological functions, including the production of mature, functional T cells and the induction of self-tolerance. Benign or malignant tumors may originate from the thymus gland, with thymoma being the most common and accounting for 50% of anterior mediastinal tumors. Malignancies linked to thymoma include the loss of self-tolerance and the presence of autoimmunity. In this review, we compiled the current scientific evidence detailing the various interactions between thymoma and autoimmune diseases, including myasthenia gravis, systemic lupus erythematosus, inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion, pure red cell aplasia, pernicious anemia, pemphigus and autoimmune thyroid diseases. In recent years, several mechanisms have been proposed to explain these interactions. Most are based on the assumption that the ‘sick' thymus, like the ‘normal' thymus, can generate mature T cells; however, the T cells generated by the sick thymus are impaired and thus may exert cellular autoreactivity. Here, we present several theories that may shed light on the loss of self-tolerance associated with this epithelial tumor of the thymus. PMID:21317916

  8. Anaphylactoid Purpura Associated with Streptococcal Cellulitis: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yuko; Uchima, Hisataka; Ishida, Takeshi; Kakei, Masafumi

    2017-01-01

    A 54-year-old Japanese man noticed painful swelling and redness of his left leg. He was admitted for treatment of cellulitis, which was accompanied with increased anti-streptolysin O and anti-streptokinase titers in his clinical course. After Piperacillin/Tazobactam administration, the skin lesion resolved. However, the patient then developed arthritis, palpable purpura, and intermittent abdominal pain, later found to be secondary to a severe duodenal ulcer. He was diagnosed with cellulitis-associated anaphylactoid purpura and was given prednisolone, which dramatically improved his symptoms. The anaphylactoid purpura was likely caused by Streptococcus-induced cellulitis, which was successfully treated with prednisolone. Association between these diseases is rare. PMID:28900445

  9. Henoch-Schönlein purpura in children: limited benefit of corticosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluman, Joel; Goldman, Ran D

    2014-11-01

    A child recently presented to my office with lower limb petechiae, arthralgia, and abdominal pain characteristic of Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP). Will systemic corticosteroids help relieve these symptoms and prevent potential HSP complications such as intussusception and nephritis? Henoch-Schönlein purpura is a common and self-limiting disease in children. Current evidence does not support universal treatment of HSP with corticosteroids. Recent trials and meta-analyses found that corticosteroids do not prevent the onset of renal disease or abdominal complications. However, corticosteroids are effective as treatment of abdominal pain, arthralgia, and purpura. Clinicians are advised to use their discretion in choosing which patients might benefit most from oral corticosteroid treatment.

  10. Lower brachial plexopathy in a child with Henoch-Schönlein purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agras, Pinar Isik; Guveloglu, Mine; Aydin, Yusuf; Yakut, Ali; Kabakus, Nimet

    2010-05-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura is characterized by nonthrombocytopenic purpura with multisystem involvement. Nervous system involvement was reported, characterized by headaches, mental-status changes, seizures, paresis, coma, or encephalopathy. Peripheral neuropathy is rarely reported. We describe a 12-year-old boy with Henoch-Schönlein purpura who presented with abdominal pain and underwent a laparatomy before the onset of palpable purpuric rash. Neuropathic findings in the left lower brachial plexus developed while he was receiving steroid treatment for gastrointestinal involvement. He responded well to intravenous pulse steroid therapy. Both sensory and motor dysfunction returned to normal after 3 months of treatment. His steroid dose was gradually withdrawn and stopped. He was symptom-free at month 12 of follow-up. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Anti-HPA-1b Mediated Posttransfusion Purpura: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. P. Arewa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Posttransfusion purpura (PTP is an uncommon, but potentially fatal, transfusion reaction characterized by profound thrombocytopenia and bleeding. PTP is caused by alloimmunization to human platelet specific antigens following blood component transfusion. Although there is evidence of a wide serological spectrum of culprit antibodies implicated, Anti-human-platelet-antigen- (HPA- 1a is the most common antibody in cases reported. We report a case of posttransfusion purpura in an African American. The patient was negative for HPA-1a antibodies, but anti-HPA-1b was identified with a platelet phenotype of HPA-1a/HPA-1a. Although less common, HPA-1b antibody may be an important consideration in posttransfusion purpura diagnosed in patients of African descent.

  12. [Disseminated intravascular coagulation, 113 cases, including 17 children with fulminant purpura].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briones, L R; Dorantes, S

    1976-01-01

    Between 1964 and 1971, 113 children with the syndrome of disseminated intravascular coagulation were studied at the Hospital Infantil de México, including 17 cases with the diagnosis of fulminant purpura. Comparison was established with reports from foreign institutions. The following conclusions are offered: Fulminant purpura appears after a period of latency following the causal disease. It is not caused by septicemia; shows a clear picture in infants, preschool and school children, with letality index of 17.7%. In Mexico, DIC was caused by infection in 88% of the cases and in 68% of them, the infection started in the digestive tract. The diagnosis of fulminant purpura is based on the clinical picture, while in DIC, the diagnosis must also be based on laboratory tests unless one half of the diagnoses be missed.

  13. A Novel Use of Tisseel in the Setting of Uncontrolled Bleeding in a Thrombocytopenic Patient With Idiopathic Thrombocytopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, John S.; Gonzalez, Ricardo; Spiess, Philippe E.

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of an 87-year-old female who was evaluated for an 8.5 cm left sided renal mass concerning for malignancy. The patient was transiently thrombocytopenic over the previous 4 months with platelet counts ranging from 50,000 to 125,000 plt/mcL and experienced diffuse hemorrhage during radical nephrectomy with failure to achieve mechanical hemostasis or fulguration. Following Surgicel (Ethicon; Somerville, New Jersey) application, we applied Tisseel (Baxter; Deerfield, IL) to the nephrectomy bed with complete hemostasis of bleeding foci. Tisseel saved this thrombocytopenic patient with uncontrolled bleeding and should have this clinical utility recognized. PMID:26793579

  14. A Novel Use of Tisseel in the Setting of Uncontrolled Bleeding in a Thrombocytopenic Patient With Idiopathic Thrombocytopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S. Fisher

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of an 87-year-old female who was evaluated for an 8.5 cm left sided renal mass concerning for malignancy. The patient was transiently thrombocytopenic over the previous 4 months with platelet counts ranging from 50,000 to 125,000 plt/mcL and experienced diffuse hemorrhage during radical nephrectomy with failure to achieve mechanical hemostasis or fulguration. Following Surgicel (Ethicon; Somerville, New Jersey application, we applied Tisseel (Baxter; Deerfield, IL to the nephrectomy bed with complete hemostasis of bleeding foci. Tisseel saved this thrombocytopenic patient with uncontrolled bleeding and should have this clinical utility recognized.

  15. [Henoch-Schönlein purpura in the adult].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillebout, E; Verine, J

    2014-06-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura is a systemic vasculitis of the small vessels characterized by perivascular leucocyte infiltrates. It is an immunoglobulin A-related immune complex-mediated disease involving the skin, the joints and the gastrointestinal system. Renal disease may sometimes be associated to these clinical manifestations. Prevalence of the nephritis is highly variable, depending on the series. More rarely, other organs such as the lungs, the heart or the nervous system may be involved. The clinical diagnosis is confirmed by histopathology of the skin (leukocytoclastic vasculitis) and kidney (endo-capillary proliferative glomerulonephritis), showing IgA deposits in these tissues. Short-term prognosis depends on the severity of digestive involvement, but long-term prognosis depends on the renal disease. Recent publications of pediatric and adult series show that the chronic renal failure may progress, sometimes more than ten years after the initial flare. Treatment is usually supportive. The benefit of more specific treatments (corticosteroids or immunosuppressive drugs) in severe visceral forms (usually abdominal or kidney) has not yet been established. Copyright © 2013 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. High-dose methylprednisolone pulse therapy for treatment of refractory intestinal involvement caused by Henoch-Schönlein purpura: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun Sik; Chung, Hee Sup; Kang, Ki-Soo; Han, Kyoung Hee

    2015-03-24

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura is an immunoglobulin A-mediated, small vascular inflammatory disease that can be associated with palpable purpura, arthralgia, abdominal pain, or nephritis. The presence of purpura facilitates the diagnosis of Henoch-Schönlein purpura at the onset of associated symptoms, whereas the absence of purpura makes the diagnosis challenging. It is important to diagnose Henoch-Schönlein purpura with delayed-onset skin purpura to avoid unnecessary surgery for acute abdomen. Most cases of Henoch-Schönlein purpura with severe abdominal pain are treated with low-dose steroids and intravenous immunoglobulin. A 15-year-old Korean girl complained of severe abdominal pain and delayed-onset purpura on admission. Henoch-Schönlein purpura was diagnosed based on endoscopic findings of hemorrhagic duodenitis and duodenal vasculitis and abdominal computed tomography findings of edematous bowels. Two common initial treatments, a low-dose steroid and intravenous immunoglobulin, were administered, but there was no improvement for 1 month. Subsequently, we used high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy (30 mg/kg/day, with a maximum of 1g/day), which dramatically alleviated her abdominal symptoms. High-dose intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy can be used as the ultimate treatment for delayed-onset Henoch-Schönlein purpura with severe abdominal pain when symptoms do not improve after low-dose steroid and intravenous immunoglobulin treatments.

  17. Henoch-Schönlein purpura associated with pulmonary Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Shuichi

    2004-09-01

    A 57-year-old woman presented with bloody sputum and high grade fever. She had been treated for Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex (MAC). High grade fever slightly decreased and bloody sputum disappeared after two weeks, but low grade fever persisted. After 3 days of recurrence of bloody sputum, she suddenly complained of palpable pururitic lesions on the bilateral lower extremities with bilateral gonalgia. Although there are some reports of direct skin lesions due to MAC, there are no reports of hypersensitivity vasculitis, Henoch-Schönlein purpura, in MAC. It is necessary to consider MAC infection as a potential cause of Henoch-Schönlein purpura.

  18. The primary haemostasis is more preserved in thrombocytopenic patients with liver cirrhosis than cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinholt, Pernille Just; Alnor, Anne B; Nybo, Mads

    2018-01-01

    : In thrombocytopenia, differences in haemostatic capacity may explain discrepancies in bleeding risk between patients with cancer and patients with liver cirrhosis. The objective was to compare the haemostatic capacity in different thrombocytopenic patient populations. We evaluated platelet aggr....... Fibrinogen activity was higher in patients with cancer compared with patients with cirrhosis [12.5 μmol/L (IQR 9.9-16.5) versus 7.2 μmol/l (IQR 5.6-10.2)], P preserved primary haemostasis compared with patients with cancer....

  19. [Treatment of autoimmune hepatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueverov, A O

    2004-01-01

    The immunosuppresive drugs, primarily glucocorticosteroids, serve as the basis for the pathogenetic treatment of autoimmune diseases of the liver. In autoimmune hepatitis, immunosuppressive therapy induces and maintains persistent remission in most patients while in primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis, its capacities are substantially limited. Ursodeoxycholic acid is used as the basic drug in predominantly occurring intrahepatic cholestasis. The treatment of cross autoimmune syndromes generally requires the choice of a combination of drugs.

  20. B Cells in Autoimmune Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Hampe, Christiane S.

    2012-01-01

    The role of B cells in autoimmune diseases involves different cellular functions, including the well-established secretion of autoantibodies, autoantigen presentation and ensuing reciprocal interactions with T cells, secretion of inflammatory cytokines, and the generation of ectopic germinal centers. Through these mechanisms B cells are involved both in autoimmune diseases that are traditionally viewed as antibody mediated and also in autoimmune diseases that are commonly classified as T cell...

  1. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becheur, M; Bouslama, B; Slama, H; Toumi, N E H

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare condition in children which differs from the adult form. It is defined by immune-mediated destruction of red blood cells caused by autoantibodies. Characteristics of the autoantibodies are responsible for the various clinical entities. Classifications of autoimmune hemolytic anemia include warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia, cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria. For each classification, this review discusses the epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, laboratory evaluation, and treatment options. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Evolution of IgA nephropathy into anaphylactoid purpura in six cases--further evidence that IgA nephropathy and Henoch-Schonlein purpura nephritis share common pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, Koichi; Ogura, Masao; Sato, Mai; Ito, Shuichi; Ishikura, Kenji

    2016-05-01

    As the morphological and immunohistochemical manifestations of immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy and Henoch-Schonlein purpura nephritis (HSPN) are very similar, they are considered to share a common pathogenesis. Although HSPN usually develops after the appearance of anaphylactoid purpura, we have encountered patients whose renal symptoms preceded purpura. We reviewed the clinical courses of patients who were first diagnosed with IgA nephropathy, but developed purpura later, at the National Center for Child Health and Development in Tokyo, Japan. Of the 53 patients who were diagnosed with primary IgA nephropathy at our institute during the study period (March 2002 to July 2015), six (11 %) developed anaphylactoid purpura after the diagnosis of primary IgA nephropathy and therefore met the inclusion criteria. Duration between the onset of nephritis and subsequent appearance of purpura ranged from 5 months to 14 years. One patient reached end-stage renal failure due to IgA nephropathy and developed purpura after renal transplantation. All renal biopsies performed before the appearance of purpura showed mesangial proliferation with predominant IgA deposits. Urinary findings deteriorated in three patients after the appearance of purpura, including one patient who developed rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Renal biopsy findings worsened in two patients. At the last observation, two patients showed mild renal insufficiency. Our clinical experience and previous reports support the argument that IgA nephropathy and HSPN are different manifestations of a single disease. Hence, it is acceptable to consider that they are variants of a single disease.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: autoimmune Addison disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of each kidney. It is classified as an autoimmune disorder because it results from a malfunctioning immune system ... disease or their family members can have another autoimmune disorder, most commonly autoimmune thyroid disease or type 1 ...

  4. [Keratitis - Infectious or Autoimmune?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messmer, E M

    2016-07-01

    Histopathological evaluation of ocular tissues is important in differentiating between infectious and autoimmune disease. Inflammation, necrosis and keratolysis are common to most forms of keratitis. Histopathology can be of great help in identifying the causative organism, establishing a final diagnosis and/or managing the patient with herpes simplex virus keratitis, mycotic keratitis, acanthamoeba keratitis or microsporidia keratoconjunctivitis. Important pathogenetic knowledge with therapeutic relevance has been gained from histopathological studies in nummular keratitis after epidemic keratoconjunctivitis and atopic keratoconjunctivitis. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Rakhi

    2015-06-01

    Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is defined as the destruction of circulating red blood cells (RBCs) in the setting of anti-RBC autoantibodies that optimally react at 37°C. The pathophysiology of disease involves phagocytosis of autoantibody-coated RBCs in the spleen and complement-mediated hemolysis. Thus far, treatment is aimed at decreasing autoantibody production with immunosuppression or reducing phagocytosis of affected cells in the spleen. The role of complement inhibitors in warm AIHA has not been explored. This article addresses the diagnosis, etiology, and treatment of warm AIHA and highlights the role of complement in disease pathology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Hyposalivation in autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Maeshima, Etsuko; Furukawa, Kanako; Maeshima, Shinichiro; Koshiba, Hiroya; Sakamoto, Wataru

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the prevalence of dry mouth among patients with autoimmune diseases other than Sj?gren?s syndrome. One hundred and forty-four patients, excluding patients with primary Sj?gren?s syndrome, were enrolled in this study. The volume of saliva secreted was measured with the screening technique for estimation of salivary flow, which uses a filter paper for diagnosing dry mouth. Disturbed salivary secretion was observed in 84 (58.3?%) of the 144 patients. In the case of patients ...

  7. Autoimmune liver disease and concomitant extrahepatic autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Paolo; Fabbri, Angela; Lalanne, Claudine; Lenzi, Marco; Muratori, Luigi

    2015-10-01

    To assess the frequency and clinical impact of associated extrahepatic autoimmune diseases (EAD) on autoimmune liver diseases (ALD). We investigated 608 patients with ALD (327 autoimmune hepatitis - AIH and 281 primary biliary cirrhosis - PBC) for concomitant EAD. In both AIH and PBC, we observed a high prevalence of EAD (29.9 and 42.3%, respectively); both diseases showed a significant association with autoimmune thyroid disease, followed by autoimmune skin disease, celiac disease, and vasculitis in AIH patients and sicca syndrome, CREST syndrome, and celiac disease in PBC patients. At diagnosis, AIH patients with concurrent EAD were more often asymptomatic than patients with isolated AIH (Pautoimmune thyroid disease. In the light of our results, all patients with an EAD should be assessed for the concomitant presence of an asymptomatic ALD.

  8. [A report of two children with fever, headache, and purpura].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hong-Bo; Tan, Mei; Lu, Jian; Tian, Mao-Qiang; Chen, Yan

    2017-09-01

    In this study, two school-aged children had an acute onset in spring and had the manifestations of fever, headache, vomiting, disturbance of consciousness, purpura and ecchymosis, and positive meningeal irritation sign. There were increases in peripheral white blood cells and neutrophils, but reductions in the hemoglobin level and platelet count in the two children. They had a significant increase in C-reactive protein. There were hundreds or thousands of white blood cells in the cerebrospinal fluid, mainly neutrophils. Increased protein contents but normal levels of glucose and chloride in the cerebrospinal fluid were found. Head CT scan showed multiple hematomas in the right cerebellum and both hemispheres in one child. Bone marrow cytology indicated infection in the bone marrow, and both blood culture and bone marrow culture showed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Both patients had cardiac murmurs and progressive reductions in the hemoglobin level and platelet count during treatment, and echocardiography showed the formation of vegetation in the aortic valve. Therefore, the patients were diagnosed with infectious endocarditis (IE). Vancomycin was used as the anti-infective therapy based on the results of drug sensitivity test. One child was cured after 6 weeks, and the other child was withdrawn from the treatment and then died. Dynamic monitoring of cardiac murmurs should be performed for children with unexplained fever, and echocardiography should be performed in time to exclude IE. IE should also be considered for children with purulent meningitis and skin and mucosal bleeding which cannot be explained by the reduction in platelet count.

  9. Vancomycin-associated Henoch-Schönlein purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Zaw; Garcia, Raquel R; Murillo, Monika; Uchin, Jeffrey M; Bhanot, Nitin

    2017-03-01

    Intravenous vancomycin is a widely used antibiotics, but it causes different types of cutaneous hypersensitivity reactions, ranging from maculopapular rash, red-man syndrome, drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms, IgA bullous dermatosis, leukocytoclastic vasculitis, Stevens-Johnsons syndrome, to IgE-mediated anaphylaxis. We report an elderly patient with the end-stage renal disease presented with diffuse palpable purpura while receiving IV vancomycin therapy for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus septicemia. Histopathology of skin biopsy revealed perivascular infiltrates of leukocytoclastic debris with necrosis of the small-sized blood vessels. Direct immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated vivid IgA plus C3 immune-complex deposits localized to the vessel walls, and no immune complexes were noted on the dermoepidermal junction. There was no IgG or IgM immunoreactivity detected on the tissue specimen. Rheumatologic disease work-ups were negative. A diagnosis of vancomycin-associated Henoch-Schönlein variant of vasculitis was made. Vancomycin was substituted by daptomycin, and the purpuric skin rashes were resolved. Since vancomycin is a commonly used antibacterial agent, clinicians are encouraged to have a heightened awareness of this rare adverse skin reaction. Early recognition and prompt discontinuation of the medication is the key in management. As it is not an Ig-E mediated reaction, desensitization of vancomycin or re-challenge with vancomycin is not recommended as re-exposure to the drug may result in a recurrence of similar manifestations with potential permanent renal failure. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Evolution of Juvenile Schönlein-Henoch Purpura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.E. Chernyshova

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hemorrhagic vasculitis, or Schönlein-Henoch purpura (SHP, is the most common type of systemic vasculitis in childhood, and peculiarities of the further evolution of the pathological process in adult patients remain unexplored. Objective: to study the evolution of juvenile SHP, comparing the nature of lesions of the skin, joints, heart and kidneys in patients in childhood and adulthood. Material and methods. The study included 92 patients (61 men and 31 women with the average age of 27 years, and the average age of disease onset — 11 years. I degree of the activity of the pathological process is determined in 40 % of cases, II — in 35 %, III — in 25 %. Seropositivity by hyperimmunoglobulinemia A occurred in 27 % of cases, by the presence of rheumatoid factor — in 21 %. At the time of the survey, cutaneous syndrome was diagnosed in 55 % of patients, joint one — in 45 %, kidney one — in 71 %. Renal biopsy was performed in 15 cases. Results. The cutaneous, cutaneous-joint-abdominal and cutaneous-abdominal-renal forms of the disease, lesions of the skin, gastrointestinal tract, wrist, ankle and knee joints become rarer in the process of juvenile SHP evolution, but exceptionally renal variant of the pathological process, changes of skeletal muscles, liver, spleen and the heart are revealed more often, chronic kidney disease with the renal failure progression is developed in 12 % of patients (in 17 % of cases of nephropathy, sacroiliitis, spondylopathy, tendovaginitis, enthesopathies, epiphyseal osteoporosis and meniscitis of the knee joints are arisen, II, III, VI and IV morphological classes of Henoch glomerulonephritis are formed in a ratio of 8 : 4 : 2 : 1 with tubulointerstitial component in all cases, and lymphohistiocytic infiltration of the vascular wall is the unfavorable sign for the prognosis of the disease. Conclusions. In cases of transition of juvenile SHP into the chronic adult form, the disease often obtain

  11. Penoscrotal edema and purpura in a 12-year-old boy: a case report and review of causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Anne G; Fox, Janelle A; Reyes-Múgica, Miguel; Cannon, Glenn

    2012-10-01

    We report the case of a 12-year-old patient with previously diagnosed Crohn disease who presented with penile edema and purpura, with extension into the scrotum. Subsequent work-up including biopsy led to the diagnosis of extraintestinal Crohn disease, a rare manifestation in the genital region. Prompt treatment with steroids led to complete resolution of both penoscrotal edema and purpura. We describe our case, followed by a discussion of etiologies of penoscrotal edema and purpura as a review for the practicing pediatric urologist. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisand, Kai; Peterson, Pärt

    2015-07-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene. This review focuses on the clinical and immunological features of APECED, summarizes the current knowledge on the function of AIRE and discusses the importance of autoantibodies in disease diagnosis and prognosis. Additionally, we review the outcome of recent immunomodulatory treatments in APECED patients.

  13. Is Tolerance Broken in Autoimmunity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dama Laxminarayana

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases are classified into about 80 different types based on their specificity related to system, organ and/or tissue. About 5% of the western population is affected by this anomaly, but its worldwide incidence is unknown. Autoimmune diseases are heterogeneous in nature and clinical manifestations range from benign disorders to life-threatening conditions. Autoimmunity strikes at any stage of life, but age and/or gender also play role in onset of some of these anomalies. The autoimmune pathogenesis is initiated by the origination of autoantigens, which leads to the development of autoantibodies followed by auto-immunogenicity and the ultimate onset of autoimmunity. There is a lack of suitable therapies to treat autoimmune diseases, because mechanisms involved in the onset of these anomalies were poorly understood. Present therapies are limited to symptomatic treatment and come with severe side effects. Here, I described the molecular mechanisms and cellular events involved in the initiation of autoimmunity and proposed better strategies to modulate such molecular and cellular anomalies, which will help in preventing and/or controlling autoimmune pathogenesis and ultimately aid in enhancing the quality of life.

  14. Klinisch denken en beslissen in de praktijk. Koorts, purpura en krachtsverlies bij een 29-jarige vrouw

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Born, B. J. H.; Koopmans, R. P.; Hart, W.

    2002-01-01

    A 29-year-old female was admitted with fever, purpura and hemiparesis. She was treated for meningococcal sepsis after a Gram stain of a purpuric lesion showed Gram-negative diplococci. CT scan of the brain revealed multiple haemorrhagic lesions with obliteration of the sulci and basal cisterns. In

  15. Two cases of infectious purpura fulminans and septic shock caused by Capnocytophaga canimorsus transmitted from dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Claus Behrend; Berg, Ronan Martin Griffen; Plovsing, Ronni R.

    2012-01-01

    We report 2 cases of Capnocytophaga canimorsus-induced septicaemia complicated by purpura fulminans in previously healthy individuals, both of whom had been exposed to dog saliva prior to disease. They both presented with purpuric skin lesions, as well as the tetrad of abdominal symptoms, haemoly...

  16. Schönlein-Henoch purpura during pregnancy with successful outcome for mother and newborn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gschnait Friedrich

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstrac Background Schönlein-Henoch purpura is a systemic vasculitis that affects vessels of a small caliber and rarely reported in the literature. Case presentation We report on a 35-year-old woman who developed palpable purpura with necrotizing cutaneous lesions on the lower limbs at 27 weeks of gestation. She also complained of epigastric pain and arthralgias. Histologic examination of a skin biopsy showed leukocytoclastic vasculitis with intravascular fibrin thrombi. The direct immunofluorescence analysis evidenced vascular deposits of IgA and C3 in the upper and mid-dermis. These findings were consistent with Schönlein-Henoch purpura. There was no evidence of renal involvement or placental dysfunction. The patient was treated with low-dose oral corticosteroids and a healthy infant was delivered by cesarean section. Examination of the placenta and the navel string disclosed no signs of vasculitis or infarction. Conclusion Schönlein-Henoch purpura is rarely reported in pregnancy. Treatment with orally administred corticosteroids may lead to a beneficial outcome for mother and newborn.

  17. [Clinical characteristics of Henoch-Schönlein purpura in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-Jun; Yu, Jing; Li, Yu-Ning

    2015-10-01

    To explore the clinical characteristics of Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) in children. The clinical data of 325 hospitalized children who were diagnosed with HSP between June 2012 and June 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. In the 325 children with HSP, the incidence of HSP was higher in winter and spring, with 33.9% and 27.4%, respectively. Infection was the major factor to induce HSP (57.2%). The incidence of renal damage in children with purpura accompanied by abdominal symptoms and children with purpura accompanied by abdominal and joint symptoms was 60.3% and 48.9%, respectively, with statistically significant differences compared with children with purpura alone (Ppurpura nephritis, the pathological grades of IIIa and IIIb were more common, accounting for 28% and 31%, respectively. In 325 children, an increased serum D-dimer level was observed in 260 children (80.0%), an increased peripheral IgA content in 101 children (46.3%), and a decreased CD4+ cell percentage in 62 children (56.4%). A high incidence of HSP is often seen in spring and winter. HSP is often induced by upper respiratory tract infection. Renal damage is more likely to occur in children with digestive tract symptoms, with IIIa and IIIb as the common pathological grades of renal damage.

  18. An 'inflammatory' variant of solar purpura: a simulant of leukocytoclastic vasculitis and neutrophilic dermatoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Benjamin A; LeBoit, Philip E

    2013-08-01

    To study the clinical and pathological features of cases of apparent solar purpura, with attention to the recently described phenomenon of inflammatory changes within otherwise typical lesions. We studied 95 cases diagnosed as solar purpura and identified 10 cases (10.5%) in which significant neutrophilic inflammation was present, potentially simulating a leukocytoclastic vasculitis or neutrophilic dermatosis. An additional three cases were identified in subsequent routine practice. The clinical features, including follow-up for subsequent development of vasculitis and histological features were studied. In all cases the histological features were typical of solar purpura, with the exception of inflammatory changes, typically associated with clefting of elastotic stroma. Clinical follow-up information was available for all patients and none developed subsequent evidence of a cutaneous or systemic vasculitis or neutrophilic dermatosis. Inflammatory changes appear to be more frequent in solar purpura than is generally recognised. Awareness of this histological variation and correlation with the clinical findings and evolution is important in avoiding misdiagnosis.

  19. Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis in children: incidence, pathogenesis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun-Yi; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2015-02-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is one of the most common vasculitides in children. It is manifested by skin purpura, arthritis, abdominal pain, renal involvement, etc. Typically, HSP is considered to be self-limiting, although renal involvement (HSP purpura nephritis, HSPN) is the principal cause of morbidity from this disease. For this reason, it is important to clarify the mechanism of onset and clinical manifestations of HSPN and to ascertain the most appropriate treatment for HSPN. In this article, we review the updated pathophysiology and treatment strategies for HSPN. We searched databases including PubMed, Elsevier and Wanfang for the following key words: Henoch-Schönlein purpura, nephritis, mechanism and treatment, and we selected those publications written in English that we judged to be relevant to the topic of this review. Based on the data present in the literature, we reviewed the following topics: 1) the possible pathogenesis of HSPN: several studies suggest that immunoglobulin A immune complexes deposit in the mesangium and induce renal injury; 2) multiple-drug treatment for HSPN: although there have been few evidence-based treatment strategies for HSPN, several studies have suggested that immunosuppressive drugs and multiple drug combination therapy were effective in ameliorating proteinuria and histological severity. HSPN is a severe disease of childhood. To better understand this disease, detailed investigations into the pathogenesis of HSPN and prospective randomized controlled treatment studies on children with severe HSPN are needed.

  20. Post-transfusion purpura treated with plasma exchange by haemonetics cell separator. A case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, B; Morling, N; Rosenkvist, J

    1978-01-01

    A case of post-transfusion purpura in a 61-year-old, multiparous female with a platelet alloantibody (anti-Zwa) in her serum is reported. The patient was successfully treated with plasma exchange by means of a Haemonetics 30 cell separator and corticosteroids. Compared with other therapeutic...

  1. The Clinical Analysis of Childhood Henoch-Schönlein Purpura Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cihangir Akgün

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Henoch-Schonlein purpura is affected often the skin, joints, gastrointestinal tract and kidneys and common systemic vasculitis of childhood. Henoch-Schonlein purpura are many and varied symptoms, also it was followed in children policlinics and hospitalized diseases for an important role. We aimed to determination of the patients with Henoch-Schönlein purpura by examination of their clinical analyses. Material and Method: The medical records of 212 patients with Henoch-Schönlein purpura in our polyclinics have been retrospectively studied. These patients were analyzed age groups, diagnosed seasons, held systems, laboratory findings, the treatments, complications and prognosis. SPSS 13 statistical software package was used for data analysis. Results: The mean age of the patients was 9.33±3.20 years. The disease was more frequently demonstrated in fall and winter seasons. There was no statistically assosiation between age groups with season, joint involvement, central nerveous system involvement, gastrointestinal system involvement and scrotal involvement but there was a positive correlation between age groups and renal involvement. Conclusion: The treatment duration increases with the age of the patient and the necessity to use a combined treatment (antihistaminic, non-steroid anti-inflammatory treatment and steroids increases.

  2. A case of fulminant varicella infection with purpura fulminans, hepatitis, and rhabdomyolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A S Karadag

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Varicella zoster virus causes varicella which is a common disease. Generally it is self-limiting, and treatment is often unnecessary, but severe or life-threatening complications are rarely seen. We report a case of fulminant varicella complicating with purpura fulminans, hepatitis, and probable rhabdomyolysis in a previously healthy child.

  3. Henoch-Schönlein purpura in children: Limited benefit of corticosteroids

    OpenAIRE

    Bluman, Joel; Goldman, Ran D.

    2014-01-01

    Question A child recently presented to my office with lower limb petechiae, arthralgia, and abdominal pain characteristic of Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP). Will systemic corticosteroids help relieve these symptoms and prevent potential HSP complications such as intussusception and nephritis?

  4. Cerebral Vasculitis Related Seizure in a Child with Henoch–Schönlein Purpura: Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Uzun H.

    2011-01-01

    Neurological complications are rare during the course of Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP). Central nervous system involvement can manifest as behavioral change, seizures, headaches and focal dysfunctions. We report an 8-year-old girl with HSP who presented with seizures.

  5. Post-transfusion purpura treated with plasma exchange by haemonetics cell separator. A case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, B; Morling, N; Rosenkvist, J

    1978-01-01

    A case of post-transfusion purpura in a 61-year-old, multiparous female with a platelet alloantibody (anti-Zwa) in her serum is reported. The patient was successfully treated with plasma exchange by means of a Haemonetics 30 cell separator and corticosteroids. Compared with other therapeutic meas...

  6. [Advance of clinical study on immune thrombocytopenia caused by irregular antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lin-Lin; Zhang, Chen-Guang

    2011-06-01

    The platelet antibodies mainly include platelet-specific and related antibodies, which belong to irregular antibodies. They are produced by autoimmune, drug-induced or isoimmunization (such as pregnancy, blood transfusion and so on), the irregular IgG and/or IgM antibodies produce and lead to platelet transfusion refractoriness (PTR), post-transfusion purpura (PTP) and isoimmune neonatal thrombocytopenic purpura (INTP), idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and so on. It is very necessary to screen and identify the irregular antibodies before blood transfusion or parturition. Except some serological detections should be done first, flow cytometry and molecular biological techniques such as PCR and PCR-SSP are applied to detect the difficult-matching patients' genotypes and fetal genotypes in order to further predict fetal INTP and to provide the right blood for difficult-matching patients, therefore, some measures must be taken early for prevention and treatment of immune thrombocytopenic purpura. In this review, the production, typing and laboratory tests of irregular antibodies, as well as the pathogenesis and clinical symptoms of diseases caused by irregular antibodies, and the current progress are summarized.

  7. Current topics in autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Luigi; Muratori, Paolo; Granito, Alessandro; Pappas, Giorgios; Cassani, Fabio; Lenzi, Marco

    2010-11-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic liver disease of unknown aetiology characterized by interface hepatitis, hypergammaglobulinaemia and circulating autoantibodies. In the last decade a number of advancements have been made in the field of clinical and basic research: the simplified diagnostic criteria, the complete response defined as normalization of transaminase levels, the molecular identification of the antigenic targets of anti-liver cytosol antibody type 1 and anti-soluble liver antigen, the detection of anti-actin antibodies, the description of de novo autoimmune hepatitis after liver transplantation for non-autoimmune liver diseases, the characterization of autoimmune hepatitis with overlapping features of primary biliary cirrhosis or primary sclerosing cholangitis, the preliminary experience with novel treatment strategies based on cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil and budesonide, the role played by "impaired" regulatory T cells and the development of novel animal models of autoimmune hepatitis. Copyright © 2010 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Recalcitrant hypocalcaemia in autoimmune enteropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, Myfanwy; Fairchild, Jan; Moore, David; Moore, Lynette; Henning, Paul; Tham, Elaine

    2014-12-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy syndrome is a monogenic disorder associated with autoimmune destruction of both endocrine and nonendocrine tissues. The classic triad includes candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and Addison disease. Up to 25% of patients with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy syndrome also have gastrointestinal manifestations, which can have an impact on the management of other aspects of the disease. The management of the case discussed was challenging because of the complex interplay between the manifestations and treatment of his hypoparathyroidism, Addison disease, and autoimmune enteropathy. Attempts at management of hypocalcemia were largely unsuccessful until the introduction of immunosuppressive therapy for autoimmune enteropathy. This case supports early consideration of immunosuppression in this condition. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. Autoimmune comorbidity in achalasia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Hernández, Fernanda; Furuzawa-Carballeda, Janette; Hernández-Molina, Gabriela; Alejandro-Medrano, Edgar; Núñez-Álvarez, Carlos A; Hernández-Ramírez, Diego F; Azamar-Llamas, Daniel; Olivares-Martínez, Elizabeth; Breña, Blanca; Palacios, Axel; Valdovinos, Miguel A; Coss-Adame, Enrique; Ramos-Ávalos, Bárbara; Torres-Landa, Samuel; Hernández-Ávila, Axel A; Flores-Nájera, Athenea; Torres-Villalobos, Gonzalo

    2018-01-01

    Idiopathic achalasia is a rare esophageal motor disorder. The disease state manifests local and systemic inflammation, and it appears that an autoimmune component and specific autoantibodies participate in the pathogenesis. The study aims to determine the prevalence of autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases in patients with achalasia and compare the results with those from patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). It was a cross-sectional and included 114 patients with idiopathic achalasia and 114 age-matched and sex-matched control patients with GERD. Data on the presence of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, the time of presentation, and any family history of autoimmune disease were obtained from the hospital's medical records. Seventy three (64%) were female patients (mean age: 42.3 ± 15.5; median disease duration: 12 months). We identified the presence of autoimmune disease in 19 patients with achalasia (16.7%), hypothyroidism was the main diagnosis, and it was present in 52.6% of patients compared with 4.2% in controls. Thirteen of the 19 achalasia patients (68.4%) with autoimmune disease had history of familial autoimmunity. We identified 11 achalasia (9.6%) and 5 GERD patients (4.16%) with an inflammatory condition. Compared with the GERD, the achalasia group was 3.8 times more likely to have an autoimmune disease (95% CI: 1.47-9.83), 3.0 times more likely to have thyroidopathies (95% CI: 1.00-9.03), and 3.02 times more likely to suffer from any chronic inflammatory disease (95% CI: 1.65-6.20). The non-negligible number of patients with autoimmune diseases identified among the patients with idiopathic achalasia supports the hypothesis that achalasia has an autoimmune component. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. Topical Human Epidermal Growth Factor in the Treatment of Senile Purpura and the Prevention of Dermatoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Braden; Seidel, Rachel; Moy, Ron

    2015-10-01

    Senile purpura presents itself as a largely unexplored challenge as it has been long thought of as a benign condition without long-term health sequelae. It is becoming increasingly accepted that skin aging not only results in cosmetic disturbances, but as a functional ones. With modern increases in lifespan, skin atrophy associated with solar damage is presenting as a clinically significant inability to mechanically protect patients. This chronic cutaneous insufficiency/fragility syndrome was recently termed dermatoporosis and senile purpura appears to be a visible marker of early stage dysfunction. To examine the effects of topically human epidermal growth factor on the clinical presence of senile purpura and its effect on skin thickness as measured via cutaneous ultrasound. Six subjects applied human epidermal growth factor morning and night for six weeks. Clinical outcomes were evaluated by comparing initial clinical photos to 6-week photos and performing a blinded investigator's global assessment (IGA). Skin thickness was evaluated via cutaneous ultrasound measurement. Ultrasound measurements indicated a mean skin thickening of 195.2 ± 35.7 um (SEM) over 6 weeks. The average number of purpuric lesions decreased from 15 ± 4.6 (SEM) to 2.3 ± 0.7 (SEM) over that same period. Senile purpura presents itself as a cosmetic disturbance posing significant psychological distress and serves as a marker of the severity of skin thinning. In this study, we demonstrate that topical h-EGF diminishes the appearance of senile purpura by thickening skin and may help prevent the development of late stage dermatoporosis.

  11. Moyamoya Syndrome Associated with Henoch-Schönlein Purpura

    Science.gov (United States)

    SHIARI, Reza; TABATABAEI NODUSHAN, Seyed Mohamad Hossein; MOHEBBI, Mohamad Mahdi; KARIMZADEH, Parvaneh; JAVADZADEH, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Some reports have shown the association between Moyamoya syndrome and autoimmune diseases. Herewith, we present a 3.5 yr old girl with Henoch- Schönleinpurpura (HSP) who was treated with steroids because of sever colicky abdominal pain. However, central nervous system manifestations such as headache, ataxia and vision impairment developed during 6 months of her outpatient follow-up. More evaluation using MRA revealed intracranial stenosis of internal carotid artery and arterial collaterals that were in favor of Moyamoya syndrome. To our knowledge, this is the first report of Moyamoya syndrome following henoch-schönleinpurpura. PMID:27843469

  12. Autoimmune premature ovarian failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Komorowska

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Premature ovarian failure (POF, also termed as primary ovarian insufficiency (POI, is a highly heterogenous condition affecting 0.5-3.0% of women in childbearing age. These young women comprise quite a formidable group with unique physical and psychological needs that require special attention. Premature ovarian senescence (POS in all of its forms evolves insidiously as a basically asymptomatic process, leading to complete loss of ovarian function, and POI/POF diagnoses are currently made at relatively late stages. Well-known and well-documented risk factors exist, and the presence or suspicion of autoimmune disorder should be regarded as an important one. Premature ovarian failure is to some degree predictable in its occurrence and should be considered while encountering young women with loss of menstrual regularity, especially when there is a concomitant dysfunction in the immune system.

  13. Selfie: Autoimmunity, boon or bane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsan, Haseeb

    2017-01-01

    The immune system provides protection to tissues damaged by infectious microrganisms or physical damage. In autoimmune diseases, the immune system recognizes and attacks its own tissues, i.e., self-destruction. Various agents such as genetic factors and environmental triggers are thought to play a major role in the development of autoimmune diseases. A common feature of all autoimmune diseases is the presence of autoantibodies and inflammation, including mononuclear phagocytes, autoreactive T lymphocytes, and autoantibody producing B cells (plasma cells). It has long been known that B cells produce autoantibodies and, thereby, contribute to the pathogenesis of many autoimmune diseases. Autoimmune diseases can be classified as organ-specific or non-organ specific depending on whether the autoimmune response is directed against a particular tissue or against widespread antigens as in chronic inflammatory autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Both SLE and RA are characterized by the presence of autoantibodies which play a major role in their etiopathogenesis. SLE is characterized by circulating antibodies and immune complex deposition that can trigger an inflammatory damage in organs. RA is a progressive inflammatory disease in which T cells, B cells, and pro-inflammatory cytokines play a key role in its pathophysiology.

  14. Henoch-Schönlein Purpura in Northern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Río, Vanesa; Loricera, Javier; Mata, Cristina; Martín, Luis; Ortiz-Sanjuán, Francisco; Alvarez, Lino; González-Vela, M. Carmen; González-Lamuño, Domingo; Rueda-Gotor, Javier; Fernández-Llaca, Héctor; González-López, Marcos A.; Armesto, Susana; Peiró, Enriqueta; Arias, Manuel; González-Gay, Miguel A.; Blanco, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The severity of clinical features and the outcomes in previous series of patients reported with Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) vary greatly, probably due to selection bias. To establish the actual clinical spectrum of HSP in all age groups using an unselected and wide series of patients diagnosed at a single center, we performed a retrospective review of 417 patients classified as having HSP according to the criteria proposed by Michel et al. Of 417 patients, 240 were male and 177 female, with a median age at the time of disease diagnosis of 7.5 years (interquartile range [IQR], 5.3–20.1 yr). Three-quarters of the patients were children or young people aged 20 years or younger (n = 315), and one-quarter were adults (n = 102). The most frequent precipitating events were a previous infection (38%), usually an upper respiratory tract infection, and/or drug intake (18.5%) shortly before the onset of the vasculitis. At disease onset the most common manifestations were skin lesions (55.9%), nephropathy (24%), gastrointestinal involvement (13.7%), joint symptoms (9.1%), and fever (6.2%). Cutaneous involvement occurring in all patients, mainly purpuric skin lesion, was the most common manifestation when the vasculitis was fully established, followed by gastrointestinal (64.5%), joint (63.1%), and renal involvement (41.2%). The main laboratory findings were leukocytosis (36.7%), anemia (8.9%), and increased serum IgA levels (31.7%). The most frequent therapies used were corticosteroids (35%), nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (14%), and cytotoxic agents (5%). After a median follow-up of 12 months (IQR, 2–38 mo), complete recovery was observed in most cases (n = 346; 83.2%), while persistent, usually mild, nephropathy was observed in only 32 (7.7%) cases. Relapses were observed in almost a third of patients (n = 133; 31.9%). In conclusion, although HSP is a typical vasculitis affecting children and young people, it is not uncommon in adults. The prognosis is

  15. Joint Affection in Henoch-Schönlein Purpura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Syniachenko

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hemorrhagic vasculitis, or Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP, in children has its onset in the form of the articular syndrome in the vast number of patients, which is a part of the diagnostic criteria of this disease. The nature of the arthritis after the disease transformation from the juvenile HSP remains unexplored. In adulthood, articular patho­logy can manifest as migratory intermittent or chronic arthritis, but this information should be clarified. The objective was to study the clinical, X-ray and sonographic features of arti­cular syndrome course in patients with HSP and to evaluate the features of arthropathy in the presence of the disease that began in childhood and adulthood. Materials and methods. The study included 174 patients with HSP (83 % of men and 47 % of women. Childhood-onset vasculitis (on average in 12 years was diagnosed in 92 patients, and adulthood-onset (on avera­ge in 25 years — in 82; I, II and III degree of activity of the pathological process are established at a ratio of 1 : 2 : 2. Results. The joint affection is observed in every second patient with HPS, which is closely related to the patient’s age at the onset of the disease, duration and degree of the activity of pathological process, seropositivity by the high content of immunoglobulin A and rheumatoid factor. At that, clinical, radiological and sonographic nature of the articular syndrome’s course (involving the wrist, hip and sacroiliac joints, the development of aseptic osteonecrosis, bone erosion, meniscitis and intraarti­cular cartilage flaps depend on extraarticular manifestations of the di­sease (lesion of heart, kidney, pancreas, central nervous system. They are accompanied by an increased concentration in the blood of β2-microglobulin and circulating immune complexes that together with the values of fibrinogenemia have predictive value. Dimorphism of HSP, transformed from a juvenile one, is characterized by the less serum levels

  16. Elevated levels of antibodies against phosphatidylserine/prothrombin complex and/or cardiolipin associated with infection and recurrent purpura in a child: a forme fruste of antiphospholipid syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Yuri; Mayumi, Nobuko; Inaba, Motoyuki; Igarashi, Touru; Katagiri, Ichigen; Kawana, Seiji

    2015-07-15

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is an autoimmune disorder characterized by the occurrence of venous and arterial thrombosis, as well as morbidity in pregnancy, in the presence of anti-phospholipid antibodies. The diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome is usually established based on clinical and laboratory findings by strictly following the 2006 Sapporo classification. However, the diagnosis remains challenging owing to the ongoing debates on the serological criteria. We report a case we describe as forme fruste antiphospholipid syndrome in which these criteria were not fulfilled. Purpura appeared repeatedly in a female infant starting from the age of 6 months and following episodes of upper respiratory infections and vaccinations. The levels of anti-cardiolipin IgG antibodies and anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin complex antibodies were elevated in accordance with these events. Histopathological evaluation revealed multiple small vessel thrombi in the dermis and adipose tissue. After 2 weeks of treatment with aspirin and heparin, the cutaneous symptoms subsided. Infection has long been associated with antiphospholipid syndrome, and anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibodies are considered a new marker for the diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome. Forme fruste antiphospholipid syndrome should be considered even if the antiphospholipid syndrome diagnostic criteria are not completely fulfilled, especially in the presence of elevated levels of anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibodies and known preceding infections.

  17. Henoch-Schönlein purpura in an older man presenting as rectal bleeding and IgA mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Howarth Charles B; Jirajariyavej Teeranun; Cheungpasitporn Wisit; Rosen Raquel M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Henoch-Schönlein purpura is the most common systemic vasculitis in children. Typical presentations are palpable purpura, abdominal pain, arthritis, and hematuria. This vasculitic syndrome can present as an uncommon cause of rectal bleeding in older patients. We report a case of an older man with Henoch-Schönlein purpura. He presented with rectal bleeding and acute kidney injury secondary to IgA mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis. Case presentation A 75-year-old Pol...

  18. Primary Sjögren syndrome that initially presented with repeated hypergammaglobulinemic purpura after prolonged sitting: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhihua; Jiang, Weiqiang; Wang, Ming; Liu, Yongyuan; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Manping; Liang, Donghui

    2017-12-01

    Purpura is a common dermatologic manifestation in Sjögren syndrome (SS). When a patient presents with sicca symptoms, the diagnosis of SS is not difficult. Here, we reported a case of a 52-year-old Chinese woman who initially presented with nonpalpable purpura on both lower extremities, and these lesions had developed soon after prolonged sitting. In the past 2 years, she had repeated cutaneous nonpalpable purpura 4 times. She had no sicca symptoms, dry eyes, or dry mouth. Combining the laboratory findings, Schirmer test, and labial gland biopsy, primary SS was confirmed. The patient was placed on a trial of hydroxychloroquine (200 mg once daily). The purpura on both lower extremities had faded at the sixth day after onset and at the third day after hydroxychloroquine treatment. These case was not easy to diagnosis primary SS because she had no sicca symptoms. A patient with primary SS who initially presented with recurrent purpura associated with prolonged sitting. Prolonged sitting had been a possible aggravating factor for the cutaneous purpura of this patient with primary SS. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Epigenetic alterations underlying autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslani, Saeed; Mahmoudi, Mahdi; Karami, Jafar; Jamshidi, Ahmad Reza; Malekshahi, Zahra; Nicknam, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in genetic explorations have extended our understanding through discovery of genetic patterns subjected to autoimmune diseases (AID). Genetics, on the contrary, has not answered all the conundrums to describe a comprehensive explanation of causal mechanisms of disease etiopathology with regard to the function of environment, sex, or aging. The other side of the coin, epigenetics which is defined by gene manifestation modification without DNA sequence alteration, reportedly has come in to provide new insights towards disease apprehension through bridging the genetics and environmental factors. New investigations in genetic and environmental contributing factors for autoimmunity provide new explanation whereby the interactions between genetic elements and epigenetic modifications signed by environmental agents may be responsible for autoimmune disease initiation and perpetuation. It is aimed through this article to review recent progress attempting to reveal how epigenetics associates with the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.

  20. [Stress and auto-immunity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delévaux, I; Chamoux, A; Aumaître, O

    2013-08-01

    The etiology of auto-immune disorders is multifactorial. Stress is probably a participating factor. Indeed, a high proportion of patients with auto-immune diseases report uncommon stress before disease onset or disease flare. The biological consequences of stress are increasingly well understood. Glucocorticoids and catecholamines released by hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis during stress will alter the balance Th1/Th2 and the balance Th17/Treg. Stress impairs cellular immunity, decreases immune tolerance and stimulates humoral immunity exposing individuals to autoimmune disease among others. The treatment for autoimmune disease should include stress management. Copyright © 2012 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. SIGNIFICANCE OF PLATELET COUNT AND PLATELET INDICES IN PATIENTS WITH SOME THROMBOCYTOPENIC CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Noureldaim Abdalla

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thrombocytopenia is one of the most frequent causes for hematologic consultation in the practice of medicine and can result from a wide variety of conditions. Objective: The study was conducted on behave of platelets count in tie with platelet volume indices to measure their consistency. Methods: The study was “prospective cross-sectional hospital based design” and conducted at Khartoum hospitals (A.Gasim, Jafar I A, and R.ICK. Studied populations texture has stipulated concurred diagnosis of heart disorders (HD, lymphoid neoplasms (LN, hypoplastic bone marrow (HPB, renal transplantation (RT, patients under chemotherapy (CT, and fully checked healthy Sudanese population (HSP. Platelet (PLT count and platelet volume index (PVI were measured using automated method of Sysmex KX-21N and the data was analyzed using SPSS. Results: does established (24 mean and standard for the study population among which (HSP was platelet distribution width (PDW (11.4±1.5 fl, mean platelet volume (MPV (9.3±0.8 fl, platelet large cell ratio (P- LCR (20.6±6.7% and PLT count (245±45 X109/L, and established correlations between PLT count and PVI in thrombocytopenic conditions. Conclusion: we conclude that, PVI has the ability to change from normal to higher or lower than (HSP in thrombocytopenic conditions and Sudanese has PVI mean lower than the mean of reference range, and there are inverse and reverse correlations between PLT count and PVI but not in (HSP and reverse correlation in between PVI except between PDW and P-LCR in (HPB

  2. Psoriasis as an autoimmune disease

    OpenAIRE

    Agnieszka Owczarczyk-Saczonek; Waldemar Placek

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays it is known that psoriasis belongs to the group of autoimmune diseases and may coexist with other diseases in this group. Most often patients have psoriatic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune thyroid diseases and multiple sclerosis. The coexistence of these disorders can be a diagnostic and therapeutic problem (there is controversy over the use of corticosteroids). The common pathogenesis is still not explained. We know that the loss of immunotole...

  3. Celiac disease and endocrine autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahaly, George J; Schuppan, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a small-intestinal inflammatory disease that is triggered by the ingestion of the storage proteins (gluten) of wheat, barley and rye. Endocrine autoimmunity is prevalent in patients with CD and their relatives. The genes that predispose to endocrine autoimmune diseases, e.g. type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid diseases, and Addison's disease, i.e. DR3-DQ2 and DR4-DQ8, are also the major genetic determinants of CD, which is the best understood HLA-linked disease. Thus, up to 30% of first-degree relatives both of patients with CD and/or endocrine autoimmunity are affected by the other disease. In CD, certain gluten proteins bind with high affinity to HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 in the small-intestinal mucosa, to activate gluten-specific T cells which are instrumental in the destruction of the resorptive villi. Here, the autoantigen tissue transglutaminase increases the T cell response by generating deamidated gluten peptides that bind more strongly to DQ2 or DQ8. Classical symptoms such as diarrhea and consequences of malabsorption like anemia and osteoporosis are often absent in patients with (screening-detected) CD, but this absence does not significantly affect these patients' incidence of endocrine autoimmunity. Moreover, once autoimmunity is established, a gluten-free diet is not able to induce remission. However, ongoing studies attempt to address how far a gluten-free diet may prevent or retard the development of CD and endocrine autoimmunity in children at risk. The close relationship between CD and endocrine autoimmunity warrants a broader immune genetic and endocrine screening of CD patients and their relatives. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. [Smoking and chronic autoimmune thyroiditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzoianu, Ioana Cristina; Arghir, Oana Cristina; Circo, E

    2010-01-01

    The chronic autoimmune thyroiditis are heterogeneous entities by the functional, lesional and evolutive point of view. Ethiopathogenic factors involved in chronic autoimmune thyroiditis are genetical factors, combines with environmental factors, hormonal factors, infectious factors etc. The exact role of smoking on the autoimmune mechanism is unclear, but smoking is known to have an antithyroid effect. Our study tries to estimate the influence of smoking on serum levels of antithyroid peroxidase antibodies and antithyroglobulin antibodies, in a group of patients with various clinical forms of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. We studied a group consists of 310 patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis, hospitalised in the Endocrinology Department of Constanta County Hospital, between January 2006 - December 2009. We detected serum values of antithyroidperoxidase antibodies and antithyroglobulin antibodies of our patients. We also followed the age, sex and presence of smoking in our study group. For statistical processing of the data we use Student's t-test. In our study group 24.28% of patients were smokers. Serum levels of antithyroid peroxidase antibodies were significantly increased (p < 0.001) in the smokers patients, compared with the nonsmokers patients. Serum levels of antithyroglobulin antibodies were significantly increased (p < 0.01) in smokers patients, compared with those who were nonsmokers. Smoking increased the serum levels of antithyroid antibodies in patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis.

  5. Fibrinogen-coated albumin microcapsules reduce bleeding in severely thrombocytopenic rabbits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levi, M. [=Marcel M.; Friederich, P. W.; Middleton, S.; de Groot, P. G.; Wu, Y. P.; Harris, R.; Biemond, B. J.; Heijnen, H. F.; Levin, J.; ten Cate, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    Severe thrombocytopenia frequently occurs in patients receiving chemotherapy and in patients with autoimmune disorders. Thrombocytopenia is associated with bleeding, which may be serious and life threatening. Current treatment strategies for thrombocytopenia may require transfusion of allogeneic

  6. Efficacy of colchicine in a child with relapsing bullous Henoch-Schönlein purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allali, Slimane; Fraitag, Sylvie; Terrier, Benjamin; Bodemer, Christine; Chalumeau, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Colchicine is not usually considered a treatment option for cutaneous lesions of Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) in children. We report a case of pediatric HSP with severe chronic and relapsing cutaneous manifestations that were resistant to corticosteroids. Colchicine had remarkable therapeutic efficacy, with positive dechallenge and rechallenge, without any adverse effects. Colchicine should be considered for chronic, severe cutaneous lesions of pediatric HSP. Colchicine is not usually considered a treatment option for cutaneous lesions of Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) in children. What is New: We report a case of pediatric HSP with severe cutaneous manifestations that responded well to colchicine. Colchicine should be considered for chronic cutaneous lesions of HSP in children.

  7. Zonisamide eradicated paroxysmal headache with EEG abnormalities triggered by hypertensive encephalopathy due to purpura nephritic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzai, Yuki; Hayashi, Masaharu; Ohya, Tatsuo

    2006-10-01

    Generally, prognosis of hypertensive encephalopathy in childhood is favorable. We reported a 5-year-old girl who presented with a headache attack and EEG abnormalities after hypertensive encephalopathy due to purpura nephritis. The patient had suffered from hypertensive encephalopathy due to purpura nephritis, which soon ameliorated. Five months later, she developed attacks of headache, vomiting and disturbed consciousness with left side-predominant EEG abnormalities. Although carbamazepine and sodium valproate failed to improve her condition, zonisamide eradicated both the symptoms and EEG abnormalities, and an attack has not reoccurred for 5 years since completion of her treatment. It is noteworthy that delayed-onset complications can occur in child hypertensive encephalopathy, cases of which should be followed up prudently. Zonisamide should be considered for treatment of attacks of headaches with an epileptic character.

  8. Varicella-associated purpura fulminans: chicken pox is not always benign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulmalik, A; Al-Ateeqi, W; Al-Khawari, M; Al-Osaimi, S

    2006-01-01

    To report a 6-year-old boy with post-chicken pox purpura fulminans (PF). A 6-year-old boy presented with purpura of the legs that rapidly progressed to other parts of the limbs and the buttocks. The patient had had chicken pox 10 days prior to presentation. He was afebrile and the chicken pox lesions were dry. He received anti-coagulants, a large volume of fresh frozen plasma, immunoglobulin and steroids. The skin lesions regressed but both hands and parts of the lower limbs remained necrotic; the patient was transferred to an orthopaedic hospital for amputation and skin grafting. This case report shows that PF can occur as a post-infection syndrome after primary varicella. Early and aggressive treatment of post-chicken pox PF might reduce the mortality and morbidity associated with this condition. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Obesity increases the risk of renal involvement in children with Henoch-Schönlein purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong-Li; Liu, Zheng-Juan; Bai, Xue-Mei; Wang, Yu-Chuan; Li, Guo-Hua; Yan, Xue-Yan

    2015-10-01

    The main aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between obesity and renal involvement in children with Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP). A retrospective study of 141 pediatric patients with HSP was conducted in our hospital. The clinical data of all patients were collected from the electronic medical record management system from January 2010 to June 2014. The possible risk factors of renal involvement, especially obesity, were analyzed using univariate and multivariate analyses. Renal involvement occurred in 45/141 of the patients. A univariate analysis showed that an age more than 7 years at onset, persistent purpura, obesity, time from symptoms onset to diagnosis more than 14 days, and decreased C3 all increased the risk of renal involvement in HSP. The forward stepwise logistic regression analysis indicated obesity (odds ratio (OR) 4.43, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.896 to 10.358), age more than 7 years at onset (OR 2.81, 95 % CI 1.142 to 6.907), and persistent purpura (OR 2.57, 95 % CI 1.119 to 5.909) were independent risk factors for renal involvement. Our results show that obesity can increase the hazard of renal involvement in children with HSP and reconfirm that older age at onset and persistent purpura are the independent risk factors for renal involvement. • There have been some reports that obesity was associated with the development of renal injury. • It is not clear whether obesity can increase the risk of renal involvement in children with HSP. What is New: • The main finding of this study is that obesity can increase the hazard of renal involvement in children with HSP.

  10. Petechiae and purpura: the ominous and the not-so-obvious?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Stan L

    2014-08-01

    Petechiae and purpura are among the most alarming findings a pediatrician will commonly observe in the office. Severity of illness can range from a temper tantrum, to common viral infections, to the most deadly infections and diseases. To avoid many of the pitfalls in diagnosis, practitioners will need to be thorough in history taking, assessing fever and immunization status, and physical examination. In addition, a few simple laboratory tests will usually be needed and possibly a manual differential. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Anaesthetic significance and management of a child with neonatal purpura fulminans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhilesh Kumar Tiwari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein C deficiency is a rare autosomal-dominant disorder of varying severity. Patients with homozygous and compound heterozygous protein C deficiency present with neonatal purpura fulminans (NPF. Other presentations usually include disseminated intravascular coagulation and venous thromboembolism. This disorder usually poses a unique anaesthetic challenge to the anaesthesiologist, requiring special precautions to prevent various intra- and post-operative complications. We hereby report the successful anaesthetic management of a 1-month-old infant who presented with NPF.

  12. Guillain-Barre syndrome in an adult patient with Henoch-Schonlein purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Puneet; Sahoo, Ratnakar; Gadpayle, A K; Kumar, Gunjan

    2013-04-03

    A 42-year-old man presented with pain in the abdomen, massive haematemesis and rashes over the body and development of bilateral lower limb weakness the next day. The patient was later diagnosed with Guillain-Barre syndrome with Henoch-Schonlein purpura. He was treated with intravenous immunoglobulins. At 3 months of follow-up and rehabilitation, patient showed complete recovery from weakness.

  13. Guillain-Barre syndrome in an adult patient with Henoch-Schonlein purpura

    OpenAIRE

    Aggarwal, Puneet; Sahoo, Ratnakar; Gadpayle, A K; Kumar, Gunjan

    2013-01-01

    A 42-year-old man presented with pain in the abdomen, massive haematemesis and rashes over the body and development of bilateral lower limb weakness the next day. The patient was later diagnosed with Guillain-Barre syndrome with Henoch-Schonlein purpura. He was treated with intravenous immunoglobulins. At 3 months of follow-up and rehabilitation, patient showed complete recovery from weakness.

  14. Is there a crossroad between infections, genetics, and Henoch-Schönlein purpura?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigante, Donato; Castellazzi, Luca; Bosco, Annalisa; Esposito, Susanna

    2013-08-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura is the most common systemic vasculitis in childhood, characterized by the presence of immunoglobulin A deposits in the small vessels of skin, gastrointestinal tube, joints and kidneys. Although there have been great efforts made in elucidating its pathogenic mechanisms, Henoch-Schönlein purpura etiology remains unknown: the basic scene comes across an abnormal inflammatory process deriving from immune reactions to various antigenic stimuli, which might be bacterial, viral, or parasitic agents, in a genetically prone individual. Then, a peculiar immune complex deposition in the vascular walls and overproduction of different proinflammatory molecules elicit different clinical signs, which might be differentiated according to either a specific trigger or a specific genetic make-up. The aim of this review is to make a critical appraisal of the last 15years' medical literature concerning the relationship between infections, genetics, and Henoch-Schönlein purpura in pediatrics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. AUTOIMMUNE EPIDERMAL BLISTERING DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune bullous skin diseases (ABDs are uncommon, potentially fatal diseases of skin and mucous membranes which are associated with deposits of autoantibodies and complement against distinct molecules of the epidermis and dermal/epidermal basement membrane zone (BMZ. These autoantibodies lead to a loss in skin molecular integrity, which manifests clinically as formation of blisters or erosions. In pemphigus vulgaris, loss of adhesion occurs within the epidermis. The pioneering work of Ernst H. Beutner, Ph.D. and Robert E. Jordon, M.D. confirmed the autoimmune nature of these diseases. Walter F. Lever, M.D. contributed significantly to our understanding of the histopathologic features of these diseases. Walter Lever, M.D. and Ken Hashimoto, M.D. contributed electron microscopic studies of these diseases, especially in pemphigus vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid. In bullous pemphigoid (BP, linear IgA bullous dermatosis, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA and dermatitis herpetiformis (DH, loss of adhesion takes place within or underneath the BMZ. Classic EBA demonstrates extensive skin fragility; DH is commonly associated with gluten-sensitive enteropathy, and manifests clinically with pruritic papulovesicles on the extensor surfaces of the extremities and the lumbosacral area. The clinical spectrum of bullous pemphigoid includes tense blisters, urticarial plaques, and prurigo-like eczematous lesions. Pemphigoid gestationis mostly occurs during the last trimester of pregnancy, and mucous membrane pemphigoid primarily involves the oral mucosa and conjunctivae and leads to scarring. Linear IgA bullous dermatosis manifests with tense blisters in a „cluster of jewels”-like pattern in childhood (chronic bullous disease of childhood and is more clinically heterogeneous in adulthood. Many of the autoantigens in these disorders are known and have been well characterized. ABDs may be influenced by both genetic and exogenous factors. The diagnoses of

  16. Autoimmune hepatitis in association with lymphocytic colitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, Edmond M

    2012-02-03

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a rare, chronic inflammatory disorder which has been associated with a number of other auto-immune conditions. However, there are no reports in the medical literature of an association with microscopic (lymphocytic) colitis. We report the case of a 53-year-old woman with several autoimmune conditions, including lymphocytic colitis, who presented with an acute hepatitis. On the basis of the clinical features, serology, and histopathology, we diagnosed autoimmune hepatitis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of autoimmune hepatitis in association with lymphocytic colitis, and lends support to the theory of an autoimmune etiology for lymphocytic colitis.

  17. Association of endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene polymorphism with the risk of Henoch-Schönlein purpura/Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Weiqiang; Zhou, Tian-Biao; Jiang, Zongpei

    2015-04-01

    Association between endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene polymorphism and Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP)/Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis (HSPN) risk is still controversial. A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the association between eNOS gene polymorphism and HSP/HSPN susceptibility. A predefined literature search and selection of eligible relevant studies were performed to collect data from electronic database. Three articles were identified for the analysis of association between eNOS gene polymorphism and HSPN/HSP risk. eNOS G894T gene polymorphism was not associated with HSPN susceptibility and the risk of patients with HSP developing into HSPN. Interestingly, eNOS G894T T allele and GG genotype were associated with HSP susceptibility, but not the TT genotype. eNOS T786C TT genotype was associated with HSPN susceptibility, but not C allele and CC genotype. Furthermore, eNOS T786C gene polymorphism was not associated with HSP risk and the risk of patients with HSP developing into HSPN. In conclusion, eNOS T786C TT genotype was associated with and eNOS G894T T allele and GG genotype were associated with HSP susceptibility. However, more studies should be performed in the future.

  18. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zen, Yoh; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2011-12-07

    Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP) has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney) and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of regulatory T-cells are assumed

  19. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zen Yoh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of

  20. Autoimmune pancreatitis. An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmberger, T.

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare disease, the pathophysiological understanding of which has been greatly improved over the last years. The most common form, type 1 AIP belongs to the IgG4-related diseases and must be distinguished from type 2 AIP, which is a much rarer entity associated with chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Clinically, there is an overlap with pancreatic cancer. Imaging and further criteria, such as serological and histological parameters are utilized for a differentiation between both entities in order to select the appropriate therapy and to avoid the small but ultimately unnecessary number of pancreatectomies. The diagnostics of AIP are complex, whereby the consensus criteria of the International Association of Pancreatology have become accepted as the parameters for discrimination. These encompass five cardinal criteria and one therapeutic criterion. By applying these criteria AIP can be diagnosed with a sensitivity of 84.9 %, a specificity of 100 % and an accuracy of 93.8 %. The diagnosis of AIP is accomplished by applying several parameters of which two relate to imaging. As for the routine diagnostics of the pancreas these are ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Important for the differential diagnosis is the exclusion of signs of local and remote tumor spread for which CT and MRI are established. The essential diagnostic parameter of histology necessitates sufficient sample material, which cannot usually be acquired by a fine needle biopsy. CT or MRI are the reference standard methods for identification of the optimal puncture site and imaging-assisted (TruCut) biopsy. In patients presenting with unspecific upper abdominal pain, painless jaundice combined with the suspicion of a pancreatic malignancy in imaging but a mismatch of secondary signs of malignancy, AIP should also be considered as a differential diagnosis. As the diagnosis of AIP only partially relies on imaging radiologists also

  1. Ocular inflammation in the setting of concomitant systemic autoimmune conditions in an older male population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Alexandra E.; McManus, Katherine T.; McClellan, Allison L.; Davis, Janet; Goldhardt, Raquel; Galor, Anat

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This retrospective cross-sectional study was designed to investigate the frequency and types of inflammatory ocular manifestations of specific systemic autoimmune diseases in a South Florida Veterans Affairs Hospital population. Methods Demographic and medical diagnosis information was extracted from the Veterans Administration database for 1225 patients. These patients were seen in Miami and Broward Veterans Affairs hospitals between 4/18/2008 and 4/17/2013 and were diagnosed with at least one of the following: systemic lupus erythematosus, sarcoid, rheumatoid arthritis, polymyalgia rheumatica, Takayasu arteritis, giant cell arteritis, Kawasaki disease, polyarteritis nodosa, Buerger disease, Henoch-Schonlein purpura, Behcet syndrome, granulomatosis with polyangiitis, other polyarteritis nodosa associated vasculitides, or arteritis NOS. Results Of 1225 patients, 618 were seen in the VA eye clinic, and 25 were diagnosed with concomitant inflammatory ocular conditions. Uveitis was the most common, and included 8 cases of anterior, 1 anterior-intermediate, 1 intermediate, 2 panuveitis, and 3 unspecified. Other manifestations included 7 cases of keratitis and 2 each of scleritis, episcleritis and AION. The overall frequency of inflammatory ocular disease was 2%. The diseases associated with the highest frequency of ocular involvement were granulomatosis with polyangiitis (1/8), sarcoid (9/198), giant cell arteritis (2/68), and rheumatoid arthritis (11/576). Of these 25 patients, 9 were diagnosed with eye prior to systemic disease. Conclusions In this population, ocular manifestations were rarely the presenting feature of systemic disease, but autoimmune disorders are an important underlying cause of inflammatory eye disease that should be considered on first evaluation, even in this “non-traditional”, predominantly male, autoimmune disease population. PMID:26053887

  2. Shaking Out Clues to Autoimmune Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... into how an immune cell involved in several autoimmune disorders is regulated. Among their findings was a potential ... but they’ve also been linked with several autoimmune disorders. Th17 cells, along with other types of helper ...

  3. Multiple autoimmune syndrome with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpreet, Singh; Deepak, Jain; Kiran, B

    Multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS) is a condition characterised by three or more autoimmune disorders in a same individual. Familial, immunologic and infectious factors are implicated in the development of MAS. Here we report a case of a 32-year-old woman with co-existence of four auto-immune diseases, namely autoimmune hypothyroidism, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and celiac disease which leads to the final diagnosis of multiple autoimmune syndrome type 3 with celiac disease. Patients with single autoimmune disorder are at 25% risk of developing other autoimmune disorders. The present case emphasises to clinicians that there is a need for continued surveillance for the development of new autoimmune disease in predisposed patients.

  4. [Therapeutic options for autoimmune encephalomyelitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisow, N; Prüss, H; Paul, F

    2013-04-01

    Autoantibodies to neuronal tissue are becoming increasingly more important in the evaluation and classification of several neurological diseases, e.g. neuromyelitis optica, paraneoplastic syndromes of the central nervous system (CNS), stiff person syndrome or autoimmune epilepsy. As these disorders are rare, no evidence-based recommendations for therapy are available. Currently, immunomodulating or immunosuppressive drugs are administered in most cases. In paraneoplastic syndromes treatment of the underlying cancer is of considerable importance. This overview summarizes current experiences and recommendations in the treatment of autoimmune neurological disorders.

  5. An autosomal locus causing autoimmune disease: Autoimmune polyglandular disease type I assigned to chromosome 21

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Aaltonen (Johanna); P. Björses (Petra); L.A. Sandkuijl (Lodewijk); J. Perheentupa (Jaakko); L. Peltonen (Leena Johanna)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractAutoimmune polyglandular disease type I (APECED) is an autosomal recessive autoimmune disease characterized by a variable combination of the failure of the endocrine glands. The pathogenesis of this unique autoimmune disease is unknown; unlike many other autoimmune diseases, APECED does

  6. A minimum number of autoimmune T cells to induce autoimmunity?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bosch, A.J.T.; Bolinger, B.; Keck, S.; Štěpánek, Ondřej; Ozga, A.J.; Galati-Fournier, V.; Stein, J.V.; Palmer, E.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 316, jaro (2017), s. 21-31 ISSN 0008-8749 R&D Projects: GA ČR GJ16-09208Y Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : T cell * Tolerance * Autoimmunity Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Immunology Impact factor: 3.172, year: 2016

  7. Multiplex autoantibody detection for autoimmune liver diseases and autoimmune gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderlocht, Joris; van der Cruys, Mart; Stals, Frans; Bakker-Jonges, Liesbeth; Damoiseaux, Jan

    2017-09-01

    Autoantibody detection for autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and autoimmune gastritis (AIG) is traditionally performed by IIF on a combination of tissues. Multiplex line/dot blots (LIA/DIA) offer multiple advantages, i.e. automation, objective reading, no interfering reactivities, no coincidental findings. In the current study we evaluated automated DIA (D-Tek) for detecting autoantibodies related to autoimmune diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. We tested samples of the Dutch EQC program and compared the results with the consensus of the participating labs. For the autoimmune liver diseases and AIG, respectively, 64 and 36 samples were tested. For anti-mitochondrial and anti-smooth muscle antibodies a concordance rate of 97% and 88% was observed, respectively. The concordance rate for anti-parietal cell antibodies was 92% when samples without EQC consensus (n=15) were excluded. For antibodies against intrinsic factor a concordance of 96% was observed. For all these antibodies discrepancies were identified that relate to the different test characteristics and the preponderance of IIF utilizing labs in the EQC program. In conclusion, we observed good agreement of the tested DIA blots with the consensus results of the Dutch EQC program. Taken together with the logistic advantages these blots are a good alternative for autoantibody detection in the respective diseases. A large prospective multicenter study is warranted to position these novel tests further in the whole spectrum of assays for the detection of these antibodies in a routine autoimmune laboratory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Anaphylactoid Purpura Manifested after Acute Gastroenteritis with Severe Dehydration in an 8-Year-Old Male Child: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Umang G; Vanikar, Aruna V; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2015-12-01

    Anaphylactoid purpura, also known as Henoch-Schönleinpurpura (HSP), is an IgA-mediated vasculitis that tends to be a benign disease of childhood. Up to 50% of cases are preceded by an upper tract respiratory infection caused by group-A beta-hemolytic streptococcus and present with the common tetrad of abdominal pain, arthritis, purpuric rash, and renal involvement. The majority of patients recover completely. Here we document a rare case of anaphylactoid purpura which manifested with skin lesions in the form of palpable purpura following about of acute gastroenteritis with severe dehydration; it was treated with a short regimen of steroid therapy, which resulted in the complete remission of the disease. We conclude that prompt diagnosis and multidisciplinary intervention will lead to appropriate management-consisting of the installation of early short-course steroid therapy and thus, prevent further complications and the recurrence of the disease.

  9. Rebooting autoimmunity with autologous HSCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, John A

    2016-01-07

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is increasingly used for severe autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, but the mechanisms involved have yet to be elucidated. In this issue of Blood, Delemarre et al report their findings in both animal and human models which provide insights into restoration of functionality and diversity within the regulatory T-cell (Treg) compartment following HSCT.

  10. Vitiligo and Autoimmune Thyroid Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enke Baldini

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Vitiligo represents the most common cause of acquired skin, hair, and oral depigmentation, affecting 0.5–1% of the population worldwide. It is clinically characterized by the appearance of disfiguring circumscribed skin macules following melanocyte destruction by autoreactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Patients affected by vitiligo usually show a poorer quality of life and are more likely to suffer from depressive symptoms, particularly evident in dark-skinned individuals. Although vitiligo is a non-fatal disease, exposure of affected skin to UV light increases the chance of skin irritation and predisposes to skin cancer. In addition, vitiligo has been associated with other rare systemic disorders due to the presence of melanocytes in other body districts, such as in eyes, auditory, nervous, and cardiac tissues, where melanocytes are thought to have roles different from that played in the skin. Several pathogenetic models have been proposed to explain vitiligo onset and progression, but clinical and experimental findings point mainly to the autoimmune hypothesis as the most qualified one. In this context, it is of relevance the strong association of vitiligo with other autoimmune diseases, in particular with autoimmune thyroid disorders, such as Hashimoto thyroiditis and Graves’ disease. In this review, after a brief overview of vitiligo and its pathogenesis, we will describe the clinical association between vitiligo and autoimmune thyroid disorders and discuss the possible underlying molecular mechanism(s.

  11. Polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proust-Lemoine, Emmanuelle; Saugier-Veber, Pascale; Wémeau, Jean-Louis

    2012-12-01

    Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrom type 1 (PAS-1) or Autoimmune PolyEndocrinopathy Candidiasis-Ectodermal-Dystrophy (APECED) is a rare recessive autosomal disease related to Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) gene mutations. AIRE is mainly implicated in central and peripheric immune tolerance. Diagnosis was classically based on presence of at least two out of three "majors" criterions of Whitaker's triad (candidiasis, autoimmune hypoparathyroidism and adrenal insufficiency). Presence of one criterion was sufficient when a sibling was previously diagnosed. However, some atypic or poorly symptomatic variants do not correspond to these criterions. As a matter of fact, digestive (malabsorption, pernicious anemia, hepatitis), cutaneous (alopecia, vitiligo, enamel dysplasia) or ophtalmological (keratitis) components could prevail. In these cases, diagnosis could be made by molecular genetics. Prognosis is influenced by genetic (AIRE mutations, HLA), hormonal and environmental (infections) factors. Potentially letal components (hepatitis and severe malabsorption) could be treated by immunosuppressors. Candidiasis and other infections should be carefully screened and treated before beginning those therapies, in order to avoid severe systemic infections. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Leaky gut and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, Alessio

    2012-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by tissue damage and loss of function due to an immune response that is directed against specific organs. This review is focused on the role of impaired intestinal barrier function on autoimmune pathogenesis. Together with the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and the neuroendocrine network, the intestinal epithelial barrier, with its intercellular tight junctions, controls the equilibrium between tolerance and immunity to non-self antigens. Zonulin is the only physiologic modulator of intercellular tight junctions described so far that is involved in trafficking of macromolecules and, therefore, in tolerance/immune response balance. When the zonulin pathway is deregulated in genetically susceptible individuals, autoimmune disorders can occur. This new paradigm subverts traditional theories underlying the development of these diseases and suggests that these processes can be arrested if the interplay between genes and environmental triggers is prevented by re-establishing the zonulin-dependent intestinal barrier function. Both animal models and recent clinical evidence support this new paradigm and provide the rationale for innovative approaches to prevent and treat autoimmune diseases.

  13. Hemophagocytosis in Cutaneous Autoimmune Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerl, Katrin; Wolf, Ingrid H; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Wolf, Peter; French, Lars E; Kerl, Helmut

    2015-07-01

    The significance of the histological visualization of hemophagocytosis in tissues depends on the context, varying from a nonspecific phenomenon to a characteristic or diagnostic feature for certain disease entities. Hemophagocytosis is also one of the key features of macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) (hemophagocytic syndrome) a potentially life-threatening complication of underlying conditions such as infections, malignancy, and autoimmune disorders. Clinical manifestations of MAS are high fever, pancytopenia, liver dysfunction, and coagulopathy. These clinical symptoms are due to an abnormal activation of the immune system in a strong association with the cytokine milieu. The diagnosis of MAS may be easily missed; it is usually detected in the bone marrow, lymph node, liver, and spleen. Only few reports exist in the literature with histological description of cutaneous hemophagocytosis as a sign for MAS in patients with lymphoma and infection. In this report, the authors present the clinicopathological and immunohistochemical features of 3 patients with cutaneous hemophagocytosis, specifically erythrophagocytosis, associated with autoimmune disease, and discuss the relevance of these findings. The authors report 3 patients who developed cutaneous hemophagocytosis during the course of an underlying autoimmune disorder. One patient suffered from dermatomyositis, the other 2 patients from systemic lupus erythematosus, whereby one of them was a 3-month old girl with neonatal lupus erythematosus. The patient with dermatomyositis developed MAS according to the current diagnostic criteria. Although the 2 other patients had an acute flare of their autoimmune disease with histological signs of cutaneous hemophagocytosis, they did not fulfill the complete criteria for a diagnosis of MAS. Histiocyte proliferation and activation with increase of cytokines could be demonstrated by immunohistology. This report is the first to describe hemophagocytosis in cutaneous biopsies

  14. [Type 2 autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS-2)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vialettes, Bernard; Dubois-Leonardon, Noémie

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS-2) are the most frequent disorders associating several organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Their high prevalence is due to the fact that the main manifestations of APS-2, such as thyroidal autoimmunity, type 1 diabetes, autoimmune gastric atrophy and vitiligo, are common diseases. APS-2 represents a clinical model that can serve to help unravel the mechanisms underlying autoimmunity. Diagnosis of APS-2 is a challenge for the clinician, especially in poorly symptomatic forms, and may require systematic screening based on measurement of autoantibodies and functional markers.

  15. Henoch-Schönlein purpura without systemic involvement beginning with acute scrotum and mimicking torsion of testis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent Verim

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP is the most common systemic vasculitis in children. Typical presentations of HSP are palpable purpura of the small vessels in the hips and lower limbs, abdominal pain, arthritis, and hematuria. Scrotal involvement manifested by the presence of scrotal pain and swelling during the course of the disease is rarely seen. HSP without systemic involvement with acute scrotum mimicking testicular torsion is even rare in the medical literature. In most cases, patients with this disease achieve complete recovery. Herein, we report an interesting HSP case with skin symptoms but without systemic involvement and then progression to acute scrotum resembling torsion of testis.

  16. Goodpasture's Syndrome due to IgA in a patient with clinical diagnosis of Henoch Schonlein's purpura

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restrepo Cesar A

    2005-01-01

    This is a case of a 23 year old woman with an initial clinical syndrome compatible with glomerulonephritis of uncertain origin, who later showed lesions of purpuric rash characteristics of Henoch- Schonlein Purpura and then complicated with a pulmonary hemorrhage and a rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis, with a mixed lung-kidney syndrome. The renal biopsy showed presence of linear deposits of immunoglobulin A and extra capillary proliferative changes. The case was concluded corresponding to Goodpasture's syndrome for antibodies antiglomerular basement membrane of the type of IgA in the context of a Henoch-Schonlein Purpura.

  17. AIRE-mutations and autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruserud, Øyvind; Oftedal, Bergithe E; Wolff, Anette B; Husebye, Eystein S

    2016-12-01

    The gene causing the severe organ-specific autoimmune disease autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type-1 (APS-1) was identified in 1997 and named autoimmune regulator (AIRE). AIRE plays a key role in shaping central immunological tolerance by facilitating negative selection of T cells in the thymus, building the thymic microarchitecture, and inducing a specific subset of regulatory T cells. So far, about 100 mutations have been identified. Recent advances suggest that certain mutations located in the SAND and PHD1 domains exert a dominant negative effect on wild type AIRE resulting in milder seemingly common forms of autoimmune diseases, including pernicious anemia, vitiligo and autoimmune thyroid disease. These findings indicate that AIRE also contribute to autoimmunity in more common organ-specific autoimmune disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mesenteric vasculitis in adults with Henoch-Schonlein purpura: a not-so-benign condition.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sibartie, V

    2009-02-07

    INTRODUCTION: The gastrointestinal manifestations of Henoch-Schonlein purpura (HSP) are well characterised, but their recognition can be difficult when they occur in isolation. Furthermore, HSP can run a more serious course in adults, compared to children, in whom the disease usually occurs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We describe two cases that illustrate the challenges of HSP with mesenteric vasculitis and the outcome in adults. CONCLUSION: Although self-limiting in most patients, the outcome of HSP in adults can be far from benign and even fatal.

  19. Purpura fulminans associated with hemiparesis following measles infection in a Nigerian girl: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliyu Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpura fulminans is a life-threatening hematologic emergency characterized by extensive skin necrosis with hemorrhagic infarction, hypotension and gangrene which may arise from severe sepsis; mostly gram negative sepsis though also associated with some gram positive organisms, similarly viral infections like varicella and measles have been implicated; it may also arise from congenital deficiency of the anticoagulants protein C, S, and antithrombin III; and it may also be idiopathic. Its clinical manifestation may be quite extensive resulting in multiorgan failure. Treatment will require aggressive management with use of fresh frozen plasma, heparin, antibiotics, and surgical debridement of necrotic tissue.

  20. Diagnostic value of polymerase chain reaction analysis of skin biopsies in purpura fulminans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beau, Caroline; Vlassova, Natalia; Sarlangue, Jean; Brissaud, Olivier; Léauté-Labrèze, Christine; Boralevi, Franck

    2013-01-01

    Even though prompt diagnosis and treatment of purpura fulminans (PF) is essential to reduce mortality, early administration of antibiotics may preclude identification of the causative agent by standard bacterial cultures and thus render definitive diagnosis impossible. Here we present a case of an infant with PF and negative bacterial cultures for whom polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of a cutaneous biopsy specimen obtained 4 days after initiation of antibiotics identified the genomic sequence of Neisseria meningitidis genogroup C. When bacterial cultures fail to provide useful information, PCR of skin biopsy specimens can be a valuable diagnostic tool in PF. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.