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Sample records for autoimmune syndrome case

  1. [Multiorgan autoimmune syndrome: case report].

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    Ghiringhelli, Paolo; Chelazzi, Paolo; Chelazzi, Giovanni; Bellintani, Claudio; Rania, Simone

    2003-01-01

    The present case report refers to a multiorgan autoimmune disease manifesting following thymectomy performed for a benign thymoma. This disease is characterized by hypothyroidism, severe myasthenia, polymyositis and alopecia which are organ-specific diseases probably with a different time of onset but which are all an expression of the same immunopathologic process occurring in individuals who have a genetic predisposition. Characteristic of the present case is not only the association of the different immunopathologic clinical pictures but also the rather difficult differential diagnosis between a hypothyroidism-related myopathy and polymyositis. It was possible to formulate the diagnosis by integrating the results of clinical and laboratory evaluation with the therapeutic outcome. The onset of the syndrome was attributed to the withdrawal, following surgery, of the inhibitory effects of the thymoma on some clones of autoreactive lymphocytes.

  2. Insulin autoimmune syndrome: case report

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    Rodrigo Oliveira Moreira

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS, Hirata disease is a rare cause of hypoglycemia in Western countries. It is characterized by hypoglycemic episodes, elevated insulin levels, and positive insulin antibodies. Our objective is to report a case of IAS identified in South America. CASE REPORT: A 56-year-old Caucasian male patient started presenting neuroglycopenic symptoms during hospitalization due to severe trauma. Biochemical evaluation confirmed hypoglycemia and abnormally high levels of insulin. Conventional imaging examinations were negative for pancreatic tumor. Insulin antibodies were above the normal range. Clinical remission of the episodes was not achieved with verapamil and steroids. Thus, a subtotal pancreatectomy was performed due to the lack of response to conservative treatment and because immunosuppressants were contraindicated due to bacteremia. Histopathological examination revealed diffuse hypertrophy of beta cells. The patient continues to have high insulin levels but is almost free of hypoglycemic episodes.

  3. Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 – a case report from Bangladesh

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    Tahniyah Haq

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of a 26 years old man who presented with adrenocortical insufficiency followed by hypoparathyroidism and subsequently mucocutaneous candidiasis. He also had nail dystrophy, cataract and alopecia, but no other endocrinopathies. He was diagnosed as a case of autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1(APS 1. APS1 is a rare endocrine disorder and only a few cases have been reported from Bangladesh. IMC J Med Sci 2016; 10(1: 33-35

  4. Multiple Autoimmune Syndromes Associated with Psoriasis: A Rare Clinical Presentation

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    Sadia Masood

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases are known to have association with each other but it is very rare to see multiple autoimmune diseases in one patient. The combination of at least three autoimmune diseases in the same patient is referred to as multiple autoimmune syndrome. The case we are reporting features multiple autoimmune syndrome with five different conditions. The patient had type 1 diabetes mellitus, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, systemic lupus erythematosus, vitiligo, and psoriasis. Psoriasis has rarely been reported previously under the spectrum of autoimmune syndrome. Although the relationship of autoimmune conditions with each other has been explored in the past, this case adds yet another dimension to the unique evolution of autoimmune pathologies. The patient presented with a combination of five autoimmune diseases, which makes it consistent type three multiple autoimmune syndromes with the addition of psoriasis. The current case is unique in this aspect that the combination of these five autoimmune disorders has never been reported in the past.

  5. Lupus erythematosus, thyroiditis, alopecia areata and vitiligo – A multiple autoimmune syndrome type 3 case presentation

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    Alin Laurentiu Tatu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The combination of at least three autoimmune diseases in the same patient has defined as multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS. Abnormalities of T cell-mediated immunity and humoral immunity have been described previously in the literature. Aims of work were to investigate the 22 years old patient with lupus erythematosus for three years and autoimune thyroiditis for one year, regardind other possible autoimmune conditions and to establish a treatment to control the diseases. The clinical exam revealed some circular hairless patches on the beard appeared about three months ago and white depigmented disseminated areas started one month ago and the laboratory investigations were performed. The modified laboratory findings were total IgE 530 UI/mL, Anti-SSA (anti-RO antibodies> 200 IU/mL, SSB negative, Antinuclear antibodies (ANA positive and fine speckled, Lupus anticoagulant testing positive, Anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies 951 UI/ml, TSH 4,7 µUI/mL. The diagnosis of multiple autoimmune syndrome(MAS type 3 including Lupus erythematosus, autoimune Thyroiditis, Alopecia Areata and Vitiligo was established. Endocrine autoimmunities are associated with autoantibodies that react to specific antigens, whereas patients with collagen diseases synthesize immunoglobulins that recognize nonorgan-specific cellular targets, such as nucleoproteins and nucleic acids. Cellular autoimmunity is important in the pathogenesis MAS. The existence of one autoimmune disorder helps lead to the discovery of other autoimmune conditions.

  6. A new combination of multiple autoimmune syndrome? Coexistence of vitiligo, autoimmune thyroid disease and ulcerative colitis

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    Firdevs Topal

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of three or more autoimmune disorders in one patient defines multiple autoimmune syndrome. The pathogenesis of multiple autoimmune syndrome is not known yet and environmental triggers and genetic susceptibility have been suggested to be involved. Herein, we report a 47-year-old woman who had Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, vitiligo and newly diagnosed ulcerative colitis. Diagnosis of ulcerative colitis was confirmed with histopathologic examination. This case presents a new combination of multiple autoimmune syndrome.

  7. Autoimmune liver disease in Noonan Syndrome.

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    Loddo, Italia; Romano, Claudio; Cutrupi, Maria Concetta; Sciveres, Marco; Riva, Silvia; Salpietro, Annamaria; Ferraù, Valeria; Gallizzi, Romina; Briuglia, Silvana

    2015-03-01

    Noonan Syndrome (NS) is characterized by short stature, typical facial dysmorphology and congenital heart defects. The incidence of NS is estimated to be between 1:1000 and 1:2500 live births. The syndrome is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. In approximately 50% of cases, the disease is caused by missense mutations in the PTPN11 gene on chromosome 12, resulting in a gain of function of the non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 protein. Autoimmune Hepatitis (AIH) is a cryptogenic, chronic and progressive necroinflammatory liver disease. Common features of AIH are hypergammaglobulinemia (IgG), presence of circulating autoantibodies, histological picture of interface hepatitis and response to immunosuppressant drugs. Conventional treatment with Prednisone and Azathioprine is effective in most patients. We describe the case of a 6 years-old girl with Noonan Syndrome and Autoimmune Hepatitis type 1. Molecular analysis of PTPN11 gene showed heterozygous mutation c.923A>G (Asn308Ser) in exon 8. Though association between NS and autoimmune disorders is known, this is the second case of association between Noonan Syndrome and Autoimmune Hepatitis type 1 described in literature. In the management of NS, an accurate clinical evaluation would be recommended. When there is a clinical suspicion of autoimmune phenomena, appropriate laboratory tests should be performed with the aim of clarifying whether the immune system is involved in NS. We think that autoimmunity represents a characteristic of NS, even if the etiopathogenesis is still unknown. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Abdominal ultrasonogram of autoimmune pancreatitis: Five cases of pancreatic lesions accompanied by Sjögren syndrome.

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    Yoshizaki, Hideo; Takeuchi, Kazuo; Okuda, Chikao; Honjyo, Hajime; Yamamoto, Takatugu; Kora, Tetuo; Takamori, Yoriyuki

    2002-09-01

    The concept of autoimmune pancreatitis has recently been established, and ultrasonographic findings we obtained from five cases consistent with autoimmune pancreatitis are reported here. Case 1, a 77-year-old man, was admitted complaining of loss of body weight. Serum hepatobiliary enzymes and γ-globulin levels were elevated, and antinuclear antibody was positive, Abdominal ultrasonography showed dilatation of the intrahepatic bile duct, wall thickening of the common bile duct and hypoechoic swelling of the pancreatic head and body. ERCP revealed multiple stenosis of the intra-and extra-hepatic bile ducts, and diffuse irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct. The patient complained of thirst, and the minor salivary gland was examined histologically. Our diagnosis was Sjögren syndrome accompanied by sclerosing cholangitis and a pancreatic lesion. Obstructive jaundice also developed, and PTCD was therefore performed. Both the pancreatic swelling and multiple stenosis of the bile duct improved after steroids were administered. Case 2, a 71-year-old man, was admitted with jaundice. Abdominal ultrasonography showed hypoechoic swelling of the pancreas. ERCP showed stenosis of the common bile duct in the pancreatic head region and diffuse irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct. Histological examination of the minor salivary gland suggested Sjögren syndrome. Steroids were therefore administered because the presence of both hyper-γ-globulinemia and positive antinuclear antibody suggested involvement of the autoimmune mechanism. Steroid therapy improved the jaundice as well as the findings from the cholangiograms and pancreatograms. We also encountered three similar cases, all consistent with the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis. The ultrasonographic findings of the pancreatic lesion (1) showed them as homogeneous and markedly hypoechoic areas and, (2) visualized the main pancreatic duct in the lesion, which facilitated a differential diagnosis of the

  9. [Primary biliary cirrhosis-autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome. Contribution of two new cases].

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    Fernández Fernández, F J; de la Fuente Aguado, J; Pérez Fernández, S; Sopeña Pérez-Argüelles, B; Nodar Germiñas, A; Butrón Vila, M

    2005-03-01

    The autoimmune hepatitis (AIH)-primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) overlap syndrome is characterized for clinical, biochemical, immunological, and histological features overlapping those of AIH and PBC, whose pathogenesis and more appropriate treatment are unknown at present. We describe two new patients of this entity, which made debut with cholestasic acute hepatitis accompanied of hypergammaglobulinemia. In the first patient was demonstrated the presence of AMA, ASMA, and anti-LKM1 autoantibodies; and ANA in the second one. The histological findings showed changes suggestive of AIH and PBC. After the start of immunosuppressive treatment, associated to ursodeoxycholic acid in one patient, a successful outcome was observed.

  10. [Coexistence of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 with diabetes insipidus].

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    Krysiak, Robert; Okopień, Bogusław

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndromes are conditions characterized by the combination of two or more organ-specific disorders. The underestimation oftheir real frequency probable results from physicians' inadequate knowledge of these clinical entities and sometimes their atypical clinical presentation. Because they comprise a wide spectrum of autoimmune disorders, autoimmune polyglandular syndromes are divided into four types, among which type-3 is the most common one. In this article, we report the case of a young female, initially diagnosed with diabetes mellitus who several years later developed full-blown autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 consisting of autoimmune thyroid disorder and latent autoimmune diabetes in adults.The discussed case suggests that in selected patients diabetes insipidus may coexist with autoimmune endocrinopathies and nonendocrine autoimmunopathies, as well as that in some patients idiopathic diabetes insipidus may be secondary to lymphocytic infiltration and destruction of the hypothalamic supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei and/or the supraoptic-hypophyseal tract

  11. A Case of Autoimmune Polyglandular Syndrome (APS) Type II with Hypothyroidism, Hypoadrenalism, and Celiac Disease - A Rare Combination.

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    Lakhotia, Manoj; Pahadia, Hans Raj; Kumar, Harish; Singh, Jagdish; Tak, Sandeep

    2015-04-01

    Autoimmune Polyglandular syndrome (APS) are rare condition characterised by presence of immune dysfunction of two or more endocrine glands and other non-endocrine organs. APS is divided into 2 major subtypes based on age of presentation, pattern of disease combinations and mode of inheritance. APS 1(juvenile) usually manifest in early adolescence or in infancy. It is characterised by multiple endocrinal deficiency with mucocutaneous candidiasis and ectodermal dystrophy. Of the endocrine diseases, hypoparathyroidism form an important component followed by Addison's disease, type 1A diabetes, hypogonadism and thyroid disease. On the other hand APS II usually manifest in 3rd or 4th decade of life with female preponderance. Endocrine diseases commonly include autoimmune thyroid disease (graves or autoimmune thyroiditis), type 1A diabetes, and Addison's disease. Hypoparathyroidism is of rare occurrence and there is no mucocutaneous candidiasis. We report here a case of APS type II in a 29-year-old male who initially presented with hypothyroidism, which was soon followed by Addison's disease. The involvement of thyroid gland preceding the involvement of adrenal is of rare occurrence. The patient also had celiac disease which makes the combination further uncommon.

  12. Primary biliary cirrhosis--autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome associated with dermatomyositis, autoimmune thyroiditis and antiphospholipid syndrome.

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    Pamfil, Cristina; Candrea, Elisabeta; Berki, Emese; Popov, Horațiu I; Radu, Pompilia I; Rednic, Simona

    2015-03-01

    Autoimmune liver diseases may be associated with extrahepatic autoimmune pathology. We report the case of a 52-year old woman who initially presented to the gastroenterology department for extreme fatigue, pale stools, dark urine and pruritus. Laboratory tests showed significant cholestasis and elevation of aminotransferase levels. Immunological tests revealed positive antinuclear (ANA=1:320) and antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA=1:40) with negative anti-smooth muscle and liver kidney microsomal type 1 antibodies. The biopsy was compatible with overlap syndrome type 1. The patient was commenced on immunosuppressive therapy according to standard of care (azathioprine 50mg, ursodeoxycholic acid and prednisone 0.5mg/kg), with moderate biochemical improvement. She subsequently developed proximal symmetrical weakness and cutaneous involvement and was diagnosed with biopsy-proven dermatomyositis. The immunosuppressive regimen was intensified to 150 mg azathioprine. At the three-month follow-up, her symptoms subsided and aminotransferases and muscle enzymes normalized. Upon further investigation the patient was diagnosed with autoimmune thyroiditis and antiphospholipid syndrome. To our knowledge, this is the first case of primary biliary cirrhosis - autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome associated with dermatomyositis, autoimmune thyroiditis and antiphospholipid syndrome.

  13. Erythema elevatum et diutinum in a young man coexisting with autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 – case report

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    Małgorzata Tupikowska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Erythema elevatum et diutinum (EED is classified as a variant of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. The etiology of this disease is unknown. Erythema elevatum et diutinum may coexist with several systemic disorders including hematologic and rheumatologic diseases as well as type 1 diabetes, thyroid diseases and other endocrinopathies. Autoimmune polyglandular syndromes (APS are rarely diagnosed conditions characterized by the coexistence of at least two autoimmune endocrinopathies and non-endocrine autoimmunopathies. Objective. Presentation of a patient with EED coexisting with APS type 3. Case report. A 23-year-old male patient was admitted to our department due to nodular lesions lasting for 5 months, located on the extremities, which were diagnosed clinically and confirmed histopathologically as EED. In spite of skin lesions the patient suffered from diabetes mellitus type 1, hyperthyroidism, celiac disease, myopathy and idiopathic urticaria – abnormalities characteristic for APS type 3. Substantial clinical improvement was observed after systemic administration of dapsone and, due to upper respiratory tract infection, a few weeks of antibiotic therapy. Conclusions . We present this case due to the rarity of EED, especially coexisting with APS, and the good effect of therapy with dapsone and oral antibiotics.

  14. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome in a 13-year old girl

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    Borgwardt, L.; Pedersen, P.; Peitersen, B.

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS) is an entity, defined by autoimmunity towards two or more endocrine organs. APS is classified in 3 subgroups (type-1, type-2a, type-2b), according to the organs involved. A case is presented of a 13-year old girl referred to the Department of Paediatrics...

  15. The toxic autoimmune syndrome with pulmonary edema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parizhskij, Z.M.; Artyunina, G.P.; Trofimova, T.N.

    1992-01-01

    A case was considered in detail of a patient with pulmonary edema of immunnocomplex nature in aerogenic intoxication by nickel tetracarbonyl. It was shown that acute aerogenic intoxication nickel carbonyl by led to unfolded toxic autoimmune syndrome. In this case autoimmune immunecomplex pulmonary lesion (AIPL) menifested by progressing pulmonary edema with expressed parenchymatous respiratory insufficiency played a leading role. Lesion of endothelium of pulmonary capillaries by immune complexes has the most significant in pathogenesis of pulmonary edema. The fact that edema appears due to AIPL, is confirmed by high efficiency of glucocorticoid therapy. Use of glucorticoids serves as a diagnostic test which provides an effective roentgenologic diagnosis of AIPL and differential diagnosis of any other pathological processes in the lungs

  16. [Type 2 autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS-2)].

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    Vialettes, Bernard; Dubois-Leonardon, Noémie

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS-2) are the most frequent disorders associating several organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Their high prevalence is due to the fact that the main manifestations of APS-2, such as thyroidal autoimmunity, type 1 diabetes, autoimmune gastric atrophy and vitiligo, are common diseases. APS-2 represents a clinical model that can serve to help unravel the mechanisms underlying autoimmunity. Diagnosis of APS-2 is a challenge for the clinician, especially in poorly symptomatic forms, and may require systematic screening based on measurement of autoantibodies and functional markers.

  17. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia as a component of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type I: a report of 2 cases.

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    Makharia, Govind K; Tandon, Nikhil; Stephen, Neil de Jesus Rangel; Gupta, Siddhartha Datta; Tandon, Rakesh K

    2007-01-01

    Chronic diarrhea and steatorrhea occur frequently in patients with autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS) type I. Intestinal lymphangiectasia has been reported earlier as a cause of steatorrhea in a young girl with APS Type I. We describe 2 patients with APS Type I who were found to have intestinal lymphangiectasia, one of whom had symptomatic protein-losing enteropathy.

  18. Autoimmune diseases in women with Turner's syndrome

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    Jørgensen, Kristian T; Rostgaard, Klaus; Bache, Iben

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In terms of number of X chromosomes, women with Turner's syndrome cytogenetically resemble men. An increased risk of autoimmune diseases has been observed among women with Turner's syndrome. This study was undertaken to investigate whether the autoimmune disease profile in women...... with Turner's syndrome is characterized by diseases with a female or male predominance. METHODS: Using the Danish Cytogenetic Central Register, the Danish National Patient Register, and the Danish Civil Registration System, we estimated relative risk of 46 different autoimmune diseases in a cohort of 798...... Danish women with Turner's syndrome followed up for 12,461 person-years between 1980 and 2004. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of first hospitalization for autoimmune disease and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were used as measures of relative risk. RESULTS: The overall risk of autoimmune...

  19. Four Cases of Atopic Dermatitis Complicated by Sjogren's Syndrome: Link between Dry Skin and Autoimmune Anhidrosis

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    Shun Kitaba

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report four adult cases of atopic dermatitis (AD complicated by Sjogren's syndrome (SS. The patients fulfilled diagnostic criteria for AD and SS. All cases showed persistent itchy dry skin and eczematous lesions complicated by sicca symptoms including dry eyes and dry mouth with moderate joint pain. One case manifested annular erythema and another manifested widespread discoid erythema. To investigate the underlying cause of dry skin in these cases, sweating function was evaluated using a quantitative sudomotor axon reflex test (QSART in which the axon reflex is stimulated by acetylcholine iontophoresis. The sweating latency time was significantly prolonged in eczematous skin of AD and AD/SS compared to normal controls. Axon reflex (AXR sweat volume was also significantly reduced in AD (normal and eczematous skin and AD/SS (normal and eczema compared to normal control. In contrast, the direct sweat volume of lesional or non-lesional AD skin induced by direct stimulation with acetylcholine was only slightly reduced compared to that in normal controls, but not in SS and lesional skin of AD/SS patients. These results suggest that the impaired sweat response in AD is attributable to an abnormal sudomotor axon reflex, which is accelerated and modulated when complicated by SS resulting in dry skin in the present cases.

  20. Achalasia in a Patient with Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome Type II

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    Bashar S. Amr

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Achalasia is a rare disease characterized by aperistalsis of the esophageal body and failure of the lower esophageal sphincter to relax. The etiology of this disease remains unknown. Polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type II is a well-identified disease characterized by the occurrence of autoimmune Addison's disease in combination with autoimmune thyroid disease and/or type 1 diabetes mellitus. We report a case that suggests autoimmunity and immunogenicity as a probable contributing factor for association of these two rare disorders.

  1. Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome Type III with Primary Hypoparathyroidism

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    Sang Jin Kim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Polyglandular autoimmune syndrome is defined as multiple endocrine gland insufficiencies accompanied by autoimmune diseases of the endocrine and nonendocrine system. After Schmidt introduced a case of nontuberculosis adrenal gland dysfunction with thyroiditis in 1926, Neufeld defined polyglandular autoimmune syndrome by I, II, and III subtypes in 1980 by their presentation of occurrence age, heredity methods, relationship with human leukocyte antigen, and accompanying diseases. We report a case of a 32-year-old female with polyglandular autoimmune syndrome III accompanied by type 1 diabetes mellitus that was treated with insulin (36 units per day for 11 years. She had insulin deficiency and Hashimoto thyroiditis as an autoimmune disorder. In addition, she had several features similar to Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy including short stature, truncal obesity, round face, short neck, low intelligence (full IQ 84, and decreased memory. Although Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy is morphological evidence of pseudohypoparathyroidism or pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism, she had primary hypoparathyroidism on laboratory results. Here, we report a case of polyglandular autoimmune syndrome III with type 1 diabetes mellitus, autoimmune thyroiditis, and primary hypoparathyroidism, accompanied by clinical features similar to Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy.

  2. Reversible adrenal insufficiency and heterophile antibodies in a case of autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndrome.

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    Kharb, Sandeep; Gundgurthi, Abhay; Dutta, Manoj K; Garg, M K

    2013-12-01

    A 27-year-old male was admitted with diabetic ketoacidosis and altered sensorium with slurring of speech and ataxia. He was managed with intravenous insulin and fluids and later shifted to basal bolus insulin regimen and during further evaluation was diagnosed to be suffering from primary hypothyroidism and adrenal insufficiency. He was started on thyroxin replacement and steroids only during stress. After three months of follow up he was clinically euthyroid. His glycemic control was adequate on oral anti-hyperglycemic drugs and adrenal insufficiency recovered. However, his thyrotropin levels were persistently elevated on adequate replacement doses of thyroxin. His repeat TSH was estimated after precipitating serum with polyethylene glycol which revealed normal TSH. Here we report reversible adrenal insufficiency with hypothyroidism with falsely raised TSH because of presence of heterophile antibodies in a case of poly glandular endocrinopathy syndrome.

  3. A rare combination of type 3 autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome (APS-3) or multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS-3).

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    Betterle, Corrado; Garelli, Silvia; Coco, Graziella; Burra, Patrizia

    2014-06-01

    Type 3 autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome (APS-3) is defined by the presence of an autoimmune thyroid disease and another autoimmune illness, excluding Addison's disease; this is a frequent combination. We report the case of a 55 years old female patient with APS-3, with seven clinical or latent autoimmune manifestations. At 49 years of age she was admitted at the General Hospital for leukopenia, weight loss, tremors, anxiety and diarrhea. The personal history revealed ulcerative colitis and, during the last year, episodes of fever with migrant arthralgia and cutaneous lesions. The patient was evaluated for thyroid function and imaging, mielobiopsy, glycaemic control, gastrointestinal and rheumatologic disorders with specific biochemical tests, imaging and endoscopic procedures. We concluded that the patient was affected by APS-3, characterized by the association of Graves' disease, autoimmune leukopenia, latent autoimmune diabetes of the adult (LADA), autoimmune gastritis, ulcerative colitis, Sjögren's and anti-phospholipid syndromes. The patient started low doses of corticosteroid drugs for leukopenia, underwent (131)I therapy for hyperthyroidism and later started substitutive thyroid therapy with l-thyroxine, insulin therapy for LADA, mesalazine for ulcerative colitis and artificial tears for Sjögren's syndrome. In this article we report a complex case of APS-3, characterized by the association of seven different autoimmune diseases, which required a complex therapeutic strategy.

  4. Thyroid Autoimmunity in Girls with Turner Syndrome.

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    Witkowska-Sędek, Ewelina; Borowiec, Ada; Kucharska, Anna; Chacewicz, Karolina; Rumińska, Małgorzata; Demkow, Urszula; Pyrżak, Beata

    2017-01-01

    Turner syndrome is associated with increased incidence of autoimmune diseases, especially those of the thyroid gland. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity among pediatric patients with Turner syndrome. The study was retrospective and included 41 girls with Turner syndrome aged 6-18 years. Free thyroxine (FT4), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO-Ab) antibodies, anti-thyroglobulin (TG-Ab) antibodies, and karyotype were investigated. The correlation between karyotype and incidence of thyroid autoimmunity was also examined. Eleven patients (26.8%) were positive for TPO-Ab and/or TG-Ab. Three girls from that subgroup were euthyroid, 5 had subclinical hypothyroidism, and 3 were diagnosed with overt hypothyroidism. Out of these 11 patients affected by thyroid autoimmunity, 6 girls had mosaic karyotype with X-isochromosome (n = 4) or with deletions (n = 2), and 5 had the 45,X karyotype. The study findings confirmed a high incidence of thyroid autoimmunity in girls with Turner syndrome, but we failed to observe an association between the incidence of thyroid autoimmunity and karyotype. We conclude that it is important to monitor thyroid function in patients with Turner syndrome because they are prone to develop hypothyroidism.

  5. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome, type 2 associated with myasthenia gravis

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    Pejin Radoslav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 is defined as adrenal insufficiency associated with autoimmune primary hypothyroidism and/or with autoimmune type 1 diabetes mellitus, but very rare with myasthenia gravis. Case report. We presented a case of an autoimmune polyglandular syndrome, type 2 associated with myasthenia gravis. A 49-year-old female with symptoms of muscle weakness and low serum levels of cortisol and aldosterone was already diagnosed with primary adrenal insufficiency. Primary hypothyroidism was identified with low values of free thyroxine 4 (FT4 and raised values of thyroidstumulating hormone (TSH. The immune system as a cause of hypothyroidism was confirmed by the presence of thyroid antibodies to peroxidase and TSH receptors. Myasthenia gravis was diagnosed on the basis of a typical clinical feature, positive diagnostic tests and an increased titre of antibodies against the acetylcholine receptors. It was not possible to confirm the immune nature of adrenal insufficiency by the presence of antibodies to 21- hydroxylase. The normal morphological finding of the adrenal glands was an indirect confirmation of the condition as well as the absence of other diseases that might have led to adrenal insufficiency and low levels of both serum cortisol and aldosterone. Hormone replacement therapy, anticholinergic therapy and corticosteroid therapy for myasthenia gravis improved the patient’s general state of health and muscle weakness. Conclusion. This case report indicates a need to examine each patient with an autoimmune disease carefully as this condition may be associated with another autoimmune diseases.

  6. Is Tourette's syndrome an autoimmune disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, P; Limburg, P; Kallenberg, C; Minderaa, R; Battistin, L

    2004-01-01

    Tourette's syndrome is a childhood-onset neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by the presence of both multiple motor and vocal tics. While its pathogenesis at a molecular and cellular level remains unknown, recent research findings point to the possible involvement of autoimmunity in at least a

  7. Autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (Shoenfeld's syndrome) - An update.

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    Watad, A; Quaresma, M; Brown, S; Cohen Tervaert, J W; Rodríguez-Pint, I; Cervera, R; Perricone, C; Shoenfeld, Y

    2017-06-01

    Autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA) has been widely described in many studies conducted thus far. The syndrome incorporates five immune-mediated conditions, all associated with previous exposure to various agents such as vaccines, silicone implants and several others. The emergence of ASIA syndrome is associated with individual genetic predisposition, for instance those carrying HLA-DRB1*01 or HLA-DRB4 and results from exposure to external or endogenous factors triggering autoimmunity. Such factors have been demonstrated as able to induce autoimmunity in both animal models and humans via a variety of proposed mechanisms. In recent years, physicians have become more aware of the existence of ASIA syndrome and the relationship between adjuvants exposure and autoimmunity and more cases are being reported. Accordingly, we have created a registry that includes at present more than 300 ASIA syndrome cases that have been reported by different physicians worldwide, describing various autoimmune conditions induced by diverse adjuvants. In this review, we have summarized the updated literature on ASIA syndrome and the knowledge accumulated since 2013 in order to elucidate the association between the exposure to various adjuvant agents and its possible clinical manifestations. Furthermore, we especially referred to the relationship between ASIA syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS).

  8. Successful Management of Insulin Allergy and Autoimmune Polyendocrine Syndrome Type 4 with Desensitization Therapy and Glucocorticoid Treatment: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

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    Joselyn Rojas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Insulin allergy is a rare complication of insulin therapy, especially in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM. Key manifestations are hypersensitivity-related symptoms and poor metabolic control. T1DM, as well as insulin allergy, may develop in the context of autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome (APS, further complicating management. Case Report. A 17-year-old male patient, diagnosed with T1DM, was treated with various insulin therapy schemes over several months, which resulted in recurrent anaphylactoid reactions and poor glycemic control, after which he was referred to our Endocrinology and Immunology Department. A prick test was carried out for all commercially available insulin presentations and another insulin scheme was designed but proved unsuccessful. A desensitization protocol was started with Glargine alongside administration of Prednisone, which successfully induced tolerance. Observation of skin lesions typical of vitiligo prompted laboratory workup for other autoimmune disorders, which returned positive for autoimmune gastritis/pernicious anemia. These findings are compatible with APS type 4. Discussion. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of insulin allergy in type 4 APS, as well as this particular combination in APS. Etiopathogenic components shared by insulin allergy and APS beg for further research in immunogenetics to further comprehend pathophysiologic aspects of these diseases.

  9. Noonan's Syndrome and Autoimmune Thyroiditis

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    Vesterhus, Per; Aarskog, Dagfinn

    1973-01-01

    Thyroid abnormalities were studies in seven boys and three girls, 4- to 17-years-old, with Noonan's syndrome, characterized by mental retardation, ocular anomalies (wide spaced eyes, drooped eye lids, or strabismus), heart lesions, characteristics of Turner's syndrome, and normal karyotypes (chromosome arrangement). (MC)

  10. The comorbidity of bipolar disorder, diabetes mellitus, and autoimmune hypothyroidism in an adult woman with Turner’s syndrome: a case report

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    Li J

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Jinling Li, Xiaohong Hong, Haiyun Xu The Mental Health Center, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Turner’s syndrome (TS is the most common sex chromosome abnormality in females and characterized with short stature and ovarian dysgenesis. Patients with TS may also present many other physical diseases and mental disorders. In this case report, we present a 49-year-old woman with TS, who also met criteria for bipolar disorder, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and autoimmune hypothyroidism. The patient was admitted to the mental health center for depressive symptoms in 1991 and was misdiagnosed as hypopituitarism, which was not corrected until 2005 when her karyotype of 45, X/46, X, i(Xq was identified. Due to the misdiagnosis and other specific reasons, the patient missed the optimal time for hormone replacement therapy. Keywords: Turner’s syndrome, bipolar disorder, karyotype, comorbidity

  11. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome in a 13-year old girl

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgwardt, L.; Pedersen, P.; Peitersen, B.

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS) is an entity, defined by autoimmunity towards two or more endocrine organs. APS is classified in 3 subgroups (type-1, type-2a, type-2b), according to the organs involved. A case is presented of a 13-year old girl referred to the Department of Paediatrics...... with hypothyroidism, subsequently diagnosed adrenocortical insufficiency and impending Addison crisis, typical for APS-type 2a. In the paper we discuss the need for more attention to APS in clinical work Udgivelsesdato: 2008/9/29...

  12. Paraneoplastic syndromes and autoimmune encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Myrna R.; Titulaer, Maarten J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary We review novel findings in paraneoplastic syndromes including the Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome, and then focus on the novel disorders associated with antibodies against cell surface antigens, discussing the importance and caveats of antibody testing, and providing an algorithm for interpretation of results. In anti-NMDAR encephalitis 2 novel findings include the recognition of a characteristic EEG pattern (“extreme delta brush”) in 30% of patients and the demonstration of a fronto-temporo-occipital gradient of glucose metabolism that correlates with disease activity. In limbic encephalitis, antibodies to GABA(B) receptor are the most frequently detected in patients with small-cell lung cancer who are anti-Hu negative, and antibodies to mGluR5 distinctively associate with Hodgkin lymphoma (Ophelia syndrome). We also address the syndromes associated with “VGKC-complex antibodies,” a problematic term that groups well-characterized immune-mediated disorders (LGI1, Caspr2) with others that lack syndrome specificity, are less responsive to treatment, and for which the target antigens are unknown. PMID:23634368

  13. Increased prevalence of autoimmunity in Turner syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, K H; Cleemann, L; Hjerrild, B E

    2009-01-01

    and karyotype. In conclusion, TS girls and women face a high prevalence of autoimmunity and associated disease with a preponderance towards hypothyroidism and CD. Thus, health care providers dealing with this patient group should be observant and test liberally for these conditions even before clinical symptoms......Individuals with Turner syndrome (TS) are prone to develop autoimmune conditions such as coeliac disease (CD), thyroiditis and type 1 diabetes (T1DM). The objective of the present study was to examine TS of various karyotypes for autoantibodies and corresponding diseases. This was investigated...... hypothyroid. Overall, 18% (19) presented with CD autoantibodies, of whom 26% (five) had CD. Anti-TPO and CD autoantibodies co-existed in 9% (10). Immunoglobulin A deficiency was found in 3% (three) of patients, who all had CD autoantibodies without disease. Among four patients with anti-GAD-65 none had T1DM...

  14. Prolonged extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy for severe acute respiratory distress syndrome in a child affected by rituximab-resistant autoimmune hemolytic anemia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beretta Chiara

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children younger than 2 years of age is usually characterized by a severe course, with a mortality rate of approximately 10%. The prolonged immunosuppression following specific treatment may be associated with a high risk of developing severe infections. Recently, the use of monoclonal antibodies (rituximab has allowed sustained remissions to be obtained in the majority of pediatric patients with refractory autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Case presentation We describe the case of an 8-month-old Caucasian girl affected by a severe form of autoimmune hemolytic anemia, which required continuous steroid treatment for 16 months. Thereafter, she received 4 weekly doses of rituximab (375 mg/m2/dose associated with steroid therapy, which was then tapered over the subsequent 2 weeks. One month after the last dose of rrituximab, she presented with recurrence of severe hemolysis and received two more doses of rrituximab. The patient remained in clinical remission for 7 months, before presenting with a further relapse. An alternative heavy immunosuppressive therapy was administered combining cyclophosphamide 10 mg/kg/day for 10 days with methylprednisolone 40 mg/kg/day for 5 days, which was then tapered down over 3 weeks. While still on steroid therapy, the patient developed an interstitial pneumonia with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome, which required immediate admission to the intensive care unit where extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy was administered continuously for 37 days. At 16-month follow-up, the patient is alive and in good clinical condition, with no organ dysfunction, free from any immunosuppressive treatment and with a normal Hb level. Conclusions This case shows that aggressive combined immunosuppressive therapy may lead to a sustained complete remission in children with refractory autoimmune hemolytic anemia. However, the severe life-threatening complication presented by our

  15. Synergistic defects of novo FAS and homozygous UNC13D leading to autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome-like disease: A 10-year-old Chinese boy case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Hao; Ma, Jie; Chen, Zhenping; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Rui; Wu, Runhui

    2018-06-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) usually presents in childhood with fever, nonmalignant splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy along with hemocytopenia. This case report describes a 10-year-old boy presenting with signs of autoimmune disease, splenomegaly, hepatomegaly and resistant hemocytopenia. Sirolimus controlled the relapsed thrombocytopenia after splenectomy. Sequencing of the FAS gene identified two spontaneous heterozygous mutations (c.234 T > G, p.D78E) (c.236dupA, p.P80Tfs*26). The boy's homozygous missense variation (c.2588G > A, p.G863D) (rs140184929) in UNC13D gene had been identified as being related to familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL). TCRαβ + CD4/CD8 double-negative T cells (markers of ALPS) were not significantly increased from the outset. Elevated cytokines, such as interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor α decreased to normal levels after splenectomy whereas IL-10 remained high. Immunological analysis of the patient revealed a marked depletion of forkhead-box P3 + expressing regulatory T cells (Treg) and Th17 cells. The obtained data demonstrate that mutations to FAS and UNC13D which result in overwhelming T-cell and macrophage activation, one associated with inhibited Treg cell development and a severe ALPS-like symptom. Therefore, we propose that variations of UND13D may be a risk factor of ALPS development. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. A Case Report of Nonvasculitic Autoimmune Inflammatory Meningoencephalitis with Sensory Ganglionopathy: A Rare Presentation of Sjögren Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Peres

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 68-year-old Caucasian female was admitted to the emergency department with a progressive history of behavioural symptoms and anxiety followed by visual and auditory hallucinations, forgetfulness, and impaired gait in the previous 3 months. On examination she was psychotic and had a postural and rest tremor of the upper limbs, cogwheel rigidity of the four limbs, retropulsion on standing position, and inability to walk. During the following 2 weeks she developed xerostomia and unilateral parotiditis that improved with steroids. A simultaneous improvement of the cognitive abilities allowed for the detection of sensory ataxia of the lower limbs. Sensory ganglionopathy was then detected with electrophysiological studies. A diagnosis of Sjögren syndrome was suspected and confirmed by salivary gland scintigraphy, Schirmer’s test, and submaxillary gland biopsy. We report a case of Sjögren syndrome associated with central and peripheral nervous system involvement, without sicca symptoms preceding the neurological clinical picture. The coexistence of ganglionopathy and a favourable response to immunosuppression are key features that can lead to the correct diagnosis in cases with atypical CNS symptoms, mimicking a rapidly progressive dementia.

  17. The value of Autoimmune Syndrome Induced by Adjuvant (ASIA) - Shedding light on orphan diseases in autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Yahel; Dahan, Shani; Sharif, Kassem; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Watad, Abdulla; Amital, Howard

    2018-05-01

    Autoimmune Syndrome Induced by Adjuvant (ASIA) is a definition aimed to describe the common etiological process at the root of five clinical entities sharing similar symptomatology: macrophagic myofasciitis syndrome (MMF), Gulf War Syndrome (GWS), sick building syndrome (SBS), siliconosis, and post vaccination autoimmune phenomena. ASIA illustrates the role of environmental immune stimulating agents, or adjuvants, in the instigation of complex autoimmune reactions among individuals bearing a genetic preponderance for autoimmunity. The value of ASIA lies first in the acknowledgment it provides for patients suffering from these as yet ill-defined medical conditions. Equally important is the spotlight it sheds for further research of these poorly understood conditions sharing a common pathogenesis. In this article we elaborate on the significance of ASIA, review the current evidence in support of the syndrome, and address recent reservations raised regarding its validity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Evidence Refuting the Existence of Autoimmune/Autoinflammatory Syndrome Induced by Adjuvants (ASIA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ameratunga, Rohan; Gillis, David; Gold, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune/autoinflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA) was described in 2011. Over time the condition and its triggers have broadened to include several autoimmune disorders, the macrophagic myofasciitis syndrome, the Gulf war syndrome, the sick building syndrome, siliconosis...

  19. Polyglandular autoimmune syndrome iii with hypoglycemia and association with empty sella and hypopituitarism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia Abdulla Bokhari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 25-year-old Saudi female with a known case of autoimmune thyroiditis presented to the Emergency Room in stuporous condition. A blood test revealed a blood sugar level of 1.7 mmols/l (30.6 mg/dl. The patient was resuscitated with intravenous glucose. Further evaluations of the patient revealed celiac disease and idiopathic thrombocytopenia with preexisting autoimmune thyroiditis (polyglandular autoimmune syndrome III [PAS III]. The severe hypoglycemia, coupled with 6 years of infertility evaluation, revealed a rare association of empty sella syndrome with hypopituitarism {PAS II}.

  20. AIRE variations in Addison's disease and autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøe Wolff, A S; Oftedal, B; Johansson, S

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) is often associated with other components in autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS). Whereas APS I is caused by mutations in the AIRE gene, the susceptibility genes for AAD and APS II are unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether polymorphisms...

  1. Type 1 diabetes and polyglandular autoimmune syndrome: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Martin P; Matheis, Nina; Kahaly, George J

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disorder caused by inflammatory destruction of the pancreatic tissue. The etiopathogenesis and characteristics of the pathologic process of pancreatic destruction are well described. In addition, the putative susceptibility genes for T1D as a monoglandular disease and the relation to polyglandular autoimmune syndrome (PAS) have also been well explored. The incidence of T1D has steadily increased in most parts of the world, especially in industrialized nations. T1D is frequently associated with autoimmune endocrine and non-endocrine diseases and patients with T1D are at a higher risk for developing several glandular autoimmune diseases. Familial clustering is observed, which suggests that there is a genetic predisposition. Various hypotheses pertaining to viral- and bacterial-induced pancreatic autoimmunity have been proposed, however a definitive delineation of the autoimmune pathomechanism is still lacking. In patients with PAS, pancreatic and endocrine autoantigens either colocalize on one antigen-presenting cell or are expressed on two/various target cells sharing a common amino acid, which facilitates binding to and activation of T cells. The most prevalent PAS phenotype is the adult type 3 variant or PAS type III, which encompasses T1D and autoimmune thyroid disease. This review discusses the findings of recent studies showing noticeable differences in the genetic background and clinical phenotype of T1D either as an isolated autoimmune endocrinopathy or within the scope of polyglandular autoimmune syndrome. PMID:25685279

  2. Possible Association of Multicentric Castleman's Disease with Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Minemura

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD is lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by systemic inflammatory symptoms such as fever and weight loss. Human herpes virus-8 (HHV-8 is thought to be a causable pathogen in all HIV-positive and some HIV-negative MCD patients. Furthermore, the term idiopathic MCD (iMCD was recently proposed to represent a group of HIV-negative and HHV-8-negative patients with unknown etiologies. Although the international diagnostic criteria for iMCD require exclusion of infection-related disorders, autoimmune/autoinflammatory diseases and malignant/lymphoproliferative disorders to make an iMCD diagnosis, the relationships and differences between these disorders and MCD have not yet been clarified. We recently reported the first case of MCD with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS. Although ALPS was included in the iMCD exclusion criteria as an autoimmune/autoinflammatory disease according to the international diagnostic criteria, there is a lack of evidence on the association between MCD and ALPS. In this study, we review the recent understanding of MCD and discuss the possible association between MCD with ALPS.

  3. [SPECIFIC CLINICAL FEATURES OF TYPE 1 AUTOIMMUNE POLYGLANDULAR SYNDROME].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhina, M S; Molashenko, N V; Troshina, E A; Orlova, E M; Sozaeva, L S; Eystein, S H; Breivik, S

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome is a primary autoimmune disorder affecting two or more peripheral endocrine glands and responsible for their incompetence. It is frequently combined with various organ-specific non-endocrine diseases. Patients with this pathology need life-long replacement therapy and dynamic observation by endocrinologists and other specialists to monitor the effectiveness of the treatment and detect new components of the disease. We report a variant of type 1 autoimmune polyglandular syndrome. Special emphasis is laid on the importance of succession of actions of endocrinologists and specialists in related medical disciplines dealing with children and adult patients.

  4. [Auto-immune disorders as a possible cause of neuropsychiatric syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Martinez, P; Molenaar, P C; Losen, M; Hoffmann, C; Stevens, J; de Witte, L D; van Amelsvoort, T; van Os, J; Rutten, B P F

    2015-01-01

    Changes that occur in the behaviour of voltage-gated ion channels and ligand-gated receptor channels due to gene mutations or auto-immune attack are the cause of channelopathies in the central and peripheral nervous system. Although the relation between molecular channel defects and clinical symptoms has been explained in the case of many neuromuscular channelopathies, the pathophysiology of auto-immunity in neuropsychiatric syndromes is still unclear. To review recent findings regarding neuronal auto-immune reactions in severe neuropsychiatric syndromes. Using PubMed, we consulted the literature published between 1990 and August 2014 relating to the occurrence of auto-immune antibodies in severe and persistent neuropsychiatric syndromes. Auto-antibodies have only limited access to the central nervous system, but if they do enter the system they can, in some cases, cause disease. We discuss recent findings regarding the occurrence of auto-antibodies against ligand-activated receptor channels and potassium channels in neuropsychiatric and neurological syndromes, including schizophrenia and limbic encephalitis. Although the occurrence of several auto-antibodies in schizophrenia has been confirmed, there is still no proof of a causal relationship in the syndrome. We still have no evidence of the prevalence of auto-immunity in neuropsychiatric syndromes. The discovery that an antibody against an ion channel is associated with some neuropsychiatric disorders may mean that in future it will be possible to treat patients by means of immunosuppression, which could lead to an improvement in a patient's cognitive abilities.

  5. Novel and rare functional genomic variants in multiple autoimmune syndrome and Sjögren's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johar, Angad S; Mastronardi, Claudio; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana; Patel, Hardip R; Chuah, Aaron; Peng, Kaiman; Higgins, Angela; Milburn, Peter; Palmer, Stephanie; Silva-Lara, Maria Fernanda; Velez, Jorge I; Andrews, Dan; Field, Matthew; Huttley, Gavin; Goodnow, Chris; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio

    2015-06-02

    Multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS), an extreme phenotype of autoimmune disorders, is a very well suited trait to tackle genomic variants of these conditions. Whole exome sequencing (WES) is a widely used strategy for detection of protein coding and splicing variants associated with inherited diseases. The DNA of eight patients affected by MAS [all of whom presenting with Sjögren's syndrome (SS)], four patients affected by SS alone and 38 unaffected individuals, were subject to WES. Filters to identify novel and rare functional (pathogenic-deleterious) homozygous and/or compound heterozygous variants in these patients and controls were applied. Bioinformatics tools such as the Human gene connectome as well as pathway and network analysis were applied to test overrepresentation of genes harbouring these variants in critical pathways and networks involved in autoimmunity. Eleven novel and rare functional variants were identified in cases but not in controls, harboured in: MACF1, KIAA0754, DUSP12, ICA1, CELA1, LRP1/STAT6, GRIN3B, ANKLE1, TMEM161A, and FKRP. These were subsequently subject to network analysis and their functional relatedness to genes already associated with autoimmunity was evaluated. Notably, the LRP1/STAT6 novel mutation was homozygous in one MAS affected patient and heterozygous in another. LRP1/STAT6 disclosed the strongest plausibility for autoimmunity. LRP1/STAT6 are involved in extracellular and intracellular anti-inflammatory pathways that play key roles in maintaining the homeostasis of the immune system. Further; networks, pathways, and interaction analyses showed that LRP1 is functionally related to the HLA-B and IL10 genes and it has a substantial impact within immunological pathways and/or reaction to bacterial and other foreign proteins (phagocytosis, regulation of phospholipase A2 activity, negative regulation of apoptosis and response to lipopolysaccharides). Further, ICA1 and STAT6 were also closely related to AIRE and IRF5, two very

  6. A rare association of localized scleroderma type morphea, vitiligo, autoimmune hypothyroidism, pneumonitis, autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura and central nervous system vasculitis. Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonilla-Abadía Fabio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The localized scleroderma (LS known as morphea, presents a variety of clinical manifestations that can include systemic involvement. Current classification schemes divide morphea into categories based solely on cutaneous morphology, without reference to systemic disease or autoimmune phenomena. This classification is likely incomplete. Autoimmune phenomena such as vitiligo and Hashimoto thyroiditis associated with LS have been reported in some cases suggesting an autoimmune basis. To our knowledge this is the first case of a morphea forming part of a multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS and presenting simultaneously with autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura and central nervous system vasculitis. Case presentation We report an uncommon case of a white 53 year old female patient with LS as part of a multiple autoimmune syndrome associated with pneumonitis, autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura and central nervous system vasculitis presenting a favorable response with thrombopoietin receptor agonists, pulses of methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide. Conclusion Is likely that LS have an autoimmune origin and in this case becomes part of MAS, which consist on the presence of three or more well-defined autoimmune diseases in a single patient.

  7. A rare association of localized scleroderma type morphea, vitiligo, autoimmune hypothyroidism, pneumonitis, autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura and central nervous system vasculitis. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla-Abadía, Fabio; Muñoz-Buitrón, Evelyn; Ochoa, Carlos D; Carrascal, Edwin; Cañas, Carlos A

    2012-12-20

    The localized scleroderma (LS) known as morphea, presents a variety of clinical manifestations that can include systemic involvement. Current classification schemes divide morphea into categories based solely on cutaneous morphology, without reference to systemic disease or autoimmune phenomena. This classification is likely incomplete. Autoimmune phenomena such as vitiligo and Hashimoto thyroiditis associated with LS have been reported in some cases suggesting an autoimmune basis. To our knowledge this is the first case of a morphea forming part of a multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS) and presenting simultaneously with autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura and central nervous system vasculitis. We report an uncommon case of a white 53 year old female patient with LS as part of a multiple autoimmune syndrome associated with pneumonitis, autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura and central nervous system vasculitis presenting a favorable response with thrombopoietin receptor agonists, pulses of methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide. Is likely that LS have an autoimmune origin and in this case becomes part of MAS, which consist on the presence of three or more well-defined autoimmune diseases in a single patient.

  8. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 in a 12-year-old ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 in a 12-year-old Ugandan girl. ... Journal of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes of South Africa ... Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 (APS-1), also known as autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasisectodermal dystrophy syndrome, is a very rare disorder of ...

  9. [Oral diseases in auto-immune polyendocrine syndrome type 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proust-Lemoine, Emmanuelle; Guyot, Sylvie

    2017-09-01

    Auto-immune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS1) also called Auto-immune Polyendocrinopathy Candidiasis Ectodermal Dystrophy (APECED) is a rare monogenic childhood-onset auto-immune disease. This autosomal recessive disorder is caused by mutations in the auto-immune regulator (AIRE) gene, and leads to autoimmunity targeting peripheral tissues. There is a wide variability in clinical phenotypes in patients with APSI, with auto-immune endocrine and non-endocrine disorders, and chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis. These patients suffer from oral diseases such as dental enamel hypoplasia and candidiasis. Both are frequently described, and in recent series, enamel hypoplasia and candidiasis are even the most frequent components of APS1 together with hypoparathyroidism. Both often occur during childhood (before 5 years old for canrdidiasis, and before 15 years old for enamel hypoplasia). Oral candidiasis is recurrent all life long, could become resistant to azole antifungal after years of treatment, and be carcinogenic, leading to severe oral squamous cell carcinoma. Oral components of APS1 should be diagnosed and rigorously treated. Dental enamel hypoplasia and/or recurrent oral candidiasis in association with auto-immune diseases in a young child should prompt APS1 diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Is Tourette's syndrome an autoimmune disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, PJ; Kallenberg, CGM; Korf, J; Minderaa, RB

    2002-01-01

    We provide a review of recent research findings which support the involvement of autoimmunity in childhood-onset tic disorders, in particular the presence of antineuronal autoantibodies, D8/17 B lymphocyte overexpression, a marker of chorea associated with streptococcal infection, and possible

  11. Overlapping humoral autoimmunity links rheumatic fever and the antiphospholipid syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blank, M; Krause, I; Magrini, L

    2006-01-01

    Rheumatic fever (RF) and the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) are autoimmune diseases that share similar cardiac and neurological pathologies. We assessed the presence of shared epitopes between M protein, N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) and beta2 glycoprotein-I (beta2GPI), the pathogenic...

  12. Wolfram Syndrome. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarała, Wojciech; Drachal, Elzbieta; Mazur, Artur; Korczowski, Bartosz; Szadkowska, Agnieszka; Zmysłowska, Agnieszka; Młynarski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome is a rare neurodegenerative and genetic disorder, characterized by insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, caused by non-autoimmune loss of β cells, as well as optic atrophy; the disease is also known as DIDMOAD (diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness). Patients that demonstrate diabetes mellitus are also affected by: optic atrophy in the first decade of their life, diabetes insipidus and sensorineural deafness in the second decade, and urinary tract and neurological abnormalities in the third decade of their life. Patients with Wolfram syndrome usually die due to central respiratory failures caused by brain stem atrophy in their third or at the beginning of their fourth decade of life. The authors present a case of two female siblings with diagnosed Wolfram syndrome that have been diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and urological abnormalities. Early diagnosis and adequate hormonal supplementation can improve their quality of life. © Polish Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology.

  13. Intestinal lymphangiectasia in a patient with autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Bipul Kumar; Saiki, Uma Kaimal; Sarm, Dipti; Choudhury, Bikash Narayan; Choudhury, Sarojini Dutta; Saharia, Dhiren; Saikia, Mihir

    2011-11-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndromes (APS) comprise a wide clinical spectrum of autoimmune disorders. APS is divided into Type I, Type II, Type I and Type IV depending upon the pattern of disease combination. Ghronic diarrhoea is one of the many manifestations of APS and many aetiological factors have been suggested for it. Apart from the established aetiological factors, intestinal lymphangiectasia may be responsible for chronic diarrhea in some cases.Intestinal lymphangiectasia has been reported in Type I APS. We report a case of Type III APS with hypocalcaemia and hypothyroidism who had chronic diarrhea of long duration and was finally diagnosed to have intestinal lymphangiectasia.

  14. Cocaine/levamisole-associated autoimmune syndrome: a disease of neutrophil-mediated autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascio, Michael J; Jen, Kuang-Yu

    2018-01-01

    Levamisole was previously used for its immunomodulatory properties to treat rheumatoid arthritis and some cancers. However, because of serious side-effects, it was taken off the market in the United States. Recently, levamisole has reemerged as a popular cocaine adulterant. Some individuals who consume levamisole-adulterated cocaine can develop a life-threatening autoimmune syndrome. In this review, the medical consequences of levamisole exposure and postulated mechanisms by which levamisole induces these adverse effects are discussed. Although agranulocytosis and cutaneous vasculitis are the major findings in patients who develop cocaine/levamisole-associated autoimmune syndrome (CLAAS), more recent experience indicates that other organ systems can be involved as well. Current studies point to neutrophil activation and neutrophil extracellular trap formation with subsequent antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-mediated tissue injury as a possible mechanism of CLAAS. In the past decade, the detrimental effects of levamisole have reemerged because of its popularity as a cocaine adulterant. Although infrequent, some individuals develop a systemic autoimmune syndrome characterized by immune-mediated agranulocytosis and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-mediated vasculitis. Mechanistically, neutrophil antigens appear to be a major player in inducing CLAAS. Prompt cessation of levamisole exposure is key to treatment, although relapses are frequent because of the addictive effects of cocaine and the high prevalence of levamisole within the cocaine supply.

  15. Autoimmune Progesterone Dermatitis Presenting as Stevens-Johnson Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drayer, Sara M; Laufer, Larry R; Farrell, Maureen E

    2017-10-01

    Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis is an uncommon disease presenting with cyclical skin eruptions corresponding with the menstrual cycle luteal phase. Because symptoms are precipitated by rising progesterone levels, treatment relies on hormone suppression. A 22-year-old nulligravid woman presented with symptoms mistaken for Stevens-Johnson syndrome. A cyclic recurrence of her symptoms was noted, and the diagnosis of autoimmune progesterone dermatitis was made by an intradermal progesterone challenge. After 48 months, she remained refractory to medical management and definitive surgical treatment with bilateral oophorectomy was performed. Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis is a challenging diagnosis owing to its rarity and variety of clinical presentations. Treatment centers on suppression of endogenous progesterone and avoidance of exogenous triggers. When these modalities fail, surgical management must be undertaken.

  16. Autoimmunity in Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome: an unsolved enigma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eCatucci

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome (WAS is a severe X-linked Primary Immunodeficiency (PID that affects 1 to 10 out of 1 million male individuals. WAS is caused by mutations in the WAS Protein (WASP expressing gene that leads to the absent or reduced expression of the protein. WASP is a cytoplasmic protein that regulates the formation of actin filaments in hematopoietic cells. WASP deficiency causes many immune cell defects both in humans and in the WAS murine model, the Was-/- mouse. Both cellular and humoral immune defects in WAS patients contribute to the onset of severe clinical manifestations, in particular microthrombocytopenia, eczema, recurrent infections and a high susceptibility to develop autoimmunity and malignancies. Autoimmune diseases affect from 22% to 72% of WAS patients and the most common manifestation is autoimmune hemolytic anemia, followed by vasculitis, arthritis, neutropenia, inflammatory bowel disease and IgA nephropathy. Many groups have widely explored immune cell functionality in WAS partially explaining how cellular defects may lead to pathology. However, the mechanisms underlying the occurrence of autoimmune manifestations have not been clearly described yet. In the present review, we report the most recent progresses in the study of immune cell function in WAS that have started to unveil the mechanisms contributing to autoimmune complications in WAS patients.

  17. Immune complex-mediated autoimmunity in a patient With Smith-Magenis syndrome (del 17p11.2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianying; Chandrasekharappa, Settara C; Vilboux, Thierry; Smith, Ann C M; Peterson, Erik J

    2014-08-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a sporadic congenital disorder involving multiple organ systems caused by chromosome 17p11.2 deletions. Smith-Magenis syndrome features craniofacial and skeletal anomalies, cognitive impairment, and neurobehavioral abnormalities. In addition, some SMS patients may exhibit hypogammaglobulinemia. We report the first case of SMS-associated autoimmunity in a woman who presented with adult onset of multiple autoimmune disorders, including systemic lupus erythematosus, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, and autoimmune hepatitis. Molecular analysis using single-nucleotide polymorphism array confirmed a de novo 3.8-Mb deletion (breakpoints, chr17: 16,660,721-20,417,975), resulting in haploinsufficiency for TACI (transmembrane activator and CAML interactor). Our data are consistent with potential loss of function for the BAFF (B cell-activating factor) receptor TACI as a contributing factor to human autoimmune phenomena.

  18. Autoimmune neurological syndromes associated limbic encephalitis and paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayas, Zeynep Özözen; Kotan, Dilcan; Aras, Yeşim Güzey

    2016-10-06

    Autoimmune neurological syndrome is a group of disorders caused by cancer affecting nervous system by different immunological mechanisms. In this study, we aim to study the clinical symptoms, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) findings, autoantibody tests, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signs and treatment outcome of patients with autoimmune syndromes. In this study, 7 patients (4 male, 3 female) diagnosed with autoimmune neurological syndrome were retrospectively examined. Five of patients were diagnosed with limbic encephalitis, two of them were paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Confusion and seizure were the most seen symptoms. Two patients had psychiatric disturbances (28,5%) followed by seizure. Headache was seen in 2 patients (% 28,5), disartria in 1 patient (% 14,2), and gait disorder in 2 patients (28,5%). The duration of symptoms was 46 (3-150) days on average. CSF abnormalities were detected in 2 patients. CT and MRI of the brain was available in all patients. Five patients had involvement of mesiotemporal region, two patients had diffuse cerebellar atrophy. One of patients had anti-GABAR B1 positivity. Tumors were detected in 2 patients while investigation for paraneoplasia screening. Remission is only possible with the detection and treatment of the malignancy. Early diagnosis and treatment are of paramount importance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. An uncommon cause of hypoglycemia: insulin autoimmune syndrome.

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    Savas-Erdeve, Senay; Yılmaz Agladioglu, Sebahat; Onder, Asan; Peltek Kendirci, Havva Nur; Bas, Veysel Nijat; Sagsak, Elif; Cetinkaya, Semra; Aycan, Zehra

    2014-01-01

    Insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS) is a condition characterized by hypoglycemia associated with the presence of autoantibodies to insulin in patients who have not been injected with insulin. A female patient (aged 16 years and 3 months) presented with the complaint of being overweight. Physical examination revealed a body weight of 78.2 kg (+2.6 SD) and a height of 167 cm (+0.73 SD). While the patient's fasting blood glucose level was found to be 40 mg/dl, blood ketone was negative and the serum insulin level was determined as 379 mIU/ml. The patient was diagnosed with hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. Abdominal ultrasound, pancreas MRI and endoscopic ultrasound were normal. The daily blood glucose profile revealed postprandial hyperglycemia and reactive hypoglycemia in addition to fasting hypoglycemia. The results of anti-insulin antibody measurements were as high as 41.8% (normal range 0-7%). A 1,600-calorie diet containing 40% carbohydrate and divided into 6 meals a day was given to the patient. Simple sugars were excluded from the diet. Hypoglycemic episodes were not observed, but during 2 years of observation, serum levels of insulin and anti-insulin antibodies remained elevated. In all hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia cases, IAS should be considered in the differential diagnosis and insulin antibody measurements should be carried out. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Multiple endocrinopathies (growth hormone deficiency, autoimmune hypothyroidism and diabetes mellitus in Kearns-Sayre syndrome

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    A. Berio

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Kearns-Sayre syndrome is characterized by onset before 20 years, chronic progressive external opthalmoplegia, pigmentary retinal degeneration, and ataxia (and/or hearth block, and/or high protein content in the cerebrospinal fluid in the presence of mtDNA rearrangements. Multiple endocrine dysfunction associated with this syndrome was rarely reported. In this paper, the Authors report on a female patient with Kearns-Sayre syndrome with large heteroplasmic mtDNA deletion, absence of cytochrome c oxidase in many muscle fibers, partial GH deficiency, hypothyroidism and subsequently insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM. Anti-thyroid peroxidase and antithyreoglobulin antibodies were present in high titer in serum while anti-islet cell antibodies were absent. The patient developed thyroiditis with Hashimoto encephalopathy. The presence of GH deficiency, autoimmune thyroiditis with hypothyroidism and IDDM distinguishes this case from others and confirms the association of Kearns-Sayre syndrome with multiple endocrine dysfunction. Hashimoto encephalopathy and anti-thyroideal antibodies suggest that in this patient, predisposed by a genetic factor (a mitochondrial deletion anti-thyroideal antibodies may have contributed to the hypothyroidism and, by interfering with cerebral mitochondrial function, may have caused the encephalopathy. GH deficiency and IDDM can be attributed to oxidative phosphorylation deficiency but the autoimmunity may also have played a role in the production of glandular insufficiencies. It seems important to search for endocrine autoimmunity in every case of KSS.

  1. Unusual pediatric co-morbility: autoimmune thyroiditis and cortico-resistant nephrotic syndrome in a 6-month-old Italian patient

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    Urbano Flavia

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report on a case of autoimmune thyroiditis in a 6-month-old patient with cortico-resistant nephrotic syndrome. Normal serum levels of thyroid hormons and thyroid-stimulating hormone were detected with high titers of circulant antithyroid antibodies and a dysomogeneous ultrasound appearance of the gland, typical of autoimmune thyroiditis. The research of maternal thyroid antibodies was negative. This is the first case of autoimmune thyroiditis found in such a young patient with pre-existing nephrotic syndrome ever described in literature. This association is random because nephrotic syndrome does not have an autoimmune pathogenesis and the genes involved in autoimmune thyroiditis are not related to those of nephrotic syndrome.

  2. Autoimmune Polyendocrine Syndrome 3 Onset with Severe Ketoacidosis in a 74-Year-Old Woman

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    Stefano Benedini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D, autoimmune thyroid disease, and autoimmune gastritis often occur together forming the so-called autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 3 (APS3. We here report a clinical case of a 74-year-old woman who presented for the first time with severe hyperglycemia and ketoacidosis diagnosed as T1D. Further clinical investigations revealed concomitant severe hypothyroidism with autoimmune thyroid disease and severe cobalamin deficiency due to chronic atrophic gastritis. The diagnosis of type 1 diabetes mellitus was confirmed by the detection of autoantibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, islet cell antibodies, and anti-insulin autoantibodies. Anti-thyroperoxidase, anti-thyroglobulin, and anti-gastric parietal cell antibodies were also clearly positive. The case emphasized that new onset diabetic ketoacidosis, hypothyroidism, and cobalamin deficiency may simultaneously occur, and one disease can mask the features of the other, thereby making diagnosis difficult. It is noteworthy that an APS3 acute episode occurred in an asymptomatic elder woman for any autoimmune diseases.

  3. [Type 1 polyglandular autoimmune syndrome associated with C322fsx372 mutation].

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    Roncalés-Samanes, P; de Arriba Muñoz, A; Lou Francés, G M; Ferrer Lozano, M; Justa Roldán, M L; Labarta Aizpun, J I

    2015-01-01

    Polyglandular autoimmune syndromes are rare diseases based on autoimmune mechanisms in which endocrine and non-endocrine disorders coexist. In type 1 the characteristic manifestations are chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism and adrenal insufficiency. A case is presented of a patient with typical clinical sequence, along with other changes, and in whom a mutation in homozygosis, C322fsX372, was detected after performing a molecular analysis of autoimmunity regulator gene (AIRE). Inheritance is autosomal recessive, associated with mutations in the AIRE gene, which encodes a protein involved in autoimmunity and immunodeficiency. For diagnosis, At least two of the three major clinical manifestations are required for a diagnosis. However, only one of them is necessary in the study of relatives of affected patients. These syndromes must be diagnosed early, given their high morbidity and mortality. Every manifestation needs to be treated, in order to maintain the quality of life. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Coxiella burnetii as a possible cause of autoimmune liver disease: a case report

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    Kaech Chloe

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Q fever is a zoonotic infection that may cause severe hepatitis. Q-fever hepatitis has not yet been associated with autoimmune hepatitis and/or primary biliary cirrhosis. Case presentation We describe a 39-year-old man of Sri Lankan origin with chronic Q-fever hepatitis who developed autoantibodies compatible with autoimmune hepatitis/primary biliary cirrhosis overlap syndrome. Ursodeoxycholic acid in addition to antibiotic therapy markedly improved hepatic enzyme levels suggesting that autoimmunity, potentially triggered by the underlying infection, was involved in the pathogenesis of liver damage. Conclusion We suggest that Coxiella burnetii might trigger autoimmune liver disease. Patients with Q-fever hepatitis who respond poorly to antibiotics should be investigated for serological evidence of autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis or overlap syndrome, as these patients could benefit from adjunctive therapy with ursodeoxycholic acid. Conversely, C. burnetii serology might be necessary in patients with autoimmune liver disease in order to exclude underlying Coxiella infection.

  5. Autoimmunity and dysmetabolism of human acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

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    Huang, Yan-Mei; Hong, Xue-Zhi; Xu, Jia-Hua; Luo, Jiang-Xi; Mo, Han-You; Zhao, Hai-Lu

    2016-06-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) remains ill-defined by lists of symptoms, infections, tumors, and disorders in metabolism and immunity. Low CD4 cell count, severe loss of body weight, pneumocystis pneumonia, and Kaposi's sarcoma are the major disease indicators. Lines of evidence indicate that patients living with AIDS have both immunodeficiency and autoimmunity. Immunodeficiency is attributed to deficits in the skin- and mucosa-defined innate immunity, CD4 T cells and regulatory T cells, presumably relating human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The autoimmunity in AIDS is evident by: (1) overproduction of autoantibodies, (2) impaired response of CD4 cells and CD8 cells, (3) failure of clinical trials of HIV vaccines, and (4) therapeutic benefits of immunosuppression following solid organ transplantation and bone marrow transplantation in patients at risk of AIDS. Autoantibodies are generated in response to antigens such as debris and molecules de novo released from dead cells, infectious agents, and catabolic events. Disturbances in metabolic homeostasis occur at the interface of immunodeficiency and autoimmunity in the development of AIDS. Optimal treatments favor therapeutics targeting on the regulation of metabolism to restore immune homeostasis.

  6. Hyperthyroidism from autoimmune thyroiditis in a man with type 1 diabetes mellitus: a case report

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    Hirsch Irl B

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The presentation, diagnosis, clinical course and treatment of a man with hyperthyroidism secondary to autoimmune thyroiditis in the setting of type 1 diabetes mellitus has not previously been described. Case presentation A 32-year-old European-American man with an eight-year history of type 1 diabetes mellitus presented with an unintentional 22-pound weight loss but an otherwise normal physical examination. Laboratory studies revealed a suppressed thyroid-stimulating hormone concentration and an elevated thyroxine level, which are consistent with hyperthyroidism. His anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies were positive, and his thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin test was negative. Uptake of radioactive iodine by scanning was 0.5% at 24 hours. The patient was diagnosed with autoimmune thyroiditis. Six weeks following his initial presentation he became clinically and biochemically hypothyroid and was treated with thyroxine. Conclusion This report demonstrates that autoimmune thyroiditis presenting as hyperthyroidism can occur in a man with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Autoimmune thyroiditis may be an isolated manifestation of autoimmunity or may be part of an autoimmune polyglandular syndrome. Among patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus who present with hyperthyroidism, Graves' disease and other forms of hyperthyroidism need to be excluded as autoimmune thyroiditis can progress quickly to hypothyroidism, requiring thyroid hormone replacement therapy.

  7. Autoimmune Syndrome Induced by Adjuvants (ASIA after Silicone Breast Augmentation Surgery

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    Daniel Nunes e Silva, MD

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Summary:. Generally, the main complications of silicone implantation are local symptoms. However, some patients develop late-onset systemic symptoms often associated with a rare form of hyperactive immune response, as part of a syndrome known as autoimmune syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA. Reported cases of ASIA have shown resolution with explantation, but not with immunomodulatory therapy. In this report, we described a case of a previously healthy 23-year-old woman, who has undergone silicone breast implant augmentation, for aesthetic reasons, and developed localized cutaneous impairment 3 years postsurgery. She received a diagnosis of ASIA with a new presentation: Lupus-like manifestation through localized cutaneous impairment. This patient’s symptoms were managed without the need for surgical intervention, which has not been previously reported, because the patient did not want an explantation for aesthetic reasons. The patient was started on hydroxychloroquine, 400 mg per day, and remains asymptomatic after 2 years of treatment. The exact predisposition to ASIA is still unknown. Without implant explantation and with immunomodulatory treatment, this patient’s condition substantially improved. Based on our current understanding of this disease, it might not be prudent to indicate breast augmentation with silicone implants in patients with documented autoimmune reaction to an adjuvant, an established autoimmune condition, or genetic predisposition. However, if a patient does develop silicone-induced ASIA, explantation is no longer the only successfully reported option, as these symptoms can be managed with immune suppression.

  8. Deep vein thrombosis, an unreported first manifestation of polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type III

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    M Horsey

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A 71-year-old woman with severe right lower leg pain, edema and erythema was presented to the Emergency Department and was found to have an extensive deep vein thrombosis (DVT confirmed by ultrasound. She underwent an extensive evaluation due to her prior history of malignancy and new hypercoagulable state, but no evidence of recurrent disease was detected. Further investigation revealed pernicious anemia (PA, confirmed by the presence of a macrocytic anemia (MCV=115.8fL/red cell, Hgb=9.0g/dL, decreased serum B12 levels (56pg/mL, with resultant increased methylmalonic acid (5303nmol/L and hyperhomocysteinemia (131μmol/L, the presumed etiology of the DVT. The patient also suffered from autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD, and both antithyroglobulin and anti-intrinsic factor antibodies were detected. She responded briskly to anticoagulation with heparin and coumadin and treatment of PA with intramuscular vitamin B12 injections. Our case suggests that a DVT secondary to hyperhomocystenemia may represent the first sign of polyglandular autoimmune syndrome III-B (PAS III-B, defined as the coexistent autoimmune conditions AITD and PA. It is important to recognize this clinical entity, as patients may not only require acute treatment with vitamin B12 supplementation and prolonged anticoagulation, as in this patient, but may also harbor other autoimmune diseases.

  9. Non-Autoimmune Subclinical and Overt Hypothyroidism in Idiopathic Steroid-resistant Nephrotic Syndrome in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marimuthu, Vidhya; Krishnamurthy, Sriram; Rajappa, Medha

    2017-11-15

    To evaluate the frequency of non-autoimmune subclinical and overt hypothyroidism in children with idiopathic steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS). This cross-sectional study recruited 30 children (age 1-18 y) with idiopathic SRNS; and 30 healthy controls. Serum T3, T4 and TSH were performed in cases as well as controls. Anti-thyroid peroxidase and anti-thyroglobulin antibody tests were performed in all cases. Non-autoimmune subclinical or overt hypothyroidism was detected in 10 out of 30 children with idiopathic SRNS; 2 had overt hypothyroidism, while 8 patients had subclinical hypothyroidism. Children with SRNS had a mean (SD) TSH value 4.55 (4.64) mIU/L that was higher as compared to controls (1.88 (1.04) mIU/L) (Phypothyroidism (2 cases) and grade III subclinical hypothyroidism (1 case) were subsequently started on levothyroxine therapy. The prevalence of subclinical and overt hypothyroidism seems to be high in idiopathic SRNS, with almost one-third of children having overt or subclinical non-autoimmune hypothyroidism.

  10. Shwachman-Diamond syndrome with autoimmune-like liver disease and enteropathy mimicking celiac disease.

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    Veropalumbo, Claudio; Campanozzi, Angelo; De Gregorio, Fabiola; Correra, Antonio; Raia, Valeria; Vajro, Pietro

    2015-02-01

    Liver abnormalities that normalize during infancy as well an enteropathy are reported in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS). The pathogenesis of both conditions is unknown. We report two SDS cases with autoimmune-like (antismooth muscle and/or antinuclear antibody positivity) liver disease and antigliadin antibody positive inflammatory enteropathy. Hypertransaminasemia did not resolve after immunosuppressive therapy and/or a gluten-free diet. These transient autoimmune phenomena and gut-liver axis perturbations may have played a role in transient SDS hepatopathy and enteropathy. Our report may stimulate other studies to define the relationship between the SDS genetic defect and intestinal permeability as the pathogenic mechanism underlying SDS related liver and intestinal inflammation. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  11. Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 2 in patient with severe allergic asthma treated with omalizumab.

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    Rams, Anna; Żółciński, Marek; Zastrzeżyńska, Weronika; Polański, Stanisław; Serafin, Agnieszka; Wilańska, Joanna; Musiał, Jacek; Bazan-Socha, Stanisława

    2018-01-04

    Asthma therapy with monoclonal antibodies is a promising and effective approach for those with a severe and refractory type of disease. Although such a targeted therapy is considered to be safe, unusual complications may occur. We present a case of a 45 year-old female patient with severe allergic asthma and chronic spontaneous urticaria, who developed autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 2 (APS-2) after 26 months of omalizumab administration. The patient was diagnosed with primary adrenal insufficiency (Addison's disease) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis accompanied by autoimmune atrophic gastritis. According to our knowledge this is the first description of APS-2 that developed in conjunction with omalizumab treatment, although we have no evidence that the observed phenomenon indicated a cause-effect relationship to omalizumab.

  12. Autoimmune pancreatitis: case series and review of the literature.

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    Shakov, Rada; DePasquale, Joseph R; Elfarra, Hossam; Spira, Robert S

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AuP) is a chronic pancreatic inflammation secondary to an underlying autoimmune mechanism. After early reports of a particular type of pancreatitis associated with hypergammaglobulinemia, others asserted that there is an autoimmune mechanism involved in some patients with chronic pancreatitis. In 1995 AuP was first described as a distinct clinical entity. Since then, there have been many documented cases of AuP in Japan, and now, perhaps due to increased awareness, more cases are being reported in Europe and the United States. Herein we present our experience with 3 cases of AuP and we review the relevant literature. These 3 cases demonstrate the difficulties that exist in making the diagnosis of AuP and the impact that the diagnosis can have on patient management.

  13. Somatic FAS mutations are common in patients with genetically undefined autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome.

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    Dowdell, Kennichi C; Niemela, Julie E; Price, Susan; Davis, Joie; Hornung, Ronald L; Oliveira, João Bosco; Puck, Jennifer M; Jaffe, Elaine S; Pittaluga, Stefania; Cohen, Jeffrey I; Fleisher, Thomas A; Rao, V Koneti

    2010-06-24

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is characterized by childhood onset of lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, autoimmune cytopenias, elevated numbers of double-negative T (DNT) cells, and increased risk of lymphoma. Most cases of ALPS are associated with germline mutations of the FAS gene (type Ia), whereas some cases have been noted to have a somatic mutation of FAS primarily in their DNT cells. We sought to determine the proportion of patients with somatic FAS mutations among a group of our ALPS patients with no detectable germline mutation and to further characterize them. We found more than one-third (12 of 31) of the patients tested had somatic FAS mutations, primarily involving the intracellular domain of FAS resulting in loss of normal FAS signaling. Similar to ALPS type Ia patients, the somatic ALPS patients had increased DNT cell numbers and elevated levels of serum vitamin B(12), interleukin-10, and sFAS-L. These data support testing for somatic FAS mutations in DNT cells from ALPS patients with no detectable germline mutation and a similar clinical and laboratory phenotype to that of ALPS type Ia. These findings also highlight the potential role for somatic mutations in the pathogenesis of nonmalignant and/or autoimmune hematologic conditions in adults and children.

  14. Sheehan’s Syndrome Revisited: Underlying Autoimmunity or Hypoperfusion?

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    José Gerardo González-González

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sheehan’s syndrome remains a frequent obstetric complication with an uncertain pathophysiology. We aimed to assess the incidence of hypopituitarism (≥2 hormonal axis impairment within the first six postchildbirth months and to determine the existence of anti-pituitary antibodies. From 2015 to 2017, adult pregnant women, who developed moderate to severe postpartum hemorrhage (PPH, were consecutively included in the study. Pituitary function was assessed 4 and 24 weeks after PPH. At the end of the study, anti-pituitary antibodies were assessed. Twenty women completed the study. Mean age was 26.35 (±5.83 years. The main etiology for severe PPH was uterine atony (65% which resulted mostly in hypovolemic shock grades III-IV. Within the first four weeks after delivery, 95% of patients had at least one hormonal pituitary affected and 60% of the patients fulfilled diagnostic criteria for hypopituitarism. At the end of the study period, five patients (25% were diagnosed with hypopituitarism (GH and cortisol axes affected. Anti-pituitary antibodies were negative in all patients. At 6 months follow-up, one in every four women with a history of moderate-to-severe PPH was found with asymptomatic nonautoimmune-mediated hypopituitarism. The role of autoimmunity in Sheehan’s syndrome remains uncertain. Further studies are needed to improve the remaining knowledge gaps.

  15. Frequency and predictive factors for overlap syndrome between autoimmune hepatitis and primary cholestatic liver disease.

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    Gheorghe, Liana; Iacob, Speranta; Gheorghe, Cristian; Iacob, Razvan; Simionov, Iulia; Vadan, Roxana; Becheanu, Gabriel; Parvulescu, Iuliana; Toader, Cristina

    2004-06-01

    To evaluate the frequency of cholestatic pattern in patients with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and to identify predictive factors associated with the development of the overlap syndrome. Eighty-two consecutive patients diagnosed with AIH at the referral centre between January 1998 and June 2002 were included in the study. The new scoring system modified by the International Autoimmune Hepatitis Group was used to classify patients as definite/probable. Overlap syndrome was considered when the patient had clinical, serological and histological characteristics of two conditions: AIH and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) or AIH and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). From the 82 AIH patients (76 female and six male), 84.1% presented definite AIH (> 15 points) and 15.9% probable AIH (10 - 15 points). The frequency of the overlap syndrome was 20%: 13% with PBC and 7% with PSC. In the univariate analysis the overlap syndrome was associated with male gender (P = 0.01), age < 35 years (P < 0.0001), histopathological aspect of cholestasis (P < 0.0001), suboptimal response to treatment (P < 0.0001) and probable AIH (P < 0.0001). Age < 35 years, probable AIH and the absence of anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) have been identified as independent indicators of the overlap diagnosis by the logistic regression analysis. Patients with overlap syndrome between AIH and primary cholestatic liver disease are frequently diagnosed in clinical practice, representing 20% of AIH cases in our study. The independent predictive factors associated with the diagnosis of overlap syndrome are young age, ANA(-) profile, and probable diagnosis according with the scoring system for AIH.

  16. Neuromyelitis optica accompanied by nephrotic syndrome and autoimmune-related pancytopenia.

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    ZhangBao, Jingzi; Zhou, Lei; Lu, Jiahong; Xi, Jianying; Zhao, Chongbo; Quan, Chao

    2016-05-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) associated with nephrotic syndrome and autoimmune-related pancytopenia has not been reported previously. We report herein a young woman who initially presented with bilateral blurring of vision and numbness in her hands. MRI disclosed multiple white matter lesions and a long cervical spinal cord lesion extending to the medulla oblongata. Serum aquaporin-4 antibody was positive and the patient was diagnosed with NMO. While in the hospital, she presented with hypoproteinemia and heavy proteinuria, meeting the diagnostic criteria of nephrotic syndrome. After high-dose methylprednisolone treatment, her vision improved significantly and urine protein quantity decreased. However, the patient subsequently developed severe pancytopenia with a positive Coombs' test. Thrombocytopenia finally led to uncontrollable gastrointestinal bleeding as the direct cause of the patient's death. This case illustrates the extremely rare condition of concurrence of NMO, nephrotic syndrome, and autoimmune pancytopenia in one patient, which suggests the involvement of organs beyond the central nervous system in NMO spectrum disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. [Seric 21-hydroxilase antibodies in patients with anti-microsomal fraction antibodies. Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botta, Silvia; Roveto, Silvana; Rimoldi, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome (APS) is the association of autoimmune endocrine diseases, with other autoimmune nonendocrine disorders. APS types 1, 2 and 4 include autoimmune adrenalitis; this suggests the presence of autoantibodies. A specific serological marker for these is the anti 21- hydroxilase autoantibody (a21-OH). APS type 2 is the association of autoimmune adrenalitis, to autoimmune thyroid disease and/or diabetes mellitus, all these are induced by autoantibodies. Alopecia, vitiligo, myasthenia and other manifestations can be minor components. We sought to establish the prevalence of seric a21-OH in patients with positive anti-microsomal fraction autoantibodies, autoimmune thyroid disease and/or non-endocrine autoimmune diseases. We also aimed to diagnose incomplete forms of APS and to follow up patients at risk of progression to complete forms of APS. A population of 72 patients and another of 60 controls with negative anti-microsomal fraction autoantibodies were studied. Elevated seric a21-OH were found in two patients. Patient A with 47 U/ml had autoimmune hypothyroidism and myasthenia; and patient B with 8.75 U/ml had autoimmune hypothyrodism and vitiligo; they both lacked adrenal insufficiency. Seric a21-OH had a prevalence of 2.8%. Regarding the adrenal component, patients A and B had an incomplete and latent APS type 2. Considering a21-OH as markers of latent endocrine autoimmune diseases and taking into account the eventual risk of developing clinical manifestations, periodic biochemical and clinical follow-ups are recommended.

  18. Multiple Sclerosis and autoimmune diseases: clinical cases and review of the literature

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    A. Protti

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS, the most frequent demyelinating disease in adults, is thought to be an autoimmune disease. Symptoms and signs observed in MS reflect lesions present mainly in the white matter of the central nervous system (CNS. The diagnosis remains difficult, at least concerning presenting symptoms, because of their low specificity. Diagnosis criteria are usually based on dissemination of signs in time and space, evoked potentials, findings of magnetic resonance imaging, results of cerebrospinal fluid examination, and the exclusion of other diagnosis possibly explaining the clinical signs. However, no clinical and paraclinical investigation can distinguish with certainity MS from other conditions such as autoimmune or inflammatory diseases predominantly affecting the central nervous system. These other disorders include systemic lupus erythematosus, antiphospholipid syndrome, Behcet disease, Sjogren syndrome, sarcoidosis and vasculitides. We present four clinical cases showing the difficulty in reaching a proper diagnosis...

  19. Autoimmune manifestations in SCID due to IL7R mutations: Omenn syndrome and cytopenias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, Claudia Augusta; Jacob, Cristina Miuki Abe; de Albuquerque Diniz, Edna Maria; Lovisolo, Silvana Maria; Zerbini, Maria Claudia Nogueira; Dorna, Mayra; Watanabe, Letícia; Fernandes, Juliana Folloni; Rocha, Vanderson; Oliveira, João Bosco; Carneiro-Sampaio, Magda

    2014-07-01

    B+NK+SCID (severe combined immunodeficiency) due to IL7Rα deficiency represents approximately 10% of American SCID cases. To better understand the spectrum of autoimmune disorders associated with IL7Rα deficiency, we describe two unrelated IL7Rα-deficient female SCID infants whose clinical picture was dominated by autoimmune manifestations: one with intrauterine Omenn syndrome (OS) and another with persistent thrombocytopenic purpura since 4months of age. The OS baby harbored a homozygous p.C118Y mutation in IL7R. She presented dense eosinophilic infiltrates in several organs, including pancarditis, which may have contributed to her death (on the 2nd day of life). B cells were observed in lymph nodes, spleen, bone marrow and thymus. The second patient harbored compound heterozygous p.C118Y and p.I121NfsX8 mutations. She underwent a successful unrelated cord blood transplant. In conclusion, early OS can be observed in patients with IL7R mutations, and autoimmune cytopenias could also complicate the clinical course of SCID babies with this type of defect. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Autoimmune hepatitis in a teenage boy: 'overlap' or 'outlier' syndrome--dilemma for internists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Arunansu; Khanra, Dibbendhu; Mukherjee, Kabita; Saha, Manjari

    2013-02-08

    An 18-year-old boy presented with upper gastrointestinal bleeding and jaundice. Investigations revealed coarse hepatomegaly, splenomegaly and advanced oesophageal varices. Blood reports showed marked rise of alkaline phosphatase and more than twofold rise of transaminases and IgG. Liver histology was suggestive of piecemeal necrosis, interphase hepatitis and bile duct proliferation. Antinuclear antibody was positive in high titre along with positive antismooth muscle antibody and antimitochondrial antibody. The patient was positive for human leukocyte antigen DR3 type. Although an 'overlap' syndrome exists between autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), a cholestatic variant of AIH, a rare 'outlier' syndrome could not be excluded in our case. Moreover, 'the chicken or the egg', AIH or PBC, the dilemma for the internists continued. The patient was put on steroid and ursodeoxycholic acid with unsatisfactory response. The existing international criteria for diagnosis of AIH are not generous enough to accommodate its variant forms.

  1. Topical tacrolimus solution in autoimmune polyglandular syndrome-1-associated keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoughy, Samir S; Tabbara, Khalid F

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of topical tacrloimus eye drops in the treatment of keratitis associated with autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS)-1. This is a retrospective review of 10 patients with APS-1. The patients were treated with topical tacrolimus 0.01% solution at The Eye Center, between 1 March 2012 and 30 April 2016. The outcome measures included improvement in visual acuity, photophobia and keratitis following treatment. Clinical assessment was carried out before, during and on the last visit following initiation of therapy. A total of 10 patients were included. There were five male and five female patients. The mean age was 11 years with age range of 3-42 years. The mean duration of treatment with topical tacrolimus was 26 months (range 8-46 months). There was improvement of photophobia in 7 out of 10 patients following therapy with topical tacrolimus. In three patients, the photophobia was persistent. There was no clinically detectable improvement in the severity of keratitis in all patients. The mean best corrected visual acuity was 0.1 before and following therapy. Topical tacrolimus is effective in reducing the photophobia in patients with APS-1-associated keratitis, but showed no effects on the severity of keratitis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) and autoimmune disorders (AD): cause or consequence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Thorsten; Fenaux, Pierre

    2013-12-01

    Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) and Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia (CMML) are frequently associated with clinical manifestations of autoimmune disorders (AD) and inflammatory response of the immune system. AD accompanying MDS and CMML include vasculitis, seronegative polyarthritis and neutrophilic dermatosis. Rare AD including relapsing polychondritis is strongly associated with MDS as in a high proportion of those patients MDS is diagnosed during disease course. Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) are frequently found among MDS patients without clinical manifestation of AD. In a subset of patients, MDS and resulting cytopenias appear to be the consequence of auto reactive immunologic activity and may respond to immunosuppressive treatment (IST). Increased release of inflammatory cytokines like tumor necrosis factor-(TNF)-α and interferon (IF)-γ triggers apoptosis of myeloid precursor cells leading to cytopenias. Impaired function of immune cells including cytotoxic, regulatory (Treg), helper (Th17) T cells and NK cells also appears to predict response to IST, outcome and occurrence of AD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A rare case of autoimmune limbic encephalitis: an uncharted territory!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Hatim; Al Jasser, Abdulelah N; Khan, Sonia A; Tlili, Kalthoum G

    2017-10-01

    Autoimmune encephalitis is rare. Several auto- antibodies are described in autoimmune encephalitis. We describe a case of autoimmune limbic encephalitis associated with positive voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC) antibodies and positive leucine-rich glioma inactivated protein 1 antibodies (LGI1). A 33-year-old Saudi housewife, she presented with 2 months history of cognitive deterioration and recurrent left facio-brachial dystonic seizures followed by generalized tonic clonic seizures. At times the seizures are preceded by rising epigastric aura and shortness of breath. The neurological examination was normal apart from upgoing left plantar reflex. She had borderline IQ of 76 with impaired verbal fluency and impaired visual and verbal memory. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed right mesial temporal non-enhancing lesion. Cerebrospinal fluid examination was positive for LGI1 and VGKC. Optimal seizure control was achieved with immunotherapy.

  4. [A case of anti-LKM 1 positive autoimmune hepatitis accompanied by systemic lupus erythematosus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Dae Han; Kim, Hae Kyung; Park, Tae Il; John, Byung Min; Kang, Sung Hwan; Lee, Yoon Serk; Kim, Tae Hyun; Lee, Uh Joo; Lee, Tae Seung; Yoon, Gwi Ok

    2008-03-01

    Overlap of autoimmune hepatitis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a comparatively rare condition. Although both autoimmune hepatitis and SLE can share common autoimmune features such as polyarthralgia, hypergammaglobulinemia and positive ANA, it has been considered as two different entities. We report a case of anti-LKM1 positive autoimmune hepatitis who developed SLE two years later. The presence of interface hepatitis with lymphoplasma cell infiltrates and rosette formation points to the autoimmune hepatitis rather than SLE hepatitis. Autoimmune hepatitis is infrequently accompanied by SLE, therefore, it could be recommended to investigate for SLE in patients with autoimmune hepatitis.

  5. A strange case of Evans syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Monti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Evans syndrome is a rare autoimmune disease presenting hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and/or neutropenia. It may be associated with other autoimmune or lymphoproliferative diseases. It can have an extremely serious disease course and, in rare cases, this can even be life-threatening. First-line treatment consists of steroids and/or immunoglobulin. Further therapy with rituximab, vincristine, cyclophosphamide and other immunosuppressive drugs can be considered in unresponsive patients. We report a case of Evans syndrome in a 54-year old woman admitted to the Emergency Department (ED for asthenia. Etiopathogenic, clinical, therapeutic and evolutive aspects are discussed. In contrast to many cases described in the literature, our patient had a satisfactory response to corticoids. We also discuss how to make a specific diagnosis, even in a suburban ED with limited resources, in order to admit patients to the appropriate hospital department and allow the correct therapy to be started as early as possible.

  6. Two Paraneoplastic Autoimmune Syndromes: Limbic Encephalitis and Palmar Fasciitis in a Patient with Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarev, Irina; Shelef, Ilan; Refaely, Yael; Ariad, Samuel; Ifergane, Gal

    2015-09-07

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is characterized by a relatively high rate of autoimmune phenomena. Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis (PLE) is an autoimmune syndrome in which a non-neural tumor containing an antigen normally present in the nervous system precipitates an antibody attack on neural tissues. Patients with PLE usually present with rapidly progressive short-term memory deficits, confusion or even dementia. Palmar fasciitis and polyarthritis syndrome (PFPAS) is another autoimmune syndrome characterized by rheumatologic manifestations, especially involving the palms of the hands. We report a case of a 59-year old woman who presented with worsening neurological symptoms of two-week duration, and later coma. The combined clinical, serological, and imaging studies suggested a diagnosis of PLE. A chest computed tomographic scan showed a 1.2 cm-diameter mass in the upper lobe of the left lung that was surgically removed and showed SCLC. Following surgery, neurological symptoms rapidly improved, allowing the patient to receive adjuvant chemotherapy. While in remission for both SCLC and PLE, the patient developed pain, soft-tissue swelling, and stiffness in both palms, suggesting the diagnosis of PFPAS. Five months following the diagnosis of palmar fasciitis, SCLC relapsed with mediastinal and cervical lymphadenopathy. This case report underlines the continuous interaction of SCLC with the immune system, expressed by coexistence of two rare paraneoplastic diseases, PLE, and PFPAS, in a patient with SCLC. While symptoms related to PLE preceded the initial diagnosis of SCLC, other symptoms related to PFPAS preceded relapse.

  7. Two paraneoplastic autoimmune syndromes: limbic encephalitis and palmar fasciitis in a patient with small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Lazarev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Small cell lung cancer (SCLC is characterized by a relatively high rate of autoimmune phenomena. Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis (PLE is an autoimmune syndrome in which a non-neural tumor containing an antigen normally present in the nervous system precipitates an antibody attack on neural tissues. Patients with PLE usually present with rapidly progressive short-term memory deficits, confusion or even dementia. Palmar fasciitis and polyarthritis syndrome (PFPAS is another autoimmune syndrome characterized by rheumatologic manifestations, especially involving the palms of the hands. We report a case of a 59-year old woman who presented with worsening neurological symptoms of two-week duration, and later coma. The combined clinical, serological, and imaging studies suggested a diagnosis of PLE. A chest computed tomographic scan showed a 1.2 cm-diameter mass in the upper lobe of the left lung that was surgically removed and showed SCLC. Following surgery, neurological symptoms rapidly improved, allowing the patient to receive adjuvant chemotherapy. While in remission for both SCLC and PLE, the patient developed pain, soft-tissue swelling, and stiffness in both palms, suggesting the diagnosis of PFPAS. Five months following the diagnosis of palmar fasciitis, SCLC relapsed with mediastinal and cervical lymphadenopathy. This case report underlines the continuous interaction of SCLC with the immune system, expressed by coexistence of two rare paraneoplastic diseases, PLE, and PFPAS, in a patient with SCLC. While symptoms related to PLE preceded the initial diagnosis of SCLC, other symptoms related to PFPAS preceded relapse.

  8. Treatment with sirolimus results in complete responses in patients with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teachey, David T.; Greiner, Robert; Seif, Alix; Attiyeh, Edward; Bleesing, Jack; Choi, John; Manno, Catherine; Rappaport, Eric; Schwabe, Dirk; Sheen, Cecilia; Sullivan, Kathleen E.; Zhuang, Hongming; Wechsler, Daniel S.; Grupp, Stephan A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary We hypothesized that sirolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, may be effective in patients with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) and treated patients who were intolerant to or failed other therapies. Four patients were treated for autoimmune cytopenias; all had a rapid complete or near complete response. Two patients were treated for autoimmune arthritis and colitis, demonstrating marked improvement. Three patients had complete resolution of lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly and all patients had a reduction in double negative T cells, a population hallmark of the disease. Based on these significant responses, we recommend that sirolimus be considered as second-line therapy for patients with steroid-refractory disease. PMID:19208097

  9. Diagnosis and Management of the Overlap Syndromes of Autoimmune Hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert J Czaja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Autoimmune hepatitis may have cholestatic features that are outside the classical phenotype and that resemble findings in other immune-mediated liver diseases. These cholestatic phenotypes have been designated ‘overlap syndromes’.

  10. Airway Autoimmune Inflammatory Response (AAIR) Syndrome: An Asthma-Autoimmune Overlap Disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Chantal Y; Millman, Jennifer; Veiga, Keila; Vicencio, Alfin G

    2018-02-15

    Asthma encompasses numerous phenotypes that may require alternate approaches to diagnosis and therapy, particularly for patients whose symptoms remain poorly controlled despite escalating treatment. We describe 3 patients with apparent asthma who demonstrated unusual findings on cryobiopsy by flexible bronchoscopy and responded to therapy directed against autoimmune disease. Copyright © 2018 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  11. Primary Biliary Cirrhosis-Related Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: Three Case Reports and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Tian

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The association between primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC and autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA is uncommon; only fourteen such case reports have been described. In this report, three patients who developed AIHA on the basis of PBC underwent successful therapy with corticosteroids and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA. Patient 3 was more complicated, suffering from PBC, Evans syndrome, Sjögren syndrome and Klinefelter syndrome simultaneously. This has not previously been reported in the world literature. Review of all fifteen cases showed that there is a prominent occurrence sequence that AIHA might take place on the basis of PBC. With sufficient doses of corticosteroids or immunosuppressant therapy, besides hemolysis under effective control, liver function also improved. According to the criteria of secondary AIHA, we may call them PBC-related AIHA. Thus, patients with PBC with serum bilirubin levels rising suddenly should undergo screening for associated hemolysis. Recommended treatment for PBC-related AIHA includes sufficient doses of corticosteroids to control the hemolysis in the acute phase, and immunosuppressant or adequate dose of UDCA to maintain therapy. These case reports have been increasing in recent years, so further reserch is needed to illustrate the incidence and natural courses of these two organ-specific autoimmune diseases.

  12. Insulin autoimmune syndrome induced by methimazole in a Korean girl with Graves' disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Hee Lee

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypoglycemia was detected in a 15-year-old girl due to loss of consciousness. She was diagnosed with Graves' disease and was being treated with methimazole for the past 4 months. A paradoxically increased insulin levels was found when she suffered from the hypoglycemic episode. An imaging study showed no mass lesion in the pancreas, and insulin antibodies were found in the serum. She was diagnosed with insulin autoimmune syndrome. Her HLA typing was performed, and it revealed HLA-DRB1 *04:06. The patient was treated with a corticosteroid for 2 months. After discontinuing the steroid, the insulin antibody titer decreased dramatically, and she did not have any episode of hypoglycemia since. This is the first report of insulin autoimmune syndrome in a Korean girl, and we have revealed the connection between HLA type and insulin autoimmune syndrome in Korea.

  13. Severe hypoglycaemia in a person with insulin autoimmune syndrome accompanied by insulin receptor anomaly type B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, T; Itoh, M; Hanashita, J; Itoi, T; Matsumoto, T; Ono, Y; Imamura, S; Hayakawa, N; Suzuki, A; Mizutani, Y; Uchigata, Y; Oda, N

    2007-11-01

    A rare case of the insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS) accompanied by insulin receptor anomaly is reported. Antibodies to insulin and insulin receptor were determined in the patient with severe hypoglycaemia before and after the treatment with prednisolone. Titers of antibody to insulin and insulin receptors were 73.0% and 41.5%, respectively. Drug-induced lymphocyte stimulation tests were all negative for the suspicious drugs. Her HLA-DR was DRB1*0403/04051. Following steroid therapy, the formation of antibodies was suppressed and alleviated her symptoms. Scatchard analysis yielded findings specific to polyclonal antibodies. The changes in autoantibodies resulted in alleviation of the hypoglycemic symptoms as a result of steroid therapy.

  14. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome and non-Hodgkin lymphoma: what 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography can do in the management of these patients? Suggestions from a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cistaro, A; Pazè, F; Durando, S; Cogoni, M; Faletti, R; Vesco, S; Vallero, S; Quartuccio, N; Treglia, G; Ramenghi, U

    2014-01-01

    A young patient with undefined autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS-U) and low back pain underwent a CT and MRI study that showed enhancing vertebral lesions, some pulmonary nodules and diffuse latero-cervical lymphadenopathy. A (18)F-FDG-PET/CT scan showed many areas of intense (18)F-FDG uptake in multiple vertebrae, in some ribs, in the sacrum, in the liver, in both lungs, in multiple lymph nodes spread in the cervical, thoracic and abdominal chains. A bone marrow biopsy showed a "lymphomatoid granulomatosis", a rare variant of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). After the treatment, the (18)F-FDG-PET/CT scan showed a complete metabolic response. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  15. Pulmonary autoimmunity as a feature of autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 and identification of KCNRG as a bronchial autoantigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimohammadi, Mohammad; Dubois, Noémie; Sköldberg, Filip; Hallgren, Asa; Tardivel, Isabelle; Hedstrand, Håkan; Haavik, Jan; Husebye, Eystein S; Gustafsson, Jan; Rorsman, Fredrik; Meloni, Antonella; Janson, Christer; Vialettes, Bernard; Kajosaari, Merja; Egner, William; Sargur, Ravishankar; Pontén, Fredrik; Amoura, Zahir; Grimfeld, Alain; De Luca, Filippo; Betterle, Corrado; Perheentupa, Jaakko; Kämpe, Olle; Carel, Jean-Claude

    2009-03-17

    Patients with autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1) suffer from multiple organ-specific autoimmunity with autoantibodies against target tissue-specific autoantigens. Endocrine and nonendocrine organs such as skin, hair follicles, and liver are targeted by the immune system. Despite sporadic observations of pulmonary symptoms among APS-1 patients, an autoimmune mechanism for pulmonary involvement has not been elucidated. We report here on a subset of APS-1 patients with respiratory symptoms. Eight patients with pulmonary involvement were identified. Severe airway obstruction was found in 4 patients, leading to death in 2. Immunoscreening of a cDNA library using serum samples from a patient with APS-1 and obstructive respiratory symptoms identified a putative potassium channel regulator (KCNRG) as a pulmonary autoantigen. Reactivity to recombinant KCNRG was assessed in 110 APS-1 patients by using immunoprecipitation. Autoantibodies to KCNRG were present in 7 of the 8 patients with respiratory symptoms, but in only 1 of 102 APS-1 patients without respiratory symptoms. Expression of KCNRG messenger RNA and protein was found to be predominantly restricted to the epithelial cells of terminal bronchioles. Autoantibodies to KCNRG, a protein mainly expressed in bronchial epithelium, are strongly associated with pulmonary involvement in APS-1. These findings may facilitate the recognition, diagnosis, characterization, and understanding of the pulmonary manifestations of APS-1.

  16. Transplantation of autoimmune potential. IV. Reversal of the NZB autoimmune syndrome by bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morton, J.I.; Siegel, B.V.

    1979-01-01

    The results of the present experiments support the concept of an etiology of autoimmune disease predicated upon innate properties of the hemopoietic stem cell and its differentiated lymphocytic progeny, independent of the host internal environment. It was concluded earlier that the NZB mouse strain possessed an enlarged compartment of cyclically active stem cells, providing an etiological basis for the development of autoimmune disease. Conceivably, a rapidly cycling stem cell population could randomly generate excessive numbers of lymphocytic progeny. Autoantibody formation would represent, then, a manifestation of the consequent hyperresponsiveness to immunological stimuli, both foreign and autologous. Alternatively, there may exist a parallel defect in the homeostatic regulation of both stem cell and immunocyte populations, attributable to either a defect in a shared regulator mechanism or to an unusually high threshold of these cells in response to negative feedback signals

  17. Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity and Autoimmunity. A Case Report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Isasi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction, objective: To present a case report in which the finding of non-coeliac gluten sensitivity was decisive for the treatment of a complex autoimmune disease. Materials and methods: A 43-year-old woman with polyarthritis, psoriatic features, anti-SSA/Ro and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies, with refractory course, was evaluated for gluten sensitivity despite negative serology for coeliac disease. Results: The patient carried the HLA DQ2 haplotype and duodenal biopsy showed lymphocytic enteritis. A gluten-free diet resolved the clinical picture and permitted tapering of immunosuppressive therapy. Conclusion: Non-coeliac gluten sensitivity can be associated with autoimmunity despite the absence of the specific autoantibodies of coeliac disease.

  18. Autoimmune features caused by dengue fever: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Leonardo Fontes Jardim

    Full Text Available Dengue virus is the most important mosquito-borne viral disease in the world. Co-circulation of the four types of dengue viruses and expansion of dengue epidemic gave rise to infection enhancement and a big expansion of clinical aspects of the disease. Herein we report a case of a 25-year-old white woman with dengue fever and numerous associated autoimmune features. Our patient had proteinuria, an extensive right pleural effusion, a thin pericardial effusion and ascites. She had a low C3 level and positive antinuclear antibody; cryoglobulins were also positive. The numerous autoimmune features of this patient were a diagnostic challenge, since she was a young woman and could be easily mistaken for a rheumatologic patient in a newly open disease. Dengue infection probably was a triggering event causing an abnormal immune response. Therefore, dengue should be suspected in patients with hematological disorders and autoimmune features in endemic regions or those who have travelled to those regions.

  19. Thyrotropin-secreting pituitary adenoma in an 11-year-old boy with type 1 autoimmune polyglandular syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazerkina, Nadia; Trunin, Yuri; Gorelyshev, Sergey; Golanov, Andrey; Kadashev, Boris; Shishkina, Liudmila; Rotin, Daniil; Karmanov, Maxim; Orlova, Elizabet

    2016-02-01

    Thyrotropinomas (TSHomas) are rare pituitary adenomas, particularly in childhood. We present here the case of an 11-year-old boy with type 1 autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS1) and TSHoma which was diagnosed by elevated thyroid - stimulating hormone and thyroid hormones levels without evident clinical signs of hyperthyroidism. He was underwent partial resection of the tumor via transsphenoidal approach and subsequently radiation therapy. Consequently, 1 year after radiotherapy, the patient developed growth hormone deficiency, three and half years after radiation became euthyroid, and five and half years after treatment - hypothyroid. This is the first case of the coexistence of these two rare endocrine diseases in one patient.

  20. [Myasthenia gravis, Graves-Basedow disease and other autoimmune diseases in patient with diabetes type 1 - APS-3 case report, therapeutic complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenczar, Karolina; Deja, Grażyna; Kalina-Faska, Barbara; Jarosz-Chobot, Przemysława

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes type 1(T1D) is the most frequent form of diabetes in children and young people, which essence is autoimmune destruction of pancreatic B cells islet. Co-occurrence of other autoimmune diseases is observed in children with T1D, the most often are: Hashimoto disease or coeliac disease. We report the case of the patient, who presents coincidence of T1D with other rare autoimmune diseases such as: Graves - Basedow disease, myasthenia gravis, vitiligo and IgA deficiency. All mentioned diseases significantly complicated both endocrine and diabetic treatment of our patient and they negatively contributed her quality of life. The clinical picture of the case allows to recognize one of the autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes: APS-3 and is associated with still high risk of developing another autoimmune disease. © Polish Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology.

  1. COEXISTENCE OF ADDISON'S DISEASE AND PERNICIOUS ANEMIA: IS THE NEW CLASSIFICATION OF AUTOIMMUNE POLYGLANDULAR SYNDROME APPROPRIATE?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrkljan, Ana Marija; Pašalić, Ante; Strinović, Mateja; Perić, Božidar; Kruljac, Ivan; Miroševć, Gorana

    2015-06-01

    A case of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS) is presented. A 45-year-old man was admitted due to fatigue, malaise and inappetence. He had a history of primary hypothyroidism and was on levothyroxine substitution therapy. One year before, he was diagnosed with normocytic anemia and vitamin B12 deficiency, which was treated with vitamin B12 substitution therapy. Physical examination revealed hypotension and marked hyperpigmentation. Laboratory testing showed hyponatremia, hyperkaliemia and severe normocytic anemia. Endocrinological evaluation disclosed low morning cortisol and increased adrenocorticotropic hormone levels. Hence, the diagnosis of Addison's disease was established. Additional laboratory workup showed positive parietal cell antibodies. However, his vitamin B12 levels were increased due to vitamin B12 supplementation therapy, which was initiated earlier. Gastroscopy and histopathology of gastric mucosa confirmed atrophic gastritis. Based on prior low serum vitamin B12 levels, positive parietal cell antibodies and atrophic gastritis, the patient was diagnosed with pernicious anemia. Hydrocortisone supplementation therapy was administered and titrated according to urinary-free cortisol levels. Electrolyte disbalance and red blood cell count were normalized. This case report demonstrates rather unique features of pernicious anemia in a patient with Addison's disease. It also highlights the link between type II and type III APS. Not only do they share the same etiological factors, but also overlap in pathophysiological and clinical characteristics. This case report favors older classification of APS, which consolidates all endocrine and other organ-specific autoimmune diseases into one category. This is important since it might help avoid pitfalls in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with APS.

  2. Development of lymphoma in Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS) and its relationship to Fas gene mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poppema, Sibrand; Maggio, Ewerton; van den Berg, Anke

    Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS) is generally the result of a mutation in genes associated with apoptosis, like Fas, Fas ligand, Casp 8 and Casp 10. As a result, the normal homeostasis of T- and B-lymphocytes is disturbed and a proliferation of polyclonal T lymphocytes occurs. This

  3. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia, as part of Evans' syndrome, caused by cold reactive IgG autoantibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaarsma, AS; Muis, N; DeGraaf, SSN

    1996-01-01

    We describe a boy with Evans' syndrome, consisting of immune thrombocytopenic purpura at age 2 and autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) at age 4. AIHA was caused by cold Ige autoantibodies. This is unusual because AIHA is generally associated with either warm IgG antibodies or cold IgM antibodies.

  4. Sjögren syndrome and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder co-exist in a common autoimmune milieu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo C. Carvalho

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between Sjögren’s syndrome (SS and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD is not completely understood. We report two patients with both conditions and review 47 other previously reported cases meeting currently accepted diagnostic criteria, from 17 articles extracted from PubMed. Out of 44 patients whose gender was informed, 42 were females. Mean age at onset of neurological manifestation was 36.2 years (10-74. Serum anti-AQP4-IgG was positive in 32 patients, borderline in 1, and negative in 4. Our Case 1 was seronegative for AQP4-IgG and had no non-organ-specific autoantibodies other than anti-SSB antibodies. Our Case 2 had serum anti-AQP4, anti-SSA/SSB, anti-thyreoglobulin and anti-acethylcholine-receptor antibodies, as well as clinical hypothyreoidism, but no evidence of myasthenia gravis. Our Cases and others, as previously reported in literature, with similar heterogeneous autoimmune response to aquaporin-4, suggest that SS and NMO co-exist in a common autoimmune milieu which is not dependent on aquaporin-4 autoimmunity.

  5. Kleine–Levin Syndrome: A case report

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    Taís Figueiredo de Araújo Lima

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Kleine–Levin Syndrome is a differential diagnosis for patients with diurnal excessive sleepiness and a suspicion of narcolepsy. It is characterized by paroxysmal attacks of diurnal excessive sleepiness, associated with one or more symptoms of hyperphagia, hypersexuality, coprolalia and copropraxia. During crisis intervals, there are no symptoms. This pathology predominantly manifests itself in teenagers, being more frequent among males. The course of this disease is unpredictable, with variable duration and frequency. The most accepted physiopathology is that of a hypothalamic dysfunction, although and recently, there has appeared a hypothesis of a post-infectious autoimmune disorder. These patients show an elevated body mass index, which can predispose to association with comorbidities such as the sleep obstructive apnea syndrome. Treatment involves medications with different effects, but there is no specific and effective therapy. Our article shows a classic case of Kleine–Levin Syndrome associated with sleep obstructive apnea syndrome, a rare association in the literature.

  6. New splice site acceptor mutation in AIRE gene in autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireia Mora

    Full Text Available Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 (APS-1, OMIM 240300 is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, characterized by the presence of at least two of three major diseases: hypoparathyroidism, Addison's disease, and chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis. We aim to identify the molecular defects and investigate the clinical and mutational characteristics in an index case and other members of a consanguineous family. We identified a novel homozygous mutation in the splice site acceptor (SSA of intron 5 (c.653-1G>A in two siblings with different clinical outcomes of APS-1. Coding DNA sequencing revealed that this AIRE mutation potentially compromised the recognition of the constitutive SSA of intron 5, splicing upstream onto a nearby cryptic SSA in intron 5. Surprisingly, the use of an alternative SSA entails the uncovering of a cryptic donor splice site in exon 5. This new transcript generates a truncated protein (p.A214fs67X containing the first 213 amino acids and followed by 68 aberrant amino acids. The mutation affects the proper splicing, not only at the acceptor but also at the donor splice site, highlighting the complexity of recognizing suitable splicing sites and the importance of sequencing the intron-exon junctions for a more precise molecular diagnosis and correct genetic counseling. As both siblings were carrying the same mutation but exhibited a different APS-1 onset, and one of the brothers was not clinically diagnosed, our finding highlights the possibility to suspect mutations in the AIRE gene in cases of childhood chronic candidiasis and/or hypoparathyroidism otherwise unexplained, especially when the phenotype is associated with other autoimmune diseases.

  7. The immunobiology and clinical features of type 1 autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Can-Jie; Leung, Patrick S C; Zhang, Weici; Ma, Xiong; Gershwin, M Eric

    2018-01-01

    Autoimmune Polyglandular Syndrome type 1 (APS-1) is a subtype of the autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome characterized by the simultaneous or sequential dysfunction of multiple endocrine or non-endocrine glands. A clinical diagnosis of APS-1 is typically based on the presence of at least two of three following criteria: chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism and adrenal insufficiency. The first identified causative mutated gene for APS-1 is autoimmune regulator (AIRE) encoding a critical transcription factor, which is primarily expressed in the medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) for generating central immune tolerance. A wide range of chronic, debilitating complications, with no obvious correlation with genetics, makes a diagnosis of APS-1 challenging early in the disease course. Managing APS-1 is difficult due to its complexity, especially the intricate relationships within manifestations and genetic mutations. The past decades have witnessed dramatic progress in elucidating the function of AIRE and conducting large-scale cohort studies in APS-1. However, no clear evidence-based guidelines have been established in APS-1. In this review, we provide a detailed critical overview of the study history, epidemiology, clinical features, and related mechanisms of autoimmunity in APS-1, as well as currently available therapies for this autoimmune disorder. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Addison's disease in a patient with hypothyroidism: autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Anna; Stewart, Munro; Mwamure, Peter; Nirmalaraj, Kingsley

    2015-08-03

    A 57-year-old Caucasian woman with known autoimmune hypothyroidism diagnosed in 2006 presented to hospital with flu-like symptoms and circulatory collapse. She reported weight loss and gradual increase in her skin pigmentation over a 1-year period. Aggressive fluid resuscitation was instituted. Hormonal tests showed primary adrenal insufficiency. Appropriate steroid replacement was started with rapid clinical response. Subsequent antibody tests confirmed the diagnosis of autoimmune polyglandular type 2 (Schmidt's) syndrome. The adrenal crisis had been precipitated by influenza virus type B infection. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  9. Remission of insulin autoimmune syndrome in a patient with Grave's disease by treatment with methimazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, R; Inaba, M; Hosoi, M; Ishimura, E; Kumeda, Y; Nishizawa, Y; Morii, H

    1999-06-01

    The patient, a 24-year-old man, had suffered from hunger, sweating, tachycardia and palpitation for three years. He was diagnosed as having Graves' disease (GD) and treated with methimazole (MMI) for 3 months. He noted that palpitation and perspiration seemed to particularly occur when he was hungry, and thus he was examined to determine whether these symptoms were caused by hypoglycemia. As a markedly elevated immunoreactive insulin level and the presence of insulin antibody in serum were found, he was diagnosed as having insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS). HLA typing revealed the patient to be positive for group Bw62/Cw4/DR4, which is reportedly a specific HLA type in MMI-treated euthyoroid GD patients with IAS. In spite of the continuation of MMI treatment, the % binding of IRI decreased and the hypoglycemic episode disappeared. In contrast to the previously reported MMI induced IAS in GD cases, MMI is unlikely to have exacerbated IAS in the present case, although his HLA combination is identical to that of the previous cases.

  10. A case of recurrent autoimmune hemolytic anemia during remission associated with acute pure red cell aplasia and hemophagocytic syndrome due to human parvovirus B19 infection successfully treated by steroid pulse therapy with a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Yasunobu; Shimada, Asami; Imai, Hidenori; Wakabayashi, Mutsumi; Sugimoto, Keiji; Nakamura, Noriko; Sawada, Tomohiro; Komatsu, Norio; Noguchi, Masaaki

    2014-01-01

    The patient was a 47-year-old man diagnosed as having autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) in April 2011. He also had a congenital chromosomal abnormality, a balanced translocation. Treatment with prednisolone (PSL) 60 mg/day resulted in resolution of the AIHA, and the treatment was completed in November 2011. While the patient no longer had anemia, the direct and indirect Coombs tests remained positive. In May 2013, he developed recurrent AIHA associated with acute pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) and hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) caused by human parvovirus B19 (HPV B19) infection. Tests for anti-erythropoietin and anti-erythropoietin receptor antibodies were positive. Steroid pulse therapy resulted in resolution of the AIHA, PRCA, as well as HPS. The serum test for anti-erythropoietin antibodies also became negative after the treatment. However, although the serum was positive for anti-HPV B19 IgG antibodies, the patient continued to have a low CD4 lymphocyte count (CD4, B19 infection (HPV B19 DNA remained positive), suggesting the risk of recurrence and bone marrow failure.

  11. Results of steroid-based therapy for the hepatitis C-autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiano, T D; Te, H S; Thomas, R M; Hussain, H; Bond, K; Black, M

    2001-10-01

    Overlap syndromes in which persons manifest clinical, histological, or immunological features of both hepatitis C infection and autoimmune hepatitis are well described. The discordant forms of treatment for hepatitis C and autoimmune hepatitis have made medical management of these patients difficult. We report our experience in using corticosteroids as first line therapy for the hepatitis C-autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome. Seven patients with this overlap syndrome (diagnosis based on the presence of serum hepatitis C antibody by RIBA and serum hepatitis C RNA by polymerase chain reaction, and serum hypergammaglobulinemia, elevated ANA or ASMA titers, or histological findings consistent with autoimmune hepatitis) were treated with prednisone with or without azathioprine or cyclosporine, and followed for a median duration of 44.5 months. Five patients (71%) showed improvement of median serum ALT level from 162 U/L to 38 U/L (p = 0.04) and median serum gamma-globulin from 2.1 g/dl to 1.4 g/dl (p = 0.04) by 6 months of therapy. The mean modified histological activity index score also decreased from 11.4 +/- 2.5 to 6.6 +/- 2.6 (p = 0.04) by at least 1 yr of therapy. One patient discontinued prednisone while taking azathioprine and experienced a rebound elevation of serum ALT that did not respond to retreatment with prednisone. Antiviral therapy was subsequently administered and resulted in biochemical and virologic response. Hepatitis C virus RNA remained detectable in all other patients. Corticosteroids are beneficial as a first line therapy for some patients with the hepatitis C-autoimmune overlap syndrome, resulting in appreciable biochemical and histological response but without viral eradication.

  12. Immune dysregulation, Polyendocrinopathy, Enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX syndrome: a paradigm of immunodeficiency with autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica eBarzaghi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Immune dysregulation, Polyendocrinopathy, Enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX syndrome is a rare monogenic primary immunodeficiency (PID due to mutations of FOXP3, a key transcription factor for naturally occurring (n regulatory T (Treg cells. The dysfunction of Treg cells is the main pathogenic event leading to the multi-organ autoimmunity that characterizes IPEX syndrome, a paradigm of genetically determined PID with autoimmunity. IPEX has a severe early onset and can become rapidly fatal within the first year of life regardless of the type and site of the mutation. The initial presenting symptoms are severe enteritis and/or type 1 diabetes mellitus, alone or in combination with eczema and elevated serum IgE. Other autoimmune symptoms, such as hypothyroidism, cytopenia, hepatitis, nephropathy, arthritis, and alopecia, can develop in patients who survive the initial acute phase.The current therapeutic options for IPEX patients are limited. Supportive and replacement therapies combined with pharmacological immunosuppression are required to control symptoms at onset. However, these procedures can allow only a reduction of the clinical manifestations without a permanent control of the disease. The only known effective cure for IPEX syndrome is haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, but it is always limited by the availability of a suitable donor and the lack of specific guidelines for bone marrow transplant in the context of this disease.This review aims to summarize the clinical histories and genomic mutations of the IPEX patients described in the literature to date. We will focus on the clinical and immunological features that allow differential diagnosis of IPEX syndrome and distinguish it from other PID with autoimmunity. The efficacy of the current therapies will be reviewed, and possible innovative approaches, based on the latest highlights of the pathogenesis to treat this severe primary autoimmune disease of childhood, will be discussed.

  13. Mills’ syndrome: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Henrique de Gobbi Porto, Fábio; Orsini, Marco; Antônio Araújo Leite, Marco; Moreira dos Santos, José; Pulier, Soraia; Mello, Mariana; Nascimento, Osvaldo J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The syndrome of progressive, ascending or descending hemiplegia, with no significant sensory impairment was first describes by Mills in 1900, which several cases were reported later. However after diagnostic tests and image improvements, the number of reports has shortened. A possible explanation for this shortage is the identification of other diseases that could mimic the clinical picture. Currently, the syndrome has an uncertain nosological status, since it was described based on clinical ...

  14. A case of autoimmune haemolytic anaemia after 39 cycles of nivolumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Hira; Daboul, Nour; Albrethsen, Mary; Fazal, Salman

    2018-04-18

    With growing use of nivolumab, rare but serious side effects have surfaced in some patients. We present a case of autoimmune haemolytic anaemia that developed after 39 cycles of nivolumab. A 78-year-old man with metastatic lung adenocarcinoma, refractory to multiple lines of chemotherapy was switched to nivolumab. After around 2 years of stable course on nivolumab, he developed transfusion-dependent anaemia with haemoglobin of 8.6 g/dL. Nivolumab was held immediately. Bone marrow biopsy findings were inconclusive of myelodysplastic syndrome. Further testing was suggestive of haemolysis with haptoglobin <10 mg/dL, elevated reticulocyte count and identification of immunoglobulin G antibody. Haemoglobin improved significantly with initiation of 1 mg/kg prednisone in addition to rituximab weekly × four doses. The development of transfusion-dependent anaemia with the exposure to cytotoxic chemotherapy usually raises the question for myelodysplastic syndrome. In contradiction, our patient was diagnosed to have a haematological autoimmune complication related to immunotherapy. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. A case of severe autoimmune hepatitis associated with Graves' disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia Abdulla Bokhari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Graves' disease is a common condition and is known to have a wide range of effects on a variety of organs. Hepatic dysfunction ranging from mild to severe due to direct effect of high circulating thyroid hormones as well as a deleterious effect of antithyroid medications (methimazole and propylthiouracil has been well - documented in literature. However, severe autoimmune hepatitis (AIH associated with Graves' disease is rare and limited to few case reports only. A 38-year-old woman presented with abdominal pain and yellowish discolouration of conjunctivae. On investigation, she was found to have Graves' disease and AIH. The liver histopathology showed typical features of AIH. She responded excellently to glucocorticoid therapy with normalisation of thyroid function and liver histology. The case is discussed with relevant literature review.

  16. IgG4-related disease in autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Ven, Annick A J M; Seidl, Maximilian; Drendel, Vanessa; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Voll, Reinhard E; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Speckmann, Carsten; Ehl, Stephan; Warnatz, Klaus; Kollert, Florian

    2017-07-01

    A patient with autoimmune lymphoproliferative disorder (ALPS) developed IgG4-related disease. In retrospect, he had high levels of serum IgG4 for several years prior to presenting with IgG4-related pancreatitis. These high IgG4 levels were masked by hypergammaglobulinemia, a common feature of ALPS. We next screened 18 ALPS patients; four of them displayed increased levels of IgG4. Hence, IgG4-related disease should be considered in ALPS patients, especially in those manifesting lymphocytic organ infiltration or excessive hypergammaglobulinaemia. Screening of IgG4-related disease patients for ALPS-associated mutations would provide further information on whether this disease could be a late-onset atypical presentation of ALPS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Clinical case of acute renal failure revealing an autoimmune hypothyroidism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montasser, Dina Ibrahim; Hassani, Mohamed; Zajjari, Yassir; Bahadi, Abdelali; Alayoud, Ahmed; Hamzi, Amine; Hassani, Kawtar; Moujoud, Omar; Asseraji, Mohamed; Kadiri, Moncif; Aatif, Taoufik; El Kabbaj, Driss; Benyahia, Mohamed; Allam, Mustapha; Akhmouch, Ismail; Oualim, Zouhir

    2010-04-01

    Although the clinic picture is often indicative of muscle manifestations in patients with hypothyroidism, signs and symptoms of this condition are variable from simple elevation of serum muscle enzymes with myalgia, muscle weakness, cramps to rhabdomyolysis with acute renal failure which remains a rare event. Thyroid hormones affect the function of almost every body organ, and thyroid dysfunction produces a wide range of metabolic disturbances. Hypothyroidism is associated with significant effects on the kidney which the pathophysiology seems to be multifactorial, but the exact mechanisms remain poorly understood. Hypothyroidism as a cause of renal impairment is usually overlooked, leading to unnecessary diagnostic procedures. The main objective of our observation is to report a case of acute renal failure revealing an autoimmune hypothyroidism in which thyroid hormone substitution led to a significant improvement in muscular, thyroid and renal disorders. Copyright 2010 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Autoimmune thyroiditis perdating the presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus: Two cases and a review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhir Rajeev

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases are commonly encountered in dermatology practice. While the association of two autoimmune diseases in the same individual is not unknown, it is relatively rare for the second disease to be suspected based on cutaneous manifestations. We present two such cases wherein cutaneous manifestations were the first clue to the development of lupus erythematosus in a setting of autoimmune thyroiditis. Further, we have reviewed literature on this uncommon occurrence and discuss various aspects of this association.

  19. Expanding spectrum of contactin-associated protein 2 (CASPR2) autoimmunity-syndrome of parkinsonism and ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannoth, Sudheeran; Nambiar, Vivek; Gopinath, Siby; Anandakuttan, Anandkumar; Mathai, Annamma; Rajan, Parvathy Kanjiramana

    2018-03-01

    Contactin-associated protein 2 (CASPR2) antibodies are originally associated with Morvan's syndrome and peripheral nerve hyper excitability. Our objective was to study retrospectively the clinical spectrum of CASPR2 antibody-positive patients in our hospital. This is a retrospective observational study. Patients treated at the Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences from May 2013 to April 2016, who were tested positive for CASPR2 antibodies, were included. A total of 1584 samples were tested in the neuroimmunology laboratory during the study period for voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex antibodies-leucine-rich glioma-inactivated protein 1 (LGI1) and CASPR2 antibodies. Thirty-four were positive for LGI1, 13 were positive for CASPR2, and 7 were for both (total 54-3.4% positivity). Of these 54 cases, 11 were treated in our hospital. Seven were positive for LGI1, three for CASPR2, and one for both. The patient who had both CASPR2 and LGI1 antibody positive had Morvan's syndrome. One patient with CASPR2 had neuromyotonia. The other patient was admitted with status epilepticus with a syndrome of parkinsonism and ataxia. The third patient had encephalopathy and myoclonus with a syndrome of parkinsonism and ataxia. Two of them underwent siddha treatment for other ailments prior to the onset of the disease for other ailments. Our short series shows the expanding spectrum of CASPR2 autoimmunity. Syndrome of parkinsonism and ataxia is an important manifestation of CASPR2 autoimmunity where we can offer a definitive treatment.

  20. Lowe syndrome: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Bahor

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Lowe syndrome is a rare X-linked multisystemic disorder, caused by mutation of the OCRL gene which encodes OCRL-1 protein. The disease is characterized by the triad of congenital cataracts, intellectual disability, and Fanconi-like proximal renal tubular dysfunction. Lifespan is short due to end-stage renal disease and other earlier complications and it rarely exceeds 40 years. The treatment is symptomatic, aimed at improving the clinical evolution of the patients and postpone the onset of terminal renal disease. The paper describes a case of a boy with Lowe syndrome with a novel genetic mutation.

  1. Does Autoimmunity have a Role in Myoclonic Astatic Epilepsy? A Case Report of Voltage Gated Potassium Channel Mediated Seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirsi, Deepa; Dolce, Alison; Greenberg, Benjamin M; Thodeson, Drew

    2016-01-01

    There is expanding knowledge about the phenotypic variability of patients with voltage gated potassium channel complex (VGKC) antibody mediated neurologic disorders. The phenotypes are diverse and involve disorders of the central and peripheral nervous systems. The central nervous system manifestations described in the literature include limbic encephalitis, status epilepticus, and acute encephalitis. We report a 4.5 year-old boy who presented with intractable Myoclonic Astatic Epilepsy (MAE) or Doose syndrome and positive VGKC antibodies in serum. Treatment with steroids led to resolution of seizures and electrographic normalization. This case widens the spectrum of etiologies for MAE to include autoimmunity, in particular VGKC auto-antibodies and CNS inflammation, as a primary or contributing factor. There is an evolving understanding of voltage gated potassium channel complex mediated autoimmunity in children and the role of inflammation and autoimmunity in MAE and other intractable pediatric epilepsy syndromes remains to be fully defined. A high index of suspicion is required for diagnosis and appropriate management of antibody mediated epilepsy syndromes.

  2. Boerhaave syndrome - case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Radovanovic Dinic

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT CONTEXT: Boerhaave syndrome consists of spontaneous longitudinal transmural rupture of the esophagus, usually in its distal part. It generally develops during or after persistent vomiting as a consequence of a sudden increase in intraluminal pressure in the esophagus. It is extremely rare in clinical practice. In 50% of the cases, it is manifested by Mackler's triad: vomiting, lower thoracic pain and subcutaneous emphysema. Hematemesis is an uncommon yet challenging presentation of Boerhaave's syndrome. Compared with ruptures of other parts of the digestive tract, spontaneous rupture is characterized by a higher mortality rate. CASE REPORT: This paper presents a 64-year-old female patient whose vomit was black four days before examination and became bloody on the day of the examination. Her symptoms included epigastric pain and suffocation. Physical examination showed hypotension, tachycardia, dyspnea and a swollen and painful abdomen. Auscultation showed lateral crackling sounds on inspiration. Ultrasound examination showed a distended stomach filled with fluid. Over 1000 ml of fresh blood was extracted by means of nasogastric suction. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy was discontinued immediately upon entering the proximal esophagus, where a large amount of fresh blood was observed. The patient was sent for emergency abdominal surgery, during which she died. An autopsy established a diagnosis of Boerhaave syndrome and ulceration in the duodenal bulb. CONCLUSION: Boerhaave syndrome should be considered in all cases with a combination of gastrointestinal symptoms (especially epigastric pain and vomiting and pulmonary signs and symptoms (especially suffocation.

  3. Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis: Case report with history of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis (APD) is a rare autoimmune response to raised endogenous progesterone levels that occur during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Cutaneous, mucosal lesions and other systemic manifestations develop cyclically during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle when ...

  4. Case report: waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumayas, Grace Lea; Capó-Aponte, José E

    2015-03-01

    A case of Waardenburg syndrome type 1 is described and relevant literature is reviewed to raise awareness about this rare syndrome, including the classification of each subtype and the differentiating clinical manifestations. A 44-year-old African-American female presented for a routine evaluation with hearing loss, dystopia canthorum (W index = 2.74), and almost complete gray hair. In addition, she presented with heterochromia irides, different fundus pigmentation between eyes. The patient did not have any upper limbs defect, cranial skeletal abnormalities, or intestinal disorders. Facial abnormalities and a white forelock are prominent features difficult to overlook during a routine ophthalmological examination. A careful medical history in patients with suspected Waardenburg syndrome is important to accurately classify this rare condition and to identify potential systemic implications associated to each subtype. The associated systemic complications can be addressed and managed through referral to the appropriate subspecialties. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  5. An Autoimmune Myositis-Overlap Syndrome Associated With Autoantibodies to Nuclear Pore Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senécal, Jean-Luc; Isabelle, Catherine; Fritzler, Marvin J.; Targoff, Ira N.; Goldstein, Rose; Gagné, Michel; Raynauld, Jean-Pierre; Joyal, France; Troyanov, Yves; Dabauvalle, Marie-Christine

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune myositis encompasses various myositis-overlap syndromes, each being identified by the presence of serum marker autoantibodies. We describe a novel myositis-overlap syndrome in 4 patients characterized by the presence of a unique immunologic marker, autoantibodies to nuclear pore complexes. The clinical phenotype was characterized by prominent myositis in association with erosive, anti-CCP, and rheumatoid factor-positive arthritis, trigeminal neuralgia, mild interstitial lung disease, Raynaud phenomenon, and weight loss. The myositis was typically chronic, relapsing, and refractory to corticosteroids alone, but remitted with the addition of a second immunomodulating drug. There was no clinical or laboratory evidence for liver disease. The prognosis was good with 100% long-term survival (mean follow-up 19.5 yr). By indirect immunofluorescence on HEp-2 cells, sera from all 4 patients displayed a high titer of antinuclear autoantibodies (ANA) with a distinct punctate peripheral (rim) fluorescent pattern of the nuclear envelope characteristic of nuclear pore complexes. Reactivity with nuclear pore complexes was confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy. In a cohort of 100 French Canadian patients with autoimmune myositis, the nuclear pore complex fluorescent ANA pattern was restricted to these 4 patients (4%). It was not observed in sera from 393 adult patients with systemic sclerosis (n = 112), mixed connective tissue disease (n = 35), systemic lupus (n = 94), rheumatoid arthritis (n = 45), or other rheumatic diseases (n = 107), nor was it observed in 62 normal adults. Autoantibodies to nuclear pore complexes were predominantly of IgG isotype. No other IgG autoantibody markers for defined connective tissue diseases or overlap syndromes were present, indicating a selective and highly focused immune response. In 3 patients, anti-nuclear pore complex autoantibody titers varied in parallel with myositis activity, suggesting a pathogenic

  6. Anesthetic management of a patient with stiff-person syndrome and thymoma: a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Xiang; WANG Dong-xin; WU Xin-min

    2006-01-01

    @@ Stiff-person syndrome (SPS, also called stiff-man syndrome) is a rare neurological disease with autoimmune features. It is characterized by fluctuating and progressive muscle rigidity, and episodic spasm that prominently involve axial and limb musculature.1,2 Herein we report a case of anesthetic management of a patient with SPS for thymectomy and review several other cases.

  7. Deterioration of autoimmune condition associated with repeated injection of dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuto Suda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 6-year-old girl underwent ureterocystoneostomy (UCN because of left flank pain due to delayed onset of ureteral stenosis one and a half years after endoscopic dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer (Deflux injection for the treatment of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR. Histopathological examination indicated chronic inflammation with abundant eosinophils characteristic of a reaction to Deflux. Several autoimmune diseases developed during the treatment for ureteral stenosis. First, 2 weeks prior to the onset of left flank pain, she was diagnosed as having systemic lupus erythematosus. Finally, she died of pulmonary hemorrhage due to thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura 4 months after UCN. The fatal outcome in this case was suspected to be caused by autoimmune syndrome induced by adjuvants, which in this case was the hyaluronic acid polymer injected into the ureteric orifice for the treatment of VUR.

  8. A rare association of localized scleroderma type morphea, vitiligo, autoimmune hypothyroidism, pneumonitis, autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura and central nervous system vasculitis. Case report.

    OpenAIRE

    Bonilla Abadía, Fabio; Muñoz Buitrón, Evelyn; Ochoa, Carlos D.; Carrascal, Edwin; Cañas Dávila, Carlos Alberto

    2012-01-01

    The localized scleroderma (LS) known as morphea, presents a variety of clinical manifestations that can include systemic involvement. Current classification schemes divide morphea into categories based solely on cutaneous morphology, without reference to systemic disease or autoimmune phenomena. This classification is likely incomplete. Autoimmune phenomena such as vitiligo and Hashimoto thyroiditis associated with LS have been reported in some cases suggesting an autoimmune basis. To our kno...

  9. Pregnancy and Evans´ syndrome: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Artucio

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Evans´ syndrome is the coexistence of autoimmune thrombocytopenia with autoimmune hemolytic anemia. It is rarely found during the course of a pregnancy. This makes treatment options more difficult, since some therapeutic drugs are teratogenic. The effects of Evans´ syndrome in the fetus and newborn are unknown given the low number of reported cases. We report the case of a patient with preconceptional diagnosis of Evans´ syndrome, who develops a hemolytic crisis during the course of a pregnancy, and diagnosis of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR, treated at Clínica Ginecotocológica “A” at the Pereira Rossell Hospital Center, in Montevideo, Uruguay. Treatment options and evolution are analyzed, as well as previous reports.

  10. Genetic and immunologic aspects of autoimmune poliendocrine syndrome type I: review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Rachel Bandeira de Araújo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndrome type 1 (APS-1, also known as candidiasis ectodermal-autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-dystrophy (APECED, it is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator gene (AIRE. Therefore, it is immunologically characterized by cell attack and / or antibodymediated generating the destruction of target organs. Furthermore, it is characterized by the pathognomonic triad chronic candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism and Addison's disease with many other endocrine and non-endocrine events. Soon, the diagnosis is made based on the presence of two of the three classic features and treatment aims to control the numerous deficiencies that patients may present. This literature review was aimed at understanding the involvement of AIRE gene in relation to immunological aspects present and, consequently, clinical manifestations of this disease. Thus, evidence of the need to broaden the discussion about this disease, in order to improve the quality of life of patients by early diagnosis and treatment and are in accordance with the clinical manifestations of each patient. Thereby, qualitative research involved scientific articles from electronic journals LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean, SCIELO (Scientific Electronic Library Online and NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information, between the years 2009 and 2016. Pursuant to, there is the relevance of this review, it is noted that, although the authors converge on views on this syndrome, there are still many unclear matters with regard to the mechanisms of the disease. This highlights the need to promote more discussion on this topic.

  11. Association of polycystic ovary syndrome and Graves′ disease: Is autoimmunity the link between the two diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobia Nisar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is a common endocrinopathy of women of child-bearing age. Although some studies have suggested an association between PCOS and autoimmune thyroiditis, to our knowledge, only a few cases indicating association between PCOS and Graves′ disease are reported. Objective: We aim to describe this first case series of six women presenting with PCOS and Graves′ disease together. Materials and Methods: Women attending the endocrinology clinic at a tertiary care centre in north India and fulfilling the AE-PCOS criteria for diagnosis of PCOS were studied using a predefined proforma for any clinical, biochemical and imaging features of Graves′ disease. Results: The series consisted of six women with a mean age of 27.5 years and menarche as 12.6 years. All women were lean with mean BMI of 22.73 kg / m 2 and three out of six had waist circumference <80 cm. The mean FG score of subjects was 16.66 and average total testosterone was 77.02 ng / dl (25.0-119.64. All the patients had suppressed TSH, the average being 0.052 μIU/ml (0.01-0.15. Thyroid gland was enlarged in all clinically and on ultrasonography and imaging with 99m Tc and/or RAIU revealed diffuse increased uptake. Conclusions: The association of a rare disorder like Graves′ disease with a relatively common disorder like PCOS is unlikely to be because of a chance alone and may point to a common aetiopathogenic linkage leaving a scope for molecular characterization.

  12. Hepatopulmonary syndrome: a case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huurnink, Arnold

    2015-01-01

    Huurnink A, Van den Berg CHSB, Booij J. Hepatopulmonary syndrome: a case report. Hepatopulmonary syndrome is characterised by a lowered oxygenation caused by intrapulmonary vascular dilatation in the setting of a liver disease. We present a case of a 42-year old woman with a Budd-Chiari syndrome,

  13. Cronkhite-Canada Syndrome (CCS)-A Rare Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Subrata

    2015-03-01

    Cronkhite-Canada syndrome (CCS) is an extremely rare non-inherited condition characterized by gastrointestinal hamartomatous polyposis, alopecia, onychodystrophy, hyperpigmentation, weight loss and diarrhoea. The aetiology is probably autoimmune and diagnosis is based on history, physical examination, endoscopic findings of gastrointestinal polyposis, and histology. The disease is very rare; approximately 450 cases of CCS have been reported worldwide. The author reports a case of CCS in an elderly Indian male.

  14. Vaccines, adjuvants and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Luísa Eça; Baker, Britain; Perricone, Carlo; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-10-01

    Vaccines and autoimmunity are linked fields. Vaccine efficacy is based on whether host immune response against an antigen can elicit a memory T-cell response over time. Although the described side effects thus far have been mostly transient and acute, vaccines are able to elicit the immune system towards an autoimmune reaction. The diagnosis of a definite autoimmune disease and the occurrence of fatal outcome post-vaccination have been less frequently reported. Since vaccines are given to previously healthy hosts, who may have never developed the disease had they not been immunized, adverse events should be carefully accessed and evaluated even if they represent a limited number of occurrences. In this review of the literature, there is evidence of vaccine-induced autoimmunity and adjuvant-induced autoimmunity in both experimental models as well as human patients. Adjuvants and infectious agents may exert their immune-enhancing effects through various functional activities, encompassed by the adjuvant effect. These mechanisms are shared by different conditions triggered by adjuvants leading to the autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA syndrome). In conclusion, there are several case reports of autoimmune diseases following vaccines, however, due to the limited number of cases, the different classifications of symptoms and the long latency period of the diseases, every attempt for an epidemiological study has so far failed to deliver a connection. Despite this, efforts to unveil the connection between the triggering of the immune system by adjuvants and the development of autoimmune conditions should be undertaken. Vaccinomics is a field that may bring to light novel customized, personalized treatment approaches in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A unique combination of autoimmune limbic encephalitis, type 1 diabetes, and Stiff person syndrome associated with GAD-65 antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Mohan Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies to GAD-65 have been implicated in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes , limbic encephalitis and Stiff person syndrome, however these diseases rarely occur concurrently. We intend to present a rare case of 35 year old female who was recently diagnosed as having type 1 diabetes presented with 1½ month history of recurrent seizures, subacute onset gait ataxia, dysathria, psychiatric disturbance and cognitive decline. No tumor was found on imaging and the classic paraneoplastic panel was negative. Cerebrospinal fluid and blood was positive for GAD-65 antibodies.Patient showed significant improvement with immunomodulatory therapy. Association of GAD-65 antibodies has been found with various disorders including type 1 diabetes, limbic encephalitis, Stiff person syndrome,cerebellar ataxia and palatal myoclonus.This case presents with unique combination of type 1 diabetes, Stiff person syndrome and limbic encephalitis associated with GAD-65 antibodies that is responsive to immunotherapy. It also highlights the emerging concept of autoimmunity in the causation of various disorders and there associations.

  16. Insulin gene polymorphisms in type 1 diabetes, Addison's disease and the polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hahner Stefanie

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphisms within the insulin gene can influence insulin expression in the pancreas and especially in the thymus, where self-antigens are processed, shaping the T cell repertoire into selftolerance, a process that protects from β-cell autoimmunity. Methods We investigated the role of the -2221Msp(C/T and -23HphI(A/T polymorphisms within the insulin gene in patients with a monoglandular autoimmune endocrine disease [patients with isolated type 1 diabetes (T1D, n = 317, Addison's disease (AD, n = 107 or Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT, n = 61], those with a polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type II (combination of T1D and/or AD with HT or GD, n = 62 as well as in healthy controls (HC, n = 275. Results T1D patients carried significantly more often the homozygous genotype "CC" -2221Msp(C/T and "AA" -23HphI(A/T polymorphisms than the HC (78.5% vs. 66.2%, p = 0.0027 and 75.4% vs. 52.4%, p = 3.7 × 10-8, respectively. The distribution of insulin gene polymorphisms did not show significant differences between patients with AD, HT, or APS-II and HC. Conclusion We demonstrate that the allele "C" of the -2221Msp(C/T and "A" -23HphI(A/T insulin gene polymorphisms confer susceptibility to T1D but not to isolated AD, HT or as a part of the APS-II.

  17. Apert Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Gharib

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Apert syndrome is a genetic defect which was first described by Eugene Apert in 1906. it's incidence is approximately one in 50000 births. This syndrome is many abnormalities in your body and Central Nervous System. rehabilitation can increase children and their parent's quality of life.We report a case of Apert syndrome and his occupational therapy program.

  18. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 (APS-3) among patients with premature ovarian insufficiency (POI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szlendak-Sauer, Katarzyna; Jakubik, Daniel; Kunicki, Michał; Skórska, Jolanta; Smolarczyk, Roman

    2016-08-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 - (APS-3), is defined as the coexistence of autoimmune thyroiditis with other non-ovarian autoimmune diseases without primary adrenal insufficiency. Additionally the definition of APS-3 also includes primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) coexistence with autoimmune thyroiditis. The main goal of that study is to assess the prevalence of APS-3 defined as coexistence of autoimmune thyroiditis with POI in population of 46 XX karyotype women with primary ovarian insufficiency (POI). The second goal is to investigate hormonal profile and insulin sensitivity in women with POI and subgroups of women with APS-3 - POI/APS-3(+) and without APS 3 - POI/APS-3(-). Anthropometric measurements, coexistence of autoimmune diseases, androgens, fasting glucose and insulin, glucose and insulin at 60' and 120' of oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and homeostasis model for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), were determine in 98 patients aged between 18 and 39 with spontaneous 46 XX primary ovarian insufficiency (POI), in 33 POI/APS-3(+), 65 POI/APS-3(-), and 75 healthy controls. Continuous data were summarized by the mean±standard deviation (SD), and categorical data by number (percentages). Data were checked for normality using Shapiro-Wilk test, the comparison between groups were performed using non-parametric Mann-Whitney or Kruskall-Wallis test. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to assess the relationships between parameters. Statistical significance was defined as p values APS-3(+) and POI/APS-3(-) showed significantly lower serum androgens in comparison to controls. Additionally women with POI/APS-3(+) showed hyperinsulinemia after 1h of OGTT; No significant differences in serum fasting glucose, insulin and during 2h OGTT between groups were observed. The prevalence of APS-3 is 33.7% in patients with spontaneous 46 XX primary ovarian insufficiency. Women with POI, POI/APS-3(+) and POI/APS-3(-) feature lower testosterone, androstendione

  19. Bertolotti's syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Raj; Carlisle, Mark

    2009-01-01

    A case report and literature review is presented. To review relevant data for the management of Bertolotti's syndrome and to determine whether the transverse process-ilium articulation may be a pain generator. Bertolotti's syndrome is associated with axial low back pain secondary to arthritic changes; the pain generator in the disorder is unclear. We present a case report of symptomatic Bertolotti's syndrome managed with intra-articular steroid injections. A patient with Bertolotti's syndrome had significant relief of axial pain after steroid injection of the ilium-transverse process articulation. Steroid therapy may be a non-surgical alternative for the treatment of symptomatic Bertolotti's syndrome.

  20. A case with atrophic autoimmune thyroiditis-related hypothyroidism causing multisystem involvement in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnaz, Erdal; Savaş-Erdeve, Şenay; Keskin, Melikşah; Doğan, Vehbi; Çetinkaya, Semra; Aycan, Zehra

    2016-01-01

    The most common reason of acquired hypothyroidism is autoimmune (Hashimoto) thyroiditis. Autoimmune thyroiditis can be atrophic or goitrogenic. Atrophic autoimmune thyroiditis (ATT) related acquired hypothyroidism causes interruption of growth, obesity, and bone age retardation in early ages while goitrogenic thyroiditis has a higher incidence rate and mostly presents with diffuse goiter. We discuss the effects of hypothyroidism on various systems through a case found to have pericardial effusion during the echocardiography performed after cardiac murmur was detected and later diagnosed with ATT related hypothyroidism.

  1. Autoimmune hepatitis in HIV: Case report | Kamau | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present a middle aged lady positive HIV who developed liver disease one year after initiation of anti-retroviral therapy (ART). Laboratory and histo pathology finding supported a diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). She responded well to immuno-suppressive therapy and is currently doing well on maintenance ...

  2. The first childhood case with coexisting Hashimoto thyroiditis, vitiligo and autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Melikşah; Savaş-Erdeve, Şenay; Özbay-Hoşnut, Ferda; Kurnaz, Erdal; Çetinkaya, Semra; Aycan, Zehra

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) is the most common pediatric autoimmune endocrine disorder. It results in autoimmune-mediated thyroid gland destruction and is an organ-specific, typical autoimmune disease. The presence of antithyroid antibodies and the typical pattern on ultrasonography indicate the diagnosis. It is also frequently seen together with other autoimmune disorders including type 1 insulin-dependent diabetes, celiac disease, alopecia and vitiligo. Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic type of liver injury with an immune etiology that can frequently cause end-stage liver disease if left untreated. Autoimmune hepatitis patients may present with hepatitis, and the laboratory tests in the absence of other etiology usually reveal a positive immune serology together with elevated immunoglobulins and abnormal liver histology. It is interesting that HT and AIH are rarely seen together although both have an autoimmune etiology. 14-year-old male who was being followed-up for vitiligo presented with symptoms of a swelling at the neck and fatigue. He was diagnosed with HT after the tests and the liver enzymes were found to be high. The patient was also diagnosed with AIH after tests revealed that the liver enzyme elevation had continued for longer than six months. The thyroid functions and liver enzymes returned to normal and the symptoms decreased after sodium L-thyroxine replacement together with steroid and azathioprine treatment. We present this case as we believe it is the first pediatric patient diagnosed with HT, AIH and vitiligo.

  3. A Longitudinal Follow-up of Autoimmune Polyendocrine Syndrome Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruserud, Øyvind; Oftedal, Bergithe E.; Landegren, Nils; Erichsen, Martina M.; Bratland, Eirik; Lima, Kari; Jørgensen, Anders P.; Myhre, Anne G.; Svartberg, Johan; Fougner, Kristian J.; Bakke, Åsne; Nedrebø, Bjørn G.; Mella, Bjarne; Breivik, Lars; Viken, Marte K.; Knappskog, Per M.; Marthinussen, Mihaela C.; Løvås, Kristian; Kämpe, Olle; Wolff, Anette B.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS1) is a childhood-onset monogenic disease defined by the presence of two of the three major components: hypoparathyroidism, primary adrenocortical insufficiency, and chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC). Information on longitudinal follow-up of APS1 is sparse. Objective: To describe the phenotypes of APS1 and correlate the clinical features with autoantibody profiles and autoimmune regulator (AIRE) mutations during extended follow-up (1996–2016). Patients: All known Norwegian patients with APS1. Results: Fifty-two patients from 34 families were identified. The majority presented with one of the major disease components during childhood. Enamel hypoplasia, hypoparathyroidism, and CMC were the most frequent components. With age, most patients presented three to five disease manifestations, although some had milder phenotypes diagnosed in adulthood. Fifteen of the patients died during follow-up (median age at death, 34 years) or were deceased siblings with a high probability of undisclosed APS1. All except three had interferon-ω) autoantibodies, and all had organ-specific autoantibodies. The most common AIRE mutation was c.967_979del13, found in homozygosity in 15 patients. A mild phenotype was associated with the splice mutation c.879+1G>A. Primary adrenocortical insufficiency and type 1 diabetes were associated with protective human leucocyte antigen genotypes. Conclusions: Multiple presumable autoimmune manifestations, in particular hypoparathyroidism, CMC, and enamel hypoplasia, should prompt further diagnostic workup using autoantibody analyses (eg, interferon-ω) and AIRE sequencing to reveal APS1, even in adults. Treatment is complicated, and mortality is high. Structured follow-up should be performed in a specialized center. PMID:27253668

  4. A new animal model of spontaneous autoimmune peripheral polyneuropathy: implications for Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mu; Rainone, Anthony; Shi, Xiang Qun; Fournier, Sylvie; Zhang, Ji

    2014-01-08

    Spontaneous autoimmune peripheral neuropathy including Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) represents as one of the serious emergencies in neurology. Although pathological changes have been well documented, molecular and cellular mechanisms of GBS are still under-explored, partially due to short of appropriate animal models. The field lacks of spontaneous and translatable models for mechanistic investigations. As GBS is preceded often by viral or bacterial infection, a condition can enhance co-stimulatory activity; we sought to investigate the critical role of T cell co-stimulation in this autoimmune disease. Our previous study reported that transgene-derived constitutive expression of co-stimulator B7.2 on antigen presenting cells of the nervous tissues drove spontaneous neurological disorders. Depletion of CD4+ T cells in L31 mice accelerated the onset and increased the prevalence of the disease. In the current study, we further demonstrated that L31/CD4-/- mice exhibited both motor and sensory deficits, including weakness and paresis of limbs, numbness to mechanical stimuli and hypersensitivity to thermal stimulation. Pathological changes were characterized by massive infiltration of macrophages and CD8+ T cells, demyelination and axonal damage in peripheral nerves, while changes in spinal cords could be secondary to the PNS damage. In symptomatic L31/CD4-/- mice, the disruption of the blood neural barriers was observed mainly in peripheral nerves. Interestingly, the infiltration of immune cells was initiated in pre-symptomatic L31/CD4-/- mice, prior to the disease onset, in the DRG and spinal roots where the blood nerve barrier is virtually absent. L31/CD4-/- mice mimic most parts of clinical and pathological signatures of GBS in human; thus providing an unconventional opportunity to experimentally explore the critical events that lead to spontaneous, autoimmune demyelinating disease of the peripheral nervous system.

  5. Gorlin syndrome: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil K

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited condition that exhibits high penetrance and variable expressivity. It is characterized mainly by Basal cell carcinomas, Odontogenic keratocysts and skeletal anomalies. However, medical literature documents both common and lesser known manifestations of the disorder involving the skin, central nervous system, skeletal system etc. Diagnosis of the syndrome in childhood is basically through oral abnormalities. A case of Gorlin syndrome has been reported here, with review of literature.

  6. Primary Sjögren′s syndrome without ocular involvement: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushar Phulambrikar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sjögren′s Syndrome (SS is a chronic systemic autoimmune disorder, characterized by the lymphocytic infiltration of lacrimal and salivary glands, giving rise to dry eyes (keratoconjunctivitis sicca and dry mouth (xerostomia. Primary Sjögren′s Syndrome commonly presents only with sicca manifestations; whereas, secondary Sjögren′s syndrome occurs in connection with other autoimmune rheumatic diseases. Primary Sjögren′s syndrome without ocular manifestation is rarely reported in the literature. Here we report a case of a 45-year-old female, who presented to us with complaints of dryness of mouth and dysphagia, without any ocular and systemic manifestations. On further evaluation she was diagnosed as a case of Primary Sjögren′s syndrome. With this case report, we intend to emphasize the importance of an early diagnosis of this disorder, along with a brief review of various diagnostic criteria.

  7. A functional alternative splicing mutation in AIRE gene causes autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyu Zhang

    Full Text Available Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1 is a rare autosomal recessive disease defined by the presence of two of the three conditions: mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and Addison's disease. Loss-of-function mutations of the autoimmune regulator (AIRE gene have been linked to APS-1. Here we report mutational analysis and functional characterization of an AIRE mutation in a consanguineous Chinese family with APS-1. All exons of the AIRE gene and adjacent exon-intron sequences were amplified by PCR and subsequently sequenced. We identified a homozygous missense AIRE mutation c.463G>A (p.Gly155Ser in two siblings with different clinical features of APS-1. In silico splice-site prediction and minigene analysis were carried out to study the potential pathological consequence. Minigene splicing analysis and subsequent cDNA sequencing revealed that the AIRE mutation potentially compromised the recognition of the splice donor of intron 3, causing alternative pre-mRNA splicing by intron 3 retention. Furthermore, the aberrant AIRE transcript was identified in a heterozygous carrier of the c.463G>A mutation. The aberrant intron 3-retaining transcript generated a truncated protein (p.G155fsX203 containing the first 154 AIRE amino acids and followed by 48 aberrant amino acids. Therefore, our study represents the first functional characterization of the alternatively spliced AIRE mutation that may explain the pathogenetic role in APS-1.

  8. Involvement of chronic epipharyngitis in autoimmune (auto-inflammatory) syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Osamu; Tanaka, Ayaki; Torigoe, Akira; Imai, Kazuaki; Ieiri, Norio

    2017-02-01

    The epipharynx is an immunologically active site even under normal conditions, and enhanced immunologic activation is prone to occur in response to an upper respiratory infection, air pollution, and possibly to vaccine adjuvants. Due to the potential link between the central nervous system and immune function, a relationship between epipharyngitis and autonomic nervous disturbance as well as autoimmune disease has been suggested. Various functional somatic symptoms have been described after human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination, although a causal relationship has not been established. We examined the epipharynx in young women showing functional somatic symptoms following HPV vaccination. Surprisingly, despite having minimal symptoms involving the pharynx, all patients were found to have severe epipharyngitis. In addition, significant improvement in symptoms was seen in most patients who underwent epipharyngeal treatment. Thus, we speculate that the chronic epipharyngitis potentially caused by the vaccine adjuvant may be involved in the pathogenesis of functional somatic syndrome (FSS) post-HPV vaccination. Further, we suggest that epipharyngeal treatment may be effective for various types of FSS regardless of the initial cause, as well as for some autoimmune diseases, and that this may be an important direction in future research.

  9. Severe hypoglycemia secondary to methimazole-induced insulin autoimmune syndrome in a 16 year old African-American male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez Cruz, Michelle J; Jabbar, Muhammad; Saini, Natinder; Eng, Donna; Crawford, Brandon; Vazquez, Delia M; Menon, Ram; Chen, Ming

    2012-12-01

    Insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS) or Hirata's disease is a rare disorder characterized by hypoglycemia secondary to insulin autoantibodies (IAb). Over 200 patients have been described from Japan with significantly less numbers being reported from outside the Orient. IAS is more common in patients older than 40 yr of age with reports in the pediatric age group being notably rarer. Exposure to sulfhydryl group containing medications is implicated in the pathogenesis of this syndrome. In this report, we describe a case of IAS in an African-American adolescent. A 16-yr-old healthy African-American male was diagnosed with Graves' disease and started on Methimazole. Four weeks later, he was found unconscious and hypoglycemic (blood sugar 1.5 mmol/L). Evaluation was negative for insulinoma. Insulin antibodies were positive. Oral glucose tolerance test revealed elevated free insulin concentrations with disproportionately elevated total insulin levels. The patient was started on prednisone, diazoxide, and propranolol for management of IAS and hyperthyroidism. Thyroid radio-ablation was subsequently undertaken. The doses of prednisone and diazoxide were tapered and these medications discontinued after 9 months. The insulin antibody levels decreased gradually and became undetectable in 6 months with resolution of the hypoglycemia. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease: Immune Biomarkers, Audiovestibular Aspects, and Therapeutic Modalities of Cogan’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oded Shamriz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cogan’s syndrome (CS is a rare autoimmune disorder characterized by audiovestibular dysfunction and ocular inflammation. Currently, there is no specific serum autoantibody used in the diagnostic workup of CS. Treatment is based on immunosuppressive agents, mainly corticosteroids as first-line choice. Recently, novel therapeutic modalities in CS have emerged. These include tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors and other biologicals. Despite medical treatment, hearing loss may progress to irreversible bilateral profound SNHL in approximately half of CS patients resulting in candidacy for cochlear implantation (CI. Due to the inflammatory nature of the disease that is causing endosteal reaction with partial obliteration or complete neoossification of the intracochlear ducts, early CI is recommended. CI provides excellent and stable hearing rehabilitation with high score of word and sentence recognition. In this review, we will discuss different aspects of CS including clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and future directives.

  11. Cricopharyngeal achalasia in connection with autoimmune disorders in a pre-adolescent patient: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urška Vučina

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cricopharyngeal achalasia is an uncommon cause of dysphagia, especially in children. Congenital form is known in neonates and infants. In older children this disease has been reported in very rare cases and mostly in connection with neurological and muscular diseases. We present a case of a 12-year-old girl with a four-year history of dysphagia. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy, radiological contrast swallow study and esophageal manometric study confrmed the diagnosis of cricopharyngeal achalasia. Te patient was successfully treated with dilatation of the upper esophageal sphincter. An initial attempt of dilatation appears to be a safe and effective option in the management of cricopharyngeal achalasia in children, and may prevent or at least postpone the need for myotomy. Following the diagnosis of cricopharyngeal achalasia, several autoimmune conditions were diagnosed. Our case report revealed that cricopharyngeal achalasia may occur in association with some other autoimmune conditions, and that autoimmunity may also play a role in cricopharyngeal achalasia itself

  12. A CASE OF METABOLIC SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    Khoo Ee Ming; Rabia Khatoon

    2006-01-01

    This case report illustrates a 40-year-old woman who presented with chest discomfort that was subsequently diagnosed to have metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is a common condition associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. As primary care providers, we should be detect this condition early, intervene and prevent appropriately before complications occur.

  13. Autoimmune diseases in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirosh, Amir; Mandel, Dror; Mimouni, Francis B; Zimlichman, Eyal; Shochat, Tzippora; Kochba, Ilan

    2006-06-20

    Previous research has suggested an inverse relationship between T-helper 2-related atopic disorders, such as asthma, and T-helper 1-related autoimmune diseases. One controversial hypothesis postulates that asthma provides a protective effect for the development of autoimmune-related disorders. To assess the rate of newly diagnosed autoimmune disorders in a large cohort of young adults. Using cross-sectional data from the Israeli Defense Force database, the authors analyzed the prevalence of autoimmune disorders in asthmatic and nonasthmatic military personnel between 1980 and 2003. A follow-up study traced newly diagnosed autoimmune disorders among asthmatic and nonasthmatic individuals from the time of enrollment in military service until discharge (22 and 36 months for women and men, respectively). General community. 307,367 male and 181,474 female soldiers in compulsory military service who were between 18 and 21 years of age. Cases of type 1 diabetes mellitus, vasculitis, immune thrombocytopenic purpura, inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and the antiphospholipid syndrome. Of 488,841 participants at enrollment, significantly more women than men had autoimmune disorders. Compared with asthmatic women, nonasthmatic women had a significantly higher prevalence of all autoimmune disorders except for the antiphospholipid syndrome. Type 1 diabetes mellitus, vasculitis, and rheumatoid arthritis were less prevalent in men with asthma than in those without. During the follow-up period, vasculitis and rheumatoid arthritis were more frequently diagnosed in nonasthmatic persons of both sexes. There was a significantly higher incidence of immune thrombocytopenic purpura, inflammatory bowel disease, and the antiphospholipid syndrome in nonasthmatic women and a statistically significantly higher incidence of type 1 diabetes mellitus in nonasthmatic men. The study was limited to a population of young military recruits; therefore, its findings are not necessarily

  14. Rare case of nephrotic syndrome: Schimke syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrosa, Anna Kelly Krislane de Vasconcelos; Torres, Luiz Fernando Oliveira; Silva, Ana Corina Brainer Amorim da; Dantas, Adrianna Barros Leal; Zuntini, Káthia Liliane da Cunha Ribeiro; Aguiar, Lia Cordeiro Bastos

    2016-01-01

    Schimke syndrome corresponds to dysplasia of bone and immunity, associated with progressive renal disease secondary to nephrotic syndrome cortico-resistant, with possible other abnormalities such as hypothyroidism and blond marrow aplasia. It is a rare genetic disorder, with few reports in the literature. The most frequent renal involvement is nephrotic syndrome with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and progressive renal failure. The objective of this study was to report a case of Schimke syndrome, diagnostic investigation and management of the case. Resumo A síndrome Schimke corresponde à displasia imuno-óssea, associada à doença renal progressiva secundária à síndrome nefrótica córtico-resistente, podendo haver outras anormalidades como hipotireoidismo e aplasia de medula óssea. Trata-se de uma patologia genética rara, com poucos relatos na literatura. O acometimento renal mais frequente é uma síndrome nefrótica por glomeruloesclerose segmentar e focal e falência renal progressiva. O objetivo deste estudo foi relatar um caso de síndrome de Schimke, investigação diagnóstica e condução do caso.

  15. A Case of Pasqualini Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.M. Liashuk

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a case of isolated congenital deficiency of luteinizing hormone (Pasqualini syndrome that manifested by secondary hypogonadism with abnormalities of copulative and fertile functions, which were normalized after the treatment using chorionic gonadotropin.

  16. A Japanese case of autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy (AAG) and a review of AAG cases in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Michiyuki; Ishii, Yuko

    2009-03-12

    A 29-year-old woman presented with acute, pure autonomic (both sympathetic and parasympathetic) failure and positive antibody to ganglionic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor; the diagnosis was autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy (AAG). She had typical symptoms of AAG, although the patient also had coughing episodes and psychiatric symptoms, which are not typical of AAG in Western countries but are common in AAG cases in Japan. In a review of the Japanese literature, 29 cases of AAG had been reported. AAG patients in Japan were younger and more male predominant than in Western countries. Of the patients in these 29 cases, 10 (34.5%) had coughing episodes and 12 (41.4%) had psychiatric symptoms.

  17. [Two cases of Costello syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuyama, Tatsuo; Matsuo, Muneaki; Kuno, Tateo; Kitsuki, Kyoko; Kan, Yuka; Ishii, Kiyohisa; Ohtani, Yoshinobu

    2003-01-01

    We report two unrelated cases of Costello syndrome, presenting with poor postnatal growth, mild mental retardation, poor feeding, curly hair, coarse characteristic face, loose skin, hypotonia, and cardiac involvement. Nasal papilloma and acanthosis nigricans were the most characteristic features of this syndrome. Both cases had atrial fibrilation from infancy to early childhood. One patient had hypertonia in the lower extremities and pes equinovarus, while the other had hypotonia and pes planovalgus.

  18. Atypical Manifestation of LPS-Responsive beige- like anchor (LRBA Deficiency Syndrome as an Autoimmune Endocrine Disorder without Enteropathy and Immunodeficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrzad Bakhtiar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Monogenic primary immunodeficiency syndromes can affect one or more endocrine organs by autoimmunity during childhood. Clinical manifestations include type1 diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, adrenal insufficiency and vitiligo. LPS-responsive beige-like anchor protein (LRBA deficiency was described in 2012 as a novel primary immunodeficiency, predominantly causing immune dysregulation and early onset enteropathy. We describe the heterogeneous clinical course of LRBA deficiency in two siblings, mimicking an autoimmune polyendocrine disorder in one of them in presence of the same underlying genetic mutation. The third child of consanguineous Egyptian parents (Patient 1 presented at six months of age with intractable enteropathy and failure to thrive. Later on he developed symptoms of adrenal insufficiency, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia, thrombocytopenia, and infectious complications due to immunosuppressive treatment. The severe enteropathy was non-responsive to the standard treatment and led to death at the age of 22 years. His younger sister (Patient 2 presented at the age of 12 to the endocrinology department with decompensated hypothyroidism, perioral vitiligo, delayed pubertal development, and growth failure without enteropathy and immunodeficiency.Using whole-exome sequencing (WES we identified a homozygous frameshift mutation (c.6862delT, p.Y2288MfsX29 in the LRBA gene in both siblings. To our knowledge our patient (patient 2 is the first case of LRBA deficiency described with predominant endocrine phenotype without immunodeficiency and enteropathy. LRBA deficiency should be considered as underlying disease in pediatric patients presenting with autoimmune endocrine symptoms. The same genetic mutation can manifest with a broad phenotypic spectrum without genotype-phenotype correlation. The awareness for disease symptoms among non-immunologists might be a key to early diagnosis. Further functional studies in LRBA deficiency are necessary to

  19. Meta-analysis of STAT4 and IFIH1 polymorphisms in type 1 diabetes mellitus patients with autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Azevêdo Silva, J; Tavares, N A C; Santos, M M S; Moura, R; Guimarães, R L; Araújo, J; Crovella, S; Brandão, L A C

    2015-12-22

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is an organ-specific autoimmune disease characterized by T-cell mediated self-destruction of insulin-producing β cells in the pancreas. T1D patients are prone to develop other glandular autoimmune disorders, such as autoimmune thyroid disease that occurs simultaneously with autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type III (APSIII). Signal transducer and activator of transcription 4 (STAT4) is a well-known regulator of proinflammatory cytokines, and interferon-induced with helicase C domain 1 (IFIH1) is activated in the interferon type I response. Both genes have been examined separately in autoimmune diseases and, in this study, we assessed their joint role in T1D and APSIII. We conducted a case-control study, enrolling 173 T1D patients and 191 healthy controls from northeastern Brazil, to assess the distribution of the rs7574865 and rs3024839 SNPs in STAT4 and the rs3747517 and rs1990760 SNPs in IFIH1 in T1D and APSIII patients. Additionally, we conducted a meta-analysis with the rs7574865 SNP in STAT4 (1392 T1D patients and 1629 controls) and the rs1990760 SNP in IFIH1 (25092 T1D patients and 28544 controls) to examine their association with T1D. Distribution of STAT4 and IFIH1 allelic frequencies did not show statistically significant differences between T1D patients and controls in our study population; however, the meta-analysis indicated that SNPs in STAT4 and IFIH1 are associated with T1D worldwide. Our findings indicate that although STAT4 and IFIH1 SNPs are not associated with T1D in a Brazilian population, they might play a role in susceptibility to T1D on a larger worldwide scale.

  20. Increased prevalence of autoimmune disorders and autoantibodies in parents of children with opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasenbrink, I; Fühlhuber, V; Juhasz-Boess, I; Stolz, E; Hahn, A; Kaps, M; Hero, B; Blaes, F

    2007-06-01

    Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) is a rare neurological disease in childhood which can be associated with neuroblastoma. Since autoantibodies have been detected in some patients with OMS, an autoimmune etiology is suspected. We compared the prevalence of autoimmune disorders and autoantibodies in parents of children with OMS and in a group of controls of same age and sex. Autoimmune diseases were found in 15.8% of the parents of OMS children, but only in 2.0% of the controls (pOMS parents (42.8% vs. 8.0%, pOMS parents also had significantly more autoantibodies against CNS structures than the controls (pOMS and may also hint to a genetic susceptibility for OMS.

  1. The use of rhG-CSF in chronic autoimmune neutropenia: reversal of autoimmune phenomena, a case history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, T. W.; de Haas, M.; de Groot, C. J.; von dem Borne, A. E.; Weening, R. S.

    1996-01-01

    An 8-year-old boy had been suffering from chronic autoimmune neutropenia for more than 5 years. The neutropenia proved to be resistant to high-dose steroids and intravenous (either low-or high-dose) immunoglobulin (Ig) therapy. The chronic autoimmune thrombocytopenia and recurrent phases of

  2. Pediatric Sjogren syndrome with distal renal tubular acidosis and autoimmune hypothyroidism: an uncommon association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Amit; Kumar, Pradeep; Gupta, Nomeeta

    2015-11-01

    A 14-year-old female came with the history of sudden onset weakness; during work up, she was found to have hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis with normal anion gap and normal renal function suggesting the possibility of renal tubular acidosis (RTA). On further evaluation of RTA, she had positive antinuclear antibody, anti-Ro, and anti-La antibodies. On nuclear scan of salivary glands, her left parotid gland was nonfunctional. Her parotid biopsy revealed dilated interlobular ducts engulfed by lymphoid cells. She also had autoimmune hypothyroidism as suggested by raised TSH and positive anti-TPO antibodies. At admission, her serum potassium levels were low and she was treated with intravenous potassium chloride. After she recovered from acute hypokalemic paralysis, she was started on oral potassium citrate along with phosphate supplements, hydroxychloroquine, oral prednisolone and thyroxine supplements. Over the next 6 months, she has significant reduction in the dosage of potassium, bicarbonate and phosphate and gained 3 kg of weight and 3.5 cm of height. As primary Sjogren syndrome itself is rare in pediatric population and its association with renal tubular acidosis is even rarer, we suggest considering Sjogren syndrome as a differential diagnosis during the RTA work-up is worth trying.

  3. Presumed Isotretinoin-Induced, Concomitant Autoimmune Thyroid Disease and Ocular Myasthenia Gravis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Gursoy

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are many adverse effects that have been described for isotretinoin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a possible association of oral isotretinoin intake with autoimmune thyroiditis and ocular myasthenia gravis (OMG. Case Presentation: A 19-year-old Caucasian male, who had used oral isotretinoin for severe acne disease for the previous six months, was referred to our clinic. He had a three-week history of diplopia and variable bilateral ptosis. Physical examination showed moderate periorbital edema and limitations of up- and down-gaze in the left eye. Laboratory findings and thyroid ultrasound were consistent with autoimmune thyroiditis. Antithyroid therapy did not relieve the clinical symptoms. Concomitant OMG was suspected. Variable ptosis and a positive response to oral prednisolone of 40 mg/day and pyridostigmine of 360 mg/day supported the diagnosis of concomitant autoimmune thyroiditis and OMG. Conclusion: Autoimmune disorders may be triggered by oral isotretinoin treatment. Clinicians prescribing isotretinoin should be aware of the possible association between isotretinoin intake and concomitant autoimmune thyroiditis and OMG.

  4. Isaacs' syndrome in a patient with dermatomyositis: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lertnawapan, Ratchaya; Kulkantrakorn, Kongkiat

    2017-08-01

    This is a case report of Isaacs' syndrome in dermatomyositis. The patient presented with proximal muscle weakness, rash, elevated muscle enzyme, myopathic electromyograph and typical muscle biopsy. Ultimately he developed typical symptoms of Isaacs' syndrome which is an autoimmune channelopathy from voltage gated potassium channel antibody (anti-VGKC) leading to dysfunction of axonal discharge at neuromuscular junctions. It shares some similar characteristics with dermatomyositis such as autoimmunity, its association with malignancy and the response to treatment. © 2016 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Leucine-rich glioma inactivated-1 and voltage gated potassium channel autoimmune encephalitis associated with ischemic stroke; A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Patryce McGinley

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune encephalitis is associated with a wide variety of antibodies and clinical presentations. Voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC antibodies are a cause of autoimmune non-paraneoplastic encephalitis characterized by memory impairment, psychiatric symptoms, and seizures. We present a case of VGKC encephalitis likely preceding an ischemic stroke. Reports of autoimmune encephalitis associated with ischemic stroke are rare. Several hypothesizes linking these two disease processes are proposed.

  6. Waardenburg syndrome: A rare case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivlal M Rawlani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Waardenburg Syndrome is a rare disorder of neural crest cell development. It is genetically inherited. Varying in prevalence from 1:42000 to 1:50,000, it compromises approximately 2-5% of congenital deaf children. The syndrome is not expressed in its complete form, in about 20% cases, which adds for its heterogenisity . Even among people affected in the same family,the features do vary. Unilateral heterochromia that manifests as lighter pigmentation of one iris is associated with Waardenburg syndrome and Parry-Romberg syndrome and less commonly with Hirschsprung disease. A case of ten yrs. old boy with a typical facial profile and hearing loss is reported.

  7. Two cases of Cantrell's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Yun Jeong; Yeon, Kyung Mo

    1982-01-01

    Congenital absence of the lower sternum, defect of the abdominal wall, defects of the anterior diaphragm, pericardial defects and cardiac anomalies had been described as a syndrome by Cantrell et al. Developing mechanism of the syndrome was embryologically defined. These defects arise apparently from combined anomalies of developing of the dorsal mesoderm. The authors present two cases of Cantrell's syndrome developed in one day old and eight months old female patient in which angiocardiography was done at the Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital

  8. [Usher syndrome: about a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoudi, Chama; Boutimzine, Noureddine; Haouzi, Samia El; Lezrek, Omar; Tachfouti, Samira; Lezrek, Mounir; Laghmari, Mina; Daoudi, Rajae

    2017-01-01

    Usher syndrome is a genetic disease resulting in double sensory deprivation (auditory and visual) called deafblindness. We report the case of a 50-year old patient, born to consanguineous parents, presenting with congenital deafness associated with normal vestibular function and pigmentary retinopathy responsible for decreased bilateral visual acuity occurred at the age of 16 years. This association composes Usher syndrome type 2, a rare autosomal recessive disorder. Cataract surgery allowed visual acuity improvement in this patient.

  9. Autoimmune diseases of the liver and biliary tract and overlap syndromes in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggiore, G; Riva, S; Sciveres, M

    2009-03-01

    infiltration and destruction) and/or lesions suggesting chronic cholangitis as well (bile duct paucity and/or proliferation, periductal sclerosis). Small bile ducts damage may be associated, at onset or in the following years, with lesions of larger bile ducts with duct wall irregularities, strictures, dilations, and beading resulting in the characteristic ''bead-on-a-string'' appearance. The ''small duct'' (autoimmune) sclerosing cholangitis is also called autoimmune cholangitis. PSC is strictly associated to a particular form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) which shows features not typical of ulcerative colitis neither of Crohn's disease. Symptoms related to IBD often are present at onset (abdominal pain, weight loss, bloody stools) but the liver disease is frequently asymptomatic and it may be discovered fortuitously. Treatment of PSC is particularly challenging. In case of ''small duct'' SC or in case of evidence active inflammation on liver biopsy, immunosuppressive treatment is probably useful while in case of large bile ducts non inflammatory sclerosis, immunosuppression is probably uneffective. Ursodeoxycholic acid, however, may leads to an improvement of liver biochemistry even if there's no evidence that it may alter the course of disease. Thus, liver transplantation, is often necessary in the long term follow-up, even with a risk of disease recurrence. In adjunction to these two main disorders, many patients show an''overlap'' disease with features of both AIH and PSC. In such disorders the immune-mediated damage concerns both the hepatocyte and the cholangiocyte with a continuous clinical spectrum from AIH with minimal bile ducts lesions and PSC with portal inflammation and active inflammatory liver damage.

  10. A Case of Pancreatic Cancer in the Setting of Autoimmune Pancreatitis with Nondiagnostic Serum Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manju D. Chandrasegaram

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP often mimics pancreatic cancer. The diagnosis of both conditions is difficult preoperatively let alone when they coexist. Several reports have been published describing pancreatic cancer in the setting of AIP. Case Report. The case of a 53-year-old man who presented with abdominal pain, jaundice, and radiological features of autoimmune pancreatitis, with a “sausage-shaped” pancreas and bulky pancreatic head with portal vein impingement, is presented. He had a normal serum IgG4 and only mildly elevated Ca-19.9. Initial endoscopic ultrasound-(EUS- guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA of the pancreas revealed an inflammatory sclerosing process only. A repeat EUS guided biopsy following biliary decompression demonstrated both malignancy and features of autoimmune pancreatitis. At laparotomy, a uniformly hard, bulky pancreas was found with no sonographically definable mass. A total pancreatectomy with portal vein resection and reconstruction was performed. Histology revealed adenosquamous carcinoma of the pancreatic head and autoimmune pancreatitis and squamous metaplasia in the remaining pancreas. Conclusion. This case highlights the diagnostic and management difficulties in a patient with pancreatic cancer in the setting of serum IgG4-negative, Type 2 AIP.

  11. A case of autoimmune cholangitis misdiagnosed for cholangiocarcinoma: How to avoid unnecessary surgical intervention?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignjatović Igor I.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Autoimmune cholangitis or immunoglobulin G4-associated cholangitis (IAC has been recently regarded as a new clinical and histopathological entity and is a part of a complex autoimmune disorder - IgG4-related systemic disease (ISD. ISD is an autoimmune disease with multi-organic involvement, characterized with IgG4-positive plasmocytic infiltration of various tissues and organs with a consequent sclerosis, which responds well to steroid therapy. Most commonly affected organs are the pancreas (autoimmune pancreatitis, [AIP] and the common bile duct (IAC. IAC and cholangiocarcinoma (CCA share many clinical, laboratory and imaging findings. Case Outline. We present a case of a 60-year-old male with a biliary stricture of a common bile duct, which was clinically considered as a bile duct carcinoma and treated surgically. Definite histopathological findings and immunohistochemistry revealed profound chronic inflammation, showing lymphoplasmacytic IgG-positive infiltration of a resected part of a common bile duct, highly suggestive for the diagnosis of IAC. In addition, postoperative IgG4 serum levels were also increased. Conclusion. It is of primary clinical importance to make a difference between IAC and CCA, in order to avoid unnecessary surgical intervention. Therefore, IAC should be considered in differential diagnosis in similar cases.

  12. Two different cytochrome P450 enzymes are the adrenal antigens in autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type I and Addison's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Winqvist, O; Gustafsson, J; Rorsman, F; Karlsson, F A; Kämpe, O

    1993-01-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type I (APS I) and idiopathic Addison's disease are both disorders with adrenal insufficiency but with differences in genetic background, clinical presentation, and extent of extraadrenal manifestations. In this study the major adrenal autoantigen identified with sera from patients with APS I was characterized by analyses using indirect immunofluorescence, Western blots of adrenal subcellular fractions and of recombinant proteins, immunoprecipitations of [35S...

  13. Mills’ syndrome: a case report

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    Fábio Henrique de Gobbi Porto

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The syndrome of progressive, ascending or descending hemiplegia, with no significant sensory impairment was first describes by Mills in 1900, which several cases were reported later. However after diagnostic tests and image improvements, the number of reports has shortened. A possible explanation for this shortage is the identification of other diseases that could mimic the clinical picture. Currently, the syndrome has an uncertain nosological status, since it was described based on clinical examination only. We can find this clinical presentation (Mills syndrome in cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, predominant upper motor neuron amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (UMN-ALS and primary lateral sclerosis (PLS, besides its symptomatic (secondary forms. We describe a case (initial presentation and one year follow-up of progressive ascending hemiplegia with clinical isolated upper neuron signs and normal sensory examination, discussing its nosological status, electromyographic findings, differential diagnosis and prognosis.

  14. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davorin Dajčman

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autoimmune pancreatitis is a recently described type of pancreatitis of presumed autoimmune etiology. Autoimmune pancreatitis is often misdiagnosed as pancreatic cancer difficult, since their clinical presentations are often similar. The concept of autoimmune pancreatitis was first published in 1961. Since then, autoimmune pancreatitis has often been treated not as an independent clinical entity but rather as a manifestation of systemic disease. The overall prevalence and incidence of the disease have yet to be determined, but three series have reported the prevalence as between 5 and 6 % of all patients with chronic pancreatitis. Patient vary widely in age, but most are older than 50 years. Patients with autoimmune pancreatitis usually complain of the painless jaundice, mild abdominal pain and weight loss. There is no laboratory hallmark of the disease, even if cholestatic profiles of liver dysfunction with only mild elevation of amylase and lipase levels have been reported.Conclusions: Proposed diagnostic criteria contains: (1 radiologic imaging, diffuse enlargement of the pancreas and diffusely irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct, (2 laboratory data, elevated levels of serum ã-globulin and/or IgG, specially IgG4, or the presence of autoantibodies and (3 histopathologic examination, fibrotic change with dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltration in the pancreas. For correct diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis, criterion 1 must be present with criterion 2 and/or 3. Autoimmune pancreatitis is frequently associated with rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren’s syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, tubulointersticial nephritis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis. Pancreatic biopsy using an endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy is the most important diagnostic method today. Treatment with corticosteroids leads to the and resolution of pancreatic inflamation, obstruction and

  15. Retrospective analysis of autoimmune hepatitis-primary biliary cirrhosis overlap syndrome in Korea: characteristics, treatments, and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoonsang Park

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/AimsOverlap syndrome of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC (AIH-PBC overlap syndrome is a rare disease that has not been clearly characterized in Korean patients. This study investigated the clinical features of AIH-PBC overlap syndrome compared with those of AIH and PBC alone.MethodsThis retrospective cohort study included 158 consecutive patients who were diagnosed as AIH (n=61, PBC (n=81, or AIH-PBC overlap syndrome (n=9 based on the Paris and the International Autoimmune Hepatitis Group (IAIHG criteria from 2001 to 2011 in Korea. We compared the clinical features of these three groups retrospectively, including their biochemical characteristics, treatments, responses, and clinical outcomes.ResultsThe AIH-PBC overlap syndrome patients exhibited biochemical characteristics of both AIH and PBC, and showed a similar response to ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA monotherapy as for the PBC patients. However, the response of AIH-PBC overlap syndrome patients to UDCA and steroid combination therapy was worse than the response of AIH patients to steroid-based therapy (P=0.024. Liver cirrhosis developed more rapidly in AIH-PBC overlap syndrome patients than in AIH patients group (P=0.013, but there was no difference between AIH-PBC overlap syndrome patients and PBC patients. The rates of developing hepatic decompensation did not differ significantly between the groups.ConclusionsThe AIH-PBC overlap syndrome patients exhibited a worse response to UDCA and steroid combination therapy and a faster cirrhotic progression compared with AIH patients.

  16. Autoantibodies in Senear-Usher Syndrome: Cross-Reactivity or Multiple Autoimmunity?

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    María Elena Pérez-Pérez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Senear-Usher syndrome or pemphigus erythematosus is a pathology that overlaps clinically and serologically with pemphigus foliaceus and lupus erythematosus. Skin biopsies of patients with pemphigus erythematosus reveal acantholysis and deposits of immunoglobulins in desmosomes, and they are positive in the lupus band test. In the present paper, we determined whether the autoantibodies associated with pemphigus erythematosus targeted a single antigen or multiple antigens as a result of the stimulation of independent B cell clones. Our present paper demonstrates that patients with pemphigus erythematosus produce both antiepithelial antibodies specific for desmoglein 1 and 3 and antinuclear antibodies specific for Ro, La, Sm, and double-stranded DNA antigens. After eluting specific anti-epithelial or anti-nuclear antibodies, which were recovered and tested using double-fluorescence assays, a lack of cross-reactivity was demonstrated between desmosomes and nuclear and cytoplasmic lupus antigens. This result suggests that autoantibodies in pemphigus erythematosus are directed against different antigens and that these autoantibodies are produced by independent clones. Given these clinical and serological data, we suggest that pemphigus erythematosus behaves as a multiple autoimmune disease.

  17. [Jerusalem syndrome - a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poleszczyk, Anna; Swiecicki, Łukasz

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the paper was to present the case of a patient who developed acute psychotic symptoms on her visit to Jerusalem. The analysis of the clinical case and medical history. The presented 62-year-old women with a history of previous psychiatric disorder arrived with her husband to Jerusalem as a part of organised touristic group. She developed acute psychotic reaction through some stages characteristic for the third type of Jerusalem syndrome. Symptoms resolved completely soon after returning to Poland and admission to the hospital where an antipsychotic treatment was performed. Despite the rare occurrence of this phenomenon, it is worth noting that we can divide Jerusalem syndrome into three types depending on its clinical course, patient's history of previous psychiatric disorders and this division has some clinical implications. This syndrome can be also considered in the context of some factors connected with travelling in general which may be responsible for psychiatric disturbances occurring among travelers. The course of psychiatric disturbances in the presented patient resembled the third type of Jerusalem syndrome despite her past psychiatric history and probably travelling caused her decompensations. In clinical practice we have to remember that in case of the patients with a known psychiatric history, clinical evaluation may be useful before travelling. In previously healthy patients developing the third type of the Jerusalem syndrome early intervention and separation from Jerusalem and its holy places and their contact with family are crucial for soon recovery.

  18. Leg ulcers associated with Klinefelter’s syndrome: a case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Shanmugam, Victoria K; Tsagaris, Katina C; Attinger, Christopher E

    2011-01-01

    We present the case of a young man with type II diabetes, stage III chronic kidney disease, hypertension, obstructive sleep apnea and diabetes who presented to the Georgetown University Hospital Center for Wound Healing with refractory lower extremity ulcers. Autoimmune work-up was negative. However, chromosome analysis showed a genetic variant of Klinefelter’s syndrome (48 XXYY). Lower extremity ulceration is a recognised complication of Klinefelter’s syndrome. The pathogenesis of ulcers in ...

  19. Anetoderma: Is It a Sign of Autoimmunity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hessa Al Buainain

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Anetoderma is a rare elastolytic disorder characterized by circumscribed areas of flaccid skin due to the loss of elastic tissue in the dermis. Primary anetoderma is frequently observed in patients with autoimmune diseases or abnormalities especially with antiphospholipid antibodies with or without antiphospholipid syndrome. In this case report we discuss a patient with primary anetoderma with positive antithyroid peroxidase antibodies, which is consistent with autoimmune thyroiditis.

  20. NOONAN SYNDROMECASE REPORT

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    Milena Vujanović

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Noonan Syndrome is a rare, autosomal dominant disorder characterized by short stature, facial abnormalities, congenital heart defects and urogenital malformations. Ocular changes occur in 95% of patients and usually include hypertelorism, ptosis, refractive errors, strabismus, amblyopia, rarely nystagmus, colobomas, cataracts, optic nerve drusen. Case report: We present a case of a boy, 10 months old, referred by the pediatrician because of strabismus. During the general examination of the head and face, we noted that the ears were low-set, and the lower jaw was slightly smaller. Ophthalmological examination revealed hypertelorism, left eye esotropia, hyperopia, and optic disc pit. Other associated malformations were: dilatation of both pyelons, cryptorchidism, pulmonary stenosis. Genetic analysis confirmed the diagnosis of Noonan syndrome. The variety of clinical manifestations of this syndrome indicates that a multidisciplinary approach is necessary for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of these patients.

  1. Autoimmunity and susceptibility to Hodgkin lymphoma: a population-based case-control study in Scandinavia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgren, Ola; Engels, Eric A; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Gridley, Gloria; Mellemkjaer, Lene; Olsen, Jørgen H; Kerstann, Kimberly F; Wheeler, William; Hemminki, Kari; Linet, Martha S; Goldin, Lynn R

    2006-09-20

    Personal history of autoimmune diseases is consistently associated with increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. In contrast, there are limited data on risk of Hodgkin lymphoma following autoimmune diseases and almost no data addressing whether there is a familial association between the conditions. Using population-based linked registry data from Sweden and Denmark, 32 separate autoimmune and related conditions were identified from hospital diagnoses in 7476 case subjects with Hodgkin lymphoma, 18,573 matched control subjects, and more than 86,000 first-degree relatives of case and control subjects. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) as measures of relative risks for each condition using logistic regression and also applied multivariable hierarchical regression models. All P values are two-sided. We found statistically significantly increased risks of Hodgkin lymphoma associated with personal histories of several autoimmune conditions, including rheumatoid arthritis (OR = 2.7, 95% CI = 1.9 to 4.0), systemic lupus erythematosus (OR = 5.8, 95% CI = 2.2 to 15.1), sarcoidosis (OR = 14.1, 95% CI = 5.4 to 36.8), and immune thrombocytopenic purpura (OR = infinity, P = .002). A statistically significant increase in risk of Hodgkin lymphoma was associated with family histories of sarcoidosis (OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.01 to 3.1) and ulcerative colitis (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.02 to 2.6). Personal or family history of certain autoimmune conditions was strongly associated with increased risk of Hodgkin lymphoma. The association between both personal and family histories of sarcoidosis and a statistically significantly increased risk of Hodgkin lymphoma suggests shared susceptibility for these conditions.

  2. Primary Sjogren%u2019s Syndrome Associated with Basal Cell Carcinoma: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tugba Kosker

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Sjogren%u2019s syndrome is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by xerostomia and xerophthalmia, known as the %u2018sicca symptoms%u2019. Patients with Sjogren%u2019s syndrome, characteristically have positive nuclear and cytoplasmic antigens, typically Anti-Ro/SSA and Anti-La/SSB because of lymphocytic infiltration of the exocrine glands. Patients with primary Sjogren%u2019s syndrome, develop systemic complications, non-Hodgkin lymphoma being the most feared of these. We describe here a case of Sjogren%u2019s syndrome with basal cell carcinoma, which presented with an ulcerated lesion on nasal dorsum.

  3. Autoimmune Hepatitis and Celiac Disease: Case Report Showing an Entero-Hepatic Link

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    Francesco Tovoli

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder primarily targeting the small bowel, although extraintestinal extensions have been reported. The autoimmune processes can affect the liver with manifestations such as primary biliary cirrhosis and autoimmune hepatitis. We describe a 61-year-old woman with celiac disease and an increased levels of aminotransferases. The persistence of increased levels of aminotransferases after 1 year of gluten-free diet and the positivity for an anti-nuclear and anti-double-strand DNA antibodies led to a misdiagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus-related hepatitis. Based on these findings the patient was placed on steroids, which after a few months were stopped because of the onset of diabetes mellitus. Soon after steroid withdrawal, the patient had a marked increase in aminotransferases and γ-globulins, and a liver biopsy revealed chronic active hepatitis. A course of three months of steroids and azathioprine normalized both biochemical and clinical parameters. Currently the patient is symptom-free and doing well. In conclusion, a hypertransaminasemia persisting after a gluten-free diet should be interpreted as a sign of coexisting autoimmune liver disease. Any autoantibody positivity (in this case to ANA and anti-dsDNA should be carefully considered in order to avoid misdiagnosis delaying appropriate clinical management.

  4. Delleman (Oculocerebrocutaneous Syndrome: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomás Ortiz-Basso

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Delleman syndrome is an unusual entity, characterized by ocular cysts or microphthalmia, focal dermal anomalies and cerebral malformations. In the following article, we carry out a review of the disease and we present the case of a patient with microphthalmos and palpebral coloboma. As we could not put orbital expanders at an early stage, we performed reconstructive surgery.

  5. Straatsma syndrome: two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Nogueira

    Full Text Available Abstract This article reports two cases of Straatsma Syndrome, a rare disease, emphasizing its clinical features that inclued myopia, strabismus and amblyopia associated with persistent myelinated fibers in the retina. Ophthalmic examination, color retinography and optical coherence tomography were performed.

  6. Coagulopathy triggered autoimmunity: experimental antiphospholipid syndrome in factor V Leiden mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background We investigated interactions between genetically and autoimmune-mediated coagulopathies by inducing experimental antiphospholipid syndrome (eAPS) in mice carrying the factor V Leiden (FVL) mutation. Methods eAPS was induced in heterozygous and homozygous FVL transgenic mice (C57BL/6 background) by immunization with β2-glycoprotein I (β2-GPI). Autoantibody levels were measured at 1 and 5 months post-immunization. Mice were tested at 4 months post-immunization for behavior and cognitive function in the staircase, elevated plus-maze, and swim T-maze tests. Brains were removed and analyzed by immunohistochemistry for inflammatory markers and neurodegenerative processes. Results A single immunization with β2-GPI induced significantly higher and longer-lasting immune responses, and this was dependent on the number of FVL alleles. At 1 and 5 months post-immunization, levels of antibodies rose from 1.17 ± 0.07 to 1.62 ± 0.17 (optical density units; ODU) in homozygous FVL mice, compared with stable levels of 0.59 ± 0.17 and 0.48 ± 0.16 ODU in heterozygous FVL mice and a drop from 1.62 ± 0.21 to 0.61 ± 0.13 ODU in wild-type mice. Behavioral and cognitive clinical features of eAPS were also correlated with FVL allele load, as assessed by the elevated plus-maze (altered anxiety), staircase (hyperactivity and higher exploration), and swim T-maze (impaired learning) tests. Histological studies identified significant neurodegenerative changes in both grey and white matter in the eAPS-FVL brains. In spite of the potential interaction of two prothrombotic disease states, there were no ischemic lesions seen in this group. Conclusions The results indicate that genetically mediated coagulopathies increase the risk of developing coagulation-targeted autoimmune responses, and suggest the importance of antibody-mediated neurodegenerative processes in the brain in APS. PMID:23566870

  7. Stylocarotid syndrome: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Branko

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION The American otolaryngologist Eagle was the first to describe styloid syndrome in 1937 and the syndrome was named after him (Eagle's syndrome. The original description of two separate syndromes is connected with his name: classical syndrome, which almost constantly occurs after tonsillectomy and carotid artery syndrome, which occurs without tonsillectomy and also in cases when stylohyoid complex compresses the carotid segments and perivascular sympathetic fibers. In the following years, two more syndromes were defined: stylohyoid and pseudostylohyoid, which according to their manifestations, correspond to the genuine classical form. CASE OUTLINE A 40-year old male is presented, with a history of 3-year duration of pains in the upper part of the left side of the neck, in the left eye and its surroundings. Pain occurrences were not regular. Throbbing pains were most often provoked by sudden head movements and neck compression. He was healthy until the onset of these problems. The findings of all examinations were normal. The applied prophylactic therapy, typical for cluster headache, was without any effect. On 64-MSCT (multislice computed tomography, the neck arteries did not show any intraluminal pathology. The styloid processes were of normal length. On the left side, the styloid process tip pressed the internal carotid artery disturbing its longitudinal axis. CONCLUSION In our presentation, the defined lengths of the styloid processes were normal. The medial angulation of the left styloid process was more expressed reaching 63.5 degrees (the right side angulation was normal. Persistent and throbbing pain in the region of the left eye with backward projection suggested compression on the internal carotid artery. Pains were most frequently provoked by head turning and neck compression. 64-MSCT diagnostics enabled us to determine the characteristics of styloid processes and their relation to the internal carotid artery. Improvement

  8. Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadros, Susan; Teichtahl, Andrew J; Ciciriello, Sabina; Wicks, Ian P

    2017-06-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PJP) is an opportunistic fungal infection that affects the immunocompromised. Patients with systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease are increasingly recognised as an at-risk clinical population with a high mortality. This case-control study examined differences in the characteristics and peripheral blood parameters between patients with systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease who developed PJP and gender, age and disease-matched controls. Historical data collected between 2002 and 2013 at the Royal Melbourne Hospital, Australia were reviewed. Cases were defined by having a systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease and a diagnosis of PJP (either a positive toluidine blue O stain or P. jirovecii PCR, with a concurrent respiratory illness that was clinically consistent with PJP). Controls were matched for age, gender and disease in a 4:1 ratio. Peripheral blood results were retrieved from an in-house pathology database. Clinical information including glucocorticoid exposure, PJP prophylaxis, comorbidities and month of admission were retrieved from medical notes. After adjustment for corticosteroid exposure and C-reactive protein, lymphocyte count on admission (0.4 vs. 1.3; p = 0.04) and at nadir (0.2 vs. 0.8 × 10 9 /L; p = 0.05) was significantly lower in cases than in controls. Cases (n = 11) were more frequently Caucasian rather than non-Caucasian (81.8% vs. 65.9%; p = 0.04). In addition, cases more commonly presented in autumn (March to May) than in other seasons (OR = 7.3; 95% CI: 1.4-38.7; p = 0.02). These data demonstrate that patients with systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease who develop PJP have significantly greater lymphopenia than age, gender and disease-matched controls, independent of corticosteroid exposure, as well as a potential ethnicity and seasonal predilection to PJP. This may help to inform prophylactic guidelines for PJP in these patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Development, Sensibility, and Validity of a Systemic Autoimmune Rheumatic Disease Case Ascertainment Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Susan M; Wither, Joan E; Borowoy, Alan M; Landolt-Marticorena, Carolina; Davis, Aileen M; Johnson, Sindhu R

    2017-01-01

    Case ascertainment through self-report is a convenient but often inaccurate method to collect information. The purposes of this study were to develop, assess the sensibility, and validate a tool to identify cases of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARD) in the outpatient setting. The SARD tool was administered to subjects sampled from specialty clinics. Determinants of sensibility - comprehensibility, feasibility, validity, and acceptability - were evaluated using a numeric rating scale from 1-7. Comprehensibility was evaluated using the Flesch Reading Ease and the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level. Self-reported diagnoses were validated against medical records using Cohen's κ statistic. There were 141 participants [systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc), rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren syndrome (SS), inflammatory myositis (polymyositis/dermatomyositis; PM/DM), and controls] who completed the questionnaire. The Flesch Reading Ease score was 77.1 and the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level was 4.4. Respondents endorsed (mean ± SD) comprehensibility (6.12 ± 0.92), feasibility (5.94 ± 0.81), validity (5.35 ± 1.10), and acceptability (3.10 ± 2.03). The SARD tool had a sensitivity of 0.91 (95% CI 0.88-0.94) and a specificity of 0.99 (95% CI 0.96-1.00). The agreement between the SARD tool and medical record was κ = 0.82 (95% CI 0.77-0.88). Subgroup analysis by SARD found κ coefficients for SLE to be κ = 0.88 (95% CI 0.79-0.97), SSc κ = 1.0 (95% CI 1.0-1.0), PM/DM κ = 0.72 (95% CI 0.49-0.95), and SS κ = 0.85 (95% CI 0.71-0.99). The screening questions had sensitivity ranging from 0.96 to 1.0 and specificity ranging from 0.88 to 1.0. This SARD case ascertainment tool has demonstrable sensibility and validity. The use of both screening and confirmatory questions confers added accuracy.

  10. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 in a 12-year-old ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-12-20

    Dec 20, 2011 ... hypoparathyroidism, which may be asymptomatic or which typically presents with tetany and seizures. Adrenal insufficiency often develops later. Other conditions which are associated with APS-1 include autoimmune thyroid disease, type 1 diabetes, hypo- gonadism, alopecia, vitiligo, autoimmune hepatitis,.

  11. Dress Syndrome - A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kremić Zorana

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS syndrome is an adverse drug-induced reaction that occurs most commonly after exposure to drugs, most frequently anticonvulsants, sulfa derivates, antidepressants, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and antimicrobials. We present a 61-year-old male, with a generalized maculopapular exanthema on the trunk, face, extremities, palms, soles, palate, and fever (38°C. His medical history was notable for generalized epilepsy, treated with carbamazepine during 1 month. The diagnosis of DRESS syndrome was confirmed by specific RegiSCAR criteria. In our case, skin eruptions were successfully treated with oral methylprednisolone, cephalexin, and topical corticosteroid ointment.

  12. CROUZON SYNDROME: A CASE REPORT

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    Debdas

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Crouzon’s Syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder. Normally, the sutures in the human skull fuse after the complete growth of the brain. But, if any of these sutures closes early then it may interfere with the growth of the brain. Premature sutural fusion most commonly involves sagittal suture followed by coronal suture. We report a case of 6 - year - old male child presented with characteristic features of Crouzon’s syndrome. Diagnosis was made on the basis of clinical and radiological findings.

  13. Hyperthyroidism from autoimmune thyroiditis in a man with type 1 diabetes mellitus: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Hirsch Irl B; Amory John K

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction The presentation, diagnosis, clinical course and treatment of a man with hyperthyroidism secondary to autoimmune thyroiditis in the setting of type 1 diabetes mellitus has not previously been described. Case presentation A 32-year-old European-American man with an eight-year history of type 1 diabetes mellitus presented with an unintentional 22-pound weight loss but an otherwise normal physical examination. Laboratory studies revealed a suppressed thyroid-stimulating hor...

  14. Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia With Chronic Fatigue After HPV Vaccination as Part of the “Autoimmune/Auto-inflammatory Syndrome Induced by Adjuvants”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucija Tomljenovic PhD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 14-year-old girl who developed postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS with chronic fatigue 2 months following Gardasil vaccination. The patient suffered from persistent headaches, dizziness, recurrent syncope, poor motor coordination, weakness, fatigue, myalgias, numbness, tachycardia, dyspnea, visual disturbances, phonophobia, cognitive impairment, insomnia, gastrointestinal disturbances, and a weight loss of 20 pounds. The psychiatric evaluation ruled out the possibility that her symptoms were psychogenic or related to anxiety disorders. Furthermore, the patient tested positive for ANA (1:1280, lupus anticoagulant, and antiphospholipid. On clinical examination she presented livedo reticularis and was diagnosed with Raynaud’s syndrome. This case fulfills the criteria for the autoimmune/auto-inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA. Because human papillomavirus vaccination is universally recommended to teenagers and because POTS frequently results in long-term disabilities (as was the case in our patient, a thorough follow-up of patients who present with relevant complaints after vaccination is strongly recommended.

  15. Usher's syndrome--case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiecień, Sława; Sulak, Robert; Szaflik, Jerzy

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present a case of coincidence of sensorineural hearing loss with chronic recurrent bilateral cystoid macular oedema in a 32-year-old woman, who was admitted to the clinic for deterioration of visual acuity of four months' duration. The patient gave a history of hearing loss for 29 years. Visual field examination disclosed peripheral ring scotoma. Electrophysiological examination was performed: pattern visual evoked response was within normal limits and electroretinogram displayed diminished both photopic and scotopic response. As ophthalmoscopy demonstrated no pigment in the fundus of the eye, the findings were consisted with diagnosis of retinitis pigmentosis sine pigmento. The presence of loss of hearing indicated the necessity of performing the genetic examination for Usher's syndrome. In order to establish a final diagnosis of Usher's syndrome genetic examination must be performed, but family history is relevant. Early investigation for Usher's syndrome in children with sensorineural hearing impairment is of a great significance. The patient may develop symptoms of retinitis pigmentosa in second or even third decade of his life. The necessity of thorough investigation for detecting other systemic abnormalities should be emphasized. There is no effective treatment of this syndrome. A child with Usher's syndrome requires a comprehensive care of different medical specialties. Psychological, educational and sociological attitude is also of a great importance in the child development.

  16. The serological profile of the autoimmune hepatitis/primary biliary cirrhosis overlap syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Paolo; Granito, Alessandro; Pappas, Georgios; Pendino, Gaspare M; Quarneti, Chiara; Cicola, Ronny; Menichella, Rita; Ferri, Silvia; Cassani, Fabio; Bianchi, Francesco B; Lenzi, Marco; Muratori, Luigi

    2009-06-01

    During the last decade patients with concomitant clinical, biochemical, immunoserological, and histological features of both autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) were sporadically described, but definite diagnostic criteria and specific serological markers to support the diagnosis of AIH/PBC overlap syndrome (AIH/PBC OS) are still lacking. Clinical, biochemical, and histological features, autoantibody profile, and treatment response of 15 patients with coexistent hepatitic and cholestatic liver damage, all fulfilling strict diagnostic criteria for both AIH and PBC, were compared with those of 120 patients with pure PBC and 120 patients with pure AIH. At diagnosis, the AIH/PBC OS patients' median age was 51 years, similar to that of the PBC patients (52 years, P=NS), but significantly higher than that of the AIH patients (40 years, P=0.04). Anti-dsDNA antibodies were detected in 60% of AIH/PBC OS patients, but only in 4% of PBC patients and 26% of AIH patients (P<0.0001 and 0.01, respectively). Double positivity for antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) and anti-dsDNA was present in 47% of those with AIH/PBC OS, but only in 2% of the pathological controls (P<0.0001; specificity: 98; 95% confidence interval (CI): 97-99.2; positive likelihood ratio: 28; 95% CI: 9.8-79.4). Combined therapy (ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) plus steroids) achieved biochemical response in 77% of AIH/PBC OS patients. Concomitant AMA/anti-dsDNA seropositivity can be considered the serological profile of AIH/PBC OS. The combination of UDCA and steroids is effective in achieving persistent biochemical amelioration in most AIH/PBC OS patients.

  17. Bartter's syndrome: A case report of nephrocalcinosis

    OpenAIRE

    KOŞAN, Celalettin

    2014-01-01

    Bartter's syndrome is characterized by generalized hyperplasia of juxtaglomerular apparatus, hyperreninism leading to secondary hyperaldesteronism, hypokalemic alkalosis and normal blood pressure. Although nephrocalcinosis has been described sporadically in patients with Barter's syndrome, this is still generally unrecognized. We reported a case of Barter's syndrome with nephrocalcinosis and discussed clinical significance of nephrocalcinosis in this syndrome.

  18. Guillain–Barré Syndrome after Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery:a Case Report

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    Manouchehr Hekmat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Guillain-Barre syndrome is a neurologic disorder that may appear after infection or major surgery.  Guillian-Barre syndrome following cardiac surgery is rare and only based on case reports, and we review all of the published cases. A 52-year-old man after 5 months suffering from chest pain was referred to our hospital and underwent coronary artery bypass graft for 3 vessel disease. The patient was discharged without complication on the 5th postoperative day. He presented Guillain- Barre syndrome after 12 months. He has not completely recovered weakness of upper extremities grade 4/5 with atrophy of both upper extremities remains after 18 months. This disorder is similar to classic GBS. It is important to be alert to de novo autoimmune neurological disorders after cardiac surgery. These disorders are similar to classic autoimmune disease and treated with standard therapies.

  19. Guillain-Barré Syndrome after Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery: a Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekmat, Manouchehr; Ghaderi, Hamid; Foroughi, Mahnoosh; Mirjafari, S Adeleh

    2016-01-01

    Guillain-Barre syndrome is a neurologic disorder that may appear after infection or major surgery. Guillain-Barré syndrome following cardiac surgery is rare and only based on case reports, and we review all of the published cases. A 52-year-old man after 5 months suffering from chest pain was referred to our hospital and underwent coronary artery bypass graft for 3 vessel disease. The patient was discharged without complication on the 5th postoperative day. He presented Guillain-Barré syndrome after 12 months. He has not completely recovered weakness of upper extremities grade 4/5 with atrophy of both upper extremities remains after 18 months. This disorder is similar to classic GBS. It is important to be alert to de novo autoimmune neurological disorders after cardiac surgery. These disorders are similar to classic autoimmune disease and treated with standard therapies.

  20. An autoimmune myositis-overlap syndrome associated with autoantibodies to nuclear pore complexes: description and long-term follow-up of the anti-Nup syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senécal, Jean-Luc; Isabelle, Catherine; Fritzler, Marvin J; Targoff, Ira N; Goldstein, Rose; Gagné, Michel; Raynauld, Jean-Pierre; Joyal, France; Troyanov, Yves; Dabauvalle, Marie-Christine

    2014-11-01

    Autoimmune myositis encompasses various myositis-overlap syndromes, each being identified by the presence of serum marker autoantibodies. We describe a novel myositis-overlap syndrome in 4 patients characterized by the presence of a unique immunologic marker, autoantibodies to nuclear pore complexes. The clinical phenotype was characterized by prominent myositis in association with erosive, anti-CCP, and rheumatoid factor-positive arthritis, trigeminal neuralgia, mild interstitial lung disease, Raynaud phenomenon, and weight loss. The myositis was typically chronic, relapsing, and refractory to corticosteroids alone, but remitted with the addition of a second immunomodulating drug. There was no clinical or laboratory evidence for liver disease. The prognosis was good with 100% long-term survival (mean follow-up 19.5 yr).By indirect immunofluorescence on HEp-2 cells, sera from all 4 patients displayed a high titer of antinuclear autoantibodies (ANA) with a distinct punctate peripheral (rim) fluorescent pattern of the nuclear envelope characteristic of nuclear pore complexes. Reactivity with nuclear pore complexes was confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy. In a cohort of 100 French Canadian patients with autoimmune myositis, the nuclear pore complex fluorescent ANA pattern was restricted to these 4 patients (4%). It was not observed in sera from 393 adult patients with systemic sclerosis (n = 112), mixed connective tissue disease (n = 35), systemic lupus (n = 94), rheumatoid arthritis (n = 45), or other rheumatic diseases (n = 107), nor was it observed in 62 normal adults.Autoantibodies to nuclear pore complexes were predominantly of IgG isotype. No other IgG autoantibody markers for defined connective tissue diseases or overlap syndromes were present, indicating a selective and highly focused immune response. In 3 patients, anti-nuclear pore complex autoantibody titers varied in parallel with myositis activity, suggesting a pathogenic link to

  1. Moebius syndrome: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Fontenelle, Lucia; Araujo, Alexandra Prufer de Q.C.; Fontana, Rosiane S.

    2001-01-01

    Nos últimos anos, temos tido oportunidade de diagnosticar maior número de casos da síndrome de Moebius, possivelmente como resultado de aumento real da sua incidência - já que numerosos fatores ambientais vêm sendo relacionados à gênese dessa síndrome. Dos casos avaliados em dois ambulatórios especializados, vale a pena registrar um deles devido à associação incomum com heterotopia cortical, dentre outras malformações.In the last few years we have been able to diagnose a larger number of case...

  2. NEONATAL ABSTINENCE SYNDROME - CASE REPORT

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    Aleksandra Matic

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS refers to the constellation of signs and symptoms exhibited by a newborn of drug-abusing mother. NAS is multisystemic disorder, most frequently involving central nervous and gastrointestinal systems with irritability, high-pitched cry, hyperactive reflexes, increased muscle tone, tremors, generalized convulsions, feeding and sleeping disorders, tachycardia, tachypnea, apnea, termolability and sweating, frequent hiccups, yawning and sneezing, vomiting, diarrhea and dehydration.Intrauterine narcotic disposition can give some other adverse effects beside NAS: fetal distress, premature birth, intrauterine growth retardation, microcephaly, increased incidence of congenital anomalies (cardiac and genitourinary anomalies, cleft palate, biliar atresia. Significantly increased risks of sudden infant’s death syndrome (SIDS, abnormalities in neurocognitive and behavioral development and deficiency in motor functions have also been noticed after the long-term surveys of these children.This paper is a case report of a newborn with developed clinical signs of NAS, but it also discusses diagnostics and management of such cases

  3. A Case of Wolfram Syndrome

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    Gholamali Naderian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report a case of Wolfram syndrome characterized by early onset diabetes mellitus and progressive optic atrophy. Case Report: A 20-year-old male patient with diabetes mellitus type I presented with best corrected visual acuity of 1/10 in both eyes with correction of -0.25+1.50@55 and -0.25+1.50@131 in his right and left eyes, respectively. Bilateral optic atrophy was evident on fundus examination. The patient also had diabetes insipidus, neurosensory deafness, neurogenic bladder, polyuria and extra-residual voiding indicating atony of the urinary tract, combined with delayed sexual maturity. Conclusion: One should consider Wolfram syndrome in patients with juvenile onset diabetes mellitus and hearing loss. Ophthalmological examination may disclose optic atrophy; urologic examinations are vital in such patients.

  4. Diogenes Syndrome: A Case Report

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    Projna Biswas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cessation of normal skin cleansing seen in geriatric or self-neglected patients can cause accumulation of keratinous crusts on the skin. In the extreme end of this spectrum is a condition known as Diogenes syndrome (DS. These patients may have psychiatric disorders like paranoid disorders, mood affection, or temporofrontal dementia. Subjects are mainly the elderly but few cases in younger age group of patients have also been reported. Lesions of DS are usually found over upper central chest, back, and groin. In the young, lesions are mainly found over scalp, face, or arms. Absence of normal skin cleaning causes keratin and dirty debris to accumulate and with time form a thick shell. These debris can be secondarily infected by bacteria, fungus, and so forth. These skin lesions are not usually seen in individual with proper hygiene. We report a case of Diogenes syndrome in a 34-year-old young male patient who had associated schizophrenia.

  5. Progeria syndrome: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastogi Rajul

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Progeria is a rare and peculiar combination of dwarfism and premature aging. The incidence is one in several million births. It occurs sporadically and is probably an autosomal recessive syndrome. Though the clinical presentation is usually typical, conventional radiological and biochemical investigations help in confirming the diagnosis. We present a rare case of progeria with most of the radiological features as a pictorial essay.

  6. A case of Boerhaave syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Zoon; Ra, Woo Youn; Woo, Won Hyung [Hankang Sacred heart Hospital, Chung Ang University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1974-10-15

    Esophageal rupture may occur from an external force such as an explosion or trauma to the chest, spontaneously as from vomiting, by instrumental perforations during endoscopy, or by foreign bodies. A case of Boerhaave syndrome was seen in a healthy 52 years old man who complained of substernal pain, vomiting and dyspnea after over-drinking. Abnormalities seen on the chest film were; A) hydropneumothorax B) mediastinal emphysema and C) subcutaneous emphysema. These characteristic roentgen findings were confirmed an esophageal rupture.

  7. Autoimmune myelofibrosis accompanied by Sjögren's syndrome in a 47, XXX/46, XX mosaic woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tohru

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a patient with autoimmune myelofibrosis accompanied by Sjögren's syndrome (SS). A 36-year-old woman was admitted due to petechiae, purpura, gingival bleeding, dyspnea on exertion, and a lack of concentration. She had pancytopenia and was diagnosed with SS. A bone marrow study showed hypercellular marrow with reticulin fibrosis. Lymphocytic infiltrates and aggregates composed of a mixture of T and B cells in the marrow were also observed. A chromosomal analysis of the marrow cells showed 47, XXX and an analysis of peripheral lymphocytes revealed 47, XXX/46, XX mosaic results. The patient's cytopenia resolved following treatment with oral prednisolone.

  8. Thoracic outlet syndrome: Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquez, Juan Camilo; Acosta, Mauricio Fernando; Uribe Jorge Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of vascular thoracic outlet syndrome in a young man, diagnosed with upper limb arteriography, leading to repeated arterio-arterial emboli originating from a post-stenotic subclavian artery aneurysm. It is of our interest due to its low incidence and the small number of cases reported that have been diagnosed by arteriography. The thoracic outlet is the path through which vascular and neural structures goes from the neck to the axilla, and it has three anatomical strictures, that when pronounced, can compress the brachial plexus or subclavian vessels, leading to different symptoms and signs.

  9. Towards a further understanding of prenatal thyroid theory of homosexuality: Autoimmune thyroiditis, polycystic ovary syndrome, autism and low birth weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Sabuncuoglu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Research into the neurobiological origins of same-sex attraction is inconclusive. A recent theory of homosexuality posited that maternal thyroid dysfunction during pregnancy is associated with an increased rate of homosexual orientation in offspring. Relevant studies from the prenatal thyroid model perspective were reviewed, the major findings of which are as follows: i An increased prevalence of Hashimoto’s disease in lesbian women suggests a maternal and even familial presence of the same autoimmune thyroid disease. Female-tomale transsexuals and lesbian women were also reported to have higher rates of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS. Over the last several years, reports suggesting a strong link between PCOS and thyroid autoimmunity have accumulated. ii The increased risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASD in the offspring of mothers with thyroid autoimmunity in pregnancy and the association between ASD and gender dysphoria indicate a link between maternal thyroid dysfunction and gender dysphoria/same-sex attraction in the offspring. iii The high risk of miscarriage and retarded fetal growth in pregnancies of mothers who give birth to homosexual offspring can be explained by the impact of maternal thyroid dysfunction during pregnancy. This perspective review highlights relevant research findings and integrates them into the prenatal thyroid model of homosexuality. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the generation of same-sex orientation will contribute to the betterment of individual lives, as well as of society.

  10. Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome with Hashimoto thyroiditis in a 9-year-old girl: an autoimmune disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yun-Jin; Cheon, Chong Kun; Yeon, Gyu Min; Kim, Young Mi; Nam, Sang Ook

    2014-05-01

    Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome (MRS) is a rare disorder of unknown cause. The classical triad of MRS is orofacial edema, recurrent facial paralysis, and a fissured tongue. We present a 9-year-old girl with a recurrent peripheral facial paralysis. She experienced the first episode of a peripheral facial paralysis on the same side without orofacial swelling and lingua plicata 1 year ago. She was diagnosed with Hashimoto thyroiditis 9 months earlier, as confirmed by an endocrinologic investigation. While the patient was hospitalized with recurrent facial paralysis, we found that serum levels of free thyroxine (1.3 ng/dL) and thyrotropin (0.4 uIU/mL) were within normal range, but the level of antithyroperoxidase antibodies (772.0 IU/mL) was very increased. She had been taking an oral prednisolone orally for 2 weeks. At the 1-month follow-up, the patient's symptoms had completely disappeared. The possible correlation between MRS and autoimmune disorders has been documented in only one report, which described an adult with autoimmune thyroiditis (Hashimoto thyroiditis) and MRS. We suggest that the co-occurrence of MRS and Hashimoto thyroiditis is not coincidental but linked to autoimmunity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Very early onset of autoimmune thyroiditis in a toddler with severe hypothyroidism presentation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzuillo, Pierluigi; Grandone, Anna; Perrotta, Silverio; Ruggiero, Laura; Capristo, Carlo; Luongo, Caterina; Miraglia Del Giudice, Emanuele; Perrone, Laura

    2016-06-18

    In infants under 3 years of age acquired primary hypothyroidism caused by autoimmune thyroiditis is very rare. Hypothyroidism can manifest with different signs and symptoms and has a wide range of presentations from subclinical hypothyroidism to overt form. We describe a child with acquired autoimmune thyroiditis during a very early period of life and with a severe hypothyroidism presentation. A 22-month-old white male patient with normal neonatal screening presented with a six-month history of asthenia and cutaneous pallor. At general clinical and biochemical exams he showed weight gain, statural growth deceleration, poor movements, sleepy expression, instability while walking, myxoedema, bradycardia, open anterior fontanelle, changes in the face habitus, macrocytic anaemia, ascites, and high CPK, creatinine and cholesterol levels. Acquired autoimmune thyroiditis was the final diagnosis. The thyroxine replacement therapy normalized all the clinical and biochemical abnormalities but at the age of 30 months his mental age showed a delay of 6 months. Our case could give useful learning points: i) although the screening for congenital hypothyroidism is routinely performed, a severe hypothyroidism (for example due to autoimmune thyroiditis) can anyway occur early in life and the clinicians should consider this possibility; ii) hypothyroidism can have a misleading and multi-face clinical presentation; iii) anemia, rhabdomyolysis and high creatinine levels should always include the hypothyroidism in the differential diagnosis; iv) thyroxine replacement therapy is able to revert all the clinical manifestations related to the hypothyroidism; v) evaluating the patient's previous pictures could play an important role in resolving a diagnostic conundrum.

  12. Correlation of hormonal and cytokines regulation in case of autoimmune thyroiditis

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    Victoria V. Zdor

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. Studied immune aspects of the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT, which occupies the first place among human autoimmune pathologies. Treatment of the disease is based on thyroid hormones (TH replacement therapy. TH are today considered to be super antigens in autoimmune inflammation of the thyroid gland. Aims. On the basis of complex assessment of hormonal and immunological markers (TSH, TH, Treg, the Th1-, Th2-, Th17-marker cytokines with a research of possible interrelations of their indicators at patients with various clinical options of a current of AIT initially and against the background of replacement therapy of TH to define differences in functional activity of various types of immunocompetent cages depending on weight of inflammatory process for forecasting of a further clinical current of AIT, optimization of protocols of therapy and timely correction of strategy of treatment. Methods. In a prospective study, patients with AIT were evaluated for serum levels of cytokines and their receptors before initiating TH replacement therapy and on treatment by means of the ELISA modern methods with immuneсhemiluminescence and electroсhemiluminescence ways of detection. Results. Patients suffering from AIT showed an excess production of Th1-, Th2-, Th17- and Tregs marker cytokines with a deficiency of TGF-β1, closely connected with autoimmune hypothyroidism severity. Under pressure of TH therapy the indices of most cytokines decreased or improved, with the exception of IL-6, IL-8, IL-2, IFN-g, TNF-α. The greatest variations from the normal range were recorded in the complicated hypothyroidism. Conclusions. High serum TNF-α level in the onset of the disease is an important marker for the unfavourable AIT course and a predictor of hormone replacement therapy in case of its subclinical course. Safety indexes of functional thyroid epithelium are systemic levels of IL-8 and IL-22, their dynamic reduction in blood serum is an

  13. Noonan syndrome: A case report

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    Asokan S

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Noonan syndrome is a developmental disorder characterized by facial dysmorphia, short stature, cardiac defects and skeletal malformations. It may be sporadic or inherited as an autosomal dominant or recessive trait and occurs, one in 1000-2500 children. This is a case report of a 13 year-old girl who was referred by a general dental practitioner to a pediatric dentist for management. Full mouth dental rehabilitation was done and the child was brought to a dental institution for correction of orofacial and occlusal defects. Multidisciplinary treatment is the key to success in managing children with Noonan syndrome and the pediatric dentists play an important position to lead the health team.

  14. Lemierre syndrome: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Young A; Lee, In Jae; Kim, Hyun Beom; Hong, Myung Sun; Lee, Kwan Seop; Lee, Yul; Bae, Sang Hoon

    2006-01-01

    Lemierre syndrome is a rare disease characterized by internal jugular vein thrombosis and septic emboli, and it primarily occurs in healthy young individuals; this disease usually follows an acute oropharyngeal infection. To the best of our knowledge, only a few reports about this disease have appeared in the radiologic literature. We report here the radiologic findings of a case of Lemierre syndrome in a young healthy female adolescent who had a history of acute pharyngotonsilitis. Chest radiographs showed lung nodules that displayed cavitary changes with rapid progression on the serial studies. High-resolution CT scan showed multi-focal patchy consolidations that connect with vessels, and this was suggestive of septic pulmonary embolism. Ultrasonography and CT scan of the neck revealed right internal jugular vein thrombosis

  15. Is chronic fatigue syndrome an autoimmune disorder of endogenous neuropeptides, exogenous infection and molecular mimicry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staines, Donald R

    2004-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome is a disorder characterised by prolonged fatigue and debility and is mostly associated with post-infection sequelae although ongoing infection is unproven. Immunological aberration is likely and this may prove to be associated with an expanding group of vasoactive neuropeptides in the context of molecular mimicry and inappropriate immunological memory. Vasoactive neuropeptides including vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and pituitary adenylate activating polypeptide (PACAP) belong to the secretin/glucagon superfamily and act as hormones, neurotransmitters, immune modulators and neurotrophes. They are readily catalysed to smaller peptide fragments by antibody hydrolysis. They and their binding sites are immunogenic and are known to be associated with a range of autoimmune conditions. Vasoactive neuropeptides are widely distributed in the body particularly in the central, autonomic and peripheral nervous systems and have been identified in the gut, adrenal gland, reproductive organs, vasculature, blood cells and other tissues. They have a vital role in maintaining vascular flow in organs, and in thermoregulation, memory and concentration. They are co-transmitters for acetylcholine, nitric oxide, endogenous opioids and insulin, are potent immune regulators with primarily anti-inflammatory activity, and have a significant role in protection of the nervous system to toxic assault, promotion of neural development and the maintenance of homeostasis. This paper describes a biologically plausible mechanism for the development of CFS based on loss of immunological tolerance to the vasoactive neuropeptides following infection, significant physical exercise or de novo. It is proposed that release of these substances is accompanied by a loss of tolerance either to them or their receptor binding sites in CFS. Such an occurrence would have predictably serious consequences resulting from compromised function of the key roles these substances perform. All

  16. [Autoimmune syndrome in the tropical spastic paraparesis/myelopathy associated with human T-lymphotropic virus infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Martha C; Torres, Miyerlandi; Tamayo, Oscar; Criollo, William; Quintana, Milton; Sánchez, Adalberto; García, Felipe

    2008-12-01

    Previous reports have given evidence that in tropical spastic paraparesis (TSP)/human T-lymphotrophic virus (HTLV-I)-associated myelopathy (HAM), an autoimmune process occurs as part of its pathogenesis. The roles of autoimmunity and the molecular mimicry was evaluated in TSP/HAM patients. Plasma samples were characterized from patients in the Pacific coastal region of Colombia. Thirty-seven were identified as TSP/HAM, 10 were diagnosed with adult T-cell leukemia virus, 22 were asymptomatic carriers but seropositive for HTLV-I and 20 were seronegative and served as negative controls. Plasmatic levels of the following were determined: antinuclear antibody (ANA) levels, anticardiolipine-2 (ACL-2), interferon- (IFN-gamma) and interleukin-4 (IL-4). Using Western blot, the crossreactivity of the seropositive and seronegative samples was evaluated against proteins extracted from several central nervous system components of non infected Wistar rats. The HTLV-I seropositive plasmas were crossreacted with a monoclonal tax (LT4 anti-taxp40) from spinal cord neurons of non infected Wistar rats. Of the TSP/HAM patients, 70.2% were reactive against ANA and 83.8% against ACL-2, in contrast with those ATL and asymptomatic seropositives subjects that were not reactive (P<0.001). Moreover, 70.3% had detectable levels of IFN and 43.2% had detectable IL-4. LT4 anti-taxp40 and plasma of TSP/HAM exhibited cross reactivity with a MW 33-35 kDa protein from the rat spinal cord nuclei. Support was provided for the existence of an autoimmune syndrome mediated by molecular mimicry; the syndrome was responsible for some of the axonal degeneration observed in TSP/HAM patients.

  17. Histological Changes in Autoimmune Hepatitis with Graves' Disease: A Child Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Mamiko; Shibata, Hironori; Masugi, Yohei; Ishi, Tomohiro; Kameyama, Kaori; Ebinuma, Hirotoshi; Hasegawa, Tomonobu

    2017-08-15

    We herein report a child case of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) accompanied with Graves' disease. Elevated aminotransferase levels were found in a 12-year-old Japanese girl with Graves' disease. In her first liver biopsy, necrosis and inflammation was limited to the centrilobular area, while the second biopsy showed different findings. Namely, portal injury newly appeared, including interface hepatitis, which represents the histological characteristics of AIH. As the histological findings at the onset of AIH do not always show typical findings, a re-biopsy is considered to be important in individuals suspected to have AIH. AIH should be included in the differential diagnosis of liver dysfunction in Graves' disease, even in children.

  18. Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis in a patient with endometriosis: case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Baptist, Alan P; Baldwin, James L

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis (APD) is a condition in which the menstrual cycle is associated with a number of skin findings such as urticaria, eczema, angioedema, and others. In affected women, it occurs 3–10 days prior to the onset of menstrual flow, and resolves 2 days into menses. Women with irregular menses may not have this clear correlation, and therefore may be missed. We present a case of APD in a woman with irregular menses and urticaria/angioedema for over 20 years, w...

  19. Alopecia universalis, hypothyroidism and pituitary hyperplasia: polyglandular autoimmune syndrome III in a patient in remission from treated Hodgkin lymphoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quintyne, K I

    2010-10-01

    We herein report a case of a 33-year-old man in remission from Hodgkin lymphoma, who presented with reduced potency and hair loss. Initial endocrine tests revealed autoimmune hypothyroidism. An MRI of his pituitary gland at onset revealed hyperplasia. He tolerated replacement endocrine therapy with good response, but with no improvement in his alopecia universalis. A repeat MRI, 6 months after his initial endocrine manipulation, showed resolution of his pituitary hyperplasia.

  20. Severe Renal Hemorrhage in a Pregnant Woman Complicated with Antiphospholipid Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohei Kawaguchi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid syndrome is a systemic autoimmune disease with thrombotic tendency. Consensus guidelines for pregnancy with antiphospholipid syndrome recommend low-dose aspirin combined with unfractionated or low-molecular-weight heparin because antiphospholipid syndrome causes habitual abortion. We report a 36-year-old pregnant woman diagnosed with antiphospholipid syndrome receiving anticoagulation treatment. The patient developed left abdominal pain and gross hematuria at week 20 of pregnancy. An initial diagnosis of left ureteral calculus was made. Subsequently abdominal-pelvic computed tomography was required for diagnosis because of the appearance of severe contralateral pain. Computed tomography revealed serious renal hemorrhage, and ureteral stent placement and pain control by patient-controlled analgesia were required. After treatment, continuance of pregnancy was possible and vaginal delivery was performed safely. This is the first case report of serious renal hemorrhage in a pregnant woman with antiphospholipid syndrome receiving anticoagulation treatment and is an instructive case for urological and obstetrical practitioners.

  1. A case of Cronkhite-Canada syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirohama, Shigeo; Soedjaro; Machida, Takashi

    1985-01-01

    A 75-year-old woman with Cronkhite-Canada syndrome underwent computed tomography (CT) and ultrasonography (US). CT and US provided useful information on pathologic conditions, including edema of the digestive mucosa, which characterize this syndrome. Clinical analysis of this syndrome in 77 Japanese cases reported in the literature was presented. (Namekawa, K.)

  2. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (a case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patkar A

    1991-07-01

    Full Text Available An adult schizophrenic patient developed neuroleptic malignant syndrome following treatment with parenteral haloperidol. An early recognition of the syndrome, immediate discontinuation of the offending agent and prompt treatment with bromocriptine and lorazepam produced a good recovery. The various features of the case are discussed in view of the potential lethality of the syndrome.

  3. [Pseudo-Bartter syndrome--2 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jóźwiak, Lucyna; Jaroszyński, Andrzej; Baranowicz-Gaszczyk, Iwona; Borowicz, Ewa; Ksiazek, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    Bartter syndrome represents the group of renal disturbances characterized by hypokaliemia and metabolic alkalosis. Some diseases could display hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis without primary tubular dysfunction. These disorders are called pseudo-Bartter syndrome. In this paper we present 2 cases of pseudo-Bartter syndrome related among to other things to overuse of diuretic drugs.

  4. Síndrome de Turner y tiroiditis autoinmune Turner´s syndrome and autoimmune thyroiditis

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    Tamara Fernández Teruel

    2003-12-01

    ´s maneuver, no pubic hair, external feminine genitalia and stage I breast development (Tanner I. Supplementary studies performed: TSH 32,6 mU/L, positive anti-michrosomal antibodies, positive anti-pancreatic islets antibodies, oral chromatin of 12%, FSH 68,8 UI/L (high, LH of 12,5 UI/L (high, estrogen value of 18 pmol/L (reduced, prolactin value of 72 mU/L (reduced. In conclusion, this was a patient with a diagnosis of Turner´s syndrome and autoimmune thyroid disease together with clinical hypothyroidism.

  5. Autoimmune liver disease 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Paolo; Granito, Alessandro; Pappas, Georgios; Muratori, Luigi; Lenzi, Marco; Bianchi, Francesco B

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune liver disease (ALD) includes a spectrum of diseases which comprises both cholestatic and hepatitic forms: autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and the so called "overlap" syndromes where hepatitic and cholestatic damage coexists. All these diseases are characterized by an extremely high heterogeneity of presentation, varying from asymptomatic, acute (as in a subset of AIH) or chronic (with aspecific symptoms such as fatigue and myalgia in AIH or fatigue and pruritus in PBC and PSC). The detection and characterization of non organ specific autoantibodies plays a major role in the diagnostic approach of autoimmune liver disease; anti nuclear reactivities (ANA) and anti smooth muscle antibodies (SMA) mark type 1 AIH, liver kidney microsomal antibody type 1 (LKM1) and liver cytosol type 1 (LC1) are the serological markers of type 2 AIH; antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) are associated with PBC, while no specific marker is found in PSC, since anticytoplasmic neutrophil antibodies with perinuclear pattern (atypical p-ANCA or p-ANNA) are also detected in a substantial proportion of type 1 AIH cases. Treatment options rely on immunosoppressive therapy (steroids and azathioprine) in AIH and on ursodeoxycholic acid in cholestatic conditions; in all these diseases liver transplantation remains the only therapeutical approach for the end stage of liver disease.

  6. A Rare case of Guillain-Barré syndrome in pregnancy treated with plasma exchange

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    Rahul Vasudev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Guillain-Barre syndromé (GBS is an autoimmune disorder. It is rare in pregnancy as there is a decrease in cell-mediated immunity. A case of 28-year-old pregnant woman who presented with acute flaccid quadriplegia suffering from GBS is discussed in this study. She was treated with plasma exchange in her immediate post-partum period. The management of GBS in pregnancy has been discussed.

  7. Analysis of PTPN22, ZFAT and MYO9B polymorphisms in Turner Syndrome and risk of autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva-Ortega, E; Ahedo, B; Fonseca-Sánchez, M A; Pérez-Durán, J; Garibay-Nieto, N; Macías-Galavíz, M T; Trujillo-Cabrera, Y; García-Latorre, E; Queipo, G

    2017-08-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is one of the most common sexual chromosome abnormalities and is clearly associated with an increased risk of autoimmune diseases, particularly thyroid disease and coeliac disease (CD). Single-nucleotide polymorphism analyses have been shown to provide correlative evidence that specific genes are associated with autoimmune disease. Our aim was to study the functional polymorphic variants of PTPN22 and ZFAT in relation to thyroid disease and those of MYO9B in relation to CD. A cross-sectional comparative analysis was performed on Mexican mestizo patients with TS and age-matched healthy females. Our data showed that PTPN22 C1858T (considered a risk variant) is not associated with TS (X 2  = 3.50, p = .61, and OR = 0.33 [95% CI = 0.10-1.10]). Also, ZFAT was not associated with TS (X 2  = 1.2, p = .28, and OR = 1.22 [95% CI = 0.84-1.79]). However, for the first time, rs2305767 MYO9B was revealed to have a strong association with TS (X 2  = 58.6, p = .0001, and OR = 10.44 [95% C = 5.51-19.80]), supporting a high level of predisposition to CD among TS patients. This report addresses additional data regarding the polymorphic variants associated with autoimmune disease, one of the most common complications in TS. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Development of central nervous system autoimmunity is impaired in the absence of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein.

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    Marita Bosticardo

    Full Text Available Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein (WASP is a key regulator of the actin cytoskeleton in hematopoietic cells. Defective expression of WASP leads to multiple abnormalities in different hematopoietic cells. Despite severe impairment of T cell function, WAS patients exhibit a high prevalence of autoimmune disorders. We attempted to induce EAE, an animal model of organ-specific autoimmunity affecting the CNS that mimics human MS, in Was(-/- mice. We describe here that Was(-/- mice are markedly resistant against EAE, showing lower incidence and milder score, reduced CNS inflammation and demyelination as compared to WT mice. Microglia was only poorly activated in Was(-/- mice. Antigen-induced T-cell proliferation, Th-1 and -17 cytokine production and integrin-dependent adhesion were increased in Was(-/- mice. However, adoptive transfer of MOG-activated T cells from Was(-/- mice in WT mice failed to induce EAE. Was(-/- mice were resistant against EAE also when induced by adoptive transfer of MOG-activated T cells from WT mice. Was(+/- heterozygous mice developed an intermediate clinical phenotype between WT and Was(-/- mice, and they displayed a mixed population of WASP-positive and -negative T cells in the periphery but not in their CNS parenchyma, where the large majority of inflammatory cells expressed WASP. In conclusion, in absence of WASP, T-cell responses against a CNS autoantigen are increased, but the ability of autoreactive T cells to induce CNS autoimmunity is impaired, most probably because of an inefficient T-cell transmigration into the CNS and defective CNS resident microglial function.

  9. Primary Sjogren Syndrome: Case report

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    Eylem Yaman Pinarci

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The importance of systemic evaluation of dry eye patients and choosing appropriate treatment based on the severity of disease were emphasized with this case. 48 years old woman complained about decreased vision, burning, itching in both eyes which got worse over the years, for about 20 years. Schirmer I test value was 0 mm/5min in both eyes. Slit lamp examination revealed filamentary keratitis in both eyes. Anti-Ro/ SSA, anti-La/ SS-B antibodies and salivary gland biopsy for Sjogren syndrome were positive. Temporary punctal occlusion and oral hydroxychloroquine were added to her treatment. After 10 days, her overall dry eye condition improved and permanent punctual plugs were inserted in both lower puctums.Dry eye patients should be evaluated systemically and severity of disease should be considered before treatment is started. Addition to topical application of artificial tears, punctal occlusion may be a proper option in dry eye patients with Sjogren syndrome. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(4.000: 818-822

  10. [Scimitar syndrome: a case series].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo González, Carlos; Karam Bechara, José; Sáenz Gómez, Jessica; Siegert Olivares, Augusto; Jamaica Balderas, Lourdes

    Scimitar syndrome is a rare and complex congenital anomaly of the lung with multiple variables and is named for its resemblance to the classical radiological crooked sword. Its defining feature is the anomalous pulmonary drainage. It is associated with various cardiothoracic malformations and a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. Nine patients diagnosed with scimitar syndrome found in the database of Hospital Infantil de México between 2009 and 2013 were reviewed. Demographic records, clinical status and hemodynamic parameters reported were collected. This case series called attention to certain differences between our group of patients and those reported in the international literature. Patients were predominantly female and were diagnosed between 1 and 20 months of life. All were asymptomatic at the time of the study. Half of the patients had a history of respiratory disease and all patients had with pulmonary hypertension. Surgical management was required in on-third of the patient group. Copyright © 2014 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  11. Chronic autoimmune disorders are increased in coeliac disease: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibbò, Stefano; Pes, Giovanni Mario; Usai-Satta, Paolo; Salis, Roberta; Soro, Sara; Quarta Colosso, Bianca Maria; Dore, Maria Pina

    2017-11-01

    Coeliac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disorder of the small bowel associated with increased risk of additional autoimmune diseases (ADs).To investigate the prevalence of ADs in a population of adult coeliac patients.This was a retrospective case-control study. Data from coeliac patients and controls referred to a tertiary center between 2013 and 2016 were collected. The frequency of ADs and the unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for age, gender, disease duration, and body mass index with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were evaluated.Two hundred fifty-five patients with CD (median age 37.1 years; 206 women) were matched with 250 controls. ADs were more frequent (35.3%) in coeliac patients than in controls (15.2%). Adjusted ORs for the presence of only 1, at least 1, and more than 1 AD were 3.13 (95% CI 1.81-5.42, P disease. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Anti-Factor V inhibitor in patients with autoimmune diseases: case report and literature review

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    Imashuku S

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Shinsaku Imashuku1, Takeshi Hasegawa2, Kagekatsu Kubo2, Masaki Nakato2, Midori Shima31Division of Pediatrics and Hematology, 2Division of Internal Medicine, Takasago-Seibu Hospital, Takasago, Hyogo; 3Department of Pediatrics, Nara Medical University, Kashihara, Nara, JapanAbstract: Acquired anti-Factor V deficiency caused by inhibitor production is a rare coagulation disorder. Although this is a well known entity in the literature, choice of optimal treatment for an individual patient is difficult, given that no standard therapeutic measures are available because of rare incidence and various underlying diseases occurring in the elderly. An 88 year-old man treated for Hashimoto's disease was found to exhibit prolongation of both prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time. Detailed study of coagulation factors revealed a deficiency of Factor V. Our patient's coagulation disorder resolved in two weeks with intravenous administration of prednisolone 20 mg/day. Clinical features of autoimmune disease-related Factor V deficiency are discussed, along with eight previously reported cases over the past 20 years.Keywords: anti-Factor V inhibitor, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, autoimmune disease

  13. Successful Pregnancy Outcome in Women with Recurrent IVF Failure and Anti-hCG Autoimmunity: A Report of Three Cases

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    Valeria Muller

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report three cases of effective management of infertility in women with a history of repeated unsuccessful IVF attempts, who have developed antibodies to hCG. A novel approach to conservative treatment of immunologic reproductive failure, suggested for selected patients, included membrane plasmapheresis, combined prednisolone, and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. No adverse side effects were observed; all cases resulted in pregnancy and subsequent life births. In order to be given an adequate efficient treatment, women with recurrent implantation failure should be suspected for autoimmune factor of infertility and its possible association with anti-hCG autoimmunity.

  14. Bruck syndrome: a case report

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    Дмитрий Степанович Буклаев

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the clinical case of an infant with Bruck syndrome. The clinical and radiological analyses showed the presence of systemic osteoporosis with pathological fractures; contractures of the elbow, knee, and ankle joints; delay of physical and motor development; and signs of hypoplasia in some of the muscle groups. There was also a right-sided congenital muscular torticollis. X-ray analysis revealed a moderate antecurvation deformity of the lower legs and femurs, with cortical thinning. Laboratory data detected an abnormal beta-cross lap increase.Treatment of osteoporosis by inhibitors of osteoclastic resorption (pamidronate had a positive effect, and the elimination of flexion contractures at the elbow using plaster bandages with the distraction device also resulted in a positive effect.

  15. AIRE variations in Addison's disease and autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS): partial gene deletions contribute to APS I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bøe Wolff, A S; Oftedal, B; Johansson, S; Bruland, O; Løvås, K; Meager, A; Pedersen, C; Husebye, E S; Knappskog, P M

    2008-03-01

    Autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) is often associated with other components in autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS). Whereas APS I is caused by mutations in the AIRE gene, the susceptibility genes for AAD and APS II are unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether polymorphisms or copy number variations in the AIRE gene were associated with AAD and APS II. First, nine SNPs in the AIRE gene were analyzed in 311 patients with AAD and APS II and 521 healthy controls, identifying no associated risk. Second, in a subgroup of 25 of these patients, AIRE sequencing revealed three novel polymorphisms. Finally, the AIRE copy number was determined by duplex quantitative PCR in 14 patients with APS I, 161 patients with AAD and APS II and in 39 healthy subjects. In two Scandinavian APS I patients previously reported to be homozygous for common AIRE mutations, we identified large deletions of the AIRE gene covering at least exon 2 to exon 8. We conclude that polymorphisms in the AIRE gene are not associated with AAD and APS II. We further suggest that DNA analysis of the parents of patients found to be homozygous for mutations in AIRE, always should be performed.

  16. Voltage-gated potassium channel-complex autoimmunity and associated clinical syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani, Sarosh R; Vincent, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC)-complex antibodies are defined by the radioimmunoprecipitation of Kv1 potassium channel subunits from brain tissue extracts and were initially discovered in patients with peripheral nerve hyperexcitability (PNH). Subsequently, they were found in patients with PNH plus psychosis, insomnia, and dysautonomia, collectively termed Morvan's syndrome (MoS), and in a limbic encephalopathy (LE) with prominent amnesia and frequent seizures. Most recently, they have been described in patients with pure epilepsies, especially in patients with the novel and distinctive semiology termed faciobrachial dystonic seizures (FBDS). In each of these conditions, there is a close correlation between clinical measures and antibody levels. The VGKC-complex is a group of proteins that are strongly associated in situ and after extraction in mild detergent. Two major targets of the autoantibodies are leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1) and contactin-associated protein 2 (CASPR2). The patients with PNH or MoS are most likely to have CASPR2 antibodies, whereas LGI1 antibodies are found characteristically in patients with FBDS and LE. Crucially, each of these conditions has a good response to immunotherapies, often corticosteroids and plasma exchange, although optimal regimes require further study. VGKC-complex antibodies have also been described in neuropathic pain syndromes, chronic epilepsies, a polyradiculopathy in porcine abattoir workers, and some children with status epilepticus. Increasingly, however, the antigenic targets in these patients are not defined and in some cases the antibodies may be secondary rather than the primary cause. Future serologic studies should define all the antigenic components of the VGKC-complex, and further inform mechanisms of antibody pathogenicity and related inflammation. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Noonan Syndrome and Stroke: A Case Report

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    Ebru Nur Mıhçı

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Noonan syndrome is an autosomal dominant genetic disease characterized by short stature, webbed neck, typical facial appearance and congenital heart disease. Here we report a 24 year old woman patient with the diagnosis of Noonan syndrome who admitted to our clinic with ischemic stroke caused by atrial fibrillation secondary to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Noonan syndrome patients with stroke due to vascular malformations have been reported, but non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a rare cause for stroke in patients with Noonan syndrome. Our aim of presenting the case emphasize that Noonan syndrome should be thought as a differential diagnosis in patients with stroke at a young age and dysmorphic facial appearance

  18. Noonan Syndrome and Stroke: A Case Report

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    Ebru Nur Mıhçı

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Noonan syndrome is an autosomal dominant genetic disease characterized by short stature, webbed neck, typical facial appearance and congenital heart disease. Here we report a 24 year old woman patient with the diagnosis of Noonan syndrome who admitted to our clinic with ischemic stroke caused by atrial fibrillation secondary to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Noonan syndrome patients with stroke due to vascular malformations have been reported, but non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a rare cause for stroke in patients with Noonan syndrome. Our aim of presenting the case emphasize that Noonan syndrome should be thought as a differential diagnosis in patients with stroke at a young age and dysmorphic facial appearance.

  19. Meckel Gruber Syndrome: A Case Report

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    Celal Devecioglu

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Meckel-Gruber syndrome is an autosomal recessive disordercharacterized by a combination of renal cysts and variably associatedfeatures including developmental anomalies of the central nervous system(typically encephalocele, hepatic ductal dysplasia and cysts, andpolydactyly. n this cases AFP levels are increases. Alternative names areMeckel Syndrome, Dysencephalia Splanchnocystica, Gruber Syndrome andMeckel – Gruber Syndrome. This study is presented to draw attention to theMeckel Gruber Syndrome which seen rarely, have high risk of reccurenceand antenathal determination of AFP levels and early diagnosis byultrasonographic screening can be confident.

  20. Benedikt's Syndrome: A Rare Case Report

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    Aslı Aksoy Gundogdu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Benedikt syndrome is a rare midbrain syndrome which is associated with the damage of the median mesencephalic tegmentum. The most common etiology of this syndrome is ischemic stroke. The occlusion of the posterior cerebral artery or the paramedian branches of the basilar artery results with the ischemia of this midbrain territory. Ipsilateral occulomotor cranial nerve palsy, contralateral hemiparesis, hemihypoesthesia, hemiataxia and korea or tremor are the clinical symptoms of this syndrome. In this article, we reported a case of Benedikt syndrome with an etiologic cause of cardioembolic stroke, who was diagnosed by the neurological examination and neuroradiological findings.

  1. Serotonin Syndrome: A Case Report

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    Pedro Oliveira

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin Syndrome (SS is a potentially fatal iatrogenic condition that occurs as a result of an over-stimulation of the serotonergic receptors. Its typical presentation consists of the triad altered mental status, autonomic hyperactivity and neuromuscular alterations, although the clinical condition is highly variable. Despite being potentially treatable, many cases per year are underdiagnosed, a fact that has been mainly attributed to the lack of knowledge of this condition by the physicians. SS treatment relies on four pillars: removal of the precipitating agent and supportive therapy, antagonism of 5-HT2A receptors, and control of agitation, autonomic instability and hyperthermia. It is expected that its incidence will accompany the growth of the prescription of antidepressants, andincreasing physician’s awareness about its occurrence, could contribute to a timely diagnosis and to the success of the treatment. We present a clinical case of a patient diagnosed with Bipolar Affective Disorder, hospitalized for a depressive episode with a psychotic component, which developed a SS compatible condition. Based on this case report the authors undertake a theoretical review of this condition.

  2. Waardenburg Syndrome: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Hayrullah Alp; Esma Alp

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Auditory-pigmentary syndromes are a group of diseases that effect the skin, hair, eyes and the cochlea. Waardenburg syndrome is one of the members of these autosomal dominantly inherited diseases. Waardenburg syndrome is characterized by white forelock, congenital sensorineural hearing loss, hypopigmented skin and anomalies of the intraocular tissues. How ever all these diagnostic features may not be seen in all patient. In addition, there are four subtypes of the syndrome in ea...

  3. In myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome, increased autoimmune activity against 5-HT is associated with immuno-inflammatory pathways and bacterial translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Michael; Ringel, Karl; Kubera, Marta; Anderson, George; Morris, Gerwyn; Galecki, Piotr; Geffard, Michel

    2013-09-05

    Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is accompanied by activation of immuno-inflammatory pathways, increased bacterial translocation and autoimmune responses to serotonin (5-HT). Inflammation is known to damage 5-HT neurons while bacterial translocation may drive autoimmune responses. This study has been carried out to examine the autoimmune responses to 5-HT in ME/CFS in relation to inflammation and bacterial translocation. We examined 5-HT antibodies in 117 patients with ME/CFS (diagnosed according to the centers for disease control and prevention criteria, CDC) as compared with 43 patients suffering from chronic fatigue (CF) but not fulfilling the CDC criteria and 35 normal controls. Plasma interleukin-1 (IL-1), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α, neopterin and the IgA responses to Gram-negative bacteria were measured. Severity of physio-somatic symptoms was measured using the fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome rating scale (FF scale). The incidence of positive autoimmune activity against 5-HT was significantly higher (pfatigue, neurocognitive and autonomic symptoms, sadness and a flu-like malaise. The results show that, in ME/CFS, increased 5-HT autoimmune activity is associated with activation of immuno-inflammatory pathways and increased bacterial translocation, factors which are known to play a role in the onset of autoimmune reactions. 5-HT autoimmune activity could play a role in the pathophysiology of ME/CFS and the onset of physio-somatic symptoms. These results provide mechanistic support for the notion that ME/CFS is a neuro-immune disorder. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Stiff person syndrome (SPS: Literature review and case report

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    Erna Pretorius

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Stiff person syndrome (SPS is a rare, debilitating condition which presents with progressive and inconsistent neurological features. The main symptoms are stiffness and intermittent, painful muscle spasms, triggered and exacerbated by stressful and emotional stimuli. The fluctuating clinical nature of SPS, and otherwise normal neurological examination, often lead to a misdiagnosis of conversion disorder. Psychiatric symptoms frequently accompany this disorder and patients are often first seen by psychiatrists. SPS is autoimmune-based: antibodies are directed against glutamate decarboxylase, resulting in dysregulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA in the brain which is considered the cause of the neuropsychiatric symptomatology. SPS should be considered in the differential diagnosis of conversion disorder. Effective management requires early detection, a collaborative approach with GABA-ergic medication and intravenous immunoglobulins, and management of concomitant psychiatric disorders. We describe a patient with SPS. Only one other case has been reported in South Africa.

  5. Autoimmune/Inflammatory Arthritis Associated Lymphomas: Who Is at Risk?

    OpenAIRE

    Yadlapati, Sujani; Efthimiou, Petros

    2016-01-01

    Specific autoimmune and inflammatory rheumatic diseases have been associated with an increased risk of malignant lymphomas. Conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), dermatomyositis, and celiac disease have been consistently linked to malignant lymphomas. Isolated cases of lymphomas associated with spondyloarthropathies and autoinflammatory diseases have also been reported. Direct association between autoimmunity and ly...

  6. Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis in a patient with endometriosis: case report and review of the literature

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    Baldwin James L

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis (APD is a condition in which the menstrual cycle is associated with a number of skin findings such as urticaria, eczema, angioedema, and others. In affected women, it occurs 3–10 days prior to the onset of menstrual flow, and resolves 2 days into menses. Women with irregular menses may not have this clear correlation, and therefore may be missed. We present a case of APD in a woman with irregular menses and urticaria/angioedema for over 20 years, who had not been diagnosed or correctly treated due to the variable timing of skin manifestations and menses. In addition, we review the medical literature in regards to clinical features, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment options.

  7. Statin-Associated Autoimmune Myopathy: A Systematic Review of 100 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazir, Salik; Lohani, Saroj; Tachamo, Niranjan; Poudel, Dilliram; Donato, Anthony

    2017-04-01

    Statins are a group of drugs that reduce the levels of triglycerides and cholesterol in blood by inhibiting HMG-CoA reductase, an enzyme involved in rate limiting step in cholesterol synthesis. About 2-20% patients on statins develop toxic myopathies, which usually resolve on discontinuation of statin. More recently, an immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy has been found to be associated with statin use which in most cases requires treatment with immunosuppressants. To perform a systematic review on published case reports and case series of statin-associated autoimmune myopathy. A comprehensive search of PUBMED, EMBASE, Cochrane library and ClinicalTrials.gov databases was performed for relevant articles from inception until March 19, 2016 to identify cases of statin-associated necrotizing myopathy and characterize their symptoms, evaluation and response to treatment. A total of 16 articles describing 100 patients with statin-associated autoimmune myopathy were identified. The mean age of presentation was 64.72 years, and 54.44% were males. The main presenting clinical feature was proximal muscle weakness, which was symmetric in 83.33% of patients. The mean creatine kinase (CK) was 6853 IU/l. Anti-HMG-CoA reductase antibody was positive in all cases tested (n = 57/57, 100%). In patients with no anti-HMG-CoA antibody results, diagnosis was established by findings of necrotizing myopathy on biopsy. Among the 83 cases where muscle biopsy information was available, 81.48% had necrosis, while 18.51% had combination of necrosis and inflammation. Most (83.82%) patients received two or more immunosuppressants to induce remission. Ninety-one percent had resolution of symptoms after treatment. Statin-associated necrotizing myopathy is a symmetric proximal muscle weakness associated with extreme elevations of CK. It is common in males and can occur after months of statin use. It is associated with necrosis on muscle biopsy and the presence of anti-HMG-CoA reductase antibodies

  8. Autoimmune Diabetes Associated With Pembrolizumab: A Review of Published Case Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheema, Anmol; Makadia, Bhaktidevi; Karwadia, Tejas; Bajwa, Ravneet; Hossain, Mohammad

    2018-02-01

    The utility of immunotherapy, such as pembrolizumab, is becoming essential in the treatment of certain cancers. Pembrolizumab works through binding of programmed cell death 1 receptor that blocks the binding of the programmed cell death ligand 1 and is commonly used in non-small cell lung cancer and melanoma. Pembrolizumab has been reported to be associated with multiple adverse reactions such as pneumonitis, colitis, hepatitis, hypophysitis, hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, nephritis, and type 1 diabetes; however, pembrolizumab causing type 1 diabetes was only reported in 0.1% of the patients in clinical trials. A review of the literature generated 1,001 unique citations of which six reported cases of autoimmune diabetes associated with pembrolizumab were selected and compared. Review of the cases showed no sexual predilection and the average age of onset was 58 years old. The majority of the patients were treated for melanoma (5/6 cases), initially presented with diabetic ketoacidosis (4/6 cases), and had at one point taken ipilimumab (4/6 cases). There was no association found between the number of treatments received and the development of diabetes. With the increasing use of pembrolizumab in cancer treatment regular blood glucose monitoring during treatment, especially in patients who had also taken ipilimumab, may prevent the onset of this life-threatening complication.

  9. Autoimmune hepatitis/sclerosing cholangitis overlap syndrome in childhood: a 16-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorio, G V; Portmann, B; Karani, J; Harrison, P; Donaldson, P T; Vergani, D; Mieli-Vergani, G

    2001-03-01

    To investigate whether sclerosing cholangitis with an autoimmune serology characteristic of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and AIH are distinct entities, we studied 55 consecutive children with clinical and/or biochemical evidence of liver disease and circulating antinuclear (ANA), anti-smooth muscle (SMA), and/or liver-kidney-microsomal type 1 (LKM1) autoantibodies. They underwent liver biopsy, direct cholangiography, sigmoidoscopy, and rectal biopsy at presentation. Twenty-eight were diagnosed as AIH in the absence and 27 autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC) in the presence of radiological features of cholangiopathy. Twenty-six ASC and 20 AIH had ANA and/or SMA; 1 ASC and 8 AIH LKM1 autoantibody. Similarities between the 2 conditions included most clinical and biochemical parameters and a lower frequency of HLA DR4. Inflammatory bowel disease and histological biliary changes were more common in ASC; coagulopathy, hypoalbuminemia, lymphocytic periportal hepatitis, and HLA DR3 were more common in AIH. Histological biliary changes were observed in 65% of ASC and 31% of AIH patients. Eighty-nine percent responded to immunosuppression. Follow-up liver biopsies from 17 ASC and 18 AIH patients had similarly reduced inflammatory activity and no progression to cirrhosis. Sixteen follow-up cholangiograms from AIH patients and 9 from ASC patients were unchanged, while 8 ASC patients showed a progressive cholangiopathy. One child with AIH and ulcerative colitis developed sclerosing cholangitis 8 years after presentation. At 2 to 16 years (median, 7 years) from presentation, all patients are alive, including 4 ASC patients who underwent liver transplantation. In conclusion, ASC and AIH are similarly prevalent in childhood; cholangiography is often needed to distinguish between these 2 entities, which are likely to lie within the same disease process.

  10. Waardenburg syndrome: A report of three cases

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    Ghosh Sudip

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Waardenburg syndrome (WS is a rare autosomally inherited and genetically heterogeneous disorder of neural crest cell development with distinct cutaneous manifestations. Based on the clinical presentations, four subtypes of the disease are recognized. A careful clinical evaluation is required to differentiate various types of WS and other associated auditory-pigmentary syndromes. We describe a case series of WS to highlight the wide spectrum of manifestations of the syndrome including a rare association.

  11. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: A rare case

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    Satyaki Ganguly

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin-Goltz syndrome or nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome is characterized by multiple basocellular epitheliomas, keratocysts in the jaws, bifid ribs, palmar and/or plantar pits and ectopic calcifications of the falx cerebri. We describe a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome illustrating the importance of a thorough examination including the examination of palms and soles and detailed investigations in a patient having lesions suggestive of basal cell carcinoma and multiple naevi.

  12. Gorlin-goltz syndrome: a rare case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Satyaki; Jaykar, Kranti C; Kumar, Rajesh; Jha, Abhijeet Kumar; Banerjee, P K

    2015-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome or nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome is characterized by multiple basocellular epitheliomas, keratocysts in the jaws, bifid ribs, palmar and/or plantar pits and ectopic calcifications of the falx cerebri. We describe a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome illustrating the importance of a thorough examination including the examination of palms and soles and detailed investigations in a patient having lesions suggestive of basal cell carcinoma and multiple naevi.

  13. Gorlin-Goltz Syndrome: A Rare Case

    OpenAIRE

    Ganguly, Satyaki; Jaykar, Kranti C; Kumar, Rajesh; Jha, Abhijeet Kumar; Banerjee, PK

    2015-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome or nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome is characterized by multiple basocellular epitheliomas, keratocysts in the jaws, bifid ribs, palmar and/or plantar pits and ectopic calcifications of the falx cerebri. We describe a case of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome illustrating the importance of a thorough examination including the examination of palms and soles and detailed investigations in a patient having lesions suggestive of basal cell carcinoma and multiple naevi.

  14. Leucine-Rich Glioma Inactivated-1 and Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel Autoimmune Encephalitis Associated with Ischemic Stroke: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, Marisa; Morales-Vidal, Sarkis; Ruland, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune encephalitis is associated with a wide variety of antibodies and clinical presentations. Voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) antibodies are a cause of autoimmune non-paraneoplastic encephalitis characterized by memory impairment, psychiatric symptoms, and seizures. We present a case of VGKC encephalitis likely preceding an ischemic stroke. Reports of autoimmune encephalitis associated with ischemic stroke are rare. Several hypotheses linking these two disease processes are proposed. PMID:27242653

  15. Williams-Beuren's Syndrome: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Hassan; Babazadeh, Kazem; Fattahi, Saeid; Mokhtari-Esbuie, Farzad

    2012-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome is a rare familial multisystem disorder occurring in 1 per 20,000 live births. It is characterized by congenital heart defects (CHD), skeletal and renal anomalies, cognitive disorder, social personality disorder and dysmorphic facies. We present a case of Williams syndrome that presented to us with heart murmur and cognitive problem. A 5-year-old girl referred to pediatric cardiologist because of heart murmurs. She had a systolic murmur (2-3/6) in right upper sternal border with radiation to right cervical region. She also had a bulge forehead. Angiography showed mild supra valvular aortic stenosis and mild multiple peripheral pulmonary stenosis. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed and the result was: 46.XX, ish del (7q11.2) (ELN X1) (7q22 X2) ELN deletion compatible with Williams syndrome. Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis is associated with Noonan syndrome, Alagille syndrome, Cutis laxa, Ehler-Danlos syndrome, and Silver-Russel syndrome. The patient had peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis, but no other signs of these syndromes were present, and also she had a supravalvular aortic stenosis which was not seen in other syndromes except Williams syndrome. Conclusion. According to primary symptoms, paraclinical and clinical finding such as dysmorphic facies, cognitive disorder and congenital heart defect, Williams syndrome was the first diagnosis. We suggest a more attention for evaluating heart murmur in childhood period, especially when the patient has abnormal facial features or mental problem.

  16. Williams-Beuren's Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Zamani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Williams-Beuren syndrome is a rare familial multisystem disorder occurring in 1 per 20,000 live births. It is characterized by congenital heart defects (CHD, skeletal and renal anomalies, cognitive disorder, social personality disorder and dysmorphic facies. We present a case of Williams syndrome that presented to us with heart murmur and cognitive problem. A 5-year-old girl referred to pediatric cardiologist because of heart murmurs. She had a systolic murmur (2-3/6 in right upper sternal border with radiation to right cervical region. She also had a bulge forehead. Angiography showed mild supra valvular aortic stenosis and mild multiple peripheral pulmonary stenosis. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH was performed and the result was: 46.XX, ish del (7q11.2 (ELN X1 (7q22 X2 ELN deletion compatible with Williams syndrome. Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis is associated with Noonan syndrome, Alagille syndrome, Cutis laxa, Ehler-Danlos syndrome, and Silver-Russel syndrome. The patient had peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis, but no other signs of these syndromes were present, and also she had a supravalvular aortic stenosis which was not seen in other syndromes except Williams syndrome. Conclusion. According to primary symptoms, paraclinical and clinical finding such as dysmorphic facies, cognitive disorder and congenital heart defect, Williams syndrome was the first diagnosis. We suggest a more attention for evaluating heart murmur in childhood period, especially when the patient has abnormal facial features or mental problem.

  17. Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome; a Case Report

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    Abbas Bagheri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report a case of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome. Case Report: A seven-year-old boy presented with marked generalized hypopigmentation, ocular exodeviation and nystagmus. He had history of easy bruising. Examination revealed green irides with marked transillumination, hypopigmented fundi and foveal hypoplasia. Further investigations disclosed platelet storage defect with adenosine diphosphate deficiency and abnormal aggregation compatible with Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome. The patient underwent strabismus surgery taking necessary precautions such as reserving platelet concentrates in case of a hemorrhagic event. Conclusion: Patients with albinism should be evaluated for Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome especially before surgery to prevent life-threatening complications.

  18. Case Report - Neonatal progeroid syndrome (Wiedemann ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Case Report - Neonatal progeroid syndrome (Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch syndrome) in an Egyptian child with premature loss of teeth, and café au lait skin ... pads in the suprabuttock areas, triangular face, pseudohydrocephalous, sparse scalp hair and eyebrows, prominent scalp veins, greatly widened anterior fontanels, ...

  19. CASE REPORT Moebius syndrome with macular hyperpigmentation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bilateral macular hyperpigmentation was detected in our patient on fundus examination which was not reported previously in Moebius syndrome cases. In addition there is hypoplasia of the right pectoralis major muscle. KEYWORDS Moebius syndrome; Macular hyperpigmentation; Pectoralis major muscle; Cranial nerves; ...

  20. Churg-strauss syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdan, Vyacheslav М; Kitura, Yevdokiia М; Kitura, Oksana Ye; Babanina, Maryna Yu; Tkachenko, Maksym V; Lebid, Volodymyr G

    A clinical case of Churg-Strauss syndrome has been reported on the 53-year-old female patient Ts. with bronchial asthma and allergic rhinitis. The main clinical signs and syndromes depending on the stage of the disease are presented, as well as therapeutic treatment of patients with this disease.

  1. Adult polysplenia syndrome. A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usamentiaga, E.; Garcia-Valtuille, R.; Abascal, F.; Artiz, A.

    1997-01-01

    Polysplenia syndrome is a rare combination of congenital anomalies. It includes in a variable range: abdominal heterotaxy with multiples splenic nodules on the right side, cardiopulmonary anomalies and incomplete development of the inferior vena cava. We present the findings of a case of polysplenia syndrome performed by CT in an Adult asyntomatic patient. 11 refs

  2. [Autoimmune thyroid disease and other non-endocrine autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilas, Ljiljana Todorović; Icin, Tijana; Paro, Jovanka Novaković; Bajkin, Ivana

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are chronic conditions initiated by the loss of immunological tolerance to self-antigens. They constitute heterogeneous group of disorders, in which multiple alterations in the immune system result in a spectrum of syndromes that either target specific organs or affect the body systematically. Recent epidemiological studies have shown a possible shift of one autoimmune disease to another or the fact that more than one autoimmune disease may coexist in a single patient or in the same family. Numerous autoimmune diseases have been shown to coexist frequently with thyroid autoimmune diseases. AUTOIMMNUNE THYROID DISEASE AND OTHER ORGAN SPECIFIC NON-ENDOCRINE AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES: This part of the study reviews the prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease coexisting with: pernicious anaemia, vitiligo, celiac disease, autoimmune liver disease, miastenia gravis, alopecia areata and sclerosis multiplex, and several recommendations for screening have been given. AUTOIMMUNE THYROID DISEASE AND OTHER ORGAN NON-SPECIFIC NON-ENDOCRINE AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES: Special attention is given to the correlation between autoimmune thyroid disease and rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, syndrome Sjögren, systemic sclerosis and mixed connective tissue disease. Screening for autoimmune thyroid diseases should be recommended in everyday clinical practice, in patients with primary organ-specific or organ non-specific autoimmune disease. Otherwise, in patients with primary thyroid autoimmune disease, there is no good reason of seeking for all other autoimmune diseases, although these patients have a greater risk of developing other autoimmune disease. Economic aspects of medicine require further analyzing of these data, from cost/benefit point of view to justified either mandatory screening or medical practitioner judgment.

  3. Rate of positive autoimmune markers in Human T lymphotropic virus type 1 carriers: a case-control study from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi Ghezeldasht, Sanaz; Hedayati-Moghaddam, Mohammad Reza; Habibi, Meysam; Mollahosseini, Farzad; Rafatpanah, Houshang; Miri, Rahele; Hatef Fard, MohammadReza; Sahebari, Maryam

    2018-01-01

    Human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection with high prevalence in the north-east of Iran, particularly in Mashhad, can lead to adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) and a variety of autoimmune diseases. The aim of the study was to examine the presence of autoimmune markers in HTLV carries. Serum samples were obtained from blood donors in Mashhad, northeastern Iran. One hundred and five HTLV-1 positive (cases) and 104 age- and sex-matched HTLV-1 negative donors (controls) were assessed for presence of serum autoimmune markers by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The mean ages of cases and controls were 40.8 ± 9.4 and 41.5 ± 9.3 years, respectively (P = 0.5). In the case group, 81.9% and in the control group 83.7% were male (P = 0.74). The frequency of positive antinuclear antibodies and anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies in the serum of the two groups were not significantly different (P = 0.68 and P = 0.62, respectively). Only one antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-positive case (1%) was observed in the group and no anti-phospholipid immunoglobulin G positivity was observed. The frequency of rheumatoid factor (RF) was greater in case group than in the control group, although the difference was not significant (P = 0.08). The amount of RF in all 12 RF positive sera were higher than normal levels (33-37 IU/mL). Because we failed to detect any significant relation between serum autoimmune markers and HTLV-1 infection, and because of the relatively low prevalence of autoimmune diseases, it could be concluded that healthy HTLV-1 carriers do not produce rheumatologic-related auto-antibodies more than the healthy population. © 2017 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  4. Poland's Syndrome: A Case Report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jen

    The Poland's anomaly was first described in 1841 by Sir Alfred Poland as a syndrome presenting with absence or underdevelopment of pectoralis ... He was the second child in a family of four. There was no familial history of similar .... hypoplasia: a middle degree of Poland syndrome. Acta Radiologica 1996; 37: 759-762. 8.

  5. Kawasaki syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeley, S L; Cohen, P R

    1993-08-01

    A four-year-old black boy with Kawasaki syndrome is reported. The child was treated with intravenous gamma globulin and aspirin. He had no disease-associated adverse sequelae. The clinical findings, diagnostic criteria, and treatment of Kawasaki syndrome are reviewed.

  6. Two cases of Goldenhar syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caca, Ihsan; Unlu, Kaan; Ari, Seyhmus

    2006-01-01

    We describe two boys with Goldenhar syndrome. The 8-year-old boy had an epibulbar dermoid in his left eye, type 1 Duane syndrome, bilateral preauricular appendages, and an interauricular septal defect. The 10-year-old boy had an epibulbar dermoid in his right eye, appendages in the right preauricular region, and sensorineural hearing loss.

  7. A fatal case of Perthes syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Jobé

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Perthes syndrome, or traumatic asphyxia, is a clinical syndrome associating cervicofacial cyanosis with cutaneous petechial haemorrhages and subconjonctival bleeding resulting from severe sudden compressive chest trauma. Deep inspiration and a Valsalva maneuver just prior to rapid and severe chest compression, are responsible for the development of this syndrome. Current treatment is symptomatic: urgent relief of chest compression and cardiopulmonary resuscitation if needed. Outcome may be satisfactory depending on the duration and severity of compression. Prolonged thoracic compression may sometimes lead to cerebral anoxia, irreversible neurologic damage and death. We report a fatal case of Perthes syndrome resulting from an industrial accident.

  8. Seckel syndrome: a report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, K; Kaliyamurthy, S D; Govindarajan, M; Swathi, S

    2012-01-01

    Seckel syndrome, first defined by Seckel in 1960, is a rare (incidence 1:10,000), genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder presenting at birth. This syndrome is characterized by a proportionate dwarfism of prenatal onset, a severe microcephaly with a "bird-headed" like appearance (beaked nose, receding forehead, prominent eyes, and micrognathia), and mental retardation. The significance of dental alterations in this syndrome resides in the defect, hypoplastic enamel, being limited to the primary dentition; in most instances the second primary molar tooth is not affected. A case of the Seckel syndrome is presented.

  9. Seckel syndrome: A report of a case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Ramalingam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Seckel syndrome, first defined by Seckel in 1960, is a rare (incidence 1:10,000, genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder presenting at birth. This syndrome is characterized by a proportionate dwarfism of prenatal onset, a severe microcephaly with a "bird-headed" like appearance (beaked nose, receding forehead, prominent eyes, and micrognathia, and mental retardation. The significance of dental alterations in this syndrome resides in the defect, hypoplastic enamel, being limited to the primary dentition; in most instances the second primary molar tooth is not affected. A case of the Seckel syndrome is presented.

  10. Paedatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorder Associated with Streptococcal Infection in an Indian Adolescent--A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sachin; Vaish, Supriya; Chopra, Saurabh; Singh, Vindyaprakash; Sharma, Priyanka

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders associated with Streptococcal infection (PANDAS) is a unique constellation of signs and symptoms that exist in a subset of children with rapid onset or exacerbation of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and/or tic disorders due to an initial autoimmune reaction to a Group A Beta Hemolytic…

  11. Neuropsychiatric autoimmune encephalitis without VGKC-complex, NMDAR, and GAD autoantibodies: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najjar, Souhel; Pearlman, Daniel; Devinsky, Orrin; Najjar, Amanda; Nadkarni, Siddhartha; Butler, Tracy; Zagzag, David

    2013-03-01

    We report a patient with a seronegative autoimmune panencephalitis, adding a subtype to the emerging spectrum of seronegative autoimmune encephalitis, and we review the sparse literature on isolated psychiatric presentations of autoimmune encephalitis. (A PubMed search for "seronegative autoimmune encephalitis," "nonvasculitic autoimmune inflammatory meningoencephalitis," and related terms revealed VGKC)-complex, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) autoantibodies. We excluded genetic, metabolic, paraneoplastic, degenerative, and infectious etiologies. The patient's symptoms remitted fully with immune therapy, but recurred in association with widespread bihemispheric brain lesions. Brain biopsy revealed mild nonvasculitic inflammation and prominent vascular hyalinization. Immune therapy with plasma exchanges cleared the MRI abnormalities but, 10 years after onset, the patient still suffers neuropsychiatric sequelae. We conclude that autoimmune panencephalitis seronegative for VGKC-complex, NMDAR, and GAD autoantibodies is a subtype of autoimmune encephalitis that can present with pure neuropsychiatric features and a normal brain MRI. Immunologic mechanisms may account for psychiatric symptoms in a subset of patients now diagnosed with classical psychotic disorders. Delay in starting immune therapy can lead to permanent neuropsychiatric sequelae. We propose a standardized classification system for the autoimmune encephalitides, integrating earlier pathology-oriented terms with more recently defined serologic and clinical phenotypes.

  12. Autoimmune Hepatitis: A Risk Factor for Cholangiocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajat Garg

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA is a very aggressive and lethal tumor, which arises from the epithelial cells of bile ducts. CCA comprises about 3% of all gastrointestinal malignancies and its incidence is on the rise in the recent years. Anatomically, it is classified into intrahepatic, perihilar, or extrahepatic (distal CCA. There are a number of risk factors associated with CCA including primary sclerosing cholangitis, fibropolycystic liver disease, parasitic infection, viral hepatitis, chronic liver disease, and genetic disorders like Lynch syndrome. Autoimmune hepatitis is also recently reported to have an association with development of CCA. We report an interesting case of perihilar CCA in the setting of autoimmune hepatitis along with a literature review. This case highlights the importance of early treatment and close clinical follow-up of patients with autoimmune hepatitis for development of CCA.

  13. Lemierre syndrome: two cases and a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Mohammed Iqbal; Baring, David; Addidle, Michael; Murray, Craig; Adams, Calum

    2007-09-01

    Lemierre syndrome is usually caused by an acute oropharyngeal infection in previously healthy young adults, resulting in thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein, leading to metastatic septic embolization and bacteraemia. The usual organism is Fusobacterium necrophorum. Lemierre syndrome, not so long ago labeled as the "forgotten disease," is on the rise. Today with increasing antibiotic-resistant organisms, and decreasing awareness of the syndrome, subsequent re-emergence of this "forgotten disease" is becoming more common in clinical settings. Lemierre syndrome has significant morbidity. Cranial nerve complications associated with the condition have been increasingly diagnosed in the last few years. Looking back at literature on Lemierre syndrome, there have been review articles in medical and microbiology journals but rarely in otolaryngology journals. By presenting our cases we demonstrate the diverse presentations and severity of the illness. A review of the literature and a case report on two cases seen in our institution in the last year are presented. Each of these had varied presentations and neurologic complications-one developed 9th to 12th cranial nerve palsies and Horner syndrome, which have not been described in previous literature, and the other developed polyneuropathy and a frontal lobe infarct among other multisystem complications. Diagnosis of Lemierre syndrome is not always straightforward as clinical features are variable and blood cultures are often negative. Awareness of the syndrome and a high degree of suspicion are needed.

  14. Cutting Edge: cGAS Is Required for Lethal Autoimmune Disease in the Trex1-Deficient Mouse Model of Aicardi-Goutières Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Elizabeth E; Treuting, Piper M; Woodward, Joshua J; Stetson, Daniel B

    2015-09-01

    Detection of intracellular DNA triggers activation of the stimulator of IFN genes-dependent IFN-stimulatory DNA (ISD) pathway, which is essential for antiviral immune responses. However, chronic activation of this pathway is implicated in autoimmunity. Mutations in TREX1, a 3' repair exonuclease that degrades cytosolic DNA, cause Aicardi-Goutières syndrome and chilblain lupus. Trex1 (-/-) mice develop lethal, IFN-driven autoimmune disease that is dependent on activation of the ISD pathway, but the DNA sensors that detect the endogenous DNA that accumulates in Trex1 (-/-) mice have not been defined. Multiple DNA sensors have been proposed to activate the ISD pathway, including cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS). In this study, we show that Trex1 (-/-) mice lacking cGAS are completely protected from lethality, exhibit dramatically reduced tissue inflammation, and fail to develop autoantibodies. These findings implicate cGAS as a key driver of autoimmune disease and suggest that cGAS inhibitors may be useful therapeutics for Aicardi-Goutières syndrome and related autoimmune diseases. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  15. A Case with Cowden Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nehir Parlak

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cowden syndrome is an autosomal dominant rare inherited disorder characterized by multiple hamartomas in variety of tissues from all three embryonic layers. Mucocutaneous lesions like facial trichilemmomas, acral keratoses, papillomatous papules, also macrocephaly and malignancies including breast, tyhroid and endometrial carcinoma are hallmark of the disease. Here we report a 47-year-old male patient with mucucutaneous lesions, gastrointestinal polyposis and macrocephaly diagnosed as Cowden syndrome.

  16. Heterotaxy syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel de Souza Carneiro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The present report describes the findings at chest computed tomography angiography of a 28-year-old female patient with heterotaxy syndrome. This syndrome consists of a variety of anomalies of position and morphology of thoracoabdominal organs which do not follow the situs solitus or situs inversus arrangement. Imaging studies play a fundamental role in the individualization of the approach to the patient.

  17. Case report 509: Proteus syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnstein, M.I.; Kottamasu, S.R.; Katz, M.E.; Weiss, L.

    1988-10-01

    Radiographic features of Proteus syndrome include asymmetry of limbs, partial gigantism of the hands or feet, and hemihypertrophy. The patient described (a 16-year-old male) manifested features of Proteus syndrome which is another entity in the gamut of conditions associated with localized gigantism. This entity should be suggested particularly when localized gigantism is associated with diffuse intra-abdominal lipomatosis and extensive lipomas involving the chest wall and back.

  18. Case report 509: Proteus syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnstein, M.I.; Kottamasu, S.R.; Katz, M.E.; Weiss, L.

    1988-01-01

    Radiographic features of Proteus syndrome include asymmetry of limbs, partial gigantism of the hands or feet, and hemihypertrophy. The patient described (a 16-year-old male) manifested features of Proteus syndrome which is another entity in the gamut of conditions associated with localized gigantism. This entity should be suggested particularly when localized gigantism is associated with diffuse intra-abdominal lipomatosis and extensive lipomas involving the chest wall and back. (orig.)

  19. Anti-synthetase syndrome associated with anti PL-12 and anti-Signal recognition particle antibodies and a necrotizing auto-immune myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkan, Ashish; Cappelen-Smith, Cecilia; Beran, Roy; Griffith, Neil; Toong, Catherine; Wang, Min-Xia; Cordato, Dennis

    2015-02-01

    We report a 37-year-old woman with a 2 month history of proximal muscle weakness and extremely high creatine kinase (21,808 U/L) due to necrotizing auto-immune myositis (NAM) in association with anti-synthetase syndrome. Myositis-specific auto-immune antibody panel was positive for anti-Signal recognition particle and anti-PL-12. CT scan of the chest confirmed interstitial lung disease. Prednisolone, intravenous immunoglobulin and cyclophosphamide therapy was given with gradual improvement. This patient is notable for the unusual combination of NAM and anti-synthetase syndrome with the rare finding of two myositis-specific autoantibodies, which directed testing for associated extramuscular features and management with more aggressive immunotherapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Update in endocrine autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark S

    2008-10-01

    The endocrine system is a common target in pathogenic autoimmune responses, and there has been recent progress in our understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of autoimmune endocrine diseases. Rapid progress has recently been made in our understanding of the genetic factors involved in endocrine autoimmune diseases. Studies on monogenic autoimmune diseases that include endocrine phenotypes like autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 and immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked have helped reveal the role of key regulators in the maintenance of immune tolerance. Highly powered genetic studies have found and confirmed many new genes outside of the established role of the human leukocyte antigen locus with these diseases, and indicate an essential role of immune response pathways in these diseases. Progress has also been made in identifying new autoantigens and the development of new animal models for the study of endocrine autoimmunity. Finally, although hormone replacement therapy is still likely to be a mainstay of treatment in these disorders, there are new agents being tested for potentially treating and reversing the underlying autoimmune process. Although autoimmune endocrine disorders are complex in etiology, these recent advances should help contribute to improved outcomes for patients with, or at risk for, these disorders.

  1. Fatal atypical reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golombeck Stefanie Kristin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome – a reversible subacute global encephalopathy clinically presenting with headache, altered mental status, visual symptoms such as hemianopsia or cortical blindness, motor symptoms, and focal or generalized seizures – is characterized by a subcortical vasogenic edema symmetrically affecting posterior brain regions. Complete reversibility of both clinical signs and magnetic resonance imaging lesions is regarded as a defining feature of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome is almost exclusively seen in the setting of a predisposing clinical condition, such as pre-eclampsia, systemic infections, sepsis and shock, certain autoimmune diseases, various malignancies and cytotoxic chemotherapy, transplantation and concomitant immunosuppression (especially with calcineurin inhibitors as well as episodes of abrupt hypertension. We describe for the first time clinical, radiological and histological findings in a case of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome with an irreversible and fatal outcome occurring in the absence of any of the known predisposing clinical conditions except for a hypertensive episode. Case presentation A 58-year-old Caucasian woman presented with a two-week history of subacute and progressive occipital headache, blurred vision and imbalance of gait and with no evidence for raised arterial blood pressure during the two weeks previous to admission. Her past medical history was unremarkable except for controlled arterial hypertension. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated cortical and subcortical lesions with combined vasogenic and cytotoxic edema atypical for both venous congestion and arterial infarction. Routine laboratory and cerebrospinal fluid parameters were normal. The diagnosis of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome was established. Within hours after

  2. Macrophage activation syndrome associated with griscelli syndrome type 2: case report and review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefsafi, Zakia; Hasbaoui, Brahim El; Kili, Amina; Agadr, Aomar; Khattab, Mohammed

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a severe and potentially fatal life-threatening condition associated with excessive activation and expansion of T cells with macrophages and a high expression of cytokines, resulting in an uncontrolled inflammatory response, with high levels of macrophage colony-stimulating factor and causing multiorgan damage. This syndrome is classified into primary (genetic/familial) or secondary forms to several etiologies, such as infections, neoplasias mainly hemopathies or autoimmune diseases. It is characterised clinically by unremitting high fever, pancytopaenia, hepatosplenomegaly, hepatic dysfunction, encephalopathy, coagulation abnormalities and sharply increased levels of ferritin. The pathognomonic feature of the syndrome is seen on bone marrow examination, which frequently, though not always, reveals numerous morphologically benign macrophages exhibiting haemophagocytic activity. Because MAS can follow a rapidly fatal course, prompt recognition of its clinical and laboratory features and immediate therapeutic intervention are essential. However, it is difficult to distinguish underlying disease flare, infectious complications or medication side effects from MAS. Although, the pathogenesis of MAS is unclear, the hallmark of the syndrome is an uncontrolled activation and proliferation of T lymphocytes and macrophages, leading to massive hypersecretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Mutations in cytolytic pathway genes are increasingly being recognised in children who develop MAS in his secondary form. We present here a case of Macrophage activation syndrome associated with Griscelli syndrome type 2 in a 3-years-old boy who had been referred due to severe sepsis with non-remitting high fever, generalized lymphoadenopathy and hepato-splenomegaly. Laboratory data revealed pancytopenia with high concentrations of triglycerides, ferritin and lactic dehydrogenase while the bone marrow revealed numerous morphologically benign

  3. Autoimmune disease and risk for Parkinson disease A population-based case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rugbjerg, K.; Friis, S.; Ritz, B.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Inflammatory mediators are increased in autoimmune diseases and may activate microglia and might cause an inflammatory state and degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the brain. Thus, we evaluated whether having an autoimmune disease increases the risk for developing Parkinson disease...... do not support the hypothesis that autoimmune diseases increase the risk for Parkinson disease. The decreased risk observed among patients with rheumatoid arthritis might be explained by underdiagnosis of movement disorders such as Parkinson disease in this patient group or by a protective effect...

  4. Aquaporin-4 IgG autoimmune syndrome and immunoreactivity associated with thyroid cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soelberg, Kerstin; Larsen, Stine Rosenkilde; Mørch, Marlene

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells can express so-called onconeural antigens, which are normally restricted to mature neurons and glial cells in the CNS.1 The detection of neural-reactive immunoglobulin G (IgG) aids the diagnosis of paraneoplastic neurologic syndromes (PNS)1; however, the diagnostic utility and potenti...

  5. Sjögren Syndrome Which Simulates Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Features: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haluk Gümüş

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Sjögren syndrome (SS is a chronic, inflammatory, autoimmune disease. It emerges as a dry mouth and eyes (sicca symptoms because, it fundamentally affects exocrine glands, frequently, salivary gland and lachrymal gland. Neurological involvement in Sjögren syndrome is observed in the approximately 20-25% of cases. 87% of the neurological involvements are peripheral nervous system involvement and around 13% of the neurological involvements are central nervous system involvement. Cerebral involvement represents heterogeneous features in terms of both localization (focal or diffuse and progress of the statement (acute, progressive or reversible. Affected central nervous system can show clinical and radiological signs similar to Multiple sclerosis (MS. In this paper, the case, which has a complaint of difficulty in walking and instability and MS like lesions in brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and is diagnosed as Sjögren syndrome by further research, is discussed

  6. [Williams-Beuren syndrome (Williams syndrome). Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklós, Györgyi; Fekete, György; Haltrich, Irén; Tóth, Miklós; Reismann, Péter

    2017-11-01

    Williams syndrome is a rare genetic disorder, that occurs equally in all ethnic groups and both sexes. The diagnosis might be missed during childhood in mild cases. However, establishing the diagnosis is important, not only to find the cause of intellectual disability but to look for cardiovascular, endocrine, psychiatry, urology and other conditions, which can occur at any age in the patients' lifetime. This case report presents the story of 47-year-old woman, who was admitted with haematemesis. During her stay on the ward, in the light of the distinctive facial features, mental retardation, and social behaviour patterns, the possibility of Williams syndrome emerged. Later, the diagnosis was confirmed by genetic analysis. This female is the oldest living patient with Williams syndrome in Hungary. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(47): 1883-1888.

  7. [Autoimmune hepatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Färkkilä, Martti

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is chronic liver disease with two subtypes, type 1 with anti nuclear or smooth muscle antibodies and type 2 with LKM1 or LC1 antibodies, and both with hypergammaglobulinemia and typical histology. Prevalence of AIH is between 10 to 17 per 100000 in Europe. Up to 20-40 % of cases present with acute hepatitis. Budesonide can be used as a first line induction therapy in non-cirrhotic patients, and tiopurines, mercaptopurine or mycophenolic acid as maintenance therapies. Patients not responding to conventional therapy can be treated with ciclosporin, tacrolimus or rituximab or finally with liver transplantation.

  8. Lung papillary adenocarcinoma complicated with paraneoplastic autoimmune hemolytic anemia: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Xing, Limin; Wang, Huaquan; Qu, Wen; Fang, Fang; Dong, Qi-e; Shao, Zonghong

    2014-01-01

    A middle-aged woman presented at our facility and was diagnosed after surgery with lung papillary adenocarcinoma. Seven years earlier, she had suffered from autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), which was refractory. Following lung surgery, the AIHA was cured.

  9. [Case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome caused by Fisher syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, Katsunori; Ando, Tetsuo; Kawakami, Osamu

    2018-01-26

    This report presents a case of a 71-year-old woman with Fisher syndrome who had posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) before the initiation of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) treatment. She had symptoms of common cold 2 weeks before the onset of PRES. On the day of the onset, she began to stagger while walking. On day 2, she developed hypertension, vision impairment, and limb weakness and was admitted to the hospital. On day 3, she was provided steroid pulse therapy. On day 4, she developed convulsions and right imperfection single paralysis and was transferred to the our hospital. During the transfer, the patient was conscious. Her blood pressure was high at 198/107 mmHg. She had mild weakness in her limbs and face, light perception in both eyes, dilation of both pupils, total external ophthalmoplegia, no tendon reflexes, and limb and trunk ataxia. We diagnosed PRES because of the high signal intensities observed on T 2 -weighted MRI on both sides of the parietal and occipital lobes. We also diagnosed Fisher syndrome because of a positive anti-GQ1b immunoglobulin G antibody test and albuminocytologic dissociation in the cerebrospinal fluid. PRES showed prompt improvement with antihypertensive therapy, whereas Fisher syndrome slowly improved over a course of 2 months. This case is the first report of PRES without IVIg suggesting that Fisher syndrome induces hypertension and causes PRES.

  10. Medical comorbidity in polycystic ovary syndrome with special focus on cardiometabolic, autoimmune, hepatic and cancer diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, Dorte; Andersen, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is defined by hyperandrogenism, irregular menses and polycystic ovaries when other causes are excluded. The possible implication of increased morbidity in PCOS for screening and follow-up is uncertain and is reviewed in this article. RECENT...... FINDINGS: The increased risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in PCOS is closely associated with BMI. Women with PCOS should be screened for the elements of the metabolic syndrome upon diagnosis. Measurement of HbA1c and the lipid accumulation product could be important tools to differentiate...... women with high metabolic risk. The immune function in PCOS is impaired with increased secretion of autoantibodies and increased risk of type 1 diabetes, asthma and thyroid disease. The occurrence of thyroid disease could be modified by BMI and D-vitamin status. Screening for diabetes and thyroid...

  11. IgG4-related sclerosing cholangitis overlapping with autoimmune hepatitis: Report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongyan; Sun, Li; Brigstock, David R; Qi, Lina; Gao, Runping

    2017-05-01

    IgG4-related sclerosing cholangitis (IgG4-SC) is the biliary manifestation of IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) but the presence of IgG4-SC in the porta hepatis is difficult to differentiate from hilar cholangiocarcinoma (HCCA). IgG4-related autoimmune hepatitis (IgG4-related AIH) is extremely rare and it is not fully clear whether IgG4-related AIH is a hepatic manifestation of IgG4-RD or a subtype of AIH. We present a rare case of a 52-year-old male who was admitted with obstructive jaundice and itchy skin. He primarily presented a severe bile duct stricture in the porta hepatis and an elevated serum level of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) mimicking HCCA. The patient underwent a surgical resection of the left hepatic lobular and cholecyst as well as common bile duct with a right hepatico-jejunostomy. He was finally diagnosed as IgG4-SC accompanied with IgG4-related AIH by immunohistochemistry, but he lacked conventional autoantibodies. The patient responded well to steroid therapy and remains healthy with no signs of recurrence at six-month follow-up. This is the first case report that hepatic portal IgG4-SC overlapping with IgG4-related AIH without the presence of conventional autoantibodies. Additionally, we suggest that IgG4-RD should be always considered in case of a bile duct stricture in the porta hepatis to avoid unnecessary surgical operation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. 355 Ocular Muscles Myopathy Associated with Autoimmune Thyroiditis. Case Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Camaño, Eugenia; Castrejon-Vázquez, Isabel; Plazola-Hernández, Sara I.; Moguel-Ancheita, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Background Thyroid-associated orbitopathy is commonly associated with Graves' disease with lid retraction, exophthalmos, and periorbital swelling, but rarely with autoimmune thyroiditis or euthyroid state. We reviewed 3 cases from our hospital whose antibodies to anti-receptor of TSH were normal. Methods Case 1: 60 year-old non-diabetic woman with bilateral glaucoma in treatment, recurrent media otitis and euthyroidism, acute onset of painless diplopia, and lid ptosis in the left eye. MRI of orbit showed increased size of the III right cranial pair and high levels of thyroid autoantibodies (Tab) anti-tiroglobulin (ATG) 115.1, anti-thyroid peroxidase (ATPO) 1751 U/mL. She started oral deflazacort 30 mg each 3 days. Sixty days later, complete remission of eye symptoms correlated with lower auto-antibodies level (ATG 19 ATPO 117). Case 2: 10 year-old girl. At age 8, she had diplopia, lid ptosis and limitations of upper gaze in the left eye. The neurological study discarded ocular myasthenia; with thyroid goitier, and hypothyrodism, she started oral levothyroxin. At age 10 with normal IRM Botulinic toxin was injected, without change. High levels of Tab were found, ATG 2723, ATPO 10.7. She started oral deflazacort 30 mg each 3 days, azathioprin 100 mg, daily. Actually, Tab levels are almost normal, but she remains with ocular alterations. Case 3: 56 year-old woman, Grave´s disease with exophtalmos in 1990, treated with I131 and immunosupression, with good outcome; obesity, hypertension and bilateral glaucoma in treatment. She suddenly presented diplopia and IV pair paresia of the right eye. A year later, ATb were found slightly elevated, ATG 100 years ATPO 227; despite prednisone 50 mg, each 3 days and azathioprin 150 mg/daily treatment, a surgical procedure was required for relieve the ocular symptoms. Results We found only 3 cases previously reported with this type of eye thyroid disease. Is important to note that awareness of this atypical form of orbitopathy

  13. [Treatment of autoimmune hepatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueverov, A O

    2004-01-01

    The immunosuppresive drugs, primarily glucocorticosteroids, serve as the basis for the pathogenetic treatment of autoimmune diseases of the liver. In autoimmune hepatitis, immunosuppressive therapy induces and maintains persistent remission in most patients while in primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis, its capacities are substantially limited. Ursodeoxycholic acid is used as the basic drug in predominantly occurring intrahepatic cholestasis. The treatment of cross autoimmune syndromes generally requires the choice of a combination of drugs.

  14. An unusual case of nephrotic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Sahay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nephrotic syndrome can be rarely due to inherited disorders of enzymes. One such variety is lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase deficiency. It leads to accumulation of unesterified cholesterol in the eye and other organs. We report a case of nephrotic syndrome with cloudy cornea and hypocholesterolemia with foam cells and lipid deposits on renal biopsy. Awareness about this rare disease may help in the early institution of specific measures to prevent progression to end-stage renal disease.

  15. Caudal regression syndrome : a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eun Joo; Kim, Hi Hye; Kim, Hyung Sik; Park, So Young; Han, Hye Young; Lee, Kwang Hun

    1998-01-01

    Caudal regression syndrome is a rare congenital anomaly, which results from a developmental failure of the caudal mesoderm during the fetal period. We present a case of caudal regression syndrome composed of a spectrum of anomalies including sirenomelia, dysplasia of the lower lumbar vertebrae, sacrum, coccyx and pelvic bones,genitourinary and anorectal anomalies, and dysplasia of the lung, as seen during infantography and MR imaging

  16. Caudal regression syndrome : a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Joo; Kim, Hi Hye; Kim, Hyung Sik; Park, So Young; Han, Hye Young; Lee, Kwang Hun [Chungang Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-07-01

    Caudal regression syndrome is a rare congenital anomaly, which results from a developmental failure of the caudal mesoderm during the fetal period. We present a case of caudal regression syndrome composed of a spectrum of anomalies including sirenomelia, dysplasia of the lower lumbar vertebrae, sacrum, coccyx and pelvic bones,genitourinary and anorectal anomalies, and dysplasia of the lung, as seen during infantography and MR imaging.

  17. Marshall-smith syndrome: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Yong; Lee, Shi Kyung; Cho, In Chul; Han, Chun Hwan

    2002-01-01

    Marshall-smith syndrome is a rare disease, with about 29 cases reported to date. It is characterized by accelerated bony growth and maturation, phalangeal abnormalities (wide middle and narrow distal phalanges), unusual facial features (prominent eyes, bluish sclerae, coarse eyebrows, an upturned nose, hypoplastic facial bones, and shallow orbits), failure to thrive, respiratory difficulties, and psychomotor retardation. This report of the radiologic findings of Marshall-smith syndrome is as, for as we know, the first to be published in Korea

  18. Marshall-Smith syndrome: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Yong; Lee, Shi Kyung; Cho, In Chul; Han, Chun Hwan

    2002-01-01

    Marshall-Smith syndrome is a rare disease, with about 29 cases reported to date. It is characterized by accelerated bony growth and maturation, phalangeal abnormalities (wide middle and narrow distal phalanges), unusual facial features (prominent eyes, bluish sclerae, coarse eyebrows, an upturned nose, hypoplastic facial bones, and shallow orbits), failure to thrive, respiratory difficulties, and psychomotor retardation. This report of the radiologic findings of Marshall-Smith syndrome is, as for as we know, the first to be published in Korea

  19. Usher Syndrome: Case Reports of Two Siblings

    OpenAIRE

    Raman Prasad Sah, B.Optom; Pragati Gautam, MD; Jyoti Baba Shrestha, MD; Mahesh Raj Joshi, M.Optom

    2015-01-01

    Background: Usher syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by congenital sensory neural deafness and progressive visual loss secondary to retinitis pigmentosa. There are three different types of Usher syndrome. Retinitis pigmentosa is the main ophthalmic manifestation shared by all three. Differences in auditory and vestibular function are the distinguishing feature. Case Reports: Two brothers, 13 and 16 years of age, presented with chief complaints of progressive dim...

  20. Tropical diabetic hand syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeika, Eugene Vernyuy; Tchoumi Tantchou, Jacques Cabral; Foryoung, Joyce Bei; Tolefac, Paul Nkemtendong; Efie, Derrick Tembi; Choukem, Siméon Pierre

    2017-02-13

    Tropical diabetic hand syndrome describes a complex hand sepsis affecting patients with diabetes across the tropics and often results from a trivial hand trauma. The clinical presentation of this syndrome is variable and ranges from localised swelling and cellulitis, with or without ulceration of the hand to progressive fulminant hand sepsis, and gangrene affecting the entire limb which may be fatal. Tropical diabetic hand syndrome could lead to permanent disability and death as a result of delay in presentation, late diagnosis and late medical and surgical intervention. This indexed case acts as an eye opener for physicians to the existence of this hand sepsis. We report the case of a 57 year-old black African female diabetic who was referred to our centre for the management of a suppurating ulcer and swelling of the left hand of two weeks duration. On examination and work-up, the patient was found to have Lawal Group III left diabetic hand syndrome and was managed with parenteral antibiotics, radical debridement and the hand was eventually amputated. She died 7 days following amputation from overwhelming sepsis. Though tropical diabetic hand syndrome is a relatively rare complication of diabetes, it can be fatal as in this case report. Early diagnosis and proper management would yield better outcome. Initial management should include aggressive intravenous broad-spectrum antibiotics with anaerobic coverage. Classification of tropical diabetic hand syndrome will assist physicians and surgeons in decision making, proper management and easy communication.

  1. A Case of Classic Raymond Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas George Zaorsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Classic Raymond syndrome consists of ipsilateral abducens impairment, contralateral central facial paresis, and contralateral hemiparesis. However, subsequent clinical observations argued on the presentation of facial involvement. To validate this entity, we present a case of classic Raymond syndrome with contralateral facial paresis. A 50 year-old man experienced acute onset of horizontal diplopia, left mouth drooling and left-sided weakness. Neurological examination showed he had right abducens nerve palsy, left-sided paresis of the lower part of the face and limbs, and left hyperreflexia. A brain MRI showed a subacute infarct in the right mid-pons. The findings were consistent with those of classic Raymond syndrome. To date, only a few cases of Raymond syndrome, commonly without facial involvement, have been reported. Our case is a validation of classic Raymond syndrome with contralateral facial paresis. We propose the concept of two types of Raymond syndrome: (1 the classic type, which may be produced by a lesion in the mid-pons involving the ipsilateral abducens fascicle and undecussated corticofacial and corticospinal fibers; and (2 the common type, which may be produced by a lesion involving the ipsilateral abducens fascicle and undecussated corticospinal fibers but sparing the corticofacial fibers.

  2. Gingival fibromatosis with hypertrichosis syndrome: Case series of rare syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preetha Balaji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gingival fibromatosis with hypertrichosis syndrome is an extremely rare genetic condition characterized by profound overgrowth of hair and gums, as well as other variable features. Gingival fibromatosis is characterized by a large increase in the gingival dimension which extends above the dental crowns, covering them partially or completely. They were found to have a genetic origin, may also occur in isolation or be part of a syndrome, or acquired origin, due to specific drugs administered systemically. Congenital generalized hypertrichosis is a heterogeneous group of diseases with continuing excessive growth of terminal hair without androgenic stimulation. It has informally been called werewolf syndrome because the appearance is similar to that of a werewolf. Various syndromes have been associated with these features such as epilepsy, mental retardation, cardiomegaly, or osteochondrodysplasia. As so far very few cases have been reported in literature, we are reporting a series of three cases with management of the same. The excess gingival tissues, in these cases, were removed by conventional gingivectomy under general anesthesia. The postoperative result was uneventful and the patient's appearance improved significantly. Good esthetic result was achieved to allow patient to practice oral hygiene measures. Though this is not a serious condition clinically, psychosocial trauma cannot be neglected owing to the cosmetic disfigurement it produces.

  3. Idiopathic hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis associated with Sweet's Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cano, Antonio; Ribes, Ramon; Riva, Andres de la; Rubio, Fernando Lopez; Sanchez, Carmen; Sancho, Jose L.

    2002-01-01

    A case of hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis associated with Sweet's Syndrome is presented. Both entities have been described in association with several other chronic systemic inflammatory diseases and autoimmune conditions. To our knowledge the coexistence between Sweet's Syndrome and hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis has not been reported up to date. We suggest a possible autoimmune or dysimmune mechanism in the pathogenesis of these two entities

  4. Thyroid autoimmunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersinga, Wilmar M.

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) is a multifactorial disease in which autoimmunity against thyroid antigens develops against a particular genetic background facilitated by exposure to environmental factors. Immunogenicity of the major thyroid antigens thyroid peroxidase, thyroglobulin (TG) and

  5. [Antisynthetase syndrome - a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prus, Visnja; Bedeković, Drazen; Milas-Ahić, Jasminka; Visević, Roberta; Segec, Branko; Jukić, Zlatica; Perić, Ljiljana

    2013-01-01

    Twenty-eight year-old woman with predominant signs of polymyositis, pulmonary interstitium involvement and with positive anti-Jo1 antibodies was suspected for antisynthetase syndrome. Over the next three months sores and ulcerations have appeared at the fingertips. In the later course of the disease clinical picture of mixed connective tissue disease associated with interstitial lung disease, with a dominant picture of systemic sclerosis have emerged. She was treated with glucocorticoides and immunosuppressive therapy. Patient condition was mostly stable, without significant progression of lung lesions. Early diagnosis and treatment antisynthetase syndrome significantly contributes to more favorable course and outcome of disease. A prerequisite for that are well-defined diagnostic criteria and an appropriate choice of treatment.

  6. [Case of exploding head syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okura, Mutsumi; Taniguchi, Mitsutaka; Muraki, Hisae; Sugita, Hideko; Ohi, Motoharu

    2010-01-01

    Exploding head syndrome (EHS) attacks are characterized by the sensation of sudden loud banging noises, and are occasionally accompanied by the sensation of a flash light. Although these attacks in themselves are usually not painful, it is reported that EHS attacks may precede migraines and may be perceived as auras. A 53-year-old woman, with a 40-year history of fulgurating migraines, experienced 2 different types of EHS attacks. During most of the attacks, which were not painful, she heard sounds like someone yelling or cars passing by. Only 1 episode was accompanied with the sensation of a flash light and of sounds similar to those of an electrical short circuit. On the video-polysomnography, video-polysomnography showed 11 EHS attacks occurred during stage N1 and stage N2; these attacks were preceded by soft snoring. She also had moderate obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (Apnea Hypopnea Index: 16.7) for which an oral appliance was prescribed; the EHS attacks did not recur after this treatment. The pathophysiology of EHS is still unclear. A detailed analysis of PSG data may help in understanding the pathophysiology of this syndrome and also in the selection of therapeutic strategies.

  7. Heerfordt Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Füsun Mayda Domaç

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Heerfordt syndrome is a form of neurosarcoidosis with the combination of fever, enlargement of the parotid gland, anterior uveitis, and facial nerve paralysis. We present a 38-year-old female patient who had a solid and painful swelling behind each ear 20 days after the complaints of redness of both eyes, fatigue, night sweat, and weight loss. Three weeks later, right facial paralysis developed, and the patient was seen in our outpatient clinic. On physical examination, bilateral solid and painful masses were observed on the parotid glands. Neurological examination was normal except for the right facial nerve paralysis. Ophthalmologic examination revealed bilateral anterior uveitis. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging was normal. On parotid gland magnetic resonance imaging, enlargement, lobulation and cystic lesions on both parotid glands with heterogeneous contrast involvement were observed. Parotid biopsy showed non-necrotizing granulomatous sialadenitis. There were multiple nodules on both lungs on mediastinum computerized tomography. Laboratory tests revealed: C-reactive protein 0.75 mg/dL, erythrocyte sedimentation rate 26 mm/hour and angiotensin-converting enzyme 83 U/L (N: 8-52 U/L Though the patient, diagnosed as Heerfordt syndrome, had phase 1 sarcoidosis, she was treated with 45 mg/day steroid because of the multiple organ involvement. In conclusion, Heerfordt syndrome, a rare manifestation of neurosarcoidosis, must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of facial nerve paralysis.

  8. Heerfordt Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Füsun Mayda Domaç

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Heerfordt syndrome is a form of neurosarcoidosis with the combination of fever, enlargement of the parotid gland, anterior uveitis, and facial nerve paralysis. We present a 38-year-old female patient who had a solid and painful swelling behind each ear 20 days after the complaints of redness of both eyes, fatigue, night sweat, and weight loss. Three weeks later, right facial paralysis developed, and the patient was seen in our outpatient clinic. On physical examination, bilateral solid and painful masses were observed on the parotid glands. Neurological examination was normal except for the right facial nerve paralysis. Ophthalmologic examination revealed bilateral anterior uveitis. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging was normal. On parotid gland magnetic resonance imaging, enlargement, lobulation and cystic lesions on both parotid glands with heterogeneous contrast involvement were observed. Parotid biopsy showed non-necrotizing granulomatous sialadenitis. There were multiple nodules on both lungs on mediastinum computerized tomography. Laboratory tests revealed: C-reactive protein 0.75 mg/dL, erythrocyte sedimentation rate 26 mm/hour and angiotensin-converting enzyme 83 U/L (N: 8-52 U/L Though the patient, diagnosed as Heerfordt syndrome, had phase 1 sarcoidosis, she was treated with 45 mg/day steroid because of the multiple organ involvement. In conclusion, Heerfordt syndrome, a rare manifestation of neurosarcoidosis, must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of facial nerve paralysis

  9. Antiphospholipid syndrome: A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, T.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: A forty-two-year-old male presented to the Royal Adelaide Hospital with symptoms of increasing shortness of breath, swelling in both ankles, petechial rash and blood in his sputum. Initial investigations showed cardiomegaly, right ventricular hypertrophy, patchy lung infiltrates, a platelet count of 1500 and a clotting time of 60 seconds. A V/Q scan indicated a high probability of pulmonary embolism. Further investigations showed that the patient was positive for lupus anticoagulant and cardiolipin antibodies. A diagnosis of primary antiphospholipid syndrome was made. The patient''s high risk of strokes and hemorrhaging prompted investigation by a 99 mTc-HMPAO brain scan. Further V/Q scans were performed to follow up the initial finding of multiple pulmonary embolism and a R-L shunt study was performed to investigate a left subclavian murmur. The patient was admitted for four weeks and began treatment which included cyclaphosphamide, corticosteroids and plasmaphoresis and was discharged when stable. Over the next six months he was re admitted three times for relapse of antiphospholipid syndrome. On his fourth admission he collapsed and died five hours after admission. Cause of death was due to cardiac arrhythmia secondary to severe right ventricular hypertrophy and dilation. The effects of antiphospholipid syndrome was believed to be responsible for this outcome

  10. Antiphospholipid syndrome: A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, T. [Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, SA (Australia). Department of Nuclear Medicine

    1998-03-01

    Full text: A forty-two-year-old male presented to the Royal Adelaide Hospital with symptoms of increasing shortness of breath, swelling in both ankles, petechial rash and blood in his sputum. Initial investigations showed cardiomegaly, right ventricular hypertrophy, patchy lung infiltrates, a platelet count of 1500 and a clotting time of 60 seconds. A V/Q scan indicated a high probability of pulmonary embolism. Further investigations showed that the patient was positive for lupus anticoagulant and cardiolipin antibodies. A diagnosis of primary antiphospholipid syndrome was made. The patient``s high risk of strokes and hemorrhaging prompted investigation by a {sup 99}mTc-HMPAO brain scan. Further V/Q scans were performed to follow up the initial finding of multiple pulmonary embolism and a R-L shunt study was performed to investigate a left subclavian murmur. The patient was admitted for four weeks and began treatment which included cyclaphosphamide, corticosteroids and plasmaphoresis and was discharged when stable. Over the next six months he was re admitted three times for relapse of antiphospholipid syndrome. On his fourth admission he collapsed and died five hours after admission. Cause of death was due to cardiac arrhythmia secondary to severe right ventricular hypertrophy and dilation. The effects of antiphospholipid syndrome was believed to be responsible for this outcome.

  11. Pfeiffer syndrome type 2: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kiyoko Oyamada

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To report on a case of Pfeiffer Syndrome, with a discussion of the diagnostic characteristics and features of disease types and the differential diagnosis. DESCRIPTION: The authors describe a newborn with cloverleaf skull, extreme bilateral exorbitism and choanal atresia, partial syndactyly of the second and third toes and broad medially-deviated big toes. The case reported was Pfeiffer Syndrome type 2, which usually has a poor prognosis. COMMENTS: Pfeiffer Syndrome is a clinically variable disorder and consists of an autosomal dominantly-inherited osteochondrodysplasia with craniosynostosis. It has been divided into three types. Type 1 is commonly associated with normal intelligence and generally good outcome. Types 2 and 3 generally have severe neurological compromise, poor prognosis, early death and sporadic occurrence. Potential for prolonged useful survival outcome can be achieved in some cases with early aggressive medical and surgical management according to recent literature.

  12. Idiopathic Harlequin syndromecase report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelina Grochowiec

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Harlequin syndrome is a very rare neurological condition characterized by redness and excessive sweating of one half of the face in response to exercise and emotions. In most cases this disorder is not life-threatening. Objective. To present diagnostic difficulties of Harlequin syndrome in dermatological practice. Case report. We present a case of a 30-year-old man with redness and excessive sweating of the right half of the face as a result of exercise that was observed during the diagnosis of chronic urticaria at the Department of Dermatology. The patient was examined ophthalmologically and neurologically, had a CT scan of the head, and the Minor test performed. Idiopathic Harlequin syndrome was diagnosed based on case history and workup results. Conclusions . Harlequin syndrome occurs most often in the form of an idiopathic condition, but neurologic and ophthalmologic assessment should be performed since some diseases, such as brainstem infarction and schwannoma of the upper chest, may initially appear as Harlequin syndrome.

  13. [Occupational carpal tunnel syndrome: 27 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slimane, Neila Ben; Elleuch, Mohamed; Gharbi, Ezzedine; Babay, Habib; Hamdoun, Moncef

    2010-09-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most frequent of tunnel syndromes in the field of the professional sphere. It is related to repetitive movements of flexion-extension of the wrist and fingers or to a support on the heel of the hands. To determine the posts in a risk and to specify the modalities of guaranteed reimbursement of professional carpal tunnel syndrome. A retrospective and descriptive study of 27 medical files of employees indemnified for professional carpal tunnel syndrome registered in the medical control services of the social security office in charge of medical insurance of Tunis and Sousse during a period of 10 years (1995-2004). There were 24 women and 3 men with the average age of 40 years all occupying posts in a risk. Their average time of service is 15 years. Tow-thirds of them work in the clothing and textile industry. The attack is bilateral in 13 cases. Nightly acroparaesthesia rules the clinical rate (44.44% of cases). Motor disorders are noted in the quarter of cases. The electromyogram had confirmed diagnosis in all of cases. The previous state study put in evidence the antecedent of carpal tunnel syndrome in 5 cases and diabetes in one case. Twenty-one patients had profit of permanent partial incapacity with a rate varying from 3 to 25%. Five had got a transfer of working place and one stayed in the same post with a half-time work. The professional origin of carpal tunnel syndrome must be called up in front of an activity in a risk. The reparation is done according to picture 82 of occupational diseases.

  14. A Case of Male Goltz Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaswati Ghoshal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a boy with a clinical diagnosis of Goltz syndrome (focal dermal hypoplasia, a rare genodermatosis characterized by widespread dysplasia of mesodermal and ectodermal tissues. A 9-year-old male patient with Goltz syndrome presented with typical skin lesions along with progressive dimness of vision and mental retardation since birth. It is inherited in an X-linked dominant fashion and is normally lethal in male patients, and so very few male patients, like the index case, have been reported.

  15. Rapunzel syndrome: a rare postpartum case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegene, Teshome; Foda, Yahia; Hussain, Omar; Oloniyo, Kolawole; Ha, Ngoc-Tram; Manikonda, Geeta

    2013-01-01

    The Rapunzel syndrome describes a disorder in which a significant amount of hair is swallowed, forming a trichobezoar that extends past the stomach into the small intestines. Given the indigestible nature of hair, it subsequently leads to obstruction within the gastrointestinal system. Clinically, patients may present with symptoms of gastrointestinal obstruction, including abdominal complaints such as pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. However, due to its broad and nonspecific presenting symptoms, the diagnosis of Rapunzel syndrome warrants consideration once other common etiologies have been excluded. Surgical intervention is often required to remove the abdominal mass. This unusual syndrome is often associated with psychiatric disorders, affecting young women most commonly. In this report, we will discuss a unique case of Rapunzel syndrome in a one-month postpartum woman.

  16. Rapunzel Syndrome: A Rare Postpartum Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teshome Tegene

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Rapunzel syndrome describes a disorder in which a significant amount of hair is swallowed, forming a trichobezoar that extends past the stomach into the small intestines. Given the indigestible nature of hair, it subsequently leads to obstruction within the gastrointestinal system. Clinically, patients may present with symptoms of gastrointestinal obstruction, including abdominal complaints such as pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. However, due to its broad and nonspecific presenting symptoms, the diagnosis of Rapunzel syndrome warrants consideration once other common etiologies have been excluded. Surgical intervention is often required to remove the abdominal mass. This unusual syndrome is often associated with psychiatric disorders, affecting young women most commonly. In this report, we will discuss a unique case of Rapunzel syndrome in a one-month postpartum woman.

  17. A Case with Cramp-Fasciculation Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Yalinay Dikmen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cramp-fasciculation syndrome is one of the peripheral nerve hyperexcitability disorders and presents muscle aching, cramps, stiffness and exercise intolerance. Fasciculation and cramps can be seen both in healthy individuals and in those with fatal diseases, such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. We present a 27-year-old male patient, professional soccer player with fasciculations and cramps in  bilateral gastrocnemius-soleus complex. The patient complained about having to stop playing soccer because of muscle cramps and twitches in both calves, which had started 3 years earlier. After completing all laboratory and electrophysiological examinations, the patient was diagnosed as cramp-fasciculation syndrome. The aim of this paper was to present a rare case of cramp-fasiculation syndrome and discuss if the syndrome is benign or pioneer of a severe pathological process.

  18. A case Report of Wolfram Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Razavi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Wolfram syndrome is the association of diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, diabetes insipidus and sensorineural deafness and is sometimes called DIDMOAD (Diabetes Insipidus, Diabets Mellitus, Optic Atrophy, and Deafness. It is a rare autosomal recessive disease with prevalence of one per 770,000. Natural history of Wolfram syndrome suggests that most patients will eventually develop most complications of this progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Juvenile–onset diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy are the best available diagnostic criteria for Wolfram syndrome. In this report clinical features of a patient with DIDMOAD syndrome is presented. A 12 year old male presented with short standing diabetes mellitus and diabetes insipidus. Further investigations showed bilateral optic atrophy, mild hearing loss and short stature. His parents were relative and he is first case in his family.

  19. Autoerythrocyte Sensitization Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Ozuguz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Autoerythrocyte sensitization syndrome or Gardner-Diamond syndrome is a rare syndrome, characterized by recurrent, spontaneous, painful ecchymosis. The lesions occur particularly after emotional stress or mild trauma. Psychiatric problems are commonly observed in these patients. The lower limbs and the trunk are the most often localizations; however, lesions can appear on any other skin area. It is thought to be a sensitivity to intradermally injected autoerythrocyte. The diagnosis is usually based on typical anamnesis, clinical presentation, absence of specific laboratory changes and positive intradermal test. This syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of purpura, especially in patients with psychiatric problems and without any coagulopathy. Herein, a case of 38 year-old-female who has recurrent ecchymoses on her legs, fatigue, headache and sleeping problems is presented.

  20. A case of central nervous system vasculitis related to an episode of Guillain-Barrè syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Sinardi, Daniele; Spada, Antonella; Marino, Antonella; Mondello, Epifanio

    2000-01-01

    The authors report their knowledge about an uncommon case of isolated vasculitis, restricted to the left sylvian artery during an auto-immune Guillain-Barrè syndrome (GBS), sustained by cytomegalovirus (CMV). An acute cardiopulmonary failure requiring a ventilator and vasopressor support manifested, notwithstanding plasma exchanging and immune-modulating therapy. An IgM-enriched formula administration coincided with a rapid amelioration of GBS and vasculitis to a complete recovery the next mo...

  1. A case of subwakefulness syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisanaga, A; Tsutsumi, M; Yasui, S; Fukuda, H; Tachibana, H; Hagino, H; Okabe, A; Mita, T; Saitoh, O; Kurachi, M

    1998-04-01

    We report a patient, a 30-year-old male Japanese-Brazilian migrant construction worker, suffering from excessive daytime sleepiness for at least 6 months. Electroencephalogram recordings during his waking states showed that 10-Hz and 60-microV alpha activity was present prominently in the occipital regions. From the multiple sleep latency test, it was found that stages 1-2 NREM sleep episodes appeared repetitively without any REM episodes, and that the mean sleep latency was 10.2 min. These findings support the diagnosis that this patient suffers from subwakefulness syndrome.

  2. Neonatal Marfan syndrome: Report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurko, Tomas; Jurko, Alexander; Minarik, Milan; Micieta, Vladimir; Tonhajzerova, Ingrid; Kolarovszka, Hana; Zibolen, Mirko

    2017-07-01

    Marfan syndrome is rarely diagnosed in the neonatal period because of variable expression and age-dependent appearance of clinical signs. The prognosis is usually poor due to high probability of congestive heart failure, mitral and tricuspid regurgitations with suboptimal response to medical therapy and difficulties in surgical management. The authors have studied two cases of Marfan syndrome in the newborn period. Two cases of neonatal Marfan syndrome, one male and one female, were diagnosed by characteristic physical appearance. Both infants had significant cardiovascular abnormalities diagnosed by ultrasonography. Genetic DNA analysis in the second case confirmed the mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene located on chromosome 15q21 which is responsible for the development of Marfan syndrome. The boy died at six weeks of age with signs of rapidly progressive left ventricular failure associated with pneumonia. The second infant was having only mild signs of congestive heart failure and has been treated with beta blockers. At the age of 4 years her symptoms of congestive heart failure had worsened due to progression of mitral and tricuspid insufficiency and development of significant cardiomegaly. Mitral and tricuspid valvuloplasy had to be done at that time. Early diagnosis of Marfan syndrome in the newborn period can allow treatment in the early stages of cardiovascular abnormalities and may improve the prognosis. It also helps to explain to the family the serious health problem of their child.

  3. Is There an Association Between Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia (HIT) and Autoimmune Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinkhammer, Brent; Gruchalla, Michael

    2018-03-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a drug-induced, immunoglobulin G medicated autoimmune disorder associated with several negative clinical outcomes including increased morbidity, mortality, and increased medical costs. Previous studies have shown associations between comorbid autoimmune diseases, but there is little known about associations between HIT and autoimmunity. To provide clinical data to suggest an association between HIT and autoimmunity. Retrospective chart review of 59 cases with a diagnosis of HIT and 251 matched controls without a HIT diagnosis, comparing the prevalence of autoimmunity in each group. A single, large upper Midwest health care system. Patients with a diagnosis of HIT were significantly more likely to have a comorbid autoimmune disease than those without a HIT diagnosis (55.9% vs 10.8%, P HIT were significantly more likely to have a diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome (15.3% vs 0.0%, P HIT were significantly older than controls ( P HIT and autoimmune disease and suggests a need for more research into the relationship between HIT and autoimmunity. These results could alter the anticoagulation management of venous thromboembolism and acute coronary syndrome in patients with a previously identified autoimmune disease. Copyright© Wisconsin Medical Society.

  4. Ortner's syndrome: case series and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Vijayalakshmi; Herle, Adarsha; Mohammed, Navisha; Thahir, Muhammad

    2011-01-01

    More than a century ago, Ortner described a case of cardiovocal syndrome wherein he attributed a case of left vocal fold immobility to compression of the recurrent laryngeal nerve by a dilated left atrium in a patient with mitral valve stenosis. Since then, the term Ortner's syndrome has come to encompass any nonmalignant, cardiac, intrathoracic process that results in embarrassment of either recurrent laryngeal nerve-usually by stretching, pulling, or compression; and causes vocal fold paralysis. Not surprisingly, the left recurrent laryngeal nerve, with its longer course around the aortic arch, is more frequently involved than the right nerve, which passes around the subclavian artery. To discuss the pathogenesis of hoarseness resulting from cardiovascular disorders involving the recurrent laryngeal nerve along with the findings of literature review. This paper reports a series of four cases of Ortner's syndrome occurring due to different causes. Case study. Ortner's syndrome could be a cause of hoarseness of voice in patients with cardiovascular diseases. Although hoarseness of voice is frequently encountered in the Otolaryngology outpatient department, cardiovascular- related hoarseness is an unusual presentation. Indirect laryngoscopy should be routinely performed in all cases of heart disease.

  5. Sjogren’s syndrome: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunata, A.; Marpaung, B.

    2018-03-01

    The incidence of Sjogren’s Syndrome was estimated 4 in 100.000 of these cases with the prevalence is 0.2% to 2.7% of the population. Predominant sex female/male ratio is approximately 10:1 with peak incidence is in the fourth and fifth decade. A 29-year-old woman had dry eyes and recurrent sensation of sand in the eyes for two years. Schimmer’s test was positive ≤5mm in 5 minutes both, and the autoantibodies SSA and SSB were positive. Without history head or neck radiation and the result of laboratory examination hepatitis C and HIV negative. Until now there is no satisfying therapy for Sjogren Syndrome, only supportive specific to symptomatic can be treated. We reported a case of Sjogren Syndrome with dry eyes symptom, polyathralgia, and fatigue. Muscarinic agonist pilocarpine 5mg PO qid and hydroxychloroquine were given.

  6. Chanarin Dorfman Syndrome: A Case Report

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    Yasemin Ozkale

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Chanarin Dorfman Syndrome is a multisystem inherited metabolic disorder associated with congenital ichthyosis and accumulation of lipid droplets in varios types of cells. Observation of lipid vacuoles in neutrophils (Jordan's anomaly in peirpheral blood smears in patients with ichthyosis is diagnostic for Chanarin Dorfman Syndrome. Since the initial case was reported by Dorfman in 1974, nearly 50 cases have been reported in the literature, and the majority were from Middle East countries. In this report we presented a 5 year old patient who admitted to our hospital for creatine kinase elevation and diagnosed as Chanarin Dorfman Syndrome with clinical and laboratory findings. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(3.000: 614-618

  7. Sjögren's syndrome in a 25-year-old female: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bacem A.E.O. Khalele

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sjögren syndrome (SS is an autoimmune epithelitis characterized by lymphocytic glandular infiltration and various extraglandular manifestations. SS is usually encountered in middle-aged females (>50 years. Immunological, viral, hereditary, environmental and hormonal etiologic factors are controversially proposed with regard to the pathogenesis of SS with no upper hand given. The present study reports an atypical case of SS in a 25-year-old female who was closely followed up for three years. Being pregnant in 2015, SS ran a total remission course but did relapse more aggressively after delivery. Immunologically implicating, the possible interpretation, which may account for such a pathological fluctuation, is also tackled.

  8. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis Revealing Primary Sjögren Syndrome: Report of 2 Cases

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    A. Mercurio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sjögren syndrome (SS is an autoimmune disease of the exocrine glands, characterized by focal lymphocytic infiltration and destruction of these glands. Neurologic complications are quite common, mainly involving the peripheral nervous system (PNS. The most common central nervous system (CNS manifestations are myelopathy and microcirculation vasculitis. However, specific diagnostic criteria for CNS SS are still lacking. We report two cases of primary SS in which the revealing symptom was cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT in the absence of genetic or acquired thrombophilias.

  9. Upper gastrointestinal symptoms in autoimmune gastritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabotti, Marilia; Lahner, Edith; Esposito, Gianluca; Sacchi, Maria Carlotta; Severi, Carola; Annibale, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune gastritis is often suspected for its hematologic findings, and rarely the diagnosis is made for the presence of gastrointestinal symptoms. Aims of this cross-sectional study were to assess in a large cohort of patients affected by autoimmune gastritis the occurrence and the pattern of gastrointestinal symptoms and to evaluate whether symptomatic patients are characterized by specific clinical features. Gastrointestinal symptoms of 379 consecutive autoimmune gastritis patients were systematically assessed and classified following Rome III Criteria. Association between symptoms and anemia pattern, positivity to gastric autoantibodies, Helicobacter pylori infection, and concomitant autoimmune disease were evaluated. In total, 70.2% of patients were female, median age 55 years (range 17–83). Pernicious anemia (53.6%), iron deficiency anemia (34.8%), gastric autoantibodies (68.8%), and autoimmune disorders (41.7%) were present. However, 56.7% of patients complained of gastrointestinal symptoms, 69.8% of them had exclusively upper symptoms, 15.8% only lower and 14.4% concomitant upper and lower symptoms. Dyspepsia, subtype postprandial distress syndrome was the most represented, being present in 60.2% of symptomatic patients. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that age gastritis is associated in almost 60% of cases with gastrointestinal symptoms, in particular dyspepsia. Dyspepsia is strictly related to younger age, no smoking, and absence of anemia. PMID:28072728

  10. PREVALENCE OF AUTOANTIBODIES TO THYROID PEROXIDASE AND AUTOIMMUNE THYROID DISEASE IN GIRLS WITH TURNER’S SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Moayeri Z. Oloomi

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Patients with Turner’s syndrome (TS are at an increased risk of developing autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-Tpo antibodies and ATD in children and adolescent girls with TS. It also assessed the influence of karyotype on the development of thyroid disease. Sixty eight patients with TS were compared with 68 age matched healthy unrelated girls in this study. They were screened for anti-Tpo antibodies, free T4 and TSH levels. Sign and symptoms of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism and the presence of goiter were also investigated. Anti-Tpo antibodies were found in 18 (26.4% TS patients and 1 (1.4% patient in the control group (P < 0.001, evenly distributed between the karyotypes 45X, 46X, isoXq and mosaicism. Out of 68 TS patients, 8 (11.7% had visible goiter. Subclinical hypothyroidism and hypothyroidism both occurred in 2 patients (5.9%. These patients were characterized by higher levels of anti-Tpo antibodies. Visible goiter was found in 3 (4.4% subjects of the control group, but all of them were euthyroid. We found that younger patients were more likely to be anti-Tpo negative (P < 0.001. Our data demonstrated a high frequency of ATD in a representative sample of Iranian girls with TS which is in accordance with previous observations. Regular follow up assessment of thyroid autoantibodies and thyroid function in patients with TS is recommended for timely diagnosis of thyroid dysfunction and treatment.

  11. Clopidogrel-Induced Insulin Autoimmune Syndrome: A Newly Recognized Cause of Hypoglycemia in a Patient Without Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajpal, Aman; Kassem, Laure Sayyed; Moscoso-Cordero, Maria; Arafah, Baha M

    2017-09-01

    Insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS), defined as hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia with high titers of anti-insulin antibodies, is frequently reported in Japanese patients but rarely observed in whites. We report in this study on a 79-year-old white male without diabetes who developed IAS following exposure to clopidogrel, a drug not previously known to cause hypoglycemia. The patient presented with recurrent symptomatic hypoglycemia. During one episode, serum glucose was 45 mg/dL, whereas insulin and C-peptide levels were 40,000 mIU/mL and 40 ng/mL, respectively. Additional studies revealed no intake of insulin or its secretagogues, whereas anti-insulin antibody titer was high (59.3 nmol/L). Although total insulin levels were consistently high, free insulin concentrations (polyethylene glycol precipitation) were appropriate for ambient glycemia. The patient was found to have HLA-DRB1*0404, a feature often reported in Japanese patients with IAS. Three weeks prior to symptom onset, he was started on clopidogrel, a drug that does not have a sulfhydryl group, but its active metabolite does. Clopidogrel was switched to a nonsulfhydryl antiplatelet agent, and glucocorticoid therapy was initiated. Shortly thereafter, the frequency of hypoglycemic episodes decreased, and glucocorticoids were tapered over the ensuing 3 months. No hypoglycemic episodes were noted during 6 months of observation after discontinuing glucocorticoids, whereas the total insulin and anti-insulin antibody levels normalized. The data indicate that IAS should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia in seemingly well individuals, even when no drugs known to cause IAS were used. Clinical suspicion of IAS can avoid expensive imaging and unnecessary surgery in affected patients.

  12. Successful treatment of pediatric IgG4 related systemic disease with mycophenolate mofetil: case report and a review of the pediatric autoimmune pancreatitis literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cron Randy Q

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Autoimmune pancreatitis is frequently associated with elevated serum and tissue IgG4 levels in the adult population, but there are few reports of pediatric autoimmune pancreatitis, and even fewer reports of IgG4 related systemic disease in a pediatric population. The standard of care treatment in adults is systemic corticosteroids with resolution of symptoms in most cases; however, multiple courses of corticosteroids are occasionally required and some patients require long term corticosteroids. In these instances, steroid sparing disease modify treatments are in demand. We describe a 13-year-old girl with IgG4 related systemic disease who presented with chronic recurrent autoimmune pancreatitis resulting in surgical intervention for obstructive hyperbilirubinemia and chronic corticosteroid treatment. In addition, she developed fibrosing medianstinitis as part of her IgG4 related systemic disease. She was eventually successfully treated with mycophenolate mofetil allowing for discontinuation of corticosteroids. This is the first reported use of mycophenolate mofetil for IgG4 related pancreatitis. Although autoimmune pancreatitis as part of IgG4 related systemic disease is rarely reported in pediatrics, autoimmune pancreatitis is also characterized as idiopathic fibrosing pancreatitis. All pediatric autoimmune pancreatitis cases reported in the world medical literature were identified via a PUBMED search and are reviewed herein. Twelve reports of pediatric autoimmune pancreatitis were identified, most of which were treated with corticosteroids or surgical approaches. Most case reports failed to report IgG4 levels, so it remains unclear how commonly IgG4 related autoimmune pancreatitis occurs during childhood. Increased evaluation of IgG4 levels in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis may shed further light on the association of IgG4 with pancreatitis and the underlying pathophysiology.

  13. Infection Elicited Autoimmunity and Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: An Explanatory Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomberg, Jonas; Gottfries, Carl-Gerhard; Elfaitouri, Amal; Rizwan, Muhammad; Rosén, Anders

    2018-01-01

    Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) often also called chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is a common, debilitating, disease of unknown origin. Although a subject of controversy and a considerable scientific literature, we think that a solid understanding of ME/CFS pathogenesis is emerging. In this study, we compiled recent findings and placed them in the context of the clinical picture and natural history of the disease. A pattern emerged, giving rise to an explanatory model. ME/CFS often starts after or during an infection. A logical explanation is that the infection initiates an autoreactive process, which affects several functions, including brain and energy metabolism. According to our model for ME/CFS pathogenesis, patients with a genetic predisposition and dysbiosis experience a gradual development of B cell clones prone to autoreactivity. Under normal circumstances these B cell offsprings would have led to tolerance. Subsequent exogenous microbial exposition (triggering) can lead to comorbidities such as fibromyalgia, thyroid disorder, and orthostatic hypotension. A decisive infectious trigger may then lead to immunization against autoantigens involved in aerobic energy production and/or hormone receptors and ion channel proteins, producing postexertional malaise and ME/CFS, affecting both muscle and brain. In principle, cloning and sequencing of immunoglobulin variable domains could reveal the evolution of pathogenic clones. Although evidence consistent with the model accumulated in recent years, there are several missing links in it. Hopefully, the hypothesis generates testable propositions that can augment the understanding of the pathogenesis of ME/CFS. PMID:29497420

  14. A Case of Bardet-Biedl Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    katayon Etemadi

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Etemadi K1, Khazaii MR2 1. MSC of Human Genetic, Molecular Medicine and Genetic department, Medical school, Hamadan University of medical sciences. 2. Assistant professor of Pediatric Urology Abstract Background: The Bardet Biedl syndrome is a heterogenous and autosomal recessive disorder. Primary features are: retinitis pigmentosa, obesity, polydactyly, mental retardation, renal abnormalities and hypogonadism. Renal failure is the major cause of death in homozygote patients, with chronic glomerolopathy that cause chronic renal disease. Secondary features are: speech disorder delay, developmental delay, polyuria, diabetes mellitus and hypertension. The diagnosis of Bardet- Biedl syndrome is established by clinical findings. Twelve genes are known to be associated with Bardet Biedl syndromes: BBS1, BBS2… BBS12. Case presentation: In this article we report a four and half year old boy that have Bardet Biedl syndrome as a result of a consanguine marriage (third degree. Conclusion: A monogenic syndrome such as Bardet Biedl has a lot of symptoms. These symptoms are out put of a mutation in locus of a recessive allel. Therefore people like to marry consanguinly have to do genetic counseling before marriage. Because analysis of family history will reduced the risk of such syndromes.

  15. [18F]-Fluoro-Deoxy-Glucose Positron Emission Tomography Scan Should Be Obtained Early in Cases of Autoimmune Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Newey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Autoimmune encephalitis (AE is a clinically challenging diagnosis with nonspecific neurological symptoms. Prompt diagnosis is important and often relies on neuroimaging. We present a case series of AE highlighting the importance of an early [18F]-fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET scan. Methods. Retrospective review of seven consecutive cases of autoimmune encephalitis. Results. All patients had both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and FDG-PET scans. Initial clinical presentations included altered mental status and/or new onset seizures. Six cases had serum voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC antibody and one had serum N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA antibody. MRI of brain showed mesial temporal lobe hyperintensity in five cases of VGKC. The other two patients with VGKC or NMDA AE had restiform body hyperintensity on MRI brain or a normal MRI, respectively. Mesial temporal lobe hypermetabolism was noted in three cases on FDG-PET, despite initial unremarkable MRI. Malignancy workup was negative in all patients. Conclusion. A high index of suspicion for AE should be maintained in patients presenting with cognitive symptoms, seizures, and limbic changes on neuroimaging. In cases with normal initial brain MRI, FDG-PET can be positive. Additionally, extralimbic hyperintensity on MRI may also be observed.

  16. [18F]-Fluoro-Deoxy-Glucose Positron Emission Tomography Scan Should Be Obtained Early in Cases of Autoimmune Encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwal, A.; Hantus, S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Autoimmune encephalitis (AE) is a clinically challenging diagnosis with nonspecific neurological symptoms. Prompt diagnosis is important and often relies on neuroimaging. We present a case series of AE highlighting the importance of an early [18F]-fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) scan. Methods. Retrospective review of seven consecutive cases of autoimmune encephalitis. Results. All patients had both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and FDG-PET scans. Initial clinical presentations included altered mental status and/or new onset seizures. Six cases had serum voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) antibody and one had serum N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antibody. MRI of brain showed mesial temporal lobe hyperintensity in five cases of VGKC. The other two patients with VGKC or NMDA AE had restiform body hyperintensity on MRI brain or a normal MRI, respectively. Mesial temporal lobe hypermetabolism was noted in three cases on FDG-PET, despite initial unremarkable MRI. Malignancy workup was negative in all patients. Conclusion. A high index of suspicion for AE should be maintained in patients presenting with cognitive symptoms, seizures, and limbic changes on neuroimaging. In cases with normal initial brain MRI, FDG-PET can be positive. Additionally, extralimbic hyperintensity on MRI may also be observed. PMID:27559482

  17. Dyke Davidoff Masson Syndrome: A case report

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    More Sumeet S, Jadhav Aravinash L, Garkal Shailendra M, Tewari Suresh C

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Dyke-Davidoff-Masson syndrome (DDMS is characterized by seizures, facial asymmetry, contralateral hemiplegia and mental retardation. The characteristic radiologic features are cerebral hemiatrophy with homolateral hypertrophy of the skull and sinuses. We report a case of DDMS in an 18years old girl who presented with a history of generalized tonic – clonic seizures, hemiparesis and hemiatrophy of right side.

  18. Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Vani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, which results in oculocutaneous albinism, bleeding disorders, and storage of abnormal fat protein compound (liposomal accumulation of ceroid lipofuscin. The major complications of this disorder are pulmonary fibrosis (PF and colitis. This is a case report of an HPS patient with PF.

  19. A rare case of Charlin's syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit P Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Charlin's syndrome is an extremely rare condition characterized by pain in the nasal and paranasal areas, which is precipitated by touching the lateral aspect of the ipsilateral nostril. We are presenting one such case of a 42-year-old man who was admitted to Dr. Chaudhary Hospital and Medical Research Centre.

  20. [Fournier syndrome: report of a clinical case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Torre, F; Otti, M; Ruggeri, E; Taglienti, D; Bonanno, L; Bianchini, G P; Veneroso, S; Tintisona, O; Monti, M

    2001-01-01

    The case of a Fournier's syndrome in a 58 years old patient is reported from the Authors that describe the ethiopathogenetic and therapeutic aspects. They analyse the importance of an early surgical treatment associated with antibiotic therapy and later a riparation of the lesions with a myocutaneous skin flap of TLF.

  1. An unusual case of the Capgras syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialkov, M J; Robins, A H

    1978-04-01

    A variant of the Capgras syndrome is described in a 43-year-old woman who had vitiligo and multinodular goitre. The unusual feature of the case was that the patient not only misidentified members of her own family but also claimed that she herself had been replaced by a double.

  2. Laugier-Hunziker syndrome: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Z; Li, G-Y; Ruan, H-H; Zhang, L; Wang, W-M; Wang, X

    2018-04-01

    Laugier-Hunziker syndrome (LHS) is a rare, benign, acquired pigmentary condition mainly affecting lips, oral mucosa and acral area, frequently associated with longitudinal melanonychia. Herein, we reported a 45-year-old female case with LHS. The clinical, dermoscopic, histopathologic features of LHS were reviewed and the important differential diagnosis was discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Treating a case of Savant syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Busuttil, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    Memory and artistic prodigies among the population at large are uncommon; among the mentally retarded, they are rarer still. This article describes the treatment of such a case, technically known as the Savant Syndrome, seen by occupational therapists at Mount Carmel Psychiatric Hospital and treated over a period of 18 years.

  4. Hoffmann's syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim, Mohammad

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available This syndrome is characterized by the presence of hypothyroidism with myxoedema, muscle stiffness and pseudo hypertrophy. We describe the disorder in a 21 year old male, who got admitted with complaints of generalized weakness, cold intolerance, constipation, and hoarse voice, difficulty in walking and progressive enlargement of muscles of thighs and back with crampy pains for two years. Examination revealed mild mental retardation, enlarged tongue, dry and rough skin, enlargement of thighs and back muscles, motor weakness in flexors of hips and knees with delayed relaxation of deep tendon reflexes. Investigations revealed evidence of hypothyroidism with marked elevation of muscle enzymes. Following institution of replacement therapy with thyroxine, the patient showed marked clinical and biochemical improvements after six months, but insignificant decrease in muscle mass. In this report we review relevant literature.

  5. A case of Tricorhinophalangeal syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Erdi Şanlı

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome (TRPS is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by craniofacial and various skeletal abnormalities. TRPS type 1 differs from type 2 by the absence of mental retardation and exocytosis and from type 3 by the absence of shortening in generalized phalanges, metacarpals and metatarsals. Systemic symptoms, such as renal and cardiac defects, growth retardation and mental retardation may accompany TRFS. Herein, we present a 10-year-old girl who was diagnosed with TRPS type 1 accompanied by sparse, weak and slow-growing hair since birth, thinning of the lateral portion of the eyebrows, long philtrum, pear-shaped nose with a typical triangular facial appearance, camptodactyly of the finger joints, in radiological evaluation, cone-shaped epiphyses in hands and feet phalanges, and malocclusion. The patient was with normal cytogenetic, no deletion of 8q24 was detected.

  6. Voltage gated potassium channel antibodies positive autoimmune encephalopathy in a child: A case report and literature review of an under-recognized condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Ganesan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune limbic encephalitis (LE associated with voltage gated potassium channel antibodies (VGKC-Abs in children is more common than previously thought and is not always paraneoplastic. Non-neoplastic, autoimmune LE associated with VGKC-Abs has been described recently. However, only few case reports in children as the disease is predominantly described in the adult population. It is likely that this type of autoimmune encephalitis is currently under-diagnosed and hence, under-treated, especially in children. We present a 13-year-old previously fit and healthy African girl diagnosed with LE and we reviewed the literature for its current management.

  7. Voltage gated potassium channel antibodies positive autoimmune encephalopathy in a child: A case report and literature review of an under-recognized condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Subramanian; Beri, Sushil; Khan, Beri; Hussain, Nahin

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune limbic encephalitis (LE) associated with voltage gated potassium channel antibodies (VGKC-Abs) in children is more common than previously thought and is not always paraneoplastic. Non-neoplastic, autoimmune LE associated with VGKC-Abs has been described recently. However, only few case reports in children as the disease is predominantly described in the adult population. It is likely that this type of autoimmune encephalitis is currently under-diagnosed and hence, under-treated, especially in children. We present a 13-year-old previously fit and healthy African girl diagnosed with LE and we reviewed the literature for its current management. PMID:24339586

  8. Autoimmune diseases in parents of children with infantile autism: a case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouridsen, Svend Erik; Rich, Bente; Isager, Torben

    2007-01-01

    This register study compared the rates and types of autoimmune disease in the parents of 111 patients (82 males, 29 females; mean age at diagnosis 5y 5mo [SD 2y 6mo]) with infantile autism (IA) with a matched control group of parents of 330 children from the general population. All parents were...

  9. Ambras syndrome: A rare case report

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    A Ishita

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital generalized hypertrichosis associated with gingival hyperplasia are rare cases published in literature. The frequency incidence of generalized congenital hypertrichosis is about one to billions of people. Hypertrichosis and gingival hyperplasia are termed as Ambras syndrome (AS, which can be noticed at birth or soon after. Here, is a rare case report of 4-year-old male child who presented with generalized hypertrichosis with gingival fibromatosis and dysmorphic facial features.

  10. Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome in the course of thyrotoxicosis - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzbicka-Chmiel, Joanna; Wierzbicki, Krzysztof; Kajdaniuk, Dariusz; Sędziak, Ryszard; Marek, Bogdan

    2011-01-01

    Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (also called Wernicke's encephalopathy) is a potentially fatal, neuropsychiatric syndrome caused most frequently by thiamine deficiency. The three classic symptoms found together are confusion, ataxia and eyeball manifestations. Memory disturbances can also be symptoms. Wernicke's encephalopathy mainly results from alcohol abuse, but also from malnutrition, cancer, chronic dialysis, thyrotoxicosis and, in well-founded cases, encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD). The coexistence of many factors makes a proper diagnosis difficult, delays appropriate treatment and consequently reduces the chance of complete recovery. We present the case of a 53 year-old female with Wernicke's encephalopathy caused by chronic malnutrition, surgical operation, as well as thyrotoxicosis. She received treatment with intravenous thiamine administration and also anti-thyroid treatment which caused satisfactory regression of her neurological symptoms.

  11. An interesting case of systemic lupus erythematosus in a patient with Moebius syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenorio, Jefferson da Rocha; Figueiredo, Marília Andrade; Espindula, Aline; Gallottini, Marina; Ortega, Karem López

    2018-03-01

    Moebius' syndrome (MS) is characterized by a nonprogressive facial palsy associated with impairment in eye abduction, which can be uni- or bilateral. Some authors raise the possibility that patients with MS may suffer from social stigmatism due to their facial dysmorphism and that constant teasing and bullying perpetrated by people in the same social circle are adjuvants in the development of low self-esteem, behavioral problems, and even psychiatric disorders. Psychological stress, anxiety, and depression are factors contributing to both development and impairment of autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The objective of this work is to report the case of a patient with MS who developed SLE. In the present case report, we have emphasized the importance of both clinical dental examination and surgeon-dentist in the early diagnosis of systemic diseases by considering that these conditions can affect both syndromic and normoreactive patients. © 2018 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The prevalence of autoimmune disease in patients with esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booy, J D; Takata, J; Tomlinson, G; Urbach, D R

    2012-04-01

    Achalasia is a rare disease of the esophagus that has an unknown etiology. Genetic, infectious, and autoimmune mechanisms have each been proposed. Autoimmune diseases often occur in association with one another, either within a single individual or in a family. There have been separate case reports of patients with both achalasia and one or more autoimmune diseases, but no study has yet determined the prevalence of autoimmune diseases in the achalasia population. This paper aims to compare the prevalence of autoimmune disease in patients with esophageal achalasia to the general population. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 193 achalasia patients who received treatment at Toronto's University Health Network between January 2000 and May 2010 to identify other autoimmune diseases and a number of control conditions. We determined the general population prevalence of autoimmune diseases from published epidemiological studies. The achalasia sample was, on average, 10-15 years older and had slightly more men than the control populations. Compared to the general population, patients with achalasia were 5.4 times more likely to have type I diabetes mellitus (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5-19), 8.5 times as likely to have hypothyroidism (95% CI 5.0-14), 37 times as likely to have Sjögren's syndrome (95% CI 1.9-205), 43 times as likely to have systemic lupus erythematosus (95% CI 12-154), and 259 times as likely to have uveitis (95% CI 13-1438). Overall, patients with achalasia were 3.6 times more likely to suffer from any autoimmune condition (95% CI 2.5-5.3). Our findings are consistent with the impression that achalasia's etiology has an autoimmune component. Further research is needed to more conclusively define achalasia as an autoimmune disease. © 2011 Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  13. Nicolau Syndrome after Intramuscular Injection: 3 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seok-Kwun Kim

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Nicolau syndrome is a rare complication of intramuscular injection consisting of ischemic necrosis of skin, soft tissue, and muscular tissue that arises locoregionally. The characteristic pattern is pain around the injection site, developing into erythema, a livedoid dermatitis patch, and necrosis of the skin, subcutaneous fat, and muscle tissue. Three patients were injected with drugs (diclofenac sodium, ketoprofen, meperidine for pain relief. Three patients complained of pain, and a skin lesion was observed, after which necrosis developed on their buttocks. Each patient underwent debridement and coverage. The wound healed uneventfully. We report three cases of Nicolau syndrome in the buttocks following diclofenac intramuscular injection.

  14. Peutz-Jehgers syndrome (A case report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Byoung Geun; Park, Heung Il; Kwun, Chung Sik

    1974-01-01

    This is a report of rare case of Peutz-Jehgers syndrome in a 13 years old boys with chief complaints of melena and intermittent abdominal pain since 3 years of age. He has multiple small melanin pigmentations in the face, lower lip, and left buccal mucosa and numerous small and large polyps in the stomach, jejunum, ileum, colon, and rectum by roentgenologic studies. Hereditary features, mucocutaneous pigmentations, clinical manifestations, pathologic features, roentgen features, and differential diagnosis, and treatment of Peutz-Jehgers syndrome are discussed with a review of the literature

  15. Nicolau Syndrome after Intramuscular Injection: 3 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seok-Kwun Kim

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Nicolau syndrome is a rare complication of intramuscular injection consisting of ischemicnecrosis of skin, soft tissue, and muscular tissue that arises locoregionally. The characteristicpattern is pain around the injection site, developing into erythema, a livedoid dermatitispatch, and necrosis of the skin, subcutaneous fat, and muscle tissue. Three patients wereinjected with drugs (diclofenac sodium, ketoprofen, meperidine for pain relief. Three patientscomplained of pain, and a skin lesion was observed, after which necrosis developed on theirbuttocks. Each patient underwent debridement and coverage. The wound healed uneventfully.We report three cases of Nicolau syndrome in the buttocks following diclofenac intramuscularinjection.

  16. [Anticonvulsant Hypersensitivity Syndrome: A Case Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valderrama Escudero, Felipe; Montoya González, Laura Elisa

    2014-01-01

    DRESS syndrome (skin reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms) is an idiosyncratic drug reaction characterized by rash, fever, lymphadenopathy, and internal organ dysfunction. This case report is on a patient with bipolar affective disorder who presented with a systemic inflammatory response associated with the use of valproic acid, and an important activation of symptoms when used with other drugs with a different pharmacological action mechanism. The diagnosis of DRESS syndrome is primarily by exclusion, and its detection may be difficult, which could potentially become fatal for the patient. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  17. Neonatal marfan syndrome: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghandi, Yazdan; Zanjani, Keyhan S; Mazhari-Mousavi, Seyed-Eshagh; Parvaneh, Nima

    2013-02-01

    Neonatal Marfan syndrome is a rare and severe phenotype of this disease. A poor prognosis is anticipated due to the high probability of congestive heart failure, and mitral and tricuspid regurgitations with suboptimal response to medical therapy and difficulties in surgical management at an early age. We present two consecutive patients with this disease who are the first reported cases from Iran to the best of our knowledge. Unfortunately both of them died shortly after diagnosis. Neonatal Marfan syndrome is reported from Iran and has a poor prognosis like the patients reported from elsewhere.

  18. Peutz-Jehgers syndrome (A case report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byoung Geun; Park, Heung Il; Kwun, Chung Sik [Chonnam University School of Medicine, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1974-10-15

    This is a report of rare case of Peutz-Jehgers syndrome in a 13 years old boys with chief complaints of melena and intermittent abdominal pain since 3 years of age. He has multiple small melanin pigmentations in the face, lower lip, and left buccal mucosa and numerous small and large polyps in the stomach, jejunum, ileum, colon, and rectum by roentgenologic studies. Hereditary features, mucocutaneous pigmentations, clinical manifestations, pathologic features, roentgen features, and differential diagnosis, and treatment of Peutz-Jehgers syndrome are discussed with a review of the literature.

  19. Seckel syndrome: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinky Sisodia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Seckel syndrome (SS is a rare, autosomal recessive syndrome; characterized by severe intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation, microcephaly, mental retardation, and typical facial appearance with beaklike protrusion of the midface (bird headed. In addition to the characteristic craniofacial dysmorphism and skeletal defects, abnormalities have been described in the cardiovascular, hematopoietic, endocrine, gastrointestinal, and central nervous systems. Usually such patients have poor psychomotor development. This case report presents an 8-year-old child with SS born to parents, exposed in Bhopal gas disaster.

  20. A case report of Halzon syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montazeri A

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Report of two cases from Halzon syndrome (Tabriz-1996-97. One mother and her daughter ten minutes after eating from raw or half-ripe sheep gut (bowel, showed clinical demonstration of Halzon syndrome. Clinical aspects included: nasal, ear, frontal, and throat pruritis; oral and nasal discharge, caugh, headache, vertigo and mucoid sputum. One day after beginning of this signs and symptoms, some small white worms in 4-6 mm size, discharge from nose and mouth of patients. These worms in laboratory study, were diagnosed as nymph of linguatula serrata

  1. A case of Swyer-James syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Toshimitsu; Ohtani, Naoshi; Kimura, Sohichi; Izuchi, Rokuro; Iio, Masaaki; Fujinami, Kenji.

    1982-01-01

    Infantile infections are thought to constitute one of the main bases of the etiology of Swyer-James syndrome. This case seems to support the above theory allowing for the anamnesis of the pleuritis at 2 years of age, bronchographical findings - bilateral but markedly left-sided bud-like bronchiectatic changes - and left pulmonary angiographical findings - simultaneous appearance of pulmonary arteries and veins with scarce capillary image. Concerning the ventilation of this syndrome, 133 Xe inhalation test showed a ''Pendelluft'' phenomenon, shift of 133 Xe from the healthy to the affected lung on forced expiration. (author)

  2. Eosinophils in Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Čiháková

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophils are multifunctional granulocytes that contribute to initiation and modulation of inflammation. Their role in asthma and parasitic infections has long been recognized. Growing evidence now reveals a role for eosinophils in autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize the function of eosinophils in inflammatory bowel diseases, neuromyelitis optica, bullous pemphigoid, autoimmune myocarditis, primary biliary cirrhosis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and other autoimmune diseases. Clinical studies, eosinophil-targeted therapies, and experimental models have contributed to our understanding of the regulation and function of eosinophils in these diseases. By examining the role of eosinophils in autoimmune diseases of different organs, we can identify common pathogenic mechanisms. These include degranulation of cytotoxic granule proteins, induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, release of proteases degrading extracellular matrix, immune modulation through cytokines, antigen presentation, and prothrombotic functions. The association of eosinophilic diseases with autoimmune diseases is also examined, showing a possible increase in autoimmune diseases in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis, hypereosinophilic syndrome, and non-allergic asthma. Finally, we summarize key future research needs.

  3. Eosinophils in Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diny, Nicola L.; Rose, Noel R.; Čiháková, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional granulocytes that contribute to initiation and modulation of inflammation. Their role in asthma and parasitic infections has long been recognized. Growing evidence now reveals a role for eosinophils in autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize the function of eosinophils in inflammatory bowel diseases, neuromyelitis optica, bullous pemphigoid, autoimmune myocarditis, primary biliary cirrhosis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and other autoimmune diseases. Clinical studies, eosinophil-targeted therapies, and experimental models have contributed to our understanding of the regulation and function of eosinophils in these diseases. By examining the role of eosinophils in autoimmune diseases of different organs, we can identify common pathogenic mechanisms. These include degranulation of cytotoxic granule proteins, induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, release of proteases degrading extracellular matrix, immune modulation through cytokines, antigen presentation, and prothrombotic functions. The association of eosinophilic diseases with autoimmune diseases is also examined, showing a possible increase in autoimmune diseases in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis, hypereosinophilic syndrome, and non-allergic asthma. Finally, we summarize key future research needs. PMID:28496445

  4. Role of Respirable Saudi Arabian Sand and Pyridostigmine in the Gulf War syndrome: An Autoimmune Adjuvant Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sopori, Mohan

    2002-01-01

    In the Lewis rat, inhalation of silica (SL) in realistic doses for 6 wk exacerbated the Mycobacterium- induced autoimmune adjuvant disease and impaired the humoral as well as cellular immune responses...

  5. Aquaporin-4-Immunoglobulin G-autoimmune syndrome in a Paraneoplastic Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soelberg, Kerstin; Grauslund, Jakob; Lillevang, Søren Thue

    immunofluorescence assay1. Clinical data and MRI were reviewed. Case: A 64-year old man developed sudden loss of vision and reduced visual field in both eyes. Visual acuity was 1/36 and 6/24 in the right and left eye, respectively. The optic disc was swollen, mostly in the right eye and bilateral optic neuritis (ON......) was diagnosed by an ophthalmologist. Brain MRI and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) intracranial pressure were normal. CSF showed 4 leukocytes, oligoclonal bands and normal IgG index and protein level. At follow-up after three month atrophy and visual loss (2/36) of the right eye was apparent. Two years earlier than...

  6. Stewart-Treves syndrome: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Wesley Pereira [Hospital A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Mastology Dept.], e-mail: wesley.andrade@hotmail.com; Aguiar Junior, Samuel; Lopes, Ademar [Hospital A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Pelvic Surgery Dept.; Batista, Ranyell Matheus Spencer S.; Ribeiro, Marcio Ventura [Hospital A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    In 1948 Stewart and Treves described a syndrome related to the association between lymphangiosarcoma and chronic lymphedema due to radical mastectomy and radiotherapy. Currently, literature data reveals around 400 published cases. However, this pathology is becoming each time rarer due to the growing indication of conservative breast surgery and sentinel lymphonode research, thus reducing the need of axillary lymph node dissection with subsequent lymphedema. Described will be the case of a woman that developed angiosarcoma in shoulder 17 years after mastectomy with adjuvant radiotherapy.Stewart-Treves syndrome is related to the rise of angiosarcoma in patients with chronic lymphedema. It is currently treated as a rare disease. We describe the case of a woman who developed angiosarcoma in shoulder 17 years after mastectomy with adjuvant radiotherapy. (author)

  7. Stewart-Treves syndrome: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Wesley Pereira

    2008-01-01

    In 1948 Stewart and Treves described a syndrome related to the association between lymphangiosarcoma and chronic lymphedema due to radical mastectomy and radiotherapy. Currently, literature data reveals around 400 published cases. However, this pathology is becoming each time rarer due to the growing indication of conservative breast surgery and sentinel lymphonode research, thus reducing the need of axillary lymph node dissection with subsequent lymphedema. Described will be the case of a woman that developed angiosarcoma in shoulder 17 years after mastectomy with adjuvant radiotherapy.Stewart-Treves syndrome is related to the rise of angiosarcoma in patients with chronic lymphedema. It is currently treated as a rare disease. We describe the case of a woman who developed angiosarcoma in shoulder 17 years after mastectomy with adjuvant radiotherapy. (author)

  8. Clinical features of type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis: an analysis of 13 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MO Xue

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the clinical features of type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP, and to deepen the understanding of this disease, reduce false positive rate, and enhance people′s awareness of this disease. MethodsA retrospective analysis was performed for the clinical data of 13 patients with type 1 AIP who were admitted to The First Hospital of Jilin University from January 2012 to December 2016, including general status, clinical manifestations, laboratory serological examination, imaging findings, histopathological findings, treatment, and prognosis. ResultsOf all 13 patients, there were 9 male and 4 female patients with a mean age of 60.08±9.47 years. Major clinical manifestations included jaundice (69.2%, abdominal pain (61.5%, and weight loss (61.5%. The most common organ involved was bile duct (462%, and 30.8% of the patients had sclerosing cholangitis. Of all patients, 23.1% had diabetes. As for serological markers, 92.30% patients had more than 2 times increase in IgG4, and 7.69% had 1-2 times increase in IgG4, 53.85% patients had an increase in CA19-9, 69.23% patients had an increase in total bilirubin, more than two thirds of the patients had an increase in aminotransferases or gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase. As for imaging findings, 53.8% patients had diffuse enlargement of the pancreas on CT, 46.2% had focal enlargement of the pancreas, and 46.2% patients had low-density cyst-like shadow in pancreatic lesions. Pathological examination showed fibrous connective tissue proliferation with infiltration of lymphocytes and plasma cells. All patients were given standard glucocorticoid therapy (initial dose of prednisone: 30-40 mg/d and the remission rate of glucocorticoid therapy was 100%. The follow-up time was 12 months, and one patient experienced multiple recurrences in the course of the disease. ConclusionType 1 AIP is the local manifestation of IgG4-associated disease in the pancreas, which often occurs in middle-aged and

  9. Imaging findings in PHACES syndrome. Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes J, Natalia; Vargas V, Sergio; Gomez C, Christhian

    2010-01-01

    Capillary hemangiomas of infancy are the most common childhood tumors, mainly in children under 1 year old, and they usually involve the head and neck. They are usually solitary, but about 20% of the children with large cervicofacial hemangiomas will have one of the anomalies associated with PHACES syndrome. PHACES is a rare neuro cutaneous syndrome with female predominance and features such as: brain malformations in the posterior fossa, hemangiomas, arterial anomalies, coarctation of the aorta, heart defects, and ocular abnormalities. When associated with sternal slit and/or supra umbilical Raphe, it is referred to as PHACES syndrome. The case of a 4-year-old child with congenital facial hemangioma associated to the posterior fossa and with cerebral vascular anomalies is presented.

  10. Gorlin Goltz syndrome: A clinicopathological case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shobha C Bijjaragi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an infrequent multisystemic disease, which is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. This shows a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness, characterized by multiple basal cell nevi or carcinomas, odontogenic keratocysts, palmar and / or plantar pits, calcification of the falx cerebri, and is occasionally associated with internal malignancies. It is fundamental to know the major and minor criteria for the diagnosis and early preventive treatment of this syndrome. Here we report a case of a 30-year-old male with major and minor features of the Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, such as, strabismus, barrel-shaped chest, with drooping shoulders and mild kyphosis, polydactyly, hypertelorism, multiple basal cell carcinomas, calcification of the falx cerebri, C5-C7 bifida spine, and fusion of T1 and T2.

  11. PLATEAU IRIS SYNDROME--CASE SERIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feraru, Crenguta Ioana; Pantalon, Anca Delia; Chiselita, Dorin; Branisteanu, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Plateau iris is characterized by closing the anterior chamber angle due to a large ciliary body or due to its anterior insertion that alters the position of iris periphery in respect to the trabecular meshwork. There are two aspects that need to be differentiated: plateau iris configuration and plateau iris syndrome. The first describes a situation when the iris root is flat and the anterior chamber is not shallow, the latter refers to a post laser iridotomy condition in which a patent iridotomy has removed the relative pupillary block, but goniscopically confirmed angle closure recurs without central shallowing of the anterior chamber. Isolated plateau iris syndrome is rare compared to plateau iris configuration. We hereby present two case reports of plateau iris syndrome in young patients who came to an ophthalmologic consult by chance.

  12. Scoliosis in Steinert syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Themistocleous, George S; Sapkas, George S; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J; Stilianessi, Eugenia V; Papadopoulos, Elias Ch; Apostolou, Constantinos D

    2005-01-01

    Steinert syndrome is described as an autosomal dominant condition characterized by progressive muscular wasting, myotonia, musculoskeletal manifestations and rare spinal defects. Little is reported about spinal deformity associated with this syndrome. We present a patient with Steinert syndrome complicated by scoliosis. In the literature on muscular dystrophy, other than Duchenne, little mention is given to the problem of scoliosis in general and its treatment in particular. A case report of a patient with Steinert syndrome associated with thoracic scoliosis and hypokyphosis is presented. A 17-year-old boy presented with King type II right thoracic scoliosis (T5-T11, Cobb angle of 40 degrees) and hypokyphosis--10 degrees. He was treated with posterior stabilization and instrumentation at level T3-L2 with a postoperative correction of the scoliotic curve to 20 degrees. Histopathologic examination of the muscles confirmed the diagnosis of Steinert myotonic dystrophy. At 30-month follow-up, the patient was clinically pain free and well balanced. Plain radiographs showed solid spine fusion with no loss of deformity correction. Scoliosis in Steinert syndrome shares the characteristic of an arthrogrypotic neuromuscular curve and demands the extensive soft tissue release for optimal surgical correction. Intraoperative observations included profound tissue bleeding, abnormally tough soft tissues and a difficult recovery from anaesthesia.

  13. [An evaluation of HLA class 2 alleles and anti-islet antibodies as evidence for non-autoimmune diabetes in Wolfram syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmysłowska, Agnieszka; Borowiec, Maciej; Antosik, Karolina; Wyka, Krystyna; Cieślik-Heinrich, Agnieszka; Klich, Izabela; Młynarski, Wojciech

    2010-01-01

    A clinical criterion of the Wolfram syndrome is the coexistence of diabetes and optic atrophy recognized before the age of 15. Diabetes present in Wolfram syndrome is a result of the selective β cell loss and failed insulin secretion which is probably associated with non-autoimmune pathogenesis. The aim of the study was an evaluation of HLA subtypes and presence of β-cell autoantibodies in patients with molecularly confirmed Wolfram syndrome. 9 patients with Wolfram syndrome aged 10-24 years were examined. We also studied 218 patients with type 1 diabetes as a reference group. A control group of 176 healthy individuals was included in the study. Besides the clinical assessment the HLA typing by PCR-SSO was performed. Islet cell antibodies (ICA), antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GADA), thyrosine phosphatase antibodies (IA2A) and insulin antibodies (IAA) were also detected. In all nine patients the coexistence of diabetes with optic atrophy was observed and in 8/9 individuals additional symptoms were recognized. In patients with Wolfram syndrome a significantly lower age of diagnosis of diabetes (Me=5.0 years) than in type 1 diabetic children (Me=10.4; p=0.002) was observed. Studies of HLA subtypes demonstrated an increased prevalence of HLA-DQw1, DRB1⋅03 and/or 04 and DR2. A comparison of the frequency of the HLA alleles in patients with Wolfram syndrome with type 1 diabetic children showed a more frequent presence of the DRB1⋅1501 (p=0.03; OR=13.28 (2.44-72.12)) and DQB1⋅06 (p=0.016; OR=10.15 (2.49-41.35)) alleles in patients with Wolfram syndrome. Polish patients with Wolfram syndrome have a different profile of the HLA antigens with the presence of DR2, DQw1 and DRB3/4 allele and are negative for diabetes-related autoantibodies, which may confirm non-autoimmune β-cell destruction in this syndrome.

  14. Basal cell nevus syndrome: 2 case reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Duk; Seo, Yo Seob; Kim, Jin Soo

    2008-01-01

    The basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS) is an autosomal dominant disorder, characterized by basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic keratocysts and skeletal abnormalities. We experienced two cases that represented several characteristics of BCNS. Case 1: a thirty three year-old man visited CSU hospital. His radiographs showed four cystic lesions at both maxillary sinus and both mandibular angle, with bifid rib and ectopic calcification of falx cerebri. After marsupialization and enucleation, recurrent and newly developing tendency were found on his follow-up radiographs. Case 2: a seventeen year-old man had four large cystic lesions which were diagnosed as odontogenic keratocysts. He had craniofacial anomalies which included ectopic calcification and frontal bossing.

  15. An unusual case of ectopic ACTH syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willhauck, M J; Pöpperl, G; Rachinger, W; Giese, A; Auernhammer, C J; Spitzweg, C

    2012-02-01

    Ectopic ACTH-syndrome is a rare cause of Cushing's disease. Despite extensive diagnostic procedures the source of ACTH secretion often remains occult. This case describes a 45-year old woman with an ectopic Cushing's syndrome. Extensive imaging procedures including CT scan of chest and abdomen, octreotide scan and MRI of the chest and pituitary did not reveal the source of ACTH secretion. In consideration of an occult source of ACTH secretion we started a therapeutic trial with cabergoline (0.5 mg/d), a dopamine receptor agonist, which has been shown to be effective in ectopic Cushing's syndrome. 2 months after cabergoline treatment had been initiated, ACTH and cortisol levels normalized in association with significant improvement of the clinical symptoms. During follow-up a [(68)Ga-DOTA-dPhe(1), Tyr(3)]-octreotate ([(68)Ga-DOTA]-TATE) PET-CT was performed revealing a somatostatin receptor positive lesion in the right sphenoidal sinus suggesting the source of ACTH secretion. The patient was cured by transnasal resection of the polypoid lesion, which was immunohistochemically characterized as an ACTH-positive neuroendocrine tumor. This case report demonstrates the management of ectopic ACTH-syndrome by molecularly -targeted therapy with dopamine receptor -agonists as well as improved detection of the ectopic ACTH source by novel imaging modalities, such as [(68)Ga-DOTA]-TATE PET specifically targeting somatostatin receptor subtype-2 with high affinity. © J. A. Barth Verlag in Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Intrapartum diagnostic of Roberts syndrome - case presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socolov, Răzvan Vladimir; Andreescu, Nicoleta Ioana; Haliciu, Ana Maria; Gorduza, Eusebiu Vlad; Dumitrache, Florentin; Balan, Raluca Anca; Puiu, Maria; Dobrescu, Mihaela Amelia; Socolov, Demetra Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Roberts syndrome is a rare disease, with multiple limb and skeletal abnormalities (called "pseudothalidomide disease"). There are only around 150 cases described in literature. We present a case of Roberts syndrome, diagnosed in moment of delivery, after a pregnancy without prenatal follow-up. The stillborn baby was naturally delivered by a 17-year-old primiparous woman at 38 weeks of amenorrhea. The pregnancy was not followed due to socioeconomic and family situation, and no prenatal ultrasound was performed. The male baby has 2650 g and presented several morphological abnormalities and tight double umbilical abdominal loop. The macroscopic evaluation showed: dolichocephaly, hypoplastic inferior maxilla with micrognathia, antimongoloid palpebral slant, pterygium colli, abnormal and lower implanted ears, superior limbs phocomelia, syndactyly at lower left limb and tetradactyly in all limbs, bilateral cryptorchidism, pancreatic aplasia. Roberts syndrome is a rare genetic disease with recessive autosomal transmission generated by mutations in ESCO2 gene, located on chromosome 8. The disease should be easy to diagnose by antenatal ultrasound examination, but in our case, the lack of prenatal follow-up determined the diagnostic at term. We believe consider this case is an argument towards introducing ultrasound-screening compulsory to all pregnancies. To identify a possible genetic mutation, further investigations of the parents are in progress, but classically the disease has a recessive autosomal transmission.

  17. A case of seropositive Neuromyelitis Optica in a paediatric patient with co-existing acute nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkman, Thomas; Hemingway, Cheryl

    2017-11-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and NMO spectrum disorder (NMOSD) is a rare relapsing autoimmune disease of the central nervous system constituting less than 1% of demyelinating diseases (Jeffery and Buncic, 1996). It preferentially affects the optic nerves and spinal cord, with the brain parenchyma generally spared. Demyelinating lesions are characterised by longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM) and often longitudinally extensive optic neuritis. Following the discovery of a novel pathogenic antibody, Aquaporin 4 in 2004 (Lennon et al., 2004) this disease has been seen as a separate entity from Multiple Sclerosis (MS). We report the case of a severe AQP4 IgG case of NMO in a 10 year old child. This case unusually had a coexisting diagnosis of acute nephrotic syndrome which has only been reported once previously in the literature 2 . This article will examine some of the treatment challenges and the spectrum of co-existing autoimmune disease in NMOSD. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. An Overlapping Case of Miller Fisher Syndrome, Bickerstaff’s Encephalitis, and the ASMAN Variant of Guillain-Barre Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. J. Pegg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 56-year-old man presented with a 3-day history of progressive tingling of the hands, unsteadiness, and diplopia. He was initially diagnosed clinically with Miller Fisher Syndrome (MFS but later developed limb weakness consistent with Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS and subsequently reduced consciousness consistent with Bickerstaff’s brainstem encephalitis (BBE. Neurophysiology revealed an axonal motor and sensory neuropathy, in keeping with the Acute Motor and Sensory Axonal Neuropathy (AMSAN variant of GBS. We believe that our patient had an MFS-AMSAN-BBE overlap syndrome. This is supported by his glycolipid antibody profile with high titres of anti-GQ1b IgG antibody and anti-GD1a IgG antibody. Anti-GQ1b antibodies are frequently found in both MFS and BBE and the anti-GD1a antibody is associated with axonal forms of GBS. Overlapping cases of MFS and BBE are well described, and because the same antibody is often found in both conditions, it is thought that they share a common autoimmune mechanism. BBE has also been previously reported in association with GBS lending support that it also lies on the same spectrum. This overlapping case of ASMAN variant of GBS, MFS, and BBE provides further support that these conditions are part of the same spectrum.

  19. Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilhami Berber

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this paper is to report the case of a patient diagnosed with Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome, as a result of bleeding diathesis. Clinical Presentation and Intervention. A 23-year-old male presented with recurrent epistaxis and, upon physical examination, was found to be remarkable for albinism and suborbital ecchymosis. The absence of dense bodies in the platelets was demonstrated using electron microscopy. This patient was (slowly administered one unit of a platelet suspension, and his bleeding decreased considerably. Conclusion. This case shows that Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with bleeding diathesis, when the clinical presentation also includes oculocutaneous albinism and visual problems.

  20. Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berber, Ilhami; Erkurt, Mehmet Ali; Kuku, Irfan; Kaya, Emin; Koroglu, Mustafa; Gul, Mehmet; Bentli, Recep

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this paper is to report the case of a patient diagnosed with Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome, as a result of bleeding diathesis. Clinical Presentation and Intervention. A 23-year-old male presented with recurrent epistaxis and, upon physical examination, was found to be remarkable for albinism and suborbital ecchymosis. The absence of dense bodies in the platelets was demonstrated using electron microscopy. This patient was (slowly) administered one unit of a platelet suspension, and his bleeding decreased considerably. Conclusion. This case shows that Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with bleeding diathesis, when the clinical presentation also includes oculocutaneous albinism and visual problems. PMID:24707413

  1. Transient Bone Marrow Edema Syndrome (Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilnur Konuralp

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Transient bone marrow edema syndrome (BMES is accepted as a possible cause of acute disabling hip pain. This syndrome is defined as local osteoporosis in hip in radiographies, BME in MRI which can be rarely seen and has a self-limiting course. Although the disease generally has a self-limiting course, surgical treatment by early core decompression of the femoral head has proven effective in rapidly relieving the symptoms. Although BMES is relatively rare and probably underdiagnosed when compared to nontraumatic osteonecrosis, both conditions are associated with known osteonecrosis risk factors in middle aged men and especially with late (thirdhad trimester pregnancy in women. We have reported three cases with BMES that had different etiology and followed up presented the differential diagnosis to nontraumatic avascular osteonecrosis. These three cases were treated in early stage very succesfully.

  2. A Case Report of Maffucci Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gh. Eshghi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Maffucci syndrome is a rare clinical entity (approximately 200 cases have been reported in the medical literature with a combination occurrence of multiple enchodroma and vascular tumors. Case Report: Our patient was an 18 year old girl born in a non-consanguineous marriage with finger and toe bones disorders (enchondroma causing deformity of fingers and toes with multiple vascular tumors (cavernous hemangioma in the distal upper and lower limbs. Entire laboratory investigations including thyroid function tests were normal. Cardiovascular ex-amination including EKG and echocardiography were also normal. The abnormal findings on brain CT SCAN with contrast were not observed. Angiographic and histologic stud-ies confirmed the cavernous hemangioma and radiography of fingers and toes approved bone lesions (enchondroma. Conclusion: A diagnosis of Maffucci syndrome was made by the above mentioned measures.(Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2013; 19 (4:82-85

  3. Exploding Head Syndrome: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Ganguly, Gautam; Mridha, Banshari; Khan, Asif; Rison, Richard Alan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Exploding head syndrome (EHS) is a rare parasomnia in which affected individuals awaken from sleep with the sensation of a loud bang. The etiology is unknown, but other conditions including primary and secondary headache disorders and nocturnal seizures need to be excluded. Case Presentation: A 57-year-old Indian male presented with four separate episodes of awakening from sleep at night after hearing a flashing sound on the right side of his head over the last 2 years. These ev...

  4. Laugier-Hunziker Syndrome: A Case Report

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    Demet Kartal

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Laugier-Hunziker syndrome (LHS is a rare, acquired mucocutaneous hyperpigmentation often associated with longitudinal melanonychia. It is important to differentiate this condition from the pigmentary disorders of the oral mucosa. The correct clinical identification avoids the need for invasive investigations. A 32-year-old female presented with a number of variably sized, hyperpigmented macules over the oral mucosa and longitudinal melanonychia. Herein, we report a case of LHS and discuss the conditions related with pigmented mucocutaneous lesions.

  5. A case of peeling skin syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Anil K Singhal; Devendra K Yadav; Bajrang Soni; Savita Arya

    2017-01-01

    Peeling skin syndrome is a very rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by widespread painless peeling of the skin in superficial sheets. Etiology is still unknown with an autosomal recessive inheritance. Less than 100 cases have been reported in the medical literature. We present a 32-year-old man having asymptomatic peeling of skin since birth. Sheets of skin were peeling from his neck, trunk, and extremities, following friction or rubbing especially if pre-soaked in water but sparin...

  6. Ekiri syndrome: a report of 13 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahbarimanesh AA

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Ekiri syndrome or lethal toxic encephalopathy is a complication of shigellosis with dysentery, hyperpyrexia, seizures, headache and altered level of consiousness, which rapidly progresses to death. These children die at the beginning of the disease (8-48 hours from the beginning of symptoms, from brain edema. However they had no symptoms or signs of sepsis, dehydration, DIC or Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS. "nMethods: This survey is a case series study of children with Ekiri syndrome in Bahrami hospital from October 1998-2008 presented with loss of consciousness, colitis and high fever shortly after admission. Information about the patients was gathered from the documents according to physical signs and symptoms, lab data of those whom Ekiri syndrome had been diagnosed for them. Studied variables in this assessment were age, sex, fever, convulsions and loss of consciousness. Headache, encephalopathy, dehydration, elevated ICP, colitis, underline disease, stool, blood and CSF cultures. "nResults: The subjects contain 13 cases (10 male, 3 female, averaged 30/5 months of age. All had seizure, elevated ICP, encephalopathy and coma. All of the patients had fever between 39 and 40, averaged 39.5 degree of centigrade. Seven patients had headache and three ones was dehydrated. The first presentation symptom in three patients was gastroenteritis, in 9 was siezure and in 1 patient was headache. Stool culture in all patients was positive, but blood culture was positive in only one of them. CSF culture was negative in all of the patients. Mortality was 100%. "nConclusion: Symptoms, signs and presentation of Ekiri syndrome, a rare complication of infection with shigella, in the patients in Bahrami hospital was similar with the other studies beforehand in other countries. In this study, all the patients were died and supportive treatments were ineffective.

  7. Two Faces of the Same Coin: A Case Report of Antiphospholipid Syndrome Nephropathy

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    Sofia Homem de Melo Marques

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS is an autoimmune disease which can be primary or secondary to other autoimmune conditions and is defined by the occurrence of arterial or venous thrombosis, or pregnancy morbidity associated with persistently positive antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLA. The kidney may be affected by thrombosis at any level of its vasculature. When small vessels are involved, this results in thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA, which can manifest as either acute vaso-occlusive or chronic vascular lesions in glomeruli, arterioles and interlobular arteries. We report the case of 26-year-old man, with a previous medical history suggestive of APS, who was found to have a small elevation in serum creatinine. A kidney biopsy was performed and revealed features of chronic TMA. Anticoagulation was begun and kidney function remained stable. However, one year later, upon suspension of anticoagulation, the patient developed acute kidney injury and a second kidney biopsy showed acute TMA. This case describes different manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome nephropathy (APSN and highlights the importance of anticoagulation for thrombosis prevention.

  8. CASE REPORT CASE CASE R Chilaiditi's syndrome demonstrated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-11-19

    Nov 19, 2009 ... hemidiaphragm.1 This syndrome is a rare condition and most often an ... is usually asymptomatic3 but may present with abdominal pain, nau- .... of functional abnormalities; this was also our motivation for using such.

  9. [Orbital apex syndrome of the aspergillus etiology--a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fric, E; Rehák, M; Vlcková, I; Burval, S; Chrapek, O; Rehák, J

    2007-04-01

    The authors present a case report of a patient, in whom after a head injury the monolateral blindness occurred. Because of autoimmune thrombocytopeny the patient was treated with long-term corticosteroids. The clinical findings corresponded with the orbital apex syndrome. According to the results of the CT and MRI examinations, the sphenoidotomy was indicated, and the histological findings verified fragments of paranasal sinuses' aspergiloma. During the next course of the disease, despite antimycotic therapy, the progression of the aspergiloma in to the anterior cranial fossa occurred. Invasive sino-orbital aspergilosis, after the penetration of the infectious agent across the wall of the sinus, may cause the orbital apex syndrome with paralysis of all three cranial nerves innervating the extraocular muscles, sensoric defect in the area of the ophthalmic nerve and the involvement of the optic nerve.

  10. H Syndrome: A case report and review of literature

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    Dilip Meena

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available H syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome characterised by constellation of clinical features and systemic manifestations including cutaneous hyperpigmentation, hypertrichosis, hepatosplenomegaly, hearing loss, heart anomalies, hypogonadism, hyperglycaemia, low height, and hallux valgus. We report a case of this syndrome with typical clinical findings. We report this case citing the rarity of this uncommon entity.

  11. H Syndrome: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Dilip; Chauhan, Payal; Hazarika, Neirita; Kansal, Naveen Kumar

    2018-01-01

    H syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome characterised by constellation of clinical features and systemic manifestations including cutaneous hyperpigmentation, hypertrichosis, hepatosplenomegaly, hearing loss, heart anomalies, hypogonadism, hyperglycaemia, low height, and hallux valgus. We report a case of this syndrome with typical clinical findings. We report this case citing the rarity of this uncommon entity. PMID:29527032

  12. Enamel renal syndrome: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S V Kala Vani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Enamel renal syndrome is a very rare disorder associating amelogenesis imperfecta with nephrocalcinosis. It is known by various synonyms such as amelogenesis imperfecta nephrocalcinosis syndrome, MacGibbon syndrome, Lubinsky syndrome, and Lubinsky-MacGibbon syndrome. It is characterized by enamel agenesis and medullary nephrocalcinosis. This paper describes enamel renal syndrome in a female patient born in a consanguineous family.

  13. Comparative assessment of the prevalence of periodontal disease in subjects with and without systemic autoimmune diseases: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh Kumar, S G; Aswath Narayanan, M B; Jayanthi, D

    2016-01-01

    Immune mechanism shares a common pathway both for systemic autoimmune diseases and periodontal diseases. Scientific exploration of literature revealed limited studies on the association between systemic autoimmune diseases and periodontal diseases in India. The aim of the study is to find whether the presence of systemic autoimmune diseases in an individual is a risk factor for the development of periodontal disease. This was a hospital-based case-control study. A sample of 253 patients with systemic autoimmune diseases, attending the Rheumatology Department of Government General Hospital, Chennai-3, and 262 patients without systemic autoimmune diseases, attending the outpatient department of the Tamil Nadu Government Dental College and Hospital, Chennai-3, constituted the case and control groups, respectively. Age, gender, and oral hygiene status matching was done. Oral hygiene status was assessed using oral hygiene index (OHI) and periodontal status was assessed using community periodontal index (CPI) and loss of attachment (LOA) index. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS version 15 (SPSS Inc, 2006, Chicago). Results showed 99.2% and 73.9% prevalence of gingivitis and periodontitis, respectively, in the case group as compared to 85.5% and 14.9%, respectively, in the control group. There is no linear relationship between OHI scores and prevalence of periodontitis (CPI and LOA scores) in the case group. Patients suffering from systemic autoimmune diseases showed more prevalence of periodontal diseases irrespective of oral hygiene scores. It is postulated that the presence of systemic autoimmune diseases may pose a risk for the development of periodontal diseases.

  14. Moebius syndrome and narcolepsy: A case dissertation

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    Lídia Sabaneeff

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Moebius syndrome (MS is a congenital syndrome characterized by unilateral or bilateral aplasia of the VI and VII cranial nerves, with consequent convergent strabismus and bilateral peripheral facial paralysis. This syndrome might be associated with diurnal excessive sleepiness and muscular hypotony, mimetizing in this manner, narcolepsy. The diagnostic criteria for narcolepsy depend on the presence of REM sleep during the day. As with patients with MS we do not have ocular movements due to the VI nerve paralysis, the absence of horizontal ocular movements might make it difficult to confirm narcolepsy in these patients. The common clinical characteristics of these patients are due to a possible impairment of the same structures that are affected in the central nervous system. However, the mechanism by which it occurs remains to be fully understood. Further electrophysiological researches are necessary to better clarify the association of these two diseases. The objective of this dissertation is to describe and discuss a case of Moebius syndrome with diurnal excessive sleepiness as a differential diagnosis for narcolepsy.

  15. An atypical case of Reye's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maehara, Fumiaki; Goto, Katsuya; Okudera, Toshio; Mitsudome, Akihisa; Hara, Kunio; Shiraishi, Masayuki

    1982-01-01

    An atypical case of Reye's syndrome was reported with emphasis on usefulness of CT for the diagnosis and follow-up study of this disease. The patient was a 13-month-old girl who had been transferred to our hospital because of status epilepticus, a comatous state and a high temperature. She was diagnosed as having Reye's syndrome according to data of liver function tests, findings in CSF and body CT which revealed swelling of the liver with diminished attenuation value suggesting fatty infiltration. However, there were atypical features in this patient: epileptic seizures since age 5 months, no vomiting at the time of onset and no evidence of brain swelling on CT in acute phase. She was discharged 2 months later with impaired neuropsychological functions of marked degree. When she was 2 year-old, she again went into status epilepticus, was comatous and had a high temperature. She was dead when she arrived at emergency room of our hospital. Autopsy findings revealed features of Reye's syndrome as follows: abundant accumulation of small fat droplets without nuclear displacement in the liver, fatty infiltration in the kidney and myocardium, and mild swelling in the cerebral cortex with marked ventricular dilatation. The possibility of recurrence of Reye's syndrome was discussed based on the clinical and autopsy findings. The value of CT in the diagnosis and the follow-up study of this disease was emphasized. (author)

  16. Autoimmune thyroid disease as a risk factor for angioedema in patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruy Felippe Brito Gonçalves Missaka

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: An association between chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU and autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD has been reported. However, there have not been any reports on whether ATD raises the risk of angioedema, which is a more severe clinical presentation of CIU. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the risk of angioedema is increased in patients with CIU and ATD. DESIGN AND SETTING: Case-control study including 115 patients with CIU at a tertiary public institution. METHODS: The patients were evaluated with regard to occurrence of angioedema and presence of ATD, hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism. RESULTS: Angioedema was detected in 70 patients (60.9%. There were 22 cases (19.1% of ATD, 19 (16.5% of hypothyroidism and nine (7.8% of hyperthyroidism. The risk among patients with ATD was 16.2 times greater than among those without this thyroid abnormality (confidence interval, CI = 2.07-126.86. The odds ratio for hypothyroidism was 4.6 (CI = 1.00-21.54 and, for hyperthyroidism, 3.3 (CI = 0.38-28.36. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with CIU and ATD presented greater risk of angioedema, which reinforces the idea that a relationship exists between this allergic condition and thyroid autoimmunity. This finding could imply that such patients require specifically directed therapy.

  17. A case of peeling skin syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil K Singhal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Peeling skin syndrome is a very rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by widespread painless peeling of the skin in superficial sheets. Etiology is still unknown with an autosomal recessive inheritance. Less than 100 cases have been reported in the medical literature. We present a 32-year-old man having asymptomatic peeling of skin since birth. Sheets of skin were peeling from his neck, trunk, and extremities, following friction or rubbing especially if pre-soaked in water but sparing palm and soles. Histologically, there was epidermal separation at the level of stratum corneum, just above the stratum granulosum. This case is being presented due to its rarity.

  18. A Case of Peeling Skin Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Anil K; Yadav, Devendra K; Soni, Bajrang; Arya, Savita

    2017-01-01

    Peeling skin syndrome is a very rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by widespread painless peeling of the skin in superficial sheets. Etiology is still unknown with an autosomal recessive inheritance. Less than 100 cases have been reported in the medical literature. We present a 32-year-old man having asymptomatic peeling of skin since birth. Sheets of skin were peeling from his neck, trunk, and extremities, following friction or rubbing especially if pre-soaked in water but sparing palm and soles. Histologically, there was epidermal separation at the level of stratum corneum, just above the stratum granulosum. This case is being presented due to its rarity.

  19. Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Relations Cyber Infrastructure Computational Biology Equal Employment Opportunity Ethics Global Research Office of Mission Integration and Financial Management Strategic Planning Workforce Effectiveness Workplace Solutions Technology Transfer Intellectual Property Division of AIDS ...

  20. Late-onset cytomegalovirus infection complicated by Guillain-Barre syndrome in a kidney transplant recipient: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaban, E; Gohh, R; Knoll, B M

    2016-04-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection remains a common infection after solid-organ transplantation. In the general population CMV disease is associated with Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), an autoimmune disease leading to an acute peripheral neuropathy, in 1 of 1000 cases. Interestingly, GBS is a rarely observed complication in solid-organ transplant recipients, possibly related to maintenance immunosuppression. We describe a case of CMV infection complicated by GBS in a kidney transplant recipient and review the literature.

  1. Celiac disease and other autoimmune diseases in patients with collagenous colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigren, Lina; Tysk, Curt; Ström, Magnus; Kilander, Anders F; Hjortswang, Henrik; Bohr, Johan; Benoni, Cecilia; Larson, Lasse; Sjöberg, Klas

    2013-08-01

    Collagenous colitis (CC) is associated with autoimmune disorders. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between CC and autoimmune disorders in a Swedish multicenter study. Patients with CC answered questionnaires about demographic data and disease activity. The patient's files were scrutinized for information about autoimmune diseases. A total number of 116 CC patients were included; 92 women, 24 men, median age 62 years (IQR 55-73). In total, 30.2% had one or more autoimmune disorder. Most common were celiac disease (CeD; 12.9%) and autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD, 10.3%), but they also had Sjögren's syndrome (3.4%), diabetes mellitus (1.7%) and conditions in skin and joints (6.0%). Patients with associated autoimmune disease had more often nocturnal stools. The majority of the patients with associated CeD or ATD got these diagnoses before the colitis diagnosis. Autoimmune disorders occurred in one-third of these patients, especially CeD. In classic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), liver disease is described in contrast to CC where no cases occurred. Instead, CeD was prevalent, a condition not reported in classic IBD. Patients with an associated autoimmune disease had more symptoms. Patients with CC and CeD had an earlier onset of their colitis. The majority of the patients with both CC and CeD were smokers. Associated autoimmune disease should be contemplated in the follow-up of these patients.

  2. Meckel Gruber syndrome, A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Kiper; Külahçı Aslan, Elif; Orhan, Adnan; Atalay, Mehmet Aral

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT. Introduction: Meckel-Gruber Syndrome was first described by J R Meckel in 1822. It is an autosomal recessive disorder, and is caused by the failure of mesodermal induction. The typical triad of Meckel-Gruber Syndrome (MGS) involves meningo-encephalocele, polycystic kidneys and postaxial polydactyly. The worldwide incidence varies from 1 in 1.300 to 1 in 140.000 live births. Case: In this report, we present a case of MGS in which the diagnosis was made at 19 weeks of gestation based on ultrasonographic findings of the typical triad of the disease (encephalocele, polycystic kidneys, and polydactyly) These features were suggestive of the diagnosis of Meckel Gruber Syndrome (MGS). She had also placenta previa totalis. The patient was counselled regarding the lethal outcome of MGS. Unfortunately, the family did not approve the termination of pregnancy. At the 32nd week, she referred to hospital with complaints of vaginal bleeding and uterine contractions. An emergency cesarean section was perfomed due to plasental malposition. A 1380 gr, female fetus was delivered. First and 5th minute Apgar scores were 1 and 0, respectively. Consequently, the baby died after 45 minutes of neonatal resuscitation. Conclusıon: MGS is a lethal disorder. One cannot speak about survival of the fetus because of the pulmonary hypoplasia. The parents should be counseled about prognosis of the fetus and the outcome. Counselers should strictly give information about the recurrence risk for the next pregnancies. PMID:26037304

  3. Frequency of a FAS ligand gene variant associated with inherited feline autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome in British shorthair cats in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberdein, D; Munday, J S; Dittmer, K E; Heathcott, R W; Lyons, L A

    2017-11-01

    AIMS To determine the frequency of the FAS-ligand gene (FASLG) variant associated with feline autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (FALPS) and the proportion of carriers of the variant in three British shorthair (BSH) breeding catteries in New Zealand. METHODS Buccal swabs were collected from all cats in two BSH breeding catteries from the South Island and one from the North Island of New Zealand. DNA was extracted and was tested for the presence of the FASLG variant using PCR. Cats with the FASLG variant were identified and the frequency of the FASLG variant allele calculated. Pedigree analysis was performed and inbreeding coefficients were calculated for cats with the FASLG variant. RESULTS Of 32 BSH cats successfully tested for the presence of the FASLG variant, one kitten (3%) was homozygous (FALPS-affected), and seven (22%) cats were heterozygous (carriers) for the FASLG variant allele, and 24 (75%) cats were homozygous for the wild type allele. The overall frequency of the FASLG variant allele in these 32 cats was 0.14. Cats carrying the FASLG variant were from all three breeding catteries sampled, including two catteries that had not previously reported cases of FALPS. Pedigree analysis revealed common ancestry of FALPS-affected and carrier cats within six generations, as well as frequent inbreeding, with inbreeding coefficients >0.12 for five cats with the FASLG variant. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE There was a high frequency of the FASLG variant allele (0.14) in this small sample of BSH cats, with 22% of healthy cats identified as carriers of the FASLG variant. For an inherited disease, lethal at a young age, in a small population in which inbreeding is common, these results are significant. To prevent future cases of disease and stop further spread of the FASLG variant allele within the BSH population in New Zealand, it is recommended that all BSH and BSH-cross cats be tested for the presence of the FASLG variant before mating. Cats identified as

  4. Paraneoplastic autoimmune movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Thien Thien

    2017-11-01

    To provide an overview of paraneoplastic autoimmune disorders presenting with various movement disorders. The spectrum of paraneoplastic autoimmune disorders has been expanding with the discovery of new antibodies against cell surface and intracellular antigens. Many of these paraneoplastic autoimmune disorders manifest as a form of movement disorder. With the discovery of new neuronal antibodies, an increasing number of idiopathic or neurodegenerative movement disorders are now being reclassified as immune-mediated movement disorders. These include anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis which may present with orolingual facial dyskinesia and stereotyped movements, CRMP-5 IgG presenting with chorea, anti-Yo paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration presenting with ataxia, anti-VGKC complex (Caspr2 antibodies) neuromyotonia, opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia syndrome, and muscle rigidity and episodic spasms (amphiphysin, glutamic acid decarboxylase, glycine receptor, GABA(A)-receptor associated protein antibodies) in stiff-person syndrome. Movement disorders may be a presentation for paraneoplastic autoimmune disorders. Recognition of these disorders and their common phenomenology is important because it may lead to the discovery of an occult malignancy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of a low grade lymphoma in the mastoid bone in a patient with atypical Cogan’s syndrome: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Kalogeropoulos

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cogan’s syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by ocular and audiovestibular manifestations in its typical form and caries a wide variety of atypical manifestations. It is considered as an autoimmune disease. We present the first case in the literature of a 67 year old woman with the development of low grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL in the mastoid bone in a pre-existing history of atypical Cogan’s syndrome. The anatomical development of NHL was to a “target” organ of Cogan’s syndrome, which is the inner ear.

  6. Kinky hair syndrome - a case report -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeon, Kyung Mo; Kim, In One; Chi, Je G.; Moon, Hyung Ro

    1986-01-01

    Kinky hair syndrome is a sex-linked recessively inherited copper metabolic disorder with severe neuro degenerative change and infant death. In 1962, Menges and associates described five boys of a related pedigree with severe psychomotor retardation, seizures and widespread cerebral and cerebellar degeneration. In 1969, Weissenberg and associates specified the radiological characterization of the syndrome. Symmetrical metaphyseal spurring and diaphyseal periosteal reaction of the long bones, anterior rib flaring, a malformed cerebral arterial system and subdural effusion. In 1972, Danks and associates found the disease to be associated with a defect of copper metabolism, confirmed by studies with labelled Cu. Authors experienced a case with characteristic clinical picture, and report cerebral and abdominal arteriographic changes and plain radiographic findings with brain CT, DSA and post-mortem angiography.

  7. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Dejan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is characterized by the following symptoms: seizures, impaired consciousness and/or vision, vomiting, nausea, and focal neurological signs. Diagnostic imaging includes examination by magnetic resonance (MR and computed tomography (CT, where brain edema is visualized bi-laterally and symmetrically, predominantly posteriorly, parietally, and occipitally. Case report. We presented a 73-year-old patient with the years-long medical history of hipertension and renal insufficiency, who developed PRES with the symptomatology of the rear cranium. CT and MR verified changes in the white matter involving all lobes on both sides of the brain. After a two-week treatment (antihypertensive, hypolipemic and rehydration therapy clinical improvement with no complications occurred, with complete resolution of changes in the white matter observed on CT and MR. Conclusion. PRES is a reversible syndrome in which the symptoms withdraw after several days to several weeks if early diagnosis is made and appropriate treatment started without delay.

  8. WERNER SYNDROME: A NEW CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faida Ajili

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available “Werner’s syndrome” or premature aging syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disease. It is responsible of several complications related to age, including atherosclerosis and association with cancer. We report the case of a 36 year-old-patient, admitted to department of Internal Medicine of the military hospital of Tunis for suspicion of systemic sclerosis. The patient had all the major signs of Werner syndrome (bilateral cataract, sclerotic skin, “bird face”, baldness, small size, parental consanguinity and 4 minor signs (type 2 diabetes, hypogonadism, squeaky voice, and flat feet. She has also a brother with the same morphotype died at the age of 32 by a myocardial infarction. The current follow-up time is 9 years..

  9. Prune Belly syndrome: A rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, Sunil Kumar; Rathod, Setu

    2015-01-01

    Prune Belly syndrome (PBS) is a rare congenital anomaly of uncertain etiology almost exclusive to males. We report a case of term male baby born to a 39-year-old grand multipara with previous four normal vaginal births. There was no history of genetic or congenital anomaly in her family. Examination of the baby revealed hypotonia, deficient abdominal muscle, cryptorchidism, palpable kidney, and bladder. Ultrasound examination of the abdomen revealed bilateral gross hydronephrosis and megaureter. Provisional diagnosis of PBS was made and the baby was admitted in neonatal intensive care units for further management. Routine antenatal care with ultrasonography will help in detecting renal anomalies, which can be followed postnatally. Early diagnosis of this syndrome and determining its optimal treatment are very important in helping to avoid its fatal course.

  10. Charles Bonnet Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice HARMANCI

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Charles Bonnet syndrome is a clinical entity in which visual hallucinations are encountered during the prognosis of illnesses presenting with vision loss. The syndrome occurs usually in the elderly and there is generally no history of mental disorder to mention. . Patients and #8217; ability to test the reality is generally conserved and they point out that what they see is not real. Affected people, for fear of being criticized as and #8220;insane and #8221;, do not easily express their experiences but they refer to a psychiatrist because of the increasing fear and anxiety. In this case report, a 73 years old male patient who has lost his vision due to diabetic retinapathy and whose quality of life was affected will be discussed in the acccompaniment of literature data. [J Contemp Med 2013; 3(3.000: 190-192

  11. The Brugada syndrome. Outcome of one case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia Ivan G.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The Brugada syndrome is a rare condition, and due to its mutating manner of presentation it may be difficult to diagnose. We report one case and discuss the diagnostic aspects and the clinical outcome of one patient with characteristic findings of this syndrome. These findings are especially defined by J-ST elevation in the right leads of serial electrocardiographic records, wide oscillations of J points and ST segments during 24-hour Holter monitoring, and nocturnal sudden death. We stress the importance of the Holter monitor findings for diagnostic complementation. Through this method it is possible to establish a correlation between vigil activities and sleep and the variability of the degree of impairment in ventricular repolarization.

  12. A Case of Devic’s Syndrome Presenting with Tonic Spasm: Response to Levetiracetam Treatment

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    Alev Leventoğlu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica or Devic’s syndrome is a rare autoimmune disorder which is characterized by inflammatory demyelination of the optic nerves and the spinal cord. Clinically, it causes visual loss in one or both eyes, and numbness or paralysis of the arms and legs. Although tonic spasm is the most frequent movement disorder occuring in MS, it has not been definetely described clinical entity for Devic’s syndrome. We hereby describe a case of Devic’s syndrome with tonic spasms treated with levetiracetam as a new approach and discussed the results of the treatment. A 52-year-old woman with Devic’s syndrome with the complaint of painful tonic spasms primarily affecting the abdomen was given levetiracetam therapy. Levetiracetam therapy resulted in a good response in our patient. Levetiracetam can be a new choice for the treatment of painful tonic spasm with Devic’s syndrome. However, more detailed studies are necessary to investigate efficacy of levetiracetam.

  13. The Symptoms Get Worse after Pregnancy in Sheehan's Syndrome: A Case Report

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    Jingwen Hao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sheehan’s syndrome, which is pituitary necrosis after severe postpartum hemorrhage and hypovolemia, may cause hypopituitarism immediately or several years later, depending on the degree of tissue destruction. We report an unusual case, in which a 55-year-old woman with Sheehan's syndrome got worse symptoms after spontaneous labor. In 1998, she had severe postpartum hemorrhage and pituitary necrosis during the third delivery, thus it was diagnosed as Sheehan’s syndrome by clinical manifestations, laboratory tests, and magnetic resonance imaging. She was treated by replacement therapy including hydrocortisone and levothyroxine sodium. However, she had the fourth spontaneous pregnancy in 2000 and got worse symptoms after delivery. We carefully concluded that pregnancy provided no evidence against the diagnosis of Sheehan’s syndrome because pregnancy might improve hypopituitarism by stimulating the pituitary remnant to undergo hyperplasia and irritating the placenta to secrete hormone. However, pregnancy might aggravate the symptoms by inducing autoimmunity as well. All in all, early diagnosis and adequate medical treatment are important to provide a good prognosis of Sheehan’s syndrome.

  14. Coffin-Siris syndrome with Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Deepak; Yadav, Dinesh K; Shukla, Umesh; Sethi, Sidharth K

    2010-11-08

    We report the case of an unusual association of Coffin-Siris syndrome with Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome. This association has never previously been reported in the medical literature. A nine-year-old Indian girl was referred to our hospital for growth retardation, mental retardation, lax joints, generalized hypertrichosis, and hypoplastic fifth fingernails and toenails. A thorough medical examination and evaluation revealed she had phenotypic features of Coffin-Siris syndrome, with Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome on radiological evaluation. The karyotype of our patient was normal. In an unexplained case of mental retardation with facies suggestive of Coffin-Siris syndrome, association with Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome should be considered and the patient should be evaluated for the same. Both of these syndromes may have a common pathogenesis, as yet unknown. This case report has broad implications, as similar cases in future may give insights into the pathogenesis of both these syndromes.

  15. Autoimmune gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2016-10-01

    Autoimmune gastritis is a chronic inflammatory disease with destruction of parietal cells of the corpus and fundus of the stomach. The known consequence is vitamin B12 deficiency and, consequently, pernicious anemia. However, loss of parietal cells reduces secretion of gastric acid which is also required for absorption of inorganic iron; thus, iron deficiency is commonly found in patients with autoimmune gastritis. This usually precedes vitamin B12 deficiency and is found mainly in young women. Patients with chronic iron deficiency, especially those refractory to oral iron therapy, should therefore be evaluated for the presence of autoimmune gastritis.

  16. Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis: Case report with history of urticaria, petechiae and palpable pinpoint purpura triggered by medical abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbonile, Lumuli

    2016-03-17

    Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis (APD) is a rare autoimmune response to raised endogenous progesterone levels that occur during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Cutaneous, mucosal lesions and other systemic manifestations develop cyclically during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle when progesterone levels are elevated. APD symptoms usually start 3 - 10 days before menstruation and resolve 1 - 2 days after menstruation ceases. A 30-year-old woman presented with urticaria, petechiae and palpable pinpoint purpura lesions of the legs, forearms, neck and buttocks 1 week prior to her menses starting and 2 months after a medical abortion. She was diagnosed with allergic contact dermatitis and topical steroids were prescribed. Her skin conditions did not improve and were associated with her menstrual cycle. We performed an intradermal test using progesterone, which was positive. She was treated with oral contraceptive pills and the symptoms were resolved. This is a typical case of APD triggered by increased sensitivity to endogenous progesterone induced a few months after medical abortion.

  17. The natural history of autoimmune Addison's disease with a non-classical presentation: a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manso, Jacopo; Pezzani, Raffaele; Scarpa, Riccardo; Gallo, Nicoletta; Betterle, Corrado

    2018-05-24

    Autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) is the most frequent cause of adrenocortical insufficiency. The natural history of AAD usually comprises five consecutive stages with the first stage characterized by the increase of plasma renin consistent with the impairment of pars glomerulosa, which is usually the first affected layer of the adrenal cortex. We describe a 19-year-old female with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) who underwent an autoantibody screening due to having the personal and family history of other autoimmune diseases in the absence of relevant clinical manifestations. She was positive for adrenal cortex autoantibodies (ACA) and steroid 21-hydroxylase autoantibodies (21-OH Ab) at high titers. She had increased basal levels of ACTH with normal basal cortisol not responding to ACTH stimulation, reduced levels of dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate but normal levels of orthostatic renin and aldosterone. This scenario was consistent with a subclinical AAD presenting with first impairments in pars fasciculata and reticularis and conserved pars glomerulosa function. Only subsequently, progressive deficiency in pars glomerulosa function has become evident. Review of the literature showed that there was only one case, reported to date, with a similar atypical natural history of AAD. The strategies for screening for ACA/21-OH Ab in patients with HT are discussed.

  18. Autoimmune diseases in a Nigerian woman – A case report | Talabi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Des ADs communément rapportés sont: myasthénie gravis, thyroidite de hasimoto, syndrome de Guillain-bare, vitiligo, diabètes mellités type 1, maladies graves, syndrome Bon paturage, pemphigus, arthrite rhumatoide, lupus erythémateux systémique, maladie d'adisons, sclérose multiple, hépatite chronique active, ...

  19. A case of Sweet's syndrome associated with uveitis in a young male with ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancu, Ligia Ariana; Ureche, Corina; Crăciun, Nicoleta Maria; Marian, Dorin

    2016-01-01

    Sweet's syndrome is rare acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis whose onset is either idiopathic or associated with other underlying conditions, such as infections, autoimmune diseases, pregnancy, use of certain medications, or malignancy. We report the case of a young male with known history of ulcerative colitis and abrupt onset of high fever, malaise, blurred vision and eruption of painful erythematous nodules and papules, localized on the head, neck, trunk and upper limbs. Ophthalmological examination established the diagnosis of anterior uveitis. Inflammatory markers were positive. Histological examination of skin lesions revealed a dense neutrophilic infiltrate of the dermis. Clinical, laboratory and histological findings were suggestive for the diagnosis of Sweet's syndrome and uveitis on a background of ulcerative colitis. Systemic and ophthalmic administration of corticotherapy leads to a prompt resolution of symptoms and inflammatory syndrome. The particularity of this case is the occurrence of two simultaneous extraintestinal manifestations in a young male with inflammatory bowel disease and colonic involvement. Although a relatively rare condition, Sweet's syndrome should be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients with acute onset of high fever and skin rash, as it may have notable internal involvement and can be easily treated.

  20. Case Report: A Rare Case Report of Frontal Lobe Syndrome

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    Morteza Nouri- Khajavi

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available The frontal lobe syndrome is a permanent personality change disorder with characteristic clinical pictures, which followed by frontal lobes damage. Clinical picture include: Affective instability, recurrent aggressive behavior, impaired social judgment, apathy and undifferentiating or suspiciousness and paranoid ideations. According DSM-IV classification frontal lobe syndrome named personality change due to head trauma on Axis I. Herein we report a case of 46 years-old man, who has developed behavioral disturbances following head trauma, about 10 years ago. Main clinical figures in this case are apathy, avolition and, undifferentiating. Clinical pictures are constant during these 10 years. The diagnostic approach has been based on patient’s problems history which, has taken from his family, mental status examination, Neurological examination, Brain imaging and Neuropsychological assessments which related to frontal lobes function. Because of rarity & neglection due to mysterious function of frontal lobes, and also considering that personality change from previous level is prominent figure of this syndrome and also brain imaging findings, which compatible with clinical findings, with this aim, we have reported this case.

  1. Autoimmune disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... exact cause of autoimmune disorders is unknown. One theory is that some microorganisms (such as bacteria or ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  2. Concurrent Van der Woude syndrome and Turner syndrome: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los, Evan; Baines, Hayley; Guttmann-Bauman, Ines

    2017-01-01

    Most cases of Van der Woude syndrome are caused by a mutation to interferon regulatory factor 6 on chromosome 1. Turner syndrome is caused by complete or partial absence of the second sex chromosome in girls. We describe a unique case of the two syndromes occurring concurrently though apparently independently in a girl with Van der Woude syndrome diagnosed at birth and Turner syndrome at 14 years 9 months. Short stature was initially misattributed to Van der Woude syndrome and pituitary insufficiency associated with clefts before correctly diagnosing Turner syndrome. We discuss the prevalence of delayed diagnosis of Turner syndrome, the rarity of reports of concurrent autosomal chromosome mutation and sex chromosome deletion, as well as the need to consider the diagnosis of Turner syndrome in all girls with short stature regardless of prior medical history.

  3. [Association Budd Chiari syndrome, antiphospholipid syndrome and Grave's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouelhi, Leila; Chaieb, Mouna; Debbeche, Radhouane; Salem, Mohamed; Sfar, Imene; Trabelsi, Sinda; Gorgi, Yosr; Najjar, Taoufik

    2009-02-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is revealed by Budd Chiari syndrome in 5% of the cases. Antiphospholipid syndrome is characterized by venous or arterial thrombosis, foetal loss and positivity of antiphospholipid antibodies, namely lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin antibodies and anti-beta2-glycoprotein I. Anticardiolipin antibodies was reported in auto-immune thyroid disorders, particularly in Grave's disease. Antiphospholipid syndrome associated to Grave's disease was reported in only three cases. To describe a case report of association of Grave's disease and antiphospholipid syndrome. We report the first case of Grave's disease associated with antiphospholipid syndrome, revealed by Budd Chiari syndrome. Our observation is particular by the fact that it is about a patient presenting a Grave's disease associated with antiphospholipid syndrome revealed by Budd Chiari syndrome. This triple association has never been reported in literature. Although association between antiphospholipid syndrome and Grave's disease was previously described, further studies evaluating the coexistence of these two affections in the same patient would be useful.

  4. A Case of Prune Belly Syndrome

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    Wei Xu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Prune belly syndrome (PBS is a rare congenital disorder characterized by deficient abdominal wall muscles, urinary tract malformation, and, in males, cryptorchidism. We present a case of PBS in China. The patient was a newborn baby boy who had wrinkled, “prune-like” abdominal skin, bilateral cryptorchidism, and urinary system malformation, complicated with hypoplasia of the lung and branch of the coronary artery–right ventricular fistula. His kidney function was inadequate. The patient subsequently died at age 28 days due to septicemia from a severe urinary tract infection.

  5. A case of prune belly syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Wu, Hui; Wang, Dong-Xuan; Mu, Zhi-Hong

    2015-06-01

    Prune belly syndrome (PBS) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by deficient abdominal wall muscles, urinary tract malformation, and, in males, cryptorchidism. We present a case of PBS in China. The patient was a newborn baby boy who had wrinkled, "prune-like" abdominal skin, bilateral cryptorchidism, and urinary system malformation, complicated with hypoplasia of the lung and branch of the coronary artery-right ventricular fistula. His kidney function was inadequate. The patient subsequently died at age 28 days due to septicemia from a severe urinary tract infection. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Unusual Cases of Hypothenar Hammer Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrapin, Saranat; Arworn, Supapong; Wisetborisut, Anawat

    2015-01-01

    Hypothenar hammer syndrome (HHS) is a rare occupational disease. The risk group of HHS is patient whose dominate hand used as a hammer. Our study report unusually cases in Chiang Mai University Hospital. 19 year-old basketball player had right ulnar artery aneurysm for two months. After operation, his symptom was relieved and returned to play basketball again. 65 year-old housekeeper had non-dominated hand ulnar artery aneurysm for two years. After operation she still had hand claudication due to poor run-off vessel. HHS is previously state in risk group. But from our report there was a risk in different occupation.

  7. Proximal iliotibial band syndrome: case report

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    Guilherme Guadagnini Falotico

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The overuse injuries in the hip joint occur commonly in sports practitioners and currently due to technical advances in diagnostic imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, are often misdiagnosed. Recently, a group of people were reported, all female, with pain and swelling in the pelvic region.T2-weighted MRI showed increased signal in the enthesis of the iliotibial band (ITB along the lower border of the iliac tubercle. We report a case of a 34 year old woman, non-professional runner, with pain at the iliac crest with no history of trauma and whose MRI was compatible with the proximal iliotibial band syndrome.

  8. Hunter′s syndrome: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N S Savitha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hunter′s syndrome or mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS type II is an X-linked recessive mucopolysaccharide disorder caused by a defect in the metabolism of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs characterized by involvement of nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory, and mucoskeletal systems along with numerous oral manifestations. This is a case report of a 13-year-old boy referred to the Department of Pediatric Dentistry with a chief complaint of irregularly placed teeth from a general physician. Here we highlight the pivotal role of pediatric dentists in diagnosis and treatment planning for patients diagnosed with such systemic conditions and the provision of advanced dental care in the management of the same.

  9. Emphysematous cystitis occurred in the case treated with steroid for autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Tateki; Ohara, Shinya; Moriyama, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Emphysematous cystitis is a rare clinically entity, more commonly seen in diabetic, immunocompromised patients, which was characterized by air within the bladder wall and lumen. A 83-year-old woman was introduced to our department with fever elevation and abnormal findings of computed tomography (CT). She took orally prednisolone for autoimmune hepatitis. Pelvic CT revealed diffuse air throughout the bladder wall. Urinalysis showed combined hematuria and pyuria. Escherichia coli was detected in blood culture. Abnormal findings of complete blood count and laboratory examination included an elevated WBC count (12,200/μL), C-reactive protein (11.7 mg/dL), and creatinine (1.07 mg/dL). Cystoscopy confirmed diffuse submucosal emphysema throughout. On the basis of diagnosis with emphysematous cystitis, she was treated with antibiotics based on the results of blood culture and indwelling Foley catheter. After treatment, the improvement of inflammatory findings and submucosal emphysema on cystoscopy and CT were achieved.

  10. Autoimmune pancreatitis type-1 associated with intraduct papillary mucinous neoplasm: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquero, Eva C; Salcedo, Maria T; Cuatrecasas, Míriam; De León, Hannah; Merino, Xavier; Navarro, Salvador; Ginès, Angels; Abu-Suboh, Monder; Balsells, Joaquim; Fernández-Cruz, Laureano; Molero, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis lesions usually embrace both intraduct papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Patients at genetically-determined high risk of PDAC often harbor IPMN and/or chronic pancreatitis, suggesting IPMN, chronic pancreatitis and PDAC may share pathogenetic mechanisms. Chronic autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) may also herald PDAC. Concurrent IPMN and AIP have been reported in few patients. Here we describe two patients with IPMN who developed type-1 AIP fulfilling the Honolulu and Boston diagnostic criteria. AIP diffusively affected the whole pancreas, as well as peripancreatic lymph nodes and the gallbladder. Previous pancreatic resection of focal IPMN did not show features of AIP. One of the patients carried a CFTR class-I mutation. Of notice, serum IgG4 levels gradually decreased to normal values after IPMN excision. Common risk factors to IPMN and AIP may facilitate its coincidental generation. Copyright © 2014 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. TREATMENT OF SEVERE AUTOIMMUNE CYTOPENIAS AFTER ALLOGENEIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION – REPORT OF TWO CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Preložnik Zupan

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Autoimmune cytopenias, thrombocytopenia, anemia and neutropenia, are rare but serious complications after stem cell transplantation (SCT. There are only a few reports concerning their treatment. We performed splenectomy in two patients with severe autoimmune cytopenias after allogeneic SCT resistant to immunosuppressive treatment.Patients, methods and results. First patient had unrelated alloSCT at Royal Free Hospital London for chronic granulocytic leukemia (CGL in July 2000. Post-transplant period was complicated with cytomegalovirus reactivation and septicemia. Seven months later RBC and platelet counts went down. Direct Coomb’s test was intermittently positive. She was resistant to steroids and high dose immunoglobulin. Splenectomy was performed in February 2001. After splenectomy hemoglobin concentration and platelet count improved. Her blood counts remained stable with hemoglobin about 110 g/L and platelets over 100 x109/L. She continued therapy with Itraconazol, Valacyclovir and Penicillin. Three months later she was readmitted for E. Coli fulminated septic infection with fatal outcome.Second patient had related alloSCT at University Medical Centre Ljubljana for CGL in January 2003. Post-transplant course was uneventful. Seven months later he was readmitted for retinal bleeding with severe thrombocytopenia with positive anti-platelet antibodies. He was resistant to steroids and high dose immunoglobulin. Splenectomy was performed in September 2003. His platelet count normalized and remains stable so far. He continues therapy with Itraconazol, Valacyclovir and Penicillin and didn’t experience any serious infection.Conclusions. We assume that splenectomy is an efficient treatment for resistant immune cytopenias after alloSCT. However, severe late infections may compromise the outcome.

  12. Cotard's syndrome: analysis of 100 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrios, G E; Luque, R

    1995-03-01

    In 1880, Jules Cotard reported a clinical state he believed was a new type of agitated melancholia. A statistical analysis has been carried out of 100 cases of Cotard's syndrome to determine how this clinical concept has fared since its inception. In terms of clinical profile, no difference was found between men and women or between underlying diagnostic categories; age seemed to increase the likelihood of developing délire des négations. Depression was reported in 89% of subjects; the most common nihilistic delusions concerned the body (86%) and existence (69%). Anxiety (65%) and guilt (63%) were also common, followed by hypochondriacal delusions (58%) and delusions of immortality (55). An exploratory factor analysis extracted 3 factors: psychotic depression, Cotard type I and Cotard type II. The psychotic depression factor included patients with melancholia and few nihilistic delusions. Cotard type 1 patients, on the other hand, showed no loadings for depression or other disease and are likely to constitute a pure Cotard syndrome whose nosology may be closer to the delusional than the affective disorders. Type II patients showed anxiety, depression and auditory hallucinations and constitute a mixed group. This new grouping cuts across the more traditional view and may have therapeutic implications. Authors, in general, have considered délire des négations as a syndrome rather than a new disease and do not seem to support the view that the completeness of the syndrome is a function of presence or severity of depression. The view that délire des négations refers only to the delusion of being dead has also carried little favour as its likely to waste information.

  13. An unusual occurrence of Kleine-Levin syndrome in a man with refractory immune thrombocytopenic purpura: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirifard, Hamed; Barzkar, Farzaneh; Fazeli, Seyed Amirhossein; Hashemi, Seyed Mehdi

    2015-04-01

    Kleine-Levin syndrome is an extremely rare neurological entity characterized by recurrent episodes of hypersomnia which are sometimes associated with compulsive hyperphagia and behavioral changes. Autoimmunity has recently been proposed as a factor contributing to its pathogenesis. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura is a relatively common autoimmune disease showing a lot of complexity and uncertainty regarding its treatment regimens and its refractory nature in some cases. A 32-year-old Persian White man visited his private hematologist complaining of recent episodes of epistaxis and appearance of petechial lesions 24 hours after receiving a meningococcal vaccine. He had a history of immune thrombocytopenic purpura 13 years before his presentation. Based on his history and laboratory findings, his condition was diagnosed as a relapse of immune thrombocytopenic purpura and was managed accordingly. He did not respond to first-line corticosteroid regimens and later developed neurological symptoms as recurrent episodes of hypersomnia and hyperphagia. After a complete clinical and paraclinical evaluation and ruling out other possible conditions, he was given a diagnosis of Kleine-Levin syndrome. He was followed up for his immune thrombocytopenic purpura and received different treatment regimens none of which were adequately successful except intravenous immunoglobulin that was only temporarily effective. He has had 4 documented self-limited episodes of Kleine-Levin syndrome since his initial presentation. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura may be associated with meningococcal vaccination in adulthood. Responses to treatment in immune thrombocytopenic purpura vary among patients. Our patient only had a transient acceptable response to intravenous immunoglobulin while all other options failed to improve his platelet count. Concurrence of immune thrombocytopenic purpura and Kleine-Levin syndrome supports the role of autoimmunity as the proposed pathophysiological mechanism of

  14. Tietze's syndrome: case report and literature review | Chuhwak ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The case report is on Tietze's syndrome – a disorder that is quite rare. Costochondritis has been thought to be synonymous with Tietze's syndrome until recently [2002] when costochondritis was differentiated from Tietze's syndrome. Costochondritis is inflammation of the costochondral joints without swelling. Tietze's ...

  15. Osteomalacia in a Case of Adult-Onset Bartter Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashid Naseem Khan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bartter syndrome is a rare heterogeneous disease characterised by a deficiency in sodium and chloride absorption. Gain-of-function mutations in the CASR gene have been described in some patients with Bartter syndrome associated with hypocalcaemia and hypercalciuria. We describe a case of adult-onset Bartter syndrome with hypocalcaemia severe enough to cause osteomalacia.

  16. Breast Cancer in Cowden Syndrome: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Mi Hee

    2009-01-01

    Cowden syndrome is rare condition with characteristic multiple hamartoma and mucocutaneous lesions. It is important for radiologists to be aware of Cowden syndrome because the patients with this disease have an increased risk for the occurrence of breast cancer. We report here on a case of invasive breast cancer in a 36-year-old female patient with Cowden syndrome

  17. The POEMS syndrome: Report of three cases with radiographic abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, O.; Ohsawa, T.

    1984-01-01

    Three cases of a unique multisystemic syndrome with polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M protein, and skin changes (the POEMS syndrome) are presented, along with a review of the literature. Clinical and radiographic features of this syndrome and etiological considerations are discussed. A variety of osteosclerotic lesions, nonspecific pleural effusion and ascites are characteristic radiographic manifestations. (orig.) [de

  18. [Gorlin-Goltz syndrome--a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debski, Tomasz; Jethon, Józef

    2010-06-01

    The Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (GGS) (the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome-NBCCS) is an autosomal dominant syndrome caused by mutations found on chromosome 9. The syndrome is characterized by increased predisposition to develop a basal cell carcinoma and associated with multiorgan anomalies. To present a case of GGS and explain modern standards of care for patients with this syndrome. Authors report the case of a 36-year-old patient who was admitted to the Plastic Surgery Clinic due to numerous basal cell carcinomas. Previously patient underwent an orthopaedic, neurologic, dermatologic, stomatologic and surgery treatment due to particular anomalies which characterize this syndrome. Comprehensive interview and broadening of the diagnostics enabled to diagnose GGS and to introduce the appropriate treatment. GGS is a multidisciplinary problem and widespread knowledge of this syndrome could accelerate the diagnosis process. Early diagnosis of GGS allows to introduce the secondary prophylaxis and to apply the appropriate treatment to slow the progress of the syndrome.

  19. Histological Remission during Corticosteroid Therapy of Overlapping Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis and Autoimmune Hepatitis: Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichiroh Fukuda

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Concurrence of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH is a rare condition that is challenging to diagnosis, due to the relatively high prevalence of autoantibodies in NASH. It is also difficult to determine the most effective treatment as corticosteroids are likely to worsen NASH despite being effective in the treatment of AIH. In this case report, we present a female diagnosed with NASH-AIH overlap with accompanying diabetes mellitus, who successfully achieved normalization of serum alanine aminotransferase levels following prednisolone therapy and weight loss. A follow-up liver biopsy performed 40 months after the initial diagnosis showed only minimal inflammatory infiltrates in the portal area without any NASH histology. Resolution of NASH, in conjunction with a reduction in hepatic fibrosis, might suggest that prednisolone itself does not aggravate steatohepatitis, but rather prevents disease progression. Appropriate immunosuppressive treatment may therefore be an important component of the optimum therapy for NASH-AIH overlap.

  20. [Mirizzi's syndrome. Evaluation of 3 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garavello, A; Manfroni, S; Bellanova, G; Antonellis, D

    2004-01-01

    Evaluation of three cases of Mirizzi's syndrome (MS), a rare condition of non neoplastic biliary tree obstruction. We reviewed three cases of MS, operated from July 1998 to December 2000 in our institution. All patients were preoperatively evaluated by clinical examination, Ultrasound (US) and Endoscopic retrograde colangiopancreatography (CPRE) for jaundice. Computed Tomography (TC) was also performed in two. Abdominal pain was the main symptom in two patients, jaundice in one (17 mg/dl); Courvoisier-Terrier sign, suggestive for a biliopancreatic neoplasm, was present in two patients. US was sensitive for gallbladder stones and biliary tree dilatation but not specific for MS; TC only excluded a malignancy in the biliopancreatic area but wasn't useful for diagnosis. CPRE visualized a gallbladder stone obstructing the biliary tree in two cases, but failed to show the fistula between gallbladder and hepatic duct in one. Operations were performed with an "open" approach; in two patients colecystectomy was sufficient to relieve the obstruction, in one patient the biliary fistula was closed with a gallbladder tissue flap over a T tube. Mirizzi's syndrome is a rare condition, but surgeons must be aware of it, particularly in the laparoscopic era were dissection of the Calot triangle may lead to a damage of the hepatic duct. Suspect of MS is mandatory in all cases of jaundice with non neoplastic biliary obstruction. Preoperative diagnosis of MS is not easy; US is sensitive for gallbladder stone and biliary tree dilatation, but not specific for choledochal stone compression and biliobiliary fistula. TC is useful for exclusion of pancreatic or liver neoplasms but is non specific for MS. CPRE represents the "gold" standard for MS, showing the hepatic duct compression caused by the stone impacted in gallbladder neck. CPRE is not only diagnostic but also operative; sphyncterotomy and stones extraction give a temporary relief of hyerbilirubinemia waiting for operation. When

  1. A traumatic case of Weber's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirakuni, Takayuki; Tamaki, Norihiko; Matsumoto, Satoshi; Ishida, Kazuhiko; Fujiwara, Masayasu.

    1983-01-01

    The present authors encountered a rare traumatic case of Weber's syndrome in which computerized tomography (CT) revealed a hematoma localized in the tegmentum of the midbrain. This 49-year-old male was admitted because of a disturbed consciousness level caused by a hit on the right frontal area in a traffic accident. A neurological examination on admission disclosed Weber's syndrome: a dilatation of the right pupil, no reaction to direct or indirect light stimuli, ptosis of the right eyelid, lateral deviation of the right eyeball, and left hemiparesis with increased deep tendon reflexes and Babinski's sign. CT revealed a high-density area localized in the tegmentum of the midbrain, but interpeduncular and quadrigeminal cisterns were patent. After admission, his motor function and level of consciousness have showed improvement with medical treatment, but his right oculomotor palsy is unchanged. CT performed 7 days after admission showed a low-density area in place of the absorbed hematoma. In this case, we cannot explain the mechanism of the primary brain-stem injury. However, there are four possible mechanisms: nerve avulsion, neurovascular friction, localized contusion, and shear strain injury. Careful consideration of the anatomical relationship shows that it is likely that the lesion was a contusional hemorrhage caused by impact on the tentorial edge. (author)

  2. New onset neuromyelitis optica in a young Nigerian woman with possible antiphospholipid syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komolafe Morenikeji A

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Devic's neuromyelitis optica is an inflammatory demyelinating disease that targets the optic nerves and spinal cord. It has a worldwide distribution and distinctive features that distinguish it from multiple sclerosis. There has been no previous report of neuromyelitis optica from our practice environment, and we are not aware of any case associated with antiphospholipid syndrome in an African person. Case presentation We report the case of a 28-year-old Nigerian woman who presented with neck pain, paroxysmal tonic spasms, a positive Lhermitte's sign and spastic quadriplegia. She later developed bilateral optic neuritis and had clinical and biochemical features of antiphospholipid syndrome. Her initial magnetic resonance imaging showed a central linear hyperintense focus in the intramedullary portion of C2 to C4. Repeat magnetic resonance imaging after treatment revealed resolution of the signal intensity noticed earlier. Conclusion Neuromyelitis optica should be considered in the differential diagnoses of acute myelopathy in Africans. We also highlight the unusual association with antiphospholipid syndrome. Physicians should screen such patients for autoimmune disorders.

  3. Kartagener′s syndrome: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayank Mishra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Kartagener′s syndrome is a rare, autosomal recessive genetic ciliary disorder comprising the triad of situs inversus, chronic sinusitis, and bronchiectasis. The basic problem lies in the defective movement of cilia, leading to recurrent chest infections, ear/nose/throat symptoms, and infertility. We hereby report three unusual cases of this rare entity - an infertile male with azoospermia in whom Bochdalek′s diaphragmatic hernia coexisted, another case of an infertile female, and a third of an infertile male with oligospermia. The need for a high index of suspicion to make an early diagnosis cannot be overemphasized in such patients so that wherever possible, options for timely treatment of infertility may be offered and unnecessary evaluation of symptoms is avoided.

  4. A case of vogt-koyanagi-harada syndrome with persistent dyspnea secondary to laryngeal edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantopoulos, Dimosthenis; deSilva, Brad W; Cebulla, Colleen M

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of laryngeal edema associated with the Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) syndrome. A 32-year-old African-American female presented with a 12-day prodrome, including headache, tinnitus and shortness of breath, which preceded sudden photophobia and bilateral visual loss. Examination and clinical testing were most consistent with VKH, and the patient improved with intravenous methylprednisolone therapy. The patient had persistent dyspnea, which was out of proportion to chest CT findings and which was exacerbated during a recurrence of VKH. Flexible fiberoptic laryngoscopy with stroboscopy revealed diffuse laryngeal edema. Symptoms were alleviated with breathing exercises. Several autoimmune diseases may cause diffuse laryngeal edema. In this case, VKH was associated with the patient's glottic edema and dyspnea. We recommend that laryngeal edema be considered in the differential diagnosis for patients with dyspnea and VKH.

  5. A Case of Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada Syndrome with Persistent Dyspnea Secondary to Laryngeal Edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimosthenis Mantopoulos

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We report a case of laryngeal edema associated with the Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH syndrome. Patient and Methods: A 32-year-old African-American female presented with a 12-day prodrome, including headache, tinnitus and shortness of breath, which preceded sudden photophobia and bilateral visual loss. Examination and clinical testing were most consistent with VKH, and the patient improved with intravenous methylprednisolone therapy. Results: The patient had persistent dyspnea, which was out of proportion to chest CT findings and which was exacerbated during a recurrence of VKH. Flexible fiberoptic laryngoscopy with stroboscopy revealed diffuse laryngeal edema. Symptoms were alleviated with breathing exercises. Conclusions: Several autoimmune diseases may cause diffuse laryngeal edema. In this case, VKH was associated with the patient's glottic edema and dyspnea. We recommend that laryngeal edema be considered in the differential diagnosis for patients with dyspnea and VKH.

  6. Autoimmune hepatitis in association with lymphocytic colitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, Edmond M

    2012-02-03

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a rare, chronic inflammatory disorder which has been associated with a number of other auto-immune conditions. However, there are no reports in the medical literature of an association with microscopic (lymphocytic) colitis. We report the case of a 53-year-old woman with several autoimmune conditions, including lymphocytic colitis, who presented with an acute hepatitis. On the basis of the clinical features, serology, and histopathology, we diagnosed autoimmune hepatitis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of autoimmune hepatitis in association with lymphocytic colitis, and lends support to the theory of an autoimmune etiology for lymphocytic colitis.

  7. Neuropatia óptica auto-imune: relato de caso Autoimmune optic neuropathy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Martins C. Duprat Cardoso

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Descrevemos uma paciente de 9 anos, sexo feminino, com perda visual bilateral grave tratada com corticóide por via oral apresentando melhora em apenas um olho. Nove anos depois apresentou recidiva que inicialmente respondeu à pulsoterapia corticóide mas foi seguida de perda progressiva e completa da visão após a redução do tratamento. Novas tentativas terapêuticas não melhoraram a visão. Avaliação clínico-laboratorial não revelou doença sistêmica, mas apresentava anticorpos antinucleares (1/640, anti-Ro e anti-La positivos. Neuropatia óptica auto-imune é uma afecção rara, que simula neurite óptica idiopática e se caracteriza por perda visual aguda, sem doença sistêmica, mas com evidências laboratoriais de doença auto-imune, em especial o FAN positivo. Biópsia de pele freqüentemente mostra evidências de vasculite. Esta condição deve ser tratada agressivamente, com corticóide e imunossupressores, uma vez que o acometimento visual geralmente é mais grave do que o da neurite óptica idiopática/desmielinizante e pode ser irreversível.We report on a 9-year-old female patient who had bilateral severe visual loss and was treated with oral corticosteroids. Visual improvement occurred in one eye. Nine years later she presented relapse of visual loss in her only seeing eye. Pulse corticosteroid therapy resulted in dramatic visual improvement followed, however, by progressive and complete visual loss as soon as the corticosteroid was tapered. Repeat treatment did not result in visual improvement. Clinical and laboratory investigation failed to find a systemic disease but the patient had positive antinuclear (1/640, anti-Ro and anti-La antibodies. Autoimmune optic neuropathy is a rare condition that may mimic an idiopathic optic neuritis and is characterized by acute visual loss, without systemic disease but with laboratory evidence of an autoimmune disorder, usually a positive ANA. A skin biopsy usually shows evidence of

  8. What Is Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Back To Health Topics / Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome Also known as What Is Antiphospholipid (AN-te-fos-fo-LIP-id) antibody syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder. Autoimmune disorders ...

  9. Management of phenytoin-induced gingival enlargement in a patient with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Sarvesh Urolagin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid antibody (APLA syndrome is a noninflammatory autoimmune disease, with innumerable clinical manifestations ranging from recurrent thrombosis and pregnancy morbidity to valvular lesions, transverse myelitis, thrombocytopenia, and hemolytic anemia. APLAs in antiphospholipid syndrome (APS are well-known risk factors for cerebrovascular accidents. Stroke is the most common manifestation of APS in the central nervous system. Gingival enlargement is a known side effect of phenytoin which is an antiepileptic drug. This can have a significant effect on the quality of life as well as increasing the oral bacterial load by generating plaque retention sites. The management of gingival overgrowth seems to be directed at controlling gingival inflammation through a good oral hygiene regimen. Thus, this case report aims to describe the conservative management of phenytoin-induced gingival enlargement combined with inflammatory enlargement in a patient with APLA syndrome.

  10. Autoimmune Progesterone Dermatitis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Çetinözman Aksoy

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune progesteron dermatitis (AIPD is a rare disorder which is characterized by cyclical premenstrual flares of cutaneous or mucocutaneous manifestations. We present a 36-year-old woman with a 2-year history of oral ulcers and a rash which presents a week before every menstruation. She also had a history of recurrent herpes labialis infection; however herpes simplex virus could not be detected by PCR in oral lesions. Routine laboratory investigations, as well as serum complement levels were normal, except for elevated ANA titer (1/160. Histopathological examination of one of the papules was consistent with erythema multiforme and immunobullous diseases were ruled out by negative immunofluorescence studies. Based on the history and the clinical features, AIPD was suspected and the diagnosis was confirmed by flare of the lesions after progesterone challenge test. Subsequently, oral tamoxifen was started which controlled her flares significantly and no major side effects except amenorrhea was observed during treatment. Next she was given spironolactone which did not control her symptoms, therefore oral prednisolone had to be introduced. Due to its rare occurence, clinical features, pathogenesis, diagnostic and treatment alternatives of AIPD are discussed in this study based on the review of the medical literature.

  11. Mowat–Wilson syndromecase study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Faltin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mowat–Wilson syndrome is a rare genetic condition characterised by a number of congenital anomalies, including facial dysmorphia, heart and kidney anomalies, Hirschsprung’s disease, intellectual disability and abnormalities of reproductive organs. In the paper, we present a case of a girl who was admitted to the Department of Paediatrics, Immunology and Nephrology at the age of 3 months, with a suspicion of tubulointerstitial nephritis. The patient had facial dysmorphia, congenital malformations of the nervous system and Hirschsprung’s disease. During hospitalisation, congenital urinary anomalies (bilateral vesicoureteral reflux and heart defects were diagnosed. On the basis of the clinical picture, the diagnostics was expanded to genetic tests for Mowat–Wilson syndrome, which revealed an 857_858delAG pathogenic mutation in one of the ZEB2 gene alleles (exon 7 – one of the rarer causes of Mowat–Wilson syndrome. At present, the girl is 13 months old. Her development is delayed. Currently, the girl is under multidisciplinary care and she is undergoing intensive rehabilitation. The knowledge of the syndrome’s clinical features allows a faster diagnosis to be made and multispecialty care to be provided to the child.

  12. Good’s syndrome. Report of case

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    Diana Andrea Herrera-Sánchez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Good’s syndrome is an association of thymoma and immunodeficiency. The symptoms are recurrent sinopulmonary infections in addition to the compressive side of thymoma. A laboratory finding is notable for the absence or decrease of B lymphocytes, hypogammaglobulinemia, inversion ratio CD4/CD8 and abnormal proliferative response to mitogens. Clinical case: Female, 49-year-old started five months earlier with lower limb edema, postprandial vomiting, dysphagia, chronic diarrhea and weight loss. A second endoscopy ruled gastric neoplasia. Chest radiography with mediastinal widening, Thoraco-abdominal CT with bilateral pleural effusion and a mass in the anterior mediastinum, histopathological report of the tumor: B1 thymoma. Laboratory findings: IgG 349 mg/dL, IgA 70.3 mg/dL, 37.1 IgM mg/dL, Ca125 631 UI/mL, leukocytes 7890 mm3, hemoglobin 13.2 g/dL, lymphocytes 2060 mm3, CD16+CD56+ 122 cells/µL, CD19 77 cells/µL, CD3 2052 cells/µL, CD4 977 cells/µL, CD8 998 cells/µL; ratio CD4/CD8 0.98, hepatitis C, B and HIV negative. They requested valuation to Clinical Immunology and Allergy due to hypogammaglobulinemia, the diagnosis of Good’s syndrome was confirmed and initiated with intravenous gamma globulin replacement to immunomodulatory dose of 1 g/kg, she reached replacement goal in the third dose of immunoglobulin intravenous, with clinical improvement. She died four months later from cardiac complications. Conclusions: Despite the variability of presentation, Good’s syndrome should be suspected as part of the paraneoplastic manifestations of thymoma.

  13. A possible link between the Epstein-Barr virus infection and autoimmune thyroid disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwizdek, Katarzyna; Michalski, Marek; Wojnicz, Romuald

    2016-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), also known as human herpesvirus 4, is a member of the Herpesviridae virus family. EBV infection can cause infectious mononucleosis (IM) in the lytic phase of EBV’s life cycle. Past EBV infection is associated with lymphomas, and may also result in certain allergic and autoimmune diseases. Although potential mechanisms of autoimmune diseases have not been clearly elucidated, both genetic and environmental factors, such as infectious agents, are considered to be responsible for their development. In addition, EBV modifies the host immune response. The worldwide prevalence of autoimmune diseases shows how common this pathogen is. Normally, the virus stays in the body and remains dormant throughout life. However, this is not always the case, and a serious EBV-related illness may develop later in life. This explains the chronic course of autoimmune diseases that is often accompanied by exacerbations of symptoms. Based on the present studies, EBV infection can cause autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), multiple sclerosis (MS), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Sjögren’s syndrome, and autoimmune hepatitis. The EBV has also been reported in patients with autoimmune thyroid disorders. Although EBV is not the only agent responsible for the development of autoimmune thyroid diseases, it can be considered a contributory factor. PMID:27833448

  14. A Case: Eight-and-A-Half Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cennet Nalan Kuş

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Scientific BACKGROUND: The combination of clinical one-and-a-half syndrome together with cranial nerve VII palsy is known to as eight-and-a-half syndrome. It localized the pathology to the pons. OBJECTIVE: To report a case having clinical and radiologic findings typical of eight-and-a-half syndrome. CASE: 65 year old man with hypertension presented with sudden onset of binocular diplopia left facial weakness. Magnetic resonance imaging demostrated a small lesion in the left paramedian pontine tegmentum. CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, this is the first report of a case of eight-and-a-half syndrome in Turkish literature

  15. BRUGADA SYNDROME-A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuževska-Maneva Konstandina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Brugada syndrome is a type of arrhythmia disorder, which is characterised by abnormal electrocardiogram (ECG findings and an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. The most frequent sign is a persistent ST elevation in the electrocardiographic leads V1-V3 with a right bundle branch block (RBBB.We present a case of 12 years old healthy child, without any complains until then. He had 2 episodes of collapse/syncope, which lasted long and spontaneously disappeared. The collapses were provoked by physical activity. On ECG we found sinus rhythm 62 bpm, RBBB (right bundle brunch block and Brugada signs in V2 and V3 channel-ST elevation ≥ 2mm. The child was sent in electrophysiological centre abroad where the electrophysiological study was performed. They did not found any accessory pathway. The atrioventricular (AV conduction was normal. Long lasting polymorphic ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation was induced with programed stimulation with 3 extrastimuli in right ventricular outflow tract. Performing one defibrillation the rhythm turned in sinus way. Then they performed ECG with translocation of electrodes V1-3 in 2nd intercostal space and the Brugada I type findings was discovered. After confirming of presence of Brugada type -1 syndrome the implantable cardioverter- defibrillator (ICD was applied on child heart.

  16. A Rare Case: Touraine Solente Gole Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Şahin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Touraine-Solente-Gole syndrome, also known as pachydermoperiostosis, is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. It is characterized by enlargement of fingers and toes, pachyderma, excessive sweating, and pain. In this paper, we present a 9-year-old patient to attract attention to this rare disease. A 9-year-old female patient was brought to our outpatient clinics with sweating and enlargement of hands and feet. She was the fourth child born to consanguineous parents. Her 26-year-old elder sister also had the same symptoms. Her physical examination revealed clubbing of the hands, and thick and sweating fingers. Her test results were unremarkable. Hand x-ray revealed epiphyseal, and metaphyseal thickening of the hands, and periostal hyperosteosis. Pachydermoperiostosis usually begins in childhood, progresses till 20 years of age, then, ceases. Delayed closure of fontanelles, and patent ductus arteriosus may be symptoms of the disease. Patients with deletions and mutations in HPGD (15-hydroxy prostaglandin dehydrogenase gene (4q33-q34 demonstrate this phenotype. This syndrome is more frequent in females, and mimics rheumatic diseases. Ibuprofen therapy may be used for bone pain. Colchicine is the alternative treatment. In cases of excessive hand and feet sweating associated with clubbed fingers pachydermoperiostosis should be brought to mind.

  17. Two Faces of the Same Coin: A Case Report of Antiphospholipid Syndrome Nephropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Sofia Homem de Melo Marques; Hugo André Nascimiento Ferreira; Ana Teresa Pires de Morais Nunes; Roberto Nicolau Pestana Silva; Susana Maria Moreira Sampaio Norton

    2017-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disease which can be primary or secondary to other autoimmune conditions and is defined by the occurrence of arterial or venous thrombosis, or pregnancy morbidity associated with persistently positive antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLA). The kidney may be affected by thrombosis at any level of its vasculature. When small vessels are involved, this results in thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA), which can manifest as either acute vaso-occlusive or c...

  18. Primary anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome causing recurrent venous thrombosis and thrombocytopenia in a patient with Addison's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elebrashy, Ibrahim; Yousief, Elham; Saif, Aasem

    2014-12-01

    We report a case of Addison's disease presenting with recurrent deep venous thrombosis and thrombocytopenia and proved to have primary anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome. The case report highlights the shared autoimmune nature of both diseases.

  19. Two Cases of. Cushing's Syndrome tumour and bilateral hyperplasia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two patients, one with Cushing's syndrome and one with Cushing's disease, are presented. In the first case the syndrome was caused by a tumour of the right suprarenal gland which was treated by unilateral adrenalectomy, and the second case was diagnosed as hyperplasia of the left suprarenal gland, eventually leading ...

  20. Anophthalmia-Waardenburg syndrome: a report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyugül, Z; Seven, M; Hacihanefioğlu, S; Kartal, A; Suyugül, N; Cenani, A

    1996-04-24

    We report on 2 Turkish families with children who had bilateral anophthalmia, upper and lower limb abnormalities, mental retardation and consanguineous parents. We have evaluated the 2 cases in the first family and the only case in the second as anophthalmia-Waardenburg syndrome. This is an extremely rare autosomal recessive syndrome.

  1. Primary sialoangiectasia - a diagnostic pitfall in Sjogren's syndrome - Case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalk, WWI; Vissink, A; Spijkervet, FKL; Bootsma, H

    A case of primary sialoangiectasia, which in this case was initially misdiagnosed as Sjogren's syndrome, is described. Other diseases, including HIV infection, psoriatic arthritis, and acute parotitis, may cause glandular changes similar to the changes found in the syndrome. Therefore, sialography

  2. Non-Syndromic Oligodontia in permanent dentition: A case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of a syndrome. The present case report highlights a unique case of non syndromic oligodontia, with agenesis of four permanent incisors, left permanent canine and right second premolar in the mandibular arch and its management with a novel fixed functional prosthetic appliance. Prosthetic rehabilitation is an urgent need ...

  3. Case Report: Cervical Klippel-Feil syndrome predisposing an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Case Report: Cervical Klippel-Feil syndrome predisposing an elderly African man to central cord myelopathy following minor trauma. ... unique presentation of this case of Klippel-Feil syndrome further supports the impression that following fusion (congenital or acquired) of one segment of the spinal column, hypermobility of ...

  4. Leukemoid reaction, a rare manifestation of autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a case of small duct primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salagre, Kaustubh D; Sahay, Ravindra Nath; Patil, Anuja; Pati, Anuja; Joshi, Amita; Shukla, Akash

    2013-10-01

    A 48 year old lady presented with jaundice and exertional breathlesness. Her laboratory reports showed anaemia, reticulocytosis, leucocytosis, elevated Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH), alkaline phosphatase levels, hyperbillirubinemia and positive direct Coomb's test. After ruling out all the other causes of autoimmunity and hemolytic anemia, she was diagnosed as leukemoid reaction due to autoimmune hemolytic anemia with primary sclerosing cholangitis. Patient showed immediate improvement after corticosteroids.

  5. Two thymus-related autoimmune disorders: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirtavoos-Mahyari H

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mirtavoos-Mahyari Hanifeh,1 Adnan Khosravi,2 Esfahani-Monfared Zahra,1 Shadmehr Mohammad Behgam31Chronic Respiratory Diseases Research Center, National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (NRITLD, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 2Tobacco Prevention and Control Research Center, National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (NRITLD, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 3Tracheal Diseases Research Center, National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (NRITLD, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IranAbstract: Thymoma is the most common tumor in the anterior mediastinum. A 56-year-old man presented unremitting and periodic chronic diarrhea of 9 weeks duration, and clinical examination revealed a huge nonhomogeneous mass lesion in the right lung and leukocytosis. He was treated with CHOP regimen (cyclophosphamide 1,200 mg/m2, doxorubicin 50 mg/m2, vincristine 1.5 mg/m2 and prednisolone 75 mg/m2 × 5 days based on lung mass computed tomography-guided biopsy, but he was reevaluated because neither symptom improved. Surprisingly, celiac disease was documented with increased titer of immunoglobulin antibodies to gliadin and tissue transglutaminase. Lung mass rebiopsy and thymectomy demonstrated thymoma. After surgery, the patient showed aplastic anemia that responded well to cyclosporine. At 2-year follow-up, the patient’s hematologic status and diarrhea were completely recovered and no symptom and/or sign of thymoma recurrence was seen.Keywords: thymus, thymoma, celiac, aplastic anemia, autoimmune disorder

  6. MELKERSSON-ROSENTHAL SYNDROME: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adil BAŞMAN

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Melkersson-Rosenthal Syndrome (MRS is a rare disorder consisting of a triad of persistent or recurrent orofacial edema, relapsing facial paralysis and fissured tongue. It is rarely possible to observe all aspects of the classical triad at the same time, since these symptoms may appear in different times of life cycle. The most common symptom is orofacial edema. Although etiology of MRS is unclear, various factors such as infections, genetic predisposition, immune deficiency, food intolerance and stress have been held responsible. MRS is diagnosed based on clinical features. This case report describes a 39 years old male patient with recurrent swelling of the upper lip. Clinical examinations showed classical triad of MRS. The diagnosis and treatment procedures were presented with special emphasis to the clinical features of this rare condition.

  7. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carolina Coelho Gozzano

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (SGG is a rare autosomal dominant disorder. Although it is hereditary, there are cases of spontaneous mutation. It is characterized by carcinogenic predisposition and several clinical manifestations. This article is about a 73-year-old white female patient with scoliosis, hypertelorism and four basal cell carcinomas (BCCs on the back. The diagnosis of SGG was made. SGG is associated with clinical findings classified in larger criteria: minimum two BCCs in more than 20 years, or one in less than 20 years, keratocystic odontogenic tumor, palmoplantar pits, intracranial ectopic calcification, family history of SGG; and minor: craniofacial anomalies, macrocephaly, cleft or palatine lip, frontal bossa, hypertelorism, skeletal anomalies, ovarian fibroma, medulloblastoma. SGG is defined with the presence of two major criteria or one major and two minor. The treatment is multidisciplinary depending on the clinical manifestations of the patient and requires constant vigilance to new clinical findings.

  8. Recurrent Hypothenar Hammer Syndrome: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Nicholas S; Ford, Ronald D

    2016-10-01

    Hypothenar hammer syndrome (HHS) is a rare cause of digital ischemia and pain caused from repetitive trauma to the palm. Often related to occupational practices, thrombosis and embolization can occur. Treatment is often surgical and involves excision with or without reconstruction. We describe a 55 year-old, male pipe fitter previously diagnosed and treated for HHS with excision and repair using a reversed interpositional vein graft in the mid-1980's. He continued to work in the profession, which he regularly used his palm as a hammer and returned approximately 30 years later with recurrent symptoms of cold intolerance and pain. Angiography confirmed occlusion of the ulnar artery with emboli present distally. The patient was again treated with excision and reconstruction. HHS is an uncommon cause of digital ischemia. Its recurrence is even more rare. To our knowledge, this is the first described case of diagnosed and treated recurrent HHS.

  9. Exploding Head Syndrome:A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautam Ganguly

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Exploding head syndrome (EHS is a rare parasomnia in which affected individuals awaken from sleep with the sensation of a loud bang. The etiology is unknown, but other conditions including primary and secondary headache disorders and nocturnal seizures need to be excluded. Case Presentation: A 57-year-old Indian male presented with four separate episodes of awakening from sleep at night after hearing a flashing sound on the right side of his head over the last 2 years. These events were described ‘as if there are explosions in my head’. A neurologic examination, imaging studies, and a polysomnogram ensued, and the results led to the diagnosis of EHS. Conclusion: EHS is a benign, uncommon, predominately nocturnal disorder that is self-limited. No treatment is generally required. Reassurance to the patient is often all that is needed.

  10. Presentation of a case with Wellens syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis A. Rodríguez López

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This case report is about a 56-year-old male, farm worker with a history of being a smoker and suffering from high blood pressure, who was admitted at the Cardiology Care Department with the diagnosis of coronary artery disease –unstable angina–, because of chest pain related to physical effort and changes in the appearance threshold. Rest-electrocardiogram, painless, shows deep, symmetric negative T waves in anterior wall, without enzyme elevation; but during admission the patient evolves quickly, clinically and electrically, to an extensive anterior wall acute myocardial infarction, without responding to the fibrinolytic reperfusion therapy, and showing a ventricular tachycardia degenerating into ventricular fibrillation. There was no response to the maneuvers of cardiovascular resuscitation, thus, he dies. It is diagnosed postmortem as a Wellens syndrome, because necropsy showed severe atherosclerotic disease of the proximal segment of the left anterior descending coronary artery with extensive anterior transmural infarction.

  11. [Primary sclerosing cholangitis associated with Sjögren's syndrome, retroperitoneal fibrosis and chronic pancreatitis. Report of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreda, F; Contardo, C; León, A; Navarrete, J; Figueroa, R; Attanasio, F

    1989-01-01

    Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis (PSC) is an unusual chronic, cholestatic disease of unknown etiology, more frequently seen in young adults in close relationship with Chronic Ulcerative Colitis. We report the case of a 30 year old woman, coming from the peruvian amazon with PSC associated with Sjögren Syndrome, Chronic Pancreatitis and Retroperitoneal Fibrosis, without colonic involvement. She was treated with external biliary drainage and controlled for 12 months. In this paper, clinical, biochemical, radiological, histological and therapeutic features are reviewed as well as its possible immunologie autoimmune origin.

  12. Autoimmune gastritis: Pathologist's viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coati, Irene; Fassan, Matteo; Farinati, Fabio; Graham, David Y; Genta, Robert M; Rugge, Massimo

    2015-11-14

    Western countries are seeing a constant decline in the incidence of Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis, coupled with a rising epidemiological and clinical impact of autoimmune gastritis. This latter gastropathy is due to autoimmune aggression targeting parietal cells through a complex interaction of auto-antibodies against the parietal cell proton pump and intrinsic factor, and sensitized T cells. Given the specific target of this aggression, autoimmune gastritis is typically restricted to the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa. In advanced cases, the oxyntic epithelia are replaced by atrophic (and metaplastic) mucosa, creating the phenotypic background in which both gastric neuroendocrine tumors and (intestinal-type) adenocarcinomas may develop. Despite improvements in our understanding of the phenotypic changes or cascades occurring in this autoimmune setting, no reliable biomarkers are available for identifying patients at higher risk of developing a gastric neoplasm. The standardization of autoimmune gastritis histology reports and classifications in diagnostic practice is a prerequisite for implementing definitive secondary prevention strategies based on multidisciplinary diagnostic approaches integrating endoscopy, serology, histology and molecular profiling.

  13. [Prune-Belly Syndrome: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattoli, Fabio; De Prisco, Ornella; Gherzi, Maurizio; Falconi, Daniela; Marazzi, Federico; Marengo, Marita; Serra, Ilaria; Tamagnone, Michela; Formica, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Prune-Belly Syndrome (PBS) is a rare congenital syndrome characterized by the absence of abdominal muscles, anomalies in the urinary tract, megaureter, cryptorchidism or testicular agenesis, hypertension and worsening chronic kidney disease (CKD). The incidence is estimated between 1 out of 35,000 and 1 out of 50,000 born alive, and it affects males in prevalence (97%). In the present study we describe the case of a 38 year old male patient (followed since May 2011) affected by PBS, CKD, one functional kidney at the scintigraphy, pediatric testicular implants, bladder surgery and correction of pectus excavatum. At the beginning of the observation, renal function was deteriorated, with a creatinine 3.3 mg/dl, GFR calculated at MDRD 23 ml/min, proteinuria in nephrotic range (4 g/day), high blood pressure, anemia and hyperparathyroidism. In the following examinations renal function framework worsened, despite the adoption of a low-protein diet. Due to the functional trend, the patient was prescribed hemodialysis as substitute treatment. In January 2013 a first attempt of artero-venous fistula (AVF) did not succeed, while a new AVF in March 2013 resulted effective. In July hemodialysis was started. In the future, we expect to insert the patient in the Kidney Transplant List (since surgical feasibility has already been positively evaluated). Our case is quite peculiar due to the late beginning of substitute treatment. Further, SPB represents a challenge that, in the absence of a prompt and effective treatment, inevitably it leads to terminal uremia; nevertheless, given a proper treatment, a transplant with good chances of success can be envisaged.

  14. Late-Onset Nephrotic Syndrome in Galloway-Mowat Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazza Issa

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Galloway-Mowat Syndrome (GMS has a wide variety of clinical manifestations and histologic findings. All reported cases had developed nephrotic syndrome in the first two years of life. We report a case of 12 years old boy with microcephaly, mental retardation, and typical dysmorphic features of GMS with a late onset of minimal change nephritic syndrome which first manifested at seven years of age.

  15. Asperger syndrome related suicidal behavior: two case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kocourkova J

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Jana Kocourkova, Iva Dudova, Jiri Koutek Department of Child Psychiatry, Charles University Second Faculty of Medicine, University Hospital Motol, Prague, Czech Republic Abstract: Asperger syndrome hinders adaptation to developmental challenges during childhood and adolescence, particularly with regard to interpersonal relationships. Individuals with Asperger syndrome display lack of empathy and limited ability to understand social and emotional exchanges with other people. Individuals with Asperger syndrome are significantly exposed to the risk of suicidal behavior, especially during adolescence. The authors describe cases of suicidal behavior in two adolescent boys with Asperger syndrome. Keywords: Asperger syndrome, suicidal behavior, adolescence

  16. Prune Belly Syndrome in Adolescence: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Mylarappa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Prune Belly syndrome also known as Eagle Barret syndrome is a rare disorder. We report a rare case of Prune Belly syndrome in 17 year old boy. Patient presented with complains of absence of both testis in scrotum since birth. On examination patient was found to have lax abdominal wall. Patient was further evaluated and found to have shrunken small right kidney and left hydroureteronephrosis and the diagnosis of Prune Belly Syndrome was made. Prune Belly Syndrome represents a wide spectrum of disease. Each patient must be dealt with on an individual basis. A course of watchful waiting with selective surgical intervention has also been successful.

  17. Familial deletion 18p syndrome: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemyre Emmanuelle

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deletion 18p is a frequent deletion syndrome characterized by dysmorphic features, growth deficiencies, and mental retardation with a poorer verbal performance. Until now, five families have been described with limited clinical description. We report transmission of deletion 18p from a mother to her two daughters and review the previous cases. Case presentation The proband is 12 years old and has short stature, dysmorphic features and moderate mental retardation. Her sister is 9 years old and also has short stature and similar dysmorphic features. Her cognitive performance is within the borderline to mild mental retardation range. The mother also presents short stature. Psychological evaluation showed moderate mental retardation. Chromosome analysis from the sisters and their mother revealed the same chromosomal deletion: 46, XX, del(18(p11.2. Previous familial cases were consistent regarding the transmission of mental retardation. Our family differs in this regard with variable cognitive impairment and does not display poorer verbal than non-verbal abilities. An exclusive maternal transmission is observed throughout those families. Women with del(18p are fertile and seem to have a normal miscarriage rate. Conclusion Genetic counseling for these patients should take into account a greater range of cognitive outcome than previously reported.

  18. Intraocular inflammation in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pras, Eran; Neumann, Ron; Zandman-Goddard, Gisele; Levy, Yair; Assia, Ehud I; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Langevitz, Pnina

    2004-12-01

    The uveal tract represents the vascular organ of the eye. In addition to providing most of the blood supply to the intraocular structures, it acts as a conduit for immune cells, particularly lymphocytes, to enter the eye. Consequently, the uveal tract is represented in many intraocular inflammatory processes. Uveitis is probably a misnomer unless antigens within the uvea are the direct targets of the inflammatory process. A better term of the condition is "intraocular inflammation" (IOI). To review the presence of IOI in autoimmune diseases, the immunopathogenic mechanisms leading to disease, and treatment. We reviewed the English medical literature by using MEDLINE (1984-2003) employing the terms "uveitis," "intraocular inflammation," and "autoimmune diseases." An underlying autoimmune disease was identified in up to 40% of patients with IOI, and included spondyloarthropathies, Behcets disease, sarcoidosis, juvenile chronic arthritis, Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome (an inflammatory syndrome including uveitis with dermatologic and neurologic manifestations), immune recovery syndrome, and uveitis with tubulointerstitial disease. The immunopathogenesis of IOI involves enhanced T-cell response. Recently, guidelines for the use of immunosuppressive drugs for inflammatory eye disease were established and include: corticosteroids, azathioprine, methotrexate, mycophenolate mofetil, cyclosporine, tacrolimus, cyclophosphamide, and chlorambucil. New therapies with limited experience include the tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors, interferon alfa, monoclonal antibodies against lymphocyte surface antigens, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), and the intraocular delivery of immunosuppressive agents. An underlying autoimmune disease was identified in up to 40% of patients with IOI. Immunosuppressive drugs, biologic agents, and IVIG are employed for the treatment of IOI in autoimmune diseases.

  19. Olmsted syndrome: Report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G K Tharini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Olmsted syndrome is an uncommon genetic disorder with symmetrical, diffuse, transgredient, mutilating palmoplantar keratoderma and periorificial hyperkeratosis. Olmsted syndrome in a female patient is particularly rare, and we report two unrelated female patients of Olmsted syndrome, who presented with perioral hyperkeratosis and palmoplantar keratoderma. One of our patients also had woolly hair from birth and flexion contracture of a digit, while the other had pseudoainhum. There was no cardiac involvement. Hence, the diagnosis of Olmsted syndrome was made.

  20. Autoimmun hypophysitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Therese; Hagen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    during pregnancy or postpartum, but also occurs in males and children. AH is often associated with other autoimmune diseases, most frequently with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The symptoms are caused by enlargement of the pituitary gland and disturbances of the hormone function. Treatment is either...

  1. EFFECT OF PLASMAPHERESIS AND PASSAGE OF ANTI-RETINAL ANTIBODIES THROUGH THE PLACENTA IN A CASE OF NON-PARANEOPLASTIC AUTOIMMUNE RETINOPATHY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierpina, David I; Skale, David M; Fan, Joseph T

    2017-01-01

    To present a case of nonparaneoplastic autoimmune retinopathy in association with myasthenia gravis in a young woman, and to report the effect of plasmapheresis as well as passage of antiretinal antibodies through the placenta. Case report. A 31-year-old woman presented with a history of myasthenia gravis and rapidly progressive vision loss at the age of 23. Funduscopic appearance and fluorescein angiographic findings on presentation were consistent with an autoimmune retinopathy. Paraneoplastic etiology was ruled out, and antiretinal antibody testing revealed positivity for autoantibodies against GAPDH, aldolase, enolase, arrestin, as well as unnamed 48-kDa and 60-kDa proteins. ARA Western Blot and immunohistochemistry profiles were unchanged by either plasmapheresis therapy or passage of serum through the maternal placenta. However, the patient's 6-month and 8-year-old daughters appeared unaffected. This is the first report of nonparaneoplastic autoimmune retinopathy associated with myasthenia gravis, although a strong history of autoimmune disorders is a known risk factor. Our patient's antiretinal antibody panel was unaffected immediately after plasmapheresis treatment. Antibodies to GAPDH and unnamed 38-kDa and 86-kDa proteins were able to pass through the placenta into the fetal circulation, although their effect on the growing fetus is not clear.

  2. Kabuki Syndrome: a case report with severe ocular abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio Mac Cord Medina

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Kabuki syndrome is a rare congenital anomaly, characterized by five fundamental features, the "Pentad of Niikawa": dysmorphic facies, skeletal anomalies, dermatoglyphic abnormalities, mild to moderate mental retardation and postnatal growth deficiency. Patients present characteristic external ocular features, nonetheless they may also present significant ocular abnormalities. We report a case of a brazilian child diagnosed with Kabuki syndrome, addressing the clinical features observed, with emphasis on the ocular manifestations. This case highlights the existence of this syndrome and all of its complexity. The identification of preventable causes of loss of vision underlines the value of detailed ophthalmologic examination of Kabuki syndrome patients.

  3. Auto-immune anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis: three case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashiri, Fahad A; Al-Rasheed, Abdulrahman A; Hassan, Saeed M; Hamad, Muddathir H A; El Khashab, Heba Y; Kentab, Amal Y; AlBadr, Fahad B; Salih, Mustafa A

    2017-08-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis is a recently identified auto-immune disorder characterised by severe memory deficit, a decreased level of consciousness, seizures, autonomic dysfunction and movement disorders. Three girls with the disorder are reported; they were aged 4 years, 5 years and 10 months. The 10-month-old infant who is one of the youngest patients reported with anti-NMDAR encephalitis worldwide, had MRI features suggestive of herpes simplex encephalitis (known to trigger anti-NMDAR encephalitis), but CSF PCR for herpes simplex was negative. All the patients presented with seizures, behavioural change, regression of speech, dystonia and choreo-athetosis. Anti-NMDAR antibodies were detected in all patients' sera and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Intravenous immunoglobulin, corticosteroids and rituximab were administered at different intervals. Cases 1 and 2 made a full recovery, but case 3 has mild motor and speech delay. Patients who present with encephalopathy, seizures and movement disorders should be tested for anti-NMDAR antibodies in serum and CSF in addition to being screened for herpes simplex encephalitis.

  4. CASE REPORT CASE CASE Conned by Conn's syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-01-08

    Jan 8, 2008 ... ing of the aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA) can prove challenging but is nonetheless very important for surgical planning and cure. We present two patients with MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) confirma- tion of APA with negative and equivocal CT (computed tomography) scans. Case 1.

  5. Autoimmune paediatric liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Vergani, Diego

    2008-06-07

    distinct entity or a form of atypical rejection in individuals susceptible to the development of autoimmune phenomena is unclear. Whatever its etiology, the recognition of this potentially life-threatening syndrome is important since its management differs from that of standard anti-rejection therapy.

  6. Trigeminal Trophic SyndromeCase Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boštjan Matos

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available 1024x768 Trigeminal trophic syndrome is a rare condition resulting from compulsive self-manipulation of the skin after a peripheral or central injury to the trigeminal system. The classic triad consists of trigeminal anesthesia, facial paresthesias, and crescentric lateral nasal alar erosion and ulceration. Although the symptoms are visibly clear, the diagnosis is not easy to establish. The appearance of the ulcers mimics many other disease entities such as neoplasm, infection, granulomatous disease, vasculitis and factitial dermatitis. Trigeminal trophic syndrome should be considered with a positive neurologic history and when laboratory and biopsy workup is inconclusive. Once diagnosis is confirmed, treatment is complicated and often multidisciplinary. We report a case of a woman who developed a strictly unilateral crescent ulcer of the ala nasi after resection of an statoacoustic neurinoma. A clinician who is faced with a patient with nasal ulceration should consider this diagnosis.     Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  7. X Chromosome Dose and Sex Bias in Autoimmune Diseases: Increased Prevalence of 47,XXX in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Sjögren's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ke; Kurien, Biji T; Zimmerman, Sarah L; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Taft, Diana H; Kottyan, Leah C; Lazaro, Sara; Weaver, Carrie A; Ice, John A; Adler, Adam J; Chodosh, James; Radfar, Lida; Rasmussen, Astrid; Stone, Donald U; Lewis, David M; Li, Shibo; Koelsch, Kristi A; Igoe, Ann; Talsania, Mitali; Kumar, Jay; Maier-Moore, Jacen S; Harris, Valerie M; Gopalakrishnan, Rajaram; Jonsson, Roland; Lessard, James A; Lu, Xianglan; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Cunninghame-Graham, Deborah S; Huang, Andrew J W; Brennan, Michael T; Hughes, Pamela; Illei, Gabor G; Miceli-Richard, Corinne; Keystone, Edward C; Bykerk, Vivian P; Hirschfield, Gideon; Xie, Gang; Ng, Wan-Fai; Nordmark, Gunnel; Eriksson, Per; Omdal, Roald; Rhodus, Nelson L; Rischmueller, Maureen; Rohrer, Michael; Segal, Barbara M; Vyse, Timothy J; Wahren-Herlenius, Marie; Witte, Torsten; Pons-Estel, Bernardo; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta E; Guthridge, Joel M; James, Judith A; Lessard, Christopher J; Kelly, Jennifer A; Thompson, Susan D; Gaffney, Patrick M; Montgomery, Courtney G; Edberg, Jeffrey C; Kimberly, Robert P; Alarcón, Graciela S; Langefeld, Carl L; Gilkeson, Gary S; Kamen, Diane L; Tsao, Betty P; McCune, W Joseph; Salmon, Jane E; Merrill, Joan T; Weisman, Michael H; Wallace, Daniel J; Utset, Tammy O; Bottinger, Erwin P; Amos, Christopher I; Siminovitch, Katherine A; Mariette, Xavier; Sivils, Kathy L; Harley, John B; Scofield, R Hal

    2016-05-01

    More than 80% of autoimmune disease predominantly affects females, but the mechanism for this female bias is poorly understood. We suspected that an X chromosome dose effect accounts for this, and we undertook this study to test our hypothesis that trisomy X (47,XXX; occurring in ∼1 in 1,000 live female births) would be increased in patients with female-predominant diseases (systemic lupus erythematosus [SLE], primary Sjögren's syndrome [SS], primary biliary cirrhosis, and rheumatoid arthritis [RA]) compared to patients with diseases without female predominance (sarcoidosis) and compared to controls. All subjects in this study were female. We identified subjects with 47,XXX using aggregate data from single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays, and, when possible, we confirmed the presence of 47,XXX using fluorescence in situ hybridization or quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We found 47,XXX in 7 of 2,826 SLE patients and in 3 of 1,033 SS patients, but in only 2 of 7,074 controls (odds ratio in the SLE and primary SS groups 8.78 [95% confidence interval 1.67-86.79], P = 0.003 and odds ratio 10.29 [95% confidence interval 1.18-123.47], P = 0.02, respectively). One in 404 women with SLE and 1 in 344 women with SS had 47,XXX. There was an excess of 47,XXX among SLE and SS patients. The estimated prevalence of SLE and SS in women with 47,XXX was ∼2.5 and ∼2.9 times higher, respectively, than that in women with 46,XX and ∼25 and ∼41 times higher, respectively, than that in men with 46,XY. No statistically significant increase of 47,XXX was observed in other female-biased diseases (primary biliary cirrhosis or RA), supporting the idea of multiple pathways to sex bias in autoimmunity. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  8. X Chromosome Dose and Sex Bias in Autoimmune Diseases: Increased 47,XXX in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Sjögren’s Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ke; Kurien, Biji T.; Zimmerman, Sarah L.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Taft, Diana H.; Kottyan, Leah C.; Lazaro, Sara; Weaver, Carrie A.; Ice, John A.; Adler, Adam J.; Chodosh, James; Radfar, Lida; Rasmussen, Astrid; Stone, Donald U.; Lewis, David M.; Li, Shibo; Koelsch, Kristi A.; Igoe, Ann; Talsania, Mitali; Kumar, Jay; Maier-Moore, Jacen S.; Harris, Valerie M.; Gopalakrishnan, Rajaram; Jonsson, Roland; Lessard, James A.; Lu, Xianglan; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Cunninghame-Graham, Deborah S.; Huang, Andrew J. W.; Brennan, Michael T.; Hughes, Pamela; Illei, Gabor G.; Miceli-Richard, Corinne; Keystone, Edward C.; Bykerk, Vivian P.; Hirschfield, Gideon; Xie, Gang; Ng, Wan-Fai; Nordmark, Gunnel; Eriksson, Per; Omdal, Roald; Rhodus, Nelson L.; Rischmueller, Maureen; Rohrer, Michael; Segal, Barbara M.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Wahren-Herlenius, Marie; Witte, Torsten; Pons-Estel, Bernardo; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta E.; Guthridge, Joel M.; James, Judith A.; Lessard, Christopher J.; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Thompson, Susan D.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Montgomery, Courtney G.; Edberg, Jeffrey C; Kimberly, Robert P; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Langefeld, Carl L.; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Kamen, Diane L.; Tsao, Betty P.; McCune, W. Joseph; Salmon, Jane E.; Merrill, Joan T.; Weisman, Michael H; Wallace, Daniel J; Utset, Tammy O; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Amos, Christopher I.; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Mariette, Xavier; Sivils, Kathy L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective More than 80% of autoimmune disease is female dominant, but the mechanism for this female bias is poorly understood. We suspected an X chromosome dose effect and hypothesized that trisomy X (47,XXX , 1 in ~1,000 live female births) would be increased in female predominant diseases (e.g. systemic lupus erythematosus [SLE], primary Sjögren’s syndrome [SS], primary biliary cirrhosis [PBC] and rheumatoid arthritis [RA]) compared to diseases without female predominance (sarcoidosis) and controls. Methods We identified 47,XXX subjects using aggregate data from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays and confirmed, when possible, by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) or quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR). Results We found 47,XXX in seven of 2,826 SLE and three of 1,033 SS female patients, but only in two of the 7,074 female controls (p=0.003, OR=8.78, 95% CI: 1.67-86.79 and p=0.02, OR=10.29, 95% CI: 1.18-123.47; respectively). One 47,XXX subject was present for ~404 SLE women and ~344 SS women. 47,XXX was present in excess among SLE and SS subjects. Conclusion The estimated prevalence of SLE and SS in women with 47,XXX was respectively ~2.5 and ~2.9 times higher than in 46,XX women and ~25 and ~41 times higher than in 46,XY men. No statistically significant increase of 47,XXX was observed in other female-biased diseases (PBC or RA), supporting the idea of multiple pathways to sex bias in autoimmunity. PMID:26713507

  9. Management of Lowe syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risky Vitria Prasetyo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Lowe syndrome (the oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe, OCRL is a multisystem disorder characterized by anomalies affecting the eyes, nervous system and kidneys.1-3 The disorder was first recognized by Lowe et al. in 1952, and described as a unique syndrome with organic aciduria, decreased renal ammonia production, hydrophthalmos, and mental retardation. In 1954, renal Fanconi syndrome was recognized as being associated with Lowe syndrome and in 1965, a recessive X-linked pattern of inheritance was determined.2,4 Lowe syndrome is a very rare disease, with an estimated prevalence in the general population of 1 in 500,000. According to the Lowe Syndrome Association (LSA in the USA, the estimated prevalence is between 1 and 10 affected males in 1,000,000 people, with 190 living in the year 2000. The Italian Association of Lowe Syndrome estimated that there were 34 Lowe syndrome patients (33 boys and one girl living in Italy in the year 2005.2,4,5 It almost exclusively affects males.6 Physicians may not be familiar with Lowe syndrome due to its rarity.4

  10. Scleroderma of geriatric age and scleroderma-like paraneoplastic syndrome – description of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Marek

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis (Ssc is an autoimmune connective tissue disease of unknown origin, characterized by progressive fibrosis of the skin and internal organs. Immune reactions taking part in Ssc pathogenesis may contribute to cancer development; therefore patients with risk factors for this disease require observation for a neoplastic process. On the other hand, symptoms of Ssc may be a mask of various cancers. Differentiating between the idiopathic form of Ssc and scleroderma-like paraneoplastic syndrome often causes a lot of difficulties. The article presents two cases of Ssc at the beginning of the disease after 60 years of age. The first case was diagnosed as Ssc, whereas in the second case the defined diagnosis was scleroderma-like syndrome in the course of colorectal cancer. This paper presents an analysis of differential diagnostic procedures which were performed and led to the final diagnosis, mentions types of cancers co-occurring with Ssc and suggests a screening scheme for cancer development in patients with a diagnosis of Ssc.

  11. OROFACIAL FINDINGS IN NOONAN SYNDROME: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca Maria MOCANU

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Noonan syndrome is an autosomal dominant multisys‐ tem disorder, associated with cardiac anomalies and a dis‐ tinctive facial appearance, characterized by genetic heterogeneity. Noonan syndrome affects both females and males, and has an estimated incidence of 1 per 1,000‐2,500 live births. The present report aims at presenting the cranio‐dento‐facial findings in a case of Noonan syndrome in a 6 year‐old male.

  12. [A case of Isaacs' syndrome associated with dextrocardia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, L; Cosentino, C; Vélez, M; Anicama, A

    Isaacs syndrome is a disorder of unknown etiology characterized by muscular rigidity, cramps and myokymias. Described by Isaacs in 1961 and called by him as continuous muscular activity syndrome. There are few reports in Latino american countries. A 31 year-old man with sustained muscular contractions in lower limbs and diffuse myokymias since he was eighteen-year old. Dextrocardia was disclosed on clinical examination. We report the case of a patient with Isaacs syndrome and dextrocardia.

  13. [Asperger syndrome with highly exceptional calendar memory: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevik, Ali Emre; Cengel Kültür, Ebru; Demirel, Hilal; Karlı Oğuz, Kader; Akça, Onur; Lay Ergün, Eser; Demir, Başaran

    2010-01-01

    Some patients with pervasive developmental disorders develop unusual talents, which are characterized as savant syndrome. Herein we present neuropsychological examination and brain imaging (fMRI and brain SPECT) findings of an 18-year-old male with Asperger syndrome and highly unusual calendar memory. Neuropsychological evaluation of the case indicated mild attention, memory, and problem solving deficits, and severe executive function deficits that included conceptualization, category formation, and abstraction. Functional MRI findings showed activation above the baseline level (Psavant syndrome.

  14. Radiologic features of preteus syndrome: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ok Hwa [Dept. of Radiology, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    Proteus syndrome is a rare congenital hamartomatous condition that is characterized by a wide range of malformations with overgrowth of various tissues. The author reports the case of a Proteus syndrome in a 14-year-old girl who had the unique features of this syndrome including megaspondylodysplasia with resultant scoliosis, leg discrepancy, macrodactyly, clinodactyly, hyperostosis in external auditory meatus, asymmetric megalencephaly, splenomegaly, cystic lung changes, asymmetric soft tissue fat infiltrations and a long, asymmetric face, with descriptions of the radiological features.

  15. Autoimmune/Inflammatory Arthritis Associated Lymphomas: Who Is at Risk?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujani Yadlapati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Specific autoimmune and inflammatory rheumatic diseases have been associated with an increased risk of malignant lymphomas. Conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA, primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, dermatomyositis, and celiac disease have been consistently linked to malignant lymphomas. Isolated cases of lymphomas associated with spondyloarthropathies and autoinflammatory diseases have also been reported. Direct association between autoimmunity and lymphomagenesis has been reinforced by large epidemiological studies. It is still uncertain whether disease specific determinants or phenotypic or treatment related characteristics increase likelihood of lymphomagenesis in these patients. For example, recent literature has indicated a positive correlation between severity of inflammation and risk of lymphomas among RA and Sjögren’s syndrome patients. It is also debated whether specific lymphoma variants are more commonly seen in accordance with certain chronic autoimmune arthritis. Previous studies have revealed a higher incidence of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas in RA and SLE patients, whereas pSS has been linked with increased risk of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. This review summarizes recent literature evaluating risk of lymphomas in arthritis patients and disease specific risk determinants. We also elaborate on the association of autoimmune arthritis with specific lymphoma variants along with genetic, environmental, and therapeutic risk factors.

  16. Antiphospholipid Syndrome - A Case Report of Pulmonary Thromboembolism, Followed with Acute Myocardial Infarction in Patient with Systemic Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Vavlukis

    2015-11-01

    CONCLUSION: The acquired antiphospholipid syndrome is common condition in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases, but relatively rare in patients with systemic sclerosis. Never the less, we have to be aware of it when treating the patients with systemic sclerosis.

  17. Seckel syndrome: A report of a case

    OpenAIRE

    K Ramalingam; S D Kaliyamurthy; M Govindarajan; S Swathi

    2012-01-01

    Seckel syndrome, first defined by Seckel in 1960, is a rare (incidence 1:10,000), genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder presenting at birth. This syndrome is characterized by a proportionate dwarfism of prenatal onset, a severe microcephaly with a "bird-headed" like appearance (beaked nose, receding forehead, prominent eyes, and micrognathia), and mental retardation. The significance of dental alterations in this syndrome resides in the defect, hypoplastic enamel, being limit...

  18. Autoimmune thyroiditis associated with neuromyelitis optica (NMO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudulagunta, Sreenivasa Rao

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica (NMO or Devic’s syndrome is a rare relapsing demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS that mainly affects the spinal cord and optic nerves and shares many clinical and radiological features with multiple sclerosis. The association of NMO with other autoimmune diseases was reported, but very few reports described association with autoimmune thyroid disease. Early differentiation between NMO and multiple sclerosis is very important as the natural course and treatment regimens differ significantly. We report a case of a 50-year-old woman who was admitted initially with vomiting, hiccups and paraesthesias but was not diagnosed with NMO and presented with a severe progression of the disease. The patient was also diagnosed to have autoimmune thyroiditis with lymphocytic infiltration of the thyroid which progressed from hyperthyroidism to hypothyroidism. NMO diagnosis was established with seropositivity for NMO-IgG and MRI showing longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions (3 or more spinal segments. In spite of treatment, the response was poor due to lack of early diagnosis and aggressive immunosuppressant therapy.

  19. Brain-hepato-renal syndrome (Zellweger syndrome). Report of two cases and a review of the syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz, T.; Caparros, C.; Blanco, A.; Lopez, A.M.

    1997-01-01

    Cerebro-hepato-renal syndrome is a rare disorder that is transmitted by autosomal recessive inheritance. Children with this syndrome present mongoloid facies and severe muscle hypotonic at birth. Scimitar-like knee calcifications are considered a pathognomonic feature of this disorder. We present two patients with Zellweger syndrome, according to the diagnosis suggested by our Radiodiagnostic Service. Our objective is to stress the importance of the radiological findings, which in many cases are decisive in establishing the definitive diagnosis. (Author) 10 refs

  20. Reversible hemispheric hypoperfusion in two cases of SMART syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wai, Karmen; Balabanski, Anna; Chia, Nicholas; Kleinig, Timothy

    2017-09-01

    Stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy (SMART) syndrome manifests as prolonged episodes of cortical dysfunction, years after cranial irradiation. We present two cases demonstrating reversible hemispheric hypoperfusion. Case 1 presented with left hemispheric symptoms following previous similar episodes. CT perfusion (CTP) demonstrated reversible hemispheric hypoperfusion; subsequent investigations were consistent with SMART syndrome. Case 2 presented following the third episode of a hemispheric syndrome with near-identical CTP abnormalities. L-arginine was administered with rapid reversal of clinical and CTP abnormalities. We conclude that SMART syndrome may demonstrate significant hypoperfusion on hyperacute CTP without subsequent infarction. Impaired cerebrovascular autoregulation probably contributes to cortical dysfunction in SMART syndrome. L-arginine warrants investigation as a potential treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.