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Sample records for autoimmune subacute encephalitis

  1. Autoimmune encephalitis and sleep disorders

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    Yan HUANG

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Research shows that autoimmune encephalitis is associated with sleep disorders. Paraneoplastic neurological syndrome (PNS with Ma2 antibodies can cause sleep disorders, particularly narcolepsy and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD. Limbic encephalitis (LE and Morvan syndrome, associated with voltage - gated potassium channel (VGKC-complex antibodies, which include leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1 antibody and contactin-associated protein 2 (Caspr2, can result in profound insomnia and other sleep disorders. Central neurogenic hypoventilation are found in patients with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor encephalitis, whereas obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, stridor and parasomnia are prominent features of encephalopathy associated with IgLON5 antibodies. Sleep disorders are cardinal manifestations in patients with autoimmune encephalitis. Immunotherapy possiblely can improve clinical symptoms and prognosis in a positive way. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.10.004

  2. A clinical approach to diagnosis of autoimmune encephalitis

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    Graus, Francesc; Titulaer, Maarten J; Balu, Ramani; Benseler, Susanne; Bien, Christian G; Cellucci, Tania; Cortese, Irene; Dale, Russell C; Gelfand, Jeffrey M; Geschwind, Michael; Glaser, Carol A; Honnorat, Jerome; Höftberger, Romana; Iizuka, Takahiro; Irani, Sarosh R; Lancaster, Eric; Leypoldt, Frank; Prüss, Harald; Rae-Grant, Alexander; Reindl, Markus; Rosenfeld, Myrna R; Rostásy, Kevin; Saiz, Albert; Venkatesan, Arun; Vincent, Angela; Wandinger, Klaus-Peter; Waters, Patrick; Dalmau, Josep

    2016-01-01

    Encephalitis is a severe inflammatory disorder of the brain with many possible causes and a complex differential diagnosis. Advances in autoimmune encephalitis research in the past 10 years have led to the identification of new syndromes and biomarkers that have transformed the diagnostic approach to these disorders. However, existing criteria for autoimmune encephalitis are too reliant on antibody testing and response to immunotherapy, which might delay the diagnosis. We reviewed the literature and gathered the experience of a team of experts with the aims of developing a practical, syndrome-based diagnostic approach to autoimmune encephalitis and providing guidelines to navigate through the differential diagnosis. Because autoantibody test results and response to therapy are not available at disease onset, we based the initial diagnostic approach on neurological assessment and conventional tests that are accessible to most clinicians. Through logical differential diagnosis, levels of evidence for autoimmune encephalitis (possible, probable, or definite) are achieved, which can lead to prompt immunotherapy. PMID:26906964

  3. Pathologically confirmed autoimmune encephalitis in suspected Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maat, P.; de Beukelaar, J.W.; Jansen, C.; Schuur, M.; van Duijn, C.M.; van Coevorden, M.H.; de Graaff, E.; Titulaer, E.; Rozemuller, A.J.M.; Sillevis Smitt, P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the clinical features and presence in CSF of antineuronal antibodies in patients with pathologically proven autoimmune encephalitis derived from a cohort of patients with suspected Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Methods: The Dutch Surveillance Centre for Prion Diseases

  4. Anti-N-Methyl-D-aspartate Receptor Encephalitis: A Severe, Potentially Reversible Autoimmune Encephalitis

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    Liu, Cai-yun; Zheng, Xiang-Yu; Ma, Chi

    2017-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is potentially lethal, but it is also a treatable autoimmune disorder characterized by prominent psychiatric and neurologic symptoms. It is often accompanied with teratoma or other neoplasm, especially in female patients. Anti-NMDAR antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum are characteristic features of the disease, thereby suggesting a pathogenic role in the disease. Here, we summarize recent studies that have clearly documented that both clinical manifestations and the antibodies may contribute to early diagnosis and multidisciplinary care. The clinical course of the disorder is reversible and the relapse could occur in some patients. Anti-NMDAR encephalitis coexisting with demyelinating disorders makes the diagnosis more complex; thus, clinicians should be aware of the overlapping diseases. PMID:28698711

  5. Autoimmune encephalitis: A potentially reversible cause of status epilepticus, epilepsy, and cognitive decline

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    Awadh Kishor Pandit

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To review clinical characteristics and response to immunomodulation therapy in autoimmune encephalitis presenting with status epilepticus (SE, epilepsy, and cognitive decline. Design: Observational, prospective case series. Setting: All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. Materials and Methods: Prospective analysis of 15 patients, who presented with SE, epilepsy, cognitive decline, and other neurological symptoms with positive autoantibodies. Demographic and clinical characteristics were recorded. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, cerebrospinal-fluid analysis (CSF, and tumor screening were done periodically. Treatment received and responses (categorized as per patients and treating doctor′s information were noted. Results: There were 15 (males = 10 patients of autoimmune encephalitis. The mean age of presentation was 24 years (range: 2-64 years. The most common onset was subacute (64% and four (29% patients presented as SE. Predominant clinical presentations were seizures (100% almost of every semiology. CSF was done in 10 patients; it was normal in 60%. Brain MRI was done in all patients, in six (40% it was normal, six (40% showed T2W and FLAIR hyperintensities in bilateral limbic areas. Antibodies found were the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibody in seven (50%, voltage-gated potassium channel antibody in five (36%, two of antiglutamic acid decarboxylase, and one patient with double stranded DNA (dsDNA antibodies. None showed evidence of malignancy. Patients received immunotherapy, either steroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, or both. Follow-up showed significant improvement in majority of cases, neither further seizures nor relapse in nine (67% cases. One death occurred, due to delayed presentation. Conclusions: Uncommon but potentially reversible causes of SE, epilepsy, and cognitive decline may be immune-related and high index of suspicion will prevent missing the diagnosis.

  6. Autoimmune neurological syndromes associated limbic encephalitis and paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration.

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    Ayas, Zeynep Özözen; Kotan, Dilcan; Aras, Yeşim Güzey

    2016-10-06

    Autoimmune neurological syndrome is a group of disorders caused by cancer affecting nervous system by different immunological mechanisms. In this study, we aim to study the clinical symptoms, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) findings, autoantibody tests, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signs and treatment outcome of patients with autoimmune syndromes. In this study, 7 patients (4 male, 3 female) diagnosed with autoimmune neurological syndrome were retrospectively examined. Five of patients were diagnosed with limbic encephalitis, two of them were paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Confusion and seizure were the most seen symptoms. Two patients had psychiatric disturbances (28,5%) followed by seizure. Headache was seen in 2 patients (% 28,5), disartria in 1 patient (% 14,2), and gait disorder in 2 patients (28,5%). The duration of symptoms was 46 (3-150) days on average. CSF abnormalities were detected in 2 patients. CT and MRI of the brain was available in all patients. Five patients had involvement of mesiotemporal region, two patients had diffuse cerebellar atrophy. One of patients had anti-GABAR B1 positivity. Tumors were detected in 2 patients while investigation for paraneoplasia screening. Remission is only possible with the detection and treatment of the malignancy. Early diagnosis and treatment are of paramount importance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. GAD65 Positive Autoimmune Limbic Encephalitis: A Case Report and Review of Literature

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    Sharma, Abhishek; Dubey, Divyanshu; Sawhney, Anshudha; Janga, Kalyana

    2012-01-01

    Limbic encephalitis is a rare disorder affecting the medial temporal lobe of the brain, sometimes also involving hippocampus atrophy. It was initially considered to be only of paraneoplastic origin but now auto-immune (non-paraneoplastic) cases have also been reported. Most common non paraneoplastic antibodies associated with limbic encephalitis are Voltage gated potassium channel antibodies, NMDA receptor antibodies and GAD receptor antibodies. We present a case of limbic encephalitis which ...

  8. [Subacute anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis. A serie of 13 paediatric cases].

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    Erazo, Ricardo; González, Jaime; Quintanilla, Consuelo; Devaud, Claudia; Gayoso, Consuelo; Toledo, Ximena; Rauch, Erna; Riffo, Claudia; Alvarez, Carolina; Salazar, Marne; Salvo, Daniela; Dalmau, Josep; Carmona, Orietta

    Subacute anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis was recognised in 2007 as a clinical entity, and was first described in young women with ovarian teratoma. The first paediatric series unrelated with tumours was reported in 2009. To present the clinical features, treatment, and prognosis of 13 patients with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis in Chile. A description is presented of 13 children, 9 males, aged between 1 and 16 years, diagnosed between 2009 and 2016 in 7 hospitals. All patients were evaluated with cerebral magnetic resonance and electroencephalogram. Cytochemical, oligoclonal bands and virus studies (PCR and antibodies) were performed in cerebrospinal fluid. All patients were evaluated in search of anti NMDA receptor in serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Tumor imaging studies were performed in all children. All children began the disease with psychiatric symptoms, and 11/13 had seizures. All of them subsequently presented with psychomotor agitation, dystonia, and bucolingual dyskinesias, with 11/13 loss of language and 6/13 autonomic disorders. All of them (13/13) had positive anti-NMDA receptor antibodies. CSF was normal in 12/13 children, positive oligoclonal bands in 6/10 patients, normal brain resonance in 13/13 children, EEG changes in 11/13 children, and abnormal SPECT in 6/6 children. A methylprednisolone bolus of 30mg/kg was given for 3-5 days to 12/13 children, and 6 received immunoglobulin 2g/kg. The large majority (12/13) of children recovered 1-4 months after disease onset. One child had a recurrence one year later, and recovered quickly. Subacute encephalitis due to NMDA anti-receptor antibodies should be suspected in children with psychiatric disorders and abnormal movements. Functional studies, such as EEG and SPECT are valuable diagnostic support. Early detection of this encephalitis leads to a faster recovery of patients. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Application of the 2016 diagnostic approach for autoimmune encephalitis from Lancet Neurology to Chinese patients.

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    Li, Lin; Sun, Lin; Du, Rong; Zheng, Yuanchu; Dai, Feifei; Ma, Qiuying; Wang, Jiawei

    2017-11-06

    A unified clinical approach to diagnose autoimmune encephalitis was published in Lancet Neurology in 2016. Purpose of our study is to examine the feasibility and reasonability of the 2016 "A clinical approach to diagnosis of autoimmune encephalitis" in China with a retrospective study. We retrospectively collected 95 cases of autoimmune encephalitis and non autoimmune encephalitis cases with detailed clinical data from Beijing Tongren Hospital and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI). All cases were analysed stepwise according to the approach in Lancet Neurology to compare the new diagnosis with the final clinical diagnosis. The disease course of these 95 cases ranged from 2 to 540 days. Initial symptoms include fever, headache, seizure, mental and behavioral disorders, memory deterioration and illusion. Based on symptoms and signs when the patient came to the hospital, the sensitivity and specificity of criteria were as follows: possible autoimmune encephalitis (pAE) 84% and 94%, definite autoimmune limbic encephalitis (dALE) 38% and 96%, probable anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis (prNMDARE) 49% and 98%. The sensitivities of the above three criteria and the specificity of pAE were low during early disease stage, while the specificities of dALE and prNMDAER remained relatively high in different time periods. This new autoimmune encephalitis diagnostic approach can recognize possible autoimmune encephalitis. The chances of a case being autoimmune-mediated following classification as autoimmune encephalitis with the new criteria are high. The flowchart is recommended to use as a whole. At the early disease stage, criteria with low sensitivity and high specificity, such as dALE and prNMDARE, lead most cases to enter subsequent diagnosis steps, namely autoantibody detection in the flowchart. Final diagnoses can only be made by autoantibody tests. These factors may make it challenging for clinicians to make diagnosis promptly and to begin

  10. Impaired autonomic responses to emotional stimuli in autoimmune limbic encephalitis

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    Olga eSchröder

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Limbic encephalitis (LE is an autoimmune-mediated disorder that affects structures of the limbic system, in particular the amygdala. The amygdala constitutes a brain area substantial for processing of emotional, especially fear-related signals. The amygdala is also involved in neuroendocrine and autonomic functions, including skin conductance responses (SCRs to emotionally arousing stimuli. This study investigates behavioral and autonomic responses to discrete emotion-evoking and neutral film clips in a patient suffering from LE associated with contactin-associated protein-2 (CASPR2-antibodies as compared to a healthy control group. Results show a lack of SCRs in the patient while watching the film clips, with significant differences compared to healthy controls in the case of fear-inducing videos. There was no comparable impairment in behavioral data (emotion report, valence and arousal ratings. The results point to a defective modulation of sympathetic responses during emotional stimulation in patients with LE, probably due to impaired functioning of the amygdala.

  11. N-methyl D-aspartate receptor encephalitis: A new addition to the spectrum of autoimmune encephalitis

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    Boby Varkey Maramattom

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A large proportion of "encephalitis" is caused by unknown agents. Of late, a new category of disorders, "autoimmune encephalitis," has been described, which present with features similar to viral encephalitides. A well-delineated and common entity among this group is the recently described anti-NMDAR encephalitis (NMDARE. Although this entity was initially described in young women harboring ovarian teratomas, it is now characterised as well in children and men. Approximately 60% of the patients have an underlying tumor, usually an ovarian teratoma. In 40% of the patients, no cause can be found (idiopathic NMDARE. NMDARE typically presents with psychiatric features followed by altered level of consciousness, severe dysautonomia, hyperkinetic movement disorders, seizures and central hypoventilation. Orofacial dyskinesias resulting in lip and tongue mutilation are quite common. Seizures, are common and may be difficult to treat. The disease can be confirmed by serum and cerebrospinal fluid anti-NMDAR antibodies. Titers of these antibodies can also guide response to treatment. Tumor removal is necessary if identified, followed by immunological treatment. Intravenous methylprednisolone and immunoglobulins aim to suppress/modulate immune response while plasma exchange attempts to remove antibodies and other inflammatory cytokines. Rituximab and cyclophosphamide aim to suppress antibody production. Recovery is slow and often with neurological deficits if treatment is delayed. With many distinctive clinical features, a specific antibody that aids diagnosis, and early effective treatment with commonly available drugs leading to good outcomes, NMDARE is a diagnosis that should be considered early in any case of "unexplained encephalitis."

  12. Continued persistence of increased Subacute Sclerosing Pan Encephalitis cases in India, 2010-2012

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    Archana Choudhry

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available AIMS & OBJECTIVES: Sub-acute sclerosing pan-encephalitis (SSPE is a neurological disorder caused due to persisting mutated measles virus. It involves loss of cerebral function, paralysis, dementia and deterioration of motor functions. There has been lack of reports on SSPE from India. Thus, the present study is an attempt to know the epidemiology of SSPE in measles patients from India. MATERIALS & METHODS: 360 serum-cerebrospinal fluid(CSF pairs received from patients clinically suspected of SSPE, were referred to National Centre for Disease Control(NCDC from Delhi, Haryana and Uttar Pradesh and were tested for the presence of Immunoglobulin G (IgG antibodies against measles, between January 2010 – April 2012. Demographic details were analysed using Microsoft Excel and Epi Info 7.0.9.34 software. RESULTS: Out of 360 serum-CSF pairs, 226 (i.e. 62.78% gave positive results for IgG antibody against measles. The sex ratio of female v/s male was 1: 2.73 (2010, 1: 3.77 (2011 and 1: 3.83 (2012. The age of onset of SSPE was between 0-12 years, comprising 65.48%. The next predominant age group was 13-24 years comprising of 31.41%, followed by the age group, 25-37 years. Majority of the positive samples were obtained from All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS, Delhi (56/226-24.77% and the maximum cases as well as the maximum positives were obtained during October- January. CONCLUSION: The risk of acquiring SSPE is mainly in the age group of 0-12 years. A gap in the measles vaccine is evident from the data and needs to be filled up. We also need to look into the measles vaccine regimen of our country and see what best suits, in order to minimize the SSPE squeal.

  13. Continued persistence of increased Subacute Sclerosing Pan Encephalitis cases in India, 2010-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ArchanaChoudhry

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available AIMS & OBJECTIVES: Sub-acute sclerosing pan-encephalitis (SSPE is a neurological disorder caused due to persisting mutated measles virus. It involves loss of cerebral function, paralysis, dementia and deterioration of motor functions. There has been lack of reports on SSPE from India. Thus, the present study is an attempt to know the epidemiology of SSPE in measles patients from India. MATERIALS & METHODS: 360 serum-cerebrospinal fluid(CSF pairs received from patients clinically suspected of SSPE, were referred to National Centre for Disease Control(NCDC from Delhi, Haryana and Uttar Pradesh and were tested for the presence of Immunoglobulin G (IgG antibodies against measles, between January 2010 – April 2012. Demographic details were analysed using Microsoft Excel and Epi Info 7.0.9.34 software. RESULTS: Out of 360 serum-CSF pairs, 226 (i.e. 62.78% gave positive results for IgG antibody against measles. The sex ratio of female v/s male was 1: 2.73 (2010, 1: 3.77 (2011 and 1: 3.83 (2012. The age of onset of SSPE was between 0-12 years, comprising 65.48%. The next predominant age group was 13-24 years comprising of 31.41%, followed by the age group, 25-37 years. Majority of the positive samples were obtained from All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS, Delhi (56/226-24.77% and the maximum cases as well as the maximum positives were obtained during October- January. CONCLUSION: The risk of acquiring SSPE is mainly in the age group of 0-12 years. A gap in the measles vaccine is evident from the data and needs to be filled up. We also need to look into the measles vaccine regimen of our country and see what best suits, in order to minimize the SSPE squeal.

  14. Neuroimaging in status epilepticus secondary to paraneoplastic autoimmune encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarria-Estrada, S.; Toledo, M.; Lorenzo-Bosquet, C.; Cuberas-Borrós, G.; Auger, C.; Siurana, S.; Rovira, À.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To describe the characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of paraneoplastic autoimmune encephalitis in patients with new-onset status epilepticus. Materials and methods: The neuroimaging and clinical data of five patients with paraneoplastic autoimmune encephalitis debuting as status epilepticus were retrospectively reviewed. All patients met the criteria for definite paraneoplastic syndrome and all underwent brain MRI during the status epilepticus episode or immediately after recovery. Results: All patients showed hyperintense lesions on T2-weighted imaging (WI) involving the limbic structures, specifically the hippocampus. Three of them showed additional extra-limbic areas of signal abnormalities. The areas of T2 hyperintensity were related to the electroclinical onset of the seizures. In three patients, various techniques were used to study cerebral perfusion, such as arterial spin labelling MRI, single photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT) and 2-[ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-positron-emission tomography (PET). Arterial spin labelling showed hyperperfusion overlapping the inflammatory lesions, whereas PET and SPECT disclosed increased perfusion and increased metabolism. The subtraction SPECT co-registered to MRI (SISCOM) demonstrated hypermetabolism outside the areas of encephalitis. After clinical recovery, follow-up MRI revealed the development of atrophy in the initially affected hippocampus. Two patients who had recurrent paraneoplastic autoimmune encephalitis manifesting as status epilepticus showed new T2 lesions involving different structures. Conclusion: The presence of limbic and extra-limbic T2 signal abnormalities in new-onset status epilepticus should suggest the diagnosis of a paraneoplastic syndrome, especially when status epilepticus is refractory to treatment. The lesions are consistently seen as hyperintense on T2WI. - Highlights: • New onset status epilepticus can be caused by paraneoplastic encephalitis.

  15. Electroencephalographic and fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography correlates in anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor autoimmune encephalitis

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    John C. Probasco

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions and relevance: This case of anti-NMDAR autoimmune encephalitis illustrates the challenges of distinguishing prolonged LE from LSE. We discuss the parallels between these two conditions and propose a management paradigm to optimize evaluation and treatment.

  16. Multiple autoimmune antibody limbic encephalitis: a case in a pregnant woman

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    Meha Goyal

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune limbic encephalitis is most commonly associated with antibodies against the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR, among other neuronal cell surface receptors. Here, a case of a pregnant female with limbic encephalitis in the presence of multiple additional autoimmune antibodies is described. The patient was a 36-year-old female who presented with 4 days of confusion, hallucinations, hypersexuality, disinhibition, and pressured speech. The patient's work-up detected the presence of anti-NMDAR antibodies, anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies, and a yet uncharacterized neuronal autoantibody. The patient was also found to be pregnant. No evidence of ovarian or other pelvic malignancy was discovered. Symptomatic control was achieved with plasma exchange.

  17. Autoimmune post-herpes simplex encephalitis of adults and teenagers.

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    Armangue, Thaís; Moris, Germán; Cantarín-Extremera, Verónica; Conde, Carlos Enrique; Rostasy, Kevin; Erro, Maria Elena; Portilla-Cuenca, Juan Carlos; Turón-Viñas, Eulàlia; Málaga, Ignacio; Muñoz-Cabello, Beatriz; Torres-Torres, Carmen; Llufriu, Sara; González-Gutiérrez-Solana, Luis; González, Guillermo; Casado-Naranjo, Ignacio; Rosenfeld, Myrna; Graus, Francesc; Dalmau, Josep

    2015-11-17

    To report 14 patients with immune-mediated relapsing symptoms post-herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) and to compare the clinical and immunologic features of the teenage and adult group with those of young children. Prospective observational study of patients diagnosed between June 2013 and February 2015. Immunologic techniques have been reported previously. Among the teenage and adult group (8 patients, median age 40 years, range 13-69; 5 male), 3 had an acute symptom presentation suggesting a viral relapse, and 5 a presentation contiguous with HSE suggesting a recrudescence of previous deficits. Seven patients developed severe psychiatric/behavioral symptoms disrupting all social interactions, and one refractory status epilepticus. Blepharospasm occurred in one patient. Five patients had CSF antibodies against NMDA receptor (NMDAR) and 3 against unknown neuronal cell surface proteins. In 5/6 patients, the brain MRI showed new areas of contrast enhancement that decreased after immunotherapy and clinical improvement. Immunotherapy was useful in 7/7 patients, sometimes with impressive recoveries, returning to their baseline HSE residual deficits. Compared with the 6 younger children (median age 13 months, range 6-20, all with NMDAR antibodies), the teenagers and adults were less likely to develop choreoathetosis (0/8 vs 6/6, p < 0.01) and decreased level of consciousness (2/8 vs 6/6, p < 0.01) and had longer delays in diagnosis and treatment (interval relapse/antibody testing 85 days, range 17-296, vs 4 days, range 0-33, p = 0.037). In teenagers and adults, the immune-mediated relapsing syndrome post-HSE is different from that known in young children as choreoathetosis post-HSE and is underrecognized. Prompt diagnosis is important because immunotherapy can be highly effective. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  18. New-Onset Headache in Patients With Autoimmune Encephalitis Is Associated With anti-NMDA-Receptor Antibodies.

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    Schankin, Christoph J; Kästele, Fabian; Gerdes, Lisa Ann; Winkler, Tobias; Csanadi, Endy; Högen, Tobias; Pellkofer, Hannah; Paulus, Walter; Kümpfel, Tania; Straube, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    We tested the hypotheses (i) that autoimmune encephalitis is associated with new-onset headache, and (ii) that the occurrence of headache is associated with the presence of anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor antibodies. Autoimmune encephalitis presents with cognitive dysfunction as well as neuro-psychiatric symptoms. Its pathophysiology might involve antibody-mediated dysfunction of the glutamatergic system as indicated by the presence of anti-NMDA-receptor antibodies in some patients. In this cross-sectional study, patients with autoimmune encephalitis were assessed with a standardized interview for previous headache and headache associated with autoimmune encephalitis. Headache was classified according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, second edition. Clinical and paraclinical findings were correlated with the occurrence of headache. Of 40 patients with autoimmune encephalitis, 19 did not have a history of headache. Of those, nine suffered from encephalitis-associated headache. Seven of these nine had anti-NMDA-receptor antibodies in contrast to only two among the remaining 10 patients without new-onset headache (P = .023, odds ratio: 14, 95% confidence interval: 1.5; 127). In most patients headache occurred in attacks on more than 15 days/month, was severe, and of short duration (less than 4 hours). International Headache Society criteria for migraine were met in three patients. New-onset headache is a relevant symptom in patients with autoimmune encephalitis who have no history of previous headache, especially in the subgroup with anti-NMDA-receptor antibodies. This indicates a thorough investigation for secondary headaches including anti-NMDA-R antibodies for patients with new-onset headache and neuropsychiatric findings. Glutamatergic dysfunction might be important for the generation of head pain but may only occasionally be sufficient to trigger migraine-like attacks in nonmigraineurs. © 2016 American Headache Society.

  19. Encephalitis

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    ... mild and symptoms only last for a short time. However, it is possible to develop a severe case of encephalitis that can be serious and possibly even life threatening. When a person has encephalitis, his or her brain becomes inflamed (inflammation means swelling and irritation). Is ...

  20. Rho-associated protein kinase 2 (ROCK2): a new target of autoimmunity in paraneoplastic encephalitis.

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    Popkirov, Stoyan; Ayzenberg, Ilya; Hahn, Stefanie; Bauer, Jan; Denno, Yvonne; Rieckhoff, Nicole; Radzimski, Christiane; Hans, Volkmar H; Berg, Sebastian; Roghmann, Florian; Noldus, Joachim; Bien, Christian G; Skodda, Sabine; Wellmer, Jörg; Stöcker, Winfried; Krogias, Christos; Gold, Ralf; Schlegel, Uwe; Probst, Christian; Komorowski, Lars; Miske, Ramona; Kleiter, Ingo

    2017-05-29

    Onconeural antibodies are associated with cancer and paraneoplastic encephalitis. While their pathogenic role is still largely unknown, their high diagnostic value is undisputed. In this study we describe the discovery of a novel target of autoimmunity in an index case of paraneoplastic encephalitis associated with urogenital cancer.A 75-year-old man with a history of invasive bladder carcinoma 6 years ago with multiple recurrences and a newly discovered renal cell carcinoma presented with seizures and progressive cognitive decline followed by super-refractory status epilepticus. Clinical and ancillary findings including brain biopsy suggested paraneoplastic encephalitis. Immunohistochemistry of the brain biopsy was used to characterize the inflammatory response. Indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) was used for autoantibody screening. The autoantigen was identified by histo-immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry and was validated by expressing the recombinant antigen in HEK293 cells and neutralization tests. Sera from 125 control patients were screened using IFA to test for the novel autoantibodies.IFA analysis of serum revealed a novel autoantibody against brain tissue. An intracellular enzyme, Rho-associated protein kinase 2 (ROCK2), was identified as target-antigen. ROCK2 was expressed in affected brain tissue and archival bladder tumor samples of this patient. Brain histopathology revealed appositions of cytotoxic CD8 + T cells on ROCK2-positive neurons. ROCK2 antibodies were not found in the sera of 20 patients with bladder cancer and 17 with renal cancer, both without neurological symptoms, 49 healthy controls, and 39 patients with other antineuronal autoantibodies. In conclusion, novel onconeural antibodies targeting ROCK2 are associated with paraneoplastic encephalitis and should be screened for when paraneoplastic neurological syndromes, especially in patients with urogenital cancers, occur.

  1. Hello from the Other Side: How Autoantibodies Circumvent the Blood-Brain Barrier in Autoimmune Encephalitis.

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    Platt, Maryann P; Agalliu, Dritan; Cutforth, Tyler

    2017-01-01

    Antibodies against neuronal receptors and synaptic proteins are associated with autoimmune encephalitides (AE) that produce movement and psychiatric disorders. In order to exert their pathological effects on neural circuits, autoantibodies against central nervous system (CNS) targets must gain access to the brain and spinal cord by crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB), a tightly regulated gateway formed by endothelial cells lining CNS blood vessels. To date, the pathogenic mechanisms that underlie autoantibody-triggered encephalitic syndromes are poorly understood, and how autoantibodies breach the barrier remains obscure for almost all AE syndromes. The relative importance of cellular versus humoral immune mechanisms for disease pathogenesis also remains largely unexplored. Here, we review the proposed triggers for various autoimmune encephalopathies and their animal models, as well as basic structural features of the BBB and how they differ among various CNS regions, a feature that likely underlies some regional aspects of autoimmune encephalitis pathogenesis. We then discuss the routes that antibodies and immune cells employ to enter the CNS and their implications for AE. Finally, we explore future therapeutic strategies that may either preserve or restore barrier function and thereby limit immune cell and autoantibody infiltration into the CNS. Recent mechanistic insights into CNS autoantibody entry indicate promising future directions for therapeutic intervention beyond current, short-lived therapies that eliminate circulating autoantibodies.

  2. Hello from the Other Side: How Autoantibodies Circumvent the Blood–Brain Barrier in Autoimmune Encephalitis

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    Tyler Cutforth

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies against neuronal receptors and synaptic proteins are associated with autoimmune encephalitides (AE that produce movement and psychiatric disorders. In order to exert their pathological effects on neural circuits, autoantibodies against central nervous system (CNS targets must gain access to the brain and spinal cord by crossing the blood–brain barrier (BBB, a tightly regulated gateway formed by endothelial cells lining CNS blood vessels. To date, the pathogenic mechanisms that underlie autoantibody-triggered encephalitic syndromes are poorly understood, and how autoantibodies breach the barrier remains obscure for almost all AE syndromes. The relative importance of cellular versus humoral immune mechanisms for disease pathogenesis also remains largely unexplored. Here, we review the proposed triggers for various autoimmune encephalopathies and their animal models, as well as basic structural features of the BBB and how they differ among various CNS regions, a feature that likely underlies some regional aspects of autoimmune encephalitis pathogenesis. We then discuss the routes that antibodies and immune cells employ to enter the CNS and their implications for AE. Finally, we explore future therapeutic strategies that may either preserve or restore barrier function and thereby limit immune cell and autoantibody infiltration into the CNS. Recent mechanistic insights into CNS autoantibody entry indicate promising future directions for therapeutic intervention beyond current, short-lived therapies that eliminate circulating autoantibodies.

  3. Electroencephalographic and fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography correlates in anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor autoimmune encephalitis.

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    Probasco, John C; Benavides, David R; Ciarallo, Anthony; Sanin, Beatriz Wills; Wabulya, Angela; Bergey, Gregory K; Kaplan, Peter W

    2014-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (anti-NMDAR) autoimmune encephalitis is an increasingly recognized cause of limbic encephalitis (LE). Prolonged LE and limbic status epilepticus (LSE) share many features. The ability to distinguish between the two is crucial in directing appropriate therapy because of the potential iatrogenesis associated with immunosuppression and anesthetic-induced coma. A 34-year-old woman with recurrent LE developed behavioral changes, global aphasia, and repetitive focal and generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Because asymmetric rhythmic delta patterns recurred on electroencephalography (EEG) despite treatment with nonsedating antiepileptic drugs followed by anesthetic-induced coma, an investigation to distinguish LSE from LE was undertaken. Implanted limbic/temporal lobe depth electrodes revealed no epileptiform activity. Brain single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) showed no hyperperfusion, and brain fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) showed hypermetabolism in the left frontal, temporal, and parietal cortices. Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor autoimmune encephalitis was diagnosed based detection of anti-NMDAR antibody in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). With chronic immunosuppression, the resolution of brain FDG-PET abnormalities paralleled clinical improvement. This case of anti-NMDAR autoimmune encephalitis illustrates the challenges of distinguishing prolonged LE from LSE. We discuss the parallels between these two conditions and propose a management paradigm to optimize evaluation and treatment.

  4. Auto-immune anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis: three case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashiri, Fahad A; Al-Rasheed, Abdulrahman A; Hassan, Saeed M; Hamad, Muddathir H A; El Khashab, Heba Y; Kentab, Amal Y; AlBadr, Fahad B; Salih, Mustafa A

    2017-08-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis is a recently identified auto-immune disorder characterised by severe memory deficit, a decreased level of consciousness, seizures, autonomic dysfunction and movement disorders. Three girls with the disorder are reported; they were aged 4 years, 5 years and 10 months. The 10-month-old infant who is one of the youngest patients reported with anti-NMDAR encephalitis worldwide, had MRI features suggestive of herpes simplex encephalitis (known to trigger anti-NMDAR encephalitis), but CSF PCR for herpes simplex was negative. All the patients presented with seizures, behavioural change, regression of speech, dystonia and choreo-athetosis. Anti-NMDAR antibodies were detected in all patients' sera and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Intravenous immunoglobulin, corticosteroids and rituximab were administered at different intervals. Cases 1 and 2 made a full recovery, but case 3 has mild motor and speech delay. Patients who present with encephalopathy, seizures and movement disorders should be tested for anti-NMDAR antibodies in serum and CSF in addition to being screened for herpes simplex encephalitis.

  5. Effect of Immunotherapy on Seizure Outcome in Patients with Autoimmune Encephalitis: A Prospective Observational Registry Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Ick Byun

    Full Text Available To evaluate the seizure characteristics and outcome after immunotherapy in adult patients with autoimmune encephalitis (AE and new-onset seizure.Adult (age ≥18 years patients with AE and new-onset seizure who underwent immunotherapy and were followed-up for at least 6 months were included. Seizure frequency was evaluated at 2-4 weeks and 6 months after the onset of the initial immunotherapy and was categorized as "seizure remission", "> 50% seizure reduction", or "no change" based on the degree of its decrease.Forty-one AE patients who presented with new-onset seizure were analysed. At 2-4 weeks after the initial immunotherapy, 51.2% of the patients were seizure free, and 24.4% had significant seizure reduction. At 6 months, seizure remission was observed in 73.2% of the patients, although four patients died during hospitalization. Rituximab was used as a second-line immunotherapy in 12 patients who continued to have seizures despite the initial immunotherapy, and additional seizure remission was achieved in 66.6% of them. In particular, those who exhibited partial response to the initial immunotherapy had a better seizure outcome after rituximab, with low adverse events.AE frequently presented as seizure, but only 18.9% of the living patients suffered from seizure at 6 months after immunotherapy. Aggressive immunotherapy can improve seizure outcome in patients with AE.

  6. A study of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in dogs as a disease model for canine necrotizing encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jong-Hyun; Jung, Hae-Won; Lee, Hee-Chun; Jeon, Joon-Hyeok; Kim, Na-Hyun; Sur, Jung-Hyang; Ha, Jeongim

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the use of dogs with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) as a disease model for necrotizing encephalitis (NE) was assessed. Twelve healthy dogs were included in this study. Canine forebrain tissues (8 g), including white and grey matter, were homogenized with 4 mL of phosphate-buffered saline for 5 min in an ice bath. The suspension was emulsified with the same volume of Freund's complete adjuvant containing 1 mg/mL of killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra. Under sedation, each dog was injected subcutaneously with canine brain homogenate at four sites: two in the inguinal and two in the axillary regions. A second injection (booster) was administered to all the dogs using the same procedure 7 days after the first injection. Clinical assessment, magnetic resonance imaging, cerebrospinal fluid analyses, necropsies, and histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations were performed for the dogs with EAE. Out of the 12 animals, seven (58%) developed clinically manifest EAE at various times after immunization. Characteristics of canine EAE models were very similar to canine NE, suggesting that canine EAE can be a disease model for NE in dogs. PMID:25269720

  7. A study of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in dogs as a disease model for canine necrotizing encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jong-Hyun; Jung, Hae-Won; Lee, Hee-Chun; Jeon, Joon-Hyeok; Kim, Na-Hyun; Sur, Jung-Hyang; Ha, Jeongim; Jung, Dong-In

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the use of dogs with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) as a disease model for necrotizing encephalitis (NE) was assessed. Twelve healthy dogs were included in this study. Canine forebrain tissues (8 g), including white and grey matter, were homogenized with 4 mL of phosphate-buffered saline for 5 min in an ice bath. The suspension was emulsified with the same volume of Freund's complete adjuvant containing 1 mg/mL of killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra. Under sedation, each dog was injected subcutaneously with canine brain homogenate at four sites: two in the inguinal and two in the axillary regions. A second injection (booster) was administered to all the dogs using the same procedure 7 days after the first injection. Clinical assessment, magnetic resonance imaging, cerebrospinal fluid analyses, necropsies, and histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations were performed for the dogs with EAE. Out of the 12 animals, seven (58%) developed clinically manifest EAE at various times after immunization. Characteristics of canine EAE models were very similar to canine NE, suggesting that canine EAE can be a disease model for NE in dogs.

  8. Effect of Immunotherapy on Seizure Outcome in Patients with Autoimmune Encephalitis: A Prospective Observational Registry Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Keun-Hwa; Sunwoo, Jun-Sang; Moon, Jangsup; Lim, Jung-Ah; Lee, Doo Young; Shin, Yong-Won; Kim, Tae-Joon; Lee, Keon-Joo; Lee, Woo-Jin; Lee, Han-Sang; Jun, Jinsun; Kim, Dong-Yub; Kim, Man-Young; Kim, Hyunjin; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Suh, Hong Il; Lee, Yoojin; Kim, Dong Wook; Jeong, Jin Ho; Choi, Woo Chan; Bae, Dae Woong; Shin, Jung-Won; Jeon, Daejong; Park, Kyung-Il; Jung, Ki-Young; Chu, Kon; Lee, Sang Kun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the seizure characteristics and outcome after immunotherapy in adult patients with autoimmune encephalitis (AE) and new-onset seizure. Methods Adult (age ≥18 years) patients with AE and new-onset seizure who underwent immunotherapy and were followed-up for at least 6 months were included. Seizure frequency was evaluated at 2–4 weeks and 6 months after the onset of the initial immunotherapy and was categorized as “seizure remission”, “> 50% seizure reduction”, or “no change” based on the degree of its decrease. Results Forty-one AE patients who presented with new-onset seizure were analysed. At 2–4 weeks after the initial immunotherapy, 51.2% of the patients were seizure free, and 24.4% had significant seizure reduction. At 6 months, seizure remission was observed in 73.2% of the patients, although four patients died during hospitalization. Rituximab was used as a second-line immunotherapy in 12 patients who continued to have seizures despite the initial immunotherapy, and additional seizure remission was achieved in 66.6% of them. In particular, those who exhibited partial response to the initial immunotherapy had a better seizure outcome after rituximab, with low adverse events. Conclusion AE frequently presented as seizure, but only 18.9% of the living patients suffered from seizure at 6 months after immunotherapy. Aggressive immunotherapy can improve seizure outcome in patients with AE. PMID:26771547

  9. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    SSPE; Subacute sclerosing leukoencephalitis; Dawson encephalitis; Measles - SSPE; Rubeola - SSPE ... Normally, the measles virus does not cause brain damage. But an abnormal immune response to measles or, possibly, certain mutant forms ...

  10. Two Paraneoplastic Autoimmune Syndromes: Limbic Encephalitis and Palmar Fasciitis in a Patient with Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarev, Irina; Shelef, Ilan; Refaely, Yael; Ariad, Samuel; Ifergane, Gal

    2015-09-07

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is characterized by a relatively high rate of autoimmune phenomena. Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis (PLE) is an autoimmune syndrome in which a non-neural tumor containing an antigen normally present in the nervous system precipitates an antibody attack on neural tissues. Patients with PLE usually present with rapidly progressive short-term memory deficits, confusion or even dementia. Palmar fasciitis and polyarthritis syndrome (PFPAS) is another autoimmune syndrome characterized by rheumatologic manifestations, especially involving the palms of the hands. We report a case of a 59-year old woman who presented with worsening neurological symptoms of two-week duration, and later coma. The combined clinical, serological, and imaging studies suggested a diagnosis of PLE. A chest computed tomographic scan showed a 1.2 cm-diameter mass in the upper lobe of the left lung that was surgically removed and showed SCLC. Following surgery, neurological symptoms rapidly improved, allowing the patient to receive adjuvant chemotherapy. While in remission for both SCLC and PLE, the patient developed pain, soft-tissue swelling, and stiffness in both palms, suggesting the diagnosis of PFPAS. Five months following the diagnosis of palmar fasciitis, SCLC relapsed with mediastinal and cervical lymphadenopathy. This case report underlines the continuous interaction of SCLC with the immune system, expressed by coexistence of two rare paraneoplastic diseases, PLE, and PFPAS, in a patient with SCLC. While symptoms related to PLE preceded the initial diagnosis of SCLC, other symptoms related to PFPAS preceded relapse.

  11. Two paraneoplastic autoimmune syndromes: limbic encephalitis and palmar fasciitis in a patient with small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Lazarev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Small cell lung cancer (SCLC is characterized by a relatively high rate of autoimmune phenomena. Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis (PLE is an autoimmune syndrome in which a non-neural tumor containing an antigen normally present in the nervous system precipitates an antibody attack on neural tissues. Patients with PLE usually present with rapidly progressive short-term memory deficits, confusion or even dementia. Palmar fasciitis and polyarthritis syndrome (PFPAS is another autoimmune syndrome characterized by rheumatologic manifestations, especially involving the palms of the hands. We report a case of a 59-year old woman who presented with worsening neurological symptoms of two-week duration, and later coma. The combined clinical, serological, and imaging studies suggested a diagnosis of PLE. A chest computed tomographic scan showed a 1.2 cm-diameter mass in the upper lobe of the left lung that was surgically removed and showed SCLC. Following surgery, neurological symptoms rapidly improved, allowing the patient to receive adjuvant chemotherapy. While in remission for both SCLC and PLE, the patient developed pain, soft-tissue swelling, and stiffness in both palms, suggesting the diagnosis of PFPAS. Five months following the diagnosis of palmar fasciitis, SCLC relapsed with mediastinal and cervical lymphadenopathy. This case report underlines the continuous interaction of SCLC with the immune system, expressed by coexistence of two rare paraneoplastic diseases, PLE, and PFPAS, in a patient with SCLC. While symptoms related to PLE preceded the initial diagnosis of SCLC, other symptoms related to PFPAS preceded relapse.

  12. A strategy for cell-based multiplex diagnostics of Myasthenia gravis and autoimmune encephalitis by modifying the subcellular localization of cell membrane autoantigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, S; Georgi, M; Roggenbuck, D; Conrad, K; Küpper, J-H

    2014-01-01

    Many autoimmune diseases are characterized by autoantibodies directed against cell membrane proteins. We were intrigued to develop a strategy for targeting individual cell membrane proteins to various subcellular compartments as a prerequisite for their simultaneous immunofluorescence detection. We first employed GFP and RFP reporters that were equipped with defined intracellular localization signals. Expressing these protein reporters in HEp-2 cells we found by using fluorescence microscopy that protein localization in cytoplasm or at mitochondria can be clearly discriminated from localization at Golgi, ER or lysosomes. We then tested for muscle-specific kinase, a relevant cell membrane autoantigen in Myasthenia gravis, and NMDA receptor which is relevant for autoimmune encephalitis, whether these autoantigens can be localized to the same intracellular compartments. To this end, we successfully targeted muscle-specific kinase to Golgi apparatus, mitochondria and cytoplasm. We found that its Golgi localization can be clearly distinguished from its natural cell membrane localization. The same we found for Golgi-localized NMDA receptor 1. Interestingly, cell membrane proteins kept at the Golgi system accumulated in higher amounts than their wild-type counterparts. The obtained results are the basis for the further development of multiplex assays for the immunofluorescence diagnostics of Myasthenia gravis and autoimmune encephalitis.

  13. Glucagon-like peptide-1 analogue, liraglutide, delays onset and reduces severity of experimental autoimmune encephalitis in Lewis rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian DellaValle

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroduction: Recent findings indicate that metabolic disturbances are involved in multiple sclerosis (MS pathology and influence the susceptibility to treatment, directing attention towards anti-diabetic drugs such as metformin and pioglitazone. Liraglutide, a drug of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 family, is also anti-diabetic and weight-reducing and is moreover, directly neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory in a broad spectrum of experimental models of brain disease. In this study we investigate the potential for this FDA-approved drug, liraglutide, as a treatment for MS by utilizing the experimental model, experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE.Methods: EAE was induced in 30 female Lewis rats that subsequently received twice-daily liraglutide (200 µg/kg s.c. or saline. Healthy controls were included (saline, n=6, liraglutide, n=7. Clinical score and weight were assessed daily by blinded observers. Animals were killed at peak disease severity (day 11 or if exceeding humane endpoint (clinical score ≥4. Protein levels of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD, amyloid precursor protein (APP, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP were determined.Results: Liraglutide treatment delayed disease onset (group clinical score significantly >0 by two days and markedly reduced disease severity (median clinical score 2 vs. 5; p=0.0003. Fourteen of 15 (93% of vehicle-treated rats reached the humane endpoint (clinical score ≥4 by day 11 compared to 5 of 15 (33% of liraglutide-treated rats (p=0.0004. Liraglutide substantially increased the mitochondrial antioxidant MnSOD (p<0.01 and reduced the neurodegenerative marker APP (p=0.036 in the brain. GFAP levels were not significantly changed with drug treatment (p=0.09Conclusion: We demonstrate, for the first time, that liraglutide treatment delays onset of EAE in Lewis rats and is associated with improved protective capacity against oxidative stress. These data suggest GLP-1 receptor

  14. Autoimmune encephalitis associated with voltage-gated potassium channels-complex and leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celicanin, M; Blaabjerg, M; Maersk-Moller, C

    2017-01-01

    -Barré syndrome, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, neuromyotonia and anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis. Magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities were demonstrated in 69% of the LGI1-positive patients. Two patients with normal magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated temporal lobe hypermetabolism using 18 F...... antibodies in the serum/cerebrospinal fluid between 2009 and 2013 with follow-up interviews in 2015 and 2016. METHODS: We evaluated antibody status, symptoms leading to testing, course of disease, suspected diagnosis and time of admission as well as diagnosis and treatment. All magnetic resonance imaging...

  15. Primary sleep disorders can cause long-term sleep disturbance in patients with autoimmune mediated limbic encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kirstie N; Kelly, Thomas P; Griffiths, Timothy D

    2013-07-01

    Antibody mediated limbic encephalitis causes a sub acute encephalopathy with an amnestic syndrome, seizures and often an affective prodrome. Sleep disturbance including abnormal dream sleep and insomnia are described in a percentage of long-term survivors but there are very few detailed assessments of sleep disturbance in patients beyond the acute phase of illness. The objectives of this study were to understand the causes of sleep disturbance in the long-term survivors of antibody mediated limbic encephalitis. We screened twelve patients under long-term follow up with sleep questionnaires and went on to perform detailed sleep studies (polysomnography) in those who reported sleep disturbance. Two were found to have persistent, severe central and obstructive sleep apnoea and two others to have restless legs and periodic limb movements of sleep. This highlights the need to investigate sleep disturbance in this group of patients. Effective treatments may be available to improve quality of life and daytime function. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients presenting with (sub)acute cerebellar ataxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Tanja [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Hamburg (Germany); The Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Division of Neuroradiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Thomalla, Goetz [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Neurology, Hamburg (Germany); Goebell, Einar [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Hamburg (Germany); Piotrowski, Anna [The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Yousem, David Mark [The Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Division of Neuroradiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-02-17

    Acute or subacute cerebellar inflammation is mainly caused by postinfectious, toxic, neoplastic, vascular, or idiopathic processes and can result in cerebellar ataxia. Previous magnetic resonance (MR) studies in single patients who developed acute or subacute ataxia showed varying imaging features. Eighteen patients presenting with acute and subacute onset of ataxia were included in this study. Cases of chronic-progressive/hereditary and noncerebellar causes (ischemia, multiple sclerosis lesions, metastasis, bleedings) were excluded. MR imaging findings were then matched with the clinical history of the patient. An underlying etiology for ataxic symptoms were found in 14/18 patients (postinfectious/infectious, paraneoplastic, autoimmune, drug-induced). In two of five patients without MR imaging findings and three of eight patients with minimal imaging features (cerebellar atrophy, slight signal alterations, and small areas of restricted diffusion), adverse clinical outcomes were documented. Of the five patients with prominent MR findings (cerebellar swelling, contrast enhancement, or broad signal abnormalities), two were lost to follow-up and two showed long-term sequelae. No correlation was found between the presence of initial MRI findings in subacute or acute ataxia patients and their long-term clinical outcome. MR imaging was more flagrantly positive in cases due to encephalitis. (orig.)

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients presenting with (sub)acute cerebellar ataxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Tanja; Thomalla, Goetz; Goebell, Einar; Piotrowski, Anna; Yousem, David Mark

    2015-01-01

    Acute or subacute cerebellar inflammation is mainly caused by postinfectious, toxic, neoplastic, vascular, or idiopathic processes and can result in cerebellar ataxia. Previous magnetic resonance (MR) studies in single patients who developed acute or subacute ataxia showed varying imaging features. Eighteen patients presenting with acute and subacute onset of ataxia were included in this study. Cases of chronic-progressive/hereditary and noncerebellar causes (ischemia, multiple sclerosis lesions, metastasis, bleedings) were excluded. MR imaging findings were then matched with the clinical history of the patient. An underlying etiology for ataxic symptoms were found in 14/18 patients (postinfectious/infectious, paraneoplastic, autoimmune, drug-induced). In two of five patients without MR imaging findings and three of eight patients with minimal imaging features (cerebellar atrophy, slight signal alterations, and small areas of restricted diffusion), adverse clinical outcomes were documented. Of the five patients with prominent MR findings (cerebellar swelling, contrast enhancement, or broad signal abnormalities), two were lost to follow-up and two showed long-term sequelae. No correlation was found between the presence of initial MRI findings in subacute or acute ataxia patients and their long-term clinical outcome. MR imaging was more flagrantly positive in cases due to encephalitis. (orig.)

  18. Rasmussen's Encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... severe seizures, loss of motor skills and speech, paralysis on one side of the body (hemiparesis), inflammation of the brain (encephalitis), and mental deterioration. Most individuals with Rasmussen’s ...

  19. Acanthamoeba encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushal V

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system infection with free-living amoebae is rare. We present a fatal case of Acanthamoeba encephalitis in a 63-year-old female from India where acanthamoebae were demonstrated and cultured from CSF. In spite of treatment with amphotericin B, fluconazole and rifampicin the patient did not survive. Amoebic infection should be suspected in a patient of encephalitis of unexplained aetiology as timely diagnosis can lead to a favourable outcome.

  20. [Autoimmune channelopathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, M; Delrieu, J; Astudillo, L

    2011-12-01

    Autoimmune channelopathies are rare neuromuscular diseases that have been characterized clinically for several decades but for which the evidence of associated antibodies has only been recently demonstrated. Ion channels have an important role of activation, inhibition and regulation in neuromuscular transmission. Myasthenia gravis, generally associated with the presence of anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody, is the best-known channelopathy. Other anti-channel antibodies, including voltage-dependent, are associated with several neurological diseases, as illustrated by anti-voltage-gated calcium channels found in Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome and paraneoplastic cerebellar ataxia, and anti-voltage-gated potassium channels found in neuromyotonia, Morvan's syndrome and limbic encephalitis. The treatment of autoimmune channelopathies is logically based on corticosteroids, immunosuppressant drugs, intravenous immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis. Copyright © 2011 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Rasmussen's encephalitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (receptive or expressive); and cognitive deficits (memory intellectual impairment, neuropsychological deficits ... Key words: Rasmussen, encephalitis, disease. Date of Acceptance: 08-03-2011. Access this article online ... hemispheres at a rate of 29.9 cm3/year vs. 6.8 cm3/year.[7]. There is decreased cerebral blood flow and ...

  2. Auto-immune encefalitis in de psychiatrische praktijk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Witte, L; Kromkamp, M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/241613876; Schoenmaker, N; van Mierlo, H C|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413967263; Martinez-Martínez, P; Palmen, S J M; Sommer, I E C|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/258791519

    BACKGROUND: Our knowledge about auto-immune limbic encephalitis is increasing rapidly and it is now evident that patients with this disease can present with psychiatric symptoms. AIM: To propose practical guidelines for the recognition and diagnosis of an underlying auto-immune limbic encephalitis

  3. Potassium channel antibody-associated encephalopathy: a potentially immunotherapy-responsive form of limbic encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Angela; Buckley, Camilla; Schott, Jonathan M; Baker, Ian; Dewar, Bonnie-Kate; Detert, Niels; Clover, Linda; Parkinson, Abigail; Bien, Christian G; Omer, Salah; Lang, Bethan; Rossor, Martin N; Palace, Jackie

    2004-03-01

    Patients presenting with subacute amnesia are frequently seen in acute neurological practice. Amongst the differential diagnoses, herpes simplex encephalitis, Korsakoff's syndrome and limbic encephalitis should be considered. Limbic encephalitis is typically a paraneoplastic syndrome with a poor prognosis; thus, identifying those patients with potentially reversible symptoms is important. Voltage-gated potassium channel antibodies (VGKC-Ab) have recently been reported in three cases of reversible limbic encephalitis. Here we review the clinical, immunological and neuropsychological features of 10 patients (nine male, one female; age range 44-79 years), eight of whom were identified in two centres over a period of 15 months. The patients presented with 1-52 week histories of memory loss, confusion and seizures. Low plasma sodium concentrations, initially resistant to treatment, were present in eight out of 10. Brain MRI at onset showed signal change in the medial temporal lobes in eight out of 10 cases. Paraneoplastic antibodies were negative, but VGKC-Ab ranged from 450 to 5128 pM (neurological and healthy controls memory, with sparing of general intellect in all but two patients, and of nominal functions in all but one. Variable regimes of steroids, plasma exchange and intravenous immunoglobulin were associated with variable falls in serum VGKC-Abs, to values between 2 and 88% of the initial values, together with marked improvement of neuropsychological functioning in six patients, slight improvement in three and none in one. The improvement in neuropsychological functioning in seven patients correlated broadly with the fall in antibodies. However, varying degrees of cerebral atrophy and residual cognitive impairment were common. Over the same period, only one paraneoplastic case of limbic encephalitis was identified between the two main centres. Thus, VGKC-Ab-associated encephalopathy is a relatively common form of autoimmune, non-paraneoplastic, potentially

  4. St. Louis Encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Virus Transmission Epidemiology & Geographic Distribution Symptoms and Treatment Diagnosis Links & References Fact Sheet Other diseases transmitted by mosquitoes Chikungunya virus Dengue Eastern Equine Encephalitis Japanese Encephalitis La Crosse Encephalitis ...

  5. Autoimmun synaptisk encefalitis er en underdiagnosticeret sygdomsgruppe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Signe Modvig; Høi-Hansen, Christina Engel; Uldall, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The term autoimmune synaptic encephalitis (ASE) comprises encephalitides associated with autoantibodies against structures of the neuronal synapse. We review four types of ASE (anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis, anti-α-amine-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid receptor...

  6. [Thymoma and autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamilloux, Y; Frih, H; Bernard, C; Broussolle, C; Petiot, P; Girard, N; Sève, P

    2018-01-01

    The association between thymoma and autoimmunity is well known. Besides myasthenia gravis, which is found in 15 to 20% of patients with thymoma, other autoimmune diseases have been reported: erythroblastopenia, systemic lupus erythematosus, inflammatory myopathies, thyroid disorders, Isaac's syndrome or Good's syndrome. More anecdotally, Morvan's syndrome, limbic encephalitis, other autoimmune cytopenias, autoimmune hepatitis, and bullous skin diseases (pemphigus, lichen) have been reported. Autoimmune diseases occur most often before thymectomy, but they can be discovered at the time of surgery or later. Two situations require the systematic investigation of a thymoma: the occurrence of myasthenia gravis or autoimmune erythroblastopenia. Nevertheless, the late onset of systemic lupus erythematosus or the association of several autoimmune manifestations should lead to look for a thymoma. Neither the characteristics of the patients nor the pathological data can predict the occurrence of an autoimmune disease after thymectomy. Thus, thymectomy usefulness in the course of the autoimmune disease, except myasthenia gravis, has not been demonstrated. This seems to indicate the preponderant role of self-reactive T lymphocytes distributed in the peripheral immune system prior to surgery. Given the high infectious morbidity in patients with thymoma, immunoglobulin replacement therapy should be considered in patients with hypogammaglobulinemia who receive immunosuppressive therapy, even in the absence of prior infection. Copyright © 2017 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Autoimmune Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with type 1 autoimmune hepatitis commonly have other autoimmune disorders, such as celiac disease, an autoimmune disease in ... 2 can also have any of the above autoimmune disorders. What are the symptoms of autoimmune hepatitis? The ...

  8. Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis and Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsiuying

    2017-01-18

    Anti- N -methyl-d-aspartate (Anti-NMDA) receptor encephalitis is an acute autoimmune neurological disorder. The cause of this disease is often unknown, and previous studies revealed that it might be caused by a virus, vaccine or tumor. It occurs more often in females than in males. Several cases were reported to be related to vaccination such as the H1N1 vaccine and tetanus/diphtheria/pertussis and polio vaccines. In this study, we reported an anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis case that may be caused by Japanese encephalitis vaccination. To investigate the association between anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis and vaccination, we analyzed the phylogenetic relationship of the microRNAs, which significantly regulate these vaccine viruses or bacteria, and the phylogenetic relationship of these viruses and bacteria. This reveals that anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis may be caused by Japanese encephalitis vaccination, as well as H1N1 vaccination or tetanus/diphtheria/pertussis and polio vaccinations, from the phylogenetic viewpoint.

  9. Anti-N-Methyl-d-Aspartate Receptor Encephalitis in a Patient with Alcoholism: A Rare Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Yangyang Li; Qiuling Wang; Chuanxin Liu; Chuanxin Liu; Yili Wu; Yili Wu; Yili Wu

    2017-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis, the most common type of autoimmune encephalitis, is characterized by autoantibodies against NMDA receptor. Patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis also present with various non-specific symptoms, such as flu-like symptoms, neurological, and psychiatric manifestations. Here, we first reported a rare case of anti-NMDAR encephalitis in a 36-year-old male alcohol abuser. The patient presented with acute psychiatric symptoms with no abnor...

  10. Japanese Encephalitis: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the vaccine, what should I do? What is Japanese encephalitis? Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a potentially severe ... cause inflammation of the brain (encephalitis). Where does Japanese encephalitis occur? JE occurs in Asia and parts ...

  11. Acute encephalitis associated with measles: MRI features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K.Y.; Cho, W.H.; Kim, S.H. [Department of Radiology, Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University, 760-1 Sanggye-7 dong, Nowon-gu, Seoul 139707 (Korea); Kim, H.D. [Department of Paediatrics, Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University, 760-1 Sanggye-7 dong, Nowon-gu, Seoul 139707 (Korea); Kim, I.O. [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, 28, Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul 110744 (Korea)

    2003-02-01

    We document the MRI features in six patients aged 5-14 years with acute encephalitis following measles. The diagnosis was made on a characteristic morbiliform rash and detection of specific IgM and IgG antibodies. The symptoms of encephalitis occurred 1-11 days after the appearance of the rash. All patients underwent MRI within 1-4 days of the onset of neurological symptoms. Diffusion weighted images (DWI) were obtained in three patients. In all patients, T2-weighted images showed widely distributed, multifocal high signal in both cerebral hemispheres with swelling of the cortex, with bilateral, symmetrical involvement of the putamen and caudate nucleus. The lesions had showed low apparent diffusion coefficients. Three patients showed subacute gyriform haemorrhage, and asymmetrical gyriform contrast enhancement on follow-up MRI. (orig.)

  12. MRI in carcinomatous encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirai, H.; Imai, S.; Kajihara, Y.; Tamada, T.; Gyoten, M.; Kamei, T.; Hata, T.; Shirabe, T.

    1997-01-01

    We report a rare case of miliary brain metastases presenting with symptoms similar to encephalitis (''carcinomatous encephalitis''). Contrast-enhanced MRI demonstrated miliary metastases more distinctly than other imaging methods and reproduced the pathological features. (orig.). With 4 figs

  13. Eastern Equine Encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Eastern Equine Encephalitis Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Eastern Equine Encephalitis Home Frequently Asked Questions Prevention Virus Transmission ...

  14. New Onset Insomnia in a Pediatric Patient: A Case of Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis

    OpenAIRE

    Tamar N. Goldberg; Michael F. Cellucci

    2017-01-01

    Anti-NMDAR encephalitis is becoming more widely recognized as a cause of encephalopathy in both adults and children. Certain clinical features such as mood lability, movement disorders, speech dysfunction, seizures, and autonomic instability in a pediatric patient should prompt immediate concern and evaluation for autoimmune encephalitis among providers. We present the case of a pediatric patient with anti-NMDAR encephalitis in which the symptom prompting medical evaluation was insomnia. Inso...

  15. Acute Measles Encephalitis in Partially Vaccinated Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, Annette; Than Manh Hung; Wertheim, Heiman; Le Nguyen Minh Hoa; Vincent, Angela; Lang, Bethan; Waters, Patrick; Nguyen Hong Ha; Nguyen Vu Trung; Farrar, Jeremy; Nguyen Van Kinh; Horby, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of acute measles encephalitis (AME) is poorly understood. Treatment with immune-modulators is based on theories that post-infectious autoimmune responses cause demyelination. The clinical course and immunological parameters of AME were examined during an outbreak in Vietnam. Methods and Findings Fifteen measles IgM-positive patients with confusion or Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score below 13, and thirteen with uncomplicated measles were enrolled from 2008?2010. Stand...

  16. Subacute Thyroiditis During Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CANAN YILDIZ

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we present a case of subacute thyroiditis occurring in the first trimester of pregnancy in a 33-years-old pregnant patient. Thyrotoxicosis during pregnancy is a rare condition and occurs in 0.1 to 0.4% of all pregnancies. Graves' Disease and transient gestational thyrotoxicosis constitute the majority of emerging thyrotoxicosis during pregnancy. Subacute thyroiditis may also cause temporary thyrotoxicosis. Although the majority of the patients recover without treatment, complications in the pregnancy should be considered and each patient must be evaluated individually. As a result, differential diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis in pregnancy and treatment plan should be done well and subacute thyroiditis should be considered in differential diagnosis. [J Contemp Med 2017; 7(1.000: 1-1

  17. Auto-immune encefalitis in de psychiatrische praktijk

    OpenAIRE

    de Witte, L; Kromkamp, M; Schoenmaker, N; van Mierlo, H C; Martinez-Martínez, P; Palmen, S J M; Sommer, I E C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Our knowledge about auto-immune limbic encephalitis is increasing rapidly and it is now evident that patients with this disease can present with psychiatric symptoms. AIM: To propose practical guidelines for the recognition and diagnosis of an underlying auto-immune limbic encephalitis in patients with acute psychiatric symptoms. METHOD: We studied recent reviews on the topic and had discussions with psychiatrists, a neurologist and a neuroimmunologist in order to reach consensus....

  18. Psychosis: an autoimmune disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Diwani, Adam A J; Pollak, Thomas A; Irani, Sarosh R; Lennox, Belinda R

    2017-11-01

    Psychotic disorders are common and disabling. Overlaps in clinical course in addition to epidemiological and genetic associations raise the possibility that autoimmune mechanisms may underlie some psychoses, potentially offering novel therapeutic approaches. Several immune loci including the major histocompatibility complex and B-cell markers CD19 and CD20 achieve genome-wide significance in schizophrenia. Emerging evidence suggests a potential role via neurodevelopment in addition to classical immune pathways. Additionally, lymphocyte biology is increasingly investigated. Some reports note raised peripheral CD19 + and reduced CD3 + lymphocyte counts, with altered CD4 : CD8 ratios in acute psychosis. Also, post-mortem studies have found CD3 + and CD20 + lymphocyte infiltration in brain regions that are of functional relevance to psychosis. More specifically, the recent paradigm of neuronal surface antibody-mediated (NSAb) central nervous system disease provides an antigen-specific model linking adaptive autoimmunity to psychopathology. NSAbs bind extracellular epitopes of signalling molecules that are classically implicated in psychosis such as NMDA and GABA receptors. This interaction may cause circuit dysfunction leading to psychosis among other neurological features in patients with autoimmune encephalitis. The detection of these cases is crucial as autoimmune encephalitis is ameliorated by commonly available immunotherapies. Meanwhile, the prevalence and relevance of these antibodies in people with isolated psychotic disorders is an area of emerging scientific and clinical interest. Collaborative efforts to achieve larger sample sizes, comparison of assay platforms, and placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials are now needed to establish an autoimmune contribution to psychosis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Subacute thyroiditis following influenza vaccine: a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munther S. Momani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Subacute thyroiditis following influenza vaccination is a rarely reported condition. Here, we review this condition and report the case of a 40-year-old male who developed subacute thyroiditis following the administration of an influenza vaccine containing the (H1N1 pandemic 2009 strain. Interestingly, the patient had history of pericarditis and his HLA typing showed HLA B35. Physicians should be aware of this complication for influenza vaccine and of the relationship of HLA B35 haplotype with the susceptibility to subacute thyroiditis and other autoimmune disorders.

  20. Encephalopathy Associated With Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    OpenAIRE

    li A. Raouf; Gianluca Tamagno

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs) are immune-endocrine disorders affecting the thyroid gland and, eventually, also a number of other systemic targets, including the brain and the nervous system. Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD) is a rare, heterogeneous condition arising from the background of an ATD. It is characterised by neurological and/or psychiatric symptoms with acute or sub-acute onset, and virtually any neurological or psychiatric symptom can appear. ...

  1. Case report: subacute tetraplegia in an immunocompromised patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, Daniel; Heidemeier, Anke; Grigoleit, Götz Ulrich; Müllges, Wolfgang

    2017-02-10

    Clinical reasoning in Neurology is based on general associations which help to deduce the site of the lesion. However, even "golden principles" may occasionally be deceptive. Here, we describe the case of subacute flaccid tetraparesis due to motor cortical lesions. To our knowledge, this is the first report to include an impressive illustration of nearly symmetric motor cortical involvement of encephalitis on brain MRI. A 51 year old immunocompromized man developed a high-grade pure motor flaccid tetraparesis over few days. Based on clinical presentation, critical illness polyneuromyopathy was suspected. However, brain MRI revealed symmetrical hyperintensities strictly limited to the subcortical precentral gyrus. An encephalitis, possibly due to CMV infection, turned out to be the most likely cause. While recognition of basic clinical patterns is indispensable in neurological reasoning, awareness of central conditions mimicking peripheral nervous disease may be crucial to detect unsuspected, potentially treatable conditions.

  2. Anti-NMDA-Receptor Encephalitis: From Bench to Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Arun; Adatia, Krishma

    2017-12-20

    NMDAR encephalitis is a common cause of autoimmune encephalitis, predominantly affecting young adults. Current data supports the idea that autoantibodies targeting NMDARs are responsible for disease pathogenesis. While these autoantibodies occur in the setting of underlying malignancy in approximately half of all patients, initiating factors for the autoimmune response in the remainder of patients are unclear. While there is increasing evidence supporting viral triggers such as herpes simplex encephalitis, this association and the mechanism of action have not yet been fully described. Although the majority of patients achieve good outcomes, those without an underlying tumor consistently show worse outcomes, prolonged recovery, and more frequent relapses. The cloning of patient-specific autoantibodies from affected individuals has raised important questions as to disease pathophysiology and clinical heterogeneity. Further advances in our understanding of this disease and underlying triggers are necessary to develop treatments which improve outcomes in patients presenting in the absence of tumors.

  3. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modi, G.; Bill, P.; Campbell, H.

    1989-01-01

    A 19-year-old female patient presented in an acute state of akinetic mutism. Serological analysis of serum and cerebrospinal fluid demonstrated the presence of antibodies to measles virus. CT scan carried out during this acute phase of relapse demonstrated white matter enhancement affecting the cortical white matter of the frontal lobes and corpus callosum. These features indicate that active demyelination occurs during acute relapse in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) and suggest that immunotherapy should be considered during this acute phase. (orig.)

  4. Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis in the Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus) Knut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prüss, H; Leubner, J; Wenke, N K; Czirják, G Á; Szentiks, C A; Greenwood, A D

    2015-08-27

    Knut the polar bear of the Berlin Zoological Garden drowned in 2011 following seizures and was diagnosed as having suffered encephalitis of unknown etiology after exhaustive pathogen screening. Using the diagnostic criteria applied to human patients, we demonstrate that Knut's encephalitis is almost identical to anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis which is a severe autoimmune disease representing the most common non-infectious encephalitis in humans. High concentrations of antibodies specific against the NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor were detected in Knut's cerebrospinal fluid. Histological examination demonstrated very similar patterns of plasma cell infiltration and minimal neuronal loss in affected brain areas. We conclude that Knut suffered anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis making his the first reported non-human case of this treatable disease. The results suggest that anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis may be a disease of broad relevance to mammals that until now has remained undiagnosed.

  5. Serum uric acid and anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Yaqing; Wang, Yuge; Lu, Tingting; Li, Rui; Sun, Xiaobo; Li, Jing; Chang, Yanyu; Hu, Xueqiang; Lu, Zhengqi; Qiu, Wei

    2017-09-01

    Uric acid (UA) levels are associated with autoimmune and neurodegenerative disorders, but their relationship with anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis is unknown. UA levels were evaluated in 58 patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis, and 58 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (CTLs). Follow-up evaluations of 30 out of the 58 patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis were conducted 3 months after admission. Modified Rankin scale (mRS) scores and clinical and cerebrospinal fluid parameters were evaluated in all anti-NMDAR encephalitis patients. Serum UA levels were significantly lower in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis than those in CTLs (p anti-NMDAR encephalitis are reduced during attacks compared with those in CTLs, are normalized after treatment, and are associated with disease severity. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Herpes simplex encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakken, J.S.; Camenga, D.L.; Glazier, M.C.; Coughlan, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    Early institution of therapy with acyclovir is essential for the successful outcome in herpes simplex encephalitis. Brain biopsy remains the only conclusive means of establishing the diagnosis, but many fear possible biobsy complications. Thus, therapy is often instituted when the diagnosis is clinically suspected, even though cerebral computed tomography and other diagnostic studies may be inconclusive. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMR) has proven to be a sensitive tool for diagnosing presumptive herpes simplex encephalitis. This case presentation demonstrates the superiority of cerebral NMR over computerized tomography for detecting early temporal lobe changes consistent with acute herpes simplex encephalitis

  7. Animal intelligence as encephalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerison, H J

    1985-02-13

    There is no consensus on the nature of animal intelligence despite a century of research, though recent work on cognitive capacities of dolphins and great apes seems to be on one right track. The most precise quantitative analyses have been of relative brain size, or structural encephalization, undertaken to find biological correlates of mind in animals. Encephalization and its evolution are remarkably orderly, and if the idea of intelligence were unknown it would have to be invented to explain encephalization. The scientific question is: what behaviour or dimensions of behaviour evolved when encephalization evolved? The answer: the relatively unusual behaviours that require increased neural information processing capacity, beyond that attributable to differences among species in body size. In this perspective, the different behaviours that depend on augmented processing capacity in different species are evidence of different intelligences (in the plural) that have evolved.

  8. Travelers' Health: Japanese Encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... human cases in north, central, and southern Laos Malaysia Endemic in Sarawak; sporadic cases reported from all ... of a booster dose of inactivated Vero cell culture-derived Japanese encephalitis vaccine: advisory committee on immunization ...

  9. Mycoplasma pneumoniae encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, H.; Korinthenberg, R.; Fahrendorf, G.; Muenster Univ.

    1987-01-01

    Clinical, CT and, in one case, autopsy findings indicated a diagnosis of a severe necrotising encephalitis in two patients. Although usually herpes simplex virus is blamed for this form of encephalitis, it was possible to prove in these two patients that mycoplasma was the causative agent of the disease. It is concluded that this organism can produce a serious disease in the central nervous system similar to that caused by herpes simplex. (orig.) [de

  10. Autoimmune disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000816.htm Autoimmune disorders To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An autoimmune disorder occurs when the body's immune system attacks and ...

  11. Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis with favorable outcome despite prolonged status epilepticus

    OpenAIRE

    Finné Lenoir, Xavier; Sindic, Christian; Van Pesch, Vincent; El Sankari, Souraya; de Tourtchaninoff, Marianne; Denays, Roger; Hantson, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To describe a case of auto-immune encephalitis in an adolescent with favorable outcome despite prolonged status epilepticus. METHODS: A 17 year old Asian man without previous medical history developed alteration of consciousness and partial seizures. The diagnosis of anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis was confirmed by the detection of specific antibodies in both cerebrospinal fluid and serum. RESULTS: The clinical course was complicated by prolonged status epilepticus...

  12. CT scans in encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imanishi, Masami; Morimoto, Tetsuya; Iida, Noriyuki; Hisanaga, Manabu; Kinugawa, Kazuhiko

    1980-01-01

    Generally, CT scans reveal a decrease in the volume of the ventricular system, sylvian fissures and cortical sulci in the acute stage of encephalitis, and softening of the cerebral lobes with dilatation of the lateral ventricles and subarachnoidian dilated spaces in the chronic stage. We encountered three cases of encephalitis: mumps (case 1), herpes simplex (case 2), and syphilis (case 3). In case 1, brain edema was seen in the acute stage and brain atrophy in the chronic stage. In case 2, necrosis of the temporal pole, which is pathognomonic in herpes simplex encephalitis, was recognized. And in case 3, multiple lesions whose CT appearance was enhanced by contrast materials were found scattered over the whole brain. These lesions were diagnosed as inflammatory granuloma by histological examination. (author)

  13. To danske tilfælde af autoimmun synaptisk encefalitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Signe Modvig; Høi-Hansen, Christina Engel; Uldall, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune synaptic encephalitis (ASE) is a recently recognized disease entity. The early and correct diagnosis of ASE is of importance, since the prognosis depends on the early onset of treatment. We present two Danish case reports of ASE: a 15-year-old boy presenting with a severe course of N-m......-methyl-D-aspartate-encephalitis including persistent cognitive deficits, and a 59-year-old woman with coeliac disease presenting with leucine-rich glioma inactivated 1-encephalitis including dyskinesia, epilepsy, psychiatric features and vocal tics....

  14. Raccoon roundworm encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, Pareen; Boyd, Zachary; Cully, Brent

    2010-01-01

    Raccoon roundworm encephalitis is a rare but devastating infection characterized by progressive neurological decline despite attempted therapy. Patients present with deteriorating neurological function, eosinophilia, and history of pica or geophagia resulting in ingestion of the parasite. Neuroimaging studies demonstrate nonspecific findings of progressive white matter inflammation and cortical atrophy. (orig.)

  15. Allergy in patients with anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xin-Yue; Zhang, Le; Jiang, Xian; Abdulaziz, Ammar Taha Abdullah; Wang, Yun-Hui; Li, Jin-Mei; Zhou, Dong

    2018-02-01

    Allergy is a potential outcome of dysregulated immune system. Previous studies have shown the association of allergy and autoimmune diseases, however, there is few study to investigate the relationship between allergy and anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis. Thus, we investigate the rate of allergy in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis and analyze the risk factors. The rate of allergy was investigated in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis and was compared with patients with virus encephalitis. The clinical cutaneous characters were described in details. All patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis were divided into allergic and nonallergic group. Clinical factors were compared in the two groups, and logistic regression model was also used to analyze possible risk factors of allergy. Patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis had a higher rate of allergy than those with viral encephalitis (22.1% vs 9.2%, odds ratio (OR)=3.23, confidence interval (CI)=1.40-7.42, P=0.006). In patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis, allergic patients exhibited longer days in hospital (30days vs 22days, P=0.005) and higher occurrence of decreased consciousness (81.5% vs 58.9%, P=0.031), higher rate of complications (77.8% vs 57.9%, P=0.046) and abnormal electroencephalography (EEG) (100% vs 78.6%, P=0.021) than patients without allergy. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) antibody titers of allergic patients during the disease course were also higher than nonallergic patients (P=0.004). However, further logistic regression analysis did not reveal independent predictors of allergy. Patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis show higher allergic rate than those with virus encephalitis. Patients with allergy show higher CSF antibody titers and greater illness severity. However, the final outcome of anti-NMDAR encephalitis was not influenced. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Epidemic of rubella encephalitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Achour, N; Benrhouma, H; Rouissi, A; Touaiti, H; Kraoua, I; Turki, I; Gouider-Khouja, N

    2013-08-01

    Rubella is a mild viral illness in children. Rubella encephalitis is an extremely uncommon complication of rubella affecting unvaccinated children, aged between 5 and 14 years. From May to June 2011, we observed 9 cases of rubella encephalitis diagnosed during an epidemic of rubella. All were previously healthy (8 boys and 1 girl). None of them had received rubella vaccine. The mean age was 11.6 years. The onset of neurological symptoms occurred within 1-5 days after the typical rush and was associated with seizures and altered consciousness in all cases. The presence of serum immunoglobulin M antibody against rubella virus was demonstrated in all patients. EEGs showed slow wave activity in all patients and brain MRI was normal in the 9 cases. Full recovery was obtained in all patients. However, 4 of them required intensive care unit referral. Acute encephalitis is an extremely rare complication of rubella. The main neurological findings are headache, ataxia, and hemiplegia. Epileptic seizure and altered consciousness are rarely observed. Rubella encephalitis is generally self-limiting with about 80% recovery rate with no sequelae. However, severe courses have been reported. These cases illustrated the potential severity of rubella and they should be prevented by encouraging widespread early childhood vaccination. In Tunisia, rubella encephalitis has been reported once previously and vaccination against rubella virus has only recently been included in the national vaccination program, prescribed only for adolescent females. Following this rubella epidemic, vaccination strategies in Tunisia have been revised. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. T-cell seeding: neonatal transfer of anti-myelin basic protein T-cell lines renders Fischer rats susceptible later in life to the active induction of experimental autoimmune encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volovitz, Ilan; Mor, Felix; Machlenkin, Arthur; Machlenkin, Athur; Goldberger, Ofir; Marmor, Yotvat; Eisenbach, Lea; Cohen, Irun R; Cohen, Irun

    2009-09-01

    Fischer strain rats resist active induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) following immunization with guinea-pig myelin basic protein (MBP) in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Nevertheless, we now report that an encephalitogenic CD4(+) anti-MBP T-cell line could be developed from actively immunized Fischer rats. Adoptive transfer of the activated line mediated acute EAE in adult Fischer rats, but not in 1-day-old rats. Moreover, we found that both resting and activated anti-MBP T cells injected 1 day post-natally rendered these rats susceptible later in life to the active induction of EAE by immunization with MBP/CFA. The actively induced EAE manifested the accelerated onset of a secondary, memory-type response. Resting anti-MBP T cells injected even up to 2 weeks post-natally produced no clinical signs but seeded 50-100% of the recipients for an active encephalitogenic immune response to MBP. An earlier T-cell injection (1-2 days) produced a higher incidence and stronger response. The transferred resting T cells entered the neonatal spleen and thymus and proliferated there but did not change the total anti-MBP precursor number in adults. Splenocytes harvested from rats that were injected neonatally but not exposed to MBP in vivo proliferated strongly and produced significant amounts of interferon-gamma to MBP in vitro. Similar results were observed in rats injected with resting T-cell lines reactive to ovalbumin, suggesting that the neonatal injection of resting T cells specific for a self or for a foreign antigen can seed the immune system with the potential for an enhanced effector response to that antigen later in life.

  18. Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borucki, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2010-08-05

    Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) is a mosquito-borne virus capable of causing large outbreaks of encephalitis in humans and horses. In North America, EEEV infection has a very high mortality rate in humans, and survivors often suffer severe neurological sequelae. Interestingly, EEEV infections from South American isolates are generally subclinical. Although EEEV is divided into two antigenic varieties and four lineages, only eleven isolates have been sequenced and eight of these are from the North American variety (Lineage I). Most sequenced strains were collected from mosquitoes and only one human isolate has been sequenced. EEEV isolates exist from a variety of hosts, vectors, years, and geographical locations and efforts should focus on sequencing strains that represent this diversity.

  19. Encephalitis in primary HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helleberg, M; Kirk, O

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of primary HIV encephalitis, which initially presented as acute psychosis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was suggestive of vasculitis and multiple infarctions, whereas a brain biopsy after six weeks of symptoms showed HIV encephalitis with microglial nodules, but no signs...... of vasculitis. We review previous reported cases and radiological findings in HIV encephalitis and discuss the role of antiretroviral therapy and steroids in its management....

  20. Arterial spin labeling perfusion imaging demonstrates cerebral hyperperfusion in anti-NMDAR encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey R. Sachs, MD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor encephalitis is an increasingly recognized autoimmune disorder that results in substantial morbidity, prolonged hospital stays, and even death. The diagnosis is often delayed or unrecognized entirely as a result of absent or only subtle initial magnetic resonance imaging findings and a nonspecific clinical syndrome. The discovery of early imaging findings in this disease may help clinicians to more aggressively treat this autoimmune encephalitis and to potentially lessen morbidity and mortality. We report a novel case of anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor encephalitis characterized by early evidence of increased cerebral perfusion on arterial spin labeling perfusion imaging, a finding that preceded laboratory diagnosis and conventional magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities. Further investigation is needed to firmly establish the pathologic basis of this finding.

  1. New Onset Insomnia in a Pediatric Patient: A Case of Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar N. Goldberg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-NMDAR encephalitis is becoming more widely recognized as a cause of encephalopathy in both adults and children. Certain clinical features such as mood lability, movement disorders, speech dysfunction, seizures, and autonomic instability in a pediatric patient should prompt immediate concern and evaluation for autoimmune encephalitis among providers. We present the case of a pediatric patient with anti-NMDAR encephalitis in which the symptom prompting medical evaluation was insomnia. Insomnia has not previously been emphasized in the literature as a presenting feature of this disease in children and has a broad differential. Recognition of the symptoms of anti-NMDAR encephalitis and its variable presentation are key to early diagnosis and prompt initiation of treatment which may help to improve outcomes.

  2. Autoimmune gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2016-10-01

    Autoimmune gastritis is a chronic inflammatory disease with destruction of parietal cells of the corpus and fundus of the stomach. The known consequence is vitamin B12 deficiency and, consequently, pernicious anemia. However, loss of parietal cells reduces secretion of gastric acid which is also required for absorption of inorganic iron; thus, iron deficiency is commonly found in patients with autoimmune gastritis. This usually precedes vitamin B12 deficiency and is found mainly in young women. Patients with chronic iron deficiency, especially those refractory to oral iron therapy, should therefore be evaluated for the presence of autoimmune gastritis.

  3. To danske tilfælde af autoimmun synaptisk encefalitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Signe Modvig; Høi-Hansen, Christina Engel; Uldall, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune synaptic encephalitis (ASE) is a recently recognized disease entity. The early and correct diagnosis of ASE is of importance, since the prognosis depends on the early onset of treatment. We present two Danish case reports of ASE: a 15-year-old boy presenting with a severe course of N...

  4. Serum cystatin C and anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Y; Chang, Y; Wu, H; Li, J; Cao, B; Sun, X; Wang, J; Peng, L; Hu, X; Yu, X; Qiu, W

    2018-05-01

    Cystatin C (CysC) is associated with many neurodegenerative disorders and autoimmune diseases, but its relationship with anti-N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis is unknown. Serum levels of CysC were determined in 66 patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis and 115 healthy controls. Of the 66 patients, 30 had a follow-up evaluation at 3 months after admission. Association of CysC with anti-NMDAR encephalitis and its clinical parameters were evaluated in the patients. The serum levels of CysC were significantly lower in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis than in controls (0.70 ± 0.13 vs 0.83 ± 0.17 mg/mL, P anti-NMDAR encephalitis patients had significantly increased serum CysC levels (P anti-NMDAR encephalitis and its clinical parameters and that the changes in CysC levels correlate with therapeutic effect. Therefore, our findings provide new insights into the association between serum CysC and anti-NMDAR encephalitis. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davorin Dajčman

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autoimmune pancreatitis is a recently described type of pancreatitis of presumed autoimmune etiology. Autoimmune pancreatitis is often misdiagnosed as pancreatic cancer difficult, since their clinical presentations are often similar. The concept of autoimmune pancreatitis was first published in 1961. Since then, autoimmune pancreatitis has often been treated not as an independent clinical entity but rather as a manifestation of systemic disease. The overall prevalence and incidence of the disease have yet to be determined, but three series have reported the prevalence as between 5 and 6 % of all patients with chronic pancreatitis. Patient vary widely in age, but most are older than 50 years. Patients with autoimmune pancreatitis usually complain of the painless jaundice, mild abdominal pain and weight loss. There is no laboratory hallmark of the disease, even if cholestatic profiles of liver dysfunction with only mild elevation of amylase and lipase levels have been reported.Conclusions: Proposed diagnostic criteria contains: (1 radiologic imaging, diffuse enlargement of the pancreas and diffusely irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct, (2 laboratory data, elevated levels of serum ã-globulin and/or IgG, specially IgG4, or the presence of autoantibodies and (3 histopathologic examination, fibrotic change with dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltration in the pancreas. For correct diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis, criterion 1 must be present with criterion 2 and/or 3. Autoimmune pancreatitis is frequently associated with rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren’s syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, tubulointersticial nephritis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis. Pancreatic biopsy using an endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy is the most important diagnostic method today. Treatment with corticosteroids leads to the and resolution of pancreatic inflamation, obstruction and

  6. Electroconvulsive Therapy in Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Encephalitis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, M Justin; Cooper, Joseph J

    2016-12-01

    There is a growing scientific literature describing the neuropsychiatric symptoms of anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis, including the use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) to treat those symptoms. We sought to consolidate this literature into a review that highlights its relevance to ECT practitioners. We performed a PubMed search using the terms electroconvulsive therapy and encephalitis, autoimmune encephalitis, or anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis. We reviewed all relevant studies in detail, cross-referenced all bibliographies, and collected key clinical information related to the practice of ECT. We identified 6 studies offering patient-level descriptions of the use of ECT in patients with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis. In all cases ECT was used to target symptoms of catatonia. Electroconvulsive therapy was delivered safely and effectively irrespective of the timing of diagnosis, tumor removal, or immunotherapy. There are no controlled data on the use of ECT in anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis. Further investigation is needed to determine whether ECT has a disease-modifying effect on this form of autoimmune encephalitis.

  7. Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Encephalitis in Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, Shelly; John, Rita Marie

    2016-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is an autoimmune disease that is becoming increasingly recognized in the pediatric population. It may be the most common cause of treatable autoimmune encephalitis. The majority of cases of anti-NMDAR encephalitis are idiopathic in etiology, but a significant minority can be attributed to a paraneoplastic origin. Children with anti-NMDAR encephalitis initially present with a prodrome of neuropsychiatric symptoms, often with orofacial dyskinesias followed by progressively worsening seizures, agitation, and spasticity, which may result in severe neurologic deficits and even death. Definitive diagnosis requires detection of NMDAR antibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid. Optimal outcomes are associated with prompt removal of the tumor in paraneoplastic cases, as well as aggressive immunosuppressive therapy. Early detection is essential for increasing the chances for a good outcome. Close follow-up is required to screen for relapse and later onset tumor presentation. The nurse practitioner plays a major role in the research, screening, diagnosis, treatment, follow-up, and rehabilitation of a child or adolescent with anti-NMDAR encephalitis. Copyright © 2016 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Understanding Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What are they? Points To Remember About Autoimmune Diseases Autoimmune diseases refer to problems with the immune system, ... Infectious Diseases Website: https://www.niaid.nih.gov/diseases-conditions/autoimmune-diseases American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association Website: https:// ...

  9. Autoimmun hypophysitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Therese; Hagen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    during pregnancy or postpartum, but also occurs in males and children. AH is often associated with other autoimmune diseases, most frequently with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The symptoms are caused by enlargement of the pituitary gland and disturbances of the hormone function. Treatment is either......Autoimmune hypophysitis (AH) - often referred to as lymphocytic hypophysitis - is a rare disease that affects the pituitary gland and causes inflammation. The disease enlarges the pituitary gland and the clinical presentations are lack of pituitary function and headaches. AH is mostly seen in women...

  10. Autoimmun hypophysitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Therese; Hagen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    during pregnancy or postpartum, but also occurs in males and children. AH is often associated with other autoimmune diseases, most frequently with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The symptoms are caused by enlargement of the pituitary gland and disturbances of the hormone function. Treatment is either......Autoimmune hypophysitis (AH) - often referred to as lymphocytic hypophysitis - is a rare disease that affects the pituitary gland and causes inflammation. The disease enlarges the pituitary gland and the clinical presentations are lack of pituitary function and headaches. AH is mostly seen in women...... immunosuppressive treatment or surgery....

  11. Autoimmun hypophysitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Therese; Hagen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    during pregnancy or postpartum, but also occurs in males and children. AH is often associated with other autoimmune diseases, most frequently with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The symptoms are caused by enlargement of the pituitary gland and disturbances of the hormone function. Treatment is either...

  12. Autoimmune sialadenitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guntinas-Lichius, O.; Vissink, A.; Ihrler, S.

    Using the European-American classification criteria the diagnosis of autoimmune sialadenitis in Sjogren's syndrome can generally be easily established or excluded. In addition, sonography performed by the ENT physician is helpful in diagnosing and especially in follow-up screening for MALT

  13. Tick-borne encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumpis, U; Crook, D; Oksi, J

    1999-04-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is a zoonotic arbovirus infection endemic to Russia and Eastern and Central Europe. Despite being a common and serious life-threatening disease for which a mass vaccination program was implemented in Austria, there is only limited reference to this disease in the English-language literature. TBE is transmitted to humans usually by the bite of a tick (either Ixodes persulcatus or Ixodes ricinus); occasionally, cases occur following consumption of infected unpasteurized milk. Transmission is seasonal and occurs in spring and summer, particularly in rural areas favored by the vector. TBE is a serious cause of acute central nervous system disease, which may result in death or long-term neurological sequelae. Effective vaccines are available in a few countries. The risk for travelers of acquiring TBE is increasing with the recent rise in tourism to areas of endemicity during spring and summer.

  14. MRI of subacute intracranial hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Hideo

    1990-01-01

    Subacute hematomas consisting of intracellular methemoglobin (MetHb) become hypointense on T 2 weighted spin-echo (SE) images using high-field magnetic resonance. This effect results from diffusion of proton through local field gradients created by MetHb and is called preferential T 2 proton relaxation enhancement (PT2PRE). Gradient-echo acquisition (GEA) can depict hematomas to be more hypointense, because the acquisition is sensitive to field inhomogeneity. In this paper, the difference between SE and GEA images of subacute hematomas was studied experimentally using intracellular MetHb suspension. Although T 2 * decay curves were expected to decline faster than T 2 decay curves, no significant differences were observed between them. This result suggests that PT2PRE cannot be increased significantly by GEA. T 2 obtained with multiple-echo technique is generally inaccurate and smaller than T 2 obtained with single-echo techqnie, but the results showed in a case of intracellular MetHb they were almost similar. This is because mutiple 180deg pulses partly correct the dephasing of proton resulting from its diffusion. As contrast of hematomas is dependent on differences of signal intensities between hematomas and surrounding tissues, it means that multiple-echo technique depicts the lesion less conspicuously than single-echo technique and GEA. GEA images (TR=200 msec/TE=15 msec) showed hypointense rim (boundary effect) at the margin of intracellular MetHb suspension with a hematocrit of larger than 30%, and with TE of 40 msec boundary effect could be seen even at a hematocrit of 15%. On the contrary, SE images (TR=2500 msec/TE=80 msec) hardly showed boundary effect. In conclusion, GEA can depict subacute hematomas to be more hypointense than SE using multiple-echo, because multiple 180deg pulses are not used and boundary effect is present. (author)

  15. Metabolic topography of autoimmune non-paraneoplastic encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, Madhavi; Roy, Shambo Guha; Parida, Girish Kumar; Damle, Nishikant; Shamim, Shamim Ahmed; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Tripathi, Manjari; Ihtisham, Kavish; Dash, Deepa

    2018-01-01

    F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is emerging to be a useful tool in supporting the diagnosis of AIE. In this study, we describe the metabolic patterns on F-18 FDG PET imaging in AIE. Twenty-four antibody-positive patients (anti-NMDA-15, anti-VGKC/LGI1-6, and anti-GAD-3), 14 females and 10 males, with an age range of 2-83 years were included in this study. Each PET study was evaluated visually for the presence of hypometabolism or hypermetabolism and semiquantitatively using Cortex ID (GE) and Scenium (Siemens) by measuring regional Z-scores. These patterns were correlated with corresponding antibody positivity once available. Visually, a pattern of hypometabolism, hypermetabolism, or both in various spatial distributions was appreciated in all 24 patients. On quantitative analysis using scenium parietal and occipital lobes showed significant hypometabolism with median Z-score of -3.8 (R) and -3.7 (L) and -2.2 (R) and -2.5 (L) respectively. Two-thirds (16/24) showed significant hypermetabolism involving the basal ganglia with median Z-score of 2.4 (R) and 3.0 (L). Similarly on Cortex ID, the median Z-score for hypometabolism in parietal and occipital lobes was -2.2 (R) and -2.4 (L) and -2.6 (R) and -2.4 (L) respectively, while subcortical regions were not evaluated. MRI showed signal alterations in only 11 of these patients. There is heterogeneity in metabolic topography of AIE which is characterized by hypometabolism most commonly involving the parietal and occipital cortices and hypermetabolism most commonly involving the basal ganglia. Scenium analysis using regional Z-scores can complement visual evaluation for demonstration of these metabolic patterns on FDG PET. (orig.)

  16. Utility of CSF Cytokine/Chemokines as Markers of Active Intrathecal Inflammation: Comparison of Demyelinating, Anti-NMDAR and Enteroviral Encephalitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavitha Kothur

    Full Text Available Despite the discovery of CSF and serum diagnostic autoantibodies in autoimmune encephalitis, there are still very limited CSF biomarkers for diagnostic and monitoring purposes in children with inflammatory or autoimmune brain disease. The cause of encephalitis is unknown in up to a third of encephalitis cohorts, and it is important to differentiate infective from autoimmune encephalitis given the therapeutic implications.To study CSF cytokines and chemokines as diagnostic biomarkers of active neuroinflammation, and assess their role in differentiating demyelinating, autoimmune, and viral encephalitis.We measured and compared 32 cytokine/chemokines using multiplex immunoassay and APRIL and BAFF using ELISA in CSF collected prior to commencing treatment from paediatric patients with confirmed acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM, n = 16, anti-NMDAR encephalitis (anti-NMDAR E, n = 11, and enteroviral encephalitis (EVE, n = 16. We generated normative data using CSF from 20 non-inflammatory neurological controls. The sensitivity of CSF cytokine/chemokines to diagnose encephalitis cases was calculated using 95th centile of control values as cut off. We correlated CSF cytokine/chemokines with disease severity and follow up outcome based on modified Rankin scale. One-way hierarchical correlational cluster analysis of molecules was performed in different encephalitis and outcome groups.In descending order, CSF TNF-α, IL-10, IFN-α, IL-6, CXCL13 and CXCL10 had the best sensitivity (>79.1% when all encephalitis patients were included. The combination of IL-6 and IFN-α was most predictive of inflammation on multiple logistic regression with area under the ROC curve 0.99 (CI 0.97-1.00. There were no differences in CSF cytokine concentrations between EVE and anti-NMDAR E, whereas ADEM showed more pronounced elevation of Th17 related (IL-17, IL-21 and Th2 (IL-4, CCL17 related cytokine/chemokines. Unlike EVE, heat map analysis showed similar clustering

  17. Limbic encephalitis – a report of four cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Żanna Pastuszak

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Usually limbic encephalitis (LE is a paraneoplastic neurologic syndrome. LE symptoms can precede cancer even by a few years. Almost 50% of LE cases are connected with small cell lung carcinoma. Testis and breast cancers, granulomatous disease, thymoma, and teratomas are also often connected with LE. Other cases have infectious and autoimmunological aetiology. In LE limbic system dysfunction is observed, and it is accompanied by cerebellum and brain stem abnormalities as well as polyneuropathy. Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis is sometimes a part of larger syndrome in which brain stem and spinal cord are involved in an inflammatory process called paraneoplastic encephalomyelitis. The main LE symptoms are: impairment of cognitive functions with subacute beginning, partial and generalised seizures, mental distress, disturbances of consciousness, and limb paresis. In MRI study hyperintensive lesions in the medial part of the temporal lobes in T2 and FLAIR sequences are present. Sharp and slow waves in electroencephalography in the temporal area are also frequent. In cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis, elevation of protein level, intensification of immunoglobulin synthesis, and oligoclonal bands can be detected. The majority of patients with paraneoplastic LE have onconeural antibodies in the blood. The presented study is a description of the clinical course of the disease in four patients diagnosed with LE.

  18. Clinical study on antibody-associated limbic encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Jia-wei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the antibody-associated limbic encephalitis (LE has attracted attentions of more and more clinicians. The associated antibodies mainly act on neuronal cell surface antigens, including the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor, the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA receptor, the γ-aminobutyric acid B (GABAB receptor, leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1 and contactin-associated protein-like 2 (Caspr2 and so on. The clinical manifestation is primarily defined by the subacute onset of short-term memory loss, seizures, confusion and psychiatric symptoms suggesting the involvement of the limbic system. These severe and protracted disorders can affect children and young adults, occurring with or without tumor association. Routine detection of serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and imaging tests show no specificity, but associated antibodies can be detected in serum and (or CSF. The patients respond well to tumor resection and immunotherapies, including corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg, plasma exchange or combination of them, but may relapse. This article aims to study the clinical features and treatment of antibody-associated limbic encephalitis and to improve the diagnosis and prognosis of these diseases.

  19. Autoimmun pankreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjordside, Eva; Novovic, Srdan; Schmidt, Palle Nordblad

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare inflammatory disease. AIP has characteristic histology, serology and imaging findings. Two types of AIP exist, type 1, which is a part of the systemic immunoglobulin G4-related disease, and type 2, which is only localized to the pancreas. Patients with type...... are predominantly older men, have involvement of other organs and more often experience relapse than patients with type 2. Both types respond well to steroid treatment. The most important differential diagnose is pancreatic cancer....

  20. Sequential analysis of CT findings in herpes simplex encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Mitsuru; Tokumaru, Yukio; Ito, Naoki; Yamada, Tatsuo; Hirayama, Keizo

    1982-01-01

    CT findings of six patients with serologically confirmed herpes simplex encephalitis were analyzed sequentially. The initial change in CT scan in 3 cases was generalized cerebral edema instead of low density areas in the anterior temporal lobes, which have generally been known as the initial findings. Then, bilateral (5 cases) or unilateral (1 case) island-shaped low absorption areas in the insular cortex and the claustrum appeared within 10 days of onset in all 6 cases. These findings, especially the latter, seem to be characteristic of the acute stage and useful in the early diagnosis of herpes simplex encephalitis. The low density areas, then, spread to the temporal lobes, rectal and cingulate gyri in the subacute stage (3 cases) and finally to the frontal and occipital lobes in the chronic stage (2 cases). In the basal ganglia, thalamus, brain stem and cerebellum, however, there were no low density areas. In 2 cases there was no progression of low density areas beyond those of the acute stage. In one case there were high density areas in the temporal lobes and parapontine cisterns bilaterally. This could correspond to the pathological findings in herpes simplex encephalitis. The improvement of CT findings (or arrest at the early stage) was noted in 2 cases in which the clinical state also improved. This might well be the effect of adenine arabinoside. The one case treated with cytosine arabinoside had extensive low density areas in CT and finally died. The importance of CT in the evaluation of adenine arabinoside therapy was stressed. (author)

  1. Cognitive outcomes following anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeon, Gemma L; Robinson, Gail A; Ryan, Alexander E; Blum, Stefan; Gillis, David; Finke, Carsten; Scott, James G

    2018-04-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is an immune-mediated neurological disorder that (among other severe neuropsychiatric symptoms) affects cognition. This study aimed to summarize current knowledge regarding the rates, nature, and predictors of neuropsychological dysfunction in patients recovering from anti-NMDAR encephalitis. A systematic review of studies describing neuropsychological outcomes following anti-NMDAR encephalitis was conducted. Electronic databases Medline, PsycINFO, EMBASE, and CINAHL were searched from inception to September 2016. Results were summarized using descriptive statistics and a series of chi-square analyses. Of 4030 identified studies, 44 were included. These reported neuropsychological outcomes for 109 treated patients (83.5% female, M age  = 22.5 years, range = 2-67) recovering from anti-NMDAR encephalitis. High rates of neuropsychological dysfunction were identified, with diverse impairments of variable severity documented in >75% of patients at assessments conducted during acute, subacute, and longer term recovery periods. Despite this, cognitive outcomes were ultimately considered favorable in most cases (74.3%). This estimate does not account for the potential impact of relapses. The frequency of impairments in overall intellectual functioning, language, attention, working memory, and visuospatial functions were significantly higher within the acute recovery period than in later phases of convalescence. However, rates of impaired processing speed, episodic memory, and aspects of executive functioning were consistent across time points. Adverse neuropsychological outcomes occurred at significantly higher frequency in patients where immunotherapy was delayed, χ 2 (1, N = 66) = 10.84, p anti-NMDAR encephalitis, although improvement in cognitive outcomes can be expected as patients recover. Some cognitive deficits may be less likely than others to resolve. Close neuropsychological monitoring is warranted

  2. Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis with associated hypothalamitis mimicking a hyperdense hypothalamic tumor: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bataduwaarachchi, Vipula R.; Tissera, Nirmali

    2016-01-01

    Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis is an uncommon association of common malignancies such as small cell lung carcinoma, testicular teratoma, and breast carcinoma. The nonspecific nature of the clinical presentation, lack of freely available diagnostic markers, and requirement for advanced imaging techniques pose a great challenge in the diagnosis of this disease in resource-poor settings. A 64-year-old previously healthy Sri Lankan man was admitted to the general medical unit with subacute memory impairment regarding recent events that had occurred during the previous 3 weeks. Initial noncontrast computed tomography of the brain revealed a hyperdensity in the hypothalamic region surrounded by hypodensities extending toward the bilateral temporal lobes; these findings were consistent with a possible hypothalamic tumor with perilesional edema. The patient later developed cranial diabetes insipidus, which was further suggestive of hypothalamic disease. Interestingly, gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed no such lesions; instead, it showed prominent T2-weighted signals in the inner mesial region, characteristic of encephalitis. The possibility of tuberculosis and viral encephalitis was excluded based on cerebrospinal fluid analysis results. Limbic encephalitis with predominant hypothalamitis was suspected based on the radiological pattern. Subsequent screening for underlying malignancy revealed a mass lesion in the right hilum on chest radiographs. Histological examination of the lesion showed small cell lung cancer of the “oat cell” variety. We suggest that the initial appearance of a hyperdensity in the hypothalamus region on noncontrast computed tomography is probably due to hyperemia caused by hypothalamitis. If hypothalamitis is predominant in a patient with paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis, magnetic resonance imaging will help to differentiate it from a hypothalamic secondary deposit. Limbic encephalitis should be considered in

  3. [Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis associated with ovarian teratoma: Description of a case and anesthetic implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteche Andrés, M A; Zugasti Echarte, O; de Carlos Errea, J; Pérez Rodríguez, M; Leyún Pérez de Zabalza, R; Azcona Calahorra, M A

    2015-10-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis is an autoimmune encephalitis relationated or not with a neoplasm. Although its incidence is unknown, probably remains underdiagnosed. Epidemiological studies place it as the second cause of immune-mediated encephalitis and the first in patients aged less of 30 years. It shows neuropsychiatric symptoms and autonomic instability. After diagnosis, based on the detection of antibodies in serum or cerebrospinal fluid, an occult malignancy must be investigated. While increasing number of cases have been diagnosed and the important role of this receptor in general anesthesia mechanisms, the interaction of the disease with anesthetic agents and perioperative stress is unknown. We describe the case of a patient with encephalitis associated to ovarian teratoma that underwent gynaecological laparoscopy. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical features of limbic encephalitis with LGI1 antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang ML

    2017-06-01

    patients improved. Conclusion: LGI1 LE is an autoimmune encephalitis whose clinical manifestations are memory deterioration, FBDS, epileptic seizure, mental disorders, and hyponatremia. Brain MRI shows that this autoimmune disease mainly involves the mediotemporal lobe and the hippocampus. This condition can also be manifested with other autoimmune encephalitis cases but can be rarely associated with tumors. After patients with LGI1 LE receive gamma globulin and hormone treatments, their clinical prognosis is good. Keywords: positive LGI1, limbic encephalitis, epilepsy, FBDS, immunotherapy

  5. Anti-N-Methyl-d-Aspartate Receptor Encephalitis in a Patient with Alcoholism: A Rare Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yangyang; Wang, Qiuling; Liu, Chuanxin; Wu, Yili

    2017-01-01

    Anti- N -methyl-d-aspartate receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis, the most common type of autoimmune encephalitis, is characterized by autoantibodies against NMDA receptor. Patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis also present with various non-specific symptoms, such as flu-like symptoms, neurological, and psychiatric manifestations. Here, we first reported a rare case of anti-NMDAR encephalitis in a 36-year-old male alcohol abuser. The patient presented with acute psychiatric symptoms with no abnormality in neuroimage examination and laboratory test results. Alcoholism was proposed as the most likely diagnosis. However, stopping alcohol drinking and symptomatic treatment were not effective, and 12 days later, the disease progressed with seizures and unconsciousness. Routine analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) showed no abnormality. Importantly, anti-NMDA receptor antibodies were detected in his CSF, indicating that the patient has anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis. Consistently, γ-immunoglobulin therapy dramatically improved symptoms, which further confirmed the diagnosis. As anti-NMDAR encephalitis has no unique clinical characteristic and its psychiatric manifestations may overlap with the alcoholism-associated psychiatric symptoms, precaution should be taken to differentiate anti-NMDAR encephalitis from alcoholism in alcohol abusers.

  6. MRI in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuncay, R. [Department of Neurology, Istanbul Medical Faculty, University of Istanbul (Turkey); Akman-Demir, G. [Department of Neurology, Istanbul Medical Faculty, University of Istanbul (Turkey); Goekyigit, A. [Department of Neurology, Istanbul Medical Faculty, University of Istanbul (Turkey); Eraksoy, M. [Department of Neurology, Istanbul Medical Faculty, University of Istanbul (Turkey); Barlas, M. [Department of Neurology, Istanbul Medical Faculty, University of Istanbul (Turkey); Tolun, R. [Department of Neurology, Istanbul Medical Faculty, University of Istanbul (Turkey); Guersoy, G. [Department of Neurology, Istanbul Medical Faculty, University of Istanbul (Turkey)

    1996-10-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a progressive, slow virus infection of the brain, caused by the measles virus, attacking children and young adults. We investigated 15 patients with SSPE by MRI, with 5 normal and 10 pathological results. In the early period, lesions were in the grey matter and subcortical white matter. They were asymmetrical and had a predilection for the posterior parts of the hemispheres. Later, high-signal changes in deep white matter and severe cerebral atrophy were observed. Parenchymal lesions significantly correlated with the duration of disease. A significant relationship between MRI findings and clinical stage was observed in the 1st year of the disease. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. MRI in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuncay, R.; Akman-Demir, G.; Goekyigit, A.; Eraksoy, M.; Barlas, M.; Tolun, R.; Guersoy, G.

    1996-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a progressive, slow virus infection of the brain, caused by the measles virus, attacking children and young adults. We investigated 15 patients with SSPE by MRI, with 5 normal and 10 pathological results. In the early period, lesions were in the grey matter and subcortical white matter. They were asymmetrical and had a predilection for the posterior parts of the hemispheres. Later, high-signal changes in deep white matter and severe cerebral atrophy were observed. Parenchymal lesions significantly correlated with the duration of disease. A significant relationship between MRI findings and clinical stage was observed in the 1st year of the disease. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab

  8. AUTOIMMUNE HEPATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusri Dianne Jurnalis

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakHepatitis autoimun merupakan penyakit inflamasi hati yang berat dengan penyebab pasti yang tidak diketahui yang mengakibatkan morbiditas dan mortalitas yang tinggi. Semua usia dan jenis kelamin dapat dikenai dengan insiden tertinggi pada anak perempuan usia prepubertas, meskipun dapat didiagnosis pada usia 6 bulan. Hepatitis autoimun dapat diklasifikasikan menjadi 2 bagian berdasarkan adanya antibodi spesifik: Smooth Muscle Antibody (SMA dengan anti-actin specificity dan/atau Anti Nuclear Antibody (ANA pada tipe 1 dan Liver-Kidney Microsome antibody (LKM1 dan/atau anti-liver cytosol pada tipe 2. Gambaran histologisnya berupa “interface hepatitis”, dengan infiltrasi sel mononuklear pada saluran portal, berbagai tingkat nekrosis, dan fibrosis yang progresf. Penyakit berjalan secara kronik tetapi keadaan yang berat biasanya menjadi sirosis dan gagal hati.Tipe onset yang paling sering sama dengan hepatitis virus akut dengan gagal hati akut pada beberapa pasien; sekitar sepertiga pasien dengan onset tersembunyi dengan kelemahan dan ikterik progresif ketika 10-15% asimptomatik dan mendadak ditemukan hepatomegali dan/atau peningkatan kadar aminotransferase serum. Adanya predominasi perempuan pada kedua tipe. Pasien LKM1 positif menunjukkan keadaan lebih akut, pada usia yang lebih muda, dan biasanya dengan defisiensi Immunoglobulin A (IgA, dengan durasi gejala sebelum diagnosis, tanda klinis, riwayat penyakit autoimun pada keluarga, adanya kaitan dengan gangguan autoimun, respon pengobatan dan prognosis jangka panjang sama pada kedua tipe.Kortikosteroid yang digunakan secara tunggal atau kombinasi azathioprine merupakan terapi pilihan yang dapat menimbulkan remisi pada lebih dari 90% kasus. Strategi terapi alternatif adalah cyclosporine. Penurunan imunosupresi dikaitkan dengan tingginya relap. Transplantasi hati dianjurkan pada penyakit hati dekom-pensata yang tidak respon dengan pengobatan medis lainnya.Kata kunci : hepatitis Autoimmune

  9. Prostate cancer may trigger paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jakob Kristian; Zakharia, Elias Raja; Boysen, Anders Kindberg

    2012-01-01

    -Hu antibody test the patient was diagnosed with paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis related to prostate cancer. The patient died within 6 months. We review the literature on prostate cancer-related paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis. High-risk prostate cancer can trigger paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis...

  10. Chronic herpes simplex virus encephalitis in childhood.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leen, W.G.; Weemaes, C.M.R.; Verbeek, M.M.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.; Rotteveel, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    Although herpes simplex virus is a major cause of acute encephalitis in childhood, chronic herpes simplex virus encephalitis has only rarely been reported. This report presents a case of chronic herpes simplex virus encephalitis in a 6-year-old female. Diagnosis was based on the detection of herpes

  11. Progressive hippocampal sclerosis after viral encephalitis: Potential role of NMDA receptor antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popkirov, Stoyan; Ismail, Fatme Seval; Grönheit, Wenke; Kapauer, Monika; Wellmer, Jörg; Bien, Christian G

    2017-10-01

    Survivors of viral encephalitis can develop refractory epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis. Both the initial infectious insult and the secondary effects of recurrent seizures have been implicated in chronic disease progression. Recently, post-infectious autoimmunity, involved in acute relapses, has also been proposed as a pathomechanism for chronic disease progression. Our case series suggests a potential role of antibodies against the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) in chronic inflammatory disease beyond acute manifestations. Retrospective chart review of four patients with epilepsy, hippocampal sclerosis following viral encephalitis and NMDAR-antibodies in CSF. The four patients were female, developed hippocampal sclerosis (in 3/4 in a step-wise progression) after Herpes simplex or Varicella zoster virus encephalitis and harboured immunoglobulin G antibodies against the NMDAR in their CSF. Two patients were treated with short-term immunosuppression but did not benefit. This case series presents the first tentative evidence in support of chronic autoimmune inflammation driving disease progression after viral encephalitis beyond the known acute immune-mediated relapses. The anecdotal nature of the data does not, however, permit conclusive judgement on causality. Should our findings be replicated in larger cohorts, the treatment of post-infectious epilepsy could potentially be expanded to include immunosuppressive strategies in antibody-positive cases. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Associated Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... celiac disease are type 1 diabetes and autoimmune thyroid disease. The tendency to develop autoimmune diseases is believed ... confusion, weight loss, and coma (if left untreated). Thyroid Disease There are two common forms of autoimmune thyroid ...

  13. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cholangitis (formerly called primary biliary cirrhosis). This group of tests ...

  14. Continuous muscle activity, Morvan's syndrome and limbic encephalitis: ionic or non ionic disorders?

    OpenAIRE

    SERRATRICE, G.; SERRATRICE, J.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The early pathophysiologic study showed increasing evidence that autoimmunity is implicated in the pathogenesis of neuromyotonia. Antibodies to voltage gated potassium channel were detected in the serum of patients who had peripheral nerves hyperexcitability and also Morvan's disease or limbic encephalitis. These discoveries offered new approaches to treatments. Recently, antibodies previously attributed to VGKC recognise 2 surface antigens LGI1 and CASPR2 into the VGKC complex. Final...

  15. Limbic encephalitis with antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase presenting with brainstem symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruk Incecik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Limbic encephalitis (LE is a neurological syndrome that may present in association with cancer, infection, or as an isolate clinical condition often accompanying autoimmune disorders. LE associated with glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (anti-GAD is rare in children. Here, we characterized the clinical and laboratory features of a patient presenting with brainstem involvement with non-paraneoplastic LE associated with anti-GAD antibodies. In our patient, after plasma exchange, we determined a dramatic improvement of the neurological deficits.

  16. Vaccines for preventing Japanese encephalitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøler, Karin Linda; Samuel, Miny; Wai, Kim Lay

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vaccination is recognized as the only practical measure for preventing Japanese encephalitis. Production shortage, costs, and issues of licensure impair vaccination programmes in many affected countries. Concerns over vaccine effectiveness and safety also have a negative impact...... on acceptance and uptake. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate vaccines for preventing Japanese encephalitis in terms of effectiveness, adverse events, and immunogenicity. SEARCH STRATEGY: In March 2007, we searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2007, Issue 1......), MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, BIOSIS, and reference lists. We also attempted to contact corresponding authors and vaccine companies. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs), including cluster-RCTs, comparing Japanese encephalitis vaccines with placebo (inert agent or unrelated vaccine...

  17. Update in Endocrine Autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2008-01-01

    Context: The endocrine system is a common target in pathogenic autoimmune responses, and there has been recent progress in our understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of autoimmune endocrine diseases.

  18. CT images of infantile viral encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Tateo; Okazaki, Hitoshi; Woo, Man

    1985-01-01

    Cranial CT scanning was undertaken in 40 patients with infantile viral encephalitis seen from 1977 to 1983. According to the pathogenic viruses, abnormal CT findings were detected most frequently in cases of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE), followed by non-eruptive viral encephalitis, measles encephalitis, and rubella encephalitis in that order, which coincided well with neurological prognosis. Although CT findings lay within a normal range in cases of measles encephalitis, except a case in which cerebral ventricle was slightly dilated, the degree of consciousness disturbance was unfavorable and it persisted long. This revealed that there is no distinct correlation between the degree of consciousness disturbance and CT findings. Normal CT findings were detected in 13% of patients aged less than 5 years and 76.5% of patients aged 5 years or more. In many patients who had an attack of viral encephalitis at the age of 5 years or more, epileptic seizures occurred frequently, even though CT findings were normal. (Namekawa, K.)

  19. Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis associated with acute Toxoplasma gondii infection: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xiaotang; Zhou, Hui; Xie, Yongmei; Yu, Dan; Wang, Zhiling; Ren, Haitao

    2018-02-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis has been recognized as the most frequent autoimmune encephalitis in children. Several infectious agents have been implicated in anti-NMDA encephalitis. A previously healthy immunocompetent 9-year-old girl first presented with seizures, headaches and vomiting. Cerebrospinal fluid and brain magnetic resonance imaging were normal. After one week onset, the patient gradually developed unexplained personality and behavior changes, accompanied by fever and seizures again. Repeated CSF analysis revealed a slightly lymphocytic predominant pleocytosis and positive anti-NMDAR antibody. A variety of pathogenic examinations were negative, except for positive toxoplasma IgM and IgG. The patient was diagnoses for anti-NMDA encephalitis associated with acute acquired toxoplasma gondii infection. The patient received 10 days azithromycin for treatment of acquired toxoplasma infection. The parents refuse immunotherapy because substantial recovery from clinical symptoms. The patient was substantially recovered with residual mild agitation after therapy for acquired toxoplasma gondii infection. Two months later, the patient was completely devoid of symptoms, and the levels of serum IgM and IgG of toxoplasma gondii were decreased. Acquired toxoplasma gondii infection may trigger anti-NMDAR encephalitis in children, which has not been reported previously. Clinicians should assess the possibility of toxoplasma gondii infection when evaluating a patient with anti-NMDA encephalitis.

  20. Proton pump inhibitor-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandholdt, L H; Laurinaviciene, R; Bygum, Anette

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) has been known in the literature since 1985 and is increasingly recognized.......Drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) has been known in the literature since 1985 and is increasingly recognized....

  1. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis with bilateral inferior collicular hyperintensity on magnetic resonance imaging brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE is chronic encephalitis occurring after infection with measles virus. An 8-year-old boy presented with progressive behavioral changes, cognitive decline and myoclonic jerks, progressing to a bed bound state over 2 months. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI brain showed T2-weighted hyperintensities in the subcortical areas of the left occipital lobe and brachium of the inferior colliculus on both sides. EEG showed bilateral, synchronous periodic discharges. Serum/cerebrospinal fluid measles IgG titer was significantly positive. The overall features were suggestive of SSPE. MRI finding of bilateral inferior colliculus changes on MRI without significant involvement of other commonly involved areas suggests an uncommon/rare imaging pattern of SSPE.

  2. [Changes in the fundus in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. Apropos of 23 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochereau-Massin, I; Gaudric, A; Reinert, P; Lehoang, P; Rousselie, F; Coscas, G

    1992-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a fatal slow encephalitis. It is related to a chronic infection of the central nervous system by a defective measles virus. Among 41 patients with SSPE, 23 had ocular involvement. The ophthalmologic involvement preceded the onset of neurological signs in 4 cases, they were detected at first presentation in 9 cases, and they occurred in the course of the disease in 10 cases. The ocular involvement was bilateral in 19 cases. Various ophthalmologic features were reported: retinitis (16 eyes), macular pigment disturbances (4 eyes), optical neuritis (33 eyes), visual agnosia (1 patient). The macular lesions were typical of the disease, but at the acute stage they were liable to be confused with toxoplasmosis. This complication of measles should disappear with the systematic vaccination of 12 month old children.

  3. Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Shounak; Takahashi, Naoki; Chari, Suresh T

    2017-07-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a chronic fibroinflammatory disease of the pancreas that belongs to the spectrum of immunoglobulin G-subclass4-related diseases (IgG4-RD) and typically presents with obstructive jaundice. Idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) is a closely related but distinct disease that mimics AIP radiologically but manifests clinically most commonly as recurrent acute pancreatitis in young individuals with concurrent inflammatory bowel disease. IgG4 levels are often elevated in AIP and normal in IDCP. Histologically, lymphoplasmacytic acinar inflammation and storiform fibrosis are seen in both. In addition, the histologic hallmark of IDCP is the granulocyte epithelial lesion: intraluminal and intraepithelial neutrophils in medium-sized and small ducts with or without granulocytic acinar inflammation often associated with destruction of ductal architecture. Initial treatment of both AIP and IDCP is with oral corticosteroids for duration of 4 weeks followed by a gradual taper. Relapses are common in AIP and relatively uncommon in IDCP, a relatively rare disease for which the natural history is not well understood. For patients with relapsing AIP, treatment with immunomodulators and more recently rituximab has been recommended. Although rare instances of pancreaticobiliary malignancy has been reported in patients with AIP, overall the lifetime risk of developing pancreatic cancer does not appear to be elevated.

  4. Case report of anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis in a middle-aged woman with a long history of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Xia; Xiong, Zhenzhen; Cao, Bingrong; Chen, Juan; Li, Mingli; Li, Zhe

    2017-08-31

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is an autoimmune disease involving antibodies against the NR1 subunits of NMDARs. The disease shows variable clinical presentation, and involves new-onset acute psychotic symptoms, making it difficult to differentiate from major depressive disorder with psychotic symptoms. Potential associations between this autoimmune disorder and onset or progression of major depressive disorder remains unclear. We present a rare case of a patient who had both major depressive disorder and anti-NMDAR encephalitis and in whom the encephalitis initially went undetected. The patient had been suffering from depressive disorder for more than 6 years without any treatment, when she was hospitalized for new-onset psychotic symptoms. She was initially diagnosed only with major depressive disorder with psychotic symptoms, but antipsychotics did not alleviate symptoms and the patient's psychiatric course began to fluctuate rapidly. Anti-NR1 IgG autoantibodies were detected in cerebrospinal fluid, and the combination of immunotherapy and antipsychotics proved more effective than antipsychotics alone. The patient was then also diagnosed with anti-NMDAR encephalitis. Our case suggests that clinicians should consider anti-NMDAR encephalitis when a patient with depressive disorder shows sudden fluctuations in psychiatric symptoms. It also highlights the need for research into possible relationships between anti-NMDAR encephalitis and major depressive disorder.

  5. Reducing Vulnerability to the Threat of Japanese Encephalitis in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Outputs. Journal articles. Regional variation in pig farmer awareness and actions regarding Japanese encephalitis in Nepal : implications for public health education. Download PDF. Journal articles. Comparative spatial dynamics of Japanese encephalitis and acute encephalitis syndrome in Nepal. Download PDF ...

  6. Subacute encephalomyelitis following measles infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manchev, L.; Manchev, I.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: A 36-years-old woman was admitted in a Clinic of Neurology due to emergency presented with acute onset of altered mental status, tonic-clonic convulsions in four extremities, bladder and bowel dysfunction. This attack lasted for 2-3 minutes.The neurological investigation showed lesion of n.facialis and n.hypoglossus on the right side from central origin, right hemiparesis, positive pathologic reflex Babinski on the right side, partial sensor and motor aphasia. An analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) showed increased levels of protein - 2.15 g/l. A week before admission to the hospital the patient had been discharged from an Infectious ward, where Measles had been diagnosed.The diagnosis was verified also with the presence of specific IgM in serum. Magnetic resonance tomography: Supratentorial on the T2W and more visibly on the FLAIR images were seen relatively homogenous high signal foci, affecting the left putamen, partially the hind limb of the left internal capsule, the body of the left nucleus caudatis, as well as more diffuse changes, affecting the cortex and subcortex in the stroke area, the upper and partially the left medial temporal gyrus. On the T1W images the changes were low signal ones. Small-degree compression of the cella media of the left lateral ventricle was noted in the changes, affecting nucleus caudatus. Infratentorial: No signal changes, affecting the cerebral stem, the small brain structures, the pontocerebral angles and the internal auditory canals were observed. Conclusion: The finding corresponds to areas of demielinization, edema and gliosis with the localization described with possible infectious genesis (encephalitis)

  7. Bi-insular cortical involvement in anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegen, Harald; Uprimny, Christian; Grams, Astrid; Virgolini, Irene; Ramberger, Melanie; Beer, Ronny; Helbok, Raimund; Pfausler, Bettina; Schmutzhard, Erich

    2016-08-08

    Anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis is an immune-mediated inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system. Brain MRI is unremarkable in at least 50% of patients and highly variable in the remaining patients with signal abnormalities in different brain regions. Only scarce reports exist on other imaging modalities. A 31-year-old woman sub-acutely developed psychosis, behavioural changes, amnesia, alternating states of agitation and mutism, fever and epileptic seizures. Clinically suspected diagnosis of anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis was confirmed by the detection of anti-NMDA receptor antibodies in CSF and serum. During the acute phase, brain MRI abnormalities were found in both insular cortices and hippocampi, whereas F(18)-FDG-PET showed hypermetabolism bilaterally in insular and prefrontal cortex. After resection of the underlying ovarian teratoma and with multimodal immunotherapy the patient substantially improved reaching a modified Rankin Scale score of 2 after 3 months. At follow-up, both hippocampi were still affected on MRI, whereas insular cortex appeared normal; however, both regions showed prominent glucose hypometabolism. Here, we report bi-insular cortical abnormalities on MRI and F(18)-FDG-PET in a patient with anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis during the acute phase and after clinical improvement.

  8. Nonsuppurative encephalitis in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöniger, S; Klose, K; Werner, H; Schwarz, B-A; Müller, T; Schoon, H-A

    2012-07-01

    A 4-year-old male German Hunting Terrier presented with tremor, dyspnea, trismus, spasms of the musculature of the larynx and pharynx, and hypothermia and subsequently died despite intensive clinical care. Prior clinical signs included vomitus and diarrhea. Microscopic examination of the brain revealed a multifocal nonsuppurative brain stem encephalitis; a few intralesional neurons contained intranuclear inclusions. By immunohistochemistry, Aujeszky disease virus (Suid herpesvirus 1) antigen was detected in neurons in the brain and in ganglion cells of the trigeminal ganglia. Viral culture of brain tissue confirmed the presence of Aujeszky disease virus. Histopathologic findings in the brain with the identification of Aujeszky disease virus by immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction are consistent with Aujeszky disease virus-induced encephalitis. Sequencing revealed a 100% homology of the isolated Aujeszky disease virus with Aujeszky disease virus isolates of wild boar from Eastern Germany.

  9. Classic Peripheral Signs of Subacute Bacterial Endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yooyoung Chong

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A 50-year-old female patient with visual disturbances was referred for further evaluation of a heart murmur. Fundoscopy revealed a Roth spot in both eyes. A physical examination showed peripheral signs of infective endocarditis, including Osler nodes, Janeway lesions, and splinter hemorrhages. Our preoperative diagnosis was subacute bacterial endocarditis with severe aortic regurgitation. The patient underwent aortic valve replacement and was treated with intravenous antibiotics for 6 weeks postoperatively. The patient made a remarkable recovery and was discharged without complications. We report this case of subacute endocarditis with all 4 classic peripheral signs in a patient who presented with visual disturbance.

  10. Clinical characteristics of subacute radiation sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Benrong; Ye Genyao; Huang Shimin

    1991-01-01

    The clinical characteristics, diagnosis and differential diagnosis of subacute radiation sickness are analysed and discussed in this paper on the basis of clinical data from cases in a 137 Cs source accident in Mudanjiang and of a review of the literature. We consider that the subacute radiation sickness is a whole body disease caused by comparatively large dose of continuous or intermittent external irradiation in several weeks or months. it must be differentiated from acute radiation sickness, chronic radiation sickness, idiopathic aplastic anemia and other hematological diseases, such as paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, acute leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome

  11. Az LGI1-encephalitis hazánkban elsőként diagnosztizált esete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szőts, Mónika; Marton, Annamária; Illés, Zsolt

    2015-01-01

    with seizures and subacute history of neuropsychiatric symptoms, including psychosis and changes in memory, cognition, behaviour. Faciobrachial dystonic seizures can be observed, which are highly characteristic for LGI1 encephalitis. MRI shows medial temporal abnormalities in more than half of the cases. CSF...... evaluation is usually normal. Hyponatremia is frequently associated and may confuse the initial diagnosis. Early recognition and prompt initiation of immunotherapies are of great importance. The clinical improvements often correlate with the antibody levels. We present the case of a 64-year old man, who...... responded quickly to plasma exchange and major improvement was noted within few weeks....

  12. A patient with encephalitis associated with NMDA receptor antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansing, Lauren H; Tüzün, Erdem; Ko, Melissa W; Baccon, Jennifer; Lynch, David R; Dalmau, Josep

    2007-05-01

    A 34-year-old woman presented with headache, feverish sensation and anxiety, rapidly followed by homicidal ideation, aggressive agitation, seizures, hypoventilation, hyperthermia and prominent autonomic instability requiring intubation and sedation. She developed episodes of hypotension and bradycardia with periods of asystole lasting up to 15 seconds. Upon weaning off sedation, her eyes opened but she was unresponsive to stimuli. There was muscle rigidity, frequent facial grimacing, rhythmic abdominal contractions, kicking motions of the legs, and intermittent dystonic postures of the right arm. Routine laboratory testing, toxicology screening, studies for autoimmune and infectious etiologies, brain MRI scan, lumbar puncture, electroencephalogram, whole-body CT scan, abdominal ultrasound, paraneoplastic and voltage-gated potassium channel antibody serologies, analysis of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibodies. Paraneoplastic encephalitis associated with immature teratoma of the ovary and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibodies. Intensive care, mechanical ventilation, antiepileptics, laparotomy and left salpingo-oophorectomy, corticosteroids, plasma exchange, intravenous immunoglobulin, cyclophosphamide, physical therapy, and chemotherapy.

  13. Autoimmunity and Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzaro, Nicola; Antico, Antonio; Villalta, Danilo

    2018-01-01

    Alterations in the immune response of patients with autoimmune diseases may predispose to malignancies, and a link between chronic autoimmune gastritis and gastric cancer has been reported in many studies. Intestinal metaplasia with dysplasia of the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa and hyperplasia of chromaffin cells, which are typical features of late-stage autoimmune gastritis, are considered precursor lesions. Autoimmune gastritis has been associated with the development of two types of gastric neoplasms: intestinal type and type I gastric carcinoid. Here, we review the association of autoimmune gastritis with gastric cancer and other autoimmune features present in gastric neoplasms. PMID:29373557

  14. Autoimmunity and Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Bizzaro

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in the immune response of patients with autoimmune diseases may predispose to malignancies, and a link between chronic autoimmune gastritis and gastric cancer has been reported in many studies. Intestinal metaplasia with dysplasia of the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa and hyperplasia of chromaffin cells, which are typical features of late-stage autoimmune gastritis, are considered precursor lesions. Autoimmune gastritis has been associated with the development of two types of gastric neoplasms: intestinal type and type I gastric carcinoid. Here, we review the association of autoimmune gastritis with gastric cancer and other autoimmune features present in gastric neoplasms.

  15. CSF findings in patients with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Guan, Hong-Zhi; Ren, Hai-Tao; Wang, Wei; Hong, Zhen; Zhou, Dong

    2015-07-01

    Anti-NMDAR-encephalitis is a recently described form of autoimmune encephalitis. Here, we characterize CSF changes in Chinese patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis, and explore the relationship between CSF findings and disease outcome. The presence of NMDAR antibodies in serum or CSF samples was evaluated in patients diagnosed with encephalitis between October 1, 2010 and August 1, 2014 at the West China Hospital. All patients fulfilling our diagnostic criteria were included and CSF findings were analyzed. Patient outcome was assessed after 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24 months using the modified Rankin scale (mRS). Out of 3000 people with encephalitis screened, 43 patients were anti-NMDAR antibody positive in CSF or serum and included in this study. 62.8% of the patients identified with positive CSFs had positive serum anti-NMDAR samples, while 100% patients with positive serum had positive CSF samples. In the CSF white cell counts were elevated in 58.1% of cases; protein was increased in 18.6%; QAlb>Qlim(Alb) of the blood-CSF barrier was found in 29.3%; intrathecal immunoglobulin synthesis was detected in 17.1%, and 39.5% patients exhibited increased CSF pressures. A longer follow-up period was associated with better outcomes. There was no relationship between changes in CSF findings and outcome. The sensitivity of NMDA receptor antibody testing is higher in CSF compared to serum. Other CSF abnormalities are present in some patients with Anti-NMDAR-encephalitis, however these changes do not appear to affect prognosis. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Encephalitis: A Review and Neuropsychological Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughan, Ashlee R; Allen, Aislyn; Perna, Robert; Malkin, Mark G

    2016-01-01

    Anti-N-Methyl-d-Aspartate Receptor (NMDAR) Encephalitis is an autoimmune-mediated encephalitis, which may be associated with a tumor, which occurs when antibodies bind central NMDA receptors. Although typically diagnosed in women, approximately 20% of cases have been males. Due to the challenges with identification, imaging, and diverse symptom presentation, this syndrome is often misdiagnosed. Accurate diagnosis may provide an opportunity for introduction of disease-modifying therapies, which may alter disease trajectory. Moreover, neuropsychology has yet to fully clarify the pattern of impairments expected with this disorder. This manuscript reviews a single case study of a 42-year-old male diagnosed with NMDAR encephalitis. Neuropsychological evaluation was completed subsequent to diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation. Ongoing patient complaints, approximately six months post diagnosis, included reduced sustained attention, poor word retrieval, and daily forgetfulness. Adaptive skills were improved following rehabilitation. Direct testing revealed mildly impaired sustained attention, processing speed, oral word fluency, and executive functioning. All other cognitive domains were within estimated premorbid range, low average to average. Neuropsychological deficits were consistent with mild frontal brain dysfunction and continued recovery. This case illustrates the need for medical and psychological practitioners to understand NMDAR encephalitis, its symptom presentation, and related neuropsychological impact; particularly with the potential for misdiagnosis.

  17. Autoimmunity and Gastric Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Nicola Bizzaro; Antonio Antico; Danilo Villalta

    2018-01-01

    Alterations in the immune response of patients with autoimmune diseases may predispose to malignancies, and a link between chronic autoimmune gastritis and gastric cancer has been reported in many studies. Intestinal metaplasia with dysplasia of the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa and hyperplasia of chromaffin cells, which are typical features of late-stage autoimmune gastritis, are considered precursor lesions. Autoimmune gastritis has been associated with the development of two types of gastri...

  18. Anti-leucine rich glioma inactivated 1 protein and anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis show distinct patterns of brain glucose metabolism in 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Florian; Wilke, Florian; Raab, Peter; Tayeb, Said Ben; Boeck, Anna-Lena; Haense, Cathleen; Trebst, Corinna; Voss, Elke; Schrader, Christoph; Logemann, Frank; Ahrens, Jörg; Leffler, Andreas; Rodriguez-Raecke, Rea; Dengler, Reinhard; Geworski, Lilli; Bengel, Frank M; Berding, Georg; Stangel, Martin; Nabavi, Elham

    2014-06-20

    Pathogenic autoantibodies targeting the recently identified leucine rich glioma inactivated 1 protein and the subunit 1 of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor induce autoimmune encephalitis. A comparison of brain metabolic patterns in 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography of anti-leucine rich glioma inactivated 1 protein and anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis patients has not been performed yet and shall be helpful in differentiating these two most common forms of autoimmune encephalitis. The brain 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose uptake from whole-body positron emission tomography of six anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis patients and four patients with anti-leucine rich glioma inactivated 1 protein encephalitis admitted to Hannover Medical School between 2008 and 2012 was retrospectively analyzed and compared to matched controls. Group analysis of anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate encephalitis patients demonstrated regionally limited hypermetabolism in frontotemporal areas contrasting an extensive hypometabolism in parietal lobes, whereas the anti-leucine rich glioma inactivated 1 protein syndrome was characterized by hypermetabolism in cerebellar, basal ganglia, occipital and precentral areas and minor frontomesial hypometabolism. This retrospective 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography study provides novel evidence for distinct brain metabolic patterns in patients with anti-leucine rich glioma inactivated 1 protein and anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis.

  19. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebman, Howard A; Weitz, Ilene C

    2017-03-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is an acquired autoimmune disorder resulting in the production of antibodies directed against red blood cell antigens causing shortened erythrocyte survival. The disorders can present as a primary disorder (idiopathic) or secondary to other autoimmune disorders, malignancies, or infections. Treatment involves immune modulation with corticosteroids and other agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Meningitis and encephalitis in Poland in 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradowska-Stankiewicz, Iwona; Piotrowska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the epidemiology of meningitis and/or encephalitis in Poland in 2012. About 2 500-3 000 cases of meningitis and/or encephalitis of viral or bacterial etiology are recorded in Poland every year. Assessment of the epidemiological situation of meningitis and/or encephalitis in Poland in 2012, was based on the results of analysis of epidemiological reports sent to the NIZP-PZH by the Regional Sanitary-Epidemiological Stations published in the annual bulletin "Infectious diseases and poisonings in Poland in 2012" and "Preventive immunizations in Poland in 2012" (Czarkowski MP. et al., Warsaw, 2013, NIZP-PZH, GIS). In 2012 in Poland 3 088 cases of meningitis and/or encephalitis were recorded. More than 50% of these were viral infections. The epidemiological situation of inflammatory meningitis and encephalitis in Poland in 2012 compared to 2011 did not change significantly.

  1. Meningitis and encephalitis in Poland in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradowska-Stankiewicz, Iwona; Piotrowska, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the epidemiology of meningitis and/or encephalitis in Poland in 2013. In the last three years in Poland, about 3000 cases of meningitis and/or encephalitis of viral or bacterial etiology were recorded annually. Assessment of the epidemiological situation of meningitis and/or encephalitis in Poland in 2013, was based on the results of the analysis of epidemiological reports sent to the NIZP-PZH by the Regional Sanitary-Epidemiological Stations published in the annual bulletin "Infectious diseases and poisonings in Poland in 2013" and "Preventive immunizations in Poland in 2013". In 2013 in Poland 3,116 cases of bacterial meningitis and/or encephalitis were recorded. Almost 50% of these were viral infections. The epidemiological situation of meningitis and/or encephalitis in Poland in 2013 compared to 2012 did not change significantly.

  2. Meningitis and encephalitis in Poland in 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradowska-Stankiewicz, Iwona; Piotrowska, Anna

    The aim of this study was to assess the epidemiology of meningitis and/or encephalitis in Poland in 2014. In the last three years in Poland, about 3000 cases of meningitis and/or encephalitis of viral or bacterial etiology were recorded annually. Assessment of the epidemiological situation of meningitis and/or encephalitis in Poland in 2014, was based on the results of the analysis of epidemiological reports sent to the NIZP-PZH by the Regional Sanitary-Epidemiological Stations published in the annual bulletin “Infectious diseases and poisonings in Poland in 2014” and “Preventive immunizations in Poland in 2014”. In 2014 in Poland 3488 cases of bacterial meningitis and/or encephalitis were recorded. Almost 61.3% of these were viral infections. In 2014, in comparison to 2013, a 1.1% increase in the number of cases of meningitis and/or encephalitis was observed and 91% with viral etiology.

  3. MRI of herpes simplex encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demaerel, P.; Wilms, G.; Johannik, K.; Hecke, P. van; Baert, A.L.; Robberecht, W.; Carton, H.

    1992-01-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in eight patients with herpes simplex meningoence phalitis were reviewed: 14 examinations were analysed. The most striking finding was high signal intensity in the temporal lobe(s) with the typical configuration known from CT. Meningeal enhancement after Gd-DTPA administration was clearly seen in four patients. Haemorrhagic changes are much better seen on MRI than on CT. When adequate motion control can be achieved, MRI becomes the examination of choice in the diagnosis and follow-up of herpes simplex encephalitis. Localized 1 H MR spectroscopy also proved promising in the study of neuronal loss. (orig.)

  4. Human herpes virus-6 encephalitis causing severe anterograde amnesia associated with rituximab, azathioprine and prednisolone combination therapy for dermatomyositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumer, Thomas; Fry, Charlie; Luppe, Sebastian; Gunawardena, Harsha; Sieradzan, Kasia

    2017-06-01

    Human herpes virus-6 (HHV-6) reactivation is a well-recognised complication following haematological stem cell transplantation, but it is novel in the context of combination immunomodulatory therapy for autoimmune disease. We report a case of severe anterograde amnesia caused by HHV-6 encephalitis in a young female patient on rituximab, azathioprine and prednisolone for dermatomyositis (DM). The use of targeted biologic treatments for systemic autoimmune connective tissue diseases (CTDs) is increasing, particularly when refractory to conventional management. The anti-CD20 B cell depleting monoclonal antibody, rituximab is now increasingly used, often in combination with conventional immunomodulatory treatments, in certain autoimmune neurological conditions and systemic CTDs including DM. Physicians should be aware of the possibility of HHV-6 in those who develop encephalitis while CD20 B cell deplete, especially in the presence of additional immunomodulatory therapies. Prompt diagnosis and treatment of HHV-6 encephalitis with evidence-based anti-viral therapy may help reduce the extent of irreversible morbidity such as amnesia.

  5. Frontal infraslow activity marks the motor spasms of anti-LGI1 encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennberg, Richard; Steriade, Claude; Chen, Robert; Andrade, Danielle

    2018-01-01

    The clinical and electrographic features of seizures in anti-LGI1 encephalitis are distinct from those seen in other autoimmune encephalitides or non-encephalitic epilepsies. One electroclinical phenomenon specific to the condition consists of lateralized motor spasms, known as faciobrachial dystonic seizures (FBDS). An electrodecremental pattern overriding a "DC shift" has been described as the EEG correlate of these spasms. We sought to further characterize this pre-spasm infraslow activity (ISA). Continuous video-EEG recordings were acquired in four patients with anti-LGI1 encephalitis: each had frequent motor spasms/FBDS as well as frequent subclinical temporal lobe seizures (an independent indicator of anti-LGI1 encephalitis). In artifact-free recordings obtained using clinical amplifiers equipped with a low frequency analog filter of 0.07 Hz, ISA reliably preceded clinical onset of the motor spasms by ∼1.2 s and preceded the electrodecremental pattern by ∼700 ms. Pre-spasm ISA was invariably recorded contralateral to FBDS, with a voltage topographic maximum over the mid frontal region. The pre-movement ISA differed from the Bereitschaftspotential in timing and topography and was an order of magnitude higher in amplitude. Sporadic FBDS that occurred in association with temporal lobe seizures were preceded by identical ISA. The motor spasms of anti-LGI1 encephalitis are preceded by frontal ISA. A paucity of data at the microscale level precludes mechanistic explanations at the macroscale level, or even determination of the relative contributions of neurons and glia in the generation of the ISA. Although fundamental cellular mechanisms await elucidation, the pre-spasm ISA represents a singular and readily identifiable EEG response to this autoimmune brain disorder. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Small-cell lung cancer with voltage-gated calcium channel antibody-positive paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaira, Kyoichi; Okamura, Takashi; Takahashi, Hiroki; Horiguchi, Norio; Sunaga, Noriaki; Hisada, Takeshi; Yamada, Masanobu

    2014-04-08

    Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis is a rare neurological syndrome and clinically characterized by cognitive dysfunction, memory impairment, seizures and psychiatric symptoms. Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis is most frequently found in small-cell lung cancer, among various malignancies, and antineuronal antibodies are related to the autoimmune mechanism. We experienced a rare case of a patient with small-cell lung cancer with anti-voltage-gated calcium channel antibody-positive paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis. A 61-year-old Japanese man with a history of smoking cigarettes presented with seizure, confusion and personality change in acute onset. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed high signal intensity on T2-weighted image in his right temporal lobe, suggestive of limbic encephalitis. A mediastinoscopy of the lymph node revealed small-cell lung carcinoma, and he was staged as having limited stage disease. Antibodies against P/Q-type and N-type voltage-gated calcium channel were positive and Hu antibody was negative. He was started on chemotherapy of carboplatin plus etoposide with concurrent thoracic radiotherapy. Neurological symptoms were gradually improved after systemic chemotherapy. We should be alert to the potential of malignant neoplasms associated with paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis when we examine a patient with cancer with neurological disorders such as personality change, disorientation, unconsciousness and memory loss. A clinical marker such as voltage-gated calcium channel antibody may help our diagnosis in clinical practice.

  7. Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis presenting with acute psychosis in a preteenage girl: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggina Paraskevi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (anti-NMDAR encephalitis is a rare, newly defined autoimmune clinical entity that presents with atypical clinical manifestations. Most patients with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis develop a progressive illness from psychosis into a state of unresponsiveness, with catatonic features often associated with abnormal movements and autonomic instability. This is the first report of anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis in a Greek pediatric hospital. Case presentation An 11-year-old Greek girl presented with clinical manifestations of acute psychosis. The differential diagnosis included viral encephalitis. The presence of a tumor usually an ovarian teratoma, a common clinical finding in many patients, was excluded. Early diagnosis and prompt immunotherapy resulted in full recovery up to one year after the initial diagnosis. Conclusion Acute psychosis is a rare psychiatric presentation in children, diagnosed only after possible organic syndromes that mimic acute psychosis are excluded, including anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor receptor encephalitis. Pediatricians, neurologists and psychiatrists should consider this rare clinical syndrome, in order to make an early diagnosis and instigate appropriate treatment to maximize neurological recovery.

  8. Sirolimus for Autoimmune Disease of Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-02

    Autoimmune Pancytopenia; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS); Evans Syndrome; Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune; Autoimmune Neutropenia; Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic; Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Rheumatoid Arthritis

  9. Ultrasonographic Characteristics of Subacute Granulomatous Thyroiditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sun Young [Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Min Jung; Oh, Ki Keun; Hong, Soon Won; Park, Cheong Soo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung Moon [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-12-15

    We wanted to describe the characteristic ultrasonography (US) features and clinical findings for making the diagnosis of subacute granulomatous thyroiditis. A total of 31 lesions from 27 patients were confirmed as subacute granulomatous thyroiditis by US-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy. We analyzed the ultrasonographic findings such as the lesion's size, margin and shape, the discrepancy between length and breadth and the vascularity. The clinical findings such as acute neck pain or fever were reviewed. The follow-up clinical and ultrasonographic data were reviewed for 15 patients. The thyroid gland was found to be enlarged in five patients, it was normal size in 20 patients and it was smaller in two patients. All the lesions had focally ill-defined hypoechogenicity. Hypervascularity was not noted in any of the lesions. Painful neck swelling was present in 18 patients. An accompanying fever was documented in nine of the 18 patients. Twelve patients showed disappearance (n = 3) or a decreased size (n = 9) of their lesions on follow-up US. The presence of ill-defined hypoechoic thyroid lesions without a discrete round or oval shape is characteristic for subacute granulomatous thyroiditis, and particularly when this is associated with painful neck swelling and/or fever.

  10. Ultrasonographic Characteristics of Subacute Granulomatous Thyroiditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sun Young; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Min Jung; Oh, Ki Keun; Hong, Soon Won; Park, Cheong Soo; Kim, Byung Moon

    2006-01-01

    We wanted to describe the characteristic ultrasonography (US) features and clinical findings for making the diagnosis of subacute granulomatous thyroiditis. A total of 31 lesions from 27 patients were confirmed as subacute granulomatous thyroiditis by US-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy. We analyzed the ultrasonographic findings such as the lesion's size, margin and shape, the discrepancy between length and breadth and the vascularity. The clinical findings such as acute neck pain or fever were reviewed. The follow-up clinical and ultrasonographic data were reviewed for 15 patients. The thyroid gland was found to be enlarged in five patients, it was normal size in 20 patients and it was smaller in two patients. All the lesions had focally ill-defined hypoechogenicity. Hypervascularity was not noted in any of the lesions. Painful neck swelling was present in 18 patients. An accompanying fever was documented in nine of the 18 patients. Twelve patients showed disappearance (n = 3) or a decreased size (n = 9) of their lesions on follow-up US. The presence of ill-defined hypoechoic thyroid lesions without a discrete round or oval shape is characteristic for subacute granulomatous thyroiditis, and particularly when this is associated with painful neck swelling and/or fever

  11. Galectin-3 in autoimmunity and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Felipe L; Gatto, Mariele; Bassi, Nicola; Luisetto, Roberto; Ghirardello, Anna; Punzi, Leonardo; Doria, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    Galectin-3 (gal-3) is a β-galactoside-binding lectin, which regulates cell-cell and extracellular interactions during self/non-self-antigen recognition and cellular activation, proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis. It plays a significant role in cellular and tissue pathophysiology by organizing niches that drive inflammation and immune responses. Gal-3 has some therapeutic potential in several diseases, including chronic inflammatory disorders, cancer and autoimmune diseases. Gal-3 exerts a broad spectrum of functions which differs according to its intra- or extracellular localization. Recombinant gal-3 strategy has been used to identify potential mode of action of gal-3; however, exogenous gal-3 may not reproduce the functions of the endogenous gal-3. Notably, gal-3 induces monocyte-macrophage differentiation, interferes with dendritic cell fate decision, regulates apoptosis on T lymphocytes and inhibits B-lymphocyte differentiation into immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells. Considering the influence of these cell populations in the pathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases, gal-3 seems to play a role in development of autoimmunity. Gal-3 has been suggested as a potential therapeutic agent in patients affected with some autoimmune disorders. However, the precise role of gal-3 in driving the inflammatory process in autoimmune or immune-mediated disorders remains elusive. Here, we reviewed the involvement of gal-3 in cellular and tissue events during autoimmune and immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. © 2015 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  12. Multiple Complications Due to Subacute Suppurative Otitis Media

    OpenAIRE

    Qirjazi, Brikena; Bardhyli, Dolores; Hoxhallari, Xhevair

    2014-01-01

    Subacute otitis media is a well-known pathology of ENT practice which is easily diagnosed and subsequently treated in the outpatient clinic. The rate of complications in acute otitis media is lower than in chronic otitis media. We present here the history of a young patient with subacute otitis media who developed both localized labyrinthitis and facial palsy requiring surgical treatment. We conclude that the treatment of subacute otitis media should be carefully monitored because complicatio...

  13. Radionuclide imaging in herpes simplex encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlin, C.A.; Robinson, R.G.; Hinthorn, D.R.; Liu, C.

    1978-01-01

    Eight patients with herpes simplex encephalitis among the 10 cases diagnosed at the University of Kansas Medical Center from 1966 to 1976 were studied with /sup 99m/Tc early in their diagnostic work-up. The images were unilaterally positive in the temporal lobe area in all 8 patients. Radionuclide studies can suggest herpes simplex as the specific etiology in cases of encephalitis and can also indicate the best site for brain biopsy to confirm the diagnosis by fluorescent antibody techniques. Appropriate antiviral therapy should be instituted as soon as possible to alter the course of this destructive form of viral encephalitis

  14. Imaging of limbic para-neoplastic encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimmelin, A.; Sellat, F.; Morand, G.; Quoix, E.; Clouet, P.L.; Dietemann, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    Para-neoplastic limbic encephalitis is a rare syndrome mostly associated with small cell lung cancer. We present the case of a 69-year-old man with selective amnesia suggesting limbic encephalitis. A neuroendocrine cell lung cancer was found, confirming the diagnostics of para-neoplastic limbic encephalitis. Contrast-enhanced cerebral CT was normal whether magnetic resonance imaging showed signal abnormalities of the medial part of temporal lobes and hippocampal regions. Because neurologic improvement may follow treatment of the primary tumor, early diagnosis is important. (authors)

  15. Natural course of LGI1 encephalitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szots, Monika; Marton, Annamaria; Kover, Ferenc

    2014-01-01

    , respectively, and none of the patients received immunotherapy. LE showed characteristics of LGI1 encephalitis in both cases, including low sodium content in the sera; disorientation, hallucination, short-term memory loss; and epileptic seizures. One patient had faciobrachial tonic seizures. MRI indicated....... Follow-up brain MRI indicated early hippocampal sclerosis and global brain atrophy in one case characterized by more pronounced cognitive deficit. Memory and verbal fluency were affected most during the natural course of LGI1 encephalitis. LGI1 encephalitis had a monophasic course and spontaneously...

  16. Acute measles encephalitis in partially vaccinated adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Fox

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of acute measles encephalitis (AME is poorly understood. Treatment with immune-modulators is based on theories that post-infectious autoimmune responses cause demyelination. The clinical course and immunological parameters of AME were examined during an outbreak in Vietnam.Fifteen measles IgM-positive patients with confusion or Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS score below 13, and thirteen with uncomplicated measles were enrolled from 2008-2010. Standardized clinical exams were performed and blood collected for lymphocyte and measles- and auto-antibody analysis. The median age of AME patients was 21 years, similar to controls. Eleven reported receiving measles vaccination when aged one year. Confusion developed a median of 4 days after rash. Six patients had GCS <8 and four required mechanical ventilation. CSF showed pleocytosis (64% and proteinorrhachia (71% but measles virus RNA was not detected. MRI revealed bilateral lesions in the cerebellum and brain stem in some patients. Most received dexamethasone +/- IVIG within 4 days of admission but symptoms persisted for ≥3 weeks in five. The concentration of voltage gated calcium channel-complex-reactive antibodies was 900 pM in one patient, and declined to 609 pM ∼ 3 months later. Measles-reactive IgG antibody avidity was high in AME patients born after vaccine coverage exceeded 50% (∼ 25 years earlier. AME patients had low CD4 (218/µl, p = 0.029 and CD8 (200/µl, p = 0.012 T-cell counts compared to controls.Young adults presenting with AME in Vietnam reported a history of one prior measles immunization, and those aged <25 years had high measles-reactive IgG avidity indicative of prior vaccination. This suggests that one-dose measles immunization is not sufficient to prevent AME in young adults and reinforces the importance of maintaining high coverage with a two-dose measles immunization schedule. Treatment with corticosteroids and IVIG is common practice, and should be

  17. Encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases, ... Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. ...

  18. Encephalopathy Associated With Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    li A. Raouf

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs are immune-endocrine disorders affecting the thyroid gland and, eventually, also a number of other systemic targets, including the brain and the nervous system. Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD is a rare, heterogeneous condition arising from the background of an ATD. It is characterised by neurological and/or psychiatric symptoms with acute or sub-acute onset, and virtually any neurological or psychiatric symptom can appear. However, EAATD often presents with confusion, altered consciousness, seizures, or myoclonus. The majority of cases are associated with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, but a number of patients with Graves’ disease have also been described. EAATD is likely an immune-mediated disorder. Its exact prevalence has not been precisely elucidated, with an increasing number of cases reported in the last few years. Most EAATD patients respond in a dramatic manner to corticosteroids. However, the immunosuppressive treatment may require a long course (up to 12 months. The increasing number of EAATD cases reported in the literature demonstrates a growing interest of the scientific community about this condition, which still requires a better definition of its pathophysiology, the diagnostic criteria, and the most appropriate management, including the long-term follow-up of patients. The current clinical evidence about EAATD is mostly based on the report of single cases or small cohort studies. In this review, we present the current knowledge about EAATD, with a dedicated focus to the clinical management of the patients from a diagnostic and therapeutic perspective.

  19. Antithyroideaantistof hos to patienter med subakut dementiel udvikling, ataksi og myoklonus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondziella, Daniel; Hansen, Klaus; Gonzalez, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Hashimoto encephalitis (HE) is a steroid-responsive autoimmune encephalitis with anti-thyroid antibodies; Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a prion disease. Both disorders can have a similar clinical presentation. Two women, 67 and 63 year-old, with subacute dementia, ataxia, myoclonus and posit......Hashimoto encephalitis (HE) is a steroid-responsive autoimmune encephalitis with anti-thyroid antibodies; Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a prion disease. Both disorders can have a similar clinical presentation. Two women, 67 and 63 year-old, with subacute dementia, ataxia, myoclonus...

  20. Bistability in autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas; Mosekilde, Erik; Lund, Ole

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases damage host tissue, which, in turn, may trigger a stronger immune response. Systems characterized by such positive feedback loops can display co-existing stable steady states. In a mathematical model of autoimmune disease, one steady state may correspond to the healthy state...... and another to an autoimmune steady state characterized by widespread tissue damage and immune activation. We show how a triggering event may move the system from the healthy to the autoimmune state and how transient immunosuppressive treatment can move the system back to the healthy state....

  1. Emergency Neurologic Life Support: Meningitis and Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaieski, David F; Nathan, Barnett R; O'Brien, Nicole F

    2015-12-01

    Bacterial meningitis and viral encephalitis, particularly herpes simplex encephalitis, are severe neurological infections that, if not treated promptly and effectively, lead to poor neurological outcome or death. Because treatment is more effective if given early, the topic of meningitis and encephalitis was chosen as an Emergency Neurological Life Support protocol. This protocol provides a practical approach to recognition and urgent treatment of bacterial meningitis and encephalitis. Appropriate imaging, spinal fluid analysis, and early empiric treatment is discussed. Though uncommon in its full form, the typical clinical triad of headache, fever, and neck stiffness should alert the clinical practitioner to the possibility of a central nervous system infection. Early attention to the airway and maintaining normotension is crucial in treatment of these patients, as is rapid treatment with anti-infectives and, in some cases, corticosteroids.

  2. Relevance of Neuroinflammation and Encephalitis in Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet eKern

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, many studies indicate that children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD diagnosis have brain pathology suggestive of ongoing neuroinflammation or encephalitis in different regions of their brains. Evidence of neuroinflammation or encephalitis in ASD includes: microglial and astrocytic activation, a unique and elevated proinflammatory profile of cytokines, and aberrant expression of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells. A conservative estimate based on the research suggests that at least 69% of individuals with an ASD diagnosis have microglial activation or neuroinflammation. Encephalitis, which is defined as inflammation of the brain, is medical diagnosis code G04.90 in the International Classification of Disease, 10th revision; however, children with an ASD diagnosis are not generally assessed for a possible medical diagnosis of encephalitis. This is unfortunate because if a child with ASD has neuroinflammation, then treating the underlying brain inflammation could lead to improved outcomes. The purpose of this review of the literature is to examine the evidence of neuroinflammation/encephalitis in those with an ASD diagnosis and to address how a medical diagnosis of encephalitis, when appropriate, could benefit these children by driving more immediate and targeted treatments.

  3. Pilomotor seizures: an autonomic semiology of limbic encephalitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocamora, Rodrigo; Becerra, Juan L; Fossas, Pilar; Gomez, María; Vivanco-Hidalgo, Rosa M; Mauri, José A; Molins, Albert

    2014-09-01

    Ictal piloerection is an infrequent seizure semiology that is commonly overlooked as an ictal epileptic manifestation. Piloerection is considered to be principally caused by temporal lobe activity although frontal and hypothalamic seizure origins have been reported. The described etiology has shown a wide variety of structural causes such as mesial temporal sclerosis, tumors, posttraumatic, cavernomas and cryptogenic epilepsies. We retrospectively reviewed the incidence of ictal piloerection in the clinical records of patients who underwent video-EEG monitoring (VEEGM) between 2007 and 2013 in a multicenter cooperative study. All patients presented refractory epilepsies and were evaluated with a protocol that included brain MRI, neuropsychology and VEEGM. A total of 766 patients were evaluated in four tertiary centers in Spain. Five patients showed piloerection as principal seizure semiology (prevalence 0.65%). The mean age at seizure onset was 39.6 years and the average epilepsy duration was 5.2 years (range 2-14) before diagnosis. Four patients were additionally examined with FDG-PET and/or SPECT-SISCOM. All presented temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), three right-sided and two left-sided. A typical unilateral hippocampal sclerosis was described in 3 cases. The etiology detected in all cases was limbic encephalitis. Three had LGI1, one anti-Hu, and another Ma2 antibodies. Our series describes a so far not well-recognized autoimmune association of pilomotor seizures to limbic encephalitis. This etiology should be ruled out through a comprehensive diagnostic work-up even in cases of long-lasting TLE with typical hippocampal atrophy on MRI. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. "Light switch" mental status changes and irritable insomnia are two particularly salient features of anti-NMDA receptor antibody encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSena, Allen D; Greenberg, Benjamin M; Graves, Donna

    2014-07-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate antibody encephalitis is becoming increasingly recognized as a cause of acute and subacute encephalopathy in both adults and children. The typical features of this disorder include some degree of encephalopathy, seizures, and often a movement disorder component. However, there is wide variability in its presentation, and diagnosis based on clinical features alone is often delayed. We report a series of four of 12 patients observed at our children's hospital between 2011 and 2013 that we chose as particularly representative examples of two distinct clinical features. In these individuals with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibody encephalitis, we note a very rapid on-off state between responsiveness and nonresponsiveness and/or insomnia accompanied by extreme irritability. We describe the abrupt mental status shift as "light switch" because the patients can awaken in seconds from a completely nonresponsive state. The insomnia noted in our patients was also impressive and often present early in the patients' courses. Light switch mental status changes and irritable insomnia are important early features of anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibody encephalitis that can signal the presence of this disorder. The exact pathophysiology of these two symptoms has not been fully elucidated, and we feel that presence of one or both of these symptoms early in the disease course should prompt immediate concern for this disorder. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... List Common Thread Women & Autoimmunity Diagnosis Tips Coping Tools Support Groups Education Modules Caregivers Patient/Caregiver Relationship The Male Caregiver AD Knowledge Base Autoimmune Disease List Common ...

  6. Autoimmune Neurology of the Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, W Oliver; Pittock, Sean J

    2017-06-01

    This article reviews the rapidly evolving spectrum of autoimmune neurologic disorders with a focus on those that involve the central nervous system, providing an understanding of how to approach the diagnostic workup of patients presenting with central nervous system symptoms or signs that could be immune mediated, either paraneoplastic or idiopathic, to guide therapeutic decision making. The past decade has seen a dramatic increase in the discovery of novel neural antibodies and their targets. Many commercial laboratories can now test for these antibodies, which serve as diagnostic markers of diverse neurologic disorders that occur on an autoimmune basis. Some are highly specific for certain cancer types, and the neural antibody profiles may help direct the physician's cancer search. The diagnosis of an autoimmune neurologic disorder is aided by the detection of an objective neurologic deficit (usually subacute in onset with a fluctuating course), the presence of a neural autoantibody, and improvement in the neurologic status after a course of immunotherapy. Neural autoantibodies should raise concern for a paraneoplastic etiology and may inform a targeted oncologic evaluation (eg, N-methyl-D-aspartate [NMDA] receptor antibodies are associated with teratoma, antineuronal nuclear antibody type 1 [ANNA-1, or anti-Hu] are associated with small cell lung cancer). MRI, EEG, functional imaging, videotaped evaluations, and neuropsychological evaluations provide objective evidence of neurologic dysfunction by which the success of immunotherapy may be measured. Most treatment information emanates from retrospective case series and expert opinion. Nonetheless, early intervention may allow reversal of deficits in many patients and prevention of future disability.

  7. THE AUTOIMMUNE ECOLOGY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Manuel eAnaya

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (ADs represent a heterogeneous group of disorders that affect specific target organs or multiple organ systems. These conditions share common immunopathogenic mechanisms (i.e., the autoimmune tautology, which explain the clinical similarities they have among them as well as their familial clustering (i.e., coaggregation. As part of the autoimmune tautology, the influence of environmental exposure on the risk of developing ADs is paramount (i.e., the autoimmune ecology. In fact, environment, more than genetics, shapes immune system. Autoimmune ecology is akin to exposome, that is all the exposures - internal and external - across the lifespan, interacting with hereditary factors (both genetics and epigenetics to favor or protect against autoimmunity and its outcomes. Herein we provide an overview of the autoimmune ecology, focusing on the immune response to environmental agents in general, and microbiota, cigarette smoking, alcohol and coffee consumption, socioeconomic status, gender and sex hormones, vitamin D, organic solvents and vaccines in particular. Inclusion of the autoimmune ecology in disease etiology and health will improve the way personalized medicine is currently conceived and applied.

  8. Update in endocrine autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark S

    2008-10-01

    The endocrine system is a common target in pathogenic autoimmune responses, and there has been recent progress in our understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of autoimmune endocrine diseases. Rapid progress has recently been made in our understanding of the genetic factors involved in endocrine autoimmune diseases. Studies on monogenic autoimmune diseases that include endocrine phenotypes like autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 and immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked have helped reveal the role of key regulators in the maintenance of immune tolerance. Highly powered genetic studies have found and confirmed many new genes outside of the established role of the human leukocyte antigen locus with these diseases, and indicate an essential role of immune response pathways in these diseases. Progress has also been made in identifying new autoantigens and the development of new animal models for the study of endocrine autoimmunity. Finally, although hormone replacement therapy is still likely to be a mainstay of treatment in these disorders, there are new agents being tested for potentially treating and reversing the underlying autoimmune process. Although autoimmune endocrine disorders are complex in etiology, these recent advances should help contribute to improved outcomes for patients with, or at risk for, these disorders.

  9. Intrinsic properties of the knee extensor muscles after subacute stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horstman, A.M.H.; Gerrits, K.H.L.; Beltman, M.J.; Koppe, P.A.; Janssen, T.W.J.; de Haan, A.

    2010-01-01

    Horstman AM, Gerrits KH, Beltman MJ, Koppe PA, Janssen, TW, de Haan A. Intrinsic properties of the knee extensor muscles after subacute stroke. Objective: To characterize muscle properties of paretic lower-limb (PL) and nonparetic lower-limb (NL) knee extensors in patients with subacute stroke.

  10. Subacute thyroiditis in Western Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qari, Faiza A.; Maimani, Abdulroaf A.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the clinical presentation of 23 patients with subacute thyroiditis (SAT) and the diagnostic value of radionuclear scan. This is a cohort study, which consists of 23 patients with a suspected diagnosis of subacute thyroiditis. The study was carried out in the Endocrinology Clinic, King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between July 2002 and July 2004. Medical charts including age, gender, clinical presentation, systemic symptoms and clinical examination of the thyroid gland were reviewed. Laboratory data included white blood count and its differential count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), thyroid function test and thyroid antibodies. The radionuclear scan results were also noted. The mode of therapy provided to patients and the outcome of the treatment during a follow up period of 2 years was reported. Twenty-three adult patients with subacute thyroiditis (15 females and 8 males with a female to male ratio of 1.9:1) were reviewed over a 2-year period. The mean age was 35.8+9.2 years. Eighteen patients (78%) had an upper respiratory tract infection at the initial clinical presentation. Twenty patients (87%) visited an Ear, Nose and Throat specialist for sore throat and abnormal sensation in the throat at least 2 weeks before presentation to the endocrinologist. Two patients were admitted to a medical unit with a diagnosis of fever of unknown origin for 4 weeks. All patients had an elevated free thyroxine (35.7+19.8 pmol/L) and suppressed thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) (0.043+0.065IU). The radionuclear scan showed either no uptake at all in 12 patients or minimal uptake in 11 patients (0.32+0.55%). Eight patients (35%) received prednisolone therapy alone with an average dose of 30-40 mg daily for 7-8 days; 7 patients (30%) were treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) only. Eight (35%) patients were treated with both NSAIDs and corticosteroids. Hypothyroidism, with elevated

  11. Subacute toxicity assessment of annatto in rat

    OpenAIRE

    Bautista, Ana Rita Pedreira Lapa; Moreira, E. L. T.; Batista, Márcio Santos; Miranda, M. S.; Gomes, I. C. S.

    2004-01-01

    Texto completo:acesso restrito. p. 625-629 Increased human use of annatto (Bixa orellana L), a red yellow food colorant, demands generation of toxicity data. The toxic effects of annatto powder (bixin 27%) have been assessed following administration of a subacute regimen (4 weeks, 20 doses) in Wistar male and female rats. A full study with three dose levels was considered unnecessary since no sign of toxicity had been noted in a preliminary experiment with 1000 mg/kg body weight/day as ...

  12. Paraneoplastic and non-paraneoplastic autoimmunity to neurons in the central nervous system

    OpenAIRE

    Melzer, Nico; Meuth, Sven G.; Wiendl, Heinz

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune central nervous system (CNS) inflammation occurs both in a paraneoplastic and non-paraneoplastic context. In a widening spectrum of clinical disorders, the underlying adaptive (auto) immune response targets neurons with a divergent role for cellular and humoral disease mechanisms: (1) in encephalitis associated with antibodies to intracellular neuronal antigens, neuronal antigen-specific CD8+ T cells seemingly account for irreversible progressive neuronal cell death and neurologica...

  13. Putaminal involvement in Rasmussen encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajesh, Bhagavatheeswaran; Ashalatha, Radhakrishnan [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Department of Neurology, Trivandrum, Kerala (India); Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan; Thomas, Bejoy [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Department of Imaging Sciences and Interventional Radiology, Trivandrum, Kerala (India)

    2006-08-15

    Rasmussen encephalitis (RE) is a rare devastating disease of childhood causing progressive neurological deficits and intractable seizures, typically affecting one hemisphere. Characteristic MRI features include progressive unihemispheric focal cortical atrophy and grey- or white-matter high-signal changes and basal ganglion involvement, particularly of the caudate nucleus. To analyse the pattern of involvement of different brain structures in a series of patients with RE and to attempt clinical correlation. We reviewed the medical records and neuroimaging data of 12 patients diagnosed with RE satisfying the European Consensus Statement diagnostic criteria. The disease manifested as seizures in all patients and was refractory; epilepsia partialis continua was a notable feature (nine patients). Hemiparesis of varying grades was noted in all but one patient; none had extrapyramidal signs. Neuroimaging showed cortical involvement in the insular/periinsular regions in 11 patients. Caudate atrophy was noted in ten patients. Putaminal atrophy was seen in nine patients, six of whom had additional hyperintense signal changes. Our study highlights frequent putaminal atrophy and signal changes in RE, which suggests a more extensive basal ganglion involvement than emphasized previously. Recognition of putaminal changes may be a useful additional tool in the radiological diagnosis of RE. (orig.)

  14. Rare case of acute dengue encephalitis with correlated MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathew, Rishi Philip; Basti, Ram Shenoy; Hegde, Pavan; Devdas, Jaidev M.; Khan, Habeeb Ullah; Bukelo, Mario Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Dengue encephalitis is extremely rare, with most patients showing no significant abnormality on neuroimaging (CT/MRI). We report one of the very few documented cases of dengue encephalitis, with abnormal signal intensities on all major sequences on brain MRI.

  15. Psoriasis and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sticherling, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Psoriasis is one of the most common chronic inflammatory human skin diseases. Though clinically well characterized, the exact etiological and pathogenic mechanisms are still not known in detail. Current knowledge indicates distinct overlap to other inflammatory as well as autoimmune disorders. However, the one or more relevant autoantigens could not be characterized so-far. On the other side, several autoimmune diseases were shown to be associated with psoriasis. In addition, serological autoimmune phenomena, namely diverse circulating specific autoantibodies could be demonstrated in the past. A matter of current debate is if psoriasis is a primary autoimmune disease or secondarily evolving into autoimmunity as seen in other chronic inflammatory diseases. Related to this aspect is the concept of autoinflammation versus autoimmunity where psoriasis shares mechanisms of both entities. Though T-cells remain among the most important cellular players in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and current therapeutic strategies successfully target these cells or their products irrespective of these concepts, autoimmunity if relevant will add to the treatment armamentarium by using protective and prophylactic antigen-specific modalities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Case Report: Encephalitis, with Brainstem Involvement, Following Checkpoint Inhibitor Therapy in Metastatic Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossart, Simon; Thurneysen, Selina; Rushing, Elisabeth; Frontzek, Karl; Leske, Henning; Mihic-Probst, Daniela; Nagel, Hannes W; Mangana, Johanna; Goldinger, Simone M; Dummer, Reinhard

    2017-06-01

    Checkpoint inhibitors are increasingly being used in the treatment of malignant melanoma and other cancers. With the use of such therapies, autoimmune-mediated adverse events in the central and peripheral nervous system are likely to occur more frequently. We report a unique case of brainstem encephalitis with a sudden lethal outcome following ipilimumab and pembrolizumab therapy in a patient with malignant melanoma. The autopsy showed a diffuse nodular activation of microglia in the whole encephalon with prominent intraparenchymal and perivascular lymphocytic infiltration of the brainstem. Non-infectious brainstem encephalitis is a well-recognized subset of paraneoplastic encephalitis. Brainstem involvement is usually accompanied by a wide spectrum of signs and symptoms, which were not observed in this case. The timing of the clinical symptoms as well as the histopathological findings suggest an autoimmune-adverse event of ipilimumab and pembrolizumab administration rather than a paraneoplastic disorder. In the presence of neurological symptoms, immediate cessation of the immunotherapy and immunosuppressive therapy may lead to successful therapeutic intervention, as described in previous reports. Therefore, it is crucial that physicians are aware of the possible side effects of immunotherapies on the nervous system. Metastatic melanoma patients treated with the anti-CTLA-4 inhibitor ipilimumab have a high utilization of various types of health care services, such as inpatient hospital stays or doctor visits. There are differences across countries regarding patterns of health care utilization and economic burden of the disease. Health care services are used more frequently after patients experience progression of their disease. The study highlights that better therapies leading to durable response in patients with metastatic melanoma have the potential to decrease health care costs and patient burden in terms of hospitalizations and other health care services.

  17. Low serum vitamin D levels and anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor encephalitis: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Yaqing; Su, Qingmei; Liao, Siyuan; Lu, Tingting; Li, Rui; Sun, Xiaobo; Qiu, Wei; Yang, Yu; Hu, Xueqiang; Lu, Zhengqi

    2017-01-01

    Low vitamin D levels are associated with autoimmunity, but the relationship with anti-N-Methyl-d-aspartate receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis is unknown. 25(OH) D levels and clinical and cerebrospinal fluid parameters were evaluated in 30 patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis and compared with 90 age-, sex-, and season-matched healthy controls. 25(OH)D levels were lower in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis compared to controls (43.89 ± 17.91 vs 64.24 ± 24.38 nmol/L, p  30 years, p = 0.002), severe impairment (mRS ≥ 5) (vs mRS D levels were associated with age (r = 0.393, p = 0.032), and mRS (r = -0.417, p = 0.022). Our data showed that serum 25(OH)D levels were reduced in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Dietary quality and encephalization in platyrrhine primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Kari L.; Kay, Richard F.

    2012-01-01

    The high energetic costs of building and maintaining large brains are thought to constrain encephalization. The ‘expensive-tissue hypothesis’ (ETH) proposes that primates (especially humans) overcame this constraint through reduction of another metabolically expensive tissue, the gastrointestinal tract. Small guts characterize animals specializing on easily digestible diets. Thus, the hypothesis may be tested via the relationship between brain size and diet quality. Platyrrhine primates present an interesting test case, as they are more variably encephalized than other extant primate clades (excluding Hominoidea). We find a high degree of phylogenetic signal in the data for diet quality, endocranial volume and body size. Controlling for phylogenetic effects, we find no significant correlation between relative diet quality and relative endocranial volume. Thus, diet quality fails to account for differences in platyrrhine encephalization. One taxon, in particular, Brachyteles, violates predictions made by ETH in having a large brain and low-quality diet. Dietary reconstructions of stem platyrrhines further indicate that a relatively high-quality diet was probably in place prior to increases in encephalization. Therefore, it is unlikely that a shift in diet quality was a primary constraint release for encephalization in platyrrhines and, by extrapolation, humans. PMID:21831898

  19. Atypical presentation of anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggio, Maria Cristina; Mastrangelo, Greta; Skabar, Aldo; Ventura, Alessandro; Carrozzi, Marco; Santangelo, Giuseppe; Vanadia, Francesca; Corsello, Giovanni; Cimaz, Rolando

    2017-08-16

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis is a rare autoimmune disease characterized by severe neurological and psychiatric symptoms and a difficult diagnosis. The disease is often secondary to a neoplastic lesion, seldom diagnosed years later. Psychiatric symptoms are prevalent in adults; neurologic symptoms are more evident in children, who typically present primarily with neurological symptoms. To the best of our knowledge, the association with juvenile idiopathic arthritis has not been described. We report the cases of two caucasian girls with an atypical presentation. The first patient was an 8-year-old girl with normal psychomotor development. Over a 4-month period she developed behavioral problems, speech impairment, and deterioration in academic skills. Within 8 months from the onset of symptoms, choreic movements gradually appeared. Hematological, neuroradiological, and neurophysiological examinations were negative; however, her symptoms worsened and treatment with prednisone was started. Although her choreic movements improved within 1 month, her neuropsychological and behavioral symptoms continued. Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid and in blood were detected. Therapy with intravenously administered immunoglobulins was administered, without improvement of symptoms. After 2 months of steroid treatment, she suddenly started to pronounce some words with a progressive improvement in language and behavior. The second patient was a 14-year-old girl with classic anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis, treated successfully with intravenously administered immunoglobulins and methylprednisolone, followed by orally administered prednisone, who developed chronic arthritis of the hip. The arthritis was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging and associated to antinuclear antigen antibody positivity. One year after the encephalitis presentation, an ovarian cystic mass was identified as a teratoma. The surgical resection

  20. Stress proteins, autoimmunity, and autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfield, J B; Jarjour, W N

    1991-01-01

    At birth, the immune system is biased toward recognition of microbial antigens in order to protect the host from infection. Recent data suggest that an important initial line of defense in this regard involves autologous stress proteins, especially conserved peptides of hsp60, which are presented to T cells bearing gamma delta receptors by relatively nonpolymorphic class lb molecules. Natural antibodies may represent a parallel B cell mechanism. Through an evolving process of "physiological" autoreactivity and selection by immunodominant stress proteins common to all prokaryotes, B and T cell repertoires expand during life to meet the continuing challenge of infection. Because stress proteins of bacteria are homologous with stress proteins of the host, there exists in genetically susceptible individuals a constant risk of autoimmune disease due to failure of mechanisms for self-nonself discrimination. That stress proteins actually play a role in autoimmune processes is supported by a growing body of evidence which, collectively, suggests that autoreactivity in chronic inflammatory arthritis involves, at least initially, gamma delta cells which recognize epitopes of the stress protein hsp60. Alternate mechanisms for T cell stimulation by stress proteins undoubtedly also exist, e.g., molecular mimicry of the DR beta third hypervariable region susceptibility locus for rheumatoid arthritis by a DnaJ stress protein epitope in gram-negative bacteria. While there still is confusion with respect to the most relevant stress protein epitopes, a central role for stress proteins in the etiology of arthritis appears likely. Furthermore, insight derived from the work thus far in adjuvant-induced arthritis already is stimulating analyses of related phenomena in autoimmune diseases other than those involving joints. Only limited data are available in the area of humoral autoimmunity to stress proteins. Autoantibodies to a number of stress proteins have been identified in SLE and

  1. A Practical Approach to Meningitis and Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richie, Megan B; Josephson, S Andrew

    2015-12-01

    Meningitis is an inflammatory syndrome involving the meninges that classically manifests with headache and nuchal rigidity and is diagnosed by cerebrospinal fluid examination. In contrast, encephalitis refers to inflammation of the brain parenchyma itself and often results in focal neurologic deficits or seizures. In this article, the authors review the differential diagnosis of meningitis and encephalitis, with an emphasis on infectious etiologies. The recommended practical clinical approach focuses on early high-yield diagnostic testing and empiric antimicrobial administration, given the high morbidity associated with these diseases and the time-sensitive nature of treatment initiation. If the initial workup does not yield a diagnosis, further etiology-specific testing based upon risk factors and clinical characteristics should be pursued. Effective treatment is available for many causes of meningitis and encephalitis, and when possible should address both the primary disease process as well as potential complications. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  2. Vaccines, adjuvants and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Luísa Eça; Baker, Britain; Perricone, Carlo; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-10-01

    Vaccines and autoimmunity are linked fields. Vaccine efficacy is based on whether host immune response against an antigen can elicit a memory T-cell response over time. Although the described side effects thus far have been mostly transient and acute, vaccines are able to elicit the immune system towards an autoimmune reaction. The diagnosis of a definite autoimmune disease and the occurrence of fatal outcome post-vaccination have been less frequently reported. Since vaccines are given to previously healthy hosts, who may have never developed the disease had they not been immunized, adverse events should be carefully accessed and evaluated even if they represent a limited number of occurrences. In this review of the literature, there is evidence of vaccine-induced autoimmunity and adjuvant-induced autoimmunity in both experimental models as well as human patients. Adjuvants and infectious agents may exert their immune-enhancing effects through various functional activities, encompassed by the adjuvant effect. These mechanisms are shared by different conditions triggered by adjuvants leading to the autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA syndrome). In conclusion, there are several case reports of autoimmune diseases following vaccines, however, due to the limited number of cases, the different classifications of symptoms and the long latency period of the diseases, every attempt for an epidemiological study has so far failed to deliver a connection. Despite this, efforts to unveil the connection between the triggering of the immune system by adjuvants and the development of autoimmune conditions should be undertaken. Vaccinomics is a field that may bring to light novel customized, personalized treatment approaches in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Anti-NMDA (a-NMDAR) receptor encephalitis related to acute consumption of metamphetamine: Relevance of differential diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriondo, O; Zaldibar-Gerrikagoitia, J; Rodríguez, T; García, J M; Aguilera, L

    2017-03-01

    A 19-year-old male came to the Emergency Room of our hospital due to an episode of dystonic movements and disorientation 4 days after consuming methamphetamine, which evolved to a catatonic frank syndrome and eventually to status epilepticus. Definitive diagnosis was anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis, an acute inflammation of the limbic area of autoimmune origin in which early diagnosis and treatment are key elements for the final outcome. In this case, initial normal tests and previous methamphetamine poisoning delayed diagnosis, because inhaled-methamphetamine poisoning causes similar clinical symptoms to anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis. Methamphetamine poisoning may have caused an immune response in the patient, bringing on the progress of the pathology. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis: a common cause of encephalitis in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueping; Li, Jin-Mei; Liu, Fan; Wang, Qiong; Zhou, Dong; Lai, Xiaohui

    2016-12-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis (anti-NMDAR encephalitis) is the most common type of immune-mediated encephalitis. This study aimed to assess the incidence and mortality of anti-NMDAR encephalitis in intensive care unit (ICU) to evaluate the clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, managements and outcomes, and to compare these characteristics with patients with non-anti-NMDAR encephalitis admitted to ICU. Patients admitted to the neurological ICU with suspected encephalitis were included between January 1, 2012 and July 31, 2015. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of enrolled patients was screened for anti-NMDAR antibodies using a cell-based assay. 72 critically ill patients with encephalitis of uncertain etiology were investigated, and 16 patients were positive for anti-NMDAR antibodies in CSF. Compared to patients with non-anti-NMDAR encephalitis, patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis were younger, more likely to present with the psychiatric symptoms, dyskinesia, and autonomic dysfunction, and had longer ICU stays. The abnormal movements were so difficult to control that complicated the management. The outcome was favorable in ten patients 1 year after the disease onset, and the mortality was as high as 25 % overall. The incidence of anti-NMDAR encephalitis is high among critically ill patients with encephalitis of uncertain etiology. Controlling dyskinesia proved to be a challenge. Persistent dysautonomias were additional difficult to manage confounders. Same points being highlighted in this study may aid clinicians in the management of patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis in intensive care practice.

  5. Mycotic encephalitis: predilection for grey matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knaap, M.S. van der (Dept. of Child Neurology, Free Univ. Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)); Valk, J. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Free Univ. Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)); Jansen, G.H. (Dept. of Pathology, Subdivision of Neuropathology, Univ. Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands)); Kapelle, L.J. (Dept. of Neurology, Univ. Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands)); Nieuwenhuizen, O. van (Dept. of Child Neurology, Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands))

    1993-10-01

    In mycotic infections of the brain three patterns of abnormality may be observed: meningitis, granuloma, and encephalitis. The first two, consisting of diffuse meningeal enhancement and mass lesion respectively, can easily be visualised by CT or MRI, but are nonspecific. The third pattern has been described histopathologically; as the clinical picture is nonspecific and the diagnosis is often unsuspected, especially in immunocompetent patients, acquaintance with the characteristic CT and MRI patterns of mycotic encephalitis may help in establishing the correct diagnosis, with important therapeutic consequences. (orig.)

  6. Eosinophils in Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diny, Nicola L; Rose, Noel R; Čiháková, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional granulocytes that contribute to initiation and modulation of inflammation. Their role in asthma and parasitic infections has long been recognized. Growing evidence now reveals a role for eosinophils in autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize the function of eosinophils in inflammatory bowel diseases, neuromyelitis optica, bullous pemphigoid, autoimmune myocarditis, primary biliary cirrhosis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and other autoimmune diseases. Clinical studies, eosinophil-targeted therapies, and experimental models have contributed to our understanding of the regulation and function of eosinophils in these diseases. By examining the role of eosinophils in autoimmune diseases of different organs, we can identify common pathogenic mechanisms. These include degranulation of cytotoxic granule proteins, induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, release of proteases degrading extracellular matrix, immune modulation through cytokines, antigen presentation, and prothrombotic functions. The association of eosinophilic diseases with autoimmune diseases is also examined, showing a possible increase in autoimmune diseases in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis, hypereosinophilic syndrome, and non-allergic asthma. Finally, we summarize key future research needs.

  7. Prolactin and Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vânia Vieira Borba

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The great asymmetry of autoimmune diseases between genders represents one of the most enigmatic observations among the mosaic of autoimmunity. Sex hormones are believed to play a crucial role on this dimorphism. The higher prevalence of autoimmunity among women at childbearing ages, disease onset/relapses during pregnancy, and post-partum are some of the arguments that support this hypothesis. Certainly, motherhood represents one of the most remarkable challenges for the immune system, which not only has to allow for the conceptus, but also has to deal with complex endocrine alterations. Hormonal homeostasis is known to exert a crucial influence in achieving a competent and healthy immune system. Prolactin (PRL has a bioactive function acting as a hormone and a cytokine. It interferes with immune system modulation, mainly inhibiting the negative selection of autoreactive B lymphocytes. Likewise, hyperprolactinemia has been described in relation to the pathogenesis and activity of several autoimmune disorders. Dopamine is an effective inhibitor of PRL secretion due to either a direct influence on the hypophysis or stimulation of postsynaptic dopamine receptors in the hypothalamus, arousing the release of the PRL inhibitory factor. Hence, dopamine agonists have proven to offer clinical benefits among autoimmune patients and represent a promising therapy to be explored. In this review, we attempt to provide a critical overview of the link between PRL, autoimmune diseases, and motherhood.

  8. Eosinophils in Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Čiháková

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophils are multifunctional granulocytes that contribute to initiation and modulation of inflammation. Their role in asthma and parasitic infections has long been recognized. Growing evidence now reveals a role for eosinophils in autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize the function of eosinophils in inflammatory bowel diseases, neuromyelitis optica, bullous pemphigoid, autoimmune myocarditis, primary biliary cirrhosis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and other autoimmune diseases. Clinical studies, eosinophil-targeted therapies, and experimental models have contributed to our understanding of the regulation and function of eosinophils in these diseases. By examining the role of eosinophils in autoimmune diseases of different organs, we can identify common pathogenic mechanisms. These include degranulation of cytotoxic granule proteins, induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, release of proteases degrading extracellular matrix, immune modulation through cytokines, antigen presentation, and prothrombotic functions. The association of eosinophilic diseases with autoimmune diseases is also examined, showing a possible increase in autoimmune diseases in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis, hypereosinophilic syndrome, and non-allergic asthma. Finally, we summarize key future research needs.

  9. Subacute bacterial endocarditis due to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, J; Robinson, F; Dasco, C; Gentry, L O

    1983-01-01

    Sixteen documented cases of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans endocarditis have been reported in the past 15 years. The characteristic granular growth and the fastidious nature and slow-growing character of this organism decrease the yield of positive blood cultures. Two recently observed cases of subacute endocarditis due to Actinobacillus are reported, one in a patient who required surgical intervention for complications of his disease and the other case associated with an aortic prosthetic valve. The first patient had late embolic complications which are commonly seen with Actinobacillus endocarditis. A review of the literature; including a synoptic table with clinical failures, treatment, and outcome is presented. Unless special care is taken to isolate these slow growing organisms, these cases will be misclassified as culture negative endocarditis.

  10. [Update on transmissible spongiform subacute encephalopathies (TSSE)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugère-Picoux, Jeanne; Adjou, Karim; Brugère, Henri

    2005-02-01

    This update concerns human and ruminant transmissible spongiform subacute encephalopathies (TSSE). The latest data on variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease confirm that new cases are less frequent than feared some years ago, but subclinical carriers could be a source of iatrogenic infection. The macaque is a good model of human oral transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). The latest data on BSE in Europe confirm the effectiveness of precautionary measures taken in 1996 and 2000. Concerns in other ruminants include a chronic wasting disease of Cervidae in North America, the discovery of a BSE-like agent associated with natural scrapie in a French goat, maternal transmission of natural scrapie in sheep, with an exceptionally short incubation period (6.5 months), and doubts over the efficacy of genetic selection for combating ovine scrapie (atypical cases in " resistant " sheep, especially with the scrapie strain Nor 98 in Europe). These data demonstrate the value of active European surveillance of scrapie in small ruminants.

  11. Subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus presenting as poikiloderma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hughes, R

    2012-02-01

    Subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) is a recognised variant of lupus erythematosus (LE), which accounts for 10-15% of all cases of cutaneous LE, occurring most commonly in young to middle-aged white women. Diagnosis is based on the detection of anti-Ro\\/SS-A antibodies in the skin and serum, characteristic clinical and histological cutaneous involvement, and relatively mild systemic involvement. Several unusual variants of SCLE have been reported including erythrodermic SCLE, SCLE with vitiligo-like lesions, acral SCLE and bullous SCLE. Poikoilodermatous SCLE is a recognised but rare variant of SCLE. There are currently only two case reports, comprising five individual cases, in the literature. We present a case of SCLE in which the main clinical findings were an extensive photodistributed poikilodermatous rash and alopecia.

  12. Subacute transverse myelitis with Lyme profile dissociation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajjan, Mohammed

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Transverse myelitis is a very rare neurologic syndrome with an incidence per year of 1-5 per million population. We are presenting an interesting case of subacute transverse myelitis with its MRI (magnetic resonance imaging and CSF (cerebrospinal fluid findings. Case: A 46-year-old African-American woman presented with decreased sensation in the lower extremities which started three weeks ago when she had a 36-hour episode of sore throat. She reported numbness up to the level just below the breasts. Lyme disease antibodies total IgG (immunoglobulin G and IgM (immunoglobulin M in the blood was positive. Antinuclear antibody profile was within normal limits. MRI of the cervical spine showed swelling in the lower cervical cord with contrast enhancement. Cerebrospinal fluid was clear with negative Borrelia Burgdorferi IgG and IgM. Herpes simplex, mycoplasma, coxiella, anaplasma, cryptococcus and hepatitis B were all negative. No oligoclonal bands were detected. Quick improvement ensued after she was given IV Ceftriaxone for 7 days. The patient was discharged on the 8th day in stable condition. She continued on doxycycline for 21 days. Conclusions: Transverse myelitis should be included in the differential diagnosis of any patient presenting with acute or subacute myelopathy in association with localized contrast enhancement in the spinal cord especially if flu-like prodromal symptoms were reported. Lyme disease serology is indicated in patients with neurological symptoms keeping in mind that dissociation in Lyme antibody titers between the blood and the CSF is possible.

  13. Hematoma epidural subagudo Subacute epidural hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvei González Orlandi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el caso de un paciente con hematoma epidural subagudo, temporoparietal derecho, secundario a una agresión física. En el cuadro clínico, a las 24 h, predominó la cefalea de intensidad moderada, con somnolencia y agitación psicomotora ligera. Las radiografías simples de cráneo no mostraron alteraciones. Los síntomas se mantuvieron a pesar del tratamiento médico, por lo que se realizó una tomografía axial simple de cráneo que mostró la presencia de un hematoma epidural subagudo temporoparietal derecho, con desplazamiento de estructuras de la línea media. Se realizó una craneotomía temporoparietal derecha para la evacuación del hematoma posterior. El paciente evolucionó satisfactoriamente y se recuperó por completo, tanto clínica como imaginológicamente.This is the case of a patient presenting with right temporoparietal subacute hematoma secondary to a physical act of aggression. In clinical picture at 24 hours there was predominance of headache of moderate intensity with drowsiness and slight psychomotor restlessness. The skull single radiographies didn't show alterations. Symptoms remained despite the medical treatment, thus a single skull axial tomography was carried out showing the presence of a right temporoparietal subacute epidural hematoma with displacement from the middle line structures. A right temporoparietal craniotomy was carried out to evacuation of the posterior hematoma. Patient evolved satisfactorily with a total recovery as much clinical as imaging.

  14. Fulminant course in a patient with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis with bilateral ovarian teratomas: A case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kuo-Wei; Liou, Li-Min; Wu, Meng-Ni

    2018-04-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis is an autoimmune disorder that can be controlled and reversed by immunotherapy. The presentation of NMDA receptor encephalitis varies, but NMDA receptor encephalitis is seldom reported in patients with both bilateral teratomas and preexisting brain injury. A 28-year-old female with a history of traumatic intracranial hemorrhage presented acute psychosis, seizure, involuntary movement, and conscious disturbance with a fulminant course. Anti-NMDA receptor antibody was identified in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid, confirming the diagnosis of anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis. Bilateral teratomas were also identified during tumor survey. DIAGNOSES:: anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis. Tumor resection and immunotherapy were performed early during the course. The patient responded well to tumor resection and immunotherapy. Compared with other reports in the literature, her symptoms rapidly improved without further relapse. This case report demonstrates that bilateral teratomas may be related to high anybody titers and that the preexisting head injury may be responsible for lowering the threshold of neurological deficits. Early diagnosis and therapy are crucial for a good prognosis in such patients.

  15. Long-term poor rapport, lack of spontaneity and passive social withdrawal related to acute post-infectious encephalitis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Atsurou; Miyachi, Nobuhiro; Miura, Toshiyasu; Suzuki, Masako; Watanabe, Norio; Akechi, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Post-infectious encephalitis/encephalopathy is a neurological syndrome that sometimes develops following common viral or bacterial infections. The most common form is acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM). ADEM is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system that typically presents as a monophasic disorder associated with multifocal neurologic symptoms and encephalitis. Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis is another type of severe autoimmune disorder, characterized by seizures, movement disorders and psychiatric symptoms. In general, the prognosis and long-term outcomes of both ADEM and anti-NMDAR encephalitis are favorable. Most patients show complete, albeit slow recovery over a period of one to 2 years. There are few reports of patients with these disorders showing long-term residual psychiatric symptoms. We report the case of a 16-year-old Japanese male who suffered from acute post-infectious encephalitis. The patient followed an atypical recovery course, in that he showed poor rapport, lack of spontaneity and passive social withdrawal for more than 2 years after the initial symptoms. While treatment with small doses of antipsychotic drugs at the hospital had no effect on the symptoms, the patient recovered gradually over a prolonged period of five or so years. This case report suggests that a type of acute post-infectious encephalitis with demyelinating features, possibly ADEM or anti-NMDAR encephalitis, or an overlap between the two, can cause a prodrome of behavioral changes and long-term residual psychiatric symptoms for many months, although it is eventually associated with a good prognosis.

  16. Subacute cannabinoid treatment: anticonvulsant activity and withdrawal excitability in mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Karler, R.; Turkanis, S. A.

    1980-01-01

    1 The effects of subacute treatment with cannabidiol, delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC), phenytoin and phenobarbitone on anticonvulsant activity and on withdrawal excitability in mice were compared in three electrically induced seizure-threshold tests. 2 In the maximal electroshock-threshold test, subacute treatment did not alter the anticonvulsant activity of cannabidiol, phenytoin or phenobarbitone, but tolerance developed to delta 9-THC. 3 In the 60 Hz electroshock-threshold test,...

  17. Japanese encephalitis virus: from genome to infectome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Unni, S. K.; Růžek, Daniel; Chhatbar, C.; Mishra, R.; Johri, M. K.; Singh, S. K.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 4 (2011), 312-321 ISSN 1286-4579 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Japanese encephalitis * Neurotropic infection * Neuropathogenesis * Mosquito borne infections * Arboviral infections Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.101, year: 2011

  18. Joint determination of biological encephalization, economic specialization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horan, R.D.; Shogren, J.F.; Bulte, E.H.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a paleoeconomic model of the co-evolution of economic specialization and encephalization-the common physiological measure of intelligence as reflected by brain mass relative to total body mass. Our economic analysis links ecological and social intelligence theories of

  19. Genotype V Japanese Encephalitis Virus Is Emerging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming-Hua; Fu, Shi-Hong; Chen, Wei-Xin; Wang, Huan-Yu; Guo, Yu-Hong; Liu, Qi-Yong; Li, Yi-Xing; Luo, Hui-Ming; Da, Wa; Duo Ji, Dun Zhu; Ye, Xiu-Min; Liang, Guo-Dong

    2011-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a global public health issue that has spread widely to more than 20 countries in Asia and has extended its geographic range to the south Pacific region including Australia. JE has become the most important cause of viral encephalitis in the world. Japanese encephalitis viruses (JEV) are divided into five genotypes, based on the nucleotide sequence of the envelope (E) gene. The Muar strain, isolated from patient in Malaya in 1952, is the sole example of genotype V JEV. Here, the XZ0934 strain of JEV was isolated from Culex tritaeniorhynchus, collected in China. The complete nucleotide and amino acid sequence of XZ0934 strain have been determined. The nucleotide divergence ranged from 20.3% to 21.4% and amino acid divergence ranged from 8.4% to 10.0% when compared with the 62 known JEV isolates that belong to genotype I–IV. It reveals low similarity between XZ0934 and genotype I–IV JEVs. Phylogenetic analysis using both complete genome and structural gene nucleotide sequences demonstrates that XZ0934 belongs to genotype V. This, in turn, suggests that genotype V JEV is emerging in JEV endemic areas. Thus, increased surveillance and diagnosis of viral encephalitis caused by genotype V JEV is an issue of great concern to nations in which JEV is endemic. PMID:21750744

  20. Tick-borne encephalitis virus, Kyrgyzstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Benjamin J; Atkinson, Barry; Czechowski, Donna M; Larsen, Peter A; Meeks, Heather N; Carrera, Juan P; Duplechin, Ryan M; Hewson, Roger; Junushov, Asankadyr T; Gavrilova, Olga N; Breininger, Irena; Phillips, Carleton J; Baker, Robert J; Hay, John

    2011-05-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) is an emerging pathogen in Europe and Asia. We investigated TBEV in Kyrgyzstan by collecting small mammals and ticks from diverse localities and analyzing them for evidence of TBEV infection. We found TBEV circulating in Kyrgyzstan much farther south and at higher altitudes than previously reported.

  1. Intracerebral hematoma complicating herpes simplex encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Sainz, Aida; Escalza-Cortina, Inés; Guio-Carrión, Laura; Matute-Nieves, Alexandra; Gómez-Beldarrain, Marian; Carbayo-Lozano, Guillermo; Garcia-Monco, Juan Carlos

    2013-10-01

    To describe two patients who developed an intracranial hematoma as a complication of temporal lobe encephalitis due to herpes simplex type 1 virus, and to review the literature. The first patient, a 45-year-old woman developed a brain hematoma in the location of the encephalitic lesion on day 9 after the onset of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) that required surgical evacuation. The second patient, a 53-year-old woman was being treated for HSE; on day 8 after admission a temporal lobe hematoma with midline shift was disclosed due to persistent headache. Both patients survived but were left with sequelae. We conducted a PubMed/MEDLINE search from 1986 to April 2013 on this topic. We have found 20 additional cases reported in the literature and review their characteristics. Hemorrhage was present on admission in 35% of pooled patients, and consistently involved the area of encephalitis. Clinical presentation of intracranial hemorrhage overlapped the encephalitic symptoms in two-thirds of the patients. Half of patients underwent surgery. Overall, mortality rate was low (5.2%), and half of patients fully recovered. Intracranial bleeding, although infrequent, can complicate the evolution of herpes simplex encephalitis and should be borne in mind since its presence may require neurosurgery. Although its presentation may overlap the encephalitic features, the lack of improvement or the worsening of initial symptoms, particularly during the second week of admission, should lead to this suspicion and to perform a neuroimaging study. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Can Herpes Simplex Virus Encephalitis Cause Aphasia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naude, H.; Pretorius, E.

    2003-01-01

    Aphasia implies the loss or impairment of language caused by brain damage. The key to understanding the nature of aphasic symptoms is the neuro-anatomical site of brain damage, and not the causative agent. However, because "Herpes simplex" virus (HSV) encephalitis infection usually affects the frontal and temporal lobes, subcortical…

  3. [Viral encephalitis virus, a new bioterrorist menace].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigaudeau, Sophie; Micol, Romain; Bricaire, François; Bossi, Philippe

    2005-01-29

    Often responsible for little known infections, today viral encephalitis viruses appear as a new bioterrorist menace, because of their easy production and their great pathogenic potential. Spraying is the best way to permit the rapid diffusion of certain encephalitis viruses. Diagnosis of viral encephalitis, predominating in tropical surroundings, is difficult. In the majority of cases, symptoms differ little from those of common flu. With supplementary examinations, the biological abnormalities are usually non-specific. There are no characteristic images on scans or MRI. Identification of the virus in the nasopharynx, blood or cerebrospinal fluid, in serology, PCR or RT-PCR permits confirmation of the virus. Treatment is essentially symptomatic and relies on appropriate reanimation measures. Ribavirin can be indicated in some cases such as the Rift Valley fever, but is formally contraindicated in West Nile encephalitis. The aim of terrorist groups who would use this type of weapon is more to provoke panic and disorganisation than to kill as many people as possible.

  4. Autoimmune gastritis: Pathologist's viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coati, Irene; Fassan, Matteo; Farinati, Fabio; Graham, David Y; Genta, Robert M; Rugge, Massimo

    2015-11-14

    Western countries are seeing a constant decline in the incidence of Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis, coupled with a rising epidemiological and clinical impact of autoimmune gastritis. This latter gastropathy is due to autoimmune aggression targeting parietal cells through a complex interaction of auto-antibodies against the parietal cell proton pump and intrinsic factor, and sensitized T cells. Given the specific target of this aggression, autoimmune gastritis is typically restricted to the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa. In advanced cases, the oxyntic epithelia are replaced by atrophic (and metaplastic) mucosa, creating the phenotypic background in which both gastric neuroendocrine tumors and (intestinal-type) adenocarcinomas may develop. Despite improvements in our understanding of the phenotypic changes or cascades occurring in this autoimmune setting, no reliable biomarkers are available for identifying patients at higher risk of developing a gastric neoplasm. The standardization of autoimmune gastritis histology reports and classifications in diagnostic practice is a prerequisite for implementing definitive secondary prevention strategies based on multidisciplinary diagnostic approaches integrating endoscopy, serology, histology and molecular profiling.

  5. Nutrition, geoepidemiology, and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmi, Carlo; Tsuneyama, Koichi

    2010-03-01

    As well represented by the impaired immune function of malnourished individuals encountered in developing countries and the incidence of specific diseases following local nutrient deficiencies, nutrition and immunity have been linked to each other for centuries while the specific connection between dietary factors and autoimmunity onset or modulation is a more recent acquisition. Autoimmune diseases manifest limited prevalence rates in developing countries while numerous immunity-related claims have been proposed in the field of functional foods. Nevertheless, over the past years multiple lines of evidence have supported a major role for specific dietary factors (including vitamin D, vitamin A, selenium, zinc, omega-3 fatty acids, probiotics, and flavanols) in determining the immune responses involved in infections, allergies, and autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, the link between nutrition and autoimmunity may well contribute to the geoepidemiology observed for numerous conditions. In general terms, most data that will be discussed herein were obtained in experimental or animal models while human data from real-life clinical settings or randomized clinical trials remain largely unsatisfactory. Our current knowledge on the beneficial impact of nutrition on autoimmunity prompts us to encourage the search for evidence-based nutrition to support the everyday diet choices of patients. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. [Autoimmune thyroid disease and other non-endocrine autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilas, Ljiljana Todorović; Icin, Tijana; Paro, Jovanka Novaković; Bajkin, Ivana

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are chronic conditions initiated by the loss of immunological tolerance to self-antigens. They constitute heterogeneous group of disorders, in which multiple alterations in the immune system result in a spectrum of syndromes that either target specific organs or affect the body systematically. Recent epidemiological studies have shown a possible shift of one autoimmune disease to another or the fact that more than one autoimmune disease may coexist in a single patient or in the same family. Numerous autoimmune diseases have been shown to coexist frequently with thyroid autoimmune diseases. AUTOIMMNUNE THYROID DISEASE AND OTHER ORGAN SPECIFIC NON-ENDOCRINE AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES: This part of the study reviews the prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease coexisting with: pernicious anaemia, vitiligo, celiac disease, autoimmune liver disease, miastenia gravis, alopecia areata and sclerosis multiplex, and several recommendations for screening have been given. AUTOIMMUNE THYROID DISEASE AND OTHER ORGAN NON-SPECIFIC NON-ENDOCRINE AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES: Special attention is given to the correlation between autoimmune thyroid disease and rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, syndrome Sjögren, systemic sclerosis and mixed connective tissue disease. Screening for autoimmune thyroid diseases should be recommended in everyday clinical practice, in patients with primary organ-specific or organ non-specific autoimmune disease. Otherwise, in patients with primary thyroid autoimmune disease, there is no good reason of seeking for all other autoimmune diseases, although these patients have a greater risk of developing other autoimmune disease. Economic aspects of medicine require further analyzing of these data, from cost/benefit point of view to justified either mandatory screening or medical practitioner judgment.

  7. Antithyroideaantistof hos to patienter med subakut dementiel udvikling, ataksi og myoklonus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondziella, Daniel; Hansen, Klaus; Gonzalez, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Hashimoto encephalitis (HE) is a steroid-responsive autoimmune encephalitis with anti-thyroid antibodies; Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a prion disease. Both disorders can have a similar clinical presentation. Two women, 67 and 63 year-old, with subacute dementia, ataxia, myoclonus...

  8. Epigenetics and Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero-Ronderos, Paula; Montoya-Ortiz, Gladis

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetics is defined as the study of all inheritable and potentially reversible changes in genome function that do not alter the nucleotide sequence within the DNA. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone modification, nucleosome positioning, and microRNAs (miRNAs) are essential to carry out key functions in the regulation of gene expression. Therefore, the epigenetic mechanisms are a window to understanding the possible mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of complex diseases such as autoimmune diseases. It is noteworthy that autoimmune diseases do not have the same epidemiology, pathology, or symptoms but do have a common origin that can be explained by the sharing of immunogenetic mechanisms. Currently, epigenetic research is looking for disruption in one or more epigenetic mechanisms to provide new insights into autoimmune diseases. The identification of cell-specific targets of epigenetic deregulation will serve us as clinical markers for diagnosis, disease progression, and therapy approaches. PMID:22536485

  9. Headache in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Seby; Hajj-Ali, Rula A

    2014-03-01

    Autoimmune diseases are a group of heterogeneous inflammatory disorders characterized by systemic or localized inflammation, leading to ischemia and tissue destruction. These include disorders like systemic lupus erythematosus and related diseases, systemic vasculitides, and central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis (primary or secondary). Headache is a very common manifestation of CNS involvement of these diseases. Although headache characteristics can be unspecific and often non-diagnostic, it is important to recognize because headache can be the first manifestation of CNS involvement. Prompt recognition and treatment is necessary not only to treat the headache, but also to help prevent serious neurological sequelae that frequently accompany autoimmune diseases. In this review, we discuss headache associated with autoimmune diseases along with important mimics. © 2014 American Headache Society.

  10. Thymoma associated with autoimmune diseases: 85 cases and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, C; Frih, H; Pasquet, F; Kerever, S; Jamilloux, Y; Tronc, F; Guibert, B; Isaac, S; Devouassoux, M; Chalabreysse, L; Broussolle, C; Petiot, P; Girard, N; Sève, P

    2016-01-01

    To describe the clinical features, treatment, and outcome of autoimmune diseases (AD) in a cohort of patients with thymoma. Pathological records from three university hospitals, between 2005 and 2011, were reviewed to identify patients with thymoma. Patients with thymoma and AD were compared with patients with thymoma without AD. 47/85 (55%) cases of thymoma had AD, including myasthenia gravis (MG) (n=33), Hashimoto's thyroiditis (n=4), Isaac's syndrome (n=3), Morvan syndrome (n=2), pure red cell aplasia (n=2), systemic lupus (n=2), lichen planus (n=2), and one case of each following conditions: aplastic anemia, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, Good's syndrome, pemphigus, autoimmune hepatitis, Graves' disease, limbic encephalitis, and inflammatory myopathy. Six patients (7%) presented at least 2 ADs. The median duration of follow-up after surgery was 60 months (40-78 months). In 32 patients, the diagnosis of AD preceded the diagnosis of thymoma, in 9 patients, thymoma was diagnosed at the same time as the AD and 7 patients had been operated on when they developed an AD. We found a significative difference on the Masaoka stage between the MG patients and the patients who present another AD (p=0.028). No risk factor for developing an AD after thymectomy was identified. We describe here the long-term follow-up of a large series of AD related to thymoma. Our results confirm previous data concerning AD occurrence in patients with thymoma and suggest that preexisting autoimmunity is not a risk factor for developing autoimmune manifestations after thymectomy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Bell's palsy and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, A; Gallo, A; Fusconi, M; Marinelli, C; Macri, G F; de Vincentiis, M

    2012-12-01

    To review our current knowledge of the etiopathogenesis of Bell's palsy, including viral infection or autoimmunity, and to discuss disease pathogenesis with respect to pharmacotherapy. Relevant publications on the etiopathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis and histopathology of Bell's palsy from 1975 to 2012 were analysed. Bell's palsy is an idiopathic peripheral nerve palsy involving the facial nerve. It accounts for 60 to 75% of all cases of unilateral facial paralysis. The annual incidence of Bell's palsy is 15 to 30 per 100,000 people. The peak incidence occurs between the second and fourth decades (15 to 45 years). The aetiology of Bell's palsy is unknown but viral infection or autoimmune disease has been postulated as possible pathomechanisms. Bell's palsy may be caused when latent herpes viruses (herpes simplex, herpes zoster) are reactivated from cranial nerve ganglia. A cell-mediated autoimmune mechanism against a myelin basic protein has been suggested for the pathogenesis of Bell's palsy. Bell's palsy may be an autoimmune demyelinating cranial neuritis, and in most cases, it is a mononeuritic variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome, a neurologic disorder with recognised cell-mediated immunity against peripheral nerve myelin antigens. In Bell's palsy and GBS, a viral infection or the reactivation of a latent virus may provoke an autoimmune reaction against peripheral nerve myelin components, leading to the demyelination of cranial nerves, especially the facial nerve. Given the safety profile of acyclovir, valacyclovir, and short-course oral corticosteroids, patients who present within three days of the onset of symptoms should be offered combination therapy. However it seems logical that in fact, steroids exert their beneficial effect via immunosuppressive action, as is the case in some other autoimmune disorders. It is to be hoped that (monoclonal) antibodies and/or T-cell immunotherapy might provide more specific treatment guidelines in the

  12. A new Purkinje cell antibody (anti-Ca associated with subacute cerebellar ataxia: immunological characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horn Sigrun

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report on a newly discovered serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF reactivity to Purkinje cells (PCs associated with subacute inflammatory cerebellar ataxia. The patient, a previously healthy 33-year-old lady, presented with severe limb and gait ataxia, dysarthria, and diplopia two weeks after she had recovered from a common cold. Immunohistochemical studies on mouse, rat, and monkey brain sections revealed binding of a high-titer (up to 1:10,000 IgG antibody to the cerebellar molecular layer, Purkinje cell (PC layer, and white matter. The antibody is highly specific for PCs and binds to the cytoplasm as well as to the inner side of the membrane of PC somata, dendrites and axons. It is produced by B cell clones within the CNS, belongs to the IgG1 subclass, and activates complement in vitro. Western blotting of primate cerebellum extract revealed binding of CSF and serum IgG to an 80-97 kDa protein. Extensive control studies were performed to rule out a broad panel of previously described paraneoplastic and non-paraneoplastic antibodies known to be associated with cerebellar ataxia. Screening of >9000 human full length proteins by means of a protein array and additional confirmatory experiments revealed Rho GTPase activating protein 26 (ARHGAP26, GRAF, oligophrenin-1-like protein as the target antigen. Preadsorption of the patient's serum with human ARHGAP26 but not preadsorption with other proteins resulted in complete loss of PC staining. Our findings suggest a role of autoimmunity against ARHGAP26 in the pathogenesis of subacute inflammatory cerebellar ataxia, and extend the panel of diagnostic markers for this devastating disease.

  13. Subacute thyroiditis at Londrina county, PR, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calegaro, J.U.M.; Calegaro, N.Q.M.

    During 3,5 years (July 74 - December 77) 130 cases of subacute thyroiditis were observed at Londrina county, North area of Parana State; this disease was considered a peculiar problem of local pathology on thyroid disorders. These cases had the following distribution: 89 in the initial stage, 36 in the transition, 2 in remission and another 3 considered as of delayed and ciclic character. Women predominated by a factor of 5,19; the peak age was 30-40 years and it had a seasonal preference for winter and spring. Factors that mislead the diagnosis are pre-existing goiter (12,3%) and infectious diseases of the upper respiratory tract (35,38%). The goiter was diffuse in 50% of the cases and nodular in 30%; the thyroid had a normal size in the others. Painless gland occurred in 5 cases. The laboratory examinations are so important for diagnosis as for disease staging and evolution. Thyrotoxicosis occurred in 31 cases of the initial stage. Hypothyroidism in the transition state was present in 8 cases: 1 clinical and 7 subclinical. Evidence, for permanent functional impairment was demonstrated for 2 patients. Corticotherapy was the effective treatment, without evidence of good response with analgesic-antiinflammatory association. Thyrotoxicosis of the initial stage showed satisfactory results to the propanalol (β adrenergic blockage). Surgery was restricted to patients with eventual residual nodule. (author) [pt

  14. Cortical swallowing processing in early subacute stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer Maren

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dysphagia is a major complication in hemispheric as well as brainstem stroke patients causing aspiration pneumonia and increased mortality. Little is known about the recovery from dysphagia after stroke. The aim of the present study was to determine the different patterns of cortical swallowing processing in patients with hemispheric and brainstem stroke with and without dysphagia in the early subacute phase. Methods We measured brain activity by mean of whole-head MEG in 37 patients with different stroke localisation 8.2 +/- 4.8 days after stroke to study changes in cortical activation during self-paced swallowing. An age matched group of healthy subjects served as controls. Data were analyzed by means of synthetic aperture magnetometry and group analyses were performed using a permutation test. Results Our results demonstrate strong bilateral reduction of cortical swallowing activation in dysphagic patients with hemispheric stroke. In hemispheric stroke without dysphagia, bilateral activation was found. In the small group of patients with brainstem stroke we observed a reduction of cortical activation and a right hemispheric lateralization. Conclusion Bulbar central pattern generators coordinate the pharyngeal swallowing phase. The observed right hemispheric lateralization in brainstem stroke can therefore be interpreted as acute cortical compensation of subcortically caused dysphagia. The reduction of activation in brainstem stroke patients and dysphagic patients with cortical stroke could be explained in terms of diaschisis.

  15. Subacute toxicity assessment of annatto in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, A R P L; Moreira, E L T; Batista, M S; Miranda, M S; Gomes, I C S

    2004-04-01

    Increased human use of annatto (Bixa orellana L), a red yellow food colorant, demands generation of toxicity data. The toxic effects of annatto powder (bixin 27%) have been assessed following administration of a subacute regimen (4 weeks, 20 doses) in Wistar male and female rats. A full study with three dose levels was considered unnecessary since no sign of toxicity had been noted in a preliminary experiment with 1000 mg/kg body weight/day as was recommended by the OECD guideline. In this study, annatto administered by gavage at a dose level of 2000 mg/kg/day decreased male body weight gain, but had no effect on either food intake or food conversion efficiency. Haematological and plasma biochemical examination as well necropsy performed at the end of administration (29th day) and observation (43rd day) periods revealed no alterations related with annatto administration. Kidney apoptosis occurred in 20% treated female rats in restricted areas without proliferation or tubular segments modification. The precise nature of apoptosis was not investigated in the present study. These findings suggest that annatto was no toxic to the rat.

  16. Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis: Clinical and Demographic Characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafique, A.; Amjad, N.; Chand, P.; Ahmed, K.; Ibrahim, S.; Zaidi, S. S. Z.; Rana, M. S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the clinical and demographic characteristics of children diagnosed with Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE). Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from January 2000 to June 2012. Methodology: A retrospective analysis was done, regarding medical charts of 43 children under the age of 16 years with a discharge diagnosis of SSPE. Demographic and clinical characteristics were recorded. Results were expressed as percentages. Results: Most of the 43 patients were male (72%). The average age at presentation was 8.7 years with average duration of symptoms being 100.6 days. History of measles was present in 17 patients (39.5%). All children had seizures at presentation and 65% had cognitive impairment. Most patients required poly therapy for control of seizures. Sodium valproate was the most commonly used anti-epileptic agent; Isoprinosine was tried in 22 (51%) patients. CSF for antimeasles antibodies was positive in approximately 86% of the 40 (93%) children. EEG showed burst suppression pattern in 36 (83.7%) cases. Forty-two patients (97.6%) were discharged home in a vegetative state. Conclusion: SSPE is progressive neurodegenerative disorder. It can be prevented by timely immunization against measles. Measles antibody in the CSF is diagnostic for SSPE and is helpful in early diagnosis. Most patients experience a gradual but progressive decline in motor and cognitive functions. (author)

  17. Identification and isolation of Genotype-I Japanese Encephalitis virus from encephalitis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Xiaoyan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Historically, Japanese Encephalitis virus (JEV genotype III (GIII has been responsible for human diseases. In recent years, JEV genotype I (GI has been isolated from mosquitoes collected in numerous countries, but has not been isolated from patients with encephalitis. In this study, we report recovery of JEV GI live virus and identification of JEV GI RNA from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of encephalitis patients in JE endemic areas of China. Whole-genome sequencing and molecular phylogenetic analysis of the JEV isolate from the CSF samples was performed. The isolate in this study is highly similar to other JEV GI strains which isolated from mosquitoes at both the nucleotide and deduced amino acid levels. Phylogenetic analysis based on the genomic sequence showed that the isolate belongs to JEV GI, which is consistent with the phylogenetic analysis based on the pre-membrane (PrM and Glycoprotein genes. As a conclusion, this is the first time to isolate JEV GI strain from CSF samples of encephalitis patients, so continuous survey and evaluate the infectivity and pathogenecity of JEV GI strains are necessary, especially for the JEV GI strains from encephalitis patients. With respect to the latter, because all current JEV vaccines (live and inactivated are derived from JEV GIII strains, future studies should be aimed at investigating and monitoring cross-protection of the human JEV GI isolates against widely used JEV vaccines.

  18. A case of relapsing encephalitis positive for gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor antibody associated with Type B3 thymoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitano, Takaya; Kinoshita, Makoto; Shimazu, Kohki; Fushimi, Hiroaki; Omori, Kenichi; Hazama, Takanori

    2016-11-29

    A 87-year-old female presented with subacute progression of cognitive decline. Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images of brain MRI showed multifocal high-intensity lesions. Thoracic CT image revealed the presence of thymoma, and serum autoantibody screening showed positivity for anti-gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) A receptor antibody. Histopathological analysis confirmed type B3 thymoma after thymectomy. The patient received both plasmapheresis and intravenous methylprednisolone therapy, and showed remarkable amelioration of clinical symptoms and MRI abnormal high intensity. However, after 2 month from the clinical recovery, the patient showed recurrence of brain lesions and intravenous methylprednisolone monotherapy was performed. Continuation of oral steroid therapy was required to maintain the quienscent state of inflammation within the central nervous system. Anti-GABA A receptor antibody is a recently discovered novel autoantibody associated with autoimmue encephalitis. Due to the limited number of literature reported, clinical course and therapeutic response of GABA A receptor antibody encephalitis remains elusive. Here we reported a rare case of GABA A receptor antibody encephalitis with type B3 thymoma. Clinical, radiological and therapeutic courses described in our report highlight the importance of immunotherapy for treatment of the disease.

  19. Early maternal death due to acute encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Vidanapathirana

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Maternal death in an unmarried woman poses a medico-legal challenge. A 24-year-old unmarried schoolteacher, residing at a boarding place, had been admitted to hospital in a state of cardiac arrest. At the autopsy, mild to moderate congestion of subarachnoid vessels and oedema of the brain was noted. An un-interfered foetus of 15 weeks with an intact sac and placental tissues were seen. Genital tract injuries were not present. Histopathological examination showed diffuse perivascular cuffing by mononuclear cells suggestive of viral encephalitis, considering the circumstances of death and the social stigma of pregnancy in this unmarried teacher, the possibility of attempted suicide by ingestion of a poison was considered. Abrus precatorius (olinda seeds commonly found in the area is known to produce acute encephalitis as well as haemorrhagic gastroenteritis and pulmonary congestion was also considered as a possible cause for this unusual presentation

  20. Decompressive craniectomy in herpes simplex encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Jasim Abdul Jalal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial hypertension is a common cause of morbidity in herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE. HSE is the most common form of acute viral encephalitis. Hereby we report a case of HSE in which decompressive craniectomy was performed to treat refractory intracranial hypertension. A 32-year-old male presented with headache, vomiting, fever, and focal seizures involving the right upper limb. Cerebrospinal fluid-meningoencephalitic profile was positive for herpes simplex. Magnetic resonance image of the brain showed swollen and edematous right temporal lobe with increased signal in gray matter and subcortical white matter with loss of gray, white differentiation in T2-weighted sequences. Decompressive craniectomy was performed in view of refractory intracranial hypertension. Decompressive surgery for HSE with refractory hypertension can positively affect patient survival, with good outcomes in terms of cognitive functions.

  1. Herpes simplex virus encephalitis: neuroradiological diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struffert, T.; Reith, W.

    2000-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus encephalitis (HSE) is the most frequent viral encephalitis, as a rule with the starting point and centre within the temporal lobe. If untreated, HSE is usually fatal, thus diagnosis has to be established rapidly. Treatment with Acyclovir should begin as soon possible. As MRI is extremely sensitive in detecting the early inflammatory changes, it should be initially performed, especially as in the early stadium CT may be unspecific. We recommend the following examination protocol: coronar T1-weighted MR imaging before and after administration of gadopentetate dimeglumine, coronar FLAIR sequence and axial T2-weighted imaging. The diagnostic proof is to show the evidence of viral DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in cerebrospinal liquor. (orig.) [de

  2. Dengue encephalitis-A rare manifestation of dengue fever

    OpenAIRE

    Madi, Deepak; Achappa, Basavaprabhu; Ramapuram, John T; Chowta, Nityananda; Laxman, Mridula; Mahalingam, Soundarya

    2014-01-01

    The clinical spectrum of dengue fever ranges from asymptomatic infection to dengue shock syndrome. Dengue is classically considered a non-neurotropic virus. Neurological complications are not commonly seen in dengue. The neurological manifestations seen in dengue are encephalitis, meningitis, encephalopathy, stroke and Guillain-Barré syndrome. Dengue encephalitis is a rare disease. We report an interesting case of dengue encephalitis from Southern India. A 49-year-old gentleman presented with...

  3. Serial CT scannings in herpes simplex encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, Masashi; Sawada, Tohru; Kuriyama, Yoshihiro; Kinugawa, Hidekazu; Yamaguchi, Takenori

    1981-01-01

    Two patients with serologically confirmed herpes simplex encephalitis were studied by serial CT scannings. Case 1, a 60-year-old woman, was admitted to National Cardiovascular Center because of headache, fever, and attacks of Jacksonian seizure. Case 2, a 54-year-old man, was admitted because of fever, consciousness disturbance and right hemipare sis. Pleocytosis (mainly lymphocytes) and elevation of protein content in cerebrospinal fluid were observed in both cases. Both patients presented ''das apallische Syndrom'' one month after admission. The diagnosis of herpes simplex encephalitis was confirmed by typical clinical courses and by greater than fourfold rises in serum antibody titer for herpes simplex virus as well as that in cerebrospinal fluid in case 1. Characteristic CT findings observed in these two cases were summarized as follows: Within a week after the onset, no obvious abnormalities could be detected on CT scans (Case 1). Two weeks after the onset, a large low-density area appeared in the left temporal lobe and in the contralateral insular cortex with midline shift toward the right side (Case 2). One month later, an ill-defined linear and ring-like high-density area (Case 1), or a well-defined high-density area (Case 2), that was enhanced after contrast administration, was observed in the large low-density area in the temporal lobe. These findings were considered as characteristic for hemorrhagic encephalitis. These high-density areas disappeared two months later, however, widespread and intensified low-density areas still remained. In both cases, the basal ganglia and thalamus were completely spared on CT scans. From these observations, it can be concluded that serial CT scannings are quite useful for diagnosis of herpes simplex encephalitis. (author)

  4. Computed tomography of herpes simplex encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodiek, S.O.; Backmund, H.; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Psychiatrie, Muenchen

    1984-01-01

    Referring to 9 patients of our own material we report on the pattern of distribution and the development of CT-changes in herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE). Our cases include the outstanding findings of a primarily hemorrhagic HSE and an extensive calcification at the residual stage on the borderline of widespread tissue necrosis on a baby. With respect to literature we receive a quite homogenous picture, reflecting the crucial characteristics of the disease as known from neuropathology. (orig.) [de

  5. EEG in ischaemic stroke: Quantitative EEG can uniquely inform (sub-)acute prognoses and clinical management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finnigan, Simon; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria

    2013-01-01

    Investigations of (sub-)acute ischaemic stroke (IS) employing quantitative electroencephalographic (QEEG) methods, in concert with other assessments, are reviewed. Numerous outcomes from hundreds of patients collectively indicate that (sub-)acute QEEG indices from standard systems can uniquely

  6. [Polyglandular autoimmune syndromes : An overview].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komminoth, P

    2016-05-01

    Polyglandular autoimmune syndromes (PGAS), also known as autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndromes (APS), are a heterogeneous group of rare, genetically caused diseases of the immune system which lead to inflammatory damage of various endocrine glands resulting in malfunctions. In addition, autoimmune diseases of non-endocrine organs may also be found. Early diagnosis of PGAS is often overlooked because of heterogeneous symptoms and the progressive occurrence of the individual diseases. The two most important forms of PGAS are the juvenile and adult types. The juvenile type (PGAS type 1) is caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene on chromosome 21, exhibits geographic variations in incidence and is defined by the combination of mucocutaneous candidiasis, Addison's disease and hypoparathyroidism. In addition, autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) syndrome and other autoimmune diseases can also occur. The adult form of PGAS (PGAS type 2) is a multigenetic disorder associated with some HLA haplotypes, is more common than the juvenile type, shows female predominance and exhibits the combination of type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid disease, Addison's disease and other autoimmune disorders. The histological alterations in affected organs of PGAS patients are similar to findings in sporadically occurring autoimmune diseases of these organs but there are no pathognomic fine tissue findings. If patients exhibit autoimmune changes in two different endocrine glands or if there are indications of several autoimmune disorders from the patient history, it is important to consider PGAS and inform the clinicians of this suspicion.

  7. Transient phonemic paraphasia by bilateral hippocampus lesion in a case of limbic encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiko Kishi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Although the hippocampus has not typically been identified as part of the language and aphasia circuit, recent evidence suggests that the hippocampus is closely related to naming, word priming, and anomic aphasia. A 59-year old woman with limbic encephalitis of possible autoimmune etiology, after recovery of consciousness, presented with severe memory impairment in both anterograde and retrograde modalities, episodes of fear, hallucination and convulsion, and transient fluent, phonemic paraphasia, together with small sharp waves diffusely by EEG. Brain MRI revealed bilateral symmetric, discrete lesions in the body to the infundibulum of the hippocampus. The transient phonemic paraphasia noted in our patient may have been a result of primary damage in the hippocampus and its fiber connection to the Wernicke’s area or secondary partial status epilepticus that might have originated in the hippocampus.

  8. Anti-N-Methyl-d-Aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis during pregnancy: Clinical analysis of reported cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yan-Chao; Chen, Xiu-Ju; Zhang, Hong-Mei; Wang, Zhen; Du, Da-Yong

    2017-06-01

    To analyze the clinical features of 13 pregnant patients with anti-N-Methyl-d-Aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis. Retrospective review of thirteen reported cases was conducted for anti-NMDAR encephalitis patients during pregnancy. The clinical data were collected from papers published in PubMed prior to 16 February 2016. Statistical analysis of the data was performed, which encompasses the patients' age, past medical history, onset of symptoms, concomitant with ovarian teratomas, immunotherapy, outcomes of mothers and newborns. Thirteen cases were reported in 11 articles with a median age of 23 (interquartile range, 19-27) years old. There were eight cases in which the onset periods of gestation happened in the first trimester and five cases in the second trimester. Among 13 cases, five patients had a past medical history, one concomitant with autoimmune Graves' hyperthyroidism, one with bilateral ovarian teratomas removed history, one with anti-NMDAR encephalitis five years before pregnancy and two with psychiatric symptoms. Five patients were found with ovarian teratomas. Seven patients responded to first-line immunotherapy whereas all of two patients responded to second-line immunotherapy when the first-line immunotherapy failed. Following up all the 13 patients, most experienced a substantial recovery, except one had spasticity and dystonia in one hand, and one died of a superimposed infection. Three fetuses were miscarried or aborted in total. Most newborns were healthy, except two cases (2/10) with abnormal neurologic signs. Clinical analysis of the data indicates that most patients respond to first-line immunotherapy. A second-line immunotherapy is effective when first-line immunotherapy fails. It has also been found that most mothers and newborns can have good outcomes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Human cerebrospinal fluid monoclonal N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor autoantibodies are sufficient for encephalitis pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreye, Jakob; Wenke, Nina K; Chayka, Mariya; Leubner, Jonas; Murugan, Rajagopal; Maier, Nikolaus; Jurek, Betty; Ly, Lam-Thanh; Brandl, Doreen; Rost, Benjamin R; Stumpf, Alexander; Schulz, Paulina; Radbruch, Helena; Hauser, Anja E; Pache, Florence; Meisel, Andreas; Harms, Lutz; Paul, Friedemann; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Garner, Craig; Schmitz, Dietmar; Wardemann, Hedda; Prüss, Harald

    2016-10-01

    SEE ZEKERIDOU AND LENNON DOI101093/AWW213 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is a recently discovered autoimmune syndrome associated with psychosis, dyskinesias, and seizures. Little is known about the cerebrospinal fluid autoantibody repertoire. Antibodies against the NR1 subunit of the NMDAR are thought to be pathogenic; however, direct proof is lacking as previous experiments could not distinguish the contribution of further anti-neuronal antibodies. Using single cell cloning of full-length immunoglobulin heavy and light chain genes, we generated a panel of recombinant monoclonal NR1 antibodies from cerebrospinal fluid memory B cells and antibody secreting cells of NMDAR encephalitis patients. Cells typically carried somatically mutated immunoglobulin genes and had undergone class-switching to immunoglobulin G, clonally expanded cells carried identical somatic hypermutation patterns. A fraction of NR1 antibodies were non-mutated, thus resembling 'naturally occurring antibodies' and indicating that tolerance induction against NMDAR was incomplete and somatic hypermutation not essential for functional antibodies. However, only a small percentage of cerebrospinal fluid-derived antibodies reacted against NR1. Instead, nearly all further antibodies bound specifically to diverse brain-expressed epitopes including neuronal surfaces, suggesting that a broad repertoire of antibody-secreting cells enrich in the central nervous system during encephalitis. Our functional data using primary hippocampal neurons indicate that human cerebrospinal fluid-derived monoclonal NR1 antibodies alone are sufficient to cause neuronal surface receptor downregulation and subsequent impairment of NMDAR-mediated currents, thus providing ultimate proof of antibody pathogenicity. The observed formation of immunological memory might be relevant for clinical relapses. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on

  10. Epilepsy in children with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jović Nebojša J.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE is a rare, progressive, fatal neurodegenerative disease of childhood and early adolescence caused by defective measles virus. The initial symptoms of SSPE usually involve regression in cognitive functioning and behavior or recurrent myoclonic jerks. Seizures revealing SSPE and epilepsy during the clinical course can occur. Objective. The aim of the study was to analyze clinical and EEG characteristics of both initially occurred seizures and epilepsy which developed in the course of the disease. Methods. Retrospective study was carried out on 19 children (14 boys, 5 girls with SSPE diagnosed and treated at our Clinic from 1995 to 2010. Seizures revealed SSPE in our patients aged from 6.5 to 11.5 years (mean 8.6 years. Results. SSPE onset ranged from 4.5 to 16.5 years (mean 10.05. Complete vaccination was performed in nine patients. Cognitive and behavioral decline was preceeded by 6-18 months in two children with intractable focal motor seizures with secondary generalization, one child with complex partial seizures and one with atypical absences. During the clinical course of the disease epilepsy developed in 10 (52.6% cases, including four patients with seizures as the initial SSPE sign. It occurred mainly in the first year, while in three cases seizures appeared between 1 and 5 years of the disease evolution. Myoclonus was present independently from seizures. No significant inter-group differences were found relating to the type of SSPE progression and history of epilepsy. The only child with fulminant SSPE presented with initial seizures. Favorable seizure control was achieved in 60.0% patients. Intractable epilepsy developed in four patients. Conclusion. Atypical SSPE presentation can include mainly focal intractable seizures. Epilepsy developed during clinical course in 52.6% cases. No significant influence was found of the history of epilepsy on the type of SSPE progression.

  11. Capgras syndrome associated with limbic encephalitis in a patient with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herval Ribeiro Soares Neto

    Full Text Available We report the case of a patient with insidious onset and slowly progressive cognitive impairment, behavioral symptoms, temporal lobe seizures and delusional thoughts typical of delusional misidentification syndromes. Clinical presentation along with extensive diagnostic work-up revealed limbic encephalitis secondary to diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The patient underwent immunotherapy with high-dose corticosteroid but no significant improvement was observed. No specific treatment for lymphoma was performed because the patient died of septic shock following a nosocomial respiratory infection. Delusional misidentification syndromes are an unusual and unique form of cognitive impairment in which a patient consistently misidentifies persons, places, objects, or events. Capgras syndrome is the most common subtype of this disorder, being defined by the recurrent and transient belief that someone close has been substituted by an imposter. These entities are generally associated with neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disturbances. Rare reports of associations between misidentification syndromes and autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis have been published, but no papers address a correlation with limbic encephalitis or lymphoma.

  12. Capgras syndrome associated with limbic encephalitis in a patient with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Herval Ribeiro; Cavalcante, Wagner Cid Palmeira; Martins, Sebastião Nunes; Smid, Jerusa; Nitrini, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a patient with insidious onset and slowly progressive cognitive impairment, behavioral symptoms, temporal lobe seizures and delusional thoughts typical of delusional misidentification syndromes. Clinical presentation along with extensive diagnostic work-up revealed limbic encephalitis secondary to diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The patient underwent immunotherapy with high-dose corticosteroid but no significant improvement was observed. No specific treatment for lymphoma was performed because the patient died of septic shock following a nosocomial respiratory infection. Delusional misidentification syndromes are an unusual and unique form of cognitive impairment in which a patient consistently misidentifies persons, places, objects, or events. Capgras syndrome is the most common subtype of this disorder, being defined by the recurrent and transient belief that someone close has been substituted by an imposter. These entities are generally associated with neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disturbances. Rare reports of associations between misidentification syndromes and autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis have been published, but no papers address a correlation with limbic encephalitis or lymphoma.

  13. Necrotizing Encephalitis Caused by Disseminated Aspergillus Infection after Orthotopic Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis E. Barrera-Herrera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver transplantation is the only available treatment for some patients with end-stage liver disease. Despite reduction in mortality rates due to advances related to surgical techniques, intensive medical management and immunosuppressive therapy, invasive fungal infections remain a serious complication in orthotopic liver transplantation. We report the case of an 18-year-old male diagnosed with autoimmune cirrhosis in 2009 who was assessed and listed for liver transplantation for massive variceal hemorrhage. One year after listing a successful orthotopic liver transplantation was performed. Uneventful early recovery was achieved; however, he developed pulmonary and neurological Aspergillus infection 23 and 40 days after surgery, respectively. Antibiotic therapy with voriconazole and amphotericin was started early, with no major response. Neuroimaging revealed multiple right frontal and right parietal lesions with perilesional edema; surgical management of the brain abscesses was performed. A biopsy with periodic acid-Schiff and Gomori stains revealed areas with mycotic microorganisms morphologically consistent with Aspergillus, later confirmed by culture. The patient developed necrotizing encephalitis secondary to aspergillosis and died. Necrotizing encephalitis as a clinical presentation of Aspergillus infection in an orthotopic liver transplant is not common, and even with adequate management, early diagnosis and prompt antifungal treatment, mortality rates remain high.

  14. Anti-N-Methyl-d-Aspartate Receptor Encephalitis as an Unusual Cause of Altered Mental Status in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Michael; Griffey, Richard T

    2016-08-01

    Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor autoimmune encephalitis is a newly identified form of encephalitis whose incidence is on the rise. Awareness of this condition and symptom recognition are key to early diagnosis and prompt treatment, which may alter the course of the disease. A 35-year-old woman presented to our Emergency Department (ED) with lethargy, bizarre behavior, agitation, confusion, memory deficits, and word-finding difficulties. Her symptoms and evaluation were potentially consistent with a primary psychiatric disorder, but the absence of frank psychosis and presence of neurologic features related to memory and cognition prompted other considerations. In the ED we performed a lumbar puncture, and in addition to routine studies, ordered anti-NMDAR antibody screening. The screening studies returned positive, leading to treatment with glucocorticoids and intravenous immune globulin and resulting in improvement to near baseline function. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Although anti-NMDAR encephalitis is relatively uncommon, reports of this previously unrecognized condition are increasing, with an unclear true incidence of disease. Emergency providers should consider this diagnosis in their differential for patients presenting with new neuropsychiatric symptoms, particularly in young women. Prompt treatment leads to near complete neurologic recovery in 75% of patients, whereas delays in diagnosis and treatment may be associated with worse outcomes including death. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. GAD antibody-associated limbic encephalitis in a young woman with APECED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kopczak

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The autoimmune polyendocrinopathy–candidiasis–ectodermal dystrophy (APECED syndrome is a genetic disorder caused by a mutation in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE gene. Immune deficiency, hypoparathyroidism and Addison’s disease due to autoimmune dysfunction are the major clinical signs of APECED. We report on a 21-year-old female APECED patient with two inactivating mutations in the AIRE gene. She presented with sudden onset of periodic nausea. Adrenal insufficiency was diagnosed by means of the ACTH stimulation test. Despite initiation of hormone replacement therapy with hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone, nausea persisted and the patient developed cognitive deficits and a loss of interest which led to the diagnosis of depression. She was admitted to the psychiatric department for further diagnostic assessment. An EEG showed a focal epileptic pattern. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD antibodies, which had been negative eight years earlier, were now elevated in serum and in the cerebrospinal fluid. Oligoclonal bands were positive indicating an inflammatory process with intrathecal antibody production in the central nervous system (CNS. The periodic nausea was identified as dialeptic seizures, which clinically presented as gastrointestinal aura followed by episodes of reduced consciousness that occurred about 3–4 times per day. GAD antibody-associated limbic encephalitis (LE was diagnosed. Besides antiepileptic therapy, an immunosuppressive treatment with corticosteroids was initiated followed by azathioprine. The presence of nausea and vomiting in endocrine patients with autoimmune disorders is indicative of adrenal insufficiency. However, our case report shows that episodic nausea may be a symptom of epileptic seizures due to GAD antibodies-associated LE in patients with APECED.

  16. [Anti-N-methyl-D aspartate receptor encephalitis - guideline to the challenges of diagnosis and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hau, Lídia; Csábi, Györgyi; Tényi, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-Aspartate encephalitis is a recently diagnosed autoimmune disorder with increasing significance. During this disease antibodies are produced against the subunit of the NMDA receptor, which cause different symptoms, both psychiatric and neurological. The aim of this publication is to introduce this disease, to facilitate the diagnosis and to recommend therapeutical guideline. In this review we summarized the relevant literature published between 2007 and 2015 giving emphasis on etiopathogenesis, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. In the etiology an underlying tumor or a viral agent should be considered. During the disease we can discern 3 periods: first prodromal viral infections-like symptoms can be seen, 1-2 weeks later psychiatric symptoms, such as aggression, sleep and behavior disturbances appear. After that neurological symptoms (tonic-clonic convulsions, aphasia, catatonia, orofacial dyskinesia, autonom lability, altered mental state) are typical, and the patient's condition deteriorates. For the correct diagnosis it is necessary to detect antibodies against the NMDA receptor from the serum and the liquor. Steroids, immunoglobulins and plasmaheresis are the first-line therapies. If the disease is unresponsive, then as a second-line therapy anti-CD 20 (Rituximab) and cyclophosphamid can be useful. Most of the patients are improving without any neurological sequale with prompt detection and appropriate therapy. It is important to be familiar with the symptoms, diagnosis and therapy of this disease as a practicing clinician, especially as a psychiatrist or neurologist. 75 percentage of the patients are admitted to psychiatric departments first because of the leading symptoms. Autoimmune NMDA encephalitis is a reversible disease after early diagnosis and treatment.

  17. Anti-NMDAR encephalitis, a mimicker of acute infectious encephalitis and a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren Wong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor encephalitis has become an increasingly recognized etiology of acute psychosis in young patients. The diverse constellation of symptoms allows for misdiagnosis as an infectious, psychological, or toxicological entity resulting in delays in treatment with increasing morbidity. We describe a case of anti-NMDAR encephalitis that was a particular challenge to diagnose. Practitioners should maintain a high index of suspicion for anti-NMDAR and related neuroautoimmune syndromes, especially in young patients that present with acute mental status decline or dyskinesia.

  18. Recent advances in understanding autoimmune thyroid disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliddal, Sofie; Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) is often observed together with other autoimmune diseases. The coexistence of two or more autoimmune diseases in the same patient is referred to as polyautoimmunity, and AITD is the autoimmune disease most frequently involved. The occurrence of polyautoimmunity has...... led to the hypothesis that the affected patients suffer from a generalized dysregulation of their immune system. The present review summarizes recent discoveries unravelling the immunological mechanisms involved in autoimmunity, ranging from natural autoimmunity to disease-specific autoimmunity...

  19. Sarcoidosis and Thyroid Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piera Fazzi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Most of the studies have shown a higher risk for subclinical and clinical hypothyroidism, antithyroid autoantibodies [overall antithyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb], and in general, thyroid autoimmunity, overall in the female gender in patients with sarcoidosis (S. A significantly higher prevalence of clinical hypothyroidism and Graves’ disease was also described in female S patients with respect to controls. Gallium-67 (Ga-67 scyntigraphy in S patients, in the case of thyroid uptake, suggests the presence of aggressive autoimmune thyroiditis and hypothyroidism. For this reason, ultrasonography and thyroid function should be done in the case of Ga-67 thyroid uptake. In conclusion, thyroid function, TPOAb measurement, and ultrasonography should be done to assess the clinical profile in female S patients, and the ones at high risk (female individuals, with TPOAb positivity, and hypoechoic and small thyroid should have periodically thyroid function evaluations and suitable treatments.

  20. Gangliosides and autoimmune diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misasi, R; Dionisi, S; Farilla, L; Carabba, B; Lenti, L; Di Mario, U; Dotta, F

    1997-09-01

    Gangliosides are sialic acid-containing glycolipids which are formed by a hydrophobic portion, the ceramide, and a hydrophilic part, i.e. the oligosaccharide chain. First described in neural tissue, several studies have shown that gangliosides are almost ubiquitous molecules expressed in all vertebrate tissues. Within cells, gangliosides are usually associated with plasma membranes, where they can act as receptors for a variety of molecules and have been shown to take part in cell-to-cell interaction and in signal transduction. In addition, gangliosides are expressed in cytosol membranes like those of secretory granules of some endocrine cells (adrenal medulla, pancreatic islets). As far as the role of gangliosides in diseases is concerned, there are some cases in which an aberrant ganglioside expression plays a crucial role in the disease pathogenetic process. These diseases include two major forms of ganglioside storage, namely GM2-gangliosidosis (Tay-Sachs and its beta-hexosaminidase deficiency) and GM1-gangliosidosis (beta-galactosidase deficiency), where the most prominent pathological characteristic is the lysosomal ganglioside accumulation in neurons. Other inflammatory or degenerative diseases both within and outside the nervous system have been shown to be associated with an altered pattern of ganglioside expression in the target organ. Since monoclonal antibodies have been discovered and used in immunology, a large variety of ganglioside antigens has been described both as blood group antigens and as tumour-related antigens. Several studies have also indicated that gangliosides can act not only as antigens, but also as autoantigens. As a matter of fact, auto-antibodies to gangliosides, detected by immunostaining methods performed directly on TLC plates or by ELISA, have been described in several autoimmune disorders such as Guillain-Barré syndrome, multiple sclerosis, lupus erythematosus, Hashimoto's thyroiditis and, last but not least, insulin

  1. Thymoma and autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Shelly, Shahar; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Altman, Arie; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2011-01-01

    The thymus is a central lymphatic organ that is responsible for many immunological functions, including the production of mature, functional T cells and the induction of self-tolerance. Benign or malignant tumors may originate from the thymus gland, with thymoma being the most common and accounting for 50% of anterior mediastinal tumors. Malignancies linked to thymoma include the loss of self-tolerance and the presence of autoimmunity. In this review, we compiled the current scientific eviden...

  2. Autoimmune liver disease 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Paolo; Granito, Alessandro; Pappas, Georgios; Muratori, Luigi; Lenzi, Marco; Bianchi, Francesco B

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune liver disease (ALD) includes a spectrum of diseases which comprises both cholestatic and hepatitic forms: autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and the so called "overlap" syndromes where hepatitic and cholestatic damage coexists. All these diseases are characterized by an extremely high heterogeneity of presentation, varying from asymptomatic, acute (as in a subset of AIH) or chronic (with aspecific symptoms such as fatigue and myalgia in AIH or fatigue and pruritus in PBC and PSC). The detection and characterization of non organ specific autoantibodies plays a major role in the diagnostic approach of autoimmune liver disease; anti nuclear reactivities (ANA) and anti smooth muscle antibodies (SMA) mark type 1 AIH, liver kidney microsomal antibody type 1 (LKM1) and liver cytosol type 1 (LC1) are the serological markers of type 2 AIH; antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) are associated with PBC, while no specific marker is found in PSC, since anticytoplasmic neutrophil antibodies with perinuclear pattern (atypical p-ANCA or p-ANNA) are also detected in a substantial proportion of type 1 AIH cases. Treatment options rely on immunosoppressive therapy (steroids and azathioprine) in AIH and on ursodeoxycholic acid in cholestatic conditions; in all these diseases liver transplantation remains the only therapeutical approach for the end stage of liver disease.

  3. [Autoimmune blistering diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvert-Lehembre, S; Joly, P

    2014-03-01

    Autoimmune blistering diseases are characterized by the production of pathogenic autoantibodies that are responsible for the formation of epidermal blisters. Major advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of these disorders have allowed the development of new therapeutic agents. Recent epidemiologic data showed that bullous pemphigoid mainly affects elderly patients. Bullous pemphigoid is often associated with degenerative neurologic disorders. A major increase in the incidence of bullous pemphigoid has been observed in France. Treatment of bullous pemphigoid is mainly based on superpotent topical corticosteroids. The role of desmosomal proteins has been demonstrated in the initiation, propagation and persistence of the autoimmune response in pemphigus. Several studies have shown a correlation between anti-desmoglein antibody titers and disease activity. Pemphigus susceptibility genes have been identified. Oral corticosteroids remain the mainstay of pemphigus treatment. Dramatic and long-lasting improvement has been recently obtained with rituximab in recalcitrant types of pemphigus. Other autoimmune junctional blistering diseases are rare entities, whose prognosis can be severe. Their diagnosis has been improved by the use of new immunological assays and immunoelectronic microscopy. Immunosupressants are widely used in severe types in order to prevent mucosal sequelae. Copyright © 2013 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Thymoma and autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelly, Shahar; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Altman, Arie; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2011-01-01

    The thymus is a central lymphatic organ that is responsible for many immunological functions, including the production of mature, functional T cells and the induction of self-tolerance. Benign or malignant tumors may originate from the thymus gland, with thymoma being the most common and accounting for 50% of anterior mediastinal tumors. Malignancies linked to thymoma include the loss of self-tolerance and the presence of autoimmunity. In this review, we compiled the current scientific evidence detailing the various interactions between thymoma and autoimmune diseases, including myasthenia gravis, systemic lupus erythematosus, inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion, pure red cell aplasia, pernicious anemia, pemphigus and autoimmune thyroid diseases. In recent years, several mechanisms have been proposed to explain these interactions. Most are based on the assumption that the ‘sick' thymus, like the ‘normal' thymus, can generate mature T cells; however, the T cells generated by the sick thymus are impaired and thus may exert cellular autoreactivity. Here, we present several theories that may shed light on the loss of self-tolerance associated with this epithelial tumor of the thymus. PMID:21317916

  5. Long-term utility and complication profile of open craniotomy for biopsy in patients with idiopathic encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Kalil G; Li, Yin; Agarwal, Prateek; Nayak, Nikhil R; Thawani, Jayesh P; Balu, Ramani; Lucas, Timothy H

    2017-03-01

    Neurosurgeons are often asked to perform open biopsy for diagnosis of encephalitis after medical investigations are non-diagnostic. These patients may be critically ill with multiple comorbidities. Patients and their families often request data regarding the success rates and complication profile of biopsy, but minimal literature exists in this area. Retrospective chart review of all patients undergoing open brain biopsy (burr hole or craniotomy) for encephalitis refractory to medical diagnosis between January 2009 and December 2013 was undertaken. Pathology records and outpatient follow-up were reviewed to determine most recent clinical status of each patient. A total of 59 patients were included with mean follow up of 20months. The average age at biopsy was 55years. The most common unconfirmed diagnoses leading to biopsy were vasculitis (44%), neoplasm (27%), infection (12%), autoimmune (12%), amyloidosis (5%). Tissue pathology was diagnostic in 42% of all cases. Overall, biopsy confirmed the preoperative diagnosis in 46% of cases and refuted the preoperative leading diagnosis in 25% of cases. At last follow-up, the tissue pathology resulted in a medical treatment change in 25% of cases. There was a 14% major neurological complication rate (postoperative stroke, hemorrhage, or neurological deficit) and 9% cardiopulmonary complication rate (delayed extubation and re-intubation) attributable to surgical intervention. In this limited series, diagnostic utility of biopsy in patients with idiopathic encephalitis is less than 50% and the major complication rate is 23%. Patients and providers must be counseled accordingly and weigh the risks and benefits of open biopsy for encephalitis cautiously. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Tick-borne encephalitis: Pathogenesis and clinical implications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Růžek, Daniel; Dobler, G.; Mantke, O. D.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 4 (2010), s. 223-232 ISSN 1477-8939 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP302/10/P438; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06009 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Tick-borne encephalitis * Tick-borne encephalitis virus * Pathogenesis * Clinical data Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  7. Operculum syndrome: unusual feature of herpes simplex encephalitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Poel, J. C.; Haenggeli, C. A.; Overweg-Plandsoen, W. C.

    1995-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis in adults and young patients carries a high mortality and morbidity. Its presentation may be nonspecific, sometimes hampering early diagnosis. Two young children are reported with herpes simplex encephalitis in whom the operculum syndrome was an outstanding feature. This

  8. [Auto-immune disorders as a possible cause of neuropsychiatric syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Martinez, P; Molenaar, P C; Losen, M; Hoffmann, C; Stevens, J; de Witte, L D; van Amelsvoort, T; van Os, J; Rutten, B P F

    2015-01-01

    Changes that occur in the behaviour of voltage-gated ion channels and ligand-gated receptor channels due to gene mutations or auto-immune attack are the cause of channelopathies in the central and peripheral nervous system. Although the relation between molecular channel defects and clinical symptoms has been explained in the case of many neuromuscular channelopathies, the pathophysiology of auto-immunity in neuropsychiatric syndromes is still unclear. To review recent findings regarding neuronal auto-immune reactions in severe neuropsychiatric syndromes. Using PubMed, we consulted the literature published between 1990 and August 2014 relating to the occurrence of auto-immune antibodies in severe and persistent neuropsychiatric syndromes. Auto-antibodies have only limited access to the central nervous system, but if they do enter the system they can, in some cases, cause disease. We discuss recent findings regarding the occurrence of auto-antibodies against ligand-activated receptor channels and potassium channels in neuropsychiatric and neurological syndromes, including schizophrenia and limbic encephalitis. Although the occurrence of several auto-antibodies in schizophrenia has been confirmed, there is still no proof of a causal relationship in the syndrome. We still have no evidence of the prevalence of auto-immunity in neuropsychiatric syndromes. The discovery that an antibody against an ion channel is associated with some neuropsychiatric disorders may mean that in future it will be possible to treat patients by means of immunosuppression, which could lead to an improvement in a patient's cognitive abilities.

  9. [Treatment of autoimmune hepatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueverov, A O

    2004-01-01

    The immunosuppresive drugs, primarily glucocorticosteroids, serve as the basis for the pathogenetic treatment of autoimmune diseases of the liver. In autoimmune hepatitis, immunosuppressive therapy induces and maintains persistent remission in most patients while in primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis, its capacities are substantially limited. Ursodeoxycholic acid is used as the basic drug in predominantly occurring intrahepatic cholestasis. The treatment of cross autoimmune syndromes generally requires the choice of a combination of drugs.

  10. B Cells in Autoimmune Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Hampe, Christiane S.

    2012-01-01

    The role of B cells in autoimmune diseases involves different cellular functions, including the well-established secretion of autoantibodies, autoantigen presentation and ensuing reciprocal interactions with T cells, secretion of inflammatory cytokines, and the generation of ectopic germinal centers. Through these mechanisms B cells are involved both in autoimmune diseases that are traditionally viewed as antibody mediated and also in autoimmune diseases that are commonly classified as T cell...

  11. Epstein-Barr virus encephalitis and encephalomyelitis: MR findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shian, W.J. [Department of Pediatrics, Tao-Yuan Veterans Hospital, No. 100, Sec 3, Cheng-Kung Rd, City of Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (Taiwan, Province of China); Chi, C.S. [Department of Pediatrics, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1996-09-01

    The purpose of this project is to investigate the clinical and brain MR characteristics of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) encephalitis and encephalomyelitis. Clinical and 30 MR findings of 29 patients with EBV encephalitis or encephalomyelitis were retrospectively reviewed. Patients included 24 with encephalitis, 3 with encephalomyelitis, and 2 with brain-stem encephalitis. Altered consciousness, seizures, visual hallucination, and acute psychotic reaction were the common presentations. Eight patients had positive MR findings. These included T2 prolongation over gray and white matter, periventricular leukomalacia, and brain atrophy. Transient T2 prolongation over gray and white matter was found in one patient. Our results indicate that EBV encephalitis and encephalomyelitis have a wide range of both clinical and MR findings. The MR lesions may disappear in a short period, so the timing for the MR scan may be critical. (orig.). With 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Seizure semiology of anti-LGI1 antibody encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beimer, Nicholas J; Selwa, Linda M

    2017-12-01

    Limbic encephalitis associated with anti-LGI1 antibody (LGI1 encephalitis) presents with a variety of features, the most prominent of which include seizures and progressive disturbance of memory and behaviour. Although varied in semiology, recognition of the pattern of seizures in LGI1 encephalitis is important, as early diagnosis and definitive treatment may prevent subsequent development of cognitive impairment. We present a patient with LGI1 encephalitis and "faciobrachial dystonic seizures-plus", which began as classic faciobrachial dystonic seizures and progressed to focal seizures with impaired awareness, dacrystic/gelastic-like outbursts, ictal speech, manual automatisms, and autonomic signs (tachycardia). Recognition of the broad range of seizure types associated with LGI1 encephalitis is crucial for early diagnosis and definitive treatment. [Published with video sequence on www.epilepticdisorders.com].

  13. Paraneoplastic extralimbic encephalitis associated with thymoma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragaki, Masato; Iimura, Yasuaki; Teramoto, Kenichi; Sato, Nagato; Hirose, Kazuyuki; Hasegawa, Naoto

    2015-01-01

    Here we a report a rare case of extralimbic encephalitis associated with thymoma. A 66-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with cramping in her right leg and inability to walk. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed multifocal high intensity signals on T2 flare images in the cerebral cortex, and chest computed tomography showed a 5-cm anterior mediastinal mass, which was considered to be a thymoma. We speculated that she had paraneoplastic encephalitis associated with thymoma. She underwent a thymectomy and was diagnosed with type B1 thymoma. On postoperative day 6, her neurological symptoms began to improve. On postoperative day 31, she was discharged without complications. Limbic encephalitis is a paraneoplastic neurological syndromeassociated with thymoma, but extralimbic encephalitis has been described in the literature very rarely. We report the case of extralimbic encephalitis associated with thymoma along with a literature review.

  14. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becheur, M; Bouslama, B; Slama, H; Toumi, N E H

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare condition in children which differs from the adult form. It is defined by immune-mediated destruction of red blood cells caused by autoantibodies. Characteristics of the autoantibodies are responsible for the various clinical entities. Classifications of autoimmune hemolytic anemia include warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia, cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria. For each classification, this review discusses the epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, laboratory evaluation, and treatment options. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Reduction of subacute uterine inversion by Haultain's method: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reduction of subacute uterine inversion by Haultain's method: A case report. ... South African Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology ... Abstract. Uterine inversion is a rare but potentially life-threatening obstetric emergency of unknown aetiology, which is often associated with inadvertent traction on the umbilical cord before ...

  16. Surgical repair of subacute left ventricular free wall rupture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeebregts, CJ; Noyez, L; Hensens, AG; Skotnicki, SH; Lacquet, LK

    1997-01-01

    Background: The natural course of subacute ventricular free wall rupture (FWR) as a complication of acute myocardial infarction (MI) is usually lethal. The aim of this study was to investigate the curability of this entity and to report on five patients successfully treated by rapid diagnosis,

  17. Speech and Language Therapy for Aphasia following Subacute Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koyuncu, E.; Çam, P.; Altinok, N.; Çalli, D.E.; Yarbay Duman, T.; Özgirgin, N.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the time window, duration and intensity of optimal speech and language therapy applied to aphasic patients with subacute stroke in our hospital. The study consisted of 33 patients being hospitalized for stroke rehabilitation in our hospital with first stroke

  18. Acute and subacute toxicities of defatted ethanolic extract of Moringa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Moringa oleifera seeds are widely accepted as a nutritional supplement. The seeds are consumed and are sold on the shelf of nature, herbal shops, pharmacy and supermarkets. They are consumed as herbal remedy for various diseases. This study was designed to evaluate the acute and sub-acute toxicity of defatted ...

  19. Acute and subacute toxicity of Schinus terebinthifolius bark extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, L B; Vasconcelos, C F B; Maranhão, H M L; Leite, V R; Ferreira, P A; Andrade, B A; Araújo, E L; Xavier, H S; Lafayette, S S L; Wanderley, A G

    2009-12-10

    Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi (Anacardiaceae) has long been used in traditional Brazilian medicine, especially to treat inflammatory and haemostatic diseases. The objective of this study was to evaluate the acute and subacute toxicity (45 days) of Schinus terebinthifolius via the oral route in Wistar rats of both sexes. For the acute toxicity test, the dried extract of Schinus terebinthifolius bark was administered in doses from 0.625 to 5.0 g/kg (n=5/group/sex) and in the subacute toxicity test the following doses were used: 0.25, 0.625 and 1.5625 g/kg/day (n=13/group/sex), for 45 consecutive days. In the acute toxicity test, Schinus terebinthifolius did not produce any toxic signs or deaths. The subacute treatment with Schinus terebinthifolius did not alter either the body weight gain or the food and water consumption. The hematological and biochemical analysis did not show significant differences in any of the parameters examined in female or male groups, except in two male groups, in which the treatment with Schinus terebinthifolius (0.25 and 0.625 g/kg) induced an increase of mean corpuscular volume values (2.9 and 2.6%, respectively). These variations are within the physiological limits described for the specie and does not have clinical relevance. The acute and subacute administration of the dried extract of Schinus terebinthifolius bark did not produced toxic effects in Wistar rats.

  20. Treatment of acute and subacute dorsal perilunate fracture dislocations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent Kucuk

    2014-04-01

    Outcomes: Results of the perilunate fracture dislocations treated in acute or subacute phase by open reduction and internal fixation via dorsal approach are satisfactory. There is a strong demand for prospective, randomized studies to compare the results of different treatment modalities. [Hand Microsurg 2014; 3(1.000: 1-7

  1. Evaluation of acute and subacute toxicity of Alstonia congensis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The extract demonstrated good hypoglycaemic effects by lowering the plasma sugar level and also had some beneficial and reduction effects on cardiovascular risk factors. There was no evidence of drug-induced symptoms or death at all the doses of the extract administered in acute study but subacute results revealed a ...

  2. Rat Brain Biogenic Amine Levels during Acute and Subacute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Organophosphate (OP) pesticides exert their toxic effects by cholinesterase inhibition and the consequent prolongation of the undesirable effects of accumulation of acetylcholine. However, sustained cholinesterase inhibition through sustained sub-acute administration of organophosphates leads to disappearance of the ...

  3. Evaluation of acute and subacute toxicities of aqueous ethanolic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of acute and subacute toxicities of aqueous ethanolic extract of leaves of Senna alata (L.) Roxb (Ceasalpiniaceae) ... Significant variation (P<0.05) of the body weight was observed after 26 days of treatment, in some biochemicals index of serum and 20% liver homogenates (glutathione , alkaline phosphatase ...

  4. Mechanism of Innate Resistance to Viral Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-12-01

    40% of spleen cells from He or RV mice. RAMB was cytotoxic only in the presence of C’ ( guinea pig ). Spleen cells were counhed after treatment and... encephalomyelitis . By day 12 1 of 4 mice given 2x10" SC and 3 of 4 mice given 1x0 8 SC also had encephalitis or myelitis. In each case where...nonsuppura- tive encephalomyelitis . Neuronal necrosis was prominent in hippo- campus and frontal cortex. HAI antibody titers during early stages of

  5. Four cases of gabab receptor encephalitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szots, Monika; Blaabjerg, M.; Kondziella, D

    2016-01-01

    loss of short-term memory, but no epilepsy. Without immunotherapy, his memory spontaneously improved up to mild cognitive impairment in six weeks. GABAbR antibodies persisted in his serum, and 18 months later, FDG-PET detected abnormal mediastinal lymph nodes and small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Another...... in three patients. Only the patient, who spontaneously improved, survived for more than 24 months. In summary, our cases show that (i) GABAbR encephalitis may develop without epilepsy; (ii) the severe short-term memory loss can spontaneously improve; (iii) persistent hyponatremia can be present...

  6. Profound Autonomic Instability Complicated by Multiple Episodes of Cardiac Asystole and Refractory Bradycardia in a Patient with Anti-NMDA Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie R. Mehr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis (anti-NMDARE is autoimmune encephalitis primarily affecting young adults and children. First described about a decade ago, it frequently manifests as a syndrome that includes progressive behavioral changes, psychosis, central hypoventilation, seizures, and autonomic instability. Although cardiac arrhythmias often accompany anti-NMDARE, the need for long-term electrophysiological support is rare. We describe the case of NMDARE whose ICU course was complicated by progressively worsening episodes of tachyarrhythmia-bradyarrhythmia and episodes of asystole from which she was successfully resuscitated. Her life-threatening episodes of autonomic instability were successfully controlled only after the placement of a permanent pacemaker during her ICU stay. She made a clinical recovery and was discharged to a skilled nursing facility after a protracted hospital course.

  7. Glucagon-like peptide-1 analog, Liraglutide, delays onset of experimental autoimmune encephalitis in Lewis rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Della Valle, Brian William; Brix, Gitte S.; Brock, Birgitte

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Recent findings indicate that metabolic disturbances are involved in multiple sclerosis (MS) pathology and influence the susceptibility to treatment, directing attention toward anti-diabetic drugs such as metformin and pioglitazone. Liraglutide, a drug of the glucagon-like peptide-1......, that liraglutide treatment delays onset of EAE in Lewis rats and is associated with improved protective capacity against oxidative stress. These data suggest GLP-1 receptor agonists should be investigated further as a potential therapy for MS...... by blinded observers. Animals were killed at peak disease severity (day 11) or if exceeding humane endpoint (clinical score ≥4). Protein levels of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), amyloid precursor protein (APP), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were determined. Results: Liraglutide...

  8. Clinical features of subacute course of radiation disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasnyuk V.I.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to show the clinical features of subacute course of subacute course of radiation disease and how they differ from the typical manifestations of acute and chronic radiation syndrome. Material and methods. Materials of the Burnasyan Federal Medical and Biophysical Center Register of acute radiation disease (ARS in the Former USSR and Russia and Materials of a Burnasyan Federal Medical and Biophysical Center database of workers "Mayak" with chronic radiation syndrome (CRS were analyzed. There were selected 22 patients with radiation syndrome due to fractionated or prolonged accidental exposure (the main group of patients. There were formed two subgroups for comparison: patients with a typical marrowy syndrome of acute radiation disease and with chronic radiation syndrome. Statistical analysis of results was made by means of statistical software package Statistica v. 6.1 for Windows (StatSoft Inc., USA and Microsoft Excel 2010. Results. It was found that subacute course of radiation syndrome is possible under radiation exposure with medium dose rate in the range of 0.1-0.3 Gy/day Early symptoms of the disease as a primary reaction symptoms are completely absent. First complaints appeared in the earliest one month after the start of work in adverse conditions, on the average 6 months. In the period of formation there is a pancytopenia in the peripheral blood. Duration of the formation period was also determined. In this case radiation cataracts in patients are not observed. After the termination of radiation exposure hematopoietic recovery is slow, possibly incomplete with a high probability of hemoblastosis development. Conclusions. There has been described the subacute course of radiation disease by analyzing the clinical material of patients with radiation syndrome, there has been analyzed the clinical criteria that distinguish subacute radiation syndrome from acute and chronic.

  9. Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1 Encephalitis Mimicking Glioblastoma: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke A. Cunha

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM often presents as a brain mass with encephalitis. In a patient with GBM, subsequent presentation with new onset encephalitis may be due to another GBM or Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 encephalitis. We present a case of HSV-1 encephalitis mimicking GBM in a patient with previous GBM.

  10. Antithyroideaantistof hos to patienter med subakut dementiel udvikling, ataksi og myoklonus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondziella, Daniel; Hansen, Klaus; Gonzalez, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Hashimoto encephalitis (HE) is a steroid-responsive autoimmune encephalitis with anti-thyroid antibodies; Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a prion disease. Both disorders can have a similar clinical presentation. Two women, 67 and 63 year-old, with subacute dementia, ataxia, myoclonus and posit......Hashimoto encephalitis (HE) is a steroid-responsive autoimmune encephalitis with anti-thyroid antibodies; Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a prion disease. Both disorders can have a similar clinical presentation. Two women, 67 and 63 year-old, with subacute dementia, ataxia, myoclonus...... and positive antithyroid antibodies were given oral steroids. Whereas one progressively declined and had histopathologically proven CJD, the other made a complete recovery and was diagnosed with HE. Anti-thyroid antibodies can occur in CJD, but when present in a patient with subacute dementia, ataxia...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: autoimmune Addison disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of each kidney. It is classified as an autoimmune disorder because it results from a malfunctioning immune system ... disease or their family members can have another autoimmune disorder, most commonly autoimmune thyroid disease or type 1 ...

  12. [Keratitis - Infectious or Autoimmune?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messmer, E M

    2016-07-01

    Histopathological evaluation of ocular tissues is important in differentiating between infectious and autoimmune disease. Inflammation, necrosis and keratolysis are common to most forms of keratitis. Histopathology can be of great help in identifying the causative organism, establishing a final diagnosis and/or managing the patient with herpes simplex virus keratitis, mycotic keratitis, acanthamoeba keratitis or microsporidia keratoconjunctivitis. Important pathogenetic knowledge with therapeutic relevance has been gained from histopathological studies in nummular keratitis after epidemic keratoconjunctivitis and atopic keratoconjunctivitis. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Rakhi

    2015-06-01

    Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is defined as the destruction of circulating red blood cells (RBCs) in the setting of anti-RBC autoantibodies that optimally react at 37°C. The pathophysiology of disease involves phagocytosis of autoantibody-coated RBCs in the spleen and complement-mediated hemolysis. Thus far, treatment is aimed at decreasing autoantibody production with immunosuppression or reducing phagocytosis of affected cells in the spleen. The role of complement inhibitors in warm AIHA has not been explored. This article addresses the diagnosis, etiology, and treatment of warm AIHA and highlights the role of complement in disease pathology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hyposalivation in autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Maeshima, Etsuko; Furukawa, Kanako; Maeshima, Shinichiro; Koshiba, Hiroya; Sakamoto, Wataru

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the prevalence of dry mouth among patients with autoimmune diseases other than Sj?gren?s syndrome. One hundred and forty-four patients, excluding patients with primary Sj?gren?s syndrome, were enrolled in this study. The volume of saliva secreted was measured with the screening technique for estimation of salivary flow, which uses a filter paper for diagnosing dry mouth. Disturbed salivary secretion was observed in 84 (58.3?%) of the 144 patients. In the case of patients ...

  15. Rehabilitation for a child with recalcitrant anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis: case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo YH

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Yao-Hong Guo,1 Ta-Shen Kuan,1,2 Pei-Chun Hsieh,1 Wei-Chih Lien,1 Chun-Kai Chang,1 Yu-Ching Lin1–3 1Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan; 2Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan; 3Medical Device Innovation Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan Abstract: Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate (anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis is a newly recognized, potentially fatal, but treatable autoimmune disease. Good outcome predictors include milder severity of symptoms, no need for intensive care unit admission, early aggressive immunotherapy, and prompt tumor removal. We report a case of a young girl aged 3 years 2 months and diagnosed as recalcitrant anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis without any underlying neoplasm. The patient had initial symptoms of behavioral changes that progressed to generalized choreoathetosis and orofacial dyskinesia, which resulted in 6 months of hospitalization in the pediatric intensive care unit. One year after initial onset of the disease, she had only achieved the developmental age of an infant aged 6–8 months in terms of gross and fine motor skills, but she resumed total independence in activities of daily living after receiving extensive immunotherapy and 28 months of rehabilitation. Our brief review will help clinical practitioners become more familiar with this disease and the unique rehabilitation programs. Keywords: anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis, autoimmune encephalitis, rehabilitation, cognition deficits

  16. Autoimmune diseases and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komrokji, Rami S; Kulasekararaj, Austin; Al Ali, Najla H; Kordasti, Shahram; Bart-Smith, Emily; Craig, Benjamin M; Padron, Eric; Zhang, Ling; Lancet, Jeffrey E; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; List, Alan F; Mufti, Ghulam J; Epling-Burnette, Pearlie K

    2016-05-01

    Immune dysregulation and altered T-cell hemostasis play important roles in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Recent studies suggest an increased risk of MDS among patients with autoimmune diseases. Here, we investigated the prevalence of autoimmune diseases among MDS patients, comparing characteristics and outcomes in those with and without autoimmune diseases. From our study group of 1408 MDS patients, 391 (28%) had autoimmune disease, with hypothyroidism being the most common type, accounting for 44% (n = 171) of patients (12% among all MDS patients analyzed). Other autoimmune diseases with ≥5% prevalence included idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in 12% (n = 46), rheumatoid arthritis in 10% (n = 41), and psoriasis in 7% (n = 28) of patients. Autoimmune diseases were more common in female MDS patients, those with RA or RCMD WHO subtype, and those who were less dependent on red blood cell transfusion. Median overall survival (OS) was 60 months (95% CI, 50-70) for patients with autoimmune diseases versus 45 months (95% CI, 40-49) for those without (log-rank test, P = 0.006). By multivariate analysis adjusting for revised IPSS and age >60 years, autoimmune diseases were a statistically significant independent factor for OS (HR 0.78; 95% CI, 0.66-0.92; P = 0.004). The rate of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) transformation was 23% (n = 89) in MDS patients with autoimmune disease versus 30% (n = 301) in those without (P = 0.011). Patient groups did not differ in response to azacitidine or lenalidomide treatment. Autoimmune diseases are prevalent among MDS patients. MDS patients with autoimmune diseases have better OS and less AML transformation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Autoimmune liver disease and concomitant extrahepatic autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Paolo; Fabbri, Angela; Lalanne, Claudine; Lenzi, Marco; Muratori, Luigi

    2015-10-01

    To assess the frequency and clinical impact of associated extrahepatic autoimmune diseases (EAD) on autoimmune liver diseases (ALD). We investigated 608 patients with ALD (327 autoimmune hepatitis - AIH and 281 primary biliary cirrhosis - PBC) for concomitant EAD. In both AIH and PBC, we observed a high prevalence of EAD (29.9 and 42.3%, respectively); both diseases showed a significant association with autoimmune thyroid disease, followed by autoimmune skin disease, celiac disease, and vasculitis in AIH patients and sicca syndrome, CREST syndrome, and celiac disease in PBC patients. At diagnosis, AIH patients with concurrent EAD were more often asymptomatic than patients with isolated AIH (Pautoimmune thyroid disease. In the light of our results, all patients with an EAD should be assessed for the concomitant presence of an asymptomatic ALD.

  18. Japanese Encephalitis: Estimating Future Trends in Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Metelka

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Limited surveillance programs and lack of diagnostic laboratory testing capacity in many low and middle income Asian countries have made it difficult to validate epidemiological patterns and anticipate future changes in disease risk. In this study, we consider the case of Japanese Encephalitis in Asia and examine how populations of human hosts and animal reservoirs are expected to change over the next three decades. Growth was modelled at the sub-national level for rural and urban areas to estimate where high-density, susceptible populations will potentially overlap with populations of the virus' amplifying host. High-risk areas based on these projections were compared to the current distribution of Japanese Encephalitis, and known immunization activities in order to identify areas of highest priority for concern. Results indicated that mapping JE risk factors at the sub-national level is an effective way to contextualize and supplement JE surveillance data. New patterns of risk factor change occurring in Southeast Asia were identified, including around major urban areas experiencing both urbanization and growth in pig populations. A hotspot analysis of pig-to-population ratio found a significant spatial cluster extending northward through Southeast Asia and interior China. Mapping forecasted changes in risk factors for JE highlights regions vulnerable to emerging zoonoses and may be an important tool for developing effecting transnational health policies.

  19. Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisand, Kai; Peterson, Pärt

    2015-07-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene. This review focuses on the clinical and immunological features of APECED, summarizes the current knowledge on the function of AIRE and discusses the importance of autoantibodies in disease diagnosis and prognosis. Additionally, we review the outcome of recent immunomodulatory treatments in APECED patients.

  20. Is Tolerance Broken in Autoimmunity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dama Laxminarayana

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases are classified into about 80 different types based on their specificity related to system, organ and/or tissue. About 5% of the western population is affected by this anomaly, but its worldwide incidence is unknown. Autoimmune diseases are heterogeneous in nature and clinical manifestations range from benign disorders to life-threatening conditions. Autoimmunity strikes at any stage of life, but age and/or gender also play role in onset of some of these anomalies. The autoimmune pathogenesis is initiated by the origination of autoantigens, which leads to the development of autoantibodies followed by auto-immunogenicity and the ultimate onset of autoimmunity. There is a lack of suitable therapies to treat autoimmune diseases, because mechanisms involved in the onset of these anomalies were poorly understood. Present therapies are limited to symptomatic treatment and come with severe side effects. Here, I described the molecular mechanisms and cellular events involved in the initiation of autoimmunity and proposed better strategies to modulate such molecular and cellular anomalies, which will help in preventing and/or controlling autoimmune pathogenesis and ultimately aid in enhancing the quality of life.

  1. Human Hendra virus infection causes acute and relapsing encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, K T; Robertson, T; Ong, B B; Chong, J W; Yaiw, K C; Wang, L F; Ansford, A J; Tannenberg, A

    2009-06-01

    To study the pathology of two cases of human Hendra virus infection, one with no clinical encephalitis and one with relapsing encephalitis. Autopsy tissues were investigated by light microscopy, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. In the patient with acute pulmonary syndrome but not clinical acute encephalitis, vasculitis was found in the brain, lung, heart and kidney. Occasionally, viral antigens were demonstrated in vascular walls but multinucleated endothelial syncytia were absent. In the lung, there was severe inflammation, necrosis and viral antigens in type II pneumocytes and macrophages. The rare kidney glomerulus showed inflammation and viral antigens in capillary walls and podocytes. Discrete necrotic/vacuolar plaques in the brain parenchyma were associated with antigens and viral RNA. Brain inflammation was mild although CD68(+) microglia/macrophages were significantly increased. Cytoplasmic viral inclusions and antigens and viral RNA in neurones and ependyma suggested viral replication. In the case of relapsing encephalitis, there was severe widespread meningoencephalitis characterized by neuronal loss, macrophages and other inflammatory cells, reactive blood vessels and perivascular cuffing. Antigens and viral RNA were mainly found in neurones. Vasculitis was absent in all the tissues examined. The case of acute Hendra virus infection demonstrated evidence of systemic infection and acute encephalitis. The case of relapsing Hendra virus encephalitis showed no signs of extraneural infection but in the brain, extensive inflammation and infected neurones were observed. Hendra virus can cause acute and relapsing encephalitis and the findings suggest that the pathology and pathogenesis are similar to Nipah virus infection.

  2. Current topics in autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Luigi; Muratori, Paolo; Granito, Alessandro; Pappas, Giorgios; Cassani, Fabio; Lenzi, Marco

    2010-11-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic liver disease of unknown aetiology characterized by interface hepatitis, hypergammaglobulinaemia and circulating autoantibodies. In the last decade a number of advancements have been made in the field of clinical and basic research: the simplified diagnostic criteria, the complete response defined as normalization of transaminase levels, the molecular identification of the antigenic targets of anti-liver cytosol antibody type 1 and anti-soluble liver antigen, the detection of anti-actin antibodies, the description of de novo autoimmune hepatitis after liver transplantation for non-autoimmune liver diseases, the characterization of autoimmune hepatitis with overlapping features of primary biliary cirrhosis or primary sclerosing cholangitis, the preliminary experience with novel treatment strategies based on cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil and budesonide, the role played by "impaired" regulatory T cells and the development of novel animal models of autoimmune hepatitis. Copyright © 2010 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Recalcitrant hypocalcaemia in autoimmune enteropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, Myfanwy; Fairchild, Jan; Moore, David; Moore, Lynette; Henning, Paul; Tham, Elaine

    2014-12-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy syndrome is a monogenic disorder associated with autoimmune destruction of both endocrine and nonendocrine tissues. The classic triad includes candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and Addison disease. Up to 25% of patients with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy syndrome also have gastrointestinal manifestations, which can have an impact on the management of other aspects of the disease. The management of the case discussed was challenging because of the complex interplay between the manifestations and treatment of his hypoparathyroidism, Addison disease, and autoimmune enteropathy. Attempts at management of hypocalcemia were largely unsuccessful until the introduction of immunosuppressive therapy for autoimmune enteropathy. This case supports early consideration of immunosuppression in this condition. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  4. Autoimmune comorbidity in achalasia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Hernández, Fernanda; Furuzawa-Carballeda, Janette; Hernández-Molina, Gabriela; Alejandro-Medrano, Edgar; Núñez-Álvarez, Carlos A; Hernández-Ramírez, Diego F; Azamar-Llamas, Daniel; Olivares-Martínez, Elizabeth; Breña, Blanca; Palacios, Axel; Valdovinos, Miguel A; Coss-Adame, Enrique; Ramos-Ávalos, Bárbara; Torres-Landa, Samuel; Hernández-Ávila, Axel A; Flores-Nájera, Athenea; Torres-Villalobos, Gonzalo

    2018-01-01

    Idiopathic achalasia is a rare esophageal motor disorder. The disease state manifests local and systemic inflammation, and it appears that an autoimmune component and specific autoantibodies participate in the pathogenesis. The study aims to determine the prevalence of autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases in patients with achalasia and compare the results with those from patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). It was a cross-sectional and included 114 patients with idiopathic achalasia and 114 age-matched and sex-matched control patients with GERD. Data on the presence of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, the time of presentation, and any family history of autoimmune disease were obtained from the hospital's medical records. Seventy three (64%) were female patients (mean age: 42.3 ± 15.5; median disease duration: 12 months). We identified the presence of autoimmune disease in 19 patients with achalasia (16.7%), hypothyroidism was the main diagnosis, and it was present in 52.6% of patients compared with 4.2% in controls. Thirteen of the 19 achalasia patients (68.4%) with autoimmune disease had history of familial autoimmunity. We identified 11 achalasia (9.6%) and 5 GERD patients (4.16%) with an inflammatory condition. Compared with the GERD, the achalasia group was 3.8 times more likely to have an autoimmune disease (95% CI: 1.47-9.83), 3.0 times more likely to have thyroidopathies (95% CI: 1.00-9.03), and 3.02 times more likely to suffer from any chronic inflammatory disease (95% CI: 1.65-6.20). The non-negligible number of patients with autoimmune diseases identified among the patients with idiopathic achalasia supports the hypothesis that achalasia has an autoimmune component. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Postencephalitic epilepsy and drug-resistant epilepsy after infectious and antibody-associated encephalitis in childhood: Clinical and etiologic risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Sekhar C; Mohammad, Shekeeb S; Hacohen, Yael; Tantsis, Esther; Prelog, Kristina; Barnes, Elizabeth H; Gill, Deepak; Lim, Ming J; Brilot, Fabienne; Vincent, Angela; Dale, Russell C

    2016-01-01

    To define the risk factors for postencephalitic epilepsy (PE) and drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE) in childhood following infectious and autoimmune encephalitis, we included 147 acute encephalitis patients with a median follow-up of 7.3 years (range 2-15.8 years). PE was defined as the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) for ≥24 months, and DRE was defined as the persistence of seizures despite ≥2 appropriate AEDs at final follow-up. PE and DRE were diagnosed in 31 (21%) and 15 (10%) of patients, respectively. The features during acute encephalitis predictive of DRE (presented as odds ratio [OR] with confidence intervals [CIs]) were status epilepticus (OR 10.8, CI 3.4-34.3), visual disturbance (6.4, 1.4-29.9), focal seizures (6.2, 1.9-20.6), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) hippocampal/amygdala involvement (5.0, 1.7-15.4), intensive care admission (4.7, 1.4-15.4), use of >3 AEDs (4.5, 1.2-16.1), MRI gadolinium enhancement (4.1, 1.2-14.2), any seizure (3.9, 1.1-14.4), and electroencephalography (EEG) epileptiform discharges (3.9, 1.3-12.0). On multivariable regression analysis, only status epilepticus remained predictive of DRE in all models. DRE was common in herpes simplex virus (3/9, 33%) and unknown (8/40, 20%) encephalitis, but absent in acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) (0/32, 0%), enterovirus (0/18), and anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-NMDAR encephalitis (0/9). We have identified risk factors for DRE and demonstrated "high-risk," and "low-risk" etiologies. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.

  6. Hyperfixation of Tc-99m ECD in subacute cortical infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Seung; Kweon, Sun Uck; Ryu, Jin Sook; Moon, Dae Hyuk; Lee, Hee Kyung [College of Medicine, Ulsan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    It has been known that hyperfixation of Tc-99m ECD (HF) is not shown in subacute cerebral infarction because the brain distribution of Tc-99m ECD reflects not only perfusion but also the metabolic status of brain tissue. However, we observed several cases with HF in the subacute pure cortical infarction. To find out the cause of HF in subacute cortical infarction. We assessed the difference in associated cerebral hemodynamics and clinical findings between the subacute cortical infarctions with and without HF. We reviewed 16 patients (63.8{+-}8.6 yr, M/F: 15/1) with pure cortical infarction not involving adjacent subcortical white matter on MRI. All patients underwent acetazolamide stress brain perfusion SPECT using Tc-99m ECD and MRI at subacute period (7.3{+-}4.4 days from ictus). Uptake of Tc-99m ECD in infarcted cortex was assessed visually comparing the contralateral side. To assess the difference in associate clinical findings between the infarctions with and without HF, rCVR of the cerebral territory including infarcted cortex, extent of Gd-enhancement on MRI. Intervals between SPECT and ictus, and the presence of associated ICA stenosis were evaluated. Infarctions were focal (n=8) or multifocal (n=8) and located in frontoparietal cortices on MRI. Twelve patients were accompanied with ipsilateral ICA stenosis. Resting SPECT showed increased cortical uptake (=HF) in 7 patients and decreased in 9. rCVR of the MCA territory was preserved in all of the 7 patients with HF, compared with 4 of the 9 patients without HF (p=0.03). Gd-enhancement was minimal in all of the 7 patients with HF, compared with of the 0 patients without HF (p=0.03). Presence of ipsilateral ICA stenosis and intervals from ictus were not different (p>0.1) Subacute cerebral cortical infarction with HF was more frequently associated with preserved rCVR and minimal destruction of the blood-brain barrier than that without HF. Our findings suggest that HF may result from luxury perfusion of

  7. Toxoplasma encephalitis: an HIV/AIDS patient with cerebral mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seza Ayse inal

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasmic encephalitis is an opportunistic infection, which develops as a result of reactivation of the latent tissue cysts of Toxoplasma gondii in patients with reduced CD4+ T lymphocytes. Amongst patients with human immunodeficiency virus or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, toxoplasmic encephalitis is one of the leading causes of the intracerebral involvement. In this report, we present a toxoplasmic encephalitis case, who has admitted with neurological symptoms and fever. The patient was identified human immunodeficiency virus positive while he was under investigation for cerebral mass lesion, The patient has fully recovered by antiprotozoal and antiretroviral therapy. [Cukurova Med J 2017; 42(1.000: 184-188

  8. A case of Herpes encephalitis followed-up by CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Yukiko; Nagai, Shinya; Nishibayashi, Yohei; Okamoto, Hirofumi; Goishi, Junji

    1982-01-01

    A 9-month-old girl was admitted with lethargy, fever and convulsion. EGG showed localized slow waves in the right temporal region. CT showed a localized low density area accompanied by a hemorrhagic focus in the right frontal lobe. Herpes encephalitis was suspected, and cytosine arabinoside was administered. The antibody titers of the serum and cerebrospinal fluid against herpes simplex virus type I significantly rose. Clinically the patient recovered without serious sequelae. CT revealed marked cerebral atrophy and subdural hematoma which were surgically treated. The importance of CT in the diagnosis and prognosis of herpes encephalitis was argued, and CT findings of herpes encephalitis were discussed. (Chiba, N.)

  9. CT findings in a case of Japanese encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyomasu, Teruo; Nakashima, Kenichi; Matsumoto, Tomie; Shida, Kenshiro

    1982-01-01

    A 44-year-old man was admitted to a hospital on August 1980, with chief complaints of high fever and consciousness disturbance. Three months later he was referred to our hospital. Neurological examination revealed mental deterioration, amnesia, bilateral pyramidal signs, tremor, truncal ataxia and others. Serum CF titer to Japanese encephalitis virus was 1 : 16. He was diagnosed as having Japanese encephalitis from the clinical features and serological response. CT scans showed low density areas in bilateral thalami, the left ganglia, left internal capsule, left substantia nigra and others. It is noticeable that the CT findings were compatible with the pathological changes of Japanese encephalitis. (author)

  10. Limbic Encephalitis Driven by a Pleural Mesothelioma: A Paraneoplastic Complication

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    Jacob O. Day

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes have only been described with pleural mesothelioma in five cases. We have described a 72-year-old man who developed anterograde amnesia 27 months after diagnosis of epithelioid pleural mesothelioma. Investigations revealed a limbic encephalitis with no alternative causes identified. Limbic encephalitis is a classical paraneoplastic syndrome and presentation within five years of a cancer with no other causes identified is sufficient to diagnose a paraneoplastic etiology. This is the first case of isolated paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis driven by a pleural mesothelioma.

  11. Incidence of Japanese Encephalitis among Acute Encephalitis Syndrome Cases in West Bengal, India

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    Bhaswati Bandyopadhyay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. Japanese encephalitis (JE is the most important cause of acute and epidemic viral encephalitis. Every year sporadic JE cases are reported from the various districts of West Bengal, indicating its endemicity in this state. JE vaccination programme has been undertaken by the State Health Department of West Bengal. This study was aimed at seeing the present scenario of JE among acute encephalitis syndrome (AES cases in West Bengal. Materials and Methods. Blood and/or CSF samples were referred from suspected AES cases to the referral virology laboratory of the Calcutta School of Tropical Medicine from different hospitals of Kolkata. IgM antibody capture ELISA was performed on the CSF and serum samples by JE virus MAC ELISA kit supplied by the National Institute of Virology, Pune. Results. The present study reveals that 22.76% and 5% of the AES cases were positive for JE IgM in 2011 and 2012, respectively. JE is mainly prevalent in children and adolescents below 20 years of age with no gender predilection. Although the percentages of JE positive cases were high in 2011, it sharply decreased thereafter possibly due to better awareness programs, due to mass vaccination, or simply due to natural epidemiological niche periodicity due to herd immunity.

  12. Incidence of Japanese encephalitis among acute encephalitis syndrome cases in West Bengal, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Bhaswati; Bhattacharyya, Indrani; Adhikary, Srima; Mondal, Saiantani; Konar, Jayashree; Dawar, Nidhi; Biswas, Asit; Bhattacharya, Nemai

    2013-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is the most important cause of acute and epidemic viral encephalitis. Every year sporadic JE cases are reported from the various districts of West Bengal, indicating its endemicity in this state. JE vaccination programme has been undertaken by the State Health Department of West Bengal. This study was aimed at seeing the present scenario of JE among acute encephalitis syndrome (AES) cases in West Bengal. Blood and/or CSF samples were referred from suspected AES cases to the referral virology laboratory of the Calcutta School of Tropical Medicine from different hospitals of Kolkata. IgM antibody capture ELISA was performed on the CSF and serum samples by JE virus MAC ELISA kit supplied by the National Institute of Virology, Pune. The present study reveals that 22.76% and 5% of the AES cases were positive for JE IgM in 2011 and 2012, respectively. JE is mainly prevalent in children and adolescents below 20 years of age with no gender predilection. Although the percentages of JE positive cases were high in 2011, it sharply decreased thereafter possibly due to better awareness programs, due to mass vaccination, or simply due to natural epidemiological niche periodicity due to herd immunity.

  13. Autoimmune premature ovarian failure

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    Beata Komorowska

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Premature ovarian failure (POF, also termed as primary ovarian insufficiency (POI, is a highly heterogenous condition affecting 0.5-3.0% of women in childbearing age. These young women comprise quite a formidable group with unique physical and psychological needs that require special attention. Premature ovarian senescence (POS in all of its forms evolves insidiously as a basically asymptomatic process, leading to complete loss of ovarian function, and POI/POF diagnoses are currently made at relatively late stages. Well-known and well-documented risk factors exist, and the presence or suspicion of autoimmune disorder should be regarded as an important one. Premature ovarian failure is to some degree predictable in its occurrence and should be considered while encountering young women with loss of menstrual regularity, especially when there is a concomitant dysfunction in the immune system.

  14. Selfie: Autoimmunity, boon or bane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsan, Haseeb

    2017-01-01

    The immune system provides protection to tissues damaged by infectious microrganisms or physical damage. In autoimmune diseases, the immune system recognizes and attacks its own tissues, i.e., self-destruction. Various agents such as genetic factors and environmental triggers are thought to play a major role in the development of autoimmune diseases. A common feature of all autoimmune diseases is the presence of autoantibodies and inflammation, including mononuclear phagocytes, autoreactive T lymphocytes, and autoantibody producing B cells (plasma cells). It has long been known that B cells produce autoantibodies and, thereby, contribute to the pathogenesis of many autoimmune diseases. Autoimmune diseases can be classified as organ-specific or non-organ specific depending on whether the autoimmune response is directed against a particular tissue or against widespread antigens as in chronic inflammatory autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Both SLE and RA are characterized by the presence of autoantibodies which play a major role in their etiopathogenesis. SLE is characterized by circulating antibodies and immune complex deposition that can trigger an inflammatory damage in organs. RA is a progressive inflammatory disease in which T cells, B cells, and pro-inflammatory cytokines play a key role in its pathophysiology.

  15. Speech and language therapy for aphasia following subacute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyuncu, Engin; Çam, Pınar; Altınok, Nermin; Çallı, Duygu Ekinci; Duman, Tuba Yarbay; Özgirgin, Neşe

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the time window, duration and intensity of optimal speech and language therapy applied to aphasic patients with subacute stroke in our hospital. The study consisted of 33 patients being hospitalized for stroke rehabilitation in our hospital with first stroke but without previous history of speech and language therapy. Sixteen sessions of impairment-based speech and language therapy were applied to the patients, 30-60 minutes per day, 2 days a week, for 8 successive weeks. Aphasia assessment in stroke patients was performed with Gülhane Aphasia Test-2 before and after treatment. Compared with before treatment, fluency of speech, listening comprehension, reading comprehension, oral motor evaluation, automatic speech, repetition and naming were improved after treatment. This suggests that 16 seesions of speech and language therapy, 30-60 minutes per day, 2 days a week, for 8 successive weeks, are effective in the treatment of aphasic patients with subacute stroke.

  16. Virtual Reality Training for Upper Extremity in Subacute Stroke (VIRTUES)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunner, Iris; Skouen, Jan Sture; Hofstad, Håkon

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effectiveness of upper extremity virtual reality rehabilitation training (VR) to time-matched conventional training (CT) in the subacute phase after stroke. Methods: In this randomized, controlled, single-blind phase III multicenter trial, 120 participants with upper...... and 10 degrees finger extension or less, respectively. The training comprised a minimum of sixteen 60-minute sessions over 4 weeks. The primary outcome measure was the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT); secondary outcome measures were the Box and Blocks Test and Functional Independence Measure. Patients...... 13) points, respectively. Improvement was also similar for our subgroup analysis with mild to moderate and severe upper extremity paresis. Conclusions: Additional upper extremity VR training was not superior but equally as effective as additional CT in the subacute phase after stroke. VR may...

  17. Fluent Aphasia From Herpes Simplex Encephalitis

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    Fariba Yadegari

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The present case report introduces a patient with fluent aphasia, anterograde amnesia and anosmia due to herpes simplex encephalitis after her first delivery. The left medial temporal lobe was one of the main areas involved. On aphasia testing she showed severe anomia on both confrontation and free recall, agraphia, alexia, repetition disorder and some auditory comprehension impairments. Therapy was focused on the following issues: phonological output lexicon , using graphemes as a source of reestablishing phonological representation; describing pictures to reinforce free recall and self-cuing word retrieval strategies; sequencing the events for language memory reinforcement, etc. Results showed improvement in confrontational naming, free recall, correct responses without priming, writing on dictation, spontaneous writing and reading comprehension.

  18. A biometeorological model of an encephalitis vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raddatz, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    Multiple linear regression techniques and seven years of data were used to build a biometeorological model of Winnipeg's mean daily levels of Culex tarsalis Coquillett. An eighth year of data was used to test the model. Hydrologic accounting of precipitation, evapotranspiration and runoff provided estimates of wetness while the warmness of the season was gauged in terms of the average temperature difference from normal and a threshold antecedent temperature regime. These factors were found to be highly correlated with the time-series of Cx. tarsalis counts. The impact of mosquito adulticiding measures was included in the model via a control effectiveness parameter. An activity-level adjustment, based on mean daily temperatures, was also made to the counts. This model can, by monitoring the weather, provide forecasts of Cx. tarsalis populations for Winnipeg with a lead-time of three weeks, thereby, contributing to an early warning of an impending Western Equine Encephalitis outbreak.

  19. Milrinone in Enterovirus 71 Brain Stem Encephalitis

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    SHIH-MIN eWANG

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 was implicated in a widespread outbreak of hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD across the Asia Pacific area since 1997 and has also been reported sporadically in patients with brain stem encephalitis. Neurogenic shock with pulmonary edema (PE is a fatal complication of EV71 infection. Among inotropic agents, milrinone is selected as a therapeutic agent for EV71- induced PE due to its immunopathogenesis. Milrinone is a type III phosphodiesterase inhibitor that has both inotropic and vasodilator effects. Its clinical efficacy has been shown by modulating inflammation, reducing sympathetic over-activity, and improving survival in patients with EV71-associated PE. Milrinone exhibits immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory effects in the management of systemic inflammatory responses in severe EV71 infection.

  20. MRI findings of herpes simplex encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hye Kyung; Chang, Kee Hyun; Han, Moon Hee; Kim, In One; Cha, Sang Hoon; Kim, Sang Joon

    1992-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the MR findings of 12 patients with herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) (8 months - 64 years old). MR imaging was performed on either a 0.5T (6 patients) or 2.0T (6 patients) superconducting unit with spin echo pulse sequences. The most common and characteristic MR finding consisted of non-hemorrhagic lesions in the cortices of the temporal lobes(12), and insular(6), either bilateral(7) or unilateral(5). The frontal lobe and cingulate gyrus were involved in 4 and 2 patients respectively. Petechial hemorrhage was found in 3 patients. Non-hemorrhagic lesions were shown as high signal intensities on proton and T2WI, and iso- or low signal intensities on T1WI. In conclusion, MR imaging findings described above appear to be characteristic of HSE and were found to be extremely valuable in the diagnosis of HSE

  1. Milrinone in Enterovirus 71 Brain Stem Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shih-Min

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) was implicated in a widespread outbreak of hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) across the Asia Pacific area since 1997 and has also been reported sporadically in patients with brain stem encephalitis. Neurogenic shock with pulmonary edema (PE) is a fatal complication of EV71 infection. Among inotropic agents, milrinone is selected as a therapeutic agent for EV71- induced PE due to its immunopathogenesis. Milrinone is a type III phosphodiesterase inhibitor that has both inotropic and vasodilator effects. Its clinical efficacy has been shown by modulating inflammation, reducing sympathetic over-activity, and improving survival in patients with EV71-associated PE. Milrinone exhibits immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory effects in the management of systemic inflammatory responses in severe EV71 infection.

  2. Subacute bacterial endocarditis (SBE due to Streptococcus gordonii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Battista

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Endocarditis is an inflammatory state of the endothelium that promotes thrombus formation and tissue damage on the surface of heart valves. Recent studies have reported endocarditis mortality rates ranging from 12% to 46% (2008. The Streptococcus gordonii is a normal inhabitant of the human oral cavity. It is a component of the microbial communities responsible of plaque formation, associated with dental caries and also regarded as the main causative agent in the development of subacute bacterial endocarditis (SBE.

  3. Paracoccidioidomycosis: acute-subacute clinical form, juvenile type*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Silvio Alencar; Lastória, Joel Carlos; de Camargo, Rosangela Maria Pires; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar

    2016-01-01

    The authors report aspects of paracoccidioidomycosis, acute-subacute clinical form, juvenile type, in a 19-year-old female patient. Paracoccidioidomycosis, juvenile type, classically occurs in young patients, both sexes, with lymphoma-like aspects as initial presentation. However, following the natural history of the disease the lymph nodes assume patterns of infectious disease, as an abscess and fistulae. Systemic dissemination of the disease can occur and lethality and morbidity are significant in this clinical presentation. PMID:27438214

  4. Paracoccidioidomycosis: acute-subacute clinical form, juvenile type*

    OpenAIRE

    Marques, Silvio Alencar; Last?ria, Joel Carlos; de Camargo, Rosangela Maria Pires; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: The authors report aspects of paracoccidioidomycosis, acute-subacute clinical form, juvenile type, in a 19-year-old female patient. Paracoccidioidomycosis, juvenile type, classically occurs in young patients, both sexes, with lymphoma-like aspects as initial presentation. However, following the natural history of the disease the lymph nodes assume patterns of infectious disease, as an abscess and fistulae. Systemic dissemination of the disease can occur and lethality and morbidity a...

  5. Paracoccidioidomycosis: acute-subacute clinical form, juvenile type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Silvio Alencar; Lastória, Joel Carlos; Camargo, Rosangela Maria Pires de; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar

    2016-01-01

    The authors report aspects of paracoccidioidomycosis, acute-subacute clinical form, juvenile type, in a 19-year-old female patient. Paracoccidioidomycosis, juvenile type, classically occurs in young patients, both sexes, with lymphoma-like aspects as initial presentation. However, following the natural history of the disease the lymph nodes assume patterns of infectious disease, as an abscess and fistulae. Systemic dissemination of the disease can occur and lethality and morbidity are significant in this clinical presentation.

  6. Adult herpes simplex encephalitis: fifteen years' experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera-Mestre, Antoni; Gubieras, Laura; Martínez-Yelamos, Sergio; Cabellos, Carmen; Fernández-Viladrich, Pedro

    2009-03-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is the most frequent cause of sporadic necrotizing encephalitis in adults. The aim of this study is to describe the characteristics of HSE and the factors influencing its outcome. Retrospective study of patients diagnosed with HSE in a tertiary care teaching hospital over a 15-year period. Diagnosis was based on a consistent clinical profile for HSE, plus either a PCR-positive CSF HSV study or consistent brain neuroimaging findings. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to the modified Rankin Scale: good outcome (Grades =3). Thirty-five patients were included. Mean age was 53.9 years. More than half presented febricula or fever, headache, disorientation, behavioral changes, decreased level of consciousness, or neurological deficit. CSF glucose concentration was normal in all patients and WBC count was normal in 8 (23%). PCR for HSV was positive in 92% and cranial MRI was suggestive of HSE in 100% of patients. Mortality was 8.6%. In relation to outcome, age (OR=1.079; 95% CI, 1.023-1.138) and serum albumin level at admission (OR=0.87; 95% CI, 0.794-0.954) were independent prognostic factors at discharge. At 6 months, days of fever after initiation of acyclovir therapy (OR=1.219; 95% CI, 1.046-1.422) and serum albumin level at admission (OR=0.917; 95% CI, 0.87-0.967) were independent prognostic factors. Normal brain MRI or detection of low CSF glucose concentration requires consideration of diagnoses other than HSE. Age, serum albumin level at admission, and days of fever after initiation of acyclovir therapy were independent prognostic factors of the disease.

  7. Infectious meningitis and encephalitis in adults in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodilsen, Jacob; Storgaard, Merete; Larsen, Lykke

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To monitor epidemiological trends of infectious meningitis (bacterial and viral) and encephalitis in Denmark. METHODS: Nation-wide prospective observational study of all cases with proven community-acquired infectious meningitis and encephalitis in adults treated in all departments...... identified 252 cases of viral meningitis (3.6/100,000/year), 214 cases of bacterial meningitis (3.1/100,000/year), and 96 cases of infectious encephalitis (1.4/100,000/year). In bacterial meningitis, Streptococcus pneumoniae was most frequent (n=101) followed by Staphylococcus aureus (n=24) and β......-haemolytic streptococci (n=14). Meningococcal meningitis was rare (n=11). In encephalitis, Herpes simplex virus-1 was most common (n=37) followed by Varicella zoster virus (n=20), while Varicella zoster virus (n=61) was most common in viral meningitis followed by enterovirus (n=50) and Herpes simplex virus-2 (n=46). Case...

  8. Frequent rhabdomyolysis in anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jung-Ah; Lee, Soon-Tae; Kim, Tae-Joon; Moon, Jangsup; Sunwoo, Jun-Sang; Byun, Jung-Ick; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Jung, Ki-Young; Chu, Kon; Lee, Sang Kun

    2016-09-15

    The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical presentation and provocation factors of rhabdomyolysis in anti-NMDAR encephalitis. Among the 16 patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis in our institutional cohort, nine patients had elevated CK enzyme levels and clinical evidence of rhabdomyolysis. Rhabdomyolysis was more frequent after immunotherapy. The use of dopamine receptor blocker (DRB) increased the risk of rhabdomyolysis. None of the patients without rhabdomyolysis received DRBs. Rhabdomyolysis is a frequent complication in anti-NMDAR encephalitis and more common after immunotherapy and the use of DRBs increases the risk. Therefore, DRBs should be administered carefully in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Enterovirus 71 Brainstem Encephalitis and Cognitive and Motor Deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Follow-up studies were conducted in 63 previously healthy children with enterovirus 71 brainstem encephalitis (49 stage II, 7 stage Ilia, and 7 stage Illb at National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan.

  10. Subacute and acute fasciolosis in sheep in southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiss, Leticia; de Lourdes Adrien, Maria; Marcolongo-Pereira, Clairton; Assis-Brasil, Nathalia D; Sallis, Eliza S V; Riet-Correa, Franklin; Ruas, Jerônimo L; Schild, Ana Lucia

    2013-02-01

    Eight outbreaks of acute and subacute fasciolosis are reported in sheep in the municipality of Santa Vitória do Palmar, southern Brazil, in areas used for irrigated rice cultivation, which are subject to frequent flooding. Two outbreaks occurred mid-winter during July and August, and six occurred during spring and early summer. Morbidity ranged from 3 to 66.7 %, and mortality ranged from 3 to 50 %. Clinical signs included weight loss, mucosal pallor, apathy, depression, muscle tremors, and drooling; these were followed by death within approximately 24 h. Some sheep were found dead. Gross lesions were characterized by an irregular liver capsule with fibrin deposition and hemorrhages. The liver parenchyma contained hemorrhagic tracts or irregular clear areas alternated with dark hemorrhagic areas. Histologically, hemorrhagic dark red tracts of necrotic liver parenchyma and an inflammatory infiltrate were noted; these lesions coincided with the presence of immature flukes. Langhans-type giant cells, fibrous tissue, and bile duct cell proliferation were observed in subacute cases. Chronic fasciolosis is a well-known disease to farmers in southern Brazil; nevertheless, acute and subacute fasciolosis, which are more difficult to diagnose and treat, may cause important economic losses. Efficient control of fasciolosis requires integration of measures to treat infections in the definitive host, to reduce the population of snails of the genus Lymnaea, and to avoid contact between the parasite and host by appropriate pasture management.

  11. MR findings of subacute necrotizing myelopathy: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Dong Gyu; Chang, Kee Hyun; Han, Moon Hee; Kim, Hyun Jip; Kim, Chong Jai; Chi, Je G.

    1994-01-01

    Subacute necrotizing myelopathy(SNM) is a rare non-tumorous disease of spinal cord characterized by subacute clinical course of progressive neurological deterioration. We report MR findings of a patient with pathologically proved SNM. 1 case of pathologically proved subacute necrotizing myelopathy. The patients was a 56-year-old man with progressive motor weakness and sensory loss of the lower extremities, and urinary and fecal incontinence for 11 months. Spine MRI revealed diffuse enlargement of the thoracic spinal cord from T2 to T7 level. Signal intensity of the expanded spinal cord was isointense relative to normal cord on T1-weighted image and hyperintense on proton-density and T2-weighted images. On contrast enhanced T1-weighted image, there was diffuse homogeneous enhancement in the expanded cord lesion. MR demonstration of stable persistence of spinal cord lesion or atrophy over months or years with clinical findings of gradual progressive neurologic deterioration may be helpful in the diagnosis of SNM

  12. EFFECT OF POSITIONAL RELEASE TECHNIQUE IN SUBJECTS WITH SUBACUTE TRAPEZITIS

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    Sweety Charles Carvalho

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trapezius stretching combined with positional release technique (PRT have found effective in trapezitis, studies are limited to find which technique has shown effective over the other due to lack of control group. The purpose of the study is to find the effect of PRT on pain intensity, functional disability and range of motion in subjects with subacute trapezitis. Method: An experimental study design, selected subjects with subacute trapezitis was randomized into Study and Control group. Total 40 subjects, 20 subjects in each group; data was collected who completed the study. Control group received passive trapezius muscle stretching while Study group received positional release technique with passive trapezius muscle stretching for 8 sessions in 2 weeks. Outcome measurements such as Visual Analogue scale, Neck disability index and cervical Range of motion were measured. Results: There is statistically significant difference (p<0.05 showing improvement in means of VAS, NDI and Range of motion before and after intervention within the groups and there is statistically significant difference when the post-intervention means after 2 weeks of treatment were compared between Study and Control group. Conclusion: It is concluded that the Positional Release Technique with trapezius stretching found to be significantly more added effect than trapezius stretching alone in improving pain, functional disability and cervical movements for subjects with subacute trapezitis.

  13. Computed tomographic brain scan findings in Q fever encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez Aranda, F.; Romero Acebal, M.; Maestre Moreno, J.; Pachon Diaz, J.; Lopez Cortes, L.; Navarro Rodriguez, A.

    1984-07-01

    Neurological involvement in Q Fever is unusual. We present a case of encephalitis due to Coxiella Burnetii with neuroradiologic findings on CT not described previously, consisting in areas of decreased absorption coefficient in the subcortical white matter of both hemispheres, predominantly in the right. Differential diagnosis must be established from viral encephalitis, of similar clinical presentation, which may show similar CT lesions to those in this case.

  14. Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate-receptor encephalitis: diagnosis, optimal management, and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mann AP

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Andrea P Mann,1 Elena Grebenciucova,2 Rimas V Lukas21Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, 2Department of Neurology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USAObjective: Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate-receptor (NMDA-R encephalitis is a new autoimmune disorder, often paraneoplastic in nature, presenting with complex neuropsychiatric symptoms. Diagnosed serologically, this disorder is often responsive to immunosuppressant treatment. The objective of this review is to educate clinicians on the challenges of diagnosis and management of this disorder.Materials and methods: A review of the relevant literature on clinical presentation, pathophysiology, and recommended management was conducted using a PubMed search. Examination of the results identified articles published between 2007 and 2014.Results: The literature highlights the importance of recognizing early common signs and symptoms, which include hallucinations, seizures, altered mental status, and movement disorders, often in the absence of fever. Although the presence of blood and/or cerebrospinal fluid autoantibodies confirms diagnosis, approximately 15% of patients have only positive cerebrospinal fluid titers. Antibody detection should prompt a search for an underlying teratoma or other underlying neoplasm and the initiation of first-line immunosuppressant therapy: intravenous methylprednisolone, intravenous immunoglobulin, or plasmapheresis, or a combination thereof. Second-line treatment with rituximab or cyclophosphamide should be implemented if no improvement is noted after 10 days. Complications can include behavioral problems (eg, aggression and insomnia, hypoventilation, catatonia, and autonomic instability. Those patients who can be managed outside an intensive care unit and whose tumors are identified and removed typically have better rates of remission and functional outcomes.Conclusion: There is an increasing need for clinicians of different specialties, including

  15. Effector Regulatory T Cells Reflect the Equilibrium between Antitumor Immunity and Autoimmunity in Adult T-cell Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ureshino, Hiroshi; Shindo, Takero; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Watanabe, Nobukazu; Watanabe, Eri; Satoh, Natsuko; Kitaura, Kazutaka; Kitamura, Hiroaki; Doi, Kazuko; Nagase, Kotaro; Kimura, Hiromi; Samukawa, Makoto; Kusunoki, Susumu; Miyahara, Masaharu; Shin-I, Tadasu; Suzuki, Ryuji; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Kimura, Shinya

    2016-08-01

    The regulatory T cells (Treg) with the most potent immunosuppressive activity are the effector Tregs (eTreg) with a CD45RA(-)Foxp3(++)CCR4(+) phenotype. Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) cells often share the Treg phenotype and also express CCR4. Although mogamulizumab, a monoclonal antibody to CCR4, shows marked antitumor effects against ATL and peripheral T-cell lymphoma, concerns have been raised that it may induce severe autoimmune immunopathology by depleting eTregs. Here, we present case reports for two patients with ATL who responded to mogamulizumab but developed a severe skin rash and autoimmune brainstem encephalitis. Deep sequencing of the T-cell receptor revealed that ATL cells and naturally occurring Tregs within the cell population with a Treg phenotype can be clearly distinguished according to CADM1 expression. The onset of skin rash and brainstem encephalitis was coincident with eTreg depletion from the peripheral blood, whereas ATL relapses were coincident with eTreg recovery. These results imply that eTreg numbers in the peripheral blood sensitively reflect the equilibrium between antitumor immunity and autoimmunity, and that mogamulizumab might suppress ATL until the eTreg population recovers. Close monitoring of eTreg numbers is crucial if we are to provide immunomodulatory treatments that target malignancy without severe adverse events. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(8); 644-9. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Epigenetic alterations underlying autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslani, Saeed; Mahmoudi, Mahdi; Karami, Jafar; Jamshidi, Ahmad Reza; Malekshahi, Zahra; Nicknam, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in genetic explorations have extended our understanding through discovery of genetic patterns subjected to autoimmune diseases (AID). Genetics, on the contrary, has not answered all the conundrums to describe a comprehensive explanation of causal mechanisms of disease etiopathology with regard to the function of environment, sex, or aging. The other side of the coin, epigenetics which is defined by gene manifestation modification without DNA sequence alteration, reportedly has come in to provide new insights towards disease apprehension through bridging the genetics and environmental factors. New investigations in genetic and environmental contributing factors for autoimmunity provide new explanation whereby the interactions between genetic elements and epigenetic modifications signed by environmental agents may be responsible for autoimmune disease initiation and perpetuation. It is aimed through this article to review recent progress attempting to reveal how epigenetics associates with the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.

  17. [Stress and auto-immunity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delévaux, I; Chamoux, A; Aumaître, O

    2013-08-01

    The etiology of auto-immune disorders is multifactorial. Stress is probably a participating factor. Indeed, a high proportion of patients with auto-immune diseases report uncommon stress before disease onset or disease flare. The biological consequences of stress are increasingly well understood. Glucocorticoids and catecholamines released by hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis during stress will alter the balance Th1/Th2 and the balance Th17/Treg. Stress impairs cellular immunity, decreases immune tolerance and stimulates humoral immunity exposing individuals to autoimmune disease among others. The treatment for autoimmune disease should include stress management. Copyright © 2012 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Psoriasis as an autoimmune disease

    OpenAIRE

    Agnieszka Owczarczyk-Saczonek; Waldemar Placek

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays it is known that psoriasis belongs to the group of autoimmune diseases and may coexist with other diseases in this group. Most often patients have psoriatic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune thyroid diseases and multiple sclerosis. The coexistence of these disorders can be a diagnostic and therapeutic problem (there is controversy over the use of corticosteroids). The common pathogenesis is still not explained. We know that the loss of immunotole...

  19. Celiac disease and endocrine autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahaly, George J; Schuppan, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a small-intestinal inflammatory disease that is triggered by the ingestion of the storage proteins (gluten) of wheat, barley and rye. Endocrine autoimmunity is prevalent in patients with CD and their relatives. The genes that predispose to endocrine autoimmune diseases, e.g. type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid diseases, and Addison's disease, i.e. DR3-DQ2 and DR4-DQ8, are also the major genetic determinants of CD, which is the best understood HLA-linked disease. Thus, up to 30% of first-degree relatives both of patients with CD and/or endocrine autoimmunity are affected by the other disease. In CD, certain gluten proteins bind with high affinity to HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 in the small-intestinal mucosa, to activate gluten-specific T cells which are instrumental in the destruction of the resorptive villi. Here, the autoantigen tissue transglutaminase increases the T cell response by generating deamidated gluten peptides that bind more strongly to DQ2 or DQ8. Classical symptoms such as diarrhea and consequences of malabsorption like anemia and osteoporosis are often absent in patients with (screening-detected) CD, but this absence does not significantly affect these patients' incidence of endocrine autoimmunity. Moreover, once autoimmunity is established, a gluten-free diet is not able to induce remission. However, ongoing studies attempt to address how far a gluten-free diet may prevent or retard the development of CD and endocrine autoimmunity in children at risk. The close relationship between CD and endocrine autoimmunity warrants a broader immune genetic and endocrine screening of CD patients and their relatives. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. [Smoking and chronic autoimmune thyroiditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzoianu, Ioana Cristina; Arghir, Oana Cristina; Circo, E

    2010-01-01

    The chronic autoimmune thyroiditis are heterogeneous entities by the functional, lesional and evolutive point of view. Ethiopathogenic factors involved in chronic autoimmune thyroiditis are genetical factors, combines with environmental factors, hormonal factors, infectious factors etc. The exact role of smoking on the autoimmune mechanism is unclear, but smoking is known to have an antithyroid effect. Our study tries to estimate the influence of smoking on serum levels of antithyroid peroxidase antibodies and antithyroglobulin antibodies, in a group of patients with various clinical forms of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. We studied a group consists of 310 patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis, hospitalised in the Endocrinology Department of Constanta County Hospital, between January 2006 - December 2009. We detected serum values of antithyroidperoxidase antibodies and antithyroglobulin antibodies of our patients. We also followed the age, sex and presence of smoking in our study group. For statistical processing of the data we use Student's t-test. In our study group 24.28% of patients were smokers. Serum levels of antithyroid peroxidase antibodies were significantly increased (p < 0.001) in the smokers patients, compared with the nonsmokers patients. Serum levels of antithyroglobulin antibodies were significantly increased (p < 0.01) in smokers patients, compared with those who were nonsmokers. Smoking increased the serum levels of antithyroid antibodies in patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis.

  1. In vivo effects of antibodies from patients with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis: further evidence of synaptic glutamatergic dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manto Mario

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A severe encephalitis that associates with auto-antibodies to the NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor (NMDA-R was recently reported. Patients' antibodies cause a decrease of the density of NMDA-R and synaptic mediated currents, but the in vivo effects on the extracellular glutamate and glutamatergic transmission are unknown. Methods We investigated the acute metabolic effects of patients' CSF and purified IgG injected in vivo. Injections were performed in CA1 area of Ammon's horn and in premotor cortex in rats. Results Patient's CSF increased the concentrations of glutamate in the extracellular space. The increase was dose-dependent and was dramatic with purified IgG. Patients' CSF impaired both the NMDA- and the AMPA-mediated synaptic regulation of glutamate, and did not affect the glial transport of glutamate. Blockade of GABA-A receptors was associated with a marked elevation of extra-cellular levels of glutamate following a pretreatment with patients' CSF. Conclusion These results support a direct role of NMDA-R antibodies upon altering glutamatergic transmission. Furthermore, we provide additional evidence in vivo that NMDA-R antibodies deregulate the glutamatergic pathways and that the encephalitis associated with these antibodies is an auto-immune synaptic disorder.

  2. Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis concomitant with multifocal subcortical white matter lesions on magnetic resonance imaging: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui-Jin; Chen, Bu-Dong; Qi, Dong

    2015-07-08

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis is a severe autoimmune disorder characterized by severe psychiatric symptoms, seizures, decreased consciousness, autonomic dysregulation, and dyskinesias. Multifocal subcortical white matter lesions on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and diffuse weighted images have rarely been reported in previous literature, and serial magnetic resonance imaging changes after plasma exchange have not been presented before. A previously healthy 24-year-old Chinese woman presented with acute psychiatric symptoms characterized by fear and agitation followed by decreased consciousness, dyskinesias, and seizures. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed hyperintense lesions on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and diffuse weighted images in bilateral subcortical white matter. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed a mild pleocytosis with lymphocytic predominance. Protein and glucose levels were normal. Aquaporin-4 antibodies in serum and cerebrospinal fluid were negative. Identification of anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibodies in serum and cerebrospinal fluid confirmed the diagnosis of anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis. She was initially treated with combined intravenous immunoglobulin and methylprednisolone without improvement. Plasma exchange was then initiated with good response; the patient made a full recovery after several cycles of plasma exchange. Repeat magnetic resonance imaging performed 1 month after plasma exchange showed partial resolution of the hyperintense lesions in bilateral subcortical white matter, and follow-up magnetic resonance imaging 2 months after plasma exchange showed complete resolution. Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis may be concomitant with multifocal subcortical white matter lesions. Such lesions may resolve after appropriate immunotherapy.

  3. AUTOIMMUNE EPIDERMAL BLISTERING DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune bullous skin diseases (ABDs are uncommon, potentially fatal diseases of skin and mucous membranes which are associated with deposits of autoantibodies and complement against distinct molecules of the epidermis and dermal/epidermal basement membrane zone (BMZ. These autoantibodies lead to a loss in skin molecular integrity, which manifests clinically as formation of blisters or erosions. In pemphigus vulgaris, loss of adhesion occurs within the epidermis. The pioneering work of Ernst H. Beutner, Ph.D. and Robert E. Jordon, M.D. confirmed the autoimmune nature of these diseases. Walter F. Lever, M.D. contributed significantly to our understanding of the histopathologic features of these diseases. Walter Lever, M.D. and Ken Hashimoto, M.D. contributed electron microscopic studies of these diseases, especially in pemphigus vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid. In bullous pemphigoid (BP, linear IgA bullous dermatosis, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA and dermatitis herpetiformis (DH, loss of adhesion takes place within or underneath the BMZ. Classic EBA demonstrates extensive skin fragility; DH is commonly associated with gluten-sensitive enteropathy, and manifests clinically with pruritic papulovesicles on the extensor surfaces of the extremities and the lumbosacral area. The clinical spectrum of bullous pemphigoid includes tense blisters, urticarial plaques, and prurigo-like eczematous lesions. Pemphigoid gestationis mostly occurs during the last trimester of pregnancy, and mucous membrane pemphigoid primarily involves the oral mucosa and conjunctivae and leads to scarring. Linear IgA bullous dermatosis manifests with tense blisters in a „cluster of jewels”-like pattern in childhood (chronic bullous disease of childhood and is more clinically heterogeneous in adulthood. Many of the autoantigens in these disorders are known and have been well characterized. ABDs may be influenced by both genetic and exogenous factors. The diagnoses of

  4. Computer tomography in herpes simplex encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacke, W.; Zeumer, H.

    1981-10-01

    The CT findings in six patients with confirmed herpes simplex encephalitis were analysed and compared with the literature. Thirty-four examinations were performed, 27 within the first 14 days of the illness. The early findings show three characteristic features: The CT may be entirely normal up to the fourth day. Consistent with clinical and E.E.G. findings there then develops a hypodense temporal lesion which, even at this stage, acts as an expanding lesion in half the patients. Between the sixth and eighth day there is frequently involvement of the contra-lateral temporal lobe, not as a continuation, but as a new lesion. At the same time, or after several days, there is involvement of the basal portions of the frontal lobes. In this late phase there may be necrosis in the basal ganglia, thalamus or other parts of the brain. The CT findings in this late phase are uniform and characteristic of the disease. For early diagnosis and treatment the early clinical, electrophysiological and neuro-radiological findings are important. A normal CT scan two days after the onset of clinical symptoms may be regarded as significant.

  5. Modern features of varicella encephalitis in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Scripchenko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available There was conducted a survey among 65 children aged from 1 year to 17 with varicella encephalitis. There was determined predominance of cerebellar forms of the disease, in 93,9%, that is characterized by the development of the light pyramidal disorders on the contrast to the cerebral that is characterized by the development of convulsivecomatose syndrome. It was determined that the disease is distinguished by the rareness of the detected changes on the MRI, 12,3% only. It was detected that the changes of the evoked potentials could be seen among all the patients and are characterized by the predominance demyelinating changes of the brainstem structures when having a cerebellar form and neuronal disorders of the cerebral hemisphere when having a cerebral form. The outcome of the cerebellar form is recovery in 100% of cases, and in cerebral – the development of epilepsy was detected in 50% and death in 25%.

  6. Computer tomography in herpes simplex encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacke, W.; Zeumer, H.

    1981-01-01

    The CT findings in six patients with confirmed herpes simplex encephalitis were analysed and compared with the literature. Thirty-four examinations were performed, 27 within the first 14 days of the illness. The early findings show three characteristic features: The CT may be entirely normal up to the fourth day. Consistent with clinical and E.E.G. findings there then develops a hypodense temporal lesion which, even at this stage, acts as an expanding lesion in half the patients. Between the sixth and eighth day there is frequently involvement of the contra-lateral temporal lobe, not as a continuation, but as a new lesion. At the same time, or after several days, there is involvement of the basal portions of the frontal lobes. In this late phase there may be necrosis in the basal ganglia, thalamus or other parts of the brain. The CT findings in this late phase are uniform and characteristic of the disease. For early diagnosis and treatment the early clinical, electrophysiological and neuro-radiological findings are important. A normal CT scan two days after the onset of clinical symptoms may be regarded as significant. (orig.) [de

  7. Herpes simplex encephalitis in patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graber, Jerome J; Rosenblum, Marc K; DeAngelis, Lisa M

    2011-11-01

    Case reports and animal models suggest that chemotherapy, corticosteroids and radiotherapy (RT) may increase the risk of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE). We retrospectively examined cases of HSE at an academic hospital devoted to cancer care. Patients were identified by positive herpes simplex virus (HSV) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or by brain pathology. There were seven patients with HSE over a 12 year period, four of whom had received cranial RT. During this time, a total of 997 patients were treated with cranial RT, suggesting a greater incidence than the expected risk of two to four cases per million people per year in the general population. Five patients had recently received chemotherapy and three were on dexamethasone. MRI findings were typical; four patients had bilateral anterior temporal lesions and three had unilateral-temporal lesions. Four patients had a normal CSF white blood cell count, three of whom had prior RT and dexamethasone. Four patients were positive for HSV-1, and two for HSV-2. One patient had a negative CSF PCR for HSV, but autopsy confirmed active HSE. Though still rare, the risk of HSE may be increased in patients with cancer, especially in those receiving cranial RT. MRI findings were typical, but CSF white blood cell count was normal in four patients and one had negative CSF testing, suggesting that CSF results may be misleading in this population.

  8. Acute and subacute toxicity of 18F-FDG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, Danielle Maia

    2013-01-01

    Before starting clinical trials of a new drug, it is necessary to perform a battery of safety tests for assessing human risk. Radiopharmaceuticals like any new drug must be tested taking into account its specificity, duration of treatment and especially the toxicity of both parties, the unlabeled molecule and its radionuclide, apart from impurities emanating from radiolysis. Regulatory agencies like the Food and Drug Administration - USA (FDA) and the European Medicine Agency (EMEA), establish guidelines for the regulation of production and research of radiopharmaceuticals. In Brazil the production of radiopharmaceuticals was not regulated until the end of 2009, when were established by the National Agency for Sanitary Surveillance (ANVISA) resolutions No. 63, which refers to the Good Manufacturing Practices of Radiopharmaceuticals and No. 64 which seeks the registration of record radiopharmaceuticals. To obtain registration of radiopharmaceuticals are necessary to prove the quality, safety, efficacy and specificity of the drug . For the safety of radiopharmaceuticals must be presented studies of acute toxicity, subacute and chronic toxicity as well as reproductive, mutagenic and carcinogenic. Nowadays IPEN-CNEN/SP produces one of the most important radiopharmaceutical of nuclear medicine, the 18 F-FDG, which is used in many clinical applications, particularly in the diagnosis and staging of tumors. The objective of this study was to evaluate the systemic toxicity (acute/ subacute) radiopharmaceutical 18 F-FDG in an in vivo test system, as recommended by the RDC No. 64, which will serve as a model for protocols toxicity of radiopharmaceuticals produced at IPEN. The following tests were performed: tests of acute and subacute toxicity, biodistribution studies of 18 F-FDG, comet assay and reproductive toxicity. In acute toxicity, healthy rats were injected . (author)

  9. Autoimmune hepatitis in association with lymphocytic colitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, Edmond M

    2012-02-03

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a rare, chronic inflammatory disorder which has been associated with a number of other auto-immune conditions. However, there are no reports in the medical literature of an association with microscopic (lymphocytic) colitis. We report the case of a 53-year-old woman with several autoimmune conditions, including lymphocytic colitis, who presented with an acute hepatitis. On the basis of the clinical features, serology, and histopathology, we diagnosed autoimmune hepatitis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of autoimmune hepatitis in association with lymphocytic colitis, and lends support to the theory of an autoimmune etiology for lymphocytic colitis.

  10. Subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord in a Nigerian child

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Vitamin B12 deficiency has been reported to be associated with a spectrum of neurological disorders among which is subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord. Method: We report a case of subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord secondary to vitamin B12 deficiency and discussed the ...

  11. Japanese encephalitis can trigger anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jiannan; Zhang, Ting; Jiang, Li

    2017-06-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is usually a monophasic disease; however, in rare cases, patients with JE may have an early relapse after a partial recovery, giving rise to a biphasic pattern for the disease. In this study, we report three pediatric cases in which post-JE relapse was characterized by movement disorder and/or behavioral problems, and was related to anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) immunoglobulin G (IgG). Serum and cerebrospinal fluid were examined for anti-NMDAR IgG in three patients who had confirmed JE and then developed relapsing symptoms which were similar to those of anti-NMDAR encephalitis. The main symptoms of the two young children were choreoathetosis, irritability, and sleep disorder; while for the teenager, agitation, mutism, rigidity, and sleep disorder were the main symptoms. Samples of cerebrospinal fluid from all patients were positive for anti-NMDAR IgG, and all patients gradually improved with immunotherapy. Testing for NMDAR antibodies is highly recommend in patients with JE, especially those with a relapsing syndrome involving movement disorder and/or behavioral problems, as these patients may benefit from immunotherapy.

  12. Computed tomographic findings of early subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, H.; Wulff, C.H.; Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography of the brain (CT) was carried out at the early stages of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) in three children. The lateral ventricles were very small and the hemispheric sulci and interhemispheric fissures were not visible in all three patients in contrast to severe atrophy found at a later stage in one patient. The early CT abnormalities were revealed at the same time as the titres of measles antibodies in blood and cerebrospinal fluid were elevated, and the characteristic periodic complexes in the electroencephalogram established the diagnosis of SSPE. The CT changes indicating brain swelling reflect the reactive changes of this slow virus infection. (orig.)

  13. Aromatase inhibitors induced autoimmune disorders in patients with breast cancer: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Zarkavelis

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE is characterized by particular cutaneous manifestations such as non-scaring plaques mainly in sunlight exposed parts of the body along with specific serum autoantibodies (i.e. antinuclear antibodies (ANA, Ro/SSa, La/SSb. It is considered either idiopathic or drug induced. The role of chemotherapeutic agents in causing SCLE has been investigated with the taxanes being the most common anticancer agents. However, recent data emerging point toward antiestrogen therapies as a causative factor not only for SCLE but also for a variety of autoimmune disorders. This is a report of a case of a 42 year old woman who developed clinical manifestations of SCLE after letrozole treatment in whom remission of the cutaneous manifestations was noticed upon discontinuation of the drug. In addition, an extensive review of the English literature has been performed regarding the association of antiestrogen therapy with autoimmune disorders. In conclusion, Oncologists should be aware of the potential development of autoimmune reactions in breast cancer patients treated with aromatase inhibitors.

  14. Inebilizumab, a B Cell-Depleting Anti-CD19 Antibody for the Treatment of Autoimmune Neurological Diseases: Insights from Preclinical Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Chen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Exaggerated or inappropriate responses by B cells are an important feature in many types of autoimmune neurological diseases. The recent success of B-cell depletion in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS has stimulated the development of novel B-cell-targeting therapies with the potential for improved efficacy. CD19 has emerged as a promising target for the depletion of B cells as well as CD19-positive plasmablasts and plasma cells. Inebilizumab (MEDI-551, an anti-CD19 antibody with enhanced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity against B cells, is currently being evaluated in MS and neuromyelitis optica. This review discusses the role of B cells in autoimmune neurological disorders, summarizes the development of inebilizumab, and analyzes the recent results for inebilizumab treatment in an autoimmune encephalitis mouse model. The novel insights obtained from these preclinical studies can potentially guide future investigation of inebilizumab in patients.

  15. Role of Cytokines and Neurotrophins in the Central Nervous System in Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) is a mosquito -borne alphavirus capable of causing acute febrile illness and encephalitis in man. Currently...Metcalf, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Microbiology and Immunology Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) is a mosquito -borne...To elucidate further the role of cytokines in CNS pathologies, researchers have utilized transgenic mice with targeted expression of specific

  16. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zen, Yoh; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2011-12-07

    Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP) has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney) and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of regulatory T-cells are assumed

  17. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zen Yoh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of

  18. Autoimmune pancreatitis. An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmberger, T.

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare disease, the pathophysiological understanding of which has been greatly improved over the last years. The most common form, type 1 AIP belongs to the IgG4-related diseases and must be distinguished from type 2 AIP, which is a much rarer entity associated with chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Clinically, there is an overlap with pancreatic cancer. Imaging and further criteria, such as serological and histological parameters are utilized for a differentiation between both entities in order to select the appropriate therapy and to avoid the small but ultimately unnecessary number of pancreatectomies. The diagnostics of AIP are complex, whereby the consensus criteria of the International Association of Pancreatology have become accepted as the parameters for discrimination. These encompass five cardinal criteria and one therapeutic criterion. By applying these criteria AIP can be diagnosed with a sensitivity of 84.9 %, a specificity of 100 % and an accuracy of 93.8 %. The diagnosis of AIP is accomplished by applying several parameters of which two relate to imaging. As for the routine diagnostics of the pancreas these are ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Important for the differential diagnosis is the exclusion of signs of local and remote tumor spread for which CT and MRI are established. The essential diagnostic parameter of histology necessitates sufficient sample material, which cannot usually be acquired by a fine needle biopsy. CT or MRI are the reference standard methods for identification of the optimal puncture site and imaging-assisted (TruCut) biopsy. In patients presenting with unspecific upper abdominal pain, painless jaundice combined with the suspicion of a pancreatic malignancy in imaging but a mismatch of secondary signs of malignancy, AIP should also be considered as a differential diagnosis. As the diagnosis of AIP only partially relies on imaging radiologists also

  19. Global brain atrophy and metabolic dysfunction in LGI1 encephalitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szots, Monika; Blaabjerg, Morten; Orsi, Gergely

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic cognitive deficits are frequent in leucin-rich glioma-inactivated 1 protein (LGI1) encephalitis. We examined structural and metabolic brain abnormalities following LGI1 encephalitis and correlated findings with acute and follow-up clinical outcomes. METHODS: Nine patients...... underwent prospective multimodal 3 Tesla MRI 33.1±18months after disease onset, including automated volumetry, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Data were compared to 9 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. RESULTS: Although extratemporal lesions were not present...... clinical outcome following LGI1 encephalitis is associated with global brain atrophy and disintegration of white matter tracts. The pathological changes affect not only temporomesial structures but also frontal lobes and the cerebellum....

  20. Anti-N-Methyl-d-Aspartate Receptor Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Te-Yu Hung

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA receptor encephalitis is a treatment-responsive encephalitis associated with anti-NMDA receptor antibodies, which bind to the NR1/NR2 heteromers of the NMDA receptors. It is a highly characteristic syndrome evolving in five stages: the prodromal phase (viral infection-like symptoms, psychotic phase, unresponsive phase, hyperkinetic phase, and gradual recovery phase. It has been considered as a paraneoplastic syndrome usually affecting childbearing-age female with ovarian tumors; however, recent reports suggest a much higher incidence of nonparaneoplastic cases in children. We report a 14-year-old girl with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis without a detectable tumor who showed a nearly complete recovery after intensive immunotherapy.

  1. Nipah virus encephalitis: A cause for concern for Indian neurologists?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halder Amit

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The first and only recorded outbreak of Nipah virus (NV encephalitis in India occurred in the winter of 2001, although the causative organism could only be identified 5 years down the line in 2006. The first ever-recorded outbreak of NV encephalitis occurred in the Malaysian peninsula in 1998-99; though between 2001 and 2005, at least four outbreaks occurred in our neighboring country of Bangladesh. The threat of further outbreaks of this dangerous disease looms large on the Indian subcontinent, given the natural reservoir of the definitive host, namely, fruit-eating bats of the genus Pteropus. This review would briefly highlight the epidemiology, clinical aspects and diagnosis of NV encephalitis to enlighten the neurological community of the country for early detection and implementation of preventive measures in the event of further outbreaks, especially those which are generally passed of as ′mystery diseases′ in the lay press and even by governmental agencies.

  2. Shaking Out Clues to Autoimmune Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... into how an immune cell involved in several autoimmune disorders is regulated. Among their findings was a potential ... but they’ve also been linked with several autoimmune disorders. Th17 cells, along with other types of helper ...

  3. Multiple autoimmune syndrome with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpreet, Singh; Deepak, Jain; Kiran, B

    Multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS) is a condition characterised by three or more autoimmune disorders in a same individual. Familial, immunologic and infectious factors are implicated in the development of MAS. Here we report a case of a 32-year-old woman with co-existence of four auto-immune diseases, namely autoimmune hypothyroidism, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and celiac disease which leads to the final diagnosis of multiple autoimmune syndrome type 3 with celiac disease. Patients with single autoimmune disorder are at 25% risk of developing other autoimmune disorders. The present case emphasises to clinicians that there is a need for continued surveillance for the development of new autoimmune disease in predisposed patients.

  4. [Therapeutic options for autoimmune encephalomyelitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisow, N; Prüss, H; Paul, F

    2013-04-01

    Autoantibodies to neuronal tissue are becoming increasingly more important in the evaluation and classification of several neurological diseases, e.g. neuromyelitis optica, paraneoplastic syndromes of the central nervous system (CNS), stiff person syndrome or autoimmune epilepsy. As these disorders are rare, no evidence-based recommendations for therapy are available. Currently, immunomodulating or immunosuppressive drugs are administered in most cases. In paraneoplastic syndromes treatment of the underlying cancer is of considerable importance. This overview summarizes current experiences and recommendations in the treatment of autoimmune neurological disorders.

  5. EFFECTIVENESS OF MIRROR THERAPY ON HANDFUNCTIONS IN SUBACUTE STROKE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatanaga Prahalada Karnati

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mirror therapy is a relatively new therapeutic intervention that focuses on moving the unimpaired limb. In stroke patients, it involves performing movements of the unimpaired limb while watching its mirror reflection superimposed over the (unseen impaired limb, thus creating a visual illusion of enhanced movement capability of the impaired limb. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of mirror therapy on upper extremity motor recovery, spasticity and hand related functions of patients with sub-acute stroke. Methods: The clinical trial was conducted at the department of Physiotherapy (SIMS College of Physiotherapy, Guntur, for the duration of 6 weeks. Thirty patients divided into two groups: Group A: Experimental treated with mirror therapy along with conventional therapy and Group B: Control group treated with conventional physiotherapy only. Data analyzed using SPSS, Mean, SD and T test for independent samples used. Results: Comparison of pre-treatment and post treatment scores of experimental group of Brunnstrom stages showed extremely significant; while the control groupconsidered not significant. For Modified Ashworth Scale the pretreatment and post, treatment scores of experimental and control groupswere extremely significant. In addition, Functional Independence Measure showed extremely significant for experimental group and not significant for the control group. Conclusions: Mirror therapy shared and a predictable rehabilitation program enhanced upper-extremity motor recovery and functioning in our sub-acute stroke inpatients. It is beneficial in improving the effects and outcome on upper extremity motor recovery and function.

  6. Subacute cannabinoid treatment: anticonvulsant activity and withdrawal excitability in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karler, R; Turkanis, S A

    1980-03-01

    1 The effects of subacute treatment with cannabidiol, delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC), phenytoin and phenobarbitone on anticonvulsant activity and on withdrawal excitability in mice were compared in three electrically induced seizure-threshold tests. 2 In the maximal electroshock-threshold test, subacute treatment did not alter the anticonvulsant activity of cannabidiol, phenytoin or phenobarbitone, but tolerance developed to delta 9-THC. 3 In the 60 Hz electroshock-threshold test, the activity of delta 9-THC and cannabidiol did not change, but tolerance developed to phenobarbitone, and there was an increase in sensitivity to phenytoin. 4 In the 6 Hz electroshock-threshold test, there was an increase in sensitivity to both delta 9-THC and cannabidiol, there was tolerance to phenobarbitone, while the activity of phenytoin did not change. 5 Although tolerance developed in some of the seizure-threshold tests to delta 9-THC and phenobarbitone, tolerance to cannabidiol and phenytoin did not develop in any of the tests. 6 Hyperexcitability followed withdrawal from only delta 9-THC (6 Hz and 60 Hz electroshock-threshold tests) and phenobarbitone (maximal electroshock-threshold and 60 Hz electroshock-threshold tests). 7 The delta 9-THC withdrawal hyperexcitability suggests that the use of marihuana may jeopardize the control of seizures in epileptics.

  7. Acute and subacute toxicity of 18F-FDG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, Danielle M.; Silva, Natanael G. da; Manetta, Ana Paula; Osso Junior, Joao A.

    2013-01-01

    Before initiating clinical trials of a new drug, it is necessary to perform a battery of safety tests, for evaluating the risk in humans. Radiopharmaceuticals must be tested taking into account its specificity, duration of treatment and especially the toxicity of both, the unlabelled molecule and its radionuclide, apart from impurities emanating from radiolysis. In Brazil the production of radiopharmaceuticals was not regulated until the end of 2009, when ANVISA established the Resolutions No. 63, which refers to the Good Manufacturing Practices of radiopharmaceuticals and No. 64 which seeks the registration of radiopharmaceuticals. Nowadays IPEN produces one of the most important radiopharmaceutical for nuclear medicine, the 18 F-FDG, which is used in the diagnosis. The objective of this study is to assess systemic toxicity (acute / subacute) of 18 F-FDG in an in vivo test system, as recommended by the RDC No. 64. In acute tests the administration occurred on the first day, healthy rats were observed for 14 days reporting their clinical signs and water consumption, and on the 15th day they were euthanized and necropsied. The assay of subacute toxicity observations were made over a period of 28 days and the first dose was administered at the beginning of the test and after a fortnight a second dose was administered. The parameters evaluated were the necropsy, histopathology of target organs, hematology studies and liver and kidney function. The results are being processed and evaluated. Initial observations did not show any acute toxicity in animals when compared to control animals. (author)

  8. Possible progression of subacute lupus erythematosus--case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brănişteanu, Daciana Elena; Lăbonţu, Andreea; Ciobanu, Delia; Stoleriu, Gabriela; Brănişteanu, D; Oanţă, A

    2014-01-01

    Subacute lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a specific form of lupus erythematosus characterized by prevalently cutaneous manifestations usually with a good prognosis. It is more common in patients aged 15 to 70 years, and there is a female predilection. This form accounts for 10% of all lupus erythematosus cases. We present the case of a 57-year-old male patient diagnosed at age 35 with chronic psoriasiform subacute lupus erythematosus, pathologically confirmed at the Iaşi Dermatology Clinic. At the age of 54 years he had multiple ischemic strokes, followed by deterioration of general status, and at 56 years deep vein thrombosis in the right leg. The patient presented the erythematous-squamous lesions specific to psoriasiform SLE localized both on the upper third of the body and knees and associated with submucosal lesions of the lower lip, oral mucosa and appendages. The patient also presented hypo- and hyperpigmentated atrophic scar-like lesions. Laboratory tests performed during the last two admissions showed the presence of anti-ds DNA and antiphospholipid antibodies, inflammatory syndrome, and nitrogen retention syndrome. Treatment consisted of systemic and local dermatocorticoids and associated medication, emollient lotions and creams with SPF 50+, with slowly favorable progression. The peculiarity of the case lies in the chronic progression without significant systemic involvement for 19 years, and then in 2 years the antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and a shift to systemic lupus erythematosus to occur.

  9. Encephalitis with Prolonged but Reversible Splenial Lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Meleková

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The splenium of the corpus callosum has a specific structure of blood supply with a tendency towards blood-brain barrier breakdown, intramyelinic edema, and damage due to hypoxia or toxins. Signs and symptoms of reversible syndrome of the splenium of the corpus callosum typically include disorientation, confusion, impaired consciousness, and epileptic seizures. Case report: A previously healthy 32-year-old man suffered from weakness, headache, and fever. Subsequently, he developed apathy, ataxia, and inability to walk, and therefore was admitted to the hospital. Cerebrospinal fluid showed protein elevation (0.9 g/l and pleocytosis (232/1 ul. A brain MRI showed hyperintense lesions in the middle of the corpus callosum. The patient was treated with antibiotics, and subsequently, in combination with steroids. Two months later, the hyperintense lesions in the splenium and the basal ganglia had disappeared. Almost seven months since his hospitalization in the Department of Neurology, the patient has returned to his previous employment. He now does not exhibit any mental changes, an optic edema and urological problems have improved. In addition, he is now actively engaged in sports. Conclusion: We have described a case of a 32-year-old man with confusion, ataxia, and inability to stand and walk. The man developed a febrile meningeal syndrome and a hyperintense lesion of the splenium, which lasted for two months. Neurological changes, optic nerve edema, and urinary retention have resolved over the course of seven months. We think that the prolonged but transient lesion of the splenium may have been caused by encephalitis of viral origin.

  10. An autosomal locus causing autoimmune disease: Autoimmune polyglandular disease type I assigned to chromosome 21

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Aaltonen (Johanna); P. Björses (Petra); L.A. Sandkuijl (Lodewijk); J. Perheentupa (Jaakko); L. Peltonen (Leena Johanna)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractAutoimmune polyglandular disease type I (APECED) is an autosomal recessive autoimmune disease characterized by a variable combination of the failure of the endocrine glands. The pathogenesis of this unique autoimmune disease is unknown; unlike many other autoimmune diseases, APECED does

  11. Epidemiology of Japanese encephalitis in the Philippines: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Anna Lena; Aldaba, Josephine G; Roque, Vito G; Tandoc, Amado O; Sy, Ava Kristy; Espino, Fe Esperanza; DeQuiroz-Castro, Maricel; Jee, Youngmee; Ducusin, Maria Joyce; Fox, Kimberley K

    2015-03-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is an important cause of encephalitis in most of Asia, with high case fatality rates and often significant neurologic sequelae among survivors. The epidemiology of JE in the Philippines is not well defined. To support consideration of JE vaccine for introduction into the national schedule in the Philippines, we conducted a systematic literature review and summarized JE surveillance data from 2011 to 2014. We conducted searches on Japanese encephalitis and the Philippines in four databases and one library. Data from acute encephalitis syndrome (AES) and JE surveillance and from the national reference laboratory from January 2011 to March 2014 were tabulated and mapped. We identified 29 published reports and presentations on JE in the Philippines, including 5 serologic surveys, 18 reports of clinical cases, and 8 animal studies (including two with both clinical cases and animal data). The 18 clinical studies reported 257 cases of laboratory-confirmed JE from 1972 to 2013. JE virus (JEV) was the causative agent in 7% to 18% of cases of clinical meningitis and encephalitis combined, and 16% to 40% of clinical encephalitis cases. JE predominantly affected children under 15 years of age and 6% to 7% of cases resulted in death. Surveillance data from January 2011 to March 2014 identified 73 (15%) laboratory-confirmed JE cases out of 497 cases tested. This comprehensive review demonstrates the endemicity and extensive geographic range of JE in the Philippines, and supports the use of JE vaccine in the country. Continued and improved surveillance with laboratory confirmation is needed to systematically quantify the burden of JE, to provide information that can guide prioritization of high risk areas in the country and determination of appropriate age and schedule of vaccine introduction, and to measure the impact of preventive measures including immunization against this important public health threat.

  12. A minimum number of autoimmune T cells to induce autoimmunity?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bosch, A.J.T.; Bolinger, B.; Keck, S.; Štěpánek, Ondřej; Ozga, A.J.; Galati-Fournier, V.; Stein, J.V.; Palmer, E.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 316, jaro (2017), s. 21-31 ISSN 0008-8749 R&D Projects: GA ČR GJ16-09208Y Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : T cell * Tolerance * Autoimmunity Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Immunology Impact factor: 3.172, year: 2016

  13. An Unusual Presentation of Herpes Simplex Virus Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Boyapati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 65-year-old man with an acute alteration in mental state that was initially diagnosed as a functional psychiatric condition. After extensive workup, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 was detected in the patient’s cerebrospinal fluid (CSF by polymerase chain reaction (PCR, and he responded rapidly to treatment with acyclovir. The case illustrates the importance of actively excluding organic causes in such patients, the need to have a low threshold of suspicion for HSV encephalitis, and the central role of CSF PCR testing for the diagnosis of HSV encephalitis, even in the absence of CSF biochemical abnormalities.

  14. Hemorrhagic herpes encephalitis: A difficult diagnosis in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann, N.U.; Albert, H.H. von

    1982-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is the most common sporadically appearing encephalitis in Central Europe. Differential diagnosis to brain tumors or spontaneous intercerebral hemorrhage is difficult. There are CT scan findings which are characteristic of HSE but there are no pathognomonic patterns. These characteristic findings are helpful in differential diagnosis to neoplastic or vascular processes. Thus, other diagnostic procedures (i.e. brain biopsy) to confirm diagnosis of HSE and effective therapy may be carried out in time. The difficulties in differential diagnosis are shown by the presented case. (orig.) [de

  15. Case Report: Magnetic resonance imaging in rabies encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Arekapudi Subramanyaswara; Varma, Dandu Ravi; Chalapathi Rao, Mamidi Venkata; Mohandas, Surat

    2009-01-01

    Rabies encephalitis is an invariably fatal disease characterized by typical clinical symptoms. Although the diagnosis of this condition can be made on the basis of the patient's history and the classical clinical presentation, neuroimaging may still play a role, especially for establishing an early diagnosis in cases with atypical presentations or when the history of animal bite is not forthcoming. We report the MRI findings in a case of furious rabies encephalitis and describe the utility of diffusion imaging in its diagnosis

  16. Multiplex autoantibody detection for autoimmune liver diseases and autoimmune gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderlocht, Joris; van der Cruys, Mart; Stals, Frans; Bakker-Jonges, Liesbeth; Damoiseaux, Jan

    2017-09-01

    Autoantibody detection for autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and autoimmune gastritis (AIG) is traditionally performed by IIF on a combination of tissues. Multiplex line/dot blots (LIA/DIA) offer multiple advantages, i.e. automation, objective reading, no interfering reactivities, no coincidental findings. In the current study we evaluated automated DIA (D-Tek) for detecting autoantibodies related to autoimmune diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. We tested samples of the Dutch EQC program and compared the results with the consensus of the participating labs. For the autoimmune liver diseases and AIG, respectively, 64 and 36 samples were tested. For anti-mitochondrial and anti-smooth muscle antibodies a concordance rate of 97% and 88% was observed, respectively. The concordance rate for anti-parietal cell antibodies was 92% when samples without EQC consensus (n=15) were excluded. For antibodies against intrinsic factor a concordance of 96% was observed. For all these antibodies discrepancies were identified that relate to the different test characteristics and the preponderance of IIF utilizing labs in the EQC program. In conclusion, we observed good agreement of the tested DIA blots with the consensus results of the Dutch EQC program. Taken together with the logistic advantages these blots are a good alternative for autoantibody detection in the respective diseases. A large prospective multicenter study is warranted to position these novel tests further in the whole spectrum of assays for the detection of these antibodies in a routine autoimmune laboratory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The CREB/CRTC2 pathway modulates autoimmune disease by promoting Th17 differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Jeniffer B; Chang, Christina; LeBlanc, Mathias; Grimm, David; Le Lay, John; Kaestner, Klaus H; Zheng, Ye; Montminy, Marc

    2015-06-02

    Following their activation in response to inflammatory signals, innate immune cells secrete T-cell-polarizing cytokines that promote the differentiation of naive CD4 T cells into T helper (Th) cell subsets. Among these, Th17 cells play a prominent role in the development of a number of autoimmune diseases. Although regarded primarily as an immunosuppressant signal, cAMP has been found to mediate pro-inflammatory effects of macrophage-derived prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) on Th17 cells. Here we show that PGE2 enhances Th17 cell differentiation via the activation of the CREB co-activator CRTC2. Following its dephosphorylation, CRTC2 stimulates the expression of the cytokines IL-17A and IL-17F by binding to CREB over both promoters. CRTC2-mutant mice have decreased Th17 cell numbers, and they are protected from experimental autoimmune encephalitis, a model for multiple sclerosis. Our results suggest that small molecule inhibitors of CRTC2 may provide therapeutic benefit to individuals with autoimmune disease.

  18. A 16-year-old girl with anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis and family history of psychotic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Neil; Lieblich, Samuel; Schalling, Martin; Rahm, Christoffer

    2015-12-01

    Autoimmune NMDA-R encephalitis (ANRE) shares clinical features with schizophrenia. Recent research also indicates that both disorders are associated with dysfunction of the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate glutamate receptors (NMDA-R) subunit 1. We present the case of Ms A, 16 years old. Ms A presented with acute personality change, bizarre behaviour, delusional ideas and atypical seizures. She had a family history of psychotic disorders, and autistic traits diagnosed in childhood. She was initially diagnosed with a psychotic disorder. Delayed testing of CSF indicated ANRE. As the patient was a Jehovah's witness the treating team was unable to use gammaglobulin therapy; they instead relied on combined plasmapheresis and rituximab. To exclude the possibility that the affected members of this family shared a gene coding for an abnormal configuration of the NMDA receptor subunit 1 we sequenced the region of the GRIN1 gene in DNA extracted from blood in both Ms A and her grandmother. Ms A's condition improved dramatically, though her long-term memory is still demonstrably impaired. No genetic abnormality was detected. This case emphasizes how important it is, for a first episode psychosis, to exclude ANRE and other autoimmune synaptic encephalitides, even in the face of significant family history, and if seronegative, the importance of testing for CSF autoantibodies.

  19. Comparative spatial dynamics of Japanese encephalitis and acute encephalitis syndrome in Nepal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Robertson

    Full Text Available Japanese Encephalitis (JE is a vector-borne disease of major importance in Asia. Recent increases in cases have spawned the development of more stringent JE surveillance. Due to the difficulty of making a clinical diagnosis, increased tracking of common symptoms associated with JE-generally classified as the umbrella term, acute encephalitis syndrome (AES has been developed in many countries. In Nepal, there is some debate as to what AES cases are, and how JE risk factors relate to AES risk. Three parts of this analysis included investigating the temporal pattern of cases, examining the age and vaccination status patterns among AES surveillance data, and then focusing on spatial patterns of risk factors. AES and JE cases from 2007-2011 reported at a district level (n = 75 were examined in relation to landscape risk factors. Landscape pattern indices were used to quantify landscape patterns associated with JE risk. The relative spatial distribution of landscape risk factors were compared using geographically weighted regression. Pattern indices describing the amount of irrigated land edge density and the degree of landscape mixing for irrigated areas were positively associated with JE and AES, while fragmented forest measured by the number of forest patches were negatively associated with AES and JE. For both JE and AES, the local GWR models outperformed global models, indicating spatial heterogeneity in risks. Temporally, the patterns of JE and AES risk were almost identical; suggesting the relative higher caseload of AES compared to JE could provide a valuable early-warning signal for JE surveillance and reduce diagnostic testing costs. Overall, the landscape variables associated with a high degree of landscape mixing and small scale irrigated agriculture were positively linked to JE and AES risk, highlighting the importance of integrating land management policies, disease prevention strategies and promoting healthy sustainable livelihoods

  20. Rebooting autoimmunity with autologous HSCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, John A

    2016-01-07

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is increasingly used for severe autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, but the mechanisms involved have yet to be elucidated. In this issue of Blood, Delemarre et al report their findings in both animal and human models which provide insights into restoration of functionality and diversity within the regulatory T-cell (Treg) compartment following HSCT.

  1. Vitiligo and Autoimmune Thyroid Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enke Baldini

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Vitiligo represents the most common cause of acquired skin, hair, and oral depigmentation, affecting 0.5–1% of the population worldwide. It is clinically characterized by the appearance of disfiguring circumscribed skin macules following melanocyte destruction by autoreactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Patients affected by vitiligo usually show a poorer quality of life and are more likely to suffer from depressive symptoms, particularly evident in dark-skinned individuals. Although vitiligo is a non-fatal disease, exposure of affected skin to UV light increases the chance of skin irritation and predisposes to skin cancer. In addition, vitiligo has been associated with other rare systemic disorders due to the presence of melanocytes in other body districts, such as in eyes, auditory, nervous, and cardiac tissues, where melanocytes are thought to have roles different from that played in the skin. Several pathogenetic models have been proposed to explain vitiligo onset and progression, but clinical and experimental findings point mainly to the autoimmune hypothesis as the most qualified one. In this context, it is of relevance the strong association of vitiligo with other autoimmune diseases, in particular with autoimmune thyroid disorders, such as Hashimoto thyroiditis and Graves’ disease. In this review, after a brief overview of vitiligo and its pathogenesis, we will describe the clinical association between vitiligo and autoimmune thyroid disorders and discuss the possible underlying molecular mechanism(s.

  2. Polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proust-Lemoine, Emmanuelle; Saugier-Veber, Pascale; Wémeau, Jean-Louis

    2012-12-01

    Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrom type 1 (PAS-1) or Autoimmune PolyEndocrinopathy Candidiasis-Ectodermal-Dystrophy (APECED) is a rare recessive autosomal disease related to Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) gene mutations. AIRE is mainly implicated in central and peripheric immune tolerance. Diagnosis was classically based on presence of at least two out of three "majors" criterions of Whitaker's triad (candidiasis, autoimmune hypoparathyroidism and adrenal insufficiency). Presence of one criterion was sufficient when a sibling was previously diagnosed. However, some atypic or poorly symptomatic variants do not correspond to these criterions. As a matter of fact, digestive (malabsorption, pernicious anemia, hepatitis), cutaneous (alopecia, vitiligo, enamel dysplasia) or ophtalmological (keratitis) components could prevail. In these cases, diagnosis could be made by molecular genetics. Prognosis is influenced by genetic (AIRE mutations, HLA), hormonal and environmental (infections) factors. Potentially letal components (hepatitis and severe malabsorption) could be treated by immunosuppressors. Candidiasis and other infections should be carefully screened and treated before beginning those therapies, in order to avoid severe systemic infections. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Leaky gut and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, Alessio

    2012-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by tissue damage and loss of function due to an immune response that is directed against specific organs. This review is focused on the role of impaired intestinal barrier function on autoimmune pathogenesis. Together with the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and the neuroendocrine network, the intestinal epithelial barrier, with its intercellular tight junctions, controls the equilibrium between tolerance and immunity to non-self antigens. Zonulin is the only physiologic modulator of intercellular tight junctions described so far that is involved in trafficking of macromolecules and, therefore, in tolerance/immune response balance. When the zonulin pathway is deregulated in genetically susceptible individuals, autoimmune disorders can occur. This new paradigm subverts traditional theories underlying the development of these diseases and suggests that these processes can be arrested if the interplay between genes and environmental triggers is prevented by re-establishing the zonulin-dependent intestinal barrier function. Both animal models and recent clinical evidence support this new paradigm and provide the rationale for innovative approaches to prevent and treat autoimmune diseases.

  4. Hemophagocytosis in Cutaneous Autoimmune Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerl, Katrin; Wolf, Ingrid H; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Wolf, Peter; French, Lars E; Kerl, Helmut

    2015-07-01

    The significance of the histological visualization of hemophagocytosis in tissues depends on the context, varying from a nonspecific phenomenon to a characteristic or diagnostic feature for certain disease entities. Hemophagocytosis is also one of the key features of macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) (hemophagocytic syndrome) a potentially life-threatening complication of underlying conditions such as infections, malignancy, and autoimmune disorders. Clinical manifestations of MAS are high fever, pancytopenia, liver dysfunction, and coagulopathy. These clinical symptoms are due to an abnormal activation of the immune system in a strong association with the cytokine milieu. The diagnosis of MAS may be easily missed; it is usually detected in the bone marrow, lymph node, liver, and spleen. Only few reports exist in the literature with histological description of cutaneous hemophagocytosis as a sign for MAS in patients with lymphoma and infection. In this report, the authors present the clinicopathological and immunohistochemical features of 3 patients with cutaneous hemophagocytosis, specifically erythrophagocytosis, associated with autoimmune disease, and discuss the relevance of these findings. The authors report 3 patients who developed cutaneous hemophagocytosis during the course of an underlying autoimmune disorder. One patient suffered from dermatomyositis, the other 2 patients from systemic lupus erythematosus, whereby one of them was a 3-month old girl with neonatal lupus erythematosus. The patient with dermatomyositis developed MAS according to the current diagnostic criteria. Although the 2 other patients had an acute flare of their autoimmune disease with histological signs of cutaneous hemophagocytosis, they did not fulfill the complete criteria for a diagnosis of MAS. Histiocyte proliferation and activation with increase of cytokines could be demonstrated by immunohistology. This report is the first to describe hemophagocytosis in cutaneous biopsies

  5. Planning for subacute care: predicting demand using acute activity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Janette P; McNamee, Jennifer P; Kobel, Conrad; Seraji, Md Habibur R; Lawrence, Suanne J

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to develop a robust model that uses the concept of 'rehabilitation-sensitive' Diagnosis Related Groups (DRGs) in predicting demand for rehabilitation and geriatric evaluation and management (GEM) care following acute in-patient episodes provided in Australian hospitals. Methods The model was developed using statistical analyses of national datasets, informed by a panel of expert clinicians and jurisdictional advice. Logistic regression analysis was undertaken using acute in-patient data, published national hospital statistics and data from the Australasian Rehabilitation Outcomes Centre. Results The predictive model comprises tables of probabilities that patients will require rehabilitation or GEM care after an acute episode, with columns defined by age group and rows defined by grouped Australian Refined (AR)-DRGs. Conclusions The existing concept of rehabilitation-sensitive DRGs was revised and extended. When applied to national data, the model provided a conservative estimate of 83% of the activity actually provided. An example demonstrates the application of the model for service planning. What is known about the topic? Health service planning is core business for jurisdictions and local areas. With populations ageing and an acknowledgement of the underservicing of subacute care, it is timely to find improved methods of estimating demand for this type of care. Traditionally, age-sex standardised utilisation rates for individual DRGs have been applied to Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) population projections to predict the future need for subacute services. Improved predictions became possible when some AR-DRGs were designated 'rehabilitation-sensitive'. This improved methodology has been used in several Australian jurisdictions. What does this paper add? This paper presents a new tool, or model, to predict demand for rehabilitation and GEM services based on in-patient acute activity. In this model, the

  6. [Type 2 autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS-2)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vialettes, Bernard; Dubois-Leonardon, Noémie

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS-2) are the most frequent disorders associating several organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Their high prevalence is due to the fact that the main manifestations of APS-2, such as thyroidal autoimmunity, type 1 diabetes, autoimmune gastric atrophy and vitiligo, are common diseases. APS-2 represents a clinical model that can serve to help unravel the mechanisms underlying autoimmunity. Diagnosis of APS-2 is a challenge for the clinician, especially in poorly symptomatic forms, and may require systematic screening based on measurement of autoantibodies and functional markers.

  7. Management of Sub-acute Ruminal Acidosis in Dairy Cattle for Improved Production: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Kafil Hussain; Amjad Ul Islam; Surinder Kumar Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Sub-acute ruminal acidosis (SARA) is a well-recognized digestive disorder that is an increasing health problem in most dairy herds. Feeding diets high in grain and other highly fermentable carbohydrates to dairy cows increases milk production, but also increases the risk of SARA. Sub-acute ruminal acidosis is defined as periods of moderately depressed ruminal pH, from about 5.5 to 5.0. Sub-acute ruminal acidosis may be associated with laminitis and other health problems resulting in decreased...

  8. Tick-borne encephalitis virus in horses, Austria, 2011

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rushton, J. O.; Lecollinet, S.; Hubálek, Zdeněk; Svobodová, Petra; Lussy, H.; Nowotny, N.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 4 (2013), s. 635-637 ISSN 1080-6040 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) * strains Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 7.327, year: 2013

  9. Von Willebrand Factor Gene Variants Associate with Herpes simplex Encephalitis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abdelmagid, N.; Bereczky-Veress, B.; Atanur, S.; Musilová, Alena; Zídek, Václav; Saba, L.; Warnecke, A.; Khademi, M.; Studahl, M.; Aurelius, E.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Garcia-Dias, A.; Denis, C. V.; Bergström, T.; Sköldenberg, B.; Kockum, I.; Aitman, T.; Hübner, N.; Olsson, T.; Pravenec, Michal; Diez, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 5 (2016), e0155832 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7E10067; GA MŠk(CZ) LL1204 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : Von Willebrand Factor gene * Herpes simplex encephalitis * rat * humans Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.806, year: 2016

  10. Group A Rotavirus Associated with Encephalitis in Red Fox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busi, Chiara; Martella, Vito; Papetti, Alice; Sabelli, Cristiano; Lelli, Davide; Alborali, G Loris; Gibelli, Lucia; Gelmetti, Daniela; Lavazza, Antonio; Cordioli, Paolo; Boniotti, M Beatrice

    2017-09-01

    In 2011, a group A rotavirus was isolated from the brain of a fox with encephalitis and neurologic signs, detected by rabies surveillance in Italy. Intracerebral inoculation of fox brain homogenates into mice was fatal. Genome sequencing revealed a heterologous rotavirus of avian origin, which could provide a model for investigating rotavirus neurovirulence.

  11. HHV-6 symptoms in central nervous system. Encephalitis and encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshinari, Satoshi; Hamano, Shinichiro

    2007-01-01

    Described is the present knowledge of central nervous symptoms, mainly encephalitis and encephalopathy, caused by the primary infection of human herpes virus-6 (HHV-6) in the pediatric field. Discovery of HHV-6 is in 1986, the virus, normally latent, has a high nervous affinity, and most infants are infected until the age of 3 years. Encephalitis and encephalopathy caused by the primary infection can be derived from direct viral invasion in nervous system or secondary like that through angitis. Most of early clinical symptoms are febrile convulsion. Imaging of the head by MRI particularly with diffusion weighted imaging and by cerebral blood flow SPECT with 123 I-infetamine (IMP) is important for classification of encephalitis and encephalopathy by HHV-6: Four types of them are defined according to the area of lesion observed in abnormal images, the basal nuclei-diencephalon-brainstem, frontal lobe-dominant one, cerebral hemisphere and diffusive one. Further reviewed are the diagnosis, treatment and prognosis together with other HHV-6 related problems like infection in neonate, temporal lobe epilepsy and drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome. Current topics are related with activation of latent HHV-6. Despite numerous findings, many remain to be elucidated in acute encephalitis and encephalopathy which are most important in pediatrics. (R.T.)

  12. Herpes simplex encephalitis | Ladapo | Nigerian Journal of Clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 14, No 1 (2011) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Herpes simplex encephalitis. TA Ladapo, E Oyenusi, FEA Lesi ...

  13. An enzyme immunoassay for detection of Japanese encephalitis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) induces human peripheral blood monocytes to secrete a chemotactic cytokine [human macrophage-derived factor (hMDF)] which causes chemotaxis of neutrophils. The only known assay for hMDF cannot quantify its level in samples, so an enzyme immunoassay has been standardized for ...

  14. An enzyme immunoassay for detection of Japanese encephalitis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Enzyme immunoassay; human macrophage-derived factor; Japanese encephalitis virus. Abbreviations used: ... macrophage-derived factor; HBSS, Hank's balanced salt solution; CSF, cerebrospinal fluid; MEM, minimum essential medium; FCS ..... much attention as pathogenic or marker substance in various diseases (Ida ...

  15. Reducing Vulnerability to the Threat of Japanese Encephalitis in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-25

    Apr 25, 2016 ... The Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus results in between 30,000 to 50,000 reported cases a year in South and Southeast Asia. Generally, the virus presents mild symptoms in people, but children are especially vulnerable. Acute cases are often fatal as the disease can cause swelling of the brain, tremors, ...

  16. Analysis of Fulminant Cerebral Edema in Acute Pediatric Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Shih-Yun; Lin, Jainn-Jim; Hsia, Shao-Hsuan; Wang, Huei-Shyong; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Lin, Kuang-Lin

    2016-10-01

    Acute pediatric encephalitis with fulminant cerebral edema can rapidly become fatal or result in devastating neurological sequelae. All cases coded with the discharge diagnosis of acute encephalitis between January 2000 and December 2010 were reviewed. Of the 1038 children with acute pediatric encephalitis, 25 were enrolled in our study with ages ranging from 5 months to 16 years. The major neurological symptoms included an altered level of consciousness (72%), vomiting (60%), and headache (48%). The onset of neurological symptoms to signs of brain herniation ranged from 0 days to 9 days. Nineteen (76%) patients had a seizure 24-48 hours prior to showing signs of fulminant cerebral edema, and 12 (48%) patients developed status epilepticus. Sixteen patients died, and no survivors returned to baseline. Risk factors for seizures and status epilepticus were compared between the fulminant cerebral edema group (n = 25, 19 seizures, including 12 status epilepticus) and control group (nonfulminant cerebral edema) (n = 1013, 444 seizures, including 141 status epilepticus; p = 0.001 for seizures and p cerebral edema in children with acute encephalitis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Polymerase chain reaction for detection of herpes simplex virus encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanzadeh, J; Skiest, D J

    1994-06-01

    A patient with herpes simplex virus encephalitis is described. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to confirm the diagnosis in cerebrospinal fluid. PCR allows the rapid diagnosis of many infectious organisms, such as HSV, in which prompt diagnosis is essential.

  18. Polymerase chain reaction for detection of herpes simplex virus encephalitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Aslanzadeh, J; Skiest, D J

    1994-01-01

    A patient with herpes simplex virus encephalitis is described. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to confirm the diagnosis in cerebrospinal fluid. PCR allows the rapid diagnosis of many infectious organisms, such as HSV, in which prompt diagnosis is essential.

  19. Epidemiologic Survey of Japanese Encephalitis Virus Infection, Tibet, China, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Rehman, Mujeeb Ur; Li, Kun; Luo, Houqiang; Lan, Yanfang; Nabi, Fazul; Zhang, Lihong; Iqbal, Muhammad Kashif; Zhu, Suolangsi; Javed, Muhammad Tariq; Chamba, Yangzom; Li, Jia Kui

    2017-06-01

    We investigated Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) prevalence in high-altitude regions of Tibet, China, by using standard assays to test mosquitoes, pigs, and humans. Results confirmed that JEV has spread to these areas. Disease prevention and control strategies should be used along with surveillance to limit spread of JEV in high-altitude regions of Tibet.

  20. Affinity (tropism) of caprine arthritis encephalitis virus for brain cells

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-11-19

    Nov 19, 2008 ... Full Length Research Paper. Affinity (tropism) of caprine arthritis encephalitis virus for brain cells. Adebayo, I. A.1*, Awoniyi, T. A. M. 1 and Olaleye, O. D.2. 1Department of Animal Production and Health, Animal Parasitology and Microbiology Research Unit, Federal University of Technology, P M B 704, ...

  1. Differential Diagnosis of Acute Stroke and Viral Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Bogadelnikov

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available At the present time, there has been an increase in the frequency of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in children. The clinical picture of the disease has similar features to the one of viral encephalitis. Differential diagnosis is necessary to choose correct treatment tactics.

  2. Computed tomography in young children with herpes simplex virus encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, T.; Woo, M.; Okazaki, H.; Nishida, N.; Hara, T.; Yasuhara, A.; Kasahara, M.; Kobayashi, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) scans were obtained from eight infants and young children with herpes simplex virus encephalitis. In two cases the initial scan showed diffuse edematous changes as a mass effect without laterality. Unilateral localized low attenuation in the initial scan was evident 4 days after the onset in one patient, and high attenuation in the initial scan appeared on the 6th day in another patient, but in general, it was not possible to establish an early diagnosis of herpes simplex virus encephalitis from CT scan. In the longitudinal study the calcification with ventriculomegaly appeared in 3 of 5 survivors, and gyriform calcification in 2 of 3 patients, respectively. The appearance of multicystic encephalomalacia was evident in one patient 6 months after the onset of neonatal herpes simplex encephalitis. It is shown that the CT findings of neonates and young children with herpes simplex encephalitis are different from those of older children and adults, and the importance of longitudinal CT studies was stressed in clarifying the pathophysiology of the central nervous system involvement in survivors. (orig.)

  3. Smell impairment after tick-borne encephalitis vaccination: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodicka, J; Jelínková, H; Chrobok, V

    2010-01-22

    We present a case of hyposmia following administration of a tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) vaccine. The olfactory impairment did not recover during 1-year follow up. In the literature, there is no report of smell deterioration after vaccination against TBE. Physicians should be aware of this rare neurological complication.

  4. AIRE-mutations and autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruserud, Øyvind; Oftedal, Bergithe E; Wolff, Anette B; Husebye, Eystein S

    2016-12-01

    The gene causing the severe organ-specific autoimmune disease autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type-1 (APS-1) was identified in 1997 and named autoimmune regulator (AIRE). AIRE plays a key role in shaping central immunological tolerance by facilitating negative selection of T cells in the thymus, building the thymic microarchitecture, and inducing a specific subset of regulatory T cells. So far, about 100 mutations have been identified. Recent advances suggest that certain mutations located in the SAND and PHD1 domains exert a dominant negative effect on wild type AIRE resulting in milder seemingly common forms of autoimmune diseases, including pernicious anemia, vitiligo and autoimmune thyroid disease. These findings indicate that AIRE also contribute to autoimmunity in more common organ-specific autoimmune disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Induction of encephalitis in rhesus monkeys infused with lymphocryptovirus-infected B-cells presenting MOG(34-56 peptide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krista G Haanstra

    Full Text Available The overlapping epidemiology of multiple sclerosis (MS and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, the increased risk to develop MS after infectious mononucleosis (IM and the localization of EBV-infected B-cells within the MS brain suggest a causal link between EBV and MS. However, the underlying mechanism is unknown. We hypothesize that EBV-infected B-cells are capable of eliciting a central nervous system (CNS targeting autoimmune reaction. To test this hypothesis we have developed a novel experimental model in rhesus monkeys of IM-like disease induced by infusing autologous B-lymphoblastoid cells (B-LCL. Herpesvirus papio (HVP is a lymphocryptovirus related to EBV and was used to generate rhesus monkey B-LCL. Three groups of five animals were included; each group received three intravenous infusions of B-LCL that were either pulsed with the encephalitogenic self peptide MOG(34-56 (group A, a mimicry peptide (981-1003 of the major capsid protein of cytomegalovirus (CMVmcp(981-1003; group B or the citrullinated MOG(34-56 (cMOG(34-56; group C. Groups A and B received on day 98 a single immunization with MOG(34-56 in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA. Group C monkeys were euthanized just prior to day 98 without booster immunization. We observed self-peptide-specific proliferation of T-cells, superimposed on similar strong proliferation of CD3(+CD8(+ T-cells against the B-LCL as observed in IM. The brains of several monkeys contained perivascular inflammatory lesions of variable size, comprising CD3(+ and CD68(+ cells. Moreover, clusters of CD3(+ and CD20(+ cells were detected in the meninges. The only evident clinical sign was substantial loss of bodyweight (>15%, a symptom observed both in early autoimmune encephalitis and IM. In conclusion, this model suggests that EBV-induced B-LCL can elicit a CNS targeting inflammatory (autoimmune reaction.

  6. Subacute Bacterial Endocarditis Caused by Cardiobacterium hominis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davie Wong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiobacterium hominis, a member of the HACEK group of organisms, is an uncommon but important cause of subacute bacterial endocarditis. First-line therapy is a third-generation cephalosporin due to rare beta-lactamase production. The authors report a case involving endovascular infection due to C hominis that initially tested resistant to third-generation cephalosporins using an antibiotic gradient strip susceptibility method (nitrocephin negative, but later proved to be susceptible using broth microdilution reference methods (a ‘major’ error. There are limited studies to guide susceptibility testing and interpretive breakpoints for C hominis in the medical literature, and the present case illustrates some of the issues that may arise when performing susceptibility testing for fastidious organisms in the clinical microbiology laboratory.

  7. Subacute brachial diplegia associated with West Nile virus myelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Sahar F; Ubogu, Eroboghene E

    2012-06-01

    Brachial diplegia is a clinical term used to describe weakness restricted to the upper extremities. We report a case of brachial diplegia associated with West Nile virus infection. A 48-year-old man developed severe painless bilateral upper extremity weakness within a few weeks of a flu-like illness. Clinical examination revealed marked periscapular, shoulder girdle, and humeral muscle atrophy and bilateral scapular winging, with near symmetrical bilateral hypotonic upper extremity weakness. This was associated with clinical signs of an encephalomyelopathy without cognitive or sensory deficits. Electrophysiological studies demonstrated a subacute disorder of motor neurons, their axons or both, involving the cervical and thoracic myotomes, with ongoing denervation. Serological studies confirmed recent West Nile virus (WNV) infection. Gradual improvement occurred following conservative supportive therapies. Progressive brachial diplegia is a rare neuromuscular presentation of WNV neuroinvasive disease. This case report adds to the clinical spectrum of WNV-induced neurologic sequelae. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Spectrophotometry of cerebrospinal fluid in subacute and chronic subdural haematomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellin, K. G.; Steiner, L.

    1974-01-01

    Spectrophotometric examinations were performed on cerebrospinal and subdural fluids in subacute (five patients) and chronic (20 patients) subdural haematomas, with special reference to the diagnostic aid of CSF spectrophotometry. Spectrophotometric xanthochromia of haemorrhagic origin was found in all CSFs examined, while definite visible xanthochromia was observed in only 28% and the CSF was judged as colourless in 52% of those cases. Characteristic bleeding patterns were found spectrophotometrically in all the 20 CSFs examined within 24 hours after lumbar puncture, haematoma patterns being detected in 90-95% of the cases. In many cases the electrophoretically separated protein fractions of CSF and subdural fluids were spectrophotometrically examined. In conclusion, CSF spectrophotometry is a simple, fast, and extremely sensitive method, which in our opinion should be used routinely in the diagnosis of suspected subdural haematomas, if lumbar puncture is not contraindicated. PMID:4140892

  9. The role of the autoimmunity laboratory in autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SS Hasson

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory testing is of great value when evaluating a patient with a suspected autoimmune disease. The results can confirm a diagnosis, estimate disease severity, aid in assessing prognosis and are useful to follow disease activity. Components of the laboratory exam include complete blood count with differential, comprehensive metabolic panel, inflammatory markers, autoantibodies, and flow cytometry. Currently, autoimmunity laboratories are very vibrant owing to the constant and increasing availability of new tests, mainly due to the detection of new autoantibodies. The main characteristic that differentiates the autoimmunity laboratory from other laboratories is the use of immunoassays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, as basic techniques which determines antibodies (autoantibodies and not antigens. For this reason, immunoassay techniques must employ antigens as reagents. However, over the last few years, a significant trend at autoimmunity laboratories has been the gradual replacement of immunofluorescence microscopy by immunoassay. Nowadays the revolution of new technology has taken place significantly, for examples; recombinant DNA technology has allowed the production of large quantities of antigens for autoantibody analysis. Flow cytometry for the analysis of microsphere-based immunoassays allows the simultaneous measurement of several autoantibodies. In the same way, autoantigen microarrays provide a practical means to analyse biological fluids in the search for a high number of autoantibodies. We are now at the beginning of an era of multiplexed analysis, with a high capacity of autoantibody specificities. The future tendency in this field will include immunoassays with greater analytical sensitivity, specificity, simultaneous multiplexed capability, the use of protein microarrays, and the use of other technologies such as microfluidics.

  10. Effect of high-dose dexamethasone on the outcome of acute encephalitis due to Japanese encephalitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoke, C H; Vaughn, D W; Nisalak, A; Intralawan, P; Poolsuppasit, S; Jongsawas, V; Titsyakorn, U; Johnson, R T

    1992-04-01

    Death due to Japanese encephalitis usually occurs in the first 5 days of hospitalization as a result of deepening coma with respiratory arrest. Death may result from edema-induced increases in intracranial pressure that might be reduced by the administration of steroids. Sixty-five patients presenting in Thailand to four hospitals with a diagnosis of acute Japanese encephalitis were randomized in a double-masked fashion and stratified by initial mental status into a placebo group (saline) or a treatment group (dexamethasone 0.6 mg/kg intravenously as a loading dose followed by 0.2 mg/kg every 6 h for 5 days). Fifty-five of the 65 had confirmed Japanese encephalitis as demonstrated by detection of virus or by Japanese encephalitis virus-specific IgM antibody. Important outcome measures included mortality (24%, treatment group; 27%, control group), days to alert mental status (3.9 vs. 6.2), and neurologic status 3 months after discharge (45% abnormal in each group). No statistically significant benefit of high-dose dexamethasone could be detected.

  11. Management strategies for autoimmune pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamisawa, Terumi; Takuma, Kensuke; Hara, Seiichi; Tabata, Taku; Kuruma, Sawako; Inaba, Yoshihiko; Gopalakrishna, Rajesh; Egawa, Naoto; Itokawa, Fumihide; Itoi, Takao

    2011-10-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a newly developed concept for a peculiar type of pancreatitis, and at present is recognized as a pancreatic lesion reflecting IgG4-related systemic disease. It is of utmost importance to differentiate AIP from pancreatic cancer to avoid unnecessary surgery. The current management strategies for AIP, including its clinical features, diagnostic criteria, clinical subtypes, steroid therapy and prognosis are discussed, based on our 66 AIP cases and papers searched in PubMed from 1992 to March 2011, using the term 'autoimmune pancreatitis'. A new clinicopathological entity, an 'IgG4-related sclerosing disease' is also mentioned. AIP should be considered in the differential diagnosis in elderly male patients presented with obstructive jaundice and pancreatic mass. Steroids are a standard therapy for AIP, but their regimen including maintenance therapy should be evaluated in prospective trials.

  12. [Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, Felipe; Vásquez, Tatiana

    2012-11-01

    Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults (LADA) is the term used to describe adults who have a slowly progressive form of diabetes mellitus (DM) of autoimmune etiology, but that may be treated initially without insulin. Although it shares some immunological and genetic aspects with type 1 DM, it affects an age group that is typically affected by type 2 DM. Therefore, it could be considered an intermediate type. Diagnosis is based on clinical and laboratory criteria: age of onset, initial response to oral hypoglycemic agents and the presence of specific antibodies for diabetes. Although the definitive treatment is insulin, glitazones may be useful in early stages of the disease. Currently, its management represents a challenge for the physician, including specialists, and it is a form of DM to keep in mind.

  13. Vitamin D in autoimmune liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyk, Daniel S; Orfanidou, Timoklia; Invernizzi, Pietro; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Lenzi, Marco

    2013-11-01

    The development of autoimmune disease is based on the interaction of genetic susceptibility and environmental causes. Environmental factors include infectious and non-infectious agents, with some of these factors being implicated in several autoimmune diseases. Vitamin D is now believed to play a role in the development (or prevention) of several autoimmune diseases, based on its immunomodulatory properties. As well, the increasing incidence of autoimmune disease as one moves away from the equator, may be due to the lack of sunlight, which is crucial for the maintenance of normal vitamin D levels. A deficiency in vitamin D levels or vitamin D receptors is commonly indicated in autoimmune diseases, with multiple sclerosis (MS) being one of the best-studied and well-known examples. However, the role of vitamin D in other autoimmune diseases is not well defined, including autoimmune liver diseases such as primary biliary cirrhosis, autoimmune hepatitis, and primary sclerosing cholangitis. This review will examine the role of vitamin D as an immunomodulator, followed by a comparison of vitamin D in MS versus autoimmune liver disease. From this comparison, it will become clear that vitamin D likely plays a role in the development of autoimmune liver disease, but this area requires further investigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Psoriasis as an autoimmune disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Owczarczyk-Saczonek

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays it is known that psoriasis belongs to the group of autoimmune diseases and may coexist with other diseases in this group. Most often patients have psoriatic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune thyroid diseases and multiple sclerosis. The coexistence of these disorders can be a diagnostic and therapeutic problem (there is controversy over the use of corticosteroids. The common pathogenesis is still not explained. We know that the loss of immunotolerance leads to formation of autoreactive Th1 and Th17 lymphocytes which recognize self-antigens and lead to their destruction in the target organ. Some features of immune mechanisms, observed in psoriasis, suggest its autoimmune background. In psoriasis the main role is played by the activation of the axis IL-12/Th1/IFN- and Th17/Il-23. Il-12 probably acts on naive T cells and the Th1 response is initiated. Il-23 maintains the Th1-mediated inflammatory reaction, stimulates maturation and effects of Th17, and maintains a certain amount of memory cells. We also observe dysfunction of Treg cells, which are responsible for the destruction of autoreactive lymphocytes. In addition, psoriatic keratinocytes have increased resistance to apoptosis, which eliminate damaged cells so that they cannot be recognized as a foreign antigen. However, researchers have suggested that initially the polyclonal activation of T lymphocytes is induced by superantigens (e.g. streptococcal M protein, peptidoglycan or skin trauma (Koebner phenomenon, whereas in the later phase self-antigens in the epidermis are recognized by autoreactive T cells (keratin K 17, HPV 5 proteins L1, Pso p27, leading to autoimmunity.

  15. Helminth Immunomodulation in Autoimmune Disease

    OpenAIRE

    John J. Miles; John J. Miles; John J. Miles; John J. Miles; Taylor B. Smallwood; Paul R. Giacomin; Alex Loukas; Jason P. Mulvenna; Jason P. Mulvenna; Jason P. Mulvenna; Richard J. Clark

    2017-01-01

    Helminths have evolved to become experts at subverting immune surveillance. Through potent and persistent immune tempering, helminths can remain undetected in human tissues for decades. Redirecting the immunomodulating “talents” of helminths to treat inflammatory human diseases is receiving intensive interest. Here, we review therapies using live parasitic worms, worm secretions, and worm-derived synthetic molecules to treat autoimmune disease. We review helminth therapy in both mouse models ...

  16. Autoimmune diseases and reproductive aging

    OpenAIRE

    Bove, Riley

    2013-01-01

    As the population ages, more individuals with autoimmune diseases are experiencing reproductive senescence. Understanding the impact of menopause and age-related androgen decline on disease onset and course, as well as the potential for hormonal interventions, is critically important. In men, lupus erythematosis (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and multiple sclerosis (MS) are associated with lower androgen levels. However, the impact of age-related declines in testosterone, as well as of tes...

  17. Autoimmune Thyroiditis and Myasthenia Gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Lopomo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (AIDs are the result of specific immune responses directed against structures of the self. In normal conditions, the molecules recognized as “self” are tolerated by immune system, but when the self-tolerance is lost, the immune system could react against molecules from the body, causing the loss of self-tolerance, and subsequently the onset of AID that differs for organ target and etiology. Autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD is caused by the development of autoimmunity against thyroid antigens and comprises Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and Graves disease. They are frequently associated with other organ or non-organ specific AIDs, such as myasthenia gravis (MG. In fact, ATD seems to be the most associated pathology to MG. The etiology of both diseases is multifactorial and it is due to genetic and environmental factors, and each of them has specific characteristics. The two pathologies show many commonalities, such as the organ-specificity with a clear pathogenic effect of antibodies, the pathological mechanisms, such as deregulation of the immune system and the implication of the genetic predisposition. They also show some differences, such as the mode of action of the antibodies and therapies. In this review that focuses on ATD and MG, the common features and the differences between the two diseases are discussed.

  18. Vitamin D and autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Potrokhova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The review discusses the effect of vitamin D on the tolerogenic modulation of an immune response, its relationship to cells of the monocyte-macrophage series, including dendritic cells, monocytes, and macrophages, in the context of the impact of the expression of anti-inflammatory proinflammatory cytokines in some autoimmune diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, systemic scleroderma, multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, systemic lupus erythematosus, and Crohn`s disease. It discusses the role of vitamin D in the development of innate and adaptive immunity. Despite some conflicting evidence, the immune regulatory function of vitamin D is generally directed toward inhibition of the components of innate and acquired immunity, which are responsible for the induction of autoimmune reactions; in this connection there are a growing number of publications devoted to the issues of vitamin D supplementation in patients with autoimmune diseases, the preventive effect of vitamin D intake on the risk of an abnormality and that of therapeutic doses of the vitamin on its course. The maintenance of the threshold value for serum 25(OHD3 at least 30 ng/ml, which is achieved by the intake of about 2000 IU of vitamin D, is shown to be required for its immune regulatory function. The data given raise the question as to whether it is necessity to revise the Russian recommended daily dietary allowances for vitamin D through its infant food fortification.

  19. Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome and thrombocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atquet, V; Lienart, F; Vaes, M

    2015-12-01

    We describe a woman aged 37  years, affected with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, detected since the age of 17, with gonadic insufficiency with anti-ovarian antibodies since the age of 22  years and Addison's disease since 24  years old. At that moment, the diagnosis of autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome (APS) was made. Concomitant to this diagnosis, thrombocytosis was detected and aetiological assessment revealed an atrophy of the spleen. Differential diagnoses of APS and hyposplenism will be discussed. We will look at a possible association between these two pathologies. Indeed, asplenism is found in approximately 20% of adults affected by type 1 APS, also called auto-immune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) syndrome. The most likely aetiology for this atrophy of the spleen is a destruction of auto-immunological origin. However, in our patient, the search for a mutation of the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene proved negative. This mutation is commonly, but not systematically, present in type 1 APS. A type 2 APS should then be considered.

  20. Stochastic Effects in Autoimmune Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Fatehi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Among various possible causes of autoimmune disease, an important role is played by infections that can result in a breakdown of immune tolerance, primarily through the mechanism of “molecular mimicry”. In this paper we propose and analyse a stochastic model of immune response to a viral infection and subsequent autoimmunity, with account for the populations of T cells with different activation thresholds, regulatory T cells, and cytokines. We show analytically and numerically how stochasticity can result in sustained oscillations around deterministically stable steady states, and we also investigate stochastic dynamics in the regime of bi-stability. These results provide a possible explanation for experimentally observed variations in the progression of autoimmune disease. Computations of the variance of stochastic fluctuations provide practically important insights into how the size of these fluctuations depends on various biological parameters, and this also gives a headway for comparison with experimental data on variation in the observed numbers of T cells and organ cells affected by infection.

  1. Autoimmune Thyroiditis and Myasthenia Gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopomo, Angela; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AIDs) are the result of specific immune responses directed against structures of the self. In normal conditions, the molecules recognized as “self” are tolerated by immune system, but when the self-tolerance is lost, the immune system could react against molecules from the body, causing the loss of self-tolerance, and subsequently the onset of AID that differs for organ target and etiology. Autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) is caused by the development of autoimmunity against thyroid antigens and comprises Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and Graves disease. They are frequently associated with other organ or non-organ specific AIDs, such as myasthenia gravis (MG). In fact, ATD seems to be the most associated pathology to MG. The etiology of both diseases is multifactorial and it is due to genetic and environmental factors, and each of them has specific characteristics. The two pathologies show many commonalities, such as the organ-specificity with a clear pathogenic effect of antibodies, the pathological mechanisms, such as deregulation of the immune system and the implication of the genetic predisposition. They also show some differences, such as the mode of action of the antibodies and therapies. In this review that focuses on ATD and MG, the common features and the differences between the two diseases are discussed. PMID:28751878

  2. Human Cytomegalovirus and Autoimmune Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) represents a prototypic pathogenic member of the β-subgroup of the herpesvirus family. A range of HCMV features like its lytic replication in multiple tissues, the lifelong persistence through periods of latency and intermitting reactivation, the extraordinary large proteome, and extensive manipulation of adaptive and innate immunity make HCMV a high profile candidate for involvement in autoimmune disorders. We surveyed the available literature for reports on HCMV association with onset or exacerbation of autoimmune disease. A causative linkage between HCMV and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc), diabetes mellitus type 1, and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is suggested by the literature. However, a clear association of HCMV seroprevalence and disease could not be established, leaving the question open whether HCMV could play a coresponsible role for onset of disease. For convincing conclusions population-based prospective studies must be performed in the future. Specific immunopathogenic mechanisms by which HCMV could contribute to the course of autoimmune disease have been suggested, for example, molecular mimicry by UL94 in SSc and UL83/pp65 in SLE patients, as well as aggravation of joint inflammation by induction and expansion of CD4+/CD28− T-cells in RA patients. Further studies are needed to validate these findings and to lay the grounds for targeted therapeutic intervention. PMID:24967373

  3. MR imaging findings in subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki Jun; Lee, Jae Hee; Lee, Sung Yong; Chung, Sung Woo

    2000-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency can cause neurologic complications in the spinal cord, brain, and optic and peripheral nerves. Subacute combined degeneration is a rare disease of demyelinating lesions of the spinal cord, affecting mainly the posterior and lateral columns of the thoracic cord. We report the MR imaging findings of a case of subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord in a patient with vitamin B12 deficiency and mega loblastic anemia. (author)

  4. Comparison of Effects of Botulinum Toxin Injection Between Subacute and Chronic Stroke Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Young-Ho; Choi, Eun-Hi; Lim, Jong Youb

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to compare the effects of botulinum toxin injection between subacute and chronic stroke patients. Eighteen stroke patients (9 subacute and 9 chronic) with spasticity of 1+ or higher in the hemiplegic elbow or wrist joint, based on the modified Ashworth scale were recruited. Modified Ashworth scale, modified Tardieu scale, manual muscle testing, passive range of motion, Brunnstrom stage, modified Barthel index, and Fugl-Meyer scale evaluations of the hemipleg...

  5. Epigenetics as biomarkers in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haijing; Liao, Jieyue; Li, Qianwen; Yang, Ming; Zhao, Ming; Lu, Qianjin

    2018-03-21

    Autoimmune diseases are immune system disorders in which immune cells cannot distinguish self-antigens from foreign ones. The current criteria for autoimmune disease diagnosis are based on clinical manifestations and laboratory tests. However, none of these markers shows both high sensitivity and specificity. In addition, some autoimmune diseases, for example, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), are highly heterogeneous and often exhibit various manifestations. On the other hand, certain autoimmune diseases, such as Sjogren's syndrome versus SLE, share similar symptoms and autoantibodies, which also causes difficulties in diagnosis. Therefore, biomarkers that have both high sensitivity and high specificity for diagnosis, reflect disease activity and predict drug response are necessary. An increasing number of publications have proposed the abnormal epigenetic modifications as biomarkers of autoimmune diseases. Therefore, this review will comprehensively summarize the epigenetic progress in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders and unearth potential biomarkers that might be appropriate for disease diagnosis and prediction. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Autoimmune diseases in adults with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Yuki M F; Egeberg, Alexander; Gislason, Gunnar H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: An increased susceptibility to autoimmune disease has been shown in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), but data remain scarce and inconsistent. Objective: We examined the co-occurrence of selected autoimmune diseases in adult patients with AD. Methods: Nationwide health registers...... were used. Adult patients with a hospital diagnosis of AD in Denmark between 1997 and 2012 were included as cases (n = 8112) and matched with controls (n = 40,560). The occurrence of autoimmune diseases was compared in the 2 groups. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios. Results: AD...... was significantly associated with 11 of 22 examined autoimmune diseases. In addition, AD was associated with having multiple autoimmune comorbidities. Patients with a history of smoking had a significantly higher occurrence of autoimmune comorbidities compared to nonsmokers. Limitations: This study was limited...

  7. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension: a flavor of autoimmunity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perros, Frédéric; Humbert, Marc; Cohen-Kaminsky, Sylvia

    2013-01-01

    It is admitted that autoimmunity results from a combination of risks such as genetic background, environmental triggers, and stochastic events. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) shares with the so-called prototypic autoimmune diseases, genetic risk factors, female predominance and sex hormone influence, association with other chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, defects in regulatory T cells function, and presence of autoantibodies. Case reports have been published indicating the beneficial effect of some immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory therapies in PAH, supporting the potential role of immune mechanisms in the pathophysiology of the disease. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge on autoimmune mechanisms operating in PAH, especially mounting a local autoimmune response inside the pulmonary tissue, namely pulmonary lymphoid neogenesis. A better understanding of the role of autoimmunity in pulmonary vascular remodelling may help develop targeted immunomodulatory strategies in PAH. © 2013 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  8. Antithyroideaantistof hos to patienter med subakut dementiel udvikling, ataksi og myoklonus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondziella, Daniel; Hansen, Klaus; Gonzalez, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Hashimoto encephalitis (HE) is a steroid-responsive autoimmune encephalitis with anti-thyroid antibodies; Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a prion disease. Both disorders can have a similar clinical presentation. Two women, 67 and 63 year-old, with subacute dementia, ataxia, myoclonus...... and positive antithyroid antibodies were given oral steroids. Whereas one progressively declined and had histopathologically proven CJD, the other made a complete recovery and was diagnosed with HE. Anti-thyroid antibodies can occur in CJD, but when present in a patient with subacute dementia, ataxia...

  9. Microbiota and Autoimmunity: exploring new avenues

    OpenAIRE

    Yurkovetskiy, Leonid; Pickard, Joseph M.; Chervonsky, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    Given the recognized role of the commensal microbiota in regulating host immunity to pathogens, it is not surprising that microbiota are also capable of regulating autoimmune responses. The underlying mechanisms of autoimmune regulation by the microbiota are just beginning to emerge. Here, we discuss possible pressure points towards the development of autoimmune diseases that can be influenced by the microbiota. Besides acting on the adaptive and innate arms of the immune response, the microb...

  10. Severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia with renal neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Emily C; Parikh, Sahil P; Bhattacharyya, Nishith

    2014-02-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a type of hemolytic anemia characterized by autoantibodies directed against red blood cells shortening their survival. When autoimmune hemolytic anemia is secondary to a paraneoplastic process, severe anemia can occur leading to significant morbidity and even mortality. Here we discuss the literature and present the case of a child with autoimmune hemolytic anemia from a paraneoplastic syndrome secondary to a renal tumor.

  11. Recurrent Oral Inflammation in Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Pac, Malgorzata; Olczak-Kowalczyk, Dorota; Wolska-Kuśnierz, Beata; Piątosa, Barbara; Górska, Renata; Bernatowska, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    Abstract   Background and aim: Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a disorder of abnormal lymphocyte survival caused by dysregulation of the Fas apoptotic pathway. In ALPS defective lymphocyte apoptosis manifests as a chronic, nonmalignant lymphadenopathy and/or splenomegaly/hepatosplenomegaly, expansion of double negative T cell (DNTC) – CD4-CD8-TCRαβ+ T cells, autoimmune cytopenias and other autoimmune diseases.  Patients demonstrate oral lesions which have not yet been repo...

  12. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Berentsen, Sigbj?rn

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorder...

  13. Diagnosing autoimmune pancreatitis with the Unifying-Autoimmune-Pancreatitis-Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Alexander; Michaely, Henrik; Rückert, Felix; Weiss, Christel; Ströbel, Philipp; Belle, Sebastian; Hirth, Michael; Wilhelm, Torsten J; Haas, Stephan L; Jesenofsky, Ralf; Schönberg, Stefan; Marx, Alexander; Singer, Manfred V; Ebert, Matthias P; Pfützer, Roland H; Löhr, J Matthias

    We had developed the Unifying-Autoimmune-Pancreatitis-Criteria (U-AIP) to diagnose autoimmune pancreatitis (AiP) within the M-ANNHEIM classification of chronic pancreatitis. In 2011, International-Consensus-Diagnostic-Criteria (ICDC) to diagnose AiP have been published. We had applied the U-AIP long before the ICDC were available. The aims of the study were, first, to describe patients with AiP diagnosed by the U-AIP; second, to compare diagnostic accuracies of the U-AIP and other diagnostic systems; third, to evaluate the clinical applicability of the U-AIP. From 1998 until 2008, we identified patients with AiP using U-AIP, Japanese-, Korean-, Asian-, Mayo-HISORt-, Revised-Mayo-HISORt- and Italian-criteria. We retrospectively verified the diagnosis by ICDC and Revised-Japanese-2011-criteria, compared diagnostic accuracies of all systems and evaluated all criteria in consecutive patients with pancreatitis (2009 until 2010, Pancreas-Outpatient-Clinic-Cohort, n = 84). We retrospectively validated our diagnostic approach in consecutive patients with a pancreatic lesion requiring surgery (Surgical-Cohort, n = 98). Overall, we identified 21 patients with AiP. Unifying-Autoimmune-Pancreatitis-Criteria and ICDC presented the highest diagnostic accuracies (each 98.8%), highest Youden indices (each 0.95238), and highest proportions of diagnosed patients (each n = 20/21, U-AIP/ICDC vs. other diagnostic systems, p Pancreatitis-Criteria revealed a satisfactory clinical applicability and offered an additional approach to diagnose AiP. Copyright © 2017 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A new combination of multiple autoimmune syndrome? Coexistence of vitiligo, autoimmune thyroid disease and ulcerative colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firdevs Topal

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of three or more autoimmune disorders in one patient defines multiple autoimmune syndrome. The pathogenesis of multiple autoimmune syndrome is not known yet and environmental triggers and genetic susceptibility have been suggested to be involved. Herein, we report a 47-year-old woman who had Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, vitiligo and newly diagnosed ulcerative colitis. Diagnosis of ulcerative colitis was confirmed with histopathologic examination. This case presents a new combination of multiple autoimmune syndrome.

  15. Echocardiographic evaluation of patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derya Çimen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is a slowly progressive, inflammatory and neurodegenerative disease caused by virus infection in the central nervous system. Since there are a limited number of studies in the literature evaluating the cardiovascular functions of patients with SSPE, the present study evaluates the patients with SSPE using tissue Doppler echocardiography and compares them between the control group in order to shed some light on the subject. Methods: The study is a prospective observational study. 49 patients (17 female, 32 male with SSPE were included in the study. Patients were divided into two groups: Stage 2 (n=29 and Stage 3 (n=20. Echocardiographic data were compared with a control group of 26 which is the same average age. All children underwent a detailed echocardiography, which contained an M-mode, pulse Doppler and tissue Doppler imaging. Results: Sinus tachycardia ( >100 beats/min in children was detected in nineteen (38.7% patients. There were not significant differences between parameters of systolic and diastolic function of the heart. Stage 2 group, EF: 69.9±6.4; SF: 39.2±5.58; and MPI (mitral: 0.38±0.03 and MPI (tricuspid: 0.39±0.10. And in the Stage 3 group, EF: 68.5±7.0, SF: 37.8±5.34, MPI (mitral: 0.37±0.09 and MPI (tricuspid: 0.38±0.12. In the control group EF:70.96±5.54; SF:39.96±5.05 and MPI(mitral: 0.35±0.06 MPI (tricuspid:0.36±0.04 and statistically meaningful differences were not found between patients and control groups (p >0.05. Conclusion: Cardiac functions may be preserved and cardiac functions constitute no significant risks of mortality in the advanced stages of patients with Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, which is a group of chronic and bedridden patients.

  16. Recent advances in Japanese encephalitis [version 1; referees: 4 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirban Basu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Japanese encephalitis is a flaviviral disease that is endemic to the South, Southeast Asia, and Asia Oceania regions. Given that about 60% of the world’s population (about 7.4 billion resides in this region (about 4.4 billion, this disease poses a significant threat to global health. Active vaccination campaigns conducted in endemic countries have led to a decrease in the number of reported cases over the years. In this article, we strive to briefly highlight recent advances in understanding the role of microRNAs in disease pathology, focus on providing brief summaries of recent clinical trials in the field of Japanese encephalitis therapeutics, and review the current prophylactic strategies.

  17. Fatal wild-type varicella-zoster virus encephalitis without a rash in a vaccinated child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibraheem, Mam; Marin, Mona; Leung, Jessica; Bryce, Clare H; Schmid, D Scott; Zaki, Sherif R; Drew, Clifton; Liu, Lindy; Smelser, Chad

    2013-02-01

    Encephalitis associated with varicella-zoster virus, rare among children in the varicella vaccine era, has generally been associated with a rash. We report fatal wild-type varicella-zoster virus encephalitis without a rash in a child who had received 1 dose of varicella vaccine. Varicella-zoster virus encephalitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis for children presenting with acute neurologic symptoms, even vaccine recipients.

  18. Encephalitis due to antibodies to voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC with cerebellar involvement in a teenager

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan M Langille

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Encephalitis due to antibodies to voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC typically presents with limbic encephalitis and medial temporal lobe involvement on neuroimaging. We describe a case of 13 year girl female with encephalitis due to antibodies to VGKC with signal changes in the cerebellar dentate nuclei bilaterally and clinical features that suggested predominant cerebellar involvement. These have never been reported previously in the literature. Our case expands the phenotypic spectrum of this rare condition.

  19. Occupational Therapy for a Boy Patient with Herpes Simplex Encephalitis

    OpenAIRE

    豊森, 千史; 佐藤, 陽子

    1993-01-01

    A boy aged three years and two months had been affected with Herpes simplex encephalitis before five months and was referred to our occupational therapeutic division. He showed stranger reaction and separation anxiety. Additonally, he had some developmental disorders in the areas of self-care skills, cognition and communication proficiency. Besides these, he felt little interest in people or things, and had a short attention span. After treatment of occupational therapy for two years and ten ...

  20. Nucleoside Inhibitors of Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eyer, L.; Valdés, James J.; Gil, V.A.; Nencka, Radim; Hřebabecký, Hubert; Šála, Michal; Salát, J.; Černý, Jiří; Palus, Martin; De Clercq, E.; Růžek, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 9 (2015), s. 5483-5493 ISSN 0066-4804 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP502/11/2116; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : tick-borne encephalitis virus * infection * molecular analyses Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology; CC - Organic Chemistry (UOCHB-X) Impact factor: 4.415, year: 2015

  1. Tick-borne encephalitis virus infection of cultured mouse macrophages

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ahantarig, A.; Růžek, Daniel; Vancová, Marie; Janowitz, A.; Šťastná, Hana; Tesařová, Martina; Grubhoffer, Libor

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 5 (2009), s. 283-290 ISSN 0300-5526 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/06/1479; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06009 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : tick-borne encephalitis * macrophage s * electron microscopy Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 1.106, year: 2009

  2. Imaging findings of neonatal herpes simplex virus type 2 encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vossough, Arastoo; Zimmerman, Robert A.; Bilaniuk, Larissa T.; Schwartz, Erin M. [University of Pennsylvania, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2008-04-15

    The CT, MR, and diffusion-weighted initial and follow-up imaging findings in neonatal herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) encephalitis were assessed. The clinical, laboratory and imaging findings in 12 patients (eight girls and four boys) with proven neonatal HSV-2 encephalitis with follow-up were retrospectively reviewed. Patterns of brain involvement and distribution of lesions were studied and the contribution of diffusion-weighted imaging to the imaging diagnosis of this disease was explored. A total of 24 CT and 22 MRI studies were performed with a mean follow-up time of 38 months. Neonatal HSV-2 encephalitis can be multifocal or limited to only the temporal lobes, brainstem, or cerebellum. The deep gray matter structures were involved in 57% of patients, and hemorrhage was seen in more than half of the patients. CT images were normal or showed mild abnormalities in the early stages of the disease. Conventional MR images may be normal in the early stages of the disease. Lesions were initially seen only by diffusion-weighted imaging in 20% of the patients and this modality showed a substantially more extensive disease distribution in an additional 50% of patients. In 40% of patients, watershed distribution ischemic changes were observed in addition to areas of presumed direct herpetic necrosis. Neonatal HSV-2 encephalitis has a variable imaging appearance. Diffusion-weighted MRI is an important adjunct in the imaging evaluation of this disease. Watershed distribution ischemia in areas remote from the primary herpetic lesions may be seen. (orig.)

  3. Contrast enhancement of the gyri in herpes simplex encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumacher, K.A.; Langer, M.; Langer, R.

    1982-01-01

    A case of herpes simplex encephalitis was examined by computer tomography. Both cerebral hemispheres showed contrast enhancement of the gyri. The cause of this is considered. The increased contrast medium accumulation in the affected areas is probably due to the marked vascular proliferation which can be demonstrated anatomically, and to the rapid escape of contrast from the capillaries into the interstitial spaces. The findings of other authors, which differ somewhat, are discussed. (orig.) [de

  4. Susceptibility of Peruvian Mosquitoes to Eastern Equine Encephalitis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Von Humboldt). Voucher specimens were placed in the collection at the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC...family To- gaviridae, genusAlphavirus) is enzootic in the eastern United States and throughout Central and South America, and infection with this...2008 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Susceptibility of Peruvian mosquitoes to eastern equine encephalitis virus

  5. Tick-borne encephalitis virus infection in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Hrnjaković-Cvjetković Ivana; Cvjetković Dejan; Patić Aleksandra; Radovanov Jelena; Kovačević Gordana; Milošević Vesna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Tick-borne meningoencephalitis virus is a flavivirus that causes the most important vector-borne central nervous system infection in many countries of Europe and Asia. There are three subtypes of tick-borne encephalitis virus: European, Siberian and the Far-Eastern subtype. Transmission. In endemic areas, the virus remains in transmissive cycles between Ixodes ticks and small rodents. Clinical picture. In most cases (70−98%) infection goes asy...

  6. Outbreaks of Eastern equine encephalitis in northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Maria L C R; Galiza, Glauco J N; Dantas, Antônio F M; Oliveira, Rafael N; Iamamoto, Keila; Achkar, Samira M; Riet-Correa, Franklin

    2011-05-01

    Outbreaks of eastern equine encephalitis observed from May 2008 to August 2009 in the Brazilian states of Pernambuco, Ceará, and Paraíba are reported. The disease occurred in 93 farms affecting 229 equids with a case fatality rate of 72.92%. Main clinical signs were circling, depression or hyperexcitability, ataxia, and progressive paralysis with a clinical manifestation period of 3-15 days. Main histologic lesions were a diffuse lymphocytic encephalomyelitis with neuronal death, satellitosis, neuronophagia, and hemorrhages being more severe in the cerebral gray matter of the telencephalon, diencephalon, and mesencephalon. Some animals also had areas of malacia in the telencephalon, thalamus, and basal nuclei. From 1 case, the virus was isolated by mice inoculation, and in other 13 cases was identified as Eastern equine encephalitis virus by semi-nested reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. After DNA sequencing, all samples were identified as eastern equine encephalitis through the BLASTn analysis, but samples from the Ceará and Paraíba states corresponded to the same cluster, while the sample from the state of Pernambuco corresponded to a different cluster. © 2011 The Author(s)

  7. A new model for Hendra virus encephalitis in the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Dups

    Full Text Available Hendra virus (HeV infection in humans is characterized by an influenza like illness, which may progress to pneumonia or encephalitis and lead to death. The pathogenesis of HeV infection is poorly understood, and the lack of a mouse model has limited the opportunities for pathogenetic research. In this project we reassessed the role of mice as an animal model for HeV infection and found that mice are susceptible to HeV infection after intranasal exposure, with aged mice reliably developing encephalitic disease. We propose an anterograde route of neuroinvasion to the brain, possibly along olfactory nerves. This is supported by evidence for the development of encephalitis in the absence of viremia and the sequential distribution of viral antigen along pathways of olfaction in the brain of intranasally challenged animals. In our studies mice developed transient lower respiratory tract infection without progressing to viremia and systemic vasculitis that is common to other animal models. These studies report a new animal model of HeV encephalitis that will allow more detailed studies of the neuropathogenesis of HeV infection, particularly the mode of viral spread and possible sequestration within the central nervous system; investigation of mechanisms that moderate the development of viremia and systemic disease; and inform the development of improved treatment options for human patients.

  8. Epidemiological surveillance of herpes viral encephalitis in Cordoba, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tique, Vaneza; Mattar, Salim; Freire, María; Illian, Eduardo; Camargo, Francisco; Vergara, Oscar; Moraes-Figueiredo, Luiz T

    2016-08-01

    Objective To establish an epidemiological surveillance of viral herpes encephalitis in major hospitals of Monteria, Cordoba. Methods From September 2009 to December 2011, a descriptive study of cases of viral encephalitis was made in three hospitals in the city of Monteria. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from 118 patients were included in the study. Clinical aspects, as well as cytochemical and microbiological analysis (Gram stain and culture) of CSF, were used for selecting the patients. Virus detection was performed by using multiplex nested PCR for Herpes simplex virus 1 and 2, Epstein Barr virus, Cytomegalovirus and Varicella zoster virus. Results Viral DNA of herpesvirus was detected in the CSFs of 30 (25.4 %) participants, as follows: 22 (18.6 %) Herpes simplex 1 and 2 viruses, 4 (3.3 %) Cytomegalovirus and 1 (0.8 %) Varicella zoster virus. Co-infections were observed in 3 patients (2.5 %), 1 case by HSV-VZV and 2 cases by CMV/HSV. The clinical manifestations of the patients included: headache (18.6 %), fever (14.4 %), asthenia (10.1 %), seizures (9.3 %), vomiting (8.4 %), and stiff neck (5.9 %). Thirty percent of the patients also had HIV-AIDS. A case fatality rate of 20 % was observed for the patients. Conclusions This paper shows that herpesvirus is a cause of infection of the CNS in patients from Cordoba. This study contributes to the epidemiology of encephalitis, as well as to patient management.

  9. MR and CT imaging patterns in post-varicella encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darling, C.F. [Div. of Neuroimaging, Children`s Memorial Center, Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States); Larsen, M.B. [Div. of Neurology, Children`s Memorial Center, Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States); Byrd, S.E. [Div. of Neuroimaging, Children`s Memorial Center, Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States); Radkowski, M.A. [Div. of Neuroimaging, Children`s Memorial Center, Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States); Palka, P.S. [Div. of Neuroimaging, Children`s Memorial Center, Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States); Allen, E.D. [Div. of Neuroimaging, Children`s Memorial Center, Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-06-01

    The aim of the investigation was to determine the patterns of cerebral involvement on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in post-varicella encephalitis. Four children between the ages of 2 and 11 years presented over a 5-year period with a diagnosis of post-varicella encephalitis. Their imaging studies and clinical data were reviewed retrospectively. The medical histories of all four children were noncontributory except for recent bouts of chickenpox 1 week to 3 months prior to hospitalization. Three children presented with parkinsonian manifestations. Bilateral, symmetric hypodense, nonenhancing basal ganglia lesions were found on CT. These areas showed nonenhancing low signal intensity on T1-weighted images and high signal intensity on T2-weighted images on MR. One child presented with diffuse, multiple gray and white matter lesions of similar imaging characteristics; some lesions, however, did enhance. This child had no gait disturbances. Post-varicella encephalitis can produce two patterns of dramatic CT and MR findings. With an appropriate history and clinical findings, varicella as a cause of bilateral basal ganglia or diffuse cerebral lesions can be differentiated from other possible etiologies which include trauma, anoxia, metabolic disorders and demyelinating diseases. (orig.)

  10. Clinical and cerebrospinal fluid findings contribute to the early differentiation between infectious and noninfectious encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Wilken

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Early recognition and prompt specific treatment are crucial factors influencing the outcome of patients with acute encephalitis. The aim of this study was to determine the main causes of acute encephalitis in our population and to find predictors that may lead to specific diagnosis. Adult patients admitted to our hospital with suspected diagnosis of encephalitis in the period 2006-2013 were included. One hundred and five medical records were analyzed. Eighty-two patients with infectious encephalitis were identified (78% of total cases, 53 (65% men and 29 (35% women, mean age 47.8 years. The most common microorganisms identified were: HSV-1 (11%, VZV (10%, HSV-2 (5% and EBV (5%. Twenty-three patients (22% of the series had non-infectious encephalitis. Headache (p < 0.0001 and fever (p = 0.008 were more frequent in encephalitis of infectious origin. Protein levels and white blood cell counts in the cerebrospinal fluid were significantly higher in patients affected by infectious encephalitis than in those affected by noninfectious encephalitis (OR 95% CI 12.3 [2.9-51.7] and OR 95% CI 7.4 [2-27], respectively. Identifying specific causal agents of acute encephalitis remains a major challenge. Cerebrospinal fluid markers, as well as specific clinical findings, may however contribute to initial differentiation between infectious and noninfectious causes.

  11. Autoimmune atrophic gastritis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minalyan A

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Artem Minalyan,1 Jihane N Benhammou,1 Aida Artashesyan,1 Michael S Lewis,2 Joseph R Pisegna1 1Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Parenteral Nutrition, 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: At present there is no universally accepted classification for gastritis. The first successful classification (The Sydney System that is still commonly used by medical professionals was first introduced by Misiewicz et al in Sydney in 1990. In fact, it was the first detailed classification after the discovery of Helicobacter pylori by Warren and Marshall in 1982. In 1994, the Updated Sydney System was proposed during the International Workshop on the Histopathology of Gastritis followed by the publication in The American Journal of Surgical Pathology by Dixon et al. Using the new classification, distinction between atrophic and nonatrophic gastritis was revised, and the visual scale grading was incorporated. According to the Updated Sydney System Classification, atrophic gastritis is categorized into multifocal (H. pylori, environmental factors, specific diet and corpus-predominant (autoimmune. Since metaplasia is a key histological characteristic in patients with atrophic gastritis, it has been recommended to use the word “metaplastic” in both variants of atrophic gastritis: autoimmune metaplastic atrophic gastritis (AMAG and environmental metaplastic atrophic gastritis. Although there are many overlaps in the course of the disease and distinction between those two entities may be challenging, the aim of this review article was to describe the etiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, clinical manifestations and treatment in patients with AMAG. However, it is important to mention that H. pylori is the most common etiologic factor for the development of gastritis in the world. Keywords: autoimmune gastritis, pernicious anemia, gastric carcinoid

  12. Immunoglobulin E-Mediated Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Maurer

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The study of autoimmunity mediated by immunoglobulin E (IgE autoantibodies, which may be termed autoallergy, is in its infancy. It is now recognized that systemic lupus erythematosus, bullous pemphigoid (BP, and chronic urticaria, both spontaneous and inducible, are most likely to be mediated, at least in part, by IgE autoantibodies. The situation in other conditions, such as autoimmune uveitis, rheumatoid arthritis, hyperthyroid Graves’ disease, autoimmune pancreatitis, and even asthma, is far less clear but evidence for autoallergy is accumulating. To be certain of an autoallergic mechanism, it is necessary to identify both IgE autoantibodies and their targets as has been done with the transmembrane protein BP180 and the intracellular protein BP230 in BP and IL-24 in chronic spontaneous urticaria. Also, IgE-targeted therapies, such as anti-IgE, must have been shown to be of benefit to patients as has been done with both of these conditions. This comprehensive review of the literature on IgE-mediated autoallergy focuses on three related questions. What do we know about the prevalence of IgE autoantibodies and their targets in different diseases? What do we know about the relevance of IgE autoantibodies in different diseases? What do we know about the cellular and molecular effects of IgE autoantibodies? In addition to providing answers to these questions, based on a broad review of the literature, we outline the current gaps of knowledge in our understanding of IgE autoantibodies and describe approaches to address them.

  13. Helminth Immunomodulation in Autoimmune Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Taylor B; Giacomin, Paul R; Loukas, Alex; Mulvenna, Jason P; Clark, Richard J; Miles, John J

    2017-01-01

    Helminths have evolved to become experts at subverting immune surveillance. Through potent and persistent immune tempering, helminths can remain undetected in human tissues for decades. Redirecting the immunomodulating "talents" of helminths to treat inflammatory human diseases is receiving intensive interest. Here, we review therapies using live parasitic worms, worm secretions, and worm-derived synthetic molecules to treat autoimmune disease. We review helminth therapy in both mouse models and clinical trials and discuss what is known on mechanisms of action. We also highlight current progress in characterizing promising new immunomodulatory molecules found in excretory/secretory products of helminths and their potential use as immunotherapies for acute and chronic inflammatory diseases.

  14. Cecocentral scotoma as the initial manifestation of subacute bacterial endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Savitsky Strauss

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Danielle Savitsky Strauss, Samuel Baharestani, Julia Nemiroff, Kiran Amesur, David HowardNew York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, USAIntroduction: We report a case of a 67-year-old male who presented with a cecocentral scotoma caused by a septic embolus from subacute bacterial endocarditis (SBE.Methods: A 67-year-old man presented with sudden, painless decreased vision in the left eye. A dilated fundoscopic exam, Humphrey visual field test, transthoracic echocardiogram, abdominal computed tomography (CT, and blood cultures were all performed.Results: A dilated fundoscopic exam revealed temporal segmental optic disc pallor on the left, and Humphrey visual field testing demonstrated a dense left cecocentral scotoma. When the patient developed fever (103.9°F and palpitations, transthoracic echocardiogram revealed valvular vegetations, and contrast CT of the abdomen revealed an abscess in the dome of the liver likely due to an infectious thrombus. Blood cultures grew viridians group streptococci in three separate peripheral collections.Conclusion: This case illustrates that a sudden cecocentral scotoma may be the initial manifestation of SBE. Keywords: endocarditis, scotoma, streptococcal infections, visual fields

  15. Subacute (90 days) oral toxicity studies of Kombucha tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavan, R; Singh, M; Rao, P V; Bhattacharya, R; Kumar, P; Sugendran, K; Kumar, O; Pant, S C; Singh, R

    2000-12-01

    Kombucha tea (KT) is a popular health beverage and is used as an alternative therapy. KT is prepared by placing the kombucha culture in solution of tea and sugar and allowing to ferment. The inoculum is a fungus consisting of symbiotic colony of yeast and bacteria. KT is consumed in several countries and is believed to have prophylactic and therapeutic benefits in a wide variety of ailments, viz., intestinal disorders, arthritis, ageing and stimulation of immunological system. Though KT is used in several parts of the world its beneficial effects and adverse effects have not been scientifically evaluated. Since there are no animal toxicological data on KT, subacute oral toxicity study was carried out. Five groups of rats were maintained: (a) control group given tap water orally, (b) KT given 2 ml/kg orally, (c) plain tea (PT) given 2 ml/kg orally, (d) KT given in drinking water, 1% (v/v) and (e) PT given in drinking water, 1% (v/v). The rats were given this treatment daily for a period of 90 days. Weekly records of weight, feed intake, water intake and general behaviour were monitored. There was no significant difference in the growth of the animals as evidenced by the progressive body weight change. The organ to body weight ratio and histological evaluation did not show any toxic signs. The haematological and biochemical variables were within the clinical limits. The study indicates that rats fed KT for 90 days showed no toxic effects.

  16. Subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) in grazing Irish dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, Luke; Doherty, Michael L; Mulligan, Finbar J

    2008-04-01

    Subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) is a significant production disease of dairy cattle. Previous concerns have been raised over the occurrence of SARA in pasture-fed dairy cattle and the potential consequences of laminitis and lameness. Highly digestible perennial rye grass contains high concentrations of rapidly fermentable carbohydrate and low concentrations of physical effective fibre that may result in SARA. This study conducted a point prevalence survey of rumen health status in grazing Irish dairy cattle fed predominantly perennial rye grass-based pasture. The survey assessed rumen fluid, animal health status, milk production data and pasture composition. A total of 144 cows between 80 and 150 days in milk were sampled on 12 farms. Eleven percent of cows were classified as affected with SARA (pH 5.8). The study showed that low rumen pH is prevalent in grazing Irish dairy cattle consuming perennial rye grass-based pasture and raises concerns regarding effective pasture utilisation and possible consequences for animal health.

  17. Tc-DMSA (V) imaging for subacute back pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldey, A.; Salehi, N.; Thomas, C.; Schlict, S.; Lichtenstein, M.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: Background: Low back pain is a common disabling illness in the Western world creating $25 billion medical costs in the USA alone. The overall outcome of back pain has not been shown to be influenced by the currently available treatments. Diagnostic techniques are also imprecise. Some back pain may be due to minor currently undetectable ligamentous tears which generate a scarring fibrotic reaction. Aim: To detect minor ligamentous tears and ultimately assess steroid injection treatment using scintigraphic techniques. Methods: Technetium [valency (5)] dimercaptosuccinic acid [ 99m Tc (V) DMSA] is a radiopharmaceutical which has been demonstrated to accumulate in fibrotic tissues 2- Technetium-99m (V) DMSA single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) scans were performed in ten patients with subacute (2-12 months duration) back pain. These scans were compared to SPECT bone scans also performed in these patients. Results: One patient was excluded post imaging due to likely infection or tumour. Of the nine patients remaining, five showed lesions presumed to be due to healing scars. Hence new abnormalities are detectable by this technique. Conclusion: Accrual is continuing but definitive results will not be available until the clinical results of scan directed steroid injections are evaluated

  18. Silent circulation of St. Louis encephalitis virus prior to an encephalitis outbreak in Cordoba, Argentina (2005.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Adrian Díaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available St. Louis encephalitis virus is a complex zoonoses. In 2005, 47 laboratory-confirmed and probable clinical cases of SLEV infection were reported in Córdoba, Argentina. Although the causes of 2005 outbreak remain unknown, they might be related not only to virological factors, but also to ecological and environmental conditions. We hypothesized that one of the factors for SLE reemergence in Córdoba, Argentina, was the introduction of a new SLEV genotype (SLEV genotype III, with no previous activity in the area. In order to evaluate this hypothesis we carried out a molecular characterization of SLEV detections from mosquitoes collected between 2001 and 2004 in Córdoba city. A total of 315 mosquito pools (11,002 individuals including 12 mosquitoes species were analyzed. Overall, 20 pools (8 mosquitoes species were positive for SLEV. During this study, genotypes II, V and VII were detected. No mosquito pool infected with genotype III was detected before the 2005 outbreak. Genotype V was found every year and in the 8 sampled sites. Genotypes II and VII showed limited temporal and spatial activities. We cannot dismiss the association of genotype II and V as etiological agents during the outbreak. However, the silent circulation of other SLEV strains in Córdoba city before the 2005 outbreak suggests that the introduction of genotype III was an important factor associated to this event. Not mutually exclusive, other factors such as changes in avian hosts and mosquitoes vectors communities, driven by climatic and environmental modifications, should also be taken into consideration in further studies.

  19. Endocrine autoimmune disease: genetics become complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebolt, Janneke; Koeleman, Bobby P C; van Haeften, Timon W

    2010-12-01

    The endocrine system is a frequent target in pathogenic autoimmune responses. Type 1 diabetes and autoimmune thyroid disease are the prevailing examples. When several diseases cluster together in one individual, the phenomenon is called autoimmune polyglandular syndrome. Progress has been made in understanding the genetic factors involved in endocrine autoimmune diseases. Studies on monogenic autoimmune diseases such as autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1, immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked and primary immune deficiencies helped uncover the role of key regulators in the preservation of immune tolerance. Alleles of the major histocompatibility complex have been known to contribute to the susceptibility to most forms of autoimmunity for more than 3 decades. Furthermore, sequencing studies revealed three non-major histocompatibility complex loci and some disease specific loci, which control T lymphocyte activation or signalling. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have enabled acceleration in the identification of novel (non-HLA) loci and hence other relevant immune response pathways. Interestingly, several loci are shared between autoimmune diseases, and surprisingly some work in opposite direction. This means that the same allele which predisposes to a certain autoimmune disease can be protective in another. Well powered GWAS in type 1 diabetes has led to the uncovering of a significant number of risk variants with modest effect. These studies showed that the innate immune system may also play a role in addition to the adaptive immune system. It is anticipated that next generation sequencing techniques will uncover other (rare) variants. For other autoimmune disease (such as autoimmune thyroid disease) GWAS are clearly needed. © 2010 The Authors. European Journal of Clinical Investigation © 2010 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  20. Reliability and validity of the de Morton Mobility Index in individuals with sub-acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Tobias; Marks, Detlef; Thiel, Christian; Grüneberg, Christian

    2018-02-04

    To establish the validity and reliability of the de Morton Mobility Index (DEMMI) in patients with sub-acute stroke. This cross-sectional study was performed in a neurological rehabilitation hospital. We assessed unidimensionality, construct validity, internal consistency reliability, inter-rater reliability, minimal detectable change and possible floor and ceiling effects of the DEMMI in adult patients with sub-acute stroke. The study included a total sample of 121 patients with sub-acute stroke. We analysed validity (n = 109) and reliability (n = 51) in two sub-samples. Rasch analysis indicated unidimensionality with an overall fit to the model (chi-square = 12.37, p = 0.577). All hypotheses on construct validity were confirmed. Internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.94) and inter-rater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.95; 95% confidence interval: 0.92-0.97) were excellent. The minimal detectable change with 90% confidence was 13 points. No floor or ceiling effects were evident. These results indicate unidimensionality, sufficient internal consistency reliability, inter-rater reliability, and construct validity of the DEMMI in patients with a sub-acute stroke. Advantages of the DEMMI in clinical application are the short administration time, no need for special equipment and interval level data. The de Morton Mobility Index, therefore, may be a useful performance-based bedside test to measure mobility in individuals with a sub-acute stroke across the whole mobility spectrum. Implications for Rehabilitation The de Morton Mobility Index (DEMMI) is an unidimensional measurement instrument of mobility in individuals with sub-acute stroke. The DEMMI has excellent internal consistency and inter-rater reliability, and sufficient construct validity. The minimal detectable change of the DEMMI with 90% confidence in stroke rehabilitation is 13 points. The lack of any floor or ceiling effects on hospital admission indicates

  1. Epstein-Barr Virus Encephalitis in an Immunocompetent Child: A Case Report and Management of Epstein-Barr Virus Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulsen Akkoc

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV usually causes mild, asymptomatic, and self-limited infections in children and adults; however, it may occasionally lead to severe conditions such as neurological diseases, malignant diseases, hepatic failure, and myocarditis. Epstein-Barr virus-related neurological disorders include meningitis, encephalitis, and cranial or peripheral neuritis, which are mostly seen in immunocompromised patients. The therapeutic modalities for EBV-related severe organ damage including central nervous system manifestations are still uncertain. Herein, we describe a seven-year-old boy with EBV encephalitis who presented with prolonged fever, exudative pharyngitis, reduced consciousness, and neck stiffness. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging showed contrast enhancement in the bilateral insular cortex and the right hypothalamus. The diagnosis was made by EBV-DNA amplification in both the blood and cerebrospinal fluid samples. He was discharged with acyclovir therapy without any sequelae.

  2. Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders without and with autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Bingjun; Zhong, Yi; Wang, Yanqiang; Dai, Yongqiang; Qiu, Wei; Zhang, Lei; Li, Haiyan; Lu, Zhengqi

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) can coexist with non-organ-specific or organ-specific autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the features between NMOSD without and with autoimmune diseases, and NMOSD with non-organ-specific and organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Methods One hundred and fifty five NMOSD patients without autoimmune diseases (n = 115) and with autoimmune diseases (n = 40) were enrolled. NMOSD with autoimmune diseases ...

  3. Interferon-¿ regulates oxidative stress during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espejo, C.; Penkowa, Milena; Saez-Torres, I.

    2002-01-01

    Neurobiology, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis IFN-d, multiple sclerosis, neurodegeneration, oxidative stress......Neurobiology, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis IFN-d, multiple sclerosis, neurodegeneration, oxidative stress...

  4. Kaleidoscope of autoimmune diseases in HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszkiewicz, Justyna; Smolewska, Elzbieta

    2016-11-01

    Within the last 30 years, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has changed its status from inevitably fatal to chronic disorder with limited impact on life span. However, this breakthrough was mainly the effect of introduction of the aggressive antiviral treatment, which has led to the clinically significant increase in CD4+ cell count, resulting in fewer cases of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and improved management of opportunistic infections occurring in the course of the disease. The occurrence of a particular autoimmune disease depends on degree of immunosuppression of the HIV-positive patient. In 2002, four stages of autoimmunity were proposed in patients infected by HIV, based on the absolute CD4+ cell count, feature of AIDS as well as on the presence of autoimmune diseases. Spectrum of autoimmune diseases associated with HIV infection seems to be unexpectedly wide, involving several organs, such as lungs (sarcoidosis), thyroid gland (Graves' disease), liver (autoimmune hepatitis), connective tissue (systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, polyarteritis nodosa and other types of vasculitis, antiphospholipid syndrome) or hematopoietic system (autoimmune cytopenias). This paper contains the state of art on possible coincidences between HIV infection and a differential types of autoimmune diseases, including the potential mechanisms of this phenomenon. As the clinical manifestations of autoimmunization often mimic those inscribed in the course of HIV infection, health care providers should be aware of this rare but potentially deadly association and actively seek for its symptoms in their patients.

  5. Gender and autoimmune comorbidity in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magyari, Melinda; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Pfleger, Claudia C

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The female preponderance in incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS) calls for investigations into sex differences in comorbidity with other autoimmune diseases (ADs). OBJECTIVES: To determine whether male and female patients with MS have a higher frequency of autoimmune comorbidity than...

  6. Autoimmune hepatitis and juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deen, M. E. J.; Porta, G.; Fiorot, F. J.; Campos, L. M. A.; Sallum, A. M. E.; Silva, C. A. A.

    Juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE) and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) are both autoimmune disorders that are rare in children and have a widespread clinical manifestation. A few case reports have shown a JSLE-AIH associated disorder. To our knowledge, this is the first study that

  7. Autoimmune diseases in women with Turner's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kristian T; Rostgaard, Klaus; Bache, Iben

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In terms of number of X chromosomes, women with Turner's syndrome cytogenetically resemble men. An increased risk of autoimmune diseases has been observed among women with Turner's syndrome. This study was undertaken to investigate whether the autoimmune disease profile in women with T...

  8. Cardiovascular Involvement in Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya-Amaya, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AD) represent a broad spectrum of chronic conditions that may afflict specific target organs or multiple systems with a significant burden on quality of life. These conditions have common mechanisms including genetic and epigenetics factors, gender disparity, environmental triggers, pathophysiological abnormalities, and certain subphenotypes. Atherosclerosis (AT) was once considered to be a degenerative disease that was an inevitable consequence of aging. However, research in the last three decades has shown that AT is not degenerative or inevitable. It is an autoimmune-inflammatory disease associated with infectious and inflammatory factors characterized by lipoprotein metabolism alteration that leads to immune system activation with the consequent proliferation of smooth muscle cells, narrowing arteries, and atheroma formation. Both humoral and cellular immune mechanisms have been proposed to participate in the onset and progression of AT. Several risk factors, known as classic risk factors, have been described. Interestingly, the excessive cardiovascular events observed in patients with ADs are not fully explained by these factors. Several novel risk factors contribute to the development of premature vascular damage. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how traditional and nontraditional risk factors contribute to pathogenesis of CVD in AD. PMID:25177690

  9. Cystic Lesions in Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macarena Gompertz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP can be chronic or recurrent, but frequently completely reversible after steroid treatment. A cystic lesion in AIP is a rare finding, and it can mimic a pancreatic cystic neoplasm. Difficulties in an exact diagnosis interfere with treatment, and surgery cannot be avoided in some cases. We report the history of a 63-year-old male presenting with jaundice and pruritus. AIP was confirmed by imaging and elevated IgG4 blood levels, and the patient completely recovered after corticosteroid therapy. One year later, he presented with a recurrent episode of AIP with elevated IgG4 levels, accompanied by the appearance of multiple intrapancreatic cystic lesions. All but 1 of these cysts disappeared after steroid treatment, but the remaining cyst in the pancreatic head was even somewhat larger 1 year later. Pancreatoduodenectomy was finally performed. Histology showed the wall of the cystic lesion to be fibrotic; the surrounding pancreatic tissue presented fibrosis, atrophy and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration by IgG4-positive cells, without malignant elements. Our case illustrates the rare possibility that cystic lesions can be part of AIP. These pseudocysts appear in the pancreatic segments involved in the autoimmune disease and can be a consequence of the local inflammation or related to ductal strictures. Steroid treatment should be initiated, after which these cysts can completely disappear with recovery from AIP. Surgical intervention may be necessary in some exceptional cases.

  10. Autoimmunity, infectious immunity, and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Eiji; Kobayashi, Kazuko; Matsunami, Yukana; Shen, Lianhua; Quan, Nanhu; Makarova, Marina; Suchkov, Sergey V; Ayada, Kiyoshi; Oguma, Keiji; Lopez, Luis R

    2009-11-01

    Vascular inflammation is common in certain systemic autoimmune diseases and contributes to the oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and oxLDL/beta2-glycoprotein I (beta2GPI) complex formation. These complexes have been implicated as proatherogenic autoantigens that participate in the development of atherosclerotic disease. We have demonstrated that the in vitro macrophage uptake of oxLDL/beta2GPI complexes increases in the presence of IgG anti-beta2GPI antibodies and that IgG immune complexes containing oxLDL/beta2GPI upregulate the expression of both scavenger and Fcgamma receptors to activate beta2GPI specific T cells. Some persistent infections may cause immune responses that promote atherogenesis. Cellular immunity (Th1) against Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) derived heat shock protein 60 (Hp-HSP60) cross-reacts with endogenous HSP60 to cause cardiovascular disease likely by molecular mimicry. Infectious cellular response may be proatherogenic,while the humoral response (antibody production) maybe protective. We review the recent progress in our understanding of autoimmunity and infectious immunity that promote atherosclerosis.

  11. Warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalfa, Theodosia A

    2016-12-02

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a rare and heterogeneous disease that affects 1 to 3/100 000 patients per year. AIHA caused by warm autoantibodies (w-AIHA), ie, antibodies that react with their antigens on the red blood cell optimally at 37°C, is the most common type, comprising ∼70% to 80% of all adult cases and ∼50% of pediatric cases. About half of the w-AIHA cases are called primary because no specific etiology can be found, whereas the rest are secondary to other recognizable underlying disorders. This review will focus on the postulated immunopathogenetic mechanisms in idiopathic and secondary w-AIHA and report on the rare cases of direct antiglobulin test-negative AIHA, which are even more likely to be fatal because of inherent characteristics of the causative antibodies, as well as because of delays in diagnosis and initiation of appropriate treatment. Then, the characteristics of w-AIHA associated with genetically defined immune dysregulation disorders and special considerations on its management will be discussed. Finally, the standard treatment options and newer therapeutic approaches for this chronic autoimmune blood disorder will be reviewed. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

  12. Treatment of autoimmune inflammation by a TLR7 ligand regulating the innate immune system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Hayashi

    Full Text Available The Toll-like receptors (TLR have been advocated as attractive therapeutic targets because TLR signaling plays dual roles in initiating adaptive immune responses and perpetuating inflammation. Paradoxically, repeated stimulation of bone marrow mononuclear cells with a synthetic TLR7 ligand 9-benzyl-8-hydroxy-2-(2-methoxyethoxy adenine (called 1V136 leads to subsequent TLR hyporesponsiveness. Further studies on the mechanism of action of this pharmacologic agent demonstrated that the TLR7 ligand treatment depressed dendritic cell activation, but did not directly affect T cell function. To verify this mechanism, we utilized experimental allergic encephalitis (EAE as an in vivo T cell dependent autoimmune model. Drug treated SJL/J mice immunized with proteolipid protein (PLP(139-151 peptide had attenuated disease severity, reduced accumulation of mononuclear cells in the central nervous system (CNS, and limited demyelination, without any apparent systemic toxicity. Splenic T cells from treated mice produced less cytokines upon antigenic rechallenge. In the spinal cords of 1V136-treated EAE mice, the expression of chemoattractants was also reduced, suggesting innate immune cell hyposensitization in the CNS. Indeed, systemic 1V136 did penetrate the CNS. These experiments indicated that repeated doses of a TLR7 ligand may desensitize dendritic cells in lymphoid organs, leading to diminished T cell responses. This treatment strategy might be a new modality to treat T cell mediated autoimmune diseases.

  13. Monogenic autoimmune diseases of the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew B; Hattersley, Andrew T; Flanagan, Sarah E

    2016-10-01

    The most common endocrine diseases, type 1 diabetes, hyperthyroidism, and hypothyroidism, are the result of autoimmunity. Clustering of autoimmune endocrinopathies can result from polygenic predisposition, or more rarely, may present as part of a wider syndrome due to a mutation within one of seven genes. These monogenic autoimmune diseases show highly variable phenotypes both within and between families with the same mutations. The average age of onset of the monogenic forms of autoimmune endocrine disease is younger than that of the common polygenic forms, and this feature combined with the manifestation of other autoimmune diseases, specific hallmark features, or both, can inform clinicians as to the relevance of genetic testing. A genetic diagnosis can guide medical management, give an insight into prognosis, inform families of recurrence risk, and facilitate prenatal diagnoses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Subacute stress and chronic stress interact to decrease intestinal barrier function in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauffer, Adriana; Vanuytsel, Tim; Vanormelingen, Christophe; Vanheel, Hanne; Salim Rasoel, Shadea; Tóth, Joran; Tack, Jan; Fornari, Fernando; Farré, Ricard

    2016-01-01

    Psychological stress increases intestinal permeability, potentially leading to low-grade inflammation and symptoms in functional gastrointestinal disorders. We assessed the effect of subacute, chronic and combined stress on intestinal barrier function and mast cell density. Male Wistar rats were allocated to four experimental groups (n = 8/group): 1/sham; 2/subacute stress (isolation and limited movement for 24 h); 3/chronic crowding stress for 14 days and 4/combined subacute and chronic stress. Jejunum and colon were collected to measure: transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER; a measure of epithelial barrier function); gene expression of tight junction molecules; mast cell density. Plasma corticosterone concentration was increased in all three stress conditions versus sham, with highest concentrations in the combined stress condition. TEER in the jejunum was decreased in all stress conditions, but was significantly lower in the combined stress condition than in the other groups. TEER in the jejunum correlated negatively with corticosterone concentration. Increased expression of claudin 1, 5 and 8, occludin and zonula occludens 1 mRNAs was detected after subacute stress in the jejunum. In contrast, colonic TEER was decreased only after combined stress, and the expression of tight junction molecules was unaltered. Increased mast cell density was observed in the chronic and combined stress condition in the colon only. In conclusion, our data show that chronic stress sensitizes the gastrointestinal tract to the effects of subacute stress on intestinal barrier function; different underlying cellular and molecular alterations are indicated in the small intestine versus the colon.

  15. Nitrogen balance in patients with hemiparetic stroke during the subacute rehabilitation phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, A; Kawakami, M; Otsuka, T; Aoki, H; Anzai, A; Yamada, Y; Liu, F; Otaka, E; Akaboshi, K; Liu, M

    2017-06-01

    In highly invasive diseases, metabolism commonly changes. Hypercatabolism is frequent in acute stroke, and nitrogen balance tends to be negative. However, there has been no study describing nitrogen balance in subacute and chronic stroke patients. The present study aimed to examine nitrogen balance in the subacute and chronic phases and to identify the factors related to it. Nitrogen balance was calculated from the collected urine of 56 patients with subacute stroke [mean (SD) 53.8 (18.4) days post-stroke] who were admitted for rehabilitation for their first-ever ischaemic or nonsurgical haemorrhagic stroke. In the first experiment, their nitrogen balance was measured during the rehabilitation phase, and factors (type, severity of hemiparesis, activities of daily living, dysphagia and malnutrition status) related to it were evaluated. The second experiment was performed to describe the time course of nitrogen balance in 31 consecutive patients, with assessments made at admission and at discharge. Nitrogen balance was positive in all patients in the subacute phase. A significant difference was seen in nitrogen balance between high and low fat-free mass in male patients. In the chronic phase, nitrogen balance was positive in 96% of the patients. There was no significant difference in nitrogen balance between discharge and admission. In the subacute and chronic phases of stroke, it was confirmed that hypercatabolism had resolved and that intensive rehabilitation is possible in the convalescent period of stroke. © 2017 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  16. Acute versus subacute community-acquired meningitis: Analysis of 611 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Tarek; Salazar, Lucrecia; Hasbun, Rodrigo

    2017-09-01

    Community-acquired meningitis can be classified into acute and subacute presentations by the duration of illness of ≤ or >5 days, respectively. There are currently no studies comparing the clinical features, management decisions, etiologies, and outcomes between acute and subacute presentations.It is a retrospective study of adults with community-acquired meningitis hospitalized in Houston, TX between January 2005 and January 2010. An adverse clinical outcome was defined as a Glasgow Outcome Scale score of ≤4.A total of 611 patients were identified, of which 458 (75%) were acute and 153 subacute (25%). The most common etiologies were unknown in 418 (68.4%), viral in 94 (15.4%), bacterial in 47 (7.7%), fungal in 42 patients (6.9%), and other noninfectious etiologies in 6 (1%). Patients with subacute meningitis were more likely to be immunosuppressed or have comorbidities, had fungal etiologies, and had higher rates of hypoglycorrachia and abnormal neurological findings (P 65 years and abnormal neurological findings were predictive of an adverse clinical outcome in both acute and subacute meningitis, whereas fever was also a significant prognostic factor in acute meningitis. (P meningitis differ in regards to clinical presentations, etiologies, laboratory findings, and management decisions, but did not differ in rates of adverse clinical outcomes. Future studies including thoroughly investigated patients with new diagnostic molecular methods may show different results and outcomes.

  17. Pharyngeal Electrical Stimulation for Treatment of Dysphagia in Subacute Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scutt, Polly; Love, Jo; Clavé, Pere; Cohen, David; Dziewas, Rainer; Iversen, Helle K.; Ledl, Christian; Ragab, Suzanne; Soda, Hassan; Warusevitane, Anushka; Woisard, Virginie; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Dysphagia is common after stroke, associated with increased death and dependency, and treatment options are limited. Pharyngeal electric stimulation (PES) is a novel treatment for poststroke dysphagia that has shown promise in 3 pilot randomized controlled trials. Methods— We randomly assigned 162 patients with a recent ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke and dysphagia, defined as a penetration aspiration score (PAS) of ≥3 on video fluoroscopy, to PES or sham treatment given on 3 consecutive days. The primary outcome was swallowing safety, assessed using the PAS, at 2 weeks. Secondary outcomes included dysphagia severity, function, quality of life, and serious adverse events at 6 and 12 weeks. Results— In randomized patients, the mean age was 74 years, male 58%, ischemic stroke 89%, and PAS 4.8. The mean treatment current was 14.8 (7.9) mA and duration 9.9 (1.2) minutes per session. On the basis of previous data, 45 patients (58.4%) randomized to PES seemed to receive suboptimal stimulation. The PAS at 2 weeks, adjusted for baseline, did not differ between the randomized groups: PES 3.7 (2.0) versus sham 3.6 (1.9), P=0.60. Similarly, the secondary outcomes did not differ, including clinical swallowing and functional outcome. No serious adverse device-related events occurred. Conclusions— In patients with subacute stroke and dysphagia, PES was safe but did not improve dysphagia. Undertreatment of patients receiving PES may have contributed to the neutral result. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: http://www.controlled-trials.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN25681641. PMID:27165955

  18. Clinical and Radiological Evaluation of Children with Subacute Sclerosan Panencephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet İrdem

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 65 children with Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis (SSPE who admittedto our clinic between September 1998 and December 2002 were retrospectively evaluated interms of clinical and radiological findings.The most common symptoms and findings at admission were myoklonia (31 patients, 47%, behaveral changes (18 patients, 27.7 % and convulsion (8 patients, 12 %. There was atrauma history initiating symptoms in 14 patients (21.5 %. Neurological symptoms presentedsignificantly earlier in patients who had measles before 2 years of age compared to others(p0.05. The clinical stage of the patients at admission was determined based on Risk veHaddad classification. The most frequent stage was IIA (21 patients, 32.2%, IIC (17patients, 26.2% and IIB (16 patients, 24.6%. At the follow-up period, 46 (71% patients wasdepended to bed. The mean time interval between SSPE initiation age and bed dependencywas 4.68 ± 4.05 months (1-17 months.Of the 31 patients who underwent cranial magnetic rezonans imaging (MRI, 15patients (48.38% had pathological findings, the most frequent findings were cortical vesubcortical lesions. Of the 24 patients who underwent cranial tomographi, 22 (91.6% werenormal. Of the remaining two, one had atrophy and the other had increase in contrast. All ofthe patients underwent rutine EEG test. Fifty-four (83.1% of these had periodic complexhigh slow wave activity.The clinical findings and Electro Encephalographi results are important parameters inthe diagnosis of SSPE. Cranial tomographi is not useful in the diagnosis of SSPE. However,cranial MRI findings is pathologic only in the half of the patients.

  19. Tick-borne encephalitis: What travelers should know when visiting an endemic country

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chrdle, A.; Chmelík, V.; Růžek, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 10 (2016), s. 2694-2699 ISSN 2164-5515 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV16-34238A Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : endemic country * flavivirus * tick-borne encephalitis * tick-borne encephalitis virus * travel medicine * vaccination Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.157, year: 2016

  20. Perinatal Chikungunya Virus-associated Encephalitis Leading to Postnatal-Onset Microcephaly and Optic Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Regina; Viana, Rafaela; Brainer-Lima, Alessandra; FloreÂncio, Telma; Carvalho, Maria Durce; van der Linden, Vanessa; Amorim, Antonio; Rocha, Maria AÂngela; Medeiros, Fabíola

    2018-01-01

    Chikungunya virus is capable of affecting the nervous system of children and adults. We describe a case of sepsis and encephalitis triggered by this agent in a newborn whose mother developed symptoms of acute infection 2 days before delivery. Consequently, the infant had severe encephalitis that evolved with postnatal-onset microcephaly, bilateral optic atrophy, epilepsy and cerebral palsy.

  1. Electroconvulsive therapy in a pediatric patient with malignant catatonia and paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Andrew; Glick, David B; Dinwiddie, Stephen H

    2006-12-01

    Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis is a rare disorder that can cause memory loss, confusion, personality change, cognitive dysfunction, and psychosis. We present a case of an 11-year-old girl who was successfully treated with electroconvulsive therapy for a catatonic state associated with paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis caused by an ovarian teratoma.

  2. Human pegivirus detected in a patient with severe encephalitis using a metagenomic pan-virus array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fridholm, Helena; Østergaard Sørensen, Line; Rosenstierne, Maiken W.

    2016-01-01

    We have used a metagenomic microarray to detect genomic RNA from human pegivirus in serum and cerebrospinal fluid from a patient suffering from severe encephalitis. No other pathogen was detected. HPgV in cerebrospinal fluid during encephalitis has never been reported before and its prevalence...

  3. Association of Enterovirus 71 encephalitis with the interleukin-8 gene region in Chinese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Lin, Aiwei; Yu, Chengwen; Zhang, Zhaofang; Xu, Daoyan; Hu, Wei; Liu, Liyan; Wang, Shaoning; Nie, Xiuzhen; Sun, Wenhui; Gai, Zhongtao; Chen, Zongbo

    2015-06-01

    The study was performed in 36 Chinese patients with Enterovirus 71 (EV71) encephalitis and 141 patients with EV71-related hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) without encephalitis. Genotyping was determined by polymerase chain reaction- restriction fragment length polymorphism. Patients with EV71 encephalitis had a significantly higher frequency of interleukin-8 (IL-8)-251TT genotype than patients with EV71-related HFMD without encephalitis (55.6% vs 31.2%, p = 0.023). The frequency of IL-8-251T alleles was significantly higher among patients with EV71 encephalitis than in patients with EV71-related HFMD without encephalitis (72.2% vs 58.9%, odds ratio 1.8, 95% confidence interval 1.0-3.2, p = 0.038). There were significant differences in gender, age, fever days, white blood cell count, C-reactive protein and blood glucose concentration and IL-8 levels among genotypes of IL-8-251A/T in EV71-infected patients, but no significant differences in alanine or aspartate aminotransferase, creatine kinase-myocardial isozyme and cerebrospinal fluid in patients with EV71 encephalitis. These findings suggest that the IL-8-251T allele is associated with susceptibility to EV71 encephalitis in Chinese patients.

  4. Typical and atypical (silent) subacute thyroiditis in a wife and husband

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, J.; Caplan, R.H.

    1978-01-01

    Typical subacute thyroiditis was diagnosed in a woman. Three weeks later, signs and symptoms of hyperthyroidism developed in her husband. Although the right lobe of his thyroid gland was slightly enlarged, pain and tenderness were absent throughout the course of his illness. The free thyroxine equivalent (FTE) value and the sedimentation rate were elevated; the low uptake of radioactive iodine by the thyroid gland was consistent with ''silent'' subacute thyroiditis. We postulate that a common etiology, probably viral, was operative in both cases. Nine additional cases of hyperthyroidism with low levels of thyroidal uptake of radioactive iodine are described. The thyroid glands of these patients were normal or slightly enlarged. Antithyroglobulin antibody levels determined in seven patients were not substantially elevated. The clinical course of these patients was characteristic of ''silent'' subacute thyroiditis. Although the origin of the syndrome remains unclear, the disease is self-limited and therapy, if any, is supportive

  5. Helminth Immunomodulation in Autoimmune Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Miles

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Helminths have evolved to become experts at subverting immune surveillance. Through potent and persistent immune tempering, helminths can remain undetected in human tissues for decades. Redirecting the immunomodulating “talents” of helminths to treat inflammatory human diseases is receiving intensive interest. Here, we review therapies using live parasitic worms, worm secretions, and worm-derived synthetic molecules to treat autoimmune disease. We review helminth therapy in both mouse models and clinical trials and discuss what is known on mechanisms of action. We also highlight current progress in characterizing promising new immunomodulatory molecules found in excretory/secretory products of helminths and their potential use as immunotherapies for acute and chronic inflammatory diseases.

  6. Local Varicella Zoster Infection As A Rare Reason For Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Ece Bayam

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Scientific BACKGROUND: Encephalitis is a clinical picture including an acute pyretic disease together with findings of meningeal involvement and cerebral effect, and cellular reaction and high protein level in brain cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. There are many infection agents involving the nervous system. Among these agents, varicella zoster virus (VZV has been infrequently reported. Neurological complications of VZV may be listed as encephalitis, cerebral ataxia, meningitis, cerebral infarct and facial paralysis. Rare complications of cervicocranial herpes infections are encephalitis, cerebral angitis and myelitis. This paper presents a case who have developed encephalitis following VZV infection related ophthalmic geniculate herpes and discusses the case accompanied by similar cases in the literature. CASE: History of the eighty-three year-old woman, who referred to our clinic with complaints of failure in consciousness developed after swelling on left eyelid and vesicular desquamations, indicated pricking and watering in the left eye, then sleepiness and difficulty in communication nearly four days before confusion in consciousness. Results of neurological examination indicated that there was confusion in consciousness, she could open her eyes upon painful stimulus and she uttered meaningless words. There were edemas around the left eye, vesicular, crusty lesions on the left which seemed to be olfactory traces, hyperemia in the left eye, left pupil dilatation, limitations in inner deviation and outer look. There was reaction to light at both sides. There was no implication for motor lateralization. Babinski bilateral was irrelevant. There was no pathology other than leukocytosis in routine biochemical examinations. Lumber ponction indicated no pathology other than moderate level of protein in CSF biochemical examination and moderate increase in the number of cells in direct examination. Herpes simplex virus (HSV PCR was negative and there was no

  7. Anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis. Clinical manifestations and pathophysiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizuka, Takahiro; Sakai, Fumihiko

    2008-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is a new category of treatment-responsive encephalitis associated with 'anti-NMDAR antibodies', which are antibodies to the NR1/NR2 heteromers of NMDAR. The antibodies are detected in the CSF/serum of young women with ovarian teratoma, who typically develop schizophrenia-like psychiatric symptoms, usually preceded by fever, headache, or viral infection-like illness. After reaching the peak of psychosis, most patients developed seizures followed by an unresponsive/catatonic state, decreased level of consciousness, central hypoventilation frequently requiring mechanical ventilation, orofacial-limb dyskinesias, and autonomic symptoms. Brain MRI is usually unremarkable but focal enhancement or medial temporal lobe abnormalities can be observed. The CSF reveals nonspecific changes. Electroencephalography (EEG) often reveals diffuse delta slowing without paroxysmal discharges, despite frequent bouts of seizures. This is a highly characteristic syndrome evolving in 5 stages, namely, the prodromal phase, psychotic phase, unresponsive phase, hyperkinetic phase, and gradual recovery phase. The hyperkinetic phase is the most prolonged and crucial. This disorder is usually severe and can be fatal, but it is potentially reversible. Once patients overcome the hyperkinetic phase, gradual improvement is expected with in months and full recovery can also be expected over 3 or more years. Ovarian teratoma-associated limbic encephalitis (OTLE) was first reported in 1997 when this syndrome was reported independently in 1 Japanese girl and 1 woman, both of whom improved following tumor resection. In 2005, Dalmau and his research group first demonstrated antibodies to novel neuronal cell membrane antigens in 4 women with OTLE in a non-permeabilized culture of hippocampal neurons. Two years later, they identified conformal extracellular epitopes present in the NR1/NR2B heteromers of NMDAR, which are expressed in the hippocampus

  8. Pemphigus autoimmunity: Hypotheses and realities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grando, Sergei A

    2011-01-01

    The goal of contemporary research in pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus foliaceus is to achieve and maintain clinical remission without corticosteroids. Recent advances of knowledge on pemphigus autoimmunity scrutinize old dogmas, resolve controversies, and open novel perspectives for treatment. Elucidation of intimate mechanisms of keratinocyte detachment and death in pemphigus has challenged the monopathogenic explanation of disease immunopathology. Over 50 organ-specific and non-organ-specific antigens can be targeted by pemphigus autoimmunity, including desmosomal cadherins and other adhesion molecules, PERP cholinergic and other cell membrane (CM) receptors, and mitochondrial proteins. The initial insult is sustained by the autoantibodies to the cell membrane receptor antigens triggering the intracellular signaling by Src, epidermal growth factor receptor kinase, protein kinases A and C, phospholipase C, mTOR, p38 MAPK, JNK, other tyrosine kinases, and calmodulin that cause basal cell shrinkage and ripping desmosomes off the CM. Autoantibodies synergize with effectors of apoptotic and oncotic pathways, serine proteases, and inflammatory cytokines to overcome the natural resistance and activate the cell death program in keratinocytes. The process of keratinocyte shrinkage/detachment and death via apoptosis/oncosis has been termed apoptolysis to emphasize that it is triggered by the same signal effectors and mediated by the same cell death enzymes. The natural course of pemphigus has improved due to a substantial progress in developing of the steroid-sparing therapies combining the immunosuppressive and direct anti-acantholytic effects. Further elucidation of the molecular mechanisms mediating immune dysregulation and apoptolysis in pemphigus should improve our understanding of disease pathogenesis and facilitate development of steroid-free treatment of patients. PMID:21939410

  9. Adaptive immunity in autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhi, Maria Serena; Ma, Yun; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Vergani, Diego

    2010-01-01

    The histological lesion of interface hepatitis, with its dense portal cell infiltrate consisting of lymphocytes, monocytes/macrophages and plasma cells, was the first to suggest an autoaggressive cellular immune attack in the pathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). Immunohistochemical studies, focused on the phenotype of inflammatory cells infiltrating the liver parenchyma, have shown a predominance of alphabeta-T cells. Amongst these cells, the majority have been CD4 helper/inducers, while a sizeable minority have consisted of CD8 cytotoxic/suppressors. Lymphocytes on non-T cell lineage included natural killer cells, monocytes/macrophages and B lymphocytes. For autoimmunity to arise, the self-antigenic peptide, embraced by an human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II molecule, must be presented to an uncommitted T helper (T(H)0) lymphocyte by professional antigen-presenting cells. Once activated and according to the presence in the milieu of interleukin 12 (IL-12) or IL-4, T(H)0 lymphocytes can differentiate into T(H)1 cells, which are pivotal to macrophage activation; enhance HLA class I expression, rendering liver cells vulnerable to CD8 T-cell attack; and induce HLA class II expression on hepatocytes; or they can differentiate into T(H)2 cells, which produce IL-4, IL-10 and IL-13, cytokines favouring autoantibody production by B lymphocytes. Autoantigen recognition is tightly controlled by regulatory mechanisms, such as those exerted by CD4+CD25(high) regulatory T cells. Numerical and functional regulatory T cell impairment characterises AIH and permits the perpetuation of effector immune responses with ensuing persistent liver destruction. Advances in the study of autoreactive T cells stem mostly from AIH type 2, where the main autoantigen, cytochrome P450IID6 (CYP2D6), is known to enable characterisation of antigen-specific immune responses. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Criteria for Environmentally Associated Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, K. Michael; Parks, Christine G.; Germolec, Dori R.; Leung, Patrick S.C.; Selmi, Carlo; Humble, Michael C.; Rose, Noel R.

    2012-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports a role for the environment in the development of autoimmune diseases, as reviewed in the accompanying three papers from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Expert Panel Workshop. An important unresolved issue, however, is the development of criteria for identifying autoimmune disease phenotypes for which the environment plays a causative role, herein referred to as environmentally associated autoimmune diseases. There are several different areas in which such criteria need to be developed, including: 1) identifying the necessary and sufficient data to define environmental risk factors for autoimmune diseases meeting current classification criteria; 2) establishing the existence of and criteria for new environmentally associated autoimmune disorders that do not meet current disease classification criteria; and 3) identifying in clinical practice specific environmental agents that induce autoimmune disease in individual patients. Here we discuss approaches that could be useful for developing criteria in these three areas, as well as factors that should be considered in evaluating the evidence for criteria that can distinguish individuals with such disorders from individuals without such disorders with high sensitivity and specificity. Current studies suggest that multiple lines of complementary evidence will be important and that in many cases there will be clinical, serologic, genetic, epigenetic, and/or other laboratory features that could be incorporated as criteria for environmentally associated autoimmune diseases to improve diagnosis and treatment and possibly allow for preventative strategies in the future. PMID:22771005

  11. Epilepsy surgery for epileptic encephalopathy as a sequela of herpes simplex encephalitis: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskin, Birce Dilge; Tanji, Kurenai; Feldstein, Neil A; McSwiggan-Hardin, Maureen; Akman, Cigdem I

    2017-07-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) encephalitis can manifest with different clinical presentations, including acute monophasic illness and biphasic chronic granulomatous HSV encephalitis. Chronic encephalitis is much less common, and very rare late relapses are associated with intractable epilepsy and progressive neurological deficits with or without evidence of HSV in the cerebrospinal fluid. The authors report on an 8-year-old girl with a history of treated HSV-1 encephalitis when she was 13 months of age and focal epilepsy when she was 2 years old. Although free of clinical seizures, when she was 5, she experienced behavioral and academic dysfunction, which was later attributed to electrographic focal seizures and worsening electroencephalography (EEG) findings with electrical status epilepticus during slow-wave sleep (ESES). Following a right temporal lobectomy, chronic granulomatous encephalitis was diagnosed. The patient's clinical course improved with the resolution of seizures and EEG abnormalities.

  12. Eastern equine encephalitis in 9 South American camelids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolen-Walston, Rose; Bedenice, Daniela; Rodriguez, Carlos; Rushton, Steven; Bright, Amy; Fecteau, Marie-Eve; Short, Diana; Majdalany, Ron; Tewari, Deepanker; Pedersen, Douglas; Kiupel, Matti; Maes, Roger; Del Piero, Fabio

    2007-01-01

    Eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) virus is a mosquito-borne togavirus (alphavirus) that causes severe (often fatal) encephalitis in many mammalian species, but it has not been reported previously in South American camelids. South American camelids can become naturally infected with EEE virus and show encephalitic signs similar to those observed in other affected species. Nine cases (8 alpacas and 1 llama, aged 3.5 weeks to 12 years) were identified; 4 of 9 were 510 weeks old. All cases were from the East Coast of the United States and presented in late summer and fall. A retrospective study was performed to include confirmed cases of EEE in camelids in North America before 2006. Eight of nine (89%) camelids died or were euthanized in extremis, with the mean time to death of 2 days. Clinical signs were consistent with encephalitis and included fever, lethargy, ataxia, seizures, recumbency, torticollis, opisthotonus, and vestibular signs. No consistent hematologic abnormalities were identified, and cerebrospinal fluid contained an increased protein concentration in the single camelid analyzed. No successful therapy was identified. EEE was confirmed by alphavirus detection by using immunohistochemistry (IHC) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the central nervous system (CNS) and by serology. Findings included polioencephalitis with lymphocytic perivascular cuffing; neutrophil infiltration; gliosis; neuron satellitosis; necrosis; and edema, with intracytoplasmic alphavirus within neurons and glial cells. No virus was detected in extraneural tissues. In endemic areas, EEE should be considered a differential diagnosis for young and adult camelids with CNS disease. Brain histopathology with indirect IHC or PCR is diagnostic.

  13. Antibody-induced generation of reactive oxygen radicals by brain macrophages in canine distemper encephalitis: a mechanism for bystander demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griot, C; Bürge, T; Vandevelde, M; Peterhans, E

    1989-01-01

    The mechanism of inflammatory demyelination in canine distemper encephalitis (CDE) is uncertain but macrophages are thought to play an important effector role in this lesion. Serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), containing anti-canine distemper virus and anti-myelin antibodies from dogs with CDE were tested for their ability to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in macrophages in primary dog brain cell cultures using a chemiluminescence (CL) assay. The majority of serum samples and several CSF samples from animals with inflammatory demyelination elicited a CL signal in infected dog brain cell cultures. In contrast, none of these samples induced a positive response in uninfected cultures which contained large numbers of myelin antigen-presenting cells, although defined anti-myelin antibodies lead to a marked secretion of ROS in this system. It was concluded that antiviral antibody-induced secretion of ROS, known to be highly toxic for brain tissue, may play an important role in white matter damage in inflammatory lesions supporting a previous hypothesis of bystander demyelination in CDE. No evidence was found for a similar antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity-like mechanism mediated by anti-myelin antibodies in CDE, which does not support the concept of autoimmunity in this disease.

  14. An Overlapping Case of Miller Fisher Syndrome, Bickerstaff’s Encephalitis, and the ASMAN Variant of Guillain-Barre Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. J. Pegg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 56-year-old man presented with a 3-day history of progressive tingling of the hands, unsteadiness, and diplopia. He was initially diagnosed clinically with Miller Fisher Syndrome (MFS but later developed limb weakness consistent with Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS and subsequently reduced consciousness consistent with Bickerstaff’s brainstem encephalitis (BBE. Neurophysiology revealed an axonal motor and sensory neuropathy, in keeping with the Acute Motor and Sensory Axonal Neuropathy (AMSAN variant of GBS. We believe that our patient had an MFS-AMSAN-BBE overlap syndrome. This is supported by his glycolipid antibody profile with high titres of anti-GQ1b IgG antibody and anti-GD1a IgG antibody. Anti-GQ1b antibodies are frequently found in both MFS and BBE and the anti-GD1a antibody is associated with axonal forms of GBS. Overlapping cases of MFS and BBE are well described, and because the same antibody is often found in both conditions, it is thought that they share a common autoimmune mechanism. BBE has also been previously reported in association with GBS lending support that it also lies on the same spectrum. This overlapping case of ASMAN variant of GBS, MFS, and BBE provides further support that these conditions are part of the same spectrum.

  15. Subacute combined spinal cord degeneration and pancytopenia secondary to severe vitamin B12 deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Cabrerizo-García

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Decreased vitamin B12 concentration does not usually result in clinical or hematological abnormalities. Subacute combined spinal cord degeneration and pancytopenia are two serious and rarely displayed consequences that appear in severe deficits. CASE REPORT: We present the case of a patient with subacute combined spinal cord degeneration and pancytopenia secondary to severe and sustained vitamin B12 deficiency. Such cases are rare nowadays and have potentially fatal consequences. CONCLUSIONS: Vitamin B12 deficiency should be taken into consideration in the differential diagnosis in cases of blood disorders or severe neurological symptoms. Early diagnosis and treatment can avoid irreversible consequences.

  16. Bickerstaff’s brainstem encephalitis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toghae M

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1":*{behavior:url(#ieooui } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis (BBE is a very uncommon central nervous system disease with unknown etiology. As it is usually responsive to treatment, the diagnosis this disease is important. It seems There is no reported Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis case in Iran."n"nCase presentation: An 83 year old woman presented with vertigo, ataxia and dysarthria from a week prior to admission. Her 2 weighted MRI revealed high intensity lesions in the pons area. She received treatment with impression of ischemic stroke. After few days, lower extremities became weak symmetrically and deep tendon reflexes depressed. Deep sensory loss was noted too. The EMG-NCV studies showed acute polyneuropathy and in CSF examination increased protein content was noted. The patient improved after IVIG and corticosteroid therapy with impression of Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis."n"nConclusion: In spite of severe initial presentation, Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis has a good prognosis if it diagnosed and treated properly. Although clinical features is too important, but paraclinical work up are necessary to diagnose this syndrome.

  17. West nile virus encephalitis induced opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Chad J; Said, Sarmad

    2014-04-22

    West Nile virus (WNV) is an arthropod borne neurotropic single stranded RNA flavivirus with syndrome (OMS) induced by the WNV meningoencephalitis. She then received five consecutive days of plasmapheresis with a significant improvement in her neurological status. Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) is a rare neurological disorder associated with chaotic multidirectional eye movements, myoclonus and less frequently cerebellar ataxia. OMS affects as few as 1 in 10,000,000 people per year. The pathogenesis is not fully understood with the majority of cases of opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome being idiopathic. According to current medical literature there have only been two previous case reports of opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome associated with WNV encephalitis.

  18. St. Louis encephalitis virus possibly transmitted through blood transfusion-Arizona, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkat, Heather; Adams, Laura; Sunenshine, Rebecca; Krow-Lucal, Elisabeth; Levy, Craig; Kafenbaum, Tammy; Sylvester, Tammy; Smith, Kirk; Townsend, John; Dosmann, Melissa; Kamel, Hany; Patron, Roberto; Kuehnert, Matthew; Annambhotla, Pallavi; Basavaraju, Sridhar V; Rabe, Ingrid B

    2017-12-01

    St. Louis encephalitis virus is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that infrequently causes epidemic central nervous system infections. In the United States, blood donors are not screened for St. Louis encephalitis virus infection, and transmission through blood transfusion has not been reported. During September 2015, St. Louis encephalitis virus infection was confirmed in an Arizona kidney transplant recipient. An investigation was initiated to determine the infection source. The patient was interviewed, and medical records were reviewed. To determine the likelihood of mosquito-borne infection, mosquito surveillance data collected at patient and blood donor residences in timeframes consistent with their possible exposure periods were reviewed. To investigate other routes of exposure, organ and blood donor and recipient specimens were obtained and tested for evidence of St. Louis encephalitis virus infection. The patient presented with symptoms of central nervous system infection. Recent St. Louis encephalitis virus infection was serologically confirmed. The organ donor and three other organ recipients showed no laboratory or clinical evidence of St. Louis encephalitis virus infection. Among four donors of blood products received by the patient via transfusion, one donor had a serologically confirmed, recent St. Louis encephalitis virus infection. Exposure to an infected mosquito was unlikely based on the patient's minimal outdoor exposure. In addition, no St. Louis encephalitis virus-infected mosquito pools were identified around the patient's residence. This investigation provides evidence of the first reported possible case of St. Louis encephalitis virus transmission through blood product transfusion. Health care providers and public health professionals should maintain heightened awareness for St. Louis encephalitis virus transmission through blood transfusion in settings where outbreaks are identified. © 2017 AABB.

  19. Presence of Autoimmune Antibody in Chikungunya Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wirach Maek-a-nantawat

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya infection has recently re-emerged as an important arthropod-borne disease in Thailand. Recently, Southern Thailand was identified as a potentially endemic area for the chikungunya virus. Here, we report a case of severe musculoskeletal complication, presenting with muscle weakness and swelling of the limbs. During the investigation to exclude autoimmune muscular inflammation, high titers of antinuclear antibody were detected. This is the report of autoimmunity detection associated with an arbovirus infection. The symptoms can mimic autoimmune polymyositis disease, and the condition requires close monitoring before deciding to embark upon prolonged specific treatment with immunomodulators.

  20. liver cirrhosis from autoimmune hepatitis in a nigerian woman

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    like autoimmune thyroiditis, celiac disease and ulcerative colitis, with about 25% having cirrhosis at ... to immunosuppressive therapy. Keywords: Autoimmune hepatitis, Autoimmune liver disease, Chronic liver disease, Nigeria ... who is also exposed to environmental triggering factors.2,5,8 Subsequently, the autoimmune.

  1. Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 and NALP5, parathyroid autoantigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alimohammadi, Mohammad; Bjorklund, Peyman; Hallgren, Asa; Pontynen, Nora; Szinnai, Gabor; Shikama, Noriko; Keller, Marcel P.; Ekwall, Olov; Kinkel, Sarah A.; Husebye, Eystein S.; Gustafsson, Jan; Rorsman, Fredrik; Peltonen, Leena; Betterle, Corrado; Perheentupa, Jaakko; Akerstrom, Goran; Westin, Gunnar; Scott, Hamish S.; Hollaender, Georg A.; Kampe, Olle

    2008-01-01

    Background: Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1) is a multiorgan autoimmune disorder caused by mutations in AIRE, the autoimmune regulator gene. Though recent studies concerning AIRE deficiency have begun to elucidate the molecular pathogenesis of organ-specific autoimmunity in patients

  2. The autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy or autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankisch, Tim O; Jaeckel, Elmar; Strassburg, Christian P

    2009-08-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndromes are rare autoimmune endocrinopathies that are associated with nonendocrine autoimmunopathies. Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED), also named autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 (APS-1), is distinguished from autoimmune polyglandular syndrome 2 (APS-2). Major disease components of APECED are adrenal insufficiency, hypoparathyroidism, and candidiasis. The diagnosis is established by the presence of two out of the three components. Minor clinical features include autoimmune hepatitis, which occurs in up to 20% of APECED patients, and ranges from a mild to a fulminant course. The disease mostly affects juvenile patients from Sardegna, Italy, Finland, and Iran (Iranian Jews), but it also occurs in other ethnic groups. The AIRE gene responsible for APECED is expressed in cells involved in induction and maintenance of immune tolerance. Genetic alterations of the single gene are associated with APECED. Because a specific therapy is not currently available, treatment consists of hormone replacement and caring for clinical symptoms. Copyright Thieme Medical Publishers.

  3. Bickerstaff’s brainstem encephalitis, Miller Fisher syndrome and Guillain-Barré syndrome overlap in an asthma patient with negative anti-ganglioside antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Chongyu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bickerstaff’s brainstem encephalitis (BBE, together with Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS and Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS were considered to form a continuous clinical spectrum. An anti-GQ1b antibody syndrome has been proposed to underlie the common pathophysiology for the three disorders; however, other studies have found a positive anti-GM1 instead of anti-GQ1b antibody. Case presentation Here we report a 20-year-old male patient with overlapping BBE, MFS and GBS. The patient had a positive family history of bronchial asthma and had suffered from the condition for over 15 years. He developed BBE symptoms nine days after an asthma exacerbation. During the course of illness, he had significantly elevated IgE levels in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Serologic analysis of antibodies against ganglioside complexes (anti-GDIa, anti-GDIb, anti-GM1, anti-GM2, anti-GM3, anti-GQIb and anti-GTIb antibodies showed negative results. Conclusions Since asthma has recently been related to autoimmune disease, our case supports an autoimmune mechanism underlying the clinical spectrum composed of BBE, MFS and GBS. However, contrary to a proposed anti-GQ1b antibody syndrome, we would suggest that pathogenesis of this clinical spectrum is not limited to anti-ganglioside antibodies.

  4. Cyclosporine Treatment in a Patient with Concurrent Autoimmune Urticaria and Autoimmune Hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ju, Hye Young; Kim, Hei Sung; Kim, Hyung Ok; Park, Young Min

    2009-01-01

    Patients with autoimmune urticaria show a higher rate of seropositivity for other autoantibodies and often have a history of autoimmune conditions. They also tend to have more severe symptoms and to have a poor response to conventional antihistamine treatment. Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder in which progressive liver injury is thought to be the result of a T-cell-mediated immunologic attack against liver cells in genetically predisposed individuals. While the associat...

  5. Hemagglutinin-specific neutralization of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Alía, Miguel Ángel; Muller, Claude P; Russell, Stephen J

    2018-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a progressive, lethal complication of measles caused by particular mutants of measles virus (MeV) that persist in the brain despite high levels of neutralizing antibodies. We addressed the hypothesis that antigenic drift is involved in the pathogenetic mechanism of SSPE by analyzing antigenic alterations in the MeV envelope hemagglutinin protein (MeV-H) found in patients with SSPE in relation to major circulating MeV genotypes. To this aim, we obtained cDNA for the MeV-H gene from tissue taken at brain autopsy from 3 deceased persons with SSPE who had short (3-4 months, SMa79), average (3.5 years, SMa84), and long (18 years, SMa94) disease courses. Recombinant MeVs with a substituted MeV-H gene were generated by a reverse genetic system. Virus neutralization assays with a panel of anti-MeV-H murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) or vaccine-immunized mouse anti-MeV-H polyclonal sera were performed to determine the antigenic relatedness. Functional and receptor-binding analysis of the SSPE MeV-H showed activity in a SLAM/nectin-4-dependent manner. Similar to our panel of wild-type viruses, our SSPE viruses showed an altered antigenic profile. Genotypes A, G3, and F (SSPE case SMa79) were the exception, with an intact antigenic structure. Genotypes D7 and F (SSPE SMa79) showed enhanced neutralization by mAbs targeting antigenic site IIa. Genotypes H1 and the recently reported D4.2 were the most antigenically altered genotypes. Epitope mapping of neutralizing mAbs BH015 and BH130 reveal a new antigenic site on MeV-H, which we designated Φ for its intermediate position between previously defined antigenic sites Ia and Ib. We conclude that SSPE-causing viruses show similar antigenic properties to currently circulating MeV genotypes. The absence of a direct correlation between antigenic changes and predisposition of a certain genotype to cause SSPE does not lend support to the proposed antigenic drift as a pathogenetic

  6. Hemagglutinin-specific neutralization of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Muñoz-Alía

    Full Text Available Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE is a progressive, lethal complication of measles caused by particular mutants of measles virus (MeV that persist in the brain despite high levels of neutralizing antibodies. We addressed the hypothesis that antigenic drift is involved in the pathogenetic mechanism of SSPE by analyzing antigenic alterations in the MeV envelope hemagglutinin protein (MeV-H found in patients with SSPE in relation to major circulating MeV genotypes. To this aim, we obtained cDNA for the MeV-H gene from tissue taken at brain autopsy from 3 deceased persons with SSPE who had short (3-4 months, SMa79, average (3.5 years, SMa84, and long (18 years, SMa94 disease courses. Recombinant MeVs with a substituted MeV-H gene were generated by a reverse genetic system. Virus neutralization assays with a panel of anti-MeV-H murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs or vaccine-immunized mouse anti-MeV-H polyclonal sera were performed to determine the antigenic relatedness. Functional and receptor-binding analysis of the SSPE MeV-H showed activity in a SLAM/nectin-4-dependent manner. Similar to our panel of wild-type viruses, our SSPE viruses showed an altered antigenic profile. Genotypes A, G3, and F (SSPE case SMa79 were the exception, with an intact antigenic structure. Genotypes D7 and F (SSPE SMa79 showed enhanced neutralization by mAbs targeting antigenic site IIa. Genotypes H1 and the recently reported D4.2 were the most antigenically altered genotypes. Epitope mapping of neutralizing mAbs BH015 and BH130 reveal a new antigenic site on MeV-H, which we designated Φ for its intermediate position between previously defined antigenic sites Ia and Ib. We conclude that SSPE-causing viruses show similar antigenic properties to currently circulating MeV genotypes. The absence of a direct correlation between antigenic changes and predisposition of a certain genotype to cause SSPE does not lend support to the proposed antigenic drift as a

  7. Vaccinations in early life are not associated with development of islet autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes high-risk children: Results from prospective cohort data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyerlein, Andreas; Strobl, Andreas N; Winkler, Christiane; Carpus, Michaela; Knopff, Annette; Donnachie, Ewan; Ankerst, Donna P; Ziegler, Anette-G

    2017-03-27

    Vaccinations in early childhood potentially stimulate the immune system and may thus be relevant for the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes (T1D). We determined the association of vaccination burden with T1D-associated islet autoimmunity in children with high familial risk followed prospectively from birth. A total of 20,570 certified vaccination records from 1918 children were correlated with time to onset of T1D-associated islet autoimmunity using Cox regression, considering multiple time periods up until age two years and vaccination types, and adjusting for HLA genotype, sex, delivery mode, season of birth, preterm delivery and maternal T1D status. Additionally, prospective claims data of 295,420 subjects were used to validate associations for the tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) vaccination. Most vaccinations were not associated with a significantly increased hazard ratio (HR) for islet autoimmunity (e.g. HR [95% confidence interval]: 1.08 [0.96-1.21] per additional vaccination against measles, mumps and rubella at age 0-24months). TBE vaccinations within the first two years of life were nominally associated with a significantly increased autoimmunity risk (HR: 1.44 [1.06-1.96] per additional vaccination at age 0-24months), but this could not be confirmed with respect to outcome T1D in the validation cohort (HR: 1.02 [0.90-1.16]). We found no evidence that early vaccinations increase the risk of T1D-associated islet autoimmunity development. The potential association with early TBE vaccinations could not be confirmed in an independent cohort and appears to be a false positive finding. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Autoimmune diseases of the thyroid gland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allelein, S; Feldkamp, J; Schott, M

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases of the thyroid gland are considered to be the most frequent cause of thyroid gland disorders. Autoimmune thyroid diseases consist of two subgroups: autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT) and Graves' disease. The AIT is the most common human autoimmune disease. Infiltration of the thyroid gland with cytotoxic T‑cells can lead to an initial thyrotoxicosis und during the course to hypothyroidism due to destruction of the thyroid gland. Substitution with Levothyroxine is indicated for manifest hypothyroidism and subclinical hypothyroidism with increased thyroid antibodies with the intention of normalizing the serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). Graves' disease is characterized by the appearance of stimulating TSH receptor antibodies leading to hyperthyroidism. Endocrine ophthalmopathy may also occur. Ablative therapy with radioiodine therapy or thyroidectomy is administered to patients with Graves' disease without remission after at least 1 year of antithyroid drug therapy.

  9. Autoimmune pancreatitis : Diagnostic and immunological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. van Heerde (Marianne)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractAutoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is the pancreatic manifestation of a systemic fibro- inflammatory disease, characterized by infiltration with lymphoplasmacytic cells and extensive fibrosis, which leads to morphological changes (swelling, mass forming) and organ dysfunction. Often, but

  10. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed. PMID:26696798

  11. Th17 Response and Inflammatory Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janelle C. Waite

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The proinflammatory activity of T helper 17 (Th17 cells can be beneficial to the host during infection. However, uncontrolled or inappropriate Th17 activation has been linked to several autoimmune and autoinflammatory pathologies. Indeed, preclinical and clinical data show that Th17 cells are associated with several autoimmune diseases such as arthritis, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, and lupus. Furthermore, targeting the interleukin-17 (IL-17 pathway has attenuated disease severity in preclinical models of autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, a recent report brings to light a potential role for Th17 cells in the autoinflammatory disorder adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD. Whether Th17 cells are the cause or are directly involved in AOSD remains to be shown. In this paper, we discuss the biology of Th17 cells, their role in autoimmune disease development, and in AOSD in particular, as well as the growing interest of the pharmaceutical industry in their use as therapeutic targets.

  12. Autoimmune Cytopenias in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni D'Arena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical course of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL may be complicated at any time by autoimmune phenomena.The most common ones are hematologic disorders, such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA and immune thrombocytopenia (ITP. Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA and autoimmune agranulocytosis (AG are, indeed, more rarely seen. However, they are probably underestimated due to the possible misleading presence of cytopenias secondary to leukemic bone marrow involvement or to chemotherapy cytotoxicity. The source of autoantibodies is still uncertain, despite the most convincing data are in favor of the involvement of resting normal B-cells. In general, excluding the specific treatment of underlying CLL, the managementof these complications is not different from that of idiopathic autoimmune cytopenias or of those associated to other causes. Among different therapeutic approaches, monoclonal antibody rituximab, given alone or in combination, has shown to be very effective.

  13. Autoimmune hepatitis: an uncommon presentation of thymoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendogni, Paolo; Rosso, Lorenzo; Tosi, Davide; Palleschi, Alessandro; Righi, Ilaria; Minonzio, Francesca; Fusco, Nicola; Nosotti, Mario

    2016-11-11

    In a substantial proportion of patients with thymoma, many different types of paraneoplastic syndromes are observed. The association between thymoma and autoimmune liver diseases, however, has been found in very few cases. We report the case of a 31-year-old man affected by autoimmune hepatitis associated with myasthenia gravis and thymoma, successfully treated with extended thymectomy. The patient is free from neoplastic and hepatic disease 4 years after surgery. Eighteen months after thymectomy, an exacerbation of hepatitis was successfully treated with steroids. To the authors' knowledge, only 7 cases of myasthenia gravis associated with thymoma and autoimmune hepatitis have been reported in the English-language literature. The exact role of thymoma in immune-mediated hepatitis is unclear. It seems likely that thymoma-associated T-cell abnormalities, due to the presence of thymoma, may have a role in the development of this rare clinical triad of autoimmune hepatitis, thymoma and myasthenia gravis.

  14. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-09-01

    The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed.

  15. Cardiovascular disease biomarkers across autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahearn, Joseph; Shields, Kelly J; Liu, Chau-Ching; Manzi, Susan

    2015-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease is increasingly recognized as a major cause of premature mortality among those with autoimmune disorders. There is an urgent need to identify those patients with autoimmune disease who are at risk for CVD so as to optimize therapeutic intervention and ultimately prevention. Accurate identification, monitoring and stratification of such patients will depend upon a panel of biomarkers of cardiovascular disease. This review will discuss some of the most recent biomarkers of cardiovascular diseases in autoimmune disease, including lipid oxidation, imaging biomarkers to characterize coronary calcium, plaque, and intima media thickness, biomarkers of inflammation and activated complement, genetic markers, endothelial biomarkers, and antiphospholipid antibodies. Clinical implementation of these biomarkers will not only enhance patient care but also likely accelerate the pharmaceutical pipeline for targeted intervention to reduce or eliminate cardiovascular disease in the setting of autoimmunity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A case of sudden death after Japanese encephalitis vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunai, Yasuo; Ishii, Akira; Akaza, Kayoko; Nagai, Atsushi; Nishida, Naoki; Yamaguchi, Seiji

    2015-07-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus is estimated to result in 3500-50,000 clinical cases every year, with mortality rates of up to 20-50% and a high percentage of neurological sequelae in survivors. Vaccination is the single most important measure in preventing this disease. Inactivated Vero cell culture-derived JE vaccines have not been linked to any fatalities, and few serious adverse events after vaccination have been reported. Here, we report a case of sudden death in which a 10-year-old boy experienced cardiopulmonary arrest 5 min after receiving a Japanese encephalitis vaccination. He had been receiving psychotropic drugs for the treatment of pervasive developmental disorders. Postmortem examinations were nonspecific, and no signs of dermatologic or mucosal lesions or an elevation of the serum tryptase level, which are characteristic of anaphylaxis, were observed. A toxicological examination revealed that the blood concentrations of the orally administered psychotropic drugs were within the therapeutic ranges. The patient was considered to have died of an arrhythmia that was not directly associated with the vaccination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Sequential MRI, SPECT and PET in respiratory syncytial virus encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, K.; Sakazaki, Hiromi; Murakami, Seiko; Yonezawa, Sumiko; Fujimoto, Keiji; Seto, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Katsuji; Hattori, Hideji; Matsuoka, Osamu; Murata, Ryosuke

    1999-01-01

    We report on a 3-year-old girl with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) encephalitis manifested by disturbance of consciousness, conjugate eye deviation, anuria, truncal ataxia and intention tremor. T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed hyperintense areas in the cerebellar cortex. No lesion was detected in the cerebral cortex, pons or spinal cord. The hyperintense areas in the cerebellar cortex diminished with recovery from the clinical manifestations and had resolved 2 months after onset. The MRI lesions in the cerebellum were considered to be due to oedema. SPECT and positron emission tomography (PET), performed 3 months after onset, disclosed areas of hypoperfusion and hypometabolism at the same sites. One year after onset, MRI showed mild atrophy of the cerebellum. Hypoperfusion on SPECT and hypometabolism on PET remained. Neuroimaging showed that ataxia and tremor in this case were the result of cerebellitis. The patient has no neurological deficit except for mild truncal ataxia. This patient is a rare example of RSV encephalitis. (orig.)

  18. Japanese encephalitis virus tropism in experimentally infected pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricklin, Meret E; Garcìa-Nicolàs, Obdulio; Brechbühl, Daniel; Python, Sylvie; Zumkehr, Beatrice; Posthaus, Horst; Oevermann, Anna; Summerfield, Artur

    2016-02-24

    Pigs are considered to be the main amplifying host for Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), and their infection can correlate with human cases of disease. Despite their importance in the ecology of the virus as it relates to human cases of encephalitis, the pathogenesis of JEV in pigs remains obscure. In the present study, the localization and kinetics of virus replication were investigated in various tissues after experimental intravenous infection of pigs. The data demonstrate a rapid and broad spreading of the virus to the central nervous system (CNS) and various other organs. A particular tropism of JEV in pigs not only to the CNS but also for secondary lymphoid tissue, in particular the tonsils with the overall highest viral loads, was observed. In this organ, even 11 days post infection, the latest time point of the experiment, no apparent decrease in viral RNA loads and live virus was found despite the presence of a neutralizing antibody response. This was also well beyond the clinical and viremic phase. These results are of significance for the pathogenesis of JEV, and call for further experimental studies focusing on the cellular source and duration of virus replication in pigs.

  19. Disgust and fear recognition in paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprengelmeyer, Reiner; Atkinson, Anthony P; Sprengelmeyer, Anke; Mair-Walther, Johanna; Jacobi, Christian; Wildemann, Brigitte; Dittrich, Winand H; Hacke, Werner

    2010-05-01

    Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis (PNLE) affects limbic portions of the brain associated with recognition of social signals of emotions. Yet it is not known whether this perceptual ability is impaired in individuals with PNLE. We therefore conducted a single case study to explore possible impairments in recognising facially, vocally and bodily expressed emotions, using standardised emotion recognition tests. Facial expression recognition was tested with two forced-choice emotion-labelling tasks using static faces with either prototypical or morphed blends of basic emotions. Recognition of vocally and bodily expressed emotions was also tested with forced-choice labelling tasks, one based on prosodic cues, the other on whole-body movement cues. We found a deficit in fear and disgust recognition from both face and voice, while recognition of bodily expressed emotions was unaffected. These findings are consistent with data from previous studies demonstrating critical roles for certain brain regions - particularly the amygdala and insular cortex - in processing facially and vocally displayed basic emotions, and furthermore, suggest that recognition of bodily expressed emotions may not depend on neural structures involved in facial and vocal emotion recognition. Impaired facial and vocal emotion recognition may form a further neuropsychological marker of limbic encephalitis, in addition to the already well-described mnestic deficits. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Srl. All rights reserved.

  20. Medical image of the week: granulomatous amoebic encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhury A

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 64-year-old woman with history of deceased donor kidney transplantation presented with altered mental status. MRI of the brain showed new region of T2/FLAIR hyperintensity with restricted diffusion and slight cortical enhancement in the left middle temporal lobe (Figure 1, Panel A. Her neurological exam was notable for expressive aphasia and right-sided weakness. Initial diagnosis of ischemic stroke was further evaluated due to immunosuppressive status. Her CSF showed a WBC of 12 cells/microL with 80% lymphocytes, glucose 61 mg/dL, and protein 53 mg/dL. Follow up MRI showed progression of T2/FLAIR hyperintensity, intraparenchymal hemorrhage, and peripheral patchy enhancement in the left anterior/medial temporal lobe and inferior frontal lobe suspicious for encephalitis (Figure 1, Panel B. Left temporal lobe biopsy revealed granulomatous encephalitis with microorganisms morphologically consistent with amoeba (Figure 2, and tissue cultures grew MRSA. Acanthamoeba species was confirmed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC with antibody testing. ...