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Sample records for autoimmune liver disease

  1. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis. This group of tests helps your health care provider ...

  2. Autoimmune liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pietro Invernizzi; Ian R Mackay

    2008-01-01

    The liver was one of the earliest recognized sites among autoimmune diseases yet autoimmune hepatitis,primary biliary cirrhosis,primary sclerosing cholangitis,and their overlap forms,are still problematic in diagnosis and causation.The contributions herein comprise 'pairs of articles' on clinical characteristics,and concepts of etiopathogenesis,for each of the above diseases,together with childhood autoimmune liver disease,overlaps,interpretations of diagnostic serology,and liver transplantation.This issue is timely,since we are witnessing an ever increasing applicability of immunology to a wide variety of chronic diseases,hepatic and non-hepatic,in both developed and developing countries.The 11 invited expert review articles capture the changing features over recent years of the autoimmune liver diseases,the underlying immunomolecular mechanisms of development,the potent albeit still unexplained genetic influences,the expanding repertoire of immunoserological diagnostic markers,and the increasingly effective therapeutic possibilities.

  3. Autoantibodies in autoimmune liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sener, Asli Gamze

    2015-11-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic hepatitis of unknown etiology characterized by clinical, histological, and immunological features, generally including circulating autoantibodies and a high total serum and/or gamma globulin. Liver-related autoantibodies are very significant for the correct diagnosis and classification of autoimmune liver diseases (AILD), namely autoimmune hepatitis types 1 and 2 (AIH-1 and 2), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), and the sclerosing cholangitis types in adults and children. This article intends to review recent studies that investigate autoantibodies in autoimmune liver diseases from a microbiological perspective.

  4. Autoimmune paediatric liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giorgina Mieli-Vergani; Diego Vergani

    2008-01-01

    Liver disorders with a likely autoimmune pathogenesis in childhood include autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC),and de novo AIH after liver transplantation.AIH is divided into two subtypes according to seropositivity for smooth muscle and/or antinuclear antibody (SMA/ANA,type 1) or liver kidney microsomal antibody (LKM1,type 2).There is a female predominance in both.LKM1 positive patients tend to present more acutely,at a younger age,and commonly have partial IgA deficiency,while duration of symptoms before diagnosis,clinical signs,family history of autoimmunity, presence of associated autoimmune disorders,response to treatment,and long-term prognosis are similar in both groups. The most common type of paediatric sclerosing cholangitis is ASC.The clinical,biochemical, immunological,and histological presentation of ASC is often indistinguishable from that of AIH type 1.In both,there are high IgG,non-organ specific autoantibodies,and interface hepatitis.Diagnosis is made by cholangiography.Children with ASC respond to immunosuppression satisfactorily and similarly to AIH in respect to remission and relapse rates,times to normalization of biochemical parameters, and decreased inflammatory activity on follow up liver biopsies. However,the cholangiopathy can progress.There may be evolution from AIH to ASC over the years,despite treatment.De novo AIH after liver transplantation affects patients not transplanted for autoimmune disorders and is strikingly reminiscent of classical AIH,including elevated titres of serum antibodies, hypergammaglobulinaemia,and histological findings of interface hepatitis,bridging fibrosis,and collapse.Like classical AIH,it responds to treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine.De novo AIH post liver transplantation may derive from interference by calcineurin inhibitors with the intrathymic physiological mechanisms of T-cell maturation and selection.Whether this condition is a distinct entity or a form of

  5. Transplantation in autoimmune liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marcus Mottershead; James Neuberger

    2008-01-01

    Liver transplantation remains an effective treatment for those with end-stage disease and with intractable liver-related symptoms.The shortage of organs for transplantation has resulted in the need for rationing.A variety of approaches to selection and allocation have been developed and vary from country to country.The shortage of donors has meant that new approaches have to be adopted to make maximal use of the available organs;these include splitting grafts,use of extended criteria livers,livers from nonheart-beating donors and from living donors.Post transplantation, most patients will need life-long immunosuppression,although a small proportion can have immunosuppression successfully withdrawn.Newer immunosuppressive drugs and different strategies may allow a more targeted approach with a reduction in sideeffects and so improve the patient and graft survival.For autoimmune diseases, transplantation is associated with significant improvement in the quality and length of life.Disease may recur after transplantation and may affect patient and graft survival.

  6. Recurrence of autoimmune liver diseases after livertransplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is the most effective treatmentmodality for end stage liver disease caused by manyetiologies including autoimmune processes. That said,the need for transplantation for autoimmune hepatitis(AIH) and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), but not forprimary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), has decreasedover the years due to the availability of effective medicaltreatment. Autoimmune liver diseases have superiortransplant outcomes than those of other etiologies. WhileAIH and PBC can recur after LT, recurrence is of limitedclinical significance in most, but not all cases. RecurrentPSC, however, often progresses over years to a stagerequiring re-transplantation. The exact incidence andthe predisposing factors of disease recurrence remaindebated. Better understanding of the pathogenesis andthe risk factors of recurrent autoimmune liver diseasesis required to develop preventive measures. In thisreview, we discuss the current knowledge of incidence,diagnosis, risk factors, clinical course, and treatmentof recurrent autoimmune liver disease (AIH, PBC, PSC)following LT.

  7. Autoimmune hepatitis: a classic autoimmune liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Libia; Levine, Jeremiah

    2014-12-01

    AIH is characterized by chronic inflammation of the liver, interface hepatitis, hypergammaglobulinemia, and production of autoantibodies. Based on the nature of the serum autoantibodies, two types of AIH are recognized: type 1 (AIH-1), positive for ANA and/or anti-smooth muscle antibody, and type 2 (AIH-2), defined by the positivity for anti-liver kidney microsomal type 1 antibody or for anti-liver cytosol type 1 antibody. AIH demonstrates a female preponderance with the female-to-male ratio of 4:1 in AIH-1 and 10:1 in AIH-2. Several genes confer susceptibility to AIH and influence clinical manifestation, response to treatment, and overall prognosis. Most are located within the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region, which is involved in the presentation of antigenic peptides to T cells and thus in the initiation of adaptive immune responses. The strongest associations are found within the HLA-DRB1 locus. In patients with increased genetic susceptibility to AIH, immune responses to liver autoantigens could be triggered by molecular mimicry. Because of molecular mimicry, different environmental agents, drugs, and viruses might produce AIH. In AIH, T cells are numerically and functionally impaired, permitting the perpetuation of effector immune responses with ensuing persistent liver destruction. AIH is rare but highly treatable inflammatory condition of the liver. Subclinical and asymptomatic disease is common. AIH therefore needs to be considered in the differential diagnosis of all patients with elevated liver enzymes. Clinical response to immunosuppressive therapy is characteristic and supports the diagnosis.

  8. Cirrhosis and autoimmune liver disease: Current understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Grant, Charlotte R

    2016-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) constitute the classic autoimmune liver diseases (AILDs). While AIH target the hepatocytes, in PBC and PSC the targets of the autoimmune attack are the biliary epithelial cells. Persistent liver injury, associated with chronic AILD, leads to un-resolving inflammation, cell proliferation and the deposition of extracellular matrix proteins by hepatic stellate cells and portal myofibroblasts. Liver cirrhosis, and the resultant loss of normal liver function, inevitably ensues. Patients with cirrhosis have higher risks or morbidity and mortality, and that in the decompensated phase, complications of portal hypertension and/or liver dysfunction lead to rapid deterioration. Accurate diagnosis and monitoring of cirrhosis is, therefore of upmost importance. Liver biopsy is currently the gold standard technique, but highly promising non-invasive methodology is under development. Liver transplantation (LT) is an effective therapeutic option for the management of end-stage liver disease secondary to AIH, PBC and PSC. LT is indicated for AILD patients who have progressed to end-stage chronic liver disease or developed intractable symptoms or hepatic malignancy; in addition, LT may also be indicated for patients presenting with acute liver disease due to AIH who do not respond to steroids. PMID:27729952

  9. Overlap syndromes among autoimmune liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christian Rust; Ulrich Beuers

    2008-01-01

    The three major immune disorders of the liver are autoimmune hepatitis (AIH),primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC).Variant forms of these diseases are generally called overlap syndromes,although there has been no standardised definition.Patients with overlap syndromes present with both hepatitic and cholestatic serum liver tests and have histological features of AIH and PBC or PSC.The AIH-PBC overlap syndrome is the most common form,affecting almost 10% of adults with AIH or PBC.Single cases of AIH and autoimmune cholangitis (AMA-negative PBC) overlap syndrome have also been reported.The AIH-PSC overlap syndrome is predominantly found in children,adolescents and young adults with AIH or PSC.Interestingly,transitions from one autoimmune to another have also been reported in a minority of patients,especially transitions from PBC to AIH-PBC overlap syndrome.Overlap syndromes show a progressive course towards liver cirrhosis and liver failure without treatment.Therapy for overlap syndromes is empiric,since controlled trials are not available in these rare disorders.Anticholestatic therapy with ursodeoxycholic acid is usually combined with immunosuppressive therapy with corticosteroids and/or azathioprine in both AIH-PBC and AIH-PSC overlap syndromes.In end-stage disease,liver transplantation is the treatment of choice.

  10. Autoimmune liver disease in Noonan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loddo, Italia; Romano, Claudio; Cutrupi, Maria Concetta; Sciveres, Marco; Riva, Silvia; Salpietro, Annamaria; Ferraù, Valeria; Gallizzi, Romina; Briuglia, Silvana

    2015-03-01

    Noonan Syndrome (NS) is characterized by short stature, typical facial dysmorphology and congenital heart defects. The incidence of NS is estimated to be between 1:1000 and 1:2500 live births. The syndrome is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. In approximately 50% of cases, the disease is caused by missense mutations in the PTPN11 gene on chromosome 12, resulting in a gain of function of the non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 protein. Autoimmune Hepatitis (AIH) is a cryptogenic, chronic and progressive necroinflammatory liver disease. Common features of AIH are hypergammaglobulinemia (IgG), presence of circulating autoantibodies, histological picture of interface hepatitis and response to immunosuppressant drugs. Conventional treatment with Prednisone and Azathioprine is effective in most patients. We describe the case of a 6 years-old girl with Noonan Syndrome and Autoimmune Hepatitis type 1. Molecular analysis of PTPN11 gene showed heterozygous mutation c.923A>G (Asn308Ser) in exon 8. Though association between NS and autoimmune disorders is known, this is the second case of association between Noonan Syndrome and Autoimmune Hepatitis type 1 described in literature. In the management of NS, an accurate clinical evaluation would be recommended. When there is a clinical suspicion of autoimmune phenomena, appropriate laboratory tests should be performed with the aim of clarifying whether the immune system is involved in NS. We think that autoimmunity represents a characteristic of NS, even if the etiopathogenesis is still unknown.

  11. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies (ANCA) in autoimmune liver diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozendaal, C.; Kallenberg, Cees

    1999-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA) are autoantibodies directed against cytoplasmic constituents of neutrophil granulocytes and monocytes. ANCA have been detected in serum from patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (mainly ulcerative colitis) and autoimmune mediated liver diseases (mainl

  12. Low Serum Hepcidin in Patients with Autoimmune Liver Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aggeliki Lyberopoulou

    Full Text Available Hepcidin, a liver hormone, is important for both innate immunity and iron metabolism regulation. As dysfunction of the hepcidin pathway may contribute to liver pathology, we analysed liver hepcidin mRNA and serum hepcidin in patients with chronic liver diseases. Hepcidin mRNA levels were determined in liver biopsies obtained from 126 patients with HCV (n = 21, HBV (n = 23, autoimmune cholestatic disease (primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis; PBC/PSC; n = 34, autoimmune hepatitis (AIH; n = 16 and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD; n = 32. Sera sampled on the biopsy day from the same patients were investigated for serum hepcidin levels. Hepatic hepcidin mRNA levels correlated positively with ferritin and negatively with serum γ-GT levels. However, no correlation was found between serum hepcidin and either ferritin or liver hepcidin mRNA. Both serum hepcidin and the serum hepcidin/ferritin ratio were significantly lower in AIH and PBC/PSC patients' sera compared to HBV, HCV or NAFLD (P<0.001 for each comparison and correlated negatively with serum ALP levels. PBC/PSC and AIH patients maintained low serum hepcidin during the course of their two-year long treatment. In summary, parallel determination of liver hepcidin mRNA and serum hepcidin in patients with chronic liver diseases shows that circulating hepcidin and its respective ratio to ferritin are significantly diminished in patients with autoimmune liver diseases. These novel findings, once confirmed by follow-up studies involving bigger size and better-matched disease subgroups, should be taken into consideration during diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune liver diseases.

  13. Low Serum Hepcidin in Patients with Autoimmune Liver Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyberopoulou, Aggeliki; Chachami, Georgia; Gatselis, Nikolaos K; Kyratzopoulou, Eleni; Saitis, Asterios; Gabeta, Stella; Eliades, Petros; Paraskeva, Efrosini; Zachou, Kalliopi; Koukoulis, George K; Mamalaki, Avgi; Dalekos, George N; Simos, George

    2015-01-01

    Hepcidin, a liver hormone, is important for both innate immunity and iron metabolism regulation. As dysfunction of the hepcidin pathway may contribute to liver pathology, we analysed liver hepcidin mRNA and serum hepcidin in patients with chronic liver diseases. Hepcidin mRNA levels were determined in liver biopsies obtained from 126 patients with HCV (n = 21), HBV (n = 23), autoimmune cholestatic disease (primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis; PBC/PSC; n = 34), autoimmune hepatitis (AIH; n = 16) and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD; n = 32). Sera sampled on the biopsy day from the same patients were investigated for serum hepcidin levels. Hepatic hepcidin mRNA levels correlated positively with ferritin and negatively with serum γ-GT levels. However, no correlation was found between serum hepcidin and either ferritin or liver hepcidin mRNA. Both serum hepcidin and the serum hepcidin/ferritin ratio were significantly lower in AIH and PBC/PSC patients' sera compared to HBV, HCV or NAFLD (Pserum ALP levels. PBC/PSC and AIH patients maintained low serum hepcidin during the course of their two-year long treatment. In summary, parallel determination of liver hepcidin mRNA and serum hepcidin in patients with chronic liver diseases shows that circulating hepcidin and its respective ratio to ferritin are significantly diminished in patients with autoimmune liver diseases. These novel findings, once confirmed by follow-up studies involving bigger size and better-matched disease subgroups, should be taken into consideration during diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune liver diseases.

  14. Current Status of Therapy in Autoimmune Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hirschfield, Gideon M.; Al-Harthi, Nadya; Heathcote, E. Jenny

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic strategies for autoimmune liver diseases are increasingly established. Although proportionately uncommon, specialist centers have with time refined the best approaches for each disease, based on an improved understanding of the spectrum of presentation. The major treatment aims are to prevent end-stage liver disease and its associated complications. As a result of drugs such as ursodeoxycholic acid, predniso(lo)ne and azathioprine, both primary biliary cirrhosis ...

  15. Autoimmune Hepatitis as a Unique Form of an Autoimmune Liver Disease: Immunological Aspects and Clinical Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hind I. Fallatah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH is a unique form of immune-mediated disease that attacks the liver through a variety of immune mechanisms. The outcomes of AIH are either acute liver disease, which can be fatal, or, more commonly, chronic progressive liver disease, which can lead to decompensated liver cirrhosis if left untreated. AIH has characteristic immunological, and pathological, features that are important for the establishment of the diagnosis. More importantly, most patients with AIH have a favorable response to treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine, although some patients with refractory AIH or more aggressive disease require more potent immune-suppressant agents, such as cyclosporine or Mycophenolate Mofetil. In this paper, we discuss the immunological, pathological and clinical features of AIH, as well as the standard and alternative treatments for AIH.

  16. Liver biopsy interpretation in the differential diagnosis of autoimmune liver disease in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Gerosa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune liver disease  (AILD represents a group of complex inflammatory liver diseases, all characterized by an aberrant autoreactivity against hepatocytes and/or biliary structures. AILD may be subclassified into four major diseases: autoimmune hepatitis (AIH, primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC, primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC, and autoimmune cholangitis (AIC. Recently a new entity frequently associated with autoimmune pancreatitis and defined IgG4-related cholangitis (IgG4-RC,  has been added to the spectrum of AILD. The most frequent autoimmune liver diseases  of the AILD spectrum occurring in children and in young adults are  AIH  and PSC, overlap syndrome between AIH and PSC, also defined as autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC, representing a frequent finding in pediatric patients. Here,  the morphological findings that may help liver pathologists in the differential diagnosis of AILD in pediatric patients are reviewed, underlying the frequency in liver biopsy interpretation of complex cases in which a precise diagnosis may remain controversial, due to overlap of hepatocytic and bile duct cell lesions. Among the multiple morphological changes typical of AILD,  the detection of an high number of plasma cell clusters in the portal and periportal regions is generally considered one of the main clue for the diagnosis of AIH. The recent report in a 13-year old  boy of IgG4-associated cholangitis, induces  pathologists when detecting a huge number of plasmacells, to consider the differential diagnosis between AIH and IgG4-RC.Proceedings of the 9th International Workshop on Neonatology · Cagliari (Italy · October 23rd-26th, 2013 · Learned lessons, changing practice and cutting-edge research

  17. Impact of Aging on Liver Histological Findings of Autoimmune Liver Diseases

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    Yuki Haga

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Our aim is to investigate the recent liver biopsy findings of autoimmune liver diseases at a university hospital located in an urban area of Japan. The study included 259 patients (mean age 56.8 ± 12.5; male/female, 46/213 who underwent a liver biopsy for primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC or autoimmune hepatitis (AIH. We analyzed their liver biopsy findings according to age and gender. Among 127 PBC patients, Scheuer stages 1, 2, 3, and 4 were 42, 54, 18, and 13, respectively. Among 101 AIH patients, fibrosis stages F1, F2, F3, and F4 were 37, 32, 19, and 13, respectively, and inflammatory activity grades A1, A2, and A3 were 22, 25, and 54, respectively. Among PBC aged ≥65 years, Scheuer stages 1–3 and 4 patients were 27 and 6, respectively. The proportion of Scheuer stage 4 patients in PBC aged ≥65 years tended to be higher than that in PBC aged <65 years (p = 0.0659. Of interest, the proportion of AIH patients with moderate or severe activity (A2 or A3 in males was higher than in females (p = 0.0311. From the point of view of fibrosis stage or inflammatory activity grade of the liver, the proportion of AIH patients aged ≥65 years was similar to that aged <65 years. Although we identified six older cirrhotic patients with AIH, three of them were male. The progression of fibrosis and inflammatory activity of the liver should be noted when we treat older patients suffering from autoimmune liver diseases. Liver biopsy plays an important role in obtaining accurate information on autoimmune liver diseases in older patients.

  18. Liver cirrhosis in selected autoimmune diseases: a nationwide cohort study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Chien-Hsueh; Lai, Ning-Seng; Lu, Ming-Chi; Lee, Ching-Chih

    2016-02-01

    The association between autoimmune diseases and liver cirrhosis has rarely been explored in Asian populations, an endemic area of viral hepatitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the comparative risk of liver cirrhosis among a group of selective autoimmune diseases in Taiwanese patients and to identify groups of high risk. This retrospective study was a nationwide, population-based study and used Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. A total of 29,856 patients with definite diagnosis of selected autoimmune diseases (Registry of Taiwan Catastrophic Illness Database, ACR classification) at the starting time point of January 1, 2005, were enrolled in this study. After tracked for a 5-year period, the endpoints were diagnosis of liver cirrhosis (in accordance with International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, ICD-9-CM codes 571). The control group was composed of other patients in the same database and consisted of randomly selected 753,495 sex- and age-matched non-autoimmune disease patients. The Cox proportional hazard regression model was used to calculate the risk of liver cirrhosis after adjusting for certain variables such as comorbidity, living area, and socioeconomic status. Among the patients with selected autoimmune diseases, 1987 liver cirrhosis were observed. Patients with psoriasis had a significantly increased risk of liver cirrhosis (HR 1.87, 95 % CI 1.25-2.81) than control group without psoriasis. The risk of liver cirrhosis was significantly lower in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (HR 0.29, 95 % CI 0.19-0.44). There is a gradient of risk of liver cirrhosis among the autoimmune diseases; the specific risks need to be investigated on the basis of hypotheses. Conventional immunosuppressive drug administration should be carefully implemented by regular monitoring of liver condition in order to avoid causing an adverse effect of chronic liver fibrosis.

  19. CLINICAL DIAGNOSTIC VALUE OF AUTOANTIBODIES IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF AUTOIMMUNE LIVER DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Bazarnyi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We are studied the 15 patients with autoimmune liver diseases and 36 patients without autoimmune pathology found the diagnostic value of antinuclear and antimitochondrial autoantibodies (AMA-M2 tests, and antibodies to asialoglycoprotein receptor (anti-ASGPR. Based on the ROC analysis showed that the diagnostic sensitivity and diagnostic specificity of AMA-M2 was 73% and 100% and for anti-ASGPR – 60% and 77%, respectively. Therefore, the test for anti-ASGPR in autoimmune diseases of the liver showed no advantages over standart tests, and its using in clinical practice requires clarification. 

  20. Diagnostic utility of IgG and IgM immunohistochemistry in autoimmune liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roger; Klein; Moreira; Frank; Revetta; Elizabeth; Koehler; Mary; Kay; Washington

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To assess the role of IgM and IgG immunohistochemistry(IHC) in the evaluation of autoimmune liver conditions-autoimmune hepatitis(AIH),primary biliary cirrhosis(PBC),and primary sclerosing cholangitis(PSC).METHODS:Forty one biopsies from untreated patients diagnosed with autoimmune liver disease(AIH,n = 20;PBC,n = 13;PSC,n = 8) and fourteen biopsies of patients with chronic hepatitis C were selected.IgM and IgG-positive plasma cells were counted in each sample.RESULTS:A predominance of IgG-positive plas...

  1. Autoimmune liver diseases: internist’s guide from bench to bedside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Visconti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune liver diseases are disorders of unknown etiology and immune pathogenesis, characterized by liver parenchyma inflammation (autoimmune hepatitis or by lesions of the intralobular biliary ducts (primary biliary cirrhosis or of the entire biliary system (primary sclerosing cholangitis. They differ with regard to the epidemiological, clinical, morphological and serological features; the possible evolution; the different associations with other immune diseases of the digestive or extra-digestive organs; the treatment options. All progressively can result in hepatic cirrhosis. More recently, overlap syndromes have been identified, in which patients exhibit overlapping clinical, morphological and serological features of the above indicated diseases. The frequency of overlap syndromes is progressively increasing, causing additional clinical difficulties. Here, I review the diagnostic and clinical problems of the definite autoimmune liver diseases and of the overlap syndromes, with more regard to the evidences that drive current practice.

  2. Therapeutic Potential of IL-17-Mediated Signaling Pathway in Autoimmune Liver Diseases

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    Haiyan Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence reveals that various cytokines and tissue microenvironments contribute to liver inflammation and autoimmunity, and IL-17 family is one of highlights acknowledged. Although the implication of IL-17 family in most common autoimmune diseases (such as psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease, and rheumatoid arthritis has been extensively characterized, the role of this critical family in pathophysiology of autoimmune liver diseases (AILD still needs to be clarified. In the review, we look into the intriguing biology of IL-17 family and further dissect on the intricate role of IL-17-mediated pathway in AILD. Considering encouraging data from preclinical and clinical trials, IL-17 targeted therapy has shown promises in several certain autoimmune conditions. However, blocking IL-17-mediated pathway is just beginning, and more fully investigation and reflection are required. Taking together, targeting IL-17-mediated responses may open up new areas of potential clinical treatment for AILD.

  3. Epstein-Barr Virus as a Trigger of Autoimmune Liver Diseases

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    Eirini I. Rigopoulou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases includes a combination of genetic factors and environmental exposures including infectious agents. Infectious triggers are commonly indicated as being involved in the induction of autoimmune disease, with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV being implicated in several autoimmune disorders. EBV is appealing in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease, due to its high prevalence worldwide, its persistency throughout life in the host’s B lymphocytes, and its ability to alter the host’s immune response and to inhibit apoptosis. However, the evidence in support of EBV in the pathogenesis varies among diseases. Autoimmune liver diseases (AiLDs, including autoimmune hepatitis (AIH, primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC, and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC, have a potential causative link with EBV. The data surrounding EBV and AiLD are scarce. The lack of evidence surrounding EBV in AiLD may also be reflective of the rarity of these conditions. EBV infection has also been linked to other autoimmune conditions, which are often found to be concomitant with AiLD. This paper will critically examine the literature surrounding the link between EBV infection and AiLD development. The current evidence is far from being conclusive of the theory of a link between EBV and AiLD.

  4. HLA-DR allele frequencies in Mexican mestizos with autoimmune liver diseases including overlap syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepeda-Gomez, Sergio; Montaño-Loza, Aldo; Zapata-Colindres, Juan Carlos; Paz, Francisco; Olivera-Martinez, Marco; López-Reyes, Alberto; Granados, Julio; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune liver diseases are sometimes difficult to differentiate from hepatic overlap syndromes (OS). The objective of this study was to use polymorphic genetic markers to better distinguish clinical heterogeneity in autoimmune liver disease. Since autoimmunity is the result of autoantibody production we studied HLA-DR alleles in 20 patients with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), 16 with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), 10 with OS, and in 99 ethnically matched healthy individuals. Patients with OS had significantly higher alkaline phosphatase and total bilirubin levels than patients with AIH. OS patients had a higher prevalence of positive antinuclear antibodies and a higher AIH score than patients with PBC. Patients with OS also had higher total immunoglobulin levels (IgG isotype) as compared to patients with PBC. We found in PBC patients a higher gene frequency of HLA-DR4 and DR1 as compared to healthy controls (p = 0.03, OR = 2.2 and p = 0.004, OR = 4.3, respectively) and to OS patients (p = 0.01, OR = 6.8, and p = 0.004, OR = 10.0, respectively). On the other hand, the gene frequency of HLADR5 was significantly decreased in the total group of patients as compared to healthy controls suggesting a protective role of this allele for developing autoimmune liver disease.

  5. Drug-induced autoimmune liver disease: A diagnostic dilemma of an increasingly reported disease.

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    Castiella, Agustin; Zapata, Eva; Lucena, M Isabel; Andrade, Raúl J

    2014-04-27

    The aetiology of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is uncertain but the disease can be triggered in susceptible patients by external factors such as viruses or drugs. AIH usually develops in individuals with a genetic background mainly consisting of some risk alleles of the major histocompatibility complex (HLA). Many drugs have been linked to AIH phenotypes, which sometimes persist after drug discontinuation, suggesting that they awaken latent autoimmunity. At least three clinical scenarios have been proposed that refers to drug- induced autoimmune liver disease (DIAILD): AIH with drug-induced liver injury (DILI); drug induced-AIH (DI-AIH); and immune mediated DILI (IM-DILI). In addition, there are instances showing mixed features of DI-AIH and IM-DILI, as well as DILI cases with positive autoantibodies. Histologically distinguishing DILI from AIH remains a challenge. Even more challenging is the differentiation of AIH from DI-AIH mainly relying in histological features; however, a detailed standardised histologic evaluation of large cohorts of AIH and DI-AIH patients would probably render more subtle features that could be of help in the differential diagnosis between both entities. Growing information on the relationship of drugs and AIH is being available, being drugs like statins and biologic agents more frequently involved in cases of DIAILD. In addition, there is some evidence on the fact that patients diagnosed with DIAILD may have had a previous episode of hepatotoxicity. Further collaborative studies in DIAILD will strengthen the knowledge and understanding of this intriguing and complex disorder which might represent different phenotypes across the spectrum of disease.

  6. Clinical Significance of Autoantibodies to P53 Protein in Patients with Autoimmune Liver Diseases

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    Takashi Himoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the p53 gene leading to conformational changes in the p53 protein have been well established in many human cancers. Conformational changes and/or cellular accumulation of the protein may induce an immune response, resulting in circulating autoantibodies to p53, which have been documented in several types of cancers. Although rarely associated with autoimmune disease, a few reports have documented titres of anti-p53 autoantibodies in patients with autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis. The clinical relevance of circulating autoantibodies to p53, therefore, remains unclear. Accordingly, this study aimed to examine the prevalence and clinical relevance of anti-p53 autoantibodies in patients with selected autoimmune liver diseases.

  7. Autoimmune liver disease and the Canadian First Nations Aboriginal Communities of British Columbia's Pacific Northwest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eric M Yoshida; Mark Riley; Laura T Arbour

    2006-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a well-known but uncommon chronic liver disease that is presumed to be of autoimmune etiology. Recently, investigations in British Columbia (BC), a province of Canada situated along the Pacific North-West of North America, have suggested that PBC is not a rare disease amongst BC's Aboriginal (i.e. First Nations) communities. Geographically, BC is adjacent to South East Alaska, an American state that has also reported an increased prevalence of PBC amongst its Aboriginal communities. In this article, the medical evidence supporting a hypothesis of increased risk of PBC amongst BC's First Nations communities is reviewed. Evidence suggesting that autoimmune hepatitis is also more likely amongst BC's First Nations communities is also presented.(C)2006 The WJG Press. All rights reserved.

  8. Autoimmune thyroid disease and other non-endocrine autoimmune diseases

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    Todorović-Đilas Ljiljana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction, Autoimmune diseases are chronic conditions initiated by the loss of immunological tolerance to self-antigens. They constitute heterogeneous group of disorders, in which multiple alterations in the immune system result in a spectrum of syndromes that either target specific organs or affect the body systematically. Recent epidemiological studies have shown a possible shift of one autoimmune disease to another or the fact that more than one autoimmune disease may coexist in a single patient or in the same family. Numerous autoimmune diseases have been shown to coexist frequently with thyroid autoimmune diseases. Autoimmune thyroid disease and other organ specific non-endocrine autoimmune diseases. This part of the study reviews the prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease coexisting with: pernicious anaemia, vitiligo, celiac disease, autoimmune liver disease, miastenia gravis, alopecia areata and sclerosis multiplex, and several recommendations for screening have been given. Autoimmune thyroid disease and other organ non-specific non-endocrine autoimmune diseases. Special attention is given to the correlation between autoimmune thyroid disease and rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, syndrome Sjögren, systemic sclerosis and mixed connective tissue disease. Conclusions. Screening for autoimmune thyroid diseases should be recommended in everyday clinical practice, in patients with primary organ-specific or organ non-specific autoimmune disease. Other­wise, in patients with primary thyroid autoimmune disease, there is no good reason of seeking for all other autoimmune diseases, although these patients have a greater risk of developing other autoimmune disease. Economic aspects of medicine require further analyzing of these data, from cost/benefit point of view to justified either mandatory screening or medical practitioner judgment.

  9. COMPARATIVE RESULTS OF LIVER TRANSPLANTATION IN PATIENTS WITH VIRAL CIRRHOSIS AND AUTOIMMUNE LIVER DISEASES AT A SINGLE CENTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.A Gerasimova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Russian Scientist Centre for Radiology and Surgical Technology has sufficient experience of orthotopic liver transplantation (100 OLT, which allowed comparing the outcomes of the terminal stages of liver disease in the two most numerous groups of patients: viral cirrhosis (VH and autoimmune liver diseases (AILD. Despite the fact that patients with VH indicator of urgency performing OLT (MELD lower, rate of deaths on the waiting list higher than AILD, due to more favorable course of immune disease. After OLT significant differences during the early and last posttransplant periods were not found, although the recurrences of viral hepatitis are recorded much more frequently than AILD. One-year and a three-year survival rates were comparable. To prevent reinfection of the hepatitis B successfully used nucleoside analogues (telbivudine, which allowed minimizing recurrence of the disease. Prevention and treatment of hepatitis C after the OLT is a relevant problem, despite the low efficiency of antiviral therapy. Relapses AILD not represent a real threat to the life of the patients, because the modification of immunosuppressive therapy can limit the progression of the disease

  10. Familial occurrence of autoimmune liver disease with overlapping features of primary biliary cholangitis and autoimmune hepatitis in a mother and her daughter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, Kaoru; Yoshida, Kanako; Yokota, Masaki; Daa, Tsutomu; Kan, Masahiro

    2016-10-01

    We encountered two patients with overlapping features of primary biliary cholangitis and autoimmune hepatitis within the same family. A 68-year-old woman presented at our hospital from a previous medical institution because of the diagnosis of primary biliary cholangitis. Her 49-year-old daughter was admitted with liver dysfunction 4 years later. When compared, these two related patients were found to have overlapping features of primary biliary cholangitis and autoimmune hepatitis. Their human leukocyte antigen haplotype was DRB1*04:05/DRB1*15:02. The clinical and biochemical findings of these two patients immediately improved following treatment with a combination of prednisolone and ursodeoxycholic acid, in accordance with the Japanese guidelines. It is extremely important to identify such pathological conditions as quickly as possible, particularly with the appearance of severe liver dysfunction due to liver cirrhosis, as observed in our case. The Japanese guidelines are considered to be a realistic and useful clinical policy for the swift and efficient treatment of patients with overlapping features of primary biliary cholangitis and autoimmune hepatitis. We suggest that our two patients presented with a genetic predisposition to autoimmune liver disease with overlapping features of primary biliary cholangitis and autoimmune hepatitis within the same family.

  11. SOME THEORETICAL ASPECTS OF COMPLEX CLINICAL-PSYCHOLOGICAL INVESTIGATION OF PATIENTS WITH AUTOIMMUNE LIVER DISEASES IN CIRRHOTIC STAGE BEFORE LIVER TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Gerasimova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents preliminary results of complex clinical-psychological investigation of patients with autoim- mune liver diseases with cirrhosis waiting for liver transplant. The data discussed defense role of anxiety com- bined with other emotional affective disorders, psychological mechanisms in combination with coping strategies of stress-overcoming behavior in the state of disease and their involvement in formation of the clinical picture of the disease. It considers the need for differential diagnosis of the pathology using modern experimental- psychological methods in connection with further building of psychological aid to patients with autoimmune liver diseases

  12. Autoimmune disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    2005164 Optimal cut-point of glutamic acid decar-boxylase antibody (GAD-Ab) for differentiating two subtypes of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA). LI Xia(李霞), et al. Dept Endocrinol, 2nd Xiangya Hosp, Central South Univ, Changsha, 410011. Chin J Diabetes, 2005;13(1) :34-38. Objective: To investigate the optimal cut-point of glutamate decarboxylase antibody (GAD-Ab) for differentiating two subtypes of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (I. ADA). Methods: The frequency

  13. Serum Cytokine Levels and Their Relation to Clinical Features in Patients with Autoimmune Liver Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akberova, Dilyara; Kiassov, Andrei P.

    2017-01-01

    Serum cytokine levels were explored in a combined group of patients with autoimmune liver diseases (AILDs) and separately in patients with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and overlap syndrome. Overall, 60 patients with AILD, among them 32 patients with AIH and 28 patients with overlap syndrome, were included in the cross-sectional study. Serum cytokine levels were measured at baseline and compared to those of 21 healthy controls. Patients with AILD had significantly higher levels of IL-6 (0.70 (range 0.17–99.86) in patients with AILD compared to 0.40 (range 0.14–2.65) in controls, p < 0.01), IL-8 (1.66 (0.45–34.58) versus 0.53 (0.35–2.38), resp., p < 0.01), and TNF-α (2.61 (0.23–120.88) versus 1.65 (0.21–7.54), resp., p < 0.01). Adjusted logistic regression analysis revealed a pronounced relation of IL-8 and AILD, 48.36 (3.63–643.60), as well as AIH, 18.54 (1.08–318.54), and overlap syndrome, 23.85 (2.37–240.23), while the associations between the level of other cytokines and AILD were assessed as nonsignificant. In the language of absolute numbers, the increase of IL-8 serum level by 1 pg/mL had increased the chance for a patient to find himself in a group of AILD by 48.36 times. Also, high IL-8 serum levels were strongly related to clinical parameters. PMID:28299346

  14. Anti-asialoglycoprotein receptor autoantibodies, detected by a capture-immunoassay, are associated with autoimmune liver diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshioka M

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available In autoimmune chronic active hepatitis (AIH and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC, various autoantibodies including anti-asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR antibodies have been found in patients' sera. We have previously developed a mouse monoclonal antibody against rat and human ASGPR. In this study, we developed a capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for detection of anti-ASGPR antibodies using this monoclonal antibody and investigated the occurrence of anti-ASGPR antibodies in the sera of patients with various liver diseases. Serum samples were obtained from 123 patients with various liver diseases, including 21 patients with AIH and 40 patients with PBC. In this capture ELISA, the target antigen in the crude rat liver membrane extracts was captured on the ELISA wells by the ASGPR-specific mouse monoclonal antibody. Thus, the cumbersome process of antigen purification was rendered unnecessary. Using this capture ELISA, we detected the anti-ASGPR antibody in 67% of the patients with AIH, in 100% of the patients with PBC, and in 57% of the patients with acute hepatitis type A. However, the anti-ASGPR antibody was rarely detected in patients with other liver diseases such as primary sclerosing cholangitis and obstructive jaundice. Our findings suggest that this capture ELISA would be useful for the detection of anti-ASGPR antibodies in autoimmune liver diseases.

  15. Liver in systemic disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Potential causes of abnormal liver function tests include viral hepatitis, alcohol intake, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, autoimmune liver diseases, hereditary diseases, hepatobiliary malignancies or infection, gallstones and drug-induced liver injury. Moreover, the liver may be involved in systemic diseases that mainly affect other organs. Therefore, in patients without etiology of liver injury by screening serology and diagnostic imaging, but who have systemic diseases, the abnormal liver function test results might be caused by the systemic disease. In most of these patients, the systemic disease should be treated primarily. However, some patients with systemic disease and severe liver injury or fulminant hepatic failure require intensive treatments of the liver.

  16. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) potentiates autoimmune hepatitis in the CYP2D6 mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Peter; Messmer, Marie; Bayer, Monika; Pfeilschifter, Josef M; Hintermann, Edith; Christen, Urs

    2016-05-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and its more severe development non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are increasing worldwide. In particular NASH, which is characterized by an active hepatic inflammation, has often severe consequences including progressive fibrosis, cirrhosis, and eventually hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here we investigated how metabolic liver injury is influencing the pathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). We used the CYP2D6 mouse model in which wild type C57BL/6 mice are infected with an Adenovirus expressing the major liver autoantigen cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6). Such mice display several features of human AIH, including interface hepatitis, formation of LKM-1 antibodies and CYP2D6-specific T cells, as well as hepatic fibrosis. NAFLD was induced with a high-fat diet (HFD). We found that pre-existing NAFLD potentiates the severity of AIH. Mice fed for 12 weeks with a HFD displayed increased cellular infiltration of the liver, enhanced hepatic fibrosis and elevated numbers of liver autoantigen-specific T cells. Our data suggest that a pre-existing metabolic liver injury constitutes an additional risk for the severity of an autoimmune condition of the liver, such as AIH.

  17. Clinical heterogeneity in autoimmune acute liver failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Norberto C Chavez-Tapia; Julio Martinez-Salgado; Julio Granados; Misael Uribe; Felix I Tellez-Avila

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To describe the outcome and prognosis in a cohort of patients with acute liver failure due to autoimmune hepatitis without liver transplantation.METHODS:A retrospective trial was conducted in 11 patients with acute liver failure due to autoimmune hepatitis who attended the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran. Demographic,biochemical and severity indexes,and treatment and outcome were assessed.RESULTS: Among the 11 patients, with a median age of 31 years, 72% had inflammatory response syndrome, and six patients received corticosteroids.The mortality rate within four weeks was 56%, and the one-year survival was 27%. In the survivors, severity indexes were lower and 83% received corticosteroids.CONCLUSION:We observed a relatively high survival rate in patients with acute liver failure due to autoimmune hepatitis. This survival rate could be influenced by severity of the disease and/or use of corticosteroids.

  18. Complement in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignesh, Pandiarajan; Rawat, Amit; Sharma, Madhubala; Singh, Surjit

    2017-02-01

    The complement system is an ancient and evolutionary conserved element of the innate immune mechanism. It comprises of more than 20 serum proteins most of which are synthesized in the liver. These proteins are synthesized as inactive precursor proteins which are activated by appropriate stimuli. The activated forms of these proteins act as proteases and cleave other components successively in amplification pathways leading to exponential generation of final effectors. Three major pathways of complement pathways have been described, namely the classical, alternative and lectin pathways which are activated by different stimuli. However, all the 3 pathways converge on Complement C3. Cleavage of C3 and C5 successively leads to the production of the membrane attack complex which is final common effector. Excessive and uncontrolled activation of the complement has been implicated in the host of autoimmune diseases. But the complement has also been bemusedly described as the proverbial "double edged sword". On one hand, complement is the final effector of tissue injury in autoimmune diseases and on the other, deficiencies of some components of the complement can result in autoimmune diseases. Currently available tools such as enzyme based immunoassays for functional assessment of complement pathways, flow cytometry, next generation sequencing and proteomics-based approaches provide an exciting opportunity to study this ancient yet mysterious element of innate immunity.

  19. Low-dose interleukin-2 promotes STAT-5 phosphorylation, Treg survival and CTLA-4-dependent function in autoimmune liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, H C; Jeffery, L E; Lutz, P; Corrigan, M; Webb, G J; Hirschfield, G M; Adams, D H; Oo, Y H

    2017-02-08

    CD4(+) CD25(high) CD127(low) forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3(+) ) regulatory T cells (Treg ) are essential for the maintenance of peripheral tolerance. Impaired Treg function and an imbalance between effector and Tregs contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. We reported recently that the hepatic microenvironment is deficient in interleukin (IL)-2, a cytokine essential for Treg survival and function. Consequently, few liver-infiltrating Treg demonstrate signal transducer and activator of transcription-5 (STAT-5) phosphorylation. To establish the potential of IL-2 to enhance Treg therapy, we investigated the effects of very low dose Proleukin (VLDP) on the phosphorylation of STAT-5 and the subsequent survival and function of Treg and T effector cells from the blood and livers of patients with autoimmune liver diseases. VLDP, at less than 5 IU/ml, resulted in selective phosphorylation of STAT-5 in Treg but not effector T cells or natural killer cells and associated with increased expression of cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4), FoxP3 and CD25 and the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 in Treg with the greatest enhancement of regulatory phenotype in the effector memory Treg population. VLDP also maintained expression of the liver-homing chemokine receptor CXCR3. VLDP enhanced Treg function in a CTLA-4-dependent manner. These findings open new avenues for future VLDP cytokine therapy alone or in combination with clinical grade Treg in autoimmune liver diseases, as VLDP could not only enhance regulatory phenotype and functional property but also the survival of intrahepatic Treg .

  20. Research Areas: Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and C, or by genetic mutations. Other liver diseases can be triggered by autoimmune reactions or drug toxicity. The rise in obesity in the United States has led to a rise in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Many liver diseases place individuals at higher risk ...

  1. Bistability in autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas; Mosekilde, Erik; Lund, Ole

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases damage host tissue, which, in turn, may trigger a stronger immune response. Systems characterized by such positive feedback loops can display co-existing stable steady states. In a mathematical model of autoimmune disease, one steady state may correspond to the healthy state...

  2. Factors Affecting Health-Related Quality of Life and Physical Activity after Liver Transplantation for Autoimmune and Nonautoimmune Liver Diseases: A Prospective, Single Centre Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Kotarska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. With the improvement of the outcomes after liver transplantation (LTx, health-related quality of life (HRQoL and physical activity are becoming significant outcome parameters. We prospectively assessed these parameters in patients with autoimmune and nonautoimmune liver disorders undergoing LTx. Materials and Methods. Patients (n=107 were subdivided into 3 groups depending on the time after LTx: group-A (n=21: 6–12 months; group-B (n=48: 13–36 months; and group-C (n=38: >37 months. SF-36 and IPAQ were applied in HRQoL and physical activity assessment. Results. Females had impaired HRQoL in most SF-36 domains. Younger patients showed higher scores at SF-36 physical functioning domain but IPAQ was not influenced by age. Group-B had higher general health and physical component summary than group-A (P=0.037, P=0.04, resp. and total IPAQ than group-C (P=0.047. The sitting time domain was longer in group-A than in group-B and group-C (P=0.0157;  P=0.042, resp.. Employed patients had better HRQoL and higher physical activity than those not working. SF-36 and IPAQ were unrelated to the autoimmune etiology of liver disease. Conclusions. These findings show that female and unemployed patients have worse HRQoL, while gender and age at LTx time do not affect IPAQ’s physical activity. The autoimmune etiology of liver disease does not influence HRQoL and physical activity after LTx.

  3. Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-) genetic polymorphisms and the risk of autoimmune liver disease: a meta-analysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shan Li; Xiamei Huang; Huizhi Zhong; Zhiping Chen; Qiliu Peng; Yan Deng; Xue Qin

    2013-12-01

    Epidemiological studies have evaluated the association between tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-)-308G/A and (TNF-)-238G/A polymorphisms, and the risk of autoimmune liver disease (AILD), yet the results are conflicting. To derive a more precise estimation of the relationship, we performed this meta-analysis. A systematic review was conducted to identify all eligible studies of TNF- polymorphisms and AILD risk. We used odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to assess the strength of the association between the two TNF- polymorphisms and AILD risk. A total of 15 eligible studies were identified. Overall, positive associations of -308G/A polymorphism with AILD risk were found (A vs G allele: OR = 1.45, 95%,CI = 1.13–1.86; AA vs GG: OR = 2.74, 95%,CI = 1.51–4.96; GA vs GG: OR = 1.46, 95%,CI = 1.11–1.92; dominant model: OR = 1.57, 95%,CI = 1.18–2.10; recessive model: OR = 2.22, 95%,CI = 1.31–3.76). In subgroup analysis by ethnicity, a significantly higher risk was found in Caucasians. In subgroup analysis by AILD category, significant association was observed in autoimmune hepatitis and primary sclerosing cholangitis, especially in Caucasians. Patients carrying TNF--238A allele had a slightly decreased risk of developing AILD (OR = 0.65, 95%,CI = 0.48–0.87). However, we found both TNF- polymorphisms were not associated with primary biliary cirrhosis risk, even in subgroup analysis. Our metaanalysis suggests that the TNF--308G/A and -238G/A polymorphisms may contribute to AILD susceptibility in Caucasians, especially for autoimmune hepatitis and primary sclerosing cholangitis. Nevertheless, we found both TNF- polymorphisms were unlikely to be associated with the risk of primary biliary cirrhosis.

  4. Headache in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Seby; Hajj-Ali, Rula A

    2014-03-01

    Autoimmune diseases are a group of heterogeneous inflammatory disorders characterized by systemic or localized inflammation, leading to ischemia and tissue destruction. These include disorders like systemic lupus erythematosus and related diseases, systemic vasculitides, and central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis (primary or secondary). Headache is a very common manifestation of CNS involvement of these diseases. Although headache characteristics can be unspecific and often non-diagnostic, it is important to recognize because headache can be the first manifestation of CNS involvement. Prompt recognition and treatment is necessary not only to treat the headache, but also to help prevent serious neurological sequelae that frequently accompany autoimmune diseases. In this review, we discuss headache associated with autoimmune diseases along with important mimics.

  5. Sirolimus for Autoimmune Disease of Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-16

    Autoimmune Pancytopenia; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS); Evans Syndrome; Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune; Autoimmune Neutropenia; Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic; Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Rheumatoid Arthritis

  6. De novo autoimmune hepatitis after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Ansgar W; Weiler-Norman, Christina; Burdelski, Martin

    2007-10-01

    The Kings College group was the first to describe a clinical syndrome similar to autoimmune hepatitis in children and young adults transplanted for non-immune mediated liver diseases. They coined the term "de novo autoimmune hepatitis". Several other liver transplant centres confirmed this observation. Even though the condition is uncommon, patients with de novo AIH are now seen in most of the major transplant centres. The disease is usually characterized by features of acute hepatitis in otherwise stable transplant recipients. The most characteristic laboratory hallmark is a marked hypergammaglobulinaemia. Autoantibodies are common, mostly ANA. We described also a case of LKM1-positivity in a patients transplanted for Wilson's disease, however this patients did not develop clinical or histological features of AIH. Development of SLA/LP-autoantibodies is also not described. Therefore, serologically de novo AIH appears to correspond to type 1 AIH. Like classical AIH patients respond promptly to treatment with increased doses of prednisolone and azathioprine, while the calcineurin inhibitors cyclosporine or tacrolimus areof very limited value - which is not surprising, as almost all patients develop de novo AIH while receiving these drugs. Despite the good response to treatment, most patients remain a clinical challenge as complete stable remissions are uncommon and flares, relapses and chronic disease activity can often occur. Pathogenetically this syndrome is intriguing. It is not clear, if the immune response is directed against allo-antigens, neo-antigens in the liver, or self-antigens, possibly shared by donor and host cells. It is very likely that the inflammatory milieu due to alloreactive cells in the transplanted organ contribute to the disease process. Either leading to aberrant antigen presentation, or providing co-stimulatory signals leading to the breaking of self-tolerance. The development of this disease in the presence of treatment with calcineurin

  7. The progress research of autoimmune liver disease%自身免疫性肝病的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭建华; 谷鸿彦

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune liver disease (AILD) which is related to abnormality of immune system is a special type of the liv -er disease. The clinical appearance of AILD includes jaundice, fever, arthritis, and so on. Autoantibodies can be found in the patients by laboratory tests. The patients of AILD may also suffer from other autoimmune diseases. Hormones, azathio -prine and other immunosuppressive agents are the main therapeutic drugs taken by these patients. Along with the develop -ment of medical service in our country, the understanding of ALID has gained great progress. To explore the pathogenesis and treatment of ALID further, this article reviews on the diagnosis and treatment of ALID in recent years.%自身免疫性肝病是一种特殊类型的肝脏疾病,其发病与患者免疫机制异常有关,临床多出现黄疸、发热、关节炎等症状,实验室检测可发现自身抗体,亦可合并其他系统自身免疫性疾病.治疗主要采用激素、硫唑嘌呤等免疫抑制剂.目前,随着我国医疗水平的逐步提高,对该疾病的认识和水平也有了长足的进步,本文就该疾病近年来的诊疗情况作一综述,以期能更深入地研究其发病机制及临床诊疗.

  8. Research Progress of Liver Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Lie-ming; JIA Ji-dong

    2005-01-01

    @@ Liver diseases are widespread in China.The disease mostly includes viral hepatitis,alcoholic or non alcoholic fatty degeneration or steatohepatitis, autoimmune liver disease,hepatic fibrosis/cirrhosis and hepatic cancer.The mechanism of most liver diseases was studied clearly in developed countries.

  9. Epigenomics of autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Bhawna; Hawkins, R David

    2015-03-01

    Autoimmune diseases are complex disorders of largely unknown etiology. Genetic studies have identified a limited number of causal genes from a marginal number of individuals, and demonstrated a high degree of discordance in monozygotic twins. Studies have begun to reveal epigenetic contributions to these diseases, primarily through the study of DNA methylation, but chromatin and non-coding RNA changes are also emerging. Moving forward an integrative analysis of genomic, transcriptomic and epigenomic data, with the latter two coming from specific cell types, will provide an understanding that has been missed from genetics alone. We provide an overview of the current state of the field and vision for deriving the epigenomics of autoimmunity.

  10. Galectin-3 in autoimmunity and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Felipe L; Gatto, Mariele; Bassi, Nicola; Luisetto, Roberto; Ghirardello, Anna; Punzi, Leonardo; Doria, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    Galectin-3 (gal-3) is a β-galactoside-binding lectin, which regulates cell-cell and extracellular interactions during self/non-self-antigen recognition and cellular activation, proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis. It plays a significant role in cellular and tissue pathophysiology by organizing niches that drive inflammation and immune responses. Gal-3 has some therapeutic potential in several diseases, including chronic inflammatory disorders, cancer and autoimmune diseases. Gal-3 exerts a broad spectrum of functions which differs according to its intra- or extracellular localization. Recombinant gal-3 strategy has been used to identify potential mode of action of gal-3; however, exogenous gal-3 may not reproduce the functions of the endogenous gal-3. Notably, gal-3 induces monocyte-macrophage differentiation, interferes with dendritic cell fate decision, regulates apoptosis on T lymphocytes and inhibits B-lymphocyte differentiation into immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells. Considering the influence of these cell populations in the pathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases, gal-3 seems to play a role in development of autoimmunity. Gal-3 has been suggested as a potential therapeutic agent in patients affected with some autoimmune disorders. However, the precise role of gal-3 in driving the inflammatory process in autoimmune or immune-mediated disorders remains elusive. Here, we reviewed the involvement of gal-3 in cellular and tissue events during autoimmune and immune-mediated inflammatory diseases.

  11. Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stay still. Liver disease has many causes. Infection Parasites and viruses can infect the liver, causing inflammation ... beyond. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/ ...

  12. Liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000205.htm Liver disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The term "liver disease" applies to many conditions that stop the ...

  13. [Autoimmune Diseases of Digestive System].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivashkinl, V T; Sheptulina, A F; Raĭkhelson, K L; Losik, E A; Ivashkin, K V; Okhlobystin, A V; Baranskaia, E K; Polouvektova, E A; Shifrin, O S

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases of digestive system refer to pathological conditions, caused by autoimmune mechanisms, and their etiology remains unknown. This is a group of relatively rare diseases, however, during the last years a marked tendency towards the raise in incidence andprevalence is observed, which led to an increase in number of clinical investigations on etiology, pathogenesis, and, accordingly, development of new diagnostic methods and therapies. Results of such trials shown, for example, that the pathogenesis of chronic cholestatic liver diseases is associated with nuclear receptors function, while the main etiological and pathogenic factor of inflammatory bowel diseases represents gut microbiota. Despite new achievements in autoinmune diseases of digestive system research, therapies are low effective and are accompanied by a huge number of adverse events. The fact that these diseases may lead to malignant tumors is also worth noting. For example, patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis have a 160 times higher risk of cholangiocellular carcinoma, while 10-14% ofpatients with celiac disease may develop malignancies of esophagus, small and large intestine. Thus, these diseases require further investigation with a purpose of more accurate diagnostic methods for the detection of disease at early stages and new effective and safe therapies development.

  14. Liver disease in pregnancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Noel M Lee; Carla W Brady

    2009-01-01

    Liver diseases in pregnancy may be categorized into liver disorders that occur only in the setting of pregnancy and liver diseases that occur coincidentally with pregnancy. Hyperemesis gravidarum, preeclampsia/eclampsia, syndrome of hemolysis, elevated liver tests and low platelets (HELLP), acute fatty liver of pregnancy, and intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy are pregnancy-specific disorders that may cause elevations in liver tests and hepatic dysfunction. Chronic liver diseases, including cholestatic liver disease, autoimmune hepatitis, Wilson disease, and viral hepatitis may also be seen in pregnancy. Management of liver disease in pregnancy requires collaboration between obstetricians and gastroenterologists/hepatologists. Treatment of pregnancy-specific liver disorders usually involves delivery of the fetus and supportive care, whereas management of chronic liver disease in pregnancy is directed toward optimizing control of the liver disorder. Cirrhosis in the setting of pregnancy is less commonly observed but offers unique challenges for patients and practitioners. This article reviews the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of liver diseases seen in pregnancy.

  15. Delineating liver events in trichloroethylene-induced autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Kathleen M; Przybyla, Beata; Pumford, Neil R; Han, Tao; Fuscoe, James; Schnackenberg, Laura K; Holland, Ricky D; Doss, Jason C; Macmillan-Crow, Lee Ann; Blossom, Sarah J

    2009-04-01

    Exposure to the environmental pollutant trichloroethylene (TCE) has been linked to autoimmune disease development in humans. Chronic (32-week) low-level exposure to TCE has been shown to promote autoimmune hepatitis in association with CD4(+) T cell activation in autoimmune-prone MRL+/+ mice. MRL+/+ mice are usually thought of as a model of systemic lupus rather than an organ-specific disease such as autoimmune hepatitis. Consequently, the present study examined gene expression and metabolites to delineate the liver events that skewed the autoimmune response toward that organ in TCE-treated mice. Female MRL+/+ mice were treated with 0.5 mg/mL TCE in their drinking water. The results showed that TCE-induced autoimmune hepatitis could be detected in as little as 26 weeks. TCE exposure also generated a time-dependent increase in the number of antibodies specific for liver proteins. The gene expression correlated with the metabolite analysis to show that TCE upregulated the methionine/homocysteine pathway in the liver after 26 weeks of exposure. The results also showed that TCE exposure altered the expression of selective hepatic genes associated with immunity and inflammation. On the basis of these results, future mechanistic studies will focus on how alterations in genes associated with immunity and inflammation, in conjunction with protein alterations in the liver, promote liver immunogenicity in TCE-treated MRL+/+ mice.

  16. Liver Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your liver is the largest organ inside your body. It helps your body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. There are many kinds of liver diseases. Viruses cause some of them, like hepatitis ...

  17. Electrosmog and autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Trevor G; Heil, Trudy J Rumann

    2016-07-13

    Studies in mice have shown that environmental electromagnetic waves tend to suppress the murine immune system with a potency similar to NSAIDs, yet the nature of any Electrosmog effects upon humans remains controversial. Previously, we reported how the human Vitamin-D receptor (VDR) and its ligand, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin-D (1,25-D), are associated with many chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. We have shown how olmesartan, a drug marketed for mild hypertension, acts as a high-affinity partial agonist for the VDR, and that it seems to reverse disease activity resulting from VDR dysfunction. We here report that structural instability of the activated VDR becomes apparent when observing hydrogen bond behavior with molecular dynamics, revealing that the VDR pathway exhibits a susceptibility to Electrosmog. Further, we note that characteristic modes of instability lie in the microwave frequency range, which is currently populated by cellphone and WiFi communication signals, and that the susceptibility is ligand dependent. A case series of 64 patient-reported outcomes subsequent to use of a silver-threaded cap designed to protect the brain and brain stem from microwave Electrosmog resulted in 90 % reporting "definite" or "strong" changes in their disease symptoms. This is much higher than the 3-5 % rate reported for electromagnetic hypersensitivity in a healthy population and suggests that effective control of environmental Electrosmog immunomodulation may soon become necessary for successful therapy of autoimmune disease.

  18. [Hydroxychloroquine for autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danza, Álvaro; Graña, Diego; Goñi, Mabel; Vargas, Andrea; Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo

    2016-02-01

    Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is by far the most frequently used antimalarial for the management of Systemic Autoimmune Diseases. It has immunomodulatory, hypolipidemic, hypoglycemic and antithrombotic properties and it diminishes the risk of malignancies. The most important mechanisms to explain the immunomodulatory actions are its ability to reduce inflammatory pathways and Toll-like receptors activation. The safety profile is favorable. In spite of its low frequency, retinal toxicity is potentially severe. In systemic lupus erythematous HCQ therapy reduces activity, the accrual of organ damage, risk of infections and thrombosis and improves the cardiometabolic profile. It contributes to induce lupus nephritis remission, spares steroid use and increases survival rates. In rheumatoid arthritis, it improves cardiometabolic risk and has a favorable effect in joint inflammation. In Sjögren's syndrome, an increased lacrimal quality as well as an improvement in objective and subjective inflammatory markers has been demonstrated with HCQ. In Antiphospholipid Syndrome, HCQ is effective in primary and secondary thrombosis prevention. The effectiveness of the drug in other systemic autoimmune diseases is less established. HCQ therapy may improve dermatological manifestations in Dermatomyositis and may have a positive effects in the treatment of Sarcoidosis and Still disease.

  19. Mucormycosis in systemic autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Mathieu; Puéchal, Xavier

    2014-07-01

    Mucormycosis is an emerging infection in systemic autoimmune diseases. All published cases of systemic autoimmune diseases complicated by mucormycosis were reviewed. The clinical features, diagnostic procedures and the main principles of treatment were analyzed. Twenty-four cases of mucormycosis have been reported in systemic auto-immune diseases, of which 83% in systemic lupus erythematosus, all occurring during immunosuppressants. In most cases, the infection was disseminated or rhinocerebral and it had mimicked a flare of the underlying connective tissue disease. A fatal outcome was reported in 58.3% of these patients. In conclusion, mucormycosis often mimics a flare of the underlying systemic disease and is associated with a high mortality rate. Systemic lupus erythematosus is by far the most common associated systemic autoimmune disease. A high degree of awareness is warranted to rapidly rule out infection, of which mucormycosis, in immunocompromised patients with systemic autoimmune disease before a disease flare is conclusively diagnosed.

  20. Autoimmune diseases and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komrokji, Rami S; Kulasekararaj, Austin; Al Ali, Najla H; Kordasti, Shahram; Bart-Smith, Emily; Craig, Benjamin M; Padron, Eric; Zhang, Ling; Lancet, Jeffrey E; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; List, Alan F; Mufti, Ghulam J; Epling-Burnette, Pearlie K

    2016-05-01

    Immune dysregulation and altered T-cell hemostasis play important roles in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Recent studies suggest an increased risk of MDS among patients with autoimmune diseases. Here, we investigated the prevalence of autoimmune diseases among MDS patients, comparing characteristics and outcomes in those with and without autoimmune diseases. From our study group of 1408 MDS patients, 391 (28%) had autoimmune disease, with hypothyroidism being the most common type, accounting for 44% (n = 171) of patients (12% among all MDS patients analyzed). Other autoimmune diseases with ≥5% prevalence included idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in 12% (n = 46), rheumatoid arthritis in 10% (n = 41), and psoriasis in 7% (n = 28) of patients. Autoimmune diseases were more common in female MDS patients, those with RA or RCMD WHO subtype, and those who were less dependent on red blood cell transfusion. Median overall survival (OS) was 60 months (95% CI, 50-70) for patients with autoimmune diseases versus 45 months (95% CI, 40-49) for those without (log-rank test, P = 0.006). By multivariate analysis adjusting for revised IPSS and age >60 years, autoimmune diseases were a statistically significant independent factor for OS (HR 0.78; 95% CI, 0.66-0.92; P = 0.004). The rate of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) transformation was 23% (n = 89) in MDS patients with autoimmune disease versus 30% (n = 301) in those without (P = 0.011). Patient groups did not differ in response to azacitidine or lenalidomide treatment. Autoimmune diseases are prevalent among MDS patients. MDS patients with autoimmune diseases have better OS and less AML transformation.

  1. Metabolic alterations and increased liver mTOR expression precede the development of autoimmune disease in a murine model of lupus erythematosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia Vilà

    Full Text Available Although metabolic syndrome (MS and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE are often associated, a common link has not been identified. Using the BWF1 mouse, which develops MS and SLE, we sought a molecular connection to explain the prevalence of these two diseases in the same individuals. We determined SLE- markers (plasma anti-ds-DNA antibodies, splenic regulatory T cells (Tregs and cytokines, proteinuria and renal histology and MS-markers (plasma glucose, non-esterified fatty acids, triglycerides, insulin and leptin, liver triglycerides, visceral adipose tissue, liver and adipose tissue expression of 86 insulin signaling-related genes in 8-, 16-, 24-, and 36-week old BWF1 and control New-Zealand-White female mice. Up to week 16, BWF1 mice showed MS-markers (hyperleptinemia, hyperinsulinemia, fatty liver and visceral adipose tissue that disappeared at week 36, when plasma anti-dsDNA antibodies, lupus nephritis and a pro-autoimmune cytokine profile were detected. BWF1 mice had hyperleptinemia and high splenic Tregs till week 16, thereby pointing to leptin resistance, as confirmed by the lack of increased liver P-Tyr-STAT-3. Hyperinsulinemia was associated with a down-regulation of insulin related-genes only in adipose tissue, whereas expression of liver mammalian target of rapamicyn (mTOR was increased. Although leptin resistance presented early in BWF1 mice can slow-down the progression of autoimmunity, our results suggest that sustained insulin stimulation of organs, such as liver and probably kidneys, facilitates the over-expression and activity of mTOR and the development of SLE.

  2. [Wilson disease: liver form].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra Montero, Luis; Ortega Álvarez, Félix; Sumire Umeres, Julia; Cok García, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is a disorder of copper metabolism that is inherited as an autosomal recessive, which produces toxic copper accumulation mainly in the liver and brain, in general has two ways presentation, liver at early ages and neurological in later ages. We present the case of a female patient of 21 years diagnosed of WD in liver cirrhosis that started with an edematous ascites without any neurological symptoms despite the age. Their laboratory studies showed decrease in serum ceruloplasmin and high cupruria within 24 hours of the disease , characteristic data of WD. Although WD is not a common disease should be suspected in all chronic liver disease of unknown etiology with negative viral markers and autoimmunity with or without neurological manifestations as soon as posible and starting treatment with copper chelating mainly leads to a substantial improvement the prognosis of these patients.

  3. AUTOIMMUNE EPIDERMAL BLISTERING DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune bullous skin diseases (ABDs are uncommon, potentially fatal diseases of skin and mucous membranes which are associated with deposits of autoantibodies and complement against distinct molecules of the epidermis and dermal/epidermal basement membrane zone (BMZ. These autoantibodies lead to a loss in skin molecular integrity, which manifests clinically as formation of blisters or erosions. In pemphigus vulgaris, loss of adhesion occurs within the epidermis. The pioneering work of Ernst H. Beutner, Ph.D. and Robert E. Jordon, M.D. confirmed the autoimmune nature of these diseases. Walter F. Lever, M.D. contributed significantly to our understanding of the histopathologic features of these diseases. Walter Lever, M.D. and Ken Hashimoto, M.D. contributed electron microscopic studies of these diseases, especially in pemphigus vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid. In bullous pemphigoid (BP, linear IgA bullous dermatosis, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA and dermatitis herpetiformis (DH, loss of adhesion takes place within or underneath the BMZ. Classic EBA demonstrates extensive skin fragility; DH is commonly associated with gluten-sensitive enteropathy, and manifests clinically with pruritic papulovesicles on the extensor surfaces of the extremities and the lumbosacral area. The clinical spectrum of bullous pemphigoid includes tense blisters, urticarial plaques, and prurigo-like eczematous lesions. Pemphigoid gestationis mostly occurs during the last trimester of pregnancy, and mucous membrane pemphigoid primarily involves the oral mucosa and conjunctivae and leads to scarring. Linear IgA bullous dermatosis manifests with tense blisters in a „cluster of jewels”-like pattern in childhood (chronic bullous disease of childhood and is more clinically heterogeneous in adulthood. Many of the autoantigens in these disorders are known and have been well characterized. ABDs may be influenced by both genetic and exogenous factors. The diagnoses of

  4. Epigenetic alterations underlying autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslani, Saeed; Mahmoudi, Mahdi; Karami, Jafar; Jamshidi, Ahmad Reza; Malekshahi, Zahra; Nicknam, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in genetic explorations have extended our understanding through discovery of genetic patterns subjected to autoimmune diseases (AID). Genetics, on the contrary, has not answered all the conundrums to describe a comprehensive explanation of causal mechanisms of disease etiopathology with regard to the function of environment, sex, or aging. The other side of the coin, epigenetics which is defined by gene manifestation modification without DNA sequence alteration, reportedly has come in to provide new insights towards disease apprehension through bridging the genetics and environmental factors. New investigations in genetic and environmental contributing factors for autoimmunity provide new explanation whereby the interactions between genetic elements and epigenetic modifications signed by environmental agents may be responsible for autoimmune disease initiation and perpetuation. It is aimed through this article to review recent progress attempting to reveal how epigenetics associates with the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.

  5. Sex differences in autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voskuhl Rhonda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Women are more susceptible to a variety of autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, multiple sclerosis (MS, primary biliary cirrhosis, rheumatoid arthritis and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. This increased susceptibility in females compared to males is also present in animal models of autoimmune diseases such as spontaneous SLE in (NZBxNZWF1 and NZM.2328 mice, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE in SJL mice, thyroiditis, Sjogren's syndrome in MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr mice and diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice. Indeed, being female confers a greater risk of developing these diseases than any single genetic or environmental risk factor discovered to date. Understanding how the state of being female so profoundly affects autoimmune disease susceptibility would accomplish two major goals. First, it would lead to an insight into the major pathways of disease pathogenesis and, secondly, it would likely lead to novel treatments which would disrupt such pathways.

  6. Low frequency of anti-SLA/LP autoantibody in Japanese adult patients with autoimmune liver diseases: analysis with recombinant antigen assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakawa, Hiroshi; Kawashima, Yumi; Kitazawa, Eriko; Kawaguchi, Naomi; Kato, Takashi; Kikuchi, Kentaro; Imai, Erika; Fujikawa, Hirotoshi; Hashimoto, Etsuko; Schlumberger, Wolfgang

    2003-08-01

    Anti-soluble liver antigen/liver pancreas (SLA/LP) autoantibody has been proposed to be one of the autoantibodies characterizing autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). Recently, one of the autoantigens to anti-SLA/LP was identified as a UGA suppressor tRNA-associated protein. Although the function of this protein remains unknown, the recombinant protein has been prokaryotically expressed. Using this protein as an antigen, a recombinant immunoassay for anti-SLA/LP autoantibody has been established and the frequency and significance of this autoantibody have been discussed in European countries. So, in the present study, we investigated anti-SLA/LP autoantibodies in Japanese patients with autoimmune liver diseases using the recombinant antigen ELISA and Western blot assay. Seventy-five patients with AIH type 1, 5 with AIH type 2, 46 with primary biliary cirrhosis, 10 with primary sclerosing cholangitis, 47 with chronic hepatitis C, 48 with systemic lupus erythematosus, 3 with cryptogenic hepatitis, and 40 normal controls were the subjects of the present study. Anti-SLA/LP autoantibodies were detected in only 5 of 75 (6.7%) patients with AIH type 1, but in none of the other 159 patients or 40 normal controls. The clinicopathologic features of anti-SLA/LP-positive AIH type 1, including carriers of HLA DR locus variations, were not significantly different from anti-SLA/LP-negative patients except for the mortality rate. Anti-SLA/LP autoantibody was detected at a low frequency in Japanese patients with AIH type 1 and did not significantly influence clinical features. However, since it has high disease-specificity to AIH type 1, further analysis of SLA/LP may contribute to help clarify the pathogenesis of AIH type 1.

  7. Therapeutic apheresis in autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambauer R

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Rolf Bambauer,1 Reinhard Latza,2 Carolin Bambauer,3 Daniel Burgard,4 Ralf Schiel5 1Institute for Blood Purification, Homburg, 2Laboratorium of Medicine, St Ingbert, 3Main Hospital Darmstadt, Darmstadt, 4Herz Zentrum, Cardiology, Völklingen, 5Inselklinik Heringsdorf GmbH, Seeheilbad Heringsdorf, Germany Abstract: Systemic autoimmune diseases based on an immune pathogenesis produce autoantibodies and circulating immune complexes, which cause inflammation in the tissues of various organs. In most cases, these diseases have a bad prognosis without treatment. Therapeutic apheresis in combination with immunosuppressive therapies has led to a steady increase in survival rates over the last 35 years. Here we provide an overview of the most important pathogenic aspects indicating that therapeutic apheresis can be a supportive therapy in some systemic autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, antiphospholipid syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, and inflammatory eye disease. With the introduction of novel and effective biologic agents, therapeutic apheresis is indicated only in severe cases, such as in rapid progression despite immunosuppressive therapy and/or biologic agents, and in patients with renal involvement, acute generalized vasculitis, thrombocytopenia, leucopenia, pulmonary, cardiac, or cerebral involvement. In mild forms of autoimmune disease, treatment with immunosuppressive therapies and/or biologic agents seems to be sufficient. The prognosis of autoimmune diseases with varying organ manifestations has improved considerably in recent years, due in part to very aggressive therapy schemes. Keywords: therapeutic apheresis, autoimmune diseases, systemic lupus erythematosus, antiphospholipid syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory eye disease

  8. Common mechanisms of autoimmune diseases (the autoimmune tautology).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2012-09-01

    The fact that autoimmune diseases share subphenotypes, physiopathological mechanisms and genetic factors has been called autoimmune tautology, and indicates that they have a common origin. The autoimmune phenotypes vary depending on the target cell and the affected organ, gender, ancestry, trigger factors and age at onset. Ten shared characteristics supporting this logical theory are herein reviewed.

  9. Autoimmune liver serology: Current diagnostic and clinical challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dimitrios P Bogdanos; Pietro Invernizzi; Ian R Mackay; Diego Vergani

    2008-01-01

    Liver-related autoantibodies are crucial for the correct diagnosis and classification of autoimmune liver diseases (AiLD), namely autoimmune hepatitis types 1 and 2 (AIH-1 and 2), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC),and the sclerosing cholangitis variants in adults and children.AIH-1 is specified by anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) and smooth muscle antibody (SMA). AIH-2 is specified by antibody to liver kidney microsomal antigen type-1 (anti-LKM1) and anti-liver cytosol type 1 (anti-LC1).SMA,ANA and anti-LKM antibodies can be present in de-novo AIH following liver transplantation.PBC is specified by antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) reacting with enzymes of the 2-oxo-acid dehydrogenase complexes (chiefly pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E2 subunit) and disease-specific ANA mainly reacting with nuclear pore gp210 and nuclear body sp100. Sclerosing cholangitis presents as at least two variants,first the classical primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) mostly affecting adult men wherein the only (and nonspecific) reactivity is an atypical perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (p-ANCA),also termed perinuclear anti-neutrophil nuclear antibodies (p-ANNA) and second the childhood disease called autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC) with serological features resembling those of type 1 AIH.Liver diagnostic serology is a fast-expanding area of investigation as new purified and recombinant autoantigens,and automated technologies such as ELISAs and bead assays,become available to complement (or even compete with) traditional immunofluorescence procedures.We survey for the first time global trends in quality assurance impacting as it does on (1) manufacturers/purveyors of kits and reagents,(2) diagnostic service laboratories that fulfill clinicians'requirements, and (3) the end-user,the physician providing patient care,who must properly interpret test results in the overall clinical context.

  10. Value of autoantibodies in diagnosis of autoimmune liver disease%自身抗体在自身免疫性肝病诊断中的价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李琳彬; 郭广波; 余焰; 刘力瑜; 陈忠余

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨自身抗体谱分析在自身免疫性肝病(ALD)诊断中的价值。方法回顾性分析864例肝病患者中各类自身免疫性肝病的分布、年龄、性别特征及自身抗体(ANA)、肝抗原自身抗体阳性率。结果864例患者中,病毒性肝炎763例、自身免疫性肝炎(AIH)51例、原发性胆汁性肝硬化(PBC)37例、原发性硬化性胆管炎(PSC)4例和重叠综合征(OS)9例。ALD多见于40岁以上女性。病毒性肝炎组ANA、抗平滑肌肌动蛋白抗体(ASMA)、抗肝肾微粒体抗体1型抗体(LKM-1)的阳性率分别为23.3%、4.6%、1.0%;AIH组ANA、ASMA、抗LKM-1、抗肝细胞溶质抗原1型抗体(抗LC-1)、抗可溶性肝抗原/肝胰抗原抗体(抗SLA/LP)、抗中性粒细胞胞浆抗体(ANCA)的阳性率分别为78.1%、70.6%、7.8%、5.9%、9.8%、29.4%;PBC组ANA、ASMA、抗线粒体抗体亚型M2(AMA-M2)的阳性率分别为83.9%、37.8%、86.5%。结论自身抗体检测是诊断自身免疫性肝病的必要条件,但这些自身抗体也可见于病毒性肝炎。%Objective To study the value of autoantibody analysis on diagnosis of autoimmune liver disease . Methods To analyze retrospectively characteristics of distribution ,age and gender for various kinds of disease and positive rate for ANA (Antiudear antibodoy ) and auto-antibody of liver antigens in 864 patients with liver disease .Re-sults 85 patients were included in this study ,among them 763 patients with Viral hepatitis ,51 with Aautoimmune hepatitis(AIH) ,37 with primary biliary cirrhosis(PBC) ,4 with primary sclerosing cholangitis(PSC) ,9 with overlap syndromes(OS) ,ALD mainly affected female patients above 40 years old .The positive rates of ANA ,ASMA(anti-smooth muscleantibody) ,anti-LKM-1 were 23 .3% ,4 .6% ,1 .0% in Viral hepatitis .The positive rates of ANA ,AS-MA ,anti-LKM-1 ,anti-LC-1 ,anti-SLA/LP ,ANCA (anti

  11. 自身免疫性肝病自身抗体检测的临床意义%Clinical significance of autoantibody detection in autoimmune liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    仲人前; 耿红莲

    2006-01-01

    @@ 自身免疫性肝病(autoimmune liver disease,ALD)是指一组病因尚不明确,但普遍认为与自身免疫有关的肝脏疾病.通常包括自身免疫性肝炎(autoimmune hepatitis,AIH)、原发性胆汁性肝硬化(primary biliary cirrhosis,PBC)及原发性硬化性胆管炎(primary sclerosing cholangitis,PSC).AIH主要造成肝细胞损伤,PBC主要破坏小胆管,而PSC主要表现为中大胆管损伤.随着自身抗体检测技术的发展,自身免疫性肝病的发现率呈逐年上升趋势,成为临床及研究领域备受关注的一类重要的自身免疫性疾病.

  12. Therapeutic apheresis in autoimmune diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bambauer, Rolf; Latza, Reinhard; Bambauer, Carolin; Burgard, Daniel; Schiel, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases based on an immune pathogenesis produce autoantibodies and circulating immune complexes, which cause inflammation in the tissues of various organs. In most cases, these diseases have a bad prognosis without treatment. Therapeutic apheresis in combination with immunosuppressive therapies has led to a steady increase in survival rates over the last 35 years. Here we provide an overview of the most important pathogenic aspects indicating that therapeutic apheresis can be a supportive therapy in some systemic autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, antiphospholipid syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, and inflammatory eye disease. With the introduction of novel and effective biologic agents, therapeutic apheresis is indicated only in severe cases, such as in rapid progression despite immunosuppressive therapy and/or biologic agents, and in patients with renal involvement, acute generalized vasculitis, thrombocytopenia, leucopenia, pulmonary, cardiac, or cerebral involvement. In mild forms of autoimmune disease, treatment with immunosuppressive therapies and/or biologic agents seems to be sufficient. The prognosis of autoimmune diseases with varying organ manifestations has improved considerably in recent years, due in part to very aggressive therapy schemes.

  13. Mucosal immunity in liver autoimmunity: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Palak J; Adams, David H

    2013-10-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) all nestle within the umbrella term of autoimmune liver disease, in which the end result is immune-mediated hepatocellular or hepatobiliary injury. All three conditions are associated with gut inflammation; PSC and AIH being strongly linked to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and PBC to coeliac disease. This clinical observation has stimulated several intriguing pathogenic concepts in which gut commensals, pathogens and intestinal antigens are all implicated in causing liver injury. Th17-cells have also been linked to AIH, PBC and more recently PSC. Given that the intestine is a key regulator of immunopathogenic Th17 responses, this may underpin a common disease mechanism and open up novel treatment avenues based on rational targeting of immune pathways. Moreover, the discovery of long-lived mucosal memory T-cells being recruited to the liver in response to aberrantly expressed endothelial-cell adhesion molecules and chemokines, which are normally 'gut-restricted,' could plausibly explain why these diseases are associated with site-restricted tissue distributions and pave the way for therapeutic strategies based on modulating tissue specific lymphocyte homing. That particular gene-polymorphisms have been found which confer combined PSC/IBD susceptibility underscores the fundamental role of mucosal immunogenicity in disease pathogenesis. Mucosal lymphocytes may also play a pivotal role in graft versus host disease affecting the liver, and there is increasing evidence to support dysregulated mucosal immunity as being responsible for the hepatic manifestations of gluten-sensitive enteropathy, graft versus host disease, as wells as the pancreatobiliary manifestations of IgG4-related disease.

  14. 自身抗体在自身免疫性肝病中的预测价值%Value of autoantibodies in predicting autoimmune liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王嘉森; 姚定康

    2011-01-01

    自身抗体作为自身免疫性肝病的诊断标志物已经在临床上得到了广泛应用,但其在病情严重程度及预后判断方面的价值报道并不多,事实上某些自身抗体除本身的诊断价值外,还具有预测病情的作用:如抗可溶性肝抗原抗体、抗肌动蛋白抗体、抗肝细胞溶质抗原Ⅰ型抗体、抗去唾液酸糖蛋白受体抗体、抗染色体抗体、抗环瓜氨酸多肽抗体和抗肝肾微粒体Ⅲ型抗体与自身免疫性肝炎的发生、发展及恶化有一定的相关性,其中抗可溶性肝抗原抗体与某些自身免疫性肝炎患者严重肝组织学改变、长期维持治疗、停药后再度恶化以及肝衰竭的发生相关;抗gp210抗体、抗Sp100抗体和抗着丝点抗体在原发性胆汁性肝硬化中有一定的预测意义,其中抗gp210抗体可提示原发性胆汁性肝硬化患者有较严重的界面性肝炎、小叶炎症以及易进展为肝衰竭等.%Autoantibodies have been widely used in autoimmune liver disease as diagnostic markers, but the value of estimating disease severity and prognosis has not been commonly comprehended.Actually, autoantibodies are valuable in predicting disease severity and treatment outcome as well as directing the diagnosis.Antibodies to soluble liver antigen, actin, liver cytosol type 1, asialoglycoprotein receptor, chromatin,cyclic citrullinated peptide, and uridine glucuronosyltransferases have been considered to be associated with the occurrence, severity and progression of autoimmune hepatitis.For example, antibody to soluble liver antigen is associated with severe histological changes, long durations of treatment, relapse after drug withdrawal and high frequency of liver failure.Besides, antibodies to Sp100, gp210 and centromere have prognostic value in primary biliary cirrhosis, for instance, antibody to gp210 is associated with severe interface hepatitis, lobular inflammation, and progression to liver failure.

  15. An autosomal locus causing autoimmune disease: Autoimmune polyglandular disease type I assigned to chromosome 21

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Aaltonen (Johanna); P. Björses (Petra); L.A. Sandkuijl (Lodewijk); J. Perheentupa (Jaakko); L. Peltonen (Leena Johanna)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractAutoimmune polyglandular disease type I (APECED) is an autosomal recessive autoimmune disease characterized by a variable combination of the failure of the endocrine glands. The pathogenesis of this unique autoimmune disease is unknown; unlike many other autoimmune diseases, APECED does

  16. Autoimmune Skin Diseases in the Dog

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, W. M.

    1981-01-01

    Diagnoses of autoimmune skin diseases require very careful observation of the skin lesions, and selection of an intact vesicle for histopathological examination. If available, immunofluorescent studies can be very useful in confirming the diagnosis of autoimmune skin disease. Seven autoimmune skin diseases are briefly reviewed. Therapy must be aggressive and owner warned of the guarded prognosis.

  17. Juvenile autoimmune hepatitis: Spectrum of the disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giuseppe; Maggiore; Silvia; Nastasio; Marco; Sciveres

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile autoimmune hepatitis(JAIH) is a progressive inflammatory liver disease, affecting mainly young girls, from infancy to late adolescence, characterized by active liver damage, as shown by high serum activity of aminotransferases, by elevated immunoglobulin G levels, high titers of serum non organ-specific andorgan-specific autoantibodies, and by interface hepatitis on liver biopsy. It is a multifactorial disease of unknown etiology in which environmental factors act as a trigger in genetically predisposed individuals. Two types of JAIH are identified according to the autoan-tibody panel detected at diagnosis: AIH-1, characterized by the presence of anti-smooth muscle antibody and/or antinuclear antibody and AIH-2, by anti-liver-kidney microsomal antibody type 1 and/or by the presence of anti-liver cytosol type 1 antibody. Epidemiological distribution, genetic markers, clinical presentation and pattern of serum cytokines differentiate the two types of AIH suggesting possible pathogenetic mechanisms. The most effective therapy for AIH is pharmacological suppression of the immune response. Treatment should be started as soon as the diagnosis is made to avoid severe liver damage and progression of fibrosis. The aim of this review is to outline the most significant and peculiar features of JAIH, based largely on our own personal database and on a review of current literature.

  18. Clinical significance of anti-asialoglycoprotein receptor autoantibodies, detected by a capture-immunoassay, in autoimmune liver diseases

    OpenAIRE

    森末, 佳子

    2002-01-01

    In the development of autoimmune chronic acive hepatitis (AIH), the pathogenic relevance of antimmune responses against asialoglycoprotein recepter (ASGPR) has been implicated. We have previously developed a capture enzyme-linked immunsorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of anti-ASGPR antibodies and found a high prevalence of anti-ASGPR antibodies in AIH and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). IN this study, to clarify the clinical singnifi-cance of the measurement of anti-ASGPR antibodies in aut...

  19. [Biermer's disease and autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafil, Hatim; Tazi, Illias; Mahmal, Lahoucine

    2012-01-01

    Biermer's disease is an autoimmune atrophic gastritis of the fundus predominantly responsible for a malabsorption of vitamin B12. Despite its association with several autoimmune disorders, few observations have reported an association with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). We report a case of Biermer's disease associated with AIHA in a patient of 66 years old.

  20. Human Cytomegalovirus and Autoimmune Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Halenius

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV represents a prototypic pathogenic member of the β-subgroup of the herpesvirus family. A range of HCMV features like its lytic replication in multiple tissues, the lifelong persistence through periods of latency and intermitting reactivation, the extraordinary large proteome, and extensive manipulation of adaptive and innate immunity make HCMV a high profile candidate for involvement in autoimmune disorders. We surveyed the available literature for reports on HCMV association with onset or exacerbation of autoimmune disease. A causative linkage between HCMV and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, systemic sclerosis (SSc, diabetes mellitus type 1, and rheumatoid arthritis (RA is suggested by the literature. However, a clear association of HCMV seroprevalence and disease could not be established, leaving the question open whether HCMV could play a coresponsible role for onset of disease. For convincing conclusions population-based prospective studies must be performed in the future. Specific immunopathogenic mechanisms by which HCMV could contribute to the course of autoimmune disease have been suggested, for example, molecular mimicry by UL94 in SSc and UL83/pp65 in SLE patients, as well as aggravation of joint inflammation by induction and expansion of CD4+/CD28− T-cells in RA patients. Further studies are needed to validate these findings and to lay the grounds for targeted therapeutic intervention.

  1. Multiple autoimmune syndrome with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpreet, Singh; Deepak, Jain; Kiran, B

    2016-01-01

    Multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS) is a condition characterised by three or more autoimmune disorders in a same individual. Familial, immunologic and infectious factors are implicated in the development of MAS. Here we report a case of a 32-year-old woman with co-existence of four auto-immune diseases, namely autoimmune hypothyroidism, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and celiac disease which leads to the final diagnosis of multiple autoimmune syndrome type 3 with celiac disease. Patients with single autoimmune disorder are at 25% risk of developing other autoimmune disorders. The present case emphasises to clinicians that there is a need for continued surveillance for the development of new autoimmune disease in predisposed patients.

  2. Autoimmune diseases and HIV infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virot, Emilie; Duclos, Antoine; Adelaide, Leopold; Miailhes, Patrick; Hot, Arnaud; Ferry, Tristan; Seve, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Abstract To describe the clinical manifestations, treatments, prognosis, and prevalence of autoimmune diseases (ADs) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. All HIV-infected patients managed in the Infectious Diseases Department of the Lyon University Hospitals, France, between January 2003 and December 2013 and presenting an AD were retrospectively included. Thirty-six ADs were found among 5186 HIV-infected patients which represents a prevalence of 0.69% including immune thrombocytopenic purpura (n = 15), inflammatory myositis (IM) (n = 4), sarcoidosis (n = 4), Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS) (n = 4), myasthenia gravis (n = 2), Graves’ disease (n = 2), and 1 case of each following conditions: systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune hepatitis, Hashimoto thyroiditis and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. One patient presented 2 ADs. Thirty patients were known to be HIV-infected when they developed an AD. The AD preceded HIV infection in 2 patients. GBS and HIV infection were diagnosed simultaneously in 3 cases. At AD diagnosis, CD4 T lymphocytes count were higher than 350/mm3 in 63% of patients, between 200 and 350/mm3 in 19% and less than 200/mm3 in 19%. Twenty patients benefited from immunosuppressant treatments, with a good tolerance. ADs during HIV infection are uncommon in this large French cohort. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura, sarcoidosis, IM, and GBS appear to be more frequent than in the general population. Immunosuppressant treatments seem to be effective and well tolerated. PMID:28121924

  3. Epidemiology of autoimmune diseases in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eaton, William W.; Rose, N.R.; Kalaydijan, A.;

    2007-01-01

    An epidemiologic study of the autoimmune diseases taken together has not been done heretofore. The National Patient Register of Denmark is used to estimate the population prevalence of 31 possible or probable autoimmune diseases. Record linkage is used to estimate 465 pairwise co...... diseases and weak across diseases. These data confirm the importance of the autoimmune diseases as a group and suggest that common etiopathologies exist among them...

  4. Liver Disease and IBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Resources > Liver Disease and IBD Go Back Liver Disease and IBD Email Print + Share Several complications ... be necessary to make the definitive diagnosis. FATTY LIVER DISEASE (HEPATCI STEATOSIS) This is the most common ...

  5. Autoimmune disease and multiple autoantibodies in 42 patients with RASopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaio, Caio R D C; Carvalho, Jozélio F; da Silva, Clovis A; Bueno, Cleonice; Brasil, Amanda S; Pereira, Alexandre C; Jorge, Alexander A L; Malaquias, Alexsandra C; Kim, Chong A; Bertola, Débora R

    2012-05-01

    The association of RASopathies [Noonan syndrome (NS) and Noonan-related syndromes] and autoimmune disorders has been reported sporadically. However, a concomitant evaluation of autoimmune diseases and an assessment of multiple autoantibodies in a large population of patients with molecularly confirmed RASopathy have not been performed. The clinical and laboratory features were analyzed in 42 RASopathy patients, the majority of whom had NS and five individuals had Noonan-related disorders. The following autoantibodies were measured: Anti-nuclear antibodies, anti-double stranded DNA, anti-SS-A/Ro, anti-SS-B/La, anti-Sm, anti-RNP, anti-Scl-70, anti-Jo-1, anti-ribosomal P, IgG and IgM anticardiolipin (aCL), thyroid, anti-smooth muscle, anti-endomysial (AE), anti-liver cytosolic protein type 1 (LC1), anti-parietal cell (APC), anti-mitochondrial (AM) antibodies, anti-liver-kidney microsome type 1 antibodies (LKM-1), and lupus anticoagulant. Six patients (14%) fulfilled the clinical criteria for autoimmune diseases [systemic lupus erythematous, polyendocrinopathy (autoimmune thyroiditis and celiac disease), primary antiphospholipid syndrome (PAPS), autoimmune hepatitis, vitiligo, and autoimmune thyroiditis]. Autoimmune antibodies were observed in 52% of the patients. Remarkably, three (7%) of the patients had specific gastrointestinal and liver autoantibodies without clinical findings. Autoimmune diseases and autoantibodies were frequently present in patients with RASopathies. Until a final conclusion of the real incidence of autoimmunity in Rasopathy is drawn, the physicians should be alerted to the possibility of this association and the need for a fast diagnosis, proper referral to a specialist and ultimately, adequate treatment.

  6. Asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) as target autoantigen in liver autoimmunity: lost and found.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigopoulou, Eirini I; Roggenbuck, Dirk; Smyk, Daniel S; Liaskos, Christos; Mytilinaiou, Maria G; Feist, Eugen; Conrad, Karsten; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P

    2012-12-01

    Asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) has attracted the attention of liver immunologists for many years. This liver-specific lectin was found to be a major B and T cell autoantigenic target in patients with autoimmune liver diseases, and in particular in autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). This review discusses the biological significance of ASGPR and its relevance to the pathogenesis of autoimmune and virus-triggered liver diseases. We also discuss emerging data on the diagnostic and clinical relevance of anti-ASGPR antibodies in light of recent reports based on commercially available anti-ASGPR enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Finally, we critically revisit the data reporting on disease-specific cellular immune responses against ASGPR and their relevance in relation to the pathogenesis of AIH.

  7. Autoimmune connective tissue disease: scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Helen; Vincent, Rachel

    Scleroderma is an umbrella term for a spectrum of rare and complex autoimmune connective tissue diseases, the cause and pathogenesis of which is only partially defined. Scleroderma can be divided into two main subgroups--systemic and localized--but the hallmark of both is skin fibrosis. As yet no drug has been found to be effective in reversing the disease process, however early intervention has been shown to give maximum benefit. Due to the chronic nature of the condition a multidisciplinary approach is essential and the nurse's input from an early stage is vital in supporting the patient to manage both their medical treatment and their activities of daily living.

  8. Refractory disease in autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasconcelos, Carlos; Kallenberg, Cees; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2011-01-01

    Refractory disease (RD) definition has different meanings but it is dynamic, according to knowledge and the availability of new drugs. It should be differentiated from severe disease and damage definitions and it must take into account duration of adequate therapy and compliance of the patient. It c

  9. [Severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia after ABO match living donor liver transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohata, Katsura; Fujiwarw, Tohru; Yamamoto, Joji; Yamada, Minami; Ishizawa, Kenichi; Satoh, Kazushige; Sekiguchi, Satoshi; Kameoka, Junichi; Satomi, Susumu; Harigae, Hideo

    2010-01-01

    A case of severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia after ABO matched living donor liver transplantation. We present here a case of severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia after ABO matched living donor liver transplantation. The patient is 56 y.o male. He received living donor liver transplantation from his ABO matched son in May 2007. In July, he was suffered from a progressive anemia, and diagnosed as autoimmune hemolytic anemia by the laboratory examinations. Intensive treatment including predonisolone, azathiopurine, rituximab, plasma exchange, was given, however, the disease was resistant to the treatment. By the administration of cyclophosphamide combined with rituximab, remission was finally achieved. To date, immune mediated hemolytic anemia after ABO matched living donor liver transplantation has not been reported, although several cases of ABO mismatched living donor liver transplantation have been reported. His severe but transient clinical course of anemia suggests that the transient emergence of donor lymphocytes may be responsible for onset of hemolytic anemia.

  10. Involvement of Fas/FasL system in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stassi, G; Di Felice, V; Todaro, M; Cappello, F; Zummo, G; Farina, F; Trucco, M; De Maria, R

    1999-01-01

    The interaction of Fas with FasL has been demonstrated to be implicated in the pathogenesis of several autoimmune and liver diseases. Recently, attention has been focused on the hypothesis that thyrocytes and beta cells undergo massive Fas/FasL-mediated apoptosis during autoimmune response. Similarly, hepatocyte cell death occurring following copper accumulation points towards the same mechanism.

  11. The immunogenetics of autoimmune diabetes and autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomer, Y; Barbesino, G; Greenberg, D; Davies, T F

    1997-03-01

    Although medical genetics is a well-developed area of interest, relatively little is known about the diseases caused by the combination of many genes. These multiinfluenced diseases include the autoimmune endocrine diseases. Recent advances in the techniques for whole-genome screening have shown a variety of loci that are linked to the development of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and similar data are likely to be soon generated in autoimmune thyroid disease. Here, the authors survey the current state of genetic knowledge in these two areas and describe the investigative and analytical techniques that are now available. (Trends Endocrinol Metab 1997;8:63-70). (c) 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  12. Amplification of autoimmune disease by infection

    OpenAIRE

    Posnett, David N; Yarilin, Dmitry

    2005-01-01

    Reports of infection with certain chronic persistent microbes (herpesviruses or Chlamydiae) in human autoimmune diseases are consistent with the hypothesis that these microbes are reactivated in the setting of immunodeficiency and often target the site of autoimmune inflammation. New experimental animal models demonstrate the principle. A herpesvirus or Chlamydia species can be used to infect mice with induced transient autoimmune diseases. This results in increased disease severity and even ...

  13. Cardiovascular Involvement in Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Amaya-Amaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (AD represent a broad spectrum of chronic conditions that may afflict specific target organs or multiple systems with a significant burden on quality of life. These conditions have common mechanisms including genetic and epigenetics factors, gender disparity, environmental triggers, pathophysiological abnormalities, and certain subphenotypes. Atherosclerosis (AT was once considered to be a degenerative disease that was an inevitable consequence of aging. However, research in the last three decades has shown that AT is not degenerative or inevitable. It is an autoimmune-inflammatory disease associated with infectious and inflammatory factors characterized by lipoprotein metabolism alteration that leads to immune system activation with the consequent proliferation of smooth muscle cells, narrowing arteries, and atheroma formation. Both humoral and cellular immune mechanisms have been proposed to participate in the onset and progression of AT. Several risk factors, known as classic risk factors, have been described. Interestingly, the excessive cardiovascular events observed in patients with ADs are not fully explained by these factors. Several novel risk factors contribute to the development of premature vascular damage. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how traditional and nontraditional risk factors contribute to pathogenesis of CVD in AD.

  14. Autoimmune hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2010:chap 88. Read More Autoimmune disorders Chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto disease) Cirrhosis Glomerulonephritis Hemolytic anemia Liver cancer - hepatocellular carcinoma Mesenteric venous thrombosis Type ...

  15. Propylthiouracil-induced autoimmune disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Paiaulla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthyroidism is a condition characterized by excessive production of thyroid hormones. Propylthiouracil (PTU is commonly used as first line drug in the management of hyperthyroidism. This is a case report of 24-year-old female, a known case of hyperthyroidism since 4 years, who came with a history of fever and myalgia since 3 days and dyspnea with coughing out of blood since 1 day. Patient was taking PTU (100 mg per day since 4 years for hyperthyroidism. Patient was immediately intubated for type-II respiratory failure. Diagnosed to be having PTU-induced autoimmune disease. PTU was stopped and treated with methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide. Clinical features improved over a period of 8 days and discharged home successfully. Having a high suspicion for the onset of autoimmune disease in hyperthyroidism patients who are on PTU therapy and timely treatment with immunosuppressants and supportive care along with the withdrawal of the drug can make a difference in morbidity and mortality.

  16. [Treatment with tacrolimus in autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sádaba, B; Azanza, J R; García Quetglas, E; Fernández, V

    2004-01-01

    Tacrolimus is an immunosuppressive drug used most successfully as a primary drug to suppress the rejection of transplants. Tacrolimus may also be useful as a novel therapy for autoimmune disease. There are various reports in the bibliography about the use of tacrolimus in the treatment of some autoimmune diseases: inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune hepatitis, cutaneous, neurologic, renal, endocrine or eye disease. In this review of more than 130 papers, we discuss the rationale for the use of tacrolimus in autoimmune disease and report the clinical experience with the drug in the management of a variety of autoimmune diseases. But, although there are a lot questions that require future research (dose, duration of treatment, when to begin tacrolimus treatment, how to monitor it, etc.), there is also wide experience with tacrolimus in the treatment of this type of disease.

  17. Rett syndrome: An autoimmune disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Felice, Claudio; Leoncini, Silvia; Signorini, Cinzia; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Rovero, Paolo; Durand, Thierry; Ciccoli, Lucia; Papini, Anna Maria; Hayek, Joussef

    2016-04-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a devastating neurodevelopmental disease, previously included into the autistic spectrum disorders, affecting almost exclusively females (frequency 1:10,000). RTT leads to intellective deficit, purposeful hands use loss and late major motor impairment besides featuring breathing disorders, epilepsy and increased risk of sudden death. The condition is caused in up to 95% of the cases by mutations in the X-linked methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene. Our group has shown a number of previously unrecognized features, such as systemic redox imbalance, chronic inflammatory status, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease-like lung disease, and erythrocyte morphology changes. While evidence on an intimate involvement of MeCP2 in the immune response is cumulating, we have recently shown a cytokine dysregulation in RTT. Increasing evidence on the relationship between MeCP2 and an immune dysfunction is reported, with, apparently, a link between MECP2 gene polymorphisms and autoimmune diseases, including primary Sjögren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic sclerosis. Antineuronal (i.e., brain proteins) antibodies have been shown in RTT. Recently, high levels of anti-N-glucosylation (N-Glc) IgM serum autoantibodies [i.e., anti-CSF114(N-Glc) IgMs] have been detected by our group in a statistically significant number of RTT patients. In the current review, the Authors explore the current evidence, either in favor or against, the presence of an autoimmune component in RTT.

  18. Exploration on value of autoimmune liver disease antibody spectrum detection in diagnosing autoimmune liver disease%自身免疫性肝病抗体谱检测在自身免疫性肝病诊断中的价值探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李伟中

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨自身免疫性肝病(AILD)抗体谱检测在AILD诊断中的临床应用价值。方法采用线性免疫分析法检测不明病因肝功能异常、各种病毒性肝炎以及健康体检者(健康对照组)的血清标本,进行抗线粒体亚型-丙酮酸脱氢酶复合物(AMA/M2)、抗肝肾微粒体Ⅰ型抗体(LKM-1)、抗肝细胞胞浆Ⅰ型抗体(LC-1)、抗可溶性肝抗原/肝胰抗原抗体(SLA/LP)、糖蛋白210抗体(gp210)以及多核点抗原抗体(sp100)等6项指标的检验结果资料进行回顾分析。结果各组患者标本中的自身抗体总阳性检出率分别为自身免疫性肝炎(AIH)80.5%、原发性胆汁性肝硬化(PBC)92.3%、乙型肝炎病毒(HBV)17.2%、丙型肝炎病毒(HCV)16.7%、甲型肝炎病毒(HAV)22.2%、戊型肝炎病毒(HEV)14.3%,对照组仅为2.6%;AILD组的阳性检出率与其他各组间比较(P<0.05);AIH各亚型中AIH-Ⅰ的AMA/M2的阳性检出率与AIH-Ⅱ和AIH-Ⅲ比较(P<0.05),AIH-Ⅱ的LKM-1的阳性检出率与 AIH-Ⅰ和 AIH-Ⅲ比较(P<0.05),AIH-Ⅲ的SLA/LP的阳性检出率与 AIH-Ⅰ和 AIH-Ⅱ比较(P<0.05)。结论 AILD抗体谱检测有助于AILD的早期诊断,可为该病的分型以及治疗提供有价值的实验室依据。%Objective To investigate the clinical application value of the autoimmune liver disease antibody spectrum detection in diagnosing autoimmune liver diseases (AILD) .Methods The linear immunoassay was adopted to detect the serum specimens in the patients with unknown etiology of liver function abnormalities ,various viral hep-atitis and healthy subjects with physical examination (control group) .The detection results of 6 indexes of anti-mito-chondrial subtype-pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (AMA/M2) ,liver kidney microsomal antibody type 1 (LKM-1 type) ,anti-liver cell cytoplasmic antibody-1(LC-1) ,type I anti soluble

  19. 多种自身抗体联合检测对自身免疫性肝病的诊断价值%Diagnosis value of multiple autoimmune antibody detection in autoimmune liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任妹; 廖永强; 彭可君; 孟芳; 俞丹菁

    2014-01-01

    目的:分析各种肝病患者多种自身抗体的检出率,探讨其对自身免疫性肝病(autoimmune liver diseases,ALD)的诊断价值.方法:根据临床诊断将患者分为ALD组(n=96)、病毒性肝炎组(n=135,包括75例乙型肝炎,65例丙型肝炎),另取62例健康体检者作为健康对照组(n=62);其中,ALD组又分为自身免疫性肝炎组(AIH组,n=36)、原发性胆汁性肝硬化组(PBC组,n=58)、原发性硬化性胆管炎组(PSC组,n=2).用间接免疫荧光法检测上述各组的抗核抗体(antinuclear antibodies,ANA)、抗平滑肌抗体(anti-smooth muscle antibodies,ASMA)、抗线粒体抗体(antimitochondrial ant-ibodies,AMA);用Western印迹法检测抗肝肾微粒体Ⅰ型抗体(anti liver-kidney microsomal antibody Type 1,LKM-1)和抗线粒体Ⅱ型抗体(subtype of AMA,AMA-M2)、抗可溶性肝抗原/胰抗原抗体(soluble liver antigen/liver pancreas,SLA/LP)、抗肝细胞溶质抗原Ⅰ型抗体(antihepatocyte cytosol antigen Type 1,LC-1).结果:AIH组ANA阳性率(69.4%)和PBC组ANA阳性率(87.9%)显著高于病毒性肝炎组(37.3%)和健康对照组(4.8%)(均P<0.01);AIH组ASMA,LKM-1,SLA/LP,LC-1阳性率(44.4%,11.1%,2.8%,8.3%)显著高于病毒性肝炎组(1.3%,1.7%,0,0)和健康对照组(均P<0.01);PBC组AMA-M2阳性率(91.3%)显著高于病毒性肝炎组(1.3%)和健康对照组(0)(均P<0.01).结论:联合检测ANA,ASMA,LKM-1,SLA/LP,LC-1和AMA-M2等自身抗体可提高ALD诊断的灵敏性和特异性,且对ALD分型、诊疗具有重要意义.

  20. Parkinson's disease: Autoimmunity and neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Virgilio, Armando; Greco, Antonio; Fabbrini, Giovanni; Inghilleri, Maurizio; Rizzo, Maria Ida; Gallo, Andrea; Conte, Michela; Rosato, Chiara; Ciniglio Appiani, Mario; de Vincentiis, Marco

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disease that causes the death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. The resulting dopamine deficiency in the basal ganglia leads to a movement disorder that is characterized by classical parkinsonian motor symptoms. Parkinson's disease is recognized as the most common neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer's disease. PD ethiopathogenesis remains to be elucidated and has been connected to genetic, environmental and immunologic conditions. The past decade has provided evidence for a significant role of the immune system in PD pathogenesis, either through inflammation or an autoimmune response. Several autoantibodies directed at antigens associated with PD pathogenesis have been identified in PD patients. This immune activation may be the cause of, rather than a response to, the observed neuronal loss. Parkinsonian motor symptoms include bradykinesia, muscular rigidity and resting tremor. The non-motor features include olfactory dysfunction, cognitive impairment, psychiatric symptoms and autonomic dysfunction. Microscopically, the specific degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and the presence of Lewy bodies, which are brain deposits containing a substantial amount of α-synuclein, have been recognized. The progression of Parkinson's disease is characterized by a worsening of motor features; however, as the disease progresses, there is an emergence of complications related to long-term symptomatic treatment. The available therapies for Parkinson's disease only treat the symptoms of the disease. A major goal of Parkinson's disease research is the development of disease-modifying drugs that slow or stop the neurodegenerative process. Drugs that enhance the intracerebral dopamine concentrations or stimulate dopamine receptors remain the mainstay treatment for motor symptoms. Immunomodulatory therapeutic strategies aiming to attenuate PD neurodegeneration have become an attractive option and

  1. Autoimmune diseases in women with Turner's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kristian T; Rostgaard, Klaus; Bache, Iben;

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In terms of number of X chromosomes, women with Turner's syndrome cytogenetically resemble men. An increased risk of autoimmune diseases has been observed among women with Turner's syndrome. This study was undertaken to investigate whether the autoimmune disease profile in women...... with Turner's syndrome is characterized by diseases with a female or male predominance. METHODS: Using the Danish Cytogenetic Central Register, the Danish National Patient Register, and the Danish Civil Registration System, we estimated relative risk of 46 different autoimmune diseases in a cohort of 798...... Danish women with Turner's syndrome followed up for 12,461 person-years between 1980 and 2004. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of first hospitalization for autoimmune disease and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were used as measures of relative risk. RESULTS: The overall risk of autoimmune...

  2. Autoimmune diseases associated with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Arti

    2008-01-01

    Associations of autoimmune diseases with neurofibromatosis type 1 have been rarely described. In the present report, we describe two patients of neurofibromatosis type 1 having an association with vitiligo in one, and alopecia areata and autoimmune thyroiditis in another. The associations of neurofibromatosis type 1 with vitiligo, alopecia areata, and autoimmune thyroiditis have not been reported earlier. Whether these associations reflect a causal relationship with neurofibromatosis type 1 or are coincidental needs to be settled.

  3. Alcoholic liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver disease due to alcohol; Cirrhosis or hepatitis - alcoholic; Laennec's cirrhosis ... Alcoholic liver disease occurs after years of heavy drinking. Over time, scarring and cirrhosis can occur. Cirrhosis is the ...

  4. Criteria for Environmentally Associated Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, K. Michael; Parks, Christine G.; Germolec, Dori R.; Leung, Patrick S.C.; Selmi, Carlo; Humble, Michael C.; Rose, Noel R.

    2012-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports a role for the environment in the development of autoimmune diseases, as reviewed in the accompanying three papers from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Expert Panel Workshop. An important unresolved issue, however, is the development of criteria for identifying autoimmune disease phenotypes for which the environment plays a causative role, herein referred to as environmentally associated autoimmune diseases. There are several different areas in which such criteria need to be developed, including: 1) identifying the necessary and sufficient data to define environmental risk factors for autoimmune diseases meeting current classification criteria; 2) establishing the existence of and criteria for new environmentally associated autoimmune disorders that do not meet current disease classification criteria; and 3) identifying in clinical practice specific environmental agents that induce autoimmune disease in individual patients. Here we discuss approaches that could be useful for developing criteria in these three areas, as well as factors that should be considered in evaluating the evidence for criteria that can distinguish individuals with such disorders from individuals without such disorders with high sensitivity and specificity. Current studies suggest that multiple lines of complementary evidence will be important and that in many cases there will be clinical, serologic, genetic, epigenetic, and/or other laboratory features that could be incorporated as criteria for environmentally associated autoimmune diseases to improve diagnosis and treatment and possibly allow for preventative strategies in the future. PMID:22771005

  5. Environmental factors affecting autoimmune thyroid disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safran, M.; Paul, T.L.; Roti, E.; Braverman, L.E.

    1987-06-01

    A number of environmental factors affect the incidence and progression of autoimmune thyroid disease. Exposure to excess iodine, certain drugs, infectious agents and pollutants, and stress have all been implicated.

  6. How pregnancy can affect autoimmune diseases progression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinni, Marie-Pierre; Lombardelli, Letizia; Logiodice, Federica; Kullolli, Ornela; Parronchi, Paola; Romagnani, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune disorders are characterized by tissue damage, caused by self-reactivity of different effectors mechanisms of the immune system, namely antibodies and T cells. Their occurrence may be associated with genetic and/or environmental predisposition and to some extent, have implications for fertility and obstetrics. The relationship between autoimmunity and reproduction is bidirectional. This review only addresses the impact of pregnancy on autoimmune diseases and not the influence of autoimmunity on pregnancy development. Th17/Th1-type cells are aggressive and pathogenic in many autoimmune disorders and inflammatory diseases. The immunology of pregnancy underlies the role of Th2-type cytokines to maintain the tolerance of the mother towards the fetal semi-allograft. Non-specific factors, including hormonal changes, favor a switch to Th2-type cytokine profile. In pregnancy Th2, Th17/Th2 and Treg cells accumulate in the decidua but may also be present in the mother's circulation and can regulate autoimmune responses influencing the progression of autoimmune diseases.

  7. [Autoimmune connective tissue diseases and vaccination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Więsik-Szewczyk, Ewa; Jahnz-Różyk, Karina

    2015-12-31

    The idea that infectious agents can induce autoimmune diseases in genetically susceptible subjects has been a matter of discussion for years. Moreover, increased incidence of autoimmune diseases and introduction of prophylactic vaccinations from early childhood suggest that these two trends are linked. In the medical literature and even non-professional media, case reports or events temporally related to vaccination are reported. It raises the issue of vaccination safety. In everyday practice medical professionals, physicians, rheumatologists and other specialists will be asked their opinion of vaccination safety. The decision should be made according to evidence-based medicine and the current state of knowledge. The purpose of this paper is to discuss a potential mechanism which links infections, vaccinations and autoimmunity. We present an overview of published case reports, especially of systemic connective tissue diseases temporally related to vaccination and results from case-nested studies. As yet, no conclusive evidence supports a causal relationship between vaccination and autoimmune diseases. It has to be determined whether the performed studies are sufficiently sensitive to detect the link. The debate is ongoing, and new data may be required to explain the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. We would like to underscore the need for prophylactic vaccination in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases and to break down the myth that the vaccines are contraindicated in this target group.

  8. AUTOIMMUNE BASEMENT MEMBRANE AND SUBEPIDERMAL BLISTERING DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune mucocutaneous blistering diseases (ABDs represent a group of conditions that manifest with blisters on the skin and/or mucous membranes. Bullous pemphigoid (BP is the most common autoimmune mucocutaneous blistering disease. In BP, the location of the blisters is subepidermal and the oral involvement is rare. Variants of BP have been described, including pemphigoid vegetans; however, this disease is not completely characterized. The majority of ABDs have blisters and/or vesicles, that are often pruritic, and manifest autoantibodies to diverse proteins. These proteins include 1 hemidesmosomal plaque proteins(ie, BP230, plectins, 2 transmembrane proteins such as BP180 and α6β4-integrin, which are connected via laminin 332 to type VII collagen and 3 currently uncharacterized 105 kDa and 200 kDa molecules. Other ABDs include drug-induced linear IgA disease, bullous systemic lupus erythematosus (BSLE, dermatitis herpetiformis (DH, cicatricial pemphigoid (CP; also termed mucous membrane pemphigoid, lichen planus pemphigoides (LPP, pemphigoid gestationis (PG, herpes gestationis(HG, chronic bullous dermatosis of childhood (CBDC and the localized forms of CP, such as Brunsting-Perry pemphigoid. The diagnosis of ABDs requires clinical data; skin biopsies (in 10% buffered formalin for hematoxylin and eosin (H&E examination and skin biopsies(in Michel’s transport medium for direct immunofluorescence (DIF. In many ABDs, the histopathologic findings demonstrate a subepidermal vesicle or bulla with a luminal inflammatory infiltrate of neutrophils, eosinophils and/or lymphocytes. In many ABDs, an extensive perivascular and interstitial inflammatory infiltrate is also noted subjacent to the blister in the upper dermis. Normal skin adjacent to an ABD plaque is often excellent for DIF results. Many ABD biopsies reveal autoantibody deposition at the lesional basement membrane zone (BMZ; IgG, IgM, IgA, other immunoglobulins, complement components and

  9. Acute recurrent pancreatitis: An autoimmune disease?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raffaele Pezzilli

    2008-01-01

    In this review article,we will briefly describe the main characteristics of autoimmune pancreatitis and then we will concentrate on our aim,namely,evaluating the clinical characteristics of patients having recurrence of pain from the disease.In fact,the open question is to evaluate the possible presence of autoimmune pancreatitis in patients with an undefined etiology of acute pancreatitis and for this reason we carried out a search in the literature in order to explore this issue.In cases of recurrent attacks of pain in patients with "idiopathic"pancreatitis,we need to keep in mind the possibility that our patients may have autoimmune pancreatitis.Even though the frequency of this disease seems to be quite low,we believe that in the future,by increasing our knowledge on the subject,we will be able to diagnose an ever-increasing number of patients having acute recurrence of pain from autoimmune pancreatitis.

  10. Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease- A Clinical Viewpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirala Khalessi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in medicine have given us a better insight into a group of disorders known as autoimmune diseases. In particular, advances have occurred in our understanding of the Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease (AIED. In this article, the authors review the different postulated theories in the pathogenesis of this disease. The clinical presentation, the available para-clinical diagnostic tools, and the important differential diagnoses will be summarized. The management methods, including steroid therapy, immunosuppressive medications, other biological agents and intra-tympanic injections, will be addressed. Cochlear implantation as a final solution to the advanced stages of the disease, causing total deafness, will also be discussed.

  11. The Etiopathogenesis of Autoimmune Bullous Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune bullous diseases are rare disorders affecting skin and mucous membranes which are mediated by pathogenic autoantibodies against target antigens whose function is adhesion within the epidermis or adhesion of epidermis to dermis. The pathogenesis of these disorders has been extensively investigated with advanced techniques in recent years. This review focuses on the etiopathogenesis of main autoimmune bullous disorders including pemphigus, bullous pemphigoid, anti-p200 pemphigoid, ci...

  12. 232例自身免疫性肝病患者合并其他自身免疫病情况及预后分析%Analysis of prognosis and coexistence with other autoimmune diseases in 232 patients with autoimmune liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高莉; 章丽娜; 何彩琴; 赵晓蕾; 刘玉兰

    2015-01-01

    目的 研究原发性胆汁性肝硬化(PBC)、自身免疫性肝炎(AIH)、原发性硬化性胆管炎(PSC)患者中出现其他自身免疫病的比例,并探讨其对预后的影响.方法 收集1994年1月至2014年3月各专科收治的全部自身免疫性肝病(AILD)患者资料共232例,分析对比PBC、AIH和PSC患者合并其他自身免疫病的种类和例数.使用Cox回归模型分析合并其他自身免疫病对AILD预后的影响.结果 232例AILD患者中,PBC患者135例,其中合并干燥综合征(SS) 64例,系统性红斑狼疮(SLE)7例,类风湿关节炎(RA)7例,系统性硬化症(SSc)9例,多发性肌炎(PM)和(或)皮肌炎3例,CD 1例;AIH患者55例,其中合并SS 19例,SLE 10例,RA 1例,SSc 2例,PM和(或)皮肌炎2例;PSC患者24例,其中合并UC 7例,CD 1例,RA 1例;PBC AIH重叠综合征患者18例,其中合并SS 5例,RA1例.调整性别、年龄、病程及药物干预等因素后发现,相比单纯PBC患者,PBC合并SS发生肺间质纤维化的风险明显增加(OR=34.0,95%CI:8.9~130.1).合并其他自身免疫病并未显著影响AILD的预后,包括死亡、肝移植,及肝硬化并发症.结论 AILD合并其他自身免疫病,如SS、SLE、SSc、RA等较为常见.PBC合并SS是发生肺间质纤维化的危险因素,合并其他自身免疫病不独立影响AILD的预后.%Objective To study the probability of other autoimmune diseases in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC),autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and explore its effects on the prognosis.Methods From January 1994 to March 2014,the data of 232 patients with autoimmune liver diseases (AILD) were collected.The type and case number of coexisting with other autoimmune diseases of patients with PBC,AIH and PSC were analyzed and compared.Cox regression model was performed to analyze the effects of coexisting with autoimmune diseases on the prognosis of AILD.Results Among 135 PBC patients,there were 64 cases that coexisted with Sjogren

  13. Liver transplant for cholestatic liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrion, Andres F; Bhamidimarri, Kalyan Ram

    2013-05-01

    Cholestatic liver diseases include a group of diverse disorders with different epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical course, and prognosis. Despite significant advances in the clinical care of patients with cholestatic liver diseases, liver transplant (LT) remains the only definitive therapy for end-stage liver disease, regardless of the underlying cause. As per the United Network for Organ Sharing database, the rate of cadaveric LT for cholestatic liver disease was 18% in 1991, 10% in 2000, and 7.8% in 2008. This review summarizes the available evidence on various common and rare cholestatic liver diseases, disease-specific issues, and pertinent aspects of LT.

  14. Bullous Skin Diseases: Classical Types of Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Damoiseaux

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The prototypic bullous skin diseases, pemphigus vulgaris, pemphigus foliaceus, and bullous pemphigoid, are characterized by the blister formation in the skin and/or oral mucosa in combination with circulating and deposited autoantibodies reactive with (hemidesmosomes. Koch’s postulates, adapted for autoimmune diseases, were applied on these skin diseases. It appears that all adapted Koch’s postulates are fulfilled, and, therefore, these bullous skin diseases are to be considered classical autoimmune diseases within the wide and expanding spectrum of autoimmune diseases.

  15. Shared genetic origins of allergy and autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waage, J. E.; Kreiner-Møller, E.; Standl, M.

    2015-01-01

    Parallel increases in allergy and autoimmune disease prevalence in recent time suggest shared, but yet unknown, etiologies. Here, we investigated shared genetic loci and molecular pathways to identify possible shared disease mechanisms between allergy and autoimmune diseases....

  16. 辅助用药在自身免疫性肝病中的临床应用研究%Adjunctive Therapy in Clinical Application of Autoimmune Liver Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘同刚

    2012-01-01

    目的:观察辅助用药在自身免疫性肝病中的应用效果,为临床工作提供参考.方法:选择我院2009年7月~2011年6月收治的自身免疫性肝病患者96例,随机分为对照组和观察组各48例.全部患者均给予标准治疗方案,观察组患者在此基础上给予辅助用药.观察并比较两组患者临床疗效和不良反应的差异.结果:与对照组比较,观察组总有效率明显较高,不良反应发生率明显较低,差异均具有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论:辅助用药对自身免疫性肝病患者的治疗和预后有积极的临床意义,值得推广应用.%Objective:Observe the effect of asjuvant drug of autoimmune liver diseases to provide reference for clinical work. Methods:96 cases with autoimmune liver disease in our hospital from Jul. 2009 to Jun. 2011, randomly divided into observation group and control group with 48 cases each. All patients were given standard treatment, the observation group were treated on the basis of given adjuvant medication. Observe and compare clinical efficacy and adverse reaction two groups. Results: Compared with control group, Total effective rate of the observation group was significantly higher, the incidence of adverse reactions were significantly lower, with statistically significant differences (P<0.05 ).Conclusion:Adjuvant medication in patients have positive value with autoimmune liver disease treatment and prognosis, it worth clinical application.

  17. Gene expression profiling in autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovin, Lone Frier; Brynskov, Jørn; Hegedüs, Laszlo;

    2007-01-01

    A central issue in autoimmune disease is whether the underlying inflammation is a repeated stereotypical process or whether disease specific gene expression is involved. To shed light on this, we analysed whether genes previously found to be differentially regulated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA...

  18. Autoimmune hepatitis in India: profile of an uncommon disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baba Chalamalasetty S

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH has been reported to show considerable geographical variation in frequency and clinical manifestations. It is considered a rare cause of liver disease in India. The present study was undertaken to determine the incidence, clinical, biochemical and histological profile of AIH in this part of the world. Methods Patients presenting with acute or chronic liver disease between January 1999 and June 2002 were evaluated prospectively. AIH was diagnosed using the international autoimmune hepatitis group criteria. Workup included clinical, biochemical, USG, viral markers, UGI endoscopy, AI markers (ANA, SMA, Anti-LKM, AMA, RF, p-ANCA using indirect immunofluorescence and liver biopsy if possible. Results Forty-one of 2401 (1.70% patients were diagnosed to have autoimmune liver disease. Out of these, 38 had autoimmune hepatitis and the rest 3 had primary biliary cirrhosis. The mean age of the patients of autoimmune hepatitis was 36.2 (15.9 years, 34 (89.4% were females, and the duration of symptoms was 20.3 (20.5 months. Nineteen (50% of them presented with chronic hepatitis, 13 (34.2% as cirrhosis, 5 (13.1% with acute hepatitis and 1 (2.6% with cholestatic hepatitis. The presentations were jaundice in 21 (55.2%, pedal edema and hepatomegaly in 17 (44.7%, splenomegaly in 13 (34.2%, encephalopathy, abdominal pain in 9 (23.6% and fever in 8 (21%. Twelve had esophageal varices and 3 had bled. Biochemical parameters were ALT 187 (360 U/L, AST 157 (193 U/L, ALP 246 (254 U/L, globulin 4.1 (1.6 g/dL, albumin 2.8 (0.9 g/dL, bilirubin 5.2 (7.4 mg/dL, prothrombin time 17 (7 sec and ESR 47 (17 sec. The autoimmune markers were SMA (24, ANA (15, both SMA and ANA (4, AMA (1, rheumatoid factor (2, pANCA (1, and Anti-LKM in none. Thirty (79% patients had definite AIH and eight (21% had probable AI hepatitis. Associated autoimmune diseases was seen in 15/38 (39.4%, diabetes 4, hypothyroidism 3, vitiligo 2, thrombocytopenia 2

  19. Recent Advances in Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won Sang Yoo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD includes hyperthyroid Graves disease, hypothyroid autoimmune thyroiditis, and subtle subclinical thyroid dysfunctions. AITD is caused by interactions between genetic and environmental predisposing factors and results in autoimmune deterioration. Data on polymorphisms in the AITD susceptibility genes, related environmental factors, and dysregulation of autoimmune processes have accumulated over time. Over the last decade, there has been progress in the clinical field of AITD with respect to the available diagnostic and therapeutic methods as well as clinical consensus. The updated clinical guidelines allow practitioners to identify the most reasonable and current approaches for proper management. In this review, we focus on recent advances in understanding the genetic and environmental pathogenic mechanisms underlying AITD and introduce the updated set of clinical guidelines for AITD management. We also discuss other aspects of the disease such as management of subclinical thyroid dysfunction, use of levothyroxine plus levotriiodothyronine in the treatment of autoimmune hypothyroidism, risk assessment of long-standing antithyroid drug therapy in recurrent Graves' hyperthyroidism, and future research needs.

  20. Recent Advances in Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Won Sang

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) includes hyperthyroid Graves disease, hypothyroid autoimmune thyroiditis, and subtle subclinical thyroid dysfunctions. AITD is caused by interactions between genetic and environmental predisposing factors and results in autoimmune deterioration. Data on polymorphisms in the AITD susceptibility genes, related environmental factors, and dysregulation of autoimmune processes have accumulated over time. Over the last decade, there has been progress in the clinical field of AITD with respect to the available diagnostic and therapeutic methods as well as clinical consensus. The updated clinical guidelines allow practitioners to identify the most reasonable and current approaches for proper management. In this review, we focus on recent advances in understanding the genetic and environmental pathogenic mechanisms underlying AITD and introduce the updated set of clinical guidelines for AITD management. We also discuss other aspects of the disease such as management of subclinical thyroid dysfunction, use of levothyroxine plus levotriiodothyronine in the treatment of autoimmune hypothyroidism, risk assessment of long-standing antithyroid drug therapy in recurrent Graves' hyperthyroidism, and future research needs. PMID:27586448

  1. Autoimmune thyroid disease and chronic urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monge, Cecilia; Demarco, Paul; Burman, Kenneth D; Wartofsky, Leonard

    2007-09-01

    We report six cases of autoimmune thyroid disease associated with chronic urticaria and briefly review the literature, including the histopathological nature of such lesions, and their aetiology and pathogenesis. In view of the prevalence of thyroid disease in patients with chronic urticaria, screening measurements of thyrotropin and anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies are recommended, although negative antibodies do not exclude a relationship between urticaria and thyroid autoimmunity. After failure of conventional therapy for urticaria, patients who are apparently clinically euthyroid may be considered for a trial with levothyroxine. Improvement of urticaria was seen with levothyroxine treatment in three of four patients with only marginal abnormalities in thyroid function.

  2. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowski, Rochella A; Robinson, John A

    2008-02-01

    The arbitrary division between antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and secondary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome has not proven useful. Antiphospholipid antibodies in the absence of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome often occur as epiphenomena in many autoimmune diseases. They are very common in systemic lupus erythematosus. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is a significant comorbidity in lupus but is uncommon in Sjögren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, and systemic vasculitis. Evidence is growing that antiphospholipid antibodies may have a pathogenic role in pulmonary hypertension and accelerated atherosclerosis of autoimmune diseases.

  3. [Narcolepsy as an autoimmune disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkanen, Tomi; Vaarala, Outi; Julkunen, Ilkka; Partinen, Markku

    2015-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder of central origin. Hypocretin deficiency is the essential feature of type 1 narcolepsy. The biological background of type 2 narcolepsy (without cataplexy) is less clear. Infections or other external factors are thought to function as triggers of narcolepsy. After the H1N1 vaccination campaign, the incidence of narcolepsy increased clearly in countries where a vaccine boosted with the AS03 adjuvant was used. According to the current view, the increase of narcolepsy in connection with the pandemic vaccine especially in children and adolescents was associated with the virus component of the vaccine, but the adjuvant may also have boosted the development of autoimmune response.

  4. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis associated with autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zand, Ladan; Fervenza, Fernando C; Nasr, Samih H; Sethi, Sanjeev

    2014-04-01

    Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) has been classified based on its pathogenesis into immune complex-mediated and complement-mediated MPGN. The immune complex-mediated type is secondary to chronic infections, autoimmune diseases or monoclonal gammopathy. There is a paucity of data on MPGN associated with autoimmune diseases. We reviewed the Mayo Clinic database over a 10-year period and identified 12 patients with MPGN associated with autoimmune diseases, after exclusion of systemic lupus erythematosus. The autoimmune diseases included rheumatoid arthritis, primary Sjögren's syndrome, undifferentiated connective tissue disease, primary sclerosing cholangitis and Graves' disease. Nine of the 12 patients were female, and the mean age was 57.9 years. C4 levels were decreased in nine of 12 patients tested. The serum creatinine at time of renal biopsy was 2.2 ± 1.0 mg/dl and the urinary protein was 2,850 ± 3,543 mg/24 h. Three patients required dialysis at the time of renal biopsy. Renal biopsy showed an MPGN in all cases, with features of cryoglobulins in six cases; immunoglobulin (Ig)M was the dominant Ig, and both subendothelial and mesangial electron dense deposits were noted. Median follow-up was 10.9 months. Serum creatinine and proteinuria improved to 1.6 ± 0.8 mg/dl and 428 ± 677 mg/24 h, respectively, except in 3 patients with end-stage renal disease. In summary, this study describes the clinical features, renal biopsy findings, laboratory evaluation, treatment and prognosis of MPGN associated with autoimmune diseases.

  5. Genomics and proteomics: Applications in autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Hueber

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Wolfgang Hueber1,2,3, William H Robinson1,21VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA, USA; 2Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 3Novartis Institutes of Biomedical Research, Novartis, Basle, SwitzerlandAbstract: Tremendous progress has been made over the past decade in the development and refinement of genomic and proteomic technologies for the identification of novel drug targets and molecular signatures associated with clinically important disease states, disease subsets, or differential responses to therapies. The rapid progress in high-throughput technologies has been preceded and paralleled by the elucidation of cytokine networks, followed by the stepwise clinical development of pathway-specific biological therapies that revolutionized the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Together, these advances provide opportunities for a long-anticipated personalized medicine approach to the treatment of autoimmune disease. The ever-increasing numbers of novel, innovative therapies will need to be harnessed wisely to achieve optimal long-term outcomes in as many patients as possible while complying with the demands of health authorities and health care providers for evidence-based, economically sound prescription of these expensive drugs. Genomic and proteomic profiling of patients with autoimmune diseases holds great promise in two major clinical areas: (1 rapid identification of new targets for the development of innovative therapies and (2 identification of patients who will experience optimal benefit and minimal risk from a specific (targeted therapy. In this review, we attempt to capture important recent developments in the application of genomic and proteomic technologies to translational research by discussing informative examples covering a diversity of autoimmune diseases.Keywords: proteomics, genomics, autoimmune diseases, antigen microarrays, 2-Dih, rheumatoid arthritis

  6. Chronic Elevation of Liver Enzymes in Acute Intermittent Porphyria Initially Misdiagnosed as Autoimmune Hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. González Estrada

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hepatitis is a disease characterized by an elevation of liver enzymes, as well as specific autoantibodies. It is more common in women than men. We describe a 32-year-old woman with elevated transaminases, autoantibodies, and a liver biopsy result suggestive of autoimmune hepatitis. The indicated treatment was administered without showing a satisfactory response. The patient had a family history of acute intermittent porphyria (AIP so we decided to begin treatment with hematin, achieving a complete remission of the symptoms. Acute intermittent porphyria is a rare condition characterized by neurovisceral symptoms, abdominal pain being the most common of them. The disease has a higher prevalence among young women and certain European countries such as Sweden, Great Britain, and Spain. A correct diagnosis and prompt treatment are essential because patients affected by AIP must have a strict followup due to the fatal outcome of the outbreaks.

  7. Scurfy mice: A model for autoimmune disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godfrey, V.L.

    1993-01-01

    Autoimmune disease-the condition in which the body attacks its own tissue-has been an object of public concern recently. Former President George Bush and his wife Barbara both are afflicted with Graves' disease in which the body's own immune system attakcs the thyroid gland. The safety of breast implants was called into question because of evidence that some recipients had developed autoimmune disorders such a rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and scleroderma. Women, the media pointed out, have a higher-than-average incidence of many autoimmune disorders. These events suggest the need to know more about what makes the immune system work so well and what makes it go awry. At ORNL's Biology Division, progress is being in understanding the underlying causes of immune disease by studying mice having a disease that causes them to be underdeveloped; to have scaly skin, small ears, and large spleens; to open their eyes late; and to die early. These [open quotes]scurfy[close quotes]mice are helping us better understand the role of the thymus gland in autoimmune disease.

  8. Antioxidant supplements for liver diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelakovic, Goran; Gluud, Lise Lotte; Nikolova, Dimitrinka

    2011-01-01

    Several liver diseases have been associated with oxidative stress. Accordingly, antioxidants have been suggested as potential therapeutics for various liver diseases. The evidence supporting these suggestions is equivocal....

  9. 抗Ro-52抗体在自身免疫性肝病中的检测%Antibody to Ro-52 in patients with autoimmune liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵丹彤; 闫惠平; 檀玉芬; 刘妍; 赵艳; 冯霞; 向代军

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the significance of antibody to Ro-52 in patients with autoim-mune liver disease(AILD). Methods One hundred and fifteen patients with abnormal liver functions, who had anti-Ro-52 detection by immunological blotting, were reviewed retrospectively. According to types of AILD, the clinical features were compared between patients with and without anti-Ro-52, respectively, κ test of concordance was used to provide a chance-corrected valve for immune-serological results. Results The rates of anti-Ro-52 in autoimmune hepatitis( AIH), primary sclerosing cholangitis(PBC) and AIH/PBC o-verlap syndrome groups were 32.43%, 24.56% and 33.33%, respectively, there were no significant differ-enees among three groups ( x2 = 0. 949, P >0. 05). The rate of anti-soluble hver antigen/liver-pancreas ( an-ti-SLA/LP) in AIH patients with anti-Ro-52 (58.33%) was higher than AIH patients without anti-Ro-52 ( 16.00% ,P 0.40, P 0.05).抗可溶性肝抗原/肝胰抗原抗体(anti-soluble liver antigen/liver-pancreas,anti-SLA/LP)在抗Ro-52阳性AIH组频率(58.33%)高于阴性组(16.00%)(x2=6.955,P<0.05),抗SLA/LP抗体在抗R0-52阳性AIH/PBC重叠综合征组频率(85.71%)高于阴性组(28.57%)(x2=6.109,P<0.05).抗Ro-52抗体和抗SLA/LP抗体结果有一致性(κ=0.466,P<0.05).AIH/PBC重叠综合征组抗Ro-52阳性患者IgG水平高于阴性患者(t=2.508,P<0.05).结论 抗Ro-52抗体在AIH、PBC和MH/PBC重叠综合征中的分布没有差别;抗Ro-52抗体与抗SLA/LP抗体检测结果有一致性;抗Ro-52抗体阳性MH/PBC重叠综合征患者IgG水平高于抗体阴性者.

  10. Serological Diagnosis of Autoimmune Blistering Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgül Özkesici

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune blistering diseases are a rare diseases, characterized by development of autoantibodies against the structural proteins of the epidermis or dermoepidermal junction, and blisters and erosions on skin and/or mucous membranes clinically. Clinical features are important guiding findings for suspicious of this group of diseases. The diagnosis is achieved by the evaluation together of clinical features, histological and immunological findings. The gold standard in the diagnosis of this group diseases are demonstration of tissue bound and/or circulating autoantibodies. Methods for this purpose are; direct and indirect immunofluorescence, Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA, immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting. The aim of this paper is to review serological diagnostic methods in the diagnosis of autoimmune bullous diseases and to present developments in recent years.

  11. The complement system in systemic autoimmune disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Min; Daha, Mohamed R.; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    2010-01-01

    Complement is part of the innate immune system. Its major function is recognition and elimination of pathogens via direct killing and/or stimulation of phagocytosis. Activation of the complement system is, however, also involved in the pathogenesis of the systemic autoimmune diseases. Activation via

  12. Genetic risk factors for autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feltkamp, T.E.W.; Aarden, L.A.; Lucas, C.J.; Verweij, C.L.; Vries, R.R.P. de

    1999-01-01

    In most autoimmune diseases multigenic factors play a significant role in pathogenesis. Progress in identifying these genetic factors, many of which are located outside the major histocompatibility complex, was the subject of a recent meeting. Chemicals/CAS: Interleukin-10, 130068-27-8; Transforming

  13. Autoimmune diseases in adults with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Yuki M F; Egeberg, Alexander; Gislason, Gunnar H

    2016-01-01

    to adult patients with AD. No information about AD severity or degree of tobacco consumption was available. Results from a hospital population of AD patients cannot be generalized to the general population. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest a susceptibility of autoimmune diseases in adult patients with AD...

  14. The Etiopathogenesis of Autoimmune Bullous Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şebnem Aktan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune bullous diseases are rare disorders affecting skin and mucous membranes which are mediated by pathogenic autoantibodies against target antigens whose function is adhesion within the epidermis or adhesion of epidermis to dermis. The pathogenesis of these disorders has been extensively investigated with advanced techniques in recent years. This review focuses on the etiopathogenesis of main autoimmune bullous disorders including pemphigus, bullous pemphigoid, anti-p200 pemphigoid, cicatricial pemphigoid, pemphigoid gestationis, dermatitis herpetiformis, linear IgA bullous dermatosis and epidermolysis bullosa acquisita.

  15. Alcohol-Related Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Baby Boomers Get Tested Core Programs HE Webinar Disney 2014 5 Ways to Love Your Liver Liver ... Drive Away Liver Disease Liver Lowdown Aug 2013 Disney Marathon In The Field Healthy Foods Diet Recommendations ...

  16. Prolactin and liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.G.C. Bauer (Alexander)

    1982-01-01

    textabstractCirrhosis of the liver is associated with profound endocrinological disturbances. Until recently it was thought that these disturbances were caused mainly by ineffective elimination of hormones by the diseased liver. It is now known that the pathogenesis of disturbed hormonal function in

  17. Association between autoimmune pancreatitis and systemic autoimmune diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Viktória Terzin; Imre F(o)ldesi; László Kovács; Gyula Pokorny; Tibor Wittmann; László Czakó

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the association between autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) and systemic autoimmune diseases (SAIDs) by measurement of serum immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4).METHODS:The serum level of IgG4 was measured in 61 patients with SAIDs of different types who had not yet participated in glucocorticosteroid treatment.Patients with an elevated IgG4 level were examined by abdominal ultrasonography (US) and,in some cases,by computer tomography (CT).RESULTS:Elevated serum IgG4 levels (919 ± 996 mg/L) were detected in 17 (28%) of the 61 SAID patients.10 patients had Sj(o)gren's syndrome (SS) (IgG4:590 ±232 mg/L),2 of them in association with Hashimoto's thyroiditis,and 7 patients (IgG4:1388 ± 985.5 mg/L)had systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).The IgG4 level in the SLE patients and that in patients with SS were not significantly different from that in AIP patients (783 ± 522 mg/L).Abdominal US and CT did not reveal any characteristic features of AIP among the SAID patients with an elevated IgG4 level.CONCLUSION:The serum IgG4 level may be elevated in SAIDs without the presence of AIP.The determination of serum IgG4 does not seem to be suitable for the differentiation between IgG4-related diseases and SAIDs.

  18. MicroRNAs in autoimmune rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.D. Sebastiani

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of autoimmune diseases remains largely unknown. In recent years, besides genetic factors, several studies proposed that the epigenome may hold the key to a better understanding of autoimmunity initiation and perpetuation. More specifically epigenetic regulatory mechanisms comprise DNA methylation, a variety of histone modifications, and microRNA (miRNA activity, all of which act upon gene and protein expression levels. In particular it is well known that epigenetic mechanisms are important for controlling the pattern of gene expression during development, the cell cycle, and the response to biological or environmental changes. In the present review a description of the most frequent epigenetic deregulations, in particular the role of miRNA, in rheumatic autoimmune disorders will be analyzed.

  19. Chronic liver disease in Aboriginal North Americans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John D Scott; Naomi Garland

    2008-01-01

    A structured literature review was performed to detail the frequency and etiology of chronic liver disease (CLD) in Aboriginal North Americans. CLD affects Aboriginal North Americans disproportionately and is now one of the most common causes of death.Alcoholic liver disease is the leading etiology of CLD,but viral hepatitis, particularly hepatitis C, is an important and growing cause of CLD. High rates of autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) are reported in regions of coastal British Columbia and southeastern Alaska. Non-alcoholic liver disease is a common, but understudied, cause of CLD.Future research should monitor the incidence and etiology of CLD and should be geographically inclusive.In addition, more research is needed on the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and non-alcoholicfatty liver disease (NAFLD) in this population.

  20. Imaging combined autoimmune and infectious disease microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewart, Tom; Raha, Sandeep; Kus, Dorothy; Tarnopolsky, Mark

    2006-09-01

    Bacterial and viral pathogens are implicated in many severe autoimmune diseases, acting through such mechanisms as molecular mimicry, and superantigen activation of T-cells. For example, Helicobacter pylori, well known cause of stomach ulcers and cancers, is also identified in ischaemic heart disease (mimicry of heat shock protein 65), autoimmune pancreatitis, systemic sclerosis, autoimmune thyroiditis (HLA DRB1*0301 allele susceptibility), and Crohn's disease. Successful antibiotic eradication of H.pylori often accompanies their remission. Yet current diagnostic devices, and test-limiting cost containment, impede recognition of the linkage, delaying both diagnosis and therapeutic intervention until the chronic debilitating stage. We designed a 15 minute low cost 39 antigen microarray assay, combining autoimmune, viral and bacterial antigens1. This enables point-of-care serodiagnosis and cost-effective narrowly targeted concurrent antibiotic and monoclonal anti-T-cell and anti-cytokine immunotherapy. Arrays of 26 pathogen and 13 autoimmune antigens with IgG and IgM dilution series were printed in triplicate on epoxysilane covalent binding slides with Teflon well masks. Sera diluted 1:20 were incubated 10 minutes, washed off, anti-IgG-Cy3 (green) and anti-IgM-Dy647 (red) were incubated for 5 minutes, washed off and the slide was read in an ArrayWoRx(e) scanning CCD imager (Applied Precision, Issaquah, WA). As a preliminary model for the combined infectious disease-autoimmune diagnostic microarray we surveyed 98 unidentified, outdated sera that were discarded after Hepatitis B antibody testing. In these, significant IgG or IgM autoantibody levels were found: dsDNA 5, ssDNA 11, Ro 2, RNP 7, SSB 4, gliadin 2, thyroglobulin 13 cases. Since control sera showed no autoantibodies, the high frequency of anti-DNA and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies found in infected sera lend increased support for linkage of infection to subsequent autoimmune disease. Expansion of the antigen

  1. Complicating autoimmune diseases in myasthenia gravis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacu, Aliona; Andersen, Jintana Bunpan; Lisnic, Vitalie; Owe, Jone Furlund; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a rare autoimmune disease of skeletal muscle endplates. MG subgroup is relevant for comorbidity, but usually not accounted for. MG patients have an increased risk for complicating autoimmune diseases, most commonly autoimmune thyroid disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. In this review, we present concomitant autoimmune disorders associated with the different MG subgroups, and show how this influences treatment and prognosis. Concomitant MG should always be considered in patients with an autoimmune disorder and developing new neuromuscular weakness, fatigue or respiratory failure. When a second autoimmune disorder is suspected, MG should be included as a differential diagnosis.

  2. Cytokines and Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbert Tilg

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytokines are pleiotropic peptides produced by virtually every nucleated cell in the body. In most tissues, including the liver, constitutive production of cytokines is absent or minimal. There is increasing evidence that several cytokines mediate hepatic inflammation, apoptosis and necrosis of liver cells, cholestasis and fibrosis. Interestingly, the same mediators also mediate the regeneration of liver tissue after injury. Among the various cytokines, the proinflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a has emerged as a key factor in various aspects of liver disease, such as cachexia and/or cholestasis. Thus, antagonism of TNF-a and other injury-related cytokines in liver diseases merits evaluation as a treatment of these diseases. However, because the same cytokines are also necessary for the regeneration of the tissue after the liver has been injured, inhibition of these mediators might impair hepatic recovery. The near future will bring the exiting clinical challenge of testing new anticytokine strategies in various liver diseases.

  3. Roles of A20 in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Peng, Ling-Long; Wang, Ying; Wang, Jian-Shu; Liu, Jiao; Liu, Meng-Meng; Hu, Jia; Song, Bin; Yang, Hai-Bing

    2016-04-01

    A20 (TNFAIP3), known to inhibit NF-κB function by deubiquitinating-specific NF-κB signaling molecules, has been found in many cell types of the immune system. Recent findings suggest that A20 is essential for the development and functional performance of dendritic cell, B cell, T cell and macrophage. A number of studies further demonstrate that these cells are crucial in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes, systemic lupus erythematosus, inflammatory bowel disease, ankylosing arthritis, Sjögren's syndrome and rheumatoid arthritis. In this article, we focus on the recent advances on the roles of A20 in autoimmune diseases and discuss the therapeutic significance of these new findings.

  4. Primary liver transplantation for autoimmune hepatitis: A comparative analysis of the European liver transplant registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Schramm (Christoph); M. Bubenheim (Michael); R. Adam (René); V. Karam (Vincent); J. Buckels (John); J.G. O'Grady (John); N. Jamieson (Neville); S. Pollard (Stephen); P. Neuhaus (Peter); M.M. Manns (Michael); R.J. Porte (Robert); D. Castaing (Denis); A. Paul (Anna); O. Traynor (Oscar); J. Garden (James); S. Friman (Styrbjörn); B.G. Ericzon; L. Fischer (Lutz); S. Vitko (Stefan); M. Krawczyk (Marek); H.J. Metselaar (Herold); A. Foss (Aksel); M. Kilic (Murat); K. Rolles (Keith); P. Burra (Patrizia); X. Rogiers (Xavier); A.W. Lohse (Ansgar)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe principal aim of this study was to compare the probability of and potential risk factors for death and graft loss after primary adult and pediatric liver transplantation in patients undergoing transplantation for autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) to those in patients undergoing transplantat

  5. Primary Liver Transplantation for Autoimmune Hepatitis : A Comparative Analysis of the European Liver Transplant Registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schramm, Christoph; Bubenheim, Michael; Adam, Rene; Karam, Vincent; Buckels, John; O'Grady, John G.; Jamieson, Neville; Pollard, Stephen; Neuhaus, Peter; Manns, Michael M.; Porte, Robert; Castaing, Denis; Paul, Andreas; Traynor, Oscar; Garden, James; Friman, Styrbjorn; Ericzon, Bo-Goran; Fischer, Lutz; Vitko, Stefan; Krawczyk, Marek; Metselaar, Herold J.; Foss, Aksel; Kilic, Murat; Rolles, Keith; Burra, Patrizia; Rogiers, Xavier; Lohse, Ansgar W.

    2010-01-01

    The principal aim of this study was to compare the probability of and potential risk factors for death and graft loss after primary adult and pediatric liver transplantation in patients undergoing transplantation for autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) to those in patients undergoing transplantation for prim

  6. Autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heneghan, Michael A; Yeoman, Andrew D; Verma, Sumita; Smith, Alastair D; Longhi, Maria Serena

    2013-10-26

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a disease of the hepatic parenchyma that can present in acute or chronic forms. In common with many autoimmune diseases, autoimmune hepatitis is associated with non-organ-specific antibodies in the context of hepatic autoimmunity. This dichotomy has made definition of a unifying hypothesis in the pathophysiology of the disease difficult, although data from the past 8 years have drawn attention to the role of regulatory T cells. Several triggers have been identified, and the disease arises in genetically susceptible individuals. Clinical and biochemical remission is achievable in up to 85% of cases. For the remaining patients, alternative immunosuppression strategies are an option. Liver transplantation provides an excellent outcome for patients with acute liver failure or complications of end-stage liver disease, including hepatocellular carcinoma. Variant or overlapping syndromes are worthy of consideration when unexpected disease features arise.

  7. Oral Tolerance: Therapeutic Implications for Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. C. Faria

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral tolerance is classically defined as the suppression of immune responses to antigens (Ag that have been administered previously by the oral route. Multiple mechanisms of tolerance are induced by oral Ag. Low doses favor active suppression, whereas higher doses favor clonal anergy/deletion. Oral Ag induces Th2 (IL-4/IL-10 and Th3 (TGF-β regulatory T cells (Tregs plus CD4+CD25+ regulatory cells and LAP+T cells. Induction of oral tolerance is enhanced by IL-4, IL-10, anti-IL-12, TGF-β, cholera toxin B subunit (CTB, Flt-3 ligand, anti-CD40 ligand and continuous feeding of Ag. In addition to oral tolerance, nasal tolerance has also been shown to be effective in suppressing inflammatory conditions with the advantage of a lower dose requirement. Oral and nasal tolerance suppress several animal models of autoimmune diseases including experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE, uveitis, thyroiditis, myasthenia, arthritis and diabetes in the nonobese diabetic (NOD mouse, plus non-autoimmune diseases such as asthma, atherosclerosis, colitis and stroke. Oral tolerance has been tested in human autoimmune diseases including MS, arthritis, uveitis and diabetes and in allergy, contact sensitivity to DNCB, nickel allergy. Positive results have been observed in phase II trials and new trials for arthritis, MS and diabetes are underway. Mucosal tolerance is an attractive approach for treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases because of lack of toxicity, ease of administration over time and Ag-specific mechanism of action. The successful application of oral tolerance for the treatment of human diseases will depend on dose, developing immune markers to assess immunologic effects, route (nasal versus oral, formulation, mucosal adjuvants, combination therapy and early therapy.

  8. [Vaccinations in patients with autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühler, Silja; Hatz, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The number of individuals with autoimmune diseases treated with immunosuppressive drugs is increasing steadily. The variety of immunosuppressive drugs and in particular biological therapies is also rising. The autoimmune disease itself as well as the immunosuppressive therapy increases the risk of infection in this population. Particularly the risk of vaccine-preventable infections is elevated. Thus, preventing infections by the means of vaccination is of utmost importance. The Division of Infectious Diseases of the Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute, University of Zurich, performed a literature search on the topic of vaccinations in patients with autoimmune diseases upon request by the Swiss Federal Commission for Vaccination Issues. Overall, data are scarce. The following main points were retrieved from the literature: Inactivated vaccines are safe, but their immunogenicity may be reduced under immunosuppressive therapy. In addition to the generally recommended basic vaccinations, specific vaccinations, such as influenza and pneumococcal vaccination are indicated in these patient groups. Live vaccines are generally contraindicated under immunosuppressive therapy due to safety concerns. However, specific exceptions apply. Furthermore, certain time intervals for the administration of live vaccines after pausing or ceasing an immunosuppressive therapy should be respected.

  9. Alcoholic Cirrhosis Increases Risk for Autoimmune Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Lisbet; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Deleuran, Bent;

    2015-01-01

    IRR, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.26-1.92), celiac disease (aIRR, 5.12; 95% CI, 2.58-10.16), pernicious anemia (aIRR, 2.35; 95% CI, 1.50-3.68), and psoriasis (aIRR, 4.06; 95% CI, 3.32-4.97). There was no increase in the incidence rate for rheumatoid arthritis (aIRR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.69-1.15); the incidence rate......BACKGROUND & AIMS: Alcoholic cirrhosis is associated with hyperactivation and dysregulation of the immune system. In addition to its ability to increase risk for infections, it also may increase the risk for autoimmune diseases. We studied the incidence of autoimmune diseases among patients...... (controls) of the same sex and age. The incidence rates of various autoimmune diseases were compared between patients with cirrhosis and controls and adjusted for the number of hospitalizations in the previous year (a marker for the frequency of clinical examination). RESULTS: Of the 24,679 patients...

  10. Experimental models of autoimmune inflammatory ocular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Gasparin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Ocular inflammation is one of the leading causes of blindness and loss of vision. Human uveitis is a complex and heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by inflammation of intraocular tissues. The eye may be the only organ involved, or uveitis may be part of a systemic disease. A significant number of cases are of unknown etiology and are labeled idiopathic. Animal models have been developed to the study of the physiopathogenesis of autoimmune uveitis due to the difficulty in obtaining human eye inflamed tissues for experiments. Most of those models are induced by injection of specific photoreceptors proteins (e.g., S-antigen, interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein, rhodopsin, recoverin, phosducin. Non-retinal antigens, including melanin-associated proteins and myelin basic protein, are also good inducers of uveitis in animals. Understanding the basic mechanisms and pathogenesis of autoimmune ocular diseases are essential for the development of new treatment approaches and therapeutic agents. The present review describes the main experimental models of autoimmune ocular inflammatory diseases.

  11. Recurrence of cholestatic liver disease after living donor liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sumihito Tamura; Masatoshi Hakuuchi; Yasuhiko Sugawara; Junichi Kaneko; Junichi Togashi; Yuichi Matsui; Noriyo Yamashiki; Norihiro Kokudo

    2008-01-01

    End-stage liver disease,due to cholestatic liver diseases with an autoimmune background such as primary biliary cirrhosis(PBC)and primary sclerosing cholangitis(PSC),is considered a good indication for liver transplantation.Excellent overall patient and graft outcomes,based mostly on the experience from deceased donor liver ransplantation(DDLT),have been reported.Due to the limited number of oraan donations from deceased donors in most Asian countries,living donor liver transplantation(LDLT)is the mainstream treatment for end-stage liver disease,including that resulting from PBC and PSC.Although the initial experiences with LDLT for PBC and PSC seem satisfactory or comparable to that with DLT,some aspects,including the timing of transplantation,the risk of recurrent disease,and its long-term clinical implications,require further evaluation.Whether or not the long-term outcomes of LDLT from a biologically related donor are equivalent to that of DDLT requires further observations.The clinical course following LDLT may be affected by he genetic background shared between the recipient and the living related donor.(C)2008 The WJG Press.All rights reserved.

  12. Generalized Vitiligo Associated Autoimmune Diseases in Japanese Patients Their Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiko Narita

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: Among Japanese vitiligo patients, there is a subgroup with strong evidence of genetically determined susceptibility to not only vitiligo, but also to autoimmune thyroid disease and other autoimmune disorders.

  13. Evaluation of autoimmune thyroid disease in melasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami Mogaddam, Majid; Iranparvar Alamdari, Manouchehr; Maleki, Nasrollah; Safavi Ardabili, Nastaran; Abedkouhi, Selma

    2015-06-01

    Melasma is one of the most frequently acquired hyperpigmentation disorders clinically characterized by symmetrical brown patches on sun-exposed areas. To date, few studies have been conducted about the relationship between thyroid autoimmun-ity and melasma. To evaluate the thyroid dysfunction and autoimmunity in nonpregnant women with melasma. A total of 70 women with melasma and 70 age-matched healthy women with no history of melasma were enrolled in the study. We studied the thyroid hormone profile in both groups. The statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software. Patients with melasma had 18.5% frequency of thyroid disorders, and 15.7% had positive anti-TPO, while subjects from the control group had a 4.3% frequency of thyroid abnormalities, and only 5.7% had positive anti-TPO. There was a significantly higher prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in women with melasma compared with control group (P = 0.008). This study suggests that there is a relationship between thyroid autoimmunity and melasma. However, to make recommendations on screening for thyroid disease in patients with melasma, future research of good methodological quality is needed.

  14. Neuroelectrophysiological studies on neurological autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-hong LIU

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The neuroelectrophysiological manifestations of four clinical typical neurological autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS, Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS, myasthenia gravis (MG, and polymyositis and dermatomyositis were reviewed in this paper. The diagnostic value of evoked potentials for multiple sclerosis, nerve conduction studies (NCS for Guillain-Barré syndrome, repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS and single-fiber electromyography (SFEMG for myasthenia gravis, and needle electromyography for polymyositis and dermatomyositis were respectively discussed. This review will help to have comprehensive understanding on electrophysiological examinations and their clinical significance in the diagnosis of neurological autoimmune diseases. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.09.004

  15. Liver disease and malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnak, Tugrul; Yilmaz, Yusuf

    2013-08-01

    Patients with hepatic disorders are exceptionally vulnerable to developing malnutrition because of the key role played by the liver in regulating the nutritional state and the energy balance. Moreover, the presence of chronic liver disorders could reduce the appetite and thus influence the nutrient intake. Poor nutritional status has been shown in various patient groups with hepatic disorders, and particularly in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis who are at high nutritional risk. It is well established that malnourished patients with liver diseases generally have a higher risk of developing adverse clinical outcomes and increased healthcare costs. Nutrition screening with the Subjective Global Assessment and anthropometric measurements are an important first step in the early identification of malnutrition and initiates the whole nutrition care process. It is therefore important for appropriate nutrition policies and protocols to be implemented so that all patients with chronic liver diseases are monitored closely from a nutritional standpoint. Early and evidence-based nutritional interventions are eagerly needed to minimize the nutritional decline associated with chronic liver disorders and ultimately improve the prognosis of such patients. This review includes a comprehensive analysis of methods to identify malnutrition in patients with chronic liver diseases as well as the extent and impact of the malnutrition problem in selected patient populations.

  16. Liver regeneration in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    Aldo Lagomarsino

    2012-01-01

    Steatosis is the accumulation of fat in hepatocytes, which may be the result of liver regeneration or pathological processes such as alcoholic and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Despite its importance, in both cases the exact mechanism that prevails in fatty liver regeneration is poorly understood. Previous studies have shown that patients with fatty liver express dispar regeneration, possibly due to the accumulation of reactive oxygen species generated by inflammatory processes caused by ...

  17. Autoimmune diseases and fungal infections: immunological mechanisms and therapeutic approaches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian-zhong

    2009-01-01

    @@ Autoimmune disease represents a breakdown of natural tolerance to autoreactive antigens.Pemphigus and lupus erythematosus are common autoimmune diseases either skin-specific or with predominant skin involvement. During the past decades,much progress has been made in understanding the mechanism of autoimmune diseases and the immunological mechanism in some infectious diseases such as fungal infections. Various novel approaches have been developed in the treatment of these diseases.

  18. Gut microbiota and liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minemura, Masami; Shimizu, Yukihiro

    2015-02-14

    Several studies revealed that gut microbiota are associated with various human diseases, e.g., metabolic diseases, allergies, gastroenterological diseases, and liver diseases. The liver can be greatly affected by changes in gut microbiota due to the entry of gut bacteria or their metabolites into the liver through the portal vein, and the liver-gut axis is important to understand the pathophysiology of several liver diseases, especially non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatic encephalopathy. Moreover, gut microbiota play a significant role in the development of alcoholic liver disease and hepatocarcinogenesis. Based on these previous findings, trials using probiotics have been performed for the prevention or treatment of liver diseases. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the changes in gut microbiota associated with various liver diseases, and we describe the therapeutic trials of probiotics for those diseases.

  19. Questions and Answers on Autoimmunity and Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Autoimmune Coalition Your Privacy Get Involved Donate Grassroots Fundraising ? Advocate for Change Take our Survey Information List ... Common Thread Coping Tools InFocus Newsletter Questions & Answers Fundraising Grassroots Fundraising Workplace Giving Special Events AARDA on ...

  20. Etiologies of chronic liver disease in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahmand F

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Liver diseases in children is the result of many different diseases including: metabolic, genetic, infectious, toxic and idiopathic causes. This was a case series study on 133 infants and children with age range 6 month to 12 years old, who presented clinically with manifestation of chronic liver disease and were admitted to Children Hospital Medical Center from year 1999 to 2000. In this study, 32 (24.5 percent patients had autoimmune chronic hepatitis, 15 (11.3 percent Glycogen storage diseases, 12 (9 percent extrahepatic biliary atresia, 11 (8.2 percent willson disease, 10 (7.5 percent cryptogenic cirrhosis, 6 (4.5 percent chronic hepatitis C, 5 (3.8 percen chronic hepatitic B, 5 (3.8 percent galactosemia 3 (2.25 percent congenital hepatic fibrosis, 3 (3.8 percent histiocytosis X, 3 (2.25 percent sclerosing cholangitis, 2 (1.5 percent byler’s disease 2 (1.5 percent primary tuberculosis, 1 (0.75 percent choledocalcyst, 1 (0.75 percent Alagyle syndrome. According to our data, chronic liver disease should be considered in infants and children. In our study, the most common causes are found to be: metabolic and genetic diseases (37.5 percent, chronic autoimmune hepatitis (24 percent and biliary disorders (14 percent, that encompass 86 percent of the patients.

  1. Narcolepsy as an autoimmune disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Partinen, Markku; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek; Plazzi, Giuseppe;

    2014-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder characterised by loss of hypothalamic hypocretin (orexin) neurons. The prevalence of narcolepsy is about 30 per 100 000 people, and typical age at onset is 12-16 years. Narcolepsy is strongly associated with the HLA-DQB1*06:02 genotype, and has been thought...... of as an immune-mediated disease. Other risk genes, such as T-cell-receptor α chain and purinergic receptor subtype 2Y11, are also implicated. Interest in narcolepsy has increased since the epidemiological observations that H1N1 infection and vaccination are potential triggering factors, and an increase...... in the incidence of narcolepsy after the pandemic AS03 adjuvanted H1N1 vaccination in 2010 from Sweden and Finland supports the immune-mediated pathogenesis. Epidemiological observations from studies in China also suggest a role for H1N1 virus infections as a trigger for narcolepsy. Although the pathological...

  2. MHC Genes Linked to Autoimmune Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deitiker, Philip; Atassi, M Zouhair

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (ADs), or autoinflammatoiy diseases, are growing in complexity as diagnoses improve and many factors escalate disease risk. Considerable genetic similarity is found among ADs, and they are frequently associated with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes. However, a given disease may be associated with more than one human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allotype, and a given HLA may be associated with more than one AD. The associations of non-MHC genes with AD present an additional problem, and the situation is further complicated by the role that other factors, such as age, diet, therapeutic drugs, and regional influences, play in disease. This review discusses some of the genetics and biochemistry of HLA-linked AD and inflammation, covering some of the best-studied examples and summarizing indicators for class I- and II-mediated disease. However, the scope of this review limits a detailed discussion of all known ADs.

  3. Stem cell therapy for severe autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marmont Alberto M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Intense immunosuppresion followed by alogenic or autogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a relatively recent procedure which was used for the first time in severe, refractory cases of systemic lupus erythematosus. Currently three agressive procedures are used in the treatment of autoimmune diseases: high dose chemotherapy without stem cell rescue, intense immunosuppression with subsequent infusion of the alogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation combined with or without the selection of CD34+ cells, and the autogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Proof of the graft-versus-leukemia effect observed define SCT as a form of immunotherapy, with additional evidence of an similar Graft-vs-Autoimmunity effect which is suggestive of a cure for autoimmune diseases in this type of therapy. The use of alogenic SCT improved due to its safety compared to autogenic transplantations. In this report, data of multiply sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus are reported, with the conclusion that Immunoablation followed by SCT is clearly indicated in such cases.

  4. Modeling toxicodynamic effects of trichloroethylene on liver in mouse model of autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Kathleen M; Reisfeld, Brad; Zurlinden, Todd J; Kreps, Meagan N; Erickson, Stephen W; Blossom, Sarah J

    2014-09-15

    Chronic exposure to industrial solvent and water pollutant trichloroethylene (TCE) in female MRL+/+mice generates disease similar to human autoimmune hepatitis. The current study was initiated to investigate why TCE-induced autoimmunity targeted the liver. Compared to other tissues the liver has an unusually robust capacity for repair and regeneration. This investigation examined both time-dependent and dose-dependent effects of TCE on hepatoprotective and pro-inflammatory events in liver and macrophages from female MRL+/+mice. After a 12-week exposure to TCE in drinking water a dose-dependent decrease in macrophage production of IL-6 at both the transcriptional and protein level was observed. A longitudinal study similarly showed that TCE inhibited macrophage IL-6 production. In terms of the liver, TCE had little effect on expression of pro-inflammatory genes (Tnfa, Saa2 or Cscl1) until the end of the 40-week exposure. Instead, TCE suppressed hepatic expression of genes involved in IL-6 signaling (Il6r, gp130, and Egr1). Linear regression analysis confirmed liver histopathology in the TCE-treated mice correlated with decreased expression of Il6r. A toxicodynamic model was developed to estimate the effects of TCE on IL-6 signaling and liver pathology under different levels of exposure and rates of repair. This study underlined the importance of longitudinal studies in mechanistic evaluations of immuntoxicants. It showed that later-occurring liver pathology caused by TCE was associated with early suppression of hepatoprotection rather than an increase in conventional pro-inflammatory events. This information was used to create a novel toxicodynamic model of IL-6-mediated TCE-induced liver inflammation.

  5. Management of autoimmune blistering diseases in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Tess; Venning, Vanessa V

    2011-10-01

    Autoimmune blistering disease (AIBD) in pregnancy raises several complex management issues associated with underlying pathogenesis and treatment options. This article considers the effects of the disease as well as its treatment for both mother and fetus. All AIBDs can occur in pregnancy but are relatively rare. Pemphigoid gestationis is a rare AIBD that is specific to pregnancy. The article considers each AIBD in turn and then looks at treatment options for the group as a whole, as there are many issues common to all.

  6. Is autoimmune chronic active hepatitis a HCV-related disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrin, S; Craxì, A; Fiorentino, G; Fabiano, C; Provenzano, G; Pinzello, G B; Palazzo, U; Almasio, P; Pagliaro, L

    1991-07-01

    We evaluated the specificity and clinical relevance of anti-hepatitis C virus antibody positivity in 22 HBsAg-negative patients with autoimmune (anti-nuclear, anti-actin or anti-liver-kidney microsomal antibody positive) chronic active hepatitis. An ELISA anti-HCV test and a recombinant immunoblot assay (RIBA-HCV) were used. Thirteen patients (59%) were anti-HCV positive and five (23%) anti-HCV negative by both ELISA and RIBA-HCV tests. Four patients (18%) were borderline positive by ELISA (OD less than 1.0), and three of them (all with severe disease) were negative by RIBA. Histologic necroinflammation, AST/ALT and gamma-globulins levels were higher and response to prednisolone treatment was better in RIBA anti-HCV-negative than in anti-HCV-positive cases. We confirmed with both RIBA and ELISA tests the high prevalence of anti-HCV already reported by ELISA in anti-nuclear and anti-liver-kidney microsomal antibody positive chronic active hepatitis. False positive for anti-HCV (i.e., a positive ELISA test not confirmed by RIBA) occurred only among patients with severe disease. Since RIBA-negative subjects showed the best response to corticosteroid, they might represent the only subset of cases of 'true' autoimmune chronic active hepatitis.

  7. Celiac Disease Autoimmunity in Patients with Autoimmune Diabetes and Thyroid Disease among Chinese Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyuan Zhao

    Full Text Available The prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity or tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (TGA amongst patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D and autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD in the Chinese population remains unknown. This study examined the rate of celiac disease autoimmunity amongst patients with T1D and AITD in the Chinese population. The study included 178 patients with type 1 diabetes and 119 with AITD where 36 had both T1D and AITD, classified as autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 variant (APS3v. The study also included 145 patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D, 97 patients with non-autoimmune thyroid disease (NAITD, and 102 healthy controls. Serum islet autoantibodies, thyroid autoantibodies and TGA were measured by radioimmunoassay. TGA positivity was found in 22% of patients with either type 1 diabetes or AITD, much higher than that in patients with T2D (3.4%; p< 0.0001 or NAITD (3.1%; P < 0.0001 or healthy controls (1%; p<0.0001. The patients with APS3v having both T1D and AITD were 36% positive for TGA, significantly higher than patients with T1D alone (p = 0.040 or with AITD alone (p = 0.017. T1D and AITD were found to have a 20% and 30% frequency of overlap respectively at diagnosis. In conclusion, TGA positivity was high in the Chinese population having existing T1D and/or AITD, and even higher when both diseases were present. Routine TGA screening in patients with T1D or AITD will be important to early identify celiac disease autoimmunity for better clinical care of patients.

  8. Measurement of disease severity in cutaneous autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The development of disease-specific outcome instruments for several autoimmune skin diseases including cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE), dermatomyositis, vitiligo, pemphigus and alopecia areata has facilitated the objective assessment of disease in clinical trials. Validation of these instruments provides reliable tools to measure disease severity and therapeutic effect in clinical studies. However, the existence of multiple outcome measures for each disease and the lack of uniformity betw...

  9. The complement system in systemic autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min; Daha, Mohamed R; Kallenberg, Cees G M

    2010-05-01

    Complement is part of the innate immune system. Its major function is recognition and elimination of pathogens via direct killing and/or stimulation of phagocytosis. Activation of the complement system is, however, also involved in the pathogenesis of the systemic autoimmune diseases. Activation via the classical pathway has long been recognized in immune complex-mediated diseases such as cryoglobulinemic vasculitis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In SLE, the role of complement is somewhat paradoxical. It is involved in autoantibody-initiated tissue damage on the one hand, but, on the other hand, it appears to have protective features as hereditary deficiencies of classical pathway components are associated with an increased risk for SLE. There is increasing evidence that the alternative pathway of complement, even more than the classical pathway, is involved in many systemic autoimmune diseases. This is true for IgA-dominant Henoch Schönlein Purpura, in which additional activation of the lectin pathway contributes to more severe disease. In anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis the complement system was considered not to be involved since immunoglobulin deposition is generally absent in the lesions. However, recent studies, both in human and animal models, demonstrated complement activation via the alternative pathway as a major pathogenic mechanism. Insight into the role of the various pathways of complement in the systemic autoimmune diseases including the vasculitides opens up new ways of treatment by blocking effector pathways of complement. This has been demonstrated for monoclonal antibodies to C5 or C5a in experimental anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome and ANCA-associated vasculitis.

  10. The epidemiologic evidence linking autoimmune diseases and psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benros, Michael E; Eaton, William W; Mortensen, Preben B

    2014-02-15

    This review summarizes the epidemiologic evidence linking autoimmune diseases and psychosis. The associations between autoimmune diseases and psychosis have been studied for more than a half century, but research has intensified within the last decades, since psychosis has been associated with genetic markers of the immune system and with excess autoreactivity and other immune alterations. A range of psychiatric disorders, including psychosis, have been observed to occur more frequently in some autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus and multiple sclerosis. Many autoimmune diseases involve multiple organs and general dysfunction of the immune system, which could affect the brain and induce psychiatric symptoms. Most studies have been cross-sectional, observing an increased prevalence of a broad number of autoimmune diseases in people with psychotic disorders. Furthermore, there is some evidence of associations of psychosis with a family history of autoimmune disorders and vice versa. Additionally, several autoimmune diseases, individually and in aggregate, have been identified as raising the risk for psychotic disorders in longitudinal studies. The associations have been suspected to be caused by inflammation or brain-reactive antibodies associated with the autoimmune diseases. However, the associations could also be caused by shared genetic factors or common etiologic components such as infections. Infections can induce the development of autoimmune diseases and autoantibodies, possibly affecting the brain. Autoimmune diseases and brain-reactive antibodies should be considered by clinicians in the treatment of individuals with psychotic symptoms, and even if the association is not causal, treatment would probably still improve quality of life and survival.

  11. Systemic abnormalities in liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masami Minemura; Kazuto Tajiri; Yukihiro Shimizu

    2009-01-01

    Systemic abnormalities often occur in patients with liver disease. In particular, cardiopulmonary or renal diseases accompanied by advanced liver disease can be serious and may determine the quality of life and prognosis of patients. Therefore, both hepatologists and non-hepatologists should pay attention to such abnormalities in the management of patients with liver diseases.

  12. Large leg ulcers due to autoimmune diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozin, Alexander P.; Egozi, Dana; Ramon, Yehuda; Toledano, Kohava; Braun-Moscovici, Yolanda; Markovits, Doron; Schapira, Daniel; Bergman, Reuven; Melamed, Yehuda; Ullman, Yehuda; Balbir-Gurman, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Large leg ulcers (LLU) may complicate autoimmune diseases. They pose a therapeutic challenge and are often resistant to treatment. To report three cases of autoimmune diseases complicated with LLU. Case Report Case 1. A 55-year old woman presented with long-standing painful LLU due to mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). Biopsy from the ulcer edge showed small vessel vasculitis. IV methylprednisolone (MethP) 1 G/day, prednisolone (PR) 1mg/kg, monthly IV cyclophosphamide (CYC), cyclosporine (CyA) 100mg/day, IVIG 125G, ciprofloxacin+IV Iloprost+enoxaparin+aspirin (AAVAA), hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HO), maggot debridement and autologous skin transplantation were performed and the LLU healed. Case 2. A 45-year old women with MCTD developed multiple LLU’s with non-specific inflammation by biopsy. MethP, PR, hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), azathioprine (AZA), CYC, IVIG, AAVAA failed. Treatment for underlying the LLU tibial osteomyelitis and addition of CyA was followed by the LLU healing. Case 3. A 20-year-old man with history of polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) developed painful LLU’s due to small vessel vasculitis (biopsy). MethP, PR 1 mg/kg, CYC, CyA 100 mg/d, AAVAA failed. MRSA sepsis and relapse of systemic PAN developed. IV vancomycin, followed by ciprofloxacin, monthly IVIG (150 g/for 5 days) and infliximab (5 mg/kg) were instituted and the LLU’s healed. Conclusions LLU are extremely resistant to therapy. Combined use of multiple medications and services are needed for healing of LLU due to autoimmune diseases. PMID:21169912

  13. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    You, Jie; Huang, Sha; Huang, Gui-Qian; Zhu, Gui-Qi; Ma, Rui-Min; Liu, Wen-yue; Shi, Ke-Qing; Guo, Gui-Long; Chen, Yong-Ping; Braddock, Martin; Zheng, Ming-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is known to be associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the relationship between NAFLD and the prognosis of CRC remains unclear. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) rates in patients with CRC and the secondary objective was to compare clinicopathologic variables which were stratified by NAFLD. We performed a large cohort study of 1314 patien...

  14. Insights into IL-37, the role in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wang-Dong; Zhao, Yi; Liu, Yi

    2015-12-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by the impaired function and the destruction of tissues that are caused by an immune response in which aberrant antibodies are generated and attack the body's own cells and tissues. Interleukin (IL) -37, a new member of the IL-1 family, broadly reduces innate inflammation as well as acquired immune responses. Recently, studies have shown that expression of IL-37 was abnormal in autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), psoriasis, Graves' disease (GD). In addition, functional analysis indicated that IL-37 is negatively involved in the development and pathogenesis of these autoimmune disorders. The strong association of this cytokine with autoimmune diseases promotes us to systematically review what had been published recently on the crucial nature of IL-37 in relation to autoimmune diseases gaining attention for its regulatory capability in these autoimmune disorders.

  15. Propylthiouracil for alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, A; Gluud, C

    2005-01-01

    Randomised clinical trials have addressed the question whether propylthiouracil has any beneficial effects in patients with alcoholic liver disease.......Randomised clinical trials have addressed the question whether propylthiouracil has any beneficial effects in patients with alcoholic liver disease....

  16. Propylthiouracil for alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fede, Giuseppe; Germani, Giacomo; Gluud, Christian;

    2011-01-01

    Randomised clinical trials have addressed the question whether propylthiouracil has any beneficial effects in patients with alcoholic liver disease.......Randomised clinical trials have addressed the question whether propylthiouracil has any beneficial effects in patients with alcoholic liver disease....

  17. Treating prolactinoma can prevent autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watad, Abdulla; Versini, Mathilde; Jeandel, Pierre-Yves; Amital, Howard; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-04-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is a pleiotropic hormone; in addition to a wide variety of endocrine effects, PRL also exhibits immunostimulating effects. Therefore, there is increasing evidence linking PRL with a large number of systemic and organ specific autoimmune diseases. Herein, we report the case of an adolescent girl diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) occurring in the context of untreated prolactinoma evolving since childhood. This raises the exciting question of the involvement of PRL in the pathogenesis of MS. It is likely that early treatment of hyperprolactinemia in this case would have significantly reduced the risk of developing MS or even prevented its occurrence.

  18. [Assessment of endothelial function in autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhamou, Y; Bellien, J; Armengol, G; Gomez, E; Richard, V; Lévesque, H; Joannidès, R

    2014-08-01

    Numerous autoimmune-inflammatory rheumatic diseases have been associated with accelerated atherosclerosis or other types of vasculopathy leading to an increase in cardiovascular disease incidence. In addition to traditional cardiovascular risk factors, endothelial dysfunction is an important early event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, contributing to plaque initiation and progression. Endothelial dysfunction is characterized by a shift of the actions of the endothelium toward reduced vasodilation, a proinflammatory and a proadhesive state, and prothrombic properties. Therefore, assessment of endothelial dysfunction targets this vascular phenotype using several biological markers as indicators of endothelial dysfunction. Measurements of soluble adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin), pro-thrombotic factors (thrombomodulin, von Willebrand factor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1) and inflammatory cytokines are most often performed. Regarding the functional assessment of the endothelium, the flow-mediated dilatation of conduit arteries is a non-invasive method widely used in pathophysiological and interventional studies. In this review, we will briefly review the most relevant information upon endothelial dysfunction mechanisms and explorations. We will summarize the similarities and differences in the biological and functional assessments of the endothelium in different autoimmune diseases.

  19. Idiopathic membranous nephropathy: an autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makker, Sudesh P; Tramontano, Alfonso

    2011-07-01

    For more than 50 years researchers have debated the evidence for an autoimmune basis of human idiopathic membranous nephritis (MN). Work published in the past 2 years has substantially strengthened the belief that MN is indeed an autoimmune disease of the kidney. Autoantibodies of the IgG4 subclass to at least three podocyte membrane proteins including phospholipase A(2)-receptor, aldose reductase, and manganese superoxide dismutase have been detected by immunoblotting in sera as well as in acid eluates prepared from renal biopsy tissue of patients with this disease, using either whole tissue or microdissected glomeruli from frozen sections. In each case the podocyte antigen has been shown to co-localize with the subepithelial glomerular immune deposits in renal tissue of the same patients. It is not certain if any of these podocyte proteins is an inciting/primary autoantigen or whether they are secondary antigens recruited by intermolecular epitope-spreading, initiating from a yet-to-be-discovered autoantigen. Although it is clear that autoantibodies to podocyte membrane proteins are elicited in idiopathic MN and contribute to the formation of the subepithelial deposits, many questions remain concerning the triggers for their development and their contribution toward proteinuria and progression of the disease.

  20. Autoimmune diseases in the TH17 era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Mesquita Jr.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A new subtype of CD4+ T lymphocytes characterized by the production of interleukin 17, i.e., TH17 cells, has been recently described. This novel T cell subset is distinct from type 1 and type 2 T helper cells. The major feature of this subpopulation is to generate significant amounts of pro-inflammatory cytokines, therefore appearing to be critically involved in protection against infection caused by extracellular microorganisms, and in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and allergy. The dynamic balance among subsets of T cells is important for the modulation of several steps of the immune response. Disturbances in this balance may cause a shift from normal immunologic physiology to the development of immune-mediated disorders. In autoimmune diseases, the fine balance between the proportion and degree of activation of the various T lymphocyte subsets can contribute to persistent undesirable inflammatory responses and tissue replacement by fibrosis. This review highlights the importance of TH17 cells in this process by providing an update on the biology of these cells and focusing on their biology and differentiation processes in the context of immune-mediated chronic inflammatory diseases.

  1. Pulmonary hypertension in autoimmune rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Massironi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Pulmonary hypertension is a severe and rapidly progressive disease, particularly frequent in patients with rheumatic diseases. The aims of this study were the following: to determine the prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in Italian patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases, and to evaluate if the presence of a rheumatic disease in general, or of a specific autoimmune rheumatic disease, is a risk factor for the development of pulmonary hypertension. Patients and Methods. One hundred and thirteen Italian patients with connective tissue diseases (105 females, 8 males, aged 19 to 83 yrs, entered the study. Fifty-one had systemic sclerosis (SSc: 49 were females, 2 males, aged 34 to 83 yrs; 41 had limited cutaneous SSc, 8 diffuse cutaneous SSc, and 2 SSc sine scleroderma. Thirty-three patients had systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE: all but one were females, their age ranged from 19 to 82 yrs. Twenty-five had rheumatoid arthritis (RA: 21 females, 4 males, aged 26 to 45 yrs. Three females and one male, 51-77 yrs, had mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD. Systolic pulmonary arterial pressure (SPAP was assessed by Doppler echocardiography. Results. Twenty three patients had pulmonary hypertension, which was more frequent in MCTD than in SLE (75% vs 6.1%, p=0.0002 or in AR (20%, p=0.0313. Pulmonary hypertension was more frequent in SSc than in SLE (25.5% vs 6.1%, p=0.0028 and in limited than in diffuse SSc(21.6% vs 3.9%. SPAP was significanly related to age (R=0.35, P=0.0275, with patients with pulmonary hypertension older than patients with normal SPAP (66±13 vs 52±16 yrs, p=0.0003. Conclusions. These data show a significant association between pulmonary hypertension and autoimmune rheumatic diseases. Therefore pulmonary hypertension assessment seems mandatory, at least in MCTD and SSc. However, more studies are needed to clarify the relationship between age and pulmonary hypertension and to verify whether the low prevalence of

  2. Propylthiouracil for alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, A; Gluud, C

    2002-01-01

    Alcohol is the most common cause of liver disease in the Western world today. Randomised clinical trials have addressed the question whether propylthiouracil has any efficacy in patients with alcoholic liver disease.......Alcohol is the most common cause of liver disease in the Western world today. Randomised clinical trials have addressed the question whether propylthiouracil has any efficacy in patients with alcoholic liver disease....

  3. Epigenetic modifications and epigenetic based medication implementations of autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Majid; Gharibi, Tohid; Dolati, Sanam; Rostamzadeh, Davood; Aslani, Saeed; Baradaran, Behzad; Younesi, Vahid; Yousefi, Mehdi

    2017-03-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have documented a number of genetic variants to explain mechanisms underlying autoimmune diseases. However, the precise etiology of autoimmune diseases remains largely unknown. Epigenetic mechanisms like alterations in the post-translational modification of histones and DNA methylation may potentially cause a breakdown of immune tolerance and the perpetuation of autoreactive responses. Recently, several studies both in experimental models and clinical settings proposed that the epigenome may hold the key to a better understanding of autoimmunity initiation and perpetuation. More specifically, data support the impact of epigenetic changes in autoimmune diseases, in some cases based on mechanistical observations. Epigenetic therapy already being employed in hematopoietic malignancies may also be associated with beneficial effects in autoimmune diseases. In this review, we will discuss on what we know and expect about the treatment of autoimmune disease based on epigenetic aberrations.

  4. Infections as risk factor for autoimmune diseases - A nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Philip Rising; Kragstrup, Tue Wenzel; Deleuran, Bent Winding;

    2016-01-01

    Viruses, bacteria and other infectious pathogens are the major postulated environmental triggers of autoimmunity. In the present nation-wide study we describe the association between infections and 29 autoimmune diseases. We used the Danish Civil Registration System to identify 4.5 million persons...... born between 1945 and 2000. Information on infections and autoimmune diseases was obtained from the Danish Hospital Register. The cohort was followed from 1977 to 2012. Incidence rate ratios for developing an autoimmune disease were estimated using poisson regression. We found an association between...... hospital admission for an infection and 29 autoimmune diseases. This study shows that infections are risk factors for a broad spectrum of autoimmune diseases in a dose-response and temporal manner, in agreement with the hypothesis that infections are an environmental risk factor contributing...

  5. Overlap syndrome in autoimmune liver diseases%自身免疫性肝病中的重叠综合征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦健; 王江滨

    2005-01-01

    自身免疫性肝病是一组具有一定自身免疫基础的炎症性肝病,包括自身免疫性肝炎(autoimmune hepatitis,AIH).原发性胆汁性肝硬化(primary biliary cirrhosis,PBC)、原发性硬化性胆管炎(primary sclerosing cholangitis,PSC)等,其共同特点是在肝脏出现病理性炎症损伤的同时,血清中可发现与肝脏有关的循环自身抗体。

  6. Palivizumab Exposure and the Risk of Autoimmune Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haerskjold, Ann; Linder, Marie; Stokholm, Lonny Merete;

    2016-01-01

    children known to be immunologically immature. The long-term effect of palivizumab in terms of autoimmune diseases has not yet been investigated. AIM: Our objective was to investigate whether exposure to palivizumab was associated with the development of autoimmune diseases in children. METHODS...... of autoimmune disease were diagnosed among palivizumab-exposed children during the period of observation. Among the children exposed to palivizumab, one child in Denmark developed inflammatory bowel disease; in Sweden, children developed juvenile arthritis (one child), diabetes mellitus (two children), celiac...... disease (four children), and inflammatory bowel disease (one child). The risk of autoimmune disease was not significantly increased after palivizumab exposure (hazard ratio adjusted for age and country: 1.54; 95 % confidence interval 0.80-2.95). CONCLUSION: The risk of autoimmune disease was not increased...

  7. Spondyloarthropathies in Autoimmune Diseases and Vice Versa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Fernández, Oscar M.; Mantilla, Rubén D.; Cruz-Tapias, Paola; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Alberto; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Polyautoimmunity is one of the major clinical characteristics of autoimmune diseases (ADs). The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of ADs in spondyloarthropathies (SpAs) and vice versa. This was a two-phase cross-sectional study. First, we examined the presence of ADs in a cohort of patients with SpAs (N = 148). Second, we searched for the presence of SpAs in a well-defined group of patients with ADs (N = 1077) including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and Sjögren's syndrome (SS). Among patients with SpAs, ankylosing spondylitis was observed in the majority of them (55.6%). There were two patients presenting with SS in the SpA group (1.4%) and 5 patients with autoimmune thyroiditis (3.5%). The global prevalence of ADs in SpAs was 4.86%. In the ADs group, there were 5 patients with SpAs (0.46%). Our results suggest a lack of association between SpAs and ADs. Accordingly, SpAs might correspond more to autoinflammatory diseases rather than to ADs. PMID:22400103

  8. Psoriasis is not an autoimmune disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Lionel; Baker, Barbara S; Powles, Anne V; Engstrand, Lars

    2015-04-01

    The concept that psoriasis is an autoimmune disease needs to be questioned. The autoimmune label has been based on molecular mimicry between streptococcal and keratin proteins and the existence of homologous peptides between these proteins. However, it is only peripheral blood CD8, and not CD4, T lymphocytes that respond to the homologous peptides. This ignores the fact that it is CD4 T cells which are necessary to initiate psoriasis. Recent studies on skin bacterial microbiota have found a variety of bacteria in both normal skin and psoriatic lesions. In biopsy specimens, the most common phylum was Firmicutes and the most common genus streptococcus in both psoriasis and normal skin. The innate immune system is activated in psoriasis, and recent genetic findings have shown the majority of susceptibility loci are associated with innate immunity. There is a known clinical relationship between both Crohn's disease (CD) and periodontitis, and psoriasis, and patients with psoriasis share mutations in some innate immunity genes with individuals with CD. It is now accepted that CD is due to a breakdown of immune tolerance (dysbiosis) to bacteria in the intestine. These findings suggest that psoriasis is initiated by an abnormal response to bacteria in the skin due to genetic factors.

  9. Modeling toxicodynamic effects of trichloroethylene on liver in mouse model of autoimmune hepatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, Kathleen M., E-mail: gilbertkathleenm@uams.edu [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Arkansas Children' s Hospital Research Institute, Little Rock, AR 72202 (United States); Reisfeld, Brad, E-mail: brad.reisfeld@colostate.edu [Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO (United States); Zurlinden, Todd J., E-mail: tjzurlin@rams.colostate.edu [Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO (United States); Kreps, Meagan N., E-mail: MNKreps@uams.edu [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Arkansas Children' s Hospital Research Institute, Little Rock, AR 72202 (United States); Erickson, Stephen W., E-mail: serickson@uams.edu [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Arkansas Children' s Hospital Research Institute, Little Rock, AR 72202 (United States); Blossom, Sarah J., E-mail: blossomsarah@uams.edu [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Arkansas Children' s Hospital Research Institute, Little Rock, AR 72202 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Chronic exposure to industrial solvent and water pollutant trichloroethylene (TCE) in female MRL +/+ mice generates disease similar to human autoimmune hepatitis. The current study was initiated to investigate why TCE-induced autoimmunity targeted the liver. Compared to other tissues the liver has an unusually robust capacity for repair and regeneration. This investigation examined both time-dependent and dose-dependent effects of TCE on hepatoprotective and pro-inflammatory events in liver and macrophages from female MRL +/+ mice. After a 12-week exposure to TCE in drinking water a dose-dependent decrease in macrophage production of IL-6 at both the transcriptional and protein level was observed. A longitudinal study similarly showed that TCE inhibited macrophage IL-6 production. In terms of the liver, TCE had little effect on expression of pro-inflammatory genes (Tnfa, Saa2 or Cscl1) until the end of the 40-week exposure. Instead, TCE suppressed hepatic expression of genes involved in IL-6 signaling (Il6r, gp130, and Egr1). Linear regression analysis confirmed liver histopathology in the TCE-treated mice correlated with decreased expression of Il6r. A toxicodynamic model was developed to estimate the effects of TCE on IL-6 signaling and liver pathology under different levels of exposure and rates of repair. This study underlined the importance of longitudinal studies in mechanistic evaluations of immuntoxicants. It showed that later-occurring liver pathology caused by TCE was associated with early suppression of hepatoprotection rather than an increase in conventional pro-inflammatory events. This information was used to create a novel toxicodynamic model of IL-6-mediated TCE-induced liver inflammation. - Highlights: • We developed a toxicodynamic model to study effects of trichloroethylene on liver. • We examined protective as well as pro-inflammatory events in the liver. • Trichloroethylene inhibits IL-6 production by macrophages. • Trichloroethylene

  10. Autoimmune Diseases Co-Existing with Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Jadali

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmunity and viral infections are closely associated fields, and viruses have been proposed as a likely aetiological, contributory or triggering factors of systemic autoimmune diseases. Hepatitis C virus seems to be the virus usually associated with the appearance of autoimmune diseases, and the relationship between chronic hepatitis C virus infection and some autoimmune disease has been studied. For some of these disorders their association with hepatitis C virus infection is well recognized while for others it remains probable or weak. Examples of autoimmune phenomena observed in chronic hepatitis C virus infection include rheumatoid arthritis, thyroid disease, cryoglobulinaemia, immune thrombocytopenic purpura, systemic lupus erythematosus and sjogren syndrome. To date, the etiological role and the pathogenetic involvement of the hepatitis C infection remains unknown.The aim of this study is to assess the presence of different autoimmune manifestations of hepatitis C virus infection reported in literature.

  11. The Epidemiologic Evidence Linking Autoimmune Diseases and Psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benros, Michael E; Eaton, William W; Mortensen, Preben B

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes the epidemiologic evidence linking autoimmune diseases and psychosis. The associations between autoimmune diseases and psychosis have been studied for more than a half century, but research has intensified within the last decades, since psychosis has been associated...... with genetic markers of the immune system and with excess autoreactivity and other immune alterations. A range of psychiatric disorders, including psychosis, have been observed to occur more frequently in some autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus and multiple sclerosis. Many autoimmune......, there is some evidence of associations of psychosis with a family history of autoimmune disorders and vice versa. Additionally, several autoimmune diseases, individually and in aggregate, have been identified as raising the risk for psychotic disorders in longitudinal studies. The associations have been...

  12. Applications of Next-generation Sequencing in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yiyangzi Ma; Na Shi; Mengtao Li; Fei Chen; Haitao Niu

    2015-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases are a group of heterogeneous disorders caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Although numerous causal genes have been identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS), these susceptibility genes are correlated to a relatively low disease risk, indicating that environmental factors also play an important role in the pathogen-esis of disease. The intestinal microbiome, as the main symbiotic ecosystem between the host and host-associated microorganisms, has been demonstrated to regulate the development of the body’s immune system and is likely related to genetic mutations in systemic autoimmune diseases. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology, with high-throughput capacity and accuracy, provides a powerful tool to discover genomic mutations, abnormal transcription and intestinal microbiome identification for autoimmune diseases. In this review, we briefly outlined the applications of NGS in systemic autoimmune diseases. This review may provide a reference for future studies in the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune diseases.

  13. Pharmacometabolomics-aided Pharmacogenomics in Autoimmune Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsila, Theodora; Konstantinou, Evangelia; Lavda, Ioanna; Malakis, Harilaos; Papantoni, Ioanna; Skondra, Lamprini; Patrinos, George P

    2016-03-01

    Inter-individual variability has been a major hurdle to optimize disease management. Precision medicine holds promise for improving health and healthcare via tailor-made therapeutic strategies. Herein, we outline the paradigm of "pharmacometabolomics-aided pharmacogenomics" in autoimmune diseases. We envisage merging pharmacometabolomic and pharmacogenomic data (to address the interplay of genomic and environmental influences) with information technologies to facilitate data analysis as well as sense- and decision-making on the basis of synergy between artificial and human intelligence. Humans can detect patterns, which computer algorithms may fail to do so, whereas data-intensive and cognitively complex settings and processes limit human ability. We propose that better-informed, rapid and cost-effective omics studies need the implementation of holistic and multidisciplinary approaches.

  14. Pharmacometabolomics-aided Pharmacogenomics in Autoimmune Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodora Katsila

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Inter-individual variability has been a major hurdle to optimize disease management. Precision medicine holds promise for improving health and healthcare via tailor-made therapeutic strategies. Herein, we outline the paradigm of “pharmacometabolomics-aided pharmacogenomics” in autoimmune diseases. We envisage merging pharmacometabolomic and pharmacogenomic data (to address the interplay of genomic and environmental influences with information technologies to facilitate data analysis as well as sense- and decision-making on the basis of synergy between artificial and human intelligence. Humans can detect patterns, which computer algorithms may fail to do so, whereas data-intensive and cognitively complex settings and processes limit human ability. We propose that better-informed, rapid and cost-effective omics studies need the implementation of holistic and multidisciplinary approaches.

  15. Introducing Polyautoimmunity: Secondary Autoimmune Diseases No Longer Exist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Rojas-Villarraga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Similar pathophysiological mechanisms within autoimmune diseases have stimulated searches for common genetic roots. Polyautoimmunity is defined as the presence of more than one autoimmune disease in a single patient. When three or more autoimmune diseases coexist, this condition is called multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS. We analyzed the presence of polyautoimmunity in 1,083 patients belonging to four autoimmune disease cohorts. Polyautoimmunity was observed in 373 patients (34.4%. Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD and Sjögren's syndrome (SS were the most frequent diseases encountered. Factors significantly associated with polyautoimmunity were female gender and familial autoimmunity. Through a systematic literature review, an updated search was done for all MAS cases (January 2006–September 2011. There were 142 articles retrieved corresponding to 226 cases. Next, we performed a clustering analysis in which AITD followed by systemic lupus erythematosus and SS were the most hierarchical diseases encountered. Our results indicate that coexistence of autoimmune diseases is not uncommon and follows a grouping pattern. Polyautoimmunity is the term proposed for this association of disorders, which encompasses the concept of a common origin for these diseases.

  16. 自身抗体及生化学指标对自身免疫性肝病筛查及诊断的意义%Significance of autoantibodies and biochemical indicators in diagnosis of autoimmune liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩丽利; 路遥; 张艳丽; 申戈; 张璐; 邱国华; 吴云忠; 杨民; 李明慧

    2012-01-01

    Objective To analyze antibodies and biochemical characteristics of patients finally diagnosed as autoimmune liver diseases(AILD)by liver biopsy,aim to provide laboratory evidence for screening and diagnosis of AILD in China.Methods The clinical data were collected and analyzed,including history of previous liver disease,accompanying symptoms,extrahepatic manifestations,biochemical tests,γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT),globulin (GLO),γglobulin,erythrocyte sedimentation rate,autoimmune antibodies,ENA spectra,of patients who were diagnosed as AILD by histopathology from July 2008 to June 2011 in Beijing Ditan Hospital affiliated to Capital Medical University.Results 65 patients were diagnosed as AILD by histopathology,including 39 cases autoimmune hepatitis (AIH),14 cases primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC),5 cases primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC),7 cases PBC-AIH overlap syndrome.AILD was more common in middle-aged women:of 65 cases,14 cases were male,and 51 cases (78.46%)female,and 47 cases(72.30%)were beyond 40 years old.In autoimmune liver disease,the positive rates of alanine aminotransferase (ALT),aspartate aminotransferase (AST),γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) were high,more than 80%.In PBC,anti-mitochondrial M2 subtype antibody(AMA-M2)-positive accounted for 41.7%.In PBC-AIH overlap syndrome,the rates of alkaline phosphatase(ALP) >2 × ULN,GGT >5 × ULN,ALT≥5 × ULN were 71.4% (5/7),57.1% (4/7),14.3% (1/7) respectively,and positive rates of anti-nuclear antibody (ANA),antimitochondrial antibody (AMA),AMA-M2 were 100 % (7/7),71.4 % (5/7),71.4 % (5/7) respectively.The positive rates of non-specific antibody anti-Ro-52 antibody (Ro-52)in AIH,PBC,PBC-AIH overlap syndrome were 26.7%(8/30),25% (3/12),83.3% (5/6)respectively.The positive rates of anti-centromere protein B antibody(CENPB)in AIH,PBC,PBC-AIH overlap syndrome were 6.7 % (2/30),25 % (3/12),16.7 % (1/6) respectively.The positive rates of anti-SS-A antibody (SS-A) in the

  17. Celiac Disease and Autoimmune-Associated Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenia Lauret

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is frequently accompanied by a variety of extradigestive manifestations, thus making it a systemic disease rather than a disease limited to the gastrointestinal tract. This is primarily explained by the fact that CD belongs to the group of autoimmune diseases. The only one with a known etiology is related to a permanent intolerance to gluten. Remarkable breakthroughs have been achieved in the last decades, due to a greater interest in the diagnosis of atypical and asymptomatic patients, which are more frequent in adults. The known presence of several associated diseases provides guidance in the search of oligosymptomatic cases as well as studies performed in relatives of patients with CD. The causes for the onset and manifestation of associated diseases are diverse; some share a similar genetic base, like type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D; others share pathogenic mechanisms, and yet, others are of unknown nature. General practitioners and other specialists must remember that CD may debut with extraintestinal manifestations, and associated illnesses may appear both at the time of diagnosis and throughout the evolution of the disease. The implementation of a gluten-free diet (GFD improves the overall clinical course and influences the evolution of the associated diseases. In some cases, such as iron deficiency anemia, the GFD contributes to its disappearance. In other disorders, like T1D, this allows a better control of the disease. In several other complications and/or associated diseases, an adequate adherence to a GFD may slow down their evolution, especially if implemented during an early stage.

  18. Selected Aspects in the Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, György; Huszthy, Peter C; Fossum, Even; Konttinen, Yrjö; Nakken, Britt; Szodoray, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune processes can be found in physiological circumstances. However, they are quenched with properly functioning regulatory mechanisms and do not evolve into full-blown autoimmune diseases. Once developed, autoimmune diseases are characterized by signature clinical features, accompanied by sustained cellular and/or humoral immunological abnormalities. Genetic, environmental, and hormonal defects, as well as a quantitative and qualitative impairment of immunoregulatory functions, have been shown in parallel to the relative dominance of proinflammatory Th17 cells in many of these diseases. In this review we focus on the derailed balance between regulatory and Th17 cells in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Additionally, we depict a cytokine imbalance, which gives rise to a biased T-cell homeostasis. The assessment of Th17/Treg-cell ratio and the simultaneous quantitation of cytokines, may give a useful diagnostic tool in autoimmune diseases. We also depict the multifaceted role of dendritic cells, serving as antigen presenting cells, contributing to the development of the pathognomonic cytokine signature and promote cellular and humoral autoimmune responses. Finally we describe the function and role of extracellular vesicles in particular autoimmune diseases. Targeting these key players of disease progression in patients with autoimmune diseases by immunomodulating therapy may be beneficial in future therapeutic strategies.

  19. Selected Aspects in the Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    György Nagy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune processes can be found in physiological circumstances. However, they are quenched with properly functioning regulatory mechanisms and do not evolve into full-blown autoimmune diseases. Once developed, autoimmune diseases are characterized by signature clinical features, accompanied by sustained cellular and/or humoral immunological abnormalities. Genetic, environmental, and hormonal defects, as well as a quantitative and qualitative impairment of immunoregulatory functions, have been shown in parallel to the relative dominance of proinflammatory Th17 cells in many of these diseases. In this review we focus on the derailed balance between regulatory and Th17 cells in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Additionally, we depict a cytokine imbalance, which gives rise to a biased T-cell homeostasis. The assessment of Th17/Treg-cell ratio and the simultaneous quantitation of cytokines, may give a useful diagnostic tool in autoimmune diseases. We also depict the multifaceted role of dendritic cells, serving as antigen presenting cells, contributing to the development of the pathognomonic cytokine signature and promote cellular and humoral autoimmune responses. Finally we describe the function and role of extracellular vesicles in particular autoimmune diseases. Targeting these key players of disease progression in patients with autoimmune diseases by immunomodulating therapy may be beneficial in future therapeutic strategies.

  20. Polycystic Liver Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linda, Nguyen, E-mail: nguyenli@einstein.edu [5501 Old York Road, Philadelphia, PA 19141 (United States)

    2016-03-25

    A 77-year-old African American male presented with intermittent abdominal pain for one week. He denied nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, fevers, anorexia, or weight loss. He denied a family history of liver disease, recent travel, or history of intravenous drug abuse. His vital signs were normal. Labs revealed total bilirubin of 1.5 mg/dl, hypoalbuminaemia 3.0 gm/dl and prolonged prothrombin time of 14.8 sec. Computed Tomography of the abdomen and pelvis with contrast showed multiple hepatic cysts with the largest cyst occupying the right abdomen, measuring 20.6 cm (Panel A and). This cyst had predominantly fluid attenuation, but also contained several septations. The patient underwent laparoscopic fenestration of the large hepatic cyst with hepatic cyst wall biopsy. Pathology revealed blood without malignant cells. The patient tolerated the procedure well with improvement of his abdominal pain and normalization of his liver function tests and coagulation profile.

  1. 自身免疫性肝病患者血清IgG4水平分析%Serum IgG4 levels in patients with autoimmune liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张敏; 朱争艳; 韩涛; 聂彩云; 王伟; 杜卫杰; 周淑芬; 王棕覃; 孙扬; 丁贤

    2014-01-01

    To study the differences of serum IgG4 levels in various autoimmune liver diseases and to analyze the clinical characterization of patients with high serum IgG4 levels. Methods 65 patients with autoimmune liver diseases were enrolled for this study including 11 patients with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH),47 patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and 7 patients with overlap syndrome of AIH and PBC. The serum IgG4 levels was detected by immuno-scatter turbidmetry. The differences of serum IgG4 levels in the three groups were studied. The clinical features of patients with autoimmune liver disease were analyzed according to their serum IgG4 levels. The significance of inter-group differences of measurement data was assessed by Student’s t-test or Mann-Whitney U test and enumeration data by Fisher’s exact test. Results The serum IgG4 levels in patients with AIH was 642.2 mg/L(97.7 mg/L~1687.0 mg/L),a little higher than in patients with PBC [153.9 mg/L(78.9 mg/L~400.3 mg/L),P=0.076] and in with overlap syndrome [229.9 mg/L(154.9 mg/L ~417.9 mg/L),P=0.388];Three patients with AIH had high serum IgG4 levels (≥1350 mg/L) out of 11 patients with AIH. The ratio of IgG4/IgG was higher in the three patients with higher as compared to 8 with relatively low serum IgG4 levels (P﹤0.05);The three patients with elevated IgG4 levels had diabetes mellitus type 2 and one of them was also complicated with rheumatoid arthritis,whereas the other 8 patients with low serum IgG4 levels were not;14 patients with PBC with higher serum IgG4 levels (≥200 mg/L) had higher total serum bilirubin levels as com-pared to those in 33 patients with relatively low serum IgG4 levels [(45.09 ±74.85)μmol/L vs.(26.38 ±23.03)μmol/L,P=0.05)]. Conclusion Compared with patients with PBC or overlap syndrome of AIH and PBC,the pa-tients with AIH have a higher serum IgG4 levels. The patients with AIH with high serum IgG4 levels might be complicated with other autoimmune or metabolic diseases.%探

  2. Autoimmunity-Basics and link with periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Mohindra, Kanika; Singla, Shifali

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune reactions reflect an imbalance between effector and regulatory immune responses, typically develop through stages of initiation and propagation, and often show phases of resolution (indicated by clinical remissions) and exacerbations (indicated by symptomatic flares). The fundamental underlying mechanism of autoimmunity is defective elimination and/or control of self-reactive lymphocytes. Periodontal diseases are characterized by inflammatory conditions that directly affect teeth-supporting structures, which are the major cause of tooth loss. Several studies have demonstrated the involvement of autoimmune responses in periodontal disease. Evidence of involvement of immunopathology has been reported in periodontal disease. Bacteria in the dental plaque induce antibody formation. Autoreactive T-cells, natural killer cells, ANCA, heat shock proteins, autoantibodies, and genetic factors are reported to have an important role in the autoimmune component of periodontal disease. The present review describes the involvement of autoimmune responses in periodontal diseases and also the mechanisms underlying these responses.

  3. Alloimmunization in multitransfused liver disease patients: Impact of underlying disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenu Bajpai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Transfusion support is vital to the management of patients with liver diseases. Repeated transfusions are associated with many risks such as transfusion-transmitted infection, transfusion immunomodulation, and alloimmunization. Materials and Methods: A retrospective data analysis of antibody screening and identification was done from February 2012 to February 2014 to determine the frequency and specificity of irregular red-cell antibodies in multitransfused liver disease patients. The clinical and transfusion records were reviewed. The data was compiled, statistically analyzed, and reviewed. Results: A total of 842 patients were included in our study. Alloantibodies were detected in 5.22% of the patients. Higher rates of alloimmunization were seen in patients with autoimmune hepatitis, cryptogenic liver disease, liver damage due to drugs/toxins, and liver cancer patients. Patients with alcoholic liver disease had a lower rate of alloimmunization. The alloimmunization was 12.7% (23/181 in females and 3.17% (21/661 in males. Antibodies against the Rh system were the most frequent with 27 of 44 alloantibodies (61.36%. The most common alloantibody identified was anti-E (11/44 cases, 25%, followed by anti-C (6/44 cases, 13.63%. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that alloimmunization rate is affected by underlying disease. Provision of Rh and Kell phenotype-matched blood can significantly reduce alloimmunization.

  4. Hot topics in autoimmune diseases: perspectives from the 2013 Asian Congress of Autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmi, Carlo

    2014-08-01

    Our understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms and possible treatments of autoimmune diseases has significantly increased over the past decade. Nonetheless, numerous major issues remain open and such issues span from epidemiology to clinimetrics and from the role of infectious agents to the search for accurate biomarkers in paradigmatic conditions such as systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and spondyloarthropathies. In the case of cardiovascular comorbidities of autoimmune diseases or, more generally, the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, fascinating evidence points to a central role of autoimmunity and metabolic dysfunctions and a possible role of therapies targeting inflammation to ameliorate both conditions. Basic science and translational medicine contribute to identify common mechanisms that underlie different autoimmune diseases, as in the case of tumor necrosis factor alpha, and more recently vitamin D, autoantibodies, T and B regulatory cells, and microRNA. Finally, new therapies are expected to significantly change our approach to autoimmune diseases, as represented by the recent FDA approval of the first oral JAK inhibitor. The present article moves from the major topics that were discussed at the 2013 Asian Congress of Autoimmunity in Hong Kong to illustrate the most recent data from leading journals in autoimmunity and immunology.

  5. Optimizing management in autoimmune hepatitis with liver failure at initial presentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jonathan R Potts; Sumita Verma

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a disease of unknown etiology, its hallmark being ongoing hepatic inflamma-tion. By its very nature, it is a chronic condition, al-though increasingly, we are becoming aware of patients with acute presentations, some of whom may have liver failure. There are very limited published data on patients with AIH with liver failure at initial diagnosis, which consist mostly of small retrospective studies. As a consequence, the clinical features and optimal management of this cohort remain poorly defined. A subset of patients with AIH who present with liver failure do respond to corticosteroids, but for the vast majority, an urgent liver transplantation may offer the only hope of long-term survival. At present, there is uncertainty on how best to stratify such a cohort into responders and non-responders to corticosteroids as soon as possible after hospitalization, thus optimizing their management. This editorial attempts to answer some of the unre-solved issues relating to management of patients with AIH with liver failure at initial presentation. However, it must be emphasized that, at present, this editorial is based mostly on small retrospective studies, and it is an understatement that multicenter prospective studies are urgently needed to address this important clinical issue.

  6. Asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR): a peculiar target of liver-specific autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Roggenbuck, Dirk; Mytilinaiou, Maria G.; Lapin, Sergey V.; Reinhold, Dirk; Conrad, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    Asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) autoantibodies have been considered specific markers of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). The exact mechanisms responsible for the development of these autoantibodies and leading to autoimmunity to this peculiar liver receptor remain elusive. Furthermore, loss of T cell tolerance to ASGPR has been demonstrated in patients with AIH, but it is poorly understood whether such liver-specific T cell responses bear a pathogenic potential and/or participate in the precip...

  7. Pervasive Sharing of Genetic Effects in Autoimmune Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cotsapas, Chris; Voight, Benjamin F.; Rossin, Elizabeth; Lage, Kasper; Neale, Benjamin M.; Wallace, Chris; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Behrens, Timothy; Cho, Judy; De Jager, Philip L.; Elder, James T.; Graham, Robert R.; Gregersen, Peter; Klareskog, Lars; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; van Heel, David A.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Worthington, Jane; Todd, John A.; Hafler, David A.; Rich, Stephen S.; Daly, Mark J.

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified numerous, replicable, genetic associations between common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and risk of common autoimmune and inflammatory (immune-mediated) diseases, some of which are shared between two diseases. Along with epidemiological

  8. Association of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and liver cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Perla Oliveira; Ferreira, Fabio Gonçalves; Nascimento, Maria de Fátima Araújo; Vieira, Andrea; Ribeiro, Mauricio Alves; David, André Ibrahim; Szutan, Luiz Arnaldo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and liver cancer, and NAFLD prevalence in different liver tumors. METHODS: This is a retrospective study of the clinical, laboratory and histological data of 120 patients diagnosed with primary or secondary hepatic neoplasms and treated at a tertiary center where they underwent hepatic resection and/or liver transplantation, with subsequent evaluation of the explant or liver biopsy. The following criteria were used to exclude patients from the study: a history of alcohol abuse, hepatitis B or C infection, no tumor detected in the liver tissue examined by histological analysis, and the presence of chronic autoimmune hepatitis, hemochromatosis, Wilson’s disease, or hepatoblastoma. The occurrence of NAFLD and the association with its known risk factors were studied. The risk factors considered were diabetes mellitus, impaired glucose tolerance, impaired fasting glucose, body mass index, dyslipidemia, and arterial hypertension. Presence of reticulin fibers in the hepatic neoplasms was assessed by histological analysis using slide-mounted specimens stained with either hematoxylin and eosin or Masson’s trichrome and silver impregnation. Analysis of tumor-free liver parenchyma was carried out to determine the association between NAFLD and its histological grade. RESULTS: No difference was found in the association of NAFLD with the general population (34.2% and 30.0% respectively, 95%CI: 25.8-43.4). Evaluation by cancer type showed that NAFLD was more prevalent in patients with liver metastasis of colorectal cancer than in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (OR = 3.99, 95%CI: 1.78-8.94, P < 0.001 vs OR = 0.60, 95%CI: 0.18-2.01, P = 0.406 and OR = 0.70, 95%CI: 0.18-2.80, P = 0.613, respectively). There was a higher prevalence of liver fibrosis in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (OR = 3.50, 95%CI: 1.06-11.57, P = 0.032). Evaluation of the

  9. Autoimmune disease classification by inverse association with SNP alleles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Sirota

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available With multiple genome-wide association studies (GWAS performed across autoimmune diseases, there is a great opportunity to study the homogeneity of genetic architectures across autoimmune disease. Previous approaches have been limited in the scope of their analysis and have failed to properly incorporate the direction of allele-specific disease associations for SNPs. In this work, we refine the notion of a genetic variation profile for a given disease to capture strength of association with multiple SNPs in an allele-specific fashion. We apply this method to compare genetic variation profiles of six autoimmune diseases: multiple sclerosis (MS, ankylosing spondylitis (AS, autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD, rheumatoid arthritis (RA, Crohn's disease (CD, and type 1 diabetes (T1D, as well as five non-autoimmune diseases. We quantify pair-wise relationships between these diseases and find two broad clusters of autoimmune disease where SNPs that make an individual susceptible to one class of autoimmune disease also protect from diseases in the other autoimmune class. We find that RA and AS form one such class, and MS and ATD another. We identify specific SNPs and genes with opposite risk profiles for these two classes. We furthermore explore individual SNPs that play an important role in defining similarities and differences between disease pairs. We present a novel, systematic, cross-platform approach to identify allele-specific relationships between disease pairs based on genetic variation as well as the individual SNPs which drive the relationships. While recognizing similarities between diseases might lead to identifying novel treatment options, detecting differences between diseases previously thought to be similar may point to key novel disease-specific genes and pathways.

  10. B cell epitope spreading: mechanisms and contribution to autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornaby, Caleb; Gibbons, Lauren; Mayhew, Vera; Sloan, Chad S; Welling, Andrew; Poole, Brian D

    2015-01-01

    While a variety of factors act to trigger or initiate autoimmune diseases, the process of epitope spreading is an important contributor in their development. Epitope spreading is a diversification of the epitopes recognized by the immune system. This process happens to both T and B cells, with this review focusing on B cells. Such spreading can progress among multiple epitopes on a single antigen, or from one antigenic molecule to another. Systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, pemphigus, bullous pemphigoid and other autoimmune diseases, are all influenced by intermolecular and intramolecular B cell epitope spreading. Endocytic processing, antigen presentation, and somatic hypermutation act as molecular mechanisms that assist in driving epitope spreading and broadening the immune response in autoimmune diseases. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current understanding of B cell epitope spreading with regard to autoimmunity, how it contributes during the progression of various autoimmune diseases, and treatment options available.

  11. Ocular Involvement in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generali, Elena; Cantarini, Luca; Selmi, Carlo

    2015-12-01

    Eye involvement represents a common finding in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases, particularly rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren syndrome, seronegative spondyloarthropathy, and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis. The eye is a privileged immune site but commensal bacteria are found on the ocular surface. The eye injury may be inflammatory, vascular or infectious, as well as iatrogenic, as in the case of hydroxychloroquine, chloroquine, corticosteroids, and bisphosphonates. Manifestations may affect different components of the eye, with episcleritis involving the episclera, a thin layer of tissue covering the sclera; scleritis being an inflammation of the sclera potentially leading to blindness; keratitis, referring to corneal inflammation frequently associated with scleritis; and uveitis as the inflammation of the uvea, including the iris, ciliary body, and choroid, subdivided into anterior, posterior, or panuveitis. As blindness may result from the eye involvement, clinicians should be aware of the possible manifestations and their management also independent of the ophthalmologist opinion as the therapeutic approach generally points to the underlying diseases. In some cases, the eye involvement may have a diagnostic implication, as for episcleritis in rheumatoid arthritis, or acute anterior uveitis in seronegative spondyloarthritis. Nonetheless, some conditions lack specificity, as in the case of dry eye which affects nearly 30 % of the general population. The aim of this review is to elucidate to non-ophthalmologists the major ocular complications of rheumatic diseases and their specific management and treatment options.

  12. Family History of Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O D Rymar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was estimate the clinical characteristics of Graves' disease (GD and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT in first@degree relatives of persons in families with autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD. Patients: Eighty one patients with AITD of 40 families, mean age (+/@s.d. 41.9 ± 1.8; range 18-73 years. In 10 families (25% AITD traced among siblings, whose average age was 33.6 ± 3.5 years, 29 families (72.5% - of two generations (parent@ descendant 57.4 ± 1.6 and 32.2 ± 1.5 years, p = 0.001, respectively. In one family (2.5% the disease was traced in both parents and their offspring. Results. Among patients with a positive family history for AITD is dominated by a pair of parent - descendant with a diagnosis of hypothyroidism (55%. Preliminary evidence of genetic anticipation in GD and HT. Patients with a family history of AITD ill of GD and HT to 50 years (84%, half - up to 30 years (47%. In familial forms of GD, a decrease in compensated patients for two generations. Among parents and descendant with hypothyroidism, there is a low percentage of persons over the medical euthyroidism (42%.

  13. Membranous Nephropathy Associated With Immunological Disorder-Related Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauvergne, Maxime; Moktefi, Anissa; Rabant, Marion; Vigneau, Cécile; Kofman, Tomek; Burtey, Stephane; Corpechot, Christophe; Stehlé, Thomas; Desvaux, Dominique; Rioux-Leclercq, Nathalie; Rouvier, Philippe; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Frouget, Thierry; Daugas, Eric; Jablonski, Mathieu; Dahan, Karine; Brocheriou, Isabelle; Remy, Philippe; Grimbert, Philippe; Lang, Philippe; Chazouilleres, Oliver; Sahali, Dil; Audard, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The association between membranous nephropathy (MN) and immunological disorder-related liver disease has not been extensively investigated, and the specific features of this uncommon association, if any, remain to be determined. We retrospectively identified 10 patients with this association. We aimed to describe the clinical, biological, and pathological characteristics of these patients and their therapeutic management. The possible involvement of the phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) in these apparent secondary forms of MN was assessed by immunohistochemistry with renal and liver biopsy specimens. The mean delay between MN and liver disease diagnoses was 3.9 years and the interval between the diagnosis of the glomerular and liver diseases was <1.5 years in 5 patients. MN was associated with a broad spectrum of liver diseases including primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). AIH whether isolated (n = 3) or associated with PBC (n = 2) or PSC (n = 2) was the most frequent autoimmune liver disease. Circulating PLA2R antibodies were detected in 4 out of 9 patients but the test was performed under specific immunosuppressive treatment in 3 out of 9 patients. Seven of the 9 patients with available renal tissue specimens displayed enhanced expression of PLA2R in glomeruli whereas PLA2R was not expressed in liver parenchyma from these patients or in normal liver tissue. The study of immunoglobulin (Ig) subclasses of deposits in glomeruli revealed that the most frequent pattern was the coexistence of IgG1 and IgG4 immune deposits with IgG4 predominating. Detection of PLA2R antibodies in glomeruli but not in liver parenchyma is a common finding in patients with MN associated with autoimmune liver disease, suggesting that these autoantibodies are not exclusively detected in idiopathic MN. PMID:26222864

  14. Hypertension and liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik; Møller, Søren

    2004-01-01

    to increased arterial blood pressure. Subjects with established arterial hypertension (essential, secondary) may become normotensive during the development of cirrhosis, and arterial hypertension is rarely manifested in patients with cirrhosis, even in cases with renovascular disease and high circulating renin......Arterial hypertension is a common disorder with a frequency of 10% to 15% in subjects in the 40- to 60-year age group. Yet most reports find the prevalence of arterial hypertension in patients with chronic liver disease (cirrhosis) much lower. In this review, we consider the alterations in systemic...... hemodynamics in cirrhosis. The most characteristic findings in cirrhotic patients are vasodilatation with low systemic vascular resistance, increased cardiac output, high arterial compliance, secondary activation of counterregulatory systems (sympathetic nervous system, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system...

  15. Hypertension and liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens H; Møller, Søren

    2004-01-01

    Arterial hypertension is a common disorder with a frequency of 10% to 15% in subjects in the 40- to 60-year age group. Yet most reports find the prevalence of arterial hypertension in patients with chronic liver disease (cirrhosis) much lower. In this review, we consider the alterations in systemic......, neuropituitary release of vasopressin), and resistance to vasopressors. The vasodilatory state is mediated through nitric oxide, calcitonin gene-related peptide, adrenomedullin, and other vasodilators, and is most pronounced in the splanchnic area. This constitutes an effective (although relative) counterbalance...... to increased arterial blood pressure. Subjects with established arterial hypertension (essential, secondary) may become normotensive during the development of cirrhosis, and arterial hypertension is rarely manifested in patients with cirrhosis, even in cases with renovascular disease and high circulating renin...

  16. Screening in liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paolo Del Poggio; Marzio Mazzoleni

    2006-01-01

    A disease is suitable for screening if it is common, if the target population can be identified and reached and if both a good screening test and an effective therapy are available. Of the most common liver diseases only viral hepatitis and genetic hemochromatosis partially satisfy these conditions. Hepatitis C is common, the screening test is good and the therapy eliminates the virus in half of the cases, but problems arise in the definition of the target population. In fact generalized population screening is not endorsed by international guidelines,although some recommend screening immigrants from high prevalence countries. Opportunistic screening (case finding) of individuals with classic risk factors,such as transfusion before 1992 and drug addiction,is the most frequently used strategy, but there is disagreement whether prison inmates, individuals with a history of promiscuous or traumatic sex and health care workers should be screened. In a real practice setting the performance of opportunistic screening by general practitioners is low but can be ameliorated by training programs. Screening targeted to segments of the population or mass campaigns are expensive and therefore interventions should be aimed to improve opportunistic screening and the detection skills of general practitioners. Regarding genetic hemochromatosis there is insufficient evidence for population screening, but individual physicians can decide to screen racial groups with a high prevalence of the disease, such as people in early middle age and of northern European origin. In the other cases opportunistic screening of high risk individuals should be performed, with a high level of suspicion in case of unexplained liver disease, diabetes, juvenile artropathy, sexual dysfunction and skin pigmentation.

  17. Involvement of dendritic cells in autoimmune diseases in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed Ann M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dendritic cells (DCs are professional antigen-presenting cells that are specialized in the uptake of antigens and their transport from peripheral tissues to the lymphoid organs. Over the last decades, the properties of DCs have been intensely studied and much knowledge has been gained about the role of DCs in various diseases and health conditions where the immune system is involved, particularly in cancer and autoimmune disorders. Emerging clues in autoimmune diseases, suggest that dendritic cell dysregulation might be involved in the development of various autoimmune disorders in both adults and children. However, studies investigating a possible contribution of DCs in autoimmune diseases in the pediatric population alone are scanty. The purpose of this review is to give a general overview of the current literature on the relevance of dendritic cells in the most common autoimmune conditions of childhood.

  18. Fibropolycystic liver disease in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veigel, Myka Call [Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences, Kansas City, MO (United States); University of Missouri-Kansas City, St. Luke' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States); Prescott-Focht, Julia; Zinati, Reza [University of Missouri-Kansas City, St. Luke' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States); Rodriguez, Michael G. [University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO (United States); Shao, Lei [Children' s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Pathology, Kansas City, MO (United States); Moore, Charlotte A.W.; Lowe, Lisa H. [University of Missouri-Kansas City, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States); Children' s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States)

    2009-04-15

    Fibropolycystic liver diseases are a group of associated congenital disorders that present most often in childhood. These disorders include congenital hepatic fibrosis, biliary hamartomas, autosomal dominant polycystic liver disease, choledochal cysts and Caroli disease. We present a discussion and illustrations of the embryology, genetics, anatomy, pathology, imaging approach and key imaging features that distinguish fibropolycystic liver disease in children. The pathogenesis of these disorders is believed to be abnormal development of the embryonic ductal plates, which ultimately form the liver and biliary systems. An understanding of the abnormal embryogenesis helps to explain the characteristic imaging features of these disorders. (orig.)

  19. Fatty Liver Disease (Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver Disease & NASH Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Biliary Atresia Cirrhosis Hemochromatosis Hepatitis A through E (Viral Hepatitis) Hepatitis ...

  20. Stem cells in liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poll, D. van

    2008-01-01

    Failure of the liver, the largest vital organ in the body, unequivocally results in death. Hepatic failure most commonly evolves over a period of several years as a result of chronic liver disease, most often viral hepatitis or alcoholic liver damage. In rarer cases, the organ shuts down within week

  1. Autoimmune Hepatitis and Celiac Disease: Case Report Showing an Entero-Hepatic Link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Tovoli

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder primarily targeting the small bowel, although extraintestinal extensions have been reported. The autoimmune processes can affect the liver with manifestations such as primary biliary cirrhosis and autoimmune hepatitis. We describe a 61-year-old woman with celiac disease and an increased levels of aminotransferases. The persistence of increased levels of aminotransferases after 1 year of gluten-free diet and the positivity for an anti-nuclear and anti-double-strand DNA antibodies led to a misdiagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus-related hepatitis. Based on these findings the patient was placed on steroids, which after a few months were stopped because of the onset of diabetes mellitus. Soon after steroid withdrawal, the patient had a marked increase in aminotransferases and γ-globulins, and a liver biopsy revealed chronic active hepatitis. A course of three months of steroids and azathioprine normalized both biochemical and clinical parameters. Currently the patient is symptom-free and doing well. In conclusion, a hypertransaminasemia persisting after a gluten-free diet should be interpreted as a sign of coexisting autoimmune liver disease. Any autoantibody positivity (in this case to ANA and anti-dsDNA should be carefully considered in order to avoid misdiagnosis delaying appropriate clinical management.

  2. De novo autoimmune hepatitis in liver transplant: State-of-the-art review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukotic, Ranka; Vitale, Giovanni; D'Errico-Grigioni, Antonia; Muratori, Luigi; Andreone, Pietro

    2016-03-14

    In the two past decades, a number of communications, case-control studies, and retrospective reports have appeared in the literature with concerns about the development of a complex set of clinical, laboratory and histological characteristics of a liver graft dysfunction that is compatible with autoimmune hepatitis. The de novo prefix was added to distinguish this entity from a pre-transplant primary autoimmune hepatitis, but the globally accepted criteria for the diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis have been adopted in the diagnostic algorithm. Indeed, de novo autoimmune hepatitis is characterized by the typical liver necro-inflammation that is rich in plasma cells, the presence of interface hepatitis and the consequent laboratory findings of elevations in liver enzymes, increases in serum gamma globulin and the appearance of non-organ specific auto-antibodies. Still, the overall features of de novo autoimmune hepatitis appear not to be attributable to a univocal patho-physiological pathway because they can develop in the patients who have undergone liver transplantation due to different etiologies. Specifically, in subjects with hepatitis C virus recurrence, an interferon-containing antiviral treatment has been indicated as a potential inception of immune system derangement. Herein, we attempt to review the currently available knowledge about de novo liver autoimmunity and its clinical management.

  3. History and milestones of mouse models of autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xinhua; Huang, Qiaoniang; Petersen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are a group of disorders mediated by self-reactive T cells and/or autoantibodies. Mice, as the most widely used animal for modeling autoimmune disorders, have been extensively used in the investigation of disease pathogenesis as well as in the search for novel therapeutics. Since the first mouse model of multiple sclerosis was established more than 60 years ago, hundreds of mouse models have been established for tens of autoimmune diseases. These mouse models can be divided into three categories based on the approaches used for disease induction. The first one represents the induced models in which autoimmunity is initiated in mice by immunization, adoptive transfer or environmental factors. The second group is formed by the spontaneous models where mice develop autoimmune disorders without further induction. The third group refers to the humanized models in which mice bearing humanized cells, tissues, or genes, develop autoimmune diseases either spontaneously or by induction. This article reviews the history and highlights the milestones of the mouse models of autoimmune diseases.

  4. An autoimmune disease prevented by anti-retroviral drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Beck-Engeser Gabriele B; Eilat Dan; Wabl Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Both Aicardi-Goutières syndrome, a Mendelian mimic of congenital infection, and the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus can result from mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme Trex1. In mice, the absence of Trex1 causes severe myocarditis. The enzyme is thought to degrade endogenous retroelements, thus linking them to autoimmune disease. However, inhibition of reverse transcription by the inhibitor zidovudine (AZT) did not ameliorate the disease, weakening th...

  5. [Comorbid autoimmune pathology in patients treated with disease modifying drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharova, Z A; Sizyakina, L P; Belovolova, R A; Megeryan, V A

    2016-01-01

    Because of intensive growth of the prevalence of multiple sclerosis (MS) and other autoimmune diseases (AID) during the last years, the comorbidity of MS and AID is not a rarity. In this literature review, the development of comorbid AID in patients with MS is considered to be the probable complication of disease modifying therapy with drugs of different groups. The authors present the own data on the prevalence of comorbid autoimmune pathology in patients with MS treated with disease modifying drugs.

  6. PI3K inhibitors as potential therapeutics for autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Jennifer; Archer, Sophie; Ward, Stephen

    2014-08-01

    Aberrant overactivation of the immune system can give rise to chronic and persistent self-attack, culminating in autoimmune disease. This is currently managed therapeutically using potent immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory drugs. Class I phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) have been identified as ideal therapeutic targets for autoimmune diseases given their wide-ranging roles in immunological processes. Recent studies into the function of selective PI3K inhibitors in vitro and in vivo have yielded encouraging results, allowing progression into the clinic. Here, we review their recent progress across a range of autoimmune diseases.

  7. Stem cell autograft and allograft in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cata, Angelo; Matarangolo, Angela; Inglese, Michele; Rubino, Rosa; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi

    2016-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by an insufficiency of immune tolerance and, although treated with a number of useful drugs, may need more unconventional therapeutic strategies for their more severe presentations. Among such unconventional therapeutic approaches, stem cell autograft and allograft have been used, with the aim of stimulating disease remission by modifying the pathogenic mechanisms that induce anomalous responses against self-antigens. Autologous transplantation is performed with the purpose of retuning autoimmune cells, whereas allogeneic transplantation is performed with the purpose of replacing anomalous immune effectors and mediators. In this article, we comprehensively review up-to-date information on the autoimmune diseases for which the transplantation of stem cells is indicated.

  8. Accounting for chance in the calculus of autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Daniel J

    2010-02-01

    Discussions around the etiology of autoimmune disease routinely focus on the interplay between genes and the environment. In turn, efforts to ameliorate these diseases seek to modify genetic and environmental factors. However, there may be a third element that also accounts for the progression of autoimmunity. This article explores the role of chance, exemplified by the stochastic process of immune repertoire generation, in the evolution of autoimmunity. The presented modeling studies and concepts suggest that chance plays as significant a role as genes or environment. This hypothesis implies that a full understanding of the role of genes and environment will also require investigators to account for stochastic processes in building comprehensive disease models.

  9. Liver transplantation for Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilsky, Michael L

    2014-05-01

    Although Wilsons's disease (WD) may be treated with copper chelation (to remove copper) or zinc salts (to prevent absorption) to alleviate or prevent symptom development in most patients, there are WD patients for whom medical therapy is inadequate and survival would be unlikely without liver transplantation. Liver transplantation is indicated for the ∼5% of WD patients with acute liver failure as the first presentation of disease, most commonly in the second decade of life, or those who present with end-stage liver disease and severe hepatic insufficiency, most commonly in the third and fourth decades. Liver transplantation restores normal biliary copper excretion (thereby preventing disease recurrence) and promotes removal of copper from extrahepatic sites. Outcomes of liver transplantation for WD are excellent, including both cadaveric and living donors.

  10. T Cell Vaccination as an Immunotherapy for Autoimmune Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JingwuZhang

    2004-01-01

    Immunization with inactivated autoreactive T cells (T cell vaccination) selected from individual's own T cellrepertoire provides a unique in vivo setting for testing immune regulation that is known to involve interactionsof a variety of related surface molecules (1). It induces regulatory immune responses that closely resemble thein vivo situation where the immune system is challenged by clonal activation and expansion of given T cellpopulations in various autoimmune diseases. T cell vaccination provides a powerful means of eliciting naturalreactions of the immune system in response to clonal expansion of T cells, which can used as a therapeuticapproach to suppress or eliminate specific pathogenic autoreactive T cells in autoimmune conditions. Clinicaltrials using T cell vaccination to deplete autoreactive T cells in human autoimmune conditions have begun toreveal the pathologic relevance of various autoimmune T cell populations in the disease processes, providing aunique opportunity to test the autoimmune theories in a clinical setting. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.2004; 1(5):321-327.

  11. Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... have immunity to this disease Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  12. Autoimmune disease: Conceptual history and contributions of ocular immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margo, Curtis E; Harman, Lynn E

    2016-01-01

    Medical historians identify the mid-20th century as the time when the scientific and medical communities acknowledged the existence of autoimmune disease. Several conditions including sympathetic ophthalmia and endophthalmitis phacoanaphylactica, however, were proposed as autoimmune disorders much earlier. During the first half of the century, autoimmune disease was viewed as biologically implausible. Paul Ehrlich coined the term horror autotoxicus to emphasize that autoimmunity would contradict nature's aversion to self-injury. The discoveries of allergy and anaphylaxis were the first clues that the immune system was capable of self-harm. A major obstacle to comprehending the pathogenesis of autoimmunity was how the immune system distinguishes foreign from self, a process eventually understood in the context of immune tolerance. Investigators of sympathetic ophthalmia and endophthalmitis phacoanaphylactica were positioned to invalidate horror autotoxicus but lacked sufficiently convincing experimental and clinical evidence to accomplish the task. Seminal studies of chronic thyroiditis and a series of clinical laboratory breakthroughs led to the general acceptance of autoimmune disease in the 1950s. The travails encountered by ophthalmic investigators offer insights into the how medical ideas take shape. We review the contributions of ocular immunology to the conceptual development of autoimmune disease and explore the reasons why the concept caught on slowly.

  13. Shaking Out Clues to Autoimmune Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... susceptible people. Immune cells called T helper 17 (Th17) cells help us fight infection, but they’ve also been linked with several autoimmune disorders. Th17 cells, along with other types of helper T ...

  14. Liver transplantation in polycystic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krohn, Paul S; Hillingsø, Jens; Kirkegaard, Preben

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Polycystic liver disease (PLD) is a rare, hereditary, benign disorder. Hepatic failure is uncommon and symptoms are caused by mass effects leading to abdominal distension and pain. Liver transplantation (LTX) offers fully curative treatment, but there is still some controversy about...... whether it is a relevant modality considering the absence of liver failure, relative organ shortage, perioperative risks and lifelong immunosuppression. The purpose of this study was to review our experience of LTX for PLD and to compare the survival with the overall survival of patients who underwent LTX....../kidney transplantation. One patient had undergone kidney transplantation 10 years earlier. RESULTS: Median follow-up was 55 months. One patient who underwent combined transplantation died after 5.4 months because of multiorgan failure after re-LTX, and one patient, with well-functioning grafts, died of lymphoma after 7...

  15. [Congenital atrioventricular block and maternal autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herreman, G; Sauvaget, F; Généreau, T; Galezowski, N

    1990-01-01

    Congenital heart block is rare; it is acquired in utero, definitive and, more often than not, complete. It can be diagnosed by the appearance of fetal bradycardia around the 23rd week of gestation, during ultrasonographic monitoring of pregnancy. Heart block is usually associated with the presence of anti-Ro and/or anti-La antibodies in the mother's serum. These maternal immunological abnormalities can be isolated or associated with an autoimmune disease, usually systemic lupus erythematosus, but also Sjögren's syndrome, or more rarely still, an as yet unclassified connective tissue disease. Anti-Ro and anti-La antibodies cross the placental barrier and react with a fetal heart, leading to acute fetal myocarditis by the 17th week of gestation. When severe, it is lethal, otherwise it can result in degeneration and endocardial fibroelastosis, disrupting conduction and leading to congenital heart block. The ideal treatment would be prevention with corticosteroids. When the mother is Ro or La antibody-positive before pregnancy, elimination of these circulating antibodies can be attempted by treatment with 0.5 mg/kg body wt/d of prednisolone for 3 months. If the treatment is successful, corticotherapy can be prescribed early in the pregnancy to try to protect the fetus. However, there is not always a relationship between maternal anti-Ro antibodies and fetal heart block. If the Ro/La antibody-positive woman is already pregnant, but before her 17th week, it is possible to prescribe dexamethasone, which crosses the placenta and remains active, sometimes in association with plasmapheresis.

  16. [Wilson's disease: clinical spectrum of liver disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa Palominos, Alejandra; Ibáñez Samaniego, Luis; Catalina Rodríguez, María-Vega; Pajares Díaz, José; Clemente Ricote, Gerardo

    2013-02-01

    Wilson's disease is a hereditary autosomal recessive disorder of copper metabolism,characterized by copper accumulation in the liver and brain. This rare entity, which has a broad clinical spectrum, is often difficult to diagnose and should therefore always be suspected in patients with liver disease of unclear cause. We describe two types of manifestation of liver disease in two patients; the first developed fulminant hepatic failure requiring urgent liver transplantation and the second showed advanced chronic liver disease and received standard medical treatment. The objective of this clinical observation is to analyze the diagnosis of Wilson's disease in two patients with distinct onset, illustrating the broad clinical spectrum of the disease, and its treatment.

  17. Vitamin D in systemic and organ-specific autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Theodor, Emanuel; Segal, Ramit Maoz; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2013-10-01

    Lately, vitamin D has been linked with metabolic and immunological processes, which established its role as an essential component of human health preservation. Vitamin D has been defined as natural immune modulators, and upon activation of its receptors (VDRs), it regulates calcium metabolism, cellular growth, proliferation and apoptosis, and other immunological functions. Epidemiological data underline a strong correlation between poor vitamin D status and higher risk for chronic inflammatory illnesses of various etiologies, including autoimmune diseases. Epidemiological, genetic, and basic studies indicated a potential role of vitamin D in the pathogenesis of certain systemic and organ-specific autoimmune diseases. These studies demonstrate correlation between low vitamin D and prevalence of diseases. In addition, VDRs' polymorphisms observed in some of these autoimmune diseases may further support a plausible pathogenic link. Notably, for some autoimmune disease, no correlation with vitamin D levels could be confirmed. Thus, in the current review we present the body of evidence regarding the plausible roles of vitamin D and VDR's polymorphism in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. We summarize the data regarding systemic (i.e., systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, etc.) and organ-specific (i.e., multiple sclerosis, diabetes mellitus, primary biliary cirrhosis, etc.) autoimmune diseases, in which low level of vitamin D was found comparing to healthy subjects. In addition, we discuss the correlations between vitamin D levels and clinical manifestations and/or activity of diseases. In this context, we address the rational for vitamin D supplementation in patients suffering from autoimmune diseases. Further studies addressing the mechanisms by which vitamin D affects autoimmunity and the proper supplementation required are needed.

  18. Autoimmune diseases and severe infections as risk factors for schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benros, Michael E; Nielsen, Philip R; Nordentoft, Merete;

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases have been associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia. It has been suggested that brain-reactive autoantibodies are part of the mechanisms behind this association. Furthermore, an increased permeability of the blood-brain barrier has been observed during periods...... of infection and inflammation. The authors therefore investigated whether autoimmune diseases combined with exposures to severe infections may increase the risk of schizophrenia...

  19. [Autoimmune diseases in type 1A diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira-Hermosillo, Aldo; Molina-Ayala, Mario Antonio

    2015-08-01

    Type 1A diabetes (DM1A) is an autoimmune disease that comprises 10% of patients with diabetes mellitus. Its frequency is gradually increasing in countries like Mexico. Patients with DM1A commonly have hypothyroidism, Addison disease, celiac disease and less common diseases such as polyglandular syndrome. These diseases are related to susceptibility genes such as HLA, CTLA-4 and PTPN22, which induce central and peripheral immunologic tolerance. This review article emphasizes the importance of searching other autoimmune diseases in patients with DM1A, to improve their prognosis and quality of life.

  20. Alterations in immune function with biologic therapies for autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Her, Minyoung; Kavanaugh, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, psoriasis, and others, are characterized by dysregulation of various aspects of normal immunity and inflammation. Biologic agents targeting key components of the dysregulated immune response have dramatically improved patient outcomes and transformed treatment paradigms for a number of systemic inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Despite their excellent efficacy, because they do affect normal immune responsiveness, biologic agents can potentially be associated with a variety of adverse effects. Important potential adverse effects related to the use of biologic agents include immunosuppression, which might result in outcomes such as infection, and autoimmunity, that could result in paradoxical inflammation or even autoimmune disease. In this article the current clinical evidence and immunologic mechanisms of the adverse effects related to biologic agents are discussed.

  1. Epigenetic control of autoimmune diseases: from bench to bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picascia, Antonietta; Grimaldi, Vincenzo; Pignalosa, Orlando; De Pascale, Maria Rosaria; Schiano, Concetta; Napoli, Claudio

    2015-03-01

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed several genes predisposing to autoimmunity, however, concordance rates in monozygotic twins are significantly below 50% for several autoimmune diseases. The limited presence of a strong genetic association only in some patients supports that other non-genetic mechanisms are active in these pathologies. Epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation, histone modification, and microRNA signaling regulate gene expression and are sensitive to external stimuli and they might be as bridging between genetic and environmental factors. Some evidence has highlighted the involvement of epigenetic alterations in the pathogenesis of various autoimmune diseases giving rise to great expectations among clinicians and researchers. The direct role of these alterations in the initiation/progression of autoimmune diseases is still unclear. The knowledge in depth of these pathogenic and epigenetic mechanisms will increase the possibility of the control and/or prevention of autoimmune diseases through the use of drugs that target epigenetic pathways. Moreover, we could use epigenetic-related biomarkers to follow this complicated framework (for example H3K4me3 and miRNA-155 are among those proposed biomarkers). This article reviews current understanding of the epigenetic involvement in the field of autoimmune diseases especially in systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, sclerosis multiple and type 1 diabetes.

  2. Novel insights into Tim-4 function in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xin-Yu; Xu, Wang-Dong; Pan, Hai-Feng; Leng, Rui-Xue; Ye, Dong-Qing

    2015-06-01

    T-cell immunoglobulin domain and mucin domain-4 (Tim-4) was first recognized as a costimulatory molecule regulating T-cell activation. Dysregulation of Tim-4 has been found in some autoimmune conditions, particularly in the immune cells. Recently, Tim-4 was found to be critical for regulating T cells, with the ability of inhibiting naïve CD4(+) T cells and Th17 cells, increasing Th2 cell development. Tim-4 can also enhance T cell expansion via linker for activation of T cells, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Protein kinase B (PKB, also known as Akt) signaling pathways. Moreover, the Tim-4 signaling pathway may affect multiple molecular processes in autoimmune diseases. A number of previous studies have demonstrated that Tim-4 influences chronic autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus. In addition, an association between Tim-4 polymorphisms and susceptibility to several autoimmune diseases have been identified, such as RA. Taken together, recent works have indicated that Tim-4 may represent a novel target for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. In this article, we will discuss the Tim-4 function and the therapeutic potential of modulating the Tim-4 in autoimmune diseases.

  3. GM-CSF alters dendritic cells in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bao-Zhu; Ye, Qian-Ling; Xu, Wang-Dong; Li, Jie-Hua; Ye, Dong-Qing; Xu, Yuekang

    2013-11-01

    Autoimmune diseases arise from an inappropriate immune response against self components, including macromolecules, cells, tissues, organs etc. They are often triggered or accompanied by inflammation, during which the levels of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) are elevated. GM-CSF is an inflammatory cytokine that has profound impact on the differentiation of immune system cells of myeloid lineage, especially dendritic cells (DCs) that play critical roles in immune initiation and tolerance, and is involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Although GM-CSF was discovered decades ago, recent studies with some new findings have shed an interesting light on the old hematopoietic growth factor. In the inflammatory autoimmune diseases, GM-CSF redirects the normal developmental pathway of DCs, conditions their antigen presentation capacities and endows them with unique cytokine signatures to affect autoimmune responses. Here we review the latest advances in the field, with the aim of demonstrating the effects of GM-CSF on DCs and their influences on autoimmune diseases. The summarized knowledge will help to design DC-based strategies for the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  4. Pregnancy and the risk of autoimmune disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khashan, Ali S

    2012-01-31

    Autoimmune diseases (AID) predominantly affect women of reproductive age. While basic molecular studies have implicated persisting fetal cells in the mother in some AID, supportive epidemiological evidence is limited. We investigated the effect of vaginal delivery, caesarean section (CS) and induced abortion on the risk of subsequent maternal AID. Using the Danish Civil Registration System (CRS) we identified women who were born between 1960 and 1992. We performed data linkage between the CRS other Danish national registers to identify women who had a pregnancy and those who developed AID. Women were categorised into 4 groups; nulligravida (control group), women who had 1st child by vaginal delivery, whose 1st delivery was by CS and who had abortions. Log-linear Poisson regression with person-years was used for data analysis adjusting for several potential confounders. There were 1,035,639 women aged >14 years and 25,570 developed AID: 43.4% nulligravida, 44.3% had their first pregnancy delivered vaginally, 7.6% CS and 4.1% abortions. The risk of AID was significantly higher in the 1st year after vaginal delivery (RR = 1.1[1.0, 1.2]) and CS (RR = 1.3[1.1, 1.5]) but significantly lower in the 1st year following abortion (RR = 0.7[0.6, 0.9]). These results suggest an association between pregnancy and the risk of subsequent maternal AID. Increased risks of AID after CS may be explained by amplified fetal cell traffic at delivery, while decreased risks after abortion may be due to the transfer of more primitive fetal stem cells. The increased risk of AID in the first year after delivery may also be related to greater testing during pregnancy.

  5. Transient Expression of Transgenic IL-12 in Mouse Liver Triggers Unremitting Inflammation Mimicking Human Autoimmune Hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Farina, Irene; Di Scala, Marianna; Salido, Eduardo; López-Franco, Esperanza; Rodríguez-García, Estefania; Blasi, Mercedes; Merino, Juana; Aldabe, Rafael; Prieto, Jesús; Gonzalez-Aseguinolaza, Gloria

    2016-09-15

    The etiopathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) remains poorly understood. In this study, we sought to develop an animal model of human AIH to gain insight into the immunological mechanisms driving this condition. C57BL/6 mice were i.v. injected with adeno-associated viral vectors encoding murine IL-12 or luciferase under the control of a liver-specific promoter. Organ histology, response to immunosuppressive therapy, and biochemical and immunological parameters, including Ag-specific humoral and cellular response, were analyzed. Mechanistic studies were carried out using genetically modified mice and depletion of lymphocyte subpopulations. Adeno-associated virus IL-12-treated mice developed histological, biochemical, and immunological changes resembling type 1 AIH, including marked and persistent liver mononuclear cell infiltration, hepatic fibrosis, hypergammaglobulinemia, anti-nuclear and anti-smooth muscle actin Abs, and disease remission with immunosuppressive drugs. Interestingly, transgenic IL-12 was short-lived, but endogenous IL-12 expression was induced, and both IL-12 and IFN-γ remained elevated during the entire study period. IFN-γ was identified as an essential mediator of liver damage, and CD4 and CD8 T cells but not NK, NKT, or B cells were essential executors of hepatic injury. Furthermore, both MHC class I and MHC class II expression was upregulated at the hepatocellular membrane, and induction of autoreactive liver-specific T cells was detected. Remarkably, although immunoregulatory mechanisms were activated, they only partially mitigated liver damage. Thus, low and transient expression of transgenic IL-12 in hepatocytes causes loss of tolerance to hepatocellular Ags, leading to chronic hepatitis resembling human AIH type 1. This model provides a practical tool to explore AIH pathogenesis and novel therapies.

  6. Vitamin D endocrine system involvement in autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Pizzorni, Carmen; Sulli, Alberto

    2011-12-01

    Vitamin D is synthesized from cholesterol in the skin (80-90%) under the sunlight and then metabolized into an active D hormone in liver, kidney and peripheral immune/inflammatory cells. These endocrine-immune effects include also the coordinated activities of the vitamin D-activating enzyme, 1alpha-hydroxylase (CYP27B1), and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) on cells of the immune system in mediating intracrine and paracrine actions. Vitamin D is implicated in prevention and protection from chronic infections (i.e. tubercolosis), cancer (i.e. breast cancer) and autoimmune rheumatic diseases since regulates both innate and adaptive immunity potentiating the innate response (monocytes/macrophages with antimicrobial activity and antigen presentation), but suppressing the adaptive immunity (T and B lymphocyte functions). Vitamin D has modulatory effects on B lymphocytes and Ig production and recent reports have demonstrated that 1,25(OH)2D3 does indeed exert direct effects on B cell homeostasis. A circannual rhythm of trough vitamin D levels in winter and peaks in summer time showed negative correlation with clinical status at least in rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Recently, the onset of symptoms of early arthritis during winter or spring have been associated with greater radiographic evidence of disease progression at 12 months possibly are also related to seasonal lower vitamin D serum levels.

  7. Asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR): a peculiar target of liver-specific autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggenbuck, Dirk; Mytilinaiou, Maria G; Lapin, Sergey V; Reinhold, Dirk; Conrad, Karsten

    2012-12-01

    Asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) autoantibodies have been considered specific markers of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). The exact mechanisms responsible for the development of these autoantibodies and leading to autoimmunity to this peculiar liver receptor remain elusive. Furthermore, loss of T cell tolerance to ASGPR has been demonstrated in patients with AIH, but it is poorly understood whether such liver-specific T cell responses bear a pathogenic potential and/or participate in the precipitation of AIH. Newly developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays have led to the investigation of the sensitivity and specificity of anti-ASGPR antibodies for AIH. The present review provides an overview of the diagnostic and clinical relevance of anti-ASGPR antibodies. A thorough investigation of the autoreactivity against ASGPR may assist efforts to understand liver autoimmunity in susceptible individuals.

  8. Muscle cramps in liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Shivang S; Fallon, Michael B

    2013-11-01

    Muscle cramps are common in patients with liver disease and adversely influence quality of life. The exact mechanisms by which they occur remain unclear, although a number of pathophysiological events unique to liver disease may contribute. Clinical studies have identified alterations in 3 areas: nerve function, energy metabolism, and plasma volume/electrolytes. Treatments have focused on these particular areas with varied results. This review will focus on the clinical features of muscle cramps in patients with liver disease and review potential mechanisms and current therapies.

  9. Cytokines and Cytokine Profiles in Human Autoimmune Diseases and Animal Models of Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred Kunz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The precise pathomechanisms of human autoimmune diseases are still poorly understood. However, a deepened understanding of these is urgently needed to improve disease prevention and early detection and guide more specific treatment approaches. In recent years, many new genes and signalling pathways involved in autoimmunity with often overlapping patterns between different disease entities have been detected. Major contributions were made by experiments using DNA microarray technology, which has been used for the analysis of gene expression patterns in chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, among which were rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, psoriasis, systemic sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, and type-1 diabetes. In systemic lupus erythematosus, a so-called interferon signature has been identified. In psoriasis, researchers found a particular immune signalling cluster. Moreover the identification of a new subset of inflammatory T cells, so-called Th17 T cells, secreting interleukin (IL-17 as one of their major cytokines and the identification of the IL-23/IL-17 axis of inflammation regulation, have significantly improved our understanding of autoimmune diseases. Since a plethora of new treatment approaches using antibodies or small molecule inhibitors specifically targeting cytokines, cellular receptors, or signalling mechanisms has emerged in recent years, more individualized treatment for affected patients may be within reach in the future.

  10. The Corrona US registry of rheumatic and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Joel M

    2016-01-01

    The Corrona US national registry collects data concerning patient status from both the rheumatologist and patient at routine clinical encounters. Corrona has functioning disease registries in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, spondyloarthropathies, psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease. Corrona merges data concerning long-term effectiveness and safety, as well as comparative and cost effectiveness of agents to treat these autoimmune diseases.

  11. Environmental triggers and epigenetic deregulation in autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javierre, Biola M; Hernando, Henar; Ballestar, Esteban

    2011-12-01

    The study of epigenetic mechanisms in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases is receiving unprecedented attention from clinicians and researchers in the field. Autoimmune disorders comprise a wide range of genetically complex diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, and multiple sclerosis. Together they affect a significant proportion of the population and have a great economic impact on public health systems. Epigenetic mechanisms control gene expression and are influenced by external stimuli, linking environment and gene function. A variety of environmental agents, such as viral infection, hormones, certain drugs, and pollutants, have been found to influence the development of autoimmune diseases. On the other hand, there is considerable evidence of epigenetic changes, particularly DNA methylation alterations, in diseases like systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, or multiple sclerosis. However, the gap in our understanding between the specific effects of external agents and the influence on epigenetic profiles has not yet been filled. Here we review a number of studies describing epigenetic alterations in autoimmune diseases and a range of environmental factors that influence the development of autoimmune diseases. We also discuss potential mechanisms linking environment and epigenetics, consider the prospects for future epigenetic studies addressing the relationship between environment and epigenetics, and comment on the use of drugs with an epigenetic-reversing effect in the clinical management of these diseases.

  12. The role of melatonin in autoimmune and atopic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.R. Calvo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin is the main secretory product synthesized and secreted by the pineal gland during the night. Melatonin is a pleitropic molecule with a wide distribution within phylogenetically distant organisms and has a great functional versatility, including the regulation of circadian and seasonal rhythms and antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. It also possesses the capacity to modulate immune responses by regulation of the TH1/TH2 balance and cytokine production. Immune system eradicates infecting organisms without serious injury to host tissues, but sometimes these responses are inadequately controlled, giving rise to called hypersensitivity diseases, or inappropriately targeted to host tissues, causing the autoimmune diseases. In clinical medicine, the hypersensitivity diseases include the allergic or atopic diseases and the hallmarks of these diseases are the activation of TH2 cells and the production of IgE antibody. Regarding autoimmunity, at the present time we know that the key events in the development of autoimmunity are a failure or breakdown of the mechanisms normally responsible for maintaining self-tolerance in B lymphocytes, T lymphocytes, or both, the recognition of self-antigens by autoreactive lymphocytes, the activation of these cells to proliferate and differentiate into effector cells, and the tissue injury caused by the effector cells and their products. Melatonin treatment has been investigated in atopic diseases, in several animal models of autoimmune diseases, and has been also evaluated in clinical autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes the role of melatonin in atopic diseases (atopic dermatitis and asthma and in several autoimmune diseases, such as arthritis rheumatoid, multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and inflammatory bowel diseases.

  13. Epigenetics and autoimmune diseases: the X chromosome-nucleolus nexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Wesley H; Renaudineau, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases occur more often in females, suggesting a key role for the X chromosome. X chromosome inactivation, a major epigenetic feature in female cells that provides dosage compensation of X-linked genes to avoid overexpression, presents special vulnerabilities that can contribute to the disease process. Disruption of X inactivation can result in loss of dosage compensation with expression from previously sequestered genes, imbalance of gene products, and altered endogenous material out of normal epigenetic context. In addition, the human X has significant differences compared to other species and these differences can contribute to the frequency and intensity of the autoimmune disease in humans as well as the types of autoantigens encountered. Here a link is demonstrated between autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, and the X chromosome by discussing cases in which typically non-autoimmune disorders complicated with X chromosome abnormalities also present lupus-like symptoms. The discussion is then extended to the reported spatial and temporal associations of the inactive X chromosome with the nucleolus. When frequent episodes of cellular stress occur, the inactive X chromosome may be disrupted and inadvertently become involved in the nucleolar stress response. Development of autoantigens, many of which are at least transiently components of the nucleolus, is then described. Polyamines, which aid in nucleoprotein complex assembly in the nucleolus, increase further during cell stress, and appear to have an important role in the autoimmune disease process. Autoantigenic endogenous material can potentially be stabilized by polyamines. This presents a new paradigm for autoimmune diseases: that many are antigen-driven and the autoantigens originate from altered endogenous material due to episodes of cellular stress that disrupt epigenetic control. This suggests that epigenetics and the X chromosome are important aspects of autoimmune

  14. The autoimmune blistering diseases in Australia: status and services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Benjamin S; Dermawan, Andrew; Murrell, Dédée F

    2011-10-01

    The exact epidemiology of autoimmune bullous disorders in Australia is unknown. This article describes the establishment of a registry and support group to serve patients with these disorders. The registry aids research in Australia by providing epidemiologic data and maintaining an up-to-date database with patient contact details. The support group caters to the needs of patients and/or caregivers. Teledermatology, diagnosis, and management of autoimmune bullous disease are briefly reviewed.

  15. Interleukin-22: a likely target for treatment of autoimmune diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xuyan; Zheng, Song Guo

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin -22 (IL-22) is a member of IL-10 family cytokines that is produced by many different types of lymphocytes including both those of the innate and adaptive immune system. This includes activated T cells, most notably Th17 and Th22 cells, and NK cells, γδ T cells, LTi cells and LTi-like cells. IL-22 mediates its effects via the IL-22-IL-22R complex and subsequent Janus Kinase-signal transduces and activators transcription (JAK-STAT) signaling pathway. Recently accumulated evidence has indicated that IL-22 also plays an important role in the pathogenesis of many autoimmune diseases. In this review, we discuss the recent findings and advancement of the role for IL-22 in several autoimmune diseases, such as psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), hepatitis, graft versus host disease (GHVD) and allergic diseases, implicating that target IL-22 may have a therapeutic potential in those autoimmune diseases. PMID:24418299

  16. The human microbiome in rheumatic autoimmune diseases: A comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coit, Patrick; Sawalha, Amr H

    2016-09-01

    The human microbiome consists of the total diversity of microbiota and their genes. High-throughput sequencing has allowed for inexpensive and rapid evaluation of taxonomic representation and functional capability of the microbiomes of human body sites. Autoimmune and inflammatory rheumatic diseases are characterized by dysbiosis of the microbiome. Microbiome dysbiosis can be influenced by host genetics and environmental factors. Dysbiosis is also associated with shifts in certain functional pathways. The goal of this article is to provide a current and comprehensive review of the unique characteristics of the microbiome of patients with autoimmune and inflammatory rheumatic diseases, measured using high-throughput sequencing. We also highlight the need for broader studies utilizing a longitudinal approach to better understand how the human microbiome contributes to disease susceptibility, and to characterize the role of the interaction between host genetics and microbial diversity in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, disease manifestations, and progression.

  17. Tzanck Cytology in Diagnosis of Autoimmune Bullous Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Durdu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Tzanck smear test is a simple, rapid, repeatable, and inexpensive diagnostic method based on the investigation of characteristics of individual cells. For diagnosis of cutaneous diseases, cytology was first used by Arnault Tzanck in 1947. After this date, Tzanck cytology has been used in the diagnosis of various erosive-vesiculobullous, nodular, and tumoral skin lesions. In daily dermatology practice, the most common use areas of cytology are diagnosis of herpetic infections, cutaneous leishmaniasis, leprosy, and autoimmune bullous diseases. The purpose of cytology in autoimmune bullous diseases is to rapidly distinguish pemphigus from subepidermal bullous disease. In this review article, taking and staining methods of cytologic specimen for the diagnosis of autoimmune bullous diseases, and the cytologic findings have been reviewed.

  18. Is Tourette's syndrome an autoimmune disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, PJ; Kallenberg, CGM; Korf, J; Minderaa, RB

    2002-01-01

    We provide a review of recent research findings which support the involvement of autoimmunity in childhood-onset tic disorders, in particular the presence of antineuronal autoantibodies, D8/17 B lymphocyte overexpression, a marker of chorea associated with streptococcal infection, and possible benef

  19. Future perspective for diagnosis in autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis E. C. Andrade

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Human beings have taken successive approaches for the understanding and management of diseases. Initially brewed in supernatural concepts and mystical procedures, a vigorous scientific approach has emerged on the grounds of fundamental disciplines such as anatomy, microbiology, biochemistry, physiology, immunology, pathology, and pharmacology. The resulting integrated knowledge contributed to the current classification of diseases and the way Medicine is carried out today. Despite considerable progress, this approach is rather insufficient when it comes to systemic inflammatory conditions, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, that covers clinical conditions ranging from mild pauci-symptomatic diseases to rapidly fatal conditions. The treatment for such conditions is often insufficient and novel approaches are needed for further progress in these areas of Medicine. A recent breakthrough has been achieved with respect to chronic auto-inflammatory syndromes, in which molecular dissection of underlying gene defects has provided directions for target-oriented therapy. Such approach may be amenable to application in systemic auto-immune diseases with the comprehension that such conditions may be the consequence of interaction of specific environmental stimuli and an array of several and interconnected gene polymorphisms. On the bulk of this transformation, the application of principles of pharmacogenetics may lead the way towards a progressively stronger personalized Medicine.O homem tem buscado sucessivas abordagens para o entendimento e manejo das doenças. Partindo de conceitos sobrenaturais e procedimentos místicos, uma abordagem científica vigorosa vicejou com base em disciplinas fundamentais como a anatomia, microbiologia, bioquímica, fisiologia, imunologia, patologia e farmacologia. O conhecimento integrado resultante contribuiu para a atual classificação das doenças e a formacom que a Medicina atual é praticada. Apesar deste consider

  20. Holmes-Adie syndrome, autoimmune hepatitis and celiac disease: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Timea Csak; Aniko Folhoffer; Andrea Horvath; Judit Halász; Csaba Diczházi; Zsuzsa Schaff; Ferenc Szalay

    2006-01-01

    A 35-year-old female patient presented with the following symptoms of Holmes-Adie syndrome: photophobia,enlargement of the left pupil unresponsive to light,Achilles areflexia. The pilocarpine test was positive. No tumor or other neurological abnormality was found. She had a 19-year history of autoimmune hepatitis. Flares up were observed following each 3 deliveries. At age of 31she presented with diarrhea and weight loss. Abdominal tumor was detected by ultrasound. The surgically removed tumor was histologically a benign mesenteric multicystic lymphangioma. Simultaneously, celiac disease was diagnosed. Gluten-free diet resulted in a significant improvement of celiac disease, but not of autoimmune hepatitis. Autonomic neuropathy was proven by standard cardiovascular tests. The patient was a homozygous carrier for HLA DQ2 antigen characteristic for celiac disease and heterozygous for HLA DR3 B8 frequent in autoimmune liver diseases. Our novel observation on association of Holmes-Adie syndrome with autoimmune hepatitis and celiac disease is suggestive for a common immunological background for all three entities present in a patient with mesenteric multicystic lymphangioma.

  1. To screen or not to screen? Celiac antibodies in liver diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narciso-Schiavon, Janaína Luz; Schiavon, Leonardo Lucca

    2017-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a systemic immune-mediated disorder triggered by dietary gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. The typical symptoms are anemia, diarrhea, fatigue, weight loss, and abdominal pain. CD has been reported in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis, primary biliary cholangitis, autoimmune hepatitis, aminotransferase elevations, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, portal hypertension and liver cirrhosis. We evaluate recommendations for active screening for CD in patients with liver diseases, and the effect of a gluten-free diet in these different settings. Active screening for CD is recommended in patients with liver diseases, particularly in those with autoimmune disorders, steatosis in the absence of metabolic syndrome, noncirrhotic intrahepatic portal hypertension, cryptogenic cirrhosis, and in the context of liver transplantation. In hepatitis C, diagnosis of CD can be important as a relative contraindication to interferon use. Gluten-free diet ameliorates the symptoms associated with CD; however, the associated liver disease may improve, remain the same, or progress. PMID:28223722

  2. Air pollution in autoimmune rheumatic diseases: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Sylvia C L; Silva, Clovis A; Orione, Maria Angelica M; Campos, Lucia M A; Sallum, Adriana M E; Braga, Alfésio L F

    2011-11-01

    Air pollution consists of a heterogeneous mixture of gasses and particles that include carbon monoxide, nitrates, sulfur dioxide, ozone, lead, toxic by-product of tobacco smoke and particulate matter. Oxidative stress and inflammation induced by inhaled pollutants may result in acute and chronic disorders in the respiratory system, as well as contribute to a state of systemic inflammation and autoimmunity. This paper reviews the mechanisms of air contaminants influencing the immune response and autoimmunity, and it focuses on studies of inhaled pollutants triggering and/or exacerbating rheumatic diseases in cities around the world. Remarkably, environmental factors contribute to the onset of autoimmune diseases, especially smoking and occupational exposure to silica in rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Other diseases such as scleroderma may be triggered by the inhalation of chemical solvents, herbicides and silica. Likewise, primary vasculitis associated with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) may be triggered by silica exposure. Only few studies showed that air pollutants could trigger or exacerbate juvenile idiopathic arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. In contrast, no studies of tropospheric pollution triggering inflammatory myopathies and spondyloarthropathies were carried out. In conclusion, air pollution is one of the environmental factors involved in systemic inflammation and autoimmunity. Further studies are needed in order to evaluate air pollutants and their potentially serious effects on autoimmune rheumatic diseases and the mechanisms involved in the onset and the exacerbation of these diseases.

  3. Bartonella henselae Infection: An Uncommon Mimicker of Autoimmune Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Despoina N. Maritsi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a seven-year-old immunocompetent female patient who developed systemic symptoms mimicking an autoimmune rather than an infectious disease. The patient presented with rash, biquotidian fever, night sweats, and arthralgias. There was no antecedent history of cat contact. Investigations showed increased inflammatory markers, leukocytosis, thrombocytosis, hypercalcemia, and raised angiotensin-converting enzyme. Interferon-gamma releasing assay for tuberculosis infection was negative. Abdominal imaging demonstrated multifocal lesions of the liver and spleen (later proved to be granulomata, chest X-ray showed enlarged hilar lymph nodes, and ophthalmology review revealed uveitis. Clinical, laboratory, and imaging features pointed towards sarcoidosis. Subsequently, raised titers (IgM 1 : 32, IgG 1 : 256 against Bartonella confirmed the diagnosis of B. henselae infection. She was treated with gentamycin followed by ciprofloxacin; repeat investigations showed complete resolution of findings. The presence of hepatic and splenic lesions in children with bartonellosis is well documented. Our case, however, exhibited certain unusual findings such as the coexistence of acute ocular and systemic involvement in an immunocompetent host. Serological testing is an inexpensive and effective way to diagnose bartonellosis in immunocompetent patients; we suggest that bartonella serology is included in the baseline tests performed on children with prolonged fever even in the absence of contact with cats in countries where bartonellosis is prevalent.

  4. Is Tourette's syndrome an autoimmune disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, P J; Kallenberg, C G M; Korf, J; Minderaa, R B

    2002-01-01

    We provide a review of recent research findings which support the involvement of autoimmunity in childhood-onset tic disorders, in particular the presence of antineuronal autoantibodies, D8/17 B lymphocyte overexpression, a marker of chorea associated with streptococcal infection, and possible beneficial effects of immunomodulatory intervention. One of the most controversial areas in this field is the validity of the proposed PANDAS concept. Some researchers have delineated a putatively unique subgroup of patients, from the spectrum of illness encompassing Tourette's syndrome and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), whose tics and obsessive-compulsive symptoms are shown to arise in response to beta-hemolytic streptococcal infections. They designated it by the term pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS). Herein we additionally present pros and cons concerning the concept of PANDAS. Finally, recommendations for future research directions are given.

  5. Interferon Type I Driven Immune Activation in Generalized Autoimmune Diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Brkić (Zana)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis describes research performed on several generalized autoimmune diseases with the main focus on primary Sjögren’s syndrome. Interferon type I has been implicated in the pathogenesis of these diseases and will be introduced in this chapter together with other important immune f

  6. Collection of hematopoietic stem cells from patients with autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burt, RK; Fassas, A; Snowden, JA; Kozak, T; Wulffraat, NM; Nash, RA; Dunbar, CE; Arnold, R; Prentice, G; Bingham, S; Marmont, AM; McSweeney, PA; van Laar, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    We reviewed data from 24 transplant centers in Asia, Australia, Europe, and North America to determine the outcomes of stem cell collection including methods used, cell yields, effects on disease activity, and complications in patients with autoimmune diseases. Twenty-one unprimed bone marrow harves

  7. The diagnostic value of detection of liver-related autoantibodies in autoimmune liver diseases%肝病相关自身抗体检测在自身免疫性肝病诊断中的价值研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高会霞; 刘玉珍

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the positive rate of detection of autoantibodies in patients with different liver diseases and in patients with autoimmune liver diseases by clinical epidemiological survey in order to explore the diagnostic value of detection of autoantibodies in autoimmune liver diseases. Methods The detection results for autoantibody in 2,714 specimens from October 2008 to October 2010 were retrospectively analyzed, furthermore,the clinical data of the autoantibody-positive cases were reviewed. Results Among 2,714 serum specimens,472 cases were positive for autoantibodies,with 17.4% positive rate,418 cases were positive for ANA, with 15.4% positive rate,124 cases were positive for AMA with 4. 57% positive rate,91 cases were positive for ASMA,with 3. 35% positive rate, 16 cases were positive for LKM,with 0.59% positive rate,8 cases were positive for LMA,with 0. 29% positive rate,5 cases were positive for LC-1 ,with 0. 18% positive rate,3 cases were positive for LSP.with 0. 11% positive rate. Among 2,914 specimens, there were 59 cases of AIH,with 2. 17% positive rate,there were 61 cases of PBC,with 2. 24% positive rate. The autoantibody-positive patients accounted for 74.57% ,who were diagnosed as viral hepatitis and related diseases. Conclusion The detection for autoantibody is a necessary condition for diagnosing autoimmune liver diseases,but these antibodies can also be found in viral hepatitis, drug-induced hepatitis and other diseases.%目的 自身免疫性肝病临床流行病学调查,观察各肝病患者中自身抗体检测的阳性率,自身免疫性肝病检测的阳性率;探讨自身抗体检测对自身免疫性肝病的诊断价值.方法 对2007年10月至2010年10月2 714份自身抗体检验结果进行回顾性分析,并对自身抗体阳性病例的查阅临床资料.结果 2 714份血清中自身抗体阳性472例,阳性率17.4%,抗核抗体(ANA)阳性418例,阳性率15.4%,抗线粒体抗体(AMA)阳性124例,阳性率4.57

  8. Biomarkers for cardiovascular risk assessment in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Priscila Camillo; Ferber, Philippe; Vuilleumier, Nicolas; Cutler, Paul

    2015-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases, such as antiphospholipid syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, and rheumatoid arthritis, are characterized by a high prevalence of cardiovascular (CV) disease (CVD), which constitutes the leading causes of morbidity and mortality among such patients. Although such effects are partly explained by a higher prevalence of traditional CV risk factors, many studies indicate that such factors do not fully explain the enhanced CV risk in these patients. In addition, risk stratification algorithms based upon traditional CV risk factors are not as predictive in autoimmune diseases as in the general population. For these reasons, the timely and accurate assessment of CV risk in these high-risk populations still remains an unmet clinical need. An enhanced contribution of different inflammatory components of the immune response, as well as autoimmune elements (e.g. autoantibodies, autoantigens, and cellular response), has been proposed to underlie the incremental CV risk observed in these populations. Recent advances in proteomic tools have contributed to the discovery of proteins involved in CVDs, including some that may be suitable to be used as biological markers. In this review we summarize the main markers in the field of CVDs associated with autoimmunity, as well as the recent advances in proteomic technology and their application for biomarker discovery in autoimmune disease.

  9. DNA-abzymes in autoimmune diseases in clinic and experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T E Naumova

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA-abzymes enzymes in autoimmune diseases in clinic and experiment T.E. Naumova, O.M. Durova, A.G. Gabibov, Z.S. Alekberova, S. V. Suchkov DNA-hydrolyzing autoantibodies (AAB or DNA-abzymes can be found in autoimmune diseases in clinic and experiment. Technology of serum express screening for presence of DNA abzymes is described. Comparative study of DNA-hydrolising activity in patients with different forms of systemic and organ-specific autoimmune diseases was performed. Blood of clinically healthy donors was usually free of IgG DNA-abzymes. DNA-abzymes were most often revealed in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and rheumatoid arthritis (RA less often in patients with organ-specific forms of autoimmune disturbances. The results of the study confirm the hypothesis of autoimmune origin of IgG DNA abzymes and demonstrate the possibility to use them in clinical practice for monitoring to disease activity in SLE and RA.

  10. Celiac disease markers in patients with liver diseases: A single center large scale screening study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pavel Drastich; Eva Honsová; Alena Lodererová; Marcela Jare(s)ová; Aneta Pekáriková; Iva Hoffmanová; Ludmila Tu(c)ková

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To study the coincidence of celiac disease,we tested its serological markers in patients with various liver diseases.METHODS:Large-scale screening of serum antibodies against tissue transglutaminase (tTG),and deamidated gliadin using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and serum antibodies against endomysium using immunohistochemistry,in patients with various liver diseases (n =962) and patients who underwent liver transplantation (OLTx,n =523) was performed.The expression of tTG in liver tissue samples of patients simultaneously suffering from celiac disease and from various liver diseases using immunohistochemistry was carried out.The final diagnosis of celiac disease was confirmed by histological analysis of small-intestinal biopsy.RESULTS:We found that 29 of 962 patients (3%) with liver diseases and 5 of 523 patients (0.8%) who underwent OLTx were seropositive for IgA and IgG anti-tTG antibodies.However,celiac disease was biopsy-diagnosed in 16 patients:4 with autoimmune hepatitis type Ⅰ,3 with Wilson's disease,3 with celiac hepatitis,2 with primary sclerosing cholangitis,1with primary biliary cirrhosis,1 with Budd-Chiari syndrome,1 with toxic hepatitis,and 1 with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.Unexpectedly,the highest prevalence of celiac disease was found in patients with Wilson's disease (9.7%),with which it is only rarely associated.On the other hand,no OLTx patients were diagnosed with celiac disease in our study.A pilot study of the expression of tTG in liver tissue using immunohistochemistry documented the overexpression of this molecule in endothelial cells and periportal hepatocytes of patients simultaneously suffering from celiac disease and toxic hepatitis,primary sclerosing cholangitis or autoimmune hepatitis type Ⅰ.CONCLUSION:We suggest that screening for celiac disease may be beneficial not only in patients with associated liver diseases,but also in patients with Wilson's disease.

  11. Genetics of liver disease: From pathophysiology to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Tom H; Lammert, Frank; Thompson, Richard J

    2015-04-01

    Paralleling the first 30 years of the Journal of Hepatology we have witnessed huge advances in our understanding of liver disease and physiology. Genetic advances have played no small part in that. Initial studies in the 1970s and 1980s identified the strong major histocompatibility complex associations in autoimmune liver diseases. During the 1990 s, developments in genomic technologies drove the identification of genes responsible for Mendelian liver diseases. Over the last decade, genome-wide association studies have allowed for the dissection of the genetic susceptibility to complex liver disorders, in which also environmental co-factors play important roles. Findings have allowed the identification and elaboration of pathophysiological processes, have indicated the need for reclassification of liver diseases and have already pointed to new disease treatments. In the immediate future genetics will allow further stratification of liver diseases and contribute to personalized medicine. Challenges exist with regard to clinical implementation of rapidly developing technologies and interpretation of the wealth of accumulating genetic data. The historical perspective of genetics in liver diseases illustrates the opportunities for future research and clinical care of our patients.

  12. Autoimmune Disease in First-Degree Relatives and Spouses of Individuals With Celiac Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emilsson, Louise; Wijmenga, Cisca; Murray, Joseph A.; Ludvigsson, Jonas F.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: First-degree relatives of individuals with celiac disease are at increased risk for this disorder, but little is known about their risk for other autoimmune diseases. We assessed the risk of nonceliac autoimmune disease in first-degree relatives and spouses of people with celiac d

  13. Therapeutic antibodies that target inflammatory cytokines in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yuping; Dong, Chen

    2016-04-01

    Inflammatory cytokines are key regulators of immune responses. Persistent and excessive production of inflammatory cytokines underscores the development of autoimmune diseases. Therefore, neutralizing inflammatory cytokines or antagonizing their receptor function is considered as a useful therapeutic strategy to treat autoimmune diseases. To achieve the success of such a strategy, understanding of the complex actions of these cytokines and cytokine networks is required. In this review we focus on four inflammatory cytokines--tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-23 and IL-17--and dissect how the dysregulation of these cytokines regulates autoimmune diseases. On the basis of pre-clinical and clinical data, we specifically discuss the therapeutic rationale for targeting these cytokines and describe the potential adverse effects.

  14. Alcoholic liver disease: The gut microbiome and liver crosstalk

    OpenAIRE

    Hartmann, Phillipp; Seebauer, Caroline T.; Schnabl, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Alcoholic fatty liver disease can progress to steatohepatitis, alcoholic hepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. Patients with alcohol abuse show quantitative and qualitative changes in the composition of the intestinal microbiome. Furthermore, patients with alcoholic liver disease have increased intestinal permeability and elevated systemic levels of gut-derived microbial products. Maintaining eubiosis, stabilizing ...

  15. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patrick-Melin, A J; Kalinski, M I; Kelly, K R

    2009-01-01

    that features steatosis plus inflammation, termed nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which may in turn progress to hepatic fibrosis, cirrhosis, and sub-acute liver failure. Thus, NAFLD and its subsequent complications create a significant health burden, and currently there is no effective treatment strategy...

  16. HEMOSTATIC DISORDERS IN LIVER DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. Minov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The liver is an essential player in the pathway of coagulation in both primary and secondary hemostasis as it is the site of synthesis of all coagulation factors and their inhibitors. Liver diseases are associated with complex changes in coagulation and the delicate balance between pro and antithrombotic factors is preserved but reset to a lower level. There is growing evidence that portal and hepatic vein thrombosis is cause of disease progression in cirrhotic patients and worsens hemostatic abnormalities. These hemostatic abnormalities do not always lead to spontaneous bleeding, which may be triggered only by additional factors, such as infections. Usually therapy for coagulation disorders in liver disease is needed only during bleeding or before invasive procedures. In patients with end stage liver disease liver transplantation is the only treatment available, which can restore normal hemostasis, and correct genetic clotting defects. During liver transplantation hemorrhage may occur due to the pre-existing hypocoagulable state, the collateral circulation caused by portal hypertension and increased fibrinolysis. 

  17. Allergen-specific immunotherapy and risk of autoimmune disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Allan; Madsen, Flemming; Skaaby, Tea

    2012-01-01

    After 100 years of experience with allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), an issue that is still unresolved is whether SIT can act as a trigger of, or as a risk factor for, autoimmune disease. We searched the literature for evidence on this topic.......After 100 years of experience with allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), an issue that is still unresolved is whether SIT can act as a trigger of, or as a risk factor for, autoimmune disease. We searched the literature for evidence on this topic....

  18. Review on thymoma and thymoma-associated autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-min LI

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Thymic carcinomas are tumors of the anterior mediastinum derived from the epithelial cells of the thymus gland. Malignancies linked to thymoma lead to the loss of self-tolerance leading to autoimmune diseases, including myasthenia gravis, pure red cell aplastic anemia, systemic lupus erythematosus and pemphigus etc. In recent years, three main mechanisms have been proposed to elucidate these interactions, such as immature T cell theory, tumor-gene theory and the combination mechanism of cellular and humoral immunity. In fact, the resection of the thymoma is beneficial to many patients of thymoma related autoimmune diseases. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.08.16

  19. Age impact on autoimmune thyroid disease in females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoian, Dana; Craciunescu, Mihalea; Timar, Romulus; Schiller, Adalbert; Pater, Liana; Craina, Marius

    2013-10-01

    Thyroid autoimmune disease, a widespread phenomenon in female population, impairs thyroid function during pregnancy. Identifying cases, which will develop hypothyroidism during pregnancy, is crucial in the follow-up process. The study group comprised 108 females, with ages between 20-40 years; with known inactive autoimmune thyroid disease, before pregnancy that became pregnant in the study follow-up period. They were monitored by means of clinical, hormonal and immunological assays. Supplemental therapy with thyroid hormones was used, where needed. Maternal age and level of anti-thyroid antibodies were used to predict thyroid functional impairment.

  20. Periodontal disease and liver cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønkjær, Lea Ladegaard

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Studies suggest that periodontal disease, a source of subclinical and persistent infection, may be associated with various systemic conditions, including liver cirrhosis. The aim of this study was to examine the literature and determine the relationship between periodontal disease...... health', 'periodontal disease', 'mouth disease', 'gingivitis', and 'periodontitis'. RESULTS: Thirteen studies published between 1981 and 2014 were found to include data on oral health and periodontal disease in cirrhotic patients. Studies indicated an increased incidence of periodontal disease...... in patients with liver cirrhosis, measured with several different periodontal indices. The reported prevalence of periodontal disease in cirrhosis patients ranged from 25.0% to 68.75% in four studies and apical periodontitis was found in 49%-79% of the patients. One study found that mortality was lower among...

  1. Liver diseases in pregnancy: diseases not unique to pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almashhrawi, Ashraf A; Ahmed, Khulood T; Rahman, Rubayat N; Hammoud, Ghassan M; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2013-11-21

    Pregnancy is a special clinical state with several normal physiological changes that influence body organs including the liver. Liver disease can cause significant morbidity and mortality in both pregnant women and their infants. Few challenges arise in reaching an accurate diagnosis in light of such physiological changes. Laboratory test results should be carefully interpreted and the knowledge of what normal changes to expect is prudent to avoid clinical misjudgment. Other challenges entail the methods of treatment and their safety for both the mother and the baby. This review summarizes liver diseases that are not unique to pregnancy. We focus on viral hepatitis and its mode of transmission, diagnosis, effect on the pregnancy, the mother, the infant, treatment, and breast-feeding. Autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, Wilson's disease, Budd Chiari and portal vein thrombosis in pregnancy are also discussed. Pregnancy is rare in patients with cirrhosis because of the metabolic and hormonal changes associated with cirrhosis. Variceal bleeding can happen in up to 38% of cirrhotic pregnant women. Management of portal hypertension during pregnancy is discussed. Pregnancy increases the pathogenicity leading to an increase in the rate of gallstones. We discuss some of the interventions for gallstones in pregnancy if symptoms arise. Finally, we provide an overview of some of the options in managing hepatic adenomas and hepatocellular carcinoma during pregnancy.

  2. Liver disease in women: the influence of gender on epidemiology, natural history, and patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Jennifer; Peters, Marion G

    2013-10-01

    Women more commonly present with acute liver failure, autoimmune hepatitis, benign liver lesions, primary biliary cirrhosis, and toxin-mediated hepatotoxicity. Women less commonly have malignant liver tumors, primary sclerosing cholangitis, and viral hepatitis. There is a decreased rate of decompensated cirrhosis in women with hepatitis C virus infection, no survival difference in alcohol-related liver disease, and improved survival from hepatocellular carcinoma. In general, men are 2-fold more likely to die from chronic liver disease and cirrhosis than are women. Liver transplant occurs less commonly in women than in men, with variable disease outcomes based on etiology. This review highlights the epidemiology, natural history, treatment outcomes, and pathophysiology of common liver diseases in women and discusses how gender influences disease incidence, presentation, progression, and outcomes. Pregnancy-related liver disease is not covered.

  3. [Alcoholic liver disease and liver transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testino, Gianni; Patussi, Valentino; Scafato, Emanuele

    2013-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is the second most common diagnosis among patients undergoing liver transplantation (LT) in Europe and in the United States. The outcome of patients transplanted for ALD is at least as good as that for most other diagnoses and better than that for hepatitis C virus. In case of severe acute alcoholic hepatitis (AAH) non-responders to medical therapy, the reason for denying LT is that it requires abstinence from alcohol for six months before consideration for a transplant. A strict application of a period of abstinence as a policy for transplant eligibility is unfair to non-responder patients, as most of them will have died prior to the end of the six-month sober period. In our opinion, in severe AAH subjects with a good social support, with the frequency of self-help groups (alcoholics anonymous or association of clubs of alcoholics in treatment), with the frequency of Alcohol Unit and without severe psychotic or personality disorders, the lack of pre-LT abstinence alone should not be a barrier against being listed.

  4. [Coexistence of Celiac Disease and autoimmune hepatitis case study and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagle, Martín; Nolte, Cecilia; Luna, Eduardo; Scavino, Yolanda

    2006-01-01

    The case of a patient who was initially diagnosed with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, with subsequent documentation of Celiac Disease histologically and serologically is reported. The patient presented elevation of the aminotransferases, upon detection of the Celiac Disease which was initially attributed to the underlying disease. However, despite the complete resolution of her articular symptoms with a gluten-free diet, the liver chemistry abnormalities persisted. This led to consider an autoimmune hepatitis as the cause which was documented with a liver biopsy three months after the diagnosis of the celiac disease and under a strict gluten-free diet. Treatment with prednisone and azathioprine was initiated with complete normalization of aminotransferase levels. We present the sequence of events with the results and a review of the literature.

  5. Toll-Like Receptor Pathways in Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ji-Qing; Szodoray, Peter; Zeher, Margit

    2016-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases are a family of chronic systemic inflammatory disorders, characterized by the dysregulation of the immune system which finally results in the break of tolerance to self-antigen. Several studies suggest that Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an essential role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. TLRs belong to the family of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that recognize a wide range of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). TLRs are type I transmembrane proteins and located on various cellular membranes. Two main groups have been classified based on their location; the extracelluar group referred to the ones located on the plasma membrane while the intracellular group all located in endosomal compartments responsible for the recognition of nucleic acids. They are released by the host cells and trigger various intracellular pathways which results in the production of proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, as well as the expression of co-stimulatory molecules to protect against invading microorganisms. In particular, TLR pathway-associated proteins, such as IRAK, TRAF, and SOCS, are often dysregulated in this group of diseases. TLR-associated gene expression profile analysis together with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assessment could be important to explain the pathomechanism driving autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize recent findings on TLR pathway regulation in various autoimmune diseases, including Sjögren's syndrome (SS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), multiple sclerosis (MS), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic sclerosis (SSc), and psoriasis.

  6. Modulation by Melatonin of the Pathogenesis of Inflammatory Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huey-Kang Sytwu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin is the major secretory product of the pineal gland during the night and has multiple activities including the regulation of circadian and seasonal rhythms, and antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. It also possesses the ability to modulate immune responses by regulation of the T helper 1/2 balance and cytokine production. Autoimmune diseases, which result from the activation of immune cells by autoantigens released from normal tissues, affect around 5% of the population. Activation of autoantigen-specific immune cells leads to subsequent damage of target tissues by these activated cells. Melatonin therapy has been investigated in several animal models of autoimmune disease, where it has a beneficial effect in a number of models excepting rheumatoid arthritis, and has been evaluated in clinical autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis and ulcerative colitis. This review summarizes and highlights the role and the modulatory effects of melatonin in several inflammatory autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and inflammatory bowel disease.

  7. T Cell Vaccination as an Immunotherapy for Autoimmune Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingwu Zhang

    2004-01-01

    Immunization with inactivated autoreactive T cells (T cell vaccination) selected from individual's own T cell repertoire provides a unique in vivo setting for testing immune regulation that is known to involve interactions of a variety of related surface molecules (1). It induces regulatory immune responses that closely resemble the in vivo situation where the immune system is challenged by clonal activation and expansion of given T cell populations in various autoimmune diseases. T cell vaccination provides a powerful means of eliciting natural reactions of the immune system in response to clonal expansion of T cells, which can used as a therapeutic approach to suppress or eliminate specific pathogenic autoreactive T cells in autoimmune conditions. Clinical trials using T cell vaccination to deplete autoreactive T cells in human autoimmune conditions have begun to reveal the pathologic relevance of various autoimmune T cell populations in the disease processes, providing a unique opportunity to test the autoimmune theories in a clinical setting. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.2004;1(5):321-327.

  8. Selenium status and over-expression of interleukin-15 in celiac disease and autoimmune thyroid diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Velia Stazi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In celiac disease (CD, for its multifactorial nature, the target organs are not limited to the gut, but include thyroid, liver, skin and reproductive and nervous systems. Between the extraintestinal symptoms associated with CD, autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs are more evident, underlining as CD-related autoimmune alterations can be modulated not only by gluten but also by various concurrent endogenous (genetic affinity, over-expression of cytokines and exogenous (environment, nutritional deficiency factors. In their pathogenesis a central role for over-expression of interleukin-15 (IL-15 is shown, by inhibiting apoptosis, leading to the perpetuation of inflammation and tissue destruction. Thyroid is particularly sensitive to selenium deficiency because selenoproteins are significant in biosynthesis and activity of thyroid hormones; besides, some selenoproteins as glutathione peroxidase are involved in inhibiting apoptosis. Thus, selenium malabsorption in CD can be thought as a key factor directly leading to thyroid and intestinal damage. Considering the complexity of this interaction and on the basis of available evidence, the aim of this review is to assess as preventive and therapeutic target the role of IL-15 and selenium in the pathogeneses of both CD and AITD.

  9. Immunoglobulin G4-related disease: autoimmune pancreatitis and extrapancreatic manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Alvarenga Fernandes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a case of immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4-related disease with pancreatic and extrapancreatic involvement, including the biliary and renal systems. Given the importance of imaging methods for the diagnosis of IgG4-related disease and its differentiation from pancreatic adenocarcinoma, we emphasize important abdominal computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings related to this recently recognized systemic autoimmune disease.

  10. Immunoglobulin G4-related disease: autoimmune pancreatitis and extrapancreatic manifestations*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Daniel Alvarenga; Kido, Ricardo Yoshio Zanetti; Barros, Ricardo Hoelz de Oliveira; Martins, Daniel Lahan; Penachim, Thiago José; Caserta, Nelson Marcio Gomes

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related disease with pancreatic and extrapancreatic involvement, including the biliary and renal systems. Given the importance of imaging methods for the diagnosis of IgG4-related disease and its differentiation from pancreatic adenocarcinoma, we emphasize important abdominal computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings related to this recently recognized systemic autoimmune disease. PMID:27141136

  11. Autoimmune disease and risk for Parkinson disease A population-based case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rugbjerg, K.; Friis, S.; Ritz, B.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Inflammatory mediators are increased in autoimmune diseases and may activate microglia and might cause an inflammatory state and degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the brain. Thus, we evaluated whether having an autoimmune disease increases the risk for developing Parkinson disease...... do not support the hypothesis that autoimmune diseases increase the risk for Parkinson disease. The decreased risk observed among patients with rheumatoid arthritis might be explained by underdiagnosis of movement disorders such as Parkinson disease in this patient group or by a protective effect...

  12. Autoimmune Pancreatitis and IgG4 Related Disease in Three Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Sze Yee; Coleman, Lee; MacGregor, Duncan; Hardikar, Winita; Oliver, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    We report 3 children who presented with fever and abdominal pain, deranged liver function tests, and on abdominal ultrasound were found to have an enlarged pancreas, substantial abdominal lymphadenopathy, and extrahepatic biliary duct dilatation. After ruling out malignancy, probable immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4RD) associated with autoimmune pancreatitis was considered. This condition was first described in the adults and often mimics pancreatic cancer. It can involve multiple organs, either synchronously or metachronously, and is rarely reported in children. The disorder mostly responds to corticosteroid therapy and other immune suppression. We highlight the difficulty in diagnosing autoimmune pancreatitis/IgG4-related disease in children and illustrate the difference between pediatric and adult presentation. PMID:27622194

  13. Toward molecular pathogenesis of an autoimmune disease: Refined genetic mapping of autoimmune polyglandular disease type I (APECED)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, J.; Bjoerses, P.; Peltonen, L. [National Public Health Institute, Helsinki (Finland)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Autoimmune reactions encoupled to many human diseases are still only partially understood. Unravelling the molecular pathogenesis of inherited diseases with a strong autoimmune component in their clinical expression could help to dissect individual components in the molecular background of abnormal immune response. One such genetic disorder is autosomal recessive autoimmune polyglandular disease type I (PGD I), also known as autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED, MIM 240300). The disease is especially enriched in the genetically isolated population of Finland and we have assigned the APECED locus to human chromosome 21q22.3 in 14 Finnish families by linkage analyses. The best positional lod score of 6.49 was observed with marker D21S49. Based on the history of the Finns, the gene pool of this population clearly demonstrates the consequences of a founder effect and consequent isolation. In the Finnish population, we can take advantage of linkage disequilibrium and allelic association studies to more precisely define the critical DNA region for our disease gene of interest than would be possible by linkage analyses alone. We are now able to define the chromosomal region of interest between two flanking markers locating 1 cM apart. Linkage disequilibrium is observed with three of the markers used in the analyses and this suggests a distance of less than 500 kb to the disease locus, well approachable with molecular cloning techniques. Overlapping YAC and cosmid clones spanning our region of interest will facilitate the cloning of APECED gene in the near future.

  14. Increased Prevalence of Cardiovascular and Autoimmune Diseases in Periodontitis Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nesse, Willem; Dijkstra, P.U.; Abbas, Frank; Spijkervet, F.K.L.; Stijger, A.; Tromp, J.A.H.; van Dijk, J.L.; Vissink, A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Associations between periodontitis and cardiovascular and autoimmune diseases are most often assessed in patients with a particular cardiovascular or autoimmune disease. To prevent selection bias, this study assesses the existence of associations between periodontitis and cardiovascular

  15. Increased Prevalence of Cardiovascular and Autoimmune Diseases in Periodontitis Patients : A Cross-Sectional Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nesse, Willem; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Abbas, Frank; Spijkervet, Fred K. L.; Stijger, Astrid; Tromp, Jan A. H.; van Dijk, Johan L.; Vissink, Arjan

    2010-01-01

    Background: Associations between periodontitis and cardiovascular and autoimmune diseases are most often assessed in patients with a particular cardiovascular or autoimmune disease. To prevent selection bias, this study assesses the existence of associations between periodontitis and cardiovascular

  16. Pleural effusion in liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, José Castellote

    2010-12-01

    Hepatic hydrothorax is the paradigmatic pleural effusion in liver cirrhosis. It is defined as a pleural effusion in a patient with portal hypertension and no cardiopulmonary disease. The estimated prevalence of this complication in patients with liver cirrhosis is 5 to 6%. Its pathophysiology involves movement of ascitic fluid from the peritoneal cavity into the pleural space through diaphragmatic defects. Thoracentesis and pleural fluid analysis are necessary for diagnosis. Initial management consists of sodium restriction, diuretics, and therapeutic thoracentesis. A transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt may provide a bridge prior to liver transplantation. Spontaneous bacterial empyema is the infection of a preexisting hydrothorax. The more frequent bacteria involved are ENTEROBACTERIACEAE and gram-positive cocci. Antibiotic therapy is the cornerstone of therapy. This article reviews etiology, clinical manifestations, and therapy of these two complications of liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension.

  17. Are human endogenous retroviruses triggers of autoimmune diseases?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexø, Bjørn A; Villesen, Palle; Nissen, Kari K

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases encompass a plethora of conditions in which the immune system attacks its own tissue, identifying them as foreign. Multiple factors are thought to contribute to the development of immune response to self, including differences in genotypes, hormonal milieu, and environmental...... manner. In this study by means of genetic epidemiology, we have searched for the involvement of endogenous retroviruses in three selected autoimmune diseases: multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and rheumatoid arthritis. We found that at least one human endogenous retroviral locus...... was associated with each of the three diseases. Although there was a significant overlap, most loci only occurred in one of the studied disease. Remarkably, within each disease, there was a statistical interaction (synergy) between two loci. Additional synergy between retroviral loci and human lymphocyte...

  18. The role of complement in autoimmune renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seelen, M. A.; Daha, M. R.

    2006-01-01

    The predominance of renal involvement in autoimmune diseases can most likely be assigned to the specialised function of the kidneys filtrating over 120 ml plasma per minute. Complement activation by autoantibodies directed against planted antigens or antigens already present in renal tissue in the s

  19. Vaccination of patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, Johanna; Rondaan, Christien; van Assen, Sander; Bijl, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases (AIRDs) are at increased risk of infections. This risk has been further increased by the introduction of biologic agents over the past two decades. One of the most effective strategies to prevent infection is vaccination. However, patients wit

  20. Current practice in laboratory diagnostics of autoimmune diseases in Croatia. 
Survey of the Working group for laboratory diagnostics of autoimmune diseases of the Croatian Society of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuna, Andrea Tešija; Đerek, Lovorka; Kozmar, Ana; Drvar, Vedrana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction With the trend of increasing incidence of autoimmune diseases, laboratories are faced with exponential growth of the requests for tests relating the diagnosis of these diseases. Unfortunately, the lack of laboratory personnel experienced in this specific discipline of laboratory diagnostic, as well as an unawareness of a method limitation often results in confusion for clinicians. The aim was to gain insight into number and type of Croatian laboratories that perform humoral diagnostics with the final goal to improve and harmonize laboratory diagnostics of autoimmune diseases in Croatia. Materials and methods In order to get insight into current laboratory practice two questionnaires, consisting of 42 questions in total, were created. Surveys were conducted using SurveyMonkey application and were sent to 88 medical biochemistry laboratories in Croatia for the first survey. Out of 33 laboratories that declared to perform diagnostic from the scope, 19 were selected for the second survey based on the tests they pleaded to perform. The survey comprised questions regarding autoantibody hallmarks of systemic autoimmune diseases while regarding organ-specific autoimmune diseases was limited to diseases of liver, gastrointestinal and nervous system. Results Response rate was high with 80 / 88 (91%) laboratories which answered the first questionnaire, and 19 / 19 (1.0) for the second questionnaire. Obtained results of surveys indicate high heterogeneity in the performance of autoantibody testing among laboratories in Croatia. Conclusions Results indicate the need of creating recommendations and algorithms in order to harmonize the approach to laboratory diagnostics of autoimmune diseases in Croatia.

  1. [Metabolic disorders and nutritional status in autoimmune thyroid diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawicka, Anna; Regulska-Ilow, Bożena; Regulska-Ilow, Bożena

    2015-01-02

    In recent years, the authors of epidemiological studies have documented that autoimmune diseases are a major problem of modern society and are classified as diseases of civilization. Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs) are caused by an abnormal immune response to autoantigens present in the thyroid gland - they often coexist with other autoimmune diseases. The most common dysfunctions of the thyroid gland are hypothyroidism, Graves-Basedow disease and Hashimoto's disease. Hashimoto's thyroiditis can be the main cause of primary hypothyroidism of the thyroid gland. Anthropometric, biochemical and physicochemical parameters are used to assess the nutritional status during the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid diseases. Patients with hypothyroidism are often obese, whereas patients with hyperthyroidism are often afflicted with rapid weight loss. The consequence of obesity is a change of the thyroid hormones' activity; however, weight reduction leads to their normalization. The activity and metabolic rate of thyroid hormones are modifiable. ATDs are associated with abnormalities of glucose metabolism and thus increased risk of developing diabetes mellitus type 1 and type 2. Celiac disease (CD) also increases the risk of developing other autoimmune diseases. Malnutrition or the presence of numerous nutritional deficiencies in a patient's body can be the cause of thyroid disorders. Coexisting deficiencies of such elements as iodine, iron, selenium and zinc may impair the function of the thyroid gland. Other nutrient deficiencies usually observed in patients suffering from ATD are: protein deficiencies, vitamin deficiencies (A, C, B6, B5, B1) and mineral deficiencies (phosphorus, magnesium, potassium, sodium, chromium). Proper diet helps to reduce the symptoms of the disease, maintains a healthy weight and prevents the occurrence of malnutrition. This article presents an overview of selected documented studies and scientific reports on the relationship of metabolic

  2. P-Glycoprotein and Drug Resistance in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Picchianti-Diamanti

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, rheumatoid arthritis (RA and psoriatic arthritis (PsA are chronic inflammatory disorders of unknown etiology characterized by a wide range of abnormalities of the immune system that may compromise the function of several organs, such as kidney, heart, joints, brain and skin. Corticosteroids (CCS, synthetic and biologic immunosuppressive agents have demonstrated the capacity to improve the course of autoimmune diseases. However, a significant number of patients do not respond or develop resistance to these therapies over time. P-glycoprotein (P-gp is a transmembrane protein that pumps several drugs out of the cell, including CCS and immunosuppressants; thus, its over-expression or hyper-function has been proposed as a possible mechanism of drug resistance in patients with autoimmune disorders. Recently, different authors have demonstrated that P-gp inhibitors, such as cyclosporine A (CsA and its analogue Tacrolimus, are able to reduce P-gp expression and or function in SLE, RA and PsA patients. These observations suggest that P-gp antagonists could be adopted to revert drug resistance and improve disease outcome. The complex inter-relationship among drug resistance, P-gp expression and autoimmunity still remains elusive.

  3. [Immunomodulatory properties of stem mesenchymal cells in autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Berná, Isabel; Santiago-Díaz, Carlos; Jiménez-Alonso, Juan

    2015-01-20

    Autoimmune diseases are a cluster of disorders characterized by a failure of the immune tolerance and a hyperactivation of the immune system that leads to a chronic inflammation state and the damage of several organs. The medications currently used to treat these diseases usually consist of immunosuppressive drugs that have significant systemic toxic effects and are associated with an increased risk of opportunistic infections. Recently, several studies have demonstrated that mesenchymal stem cells have immunomodulatory properties, a feature that make them candidates to be used in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. In the present study, we reviewed the role of this therapy in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic sclerosis, Crohn's disease and multiple sclerosis, as well as the potential risks associated with its use.

  4. Cholestatic liver disease masquerading as Wilson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Vikrant; Rawat, Dinesh; Khanna, Rajeev; Alam, Seema

    2015-03-01

    Wilson disease and cholestatic liver diseases may present as a diagnostic dilemma if standard guidelines incorporating markers of copper overload are followed. We hereby present a series of four cases of sclerosing cholangitis masquerading as Wilson disease. True Wilson disease cases had significantly lower ceruloplasmin (6 vs. 16 mg/dL) and higher 24-hour urinary copper (322.3 vs. 74.5 μg/day) as compared to mimickers. Initial low serum ceruloplasmin levels normalized in mimickers on follow up, and this may used as a diagnostic indicator. Standard Wilson disease diagnostic criteria thus need further modification especially in developing countries to help avoid mismanagement.

  5. Early manifestations of gastric autoimmunity in patients with juvenile autoimmune thyroid diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segni, Maria; Borrelli, Osvaldo; Pucarelli, Ida; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; Pasquino, Anna Maria; Annibale, Bruno

    2004-10-01

    Juvenile patients affected with autoimmune thyroid disorders showed a 14-21% prevalence of parietal cell antibodies (PCA) reacting against the H+/K+-ATPase of the gastric parietal cells. PCA are the principal immunological markers of atrophic body gastritis (ABG).ABG is characterized by loss of oxyntic glands, achlorhydria, and hypergastrinemia. The aim of this study was to determine whether PCA positivity could be associated with biochemical and histological manifestations of gastric autoimmunity in juvenile patients with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). We studied 129 children (96 females and 33 males) with chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis (n = 115) or Graves' disease (n = 14). Mean age at diagnosis of AITD was 9.7 +/- 3.3 yr, and mean age at sampling was 12.3 +/- 3.7 yr. We determined PCA and Helicobacter pylori antibodies, gastrin, and pepsinogen I plasma levels. Gastroscopy with multiple biopsies was carried out in a subgroup of patients with PCA positivity. We found that 30% of children had detectable PCA. Hypergastrinemia was found in 45% of the PCA-positive children (range, 40-675 pg/ml) vs. 12% of PCA-negative children (range, 35-65 pg/ml; P < 0.001). Eighteen patients with PCA positivity underwent gastroscopy; eight of these children had normogastrinemia, which showed no signs of ABG, and 10 children had hypergastrinemia, of whom five had mild to severe ABG. Our study shows that autoimmune gastritis is an early event in juvenile AITD with detectable PCA. Gastrin plasma level is a reliable marker of gastric atrophy.

  6. Strategies for Treating Autoimmune Disease With Monoclonal Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Wofsy, David

    1985-01-01

    There is no safe and reliable therapy for most serious autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus. Severe cases usually require treatment with corticosteroids or cytotoxic drugs or both, which frequently provide inadequate disease control and can cause serious complications. These therapies are not restricted in their effects to cells of the immune system, but rather have a broad range of toxic effects on cells throughout the body. The development of monoclonal antibodies has l...

  7. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia and Hodgkin's Disease: An Unusual Pediatric Association

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Miguel Gomes; Tereza Oliva; Armando Pinto

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a recognized complication of lymphoproliferative disorders. AIHA associated with Hodgkin’s disease (HD) is uncommon especially in the pediatric population. The diagnosis of AIHA is usually associated with HD at the time of initial presentation or during the course of disease, but it could precede it by years to months. In adults the association of AIHA and HD is more frequent in advanced stages and in the nodular sclerosis and mixed cellularity type HD. W...

  8. Obesity in autoimmune diseases: not a passive bystander.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versini, Mathilde; Jeandel, Pierre-Yves; Rosenthal, Eric; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2014-09-01

    In the last decades, autoimmune diseases have experienced a dramatic increase in Western countries. The involvement of environmental factors is strongly suspected to explain this rise. Particularly, over the same period, obesity has followed the same outbreak. Since the exciting discovery of the secretory properties of adipose tissue, the relationship between obesity and autoimmunity and the understanding of the underlying mechanisms have become of major interest. Indeed, the fat tissue has been found to produce a wide variety of "adipokines", involved in the regulation of numerous physiological functions, including the immune response. By conducting a systematic literature review, we extracted 329 articles regarding clinical, experimental and pathophysiological data on the relationship between obesity, adipokines - namely leptin, adiponectin, resistin, visfatin - and various immune-mediated conditions, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), multiple sclerosis (MS), type-1 diabetes (T1D), psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and thyroid autoimmunity (TAI), especially Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT). The strongest levels of evidence support an increased risk of RA (OR=1.2-3.4), MS (OR=2), psoriasis and PsA (OR=1.48-6.46) in obese subjects. A higher risk of IBD, T1D and TAI is also suggested. Moreover, obesity worsens the course of RA, SLE, IBD, psoriasis and PsA, and impairs the treatment response of RA, IBD, psoriasis and PsA. Extensive clinical data and experimental models demonstrate the involvement of adipokines in the pathogenesis of these autoimmune diseases. Obesity appears to be a major environmental factor contributing to the onset and progression of autoimmune diseases.

  9. Restoring the balance: immunotherapeutic combinations for autoimmune disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn E. Smilek

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmunity occurs when T cells, B cells or both are inappropriately activated, resulting in damage to one or more organ systems. Normally, high-affinity self-reactive T and B cells are eliminated in the thymus and bone marrow through a process known as central immune tolerance. However, low-affinity self-reactive T and B cells escape central tolerance and enter the blood and tissues, where they are kept in check by complex and non-redundant peripheral tolerance mechanisms. Dysfunction or imbalance of the immune system can lead to autoimmunity, and thus elucidation of normal tolerance mechanisms has led to identification of therapeutic targets for treating autoimmune disease. In the past 15 years, a number of disease-modifying monoclonal antibodies and genetically engineered biologic agents targeting the immune system have been approved, notably for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and psoriasis. Although these agents represent a major advance, effective therapy for other autoimmune conditions, such as type 1 diabetes, remain elusive and will likely require intervention aimed at multiple components of the immune system. To this end, approaches that manipulate cells ex vivo and harness their complex behaviors are being tested in preclinical and clinical settings. In addition, approved biologic agents are being examined in combination with one another and with cell-based therapies. Substantial development and regulatory hurdles must be overcome in order to successfully combine immunotherapeutic biologic agents. Nevertheless, such combinations might ultimately be necessary to control autoimmune disease manifestations and restore the tolerant state.

  10. Effect of autoimmune diseases on risk and survival in histology-specific lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemminki, Kari; Liu, Xiangdong; Ji, Jianguang; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2012-12-01

    Patients with autoimmune diseases are at an increased risk of cancer due to underlying dysregulation of the immune system or treatment. Data on cancer incidence, mortality and survival after autoimmune diseases would provide further information on the clinical implications. We systematically analysed data on lung cancer in patients diagnosed with 33 different autoimmune diseases. Standardised incidence ratios (SIRs), standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) and hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated for subsequent incident lung cancers or lung cancer deaths up to 2008 in patients hospitalised for autoimmune disease after 1964. Increased risks of lung cancer were recorded for SIRs after 12 autoimmune diseases, SMRs after 11 autoimmune diseases and HRs after two autoimmune diseases. The highest SIRs and SMRs, respectively, were seen after discoid lupus erythematosus (4.71 and 4.80), polymyosistis/dermatomyositis (4.20 and 4.17), systemic lupus erythematosus (2.47 and 2.69), rheumatic fever (2.07 and 2.07) and systemic sclerosis (2.19 and 1.98). Autoimmune disease did not influence survival overall but some autoimmune diseases appeared to impair survival in small cell carcinoma. All autoimmune diseases that had an SIR >2.0 are known to present with lung manifestations, suggesting that the autoimmune process contributes to lung cancer susceptibility. The data on survival are reassuring that autoimmune diseases do not influence prognosis in lung cancer.

  11. Celiac disease, rare symptoms, autoimmune patology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Volta

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 42-years-old woman with constipation, anemia and recurrent itch. After several investigations, celiac disease was diagnosed and a treatment with a gluten-free diet was applied with beneficial effects. Recognizing celiac disease can be difficult because some of its symptoms are similar to those of other diseases. In fact, sometimes it is confused with irritable bowel syndrome or iron-deficiency anemia or intestinal infections: as a result, celiac disease is commonly underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed. This case report is described to address the physician to a correct diagnosis of celiac disease.

  12. Serum IgG subclasses in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haoze; Li, Ping; Wu, Di; Xu, Dong; Hou, Yong; Wang, Qian; Li, Mengtao; Li, Yongzhe; Zeng, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Fengchun; Shi, Qun

    2015-01-01

    To characterize serum IgG subclass levels in several autoimmune diseases, including primary Sjogren syndrome (pSS), systemic sclerosis (SSc), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). We aimed to analyze serum IgG subclass distribution and to test whether serum IgG4 levels are elevated in these diseases. Serum IgG subclass levels from 102 pSS, 102 SSc, 100 SLE, and 59 PBC patients, as well as 40 healthy controls (HCs), were measured using the immunonephelometric assay. The distribution of IgG subclasses among these autoimmune diseases was analyzed. In this cross-sectional study, serum IgG1 (IgG1/IgG) and/or IgG3 (IgG3/IgG) were significantly increased, compared with those in HCs. Only 6.34% of patients had levels of serum IgG4 >135 mg/dL. There were no significant differences in the frequency of elevated serum IgG4 levels between patients and HC. In pSS, serum IgG1 levels were much higher than those in other disease groups, whereas serum IgG2 and IgG3 levels were most prominently increased in PBC. A strikingly different serum IgG subclass distribution was detected in patients with autoimmune diseases compared with HCs. Serum IgG subclass levels also showed distinct characteristics among different autoimmune diseases. Serum IgG4 levels in these patients were lower or not much higher than those in HCs, which differed from IgG4-related diseases.

  13. Radiosensitivity of peripheral blood lymphocytes in autoimmune disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, G. (Kennedy Inst. of Rheumatology, London (UK). Div. of Experimental Pathology); Cramp, W.A.; Edwards, J.C.; George, A.M.; Sabovljev, S.A.; Hart, L.; Hughes, G.R.V. (Hammersmith Hospital, London (UK)); Denman, A.M. (Northwich Park Hospital, Harrow (UK)); Yatvin, M.B. (Wisconsin Clinical Cancer Center, Madison (USA))

    1985-06-01

    The proliferation of peripheral blood lymphocytes, cultured with Con A, can be inhibited by ionizing radiation. Lymphocytes from patients with conditions associated with autoimmunity, such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and polymyositis, are more radiosensitive than those from healthy volunteers or patients with conditions not associated with autoimmunity. Nuclear material isolated from the lymphocytes of patients with autoimmune diseases is, on average, lighter in density than the nuclear material from most healthy controls. This difference in density is not related to increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation but the degree of post-irradiation change in density (lightening) is proportional to the initial density, i.e. more dense nuclear material always shows a greater upward shift after radiation. The recovery of pre-irradiation density of nuclear material, 1 h after radiation exposure, taken as an indication of DNA repair, correlates with the radiosensitivity of lymphocyte proliferation (Con A response); failure to return to pre-irradiation density being associated with increased sensitivity of proliferative response. These results require extension but, taken with previously reported studied of the effects of DNA methylating agents, support the idea that DNA damage and its defective repair could be important in the aetio-pathogenesis of autoimmune disease.

  14. Endothelins in chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1996-01-01

    This review describes recent progress in the accumulation of knowledge about the endothelins (ETs), a family of vasoactive 21-amino acid polypeptides, in chronic liver disease. Particular prominence is given to the dynamics of ET-1 and ET-3 and their possible relation to the disturbed circulation...... and neurohumoral dysregulation found in cirrhosis. Recent studies have shown that the ET system is highly activated in most cirrhotic patients. Circulating ET-1 and ET-3 levels have a positive relation to the severity of the disease and fluid retention, with the highest values recorded in patients with functional....... In addition, marked associations with disturbance of systemic haemodynamics and with abnormal distribution of blood volume have been reported. Although the pathophysiological importance of the ET system in chronic liver disease is not completely understood, similarities to other vasopressive...

  15. Endothelins in chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Henriksen, Jens Henrik

    1996-01-01

    This review describes recent progress in the accumulation of knowledge about the endothelins (ETs), a family of vasoactive 21-amino acid polypeptides, in chronic liver disease. Particular prominence is given to the dynamics of ET-1 and ET-3 and their possible relation to the disturbed circulation....... In addition, marked associations with disturbance of systemic haemodynamics and with abnormal distribution of blood volume have been reported. Although the pathophysiological importance of the ET system in chronic liver disease is not completely understood, similarities to other vasopressive...... and neurohumoral dysregulation found in cirrhosis. Recent studies have shown that the ET system is highly activated in most cirrhotic patients. Circulating ET-1 and ET-3 levels have a positive relation to the severity of the disease and fluid retention, with the highest values recorded in patients with functional...

  16. Siglec-1 and -2 as potential biomarkers in autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eakin, Amanda J; Bustard, Michael J; McGeough, Cathy M; Ahmed, Tahanver; Bjourson, Anthony J; Gibson, David S

    2016-06-01

    Autoimmune diseases (ADs) are currently treated with anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive drugs, aimed at reducing symptoms of disease in order to improve quality of life for patients. However, for a significant number of patients these therapies are ineffective, leading to an increased risk of irreversible damage and eventual disability in certain cases. Growing evidence has implicated glycosylated proteins and their cognate receptors in modulation of the autoimmune response. This review will summarize these findings with particular focus on sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin (Siglec)-1 and Siglec-2 involvement in AD. Fluctuations in these glycosylation-dependent pathways could act as sentinels of disease activity or drug responses. If validated, protein modification and cellular response markers could help clinicians achieve remission earlier.

  17. ANTI-B CELL THERAPY OF AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Masliansky

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Our understanding of the multiple physiological and pathological functions of B-cells continues to expand at a fascinating rate. As pathogenic elements in the development of autoimmune diseases, B-cells have become the focus of new therapeutics. Based on the published data, rituximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody to CD20, when used in combination with other agents (i.e., cyclophosphamide or methotrexate, appears to be a reasonable treatment option for refractory RA. There are now numerous case reports and small openlabel series using rituximab in many autoimmune diseases, others then RA. While these data must be interpreted with caution, they suggest that rituximab may be a promising addition to the therapeutic armamentarium in these diseases. However, additional controlled trials need to be conducted to confirm clinical efficacy, further define optimal dosage, response rates, comparative long-term efficacy, and treatment algorithm for rituximab in these patients.

  18. Determination of autoantibodies to annexin XI in systemic autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, C S; Levantino, G; Houen, Gunnar

    2000-01-01

    Annexin XI, a calcyclin-associated protein, has been shown to be identical to a 56,000 Da antigen recognized by antibodies found in sera from patients suffering from systemic autoimmune diseases. In this work hexahistidine-tagged recombinant annexin XI (His6- rAnn XI) was used as antigen in ELISA...... experiments for determination of autoantibodies to annexin XI in sera of patients with systemic rheumatic autoimmune diseases. Immunoblotting with HeLa cell extract and with His6-rAnn XI as antigen was used for confirmation of positive ELISA results. We found eleven anti-annexin XI positive sera (3.9%) out...... of 282 sera from patients with systemic rheumatic diseases. The highest number of annexin XI positive sera were found in primary antiphospholipid syndrome (3/17), and in subacute lupus erythematosus (1/6), while lower frequencies of positive sera were found in patients with systemic sclerosis (5...

  19. Challenge of liver disease in systemic lupus erythematosus: Clues for diagnosis and hints for pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Bessone, Fernando; Poles, Natalia; Roma, Marcelo Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) encompass a broad spectrum of liver diseases. We propose here to classify them as follows: (1) immunological comorbilities (overlap syndromes); (2) non-immunological comorbilities associated to SLE; and (3) a putative liver damage induced by SLE itself, referred to as “lupus hepatitis”. In the first group, liver injury can be ascribed to overlapping hepatopathies triggered by autoimmune mechanisms other than SLE occurring with higher incidence in the context...

  20. [Immunological Techniques that Support the Diagnosis of the Autoimmune Diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Ramírez, Diego F; Cabiedes, Javier

    2010-01-01

    During the past few years technological advance have been allowed the developing of techniques that help to the diagnosis of multiple diseases. In the case of the autoimmune diseases, immunological techniques are helpful since they allow the detection of multiple autoantibodies at the same time with small volumes of sample. Together with the development of the new techniques, sensitivity and specificity in the detection of the antibodies specificities' also have been increased, in such a way that the clinicians can count with tests that allow them to make early diagnoses with greater certainty and also to follow the course of the disease based on the variation of the antibodies presents in the patient's samples. It is important to emphasize that the new techniques of laboratory that are used for the support of the diagnosis of autoimmune diseases, no longer are exclusive for research laboratories but by their facility of standardization, quality control and reproducibility they can be used in clinical laboratory of medium and small sizes. In the present paper we describe those techniques with greater application in the clinical laboratory of autoimmune diseases.

  1. Future perspective for diagnosis in autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Luis E. C. Andrade

    2009-01-01

    Human beings have taken successive approaches for the understanding and management of diseases. Initially brewed in supernatural concepts and mystical procedures, a vigorous scientific approach has emerged on the grounds of fundamental disciplines such as anatomy, microbiology, biochemistry, physiology, immunology, pathology, and pharmacology. The resulting integrated knowledge contributed to the current classification of diseases and the way Medicine is carried out today. Despite considerabl...

  2. [Pregnancy in systemic autoimmune diseases: Myths, certainties and doubts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danza, Álvaro; Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo; Khamashta, Munther

    2016-10-07

    Systemic autoimmune diseases especially affect young women during childbearing age. The aim of this review is to update systemic lupus erythematosus, antiphospholipid syndrome and systemic sclerosis management during pregnancy. These diseases present variable maternal and fetal risks. Studies show that an appropriate disease control and a reasonable remission period prior to pregnancy are associated with satisfactory obstetric outcomes. Antiphospholipid autoantibodies profile, anti-Ro/anti-La antibodies, pulmonary pressure and activity evaluation are crucial to assess the pregnancy risk. Monitoring requires a multidisciplinary team, serial analytic controls and Doppler ultrasound of maternal and fetal circulation. Evaluation of the activity of the disease is essential.

  3. Twin studies in auto-immune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, R D; Hawa, M

    1994-01-01

    Immune-mediated diseases affect up to 5% of the population and are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. These diseases can be organ specific, such as insulin-dependent diabetes (IDDM) and non-organ specific, such as Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). Identical and non-identical twins have been used to establish whether these diseases are determined by genetic or environmental factors. The results of these studies have been collated in a new section of the Mendel Institute in Rome. Diseases included in these studies included IDDM, RA, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and Myasthenia. Striking differences in concordance rates between identical and non-identical twins in all these studies suggest that genetic factors are important in causing these diseases. All the diseases are known to be associated with HLA genes on chromosome 6 which may account for some or all of the genetic susceptibility. However, in the majority of pairs the affected twin has an unaffected co-twin. These observations suggest that non-genetically determined factors, probably environmental factors and not somatic mutations, are critical. The study of unaffected co-twins, who are at high disease-risk, has allowed the identification of changes which precede and predict the clinical disease. The immune-mediated destruction in many of these diseases is probably caused by T-lymphocytes. Twin studies have shown the importance of genetic factors in determining T-cell responses. Identical twins should, therefore, provide the perfect test bed to assess the role of T-cells in immune-mediated diseases.

  4. Autoantibody profiles in autoimmune hepatitis and chronic hepatitis C identifies similarities in patients with severe disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Kawa; Rasool, Aram H; Hattem, Ali; Al-Karboly, Taha AM; Taher, Taher E; Bystrom, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine how the auto-antibodies (Abs) profiles overlap in chronic hepatitis C infection (CHC) and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and correlate to liver disease. METHODS Levels of antinuclear Ab, smooth muscle antibody (SMA) and liver/kidney microsomal-1 (LKM-1) Ab and markers of liver damage were determined in the sera of 50 patients with CHC infection, 20 AIH patients and 20 healthy controls using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and other immune assays. RESULTS We found that AIH patients had more severe liver disease as determined by elevation of total IgG, alkaline phosphatase, total serum bilirubin and serum transaminases and significantly higher prevalence of the three non-organ-specific autoantibodies (auto-Abs) than CHC patients. Antinuclear Ab, SMA and LKM-1 Ab were also present in 36% of CHC patients and related to disease severity. CHC cases positive for auto-Abs were directly comparable to AIH in respect of most markers of liver damage and total IgG. These cases had longer disease duration compared with auto-Ab negative cases, but there was no difference in gender, age or viral load. KLM-1+ Ab CHC cases showed best overlap with AIH. CONCLUSION Auto-Ab levels in CHC may be important markers of disease severity and positive cases have a disease similar to AIH. Auto-Abs might have a pathogenic role as indicated by elevated markers of liver damage. Future studies will unravel any novel associations between these two diseases, whether genetic or other. PMID:28293081

  5. Pervasive Sharing of Genetic Effects in Autoimmune Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cotsapas, Chris; Voight, Benjamin F.; Rossin, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified numerous, replicable, genetic associations between common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and risk of common autoimmune and inflammatory (immune-mediated) diseases, some of which are shared between two diseases. Along with epidemiological...... and clinical evidence, this suggests that some genetic risk factors may be shared across diseases-as is the case with alleles in the Major Histocompatibility Locus. In this work we evaluate the extent of this sharing for 107 immune disease-risk SNPs in seven diseases: celiac disease, Crohn's disease, multiple......-mediated disease risk SNPs are associated to multiple-but not all-immune-mediated diseases (SNP-wise P-CPMA...

  6. Endogenous retroviruses are associated with autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexø, Bjørn A; Bisgaard Jensen, Sara; Hansen, Bettina;

    2016-01-01

    Retroviruses can be transmitted in two fundamentally different ways: 1) They can be horizontally transmitted as infectious virus, or 2) they can integrate in the germ line and be transmitted to offspring and the offsprings' offspring as DNA. The latter is called endogenous viruses. The mode of tr...... grows and this contributes to disease, one should be able to alleviate disease with antiretroviral drugs. We call for clinical trials to elucidate this issue....... of transmission is called vertical. Viral variants of importance for development of disease must be more frequent among diseased persons than among healthy individuals. Multiple sclerosis, diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis are all associated with sets of endogenouos retroviruses but not the same sets. If a virus...

  7. [Endogenous retroviruses are associated with autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nexø, Bjørn A; Jensen, Sara B; Hansen, Bettina; Laska, Magdalena J

    2016-06-13

    Retroviruses can be transmitted in two fundamentally different ways: 1) They can be horizontally transmitted as infectious virus, or 2) they can integrate in the germ line and be transmitted to offspring and the offsprings' offspring as DNA. The latter is called endogenous viruses. The mode of transmission is called vertical. Viral variants of importance for development of disease must be more frequent among diseased persons than among healthy individuals. Multiple sclerosis, diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis are all associated with sets of endogenouos retroviruses but not the same sets. If a virus grows and this contributes to disease, one should be able to alleviate disease with antiretroviral drugs. We call for clinical trials to elucidate this issue.

  8. [Involvement of Syk in pathology of systemic autoimmune disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Shigeru; Yamaoka, Kunihiro; Niiro, Hiroaki; Nakano, Kazuhisa; Wang, Sheau-Pey; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Akashi, Koichi; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2012-01-01

    Biological products have proven its high efficacy on autoimmune disease such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Meanwhile, small molecular drugs have attracted attention over the years because of its availability of oral administration and cost effectiveness. Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) is a 72 kDa protein tyrosine kinase widely expressed on cells that are involved in the immune system and inflammation such as B cells, T cells, macrophages and synovial fibroblast. Syk is involved in intracellular signaling of the multi-chain immune receptors, including B cell receptor (BCR), ζchain of T-cell receptor (TCR), FcR and integrins, which contains the immune-receptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM). Recently, Syk inhibitor fostamatinib has exerted potent therapeutic efficacy against autoimmune and allergic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), bronchial asthma and thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Moreover, Syk blockade prevented the development of skin and kidney lesions in lupus-prone mice, however the mechanism of action is unclear. We have revealed that Syk-mediated BCR-signaling is prerequisite for optimal induction of toll-like receptor (TLR)-9, thereby allowing efficient propagation of CD40- and TLR9- signaling in human B cells. These results indicate that inhibition of Syk have a potential to regulate B-cell mediated inflammatory diseases such as SLE. We here document the in vitro and in vivo effects of a Syk inhibitor for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, mainly in RA and SLE.

  9. Autoimmune diseases in pregnancy: maternal and fetal outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavithra M. Vengetesh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of autoimmune connective tissue disorders on the outcomes of pregnancy and the influence of treatment on pregnancy. Methods: Thirty-seven antenatal patients with autoimmune connective tissue diseases, comprising of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE, primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS, Mixed Connective Tissue Diseases (MCTD, ankylosing spondylitis and Takayasu arteritis were analysed. Results: Multigravidas constituted 89.4% and were associated with bad obstetric history. Before diagnosis and treatment, serious maternal complications of eclampsia and thromboembolism were observed in patients with SLE and APS. The live birth rates were 9% and 2.4% respectively in patients with SLE and APS. With appropriate treatment- aspirin, heparin and immunosuppressant, the live birth rates were raised to 70% in SLE and 100% in APS patients. Investigation for autoimmune disease in recurrent pregnancy loss is important. A rare association between MCTD and congenital anomaly - Rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata was observed. Preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, fetal growth restriction and preterm labour were the common complications noted. Conclusions: Active disease at onset of pregnancy, presence of Anti-ds DNA antibodies and secondary APS were strong predictors of poor pregnancy outcomes among patients with SLE. Vigilant monitoring during pregnancy is required for favourable outcomes. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(1.000: 9-14

  10. Molecular Imaging of Autoimmune Diseases and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Anna Sargsyan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging methods allow the noninvasive detection and localization of specific molecules. Agents that report on molecular disease biomarkers can be used to diagnose and monitor disease. Many inflammatory diseases have molecular signatures within altered tissues. Although tissue biopsy is still the gold standard for detecting these signatures, several molecular imaging markers have been developed. Pharmacologic agents that block specific immune molecules have recently entered the clinic, and these drugs have already transformed the way we care for patients with immune-mediated diseases. The use of immunomodulatory drugs is usually guided by clinical assessment of the patient's response. Unfortunately, clinical assessment may miss the signs of inflammation, and many of the serologic markers of immune-mediated diseases correlate poorly with the underlying inflammatory activity within target tissues. Molecular imaging methods have the potential to improve our ability to detect and characterize tissue inflammation. We discuss some of the molecular signatures of immune activation and review molecular imaging methods that have been developed to detect active tissue inflammation.

  11. COAGULATION ACTIVITY IN LIVER DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Sheikh Sajjadieh Mohammad Reza

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Patients with advanced hepatic failure may present with the entire spectrum of coagulation factor deficiencies. This study was designed to determine laboratory abnormalities in coagulation in chronic liver disease and the association of these abnormalities with the extent of chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis. Coagulation markers were assayed in 60 participants: 20 patients with chronic hepatitis, 20 patients with cirrhosis, and 20 healthy individuals (control. Plasma levels of anti-thrombin III were determined by a chromogenic substrate method, and plasma concentrations of fibrinogen were analyzed by the Rutberg method. Commercially available assays were used for laboratory coagulation tests. The levels of coagualation activity markers in patients with chronic liver disease were significantly different in comparison to those in healthy participants. These results indicate the utility of measuring markers for coagulation activity in determining which cirrhosis patients are more susceptible to disseminated intravascular coagulation.

  12. The Autoimmune Disease Database: a dynamically compiled literature-derived database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mevissen Heinz-Theodor

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autoimmune diseases are disorders caused by an immune response directed against the body's own organs, tissues and cells. In practice more than 80 clinically distinct diseases, among them systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis, are classified as autoimmune diseases. Although their etiology is unclear these diseases share certain similarities at the molecular level i.e. susceptibility regions on the chromosomes or the involvement of common genes. To gain an overview of these related diseases it is not feasible to do a literary review but it requires methods of automated analyses of the more than 500,000 Medline documents related to autoimmune disorders. Results In this paper we present the first version of the Autoimmune Disease Database which to our knowledge is the first comprehensive literature-based database covering all known or suspected autoimmune diseases. This dynamically compiled database allows researchers to link autoimmune diseases to the candidate genes or proteins through the use of named entity recognition which identifies genes/proteins in the corresponding Medline abstracts. The Autoimmune Disease Database covers 103 autoimmune disease concepts. This list was expanded to include synonyms and spelling variants yielding a list of over 1,200 disease names. The current version of the database provides links to 541,690 abstracts and over 5,000 unique genes/proteins. Conclusion The Autoimmune Disease Database provides the researcher with a tool to navigate potential gene-disease relationships in Medline abstracts in the context of autoimmune diseases.

  13. Therapies in the Pipeline for Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Felipe Betancur

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The current goals in the development of novel therapeutics of systemic autoimmune diseases are to develop agents more effective than conventional therapies as well as to reduce the risk of organ damage. To achieve this goal, large multicentre randomised controlled trials are needed to confirm the efficacy and safety of novel agents. Whether these novel modalities are synergistic to conventional drugs, the optimal dosages, and duration of treatment, need to be explored. As expected, the development of new molecules for the treatment of autoimmune diseases is constant, and there are different ongoing clinical trials. We review the different molecules in the pipeline, summarised in Tables 1, 2, and 3. We also show the successes, failures, and molecules that require more evidence.

  14. Increased polyamines alter chromatin and stabilize autoantigens in autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley H. Brooks

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Polyamines are small cations with unique combinations of charge and length that give them many putative interactions in cells. Polyamines are essential since they are involved in replication, transcription, translation, and stabilization of macro-molecular complexes. However, polyamine synthesis competes with cellular methylation for S-adenosylmethionine, the methyl donor. Also, polyamine degradation can generate reactive molecules like acrolein. Therefore, polyamine levels are tightly controlled. This control may be compromised in autoimmune diseases since elevated polyamine levels are seen in autoimmune diseases. Here a hypothesis is presented explaining how polyamines can stabilize autoantigens. In addition, the hypothesis explains how polyamines can inappropriately activate enzymes involved in NETosis, a process in which chromatin is modified and extruded from cells as extracellular traps that bind pathogens during an immune response. This polyamine-induced enzymatic activity can lead to an increase in NETosis resulting in release of autoantigenic material and tissue damage.

  15. Updates on the management of autoimmune blistering diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooten, Joanna N; Hall, Russell P; Cardones, Adela R

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune blistering diseases are rare, but potentially debilitating cutaneous disorders characterized by varying degrees of mucosal and cutaneous bullae formation. Topical therapy is appropriate for mild and even some moderate disease activity, but systemic treatment can be considered for more extensive involvement. Corticosteroids remain the first-line systemic therapy for patients with moderate to severe bullous pemphigoid and pemphigus vulgaris. While the use of systemic steroids has dramatically reduced mortality from these two autoimmune blistering disorders, treatment is also associated with multiple side effects, especially when used long-term. Steroid sparing agents, therefore, are invaluable in inducing long-term remission while minimizing steroid associated side effects. Treatment must be tailored to the individual patient's condition, and several other factors must be carefully considered in choosing appropriate therapy: 1) diagnosis, 2) severity of the condition and body site affected, 3) presence of comorbidities, and 4) ability to tolerate systemic therapy.

  16. Treatment of Subepidermal Autoimmune Bullous Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekin Şavk

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The common therapeutic goal for all subepidermal bullous diseases is to prevent inflammation and production of pathogenic autoantibodies and/or to facilitate the elimination of these antibodies. Diseases included in this group are the pemphigoids, linear IgA dermatosis, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, dermatitis herpetiformis and bullous systemic erythematosus. Corticosteroids are the most commonly used systemic medication. Other alternatives include dapsone, various antibiotics and nicotinamide, azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, cycloporine, mycophenolate mofetil, IV immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis. Rapid reepithelialization and prevention of secondary infections are provided by local hygenic measures including antiseptic baths and wound care.

  17. Thyroid volume in hypothyroidism due to autoimmune disease follows a unimodal distribution: evidence against primary thyroid atrophy and autoimmune thyroiditis being distinct diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlé, Allan; Pedersen, Inge Bülow; Knudsen, Nils

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT: Primary overt autoimmune hypothyroidism is often divided into primary idiopathic hypothyroidism with thyroid atrophy (Ord's disease) and hypothyroidism with goitre (Hashimoto's disease). OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to characterize the two subtypes of disease. DESIGN...

  18. Phenomics in Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-12

    Healthy Volunteer; Rheumatoid Arthritis; Ankylosing Spondylitis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus/Antiphospholipid Syndrome; FMF; Cryopyrin-Associated Periodic Syndromes /TNF-receptor Associated Periodic Syndrome; Vasculitis; Uveitis; Myositis; Crohn's Disease; Ulcerative Rectocolitis; Type 1 Diabetes; Unclassified IAD Knee and/or Hip Arthritis, Muscular Dystrophy

  19. Endocrine Ophthalmopathy in Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Pashkovska, N.V.

    2014-01-01

    The article presents modern data about risk factors, mechanisms of development, clinical features of endocrine ophthalmopathy, as well as information regarding current approaches to diagnosis, treatment and prevention of this disease according to the latest global recommendations developed from the position of evidence-based medicine.

  20. Vaccination recommendations for adult patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Bühler, Silja; Eperon, Gilles; Ribi, Camillo; Kyburz, Diego; van Gompel, Fons; Visser, Leo G.; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Hatz, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The number of individuals with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases (AIIRDs) treated with immunosuppressive drugs is increasing steadily. The variety of immunosuppressive drugs and, in particular, biological therapies is also rising. The immunosuppressants, as well as the AIIRD itself, increase the risk of infection in this population. Thus, preventing infections by means of vaccination is of utmost importance. New Swiss vaccination recommendations for AIIRD patients were in...

  1. Therapies in the Pipeline for Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Felipe Betancur; Jose Fernando Molina; Gabriel J. Tobón

    2016-01-01

    The current goals in the development of novel therapeutics of systemic autoimmune diseases are to develop agents more effective than conventional therapies as well as to reduce the risk of organ damage. To achieve this goal, large multicentre randomised controlled trials are needed to confirm the efficacy and safety of novel agents. Whether these novel modalities are synergistic to conventional drugs, the optimal dosages, and duration of treatment, need to be explored. As expected, the dev...

  2. Role of soluble Fas ligand in autoimmune diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning-Li Li; Tong Zhou; Dong-Qing Zhang; Hong Nie; Qi-Wen Yu; Ji-Ying Zhang; An-Lun Ma; Bai-Hua Shen; Li Wang; Jun Bai; Xue-Hua Chen

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of soluble Fas ligand in autoimmune diseases.METHODS: RT-PCR was performed to amplify sFasL cDNA from the total RNA extracted from activated human peripheral blood lymphocytes. DNA fragments were cloned into PCR vector. After sequenced, sFasL gene fragments were inserted into pQE-31 vector and expressed in E. Coli M15respectively. Proteins were purified through affinity chromatography column with ligand of 6xHis tag and identified by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. Mice were immunized with sFasL protein and specific anti-serum was harvested 6 wk after immunization. Monoclonal anti-human FasL antibody was made from the immunized mice. Serum level of sFasL in different patients was detected using antiFasL antibodies from the immunized mice.RESULTS: The protein expressed was 24 ku by SDS-PAGE electrophrosis. The protein was specially bound to antihuman FasL antibody by Western blot analysis. The sFasL protein could induce Jurket cell apoptosis in vitro. The concentration of serum sFasL in patients with autoimmune diseases was higher than that in normal individuals. sFasL could reduce arthritis in collagen induced arthritis (CIA)mice model by subcutaneous injection.CONCLUSION: sFasL may be involved in either induction of apoptosis or autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, sFasL may have potential application in treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  3. Regulatory T cells and B cells: implication on autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ping; Zheng, Song Guo

    2013-01-01

    The regulatory T (Treg) cells play an important role in the maintenance of homeostasis and the prevention of autoimmune diseases. Although most studies are focusing on the role of Treg cells in T cells and T cells-mediated diseases, these cells also directly affect B cells and other non-T cells. This manuscript updates the role of Treg cells on the B cells and B cell-mediated diseases. In addition, the mechanisms whereby Treg cells suppress B cell responses have been discussed.

  4. Undifferentiated vasculitis or an evolving systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatimah, Nafeesah; Ussaid, Ahmad; Rasheed, Aflak

    2016-01-01

    Undifferentiated connective tissue diseases usually present with arthralgias, sicca symptoms, Raynaud's phenomenon and leucopenia. This case presents the atypical presentation of an undifferentiated connective tissue disease with extensive cutaneous involvement of fingers and toes leading to gangrene with absence of typical rheumatological symptoms. The autoimmune profile showed positive ANA and anti-Ro/SS-A. Thromboembolism was ruled out on the basis of transthoracic and transesophageal echo. She was treated with I/V corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide that halted the disease progression. PMID:27574560

  5. Bioluminescence in vivo imaging of autoimmune encephalomyelitis predicts disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinman Lawrence

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis is a widely used animal model to understand not only multiple sclerosis but also basic principles of immunity. The disease is scored typically by observing signs of paralysis, which do not always correspond with pathological changes. Methods Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis was induced in transgenic mice expressing an injury responsive luciferase reporter in astrocytes (GFAP-luc. Bioluminescence in the brain and spinal cord was measured non-invasively in living mice. Mice were sacrificed at different time points to evaluate clinical and pathological changes. The correlation between bioluminescence and clinical and pathological EAE was statistically analyzed by Pearson correlation analysis. Results Bioluminescence from the brain and spinal cord correlates strongly with severity of clinical disease and a number of pathological changes in the brain in EAE. Bioluminescence at early time points also predicts severity of disease. Conclusion These results highlight the potential use of bioluminescence imaging to monitor neuroinflammation for rapid drug screening and immunological studies in EAE and suggest that similar approaches could be applied to other animal models of autoimmune and inflammatory disorders.

  6. Scavenging nucleic acid debris to combat autoimmunity and infectious disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holl, Eda K.; Shumansky, Kara L.; Borst, Luke B.; Burnette, Angela D.; Sample, Christopher J.; Ramsburg, Elizabeth A.; Sullenger, Bruce A.

    2016-08-01

    Nucleic acid-containing debris released from dead and dying cells can be recognized as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) or pattern-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by the innate immune system. Inappropriate activation of the innate immune response can engender pathological inflammation and autoimmune disease. To combat such diseases, major efforts have been made to therapeutically target the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) such as the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) that recognize such DAMPs and PAMPs, or the downstream effector molecules they engender, to limit inflammation. Unfortunately, such strategies can limit the ability of the immune system to combat infection. Previously, we demonstrated that nucleic acid-binding polymers can act as molecular scavengers and limit the ability of artificial nucleic acid ligands to activate PRRs. Herein, we demonstrate that nucleic acid scavengers (NASs) can limit pathological inflammation and nucleic acid-associated autoimmunity in lupus-prone mice. Moreover, we observe that such NASs do not limit an animal’s ability to combat viral infection, but rather their administration improves survival when animals are challenged with lethal doses of influenza. These results indicate that molecules that scavenge extracellular nucleic acid debris represent potentially safer agents to control pathological inflammation associated with a wide range of autoimmune and infectious diseases.

  7. Th17 Cells in Autoimmune and Infectious Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Francisco Zambrano-Zaragoza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The view of CD4 T-cell-mediated immunity as a balance between distinct lineages of Th1 and Th2 cells has changed dramatically. Identification of the IL-17 family of cytokines and of the fact that IL-23 mediates the expansion of IL-17-producing T cells uncovered a new subset of Th cells designated Th17 cells, which have emerged as a third independent T-cell subset that may play an essential role in protection against certain extracellular pathogens. Moreover, Th17 cells have been extensively analyzed because of their strong association with inflammatory disorders and autoimmune diseases. Also, they appear to be critical for controlling these disorders. Similar to Th1 and Th2 cells, Th17 cells require specific cytokines and transcription factors for their differentiation. Th17 cells have been characterized as one of the major pathogenic Th cell populations underlying the development of many autoimmune diseases, and they are enhanced and stabilized by IL-23. The characteristics of Th17 cells, cytokines, and their sources, as well as their role in infectious and autoimmune diseases, are discussed in this review.

  8. Autoimmune hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Motamed

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hepatitis is (AIH is a chronic hepatitis that occurs in children and adults of all ages. It is characterized by immunologic and autoimmune features, including circulating auto antibodies and high serum globulin concentrations. It was first described in the 1950s by term of chronic active hepatitis. It has 2 types with different auto antibodies. Diagnosis is based upon serologic and histologic findings and exclusion of other forms of chronic liver disease.   A scoring system should be used in assessment based upon: 1 Auto anti bodie titer 2 Serum IgG level  3 Liver histology 4 Absence of viral and other causes of hepatitis. Clear indications for treatment: 1   rise of aminotrasferases 2   clinical symptoms of liver disease 3   histological features in liver biopsy 4   Children with AIH initial treatment involve glucocorticoid with or without azathioprine. For patients with fulminant hepatitis liver transplantation, should be kept in mind.   Remission is defined by: 1   Resolution of symptoms 2   Normalization of serum trasaminases 3   Normalization of serum bilirubin and gamma globuline levels. 4   Improvement in liver histology 5   Treatment is continued for at least 2-5 years, glucocorticoids are with drawn first, by tapering over six weeks. Azathioprine will be with drawn.  

  9. Immunological GABAergic interactions and therapeutic applications in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'homme, Gérald J; Glinka, Yelena; Wang, Qinghua

    2015-11-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. However, it is also produced in other sites; notably by pancreatic β cells and immune cells. The function of GABA in the immune system is at an early stage of study, but it exerts inhibitory effects that are relevant to autoimmune diseases. The study of GABAergic interactions in the immune system has centered on three main aspects: 1) the expression of GABA and the relevant GABAergic molecular machinery; 2) the in vitro response of immune cells; and 3) therapeutic applications in autoimmune diseases. T cells and macrophages can produce GABA, and express all the components necessary for a GABAergic response. There are two types of GABA receptors, but lymphocytes appear to express only type A (GABAAR); a ligand-gated chloride channel. Other immune cells may also express the type B receptor (GABABR); a G-protein coupled receptor. Activation of GABA receptors on T cells and macrophages inhibits responses such as production of inflammatory cytokines. In T cells, GABA blocks the activation-induced calcium signal, and it also inhibits NF-κB activation. In preclinical models, therapeutic application of GABA, or GABAergic (agonistic) drugs, protects against type 1 diabetes (T1D), experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and contact dermatitis. In addition, GABA exerts anti-apoptotic and proliferative effects on islet β cells, which may be applicable to islet transplantation. Autoimmunity against glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65; synthesizes GABA) occurs in T1D. Antigen therapy of T1D with GAD65 or proinsulin in mice has protective effects, which are markedly enhanced by combined GABA therapy. Clinically, autoantibodies against GAD65 and/or GABA receptors play a pathogenic role in several neurological conditions, including stiff person syndrome (SPS), some forms of encephalitis, and autoimmune epilepsy. GABAergic drugs are widely used in

  10. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Sadeghian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is increasing in pediatric age group parallel to the growing prevalence of obesity and overweight all around the world. So changing in life style and   interventions on obesogenic environment is cornerstone of NAFLD therapy in obese children. Some experts recommend that children and adolescents be encouraged to follow a low-fat, low-glycemic-index diet that includes eating a minimum of 5 servings of vegetables and fruits daily, engaging in physical activity for at least 1 hour daily, and minimizing television/computer time to 2 hours daily.  In spite of effectiveness of weight loss and exercise in improvement NAFLD, this goal is very difficult to be achieved and pharmacological approaches have become necessary. Pharmacologic therapies against one or more specific factors and/or molecules involved in the development of NAFLD (i.e., insulin resistance, free fatty acid lipid toxicity, and oxidative stress also might slow the progression of NAFLD to NASH or cirrhosis.  On this basis, insulin sensitizers, antioxidants, cytoprotective agents, and dietary supplementations have been evaluated in pediatric clinical trials but there is no approved pharmacologic therapy for NAFLD or NASH. Not all obese children affected by NAFLD. Diet modification and regular exercise beside to serial medical follow up highly suggested for this group of children. Normal weight and thin children with NAFLD or NASH should be investigated appropriately in a logical manner based on causes of primary liver steatosis in children and treatment of underlying disease can cause improvement fatty liver in these patients.   Keywords: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis; Children; Steatosis; Treatment

  11. [Polycystic liver disease without autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, R; González, P; Venegas, J L

    2003-01-01

    Polycystic liver disease is characterized by the presence of multiple bile duct-derived epithelial cysts scattered in the liver parenchyma. The natural history and clinical manifestations of polycystic liver disease are based on the disease as it manifests in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The occurrence of polycystic liver disease independently from polycystic kidney disease has been known for a long time. More recently, a gene for autosomal dominant polycystic liver disease has been identified on chromosome 19p 13.2-13.1. Isolated polycystic liver disease is underdiagnosed and genetically distinct from polycystic liver disease associated with ADPKD but with similar pathogenesis and clinical manifestations. We report here two men with polycystic liver disease no associated with ADPKD. Ultrasound and computed tomography imaging were effective in documenting the underlying lesions non-invasively.

  12. [Syndrome overlap: autoimmune hepatitis and autoimmune cholangitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra Montero, Luis; Ortega Alvarez, Félix; Marquez Teves, Maguin; Asato Higa, Carmen; Sumire Umeres, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and autoimmune cholangitis are chronic autoimmune liver disease, usually present separate, the cases where characteristics of two of the above is observed liver disease is commonly referred to as Overlap Syndromes (OS). Although there is no consensus on specific criteria for the diagnosis of OS identification of this association is important for initiating appropriate treatment and prevent its progression to cirrhosis or at least the complications of cirrhosis and death. We report the case of awoman aged 22 cirrhotic which debuted are edematous ascites, severe asthenia and jaundice compliant diagnostics SS criteria and initially present any response to treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid and oral corticosteroids, but ultimately finished performing a transplant orthotopic liver.

  13. [Narcolepsy with cataplexy: an autoimmune disease?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Louis; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2014-12-01

    Narcolepsy type 1 (also named narcolepsy-cataplexy or hypocretin deficiency syndrome) is a rare sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy, plus frequently hypnagogic hallucinations, sleep paralysis and nocturnal sleep disturbances. Narcolepsy type 1 is an immune system-associated disease linked with the destruction of 70.000-90.000 hypocretin neurons notably involved in wakefulness. Among narcoleptic patients, 98% are positive for HLA-DQB1*06:02, a HLA class II allele, against 20-25% in general population. Individuals carrying HLA-DQB1*06:02 have an extraordinary risk to develop narcolepsy (odd ratio: 251). Other genes involved in CD4+ T cells and immune system activation as T-cell receptor α are also associated with narcolepsy. The development of the disease is linked with environmental factors such as influenza and streptococcal infections. Narcolepsy type 1 incidence also increased in Europe following the use of Pandemrix, a 2009 H1N1 AS03-adjuvanted vaccine manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline. Interestingly, such increase was not observed with Arepanrix, another vaccine developed by GSK very similar to Pandemrix.

  14. Pyogenic liver abscess after choledochoduodenostomy for biliary obstruction caused by autoimmune pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nobuyuki Toshikuni; Hirofumi Morishita; Koichi Uesaka; Shiro Yuasa; Kyohei Kai; Shizo Sato; Motoko Kitano; Masayoshi Fujisawa; Hiroaki Okushin; Kazuhiko Morii; Shinjiro Takagi; Masahiro Takatani

    2006-01-01

    A 68-year-old man underwent cholecystectomy and choledochoduodenostomy for biliary obstruction and nephrectomy for a renal tumor. Based on clinical and histopathologic findings, autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was diagnosed. The renal tumor was diagnosed as a renal cell cancer. Steroid therapy was started and thereafter pancreatic inflammation improved. Five years after surgery, the patient was readmitted because of pyrexia in a preshock state. A Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess complicated by sepsis was diagnosed. The patient recovered with percutaneous abscess drainage and administration of intravenous antibiotics. Liver abscess recurred 1 mo later but was successfully treated with antibiotics. There has been little information on long-term outcomes of patients with AIP treated with surgery. To our knowledge, this is the second case of liver abscess after surgical treatment of AIP.

  15. [Equine exudative canker: an (auto-)immune disease?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongbloets, A M C; Sloet van Oldruitenborgh-Oosterbaan, M M; Meeus, P J H M; Back, W

    2005-02-15

    Equine canker is a chronic, hyperplastic, exudative pododermatitis affecting one or more feet. Although many causes and treatments have been suggested, the cause of the disease is still unknown and most probably multifactorial. Local treatments include radical surgical debridement of the diseased hoof tissue and application of caustic substances, antibiotics, and pressure bandaging. Nevertheless, the number of recurrences is high (45%). This article presents a 3-year-old New Forest pony-cross mare in which all horny structures (frogs, coronets, spurs, chestnuts) of all feet were affected. Bacteriological and fungal cultures of the frogs were found negative for the pathogens tested. Papilloma virus was not found. Clinical findings raised the hypothesis that the non-specific hyperplastic inflammation of these horn-like structures might have been caused by an (auto-)immune reaction. On the basis of the clinical findings, the pony was treated with surgical debridement of the frogs of a diagonal pair of feet and oral administration of prednisolone (1 mg/kg sid). The frogs, coronets, spurs, and chestnuts of all four feet healed completely within 8 weeks, thus making an (auto-)immune reaction more likely. In conclusion, this case report raised the hypothesis that an aspecific, hyperplastic inflammation of all four feet ('equine canker') and other horny structures may be caused by an (auto-)immune reaction, and that corticosteroids (prednisolone 1 mg/kg sid per os) are effective as treatment.

  16. The immunobiology of Campylobacter jejuni: Innate immunity and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phongsisay, Vongsavanh

    2016-04-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Campylobacter jejuni causes gastroenteritis and Guillain-Barré syndrome in humans. Recent advances in the immunobiology of C. jejuni have been made. This review summarizes C. jejuni-binding innate receptors and highlights the role of innate immunity in autoimmune diseases. This human pathogen produces a variety of glycoconjugates, including human ganglioside-like determinants and multiple activators of Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Furthermore, C. jejuni targets MyD88, NLRP3 inflammasome, TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF), sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (Siglecs), macrophage galactose-type lectin (MGL), and immunoglobulin-like receptors (TREM2, LMIR5/CD300b). The roles of these innate receptors and signaling molecules have been extensively studied. MyD88-mediated TLR activation or inflammasome-dependent IL-1β secretion is essential for autoimmune induction. TRIF mediates the production of type I interferons that promote humoral immune responses and immunoglobulin class-switching. Siglec-1 and Siglec-7 interact directly with gangliosides. Siglec-1 activation enhances phagocytosis and inflammatory responses. MGL internalizes GalNAc-containing glycoconjugates. TREM2 is well-known for its role in phagocytosis. LMIR5 recognizes C. jejuni components and endogenous sulfoglycolipids. Several lines of evidence from animal models of autoimmune diseases suggest that simultaneous activation of innate immunity in the presence of autoreactive lymphocytes or antigen mimicry may link C. jejuni to immunopathology.

  17. Interferons in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases: regulation and roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubey, Divaker; Moudgil, Kamal D

    2011-12-01

    Several lines of evidence strongly implicate type I interferons (IFN-α and β) and IFN-signaling in the pathogenesis of certain autoimmune inflammatory diseases. Accordingly, genome-wide association studies have identified polymorphisms in the type I IFN-signaling pathways. Other studies also indicate that a feed-forward loop of type I IFN production, which involves sensing of cytoplasmic nucleic acids by sensors, contributes to the development of immunopathology. In addition, a mutually positive regulatory feedback loop between type I IFNs and estrogen receptor-α may contribute to a gender bias, thus resulting in an increased production of type I IFNs and associated immunopathology in women. Increased levels of type I IFNs have numerous immunomodulatory functions for both the innate and adaptive immune responses. Given that the IFN-β also has some anti-inflammatory roles, identifying molecular links among certain genotypes, cytokine profiles, and associated phenotypes in patients with autoimmune inflammatory diseases is likely to improve our understanding of autoimmunity-associated pathogenesis and suboptimal outcomes following standard therapies.

  18. The PD-1/PD-Ls pathway and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Suya; Jia, Ru; Zhang, Xiao; Fang, Qiwen; Huang, Lijuan

    2014-07-01

    The programmed death (PD)-1/PD-1 ligands (PD-Ls) pathway, is a new member of the B7/CD28 family, and consists of the PD-1 receptor and its ligands PD-L1 (B7-H1, CD274) and PD-L2 (B7-DC, CD273). Recently, it is reported that PD-1, PD-L1 and PD-L2 also have soluble forms aside from their membrane bound forms. The soluble forms increase the diversity and complexity of PD-1/PD-Ls pathway in both composition and function. The PD-1/PD-Ls pathway is broadly expressed and exerts a wider range of immunoregulatory roles in T-cell activation and tolerance compared with other B7/CD28 family members. Studies show that the PD-1/PD-Ls pathway regulates the induction and maintenance of peripheral tolerance and protects tissues from autoimmune attack in physiological conditions. In addition, it is also involved in various diseases mediated by T cells, such as autoimmunity, tumor immunity, chronic viral infections, and transplantation immunity. In this review, we will summarize the relevance of the soluble forms and the latest researches on the role of PD-1/PD-Ls pathway in autoimmune diseases.

  19. Treatment of patients with severe autoimmune hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Finn Stolze

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a progressive inflammatory diseases of unknown origin that is characterised by a necro-inflammatory and fibrotic process and may result in liver failure or uncompensated liver cirrhosis. Normally AIH is responsive to immunosuppressive therapy, and treatment aims...... and tacrolimus) might salvage patients from transplantation. Mycophenolate mofetil may also improve liver tests and reduce the requirement for corticosteroids. Besides, sirolimus is effective for treatment of de novo autoimmune hepatitis that sometimes develops after liver transplantation. Initial experience...

  20. AIRE variations in Addison's disease and autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøe Wolff, A S; Oftedal, B; Johansson, S

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) is often associated with other components in autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS). Whereas APS I is caused by mutations in the AIRE gene, the susceptibility genes for AAD and APS II are unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether polymorphisms...... or copy number variations in the AIRE gene were associated with AAD and APS II. First, nine SNPs in the AIRE gene were analyzed in 311 patients with AAD and APS II and 521 healthy controls, identifying no associated risk. Second, in a subgroup of 25 of these patients, AIRE sequencing revealed three novel...... polymorphisms. Finally, the AIRE copy number was determined by duplex quantitative PCR in 14 patients with APS I, 161 patients with AAD and APS II and in 39 healthy subjects. In two Scandinavian APS I patients previously reported to be homozygous for common AIRE mutations, we identified large deletions...

  1. Usefulness of liver infiltrating CD86-positive mononuclear cells for diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazutaka Kurokohchi; Shigeki Kuriyama; Tsutomu Masaki; Takashi Himoto; Akihiro Deguchi; Seiji Nakai; Asahiro Morishita; Hirohito Yoneyama; Yasuhiko Kimura; Seishiro Watanabe

    2006-01-01

    AIM: Although the pathogenic mechanism underlying autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) remains unclear, the immune system is thought to be critical for the progression of the disease. Cellular immune responses may be linked to the hepatocellular damage in AIH. Recently, much attention has been focused on the critical functions of costimulatory molecules expressed on mononuclear cells in the generation of effective T cell-mediated immune responses. Analysis of costimulatory molecule expressed on mononuclear cells from the patients with AIH may give us insight into the pathogenic mechanism of hepatocellular damage in AIH.METHODS: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC)were taken from the patients with AIH (34 cases) and healthy controls (25 cases). Liver infiltrating mononuclear cells (LIMCs) were taken from the patients with AIH (18 cases), the patient with chronic hepatitis C (CH-C) (13 cases) and the patients with fatty liver (2 cases).Using flow cytometry, the cells were analyzed for the expression of costimulatory molecules, such as CD80,CD86, and CD152 (CTLA-4). The results were compared with clinical data such as the level of gammaglobulin,histological grade, presence or absence of corticosteroids administration and the response to corticosteroids.RESULTS: The levels of CD80+, CD86+ and CD152+PBMC were significantly reduced in the patients with AIH as compared with healthy controls. By contrast,those cells were significantly higher in LTMC than in PBMC of the patients with AIH. Especially, the level of CD86+ LIMC showed a marked increase irrespective of the degree of disease activity in the patients with ATH,although CD86+ cells were rarely present in PBMC. The levels of CD86+ cells were present in significantly higher frequency in patients with AIH than in the patients with CH-C. Furthermore, the patients with AIH with high levels of CD86+ LIMC showed good responses to corticosteroids, whereas 2 cases of AIH with low levels of CD86+ LIMC did not respond well

  2. Kidneys in chronic liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marek Hartleb; Krzysztof Gutkowski

    2012-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI),defined as an abrupt increase in the serum creatinine level by at least 0.3 mg/dL,occurs in about 20% of patients hospitalized for decompensating liver cirrhosis.Patients with cirrhosis are susceptible to developing AKI because of the progressive vasodilatory state,reduced effective blood volume and stimulation of vasoconstrictor hormones.The most common causes of AKI in cirrhosis are pre-renal azotemia,hepatorenal syndrome and acute tubular necrosis.Differential diagnosis is based on analysis of circumstances of AKI development,natriuresis,urine osmolality,response to withdrawal of diuretics and volume repletion,and rarely on renal biopsy.Chronic glomeruIonephritis and obstructive uropathy are rare causes of azotemia in cirrhotic patients.AKI is one of the last events in the natural history of chronic liver disease,therefore,such patients should have an expedited referral for liver transplantation.Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is initiated by progressive portal hypertension,and may be prematurely triggered by bacterial infections,nonbacterial systemic inflammatory reactions,excessive diuresis,gastrointestinal hemorrhage,diarrhea or nephrotoxic agents.Each type of renal disease has a specific treatment approach ranging from repletion of the vascular system to renal replacement therapy.The treatment of choice in type 1 hepatorenal syndrome is a combination of vasoconstrictor with albumin infusion,which is effective in about 50% of patients.The second-line treatment of HRS involves a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt,renal vasoprotection or systems of artificial liver support.

  3. CYP2E1 autoantibodies in liver diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutti, Salvatore; Rigamonti, Cristina; Vidali, Matteo; Albano, Emanuele

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune reactions involving cytochrome P4502E1 (CYP2E1) are a feature of idiosyncratic liver injury induced by halogenated hydrocarbons and isoniazid, but are also detectable in about one third of the patients with advanced alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and chronic hepatitis C (CHC). In these latter the presence of anti-CYP2E1 auto-antibodies is an independent predictor of extensive necro-inflammation and fibrosis and worsens the recurrence of hepatitis following liver transplantation, indicating that CYP2E1-directed autoimmunity can contribute to hepatic injury. The molecular characterization of the antigens recognized by anti-CYP2E1 auto-antibodies in ALD and CHC has shown that the targeted conformational epitopes are located in close proximity on the molecular surface. Furthermore, these epitopes can be recognized on CYP2E1 expressed on hepatocyte plasma membranes where they can trigger antibody-mediated cytotoxicity. This does not exclude that T cell-mediated responses against CYP2E1 might also be involved in causing hepatocyte damage. CYP2E1 structural modifications by reactive metabolites and molecular mimicry represent important factors in the breaking of self-tolerance against CYP2E1 in, respectively, ALD and CHC. However, genetic or acquired interferences with the mechanisms controlling the homeostasis of the immune system are also likely to contribute. More studies are needed to better characterize the impact of anti-CYP2E1 autoimmunity in liver diseases particularly in relation to the fact that common metabolic alterations such as obesity and diabetes stimulates hepatic CYP2E1 expression. PMID:25462068

  4. Multisensory body representation in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finotti, Gianluca; Costantini, Marcello

    2016-02-12

    Body representation has been linked to the processing and integration of multisensory signals. An outstanding example of the pivotal role played by multisensory mechanisms in body representation is the Rubber Hand Illusion (RHI). In this paradigm, multisensory stimulation induces a sense of ownership over a fake limb. Previous work has shown high interindividual differences in the susceptibility to the RHI. The origin of this variability remains largely unknown. Given the tight and bidirectional communication between the brain and the immune system, we predicted that the origin of this variability could be traced, in part, to the immune system's functioning, which is altered by several clinical conditions, including Coeliac Disease (CD). Consistent with this prediction, we found that the Rubber Hand Illusion is stronger in CD patients as compared to healthy controls. We propose a biochemical mechanism accounting for the dependency of multisensory body representation upon the Immune system. Our finding has direct implications for a range of neurological, psychiatric and immunological conditions where alterations of multisensory integration, body representation and dysfunction of the immune system co-exist.

  5. Alcoholic liver disease and the gut-liver axis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gyongyi; Szabo; Shashi; Bala

    2010-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is one of the leading causes of liver diseases and liver-related death worldwide. Of the many factors that contribute to the pathogenesis of ALD, gut-derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plays a central role in induction of steatosis, inflammation, and fi brosis in the liver. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms by which alcohol contributes to increased gut permeability, the activation of Kupffer cells, and the infl ammatory cascade by LPS. The role of the Toll-like receptor 4...

  6. Fulminant hepatic failure in autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, R; Chapman, A R; Reid, G T; Hayes, P C

    2015-01-01

    Fulminant hepatic failure is liver disease that causes encephalopathy within 8 weeks of onset of symptoms or within 2 weeks of onset of jaundice in a patient without prior evidence of liver disease. Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type-1 is an autoimmune autosomal-recessive condition causing parathyroid and adrenal insufficiency, alopecia, chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, ectodermal dystrophy and, rarely, hepatitis. Although the liver can be affected as a consequence of the autoimmune process, the spectrum of disease activity is varied. Autoimmune hepatitis develops in 10-20% of patients and successful liver transplantation has been reported in pediatric patients who failed immunosuppressive treatment. We report fulminant hepatic failure in an adult patient with autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type-1 who responded to medical treatment and did not require liver transplantation. We highlight the diagnostic scoring system for autoimmune hepatitis and the referral criteria for liver transplantation in fulminant hepatic failure.

  7. The Complement System in Liver Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuebin Qin; Bin Gao

    2006-01-01

    The complement system plays an important role in mediating both acquired and innate responses to defend against microbial infection, and in disposing immunoglobins and apoptotic cells. The liver (mainly hepatocytes) is responsible for biosynthesis of about 80-90% of plasma complement components and expresses a variety of complement receptors.Recent evidence from several studies suggests that the complement system is also involved in the pathogenesis of a variety of liver disorders including liver injury and repair, fibrosis, viral hepatitis, alcoholic liver disease, and liver ischemia/reperfusion injury. In this review, we will discuss the potential role of the complement system in the pathogenesis of liver diseases.

  8. Epstein-Barr Virus in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anette Holck Draborg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic autoimmune diseases (SADs are a group of connective tissue diseases with diverse, yet overlapping, symptoms and autoantibody development. The etiology behind SADs is not fully elucidated, but a number of genetic and environmental factors are known to influence the incidence of SADs. Recent findings link dysregulation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV with SAD development. EBV causes a persistent infection with a tight latency programme in memory B-cells, which enables evasion of the immune defence. A number of immune escape mechanisms and immune-modulating proteins have been described for EBV. These immune modulating functions make EBV a good candidate for initiation of autoimmune diseases and exacerbation of disease progression. This review focuses on systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, rheumatoid arthritis (RA, and Sjögren’s syndrome (SS and sum up the existing data linking EBV with these diseases including elevated titres of EBV antibodies, reduced T-cell defence against EBV, and elevated EBV viral load. Together, these data suggest that uncontrolled EBV infection can develop diverse autoreactivities in genetic susceptible individuals with different manifestations depending on the genetic background and the site of reactivation.

  9. Epstein-Barr virus in systemic autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draborg, Anette Holck; Duus, Karen; Houen, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases (SADs) are a group of connective tissue diseases with diverse, yet overlapping, symptoms and autoantibody development. The etiology behind SADs is not fully elucidated, but a number of genetic and environmental factors are known to influence the incidence of SADs. Recent findings link dysregulation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) with SAD development. EBV causes a persistent infection with a tight latency programme in memory B-cells, which enables evasion of the immune defence. A number of immune escape mechanisms and immune-modulating proteins have been described for EBV. These immune modulating functions make EBV a good candidate for initiation of autoimmune diseases and exacerbation of disease progression. This review focuses on systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and Sjögren's syndrome (SS) and sum up the existing data linking EBV with these diseases including elevated titres of EBV antibodies, reduced T-cell defence against EBV, and elevated EBV viral load. Together, these data suggest that uncontrolled EBV infection can develop diverse autoreactivities in genetic susceptible individuals with different manifestations depending on the genetic background and the site of reactivation.

  10. Modulation of autoimmune rheumatic diseases by oestrogen and progesterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Grant C; Choubey, Divaker

    2014-12-01

    Sexual dimorphism is evident in the risk and expression of several human autoimmune diseases. Differences in disease manifestations observed between sexes are likely to involve immunomodulation by sex steroids, nonhormonal factors encoded by genes on the X and Y chromosomes, and immunological phenomena unique to pregnancy. In systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and perhaps other autoantibody-mediated diseases, oestrogen seems to increase the risk of disease in genetically predisposed women by targeting key immune pathways, including the type 1 interferon (IFN) response, differentiation of CD4(+) T helper cells and survival of autoreactive B cells. By contrast, progesterone seems to reduce the risk of SLE by counteracting the effects of oestrogen on some of these same pathways, which suggests that the balance between oestrogen and progesterone can determine disease expression. In this Review we focus on the roles of the sex steroid hormones oestrogen and progesterone in modulating the risk and expression of SLE and rheumatoid arthritis. Intensive research in this area promises to identify novel therapeutic strategies and improve understanding of the immunological requirements and complications of pregnancy, and is expected to define the mechanisms behind sexual dimorphism in autoimmunity, immunity and other aspects of human health--a newly announced directive of the NIH.

  11. Seven newly identified loci for autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Jason D; Simmonds, Matthew J; Walker, Neil M; Burren, Oliver; Brand, Oliver J; Guo, Hui; Wallace, Chris; Stevens, Helen; Coleman, Gillian; Franklyn, Jayne A; Todd, John A; Gough, Stephen C L

    2012-12-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), including Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), is one of the most common of the immune-mediated diseases. To further investigate the genetic determinants of AITD, we conducted an association study using a custom-made single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, the ImmunoChip. The SNP array contains all known and genotype-able SNPs across 186 distinct susceptibility loci associated with one or more immune-mediated diseases. After stringent quality control, we analysed 103 875 common SNPs (minor allele frequency >0.05) in 2285 GD and 462 HT patients and 9364 controls. We found evidence for seven new AITD risk loci (P < 1.12 × 10(-6); a permutation test derived significance threshold), five at locations previously associated and two at locations awaiting confirmation, with other immune-mediated diseases.

  12. MicroRNAs in Human Diseases: From Autoimmune Diseases to Skin, Psychiatric and Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Tai-You

    2011-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNA molecules that negatively regulate gene expression via degradation or translational repression of their target messenger RNAs (mRNAs). Recent studies have clearly demonstrated that miRNAs play critical roles in several biologic processes, including cell cycle, differentiation, cell development, cell growth, and apoptosis and that miRNAs are highly expressed in regulatory T (Treg) cells and a wide range of miRNAs are involved in the regulation of immunity and in the prevention of autoimmunity. It has been increasingly reported that miRNAs are associated with various human diseases like autoimmune disease, skin disease, neurological disease and psychiatric disease. Recently, the identification of mi- RNAs in skin has added a new dimension in the regulatory network and attracted significant interest in this novel layer of gene regulation. Although miRNA research in the field of dermatology is still relatively new, miRNAs have been the subject of much dermatological interest in skin morphogenesis and in regulating angiogenesis. In addition, miRNAs are moving rapidly onto center stage as key regulators of neuronal development and function in addition to important contributions to neurodegenerative disorder. Moreover, there is now compelling evidence that dysregulation of miRNA networks is implicated in the development and onset of human neruodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Tourette's syndrome, Down syndrome, depression and schizophrenia. In this review, I briefly summarize the current studies about the roles of miRNAs in various autoimmune diseases, skin diseases, psychoneurological disorders and mental stress.

  13. Cytokines, STATs and Liver Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BinGao

    2005-01-01

    The Janus kinase-signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK-STAT) signaling pathway, activated by more than 50 cytokines or growth factors, plays critical roles in a wide variety of cellular functions in the hematopoietic, immune, neuronal and hepatic systems. In the liver, this signaling pathway, activated by more than 20 cytokines, growth factors, hormones, and hepatitis viral proteins, plays critical roles in antiviral defense, acute phase response, hepatic injury, repair, inflammation, transformation, and hepatitis. This article reviews the biological significance of STAT1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 in hepatic functions and diseases. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2005;2(2):92-100.

  14. Cytokines, STATs and Liver Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Gao

    2005-01-01

    The Janus kinase-signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK-STAT) signaling pathway, activated by more than 50 cytokines or growth factors, plays critical roles in a wide variety of cellular functions in the hematopoietic, immune, neuronal and hepatic systems. In the liver, this signaling pathway, activated by more than 20 cytokines, growth factors, hormones, and hepatitis viral proteins, plays critical roles in antiviral defense, acute phase response, hepatic injury, repair, inflammation, transformation, and hepatitis. This article reviews the biological significance of STAT1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 in hepatic functions and diseases. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.2005;2(2):92-100.

  15. The potential for induction of autoimmune disease by a randomly-mutated self-antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm

    2007-01-01

    The pathology of most autoimmune diseases is well described. However, the exact event that triggers the onset of the inflammatory cascade leading to disease is less certain and most autoimmune diseases are complex idiopathic diseases with no single gene known to be causative. In many cases...

  16. Targeting collagen expression in alcoholic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kyle J Thompson; Iain H McKillop; Laura W Schrum

    2011-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a leading cause of liver disease and liver-related deaths globally, particularly in developed nations. Liver fibrosis is a consequence of ALD and other chronic liver insults, which can progress to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma if left untreated. Liver fibrosis is characterized by accumulation of excess extracellular matrix components, including type Ⅰ collagen, which disrupts liver microcirculation and leads to injury. To date, there is no therapy for the treatment of liver fibrosis; thus treatments that either prevent the accumulation of type Ⅰ collagen or hasten its degradation are desirable. The focus of this review is to examine the regulation of type Ⅰ collagen in fibrogenic cells of the liver and to discuss current advances in therapeutics to eliminate excessive collagen deposition.

  17. Is there a Common Genetic Basis for Autoimmune Diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Manuel Anaya

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (ADs represent a diverse collection of diseases in terms of their demographic profile and primary clinical manifestations. The commonality between them however, is the damage to tissues and organs that arises from the response to self-antigens. The presence of shared pathophysiological mechanisms within ADs has stimulated searches for common genetic roots to these diseases. Two approaches have been undertaken to sustain the “common genetic origin” theory of ADs. Firstly, a clinical genetic analysis showed that autoimmunity aggregates within families of probands diagnosed with primary Sjögren's (pSS syndrome or type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D. A literature review supported the establishment of a familiar cluster of ADs depending upon the proband's disease phenotype. Secondly, in a same and well-defined population, a large genetic association study indicated that a number of polymorphic genes (i.e. HLA-DRB1, TNF and PTPN22 influence the susceptibility for acquiring different ADs. Likewise, association and linkage studies in different populations have revealed that several susceptibility loci overlap in ADs, and clinical studies have shown that frequent clustering of several ADs occurs. Thus, the genetic factors for ADs consist of two types: those which are common to many ADs (acting in epistatic pleitropy and those that are specific to a given disorder. Their identification and functional characterization will allow us to predict their effect as well as to indicate potential new therapeutic interventions. Both autoimmunity family history and the co-occurrence of ADs in affected probands should be considered when performing genetic association and linkage studies.

  18. Origin of B-Cell Neoplasms in Autoimmune Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari Hemminki

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (ADs are associated with a number of B-cell neoplasms but the associations are selective in regard to the type of neoplasm and the conferred risks are variable. So far no mechanistic bases for these differential associations have been demonstrated. We speculate that developmental origin of B-cells might propose a mechanistic rationale for their carcinogenic response to autoimmune stimuli and tested the hypothesis on our previous studies on the risks of B-cell neoplasms after any of 33 ADs. We found that predominantly germinal center (GC-derived B-cells showed multiple associations with ADs: diffuse large B cell lymphoma associated with 15 ADs, follicular lymphoma with 7 ADs and Hodgkin lymphoma with 11 ADs. Notably, these neoplasms shared significant associations with 5 ADs (immune thrombocytopenic purpura, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosis. By contrast, primarily non-GC neoplasms, acute lymphocytic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and myeloma associated with 2 ADs only and mantle cell lymphoma with 1 AD. None of the neoplasms shared associated ADs. These data may suggest that autoimmune stimulation critically interferes with the rapid cell division, somatic hypermutation, class switch recombination and immunological selection of maturing B-cell in the GC and delivers damage contributing to transformation.

  19. Human leukocyte Antigen-DM polymorphisms in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvaro-Benito, Miguel; Morrison, Eliot; Wieczorek, Marek; Sticht, Jana; Freund, Christian

    2016-08-01

    Classical MHC class II (MHCII) proteins present peptides for CD4(+) T-cell surveillance and are by far the most prominent risk factor for a number of autoimmune disorders. To date, many studies have shown that this link between particular MHCII alleles and disease depends on the MHCII's particular ability to bind and present certain peptides in specific physiological contexts. However, less attention has been paid to the non-classical MHCII molecule human leucocyte antigen-DM, which catalyses peptide exchange on classical MHCII proteins acting as a peptide editor. DM function impacts the presentation of both antigenic peptides in the periphery and key self-peptides during T-cell development in the thymus. In this way, DM activity directly influences the response to pathogens, as well as mechanisms of self-tolerance acquisition. While decreased DM editing of particular MHCII proteins has been proposed to be related to autoimmune disorders, no experimental evidence for different DM catalytic properties had been reported until recently. Biochemical and structural investigations, together with new animal models of loss of DM activity, have provided an attractive foundation for identifying different catalytic efficiencies for DM allotypes. Here, we revisit the current knowledge of DM function and discuss how DM function may impart autoimmunity at the organism level.

  20. Effect of Autophagy Over Liver Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-qian Yi; Xue-feng Yang; Duan-fang Liao; Qing Wu; Nian Fu; Yang Hu; Ting Cao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In recent years, increasingly evidences show that autophagy plays an important role in the pathogenesis and development of liver diseases, and the relationship between them has increasingly become a focus of concern. Autophagy refers to the process through which the impaired organelles, misfolded protein, and intruding microorganisms is degraded by lysosomes to maintain stability inside cells. This article states the effect of autophagy on liver diseases (hepatic fibrosis, fatty liver, viral hepatitis, and liver cancer), which aims to provide a new direction for the treatment of liver diseases.

  1. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease after liver transplantation for cryptogenic cirrhosis or nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalamanchili, Kanthi; Saadeh, Sherif; Klintmalm, Göran B; Jennings, Linda W; Davis, Gary L

    2010-04-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) may account for many cases of cryptogenic cirrhosis. If so, then steatosis might recur after liver transplantation. Two thousand fifty-two patients underwent primary liver transplantation for chronic liver disease between 1986 and 2004. Serial liver biopsy samples were assessed for steatosis and fibrosis. Two hundred fifty-seven patients (12%) had a pretransplant diagnosis of cryptogenic cirrhosis (239) or NASH (18). Fatty liver developed in 31% and was more common when the pretransplant diagnosis was NASH (45% at 5 years versus 23% for cryptogenic cirrhosis, P = 0.007). NASH developed in only 4% and occurred exclusively when steatosis had already occurred. Steatosis after liver transplantation was associated with the baseline body weight and body mass index by univariate analyses, but no pretransplant or posttransplant characteristic independently predicted steatosis after liver transplantation because obesity was so common in all groups. Five percent and 10% developed bridging fibrosis or cirrhosis after 5 and 10 years, respectively, and this was more common after NASH (31%) than in those who developed steatosis alone (6%) or had no fat (3%, P = 0.002). One-, 5-, and 10-year survival was the same in patients who underwent transplantation for cryptogenic cirrhosis or NASH (86%, 71%, and 56%) and in patients who underwent transplantation for other indications (86%, 71%, and 53%; not significant), but death was more often due to cardiovascular disease and less likely from recurrent liver disease. In conclusion, fatty liver is common after liver transplantation for cryptogenic cirrhosis or NASH but is twice as common in the latter group; this suggests that some cryptogenic cirrhosis, but perhaps not all, is caused by NASH. Posttransplant NASH is unusual, and steatosis appears to be a prerequisite. Advanced fibrosis is uncommon, and survival is the same as that of patients who undergo transplantation for other causes.

  2. Pervasive sharing of genetic effects in autoimmune disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Cotsapas

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association (GWA studies have identified numerous, replicable, genetic associations between common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and risk of common autoimmune and inflammatory (immune-mediated diseases, some of which are shared between two diseases. Along with epidemiological and clinical evidence, this suggests that some genetic risk factors may be shared across diseases-as is the case with alleles in the Major Histocompatibility Locus. In this work we evaluate the extent of this sharing for 107 immune disease-risk SNPs in seven diseases: celiac disease, Crohn's disease, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and type 1 diabetes. We have developed a novel statistic for Cross Phenotype Meta-Analysis (CPMA which detects association of a SNP to multiple, but not necessarily all, phenotypes. With it, we find evidence that 47/107 (44% immune-mediated disease risk SNPs are associated to multiple-but not all-immune-mediated diseases (SNP-wise P(CPMA<0.01. We also show that distinct groups of interacting proteins are encoded near SNPs which predispose to the same subsets of diseases; we propose these as the mechanistic basis of shared disease risk. We are thus able to leverage genetic data across diseases to construct biological hypotheses about the underlying mechanism of pathogenesis.

  3. Excellent survival after liver transplantation for isolated polycystic liver disease : an European Liver Transplant Registry study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Keimpema, Loes; Nevens, Frederik; Adam, Rene; Porte, Robert J.; Fikatas, Panagiotis; Becker, Thomas; Kirkegaard, Preben; Metselaar, Herold J.; Drenth, Joost P. H.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with end-stage isolated polycystic liver disease (PCLD) suffer from incapacitating symptoms because of very large liver volumes. Liver transplantation (LT) is the only curative option. This study assesses the feasibility of LT in PCLD. We used the European Liver Transplant Registry (ELTR) d

  4. Excellent survival after liver transplantation for isolated polycystic liver disease: an European Liver Transplant Registry study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Keimpema, Loes; Nevens, Frederik; Adam, René

    2011-01-01

    Patients with end-stage isolated polycystic liver disease (PCLD) suffer from incapacitating symptoms because of very large liver volumes. Liver transplantation (LT) is the only curative option. This study assesses the feasibility of LT in PCLD. We used the European Liver Transplant Registry (ELTR...

  5. The NLRP3 inflammasome in kidney disease and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, Holly L; Ooi, Joshua D; Holdsworth, Stephen R; Kitching, A Richard

    2016-09-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome is an intracellular platform that converts the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18 to their active forms in response to 'danger' signals, which can be either host or pathogen derived, and mediates a form of inflammatory cell death called pyroptosis. This component of the innate immune system was initially discovered because of its role in rare autoinflammatory syndromes called cryopyrinopathies, but it has since been shown to mediate injurious inflammation in a broad range of diseases. Inflammasome activation occurs in both immune cells, primarily macrophages and dendritic cells, and in some intrinsic kidney cells such as the renal tubular epithelium. The NLRP3 inflammasome has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of renal conditions, including acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, diabetic nephropathy and crystal-related nephropathy. The inflammasome also plays a role in autoimmune kidney disease, as IL-1β and IL-18 influence adaptive immunity through modulation of T helper cell subsets, skewing development in favour of Th17 and Th1 cells that are important in the development of autoimmunity. Both IL-1 blockade and two recently identified specific NLRP3 inflammasome blockers, MCC950 and β-hydroxybutyrate, have shown promise in the treatment of inflammasome-mediated conditions. These targeted therapies have the potential to be of benefit in the growing number of kidney diseases in which the NLRP3 inflammasome has been implicated.

  6. Glutamic acid decarboxylase autoimmunity in Batten disease and other disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, David A; Atkinson, Mark; Tagle, Danilo A

    2004-12-14

    Degenerative diseases of the CNS, such as stiff-person syndrome (SPS), progressive cerebellar ataxia, and Rasmussen encephalitis, have been characterized by the presence of autoantibodies. Recent findings in individuals with Batten disease and in animal models for the disorder indicate that this condition may be associated with autoantibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), an enzyme that converts the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate to the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Anti-GAD autoantibodies could result in excess excitatory neurotransmitters, leading to the seizures and other symptoms observed in patients with Batten disease. The pathogenic potential of GAD autoantibodies is examined in light of what is known for other autoimmune disorders, such as multiple sclerosis, SPS, Rasmussen encephalitis, and type 1 diabetes, and may have radical implications for diagnosis and management of Batten disease.

  7. Clustering of autoimmune diseases in patients with rosacea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Hansen, Peter Riis; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rosacea is a common inflammatory skin condition that shares genetic risk loci with autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and celiac disease. A recent genomewide association study identified 90 genetic regions associated with T1DM, celiac disease, multiple sclerosis......, and/or rheumatoid arthritis, respectively. However, a possible association with rosacea was not investigated. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the association between rosacea and T1DM, celiac disease, multiple sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis, respectively. METHODS: We performed a population-based case......-control study. A total of 6759 patients with rosacea were identified and matched with 33,795 control subjects on age, sex, and calendar time. We used conditional logistic regression to calculate crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: After adjustment for smoking...

  8. Interrelation specific autoimmune pathologies of a thyroid gland with inorganic autoimmune rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O V Paramonova

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The problem of a pathology of a thyroid gland at rheumatic diseases, in particular at rheumatoid arthritis, remains actual and to this day. The work purpose was studying antitelogenesis to thyroid hormones at patients with mixt autoimmune pathology. In whey of blood of patients with RA and autothyroid pathology are found out antibodies (AB to Т3 and Т4, their concentration correlates with activity of pathological process. It is shown, that level AB to Т3 and Т4 authentically differs from the maintenance of the given antibodies in whey of blood of healthy faces. Level of antibodies to thyroid hormones can be considered as the criterion predicting development of pathology of a thyroid gland at patients with RA.

  9. Clinical potential of regulatory T cell therapy in liver diseases: An overview and current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Claire Jeffery

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand for liver transplantation and the decline in donor organs has highlighted the need for alternative novel therapies to prevent chronic active hepatitis, which eventually leads to liver cirrhosis and liver cancer. Liver histology of chronic hepatitis is composed of both effector and regulatory lymphocytes. The human liver contains different subsets of effector lymphocytes, that are kept in check by a subpopulation of T cells known as Regulatory T cells (Treg. The balance of effector and regulatory lymphocytes generally determines the outcome of hepatic inflammation: resolution, fulminant hepatitis or chronic active hepatitis. Thus, maintaining and adjusting this balance is crucial in immunological manipulation of liver diseases. One of the options to restore this balance is to enrich Treg in the liver disease patients.Advances in the knowledge of Treg biology and development of clinical grade isolation reagents, cell sorting equipment and Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP facilities have paved the way to apply Treg cells as a potential therapy to restore peripheral self-tolerance in autoimmune liver diseases, chronic rejection and post-transplantation. Past and on-going studies have applied Treg in type-1 diabetes mellitus, systemic lupus erythematosus, graft versus host diseases (GVHD and solid organ transplantations. There have not been any new therapies for the autoimmune liver diseases for more than three decades; thus the clinical potential for the application of autologous Treg cell therapy to treat autoimmune liver disease is an attractive and novel option. However, it is fundamental to understand the deep immunology, genetic profiles, biology, homing behavior and microenvironment of Treg before applying the cells to the patients.

  10. Membranous Nephropathy Associated With Immunological Disorder-Related Liver Disease: A Retrospective Study of 10 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauvergne, Maxime; Moktefi, Anissa; Rabant, Marion; Vigneau, Cécile; Kofman, Tomek; Burtey, Stephane; Corpechot, Christophe; Stehlé, Thomas; Desvaux, Dominique; Rioux-Leclercq, Nathalie; Rouvier, Philippe; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Frouget, Thierry; Daugas, Eric; Jablonski, Mathieu; Dahan, Karine; Brocheriou, Isabelle; Remy, Philippe; Grimbert, Philippe; Lang, Philippe; Chazouilleres, Oliver; Sahali, Dil; Audard, Vincent

    2015-07-01

    The association between membranous nephropathy (MN) and immunological disorder-related liver disease has not been extensively investigated, and the specific features of this uncommon association, if any, remain to be determined.We retrospectively identified 10 patients with this association. We aimed to describe the clinical, biological, and pathological characteristics of these patients and their therapeutic management. The possible involvement of the phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) in these apparent secondary forms of MN was assessed by immunohistochemistry with renal and liver biopsy specimens.The mean delay between MN and liver disease diagnoses was 3.9 years and the interval between the diagnosis of the glomerular and liver diseases was <1.5 years in 5 patients. MN was associated with a broad spectrum of liver diseases including primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). AIH whether isolated (n = 3) or associated with PBC (n = 2) or PSC (n = 2) was the most frequent autoimmune liver disease. Circulating PLA2R antibodies were detected in 4 out of 9 patients but the test was performed under specific immunosuppressive treatment in 3 out of 9 patients. Seven of the 9 patients with available renal tissue specimens displayed enhanced expression of PLA2R in glomeruli whereas PLA2R was not expressed in liver parenchyma from these patients or in normal liver tissue. The study of immunoglobulin (Ig) subclasses of deposits in glomeruli revealed that the most frequent pattern was the coexistence of IgG1 and IgG4 immune deposits with IgG4 predominating.Detection of PLA2R antibodies in glomeruli but not in liver parenchyma is a common finding in patients with MN associated with autoimmune liver disease, suggesting that these autoantibodies are not exclusively detected in idiopathic MN.

  11. Trace elements and chronic liver diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loguercio, C.; De Girolamo, V.; Federico A., A.; Del Vecchio Blanco, C. [Seconda Universita di Napoli, Naples (Italy). Cattedra di Gastroenterologia; Feng, S.L.; Gialanella, G. [Naples Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche; Cataldi, V. [Naples Univ. (Italy). Prima Medicina Ospedale Ascalesi

    1997-12-31

    The relationships between chronic liver diseases and trace element (TE) contents are debated. Particularly, no defined data are available about the TE levels in viral liver disease patients with or without malnutrition. In this study we evaluated blood and plasma levels of various trace elements in patients with HCV-related chronic liver disease, at different stages of liver damage (8 patients with chronic hepatitis and 32 with liver cirrhosis) with or without malnutrition. We also studied 10 healthy volunteers as control group. We found that cirrhotic subjects had a significant decrease of blood levels of Zn and Se, independently on the nutritional status, whereas plasma levels of Fe were significantly reduced only in malnourished cirrhotic patients. Our data indicate that liver impairment is the main cause of the blood decrease of Se and Zn levels in patients with non alcoholic liver disease, whereas the malnutrition affects Fe levels only. (orig.)

  12. Anemia of Chronic Liver Diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hyun Chung; Lee, Jhung Sang; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1971-09-15

    The pathogenetic mechanisms of anemia in patients with chronic liver disease were observed. Seventeen patients with moderate to advanced hepatic diseases were studied by various methods. Only patients without previous blood loss were included : 14 had cirrhosis, 2 had active chronic hepatitis, and one had inferior vena cava obstruction with associated liver cirrhosis. The followings were the results: 1. The anemia based on red blood cell count, Hb., and Ht. was found in 76.5-78.6% of the patients. 2. Red cell indices indicated that normo-macrocytic and normochromic anemia was present is the majority of the patients. 3. No evidence of megaloblastic anemia was found on the basis of the morphological examinations. 4. Serum iron, TIBC, % saturation and iron content in the bone marrow indicated that iron deficiency anemia was present in about half of the patients. 5. In the view of the erythrocyte dynamics, primary increase in the red cell destruction was ascribed to the cause of the anemia. 6. Decrease in the red cell survival time was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and S.L. ratio. Also, hemoglobin level was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and T{sub 50} Cr. Therefore, multiple causes may be involved in the pathogenesis of the anemia. 7. Anemia as determined by the red cell volume was found in only 60% of the patients. It may be possible that hemodilutional anemia is present.

  13. Extraintestinal Crohn's disease mimicking autoimmune inner ear disease: a histopathological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, M; Hegemann, I; Hegemann, S C A

    2011-01-01

    Patients with autoimmune inner ear disease develop rapidly progressive sensorineural hearing loss over a period of several weeks or months, often accompanied by vestibular loss. This disease can occur as a distinct clinical entity or in association with an underlying autoimmune disorder. Treatment comprises immunosuppression by corticosteroids, cytostatic drugs or tumor necrosis factor-α antagonists. We report histopathological and immunohistochemical findings of the inner ear of a patient with a granulomatous inner ear disease suffering from Crohn's disease that was nonresponsive to treatment and who underwent surgery for bilateral cochlear implants.

  14. Metabolite monitoring to guide thiopurine therapy in systemic autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapdelaine, Aurélie; Mansour, Anne-Marie; Troyanov, Yves; Williamson, David R; Doré, Maxime

    2017-01-27

    6-Thioguanine nucleotide (6-TGN) is the active metabolite of thiopurine drugs azathioprine and 6-mercaptopurine. 6-Methylmercaptopurine (6-MMP) is an inactive and potentially hepatotoxic metabolite. A subgroup of patients (shunters) preferentially produce 6-MMP instead of 6-TGN, therefore displaying thiopurine resistance and risk for hepatotoxicity. Outside inflammatory bowel disease literature, few data exist regarding individualized thiopurine therapy based on metabolite monitoring. This study sought to describe metabolite monitoring in patients receiving weight-based thiopurine for systemic autoimmune diseases. Patients were enrolled using a laboratory database, and data were retrospectively collected. The correlation between the highest thiopurine dose (mg/kg) and the 6-TGN concentration (pmol/8 × 10(8) erythrocytes) was estimated with Pearson's correlation coefficient. Seventy-one patients with various systemic autoimmune conditions were enrolled. The correlation between the thiopurine dose and the 6-TGN level was weak for the overall patient sample (r = 0.201, p = 0.092) and for the subgroup of non-shunters (r = 0.278, p = 0.053). Subjects with 6-MMP levels >5700 pmol/8 × 10(8) erythrocytes had more hepatic cytolysis compared to subjects with 6-MMP 5700. Eleven non-shunters had hepatotoxicity, one of which had 6-MMP >5700. Thiopurine metabolite monitoring shows wide variability in 6-TGN levels among patients treated with weight-based thiopurine for systemic autoimmune diseases. Thirty-one percent of the patients in our series fulfilled the shunter definition. Thiopurine metabolite monitoring and dose adjustment to improve maintenance of remission and avoid hepatotoxicity should be studied prospectively.

  15. Development of a disease registry for autoimmune bullous diseases: initial analysis of the pemphigus vulgaris subset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Amit Aakash; Seiffert-Sinha, Kristina; Sirois, David; Werth, Victoria P; Rengarajan, Badri; Zrnchik, William; Attwood, Kristopher; Sinha, Animesh A

    2015-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a rare, potentially life threatening, autoimmune blistering skin disease. The International Pemphigus and Pemphigoid Foundation (IPPF) has recently developed a disease registry with the aim to enhance our understanding of autoimmune bullous diseases with the long-term goal of acquiring information to improve patient care. Patients were recruited to the IPPF disease registry through direct mail, e-mail, advertisements, and articles in the IPPF-quarterly, -website, -Facebook webpage, and IPPF Peer Health Coaches to complete a 38-question survey. We present here the initial analysis of detailed clinical information collected on 393 PV patients. We report previously unrecognized gender differences in terms of lesion location, autoimmune comorbidity, and delay in diagnosis. The IPPF disease registry serves as a useful resource and guide for future clinical investigation.

  16. Familial associations of lymphoma and myeloma with autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Hemminki, K; Försti, A; Sundquist, K.; Sundquist, J.; Li, X

    2017-01-01

    Many B-cell neoplasms are associated with autoimmune diseases (AIDs) but most evidence is based on a personal rather than a family history of AIDs. Here we calculated risks for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and multiple myeloma (MM) when family members were diagnosed with any of 44 different AIDs, or, independently, risk for AIDs when family members were diagnosed with a neoplasm. A total of 64 418 neoplasms and 531 155 AIDs were identified from Swedish nationwide health c...

  17. Mechanisms in endocrinology: autoimmune thyroid disease: old and new players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effraimidis, Grigoris; Wiersinga, Wilmar M

    2014-06-01

    The last 10 years have seen some progress in understanding the etiology of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). The female preponderance can now be explained - at least in part - by fetal microchimerism and X-chromosome inactivation. The number of identified susceptibility genes for AITD is increasing (among others now including TSHR, TG, HLA, CTLA4, PTPN22, CD40, FCRL3, IL2RA, and FOXP3), but these genes together probably do not explain more than about 10% of the heritability of AITD. As twin studies indicate that genes contribute for 70% of AITD, it follows that there must be many more loci, each of them contributing a little. While the genetic studies have clarified why various autoimmune diseases so often cluster in the same patient, the molecular mechanism of action of these genetic polymorphisms (frequently located in introns) has hardly been explained. Polymorphisms in AITD susceptibility genes may become helpful in clinical practice, e.g. in assessing risk of recurrent Graves' hyperthyroidism (GH) after a course of antithyroid drugs. Moderate alcohol intake decreases the risk on overt GH and overt Hashimoto's hypothyroidism. Current smokers - as well known - are at increased risk for Graves' disease, but - surprisingly - at diminished risk for Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Low selenium and low vitamin D levels might increase the risk of developing AITD, but data are still inconclusive. Current options for preventive interventions in subjects at risk to develop AITD are very limited.

  18. Autoimmune Thyroid Disease in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Global Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Cárdenas Roldán

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the prevalence and impact of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Methods. Eight-hundred patients were included. The association between AITD and RA was analyzed was analyzed by bivariate and multivariate analysis. In addition, a literature review was done focusing on geographical variations. Results. In our cohort the prevalence of AITD was 9.8% while the presence of antibodies was 37.8% for antithyroperoxidase enzyme (TPOAb and 20.8% for antithyroglobulin protein (TgAb. The presence of type 2 diabetes, thrombosis, abnormal body mass index, and a high educational level was positively associated with AITD. The literature review disclosed a geographical variation of AITD in RA ranging from 0.5% to 27%. Autoantibody prevalence ranges from 6% to 31% for TgAb, 5% to 37% for TPOAb, and from 11.4% to 32% for the presence of either of the two. Conclusion. AITD is not uncommon in RA and should be systematically assessed since it is a risk factor for developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. These results may help to further study the common mechanisms of autoimmune diseases, to improve patients’ outcome, and to define public health policies. An international consensus to accurately diagnose AITD is warranted.

  19. Autoimmune Thyroid Disease in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Global Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas Roldán, Jorge; Amaya-Amaya, Jenny; Castellanos-de la Hoz, Juan; Giraldo-Villamil, Juliana; Montoya-Ortiz, Gladys; Cruz-Tapias, Paola; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana; Mantilla, Rubén D.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To determine the prevalence and impact of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. Eight-hundred patients were included. The association between AITD and RA was analyzed was analyzed by bivariate and multivariate analysis. In addition, a literature review was done focusing on geographical variations. Results. In our cohort the prevalence of AITD was 9.8% while the presence of antibodies was 37.8% for antithyroperoxidase enzyme (TPOAb) and 20.8% for antithyroglobulin protein (TgAb). The presence of type 2 diabetes, thrombosis, abnormal body mass index, and a high educational level was positively associated with AITD. The literature review disclosed a geographical variation of AITD in RA ranging from 0.5% to 27%. Autoantibody prevalence ranges from 6% to 31% for TgAb, 5% to 37% for TPOAb, and from 11.4% to 32% for the presence of either of the two. Conclusion. AITD is not uncommon in RA and should be systematically assessed since it is a risk factor for developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. These results may help to further study the common mechanisms of autoimmune diseases, to improve patients' outcome, and to define public health policies. An international consensus to accurately diagnose AITD is warranted. PMID:23209899

  20. Elevated Adiponectin Serum Levels in Women with Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éric Toussirot

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue produces a wide range of proteins that may influence the immune system. In this study, we assessed the serum levels of leptin, adiponectin, and ghrelin, in association with the measurements of body composition, in 15 female patients with various autoimmune diseases (systemic lupus erythematosus, primary Sjögren's syndrome, sarcoidosis, mixed connective tissue disease, vasculitis, CREST syndrome, and polymyositis and in 15 healthy female controls. There were no statistically significant differences between the patients and controls with regard to serum leptin, serum ghrelin, global fat mass, adiposity, and fat mass in the android or gynoid regions, whereas serum adiponectin levels were higher in patients than controls (16.3±1.6 μg/mL versus 9.7±0.6 μg/mL; =.01. As adiponectin is known to exhibit potent anti-inflammatory properties, a high adiponectinemia in patients with systemic autoimmune disease may mitigate the inflammatory response. However, the precise consequences of these elevated serum adiponectin levels on the metabolic syndrome development and atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk in this patient population still needs to be determined.

  1. Do we need autoimmune disease units in hospitals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Carlos

    2009-09-01

    Autoimmune diseases are increasing worldwide, and associated morbidity, mortality, and health care costs are high. Biological therapies, however, have brought physicians an extraordinary opportunity to change natural disease history, although these therapies can also have high associated iatrogenic costs. These factors point to the necessity of having physicians that are dedicated to autoimmunology. The question regarding the creation of a new specialty, the autoimmunologist, should be addressed after an inquiry into the current practice in this field of medicine. This includes many classical specialties, such as internal medicine, rheumatology, and neurology, as well as clinical immunology. In clinical immunology, not counting the specialists in allergology and clinical immunology that mainly work only with allergies, heterogeneity is high in clinical practice, as the European Union of Medical Specialists documented some years ago. I am, at least for now, in favor of the creation of a transversal competency to which the different physicians working in the area could apply to in order to standardize the clinical practice in autoimmunology. It will be necessary to define a core curriculum, and in the end we shall have classical specialists and clinical immunologists with or without the competency of autoimmunology. Of utmost importance is that this new field of medicine should not be translated, as in the past happened with other areas, by walls between medical specialties. Instead it should help standardize and harmonize clinical practice. The time for autoimmunology is now, and, indeed, hospitals must have autoimmune disease units.

  2. Current and future immunomodulation strategies to restore tolerance in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluestone, Jeffrey A; Bour-Jordan, Hélène

    2012-11-01

    Autoimmune diseases reflect a breakdown in self-tolerance that results from defects in thymic deletion of potentially autoreactive T cells (central tolerance) and in T-cell intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms that normally control potentially autoreactive T cells in the periphery (peripheral tolerance). The mechanisms leading to autoimmune diseases are multifactorial and depend on a complex combination of genetic, epigenetic, molecular, and cellular elements that result in pathogenic inflammatory responses in peripheral tissues driven by self-antigen-specific T cells. In this article, we describe the different checkpoints of tolerance that are defective in autoimmune diseases as well as specific events in the autoimmune response which represent therapeutic opportunities to restore long-term tolerance in autoimmune diseases. We present evidence for the role of different pathways in animal models and the therapeutic strategies targeting these pathways in clinical trials in autoimmune diseases.

  3. An unusual association of three autoimmune disorders: celiac disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccuti, Viera; Perrone, Antonio; D'Introno, Alessia; Campobasso, Anna; Sangineto, Moris; Sabbà, Carlo

    2016-12-01

    Autoimmune disorders are known to be more frequent in women and often associated each others, but it is rare to see multiple autoimmune diseases in a single patient. Recently, the concept of multiple autoimmune syndrome has been introduced to describe patients with at least three autoimmune diseases. We describe a case of a young man with a clinical history of psychiatric symptoms and celiac disease (CD) who was diagnosed to have other two autoimmune disorders: systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. This case is unusual upon different patterns: the rare combination of the three autoimmune diseases, their appearance in a man and the atypical onset of the diseases with psychiatric symptoms likely to be related either to CD or to SLE.

  4. CKD and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targher, Giovanni; Chonchol, Michel B; Byrne, Christopher D

    2014-10-01

    The possible link between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and chronic kidney disease (CKD) recently has attracted considerable scientific interest. Accumulating clinical evidence indicates that the presence and severity of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is associated significantly with CKD (defined as decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate and/or proteinuria) and that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease predicts the development and progression of CKD, independently of traditional cardiorenal risk factors. Experimental evidence also suggests that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease itself may exacerbate systemic and hepatic insulin resistance, cause atherogenic dyslipidemia, and release a variety of proinflammatory, procoagulant, pro-oxidant, and profibrogenic mediators that play important roles in the development and progression of CKD. However, despite the growing evidence linking nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with CKD, it has not been definitively established whether a causal association exists. The clinical implication for these findings is that patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease may benefit from more intensive surveillance or early treatment interventions to decrease the risk of CKD. In this review, we discuss the evidence linking nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with CKD and the putative mechanisms by which nonalcoholic fatty liver disease contributes to kidney damage. We also briefly discuss current treatment options for this increasingly prevalent disease that is likely to have an important future impact on the global burden of disease.

  5. Correlation between liver morphology and haemodynamics in alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard, K; Gluud, C; Henriksen, J H;

    1985-01-01

    was found with haemodynamic variables. The present data substantiate the concept that established portal hypertension in alcoholic liver disease is mainly accomplished by a derangement in hepatic architecture, whereas parenchymal changes, including hepatocyte size, are of less importance....

  6. Primary sclerosing cholangitis, autoimmune hepatitis and overlap syndromes in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rebecca Saich; Roger Chapman

    2008-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic progressive disorder of unknown aetiology characterised by chronic inflammation and stricture formation of the biliary tree. Symptoms include itch and lethargy and in advanced cases cholangitis and end-stage liver disease, however increasing numbers of asymptomatic individuals are being identified. The disease is rare in the general population but is strongly associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) affecting up to 5% of patients with Ulcerative Colitis, with a slightly lower prevalence (up to 3.6%) in Crohns disease. The strength of this association means that the vast majority (> 90%) of patients with PSC also have IBD, although many may have only mild gastro-intestinal symptoms. Usually IBD presents before PSC, although vice-versa can occur and the onset of both conditions can be separated in some cases by many years. Mean age of diagnosis of PSC is in the fifth decade of life with a strong male predominance.Risk is increased in those with a family history of PSC, suggesting a genetic predisposition and the disease is almost exclusive to non-smokers. The ulcerative colitis associated with PSC is characteristically mild, runs a quiescent course, is associated with rectal sparing, more severe right sided disease, backwash ilieitis and has a high risk of pouchiUs post-colectomy. Most worrisome is the high risk of colorectal malignancy which necessitates routine colonoscopic surveillance. Cholangiocarcinoma is also a frequent complication of PSC with a 10%-15% lifetime risk of developing this condition. Treatment with high dose ursodeoxycholic acid offers some chemoprotective effects against colorectal malignancy and may decrease symptoms, biochemical and histological progression of liver disease. Small duct PSC patients characteristically have normal cholangiography, and liver biopsy is required for diagnosis, it appears to have a more favourable prognosis. Autoimmune Hepatitis (AIH) is also more prevalent

  7. Porous silicon biosensor for the detection of autoimmune diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jane, Andrew O.; Szili, Endre J.; Reed, Joanne H.; Gordon, Tom P.; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2007-12-01

    Advances in porous silicon (pSi) technology have led to the development of new sensitive biosensors. The unique optical properties of pSi renders the material a perfect candidate for optical transducers exploiting photoluminescence or white light interference effects. The ability of biosensors exploiting these transduction mechanisms to quickly and accurately detect biological target molecules affords an alternative to current bioassays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Here, we present a pSi biosensor that was developed to detect antibodies against the autoimmune protein La. This protein is associated with autoimmune diseases including rheumatic disorders, systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Sjogren's syndrome (SS). A fast and sensitive detection platform such as the one described here can be applied to the rapid diagnosis of these debilitating autoimmune diseases. The immobilisation of the La protein onto pSi films gave a protein receptor-decorated sensor matrix. A cascade of immunological reactions was then initiated to detect anti-La antibody on the functionalised pSi surface. In the presence of o-phenylenediamine (OPD), horseradish peroxidase (HRP)/H IIO II catalysed the formation of an oxidised radical species that accelerated pSi corrosion. pSi corrosion was detected as a blue-shift in the generated interference pattern, corresponding to a decrease in the effective optical thickness (EOT) of the pSi film. Compared to an ELISA, the pSi biosensor could detect the anti-La antibody at a similar concentration (500 - 125 ng/ml). Furthermore, we found that the experimental process can be significantly shortened resulting in detection of the anti-La antibody in 80 minutes compared to a minimum of 5 hours required for ELISA.

  8. Increased prevalence of autoimmune disease in patients with unilateral compared with bilateral moyamoya disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-Bin; Liu, Yi; Zhou, Liang-Xue; Sun, Hong; He, Min; You, Chao

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT This study explored whether there were differences between the autoimmune disease prevalence rates in unilateral and bilateral moyamoya disease (MMD). METHODS The authors performed a retrospective review of data obtained from the medical records of their hospital, analyzing and comparing the clinical characteristics and prevalence rates of all autoimmune diseases that were associated with unilateral and bilateral MMD in their hospital from January 1995 to October 2014. RESULTS Three hundred sixteen patients with bilateral MMD and 68 with unilateral MMD were identified. The results indicated that patients with unilateral MMD were more likely to be female than were patients with bilateral MMD (67.6% vs 51.3%, p = 0.014, odds ratio [OR] 1.99). Overall, non-autoimmune comorbidities tended to be more prevalent in the unilateral MMD cases than in the bilateral MMD cases (17.6% vs 9.8%, p = 0.063, OR 1.97, chi-square test). Autoimmune thyroid disease and other autoimmune diseases also tended to be more prevalent in the unilateral MMD cases than in the bilateral MMD cases (19.1% vs 10.8%, p = 0.056, OR 1.96 and 8.8% vs 3.5%, p = 0.092, OR 2.77, respectively, chi-square test). The overall autoimmune disease prevalence in the unilateral MMD cases was significantly higher than in the bilateral MMD cases (26.5% vs 13.6%, p = 0.008, OR 2.29, 95% CI 1.22-4.28, chi-square test). Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that autoimmune disease was more likely to be associated with unilateral than with bilateral MMD (p = 0.039, OR 10.91, 95% CI 1.13-105.25). CONCLUSIONS This study indicated a higher overall autoimmune disease prevalence in unilateral than in bilateral MMD. Unilateral MMD may be more associated with autoimmune disease than bilateral MMD. Different pathogenetic mechanisms may underlie moyamoya vessel formation in unilateral and bilateral MMD.

  9. Pathophysiology of Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petta, Salvatore; Gastaldelli, Amalia; Rebelos, Eleni; Bugianesi, Elisabetta; Messa, Piergiorgio; Miele, Luca; Svegliati-Baroni, Gianluca; Valenti, Luca; Bonino, Ferruccio

    2016-01-01

    The physiopathology of fatty liver and metabolic syndrome are influenced by diet, life style and inflammation, which have a major impact on the severity of the clinicopathologic outcome of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. A short comprehensive review is provided on current knowledge of the pathophysiological interplay among major circulating effectors/mediators of fatty liver, such as circulating lipids, mediators released by adipose, muscle and liver tissues and pancreatic and gut hormones in relation to diet, exercise and inflammation. PMID:27973438

  10. FOXP3(+) Treg Cells and Gender Bias in Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Jia; Li, Yang Yang; Zheng, Song Guo; Tsun, Andy; Li, Bin

    2015-01-01

    CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells play a pivotal role in the maintenance of immune homeostasis, where the X-linked master transcription factor forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) determines Treg cell development and function. Genetic deficiency of foxp3 induces dysfunction of Treg cells and immuno-dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, and X-linked syndrome in humans. Functionally deficient Treg cells or the development of exTreg cells positively correlate with autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), multiple sclerosis (MS), and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). In general, females are more susceptible to SLE and MS but less susceptible to AS, where the expression of FOXP3 and its protein complex are perturbed by multiple factors, including hormonal fluctuations, inflammatory cytokines, and danger signals. Therefore, it is critical to explore the potential molecular mechanisms involved and these differences linked to gender. Here, we review recent findings on the regulation of FOXP3 activity in Treg cells and also discuss gender difference in the determination of Treg cell function in autoimmune diseases.

  11. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Autoimmune or Immune-mediated Pathogenesis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonghui Wen

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC, the two main forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, is still unclear, but both autoimmune and immune-mediated phenomena are involved. Autoimmune phenomena include the presence of serum and mucosal autoantibodies against intestinal epithelial cells in either form of IBD, and against human tropomyosin fraction five selectively in UC. In addition, perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (pANCA are common in UC, whereas antibodies against Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ASCA are frequently found in CD. Immune-mediate phenomena include a variety of abnormalities of humoral and cell-mediated immunity, and a generalized enhanced reactivity against intestinal bacterial antigens in both CD and UC. It is currently believed that loss of tolerance against the indigenous enteric flora is the central event in IBD pathogenesis. Various complementary factors probably contribute to the loss of tolerance to commensal bacteria in IBD. They include defects in regulatory T-cell function, excessive stimulation of mucosal dendritic cells, infections or variants of proteins critically involved in bacterial antigen recognition, such as the products of CD-associated NOD2/CARD15 mutations.

  12. The skin in autoimmune diseases-Unmet needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, A; Landmann, A; Bonsmann, G

    2016-10-01

    Treatment of skin manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc), and dermatomyositis (DM) is based on the results of only few randomized controlled trials. The first-line treatment for disfiguring and widespread cutaneous involvement in SLE is antimalarials, but some patients are therapy resistant. Recently, the monoclonal antibody belimumab was approved for SLE as an adjunct therapy for patients with autoantibody-positive disease who despite standard therapy show high disease activity, intolerance of other treatments, or an unacceptably high need for corticosteroids. However, a validated skin score has not been used to confirm the efficacy of belimumab on mucocutaneous manifestations. In SSc, another multi-systemic progressive disease, involvement of the lung, kidney, and the heart is frequently treated with corticosteroids and immunosuppressives, but therapeutic modalities for cutaneous lesions, such as skin sclerosis and digital ulcers, are limited. In the past years, treatment with the endothelin-receptor antagonist bosentan has been proven to reduce the occurrence of new digital ulcers in SSc patients but has no or limited effect on healing of digital ulcers. DM is an idiopathic autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation of the muscles and skin, which is treated with immunosuppressives. Corticosteroids are the first-line treatment for muscle involvement in DM, but skin lesions often flare by reduction or discontinuation. In summary, there is a high unmet need for new therapeutic strategies focusing on skin involvement in systemic autoimmune diseases. Therefore, innovative designs of randomized controlled trials with validated skin scores are warranted to develop new therapeutic strategies for patients with cutaneous manifestations.

  13. The microbiome and autoimmune disease: Report from a Noel R. Rose Colloquium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barin, Jobert G; Tobias, Lawrence D; Peterson, Daniel A

    2015-08-01

    Although the mechanisms by which the human microbiome influences the onset and progression of autoimmune diseases remain to be determined, established animal models of autoimmune diseases indicate that local and systemic bidirectional interactions with the microbiome play a signaling or promoting role through the immune system. Whether alterations in the microbiome are a pathogenic cause or simply an effect of inflammation and autoimmune disease remains an essential question to be addressed in disease-specific research, as well as whether particular conditions of the microbiome promote health or promote disease. Future research in this area needs to account for sex differences in microbiome composition because autoimmune diseases disproportionately affect women. Probiotic and other treatments that manipulate assemblage of the microbiome may offer methods of preventing or mitigating the effects of autoimmune disease.

  14. Gene expression profiling in autoimmune diseases: chronic inflammation or disease specific patterns?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovin, Lone Frier; Brynskov, Jørn; Hegedüs, Laszlo;

    2007-01-01

    A central issue in autoimmune disease is whether the underlying inflammation is a repeated stereotypical process or whether disease specific gene expression is involved. To shed light on this, we analysed whether genes previously found to be differentially regulated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA...

  15. Liver Disease and Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fats, produces several important com- pounds, stores certain vitamins, makes specific amino acids, converts glucose to glycogen, ... liver. This increased pres- sure causes blood to bypass the liver. As a result, the blood is ...

  16. Reactivity of anti-thyroid antibodies to thyroglobulin tryptic fragments: comparison of autoimmune and non-autoimmune thyroid diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boechat L.H.B.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies concerning the antigenicity of thyroglobulin fragments allow the characterization of the epitopes but do not consider the role of heavier antigenic fragments that could result in vivo from the action of endoproteases. Here we assess the relative importance of the fragments obtained from thyroglobulin by limited proteolysis with trypsin and compare by immunoblotting their reactivity to serum from patients with autoimmune (Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis and non-autoimmune (subacute thyroiditis disease. The results showed no difference in frequency of recognition of any peptide by sera from patients with autoimmune thyroiditis. In contrast, sera from patients with subacute thyroiditis reacted more frequently with a peptide of 80 kDa. These results suggest the presence of antibody subpopulations directed at fragments produced in vivo by enzymatic cleavage of thyroglobulin. This fragment and antibodies to it may represent markers for subacute thyroiditis.

  17. Biomarkers of An Autoimmune Skin Disease-Psoriasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Jiang; Taylor E Hinchliffe; Tianfu Wu

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is one of the most prevalent autoimmune skin diseases. However, its etiology and pathogenesis are still unclear. Over the last decade, omics-based technologies have been exten-sively utilized for biomarker discovery. As a result, some promising markers for psoriasis have been identified at the genome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome level. These discoveries have provided new insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways in psoriasis pathogenesis. More importantly, some of these markers may prove useful in the diagnosis of psoriasis and in the prediction of disease progression once they have been validated. In this review, we summarize the most recent findings in psoriasis biomarker discovery. In addition, we will discuss several emerging technologies and their potential for novel biomarker discovery and diagnostics for psoriasis.

  18. Pregnancy and the risk of autoimmune disease: An exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donoghue, Keelin

    2011-07-01

    Fetal microchimerism is the study of persisting fetal cells in the mother years after pregnancy and the purported implications for her health and longevity. Due to the association between pregnancy and autoimmune disease (AID), and the preponderance of these diseases in women, laboratory studies have for years attempted to link microchimeric fetal cells with the onset of AID after pregnancy. This new study gave us the opportunity to examine for the first time if this theory could be proven clinically in a large cohort of women. By examining whether different types of delivery affected the onset of AID, we also aimed to indirectly relate this finding to fetal microchimerism. The results did suggest an association between pregnancy and the risk of subsequent maternal AID, with increased risks noted after caesarean section (CS) and decreased risks after abortion. This is the first epidemiological study on the risk of AID following pregnancy.

  19. Celiac disease and endocrine autoimmune disorders in children: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamanti, Antonella; Capriati, Teresa; Bizzarri, Carla; Panetta, Fabio; Ferretti, Francesca; Ancinelli, Monica; Romano, Francesca; Locatelli, Mattia

    2013-12-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a life-long inflammatory condition of the gut that occurs in genetically susceptible individuals. Several autoimmune diseases (AI) are associated with CD. To date, no conclusive evidence is available that proves if the relationship between CD and AI is mediated by gluten exposure, or if CD and AI could co-occur due to other causes, in particular the loss of the intestinal barrier function and the common genetic background. Furthermore, it is not clear yet if CD needs a regular screening program for AI. This review will cover the key studies on both the pathogenetic and clinical evidence explaining this association. We will review the reports including patients aged endocrine AI.

  20. Pregnancy and the risk of autoimmune disease: An exploration.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-01-31

    Fetal microchimerism is the study of persisting fetal cells in the mother years after pregnancy and the purported implications for her health and longevity. Due to the association between pregnancy and autoimmune disease (AID), and the preponderance of these diseases in women, laboratory studies have for years attempted to link microchimeric fetal cells with the onset of AID after pregnancy. This new study gave us the opportunity to examine for the first time if this theory could be proven clinically in a large cohort of women. By examining whether different types of delivery affected the onset of AID, we also aimed to indirectly relate this finding to fetal microchimerism. The results did suggest an association between pregnancy and the risk of subsequent maternal AID, with increased risks noted after caesarean section (CS) and decreased risks after abortion. This is the first epidemiological study on the risk of AID following pregnancy.

  1. Oxidative stress and nutritional prevention in autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukkar, Samir G; Rossi, Edoardo

    2004-03-01

    The hypothesis that oxidative stress favours flogistic and immune processes inducing autoimmune rheumatic diseases (ARDs) and their complications is still under discussion. In this review we take into consideration both the aetiopathological role of the diet in such diseases and the possible efficacy of dietary supports as adjuvants for the usual specific therapies. Moreover, we shall examine the hypothetical pathophysiological role of oxidative stress on ARDs and their complications, the methods for its evaluation and the possibility of intervening on oxidative pathways by means of nutritional modulation. It is possible that in the future we will be able to control connective pathology by associating an immuno-modulating therapy ('re-educating') with natural products having an anti-oxidant activity to current immunosuppressive treatment (which has potentially toxic effects).

  2. Helicobacter Infection and Chronic Liver Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the recentHelicobacter infection associated with chronic liver disease. The bacteriology, prevalence, pathogenesis and diagnosis were reviewed. Future work should be conducted on the pathogenesis and treatment of this disease.

  3. Genetic homogeneity of autoimmune polyglandular disease type I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjoerses, P.; Aaltonen, J.; Vikman, A. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular disease type I (APECED) is an autosomal recessive autoimmune disease (MIM 240300) characterized by hypoparathyroidism, primary adrenocortical failure, and chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis. The disease is highly prevalent in two isolated populations, the Finnish population and the Iranian Jewish one. Sporadic cases have been identified in many other countries, including almost all European countries. The APECED locus has previously been assigned to chromosome 21q22.3 by linkage analyses in 14 Finnish families. Locus heterogeneity is a highly relevant question in this disease affecting multiple tissues and with great phenotypic diversity. To solve this matter, we performed linkage and haplotype analyses on APECED families rising from different populations. Six microsatellite markers on the critical chromosomal region of 2.6 cM on 21q22.3 were analyzed. Pair-wise linkage analyses revealed significant LOD scores for all these markers, maximum LOD score being 10.23. The obtained haplotype data and the geographic distribution of the great-grandparents of the Finnish APECED patients suggest the presence of one major, relatively old mutation responsible for {approximately}90% of the Finnish cases. Similar evidence for one founder mutation was also found in analyses of Iranian Jewish APECED haplotypes. These haplotypes, however, differed totally from the Finnish ones. The linkage analyses in 21 non-Finnish APECED families originating from several European countries provided independent evidence for linkage to the same chromosomal region on 21q22.3 and revealed no evidence for locus heterogeneity. The haplotype analyses of APECED chromosomes suggest that in different populations APECED is due to a spectrum of mutations in a still unknown gene on chromosome 21. 21 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Update on fatty liver disease and steatohepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Fatima Zahra; Kleiner, David E

    2011-07-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a broad term that includes liver diseases characterized by abnormal hepatocellular accumulations of lipid that cannot be related to alcohol abuse. It may be found in both adults and children, particularly those who are obese or have insulin resistance. Steatohepatitis is a specific pattern of injury within the spectrum of NAFLD and this pattern is associated with fibrotic progression and cirrhosis. In addition to steatohepatitis, a distinct form of fibrotic fatty liver disease exists in children. There have been a number of recent advances in the characterization of histologic changes in NAFLD. In light of these recent reports, this study will: (1) review the histologic features of steatosis and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in adults; (2) review the variation of histologic patterns of pediatric fatty liver disease; and (3) discuss the validity and use of the nonalcoholic fatty liver disease Activity Score.

  5. Study on Antibodies to Liver Antigens in Chinese Patients with Different Liver Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫惠平; 孔淑玲; WinfriedStoecker; 贺立香; 张世斌; 刘燕敏; 黄德庄; 赵春惠

    2003-01-01

    In order to observe several antibodies to liver antigens in Chinese patients with different fiver diseases and to discuss the characteristics of the autoantibodies in autoimmune liver diseases, from 1412 patients, detected by indirect immumofluoreseence (IIF) initially, 230 patients with abnormal ALT were chosen and divided into 5 groups: ① autoimmune diseases group, 42 cases: 18 with autoimmtme hepatitis (AIH), 21 with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), 3 with primary sclerosing cholangitis(PSC). ② HAV group, 23 cases; ③ HBV group, 70 cases; ④ HCV group, 35 cases and ⑤ Non A-Egroup, 60 cases. First, ANA, AMA, SMA, liver-kidney microsomal antibody (LKM) and so on were tested by 1/F.Then,LKM-1, fiver cytosofic-1 (LC-1), soluble liver antigen/fiver pancreas (SLA/LP) and subtype of AMA (M2) as well as ANA profile such as SS-A, SS-B and dsDNA were tested by Western blot and immtmoblot strips assay, respectively. The results were that among 1412 cases, those diagnosed as AIH, PBC and PSC accotmted for 12.7‰, 14.9‰ and 2.1‰, respectively, of the samples being tested. 2/230 with LKM-1 and 2/230 with SLA/LP were seen in individuals infected withAIH and HCV, respectively. All patients with PBC showed AMA and M2 antibodies. No specific ANA pattern was seen in AIH by 1/F but anti-actin was only found in patients with AIH. In Non A-E group, four cases were positive of AMA andM2; three had high titer of SMA and other 4 had SS-A, SS-B or dsDNA antibodies, etc. It was concluded that the detection of anti-fiver antigens, ANA profile and AMA subtypes were helpful for the diagnosis of autoimmune fiver diseases and overlap syndromes. In patients with Non A-E hepatitis, the diagnosis of PBC or AIH should be taken into consideration.

  6. Role of cannabinoids in chronic liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anna Parfieniuk; Robert Flisiak

    2008-01-01

    Cannabinoids are a group of compounds acting primarily via CB1 and CB2 receptors. The expression of cannabinoid receptors in normal liver is low or absent. However, many reports have proven up-regulation of the expression of CB1 and CB2 receptors in hepatic myofibroblasts and vascular endothelial cells, as well as increased concentration of endocannabinoids in liver in the course of chronic progressive liver diseases. It has been shown that CB1 receptor signalling exerts profibrogenic and proinflammatory effects in liver tissue, primarily due to the stimulation of hepatic stellate cells, whereas the activation of CB2 receptors inhibits or even reverses liver fibrogenesis. Similarly, CB1 receptor stimulation contributes to progression of liver steatosis. In end-stage liver disease, the endocannabi-noid system has been shown to contribute to hepatic encephalopathy and vascular effects, such as portal hypertension, splanchnic vasodilatation, relative pe-ripheral hypotension and probably cirrhotic cardiomy-opathy. So far, available evidence is based on cellular cultures or animal models. Clinical data on the effects of cannabinoids in chronic liver diseases are limited. However, recent studies have shown the contribution of cannabis smoking to the progression of liver fibrosis and steatosis. Moreover, controlling CB1 or CB2 signal-ling appears to be an attractive target in managing liver diseases.

  7. Hepatic lipogranulomas in patients with chronic liver disease: Association with hepatitis C and fatty liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Henry; C; Bodenheimer; David; J; Clain; Albert; D; Min; Neil; D; Theise

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To study the significance and clinical implication of hepatic lipogranuloma in chronic liver diseases, including fatty liver disease and hepatitis C. METHODS: A total of 376 sequential, archival liver biopsy specimens were reviewed. Lipogranuloma, steatosis and steato-fibrosis were evaluated with combined hematoxylin and eosin and Masson’s trichrome staining. RESULTS: Fifty-eight (15.4%) patients had lipogranuloma, including 46 patients with hepatitis C, 14 patients with fatty liver disease, and 5 pati...

  8. The Emerging Functions of Long Noncoding RNA in Immune Cells: Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigdel, Keshav Raj; Cheng, Ao; Wang, Yin; Duan, Lihua; Zhang, YanLin

    2015-01-01

    The long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are RNA transcripts more than 200 nucleotides in length, which do not encode proteins. The lncRNAs are emerging as an important regulator of biological process, such as chromatin remodeling, gene transcription, protein transport, and trafficking through diverse mechanisms. The lncRNAs play crucial role in various multigenetics human diseases including cancers and neurological diseases and currently its role in autoimmune diseases is attracting many researchers. Recent studies have reported that differentiation and activation of immune cells, T cells, B cells, macrophages, and NK cells have correlation with lncRNAs, which have also an essential role in autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and SLE. Therefore, elucidation of the roles of lncRNAs in autoimmunity could be beneficial to understand the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. In this review article we attempt to highlight the recent progress regarding lncRNAs studies and summarize its role in autoimmune diseases.

  9. The Emerging Functions of Long Noncoding RNA in Immune Cells: Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshav Raj Sigdel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs are RNA transcripts more than 200 nucleotides in length, which do not encode proteins. The lncRNAs are emerging as an important regulator of biological process, such as chromatin remodeling, gene transcription, protein transport, and trafficking through diverse mechanisms. The lncRNAs play crucial role in various multigenetics human diseases including cancers and neurological diseases and currently its role in autoimmune diseases is attracting many researchers. Recent studies have reported that differentiation and activation of immune cells, T cells, B cells, macrophages, and NK cells have correlation with lncRNAs, which have also an essential role in autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and SLE. Therefore, elucidation of the roles of lncRNAs in autoimmunity could be beneficial to understand the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. In this review article we attempt to highlight the recent progress regarding lncRNAs studies and summarize its role in autoimmune diseases.

  10. [The diagnostic value of immunologic findings in the differentiation of chronic liver diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manns, M; Meyer zum Büschenfelde, K H; Arnold, W

    1988-12-01

    Various types of virus induced and non-virus induced chronic active hepatitis (CAH) as well as chronic non-suppurative destructive cholangitis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis have to be distinguished. Classical autoimmune type "lupoid" CAH is characterized by antinuclear antibodies (ANA), liver membrane antibodies (LMA) and smooth muscle antibodies (SMA). A second subgroup of autoimmune type CAH is characterized by anti liver kidney-microsomal antibodies (LKM) which are directed against a specific cytochrome p-450 isoenzyme. A third subgroup of autoimmune type CAH is identified by auto-antibodies to a soluble cytoplasmic liver antigen (SLA). Autoimmune type CAH profits from immuno-suppressive therapy, i.e. corticosteroids alone or in combination with azathioprin. Chronic hepatitis B virus infection is nowadays treated with Interferon when HBV-DNA is detectable in serum, duration of liver disease is less than 5 years and superinfection with HDV and HIV can be excluded. PBC is diagnosed through the detection of antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) and its PBC specific subtypes anti p 62 (M2) and anti p 48. Aetiology and pathogenesis of PBC are still unknown. Liver transplantation is an established therapy for endstage PBC. This is also true for primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC).

  11. Rapid infusion with rituximab: short term safety in systemic autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Janni Lisander; Jacobsen, Soren

    2013-01-01

    To describe the incidence, types and severity of adverse events, related to an accelerated regime of rituximab infusion in patients with various autoimmune diseases. Fifty-four patients with systemic autoimmune disease, to be treated with 1,000 mg of rituximab twice 2 weeks apart, participated. Pre...

  12. Green tea EGCG, T cells, and T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    One of the proposed health benefits of consuming green tea is its protective effect on autoimmune diseases. Research on the immunopathogenesis of autoimmune diseases has made significant progression in the past few years and several key concepts have been revised. T cells, particularly CD4+ T helper...

  13. Dendritic cells and veiled accessory macrophages : hormonal influences and autoimmune thyroid disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.O. Canning (Martha)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractImmune responses to thyroid specific autoantigens form the basis of autoimmune thyroid disease pathogenesis. Two polar forms of autoimmune reactivity of the thyroid gland exist in this disease spectrum: a catabolic form characterized by gradual inflammatory destruction of thyroid parench

  14. Current status in the therapy of liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhl, Philipp; Fricker, Gert; Haberkorn, Uwe; Mier, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic diseases, like viral hepatitis, autoimmune hepatitis, hereditary hemochromatosis, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and Wilson's disease, play an important role in the development of liver cirrhosis and, hence, hepatocellular carcinoma. In this review, the current treatment options and the molecular mechanisms of action of the drugs are summarized. Unfortunately, the treatment options for most of these hepatic diseases are limited. Since hepatitis B (HBV) and C (HCV) infections are the most common causes of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, they are the focus of the development of new drugs. The current treatment of choice for HBV/HCV infection is an interferon-based combination therapy with oral antiviral drugs, like nucleos(t)ide analogues, which is associated with improving the therapeutic success and also preventing the development of resistances. Currently, two new protease inhibitors for HCV treatment are expected (deleobuvir, faldaprevir) and together with the promising drug, daclatasvir (NS5A-inhibitor, currently in clinical trials), adequate therapy is to be expected in due course (circumventing the requirement of interferon with its side-effects), while in contrast, efficient HBV therapeutics are still lacking. In this respect, entry inhibitors, like Myrcludex B, the lead substance of the first entry inhibitor for HBV/HDV (hepatitis D) infection, provide immense potential. The pharmacokinetics and the mechanism of action of Myrcludex B are described in detail.

  15. Pregnancy in patients with autoimmune disease: A reality in 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tincani, A; Dall'Ara, F; Lazzaroni, M G; Reggia, R; Andreoli, L

    2016-10-01

    Autoimmune rheumatic diseases are chronic systemic conditions often affecting young women during their reproductive years, so that pregnancy is a major issue in their management. For a long time pregnancy has been discouraged in these women, mainly for two reasons: gestation could aggravate maternal disease and, vice versa, the disease could negatively influence the gestational outcome. The great improvement in the approach to pregnancy done in the past few decades has allowed a progressively increasing number of affected women to fulfill their family plan. Women should be informed about potential risks related to their disease, but they should also be reassured that a good pregnancy outcome is possible if conception occurs in a stable remission state, teratogenic medications have been properly withdrawn and "safe" drugs have been mantained to prevent disease flare. A brief excursus regarding the main issues regarding SLE/APS, Systemic Sclerosis and Systemic Vasculitis is provided, in the attempt to delineate the main risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcome, the onset of maternal complications and the role played by a close multi-specialistic monitoring.

  16. Role of liver biopsy in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalbantoglu, I L Ke; Brunt, Elizabeth M

    2014-07-21

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), defined as abnormal accumulation (> 5%) of hepatic triglyceride without excess alcohol intake, is the most common form of chronic liver disease in adults and children in the United States. NAFLD encompasses a spectrum of histologic findings including uncomplicated steatosis, steatosis with inflammation and steatohepatitis [nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)]; the latter can advance to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. NASH is currently accepted as the hepatic manifestation of the set of cardiovascular risk factors collectively known as metabolic syndrome. In 1999 a system for histologic grading and staging for NASH was proposed; this was revised by the NASH Clinical Research Network in 2005 for the entire spectrum of lesions in NAFLD, including the lesions and patterns of pediatric NAFLD, and for application in clinical research trials. Diagnosis remains distinct from grade and stage. A recent European proposal separates steatosis from activity to derive a numeric diagnosis of NASH. Even though there have been promising advancements in non-invasive testing, these tests are not yet detailed enough to replace the full range of findings provided by liver biopsy evaluation. Limitations of biopsy are acknowledged, but liver biopsy remains the "gold standard" for diagnosis and determination of amounts of necroinflammatory activity, and location of fibrosis, as well as remodeling of the parenchyma in NASH. This review focuses on the specific histologic lesions of NAFLD and NASH, grading and staging, differential diagnoses to be considered, and the continuing role of the liver biopsy in this important liver disease.

  17. Chronic Liver Disease and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander > Chronic Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander Native Hawaiian/ ... times more likely to be diagnosed with chronic liver disease in 2006. American Samoans were 8 times ...

  18. Stem cell therapy in autoimmune rheumatic diseases: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Shu, ShangAn; Kenny, Thomas P; Chang, Christopher; Leung, Patrick S C

    2014-10-01

    The clinical management of autoimmune rheumatic diseases (ARD) has undergone significant changes in the last few decades, leading to remarkable improvements in clinical outcomes of many patients with mild to moderate ARD. On the other hand, severe refractory ARD patients often have high morbidity and mortality. Extensive basic research and clinical evidence has opened the door to new encouraging perspectives, such as the establishment of a role of stem cell transplantation (SCT) in the strategic management of ARD. Given the great heterogeneity of ARD, it is difficult to assign an optimal SCT regimen to all ARD patients. SCT remains a challenging mode of therapy in ARD patients from the standpoints of both efficacy and safety. As the clinical data of SCT in ARD increases and as we improve our understanding of stem cell biology and the downstream effects on the immune system, the future is promising for the development of optimal personalized SCT regimens in ARD.

  19. Inflammation is strongly associated with lupus anticoagulant positivity, indepentent of know autoimmune disease and recent venous or arterial thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Just, Søren Andreas; Nybo, Mads; Laustrup, Helle;

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is strongly associated with lupus anticoagulant positivity, indepentent of know autoimmune disease and recent venous or arterial thrombosis......Inflammation is strongly associated with lupus anticoagulant positivity, indepentent of know autoimmune disease and recent venous or arterial thrombosis...

  20. Risk of cancer of unknown primary after hospitalization for autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemminki, Kari; Sundquist, Kristina; Sundquist, Jan; Ji, Jianguang

    2015-12-15

    Cancer of unknown primary (CUP) is a heterogeneous syndrome diagnosed at metastatic sites. The etiology is unknown but immune dysfunction may be a contributing factor. Patients with autoimmune diseases were identified from the Swedish Hospital Discharge Register and linked to the Swedish Cancer Registry. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for subsequent CUP and compared with subjects without autoimmune diseases. A total of 789,681 patients were hospitalized for any of 32 autoimmune diseases during years 1964-2012; 2,658 developed subsequent CUP, giving an overall SIR of 1.27. A total of 16 autoimmune diseases were associated with an increased risk for CUP; polymyositis/dermatomyositis showed the highest SIR of 3.51, followed by primary biliary cirrhosis (1.81) and Addison's disease (1.77). CUP risk is known to be reduced in long-time users of pain-relieving nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as aspirin. For patients with ankylosing spondylitis and with some other autoimmune diseases, with assumed chronic medication by NSAIDSs, CUP risks decreased in long-term follow-up. The overall risk of CUP was increased among patients diagnosed with autoimmune diseases, which call for clinical attention and suggest a possible role of immune dysfunction in CUP. The associations with many autoimmune diseases were weak which may imply that autoimmunity may not synergize with CUP-related immune dysfunction. However, long-term NSAID medication probably helped to curtail risks in some autoimmune diseases and CUP risks were generally higher in autoimmune diseases for which NSAIDs are not used and for these CUP appears to be a serious side effect.

  1. IVIG in autoimmune disease - Potential next generation biologics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuercher, Adrian W; Spirig, Rolf; Baz Morelli, Adriana; Käsermann, Fabian

    2016-08-01

    Polyclonal plasma-derived IgG is a mainstay therapeutic of immunodeficiency disorders as well as of various inflammatory autoimmune diseases. In immunodeficiency the primary function of IVIG/SCIG is to replace missing antibody specificities, consequently a diverse Fab-based repertoire is critical for efficacy. Attempts to capture the Ig repertoire and express it as a recombinant IVIG product are currently ongoing. Likewise correction of the defective genes by gene therapy has also been tried. However, both approaches are far from becoming mainstream treatments. In contrast, some of the most important effector mechanisms relevant in therapy of autoimmunity are based on the Fc-portion of IgG; they include scavenging of complement and blockade/modulation of IgG receptors (Fc gamma receptor [FcγR] or the neonatal Fc receptor [FcRn]). These effects might be achieved with appropriately formulated Fc-fragments instead of full-length IgG, as suggested by a pilot study with monomeric plasma-derived Fc in children with ITP and in Kawasaki disease in the 1990s. Since then it has been proposed that structured multimerization of Fc fragments might confer efficacy at much lower doses than with IVIG. Accordingly, various molecular strategies are currently being explored to achieve controlled Fc multimerization, e.g. by fusion of IgG1 Fc to the IgG2 hinge-region or to the IgM tail-piece. Safety considerations will be crucial in the evaluation of these new entities. In a different approach, mutant Fc fragments and monoclonal antibodies have been designed for blockade of the FcRn.

  2. PEG minocycline-liposomes ameliorate CNS autoimmune disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Hu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Minocycline is an oral tetracycline derivative with good bioavailability in the central nervous system (CNS. Minocycline, a potent inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9, attenuates disease activity in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS. Potential adverse effects associated with long-term daily minocycline therapy in human patients are concerning. Here, we investigated whether less frequent treatment with long-circulating polyethylene glycol (PEG minocycline liposomes are effective in treating EAE. FINDINGS: Performing in vitro time kinetic studies of PEG minocycline-liposomes in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, we determined that PEG minocycline-liposome preparations stabilized with CaCl(2 are effective in diminishing MMP-9 activity. Intravenous injections of PEG minocycline-liposomes every five days were as effective in ameliorating clinical EAE as daily intraperitoneal injections of minocycline. Treatment of animals with PEG minocycline-liposomes significantly reduced the number of CNS-infiltrating leukocytes, and the overall expression of MMP-9 in the CNS. There was also a significant suppression of MMP-9 expression and proteolytic activity in splenocytes of treated animals, but not in CNS-infiltrating leukocytes. Thus, leukocytes gaining access to the brain and spinal cord require the same absolute amount of MMP-9 in all treatment groups, but minocycline decreases the absolute cell number. CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate that less frequent injections of PEG minocycline-liposomes are an effective alternative pharmacotherapy to daily minocycline injections for the treatment of CNS autoimmune diseases. Also, inhibition of MMP-9 remains a promising treatment target in EAE and patients with MS.

  3. Lactate metabolism in chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Johanne B; Mortensen, Christian; Bendtsen, Flemming;

    2013-01-01

    Background. In the healthy liver there is a splanchnic net-uptake of lactate caused by gluconeogenesis. It has previously been shown that patients with acute liver failure in contrast have a splanchnic release of lactate caused by a combination of accelerated glycolysis in the splanchnic region...... and a reduction in hepatic gluconeogenesis. Aims. The aims of the present study were to investigate lactate metabolism and kinetics in patients with chronic liver disease compared with a control group with normal liver function. Methods. A total of 142 patients with chronic liver disease and 14 healthy controls...... underwent a liver vein catheterization. Blood samples from the femoral artery and the hepatic and renal veins were simultaneously collected before and after stimulation with galactose. Results. The fasting lactate levels, both in the hepatic vein and in the femoral artery, were higher in the patients than...

  4. GFR Estimating Equations and Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beben, Tomasz; Rifkin, Dena E

    2015-09-01

    It is important to accurately assess the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of patients with liver disease to deliver care and allocate organs for transplantation in a way that improves outcomes. The most commonly used methods to estimate GFR in this population are based on creatinine, which is biased by these patients' low creatinine production and potentially by elevated serum bilirubin and decreased albumin levels. None of the creatinine-based estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) equations have been specifically modified for a population with liver disease, and even measurement of a 24-hour creatinine clearance has limitations. In liver disease, all creatinine-based estimates of GFR overestimate gold standard-measured GFR, and the degree of overestimation is highest at lower measured GFR values and in more severe liver disease. Cystatin C-based eGFR has shown promise in general population studies by demonstrating less bias than creatinine-based eGFR and improved association with clinically important outcomes, but results in the liver disease population have been mixed, and further studies are necessary. Ultimately, specific eGFR equations for liver disease or novel methods for estimating GFR may be necessary. However, for now, the limitations of currently available methods need to be appreciated to understand kidney function in liver disease.

  5. Diagnosis and management of polycystic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevers, Tom J G; Drenth, Joost P H

    2013-02-01

    Polycystic liver disease (PLD) is arbitrarily defined as a liver that contains >20 cysts. The condition is associated with two genetically distinct diseases: as a primary phenotype in isolated polycystic liver disease (PCLD) and as an extrarenal manifestation in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Processes involved in hepatic cystogenesis include ductal plate malformation with concomitant abnormal fluid secretion, altered cell-matrix interaction and cholangiocyte hyperproliferation. PLD is usually a benign disease, but can cause debilitating abdominal symptoms in some patients. The main risk factors for growth of liver cysts are female sex, exogenous oestrogen use and multiple pregnancies. Ultrasonography is very useful for achieving a correct diagnosis of a polycystic liver and to differentiate between ADPKD and PCLD. Current radiological and surgical therapies for symptomatic patients include aspiration-sclerotherapy, fenestration, segmental hepatic resection and liver transplantation. Medical therapies that interact with regulatory mechanisms controlling expansion and growth of liver cysts are under investigation. Somatostatin analogues are promising; several clinical trials have shown that these drugs can reduce the volume of polycystic livers. The purpose of this Review is to provide an update on the diagnosis and management of PLD with a focus on literature published in the past 4 years.

  6. Scientists find link between allergic and autoimmune diseases in mouse study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists at the National Institutes of Health, and their colleagues, have discovered that a gene called BACH2 may play a central role in the development of diverse allergic and autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, asthma, Crohn's disease, ce

  7. Low prevalence of hepatitis B virus infection in patients with autoimmune diseases in a Chinese patient population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, M; Wu, R; Hu, X; Zhang, H; Jiang, J; Yang, Y; Niu, J

    2014-12-01

    Hepatitis B is a very common communicable disease in China but the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in patients with autoimmune diseases is unknown. We retrospectively investigated the prevalence of autoimmune diseases in patients with HBV infection. The medical records of 4060 patients with autoimmune or nonautoimmune diseases were reviewed. A positive test result for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was used to indicate the presence of HBV infection. Autoimmune diseases included autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, systemic lupus erythematosus and ulcerative colitis. Nonautoimmune conditions included inguinal hernia, appendicitis and pregnant or postpartum women. The proportion of autoimmune disease patients who were HBsAg positive (2.24%) was significantly lower than that of nonautoimmune disease patients who were HBsAg positive (4.58%; P = 0.0014). Regarding hepatic autoimmune diseases, the positivity rates for HBsAg in autoimmune hepatitis patients (0.83%) and primary biliary cirrhosis patients (1.02%) were both significantly lower than in nonautoimmune patients (4.58%; P = 0.006 and 0.004, respectively). Patients with hepatic autoimmune disease were significantly less likely to be HBsAg positive (0.93%) than patients with non-hepatic autoimmune disease (3.99%; P = 0.002). Patients with autoimmune diseases, especially those with hepatic autoimmune disease, may more efficiently clear HBV than patients with nonautoimmune diseases.

  8. Sex-specific environmental influences on the development of autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiniakou, Eleni; Costenbader, Karen H; Kriegel, Martin A

    2013-11-01

    Sex differences in autoimmune diseases are evolutionarily tied to the fact that the female immune system is confronted with intense alterations during menstrual cycles, pregnancy and childbirth. These events may be associated with breaches in the mucosal epithelial layers that are shielding us from environmental factors. Associations between environmental agents and autoimmune diseases have been described extensively in prior studies. Little evidence, however, exists for sex-specific environmental effects on autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize studies involving this often-neglected aspect. We give examples of environmental factors that may influence the sex bias in autoimmunity. We conclude that most studies do not give insight into sex-specific environmental effects due to the influence of gender-selective social, occupational or other exposures. Prospective studies are needed in order to determine true sex-biased environmental influences. Finally, humanized murine models might aid in better understanding the mechanisms involved in sex-specific environmental effects on autoimmune diseases.

  9. Association of schizophrenia and autoimmune diseases: linkage of Danish national registers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eaton, William W.; Byrne, Majella; Ewald, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    the association of schizophrenia with these disorders as well as a range of other autoimmune diseases in a single large epidemiologic study. METHOD: The Danish Psychiatric Register, the National Patient Register, and a register with socioeconomic information were linked to form a data file that included all 7......,704 persons in Denmark diagnosed with schizophrenia from 1981 to 1998 and their parents along with a sample of matched comparison subjects and their parents. The data linkage required that the autoimmune disease occur before the diagnosis of schizophrenia. RESULTS: A history of any autoimmune disease...... was associated with a 45% increase in risk for schizophrenia. Nine autoimmune disorders had higher prevalence rates among patients with schizophrenia than among comparison subjects (crude incidence rate ratios ranging from 1.9 to 12.5), and 12 autoimmune diseases had higher prevalence rates among parents...

  10. Managing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngu, Jing Hieng; Goh, George Boon Bee; Poh, Zhongxian; Soetikno, Roy

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is increasing rapidly with the obesity and diabetes mellitus epidemics. It is rapidly becoming the most common cause of liver disease worldwide. NAFLD can progress to serious complications such as cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and death. Therefore, it is important to recognise this condition so that early intervention can be implemented. Lifestyle modifications and strict control of metabolic risk factors are the mainstay of treatment. As disease progression is slow in the majority of NAFLD patients, most can be managed well by primary care physicians. NAFLD patients with advanced liver fibrosis should be referred to specialist care for further assessment. PMID:27439352

  11. TGF-β signalling and liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabregat, Isabel; Moreno-Càceres, Joaquim; Sánchez, Aránzazu; Dooley, Steven; Dewidar, Bedair; Giannelli, Gianluigi; Ten Dijke, Peter

    2016-06-01

    The transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) family signalling pathways play essential roles in the regulation of different cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, migration or cell death, which are essential for the homeostasis of tissues and organs. Because of the diverse and pleiotropic TGF-β functions, deregulation of its pathways contributes to human disease. In the case of the liver, TGF-β signalling participates in all stages of disease progression, from initial liver injury through inflammation and fibrosis, to cirrhosis and cancer. TGF-β has cytostatic and apoptotic effects in hepatocytes, promoting liver differentiation during embryogenesis and physiological liver regeneration. However, high levels of TGF-β, as a consequence of chronic liver damage, result in activation of stellate cells to myofibroblasts and massive hepatocyte cell death, which contributes to the promotion of liver fibrosis and later cirrhosis. During liver tumorigenesis, TGF-β may behave as a suppressor factor at early stages; however, there is strong evidence that overactivation of TGF-β signalling might contribute to later tumour progression, once cells escape from its cytostatic effects. For these reasons, targeting the TGF-β signalling pathway is being explored to counteract liver disease progression. In this review, we aim to shed light on the state-of-the-art in the signalling pathways induced by TGF-β that are involved in different stages of liver physiology and pathology.

  12. Brain MRI changes in chronic liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skehan, S. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Norris, S. [Liver Unit, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Hegarty, J. [Liver Unit, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Owens, A. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); MacErlaine, D. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    1997-08-01

    Cirrhotic patients are known to have abnormally high signal principally in the globus pallidus on non-contrast T1-weighted MRI. The purpose of this study was to relate MR changes to clinical and pathological features of chronic liver disease. We confirmed abnormally high signal in the globus pallidus on T1-weighted images in 25 of 28 patients with chronic liver disease, showing that it also occurs in patients who have not yet progressed to cirrhosis. Changes were seen in patients both with and without clinical portosystemic shunting. This abnormality is not responsible for hepatic encephalopathy. Cholestatic disease was more likely to produce marked changes than non-cholestatic disease. No statistically significant correlation was demonstrated between the severity of liver disease and the degree of MR abnormality. However, marked improvement in MR appearances was seen after successful liver transplantation. (orig.). With 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Pediatric Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppal, Vikas; Mansoor, Sana; Furuya, Katryn N

    2016-05-01

    Childhood obesity has reached epidemic proportions, and by 2012, more than one third of American children were overweight or obese. As a result, increasingly, children are developing complications of obesity including liver disease. In fact, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common form of chronic liver disease seen in children today. Recently, there has been a burgeoning literature examining the pathogenesis, genetic markers, and role of the microbiome in this disease. On the clinical front, new modalities of diagnosing hepatic steatosis and hepatic fibrosis are being developed to provide non-invasive methods of surveillance in children. Lastly, the mainstay of treatment of pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has been largely through lifestyle interventions, namely, dieting and exercise. Currently, there are a number of clinical trials examining novel lifestyle and drug therapies for NAFLD that are registered with the US National Institutes of Health ClinicalTrials.gov website.

  14. Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis Risk and Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert F. Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Evaluate the incidence of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF in patients with liver disease in the peritransplant period. Materials and Methods. This IRB approved study retrospectively reviewed patients requiring transplantation for cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, or both from 2003 to 2013. Records were reviewed identifying those having gadolinium enhanced MRI within 1 year of posttransplantation to document degree of liver disease, renal disease, and evidence for NSF. Results. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI was performed on 312 of 837 patients, including 23 with severe renal failure (GFR 30. Two of 23 patients with renal failure developed NSF compared to zero NSF cases in 289 patients with GFR > 30 (0/289; P<0.003. High dose gadodiamide was used in the two NSF cases. There was no increased incidence of NSF with severe liver disease (1/71 compared to nonsevere liver disease (1/241; P=0.412. Conclusion. Renal disease is a risk factor for NSF, but in our small sample our evidence suggests liver disease is not an additional risk factor, especially if a low-risk gadolinium agent is used. Noting that not all patients received high-risk gadolinium, a larger study focusing on patients receiving high-risk gadolinium is needed to further evaluate NSF risk in liver disease in the peritransplant period.

  15. Autoimmune Hepatitis and PSC Connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergani, Diego; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina

    2008-02-01

    This article describes the connection between autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). The two conditions have chronicity, liver inflammation, and a positive autoimmune serology in common; they differ in terms of gender distribution and bile duct damage. There is evidence suggesting that AIH and PSC are immune-mediated diseases. PSC and AIH could lie within the spectrum of the same disease process. Future studies should determine how frequently AIH evolves to PSC.

  16. Nutrition for children with cholestatic liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Los, E. Leonie; Lukovac, Sabina; Werner, Anniek; Dijkstra, Tietie; Verkade, Henkjan J.; Rings, Edmond H. H. M.; Cooke, RJ; Vandenplas, Y; Wahn, U

    2007-01-01

    Cholestatic liver disease (CLD) in children negatively affects nutritional status, growth and development, which all lead to an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. This is illustrated by the fact that the clinical outcome of children with CLD awaiting a liver transplantation is in part predic

  17. Some like it hot: The emerging role of spicy food (capsaicin) in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yaxiong; Huang, Xin; Wu, Haijing; Zhao, Ming; Lu, Qianjin; Israeli, Eitan; Dahan, Shani; Blank, Miri; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2016-05-01

    Autoimmune diseases refer to a spectrum of diseases characterized by an active immune response against the host, which frequently involves increased autoantibody production. The pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases is multifactorial and the exploitation of novel effective treatment is urgent. Capsaicin is a nutritional factor, the active component of chili peppers, which is responsible for the pungent component of chili pepper. As a stimuli, capsaicin selectively activate transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily 1(TRPV1) and exert various biological effects. This review discusses the effect of capsaicin through its receptor on the development and modulation of autoimmune diseases, which may shed light upon potential therapies in capsaicin-targeted approaches.

  18. Alcoholic liver disease: the gut microbiome and liver cross talk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Phillipp; Seebauer, Caroline T; Schnabl, Bernd

    2015-05-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Alcoholic fatty liver disease can progress to steatohepatitis, alcoholic hepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. Patients with alcohol abuse show quantitative and qualitative changes in the composition of the intestinal microbiome. Furthermore, patients with ALD have increased intestinal permeability and elevated systemic levels of gut-derived microbial products. Maintaining eubiosis, stabilizing the mucosal gut barrier, or preventing cellular responses to microbial products protect from experimental ALD. Therefore, intestinal dysbiosis and pathological bacterial translocation appear fundamental for the pathogenesis of ALD. This review highlights causes for intestinal dysbiosis and pathological bacterial translocation, their relationship, and consequences for ALD. We also discuss how the liver affects the intestinal microbiota.

  19. [Treatment of parasitic liver diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecuna, V

    1989-01-01

    Most of primary and secondary parasitic liver diseases, at present can be property treated with drugs. Venezuelan pharmaceutic market has some peculiarities that have determined the disappearance from the market of many drugs such as emetine, thiabendazole, quinacrine and niclosamide. Diloxanide never appeared. Venezuela has no commercial international treatises that protect international patents in the pharmaceutical area. In addition, government regulation of cost of drugs is very strict. This is particularly true with old drugs (such as emetine or quinacrine) which had such a low price that is non-commercial for the maker of the drug, usually a large transnational, and is withdrawn from the market. Flexibility of prices is quite easy for new antibiotics which are very expensive. Frequently small national companies import the drug from Italy and Japan which sell the drug independently from international treats. Such companies frequently produce the drug for the government social system, but are unreliable and also frequently they withdraw the drug a variable period of time. The government, through the Ministry of Public Health administer free treatment with drugs for malaria, tuberculosis and leprosy. The severe economic crisis of the country has severely impaired the preventive programs and there is an increase of malaria due to gold mining in the south of the country and falciparum chloroquine resistance and an increase of schistosomiasis in a previous free area. Also administration of drugs for malaria has been severely impaired, mainly for economic reasons. The establishment of a National Government Laboratory is an old (as far as 1946) political goal, but has remained in the political intention.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Martin; Zong, Wenjing; Biank, Vincent F; Hageman, Joseph R

    2016-02-01

    A 16-year-old Hispanic girl with an elevated body mass index in an otherwise normal state of health presented for her well-child examination. She had signs of metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance including increased waist circumference and acanthosis nigricans. Laboratory results revealed elevated transaminases with otherwise normal hepatic function. Based on the physical examination and laboratory results, she was diagnosed with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). After further evaluation, she eventually underwent a liver biopsy. The biopsy revealed nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) with stage 2 fibrosis. This article reviews the definition of NAFLD and NASH, an increasingly prevalent cause of pediatric chronic liver disease associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome. The article also outlines the epidemiology, risk factors, and natural history of NAFLD, which may help identify and prevent high-risk pediatric patients from progressing to irreversible liver disease. Understanding the diagnostic and treatment options offers the best chance at preventing and reversing the early stages of this disease.

  1. Concurrent reactive arthritis, Graves' disease, and warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Elizabeth; Packer, Clifford D

    2009-08-13

    Warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia is due to the presence of warm agglutinins that react with protein antigens on the surface of red blood cells causing premature destruction of circulating red blood cells. We report the first case of concurrent reactive arthritis, Graves' disease, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. A 40-year-old man with reactive arthritis, Graves' disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, mitral valve prolapse, and Gilbert's disease presented with a one month history of jaundice, fatigue, and black stools. After diagnosis of warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia, the patient was started on prednisone 1 mg/kg with rapid improvement in his anemia and jaundice. Our subject's mother and possibly his maternal grandmother also had autoimmune hemolytic anemia, which raises the possibility of hereditary autoimmune hemolytic anemia, a rarely reported condition.

  2. CD24: from a Hematopoietic Differentiation Antigen to a Genetic Risk Factor for Multiple Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yixin; Zhao, Ming; Xiang, Bo; Chang, Christopher; Lu, Qianjin

    2016-02-01

    The autoantibody is an essential characteristic of inflammatory disorders, including autoimmune diseases. Although the exact pathogenic mechanisms of these diseases remain elusive, accumulated evidence has implicated that genetic factors play important roles in autoimmune inflammation. Among these factors, CD24 was first identified as a heat-stable antigen in 1978 and first successfully cloned in 1990. Thereafter, its functional roles have been intensively investigated in various human diseases, especially autoimmune diseases and cancers. It is currently known that CD24 serves as a costimulatory factor of T cells that regulate their homeostasis and proliferation, while in B cells, CD24 is functionally involved in cell activation and differentiation. CD24 can enhance autoimmune diseases in terms of its protective role in the clonal deletion of autoreactive thymocytes. Furthermore, CD24 deficiency has been linked to mouse experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Finally, CD24 genetic variants, including single-nucleotide polymorphisms and deletions, are etiologically relevant to autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Therefore, CD24 is a promising biomarker and novel therapeutic target for autoimmune diseases.

  3. Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients With Life Threatening Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-23

    Purpura, Schoenlein-Henoch; Graft Versus Host Disease; Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune; Rheumatoid Arthritis; Churg-Strauss Syndrome; Hypersensitivity Vasculitis; Wegener's Granulomatosis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Giant Cell Arteritis; Pure Red Cell Aplasia; Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis; Polyarteritis Nodosa; Autoimmune Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Takayasu Arteritis

  4. Role of Gut Microbiota in Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, David A; Paik, Yong-Han; Schnabl, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Many lines of research have established a relationship between the gut microbiome and patients with liver disease. For example, patients with cirrhosis have increased bacteremia, increased blood levels of lipopolysaccharide, and increased intestinal permeability. Patients with cirrhosis have bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine. Selective intestinal decontamination with antibiotics is beneficial for patients with decompensated cirrhosis. In experimental models of chronic liver injury with fibrosis, several toll-like receptors (TLR) are required to make mice sensitive to liver fibrosis. The presumed ligand for the TLRs are bacterial products derived from the gut microbiome, and TLR knockout mice are resistant to liver inflammation and fibrosis. We and others have characterized the association between preclinical models of liver disease in mice with the microbial diversity in their gut microbiome. In each model, including intragastric alcohol, bile duct ligation, chronic carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), administration, and genetic obesity, there is a significant change in the gut microbiome from normal control mice. However, there is not a single clear bacterial strain or pattern that distinguish mice with liver injury from controlled mice. So how can the gut microbiota affect liver disease? We can identify at least 6 changes that would result in liver injury, inflammation, and/or fibrosis. These include: (1) changes in caloric yield of diet; (2) regulation of gut permeability to release bacterial products; (3) modulation of choline metabolism; (4) production of endogenous ethanol; (5) regulation of bile acid metabolism; and (6) regulation in lipid metabolism.

  5. Interleukin-10 and chronic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Juan Zhang; Xiao-Zhong Wang

    2006-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-10 is an important immunoregulatory cytokine produced by many cell populations. Numerous investigations suggest that IL-10 plays a major role in chronic liver diseases. IL-10 gene polymorphisms are possibly associated with liver disease susceptibility or severity. Recombinant human IL-10 has been produced and is currently tested in clinical trials. These trials may give new insights into the immunobiology of IL-10 and suggest that the IL-10/IL-10 receptor system may become a new therapeutic target.

  6. Venous thromboembolic disease in systemic autoimmune diseases: an association to keep in mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvariño, Ricardo; Danza, Álvaro; Mérola, Valentina; Bérez, Adriana; Méndez, Enrique; Espinosa, Gerard; Cervera, Ricard

    2012-12-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases are conditions of unknown etiology, characterized by the simultaneous or successive involvement of most organs and systems, as well as the presence of autoantibodies as biological markers. Venous thromboembolic disease has a higher incidence in this population when compared to healthy individuals. This responds to the increase in congenital and acquired risk factors in this group. One of the main risk factors is linked to the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies, whose prevalence is increased among patients with such conditions.

  7. Hepatic progenitors for liver disease: current position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Conigliaro

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Alice Conigliaro1, David A Brenner2, Tatiana Kisseleva21University “La Sapienza”, Dipartimento di Biotecnologie Cellulari ed Ematologia Policlinico Umberto I, V Clinica Medica, Rome, Italy; 2Department of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USAAbstract: Liver regeneration restores the original functionality of hepatocytes and cholangiocytes in response to injury. It is regulated on several levels, with different cellular populations contributing to this process, eg, hepatocytes, liver precursor cells, intrahepatic stem cells. In response to injury, mature hepatocytes have the capability to proliferate and give rise to new hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. Meanwhile, liver precursor cells (oval cells have become the most recognized bipotential precursor cells in the damaged liver. They rapidly proliferate, change their cellular composition, and differentiate into hepatocytes and cholangiocytes to compensate for the cellular loss and maintain liver homeostasis. There is a growing body of evidence that oval cells originate from the intrahepatic stem cell(s, which in turn give(s rise to epithelial, including oval cells, and/or other hepatic cells of nonepithelial origin. Since there is a close relationship between the liver and hematopoiesis, bone marrow derived cells can also contribute to liver regeneration by the fusion of myeloid cells with damaged hepatocytes, or differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells. The current review discusses the contribution of different cells to liver regeneration and their characteristics.Keywords: hepatic progenitor, liver disease, liver precursor cells, oval cells, hepatocytes, intrahepatic stem cells, cholangiocytes

  8. Clinical application of mycophenloate mofetil for autoimmune disease%麦考酚酸酯治疗自身免疫性疾病的临床应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏光涛; 李霞; 杨兆文; 郑加田; 孙红胜

    2013-01-01

    免疫抑制药物麦考酚酸酯预防移植排异的疗效肯定,耐受性好,不良反应少.本文综述近期麦考酚酸酯在狼疮性肾炎、IgA肾病、紫癜性肾炎和自身免疫性肝病等自身免疫性疾病中的临床应用评价.%Mycophenloate mofetil has a good efficacy against transplant rejection. However, it is also used for autoimmune diseases with well tolerance and less adverse reaction. This review summarizes the clinical application of mycophenloate mofetil for lupus nephropathy, IgA nephropathy, henoch-schonlein purpura nephritis, autoimmune liver diseases and other autoimmune diseases.

  9. Management of Pruritus in Chronic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeline Bhalerao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There continues to be uncertainty on the ideal treatment of pruritus in chronic liver disease. The aim of this study was to gather the latest information on the evidence-based management of pruritus in chronic liver disease. Methodology. A literature search for pruritus in chronic liver disease was conducted using Pubmed and Embase database systems using the MeSH terms “pruritus,” “chronic liver disease,” “cholestatic liver disease,” and “treatment.” Results. The current understanding of the pathophysiology of pruritus is described in addition to detailing research into contemporary treatment options of the condition. These medical treatments range from bile salts, rifampicin, and opioid receptor antagonists to antihistamines. Conclusion. The burden of pruritus in liver disease patients persists and, although it is a common symptom, it can be difficult to manage. In recent years there has been greater study into the etiology and treatment of the condition. Nonetheless, pruritus remains poorly understood and many patients continue to suffer, reiterating the need for further research to improve our understanding of the etiology and treatment for the condition.

  10. Dame Sheila Sherlock: pioneer in liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Harold

    2009-04-01

    Within living memory of some of us, liver disease was a Cinderella subject. If you look up the first edition of the standard medical textbook of the time, Sir William Osler's 'Principles and Practice of Medicine', published in 1892, you will find a mere 24 of its 1079 pages devoted to the liver, compared with 38 pages on typhoid fever alone; and matters hardly changed throughout the first half of the 20th century. Although 'cirrhosis' and 'hepatitis' were well recognised conditions when I was a house surgeon in 1948, their classification, aetiologies, detailed pathology and management were little understood, while laboratory investigations of the liver diseases were few and non-specific.

  11. [Diagnosis of osteoporosis occurring in autoimmune thyroid gland disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radojković, Ivan; Radojković, Jana; Djurica, Snezana

    2005-10-01

    Osteoporosis or porotic bone is a general, systemic bone disease, which is manifested by fracture as its consequence. The main characteristic of this disease is the loss of bone microarchitecture, bone mass reduction, and its increased fragility. The result, thereof, is susceptibility to fracture. Etiology of osteoporosis is polymorph. Its socio-medical importance is enormous, since there is one osteoporotic fracture every 20 sec. worldwide. Million and six hundred thousand osteoporotic fractures occur annualy throughout the world. Thyroid gland is susceptible to autoimmune reactions that lead to autoimmune diseases, just like many other organs. The autoimmune disorder is a final consequence of a failure, in some instance, within the crucial mechanism of regulation of self tissue tolerance. The main goal is to prove the presence of osteoporosis, its inexpensive and quick diagnostics; to make a distinction among the causes that lead to it. In addition, to indicate the importance of osteoporosis that is caused by normal, metabolic processes which are an inevitable part of ageing. Diagnosis of osteoporosis can be done through laboratory, which is a tiresome, time consuming task. Measurements of BMD could be also performed by using new devices. Osteometers could be constructed on the basis of X-ray photon energy or US. Utilization most contemporary one uses laser beam, and it approximates the distance of additional tissue that also absorbs part of energy changing absorption of the reception unit and thus making the measurement results accurate. In diagnosing BMD by osteometer, one faces with certain difficulties. When axial quantitative CT is used, the value may be falsely lower, because of the loss of energy absorbed by aorta which is often calcified in elderly people. In devices with transversal scanning, of the same nature and technology, a part of the energy is being absorbed by transversal and spinal vertebrals. After the research, one may conclude that the most

  12. Prevalence and clinical features of celiac disease in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis: cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Ventura

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder with an average prevalence of 1% in Europe and the United States. Because of strong European ancestry in southern Brazil, this study aimed to evaluate the seroprevalence of celiac disease among autoimmune thyroiditis patients.DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional study in a public university hospital.METHODS: This cross-sectional prevalence study included autoimmune thyroiditis patients who were tested for anti-endomysial and anti-transglutaminase antibodies between August 2010 and July 2011.RESULTS: Fifty-three patients with autoimmune thyroiditis were included; 92.5% were women, with mean age of 49.0 ± 13.5 years. Five patients (9.3% were serologically positive for celiac disease: three of them (5.6% were reactive for anti-endomysial antibodies and two (3.7% for anti-transglutaminase. None of them exhibited anemia and one presented diarrhea. Endoscopy was performed on two patients: one with normal histology and the other with lymphocytic infiltrate and villous atrophy.CONCLUSION: The prevalence of celiac disease among patients with autoimmune thyroid disease was 9.3%; one patient complained of diarrhea and none presented anemia. Among at-risk populations, like autoimmune thyroiditis patients, the presence of diarrhea or anemia should not be used as a criterion for indicating celiac disease investigation. This must be done for all autoimmune thyroiditis patients because of its high prevalence.

  13. Concurrent reactive arthritis, Graves’ disease, and warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Chiang, Elizabeth; Packer, Clifford D

    2009-01-01

    Warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia is due to the presence of warm agglutinins that react with protein antigens on the surface of red blood cells causing premature destruction of circulating red blood cells. We report the first case of concurrent reactive arthritis, Graves’ disease, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. A 40-year-old man with reactive arthritis, Graves’ disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, mitral valve prolapse, and Gilbert’s disease presented with a one month history of jaund...

  14. Skin disease and thyroid autoimmunity in atopic South Italian children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedullà, Marcella; Fierro, Vincenzo; Marzuillo, Pierluigi; Capuano, Francesco; Miraglia del Giudice, Emanuele; Ruocco, Eleonora

    2016-01-01

    AIM To verify the prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity (TA) and the possible association between atopy and TA in children affected by skin disease. METHODS Three hundred and twenty-four children consecutively referred due to skin disease symptoms to our Pediatric Department were enrolled. One hundred and eighty-seven were diagnosed with atopic dermatitis (AD), 95 with acute urticaria, 40 with chronic urticaria (CU), and 2 with alopecia areata (AA). According to the work-up for atopy, the children were divided into two groups: Atopics and non-atopics. TA was diagnosed by serum thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies and/or thyroglobulin autoantibodies levels more than twice normal values over a period of two months by immunoassay. RESULTS In all children with skin disease, a significant prevalence of TA in atopics compared with non-atopics (13.67% vs 2.67%, P = 0.0016) and a significant association between TA and atopy (OR = 5.76, 95%CI: 1.71-19.35) were observed. These findings were confirmed as significant in children with AD: TA in atopics was 11.5%, while TA in non-atopics was 2.7% (P = 0.03, OR = 4.68, 95%CI: 1.02-21.38). In addition, atopics with CU showed a significantly higher prevalence of TA (26.9%), but none of the non-atopics showed CU (P = 0.0326). On the other hand, atopics with AA showed a 100% (2 out of 2) prevalence of TA, compared with none of the non-atopics. CONCLUSION In children with skin disease, atopy seems to be associated with an increased risk of TA. PMID:27610344

  15. Genetics of autoimmune diseases: insights from population genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Paula S; Shedlock, Andrew M; Langefeld, Carl D

    2015-11-01

    Human genetic diversity is the result of population genetic forces. This genetic variation influences disease risk and contributes to health disparities. Autoimmune diseases (ADs) are a family of complex heterogeneous disorders with similar underlying mechanisms characterized by immune responses against self. Collectively, ADs are common, exhibit gender and ethnic disparities, and increasing incidence. As natural selection is an important influence on human genetic variation, and immune function genes are enriched for signals of positive selection, it is thought that the prevalence of AD risk alleles seen in different population is partially the result of differing selective pressures (for example, due to pathogens). With the advent of high-throughput technologies, new analytical methodologies and large-scale projects, evidence for the role of natural selection in contributing to the heritable component of ADs keeps growing. This review summarizes the genetic regions associated with susceptibility to different ADs and concomitant evidence for selection, including known agents of selection exerting selective pressure in these regions. Examples of specific adaptive variants with phenotypic effects are included as an evidence of natural selection increasing AD susceptibility. Many of the complexities of gene effects in different ADs can be explained by population genetics phenomena. Integrating AD susceptibility studies with population genetics to investigate how natural selection has contributed to genetic variation that influences disease risk will help to identify functional variants and elucidate biological mechanisms. As such, the study of population genetics in human population holds untapped potential for elucidating the genetic causes of human disease and more rapidly focusing to personalized medicine.

  16. Micronutrient Antioxidants and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guanliang; Ni, Yinhua; Nagata, Naoto; Xu, Liang; Ota, Tsuguhito

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most important chronic liver diseases worldwide and has garnered increasing attention in recent decades. NAFLD is characterized by a wide range of liver changes, from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The blurred pathogenesis of NAFLD is very complicated and involves lipid accumulation, insulin resistance, inflammation, and fibrogenesis. NAFLD is closely associated with complications such as obesity, diabetes, steatohepatitis, and liver fibrosis. During the progression of NAFLD, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are activated and induce oxidative stress. Recent attempts at establishing effective NAFLD therapy have identified potential micronutrient antioxidants that may reduce the accumulation of ROS and finally ameliorate the disease. In this review, we present the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and introduce some dietary antioxidants that may be used to prevent or cure NAFLD, such as vitamin D, E, and astaxanthin. PMID:27563875

  17. THE CLINICAL PRESENTATION OF AUTOIMMUNE THYROID DISEASE IN MEN IS ASSOCIATED WITH IL12B GENOTYPE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walsh, John P; Berry, Jemma; Liu, Shu;

    2011-01-01

    hypothesized that IL12B genotype may influence the clinical presentation of autoimmune thyroid disease. Objective.  We tested for differences in IL12B genotype between Graves' disease and Hashimoto's disease. Patients.  We studied a discovery cohort of 203 Australian women and 37 men with autoimmune thyroid......' disease (P=0.005) and Hashimoto's disease (P=0.029). Conclusion.  In men with autoimmune thyroid disease, a common variant located upstream of the IL12B coding region may influence whether patients present with Graves' disease or Hashimoto's disease.......Background.  Common variants in the interleukin 12B (IL12B) gene are associated with predominantly inflammatory (Th1) or antibody-mediated (Th2) immune responses. Since Hashimoto's disease and Graves' disease are thought to arise from mainly Th1 and Th2 immune responses respectively, we...

  18. Acute renal dysfunction in liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Renal dysfunction is common in liver diseases, either as part of multiorgan involvement in acute illness or secondary to advanced liver disease. The presence of renal impairment in both groups is a poor prognostic indicator. Renal failure is often multifactorial and can present as pre-renal or intrinsic renal dysfunction. Obstructive or post renal dysfunction only rarely complicates liver disease. Hepatorenal syndrome (MRS) is a unique form of renal failure associated with advanced liver disease or cirrhosis, and is characterized by functional renal impairment without significant changes in renal histology. Irrespective of the type of renal failure, renal hypoperfusion is the central pathogenetic mechanism, due either to reduced perfusion pressure or increased renal vascular resistance. Volume expansion, avoidance of precipitating factors and treatment of underlying liver disease constitute the mainstay of therapy to prevent and reverse renal impairment. Splanchnic vasoconstrictor agents, such as terlipressin, along with volume expansion, and early placement of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) may be effective in improving renal function in HRS. Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) and molecular absorbent recirculating system (MARS) in selected patients may be life saving while awaiting liver transplantation.

  19. Clinical Potential of Regulatory T Cell Therapy in Liver Diseases: An Overview and Current Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Hannah C.; Braitch, Manjit Kaur; Brown, Solomon; Oo, Ye Htun

    2016-01-01

    The increasing demand for liver transplantation and the decline in donor organs has highlighted the need for alternative novel therapies to prevent chronic active hepatitis, which eventually leads to liver cirrhosis and liver cancer. Liver histology of chronic hepatitis is composed of both effector and regulatory lymphocytes. The human liver contains different subsets of effector lymphocytes that are kept in check by a subpopulation of T cells known as Regulatory T cells (Treg). The balance of effector and regulatory lymphocytes generally determines the outcome of hepatic inflammation: resolution, fulminant hepatitis, or chronic active hepatitis. Thus, maintaining and adjusting this balance is crucial in immunological manipulation of liver diseases. One of the options to restore this balance is to enrich Treg in the liver disease patients. Advances in the knowledge of Treg biology and development of clinical grade isolation reagents, cell sorting equipment, and good manufacturing practice facilities have paved the way to apply Treg cells as a potential therapy to restore peripheral self-tolerance in autoimmune liver diseases (AILD), chronic rejection, and posttransplantation. Past and on-going studies have applied Treg in type-1 diabetes mellitus, systemic lupus erythematosus, graft versus host diseases, and solid organ transplantations. There have not been any new therapies for the AILD for more than three decades; thus, the clinical potential for the application of autologous Treg cell therapy to treat autoimmune liver disease is an attractive and novel option. However, it is fundamental to understand the deep immunology, genetic profiles, biology, homing behavior, and microenvironment of Treg before applying the cells to the patients. PMID:27656181

  20. Anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, A; Gluud, C

    2006-01-01

    Alcohol is one of the most common causes of liver disease in the Western World. Randomised clinical trials have examined the effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease.......Alcohol is one of the most common causes of liver disease in the Western World. Randomised clinical trials have examined the effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease....

  1. [The role of gender in the pathogenesis and development of autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomczyńska, Małgorzata; Salata, Ireneusz; Saluk, Joanna

    2016-09-29

    Autoimmune diseases occur with greater frequency in women than in men, suggesting that the mechanism of pathogenesis is conditioned by gender. So far not defined clearly factors responsible for the development and course of these diseases depending on sex. However, it was found there is a clear sexual dimorphism of the immune system, which may determine the process of autoimmunity. The causes of the increased incidence of women in autoimmune diseases are attributed to the action of the hormones estrogen, which can promote the process of autoimmunity and enhance the clinical symptoms of the disease. As shown sex hormones have immunomodulatory activities on dendritic cells, macrophages, neutrophils, B and T cells. In the both situation the response to strange antigens and mechanism of autoimmunity sex hormones have been shown to play contributory roles in process of cytokine production, the expression of cytokine receptors and response of effector cells. According to recent research, the development of autoimmune diseases is determined by genetic factors. Changes in the autosomal genes X and Y chromosomes play an important role in the progression of autoimmune processes, especially that the X chromosome has genes responsible for the regulation of the immune system.

  2. Hyaluronic acid concentration in liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudowska, Monika; Gruszewska, Ewa; Panasiuk, Anatol; Cylwik, Bogdan; Flisiak, Robert; Świderska, Magdalena; Szmitkowski, Maciej; Chrostek, Lech

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of liver diseases of different etiologies and clinical severity of liver cirrhosis on the serum level of hyaluronic acid. The results were compared with noninvasive markers of liver fibrosis: APRI, GAPRI, HAPRI, FIB-4 and Forn's index. Serum samples were obtained from 20 healthy volunteers and patients suffering from alcoholic cirrhosis (AC)-57 patients, non-alcoholic cirrhosis (NAC)-30 and toxic hepatitis (HT)-22. Cirrhotic patients were classified according to Child-Pugh score. Hyaluronic acid concentration was measured by the immunochemical method. Non-patented indicators were calculated using special formulas. The mean serum hyaluronic acid concentration was significantly higher in AC, NAC and HT group in comparison with the control group. There were significant differences in the serum hyaluronic acid levels between liver diseases, and in AC they were significantly higher than those in NAC and HT group. The serum hyaluronic acid level differs significantly due to the severity of cirrhosis and was the highest in Child-Pugh class C. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive values and the area under the ROC curve for hyaluronic acid and all non-patented algorithms were high and similar to each other. We conclude that the concentration of hyaluronic acid changes in liver diseases and is affected by the severity of liver cirrhosis. Serum hyaluronic acid should be considered as a good marker for noninvasive diagnosis of liver damage, but the combination of markers is more useful.

  3. The use of stem cells for the treatment of autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.B. Rosa

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases constitute a heterogeneous group of conditions commonly treated with anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressant and immunomodulating drugs, with satisfactory results in most cases. Nevertheless, some patients become resistant to conventional therapy. The use of high doses of drugs in such cases results in the need for bone marrow reconstitution, a situation which has stimulated research into the use of hematopoietic stem cells in autoimmune disease therapy. Stem cell transplantation in such diseases aims to destroy the self-reacting immune cells and produce a new functional immune system, as well as substitute cells for tissue damaged in the course of the disease. Significant results, such as the reestablishment of tolerance and a decrease in the recurrence of autoimmune disease, have been reported following stem cell transplantation in patients with autoimmune disease in Brazil and throughout the world. These results suggest that stem cell transplantation has the potential to become an important therapeutic approach to the treatment of various autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, systemic sclerosis, Crohn's disease, autoimmune blood cytopenias, and type I diabetes mellitus.

  4. Sex bias in paediatric autoimmune disease - Not just about sex hormones?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaroni-Clarke, Rachel C; Munro, Jane E; Ellis, Justine A

    2016-05-01

    Autoimmune diseases affect up to 10% of the world's population, and approximately 80% of those affected are female. The majority of autoimmune diseases occur more commonly in females, although some are more frequent in males, while others show no bias by sex. The mechanisms leading to sex biased disease prevalence are not well understood. However, for adult-onset autoimmune disease, at least some of the cause is usually ascribed to sex hormones. This is because levels of sex hormones are one of the most obvious physiological differences between adult males and females, and their impact on immune system function is well recognised. While for paediatric-onset autoimmune diseases a sex bias is not as common, there are several such diseases for which one sex predominates. For example, the oligoarticular subtype of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) occurs in approximately three times more girls than boys, with a peak age of onset well before the onset of puberty, and at a time when levels of androgen and oestrogen are low and not strikingly different between the sexes. Here, we review potential explanations for autoimmune disease sex bias with a particular focus on paediatric autoimmune disease, and biological mechanisms outside of sex hormone differences.

  5. Weight loss during cirrhosis is related to the etiology of liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucilene Rezende Anastácio

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Malnutrition is widely described in patients waiting for liver transplantation (LTx. However, risk factors associated with weight loss during liver disease have not yet been well studied. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to assess weight loss and its risk factors during liver disease and up to the first appointment after transplantation. Patients who underwent LTx were retrospectively assessed for weight loss during liver disease while on the waiting list for LTx. The usual weight of the patients before disease and their weight on the first outpatient appointment after transplant were considered. Demographic, socioeconomic, lifestyle and clinical variables were collected to assess risk factors using a linear regression analysis. We retrospectively evaluated 163 patients undergoing LTx between 1997 and 2008. RESULTS: Patients lost in average 7.7 ± 12.4 kg while ill. Variables independently associated with weight loss by multiple linear regression analyses were as follows: former smoker (P = 0.03, greater body mass index (P<0.01, overweight before liver disease (P = 0.02 and indication for LTx (P = 0.01. Among these indications, patients with alcoholic cirrhosis had lost significantly more weight (P<0.01, and those with hepatitis C virus (P = 0.01 and autoimmune hepatitis (P = 0.02 had lost significantly less weight. CONCLUSIONS: Patients experienced weight loss during liver disease independent of age, sex, schooling and income; however, the etiology of liver disease was related to weight loss.

  6. Same-sex marriage, autoimmune thyroid gland dysfunction and other autoimmune diseases in Denmark 1989-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, Morten; Nielsen, Nete Munk; Pedersen, Bo Vestergaard

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases have been little studied in gay men and lesbians. We followed 4.4 million Danes, including 9,615 same-sex married (SSM) persons, for 47 autoimmune diseases in the National Patient Registry between 1989 and 2008. Poisson regression analyses provided first hospitalization rate ratios (RRs) comparing rates between SSM individuals and persons in other marital status categories. SSM individuals experienced no unusual overall risk of autoimmune diseases. However, the risk of autoimmune thyroid dysfunction was increased, notably Hashimoto's thyroiditis (women(SSM), RR = 2.92; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.74-4.55) and Graves' disease (men(SSM), RR = 1.88; 95% CI 1.08-3.01). There was also an excess of primary biliary cirrhosis (women(SSM), RR = 4.09; 95% CI 1.01-10.7), and of psoriasis (men(SSM), RR = 2.48; 95% CI 1.77-3.36), rheumatic fever (men(SSM), RR = 7.55; 95% CI 1.87-19.8), myasthenia gravis (men(SSM), RR = 5.51; 95% CI 1.36-14.4), localized scleroderma (men(SSM), RR = 7.16; 95% CI 1.18-22.6) and pemphigoid (men(SSM), RR = 6.56; 95% CI 1.08-20.6), while Dupuytren's contracture was reduced (men(SSM), RR = 0.64; 95% CI 0.39-0.99). The excess of psoriasis was restricted to same-sex married men with HIV/AIDS (men(SSM), RR = 10.5; 95% CI 6.44-15.9), whereas Graves' disease occurred in excess only among same-sex married men without HIV/AIDS (men(SSM), RR = 1.99; 95% CI 1.12-3.22). Lesbians and immunologically competent gay men in same-sex marriage face no unusual overall risk of autoimmune diseases. However, the observed increased risk of thyroid dysfunction in these lesbians and gay men deserves further study.

  7. The many faces of Mac-1 in autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosetti, Florencia; Mayadas, Tanya N

    2016-01-01

    Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18) is a β2 integrin classically regarded as a pro-inflammatory molecule because of its ability to promote phagocyte cytotoxic functions and enhance the function of several effector molecules such as FcγR, uPAR, and CD14. Nevertheless, recent reports have revealed that Mac-1 also plays significant immunoregulatory roles, and genetic variants in ITGAM, the gene that encodes CD11b, confer risk for the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This has renewed interest in the physiological roles of this integrin and raised new questions on how its seemingly opposing biological functions may be regulated. Here, we provide an overview of the CD18 integrins and how their activation may be regulated as this may shed light on how the opposing roles of Mac-1 may be elicited. We then discuss studies that exemplify Mac-1's pro-inflammatory versus regulatory roles particularly in the context of IgG immune complex-mediated inflammation. This includes a detailed examination of molecular mechanisms that could explain the risk-conferring effect of rs1143679, a single nucleotide non-synonymous Mac-1 polymorphism associated with SLE.

  8. Familial associations of lymphoma and myeloma with autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemminki, K; Försti, A; Sundquist, K; Sundquist, J; Li, X

    2017-01-06

    Many B-cell neoplasms are associated with autoimmune diseases (AIDs) but most evidence is based on a personal rather than a family history of AIDs. Here we calculated risks for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and multiple myeloma (MM) when family members were diagnosed with any of 44 different AIDs, or, independently, risk for AIDs when family members were diagnosed with a neoplasm. A total of 64 418 neoplasms and 531 155 AIDs were identified from Swedish nationwide health care records. NHL was associated with a family history of five AIDs, all increasing the risk, HL was associated with one AID increasing and three AIDs decreasing the risk while MM had no association. A family history of NHL was associated with eight, HL with seven and MM with seven different AIDs, nine increasing and 13 decreasing the risk. The present family data on B-cell neoplasms and AIDs show an approximately equal number of associations for risk increase and risk decrease, suggesting that inherited genes or gene-environment interactions may increase the risk or be protective. These results differed from published data on personal history of AID, which only report increased risks, often vastly higher and for different AIDs compared with the present data.

  9. Association between Autoimmune Rheumatic Diseases and the Risk of Dementia

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    Kang Lu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Autoimmune rheumatic diseases (ARD are characterized by systemic inflammation and may affect multiple organs and cause vascular events such as ischemic stroke and acute myocardial infarction. However, the association between ARD and increased risk of dementia is uncertain. This is a retrospective cohort study to investigate and compare the risk of dementia between patients clinically diagnosed with ARD and non-ARD patients during a 5-year follow-up period. Methods. Data were obtained from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000 (LHID2000. We included 1221 patients receiving ambulatory or hospitalization care and 6105 non-ARD patients; patients were matched by sex, age, and the year of index use of health care. Each patient was studied for 5 years to identify the subsequent manifestation of dementia. The data obtained were analyzed by Cox proportional hazard regression. Results. During the 5-year follow-up period, 30 ARD (2.48% and 141 non-ARD patients (2.31% developed dementia. During the 5-year follow-up period, there were no significant differences in the risks of any type of dementia (adjusted hazard ratio (HR, 1.18; 95% CI, 0.79–1.76 in the ARD group after adjusting for demographics and comorbidities. Conclusions. Within the 5-year period, patients with and without ARD were found to have similar risks of developing dementia.

  10. [The role of hereditary and environmental factors in autoimmune thyroid diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balázs, Csaba

    2012-07-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases are the most common organ-specific autoimmune disorders affecting 5% to 10% of the population in Western countries. The clinical presentation varies from hyperthyroidism in Graves' disease to hypothyroidism in Hashimoto's thyroiditis. While the exact etiology of thyroid autoimmunity is not known, the interaction between genetic susceptibility and environmental factors appears to be of fundamental importance to initiate the process of thyroid autoimmunity. The identified autoimmune thyroid disease susceptibility genes include immune-modulating genes, such as the major histocompatibility complex, and thyroid-specific genes, including TSH receptor, thyroglobulin and thyroid peroxidase. The majority of the anti-TSH-receptor antibodies have a stimulating capacity and are responsible for hyperthyroidism. The anti-thyroglobulin- and anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies belonging to the catalytic type of antibodies destroy the thyrocytes resulting in hypothyroidism. The appearance of anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies precedes the induction of thyroiditis and the manifestation of hypothyroidism. The molecular analysis of thyroglobulin gene polymorphism is important in the mechanism of autoimmune thyroiditis. The autoantigen presentation by major histocompatibility complex molecules is a key point of the autoimmune mechanism. It has been shown that a HLA-DR variant containing arginine at position 74 of the DRβ1 chain confers a strong genetic susceptibility to autoimmune thyroid diseases, Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis, while glutamine at position DRβ1-74 is protective. Human thyroglobulin 2098 peptide represents a strong and specific DRβ1-Arg74 binder, while a non-binding control peptide, thyroglobulin 2766 fails to induce this response. Moreover, thyroglobulin 2098 stimulated T-cells from individuals who were positive for thyroglobulin antibodies, demonstrating that thyroglobulin 2098 is an immunogenic peptide capable of being

  11. PTPN22 gene polymorphisms in autoimmune diseases with special reference to systemic lupus erythematosus disease susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradhan V

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a prototype autoimmune disease. SLE is a result of one or more immune mechanisms, like autoantibody production, complement activation, multiple inflammation and immune complex deposition leading to organ tissue damage. SLE affected patients are susceptible to common and opportunistic infections. There are several reports suggesting that Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection precipitates SLE in patients from endemic areas. Genetic factors and environmental factors also play an important role in the overall susceptibility to SLE pathophysiology. Recently, protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 22 (PTPN22 gene, has been found to be associated with several autoimmune diseases like SLE, Grave′s disease and Hashimoto thyroiditis. The missense R620W polymorphism, rs 2476601, in PTPN22 gene at the nucleotide 1858 in codon 620 (620Arg > Trp has been associated with autoimmune diseases. The PTPN22 locus is also found to be responsible for development of pulmonary tuberculosis in certain populations. The PTPN22 1858C/T gene locus will be ideal to look for SLE susceptibility to tuberculosis in the Indian population. In this review, we focus on human PTPN22 gene structure and function as well as the association of PTPN22 gene polymorphisms with SLE susceptibility

  12. [Autoimmune hepatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostojić, Rajko

    2003-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is an unresolving, hepatocellular inflammation of unknown cause that is characterized by the presence of periportal hepatitis on histologic examination, tissue autoantibodies in serum, and hypergammaglobulinemia. By international consensus, the designation autoimmune hepatitis has replaced alternative terms for the condition. Three types of autoimmune hepatitis have been proposed based on immunoserologic findings. Type 1 autoimmune hepatitis is characterized by the presence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) or smooth muscle antibodies (SMA) (or both) in serum. Seventy percent of patients with type 1 of autoimmune hepatitis are women. This type is the most common form and accounts for at least 80% of cases. Type 2 is characterized by the presence of antibodies to liver-kidney microsome type 1 (anti-LKM1) in serum. Patients with this type of autoimmune hepatitis are predominantly children. Type 3 autoimmune hepatitis is characterized by the presence of antibodies to soluble liver antigen (anti-SLA) in serum. There are no individual features that are pathognomonic of autoimmune hepatitis, and its diagnosis requires the confident exclusion of other conditions. The large majority of patients show satisfactory response to corticosteroid (usually prednisone or prednisolone) therapy. For the past 30 years it has been customary to add azathioprine as a "steroid sparing" agent to allow lower doses of steroids to be used and remission, once achieved, can be sustained in many patients with azathioprine alone after steroid withdrawal. Patients with autoimmune hepatitis who have decompensated during or after corticosteroid therapy are candidates for liver transplantation.

  13. Immunogenicity and safety of the human papillomavirus vaccine in patients with autoimmune diseases: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, Paolo; Radice, Sonia; Clementi, Emilio

    2015-07-09

    Whereas safety and efficacy of HPV vaccines in healthy women have been shown in several randomised controlled clinical trials and in post marketing analyses, only few data exist in patients affected by autoimmune diseases. These issues are significant as autoimmune conditions are recognised as a risk factor for the persistence of HPV infection. Herein we review and systematise the existing literature to assess immunogenicity and safety of HPV vaccination in patients with autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. The results of our literature revision suggest that the HPV vaccines are efficacious and safe in most of the patients affected by autoimmune diseases. Yet, some points of concern remain to be tackled, including the effects of concomitant therapies, the risk of disease exacerbation and the cost-effectiveness of such immunisation programmes in these populations.

  14. EULAR recommendations for vaccination in adult patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Assen, S.; Agmon-Levin, N.; Elkayam, O.; Cervera, R.; Doran, M. F.; Dougados, M.; Emery, P.; Geborek, P.; Ioannidis, J. P. A.; Jayne, D. R. W.; Kallenberg, C. G. M.; Mueller-Ladner, U.; Shoenfeld, Y.; Stojanovich, L.; Valesini, G.; Wulffraat, N. M.; Bijl, M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To develop evidence-based European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for vaccination in patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases (AIIRD). Methods A EULAR task force was composed of experts representing 11 European countries, consisting of eight rheumatologi

  15. Clinical characteristics of patients with lymphoproliferative neoplasms in the setting of systemic autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvajdzic, Nada; Djurdjevic, Predrag; Todorovic, Milena; Perunicic, Maja; Stojanović, Roksanda; Novkovic, Aleksandra; Mihaljevic, Biljana

    2012-09-01

    Clinical features of 40 lymphoproliferative neoplasm patients in the setting of systemic autoimmune diseases managed in the Clinic of Hematology during 1994-2006 were analyzed retrospectively. The classification of systemic autoimmune disease patients was as follows: 15 systemic lupus erythematosus--SLE, 11 rheumatoid arthritis--RA, 12 Sjögren's syndrome--SS, 1 scleroderma, and 1 dermatomyositis. Patients comprised 31 women and 9 men of mean age 55 years (range 33-76). Systemic autoimmune diseases preceeded the development of lymphoproliferative neoplasms in 37/40 (92.5%) patients. Mean latency period between the onset of systemic autoimmune diseases and lymphoproliferative neoplasms occurrence was significantly longer in RA (113 months) than in SLE (75 months) and SS patients (65 months)--P autoimmune diseases type or antirheumatic treatment P > 0.05. Our findings are in line with earlier reports showing a high proportion of patients with advanced disease, constitutional symptoms, extranodal manifestations, high grade histology, and low OS in the systemic autoimmune diseases setting.

  16. Arterial hypertension and chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Møller, S

    2005-01-01

    This review looks at the alterations in the systemic haemodynamics of patients with chronic liver disease (cirrhosis) in relation to essential hypertension and arterial hypertension of renal origin. Characteristic findings in patients with cirrhosis are vasodilatation with low overall systemic...... the development of chronic liver disease, and arterial hypertension is rarely manifested in patients with cirrhosis, even in those with renovascular disease and high circulating renin activity. There is much dispute as to the understanding of homoeostatic regulation in cirrhotic patients with manifest arterial...

  17. Obesity as a risk and severity factor in rheumatic diseases (Autoimmune Chronic inflammatory diseases-ACIDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa eGremese

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The growing body of evidence recognizing the adipose tissue as an active endocrine organ secreting bioactive mediators involved in metabolic and inflammatory disorders, together with the global epidemic of overweight and obesity, rise obesity as a hot topic of current research. The chronic state of low grade inflammation present in the obese condition and the multiple pleiotropic effects of adipokines on the immune system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory conditions including rheumatic autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. We will discuss the main relevant evidences on the role of the adipose tissue on immune and inflammatory networks and the more recent evidences regarding the effects of obesity on the incidence and outcomes of the major autoimmune chronic inflammatory diseases.

  18. Acetaldehyde Adducts in Alcoholic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashiko Setshedi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic alcohol abuse causes liver disease that progresses from simple steatosis through stages of steatohepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and eventually hepatic failure. In addition, chronic alcoholic liver disease (ALD, with or without cirrhosis, increases risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Acetaldehyde, a major toxic metabolite, is one of the principal culprits mediating fibrogenic and mutagenic effects of alcohol in the liver. Mechanistically, acetaldehyde promotes adduct formation, leading to functional impairments of key proteins, including enzymes, as well as DNA damage, which promotes mutagenesis. Why certain individuals who heavily abuse alcohol, develop HCC (7.2–15% versus cirrhosis (15–20% is not known, but genetics and co-existing viral infection are considered pathogenic factors. Moreover, adverse effects of acetaldehyde on the cardiovascular and hematologic systems leading to ischemia, heart failure, and coagulation disorders, can exacerbate hepatic injury and increase risk for liver failure. Herein, we review the role of acetaldehyde adducts in the pathogenesis of chronic ALD and HCC.

  19. [Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Monika; Weiss, Johannes; Geier, Andreas

    2015-07-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common chronic liver disease in Europe and in the USA with rising prevalence. Patients with a metabolic syndrome (diabetes mellitus, obesity, dyslipidemia) are patients at risk with the highest prevalence for NAFLD. Progression from a non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) to a non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) occurs in 5-20% of patients with the potential to develop a liver fibrosis/cirrhosis. NASH patients and NAFLD patients with higher fibrosis should be identified because they are at risk of a higher mortality. A specific treatment for NASH is not available at the moment. Therefore, the treatment of risk factors and metabolic syndrome has high priority.

  20. [Systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases in 2013: problems of laboratory diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasonov, E L; Aleksandrova, E N; Novikov, A A

    2014-01-01

    Progress in the laboratory diagnosis of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SRAD) is caused by the ever increasing clinical introduction of new highly productive methods for immune analysis using computer-aided systems and multiplex proteomic technologies. The urgent problem in the laboratory diagnosis of SRAD is the standardization of current methods for the detection of autoantibodies (autoAb), including the preparation of international reference materials for the calibration and external quality assessment of immunological assay. New autoAb technologies have a higher analytical validity than the previously used classical techniques immunodiffusion, agglutination, and immunofluorescence; however, their diagnostic sensitivity and specificity for SRAD have been poorly studied. Particular emphasis is laid on the standardization of the methods for examining antinuclear antibodies (ANAb), the major serologic marker of SRAD. According to the EULAR/ACR guidelines, indirect immunofluorescence reaction (IIFR) using human HEp-2 cells as substrate is the gold standard and a primary screening ANAb method. New methods for solid-phase analysis (enzyme immunoassay, multiplex test systems, etc.) cannot substitute the primary screening of ANAb using IIFR-HEp-2 as they identify antibodies to the limited number of antigens, increasing the number of false- negative results. The computer-aided systems for interpreting cell fluorescence tests contribute to the standardization and enhancement of the efficiency of detection of ANAb and other autoAb by IIFR. The use of complex diagnostic indices based on the multiparametric analysis of laboratory biomarkers in the serum makes it possible to most fully and objectively assess complex molecular mechanisms for the pathogenesis of SRAD, thus radically improving the early diagnosis, the estimation of the activity and severity of disease, the prediction of the outcomes of a pathological process and the response to treatment.