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Sample records for autoimmune liver disease

  1. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis. This group of tests helps your health care provider ...

  2. Autoimmune liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pietro Invernizzi; Ian R Mackay

    2008-01-01

    The liver was one of the earliest recognized sites among autoimmune diseases yet autoimmune hepatitis,primary biliary cirrhosis,primary sclerosing cholangitis,and their overlap forms,are still problematic in diagnosis and causation.The contributions herein comprise 'pairs of articles' on clinical characteristics,and concepts of etiopathogenesis,for each of the above diseases,together with childhood autoimmune liver disease,overlaps,interpretations of diagnostic serology,and liver transplantation.This issue is timely,since we are witnessing an ever increasing applicability of immunology to a wide variety of chronic diseases,hepatic and non-hepatic,in both developed and developing countries.The 11 invited expert review articles capture the changing features over recent years of the autoimmune liver diseases,the underlying immunomolecular mechanisms of development,the potent albeit still unexplained genetic influences,the expanding repertoire of immunoserological diagnostic markers,and the increasingly effective therapeutic possibilities.

  3. Autoimmune liver disease, autoimmunity and liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Marco; Neuberger, James M

    2014-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) represent the three major autoimmune liver diseases (AILD). PBC, PSC, and AIH are all complex disorders in that they result from the effects of multiple genes in combination with as yet unidentified environmental factors. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified numerous risk loci for PBC and PSC that host genes involved in innate or acquired immune responses. These loci may provide a clue as to the immune-based pathogenesis of AILD. Moreover, many significant risk loci for PBC and PSC are also risk loci for other autoimmune disorders, such type I diabetes, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis, suggesting a shared genetic basis and possibly similar molecular pathways for diverse autoimmune conditions. There is no curative treatment for all three disorders, and a significant number of patients eventually progress to end-stage liver disease requiring liver transplantation (LT). LT in this context has a favourable overall outcome with current patient and graft survival exceeding 80% at 5years. Indications are as for other chronic liver disease although recent data suggest that while lethargy improves after transplantation, the effect is modest and variable so lethargy alone is not an indication. In contrast, pruritus rapidly responds. Cholangiocarcinoma, except under rigorous selection criteria, excludes LT because of the high risk of recurrence. All three conditions may recur after transplantation and are associated with a greater risk of both acute cellular and chronic ductopenic rejection. It is possible that a crosstalk between alloimmune and autoimmune response perpetuate each other. An immunological response toward self- or allo-antigens is well recognised after LT in patients transplanted for non-autoimmune indications and sometimes termed "de novo autoimmune hepatitis". Whether this is part of the spectrum of rejection or an autoimmune

  4. Autoimmune paediatric liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgina Mieli-Vergani, Diego Vergani

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Liver disorders with a likely autoimmune pathogenesis in childhood include autoimmune hepatitis (AIH, autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC, and de novo AIH after liver transplantation. AIH is divided into two subtypes according to seropositivity for smooth muscle and/or antinuclear antibody (SMA/ANA, type 1 or liver kidney microsomal antibody (LKM1, type 2. There is a female predominance in both. LKM1 positive patients tend to present more acutely, at a younger age, and commonly have partial IgA deficiency, while duration of symptoms before diagnosis, clinical signs, family history of autoimmunity, presence of associated autoimmune disorders, response to treatment, and long-term prognosis are similar in both groups. The most common type of paediatric sclerosing cholangitis is ASC. The clinical, biochemical, immunological, and histological presentation of ASC is often indistinguishable from that of AIH type 1. In both, there are high IgG, non-organ specific autoantibodies, and interface hepatitis. Diagnosis is made by cholangiography. Children with ASC respond to immunosuppression satisfactorily and similarly to AIH in respect to remission and relapse rates, times to normalization of biochemical parameters, and decreased inflammatory activity on follow up liver biopsies. However, the cholangiopathy can progress. There may be evolution from AIH to ASC over the years, despite treatment. De novo AIH after liver transplantation affects patients not transplanted for autoimmune disorders and is strikingly reminiscent of classical AIH, including elevated titres of serum antibodies, hypergammaglobulinaemia, and histological findings of interface hepatitis, bridging fibrosis, and collapse. Like classical AIH, it responds to treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine. De novo AIH post liver transplantation may derive from interference by calcineurin inhibitors with the intrathymic physiological mechanisms of T-cell maturation and selection. Whether

  5. Autoimmune paediatric liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giorgina Mieli-Vergani; Diego Vergani

    2008-01-01

    Liver disorders with a likely autoimmune pathogenesis in childhood include autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC),and de novo AIH after liver transplantation.AIH is divided into two subtypes according to seropositivity for smooth muscle and/or antinuclear antibody (SMA/ANA,type 1) or liver kidney microsomal antibody (LKM1,type 2).There is a female predominance in both.LKM1 positive patients tend to present more acutely,at a younger age,and commonly have partial IgA deficiency,while duration of symptoms before diagnosis,clinical signs,family history of autoimmunity, presence of associated autoimmune disorders,response to treatment,and long-term prognosis are similar in both groups. The most common type of paediatric sclerosing cholangitis is ASC.The clinical,biochemical, immunological,and histological presentation of ASC is often indistinguishable from that of AIH type 1.In both,there are high IgG,non-organ specific autoantibodies,and interface hepatitis.Diagnosis is made by cholangiography.Children with ASC respond to immunosuppression satisfactorily and similarly to AIH in respect to remission and relapse rates,times to normalization of biochemical parameters, and decreased inflammatory activity on follow up liver biopsies. However,the cholangiopathy can progress.There may be evolution from AIH to ASC over the years,despite treatment.De novo AIH after liver transplantation affects patients not transplanted for autoimmune disorders and is strikingly reminiscent of classical AIH,including elevated titres of serum antibodies, hypergammaglobulinaemia,and histological findings of interface hepatitis,bridging fibrosis,and collapse.Like classical AIH,it responds to treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine.De novo AIH post liver transplantation may derive from interference by calcineurin inhibitors with the intrathymic physiological mechanisms of T-cell maturation and selection.Whether this condition is a distinct entity or a form of

  6. Transplantation in autoimmune liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marcus Mottershead; James Neuberger

    2008-01-01

    Liver transplantation remains an effective treatment for those with end-stage disease and with intractable liver-related symptoms.The shortage of organs for transplantation has resulted in the need for rationing.A variety of approaches to selection and allocation have been developed and vary from country to country.The shortage of donors has meant that new approaches have to be adopted to make maximal use of the available organs;these include splitting grafts,use of extended criteria livers,livers from nonheart-beating donors and from living donors.Post transplantation, most patients will need life-long immunosuppression,although a small proportion can have immunosuppression successfully withdrawn.Newer immunosuppressive drugs and different strategies may allow a more targeted approach with a reduction in sideeffects and so improve the patient and graft survival.For autoimmune diseases, transplantation is associated with significant improvement in the quality and length of life.Disease may recur after transplantation and may affect patient and graft survival.

  7. Worldwide Incidence of Autoimmune Liver Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Peter; Grønbæk, Lisbet; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The variation that occurs in the incidence patterns of autoimmune liver diseases may provide insight into the risk factors causing the diseases. We systematically reviewed studies on the incidence of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing...... England. Most studies of PSC found incidence rates around 1 per 100,000 population per year, but there were no incident cases among 100,000 Alaska natives during the period 1984-2000. The incidence of IAC remains unknown. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of the autoimmune liver diseases is around 1-2 per 100......,000 population per year for each disease. The variation in incidence over time and place suggests that there are differences in the prevalence of risk factors for the diseases, but the studies used different methods and so it is difficult to draw firm conclusions. We recommend that groups of investigators...

  8. Overlap syndromes among autoimmune liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christian Rust; Ulrich Beuers

    2008-01-01

    The three major immune disorders of the liver are autoimmune hepatitis (AIH),primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC).Variant forms of these diseases are generally called overlap syndromes,although there has been no standardised definition.Patients with overlap syndromes present with both hepatitic and cholestatic serum liver tests and have histological features of AIH and PBC or PSC.The AIH-PBC overlap syndrome is the most common form,affecting almost 10% of adults with AIH or PBC.Single cases of AIH and autoimmune cholangitis (AMA-negative PBC) overlap syndrome have also been reported.The AIH-PSC overlap syndrome is predominantly found in children,adolescents and young adults with AIH or PSC.Interestingly,transitions from one autoimmune to another have also been reported in a minority of patients,especially transitions from PBC to AIH-PBC overlap syndrome.Overlap syndromes show a progressive course towards liver cirrhosis and liver failure without treatment.Therapy for overlap syndromes is empiric,since controlled trials are not available in these rare disorders.Anticholestatic therapy with ursodeoxycholic acid is usually combined with immunosuppressive therapy with corticosteroids and/or azathioprine in both AIH-PBC and AIH-PSC overlap syndromes.In end-stage disease,liver transplantation is the treatment of choice.

  9. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies (ANCA) in autoimmune liver diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozendaal, C.; Kallenberg, Cees

    1999-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA) are autoantibodies directed against cytoplasmic constituents of neutrophil granulocytes and monocytes. ANCA have been detected in serum from patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (mainly ulcerative colitis) and autoimmune mediated liver diseases (mainl

  10. Low Serum Hepcidin in Patients with Autoimmune Liver Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Lyberopoulou, Aggeliki; Chachami, Georgia; Gatselis, Nikolaos K.; Kyratzopoulou, Eleni; Saitis, Asterios; Gabeta, Stella; Eliades, Petros; Paraskeva, Efrosini; Zachou, Kalliopi; Koukoulis, George K.; Mamalaki, Avgi; Dalekos, George N; Simos, George

    2015-01-01

    Hepcidin, a liver hormone, is important for both innate immunity and iron metabolism regulation. As dysfunction of the hepcidin pathway may contribute to liver pathology, we analysed liver hepcidin mRNA and serum hepcidin in patients with chronic liver diseases. Hepcidin mRNA levels were determined in liver biopsies obtained from 126 patients with HCV (n = 21), HBV (n = 23), autoimmune cholestatic disease (primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis; PBC/PSC; n = 34), autoimm...

  11. Markers of autoimmune liver diseases in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umit Secil Demirdal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Osteoporosis is a common complication of chronic liver diseases. However, there is limited information about autoimmune liver diseases as a factor of secondary osteoporosis. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the autoantibodies of autoimmune liver diseases in patients with osteoporosis. METHODS: One hundred fifty female patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis were included. Bone mineral density was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. We analysized autoantibodies including antinuclear antibodies, liver membrane antibodies, anti-liver/kidney microsomal autoantibodies1, liver-specific protein, antismooth muscle antibodies, and anti-mitochondrial antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence. Serum was assayed for the levels of aminotransferases. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 63,13±8,6 years. The mean values of L1-L4 T-scores and femur total T-scores were -3,08±0,58 and -1,53±0,81, respectively. Among the 150 patients with osteoporosis, 14 (9.3% were antinuclear antibodies, four (2.7% were liver membrane antibodies, three (2.0% were anti-liver/kidney microsomal autoantibodies1, and two (1.3% were liver-specific protein positive. None of the patients had anti-mitochondrial antibodies or smooth muscle antibodies positivity. The mean values of levels of aminotransferases were within normal range. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of liver membrane antibodies, liver-specific protein, and anti-liver/kidney microsomal autoantibodies1 has permitted us to see that there may be some suspicious clues of autoimmune liver diseases in patients with osteoporosis as a secondary risk factor. On the other hand, there is a need for comprehensive studies with a larger sample size and studies designed to compare the results with a normal population to understand the clinical importance of our findings.

  12. NK Cell Subtypes as Regulators of Autoimmune Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    As major components of innate immunity, NK cells not only exert cell-mediated cytotoxicity to destroy tumors or infected cells, but also act to regulate the functions of other cells in the immune system by secreting cytokines and chemokines. Thus, NK cells provide surveillance in the early defense against viruses, intracellular bacteria, and cancer cells. However, the effecter function of NK cells must be exquisitely controlled to prevent inadvertent attack against normal “self” cells. In an organ such as the liver, where the distinction between immunotolerance and immune defense against routinely processed pathogens is critical, the plethora of NK cells has a unique role in the maintenance of homeostasis. Once self-tolerance is broken, autoimmune liver disease resulted. NK cells act as a “two-edged weapon” and even play opposite roles with both regulatory and inducer activities in the hepatic environment. That is, NK cells act not only to produce inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, but also to alter the proliferation and activation of associated lymphocytes. However, the precise regulatory mechanisms at work in autoimmune liver diseases remain to be identified. In this review, we focus on recent research with NK cells and their potential role in the development of autoimmune liver disease. PMID:27462349

  13. [Auto-immune liver diseases and their treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, J; Thorens, J; Pache, I; Troillet, F X; Moradpour, D; Gonvers, J J

    2005-01-19

    There are three main types of auto-immune liver disease, auto-immune hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis. In the case of auto-immune hepatitis, prednisone therapy, with or without azathioprine, can improve quality of life and halt progression to cirrhosis. If there is no response or if the therapy is poorly tolerated, mycophenolate mofetil or cyclosporin should be considered. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), at a dosage of 13 to 15 mg/kg/day slows the progression of fibrosis in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. Pruritus may be treated with cholestyramine, rifampicin or opiate antagonists. Ursodeoxycholic acid at a dosage of 20 to 30 mg/kg/day will slow the evolution of fibrosis. PMID:15770819

  14. Recurrence of autoimmune liver disease and inflammatory bowel disease after pediatric liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Vergani, Diego; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina

    2016-09-01

    Approximately 10% of children with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and 30% of those with sclerosing cholangitis (SC) require liver transplantation (LT). LT is indicated in patients who present with fulminant hepatic failure (ie, with encephalopathy) and in those who develop end-stage liver disease despite treatment. After LT, recurrent AIH is reported in approximately 30% of patients and recurrent SC in up to 50%. Diagnosis of recurrence is based on biochemical abnormalities, seropositivity for autoantibodies, interface hepatitis on histology, steroid dependence, and, for SC, presence of cholangiopathy. Recurrence of SC after LT is often associated with poorly controlled inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Recurrence may even appear years after LT; therefore, steroid-based immunosuppression should be maintained at a higher dose than that used for patients transplanted for nonautoimmune liver diseases. Although the impact of recurrent disease on graft function is controversial, it seems that in pediatric LT recipients recurrence of AIH or SC is associated with compromised graft survival. Exacerbation of preexistent IBD may be observed after LT for SC or AIH, and IBD appears to have a more aggressive course than before LT. In addition, IBD can develop de novo following LT. Liver Transplantation 22 1275-1283 2016 AASLD. PMID:27257963

  15. Diagnostic utility of IgG and IgM immunohistochemistry in autoimmune liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roger; Klein; Moreira; Frank; Revetta; Elizabeth; Koehler; Mary; Kay; Washington

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To assess the role of IgM and IgG immunohistochemistry(IHC) in the evaluation of autoimmune liver conditions-autoimmune hepatitis(AIH),primary biliary cirrhosis(PBC),and primary sclerosing cholangitis(PSC).METHODS:Forty one biopsies from untreated patients diagnosed with autoimmune liver disease(AIH,n = 20;PBC,n = 13;PSC,n = 8) and fourteen biopsies of patients with chronic hepatitis C were selected.IgM and IgG-positive plasma cells were counted in each sample.RESULTS:A predominance of IgG-positive plas...

  16. Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Some examples of CAM are herbal products, chiropractic , acupuncture , and hypnosis . If you have an autoimmune disease, ... Toll-Free: 877-226-4267 National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, NIH, HHS Phone: ...

  17. Autoimmune BSEP disease: disease recurrence after liver transplantation for progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubitz, Ralf; Dröge, Carola; Kluge, Stefanie; Stross, Claudia; Walter, Nathalie; Keitel, Verena; Häussinger, Dieter; Stindt, Jan

    2015-06-01

    Severe cholestasis may result in end-stage liver disease with the need of liver transplantation (LTX). In children, about 10 % of LTX are necessary because of cholestatic liver diseases. Apart from bile duct atresia, three types of progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) are common causes of severe cholestasis in children. The three subtypes of PFIC are defined by the involved genes: PFIC-1, PFIC-2, and PFIC-3 are due to mutations of P-type ATPase ATP8B1 (familial intrahepatic cholestasis 1, FIC1), the ATP binding cassette transporter ABCB11 (bile salt export pump, BSEP), or ABCB4 (multidrug resistance protein 3, MDR3), respectively. All transporters are localized in the canalicular membrane of hepatocytes and together mediate bile salt and phospholipid transport. In some patients with PFIC-2 disease, recurrence has been observed after LTX, which mimics a PFIC phenotype. It could be shown by several groups that inhibitory anti-BSEP antibodies emerge, which most likely cause disease recurrence. The prevalence of severe BSEP mutations (e.g., splice site and premature stop codon mutations) is very high in this group of patients. These mutations often result in the complete absence of BSEP, which likely accounts for an insufficient auto-tolerance against BSEP. Although many aspects of this "new" disease are not fully elucidated, the possibility of anti-BSEP antibody formation has implications for the pre- and posttransplant management of PFIC-2 patients. This review will summarize the current knowledge including diagnosis, pathomechanisms, and management of "autoimmune BSEP disease." PMID:25342496

  18. Autoimmune liver disease and the Canadian First Nations Aboriginal Communities of British Columbia's Pacific Northwest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eric M Yoshida; Mark Riley; Laura T Arbour

    2006-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a well-known but uncommon chronic liver disease that is presumed to be of autoimmune etiology. Recently, investigations in British Columbia (BC), a province of Canada situated along the Pacific North-West of North America, have suggested that PBC is not a rare disease amongst BC's Aboriginal (i.e. First Nations) communities. Geographically, BC is adjacent to South East Alaska, an American state that has also reported an increased prevalence of PBC amongst its Aboriginal communities. In this article, the medical evidence supporting a hypothesis of increased risk of PBC amongst BC's First Nations communities is reviewed. Evidence suggesting that autoimmune hepatitis is also more likely amongst BC's First Nations communities is also presented.(C)2006 The WJG Press. All rights reserved.

  19. A case of cholestatic autoimmune hepatitis and acute liver failure: an unusual hepatic manifestation of mixed connective tissue disease and Sjögren's syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Min, J. K.; Han, N. I.; Kim, J. A; Lee, Y. S.; Cho, C.S.; Kim, H. Y.

    2001-01-01

    Although hepatomegaly is reported to occur occasionally in patients with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) or Sjögren's syndrome (SS), autoimmune liver diseases such as primary biliary cirrhosis, sclerosing cholangitis, and autoimmune hepatitis in association with MCTD or SS have rarely been described. We report a case of severe cholestatic autoimmune hepatitis presenting with acute liver failure in a 40-yr-old female patient suffering from MCTD and SS. The diagnosis of MCTD and SS was m...

  20. Autoimmune disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    2005164 Optimal cut-point of glutamic acid decar-boxylase antibody (GAD-Ab) for differentiating two subtypes of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA). LI Xia(李霞), et al. Dept Endocrinol, 2nd Xiangya Hosp, Central South Univ, Changsha, 410011. Chin J Diabetes, 2005;13(1) :34-38. Objective: To investigate the optimal cut-point of glutamate decarboxylase antibody (GAD-Ab) for differentiating two subtypes of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (I. ADA). Methods: The frequency

  1. SOME THEORETICAL ASPECTS OF COMPLEX CLINICAL-PSYCHOLOGICAL INVESTIGATION OF PATIENTS WITH AUTOIMMUNE LIVER DISEASES IN CIRRHOTIC STAGE BEFORE LIVER TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Gerasimova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents preliminary results of complex clinical-psychological investigation of patients with autoim- mune liver diseases with cirrhosis waiting for liver transplant. The data discussed defense role of anxiety com- bined with other emotional affective disorders, psychological mechanisms in combination with coping strategies of stress-overcoming behavior in the state of disease and their involvement in formation of the clinical picture of the disease. It considers the need for differential diagnosis of the pathology using modern experimental- psychological methods in connection with further building of psychological aid to patients with autoimmune liver diseases

  2. Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find an ENT Doctor Near You Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease Patient Health Information ... with a hearing loss. How Does the Healthy Ear Work? The ear has three main parts: the ...

  3. Clinical heterogeneity in autoimmune acute liver failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Norberto C Chavez-Tapia; Julio Martinez-Salgado; Julio Granados; Misael Uribe; Felix I Tellez-Avila

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To describe the outcome and prognosis in a cohort of patients with acute liver failure due to autoimmune hepatitis without liver transplantation.METHODS:A retrospective trial was conducted in 11 patients with acute liver failure due to autoimmune hepatitis who attended the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran. Demographic,biochemical and severity indexes,and treatment and outcome were assessed.RESULTS: Among the 11 patients, with a median age of 31 years, 72% had inflammatory response syndrome, and six patients received corticosteroids.The mortality rate within four weeks was 56%, and the one-year survival was 27%. In the survivors, severity indexes were lower and 83% received corticosteroids.CONCLUSION:We observed a relatively high survival rate in patients with acute liver failure due to autoimmune hepatitis. This survival rate could be influenced by severity of the disease and/or use of corticosteroids.

  4. Liver in systemic disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Potential causes of abnormal liver function tests include viral hepatitis, alcohol intake, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, autoimmune liver diseases, hereditary diseases, hepatobiliary malignancies or infection, gallstones and drug-induced liver injury. Moreover, the liver may be involved in systemic diseases that mainly affect other organs. Therefore, in patients without etiology of liver injury by screening serology and diagnostic imaging, but who have systemic diseases, the abnormal liver function test results might be caused by the systemic disease. In most of these patients, the systemic disease should be treated primarily. However, some patients with systemic disease and severe liver injury or fulminant hepatic failure require intensive treatments of the liver.

  5. Bistability in autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas; Mosekilde, Erik; Lund, Ole

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases damage host tissue, which, in turn, may trigger a stronger immune response. Systems characterized by such positive feedback loops can display co-existing stable steady states. In a mathematical model of autoimmune disease, one steady state may correspond to the healthy state and...... another to an autoimmune steady state characterized by widespread tissue damage and immune activation. We show how a triggering event may move the system from the healthy to the autoimmune state and how transient immunosuppressive treatment can move the system back to the healthy state....

  6. Questions and Answers on Autoimmunity and Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dermatomyositis . What are some of the treatments for autoimmune diseases? Of first importance in treating any autoimmune disease ... being researched. What is the family connection in autoimmune diseases? The ability to develop an autoimmune disease is ...

  7. American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Its 25th Anniversary With #25FOR25 Campaign During National Autoimmune Disease Awareness Month AARDA officially kicks of National Autoimmune ... will benefit AARDA. Click here to read more. Autoimmune Disease Awareness Month AARDA and the NCAPG held two ...

  8. Celiac disease and autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ch'ng, Chin Lye; Jones, M Keston; Kingham, Jeremy G C

    2007-10-01

    Celiac disease (CD) or gluten sensitive enteropathy is relatively common in western populations with prevalence around 1%. With the recent availability of sensitive and specific serological testing, many patients who are either asymptomatic or have subtle symptoms can be shown to have CD. Patients with CD have modest increases in risks of malignancy and mortality compared to controls. The mortality among CD patients who comply poorly with a gluten-free diet is greater than in compliant patients. The pattern of presentation of CD has altered over the past three decades. Many cases are now detected in adulthood during investigation of problems as diverse as anemia, osteoporosis, autoimmune disorders, unexplained neurological syndromes, infertility and chronic hypertransaminasemia of uncertain cause. Among autoimmune disorders, increased prevalence of CD has been found in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus, autoimmune liver diseases and inflammatory bowel disease. Prevalence of CD was noted to be 1% to 19% in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, 2% to 5% in autoimmune thyroid disorders and 3% to 7% in primary biliary cirrhosis in prospective studies. Conversely, there is also an increased prevalence of immune based disorders among patients with CD. The pathogenesis of co-existent autoimmune thyroid disease and CD is not known, but these conditions share similar HLA haplotypes and are associated with the gene encoding cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4. Screening high risk patients for CD, such as those with autoimmune diseases, is a reasonable strategy given the increased prevalence. Treatment of CD with a gluten-free diet should reduce the recognized complications of this disease and provide benefits in both general health and perhaps life expectancy. It also improves glycemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and enhances the absorption of medications for associated hypothyroidism and osteoporosis. It

  9. Sirolimus for Autoimmune Disease of Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-22

    Autoimmune Pancytopenia; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS); Evans Syndrome; Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune; Autoimmune Neutropenia; Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic; Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Rheumatoid Arthritis

  10. Autoimmunity in Addison's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Martorell, P; Roep, B O; Smit, J W A; Martorell, P M

    2002-08-01

    Addison's disease has a low incidence and is most frequently the result of an autoimmune disease in developed countries. Addison's disease can present as an isolated entity or in combination with other autoimmune diseases: Addison's disease can be part of the distinct polyglandular autoimmune syndromes APS I and II. Autoantibodies in patients with isolated Addison's disease are directed against the enzymes involved in steroid synthesis, P45oc21, P45oscc and P45oc17. Addison's disease, both isolated and in the context of APS II, has been associated with the haplotype HLA-A1, -B8 and DR3. The value of the increased expression of these molecules on adrenocortical cells could point towards an infectious pathogenesis. Given the prevalence, up to 80 %, of autoantibodies in Addison's disease as well as the high predictive value for developing the disease when antibodies are present (41% in three years), we advise screening high-risk populations, such as patients with other autoimmune endocrinopathies or their relatives for the presence of these antibodies. The adrenocortical function of patients positive for antibodies should be followed yearly. PMID:12430572

  11. Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-) genetic polymorphisms and the risk of autoimmune liver disease: a meta-analysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shan Li; Xiamei Huang; Huizhi Zhong; Zhiping Chen; Qiliu Peng; Yan Deng; Xue Qin

    2013-12-01

    Epidemiological studies have evaluated the association between tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-)-308G/A and (TNF-)-238G/A polymorphisms, and the risk of autoimmune liver disease (AILD), yet the results are conflicting. To derive a more precise estimation of the relationship, we performed this meta-analysis. A systematic review was conducted to identify all eligible studies of TNF- polymorphisms and AILD risk. We used odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to assess the strength of the association between the two TNF- polymorphisms and AILD risk. A total of 15 eligible studies were identified. Overall, positive associations of -308G/A polymorphism with AILD risk were found (A vs G allele: OR = 1.45, 95%,CI = 1.13–1.86; AA vs GG: OR = 2.74, 95%,CI = 1.51–4.96; GA vs GG: OR = 1.46, 95%,CI = 1.11–1.92; dominant model: OR = 1.57, 95%,CI = 1.18–2.10; recessive model: OR = 2.22, 95%,CI = 1.31–3.76). In subgroup analysis by ethnicity, a significantly higher risk was found in Caucasians. In subgroup analysis by AILD category, significant association was observed in autoimmune hepatitis and primary sclerosing cholangitis, especially in Caucasians. Patients carrying TNF--238A allele had a slightly decreased risk of developing AILD (OR = 0.65, 95%,CI = 0.48–0.87). However, we found both TNF- polymorphisms were not associated with primary biliary cirrhosis risk, even in subgroup analysis. Our metaanalysis suggests that the TNF--308G/A and -238G/A polymorphisms may contribute to AILD susceptibility in Caucasians, especially for autoimmune hepatitis and primary sclerosing cholangitis. Nevertheless, we found both TNF- polymorphisms were unlikely to be associated with the risk of primary biliary cirrhosis.

  12. Research Progress of Liver Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Lie-ming; JIA Ji-dong

    2005-01-01

    @@ Liver diseases are widespread in China.The disease mostly includes viral hepatitis,alcoholic or non alcoholic fatty degeneration or steatohepatitis, autoimmune liver disease,hepatic fibrosis/cirrhosis and hepatic cancer.The mechanism of most liver diseases was studied clearly in developed countries.

  13. Progression of Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Browse Related Terms Progression of Liver Disease , Family History of Liver Disease , Liver Wellness , Liver Failure , Liver Biopsy Home > Your Liver > Liver Disease Information > The Progression ...

  14. [Diagnostics of autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beleznay, Zsuzsanna; Regenass, Stephan

    2008-09-01

    Autoantibodies play a key role in diagnostic laboratories as markers of autoimmune diseases. In addition to their role as markers they mediate diverse effects in vivo. Autoantibodies with protective effect have been described. Natural protective IgM autoantibodies against tumour-antigens of malignant cells or their precursors may contribute to increased survival rates of carcinoma patients. In a mouse model of systemic lupus erythematosus it has been shown that anti-dsDNA IgM autoantibodies protect from glomerular damage. In contrast, a direct pathogenic role of autoantibodies has been well established e.g. in myasthenia gravis or in Goodpasture syndrome. Similarly autoantibodies against SSA Ro52 are detrimental in neonatal lupus erythematosus with congenital heart block. Moreover, putatively protective autoantibodies may become pathogenic during the course of the disease such as the onconeuronal autoantibodies whose pathogenicity depends on their compartmentalisation. In patients with paraneoplastic syndromes tumour cells express proteins that are also naturally present in the brain. Anti-tumour autoantibodies which temporarily suppress tumour growth can provoke an autoimmune attack on neurons once having crossed the blood-brain barrier and cause specific neurological symptoms. Only a restricted number of autoantibodies are useful follow-up markers for the effectiveness of treatment in autoimmune diseases. Certain autoantibodies hold prognostic value and appear years or even decades before the diagnosis of disease such as the antimitochondrial antibodies in primary biliary cirrhosis or anti-citrullinated protein (CCP)-antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis. It is crucial to know whether the autoantibodies in question recognise linear or conformational epitopes in order to choose the appropriate detection methods. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy remains a very useful tool for confirmation of results of commercially available immunoassays and for detection of

  15. Autoimmune thyroid disease and other non-endocrine autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Todorović-Đilas Ljiljana; Ičin Tijana; Novaković-Paro Jovanka; Bajkin Ivana

    2011-01-01

    Introduction, Autoimmune diseases are chronic conditions initiated by the loss of immunological tolerance to self-antigens. They constitute heterogeneous group of disorders, in which multiple alterations in the immune system result in a spectrum of syndromes that either target specific organs or affect the body systematically. Recent epidemiological studies have shown a possible shift of one autoimmune disease to another or the fact that more than one autoimmune disease may coexist in a...

  16. Infections and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Jean-François

    2005-01-01

    The high percentage of disease-discordant pairs of monozygotic twins demonstrates the central role of environmental factors in the etiology of autoimmune diseases. Efforts were first focussed on the search for triggering factors. The study of animal models has clearly shown that infections may trigger autoimmune diseases, as in the case of Coxsackie B4 virus in type I diabetes and the encephalomyocarditis virus in autoimmune myositis, two models in which viruses are thought to act by increasing immunogenicity of autoantigens secondary to local inflammation. The induction of a Guillain-Barré syndrome in rabbits after immunization with a peptide derived from Campylobacter jejuni is explained by mimicry between C. jejuni antigens and peripheral nerve axonal antigens. Other models involve chemical modification of autoantigens, as in the case of iodine-induced autoimmune thyroiditis. These mechanisms have so far only limited clinical counterparts (rheumatic fever, Guillain-Barré syndrome and drug-induced lupus or myasthenia gravis) but one may assume that unknown viruses may be at the origin of a number of chronic autoimmune diseases, such as type I diabetes and multiple sclerosis) as illustrated by the convergent data incriminating IFN-alpha in the pathophysiology of type I diabetes and systemic lupus erythematosus. Perhaps the difficulties met in identifying the etiologic viruses are due to the long lag time between the initial causal infection and onset of clinical disease. More surprisingly, infections may also protect from autoimmune diseases. Western countries are being confronted with a disturbing increase in the incidence of most immune disorders, including autoimmune and allergic diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, and some lymphocyte malignancies. Converging epidemiological evidence indicates that this increase is linked to improvement of the socio-economic level of these countries, posing the question of the causal relationship and more precisely the

  17. Liver Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your liver is the largest organ inside your body. It helps your body digest food, store energy, and remove poisons. There are many kinds of liver diseases. Viruses cause some of them, like hepatitis ...

  18. Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Francesca Crea; Carla Bizzarri; Marco Cappa

    2011-01-01

    The two major autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs) include Graves' disease (GD) and autoimmune thyroiditis (AT); both of which are characterized by infiltration of the thyroid by T and B cells reactive to thyroid antigens, by the production of thyroid autoantibodies and by abnormal thyroid function (hyperthyroidism in GD and hypothyroidism in AT). While the exact etiology of thyroid autoimmunity is not known, it is believed to develop when a combination of genetic susceptibility and environment...

  19. Autoimmune diseases and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komrokji, Rami S; Kulasekararaj, Austin; Al Ali, Najla H; Kordasti, Shahram; Bart-Smith, Emily; Craig, Benjamin M; Padron, Eric; Zhang, Ling; Lancet, Jeffrey E; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; List, Alan F; Mufti, Ghulam J; Epling-Burnette, Pearlie K

    2016-05-01

    Immune dysregulation and altered T-cell hemostasis play important roles in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Recent studies suggest an increased risk of MDS among patients with autoimmune diseases. Here, we investigated the prevalence of autoimmune diseases among MDS patients, comparing characteristics and outcomes in those with and without autoimmune diseases. From our study group of 1408 MDS patients, 391 (28%) had autoimmune disease, with hypothyroidism being the most common type, accounting for 44% (n = 171) of patients (12% among all MDS patients analyzed). Other autoimmune diseases with ≥5% prevalence included idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in 12% (n = 46), rheumatoid arthritis in 10% (n = 41), and psoriasis in 7% (n = 28) of patients. Autoimmune diseases were more common in female MDS patients, those with RA or RCMD WHO subtype, and those who were less dependent on red blood cell transfusion. Median overall survival (OS) was 60 months (95% CI, 50-70) for patients with autoimmune diseases versus 45 months (95% CI, 40-49) for those without (log-rank test, P = 0.006). By multivariate analysis adjusting for revised IPSS and age >60 years, autoimmune diseases were a statistically significant independent factor for OS (HR 0.78; 95% CI, 0.66-0.92; P = 0.004). The rate of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) transformation was 23% (n = 89) in MDS patients with autoimmune disease versus 30% (n = 301) in those without (P = 0.011). Patient groups did not differ in response to azacitidine or lenalidomide treatment. Autoimmune diseases are prevalent among MDS patients. MDS patients with autoimmune diseases have better OS and less AML transformation. Am. J. Hematol. 91:E280-E283, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26875020

  20. Mast Cell and Autoimmune Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Yunzhi Xu; Guangjie Chen

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are important in innate immune system. They have been appreciated as potent contributors to allergic reaction. However, increasing evidence implicates the important role of mast cells in autoimmune disease like rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Here we review the current stage of knowledge about mast cells in autoimmune diseases.

  1. Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Children with Autoimmune Hepatitis and vice versa

    OpenAIRE

    Najafi, Mehri; Sadjadei, Nooshin; Eftekhari, Kambiz; Khodadad, Ahmad; Motamed, Farzaneh; Fallahi, Gholam-Hossain; Farahmand, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder in which the risk of autoimmune liver disease is high. Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic and progressive entity and the risk of its being associated with other autoimmune disorders such as celiac disease is high also. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with autoimmune hepatitis and vice versa. Methods: In a cross-sectional study children with autoimmune hepatitis underwent serological screenin...

  2. AUTOIMMUNE EPIDERMAL BLISTERING DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune bullous skin diseases (ABDs are uncommon, potentially fatal diseases of skin and mucous membranes which are associated with deposits of autoantibodies and complement against distinct molecules of the epidermis and dermal/epidermal basement membrane zone (BMZ. These autoantibodies lead to a loss in skin molecular integrity, which manifests clinically as formation of blisters or erosions. In pemphigus vulgaris, loss of adhesion occurs within the epidermis. The pioneering work of Ernst H. Beutner, Ph.D. and Robert E. Jordon, M.D. confirmed the autoimmune nature of these diseases. Walter F. Lever, M.D. contributed significantly to our understanding of the histopathologic features of these diseases. Walter Lever, M.D. and Ken Hashimoto, M.D. contributed electron microscopic studies of these diseases, especially in pemphigus vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid. In bullous pemphigoid (BP, linear IgA bullous dermatosis, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA and dermatitis herpetiformis (DH, loss of adhesion takes place within or underneath the BMZ. Classic EBA demonstrates extensive skin fragility; DH is commonly associated with gluten-sensitive enteropathy, and manifests clinically with pruritic papulovesicles on the extensor surfaces of the extremities and the lumbosacral area. The clinical spectrum of bullous pemphigoid includes tense blisters, urticarial plaques, and prurigo-like eczematous lesions. Pemphigoid gestationis mostly occurs during the last trimester of pregnancy, and mucous membrane pemphigoid primarily involves the oral mucosa and conjunctivae and leads to scarring. Linear IgA bullous dermatosis manifests with tense blisters in a „cluster of jewels”-like pattern in childhood (chronic bullous disease of childhood and is more clinically heterogeneous in adulthood. Many of the autoantigens in these disorders are known and have been well characterized. ABDs may be influenced by both genetic and exogenous factors. The diagnoses of

  3. Sex differences in autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voskuhl Rhonda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Women are more susceptible to a variety of autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, multiple sclerosis (MS, primary biliary cirrhosis, rheumatoid arthritis and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. This increased susceptibility in females compared to males is also present in animal models of autoimmune diseases such as spontaneous SLE in (NZBxNZWF1 and NZM.2328 mice, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE in SJL mice, thyroiditis, Sjogren's syndrome in MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr mice and diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice. Indeed, being female confers a greater risk of developing these diseases than any single genetic or environmental risk factor discovered to date. Understanding how the state of being female so profoundly affects autoimmune disease susceptibility would accomplish two major goals. First, it would lead to an insight into the major pathways of disease pathogenesis and, secondly, it would likely lead to novel treatments which would disrupt such pathways.

  4. Epigenetic alterations underlying autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslani, Saeed; Mahmoudi, Mahdi; Karami, Jafar; Jamshidi, Ahmad Reza; Malekshahi, Zahra; Nicknam, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-03-01

    Recent breakthroughs in genetic explorations have extended our understanding through discovery of genetic patterns subjected to autoimmune diseases (AID). Genetics, on the contrary, has not answered all the conundrums to describe a comprehensive explanation of causal mechanisms of disease etiopathology with regard to the function of environment, sex, or aging. The other side of the coin, epigenetics which is defined by gene manifestation modification without DNA sequence alteration, reportedly has come in to provide new insights towards disease apprehension through bridging the genetics and environmental factors. New investigations in genetic and environmental contributing factors for autoimmunity provide new explanation whereby the interactions between genetic elements and epigenetic modifications signed by environmental agents may be responsible for autoimmune disease initiation and perpetuation. It is aimed through this article to review recent progress attempting to reveal how epigenetics associates with the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. PMID:26761426

  5. Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease (AIED)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to order. Mention “VEDA” to receive a 15% discount. Paid Advertisement Disclaimer Information on this website is ... treatment of autoimmune inner ear disease. Although drug companies are not directly studying treatments for inner ear ...

  6. Estrogens and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Capellino, Silvia; Sulli, Alberto; Serioli, Bruno; Secchi, Maria Elena; Villaggio, Barbara; Straub, Rainer H

    2006-11-01

    Sex hormones are implicated in the immune response, with estrogens as enhancers at least of the humoral immunity and androgens and progesterone (and glucocorticoids) as natural immune-suppressors . Several physiological, pathological, and therapeutic conditions may change the serum estrogen milieu and/or peripheral conversion rate, including the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, postpartum period, menopause, being elderly, chronic stress, altered circadian rhythms, inflammatory cytokines, and use of corticosteroids, oral contraceptives, and steroid hormonal replacements, inducing altered androgen/estrogen ratios and related effects. In particular, cortisol and melatonin circadian rhythms are altered, at least in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and partially involve sex hormone circadian synthesis and levels as well. Abnormal regulation of aromatase activity (i.e., increased activity) by inflammatory cytokine production (i.e., TNF-alpha, IL-1, and IL-6) may partially explain the abnormalities of peripheral estrogen synthesis in RA (i.e., increased availability of 17-beta estradiol and possible metabolites in synovial fluids) and in systemic lupus erythematosus, as well as the altered serum sex-hormone levels and ratio (i.e., decreased androgens and DHEAS). In the synovial fluids of RA patients, the increased estrogen concentration is observed in both sexes and is more specifically characterized by the hydroxylated forms, in particular 16alpha-hydroxyestrone, which is a mitogenic and cell proliferative endogenous hormone. Local effects of sex hormones in autoimmune rheumatic diseases seems to consist mainly in modulation of cell proliferation and cytokine production (i.e., TNF-alpha, Il-1, IL-12). In this respect, it is interesting that male patients with RA seem to profit more from anti-TNFalpha strategies than do female patients. PMID:17261796

  7. Liver Injury with Features Mimicking Autoimmune Hepatitis following the Use of Black Cohosh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Grace; Kallwitz, Eric R; Wojewoda, Christina; Chennuri, Rohini; Berkes, Jamie; Layden, Thomas J; Cotler, Scott J

    2009-01-01

    There are a growing number of cases detailing acute hepatic necrosis in patients taking black cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa), an over-the-counter herbal supplement for management of menopausal symptoms. Our aim is to illustrate two cases of liver injury following the use of black cohosh characterized by histopathological features mimicking autoimmune hepatitis. Both patients reported black cohosh use for at least six months and had no evidence of another cause of liver disease. Their liver biopsies showed a component of centrilobular necrosis consistent with severe drug-induced liver injury. In addition, the biopsies showed characteristics of autoimmune-like liver injury with an interface hepatitis dominated by plasma cells. Although serum markers for autoimmune hepatitis were not particularly elevated, both patients responded to corticosteroids, supporting an immune-mediated component to the liver injury. Liver injury following the use of black cohosh should be included in the list of differential diagnoses for chronic hepatitis with features mimicking autoimmune hepatitis. PMID:20130783

  8. [Infectious agents and autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebeling-Navarro, C; Madrid-Marina, V; Camarena-Medellín, B E; Peralta-Zaragoza, O; Barrera, R

    1992-01-01

    In this paper the molecular aspects of the relationships between infectious agents and autoimmune diseases, the mechanisms of immune response to infectious agents, and the more recent hypotheses regarding the cause of autoimmune diseases are discussed. The antigens are processed and selected by their immunogenicity, and presented by HLA molecules to the T cell receptor. These events initiate the immune response with the activation and proliferation of T-lymphocytes. Although there are several hypotheses regarding the cause of autoimmune diseases and too many findings against and in favor of them, there is still no conclusive data. All these hypothesis and findings are discussed in the context of the more recent advances. PMID:1615352

  9. Possible beneift of splenectomy in liver transplantation for autoimmune hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Tian Xu; De-Jie Liu; Fan-Ying Meng; Guang-Bing Li; Jun Liu

    2014-01-01

    Liver transplantation for autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is usually successful with excellent long-term outcomes, but primary disease may recur. The recurrence of AIH is a signiifcant cause of graft loss. This study was to analyze the effect of splenectomy in preventing AIH relapse. The clinical courses of 12 patients who had transplantation for AIH were analyzed retrospectively. All patients were subjected to transplantation for end-stage liver disease caused by chronic AIH. Based on the duration of immunosuppressive treatment before liver transplantation, simultaneous splenectomy was performed in ten patients. Two patients underwent liver transplantation without splenectomy, one of them developed recurrent AIH and died from graft failure caused by AIH relapse. However, no episode of AIH recurrence was observed in patients who had undergone simultaneous splenectomy. Splenectomy might be an option to prevent AIH relapse in some patients with high risk factors.

  10. Modeling toxicodynamic effects of trichloroethylene on liver in mouse model of autoimmune hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, Kathleen M.; Reisfeld, Brad; Zurlinden, Todd; Kreps, Meagan N.; Erickson, Stephen W.; Blossom, Sarah J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic exposure to industrial solvent and water pollutant trichloroethylene (TCE) in female MRL+/+ mice generates disease similar to human autoimmune hepatitis. The current study was initiated to investigate why TCE-induced autoimmunity targeted the liver. Compared to other tissues the liver has an unusually robust capacity for repair and regeneration. This investigation examined both time-dependent and dose-dependent effects of TCE on hepatoprotective and pro-inflammatory events in liver an...

  11. Autoimmune liver serology: Current diagnostic and clinical challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios P Bogdanos, Pietro Invernizzi, Ian R Mackay, Diego Vergani

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Liver-related autoantibodies are crucial for the correct diagnosis and classification of autoimmune liver diseases (AiLD, namely autoimmune hepatitis types 1 and 2 (AIH-1 and 2, primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC, and the sclerosing cholangitis variants in adults and children. AIH-1 is specified by anti-nuclear antibody (ANA and smooth muscle antibody (SMA. AIH-2 is specified by antibody to liver kidney microsomal antigen type-1 (anti-LKM1 and anti-liver cytosol type 1 (anti-LC1. SMA, ANA and anti-LKM antibodies can be present in de-novo AIH following liver transplantation. PBC is specified by antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA reacting with enzymes of the 2-oxo-acid dehydrogenase complexes (chiefly pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E2 subunit and disease-specific ANA mainly reacting with nuclear pore gp210 and nuclear body sp100. Sclerosing cholangitis presents as at least two variants, first the classical primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC mostly affecting adult men wherein the only (and non-specific reactivity is an atypical perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (p-ANCA, also termed perinuclear anti-neutrophil nuclear antibodies (p-ANNA and second the childhood disease called autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC with serological features resembling those of type 1 AIH. Liver diagnostic serology is a fast-expanding area of investigation as new purified and recombinant autoantigens, and automated technologies such as ELISAs and bead assays, become available to complement (or even compete with traditional immunofluorescence procedures. We survey for the first time global trends in quality assurance impacting as it does on (1 manufacturers/purveyors of kits and reagents, (2 diagnostic service laboratories that fulfill clinicians’ requirements, and (3 the end-user, the physician providing patient care, who must properly interpret test results in the overall clinical context.

  12. Autoimmune liver serology: Current diagnostic and clinical challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dimitrios P Bogdanos; Pietro Invernizzi; Ian R Mackay; Diego Vergani

    2008-01-01

    Liver-related autoantibodies are crucial for the correct diagnosis and classification of autoimmune liver diseases (AiLD), namely autoimmune hepatitis types 1 and 2 (AIH-1 and 2), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC),and the sclerosing cholangitis variants in adults and children.AIH-1 is specified by anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) and smooth muscle antibody (SMA). AIH-2 is specified by antibody to liver kidney microsomal antigen type-1 (anti-LKM1) and anti-liver cytosol type 1 (anti-LC1).SMA,ANA and anti-LKM antibodies can be present in de-novo AIH following liver transplantation.PBC is specified by antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) reacting with enzymes of the 2-oxo-acid dehydrogenase complexes (chiefly pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E2 subunit) and disease-specific ANA mainly reacting with nuclear pore gp210 and nuclear body sp100. Sclerosing cholangitis presents as at least two variants,first the classical primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) mostly affecting adult men wherein the only (and nonspecific) reactivity is an atypical perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (p-ANCA),also termed perinuclear anti-neutrophil nuclear antibodies (p-ANNA) and second the childhood disease called autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC) with serological features resembling those of type 1 AIH.Liver diagnostic serology is a fast-expanding area of investigation as new purified and recombinant autoantigens,and automated technologies such as ELISAs and bead assays,become available to complement (or even compete with) traditional immunofluorescence procedures.We survey for the first time global trends in quality assurance impacting as it does on (1) manufacturers/purveyors of kits and reagents,(2) diagnostic service laboratories that fulfill clinicians'requirements, and (3) the end-user,the physician providing patient care,who must properly interpret test results in the overall clinical context.

  13. Coeliac disease with autoimmune haemolytic anaemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    Two patients are described who have developed autoimmune haemolytic anaemia in association with their coeliac disease. Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia may represent an extension of immunological disorders linked with coeliac disease, centred on the histocompatibility antigen B8.

  14. Autoimmune Skin Diseases in the Dog

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, W M

    1981-01-01

    Diagnoses of autoimmune skin diseases require very careful observation of the skin lesions, and selection of an intact vesicle for histopathological examination. If available, immunofluorescent studies can be very useful in confirming the diagnosis of autoimmune skin disease. Seven autoimmune skin diseases are briefly reviewed. Therapy must be aggressive and owner warned of the guarded prognosis.

  15. Progranulin antibodies in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurner, Lorenz; Preuss, Klaus-Dieter; Fadle, Natalie; Regitz, Evi; Klemm, Philipp; Zaks, Marina; Kemele, Maria; Hasenfus, Andrea; Csernok, Elena; Gross, Wolfgang L; Pasquali, Jean-Louis; Martin, Thierry; Bohle, Rainer Maria; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Systemic vasculitides constitute a heterogeneous group of diseases. Autoimmunity mediated by B lymphocytes and their humoral effector mechanisms play a major role in ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) as well as in non-ANCA associated primary systemic vasculitides and in the different types of autoimmune connective tissue disorders and rheumatoid arthritis. In order to detect autoantibodies in systemic vasculitides, we screened protein macroarrays of human cDNA expression libraries with sera from patients with ANCA-associated and ANCA-negative primary systemic vasculitides. This approach led to the identification of antibodies against progranulin, a 88 kDA secreted glycoprotein with strong anti-inflammatory activity in the course of disease of giant-cell arteritis/polymyalgia rheumatica (14/65), Takayasu's arteritis (4/13), classical panarteritis nodosa (4/10), Behcet's disease (2/6) and in the course of disease in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (31/75), Churg-Strauss syndrome (7/23) and in microscopic polyangiitis (7/19). In extended screenings the progranulin antibodies were also detected in other autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (39/91) and rheumatoid arthritis (16/44). Progranulin antibodies were detected only in 1 of 97 healthy controls. Anti-progranulin positive patients with systemic vasculitides, systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis had significant lower progranulin plasma levels, indicating a neutralizing effect. In light of the anti-inflammatory effects of progranulin, progranulin antibodies might exert pro-inflammatory effects thus contributing to the pathogenesis of the respective autoimmune diseases and might serve as a marker for disease activity. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that a positive progranulin antibody status was associated with active disease in granulomatosis with polyangiitis. PMID:23149338

  16. Juvenile autoimmune hepatitis: Spectrum of the disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giuseppe; Maggiore; Silvia; Nastasio; Marco; Sciveres

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile autoimmune hepatitis(JAIH) is a progressive inflammatory liver disease, affecting mainly young girls, from infancy to late adolescence, characterized by active liver damage, as shown by high serum activity of aminotransferases, by elevated immunoglobulin G levels, high titers of serum non organ-specific andorgan-specific autoantibodies, and by interface hepatitis on liver biopsy. It is a multifactorial disease of unknown etiology in which environmental factors act as a trigger in genetically predisposed individuals. Two types of JAIH are identified according to the autoan-tibody panel detected at diagnosis: AIH-1, characterized by the presence of anti-smooth muscle antibody and/or antinuclear antibody and AIH-2, by anti-liver-kidney microsomal antibody type 1 and/or by the presence of anti-liver cytosol type 1 antibody. Epidemiological distribution, genetic markers, clinical presentation and pattern of serum cytokines differentiate the two types of AIH suggesting possible pathogenetic mechanisms. The most effective therapy for AIH is pharmacological suppression of the immune response. Treatment should be started as soon as the diagnosis is made to avoid severe liver damage and progression of fibrosis. The aim of this review is to outline the most significant and peculiar features of JAIH, based largely on our own personal database and on a review of current literature.

  17. An autosomal locus causing autoimmune disease: Autoimmune polyglandular disease type I assigned to chromosome 21

    OpenAIRE

    Aaltonen, Johanna; Björses, Petra; Sandkuijl, Lodewijk; Perheentupa, Jaakko; Peltonen, Leena Johanna

    1994-01-01

    textabstractAutoimmune polyglandular disease type I (APECED) is an autosomal recessive autoimmune disease characterized by a variable combination of the failure of the endocrine glands. The pathogenesis of this unique autoimmune disease is unknown; unlike many other autoimmune diseases, APECED does not show association to specific HLA haplotypes. Unravelling the APECED locus will identify a novel gene outside the HLA loci influencing the outcome of autoimmune diseases. We have assigned the di...

  18. Cardiovascular Involvement in Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Amaya-Amaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (AD represent a broad spectrum of chronic conditions that may afflict specific target organs or multiple systems with a significant burden on quality of life. These conditions have common mechanisms including genetic and epigenetics factors, gender disparity, environmental triggers, pathophysiological abnormalities, and certain subphenotypes. Atherosclerosis (AT was once considered to be a degenerative disease that was an inevitable consequence of aging. However, research in the last three decades has shown that AT is not degenerative or inevitable. It is an autoimmune-inflammatory disease associated with infectious and inflammatory factors characterized by lipoprotein metabolism alteration that leads to immune system activation with the consequent proliferation of smooth muscle cells, narrowing arteries, and atheroma formation. Both humoral and cellular immune mechanisms have been proposed to participate in the onset and progression of AT. Several risk factors, known as classic risk factors, have been described. Interestingly, the excessive cardiovascular events observed in patients with ADs are not fully explained by these factors. Several novel risk factors contribute to the development of premature vascular damage. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how traditional and nontraditional risk factors contribute to pathogenesis of CVD in AD.

  19. Propylthiouracil-induced autoimmune disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Paiaulla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthyroidism is a condition characterized by excessive production of thyroid hormones. Propylthiouracil (PTU is commonly used as first line drug in the management of hyperthyroidism. This is a case report of 24-year-old female, a known case of hyperthyroidism since 4 years, who came with a history of fever and myalgia since 3 days and dyspnea with coughing out of blood since 1 day. Patient was taking PTU (100 mg per day since 4 years for hyperthyroidism. Patient was immediately intubated for type-II respiratory failure. Diagnosed to be having PTU-induced autoimmune disease. PTU was stopped and treated with methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide. Clinical features improved over a period of 8 days and discharged home successfully. Having a high suspicion for the onset of autoimmune disease in hyperthyroidism patients who are on PTU therapy and timely treatment with immunosuppressants and supportive care along with the withdrawal of the drug can make a difference in morbidity and mortality.

  20. Rett syndrome: An autoimmune disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Felice, Claudio; Leoncini, Silvia; Signorini, Cinzia; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Rovero, Paolo; Durand, Thierry; Ciccoli, Lucia; Papini, Anna Maria; Hayek, Joussef

    2016-04-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a devastating neurodevelopmental disease, previously included into the autistic spectrum disorders, affecting almost exclusively females (frequency 1:10,000). RTT leads to intellective deficit, purposeful hands use loss and late major motor impairment besides featuring breathing disorders, epilepsy and increased risk of sudden death. The condition is caused in up to 95% of the cases by mutations in the X-linked methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene. Our group has shown a number of previously unrecognized features, such as systemic redox imbalance, chronic inflammatory status, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease-like lung disease, and erythrocyte morphology changes. While evidence on an intimate involvement of MeCP2 in the immune response is cumulating, we have recently shown a cytokine dysregulation in RTT. Increasing evidence on the relationship between MeCP2 and an immune dysfunction is reported, with, apparently, a link between MECP2 gene polymorphisms and autoimmune diseases, including primary Sjögren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic sclerosis. Antineuronal (i.e., brain proteins) antibodies have been shown in RTT. Recently, high levels of anti-N-glucosylation (N-Glc) IgM serum autoantibodies [i.e., anti-CSF114(N-Glc) IgMs] have been detected by our group in a statistically significant number of RTT patients. In the current review, the Authors explore the current evidence, either in favor or against, the presence of an autoimmune component in RTT. PMID:26807990

  1. Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Diseases: A Short Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jithin Jose

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmunity is characterized by the reaction of cells (auto reactive T-lymphocytes or products (autoantibodies of the immune system against the organism’s own antigens (autoantigen. It may be part of the physiological immune response (natural autoimmunity or pathologically induced, which may eventually lead to development of clinical abnormalities (autoimmune disease. Different mechanisms are involved in the induction and progression of autoimmunity. These include genetic or acquired defects in immune tolerance or immune regulatory pathways, molecular mimicry to viral or bacterial protein, an impaired clearance of apoptotic cell material. A A number of diseases have been identified in which there is autoimmunity, due to copious production of autoantibodies and autoreactive cells. The aim of the present article is to review on the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.

  2. Activated farnesoid X receptor attenuates apoptosis and liver injury in autoimmune hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    LIAN, FAN; Wang, Yu; Xiao, Youjun; WU, XIWEN; Xu, Hanshi; Liang, Liuqin; Yang, Xiuyan

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic inflammatory liver disease associated with interface hepatitis, the presence of autoantibodies, regulatory T-cell dysfunction and raised plasma liver enzyme levels. The present study assessed the hepatoprotective and antiapoptotic role of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) in AIH. A mouse model of AIH was induced by treatment with concanavalin A (ConA). The FXR agonist, chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), was administered to mice exhibiting ConA-induced liver injury ...

  3. Pulmonary hypertension in autoimmune rheumatic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    L. Massironi; R. Cossutta; Massarotti, M.; Marasini, B; A. Mantero

    2011-01-01

    Objective. Pulmonary hypertension is a severe and rapidly progressive disease, particularly frequent in patients with rheumatic diseases. The aims of this study were the following: to determine the prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in Italian patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases, and to evaluate if the presence of a rheumatic disease in general, or of a specific autoimmune rheumatic disease, is a risk factor for the development of pulmonary hypertension. Patients and Methods. One hu...

  4. [Autoimmune diseases in type 1 diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechleitner, Monika; Hoppichler, Friedrich; Kaser, Susanne

    2016-04-01

    According to literature about 30 % of the patients with type 1 diabetes develop further autoimmune diseases. Thyroid dysfunction represents with 15‒30 % the most common disorder, followed by gastritis with 5‒10 %, celiac disease with 4‒9 % and vitiligo with 2‒10 %. Addison's disease seems to be less prevalent. Diagnostic procedures in the course of the comprehensive care for diabetic patients should therefore include screening for further autoimmune diseases. PMID:27052247

  5. Molecular diagnosis of autoimmune blistering diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruta, Daisuke; Dainichi, Teruki; Hamada, Takahiro; Ishii, Norito; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune bullous diseases are the best-characterized autoimmune skin diseases. Molecular diagnosis of these diseases has become possible due to the identification of their target autoantigens over the past three decades. In this review, we summarize methodology for categorizing autoimmune bullous diseases by means of combinations of direct and indirect immunofluorescence techniques using normal human skin sections, rat bladder sections and COS7 cells transfected with desmocollins 1-3 encoded vectors, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and immunoblotting with normal human epidermal extracts, dermal extracts, purified proteins from cell cultures and recombinant proteins. PMID:23325635

  6. Alcohol-Related Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to run events. Please support us. Donate | Volunteer Alcohol-Related Liver Disease Discussion on Inspire Support Community ... Liver > Liver Disease Information > Alcohol-Related Liver Disease Alcohol-Related Liver Disease Explore this section to learn ...

  7. Liver Disease and Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver Disease Pulmonary & PH Hypertension Did you know that if you have liver disease, you are at risk for pulmonary ... to the liver without cirrhosis. How does liver disease relate to pulmonary hypertension? Liver disease can cause what is known ...

  8. Large leg ulcers due to autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Rozin, Alexander P; Egozi, Dana; Ramon, Yehuda; Toledano, Kohava; Braun-Moscovici, Yolanda; Markovits, Doron; Schapira, Daniel; Bergman, Reuven; Melamed, Yehuda; Ullman, Yehuda; Balbir-Gurman, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Large leg ulcers (LLU) may complicate autoimmune diseases. They pose a therapeutic challenge and are often resistant to treatment. To report three cases of autoimmune diseases complicated with LLU. Case Report Case 1. A 55-year old woman presented with long-standing painful LLU due to mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). Biopsy from the ulcer edge showed small vessel vasculitis. IV methylprednisolone (MethP) 1 G/day, prednisolone (PR) 1mg/kg, monthly IV cyclophosphamide ...

  9. Human autoimmune diseases: a comprehensive update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lifeng; Wang, Fu-Sheng; Gershwin, M Eric

    2015-10-01

    There have been significant advances in our understanding of human autoimmunity that have led to improvements in classification and diagnosis and, most importantly, research advances in new therapies. The importance of autoimmunity and the mechanisms that lead to clinical disease were first recognized about 50 years ago following the pioneering studies of Macfarlane Burnett and his Nobel Prize-winning hypothesis of the 'forbidden clone'. Such pioneering efforts led to a better understanding not only of autoimmunity, but also of lymphoid cell development, thymic education, apoptosis and deletion of autoreactive cells. Contemporary theories suggest that the development of an autoimmune disease requires a genetic predisposition and environmental factors that trigger the immune pathways that lead, ultimately, to tissue destruction. Despite extensive research, there are no genetic tools that can be used clinically to predict the risk of autoimmune disease. Indeed, the concordance of autoimmune disease in identical twins is 12-67%, highlighting not only a role for environmental factors, but also the potential importance of stochastic or epigenetic phenomena. On the other hand, the identification of cytokines and chemokines, and their cognate receptors, has led to novel therapies that block pathological inflammatory responses within the target organ and have greatly improved the therapeutic effect in patients with autoimmune disease, particularly rheumatoid arthritis. Further advances involving the use of multiplex platforms for diagnosis and identification of new therapeutic agents should lead to major breakthroughs within the next decade. PMID:26212387

  10. Epidemiology of autoimmune diseases in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eaton, William W.; Rose, N.R.; Kalaydijan, A.;

    2007-01-01

    An epidemiologic study of the autoimmune diseases taken together has not been done heretofore. The National Patient Register of Denmark is used to estimate the population prevalence of 31 possible or probable autoimmune diseases. Record linkage is used to estimate 465 pairwise co-morbidities in...... diseases and weak across diseases. These data confirm the importance of the autoimmune diseases as a group and suggest that common etiopathologies exist among them...... individuals among the 31 diseases, and familial aggregation among sibs, parents and offspring. The prevalence of any of the 31 diseases in the population is more than 5%. Within individuals, there is extensive comorbidity across the 31 diseases. Within families, aggregation is strongest for individual...

  11. Vitamin D and autoimmune thyroid diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Kivity, Shaye; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Zisappl, Michael; Shapira, Yinon; Nagy, Endre V.; Dankó, Katalin; Szekanecz, Zoltan; Langevitz, Pnina; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2011-01-01

    The role of vitamin D as an immune modulator has been emphasized in recent years, and low levels of the hormone were observed in several autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Vitamin D mediates its effect though binding to vitamin D receptor (VDR), and activation of VDR-responsive genes. While VDR gene polymorphism was found to associate with autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs), few studies examined levels of vitamin D in these patients and those t...

  12. Alcoholic liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver disease due to alcohol; Cirrhosis or hepatitis - alcoholic; Laennec's cirrhosis ... Alcoholic liver disease occurs after years of heavy drinking. Over time, scarring and cirrhosis can occur. Cirrhosis is the ...

  13. Iron and Liver Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Fargion, Silvia; Mattioli, Michela; Fracanzani, Anna Ludovica; Fiorelli, Gemino

    2000-01-01

    A mild to moderate iron excess is found in patients with liver diseases apparently unrelated to genetic hemochromatosis. Iron appears to affect the natural history of hepatitis C virus-related chronic liver diseases, alcoholic liver disease and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis by leading to a more severe fibrosis and thus aiding the evolution to cirrhosis.Ahigher frequency of mutations of the HFE gene, the gene responsible for hereditary hemochromatosis, is found in patients with liver diseases a...

  14. The Emerging Link Between Autoimmune Disorders and Neuropsychiatric Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kayser, Matthew S; Dalmau, Josep

    2011-01-01

    Abnormal autoimmune activity has been implicated in a number of neuropsychiatric disorders. In this review, the authors discuss a newly recognized class of synaptic autoimmune encephalitides as well as behavioral and cognitive manifestations of systemic autoimmune diseases.

  15. Autism and Autoimmune Disease: A Family Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Money, John; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Described in a family in which the youngest boy has early infantile autism, Addison's disease, and moniliasis and two older boys have autoimmune disease with hypoparathyroidism, Addison's disease, moniliasis, and either alopecia totalis or diabetes mellitus, while the oldest boy and parents are symptom free. (KW)

  16. Acute recurrent pancreatitis: An autoimmune disease?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raffaele Pezzilli

    2008-01-01

    In this review article,we will briefly describe the main characteristics of autoimmune pancreatitis and then we will concentrate on our aim,namely,evaluating the clinical characteristics of patients having recurrence of pain from the disease.In fact,the open question is to evaluate the possible presence of autoimmune pancreatitis in patients with an undefined etiology of acute pancreatitis and for this reason we carried out a search in the literature in order to explore this issue.In cases of recurrent attacks of pain in patients with "idiopathic"pancreatitis,we need to keep in mind the possibility that our patients may have autoimmune pancreatitis.Even though the frequency of this disease seems to be quite low,we believe that in the future,by increasing our knowledge on the subject,we will be able to diagnose an ever-increasing number of patients having acute recurrence of pain from autoimmune pancreatitis.

  17. Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease- A Clinical Viewpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirala Khalessi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in medicine have given us a better insight into a group of disorders known as autoimmune diseases. In particular, advances have occurred in our understanding of the Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease (AIED. In this article, the authors review the different postulated theories in the pathogenesis of this disease. The clinical presentation, the available para-clinical diagnostic tools, and the important differential diagnoses will be summarized. The management methods, including steroid therapy, immunosuppressive medications, other biological agents and intra-tympanic injections, will be addressed. Cochlear implantation as a final solution to the advanced stages of the disease, causing total deafness, will also be discussed.

  18. Alcoholic Cirrhosis Increases Risk for Autoimmune Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Lisbet; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Deleuran, Bent;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Alcoholic cirrhosis is associated with hyperactivation and dysregulation of the immune system. In addition to its ability to increase risk for infections, it also may increase the risk for autoimmune diseases. We studied the incidence of autoimmune diseases among patients with...... alcohol-associated cirrhosis vs controls in Denmark. METHODS: We collected data from nationwide health care registries to identify and follow up all citizens of Denmark diagnosed with alcoholic cirrhosis from 1977 through 2010. Each patient was matched with 5 random individuals from the population...... diagnosed with alcoholic cirrhosis, 532 developed an autoimmune disease, yielding an overall increased adjusted incidence rate ratio (aIRR) of 1.36 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.24-1.50). The strongest associations were with Addison's disease (aIRR, 2.47; 95% CI, 1.04-5.85), inflammatory bowel disease (a...

  19. NK cell autoreactivity and autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro ePoggi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidences have pointed out the relevance of Natural Killer (NK cells in organ specific and systemic autoimmune diseases. NK cells bear a plethora of activating and inhibiting receptors that can play a role in regulating reactivity with autologous cells. The activating receptors recognize natural ligands upregulated on virus-infected or stressed or neoplastic cells. Of note, several autoimmune diseases are thought to be linked to viral infections as one of the first event in inducing autoimmunity. Also, it is conceivable that autoimmunity can be triggered when a dysregulation of innate immunity occurs, activating T and B lymphocytes to react with self-components. This would imply that NK cells can play a regulatory role during adaptive immunity; indeed, innate lymphoid cells (ILC, comprising the classical CD56+ NK cells, have a role in maintaining or alterating tissue homeostasis secreting protective and/or proinflammatory cytokines. In addition, NK cells display activating receptors involved in natural cytotoxicity and the activating isoforms of receptors for HLA class I that can interact with healthy host cells and induce damage without any evidence of viral infection or neoplastic-induced alteration. In this context, the interrelationship among ILC, extracellular matrix components and mesenchymal stromal cells can be considered a key point for the control of homeostasis. Herein, we summarize evidences for a role of NK cells in autoimmune diseases and will give a point of view of the interplay between NK cells and self-cells in triggering autoimmunity.

  20. Cardiovascular disease in autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollan, Ivana; Meroni, Pier Luigi; Ahearn, Joseph M; Cohen Tervaert, J W; Curran, Sam; Goodyear, Carl S; Hestad, Knut A; Kahaleh, Bashar; Riggio, Marcello; Shields, Kelly; Wasko, Mary C

    2013-08-01

    Various autoimmune rheumatic diseases (ARDs), including rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritis, vasculitis and systemic lupus erythematosus, are associated with premature atherosclerosis. However, premature atherosclerosis has not been uniformly observed in systemic sclerosis. Furthermore, although experimental models of atherosclerosis support the role of antiphospholipid antibodies in atherosclerosis, there is no clear evidence of premature atherosclerosis in antiphospholipid syndrome (APA). Ischemic events in APA are more likely to be caused by pro-thrombotic state than by enhanced atherosclerosis. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) in ARDs is caused by traditional and non-traditional risk factors. Besides other factors, inflammation and immunologic abnormalities, the quantity and quality of lipoproteins, hypertension, insulin resistance/hyperglycemia, obesity and underweight, presence of platelets bearing complement protein C4d, reduced number and function of endothelial progenitor cells, apoptosis of endothelial cells, epigenetic mechanisms, renal disease, periodontal disease, depression, hyperuricemia, hypothyroidism, sleep apnea and vitamin D deficiency may contribute to the premature CVD. Although most research has focused on systemic inflammation, vascular inflammation may play a crucial role in the premature CVD in ARDs. It may be involved in the development and destabilization of both atherosclerotic lesions and of aortic aneurysms (a known complication of ARDs). Inflammation in subintimal vascular and perivascular layers appears to frequently occur in CVD, with a higher frequency in ARD than in non-ARD patients. It is possible that this inflammation is caused by infections and/or autoimmunity, which might have consequences for treatment. Importantly, drugs targeting immunologic factors participating in the subintimal inflammation (e.g., T- and B-cells) might have a protective effect on CVD. Interestingly, vasa vasorum and cardiovascular adipose tissue may

  1. Autoimmune diseases in women with Turner's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kristian T; Rostgaard, Klaus; Bache, Iben;

    2010-01-01

    Danish women with Turner's syndrome followed up for 12,461 person-years between 1980 and 2004. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of first hospitalization for autoimmune disease and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were used as measures of relative risk. RESULTS: The overall risk of autoimmune...... disease among women with Turner's syndrome was twice that among Danish women in general (SIR 2.1 [95% CI 1.6-2.7]). For autoimmune diseases with a female predominance, the SIR among women with Turner's syndrome was 1.7 (95% CI 1.2-2.4), whereas the SIR for autoimmune diseases with a male predominance...... among these women was 3.9 (95% CI 2.5-5.8). Associations were strongest for Hashimoto thyroiditis (SIR 14.6 [95% CI 6.7-27.1]), a strongly female-predominant condition, and type 1 diabetes mellitus (SIR 4.1 [95% CI 2.5-6.3]). CONCLUSION: Women with Turner's syndrome are at excess risk of autoimmune...

  2. Shared genetic origins of allergy and autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waage, J. E.; Kreiner-Møller, E.; Standl, M.;

    2015-01-01

    Parallel increases in allergy and autoimmune disease prevalence in recent time suggest shared, but yet unknown, etiologies. Here, we investigated shared genetic loci and molecular pathways to identify possible shared disease mechanisms between allergy and autoimmune diseases....

  3. Chronic Granulomatous Disease as a Risk Factor for Autoimmune Disease

    OpenAIRE

    De Ravin, Suk See; Naumann, Nora; Cowen, Edward W.; Friend, Julia; Hilligoss, Dianne; Marquesen, Martha; Balow, James E.; Karyl S. Barron; Turner, Maria L.; Gallin, John I.; Malech, Harry L.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is characterized by recurrent infections and granuloma formation. In addition, we have observed a number of diverse autoimmune conditions in our CGD population, suggesting that patients with CGD are at an elevated risk for development of autoimmune (AI) disorders. In this report, we describe antiphospholipid syndrome (aPL), recurrent pericardial effusion, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), IgA nephropathy, cutaneous lupus erythematosus, and autoimmune pul...

  4. Macrophage activation syndrome in autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, Sean; Selmi, Carlo; Teuber, Suzanne S; Gershwin, M Eric

    2010-01-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a phenomenon characterized by cytopenia, organ dysfunction, and coagulopathy associated with an inappropriate activation of macrophages. Current diagnostic criteria are imprecise, but the syndrome is now recognized as a form of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis that is characteristically associated with autoimmune diatheses. The diagnosis of incipient MAS in patients with autoimmune disease requires a high index of suspicion, as several characteristics of the disorder may be present in the underlying condition or infectious complications associated with the treatment thereof. Proposed treatment regimens include aggressive approaches that require validation in future controlled studies. This review discusses the major aspects of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of MAS with a focus on the association with autoimmune disease. PMID:20407267

  5. Genomics and proteomics: Applications in autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Hueber

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Wolfgang Hueber1,2,3, William H Robinson1,21VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA, USA; 2Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 3Novartis Institutes of Biomedical Research, Novartis, Basle, SwitzerlandAbstract: Tremendous progress has been made over the past decade in the development and refinement of genomic and proteomic technologies for the identification of novel drug targets and molecular signatures associated with clinically important disease states, disease subsets, or differential responses to therapies. The rapid progress in high-throughput technologies has been preceded and paralleled by the elucidation of cytokine networks, followed by the stepwise clinical development of pathway-specific biological therapies that revolutionized the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Together, these advances provide opportunities for a long-anticipated personalized medicine approach to the treatment of autoimmune disease. The ever-increasing numbers of novel, innovative therapies will need to be harnessed wisely to achieve optimal long-term outcomes in as many patients as possible while complying with the demands of health authorities and health care providers for evidence-based, economically sound prescription of these expensive drugs. Genomic and proteomic profiling of patients with autoimmune diseases holds great promise in two major clinical areas: (1 rapid identification of new targets for the development of innovative therapies and (2 identification of patients who will experience optimal benefit and minimal risk from a specific (targeted therapy. In this review, we attempt to capture important recent developments in the application of genomic and proteomic technologies to translational research by discussing informative examples covering a diversity of autoimmune diseases.Keywords: proteomics, genomics, autoimmune diseases, antigen microarrays, 2-Dih, rheumatoid arthritis

  6. Cell Therapies for Liver Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Yue; Fisher, James E.; Lillegard, Joseph B.; Rodysill, Brian; Amiot, Bruce; Nyberg, Scott L.

    2012-01-01

    Cell therapies, which include bioartificial liver support and hepatocyte transplantation, have emerged as potential treatments for a variety of liver diseases. Acute liver failure (ALF), acute-on-chronic liver failure, and inherited metabolic liver diseases are examples of liver diseases that have been successfully treated with cell therapies at centers around the world. Cell therapies also have the potential for wide application in other liver diseases, including non-inherited liver diseases...

  7. Serological Diagnosis of Autoimmune Blistering Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Birgül Özkesici; Ayşe Akman Karakaş

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune blistering diseases are a rare diseases, characterized by development of autoantibodies against the structural proteins of the epidermis or dermoepidermal junction, and blisters and erosions on skin and/or mucous membranes clinically. Clinical features are important guiding findings for suspicious of this group of diseases. The diagnosis is achieved by the evaluation together of clinical features, histological and immunological findings. The gold standard in the diagnosis of this g...

  8. Cell Therapies for Liver Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yue; Fisher, James E.; Lillegard, Joseph B.; Rodysill, Brian; Amiot, Bruce; Nyberg, Scott L.

    2011-01-01

    Cell therapies, which include bioartificial liver support and hepatocyte transplantation, have emerged as potential treatments for a variety of liver diseases. Acute liver failure (ALF), acute-on-chronic liver failure, and inherited metabolic liver diseases are examples of liver diseases that have been successfully treated with cell therapies at centers around the world. Cell therapies also have the potential for wide application in other liver diseases, including non-inherited liver diseases and liver cancer, and in improving the success of liver transplantation. Here we briefly summarize current concepts of cell therapy for liver diseases. PMID:22140063

  9. Serological Diagnosis of Autoimmune Blistering Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgül Özkesici

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune blistering diseases are a rare diseases, characterized by development of autoantibodies against the structural proteins of the epidermis or dermoepidermal junction, and blisters and erosions on skin and/or mucous membranes clinically. Clinical features are important guiding findings for suspicious of this group of diseases. The diagnosis is achieved by the evaluation together of clinical features, histological and immunological findings. The gold standard in the diagnosis of this group diseases are demonstration of tissue bound and/or circulating autoantibodies. Methods for this purpose are; direct and indirect immunofluorescence, Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA, immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting. The aim of this paper is to review serological diagnostic methods in the diagnosis of autoimmune bullous diseases and to present developments in recent years.

  10. Oral mucosal manifestations of autoimmune skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Mayson B; Porter, Stephen R; Smoller, Bruce R; Sitaru, Cassian

    2015-10-01

    A group of autoimmune diseases is characterised by autoantibodies against epithelial adhesion structures and/or tissue-tropic lymphocytes driving inflammatory processes resulting in specific pathology at the mucosal surfaces and the skin. The most frequent site of mucosal involvement in autoimmune diseases is the oral cavity. Broadly, these diseases include conditions affecting the cell-cell adhesion causing intra-epithelial blistering and those where autoantibodies or infiltration lymphocytes cause a loss of cell-matrix adhesion or interface inflammation. Clinically, patients present with blistering, erosions and ulcers that may affect the skin as well as further mucosal surfaces of the eyes, nose and genitalia. While the autoimmune disease may be suspected based on clinical manifestations, demonstration of tissue-bound and circulating autoantibodies, or lymphocytic infiltrates, by various methods including histological examination, direct and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, immunoblotting and quantitative immunoassay is a prerequisite for definitive diagnosis. Given the frequency of oral involvement and the fact that oral mucosa is the initially affected site in many cases, the informed practitioner should be well acquainted with diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of autoimmune dermatosis with oral involvement. This paper reviews the pathogenesis and clinical presentation of these conditions in the oral cavity with a specific emphasis on their differential diagnosis and current management approaches. PMID:26117595

  11. Capillaroscopy in diagnostic of systemic autoimmune diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnosis of systemic autoimmune diseases is carried out by combining clinical, paraclinical, imaging and anatomopathological data. However, in many cases is necessary to access other guiding parameters. The capillaroscopy is a technique that consists in the observation of capillary microcirculation in the proximal nail fold hands. The methods used are the videocapillaroscopy (microscopy, stereoscopic)

  12. The immunofluorescence techniques in the diagnosis of endocrine autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Betterle, Corrado; Zanchetta, Renato

    2012-01-01

    In the study of autoimmune diseases, the laboratory plays a very important role. We describe the immunofluorescence techniques (direct, indirect, complement-fixing, double) for determining the presence of autoantibodies and their role in the autoimmune endocrine diseases.

  13. Tips for Getting a Proper Diagnosis of an Autoimmune Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tips for Getting a Proper Diagnosis of an Autoimmune Disease Do your own family medical history. Take an ... research points to a genetic component in most autoimmune diseases, you should know the health histories of your ...

  14. Immunosuppressive therapy in immune-mediated liver disease in the non-transplanted patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhyankar, Anita; Tapper, Elliot; Bonder, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune liver disease management goals are primarily slowing disease progression and symptomatic treatment. There are few options for curative medical management other than transplant for a spectrum of autoimmune liver disease that encompasses autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis as well as their overlap syndromes. These diseases are managed primarily with immunosuppressive therapy. Herein, we review the current literature, detailing the promise and pitfalls of the recommended immunosuppressive therapy for these challenging diseases. PMID:24380894

  15. Alcoholic liver disease: Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Suk, Ki Tae; Kim, Moon Young; Baik, Soon Koo

    2014-01-01

    The excess consumption of alcohol is associated with alcoholic liver diseases (ALD). ALD is a major healthcare problem, personal and social burden, and significant reason for economic loss worldwide. The ALD spectrum includes alcoholic fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. The diagnosis of ALD is based on a combination of clinical features, including a history of significant alcohol intake, evidence of liver disease, and laboratory findi...

  16. Rituximab for autoimmune blistering diseases: recent studies, new insights

    OpenAIRE

    Lunardon, Luisa; Payne, Aimee S.

    2012-01-01

    Rituximab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, has been successfully used off-label for treatment of autoimmune blistering diseases. We discuss rituximab mechanisms of action, host factors that may affect response to rituximab, and the efficacy and safety of rituximab in autoimmune blistering diseases, incorporating recent data on the use of rituximab in other autoimmune disease patients.

  17. Imaging combined autoimmune and infectious disease microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewart, Tom; Raha, Sandeep; Kus, Dorothy; Tarnopolsky, Mark

    2006-09-01

    Bacterial and viral pathogens are implicated in many severe autoimmune diseases, acting through such mechanisms as molecular mimicry, and superantigen activation of T-cells. For example, Helicobacter pylori, well known cause of stomach ulcers and cancers, is also identified in ischaemic heart disease (mimicry of heat shock protein 65), autoimmune pancreatitis, systemic sclerosis, autoimmune thyroiditis (HLA DRB1*0301 allele susceptibility), and Crohn's disease. Successful antibiotic eradication of H.pylori often accompanies their remission. Yet current diagnostic devices, and test-limiting cost containment, impede recognition of the linkage, delaying both diagnosis and therapeutic intervention until the chronic debilitating stage. We designed a 15 minute low cost 39 antigen microarray assay, combining autoimmune, viral and bacterial antigens1. This enables point-of-care serodiagnosis and cost-effective narrowly targeted concurrent antibiotic and monoclonal anti-T-cell and anti-cytokine immunotherapy. Arrays of 26 pathogen and 13 autoimmune antigens with IgG and IgM dilution series were printed in triplicate on epoxysilane covalent binding slides with Teflon well masks. Sera diluted 1:20 were incubated 10 minutes, washed off, anti-IgG-Cy3 (green) and anti-IgM-Dy647 (red) were incubated for 5 minutes, washed off and the slide was read in an ArrayWoRx(e) scanning CCD imager (Applied Precision, Issaquah, WA). As a preliminary model for the combined infectious disease-autoimmune diagnostic microarray we surveyed 98 unidentified, outdated sera that were discarded after Hepatitis B antibody testing. In these, significant IgG or IgM autoantibody levels were found: dsDNA 5, ssDNA 11, Ro 2, RNP 7, SSB 4, gliadin 2, thyroglobulin 13 cases. Since control sera showed no autoantibodies, the high frequency of anti-DNA and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies found in infected sera lend increased support for linkage of infection to subsequent autoimmune disease. Expansion of the antigen

  18. A case of severe autoimmune hepatitis associated with Graves' disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia Abdulla Bokhari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Graves' disease is a common condition and is known to have a wide range of effects on a variety of organs. Hepatic dysfunction ranging from mild to severe due to direct effect of high circulating thyroid hormones as well as a deleterious effect of antithyroid medications (methimazole and propylthiouracil has been well - documented in literature. However, severe autoimmune hepatitis (AIH associated with Graves' disease is rare and limited to few case reports only. A 38-year-old woman presented with abdominal pain and yellowish discolouration of conjunctivae. On investigation, she was found to have Graves' disease and AIH. The liver histopathology showed typical features of AIH. She responded excellently to glucocorticoid therapy with normalisation of thyroid function and liver histology. The case is discussed with relevant literature review.

  19. Celiac Disease Autoimmunity in Patients with Autoimmune Diabetes and Thyroid Disease among Chinese Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhiyuan; Zou, Jing; Zhao, Lingling; Cheng, Yan; Cai, Hanqing; Li, Mo; Liu, Edwin; Yu, Liping; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity or tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (TGA) amongst patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) in the Chinese population remains unknown. This study examined the rate of celiac disease autoimmunity amongst patients with T1D and AITD in the Chinese population. The study included 178 patients with type 1 diabetes and 119 with AITD where 36 had both T1D and AITD, classified as autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 variant (APS3v). The study also included 145 patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), 97 patients with non-autoimmune thyroid disease (NAITD), and 102 healthy controls. Serum islet autoantibodies, thyroid autoantibodies and TGA were measured by radioimmunoassay. TGA positivity was found in 22% of patients with either type 1 diabetes or AITD, much higher than that in patients with T2D (3.4%; pdiseases were present. Routine TGA screening in patients with T1D or AITD will be important to early identify celiac disease autoimmunity for better clinical care of patients. PMID:27427767

  20. [Glycosylation of autoantibodies in autoimmunes diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulabchand, R; Batteux, F; Guilpain, P

    2013-12-01

    Protein glycosylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications, involved in the well described protein biosynthesis process. Protein glycosylation seems to play a major role in the pathogenesis of auto-immune diseases. Herein are described the main alterations of autoantibody glycosylation associated with autoimmunes diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, IgA glomerulonephritis, Schoenlein-Henoch purpura, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic scleroderma, systemic lupus erythematosus, myasthenia gravis and granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener). Molecular identification of altered immunoglobulin glycosylation could lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of those diseases, might allow an evaluation of their biological activity and could even be a new therapeutic target. PMID:24139501

  1. Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and click "GO" or visit Healthmap Vaccine Finder . Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... critical for people with health conditions such as liver disease. If you have chronic liver disease, talk ...

  2. Oral Tolerance: Therapeutic Implications for Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. C. Faria

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral tolerance is classically defined as the suppression of immune responses to antigens (Ag that have been administered previously by the oral route. Multiple mechanisms of tolerance are induced by oral Ag. Low doses favor active suppression, whereas higher doses favor clonal anergy/deletion. Oral Ag induces Th2 (IL-4/IL-10 and Th3 (TGF-β regulatory T cells (Tregs plus CD4+CD25+ regulatory cells and LAP+T cells. Induction of oral tolerance is enhanced by IL-4, IL-10, anti-IL-12, TGF-β, cholera toxin B subunit (CTB, Flt-3 ligand, anti-CD40 ligand and continuous feeding of Ag. In addition to oral tolerance, nasal tolerance has also been shown to be effective in suppressing inflammatory conditions with the advantage of a lower dose requirement. Oral and nasal tolerance suppress several animal models of autoimmune diseases including experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE, uveitis, thyroiditis, myasthenia, arthritis and diabetes in the nonobese diabetic (NOD mouse, plus non-autoimmune diseases such as asthma, atherosclerosis, colitis and stroke. Oral tolerance has been tested in human autoimmune diseases including MS, arthritis, uveitis and diabetes and in allergy, contact sensitivity to DNCB, nickel allergy. Positive results have been observed in phase II trials and new trials for arthritis, MS and diabetes are underway. Mucosal tolerance is an attractive approach for treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases because of lack of toxicity, ease of administration over time and Ag-specific mechanism of action. The successful application of oral tolerance for the treatment of human diseases will depend on dose, developing immune markers to assess immunologic effects, route (nasal versus oral, formulation, mucosal adjuvants, combination therapy and early therapy.

  3. [Vaccinations in patients with autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühler, Silja; Hatz, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The number of individuals with autoimmune diseases treated with immunosuppressive drugs is increasing steadily. The variety of immunosuppressive drugs and in particular biological therapies is also rising. The autoimmune disease itself as well as the immunosuppressive therapy increases the risk of infection in this population. Particularly the risk of vaccine-preventable infections is elevated. Thus, preventing infections by the means of vaccination is of utmost importance. The Division of Infectious Diseases of the Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute, University of Zurich, performed a literature search on the topic of vaccinations in patients with autoimmune diseases upon request by the Swiss Federal Commission for Vaccination Issues. Overall, data are scarce. The following main points were retrieved from the literature: Inactivated vaccines are safe, but their immunogenicity may be reduced under immunosuppressive therapy. In addition to the generally recommended basic vaccinations, specific vaccinations, such as influenza and pneumococcal vaccination are indicated in these patient groups. Live vaccines are generally contraindicated under immunosuppressive therapy due to safety concerns. However, specific exceptions apply. Furthermore, certain time intervals for the administration of live vaccines after pausing or ceasing an immunosuppressive therapy should be respected. PMID:27268452

  4. Experimental models of autoimmune inflammatory ocular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Gasparin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Ocular inflammation is one of the leading causes of blindness and loss of vision. Human uveitis is a complex and heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by inflammation of intraocular tissues. The eye may be the only organ involved, or uveitis may be part of a systemic disease. A significant number of cases are of unknown etiology and are labeled idiopathic. Animal models have been developed to the study of the physiopathogenesis of autoimmune uveitis due to the difficulty in obtaining human eye inflamed tissues for experiments. Most of those models are induced by injection of specific photoreceptors proteins (e.g., S-antigen, interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein, rhodopsin, recoverin, phosducin. Non-retinal antigens, including melanin-associated proteins and myelin basic protein, are also good inducers of uveitis in animals. Understanding the basic mechanisms and pathogenesis of autoimmune ocular diseases are essential for the development of new treatment approaches and therapeutic agents. The present review describes the main experimental models of autoimmune ocular inflammatory diseases.

  5. Antioxidant supplements for liver diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelakovic, Goran; Gluud, Lise Lotte; Nikolova, Dimitrinka;

    2011-01-01

    Several liver diseases have been associated with oxidative stress. Accordingly, antioxidants have been suggested as potential therapeutics for various liver diseases. The evidence supporting these suggestions is equivocal....

  6. Neuroelectrophysiological studies on neurological autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-hong LIU

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The neuroelectrophysiological manifestations of four clinical typical neurological autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS, Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS, myasthenia gravis (MG, and polymyositis and dermatomyositis were reviewed in this paper. The diagnostic value of evoked potentials for multiple sclerosis, nerve conduction studies (NCS for Guillain-Barré syndrome, repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS and single-fiber electromyography (SFEMG for myasthenia gravis, and needle electromyography for polymyositis and dermatomyositis were respectively discussed. This review will help to have comprehensive understanding on electrophysiological examinations and their clinical significance in the diagnosis of neurological autoimmune diseases. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.09.004

  7. Chronic liver disease in Aboriginal North Americans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John D Scott; Naomi Garland

    2008-01-01

    A structured literature review was performed to detail the frequency and etiology of chronic liver disease (CLD) in Aboriginal North Americans. CLD affects Aboriginal North Americans disproportionately and is now one of the most common causes of death.Alcoholic liver disease is the leading etiology of CLD,but viral hepatitis, particularly hepatitis C, is an important and growing cause of CLD. High rates of autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) are reported in regions of coastal British Columbia and southeastern Alaska. Non-alcoholic liver disease is a common, but understudied, cause of CLD.Future research should monitor the incidence and etiology of CLD and should be geographically inclusive.In addition, more research is needed on the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and non-alcoholicfatty liver disease (NAFLD) in this population.

  8. Antigenic Challenge in the Etiology of Autoimmune Disease in Women

    OpenAIRE

    Mary A M Rogers; Levine, Deborah A.; Blumberg, Neil; Fisher, Gwenith G.; Kabeto, Mohammed; Kenneth M. Langa

    2011-01-01

    Infection has long been implicated as a trigger for autoimmune disease. Other antigenic challenges include receipt of allogeneic tissue or blood resulting in immunomodulation. We investigated antigenic challenges as possible risk factors for autoimmune disease in women using the Health and Retirement Study, a nationally representative longitudinal study, linked to Medicare files, years 1991–2007. The prevalence of autoimmune disease (rheumatoid arthritis, Hashimoto’s disease, Graves’ disease,...

  9. Autoimmune diseases and fungal infections: immunological mechanisms and therapeutic approaches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian-zhong

    2009-01-01

    @@ Autoimmune disease represents a breakdown of natural tolerance to autoreactive antigens.Pemphigus and lupus erythematosus are common autoimmune diseases either skin-specific or with predominant skin involvement. During the past decades,much progress has been made in understanding the mechanism of autoimmune diseases and the immunological mechanism in some infectious diseases such as fungal infections. Various novel approaches have been developed in the treatment of these diseases.

  10. Coeliac disease in endocrine diseases of autoimmune origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miśkiewicz, Piotr; Kępczyńska-Nyk, Anna; Bednarczuk, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Coeliac disease (CD, sometimes called gluten-sensitive enteropathy or nontropical sprue) is an inflammatory disorder of the small intestine of autoimmune origin. It occurs in genetically predisposed people and is induced by a gluten protein, which is a component of wheat. The prevalence of histologically confirmed CD is estimated in screening studies of adults in the United States and Europe to be between 0.2% and 1.0%. The results of previous studies have indicated that the prevalence of CD is increased in patients with other autoimmune disorders such as: autoimmune thyroid diseases, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and Addison's disease. A coincidence of the above diseases constitutes autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS). The high prevalence of CD in APS is probably due to the common genetic predisposition to the coexistent autoimmune diseases. The majority of adult patients have the atypical or silent type of the disease. This is the main reason why CD so often goes undiagnosed or the diagnosis is delayed. CD, if undiagnosed and untreated, is associated with many medical disorders including haematological (anaemia), metabolical (osteopenia/osteoporosis), obstetric-gynaecological (infertility, spontaneous abortions, late puberty, early menopause), neurological (migraine, ataxia, epilepsy) as well as with an increased risk of malignancy, especially: enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma, small intestine adenocarcinoma, and oesophageal and oropharyngeal carcinomas. Early introduction of a gluten-free diet and lifelong adherence to this treatment decreases the risk of these complications. PMID:22744631

  11. Genetics of autoimmune diseases: a multistep process.

    OpenAIRE

    Johannesson, Martina; Hultqvist, Malin; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2006-01-01

    It has so far been difficult to identify genes behind polygenic autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), multiple sclerosis (MS), and type I diabetes (T1D). With proper animal models, some of the complexity behind these diseases can be reduced. The use of linkage analysis and positional cloning of genes in animal models for RA resulted in the identification of one of the genes regulating severity of arthritis in rats and mice, the Ncf1 gene. The Ncf1 gene encodes for the Ncf1 pr...

  12. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patrick-Melin, A J; Kalinski, M I; Kelly, K R;

    2009-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a rapidly emerging chronic liver disease and is reported to affect up to 70-80% of overweight and obese individuals. NAFLD represents a spectrum of liver diseases that range from simple hepatic steatosis, to a more severe and treatment resistant stage...... that features steatosis plus inflammation, termed nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which may in turn progress to hepatic fibrosis, cirrhosis, and sub-acute liver failure. Thus, NAFLD and its subsequent complications create a significant health burden, and currently there is no effective treatment strategy...... the potential role of exercise in treating and preventing NAFLD. Regular exercise can reverse insulin resistance, suppress low-grade systemic inflammation, and attenuate inflammatory markers associated with NAFLD. Thus, exercise has the potential to become an effective treatment and prevention modality...

  13. Alcoholic Liver Disease and Liver Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos-Orozco, Juan F; Charlton, Michael R

    2016-08-01

    Excessive alcohol use is a common health care problem worldwide and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Alcoholic liver disease represents the second most frequent indication for liver transplantation in North America and Europe. The pretransplant evaluation of patients with alcoholic liver disease should aim at identifying those at high risk for posttransplant relapse of alcohol use disorder, as return to excessive drinking can be deleterious to graft and patient survival. Carefully selected patients with alcoholic liver disease, including those with severe alcoholic hepatitis, will have similar short-term and long-term outcomes when compared with other indications for liver transplantation. PMID:27373614

  14. Ovarian autoimmune disease: clinical concepts and animal models

    OpenAIRE

    Warren, Bryce D; Kinsey, William K; McGinnis, Lynda K; Christenson, Lane K.; Jasti, Susmita; Stevens, Anne M.; Petroff, Brian K.; Petroff, Margaret G.

    2014-01-01

    The ovary is not an immunologically privileged organ, but a breakdown in tolerogenic mechanisms for ovary-specific antigens has disastrous consequences on fertility in women, and this is replicated in murine models of autoimmune disease. Isolated ovarian autoimmune disease is rare in women, likely due to the severity of the disease and the inability to transmit genetic information conferring the ovarian disease across generations. Nonetheless, autoimmune oophoritis is often observed in associ...

  15. Sex bias in CNS autoimmune disease mediated by androgen control of autoimmune regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Meng-Lei; Bakhru, Pearl; Conley, Bridget; Nelson, Jennifer S; Free, Meghan; Martin, Aaron; Starmer, Joshua; Wilson, Elizabeth M; Su, Maureen A

    2016-01-01

    Male gender is protective against multiple sclerosis and other T-cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. This protection may be due, in part, to higher androgen levels in males. Androgen binds to the androgen receptor (AR) to regulate gene expression, but how androgen protects against autoimmunity is not well understood. Autoimmune regulator (Aire) prevents autoimmunity by promoting self-antigen expression in medullary thymic epithelial cells, such that developing T cells that recognize these self-antigens within the thymus undergo clonal deletion. Here we show that androgen upregulates Aire-mediated thymic tolerance to protect against autoimmunity. Androgen recruits AR to Aire promoter regions, with consequent enhancement of Aire transcription. In mice and humans, thymic Aire expression is higher in males compared with females. Androgen administration and male gender protect against autoimmunity in a multiple sclerosis mouse model in an Aire-dependent manner. Thus, androgen control of an intrathymic Aire-mediated tolerance mechanism contributes to gender differences in autoimmunity. PMID:27072778

  16. Recurrence of cholestatic liver disease after living donor liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sumihito Tamura; Masatoshi Hakuuchi; Yasuhiko Sugawara; Junichi Kaneko; Junichi Togashi; Yuichi Matsui; Noriyo Yamashiki; Norihiro Kokudo

    2008-01-01

    End-stage liver disease,due to cholestatic liver diseases with an autoimmune background such as primary biliary cirrhosis(PBC)and primary sclerosing cholangitis(PSC),is considered a good indication for liver transplantation.Excellent overall patient and graft outcomes,based mostly on the experience from deceased donor liver ransplantation(DDLT),have been reported.Due to the limited number of oraan donations from deceased donors in most Asian countries,living donor liver transplantation(LDLT)is the mainstream treatment for end-stage liver disease,including that resulting from PBC and PSC.Although the initial experiences with LDLT for PBC and PSC seem satisfactory or comparable to that with DLT,some aspects,including the timing of transplantation,the risk of recurrent disease,and its long-term clinical implications,require further evaluation.Whether or not the long-term outcomes of LDLT from a biologically related donor are equivalent to that of DDLT requires further observations.The clinical course following LDLT may be affected by he genetic background shared between the recipient and the living related donor.(C)2008 The WJG Press.All rights reserved.

  17.  An autoimmune polyglandular syndrome complicated with celiac disease and autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieli-Crimi, Romina; Núñez, Concepción; Estrada, Lourdes; López-Palacios, Natalia

    2016-01-01

     Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS) is a combination of different autoimmune diseases. The close relationship between immune-mediated disorders makes it mandatory to perform serological screening periodically in order to avoid delayed diagnosis of additional autoimmune diseases. We studied a patient with type 1 diabetes (T1D) who later developed an autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) and was referred to our hospital with a serious condition of his clinical status. The patient was suffering from an advance stage of celiac disease (CD), the delay in its diagnosis and in the establishment of a gluten-free dietled the patient to a severe proteincalorie malnutrition. Later, the patient developed an autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). We consider that clinical deterioration in patients with APS should alert physicians about the possible presence of other immune-mediated diseases. Periodic screening for autoantibodies would help to prevent delayed diagnosis and would improve patient's quality of life. PMID:27236159

  18. Etiologies of chronic liver disease in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahmand F

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Liver diseases in children is the result of many different diseases including: metabolic, genetic, infectious, toxic and idiopathic causes. This was a case series study on 133 infants and children with age range 6 month to 12 years old, who presented clinically with manifestation of chronic liver disease and were admitted to Children Hospital Medical Center from year 1999 to 2000. In this study, 32 (24.5 percent patients had autoimmune chronic hepatitis, 15 (11.3 percent Glycogen storage diseases, 12 (9 percent extrahepatic biliary atresia, 11 (8.2 percent willson disease, 10 (7.5 percent cryptogenic cirrhosis, 6 (4.5 percent chronic hepatitis C, 5 (3.8 percen chronic hepatitic B, 5 (3.8 percent galactosemia 3 (2.25 percent congenital hepatic fibrosis, 3 (3.8 percent histiocytosis X, 3 (2.25 percent sclerosing cholangitis, 2 (1.5 percent byler’s disease 2 (1.5 percent primary tuberculosis, 1 (0.75 percent choledocalcyst, 1 (0.75 percent Alagyle syndrome. According to our data, chronic liver disease should be considered in infants and children. In our study, the most common causes are found to be: metabolic and genetic diseases (37.5 percent, chronic autoimmune hepatitis (24 percent and biliary disorders (14 percent, that encompass 86 percent of the patients.

  19. Autoimmune vitiligo in rheumatic disease in the mestizo Mexican population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avalos-Díaz, Esperanza; Pérez-Pérez, Elena; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Mayra; Pacheco-Tovar, María-Guadalupe; Herrera-Esparza, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is a chronic disease characterized by the dysfunction or destruction of melanocytes with secondary depigmentation. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of vitiligo associated with autoimmune rheumatic diseases. The clinical records from a 10-year database of patients with rheumatic diseases and associated vitiligo was analysed, with one group of patients having autoimmune rheumatic disease and another non-autoimmune rheumatic disease. Available serum samples were used to assess the anti-melanocyte antibodies. A total of 5,251 individual clinical files were archived in the last 10 years, and these patients underwent multiple rheumatology consultations, with 0.3% of the group presenting with vitiligo. The prevalence of vitiligo in the autoimmune rheumatic disease group was 0.672%, which was mainly associated with lupus and arthritis. However, patients with more than one autoimmune disease had an increased relative risk to develop vitiligo, and anti-melanocyte antibodies were positive in 92% of these patients. By contrast, the prevalence was 0.082% in the group that lacked autoimmune rheumatic disease and had negative autoantibodies. In conclusion, the association between vitiligo and autoimmune rheumatic diseases was relatively low. However, the relative risk increased when there were other autoimmune comorbidities, such as thyroiditis or celiac disease. Therefore, the presence of multiple autoimmune syndromes should be suspected. PMID:27446537

  20. Sex Differences in Autoimmune Disease from a Pathological Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Fairweather, DeLisa; Frisancho-Kiss, Sylvia; Rose, Noel R.

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases affect ∼8% of the population, 78% of whom are women. The reason for the high prevalence in women is unclear. Women are known to respond to infection, vaccination, and trauma with increased antibody production and a more T helper (Th)2-predominant immune response, whereas a Th1 response and inflammation are usually more severe in men. This review discusses the distribution of autoimmune diseases based on sex and age, showing that autoimmune diseases progress from an acute p...

  1. Encephalopathy Associated With Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    li A. Raouf

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs are immune-endocrine disorders affecting the thyroid gland and, eventually, also a number of other systemic targets, including the brain and the nervous system. Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD is a rare, heterogeneous condition arising from the background of an ATD. It is characterised by neurological and/or psychiatric symptoms with acute or sub-acute onset, and virtually any neurological or psychiatric symptom can appear. However, EAATD often presents with confusion, altered consciousness, seizures, or myoclonus. The majority of cases are associated with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, but a number of patients with Graves’ disease have also been described. EAATD is likely an immune-mediated disorder. Its exact prevalence has not been precisely elucidated, with an increasing number of cases reported in the last few years. Most EAATD patients respond in a dramatic manner to corticosteroids. However, the immunosuppressive treatment may require a long course (up to 12 months. The increasing number of EAATD cases reported in the literature demonstrates a growing interest of the scientific community about this condition, which still requires a better definition of its pathophysiology, the diagnostic criteria, and the most appropriate management, including the long-term follow-up of patients. The current clinical evidence about EAATD is mostly based on the report of single cases or small cohort studies. In this review, we present the current knowledge about EAATD, with a dedicated focus to the clinical management of the patients from a diagnostic and therapeutic perspective.

  2. Autoimmune diseases in the TH17 era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Mesquita Jr.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A new subtype of CD4+ T lymphocytes characterized by the production of interleukin 17, i.e., TH17 cells, has been recently described. This novel T cell subset is distinct from type 1 and type 2 T helper cells. The major feature of this subpopulation is to generate significant amounts of pro-inflammatory cytokines, therefore appearing to be critically involved in protection against infection caused by extracellular microorganisms, and in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and allergy. The dynamic balance among subsets of T cells is important for the modulation of several steps of the immune response. Disturbances in this balance may cause a shift from normal immunologic physiology to the development of immune-mediated disorders. In autoimmune diseases, the fine balance between the proportion and degree of activation of the various T lymphocyte subsets can contribute to persistent undesirable inflammatory responses and tissue replacement by fibrosis. This review highlights the importance of TH17 cells in this process by providing an update on the biology of these cells and focusing on their biology and differentiation processes in the context of immune-mediated chronic inflammatory diseases.

  3. Imaging B lymphocytes in autoimmune inflammatory diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    B cells arise from stem cells precursor and develop through a tightly regulated and selective process that lead to the generation of different B cell populations such as transitional, mature, memory and plasma cells. These B cell subsets can be identified using flow cytometry by the expression of specific surface antigens. The growing knowledge of the pivotal role played by B cells in the development and progression of autoimmune diseases combined with the advances in monoclonal antibody technology, led in the last years to the generation of different biological agents targeting B cells. In this context, nuclear medicine can offer the possibility to use a panel of biologic radiopharmaceuticals for molecular imaging of inflammatory diseases. Radiopharmaceuticals bind to their targets with high affinity and specificity and have an excellent imaging diagnostic potential for the evaluation of disease activity, selection and monitoring of immune therapies. Several molecules have been radiolabelled for the imaging of T lymphocytes whereas, by now, the anti CD20 rituximab is the only biological therapy targeting B cells that demonstrated to be efficiently radiolabelled and used to detect inflammation in autoimmune patients

  4. Pulmonary hypertension in autoimmune rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Massironi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Pulmonary hypertension is a severe and rapidly progressive disease, particularly frequent in patients with rheumatic diseases. The aims of this study were the following: to determine the prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in Italian patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases, and to evaluate if the presence of a rheumatic disease in general, or of a specific autoimmune rheumatic disease, is a risk factor for the development of pulmonary hypertension. Patients and Methods. One hundred and thirteen Italian patients with connective tissue diseases (105 females, 8 males, aged 19 to 83 yrs, entered the study. Fifty-one had systemic sclerosis (SSc: 49 were females, 2 males, aged 34 to 83 yrs; 41 had limited cutaneous SSc, 8 diffuse cutaneous SSc, and 2 SSc sine scleroderma. Thirty-three patients had systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE: all but one were females, their age ranged from 19 to 82 yrs. Twenty-five had rheumatoid arthritis (RA: 21 females, 4 males, aged 26 to 45 yrs. Three females and one male, 51-77 yrs, had mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD. Systolic pulmonary arterial pressure (SPAP was assessed by Doppler echocardiography. Results. Twenty three patients had pulmonary hypertension, which was more frequent in MCTD than in SLE (75% vs 6.1%, p=0.0002 or in AR (20%, p=0.0313. Pulmonary hypertension was more frequent in SSc than in SLE (25.5% vs 6.1%, p=0.0028 and in limited than in diffuse SSc(21.6% vs 3.9%. SPAP was significanly related to age (R=0.35, P=0.0275, with patients with pulmonary hypertension older than patients with normal SPAP (66±13 vs 52±16 yrs, p=0.0003. Conclusions. These data show a significant association between pulmonary hypertension and autoimmune rheumatic diseases. Therefore pulmonary hypertension assessment seems mandatory, at least in MCTD and SSc. However, more studies are needed to clarify the relationship between age and pulmonary hypertension and to verify whether the low prevalence of

  5. Spondyloarthropathies in Autoimmune Diseases and Vice Versa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar M. Pérez-Fernández

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyautoimmunity is one of the major clinical characteristics of autoimmune diseases (ADs. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of ADs in spondyloarthropathies (SpAs and vice versa. This was a two-phase cross-sectional study. First, we examined the presence of ADs in a cohort of patients with SpAs (N=148. Second, we searched for the presence of SpAs in a well-defined group of patients with ADs (N=1077 including rheumatoid arthritis (RA, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, and Sjögren’s syndrome (SS. Among patients with SpAs, ankylosing spondylitis was observed in the majority of them (55.6%. There were two patients presenting with SS in the SpA group (1.4% and 5 patients with autoimmune thyroiditis (3.5%. The global prevalence of ADs in SpAs was 4.86%. In the ADs group, there were 5 patients with SpAs (0.46%. Our results suggest a lack of association between SpAs and ADs. Accordingly, SpAs might correspond more to autoinflammatory diseases rather than to ADs.

  6. Applications of Next-generation Sequencing in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yiyangzi Ma; Na Shi; Mengtao Li; Fei Chen; Haitao Niu

    2015-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases are a group of heterogeneous disorders caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Although numerous causal genes have been identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS), these susceptibility genes are correlated to a relatively low disease risk, indicating that environmental factors also play an important role in the pathogen-esis of disease. The intestinal microbiome, as the main symbiotic ecosystem between the host and host-associated microorganisms, has been demonstrated to regulate the development of the body’s immune system and is likely related to genetic mutations in systemic autoimmune diseases. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology, with high-throughput capacity and accuracy, provides a powerful tool to discover genomic mutations, abnormal transcription and intestinal microbiome identification for autoimmune diseases. In this review, we briefly outlined the applications of NGS in systemic autoimmune diseases. This review may provide a reference for future studies in the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune diseases.

  7. Pharmacometabolomics-aided Pharmacogenomics in Autoimmune Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodora Katsila

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Inter-individual variability has been a major hurdle to optimize disease management. Precision medicine holds promise for improving health and healthcare via tailor-made therapeutic strategies. Herein, we outline the paradigm of “pharmacometabolomics-aided pharmacogenomics” in autoimmune diseases. We envisage merging pharmacometabolomic and pharmacogenomic data (to address the interplay of genomic and environmental influences with information technologies to facilitate data analysis as well as sense- and decision-making on the basis of synergy between artificial and human intelligence. Humans can detect patterns, which computer algorithms may fail to do so, whereas data-intensive and cognitively complex settings and processes limit human ability. We propose that better-informed, rapid and cost-effective omics studies need the implementation of holistic and multidisciplinary approaches.

  8. Gene expression profiling in autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovin, Lone Frier; Brynskov, Jørn; Hegedüs, Laszlo;

    2007-01-01

    A central issue in autoimmune disease is whether the underlying inflammation is a repeated stereotypical process or whether disease specific gene expression is involved. To shed light on this, we analysed whether genes previously found to be differentially regulated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA...... differences in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (MNC) gene expression patterns between 15 newly diagnosed HT patients and 15 matched healthy controls. However, the MNC expression levels of five genes were significantly upregulated in 25 IBD patients, compared to 18 matched healthy controls (CD14, FACL2, FCN1......, RNASE2, VNN2). There was concordance in the directional change for all genes between IBD and RA patients, i.e. increased expression compared to controls. These data show that one third of the genes significantly upregulated in MNC from RA patients were upregulated in patients with other chronic...

  9. Systemic abnormalities in liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    Minemura, Masami; Tajiri, Kazuto; Shimizu, Yukihiro

    2009-01-01

    Systemic abnormalities often occur in patients with liver disease. In particular, cardiopulmonary or renal diseases accompanied by advanced liver disease can be serious and may determine the quality of life and prognosis of patients. Therefore, both hepatologists and non-hepatologists should pay attention to such abnormalities in the management of patients with liver diseases.

  10. Hypertension and liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens H; Møller, Søren

    2004-01-01

    Arterial hypertension is a common disorder with a frequency of 10% to 15% in subjects in the 40- to 60-year age group. Yet most reports find the prevalence of arterial hypertension in patients with chronic liver disease (cirrhosis) much lower. In this review, we consider the alterations in systemic...

  11. Toll-Like Receptor 3 in Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Yin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3 is a member of the TLR family that can recognize double-stranded RNA (dsRNA, playing an important role in antiviral immunity. Recent studies have shown that TLR3 is also expressed on parenchymal and nonparenchymal cells in the liver as well as on several types of immune cells. In this review, we summarize the role of TLR3 in liver injury, inflammation, regeneration, and liver fibrosis, and discuss the implication of TLR3 in the pathogenesis of human liver diseases including viral hepatitis and autoimmune liver disease.

  12. Autoimmune hepatitis, one disease with many faces: Etiopathogenetic, clinico-laboratory and histological characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Gatselis, Nikolaos K.; Zachou, Kalliopi; Koukoulis, George K; Dalekos, George N.

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is an unresolving progressive liver disease of unknown etiology characterized by hypergammaglobulinemia, autoantibodies detection and interface hepatitis. Due to the absence of specific diagnostic markers and the large heterogeneity of its clinical, laboratory and histological features, AIH diagnosis may be potentially difficult. Therefore, in this in-depth review we summarize the substantial progress on etiopathogenesis, clinical, serological and histological pheno...

  13. in Human Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoru Fujimoto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptor (TLR signaling pathways are strictly coordinated by several mechanisms to regulate adequate innate immune responses. Recent lines of evidence indicate that the suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS family proteins, originally identified as negative-feedback regulators in cytokine signaling, are involved in the regulation of TLR-mediated immune responses. SOCS1, a member of SOCS family, is strongly induced upon TLR stimulation. Cells lacking SOCS1 are hyperresponsive to TLR stimulation. Thus, SOCS1 is an important regulator for both cytokine and TLR-induced responses. As an immune organ, the liver contains various types of immune cells such as T cells, NK cells, NKT cells, and Kupffer cells and is continuously challenged with gut-derived bacterial and dietary antigens. SOCS1 may be implicated in pathophysiology of the liver. The studies using SOCS1-deficient mice revealed that endogenous SOCS1 is critical for the prevention of liver diseases such as hepatitis, cirrhosis, and cancers. Recent studies on humans suggest that SOCS1 is involved in the development of various liver disorders in humans. Thus, SOCS1 and other SOCS proteins are potential targets for the therapy of human liver diseases.

  14. Graft versus host disease following liver transplantation: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Changsong; YANG, GUANGSHUN; LING, YANG; Chen, Guihua; Zhou, Tianbao

    2014-01-01

    Graft versus host disease (GVHD) is an uncommon complication following liver transplantation. In the present case report, a 53-year-old male hepatitis B virus carrier was diagnosed with primary liver cancer with post-hepatitis cirrhosis. Preoperative cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus, coxsackievirus, herpes simplex virus and autoimmune antibody series were negative. Preoperative human leukocyte antigen type was also negative. Following classic orthotropic liver transplantation, postop...

  15. Propylthiouracil for alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fede, Giuseppe; Germani, Giacomo; Gluud, Christian;

    2011-01-01

    Randomised clinical trials have addressed the question whether propylthiouracil has any beneficial effects in patients with alcoholic liver disease.......Randomised clinical trials have addressed the question whether propylthiouracil has any beneficial effects in patients with alcoholic liver disease....

  16. Selected Aspects in the Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    György Nagy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune processes can be found in physiological circumstances. However, they are quenched with properly functioning regulatory mechanisms and do not evolve into full-blown autoimmune diseases. Once developed, autoimmune diseases are characterized by signature clinical features, accompanied by sustained cellular and/or humoral immunological abnormalities. Genetic, environmental, and hormonal defects, as well as a quantitative and qualitative impairment of immunoregulatory functions, have been shown in parallel to the relative dominance of proinflammatory Th17 cells in many of these diseases. In this review we focus on the derailed balance between regulatory and Th17 cells in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Additionally, we depict a cytokine imbalance, which gives rise to a biased T-cell homeostasis. The assessment of Th17/Treg-cell ratio and the simultaneous quantitation of cytokines, may give a useful diagnostic tool in autoimmune diseases. We also depict the multifaceted role of dendritic cells, serving as antigen presenting cells, contributing to the development of the pathognomonic cytokine signature and promote cellular and humoral autoimmune responses. Finally we describe the function and role of extracellular vesicles in particular autoimmune diseases. Targeting these key players of disease progression in patients with autoimmune diseases by immunomodulating therapy may be beneficial in future therapeutic strategies.

  17. Biological and clinical aspects of autoimmune inner ear disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Griffith, A J

    1992-01-01

    The clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of autoimmune inner ear disease are reviewed. Recent studies indicating an autoimmune etiology and pathogenesis are discussed, along with a comparative analysis of several promising new animal models. Further studies to define the natural history, pathogenesis, and diagnosis of the disease are suggested.

  18. Modeling toxicodynamic effects of trichloroethylene on liver in mouse model of autoimmune hepatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic exposure to industrial solvent and water pollutant trichloroethylene (TCE) in female MRL +/+ mice generates disease similar to human autoimmune hepatitis. The current study was initiated to investigate why TCE-induced autoimmunity targeted the liver. Compared to other tissues the liver has an unusually robust capacity for repair and regeneration. This investigation examined both time-dependent and dose-dependent effects of TCE on hepatoprotective and pro-inflammatory events in liver and macrophages from female MRL +/+ mice. After a 12-week exposure to TCE in drinking water a dose-dependent decrease in macrophage production of IL-6 at both the transcriptional and protein level was observed. A longitudinal study similarly showed that TCE inhibited macrophage IL-6 production. In terms of the liver, TCE had little effect on expression of pro-inflammatory genes (Tnfa, Saa2 or Cscl1) until the end of the 40-week exposure. Instead, TCE suppressed hepatic expression of genes involved in IL-6 signaling (Il6r, gp130, and Egr1). Linear regression analysis confirmed liver histopathology in the TCE-treated mice correlated with decreased expression of Il6r. A toxicodynamic model was developed to estimate the effects of TCE on IL-6 signaling and liver pathology under different levels of exposure and rates of repair. This study underlined the importance of longitudinal studies in mechanistic evaluations of immuntoxicants. It showed that later-occurring liver pathology caused by TCE was associated with early suppression of hepatoprotection rather than an increase in conventional pro-inflammatory events. This information was used to create a novel toxicodynamic model of IL-6-mediated TCE-induced liver inflammation. - Highlights: • We developed a toxicodynamic model to study effects of trichloroethylene on liver. • We examined protective as well as pro-inflammatory events in the liver. • Trichloroethylene inhibits IL-6 production by macrophages. • Trichloroethylene

  19. Modeling toxicodynamic effects of trichloroethylene on liver in mouse model of autoimmune hepatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, Kathleen M., E-mail: gilbertkathleenm@uams.edu [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Arkansas Children' s Hospital Research Institute, Little Rock, AR 72202 (United States); Reisfeld, Brad, E-mail: brad.reisfeld@colostate.edu [Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO (United States); Zurlinden, Todd J., E-mail: tjzurlin@rams.colostate.edu [Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO (United States); Kreps, Meagan N., E-mail: MNKreps@uams.edu [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Arkansas Children' s Hospital Research Institute, Little Rock, AR 72202 (United States); Erickson, Stephen W., E-mail: serickson@uams.edu [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Arkansas Children' s Hospital Research Institute, Little Rock, AR 72202 (United States); Blossom, Sarah J., E-mail: blossomsarah@uams.edu [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Arkansas Children' s Hospital Research Institute, Little Rock, AR 72202 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Chronic exposure to industrial solvent and water pollutant trichloroethylene (TCE) in female MRL +/+ mice generates disease similar to human autoimmune hepatitis. The current study was initiated to investigate why TCE-induced autoimmunity targeted the liver. Compared to other tissues the liver has an unusually robust capacity for repair and regeneration. This investigation examined both time-dependent and dose-dependent effects of TCE on hepatoprotective and pro-inflammatory events in liver and macrophages from female MRL +/+ mice. After a 12-week exposure to TCE in drinking water a dose-dependent decrease in macrophage production of IL-6 at both the transcriptional and protein level was observed. A longitudinal study similarly showed that TCE inhibited macrophage IL-6 production. In terms of the liver, TCE had little effect on expression of pro-inflammatory genes (Tnfa, Saa2 or Cscl1) until the end of the 40-week exposure. Instead, TCE suppressed hepatic expression of genes involved in IL-6 signaling (Il6r, gp130, and Egr1). Linear regression analysis confirmed liver histopathology in the TCE-treated mice correlated with decreased expression of Il6r. A toxicodynamic model was developed to estimate the effects of TCE on IL-6 signaling and liver pathology under different levels of exposure and rates of repair. This study underlined the importance of longitudinal studies in mechanistic evaluations of immuntoxicants. It showed that later-occurring liver pathology caused by TCE was associated with early suppression of hepatoprotection rather than an increase in conventional pro-inflammatory events. This information was used to create a novel toxicodynamic model of IL-6-mediated TCE-induced liver inflammation. - Highlights: • We developed a toxicodynamic model to study effects of trichloroethylene on liver. • We examined protective as well as pro-inflammatory events in the liver. • Trichloroethylene inhibits IL-6 production by macrophages. • Trichloroethylene

  20. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunt, Elizabeth M; Wong, Vincent W-S; Nobili, Valerio; Day, Christopher P; Sookoian, Silvia; Maher, Jacquelyn J; Bugianesi, Elisabetta; Sirlin, Claude B; Neuschwander-Tetri, Brent A; Rinella, Mary E

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a disorder characterized by excess accumulation of fat in hepatocytes (nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL)); in up to 40% of individuals, there are additional findings of portal and lobular inflammation and hepatocyte injury (which characterize nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)). A subset of patients will develop progressive fibrosis, which can progress to cirrhosis. Hepatocellular carcinoma and cardiovascular complications are life-threatening co-morbidities of both NAFL and NASH. NAFLD is closely associated with insulin resistance; obesity and metabolic syndrome are common underlying factors. As a consequence, the prevalence of NAFLD is estimated to be 10-40% in adults worldwide, and it is the most common liver disease in children and adolescents in developed countries. Mechanistic insights into fat accumulation, subsequent hepatocyte injury, the role of the immune system and fibrosis as well as the role of the gut microbiota are unfolding. Furthermore, genetic and epigenetic factors might explain the considerable interindividual variation in disease phenotype, severity and progression. To date, no effective medical interventions exist that completely reverse the disease other than lifestyle changes, dietary alterations and, possibly, bariatric surgery. However, several strategies that target pathophysiological processes such as an oversupply of fatty acids to the liver, cell injury and inflammation are currently under investigation. Diagnosis of NAFLD can be established by imaging, but detection of the lesions of NASH still depend on the gold-standard but invasive liver biopsy. Several non-invasive strategies are being evaluated to replace or complement biopsies, especially for follow-up monitoring. PMID:27188459

  1. Celiac Disease and Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ch’ng, Chin Lye; Jones, M Keston; Kingham, Jeremy G. C.

    2007-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) or gluten sensitive enteropathy is relatively common in western populations with prevalence around 1%. With the recent availability of sensitive and specific serological testing, many patients who are either asymptomatic or have subtle symptoms can be shown to have CD. Patients with CD have modest increases in risks of malignancy and mortality compared to controls. The mortality among CD patients who comply poorly with a gluten-free diet is greater than in compliant patien...

  2. Propylthiouracil for alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, A; Gluud, C

    2002-01-01

    Alcohol is the most common cause of liver disease in the Western world today. Randomised clinical trials have addressed the question whether propylthiouracil has any efficacy in patients with alcoholic liver disease.......Alcohol is the most common cause of liver disease in the Western world today. Randomised clinical trials have addressed the question whether propylthiouracil has any efficacy in patients with alcoholic liver disease....

  3. The Epidemiologic Evidence Linking Autoimmune Diseases and Psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benros, Michael E; Eaton, William W; Mortensen, Preben B

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes the epidemiologic evidence linking autoimmune diseases and psychosis. The associations between autoimmune diseases and psychosis have been studied for more than a half century, but research has intensified within the last decades, since psychosis has been associated with...... genetic markers of the immune system and with excess autoreactivity and other immune alterations. A range of psychiatric disorders, including psychosis, have been observed to occur more frequently in some autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus and multiple sclerosis. Many autoimmune...... diseases involve multiple organs and general dysfunction of the immune system, which could affect the brain and induce psychiatric symptoms. Most studies have been cross-sectional, observing an increased prevalence of a broad number of autoimmune diseases in people with psychotic disorders. Furthermore...

  4. Ocular Involvement in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generali, Elena; Cantarini, Luca; Selmi, Carlo

    2015-12-01

    Eye involvement represents a common finding in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases, particularly rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren syndrome, seronegative spondyloarthropathy, and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis. The eye is a privileged immune site but commensal bacteria are found on the ocular surface. The eye injury may be inflammatory, vascular or infectious, as well as iatrogenic, as in the case of hydroxychloroquine, chloroquine, corticosteroids, and bisphosphonates. Manifestations may affect different components of the eye, with episcleritis involving the episclera, a thin layer of tissue covering the sclera; scleritis being an inflammation of the sclera potentially leading to blindness; keratitis, referring to corneal inflammation frequently associated with scleritis; and uveitis as the inflammation of the uvea, including the iris, ciliary body, and choroid, subdivided into anterior, posterior, or panuveitis. As blindness may result from the eye involvement, clinicians should be aware of the possible manifestations and their management also independent of the ophthalmologist opinion as the therapeutic approach generally points to the underlying diseases. In some cases, the eye involvement may have a diagnostic implication, as for episcleritis in rheumatoid arthritis, or acute anterior uveitis in seronegative spondyloarthritis. Nonetheless, some conditions lack specificity, as in the case of dry eye which affects nearly 30 % of the general population. The aim of this review is to elucidate to non-ophthalmologists the major ocular complications of rheumatic diseases and their specific management and treatment options. PMID:26494481

  5. [Dietotherapy children with liver diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovskaia, E V; Strokova, T V; Topil'skaia, N V; Isakova, V A

    2009-01-01

    In children with liver diseases disorders of the nutritional status appear more quickly and delay normal growth and development. Administration of the nutritional support based on nosological and syndromal approaches lets provide optimal conditions for normalization of the liver functions, improves efficiency of therapy and prognosis of the disease. The article contents modern recommendations on the organization of nutrition in children with different liver diseases, correction of metabolic disorders during complications of liver pathology. PMID:20120964

  6. Primary biliary cirrhosis and autoimmune cholangitis are not associated with coeliac disease in Crete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimoulios Philippos

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An increased prevalence of coeliac disease in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis has been recently reported. However, in other studies the association has not been confirmed. There have been no formal attempts to systematically evaluate patients with autoimmune cholangitis for coeliac disease. Methods Sera from 62 patients with primary biliary cirrhosis, 17 with autoimmune cholangitis and 100 blood donors were screened for anti-gliadin, anti-endomysial, anti-reticulin, and IgA class antibodies to guinea pig liver-derived tissue transglutaminase. Eighteen untreated coeliacs served as methodological controls. Analyses were performed by using the χ2 and Fischer's exact tests. Results Anti-gliadin antibodies were detected in 21% of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis, 35% of patients with autoimmune cholangitis, and 3% of controls (p Conclusions We were unable to demonstrate an increased risk of coeliac disease in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis and autoimmune cholangitis. Our results confirm the previously reported high prevalence of false-positive anti-gliadin and guinea pig liver-derived anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies in patients with chronic liver disease.

  7. Optimizing management in autoimmune hepatitis with liver failure at initial presentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jonathan R Potts; Sumita Verma

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a disease of unknown etiology, its hallmark being ongoing hepatic inflamma-tion. By its very nature, it is a chronic condition, al-though increasingly, we are becoming aware of patients with acute presentations, some of whom may have liver failure. There are very limited published data on patients with AIH with liver failure at initial diagnosis, which consist mostly of small retrospective studies. As a consequence, the clinical features and optimal management of this cohort remain poorly defined. A subset of patients with AIH who present with liver failure do respond to corticosteroids, but for the vast majority, an urgent liver transplantation may offer the only hope of long-term survival. At present, there is uncertainty on how best to stratify such a cohort into responders and non-responders to corticosteroids as soon as possible after hospitalization, thus optimizing their management. This editorial attempts to answer some of the unre-solved issues relating to management of patients with AIH with liver failure at initial presentation. However, it must be emphasized that, at present, this editorial is based mostly on small retrospective studies, and it is an understatement that multicenter prospective studies are urgently needed to address this important clinical issue.

  8. Involvement of dendritic cells in autoimmune diseases in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed Ann M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dendritic cells (DCs are professional antigen-presenting cells that are specialized in the uptake of antigens and their transport from peripheral tissues to the lymphoid organs. Over the last decades, the properties of DCs have been intensely studied and much knowledge has been gained about the role of DCs in various diseases and health conditions where the immune system is involved, particularly in cancer and autoimmune disorders. Emerging clues in autoimmune diseases, suggest that dendritic cell dysregulation might be involved in the development of various autoimmune disorders in both adults and children. However, studies investigating a possible contribution of DCs in autoimmune diseases in the pediatric population alone are scanty. The purpose of this review is to give a general overview of the current literature on the relevance of dendritic cells in the most common autoimmune conditions of childhood.

  9. Parallel Aspects of the Microenvironment in Cancer and Autoimmune Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahat, Michal A.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer and autoimmune diseases are fundamentally different pathological conditions. In cancer, the immune response is suppressed and unable to eradicate the transformed self-cells, while in autoimmune diseases it is hyperactivated against a self-antigen, leading to tissue injury. Yet, mechanistically, similarities in the triggering of the immune responses can be observed. In this review, we highlight some parallel aspects of the microenvironment in cancer and autoimmune diseases, especially hypoxia, and the role of macrophages, neutrophils, and their interaction. Macrophages, owing to their plastic mode of activation, can generate a pro- or antitumoral microenvironment. Similarly, in autoimmune diseases, macrophages tip the Th1/Th2 balance via various effector cytokines. The contribution of neutrophils, an additional plastic innate immune cell population, to the microenvironment and disease progression is recently gaining more prominence in both cancer and autoimmune diseases, as they can secrete cytokines, chemokines, and reactive oxygen species (ROS), as well as acquire an enhanced ability to produce neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) that are now considered important initiators of autoimmune diseases. Understanding the contribution of macrophages and neutrophils to the cancerous or autoimmune microenvironment, as well as the role their interaction and cooperation play, may help identify new targets and improve therapeutic strategies. PMID:26997761

  10.  Molecular mimicry in the etiology of autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Lis

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available  There are currently more than 80 different autoimmune diseases, affecting approximately 100 million people worldwide. The etiology of most autoimmune diseases is unknown. The highest incidence of these diseases is in the developed countries and they are more common in women than in men. Among the most often listed factors responsible for the onset of autoimmunity are genetic predisposition and the phenomenon known as molecular mimicry. The latter stems from a similarity between microbial antigens and antigens present in the human body (self antigens. It is believed that such homology is responsible for the production of auto-antibodies and in consequence attack of the immune system against host tissues and organs. However, the main molecular factors responsible for these diseases in most cases remain unknown. While pathogenesis of many autoimmune diseases indicates the presence of molecular mimicry, at the same time the similarities between the own and foreign structures do not always result in autoimmunity. Therefore, prediction of such crucial homology responsible for the development of autoimmune disease is extremely difficult. In this paper we present examples of autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, reactive arthritis and the potential contribution of micro-organisms to the mechanism of molecular mimicry.

  11. AIRE variations in Addison's disease and autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøe Wolff, A S; Oftedal, B; Johansson, S; Bruland, O; Løvås, K; Meager, A; Pedersen, Carsten; Husebye, E S; Knappskog, P M

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) is often associated with other components in autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS). Whereas APS I is caused by mutations in the AIRE gene, the susceptibility genes for AAD and APS II are unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether polymorphisms or...

  12. Inflammatory bowel disease after liver transplantation : Risk factors for recurrence and De novo disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdonka, RC; Dijkstra, G; Haagsma, EB; Shostrom, VK; Van den Berg, AP; Kleibeuker, JH

    2006-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and can recur or develop de novo after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence and severity of IBD after liver transplantatio

  13. Polycystic Liver Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 77-year-old African American male presented with intermittent abdominal pain for one week. He denied nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, fevers, anorexia, or weight loss. He denied a family history of liver disease, recent travel, or history of intravenous drug abuse. His vital signs were normal. Labs revealed total bilirubin of 1.5 mg/dl, hypoalbuminaemia 3.0 gm/dl and prolonged prothrombin time of 14.8 sec. Computed Tomography of the abdomen and pelvis with contrast showed multiple hepatic cysts with the largest cyst occupying the right abdomen, measuring 20.6 cm (Panel A and). This cyst had predominantly fluid attenuation, but also contained several septations. The patient underwent laparoscopic fenestration of the large hepatic cyst with hepatic cyst wall biopsy. Pathology revealed blood without malignant cells. The patient tolerated the procedure well with improvement of his abdominal pain and normalization of his liver function tests and coagulation profile

  14. Polycystic Liver Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linda, Nguyen, E-mail: nguyenli@einstein.edu [5501 Old York Road, Philadelphia, PA 19141 (United States)

    2016-03-25

    A 77-year-old African American male presented with intermittent abdominal pain for one week. He denied nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, fevers, anorexia, or weight loss. He denied a family history of liver disease, recent travel, or history of intravenous drug abuse. His vital signs were normal. Labs revealed total bilirubin of 1.5 mg/dl, hypoalbuminaemia 3.0 gm/dl and prolonged prothrombin time of 14.8 sec. Computed Tomography of the abdomen and pelvis with contrast showed multiple hepatic cysts with the largest cyst occupying the right abdomen, measuring 20.6 cm (Panel A and). This cyst had predominantly fluid attenuation, but also contained several septations. The patient underwent laparoscopic fenestration of the large hepatic cyst with hepatic cyst wall biopsy. Pathology revealed blood without malignant cells. The patient tolerated the procedure well with improvement of his abdominal pain and normalization of his liver function tests and coagulation profile.

  15. AUTOIMMUNE DISEASE DURING PREGNANCY AND THE MICROCHIMERISM LEGACY OF PREGNANCY

    OpenAIRE

    Kristina M Adams Waldorf; Nelson, J. Lee

    2008-01-01

    Pregnancy has both short-term effects and long-term consequences. For women who have an autoimmune disease and subsequently become pregnant, pregnancy can induce amelioration of the mother’s disease, such as in rheumatoid arthritis, while exacerbating or having no effect on other autoimmune diseases like systemic lupus erythematosus. That pregnancy also leaves a long-term legacy has recently become apparent by the discovery that bi-directional cell trafficking results in persistence of fetal ...

  16. Liver transplantation in polycystic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krohn, Paul S; Hillingsø, Jens; Kirkegaard, Preben

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Polycystic liver disease (PLD) is a rare, hereditary, benign disorder. Hepatic failure is uncommon and symptoms are caused by mass effects leading to abdominal distension and pain. Liver transplantation (LTX) offers fully curative treatment, but there is still some controversy about...... whether it is a relevant modality considering the absence of liver failure, relative organ shortage, perioperative risks and lifelong immunosuppression. The purpose of this study was to review our experience of LTX for PLD and to compare the survival with the overall survival of patients who underwent LTX...... from 1992 to 2005. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A retrospective study of the journals of 440 patients, who underwent 506 LTXs between 1992 and 2005, showed that 14 patients underwent LTX for PLD. All patients had normal liver function. Three were receiving haemodialysis and thus underwent combined liver...

  17. T Cell Vaccination as an Immunotherapy for Autoimmune Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JingwuZhang

    2004-01-01

    Immunization with inactivated autoreactive T cells (T cell vaccination) selected from individual's own T cellrepertoire provides a unique in vivo setting for testing immune regulation that is known to involve interactionsof a variety of related surface molecules (1). It induces regulatory immune responses that closely resemble thein vivo situation where the immune system is challenged by clonal activation and expansion of given T cellpopulations in various autoimmune diseases. T cell vaccination provides a powerful means of eliciting naturalreactions of the immune system in response to clonal expansion of T cells, which can used as a therapeuticapproach to suppress or eliminate specific pathogenic autoreactive T cells in autoimmune conditions. Clinicaltrials using T cell vaccination to deplete autoreactive T cells in human autoimmune conditions have begun toreveal the pathologic relevance of various autoimmune T cell populations in the disease processes, providing aunique opportunity to test the autoimmune theories in a clinical setting. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.2004; 1(5):321-327.

  18. DNA methylation perspectives in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bao; Hu, Lei; Luo, Zhi-Ying; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Zhang, Wei

    2016-03-01

    DNA methylation is now widely recognized as being critical to maintain the function of immune cells. Recent studies suggest that aberrant DNA methylation levels not only can result in immune cells autoreactivity in vitro, but also are related to autoimmunity in vivo. Environmental factors and genetic polymorphisms cause abnormal methylation, which affects the expression of certain immune-related genes, being becoming hot spot of explaining the mechanism of autoimmune diseases. This paper reviews the importance of abnormal methylation during the development of common autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes, aiming at a better understanding of the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and providing new ideas for the treatment of these diseases. PMID:26821302

  19. Maternal autoimmune thyroid disease and pregnancy complication

    OpenAIRE

    Gudović Aleksandra; Spremović-Radjenović Svetlana; Lazović Gordana; Marinković Jelena; Glišić Andreja; Milićević Srboljub

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aim. Thyroid disorders exert a great impact on pregnancy course and outcome. The aim of the study was to investigate impact of autoimmune thyroid disorders on pregnancy course and outcome, frequency of pregnancy complications and pregnancy loss. Methods. We followed 63 pregnancies prospectively during the period 1985-2007, 28 with hyperthyroid and 15 with hypothyroid autoimmune disorders, and 20 healthy pregnancies. Follow up included clinical, sonographic and laboratory investigat...

  20. Hypertension and liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik; Møller, Søren

    2004-01-01

    Arterial hypertension is a common disorder with a frequency of 10% to 15% in subjects in the 40- to 60-year age group. Yet most reports find the prevalence of arterial hypertension in patients with chronic liver disease (cirrhosis) much lower. In this review, we consider the alterations in systemic...... to increased arterial blood pressure. Subjects with established arterial hypertension (essential, secondary) may become normotensive during the development of cirrhosis, and arterial hypertension is rarely manifested in patients with cirrhosis, even in cases with renovascular disease and high...... circulating renin activity. There is much dispute as to the understanding of homeostatic regulation in cirrhotic patients with manifest arterial hypertension. This is a topic for future research....

  1. Probiotics in Pediatric Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloh, Tamir

    2015-01-01

    The gut-liver axis involves complex interaction between the intestinal microbiome and the liver parenchyma. Probiotics are live microorganisms that are used in a variety of diseases. With currently only 2 randomized-controlled studies (one with Lactobacillus GG and the other with VSL #3), data are scarce to support the clinical effect of probiotic use in children with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. There is evidence that probiotics decrease the risk of necrotizing enterocolitis and thereby reduce the prevalence of total parenteral nutrition-induced chronic liver disease. Probiotics are used with a few reported positive outcomes in patients with cystic fibrosis and familial hypercholesterolemia and may be promising in other liver conditions. Probiotics are generally safe and well tolerated in children, premature infants, and in patients after liver transplantation. Large, prospective, randomized clinical trials are needed to evaluate the benefit of probiotics in children with liver diseases. PMID:26447962

  2. Screening in liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Poggio, Paolo; Mazzoleni, Marzio

    2006-09-01

    A disease is suitable for screening if it is common, if the target population can be identified and reached and if both a good screening test and an effective therapy are available. Of the most common liver diseases only viral hepatitis and genetic hemochromatosis partially satisfy these conditions. Hepatitis C is common, the screening test is good and the therapy eliminates the virus in half of the cases, but problems arise in the definition of the target population. In fact generalized population screening is not endorsed by international guidelines, although some recommend screening immigrants from high prevalence countries. Opportunistic screening (case finding) of individuals with classic risk factors, such as transfusion before 1992 and drug addiction, is the most frequently used strategy, but there is disagreement whether prison inmates, individuals with a history of promiscuous or traumatic sex and health care workers should be screened. In a real practice setting the performance of opportunistic screening by general practitioners is low but can be ameliorated by training programs. Screening targeted to segments of the population or mass campaigns are expensive and therefore interventions should be aimed to improve opportunistic screening and the detection skills of general practitioners. Regarding genetic hemochromatosis there is insufficient evidence for population screening, but individual physicians can decide to screen racial groups with a high prevalence of the disease, such as people in early middle age and of northern European origin. In the other cases opportunistic screening of high risk individuals should be performed, with a high level of suspicion in case of unexplained liver disease, diabetes, juvenile artropathy, sexual dysfunction and skin pigmentation. PMID:16981254

  3. Screening in liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paolo Del Poggio; Marzio Mazzoleni

    2006-01-01

    A disease is suitable for screening if it is common, if the target population can be identified and reached and if both a good screening test and an effective therapy are available. Of the most common liver diseases only viral hepatitis and genetic hemochromatosis partially satisfy these conditions. Hepatitis C is common, the screening test is good and the therapy eliminates the virus in half of the cases, but problems arise in the definition of the target population. In fact generalized population screening is not endorsed by international guidelines,although some recommend screening immigrants from high prevalence countries. Opportunistic screening (case finding) of individuals with classic risk factors,such as transfusion before 1992 and drug addiction,is the most frequently used strategy, but there is disagreement whether prison inmates, individuals with a history of promiscuous or traumatic sex and health care workers should be screened. In a real practice setting the performance of opportunistic screening by general practitioners is low but can be ameliorated by training programs. Screening targeted to segments of the population or mass campaigns are expensive and therefore interventions should be aimed to improve opportunistic screening and the detection skills of general practitioners. Regarding genetic hemochromatosis there is insufficient evidence for population screening, but individual physicians can decide to screen racial groups with a high prevalence of the disease, such as people in early middle age and of northern European origin. In the other cases opportunistic screening of high risk individuals should be performed, with a high level of suspicion in case of unexplained liver disease, diabetes, juvenile artropathy, sexual dysfunction and skin pigmentation.

  4. Autoimmune diseases and severe infections as risk factors for schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benros, Michael E; Nielsen, Philip R; Nordentoft, Merete;

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases have been associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia. It has been suggested that brain-reactive autoantibodies are part of the mechanisms behind this association. Furthermore, an increased permeability of the blood-brain barrier has been observed during periods of...... infection and inflammation. The authors therefore investigated whether autoimmune diseases combined with exposures to severe infections may increase the risk of schizophrenia...

  5. Autoimmune diseases in pregnancy: maternal and fetal outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Pavithra M. Vengetesh; Shripad Hebbar; Lavanya Rai

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of autoimmune connective tissue disorders on the outcomes of pregnancy and the influence of treatment on pregnancy. Methods: Thirty-seven antenatal patients with autoimmune connective tissue diseases, comprising of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS), Mixed Connective Tissue Diseases (MCTD), ankylosing spondylitis and Takayasu arteritis were analysed. Results: Multigravidas con...

  6. Fibropolycystic liver disease in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fibropolycystic liver diseases are a group of associated congenital disorders that present most often in childhood. These disorders include congenital hepatic fibrosis, biliary hamartomas, autosomal dominant polycystic liver disease, choledochal cysts and Caroli disease. We present a discussion and illustrations of the embryology, genetics, anatomy, pathology, imaging approach and key imaging features that distinguish fibropolycystic liver disease in children. The pathogenesis of these disorders is believed to be abnormal development of the embryonic ductal plates, which ultimately form the liver and biliary systems. An understanding of the abnormal embryogenesis helps to explain the characteristic imaging features of these disorders. (orig.)

  7. Fibropolycystic liver disease in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veigel, Myka Call [Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences, Kansas City, MO (United States); University of Missouri-Kansas City, St. Luke' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States); Prescott-Focht, Julia; Zinati, Reza [University of Missouri-Kansas City, St. Luke' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States); Rodriguez, Michael G. [University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO (United States); Shao, Lei [Children' s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Pathology, Kansas City, MO (United States); Moore, Charlotte A.W.; Lowe, Lisa H. [University of Missouri-Kansas City, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States); Children' s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States)

    2009-04-15

    Fibropolycystic liver diseases are a group of associated congenital disorders that present most often in childhood. These disorders include congenital hepatic fibrosis, biliary hamartomas, autosomal dominant polycystic liver disease, choledochal cysts and Caroli disease. We present a discussion and illustrations of the embryology, genetics, anatomy, pathology, imaging approach and key imaging features that distinguish fibropolycystic liver disease in children. The pathogenesis of these disorders is believed to be abnormal development of the embryonic ductal plates, which ultimately form the liver and biliary systems. An understanding of the abnormal embryogenesis helps to explain the characteristic imaging features of these disorders. (orig.)

  8. Stem cells in liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poll, D. van

    2008-01-01

    Failure of the liver, the largest vital organ in the body, unequivocally results in death. Hepatic failure most commonly evolves over a period of several years as a result of chronic liver disease, most often viral hepatitis or alcoholic liver damage. In rarer cases, the organ shuts down within week

  9. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wei; Feng, Xuebing; Li, Xia; Wang, Dandan; Sun, Lingyun

    2016-05-01

    Autoimmune disorders are a complicated and varied group of diseases arising from inappropriate immune responses. Recent studies have demonstrated that ongoing inflammatory and immune responses are associated with increased oxygen consumption, a process resulting in localized tissue hypoxia within inflammatory lesions ("inflammatory hypoxia"), in which hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1), an oxygen-sensitive transcription factor that allows adaptation to hypoxia environments, has been shown to play an important function. HIF-1 is a regulator of angiogenesis and immune system. Besides, HIF-1-mediated metabolic shift and fibrosis may also play crucial roles in some autoimmune disorders. Firstly, we briefly summarize the role of HIF-1 in angiogenesis, immune responses and fibrosis. Secondly, we will show the major recent findings demonstrating a role for HIF-1 signaling in autoimmune disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, psoriasis, systemic sclerosis and multiple sclerosis. The growing evidences may prompt HIF-1 to be a new target for treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:27071377

  10. Pregnancy and the risk of autoimmune disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khashan, Ali S

    2012-01-31

    Autoimmune diseases (AID) predominantly affect women of reproductive age. While basic molecular studies have implicated persisting fetal cells in the mother in some AID, supportive epidemiological evidence is limited. We investigated the effect of vaginal delivery, caesarean section (CS) and induced abortion on the risk of subsequent maternal AID. Using the Danish Civil Registration System (CRS) we identified women who were born between 1960 and 1992. We performed data linkage between the CRS other Danish national registers to identify women who had a pregnancy and those who developed AID. Women were categorised into 4 groups; nulligravida (control group), women who had 1st child by vaginal delivery, whose 1st delivery was by CS and who had abortions. Log-linear Poisson regression with person-years was used for data analysis adjusting for several potential confounders. There were 1,035,639 women aged >14 years and 25,570 developed AID: 43.4% nulligravida, 44.3% had their first pregnancy delivered vaginally, 7.6% CS and 4.1% abortions. The risk of AID was significantly higher in the 1st year after vaginal delivery (RR = 1.1[1.0, 1.2]) and CS (RR = 1.3[1.1, 1.5]) but significantly lower in the 1st year following abortion (RR = 0.7[0.6, 0.9]). These results suggest an association between pregnancy and the risk of subsequent maternal AID. Increased risks of AID after CS may be explained by amplified fetal cell traffic at delivery, while decreased risks after abortion may be due to the transfer of more primitive fetal stem cells. The increased risk of AID in the first year after delivery may also be related to greater testing during pregnancy.

  11. Pregnancy and the risk of autoimmune disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali S Khashan

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (AID predominantly affect women of reproductive age. While basic molecular studies have implicated persisting fetal cells in the mother in some AID, supportive epidemiological evidence is limited. We investigated the effect of vaginal delivery, caesarean section (CS and induced abortion on the risk of subsequent maternal AID. Using the Danish Civil Registration System (CRS we identified women who were born between 1960 and 1992. We performed data linkage between the CRS other Danish national registers to identify women who had a pregnancy and those who developed AID. Women were categorised into 4 groups; nulligravida (control group, women who had 1st child by vaginal delivery, whose 1st delivery was by CS and who had abortions. Log-linear Poisson regression with person-years was used for data analysis adjusting for several potential confounders. There were 1,035,639 women aged >14 years and 25,570 developed AID: 43.4% nulligravida, 44.3% had their first pregnancy delivered vaginally, 7.6% CS and 4.1% abortions. The risk of AID was significantly higher in the 1st year after vaginal delivery (RR = 1.1[1.0, 1.2] and CS (RR = 1.3[1.1, 1.5] but significantly lower in the 1st year following abortion (RR = 0.7[0.6, 0.9]. These results suggest an association between pregnancy and the risk of subsequent maternal AID. Increased risks of AID after CS may be explained by amplified fetal cell traffic at delivery, while decreased risks after abortion may be due to the transfer of more primitive fetal stem cells. The increased risk of AID in the first year after delivery may also be related to greater testing during pregnancy.

  12. Activated farnesoid X receptor attenuates apoptosis and liver injury in autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Fan; Wang, Yu; Xiao, Youjun; Wu, Xiwen; Xu, Hanshi; Liang, Liuqin; Yang, Xiuyan

    2015-10-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic inflammatory liver disease associated with interface hepatitis, the presence of autoantibodies, regulatory T‑cell dysfunction and raised plasma liver enzyme levels. The present study assessed the hepatoprotective and antiapoptotic role of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) in AIH. a mouse model of AIH was induced by treatment with concanavalin A (ConA). The FXR agonist, chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), was administered to mice exhibiting ConA‑induced liver injury and a normal control. Blood samples were obtained to detect the levels of aminotransferases and inflammatory cytokines. Liver specimens were collected, and hematoxylin‑eosin staining was used for histopathological examination and detection. Apoptosis was evaluated using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase‑mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) method. The expression levels of apoptosis‑associated genes and proteins were determined by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, respectively. The results demonstrated that FXR was downregulated at the mRNA and protein level in the liver specimens of mice induced with ConA‑induced hepatitis. Increased levels of aminotransferases and inflammatory cytokines, including interferon‑γ, tumor necrosis factor‑α, interleukin (IL)‑4 and IL‑2, were detected in ConA‑treated mice. The mice pretreated with the FXR agonist, CDCA, were more resistant to ConA hepatitis, as indicated by reduced levels of alanine transaminase/aspartate aminotransferase and aminotransferases. The activation of FXR ameliorated hepatocyte apoptosis, as demonstrated by TUNEL analysis and downregulation of the Fas/Fas ligand, tumor necrosis factor‑related apoptosis‑inducing ligand and caspase‑3. Taken together, FXR activation ameliorated liver injury and suppressed inflammatory cytokines in ConA‑induced hepatitis. FXR, therefore, exerts a protective role against ConA-induced apoptosis. PMID

  13. Immunogenetics of autoimmune diseases in Asian Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, N K; Kaur, Gurvinder; Kanga, Uma; Tandon, Nikhil

    2002-04-01

    The HLA class II molecules play a critical role in the processing and presentation of specific peptides derived from autoantigens of pancreatic beta cells or gluten for T cell scrutiny in IDDM and CD. In the present study, extended DR3-positive haplotypes associated with autoimmunity in northern Indian patients have been reported. The haplotype A26-B8-DR3 was the most common autoimmunity-favoring haplotype encountered among these patients. This association is, indeed, unique to Indian autoimmune patients, as it replaces the otherwise most commonly associated Caucasian haplotype A1-B8-DR3 (AH8.1) in this population. Further, CD patients revealed 100% association with DQB1*0201 along with DQA*0501 (97%) either in cis or trans configuration. PMID:12021136

  14. Autoimmune disease: A role for new anti-viral therapies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyfus, David H

    2011-12-01

    Many chronic human diseases may have an underlying autoimmune mechanism. In this review, the author presents a case of autoimmune CIU (chronic idiopathic urticaria) in stable remission after therapy with a retroviral integrase inhibitor, raltegravir (Isentress). Previous reports located using the search terms "autoimmunity" and "anti-viral" and related topics in the pubmed data-base are reviewed suggesting that novel anti-viral agents such as retroviral integrase inhibitors, gene silencing therapies and eventually vaccines may provide new options for anti-viral therapy of autoimmune diseases. Cited epidemiologic and experimental evidence suggests that increased replication of epigenomic viral pathogens such as Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) in chronic human autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus Erythematosus (SLE), and multiple sclerosis (MS) may activate endogenous human retroviruses (HERV) as a pathologic mechanism. Memory B cells are the reservoir of infection of EBV and also express endogenous retroviruses, thus depletion of memory b-lymphocytes by monoclonal antibodies (Rituximab) may have therapeutic anti-viral effects in addition to effects on B-lymphocyte presentation of both EBV and HERV superantigens. Other novel anti-viral therapies of chronic autoimmune diseases, such as retroviral integrase inhibitors, could be effective, although not without risk. PMID:21871974

  15. Cytokines and Cytokine Profiles in Human Autoimmune Diseases and Animal Models of Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred Kunz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The precise pathomechanisms of human autoimmune diseases are still poorly understood. However, a deepened understanding of these is urgently needed to improve disease prevention and early detection and guide more specific treatment approaches. In recent years, many new genes and signalling pathways involved in autoimmunity with often overlapping patterns between different disease entities have been detected. Major contributions were made by experiments using DNA microarray technology, which has been used for the analysis of gene expression patterns in chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, among which were rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, psoriasis, systemic sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, and type-1 diabetes. In systemic lupus erythematosus, a so-called interferon signature has been identified. In psoriasis, researchers found a particular immune signalling cluster. Moreover the identification of a new subset of inflammatory T cells, so-called Th17 T cells, secreting interleukin (IL-17 as one of their major cytokines and the identification of the IL-23/IL-17 axis of inflammation regulation, have significantly improved our understanding of autoimmune diseases. Since a plethora of new treatment approaches using antibodies or small molecule inhibitors specifically targeting cytokines, cellular receptors, or signalling mechanisms has emerged in recent years, more individualized treatment for affected patients may be within reach in the future.

  16. Antilipide antibodies cofactor in syphilis, Lyme borreliosis and autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    B Voicechovskaya; J Zabek

    2003-01-01

    Objective. To study (32 glycoprotein 1 contribution to frequency of aCL in pts with autoimmune and some infectious diseases. Methods. Antibodies to different phospholipids were tested by immune-enzyme method (IEM) in serum of 92 pts: 20 of them had systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 15 Sjogren’s disease (SD), 20 rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 20 syphilis and 17 Lyme disease (LD). Pts with syphilis and LD did not have clinical signs of autoimmune disease. Stimulation of aCL test in IEM was perfor...

  17. The role of melatonin in autoimmune and atopic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.R. Calvo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin is the main secretory product synthesized and secreted by the pineal gland during the night. Melatonin is a pleitropic molecule with a wide distribution within phylogenetically distant organisms and has a great functional versatility, including the regulation of circadian and seasonal rhythms and antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. It also possesses the capacity to modulate immune responses by regulation of the TH1/TH2 balance and cytokine production. Immune system eradicates infecting organisms without serious injury to host tissues, but sometimes these responses are inadequately controlled, giving rise to called hypersensitivity diseases, or inappropriately targeted to host tissues, causing the autoimmune diseases. In clinical medicine, the hypersensitivity diseases include the allergic or atopic diseases and the hallmarks of these diseases are the activation of TH2 cells and the production of IgE antibody. Regarding autoimmunity, at the present time we know that the key events in the development of autoimmunity are a failure or breakdown of the mechanisms normally responsible for maintaining self-tolerance in B lymphocytes, T lymphocytes, or both, the recognition of self-antigens by autoreactive lymphocytes, the activation of these cells to proliferate and differentiate into effector cells, and the tissue injury caused by the effector cells and their products. Melatonin treatment has been investigated in atopic diseases, in several animal models of autoimmune diseases, and has been also evaluated in clinical autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes the role of melatonin in atopic diseases (atopic dermatitis and asthma and in several autoimmune diseases, such as arthritis rheumatoid, multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and inflammatory bowel diseases.

  18. Is Tourette's syndrome an autoimmune disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, PJ; Kallenberg, CGM; Korf, J; Minderaa, RB

    2002-01-01

    We provide a review of recent research findings which support the involvement of autoimmunity in childhood-onset tic disorders, in particular the presence of antineuronal autoantibodies, D8/17 B lymphocyte overexpression, a marker of chorea associated with streptococcal infection, and possible benef

  19. Thyroid autoantibodies in autoimmune diseases Anticuerpos antitiroideos en enfermedades autoinmunes

    OpenAIRE

    Regina M. Innocencio; João H. Romaldini; Ward, Laura S.

    2004-01-01

    Abnormalities in the thyroid function and thyroid autoantibodies have been frequently described in patients with autoimmune diseases but seldom in antiphospholipid syndrome patients. In order to determine the prevalence of thyroid function and autoimmune abnormalities, we compared serum thyrotropin (TSH, serum free thyroxine (T4) levels, thyroid antithyroglobulin (TgAb) and antithyroperoxidase (TPOAb) levels of 25 patients with systemic sclerosis, 25 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 13 ...

  20. Bioluminescence in vivo imaging of autoimmune encephalomyelitis predicts disease

    OpenAIRE

    Steinman Lawrence; Ho Peggy; Luo Jian; Wyss-Coray Tony

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis is a widely used animal model to understand not only multiple sclerosis but also basic principles of immunity. The disease is scored typically by observing signs of paralysis, which do not always correspond with pathological changes. Methods Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis was induced in transgenic mice expressing an injury responsive luciferase reporter in astrocytes (GFAP-luc). Bioluminescence in the brain and spinal co...

  1. Intestinal microbiota in liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Tanvir R; Barritt, A Sidney

    2016-02-01

    The intestinal microbiota have emerged as a topic of intense interest in gastroenterology and hepatology. The liver is on the front line as the first filter of nutrients, toxins and bacterial metabolites from the intestines and we are becoming increasingly aware of interactions among the gut, liver and immune system as important mediators of liver health and disease. Manipulating the microbiota with therapeutic intent is a rapidly expanding field. In this review, we will describe what is known about the contribution of intestinal microbiota to liver homeostasis; the role of dysbiosis in the pathogenesis of liver disease including alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma; and the therapeutic manifestations of altering intestinal microbiota via antibiotics, prebiotics, probiotics and fecal microbiota transplantation. PMID:27048904

  2. Holmes-Adie syndrome, autoimmune hepatitis and celiac disease: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Timea Csak; Aniko Folhoffer; Andrea Horvath; Judit Halász; Csaba Diczházi; Zsuzsa Schaff; Ferenc Szalay

    2006-01-01

    A 35-year-old female patient presented with the following symptoms of Holmes-Adie syndrome: photophobia,enlargement of the left pupil unresponsive to light,Achilles areflexia. The pilocarpine test was positive. No tumor or other neurological abnormality was found. She had a 19-year history of autoimmune hepatitis. Flares up were observed following each 3 deliveries. At age of 31she presented with diarrhea and weight loss. Abdominal tumor was detected by ultrasound. The surgically removed tumor was histologically a benign mesenteric multicystic lymphangioma. Simultaneously, celiac disease was diagnosed. Gluten-free diet resulted in a significant improvement of celiac disease, but not of autoimmune hepatitis. Autonomic neuropathy was proven by standard cardiovascular tests. The patient was a homozygous carrier for HLA DQ2 antigen characteristic for celiac disease and heterozygous for HLA DR3 B8 frequent in autoimmune liver diseases. Our novel observation on association of Holmes-Adie syndrome with autoimmune hepatitis and celiac disease is suggestive for a common immunological background for all three entities present in a patient with mesenteric multicystic lymphangioma.

  3. Chronic Liver Disease and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... American > Chronic Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and African Americans Among African Americans, chronic liver disease is a ... white women. At a glance – Cancer Rates for African Americans (2008-2012) Cancer Incidence Rates per 100,000 – ...

  4. Is Tourette's syndrome an autoimmune disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, P J; Kallenberg, C G M; Korf, J; Minderaa, R B

    2002-01-01

    We provide a review of recent research findings which support the involvement of autoimmunity in childhood-onset tic disorders, in particular the presence of antineuronal autoantibodies, D8/17 B lymphocyte overexpression, a marker of chorea associated with streptococcal infection, and possible beneficial effects of immunomodulatory intervention. One of the most controversial areas in this field is the validity of the proposed PANDAS concept. Some researchers have delineated a putatively unique subgroup of patients, from the spectrum of illness encompassing Tourette's syndrome and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), whose tics and obsessive-compulsive symptoms are shown to arise in response to beta-hemolytic streptococcal infections. They designated it by the term pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS). Herein we additionally present pros and cons concerning the concept of PANDAS. Finally, recommendations for future research directions are given. PMID:12082557

  5. Osteoporosis across chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, M; Loperto, I; Camera, S; Cossiga, V; Di Somma, C; Colao, A; Caporaso, N; Morisco, F

    2016-06-01

    Osteoporosis is a complication of chronic liver disease, with impact on morbidity, quality of life, and survival. The progress of medicine and the new therapies stretched the disease's natural history and improved the survival of patients with liver disease. So, it is fundamental to make better the quality of life and to prevent complications. Metabolic bone disorders are common complications of chronic liver disease (CLD). Patients with CLD have an increased risk of bone fractures, with significant impact on morbidity, quality of life, and even on survival. Bone diseases, including osteomalacia, osteoporosis, and osteopenia, are frequently observed in many types of liver disease. The pathogenesis of damage and the mechanisms of bone loss are different in relation to the specific liver disease. The relevance of these conditions induced many authors to create a new nosographic entity known as "hepatic osteodystrophy", although this term is rarely used anymore and it is now commonly referred to as osteopenia or osteoporosis associated with chronic liver disease. This review is based on the personal experiences of the authors and upon research done of the available literature on this subject matter. The authors searched the PubMed database for publications containing the term "liver disease" in combination with "bone disease", "hepatic osteodistrophy", "osteoporosis", "osteopenia", "osteomalacia", and "fractures". They selected publications from the past 10 years but did not exclude older seminal publications, especially for colestatic liver diseases. This review of literature shows that osteoporosis crosses all CLD. It is important to underline that the progress of medicine and the new therapies stretched the disease's natural history and improved the survival of patients with CLD. It is fundamental to make better the quality of life and it is mandatory to prevent complications and in particular the osteoporotic ones, especially fractures. PMID:26846777

  6. Liver Transplantation for Caroli Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Zahmatkeshan, M.; Bahador, A.; Geramizade, B.; Emadmarvasti, V.; SA Malekhosseini

    2012-01-01

    Caroli disease is a rare congenital disorder characterized by multifocal, segmental dilatation of intrahepatic bile ducts. Patients with Caroli disease who have recurrent bouts of biliary infection, particularly those who also have complications related to portal hypertension may require liver transplantation. In liver transplant ward of Shiraz University of Medical Science we had 4 patients with Caroli disease who were transplanted. Herein, we describe the demographic characteristics and pos...

  7. Bartonella henselae Infection: An Uncommon Mimicker of Autoimmune Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maritsi, Despoina N; Zarganis, Diagoras; Metaxa, Zoi; Papaioannou, Georgia; Vartzelis, George

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of a seven-year-old immunocompetent female patient who developed systemic symptoms mimicking an autoimmune rather than an infectious disease. The patient presented with rash, biquotidian fever, night sweats, and arthralgias. There was no antecedent history of cat contact. Investigations showed increased inflammatory markers, leukocytosis, thrombocytosis, hypercalcemia, and raised angiotensin-converting enzyme. Interferon-gamma releasing assay for tuberculosis infection was negative. Abdominal imaging demonstrated multifocal lesions of the liver and spleen (later proved to be granulomata), chest X-ray showed enlarged hilar lymph nodes, and ophthalmology review revealed uveitis. Clinical, laboratory, and imaging features pointed towards sarcoidosis. Subsequently, raised titers (IgM 1 : 32, IgG 1 : 256) against Bartonella confirmed the diagnosis of B. henselae infection. She was treated with gentamycin followed by ciprofloxacin; repeat investigations showed complete resolution of findings. The presence of hepatic and splenic lesions in children with bartonellosis is well documented. Our case, however, exhibited certain unusual findings such as the coexistence of acute ocular and systemic involvement in an immunocompetent host. Serological testing is an inexpensive and effective way to diagnose bartonellosis in immunocompetent patients; we suggest that bartonella serology is included in the baseline tests performed on children with prolonged fever even in the absence of contact with cats in countries where bartonellosis is prevalent. PMID:23424700

  8. Bartonella henselae Infection: An Uncommon Mimicker of Autoimmune Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Despoina N. Maritsi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a seven-year-old immunocompetent female patient who developed systemic symptoms mimicking an autoimmune rather than an infectious disease. The patient presented with rash, biquotidian fever, night sweats, and arthralgias. There was no antecedent history of cat contact. Investigations showed increased inflammatory markers, leukocytosis, thrombocytosis, hypercalcemia, and raised angiotensin-converting enzyme. Interferon-gamma releasing assay for tuberculosis infection was negative. Abdominal imaging demonstrated multifocal lesions of the liver and spleen (later proved to be granulomata, chest X-ray showed enlarged hilar lymph nodes, and ophthalmology review revealed uveitis. Clinical, laboratory, and imaging features pointed towards sarcoidosis. Subsequently, raised titers (IgM 1 : 32, IgG 1 : 256 against Bartonella confirmed the diagnosis of B. henselae infection. She was treated with gentamycin followed by ciprofloxacin; repeat investigations showed complete resolution of findings. The presence of hepatic and splenic lesions in children with bartonellosis is well documented. Our case, however, exhibited certain unusual findings such as the coexistence of acute ocular and systemic involvement in an immunocompetent host. Serological testing is an inexpensive and effective way to diagnose bartonellosis in immunocompetent patients; we suggest that bartonella serology is included in the baseline tests performed on children with prolonged fever even in the absence of contact with cats in countries where bartonellosis is prevalent.

  9. Interferon Type I Driven Immune Activation in Generalized Autoimmune Diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Brkić (Zana)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis describes research performed on several generalized autoimmune diseases with the main focus on primary Sjögren’s syndrome. Interferon type I has been implicated in the pathogenesis of these diseases and will be introduced in this chapter together with other important immune f

  10. Collection of hematopoietic stem cells from patients with autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burt, RK; Fassas, A; Snowden, JA; Kozak, T; Wulffraat, NM; Nash, RA; Dunbar, CE; Arnold, R; Prentice, G; Bingham, S; Marmont, AM; McSweeney, PA; van Laar, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    We reviewed data from 24 transplant centers in Asia, Australia, Europe, and North America to determine the outcomes of stem cell collection including methods used, cell yields, effects on disease activity, and complications in patients with autoimmune diseases. Twenty-one unprimed bone marrow harves

  11. DNA-abzymes in autoimmune diseases in clinic and experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T E Naumova

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA-abzymes enzymes in autoimmune diseases in clinic and experiment T.E. Naumova, O.M. Durova, A.G. Gabibov, Z.S. Alekberova, S. V. Suchkov DNA-hydrolyzing autoantibodies (AAB or DNA-abzymes can be found in autoimmune diseases in clinic and experiment. Technology of serum express screening for presence of DNA abzymes is described. Comparative study of DNA-hydrolising activity in patients with different forms of systemic and organ-specific autoimmune diseases was performed. Blood of clinically healthy donors was usually free of IgG DNA-abzymes. DNA-abzymes were most often revealed in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and rheumatoid arthritis (RA less often in patients with organ-specific forms of autoimmune disturbances. The results of the study confirm the hypothesis of autoimmune origin of IgG DNA abzymes and demonstrate the possibility to use them in clinical practice for monitoring to disease activity in SLE and RA.

  12. Pathogenesis of Alcoholic Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Winston; Shah, Vijay H

    2016-08-01

    Alcoholic liver disease includes a broad clinical-histological spectrum from simple steatosis, cirrhosis, acute alcoholic hepatitis with or without cirrhosis to hepatocellular carcinoma as a complication of cirrhosis. The pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease can be conceptually divided into (1) ethanol-mediated liver injury, (2) inflammatory immune response to injury, (3) intestinal permeability and microbiome changes. Corticosteroids may improve outcomes, but this is controversial and probably only impacts short-term survival. New pathophysiology-based therapies are under study, including antibiotics, caspase inhibition, interleukin-22, anakinra, FXR agonist and others. These studies provide hope for better future outcomes for this difficult disease. PMID:27373608

  13. The Clinical Usefulness of 18F FDG PET/CT in Patients with Systemic Autoimmune Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Individuals with systemic autoimmune disease have an increased susceptibility to both inflammation and malignancy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of 18F FDG PET/CT in patients with systemic autoimmune disease. Forty patients diagnosed with systemic autoimmune disease were enrolled. Diagnostic accuracy of FDG PET/CT for detecting malignancy was assessed. FDG PET/CT findings, including maximum standardized uptake (SUVmax) of lymphadenopathy (LAP), liver, bone marrow, spleen, joint and muscles, were considered for the characterization of LAPs. FDG PET/CT could detect metabolically activated lesions in 36 out of 40 patients (90%) including inflammatory lesions in 28 out of 32 patients (88%). The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of FDG PET/CT for the detection of malignancy were 100, 67, 70, 25, and 100%, respectively. Multiple LAPs were found in 25 of 40 patients (63%), and comprised three malignancies, four cases of tuberculosis, and 18 reactive changes. A SUVmax ratio of bone marrow to liver below 0.78 could distinguish malignancy from tuberculosis + reactive change (AUC=1.000, sensitivity: 100%, specificity: 100%). The SUVmax ratio of spleen to liver in the reactive group was also significantly higher than that in the malignancy group (P=0.014). SUVmax of LAP in the TB group was significantly higher than that in the reactive group (P=0.040). PET/CT is useful in detecting and differentiating inflammation and malignancy in patients with systemic autoimmune disease. Frequent false positive interpretations can be minimized by consideration of FDG uptake in bone marrow and spleen.

  14. Autoimmune Disease in First-Degree Relatives and Spouses of Individuals With Celiac Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emilsson, Louise; Wijmenga, Cisca; Murray, Joseph A.; Ludvigsson, Jonas F.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: First-degree relatives of individuals with celiac disease are at increased risk for this disorder, but little is known about their risk for other autoimmune diseases. We assessed the risk of nonceliac autoimmune disease in first-degree relatives and spouses of people with celiac d

  15. Solar Radiation and Vitamin D: Mitigating Environmental Factors in Autoimmune Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Schwalfenberg, Gerry K.

    2012-01-01

    This paper looks at the environmental role of vitamin D and solar radiation as risk reduction factors in autoimmune disease. Five diseases are considered: multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune disease of the thyroid, and inflammatory bowel disease. Clinical relevant studies and factors that may indicate evidence that autoimmune disease is a vitamin D-sensitive disease are presented. Studies that have resulted in prevention or amelioration of some autoimmune dis...

  16. Review on thymoma and thymoma-associated autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-min LI

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Thymic carcinomas are tumors of the anterior mediastinum derived from the epithelial cells of the thymus gland. Malignancies linked to thymoma lead to the loss of self-tolerance leading to autoimmune diseases, including myasthenia gravis, pure red cell aplastic anemia, systemic lupus erythematosus and pemphigus etc. In recent years, three main mechanisms have been proposed to elucidate these interactions, such as immature T cell theory, tumor-gene theory and the combination mechanism of cellular and humoral immunity. In fact, the resection of the thymoma is beneficial to many patients of thymoma related autoimmune diseases. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.08.16

  17. Age impact on autoimmune thyroid disease in females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoian, Dana; Craciunescu, Mihalea; Timar, Romulus; Schiller, Adalbert; Pater, Liana; Craina, Marius

    2013-10-01

    Thyroid autoimmune disease, a widespread phenomenon in female population, impairs thyroid function during pregnancy. Identifying cases, which will develop hypothyroidism during pregnancy, is crucial in the follow-up process. The study group comprised 108 females, with ages between 20-40 years; with known inactive autoimmune thyroid disease, before pregnancy that became pregnant in the study follow-up period. They were monitored by means of clinical, hormonal and immunological assays. Supplemental therapy with thyroid hormones was used, where needed. Maternal age and level of anti-thyroid antibodies were used to predict thyroid functional impairment.

  18. Allergen-specific immunotherapy and risk of autoimmune disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Allan; Madsen, Flemming; Skaaby, Tea

    2012-01-01

    After 100 years of experience with allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), an issue that is still unresolved is whether SIT can act as a trigger of, or as a risk factor for, autoimmune disease. We searched the literature for evidence on this topic.......After 100 years of experience with allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), an issue that is still unresolved is whether SIT can act as a trigger of, or as a risk factor for, autoimmune disease. We searched the literature for evidence on this topic....

  19. Interventional Treatments for Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feeds Radiation Safety IR History Bibliographies Meetings and Education ... radiology techniques. Portal Hypertension Seen most frequently in patients with liver disease such as cirrhosis or hepatitis, portal hypertension is a condition in which the ...

  20. Research Areas: Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 900 drugs and supplements.​​ Recent discoveries from NIDDK research include: New medication shows promise against liver fibrosis ... linked to biliary atresia in newborn animals Support Research NIDDK invests in basic, clinical and translational research ...

  1. Research Areas: Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 900 drugs and supplements.​​ Recent discoveries from NIDDK research include: Allergy drug inhibits hepatitis C in mice ... Liver Regeneration Breakthrough Using Mature Human Cells Support Research NIDDK invests in basic, clinical and translational research ...

  2. Nutrition in Chronic Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Silva; Sara Gomes; Armando Peixoto; Paulo Torres-Ramalho; Hélder Cardoso; Rosa Azevedo; Carla Cunha; Guilherme Macedo

    2015-01-01

    Protein-calorie malnutrition is a transversal condition to all stages of chronic liver disease. Early recognition of micro or macronutrient deficiencies is essential, because the use of nutritional supplements reduces the risk of complications. The diet of patients with chronic liver disease is based on a standard diet with supplements addition as necessary. Restrictions may be harmful and should be individualized. Treatment management should aim to maintain an adequate protein and caloric...

  3. Alcoholic Liver Disease and Malnutrition

    OpenAIRE

    McClain, Craig J.; Barve, Shirish S.; Barve, Ashutosh; Marsano, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Malnutrition, both protein energy malnutrition (PEM) and deficiencies in individual nutrients, is a frequent complication of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Severity of malnutrition correlates with severity of ALD. Malnutrition also occurs in patients with cirrhosis due to etiologies other than alcohol. The mechanisms for malnutrition are multifactorial, and malnutrition frequently worsens in the hospital due to fasting for procedures and metabolic complications of liver disease, such as hepat...

  4. Idiopathic Granulomatous Mastitis: An Autoimmune Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Altintoprak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study aimed to investigate the autoimmune basis of idiopathic granulomatous mastitis (IGM by determining the anti-nuclear antibody (ANA and extractable nuclear antigen (ENA levels of patients diagnosed with IGM. Material and Methods. Twenty-six IGM patients were evaluated. Serum samples were analyzed for autoantibodies by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF using a substrate kit that induced fluorescein-conjugated goat antibodies to human immunoglobulin G (IgG. IIF patterns were read at serum dilutions of 1 : 40 and 1 : 100 for ANA positivity. Using the immunoblot technique, the sera of patients were assayed at dilutions of 1 : 40 and 1 : 100 for human autoantibodies of the IgG class to 15 lines of highly purified ENAs. Results. In the IIF studies for ANA, positivity was identified for four different patterns in the 1 : 40 diluted preparations, for three different patients in the 1 : 100 diluted preparations and only one pattern was identified at the 1 : 320 dilution. In the ENA studies, positivity was identified for four different pattern in the 1 : 40 dilution, and only one pattern was identified at the 1 : 100 dilution. Conclusion. This study was not able to support the eventual existence of an autoimmune basis for IGM.

  5. Clinical aspects of indirect immunofluorescence for autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanadan, Alireza; Saghazadeh, Amene; Jahanzad, Issa; Rezaei, Nima

    2015-05-01

    Because the most common term used in conversations considering autoimmunity is autoantibodies, it is well-expected that the indirect immunofluorescence assay, which detects antibodies directed against various antigens, is one of our most impressive techniques for investigating autoimmune diseases (AIDs). Roughly speaking, the current literature corroborates that this immunopathologic investigation means that autoantibodies detection makes a considerable contribution to both diagnostic and prognostic aspects of AIDs in the clinical setting. However, it varies between different AIDs, autoantibodies, ethnicities or detection methodologies. Directly focusing on the indirect immunofluorescence assay, we present evidence to support this multidimensional variation regarding the subject via reviewing briefly the best-investigated autoantibodies in the well-documented AIDs, including vasculitis, inflammatory bowel disease, scleroderma, autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren's syndrome. PMID:25786676

  6. HLA-G Molecules in Autoimmune Diseases and Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Roberta; Bortolotti, Daria; Bolzani, Silvia; Fainardi, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G molecule, a non-classical HLA-Ib molecule, is less polymorphic when compared to classical HLA class I molecules. Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) was first detected on cytotrophoblast cells at the feto-maternal interface but its expression is prevalent during viral infections and several autoimmune diseases. HLA-G gene is characterized by polymorphisms at the 3′ un-translated region and 5′ upstream regulatory region that regulate its expression and are associated with autoimmune diseases and viral infection susceptibility, creating an unbalanced and pathologic environment. This review focuses on the role of HLA-G genetic polymorphisms, mRNA, and protein expression in autoimmune conditions and viral infections. PMID:25477881

  7. Urticarial vasculitis: an autoimmune disorder following therapy for Hodgkin's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, D K; Ware, R E

    1995-09-01

    Immunological abnormalities have been described in patients with Hodgkin's disease, both associated with the malignancy itself and occurring secondary to therapy. These abnormalities often manifest as an immunodeficiency state, but can also present as immune dysregulation and autoimmune disease. We report two young patients with Hodgkin's disease who, following successful therapy, developed urticarial vasculitis (UV), a form of cutaneous autoimmune vasculitis. Both patients also had systemic symptoms including fever, an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate and serum copper, and abnormal in vitro studies of lymphocyte enumeration and proliferation. Distinguishing UV from recurrent Hodgkin's disease was especially difficult in one patient, and was possible only by lymph node biopsy. One patient has responded well to immunosuppressive therapy, while the other, who has more profound immune dysfunction, has developed a chronic autoimmune disorder. UV may thus occur in patients after therapy for Hodgkin's disease; we hypothesize that immune dysregulation, either associated with the malignancy or resulting from therapy, is important in the pathogenesis of this autoimmune process. PMID:7623731

  8. Toll-Like Receptor Pathways in Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ji-Qing; Szodoray, Peter; Zeher, Margit

    2016-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases are a family of chronic systemic inflammatory disorders, characterized by the dysregulation of the immune system which finally results in the break of tolerance to self-antigen. Several studies suggest that Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an essential role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. TLRs belong to the family of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that recognize a wide range of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). TLRs are type I transmembrane proteins and located on various cellular membranes. Two main groups have been classified based on their location; the extracelluar group referred to the ones located on the plasma membrane while the intracellular group all located in endosomal compartments responsible for the recognition of nucleic acids. They are released by the host cells and trigger various intracellular pathways which results in the production of proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, as well as the expression of co-stimulatory molecules to protect against invading microorganisms. In particular, TLR pathway-associated proteins, such as IRAK, TRAF, and SOCS, are often dysregulated in this group of diseases. TLR-associated gene expression profile analysis together with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assessment could be important to explain the pathomechanism driving autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize recent findings on TLR pathway regulation in various autoimmune diseases, including Sjögren's syndrome (SS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), multiple sclerosis (MS), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic sclerosis (SSc), and psoriasis. PMID:25687121

  9. Modulation by Melatonin of the Pathogenesis of Inflammatory Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huey-Kang Sytwu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin is the major secretory product of the pineal gland during the night and has multiple activities including the regulation of circadian and seasonal rhythms, and antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. It also possesses the ability to modulate immune responses by regulation of the T helper 1/2 balance and cytokine production. Autoimmune diseases, which result from the activation of immune cells by autoantigens released from normal tissues, affect around 5% of the population. Activation of autoantigen-specific immune cells leads to subsequent damage of target tissues by these activated cells. Melatonin therapy has been investigated in several animal models of autoimmune disease, where it has a beneficial effect in a number of models excepting rheumatoid arthritis, and has been evaluated in clinical autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis and ulcerative colitis. This review summarizes and highlights the role and the modulatory effects of melatonin in several inflammatory autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and inflammatory bowel disease.

  10. Celiac disease markers in patients with liver diseases: A single center large scale screening study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drastich, P.; Honsová, E.; Lodererová, A.; Jarešová, M.; Pekáriková, Aneta; Hoffmanová, I.; Tučková, Ludmila; Tlaskalová-Hogenová, Helena; Špičák, J.; Sánchez, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 43 (2012), s. 6255-6262. ISSN 1007-9327 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500200709; GA ČR GA310/07/0414 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Tissue transglutaminase * Anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies * Autoimmune liver diseases Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 2.547, year: 2012

  11. T Cell Vaccination as an Immunotherapy for Autoimmune Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingwu Zhang

    2004-01-01

    Immunization with inactivated autoreactive T cells (T cell vaccination) selected from individual's own T cell repertoire provides a unique in vivo setting for testing immune regulation that is known to involve interactions of a variety of related surface molecules (1). It induces regulatory immune responses that closely resemble the in vivo situation where the immune system is challenged by clonal activation and expansion of given T cell populations in various autoimmune diseases. T cell vaccination provides a powerful means of eliciting natural reactions of the immune system in response to clonal expansion of T cells, which can used as a therapeutic approach to suppress or eliminate specific pathogenic autoreactive T cells in autoimmune conditions. Clinical trials using T cell vaccination to deplete autoreactive T cells in human autoimmune conditions have begun to reveal the pathologic relevance of various autoimmune T cell populations in the disease processes, providing a unique opportunity to test the autoimmune theories in a clinical setting. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.2004;1(5):321-327.

  12. Immunoglobulin G4-related disease: autoimmune pancreatitis and extrapancreatic manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Alvarenga Fernandes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a case of immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4-related disease with pancreatic and extrapancreatic involvement, including the biliary and renal systems. Given the importance of imaging methods for the diagnosis of IgG4-related disease and its differentiation from pancreatic adenocarcinoma, we emphasize important abdominal computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings related to this recently recognized systemic autoimmune disease.

  13. Application of latent variable models to autoimmune diseases clinimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Molano González, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Clinical manifestations of autoimmune diseases often are presented as presence or absence of certain symptoms, which in the clinical context can be associated with disease severity. Classical measures like number of symptoms present have been used to assess the severity of disease, nevertheless this score does not reflect particular aspects of each symptom in the severity manifestation. In this setting latent variable models are a natural choice to address the pro...

  14. Autoimmune disease and risk for Parkinson disease A population-based case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rugbjerg, K.; Friis, S.; Ritz, B.;

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Inflammatory mediators are increased in autoimmune diseases and may activate microglia and might cause an inflammatory state and degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the brain. Thus, we evaluated whether having an autoimmune disease increases the risk for developing Parkinson disease...... among inhabitants of Denmark who were alive at the date of the patient's diagnosis. The main exposure measure was a hospital diagnosis of 1 of 32 selected autoimmune diseases recorded 5 or more years before the index date in the files of the Danish Hospital Register. Results: We observed no overall...... association between a diagnosis of autoimmune disease and risk for subsequent PD (odds ratio 0.96, 95% confidence interval 0.85-1.08). In a subgroup of patients with autoimmune diseases with systemic involvement, primarily rheumatoid arthritis, we saw a decrease in risk for PD of 30%. Conclusions: Our results...

  15. Stem cells and liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javed Akhter

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Liver transplantation is the primary treatment for various end-stage hepatic diseases but is hindered by the lack of donor organs, complications associated with rejection and immunosuppression. An increasingly unbridgeable gap exists between the supply and demand of transplantable organs. Hence stem cell research and regenerative medicine have the potential to revolutionize the future of medicine with the ability to regenerate damaged and diseased organs. Stem cells serving as a repair system for the body, can theoretically divide without limit to replenish other cells. These cells could relieve the symptoms of liver disease or the genetic error could potentially be corrected by gene therapy. In cases of acute liver failure in adults, stem cell therapies might be used to support the liver, allowing it time to recover.

  16. Toward molecular pathogenesis of an autoimmune disease: Refined genetic mapping of autoimmune polyglandular disease type I (APECED)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, J.; Bjoerses, P.; Peltonen, L. [National Public Health Institute, Helsinki (Finland)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Autoimmune reactions encoupled to many human diseases are still only partially understood. Unravelling the molecular pathogenesis of inherited diseases with a strong autoimmune component in their clinical expression could help to dissect individual components in the molecular background of abnormal immune response. One such genetic disorder is autosomal recessive autoimmune polyglandular disease type I (PGD I), also known as autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED, MIM 240300). The disease is especially enriched in the genetically isolated population of Finland and we have assigned the APECED locus to human chromosome 21q22.3 in 14 Finnish families by linkage analyses. The best positional lod score of 6.49 was observed with marker D21S49. Based on the history of the Finns, the gene pool of this population clearly demonstrates the consequences of a founder effect and consequent isolation. In the Finnish population, we can take advantage of linkage disequilibrium and allelic association studies to more precisely define the critical DNA region for our disease gene of interest than would be possible by linkage analyses alone. We are now able to define the chromosomal region of interest between two flanking markers locating 1 cM apart. Linkage disequilibrium is observed with three of the markers used in the analyses and this suggests a distance of less than 500 kb to the disease locus, well approachable with molecular cloning techniques. Overlapping YAC and cosmid clones spanning our region of interest will facilitate the cloning of APECED gene in the near future.

  17. Cannabinoids and autoimmune diseases: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katchan, Valeria; David, Paula; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2016-06-01

    Cannabinoids have shown to have a variety effects on body systems. Through CB1 and CB2 receptors, amongst other, they exert an effect by modulating neurotransmitter and cytokine release. Current research in the role of cannabinoids in the immune system shows that they possess immunosuppressive properties. They can inhibit proliferation of leucocytes, induce apoptosis of T cells and macrophages and reduce secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In mice models, they are effective in reducing inflammation in arthritis, multiple sclerosis, have a positive effect on neuropathic pain and in type 1 diabetes mellitus. They are effective as treatment for fibromyalgia and have shown to have anti-fibrotic effect in scleroderma. Studies in human models are scarce and not conclusive and more research is required in this field. Cannabinoids can be therefore promising immunosuppressive and anti-fibrotic agents in the therapy of autoimmune disorders. PMID:26876387

  18. Liver Disease in Women: The Influence of Gender on Epidemiology, Natural History, and Patient Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Guy, Jennifer; Peters, Marion G.

    2013-01-01

    Women more commonly present with acute liver failure, autoimmune hepatitis, benign liver lesions, primary biliary cirrhosis, and toxin-mediated hepatotoxicity. Women less commonly have malignant liver tumors, primary sclerosing cholangitis, and viral hepatitis. There is a decreased rate of decompensated cirrhosis in women with hepatitis C virus infection, no survival difference in alcohol-related liver disease, and improved survival from hepatocellular carcinoma. In general, men are 2-fold mo...

  19. The role of parvovirus B19 in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity and autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Jonathan R

    2016-04-01

    Human parvovirus B19 is a single-stranded DNA virus which preferentially targets the erythroblasts in the bone marrow. B19 infection commonly causes erythema infectiosum, arthralgia, fetal death, transient aplastic crisis in patients with shortened red cell survival, and persistent infection in people who are immunocompromised. Less common clinical manifestations include atypical skin rashes, neurological syndromes, cardiac syndromes, and various cytopenias. B19 infection has also been associated with development of a variety of different autoimmune diseases, including rheumatological, neurological, neuromuscular, cardiovascular, haematological, nephrological and metabolic. Production of a variety of autoantibodies has been demonstrated to occur during B19 infection and these have been shown to be key to the pathogenesis of the particular disease process in a significant number of cases, for example, production of rheumatoid factor in cases of B19-associated rheumatoid arthritis and production of anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in patients with B19-associated type 1 diabetes mellitus. B19 infection has also been associated with the development of multiple autoimmune diseases in 12 individuals. Documented mechanisms in B19-associated autoimmunity include molecular mimicry (IgG antibody to B19 proteins has been shown to cross react with a variety of recognised human autoantigens, including collagen II, keratin, angiotensin II type 1 receptor, myelin basic protein, cardiolipin, and platelet membrane glycoprotein IIb/IIIa), B19-induced apoptosis with presentation of self-antigens to T lymphocytes, and the phospholipase activity of the B19 unique VP1 protein. PMID:26644521

  20. Selenium status and over-expression of interleukin-15 in celiac disease and autoimmune thyroid diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Velia Stazi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In celiac disease (CD, for its multifactorial nature, the target organs are not limited to the gut, but include thyroid, liver, skin and reproductive and nervous systems. Between the extraintestinal symptoms associated with CD, autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs are more evident, underlining as CD-related autoimmune alterations can be modulated not only by gluten but also by various concurrent endogenous (genetic affinity, over-expression of cytokines and exogenous (environment, nutritional deficiency factors. In their pathogenesis a central role for over-expression of interleukin-15 (IL-15 is shown, by inhibiting apoptosis, leading to the perpetuation of inflammation and tissue destruction. Thyroid is particularly sensitive to selenium deficiency because selenoproteins are significant in biosynthesis and activity of thyroid hormones; besides, some selenoproteins as glutathione peroxidase are involved in inhibiting apoptosis. Thus, selenium malabsorption in CD can be thought as a key factor directly leading to thyroid and intestinal damage. Considering the complexity of this interaction and on the basis of available evidence, the aim of this review is to assess as preventive and therapeutic target the role of IL-15 and selenium in the pathogeneses of both CD and AITD.

  1. Solar Radiation and Vitamin D: Mitigating Environmental Factors in Autoimmune Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerry K. Schwalfenberg

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper looks at the environmental role of vitamin D and solar radiation as risk reduction factors in autoimmune disease. Five diseases are considered: multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune disease of the thyroid, and inflammatory bowel disease. Clinical relevant studies and factors that may indicate evidence that autoimmune disease is a vitamin D-sensitive disease are presented. Studies that have resulted in prevention or amelioration of some autoimmune disease are discussed. An example of the utility of supplementing vitamin D in an unusual autoimmune disease, idiopathic thrombocytic purpura, is presented.

  2. Celiac disease markers in patients with liver diseases: A single center large scale screening study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pavel Drastich; Eva Honsová; Alena Lodererová; Marcela Jare(s)ová; Aneta Pekáriková; Iva Hoffmanová; Ludmila Tu(c)ková

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To study the coincidence of celiac disease,we tested its serological markers in patients with various liver diseases.METHODS:Large-scale screening of serum antibodies against tissue transglutaminase (tTG),and deamidated gliadin using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and serum antibodies against endomysium using immunohistochemistry,in patients with various liver diseases (n =962) and patients who underwent liver transplantation (OLTx,n =523) was performed.The expression of tTG in liver tissue samples of patients simultaneously suffering from celiac disease and from various liver diseases using immunohistochemistry was carried out.The final diagnosis of celiac disease was confirmed by histological analysis of small-intestinal biopsy.RESULTS:We found that 29 of 962 patients (3%) with liver diseases and 5 of 523 patients (0.8%) who underwent OLTx were seropositive for IgA and IgG anti-tTG antibodies.However,celiac disease was biopsy-diagnosed in 16 patients:4 with autoimmune hepatitis type Ⅰ,3 with Wilson's disease,3 with celiac hepatitis,2 with primary sclerosing cholangitis,1with primary biliary cirrhosis,1 with Budd-Chiari syndrome,1 with toxic hepatitis,and 1 with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.Unexpectedly,the highest prevalence of celiac disease was found in patients with Wilson's disease (9.7%),with which it is only rarely associated.On the other hand,no OLTx patients were diagnosed with celiac disease in our study.A pilot study of the expression of tTG in liver tissue using immunohistochemistry documented the overexpression of this molecule in endothelial cells and periportal hepatocytes of patients simultaneously suffering from celiac disease and toxic hepatitis,primary sclerosing cholangitis or autoimmune hepatitis type Ⅰ.CONCLUSION:We suggest that screening for celiac disease may be beneficial not only in patients with associated liver diseases,but also in patients with Wilson's disease.

  3. Anti-cytokine vaccines and the immunotherapy of autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Wraith, David C

    2006-01-01

    Three papers in this issue of the European Journal of Immunology describe the use of cytokine vaccines to prevent autoimmune disease in experimental animals. The vaccines are based on interleukin 17 (IL-17), a cytokine that has recently been shown to play a central role in inflammation.

  4. Allergen-specific immunotherapy and risk of autoimmune disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Allan; Madsen, Flemming; Skaaby, Tea

    2012-01-01

    After 100 years of experience with allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), an issue that is still unresolved is whether SIT can act as a trigger of, or as a risk factor for, autoimmune disease. We searched the literature for evidence on this topic....

  5. Glassy Dynamics in the Adaptive Immune Response Prevents Autoimmune Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jun; Deem, Michael

    2006-03-01

    The immune system normally protects the human host against death by infection. However, when an immune response is mistakenly directed at self antigens, autoimmune disease can occur. We describe a model of protein evolution to simulate the dynamics of the adaptive immune response to antigens. Computer simulations of the dynamics of antibody evolution show that different evolutionary mechanisms, namely gene segment swapping and point mutation, lead to different evolved antibody binding affinities. Although a combination of gene segment swapping and point mutation can yield a greater affinity to a specific antigen than point mutation alone, the antibodies so evolved are highly cross-reactive and would cause autoimmune disease, and this is not the chosen dynamics of the immune system. We suggest that in the immune system a balance has evolved between binding affinity and specificity in the mechanism for searching the amino acid sequence space of antibodies. Our model predicts that chronic infection may lead to autoimmune disease as well due to cross-reactivity and suggests a broad distribution for the time of onset of autoimmune disease due to chronic exposure. The slow search of antibody sequence space by point mutation leads to the broad of distribution times.

  6. Undifferentiated CTD: a wide spectrum of autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosca, Marta; Tani, Chiara; Carli, Linda; Bombardieri, Stefano

    2012-02-01

    The existence of systemic autoimmune diseases not fulfilling classification criteria for defined connective tissue diseases (CTDs) is a common clinical experience. These conditions have been variably defined as incomplete lupus erythematosus, early undifferentiated connective tissue diseases and undifferentiated connective tissue diseases (UCTDs). However, the definition of UCTD includes a wide spectrum of diseases ranging from 'organ-dominant' conditions (e.g., idhiopatic non-specific interstitial pneumonia) to simplified conditions (stable UCTD), to early CTDs or mild forms of CTDs. In the present article, the literature data on undifferentiated diseases and their clinical spectrum as well as the importance of the definition of new classificative criteria are discussed. PMID:22424194

  7. Contribution of MicroRNAs to autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garo, Lucien P; Murugaiyan, Gopal

    2016-05-01

    MicroRNAs are a class of evolutionarily conserved, short non-coding RNAs that post-transcriptionally modulate the expression of multiple target genes. They are implicated in almost every biological process, including pathways involved in immune homeostasis, such as immune cell development, central and peripheral tolerance, and T helper cell differentiation. Alterations in miRNA expression and function can lead to major dysfunction of the immune system and mediate susceptibility to autoimmune disease. Here, we discuss the role of miRNAs in the maintenance of immune tolerance to self-antigens and the gain or loss of miRNA functions on tissue inflammation and autoimmunity. PMID:26943802

  8. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: another autoimmune disease associated with sarcoidosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerner, Eda Burcu; Costabel, Ulrich; Wessendorf, Thomas Ernst; Theegarten, Dirk; Hetzel, Martin; Drent, Marjolein; Bonella, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare lung disease characterized by the accumulation of surfactant phospholipids and lipoproteins within the alveoli.  Here we report on a female patient who was diagnosed with autoimmune PAP and successfully treated with whole lung lavage (WLL). 15 months after PAP diagnosis the patient developed marked fatigue. Additional tests revealed the diagnosis of sarcoidosis. We can only speculate that PAP and sarcoidosis in our patient are linked to each other based on the fact that other autoimmune disorders have also been associated with sarcoidosis. PMID:27055841

  9. MEDICINAL PLANTS AGAINST LIVER DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandey Govind

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available India is the largest producer of medicinal plants and is rightly called the “Botanical Garden of the World”. The medicinal plants have very important place in the health and vitality of human beings as well as animals. As per the WHO estimates, about three quarters of the world’s population currently use herbs and other traditional medicines to cure various diseases, including liver disorders. Hence, several phytomedicines (medicinal plants or herbal drugs are now used for the prevention and treatment of various liver disorders. Although experimental studies have been conducted on a number of these plants and their formulations, however, only some plants have clearly shown the hepatogenic / hepatoprotective effects against liver diseases or hepatotoxicity caused by variety of hepatotoxic agents such as chemicals, drugs, pollutants, and infections from parasites, bacteria or viruses (e.g., hepatitis A, B and C, etc. Indeed, to obtain satisfactory herbal drugs for treating severe liver diseases, the medicinal plants must be evaluated systematically for properties like antiviral activity (Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, etc., antihepatotoxicity activity (antioxidants and others, stimulation of liver regeneration and choleretic activity. A combination of different herbal extracts / fractions is likely to provide desired activities to cure severe liver diseases. The medicinal plants contain several phytochemicals which possess strong antioxidant property, leading to antihepatotoxic activity.

  10. HEMOSTATIC DISORDERS IN LIVER DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. Minov

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The liver is an essential player in the pathway of coagulation in both primary and secondary hemostasis as it is the site of synthesis of all coagulation factors and their inhibitors. Liver diseases are associated with complex changes in coagulation and the delicate balance between pro and antithrombotic factors is preserved but reset to a lower level. There is growing evidence that portal and hepatic vein thrombosis is cause of disease progression in cirrhotic patients and worsens hemostatic abnormalities. These hemostatic abnormalities do not always lead to spontaneous bleeding, which may be triggered only by additional factors, such as infections. Usually therapy for coagulation disorders in liver disease is needed only during bleeding or before invasive procedures. In patients with end stage liver disease liver transplantation is the only treatment available, which can restore normal hemostasis, and correct genetic clotting defects. During liver transplantation hemorrhage may occur due to the pre-existing hypocoagulable state, the collateral circulation caused by portal hypertension and increased fibrinolysis. 

  11. Induction of Regulatory t Cells by Low Dose il2 in Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-18

    Rheumatoid Arthritis; Ankylosing Spondylitis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Psoriasis; Behcet's Disease; Wegener's Granulomatosis; Takayasu's Disease; Crohn's Disease; Ulcerative Colitis; Autoimmune Hepatitis; Sclerosing Cholangitis

  12. Are human endogenous retroviruses triggers of autoimmune diseases?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexø, Bjørn A; Villesen, Palle; Nissen, Kari K;

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases encompass a plethora of conditions in which the immune system attacks its own tissue, identifying them as foreign. Multiple factors are thought to contribute to the development of immune response to self, including differences in genotypes, hormonal milieu, and environmental...... factors. Viruses including human endogenous retroviruses have long been linked to the occurrence of autoimmunity, but never proven to be causative factors. Endogenous viruses are retroviral sequences embedded in the host germline DNA and transmitted vertically through successive generations in a Mendelian...... antigens is reported for multiple sclerosis. We speculate the possibility that recombinants or mixed viral particles are formed and that the resulting viruses stimulate the innate immune system, thereby initiating the autoimmune response....

  13. Living donor liver transplantation for patients with alcoholic liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Yo-Han; Hwang, Shin; Ahn, Chul-Soo; Kim, Ki-Hun; Moon, Deok-Bog; Ha, Tae-Yong; Song, Gi-Won; Jung, Dong-Hwan; Park, Gil-Chun; Namgoong, Jung-Man; Park, Hyung-Woo; Park, Chun-Soo; Kang, Sung-Hwa; Jung, Bo-Hyeon; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2013-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Since most transplantation studies for alcoholic liver disease (ALD) were performed on deceased donor liver transplantation, little was known following living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Methods The clinical outcome of 18 ALD patients who underwent LDLT from Febraury 1997 to December 2004 in a large-volume liver transplantation center was assessed retrospectively. Results The model for end-stage liver disease score was 23±11, and mean pretransplant abstinence period w...

  14. Periodontal disease and liver cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønkjær, Lea Ladegaard

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Studies suggest that periodontal disease, a source of subclinical and persistent infection, may be associated with various systemic conditions, including liver cirrhosis. The aim of this study was to examine the literature and determine the relationship between periodontal disease and...... health', 'periodontal disease', 'mouth disease', 'gingivitis', and 'periodontitis'. RESULTS: Thirteen studies published between 1981 and 2014 were found to include data on oral health and periodontal disease in cirrhotic patients. Studies indicated an increased incidence of periodontal disease in...... patients with liver cirrhosis, measured with several different periodontal indices. The reported prevalence of periodontal disease in cirrhosis patients ranged from 25.0% to 68.75% in four studies and apical periodontitis was found in 49%-79% of the patients. One study found that mortality was lower among...

  15. Ultraviolet radiation and autoimmune disease: insights from epidemiological research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review examines the epidemiological evidence that suggests ultraviolet radiation (UVR) may play a protective role in three autoimmune diseases: multiple sclerosis, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and rheumatoid arthritis. To date, most of the information has accumulated from population studies that have studied the relationship between geography or climate and autoimmune disease prevalence. An interesting gradient of increasing prevalence with increasing latitude has been observed for at least two of the three diseases. This is most evident for multiple sclerosis, but a similar gradient has been shown for insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in Europe and North America. Seasonal influences on both disease incidence and clinical course and, more recently, analytical studies at the individual level have provided further support for a possible protective role for UVR in some of these diseases but the data are not conclusive. Organ-specific autoimmune diseases involve Th1 cell-mediated immune processes. Recent work in photoimmunology has shown ultraviolet B (UVB) can specifically attenuate these processes through several mechanisms which we discuss. In particular, the possible contribution of an UVR-induced increase in serum vitamin D (1,25(OH)2D3) levels in the beneficial immunomodulation of these diseases is discussed

  16. P-Glycoprotein and Drug Resistance in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Picchianti-Diamanti

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, rheumatoid arthritis (RA and psoriatic arthritis (PsA are chronic inflammatory disorders of unknown etiology characterized by a wide range of abnormalities of the immune system that may compromise the function of several organs, such as kidney, heart, joints, brain and skin. Corticosteroids (CCS, synthetic and biologic immunosuppressive agents have demonstrated the capacity to improve the course of autoimmune diseases. However, a significant number of patients do not respond or develop resistance to these therapies over time. P-glycoprotein (P-gp is a transmembrane protein that pumps several drugs out of the cell, including CCS and immunosuppressants; thus, its over-expression or hyper-function has been proposed as a possible mechanism of drug resistance in patients with autoimmune disorders. Recently, different authors have demonstrated that P-gp inhibitors, such as cyclosporine A (CsA and its analogue Tacrolimus, are able to reduce P-gp expression and or function in SLE, RA and PsA patients. These observations suggest that P-gp antagonists could be adopted to revert drug resistance and improve disease outcome. The complex inter-relationship among drug resistance, P-gp expression and autoimmunity still remains elusive.

  17. Endogenous retroviruses are associated with autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexø, Bjørn A; Jensen, Sara B; Hansen, Bettina;

    2016-01-01

    transmission is called vertical. Viral variants of importance for development of disease must be more frequent among diseased persons than among healthy individuals. Multiple sclerosis, diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis are all associated with sets of endogenouos retroviruses but not the same sets. If a virus...... grows and this contributes to disease, one should be able to alleviate disease with antiretroviral drugs. We call for clinical trials to elucidate this issue....

  18. Total lymphoid irradiation in autoimmune diseases and organ transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total lymphoid irradiation, a treatment program developed for the management of Hodgkin's disease, induces profound immunologic changes. These effects have been characterized in animal systems and are now beginning to be exploited in humans for the treatment of autoimmune disease and preparation for organ transplantation. A burgeonning new era of clinical research is developing that will require multidisciplinary collaboration in order to realize its ultimate potential

  19. Liver Transplantation for Caroli Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Zahmatkeshan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Caroli disease is a rare congenital disorder characterized by multifocal, segmental dilatation of intrahepatic bile ducts. Patients with Caroli disease who have recurrent bouts of biliary infection, particularly those who also have complications related to portal hypertension may require liver transplantation. In liver transplant ward of Shiraz University of Medical Science we had 4 patients with Caroli disease who were transplanted. Herein, we describe the demographic characteristics and post-transplant course of the patients. These patients presented with liver failure, recurrent cholangitis and portal hypertension sequelae unresponsive to medical treatment. The mean age of patients was 24.5 (range: 18–36 years, the mean MELD score was 17.5 (range: 11–23, three patients were female; one was male. All of the patients had good post-transplantation course except for one patient who developed post-operative biliary stricture for whom biliary reconstruction was done.

  20. Radiosensitivity of peripheral blood lymphocytes in autoimmune disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proliferation of peripheral blood lymphocytes, cultured with Con A, can be inhibited by ionizing radiation. Lymphocytes from patients with conditions associated with autoimmunity, such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and polymyositis, are more radiosensitive than those from healthy volunteers or patients with conditions not associated with autoimmunity. Nuclear material isolated from the lymphocytes of patients with autoimmune diseases is, on average, lighter in density than the nuclear material from most healthy controls. This difference in density is not related to increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation but the degree of post-irradiation change in density (lightening) is proportional to the initial density, i.e. more dense nuclear material always shows a greater upward shift after radiation. The recovery of pre-irradiation density of nuclear material, 1 h after radiation exposure, taken as an indication of DNA repair, correlates with the radiosensitivity of lymphocyte proliferation (Con A response); failure to return to pre-irradiation density being associated with increased sensitivity of proliferative response. These results require extension but, taken with previously reported studied of the effects of DNA methylating agents, support the idea that DNA damage and its defective repair could be important in the aetio-pathogenesis of autoimmune disease. (author)

  1. Refractive surgery in systemic and autoimmune disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majed AlKharashi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with underlying systemic disease represent challenging treatment dilemma to the refractive surgeon. The refractive error in this patient population is accompanied by a systemic disease that may have an ocular or even a corneal component. The literature is rather sparse about the use of laser refractive surgery (LRS and such procedure is not approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA in this patient population. Patients with collagen vascular disease, diabetes mellitus (DM, allergic and atopic disease, or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV are never ideal for LRS. Patients with uncontrolled systemic disease or ocular involvement of the disease should not undergo LRS. However, a patient with well-controlled and mild disease, no ocular involvement, and not on multidrug regimen may be a suitable candidate if they meet stringent criteria. There is a need for a large, multicenter, controlled trial to address the safety and efficacy of LRS in patients with systemic disease before such technology can be widely adopted by the refractive surgery community.

  2. Determination of autoantibodies to annexin XI in systemic autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, C S; Levantino, G; Houen, Gunnar;

    2000-01-01

    Annexin XI, a calcyclin-associated protein, has been shown to be identical to a 56,000 Da antigen recognized by antibodies found in sera from patients suffering from systemic autoimmune diseases. In this work hexahistidine-tagged recombinant annexin XI (His6- rAnn XI) was used as antigen in ELISA...... experiments for determination of autoantibodies to annexin XI in sera of patients with systemic rheumatic autoimmune diseases. Immunoblotting with HeLa cell extract and with His6-rAnn XI as antigen was used for confirmation of positive ELISA results. We found eleven anti-annexin XI positive sera (3.9%) out of...... 282 sera from patients with systemic rheumatic diseases. The highest number of annexin XI positive sera were found in primary antiphospholipid syndrome (3/17), and in subacute lupus erythematosus (1/6), while lower frequencies of positive sera were found in patients with systemic sclerosis (5...

  3. Autoimmune thyroid disease with myasthenia gravis in a 28-year-old male: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Masood, Imran; Yasir, Mir; Aiman, Aiffa; Kudyar, R P

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Graves' disease and myasthenia gravis are both auto-immune diseases and the coexistence of these two diseases is rare but well recognized. Myasthenia gravis is more frequent in patients with thyroid disease. Case presentation Here we present a case of 28-year-old male patient having Auto-immune thyroid disease (Graves' disease) with concomitant myasthenia gravis. Conclusion In conclusion, we report that the coexistence of Myasthenia Gravis with Autoimmune thyroid disease might ha...

  4. Presence of Autoimmune Diseases in Alopecia Areata Patients and Their Families and Its Effect on Prognosis

    OpenAIRE

    Hatice Ergün Duman; Afet Akdağ Köse; Halim İşsever

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to investigate the role of autoimmunity in the etiopathogenesis of alopecia areata (AA) and the effects of the coexisting autoimmune diseases on the prognosis of AA. Methods: The records of 134 AA patients diagnosed in the dermatology and venereology outpatient clinic were retrospectively analyzed for the history of concomitant autoimmune disease and the family history for autoimmune diseases. Results: Of the 134 patients, 79 were males, 55 were females. The rate of ...

  5. Treatment of Subepidermal Autoimmune Bullous Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Ekin Şavk

    2011-01-01

    The common therapeutic goal for all subepidermal bullous diseases is to prevent inflammation and production of pathogenic autoantibodies and/or to facilitate the elimination of these antibodies. Diseases included in this group are the pemphigoids, linear IgA dermatosis, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, dermatitis herpetiformis and bullous systemic erythematosus. Corticosteroids are the most commonly used systemic medication. Other alternatives include dapsone, various antibiotics and nicotina...

  6. Autoimmune diseases in pregnancy: maternal and fetal outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavithra M. Vengetesh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of autoimmune connective tissue disorders on the outcomes of pregnancy and the influence of treatment on pregnancy. Methods: Thirty-seven antenatal patients with autoimmune connective tissue diseases, comprising of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE, primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS, Mixed Connective Tissue Diseases (MCTD, ankylosing spondylitis and Takayasu arteritis were analysed. Results: Multigravidas constituted 89.4% and were associated with bad obstetric history. Before diagnosis and treatment, serious maternal complications of eclampsia and thromboembolism were observed in patients with SLE and APS. The live birth rates were 9% and 2.4% respectively in patients with SLE and APS. With appropriate treatment- aspirin, heparin and immunosuppressant, the live birth rates were raised to 70% in SLE and 100% in APS patients. Investigation for autoimmune disease in recurrent pregnancy loss is important. A rare association between MCTD and congenital anomaly - Rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata was observed. Preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, fetal growth restriction and preterm labour were the common complications noted. Conclusions: Active disease at onset of pregnancy, presence of Anti-ds DNA antibodies and secondary APS were strong predictors of poor pregnancy outcomes among patients with SLE. Vigilant monitoring during pregnancy is required for favourable outcomes. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(1.000: 9-14

  7. Treatment of Subepidermal Autoimmune Bullous Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekin Şavk

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The common therapeutic goal for all subepidermal bullous diseases is to prevent inflammation and production of pathogenic autoantibodies and/or to facilitate the elimination of these antibodies. Diseases included in this group are the pemphigoids, linear IgA dermatosis, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, dermatitis herpetiformis and bullous systemic erythematosus. Corticosteroids are the most commonly used systemic medication. Other alternatives include dapsone, various antibiotics and nicotinamide, azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, cycloporine, mycophenolate mofetil, IV immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis. Rapid reepithelialization and prevention of secondary infections are provided by local hygenic measures including antiseptic baths and wound care.

  8. Endothelins in chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1996-01-01

    This review describes recent progress in the accumulation of knowledge about the endothelins (ETs), a family of vasoactive 21-amino acid polypeptides, in chronic liver disease. Particular prominence is given to the dynamics of ET-1 and ET-3 and their possible relation to the disturbed circulation...... with functional renal failure. Studies on liver biopsies have revealed synthesis of ET-1 in hepatic endothelial and other cells, and recent investigations have identified the hepatosplanchnic system as a major source of ET-1 and ET-3 spillover into the circulation, with a direct relation to portal...... venous hypertension. In addition, marked associations with disturbance of systemic haemodynamics and with abnormal distribution of blood volume have been reported. Although the pathophysiological importance of the ET system in chronic liver disease is not completely understood, similarities to other...

  9. Tight Junctions, Intestinal Permeability, and Autoimmunity Celiac Disease and Type 1 Diabetes Paradigms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Jeroen; Rozing, Jan; Sapone, Anna; Lammers, Karen; Fasano, Alessio; Fromm, M; Schulzke, JD

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by tissue damage and loss of function due to an immune response that is directed against specific organs. This review is focused on celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune enteropathy, and type I diabetes (TID), a hyperglycosaemia caused by a destructive autoimmune p

  10. Genetics Home Reference: autoimmune Addison disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is the most common form in developed countries, accounting for up to 90 percent of cases. Related ... disease ClinicalTrials.gov (1 link) ClinicalTrials.gov Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed Sources for This ...

  11. Phenomics in Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-18

    Healthy Volunteer; Rheumatoid Arthritis; Ankylosing Spondylitis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus/Antiphospholipid Syndrome; FMF; Cryopyrin-Associated Periodic Syndromes /TNF-receptor Associated Periodic Syndrome; Vasculitis; Uveitis; Myositis; Crohn's Disease; Ulcerative Rectocolitis; Type 1 Diabetes; Unclassified IAD Knee and/or Hip Arthritis, Muscular Dystrophy

  12. Regulatory T cells and B cells: implication on autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ping; Zheng, Song Guo

    2013-01-01

    The regulatory T (Treg) cells play an important role in the maintenance of homeostasis and the prevention of autoimmune diseases. Although most studies are focusing on the role of Treg cells in T cells and T cells-mediated diseases, these cells also directly affect B cells and other non-T cells. This manuscript updates the role of Treg cells on the B cells and B cell-mediated diseases. In addition, the mechanisms whereby Treg cells suppress B cell responses have been discussed.

  13. [Autoimmunity in pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urboniene, Daiva; Sakalauskas, Raimundas; Sitkauskiene, Brigita

    2005-01-01

    For years, smoking induced inflammatory reaction, comprised mainly of neutrophils and macrophages, has been accepted to be the major component in pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. New developments in molecular and cell biology have provided scientists with new knowledge and understanding of inflammatory processes in lung. Recent reports have underlined the role of autoimmunity and T lymphocytes as a potential important factor, which takes place in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This article reviews potential mechanism of T cell mediated immune response in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:15827384

  14. Association between Autoimmune Rheumatic Diseases and the Risk of Dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Kang Lu; Hao-Kuang Wang; Chih-Ching Yeh; Chih-Yuan Huang; Pi-Shan Sung; Liang-Chao Wang; Chih-Hsin Muo; Fung-Chang Sung; Han-Jung Chen; Ying-Chun Li; Li-Ching Chang; Kuen-Jer Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Aim. Autoimmune rheumatic diseases (ARD) are characterized by systemic inflammation and may affect multiple organs and cause vascular events such as ischemic stroke and acute myocardial infarction. However, the association between ARD and increased risk of dementia is uncertain. This is a retrospective cohort study to investigate and compare the risk of dementia between patients clinically diagnosed with ARD and non-ARD patients during a 5-year follow-up period. Methods. Data were obtained fr...

  15. PEG Minocycline-Liposomes Ameliorate CNS Autoimmune Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Hu; Josbert Metselaar; Li-Hong Ben; Cravens, Petra D.; Mahendra P Singh; Frohman, Elliot M.; Eagar, Todd N.; Racke, Michael K.; Kieseier, Bernd C.; Olaf Stüve

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Minocycline is an oral tetracycline derivative with good bioavailability in the central nervous system (CNS). Minocycline, a potent inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, attenuates disease activity in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Potential adverse effects associated with long-term daily minocycline therapy in human patients are concerning. Here, we investigated whether less frequent treatment with long-circul...

  16. Emerging role of Interleukin-22 in autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Hai-Feng; Li, Xiang-Pei; Zheng, Song Guo; Ye, Dong-Qing

    2012-01-01

    Interleukin-22 (IL-22) is an IL-10 family cytokine member that was recently discovered to be mainly produced by Th17 cells. Previous studies have indicated the importance of IL-22 in host defense against Gram-negative bacterial organisms (in gut and lung). Recently, there is emerging evidence that IL-22 is involved in the development and pathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), multiple sclerosis (MS), Sjögren’s syndro...

  17. Peripheral Nervous System Manifestations in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Cojocaru, Inimioara Mihaela; COJOCARU, Manole; SILOSI, Isabela; VRABIE, Camelia Doina

    2014-01-01

    The peripheral nervous system refers to parts of the nervous system outside the brain and spinal cord. Systemic autoimmune diseases can affect both the central and peripheral nervous systems in a myriad of ways and through a heterogeneous number of mechanisms leading to many different clinical manifestations. As a result, neurological complications of these disorders can result in significant morbidity and mortality. The most common complication of peripheral nervous system (PNS) involvement ...

  18. Antiviral TRIMs: Friend or Foe in Autoimmune and Autoinflammatory Disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Jefferies, Caroline A; Wynne, Claire; Higgs, Rowan

    2011-01-01

    The concept that viral sensing systems, via their ability to drive pro-inflammatory cytokine and interferon production, contribute to the development of autoimmune and autoinflammatory disease is supported by a wide range of clinical and experimental observations. Recently, the tripartite motif-containing proteins (TRIMs) have emerged as having key roles in antiviral immunity — either as viral restriction factors or as regulators of pathways downstream of viral RNA and DNA sensors, and the in...

  19. FOXP3+ Treg Cells and Gender Bias in Autoimmune Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Nie, Jia; Li, Yang Yang; Zheng, Song Guo; Tsun, Andy; Li, Bin

    2015-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells play a pivotal role in the maintenance of immune homeostasis, where the X-linked master transcription factor forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) determines Treg cell development and function. Genetic deficiency of foxp3 induces dysfunction of Treg cells and immuno-dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, and X-linked syndrome in humans. Functionally deficient Treg cells or the development of exTreg cells positively correlate with autoimmune diseases, such as sys...

  20. Role of soluble Fas ligand in autoimmune diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning-Li Li; Tong Zhou; Dong-Qing Zhang; Hong Nie; Qi-Wen Yu; Ji-Ying Zhang; An-Lun Ma; Bai-Hua Shen; Li Wang; Jun Bai; Xue-Hua Chen

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of soluble Fas ligand in autoimmune diseases.METHODS: RT-PCR was performed to amplify sFasL cDNA from the total RNA extracted from activated human peripheral blood lymphocytes. DNA fragments were cloned into PCR vector. After sequenced, sFasL gene fragments were inserted into pQE-31 vector and expressed in E. Coli M15respectively. Proteins were purified through affinity chromatography column with ligand of 6xHis tag and identified by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. Mice were immunized with sFasL protein and specific anti-serum was harvested 6 wk after immunization. Monoclonal anti-human FasL antibody was made from the immunized mice. Serum level of sFasL in different patients was detected using antiFasL antibodies from the immunized mice.RESULTS: The protein expressed was 24 ku by SDS-PAGE electrophrosis. The protein was specially bound to antihuman FasL antibody by Western blot analysis. The sFasL protein could induce Jurket cell apoptosis in vitro. The concentration of serum sFasL in patients with autoimmune diseases was higher than that in normal individuals. sFasL could reduce arthritis in collagen induced arthritis (CIA)mice model by subcutaneous injection.CONCLUSION: sFasL may be involved in either induction of apoptosis or autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, sFasL may have potential application in treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  1. Bartonella henselae Infection: An Uncommon Mimicker of Autoimmune Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Maritsi, Despoina N.; Diagoras Zarganis; Zoi Metaxa; Georgia Papaioannou; George Vartzelis

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of a seven-year-old immunocompetent female patient who developed systemic symptoms mimicking an autoimmune rather than an infectious disease. The patient presented with rash, biquotidian fever, night sweats, and arthralgias. There was no antecedent history of cat contact. Investigations showed increased inflammatory markers, leukocytosis, thrombocytosis, hypercalcemia, and raised angiotensin-converting enzyme. Interferon-gamma releasing assay for tuberculosis infection was n...

  2. Interferon regulatory factor 5 in human autoimmunity and murine models of autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eames, Hayley L; Corbin, Alastair L; Udalova, Irina A

    2016-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) has been demonstrated as a key transcription factor of the immune system, playing important roles in modulating inflammatory immune responses in numerous cell types including dendritic cells, macrophages, and B cells. As well as driving the expression of type I interferon in antiviral responses, IRF5 is also crucial for driving macrophages toward a proinflammatory phenotype by regulating cytokine and chemokine expression and modulating B-cell maturity and antibody production. This review highlights the functional importance of IRF5 in a disease setting, by discussing polymorphic mutations at the human Irf5 locus that lead to susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and inflammatory bowel disease. In concordance with this, we also discuss lessons in IRF5 functionality learned from murine in vivo models of autoimmune disease and inflammation and hypothesize that modulation of IRF5 activity and expression could provide potential therapeutic benefits in the clinic. PMID:26207886

  3. Bioluminescence in vivo imaging of autoimmune encephalomyelitis predicts disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinman Lawrence

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis is a widely used animal model to understand not only multiple sclerosis but also basic principles of immunity. The disease is scored typically by observing signs of paralysis, which do not always correspond with pathological changes. Methods Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis was induced in transgenic mice expressing an injury responsive luciferase reporter in astrocytes (GFAP-luc. Bioluminescence in the brain and spinal cord was measured non-invasively in living mice. Mice were sacrificed at different time points to evaluate clinical and pathological changes. The correlation between bioluminescence and clinical and pathological EAE was statistically analyzed by Pearson correlation analysis. Results Bioluminescence from the brain and spinal cord correlates strongly with severity of clinical disease and a number of pathological changes in the brain in EAE. Bioluminescence at early time points also predicts severity of disease. Conclusion These results highlight the potential use of bioluminescence imaging to monitor neuroinflammation for rapid drug screening and immunological studies in EAE and suggest that similar approaches could be applied to other animal models of autoimmune and inflammatory disorders.

  4. Association of Addison's disease with autoimmune disorders--a long-term observation of 180 patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Kasperlik-Zaluska, A. A.; Migdalska, B.; Czarnocka, B; Drac-Kaniewska, J.; Niegowska, E.; Czech, W.

    1991-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the frequency of autoimmune disorders in Addison's disease. We have observed 180 patients (113 females, 67 males, aged 9-74 years) for 1 to 26 years. Tuberculosis was noted in 54 patients. Autoimmune disorders were found in 80 patients (44%); however, 125 (69%) patients were believed to have an autoimmune origin of adrenocortical insufficiency. In 20 patients two or more autoimmune disorders were found to coexist with Addison's disease.

  5. Celiac autoimmunity in autoimmune thyroid disease is highly prevalent with a questionable impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bharat Rakeshkumar; Joshi, Ameya S.; Varthakavi, Premlata K.; Chadha, Manoj D.; Bhagwat, Nikhil M.; Pawal, Pratibha S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) is 10–12% in the general population worldwide. Among various disorders co-existing with AITD, the concomitance of celiac disease (CD) with AITD results in poor absorption of thyroid medications and results in higher doses of the same. Institution of gluten-free diet (GFD) in this cohort helps reduce medication doses. Aim: To screen patients with AITD for the presence of celiac autoimmunity (CA). Materials and Methods: A total of 280 consecutive patients with AITD attending the thyroid Out-patient Department of a tertiary care hospital were screened for the presence of tissue transglutaminase antibodies (immunoglobulin A tissue transglutaminase). Those with a positive titer (but duodenal mucosal biopsy for the diagnosis of CD, followed by institution of GFD in confirmed cases. Results: Of a total of 280 (182 females and 98 males) patients with AITD screened, 24 (8.6%) turned out to be positive for CA. Of 24 (8.6%), 15 (8.24%) females and 9 (9.18%) males were positive for CA. There was no statistically significant difference in the thyroxine doses required for normalization of thyroid function and the weight of the patients in CA positive and CA negative patients. Conclusions: The prevalence of CD in patients with AITD is much greater than in the general population. This forms the basis for screening patients with AITD for presence of CD. PMID:26904476

  6. Epigenetics in liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    Mann, Derek A.

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetics is a term that encompasses a variety of regulatory processes that are able to crosstalk in order to influence gene expression and cell phenotype in response to environmental cues. A deep understanding of epigenetics offers the potential for fresh insights into the basis for complex chronic diseases and improved diagnostic and prognostic tools. Moreover, as epigenetic modifications are highly plastic and responsive to the environment, there is much excitement around the theme of ep...

  7. Endothelins in chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Henriksen, Jens Henrik

    1996-01-01

    and neurohumoral dysregulation found in cirrhosis. Recent studies have shown that the ET system is highly activated in most cirrhotic patients. Circulating ET-1 and ET-3 levels have a positive relation to the severity of the disease and fluid retention, with the highest values recorded in patients...... venous hypertension. In addition, marked associations with disturbance of systemic haemodynamics and with abnormal distribution of blood volume have been reported. Although the pathophysiological importance of the ET system in chronic liver disease is not completely understood, similarities to other......This review describes recent progress in the accumulation of knowledge about the endothelins (ETs), a family of vasoactive 21-amino acid polypeptides, in chronic liver disease. Particular prominence is given to the dynamics of ET-1 and ET-3 and their possible relation to the disturbed circulation...

  8. The immunobiology of Campylobacter jejuni: Innate immunity and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phongsisay, Vongsavanh

    2016-04-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Campylobacter jejuni causes gastroenteritis and Guillain-Barré syndrome in humans. Recent advances in the immunobiology of C. jejuni have been made. This review summarizes C. jejuni-binding innate receptors and highlights the role of innate immunity in autoimmune diseases. This human pathogen produces a variety of glycoconjugates, including human ganglioside-like determinants and multiple activators of Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Furthermore, C. jejuni targets MyD88, NLRP3 inflammasome, TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF), sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (Siglecs), macrophage galactose-type lectin (MGL), and immunoglobulin-like receptors (TREM2, LMIR5/CD300b). The roles of these innate receptors and signaling molecules have been extensively studied. MyD88-mediated TLR activation or inflammasome-dependent IL-1β secretion is essential for autoimmune induction. TRIF mediates the production of type I interferons that promote humoral immune responses and immunoglobulin class-switching. Siglec-1 and Siglec-7 interact directly with gangliosides. Siglec-1 activation enhances phagocytosis and inflammatory responses. MGL internalizes GalNAc-containing glycoconjugates. TREM2 is well-known for its role in phagocytosis. LMIR5 recognizes C. jejuni components and endogenous sulfoglycolipids. Several lines of evidence from animal models of autoimmune diseases suggest that simultaneous activation of innate immunity in the presence of autoreactive lymphocytes or antigen mimicry may link C. jejuni to immunopathology. PMID:26709064

  9. Risk Factors for Autoimmune Diseases Development After Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    OpenAIRE

    Roriz, Mélanie; Landais, Mickael; Desprez, Jonathan; Barbet, Christelle; Azoulay, Elie; Galicier, Lionel; Wynckel, Alain; Baudel, Jean-luc; Provôt, François; Pène, Frédéric; Mira, Jean-Paul; Presne, Claire; Poullin, Pascale; Delmas, Yahsou; Kanouni, Tarik

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) can be associated with other autoimmune disorders, but their prevalence following autoimmune TTP remains unknown. To assess the prevalence of autoimmune disorders associated with TTP and to determine risk factors for and the time course of the development of an autoimmune disorder after a TTP episode, we performed a cross sectional study. Two-hundred sixty-one cases of autoimmune TTP were included in the French Reference Center reg...

  10. Serum IgG Subclasses in Autoimmune Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Haoze; Ping LI; Wu, Di; Xu, Dong; Hou, Yong; Qian WANG; Li, Mengtao; Li, Yongzhe; Zeng, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Fengchun; Shi, Qun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To characterize serum IgG subclass levels in several autoimmune diseases, including primary Sjogren syndrome (pSS), systemic sclerosis (SSc), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). We aimed to analyze serum IgG subclass distribution and to test whether serum IgG4 levels are elevated in these diseases. Serum IgG subclass levels from 102 pSS, 102 SSc, 100 SLE, and 59 PBC patients, as well as 40 healthy controls (HCs), were measured using the immunoneph...

  11. Inflammatory glycoproteins in cardiometabolic disorders, autoimmune diseases and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, Margery A; Gruppen, Eke G; Otvos, James D; Dullaart, Robin P F

    2016-08-01

    The physiological function initially attributed to the oligosaccharide moieties or glycans on inflammatory glycoproteins was to improve protein stability. However, it is now clear that glycans play a prominent role in glycoprotein structure and function and in some cases contribute to disease states. In fact, glycan processing contributes to pathogenicity not only in autoimmune disorders but also in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, diabetes and malignancy. While most clinical laboratory tests measure circulating levels of inflammatory proteins, newly developed diagnostic and prognostic tests are harvesting the information that can be gleaned by measuring the amount or structure of the attached glycans, which may be unique to individuals as well as various diseases. As such, these newer glycan-based tests may provide future means for more personalized approaches to patient stratification and improved patient care. Here we will discuss recent progress in high-throughput laboratory methods for glycomics (i.e. the study of glycan structures) and glycoprotein quantification by methods such as mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We will also review the clinical utility of glycoprotein and glycan measurements in the prediction of common low-grade inflammatory disorders including cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer, as well as for monitoring autoimmune disease activity. PMID:27312321

  12. P15: The expression of Tc17 cells in thymoma accompany with autoimmune diseases or autoimmune disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Background Thymoma is thymic epithelial cell tumor. Studies have shown that thymoma associated with autoimmune disorders and possible mechanisms of autoimmune diseases is the central immune tolerance and peripheral tolerance obstacles have resulted in the breaking of the autoimmune response activation and immune tolerance. Tc17 cells and Th17 cells have been shown play an important role in tumor and autoimmune diseases’ development process. This study test the distribution of Tc17cells in thymoma and the expression of RORγt in thymus of thymoma patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) or other autoimmune diseases, the frequency of Th17/Tc17 in PBMCs, to explore the expression of Th17/Tc17 cells in thymoma accompany with autoimmune diseases or autoimmune disorders. Methods In this study, grouped as follows: (I) thymoma non gravis group (Tm groups); (II) thymoma with MG group thymoma with MG (MG group); (III) thymoma with MG associated with other autoimmune diseases group or anti- nuclear antibodies abnormal elevation of the group (AD group), to analyze the basic differences between the groups. In this study, we examined the RT-PCR to detect RORγt in the thymoma tissue, immunohistochemical double staining method to detect Tc17 cells expression and localization in the thymoma tissue distribution expression Th17/Tc17 in PBMCs by flow cytometry [Interleukin (IL)-17-producing CD8+ cells as Thl7 cells and IL-17-producing CD4+ cells as Tcl7 cells], analysis of differential expression of three in each group thymoma; and explore of Th17/Tc17 expression. Results (I) Tm groups and AD group serum CD8+ cells was statistically significant (PTc17 cells in MG/AD group was significantly higher than that in Tm, was statistically significant (PTc17 cells have risen trend in Tm groups and MG/AD group. Conclusions (I) CD8+ cells, CD4+/CD8+ T ratio, immunoglobulin, CRP and complement C3 levels can be used as indicators of evaluation of the role of the immune status of patients with

  13. COAGULATION ACTIVITY IN LIVER DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Sheikh Sajjadieh Mohammad Reza

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Patients with advanced hepatic failure may present with the entire spectrum of coagulation factor deficiencies. This study was designed to determine laboratory abnormalities in coagulation in chronic liver disease and the association of these abnormalities with the extent of chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis. Coagulation markers were assayed in 60 participants: 20 patients with chronic hepatitis, 20 patients with cirrhosis, and 20 healthy individuals (control. Plasma levels of anti-thrombin III were determined by a chromogenic substrate method, and plasma concentrations of fibrinogen were analyzed by the Rutberg method. Commercially available assays were used for laboratory coagulation tests. The levels of coagualation activity markers in patients with chronic liver disease were significantly different in comparison to those in healthy participants. These results indicate the utility of measuring markers for coagulation activity in determining which cirrhosis patients are more susceptible to disseminated intravascular coagulation.

  14. MEDICINAL PLANTS AGAINST LIVER DISEASES

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey Govind

    2011-01-01

    India is the largest producer of medicinal plants and is rightly called the “Botanical Garden of the World”. The medicinal plants have very important place in the health and vitality of human beings as well as animals. As per the WHO estimates, about three quarters of the world’s population currently use herbs and other traditional medicines to cure various diseases, including liver disorders. Hence, several phytomedicines (medicinal plants or herbal drugs) are now used for the prevention and...

  15. Treatment of patients with severe autoimmune hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Finn Stolze

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a progressive inflammatory diseases of unknown origin that is characterised by a necro-inflammatory and fibrotic process and may result in liver failure or uncompensated liver cirrhosis. Normally AIH is responsive to immunosuppressive therapy, and treatment aims...... and tacrolimus) might salvage patients from transplantation. Mycophenolate mofetil may also improve liver tests and reduce the requirement for corticosteroids. Besides, sirolimus is effective for treatment of de novo autoimmune hepatitis that sometimes develops after liver transplantation. Initial experience...

  16. Is there a Common Genetic Basis for Autoimmune Diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Manuel Anaya

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (ADs represent a diverse collection of diseases in terms of their demographic profile and primary clinical manifestations. The commonality between them however, is the damage to tissues and organs that arises from the response to self-antigens. The presence of shared pathophysiological mechanisms within ADs has stimulated searches for common genetic roots to these diseases. Two approaches have been undertaken to sustain the “common genetic origin” theory of ADs. Firstly, a clinical genetic analysis showed that autoimmunity aggregates within families of probands diagnosed with primary Sjögren's (pSS syndrome or type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D. A literature review supported the establishment of a familiar cluster of ADs depending upon the proband's disease phenotype. Secondly, in a same and well-defined population, a large genetic association study indicated that a number of polymorphic genes (i.e. HLA-DRB1, TNF and PTPN22 influence the susceptibility for acquiring different ADs. Likewise, association and linkage studies in different populations have revealed that several susceptibility loci overlap in ADs, and clinical studies have shown that frequent clustering of several ADs occurs. Thus, the genetic factors for ADs consist of two types: those which are common to many ADs (acting in epistatic pleitropy and those that are specific to a given disorder. Their identification and functional characterization will allow us to predict their effect as well as to indicate potential new therapeutic interventions. Both autoimmunity family history and the co-occurrence of ADs in affected probands should be considered when performing genetic association and linkage studies.

  17. Pervasive sharing of genetic effects in autoimmune disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Cotsapas

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association (GWA studies have identified numerous, replicable, genetic associations between common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and risk of common autoimmune and inflammatory (immune-mediated diseases, some of which are shared between two diseases. Along with epidemiological and clinical evidence, this suggests that some genetic risk factors may be shared across diseases-as is the case with alleles in the Major Histocompatibility Locus. In this work we evaluate the extent of this sharing for 107 immune disease-risk SNPs in seven diseases: celiac disease, Crohn's disease, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and type 1 diabetes. We have developed a novel statistic for Cross Phenotype Meta-Analysis (CPMA which detects association of a SNP to multiple, but not necessarily all, phenotypes. With it, we find evidence that 47/107 (44% immune-mediated disease risk SNPs are associated to multiple-but not all-immune-mediated diseases (SNP-wise P(CPMA<0.01. We also show that distinct groups of interacting proteins are encoded near SNPs which predispose to the same subsets of diseases; we propose these as the mechanistic basis of shared disease risk. We are thus able to leverage genetic data across diseases to construct biological hypotheses about the underlying mechanism of pathogenesis.

  18. Usefulness of liver infiltrating CD86-positive mononuclear cells for diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazutaka Kurokohchi; Shigeki Kuriyama; Tsutomu Masaki; Takashi Himoto; Akihiro Deguchi; Seiji Nakai; Asahiro Morishita; Hirohito Yoneyama; Yasuhiko Kimura; Seishiro Watanabe

    2006-01-01

    AIM: Although the pathogenic mechanism underlying autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) remains unclear, the immune system is thought to be critical for the progression of the disease. Cellular immune responses may be linked to the hepatocellular damage in AIH. Recently, much attention has been focused on the critical functions of costimulatory molecules expressed on mononuclear cells in the generation of effective T cell-mediated immune responses. Analysis of costimulatory molecule expressed on mononuclear cells from the patients with AIH may give us insight into the pathogenic mechanism of hepatocellular damage in AIH.METHODS: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC)were taken from the patients with AIH (34 cases) and healthy controls (25 cases). Liver infiltrating mononuclear cells (LIMCs) were taken from the patients with AIH (18 cases), the patient with chronic hepatitis C (CH-C) (13 cases) and the patients with fatty liver (2 cases).Using flow cytometry, the cells were analyzed for the expression of costimulatory molecules, such as CD80,CD86, and CD152 (CTLA-4). The results were compared with clinical data such as the level of gammaglobulin,histological grade, presence or absence of corticosteroids administration and the response to corticosteroids.RESULTS: The levels of CD80+, CD86+ and CD152+PBMC were significantly reduced in the patients with AIH as compared with healthy controls. By contrast,those cells were significantly higher in LTMC than in PBMC of the patients with AIH. Especially, the level of CD86+ LIMC showed a marked increase irrespective of the degree of disease activity in the patients with ATH,although CD86+ cells were rarely present in PBMC. The levels of CD86+ cells were present in significantly higher frequency in patients with AIH than in the patients with CH-C. Furthermore, the patients with AIH with high levels of CD86+ LIMC showed good responses to corticosteroids, whereas 2 cases of AIH with low levels of CD86+ LIMC did not respond well

  19. Gene expression profiling in autoimmune diseases: chronic inflammation or disease specific patterns?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovin, Lone Frier; Brynskov, Jørn; Hegedüs, Laszlo;

    2007-01-01

    ) patients and healthy individuals were specific for the arthritic process or likewise altered in other chronic inflammatory diseases such as chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (Hashimoto's thyroiditis, HT) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Using qPCR for 18 RA-discriminative genes, there were no significant......A central issue in autoimmune disease is whether the underlying inflammation is a repeated stereotypical process or whether disease specific gene expression is involved. To shed light on this, we analysed whether genes previously found to be differentially regulated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA...... immunoinflammatory diseases, but only if accompanied by pronounced systemic manifestations. This suggests that at least some of the genes activated in RA are predominantly or solely related to general and disease-nonspecific autoimmune processes....

  20. Clustering of autoimmune diseases in patients with rosacea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Hansen, Peter Riis; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rosacea is a common inflammatory skin condition that shares genetic risk loci with autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and celiac disease. A recent genomewide association study identified 90 genetic regions associated with T1DM, celiac disease, multiple sclerosis......, and/or rheumatoid arthritis, respectively. However, a possible association with rosacea was not investigated. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the association between rosacea and T1DM, celiac disease, multiple sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis, respectively. METHODS: We performed a population-based case......-control study. A total of 6759 patients with rosacea were identified and matched with 33,795 control subjects on age, sex, and calendar time. We used conditional logistic regression to calculate crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: After adjustment for smoking and...

  1. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Sadeghian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is increasing in pediatric age group parallel to the growing prevalence of obesity and overweight all around the world. So changing in life style and   interventions on obesogenic environment is cornerstone of NAFLD therapy in obese children. Some experts recommend that children and adolescents be encouraged to follow a low-fat, low-glycemic-index diet that includes eating a minimum of 5 servings of vegetables and fruits daily, engaging in physical activity for at least 1 hour daily, and minimizing television/computer time to 2 hours daily.  In spite of effectiveness of weight loss and exercise in improvement NAFLD, this goal is very difficult to be achieved and pharmacological approaches have become necessary. Pharmacologic therapies against one or more specific factors and/or molecules involved in the development of NAFLD (i.e., insulin resistance, free fatty acid lipid toxicity, and oxidative stress also might slow the progression of NAFLD to NASH or cirrhosis.  On this basis, insulin sensitizers, antioxidants, cytoprotective agents, and dietary supplementations have been evaluated in pediatric clinical trials but there is no approved pharmacologic therapy for NAFLD or NASH. Not all obese children affected by NAFLD. Diet modification and regular exercise beside to serial medical follow up highly suggested for this group of children. Normal weight and thin children with NAFLD or NASH should be investigated appropriately in a logical manner based on causes of primary liver steatosis in children and treatment of underlying disease can cause improvement fatty liver in these patients.   Keywords: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis; Children; Steatosis; Treatment

  2. Development of a disease registry for autoimmune bullous diseases: initial analysis of the pemphigus vulgaris subset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Amit Aakash; Seiffert-Sinha, Kristina; Sirois, David; Werth, Victoria P; Rengarajan, Badri; Zrnchik, William; Attwood, Kristopher; Sinha, Animesh A

    2015-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a rare, potentially life threatening, autoimmune blistering skin disease. The International Pemphigus and Pemphigoid Foundation (IPPF) has recently developed a disease registry with the aim to enhance our understanding of autoimmune bullous diseases with the long-term goal of acquiring information to improve patient care. Patients were recruited to the IPPF disease registry through direct mail, e-mail, advertisements, and articles in the IPPF-quarterly, -website, -Facebook webpage, and IPPF Peer Health Coaches to complete a 38-question survey. We present here the initial analysis of detailed clinical information collected on 393 PV patients. We report previously unrecognized gender differences in terms of lesion location, autoimmune comorbidity, and delay in diagnosis. The IPPF disease registry serves as a useful resource and guide for future clinical investigation. PMID:24691863

  3. Increased Prevalence of Cardiovascular and Autoimmune Diseases in Periodontitis Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    Nesse, Willem; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Abbas, Frank; Spijkervet, Fred K. L.; Stijger, Astrid; Tromp, Jan A. H.; van Dijk, Johan L.; Vissink, Arjan

    2010-01-01

    Background: Associations between periodontitis and cardiovascular and autoimmune diseases are most often assessed in patients with a particular cardiovascular or autoimmune disease. To prevent selection bias, this study assesses the existence of associations between periodontitis and cardiovascular and autoimmune diseases in patients attending a dental or periodontal clinic. Methods: Data were collected from 1,276 randomly selected dental records from patients attending a dental (n = 588) or ...

  4. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Clustering in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlon, Thomas; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Carmona, F. David; Di Cara, Alessandro; Wojcik, Jérôme; Voloshynovskiy, Sviatoslav

    2016-01-01

    Systemic Autoimmune Diseases, a group of chronic inflammatory conditions, have variable symptoms and difficult diagnosis. In order to reclassify them based on genetic markers rather than clinical criteria, we performed clustering of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms. However naive approaches tend to group patients primarily by their geographic origin. To reduce this “ancestry signal”, we developed SNPClust, a method to select large sources of ancestry-independent genetic variations from all variations detected by Principal Component Analysis. Applied to a Systemic Lupus Erythematosus case control dataset, SNPClust successfully reduced the ancestry signal. Results were compared with association studies between the cases and controls without or with reference population stratification correction methods. SNPClust amplified the disease discriminating signal and the ratio of significant associations outside the HLA locus was greater compared to population stratification correction methods. SNPClust will enable the use of ancestry-independent genetic information in the reclassification of Systemic Autoimmune Diseases. SNPClust is available as an R package and demonstrated on the public Human Genome Diversity Project dataset at https://github.com/ThomasChln/snpclust. PMID:27490238

  5. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Clustering in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlon, Thomas; Martínez-Bueno, Manuel; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Carmona, F David; Di Cara, Alessandro; Wojcik, Jérôme; Voloshynovskiy, Sviatoslav; Martín, Javier; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E

    2016-01-01

    Systemic Autoimmune Diseases, a group of chronic inflammatory conditions, have variable symptoms and difficult diagnosis. In order to reclassify them based on genetic markers rather than clinical criteria, we performed clustering of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms. However naive approaches tend to group patients primarily by their geographic origin. To reduce this "ancestry signal", we developed SNPClust, a method to select large sources of ancestry-independent genetic variations from all variations detected by Principal Component Analysis. Applied to a Systemic Lupus Erythematosus case control dataset, SNPClust successfully reduced the ancestry signal. Results were compared with association studies between the cases and controls without or with reference population stratification correction methods. SNPClust amplified the disease discriminating signal and the ratio of significant associations outside the HLA locus was greater compared to population stratification correction methods. SNPClust will enable the use of ancestry-independent genetic information in the reclassification of Systemic Autoimmune Diseases. SNPClust is available as an R package and demonstrated on the public Human Genome Diversity Project dataset at https://github.com/ThomasChln/snpclust. PMID:27490238

  6. Elevated Adiponectin Serum Levels in Women with Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éric Toussirot

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue produces a wide range of proteins that may influence the immune system. In this study, we assessed the serum levels of leptin, adiponectin, and ghrelin, in association with the measurements of body composition, in 15 female patients with various autoimmune diseases (systemic lupus erythematosus, primary Sjögren's syndrome, sarcoidosis, mixed connective tissue disease, vasculitis, CREST syndrome, and polymyositis and in 15 healthy female controls. There were no statistically significant differences between the patients and controls with regard to serum leptin, serum ghrelin, global fat mass, adiposity, and fat mass in the android or gynoid regions, whereas serum adiponectin levels were higher in patients than controls (16.3±1.6 μg/mL versus 9.7±0.6 μg/mL; =.01. As adiponectin is known to exhibit potent anti-inflammatory properties, a high adiponectinemia in patients with systemic autoimmune disease may mitigate the inflammatory response. However, the precise consequences of these elevated serum adiponectin levels on the metabolic syndrome development and atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk in this patient population still needs to be determined.

  7. Autoimmune Thyroid Disease in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Global Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas Roldán, Jorge; Amaya-Amaya, Jenny; Castellanos-de la Hoz, Juan; Giraldo-Villamil, Juliana; Montoya-Ortiz, Gladys; Cruz-Tapias, Paola; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana; Mantilla, Rubén D.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To determine the prevalence and impact of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. Eight-hundred patients were included. The association between AITD and RA was analyzed was analyzed by bivariate and multivariate analysis. In addition, a literature review was done focusing on geographical variations. Results. In our cohort the prevalence of AITD was 9.8% while the presence of antibodies was 37.8% for antithyroperoxidase enzyme (TPOAb) and 20.8% for antithyroglobulin protein (TgAb). The presence of type 2 diabetes, thrombosis, abnormal body mass index, and a high educational level was positively associated with AITD. The literature review disclosed a geographical variation of AITD in RA ranging from 0.5% to 27%. Autoantibody prevalence ranges from 6% to 31% for TgAb, 5% to 37% for TPOAb, and from 11.4% to 32% for the presence of either of the two. Conclusion. AITD is not uncommon in RA and should be systematically assessed since it is a risk factor for developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. These results may help to further study the common mechanisms of autoimmune diseases, to improve patients' outcome, and to define public health policies. An international consensus to accurately diagnose AITD is warranted. PMID:23209899

  8. Body mass index and risk of autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Maria C; Basit, Saima; Andersson, Mikael;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A possible aetiological link between obesity and certain autoimmune diseases (ADs) has been suggested. We investigated the associations between body mass index (BMI, kg/m2) and 43 ADs. METHODS: 75,008 women participating in the Danish National Birth Cohort were followed during a median......-up, 2430 women (3.2%) developed a total of 2607 new-onset ADs. Risk of any autoimmune disease was increased in obese women (HR, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.46) compared with normal weight women (18.5-≤25 kg/m2). Obese women (BMI≥30 kg/m2) were at increased risk of sarcoidosis (HR 3.59; 95% CI, 2.31 to 5.......57) and type 1 diabetes mellitus (HR 2.67; 95% CI, 1.71 to 4.17). Risk of dermatitis herpetiformis increased by 14% (95% CI, 1% to 30%) per BMI unit. Conversely, risk of celiac disease and Raynaud's phenomenon decreased by 7% (95% CI, 1% to 13%) and 12% (95% CI, 4% to 19%) per BMI unit, respectively...

  9. Kidneys in chronic liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marek Hartleb; Krzysztof Gutkowski

    2012-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI),defined as an abrupt increase in the serum creatinine level by at least 0.3 mg/dL,occurs in about 20% of patients hospitalized for decompensating liver cirrhosis.Patients with cirrhosis are susceptible to developing AKI because of the progressive vasodilatory state,reduced effective blood volume and stimulation of vasoconstrictor hormones.The most common causes of AKI in cirrhosis are pre-renal azotemia,hepatorenal syndrome and acute tubular necrosis.Differential diagnosis is based on analysis of circumstances of AKI development,natriuresis,urine osmolality,response to withdrawal of diuretics and volume repletion,and rarely on renal biopsy.Chronic glomeruIonephritis and obstructive uropathy are rare causes of azotemia in cirrhotic patients.AKI is one of the last events in the natural history of chronic liver disease,therefore,such patients should have an expedited referral for liver transplantation.Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is initiated by progressive portal hypertension,and may be prematurely triggered by bacterial infections,nonbacterial systemic inflammatory reactions,excessive diuresis,gastrointestinal hemorrhage,diarrhea or nephrotoxic agents.Each type of renal disease has a specific treatment approach ranging from repletion of the vascular system to renal replacement therapy.The treatment of choice in type 1 hepatorenal syndrome is a combination of vasoconstrictor with albumin infusion,which is effective in about 50% of patients.The second-line treatment of HRS involves a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt,renal vasoprotection or systems of artificial liver support.

  10. An unusual association of three autoimmune disorders: celiac disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccuti, Viera; Perrone, Antonio; D'Introno, Alessia; Campobasso, Anna; Sangineto, Moris; Sabbà, Carlo

    2016-12-01

    Autoimmune disorders are known to be more frequent in women and often associated each others, but it is rare to see multiple autoimmune diseases in a single patient. Recently, the concept of multiple autoimmune syndrome has been introduced to describe patients with at least three autoimmune diseases. We describe a case of a young man with a clinical history of psychiatric symptoms and celiac disease (CD) who was diagnosed to have other two autoimmune disorders: systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. This case is unusual upon different patterns: the rare combination of the three autoimmune diseases, their appearance in a man and the atypical onset of the diseases with psychiatric symptoms likely to be related either to CD or to SLE. PMID:27383232

  11. Porous silicon biosensor for the detection of autoimmune diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jane, Andrew O.; Szili, Endre J.; Reed, Joanne H.; Gordon, Tom P.; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2007-12-01

    Advances in porous silicon (pSi) technology have led to the development of new sensitive biosensors. The unique optical properties of pSi renders the material a perfect candidate for optical transducers exploiting photoluminescence or white light interference effects. The ability of biosensors exploiting these transduction mechanisms to quickly and accurately detect biological target molecules affords an alternative to current bioassays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Here, we present a pSi biosensor that was developed to detect antibodies against the autoimmune protein La. This protein is associated with autoimmune diseases including rheumatic disorders, systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Sjogren's syndrome (SS). A fast and sensitive detection platform such as the one described here can be applied to the rapid diagnosis of these debilitating autoimmune diseases. The immobilisation of the La protein onto pSi films gave a protein receptor-decorated sensor matrix. A cascade of immunological reactions was then initiated to detect anti-La antibody on the functionalised pSi surface. In the presence of o-phenylenediamine (OPD), horseradish peroxidase (HRP)/H IIO II catalysed the formation of an oxidised radical species that accelerated pSi corrosion. pSi corrosion was detected as a blue-shift in the generated interference pattern, corresponding to a decrease in the effective optical thickness (EOT) of the pSi film. Compared to an ELISA, the pSi biosensor could detect the anti-La antibody at a similar concentration (500 - 125 ng/ml). Furthermore, we found that the experimental process can be significantly shortened resulting in detection of the anti-La antibody in 80 minutes compared to a minimum of 5 hours required for ELISA.

  12. Liver disease in transfusion dependent thalassaemia major

    OpenAIRE

    C. Li; Chik, K; Lam, C.; To, K; Yu, S.; Lee, V.; Shing, M.; Cheung, A; Yuen, P

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To study the prevalence and severity of liver diseases of transfusion dependent thalassaemia major patients, and correlate the histological and biochemical changes of iron overload in liver with the peripheral blood markers.

  13. Antibodies to soluble liver antigen and alpha-enolase in patients with autoimmune hepatitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Bogdanos, Dimitrios-Petrou; Gilbert, Daniele; Bianchi, Ilaria; Leoni, Simona; Mitry, Ragai; Ma, Yun; Mieli-vergani, Giorgina; Vergani, Diego

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antibodies to a cytosolic soluble liver antigen (SLA) are specifically detected in patients with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). The target of anti-SLA has been identified as a ~50 kDa UGA serine tRNA-associated protein complex (tRNP(Ser)Sec), through the screening of cDNA libraries. A recent report questioned the identity of tRNP(Ser)Sec as the real SLA antigen. The latter study identified alpha-enolase as a major anti-SLA target, through proteomic analysis. METHODS: In an attempt to...

  14. Identification of antigenic proteins associated with trichloroethylene-induced autoimmune disease by serological proteome analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although many studies indicated that trichloroethylene (TCE) could induce autoimmune diseases and some protein adducts were detected, the proteins were not identified and mechanisms remain unknown. To screen and identify autoantigens which might be involved in TCE-induced autoimmune diseases, three groups of sera were collected from healthy donors (I), patients suffering from TCE-induced exfoliative dermatitis (ED) (II), and the healed ones (III). Serological proteome analysis (SERPA) was performed with total proteins of TCE-treated L-02 liver cells as antigen sources and immunoglobins of the above sera as probes. Highly immunogenic spots (2-fold or above increase compared with group I) in group II and III were submitted to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry sequencing. Western blot analysis was followed using commercial antibodies and individual serum. Six proteins were identified. Among them, Enoyl Coenzyme A hydratase peroxisoma 1 and lactate dehydrogenase B only showed stronger immunogenicity for group II sera, while Purine nucleoside phosphorylase, ribosomal protein P0 and proteasome activator subunit1 isoform1 also showed stronger immunogenicity for group III sera. Noteworthy, NM23 reacted only with group II sera. Western blot analysis of NM23 expression indicated that all of the individual serum of group II showed immune activity, which confirmed the validity of SERPA result. These findings revealed that there exist autoantibodies in group II and III sera. Besides, autoantibodies of the two stages of disease course were different. These autoantigens might serve as biomarkers to elucidate mechanisms underlying TCE toxicity and are helpful for diagnosis, therapy and prognosis of TCE-induced autoimmune diseases.

  15. Primary sclerosing cholangitis, autoimmune hepatitis and overlap syndromes in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rebecca Saich; Roger Chapman

    2008-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic progressive disorder of unknown aetiology characterised by chronic inflammation and stricture formation of the biliary tree. Symptoms include itch and lethargy and in advanced cases cholangitis and end-stage liver disease, however increasing numbers of asymptomatic individuals are being identified. The disease is rare in the general population but is strongly associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) affecting up to 5% of patients with Ulcerative Colitis, with a slightly lower prevalence (up to 3.6%) in Crohns disease. The strength of this association means that the vast majority (> 90%) of patients with PSC also have IBD, although many may have only mild gastro-intestinal symptoms. Usually IBD presents before PSC, although vice-versa can occur and the onset of both conditions can be separated in some cases by many years. Mean age of diagnosis of PSC is in the fifth decade of life with a strong male predominance.Risk is increased in those with a family history of PSC, suggesting a genetic predisposition and the disease is almost exclusive to non-smokers. The ulcerative colitis associated with PSC is characteristically mild, runs a quiescent course, is associated with rectal sparing, more severe right sided disease, backwash ilieitis and has a high risk of pouchiUs post-colectomy. Most worrisome is the high risk of colorectal malignancy which necessitates routine colonoscopic surveillance. Cholangiocarcinoma is also a frequent complication of PSC with a 10%-15% lifetime risk of developing this condition. Treatment with high dose ursodeoxycholic acid offers some chemoprotective effects against colorectal malignancy and may decrease symptoms, biochemical and histological progression of liver disease. Small duct PSC patients characteristically have normal cholangiography, and liver biopsy is required for diagnosis, it appears to have a more favourable prognosis. Autoimmune Hepatitis (AIH) is also more prevalent

  16. Alcoholic liver disease and the gut-liver axis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gyongyi; Szabo; Shashi; Bala

    2010-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is one of the leading causes of liver diseases and liver-related death worldwide. Of the many factors that contribute to the pathogenesis of ALD, gut-derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plays a central role in induction of steatosis, inflammation, and fi brosis in the liver. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms by which alcohol contributes to increased gut permeability, the activation of Kupffer cells, and the infl ammatory cascade by LPS. The role of the Toll-like receptor 4...

  17. The Complement System in Liver Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuebin Qin; Bin Gao

    2006-01-01

    The complement system plays an important role in mediating both acquired and innate responses to defend against microbial infection, and in disposing immunoglobins and apoptotic cells. The liver (mainly hepatocytes) is responsible for biosynthesis of about 80-90% of plasma complement components and expresses a variety of complement receptors.Recent evidence from several studies suggests that the complement system is also involved in the pathogenesis of a variety of liver disorders including liver injury and repair, fibrosis, viral hepatitis, alcoholic liver disease, and liver ischemia/reperfusion injury. In this review, we will discuss the potential role of the complement system in the pathogenesis of liver diseases.

  18. Vitamin D and autoimmune thyroid diseases: facts and unresolved questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzaro, Giorgia; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-02-01

    Vitamin D deficiency (levels lower than 20 ng/ml) is becoming a global health problem, since it is increasingly represented even among healthy subjects. Vitamin D, as an environmental factor, is involved in many biological processes, like perception of chronic pain and response to infections. In recent years, evidence has emerged pointing to an involvement of vitamin D in the development of many autoimmune diseases, and a severe vitamin D deficiency has been especially demonstrated in patients affected with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). Low levels of vitamin D were found associated with antithyroid antibody presence, abnormal thyroid function, increased thyroid volume, increased TSH levels, and adverse pregnancy outcome in women with AITD. Vitamin D mediates its effect through binding to vitamin D receptor (VDR), which is harbored on many human immune cells, and in this way is able to modulate immune cells activity, triggering both innate and adaptive immune responses. As VDR gene polymorphisms were found to associate with AITD, the evidence links vitamin D deficiency to AITD either through gene polymorphism or by environmental factors (lack of dietary uptake and sun exposure). Vitamin D supplementation may be offered to AITD patients, but further research is needed to define whether it should be introduced in clinical practice. PMID:25407646

  19. [Assessment of association between autoimmune thyroid disease and chronic urticaria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feibelmann, Taciana C M; Gonçalves, Fabrícia Torres; Daud, Mariana Salomão; Jorge, André de Sousa; Mantese, Sônia A O; Jorge, Paulo Tannús

    2007-10-01

    Several studies found a higher prevalence of Autoimmune Thyroid Disease (ATD) in patients with Chronic Urticaria (CU). This relationship may be due to the possible autoimmune etiology in up to one third of the cases of Chronic Idiopathic Urticaria (CIU). However, the frequency of ATD ranged from 1.14% to 28.6%. The study began by determining whether there is an association between ATD and CU, in a population seen at the same clinic. We compared the frequency of anti-thyroid antibodies and thyroid dysfunction in 49 patients with CIU (group 1) and 112 controls (group 2). In order to support the result found, we studied the prevalence of CIU in 60 patients with ATD (group 3) and compared with 29 patients who had non-immune thyroid disease (NITD) (group 4). We did not find a statistical difference for the presence of anti-thyroid antibodies or thyroid dysfunction between groups 1 and 2 (12.24% x 9.82% and 12.24% x 7.14%, respectively). The same occurred for the presence of CIU among groups 3 and 4 (3.33% x 3.44%). In our study it was not possible to demonstrate a relationship between ATD and CIU, which means that different populations may present a higher or lower degree of association between these illnesses. PMID:18157382

  20. Myasthenia gravis, a model of organ-specific autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrih-Aknin, S

    1995-04-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a neuromuscular disorder of autoimmune origin. Most patients have antibodies directed against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) that interfere with neuromuscular transmission. MG is a model of organ-specific autoimmune disease in which the autoantigen, AChR, is well characterized. However, several questions remain unanswered. Why is AChR, which is present in the thymus, not tolerized? Why does the anti-AChR antibody titre not correlate with clinical manifestations, and why do some patients not have such antibodies? What genetic elements are involved in disease susceptibility? How is the expression of AChR regulated after its attack by autoantibodies? Could MG patients benefit from new immunomodulatory treatments? At the IVth EuroMyasthenia meeting, held in Versailles in April 1994, almost 200 researchers and physicians met to discuss the pathophysiology and treatment of myasthenia gravis and to provide answers to some of these questions. The sessions covered immunological, genetic and clinical aspects of MG. PMID:7612144

  1. Encephalopathy Associated with Autoimmune Thyroid Disease: A Potentially Reversible Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Correia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune thyroid disease may occasionally associate with unspecific neurological symptoms, which are more commonly insidious, include cognitive or behavioural symptoms, and may associate with tremor, myoclonus, or ataxia. We report a 61-year-old female patient who presented with chronic headache, insidious mood, and cognitive disturbance which evolved in a few months to dementia associated with exuberant limb myoclonus. Diagnostic workup revealed high anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody titers and an inflammatory CSF profile, and it was negative for other possible etiologies. Treatment with steroids induced significant improvement. The diagnosis of encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease is still controversial given the fact that the clinical presentation and diagnostic workup are unspecific, the pathophysiology is still undetermined, and the diagnosis is mostly of exclusion. No direct correlation is found between anti-thyroid antibody titers and clinical presentation, and it is currently speculated that other still unrecognized antibodies may be responsible for this clinical entity. It is extremely important to recognize this entity because it is potentially treatable with immunotherapies. It is also increasingly recognized that clinical improvement with first-line treatment with steroids may be absent or incomplete, and other immunotherapies as immunosuppressants, intravenous immunoglobulin, or plasma exchange must be attempted in the clinical suspicion of EEAT.

  2. Encephalopathy Associated with Autoimmune Thyroid Disease: A Potentially Reversible Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Inês; Marques, Inês B.; Ferreira, Rogério; Sousa, Lívia

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease may occasionally associate with unspecific neurological symptoms, which are more commonly insidious, include cognitive or behavioural symptoms, and may associate with tremor, myoclonus, or ataxia. We report a 61-year-old female patient who presented with chronic headache, insidious mood, and cognitive disturbance which evolved in a few months to dementia associated with exuberant limb myoclonus. Diagnostic workup revealed high anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody titers and an inflammatory CSF profile, and it was negative for other possible etiologies. Treatment with steroids induced significant improvement. The diagnosis of encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease is still controversial given the fact that the clinical presentation and diagnostic workup are unspecific, the pathophysiology is still undetermined, and the diagnosis is mostly of exclusion. No direct correlation is found between anti-thyroid antibody titers and clinical presentation, and it is currently speculated that other still unrecognized antibodies may be responsible for this clinical entity. It is extremely important to recognize this entity because it is potentially treatable with immunotherapies. It is also increasingly recognized that clinical improvement with first-line treatment with steroids may be absent or incomplete, and other immunotherapies as immunosuppressants, intravenous immunoglobulin, or plasma exchange must be attempted in the clinical suspicion of EEAT.

  3. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Autoimmune or Immune-mediated Pathogenesis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonghui Wen

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC, the two main forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, is still unclear, but both autoimmune and immune-mediated phenomena are involved. Autoimmune phenomena include the presence of serum and mucosal autoantibodies against intestinal epithelial cells in either form of IBD, and against human tropomyosin fraction five selectively in UC. In addition, perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (pANCA are common in UC, whereas antibodies against Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ASCA are frequently found in CD. Immune-mediate phenomena include a variety of abnormalities of humoral and cell-mediated immunity, and a generalized enhanced reactivity against intestinal bacterial antigens in both CD and UC. It is currently believed that loss of tolerance against the indigenous enteric flora is the central event in IBD pathogenesis. Various complementary factors probably contribute to the loss of tolerance to commensal bacteria in IBD. They include defects in regulatory T-cell function, excessive stimulation of mucosal dendritic cells, infections or variants of proteins critically involved in bacterial antigen recognition, such as the products of CD-associated NOD2/CARD15 mutations.

  4. White liver disease in goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, H; Hutton, J B; Sutherland, R J; James, M P

    1988-03-01

    Three field cases of ill-thrift, hepatic lipodystrophy and low tissue levels of vitamin B12 in young angora cross goats are reported. The cases meet the criteria for the diagnosis of white liver disease (WLD) described for sheep. The hypothesis that WLD is a metabolic consequence of cobalt/vit B12 deficiency in sheep and goats on a diet rich in propionate is developed, together with possible reasons for its occurrence in these species but not in cattle or red deer. PMID:16031425

  5. Cytokines, STATs and Liver Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Gao

    2005-01-01

    The Janus kinase-signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK-STAT) signaling pathway, activated by more than 50 cytokines or growth factors, plays critical roles in a wide variety of cellular functions in the hematopoietic, immune, neuronal and hepatic systems. In the liver, this signaling pathway, activated by more than 20 cytokines, growth factors, hormones, and hepatitis viral proteins, plays critical roles in antiviral defense, acute phase response, hepatic injury, repair, inflammation, transformation, and hepatitis. This article reviews the biological significance of STAT1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 in hepatic functions and diseases. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.2005;2(2):92-100.

  6. Cytokines, STATs and Liver Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BinGao

    2005-01-01

    The Janus kinase-signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK-STAT) signaling pathway, activated by more than 50 cytokines or growth factors, plays critical roles in a wide variety of cellular functions in the hematopoietic, immune, neuronal and hepatic systems. In the liver, this signaling pathway, activated by more than 20 cytokines, growth factors, hormones, and hepatitis viral proteins, plays critical roles in antiviral defense, acute phase response, hepatic injury, repair, inflammation, transformation, and hepatitis. This article reviews the biological significance of STAT1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 in hepatic functions and diseases. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2005;2(2):92-100.

  7. The Clinical Usefulness of {sup 18F} FDG PET/CT in Patients with Systemic Autoimmune Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jong Ryool; Song, Ho Chun; Kang, Sae Ryung; Yoo, Su Woong; Kim, Jahae; Chong, Ari; Min, Jung Joon; Bom, Hee Seung; Lee, Shin Seok; Park, Youg Wook [Chonnam National Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    Individuals with systemic autoimmune disease have an increased susceptibility to both inflammation and malignancy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of {sup 18F} FDG PET/CT in patients with systemic autoimmune disease. Forty patients diagnosed with systemic autoimmune disease were enrolled. Diagnostic accuracy of FDG PET/CT for detecting malignancy was assessed. FDG PET/CT findings, including maximum standardized uptake (SUVmax) of lymphadenopathy (LAP), liver, bone marrow, spleen, joint and muscles, were considered for the characterization of LAPs. FDG PET/CT could detect metabolically activated lesions in 36 out of 40 patients (90%) including inflammatory lesions in 28 out of 32 patients (88%). The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of FDG PET/CT for the detection of malignancy were 100, 67, 70, 25, and 100%, respectively. Multiple LAPs were found in 25 of 40 patients (63%), and comprised three malignancies, four cases of tuberculosis, and 18 reactive changes. A SUVmax ratio of bone marrow to liver below 0.78 could distinguish malignancy from tuberculosis + reactive change (AUC=1.000, sensitivity: 100%, specificity: 100%). The SUVmax ratio of spleen to liver in the reactive group was also significantly higher than that in the malignancy group (P=0.014). SUVmax of LAP in the TB group was significantly higher than that in the reactive group (P=0.040). PET/CT is useful in detecting and differentiating inflammation and malignancy in patients with systemic autoimmune disease. Frequent false positive interpretations can be minimized by consideration of FDG uptake in bone marrow and spleen.

  8. Targeting collagen expression in alcoholic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kyle J Thompson; Iain H McKillop; Laura W Schrum

    2011-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a leading cause of liver disease and liver-related deaths globally, particularly in developed nations. Liver fibrosis is a consequence of ALD and other chronic liver insults, which can progress to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma if left untreated. Liver fibrosis is characterized by accumulation of excess extracellular matrix components, including type Ⅰ collagen, which disrupts liver microcirculation and leads to injury. To date, there is no therapy for the treatment of liver fibrosis; thus treatments that either prevent the accumulation of type Ⅰ collagen or hasten its degradation are desirable. The focus of this review is to examine the regulation of type Ⅰ collagen in fibrogenic cells of the liver and to discuss current advances in therapeutics to eliminate excessive collagen deposition.

  9. Pregnancy and the risk of autoimmune disease: An exploration.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-01-31

    Fetal microchimerism is the study of persisting fetal cells in the mother years after pregnancy and the purported implications for her health and longevity. Due to the association between pregnancy and autoimmune disease (AID), and the preponderance of these diseases in women, laboratory studies have for years attempted to link microchimeric fetal cells with the onset of AID after pregnancy. This new study gave us the opportunity to examine for the first time if this theory could be proven clinically in a large cohort of women. By examining whether different types of delivery affected the onset of AID, we also aimed to indirectly relate this finding to fetal microchimerism. The results did suggest an association between pregnancy and the risk of subsequent maternal AID, with increased risks noted after caesarean section (CS) and decreased risks after abortion. This is the first epidemiological study on the risk of AID following pregnancy.

  10. Biomarkers of An Autoimmune Skin Disease-Psoriasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Jiang; Taylor E Hinchliffe; Tianfu Wu

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is one of the most prevalent autoimmune skin diseases. However, its etiology and pathogenesis are still unclear. Over the last decade, omics-based technologies have been exten-sively utilized for biomarker discovery. As a result, some promising markers for psoriasis have been identified at the genome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome level. These discoveries have provided new insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways in psoriasis pathogenesis. More importantly, some of these markers may prove useful in the diagnosis of psoriasis and in the prediction of disease progression once they have been validated. In this review, we summarize the most recent findings in psoriasis biomarker discovery. In addition, we will discuss several emerging technologies and their potential for novel biomarker discovery and diagnostics for psoriasis.

  11. A systematic review of the incidence and prevalence of autoimmune disease in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marrie, Ruth Ann; Reider, Nadia; Cohen, Jeffrey;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As new therapies emerge which increase the risk of autoimmune disease it is increasingly important to understand the incidence of autoimmune disease in multiple sclerosis (MS). OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this review is to estimate the incidence and prevalence of comorbid autoimmune dis...... uveitis and possibly pemphigoid. CONCLUSION: Fewer than half of the studies identified were of high quality. Population-based studies that report age, sex and ethnicity-specific estimates of incidence and prevalence are needed in jurisdictions worldwide....

  12. Genetic homogeneity of autoimmune polyglandular disease type I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjoerses, P.; Aaltonen, J.; Vikman, A. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular disease type I (APECED) is an autosomal recessive autoimmune disease (MIM 240300) characterized by hypoparathyroidism, primary adrenocortical failure, and chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis. The disease is highly prevalent in two isolated populations, the Finnish population and the Iranian Jewish one. Sporadic cases have been identified in many other countries, including almost all European countries. The APECED locus has previously been assigned to chromosome 21q22.3 by linkage analyses in 14 Finnish families. Locus heterogeneity is a highly relevant question in this disease affecting multiple tissues and with great phenotypic diversity. To solve this matter, we performed linkage and haplotype analyses on APECED families rising from different populations. Six microsatellite markers on the critical chromosomal region of 2.6 cM on 21q22.3 were analyzed. Pair-wise linkage analyses revealed significant LOD scores for all these markers, maximum LOD score being 10.23. The obtained haplotype data and the geographic distribution of the great-grandparents of the Finnish APECED patients suggest the presence of one major, relatively old mutation responsible for {approximately}90% of the Finnish cases. Similar evidence for one founder mutation was also found in analyses of Iranian Jewish APECED haplotypes. These haplotypes, however, differed totally from the Finnish ones. The linkage analyses in 21 non-Finnish APECED families originating from several European countries provided independent evidence for linkage to the same chromosomal region on 21q22.3 and revealed no evidence for locus heterogeneity. The haplotype analyses of APECED chromosomes suggest that in different populations APECED is due to a spectrum of mutations in a still unknown gene on chromosome 21. 21 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity in children with celiac disease compared to healthy 12-year olds.

    OpenAIRE

    vanderPals, Maria; Ivarsson, Anneli; Norström, Fredrik; Högberg, Lotta; Svensson, Johan; Carlsson, Annelie

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Studies have suggested a correlation between untreated celiac disease and risk for other autoimmune diseases. We investigated the prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity in 12-year-old children (i) with symptomatic celiac disease diagnosed and treated with a gluten-free diet, (ii) with screening-detected untreated celiac disease, and (iii) without celiac disease. Methods. Blood samples from 12632 children were collected. All celiac disease cases, previously diagnosed and newly screenin...

  14. Prevalence of Thyroid Autoimmunity in Children with Celiac Disease Compared to Healthy 12-Year Olds

    OpenAIRE

    Maria van der Pals; Anneli Ivarsson; Fredrik Norström; Lotta Högberg; Johan Svensson; Annelie Carlsson

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Studies have suggested a correlation between untreated celiac disease and risk for other autoimmune diseases. We investigated the prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity in 12-year-old children (i) with symptomatic celiac disease diagnosed and treated with a gluten-free diet, (ii) with screening-detected untreated celiac disease, and (iii) without celiac disease. Methods. Blood samples from 12632 children were collected. All celiac disease cases, previously diagnosed and newly screenin...

  15. Anemia of Chronic Liver Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pathogenetic mechanisms of anemia in patients with chronic liver disease were observed. Seventeen patients with moderate to advanced hepatic diseases were studied by various methods. Only patients without previous blood loss were included : 14 had cirrhosis, 2 had active chronic hepatitis, and one had inferior vena cava obstruction with associated liver cirrhosis. The followings were the results: 1. The anemia based on red blood cell count, Hb., and Ht. was found in 76.5-78.6% of the patients. 2. Red cell indices indicated that normo-macrocytic and normochromic anemia was present is the majority of the patients. 3. No evidence of megaloblastic anemia was found on the basis of the morphological examinations. 4. Serum iron, TIBC, % saturation and iron content in the bone marrow indicated that iron deficiency anemia was present in about half of the patients. 5. In the view of the erythrocyte dynamics, primary increase in the red cell destruction was ascribed to the cause of the anemia. 6. Decrease in the red cell survival time was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and S.L. ratio. Also, hemoglobin level was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and T50 Cr. Therefore, multiple causes may be involved in the pathogenesis of the anemia. 7. Anemia as determined by the red cell volume was found in only 60% of the patients. It may be possible that hemodilutional anemia is present.

  16. Caroli's disease misdiagnosed as hydatid liver cysts.

    OpenAIRE

    Akoglu, M.; B. R. Davidson

    1991-01-01

    A 27 year old woman who presented with upper abdominal pain was found on ultrasonography to have multiple liver cysts consistent with hydatid disease. Three years previously she had undergone evacuation of multiple infected liver cysts thought to be due to hydatid disease. Computed tomographic scanning supported the diagnosis of hydatid disease affecting the right lobe of the liver. At laparotomy the right lobe contained multiple cysts which were removed by right lobectomy. Histology revealed...

  17. Challenges in interpretation of thyroid function tests in pregnant women with autoimmune thyroid disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Bliddal, Sofie; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh; Boas, Malene; Hilsted, Linda; Main, Katharina

    2011-01-01

    Physiological changes during gestation are important to be aware of in measurement and interpretation of thyroid function tests in women with autoimmune thyroid diseases. Thyroid autoimmune activity is decreasing in pregnancy. Measurement of serum TSH is the first-line screening variable for thyr....... Measurement of antithyroperoxidase and/or TSH receptor antibodies adds to the differential diagnosis of autoimmune and nonautoimmune thyroid diseases.......Physiological changes during gestation are important to be aware of in measurement and interpretation of thyroid function tests in women with autoimmune thyroid diseases. Thyroid autoimmune activity is decreasing in pregnancy. Measurement of serum TSH is the first-line screening variable for...... thyroid dysfunction also in pregnancy. However, using serum TSH for control of treatment of maternal thyroid autoimmunity infers a risk for compromised foetal development. Peripheral thyroid hormone values are highly different among laboratories, and there is a need for laboratory-specific gestational age...

  18. Autoimmune diseases in Adult Life after Childhood Cancer in Scandinavia (ALiCCS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmqvist, Anna Sällfors; Olsen, Jørgen H.; Mellemkjaer, Lene;

    2015-01-01

    all autoimmune diseases combined, corresponding to an AER of 67 per 100 000 person-years. The SHRRs were significantly increased for autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (16.3), Addison's disease (13.9), polyarteritis nodosa (5.8), chronic rheumatic heart disease (4.5), localised scleroderma (3......OBJECTIVES: The pattern of autoimmune diseases in childhood cancer survivors has not been investigated previously. We estimated the risk for an autoimmune disease after childhood cancer in a large, population-based setting with outcome measures from comprehensive, nationwide health registries.......6), idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (3.4), Hashimoto's thyroiditis (3.1), pernicious anaemia (2.7), sarcoidosis (2.2), Sjögren's syndrome (2.0) and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (1.6). The SHRRs for any autoimmune disease were significantly increased after leukaemia (SHRR 1.6), Hodgkin's lymphoma (1...

  19. Long-term observations of autoimmune-prone mice treated for autoimmune disease by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-term effects of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (ABMT) across major histocompatibility complex barriers were studied in (NZB x NZW)F1 (B/W), BXSB, and MRL/Mr-lpr-lpr (MRL/lpr) mice with established autoimmune disease at the time of ABMT. In the BXSB or B/W mice, ABMT cured all aspects of autoimmune disease. Glomerular damage, revealed by histological study was dramatically improved. Serological abnormalities and immunologic functions also were normalized. Correction of autoimmune disease and advanced renal disease in BXSB and B/W mice regularly lasted greater than 5-6 mo and even 1 yr after ABMT. In the MRL/lpr mice, however, autoimmune and renal disease at first improved but then recurred after ABMT, apparently because of intolerance of mice for high doses of irradiation and a high degree of resistance of recipient stem cells to irradiation. In this model, H-2 typing revealed that by the time of relapse, immunocompetent cells of the chimeric mice had been replaced by host (MRL/lpr; H-2k) cells. B220+ Ly-1+ cells, present in increased numbers in untreated MRL/lpr mice, initially returned to normal levels after ABMT but then reappeared in the MRL/lpr mice that had received marrow from donors having few such lymphocytes. Thus, our results show that MRL/lpr mice possess abnormal radioresistant stem cells and provide impressive evidence that the origin of autoimmune diseases in this strain, as in the several other strains studied, resids in abnormalities present in stem cells

  20. Specific IgE positivity against inhalant allergens and development of autoimmune disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaaby, Tea; Husemoen, Lise Lotte Nystrup; Thuesen, Betina Heinsbæk;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Allergic and autoimmune diseases have been suggested to be inversely associated. We investigated the association between atopy and development of any and specific types of autoimmune disease. METHODS: We included a total of 14,849 individuals from five population-based studies with...

  1. Green tea EGCG, T cells, and T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    One of the proposed health benefits of consuming green tea is its protective effect on autoimmune diseases. Research on the immunopathogenesis of autoimmune diseases has made significant progression in the past few years and several key concepts have been revised. T cells, particularly CD4+ T helper...

  2. Thyroid volume in hypothyroidism due to autoimmune disease follows a unimodal distribution: evidence against primary thyroid atrophy and autoimmune thyroiditis being distinct diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlé, Allan; Pedersen, Inge Bülow; Knudsen, Nils;

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT: Primary overt autoimmune hypothyroidism is often divided into primary idiopathic hypothyroidism with thyroid atrophy (Ord's disease) and hypothyroidism with goitre (Hashimoto's disease). OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to characterize the two subtypes of disease. DESIGN AND...... SETTING: This was a population-based study identifying patients newly diagnosed with overt autoimmune hypothyroidism. PATIENTS: We prospectively identified all patients with incident overt autoimmune hypothyroidism in a Danish population cohort, and 247 patients were invited to join a comprehensive...... before hypothyroidism was diagnosed. CONCLUSIONS: In primary autoimmune hypothyroidism, thyroid volume follows a normal distribution. Cases with thyroid atrophy and goiter are only extremes within this distribution and do not represent separate disorders. However, patients with low vs. high thyroid...

  3. Association of schizophrenia and autoimmune diseases: linkage of Danish national registers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eaton, William W.; Byrne, Majella; Ewald, Henrik;

    2006-01-01

    ,704 persons in Denmark diagnosed with schizophrenia from 1981 to 1998 and their parents along with a sample of matched comparison subjects and their parents. The data linkage required that the autoimmune disease occur before the diagnosis of schizophrenia. RESULTS: A history of any autoimmune disease was......OBJECTIVE: Individuals with schizophrenia and their relatives tend to have either higher or lower than expected prevalences of autoimmune disorders, especially rheumatoid arthritis, celiac disease, autoimmune thyroid diseases, and type 1 diabetes. The purpose of the study was to estimate the...... association of schizophrenia with these disorders as well as a range of other autoimmune diseases in a single large epidemiologic study. METHOD: The Danish Psychiatric Register, the National Patient Register, and a register with socioeconomic information were linked to form a data file that included all 7...

  4. Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Carmen Maria Lara; Borella, Elisabetta; Palma, Lavinia; Ragozzino, Silvio; De Ramón, Enrique; Gomez-Huelgas, Ricardo; Punzi, Leonardo; Doria, Andrea

    2015-02-01

    Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) is defined by buds of granulation tissue within lung distal airspaces. The diagnosis requires the histopathologic evidence of organizing pneumonia along with a suggestive clinical and radiographic pattern. This disorder is characterized by a good response to corticosteroids and an excellent prognosis. It can occur in association with a broad spectrum of clinical conditions or can be isolated, in this last case named cryptogenic organizing pneumonia. We searched for BOOP in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases (ARD) in the literature, and we found 32 well-documented cases. We reported here demographic features, manifestations, treatment and outcome of patients with BOOP associated with ARD. Notably, BOOP can be the presenting feature in some patients with ARD; thus, a close follow-up of patients with BOOP is recommended. PMID:25480740

  5. PEG minocycline-liposomes ameliorate CNS autoimmune disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Hu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Minocycline is an oral tetracycline derivative with good bioavailability in the central nervous system (CNS. Minocycline, a potent inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9, attenuates disease activity in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS. Potential adverse effects associated with long-term daily minocycline therapy in human patients are concerning. Here, we investigated whether less frequent treatment with long-circulating polyethylene glycol (PEG minocycline liposomes are effective in treating EAE. FINDINGS: Performing in vitro time kinetic studies of PEG minocycline-liposomes in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, we determined that PEG minocycline-liposome preparations stabilized with CaCl(2 are effective in diminishing MMP-9 activity. Intravenous injections of PEG minocycline-liposomes every five days were as effective in ameliorating clinical EAE as daily intraperitoneal injections of minocycline. Treatment of animals with PEG minocycline-liposomes significantly reduced the number of CNS-infiltrating leukocytes, and the overall expression of MMP-9 in the CNS. There was also a significant suppression of MMP-9 expression and proteolytic activity in splenocytes of treated animals, but not in CNS-infiltrating leukocytes. Thus, leukocytes gaining access to the brain and spinal cord require the same absolute amount of MMP-9 in all treatment groups, but minocycline decreases the absolute cell number. CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate that less frequent injections of PEG minocycline-liposomes are an effective alternative pharmacotherapy to daily minocycline injections for the treatment of CNS autoimmune diseases. Also, inhibition of MMP-9 remains a promising treatment target in EAE and patients with MS.

  6. IVIG in autoimmune disease - Potential next generation biologics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuercher, Adrian W; Spirig, Rolf; Baz Morelli, Adriana; Käsermann, Fabian

    2016-08-01

    Polyclonal plasma-derived IgG is a mainstay therapeutic of immunodeficiency disorders as well as of various inflammatory autoimmune diseases. In immunodeficiency the primary function of IVIG/SCIG is to replace missing antibody specificities, consequently a diverse Fab-based repertoire is critical for efficacy. Attempts to capture the Ig repertoire and express it as a recombinant IVIG product are currently ongoing. Likewise correction of the defective genes by gene therapy has also been tried. However, both approaches are far from becoming mainstream treatments. In contrast, some of the most important effector mechanisms relevant in therapy of autoimmunity are based on the Fc-portion of IgG; they include scavenging of complement and blockade/modulation of IgG receptors (Fc gamma receptor [FcγR] or the neonatal Fc receptor [FcRn]). These effects might be achieved with appropriately formulated Fc-fragments instead of full-length IgG, as suggested by a pilot study with monomeric plasma-derived Fc in children with ITP and in Kawasaki disease in the 1990s. Since then it has been proposed that structured multimerization of Fc fragments might confer efficacy at much lower doses than with IVIG. Accordingly, various molecular strategies are currently being explored to achieve controlled Fc multimerization, e.g. by fusion of IgG1 Fc to the IgG2 hinge-region or to the IgM tail-piece. Safety considerations will be crucial in the evaluation of these new entities. In a different approach, mutant Fc fragments and monoclonal antibodies have been designed for blockade of the FcRn. PMID:27019051

  7. Inflammation is strongly associated with lupus anticoagulant positivity, indepentent of know autoimmune disease and recent venous or arterial thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Just, Søren Andreas; Nybo, Mads; Laustrup, Helle;

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is strongly associated with lupus anticoagulant positivity, indepentent of know autoimmune disease and recent venous or arterial thrombosis......Inflammation is strongly associated with lupus anticoagulant positivity, indepentent of know autoimmune disease and recent venous or arterial thrombosis...

  8. Lin28 and let-7: roles and regulation in liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Kelly; Hall, Chad; Sato, Keisaku; Lairmore, Terry; Marzioni, Marco; Glaser, Shannon; Meng, Fanyin; Alpini, Gianfranco

    2016-05-15

    The diagnosis and treatment of liver disease remain a major health concern worldwide because of the diverse etiologies of this disease. For this reason, new therapeutic targets are greatly needed to halt the progression of this damaging disease. Upon initiation of liver injury by viral infection, autoimmune disease or toxin, and/or hepatitis, chronic disease may develop, which can progress to cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), cholangiocarcinoma, liver failure, or death. The Lin28/lethal-7 (let-7) molecular switch has emerged as a central regulator of multiorgan injuries and cancer development. Lin28 is a stem cell marker vital to initiation or maintenance of a stem cell phenotype. Lin28 has not been extensively studied in the liver, despite its ability to induce tissue regeneration via reprogramming of oxidative enzymes in other tissues and its involvement with numerous upstream regulators and downstream targets in liver disease. Theoretically, overexpression of Lin28 in certain forms of liver disease could be a potential treatment that aids in liver regeneration. Alternatively, Lin28 has been implicated numerous times in the progression of diverse cancer types and is associated with increased severity of disease. In this case, Lin28 could be a potential inhibitory target to prevent malignant transformation in the liver. This review seeks to characterize the role of Lin28 in liver disease. PMID:27012771

  9. Interaction between periodontitis and liver diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Pengyu; Sun, Dianxing; Yang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is an oral disease that is highly prevalent worldwide, with a prevalence of 30–50% of the population in developed countries, but only ~10% present with severe forms. It is also estimated that periodontitis results in worldwide productivity losses amounting to ~54 billion USD yearly. In addition to the damage it causes to oral health, periodontitis also affects other types of disease. Numerous studies have confirmed the association between periodontitis and systemic diseases, such as diabetes, respiratory disease, osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease. Increasing evidence also indicated that periodontitis may participate in the progression of liver diseases, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, as well as affecting liver transplantation. However, to the best of our knowledge, there are currently no reviews elaborating upon the possible links between periodontitis and liver diseases. Therefore, the current review summarizes the human trials and animal experiments that have been conducted to investigate the correlation between periodontitis and liver diseases. Furthermore, in the present review, certain mechanisms that have been postulated to be responsible for the role of periodontitis in liver diseases (such as bacteria, pro-inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress) are considered. The aim of the review is to introduce the hypothesis that periodontitis may be important in the progression of liver disease, thus providing dentists and physicians with an improved understanding of this issue. PMID:27588170

  10. Challenges in Interpretation of Thyroid Function Tests in Pregnant Women with Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Katharina Main; Linda Hilsted; Malene Boas; Anne-Sofie Bliddal Mortensen; Åse Krogh Rasmussen; Ulla Feldt-Rasmussen

    2011-01-01

    Physiological changes during gestation are important to be aware of in measurement and interpretation of thyroid function tests in women with autoimmune thyroid diseases. Thyroid autoimmune activity is decreasing in pregnancy. Measurement of serum TSH is the first-line screening variable for thyroid dysfunction also in pregnancy. However, using serum TSH for control of treatment of maternal thyroid autoimmunity infers a risk for compromised foetal development. Peripheral thyroid hormone value...

  11. Scientists find link between allergic and autoimmune diseases in mouse study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists at the National Institutes of Health, and their colleagues, have discovered that a gene called BACH2 may play a central role in the development of diverse allergic and autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, asthma, Crohn's disease, ce

  12. Chronic Liver Disease and Hispanic Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Program Grants Other Grants Planning and Evaluation Grantee Best Practices Hispanic/Latino Asthma Cancer Chronic Liver Disease Diabetes Heart Disease Hepatitis HIV/AIDS Immunizations Infant Heath & Mortality Mental Health Obesity Organ and Tissue Donation Stroke Stay Connected ...

  13. Obstructive Jaundice Associated with Polcystic Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Dmitrewski, J.; Olliff, S; Buckels, J. A. C.

    1996-01-01

    A 65 year old patient with polycystic liver disease presented with obstructive jaundice thought to be a cholangiocarcinoma. Subsequent investigations demonstrated a large cyst compressing the confluence of the hepatic ducts. Percutaneous decompression of the biliary tree led to a complication necessitating surgery. Treatment options for symptomatic polycystic liver disease are reviewed.

  14. The Autoimmune Disease Database: a dynamically compiled literature-derived database

    OpenAIRE

    Mevissen Heinz-Theodor; Fluck Juliane; Karopka Thomas; Glass Änne

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Autoimmune diseases are disorders caused by an immune response directed against the body's own organs, tissues and cells. In practice more than 80 clinically distinct diseases, among them systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis, are classified as autoimmune diseases. Although their etiology is unclear these diseases share certain similarities at the molecular level i.e. susceptibility regions on the chromosomes or the involvement of common genes. To gain an o...

  15. Autoimmunity and the basal ganglia: new insights into old diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, R C

    2003-03-01

    Sydenham's chorea (SC) occurs weeks or months after Group A streptococcal infection, and is characterized by involuntary, purposeless movements of the limbs, in addition to behavioural alteration. There is a body of evidence which suggests that SC is an immune-mediated brain disorder with regional localization to the basal ganglia. Recent reports have suggested that the spectrum of post-streptococcal CNS disease is broader than chorea alone, and includes other hyperkinetic movement disorders (tics, dystonia and myoclonus). In addition, there are high rates of behavioural sequelae, particularly emotional disorders such as obsessive-compulsive disorder, anxiety and depression. These findings have lead to the hypothesis that similar immune-mediated basal ganglia processes may be operating in common neuropsychiatric disease such as tic disorders, Tourette syndrome and obsessive-compulsive disorder. This review analyses the historical aspects of post-streptococcal CNS disease, and the recent immunological studies which have addressed the hypothesis that common neuropsychiatric disorders may be secondary to basal ganglia autoimmunity. PMID:12615982

  16. Metabolic therapy: lessons from liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Ruiz, Carmen; Marí, Montserrat; Colell, Anna; Morales, Albert; Fernandez-Checa, Jose C

    2011-12-01

    Fatty liver disease is one of most prevalent metabolic liver diseases, which includes alcoholic (ASH) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Its initial stage is characterized by fat accumulation in the liver, that can progress to steatohepatitis, a stage of the disease in which steatosis is accompanied by inflammation, hepatocellular death, oxidative stress and fibrosis. Recent evidence in experimental models as well as in patients with steatohepatitis have uncovered a role for cholesterol and sphingolipids, particularly ceramide, in the transition from steatosis to steatohepatitis, insulin resistance and hence disease progression. Cholesterol accumulation and its trafficking to mitochondria sensitizes fatty liver to subsequent hits including inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF/Fas, in a pathway involving ceramide generation by acidic sphingomyelinase (ASMase). Thus, targeting both cholesterol and/or ASMase may represent a novel therapeutic approach of relevance in ASH and NASH, two of the most common forms of liver diseases worldwide. PMID:21933146

  17. Hepatic lipogranulomas in patients with chronic liver disease: Association with hepatitis C and fatty liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Henry; C; Bodenheimer; David; J; Clain; Albert; D; Min; Neil; D; Theise

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To study the significance and clinical implication of hepatic lipogranuloma in chronic liver diseases, including fatty liver disease and hepatitis C. METHODS: A total of 376 sequential, archival liver biopsy specimens were reviewed. Lipogranuloma, steatosis and steato-fibrosis were evaluated with combined hematoxylin and eosin and Masson’s trichrome staining. RESULTS: Fifty-eight (15.4%) patients had lipogranuloma, including 46 patients with hepatitis C, 14 patients with fatty liver disease, and 5 pati...

  18. Development of a Recombinant Cell-Based Indirect Immunofluorescence Assay for the Determination of Autoantibodies against Soluble Liver Antigen in Autoimmune Hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Radzimski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoantibodies against soluble liver antigen (SLA are specific markers for autoimmune hepatitis (AIH type 1. In contrast to the determination of other AIH-associated autoantibodies by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA, detection of anti-SLA relied up to now on ELISA or immunoblot based on bacterially expressed recombinant protein. In order to develop a complementary IFA substrate, SLA isoform 1 was recombinantly produced in the human cell line HEK293 and controlled by a rabbit hyperimmune serum against SLA. The recombinant cells were used in IFA (RC-IFA to analyze sera from 20 AIH patients with anti-SLA positivity predetermined by ELISA together with 80 controls (20 anti-SLA negative AIH, 15 primary biliary cirrhosis, 15 HCV, and 30 healthy blood donors. Using RC-IFA, anti-SLA was detected in all ELISA positive AIH sera but in none of the controls. Furthermore, a cytosolic fraction of HEK293 containing SLA was able to neutralize the autoantibodies in all positive sera in a dose-dependent manner. HEK293 cells expressing SLA are a valid substrate for the serodiagnosis of AIH relevant autoantibodies by IFA. In concert with cryosections of primate liver, rat kidney, rat liver, rat stomach, and HEp-2 cells, they enable the parallel determination of all autoantibodies associated with autoimmune liver diseases.

  19. Role of cannabinoids in chronic liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anna Parfieniuk; Robert Flisiak

    2008-01-01

    Cannabinoids are a group of compounds acting primarily via CB1 and CB2 receptors. The expression of cannabinoid receptors in normal liver is low or absent. However, many reports have proven up-regulation of the expression of CB1 and CB2 receptors in hepatic myofibroblasts and vascular endothelial cells, as well as increased concentration of endocannabinoids in liver in the course of chronic progressive liver diseases. It has been shown that CB1 receptor signalling exerts profibrogenic and proinflammatory effects in liver tissue, primarily due to the stimulation of hepatic stellate cells, whereas the activation of CB2 receptors inhibits or even reverses liver fibrogenesis. Similarly, CB1 receptor stimulation contributes to progression of liver steatosis. In end-stage liver disease, the endocannabi-noid system has been shown to contribute to hepatic encephalopathy and vascular effects, such as portal hypertension, splanchnic vasodilatation, relative pe-ripheral hypotension and probably cirrhotic cardiomy-opathy. So far, available evidence is based on cellular cultures or animal models. Clinical data on the effects of cannabinoids in chronic liver diseases are limited. However, recent studies have shown the contribution of cannabis smoking to the progression of liver fibrosis and steatosis. Moreover, controlling CB1 or CB2 signal-ling appears to be an attractive target in managing liver diseases.

  20. Some like it hot: The emerging role of spicy food (capsaicin) in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yaxiong; Huang, Xin; Wu, Haijing; Zhao, Ming; Lu, Qianjin; Israeli, Eitan; Dahan, Shani; Blank, Miri; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2016-05-01

    Autoimmune diseases refer to a spectrum of diseases characterized by an active immune response against the host, which frequently involves increased autoantibody production. The pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases is multifactorial and the exploitation of novel effective treatment is urgent. Capsaicin is a nutritional factor, the active component of chili peppers, which is responsible for the pungent component of chili pepper. As a stimuli, capsaicin selectively activate transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily 1(TRPV1) and exert various biological effects. This review discusses the effect of capsaicin through its receptor on the development and modulation of autoimmune diseases, which may shed light upon potential therapies in capsaicin-targeted approaches. PMID:26812350

  1. Senescence of the adaptive immune system in health and aging-associated autoimmune disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geest, Kornelis Stephan Mario

    2015-01-01

    Aging of the immune system may contribute to the development of aging-associated autoimmune diseases, such as giant cell arteritis, polymyalgia rheumatica and rheumatoid arthritis. The aim of this thesis was to identify aging-dependent changes of the adaptive immune system that promote autoimmunity

  2. Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients With Life Threatening Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-23

    Purpura, Schoenlein-Henoch; Graft Versus Host Disease; Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune; Rheumatoid Arthritis; Churg-Strauss Syndrome; Hypersensitivity Vasculitis; Wegener's Granulomatosis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Giant Cell Arteritis; Pure Red Cell Aplasia; Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis; Polyarteritis Nodosa; Autoimmune Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Takayasu Arteritis

  3. Skin involvement and outcome measures in systemic autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, J; Atzeni, F; Baldini, C; Bombardieri, S; Dalakas, M C; Demirkesen, C; Yazici, H; Mat, C; Werth, V P; Sarzi-Puttini, P

    2006-01-01

    This paper focuses on skin manifestations that can be observed in autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Sjögren syndrome (SS), dermatomyositis (DM) and Behçet syndrome (BS). In RA the most widely recognized skin lesion is the rheumatoid nodule. Other cutaneous manifestations can be observed either non-specific or related to the disease itself and/or to the commonly used drugs. Cutaneous manifestations are considered one of the most typical extraglandular features of primary SS, generally they are distinguished in vasculitic and non vasculitic lesions. Among non-vasculitc lesions, skin dryness (xerosis) has been shown to be very common in pSS while vasculitis lesions include typically flat and palpable purpura and urticarial vasculits. In DM the skin manifestations are also frequent and include a heliotrope rash (blue-purple discoloration) on the upper eyelids with edema, a flat red rash on the face and upper trunk, and erythema of the knuckles with a raised violaceous scaly eruption (Gottron rash). The most frequent mucocutaneous finding in BS is aphthous stomatitis which can not usually be differentiated from idiopatic reccurrent aphthous stomatitis on clinical grounds. The most typical skin manifestations are nodular lesions, which are commonly seen in BS and may be due to panniculitis [erythema nodosum (EN)-like lesions] or superficial thrombophlebitis. PMID:16466625

  4. Telomere length in human liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urabe, Y; Nouso, K; Higashi, T; Nakatsukasa, H; Hino, N; Ashida, K; Kinugasa, N; Yoshida, K; Uematsu, S; Tsuji, T

    1996-10-01

    To determine the role of telomere-mediated gene stability in hepatocarcinogenesis, we examined the telomere length of human liver with or without chronic liver diseases and hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). The mean telomere restriction fragment (TRF) length of normal liver (n = 13), chronic hepatitis (n = 11), liver cirrhosis (n = 24) and HCC (n = 24) was 7.8 +/- 0.2, 7.1 +/- 0.3, 6.4 +/- 0.2 and 5.2 +/- 0.2 kb, respectively (mean +/- standard error). TRF length decreased with a progression of chronic liver diseases and that in HCC was significantly shorter than that in other chronic liver diseases (p HCC to that of corresponding surrounding liver of well differentiated (n = 7), moderately differentiated (n = 10) and poorly differentiated (n = 4) HCCs were 0.83 +/- 0.06, 0.75 +/- 0.05 and 0.98 +/- 0.09, respectively. The ratio of poorly differentiated HCC was significantly higher than that of moderately differentiated HCC (p telomere length ratio of moderately differentiated HCCs revealed a decrease of the ratio with size until it reached 50 mm in diameter. In contrast, the ratio increased as the size enlarged over 50 mm. These findings suggest that the gene stability of the liver cells mediated by the telomere is reduced as chronic liver disease progresses and that telomerase is activated in poorly differentiated HCC and moderately differentiated HCC over 50 mm in diameter. PMID:8938628

  5. Similar biotherapeutic products in Latin America. Regulation and opportunities for patients with autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Desanvicente-Celis Z; Caro-Moreno J; Enciso-Zuluaga M; Anaya JM

    2013-01-01

    Zayrho Desanvicente-Celis, Julian Caro-Moreno, Mateo Enciso-Zuluaga, Juan-Manuel AnayaCenter for Autoimmune Diseases Research (CREA), Universidad del Rosario, Bogotá, ColombiaAbstract: Biotherapeutic products have revolutionized medicine, changing the way we can treat some chronic diseases, such as autoimmune diseases. The patent expiry and the high costs of reference biotherapeutic products, among other factors, have promoted interest in similar biotherapeutic products (SBPs), also kn...

  6. Similar biotherapeutic products in Latin America. Regulation and opportunities for patients with autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Zayrho Desanvicente-Celis, Julian Caro-Moreno, Mateo Enciso-Zuluaga, Juan-Manuel AnayaCenter for Autoimmune Diseases Research (CREA), Universidad del Rosario, Bogotá, ColombiaAbstract: Biotherapeutic products have revolutionized medicine, changing the way we can treat some chronic diseases, such as autoimmune diseases. The patent expiry and the high costs of reference biotherapeutic products, among other factors, have promoted interest in similar biotherapeutic products (SBPs), als...

  7. Recommendations for the use of immunoapheresis in the treatment of autoimmune bullous diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zillikens, Detlef; Derfler, Kurt; Eming, Rüdiger; Fierlbeck, Gerhard; Goebeler, Matthias; Hertl, Michael; Hofmann, Silke C; Karlhofer, Franz; Kautz, Ocko; Nitschke, Martin; Opitz, Andreas; Quist, Sven; Rose, Christian; Schanz, Stefan; Schmidt, Enno; Shimanovich, Iakov; Michael, Michael; Ziller, Fabian

    2007-10-01

    Despite the use of high-dose systemic corticosteroids in combination with other immunosuppressants, in some patients with autoimmune bullous diseases only insufficient improvement is achieved. In these cases and in acute severe disease, adjuvant immunoapheresis has been increasingly used. A consensus meeting was held in mid-2005 in Hamburg, aiming at developing guidelines for the use of immunoapheresis in the treatment of autoimmune bullous diseases. This paper summarizes the experts' recommendations. PMID:17910670

  8. Widespread non-additive and interaction effects within HLA loci modulate the risk of autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Lenz, Tobias L.; Deutsch, Aaron J.; Han, Buhm; Hu, Xinli; Okada, Yukinori; Eyre, Stephen; Knapp, Michael; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Abecasis, Gonçalo; Becker, Jessica; Boeckxstaens, Guy; Chen, Wei-Min; Franke, Andre; Gladman, Dafna D

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes confer substantial risk for autoimmune diseases on a log-additive scale. Here we speculated that differences in autoantigen-binding repertoires between a heterozygote's two expressed HLA variants might result in additional non-additive risk effects. We tested the non-additive disease contributions of classical HLA alleles in patients and matched controls for five common autoimmune diseases: rheumatoid arthritis (ncases = 5,337), type 1 diabetes (T1D; ncases...

  9. Autoimmune disease and the nervous system. Biochemical, molecular, and clinical update.

    OpenAIRE

    Merrill, J E; Graves, M C; Mulder, D. G.

    1992-01-01

    Autoimmunity in the central and peripheral nervous system can manifest as the result of cellular or humoral immune responses to autoantigens. There is evidence that multiple sclerosis is a cell-mediated autoimmune disease of the central nervous system in which both myelin and the cell that produces the myelin are destroyed. Diseases such as acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (also called Guillain-Barré syndrome) and myasthenia gravis are considered antibody-mediated diseases of t...

  10. Lactate metabolism in chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Johanne B; Mortensen, Christian; Bendtsen, Flemming;

    2013-01-01

    Background. In the healthy liver there is a splanchnic net-uptake of lactate caused by gluconeogenesis. It has previously been shown that patients with acute liver failure in contrast have a splanchnic release of lactate caused by a combination of accelerated glycolysis in the splanchnic region and...... a reduction in hepatic gluconeogenesis. Aims. The aims of the present study were to investigate lactate metabolism and kinetics in patients with chronic liver disease compared with a control group with normal liver function. Methods. A total of 142 patients with chronic liver disease and 14 healthy...... controls underwent a liver vein catheterization. Blood samples from the femoral artery and the hepatic and renal veins were simultaneously collected before and after stimulation with galactose. Results. The fasting lactate levels, both in the hepatic vein and in the femoral artery, were higher in the...

  11. Childbirths and risk of female predominant and other autoimmune diseases in a population-based Danish cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kristian Tore; Pedersen, Bo Vestergaard; Nielsen, Nete Munk;

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the possible biological role of pregnancy on the risk of autoimmune diseases we assessed associations between reproductive history and subsequent risk of autoimmune diseases characterized by female predominance and other autoimmune diseases. Our study cohort comprised 4.6 million Danes.......14-1.24), erythema nodosum (1.15; 1.01-1.32), psoriasis (1.08; 1.01-1.15), sarcoidosis (1.17; 1.06-1.28) and systemic lupus erythematosus (0.83; 0.74-0.93). Especially the one-year postpartum period was associated with an increased risk of Hashimoto thyroiditis, Graves' disease and sarcoidosis. Overall, parity was...... associated with an 11% increased risk of female predominant autoimmune diseases. Pregnancies resulting in liveborn children therefore seem to contribute only little to the general female predominance in autoimmune diseases. However, for a number of autoimmune diseases; especially autoimmune thyroid diseases...

  12. Important issues of alcoholic liver disease prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.P. Sernov

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Alcoholic liver disease prognosis has not been thoroughly developed yet. The possibility of morphologic prognosis has been limited due to disadvantages of liver biopsy. Insignificant amount of studies is devoted to laboratory methods. prognosis value of serum markers of liver fibrosis at the last cirrhotic stages is widely considered in the medical literature. at the same time the results of treatment are determined by making a diagnosis

  13. The potential for induction of autoimmune disease by a randomly-mutated self-antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm

    2007-01-01

    The pathology of most autoimmune diseases is well described. However, the exact event that triggers the onset of the inflammatory cascade leading to disease is less certain and most autoimmune diseases are complex idiopathic diseases with no single gene known to be causative. In many cases, a...... relation to an infectious disease is described, and it is thought that microbes can play a direct role in induction of autoimmunity, for instance by molecular mimicry or bystander activation of autoreactive T cells. In contrast, less attention has been given to the possibility that modified self......-antigens can be immunogenic and lead to autoimmunity against wildtype self-antigens. In theory, modified self-antigens can arise by random errors and mutations during protein synthesis and would be recognized as foreign antigens by naïve B and T lymphocytes. Here, it is postulated that the initial auto...

  14. Managing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngu, Jing Hieng; Goh, George Boon Bee; Poh, Zhongxian; Soetikno, Roy

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is increasing rapidly with the obesity and diabetes mellitus epidemics. It is rapidly becoming the most common cause of liver disease worldwide. NAFLD can progress to serious complications such as cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and death. Therefore, it is important to recognise this condition so that early intervention can be implemented. Lifestyle modifications and strict control of metabolic risk factors are the mainstay of treatment. As disease progression is slow in the majority of NAFLD patients, most can be managed well by primary care physicians. NAFLD patients with advanced liver fibrosis should be referred to specialist care for further assessment. PMID:27439352

  15. Neurohumoral fluid regulation in chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Henriksen, Jens Henrik

    1998-01-01

    regulation are outlined in order to provide an update of recent investigations on the neuroendocrine compensation of circulatory and volume dysfunction in chronic liver disease. The underlying pathophysiology is a systemic vasodilatation in which newly described potent vasoactive substances such as nitric...... and lungs. It is still an enigma why patients with chronic liver disease are at the same time overloaded and functional hypovolaemic with a hyperdynamic, hyporeactive circulation. Further research is needed to find the solution to this apparent haemodynamic conflict concerning the abnormal...... neurohumoral fluid regulation in chronic liver disease....

  16. Pediatric Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppal, Vikas; Mansoor, Sana; Furuya, Katryn N

    2016-05-01

    Childhood obesity has reached epidemic proportions, and by 2012, more than one third of American children were overweight or obese. As a result, increasingly, children are developing complications of obesity including liver disease. In fact, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common form of chronic liver disease seen in children today. Recently, there has been a burgeoning literature examining the pathogenesis, genetic markers, and role of the microbiome in this disease. On the clinical front, new modalities of diagnosing hepatic steatosis and hepatic fibrosis are being developed to provide non-invasive methods of surveillance in children. Lastly, the mainstay of treatment of pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has been largely through lifestyle interventions, namely, dieting and exercise. Currently, there are a number of clinical trials examining novel lifestyle and drug therapies for NAFLD that are registered with the US National Institutes of Health ClinicalTrials.gov website. PMID:27086005

  17. Surveillance of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases using administrative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernatsky, S; Lix, L; Hanly, J G; Hudson, M; Badley, E; Peschken, C; Pineau, C A; Clarke, A E; Fortin, P R; Smith, M; Bélisle, P; Lagace, C; Bergeron, L; Joseph, L

    2011-04-01

    There is growing interest in developing tools and methods for the surveillance of chronic rheumatic diseases, using existing resources such as administrative health databases. To illustrate how this might work, we used population-based administrative data to estimate and compare the prevalence of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARDs) across three Canadian provinces, assessing for regional differences and the effects of demographic factors. Cases of SARDs (systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, primary Sjogren's, polymyositis/dermatomyositis) were ascertained from provincial physician billing and hospitalization data. We combined information from three case definitions, using hierarchical Bayesian latent class regression models that account for the imperfect nature of each case definition. Using methods that account for the imperfect nature of both billing and hospitalization databases, we estimated the over-all prevalence of SARDs to be approximately 2-3 cases per 1,000 residents. Stratified prevalence estimates suggested similar demographic trends across provinces (i.e. greater prevalence in females-versus-males, and in persons of older age). The prevalence in older females approached or exceeded 1 in 100, which may reflect the high burden of primary Sjogren's syndrome in this group. Adjusting for demographics, there was a greater prevalence in urban-versus-rural settings. In our work, prevalence estimates had good face validity and provided useful information about potential regional and demographic variations. Our results suggest that surveillance of some rheumatic diseases using administrative data may indeed be feasible. Our work highlights the usefulness of using multiple data sources, adjusting for the error in each. PMID:20665025

  18. TGF-β signalling and liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabregat, Isabel; Moreno-Càceres, Joaquim; Sánchez, Aránzazu; Dooley, Steven; Dewidar, Bedair; Giannelli, Gianluigi; Ten Dijke, Peter

    2016-06-01

    The transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) family signalling pathways play essential roles in the regulation of different cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, migration or cell death, which are essential for the homeostasis of tissues and organs. Because of the diverse and pleiotropic TGF-β functions, deregulation of its pathways contributes to human disease. In the case of the liver, TGF-β signalling participates in all stages of disease progression, from initial liver injury through inflammation and fibrosis, to cirrhosis and cancer. TGF-β has cytostatic and apoptotic effects in hepatocytes, promoting liver differentiation during embryogenesis and physiological liver regeneration. However, high levels of TGF-β, as a consequence of chronic liver damage, result in activation of stellate cells to myofibroblasts and massive hepatocyte cell death, which contributes to the promotion of liver fibrosis and later cirrhosis. During liver tumorigenesis, TGF-β may behave as a suppressor factor at early stages; however, there is strong evidence that overactivation of TGF-β signalling might contribute to later tumour progression, once cells escape from its cytostatic effects. For these reasons, targeting the TGF-β signalling pathway is being explored to counteract liver disease progression. In this review, we aim to shed light on the state-of-the-art in the signalling pathways induced by TGF-β that are involved in different stages of liver physiology and pathology. PMID:26807763

  19. Genetic variants in adult liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dröge, C; Häussinger, D; Keitel, V

    2015-12-01

    In the last decades, understanding of genetic variants contributing to liver disease development has considerably improved through novel genotyping techniques. Genetic variants of single genes are known to be decisive for the development of monogenetic liver diseases of varying severity. Identification of genetic variants is an important part of the diagnostic process, e. g. the majority of patients with high iron [Fe] (HFE)-associated hemochromatosis carry the homozygous mutation p.C282Y. Detection of mutations in genes encoding hepatobiliary transport proteins like familial intrahepatic cholestasis 1 (FIC1), bile salt export pump (BSEP), or multidrug resistance protein 3 (MDR3) is the basis to differentiate various forms of intrahepatic cholestasis. Moreover, genetic variants in a variety of genes are known to act as disease modifiers and represent risk factors for disease progression and the development of cirrhosis or even hepatocellular carcinoma. Success of drug treatment or appearance of severe side effects can also be influenced by specific genetic variants. All these aspects underscore the increasing importance of genetic variants, which in the future may help to identify patients at risk for disease progression or help to guide treatment decisions. In the present overview, specific frequent genetic variants are summarized that play roles in monogenetic liver diseases, forms of intrahepatic cholestasis, gallstone development, fatty liver disease, drug-induced liver injury, and liver disease progression as well as hepatocellular carcinoma development. PMID:26666282

  20. Same-sex marriage, autoimmune thyroid gland dysfunction and other autoimmune diseases in Denmark 1989-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, Morten; Nielsen, Nete Munk; Pedersen, Bo Vestergaard

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases have been little studied in gay men and lesbians. We followed 4.4 million Danes, including 9,615 same-sex married (SSM) persons, for 47 autoimmune diseases in the National Patient Registry between 1989 and 2008. Poisson regression analyses provided first hospitalization rate ratios (RRs) comparing rates between SSM individuals and persons in other marital status categories. SSM individuals experienced no unusual overall risk of autoimmune diseases. However, the risk of autoimmune thyroid dysfunction was increased, notably Hashimoto's thyroiditis (women(SSM), RR = 2.92; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.74-4.55) and Graves' disease (men(SSM), RR = 1.88; 95% CI 1.08-3.01). There was also an excess of primary biliary cirrhosis (women(SSM), RR = 4.09; 95% CI 1.01-10.7), and of psoriasis (men(SSM), RR = 2.48; 95% CI 1.77-3.36), rheumatic fever (men(SSM), RR = 7.55; 95% CI 1.87-19.8), myasthenia gravis (men(SSM), RR = 5.51; 95% CI 1.36-14.4), localized scleroderma (men(SSM), RR = 7.16; 95% CI 1.18-22.6) and pemphigoid (men(SSM), RR = 6.56; 95% CI 1.08-20.6), while Dupuytren's contracture was reduced (men(SSM), RR = 0.64; 95% CI 0.39-0.99). The excess of psoriasis was restricted to same-sex married men with HIV/AIDS (men(SSM), RR = 10.5; 95% CI 6.44-15.9), whereas Graves' disease occurred in excess only among same-sex married men without HIV/AIDS (men(SSM), RR = 1.99; 95% CI 1.12-3.22). Lesbians and immunologically competent gay men in same-sex marriage face no unusual overall risk of autoimmune diseases. However, the observed increased risk of thyroid dysfunction in these lesbians and gay men deserves further study. PMID:24306355

  1. Association between Autoimmune Rheumatic Diseases and the Risk of Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Lu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Autoimmune rheumatic diseases (ARD are characterized by systemic inflammation and may affect multiple organs and cause vascular events such as ischemic stroke and acute myocardial infarction. However, the association between ARD and increased risk of dementia is uncertain. This is a retrospective cohort study to investigate and compare the risk of dementia between patients clinically diagnosed with ARD and non-ARD patients during a 5-year follow-up period. Methods. Data were obtained from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000 (LHID2000. We included 1221 patients receiving ambulatory or hospitalization care and 6105 non-ARD patients; patients were matched by sex, age, and the year of index use of health care. Each patient was studied for 5 years to identify the subsequent manifestation of dementia. The data obtained were analyzed by Cox proportional hazard regression. Results. During the 5-year follow-up period, 30 ARD (2.48% and 141 non-ARD patients (2.31% developed dementia. During the 5-year follow-up period, there were no significant differences in the risks of any type of dementia (adjusted hazard ratio (HR, 1.18; 95% CI, 0.79–1.76 in the ARD group after adjusting for demographics and comorbidities. Conclusions. Within the 5-year period, patients with and without ARD were found to have similar risks of developing dementia.

  2. The use of stem cells for the treatment of autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.B. Rosa

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases constitute a heterogeneous group of conditions commonly treated with anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressant and immunomodulating drugs, with satisfactory results in most cases. Nevertheless, some patients become resistant to conventional therapy. The use of high doses of drugs in such cases results in the need for bone marrow reconstitution, a situation which has stimulated research into the use of hematopoietic stem cells in autoimmune disease therapy. Stem cell transplantation in such diseases aims to destroy the self-reacting immune cells and produce a new functional immune system, as well as substitute cells for tissue damaged in the course of the disease. Significant results, such as the reestablishment of tolerance and a decrease in the recurrence of autoimmune disease, have been reported following stem cell transplantation in patients with autoimmune disease in Brazil and throughout the world. These results suggest that stem cell transplantation has the potential to become an important therapeutic approach to the treatment of various autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, systemic sclerosis, Crohn's disease, autoimmune blood cytopenias, and type I diabetes mellitus.

  3. PTPN22 gene polymorphisms in autoimmune diseases with special reference to systemic lupus erythematosus disease susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradhan V

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a prototype autoimmune disease. SLE is a result of one or more immune mechanisms, like autoantibody production, complement activation, multiple inflammation and immune complex deposition leading to organ tissue damage. SLE affected patients are susceptible to common and opportunistic infections. There are several reports suggesting that Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection precipitates SLE in patients from endemic areas. Genetic factors and environmental factors also play an important role in the overall susceptibility to SLE pathophysiology. Recently, protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 22 (PTPN22 gene, has been found to be associated with several autoimmune diseases like SLE, Grave′s disease and Hashimoto thyroiditis. The missense R620W polymorphism, rs 2476601, in PTPN22 gene at the nucleotide 1858 in codon 620 (620Arg > Trp has been associated with autoimmune diseases. The PTPN22 locus is also found to be responsible for development of pulmonary tuberculosis in certain populations. The PTPN22 1858C/T gene locus will be ideal to look for SLE susceptibility to tuberculosis in the Indian population. In this review, we focus on human PTPN22 gene structure and function as well as the association of PTPN22 gene polymorphisms with SLE susceptibility

  4. Etiology of a spontaneous autoimmune joint disease in mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šinkora, Jiří

    Lieden, 2002. s. 1. [European Workshop for Rheumatology Research /22./. 28.02.2002-03.03.2002, Leiden] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : etiology * spontaneous * autoimmune Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  5. [Treatment of parasitic liver diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecuna, V

    1989-01-01

    Most of primary and secondary parasitic liver diseases, at present can be property treated with drugs. Venezuelan pharmaceutic market has some peculiarities that have determined the disappearance from the market of many drugs such as emetine, thiabendazole, quinacrine and niclosamide. Diloxanide never appeared. Venezuela has no commercial international treatises that protect international patents in the pharmaceutical area. In addition, government regulation of cost of drugs is very strict. This is particularly true with old drugs (such as emetine or quinacrine) which had such a low price that is non-commercial for the maker of the drug, usually a large transnational, and is withdrawn from the market. Flexibility of prices is quite easy for new antibiotics which are very expensive. Frequently small national companies import the drug from Italy and Japan which sell the drug independently from international treats. Such companies frequently produce the drug for the government social system, but are unreliable and also frequently they withdraw the drug a variable period of time. The government, through the Ministry of Public Health administer free treatment with drugs for malaria, tuberculosis and leprosy. The severe economic crisis of the country has severely impaired the preventive programs and there is an increase of malaria due to gold mining in the south of the country and falciparum chloroquine resistance and an increase of schistosomiasis in a previous free area. Also administration of drugs for malaria has been severely impaired, mainly for economic reasons. The establishment of a National Government Laboratory is an old (as far as 1946) political goal, but has remained in the political intention.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2535455

  6. Immunogenicity and safety of the human papillomavirus vaccine in patients with autoimmune diseases: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, Paolo; Radice, Sonia; Clementi, Emilio

    2015-07-01

    Whereas safety and efficacy of HPV vaccines in healthy women have been shown in several randomised controlled clinical trials and in post marketing analyses, only few data exist in patients affected by autoimmune diseases. These issues are significant as autoimmune conditions are recognised as a risk factor for the persistence of HPV infection. Herein we review and systematise the existing literature to assess immunogenicity and safety of HPV vaccination in patients with autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. The results of our literature revision suggest that the HPV vaccines are efficacious and safe in most of the patients affected by autoimmune diseases. Yet, some points of concern remain to be tackled, including the effects of concomitant therapies, the risk of disease exacerbation and the cost-effectiveness of such immunisation programmes in these populations. PMID:26036945

  7. Rheumatologic Manifestations in Iranian Patients with Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hezarkhani, Sharabeh; Aghaei, Mehrdad; Shamekhi, Maryam; Nomali, Mahin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs) are the most common endocrine diseases which result in rheumatologic manifestations. Some studies have shown association between rheumatologic disorders and ATDs. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the frequency of rheumatologic manifestations in patients with ATDs. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional descriptive study during 2010 to 2011, 65 patients with ATDs referred to the Rheumatology clinic of 5 Azar Hospital in Gorgan (North of Iran) were studied via systematic random sampling and patients with positive antithyroid peroxides (anti-TPO) were included in the study. These patients were examined by a rheumatologist for diagnosis of rheumatologic manifestations and tested for serum levels of TSH, Free T3 and T4, Anti-Nuclear Antibodies (ANAs) and Rheumatoid Factor (RF). SPSS software (version 16) and descriptive statistics were used for data analysis. Results: Nine males (14.8%) and 56 females (86.2%) with mean age of 38.81±1.44 years were studied. Overall, Rheumatologic manifestations were seen in 86.2 % (n=56). In this study, the most frequent rheumatologic manifestations were Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (36.1%) and Osteoarthritis (23%). Reynaud’s phenomenon (RP) (10.7%), Discopathy (8.9%), Fibromyalgia (5.3%), Myopathy (3.6%), Rheumatoid arthritis (3.6%) and trigger finger (3.6%) were other manifestations, respectively. Conclusion: In this region, there is a high frequency of rheumatologic manifestations in patients with ATDs. Thus, initial evaluation and regular checkings are recommended. PMID:25478383

  8. Teen Obesity May Mean Liver Disease Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159416.html Teen Obesity May Mean Liver Disease Later Study found risk ... Overweight is defined as a BMI above 25. Obesity is defined as a BMI above 30, according ...

  9. Teen Obesity May Mean Liver Disease Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159416.html Teen Obesity May Mean Liver Disease Later Study found risk ... Overweight is defined as a BMI above 25. Obesity is defined as a BMI above 30, according ...

  10. Treatment of Decompensated Alcoholic Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    John Menachery; Ajay Duseja

    2011-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a spectrum ranging from simple hepatic steatosis to alcoholic hepatitis and cirrhosis. Patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis can have clinical presentation almost similar to those with decompensated cirrhosis. Scoring with models like Maddrey discriminant function, a model for end-stage liver disease, Glasgow alcoholic hepatitis score, and Lille model are helpful in prognosticating patients with ALD. One of the first therapeutic goals in ALD is to induce al...

  11. Interleukin-10 and chronic liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    ZHANG, LI-JUAN; Wang, Xiao-Zhong

    2006-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-10 is an important immunoregulatory cytokine produced by many cell populations. Numerous investigations suggest that IL-10 plays a major role in chronic liver diseases. IL-10 gene polymorphisms are possibly associated with liver disease susceptibility or severity. Recombinant human IL-10 has been produced and is currently tested in clinical trials. These trials may give new insights into the immunobiology of IL-10 and suggest that the IL-10/IL-10 receptor system may become a ...

  12. Interleukin-10 and chronic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Juan Zhang; Xiao-Zhong Wang

    2006-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-10 is an important immunoregulatory cytokine produced by many cell populations. Numerous investigations suggest that IL-10 plays a major role in chronic liver diseases. IL-10 gene polymorphisms are possibly associated with liver disease susceptibility or severity. Recombinant human IL-10 has been produced and is currently tested in clinical trials. These trials may give new insights into the immunobiology of IL-10 and suggest that the IL-10/IL-10 receptor system may become a new therapeutic target.

  13. Reduced leucocyte zinc in liver disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Keeling, P W; Jones, R.B.; Hilton, P J; Thompson, R P

    1980-01-01

    The zinc content of peripheral blood leucocytes has been measured in normal controls and in three groups of patients with liver disease. A significant reduction in leucocyte zinc, but not erythrocyte zinc, was observed in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis, alcoholic cirrhosis, and active chronic hepatitis. It is suggested that the nucleated tissues of some patients with liver disease are therefore zinc deficient, and that leucocyte zinc may prove of value in the assessment of the zinc s...

  14. Role of Gut Microbiota in Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, David A; Paik, Yong-Han; Schnabl, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Many lines of research have established a relationship between the gut microbiome and patients with liver disease. For example, patients with cirrhosis have increased bacteremia, increased blood levels of lipopolysaccharide, and increased intestinal permeability. Patients with cirrhosis have bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine. Selective intestinal decontamination with antibiotics is beneficial for patients with decompensated cirrhosis. In experimental models of chronic liver injury with fibrosis, several toll-like receptors (TLR) are required to make mice sensitive to liver fibrosis. The presumed ligand for the TLRs are bacterial products derived from the gut microbiome, and TLR knockout mice are resistant to liver inflammation and fibrosis. We and others have characterized the association between preclinical models of liver disease in mice with the microbial diversity in their gut microbiome. In each model, including intragastric alcohol, bile duct ligation, chronic carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), administration, and genetic obesity, there is a significant change in the gut microbiome from normal control mice. However, there is not a single clear bacterial strain or pattern that distinguish mice with liver injury from controlled mice. So how can the gut microbiota affect liver disease? We can identify at least 6 changes that would result in liver injury, inflammation, and/or fibrosis. These include: (1) changes in caloric yield of diet; (2) regulation of gut permeability to release bacterial products; (3) modulation of choline metabolism; (4) production of endogenous ethanol; (5) regulation of bile acid metabolism; and (6) regulation in lipid metabolism. PMID:26447960

  15. The use of stem cells for the treatment of autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    S.B. Rosa; J.C. Voltarelli; J.A.B. Chies; Pranke, P.

    2007-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases constitute a heterogeneous group of conditions commonly treated with anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressant and immunomodulating drugs, with satisfactory results in most cases. Nevertheless, some patients become resistant to conventional therapy. The use of high doses of drugs in such cases results in the need for bone marrow reconstitution, a situation which has stimulated research into the use of hematopoietic stem cells in autoimmune disease therapy. Stem cell transplanta...

  16. Lessons from type 1 diabetes for understanding natural history and prevention of autoimmune disease

    OpenAIRE

    Simmons, Kimber; Michels, Aaron W

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disorder resulting from immune mediated destruction of insulin producing beta cells within the pancreatic islets. The natural history of T1D is well defined with distinct stages in disease development. Genetics and environmental factors contribute to disease susceptibility, followed by autoimmune targeting of proteins within beta cells. Preclinical T1D is marked by the presence of islet autoantibodies and normal blood glucose levels. Prediction of...

  17. The hygiene hypothesis revisited: autoimmune diseases, intestinal microbiota and vitamin D's role

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Allison

    2016-01-01

    The hygiene hypothesis postulates that higher levels of hygiene and improper exposure to microorganisms early in childhood could disturb the intestinal microbiome functions resulting in abnormal immune responses that can later lead to allergies and autoimmune diseases. Additionally, vitamin D deficiency and vitamin D receptor (VDR) polymorphisms and function might also trigger abnormal immune responses that can lead to an autoimmune disease. Therefore, this review explores the role Western li...

  18. Possible Role of Human Herpesvirus 6 as a Trigger of Autoimmune Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Francesco Broccolo; Lisa Fusetti; Luca Ceccherini-Nelli

    2013-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) infection is common and has a worldwide distribution. Recently, HHV-6A and HHV-6B have been reclassified into two distinct species based on different biological features (genetic, antigenic, and cell tropism) and disease associations. A role for HHV-6A/B has been proposed in several autoimmune disorders (AD), including multiple sclerosis (MS), autoimmune connective tissue diseases, and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The focus of this review is to discuss the above-mentio...

  19. Human adjuvant disease: remission of silicone induced autoimmune disease after explanation of breast augmentation.

    OpenAIRE

    Kaiser, W; Biesenbach, G; Stuby, U; Grafinger, P; Zazgornik, J.

    1990-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases following silicone or paraffin implantation are rarely encountered complications of plastic surgery. A 42 year old woman is presented who developed clinical and immunological features of systemic lupus erythematosus 11 years after silicone augmentation. After explanation antinuclear antibody titres decreased from 1/1280 to 1/160, C4 complement fraction and the previously raised angiotensin converting enzyme normalised in step with clinical improvement. It is important that...

  20. Vitamin D or hormone D deficiency in autoimmune rheumatic diseases, including undifferentiated connective tissue disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cutolo, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicates a significant association between vitamin D deficiency and an increased incidence of autoimmune diseases. The presence of vitamin D receptors in the cells of the immune system and the fact that several of these cells produce the vitamin D hormone suggested that vitamin D could have immunoregulatory properties, and now potent immuno-mudulatory activities on dendritic cells, Th1 and Th17 cells, as well as B cells have been confirmed. Patients with undifferenti...

  1. Hepatic progenitors for liver disease: current position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Conigliaro

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Alice Conigliaro1, David A Brenner2, Tatiana Kisseleva21University “La Sapienza”, Dipartimento di Biotecnologie Cellulari ed Ematologia Policlinico Umberto I, V Clinica Medica, Rome, Italy; 2Department of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USAAbstract: Liver regeneration restores the original functionality of hepatocytes and cholangiocytes in response to injury. It is regulated on several levels, with different cellular populations contributing to this process, eg, hepatocytes, liver precursor cells, intrahepatic stem cells. In response to injury, mature hepatocytes have the capability to proliferate and give rise to new hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. Meanwhile, liver precursor cells (oval cells have become the most recognized bipotential precursor cells in the damaged liver. They rapidly proliferate, change their cellular composition, and differentiate into hepatocytes and cholangiocytes to compensate for the cellular loss and maintain liver homeostasis. There is a growing body of evidence that oval cells originate from the intrahepatic stem cell(s, which in turn give(s rise to epithelial, including oval cells, and/or other hepatic cells of nonepithelial origin. Since there is a close relationship between the liver and hematopoiesis, bone marrow derived cells can also contribute to liver regeneration by the fusion of myeloid cells with damaged hepatocytes, or differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells. The current review discusses the contribution of different cells to liver regeneration and their characteristics.Keywords: hepatic progenitor, liver disease, liver precursor cells, oval cells, hepatocytes, intrahepatic stem cells, cholangiocytes

  2. Excellent survival after liver transplantation for isolated polycystic liver disease: an European Liver Transplant Registry study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Keimpema, Loes; Nevens, Frederik; Adam, René;

    2011-01-01

    Patients with end-stage isolated polycystic liver disease (PCLD) suffer from incapacitating symptoms because of very large liver volumes. Liver transplantation (LT) is the only curative option. This study assesses the feasibility of LT in PCLD. We used the European Liver Transplant Registry (ELTR......) database to extract demographics and outcomes of 58 PCLD patients. We used Kaplan-Meier survival analysis for survival rates. Severe abdominal pain (75%) was the most prominent symptom, while portal hypertension (35%) was the most common complication in PCLD. The explantation of the polycystic liver was...

  3. Management of Pruritus in Chronic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeline Bhalerao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There continues to be uncertainty on the ideal treatment of pruritus in chronic liver disease. The aim of this study was to gather the latest information on the evidence-based management of pruritus in chronic liver disease. Methodology. A literature search for pruritus in chronic liver disease was conducted using Pubmed and Embase database systems using the MeSH terms “pruritus,” “chronic liver disease,” “cholestatic liver disease,” and “treatment.” Results. The current understanding of the pathophysiology of pruritus is described in addition to detailing research into contemporary treatment options of the condition. These medical treatments range from bile salts, rifampicin, and opioid receptor antagonists to antihistamines. Conclusion. The burden of pruritus in liver disease patients persists and, although it is a common symptom, it can be difficult to manage. In recent years there has been greater study into the etiology and treatment of the condition. Nonetheless, pruritus remains poorly understood and many patients continue to suffer, reiterating the need for further research to improve our understanding of the etiology and treatment for the condition.

  4. Liver diseases in pregnancy: liver transplantation in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammoud, Ghassan M; Almashhrawi, Ashraf A; Ahmed, Khulood T; Rahman, Rubayat; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2013-11-21

    Pregnancy in patients with advanced liver disease is uncommon as most women with decompensated cirrhosis are infertile and have high rate of anovulation. However, if gestation ensued; it is very challenging and carries high risks for both the mother and the baby such as higher rates of spontaneous abortion, prematurity, pulmonary hypertension, splenic artery aneurysm rupture, postpartum hemorrhage, and a potential for life-threatening variceal hemorrhage and hepatic decompensation. In contrary, with orthotopic liver transplantation, menstruation resumes and most women of childbearing age are able to conceive, give birth and lead a better quality of life. Women with orthotopic liver transplantation seeking pregnancy should be managed carefully by a team consultation with transplant hepatologist, maternal-fetal medicine specialist and other specialists. Pregnant liver transplant recipients need to stay on immunosuppression medication to prevent allograft rejection. Furthermore, these medications need to be monitored carefully and continued throughout pregnancy to avoid potential adverse effects to mother and baby. Thus delaying pregnancy 1 to 2 years after transplantation minimizes fetal exposure to high doses of immunosuppressants. Pregnant female liver transplant patients have a high rate of cesarean delivery likely due to the high rate of prematurity in this population. Recent reports suggest that with close monitoring and multidisciplinary team approach, most female liver transplant recipient of childbearing age will lead a successful pregnancy. PMID:24282354

  5. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease as a multi-systemic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotbolcu, Hakan; Zorlu, Elçin

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease. NAFLD includes a wide spectrum of liver conditions ranging from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and advanced hepatic fibrosis. NAFLD has been recognized as a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome linked with insulin resistance. NAFLD should be considered not only a liver specific disease but also an early mediator of systemic diseases. Therefore, NAFLD is usually associated with cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, type 2 diabetes, obesity, and dyslipidemia. NAFLD is highly prevalent in the general population and is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The underlying mechanisms and pathogenesis of NAFLD with regard to other medical disorders are not yet fully understood. This review focuses on pathogenesis of NAFLD and its relation with other systemic diseases. PMID:27122660

  6. UNUSUAL CASE OF POLYCYSTIC LIVER DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea Brumaru

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycystic liver disease (PCLD is a rare disease defined as the presence of four or more thin-walled cyst within the hepatic parenchyma.The most common form of autosomal dominant PCLD coexist with renal cystic disease. In contrast to the concomitant renal and liver cystic disease, the isolated form of PCLD is a comparatively rare form, that displays no renal involvement.Only 7% of patients with PCDL do not have associated renal cyst. Most cases are asymptomatic. Patients generally have preserved hepatic functions.The liver function tests are normal. Polycystic liver is rarely associated with portal hypertension , obstructive jaundice or infection of hepatic cysts. Autopsy series show that 20 % of patients with PCLD have associated intracranial aneurism. There are no effective medical therapies for PCLD.Surgical options for those with refractory symptoms or complications include percutaneous puncture and sclerosys of cysts, cysts fenestration by open or laparoscopic technique, hepatic resection, and isolated hepatic or combined liver kidney transplantation. We present the case of a 68 years male subject , diagnosed with alcoholic liver cirrhosis based on the chronic alcohol consumption,negative serological markers for the B and C hepatitis viruses, hepatoprive and biliar retention tests, portal hypertension. The abdominal echography revealed a diffuse enlargement of the liver , witch contains numerous cysts scattered throughout the liver. The cysts vary in size from less than 1 cm to more than 5 cm. There is no evidence of renal or pancreatic cysts. The treatment is addressed to the portal hypertension due to alcoholic liver disease. The PCLD is not complicated and therefore requires no surgical treatment.

  7. UNUSUAL CASE OF POLYCYSTIC LIVER DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    Andreea Brumaru; Catalina Mihai; Cristina Cijevschi Prelipcean

    2005-01-01

    Polycystic liver disease (PCLD) is a rare disease defined as the presence of four or more thin-walled cyst within the hepatic parenchyma.The most common form of autosomal dominant PCLD coexist with renal cystic disease. In contrast to the concomitant renal and liver cystic disease, the isolated form of PCLD is a comparatively rare form, that displays no renal involvement.Only 7% of patients with PCDL do not have associated renal cyst. Most cases are asymptomatic. Patients generally have pre...

  8. Molecular mimicry: its evolution from concept to mechanism as a cause of autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldstone, Michael B A

    2014-06-01

    On a clonal level, certain antibodies and T cells can interact with dissimilar antigens found in microbes and in host cells. More than 5% of over 800 monoclonal antibodies derived from multiple RNA and DNA viruses, as well as from a large number of T cell clones, engage in such interactions. Several of these cross-reactions, which we termed molecular mimicry, are against unique host proteins involved in autoimmune responses and diseases. Thus, molecular mimicry initiated as a host response to a virus or a microbial infection, but alternatively cross-reacting with an appropriate host-antigen, can be a mechanism for instigating an autoimmune disease. Molecular mimicry provides an explanation for the genetic observation that identical twins rarely manifest the same autoimmune disease and the documented epidemiologic evidence that microbial and/or viral infections often precede autoimmune disorders. PMID:24694269

  9. Thyroid autoantibodies in autoimmune diseases Anticuerpos antitiroideos en enfermedades autoinmunes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina M. Innocencio

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abnormalities in the thyroid function and thyroid autoantibodies have been frequently described in patients with autoimmune diseases but seldom in antiphospholipid syndrome patients. In order to determine the prevalence of thyroid function and autoimmune abnormalities, we compared serum thyrotropin (TSH, serum free thyroxine (T4 levels, thyroid antithyroglobulin (TgAb and antithyroperoxidase (TPOAb levels of 25 patients with systemic sclerosis, 25 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 13 patients with antiphospholipid syndrome to a control group of 113 healthy individuals. Evaluation included a thorough clinical examination with particular attention to thyroid disease and a serologic immune profile including rheumatoid factor, antinuclear and anticardiolipin antibody measurements. Subclinical hypothyroidism (4.2Ciertas anormalidades en la función tiroidea y anticuerpos antitiroideos han sido frecuentemente descriptos en pacientes con enfermedades autoinmunes, y más raramente en pacientes con el síndrome antifosfolipídico. Para determinar la prevalencía de anormalidades en la función tiroidea y de autoinmunidad, comparamos los niveles séricos de tirotropina (TSH tiroxina libre en suero (T4 anticuerpos antitiroglobulina (TgAb y antitiroperoxidasa (TPOAb en 25 pacientes con esclerosis sistémica, 25 pacientes con artritis reumatoidea y 13 pacientes con el síndrome antifosfolipídico con un grupo control de 113 individuos aparentemente sanos. La evaluación incluyó un completo examen clínico con particular atención para las enfermedades de la tiroides y una evaluación inmunológica incluyendo dosaje del factor reumatoideo, anticuerpos antinucleares y anticardiolipina. Hipotiroidismo subclínico (4.2

  10. Natural History of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, George Boon-Bee; McCullough, Arthur J

    2016-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) remains among the most common liver diseases worldwide, with increasing prevalence in concert with the obesity and metabolic syndrome epidemic. The evidence on the natural history, albeit with some ambiguity, suggests the potential for some subsets of NAFLD to progress to cirrhosis, liver-related complications and mortality with fibrosis being the most important predictor of hard long-term endpoints such as mortality and liver complications. In this setting, NAFLD proves to be a formidable disease entity, with considerable clinical burden, for both the present and the future. Our understanding of the natural history of NAFLD is constantly evolving, with nascent data challenging current dogma. Further clarification of the natural history is required with well-designed, well-defined studies using prospectively collected data. Identifying the predictors of long-term outcomes should be used to direct development of clinical trial endpoints in NAFLD. PMID:27003142

  11. The increased risk for autoimmune diseases in patients with eating disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anu Raevuori

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Research suggests autoimmune processes to be involved in psychiatric disorders. We aimed to address the prevalence and incidence of autoimmune diseases in a large Finnish patient cohort with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder. METHODS: Patients (N = 2342 treated at the Eating Disorder Unit of Helsinki University Central Hospital between 1995 and 2010 were compared with general population controls (N = 9368 matched for age, sex, and place of residence. Data of 30 autoimmune diseases from the Hospital Discharge Register from 1969 to 2010 were analyzed using conditional and Poisson regression models. RESULTS: Of patients, 8.9% vs. 5.4% of control individuals had been diagnosed with one or more autoimmune disease (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.5-2.0, P<0.001. The increase in endocrinological diseases (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.8-3.2, P<0.001 was explained by type 1 diabetes, whereas Crohn's disease contributed most to the risk of gastroenterological diseases (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.4-2.5, P<0.001. Higher prevalence of autoimmune diseases among patients with eating disorders was not exclusively due to endocrinological and gastroenterological diseases; when the two categories were excluded, the increase in prevalence was seen in the patients both before the onset of the eating disorder treatment (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1-2.1, P = 0.02 and at the end of the follow-up (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.1-1.8, P = 0.01. CONCLUSIONS: We observed an association between eating disorders and several autoimmune diseases with different genetic backgrounds. Our findings support the link between immune-mediated mechanisms and development of eating disorders. Future studies are needed to further explore the risk of autoimmune diseases and immunological mechanisms in individuals with eating disorders and their family members.

  12. Frequency of autoimmune thyroid disease in chronic urticaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the frequency of autoimmune thyroid disease in diagnosed cases of chronic urticaria (CU) and the association between hypothyroidism and chronic urticaria if any. Study Design: Non-interventional, descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Physiology, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, from December 2004 to January 2006. Methodology: The patients were selected from Department of Dermatology and Medical Units of Civil Hospital, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, the Aga Khan Hospital and community clinics. A total number of 60 patients were enrolled in this study. In all patients, serum antithyroid autoantibodies (anti thyroglobulin and anti microsomal/thyroperoxidase), thyroid profile (serum TSH, T3 and FT4), complete blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and IgE levels were carried out. The proportions were compared using chi-square test with significance at p < 0.05. Results: Forty seven (78%) patients were found to have chronic urticaria (history and laboratory reports). Out of 47 patients with diagnosis of CU, elevated titres of anti thyroglobulin (TGA) and anti microsomal antibodies (TMA) were found to be present in 20 (42.6%) and 27 (57.4%) patients respectively. Serum TSH level (thyroid stimulating hormone) was increased and T3, FT4 were decreased in 20 (42.6%) patients (p < 0.001). A total number of 20 (42.5%) patients were found to be hypothyroid with chronic urticaria of greater than 6 weeks duration. Conclusion: This study shows a statistically significant association between hypothyroidism and chronic urticaria. Full thyroid profile (serum thyroid autoantibodies, serum TSH, T3 and FT4) is highly recommended in patients with diagnosis of chronic urticaria. (author)

  13. Acute renal dysfunction in liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Renal dysfunction is common in liver diseases, either as part of multiorgan involvement in acute illness or secondary to advanced liver disease. The presence of renal impairment in both groups is a poor prognostic indicator. Renal failure is often multifactorial and can present as pre-renal or intrinsic renal dysfunction. Obstructive or post renal dysfunction only rarely complicates liver disease. Hepatorenal syndrome (MRS) is a unique form of renal failure associated with advanced liver disease or cirrhosis, and is characterized by functional renal impairment without significant changes in renal histology. Irrespective of the type of renal failure, renal hypoperfusion is the central pathogenetic mechanism, due either to reduced perfusion pressure or increased renal vascular resistance. Volume expansion, avoidance of precipitating factors and treatment of underlying liver disease constitute the mainstay of therapy to prevent and reverse renal impairment. Splanchnic vasoconstrictor agents, such as terlipressin, along with volume expansion, and early placement of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) may be effective in improving renal function in HRS. Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) and molecular absorbent recirculating system (MARS) in selected patients may be life saving while awaiting liver transplantation.

  14. Co-occurrence of autoimmune thyroid disease in a multiple sclerosis cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Sloka, JS; Phillips, Pryse-WEM; Stefanelli, M.; Joyce, C.

    2005-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS), Hashimoto's disease and Graves' disease are autoimmune diseases that may share similar pathogenic mechanisms. The co-occurrence rates and demographic characteristics of Graves' disease and Hashimoto's disease (HT) in our MS population are compared with the general population. Methods The prevalence of thyroid disease in our MS patients was determined by chart review and survey. Previous diagnosis of thyroid disease, age at diagnosis, treatment used, and abo...

  15. Nuclear receptor variants in liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Vincent; Liebe, Roman; Lammert, Frank

    2015-01-01

    This snapshot reviews the current state of knowledge on genetic variants of nuclear receptors (NRs) involved in regulating various aspects of liver metabolism. Interindividual differences in responses to diet and other 'in-' and environmental stressors can be caused by variants in components of the NR regulatory gene network. We recapitulate recent evidence for the application of NRs in genetic diagnosis of monogenic liver disease. Genetic analysis of multifactorial liver diseases, such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and diabetes mellitus, pinpoints key players in disease predisposition and progression. In particular, NR1H4 variants have been associated with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy and gallstone disease. Other examples include studies of NR1I2 and NR1I3 polymorphisms in patients with drug-induced liver injury and NR5A2 variation in cholangiocarcinoma. Associations of NR gene variants have been identified in patients with dyslipidemia and other metabolic syndrome-associated traits by genome-wide studies. Evidence from these analyses confirms a role for NR variation in common diseases, linking regulatory networks to complex and variable phenotypes. These new insights into the impact of NR variants offer perspectives for their future use in diagnosis and treatment of common diseases. PMID:26045277

  16. Anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, A; Gluud, C

    2006-01-01

    Alcohol is one of the most common causes of liver disease in the Western World. Randomised clinical trials have examined the effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease.......Alcohol is one of the most common causes of liver disease in the Western World. Randomised clinical trials have examined the effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease....

  17. Ionizing radiation and autoimmunity: Induction of autoimmune disease in mice by high dose fractionated total lymphoid irradiation and its prevention by inoculating normal T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation can functionally alter the immune system and break self-tolerance. High dose (42.5 Gy), fractionated (2.5 Gy 17 times) total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) on mice caused various organ-specific autoimmune diseases, such as gastritis, thyroiditis, and orchitis, depending on the radiation dosages, the extent of lymphoid irradiation, and the genetic background of the mouse strains. Radiation-induced tissue damage is not the primary cause of the autoimmune disease because irradiation of the target organs alone failed to elicit the autoimmunity and shielding of the organs from irradiation was unable to prevent it. In contrast, irradiation of both the thymus and the peripheral lymphoid organs/tissues was required for efficient induction of autoimmune disease by TLI. TLI eliminated the majority of mature thymocytes and the peripheral T cells for 1 mo, and inoculation of spleen cell, thymocyte, or bone marrow cell suspensions (prepared from syngeneic nonirradiated mice) within 2 wk after TLI effectively prevented the autoimmune development. Depletion of T cells from the inocula abrogated the preventive activity. CD4+ T cells mediated the autoimmune prevention but CD8+ T cells did not. CD4+ T cells also appeared to mediate the TLI-induced autoimmune disease because CD4+ T cells from disease-bearing TLI mice adoptively transferred the autoimmune disease to syngeneic naive mice. Taken together, these results indicate that high dose, fractionated ionizing radiation on the lymphoid organs/tissues can cause autoimmune disease by affecting the T cell immune system, rather than the target self-Ags, presumably by altering T cell-dependent control of self-reactive T cells. 62 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Environmental chemicals and autoimmune disease: cause and effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many important clues have been provided by the relationship of certain medications to lupus and other autoimmune syndromes. These are temporary conditions that resolve when the medication is removed. There are now over 70 such medications which have been reported related to these autoimmune conditions. Interest continues to grow in the potential for environmental substances to cause these syndromes. Among those under suspicion are hydrazines, tartrazines, hair dyes, trichloroethylene, industrial emissions and hazardous wastes. Other possible associations include silica, mercury, cadmium, gold and L canavanine. Two recognised outbreaks include 'toxic oil syndrome' related to contaminated rape seed oil in Spain in 1981 and exposure to a contaminated environmental substance associated with an autoimmune attack on muscle tissue in 1989. Recently, there have been proposals made for the definition and identification of environmentally associated immune disorders. The World Health Organisation (WHO) has also provided recent publications for other environmentally related problems. All these aspects will be presented and reviewed in detail

  19. IMMUNOHISTOCHEMISTRY VERSUS IMMUNOFLUORESENCE IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF AUTOIMMUNE BLISTERING DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In patients with autoimmune skin blistering diseases (ABDs, the diagnostic gold standard has classically been direct and indirect immunofluorescence (DIF and IIF, despite inherent technical problems of autofluorescence. Aim: We sought to overcome autofluorescence issues and compare the reliability of immunofluorescence versus immunohistochemistry (IHC staining in the diagnoses of these diseases. Methods: We tested via IHC for anti-human IgG, IgM, IgA, IgD, IgE, Kappa light chains, Lambda light chains, Complement/C3c, Complement/C1q, Complement/C3d, albumin and fibrinogen in 30 patients affected by a new variant of endemic pemphigus foliaceus in El Bagre, Colombia (El Bagre-EPF, and 30 control biopsies from the endemic area. We also tested archival biopsies from patients with ABDs whose diagnoses were made clinically, histopathologically and by DIF/IIF studies from 2 independent dermatopathology laboratories in the USA. Specifically, we tested 34 patients with bullous pemphigoid (BP, 18 with pemphigus vulgaris (PV, 8 with pemphigus foliaceus (PF, 14 with dermatitis herpetiformis (DH and 30 control skin samples from plastic esthetic surgery reduction surgeries. Results: The diagnostic correlation between IHC and DIF-IIF was almost 98% in most cases. IHC revealed evidence of autofluorescence around dermal blood vessels, dermal eccrine glands and neurovascular packages feeding skin appendices in ABDs; this autofluorescence may represent a non-specific immune response. Strong patterns of positivity were seen also in endothelial-mesenchymal cell junction-like structures, as well as between dermal fibrohistiocytic cells. In PV, we noted strong reactivity to neurovascular packages supplying sebaceous glands, as well as apocrine glands with edematous changes. Conclusions: We suggest that IHC is as reliable as DIF or IIF for the diagnosis of ABDs; our findings further suggest that what has previously been considered DIF/IIF autofluorescence

  20. Low-dose tacrolimus ameliorates liver inflammation and fibrosis in steroid refractory autoimmune hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fin Stolze Larsen; Ben Vainer; Martin Eefsen; Peter Nissen Bjerring; Bent Adel Hansen

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To determine the efficacy of tacrolimus on clinical status, histopathological status and biochemical markers in patients with steroid refractory autoimmune hepatitis(AIH).METHODS: Retrospectively, clinical parameters,biochemistry and histology were obtained from patient records.RESULTS: Nine patients [8 females/1 male, median age 32 (range 16-64) years] were identified to have received tacrolimus for a median duration of 18 (12-37) mo. Before initiation of tacrolimus treatment the patients were maintained on a prednisolone dose of 20 mg daily (range 20-80 mg/d), which was tapered to 7.5 (5-12.5) mg/d (P=0.004). Alanine aminotransferase and immunoglobulin-G concentrations decreased from 154 (100-475) to 47(22-61) U/L (P=0.007), and from 16 (10-30.2) to 14.5 (8.4-20) g/L (P=0.032),respectively. All patients showed improvement of the liver inflammatory activity, as determined by the Ishak score (P=0.016), while the degree of fibrosis tended to decrease (P=0.049).CONCLUSION: The use of low dose tacrolimus can lead to biochemical and histologic improvement of inflammation with no progression of the stage of fibrosis in patients with steroid refractory AIH. Low dose tacrolimus therapy also allows substantialreduction of prednisone dose.

  1. The pathophysiology of thrombocytopenia in chronic liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell O

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Oscar Mitchell,1 David M Feldman,1,2 Marla Diakow,1 Samuel H Sigal3 1Department of Medicine, 2Division of Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases, New York University School of Medicine, Langone Medical Center, New York, 3Division of Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases, Department of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA Abstract: Thrombocytopenia is the most common hematological abnormality encountered in patients with chronic liver disease (CLD. In addition to being an indicator of advanced disease and poor prognosis, it frequently prevents crucial interventions. Historically, thrombocytopenia has been attributed to hypersplenism, which is the increased pooling of platelets in a spleen enlarged by congestive splenomegaly secondary to portal hypertension. Over the past decade, however, there have been significant advances in the understanding of thrombopoiesis, which, in turn, has led to an improved understanding of thrombocytopenia in cirrhosis. Multiple factors contribute to the development of thrombocytopenia and these can broadly be divided into those that cause decreased production, splenic sequestration, and increased destruction. Depressed thrombopoietin levels in CLD, together with direct bone marrow suppression, result in a reduced rate of platelet production. Thrombopoietin regulates both platelet production and maturation and is impaired in CLD. Bone marrow suppression can be caused by viruses, alcohol, iron overload, and medications. Splenic sequestration results from hypersplenism. The increased rate of platelet destruction in cirrhosis also occurs through a number of pathways: increased shear stress, increased fibrinolysis, bacterial translocation, and infection result in an increased rate of platelet aggregation, while autoimmune disease and raised titers of antiplatelet immunoglobulin result in the immunologic destruction of platelets. An in-depth understanding of the complex

  2. 76 FR 13111 - Compassionate Allowances for Autoimmune Disease, Office of the Commissioner; Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-10

    ... ADMINISTRATION 20 CFR Parts 404, 405, and 416 Compassionate Allowances for Autoimmune Disease, Office of the... Alzheimer's disease and related dementias, schizophrenia, and cardiovascular disease and multiple organ... mental impairments that are severe enough to meet the statutory definition of disability. The rules...

  3. Human parvovirus B19 and autoimmune diseases. Review of the literature and pathophysiological hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Cyril; François, Catherine; Goëb, Vincent; Duverlie, Gilles

    2015-11-01

    A number of arguments support the role played by PVB19 in autoimmunity, in the broad sense of the term essentially derived from numerous clinical case reports and/or small series over the past 20-30 years in the medical literature. PVB19 can induce a very broad spectrum of autoantibody production, especially including: anti-soluble nuclear antigen antibodies, antiphospholipid antibodies anti-native DNA antibodies, antilymphocyte antibody, anticardiolipin antibodies, antinuclear antibodies and rheumatoid factor. Notably acute PVB19 infection can mimic or stimulate autoimmune systemic diseases as rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematosus. However, at the present time, there is no formal scientific evidence demonstrating a direct role of PVB19 in autoimmunity, bearing in mind that there are also no formal arguments against it. Further large studies are needed to understand the eventual role of PVB19 in autoimmune diseases. PMID:26433772

  4. Autoimmune diseases — connecting risk alleles with molecular traits of the immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Arcelus, Maria; Rich, Stephen S.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide strategies have driven the discovery of more than 300 susceptibility loci for autoimmune diseases. However, for almost all loci, understanding of the mechanisms leading to autoimmunity remains limited, and most variants that are likely to be causal are in non-coding regions of the genome. A critical next step will be to identify the in vivo and ex vivo immunophenotypes that are affected by risk variants. To do this, key cell types and cell states that are implicated in autoimmune diseases will need to be defined. Functional genomic annotations from these cell types and states can then be used to resolve candidate genes and causal variants. Together with longitudinal studies, this approach may yield pivotal insights into how autoimmunity is triggered. PMID:26907721

  5. Acetaldehyde Adducts in Alcoholic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashiko Setshedi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic alcohol abuse causes liver disease that progresses from simple steatosis through stages of steatohepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and eventually hepatic failure. In addition, chronic alcoholic liver disease (ALD, with or without cirrhosis, increases risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Acetaldehyde, a major toxic metabolite, is one of the principal culprits mediating fibrogenic and mutagenic effects of alcohol in the liver. Mechanistically, acetaldehyde promotes adduct formation, leading to functional impairments of key proteins, including enzymes, as well as DNA damage, which promotes mutagenesis. Why certain individuals who heavily abuse alcohol, develop HCC (7.2–15% versus cirrhosis (15–20% is not known, but genetics and co-existing viral infection are considered pathogenic factors. Moreover, adverse effects of acetaldehyde on the cardiovascular and hematologic systems leading to ischemia, heart failure, and coagulation disorders, can exacerbate hepatic injury and increase risk for liver failure. Herein, we review the role of acetaldehyde adducts in the pathogenesis of chronic ALD and HCC.

  6. Mast cells are important modifiers of autoimmune disease: With so much evidence, why is there controversy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Ann Brown

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available There is abundant evidence that mast cells are active participants in events that mediate tissue damage in autoimmune disease. Disease-associated increases in mast cell numbers accompanied by mast cell degranulation and elaboration of numerous mast cell mediators at sites of inflammation are commonly observed in many human autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and bullous pemphigoid. In animal models, treatment with mast cell stabilizing drugs or mast cell ablation can result in diminished disease. A variety of receptors including those engaged by antibody, complement, pathogens and intrinsic danger signals are implicated in mast cell activation in disease. Similar to their role as first responders in infection settings, mast cells likely orchestrate early recruitment of immune cells, including neutrophils, to the sites of autoimmune destruction. This co-localization promotes cellular crosstalk and activation and results in the amplification of the local inflammatory response thereby promoting and sustaining tissue damage. Despite the evidence, there is still a debate regarding the relative role of mast cells in these processes. However, by definition, mast cells can only act as accessory cells to the self-reactive T and/or antibody driven autoimmune responses. Thus, when evaluating mast cell involvement using existing and somewhat imperfect animal models of disease, their importance is sometimes obscured. However, these potent immune cells are undoubtedly major contributors to autoimmunity and should be considered as important targets for therapeutic disease intervention.

  7. Management of rheumatic and autoimmune blistering disease in pregnancy and postpartum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Joy; Imadojemu, Sotonye; Werth, Victoria P

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of rheumatic and autoimmune skin disease in women who are pregnant or of childbearing potential can present challenges to the dermatologist. We discuss the current approaches to treating lupus erythematosus, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, dermatomyositis, morphea and systemic sclerosis, mixed connective tissue disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and autoimmune blistering disease in such patients. In the appropriate setting, topical and systemic corticosteroids, hydroxychloroquine, dapsone, azathioprine, and ultraviolet B phototherapy may be safely and cautiously used during pregnancy. Considerations about contraception, planned conception, therapeutic options, and disease control are paramount in optimizing pregnancy outcomes and minimizing risks to both mother and fetus. PMID:27265072

  8. Is vitamin D a player or not in the pathophysiology of autoimmune thyroid diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aurizio, Federica; Villalta, Danilo; Metus, Paolo; Doretto, Paolo; Tozzoli, Renato

    2015-05-01

    1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D is a steroid hormone derived from vitamin D, playing an important role in maintaining an adequate serum level of calcium and phosphorus. It is now clear that vitamin D exerts an endocrine action on the cells of the immune system, generating anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory effects. The mechanisms underlying the role of vitamin D in autoimmunity are not completely understood. Lower vitamin D levels have been found in several autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel diseases, autoimmune thyroid diseases (i.e. Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Graves' disease) and autoimmune gastritis. Several genetic studies have demonstrated an association between thyroid autoimmunity susceptibility and gene polymorphisms of vitamin D receptor, vitamin D binding protein, 1-alpha-hydroxylase and 25-hydroxylase. Of note, some papers do not confirm this connection. With regard to the role of vitamin D in autoimmune thyroid diseases, available data remain controversial. Only few reports have analyzed the supposed association between autoimmune thyroid diseases and vitamin D concentration with inconclusive results. In our experience, low serum levels of vitamin D do not correlate either with Hashimoto's thyroiditis or with Graves' disease. The inability to achieve an unambiguous conclusion is in part due to the limitations in study design. In fact, most of the studies are cross-sectional surveys with a small number of subjects. In addition, the heterogeneity of the study population, seasonal variation of blood sampling, inter-method analytical variability of vitamin D assays and different definitions of vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency contribute to contradicting results. Therefore, further randomized, controlled, prospective trials are needed in order to demonstrate the causality of vitD in AITD and consequently the role of vitamin D

  9. Chronic Liver Disease: Stem Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal MA Hassan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic liver diseases (CLD affect hundreds of millions of patientsworldwide. Stem Cells (SCs therapy to treat chronic liver diseasesis resorted and is considered as the dream of the future. AlthoughSCs are a promising means for treatment of liver diseases, studiesare still at the beginning of this era. SCs are undifferentiatedcells capable of renewing themselves throughout their life and ofgenerating one or more types of differentiated cells. Different typesof SCs with hepatic differentiation potential are theoretically eligiblefor liver cell replacement. These include Embryonic and fetal liverSCs, induced pluripotent SCs, hepatoblasts, annex SCs (pluripotentSCs obtained from umbilical cord and umbilical cord blood,placenta and amniotic fluid, and adult SCs, such hepatic progenitorcells, hematopoietic SCs, and mesenchymal stem cell. The optimalSCs delivery route should be easy to perform, less invasive andtraumatic, minimum side effects, and with high cells survival rate.Liver SCs can be transplanted through several routes: Intraperitonealand percutaneous intrahepatic artery catheterization in acute liverfailure, and umbilical vein catheterization, percutaneous intrahepaticroute, and portal vein or intrahepatic artery catheterization inmetabolic liver diseases. Whatever the source or delivery route ofSCs, how they can be manipulated for therapeutic interventionsin a variety of hepatic diseases is of course of great interest infuture studies. Although all clinical trials to date have shown someimprovement in liver function and CD34+ cells have been usedsafely for bone marrow transplantation for over 20 years, onlyrandomized controlled clinical trials will be able to fully assess thepotential clinical benefit of adult SCs therapy for patients with CLD.

  10. Histopathology of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elizabeth; M; Brunt; Dina; G; Tiniakos

    2010-01-01

    Histological analysis of liver biopsies remains a standard against which other methods of assessment for the presence and amount of hepatic injury due to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease(NAFLD) are measured.Histological evaluation remains the sole method of distinguishing steatosis from advanced forms of NAFLD,i.e.nonalcoholic steatohepatitis(NASH) and fibrosis.Included in the lesions of NAFLD are steatosis,lobular and portal inflammation,hepatocyte injury in the forms of ballooning and apoptosis,and fibros...

  11. Annotation: PANDAS--A Model for Human Autoimmune Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swedo, Susan E.; Grant, Paul J.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcus infections (PANDAS) is a recently recognized syndrome in which pre-adolescent children have abrupt onsets of tics and/or obsessive-compulsive symptoms, a recurring and remitting course of illness temporally related to streptococcal infections, and associated…

  12. The Increased Risk for Autoimmune Diseases in Patients with Eating Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Anu Raevuori; Jari Haukka; Outi Vaarala; Suvisaari, Jaana M.; Mika Gissler; Marjut Grainger; Milla S Linna; Suokas, Jaana T

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Research suggests autoimmune processes to be involved in psychiatric disorders. We aimed to address the prevalence and incidence of autoimmune diseases in a large Finnish patient cohort with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder. METHODS: Patients (N = 2342) treated at the Eating Disorder Unit of Helsinki University Central Hospital between 1995 and 2010 were compared with general population controls (N = 9368) matched for age, sex, and place of residence. Da...

  13. Correlation between liver morphology and haemodynamics in alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard, K; Gluud, C; Henriksen, J H; Christoffersen, Pernille Yde

    1985-01-01

    In 32 alcoholic patients the degree of hepatic architectural destruction was graded (preserved architecture, nodules alternating with preserved architecture, totally destroyed architecture) and related to portal pressure. A significant positive correlation was found between degree of architectura...... found with haemodynamic variables. The present data substantiate the concept that established portal hypertension in alcoholic liver disease is mainly accomplished by a derangement in hepatic architecture, whereas parenchymal changes, including hepatocyte size, are of less importance....

  14. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Guang Fan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the autoimmune pancreatitis was introduced in 1995, it has been recognized as a form of chronic pancreatitis, which is always associated with autoimmune manifestations. As the improvement of technical and instrumental made in ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, the diagnoses of autoimmune pancreatitis is no longer such difficult. Even though the treatment of autoimmune pancreatitis is available with a conservative therapy, there are many points that are still unclearly. These have stimulated widespread interest in this disease from gastroenterologists, endoscopists, pathologists, and prevalent research. The present article provides with our better understanding of the diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune pancreatitis.

  15. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Guang Fan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the autoimmune pancreatitis was introduced in 1995, it has been recognized as a form of chronic pancreatitis, which is always associated with autoimmune manifestations. As the improvement of technical and instrumental made in ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, the diagnoses of autoimmune pancreatitis is no longer such difficult. Even though the treatment of autoimmune pancreatitis is available with a conservative therapy, there are many points that are still unclearly. These have stimulated widespread interest in this disease from gastroenterologists, endoscopists, pathologists, and prevalent research. The present article provides with our better understanding of the diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune pancreatitis.

  16. Sexual dimorphism of miRNA expression: a new perspective in understanding the sex bias of autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Dai R; Ahmed SA

    2014-01-01

    Rujuan Dai, S Ansar Ahmed Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, USA Abstract: Autoimmune diseases encompass a diverse group of diseases which emanate from a dysregulated immune system that launches a damaging attack on its own tissues. Autoimmune attacks on self tissues can occur in any organ or body system. A notable feature of autoimmune disease is that a majority of these disorders occu...

  17. Neurohumoral fluid regulation in chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1998-01-01

    Impaired homeostasis of the blood volume, with increased fluid and sodium retention, is a prevailing element in the deranged systemic and splanchnic haemodynamics in patients with liver disease. In this review, some basic elements of the circulatory changes that take place and of neurohumoral fluid...... regulation are outlined in order to provide an update of recent investigations on the neuroendocrine compensation of circulatory and volume dysfunction in chronic liver disease. The underlying pathophysiology is a systemic vasodilatation in which newly described potent vasoactive substances such as nitric...... and lungs. It is still an enigma why patients with chronic liver disease are at the same time overloaded and functional hypovolaemic with a hyperdynamic, hyporeactive circulation. Further research is needed to find the solution to this apparent haemodynamic conflict concerning the abnormal...

  18. Liver and Kidney Disease in Ciliopathies

    OpenAIRE

    Gunay-Aygun, Meral

    2009-01-01

    Hepatorenal fibrocystic diseases (HRFCDs) are among the most common inherited human disorders. The discovery that proteins defective in the autosomal dominant and recessive polycystic kidney diseases (ADPKD and ARPKD) localize to the primary cilia and the recognition of the role these organelles play in the pathogenesis of HRFCDs led to the term “ciliopathies.” While ADPKD and ARPKD are the most common ciliopathies associated with both liver and kidney disease, variable degrees of renal and/o...

  19. Google-driven search for big data in autoimmune geoepidemiology: analysis of 394,827 patients with systemic autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Casals, Manuel; Brito-Zerón, Pilar; Kostov, Belchin; Sisó-Almirall, Antoni; Bosch, Xavier; Buss, David; Trilla, Antoni; Stone, John H; Khamashta, Munther A; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-08-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases (SADs) are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, although their epidemiological profile varies significantly country by country. We explored the potential of the Google search engine to collect and merge large series (>1000 patients) of SADs reported in the Pubmed library, with the aim of obtaining a high-definition geoepidemiological picture of each disease. We collected data from 394,827 patients with SADs. Analysis showed a predominance of medical vs. administrative databases (74% vs. 26%), public health system vs. health insurance resources (88% vs. 12%) and patient-based vs. population-based designs (82% vs. 18%). The most unbalanced gender ratio was found in primary Sjögren syndrome (pSS), with nearly 10 females affected per 1 male, followed by systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) (ratio of nearly 5:1). Each disease predominantly affects a specific age group: children (Kawasaki disease, primary immunodeficiencies and Schonlein-Henoch disease), young people (SLE Behçet disease and sarcoidosis), middle-aged people (SSc, vasculitis and pSS) and the elderly (amyloidosis, polymyalgia rheumatica, and giant cell arteritis). We found significant differences in the geographical distribution of studies for each disease, and a higher frequency of the three SADs with available data (SLE, inflammatory myopathies and Kawasaki disease) in African-American patients. Using a "big data" approach enabled hitherto unseen connections in SADs to emerge. PMID:25842074

  20. Coombs-Negative Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia in Crohn’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Bong Soo; Park, Sihyung; Jin, Kyubok; Kim, Yeon Mee; Park, Kang Min; Lee, Jeong-Nyeo; Kamesaki, Toyomi; Kim, Yang Wook

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Female, 41 Final Diagnosis: Coombs negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia Symptoms: Dark urine • dizziness • dyspnea Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Immunoradiometric assay for RBC-IgG Specialty: Hematology Objective: Rare disease Background: Anemia is a common, important extraintestinal complication of Crohn’s disease. The main types of anemia in patients with Crohn’s disease are iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease. Although patients with Crohn’s disease may experie...

  1. Clinical indications and biological mechanisms of splenic irradiation in autoimmune diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Splenic irradiation (SI) is a fairly unknown treatment modality in autoimmune disorders like autoimmune thrombocytopenia (AIT) or autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), which may provide an effective, low toxic and cost-effective treatment for selected patients. Patients, Materials and Methods: This article reviews the limited experiences on splenic irradiation in autoimmune thrombocytopenia by analyzing the current studies including 71 patients and some preliminary reports on splenic irradiation in autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Results: In autoimmune thrombocytopenia between 40 and 90% of all patients responded, but most of them relapsed within 4 to 6 months after splenic irradiation. Between 10 and 20% of all patients had a sustained response. The efficacy of splenic irradiation in HIV-associated cases of thrombocytopenia is probably lower than in other forms of autoimmune thrombocytopenia, but especially in this group immunosuppressive drug treatment of autoimmune thrombocytopenia exposes some problems. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia there are some case reports about efficacy of splenic irradiation. Toxicity of splenic irradiation in both diseases was very moderate. Conclusions: For HIV patients, for elderly patients or patients at high risk for complications following splenectomy splenic irradiation might be a treatment option. Splenic irradiation as preoperative treatment in patients not responding to or not suitable for immunosuppressive drugs prior to splenectomy may be a promising new application of splenic irradiation to reduce adverse effects of splenectomy in thrombocytopenic patients. A further analysis of the biological mechanisms underlying splenic irradiation may help to improve patient selection, to optimize dose concepts and treatment schedules and will improve understanding of radiotherapy as an immunomodulatory treatment modality. (orig.)

  2. THE CLINICAL PRESENTATION OF AUTOIMMUNE THYROID DISEASE IN MEN IS ASSOCIATED WITH IL12B GENOTYPE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walsh, John P; Berry, Jemma; Liu, Shu; Panicker, Vijay; Dayan, Colin M; Brix, Thomas H; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Hou, Peng; Shi, Bingyin; Morahan, Grant

    2011-01-01

    Background.  Common variants in the interleukin 12B (IL12B) gene are associated with predominantly inflammatory (Th1) or antibody-mediated (Th2) immune responses. Since Hashimoto's disease and Graves' disease are thought to arise from mainly Th1 and Th2 immune responses respectively, we...... hypothesized that IL12B genotype may influence the clinical presentation of autoimmune thyroid disease. Objective.  We tested for differences in IL12B genotype between Graves' disease and Hashimoto's disease. Patients.  We studied a discovery cohort of 203 Australian women and 37 men with autoimmune thyroid...... cohort, rs41292470 and rs3212227 genotypes did not differ significantly between Hashimoto's disease and Graves' disease. In Australian males (but not females), rs6887695 genotype differed between Hashimoto's disease and Graves' disease, with a minor allele frequency (MAF) of 14% and 41% respectively (P=0...

  3. Update in Endocrine Autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2008-01-01

    Context: The endocrine system is a common target in pathogenic autoimmune responses, and there has been recent progress in our understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of autoimmune endocrine diseases.

  4. Association of subcutaneous allergen-specific immunotherapy with incidence of autoimmune disease, ischemic heart disease, and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Allan; Jacobsen, Rikke Kart; Jespersen, Lasse; Abildstrøm, Steen Z

    2012-01-01

    Subcutaneous allergen-specific immunotherapy (SCIT) is a well-documented treatment of IgE-mediated allergic disease. Little is known about potential effects of SCIT on the risk of other chronic immune-related diseases. Over the years, a few casuistic reports have caused concern that SCIT might act...... as a trigger of autoimmune disease....

  5. Vitiligo vulgaris and autoimmune diseases in Japan: A report from vitiligo clinic in Kyoto University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanioka, Miki; Yamamoto, Yosuke; Katoh, Mayumi; Takahashi, Kenzo; Miyachi, Yoshiki

    2009-01-01

    We reviewed the causes of "loss of skin color" in 144 patients, who visited Vitiligo Clinic of Kyoto University Hospital between April 2005 and August 2008. The numbers of patients with generalized and segmental Vitiligo vulgaris were 98 (68.1%) and 26 (18.1%), respectively. Small numbers of the patients suffered from Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, piebaldism, congenital albinism, Hypomelanosis of Ito, post-inflammatory hypopigmentation, white leaf-shaped macules associated with tuberous sclerosis and nevus hypopigmentosus. One forth of the patients with generalized vitiligo had complications, while no complications were found in the patients with segmental vitiligo. Among the complications, autoimmune diseases dominated 43% (10 of 23 cases). Autoimmune thyroid diseases explained for the most of the complicated autoimmune diseases and were associated with 7.4% of the patients with generalized vitiligo. Minor autoimmune complications include myasthenia gravis, Sjogren syndrome and autoimmune nephritis. Reflecting the condition that our clinic is located in a university hospital, vitiligo patients with end-stage non-melanoma cancers of internal organs accounted for 8.4% of the patients of generalized vitiligo. PMID:20046588

  6. Research Progression of Cellular Autophagy in Liver System Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyun Liu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a basic biological phenomenon widely existed in eukaryotic cells and an important mechanism for cells to adjust to the surrounding environment, prevent invasion of pathogenic micro-organisms and maintain homeostasis, whose activity changes evidently in multiple liver system diseases, suggesting that there is close association between autophagy and the generation and development of liver system diseases. It is also reported that autophagy develops and exerts an important function in many liver-related diseases, such as hepatic carcinoma, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, alcoholic liver disease, viral liver disease and acute liver injury. Therefore, this study aimed to summarize the relationship between autophagy and multiple liver diseases, hoping to explore the effect of autophagy in liver system diseases and further study the regulative effect of autophagy so as to provide new thoughts for their treatment.

  7. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Pathogenesis and Disease Spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Timothy; Oakley, Fiona; Anstee, Quentin M; Day, Christopher P

    2016-05-23

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of liver dysfunction in the Western world and is increasing owing to its close association with obesity and insulin resistance. NAFLD represents a spectrum of liver disease that, in a minority of patients, can lead to progressive nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), fibrosis, and ultimately hepatocellular carcinoma and liver failure. NAFLD is a complex trait resulting from the interaction between environmental exposure and a susceptible polygenic background and comprising multiple independent modifiers of risk, such as the microbiome. The molecular mechanisms that combine to define the transition to NASH and progressive disease are complex, and consequently, no pharmacological therapy currently exists to treat NASH. A better understanding of the pathogenesis of NAFLD is critical if new treatments are to be discovered. PMID:26980160

  8. Defining Normal Liver Stiffness Range in a Normal Healthy Chinese Population without Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    James Fung; Cheuk-kwong Lee; Monica Chan; Wai-kay Seto; Danny Ka-ho Wong; Ching-lung Lai; Man-fung Yuen

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For patients with chronic liver disease, different optimal liver stiffness cut-off values correspond to different stages of fibrosis, which are specific for the underlying liver disease and population. AIMS: To establish the normal ranges of liver stiffness in the healthy Chinese population without underlying liver disease. METHODS: This is a prospective cross sectional study of 2,528 healthy volunteers recruited from the general population and the Red Cross Transfusion Center in ...

  9. Nutritional therapy for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongiovanni, Paola; Lanti, Claudia; Riso, Patrizia; Valenti, Luca

    2016-03-01

    Following the epidemics of obesity, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the leading cause of liver disease in western countries. NAFLD is the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and may progress to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. To date, there are no approved drugs for the treatment of NAFLD, and the main clinical recommendation is lifestyle modification, including increase of physical activity and the adoption of a healthy eating behavior. In this regard, studies aimed to elucidate the effect of dietary interventions and the mechanisms of action of specific food bioactives are urgently needed. The present review tries to summarize the most recent data evidencing the effects of nutrients and dietary bioactive compounds intake (i.e., long-chain PUFA, Vitamin E, Vitamin D, minerals and polyphenols) on the modulation of molecular mechanisms leading to fat accumulation, oxidative stress, inflammation and liver fibrosis in NAFLD patients. PMID:26895659

  10. Vitamin D status, liver enzymes, and incident liver disease and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaaby, Tea; Husemoen, Lise Lotte Nystrup; Borglykke, Anders;

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is common among patients with liver diseases. Both cholestatic and non-cholestatic liver diseases can cause vitamin D deficiency. Whether vitamin D status can also affect liver function is poorly understood. To investigate the association between vitamin D status, liver enzym...

  11. How Does Age at Onset Influence the Outcome of Autoimmune Diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel J. Amador-Patarroyo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The age at onset refers to the time period at which an individual experiences the first symptoms of a disease. In autoimmune diseases (ADs, these symptoms can be subtle but are very relevant for diagnosis. They can appear during childhood, adulthood or late in life and may vary depending on the age at onset. Variables like mortality and morbidity and the role of genes will be reviewed with a focus on the major autoimmune disorders, namely, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, rheumatoid arthritis (RA, multiple sclerosis (MS, type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D, Sjögren's syndrome, and autoimmune thyroiditis (AITD. Early age at onset is a worst prognostic factor for some ADs (i.e., SLE and T1D, while for others it does not have a significant influence on the course of disease (i.e., SS or no unanimous consensus exists (i.e., RA and MS.

  12. Induced Foxp3+ regulatory T cells: a potential new weapon to treat autoimmune and inflammatory diseases?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Lan; Huimin Fan; Valerie Quesniaux; Bernhard Ryffel; Zhongmin Liu; Song Guo Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Foxp3+ T regulatory cells (Tregs) consisting of natural and induced Treg subsets play a crucial role in the maintenance of immune homeostasis against self-antigen.The actions designed to correct defects in numbers or functions of Tregs may be therapeutic in the treatment of autoimmune diseases.While recent studies demonstrated that natural Tregs are instable and dysfunctional in the inflammatory condition,induced Tregs (iTregs) may have a different feature.Here we review the progress of iTregs,particularly focus on their stability and function in the established autoimmune diseases.The advantage of iTregs as therapeutics used under inflammatory conditions is highlighted.Proper generation and manipulation of iTregs used for cellular therapy may provide a promise for the treatment of many autoimmune and inflammatory diseases.

  13. Toxins Targeting the KV1.3 Channel: Potential Immunomodulators for Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yipeng Zhao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases are usually accompanied by tissue injury caused by autoantigen-specific T-cells. KV1.3 channels participate in modulating calcium signaling to induce T-cell proliferation, immune activation and cytokine production. Effector memory T (TEM-cells, which play major roles in many autoimmune diseases, are controlled by blocking KV1.3 channels on the membrane. Toxins derived from animal venoms have been found to selectively target a variety of ion channels, including KV1.3. By blocking the KV1.3 channel, these toxins are able to suppress the activation and proliferation of TEM cells and may improve TEM cell-mediated autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and type I diabetes mellitus.

  14. [MEDICAL CANNABIS - A SOURCE FOR A NEW TREATMENT FOR AUTOIMMUNE DISEASE?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Daphna; Katz, Itay; Golan, Amir

    2016-02-01

    Medical uses of Cannabis sativa have been known for over 6,000 years. Nowadays, cannabis is mostly known for its psychotropic effects and its ability to relieve pain, even though there is evidence of cannabis use for autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis centuries ago. The pharmacological therapy in autoimmune diseases is mainly based on immunosuppression of diffefent axes of the immune system while many of the drugs have major side effects. In this review we set out to examine the rule of Cannabis sativa as an immunomodulator and its potential as a new treatment option. In order to examine this subject we will focus on some major autoimmune diseases such as diabetes type I and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27215114

  15. Immunofluorescence testing in the diagnosis of autoimmune blistering diseases: overview of 10-year experience*

    OpenAIRE

    Arbache, Samia Trigo; Nogueira, Tarsila Gasparotto; Delgado, Lívia; Miyamoto, Denise; Aoki, Valéria

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Immunofluorescence testing is an important tool for diagnosing blistering diseases. OBJECTIVE To characterize the immunofluorescence findings in patients diagnosed with autoimmune blistering skin diseases. METHODS We retrospectively analyzed immunofluorescence results encompassing a 10-year period. RESULTS 421 patients were included and divided into 2 groups: group 1- intraepidermal blistering diseases (n=277) and 2- subepidermal blistering diseases (n=144). For group 1, positive D...

  16. Periodic Acid-Schiff Staining Parallels the Immunoreactivity Seen By Direct Immunofluorescence in Autoimmune Skin Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu Velez, Ana Maria; Upegui Zapata, Yulieth Alexandra; Howard, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Background: In many countries and laboratories, techniques such as direct immunofluorescence (DIF) are not available for the diagnosis of skin diseases. Thus, these laboratories are limited in the full diagnoses of autoimmune skin diseases, vasculitis, and rheumatologic diseases. In our experience with these diseases and the patient's skin biopsies, we have noted a positive correlation between periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining and immunofluorescence patterns; however, these were just empiric observations. In the current study, we aim to confirm these observations, given the concept that the majority of autoantibodies are glycoproteins and should thus be recognized by PAS staining. Aims: To compare direct immunofluorescent and PAS staining, in multiple autoimmune diseases that are known to exhibit specific direct immunofluorescent patterns. Materials and Methods: We studied multiple autoimmune skin diseases: Five cases of bullous pemphigoid, five cases of pemphigus vulgaris, ten cases of cutaneous lupus, ten cases of autoimmune vasculitis, ten cases of lichen planus (LP), and five cases of cutaneous drug reactions (including one case of erythema multiforme). In addition, we utilized 45 normal skin control specimens from plastic surgery reductions. Results: We found a 98% positive correlation between DIF and PAS staining patterns over all the disease samples. Conclusion: We recommend that laboratories without access to DIF always perform PAS staining in addition to hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, for a review of the reactivity pattern. PMID:27114972

  17. Outcome in cystic fibrosis liver disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rowland, Marion

    2011-01-01

    Evidence suggests that cystic fibrosis liver disease (CFLD) does not affect mortality or morbidity in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The importance of gender and age in outcome in CF makes selection of an appropriate comparison group central to the interpretation of any differences in mortality and morbidity in patients with CFLD.

  18. Vitamin D deficiency in chronic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paula; Iruzubieta; lvaro; Terán; Javier; Crespo; Emilio; Fábrega

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D is an important secosteroid hormone with known effect on calcium homeostasis,but recently there is increasing recognition that vitamin D also is involved in cell proliferation and differentiation,has immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties.Vitamin D deficiency has been frequently reported in many causes of chronic liver disease and has been associated with the development and evolution of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease(NAFLD)and chronic hepatitis C(CHC)virus infection.The role of vitamin D in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and CHC is not completely known,but it seems that the involvement of vitamin D in the activation and regulation of both innate and adaptive immune systems and its antiproliferative effect may explain its importance in these liver diseases.Published studies provide evidence for routine screening for hypovitaminosis D in patients with liver disease.Further prospectives studies demonstrating the impact of vitamin D replacement in NAFLD and CHC are required.

  19. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Martin; Zong, Wenjing; Biank, Vincent F; Hageman, Joseph R

    2016-02-01

    A 16-year-old Hispanic girl with an elevated body mass index in an otherwise normal state of health presented for her well-child examination. She had signs of metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance including increased waist circumference and acanthosis nigricans. Laboratory results revealed elevated transaminases with otherwise normal hepatic function. Based on the physical examination and laboratory results, she was diagnosed with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). After further evaluation, she eventually underwent a liver biopsy. The biopsy revealed nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) with stage 2 fibrosis. This article reviews the definition of NAFLD and NASH, an increasingly prevalent cause of pediatric chronic liver disease associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome. The article also outlines the epidemiology, risk factors, and natural history of NAFLD, which may help identify and prevent high-risk pediatric patients from progressing to irreversible liver disease. Understanding the diagnostic and treatment options offers the best chance at preventing and reversing the early stages of this disease. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(2):e54-e58.]. PMID:26878184

  20. Vitamin D Actions on CD4+ T cells in Autoimmune Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colleen Elizabeth Hayes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes and integrates research on vitamin D and CD4+ T lymphocyte biology to develop new mechanistic insights into the molecular etiology of autoimmune disease. A deep understanding of molecular mechanisms relevant to gene-environment interactions is needed to deliver etiology-based autoimmune disease prevention and treatment strategies. Evidence linking sunlight, vitamin D, and the risk of multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes is summarized to develop the thesis that vitamin D is the environmental factor that most strongly influences autoimmune disease development. Evidence for CD4+ T cell involvement in autoimmune disease pathogenesis and for paracrine calcitriol signaling to CD4+ T lymphocytes is summarized to support the thesis that calcitriol is sunlight’s main protective signal transducer in autoimmune disease risk. Animal modeling and human mechanistic data to support the view that vitamin D probably influences thymic negative selection, effector Th1 and Th17 pathogenesis and responsiveness to extrinsic cell death signals, FoxP3+CD4+ Treg cell and CD4+ Tr1 cell functions, and a Th1-Tr1 switch. The proposed Th1-Tr1 switch appears to bridge two stable, self-reinforcing immune states, pro- and anti-inflammatory, each with a characteristic gene regulatory network. The bi-stable switch would enable T cells to integrate signals from pathogens, hormones, cell-cell interactions, and soluble mediators and respond in a biologically appropriate manner. Finally, we highlight unanswered questions that potentially informative future research directions that may speed delivery of etiology-based strategies to reduce autoimmune disease.

  1. Clinical characteristics and the incidence of extrahepatic autoimmune disease and malignant tumor in primary biliary cirrhosis-autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨蜜蜜

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze clinical pathologic characteristics of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis-autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome (PBC-AIH OS) ,the incidence of extrahepatic autoimmune disease,malignant tumor and the abdominal lymph node enlargement.Methods From January 2000 to January 2012,the clinical data of 49 patients with PBC-AIH OS were retrospectively analyzed,which included general information,clinical manifestations,biochemical parameters,immu-

  2. HLA-B27 associated spondyloarthropathy, an autoimmune disease based on crossreactivity between bacteria and HLA-B27?

    OpenAIRE

    Ringrose, J.H.

    1999-01-01

    Most autoimmune diseases are associated with certain HLA types. Therefore, spondyloarthropathies (SpA) strongly associated with HLA-B27, are also often classified as autoimmune diseases. This study questions whether SpA indeed fulfils the criteria of an autoimmune disease. The Medline database was searched for all reports between 1966 and April 1998 on the presence of autoimmune reactivity in SpA patients. This search yielded 45 articles on this subject. Only eight articles study T cell react...

  3. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in developing countries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hossein Bahrami

    2005-01-01

    @@ TO THE EDITOR Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an increasingly known medical entity with high prevalence, about 1 0 to 24 percent in general population and up to 74% in obese population[1]. The prevalence of the disease is expected to increase worldwide, as we are encountering the global obesity epidemic and the trend in developing countries toward the Western lifestyles. However, it looks that there are some differences between the demographic and epidemiologic features of NAFLD in developing and developed countries.

  4. The autoimmune tautology

    OpenAIRE

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Although autoimmune diseases exhibit contrasting epidemiological features, pathology, and clinical manifestations, three lines of evidence demonstrate that these diseases share similar immunogenetic mechanisms (that is, autoimmune tautology). First, clinical evidence highlights the co-occurrence of distinct autoimmune diseases within an individual (that is, polyautoimmunity) and within members of a nuclear family (that is, familial autoimmunity). Second, physiopathologic evidence indicates th...

  5. Immunological response in alcoholic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The development of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) can be attributed to many factors that cause damage to the liver and alter its functions. Data collected over the last 30 years strongly suggests that an immune component may be involved in the onset of this disease. This is best evidenced by the detection of circulating autoantibodies,infiltration of immune cells in the liver, and the detection of hepatic aldehyde modified proteins in patients with ALD. Experimentally, there are numerous immune responses that occur when proteins are modified with the metabolites of ethanol. These products are formed in response to the high oxidative state of the liver during ethanol metabolism, causing the release of many inflammatory processes and potential of necrosis or apoptosis of liver cells. Should cellular proteins become modified with these reactive alcohol metabolites and be recognized by the immune system, then immune responses may be initiated. Therefore, it was the purpose of this article to shed some insight into how the immune system is involved in the development and/or progression of ALD.

  6. Autoimmune Neutropenia as a Cause of Periodontal Disease in Preschool Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajishengallis, Evlambia; Rashewsky, Stephanie; Kulkarni, Cyelee; Stathopoulou, Panagiota

    2016-01-01

    In autoimmune neutropenia, autoantibodies attack neutrophils resulting in their destruction or alteration of their function. Since neutrophils have important immunologic functions, aberrations in their homeostasis lead to increased susceptibility to diseases, such as periodontitis. Periodontitis as a manifestation of neutropenia can affect adults and children. In this paper, we describe the treatment of periodontal disease in a 2-year-old female with autoimmune neutropenia. The importance of an interdisciplinary approach, frequent recalls, and meticulous mechanical therapy in stabilizing her periodontal condition, despite ongoing systemic infections is emphasized. PMID:26696110

  7. The clinical value of detection of serum TGAb and TPOAb level in autoimmune thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the clinical value of serum TGAb and TPOAb levels in the diagnosis of patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD), the serum levels of TGAb and TPOAb in 175 patients with AITD and 64 non-AITD patients and 57 health controls were measured by RIA. The results showed that the serum levels of TGAb and TPOAb in AITD patients with GD and HT were significantly higher than that of control group (P0.05). The detection of serum TGAb and TPOAb levels may have clinical value in the diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of autoimmune thyroid diseases. (authors)

  8. From Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms to Constant Immunosuppression: Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavan Chinnadurai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The regenerative abilities and the immunosuppressive properties of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs make them potentially the ideal cellular product of choice for treatment of autoimmune and other immune mediated disorders. Although the usefulness of MSCs for therapeutic applications is in early phases, their potential clinical use remains of great interest. Current clinical evidence of use of MSCs from both autologous and allogeneic sources to treat autoimmune disorders confers conflicting clinical benefit outcomes. These varied results may possibly be due to MSC use across wide range of autoimmune disorders with clinical heterogeneity or due to variability of the cellular product. In the light of recent genome wide association studies (GWAS, linking predisposition of autoimmune diseases to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the susceptible genetic loci, the clinical relevance of MSCs possessing SNPs in the critical effector molecules of immunosuppression is largely undiscussed. It is of further interest in the allogeneic setting, where SNPs in the target pathway of MSC's intervention may also modulate clinical outcome. In the present review, we have discussed the known critical SNPs predisposing to disease susceptibility in various autoimmune diseases and their significance in the immunomodulatory properties of MSCs.

  9. Restoring the balance: immunotherapeutic combinations for autoimmune disease

    OpenAIRE

    Smilek, Dawn E.; Ehlers, Mario R.; Nepom, Gerald T.

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmunity occurs when T cells, B cells or both are inappropriately activated, resulting in damage to one or more organ systems. Normally, high-affinity self-reactive T and B cells are eliminated in the thymus and bone marrow through a process known as central immune tolerance. However, low-affinity self-reactive T and B cells escape central tolerance and enter the blood and tissues, where they are kept in check by complex and non-redundant peripheral tolerance mechanisms. Dysfunction or im...

  10. The Clinical Diagnosis of Autoimmune Bullous Diseases Sürekli Eğitim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rıfkiye Küçükoğlu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The autoimmune bullous diseases were diagnosed on the clinical and histopathological basis, before the introduction of the immunological assays. However, not the clinical features, but the classification of the diseases has recently changed during the immunological development. According to this new classification, pemphigus group diseases include, pemphigus vulgaris, pemphigus vegetans, pemphigus foliaceus, pemphigus erythematosus, endemic pemphigus, IgA pemphigus, pemphigus herpetiformis, paraneoplastic pemphigus, and drug-induced pemphigus. The subepidermal bullous diseases are classified as pemphigoid group diseases, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, dermatitis herpetiformis, and linear IgA bullous dermatosis. The pemphigoid-group diseases consist of bullous pemphigoid, childhood bullous pemphigoid, localised bullous pemphigoid, drug-induced pemphigoid, anti p200 pemphigoid, pemphigoid gestationes, pemphigoid nodularis, and cicatricial pemphigoid. In this review, the clinical features of the autoimmune bullous diseases are discussed according to the above mentioned classification. (Turkderm 2010; 45 Suppl 1: 16-25

  11. IL-17/IL-17 receptor system in autoimmune disease: mechanisms and therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shu; Qian, Youcun

    2012-06-01

    IL-17 (interleukin-17), a hallmark cytokine of Th17 (T-helper 17) cells, plays critical roles in host defence against bacterial and fungal infections, as well as in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. The present review focuses on current knowledge of the regulation, functional mechanisms and targeting strategies of IL-17 in the context of inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Evidence shows that IL-17 is highly up-regulated at sites of inflammatory tissues of autoimmune diseases and amplifies the inflammation through synergy with other cytokines, such as TNF (tumour necrosis factor) α. Although IL-17 was originally thought to be produced mainly by Th17 cells, a newly defined T-cell subset with a specific differentiation programme and tight regulation, several other cell types (especially innate immune cells) are also found as important sources for IL-17 production. Although IL-17 activates common downstream signalling, including NF-κB (nuclear factor κB), MAPKs (mitogen-activated protein kinases), C/EBPs (CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins) and mRNA stability, the immediate receptor signalling has been shown to be quite unique and tightly regulated. Mouse genetic studies have demonstrated a critical role for IL-17 in the pathogenesis of variety of inflammatory autoimmune diseases, such as RA (rheumatoid arthritis) and MS (multiple sclerosis). Importantly, promising results have been shown in initial clinical trials of monoclonal antibodies against IL-17 or its receptor (IL-17R) to block IL-17-mediated function in treating autoimmune patients with psoriasis, RA and MS. Therefore targeting IL-17/IL-17R, IL-17-producing pathways or IL-17-mediated signalling pathways can be considered for future therapy in autoimmune diseases. PMID:22324470

  12. Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease in patients with Graves' disease: clinical manifestations, follow-up, and outcomes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tamagno, Gianluca

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: The encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD) is characterized by neurological\\/psychiatric symptoms, high levels of anti-thyroid antibodies, increased cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration, non-specific electroencephalogram abnormalities, and responsiveness to the corticosteroid treatment in patients with an autoimmune thyroid disease. Almost all EAATD patients are affected by Hashimoto\\'s thyroiditis (HT), although fourteen EAATD patients with Graves\\' disease (GD) have been also reported. METHODS: We have recorded and analyzed the clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological findings and the data on the therapeutic management of all GD patients with EAATD reported so far as well as the clinical outcomes in those followed-up in the long term. RESULTS: Twelve of the fourteen patients with EAATD and GD were women. The majority of GD patients with EAATD presented with mild hyperthyroidism at EAATD onset or shortly before it. Active anti-thyroid autoimmunity was detected in all cases. Most of the patients dramatically responded to corticosteroids. The long term clinical outcome was benign but EAATD can relapse, especially at the time of corticosteroid dose tapering or withdrawal. GD and HT patients with EAATD present with a similar clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological picture and require an unaffected EAATD management. CONCLUSIONS: GD and HT equally represent the possible background condition for the development of EAATD, which should be considered in the differential diagnosis of all patients with encephalopathy of unknown origin and an autoimmune thyroid disease, regardless of the nature of the underlying autoimmune thyroid disease.

  13. Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease in patients with Graves' disease: clinical manifestations, follow-up, and outcomes

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tamagno, Gianluca

    2010-04-28

    Abstract Background The encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD) is characterized by neurological\\/psychiatric symptoms, high levels of anti-thyroid antibodies, increased cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration, non-specific electroencephalogram abnormalities, and responsiveness to the corticosteroid treatment in patients with an autoimmune thyroid disease. Almost all EAATD patients are affected by Hashimoto\\'s thyroiditis (HT), although fourteen EAATD patients with Graves\\' disease (GD) have been also reported. Methods We have recorded and analyzed the clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological findings and the data on the therapeutic management of all GD patients with EAATD reported so far as well as the clinical outcomes in those followed-up in the long term. Results Twelve of the fourteen patients with EAATD and GD were women. The majority of GD patients with EAATD presented with mild hyperthyroidism at EAATD onset or shortly before it. Active anti-thyroid autoimmunity was detected in all cases. Most of the patients dramatically responded to corticosteroids. The long term clinical outcome was benign but EAATD can relapse, especially at the time of corticosteroid dose tapering or withdrawal. GD and HT patients with EAATD present with a similar clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological picture and require an unaffected EAATD management. Conclusions GD and HT equally represent the possible background condition for the development of EAATD, which should be considered in the differential diagnosis of all patients with encephalopathy of unknown origin and an autoimmune thyroid disease, regardless of the nature of the underlying autoimmune thyroid disease.

  14. Encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease in patients with Graves' disease: clinical manifestations, follow-up, and outcomes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tamagno, Gianluca

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD) is characterized by neurological\\/psychiatric symptoms, high levels of anti-thyroid antibodies, increased cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration, non-specific electroencephalogram abnormalities, and responsiveness to the corticosteroid treatment in patients with an autoimmune thyroid disease. Almost all EAATD patients are affected by Hashimoto\\'s thyroiditis (HT), although fourteen EAATD patients with Graves\\' disease (GD) have been also reported. METHODS: We have recorded and analyzed the clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological findings and the data on the therapeutic management of all GD patients with EAATD reported so far as well as the clinical outcomes in those followed-up in the long term. RESULTS: Twelve of the fourteen patients with EAATD and GD were women. The majority of GD patients with EAATD presented with mild hyperthyroidism at EAATD onset or shortly before it. Active anti-thyroid autoimmunity was detected in all cases. Most of the patients dramatically responded to corticosteroids. The long term clinical outcome was benign but EAATD can relapse, especially at the time of corticosteroid dose tapering or withdrawal. GD and HT patients with EAATD present with a similar clinical, biological, radiological, and electrophysiological picture and require an unaffected EAATD management. CONCLUSIONS: GD and HT equally represent the possible background condition for the development of EAATD, which should be considered in the differential diagnosis of all patients with encephalopathy of unknown origin and an autoimmune thyroid disease, regardless of the nature of the underlying autoimmune thyroid disease.

  15. [Liver, bile ducts and pancreatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, T

    1995-06-01

    A fundamental guideline for the use of test results concerning liver, bile duct and pancreatic diseases was proposed in 1991 from the Japan Society of Clinical Pathology (JSCP). This guideline was principally based on the document of 1988 from the Committee on liver function tests of the Japanese Society of Gastroenterology (JSG). The document from the JSG was revised in May, 1994. Also a guideline for selection of markers of hepatitis virus in hepatic disorders, was proposed in January, 1994 from the same Committee of JSG. Here, we reevaluated and discussed the JSCP guideline as taking into consideration the two 1994 JSG documents. PMID:7602802

  16. Serum neopterin levels in alcoholic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Reimers, E; Santolaria-Fernández, F; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, E; Rodríguez-Moreno, F; Martínez-Riera, A; Milena-Abril, A; González-García, C

    1993-09-01

    Serum neopterin levels have been determined by RIA in 105 patients affected by chronic alcoholic liver disease, 68 of them cirrhotics, and in 12 controls. Serum Neopterin was significantly higher in patients than in controls, correlated with Pughs' score and Child's classification, and also with serum laminin and type III collagen N-terminal propeptide, and with histomorphometrically determined liver fibrosis. Serum neopterin levels were higher in patients who died than in survivors, serum neopterin levels over 19.15 nmol/l being associated with higher mortality rates. PMID:8261879

  17. Cystic diseases of the biliary tract and liver Invited Editor

    OpenAIRE

    Urgancı, Nafiye

    2008-01-01

    Cystic diseases of liver are recognized in infancy and childhood initially Cystic diseases of liver and biliary tract are choledocal cysts autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease congenital hepatic fibrosis and Caroli disease cystic dilatation of intrahepatic bile ducts Choledochal cysts and Caroli disease do not allow biliary flow cause chronic or obstructive cholestasis and progressive liver disease In congenital hepatic fibrosis and polycystic kidney disease th...

  18. Treatment of Decompensated Alcoholic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Menachery

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcoholic liver disease (ALD is a spectrum ranging from simple hepatic steatosis to alcoholic hepatitis and cirrhosis. Patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis can have clinical presentation almost similar to those with decompensated cirrhosis. Scoring with models like Maddrey discriminant function, a model for end-stage liver disease, Glasgow alcoholic hepatitis score, and Lille model are helpful in prognosticating patients with ALD. One of the first therapeutic goals in ALD is to induce alcohol withdrawal with psychotherapy or drugs. Most studies have shown that nutritional therapy improves liver function and histology in patients with ALD. The rationale for using glucocorticoids is to block cytotoxic and inflammatory pathways in patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis. Pentoxifylline, a tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα suppressor, and infliximab, an anti-TNFα mouse/human chimeric antibody, has been extensively studied in patients with alcoholic hepatitis. Liver transplantation remains the definitive therapy for decompensated cirrhosis/alcoholic hepatitis despite the issues of recidivism, poor compliance with postoperative care, and being a self-inflicted disease.

  19. Chronic Liver Disease and American Indians/Alaska Natives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Native > Chronic Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and American Indians/Alaska Natives Among American Indians and Alaska Natives, ... 54. 1 At a glance – Cancer Rates for American Indian/Alaska Natives (2008-2012) Cancer Incidence Rates per ...

  20. Propylthiouracil for alcoholic liver disease. Protocol for a Cochrane Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, A; Gluud, C

    Randomised clinical trials have addressed the question whether propylthiouracil has any beneficial effects in patients with alcoholic liver disease.......Randomised clinical trials have addressed the question whether propylthiouracil has any beneficial effects in patients with alcoholic liver disease....

  1. Anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, Andrea; Iaquinto, Gaetano; Gluud, Christian

    2002-01-01

    The objectives were to assess the beneficial and harmful effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease.......The objectives were to assess the beneficial and harmful effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease....

  2. Autoantigens as Partners in Initiation and Propagation of Autoimmune Rheumatic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Antony; Casciola-Rosen, Livia

    2016-05-20

    Systemic autoimmune diseases are characterized by specific targeting of a limited group of ubiquitously expressed autoantigens by the immune system. This review examines the mechanisms underlying their selection as immune targets. Initiation of autoimmune responses likely reflects the presentation of antigens with a distinct structure not previously encountered by the immune system, in a proimmune context (injury, malignancy, or infection). Causes of modified structure include somatic mutation and posttranslational modifications (including citrullination and proteolysis). Many autoantigens are components of multimolecular complexes, and some of the other components may provide adjuvant activity. Propagation of autoimmune responses appears to reflect a bidirectional interaction between the immune response and the target tissues in a mutually reinforcing cycle: Immune effector pathways generate additional autoantigen, which feeds further immune response. We propose that this resonance may be a critical principle underlying disease propagation, with specific autoantigens functioning as the hubs around which amplification occurs. PMID:26907212

  3. Sniping the scout: Targeting the key molecules in dendritic cell functions for treatment of autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xing; Han, Yanping; Sun, Erwei

    2016-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a power tool for manipulating immune system. They play important roles in the induction of immunity as well as inducing intrathymic and peripheral tolerance. After generated from stem cells in the bone marrow, DCs traffic to the peripheral tissues, where they capture and process antigens, express lymphocyte co-stimulators, migrate to the secondary lymph organs and present the processed antigen to naive T cells to either activate or tolerize them. These processes are modulated subtly and influenced by various factors. Aberrant regulation of the processes may cause autoimmunity. Investigation into the biology of DCs and the molecules and mechanisms that regulate them helps us understanding the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and reveals numerous steps for pharmacological manipulation. In this review, we made a sketch line of the critical events of DC biology that are potential pharmacologic targets for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:26931618

  4. Arterial hypertension and chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Møller, S

    2005-01-01

    This review looks at the alterations in the systemic haemodynamics of patients with chronic liver disease (cirrhosis) in relation to essential hypertension and arterial hypertension of renal origin. Characteristic findings in patients with cirrhosis are vasodilatation with low overall systemic......, calcitonin gene-related peptide, nitric oxide, and other vasodilators, and is most pronounced in the splanchnic area. This provides an effective (although relative) counterbalance to raised arterial blood pressure. Subjects with arterial hypertension (essential, secondary) may become normotensive during the...... development of chronic liver disease, and arterial hypertension is rarely manifested in patients with cirrhosis, even in those with renovascular disease and high circulating renin activity. There is much dispute as to the understanding of homoeostatic regulation in cirrhotic patients with manifest arterial...

  5. Interleukin-1 Family Cytokines in Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Tsutsui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The gene encoding IL-1 was sequenced more than 30 years ago, and many related cytokines, such as IL-18, IL-33, IL-36, IL-37, IL-38, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra, and IL-36Ra, have since been identified. IL-1 is a potent proinflammatory cytokine and is involved in various inflammatory diseases. Other IL-1 family ligands are critical for the development of diverse diseases, including inflammatory and allergic diseases. Only IL-1Ra possesses the leader peptide required for secretion from cells, and many ligands require posttranslational processing for activation. Some require inflammasome-mediated processing for activation and release, whereas others serve as alarmins and are released following cell membrane rupture, for example, by pyroptosis or necroptosis. Thus, each ligand has the proper molecular process to exert its own biological functions. In this review, we will give a brief introduction to the IL-1 family cytokines and discuss their pivotal roles in the development of various liver diseases in association with immune responses. For example, an excess of IL-33 causes liver fibrosis in mice via activation and expansion of group 2 innate lymphoid cells to produce type 2 cytokines, resulting in cell conversion into pro-fibrotic M2 macrophages. Finally, we will discuss the importance of IL-1 family cytokine-mediated molecular and cellular networks in the development of acute and chronic liver diseases.

  6. Aberrant O-glycosylation and anti-glycan antibodies in an autoimmune disease IgA nephropathy and breast adenocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stuchlová Horynová, Milada; Raška, Milan; Clausen, Henrik;

    2013-01-01

    Glycosylation abnormalities have been observed in autoimmune diseases and cancer. Here, we compare mechanisms of aberrant O-glycosylation, i.e., formation of Tn and sialyl-Tn structures, on MUC1 in breast cancer, and on IgA1 in an autoimmune disease, IgA nephropathy. The pathways of aberrant O...

  7. Pathogenic T cells persist after reversal of autoimmune disease by immunosuppression with regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Eric; Bourges, Dorothée; Gleeson, Paul A; Ang, Desmond K Y; van Driel, Ian R

    2013-05-01

    Autoimmune disease can be prevented with immunosuppressive agents; however, the effectiveness of these treatments in advanced stage of disease and the fate of pathogenic T cells following such treatments are not clear. In this study we demonstrate that a single dose of in vitro-induced Treg cells (iTreg cells) resulted in the functional repair and restitution of stomach tissue that had been severely damaged in advanced autoimmune gastritis. iTreg cells caused depletion or inactivation of autoreactive naïve T cells that were antigen inexperienced, however, autoreactive effector/memory T cells persisted in treated mice, resulting in residual cellular infiltrates within the repaired stomach tissue. The persisting autoreactive T cells were able to rapidly cause autoimmune disease if iTreg cells were removed. Similar data were obtained from mice treated continuously with corticosteroid, in that there was substantial restitution of the gastric mucosa; however, effector T cells persisted and rapidly caused pathology following drug removal. Therefore, iTreg cells or corticosteroid can suppress pathogenic autoreactive cells in advanced autoimmune disease, reversing tissue damage and improving tissue function. However, the persistence of pathogenic T cells represents a disease risk. PMID:23420509

  8. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and mitochondrial dysfunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongzhong Wei; R Scott Rector; John P Thyfault; Jamal A Ibdah

    2008-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) includes hepatic steatosis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), fibrosis,and cirrhosis. NAFLD is the most common liver disorder in the United States and worldwide. Due to the rapid rise of the metabolic syndrome, the prevalence of NAFLD has recently dramatically increased and will continue to increase. NAFLD has also the potential to progress to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) or liver failure. NAFLD is strongly linked to caloric overconsumption, physical inactivity, insulin resistance and genetic factors. Although significant progress in understanding the pathogenesis of NAFLD has been achieved in years, the primary metabolic abnormalities leading to lipid accumulation within hepatocytes has remained poorly understood.Mitochondria are critical metabolic organelles serving as "cellular power plants". Accumulating evidence indicate that hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction is crucial to the pathogenesis of NAFLD. This review is focused on the significant role of mitochondria in the development of NAFLD.

  9. Treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juergen Siebler; Peter R Galle

    2006-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause for elevated liver enzymes in the developed nations. Beyond prevention programs which are of particular interest because of the increasing number of overweight children, treatment should be focussed on the most important risk factors, obesity and insulin resistance. As a consequence of elucidating the pathomechanisms of NAFLD, the number of potential therapeutic options increased. However, many studies investigating the therapeutic effect show shortcomings in at least one of the following points: lack of a serial liver biopsy, short term of treatment and limited number of included patients. The second generation insulin sensitizer pioglitazone and rosiglitazone show the most promising improvements in NAFLD, but weight gain and potential hepatotoxicity calls for attention. In conclusion,a general recommendation for the application of specific drugs cannot be given. Besides controlled clinical trials,weight reduction and physical activity to improve insulin sensitivity in obese patients should be the priority objective.

  10. Anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, A; Iaquinto, G; Gluud, C

    2003-01-01

    Alcohol is one of the most common causes of liver disease in the Western World today. Randomised clinical trials have examined the effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease.......Alcohol is one of the most common causes of liver disease in the Western World today. Randomised clinical trials have examined the effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease....

  11. Heat shock protein 90: a pathophysiological factor and novel treatment target in autoimmune bullous skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tukaj, Stefan; Zillikens, Detlef; Kasperkiewicz, Michael

    2015-08-01

    The chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), a cell stress-inducible molecule that regulates activity of many client proteins responsible for cellular growth, differentiation and apoptosis, has been proposed as an important therapeutic target in patients with malignancies. More recently, its active participation in (auto)immune processes has been recognized as evidenced by amelioration of inflammatory disease pathways through pharmacological inhibition of Hsp90 in rodent models of autoimmune encephalomyelitis, rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Based on own current research results, this viewpoint essay provides important insights that Hsp90 is also involved as a notable pathophysiological factor in autoimmune blistering dermatoses including epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, bullous pemphigoid and possibly dermatitis herpetiformis. The observed in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo efficacy of anti-Hsp90 treatment in experimental models of autoimmune bullous diseases and its underlying multimodal anti-inflammatory mechanisms of interference with key contributors to autoimmune-mediated blister formation supports the introduction of selective non-toxic Hsp90 inhibitors into the clinical setting for the treatment of patients with these disorders. PMID:25980533

  12. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase deficiency causes organ-specific autoimmune disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Hase

    Full Text Available Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID expressed by germinal center B cells is a central regulator of somatic hypermutation (SHM and class switch recombination (CSR. Humans with AID mutations develop not only the autosomal recessive form of hyper-IgM syndrome (HIGM2 associated with B cell hyperplasia, but also autoimmune disorders by unknown mechanisms. We report here that AID-/- mice spontaneously develop tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs in non-lymphoid tissues including the stomach at around 6 months of age. At a later stage, AID-/- mice develop a severe gastritis characterized by loss of gastric glands and epithelial hyperplasia. The disease development was not attenuated even under germ-free (GF conditions. Gastric autoantigen -specific serum IgM was elevated in AID-/- mice, and the serum levels correlated with the gastritis pathological score. Adoptive transfer experiments suggest that autoimmune CD4+ T cells mediate gastritis development as terminal effector cells. These results suggest that abnormal B-cell expansion due to AID deficiency can drive B-cell autoimmunity, and in turn promote TLO formation, which ultimately leads to the propagation of organ-specific autoimmune effector CD4+ T cells. Thus, AID plays an important role in the containment of autoimmune diseases by negative regulation of autoreactive B cells.

  13. Prevalence of macroprolactinaemia in regularly menstruating women with non-toxic goitre or autoimmune thyroid disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewandowski Krzysztof C

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The so called “big-big” prolactin (Prl, also known as macroprolactin is formed by Prl-immunoglobulin (Prl-IgG complexes and may cause elevation of serum Prl concentrations measured by standard assays, potentially leading to unnecessary investigations and/or treatment. In our study, we have endeavoured to assess the prevalence of macroprolactinaemia in euthyroid, regularly menstruating women with thyroid disease, as well as to assess whether autoimmune thyroid disease may result in an increased prevalence of macroprolactinaemia. Material and methods We measured serum Prl in 182 regularly menstruating women aged 32.7 ± 7.5 years (mean ± SD, range 17–46 years who attended endocrine clinic either for investigation of non-toxic goitre (n = 86, age 33.2 ± 7.8 years or with autoimmune thyroid disease (n = 96, age 32.3 ± 7.2 years. Autoimmune thyroid disease was defined as raised titre of at least one anti-thyroid antibody [anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO, anti-thyroglobulin (anti-Tg and/or anti-TSH-receptor (anti-TSH-R antibodies]. All women were clinically and biochemically euthyroid, either without or on treatment with L-thyroxine. In those with raised Prl (i.e., above 530 mIU/l we ruled out the presence of macroprolactinaemia by polyethylene glycol (PEG precipitation method. Results There was no significant age difference between women with and without autoimmune thyroid disease (p = 0.84. Raised Prl concentrations were found in 10 women with thyroid disease (5.5%, and of those a significant macroprolactinaemia (i.e., reduction of Prl concentrations of more than 60% after PEG precipitation was found in 9 subjects (4.94%. There were no differences in the prevalence of macroprolactinaemia between women with autoimmune thyroid disease (4 out of 96, and without autoimmune thyroid disease (5 out of 86, p = 0.75. Conclusions Approximately one out of twenty women with regular menses is likely

  14. Proteasome inhibitor treatment in alcoholic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fawzia Bardag-Gorce

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress, generated by chronic ethanol consumption, is a major cause of hepatotoxicity and liver injury. Increased production of oxygen-derived free radicals due to ethanol metabolism by CYP2E1 is principally located in the cytoplasm and in the mitochondria, which does not only injure liver cells, but also other vital organs, such as the heart and the brain. Therefore, there is a need for better treatment to enhance the antioxidant response elements. To date, there is no established treatment to attenuate high levels of oxidative stress in the liver of alcoholic patients. To block this oxidative stress, proteasome inhibitor treatment has been found to significantly enhance the antioxidant response elements of hepatocytes exposed to ethanol. Recent studies have shown in an experimental model of alcoholic liver disease that proteasome inhibitor treatment at low dose has cytoprotective effects against ethanol-induced oxidative stress and liver steatosis. The beneficial effects of proteasome inhibitor treatment against oxidative stress occurred because antioxidant response elements (glutathione peroxidase 2, superoxide dismutase 2, glutathione synthetase, glutathione reductase, and GCLC) were upregulated when rats fed alcohol were treated with a low dose of PS-341 (Bortezomib, Velcade(r)). This is an important finding because proteasome inhibitor treatment up-regulated reactive oxygen species removal and glutathione recycling enzymes, while ethanol feeding alone down-regulated these antioxidant elements. For the first time, it was shown that proteasome inhibition by a highly specific and reversible inhibitor is different from the chronic ethanol feeding-induced proteasome inhibition. As previously shown by our group, chronic ethanol feeding causes a complex dysfunction in the ubiquitin proteasome pathway, which affects the proteasome system, as well as the ubiquitination system. The beneficial effects of proteasome inhibitor treatment in alcoholic liver disease

  15. Successful treatment with Ipilimumab and Interleukin‑2 in two patients with metastatic melanoma and systemic autoimmune disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Magnus; Andersen, Rikke; Larsen, Peter Nørgaard;

    2014-01-01

    Two patients were treated with immunotherapy for metastatic malignant melanoma (MM) despite suffering from systemic autoimmune disease, i.e., ulcerative colitis (UC) and Behcets disease (BD), respectively. Both patients benefitted from the treatment. The patient with UC achieved partial remission...... of all measurable parameters after treatment with Ipilimumab, while the patient with BD achieved a complete remission of MM after treatment with Interleukin-2 (IL-2) and Interferon-α (IFN-α). Moreover, no aggravation of symptoms related to the autoimmune diseases was seen during treatment, in...... contrast, clinical indications of improvement were observed. These two cases illustrate that the presence of autoimmune disease does not necessarily predict increased autoimmune toxicity in connection with immunotherapy. They also raise the question of whether autoimmune disease should continue to be an...

  16. Lower Muscle Endurance in Patients with Alcoholic Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Henning; Aagaard, Niels K.; Jakobsen, Johannes; Dorup, Inge; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Patients with alcoholic liver disease often complain of restricted physical capacity, which could be due to decreased muscle endurance. The aim of this study was to assess the muscular endurance in patients with alcoholic liver disease. In a cross sectional study, 24 patients with alcoholic liver disease and 22 controls were evaluated using…

  17. Hypoxia-inducible factors as molecular targets for liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Cynthia; Colgan, Sean P; Eltzschig, Holger K

    2016-06-01

    Liver disease is a growing global health problem, as deaths from end-stage liver cirrhosis and cancer are rising across the world. At present, pharmacologic approaches to effectively treat or prevent liver disease are extremely limited. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is a transcription factor that regulates diverse signaling pathways enabling adaptive cellular responses to perturbations of the tissue microenvironment. HIF activation through hypoxia-dependent and hypoxia-independent signals have been reported in liver disease of diverse etiologies, from ischemia-reperfusion-induced acute liver injury to chronic liver diseases caused by viral infection, excessive alcohol consumption, or metabolic disorders. This review summarizes the evidence for HIF stabilization in liver disease, discusses the mechanistic involvement of HIFs in disease development, and explores the potential of pharmacological HIF modifiers in the treatment of liver disease. PMID:27094811

  18. Is obsessive-compulsive disorder an autoimmune disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, P D; Richter, M A

    2001-11-13

    OBSESSIVE-COMPULSIVE DISORDER (OCD) IS A COMMON and debilitating neuropsychiatric disorder. Although it is widely believed to have a genetic basis, no specific genetic factors have been conclusively identified as yet, leading researchers to look for environmental risk factors that may interact with an underlying genetic susceptibility in affected individuals. Recently, there has been increasing interest in a possible link between streptococcal infections and the development of OCD and tic disorders in children. It has been suggested that OCD in some susceptible individuals may be caused by an autoimmune response to streptococcal infections, that is, a similar biological mechanism to that associated with Sydenham's chorea. The term "pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections" (PANDAS) has been used to describe a subset of children with abrupt onset or exacerbations of OCD or tics, or both, following streptococcal infections. Affected children have relatively early symptom onset, characteristic comorbid symptoms and subtle neurological dysfunction. Neuroimaging studies reveal increased basal ganglia volumes, and the proposed cause involves the cross-reaction of streptococcal antibodies with basal ganglia tissue. Vulnerability to developing PANDAS probably involves genetic factors, and elevated levels of D8/17 antibodies may represent a marker of susceptibility to PANDAS. Prophylactic antibiotic treatments have thus far not been shown to be helpful in preventing symptom exacerbations. Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy may be an effective treatment in selected individuals. Further understanding of the role of streptococcal infections in childhood-onset OCD will be important in determining alternative and effective strategies for treatment, early identification and prevention of this common and debilitating psychiatric disorder. PMID:11760984

  19. Clinical indications and biological mechanisms of splenic irradiation in autoimmune diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinmann, M.; Becker, G. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Strahlenonkologie; Einsele, H.; Bamberg, M. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Innere Medizin 2

    2001-02-01

    Background: Splenic irradiation (SI) is a fairly unknown treatment modality in autoimmune disorders like autoimmune thrombocytopenia (AIT) or autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), which may provide an effective, low toxic and cost-effective treatment for selected patients. Patients, Materials and Methods: This article reviews the limited experiences on splenic irradiation in autoimmune thrombocytopenia by analyzing the current studies including 71 patients and some preliminary reports on splenic irradiation in autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Results: In autoimmune thrombocytopenia between 40 and 90% of all patients responded, but most of them relapsed within 4 to 6 months after splenic irradiation. Between 10 and 20% of all patients had a sustained response. The efficacy of splenic irradiation in HIV-associated cases of thrombocytopenia is probably lower than in other forms of autoimmune thrombocytopenia, but especially in this group immunosuppressive drug treatment of autoimmune thrombocytopenia exposes some problems. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia there are some case reports about efficacy of splenic irradiation. Toxicity of splenic irradiation in both diseases was very moderate. Conclusions: For HIV patients, for elderly patients or patients at high risk for complications following splenectomy splenic irradiation might be a treatment option. Splenic irradiation as preoperative treatment in patients not responding to or not suitable for immunosuppressive drugs prior to splenectomy may be a promising new application of splenic irradiation to reduce adverse effects of splenectomy in thrombocytopenic patients. A further analysis of the biological mechanisms underlying splenic irradiation may help to improve patient selection, to optimize dose concepts and treatment schedules and will improve understanding of radiotherapy as an immunomodulatory treatment modality. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund: Die Bestrahlung der Milz zur Behandlung von haematologischen

  20. Epigenetic regulation in alcoholic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pranoti Mandrekar

    2011-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is characterized by steatosis or fat deposition in the liver and inflammation, which leads to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Induction of target genes without involving changes in DNA sequence seems to contribute greatly to liver injury. Chromatin modifications including alterations in histones and DNA, as well as post-transcriptional changes collectively referred to as epigenetic effects are altered by alcohol. Recent studies have pointed to a significant role for epigenetic mechanisms at the nucleosomal level influencing gene expression and disease outcome in ALD. Specifically, epigenetic alterations by alcohol include histone modifications such as changes in acetylation and phosphorylation, hypomethylation of DNA, and alterations in miRNAs. These modifications can be induced by alcohol-induced oxidative stress that results in altered recruitment of transcriptional machinery and abnormal gene expression. Delineating these mechanisms in initiation and progression of ALD is becoming a major area of interest. This review summarizes key epigenetic mechanisms that are dysregulated by alcohol in the liver. Alterations by alcohol in histone and DNA modifications, enzymes related to histone acetylation such as histone acetyltransferases, histone deacetylases and sirtuins, and methylation enzymes such as DNA methyltransferases are discussed. Chromatin modifications and miRNA alterations that result in immune cell dysfunction contributing to inflammatory cytokine production in ALD is reviewed. Finally, the role of alcohol-mediated oxidative stress in epigenetic regulation in ALD is described. A better understanding of these mechanisms is crucial for designing novel epigenetic based therapies to ameliorate ALD.

  1. Cystic diseases of the biliary tract and liver

    OpenAIRE

    Nafiye Urgancı

    2008-01-01

    Cystic diseases of liver are recognized in infancy and childhood initially. Cystic diseases of liver and biliary tract are choledocal cysts, autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, congenital hepatic fibrosis and Caroli disease (cystic dilatation of intrahepatic bile ducts). Choledochal cysts and Caroli disease do not allow biliary flow, cause chronic or obstructive cholestasis and progressive liver disease. In congenital hepatic fibrosis and polycystic kidney di...

  2. Recent advancement on autoantigens, autoantibodies and inflammatory cells in subepidermal autoimmune bullous diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianguo Huang; Qiying Gong; Guiming Li

    2007-01-01

    Subepidermal autoimmune bullous diseases (SABD) are some autoimmune skin diseases that can present in a variety of forms and can be a challenging disease to treat. An overview of the different forms of SABD are discussed including bullous pemphigoid (BP), epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA), cicatricial pemphigoid (CP), bullous systemic lupus erythematosus (BSLE), and Anti-p200 pemphigoid. Emphasis on recent advancement is presented. In recent years, improved Knowledge of the mechanisms of intercellular and cell-matrix adhesion has led to better understanding of the blistering process in some SABD. Defects of such structures cause the subepidermal bullous diseases and have also led to the discovery of new diseases (e.g. anti-p200-pemphigoid). Recent studies have outlined the important role of autoantibodies, mast cell lymphocytes and their cytokines in pathogenesis of SABD.

  3. Vaccination of patients with auto-immune inflammatory rheumatic diseases requires careful benefit-risk assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, M.; Agmon-Levin, N.; Dayer, J. -M.; Israeli, E.; Gatto, M.; Shoenfeld, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Will vaccination raise the incidence of autoimmune diseases, what is the impact of increasingly crowded vaccination schedules, the vaccination in age groups and the risk of coincidental temporal association? All these issues are still under debate. However, for the time being, to avoid confusion in

  4. Beta-endorphin and the immune system--possible role in autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, H; Pedersen, B K

    1995-01-01

    The immune system and the neuroendocrine system are closely interconnected having such means of bidirectional communication and regulation. In this review, a hypothesis is put forward regarding the possible role of beta-endorphins in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases: It is suggested that the...

  5. Altered BCR signalling quality predisposes to autoimmune disease and a pre-diabetic state

    OpenAIRE

    Königsberger, Sebastian; Prodöhl, Jan; Stegner, David; Weis, Vanessa; Andreas, Martin; Stehling, Martin; Schumacher, Theresa; Böhmer, Ruben; Thielmann, Ina; van Eeuwijk, Judith M M; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Kiefer, Friedemann

    2012-01-01

    The related tyrosine kinases Syk and Zap-70 are key signalling proteins downstream of antigen receptors. A knock-in strategy reveals that the two kinases differentially affect BCR signalling, leading to aberrant B cell section and increased risk of autoimmune disease.

  6. Leishmaniasis, Autoimmune Rheumatic Disease, and Anti–Tumor Necrosis Factor Therapy, Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Xynos, Ioannis D.; Tektonidou, Maria G.; Pikazis, Dimitrios; Sipsas, Nikolaos V.

    2009-01-01

    We report 2 cases of leishmaniasis in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases in Greece. To assess trends in leishmaniasis reporting in this patient population, we searched the literature for similar reports from Europe. Reports increased during 2004–2008, especially for patients treated with anti–tumor necrosis factor agents.

  7. Tc-99m-labeled Rituximab for Imaging B Lymphocyte Infiltration in Inflammatory Autoimmune Disease Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malviya, G.; Anzola, K. L.; Podesta, E.; Lagana, B.; Del Mastro, C.; Dierckx, R. A.; Scopinaro, F.; Signore, A.

    2012-01-01

    The rationale of the present study was to radiolabel rituximab with 99m-technetium and to image B lymphocytes infiltration in the affected tissues of patients with chronic inflammatory autoimmune diseases, in particular, the candidates to be treated with unlabelled rituximab, in order to provide a r

  8. Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) - an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asgari, N; Owens, T; Frøkiaer, J;

    2010-01-01

    Asgari N, Owens T, Frøkiaer J, Stenager E, Lillevang ST, Kyvik KO. Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) - an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS).
Acta Neurol Scand: DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0404.2010.01416.x.
© 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S. In the past 10 years, neuromyelitis optica (NMO) has...

  9. Autoimmune disease in individuals and close family members and susceptibility to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellemkjaer, Lene; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Engels, Eric A;

    2008-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and Sjögren's syndrome have been consistently associated with an increased risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). This study was initiated to evaluate the risks of NHL associated with a personal or family history of a wide range of aut...... autoimmune diseases....

  10. Total lymphoid irradiation as an immunosuppressive agent for transplantation and the treatment of 'autoimmune' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) is a powerful immunosuppressive agent. This immunosuppression has the potential for clinical application in certain selected situations. In this review, the immunological changes produced by TLI and its potential applications in organ transplantation and the treatment of certain 'autoimmune' diseases are discussed. (author)

  11. Autoimmune Diseases in Parents of Children with Infantile Autism: A Case--Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouridsen, Svend Erik; Rich, Bente; Isager, Torben; Nedergaard, Niels Jorgen

    2007-01-01

    This register study compared the rates and types of autoimmune disease in the parents of 111 patients (82 males, 29 females; mean age at diagnosis 5y 5mo [SD 2y 6mo]) with infantile autism (IA) with a matched control group of parents of 330 children from the general population. All parents were screened through the nationwide Danish National…

  12. Histopathology of IgG4-Related Autoimmune Hepatitis and IgG4-Related Hepatopathy in IgG4-Related Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanuma, Yasuni; Ishizu, Yoji; Zen, Yoh; Harada, Kenichi; Umemura, Takeji

    2016-08-01

    Immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a systemic disease involving many organs; it includes IgG4-related sclerosing cholangitis and inflammatory pseudotumor in the hepatobiliary system. Two types of hepatic parenchymal involvement have been reported in IgG4-RD: IgG4-related autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and IgG4-hepatopathy. Moreover, only three cases of IgG4-related AIH have been reported. Immunoglobulin G4-related AIH is clinicopathologically similar to AIH, except for an elevated serum IgG4 level and heavy infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells in the liver tissue. Interestingly, IgG4-related AIH can be complicated by well-known IgG4-RD(s). Immunoglobulin G4-hepatopathy, which includes various histopathological lesions encountered in the liver of patients with type I autoimmune pancreatitis, is classified into five histological categories: portal inflammation, large bile duct damage, portal sclerosis, lobular hepatitis, and cholestasis. Immunoglobulin G4-hepatopathy is currently a collective term covering hepatic lesions primarily or secondarily related to IgG4-related sclerosing cholangitis and type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis. In conclusion, the liver is not immune to IgG4-RD, and at least two types of hepatic involvement in IgG4-RD have been reported: IgG4-related AIH and IgG4-hepatopathy. Additional studies are required to clarify their precise clinical significance with respect to IgG4-RD and inherent liver diseases. PMID:27466793

  13. Dysbiosis may trigger autoimmune diseases via inappropriate posttranslational modification of host proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron eLerner

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The gut ecosystem with myriads of microorganisms and the high concentration of immune system cells can be considered as a separate organ on its own. The balanced interaction between the host and microbial cells has been shaped during the long co-evolutionary process. In dysbiotic conditions, however, this balance is compromised and results in abnormal interaction between the host and microbiota. It is hypothesize here that the changed spectrum of microbial enzymes involved in posttranslational modification of proteins may contribute to the aberrant modification of host proteins thus generating autoimmune responses by the host, resulting in autoimmune diseases.

  14. Noninvasive investigations for non alcoholic fatty liver disease and liver fi brosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carmen; Fierbinteanu-Braticevici; Ion; Dina; Ana; Petrisor; Laura; Tribus; Lucian; Negreanu; Catalin; Carstoiu

    2010-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) includes a spectrum of diseases that have insulin resistance in common and are associated with metabolic conditions such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia. NAFLD ranges from simple liver steatosis, which follows a benign course, to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a more severe entity, with necroinflmmation and f ibrosis, which can progress to cryptogenic cirrhosis and end-stage liver disease. Liver biopsy remains the gold standard for evalu...

  15. The Role of Liver Biopsy in the Management of Patients with Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Florence

    2003-01-01

    The role of liver biopsy in the diagnosis and management of liver disease is a controversial issue even among hepatologists. Although most causes of elevated liver enzymes can be determined, or at least suspected, on the basis of a careful history and laboratory tests, histological assessment remains the gold standard for most liver diseases. Histological evaluation can either confirm or refute clinical diagnoses and can provide information about the severity and stage of disease. Occasionall...

  16. Ideal Experimental Rat Models for Liver Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sang Woo; Kim, Sung Hoon; Min, Seon Ok; Kim, Kyung Sik

    2011-01-01

    There are many limitations for conducting liver disease research in human beings due to the high cost and potential ethical issues. For this reason, conducting a study that is difficult to perform in humans using appropriate animal models, can be beneficial in ascertaining the pathological physiology, and in developing new treatment modalities. However, it is difficult to determine the appropriate animal model which is suitable for research purposes, since every patient has different and dive...

  17. Liver Atrophy Associated With Monolobar Caroli's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Mohan, L. N.; P. G. Thomas; Kilpadi, A. B.; S. D'Cunha

    1991-01-01

    The association of the atrophy-hypertrophy complex in monolobar Caroli’s disease (Type I) is reported in a 30 year old male who presented with recurrent cholangitis. Ultrasound and CT scan showed localised, right sided, saccular biliary dilatation in a normal sized liver. Severe right lobar atrophy was detected at operation and the resected right lobe weighed only 140 gms. Distortion of the hilar vascular anatomy and posterior displacement of the right hepatic duct orifice were problems encou...

  18. Challenges in interpretation of thyroid function tests in pregnant women with autoimmune thyroid disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Bliddal, Sofie; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh;

    2011-01-01

    Physiological changes during gestation are important to be aware of in measurement and interpretation of thyroid function tests in women with autoimmune thyroid diseases. Thyroid autoimmune activity is decreasing in pregnancy. Measurement of serum TSH is the first-line screening variable for...... thyroid dysfunction also in pregnancy. However, using serum TSH for control of treatment of maternal thyroid autoimmunity infers a risk for compromised foetal development. Peripheral thyroid hormone values are highly different among laboratories, and there is a need for laboratory-specific gestational age......-related reference ranges. Equally important, the intraindividual variability of the thyroid hormone measurements is much narrower than the interindividual variation (reflecting the reference interval). The best laboratory assessment of thyroid function is a free thyroid hormone estimate combined with TSH...

  19. Presumed Isotretinoin-Induced, Concomitant Autoimmune Thyroid Disease and Ocular Myasthenia Gravis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Gursoy

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are many adverse effects that have been described for isotretinoin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a possible association of oral isotretinoin intake with autoimmune thyroiditis and ocular myasthenia gravis (OMG. Case Presentation: A 19-year-old Caucasian male, who had used oral isotretinoin for severe acne disease for the previous six months, was referred to our clinic. He had a three-week history of diplopia and variable bilateral ptosis. Physical examination showed moderate periorbital edema and limitations of up- and down-gaze in the left eye. Laboratory findings and thyroid ultrasound were consistent with autoimmune thyroiditis. Antithyroid therapy did not relieve the clinical symptoms. Concomitant OMG was suspected. Variable ptosis and a positive response to oral prednisolone of 40 mg/day and pyridostigmine of 360 mg/day supported the diagnosis of concomitant autoimmune thyroiditis and OMG. Conclusion: Autoimmune disorders may be triggered by oral isotretinoin treatment. Clinicians prescribing isotretinoin should be aware of the possible association between isotretinoin intake and concomitant autoimmune thyroiditis and OMG.

  20. Nuclear receptors and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cave, Matthew C; Clair, Heather B; Hardesty, Josiah E; Falkner, K Cameron; Feng, Wenke; Clark, Barbara J; Sidey, Jennifer; Shi, Hongxue; Aqel, Bashar A; McClain, Craig J; Prough, Russell A

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear receptors are transcription factors which sense changing environmental or hormonal signals and effect transcriptional changes to regulate core life functions including growth, development, and reproduction. To support this function, following ligand-activation by xenobiotics, members of subfamily 1 nuclear receptors (NR1s) may heterodimerize with the retinoid X receptor (RXR) to regulate transcription of genes involved in energy and xenobiotic metabolism and inflammation. Several of these receptors including the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), the pregnane and xenobiotic receptor (PXR), the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), the liver X receptor (LXR) and the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) are key regulators of the gut:liver:adipose axis and serve to coordinate metabolic responses across organ systems between the fed and fasting states. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease and may progress to cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD is associated with inappropriate nuclear receptor function and perturbations along the gut:liver:adipose axis including obesity, increased intestinal permeability with systemic inflammation, abnormal hepatic lipid metabolism, and insulin resistance. Environmental chemicals may compound the problem by directly interacting with nuclear receptors leading to metabolic confusion and the inability to differentiate fed from fasting conditions. This review focuses on the impact of nuclear receptors in the pathogenesis and treatment of NAFLD. Clinical trials including PIVENS and FLINT demonstrate that nuclear receptor targeted therapies may lead to the paradoxical dissociation of steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and obesity. Novel strategies currently under development (including tissue-specific ligands and dual receptor agonists) may be required to separate the beneficial effects of nuclear receptor activation from unwanted metabolic