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Sample records for autogenous translational regulation

  1. RNase III-Independent Autogenous Regulation of Escherichia coli Polynucleotide Phosphorylase via Translational Repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carzaniga, Thomas; Dehò, Gianni; Briani, Federica

    2015-06-01

    The complex posttranscriptional regulation mechanism of the Escherichia coli pnp gene, which encodes the phosphorolytic exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase), involves two endoribonucleases, namely, RNase III and RNase E, and PNPase itself, which thus autoregulates its own expression. The models proposed for pnp autoregulation posit that the target of PNPase is a mature pnp mRNA previously processed at its 5' end by RNase III, rather than the primary pnp transcript (RNase III-dependent models), and that PNPase activity eventually leads to pnp mRNA degradation by RNase E. However, some published data suggest that pnp expression may also be regulated through a PNPase-dependent, RNase III-independent mechanism. To address this issue, we constructed isogenic Δpnp rnc(+) and Δpnp Δrnc strains with a chromosomal pnp-lacZ translational fusion and measured β-galactosidase activity in the absence and presence of PNPase expressed by a plasmid. Our results show that PNPase also regulates its own expression via a reversible RNase III-independent pathway acting upstream from the RNase III-dependent branch. This pathway requires the PNPase RNA binding domains KH and S1 but not its phosphorolytic activity. We suggest that the RNase III-independent autoregulation of PNPase occurs at the level of translational repression, possibly by competition for pnp primary transcript between PNPase and the ribosomal protein S1. In Escherichia coli, polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase, encoded by pnp) posttranscriptionally regulates its own expression. The two models proposed so far posit a two-step mechanism in which RNase III, by cutting the leader region of the pnp primary transcript, creates the substrate for PNPase regulatory activity, eventually leading to pnp mRNA degradation by RNase E. In this work, we provide evidence supporting an additional pathway for PNPase autogenous regulation in which PNPase acts as a translational repressor independently of RNase III

  2. Translational regulation in nutrigenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Botao; Qian, Shu-Bing

    2011-11-01

    The emergence of genome-wide analysis to interrogate cellular DNA, RNA, and protein content has revolutionized the study of the control network that mediates cellular homeostasis. Nutrigenomics addresses the effect of nutrients on gene expression, which provides a basis for understanding the biological activity of dietary components. Translation of mRNAs represents the last step of genetic flow and primarily defines the proteome. Translational regulation is thus critical for gene expression, in particular, under nutrient excess or deficiency. Until recently, it was unclear how the global effects of translational control are influenced by nutrient signaling. An emerging concept of translational reprogramming addresses how to maintain the expression of specific proteins during pathophysiological conditions by translation of selective mRNAs. Here we describe recent advances in our understanding of translational control, nutrient signaling, and their dysregulation in aging and cancer. The mechanistic understanding of translational regulation in response to different nutrient conditions may help identify potential dietary and therapeutic targets to improve human health.

  3. Translational Regulation in Nutrigenomics12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Botao; Qian, Shu-Bing

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of genome-wide analysis to interrogate cellular DNA, RNA, and protein content has revolutionized the study of the control network that mediates cellular homeostasis. Nutrigenomics addresses the effect of nutrients on gene expression, which provides a basis for understanding the biological activity of dietary components. Translation of mRNAs represents the last step of genetic flow and primarily defines the proteome. Translational regulation is thus critical for gene expression, in particular, under nutrient excess or deficiency. Until recently, it was unclear how the global effects of translational control are influenced by nutrient signaling. An emerging concept of translational reprogramming addresses how to maintain the expression of specific proteins during pathophysiological conditions by translation of selective mRNAs. Here we describe recent advances in our understanding of translational control, nutrient signaling, and their dysregulation in aging and cancer. The mechanistic understanding of translational regulation in response to different nutrient conditions may help identify potential dietary and therapeutic targets to improve human health. PMID:22332093

  4. Extensive translational regulation during seed germination revealed by polysomal profiling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bai, Bing; Peviani, Alessia; Horst, van der Sjors; Gamm, Magdalena; Snel, Berend; Bentsink, Leónie; Hanson, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    This work investigates the extent of translational regulation during seed germination. The polysome occupancy of each gene is determined by genome-wide profiling of total mRNA and polysome-associated mRNA. This reveals extensive translational regulation during Arabidopsis thaliana seed

  5. Negative Autogenous Control of the Master Type III Secretion System Regulator HrpL in Pseudomonas syringae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Waite

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The type III secretion system (T3SS is a principal virulence determinant of the model bacterial plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. T3SS effector proteins inhibit plant defense signaling pathways in susceptible hosts and elicit evolved immunity in resistant plants. The extracytoplasmic function sigma factor HrpL coordinates the expression of most T3SS genes. Transcription of hrpL is dependent on sigma-54 and the codependent enhancer binding proteins HrpR and HrpS for hrpL promoter activation. hrpL is oriented adjacently to and divergently from the HrpL-dependent gene hrpJ, sharing an intergenic upstream regulatory region. We show that association of the RNA polymerase (RNAP-HrpL complex with the hrpJ promoter element imposes negative autogenous control on hrpL transcription in P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000. The hrpL promoter was upregulated in a ΔhrpL mutant and was repressed by plasmid-borne hrpL. In a minimal Escherichia coli background, the activity of HrpL was sufficient to achieve repression of reconstituted hrpL transcription. This repression was relieved if both the HrpL DNA-binding function and the hrp-box sequence of the hrpJ promoter were compromised, implying dependence upon the hrpJ promoter. DNA-bound RNAP-HrpL entirely occluded the HrpRS and partially occluded the integration host factor (IHF recognition elements of the hrpL promoter in vitro, implicating inhibition of DNA binding by these factors as a cause of negative autogenous control. A modest increase in the HrpL concentration caused hypersecretion of the HrpA1 pilus protein but intracellular accumulation of later T3SS substrates. We argue that negative feedback on HrpL activity fine-tunes expression of the T3SS regulon to minimize the elicitation of plant defenses.

  6. Regulation of mRNA translation during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanenbaum, Marvin E; Stern-Ginossar, Noam; Weissman, Jonathan S; Vale, Ronald D

    2015-08-25

    Passage through mitosis is driven by precisely-timed changes in transcriptional regulation and protein degradation. However, the importance of translational regulation during mitosis remains poorly understood. Here, using ribosome profiling, we find both a global translational repression and identified ~200 mRNAs that undergo specific translational regulation at mitotic entry. In contrast, few changes in mRNA abundance are observed, indicating that regulation of translation is the primary mechanism of modulating protein expression during mitosis. Interestingly, 91% of the mRNAs that undergo gene-specific regulation in mitosis are translationally repressed, rather than activated. One of the most pronounced translationally-repressed genes is Emi1, an inhibitor of the anaphase promoting complex (APC) which is degraded during mitosis. We show that full APC activation requires translational repression of Emi1 in addition to its degradation. These results identify gene-specific translational repression as a means of controlling the mitotic proteome, which may complement post-translational mechanisms for inactivating protein function.

  7. Codon usage influences the local rate of translation elongation to regulate co-translational protein folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chien-Hung; Dang, Yunkun; Zhou, Zhipeng; Wu, Cheng; Zhao, Fangzhou; Sachs, Matthew S.; Liu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Summary Codon usage bias is a universal feature of eukaryotic and prokaryotic genomes and has been proposed to regulate translation efficiency, accuracy and protein folding based on the assumption that codon usage affects translation dynamics. The roles of codon usage in translation, however, are not clear and have been challenged by recent ribosome profiling studies. Here we used a Neurospora cell-free translation system to directly monitor the velocity of mRNA translation. We demonstrated that the preferred codons enhance rate of translation elongation, whereas non-optimal codons slow elognatioon. Codon usage also controls ribosome traffic on mRNA. These conclusions were further supported by ribosome profiling results in vitro and in vivo with template mRNAs designed to increase signal to noise. Finally, we demonstrate that codon usage regulates protein function by affecting co-translational protein folding. These results resolve a long-standing fundamental question and suggest the existence of a codon usage code for protein folding. PMID:26321254

  8. Autogenous Deformation of Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autogenous deformation of concrete can be defined as the free deformation of sealed concrete at a constant temperature. A number of observed problems with early age cracking of high-performance concretes can be attributed to this phenomenon. During the last 10 years , this has led to an increased...... focus on autogenous deformation both within concrete practice and concrete research. Since 1996 the interest has been significant enough to hold international, yearly conferences entirely devoted to this subject. The papers in this publication were presented at two consecutive half-day sessions...... at the American Concrete Institute’s Fall Convention in Phoenix, Arizona, October 29, 2002. All papers have been reviewed according to ACI rules. This publication, as well as the sessions, was sponsored by ACI committee 236, Material Science of Concrete. The 12 presentations from 8 different countries indicate...

  9. Autogenous regulation and kinetics of induction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa recA transcription as analyzed with operon fusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, J.M.; Ohman, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    A promoterless chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene (cat) was used to construct recA-cat operon fusions to quantitatively examine the transcriptional regulation of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa recA gene in P. aeruginosa PAO. Wild-type P. aeruginosa containing the recA8-cat fusion was treated with methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and showed immediate induction of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) specific activity, whereas a recA::Tn501 mutant of P. aeruginosa containing recA8-cat showed no induction with MMS. This indicated that a functional copy of recA was required for derepression of recA transcription and that P. aeruginosa recA protein was a positive regulatory factor promoting its own expression. Compared with that in the wild type, the uninduced level of CAT in recA8-cat-containing cells was reduced by approximately one-half in the recA::Tn501 mutant, indicating that recA+-dependent spontaneous induction contributes to the uninduced levels of recA expression in P. aeruginosa. MMS (0.012%) caused recA-directed CAT synthesis to increase almost immediately, with maximum CAT activity, fourfold higher than uninduced levels, attained at 60 min postinduction. The kinetics of recA8-cat fusion activity were shown to be directly related to the MMS doses used. Another fusion called recAa1-cat, where cat was located between the two transcriptional terminators of the P. aeruginosa recA gene, also showed dose-dependent induction by MMS, but the CAT activity from recAa1-cat was only one-half of that obtained with recA8-cat under the same conditions. Treatment of recA+ P. aeruginosa containing recA8-cat with UV irradiation produced an immediate effect on recA8-cat transcription and showed little UV dose dependency at doses of 5 J/m2 or greater

  10. Regulation of mRNA translation influences hypoxia tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koritzinsky, M.; Wouters, B.G.; Koumenis, C.

    2003-01-01

    Hypoxia is a heterogenous but common characteristic of human tumours and poor oxygenation is associated with poor prognosis. We believe that the presence of viable hypoxic tumor cells reflects in part an adaptation and tolerance of these cells to oxygen deficiency. Since oxidative phosphorylation is compromized during hypoxia, adaptation may involve both the upregulation of glycolysis as well as downregulation of energy consumption. mRNA translation is one of the most energy costly cellular processes, and we and others have shown that global mRNA translation is rapidly inhibited during hypoxia. However, some mRNAs, including those coding for HIF-1 α and VEGF, remain efficiently translated during hypoxia. Clearly, the mechanisms responsible for the overall inhibition of translation during hypoxia does not compromize the translation of certain hypoxia-induced mRNA species. We therefore hypothesize that the inhibition of mRNA translation serves to promote hypoxia tolerance in two ways: i) through conservation of energy and ii) through differential gene expression involved in hypoxia adaptation. We have recently identified two pathways that are responsible for the global inhibition of translation during hypoxia. The phosphorylation of the eukaryotic initiation factor eIF2 α by the ER resident kinase PERK results in down-regulation of protein synthesis shortly after the onset of hypoxia. In addition, the initiation complex eIF4F is disrupted during long lasting hypoxic conditions. The identification of the molecular pathways responsible for the inhibition of overall translation during hypoxia has rendered it possible to investigate their importance for hypoxia tolerance. We have found that mouse embryo fibroblasts that are knockout for PERK and therefore not able to inhibit protein synthesis efficiently during oxygen deficiency are significantly less tolerant to hypoxia than their wildtype counterparts. We are currently also investigating the functional significance

  11. Cell fate determination by ubiquitin-dependent regulation of translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Achim; Iwasaki, Shintaro; McGourty, Colleen; Medina-Ruiz, Sofia; Teerikorpi, Nia; Fedrigo, Indro; Ingolia, Nicholas T.; Rape, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Metazoan development depends on accurate execution of differentiation programs that allow pluripotent stem cells to adopt specific fates 1. Differentiation requires changes to chromatin architecture and transcriptional networks, yet whether other regulatory events support cell fate determination is less well understood. Here, we have identified the vertebrate-specific ubiquitin ligase CUL3KBTBD8 as an essential regulator of neural crest specification. CUL3KBTBD8 monoubiquitylates NOLC1 and its paralog TCOF1, whose mutation underlies the neurocristopathy Treacher Collins Syndrome 2,3. Ubiquitylation drives formation of a TCOF1-NOLC1 platform that connects RNA polymerase I with ribosome modification enzymes and remodels the translational program of differentiating cells in favor of neural crest specification. We conclude that ubiquitin-dependent regulation of translation is an important feature of cell fate determination. PMID:26399832

  12. Translational regulation shapes the molecular landscape of complex disease phenotypes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schafer, S.; Adami, E.; Heinig, M.; Rodrigues, K. E. C.; Kreuchwig, F.; Šilhavý, Jan; van Heesch, S.; Simaite, D.; Rajewsky, N.; Cuppen, E.; Pravenec, Michal; Vingron, M.; Cook, S. A.; Hubner, N.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 6, May 2015 (2015), s. 7200 ISSN 2041-1723 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GB14-36804G; GA MŠk(CZ) LL1204; GA MŠk(CZ) 7E10067 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : translational regulation * RNA sequencing * ribosome profiling * rat Subject RIV: EB - Gene tics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 11.329, year: 2015

  13. Alcohols inhibit translation to regulate morphogenesis in C. albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbe, Nkechi E; Paget, Caroline M; Wang, Hui; Ashe, Mark P

    2015-04-01

    Many molecules are secreted into the growth media by microorganisms to modulate the metabolic and physiological processes of the organism. For instance, alcohols like butanol, ethanol and isoamyl alcohol are produced by the human pathogenic fungus, Candida albicans and induce morphological differentiation. Here we show that these same alcohols cause a rapid inhibition of protein synthesis. More specifically, the alcohols target translation initiation, a complex stage of the gene expression process. Using molecular techniques, we have identified the likely translational target of these alcohols in C. albicans as the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2B (eIF2B). eIF2B is the guanine nucleotide exchange factor for eIF2, which supports the exchange reaction where eIF2.GDP is converted to eIF2.GTP. Even minimal regulation at this step will lead to alterations in the levels of specific proteins that may allow the exigencies of the fungus to be realised. Indeed, similar to the effects of alcohols, a minimal inhibition of protein synthesis with cycloheximide also causes an induction of filamentous growth. These results suggest a molecular basis for the effect of various alcohols on morphological differentiation in C. albicans. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Model of cap-dependent translation initiation in sea urchin: a step towards the eukaryotic translation regulation network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellé, Robert; Prigent, Sylvain; Siegel, Anne; Cormier, Patrick

    2010-03-01

    The large and rapid increase in the rate of protein synthesis following fertilization of the sea urchin egg has long been a paradigm of translational control, an important component of the regulation of gene expression in cells. This translational up-regulation is linked to physiological changes that occur upon fertilization and is necessary for entry into first cell division cycle. Accumulated knowledge on cap-dependent initiation of translation makes it suited and timely to start integrating the data into a system view of biological functions. Using a programming environment for system biology coupled with model validation (named Biocham), we have built an integrative model for cap-dependent initiation of translation. The model is described by abstract rules. It contains 51 reactions involved in 74 molecular complexes. The model proved to be coherent with existing knowledge by using queries based on computational tree logic (CTL) as well as Boolean simulations. The model could simulate the change in translation occurring at fertilization in the sea urchin model. It could also be coupled with an existing model designed for cell-cycle control. Therefore, the cap-dependent translation initiation model can be considered a first step towards the eukaryotic translation regulation network.

  15. Translational profiling in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: no evidence for glucocorticoid regulation of mRNA translation.

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    Aneichyk, Tatsiana; Bindreither, Daniel; Mantinger, Christine; Grazio, Daniela; Goetsch, Katrin; Kofler, Reinhard; Rainer, Johannes

    2013-12-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are natural stress induced steroid hormones causing cell cycle arrest and cell death in lymphoid tissues. Therefore they are the central component in the treatment of lymphoid malignancies, in particular childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (chALL). GCs act mainly via regulating gene transcription, which has been intensively studied by us and others. GC control of mRNA translation has also been reported but has never been assessed systematically. In this study we investigate the effect of GCs on mRNA translation on a genome-wide scale. Childhood T- (CCRF-CEM) and precursor B-ALL (NALM6) cells were exposed to GCs and subjected to "translational profiling", a technique combining sucrose-gradient fractionation followed by Affymetrix Exon microarray analysis of mRNA from different fractions, to assess the translational efficiency of the expressed genes. Analysis of GC regulation in ribosome-bound fractions versus transcriptional regulation revealed no significant differences, i.e., GC did not entail a significant shift between ribosomal bound and unbound mRNAs. In the present study we analyzed for the first time possible effects of GC on the translational efficiency of expressed genes in two chALL model systems employing whole genome polysome profiling. Our results did not reveal significant differences in translational efficiency of expressed genes thereby arguing against a potential widespread regulatory effect of GCs on translation at least in the investigated in vitro systems.

  16. Bacterial translational regulations: high diversity between all mRNAs and major role in gene expression

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    Picard Flora

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In bacteria, the weak correlations at the genome scale between mRNA and protein levels suggest that not all mRNAs are translated with the same efficiency. To experimentally explore mRNA translational level regulation at the systemic level, the detailed translational status (translatome of all mRNAs was measured in the model bacterium Lactococcus lactis in exponential phase growth. Results Results demonstrated that only part of the entire population of each mRNA species was engaged in translation. For transcripts involved in translation, the polysome size reached a maximum of 18 ribosomes. The fraction of mRNA engaged in translation (ribosome occupancy and ribosome density were not constant for all genes. This high degree of variability was analyzed by bioinformatics and statistical modeling in order to identify general rules of translational regulation. For most of the genes, the ribosome density was lower than the maximum value revealing major control of translation by initiation. Gene function was a major translational regulatory determinant. Both ribosome occupancy and ribosome density were particularly high for transcriptional regulators, demonstrating the positive role of translational regulation in the coordination of transcriptional networks. mRNA stability was a negative regulatory factor of ribosome occupancy and ribosome density, suggesting antagonistic regulation of translation and mRNA stability. Furthermore, ribosome occupancy was identified as a key component of intracellular protein levels underlining the importance of translational regulation. Conclusions We have determined, for the first time in a bacterium, the detailed translational status for all mRNAs present in the cell. We have demonstrated experimentally the high diversity of translational states allowing individual gene differentiation and the importance of translation-level regulation in the complex process linking gene expression to protein

  17. 4EGI-1 represses cap-dependent translation and regulates genome-wide translation in malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Arpita; Jacobson, Blake A; Peterson, Mark S; Jay-Dixon, Joe; Kratzke, Marian G; Sadiq, Ahad A; Patel, Manish R; Kratzke, Robert A

    2018-04-01

    Deregulation of cap-dependent translation has been implicated in the malignant transformation of numerous human tissues. 4EGI-1, a novel small-molecule inhibitor of cap-dependent translation, disrupts formation of the eukaryotic initiation factor 4F (eIF4F) complex. The effects of 4EGI-1-mediated inhibition of translation initiation in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) were examined. 4EGI-1 preferentially inhibited cell viability and induced apoptosis in MPM cells compared to normal mesothelial (LP9) cells. This effect was associated with hypophosphorylation of 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) and decreased protein levels of the cancer-related genes, c-myc and osteopontin. 4EGI-1 showed enhanced cytotoxicity in combination with pemetrexed or gemcitabine. Translatome-wide polysome microarray analysis revealed a large cohort of genes that were translationally regulated upon treatment with 4EGI-1. The 4EGI-1-regulated translatome was negatively correlated to a previously published translatome regulated by eIF4E overexpression in human mammary epithelial cells, which is in agreement with the notion that 4EGI-1 inhibits the eIF4F complex. These data indicate that inhibition of the eIF4F complex by 4EGI-1 or similar translation inhibitors could be a strategy for treating mesothelioma. Genome wide translational profiling identified a large cohort of promising target genes that should be further evaluated for their potential significance in the treatment of MPM.

  18. Ribosome stalling regulates IRES-mediated translation in eukaryotes, a parallel to prokaryotic attenuation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez, James; Yaman, Ibrahim; Huang, Charles; Liu, Haiyan; Lopez, Alex B.; Komar, Anton A.; Caprara, Mark G.; Merrick, William C.; Snider, Martin D.; Kaufman, Randal J.; Lamers, Wouter H.; Hatzoglou, Maria

    2005-01-01

    It was previously shown that the mRNA for the cat-1 Arg/Lys transporter is translated from an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) that is regulated by cellular stress. Amino acid starvation stimulated cat-1 translation via a mechanism that requires translation of an ORF in the mRNA leader and

  19. Analyzing the temporal regulation of translation efficiency in mouse liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peggy Janich

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian physiology and behavior follow daily rhythms that are orchestrated by endogenous timekeepers known as circadian clocks. Rhythms in transcription are considered the main mechanism to engender rhythmic gene expression, but important roles for posttranscriptional mechanisms have recently emerged as well (reviewed in Lim and Allada (2013 [1]. We have recently reported on the use of ribosome profiling (RPF-seq, a method based on the high-throughput sequencing of ribosome protected mRNA fragments, to explore the temporal regulation of translation efficiency (Janich et al., 2015 [2]. Through the comparison of around-the-clock RPF-seq and matching RNA-seq data we were able to identify 150 genes, involved in ribosome biogenesis, iron metabolism and other pathways, whose rhythmicity is generated entirely at the level of protein synthesis. The temporal transcriptome and translatome data sets from this study have been deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus under the accession number GSE67305. Here we provide additional information on the experimental setup and on important optimization steps pertaining to the ribosome profiling technique in mouse liver and to data analysis.

  20. Regulation of translation initiation at the Poliovirus IRES

    OpenAIRE

    Hirnet, Juliane

    2010-01-01

    Poliovirus (PV) translation and replication can occur in neuronal cells where it causes degeneration and lysis of cells leading to paralytic poliomyelitis. Other cell types are much less affected by PV infection and do not support translation and replication of the virus as well. Apart from the poliospecific receptor, the reasons for the tissue preference of poliovirus may be found in its translation initiation via an internal ribosome entry site (IRES), which in addition ...

  1. Global Analysis of mRNA, Translation, and Protein Localization: Local Translation Is a Key Regulator of Cell Protrusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardakheh, Faraz K; Paul, Angela; Kümper, Sandra; Sadok, Amine; Paterson, Hugh; Mccarthy, Afshan; Yuan, Yinyin; Marshall, Christopher J

    2015-11-09

    Polarization of cells into a protrusive front and a retracting cell body is the hallmark of mesenchymal-like cell migration. Many mRNAs are localized to protrusions, but it is unclear to what degree mRNA localization contributes toward protrusion formation. We performed global quantitative analysis of the distributions of mRNAs, proteins, and translation rates between protrusions and the cell body by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and quantitative proteomics. Our results reveal local translation as a key determinant of protein localization to protrusions. Accordingly, inhibition of local translation destabilizes protrusions and inhibits mesenchymal-like morphology. Interestingly, many mRNAs localized to protrusions are translationally repressed. Specific cis-regulatory elements within mRNA UTRs define whether mRNAs are locally translated or repressed. Finally, RNAi screening of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) enriched in protrusions revealed trans-regulators of localized translation that are functionally important for protrusions. We propose that by deciphering the localized mRNA UTR code, these proteins regulate protrusion stability and mesenchymal-like morphology. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Equipment for measuring autogenous RH-change and autogenous deformation in cement paste and concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    1997-01-01

    Equipment for measuring autogenous RH-change and autogenous deformation in cement paste and concrete are presented. The equipment consists of a Rotronic Hygroskop DT including a measuring chamber for measuring autogenous RH-change in cement paste and concrete, a paste dilatometer for measuring...

  3. The molecular choreography of protein synthesis: translational control, regulation, and pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin; Choi, Junhong; O'Leary, Seán E; Prabhakar, Arjun; Petrov, Alexey; Grosely, Rosslyn; Puglisi, Elisabetta Viani; Puglisi, Joseph D

    2016-01-01

    Translation of proteins by the ribosome regulates gene expression, with recent results underscoring the importance of translational control. Misregulation of translation underlies many diseases, including cancer and many genetic diseases. Decades of biochemical and structural studies have delineated many of the mechanistic details in prokaryotic translation, and sketched the outlines of eukaryotic translation. However, translation may not proceed linearly through a single mechanistic pathway, but likely involves multiple pathways and branchpoints. The stochastic nature of biological processes would allow different pathways to occur during translation that are biased by the interaction of the ribosome with other translation factors, with many of the steps kinetically controlled. These multiple pathways and branchpoints are potential regulatory nexus, allowing gene expression to be tuned at the translational level. As research focus shifts toward eukaryotic translation, certain themes will be echoed from studies on prokaryotic translation. This review provides a general overview of the dynamic data related to prokaryotic and eukaryotic translation, in particular recent findings with single-molecule methods, complemented by biochemical, kinetic, and structural findings. We will underscore the importance of viewing the process through the viewpoints of regulation, translational control, and heterogeneous pathways.

  4. Regulation of human autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene translation by miR-220b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Tomohito; Noguchi, Yukiko; Shindo, Mieko; Morita, Yoshifumi; Oda, Yoshie; Yoshida, Eiko; Hamada, Hiroko; Harada, Mine; Shiokawa, Yuichi; Nishida, Takahiro; Tominaga, Ryuji; Kikushige, Yoshikane; Akashi, Koichi; Kudoh, Jun; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Tanaka, Yuka; Umemura, Tsukuru; Taniguchi, Taketoshi; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Kobayashi, Takashi; Mitsuyama, Masao; Kurisaki, Hironori; Katsuta, Hitoshi; Nagafuchi, Seiho

    2013-11-01

    Although mutations of autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene are responsible for autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED), presenting a wide spectrum of many characteristic and non-characteristic clinical features, some patients lack AIRE gene mutations. Therefore, something other than a mutation, such as dysregulation of AIRE gene, may be a causal factor for APECED or its related diseases. However, regulatory mechanisms for AIRE gene expression and/or translation have still remained elusive. We found that IL-2-stimulated CD4(+) T (IL-2T) cells showed a high expression of AIRE gene, but very low AIRE protein production, while Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B (EBV-B) cells express both AIRE gene and AIRE protein. By using microarray analysis, we could identify miR-220b as a possible regulatory mechanism for AIRE gene translation in IL-2T cells. Here we report that miR-220b significantly reduced the expression of AIRE protein in AIRE gene with 3'UTR region transfected 293T cells, whereas no alteration of AIRE protein production was observed in the open reading frame of AIRE gene alone transfected cells. In addition, anti-miR-220b reversed the inhibitory function of miR-220b for the expression of AIRE protein in AIRE gene with 3'UTR region transfected cells. Moreover, when AIRE gene transfected cells with mutated 3'UTR were transfected with miR-220b, no reduction of AIRE protein production was observed. Taken together, it was concluded that miR-220b inhibited the AIRE gene translation through the 3'UTR region of AIRE gene, indicating that miR-220b could serve as a regulator for human AIRE gene translation. © 2013.

  5. Post-translational modifications regulate signalling by Ror1

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaucká, M.; Krejčí, Pavel; Plevová, K.; Pavlová, Š.; Procházková, Jiřina; Janovská, P.; Valnohová, J.; Kozubík, Alois; Pospíšilová, Š.; Bryja, Vítězslav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 203, č. 3 (2011), s. 351-362 ISSN 1748-1708 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : chronic lymphocytic leukaemia * glycosylation * post-translational modification Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.090, year: 2011

  6. Hypoxia Induces Autophagy through Translational Up-Regulation of Lysosomal Proteins in Human Colon Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Chih Lai

    Full Text Available Hypoxia occurs in a wide variety of physiological and pathological conditions, including tumorigenesis. Tumor cells have to adapt to hypoxia by altering their gene expression and protein synthesis. Here, we showed that hypoxia inhibits translation through activation of PERK and inactivation of mTOR in human colon cancer HCT116 cells. Prolonged hypoxia (1% O2, 16 h dramatically inhibits general translation in HCT116 cells, yet selected mRNAs remain efficiently translated under such a condition. Using microarray analysis of polysome- associated mRNAs, we identified a large number of hypoxia-regulated genes at the translational level. Efficiently translated mRNAs during hypoxia were validated by polysome profiling and quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Pathway enrichment analysis showed that many of the up-regulated genes are involved in lysosome, glycan and lipid metabolism, antigen presentation, cell adhesion, and remodeling of the extracellular matrix and cytoskeleton. The majority of down-regulated genes are involved in apoptosis, ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, and oxidative phosphorylation. Further investigation showed that hypoxia induces lysosomal autophagy and mitochondrial dysfunction through translational regulation in HCT116 cells. The abundance of several translation factors and the mTOR kinase activity are involved in hypoxia-induced mitochondrial autophagy in HCT116 cells. Our studies highlight the importance of translational regulation for tumor cell adaptation to hypoxia.

  7. The Drosophila PNG kinase complex regulates the translation of cyclin B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardy, Leah; Orr-Weaver, Terry L

    2007-01-01

    The Drosophila PAN GU (PNG) kinase complex regulates the developmental translation of cyclin B. cyclin B mRNA becomes unmasked during oogenesis independent of PNG activity, but PNG is required for translation from egg activation. We find that although polyadenylation of cyclin B augments translation, it is not essential, and a fully elongated poly(A) is not required for translation to proceed. In fact, changes in poly(A) tail length are not sufficient to account for PNG-mediated control of cyclin B translation and of the early embryonic cell cycles. We present evidence that PNG functions instead as an antagonist of PUMILIO-dependent translational repression. Our data argue that changes in poly(A) tail length are not a universal mechanism governing embryonic cell cycles, and that PNG-mediated derepression of translation is an important alternative mechanism in Drosophila.

  8. Codon usage regulates protein structure and function by affecting translation elongation speed in Drosophila cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fangzhou; Yu, Chien-Hung; Liu, Yi

    2017-08-21

    Codon usage biases are found in all eukaryotic and prokaryotic genomes and have been proposed to regulate different aspects of translation process. Codon optimality has been shown to regulate translation elongation speed in fungal systems, but its effect on translation elongation speed in animal systems is not clear. In this study, we used a Drosophila cell-free translation system to directly compare the velocity of mRNA translation elongation. Our results demonstrate that optimal synonymous codons speed up translation elongation while non-optimal codons slow down translation. In addition, codon usage regulates ribosome movement and stalling on mRNA during translation. Finally, we show that codon usage affects protein structure and function in vitro and in Drosophila cells. Together, these results suggest that the effect of codon usage on translation elongation speed is a conserved mechanism from fungi to animals that can affect protein folding in eukaryotic organisms. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Regulation of Translational Efficiency by Disparate 5′-UTRs of PPARγ Splice Variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn McClelland

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The PPAR-γ gene encodes for at least 7 unique transcripts due to alternative splicing of five exons in the 5′-untranslated region (UTR. The translated region is encoded by exons 1–6, which are identical in all isoforms. This study investigated the role of the 5′-UTR in regulating the efficiency with which the message is translated to protein. A coupled in vitro transcription-translation assay demonstrated that PPAR-γ1, -γ2, and -γ5 are efficiently translated, whereas PPAR-γ4 and -γ7 are poorly translated. An in vivo reporter gene assay using each 5′-UTR upstream of the firefly luciferase gene showed that the 5′-UTRs for PPAR-γ1, -γ2, and -γ4 enhanced translation, whereas the 5′-UTRs for PPAR-γ5 and -γ7 inhibited translation. Models of RNA secondary structure, obtained by the mfold software, were used to explain the mechanism of regulation by each 5′-UTR. In general, it was found that the translational efficiency was inversely correlated with the stability of the mRNA secondary structure, the presence of base-pairing in the consensus Kozak sequence, the number of start codons in the 5′-UTR, and the length of the 5′-UTR. A better understanding of posttranscriptional regulation of translation will allow modulation of protein levels without altering transcription.

  10. Proteomic analysis of polyribosomes identifies splicing factors as potential regulators of translation during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviner, Ranen; Hofmann, Sarah; Elman, Tamar; Shenoy, Anjana; Geiger, Tamar; Elkon, Ran; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Elroy-Stein, Orna

    2017-06-02

    Precise regulation of mRNA translation is critical for proper cell division, but little is known about the factors that mediate it. To identify mRNA-binding proteins that regulate translation during mitosis, we analyzed the composition of polysomes from interphase and mitotic cells using unbiased quantitative mass-spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). We found that mitotic polysomes are enriched with a subset of proteins involved in RNA processing, including alternative splicing and RNA export. To demonstrate that these may indeed be regulators of translation, we focused on heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C (hnRNP C) as a test case and confirmed that it is recruited to elongating ribosomes during mitosis. Then, using a combination of pulsed SILAC, metabolic labeling and ribosome profiling, we showed that knockdown of hnRNP C affects both global and transcript-specific translation rates and found that hnRNP C is specifically important for translation of mRNAs that encode ribosomal proteins and translation factors. Taken together, our results demonstrate how proteomic analysis of polysomes can provide insight into translation regulation under various cellular conditions of interest and suggest that hnRNP C facilitates production of translation machinery components during mitosis to provide daughter cells with the ability to efficiently synthesize proteins as they enter G1 phase. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Translation regulation in plants: an interesting past, an exciting present and a promising future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchante, Catharina; Stepanova, Anna N; Alonso, Jose M

    2017-05-01

    Changes in gene expression are at the core of most biological processes, from cell differentiation to organ development, including the adaptation of the whole organism to the ever-changing environment. Although the central role of transcriptional regulation is solidly established and the general mechanisms involved in this type of regulation are relatively well understood, it is clear that regulation at a translational level also plays an essential role in modulating gene expression. Despite the large number of examples illustrating the critical role played by translational regulation in determining the expression levels of a gene, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind such types of regulation has been slow to emerge. With the recent development of high-throughput approaches to map and quantify different critical parameters affecting translation, such as RNA structure, protein-RNA interactions and ribosome occupancy at the genome level, a renewed enthusiasm toward studying translation regulation is warranted. The use of these new powerful technologies in well-established and uncharacterized translation-dependent processes holds the promise to decipher the likely complex and diverse, but also fascinating, mechanisms behind the regulation of translation. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Ribosomal protein mRNAs are translationally-regulated during human dendritic cells activation by LPS.

    OpenAIRE

    Ceppi, Maurizio; Clavarino, Giovanna; Gatti, Evelina; Schmidt, Enrico; De Gassart, Aude; Blankenship, Derek; Ogola, Gerald; Banchereau, Jacques; Chaussabel, Damien; Pierre, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    International audience; BACKGROUND: Dendritic cells (DCs) are the sentinels of the mammalian immune system, characterized by a complex maturation process driven by pathogen detection. Although multiple studies have described the analysis of activated DCs by transcriptional profiling, recent findings indicate that mRNAs are also regulated at the translational level. A systematic analysis of the mRNAs being translationally regulated at various stages of DC activation was performed using transla...

  13. Translation is actively regulated during the differentiation of CD8+ effector T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Koichi; Morita, Masahiro; Bederman, Annelise G; Konieczny, Bogumila T; Kissick, Haydn T; Sonenberg, Nahum; Ahmed, Rafi

    2017-09-01

    Translation is a critical process in protein synthesis, but translational regulation in antigen-specific T cells in vivo has not been well defined. Here we have characterized the translatome of virus-specific CD8 + effector T cells (T eff cells) during acute infection of mice with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). Antigen-specific T cells exerted dynamic translational control of gene expression that correlated with cell proliferation and stimulation via the T cell antigen receptor (TCR). The translation of mRNAs that encode translation machinery, including ribosomal proteins, was upregulated during the T cell clonal-expansion phase, followed by inhibition of the translation of those transcripts when the CD8 + T eff cells stopped dividing just before the contraction phase. That translational suppression was more pronounced in terminal effector cells than in memory precursor cells and was regulated by antigenic stimulation and signals from the kinase mTOR. Our studies show that translation of transcripts encoding ribosomal proteins is regulated during the differentiation of CD8 + T eff cells and might have a role in fate 'decisions' involved in the formation of memory cells.

  14. Managing the complexity of communication: regulation of gap junctions by post-translational modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsen, Lene N; Calloe, Kirstine; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Nielsen, Morten S

    2013-10-22

    Gap junctions are comprised of connexins that form cell-to-cell channels which couple neighboring cells to accommodate the exchange of information. The need for communication does, however, change over time and therefore must be tightly controlled. Although the regulation of connexin protein expression by transcription and translation is of great importance, the trafficking, channel activity and degradation are also under tight control. The function of connexins can be regulated by several post translational modifications, which affect numerous parameters; including number of channels, open probability, single channel conductance or selectivity. The most extensively investigated post translational modifications are phosphorylations, which have been documented in all mammalian connexins. Besides phosphorylations, some connexins are known to be ubiquitinated, SUMOylated, nitrosylated, hydroxylated, acetylated, methylated, and γ-carboxyglutamated. The aim of the present review is to summarize our current knowledge of post translational regulation of the connexin family of proteins.

  15. Managing the complexity of communication; regulation of gap junctions by post-translational modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lene Nygaard Axelsen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Gap junctions are comprised of connexins that form cell-to-cell channels which couple neighboring cells to accommodate the exchange of information. The need for communication does, however, change over time and therefore must be tightly controlled. Although the regulation of connexin protein expression by transcription and translation is of great importance, the trafficking, channel activity and degradation are also under tight control. The function of connexins can be regulated by several post translational modifications, which affect numerous parameters; including number of channels, open probability, single channel conductance or selectivity. The most extensively investigated post translational modifications are phosphorylations, which have been documented in all mammalian connexins. Besides phosphorylations, some connexins are known to be ubiquitinated, SUMOylated, nitrosylated, hydroxylated, acetylated, methylated and γ-carboxyglutamated. The aim of the present review is to summarize our current knowledge of post translational regulation of the connexin family of proteins.

  16. Regulation of host translational machinery by African swine fever virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Castelló

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available African swine fever virus (ASFV, like other complex DNA viruses, deploys a variety of strategies to evade the host's defence systems, such as inflammatory and immune responses and cell death. Here, we analyse the modifications in the translational machinery induced by ASFV. During ASFV infection, eIF4G and eIF4E are phosphorylated (Ser1108 and Ser209, respectively, whereas 4E-BP1 is hyperphosphorylated at early times post infection and hypophosphorylated after 18 h. Indeed, a potent increase in eIF4F assembly is observed in ASFV-infected cells, which is prevented by rapamycin treatment. Phosphorylation of eIF4E, eIF4GI and 4E-BP1 is important to enhance viral protein production, but is not essential for ASFV infection as observed in rapamycin- or CGP57380-treated cells. Nevertheless, eIF4F components are indispensable for ASFV protein synthesis and virus spread, since eIF4E or eIF4G depletion in COS-7 or Vero cells strongly prevents accumulation of viral proteins and decreases virus titre. In addition, eIF4F is not only activated but also redistributed within the viral factories at early times of infection, while eIF4G and eIF4E are surrounding these areas at late times. In fact, other components of translational machinery such as eIF2alpha, eIF3b, eIF4E, eEF2 and ribosomal P protein are enriched in areas surrounding ASFV factories. Notably, the mitochondrial network is polarized in ASFV-infected cells co-localizing with ribosomes. Thus, translation and ATP synthesis seem to be coupled and compartmentalized at the periphery of viral factories. At later times after ASFV infection, polyadenylated mRNAs disappear from the cytoplasm of Vero cells, except within the viral factories. The distribution of these pools of mRNAs is similar to the localization of viral late mRNAs. Therefore, degradation of cellular polyadenylated mRNAs and recruitment of the translation machinery to viral factories may contribute to the inhibition of host protein synthesis

  17. Post-translational regulation of Oct4 transcriptional activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan P Saxe

    Full Text Available Oct4 is a key component of the molecular circuitry which regulates embryonic stem cell proliferation and differentiation. It is essential for maintenance of undifferentiated, pluripotent cell populations, and accomplishes these tasks by binding DNA in multiple heterodimer and homodimer configurations. Very little is known about how formation of these complexes is regulated, or the mechanisms through which Oct4 proteins respond to complex extracellular stimuli which regulate pluripotency. Here, we provide evidence for a phosphorylation-based mechanism which regulates specific Oct4 homodimer conformations. Point mutations of a putative phosphorylation site can specifically abrogate transcriptional activity of a specific homodimer assembly, with little effect on other configurations. Moreover, we performed bioinformatic predictions to identify a subset of Oct4 target genes which may be regulated by this specific assembly, and show that altering Oct4 protein levels affects transcription of Oct4 target genes which are regulated by this assembly but not others. Finally, we identified several signaling pathways which may mediate this phosphorylation and act in combination to regulate Oct4 transcriptional activity and protein stability. These results provide a mechanism for rapid and reversible alteration of Oct4 transactivation potential in response to extracellular signals.

  18. Autogenous shrinkage, speciality of high performance concretes

    OpenAIRE

    Vogrič, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Autogenous shrinkage is a consequence of self dessication in pores of hardened cement paste and is, at high performance concrete significantly greater than that of the ordinary concretes, mainly due to low water to cement ratio. In the graduation thesis we examined the main mechanisms that cause autogenous shrinkage. It can be reduced by internal curinginternal water reservoirs. As internal water reservoirs we used pre-soaked expanded clay Liapor. On specimens, in which we replaced 12 % of ag...

  19. AUU-to-AUG mutation in the initiator codon of the translation initiation factor IF3 abolishes translational autocontrol of its own gene (infC) in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, J S; Springer, M; Grunberg-Manago, M

    1987-06-01

    We previously showed that Escherichia coli translation initiation factor IF3 regulates the expression of its own gene infC at the translational level in vivo. Here we create two alterations in the infC gene and test their effects on translational autocontrol of infC expression in vivo by measuring beta-galactosidase activity expressed from infC-lacZ gene fusions under conditions of up to 4-fold derepression or 3-fold repression of infC expression. Replacement of the infC promoter with the trp promoter deletes 120 nucleotides of the infC mRNA 5' to the translation initiation site without affecting autogenous translational control. Mutation of the unusual AUU initiator codon of infC to the more common AUG initiator codon abolishes translation initiation factor IF3-dependent repression and derepression of infC expression in vivo. These results establish the AUU initiator codon of infC as an essential cis-acting element in autogenous translational control of translation initiation factor IF3 expression in vivo.

  20. The Importance of Autonomous Regulation for Students' Successful Translation of Intentions into Behavior Change via Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Dian Sheng; Lippke, Sonia; Liu, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Physical activity has a high prevention potential in adolescents. This study investigated the relations between physical activity and intention, autonomous regulation, and planning. We hypothesized that planning mediates the relationship between intention and behavior and that this mediation should depend on the level of autonomous regulation. Stratified randomization sampling method was administered to assemble a sample of N = 534 students among two schools in China. To test the hypothesis, autonomous regulation, intention, and physical activity were assessed at baseline as well as planning and follow-up physical activity four weeks after the pretest. A moderated mediation model confirmed that planning mediated the intention-behavior relation with the effect of planning being moderated by autonomous regulation. Study results demonstrated that autonomous regulation facilitated the translation of intention into behavior change via planning. To promote physical activity among adolescents, interventions targeting planning and autonomous regulation might facilitate successful translation of intentions into behavior change.

  1. The Importance of Autonomous Regulation for Students' Successful Translation of Intentions into Behavior Change via Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dian Sheng Cao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity has a high prevention potential in adolescents. This study investigated the relations between physical activity and intention, autonomous regulation, and planning. We hypothesized that planning mediates the relationship between intention and behavior and that this mediation should depend on the level of autonomous regulation. Stratified randomization sampling method was administered to assemble a sample of =534 students among two schools in China. To test the hypothesis, autonomous regulation, intention, and physical activity were assessed at baseline as well as planning and follow-up physical activity four weeks after the pretest. A moderated mediation model confirmed that planning mediated the intention-behavior relation with the effect of planning being moderated by autonomous regulation. Study results demonstrated that autonomous regulation facilitated the translation of intention into behavior change via planning. To promote physical activity among adolescents, interventions targeting planning and autonomous regulation might facilitate successful translation of intentions into behavior change.

  2. Regulation of translation in haloarchaea: 5'- and 3'-UTRs are essential and have to functionally interact in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariam Brenneis

    Full Text Available Recently a first genome-wide analysis of translational regulation using prokaryotic species had been performed which revealed that regulation of translational efficiency plays an important role in haloarchaea. In fact, the fractions of genes under differential growth phase-dependent translational control in the two species Halobacterium salinarum and Haloferax volcanii were as high as in eukaryotes. However, nothing is known about the mechanisms of translational regulation in archaea. Therefore, two genes exhibiting opposing directions of regulation were selected to unravel the importance of untranslated regions (UTRs for differential translational control in vivo.Differential translational regulation in exponentially growing versus stationary phase cells was studied by comparing translational efficiencies using a reporter gene system. Translational regulation was not observed when 5'-UTRs or 3'-UTRs alone were fused to the reporter gene. However, their simultaneous presence was sufficient to transfer differential translational control from the native transcript to the reporter transcript. This was true for both directions of translational control. Translational regulation was completely abolished when stem loops in the 5'-UTR were changed by mutagenesis. An "UTR-swap" experiment demonstrated that the direction of translational regulation is encoded in the 3'-UTR, not in the 5'-UTR. While much is known about 5'-UTR-dependent translational control in bacteria, the reported findings provide the first examples that both 5'- and 3'-UTRs are essential and sufficient to drive differential translational regulation in a prokaryote and therefore have to functionally interact in vivo. The current results indicate that 3'-UTR-dependent translational control had already evolved before capping and polyadenylation of transcripts were invented, which are essential for circularization of transcripts in eukaryotes.

  3. Regulation of mRNA Translation Is a Novel Mechanism for Phthalate Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Jun; Lopez-Dee, Zenaida P; Cottell, Colby; Wolfe, Laura; Nye, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Phthalates are a group of plasticizers that are widely used in many consumer products and medical devices, thus generating a huge burden to human health. Phthalates have been known to cause a number of developmental and reproductive disorders functioning as endocrine modulators. They are also involved in carcinogenesis with mechanisms less understood. To further understand the molecular mechanisms of phthalate toxicity, in this study we reported a new effect of phthalates on mRNA translation/protein synthesis, a key regulatory step of gene expression. Butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP) was found to directly inhibit mRNA translation in vitro but showed a complicated pattern of affecting mRNA translation in cells. In human kidney embryonic cell (HEK-293T), BBP increased cap-dependent mRNA translation at lower concentrations but showed inhibitory effect at higher concentrations. Cap-independent translation was not affected. On the other hand, mono (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) as a major metabolite of another important phthalate di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) inhibited both can-dependent and -independent mRNA translation in vivo. In contrast, BBP and MEHP exhibited an overall promoting effect on mRNA translation in cancer cells. Mechanistic studies identified that the level and phosphorylation of eIF4E-BP (eIF4E binding protein) and the amount of eIF4GI in eIF4F complex were altered in accordance with the effect of BBP on translation. BBP was also identified to directly bind to eIF4E, providing a further mechanism underlying the regulation of mRNA by phthalate. At the cellular level BBP inhibited normal cell growth but slightly promoted cancer cells (HT29) growth. Overall, this study provides the first evidence that phthalates can directly regulate mRNA translation as a novel mechanism to mediate their biological toxicities.

  4. Regulation of mRNA Translation Is a Novel Mechanism for Phthalate Toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ling

    Full Text Available Phthalates are a group of plasticizers that are widely used in many consumer products and medical devices, thus generating a huge burden to human health. Phthalates have been known to cause a number of developmental and reproductive disorders functioning as endocrine modulators. They are also involved in carcinogenesis with mechanisms less understood. To further understand the molecular mechanisms of phthalate toxicity, in this study we reported a new effect of phthalates on mRNA translation/protein synthesis, a key regulatory step of gene expression. Butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP was found to directly inhibit mRNA translation in vitro but showed a complicated pattern of affecting mRNA translation in cells. In human kidney embryonic cell (HEK-293T, BBP increased cap-dependent mRNA translation at lower concentrations but showed inhibitory effect at higher concentrations. Cap-independent translation was not affected. On the other hand, mono (2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP as a major metabolite of another important phthalate di (2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP inhibited both can-dependent and -independent mRNA translation in vivo. In contrast, BBP and MEHP exhibited an overall promoting effect on mRNA translation in cancer cells. Mechanistic studies identified that the level and phosphorylation of eIF4E-BP (eIF4E binding protein and the amount of eIF4GI in eIF4F complex were altered in accordance with the effect of BBP on translation. BBP was also identified to directly bind to eIF4E, providing a further mechanism underlying the regulation of mRNA by phthalate. At the cellular level BBP inhibited normal cell growth but slightly promoted cancer cells (HT29 growth. Overall, this study provides the first evidence that phthalates can directly regulate mRNA translation as a novel mechanism to mediate their biological toxicities.

  5. Managing the complexity of communication: regulation of gap junctions by post-translational modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Callø, Kirstine; von Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions are comprised of connexins that form cell-to-cell channels which couple neighboring cells to accommodate the exchange of information. The need for communication does, however, change over time and therefore must be tightly controlled. Although the regulation of connexin protein...... expression by transcription and translation is of great importance, the trafficking, channel activity and degradation are also under tight control. The function of connexins can be regulated by several post translational modifications, which affect numerous parameters; including number of channels, open...

  6. Amplified in Breast Cancer Regulates Transcription and Translation in Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochnik, Aleksandra M; Peterson, Mark S; Avdulov, Svetlana V; Oh, Annabell S; Bitterman, Peter B; Yee, Douglas

    2016-02-01

    Control of mRNA translation is fundamentally altered in cancer. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) signaling regulates key translation mediators to modulate protein synthesis (e.g. eIF4E, 4E-BP1, mTOR, and S6K1). Importantly the Amplified in Breast Cancer (AIB1) oncogene regulates transcription and is also a downstream mediator of IGF-I signaling. To determine if AIB1 also affects mRNA translation, we conducted gain and loss of AIB1 function experiments in estrogen receptor alpha (ERα)(+) (MCF-7L) and ERα(-) (MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-435 and LCC6) breast cancer cells. AIB1 positively regulated IGF-I-induced mRNA translation in both ERα(+) and ERα(-) cells. Formation of the eIF4E-4E-BP1 translational complex was altered in the AIB1 ERα(+) and ERα(-) knockdown cells, leading to a reduction in the eIF4E/4E-BP1 and eIF4G/4E-BP1 ratios. In basal and IGF-I stimulated MCF-7 and LCC6 cells, knockdown of AIB1 decreased the integrity of the cap-binding complex, reduced global IGF-I stimulated polyribosomal mRNA recruitment with a concomitant decrease in ten of the thirteen genes tested in polysome-bound mRNAs mapping to proliferation, cell cycle, survival, transcription, translation and ribosome biogenesis ontologies. Specifically, knockdown of AIB1 decreased ribosome-bound mRNA and steady-state protein levels of the transcription factors ERα and E2F1 in addition to reduced ribosome-bound mRNA of the ribosome biogenesis factor BYSL in a cell-line specific manner to regulate mRNA translation. The oncogenic transcription factor AIB1 has a novel role in the regulation of polyribosome recruitment and formation of the translational complex. Combinatorial therapies targeting IGF signaling and mRNA translation in AIB1 expressing breast cancers may have clinical benefit and warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. ATX-2, the C. elegans ortholog of ataxin 2, functions in translational regulation in the germline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciosk, Rafal; DePalma, Michael; Priess, James R

    2004-10-01

    Human ataxin 2 is a protein of unknown function that is implicated in the neurodegenerative disorder spinocerebellar ataxia type 2. We found that the C. elegans ortholog of ataxin 2, ATX-2, forms a complex with PAB-1, a cytoplasmic polyA-binding protein, and that ATX-2 is required for development of the germline. In the absence of ATX-2, proliferation of stem cells is reduced, and the germline is abnormally masculinized. These defects appear to result from inappropriate translational regulation that normally is mediated by the conserved KH-domain protein GLD-1. We find that MEX-3, a second KH-domain protein, exhibits a novel, ATX-2-dependent role in preventing inappropriate translation in the germline stem cells. Together, our results suggest that ATX-2 functions in translational regulation that is mediated by GLD-1 and MEX-3 proteins.

  8. 30 CFR 35.20 - Autogenous-ignition temperature test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Autogenous-ignition temperature test. 35.20... Autogenous-ignition temperature test. (a) Purpose. The purpose of this test, referred to hereinafter as the ignition-temperature test, is to determine the lowest autogenous-ignition temperature of a hydraulic fluid...

  9. 47 CFR 74.789 - Broadcast regulations applicable to digital low power television and television translator stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... power television and television translator stations. 74.789 Section 74.789 Telecommunication FEDERAL....789 Broadcast regulations applicable to digital low power television and television translator stations. The following sections are applicable to digital low power television and television translator...

  10. Circadian clock regulation of mRNA translation through eukaryotic elongation factor eEF-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caster, Stephen Z.; Castillo, Kathrina; Sachs, Matthew S.; Bell-Pedersen, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock has a profound effect on gene regulation, controlling rhythmic transcript accumulation for up to half of expressed genes in eukaryotes. Evidence also exists for clock control of mRNA translation, but the extent and mechanisms for this regulation are not known. In Neurospora crassa, the circadian clock generates daily rhythms in the activation of conserved mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways when cells are grown in constant conditions, including rhythmic activation of the well-characterized p38 osmosensing (OS) MAPK pathway. Rhythmic phosphorylation of the MAPK OS-2 (P-OS-2) leads to temporal control of downstream targets of OS-2. We show that osmotic stress in N. crassa induced the phosphorylation of a eukaryotic elongation factor-2 (eEF-2) kinase, radiation sensitivity complementing kinase-2 (RCK-2), and that RCK-2 is necessary for high-level phosphorylation of eEF-2, a key regulator of translation elongation. The levels of phosphorylated RCK-2 and phosphorylated eEF-2 cycle in abundance in wild-type cells but not in cells deleted for OS-2 or the core clock component FREQUENCY (FRQ). Translation extracts from cells grown in constant conditions show decreased translational activity in the late subjective morning, coincident with the peak in eEF-2 phosphorylation, and rhythmic translation of glutathione S-transferase (GST-3) from constitutive mRNA levels in vivo is dependent on circadian regulation of eEF-2 activity. In contrast, rhythms in phosphorylated eEF-2 levels are not necessary for rhythms in accumulation of the clock protein FRQ, indicating that clock control of eEF-2 activity promotes rhythmic translation of specific mRNAs. PMID:27506798

  11. Managing the complexity of communication: regulation of gap junctions by post-translational modification

    OpenAIRE

    Axelsen, Lene N.; Calloe, Kirstine; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Nielsen, Morten S.

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions are comprised of connexins that form cell-to-cell channels which couple neighboring cells to accommodate the exchange of information. The need for communication does, however, change over time and therefore must be tightly controlled. Although the regulation of connexin protein expression by transcription and translation is of great importance, the trafficking, channel activity and degradation are also under tight control. The function of connexins can be regulated by several po...

  12. A UV-induced mutation in neurospora that affects translational regulation in response to arginine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitag, M.; Dighde, N.; Sachs, M.S.

    1996-01-01

    The Neurospora crassa arg-2 gene encodes the small subunit of arginine-specific carbamoyl phosphate synthetase. The levels of arg-2 mRNA and mRNA translation are negatively regulated by arginine. An upstream open reading frame (uORF) in the transcript's 5' region has been implicated in arginine-specific control. An arg-2-hph fusion gene encoding hygromycin phosphotransferase conferred arginine-regulated resistance to hygromycin when introduced into N. crassa. We used an arg-2-hph strain to select for UV-induced mutants that grew in the presence of hygromycin and arginine, and we isolated 46 mutants that had either of two phenotypes. One phenotype indicated altered expression of both arg-2-hph and arg-2 genes; the other, altered expression of arg-2-hph but not arg-2. One of the latter mutations, which was genetically closely linked to arg-2-hph, was recovered from the 5' region of the arg-2-hph gene using PCR Sequence analyses and transformation experiments revealed a mutation at uORF codon 12 (Asp to Asn) that abrogated negative regulation. Examination of the distribution of ribosomes on arg-2-hph transcripts showed that loss of regulation had a translational component, indicating the uORF sequence was important for Arg-specific translational control. Comparisons with other uORFs suggest common elements in translational control mechanisms

  13. Roles of Transcriptional and Translational Control Mechanisms in Regulation of Ribosomal Protein Synthesis in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos, Hector L; O'Connor, Kevin; Sanchez-Vazquez, Patricia; Gourse, Richard L

    2017-11-01

    Bacterial ribosome biogenesis is tightly regulated to match nutritional conditions and to prevent formation of defective ribosomal particles. In Escherichia coli , most ribosomal protein (r-protein) synthesis is coordinated with rRNA synthesis by a translational feedback mechanism: when r-proteins exceed rRNAs, specific r-proteins bind to their own mRNAs and inhibit expression of the operon. It was recently discovered that the second messenger nucleotide guanosine tetra and pentaphosphate (ppGpp), which directly regulates rRNA promoters, is also capable of regulating many r-protein promoters. To examine the relative contributions of the translational and transcriptional control mechanisms to the regulation of r-protein synthesis, we devised a reporter system that enabled us to genetically separate the cis -acting sequences responsible for the two mechanisms and to quantify their relative contributions to regulation under the same conditions. We show that the synthesis of r-proteins from the S20 and S10 operons is regulated by ppGpp following shifts in nutritional conditions, but most of the effect of ppGpp required the 5' region of the r-protein mRNA containing the target site for translational feedback regulation and not the promoter. These results suggest that most regulation of the S20 and S10 operons by ppGpp following nutritional shifts is indirect and occurs in response to changes in rRNA synthesis. In contrast, we found that the promoters for the S20 operon were regulated during outgrowth, likely in response to increasing nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) levels. Thus, r-protein synthesis is dynamic, with different mechanisms acting at different times. IMPORTANCE Bacterial cells have evolved complex and seemingly redundant strategies to regulate many high-energy-consuming processes. In E. coli , synthesis of ribosomal components is tightly regulated with respect to nutritional conditions by mechanisms that act at both the transcription and translation steps. In

  14. Ribosome profiling reveals translational regulation of mammalian cells in response to hypoxic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhiwen; Yang, Jiaqi; Dai, Aimei; Wang, Yuming; Li, Wei; Xie, Zhi

    2017-08-21

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells transfer oxygen and nutrients from choroid to the neural retina. Reduced oxygen to RPE perturbs development and functions of blood vessels in retina. Previous efforts of genome-wide studies have been largely focused on transcriptional changes of cells in response to hypoxia. Recently developed ribosome profiling provides an opportunity to study genome-wide translational changes. To gain systemic insights into the transcriptional and translational regulation of cellular in response to hypoxic stress, we used simultaneous RNA sequencing and ribosome profiling on an RPE cells line, ARPE-19, under hypoxia condition. Both HIF-1α and EPAS1 (HIF-2α) proteins were stabilized in ARPE-19 under hypoxic stress treatment at 1 h, 2 h and 4 h. Analysis of simultaneous RNA sequencing and ribosome profiling data showed genome-wide gene expression changes at both transcriptional and translational levels. Comparative analysis of ribosome profiling and RNA-seq data revealed that hypoxia induced changes of more genes at the translational than the transcriptional levels. Ribosomes densities at 5' untranslated region (UTR) significantly increased under hypoxic stress. Interestingly, the increase in ribosome densities at 5' UTR is positively correlated with the presence of upstream open reading frames (uORFs) in the 5' UTR of mRNAs. Our results characterized translational profiles of mRNAs for a RPE cell line in response to hypoxia. In particular, uORFs play important roles in the regulation of translation efficiency by affecting ribosomes loading onto mRNAs. This study provides the first attempt to understand translational response of mammalian cells under hypoxic condition.

  15. A universal strategy for regulating mRNA translation in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jicong; Arha, Manish; Sudrik, Chaitanya; Mukherjee, Abhirup; Wu, Xia; Kane, Ravi S

    2015-04-30

    We describe a simple strategy to control mRNA translation in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells which relies on a unique protein-RNA interaction. Specifically, we used the Pumilio/FBF (PUF) protein to repress translation by binding in between the ribosome binding site (RBS) and the start codon (in Escherichia coli), or by binding to the 5' untranslated region of target mRNAs (in mammalian cells). The design principle is straightforward, the extent of translational repression can be tuned and the regulator is genetically encoded, enabling the construction of artificial signal cascades. We demonstrate that this approach can also be used to regulate polycistronic mRNAs; such regulation has rarely been achieved in previous reports. Since the regulator used in this study is a modular RNA-binding protein, which can be engineered to target different 8-nucleotide RNA sequences, our strategy could be used in the future to target endogenous mRNAs for regulating metabolic flows and signaling pathways in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 6, an evolutionarily conserved regulator of ribosome biogenesis and protein translation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Jianjun [Harvard University; Jin, Zhaoqing [ORNL; Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL; Li, Jian-Feng [Harvard University; Chen, Jay [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    We recently identified Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1 (RACK1) as one of the molecular links between abscisic acid (ABA) signaling and its regulation on protein translation. Moreover, we identified Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 6 (eIF6) as an interacting partner of RACK1. Because the interaction between RACK1 and eIF6 in mammalian cells is known to regulate the ribosome assembly step of protein translation initiation, it was hypothesized that the same process of protein translation in Arabidopsis is also regulated by RACK1 and eIF6. In this article, we analyzed the amino acid sequences of eIF6 in different species from different lineages and discovered some intriguing differences in protein phosphorylation sites that may contribute to its action in ribosome assembly and biogenesis. In addition, we discovered that, distinct from non-plant organisms in which eIF6 is encoded by a single gene, all sequenced plant genomes contain two or more copies of eIF6 genes. While one copy of plant eIF6 is expressed ubiquitously and might possess the conserved function in ribosome biogenesis and protein translation, the other copy seems to be only expressed in specific organs and therefore may have gained some new functions. We proposed some important studies that may help us better understand the function of eIF6 in plants.

  17. Identification of microcracks caused by autogenous shrinkage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lura, Pietro; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Guang, Ye

    2005-01-01

    Detection and quantification of microcracks caused by restrained autogenous shrinkage in high-performance concrete is difficult. Available techniques either lack the required resolution or may cause further cracks indistinguishable from the original ones. The new technique presented in this paper...

  18. Autogenous Phenomena in Cement-Based Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2005-01-01

    Denne afhandling er skrevet med henblik på opnåelse af den danske doktorgrad i teknik, dr.techn. Den vedrører autogene fænomener i cementbaserede materialer – primært deformation og ændring af den relative luftfugtighed (RF). I afhandlingen er det belyst, hvordan betydningen af disse fænomener bl...

  19. Autogenous Phenomena in Cement-Based Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    Denne afhandling er skrevet med henblik på opnåelse af den danske doktorgrad i teknik, dr.techn. Den vedrører autogene fænomener i cementbaserede materialer – primært deformation og ændring af den relative luftfugtighed (RF). I afhandlingen er det belyst, hvordan betydningen af disse fænomener bl...

  20. The long non-coding RNA GAS5 cooperates with the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E to regulate c-Myc translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangzhen Hu

    Full Text Available Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs are important regulators of transcription; however, their involvement in protein translation is not well known. Here we explored whether the lncRNA GAS5 is associated with translation initiation machinery and regulates translation. GAS5 was enriched with eukaryotic translation initiation factor-4E (eIF4E in an RNA-immunoprecipitation assay using lymphoma cell lines. We identified two RNA binding motifs within eIF4E protein and the deletion of each motif inhibited the binding of GAS5 with eIF4E. To confirm the role of GAS5 in translation regulation, GAS5 siRNA and in vitro transcribed GAS5 RNA were used to knock down or overexpress GAS5, respectively. GAS5 siRNA had no effect on global protein translation but did specifically increase c-Myc protein level without an effect on c-Myc mRNA. The mechanism of this increase in c-Myc protein was enhanced association of c-Myc mRNA with the polysome without any effect on protein stability. In contrast, overexpression of in vitro transcribed GAS5 RNA suppressed c-Myc protein without affecting c-Myc mRNA. Interestingly, GAS5 was found to be bound with c-Myc mRNA, suggesting that GAS5 regulates c-Myc translation through lncRNA-mRNA interaction. Our findings have uncovered a role of GAS5 lncRNA in translation regulation through its interactions with eIF4E and c-Myc mRNA.

  1. Cell-fate determination by ubiquitin-dependent regulation of translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Achim; Iwasaki, Shintaro; McGourty, Colleen A; Medina-Ruiz, Sofia; Teerikorpi, Nia; Fedrigo, Indro; Ingolia, Nicholas T; Rape, Michael

    2015-09-24

    Metazoan development depends on the accurate execution of differentiation programs that allow pluripotent stem cells to adopt specific fates. Differentiation requires changes to chromatin architecture and transcriptional networks, yet whether other regulatory events support cell-fate determination is less well understood. Here we identify the ubiquitin ligase CUL3 in complex with its vertebrate-specific substrate adaptor KBTBD8 (CUL3(KBTBD8)) as an essential regulator of human and Xenopus tropicalis neural crest specification. CUL3(KBTBD8) monoubiquitylates NOLC1 and its paralogue TCOF1, the mutation of which underlies the neurocristopathy Treacher Collins syndrome. Ubiquitylation drives formation of a TCOF1-NOLC1 platform that connects RNA polymerase I with ribosome modification enzymes and remodels the translational program of differentiating cells in favour of neural crest specification. We conclude that ubiquitin-dependent regulation of translation is an important feature of cell-fate determination.

  2. Eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase regulates the cold stress response by slowing translation elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, John R P; Bastide, Amandine; Roobol, Anne; Roobol, Jo; Jackson, Thomas J; Utami, Wahyu; Barrett, David A; Smales, C Mark; Willis, Anne E

    2015-01-15

    Cells respond to external stress conditions by controlling gene expression, a process which occurs rapidly via post-transcriptional regulation at the level of protein synthesis. Global control of translation is mediated by modification of translation factors to allow reprogramming of the translatome and synthesis of specific proteins that are required for stress protection or initiation of apoptosis. In the present study, we have investigated how global protein synthesis rates are regulated upon mild cooling. We demonstrate that although there are changes to the factors that control initiation, including phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2) on the α-subunit, the reduction in the global translation rate is mediated by regulation of elongation via phosphorylation of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2) by its specific kinase, eEF2K (eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase). The AMP/ATP ratio increases following cooling, consistent with a reduction in metabolic rates, giving rise to activation of AMPK (5'-AMP-activated protein kinase), which is upstream of eEF2K. However, our data show that the major trigger for activation of eEF2K upon mild cooling is the release of Ca2+ ions from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and, importantly, that it is possible to restore protein synthesis rates in cooled cells by inhibition of this pathway at multiple points. As cooling has both therapeutic and industrial applications, our data provide important new insights into how the cellular responses to this stress are regulated, opening up new possibilities to modulate these responses for medical or industrial use at physiological or cooler temperatures.

  3. Modifications to the translational apparatus which affect the regulation of protein synthesis in sea urchin embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scalise, F.W.

    1988-01-01

    Protein synthesis can be regulated at a number of cellular levels. I have examined how modifications to specific components of the protein synthetic machinery are involved in regulating the efficiency of initiation of translation during early sea urchin embryogenesis. It is demonstrated that Ca{sup 2+} concentrations exceeding 500 uM cause the inhibition of protein synthesis in cell-free translation lysates prepared from sea urchin embryos. Specific changes in the state of phosphorylation of at least 8 proteins occur during this Ca{sup 2+}-mediated repression of translation. Analysis of these proteins has indicated that, unlike mammalian systems, there is no detectable level of Ca{sup 2+}-dependent phosphorylation of the {alpha}subunit eIF-2. Two of the proteins which do become phosphorylated in response to Ca{sup 2+} are calmodulin and an isoelectric form of sea urchin eIF-4D. In addition, 2 proteins which share similarities with kinases involved in the regulation of protein synthesis in mammalian cells, also become phosphorylated. I have investigated the consequences of changes in eIF-4D during sea urchin embryogenesis because it has been proposed that a polyamine-mediated conversion of lysine to hypusine in this factor may enhance translational activity. It is demonstrated that ({sup 3}H) spermidine-derived radioactivity is incorporated into a number of proteins when sea urchin embryos are labeled in vivo, and that the pattern of individual proteins that become labeled changes over the course of the first 30 hr of development.

  4. Identification of nuclear protein targets for six leukemogenic tyrosine kinases governed by post-translational regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Pierce

    Full Text Available Mutated tyrosine kinases are associated with a number of different haematological malignancies including myeloproliferative disorders, lymphoma and acute myeloid leukaemia. The potential commonalities in the action of six of these leukemogenic proteins on nuclear proteins were investigated using systematic proteomic analysis. The effects on over 3600 nuclear proteins and 1500 phosphopeptide sites were relatively quantified in seven isogenic cell lines. The effects of the kinases were diverse although some commonalities were found. Comparison of the nuclear proteomic data with transcriptome data and cytoplasmic proteomic data indicated that the major changes are due to post-translational mechanisms rather than changes in mRNA or protein distribution. Analysis of the promoter regions of genes whose protein levels changed in response to the kinases showed the most common binding site found was that for NFκB whilst other sites such as those for the glucocorticoid receptor were also found. Glucocorticoid receptor levels and phosphorylation were decreased by all 6 PTKs. Whilst Glucocorticoid receptor action can potentiate NFκB action those proteins where genes have NFκB binding sites were in often regulated post-translationally. However all 6 PTKs showed evidence of NFkB pathway modulation via activation via altered IkB and NFKB levels. Validation of a common change was also undertaken with PMS2, a DNA mismatch repair protein. PMS2 nuclear levels were decreased in response to the expression of all 6 kinases, with no concomitant change in mRNA level or cytosolic protein level. Response to thioguanine, that requires the mismatch repair pathway, was modulated by all 6 oncogenic kinases. In summary common targets for 6 oncogenic PTKs have been found that are regulated by post-translational mechanisms. They represent potential new avenues for therapies but also demonstrate the post-translational regulation is a key target of leukaemogenic kinases.

  5. Regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis in erythropoiesis by mTORC1-mediated protein translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Zhang, Yuannyu; Ni, Min; Cao, Hui; Signer, Robert A J; Li, Dan; Li, Mushan; Gu, Zhimin; Hu, Zeping; Dickerson, Kathryn E; Weinberg, Samuel E; Chandel, Navdeep S; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Zhou, Feng; Shao, Zhen; Xu, Jian

    2017-06-01

    Advances in genomic profiling present new challenges of explaining how changes in DNA and RNA are translated into proteins linking genotype to phenotype. Here we compare the genome-scale proteomic and transcriptomic changes in human primary haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells and erythroid progenitors, and uncover pathways related to mitochondrial biogenesis enhanced through post-transcriptional regulation. Mitochondrial factors including TFAM and PHB2 are selectively regulated through protein translation during erythroid specification. Depletion of TFAM in erythroid cells alters intracellular metabolism, leading to elevated histone acetylation, deregulated gene expression, and defective mitochondria and erythropoiesis. Mechanistically, mTORC1 signalling is enhanced to promote translation of mitochondria-associated transcripts through TOP-like motifs. Genetic and pharmacological perturbation of mitochondria or mTORC1 specifically impairs erythropoiesis in vitro and in vivo. Our studies support a mechanism for post-transcriptional control of erythroid mitochondria and may have direct relevance to haematologic defects associated with mitochondrial diseases and ageing.

  6. Novel role of c-jun N-terminal kinase in regulating the initiation of cap-dependent translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manish R; Sadiq, Ahad A; Jay-Dixon, Joe; Jirakulaporn, Tanawat; Jacobson, Blake A; Farassati, Faris; Bitterman, Peter B; Kratzke, Robert A

    2012-02-01

    Initiation of protein translation by the 5' mRNA cap is a tightly regulated step in cell growth and proliferation. Aberrant activation of cap-dependent translation is a hallmark of many cancers including non-small cell lung cancer. The canonical signaling mechanisms leading to translation initiation include activation of the Akt/mTOR pathway in response to the presence of nutrients and growth factors. We have previously observed that inhibition of c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) leads to inactivation of cap-dependent translation in mesothelioma cells. Since JNK is involved in the genesis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), we hypothesized that JNK could also be involved in activating cap-dependent translation in NSCLC cells and could represent an alternative pathway regulating translation. In a series of NSCLC cell lines, inhibition of JNK using SP600125 resulted in inhibition of 4E-BP1 phosphorylation and a decrease in formation of the cap-dependent translation complex, eIF4F. Furthermore, we show that JNK-mediated inhibition of translation is independent of mTOR. Our data provide evidence that JNK is involved in the regulation of translation and has potential as a therapeutic target in NSCLC.

  7. Translation Initiation from Conserved Non-AUG Codons Provides Additional Layers of Regulation and Coding Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivaylo P. Ivanov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurospora crassa cpc-1 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae GCN4 are homologs specifying transcription activators that drive the transcriptional response to amino acid limitation. The cpc-1 mRNA contains two upstream open reading frames (uORFs in its >700-nucleotide (nt 5′ leader, and its expression is controlled at the level of translation in response to amino acid starvation. We used N. crassa cell extracts and obtained data indicating that cpc-1 uORF1 and uORF2 are functionally analogous to GCN4 uORF1 and uORF4, respectively, in controlling translation. We also found that the 5′ region upstream of the main coding sequence of the cpc-1 mRNA extends for more than 700 nucleotides without any in-frame stop codon. For 100 cpc-1 homologs from Pezizomycotina and from selected Basidiomycota, 5′ conserved extensions of the CPC1 reading frame are also observed. Multiple non-AUG near-cognate codons (NCCs in the CPC1 reading frame upstream of uORF2, some deeply conserved, could potentially initiate translation. At least four NCCs initiated translation in vitro. In vivo data were consistent with initiation at NCCs to produce N-terminally extended N. crassa CPC1 isoforms. The pivotal role played by CPC1, combined with its translational regulation by uORFs and NCC utilization, underscores the emerging significance of noncanonical initiation events in controlling gene expression.

  8. Translation Initiation from Conserved Non-AUG Codons Provides Additional Layers of Regulation and Coding Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Ivaylo P; Wei, Jiajie; Caster, Stephen Z; Smith, Kristina M; Michel, Audrey M; Zhang, Ying; Firth, Andrew E; Freitag, Michael; Dunlap, Jay C; Bell-Pedersen, Deborah; Atkins, John F; Sachs, Matthew S

    2017-06-27

    Neurospora crassa cpc-1 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae GCN4 are homologs specifying transcription activators that drive the transcriptional response to amino acid limitation. The cpc-1 mRNA contains two upstream open reading frames (uORFs) in its >700-nucleotide (nt) 5' leader, and its expression is controlled at the level of translation in response to amino acid starvation. We used N. crassa cell extracts and obtained data indicating that cpc-1 uORF1 and uORF2 are functionally analogous to GCN4 uORF1 and uORF4, respectively, in controlling translation. We also found that the 5' region upstream of the main coding sequence of the cpc-1 mRNA extends for more than 700 nucleotides without any in-frame stop codon. For 100 cpc-1 homologs from Pezizomycotina and from selected Basidiomycota, 5' conserved extensions of the CPC1 reading frame are also observed. Multiple non-AUG near-cognate codons (NCCs) in the CPC1 reading frame upstream of uORF2, some deeply conserved, could potentially initiate translation. At least four NCCs initiated translation in vitro In vivo data were consistent with initiation at NCCs to produce N-terminally extended N. crassa CPC1 isoforms. The pivotal role played by CPC1, combined with its translational regulation by uORFs and NCC utilization, underscores the emerging significance of noncanonical initiation events in controlling gene expression. IMPORTANCE There is a deepening and widening appreciation of the diverse roles of translation in controlling gene expression. A central fungal transcription factor, the best-studied example of which is Saccharomyces cerevisiae GCN4, is crucial for the response to amino acid limitation. Two upstream open reading frames (uORFs) in the GCN4 mRNA are critical for controlling GCN4 synthesis. We observed that two uORFs in the corresponding Neurospora crassa cpc-1 mRNA appear functionally analogous to the GCN4 uORFs. We also discovered that, surprisingly, unlike GCN4, the CPC1 coding sequence extends far

  9. Autogenous Deformation and Change of the Relative Humidity in Silica Fume-Modified Cement Paste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben

    1996-01-01

    Even during sealed curing and at a constant temperature a hardening cement paste will deform and the relative humidity within its pores will lower. This autogenous deformation and autogenous relative humidity change may be so significant that the cement paste cracks if the deformation is restrained....... This article focuses on the influence of silica fume addition on autogenous deformation and autogenous relative humidity change. Continuous measurement of autogenous deformation and autogenous relative humidity change for more than 1 year and 1« years, respectively, was performed. The investigations show...... thatsilica fume addition markedly increases the autogenous shrinkage as well as the autogenous relative humidity change....

  10. Comparing national home-keeping and the regulation of translational stem cell applications: An international perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleeboom-Faulkner, Margaret; Chekar, Choon Key; Faulkner, Alex; Heitmeyer, Carolyn; Marouda, Marina; Rosemann, Achim; Chaisinthop, Nattaka; Chang, Hung-Chieh Jessica; Ely, Adrian; Kato, Masae; Patra, Prasanna K; Su, Yeyang; Sui, Suli; Suzuki, Wakana; Zhang, Xinqing

    2016-03-01

    A very large grey area exists between translational stem cell research and applications that comply with the ideals of randomised control trials and good laboratory and clinical practice and what is often referred to as snake-oil trade. We identify a discrepancy between international research and ethics regulation and the ways in which regulatory instruments in the stem cell field are developed in practice. We examine this discrepancy using the notion of 'national home-keeping', referring to the way governments articulate international standards and regulation with conflicting demands on local players at home. Identifying particular dimensions of regulatory tools - authority, permissions, space and acceleration - as crucial to national home-keeping in Asia, Europe and the USA, we show how local regulation works to enable development of the field, notwithstanding international (i.e. principally 'western') regulation. Triangulating regulation with empirical data and archival research between 2012 and 2015 has helped us to shed light on how countries and organisations adapt and resist internationally dominant regulation through the manipulation of regulatory tools (contingent upon country size, the state's ability to accumulate resources, healthcare demands, established traditions of scientific governance, and economic and scientific ambitions). Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Autogenic training as a therapy for adjustment disorder in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jojić Boris R.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Autogenic training is a widespread technique used in psychotherapy. The British school of autogenic training cites a large list of diseases, health states, and life changes, in which autogenic training can be of help. We wanted to explore the application of autogenic training as a therapy for adjustment disorder in adolescents. The sample consisted of a homogeneous group of 31 individuals, with an average age of 17.3±0.2 years, who were diagnosed with adjustment disorder, F 43.2, in accordance with ICD 10 search criteria. OBJECTIVE The aim of our work was to figure out the influence of autogenic training on adjustment disorder, through biophysical and biochemical indicators, and to research the efficacy of autogenic training as a therapy for adjustment disorder in adolescents. METHOD We observed adjustment disorder indicators and their changes in three phases, using initial, final, and control values, which we measured immediately before the beginning, immediately after the completion, and six months after the completion, of the practical course in autogenic training. We measured systolic and diastolic arterial blood pressure, brachial pulse rates, cortisol levels in plasma, cholesterol levels in blood, as well as glucose concentrations. During that period, autogenic training was employed as the sole therapy. RESULTS The study confirmed our preliminary assumptions. The measurements we performed showed that arterial blood pressure, pulse rates, cholesterol and cortisol concentrations, after the application of autogenic training among adolescents suffering from adjustment disorder, were lower than the initial values. They remained lower even six months after the completion of the practical course in autogenic training. CONCLUSION We concluded that autogenic training significantly decreases the values of physiological indicators of adjustment disorder, diminishes the effects of stress in an individual, and eases the adaptation of

  12. Involvement of Arabidopsis RACK1 in Protein Translation and Its Regulation by Abscisic Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Jianjun [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Wang, Shucai [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Valerius, Oliver [Universitaet Goettingen, Goettingen, Germany; Hall, Hardy [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Zeng, Qingning [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Li, Jian-Feng [Harvard University; Weston, David [ORNL; Ellis, Brian [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Chen, Jay [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Earlier studies have shown that RACK1 functions as a negative regulator of ABA responses in Arabidopsis, but the molecular mechanism of the action of RACK1 in these processes remains elusive. Global gene expression profiling revealed that approximately 40% of the genes affected by ABA treatment were affected in a similar manner by the rack1 mutation, supporting the view that RACK1 is an important regulator of ABA responses. On the other hand, co-expression analysis revealed that >80% of the genes co-expressed with RACK1 encode ribosome proteins, implying a close relationship between RACK1 s function and the ribosome complex. These results implied that the regulatory role for RACK1 in ABA responses may be partially due to its putative function in protein translation, which is one of the major cellular processes that mammalian and yeast RACK1 is involved in. Consistently, all three Arabidopsis RACK1 homologous genes, namely RACK1A, RACK1B and RACK1C, complemented the growth defects of the S. cerevisiae cpc2/rack1 mutant. In addition, RACK1 physically interacts with Arabidopsis Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 6 (eIF6), whose mammalian homologue is a key regulator of 80S ribosome assembly. Moreover, rack1 mutants displayed hypersensitivity to anisomycin, an inhibitor of protein translation, and displayed characteristics of impaired 80S functional ribosome assembly and 60S ribosomal subunit biogenesis in a ribosome profiling assay. Gene expression analysis revealed that ABA inhibits the expression of both RACK1 and eIF6. Taken together, these results suggest that RACK1 may be required for normal production of 60S and 80S ribosomes and that its action in these processes may be regulated by ABA.

  13. Deciphering human heat shock transcription factor 1 regulation via post-translational modification in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Batista-Nascimento

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1 plays an important role in the cellular response to proteotoxic stresses. Under normal growth conditions HSF1 is repressed as an inactive monomer in part through post-translation modifications that include protein acetylation, sumoylation and phosphorylation. Upon exposure to stress HSF1 homotrimerizes, accumulates in nucleus, binds DNA, becomes hyper-phosphorylated and activates the expression of stress response genes. While HSF1 and the mechanisms that regulate its activity have been studied for over two decades, our understanding of HSF1 regulation remains incomplete. As previous studies have shown that HSF1 and the heat shock response promoter element (HSE are generally structurally conserved from yeast to metazoans, we have made use of the genetically tractable budding yeast as a facile assay system to further understand the mechanisms that regulate human HSF1 through phosphorylation of serine 303. We show that when human HSF1 is expressed in yeast its phosphorylation at S303 is promoted by the MAP-kinase Slt2 independent of a priming event at S307 previously believed to be a prerequisite. Furthermore, we show that phosphorylation at S303 in yeast and mammalian cells occurs independent of GSK3, the kinase primarily thought to be responsible for S303 phosphorylation. Lastly, while previous studies have suggested that S303 phosphorylation represses HSF1-dependent transactivation, we now show that S303 phosphorylation also represses HSF1 multimerization in both yeast and mammalian cells. Taken together, these studies suggest that yeast cells will be a powerful experimental tool for deciphering aspects of human HSF1 regulation by post-translational modifications.

  14. Deciphering human heat shock transcription factor 1 regulation via post-translational modification in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista-Nascimento, Liliana; Neef, Daniel W; Liu, Phillip C C; Rodrigues-Pousada, Claudina; Thiele, Dennis J

    2011-01-06

    Heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1) plays an important role in the cellular response to proteotoxic stresses. Under normal growth conditions HSF1 is repressed as an inactive monomer in part through post-translation modifications that include protein acetylation, sumoylation and phosphorylation. Upon exposure to stress HSF1 homotrimerizes, accumulates in nucleus, binds DNA, becomes hyper-phosphorylated and activates the expression of stress response genes. While HSF1 and the mechanisms that regulate its activity have been studied for over two decades, our understanding of HSF1 regulation remains incomplete. As previous studies have shown that HSF1 and the heat shock response promoter element (HSE) are generally structurally conserved from yeast to metazoans, we have made use of the genetically tractable budding yeast as a facile assay system to further understand the mechanisms that regulate human HSF1 through phosphorylation of serine 303. We show that when human HSF1 is expressed in yeast its phosphorylation at S303 is promoted by the MAP-kinase Slt2 independent of a priming event at S307 previously believed to be a prerequisite. Furthermore, we show that phosphorylation at S303 in yeast and mammalian cells occurs independent of GSK3, the kinase primarily thought to be responsible for S303 phosphorylation. Lastly, while previous studies have suggested that S303 phosphorylation represses HSF1-dependent transactivation, we now show that S303 phosphorylation also represses HSF1 multimerization in both yeast and mammalian cells. Taken together, these studies suggest that yeast cells will be a powerful experimental tool for deciphering aspects of human HSF1 regulation by post-translational modifications.

  15. Concordant regulation of translation and mRNA abundance for hundreds of targets of a human microRNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G Hendrickson

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs regulate gene expression posttranscriptionally by interfering with a target mRNA's translation, stability, or both. We sought to dissect the respective contributions of translational inhibition and mRNA decay to microRNA regulation. We identified direct targets of a specific miRNA, miR-124, by virtue of their association with Argonaute proteins, core components of miRNA effector complexes, in response to miR-124 transfection in human tissue culture cells. In parallel, we assessed mRNA levels and obtained translation profiles using a novel global approach to analyze polysomes separated on sucrose gradients. Analysis of translation profiles for approximately 8,000 genes in these proliferative human cells revealed that basic features of translation are similar to those previously observed in rapidly growing Saccharomyces cerevisiae. For approximately 600 mRNAs specifically recruited to Argonaute proteins by miR-124, we found reductions in both the mRNA abundance and inferred translation rate spanning a large dynamic range. The changes in mRNA levels of these miR-124 targets were larger than the changes in translation, with average decreases of 35% and 12%, respectively. Further, there was no identifiable subgroup of mRNA targets for which the translational response was dominant. Both ribosome occupancy (the fraction of a given gene's transcripts associated with ribosomes and ribosome density (the average number of ribosomes bound per unit length of coding sequence were selectively reduced for hundreds of miR-124 targets by the presence of miR-124. Changes in protein abundance inferred from the observed changes in mRNA abundance and translation profiles closely matched changes directly determined by Western analysis for 11 of 12 proteins, suggesting that our assays captured most of miR-124-mediated regulation. These results suggest that miRNAs inhibit translation initiation or stimulate ribosome drop-off preferentially near the

  16. CSPGs inhibit axon branching by impairing mitochondria-dependent regulation of actin dynamics and axonal translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainath, Rajiv; Ketschek, Andrea; Grandi, Leah; Gallo, Gianluca

    2017-04-01

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) inhibit the formation of axon collateral branches. The regulation of the axonal cytoskeleton and mitochondria are important components of the mechanism of branching. Actin-dependent axonal plasticity, reflected in the dynamics of axonal actin patches and filopodia, is greatest along segments of the axon populated by mitochondria. It is reported that CSPGs partially depolarize the membrane potential of axonal mitochondria, which impairs the dynamics of the axonal actin cytoskeleton and decreases the formation and duration of axonal filopodia, the first steps in the mechanism of branching. The effects of CSPGs on actin cytoskeletal dynamics are specific to axon segments populated by mitochondria. In contrast, CSPGs do not affect the microtubule content of axons, or the localization of microtubules into axonal filopodia, a required step in the mechanism of branch formation. It is also reported that CSPGs decrease the mitochondria-dependent axonal translation of cortactin, an actin associated protein involved in branching. Finally, the inhibitory effects of CSPGs on axon branching, actin cytoskeletal dynamics and the axonal translation of cortactin are reversed by culturing neurons with acetyl-l-carnitine, which promotes mitochondrial respiration. Collectively these data indicate that CSPGs impair mitochondrial function in axons, an effect which contributes to the inhibition of axon branching. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 77: 419-437, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Regulation of multispanning membrane protein topology via post-translational annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lehn, Reid C; Zhang, Bin; Miller, Thomas F

    2015-09-26

    The canonical mechanism for multispanning membrane protein topogenesis suggests that protein topology is established during cotranslational membrane integration. However, this mechanism is inconsistent with the behavior of EmrE, a dual-topology protein for which the mutation of positively charged loop residues, even close to the C-terminus, leads to dramatic shifts in its topology. We use coarse-grained simulations to investigate the Sec-facilitated membrane integration of EmrE and its mutants on realistic biological timescales. This work reveals a mechanism for regulating membrane-protein topogenesis, in which initially misintegrated configurations of the proteins undergo post-translational annealing to reach fully integrated multispanning topologies. The energetic barriers associated with this post-translational annealing process enforce kinetic pathways that dictate the topology of the fully integrated proteins. The proposed mechanism agrees well with the experimentally observed features of EmrE topogenesis and provides a range of experimentally testable predictions regarding the effect of translocon mutations on membrane protein topogenesis.

  18. A Heme-Sensing Mechanism in the Translational Regulation of Mitochondrial Cytochrome c Oxidase Biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Iliana C.; Fontanesi, Flavia; Myers, Richard S.; Hamel, Patrice; Barrientos, Antoni

    2012-01-01

    Heme plays fundamental roles as cofactor and signaling molecule in multiple pathways devoted to oxygen sensing and utilization in aerobic organisms. For cellular respiration, heme serves as a prosthetic group in electron transfer proteins and redox enzymes. Here we report that in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae a heme-sensing mechanism translationally controls the biogenesis of cytochrome c oxidase (COX), the terminal mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme. We show that Mss51, a COX1 mRNA-specific translational activator and Cox1 chaperone, which coordinates Cox1 synthesis in mitoribosomes with its assembly in COX, is a heme-binding protein. Mss51 contains two heme regulatory motifs or Cys-Pro-X domains located in its N-terminus. Using a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches, we have demonstrated that these motifs are important for heme binding and efficient performance of Mss51 functions. We conclude that heme sensing by Mss51 regulates COX biogenesis and aerobic energy production. PMID:23217259

  19. Ribosome Levels Selectively Regulate Translation and Lineage Commitment in Human Hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajuria, Rajiv K; Munschauer, Mathias; Ulirsch, Jacob C; Fiorini, Claudia; Ludwig, Leif S; McFarland, Sean K; Abdulhay, Nour J; Specht, Harrison; Keshishian, Hasmik; Mani, D R; Jovanovic, Marko; Ellis, Steven R; Fulco, Charles P; Engreitz, Jesse M; Schütz, Sabina; Lian, John; Gripp, Karen W; Weinberg, Olga K; Pinkus, Geraldine S; Gehrke, Lee; Regev, Aviv; Lander, Eric S; Gazda, Hanna T; Lee, Winston Y; Panse, Vikram G; Carr, Steven A; Sankaran, Vijay G

    2018-03-22

    Blood cell formation is classically thought to occur through a hierarchical differentiation process, although recent studies have shown that lineage commitment may occur earlier in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). The relevance to human blood diseases and the underlying regulation of these refined models remain poorly understood. By studying a genetic blood disorder, Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), where the majority of mutations affect ribosomal proteins and the erythroid lineage is selectively perturbed, we are able to gain mechanistic insight into how lineage commitment is programmed normally and disrupted in disease. We show that in DBA, the pool of available ribosomes is limited, while ribosome composition remains constant. Surprisingly, this global reduction in ribosome levels more profoundly alters translation of a select subset of transcripts. We show how the reduced translation of select transcripts in HSPCs can impair erythroid lineage commitment, illuminating a regulatory role for ribosome levels in cellular differentiation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A pea chloroplast translation elongation factor that is regulated by abiotic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.N.; Mishra, R.N.; Agarwal, Pradeep K.; Goswami, Mamta; Nair, Suresh; Sopory, S.K.; Reddy, M.K.

    2004-01-01

    We report the cloning and characterization of both the cDNA (tufA) and genomic clones encoding for a chloroplast translation elongation factor (EF-Tu) from pea. The analysis of the deduced amino acids of the cDNA clone reveals the presence of putative transit peptide sequence and four GTP binding domains and two EF-Tu signature motifs in the mature polypeptide region. Using in vivo immunostaining followed by confocal microscopy pea EF-Tu was localized to chloroplast. The steady state transcript level of pea tufA was high in leaves and not detectable in roots. The expression of this gene is stimulated by light. The differential expression of this gene in response to various abiotic stresses showed that it is down-regulated in response to salinity and ABA and up-regulated in response to low temperature and salicylic acid treatment. These results indicate that regulation of pea tufA may have an important role in plant adaptation to environmental stresses

  1. Post-translational regulation of SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE as a major mechanism for thermoregulation of flowering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwan Lee, Jeong; Sook Chung, Kyung; Kim, Soon-Kap; Ahn, Ji Hoon

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to our extensive knowledge of vernalization, we know relatively little about the regulation of ambient temperature-responsive flowering. Recent reports revealed that FLOWERING LOCUS M (FLM) and SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP) regulate high ambient temperature-responsive flowering through two different mechanisms: degradation of SVP protein and formation of a non-functional SVP-FLM-δ complex. To investigate further the mechanism of thermoregulation of flowering, we performed real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and in vitro pull-down assays. We found that FLM-β and FLM-δ transcripts show similar absolute levels at different temperatures. Also, His-SVP protein bound to the GST-FLM-β or -δ proteins with similar binding intensities. These results suggest that functional SVP-FLM-β and non-functional SVP-FLM-δ complexes form similarly at warmer temperatures, thus indicating that post-translational regulation of SVP functions as a major mechanism for thermoregulation in flowering.

  2. Developmentally Regulated Post-translational Modification of Nucleoplasmin Controls Histone Sequestration and Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Onikubo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nucleoplasmin (Npm is an abundant histone chaperone in vertebrate oocytes and embryos. During embryogenesis, regulation of Npm histone binding is critical for its function in storing and releasing maternal histones to establish and maintain the zygotic epigenome. Here, we demonstrate that Xenopus laevis Npm post-translational modifications (PTMs specific to the oocyte and egg promote either histone deposition or sequestration, respectively. Mass spectrometry and Npm phosphomimetic mutations used in chromatin assembly assays identified hyperphosphorylation on the N-terminal tail as a critical regulator for sequestration. C-terminal tail phosphorylation and PRMT5-catalyzed arginine methylation enhance nucleosome assembly by promoting histone interaction with the second acidic tract of Npm. Electron microscopy reconstructions of Npm and TTLL4 activity toward the C-terminal tail demonstrate that oocyte- and egg-specific PTMs cause Npm conformational changes. Our results reveal that PTMs regulate Npm chaperoning activity by modulating Npm conformation and Npm-histone interaction, leading to histone sequestration in the egg.

  3. Transcriptional and post-translational regulation of Arc in synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Ruth E; Henley, Jeremy M

    2017-09-07

    One of the most interesting features of Arc-dependent synaptic plasticity is how multiple types of synaptic activity can converge to alter Arc transcription and then diverge to induce different plasticity outcomes, ranging from AMPA receptor internalisation that promotes long-term depression (LTD), to actin stabilisation that promotes long-term potentiation (LTP). This diversity suggests that there must be numerous levels of control to ensure the temporal profile, abundance, localisation and function of Arc are appropriately regulated to effect learning and memory in the correct contexts. The activity-dependent transcription and post-translational modification of Arc are crucial regulators of synaptic plasticity, fine-tuning the function of this key protein depending on the specific situation. The extensive cross-talk between signalling pathways and the numerous routes of Arc regulation provide a complex interplay of processes in which Arc-mediated plasticity can be broadly induced, but specifically tailored to synaptic activity. Here we provide an overview what is currently known about these processes and potential future directions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Autophagy Regulates the Post-Translational Cleavage of BCL-2 and Promotes Neuronal Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Lossi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available B-cell lymphoma 2 protein (BCL-2 is one of the more widely investigated anti-apoptotic protein in mammals, and its levels are critical for protecting from programmed cell death. We report here that the cellular content of BCL-2 is regulated at post-translational level along the autophagy/lysosome pathways in organotypic cultures of post-natal mouse cerebellar cortex. Specifically this mechanism appears to be effective in the cerebellar granule cells (CGCs that are known to undergo massive programmed cell death (apoptosis during post-natal maturation. By the use of specific agonists/antagonist of calcium channels at the endoplasmic reticulum it was possible to understand the pivotal role of calcium release from intracellular stores in CGC neuroprotection. The more general significance of these findings is supported by a very recent study Niemann-Pick transgenic mice.

  5. Decoupling allogenic and autogenic processes in experimental stratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, W.

    2009-12-01

    At the heart of interpreting the history of Earth surface evolution preserved in the sedimentary record is decoupling environmental (allogenic) forcing from internally generated (autogenic) “noise.” One of the major stumbling blocks for distinguishing allogenic and autogenic origins in the stratigraphic record lies in the lack of quantitative understanding on autogenic processes. So far no existing computational models can explicitly model geomorphic self-organization. However, flume studies with sediment and water, which clearly show self-organized, internally driven sediment transport processes, do give the opportunity to model and investigate autogenic processes under controlled boundary conditions. I present data from two recent experiments performed in the Experimental EarthScape (XES) subsiding basin at St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, University of Minnesota. Evolution of experimental deltas in XES performed in 2002 and 2005 showed 1) clear cyclic alternations of autogenic fluvial sediment storage and release associated with changes in the fluvial planform pattern and 2) changes in time and event size of the autogenic processes by interaction with external controls e.g., tectonics. Comparing the experimental data conducted under either no or active relative base-level rise, I further explore the effects of coupling autogenic processes with environmental forcing.

  6. Translational independence between overlapping genes for a restriction endonuclease and its transcriptional regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blumenthal Robert M

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most type II restriction-modification (RM systems have two independent enzymes that act on the same DNA sequence: a modification methyltransferase that protects target sites, and a restriction endonuclease that cleaves unmethylated target sites. When RM genes enter a new cell, methylation must occur before restriction activity appears, or the host's chromosome is digested. Transcriptional mechanisms that delay endonuclease expression have been identified in some RM systems. A substantial subset of those systems is controlled by a family of small transcription activators called C proteins. In the PvuII system, C.PvuII activates transcription of its own gene, along with that of the downstream endonuclease gene. This regulation results in very low R.PvuII mRNA levels early after gene entry, followed by rapid increase due to positive feedback. However, given the lethal consequences of premature REase accumulation, transcriptional control alone might be insufficient. In C-controlled RM systems, there is a ± 20 nt overlap between the C termination codon and the R (endonuclease initiation codon, suggesting possible translational coupling, and in many cases predicted RNA hairpins could occlude the ribosome binding site for the endonuclease gene. Results Expression levels of lacZ translational fusions to pvuIIR or pvuIIC were determined, with the native pvuII promoter having been replaced by one not controlled by C.PvuII. In-frame pvuIIC insertions did not substantially decrease either pvuIIC-lacZ or pvuIIR-lacZ expression (with or without C.PvuII provided in trans. In contrast, a frameshift mutation in pvuIIC decreased expression markedly in both fusions, but mRNA measurements indicated that this decrease could be explained by transcriptional polarity. Expression of pvuIIR-lacZ was unaffected when the pvuIIC stop codon was moved 21 nt downstream from its WT location, or 25 or 40 bp upstream of the pvuIIR initiation codon. Disrupting

  7. Translational independence between overlapping genes for a restriction endonuclease and its transcriptional regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaw, Meenakshi K; Blumenthal, Robert M

    2010-11-19

    Most type II restriction-modification (RM) systems have two independent enzymes that act on the same DNA sequence: a modification methyltransferase that protects target sites, and a restriction endonuclease that cleaves unmethylated target sites. When RM genes enter a new cell, methylation must occur before restriction activity appears, or the host's chromosome is digested. Transcriptional mechanisms that delay endonuclease expression have been identified in some RM systems. A substantial subset of those systems is controlled by a family of small transcription activators called C proteins. In the PvuII system, C.PvuII activates transcription of its own gene, along with that of the downstream endonuclease gene. This regulation results in very low R.PvuII mRNA levels early after gene entry, followed by rapid increase due to positive feedback. However, given the lethal consequences of premature REase accumulation, transcriptional control alone might be insufficient. In C-controlled RM systems, there is a ± 20 nt overlap between the C termination codon and the R (endonuclease) initiation codon, suggesting possible translational coupling, and in many cases predicted RNA hairpins could occlude the ribosome binding site for the endonuclease gene. Expression levels of lacZ translational fusions to pvuIIR or pvuIIC were determined, with the native pvuII promoter having been replaced by one not controlled by C.PvuII. In-frame pvuIIC insertions did not substantially decrease either pvuIIC-lacZ or pvuIIR-lacZ expression (with or without C.PvuII provided in trans). In contrast, a frameshift mutation in pvuIIC decreased expression markedly in both fusions, but mRNA measurements indicated that this decrease could be explained by transcriptional polarity. Expression of pvuIIR-lacZ was unaffected when the pvuIIC stop codon was moved 21 nt downstream from its WT location, or 25 or 40 bp upstream of the pvuIIR initiation codon. Disrupting the putative hairpins had no significant

  8. Post-translational regulation via Clp protease is critical for survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravikiran M Raju

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Unlike most bacterial species, Mycobacterium tuberculosis depends on the Clp proteolysis system for survival even in in vitro conditions. We hypothesized that Clp is required for the physiologic turnover of mycobacterial proteins whose accumulation is deleterious to bacterial growth and survival. To identify cellular substrates, we employed quantitative proteomics and transcriptomics to identify the set of proteins that accumulated upon the loss of functional Clp protease. Among the set of potential Clp substrates uncovered, we were able to unambiguously identify WhiB1, an essential transcriptional repressor capable of auto-repression, as a substrate of the mycobacterial Clp protease. Dysregulation of WhiB1 turnover had a toxic effect that was not rescued by repression of whiB1 transcription. Thus, under normal growth conditions, Clp protease is the predominant regulatory check on the levels of potentially toxic cellular proteins. Our findings add to the growing evidence of how post-translational regulation plays a critical role in the regulation of bacterial physiology.

  9. Post-translational regulation via Clp protease is critical for survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Ravikiran M; Jedrychowski, Mark P; Wei, Jun-Rong; Pinkham, Jessica T; Park, Annie S; O'Brien, Kathryn; Rehren, German; Schnappinger, Dirk; Gygi, Steven P; Rubin, Eric J

    2014-03-01

    Unlike most bacterial species, Mycobacterium tuberculosis depends on the Clp proteolysis system for survival even in in vitro conditions. We hypothesized that Clp is required for the physiologic turnover of mycobacterial proteins whose accumulation is deleterious to bacterial growth and survival. To identify cellular substrates, we employed quantitative proteomics and transcriptomics to identify the set of proteins that accumulated upon the loss of functional Clp protease. Among the set of potential Clp substrates uncovered, we were able to unambiguously identify WhiB1, an essential transcriptional repressor capable of auto-repression, as a substrate of the mycobacterial Clp protease. Dysregulation of WhiB1 turnover had a toxic effect that was not rescued by repression of whiB1 transcription. Thus, under normal growth conditions, Clp protease is the predominant regulatory check on the levels of potentially toxic cellular proteins. Our findings add to the growing evidence of how post-translational regulation plays a critical role in the regulation of bacterial physiology.

  10. Autogenous femoral head as grafting material for mandibular augmentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, M. D.; Raghoebar, G. M.; van der Wal, J. E.; Kalk, W. W. I.; Vissink, A.

    2009-01-01

    Bone grafting is commonly used for augmentation of the atrophic edentulous maxilla and mandible. Although bone substitutes and allogeneic frozen bone grafts have been applied successfully, fresh autogenous bone grafts remain the 'gold standard' in maxillofacial reconstructive surgery. A disadvantage

  11. Measuring autogenous strain of concrete with corrugated moulds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Qian; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2008-01-01

    A reliable technique to quantify autogenous strain is a prerequisite to numerical modeling in stress calculations for high performance concrete. The introducing of a special kind of corrugated tube mould helps to transforming volume strain measurement into liner strain measurement in horizontal...... direction for fluid concrete, which not only realizes the continuous monitoring of the autogenous shrinkage since casting, but also effectively eliminates the disturbance resulting from gravity, temperature variation and mould restraint on measuring results. Based on this measuring technique, this paper...

  12. DMPD: Translational mini-review series on Toll-like receptors: networks regulated byToll-like receptors mediate innate and adaptive immunity. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17223959 Translational mini-review series on Toll-like receptors: networks regulate...ol. 2007 Feb;147(2):199-207. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Translational mini-review series on Toll-like receptors: network... immunity. PubmedID 17223959 Title Translational mini-review series on Toll-like receptors: networks regulat

  13. Conserved regions of the DMD 3’ UTR regulate translation and mRNA abundance in cultured myotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, C. Aaron; Howard, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a severe muscle-wasting disease, is caused by mutations in the DMD gene, which encodes for the protein dystrophin. Its regulation is of therapeutic interest as even small changes in expression of functional dystrophin can significantly impact the severity of DMD. While tissue-specific distribution and transcriptional regulation of several DMD mRNA isoforms has been well characterized, the post-transcriptional regulation of dystrophin synthesis is not well understood. Here, we utilize qRTPCR and a quantitative dual-luciferase reporter assay to examine the effects of isoform specific DMD 5’ UTRs and the highly conserved DMD 3’ UTR on mRNA abundance and translational control of gene expression in C2C12 cells. The 5’ UTRs were shown to initiate translation with low efficiency in both myoblasts and myotubes. Whereas, two large highly conserved elements in the 3’ UTR, which overlap the previously described Lemaire A and D regions, increase mRNA levels and enhance translation upon differentiation of myoblasts into myotubes. The results presented here implicate an important role for DMD UTRs in dystrophin expression and delineate the cis-acting elements required for the myotube-specific regulation of steady-state mRNA levels and translational enhancer activity found in the DMD 3’ UTR. PMID:24928536

  14. Conserved regions of the DMD 3' UTR regulate translation and mRNA abundance in cultured myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, C Aaron; Howard, Michael T

    2014-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a severe muscle-wasting disease, is caused by mutations in the DMD gene, which encodes for the protein dystrophin. Its regulation is of therapeutic interest as even small changes in expression of functional dystrophin can significantly impact the severity of DMD. While tissue-specific distribution and transcriptional regulation of several DMD mRNA isoforms has been well characterized, the post-transcriptional regulation of dystrophin synthesis is not well understood. Here, we utilize qRTPCR and a quantitative dual-luciferase reporter assay to examine the effects of isoform specific DMD 5' UTRs and the highly conserved DMD 3' UTR on mRNA abundance and translational control of gene expression in C2C12 cells. The 5' UTRs were shown to initiate translation with low efficiency in both myoblasts and myotubes. Whereas, two large highly conserved elements in the 3' UTR, which overlap the previously described Lemaire A and D regions, increase mRNA levels and enhance translation upon differentiation of myoblasts into myotubes. The results presented here implicate an important role for DMD UTRs in dystrophin expression and delineate the cis-acting elements required for the myotube-specific regulation of steady-state mRNA levels and translational enhancer activity found in the DMD 3' UTR. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Computed tomography evaluation of autogenous graft in sinus lift surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajzen, Sergio Aron; Moscatiello, Rafael Andrade; Lima, Aida Maria Custodio de; Moscatiello, Vitoria Aparecida Muglia; Helio Kiitiro Yamashita; Mosacatiello, Rafael Muglia; Nishiguchi, Celso Itiro; Alves, Maria Teresa de Seixas

    2001-01-01

    The objective was to quantify bone formation within autogenous bone grafts and autogenous bone grafts in combination with platelet-rich plasma obtained either from apheresis or centrifugation using computed tomography. This prospective, double-blind study was conducted in 34 male and female adult patients (mean age of 28 years and 8 months), with either unilateral or bilateral pneumatization of the maxillary sinuses, requiring bone graft for dental implant. All patients were submitted to computed tomography examinations prior and six months after sinus lift surgery. Fifty-three maxillary sinuses were operated and divided into three distinct groups: autogenous bone graft, autogenous bone graft in combination with platelet-rich plasma obtained by centrifugation, and autogenous bone graft in combination with platelet-rich plasma obtained by apheresis. The results showed that computed tomography demonstrated bone growth in height and width between the initial and the follow-up computed tomography scans in all three groups. However, no statistical difference was found either for bone height or width. It was concluded that clinical evidence demonstrates the effectiveness of autogenous bone grafts, particularly when used in combination with bone growth factors such as platelet-rich plasma, which allow prosthetic and functional restoration of maxillofacial structures through fixation of dental implants. (author)

  16. Neuron-wide RNA transport combines with netrin-mediated local translation to spatially regulate the synaptic proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangmok; Martin, Kelsey C

    2015-01-08

    The persistence of experience-dependent changes in brain connectivity requires RNA localization and protein synthesis. Previous studies have demonstrated a role for local translation in altering the structure and function of synapses during synapse formation and experience-dependent synaptic plasticity. In this study, we ask whether in addition to promoting local translation, local stimulation also triggers directed trafficking of RNAs from nucleus to stimulated synapses. Imaging of RNA localization and translation in cultured Aplysia sensory-motor neurons revealed that RNAs were delivered throughout the arbor of the sensory neuron, but that translation was enriched only at sites of synaptic contact and/or synaptic stimulation. Investigation of the mechanisms that trigger local translation revealed a role for calcium-dependent retrograde netrin-1/DCC receptor signaling. Spatially restricting gene expression by regulating local translation rather than by directing the delivery of mRNAs from nucleus to stimulated synapses maximizes the readiness of the entire neuronal arbor to respond to local cues.

  17. PRMT1-Mediated Translation Regulation Is a Crucial Vulnerability of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jessie Hao-Ru; Hubbell-Engler, Benjamin; Adelmant, Guillaume; Huang, Jialiang; Joyce, Cailin E; Vazquez, Francisca; Weir, Barbara A; Montgomery, Philip; Tsherniak, Aviad; Giacomelli, Andrew O; Perry, Jennifer A; Trowbridge, Jennifer; Fujiwara, Yuko; Cowley, Glenn S; Xie, Huafeng; Kim, Woojin; Novina, Carl D; Hahn, William C; Marto, Jarrod A; Orkin, Stuart H

    2017-09-01

    Through an shRNA screen, we identified the protein arginine methyltransferase Prmt1 as a vulnerable intervention point in murine p53/Rb-null osteosarcomas, the human counterpart of which lacks effective therapeutic options. Depletion of Prmt1 in p53-deficient cells impaired tumor initiation and maintenance in vitro and in vivo Mechanistic studies reveal that translation-associated pathways were enriched for Prmt1 downstream targets, implicating Prmt1 in translation control. In particular, loss of Prmt1 led to a decrease in arginine methylation of the translation initiation complex, thereby disrupting its assembly and inhibiting translation. p53/Rb-null cells were sensitive to p53-induced translation stress, and analysis of human cancer cell line data from Project Achilles further revealed that Prmt1 and translation-associated pathways converged on the same functional networks. We propose that targeted therapy against Prmt1 and its associated translation-related pathways offer a mechanistic rationale for treatment of osteosarcomas and other cancers that exhibit dependencies on translation stress response. Cancer Res; 77(17); 4613-25. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Genomic analysis of sleep deprivation reveals translational regulation in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecsey, Christopher G; Peixoto, Lucia; Choi, Jennifer H K; Wimmer, Mathieu; Jaganath, Devan; Hernandez, Pepe J; Blackwell, Jennifer; Meda, Karuna; Park, Alan J; Hannenhalli, Sridhar; Abel, Ted

    2012-10-17

    Sleep deprivation is a common problem of considerable health and economic impact in today's society. Sleep loss is associated with deleterious effects on cognitive functions such as memory and has a high comorbidity with many neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the molecular basis of the effect of sleep deprivation in the brain. In this study, we combined genome-wide and traditional molecular biological approaches to determine the cellular and molecular impacts of sleep deprivation in the mouse hippocampus, a brain area crucial for many forms of memory. Microarray analysis examining the effects of 5 h of sleep deprivation on gene expression in the mouse hippocampus found 533 genes with altered expression. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that a prominent effect of sleep deprivation was to downregulate translation, potentially mediated through components of the insulin signaling pathway such as the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a key regulator of protein synthesis. Consistent with this analysis, sleep deprivation reduced levels of total and phosphorylated mTOR, and levels returned to baseline after 2.5 h of recovery sleep. Our findings represent the first genome-wide analysis of the effects of sleep deprivation on the mouse hippocampus, and they suggest that the detrimental effects of sleep deprivation may be mediated by reductions in protein synthesis via downregulation of mTOR. Because protein synthesis and mTOR activation are required for long-term memory formation, our study improves our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the memory impairments induced by sleep deprivation.

  19. Identifying intrinsic and extrinsic determinants that regulate internal initiation of translation mediated by the FMR1 5' leader

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timmerman Stephanie

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulating synthesis of the Fragile X gene (FMR1 product, FMRP alters neural plasticity potentially through its role in the microRNA pathway. Cap-dependent translation of the FMR1 mRNA, a process requiring ribosomal scanning through the 5' leader, is likely impeded by the extensive secondary structure generated by the high guanosine/cytosine nucleotide content including the CGG triplet nucleotide repeats in the 5' leader. An alternative mechanism to initiate translation – internal initiation often utilizes secondary structure to recruit the translational machinery. Consequently, studies were undertaken to confirm and extend a previous observation that the FMR1 5' leader contains an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES. Results Cellular transfection of a dicistronic DNA construct containing the FMR1 5' leader inserted into the intercistronic region yielded significant translation of the second cistron, but the FMR1 5' leader was also found to contain a cryptic promoter possibly confounding interpretation of these results. However, transfection of dicistronic and monocistronic RNA ex vivo or in vitro confirmed that the FMR1 5' leader contains an IRES. Moreover, inhibiting cap-dependent translation ex vivo did not affect the expression level of endogenous FMRP indicating a role for IRES-dependent translation of FMR1 mRNA. Analysis of the FMR1 5' leader revealed that the CGG repeats and the 5' end of the leader were vital for internal initiation. Functionally, exposure to potassium chloride or intracellular acidification and addition of polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid as mimics of neural activity and double stranded RNA, respectively, differentially affected FMR1 IRES activity. Conclusion Our results indicate that multiple stimuli influence IRES-dependent translation of the FMR1 mRNA and suggest a functional role for the CGG nucleotide repeats.

  20. Ribosome Reinitiation Directs Gene-specific Translation and Regulates the Integrated Stress Response*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Sara K.; Willy, Jeffrey A.; Wu, Cheng; Sachs, Matthew S.; Wek, Ronald C.

    2015-01-01

    In the integrated stress response, phosphorylation of eIF2α (eIF2α-P) reduces protein synthesis to conserve resources and facilitate preferential translation of transcripts that promote stress adaptation. Preferentially translated GADD34 (PPP1R15A) and constitutively expressed CReP (PPP1R15B) function to dephosphorylate eIF2α-P and restore protein synthesis. The 5′-leaders of GADD34 and CReP contain two upstream ORFs (uORFs). Using biochemical and genetic approaches we show that features of these uORFs are central for their differential expression. In the absence of stress, translation of an inhibitory uORF in GADD34 acts as a barrier that prevents reinitiation at the GADD34 coding region. Enhanced eIF2α-P during stress directs ribosome bypass of the uORF, facilitating translation of the GADD34 coding region. CReP expression occurs independent of eIF2α-P via an uORF that allows for translation reinitiation at the CReP coding region independent of stress. Importantly, alterations in the GADD34 uORF affect the status of eIF2α-P, translational control, and cell adaptation to stress. These results show that properties of uORFs that permit ribosome reinitiation are critical for directing gene-specific translational control in the integrated stress response. PMID:26446796

  1. [Clinical experience in communication in autogenous psychotherapy and hypnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eletti, P L; Peresson, L

    1983-12-30

    Questions relating to communication and metacommunication during two forms of directive psychotherapy (Schultz's autogenous training and hypnosis) are examined. The concept of rigidity and cognitive flexibility with regard to the physician-patient relationship is discussed: abstract-concrete dynamics, abstract generalisation of diagnosis, linguistic egocentricity, stereotypical adaptation to conventional language. Some attention is devoted to Heider's balance theory as the first approach to psychological understanding of the therapeutic relationship. The communicative and metacommunicative process described by the Palo Alto (California) school is discussed. Autogenous psychotherapy and hypnosis extend through the concepts of symmetrical relation and inferior complementarity. The criteria for reaching these objectives are stated, along with the pragmatic methods devised for decoding messages and gaining access to metacommunication. Three clinical cases treated through autogenous training and one with hypnosis are analysed with respect to communication and from the relational standpoint. The patient's messages are decoded, the ambiguity of the communication is detected, and the physician's possible answers are examined at both the technical and the emotive level. It is felt that the correct use of the communicational perspective greatly extends the possibilities of autogenous training and hypnosis. It is not a question of combining relational and autogenous management, but of using the Palo Alto discoveries in the more complete understanding of cases in which psychotherapy is employed.

  2. Eukaryotic initiation factor 3 (eIF3) and 5’ mRNA leader sequences as agents of translational regulation in Arabidopsis. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    von Arnim, Albrecht G. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-02-04

    Protein synthesis, or translation, consumes a sizable fraction of the cell’s energy budget, estimated at 5% and up to 50% in differentiated and growing cells, respectively. Plants also invest significant energy and biomass to construct and maintain the translation apparatus. Translation is regulated by a variety of external stimuli. Compared to transcriptional control, attributes of translational control include reduced sensitivity to stochastic fluctuation, a finer gauge of control, and more rapid responsiveness to environmental stimuli. Yet, our murky understanding of translational control allows few generalizations. Consequently, translational regulation is underutilized in the context of transgene regulation, although synthetic biologists are now beginning to appropriate RNA-level gene regulation into their regulatory circuits. We also know little about how translational control contributes to the diversity of plant form and function. This project explored how an emerging regulatory mRNA sequence element, upstream open reading frames (uORFs), is integrated with the general translation initiation machinery to permit translational regulation on specific mRNAs.

  3. PRMT1-Mediated Translation Regulation is a Crucial Vulnerability of Cancer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Through an shRNA screen, we identified the protein arginine methyltransferase Prmt1 as a vulnerable intervention point in murine p53/Rb-null osteosarcomas, the human counterpart of which lacks effective therapeutic options. Depletion of Prmt1 in p53-deficient cells impaired tumor initiation and maintenance in vitro and in vivo Mechanistic studies reveal that translation-associated pathways were enriched for Prmt1 downstream targets, implicating Prmt1 in translation control.

  4. Comparison of Autogenous Vaccine and Autohaemotherapy Administrations in the Treatment of Bovine Papillomatosis

    OpenAIRE

    BİRİCİK, Halil Selçuk

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of autogenous vaccine, autohaemotherapy and autogenous vaccine-autohaemotherapy combinations in the treatment of bovine papillomatosis. The study was performed on 27 cattle aged between 1 and 2.5 years. The animals were divided into three groups (nine in each group) as autogenous vaccine, autohaemotherapy and autogenous vaccine-autohaemotherapy combinations. Doses of 10 ml per animal were injected subcutaneously at weekly intervals, a t...

  5. Cracking in cement paste induced by autogenous shrinkage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lura, Pietro; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Weiss, Jason

    2009-01-01

    Detection and quantification of microcracks caused by restrained autogenous shrinkage in high-performance concrete is a difficult task. Available techniques either lack the required resolution or may produce additional cracks that are indistinguishable from the original ones. A recently developed...... technique allows identification of microcracks while avoiding artefacts induced by unwanted restraint, drying, or temperature variations during sample preparation. Small cylindrical samples of cement paste are cast with steel rods of different diameters in their centre. The rods restrain the autogenous...... shrinkage of the paste and may cause crack formation. The crack pattern is identified by impregnation with gallium and analyzed by optical and scanning electron microscopy. In this study, a non-linear numerical analysis of the samples was performed. Autogenous strain, elastic modulus, fracture energy...

  6. Evaluation of the efficacy of an autogenous Escherichia coli vaccine in broiler breeders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Lili; Thøfner, Ida; Christensen, Jens Peter

    2017-01-01

    In poultry production Escherichia coli autogenous vaccines are often used. However, the efficacy of autogenous E. coli vaccinations has not been evaluated experimentally in chickens after start of lay. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the protective effect of an autogenous E. coli vac...

  7. Mitochondrial Cytochrome c Oxidase Biogenesis Is Regulated by the Redox State of a Heme-Binding Translational Activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Iliana C; Barrientos, Antoni

    2016-02-20

    Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (COX), the last enzyme of the respiratory chain, catalyzes the reduction of oxygen to water and therefore is essential for cell function and viability. COX is a multimeric complex, whose biogenesis is extensively regulated. One type of control targets cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (Cox1), a key COX enzymatic core subunit translated on mitochondrial ribosomes. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Cox1 synthesis and COX assembly are coordinated through a negative feedback regulatory loop. This coordination is mediated by Mss51, a heme-sensing COX1 mRNA-specific processing factor and translational activator that is also a Cox1 chaperone. In this study, we investigated whether Mss51 hemylation and Mss51-mediated Cox1 synthesis are both modulated by the reduction-oxidation (redox) environment. We report that Cox1 synthesis is attenuated under oxidative stress conditions and have identified one of the underlying mechanisms. We show that in vitro and in vivo exposure to hydrogen peroxide induces the formation of a disulfide bond in Mss51 involving CPX motif heme-coordinating cysteines. Mss51 oxidation results in a heme ligand switch, thereby lowering heme-binding affinity and promoting its release. We demonstrate that in addition to affecting Mss51-dependent heme sensing, oxidative stress compromises Mss51 roles in COX1 mRNA processing and translation. H2O2-induced downregulation of mitochondrial translation has so far not been reported. We show that high H2O2 concentrations induce a global attenuation effect, but milder concentrations specifically affect COX1 mRNA processing and translation in an Mss51-dependent manner. The redox environment modulates Mss51 functions, which are essential for regulation of COX biogenesis and aerobic energy production.

  8. Sodium arsenite down-regulates the expression of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein via translational and post-translational mechanisms in hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Hong; Hao, Yuqing; Wang, Lijing; Jia, Dongwei; Ruan, Yuanyuan; Gu, Jianxin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Sodium arsenite down-regulates the protein expression level of XIAP in HCC. ► Sodium arsenite inhibits the de novo XIAP synthesis and its IRES activity. ► Sodium arsenite decreases XIAP stability and promotes its proteasomal degradation. ► Overexpression of XIAP attenuates the pro-apoptotic effect of sodium arsenite. -- Abstract: X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) is a member of the inhibitors of apoptosis protein (IAP) family, and has been reported to exhibit elevated expression levels in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and promote cell survival, metastasis and tumor recurrence. Targeting XIAP has proven effective for the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation and restoration of cancer cell chemosensitivity. Arsenic (or sodium arsenite) is a potent anti-tumor agent used to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Additionally, arsenic induces cell growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human HCC cells. In this study, we identified XIAP as a target for sodium arsenite-induced cytotoxicity in HCC. The exposure of HCC cell lines to sodium arsenite resulted in inhibition of XIAP expression in both a dose- and time-dependent manner. Sodium arsenite blocked the de novo XIAP synthesis and the activity of its internal ribosome entry site (IRES) element. Moreover, treatment with sodium arsenite decreased the protein stability of XIAP and induced its ubiquitin–proteasomal degradation. Overexpression of XIAP attenuated the pro-apoptotic effect of sodium arsenite in HCC. Taken together, our data demonstrate that sodium arsenite suppresses XIAP expression via translational and post-translational mechanisms in HCC.

  9. Control of PNG kinase, a key regulator of mRNA translation, is coupled to meiosis completion at egg activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Masatoshi; Petrova, Boryana; Orr-Weaver, Terry L

    2017-05-30

    The oocyte-to-embryo transition involves extensive changes in mRNA translation, regulated in Drosophila by the PNG kinase complex whose activity we show here to be under precise developmental control. Despite presence of the catalytic PNG subunit and the PLU and GNU activating subunits in the mature oocyte, GNU is phosphorylated at Cyclin B/CDK1sites and unable to bind PNG and PLU. In vitro phosphorylation of GNU by CyclinB/CDK1 blocks activation of PNG. Meiotic completion promotes GNU dephosphorylation and PNG kinase activation to regulate translation. The critical regulatory effect of phosphorylation is shown by replacement in the oocyte with a phosphorylation-resistant form of GNU, which promotes PNG-GNU complex formation, elevation of Cyclin B, and meiotic defects consistent with premature PNG activation. After PNG activation GNU is destabilized, thus inactivating PNG. This short-lived burst in kinase activity links development with maternal mRNA translation and ensures irreversibility of the oocyte-to-embryo transition.

  10. SRSF3 represses the expression of PDCD4 protein by coordinated regulation of alternative splicing, export and translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seung Kuk; Jeong, Sunjoo

    2016-02-05

    Gene expression is regulated at multiple steps, such as transcription, splicing, export, degradation and translation. Considering diverse roles of SR proteins, we determined whether the tumor-related splicing factor SRSF3 regulates the expression of the tumor-suppressor protein, PDCD4, at multiple steps. As we have reported previously, knockdown of SRSF3 increased the PDCD4 protein level in SW480 colon cancer cells. More interestingly, here we showed that the alternative splicing and the nuclear export of minor isoforms of pdcd4 mRNA were repressed by SRSF3, but the translation step was unaffected. In contrast, only the translation step of the major isoform of pdcd4 mRNA was repressed by SRSF3. Therefore, overexpression of SRSF3 might be relevant to the repression of all isoforms of PDCD4 protein levels in most types of cancer cell. We propose that SRSF3 could act as a coordinator of the expression of PDCD4 protein via two mechanisms on two alternatively spliced mRNA isoforms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. SRSF3 represses the expression of PDCD4 protein by coordinated regulation of alternative splicing, export and translation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seung Kuk; Jeong, Sunjoo, E-mail: sjsj@dankook.ac.kr

    2016-02-05

    Gene expression is regulated at multiple steps, such as transcription, splicing, export, degradation and translation. Considering diverse roles of SR proteins, we determined whether the tumor-related splicing factor SRSF3 regulates the expression of the tumor-suppressor protein, PDCD4, at multiple steps. As we have reported previously, knockdown of SRSF3 increased the PDCD4 protein level in SW480 colon cancer cells. More interestingly, here we showed that the alternative splicing and the nuclear export of minor isoforms of pdcd4 mRNA were repressed by SRSF3, but the translation step was unaffected. In contrast, only the translation step of the major isoform of pdcd4 mRNA was repressed by SRSF3. Therefore, overexpression of SRSF3 might be relevant to the repression of all isoforms of PDCD4 protein levels in most types of cancer cell. We propose that SRSF3 could act as a coordinator of the expression of PDCD4 protein via two mechanisms on two alternatively spliced mRNA isoforms.

  12. PTENα, a PTEN isoform translated through alternative initiation, regulates mitochondrial function and energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hui; He, Shiming; Yang, Jingyi; Jia, Xinying; Wang, Pan; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Zhong; Zou, Xiajuan; McNutt, Michael A; Shen, Wen Hong; Yin, Yuxin

    2014-05-06

    PTEN is one of the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer. It is known that PTEN has a wide range of biological functions beyond tumor suppression. Here, we report that PTENα, an N-terminally extended form of PTEN, functions in mitochondrial metabolism. Translation of PTENα is initiated from a CUG codon upstream of and in-frame with the coding region of canonical PTEN. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2A (eIF2A) controls PTENα translation, which requires a CUG-centered palindromic motif. We show that PTENα induces cytochrome c oxidase activity and ATP production in mitochondria. TALEN-mediated somatic deletion of PTENα impairs mitochondrial respiratory chain function. PTENα interacts with canonical PTEN to increase PINK1 protein levels and promote energy production. Our studies demonstrate the importance of eIF2A-mediated alternative translation for generation of protein diversity in eukaryotic systems and provide insights into the mechanism by which the PTEN family is involved in multiple cellular processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mixed messages: Re-initiation factors regulate translation of animal mRNAs

    OpenAIRE

    Obermayer, Benedikt; Rajewsky, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    When ribosomes encounter upstream open reading frames (uORFs) during scanning of the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR), translation of the downstream ORF requires re-initiation. In a recent paper in Nature, Schleich et al. describe metazoan factors which specifically promote re-initiation.

  14. Leucine Differentially Regulates Gene-Specific Translation in Mouse Skeletal Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Micah J; Reidy, Paul T; Baird, Lisa M; Dalley, Brian K; Howard, Michael T

    2017-09-01

    Background: Amino acids, especially leucine, are particularly effective in promoting protein synthesis. Leucine is known to increase the rate of protein synthesis in skeletal muscle through the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1-dependent, as well as -independent, signaling pathways. However, the overall translation program is poorly defined, and it is unknown how the activation of these pathways differentially controls the translation of specific mRNAs. Objective: Ribosome profiling and RNA sequencing were used to precisely define the translational program activated by an acute oral dose of leucine. Methods: Adult male C57BL/6 mice were deprived of food overnight before the delivery of an acute dose of l-leucine (9.4 mg) ( n = 6) or vehicle ( n = 5) and tissues collected 30 min later. Ribosome footprints and total RNA were isolated and subjected to deep sequencing. Changes in gene-specific mRNA abundance and ribosome occupancy were determined between the leucine-treated and control groups by aligning sequence reads to Reference Sequence database mRNAs and applying statistical features of the Bioconductor package edgeR. Results: Our data revealed mRNA features that confer translational control of skeletal muscle mRNAs in response to an acute dose of leucine. The subset of skeletal muscle mRNAs that are activated consists largely of terminal oligopyrimidine mRNAs (false discovery rate: translation had 5' untranslated regions with increased length. Only the small nuclear RNAs, which are required for ribosome biogenesis, were significantly altered in RNA abundance. The inferred functional translational program activated by dietary leucine includes increased protein synthesis capacity and energy metabolism, upregulation of sarcomere-binding proteins, modulation of circadian rhythm, and suppression of select immune components. Conclusions: These results clarify the translation program acutely stimulated by leucine in mouse skeletal muscle and establish new

  15. Autogenous tooth transplantation: an alternative to replace extracted tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Kamadjaja

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The gold standard treatment to replace missing tooth is dental implants, however, in certain cases, such as in young patients its placement is contraindicated. Autogenous tooth transplantation, which has been widely done in Scandinavian countries for many years, may become a good alternative to overcome this problem. Purpose: This article attempted to provide information about the indication, treatment planning, surgical technique and the successful result of autogenous tooth transplantation. Case: A fifteen year old male patient presented with large caries and periapical disease of his lower left first molar, which was partially erupted and the roots was not fully formed in radiograph. Case management: Autogenous tooth transplantation procedure was performed consisting of extraction of #36, odontectomy of #38 followed by its implantation to socket #36 and fixation of the transplanted tooth to the adjacent teeth. Post operative evaluation was done on regular basis within 18 months period. There was no complaint, the tooth was clinically stable and no evidence of periodontal problem. Serial radiographs showed healing of alveolar bone and periodontal tissue, and the complete root formation was evident by 18 months post operatively. Conclusion: Autogenous tooth transplantation is a potential alternative to replace extracted tooth. Provided that the case be properly planned and operation carefully performed, successful result of this treatment can be achieved.

  16. Thermodynamics of Autogenous Self-healing in Cementitious Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, H.

    2014-01-01

    Concrete is a brittle composite cementitious material that easily fractures under tensile loading. Microcracks can appear throughout the concrete prior to application of any load because of temperature-induced strain and autogenous and drying shrinkage. There is no doubt that these cracks provide

  17. Application of autogenous periosteum as a membrane in sinus lifting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To evaluate the success level of autogenous periosteum in sinus lifting as a barrier membrane which contributes positively to wound healing and is effective in bone formation without the risk of tissue rejection. Materials and Methods: In this study, 32 male New Zealand rabbits were used and were divided into four ...

  18. Application of Autogenous Periosteum as a Membrane in Sinus Lifting

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-24

    Jan 24, 2018 ... Keywords: Autogenous periosteum, barrier membrane, new bone formation, ... cases of fracture and provides the nutritional needs of bone.[4] It has been shown by experimental studies that the periosteum contributes positively to osteogenesis and ..... The cell and molecular biology of fracture healing.

  19. Nuclear Protein Sam68 Interacts with the Enterovirus 71 Internal Ribosome Entry Site and Positively Regulates Viral Protein Translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Song, Lei; Cong, Haolong; Tien, Po

    2015-10-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) recruits various cellular factors to assist in the replication and translation of its genome. Identification of the host factors involved in the EV71 life cycle not only will enable a better understanding of the infection mechanism but also has the potential to be of use in the development of antiviral therapeutics. In this study, we demonstrated that the cellular factor 68-kDa Src-associated protein in mitosis (Sam68) acts as an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) trans-acting factor (ITAF) that binds specifically to the EV71 5' untranslated region (5'UTR). Interaction sites in both the viral IRES (stem-loops IV and V) and the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K homology (KH) domain of Sam68 protein were further mapped using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and biotin RNA pulldown assay. More importantly, dual-luciferase (firefly) reporter analysis suggested that overexpression of Sam68 positively regulated IRES-dependent translation of virus proteins. In contrast, both IRES activity and viral protein translation significantly decreased in Sam68 knockdown cells compared with the negative-control cells treated with short hairpin RNA (shRNA). However, downregulation of Sam68 did not have a significant inhibitory effect on the accumulation of the EV71 genome. Moreover, Sam68 was redistributed from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and interacts with cellular factors, such as poly(rC)-binding protein 2 (PCBP2) and poly(A)-binding protein (PABP), during EV71 infection. The cytoplasmic relocalization of Sam68 in EV71-infected cells may be involved in the enhancement of EV71 IRES-mediated translation. Since Sam68 is known to be a RNA-binding protein, these results provide direct evidence that Sam68 is a novel ITAF that interacts with EV71 IRES and positively regulates viral protein translation. The nuclear protein Sam68 is found as an additional new host factor that interacts with the EV71 IRES during infection and could potentially

  20. Post-translational regulation of PTEN catalytic function and protein stability in the hibernating 13-lined ground squirrel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cheng-Wei; Bell, Ryan A; Storey, Kenneth B

    2015-11-01

    The insulin signaling pathway functions as a major regulator of many metabolic and cellular functions, and has been shown to be reversibly suppressed in many species during hibernation. This study characterized the regulation of PTEN phosphatase, a negative regulator of the insulin receptor network, over the torpor-arousal cycle of hibernation in the skeletal muscle of Ictidomys tridecemlineatus. Western blotting and RT-PCR were used to analyze post-translational and transcriptional regulations of PTEN respectively. Enzymatic activities were determined by the malachite green assay, while protein stability was assessed the using pulse-proteolysis method. During torpor, the ratio of non-phosphorylated PTEN (S380/T382/T383) was significantly elevated by 1.4-fold during late torpor compared with euthermic controls; this was coupled with an increase in substrate affinity for PIP3 (by 56%) in late torpor. Two proteolytic cleavage PEST motifs were identified in the C-terminus that overlapped with the phosphorylation sites of PTEN; pulse-proteolysis analysis of PTEN protein showed a decrease in protein stability during late torpor (Cm of urea decreased by 21%). Furthermore, the increase in PTEN activity observed was correlated with a decrease in PDK-1 phosphorylation by 32%, suggesting a downstream effect of PTEN activation during torpor. Transcriptional analysis showed that mRNA expression of pten and pdk-1 remain unchanged during hibernation, suggesting post-translation modification as the primary regulatory mechanism of PTEN function. Phosphorylation plays an important role in the regulation of PTEN enzymatic activity and protein stability. Activation of PTEN during torpor can regulate insulin signaling during periods of low energy state. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Post-translational regulation of macrophage migration inhibitory factor: Basis for functional fine-tuning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Schindler

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF is a chemokine-like protein and an important mediator in the inflammatory response. Unlike most other pro-inflammatory cytokines, a number of cell types constitutively express MIF and secretion occurs from preformed stores. MIF is an evolutionarily conserved protein that shows a remarkable functional diversity, including specific binding to surface CD74 and chemokine receptors and the presence of two intrinsic tautomerase and oxidoreductase activities. Several studies have shown that MIF is subject to post-translational modification, particularly redox-dependent modification of the catalytic proline and cysteine residues. In this review, we summarize and discuss MIF post-translational modifications and their effects on the biological properties of this protein. We propose that the redox-sensitive residues in MIF will be modified at sites of inflammation and that this will add further depth to the functional diversity of this intriguing cytokine.

  2. Notch-mediated post-translational control of Ngn3 protein stability regulates pancreatic patterning and cell fate commitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qu, Xiaoling; Afelik, Solomon; Jensen, Jan Nygaard

    2013-01-01

    activation of the Notch>Hes1 pathway impacts formation of the trunk domain in the pancreas causing multipotent progenitors to lose acinar, while gaining endocrine and ductal, competence. The subsequent selection of fate from such bipotential progenitors is then governed by lateral inhibition, where Notch...... protein stabilization in the normal mouse pancreas explants. We conclude that the mutually exclusive expression pattern of Ngn3/Hes1 proteins in the mammalian pancreas is partially controlled through Notch-mediated post-translational regulation and we demonstrate that the formation of insulin...

  3. D-Glucosamine down-regulates HIF-1{alpha} through inhibition of protein translation in DU145 prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jee-Young; Park, Jong-Wook; Suh, Seong-Il [Chronic Disease Research Center, School of Medicine, Keimyung University, 194 Dongsan-Dong, Jung-Gu, Daegu 700-712 (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Won-Ki, E-mail: wonki@dsmc.or.kr [Chronic Disease Research Center, School of Medicine, Keimyung University, 194 Dongsan-Dong, Jung-Gu, Daegu 700-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-04-24

    D-Glucosamine has been reported to inhibit proliferation of cancer cells in culture and in vivo. In this study we report a novel response to D-glucosamine involving the translation regulation of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1{alpha} expression. D-Glucosamine caused a decreased expression of HIF-1{alpha} under normoxic and hypoxic conditions without affecting HIF-1{alpha} mRNA expression in DU145 prostate cancer cells. D-Glucosamine inhibited HIF-1{alpha} accumulation induced by proteasome inhibitor MG132 and prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor DMOG suggesting D-glucosamine reduces HIF-1{alpha} protein expression through proteasome-independent pathway. Metabolic labeling assays indicated that D-glucosamine inhibits translation of HIF-1{alpha} protein. In addition, D-glucosamine inhibited HIF-1{alpha} expression induced by serum stimulation in parallel with inhibition of p70S6K suggesting D-glucosamine inhibits growth factor-induced HIF-1{alpha} expression, at least in part, through p70S6K inhibition. Taken together, these results suggest that D-glucosamine inhibits HIF-1{alpha} expression through inhibiting protein translation and provide new insight into a potential mechanism of the anticancer properties of D-glucosamine.

  4. Crystal Structure of the CTP1L Endolysin Reveals How Its Activity Is Regulated by a Secondary Translation Product*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Matthew; Leicht, Stefan; Krichel, Boris; Thompson, Andrew; Gómez-Torres, Natalia; Garde, Sonia; Narbad, Arjan; Mayer, Melinda J.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages produce endolysins, which lyse the bacterial host cell to release newly produced virions. The timing of lysis is regulated and is thought to involve the activation of a molecular switch. We present a crystal structure of the activated endolysin CTP1L that targets Clostridium tyrobutyricum, consisting of a complex between the full-length protein and an N-terminally truncated C-terminal cell wall binding domain (CBD). The truncated CBD is produced through an internal translation start site within the endolysin gene. Mutants affecting the internal translation site change the oligomeric state of the endolysin and reduce lytic activity. The activity can be modulated by reconstitution of the full-length endolysin-CBD complex with free CBD. The same oligomerization mechanism applies to the CD27L endolysin that targets Clostridium difficile and the CS74L endolysin that targets Clostridium sporogenes. When the CTP1L endolysin gene is introduced into the commensal bacterium Lactococcus lactis, the truncated CBD is also produced, showing that the alternative start codon can be used in other bacterial species. The identification of a translational switch affecting oligomerization presented here has implications for the design of effective endolysins for the treatment of bacterial infections. PMID:26683375

  5. Crystal Structure of the CTP1L Endolysin Reveals How Its Activity Is Regulated by a Secondary Translation Product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Matthew; Leicht, Stefan; Krichel, Boris; Mertens, Haydyn D T; Thompson, Andrew; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; Svergun, Dmitri I; Gómez-Torres, Natalia; Garde, Sonia; Uetrecht, Charlotte; Narbad, Arjan; Mayer, Melinda J; Meijers, Rob

    2016-03-04

    Bacteriophages produce endolysins, which lyse the bacterial host cell to release newly produced virions. The timing of lysis is regulated and is thought to involve the activation of a molecular switch. We present a crystal structure of the activated endolysin CTP1L that targets Clostridium tyrobutyricum, consisting of a complex between the full-length protein and an N-terminally truncated C-terminal cell wall binding domain (CBD). The truncated CBD is produced through an internal translation start site within the endolysin gene. Mutants affecting the internal translation site change the oligomeric state of the endolysin and reduce lytic activity. The activity can be modulated by reconstitution of the full-length endolysin-CBD complex with free CBD. The same oligomerization mechanism applies to the CD27L endolysin that targets Clostridium difficile and the CS74L endolysin that targets Clostridium sporogenes. When the CTP1L endolysin gene is introduced into the commensal bacterium Lactococcus lactis, the truncated CBD is also produced, showing that the alternative start codon can be used in other bacterial species. The identification of a translational switch affecting oligomerization presented here has implications for the design of effective endolysins for the treatment of bacterial infections. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Translator awareness Translator awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram Wilss

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available If we want to encompass adequately the wide-ranging field of human translation, it is necessary to include in translation studies (TS the concept of translator awareness (or translator consciousness, for that matter. However, this is more easily said than done, because this concept does not easily lend itself to definition, let alone to measurement, e. g., by investigating translator behaviour. To put it bluntly: Translator awareness is a fuzzy concept. Like many obviously difficult-to-define concepts, with which dialogue in TS is burdened, translator awareness lacks an articulated theory within which different forms of translator behaviour can be convincingly related to, or distinguished from, one another. Hence, TS has so far not tackled, at least not systematically, the issue of translator awareness. If we want to encompass adequately the wide-ranging field of human translation, it is necessary to include in translation studies (TS the concept of translator awareness (or translator consciousness, for that matter. However, this is more easily said than done, because this concept does not easily lend itself to definition, let alone to measurement, e. g., by investigating translator behaviour. To put it bluntly: Translator awareness is a fuzzy concept. Like many obviously difficult-to-define concepts, with which dialogue in TS is burdened, translator awareness lacks an articulated theory within which different forms of translator behaviour can be convincingly related to, or distinguished from, one another. Hence, TS has so far not tackled, at least not systematically, the issue of translator awareness.

  7. Multifaceted regulation of translational readthrough by RNA replication elements in a tombusvirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A Cimino

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Translational readthrough of stop codons by ribosomes is a recoding event used by a variety of viruses, including plus-strand RNA tombusviruses. Translation of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp in tombusviruses is mediated using this strategy and we have investigated this process using a variety of in vitro and in vivo approaches. Our results indicate that readthrough generating the RdRp requires a novel long-range RNA-RNA interaction, spanning a distance of ∼3.5 kb, which occurs between a large RNA stem-loop located 3'-proximal to the stop codon and an RNA replication structure termed RIV at the 3'-end of the viral genome. Interestingly, this long-distance RNA-RNA interaction is modulated by mutually-exclusive RNA structures in RIV that represent a type of RNA switch. Moreover, a different long-range RNA-RNA interaction that was previously shown to be necessary for viral RNA replicase assembly was also required for efficient readthrough production of the RdRp. Accordingly, multiple replication-associated RNA elements are involved in modulating the readthrough event in tombusviruses and we propose an integrated mechanistic model to describe how this regulatory network could be advantageous by (i providing a quality control system for culling truncated viral genomes at an early stage in the replication process, (ii mediating cis-preferential replication of viral genomes, and (iii coordinating translational readthrough of the RdRp with viral genome replication. Based on comparative sequence analysis and experimental data, basic elements of this regulatory model extend to other members of Tombusviridae, as well as to viruses outside of this family.

  8. Translation of myelin basic protein mRNA in oligodendrocytes is regulated by integrin activation and hnRNP-K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Lisbeth Schmidt; Chan, Colin W; ffrench-Constant, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Myelination in the central nervous system provides a unique example of how cells establish asymmetry. The myelinating cell, the oligodendrocyte, extends processes to and wraps multiple axons of different diameter, keeping the number of wraps proportional to the axon diameter. Local regulation...... of protein synthesis represents one mechanism used to control the different requirements for myelin sheath at each axo–glia interaction. Prior work has established that β1-integrins are involved in the axoglial interactions that initiate myelination. Here, we show that integrin activation regulates...... translation of a key sheath protein, myelin basic protein (MBP), by reversing the inhibitory effect of the mRNA 3′UTR. During oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination α6β1-integrin interacts with hnRNP-K, an mRNA-binding protein, which binds to MBP mRNA and translocates from the nucleus to the myelin...

  9. Self-Regulation and Psychopathology: Toward an Integrative Translational Research Paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauman, Timothy J

    2017-05-08

    This article presents a general framework in which different manifestations of psychopathology can be conceptualized as dysfunctions in one or more mechanisms of self-regulation, defined as the ongoing process of managing personal goal pursuit in the face of internal, interpersonal, and environmental forces that would derail it. The framework is based on the assertion that self-regulation is a critical locus for the proximal influence on motivation, cognition, emotion, and behavior of more distal factors such as genetics, temperament, socialization history, and neurophysiology. Psychological theories of self-regulation are ideal platforms from which to integrate the study of self-regulation both within and across traditional disciplines. This article has two related goals: to elucidate how the construct of self-regulation provides a unique conceptual platform for the study of psychopathology and to illustrate that platform by presenting our research on depression as an example.

  10. A theory for the origin of a self-replicating chemical system. I - Natural selection of the autogen from short, random oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    A general theory is presented for the origin of a self-replicating chemical system, termed an autogen, which is capable of both crude replication and translation (protein synthesis). The theory requires the availability of free energy and monomers to the system, a significant background low-yield synthesis of kinetically stable oligopeptides and oligonucleotides, the localization of the oligomers, crude oligonucleotide selectivity of amino acids during oligopeptide synthesis, crude oligonucleotide replication, and two short peptide families which catalyze replication and translation, to produce a localized group of at least one copy each of two protogenes and two protoenzymes. The model posits a process of random oligomerization, followed by the random nucleation of functional components and the rapid autocatalytic growth of the functioning autogen to macroscopic amounts, to account for the origin of the first self-replicating system. Such a process contains steps of such high probability and short time periods that it is suggested that the emergence of an autogen in a laboratory experiment of reasonable time scale may be possible.

  11. Synthesis of Magnesium Nickel Boride Aggregates via Borohydride Autogenous Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazi, Mahboobeh; Cathey, Henrietta E; Mackinnon, Ian D R

    2018-03-23

    We demonstrate synthesis of the ternary intermetallic MgNi₃B₂ using autogenous pressure from the reaction of NaBH₄ with Mg and Ni metal powder. The decomposition of NaBH₄ to H₂ and B₂H₆ commences at low temperatures in the presence of Mg and/or Ni and promotes formation of Ni-borides and MgNi₃B₂ with the increase in temperature. MgNi₃B₂ aggregates with Ni-boride cores are formed when the reaction temperature is >670 °C and autogenous pressure is >1.7 MPa. Morphologies and microstructures suggest that solid-gas and liquid-gas reactions are dominant mechanisms and that Ni-borides form at a lower temperature than MgNi₃B₂. Magnetic measurements of the core-shell MgNi₃B₂ aggregates are consistent with ferromagnetic behaviour in contrast to stoichiometric MgNi₃B₂ which is diamagnetic at room temperature.

  12. Expression profile of maize (Zea mays L.) embryonic axes during germination: translational regulation of ribosomal protein mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-López, Sara; Mancera-Martínez, Eder; Donayre-Torres, Alberto; Rangel, Claudia; Uribe, Laura; March, Santiago; Jiménez-Sánchez, Gerardo; Sánchez de Jiménez, Estela

    2011-10-01

    Seed germination is a critical developmental period for plant propagation. Information regarding gene expression within this important period is relevant for understanding the main biochemical processes required for successful germination, particularly in maize, one of the most important cereals in the world. The present research focuses on the global microarray analysis of differential gene expression between quiescent and germinated maize embryo stages. This analysis revealed that a large number of mRNAs stored in the quiescent embryonic axes (QEAs) were differentially regulated during germination in the 24 h germinated embryonic axes (GEAs). These genes belong to 14 different functional categories and most of them correspond to metabolic processes, followed by transport, transcription and translation. Interestingly, the expression of mRNAs encoding ribosomal proteins [(r)-proteins], required for new ribosome formation during this fast-growing period, remains mostly unchanged throughout the germination process, suggesting that these genes are not regulated at the transcriptional level during this developmental period. To investigate this issue further, comparative microarray analyses on polysomal mRNAs from growth-stimulated and non-stimulated GEAs were performed. The results revealed that (r)-protein mRNAs accumulate to high levels in polysomes of the growth-stimulated tissues, indicating a translational control mechanism to account for the rapid (r)-protein synthesis observed within this period. Bioinformatic analysis of (r)-protein mRNAs showed that 5' TOP (tract of pyrimidines)-like sequences are present only in the 5'-untranslated region set of up-regulated (r)-protein mRNAs. This overall approach to the germination process allows an in-depth view of molecular changes, enabling a broader understanding of the regulatory mechanisms that occur during this process.

  13. Autogenous tooth transplantation for replacing a lost tooth: case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Youn Kang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The autogenous tooth transplantation is an alternative treatment replacing a missing tooth when a suitable donor tooth is available. It is also a successful treatment option to save significant amount of time and cost comparing implants or conventional prosthetics. These cases, which required single tooth extraction due to deep caries and severe periodontal disease, could have good results by transplanting non-functional but sound donor tooth to the extraction site.

  14. MicroRNA, SND1, and alterations in translational regulation in colon carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, Naoto; Nakagama, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression by microRNA (miRNA) has recently attracted major interest in relation to its involvement in cancer development. miRNA is a member of small non-coding RNA, consists of 22-24 nucleotides and regulates expression of target mRNA species in a post-transcriptional manner by being incorporated with RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). Staphylococcal nuclease homology domain containing 1 (SND1), a component of RISC, is frequently up-regulated in human colon cancers and also chemically induced colon cancers in animals. We here showed that SDN1 is involved in miRNA-mediated gene suppression and overexpression of SND1 in colon cancer cells causes down-regulation of APC without altering APC mRNA levels. As for the miRNA expression profile in human colon cancer, miR-34a was among the list of down-regulated miRNA. Expression of miR-34a is tightly regulated by p53, and ectopic expression of miR-34a in colon cancer cells causes remarkable reduction of cell proliferation and induces senescence-like phenotypes. MiR-34a also participates in the positive feedback loop of the p53 tumor suppressor network. This circuitry mechanism for p53 activation is of interest in understanding the tumor suppressive function of miR-34a in colon carcinogenesis. miRNA should also be considered as novel anti-cancer agents in tumor suppressive therapeutic applications.

  15. Immediate autogenous cartilage grafts in rhinoplasty after alloplastic implant rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Ullas; Jones, Nick S; Romo, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    It is accepted in rhinoplasty that complications are more common with alloplastic implants than with autografts. There is little guidance in the literature on how to deal with the cosmetic and/or functional problems that follow alloplastic implant rejection. The conventional advice has been to remove the allograft and not place any graft at the same time. The present article presents our experience treating allograft rejection and immediately repairing any structural defect with autografts. To demonstrate that immediate nasal reconstruction using autogenous cartilage is a good technique when an alloplastic material has to be removed because of rejection, inflammation, or infection. A retrospective analysis of outcome for a case series. A retrospective review of the management of 8 patients who presented to 2 tertiary referral centers with alloplastic implant rejection following rhinoplasty. In 7 cases, the alloplastic implant had to be removed because it had migrated and caused a foreign body reaction; in 1 case, the implant had caused a bacterial infection. In all 8 cases, the nasal deformity that followed the removal of the allograft was so marked that the nose was immediately reconstructed with autogenous cartilage. The patients all made a good recovery after immediate reconstruction, although skin changes associated with the alloplastic implant remained after a mean follow-up of 3 years 3 months. The use of autogenous cartilage is a good option for nasal augmentation immediately after the removal of an alloplastic implant.

  16. The regulation of protein synthesis and translation factors by CD3 and CD28 in human primary T lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Proud Christopher G

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of human resting T lymphocytes results in an immediate increase in protein synthesis. The increase in protein synthesis after 16–24 h has been linked to the increased protein levels of translation initiation factors. However, the regulation of protein synthesis during the early onset of T cell activation has not been studied in great detail. We studied the regulation of protein synthesis after 1 h of activation using αCD3 antibody to stimulate the T cell receptor and αCD28 antibody to provide the co-stimulus. Results Activation of the T cells with both antibodies led to a sustained increase in the rate of protein synthesis. The activities and/or phosphorylation states of several translation factors were studied during the first hour of stimulation with αCD3 and αCD28 to explore the mechanism underlying the activation of protein synthesis. The initial increase in protein synthesis was accompanied by activation of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor, eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF 2B, and of p70 S6 kinase and by dephosphorylation of eukaryotic elongation factor (eEF 2. Similar signal transduction pathways, as assessed using signal transduction inhibitors, are involved in the regulation of protein synthesis, eIF2B activity and p70 S6 kinase activity. A new finding was that the p38 MAPK α/β pathway was involved in the regulation of overall protein synthesis in primary T cells. Unexpectedly, no changes were detected in the phosphorylation state of the cap-binding protein eIF4E and the eIF4E-binding protein 4E-BP1, or the formation of the cap-binding complex eIF4F. Conclusions Both eIF2B and p70 S6 kinase play important roles in the regulation of protein synthesis during the early onset of T cell activation.

  17. Autogenic Training, Metacognition and Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, Bastien

    2013-01-01

    In French universities, only one out of two students is successful in his/her first year. The change of the working rhythm and the importance of self-regulated learning (relying on metacognition) can to a large extent explain these dramatic rates. Metacognition, as the process of being aware of one's own cognition and activity implies awareness…

  18. Regulating Prostate Cancer Sensitivity to Chemotherapy through Translational Control of CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    from a single transcript and has been suggested to regulate mTOR activity. The longer LAP isoforms promote cell survival, growth arrest and...contexts and are more functionally linked with survival, cell cycle arrest and terminal differentiation. [10, 12, 13]. In contrast, truncated isoforms...Pritts TA, Hershko DD, Hasselgren PO. Proteasome inhibitors activate the transcription factors C/EBP-beta and delta in human intestinal epithelial cells

  19. USP2-45 Is a Circadian Clock Output Effector Regulating Calcium Absorption at the Post-Translational Level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Pouly

    Full Text Available The mammalian circadian clock influences most aspects of physiology and behavior through the transcriptional control of a wide variety of genes, mostly in a tissue-specific manner. About 20 clock-controlled genes (CCGs oscillate in virtually all mammalian tissues and are generally considered as core clock components. One of them is Ubiquitin-Specific Protease 2 (Usp2, whose status remains controversial, as it may be a cogwheel regulating the stability or activity of core cogwheels or an output effector. We report here that Usp2 is a clock output effector related to bodily Ca2+ homeostasis, a feature that is conserved across evolution. Drosophila with a whole-body knockdown of the orthologue of Usp2, CG14619 (dUsp2-kd, predominantly die during pupation but are rescued by dietary Ca2+ supplementation. Usp2-KO mice show hyperabsorption of dietary Ca2+ in small intestine, likely due to strong overexpression of the membrane scaffold protein NHERF4, a regulator of the Ca2+ channel TRPV6 mediating dietary Ca2+ uptake. In this tissue, USP2-45 is found in membrane fractions and negatively regulates NHERF4 protein abundance in a rhythmic manner at the protein level. In clock mutant animals (Cry1/Cry2-dKO, rhythmic USP2-45 expression is lost, as well as the one of NHERF4, confirming the inverse relationship between USP2-45 and NHERF4 protein levels. Finally, USP2-45 interacts in vitro with NHERF4 and endogenous Clathrin Heavy Chain. Taken together these data prompt us to define USP2-45 as the first clock output effector acting at the post-translational level at cell membranes and possibly regulating membrane permeability of Ca2+.

  20. Post-translational regulation of P2X receptor channels: modulation by phospholipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis-Philippe eBernier

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available P2X receptor channels mediate fast excitatory signaling by ATP and play major roles in sensory transduction, neuro-immune communication and inflammatory response. P2X receptors constitute a gene family of calcium-permeable ATP-gated cation channels therefore the regulation of P2X signaling is critical for both membrane potential and intracellular calcium homeostasis. Phosphoinositides (PIPn are anionic signaling phospholipids that act as functional regulators of many types of ion channels. Direct PIPn binding was demonstrated for several ligand- or voltage-gated ion channels, however no generic motif emerged to accurately predict lipid-protein binding sites. This review presents what is currently known about the modulation of the different P2X subtypes by phospholipids and about critical determinants underlying their sensitivity to PIPn levels in the plasma membrane.All functional mammalian P2X subtypes tested, with the notable exception of P2X5, have been shown to be positively modulated by PIPn, i.e. homomeric P2X1, P2X2, P2X3, P2X4, and P2X7, as well as heteromeric P2X1/5 and P2X2/3 receptors. Based on various results reported on the aforementioned subtypes including mutagenesis of the prototypical PIPn-sensitive P2X4 and PIPn-insensitive P2X5 receptor subtypes, an increasing amount of functional, biochemical and structural evidence converges on the modulatory role of a short polybasic domain located in the proximal C-terminus of P2X subunits. This linear motif, semi-conserved in the P2X family, seems necessary and sufficient for encoding direct modulation of ATP-gated channels by PIPn. Furthermore, the physiological impact of the regulation of ionotropic purinergic responses by phospholipids on pain pathways was recently revealed in the context of native crosstalks between phospholipase C-linked metabotropic receptors and P2X receptor channels in DRG sensory neurons and microglia.

  1. Transcriptional regulation and signature patterns revealed by microarray analyses of Streptococcus pneumoniae R6 challenged with sublethal concentrations of translation inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Wai-Leung; Kazmierczak, Krystyna M; Robertson, Gregory T; Gilmour, Raymond; Winkler, Malcolm E

    2003-01-01

    The effects of sublethal concentrations of four different classes of translation inhibitors (puromycin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, and erythromycin) on global transcription patterns of Streptococcus pneumoniae R6 were determined by microarray analyses. Consistent with the general mode of action of these inhibitors, relative transcript levels of genes that encode ribosomal proteins and translation factors or that mediate tRNA charging and amino acid biosynthesis increased or decreased, respectively. Transcription of the heat shock regulon was induced only by puromycin or streptomycin treatment, which lead to truncation or mistranslation, respectively, but not by other antibiotics that block translation, transcription, or amino acid charging of tRNA. In contrast, relative transcript amounts of certain genes involved in transport, cellular processes, energy metabolism, and purine nucleotide (pur) biosynthesis were changed by different translation inhibitors. In particular, transcript amounts from a pur gene cluster and from purine uptake and salvage genes were significantly elevated by several translation inhibitors, but not by antibiotics that target other cellular processes. Northern blotting confirmed increased transcript amounts from part of the pur gene cluster in cells challenged by translation inhibitors and revealed the presence of a 10-kb transcript. Purine metabolism genes were negatively regulated by a homologue of the PurR regulatory protein, and full derepression in a DeltapurR mutant depended on optimal translation. Unexpectedly, hierarchical clustering of the microarray data distinguished among the global transcription patterns caused by antibiotics that inhibit different steps in the translation cycle. Together, these results show that there is extensive control of transcript amounts by translation in S. pneumoniae, especially for de novo purine nucleotide biosynthesis. In addition, these global transcription patterns form a signature that can be

  2. eIF2α-mediated translational control regulates the persistence of cocaine-induced LTP in midbrain dopamine neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placzek, Andon N; Prisco, Gonzalo Viana Di; Khatiwada, Sanjeev; Sgritta, Martina; Huang, Wei; Krnjević, Krešimir; Kaufman, Randal J; Dani, John A; Walter, Peter; Costa-Mattioli, Mauro

    2016-12-13

    Recreational drug use leads to compulsive substance abuse in some individuals. Studies on animal models of drug addiction indicate that persistent long-term potentiation (LTP) of excitatory synaptic transmission onto ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons is a critical component of sustained drug seeking. However, little is known about the mechanism regulating such long-lasting changes in synaptic strength. Previously, we identified that translational control by eIF2α phosphorylation (p-eIF2α) regulates cocaine-induced LTP in the VTA (Huang et al., 2016). Here we report that in mice with reduced p-eIF2α-mediated translation, cocaine induces persistent LTP in VTA DA neurons. Moreover, selectively inhibiting eIF2α-mediated translational control with a small molecule ISRIB, or knocking down oligophrenin-1 -an mRNA whose translation is controlled by p-eIF2α-in the VTA also prolongs cocaine-induced LTP. This persistent LTP is mediated by the insertion of GluR2-lacking AMPARs. Collectively, our findings suggest that eIF2α-mediated translational control regulates the progression from transient to persistent cocaine-induced LTP.

  3. Cytoplasmic protein binding to highly conserved sequences in the 3' untranslated region of mouse protamine 2 mRNA, a translationally regulated transcript of male germ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Y.K.; Hecht, N.B.

    1991-01-01

    The expression of the protamines, the predominant nuclear proteins of mammalian spermatozoa, is regulated translationally during male germ-cell development. The 3' untranslated region (UTR) of protamine 1 mRNA has been reported to control its time of translation. To understand the mechanisms controlling translation of the protamine mRNAs, we have sought to identify cis elements of the 3' UTR of protamine 2 mRNA that are recognized by cytoplasmic factors. From gel retardation assays, two sequence elements are shown to form specific RNA-protein complexes. Protein binding sites of the two complexes were determined by RNase T1 mapping, by blocking the putative binding sites with antisense oligonucleotides, and by competition assays. The sequences of these elements, located between nucleotides + 537 and + 572 in protamine 2 mRNA, are highly conserved among postmeiotic translationally regulated nuclear proteins of the mammalian testis. Two closely linked protein binding sites were detected. UV-crosslinking studies revealed that a protein of about 18 kDa binds to one of the conserved sequences. These data demonstrate specific protein binding to a highly conserved 3' UTR of translationally regulated testicular mRNA

  4. Influence of temperature on autogenous deformation and relative humidity change in hardening cement paste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben

    1999-01-01

    This paper deals with autogenous deformation and autogenous relative humidity change (RH change) in hardening cement paste. Theoretical considerations and experimental data are presented, which elucidate the influence of temperature on these properties. This is an important subject in the control...

  5. Adjuvant auricular electroacupuncture and autogenic training in rheumatoid arthritis: a randomized controlled trial. Auricular acupuncture and autogenic training in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernateck, M; Becker, M; Schwake, C

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In contrast to psychological interventions the usefulness of acupuncture as an adjuvant therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has not yet been demonstrated. OBJECTIVE: The efficacy of auricular electroacupuncture (EA) was directly compared with autogenic training (AT). METHODS: Patients...

  6. Autogenous tooth bone graft: Ingenious bone regeneration material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chadalavada Sarala

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Tooth-derived bone graft material, which is proved to be rich in bone growth factors and bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs, have been becoming a practical substitute to bone grafting. It can also be used as a carrier for growth factors and stem cells as reported in many recent studies. Autogenous-tooth bone grafting technique is significant as this biomaterial has excellent bone regeneration capacity and also relatively non-existent chances of antigenicity, genetic diseases and disease transmission. In this article, a broad overview of the published findings with regard to the properties and uses of tooth-derived regenerative bone grafting is discussed.

  7. Measuring techniques for autogenous strain of cement paste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lura, Pietro; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2006-01-01

    of the volumetric method. Water absorption is driven by a lowering of the water activity in the cement paste due to dissolved salts in the pore fluid and to self-desiccation. From the moment of casting, significant water uptake was registered in all experiments. This water uptake influenced the volumetric...... measurements by the same order of magnitude as the autogenous strain itself. By performing the measurements in a paraffin oil bath instead of a water bath, this artefact was eliminated. Furthermore, volumetric measurements performed in paraffin oil gave almost identical results as linear measurements performed...

  8. Measuring techniques for autogenous strain of cement paste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lura, Pietro; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2007-01-01

    of the volumetric method. Water absorption is driven by a lowering of the water activity in the cement paste due to dissolved salts in the pore fluid and to self-desiccation. From the moment of casting, significant water uptake was registered in all experiments. This water uptake influenced the volumetric...... measurements by the same order of magnitude as the autogenous strain itself. By performing the measurements in a paraffin oil bath instead of a water bath, this artefact was eliminated. Furthermore, volumetric measurements performed in paraffin oil gave almost identical results as linear measurements performed...

  9. Autogenic therapy: Techniques, foundations, health and clinical applications, and empirical support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel R. Abuín

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Autogenic therapy emerges from the "autogenic training" method created by Schultz, and its development incorporates different therapeutic methods based on a psychophysiological approach. All these methods promote homeostatic self-regulatory brain processes. The aims of this paper are to describe and analyse the autogenic methods, the psychophysiological and neurophysiological processes involved, and their effective applications in both health and clinical fields. For these purposes, beside reviewing the earlier work by Schultz and Luthe, an electronic search of literature was conducted in order to find relevant contributions on these topics. Results show a big development of autogenic methods until the 80s, with an enormous amount of applications and studies on the psychophysiological and neurophysiological changes related to the practice of autogenic training. However, their expansion during the last 25 years has been much lower in comparison with other methods such as mindfulness and hypnosis. Possible causes are discussed and new challenges are suggested

  10. Translational control and differential RNA decay are key elements regulating postsegregational expression of the killer protein encoded by the parB locus of plasmid R1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, K; Helin, K; Christensen, O W

    1988-01-01

    The parB locus of plasmid R1, which mediates plasmid stability via postsegregational killing of plasmid-free cells, encodes two genes, hok and sok. The hok gene product is a potent cell-killing protein. The hok gene is regulated at the translational level by the sok gene-encoded repressor, a small...

  11. A Canonical DREB2-Type Transcription Factor in Lily Is Post-translationally Regulated and Mediates Heat Stress Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze Wu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on studies of monocot crops and eudicot model plants, the DREB2 class of AP2-type transcription factor has been shown to play crucial roles in various abiotic stresses, especially in the upstream of the heat stress response; however, research on DREB2s has not been reported in non-gramineous monocot plants. Here, we identified a novel DREB2 (LlDREB2B from lily (Lilium longiflorum, which was homologous to AtDREB2A of Arabidopsis, OsDREB2B of rice, and ZmDREB2A of maize. LlDREB2B was induced by heat, cold, salt, and mannitol stress, and its protein had transcriptional activity, was located in the nucleus, was able to bind to the dehydration-responsive element (DRE, and participated in the heat-responsive pathway of HsfA3. Overexpression of LlDREB2B in Arabidopsis activated expression of downstream genes and improved thermotolerance. LlDREB2B was not regulated by alternative splicing; functional transcripts accumulated under either normal or heat-stress conditions. A potential PEST sequence was predicted in LlDREB2B, but the stability of the LlDREB2B protein was not positively affected when the predicated PEST sequence was deleted. Further analysis revealed that the predicated PEST sequence lacked a SBC or SBC-like motif allowing interaction with BPMs and required for negative regulation. Nevertheless, LlDREB2B was still regulated at the post-translational level by interaction with AtDRIP1 and AtDRIP2 of Arabidopsis. In addition, LlDREB2B also interacted with AtRCD1 and LlRCD1 via a potential RIM motif located at amino acids 215–245. Taken together, our results show that LlDREB2B participated in the establishment of thermotolerance, and its regulation was different from that of the orthologs of gramineous and eudicot plants.

  12. Periodontally accelerated osteogenic orthodontics combined with autogenous bone grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowzari, Hessam; Yorita, Frank Kazuo; Chang, Hsuan-Chen

    2008-05-01

    This case report documents the first use of particulate autogenous bone graft with the corticotomy-assisted rapid orthodontic procedure known as periodontally accelerated osteogenic orthodontics (PAOO). A 41-year-old man, with class II, division 2 crowded occlusion, was treated with the PAOO procedure. Buccal mucoperiosteal flaps were reflected, and selected vertical and horizontal corticotomy was performed around the roots in both the maxillary and mandibular arches. Particulate bone graft was harvested from the rami and exostosis for alveolar ridge augmentation. Orthodontic movement was initiated immediately after the surgical intervention and adjusted every 2 weeks. Eight months after corticotomy surgery, total active orthodontic treatment was completed. No detrimental periodontal effects or root resorption were observed. The alveolar ridges of both the maxilla and mandible maintained the original thickness and configuration despite facial tipping of the incisors. It was concluded that PAOO is an effective treatment approach in adults to decrease treatment time and reduce the risk of root resorption. Selected corticotomy limited to the buccal and labial aspects also significantly reduces treatment time. More clinical studies with additional patients and long-term follow-up are needed to determine the optimal amount of autogenous bone graft.

  13. Bacterial phagocytosis by macrophage of autogenous splenic implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marques R. G.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Autogenous splenic implant seems to be the only alternative for preservation of splenic tissue after total splenectomy. This work was carried out to analyze the morphologic regeneration of autotransplanted splenic tissue in Wistar rats and to determine the bacterial phagocytic function of their macrophages. We utilized an experimental model with thirty-two rats, of both sexes, submitted to total splenectomy combined with autotransplantation in greater omentum of slices of the whole spleen mass. The animals were divided into two groups: I - young rats weighing 100 to 150 g; and II - adult rats weighing 250 to 300 g. Sixteen weeks later animals were intravenously inoculated with a suspension of Escherichia coli AB1157. Twenty minutes after inoculation, the animals were sacrificed and the splenic autotransplants were removed for morphological study. There was regeneration of autotransplanted splenic tissue in all animals. A similar morphological aspect among all animals was observed, with splenic tissue showing red and white pulps, lymphoid follicles, and marginal zone, with a moderate architectural disarrangement. Macrophages containing gram-negative bacterial aggregates as well as macrophages with hemosiderin pigments within the cytoplasm were observed. Blood vessels showed preserved walls, with no signs of vasculitis or thrombosis. The present results suggest that autogenous splenic implants in the greater omentum of the rat acquire the macro- and microscopic architecture of a normal spleen, with reduced dimensions, and preserve bacterial phagocyte function.

  14. Autogenic-Feedback Training Exercise (AFTE) Method and System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowings, Patricia S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The Autogenic-Feedback Training Exercise (AFTE) method of the present invention is a combined application of physiologic and perceptual training techniques. such as autogenic therapy and biofeedback. This combined therapy approach produces a methodology that is appreciably more effective than either of the individual techniques used separately. The AFTE method enables sufficient magnitude of control necessary to significantly reduce the behavioral and physiologic reactions to severe environmental stressors. It produces learned effects that are persistent over time and are resistant to extinction and it can be administered in a short period of time. The AFTE method may be used efficiently in several applications, among which are the following: to improve pilot and crew performance during emergency flying conditions; to train people to prevent the occurrence of nausea and vomiting associated with motion and sea sickness, or morning sickness in early pregnancy; as a training method for preventing or counteracting air-sickness symptoms in high-performance military aircraft; for use as a method for cardiovascular training, as well as for multiple other autonomic responses, which may contribute to the alleviation of Space Motion Sickness (SMS) in astronauts and cosmonauts; training people suffering from migraine or tension headaches to control peripheral blood flow and reduce forehead and/or trapezius muscle tension; training elderly people suffering from fecal incontinence to control their sphincter muscles; training cancer patients to reduce the nauseagenic effects of chemotherapy; and training patients with Chronic Intestinal Pseudo-obstruction (CIP).

  15. Protein phosphatase PPM1G regulates protein translation and cell growth by dephosphorylating 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianyu; Stevens, Payton D; Eshleman, Nichole E; Gao, Tianyan

    2013-08-09

    Protein translation initiation is a tightly controlled process responding to nutrient availability and mitogen stimulation. Serving as one of the most important negative regulators of protein translation, 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) binds to translation initiation factor 4E and inhibits cap-dependent translation in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Although it has been demonstrated previously that the phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 is controlled by mammalian target of rapamycin in the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1, the mechanism underlying the dephosphorylation of 4E-BP1 remains elusive. Here, we report the identification of PPM1G as the phosphatase of 4E-BP1. A coimmunoprecipitation experiment reveals that PPM1G binds to 4E-BP1 in cells and that purified PPM1G dephosphorylates 4E-BP1 in vitro. Knockdown of PPM1G in 293E and colon cancer HCT116 cells results in an increase in the phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 at both the Thr-37/46 and Ser-65 sites. Furthermore, the time course of 4E-BP1 dephosphorylation induced by amino acid starvation or mammalian target of rapamycin inhibition is slowed down significantly in PPM1G knockdown cells. Functionally, the amount of 4E-BP1 bound to the cap-dependent translation initiation complex is decreased when the expression of PPM1G is depleted. As a result, the rate of cap-dependent translation, cell size, and protein content are increased in PPM1G knockdown cells. Taken together, our study has identified protein phosphatase PPM1G as a novel regulator of cap-dependent protein translation by negatively controlling the phosphorylation of 4E-BP1.

  16. Translation Theory 'Translated'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wæraas, Arild; Nielsen, Jeppe

    2016-01-01

    common theoretical approaches to translation within the organization and management discipline: actor-network theory, knowledge-based theory, and Scandinavian institutionalism. Although each of these approaches already has borne much fruit in research, the literature is diverse and somewhat fragmented......Translation theory has proved to be a versatile analytical lens used by scholars working from different traditions. On the basis of a systematic literature review, this study adds to our understanding of the ‘translations’ of translation theory by identifying the distinguishing features of the most......, but also overlapping. We discuss the ways in which the three versions of translation theory may be combined and enrich each other so as to inform future research, thereby offering a more complete understanding of translation in and across organizational settings....

  17. Translational Upregulation of an Individual p21Cip1 Transcript Variant by GCN2 Regulates Cell Proliferation and Survival under Nutrient Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey L Lehman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiple transcripts encode for the cell cycle inhibitor p21(Cip1. These transcripts produce identical proteins but differ in their 5' untranslated regions (UTRs. Although several stresses that induce p21 have been characterized, the mechanisms regulating the individual transcript variants and their functional significance are unknown. Here we demonstrate through (35S labeling, luciferase reporter assays, and polysome transcript profiling that activation of the Integrated Stress Response (ISR kinase GCN2 selectively upregulates the translation of a p21 transcript variant containing 5' upstream open reading frames (uORFs through phosphorylation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF2α. Mutational analysis reveals that the uORFs suppress translation under basal conditions, but promote translation under stress. Functionally, ablation of p21 ameliorates G1/S arrest and reduces cell survival in response to GCN2 activation. These findings uncover a novel mechanism of p21 post-transcriptional regulation, offer functional significance for the existence of multiple p21 transcripts, and support a key role for GCN2 in regulating the cell cycle under stress.

  18. Role of 3'UTRs in the translation of mRNAs regulated by oncogenic eIF4E--a computational inference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arti N Santhanam

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cap-dependent mRNA translation is mediated by the initiation factor eIF4E, which binds mRNAs and stimulates efficient translation initiation. eIF4E is often overexpressed in human cancers. To elucidate the molecular signature of eIF4E target mRNAs, we analyzed sequence and structural properties of two independently derived polyribosome recruited mRNA datasets. These datasets originate from studies of mRNAs that are actively being translated in response to cells over-expressing eIF4E or cells with an activated oncogenic AKT: eIF4E signaling pathway, respectively. Comparison of eIF4E target mRNAs to mRNAs insensitive to eIF4E-regulation has revealed surprising features in mRNA secondary structure, length and microRNA-binding properties. Fold-changes (the relative change in recruitment of an mRNA to actively translating polyribosomal complexes in response to eIF4E overexpression or AKT upregulation are positively correlated with mRNA G+C content and negatively correlated with total and 3'UTR length of the mRNAs. A machine learning approach for predicting the fold change was created. Interesting tendencies of secondary structure stability are found near the start codon and at the beginning of the 3'UTR region. Highly upregulated mRNAs show negative selection (site avoidance for binding sites of several microRNAs. These results are consistent with the emerging model of regulation of mRNA translation through a dynamic balance between translation initiation at the 5'UTR and microRNA binding at the 3'UTR.

  19. Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor eIFiso4G Is Required to Regulate Violaxanthin De-epoxidase Expression in Arabidopsis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhong; Jolley, Blair; Caldwell, Christian; Gallie, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    The eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF) 4G is a scaffold protein that organizes the assembly of those initiation factors needed to recruit the 40 S ribosomal subunit to an mRNA. Plants, like many eukaryotes, express two eIF4G isoforms. eIFiso4G, one of the isoforms specific to plants, is unique among eukaryotic eIF4G proteins in that it is highly divergent and unusually small in size, raising the possibility of functional specialization. In this study, the role of eIFiso4G in plant growth was investigated using null mutants for the eIF4G isoforms in Arabidopsis. eIFiso4G loss of function mutants exhibited smaller cell, leaf, plant size, and biomass accumulation that correlated with its reduced photosynthetic activity, phenotypes not observed with the eIF4G loss of function mutant. Although no change in photorespiration or dark respiration was observed in the eIFiso4G loss of function mutant, a reduction in chlorophyll levels and an increase in the level of nonphotochemical quenching were observed. An increase in xanthophyll cycle activity and the generation of reactive oxygen species contributed to the qE and qI components of nonphotochemical quenching, respectively. An increase in the transcript and protein levels of violaxanthin de-epoxidase in the eIFiso4G loss of function mutant and an increase in its xanthophyll de-epoxidation state correlated with the higher qE associated with loss of eIFiso4G expression. These observations indicate that eIFiso4G expression is required to regulate violaxanthin de-epoxidase expression and to support photosynthetic activity. PMID:24706761

  20. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIFiso4G is required to regulate violaxanthin De-epoxidase expression in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhong; Jolley, Blair; Caldwell, Christian; Gallie, Daniel R

    2014-05-16

    The eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF) 4G is a scaffold protein that organizes the assembly of those initiation factors needed to recruit the 40 S ribosomal subunit to an mRNA. Plants, like many eukaryotes, express two eIF4G isoforms. eIFiso4G, one of the isoforms specific to plants, is unique among eukaryotic eIF4G proteins in that it is highly divergent and unusually small in size, raising the possibility of functional specialization. In this study, the role of eIFiso4G in plant growth was investigated using null mutants for the eIF4G isoforms in Arabidopsis. eIFiso4G loss of function mutants exhibited smaller cell, leaf, plant size, and biomass accumulation that correlated with its reduced photosynthetic activity, phenotypes not observed with the eIF4G loss of function mutant. Although no change in photorespiration or dark respiration was observed in the eIFiso4G loss of function mutant, a reduction in chlorophyll levels and an increase in the level of nonphotochemical quenching were observed. An increase in xanthophyll cycle activity and the generation of reactive oxygen species contributed to the qE and qI components of nonphotochemical quenching, respectively. An increase in the transcript and protein levels of violaxanthin de-epoxidase in the eIFiso4G loss of function mutant and an increase in its xanthophyll de-epoxidation state correlated with the higher qE associated with loss of eIFiso4G expression. These observations indicate that eIFiso4G expression is required to regulate violaxanthin de-epoxidase expression and to support photosynthetic activity. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. MDM2 but not MDM4 promotes retinoblastoma cell proliferation through p53-independent regulation of MYCN translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Dong-Lai; Cobrinik, David

    2016-01-01

    Retinoblastomas can arise from cone photoreceptor precursors in response to the loss of pRB function. Cone precursor-specific circuitry cooperates with pRB loss to initiate this process and subsequently contributes to the malignancy. Intrinsic high level MDM2 expression is a key component of the cone precursor circuitry and is thought to inactivate p53-mediated tumor surveillance that could otherwise be induced in response to pRB loss. However, the MDM2-related MDM4 has also been proposed to abrogate p53-mediated tumor surveillance in the absence of detectable MDM2 in retinoblastoma cells, bringing into question the importance of high-level MDM2 versus MDM4 expression. Here we report that high-level MDM2 but not MDM4 has a consistent critical role in retinoblastoma cell proliferation in vitro as well as in orthotopic xenografts. Reduction of either MDM2 or MDM4 weakly induced p53, yet reduction of MDM2 but not MDM4 severely impaired proliferation and survival through a p53-independent mechanism. Specifically, MDM2 up-regulated the mRNA expression and translation of another component of the cone circuitry, MYCN, in retinoblastoma cells. Moreover, MYCN was essential to retinoblastoma cell growth and tumor formation, and ectopic MYCN partially reversed the effects of MDM2 depletion, indicating that MYCN is an important MDM2 target. These findings indicate that high-level MDM2 expression is needed in order to perform a critical p53-independent function and may obviate the need for genomic alterations to the p53 pathway during retinoblastoma tumorigenesis. PMID:27748758

  2. Selective regulation of YB-1 mRNA translation by the mTOR signaling pathway is not mediated by 4E-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyabin, D N; Ovchinnikov, L P

    2016-03-02

    The Y-box binding protein 1 (YB-1) is a key regulator of gene expression at the level of both translation and transcription. The mode of its action on cellular events depends on its subcellular distribution and the amount in the cell. So far, the regulatory mechanisms of YB-1 synthesis have not been adequately studied. Our previous finding was that selective inhibition of YB-1 mRNA translation was caused by suppression of activity of the mTOR signaling pathway. It was suggested that this event may be mediated by phosphorylation of the 4E-binding protein (4E-BP). Here, we report that 4E-BP alone can only slightly inhibit YB-1 synthesis both in the cell and in vitro, although it essentially decreases binding of the 4F-group translation initiation factors to mRNA. With inhibited mTOR kinase, the level of mRNA binding to the eIF4F-group factors was decreased, while that to 4E-BP1 was increased, as was observed for both mTOR kinase-sensitive mRNAs and those showing low sensitivity. This suggests that selective inhibition of translation of YB-1 mRNA, and probably some other mRNAs as well, by mTOR kinase inhibitors is not mediated by the action of the 4E-binding protein upon functions of the 4F-group translation initiation factors.

  3. The histone demethylase KDM5A is required for the repression of astrocytogenesis and regulated by the translational machinery in neural progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Sun-Young; Kim, Woosuk; Lee, Ha-Rim; Kim, Hyun-Jung

    2018-02-01

    Histone demethylases are known to play important roles in the determination of the fate of stem cells and in cancer progression. In this study, we show that the lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4), lysine-specific demethylase 5A (KDM5A) is essential for the repression of astrocyte differentiation in neural progenitor cells (NPCs), and its expression is regulated by translational machinery. Knockdown of KDM5A in NPCs increased astrocytogenesis, and conversely, KDM5A overexpression reduced the transcriptional activity of the Gfap promoter. Induction of astrocytogenesis by ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) or small interfering RNA-induced knockdown of KDM5A decreased KDM5A recruitment to the Gfap promoter and increased H3K4 methylation. The transcript level of Kdm5a was high, whereas KDM5A protein level was low in CNTF induced astrocytes. During astroglial differentiation, translational activity indicated by the phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF)4E was decreased. Treatment of NPCs with the cercosporamide, a MAPK-interacting kinases inhibitor, reduced eIF4E phosphorylation and KDM5A protein expression, increased GFAP levels, and enhanced astrocytogenesis. These data suggest that KDM5A is a key regulator that maintains NPCs in an undifferentiated state by repressing astrocytogenesis and that its expression is translationally controlled during astrocyte differentiation. Thus, KDM5A is a promising target for the modulation of NPC fate.-Kong, S.-Y., Kim, W., Lee, H.-R., Kim, H.-J. The histone demethylase KDM5A is required for the repression of astrocytogenesis and regulated by the translational machinery in neural progenitor cells.

  4. Leucine-induced activation of translational initiation is partly regulated by the branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase complex in C2C12 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakai, Naoya; Shimomura, Yoshiharu; Tamura, Tomohiro; Tamura, Noriko; Hamada, Koichiro; Kawano, Fuminori; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2006-01-01

    Branched-chain amino acid leucine has been shown to activate the translational regulators through the mammalian target of rapamycin. However, the leucine's effects are self-limiting because leucine promotes its own disposal by an oxidative pathway. The irreversible and rate-limiting step in the leucine oxidation pathway is catalyzed by the branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKDH) complex. The complex contains E1 (α2β2), E2, and E3 subunits, and its activity is abolished by phosphorylation of the E1α subunit by BCKDH kinase. The relationship between the activity of BCKDH complex and leucine-mediated activation of the protein translation was investigated using the technique of RNA interference. The activity of BCKDH complex in C2C12 cell was modulated by transfection of small interfering RNA (siRNA) for BCKDH E2 subunit or BCKDH kinase. Transfection of siRNAs decreased the mRNA expression and protein amount of corresponding gene. Suppression of either E2 subunit or kinase produced opposite effects on the cell proliferation and the activation of translational regulators by leucine. Suppression of BCKDH kinase for 48 h resulted in decreasing cell proliferation. In contrast, E2 suppression led to increased amount of total cellular protein. The phosphorylation of p70 S6 kinase by leucine was increased in E2-siRNA transfected C2C12 cells, whereas the leucine's effect was diminished in kinase-siRNA transfected cells. These results suggest that the activation of the translational regulators by leucine was partly regulated by the activity of BCKDH complex

  5. Adjuvant auricular electroacupuncture and autogenic training in rheumatoid arthritis: a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernateck, M.; Becker, M.; Schwacke, C.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In contrast to psychological interventions the usefulness of acupuncture as an adjuvant therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has not yet been demonstrated. OBJECTIVE: The efficacy of auricular electroacupuncture (EA) was directly compared with autogenic training (AT). METHODS: Patients...

  6. Translational control by eIF2α phosphorylation regulates vulnerability to the synaptic and behavioral effects of cocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Placzek, Andon N; Viana Di Prisco, Gonzalo; Khatiwada, Sanjeev; Sidrauski, Carmela; Krnjević, Krešimir; Walter, Peter; Dani, John A; Costa-Mattioli, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Adolescents are especially prone to drug addiction, but the underlying biological basis of their increased vulnerability remains unknown. We reveal that translational control by phosphorylation of the translation initiation factor eIF2α (p-eIF2α) accounts for adolescent hypersensitivity to cocaine. In adolescent (but not adult) mice, a low dose of cocaine reduced p-eIF2α in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), potentiated synaptic inputs to VTA dopaminergic neurons, and induced drug-reinforced behavior. Like adolescents, adult mice with reduced p-eIF2α-mediated translational control were more susceptible to cocaine-induced synaptic potentiation and behavior. Conversely, like adults, adolescent mice with increased p-eIF2α became more resistant to cocaine's effects. Accordingly, metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated long-term depression (mGluR-LTD)—whose disruption is postulated to increase vulnerability to drug addiction—was impaired in both adolescent mice and adult mice with reduced p-eIF2α mediated translation. Thus, during addiction, cocaine hijacks translational control by p-eIF2α, initiating synaptic potentiation and addiction-related behaviors. These insights may hold promise for new treatments for addiction. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12052.001 PMID:26928234

  7. Translational control by eIF2α phosphorylation regulates vulnerability to the synaptic and behavioral effects of cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Placzek, Andon N; Viana Di Prisco, Gonzalo; Khatiwada, Sanjeev; Sidrauski, Carmela; Krnjević, Krešimir; Walter, Peter; Dani, John A; Costa-Mattioli, Mauro

    2016-03-01

    Adolescents are especially prone to drug addiction, but the underlying biological basis of their increased vulnerability remains unknown. We reveal that translational control by phosphorylation of the translation initiation factor eIF2α (p-eIF2α) accounts for adolescent hypersensitivity to cocaine. In adolescent (but not adult) mice, a low dose of cocaine reduced p-eIF2α in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), potentiated synaptic inputs to VTA dopaminergic neurons, and induced drug-reinforced behavior. Like adolescents, adult mice with reduced p-eIF2α-mediated translational control were more susceptible to cocaine-induced synaptic potentiation and behavior. Conversely, like adults, adolescent mice with increased p-eIF2α became more resistant to cocaine's effects. Accordingly, metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated long-term depression (mGluR-LTD)-whose disruption is postulated to increase vulnerability to drug addiction-was impaired in both adolescent mice and adult mice with reduced p-eIF2α mediated translation. Thus, during addiction, cocaine hijacks translational control by p-eIF2α, initiating synaptic potentiation and addiction-related behaviors. These insights may hold promise for new treatments for addiction.

  8. Understanding translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjoldager, Anne Gram; Gottlieb, Henrik; Klitgård, Ida

    Understanding Translation is designed as a textbook for courses on the theory and practice of translation in general and of particular types of translation - such as interpreting, screen translation and literary translation. The aim of the book is to help you gain an in-depth understanding...... of the phenomenon of translation and to provide you with a conceptual framework for the analysis of various aspects of professional translation. Intended readers are students of translation and languages, but the book will also be relevant for others who are interested in the theory and practice of translation...... - translators, language teachers, translation users and literary, TV and film critics, for instance. Discussions focus on translation between Danish and English....

  9. Detailed characterisation of STC-1 cells and the pGIP/Neo sub-clone suggests the incretin hormones are translationally regulated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Anna L; Pan, Xiaobei; Marco-Ramell, Anna; Meharg, Caroline; Green, Brian D

    2017-10-01

    STC-1 is a heterogeneous plurihormonal cell line producing several prominent gut peptide hormones. pGIP/Neo is a genetically selected sub-clone of STC-1 with augmented levels of glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP). Morphometric parameters, hormone concentrations, mRNA transcripts, hormone immunocytochemistry and nutrient utilisation/production of these two cell lines were compared. Proglucagon-derived peptides (Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and - 2(GLP-2)) were lower in sub-clone cells than progenitor cells. High Content Analysis found altered intracellular GLP-1, GIP, cholecystokinin (CCK) and peptide YY (PYY) levels and differing hormone co-localisation. The proportion pGIP/Neo cells containing GIP immunoreactivity (82%) was greater than STC-1 (65%), as were the proportion with 'GIP only', 'GLP-1+GIP' or 'GIP+PYY' immunoreactivity. Most surprisingly mRNA transcripts of the proglucagon and GIP genes were inversely correlated to the levels of their translated peptides. This strongly suggests that proglucagon and GIP are encoded on 'translationally regulated genes' - a characteristic possessed by other endocrine hormones. Metabolomic profiling revealed differences in cellular nutrient utilisation/production and that under normal culture conditions both cell lines exhibit signs of overflow metabolism. These studies provide an insight into the metabolism and properties of these valuable cells, suggesting for the first time that incretin hormone genes are translationally regulated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Volume changes of grafted autogenous bone in sinus augmentation procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbordone, Carolina; Sbordone, Ludovico; Toti, Paolo; Martuscelli, Ranieri; Califano, Luigi; Guidetti, Franco

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate associations between the osseous remodeling and the 3-dimensional features of both the grafted bone and the recipient site, as well as the density of the grafted bone, and to assess the relation between the degree of bone resorption and the type of autogenous bone-grafting procedure or the source (block or particulate bone from iliac crest or block bone from chin). A retrospective chart review of patients receiving sinus lifting and grafting procedures for implant positioning was conducted: radiographic analysis of the volume and area of both sinuses and autogenous bone grafts was performed, as per Smolka et al and Krennmair et al. The volumetric remodeling--measured at 1 year after implant positioning as the percentage of residual bone (%R)--was correlated, with Spearman analysis, to 3-dimensional features of both graft and recipient sites. All quantities correlated with %R at a statistically significant level were used for 2-dimensional and multidimensional visualizations with scattergrams. Twenty-five iliac crest or chin grafts were inlay positioned in the maxillary sinuses of patients. Computed tomography scans, taken before implant positioning and after 1 year, showed a 1-year negligible volume remodeling for block graft from chin (97.9%) but slightly greater resorption values (%R) for particulate and block grafts from iliac crest (93.8% and 83.3%, respectively). Three- and four-dimensional scattergrams of significant data resulting from Spearman correlation tests (particulate and block grafts both from iliac crest) showed a variation of the remodeling pattern dependent on 3-dimensional features, namely inlay graft thickness, surface area of the graft in contact with basal bone, volume of the recipient site, and surface area of the graft projecting into the sinus cavity. Retrospective data analysis shows that iliac crest grafts positioned on a small basal bone volume (≤ 2.5 mL) may point to a very favorable remodeling of the volume when the

  11. Repression of mitochondrial translation, respiration and a metabolic cycle-regulated gene, SLF1, by the yeast Pumilio-family protein Puf3p.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Chatenay-Lapointe

    Full Text Available Synthesis and assembly of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS system requires genes located both in the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, but how gene expression is coordinated between these two compartments is not fully understood. One level of control is through regulated expression mitochondrial ribosomal proteins and other factors required for mitochondrial translation and OXPHOS assembly, which are all products of nuclear genes that are subsequently imported into mitochondria. Interestingly, this cadre of genes in budding yeast has in common a 3'-UTR element that is bound by the Pumilio family protein, Puf3p, and is coordinately regulated under many conditions, including during the yeast metabolic cycle. Multiple functions have been assigned to Puf3p, including promoting mRNA degradation, localizing nucleus-encoded mitochondrial transcripts to the outer mitochondrial membrane, and facilitating mitochondria-cytoskeletal interactions and motility. Here we show that Puf3p has a general repressive effect on mitochondrial OXPHOS abundance, translation, and respiration that does not involve changes in overall mitochondrial biogenesis and largely independent of TORC1-mitochondrial signaling. We also identified the cytoplasmic translation factor Slf1p as yeast metabolic cycle-regulated gene that is repressed by Puf3p at the post-transcriptional level and promotes respiration and extension of yeast chronological life span when over-expressed. Altogether, these results should facilitate future studies on which of the many functions of Puf3p is most relevant for regulating mitochondrial gene expression and the role of nuclear-mitochondrial communication in aging and longevity.

  12. Repression of mitochondrial translation, respiration and a metabolic cycle-regulated gene, SLF1, by the yeast Pumilio-family protein Puf3p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatenay-Lapointe, Marc; Shadel, Gerald S

    2011-01-01

    Synthesis and assembly of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system requires genes located both in the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, but how gene expression is coordinated between these two compartments is not fully understood. One level of control is through regulated expression mitochondrial ribosomal proteins and other factors required for mitochondrial translation and OXPHOS assembly, which are all products of nuclear genes that are subsequently imported into mitochondria. Interestingly, this cadre of genes in budding yeast has in common a 3'-UTR element that is bound by the Pumilio family protein, Puf3p, and is coordinately regulated under many conditions, including during the yeast metabolic cycle. Multiple functions have been assigned to Puf3p, including promoting mRNA degradation, localizing nucleus-encoded mitochondrial transcripts to the outer mitochondrial membrane, and facilitating mitochondria-cytoskeletal interactions and motility. Here we show that Puf3p has a general repressive effect on mitochondrial OXPHOS abundance, translation, and respiration that does not involve changes in overall mitochondrial biogenesis and largely independent of TORC1-mitochondrial signaling. We also identified the cytoplasmic translation factor Slf1p as yeast metabolic cycle-regulated gene that is repressed by Puf3p at the post-transcriptional level and promotes respiration and extension of yeast chronological life span when over-expressed. Altogether, these results should facilitate future studies on which of the many functions of Puf3p is most relevant for regulating mitochondrial gene expression and the role of nuclear-mitochondrial communication in aging and longevity.

  13. Internal ribosome entry site-mediated translation of a mammalian mRNA is regulated by amino acid availability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez, J.; Yaman, I.; Mishra, R.; Merrick, W. C.; Snider, M. D.; Lamers, W. H.; Hatzoglou, M.

    2001-01-01

    The cationic amino acid transporter, Cat-1, facilitates the uptake of the essential amino acids arginine and lysine. Amino acid starvation causes accumulation and increased translation of cat-1 mRNA, resulting in a 58-fold increase in protein levels and increased arginine uptake. A bicistronic mRNA

  14. Direct evidence for translational regulation by leader RNA and Tat protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SenGupta, D. N.; Berkhout, B.; Gatignol, A.; Zhou, A. M.; Silverman, R. H.

    1990-01-01

    Translational effects of the RNA leader and Tat protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) were investigated in rabbit reticulocyte lysate. Hybrid RNA species with natural or mutated HIV-1 leader fused to human interferon- gamma mRNA were produced in vitro from recombinant plasmids.

  15. MicroRNA-146a regulates both transcription silencing and translation disruption of TNF-α during TLR4-induced gene reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Gazzar, Mohamed; Church, Ashley; Liu, Tiefu; McCall, Charles E

    2011-09-01

    Following the TLR-dependent initiation phase of acute systemic proinflammatory responses such as sepsis, an adaptive phase represses or activates a specific pattern of gene expression until the inflammation resolves. Here, we used the THP-1 sepsis cell model of bacterial LPS/endotoxin tolerance to show that TLR4-induced miR-146a supports the feed-forward adaptive processes that silence transcription and disrupt translation of acute proinflammatory genes. First, we found that miR-146a regulates a pathway that promotes the binding of transcription repressor RelB to the TNF-α promoter, a step known to precede histone and DNA modifications, which generate facultative heterochromatin to silence acute proinflammatory genes. However, once RelB binding occurred, miR-146a inhibition could not reverse compacted chromatin, and endotoxin tolerance persisted. Second, we observed that miR-146a regulates a pathway that supports assembly of the translation repressor complex of TNF-α by preventing the interaction of the RNA-binding protein effector Ago2 and RBM4. We also determined that once endotoxin tolerance is established, and specific genes have been reprogrammed, transcription and translation disruption can be reversed only by simultaneously depleting RelB and inhibiting miR-146a. Thus, miR-146a induction supports the TLR4-dependent shift from initiation to gene-specific repression at two levels. Our results also imply that therapies designed to reverse endotoxin tolerance as potential therapies for sepsis should be directed at the transcription and translation pathways of reprogramming.

  16. Mammographic microcalcification in an autogenously reconstructed breast simulating recurrent carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wayne; Sheen-Chen, Shyr-Ming; Eng, Hock-Liew; Ko, Sheung-Fat

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer is a common cancer among women. The transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap is a popular option because not only does it provide a breast with satisfactory bulk composed of autogenous tissue but it also provides an abdominal dermolipectomy to the patient. Fat necrosis remains a common problem following TRAM flap reconstruction, occurring in 10% to 36% of patients undergoing the procedure. A 44-year-old woman underwent a modified radical mastectomy followed by pedicled TRAM flap reconstruction after 5 months. Follow-up mammography 27 months after TRAM flap reconstruction showed a cluster of microcalcifications in the deep retroareolar area and recurrent breast carcinoma was highly suspected. Physical examination did not detect any abnormality of the reconstructed breast. Stereotactic hook localization was performed and an excisional biopsy was successfully done. The histological features of the resected specimens corresponded to fat necrosis change. Only with the awareness of the existence of such entity and careful follow-up can the occurrence of fat necrosis in TRAM flap reconstructed breasts be accurately detected and appropriately treated.

  17. Dynamic correlations between heart and brain rhythm during Autogenic meditation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daekeun eKim

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed to determine significant physiological parameters of brain and heart under meditative state, both in each activities and their dynamic correlations. Electrophysiological changes in response to meditation were explored in 12 healthy volunteers who completed 8 weeks of a basic training course in autogenic meditation. Heart coherence, representing the degree of ordering in oscillation of heart rhythm intervals, increased significantly during meditation. Relative EEG alpha power and alpha lagged coherence also increased. A significant slowing of parietal peak alpha frequency was observed. Parietal peak alpha power increased with increasing heart coherence during meditation, but no such relationship was observed during baseline. Average alpha lagged coherence also increased with increasing heart coherence during meditation, but, again, no significant relationship was observed at baseline. Relative alpha power increased with increasing heart coherence during both meditation and baseline periods. Heart coherence can be a cardiac marker for the meditative state and also may be a general marker for the meditative state since heart coherence is strongly correlated with EEG alpha activities. It is expected that increasing heart coherence and the accompanying EEG alpha activations, heart brain synchronicity, would help recover physiological synchrony following a period of homeostatic depletion.

  18. Autogenous Crack Control during Construction Phases of MOSE Venice Dams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertagnoli, Gabriele; Anerdi, Constanza; Malavisi, Marzia; Zoratto, Nadia

    2017-10-01

    The design of concrete structures exposed to severe environmental attack, like in marine environment, requires serious attention for concrete durability. Early age cracking due to autogenous deformations can be detrimental to the performance of tidal structures. The study of the structural effects of hydration heat and rheological behaviour of a set of huge concrete structures of the Mobile Venice Dams known with the MOSE acronym (Experimental Electromechanical Module) is presented in this paper. Together with other measures such as coastal reinforcement, the raising of quaysides, and the paving and improvement of the lagoon, MOSE is designed to protect Venice and the lagoon from tides of up to 3 meters. Construction began simultaneously in 2003 at all three lagoon inlets, and the project has been completed in 2014. Floods have caused damage since ancient times and have become more frequent and intense as a result of the combined effect of eustatism (a rise in sea level) and subsidence (a drop in land level) caused by natural and man-induced phenomena. Nowadays, towns and villages in the lagoon are about 23 cm lower with respect to the water level than at the beginning of the 1900s. Each year, floods can cause serious problems for the inhabitants as well as deterioration of architecture, urban structures and the ecosystem. Over the entire lagoon area, there is also a constant risk of a catastrophic event such as that of 4 November 1966, when a tide of 194 cm submerged Venice, Chioggia and the other built-up areas.

  19. Translational control of cyclins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Ming-Chih

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Regulation of cyclin levels is important for many cell cycle-related processes and can occur at several different steps of gene expression. Translational regulation of cyclins, which occurs by a variety of regulatory mechanisms, permits a prompt response to signal transduction pathways induced by environmental stimuli. This review will summarize translational control of cyclins and its influence on cell cycle progression.

  20. Temporal and spatial regulation of translation in the mammalian oocyte via the mTOR-eIF4F pathway

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šušor, Andrej; Jansová, Denisa; Černá, Renata; Danylevska, Anna; Anger, Martin; Toralová, Tereza; Malík, Radek; Šupolíková, Jaroslava; Cook, M. S.; Oh, J. S.; Kubelka, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 6078 (2015) ISSN 2041-1723 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-12291S; GA ČR GAP502/12/2201; GA ČR GAP502/10/0944 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : oocyte meiosis * localized in situ translation * mTOR Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 11.329, year: 2015

  1. Aspects of energy reduction by autogenous copper production in the copper smelting plant Bor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najdenov, Ivan; Raić, Karlo T.; Kokeza, Gordana

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a comparative analysis of the energy consumption during copper production by the “standard” procedure (roasting in a fluo–solid reactor and smelting in a reverberatory furnace) in the Smelting Plant in Bor with modern autogenous procedures. All forms of expended energy were reduced to primary energy or to the same energy form, i.e., to the energy equivalent of the process (EEP), the raw material and the process materials. In addition, the energy equivalent of the process and waste products (water vapour, thermal energy and similar) were balanced. To complete the consumption of all energy generating products in copper production, they were reduced to conditional fuel (coal equivalent = 29.3 MJ/kg). Additionally, this study suggests replacement of the existing technology by an appropriate autogenous procedure and considers the prospects for further development of mining and metallurgy in Bor. Estimates of development perspectives for copper production should be comprehensive, based on complete and relevant data, as well as on real considerations of future development in world production. -- Highlights: ► “Standard” autogenous copper production in the Smelting Plant, Bor, Serbia. ► Comparation of energy consumption in “standard” with other autogenous procedures. ► All forms of energy are reduced to energy equivalent and conditional fuel. ► Replacement of existing technology with the appropriate autogenous procedure. ► Perspectives of further development of mining and metallurgy in Bor.

  2. Reconstruction of mandibular defects with autogenous bone grafts: a review of 30 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajid, M.A.; Warraich, R.A.; Abid, H.; Haq, M.E.; Shah, K.L.; Khan, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Multitudes of options are available for reconstruction of functional and cosmetic defects of the mandible, caused by various ailments. At the present time, autogenous bone grafting is the gold standard by which all other techniques of reconstruction of the mandible can be judged. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of different osseous reconstruction options using autogenous bone grafts for mandibular reconstruction. Methods: This Interventional study was conducted at Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, King Edward Medical University/Mayo Hospital Lahore, from January 2008 to July 2009 including one year follow-up. The study was carried out on thirty patients having bony mandibular defects. They were reconstructed with the autogenous bone grafts from different graft donor sites. On post-operative visits they were evaluated for outcome variables. Results: Success rate of autogenous bone grafts in this study was 90%. Only 10% of the cases showed poor results regarding infection, resorption and graft failure. Conclusion: Autogenous bone grafts, non-vascularized or vascularized, are a reliable treatment modality for the reconstruction of the bony mandibular defects with predictable functional and aesthetic outcome. (author)

  3. Brain structural alterations in obsessive-compulsive disorder patients with autogenous and reactive obsessions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Subirà

    Full Text Available Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD is a clinically heterogeneous condition. Although structural brain alterations have been consistently reported in OCD, their interaction with particular clinical subtypes deserves further examination. Among other approaches, a two-group classification in patients with autogenous and reactive obsessions has been proposed. The purpose of the present study was to assess, by means of a voxel-based morphometry analysis, the putative brain structural correlates of this classification scheme in OCD patients. Ninety-five OCD patients and 95 healthy controls were recruited. Patients were divided into autogenous (n = 30 and reactive (n = 65 sub-groups. A structural magnetic resonance image was acquired for each participant and pre-processed with SPM8 software to obtain a volume-modulated gray matter map. Whole-brain and voxel-wise comparisons between the study groups were then performed. In comparison to the autogenous group, reactive patients showed larger gray matter volumes in the right Rolandic operculum. When compared to healthy controls, reactive patients showed larger volumes in the putamen (bilaterally, while autogenous patients showed a smaller left anterior temporal lobe. Also in comparison to healthy controls, the right middle temporal gyrus was smaller in both patient subgroups. Our results suggest that autogenous and reactive obsessions depend on partially dissimilar neural substrates. Our findings provide some neurobiological support for this classification scheme and contribute to unraveling the neurobiological basis of clinical heterogeneity in OCD.

  4. Mitotic protein kinase CDK1 phosphorylation of mRNA translation regulator 4E-BP1 Ser83 may contribute to cell transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velasquez, Celestino; Cheng, Erdong; Shuda, Masahiro; Lee-Oesterreich, Paula J.; Pogge von Strandmann, Lisa; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Moore, Patrick S.; Chang, Yuan

    2016-07-11

    mTOR-directed 4E-BP1 phosphorylation promotes cap-dependent translation and tumorigen-esis. During mitosis, CDK1 substitutes for mTOR and fully phosphorylates 4E-BP1 at canoni-cal as well a non-canonical S83 site resulting in a mitosis-specific hyperphosphorylated δ isoform. Colocalization studies with a phospho-S83 specific antibody indicate that 4E-BP1 S83 phosphorylation accumulates at centrosomes during prophase, peaks at metaphase, and decreases through telophase. While S83 phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 does not affect in vitro cap-dependent translation, nor eIF4G/4E-BP1 cap-binding, expression of an alanine substitution mutant 4E-BP1.S83A partially reverses rodent cell transformation induced by Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) small T (sT) antigen viral oncoprotein. In contrast to inhibitory mTOR 4E-BP1 phosphorylation, these findings suggest that mitotic CDK1-directed phosphorylation of δ-4E-BP1 may yield a gain-of-function, distinct from translation regulation, that may be important in tumorigenesis and mitotic centrosome function.

  5. Translational Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sandro

    2010-01-01

    is given to genre conventions in source texts and the ways in which they can best be translated. I propose that translators of statutes with an informative function in expert-to-expert communication may be allowed limited translational creativity when translating specific types of genre convention....... This creativity is a result of translators adopting either a source-language or a target-language oriented strategy and is limited by the pragmatic principle of co-operation. Examples of translation options are provided illustrating the different results in target texts. The use of a target-language oriented......A long-established approach to legal translation focuses on terminological equivalence making translators strictly follow the words of source texts. Recent research suggests that there is room for some creativity allowing translators to deviate from the source texts. However, little attention...

  6. The class II transactivator (CIITA) is regulated by post-translational modification cross-talk between ERK1/2 phosphorylation, mono-ubiquitination and Lys63 ubiquitination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Julie E; Shanderson, Ronald L; Boyd, Nathaniel H; Cacan, Ercan; Greer, Susanna F

    2015-06-19

    The class II transactivator (CIITA) is known as the master regulator for the major histocompatibility class II (MHC II) molecules. CIITA is dynamically regulated through a series of intricate post-translational modifications (PTMs). CIITA's role is to initiate transcription of MHC II genes, which are responsible for presenting extracellular antigen to CD4(+) T-cells. In the present study, we identified extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 as the kinase responsible for phosphorylating the regulatory site, Ser(280), which leads to increased levels of mono-ubiquitination and an overall increase in MHC II activity. Further, we identify that CIITA is also modified by Lys(63)-linked ubiquitination. Lys(63) ubiquitinated CIITA is concentrated in the cytoplasm and following activation of ERK1/2, CIITA phosphorylation occurs and Lys=ubiquitinated CIITA translocates to the nucleus. CIITA ubiquitination and phosphorylation perfectly demonstrates how CIITA location and activity is regulated through PTM cross-talk. Identifying CIITA PTMs and understanding how they mediate CIITA regulation is necessary due to the critical role CIITA has in the initiation of the adaptive immune response. © 2015 Authors.

  7. Use of rice husk ash for mitigating the autogenous shrinkage of cement pastes at low water cement ratio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, H.; Ye, G.; Fehling, Ekkehard; Middendorf, Bernhard; Thiemicke, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    It is well recognized that the high risk of early age micro-crack of HPC/UHPC is attributed to the large magnitude of early age autogenous shrinkage caused by self-desiccation in binder hydration. Over the years, several methods have been proposed to mitigate autogenous shrinkage based on internal

  8. The influence of superabsorbent polymers on the autogenous shrinkage properties of cement pastes with supplementary cementitious materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoeck, D.; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; De Belie, N.

    2015-01-01

    shrinkage was determined by manual and automated shrinkage measurements. Autogenous shrinkage was reduced in cement pastes with the supplementary cementitious materials versus Portland cement pastes. At later ages, the rate of autogenous shrinkage is higher due to the pozzolanic activity. Internal curing...

  9. Post-transcriptional effects and interactions between chronic mild stress and acute sleep deprivation: regulation of translation factor and cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-binding protein phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grønli, Janne; Dagestad, Grethe; Milde, Anne Marita; Murison, Robert; Bramham, Clive R

    2012-12-01

    Stress and restricted or disrupted sleep trigger adaptive responses in the brain at the level of gene transcription. We investigated the possible impact of chronic mild stress (CMS), acute sleep deprivation, and a combination of these in male rats on post-transcriptional mechanisms important for cognitive function and synaptic plasticity. Relationships between sleep architecture and translational regulators were also assessed. After four weeks of CMS, phosphorylation of two key translation factors, eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) and elongation factor 2 (eEF2), was enhanced in the prefrontal cortex, but unchanged in the hippocampus and dentate gyrus. Sleep deprivation decreased phosphorylated eIF4E in the dentate gyrus. In contrast, eEF2 phosphorylation was elevated in all brain regions after sleep deprivation. Thus, CMS and sleep deprivation, when given alone, have distinct region-specific effects. Furthermore, the combined treatment revealed striking interactions with eEF2 phosphorylation in which sleep deprivation counteracts the effect of CMS cortically and CMS modulates the effects of sleep deprivation in the hippocampus proper. Although CMS exposure alone had no effect in the hippocampus, it inhibited the sleep deprivation-induced eIF4E phosphorylation, while inducing phosphorylation of a major regulatory RNA-binding protein, cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-binding protein (CPEB) in the combined treatment. CMS had no effect on plasma corticosterone, but led to disruption of sleep. Sleep quality and sleep quantity in non-stressed animals showed predictive changes in eIF4E and eEF2 phosphorylation cortically. Prior exposure to CMS abolishes this relationship. We conclude that CMS and acute sleep deprivation have interactive and brain region-specific effects on translational regulators of relevance to mechanisms of stress responsiveness and sleep homeostasis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The translation initiation factor eIF4E regulates the sex-specific expression of the master switch gene Sxl in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia L Graham

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In female fruit flies, Sex-lethal (Sxl turns off the X chromosome dosage compensation system by a mechanism involving a combination of alternative splicing and translational repression of the male specific lethal-2 (msl-2 mRNA. A genetic screen identified the translation initiation factor eif4e as a gene that acts together with Sxl to repress expression of the Msl-2 protein. However, eif4e is not required for Sxl mediated repression of msl-2 mRNA translation. Instead, eif4e functions as a co-factor in Sxl-dependent female-specific alternative splicing of msl-2 and also Sxl pre-mRNAs. Like other factors required for Sxl regulation of splicing, eif4e shows maternal-effect female-lethal interactions with Sxl. This female lethality can be enhanced by mutations in other co-factors that promote female-specific splicing and is caused by a failure to properly activate the Sxl-positive autoregulatory feedback loop in early embryos. In this feedback loop Sxl proteins promote their own synthesis by directing the female-specific alternative splicing of Sxl-Pm pre-mRNAs. Analysis of pre-mRNA splicing when eif4e activity is compromised demonstrates that Sxl-dependent female-specific splicing of both Sxl-Pm and msl-2 pre-mRNAs requires eif4e activity. Consistent with a direct involvement in Sxl-dependent alternative splicing, eIF4E is associated with unspliced Sxl-Pm pre-mRNAs and is found in complexes that contain early acting splicing factors--the U1/U2 snRNP protein Sans-fils (Snf, the U1 snRNP protein U1-70k, U2AF38, U2AF50, and the Wilms' Tumor 1 Associated Protein Fl(2d--that have been directly implicated in Sxl splicing regulation.

  11. Selection of random RNA fragments as method for searching for a site of regulation of translation of E. coli streptomycin mRNA by ribosomal protein S7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surdina, A V; Rassokhin, T I; Golovin, A V; Spiridonova, V A; Kraal, B; Kopylov, A M

    2008-06-01

    In E. coli cells ribosomal small subunit biogenesis is regulated by RNA-protein interactions involving protein S7. S7 initiates the subunit assembly interacting with 16S rRNA. During shift-down of rRNA synthesis level, free S7 inhibits self-translation by interacting with 96 nucleotides long specific region of streptomycin (str) mRNA between cistrons S12 and S7 (intercistron). Many bacteria do not have the extended intercistron challenging development of specific approaches for searching putative mRNA regulatory regions, which are able to interact with proteins. The paper describes application of SERF approach (Selection of Random RNA Fragments) to reveal regulatory regions of str mRNA. Set of random DNA fragments has been generated from str operon by random hydrolysis and then transcribed into RNA; the fragments being able to bind protein S7 (serfamers) have been selected by iterative rounds. S7 binds to single serfamer, 109 nucleotide long (RNA109), derived from the intercistron. After multiple copying and selection, the intercistronic mutant (RNA109) has been isolated; it has enhanced affinity to S7. RNA109 binds to the protein better than authentic intercistronic str mRNA; apparent dissociation constants are 26 +/- 5 and 60 +/- 8 nM, respectively. Location of S7 binding site on the mRNA, as well as putative mode of regulation of coupled translation of S12 and S7 cistrons have been hypothesized.

  12. Escherichia coli Quorum-Sensing EDF, A Peptide Generated by Novel Multiple Distinct Mechanisms and Regulated by trans-Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathish Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Eshcerichia coli mazEF is a stress-induced toxin-antitoxin module mediating cell death and requiring a quorum-sensing (QS extracellular death factor (EDF, the pentapeptide NNWNN. Here we uncovered several distinct molecular mechanisms involved in its generation from the zwf mRNA encoding glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. In particular, we show that, under stress conditions, the endoribonuclease MazF cleaves specific ACA sites, thereby generating a leaderless zwf mRNA which is truncated 30 codons after the EDF-encoding region. Since the nascent ribosome peptide exit tunnel can accommodate up to 40 amino acids, this arrangement allows the localization of the EDF residues inside the tunnel when the ribosome is stalled at the truncation site. Moreover, ribosome stalling activates the trans-translation system, which provides a means for the involvement of ClpPX in EDF generation. Furthermore, the trans-translation is described as a regulatory system that attenuated the generation of EDF, leading to low levels of EDF in the single cell. Therefore, the threshold EDF molecule concentration required is achieved only by the whole population, as expected for QS.

  13. Rat Humanin is encoded and translated in mitochondria and is localized to the mitochondrial compartment where it regulates ROS production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paharkova, Vladislava; Alvarez, Griselda; Nakamura, Hiromi; Cohen, Pinchas; Lee, Kuk-Wha

    2015-09-15

    Evidence for the putative mitochondrial origin of the Humanin (HN) peptide has been lacking, although its cytoprotective activity has been demonstrated in a variety of organismal and cellular systems. We sought to establish proof-of-principle for a mitochondria-derived peptide (MDP) in a rat-derived cellular system as the rat HN sequence is predicted to lack nuclear insertions of mitochondrial origin (NUMT). We found that the rat HN (Rattin; rHN) homologue is derived from the mitochondrial genome as evidenced by decreased production in Rho-0 cells, and that peptide translation occurs in the mitochondria as it is unaffected by cycloheximide. Rat HN localizes to the mitochondria in cellular subfractionation and immunohistochemical studies. Addition of a HN analogue to isolated mitochondria from rat INS-1 beta cells reduced hydrogen peroxide production by 55%. In summary, a locally bioactive peptide is derived and translated from an open reading frame (ORF) within rat mitochondrial DNA encoding 16S rRNA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Repair process of surgical defects filled with autogenous bone grafts in tibiae of diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jônatas Caldeira Esteves

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available From a biological standpoint, the best material for reconstruction of bone defects is the autogenous bone graft. However, as tissue healing is affected under diabetic conditions, major changes might take place in the revascularization, incorporation, replacement and remodeling phases of the grafted area. The purpose of this study was to assess the bone healing process in surgical wounds prepared in tibiae of diabetic rats and filled with autogenous bone. Forty male rats (Rattus norvegicus albinus, Wistar were randomly assigned to receive an endovenous injection (penile vein of either citrate buffer solution (Group 1 - control; n=20 or streptozotocin dissolved in citrate buffer solution (35 mg/kg to induce diabetes (Group 2 - diabetic; n=20. After determination of glycemia, the animals were anesthetized and the anterolateral regions of the tibiae of both limbs were shaved, antisepsis was performed and longitudinal incisions were made in each limb. The tibiae were exposed and two 2mm-diameter surgical cavities were prepared: one in the right limb, filled with particulate autogenous bone and the other in the left limb, filled with blood clot. The animals were euthanized at 10 and 30 postoperative days. The anatomic pieces were obtained, submitted to laboratory processing and sections were stained by hematoxylin and eosin and Masson's Trichrome for histomorphologic and histometric analyses. In both groups, the wounds filled with autogenous bone graft showed better results than those filled with blood clot. The control group showed higher new bone formation in wounds filled with autogenous bone graft at 30 days than the diabetic group, but without statistical significance. It may be concluded that, in general, the new bone formation occurred with autogenous graft was quantitatively similar between control and diabetic groups and qualitatively better in the control group.

  15. Autogenous bone graft associated with enamel matrix proteins in bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prata, Celina A; Lacerda, Suzie A; Brentegani, Luiz Guilherme

    2007-12-01

    Autogenous bone has been used with success as implants in intrabony defects, because of its biological advantages and osteogenic potential. The objective of this study was to evaluate histological and histometrically the bony repair in intrabony defects after dental extractions in rats with graft of a combination of the enamel matrix protein (EMP) (Emdogain, Strauman USA, LLC, Andover, MA. Headquarters in Basel, Switzerland) and autogenous bone. Male rats (Rattus norvegicus, Wistar variety) weighing from 250 to 300 g were anesthetized and submitted to the extraction of the superior incisive and divided in (a) group with autogenous bone (fragment of bone of the alveolar ridge was grafted inside the alveolus) and (b) group with autogenous bone associated with EMP. The animals were killed on the 7th, 21st, and 42nd day after the extraction. The maxillae were processed to obtain fine sections (5 microm) stained with hematoxylin-eosin. The percentual volume of bone tissue in contiguous areas of the graft was calculated through a counting point system of image. The results showed that the bone fragments grafted in the cervical third of the alveolus developed a progressive osseointegration without foreign-body reaction. The quantification of the bony repair in the areas adjacent to the graft showed that the autogenous bone associated with EMP produced a greater amount of bone (10%-15% by analysis of variance, P = 0.05) in all the studied periods. It was concluded that the autogenous bone associated with EMP grafted in bony defects, immediately after the dental extraction in rats, demonstrated biocompatibility and accelerated the repair of bone defect.

  16. TRANSLATING FEMINISM

    OpenAIRE

    Gajewska, Agnieszka

    2012-01-01

    Translating feminism Pointing to manifold and long-lasting connections between feminism and translation, the article first presents a selection of multilingual writers (Narcyza Żmichowska and Deborah Vogel), translators (Zofia Żeleńska and Kazimiera Iłłakowiczówna) and translation commentators (Joanna Lisek and Karolina Szymaniak) to ponder why the work of early Polish feminists is neglected. It seems that one of the reasons might be the current colonization of Polish femini...

  17. Comparative Analysis of Muscle Hypertrophy Models Reveals Divergent Gene Transcription Profiles and Points to Translational Regulation of Muscle Growth through Increased mTOR Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo G. Pereira

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle mass is a result of the balance between protein breakdown and protein synthesis. It has been shown that multiple conditions of muscle atrophy are characterized by the common regulation of a specific set of genes, termed atrogenes. It is not known whether various models of muscle hypertrophy are similarly regulated by a common transcriptional program. Here, we characterized gene expression changes in three different conditions of muscle growth, examining each condition during acute and chronic phases. Specifically, we compared the transcriptome of Extensor Digitorum Longus (EDL muscles collected (1 during the rapid phase of postnatal growth at 2 and 4 weeks of age, (2 24 h or 3 weeks after constitutive activation of AKT, and (3 24 h or 3 weeks after overload hypertrophy caused by tenotomy of the Tibialis Anterior muscle. We observed an important overlap between significantly regulated genes when comparing each single condition at the two different timepoints. Furthermore, examining the transcriptional changes occurring 24 h after a hypertrophic stimulus, we identify an important role for genes linked to a stress response, despite the absence of muscle damage in the AKT model. However, when we compared all different growth conditions, we did not find a common transcriptional fingerprint. On the other hand, all conditions showed a marked increase in mTORC1 signaling and increased ribosome biogenesis, suggesting that muscle growth is characterized more by translational, than transcriptional regulation.

  18. Intersections between cardiac physiology, emotion regulation and interpersonal warmth in preschoolers: Implications for drug abuse prevention from translational neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Caron A C; Skowron, Elizabeth A; Giuliano, Ryan J; Fisher, Philip A

    2016-06-01

    Early childhood is characterized by dramatic gains in emotion regulation skills that support social adjustment and mental health. Understanding the physiological substrates of healthy emotion regulation may offer new directions for altering trajectories toward initiation and escalation of substance abuse. Here, we describe the intersections between parasympathetic and sympathetic tone, emotion regulation and prosocial behavior in a high-risk sample of preschoolers. Fifty-two 3-6 year old children completed an assessment of attention regulation in response to affective stimuli. Cardiac respiratory sinus arrhythmia, an index of parasympathetic tone, and pre-ejection period, a marker of sympathetic activation, were recorded at rest and while children engaged in social interactions with their mothers and an unfamiliar research assistant. Mothers reported on children's emotional reactivity and prosocial behavior. Controlling for age and psychosocial risk, higher parasympathetic tone predicted better attention regulation in response to angry emotion and higher levels of prosocial behavior, whereas a reciprocal pattern of higher parasympathetic tone and lower sympathetic arousal predicted better attention in response to positive emotion and lower emotional reactivity. Children exposed to fewer risk factors and higher levels of maternal warmth were more able to sustain a high level of parasympathetic tone during interaction episodes. Findings suggest that autonomic measures represent biomarkers for socio-emotional competence in young children. They also point to the importance of early experiences in the establishment of physiological regulation and the promise of family-based intervention to promote healthy emotion regulation and prevent substance dependence in high-risk populations. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. eIF4A inhibition allows translational regulation of mRNAs encoding proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Bottley

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the main cause of dementia in our increasingly aging population. The debilitating cognitive and behavioral symptoms characteristic of AD make it an extremely distressing illness for patients and carers. Although drugs have been developed to treat AD symptoms and to slow disease progression, there is currently no cure. The incidence of AD is predicted to increase to over one hundred million by 2050, placing a heavy burden on communities and economies, and making the development of effective therapies an urgent priority. Two proteins are thought to have major contributory roles in AD: the microtubule associated protein tau, also known as MAPT; and the amyloid-beta peptide (A-beta, a cleavage product of amyloid precursor protein (APP. Oxidative stress is also implicated in AD pathology from an early stage. By targeting eIF4A, an RNA helicase involved in translation initiation, the synthesis of APP and tau, but not neuroprotective proteins, can be simultaneously and specifically reduced, representing a novel avenue for AD intervention. We also show that protection from oxidative stress is increased upon eIF4A inhibition. We demonstrate that the reduction of these proteins is not due to changes in mRNA levels or increased protein degradation, but is a consequence of translational repression conferred by inhibition of the helicase activity of eIF4A. Inhibition of eIF4A selectively and simultaneously modulates the synthesis of proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease: reducing A-beta and tau synthesis, while increasing proteins predicted to be neuroprotective.

  20. Translational regulation of gene expression by an anaerobically induced small non-coding RNA in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boysen, Anders; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Kallipolitis, Birgitte H.

    2010-01-01

    of at least one sRNA regulator. Here, we extend this view by the identification and characterization of a highly conserved, anaerobically induced small sRNA in E. coli, whose expression is strictly dependent on the anaerobic transcriptional fumarate and nitrate reductase regulator (FNR). The sRNA, named Fnr......Small non-coding RNAs (sRNA) have emerged as important elements of gene regulatory circuits. In enterobacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella many of these sRNAs interact with the Hfq protein, an RNA chaperone similar to mammalian Sm-like proteins and act in the post....... Furthermore, in previous work most of the potential target genes have been shown to be repressed by FNR through an undetermined mechanism. Collectively, our results provide insight into the mechanism by which FNR negatively regulates genes such as sodA, sodB, cydDC, and metE, thereby demonstrating...

  1. Post-translational regulation of miRNA pathway components, AGO1 and HYL1, in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cho, Seok Keun; Ryu, Moon Young; Shah, Pratik

    2016-01-01

    , the complexity of the proteome increases, and this then influences most biological processes. Although small RNAs are crucial regulatory elements for gene expression in most eukaryotes, PTMs of small RNA microprocessor and RNA silencing components have not been extensively investigated in plants. To date......, several studies have shown that the proteolytic regulation of AGOs is important for host-pathogen interactions. DRB4 is regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and the degradation of HYL1 is modulated by a de-etiolation repressor, COP1, and an unknown cytoplasmic protease. Here, we discuss current...... findings on the PTMs of microprocessor and RNA silencing components in plants....

  2. Translational up-regulation and high-level protein expression from plasmid vectors by mTOR activation via different pathways in PC3 and 293T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanthi Karyala

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Though 293T cells are widely used for expression of proteins from transfected plasmid vectors, the molecular basis for the high-level expression is yet to be understood. We recently identified the prostate carcinoma cell line PC3 to be as efficient as 293T in protein expression. This study was undertaken to decipher the molecular basis of high-level expression in these two cell lines. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a survey of different cell lines for efficient expression of platelet-derived growth factor-B (PDGF-B, β-galactosidase (β-gal and green fluorescent protein (GFP from plasmid vectors, PC3 was found to express at 5-50-fold higher levels compared to the bone metastatic prostate carcinoma cell line PC3BM and many other cell lines. Further, the efficiency of transfection and level of expression of the reporters in PC3 were comparable to that in 293T. Comparative analyses revealed that the high level expression of the reporters in the two cell lines was due to increased translational efficiency. While phosphatidic acid (PA-mediated activation of mTOR, as revealed by drastic reduction in reporter expression by n-butanol, primarily contributed to the high level expression in PC3, multiple pathways involving PA, PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 appear to contribute to the abundant reporter expression in 293T. Thus the extent of translational up-regulation attained through the concerted activation of mTOR by multiple pathways in 293T could be achieved through its activation primarily by the PA pathway in PC3. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our studies reveal that the high-level expression of proteins from plasmid vectors is effected by translational up-regulation through mTOR activation via different signaling pathways in the two cell lines and that PC3 is as efficient as 293T for recombinant protein expression. Further, PC3 offers an advantage in that the level of expression of the protein can be regulated by simple addition of n-butanol to

  3. Transcription and translation products of the cytolysin gene psm-mec on the mobile genetic element SCCmec regulate Staphylococcus aureus virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chikara Kaito

    Full Text Available The F region downstream of the mecI gene in the SCCmec element in hospital-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA-MRSA contains two bidirectionally overlapping open reading frames (ORFs, the fudoh ORF and the psm-mec ORF. The psm-mec ORF encodes a cytolysin, phenol-soluble modulin (PSM-mec. Transformation of the F region into the Newman strain, which is a methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA strain, or into the MW2 (USA400 and FRP3757 (USA300 strains, which are community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA strains that lack the F region, attenuated their virulence in a mouse systemic infection model. Introducing the F region to these strains suppressed colony-spreading activity and PSMα production, and promoted biofilm formation. By producing mutations into the psm-mec ORF, we revealed that (i both the transcription and translation products of the psm-mec ORF suppressed colony-spreading activity and promoted biofilm formation; and (ii the transcription product of the psm-mec ORF, but not its translation product, decreased PSMα production. These findings suggest that both the psm-mec transcript, acting as a regulatory RNA, and the PSM-mec protein encoded by the gene on the mobile genetic element SCCmec regulate the virulence of Staphylococcus aureus.

  4. Topology and regulation of the human eIF4A/4G/4H helicase complex in translation initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marintchev, Assen; Edmonds, Katherine A.; Marintcheva, Boriana; Hendrickson, Elthea; Oberer, Monika; Suzuki, Chikako; Herdy, Barbara; Sonenberg, Nahum; Wagner, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    Summary The RNA helicase eIF4A plays a key role in unwinding of mRNA and scanning during translation initiation. Free eIF4A is a poor helicase and requires the accessory proteins eIF4G and eIF4H. However, the structure of the helicase complex and the mechanisms of stimulation of eIF4A activity have remained elusive. Here we report the topology of the eIF4A/4G/4H helicase complex, which is built from multiple experimentally observed domain-domain contacts. Remarkably, some of the interactions are continuously rearranged during the ATP binding/hydrolysis cycle of the helicase. We show that the accessory proteins modulate the affinity of eIF4A for ATP by interacting simultaneously with both helicase domains and promoting either the closed, ATP-bound conformation or the open, nucleotide-free conformation. The topology of the complex and the spatial arrangement of the RNA-binding surfaces offer insights into their roles in stimulation of helicase activity and the mechanisms of mRNA unwinding and scanning. PMID:19203580

  5. The Measurement of Reversible Redox Dependent Post-translational Modifications and Their Regulation of Mitochondrial and Skeletal Muscle Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, Philip A.; Duan, Jicheng; Qian, Wei-Jun; Marcinek, David J.

    2015-11-25

    Mitochondrial oxidative stress is a common feature of skeletal myopathies across multiple conditions; however, the mechanism by which it contributes to skeletal muscle dysfunction remains controversial. Oxidative damage to proteins, lipids, and DNA has received the most attention, yet an important role for reversible redox post-translational modifications (PTMs) in pathophysiology is emerging. The possibility that these PTMs can exert dynamic control of muscle function implicates them as a mechanism contributing to skeletal muscle dysfunction in chronic disease. Herein, we discuss the significance of thiol-based redox dependent modifications to mitochondrial, myofibrillar and excitation-contraction (EC) coupling proteins with an emphasis on how these changes could alter skeletal muscle performance under chronically stressed conditions. A major barrier to a better mechanistic understanding of the role of reversible redox PTMs in muscle function is the technical challenges associated with accurately measuring the changes of site-specific redox PTMs. Here we will critically review current approaches with an emphasis on sample preparation artifacts, quantitation, and specificity. Despite these challenges, the ability to accurately quantify reversible redox PTMs is critical to understanding the mechanisms by which mitochondrial oxidative stress contributes to skeletal muscle dysfunction in chronic diseases.

  6. The measurement of reversible redox dependent post-translational modifications and their regulation of mitochondrial and skeletal muscle function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip A Kramer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial oxidative stress is a common feature of skeletal myopathies across multiple conditions; however, the mechanism by which it contributes to skeletal muscle dysfunction remains controversial. Oxidative damage to proteins, lipids, and DNA has received the most attention, yet an important role for reversible redox post-translational modifications (PTMs in pathophysiology is emerging. The possibility that these PTMs can exert dynamic control of muscle function implicates them as a mechanism contributing to skeletal muscle dysfunction in chronic disease. Herein, we discuss the significance of thiol-based redox dependent modifications to mitochondrial, myofibrillar and excitation-contraction (EC coupling proteins with an emphasis on how these changes could alter skeletal muscle performance under chronically stressed conditions. A major barrier to a better mechanistic understanding of the role of reversible redox PTMs in muscle function is the technical challenges associated with accurately measuring the changes of site-specific redox PTMs. Here we will critically review current approaches with an emphasis on sample preparation artifacts, quantitation, and specificity. Despite these challenges, the ability to accurately quantify reversible redox PTMs is critical to understanding the mechanisms by which mitochondrial oxidative stress contributes to skeletal muscle dysfunction in chronic diseases.

  7. Bone-to-implant contact after maxillary sinus floor augmentation with Bio-Oss and autogenous bone in different ratios in mini pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas; Schou, Søren; Gundersen, Hans Jørgen G

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective was to test the hypotheses: (i) no differences in bone-to-implant contact formation, and (ii) no differences between the use of autogenous mandibular or iliac bone grafts, when autogenous bone, Bio-Oss mixed with autogenous bone, or Bio-Oss is used as graft for the maxil......OBJECTIVES: The objective was to test the hypotheses: (i) no differences in bone-to-implant contact formation, and (ii) no differences between the use of autogenous mandibular or iliac bone grafts, when autogenous bone, Bio-Oss mixed with autogenous bone, or Bio-Oss is used as graft...... for the maxillary sinus floor augmentation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Bilateral sinus floor augmentation was performed in 40 mini pigs with: (A) 100% autogenous bone, (B) 75% autogenous bone and 25% Bio-Oss, (C) 50% autogenous bone and 50% Bio-Oss, (D) 25% autogenous bone and 75% Bio-Oss, or (E) 100% Bio......-Oss. Autogenous bone was harvested from the iliac crest or the mandible and the graft composition was selected at random and placed concomitant with the implant placement. The animals were euthanized 12 weeks after surgery. Bone-to-implant contact was estimated by stereological methods and summarized as median...

  8. Trait- and density-mediated indirect interactions initiated by an exotic invasive plant autogenic ecosystem engineer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean E. Pearson

    2010-01-01

    Indirect interactions are important for structuring ecological systems. However, research on indirect effects has been heavily biased toward top-down trophic interactions, and less is known about other indirect-interaction pathways. As autogenic ecosystem engineers, plants can serve as initiators of nontrophic indirect interactions that, like top-down pathways, can...

  9. Autogenous shrinkage in high-performance cement paste: An evaluation of basic mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lura, Pietro; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Breugel, Klaas van

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, various mechanisms suggested to cause autogenous shrinkage are presented. The mechanisms are evaluated from the point of view of their soundness and applicability to quantitative modeling of autogenous shrinkage. The capillary tension approach is advantageous, because it has a sound mechanical and thermodynamical basis. Furthermore, this mechanism is easily applicable in a numerical model when dealing with a continuously changing microstructure. In order to test the numerical model, autogenous deformation and internal relative humidity (RH) of a Portland cement paste were measured during the first week of hardening. The isothermal heat evolution was also recorded to monitor the progress of hydration and the elastic modulus in compression was measured. RH change, degree of hydration and elastic modulus were used as input data for the calculation of autogenous deformation based on the capillary tension approach. Because a part of the RH drop in the cement paste is due to dissolved salts in the pore solution, a method is suggested to separate this effect from self-desiccation and to calculate the actual stress in the pore fluid associated with menisci formation

  10. Augmentation of localized defects of the anterior maxillary ridge with autogenous bone before insertion of implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raghoebar, GM; Batenburg, RHK; Vissink, A; Reintsema, H

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated the applicability of intraorally harvested autogenous bone grafts for the augmentation of the narrow maxillary alveolar ridge to enable insertion of implants for single tooth replacement. Materials and Methods: Local defects of the anterior maxilla were reconstructed in

  11. Autogenous shrinkage of Ducorit S5R ASTM C 1698-09 test method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkilde, Lars

    The report deals with experimental measurement of autogenous shrinkage of Ducorit S5R according to the test method ASTM C 1698-09. This test method measures the bulk strain of a sealed cementitious specimen, at constant temperature and not subjected to external forces, from the time of final...

  12. Acromioclavicular Reconstruction using Autogenous Semitendinosus Tendon Graft and the Importance of Postoperative Rehabilitation: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jade PY Ho

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of chronic acromioclavicular joint dislocation (Rockwood type 5 in which the choice of acromioclavicular reconstruction using autogenous semitendinosus tendon graft was made due to its superiority in anatomical reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligaments, and the impact of postoperative rehabilitation on the recovery of this patient. We also discuss the rationale behind this.

  13. Starch hydrolysis in autogenerative high pressure digestion: Gelatinisation and saccharification as rate limiting steps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindeboom, R.E.F.; Ding, L.; Weijma, J.; Plugge, C.M.; Lier, van J.B.

    2014-01-01

    Autogenerative high pressure digestion (AHPD) provides an integrated biogas upgrading technology, capable of producing biogas with a CH4 content exceeding 95% at pressures up to 90 bar. Hydrolysis is generally regarded as the rate-limiting step in the anaerobic digestion of complex organic matter,

  14. Ultra high performance concrete made with rice husk ash for reduced autogenous shrinkage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Breugel, K.; Van Tuan, N.

    2014-01-01

    Ultra High Strength Concrete (UHPC) is generally made with low w/c mixtures and by adding silica fume. Low w/c mixtures, however, exhibit high autogenous shrinkage, while a high amount of silica fume increases the price of these mixtures. For designing ultra high strength mixtures with low

  15. Regulation of Mammary Stem Cell Quiescence via Post-Translational Modification of DeltaNp63alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    This document is the Annual Summary Report on the training grant awarded to Andrew DeCastro entitled Regulation of Mammary Stem Cell Quiescence via...screen) mediated phosphorylation of deltaNPdelta3 on stem cell behavior and mitotic activity. Task 1 aims to determine the effects of wild-type, phospho...ablative and phospho-mimetic alleles of deltaNP63delta phosphorylation on stem cell behavior in vitro. Thus far, we demonstrate that stem cell enriched

  16. Translating Inclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fallov, Mia Arp; Birk, Rasmus

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore how practices of translation shape particular paths of inclusion for people living in marginalized residential areas in Denmark. Inclusion, we argue, is not an end-state, but rather something which must be constantly performed. Active citizenship, today......, is not merely a question of participation, but of learning to become active in all spheres of life. The paper draws on empirical examples from a multi-sited field work in 6 different sites of local community work in Denmark, to demonstrate how different dimensions of translation are involved in shaping active...... citizenship. We propose the following different dimensions of translation: translating authority, translating language, translating social problems. The paper takes its theoretical point of departure from assemblage urbanism, arguing that cities are heterogeneous assemblages of socio-material interactions...

  17. MDM2 but not MDM4 promotes retinoblastoma cell proliferation through p53-independent regulation of MYCN translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, D-L; Cobrinik, D

    2017-03-30

    Retinoblastomas can arise from cone photoreceptor precursors in response to the loss of pRB function. Cone precursor-specific circuitry cooperates with pRB loss to initiate this process and subsequently contributes to the malignancy. Intrinsic high-level MDM2 expression is a key component of the cone precursor circuitry and is thought to inactivate p53-mediated tumor surveillance, which could otherwise be induced in response to pRB loss. However, the MDM2-related MDM4 has also been proposed to abrogate p53-mediated tumor surveillance in the absence of detectable MDM2 in retinoblastoma cells, bringing into question the importance of high-level MDM2 versus MDM4 expression. Here we report that high-level MDM2 but not MDM4 has a consistent critical role in retinoblastoma cell proliferation in vitro, as well as in orthotopic xenografts. Reduction of either MDM2 or MDM4 weakly induced p53, yet reduction of MDM2 but not MDM4 severely impaired proliferation and survival through a p53-independent mechanism. Specifically, MDM2 upregulated the mRNA expression and translation of another component of the cone circuitry, MYCN, in retinoblastoma cells. Moreover, MYCN was essential to retinoblastoma cell growth and tumor formation, and ectopic MYCN partially reversed the effects of MDM2 depletion, indicating that MYCN is an important MDM2 target. These findings indicate that high-level MDM2 expression is needed in order to perform a critical p53-independent function and may obviate the need for genomic alterations to the p53 pathway during retinoblastoma tumorigenesis.

  18. SIAMESE-RELATED1 is regulated post-translationally and participates in repression of leaf growth under moderate drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Marieke; Selden, Katia; Bediée, Alexis; Rolland, Gaëlle; Baumberger, Nicolas; Noir, Sandra; Bach, Lien; Lamy, Geneviève; Granier, Christine; Genschik, Pascal

    2018-02-22

    The plant cell cycle is tightly regulated by factors that integrate endogenous cues and environmental signals to adapt plant growth to changing conditions. Under drought, cell division in young leaves is blocked by an active mechanism, reducing the evaporative surface and conserving energy resources. The molecular function of cyclin-dependent kinase-inhibitory proteins (CKIs) in regulating the cell cycle has already been well studied, but little is known about their involvement in cell cycle regulation under adverse growth conditions. In this study, we show that the transcript of the CKI gene SIAMESE-RELATED1 (SMR1) is quickly induced under moderate drought in young Arabidopsis thaliana leaves. Functional characterization further revealed that SMR1 inhibits cell division and affects meristem activity, thereby restricting the growth of leaves and roots. Moreover, we demonstrate that SMR1 is a short-lived protein that is degraded by the 26S proteasome after being ubiquitinated by a Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase. Consequently, overexpression of a more stable variant of the SMR1 protein leads to a much stronger phenotype than overexpression of the native SMR1. Under moderate drought, both the SMR1 transcript and SMR1 protein accumulate. Despite this induction, smr1 mutants do not show overall tolerance to drought stress but do show less growth inhibition of young leaves under drought. Surprisingly, the growth-repressive hormone ethylene promotes SMR1 induction, but the classical drought hormone abscisic acid does not. {copyright, serif} 2018 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  19. Revising Translations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Kirsten Wølch; Schjoldager, Anne

    2011-01-01

    out by specialised revisers, but by staff translators, who revise the work of colleagues and freelancers on an ad hoc basis. Corrections are mostly given in a peer-to-peer fashion, though the work of freelancers and inexperienced in-house translators is often revised in an authoritative (nonnegotiable...

  20. Translating democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doerr, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    grassroots activists in social movements use translation as a novel practice to debate political alternatives in the European Union's (EU) multilingual public sphere. In recent years, new cross-European protest movements have created the multilingual discursive democracy arena known as the European Social...... to the national context. In the ESF, grassroots deliberators work using a novel practice of translation that has the potential to include marginalized groups. It is, however, a distinct kind of translation that activists use. Translation, compared to EU-official practices of multilingualism, affects a change...... in institutionalized habits and norms of deliberation. Addressing democratic theorists, my findings suggest that translation could be a way to think about difference not as a hindrance but as a resource for democracy in linguistically heterogeneous societies and public spaces, without presupposing a shared language...

  1. Proteomics analysis reveals a highly heterogeneous proteasome composition and the post-translational regulation of peptidase activity under pathogen signaling in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hui H; Fukao, Yoichiro; Ishida, Sakiko; Yamamoto, Hiroko; Maekawa, Shugo; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Sato, Takeo; Yamaguchi, Junji

    2013-11-01

    The proteasome is a large multisubunit complex that plays a crucial role in the removal of damaged or selective ubiquitinated proteins, thereby allowing quality control of cellular proteins and restricted regulation of diverse cellular signaling in eukaryotic cells. Proteasome-dependent protein degradation is involved in almost all aspects of plant growth and responses to environmental stresses including pathogen resistance. Although the molecular mechanism for specifying targets by ubiquitin ligases is well understood, the detailed characterization of the plant proteasome complex remains unclear. One of the most important features of the plant proteasome is that most subunits are encoded by duplicate genes, suggesting the highly heterogeneous composition of this proteasome. Here, we performed affinity purification and a combination of 2-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, which identified the detailed composition of paralogous and modified proteins. Moreover, these proteomics approaches revealed that specific subunit composition and proteasome peptidase activity were affected by pathogen-derived MAMPs, flg22 treatment. Interestingly, flg22 treatment did not alter mRNA expression levels of the peptidase genes PBA, PBB1/2, PBE1/2, and total proteasome levels remained unchanged by flg22 as well. These results demonstrate the finely tuned mechanism that regulates proteasome function via putative post-translational modifications in response to environmental stress in plants.

  2. Translator: Expert of ‘What’? Translator Training and the Changing/Changeful Identity of the Translator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senem Öner

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to trace the contemporary perceptions/definitions of the translator and translation in Turkey where the translation profession is not a legally regulated profession. (Invisibility of the translator and the scope of his/her expertise are widely debated issues among both the scholars/students of translation and the various players in the world of translation. Although translation is no longer being defined as a mere linguistic activity, reductionist views of translation that equate translation to ‘know’ing a foreign language still continues to prevail. What accompanies the said reductionist view is the claim that a translator can not translate ‘all the texts’ in different fields of expertise, at least not as successfully as the ‘real’ experts of the field who also know a foreign language such as engineer-translators or lawyer-translators who know English. However, recent developments concerning legal translation in plurilingual settings evidence a completely different understanding of translation and the identity/expertise of the translator. In such settings, translators work together with the drafters of the legal texts and are responsible for the source legal texts as well as the target ones, broadening the scope of the ‘expertise’ of the translator in an unprecedented way. In the light of the implications of the said transformation of the identity of the legal translator, this paper argues that the identity/definition of the translator/translation needs to be reconsidered and the results should be reflected onto the translator training programs with the aim of helping students of translation (redefine their identity as real ‘experts’ of the translation field and contributing to the transformation of the perception of translation and the translator.

  3. Translator: Expert of ‘What’? Translator Training and the Changing/Changeful Identity of the Translator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senem Öner

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to trace the contemporary perceptions/definitions of the translator and translation in Turkey where the translation profession is not a legally regulated profession. (Invisibility of the translator and the scope of his/her expertise are widely debated issues among both the scholars/students of translation and the various players in the world of translation. Although translation is no longer being defined as a mere linguistic activity, reductionist views of translation that equate translation to ‘know’ing a foreign language still continues to prevail. What accompanies the said reductionist view is the claim that a translator can not translate ‘all the texts’ in different fields of expertise, at least not as successfully as the ‘real’ experts of the field who also know a foreign language such as engineer-translators or lawyer-translators who know English. However, recent developments concerning legal translation in plurilingual settings evidence a completely different understanding of translation and the identity/expertise of the translator. In such settings, translators work together with the drafters of the legal texts and are responsible for the source legal texts as well as the target ones, broadening the scope of the ‘expertise’ of the translator in an unprecedented way. In the light of the implications of the said transformation of the identity of the legal translator, this paper argues that the identity/definition of the translator/translation needs to be reconsidered and the results should be reflected onto the translator training programs with the aim of helping students of translation (redefine their identity as real ‘experts’ of the translation field and contributing to the transformation of the perception of translation and the translator.

  4. The PurR regulon in Lactococcus lactis – transcriptional regulation of the purine nucleotide metabolism and translational machinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jendresen, Christian Bille; Martinussen, Jan; Kilstrup, Mogens

    2012-01-01

    to a conserved PurBox motif present on the DNA at a fixed distance from the promoter -10 element. PurR contains a PRPP-binding site, and activation occurs when the intracellular PRPP pool is high as a consequence of low exogenous purine nucleotide pools. By an iterative approach of bioinformatics searches...... and motif optimization, 21 PurR-regulated genes were identified and used in a redefinition of the PurBox consensus sequence. In the process a new motif, the double-PurBox, which is present in a number of promoters and contains two partly overlapping PurBox motifs, was established. Transcriptional fusions...... were used to analyse wild-type promoters and promoters with inactivating PurBox mutations to confirm the relevance of the PurBox motifs as PurR-binding sites. The promoters of several operons were shown to be devoid of any -35 sequence, and found to be completely dependent on PurR-mediated activation...

  5. Prader-Willi Critical Region, a Non-Translated, Imprinted Central Regulator of Bone Mass: Possible Role in Skeletal Abnormalities in Prader-Willi Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ee-Cheng Khor

    Full Text Available Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS, a maternally imprinted disorder and leading cause of obesity, is characterised by insatiable appetite, poor muscle development, cognitive impairment, endocrine disturbance, short stature and osteoporosis. A number of causative loci have been located within the imprinted Prader-Willi Critical Region (PWCR, including a set of small non-translated nucleolar RNA's (snoRNA. Recently, micro-deletions in humans identified the snoRNA Snord116 as a critical contributor to the development of PWS exhibiting many of the classical symptoms of PWS. Here we show that loss of the PWCR which includes Snord116 in mice leads to a reduced bone mass phenotype, similar to that observed in humans. Consistent with reduced stature in PWS, PWCR KO mice showed delayed skeletal development, with shorter femurs and vertebrae, reduced bone size and mass in both sexes. The reduction in bone mass in PWCR KO mice was associated with deficiencies in cortical bone volume and cortical mineral apposition rate, with no change in cancellous bone. Importantly, while the length difference was corrected in aged mice, consistent with continued growth in rodents, reduced cortical bone formation was still evident, indicating continued osteoblastic suppression by loss of PWCR expression in skeletally mature mice. Interestingly, deletion of this region included deletion of the exclusively brain expressed Snord116 cluster and resulted in an upregulation in expression of both NPY and POMC mRNA in the arcuate nucleus. Importantly, the selective deletion of the PWCR only in NPY expressing neurons replicated the bone phenotype of PWCR KO mice. Taken together, PWCR deletion in mice, and specifically in NPY neurons, recapitulates the short stature and low BMD and aspects of the hormonal imbalance of PWS individuals. Moreover, it demonstrates for the first time, that a region encoding non-translated RNAs, expressed solely within the brain, can regulate bone mass in health

  6. YelA, a putative Dictyostelium translational regulator, acts as antagonist of DIF-1 signaling to control cell-type proportioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yoko; Sugden, Chris; Williams, Jeffrey G

    2017-01-01

    DIF-1 (differentiation-inducing factor1) is a polyketide produced by Dictyostelium prespore cells which induces initially uncommitted cells to differentiate as prestalk cells. Exposure of cells to DIF-1 causes transitory hypo-phosphorylation of seven serine residues in YelA, a protein with a region of strong homology to the MIF4G domain of the eukaryotic initiation factor eIF4G. Based upon its domain architecture, which in one important aspect closely resembles that of Death-Associated Protein 5 (DAP5), we predict a role in stimulating internal ribosome entry-driven mRNA translation. The two paradigmatic DIF-1 inducible genes are ecmA (extracellular matrixA) and ecmB. In support of a YelA function in DIF-1 signaling, a YelA null strain showed greatly increased expression of ecmA and ecmB in response to DIF-1. Also, during normal development in the null strain, expression of the two genes is accelerated. This is particularly evident for ecmB, a marker of stalk tube and supporting structure differentiation. Mutants in DIF-1 bio-synthesis or signaling display a rudimentary or no basal disc and, conversely, YelA null mutants produce fruiting bodies with a highly enlarged basal disc that ectopically expresses a stalk tube-specific marker. Thus YelA acts as an antagonist of DIF-1 signaling, with a consequent effect on cell type proportioning and it is predicted to act as a translational regulator.

  7. EFFECTIVENESS OF AUTOGENIC DRAINAGE VERSUS POSTURAL DRAINAGE ON OXYGEN SATURATION IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC BRONCHITIS WITH 15 MINUTES POST THERAPY

    OpenAIRE

    V. Kiran; Dr. Bhimasen .S; E. Mastanaiah; A. Thiruppathi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients with COPD will have more amount of secretions. To clear the secretions by using of different bronchial hygiene techniques like postural drainage and autogenic drainage technique, manual hyperventilation technique ,active cycle breathing technique .Hence in this study to compare the short-term effects of postural drainage with clapping (PD) and autogenic drainage (AD) on level of oxygen saturation in blood, and amount of sputum recovery. Methodology: The study was done ...

  8. Binary translation using peephole translation rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Sorav; Aiken, Alex

    2010-05-04

    An efficient binary translator uses peephole translation rules to directly translate executable code from one instruction set to another. In a preferred embodiment, the translation rules are generated using superoptimization techniques that enable the translator to automatically learn translation rules for translating code from the source to target instruction set architecture.

  9. Teriparatide treatment of femoral fracture nonunion that autogenous bone grafting failed to heal: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wei; Guo, Xiaodong

    2017-12-01

    Management of fracture nonunion is challenging as another surgical intervention for the patient is often a necessity, which has a huge impact on both quality of life and economic burden of the patient. Thus, a less aggressive and better accepted treatment for nonunion is required. We gave teriparatide to a 45-year-old man with femoral fracture nonunion 1 year after he underwent surgery with autogenous bone grafting that failed to heal his initial nonunion. Successful union was obtained after once-daily administration of teriparatide for 9 months. Our case showed teriparatide could successfully treat a femoral fracture nonunion that autogenous bone grafting failed to heal. Teriparatide may provide an alternative treatment for fracture nonunion.

  10. Retrograde tracing of fluorescent gold after autogenous nerve transplantation on spinal cord injured in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, X; Liu, W; Ding, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the changes of the fluorescent gold retrograde tracing autogenous nerve transplantation on spinal cord injured in rats. Methods The animals were divided into two groups, with modified Allen impact method to establish model of spinal cord injury. After 4 weeks, the transpl......Objective To investigate the changes of the fluorescent gold retrograde tracing autogenous nerve transplantation on spinal cord injured in rats. Methods The animals were divided into two groups, with modified Allen impact method to establish model of spinal cord injury. After 4 weeks......, the transplantation group using autologous sural nerve graft to repair spinal cord injury period and non-transplantation group was only exposed incision without treatment. In the 4, 6 and 8 weeks after operation, the retrograde tracing of FG Fluoro-Gold was performed to discover the recovery of the axial plasma...

  11. The Formation of Carbon Nanostructures via Catalytic Pyrolysis of Naphthalene under Its Autogenic Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Gang Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs, spherical carbon nanocapsules (CNCs, and carbon spheres (CSs is accomplished by using the method of reactions under autogenic pressure at elevated temperatures (RAPET. A powder mixture of naphthalene and nickel acetate tetrahydrate is dissociated under its autogenic pressure. The resultant CNTs and CNCs exhibit good graphitic quality, and the diameters range from 50~200 nm. Smooth and monodisperse CSs with the diameter ranging from 5~10 μm can be obtained by pyrolysis of pure naphthalene. Our results show that the reaction temperature and catalyst proportion play a key role in the formation of carbon nanostructures with RAPET method.

  12. Sustainable exploitation and management of autogenic ecosystem engineers: application to oysters in Chesapeake Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilberg, Michael J; Wiedenmann, John R; Robinson, Jason M

    2013-06-01

    Autogenic ecosystem engineers are critically important parts of many marine and estuarine systems because of their substantial effect on ecosystem services. Oysters are of particular importance because of their capacity to modify coastal and estuarine habitats and the highly degraded status of their habitats worldwide. However, models to predict dynamics of ecosystem engineers have not previously included the effects of exploitation. We developed a linked population and habitat model for autogenic ecosystem engineers undergoing exploitation. We parameterized the model to represent eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) in upper Chesapeake Bay by selecting sets of parameter values that matched observed rates of change in abundance and habitat. We used the model to evaluate the effects of a range of management and restoration options including sustainability of historical fishing pressure, effectiveness of a newly enacted sanctuary program, and relative performance of two restoration approaches. In general, autogenic ecosystem engineers are expected to be substantially less resilient to fishing than an equivalent species that does not rely on itself for habitat. Historical fishing mortality rates in upper Chesapeake Bay for oysters were above the levels that would lead to extirpation. Reductions in fishing or closure of the fishery were projected to lead to long-term increases in abundance and habitat. For fisheries to become sustainable outside of sanctuaries, a substantial larval subsidy would be required from oysters within sanctuaries. Restoration efforts using high-relief reefs were predicted to allow recovery within a shorter period of time than low-relief reefs. Models such as ours, that allow for feedbacks between population and habitat dynamics, can be effective tools for guiding management and restoration of autogenic ecosystem engineers.

  13. Repair of chronic distal biceps brachii tendon rupture using free autogenous semitendinosus tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, D W; Bach, B R; Bojchuk, J

    1996-02-01

    Distal biceps brachii tendon ruptures occur much less frequently than do their proximal counterparts. Distal tendon ruptures usually are associated with considerable function deficits and may require surgical treatment. Repair of chronic distal biceps brachii ruptures are extremely unusual. A free autogenous semitendinosus tendon graft was used to reconstruct the distal biceps tendon by reattaching the graft to the radial tuberosity via a 2-incision technique in a patient with symptoms and a chronic injury.

  14. Treatment of ankylosed maxillary central incisors by segmental osteotomy with autogenous bone graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Kug-Ho; Min, Yon-Sook; Baik, Hyoung-Seon

    2012-04-01

    This case report describes the treatment of a 16-year-old girl with ankylosed maxillary central incisors that were noticeably infraoccluded and labially displaced. We performed a segmental osteotomy with an autogenous bone graft in a single-stage surgery to align and level the ankylosed teeth. The dento-osseous segment was successfully repositioned with satisfactory periodontal results. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The treatment of persistent night terrors with autogenic training: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadigh, M R; Mierzwa, J A

    1995-09-01

    This is a case study of a 16-year-old male with a long history of persistent and severe night terrors. After a comprehensive medical and psychological evaluation, the patient was trained in standard autogenic training exercises and an organ-specific formula. By the end of the eight-week treatment, the nocturnal episodes ceased. Information at 11 weeks and 37 weeks follow-up supported the effectiveness of the treatment.

  16. The Translation Initiation Factor 1A (TheIF1A) fromTamarix hispidaIs Regulated by a Dof Transcription Factor and Increased Abiotic Stress Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guiyan; Yu, Lili; Wang, Yucheng; Wang, Chao; Gao, Caiqiu

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 1A ( eIF1A ) functions as an mRNA scanner and AUG initiation codon locator. However, few studies have clarified the role of eIF1A in abiotic stress. In this study, we cloned eIF1A ( TheIF1A ) from Tamarix hispida and found its expression to be induced by NaCl and polyethylene glycol (PEG) in roots, stems, and leaves. Compared to control, TheIF1A root expression was increased 187.63-fold when exposed to NaCl for 6 h, suggesting a potential abiotic stress response for this gene. Furthermore, transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing TheIF1A exhibited enhanced seed germination and a higher total chlorophyll content under salt and mannitol stresses. Increased superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, glutathione transferase and glutathione peroxidase activities, as well as decreased electrolyte leakage rates and malondialdehyde contents, were observed in TheIF1A -transgenic tobacco and T. hispida seedlings under salt and mannitol stresses. Histochemical staining suggested that TheIF1A improves reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging in plants. Moreover, TheIF1A may regulate expression of stress-related genes, including TOBLTP , GST , MnSOD , NtMPK9 , poxN1 , and CDPK15 . Moreover, a 1352-bp promoter fragment of TheIF1A was isolated, and cis -elements were identified. Yeast one-hybrid assays showed that ThDof can specifically bind to the Dof motif present in the promoter. In addition, ThDof showed expression patterns similar to those of TheIF1A under NaCl and PEG stresses. These findings suggest the potential mechanism and physiological roles of TheIF1A . ThDof may be an upstream regulator of TheIF1A , and TheIF1A may function as a stress response regulator to improve plant salt and osmotic stress tolerance via regulation of associated enzymes and ROS scavenging, thereby reducing cell damage under stress conditions.

  17. Spontaneous Blinking Kinematics in Patients Who Have Undergone Autogeneous Fascia Frontalis Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccega, Adriano; Garcia, Denny Marcos; Cruz, Antonio Augusto V

    2017-09-01

    To measure spontaneous blink metrics and brow motion in patients with congenital ptosis operated with frontalis slings with autogenous fascia lata. An infrared three-dimensional video motion analyzer was employed to simultaneously measure brow motion and spontaneous blinks of 17 patients with congenital ptosis who underwent frontalis sling with autogenous fascia lata and a control group of equal number of healthy subjects. A customized software identified and quantified the amplitude and maximum velocity spontaneous blinks eyelid and brown motion during a 5-minute observation of a commercial movie. The corneal status of the patients with and without lagophthamos was evaluated with slit-lamp biomicroscopy with fluorescein staining. Lagophthalmos was detected on 13 (76.5%) patients. Out of these 3 (23%) showed signs of inferior superficial keratopathy despite the presence of normal (upwards) Bell's phenomenon in all of them. Blink rate was significantly diminished in the patients. The distribution of interblink time was similar in both groups. The mean amplitude of the down-phase of the patients' blinks was only 38% of the controls. The main sequence slope of the patients' blinks was abnormally low. In controls brow motion was a minute and random event no related to blinks. In the patients, the mean brow amplitude was five times higher than in controls reaching 45% of the blink amplitude. Spontaneous blink amplitude and velocity are severely impaired in patients with fascia lata autogenous slings. After surgery blinking amplitude is linearly related to the amplitude of brow motion.

  18. Autogenous Partial Bone Chip Grafting on the Exposed Inferior Alveolar Nerve After Cystic Enucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Mi Hyun; Eo, Mi Young; Cho, Yun Ju; Kim, Soung Min; Lee, Suk Keun

    2018-03-01

    This prospective study evaluated the clinical effectiveness of the new approach of partial autogenous bone chip grafts for the treatment of mandibular cystic lesions related to the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN). A total of 38 patients treated for mandibular cysts or benign tumors were included in this prospective study and subsequently divided into 3 groups depending on the bone grafting method used: cystic enucleation without a bone graft (group 1), partial bone chip graft covering the exposed IAN (group 2), and autogenous bone graft covering the entire defect (group 3). We evaluated the symptoms, clinical signs, and radiographic changes using dental panorama preoperatively, immediate postoperatively, and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Radiographic densities were compared using Adobe Photoshop CS5 (Adobe Systems Inc., San Jose, CA). Repeated measures analysis of variance was used for statistical evaluation with SPSS 22.0 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL), and P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant.Radiopacities were the most increased at 1 year postoperative in group 3; groups 2 and 3 did not show statistically significant differences, whereas groups 1 and 3 were statistically significant. In terms of radiographic bone healing with clinical regeneration of the exposed IAN, healing occurred in all patients, although the best healing was achieved in group 2.This autogenous partial bone chip grafting procedure to cover the exposed IAN is suggested as a new surgical protocol for the treatment of cystic lesions associated with the IAN.

  19. Ezh2 regulates transcriptional and post-translational expression of T-bet and promotes Th1 cell responses mediating aplastic anemia in mice1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Qing; He, Shan; Xie, Fang; Mochizuki, Kazuhiro; Liu, Yongnian; Mochizuki, Izumi; Meng, Lijun; Sun, Hongxing; Zhang, Yanyun; Guo, Yajun; Hexner, Elizabeth; Zhang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia (AA) is a potentially fatal bone marrow (BM) failure syndrome. IFN-γ-producing T helper (Th)1 CD4+ T cells mediate the immune destruction of hematopoietic cells, and are central to the pathogenesis. However, the molecular events that control the development of BM-destructive Th1 cells remain largely unknown. Ezh2 is a chromatin-modifying enzyme that regulates multiple cellular processes primarily by silencing gene expression. We recently reported that Ezh2 is crucial for inflammatory T cell responses after allogeneic BM transplantation. To elucidate whether Ezh2 mediates pathogenic Th1 responses in AA and the mechanism of Ezh2 action in regulating Th1 cells, we studied the effects of Ezh2 inhibition in CD4+ T cells using a mouse model of human AA. Conditionally deleting Ezh2 in mature T cells dramatically reduced the production of BM-destructive Th1 cells in vivo, decreased BM-infiltrating Th1 cells, and rescued mice from BM failure. Ezh2 inhibition resulted in significant decrease in the expression of Tbx21 and Stat4 (which encode transcription factors T-bet and STAT4, respectively). Introduction of T-bet but not STAT4 into Ezh2-deficient T cells fully rescued their differentiation into Th1 cells mediating AA. Ezh2 bound to the Tbx21 promoter in Th1 cells, and directly activated Tbx21 transcription. Unexpectedly, Ezh2 was also required to prevent proteasome-mediated degradation of T-bet protein in Th1 cells. Our results identify T-bet as the transcriptional and post-translational Ezh2 target that acts together to generate BM-destructive Th1 cells, and highlight the therapeutic potential of Ezh2 inhibition in reducing AA and other autoimmune diseases. PMID:24760151

  20. Interaction proteins of invertase and invertase inhibitor in cold-stored potato tubers suggested a protein complex underlying post-translational regulation of invertase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan; Liu, Jun; Liu, Xun; Ou, Yongbin; Li, Meng; Zhang, Huiling; Song, Botao; Xie, Conghua

    2013-12-01

    The activity of vacuolar invertase (VI) is vital to potato cold-induced sweetening (CIS). A post-translational regulation of VI activity has been proposed which involves invertase inhibitor (VIH), but the mechanism for the interaction between VI and VIH has not been fully understood. To identify the potential partners of VI and VIH, two cDNA libraries were respectively constructed from CIS-resistant wild potato species Solanum berthaultii and CIS-sensitive potato cultivar AC035-01 for the yeast two-hybrid analysis. The StvacINV1 (one of the potato VIs) and StInvInh2B (one of the potato VIHs), previously identified to be associated with potato CIS, were used as baits to screen the two libraries. Through positive selection and sequencing, 27 potential target proteins of StvacINV1 and eight of StInvInh2B were clarified. The Kunitz-type protein inhibitors were captured by StvacINV1 in both libraries and the interaction between them was confirmed by bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay in tobacco cells, reinforcing a fundamental interaction between VI and VIH. Notably, a sucrose non-fermenting-1-related protein kinase 1 was captured by both the baits, suggesting that a protein complex could be necessary for fine turning of the invertase activity. The target proteins clarified in present research provide a route to elucidate the mechanism by which the VI activity can be subtly modulated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Post-translational regulation of acid invertase activity by vacuolar invertase inhibitor affects resistance to cold-induced sweetening of potato tubers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Marian J; Chen, Ronan K Y; Harris, John C; Ashworth, Matthew J; Brummell, David A

    2013-01-01

    Cold-induced sweetening (CIS) is a serious post-harvest problem for potato tubers, which need to be stored cold to prevent sprouting and pathogenesis in order to maintain supply throughout the year. During storage at cold temperatures (below 10 °C), many cultivars accumulate free reducing sugars derived from a breakdown of starch to sucrose that is ultimately cleaved by acid invertase to produce glucose and fructose. When affected tubers are processed by frying or roasting, these reducing sugars react with free asparagine by the Maillard reaction, resulting in unacceptably dark-coloured and bitter-tasting product and generating the probable carcinogen acrylamide as a by-product. We have previously identified a vacuolar invertase inhibitor (INH2) whose expression correlates both with low acid invertase activity and with resistance to CIS. Here we show that, during cold storage, overexpression of the INH2 vacuolar invertase inhibitor gene in CIS-susceptible potato tubers reduced acid invertase activity, the accumulation of reducing sugars and the generation of acrylamide in subsequent fry tests. Conversely, suppression of vacuolar invertase inhibitor expression in a CIS-resistant line increased susceptibility to CIS. The results show that post-translational regulation of acid invertase by the vacuolar invertase inhibitor is an important component of resistance to CIS. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Can neural machine translation do simultaneous translation?

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Kyunghyun; Esipova, Masha

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the potential of attention-based neural machine translation in simultaneous translation. We introduce a novel decoding algorithm, called simultaneous greedy decoding, that allows an existing neural machine translation model to begin translating before a full source sentence is received. This approach is unique from previous works on simultaneous translation in that segmentation and translation are done jointly to maximize the translation quality and that translating each segmen...

  3. Machine Translation and Other Translation Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melby, Alan

    1996-01-01

    Examines the application of linguistic theory to machine translation and translator tools, discusses the use of machine translation and translator tools in the real world of translation, and addresses the impact of translation technology on conceptions of language and other issues. Findings indicate that the human mind is flexible and linguistic…

  4. Post-General Anesthesia Ultrasound-Guided Venous Mapping Increases Autogenous Access Placement Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Png, C Y Maximilian; Korayem, Adam; Finlay, David J

    2018-04-18

    This study investigates the impact of introducing a post-general anesthesia ultrasound mapping (PAUS) on the type of vascular access chosen for hemodialysis in patients without previous accesses. 203 of 297 consecutive patients met inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Within-subjects analysis was performed on patients with both an outpatient ultrasound-guided vein mapping and a PAUS using sign tests and Wilcoxon signed ranked tests. Further, a between-subjects analysis added patients with only the outpatient vein mapping; demographic and comorbidity data were analyzed using t-tests and chi-squared tests. An ordinal logit regression was run for the type of access placed, while a bivariate logit regression was used to compare rates of autogenous access maturation. 165 (81%) patients received both a standard outpatient vein mapping and a PAUS. At the outpatient vein mapping, 130 (79%) patients had suitable veins for an autogenous access while 35 (21%) patients did not have suitable veins for an autogenous access and were planned for a prosthetic access. During PAUS, all 165 (100%) patients were found to have suitable veins for autogenous access formation (P<0.001). When comparing specific autogenous access configurations, Wilcoxon signed rank testing showed significantly more preferable access configurations in the PAUS group compared to the outpatient mapping (P<0.001); Outpatient mapping resulted in 81 (47%) radiocephalic accesses, 10 (6%) radiobasilic accesses, 20 (12%) brachiocephalic accesses, 19 (12%) brachiobasilic accesses and 35 (21%) prosthetic accesses planned, in contrast to 149 (90%) radiocephalic accesses, 3 (2%) radiobasilic accesses, 10 (6%) brachiocephalic accesses, 3 (2%) brachiobasilic accesses and 0 prosthetic accesses when the same patients were analyzed using PAUS. With the analysis expanded to include the 38 (19%) patients with only the outpatient vein mapping (without-PAUS), the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test showed no significant differences

  5. Machine Translation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    LANT has a suite of related Language Technology products: LANT-Master, a language checker, integrates into existing word processors like MS-Word and allows the vocabulary and style oftexts to be in a controlled language which can then be automatically translated; Pangaea is an electronic dictionary that allows the.

  6. Translation Competence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandepitte, Sonia; Mousten, Birthe; Maylath, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    After Kiraly (2000) introduced the collaborative form of translation in classrooms, Pavlovic (2007), Kenny (2008), and Huertas Barros (2011) provided empirical evidence that testifies to the impact of collaborative learning. This chapter sets out to describe the collaborative forms of learning...

  7. Comparison of autogeneic and allogeneic natural killer cells immunotherapy on the clinical outcome of recurrent breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang S

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Shuzhen Liang,1,2 Kecheng Xu,1,2 Lizhi Niu,1,2 Xiaohua Wang,1 Yingqing Liang,1 Mingjie Zhang,3 Jibing Chen,1,2 Mao Lin1,2 1Department of Central Laboratory, Fuda Cancer Hospital, Jinan University School of Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China; 2Fuda Cancer Institute, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China; 3Hank Bioengineering Co., Ltd, Shenzhen, China Abstract: In the present study, we aimed to compare the clinical outcome of autogeneic and allogeneic natural killer (NK cells immunotherapy for the treatment of recurrent breast cancer. Between July 2016 and February 2017, 36 patients who met the enrollment criteria were randomly assigned to two groups: autogeneic NK cells immunotherapy group (group I, n=18 and allogeneic NK cells immunotherapy group (group II, n=18. The clinical efficacy, quality of life, immune function, circulating tumor cell (CTC level, and other related indicators were evaluated. We found that allogeneic NK cells immunotherapy has better clinical efficacy than autogeneic therapy. Moreover, allogeneic NK cells therapy improves the quality of life, reduces the number of CTCs, reduces carcinoembryonic antigen and cancer antigen 15-3 (CA15-3 expression, and significantly enhances immune function. To our knowledge, this is the first clinical trial to compare the clinical outcome of autogeneic and allogeneic NK cells immunotherapy for recurrent breast cancer. Keywords: clinical outcome, autogeneic, allogeneic, natural killer cells, recurrent breast cancer

  8. Translation Factors Specify Cellular Metabolic State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Mata

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this issue of Cell Reports, Shah et al. present evidence that a subcomplex of the eIF3 translation initiation factor regulates translation of mRNAs encoding components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain and glycolytic enzymes, thus linking translational control with energy metabolism.

  9. Word translation entropy in translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaeffer, Moritz; Dragsted, Barbara; Hvelplund, Kristian Tangsgaard

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on an investigation into the relationship between the number of translation alternatives for a single word and eye movements on the source text. In addition, the effect of word order differences between source and target text on eye movements on the source text is studied. In p...

  10. Beyond Translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olwig, Mette Fog

    2013-01-01

    This article contributes to the growing scholarship on local development practitioners by re-examining conceptualizations of practitioners as ‘brokers’ strategically translating between ‘travelling’ (development institution) rationalities and ‘placed’ (recipient area) rationalities in relation...... and practice spurred by new challenges deriving from climate change anxiety, the study shows how local practitioners often make local activities fit into travelling development rationalities as a matter of habit, rather than as a conscious strategy. They may therefore cease to ‘translate’ between different...... rationalities. This is shown to have important implications for theory, research and practice concerning disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation in which such translation is often expected....

  11. Translational genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kussmann

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The term “Translational Genomics” reflects both title and mission of this new journal. “Translational” has traditionally been understood as “applied research” or “development”, different from or even opposed to “basic research”. Recent scientific and societal developments have triggered a re-assessment of the connotation that “translational” and “basic” are either/or activities: translational research nowadays aims at feeding the best science into applications and solutions for human society. We therefore argue here basic science to be challenged and leveraged for its relevance to human health and societal benefits. This more recent approach and attitude are catalyzed by four trends or developments: evidence-based solutions; large-scale, high dimensional data; consumer/patient empowerment; and systems-level understanding.

  12. Regulation of de novo translation of host cells by manipulation of PERK/PKR and GADD34-PP1 activity during Newcastle disease virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Ying; Gu, Feng; Mao, Xiang; Niu, Qiaona; Wang, Huaxia; Sun, Yingjie; Song, Cuiping; Qiu, Xusheng; Tan, Lei; Ding, Chan

    2016-04-01

    Viral infections result in cellular stress responses, which can trigger protein translation shutoff via phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2α). Newcastle disease virus (NDV) causes severe disease in poultry and selectively kills human tumour cells. In this report, we determined that infection of HeLa human cervical cancer cells and DF-1 chicken fibroblast cells with NDV maintained protein at early infection times, 0-12 h post-infection (p.i.), and gradually inhibited global protein translation at late infection times, 12-24 h p.i. Mechanistic studies showed that translation inhibition at late infection times was accompanied by phosphorylation of eIF2α, a checkpoint of translation initiation. Meanwhile, the eIF2α kinase, PKR, was upregulated and activated by phosphorylation and another eIF2α kinase, PERK, was phosphorylated and cleaved into two fragments. Pharmacological inhibition experiments revealed that only PKR activity was required for eIF2α phosphorylation, suggesting that recognition of viral dsRNA by PKR was responsible for translation shutoff. High levels of phospho-eIF2α led to preferential translation of the transcription factor ATF4 and an increase in GADD34 expression. Functionally, GADD34, in conjunction with PP1, dephosphorylated eIF2a and restored protein translation, benefiting virus protein synthesis. However, PP1 was degraded at late infection times, functionally counteracting the upregulation of GADD34. Taken together, our data support that NDV-induced translation shutoff at late infection times was attributed to sustaining phosphorylation of eIF2α, which is mediated by continual activation of PKR and degradation of PP1.

  13. Autogenous bone block in the treatment of teeth with hopeless prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nymphea Pandit

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autogenous bone graft, although considered as a gold standard, has been relegated to background because of limited quantity and donor site morbidity. Revival of interest in its use has been reflected by its tremendous capacity for regeneration in less than ideal situation. Bone blocks have been used for implant site augmentation, with varied success. Aim: Aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of autogenous bone block in the regeneration of bone, for saving teeth with a hopeless prognosis. Settings and Design: A total of six patients and 12 sites with grade II and III mobile teeth were treated with autogenous bone blocks and fiber splinting. Subjects and Methods: Attachment loss, probing depths, and radiographic bone loss were recorded at baseline and at 12 months interval. Statistical Analysis Used: The Student paired t test was used for evaluation of the changes from baseline to 12 months. Results: At 12 months post-operatively, there was a highly significant amount of bone gain as compared to the baseline. The mean amount of bone loss reduced from 9.41 ± 1.16 to 5.41 ± 1.01. The clinical attachment loss reduced from 7.37 ± 1.24 mm to 3.79 ± 0.89 mm and probing depth reduced from 7 ± 1.67 mm to 5.5 ± 0.63 mm. The grafted bone was observed to have been incorporated with the host bone in most of the sites as evidenced by radiographs. Conclusions: For teeth with hopeless prognosis, this method can be considered to be a very viable alternative to extraction and replacement by costly implants.

  14. Mersilene Mesh Vs Autogenous Fascia Lata for Upper Lid Sling Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Salour

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    PURPOSE: To compare mersilene mesh and autogenous fascia lata for upper lid sling procedure in the management of ptosis with poor levator function. METHODS: This randomized clinical trial included 9 patients with unilateral and 11 patients with bilateral congenital ptosis and poor levator function. All subjects underwent upper lid sling procedure with a random choice of two different materials: mersilene mesh in 16 eyelids and autogenous fascia lata in 15 eyelids. RESULTS: Overall, 31 eyelids underwent the upper lid sling procedure. There was no difference between the two groups in terms of final functional (lid fissure height stability and cosmetic (lid margin contour results. Dermatochalasis was more common in the fascia lata group (10 eyes compared to the mersilene mesh group (2 eyes. Mersilene mesh extrusion occurred in two eyelids. CONCLUSION: Mersilene mesh has favorable long-term functional results and a low rate of complications. This material may be considered as an alternative to autogenous fascia lata for frontalis suspension surgery.

  15. A comparison of autogenous theories for the origin of eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, David A

    2015-12-01

    Eukaryotic cells have many unique features that all evolved on the stem lineage of living eukaryotes, making it difficult to reconstruct the order in which they accumulated. Nuclear endosymbiotic theories hold that three prokaryotes (nucleus, cytoplasm, and mitochondrion) came together to form a eukaryotic cell, whereas autogenous models hold that the nucleus and cytoplasm formed through evolutionary changes in a single prokaryotic lineage. Given several problems with nuclear endosymbiotic theories, this review focuses on autogenous models. Until recently all autogenous models assumed an outside-in (OI) topology, proposing that the nuclear envelope was formed from membrane-bound vesicles within the original cell body. Buzz Baum and I recently proposed an inside-out (IO) alternative, suggesting that the nucleus corresponds to the original cell body, with the cytoplasmic compartment deriving from extracellular protrusions. In this review, I show that OI and IO models are compatible with both mitochondria early (ME) or mitochondria late (ML) formulations. Whereas ME models allow that the relationship between mitochondria and host was mutualistic from the outset, ML models imply that the association began with predation or parasitism, becoming mutualistic later. In either case, the mutualistic interaction that eventually formed was probably syntrophic. Diverse features of eukaryotic cell biology align well with the IOME model, but it would be premature to rule out the OIME model. ML models require that phagocytosis, a complex and energy expensive process, evolved before mitochondria, which seems unlikely. Nonetheless, further research is needed, especially resolution of the phylogenetic affinities of mitochondria. © 2015 Botanical Society of America.

  16. Maxillary sinus floor elevation surgery with BioOss (R) mixed with a bone marrow concentrate or autogenous bone : test of principle on implant survival and clinical performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rickert, D.; Vissink, A.; Slot, Jan; Sauerbier, S.; Meijer, H. J. A.; Raghoebar, G. M.

    The purpose of this study was to assess implant survival and 1-year clinical performance of implants placed in the posterior maxilla that had been subjected to maxillary sinus floor elevation surgery with bovine bone mineral (BioOss (R)) mixed with autogenous bone marrow concentrate or autogenous

  17. Autogenous bone graft and ePTFE membrane in the treatment of peri-implantitis. II. Stereologic and histologic observations in cynomolgus monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Søren; Holmstrup, Palle; Skovgaard, Lene Theil

    2003-01-01

    autogenous bone graft; guided bone regeneration; histology; membrane; non-human primates; oral implants; osseointegration; pathalogy; peri-implantitis; stereology; treatment......autogenous bone graft; guided bone regeneration; histology; membrane; non-human primates; oral implants; osseointegration; pathalogy; peri-implantitis; stereology; treatment...

  18. Effect of Oxygen Concentration on Autogenous Ignition Temperature and Pneumatic Impact Ignitability of Nonmetallic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Extensive test data exist on the ignitability of nonmetallic materials in pure oxygen, but these characteristics are not as well understood for lesser oxygen concentrations. In this study, autogenous ignition temperature testing and pneumatic impact testing were used to better understand the effects of oxygen concentration on ignition of nonmetallic materials. Tests were performed using oxygen concentrations of 21, 34, 45, and 100 %. The following materials were tested: PTFE Teflon(Registered Trademark), Buna-N, Silicone, Zytel(Registered Trademark) 42, Viton(registered Trademark) A, and Vespel(Registered Trademark) SP-21.

  19. Histomorphometric evaluation of bone regeneration using autogenous bone and beta-tricalcium phosphate in diabetic rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živadinović Milka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The mechanism of impaired bone healing in diabetes mellitus includes different tissue and cellular level activities due to micro- and macrovascular changes. As a chronic metabolic disease with vascular complications, diabetes affects a process of bone regeneration as well. The therapeutic approach in bone regeneration is based on the use of osteoinductive autogenous grafts as well as osteoconductive synthetic material, like a β-tricalcium phosphate. The aim of the study was to determine the quality and quantity of new bone formation after the use of autogenous bone and β-tricalcium phosphate in the model of calvarial critical-sized defect in rabbits with induced diabetes mellitus type I. Methods. The study included eight 4-month-old Chincilla rabbits with alloxan-induced diabetes mellitus type I. In all animals, there were surgically created two calvarial bilateral defects (diameter 12 mm, which were grafted with autogenous bone and β-tricalcium phosphate (n = 4 or served as unfilled controls (n = 4. After 4 weeks of healing, animals were sacrificed and calvarial bone blocks were taken for histologic and histomorphometric analysis. Beside descriptive histologic evaluation, the percentage of new bone formation, connective tissue and residual graft were calculated. All parameters were statistically evaluated by Friedman Test and post hock Wilcoxon Singed Ranks Test with a significance of p < 0.05. Results. Histology revealed active new bone formation peripherally with centrally located connective tissue, newly formed woven bone and well incorporated residual grafts in all treated defects. Control samples showed no bone bridging of defects. There was a significantly more new bone in autogeonous graft (53% compared with β-tricalcium phosphate (30%, (p < 0.030 and control (7%, (p < 0.000 groups. A significant difference was also recorded between β-tricalcium phosphate and control groups (p < 0.008. Conclusion. In the present

  20. A thermal comparator sensor for measuring autogenous deformation in hardening Portland cement paste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Thomas; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a simple and accurate experimental device specially developed to measure autogenous deformation in hardening cement-based materials. The measuring system consists of a so-called thermal comparator sensor and a modular thermostatically controlled system. The operating principle...... of the thermal comparator is based on thermal expansion of aluminium. A particular characteristic of the measuring system is the fixation of the thermal comparator sensor to the deforming specimen. The modular system ensures effective thermostatic control of the hydrating cement paste samples. The technique...

  1. Autogenous shrinkage in high-performance cement paste: An evaluation of basic mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lura, Pietro; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; van Breugel, Klaas

    2003-01-01

    mechanical and thermodynamical basis. Furthermore, this mechanism is easily applicable in a numerical model when dealing with a continuously changing microstructure. In order to test the numerical model, autogenous deformation and internal relative humidity (RH) of a Portland cement paste were measured...... on the capillary tension approach. Because a part of the RH drop in the cement paste is due to dissolved salts in the pore solution, a method is suggested to separate this effect from self-desiccation and to calculate the actual stress in the pore fluid associated with menisci formation....

  2. Autogenic training for self-care and skills training among social work honours students

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    M.A. In social work, the focus is on the care for others, but the issue of self-care is neglected. There is no internship requirements for students to learn about selfcare and the consequences that a lack of self-care behaviours will have on them personally and professionally. This research study had the dual purpose of teaching social work honours students Autogenic Training (AT) as a practical method of self-care and to measure and evaluate the personal and professional value of AT for t...

  3. Treatment of Rockwood type III acromioclavicular joint dislocation using autogenous semitendinosus tendon graft and endobutton technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye G

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gang Ye, Chao-An Peng, Hua-Bin Sun, Jing Xiao, Kang Zhu Department of Orthopedics, the People’s Hospital of Huangpi District, Wuhan City, People’s Republic of China Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of autogenous semitendinosus graft and endobutton technique, and compare with hook plate in treatment of Rockwood type III acromioclavicular (AC joint dislocation.Methods: From April 2012 to April 2013, we treated 46 patients with Rockwood type III AC joint dislocation. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: Group A was treated using a hook plate and Group B with autogenous semitendinosus graft and endobutton technique. All participants were followed up for 12 months. Radiographic examinations were performed every 2 months postoperatively, and clinical evaluation was performed using the Constant–Murley score at the last follow-up.Results: Results indicated that patients in Group B showed higher mean scores (90.3±5.4 than Group A (80.4±11.5 in terms of Constant–Murley score (P=0.001. Group B patients scored higher in terms of pain (P=0.002, activities (P=0.02, range of motion (P<0.001, and strength (P=0.004. In Group A, moderate pain was reported by 2 (8.7% and mild pain by 8 (34.8% patients. Mild pain was reported by 1 (4.3% patient in Group B. All patients in Group B maintained complete reduction, while 2 (8.7% patients in Group A experienced partial reduction loss. Two patients (8.7% encountered acromial osteolysis on latest radiographs, with moderate shoulder pain and limited range of motion.Conclusion: Autogenous semitendinosus graft and endobutton technique showed better results compared with the hook plate method and exhibited advantages of fewer complications such as permanent pain and acromial osteolysis. Keywords: Rockwood type III acromioclavicular joint dislocation, autogenous semitendinosus graft, endobutton, hook plate

  4. Argus II retinal prosthesis implantation with scleral flap and autogenous temporalis fascia as alternative patch graft material: a 4-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matet, Alexandre; Amar, Nawel; Mohand-Said, Saddek; Sahel, José-Alain; Barale, Pierre-Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The Argus II retinal prosthesis is composed of an epiretinal electrode array positioned over the macula and connected to an extrascleral electronics case via a silicone cable, running through a sclerotomy. During implantation, the manufacturer recommends to cover the sclerotomy site with a patch of processed human pericardium to prevent postoperative hypotony and conjunctival erosion by the underlying electronics case. Due to biomedical regulations prohibiting the use of this material in France, we developed an alternative technique combining a scleral flap protecting the sclerotomy and an autogenous graft of superior temporalis fascia overlying the electronics case. The purpose of this study is to describe the 4-year outcomes of this modified procedure in three subjects who underwent Argus II Retinal Prosthesis System implantation. Clinical data consisting of intraocular pressure measurements and tolerance in terms of conjunctival erosion or inflammation were retrospectively assessed over a 4-year postoperative follow-up. None of the three patients implanted with the modified technique developed ocular hypotony over 4 years. A normal, transient conjunctival inflammation occurred during the first postoperative month but conjunctival erosion was not observed in any of the three patients over 4 years. Four years after implantation, the autogenous temporalis fascia graft remained well tolerated and the retinal prosthesis was functional in all three patients. The combination of an autograft of superficial temporalis fascia and a scleral flap efficiently prevented leakage through the sclerotomy site, ocular hypotony, and conjunctival erosion by the extrascleral electronics case. This modified technique is suitable for the implantation of existing and forthcoming retinal prostheses. Superficial temporalis fascia may also be used as alternative to commercial tectonic tissues for scleral wound repair in clinical settings where they are not available.

  5. MicroRNA-9 enhances sensitivity to cetuximab in epithelial phenotype hepatocellular carcinoma cells through regulation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Fei; Liang, Yuntian; Li, Zhenrong; Liu, Yanhui; Zhang, Hongwei; Wen, Yu; Yan, Lei; Tang, Qiang; Xiao, Erhui; Zhang, Dongyi

    2018-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most widespread malignant human tumors worldwide. Treatment options include radiotherapy, surgical intervention and chemotherapy; however, drug resistance is an ongoing treatment concern. In the present study, the effects of a microRNA (miR/miRNA), miR-9, on the sensitivity of HCC cell lines to the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor, cetuximab, were examined. miR-9 has been proposed to serve a role in tumorigenesis and tumor progression. In the present study, bioinformatics analyses identified the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A2 (eIF-5A-2) as a target of miR-9. The expression levels of miR-9 and eIF-5A-2 were examined by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and HCC cell lines were transfected with miR-9 mimics and inhibitors to determine the effects of the miRNA on cell proliferation and viability. The miR-9 mimic was revealed to significantly increase the sensitivity of epithelial phenotype HCC cells (Hep3B and Huh7) to cetuximab, while the miR-9 inhibitor triggered the opposite effect. There were no significant differences in sensitivity to cetuximab observed in mesenchymal phenotype HCC cells (SNU387 and SNU449). Cells lines displaying high expression levels of eIF-5A-2 were more resistant to cetuximab. Transfection of cells with a miR-9 mimic resulted in downregulation of the expression of eIF-5A-2 mRNA, while an miR-9 inhibitor increased expression. When expression of eIF-5A-2 was knocked down with siRNA, the effects of miR-9 on cetuximab sensitivity were no longer observed. Taken together, these data support a role for miR-9 in enhancing the sensitivity of epithelial phenotype HCC cells to cetuximab through regulation of eIF-5A-2.

  6. Rethinking Unconventional Translation in Neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fen-Biao; Richter, Joel D; Cleveland, Don W

    2017-11-16

    Eukaryotic translation is tightly regulated to ensure that protein production occurs at the right time and place. Recent studies on abnormal repeat proteins, especially in age-dependent neurodegenerative diseases caused by nucleotide repeat expansion, have highlighted or identified two forms of unconventional translation initiation: usage of AUG-like sites (near cognates) or repeat-associated non-AUG (RAN) translation. We discuss how repeat proteins may differ due to not just unconventional initiation, but also ribosomal frameshifting and/or imperfect repeat DNA replication, expansion, and repair, and we highlight how research on translation of repeats may uncover insights into the biology of translation and its contribution to disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. AtLa1 protein initiates IRES-dependent translation of WUSCHEL mRNA and regulates the stem cell homeostasis of Arabidopsis in response to environmental hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yuchao; Rao, Shaofei; Chang, Beibei; Wang, Xiaoshuang; Zhang, Kaidian; Hou, Xueliang; Zhu, Xueyi; Wu, Haijun; Tian, Zhaoxia; Zhao, Zhong; Yang, Chengwei; Huang, Tao

    2015-10-01

    Plant stem cells are hypersensitive to environmental hazards throughout their life cycle, but the mechanism by which plants safeguard stem cell homeostasis in response to environmental hazards is largely unknown. The homeodomain transcription factor WUSCHEL (WUS) protein maintains the stem cell pool in the shoot apical meristem of Arabidopsis. Here, we demonstrate that the translation of WUS mRNA is directed by an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) located in the 5'-untranslated region. The AtLa1 protein, an RNA-binding factor, binds to the 5'-untranslated region and initiates the IRES-dependent translation of WUS mRNA. Knockdown of AtLa1 expression represses the WUS IRES-dependent translation and leads to the arrest of growth and development. The AtLa1 protein is mainly located in the nucleoplasm. However, environmental hazards promote the nuclear-to-cytoplasmic translocation of the AtLa1 protein, which further enhances the IRES-dependent translation of WUS mRNA. Genetic evidence indicates that the WUS protein increases the tolerance of the shoot apical meristem to environmental hazards. Based on these results, we conclude that the stem cell niche in Arabidopsis copes with environmental hazards by enhancing the IRES-dependent translation of WUS mRNA under the control of the AtLa1 protein. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Evaluation and Observation of Autogenous Healing Ability of Bond Cracks along Rebar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Choonghyun; Kunieda, Minoru

    2014-04-17

    Micro cracks occurring in concrete around tensile rebar is well known latent damage phenomenon. These micro cracks develop, and can be detected after reaching the surface of the concrete. Detection of these cracks before they are fully formed is preferable, but observing the whole crack structure is difficult. Another problem is repairing micro cracks under the concrete surface. The autogenous ability of bond cracks along rebar was evaluated using the air permeability test. Air permeability coefficients were measured before and after tensile loading, and experimental air permeability coefficients became larger near cracks along rebar as a result of tensile loading. Recuring for 28 days after tensile loading made the air permeability coefficients smaller, but this restriction only occurred during water recuring. Observation of crack patterns helped the understanding of change in the air permeability coefficients. Several small cracks along rebar were observed after tensile loading, and most cracks along rebar were not found after water recuring. On the other hand, the crack pattern did not change after air recuring. These results indicate that bond cracks along rebar can be closed by autogenous healing, and cause the air permeability coefficients.

  9. Evaluation and Observation of Autogenous Healing Ability of Bond Cracks along Rebar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choonghyun Kang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Micro cracks occurring in concrete around tensile rebar is well known latent damage phenomenon. These micro cracks develop, and can be detected after reaching the surface of the concrete. Detection of these cracks before they are fully formed is preferable, but observing the whole crack structure is difficult. Another problem is repairing micro cracks under the concrete surface. The autogenous ability of bond cracks along rebar was evaluated using the air permeability test. Air permeability coefficients were measured before and after tensile loading, and experimental air permeability coefficients became larger near cracks along rebar as a result of tensile loading. Recuring for 28 days after tensile loading made the air permeability coefficients smaller, but this restriction only occurred during water recuring. Observation of crack patterns helped the understanding of change in the air permeability coefficients. Several small cracks along rebar were observed after tensile loading, and most cracks along rebar were not found after water recuring. On the other hand, the crack pattern did not change after air recuring. These results indicate that bond cracks along rebar can be closed by autogenous healing, and cause the air permeability coefficients.

  10. Simultaneous maxillary sinus lifting and implant placement with autogenous parietal bone graft: outcome of 17 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakka, Salah; Krenkel, Christian

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the surgical technique of sinus floor elevation with autogenous parietal bone grafting in conjunction with immediate dental implants for the reconstruction of the maxilla in deficient maxillary alveolar ridges. Seventeen patients who underwent sinus floor elevation with bone graft from the parietal bone between 2005 and 2007 were included in the study. Cases of extremely deficient bone level in the alveolar ridgeAnkylos®) with different length and diameter were placed immediately after the graft was placed. Strict oral hygiene was required for the patients. Presurgical and postsurgical panoramic radiographs were taken. A high-quality reconstruction with an increase in lifted sinus bone height was achieved with parietal bone particulates. Seventy-three implants were clinically osseointegrated and four implants were lost giving a success rate 94.8%. No correlation was found between failure and the surgery. The encouraging results of this study suggest that the technique of reconstruction of the sinus floor and the resorbed alveolar ridge using an autogenous parietal bone graft is reliable, giving the surgeon the opportunity to successfully perform immediate implant placement in more difficult and deficient maxillary alveolar bone height. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Comparative study of two autogenous graft techniques using piezosurgery for sinus lifting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo Filho, Geraldo Prestes de; Corrêa, Luciana; Costa, Claudio; Pannuti, Claudio Mendes; Schmelzeisen, Rainer; Luz, João Gualberto de Cerqueira

    2010-12-01

    Maxillary sinus lifting is a technique, in which, a possible complication is sinus membrane perforation. The aim of this study was to compare two techniques using ultrasound surgery to perform autogenous graft for maxillary sinus lifting. Ten rabbits were used in the study, one of them did not undergo surgery. The other nine rabbits had their maxillary sinuses filled with autogenous bone grafts collected from the external skull diploe in particulate form on the right side, and shaved on the left side, both with ultrasonic device. Data on bone density in left and right maxillary sinus, obtained by computed tomography in transverse and longitudinal sections, recorded 90 days after the grafts, were statistically compared. There were no statistically significant differences between the two techniques that used shaved and particulate bone collected by means of ultrasonic device from rabbit skulls. Assessment of operative procedures led to the conclusion that piezoelectric ultrasound was shown to be a safe tool in the surgical approach to the maxillary sinus of rabbits, allowing sinus membrane integrity to be maintained during surgical procedures.

  12. Evaluation of autogenous tooth transplantation for replacement of the missing or unrestorable mandibular molar tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahiduj Jaman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to evaluate the functional and occlusal stability of autogenous tooth transplantation. A total of 30 patients were included. Among them, 21 participants received transplanted first molar and the remaining 9 received transplanted second molar. In all the cases, donor tooth were third molar. In each participant, extraction of un-restorable first or second molar tooth was performed which was then replaced by atrumatic extracted third molar tooth. Each third molar tooth was placed in the recipient extracted socket, followed by the evaluation of the occlusion and then stabilized with arch bar and ligature wire. Clinical follow-up evaluation was performed at 15 days, 3 and 12 months in respect to occlusal stability, tooth mobility and periodontal status. It was found that 23 transplanted tooth were successful and the remaining 7 tooth need long-term observation for the final outcome, which was statistically significant. It can be concluded that the autogenous tooth transplantation can replace missing tooth to ensure the preservation of function, aesthetic and to prevent bone resorption of the missing area of the jaw, which can lead to exceptional esthetic and functional outcome.

  13. One Gene and Two Proteins: a Leaderless mRNA Supports the Translation of a Shorter Form of the Shigella VirF Regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Letizia Di Martino

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available VirF, an AraC-like activator, is required to trigger a regulatory cascade that initiates the invasive program of Shigella spp., the etiological agents of bacillary dysentery in humans. VirF expression is activated upon entry into the host and depends on many environmental signals. Here, we show that the virF mRNA is translated into two proteins, the major form, VirF30 (30 kDa, and the shorter VirF21 (21 kDa, lacking the N-terminal segment. By site-specific mutagenesis and toeprint analysis, we identified the translation start sites of VirF30 and VirF21 and showed that the two different forms of VirF arise from differential translation. Interestingly, in vitro and in vivo translation experiments showed that VirF21 is also translated from a leaderless mRNA (llmRNA whose 5′ end is at position +309/+310, only 1 or 2 nucleotides upstream of the ATG84 start codon of VirF21. The llmRNA is transcribed from a gene-internal promoter, which we identified here. Functional analysis revealed that while VirF30 is responsible for activation of the virulence system, VirF21 negatively autoregulates virF expression itself. Since VirF21 modulates the intracellular VirF levels, this suggests that transcription of the llmRNA might occur when the onset of the virulence program is not required. We speculate that environmental cues, like stress conditions, may promote changes in virF mRNA transcription and preferential translation of llmRNA.

  14. The phylogeny of C/S1 bZIP transcription factors reveals a shared algal ancestry and the pre-angiosperm translational regulation of S1 transcripts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peviani, Alessia; Lastdrager, Jeroen; Hanson, Johannes; Snel, Berend

    2016-01-01

    Basic leucine zippers (bZIPs) form a large plant transcription factor family. C and S1 bZIP groups can heterodimerize, fulfilling crucial roles in seed development and stress response. S1 sequences also harbor a unique regulatory mechanism, termed Sucrose-Induced Repression of Translation (SIRT).

  15. Morphological variation and habitat modification are strongly correlated for the autogenic ecosystem engineer Spartina anglica (common cordgrass)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulzen, J.B.; Van Soelen, J.; Bouma, T.J.

    2007-01-01

    We explored to what extent morphological variation and habitat modification are correlated for an autogenic ecosystem engineer, which is an organism that modifies its habitat via its own physical structures. The intertidal salt marsh species Spartina anglica is well known for its capacity to enhance

  16. Influence of Cement Particle-Size Distribution on Early Age Autogenous Strains and Stresses in Cement-Based Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentz, Dale P.; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2001-01-01

    The influence of cement particle-size distribution on autogenous strains and stresses in cement pastes of identical water-to-cement ratios is examined for cement powders of four different finenesses. Experimental measurements include chemical shrinkage, to quantify degree of hydration; internal r...

  17. Severe bovine papillomatosis: detection of bovine papillomavirus in tumour tissue and efficacy of treatment using autogenous vaccine and parammunity inducer

    OpenAIRE

    Turk, Nenad; Župančić, Željko; Starešina, Vilim; Kovač, Snježana; Babić, Tomislav; Kreszinger, Mario; Ćurić, Stipica; Barbić, Ljubo; Milas, Zoran

    2005-01-01

    Two cases of severe bovine papillomatosis occurred in northwest Croatia during 2000 are described. Diagnosis was based on presented clinical signs, histopathological findings, and detection of the papillomavirus by transmission electron microscopy. Animals successfully recovered following treatment with the autogenous (non-purified) vaccine and a parammunity inducer. For the first time in Croatia we report the detection of papillomavirus by electron microscopy.

  18. Bone healing around nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite, deproteinized bovine bone mineral, biphasic calcium phosphate, and autogenous bone in mandibular bone defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broggini, Nina; Bosshardt, Dieter D; Jensen, Simon S

    2015-01-01

    with nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (HA-SiO), deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM), biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) with a 60/40% HA/β-TCP (BCP 60/40) ratio, or particulate autogenous bone (A) for histological and histomorphometric analysis. At 2 weeks, percent filler amongst the test groups (DBBM (35.65%), HA...

  19. Total Upper Eyelid Reconstruction with Modified Cutler-Beard Procedure Using Autogenous Auricular Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Salil Kumar; Fleming, James Christian; Reddy, Shilpa Gillella; Fowler, Brian T

    2016-08-01

    Malignant tumour in upper lid is a surgical challenge to oculoplastic surgeon. Full thickness defect created after removal of large tumour promptly treated with modified cutler beard procedure using autogenous auricular cartilage. Surgical procedure is two staged: In first stage, removal of the tumour followed by full thickness flap repaired; In second stage, opening the closed lid with lid margin repair. Post-operatively, there is good anatomical, functional and cosmetic restoration of the eyelid similar to the other eye. To evaluate the efficacy of the modified Cutler-Beard procedure using autogenous ear cartilage for tarsal plate reconstruction in the repair of 70-100% upper eyelid defects. This is a prospective, interventional case series of 16 patients over a period of three years. Patients with upper eyelid defects, secondary to removal of tumour, greater than or equal to 70% were included. Of these patients, those with lymph node involvement, distant metastasis, lower eyelid involvement, corneal infiltration or intra-orbital extension were excluded. FNAC was done in all the cases. Created defect was measured in mm (length and width) and later expressed in percentage. Pre and Post-operative measurement of Levator Palpebrae Superioris (LPS) was done. Pre and Post-operative measurement of Margin to Reflex Distance (MRD1) were also noted. Upper eyelid recreation was successful in all patients without complications. Pre-operative LPS action ranged from 0-4 mm, while post-operative LPS action was 12-14 mm. Pre-operative MRD1 ranged from -4 millimeters to -1 mm, while post-operative MRD1 was +3 to +4 millimeters. The follow-up period ranged from six months to two years. Every patient had a successful upper eyelid reconstruction. The modified Cutler-Beard procedure using an autogenous auricular cartilage graft is an effective procedure for repair of large upper eyelid defects, with acceptable functional and cosmetic results. Furthermore, it is particularly useful in

  20. Sonic Hedgehog-GLI Family Zinc Finger 1 Signaling Pathway Promotes the Growth and Migration of Pancreatic Cancer Cells by Regulating the Transcription of Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 5A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xuanfu; Liu, Hua; Zhang, Hui; Dai, Weiqi; Guo, Chuanyong; Xie, Chuangao; Wei, Shumei; He, Shengli; Xu, Xiaorong

    2015-11-01

    The Hh (hedgehog) signaling pathway is still waiting for further studies because its downstream molecular mechanism remains elusive. Because EIF5A2 (eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A2) gene was up-regulated upon Gli1 (GLI family zinc finger 1) in pancreatic cancer (PC) cells, we speculated that this pathway might promote tumor progression through regulating EIF5A2. We investigated regulation effect of Hh signaling pathway to EIF5A2 gene transcription by Gli1 knockdown or overexpression in PC cell lines first. Then, the regulation mechanism of Gli1 to EIF5A2 gene was studied at transcription level. Finally, we studied cancer-promoting effects of Gli1-dependent EIF5A2 in PC cells. The data showed that Gli1 up-regulated expression of EIF5A2 by promoting transcription via cis-acting elements in PC cells. Moreover, vimentin gene was up-regulated significantly by sonic hedgehog (SHh)/Gli1 expression increasing, and E-cadherin was significantly reduced. The EIF5A2 knockdown partially reversed cell proliferation and migration induced by artificial SHh overexpression and inhibited epithelial mesenchymal transition process in PC cells with SHh overexpression (P cells. Thus, EIF5A2 oncogene effect could be incorporated into cancer-promoting molecular network upon Hh signaling pathway.

  1. Autogenous vaccination for control of yersiniosis (Yersiniosis salmonis in the salmonid aquaculture in Republic of Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvetkovik Aleksandar

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to produce an autogenous vaccine from Yersinia ruckeri isolate and to test it’s efficacy in field conditions. Colonies of Yersinia ruckeri biotype I isolated from rainbow trout with haemorrhagic septicemia were cultivated in TSB and inactivated with formalin. The vaccine was diluted and administered by immersion of rainbow trout fry (~ 4.5 g BW in the vacinal suspension. The experimental infection was done 28 days post vaccination by immersing the fry in infectious suspension of the same isolate. Mortality of the control and vaccinated fish was 87% and 11%, respectively. Vaccinated fish showed high level of gained specific resistance to the infection (RPS 87,4%.

  2. [Self-relaxation techniques for glaucoma patients. Significance of autogenic training, hypnosis and music therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelmann, T; Strempel, I

    2016-02-01

    Glaucoma is currently the second most common cause of severe visual impairment and blindness worldwide. Standard pharmaceutical and surgical interventions often fail to prevent progression of glaucomatous optic neuropathy. To evaluate whether adjuvantly applied self-relaxation techniques can significantly impact intraocular pressure, ocular perfusion and the overall mental state of affected patients. A search of the literature was carried out and a comprehensive overview of currently available data is presented. Autogenic training, hypnosis and music therapy can significantly impact intraocular pressure, ocular perfusion and overall mental state of patients suffering from glaucoma. As all of these adjuvant therapeutic options are cost-effective, available almost everywhere and at anytime as well as without any known side effects, they can be useful additional techniques in the overall concept for treating glaucoma patients. Regular ocular examinations by an ophthalmologist are, however, mandatory.

  3. Measurement with corrugated tubes of early-age autogenous shrinkage of cement-based material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Qian; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2009-01-01

    The use of a special corrugated mould enables transformation of volume strain into horizontal, linear strain measurement in the fluid stage. This allows continuous measurement of the autogenous shrinkage of cement-based materials since casting, and also effectively eliminates unwanted influence...... on the measuring results from gravity, temperature variation and mould restraint. In this paper the principle of the corrugated tube measurement is described. A systematic study was carried out on the influence on the measuring results of the material properties, size effects and encapsulated air in the corrugated...... tube. The experimental results show that there is a minor influence on the measuring results of the stiffness and size of the plastic tube as well as of the encapsulated air. However, the influence decreases with the hardening process and becomes negligible a few hours after final set....

  4. Autogenic-feedback training: A preventive method for space adaptation syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowings, Patricia S.; Sharp, Joseph C.; Toscano, William B.; Kamiya, Joe; Miller, Neal E.

    1987-01-01

    The progress made to date on the reduction of data for Spacelab 3 Shuttle experiment, No. 3AFT23 is reported. Four astronauts participated as subjects in this experiment. Crewmen A and B served as treatment subjects (i.e., received preflight training for control of their own motion sickness symptoms) and Crewmen C and D served as control (i.e., did not receive training). A preliminary evaluation of Autogenic Feedback Training (AFT) was made from visual inspections of graphs that were generated from the preflight and inflight and inflight physiological data which included: (1) Baseline rotating chair tests for all crewmen; (2) Posttraining rotating chair tests of treatment groups subjects; (3) Preflight data from Joint Integrated Simulations for all crewmen; and (4) Flight data for all crewmen during mission days 0 through 4, and mission day 6 for treatment subjects only. A summary of the findings suggested by these data is outlined.

  5. Autogenic feedback training experiment: A preventative method for space motion sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowings, Patricia S.

    1993-01-01

    Space motion sickness is a disorder which produces symptoms similar to those of motion sickness on Earth. This syndrome has affected approximately 50 percent of all astronauts and cosmonauts exposed to microgravity in space, but it differs from what is commonly known as motion sickness in a number of critical ways. There is currently no ground-based method for predicting susceptibility to motion sickness in space. Antimotion sickness drugs have had limited success in preventing or counteracting symptoms in space, and frequently caused debilitating side effects. The objectives were: (1) to evaluate the effectiveness of Autogenic-Feedback Training as a countermeasure for space motion sickness; (2) to compare physiological data and in-flight symptom reports to ground-based motion sickness data; and (3) to predict susceptibility to space motion sickness based on pre-flight data of each treatment group crew member.

  6. Effects of diet breadth on autogenous chemical defense of a generalist grasshopper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C G; Hess, T A; Whitman, D W; Silk, P J; Blum, M S

    1987-02-01

    The lubber grasshopper,Romalea guttata, produces a metathoracic defensive secretion containing primarily phenolics and quinones. This insect feeds on a wide range of plant species. Insects reared on an artificial diet and a diet of onion,Allium canadense, had secretions that contained fewer compounds, lower concentrations of compounds, and markedly altered relative composition of components compared to insects reared on a varied diet of 26 plant species that included onion. The study demonstrates that diet breadth has a major effect on the quality and quantity of the autogenous defensive secretion of this generalist herbivore. The results are compared to diet effects known in chemically defended specialists. Two possible mechanisms explaining the effects of diet breadth are proposed: one involves changes in precursor availability with changing diet breadth; the other suggests that physiological stress due to diet restriction changes allocation of resources to chemical defense.

  7. Effect of Cement Type on Autogenous Deformation of Cement-Based Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pietro, Lura; Ye, Guang; van Breugel, Klaas

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, measurements of non-evaporable water content, chemical shrinkage, autogenous deformation, internal relative humidity (RH), pore solution composition, and early-age elastic modulus are presented and discussed. All experiments were performed on Portland cement and blast-furnace slag...... (BFS) cement pastes. Self-desiccation shrinkage of the BFS cement paste was modeled based on the RH measurements, following the capillary-tension approach. The main findings of this study are: 1) self-desiccation shrinkage can be related to self-desiccation both for Portland and for BFS cement pastes......, taking into account the influence of the dissolved salts in the pore solution, 2) the BFS cement paste studied shows pronounced self-desiccation and self-desiccation shrinkage, mainly caused by its very fine pore structure....

  8. Unprotected autogenous bone block grafts in anterior maxilla: Resorption rates and clinical outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosanić Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The use of autogenous bone grafts for augmentation of the resorbed alveolar ridge is still considered the gold standard in implant dentistry. The aim of this study was to analyze the resorption rate of autogenous bone block grafts from the retromolar region placed in the frontal segment of the upper jaw unprotected by barrier membranes, to assess the stability of implants placed into the grafted bone, as well as to monitor its changes during the healing period. Methods. The study included 18 patients with a total of 20 grafted sites. The residual alveolar ridge was measured before and after the augmentation and prior to implant placement. All implants were restored with provisional crowns within 48 hours after the placement. Implant stability was assessed using resonance frequency analysis. Results. The average period from ridge augmentation to reentry was 5.4 months (range 4–6 months. At reentry the healed alveolar ridge had a mean width of 6.1 ± 1.27 mm. The mean calculated width gain was 3.04 ± 1.22 mm. The overall surface resorption of block grafts was 0.68 ± 0.69 mm (18.85%. At the time of implant placement the mean value of implant stability quotient (ISQ was 71.25 ± 5.77. The lowest ISQ values were noted after three weeks of healing, followed by a gradual increase until week 12. After 12 weeks implants showed significantly higher ISQ values compared to primary stability (p < 0.05 Wilcoxon signed ranks test. During the 3-years followup period no cases of implant loss were recorded. Conclusion. Despite a significant resorption of bone grafts, it was possible to place implants in all the cases and to use the immediate loading protocol without affecting implant survival rate. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no.175021

  9. Endovascular Treatment of Autogenous Radiocephalic Fistulas with the 'Eighth Note' Deformity for Hemodialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng Meijui; Chen, Matt Chiung-Yu; Chi Wenche; Liu Yichun; Chien Kofen; Liang Hueilung; Pan, Huay-Ben

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a unique 'eighth note' deformity of the autogenous radiocephalic fistula for hemodialysis and to retrospectively evaluate the efficacy and safety of its endovascular treatment. Over 3 years, a total of 808 patients and 558 autogenous radiocephalic fistulas were treated for vascular access dysfunction or thrombosis. These included 14 fistulas in 14 patients (9 men, 5 women; mean age, 58.2 ± 2.8 years; range 27-79 years) whose fistulograms before treatment resembled a musical note, the eighth note. Endovascular treatment sought to remodel the deformed vascular access to a classic radiocephalic fistula and increase the number of cannulation sites available for hemodialysis. The technical and clinical success rates were each 92.8% (13/14). Fistula remodeling was successful in 13 patients. The postintervention primary patency was 100% at 90 days, 91.7 ± 0.8% at 120 days, 78.6 ± 13.9% at 180 days, 62.9 ± 17.9% at 360 days, 31.4 ± 24.0% at 540 days, and 0% at 720 days. The postintervention secondary patency was 100% at 90 days, 100% at 120 days, 100% at 180 days, 85.7 ± 13.2% at 360 days, and 85.7 ± 13.2% at 720 days. No major complications were noted. Minor complications were found in 71.4% of patients, all of which resolved spontaneously. In conclusion, endovascular treatment of fistulas with the eighth note deformity can effectively increase the number of available cannulation sites, facilitate fistula maturation, and facilitate thromboaspiration after fistula thrombosis.

  10. Operational Risk, Translation, and Globalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Czarniawska

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares a translation of a global (more specifically, European regulation into two local contexts, setting this process in a broader context of the all-pervading risk management. The two countries are Sweden and Poland, both relatively untouched by the current financial crisis, and the regulation is Basel II Accord. In both countries, the translation is shaped by the past history, and the present circumstances. The results show that, in spite of local differences, there is a common belief in quantification of risks as the main remedy and therefore the main way of managing them. Abstract and vague formulations, combined with sophisticated calculation techniques, win over the complications of actual practices. The role of researchers in this process is also examined. A study illustrates also the advantages of translation theory versus diffusion theory of spreading of ideas.

  11. Mapping Translation Technology Research in Translation Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjoldager, Anne; Christensen, Tina Paulsen; Flanagan, Marian

    2017-01-01

    technology research as a subdiscipline of TS, and we define and discuss some basic concepts and models of the field that we use in the rest of the paper. Based on a small-scale study of papers published in TS journals between 2006 and 2016, Section 3 attempts to map relevant developments of translation......Due to the growing uptake of translation technology in the language industry and its documented impact on the translation profession, translation students and scholars need in-depth and empirically founded knowledge of the nature and influences of translation technology (e.g. Christensen....../Schjoldager 2010, 2011; Christensen 2011). Unfortunately, the increasing professional use of translation technology has not been mirrored within translation studies (TS) by a similar increase in research projects on translation technology (Munday 2009: 15; O’Hagan 2013; Doherty 2016: 952). The current thematic...

  12. Avian and mammalian receptors for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D/sub 3/: in vitro translation to characterize size and hormone-dependent regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangelsdorf, D.J.; Pike, J.W.; Haussler, M.R.

    1987-01-01

    In vitro translation of cellular poly(A)/sup +/ RNA coupled with immunoprecipitation was developed as a technique for characterizing 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D/sub 3/ (1,25-(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/) receptors and assessing receptor mRNA activity. Cell-free translation of poly(A)/sup +/ RNA isolated from chicken intestine revealed two immunoprecipitable forms of avian receptor at 60 kDa and 58 kDa. 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/ receptors were also synthesized in vitro employing poly(A)/sup +/ RNA obtained from several cultured mammalian cell lines. Selective immunoprecipitation revealed a single form of receptor at 54 kDa in mouse fibroblasts (3T6) and pig kidney cells (LLC-PK/sub 1/) and a 52-kDa species in human breast carcinoma (T47D). Each of these in vitro translated mammalian 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/ receptors migrated identically with its cellular counterpart that was synthesized in vivo employing metabolic labeling of cell protein with (/sup 35/S)methionine. These results are consistent with the conclusions that 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/ receptors are protein species ranging from 52 to 60 kDa and that, though their functional and immunological domains have been evolutionarily conserved, an inverse relationship apparently exists between phylogenetic status and receptor mass. The data also support the hypothesis that the presence of 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/ leads to a significant increase in receptor mRNA activity in 3T6 cells, indicative of receptor autoregulation.

  13. Canine investigation of rhBMP-2, autogenous bone graft, and rhBMP-2 with autogenous bone graft for the healing of a large segmental tibial defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Andrew S; Reveal, Greg; Scheid, D Kevin; Kaehr, David M; Maar, Dean; Watts, Melanie; Stone, Marcus B

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of bone morphogenetic protein, bone morphogenetic protein with autogenous bone graft (ABG), and ABG alone on the healing of a large bone defect in the canine tibia. Fifteen 45- to 55-lb canines were randomly assigned to 1 of 5 treatment groups, 3 per group. The groups included (1) recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP-2, 0.43 mg/mL)/absorbable collagen sponge (ACS) + collagen/ceramic matrix (CCM), (2) rhBMP-2 (0.22 mg/mL) ACS + CCM, (3) rhBMP-2 (0.43 mg/mL) ACS + ABG, (4) rhBMP-2 (0.22 mg/mL) ACS + ABG, and (5) ABG alone. A 5-mL defect was created in the right tibia and fixed with a 4.5 mm locking plate and 1 of the grafts described above implanted. X-rays were taken biweekly for 12 weeks and evaluated for radiographic union. Representative histology was also examined. All defects treated with rhBMP-2 (any combination) healed at 6.0 +/- 0.9 weeks. None of the ABG alone-treated defects were healed at 12 weeks. Dogs receiving rhBMP-2/ACS + CCM healed at 5.7 +/- 0.8 weeks, whereas rhBMP-2/ACS + ABG defects healed at 6.3 +/- 0.8 weeks. Histology showed healing consistent with 12-week radiologic results. Large segmental defects in canine tibiae can be effectively healed with stable fixation and rhBMP-2/ACS + ABG or CCM. These conclusions may offer insight into the clinical treatment of segmental defect nonunions in the human.

  14. Translation Theory and Translation Studies in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qin

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation is a comparative study of "translation theory" and "translation studies" in China and the West. Its focus is to investigate whether there is translation theory in the Chinese tradition. My study begins with an examination of the debate in China over whether there has already existed a system of translation…

  15. Synaptic Plasticity and Translation Initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klann, Eric; Antion, Marcia D.; Banko, Jessica L.; Hou, Lingfei

    2004-01-01

    It is widely accepted that protein synthesis, including local protein synthesis at synapses, is required for several forms of synaptic plasticity. Local protein synthesis enables synapses to control synaptic strength independent of the cell body via rapid protein production from pre-existing mRNA. Therefore, regulation of translation initiation is…

  16. Evaluation of “Autogenous Bioengineered Injectable PRF – Tooth graft” combination (ABIT) in reconstruction of maxillary alveolar ridge defects: CBCT volumetric analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Melek, Lydia Nabil; El Said, Marwan M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Extracted human teeth were suggested as a source for autogenous bone grafts, especially that they have similar chemical composition to bone. In order to accelerate healing of bone graft over the bony defect, numerous techniques utilizing platelet and fibrinogen concentrations have been introduced in the literature. Objectives: To evaluate clinically and radiographically the use of autogenous tooth bone graft material in combination with injectable platelet-rich fibrin for reconstr...

  17. Computed tomography evaluation of autogenous graft in sinus lift surgery; Analise por tomografia computadorizada do enxerto autogeno na cirurgia de 'sinus lift'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajzen, Sergio Aron; Moscatiello, Rafael Andrade; Lima, Aida Maria Custodio de; Moscatiello, Vitoria Aparecida Muglia; Helio Kiitiro Yamashita [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem; Mosacatiello, Rafael Muglia; Nishiguchi, Celso Itiro [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Disciplina de Tecnica Operatoria e Cirurgia Experimental; Alves, Maria Teresa de Seixas [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Disciplina de Anatomia Patologica

    2001-02-01

    The objective was to quantify bone formation within autogenous bone grafts and autogenous bone grafts in combination with platelet-rich plasma obtained either from apheresis or centrifugation using computed tomography. This prospective, double-blind study was conducted in 34 male and female adult patients (mean age of 28 years and 8 months), with either unilateral or bilateral pneumatization of the maxillary sinuses, requiring bone graft for dental implant. All patients were submitted to computed tomography examinations prior and six months after sinus lift surgery. Fifty-three maxillary sinuses were operated and divided into three distinct groups: autogenous bone graft, autogenous bone graft in combination with platelet-rich plasma obtained by centrifugation, and autogenous bone graft in combination with platelet-rich plasma obtained by apheresis. The results showed that computed tomography demonstrated bone growth in height and width between the initial and the follow-up computed tomography scans in all three groups. However, no statistical difference was found either for bone height or width. It was concluded that clinical evidence demonstrates the effectiveness of autogenous bone grafts, particularly when used in combination with bone growth factors such as platelet-rich plasma, which allow prosthetic and functional restoration of maxillofacial structures through fixation of dental implants. (author)

  18. Translational Repression in Malaria Sporozoites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turque, Oliver; Tsao, Tiffany; Li, Thomas; Zhang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a mosquito-borne infectious disease of humans and other animals. It is caused by the parasitic protozoan, Plasmodium. Sporozoites, the infectious form of malaria parasites, are quiescent when they remain in the salivary glands of the Anopheles mosquito until transmission into a mammalian host. Metamorphosis of the dormant sporozoite to its active form in the liver stage requires transcriptional and translational regulations. Here, we summarize recent advances in the translational repression of gene expression in the malaria sporozoite. In sporozoites, many mRNAs that are required for liver stage development are translationally repressed. Phosphorylation of eukaryotic Initiation Factor 2α (eIF2α) leads to a global translational repression in sporozoites. The eIF2α kinase, known as Upregulated in Infectious Sporozoite 1 (UIS1), is dominant in the sporozoite. The eIF2α phosphatase, UIS2, is translationally repressed by the Pumilio protein Puf2. This translational repression is alleviated when sporozoites are delivered into the mammalian host. PMID:28357358

  19. Translational repression in malaria sporozoites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Turque

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a mosquito-borne infectious disease of humans and other animals. It is caused by the parasitic protozoan, Plasmodium. Sporozoites, the infectious form of malaria parasites, are quiescent when they remain in the salivary glands of the Anopheles mosquito until transmission into a mammalian host. Metamorphosis of the dormant sporozoite to its active form in the liver stage requires transcriptional and translational regulations. Here, we summarize recent advances in the translational repression of gene expression in the malaria sporozoite. In sporozoites, many mRNAs that are required for liver stage development are translationally repressed. Phosphorylation of eukaryotic Initiation Factor 2α (eIF2α leads to a global translational repression in sporozoites. The eIF2α kinase, known as Upregulated in Infectious Sporozoite 1 (UIS1, is dominant in the sporozoite. The eIF2α phosphatase, UIS2, is translationally repressed by the Pumilio protein Puf2. This translational repression is alleviated when sporozoites are delivered into the mammalian host.

  20. The effect of butyric acid with autogenous omental graft on healing of experimental Achilles tendon injury in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahani, S; Moslemi, H R; Dehghan, M M; Sedaghat, R; Mazaheri Nezhad, R; Rezaee Moghaddam, D

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the role of local injection of butyric acid (BA) with autogenous omental graft was evaluated in healing of experimental Achilles tendon injury in rabbits. Nine adult male New Zealand rabbits were anesthetized and a partial thickness tenotomy was created on both hindlimbs. In treated group, omental graft was secured in place using BA soaked polygalactin 910 suture. In control group, the graft was sutured without BA. Butyric acid and normal saline were injected daily to treatment and control groups for three days, respectively. Based on the findings, on day 15 after injury, the tendon sections showed that healing rate in BA treated group was higher than that in control group. Furthermore, at days 28 and 45, comparison between BA treated and control groups demonstrated that BA increased the healing rate but with no significance. In summary, results of this study show that application of BA with autogenous omental graft can improve healing process of damaged Achilles tendon.

  1. Various autogenous fresh demineralized tooth forms for alveolar socket preservation in anterior tooth extraction sites: a series of 4 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Suk; Lee, In-Kyung; Kang, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Eun-Young

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical relevance of autogenous fresh demineralized tooth (Auto-FDT) prepared at chairside immediately after extraction for socket preservation. Teeth were processed to graft materials in block, chip, or powder types immediately after extraction. Extraction sockets were filled with these materials and dental implants were installed immediately or after a delay. A panoramic radiograph and a conebeam CT were taken. In two cases, tissue samples were taken for histologic examination. Vertical and horizontal maintenance of alveolar sockets showed some variance depending on the Auto-FDT and barrier membrane types used. Radiographs showed good bony healing. Histologic sections showed that it guided good new bone formation and resorption pattern of the Auto-FDT. This case series shows that Auto-FDT prepared at chairside could be a good material for the preservation of extraction sockets. This study will suggest the possibility of recycling autogenous tooth after immediate extraction.

  2. Hard and Soft Tissue Management of a Localized Alveolar Ridge Atrophy with Autogenous Sources and Biomaterials: A Challenging Clinical Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Maiorana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Particularly in the premaxillary area, the stability of hard and soft tissues plays a pivotal role in the success of the rehabilitation from both a functional and aesthetic aspect. The present case report describes the clinical management of a localized alveolar ridge atrophy in the area of the upper right canine associated with a thin gingival biotype with a lack of keratinized tissue. An autogenous bone block harvested from the chin associated with heterologous bone particles was used to replace the missing bone, allowing for a prosthetic driven implant placement. Soft tissues deficiency was corrected by means of a combined epithelialized and subepithelial connective tissue graft. The 3-year clinical and radiological follow-up demonstrated symmetric gingival levels of the upper canines, with physiological peri-implant probing depths and bone loss. Thus, the use of autogenous tissues combined with biomaterials might be considered a reliable technique in case of highly aesthetic demanding cases.

  3. Comparative studies on the biology and filarial susceptibility of selected blood-feeding and autogenous Aedes togoi sub-colonies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuluck Junkum

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Blood-feeding and autogenous sub-colonies were selected from a laboratory, stock colony of Aedes togoi, which was originally collected from Koh Nom Sao, Chanthaburi province, Southeast Thailand. Comparative biology and filarial susceptibility between the two sub-colonies (blood-feeding: F11, F13; autogeny: F38, F40 were investigated to evaluate their viability and vectorial capacity. The results of comparison on biology revealed intraspecific differences, i.e., the average egg deposition/gravid female (F11/F38; F13/F40, embryonation rate (F13/F40, hatchability rate (F11/F38; F13/F40, egg width (F11/F38, wing length of females (F13/F40, and wing length and width of males (F11/F38 in the blood-feeding sub-colony were significantly greater than that in the autogenous sub-colony; and egg length (F11/F38 and width (F13/F40, and mean longevity of adult females (F11/F38 and males (F13/F40 in the blood-feeding sub-colony were significantly less than that in the autogenous sub-colony. The results of comparison on filarial susceptibility demonstrated that both sub-colonies yielded similar susceptibilities to Brugia malayi [blood-feeding/autogeny = 56.7% (F11/53.3%(F38, 60%(F13/83.3%(F40] and Dirofilaria immitis [blood-feeding/autogeny = 85.7%(F11/75%(F38, 45%(F13/29.4%(F40], suggesting autogenous Ae. togoi sub-colony was an efficient laboratory vector in study of filariasis.

  4. Hard and Soft Tissue Management of a Localized Alveolar Ridge Atrophy with Autogenous Sources and Biomaterials: A Challenging Clinical Case

    OpenAIRE

    C. Maiorana; D. Andreoni; P. P. Poli

    2016-01-01

    Particularly in the premaxillary area, the stability of hard and soft tissues plays a pivotal role in the success of the rehabilitation from both a functional and aesthetic aspect. The present case report describes the clinical management of a localized alveolar ridge atrophy in the area of the upper right canine associated with a thin gingival biotype with a lack of keratinized tissue. An autogenous bone block harvested from the chin associated with heterologous bone particles was used to re...

  5. Autogenic influence on the morphology of submarine fans: an approach from 3D physical modelling of turbidity currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Fick

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Autogenic controls have significant influence on deep-water fans and depositional lobes morphology. In this work, we aim to investigate autogenic controls on the topography and geometry of deep-water fans. The influence of the sediment concentration of turbidity currents on deep-water fans morphology was also investigated. From the repeatability of 3D physical modeling of turbidity currents, two series of ten experiments were made, one of high-density turbidity currents (HDTC and another of low-density turbidity currents (LDTC. All other input parameters (discharge, sediment volumetric concentration and grain size median were kept constant. Each deposit was analyzed from qualitative and quantitative approaches and statistical analysis. In each experimental series, the variability of the morphological parameters (length, width, L/W ratio, centroid, area, topography of the simulated deep-water fans was observed. Depositional evolution of the HDTC fans was more complex, showing four evolutionary steps and characterized by the self-channelizing of the turbidity current, while LDTC fans neither present self-channelizing, nor evolutionary steps. High disparities on the geometrical parameters of the fans, as characterized by the elevated relative standard deviation, suggest that autogenic controls induced a stochastic morphological behaviour on the simulated fans of the two experimental series.

  6. Endodontic Treatment of an Autogenous Transplanted Tooth Using an Er,Cr:YSGG Laser and Radial Firing Tips: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Miguel Rodrigues; Lima, Rita C; Pina-Vaz, Irene; Carvalho, Manuel Fontes; Gutknecht, Norbert

    2016-10-01

    Although several surgical techniques have been reported, no study has yet reported alternative strategies for endodontic treatment of autogenous transplanted teeth. Therefore, the aim of this clinical report is to present the long-term endodontic outcome of a nonvital autogenously transplanted third molar treated with an Er,Cr:YSGG laser and radial firing tips (RFTs). Autogenous tooth transplantation can be considered an alternative to restore edentulous areas and, in donor's teeth with complete root formation, root canal treatment should be performed up to 14 days following transplantation. In the present case report, the patient returned only after 6 months, with clinical and radiological signs of apical periodontitis (AP) associated with the transplanted tooth. Instead of traditional endodontic chemical irrigants or medications, the protocol for smear-layer removal and root canal disinfection was based on intracanal irradiation with an Er,Cr:YSGG laser and RFTs. After 3-years' follow-up, the complete reestablishment of the periodontal ligament and the arrest of the resorptive process could be noticed. This protocol has shown to be effective for the endodontic treatment of a transplanted multi-rooted tooth with AP. Further randomized clinical trials should be conducted to clearly demonstrate the effectiveness of this laser-assisted endodontic protocol.

  7. Effect of autogenic training on cardiac autonomic nervous activity in high-risk fire service workers for posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, Satoko; Fujita, Masatoshi; Sakamoto, Satoko; Shirakawa, Taro

    2006-05-01

    We investigated the effect of autogenic training (AT) on cardiac autonomic nervous activity in fire services workers with the use of the questionnaire of the Japanese-language version of Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R-J) and indexes of heart rate variability. We studied 22 male fire services workers who were divided into posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)-related stress group (n=10) and control group (n=12). They underwent AT twice or three times a week for 2 months. Posttraumatic stress disorder-related stress group showed a significantly higher cardiac sympathetic nervous activity and a significantly lower cardiac parasympathetic nervous activity than control group at baseline. Autogenic training significantly decreased cardiac sympathetic nervous activity and significantly increased cardiac parasympathetic nervous activity in both groups. These changes were accompanied by a significant decrease in the total points of IES-R-J. Autogenic training is effective for ameliorating the disturbance of cardiac autonomic nervous activity and psychological issues secondary to PTSD.

  8. Autogenic Versus Allogenic Controls on the Evolution of a Coupled Fluvial Megafan-Mountainous Catchment System: Insight from Numerical Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouchene, M.; van der Beek, P.; Carretier, S.; Mouthereau, F.

    2017-12-01

    Alluvial megafans are sensitive recorders of landscape evolution, controlled by both autogenic processes and allogenic forcing, and they are influenced by the coupled dynamics of the fan with its mountainous catchment. The Mio-Pliocene Lannemezan megafan in the northern Pyrenean foreland (SW France) was abandoned by its mountainous feeder stream during the Quaternary and subsequently incised. The flight of alluvial terraces abandoned along the stream network may suggest a climatic control on the incision. We use a landscape evolution numerical model (CIDRE) to explore the relative roles of autogenic processes and external forcing in the building, abandonment and incision of a foreland megafan, and we compare the results with the inferred evolution of the Lannemezan megafan. Autogenic processes are sufficient to explain the building of a megafan and the long-term entrenchment of its feeding river on time and space scales that match the Lannemezan setting. Climate, through temporal variations in precipitation rate, may have played a role in the episodic pattern of incision on a shorter timescale. In contrast, base-level changes, tectonic activity in the mountain range or tilting of the foreland through flexural isostatic rebound do not appear to have played a role in the abandonment of the megafan.

  9. Microstructure Characterization and Stress Corrosion Evaluation of Autogenous and Hybrid Friction Stir Welded Al-Cu-Li 2195 Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhixian; Arbegast, William J.; Meletis, Efstathios I.

    1997-01-01

    Friction stir welding process is being evaluated for application on the Al-Cu-Li 2195 Super-Light Weight External Tank of the Space Transportation System. In the present investigation Al-Cu-Li 2195 plates were joined by autogenous friction stir welding (FSW) and hybrid FSW (friction stir welding over existing variable polarity plasma arc weld). Optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were utilized to characterize microstructures of the weldments processed by both welding methods. TEM observations of autogenous FSW coupons in the center section of the dynamically-recrystallized zone showed an equiaxed recrystallized microstructure with an average grain size of approx. 3.8 microns. No T(sub 1), precipitates were present in the above-mentioned zone. Instead, T(sub B) and alpha precipitates were found in this zone with a lower population. Alternate immersion, anodic polarization, constant load, and slow strain tests were carried out to evaluate the general corrosion and stress-corrosion properties of autogenous and hybrid FSW prepared coupons. The experimental results will be discussed.

  10. Lateral Ridge Augmentation Using Autogenous Block Grafts and Guided Bone Regeneration: A 10-Year Prospective Case Series Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappuis, Vivianne; Cavusoglu, Yeliz; Buser, Daniel; von Arx, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    The use of autogenous block grafts harvested from intraoral donor sites has proven to be effective for the reconstruction of horizontal bone defects. The objective of this study was to analyze implant success and the rate of block graft resorption 10 years after ridge augmentation to elucidate contributing factors influencing graft maintenance. A staged horizontal block graft augmentation was performed in 52 implant sites exhibiting severe horizontal bone atrophy using autogenous block grafts protected by DBBM and collagen membranes. The crest width was assessed intraoperatively at surgery and at re-entry after 6 months. At the 10 year reexamination clinical and radiographic parameters were assessed using cone beam computed tomography. The 10-year implant success rate amounted to 98.1%, with minimal peri-implant bone loss (-0.17 mm for the maxilla, -0.09 mm for the mandible). The surface resorption rate after 10 years was 7.7% (0.38 mm). Grafts originating from the chin demonstrated significantly better graft maintenance at 10 years compared to retromolar grafts. Recipient site and age had no significant impact on graft resorption, whereas females showed more bone loss at the 10-year examination. Lateral ridge augmentation using autogenous block grafts and guided bone regeneration demonstrated a favorable success rate of 98.1% with minimal block graft resorption of 7.7% after 10 years. Modulating factors were origin of the graft and gender. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Why Translation Is Difficult

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carl, Michael; Schaeffer, Moritz Jonas

    2017-01-01

    translations we investigate the effects of cross-lingual syntactic and semantic distance on translation production times and find that non-literality makes from-scratch translation and post-editing difficult. We show that statistical machine translation systems encounter even more difficulties with non-literality....

  12. Changes of mineralization of free autogenous bone grafts used for sinus floor elevation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Karl Andreas; Schultze-Mosgau, Stefan; Wiltfang, Jörg; Neukam, Friedrich Wilhelm; Rupprecht, Stephan; Thorwarth, Michael

    2006-12-01

    For augmentations before implant placement in areas of minor bone quantity, autogenous bone is considered the reference to all bone substitutes used alternatively. Autogenous bone transplants originate from various donor areas and can be prepared in different ways before augmentation. They may either be used as block grafts or may be milled to granules that can be used solitarily or in combination with a bone substitute. In a prospective study, 61 patients of the Maxillofacial Surgery Department of our University receiving two-stage sinus floor elevation because of insufficient bone supply were randomly selected. At first-stage surgery, the local augmentation procedure, monocortical probes were obtained on the site of bone harvesting. At second-stage surgery, the implant insertion 6 months after the elevation procedure, bone cores were harvested in the areas of implant placement. Donor regions were the following three areas: the posterior (N=28) and anterior pelvic region (N=15) and the chin region (N=18). The implanted bone in all three groups was particulated to granules of 2-3 mm(2) using a bone mill. All biopsies were analyzed by means of microradiography. The anterior pelvic bone grafts showed a mineralized tissue grade of 35.1+/-7.6% before milling and augmentation. The posterior pelvic bone grafts exhibited a mineralization of 30.7+/-9.5% and the chin bone grafts 74.6+/-8.6%. At second-stage surgery after 6 months, the mineralization was 36.1+/-7.59% in the areas where bone grafts from the anterior pelvic crest were used. Probes harvested from sites with posterior pelvic bone augmentations showed a mineralization rate of 34.5+/-6.5%, and sites were chin bone grafts were applied expressed a mineralization of 54+/-8.6% (P=0.003 compared with the pre-operative value). The comparison of the microradiographical results demonstrated significant differences in the mineralization grades depending on the origin of the graft. The origin of the grafts and their

  13. Blood clearance of Howell-Jolly bodies in an experimental autogenic splenic implant model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, R G; Lucena, S B S G; Caetano, C E R; de Sousa, V Oliveira; Portela, M C; Petroianu, A

    2014-06-01

    Autogenic splenic implant (ASI) is one of the few alternatives for preservation of splenic tissue when total splenectomy is inevitable. The aim of this study was to determine the morphological and functional regeneration of ASIs, as indicated by the clearance of Howell-Jolly (HJ) bodies, in an experimental model. Ninety-nine male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: sham-operated (group 1), total splenectomy alone (group 2), and total splenectomy combined with ASI (group 3). Animals in group 3 were further allocated to nine subgroups of nine rats each, and analysed at different time points (1, 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 28 and 32 weeks after surgery). Blood smears were prepared at predetermined times for detection of HJ bodies. Morphological regeneration of tissue in the ASI was analysed by histology. At 1 week, the regenerated mass corresponded to about 7 per cent of the tissue implanted, reaching approximately 54 per cent at 24 weeks. The HJ body levels were increased in groups 2 and 3 until 8 weeks after surgery, following which levels in the ASI group became similar to those in the sham-operated group. HJ bodies were difficult to detect when a level of 22.5 per cent of regenerated ASI mass was reached. Functional regeneration of ASIs occurred from 8 weeks after surgery. When 22.5 per cent of regenerated ASI mass was reached almost no HJ bodies could be observed in the bloodstream, resembling a spleen in situ. Splenectomy has been practised routinely, both in the emergency setting and as a therapeutic elective procedure. There is a correlation between asplenia/hyposplenia and the occurrence of fulminant sepsis, underlining the importance of developing surgical methods for preserving splenic function. Both clinical and experimental studies have shown at least partial morphological and functional regeneration of autogenic splenic implants (ASIs). Experimental studies investigating the immunoprotective effect of ASIs, based mostly on exposure of animals to

  14. On Various Negative Translations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilda Ferreira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Several proof translations of classical mathematics into intuitionistic mathematics have been proposed in the literature over the past century. These are normally referred to as negative translations or double-negation translations. Among those, the most commonly cited are translations due to Kolmogorov, Godel, Gentzen, Kuroda and Krivine (in chronological order. In this paper we propose a framework for explaining how these different translations are related to each other. More precisely, we define a notion of a (modular simplification starting from Kolmogorov translation, which leads to a partial order between different negative translations. In this derived ordering, Kuroda and Krivine are minimal elements. Two new minimal translations are introduced, with Godel and Gentzen translations sitting in between Kolmogorov and one of these new translations.

  15. Translation and Quality Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Margrethe

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this article is to consider the issue of quality in translation. Specifically, the question under consideration is whether quality assurance in relation to translation is feasible and, if so, what some of the implications for translation theory, translation practice and the teaching of...... under the ISO 9001 standard, and section 4. discusses the implications which quality management seems to hold for the field of translation in a broad sense. Finally, section 5. concludes the article....

  16. Translational autocontrol of the Escherichia coli ribosomal protein S15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portier, C; Dondon, L; Grunberg-Manago, M

    1990-01-20

    When rpsO, the gene encoding the ribosomal protein S15 in Escherichia coli, is carried by a multicopy plasmid, the mRNA synthesis rate of S15 increases with the gene dosage but the rate of synthesis of S15 does not rise. A translational fusion between S15 and beta-galactosidase was introduced on the chromosome in a delta lac strain and the expression of beta-galactosidase studied under different conditions. The presence of S15 in trans represses the beta-galactosidase level five- to sixfold, while the synthesis rate of the S15-beta-galactosidase mRNA decreases by only 30 to 50%. These data indicate that S15 is subject to autogenous translational control. Derepressed mutants were isolated and sequenced. All the point mutations map in the second codon of S15, suggesting a location for the operator site that is very near to the translation initiation codon. However, the creation of deletion mutations shows that the operator extends into the 5' non-coding part of the message, thus overlapping the ribosome loading site.

  17. Translation-coupling systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfleger, Brian; Mendez-Perez, Daniel

    2013-11-05

    Disclosed are systems and methods for coupling translation of a target gene to a detectable response gene. A version of the invention includes a translation-coupling cassette. The translation-coupling cassette includes a target gene, a response gene, a response-gene translation control element, and a secondary structure-forming sequence that reversibly forms a secondary structure masking the response-gene translation control element. Masking of the response-gene translation control element inhibits translation of the response gene. Full translation of the target gene results in unfolding of the secondary structure and consequent translation of the response gene. Translation of the target gene is determined by detecting presence of the response-gene protein product. The invention further includes RNA transcripts of the translation-coupling cassettes, vectors comprising the translation-coupling cassettes, hosts comprising the translation-coupling cassettes, methods of using the translation-coupling cassettes, and gene products produced with the translation-coupling cassettes.

  18. Influence of the mycotoxins alpha- and beta-zearalenol (ZOL) on regulators of cap-dependent translation control in pig endometrial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollenhaupt, K; Jonas, L; Tiemann, U; Tomek, W

    2004-12-01

    The molecular mechanisms that control the mycotoxin-mediated effects in porcine endometrial cells are far from being completely understood. Recent results show that they could inhibit cell proliferation. Therefore, the present study investigated the effects of the mycotoxins alpha-zearalenol (alpha-ZOL) and beta-zearalenol (beta-ZOL) on a cellular level. Mainly, the abundance and phosphorylation state (activity) of the cell cycle-dependent kinases MAPK and Akt (PKB) and their potential targets eIF4E (eukaryotic initiation factor 4E) and 4E-BP1 (4E binding protein, eIF4E repressor protein) were investigated. The results show that alpha-ZOL has apparently only a slight influence on the phosphorylation state of MAP kinases, Akt and on eIF4E and 4E-BP1. In contrast, their phosphorylation was strongly reduced in beta-ZOL-treated cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Therefore, our results indicate that beta-ZOL potentially not only influences transcription but also effects gene expression on translational level. The effect of alpha- and beta-ZOL on endometrial cell proliferation and their toxicology are discussed.

  19. Novel post-transcriptional and post-translational regulation of pro-apoptotic protein BOK and anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1 determine the fate of breast cancer cells to survive or die

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyeagucha, Benjamin; Subbarayalu, Panneerdoss; Abdelfattah, Nourhan; Rajamanickam, Subapriya; Timilsina, Santosh; Guzman, Rosa; Zeballos, Carla; Eedunuri, Vijay; Bansal, Sanjay; Mohammad, Tabrez; Chen, Yidong; Vadlamudi, Ratna K.; Rao, Manjeet K.

    2017-01-01

    Deregulation of apoptosis is central to cancer progression and a major obstacle to effective treatment. The Bcl-2 gene family members play important roles in the regulation of apoptosis and are frequently altered in cancers. One such member is pro-apoptotic protein Bcl-2-related Ovarian Killer (BOK). Despite its critical role in apoptosis, the regulation of BOK expression is poorly understood in cancers. Here, we discovered that miR-296-5p regulates BOK expression by binding to its 3’-UTR in breast cancers. Interestingly, miR-296-5p also regulates the expression of anti-apoptotic protein myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl-1), which is highly expressed in breast cancers. Our results reveal that Mcl-1 and BOK constitute a regulatory feedback loop as ectopic BOK expression induces Mcl-1, whereas silencing of Mcl-1 results in reduced BOK levels in breast cancer cells. In addition, we show that silencing of Mcl-1 but not BOK reduced the long-term growth of breast cancer cells. Silencing of both Mcl-1 and BOK rescued the effect of Mcl-1 silencing on breast cancer cell growth, suggesting that BOK is important for attenuating cell growth in the absence of Mcl-1. Depletion of BOK suppressed caspase-3 activation in the presence of paclitaxel and in turn protected cells from paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that glycogen synthase kinase (GSK3) α/β interacts with BOK and regulates its level post-translationally in breast cancer cells. Taken together, our results suggest that fine tuning of the levels of pro-apoptotic protein BOK and anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1 may decide the fate of cancer cells to either undergo apoptosis or proliferation. PMID:29156771

  20. Autogenic entrenchment patterns and terraces due to coupling with lateral erosion in incising alluvial channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malatesta, Luca C.; Prancevic, Jeffrey P.; Avouac, Jean-Philippe

    2017-01-01

    The abandonment of terraces in incising alluvial rivers can be used to infer tectonic and climatic histories. A river incising into alluvium erodes both vertically and laterally as it abandons fill-cut terraces. We argue that the input of sediment from the valley walls during entrenchment can alter the incision dynamics of a stream by promoting vertical incision over lateral erosion. Using a numerical model, we investigate how valley wall feedbacks may affect incision rates and terrace abandonment as the channel becomes progressively more entrenched in its valley. We postulate that erosion of taller valley walls delivers large pulses of sediment to the incising channel, potentially overwhelming the local sediment transport capacity. Based on field observations, we propose that these pulses of sediment can form talus piles that shield the valley wall from subsequent erosion and potentially force progressive channel narrowing. Our model shows that this positive feedback mechanism can enhance vertical incision relative to 1-D predictions that ignore lateral erosion. We find that incision is most significantly enhanced when sediment transport rates are low relative to the typical volume of material collapsed from the valley walls. The model also shows a systematic erosion of the youngest terraces when river incision slows down. The autogenic entrenchment due to lateral feedbacks with valley walls should be taken into account in the interpretation of complex-response terraces.

  1. Response of spinal myoclonus to a combination therapy of autogenic training and biofeedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kempuraj Duraisamy

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Clinical evidence indicates that certain types of movement disorders are due to psychosomatic factors. Patients with myoclonic movements are usually treated by a variety of therapeutic agents. Autogenic training (AT, a recognized form of psychosomatic therapies, is suitable for certain types of neurological diseases. We describe a patient with myoclonus who failed to respond to conventional medical therapy. His symptoms were exaggerated by psychogenic factors, especially anger. Case presentation A 42-year-old man was admitted to our hospital, Preventive Welfare Clinic, for severe paroxysmal axial myoclonus of the left shoulder and abdominal muscles. The initial diagnosis was "combination of spinal segmental myoclonus and propriospinal myoclonus". The myoclonic movements did not occur during sleep but were aggravated by bathing, alcohol drinking, and anger. Psychological examination indicated hostile attribution. Although considered not to be a case of psychogenic myoclonus, a "psychogenic factor" was definitely involved in the induction of the organic myoclonus. The final diagnosis was "combination of spinal segmental myoclonus and propriospinal myoclonus accompanied by features of psychosomatic disorders". The patient underwent psychosomatic therapy including AT and surface electromyography (EMG-biofeedback therapy and treatment with clonazepam and carbamazepine. Results AT and EMG-biofeedback resulted in shortening the duration and reducing the amplitude and frequency of the myoclonic discharges. Conclusion Psychosomatic therapy with AT and surface EMG-biofeedback produced excellent improvement of myoclonic movements and allowed the reduction of the dosage of conventional medications.

  2. Clinical trial comparing autogenous fascia lata sling and Gore-Tex suspension in bilateral congenital ptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsamkary, Mahmoud Ahmed; Roshdy, Maged Maher Salib

    2016-01-01

    To study the effect of autogenous fascia lata sling (AFLS) versus Gore-Tex suspension (GTS) regarding the functional and aesthetic outcomes in patients with bilateral congenital ptosis. A prospective comparative randomized single-center study enrolled 110 patients with bilateral congenital ptosis. One group (n=55) underwent AFLS and the second group (n=55) underwent GTS. Exclusion criteria were good levator function, absent Bell's phenomenon, and abnormal ocular motility. Follow-up period was 2 years. Functional outcome was measured from digital photos by analysis of upper eyelid margin position relative to the superior limbus and classified as very good (5 mm), and recurrent. Aesthetic outcome was assessed in terms of lid contour, symmetry of eyelid height, and lid crease presence. Complications were also reported. Failure rate (recurrence and complications) was less in AFLS (P=0.035). Symmetrical lid height and good contour were more frequently attained by AFLS (P=0.007 and 0.047, respectively). However, the frequency of very good, good, poor, recurrence, lagopthalmos, ectropion, infection, and formed lid crease individually showed no statistically significant difference (P=0.252, 0.482, 1, 0.489, 0.438, 1, 0.618, and 0.506, respectively). AFLS is a better choice in surgery for patients with bilateral congenital ptosis because it has fewer complications and a lesser recurrence rate than GTS.

  3. A new autogenous mobile system driven by vibration without impacts, excited by an impulse periodic force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duong The-Hung

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes a new proposed design for autogenous mobile systems which can move without any external mechanisms such as legs or wheels. A Duffing oscillator with a cubic spring, which is excited by an impulse periodic force, is utilized to drive the whole system. The rectilinear motion of the system is performed employing the periodically oscillation of the internal mass interacting without collisions with the main body. Utilizing the nonlinear restoring force of the cubic spring, the system can move in desired directions. When the ratio between the excitation force and the friction force is smaller than 2.5, backward or forward motion can be easily achieved by applying an excitation force in the same desired direction. Different from other vibro-impact drifting devices, no impact needed to drive the new proposed system. This novel structure allows to miniaturize the device as well as to simplify the control algorithm thus can significantly expand applicability of the proposed system.

  4. Cephalic Arch Stenosis in Autogenous Haemodialysis Fistulas: Treatment With the Viabahn Stent-Graft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shawyer, Andrew, E-mail: andrew.shawyer@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk [The Royal London Hospital, Radiology Department (United Kingdom); Fotiadis, Nicos I., E-mail: fotiadis.nicholas@gmail.com [Royal Marsden Hospital, Radiology Department, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom); Namagondlu, Girish, E-mail: girish.namagondlu@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk [The Royal London Hospital, Renal Medicine Department (United Kingdom); Iyer, Arun, E-mail: arun.iyer@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk [The Royal London Hospital, Radiology Department (United Kingdom); Blunden, Mark, E-mail: mark.blunden@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk; Raftery, Martin, E-mail: martin.raftery@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk; Yaqoob, Magdi, E-mail: magdi.yaqoob@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk [The Royal London Hospital, Renal Medicine Department (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-15

    Cephalic arch stenosis (CAS) is an important and common cause of dysfunction in autogenous haemodialysis fistulas that requires multiple reinterventions and aggressive surveillance. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of the Viabahn stent-graft for the management of CAS. Between April 2005 and October 2011, 11 consecutive patients [four men and seven women (mean age 56.7 years)] with CAS and dysfunctional fistulas were treated with insertion of 11 Viabahn stent-grafts. Six stent-grafts were inserted due to residual stenosis after angioplasty and five for fistuloplasty-induced rupture. No patient was lost to follow-up. The technical and clinical success rate was 100 %. Primary access patency rates were 81.8 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.482-0.977] at 6 months and 72.7 % (95 % CI 0.390-0.939) at 12 months. Secondary access patency rates were 90.9 % at 6 months (95 % CI 0.587-0.997). There were no procedure-related complications. Mean follow-up was 543.8 days (range 156-2,282). The use of the Viabahn stent-graft in the management of CAS is technically feasible and, in this small series, showed patency rates that compare favorably with historical data of angioplasty and bare stents.

  5. Surgical Outcome of Autogenic Hard Palate Grafts in Lower Eyelid Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlke Bahçeci Şimşek

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the surgical outcome of autogenic hard palate mucosal grafts (HPMGs in full-thickness lower eyelid reconstruction following tumor excision. Material and Method: The medical records of patients who had full-thickness lower eyelid tumor excision between 2005 and 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Seven patients who had HPMG for posterior lamellar reconstruction were included in the study. Graft complications like necrosis, contraction, excessive mucous discharge, and potential problems in the graft harvesting site and technique were evaluated. Results: Seven eyelid reconstructions with HPMG were performed on 4 female and 3 male patients with an age range of 48 to 71 years at surgery. The patients were followed for 6 to 56 months. Two patients had inferior eyelid retraction - one of them was severe and the other one was mild. None of the patients had HPMG necrosis. Donor site haemorrhage occurred in two patients which was controlled with direct pressure and cauterization in the early postoperative period. Discussion: HPMGs have been the golden standard for the reconstruction of posterior lamellar eyelid defects. The main problem about these grafts is that the oral cavity is an unusual region for ophthalmologists with potential complications arising from the hard palate. Comprehension of the anatomy, proper surgical technique, and postoperative care can decrease the rate of these complications. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2013; 43: 442-5

  6. Effect of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty on the stenosis of autogenous radiocephalic ateriovenous fistula for hemodialysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Sun Min; Kim, Jeong Ho; Byun, Sung Su; Kang, Jin MMo; Choi, Sang Tae; Kim, Jong Woo; Kim, Hyung Sik; Choi, Hye Young [Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae Hyung [Dept. of Radiology, Seonam University College of Medicine, Myongji Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) on stenosis of autogenous radiocephalic arteriovenous fistula (RCF) for hemodialysis and to determine the factors influencing patency. This retrospective study included 136 patients referred for PTA of RCF stenosis between March 2005 and July 2014. The technical success rate, complications, and patency rate were evaluated. The following factors were analyzed as they might influence patency: age, gender, site and duration of arteriovenous fistula, underlying disease, body mass index, hypercholesterolemia, smoking, peripheral artery or coronary artery occlusive disease, stenosis length/grade, cutting balloon, and balloon size. The initial technical success rate was 91.9% (125/136). Complications included vessel rupture (n = 2) and vessel dissection (n = 2). The patency rates at 6, 12, 24, and 48 months after PTA were 81.9, 67.1, 52.7, and 42.3%, respectively. The patency rate was higher in cases with longer (> 3 cm) stenosis (p = 0.04). Use of cutting balloon and larger size of balloon catheter made the patency longer, but this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.637, 0.258). PTA is a safe and effective way to manage stenosis in RCF. The length of stenosis was the only factor which affected the patency rate in this study.

  7. Autogenic-feedback training exercise is superior to promethazine for control of motion sickness symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowings, P. S.; Toscano, W. B.

    2000-01-01

    Motion sickness symptoms affect approximately 50% of the crew during space travel and are commonly treated with intramuscular injections of promethazine. The purpose of this paper is to compare the effectiveness of three treatments for motion sickness: intramuscular injections (i.m.) of promethazine, a physiological training method (autogenic-feedback training exercise [AFTE]), and a no-treatment control. An earlier study tested the effects of promethazine on cognitive and psychomotor performance and motion sickness tolerance in a rotating chair. For the present paper, motion sickness tolerance, symptom reports, and physiological responses of these subjects were compared to matched subjects selected from an existing database who received either AFTE or no treatment. Three groups of 11 men, between the ages of 33 and 40 years, were matched on the number of rotations tolerated during their initial rotating-chair motion sickness test. The motion sickness test procedures and the 7-day interval between tests were the same for all subjects. The drug group was tested under four treatment conditions: baseline (no injections), a 25 mg dose of promethazine, a 50 mg dose of promethazine, and a placebo of sterile saline. AFTE subjects were given four 30-minute AFTE sessions before their second, third, and fourth motion sickness tests (6 hours total). The no-treatment control subjects were only given the four rotating-chair tests. Motion sickness tolerance was significantly increased after 4 hours of AFTE when compared to either 25 mg (p training.

  8. Cephalic Arch Stenosis in Autogenous Haemodialysis Fistulas: Treatment With the Viabahn Stent-Graft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shawyer, Andrew; Fotiadis, Nicos I.; Namagondlu, Girish; Iyer, Arun; Blunden, Mark; Raftery, Martin; Yaqoob, Magdi

    2013-01-01

    Cephalic arch stenosis (CAS) is an important and common cause of dysfunction in autogenous haemodialysis fistulas that requires multiple reinterventions and aggressive surveillance. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of the Viabahn stent-graft for the management of CAS. Between April 2005 and October 2011, 11 consecutive patients [four men and seven women (mean age 56.7 years)] with CAS and dysfunctional fistulas were treated with insertion of 11 Viabahn stent-grafts. Six stent-grafts were inserted due to residual stenosis after angioplasty and five for fistuloplasty-induced rupture. No patient was lost to follow-up. The technical and clinical success rate was 100 %. Primary access patency rates were 81.8 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.482–0.977] at 6 months and 72.7 % (95 % CI 0.390–0.939) at 12 months. Secondary access patency rates were 90.9 % at 6 months (95 % CI 0.587–0.997). There were no procedure-related complications. Mean follow-up was 543.8 days (range 156–2,282). The use of the Viabahn stent-graft in the management of CAS is technically feasible and, in this small series, showed patency rates that compare favorably with historical data of angioplasty and bare stents.

  9. Histological evaluation of the influence of magnetic field application in autogenous bone grafts in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponzoni Deise

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bone grafts are widely used in oral and maxillofacial reconstruction. The influence of electromagnetic fields and magnets on the endogenous stimulation of target tissues has been investigated. This work aimed to assess the quality of bone healing in surgical cavities filled with autogenous bone grafts, under the influence of a permanent magnetic field produced by in vivo buried devices. Methods Metal devices consisting of commercially pure martensitic stainless steel washers and titanium screws were employed. Thirty male Wistar rats were divided into 3 experimental and 3 control groups. A surgical bone cavity was produced on the right femur, and a bone graft was collected and placed in each hole. Two metallic washers, magnetized in the experimental group but not in the control group, were attached on the borders of the cavity. Results The animals were sacrificed on postoperative days 15, 45 and 60. The histological analysis of control and experimental samples showed adequate integration of the bone grafts, with intense bone neoformation. On days 45 and 60, a continued influence of the magnetic field on the surgical cavity and on the bone graft was observed in samples from the experimental group. Conclusion The results showed intense bone neoformation in the experimental group as compared to control animals. The intense extra-cortical bone neoformation observed suggests that the osteoconductor condition of the graft may be more susceptible to stimulation, when submitted to a magnetic field.

  10. The effect of Emdogain gel on periodontal regeneration in autogenous transplanted dog′s teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Marques Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the enamel matrix derivative (EMD as biomaterial used in autogenous tooth transplantation. Material and Methods: The study consisted of 3 beagle dogs, 5 months old, in which six incisors and six premolars were transplanted to mechanically prepared recipient alveolar sockets. One group of teeth was transplanted to a recipient bed, with EMD in the root surface. The second groups of teeth were transplanted using saline solution in the root surface. Every week, clinical examinations were done. Nine weeks later, the animals were killed and the specimens decalcified and prepared for histological and imunohistochemical analysis. Periodontal healing was evaluated by undertaking histomorphometric investigation and analyzed using the Mann- Whitney test (P = 0.05. Results: In both groups, all the transplanted teeth survived. Between the experimental groups, there was statistically significant difference in the complete healing (P = 0.004. There was statistically significant difference between the treatment group in the occurrence of inflammatory root resorption (P = 0.015 and the occurrence of replacement root resorption (P = 0.041. Conclusions: Emdogain gel used on the surface of transplanted teeth improves the occurrence of complete healing and reduces root resorption.

  11. The effect of Emdogain gel on periodontal regeneration in autogenous transplanted dog's teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Manuel Marques; Filomena, Botelho Maria; Lina, Carvalho; Barbara, Oliveiros; Palmeirao, Carrilho Eunice Virginia

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the enamel matrix derivative (EMD) as biomaterial used in autogenous tooth transplantation. The study consisted of 3 beagle dogs, 5 months old, in which six incisors and six premolars were transplanted to mechanically prepared recipient alveolar sockets. One group of teeth was transplanted to a recipient bed, with EMD in the root surface. The second groups of teeth were transplanted using saline solution in the root surface. Every week, clinical examinations were done. Nine weeks later, the animals were killed and the specimens decalcified and prepared for histological and imunohistochemical analysis. Periodontal healing was evaluated by undertaking histomorphometric investigation and analyzed using the Mann- Whitney test (P = 0.05). In both groups, all the transplanted teeth survived. Between the experimental groups, there was statistically significant difference in the complete healing (P = 0.004). There was statistically significant difference between the treatment group in the occurrence of inflammatory root resorption (P = 0.015) and the occurrence of replacement root resorption (P = 0.041). Emdogain gel used on the surface of transplanted teeth improves the occurrence of complete healing and reduces root resorption.

  12. Restoration of mandibular continuity defects using combinations of hydroxylapatite and autogenous bone: microscopic observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, C M; Eick, J D; Barker, B F; Mosby, E L; Hiatt, W R

    1990-03-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess by light, transmission, and scanning electron microscopy the healing of mandibular continuity defects reconstructed with varying ratios of an alloplastic hydroxylapatite implant material (HA) mixed with autogenous bone (AB). This study reports the microscopic observations of implant and control sites at 6 and 18 months postsurgery. The results confirm the biocompatibility of dense HA granules. Specimens exhibited differing degrees of osseous regeneration that appeared related to the percent composition of HA. At 18 months, 86% and 91% of the HA granules were completely surrounded by bone in those specimens reconstructed with implants consisting of 25% and 50% HA, respectively. In contrast, specimens receiving implants consisting of 75% and 100% HA features osseous encapsulation of 75% and 66% of the granules, respectively. The results of this limited study indicate that dense HA granules mixed with AB in ratios ranging from 3:1 to 1:1 (AB:HA) may be successfully used as a bone extender during reconstructive surgery.

  13. Histological evaluation of healing after transalveolar maxillary sinus augmentation with bioglass and autogenous bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stavropoulos, Andreas; Sima, Catalin; Sima, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    . RESULTS: Bone and connective tissue fraction in the newly formed tissues inside the sinus cavity averaged 23.4 ± 13.2% and 54.1 ± 23.5%, respectively. Residual biomaterial, empty spaces, and debris averaged 1.9 ± 3.5%, 10.5 ± 6.3%, and 8.4 ± 14.5%, respectively. In the transalveolar osteotomy, bone...... and connective tissue fraction averaged 41.6 ± 14.3% and 46.1 ± 13%, respectively, while the amount of residual biomaterial, empty spaces, and debris was 2.8 ± 5%, 4.7 ± 1.9%, and 3.2 ± 2.6%, respectively. Statistically significant differences between the sinus cavity and the transalveolar osteotomy were found......OBJECTIVES: The aim was to evaluate histologically the outcome of a bioglass and autogenous bone (at 1 : 1 ratio) composite implantation for transalveolar sinus augmentation. METHODS: In 31 patients, during implant installation ca. 4 months after sinus augmentation, biopsies were harvested through...

  14. Biological and physical properties of autogenous vascularized fibular grafts in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, V.M.; Stevenson, S.; Shaffer, J.W.; Davy, D.; Klein, L.; Zika, J.; Field, G.

    1990-01-01

    The biological and biomechanical properties of normal fibulae, fibulae that had had a sham operation, and both vascularized and non-vascularized autogenous grafts were studied in dogs at three months after the operation. The study was designed to quantify and correlate changes in these properties in orthotopic, stably fixed, weight-bearing grafts and to provide a baseline for additional studies of allografts. The grafts were eight centimeters long and internally fixed. The mechanical properties of the grafts were studied by torsional testing. Metabolic turnover of the grafts was evaluated by preoperative labeling of the dogs with 3H-tetracycline for resorption of bone mineral and with 3H-proline for turnover of collagen. Cortical bone area and porosity were measured. Postoperative formation of bone was evaluated by sequential labeling with fluorochrome. The vascularized grafts resembled the fibulae that had had a sham operation and those that had not had an operation with regard to the total number of osteons and the remodeling process, as measured both morphometrically and metabolically. The vascularized grafts were stronger and stiffer than the non-vascularized grafts and were not different from the bones that had had a sham operation. In contrast, the non-vascularized grafts were smaller, weaker, less stiff, and more porotic, had fewer osteons, and demonstrated increased turnover and resorption compared with the vascularized grafts, the bones that had had a sham operation, and the bones that had not been operated on

  15. Plasma platelet-rich autogenous healing tendon of the gastrocnemius muscle in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duvaldo Eurides

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Tendon lesions may involve the partial or total section of the common calcaneal tendon and cause postural changes of the member. This study evaluated, after 45 and 90 postoperative days (PO, the repair of the tendon of gastrocnemius muscle of rabbits with topical application of autologous platelet concentrate. Twelve adult rabbits were divided into two groups (n = 6 undergoing cardiac puncture and collection of 10 ml of blood to obtain platelet rich-plasma (PRP. Animals of both groups had a transverse tenotomy in the middle third of the lateral belly of the gastrocnemius tendon and muscle that was approximated with modified Kessler suture and nylon thread. In the animals of the treated group it was applied the average of 490.644 platelets / uL of PRP, per animal over the tendon synthesis. The treated group showed a higher amount of collagen fibers than the control one, and at 90 PO days the intensity of collagen was higher than at 45 days with more fibroblasts in the control than in treated one. The administration of plasma autogenous platelet concentrate in the repair of the gastrocnemius tendon of rabbits stimulates and organizes the repair process and causes early production of collagen fibers.

  16. Autogenic succession and deterministic recovery following disturbance in soil bacterial communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurburg, Stephanie D.; Nunes, Inês; Stegen, James C.; Le Roux, Xavier; Priemé, Anders; Sørensen, Søren J.; Salles, Joana Falcão

    2017-04-06

    The response of bacterial communities to environmental change may affect local to global nutrient cycles; however the dynamics of these communities following disturbance are poorly understood, and are generally attributed to abiotic factors. Here, we subjected soil microcosms to a heat disturbance and followed the community composition of active bacteria over 50 days of recovery. Phylogenetic turnover patterns indicated that biotic interactions shaped the community during recovery, and that the disturbance imposed a strong selective pressure that persisted for up to 10 days, after which the importance of stochastic processes increased. Three successional stages were detected: a primary response (1-4 days after disturbance) in which surviving taxa increased in abundance; a secondary response phase (10-29 days), during which community dynamics slowed down, and a stability phase (after 29 days), during which the community tended towards its original composition. Soil bacterial communities, despite their extreme diversity and functional redundancy, respond to disturbances like many macroecological systems and exhibit path-dependent, autogenic dynamics during secondary succession.

  17. Writing Through: Practising Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Scott

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This essay exists as a segment in a line of study and writing practice that moves between a critical theory analysis of translation studies conceptions of language, and the practical questions of what those ideas might mean for contemporary translation and writing practice. Although the underlying preoccupation of this essay, and my more general line of inquiry, is translation studies and practice, in many ways translation is merely a way into a discussion on language. For this essay, translation is the threshold of language. But the two trails of the discussion never manage to elude each other, and these concatenations have informed two experimental translation methods, referred to here as Live Translations and Series Translations. Following the essay are a number of poems in translation, all of which come from Blanco Nuclear by the contemporary Spanish poet, Esteban Pujals Gesalí. The first group, the Live Translations consist of transcriptions I made from audio recordings read in a public setting, in which the texts were translated in situ, either off the page of original Spanish-language poems, or through a process very much like that carried out by simultaneous translators, for which readings of the poems were played back to me through headphones at varying speeds to be translated before the audience. The translations collected are imperfect renderings, attesting to a moment in language practice rather than language objects. The second method involves an iterative translation process, by which three versions of any one poem are rendered, with varying levels of fluency, fidelity and servility. All three translations are presented one after the other as a series, with no version asserting itself as the primary translation. These examples, as well as the translation methods themselves, are intended as preliminary experiments within an endlessly divergent continuum of potential methods and translations, and not as a complete representation of

  18. Differences between Mice and Humans in Regulation and the Molecular Network of Collagen, Type III, Alpha-1 at the Gene Expression Level: Obstacles that Translational Research Must Overcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lishi Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Collagen, type III, alpha-1 (COL3A1 is essential for normal collagen I fibrillogenesis in many organs. There are differences in phenotypes of mutations in the COL3A1 gene in humans and mutations in mice. In order to investigate whether the regulation and gene network of COL3A1 is the same in healthy populations of mice and humans, we compared the quantitative trait loci (QTL that regulate the expression level of COL3A1 and the gene network of COL3A1 pathways between humans and mice using whole genome expression profiles. Our results showed that, for the regulation of expression of Col3a1 in mice, an eQTL on chromosome (Chr 12 regulates the expression of Col3a1. However, expression of genes in the syntenic region on human Chr 7 has no association with the expression level of COL3A1. For the gene network comparison, we identified 44 top genes whose expression levels are strongly associated with that of Col3a1 in mice. We next identified 41 genes strongly associated with the expression level of COL3A1 in humans. There are a few but significant differences in the COL3A1 gene network between humans and mice. Several genes showed opposite association with expression of COL3A1. These genes are known to play important roles in development and function of the extracellular matrix of the lung. Difference in the molecular pathway of key genes in the COL3A1 gene network in humans and mice suggest caution should be used in extrapolating results from models of human lung diseases in mice to clinical lung diseases in humans. These differences may influence the efficacy of drugs in humans whose development employed mouse models.

  19. Sound Effects in Translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mees, Inger M.; Dragsted, Barbara; Gorm Hansen, Inge

    2013-01-01

    On the basis of a pilot study using speech recognition (SR) software, this paper attempts to illustrate the benefits of adopting an interdisciplinary approach in translator training. It shows how the collaboration between phoneticians, translators and interpreters can (1) advance research, (2) have...... implications for the curriculum, (3) be pedagogically motivating, and (4) prepare students for employing translation technology in their future practice as translators. In a two-phase study in which 14 MA students translated texts in three modalities (sight, written, and oral translation using an SR program......), Translog was employed to measure task times. The quality of the products was assessed by three experienced translators, and the number and types of misrecognitions were identified by a phonetician. Results indicate that SR translation provides a potentially useful supplement to written translation...

  20. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A2 regulates the migration and invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma cells via pathways involving reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rong-Rong; Lv, Ya-Su; Tang, Yue-Xiao; Wang, Yan-Fang; Chen, Xiao-Ling; Zheng, Xiao-Xiao; Xie, Shang-Zhi; Cai, Ying; Yu, Jun; Zhang, Xian-Ning

    2016-04-26

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A2 (eIF5A2) has been identified as a critical gene in tumor metastasis. Research has suggested that reactive oxygen species (ROS) serve as signaling molecules in cancer cell proliferation and migration. However, the mechanisms linking eIF5A2 and ROS are not fully understood. Here, we investigated the effects of ROS on the eIF5A2-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and migration in six hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines. Western hybridization, siRNA transfection, transwell migration assays, wound-healing assays, and immunofluorescence analysis were used. The protein levels of eIF5A2 in tumor and adjacent tissue samples from 90 HCC patients with detailed clinical, pathological, and clinical follow-up data were evaluated. Overexpression of eIF5A2 was found in cancerous tissues compared with adjacent tissues. We found that eIF5A2 overexpression in HCC was associated with reduced overall survival. Knockdown of eIF5A2 and intracellular reduction of ROS significantly suppressed the invasion and metastasis of HCC cells. Interestingly, N1-guanyl-1, 7-diaminoheptane (GC7) suppressed the intracellular ROS levels. After blocking the EMT, administration of GC7 or N-acetyl-L-cysteine did not reduce cell migration further. Based on the experimental data, we concluded that inhibition of eIF5A2 alters progression of the EMT to decrease the invasion and metastasis of HCC cells via ROS-related pathways.

  1. Introduction: contemporary translation studies and Bible translation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: contemporary translation studies and Bible translation. J.A. Naude, C.H.J. Van der Merwe. Abstract. (Acta Theologica, Supplementum 2, 2002: 1-5). Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/actat.v22i1.5450.

  2. Translation, Quality and Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Margrethe

    The paper investigates the feasibility and some of the possible consequences of applying quality management to translation. It first gives an introduction to two different schools of translation and to (total) quality management. It then examines whether quality management may, in theory......, be applied to translation and goes on to present a case study which involves a firm in the translation industry and which illustrates quality management in practice. The paper shows that applying quality management to translation is feasible and that doing so may translate into sustained growth....

  3. The GAIT translational control system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Abul; Yao, Peng; Terenzi, Fulvia; Jia, Jie; Ray, Partho Sarothi; Fox, Paul L

    2018-03-01

    The interferon (IFN)-γ-activated inhibitor of translation (GAIT) system directs transcript-selective translational control of functionally related genes. In myeloid cells, IFN-γ induces formation of a multiprotein GAIT complex that binds structural GAIT elements in the 3'-untranslated regions (UTRs) of multiple inflammation-related mRNAs, including ceruloplasmin and VEGF-A, and represses their translation. The human GAIT complex is a heterotetramer containing glutamyl-prolyl tRNA synthetase (EPRS), NS1-associated protein 1 (NSAP1), ribosomal protein L13a (L13a), and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). A network of IFN-γ-stimulated kinases regulates recruitment and assembly of GAIT complex constituents. Activation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5), mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), and S6K1 kinases induces EPRS release from its parental multiaminoacyl tRNA synthetase complex to join NSAP1 in a 'pre-GAIT' complex. Subsequently, the DAPK-ZIPK kinase axis phosphorylates L13a, inducing release from the 60S ribosomal subunit and binding to GAPDH. The subcomplexes join to form the functional GAIT complex. Each constituent has a distinct role in the GAIT system. EPRS binds the GAIT element in target mRNAs, NSAP1 negatively regulates mRNA binding, L13a binds eIF4G to block ribosome recruitment, and GAPDH shields L13a from proteasomal degradation. The GAIT system is susceptible to genetic and condition-specific regulation. An N-terminus EPRS truncate is a dominant-negative inhibitor ensuring a 'translational trickle' of target transcripts. Also, hypoxia and oxidatively modified lipoproteins regulate GAIT activity. Mouse models exhibiting absent or genetically modified GAIT complex constituents are beginning to elucidate the physiological role of the GAIT system, particularly in the resolution of chronic inflammation. Finally, GAIT-like systems in proto-chordates suggests an evolutionarily conserved role of the pathway in innate immunity

  4. Living in Translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke Jakobsen, Arnt

    Exaugural presentation. A retrospect of my personal itinerary from literature, across translation studies to translation process research and a look ahead. In the retrospect, I range over diverse topics, all of which have sprung from my concern with the phenomenon of translation. I reflect on how......, as humans, we generate meaning, interpret meaning, and reformulate or translate meaning. I also reflect on the way computing has influenced research into these phenomena as seen e.g. in my creation of the Translog program and in projects I have been involved in, such as OFT (Translation of Professional...... for global communication purposes, and for improving research into translation, the phenomenon of translation and the world of translation in which we all live....

  5. Determinants of translation ambiguity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degani, Tamar; Prior, Anat; Eddington, Chelsea M.; Arêas da Luz Fontes, Ana B.; Tokowicz, Natasha

    2016-01-01

    Ambiguity in translation is highly prevalent, and has consequences for second-language learning and for bilingual lexical processing. To better understand this phenomenon, the current study compared the determinants of translation ambiguity across four sets of translation norms from English to Spanish, Dutch, German and Hebrew. The number of translations an English word received was correlated across these different languages, and was also correlated with the number of senses the word has in English, demonstrating that translation ambiguity is partially determined by within-language semantic ambiguity. For semantically-ambiguous English words, the probability of the different translations in Spanish and Hebrew was predicted by the meaning-dominance structure in English, beyond the influence of other lexical and semantic factors, for bilinguals translating from their L1, and translating from their L2. These findings are consistent with models postulating direct access to meaning from L2 words for moderately-proficient bilinguals. PMID:27882188

  6. Translation in ESL Classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagy Imola Katalin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of translation in foreign language classes cannot be dealt with unless we attempt to make an overview of what translation meant for language teaching in different periods of language pedagogy. From the translation-oriented grammar-translation method through the complete ban on translation and mother tongue during the times of the audio-lingual approaches, we have come today to reconsider the role and status of translation in ESL classes. This article attempts to advocate for translation as a useful ESL class activity, which can completely fulfil the requirements of communicativeness. We also attempt to identify some activities and games, which rely on translation in some books published in the 1990s and the 2000s.

  7. Translating Others, Discovering Himself: Beckett as Translator

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    Darren Gribben

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the work of Samuel Beckett in the light of his early work as a translator of the works of other writers.  In his translations for Negro: An Anthology (1934, the Anthology of Mexican Poetry (1958, or commissioned translations for journals such as “This Quarter”, early pre-figurings of Beckett’s own thematic and linguistic concerns abound.  Rarely viewed as more than acts of raising money for himself, Beckett’s acts of translation, examined chronologically, demonstrate a writer discovering his craft, and developing his unique voice, unencumbered by the expectations of originality.  This essay posits that Beckett’s works, with their distinctive voice and characterisation, owe much to the global perspective he gained through translating across cultural, continental divides, as well as experimenting with form, which became a staple of Beckett’s own work.  Without formal training or theoretical grounding in translation, Beckett utilises the act of translation as a means of finding himself, revisiting it as a means of shaping his own unique literary voice.

  8. Translating HOL to Dedukti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Assaf

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dedukti is a logical framework based on the lambda-Pi-calculus modulo rewriting, which extends the lambda-Pi-calculus with rewrite rules. In this paper, we show how to translate the proofs of a family of HOL proof assistants to Dedukti. The translation preserves binding, typing, and reduction. We implemented this translation in an automated tool and used it to successfully translate the OpenTheory standard library.

  9. Neural Machine Translation

    OpenAIRE

    Koehn, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    Draft of textbook chapter on neural machine translation. a comprehensive treatment of the topic, ranging from introduction to neural networks, computation graphs, description of the currently dominant attentional sequence-to-sequence model, recent refinements, alternative architectures and challenges. Written as chapter for the textbook Statistical Machine Translation. Used in the JHU Fall 2017 class on machine translation.

  10. Machine Translation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajis, Katie

    1993-01-01

    The characteristics and capabilities of existing machine translation systems were examined and procurement recommendations were developed. Four systems, SYSTRAN, GLOBALINK, PC TRANSLATOR, and STYLUS, were determined to meet the NASA requirements for a machine translation system. Initially, four language pairs were selected for implementation. These are Russian-English, French-English, German-English, and Japanese-English.

  11. For "Translation and Theories"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Lili

    2009-01-01

    Translation studies stem from comparative literature and contrastive analysis. It involves the transfer of messages between two different language systems and cultures, and Munday (2001, p.1) notes that translation "by its nature" "is multilingual and also interdisciplinary". Translation subjects are the texts in various…

  12. Clinical trial comparing autogenous fascia lata sling and Gore-Tex suspension in bilateral congenital ptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsamkary MA

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mahmoud Ahmed Elsamkary,1 Maged Maher Salib Roshdy1,2 1Ophthalmology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt; 2Pediatric Ophthalmology Department, Al Watany Eye Hospital, Cairo, Egypt Purpose: To study the effect of autogenous fascia lata sling (AFLS versus Gore-Tex suspension (GTS regarding the functional and aesthetic outcomes in patients with bilateral congenital ptosis. Patients and methods: A prospective comparative randomized single-center study enrolled 110 patients with bilateral congenital ptosis. One group (n=55 underwent AFLS and the second group (n=55 underwent GTS. Exclusion criteria were good levator function, absent Bell’s phenomenon, and abnormal ocular motility. Follow-up period was 2 years. Functional outcome was measured from digital photos by analysis of upper eyelid margin position relative to the superior limbus and classified as very good (<3 mm, good (3–5 mm, poor (>5 mm, and recurrent. Aesthetic outcome was assessed in terms of lid contour, symmetry of eyelid height, and lid crease presence. Complications were also reported. Results: Failure rate (recurrence and complications was less in AFLS (P=0.035. Symmetrical lid height and good contour were more frequently attained by AFLS (P=0.007 and 0.047, respectively. However, the frequency of very good, good, poor, recurrence, lagopthalmos, ectropion, infection, and formed lid crease individually showed no statistically significant difference (P=0.252, 0.482, 1, 0.489, 0.438, 1, 0.618, and 0.506, respectively. Conclusion: AFLS is a better choice in surgery for patients with bilateral congenital ptosis because it has fewer complications and a lesser recurrence rate than GTS. Keywords: ptosis surgery, surgical outcomes, ptosis recurrence, lagophthalmos

  13. Anatomic study of the lacrimal fossa and lacrimal pathway for bypass surgery with autogenous tissue grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Tao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To study the microsurgical anatomy of the lacrimal drainage system and to provide anatomical evidence for transnasal endoscopic lacrimal drainage system bypass surgery by autogenous tissue grafting. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 Chinese adult cadaveric heads in 10% formaldehyde, comprising 40 lacrimal ducts were used. The middle third section of the specimens were examined for the following features: the thickness of the lacrimal fossa at the anterior lacrimal crest, vertical middle line, and posterior lacrimal crest; the cross section of the upper opening, middle part, and lower opening of the nasolacrimal canal; the horizontal, 30° oblique, and 45° oblique distances from the lacrimal caruncle to the nasal cavity; the distance from the lacrimal caruncle to the upper opening of the nasolacrimal duct; and the included angle between the lacrimal caruncle-nasolacrimal duct upper opening junction and Aeby′s plane. Results: The middle third of the anterior lacrimal crest was significantly thicker than the vertical middle line and the posterior lacrimal crest (P > 0.05. The horizontal distance, 30° oblique distance, and 45° oblique distance from the lacrimal caruncle to the nasal cavity exhibited no significant differences (P > 0.05. The included angle between the lacrimal caruncle and the lateral wall middle point of the superior opening line of the nasolacrimal duct and Aeby′s plane was average (49.9° ± 1.8°. Conclusion: The creation of the bony tunnel should start from the middle or posterior middle part of the lacrimal fossa, extending toward the anterior inferior region with an optimal downward oblique angle of 45°.

  14. Autogenic Training as a behavioural approach to insomnia: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Ann; Lorenc, Ava; Robinson, Nicola

    2012-04-01

    Insomnia is commonly associated with chronic health problems. Behavioural and cognitive factors often perpetuate a vicious cycle of anxiety and sleep disturbance, leading to long-term insomnia. National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence currently recommends behavioural approaches before prescribing hypnotics. Behavioural approaches aim to treat underlying causes, but are not widely available. Research usually includes patients diagnosed with insomnia rather than secondary, co-morbid sleep- related problems. To examine the effectiveness of autogenic training (AT) as a non-drug approach to sleep-related problems associated with chronic ill health. Prospective pre- and post-treatment cohort study. AT centre, Royal London Hospital for Integrated Medicine, University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. All patients referred for AT from April 2007 to April 2008 were invited to participate. Participants received standard 8-week training, with no specific focus on sleep. Sleep questionnaires were administered at four time points, 'Measure Your Medical Outcome Profile' (MYMOP) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, before and after treatment. Results before and after treatment were compared. Camden and Islington Community Local Research and Ethics Committee approved the study. The AT course was completed by 153 participants, of whom 73% were identified as having a sleep-related problem. Improvements in sleep patterns included: sleep onset latency (P = 0.049), falling asleep quicker after night waking (P cause insomnia. Improvements in sleep patterns occurred despite, or possibly due to, not focusing on sleep during training. AT may provide an approach to insomnia that could be incorporated into primary care.

  15. Assisted autogenic drainage in infants and young children hospitalized with uncomplicated pneumonia, a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corten, Lieselotte; Jelsma, Jennifer; Human, Anri; Rahim, Sameer; Morrow, Brenda M

    2018-01-01

    Pneumonia is the most important respiratory problem in low-to-middle income countries. Airway clearance therapy continues to be used in children with pneumonia and secretion retention; however, there is lack of evidence to support or reject this treatment. This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) on the efficacy and safety of assisted autogenic drainage (AAD) compared to standard nursing care in children hospitalized with uncomplicated pneumonia. A single-blinded pilot RCT was conducted on 29 children (median age 3.5 months, IQR 1.5-9.4) hospitalized with uncomplicated pneumonia. The intervention group received standard nursing care with additional bi-daily AAD, for 10 to 30 min. The control group only received standard nursing care, unless otherwise deemed necessary by the physician or physiotherapist. The primary outcome measure was duration of hospitalization. The secondary outcome measures included days of fever and supplemental oxygen support; respiratory rate (RR) and heart rate adjusted for age; RR and oxygen saturation pre-, post-, and 1-hr post-treatment; oxygen saturation; adverse events; and mortality. No difference was found for duration of hospitalization (median 7.5 and 7.0 days for the control and intervention groups, respectively); however, Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed a strong tendency towards a shorter time to discharge in the intervention group (p = .06). No significant differences were found for the other outcome measures at time of discharge. No adverse events were reported. Within the intervention group, a significant reduction in RR adjusted for age was found. As no adverse events were reported, and AAD did not prolong hospitalization; AAD might be considered as safe and effective in young children with uncomplicated pneumonia. However, a larger multicentred RCT is warranted to determine the efficacy of AAD compared to standard nursing care. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. EFFECTIVENESS OF AUTOGENIC DRAINAGE VERSUS POSTURAL DRAINAGE ON OXYGEN SATURATION IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC BRONCHITIS WITH 15 MINUTES POST THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kiran

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with COPD will have more amount of secretions. To clear the secretions by using of different bronchial hygiene techniques like postural drainage and autogenic drainage technique, manual hyperventilation technique ,active cycle breathing technique .Hence in this study to compare the short-term effects of postural drainage with clapping (PD and autogenic drainage (AD on level of oxygen saturation in blood, and amount of sputum recovery. Methodology: The study was done on 60 patients with COPD. Dividing Patients into two group and patients were treated with PD or AD in separate Groups. The effectiveness of the treatment was measured up to 6 days. Pulse oximetry was monitored and sputum was collected immediately after treatment and 15 minutes following each treatment. Results: The results of the study shown that there was significant difference in the amount of sputum recovered with AD (14.0±3.5 g vs PD (24.4±3.0 g and significant differences in Oxygen saturation; during PD fell from 93.3±0.7% to 91.2±0.8% (p<0.01 and required 15 min following treatment to return to baseline. Oxygen saturation did not fall during AD and increased to gradually following complete treatment days (baseline, 93.3±0.8%; p<0.01. Conclusion: Hence this study concludes that Autogenic drainage is more effective in improving spo2 in COPD & does not cause a sudden fall in spo2 as occurs in Postural drainage immediately after therapy. And it can be better tolerated by patients with COPD while producing fewer benefits in sputum clearance. In concern to mean amount of secretion removal Postural is found to be more effective

  17. Self-organization in irregular landscapes: Detecting autogenic interactions from field data using descriptive statistics and dynamical systems theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, L.; Watts, D.; Khurana, A.; Anderson, J. L.; Xu, C.; Merritts, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The classic signal of self-organization in nature is pattern formation. However, the interactions and feedbacks that organize depositional landscapes do not always result in regular or fractal patterns. How might we detect their existence and effects in these "irregular" landscapes? Emergent landscapes such as newly forming deltaic marshes or some restoration sites provide opportunities to study the autogenic processes that organize landscapes and their physical signatures. Here we describe a quest to understand autogenic vs. allogenic controls on landscape evolution in Big Spring Run, PA, a landscape undergoing restoration from bare-soil conditions to a target wet meadow landscape. The contemporary motivation for asking questions about autogenic vs. allogenic controls is to evaluate how important initial conditions or environmental controls may be for the attainment of management objectives. However, these questions can also inform interpretation of the sedimentary record by enabling researchers to separate signals that may have arisen through self-organization processes from those resulting from environmental perturbations. Over three years at Big Spring Run, we mapped the dynamic evolution of floodplain vegetation communities and distributions of abiotic variables and topography. We used principal component analysis and transition probability analysis to detect associative interactions between vegetation and geomorphic variables and convergent cross-mapping on lidar data to detect causal interactions between biomass and topography. Exploratory statistics revealed that plant communities with distinct morphologies exerted control on landscape evolution through stress divergence (i.e., channel initiation) and promoting the accumulation of fine sediment in channels. Together, these communities participated in a negative feedback that maintains low energy and multiple channels. Because of the spatially explicit nature of this feedback, causal interactions could not

  18. Speaking your Translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, Barbara; Mees, Inger M.; Gorm Hansen, Inge

    2011-01-01

    In this article we discuss the translation processes and products of 14 MA students who produced translations from Danish (L1) into English (L2) under different working conditions: (1) written translation, (2) sight translation, and (3) sight translation with a speech recognition (SR) tool. Audio......, since students were dictating in their L2, we looked into the number and types of error that occurred when using the SR software. Items that were misrecognised by the program could be divided into three categories: homophones, hesitations, and incorrectly pronounced words. Well over fifty per cent...

  19. Lost in translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Steffen; Simonsen, Jakob Grue

    2011-01-01

    of translated texts. Our results suggest (i) that frame-based classifiers are usable for author attribution of both translated and untranslated texts; (ii) that framebased classifiers generally perform worse than the baseline classifiers for untranslated texts, but (iii) perform as well as, or superior...... to the baseline classifiers on translated texts; (iv) that—contrary to current belief—naïve classifiers based on lexical markers may perform tolerably on translated texts if the combination of author and translator is present in the training set of a classifier....

  20. Two genetic determinants acquired late in Mus evolution regulate the inclusion of exon 5, which alters mouse APOBEC3 translation efficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mouse apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like editing complex 3 (mA3, an intracellular antiviral factor, has 2 allelic variations that are linked with different susceptibilities to beta- and gammaretrovirus infections among various mouse strains. In virus-resistant C57BL/6 (B6 mice, mA3 transcripts are more abundant than those in susceptible BALB/c mice both in the spleen and bone marrow. These strains of mice also express mA3 transcripts with different splicing patterns: B6 mice preferentially express exon 5-deficient (Δ5 mA3 mRNA, while BALB/c mice produce exon 5-containing full-length mA3 mRNA as the major transcript. Although the protein product of the Δ5 mRNA exerts stronger antiretroviral activities than the full-length protein, how exon 5 affects mA3 antiviral activity, as well as the genetic mechanisms regulating exon 5 inclusion into the mA3 transcripts, remains largely uncharacterized. Here we show that mA3 exon 5 is indeed a functional element that influences protein synthesis at a post-transcriptional level. We further employed in vitro splicing assays using genomic DNA clones to identify two critical polymorphisms affecting the inclusion of exon 5 into mA3 transcripts: the number of TCCT repeats upstream of exon 5 and the single nucleotide polymorphism within exon 5 located 12 bases upstream of the exon 5/intron 5 boundary. Distribution of the above polymorphisms among different Mus species indicates that the inclusion of exon 5 into mA3 mRNA is a relatively recent event in the evolution of mice. The widespread geographic distribution of this exon 5-including genetic variant suggests that in some Mus populations the cost of maintaining an effective but mutagenic enzyme may outweigh its antiviral function.

  1. What is a translator?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Pulido

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available I copied the title from Foucault’s text, "Qu'est-ce qu'un auteur" in Dits et écrits [1969], Paris, Gallimard, 1994, that I read in French, then in English in Donald F. Bouchard’s and Sherry Simon’s translation, and finally in Spanish in Yturbe Corina’s translation, and applied for the translator some of the analysis that Foucault presents to define the author. Foucault suggests that if we cannot define an author, at least we can see where their function is reflected. My purpose in this paper is to present those surfaces where the function of the translator is reflected or where it can be revealed, and to analyse the categories that could lead us to the elaboration of a suitable definition of a Translator. I dare already give a compound noun for the translator: Translator-Function.

  2. What is a translator?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Martha Pulido

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available I copied the title from Foucault’s text, "Qu'est-ce qu'un auteur" in Dits et écrits [1969], Paris, Gallimard, 1994, that I read in French, then in English in Donald F. Bouchard’s and Sherry Simon’s translation, and finally in Spanish in Yturbe Corina’s translation, and applied for the translator some of the analysis that Foucault presents to define the author. Foucault suggests that if we cannot define an author, at least we can see where their function is reflected. My purpose in this paper is to present those surfaces where the function of the translator is reflected or where it can be revealed, and to analyse the categories that could lead us to the elaboration of a suitable definition of a Translator. I dare already give a compound noun for the translator: Translator-Function.

  3. Baudelaire: Translator-Auctoritas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Zapata

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to achieve visibility in the media and a position recognized by both the public and their peers, translators are compelled to take advantage of spaces of enunciation such as those provided by prefaces, criticism, or biographical notes. Thanks to these spaces, in which translators deploy discursive and institutional strategies that allow them to position themselves and their translation project, translators acquire the status of translator-auctoritas, that is, a level of symbolic authority capable of endowing them with a public image. Through the detailed analysis of the editorial strategies and institutional calculations implemented by Baudelaire in order to position his project of translating Edgar Allan Poe, we show how the poet achieves the status of translator-auctoritas and the role the latter played in the construction of his own literary identity.

  4. Lost in translation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granas, Anne Gerd; Nørgaard, Lotte Stig; Sporrong, Sofia Kälvemark

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The "Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire" (BMQ) assess balance of necessity and concern of medicines. The BMQ has been translated from English to many languages. However, the original meaning of statements, such as "My medicine is a mystery to me", may be lost in translation. The aim...... of this study is to compare three Scandinavian translations of the BMQ. (1) How reliable are the translations? (2) Are they still valid after translation? METHODS: Translated Norwegian, Swedish and Danish versions of the BMQ were scrutinized by three native Scandinavian researchers. Linguistic differences...... and ambiguities in the 5-point Likert scale and the BMQ statements were compared. RESULTS: In the Scandinavian translations, the Likert scale expanded beyond the original version at one endpoint (Swedish) or both endpoints (Danish). In the BMQ statements, discrepancies ranged from smaller inaccuracies toward...

  5. Introduction : Translation Peripheries. The Paratextual Elements In Translation

    OpenAIRE

    Gil-Bardají, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The notion of paratext is an unquestionably important consideration for many lines of research in translation studies: the history of translation, literary translation, audiovisual translation, and the analysis of ideological discourse in translation or self-translation. This inexplicable short-age of studies on paratexts in translations was one of the reasons why the Department of Translation and Interpreting at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona decided to organise the 7th International ...

  6. Maxillary sinus floor augmentation with Bio-Oss or Bio-Oss mixed with autogenous bone as graft: a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas; Schou, Søren; Stavropoulos, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Aims: The objective of the present systematic review was to test the hypothesis of no differences in the implant treatment outcome when Bio-Oss or Bio-Oss mixed with autogenous bone is used as graft for the maxillary sinus floor augmentation (MSFA) applying the lateral window technique. Material ......, Holmstrup P. Maxillary sinus floor augmentation with Bio-Oss or Bio-Oss mixed with autogenous bone as graft: a systematic review. Clin. Oral Impl. Res. xx, 2011; 000-000 doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0501.2011.02168.x....

  7. Maxillary sinus floor augmentation with Bio-Oss or Bio-Oss mixed with autogenous bone as graft in animals: a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas; Schou, S; Stavropoulos, A

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present systematic review was to test the hypothesis of no differences between the use of Bio-Oss or Bio-Oss mixed with autogenous bone as graft for maxillary sinus floor augmentation (MSFA) applying the lateral window technique, as evaluated in animals. A MEDLINE (Pub...... of the graft improved significantly with increased proportion of Bio-Oss. Bone regeneration, bone-to-implant contact (BIC), biomechanical implant test values, and biodegradation of Bio-Oss after MSFA with Bio-Oss or Bio-Oss mixed with autogenous bone have never been compared within the same study in animals...

  8. Internal translation of the connexin 43 transcript.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salat-Canela, Clàudia; Sesé, Marta; Peula, Cristina; Ramón y Cajal, Santiago; Aasen, Trond

    2014-05-08

    Connexin 43 (Cx43), the most widely expressed gap junction protein, is associated with a number of physiological and pathological conditions. Many functions of Cx43 have been shown to be independent of gap junction formation and only require the expression of Cx43 C-terminal fragments. Recent evidence demonstrated that naturally occurring C-terminal isoforms can be generated via internal translation. Here, we confirm that C-terminal domains of Cx43, particularly the major 20-kDa isoform, can be independently generated and regulated by internal translation of the same single GJA1 gene transcript that encodes full-length Cx43. Through direct RNA transfection experiments, we provide evidence that internal translation is not due to a bona fide cap-independent IRES-mediated mechanism, as upstream ribosomal scanning or translation is required. In addition to the mTOR pathway, we show for the first time, using both inhibitors and cells from knockout mice, that the Mnk1/2 pathway regulates the translation of the main 20-kDa isoform. Internal translation of the Cx43 transcript occurs but is not cap-independent and requires translation upstream of the internal start codon. In addition to the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, the major 20-kDa isoform is regulated by the Mnk1/2 pathway. Our results have major implications for past and future studies describing gap junction-independent functions of Cx43 in cancer and other pathological conditions. This study provides further clues to the signalling pathways that regulate internal mRNA translation, an emerging mechanism that allows for increased protein diversity and functional complexity from a single mRNA transcript.

  9. Gore-Tex small-vessel angioplasty: A suitable substitute for the use of autogenous saphenous vein grafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Rinaldi, Raul; Rea, John E.; Gallagher, Michael W.; Laevsky, Marlene J.; Ogburn, Michael; Porter, Robert H.

    1980-01-01

    Autogenous saphenous vein has been the material of choice for small-vessel angioplasty and for circulatory access graft reconstruction. In an effort to conserve autogenous saphenous vein, we used expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) grafts in 45 patients over a 12-month period. We used Gore-Tex* to reconstruct 17 circulatory access grafts, 16 carotid arteries, two brachial arteries, seven femoral arteries, and three popliteal anterior or posterior tibial arteries. The indications for reconstruction were chronic occlusion of the access grafts, trauma to the brachial and anterior tibial arteries, and atherosclerotic disease of the carotid, femoral, and popliteal-tibial arteries. Of the reconstructed circulatory access grafts, one failed immediately because of technical problems in the conduit, and one failed 11 months after reconstruction. All other grafts have functioned well and have produced a marked improvement in flow. Of the 28 patients who underwent reconstruction of arteries measuring 3 mm or less, two had patent arteries but died shortly after operation. The remaining 26 have been followed for one to 43 months. All reconstructed arteries are patent, and there have been no instances of distal embolization or false aneurysm formation. From this brief experience, we conclude that Gore-Tex is a suitable short-term alternative to saphenous vein for small vessel arterioplasty; it also may be the material of choice for reconstructing the outflow tract of occluded access grafts. PMID:15216240

  10. Workability’s recreation methodic with application of cupping massage and autogenic training of women student teams’ basketball players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zh.L. Kozina

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to experimentally subsituate effectiveness of non traditional complex methodic of recreation in female basketball players’ training process. Material: 22 basketball players of women student’s team participated in the research. Pedagogic testing was conducted by 12 tests in special physical and technical fitness. Psycho-physiological testing was conducted by program PSYCHO-DIAGNOSTIC. Groups were trained by identical programs during 9 weeks. Results: we authors observed increased physical and technical fitness of basketball players. Besides, quantity of mistakes in response to visual irritator reduced. It indirectly witnesses about strengthening of nervous processes. There was registered influence of mind on quality of organism’s recreation after physical loads. Conclusions: the authors recommend methodic of cupping massage, combined with autogenic training. Autogenic training implies repeated pronouncing by instructor (or independently by sportswomen of text, describing coming turn by turn natural images. Peculiarities of massage were influence of massage passes on muscles and ligaments. Cupping massage was used after warming up classic massage techniques.

  11. Remodeling of Autogenous Bone Grafts after Osteotome Sinus Floor Elevation Assessed by Limited Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Nishida

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the radiographic appearance of bone graft domes longitudinally after osteotome sinus floor elevation using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT. This study presents the radiological findings of a 6-month follow-up CBCT study in maxillary osteotome sinus floor elevation. We examined 52 patients with a crestal bone height of less than 8 mm in the posterior maxilla who required sinus augmentation. Implants ( were subsequently placed in regenerated bone following osteotome sinus floor elevation; autogenous bone was used as the augmentation material. In all cases, the grafted augmentation material tended to be absorbed, but at least 1 mm of grafted augmentation material was recognized around the implant fixtures on CBCT at the second implant operation. The border between the grafted augmentation material and the existing bone was indistinct. The grafted area apical to the implants undergoes shrinkage and remodeling. It was suggested that sufficient grafted autogenous bone changes into bone to support an implant.

  12. Alcohol extract of Schinu sterebinthifolius raddi (anacardiaceae) as a local antimicrobial agent in severe autogenously fecal peritonitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Maria Cecília Santos Cavalcanti; Gadelha, Diego Nery Benevides; Oliveira, Thárcia Kiara Beserra; Brandt, Carlos Teixeira

    2014-01-01

    To develop an alcoholic extract of the inner bark of the Schinus terebinthifolius raddi and to test its impact on autogenously fecal peritonitis in Wistar rats. The inner bark of the Schinus terebinthifolius raddi was kept for seven days in 70% ethanol alcohol. The total elimination of the solvent was performed in a rotary evaporator under reduced pressure at 55-60°C. Four milliliter of this extract was injected, after 24 h, into the abdominal cavity of six out of eight survival rats that underwent autogenously fecal peritonitis with five milliliter of 10% filtered fecal suspension. They were clinically followed up for 45 days when they were euthanized. The necropsy findings (inventory) of the abdominal and thorax cavities were inspected and the main findings were recorded and photographed. The investigation was approved by the Ethics Committee. Two out of six survival rats that were critically ill after 24 h died within the 12 h after the extract injection into the abdominal cavity. Four rats that were also critically ill recovered and gradually became healthy, eating well, regaining weight and moving normally in the cage. At 45 days post severe peritonitis the necropsy findings revealed few signs of residual infection on the abdominal and thorax cavities. There were no bowel adhesions. The impact of alcoholic extract of the inner bark of the Schinus terebinthifolius raddi was considered very positive and promising as natural local antiseptic against very severe peritonitis in Wistar rats.

  13. Alveolar ridge preservation using autogenous tooth graft versus beta-tricalcium phosphate alloplast: A randomized, controlled, prospective, clinical pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Chaitanya Pradeep; Dani, Nitin Hemchandra; Khedkar, Smita Uday

    2016-01-01

    A randomized, prospective clinical, radiographical, and histological study was conducted to evaluate healing after alveolar ridge preservation technique using two different graft materials, namely, a novel autogenous graft material i. e., autogenous tooth graft (ATG) and beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) alloplast. Fifteen patients undergoing extraction of at least three teeth were selected. Atraumatic extractions were performed. Of the three extraction sockets, one was grafted with ATG, other with β-TCP, and the third was left ungrafted. Cone-beam computed tomography scans were taken immediately after grafting and 4 months postoperatively to check the changes in alveolar crest height and width at all the sites. Three patients in whom implant placement was done after complete healing; bone samples were harvested using a 3 mm diameter trephine during osteotomy preparation from both the ridge preserved sites and studied histologically. There was a statistically significant difference when the changes in width and height of alveolar crest were compared within all the three groups ( P alveolar crest height and width. Histological analysis also showed the same trend with more new bone formation at ATG-grafted sites as compared to β-TCP-grafted sites. Postextraction, ridge preservation leads to more predictable maintenance of alveolar ridge height and width. ATG as compared to β-TCP provided superior results. Based on this, we conclude that ATG material can serve as a better alternative to conventional bone graft materials.

  14. Audio-Visual and Autogenic Relaxation Alter Amplitude of Alpha EEG Band, Causing Improvements in Mental Work Performance in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikicin, Mirosław; Kowalczyk, Marek

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of regular audio-visual relaxation combined with Schultz's autogenic training on: (1) the results of behavioral tests that evaluate work performance during burdensome cognitive tasks (Kraepelin test), (2) changes in classical EEG alpha frequency band, neocortex (frontal, temporal, occipital, parietal), hemisphere (left, right) versus condition (only relaxation 7-12 Hz). Both experimental (EG) and age-and skill-matched control group (CG) consisted of eighteen athletes (ten males and eight females). After 7-month training EG demonstrated changes in the amplitude of mean electrical activity of the EEG alpha bend at rest and an improvement was significantly changing and an improvement in almost all components of Kraepelin test. The same examined variables in CG were unchanged following the period without the intervention. Summing up, combining audio-visual relaxation with autogenic training significantly improves athlete's ability to perform a prolonged mental effort. These changes are accompanied by greater amplitude of waves in alpha band in the state of relax. The results suggest usefulness of relaxation techniques during performance of mentally difficult sports tasks (sports based on speed and stamina, sports games, combat sports) and during relax of athletes.

  15. Workability’s recreation methodic with application of cupping massage and autogenic training of women student teams’ basketball players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozina Zh.L.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to experimentally subsituate effectiveness of non traditional complex methodic of recreation in female basketball players’ training process. Material: 22 basketball players of women student’s team participated in the research. Pedagogic testing was conducted by 12 tests in special physical and technical fitness. Psycho-physiological testing was conducted by program PSYCHO-DIAGNOSTIC. Groups were trained by identical programs during 9 weeks. Results: we authors observed increased physical and technical fitness of basketball players. Besides, quantity of mistakes in response to visual irritator reduced. It indirectly witnesses about strengthening of nervous processes. There was registered influence of mind on quality of organism’s recreation after physical loads. Conclusions: the authors recommend methodic of cupping massage, combined with autogenic training. Autogenic training implies repeated pronouncing by instructor (or independently by sportswomen of text, describing coming turn by turn natural images. Peculiarities of massage were influence of massage passes on muscles and ligaments. Cupping massage was used after warming up classic massage techniques.

  16. The role of ubiquinone supplementation on osteogenesis of nonvascularized autogenous bone graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irham Taufiqurrahman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ubiquinone is one of food supplement which is known have positive effect in wound healing. However the study to evaluate the possible role of ubiquinone in bone healing in autogenous bone grafting after mandibular resection has not been studied. An in vitro study is required to evaluate whether ubiquinone or coenzyme Q-10 (CoQ10 has a positive effect on osteogenesis. Viability test of CoQ10 and a model of osteogenic-induced and hypoxic-condition mesenchymal stem cell culture were established to support the study. Purpose: The study was made to evaluate the role of ubiquinone in osteogenesis by analyzing the toxicity effect and the optimal dose of CoQ10 that might interfere in bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cell (BM-MSC that was dose in cell culture medium. The BM-MSC culture under hypoxia condition were also observed. Method: The toxicity and the optimum viability concentration of ubiquinone were observed using MTT assay. The osteogenic differentiation under hypoxic condition was done on BM-MSC in osteogenic medium that composed of ascorbic acid, glycerolphosphate and dexamethasone in hypoxia chamber for 21 days. Osteogenic differentiation and cellular hypoxia features were tested with immunocytochemical staining using anti-Runx2 and anti-HIF1α monoclonal antibody, respectively. Result: The maximum density value of  1.826 was found in the group of ubiquinone concentration of 75μM/ml, increasing of in concentration of ubiquinone resulted with the decrease ofoptical density of CoQ10. Statistic analysis using Anova showed with no significant difference among groups with various concentration. Immunocytochemical staining showed that Runx2 expression in 3% hypoxia group (p<0.05. Conclusion:Ubiquinone was found non toxic in its optimum dose of 75μM/ml, showed by optimum result in the expression ofRunx2 and HIF1α further study is necessary to evaluate the angiogenic and osteogenic effect ofubiquione.

  17. Measuring Translation Literality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carl, Michael; Schaeffer, Moritz

    2017-01-01

    Tirkkonen-Condit (2005: 407–408) argues that “It looks as if literal translation is [the result of] a default rendering procedure”. As a corollary, more literal translations should be easier to process, and less literal ones should be associated with more cognitive effort. In order to assess...... this hypothesis, we operationalize translation literality as 1. the word-order similarity of the source and the target text and 2. the number of possible different translation renderings. We develop a literality metric and apply it on a set of manually word and sentence aligned alternative translations. Drawing...... on the monitor hypothesis (Tirkkonen-Condit 2005) and a model of shared syntax (Hartsuiker et al. 2004) we develop a model of translation effort based on priming strength: shared combinatorial nodes and meaning representations are activated through automatized bilingual priming processes where more strongly...

  18. Struggling with Translations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obed Madsen, Søren

    This paper shows empirical how actors have difficulties with translating strategy texts. The paper uses four cases as different examples of what happens, and what might be difficult, when actors translate organizational texts. In order to explore this, it draws on a translation training method from...... translation theory. The study shows that for those who have produced the text, it is difficult to translate a strategy where they have to change the words so others who don’t understand the language in the text can understand it. It also shows that for those who haven’t been a part of the production, it very...... challenge the notion that actors understand all texts and that managers per se can translate a text....

  19. Translational ecology for hydrogeology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, William H

    2013-01-01

    Translational ecology--a special discipline aimed to improve the accessibility of science to policy makers--will help hydrogeologists contribute to the solution of pressing environmental problems. Patterned after translational medicine, translational ecology is a partnership to ensure that the right science gets done in a timely fashion, so that it can be communicated to those who need it. © 2013, National Ground Water Association.

  20. The Metalanguage of Translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Amanda Case

    2013-04-01

    The Metalanguage of Translation, sections of which contain materials originally published in volume nineteen of the international translation studies journal, Target (2007, presents a compilation of eleven position articles, written by eleven contributors who draw attention to the often diametric variations between the practice and conceptualization of translation studies and the language we use to describe it. This volume provides a multiplicity of metalinguistic topics covering everything from terminology and bibliography to epistemology and localization.

  1. Variational Neural Machine Translation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Biao; Xiong, Deyi; Su, Jinsong; Duan, Hong; Zhang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Models of neural machine translation are often from a discriminative family of encoderdecoders that learn a conditional distribution of a target sentence given a source sentence. In this paper, we propose a variational model to learn this conditional distribution for neural machine translation: a variational encoderdecoder model that can be trained end-to-end. Different from the vanilla encoder-decoder model that generates target translations from hidden representations of source sentences al...

  2. Vajon in Translated Hungarian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Götz Andrea

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of the structures the discourse marker vajon forms in translated Hungarian fiction. Although translation data has been deployed in the study of discourse markers (Aijmer & Simon- Vandenbergen, 2004, such studies do not account for translation-specific phenomena which can influence the data of their analysis. In addition, translated discourse markers could offer insights into the idiosyncratic properties of translated texts as well as the culturally defined norms of translation that guide the creation of target texts. The analysis presented in this paper extends the cross-linguistic approach beyond contrastive analysis with a detailed investigation of two corpora of translated texts in order to identify patterns which could be a sign of translation or genre norms impacting the target texts. As a result, a distinct, diverging pattern emerges between the two corpora: patterns of explicit polarity show a marked difference. However, further research is needed to clarify whether these are due to language, genre, or translation norms.

  3. Translation as cultural mediator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana Petcu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyze the role that translation plays as cultural mediator, as it already widely accepted that translation involves not just two languages, but two cultures, two worlds that are brought into close contact with each other. Obviously, between the two cultures, the two worlds that translation compares and contrasts there are both similarities and dissimilarities. What is of interest to us is the way in which dissimilarities should be approached in the process of translation, whether they should be domesticated or foreignized as Venuti put it, whether the reader should be brought closer to the text or the text closer to the reader.

  4. Mandibular reconstruction: a histological and histomorphometric study on the use of autogenous scaffolds, particulate cortico-cancellous bone grafts and platelet rich plasma in goats.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fennis, J.P.M.; Stoelinga, P.J.W.; Jansen, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-eight goats underwent a continuity resection of the mandibular angle. In all goats primary reconstruction was carried out using specially designed pre-shaped osteosynthesis plates and monocortical screws. The original cortical scaffold was used to bridge the defect, filled with an autogenous

  5. Translational Health Economics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogowski, Wolf; John, Jürgen; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Scheffler, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    Translational health economics (THE) can be defined as the use of theoretical concepts and empirical methods in health economics to bridge the gap between the decision to fund and use a new health technology in clinical practice (the backend of translational medicine) and the decision to invest into

  6. Translating VDM to Alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lausdahl, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    specifications. However, to take advantage of the automated analysis of Alloy, the model-oriented VDM specifications must be translated into a constraint-based Alloy specifications. We describe how a sub- set of VDM can be translated into Alloy and how assertions can be expressed in VDM and checked by the Alloy...

  7. Semantics via Machine Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culhane, P. T.

    1977-01-01

    Recent experiments in machine translation have given the semantic elements of collocation in Russian more objective criteria. Soviet linguists in search of semantic relationships have attempted to devise a semantic synthesis for construction of a basic language for machine translation. One such effort is summarized. (CHK)

  8. Idioms and Back Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Frank

    2004-01-01

    The challenges of intercultural communication are an integral part of many undergraduate business communication courses. Marketing gaffes clearly illustrate the pitfalls of translation and underscore the importance of a knowledge of the culture with which one is attempting to communicate. A good way to approach the topic of translation pitfalls in…

  9. Students' Differentiated Translation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossé, Michael J.; Adu-Gyamfi, Kwaku; Chandler, Kayla

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how students translate between mathematical representations is of both practical and theoretical importance. This study examined students' processes in their generation of symbolic and graphic representations of given polynomial functions. The purpose was to investigate how students perform these translations. The result of the study…

  10. Staging Ethnographic Translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundberg, Pia

    2009-01-01

    Objectifying the cultural diversity of visual fieldmethods - and the analysis of balancing the cultural known and unknown through anthropological analysis (aided by the analytical concept translation (Edwin Ardener 1989))......Objectifying the cultural diversity of visual fieldmethods - and the analysis of balancing the cultural known and unknown through anthropological analysis (aided by the analytical concept translation (Edwin Ardener 1989))...

  11. Translation as (Global) Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Bruce; Tetreault, Laura

    2016-01-01

    This article explores translation as a useful point of departure and framework for taking a translingual approach to writing engaging globalization. Globalization and the knowledge economy are putting renewed emphasis on translation as a key site of contest between a dominant language ideology of monolingualism aligned with fast capitalist…

  12. Creativity, Culture and Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaee, Siamak; Wan Yahya, Wan Roselezam; Babaee, Ruzbeh

    2014-01-01

    Some scholars (Bassnett-McGuire, Catford, Brislin) suggest that a good piece of translation should be a strict reflection of the style of the original text while some others (Gui, Newmark, Wilss) consider the original text untranslatable unless it is reproduced. Opposing views by different critics suggest that translation is still a challenging…

  13. Translating the Folk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Bryan

    2000-01-01

    This article looks at issues affecting Robert Garioch's translation into Scots of a sonnet from Giuseppe Gioachino Belli's Romaneschi collection. It begins with the discussion of a problem involved in writing in dialects with no settled written standard. This 'standardizing' poetry is then looked at in terms of translation and theories of the…

  14. Translation between cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique de Oliveira Lee

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This article will question the pertinence of understanding interculturality in terms of translation between cultures. I shall study this hypothesis in two ways : 1 / the cosmopolitan horizon, which the idea of translation may implicate ; 2 / the critique of the premises of unique origin and homogeneity of cultures which this hypothesis makes possible.

  15. Sound Effects in Translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mees, Inger M.; Dragsted, Barbara; Gorm Hansen, Inge

    2015-01-01

    On the basis of a pilot study using speech recognition (SR) software, this paper attempts to illustrate the benefits of adopting an interdisciplinary approach in translator training. It shows how the collaboration between phoneticians, translators and interpreters can (1) advance research, (2) ha...

  16. Parametrization of translational surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Perez-Diaz, Sonia; Shen, Liyong

    2014-01-01

    The algebraic translational surface is a typical modeling surface in computer aided design and architecture industry. In this paper, we give a necessary and sufficient condition for that algebraic surface having a standard parametric representation and our proof is constructive. If the given algebraic surface is translational, then we can compute a standard parametric representation for the surface.

  17. [Translational dental medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Li-Wei; Wang, Qi; Zhou, Xue-Dong

    2011-06-01

    Over the last decade, as tremendous innovations have been achieved in scientific technology, translational medicine has come into the focus of academic medicine, and significant intellectual and financial efforts have been made to initiate a multitude of bench-to-bedside projects. The concept of translational medicine is described as the transfer of new understandings of disease mechanisms gained in the laboratory into the development of new methods for diagnosis, therapy, and prevention and their first testing in humans, meanwhile, translational medicine also is described as a patient-oriented population research and the translation of results from clinical studies into everyday clinical practice and health decision making. Translational medicine is a hot spot in recent academic field, and it is crucial for improving the living standard of population and renewing the research idea and technology. It has, however, significant obstacles during the approach of translational medicine. We here review the background, concept, current situation of translational dental medicine, key components and obstacles of translational medicine.

  18. Stimulating translational research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentires-Alj, Mohamed; Rajan, Abinaya; van Harten, Wim

    2015-01-01

    Translational research leaves no-one indifferent and everyone expects a particular benefit. We as EU-LIFE (www.eu-life.eu), an alliance of 13 research institutes in European life sciences, would like to share our experience in an attempt to identify measures to promote translational research...

  19. Translation as iniciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Martina Schuler Zea

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7968.2016v36n3p192        In an increasingly noteworthy manner translation appears as a process, device or configuration that is not limited do textual dimension, but inserted in the wider context of ritual, social and technical exchanges. This is a moment of overflowing or expansion of translation, which requires a specific attention. This extratextual proceeding of translation is taken here as a motif to rethink the practice and conceptualization of translation under the figure of shamanic initiation. Specifically, the purpose here is to elaborate articulations in the event of shamanic initiation as narrated in The falling sky (Kopenawa & Albert, 2010, 2013, 2015, emphasizing questions of access to otherness, interlocution with it and the ways of transformation that traverse the double field of anthropology and translation.

  20. Translation Ambiguity but Not Word Class Predicts Translation Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Anat; Kroll, Judith F.; Macwhinney, Brian

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the influence of word class and translation ambiguity on cross-linguistic representation and processing. Bilingual speakers of English and Spanish performed translation production and translation recognition tasks on nouns and verbs in both languages. Words either had a single translation or more than one translation. Translation…

  1. Examining English-German Translation Ambiguity Using Primed Translation Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddington, Chelsea M.; Tokowicz, Natasha

    2013-01-01

    Many words have more than one translation across languages. Such "translation-ambiguous" words are translated more slowly and less accurately than their unambiguous counterparts. We examine the extent to which word context and translation dominance influence the processing of translation-ambiguous words. We further examine how these factors…

  2. Translation Commentary: A Happy Medium between Translation Curriculum and EAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shei, Chris C.-C.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, "Translation Commentary" refers to an English composition written by a learner of both English and translation, submitted together with his or her translation output. In an academic setting combining English-to-Chinese translation and English as a second language, this article deals with both the issue of translation and that of…

  3. Allogenic and Autogenic Signals in the Detrital Zircon U-Pb Record of the Deep-Sea Bengal Fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, M. D.; Rogers, K. G.; Gleason, J. D.; Najman, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The Himalayan-sourced Ganges-Brahmaputra river system and the deep-sea Bengal Fan represent Earth's largest sediment-dispersal system. This presentation summarizes a new detrital zircon U-Pb (DZ) provenance record from the Bengal Fan from cores collected during IODP Expedition 354, with coring sites located 1350 km downdip from the shelf margin. Each of our 15 samples were collected from medium- to fine-grained turbidite sand and, based on shipboard biostratigraphic analyses, our samples are late Miocene to late Pleistocene in age. Each sample was analyzed by LA-ICPMS at the Arizona Laserchron facility, with an average of n=270 concordant U-Pb ages per sample. Our goals are to use these data to evaluate the influence of allogenic controls vs. autogenic processes on signal propagation from source-to-sink. At the first order, large-scale sediment transfer to the Bengal Fan clearly records the strong tectonic and climatic forcing associated with the Himalayas and Ganges-Brahmaputra system: after up to 2500 km of river transport, and 1350 km of transport in turbidity currents, the DZ record faithfully represents Himalayan source terrains. The sand-rich turbidite part of the record is nevertheless biased towards glacial periods when rivers extended across the shelf in response to climate-forced sea-level fall, and discharged directly to slope canyons. However, only part of the Bengal Fan DZ record represents either the Ganges or the Brahmaputra, with most samples representing varying degrees of mixing of sediments from the two systems: this mixing, or the lack thereof, represents the signal of autogenic avulsions on the delta plain that result in the two river systems delivering sediment separately to the shelf margin, or together as they do today. Within the allogenic framework established by tectonic processes, the climatic system, and global climate-forced sea-level change, the DZ U-Pb record of sediment mixing or the lack thereof provides a fingerprint of autogenic

  4. MCT-1 protein interacts with the cap complex and modulates messenger RNA translational profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinert, Line; Shi, B; Nandi, S

    2006-01-01

    -regulation of MCT-1 was able to modulate the translation profiles of BCL2L2, TFDP1, MRE11A, cyclin D1, and E2F1 mRNAs, despite equivalent levels of mRNAs in the cytoplasm. Our data establish a role for MCT-1 in translational regulation, and support a linkage between translational control and oncogenesis....

  5. Theory of Test Translation Error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano-Flores, Guillermo; Backhoff, Eduardo; Contreras-Nino, Luis Angel

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we present a theory of test translation whose intent is to provide the conceptual foundation for effective, systematic work in the process of test translation and test translation review. According to the theory, translation error is multidimensional; it is not simply the consequence of defective translation but an inevitable fact…

  6. Lessons (not) learned from mistakes about translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, Marilyn

    2007-11-15

    Some popular ideas about translational regulation in eukaryotes have been recognized recently as mistakes. One example is the rejection of a long-standing idea about involvement of S6 kinase in translation of ribosomal proteins. Unfortunately, new proposals about how S6 kinase might regulate translation are based on evidence that is no better than the old. Recent findings have also forced rejection of some popular ideas about the function of sequences at the 3' end of viral mRNAs and rejection of some ideas about internal ribosome entry sequences (IRESs). One long-held belief was that tissue-specific translation via an IRES underlies the neurotropism of poliovirus and the attenuation of Sabin vaccine strains. Older experiments that appeared to support this belief and recent experiments that refute it are discussed. The hypothesis that dyskeratosis congenita is caused by a defect in IRES-mediated translation is probably another mistaken idea. The supporting evidence, such as it is, comes from a mouse model of the disease and is contradicted by studies carried out with cells from affected patients. The growing use of IRESs as tools to study other questions about translation is discussed and lamented. The inefficient function of IRESs (if they are IRESs) promotes misunderstandings. I explain again why it is not valid to invoke a special mechanism of initiation based on the finding that edeine (at very low concentrations) does not inhibit the translation of a putative IRES from cricket paralysis virus. I explain why new assays, devised to rule out splicing in tests with dicistronic vectors, are not valid and why experiments with IRESs are not a good way to investigate the mechanism whereby microRNAs inhibit translation.

  7. Translational Epidemiology in Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, Myrna M.; Brown, Alan S.; Talati, Ardesheer

    2012-01-01

    Translational research generally refers to the application of knowledge generated by advances in basic sciences research translated into new approaches for diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of disease. This direction is called bench-to-bedside. Psychiatry has similarly emphasized the basic sciences as the starting point of translational research. This article introduces the term translational epidemiology for psychiatry research as a bidirectional concept in which the knowledge generated from the bedside or the population can also be translated to the benches of laboratory science. Epidemiologic studies are primarily observational but can generate representative samples, novel designs, and hypotheses that can be translated into more tractable experimental approaches in the clinical and basic sciences. This bedside-to-bench concept has not been explicated in psychiatry, although there are an increasing number of examples in the research literature. This article describes selected epidemiologic designs, providing examples and opportunities for translational research from community surveys and prospective, birth cohort, and family-based designs. Rapid developments in informatics, emphases on large sample collection for genetic and biomarker studies, and interest in personalized medicine—which requires information on relative and absolute risk factors—make this topic timely. The approach described has implications for providing fresh metaphors to communicate complex issues in interdisciplinary collaborations and for training in epidemiology and other sciences in psychiatry. PMID:21646577

  8. Exploring Translations Theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Autor: Anthony Pym

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7968.2016v36n3p214 This work is a translation of the chapter “Descriptions – the intellectual background” serving as a complement to the chapter 5 of the book titled Exploring Translations Studies (2010 by Anthony Pym. The chapter outlines the relationship between Russian Formalism and some of the strands of the Translation Studies which emerged during the 19th century. It brings to the fore works done in Prague (Prague Circle, Bratislava, Leipzig, Holland and Flanders focusing specially on the Tel-Aviv School of Itamar-Even and Gideon Toury, the main forerunners of the Descriptive Translation Studies (DTS. By analyzing this academic context, not only it describes the type of approaches those theorists suggested, but it also discusses the ups and downs of such paradigms problematizing concepts like “translation shifts”, “assumed translations” and “norms”. This translation aims at presenting and sharing Pym’s work as clearly and fluid as the original is, so that it serves as both a historical reference and an introductory text to Translation Studies.

  9. Exploring Translations Theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Pym

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This work is a translation of the chapter “Descriptions – the intellectual background” serving as a complement to the chapter 5 of the book titled Exploring Translations Studies (2010 by Anthony Pym. The chapter outlines the relationship between Russian Formalism and some of the strands of the Translation Studies which emerged during the 19th century. It brings to the fore works done in Prague (Prague Circle, Bratislava, Leipzig, Holland and Flanders focusing specially on the Tel-Aviv School of Itamar-Even and Gideon Toury, the main forerunners of the Descriptive Translation Studies (DTS. By analyzing this academic context, not only it describes the type of approaches those theorists suggested, but it also discusses the ups and downs of such paradigms problematizing concepts like “translation shifts”, “assumed translations” and “norms”. This translation aims at presenting and sharing Pym’s work as clearly and fluid as the original is, so that it serves as both a historical reference and an introductory text to Translation Studies.

  10. Autogenic-Feedback Training (AFT) as a preventive method for space motion sickness: Background and experimental design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowings, Patricia S.; Toscano, William B.

    1993-01-01

    Finding an effective treatment for the motion sickness-like symptoms that occur in space has become a high priority for NASA. The background research is reviewed and the experimental design of a formal life sciences shuttle flight experiment designed to prevent space motion sickness in shuttle crew members is presented. This experiment utilizes a behavioral medicine approach to solving this problem. This method, Autogenic-Feedback Training (AFT), involves training subjects to voluntarily control several of their own physiological responses to environmental stressors. AFT has been used reliably to increase tolerance to motion sickness during ground-based tests in over 200 men and women under a variety of conditions that induce motion sickness, and preliminary evidence from space suggests that AFT may be an effective treatment for space motion sickness as well. Proposed changes to this experiment for future manifests are included.

  11. A translational systems biology approach in both animals and humans identifies a functionally related module of accumbal genes involved in the regulation of reward processing and binge drinking in males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, David; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Ruggeri, Barbara; Maroteaux, Matthieu; Jia, Tianye; Cattrell, Anna; Nymberg, Charlotte; Banaschewski, Tobias; Bhattacharyya, Sohinee; Band, Hamid; Barker, Gareth; Bokde, Arun; Buchel, Christian; Carvalho, Fabiana; Conrod, Patricia; Desrivieres, Sylvane; Easton, Alanna; Fauth-Buehler, Mira; Fernandez-Medarde, Alberto; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jurgen; Garavanh, Hugh; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Lathrop, Mark; Lawrence, Claire; Loth, Eva; Mann, Karl; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Rotter, Andrea; Santos, Eugenio; Smolka, Michael; Sommer, Wolfgang; Mameli, Manuel; Spanagel, Rainer; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Mueller, Christian; Schumann, Gunter

    2016-04-01

    The mesolimbic dopamine system, composed primarily of dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area that project to striatal structures, is considered to be the key mediator of reinforcement-related mechanisms in the brain. Prompted by a genome-wide association meta-analysis implicating the Ras-specific guanine nucleotide-releasing factor 2 (RASGRF2) gene in the regulation of alcohol intake in men, we have recently shown that male Rasgrf2(-/-) mice exhibit reduced ethanol intake and preference accompanied by a perturbed mesolimbic dopamine system. We therefore propose that these mice represent a valid model to further elucidate the precise genes and mechanisms regulating mesolimbic dopamine functioning. Transcriptomic data from the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) of male Rasgrf2(-/-) mice and wild-type controls were analyzed by weighted gene coexpression network analysis (WGCNA). We performed follow-up genetic association tests in humans using a sample of male adolescents from the IMAGEN study characterized for binge drinking (n = 905) and ventral striatal activation during an fMRI reward task (n = 608). The WGCNA analyses using accumbal transcriptomic data revealed 37 distinct "modules," or functionally related groups of genes. Two of these modules were significantly associated with Rasgrf2 knockout status: M5 (p < 0.001) and M6 (p < 0.001). In follow-up translational analyses we found that human orthologues for the M5 module were significantly (p < 0.01) enriched with genetic association signals for binge drinking in male adolescents. Furthermore, the most significant locus, originating from the EH-domain containing 4 (EHD4) gene (p < 0.001), was also significantly associated with altered ventral striatal activity in male adolescents performing an fMRI reward task (pempirical < 0.001). It was not possible to determine the extent to which the M5 module was dysregulated in Rasgrf2(-/-) mice by perturbed mesolimbic dopamine signalling or by the loss of Rasgrf2

  12. Word Translation Entropy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaeffer, Moritz; Dragsted, Barbara; Hvelplund, Kristian Tangsgaard

    2016-01-01

    language activation during source text reading in translation, i.e. co-activation of the two linguistic systems, employed late eye movement measures or reaction times. The current study therefore aims to investigate if and to what extent earlier eye movement measures in reading for translation show...... evidence of co-activation. Results show that the number of translation alternatives for a single word and differences between source and target text in terms of word order have an effect on very early and late eye movement measures. Results are interpreted in terms of semantic and structural cross...

  13. Word Translation Entropy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaeffer, Moritz; Dragsted, Barbara; Hvelplund, Kristian Tangsgaard

    language activation during source text reading in translation, i.e. co-activation of the two linguistic systems, employed late eye movement measures or reaction times. The current study therefore aims to investigate if and to what extent earlier eye movement measures in reading for translation show...... evidence of co-activation. Results show that the number of translation alternatives for a single word and differences between source and target text in terms of word order have an effect on very early and late eye movement measures. Results are interpreted in terms of semantic and structural cross...

  14. Translation, Interpreting and Lexicography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Helle Vrønning; Tarp, Sven

    2018-01-01

    Translation, interpreting and lexicography represent three separate areas of human activity, each of them with its own theories, models and methods and, hence, with its own disciplinary underpinnings. At the same time, all three disciplines are characterized by a marked interdisciplinary dimension...... in the sense that their practice fields are typically ‘about something else’. Translators may, for example, be called upon to translate medical texts, and interpreters may be assigned to work on medical speeches. Similarly, practical lexicography may produce medical dictionaries. In this perspective, the three...

  15. Alveolar ridge preservation using autogenous tooth graft versus beta-tricalcium phosphate alloplast: A randomized, controlled, prospective, clinical pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaitanya Pradeep Joshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A randomized, prospective clinical, radiographical, and histological study was conducted to evaluate healing after alveolar ridge preservation technique using two different graft materials, namely, a novel autogenous graft material i. e., autogenous tooth graft (ATG and beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP alloplast. Materials and Methods: Fifteen patients undergoing extraction of at least three teeth were selected. Atraumatic extractions were performed. Of the three extraction sockets, one was grafted with ATG, other with β-TCP, and the third was left ungrafted. Cone-beam computed tomography scans were taken immediately after grafting and 4 months postoperatively to check the changes in alveolar crest height and width at all the sites. Three patients in whom implant placement was done after complete healing; bone samples were harvested using a 3 mm diameter trephine during osteotomy preparation from both the ridge preserved sites and studied histologically. Results: There was a statistically significant difference when the changes in width and height of alveolar crest were compared within all the three groups (P < 0.05. Among three sites, ATG-grafted sites showed the most superior results with a minimal reduction in alveolar crest height and width. Histological analysis also showed the same trend with more new bone formation at ATG-grafted sites as compared to β-TCP-grafted sites. Conclusion: Postextraction, ridge preservation leads to more predictable maintenance of alveolar ridge height and width. ATG as compared to β-TCP provided superior results. Based on this, we conclude that ATG material can serve as a better alternative to conventional bone graft materials.

  16. Influence of platelet-rich plasma on a bioglass and autogenous bone in sinus augmentation. An explorative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klongnoi, Boworn; Rupprecht, Stephan; Kessler, Peter; Thorwarth, Michael; Wiltfang, Joerg; Schlegel, Karl Andreas

    2006-06-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been introduced to the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery for a decade, but its beneficial effects on maxillary sinus augmentation remain unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the short- and long-term effects of PRP on osseointegration following single-stage sinus augmentation in a randomized prospective animal study. The maxillary premolars of 24 minipigs were extracted bilaterally and allowed to heal for 2 months. Consecutively all animals underwent bilateral sinus floor elevation using autogenous bone, Biogran as well as a combination of the materials with PRP. Three dental implants (Ankylos, Dentsply Co., Mannheim, Germany) were installed in each sinus simultaneously. Four animals were sacrificed at each period of observation (1, 2, 8 and 12 months). Microradiographic images of the specimens were made for quantitative evaluation of the bone-implant contact (BIC) and light microscopic images were made for qualitative analysis. An increment of the BIC during the observation time could be seen over the observation time in all groups. Autogenous bone exhibited a level of BIC from 25.1 +/- 9.96% at 1 month to 55.1 +/- 13.10% at 12 months; on adding PRP, the BIC ranged from 28.4 +/- 4.64% to 52.5 +/- 17.06%. Biogran with and without PRP led to BIC levels from 16.3 +/- 4.64% to 37.6 +/- 16.40% and 21.7 +/- 4.33% to 46.6 +/- 19.37%, respectively. The results of this study did not show a significantly positive effect of PRP on the BIC following sinus augmentation in both groups.

  17. Serologic profile of a cohort of pigs and antibody response to an autogenous vaccine for Actinobacillus suis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapointe, L; D'Allaire, S; Lacouture, S; Gottschalk, M

    2001-01-01

    Actinobacillus suis is a commensal opportunistic pathogen in swine. However, in recent years, an increasing prevalence of clinical signs associated with A. suis has been observed in high health status herds in North America. The objectives of the study were to assess the kinetics of antibodies to A. suis in pigs from a herd showing clinical signs of A. suis infection and, to evaluate the antibody response in gilts following vaccination with an autogenous vaccine. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a saline extract of boiled-formalinized whole cells of a field strain as the coating antigen was standardized. This ELISA was used as a tool for monitoring, in a comparative way, the variations in A. suis antibody levels. The herd selected for the serologic profile was negative for Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae infection and showed clinical signs of A. suis infection in 16 to 19-week-old pigs. A cohort of 20 pigs was blood sampled at 5, 8, 12, and 16 weeks of age. The lowest level of serum antibodies was observed between weeks 8 and 12, this probably corresponding to a decrease in maternal immunity. A marked increase in the antibody response was seen at 16-week of age, at the approximate time of onset of A. suis clinical signs in the herd. The evaluation of serum antibody responses to an autogenous vaccine revealed that the humoral immunity of gilts further increased following vaccination although the level of antibodies was already high prior to vaccination. The magnitude of the response to vaccination was higher when the level of antibodies was low prior to the first injection. The ELISA test seems to detect antibodies against the O-chain LPS.

  18. The effects of the centrifugation speed on the survival of autogenous fat grafts in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Mehmet; Kapı, Emin; Şirinoğlu, Hakan; Güvercin, Emre; Filinte, Gaye Taylan; Filinte, Deniz

    2016-06-01

    Purpose The most important problem in fat transplantation is the durability, which is closely associated with the applied technique. This study includes the comparison of different centrifugation speeds on the survival of autogenous fat grafts in rats. Materials and methods Forty-nine Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into seven groups and the left inguinal fat pad was extracted and re-implanted under the scalp after performing appropriate preparation processes. In the first group the fatty tissue was re-implanted in en-bloc fashion and in the second group it was re-implanted after trimming. After trimming, centrifugation with a G-force of 111.8 (1000 rpm) was performed in the third group, 447.2 (2000 rpm) in the fourth group, 1006.2 (3000 rpm) in the fifth group, 1788.8 (4000 rpm) in the sixth group, and 2795 (5000 rpm) in the seventh group for 4 minutes. The fat grafts were taken after 3 months and histopathological and statistical evaluations were performed. Results The rate of viable fat grafts was significantly higher in the 4th and 5th groups comparing to the first three groups. Total weight and volume amounts of the 4th and 5th groups were also significantly higher comparing to the first three groups. Conclusion Maximal long-term durability and fat cell viability results were obtained in the groups with 2000 rpm or 447.2 G-force/4 minutes and 3000 rpm or 1006.2 G-force/4 minutes centrifugation speed, indicating that 4 minutes centrifugation with an average G-force of 698.75 or 2500 rpm provides the best results for the survival of autogenous fat grafts.

  19. Nuclear Criticality Safety Handbook (English translation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This is an English translation of 'Nuclear Criticality Safety Handbook' compiled by Nuclear Materials Regulation Division in Nuclear Safety Bureau of Science and Technology Agency of Japan and published by Nikkan Shobo in 1988, which was originally written in Japanese. (author)

  20. Perceived radial translation during centrifugation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J.E.; Correia Gracio, B.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Linear acceleration generally gives rise to translation perception. Centripetal acceleration during centrifugation, however, has never been reported giving rise to a radial, inward translation perception. OBJECTIVE: To study whether centrifugation can induce a radial translation

  1. Perceived radial translation during centrifugation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J.E.; Correia Grácio, B.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Linear acceleration generally gives rise to translation perception. Centripetal acceleration during centrifugation, however, has never been reported giving rise to a radial, inward translation perception. OBJECTIVE: To study whether centrifugation can induce a radial translation

  2. Wearable Language Translation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carroll, Wendell

    1999-01-01

    VIA Team Mission Statement: To develop a near real time, two way, mobile, lightweight, robust and low cost multi-lingual language translation device that can be operated with minimal training in a hands free manner...

  3. A phased translation function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Read, R.J.; Schierbeek, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    A phased translation function, which takes advantage of prior phase information to determine the position of an oriented mulecular replacement model, is examined. The function is the coefficient of correlation between the electron density computed with the prior phases and the electron density of the translated model, evaluated in reciprocal space as a Fourier transform. The correlation coefficient used in this work is closely related to an overlap function devised by Colman, Fehlhammer and Bartels. Tests with two protein structures, one of which was solved with the help of the phased translation function, show that little phase information is required to resolve the translation problem, and that the function is relatively insensitive to misorientation of the model. (orig.)

  4. Russian translations for Cochrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudina, E V; Ziganshina, L E

    2015-01-01

    Cochrane collaboration has made a huge contribution to the development of evidence-based medicine; Cochrane work is the international gold standard of independent, credible and reliable high-quality information in medicine. Over the past 20 years the Cochrane Collaboration helped transforming decision-making in health and reforming it significantly, saving lives and contributing to longevity [1]. Until recently, Cochrane evidence were available only in English, which represents a significant barrier to their wider use in non-English speaking countries. To provide access to evidence, obtained from Cochrane Reviews, for health professionals and general public (from non-English-speaking countries), bypassing language barriers, Cochrane collaboration in 2014 initiated an international project of translating Plain language summaries of Cochrane Reviews into other languages [2, 3]. Russian translations of Plain language summaries were started in May 2014 by the team from Kazan Federal University (Department of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology; 2014-2015 as an Affiliated Centre in Tatarstan of the Nordic Cochrane Centre, since August 2015 as Cochrane Russia, a Russian branch of Cochrane Nordic, Head - Liliya Eugenevna Ziganshina) on a voluntary basis. To assess the quality of Russian translations of Cochrane Plain Language Summaries (PLS) and their potential impact on the Russian speaking community through user feedback with the overarching aim of furthering the translations project. We conducted the continuous online survey via Google Docs. We invited respondents through the electronic Russian language discussion forum on Essential Medicines (E-lek), links to survey on the Russian Cochrane.org website, invitations to Cochrane contributors registered in Archie from potential Russian-speaking countries. We set up the survey in Russian and English. The respondents were asked to respond to the questionnaire regarding the relevance and potential impact of the Cochrane Russian

  5. Translation and Creation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Bezerra

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article begins with the differences betweenscientific and fictional translations, and focus on the second.The fictional translation works with meanings, opens itselfto the plurissignification in the purpose to create a similarity of the dissimilarity; in this process, the translator does nottranslate a language, but what a creative individuality makeswith a language. At last there is an approach to the knowledgeand skills necessaries to a translator of literature: theknowledge of the theories of the literature and of thetranslation, the capacity to preserve the national color ofthe original text and at the same time to respect the arrivallanguage, and the sensibility to his national languagevariations present in the daily and in the literary spheres.

  6. Translation for language purposes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjoldager, Anne

    2003-01-01

    The paper describes the background, subjects, assumptions, procedure, and preliminary results of a small-scale experimental study of L2 translation (Danish into English) and picture verbalization in L2 (English)....

  7. Lost in Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lass, Wiebke; Reusswig, Fritz

    2014-05-01

    Lost in Translation? Introducing Planetary Boundaries into Social Systems. Fritz Reusswig, Wiebke Lass Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany Identifying and quantifying planetary boundaries by interdisciplinary science efforts is a challenging task—and a risky one, as the 1972 Limits to Growth publication has shown. Even if we may be assured that scientific understanding of underlying processes of the Earth system has significantly improved since then, the challenge of translating these findings into the social systems of the planet remains crucial for any kind of action, and in many respects far more challenging. We would like to conceptualize what could also be termed a problem of coupling social and natural systems as a nested set of social translation processes, well aware of the limited applicability of the language-related translation metaphor. Societies must, first, perceive these boundaries, and they have to understand their relevance. This includes, among many other things, the organization of transdisciplinary scientific cooperation. They will then have to translate this understood perception into possible actions, i.e. strategies for different local bodies, actors, and institutional settings. This implies a lot of 'internal' translation processes, e.g. from the scientific subsystem to the mass media, the political and the economic subsystem. And it implies to develop subsystem-specific schemes of evaluation for these alternatives, e.g. convincing narratives, cost-benefit analyses, or ethical legitimacy considerations. And, finally, societies do have to translate chosen action alternatives into monitoring and evaluation schemes, e.g. for agricultural production or renewable energies. This process includes the continuation of observing and re-analyzing the planetary boundary concept itself, as a re-adjustment of these boundaries in the light of new scientific insights cannot be excluded. Taken all together, societies may well

  8. Lost in Translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Askehave, Inger; Zethsen, Karen Korning

    2011-01-01

    This article deals with an aspect of patient information that differs somewhat from the traditional scope of this journal; namely the linguistic and translational aspects of Patient Information Leaflets (PILs). During the past decade much work has been dedicated to making the English PILs...... as informative and lay-friendly as possible. However, much of the good work is ruined when the PIL is translated. Why is this so and what can be done about it?...

  9. Jungmann's translation of Paradise Lost

    OpenAIRE

    Janů, Karel

    2014-01-01

    This thesis examines Josef Jungmann's translation of John Milton's Paradise Lost. Josef Jungmann was one of the leading figures of the Czech National Revival and translated Milton 's poem between the years 1800 and 1804. The thesis covers Jungmann's theoretical model of translation and presents Jungmann's motives for translation of Milton's epic poem. The paper also describes the aims Jungmann had with his translation and whether he has achieved them. The reception Jungmann's translation rece...

  10. Translating Alcohol Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batman, Angela M.; Miles, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol use disorder (AUD) and its sequelae impose a major burden on the public health of the United States, and adequate long-term control of this disorder has not been achieved. Molecular and behavioral basic science research findings are providing the groundwork for understanding the mechanisms underlying AUD and have identified multiple candidate targets for ongoing clinical trials. However, the translation of basic research or clinical findings into improved therapeutic approaches for AUD must become more efficient. Translational research is a multistage process of streamlining the movement of basic biomedical research findings into clinical research and then to the clinical target populations. This process demands efficient bidirectional communication across basic, applied, and clinical science as well as with clinical practitioners. Ongoing work suggests rapid progress is being made with an evolving translational framework within the alcohol research field. This is helped by multiple interdisciplinary collaborative research structures that have been developed to advance translational work on AUD. Moreover, the integration of systems biology approaches with collaborative clinical studies may yield novel insights for future translational success. Finally, appreciation of genetic variation in pharmacological or behavioral treatment responses and optimal communication from bench to bedside and back may strengthen the success of translational research applications to AUD. PMID:26259085

  11. Revisiting Translation Strategies and Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngoran Constantine Tardzenyuy

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Many translation researchers, scholars and students or trainees have the tendency to use the terms ‘translation strategy’,’ translation technique’  ‘translation method’ and ‘translation procedure’ invariably, and sometimes with varying shades of meaning This paper attempts to define, distinguish and clarify these terms in a bid to give the study of translation the scientific basis it deserves, given that scientific terminology is bound to be clear and unequivocal. Employing the qualitative research method and secondary or documentary sources, the paper provides elaborate explanations of the terms using sourced and invented examples. The paper concludes that the term ‘translation strategy’ should be used strictly to refer to a global or general decision a translator takes before engaging  in the translation of any text. Such a general decision could concern the issue of whether the translation would be literal, foreignized or source-text oriented; or whether it would be free, oblique, domesticated or target-text-oriented. On the other hand, the paper conclusively contends that all the other terms, that is to say, ‘translation technique, ‘translation procedure’ and ‘translation method’ should be used to refer to tools or operational measures deployed   by the translator in the course of actual translation. In other words, they should be used as mechanisms for effecting general or globalizing translation strategies. Keywords: Translation, Strategy, Translation, Technique, Foreignization, Domestication.

  12. Challenges in legal translation - revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Simonnæs

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to discuss challenges in legal translation from the view of a teacher who evaluates the work of semi-professional translators in a special setting. Recurrent translation errors may subsequently be used as a pedagogical resource in specialised translator training. The observation of recurrent challenges confronting the candidates in legal translation and the absence of formal translator training programs are the reasons why NHH now offers an on-line course in legal translation, JurDist, focusing i.a. on useful translation strategies.

  13. The Effect of Translators' Emotional Intelligence on Their Translation Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varzande, Mohsen; Jadidi, Esmaeil

    2015-01-01

    Translators differ from each other in many ways in terms of their knowledge, professional and psychological conditions that may directly influence their translation. The present study aimed at investigating the impact of translators' Emotional Intelligence on their translation quality. Following a "causal-comparative study," a sample of…

  14. The Impact of Translators' Academic Experience on Their Translation Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varzande, Mohsen; Jadidi, Esmaeil

    2015-01-01

    Translators differ from each other in many ways in terms of their knowledge and professional conditions that may directly influence their translation. The present study aimed at investigating the impact of translators' academic experience on their translation quality. Following a "causal-comparative study", a sample of 100 male and…

  15. Translating Signs, Producing Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett Neilson

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper moves between two streets: Liverpool Road in the Sydney suburb of Ashfield and Via Sarpi in the Italian city of Milan. What connects these streets is that both have become important sites for businesses in the Chinese diaspora. Moreover, both are streets on which locals have expressed desires for Chinese signs to be translated into the national lingua franca. The paper argues that the cultural politics inherent in this demand for translation cannot be fully understood in the context of national debates about diversity and integration. It is also necessary to consider the emergence of the official Chinese Putonghua as global language, which competes with English but also colonizes dialects and minority languages. In the case of these dual language signs, the space between languages can neither be reduced to a contact zone of minority and majority cultures nor celebrated as a ‘third space’ where the power relations implied by such differences are subverted. At stake is rather a space characterised by what Naoki Sakai calls the schema of co-figuration, which allows the representation of translation as the passage between two equivalents that resemble each other and thus makes possible their determination as conceptually different and comparable. Drawing on arguments about translation and citizenship, the paper critically interrogates the ethos of interchangeability implied by this regime of translation. A closing argument is made for a vision of the common that implies neither civilisational harmony nor the translation of all values into a general equivalent. Primary sources include government reports, internet texts and media stories. These are analyzed using techniques of discourse analysis and interpreted with the help of secondary literature concerning globalisation, language and migration. The disciplinary matrix cuts and mixes between cultural studies, translation studies, citizenship studies, globalization studies and

  16. Translation as Genesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Gilberthorpe

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Translation of literature is generally understood as a copy of an original. As such, it finds itself compared negatively to the original; judged and found lacking either the style or meaning of the original text it was seeking to translate. However, this paper will explore the relationship between the text and its translation through the work of Jacques Derrida and his neologisms such as the supplement and différance in addition to the work of Walter Benjamin. Through understanding the translation as a supplement, this paper will explore whether the original text was complete in and of itself. Through this and Derrida’s understanding of the play of language, I argue that translation can be understood as the palingenesis of literature, as it is only through translation that literature is reborn and lives on. Moreover, this paper will conclude with an examination of Blanchot’s distinction between the Book and the book in order to argue that literature is in itself a form of translation. Thus, the relationship between translation and literature is one of a cycle of genesis and palingenesis, as translation finds itself at both the beginning and continual rebirth of literature. La traduzione letteraria viene generalmente intesa come la copia di un originale. In quanto tale essa viene considerata negativamente in rapporto a quest’ultimo, giudicata manchevole quanto a stile o contenuto rispetto al testo originale che cerca di tradurre. Questo articolo intende esaminare la relazione tra il testo e la sua traduzione attraverso l’opera di Jacques Derrida e i suoi neologismi, come supplemento e différance, e sulla scorta degli studi di Walter Benjamin. Considerando la traduzione come un supplemento, l’articolo indaga se l’originale sia completo in e di per se stesso. Attraverso questo concetto e la prospettiva di Derrida sul gioco del linguaggio, la tesi sostenuta è che la traduzione possa essere considerata come palingenesi della

  17. Translation: Elements of a Craft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiderson, Mazin A.

    An overview of the skills, techniques, tools, and compensation of language translators and interpreters is offered. It begins with a definition of translation and a brief history of translation in the western world. Basic principles of translation dating back to Roman writers are also outlined. A five-step process in producing a good translation…

  18. Translational autocontrol of the Escherichia coli hfq RNA chaperone gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecerek, Branislav; Moll, Isabella; Bläsi, Udo

    2005-06-01

    The conserved bacterial RNA chaperone Hfq has been shown to play an important role in post-transcriptional regulation. Here, we demonstrate that Hfq synthesis is autoregulated at the translational level. We have mapped two Hfq binding sites in the 5'-untranslated region of hfq mRNA and show that Hfq binding inhibits formation of the translation initiation complex. In vitro translation and in vivo studies further revealed that Hfq binding to both sites is required for efficient translational repression of hfq mRNA.

  19. Dysregulated Translational Control: From Brain Disorders to Psychoactive Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela eSantini

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, a plethora of studies utilizing pharmacological, biochemical, and genetic approaches have shown that precise translational control is required for long-lasting synaptic plasticity and the formation of long-term memory. Moreover, more recent studies indicate that alterations in translational control are a common pathophysiological feature of human neurological disorders, including developmental disorders, neuropsychiatric disorders, and neurodegenerative diseases. Finally, translational control mechanisms are susceptible to modification by psychoactive drugs. Taken together, these findings point to a central role for translational control in the regulation of synaptic function and behavior.

  20. Engineering in translational medicine

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book covers a broad area of engineering research in translational medicine. Leaders in academic institutions around the world contributed focused chapters on a broad array of topics such as: cell and tissue engineering (6 chapters), genetic and protein engineering (10 chapters), nanoengineering (10 chapters), biomedical instrumentation (4 chapters), and theranostics and other novel approaches (4 chapters). Each chapter is a stand-alone review that summarizes the state-of-the-art of the specific research area. Engineering in Translational Medicine gives readers a comprehensive and in-depth overview of a broad array of related research areas, making this an excellent reference book for scientists and students both new to engineering/translational medicine and currently working in this area.

  1. Translational research in medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakir Mehić

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Translational medicine is a medical practice based on interventional epidemiology. It is regarded by its proponents as a natural progression from Evidence-Based Medicine. It integrates research from the basic sciences, social sciences and political sciences with the aim of optimizing patient care and preventive measures which may extend beyond healthcare services. In short, it is the process of turning appropriate biological discoveries into drugs and medical devices that can be used in the treatment of patients.[1]Scientific research and the development of modern powerful techniques are crucial for improving patient care in a society that is increasingly demanding the highest quality health services.[2] Indeed, effective patient care requires the continuous improvement of knowledge on the pathophysiology of the diseases, diagnostic procedures and therapeutic tools available. To this end, development of both clinical and basic research in health sciences is required. However, what is most effective in improving medical knowledge, and hence patient care, is the cross-fertilization between basic and clinical science. This has been specifically highlighted in recent years with the coining of the term “translational research”.[3] Translational research is of great importance in all medical specialties.Translational Research is the basis for Translational Medicine. It is the process which leads from evidence based medicine to sustainable solutions for public health problems.[4] It aims to improve the health and longevity of the world’s populations and depends on developing broad-based teams of scientists and scholars who are able to focus their efforts to link basic scientific discoveries with the arena of clinical investigation, and translating the results of clinical trials into changes in clinical practice, informed by evidence from the social and political sciences. Clinical science and ecological support from effective policies can

  2. Translational Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issenberg, S. Barry; Cohen, Elaine R.; Barsuk, Jeffrey H.; Wayne, Diane B.

    2012-01-01

    Medical education research contributes to translational science (TS) when its outcomes not only impact educational settings, but also downstream results, including better patient-care practices and improved patient outcomes. Simulation-based medical education (SBME) has demonstrated its role in achieving such distal results. Effective TS also encompasses implementation science, the science of health-care delivery. Educational, clinical, quality, and safety goals can only be achieved by thematic, sustained, and cumulative research programs, not isolated studies. Components of an SBME TS research program include motivated learners, curriculum grounded in evidence-based learning theory, educational resources, evaluation of downstream results, a productive research team, rigorous research methods, research resources, and health-care system acceptance and implementation. National research priorities are served from translational educational research. National funding priorities should endorse the contribution and value of translational education research. PMID:23138127

  3. Asymmetries of Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Gorčeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Given the incompatibility between aesthetic and economic approaches to literary translation, the A. perceives a lack of creative initiative in the international socialisation of Bulgarian literature within its literary field (and especially in the subfield of criticism. Together with a probable inability to (reintegrate ethnically Bulgarian emigré writers, this gives Bulgarian literature a “repellent capacity”. Pointing at non-mainstream developments in both literature and translation may offer a way out: Gorčeva recommends abundant analytical and not self-exoticising self-representation. She also stresses that not only interliterary ‘export’ but also ‘import’ forges a literature’s status, and suggests that “small” literatures can take part in interliterary communication as equals in so far as they have the opportunity to keep on translating not in an assimilative but in a foreignising manner.

  4. Lack of beneficial effects of platelet-rich plasma on sinus augmentation using a fluorohydroxyapatite or autogenous bone: an explorative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klongnoi, Boworn; Rupprecht, Stephan; Kessler, Peter; Zimmermann, Robert; Thorwarth, Michael; Pongsiri, Sumitra; Neukam, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Wiltfang, Joerg; Schlegel, Karl Andreas

    2006-07-01

    Maxillary sinus augmentation is frequently necessary before placement of dental implants in the posterior maxilla. Besides autogenous bone graft, various bone substitutes have been used, with favourable results. Although platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been used in the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery for years, its beneficial effects on osseous regeneration still remain unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the short and long time effects of PRP on single-stage sinus augmentation using autogenous bone or a fluorohydroxyapatite (Algipore) in a randomized prospective animal study. After extraction of maxillary premolars of sixteen minipigs, the wounds were allowed to heal for 2 months. Then, sinus augmentations were performed bilaterally using one of the following grafting materials: autogenous bone and Algipore with or without PRP. Three dental implants (Ankylos) were installed in each sinus simultaneously. Four animals were euthanized at each period of observation (1, 2, 8 and 12 months). Implant-bearing specimens were sectioned bucco-lingually along the long axis of implants and undecalcified ground specimens were prepared. The bone-implant-contact (BIC) was measured by means of microradiographic examination. For histological evaluation, the specimens were stained with toluidin blue, and the percentage of the newly formed bone and the remaining bone substitute were evaluated. The grafting materials chosen showed increasing levels of BIC and newly formed bone throughout the period of observation in both PRP and non-PRP groups. Adding PRP resulted in lower BIC and newly formed bone compared with autogenous bone grafts or Algipore alone. However, a statistical significance was not found. The percentages of the remaining bone substitute in both the PRP and non-PRP groups were closely comparable in all observation periods. The application of PRP could not reveal significant beneficial effects on the BIC, the percentage of the newly formed bone and the

  5. Hernioplastia sin tensión con colgajo autógeno Hernioplasty without tension with autogenous flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gimel Sosa Martín

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCCIÓN. La hernia inguinal es una afección frecuente en la población joven, más en el sexo masculino que en el femenino. Su corrección se alcanza solo quirúrgicamente. Los objetivos del presente estudio fueron evaluar los resultados de la hernioplastia sin tensión con colgajo autógeno, así como determinar su utilidad para el tratamiento de hernias inguinales de grados 3, 4 y 5 según la Clasificación de Gilbert (1989 para este particular. MÉTODOS. Se realizó un estudio prospectivo y descriptivo de los pacientes atendidos por hernias inguinales a quienes se practicó una hernioplastia inguinal sin tensión, con colgajo triangular autógeno tomado de la aponeurosis del músculo recto abdominal. Las hernias correspondían a los grados 3, 4 y 5 según Clasificación de Gilbert, y fueron tratadas entre febrero de 2004 y febrero de 2008. RESULTADOS. La muestra estudiada estuvo constituida por 81 pacientes, todos del sexo masculino, de ellos 60 con hernias inguinales indirectas y 21 con hernias directas. La edad promedio fue de 31 años. El 71,60 % (58 pacientes fueron intervenidos quirúrgicamente en régimen de corta estadía, y los 23 restantes lo fueron en régimen de cirugía mayor ambulatoria (28,39 %. Las complicaciones consistieron en hematoma de la herida quirúrgica y orquitis posquirúrgica; no han aparecido reproducciones. El seguimiento de los pacientes se cumplimentó en consultas externas. CONCLUSIONES. La reparación de las hernias inguinales directas e indirectas con un colgajo autógeno es satisfactoria. Las complicaciones encontradas fueron el hematoma de la herida quirúrgica y la orquitis. No se han reportado recidivas de hernias con esta técnica quirúrgica.INTRODUCTION: Inguinal hernia is a frequent affection in young people with more predominance of male then the female one. Its correction is achieved only by surgery. Aims of present study wee to assess results of without tension Hernioplasty using autogenic

  6. Interdisciplinarity in Translation Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Lambert

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Since 1992 (Snell-Hornby et al. 1994 the Translation Studies * (EdT have claimed the status of "interdiscipline". In fact, there are still doubts about his academic status which is recent in relation to the profession. Since Holmes 1988 [1972], the development of the EdT was, several times, considered a success story; Although it is not clear whether the academic results (arguments and peculiar components linked to their prestige, such as books, societies, recognized scholars, congresses were more decisive than the translation market in the progressive recognition of WTS.

  7. Translating BPEL to FLOWer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Kristian Bisgaard

    FLOWer is a case handling tool made by Pallas-Athena for process management in the service industry. BPEL on the other hand is a language for web service orchestration, and has become a de facto standard, because of its popularity, for specifying workflow processes even though that was not its...... original purpose. This paper describe an approach translating BPLE to FLOWer, or more precisely form BPEL to CHIP. where CHIP is the interchange language that FLOWer import from and export to. The aim of the translation scheme that I give is to derive a CHIP specification that is behaviorally equivalent...

  8. Data format translation routines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burris, R.D.

    1981-02-01

    To enable the effective connection of several dissimilar computers into a network, modification of the data being passed from one computer to another may become necessary. This document describes a package of routines which permit the translation of data in PDP-8 formats to PDP-11 or DECsystem-10 formats or from PDP-11 format to DECsystem-10 format. Additional routines are described which permit the effective use of the translation routines in the environment of the Fusion Energy Division (FED) network and the Elmo Bumpy Torus (EBT) data base

  9. A randomized and blinded field trial to assess the efficacy of an autogenous vaccine to prevent naturally occurring infectious bovine keratoconjunctivis (IBK) in beef calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, L; O'Connor, A M; Maroney, M; Engelken, T; Cooper, V L; Kinyon, J; Plummer, P

    2009-07-23

    A randomized and blinded 2-arm parallel trial was conducted to assess the efficacy of an autogenous vaccine to prevent naturally occurring infectious bovine keratoconjunctivis (IBK) in beef calves. The trial was managed between May and November 2008 on university owned farms in Iowa and Wisconsin. The vaccine at Iowa contained Moraxella bovoculi (M. bovoculi) while the organism used in the Wisconsin herds vaccine was Branhemella ovis (B. ovis renamed M. ovis). Calves born between January and May 2008 without visible corneal lesions were randomized to receive an autogenous vaccine or placebo vaccine using a computer generated sequence. Two subcutaneous doses were administered 21-28 days apart. Allocation to treatment was concealed using bottles marked A or B. Staff were blind to the treatment allocation. The primary outcome was IBK cumulative incidence over the study period. The secondary outcome was weaning weight. Only the Iowa herd met the criteria for an "at-risk" herd i.e. >15% IBK in unvaccinated calves and M. bovoculi isolation from IBK cases. Analysis was "per-protocol". The cumulative incidence of IBK was 47/105 in vaccinated calves and 49/109 in unvaccinated calves (unadjusted odds ratio=0.99, 95% CI: 0.58-1.70). Weight at weaning did not differ between the vaccinated cohort 148kg (SD: +/-27) and unvaccinated cohort 146kg (SD: +/-26) (unadjusted beta=1.5 and 95% CI: -5.5 to 8.6). Results indicate that the autogenous vaccine was ineffective in this study population.

  10. The Long-Term Results of Frontalis Suspension Using Autogenous Fascia Lata in Children with Congenital Ptosis under 3 Years Old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lale Kozer Bilgin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To describe the long-term results of frontalis suspension using autogenous fascia lata in children with congenital ptosis under 3 years old. Methods. Forty three-eyes of 35 patients were enrolled in the study. Frontalis suspension using autogenous fascia lata was performed in all patients. The postoperative eyelid level, ptosis recurrence, visual acuity, and cosmetic results were evaluated. Results. The mean age of the patients was 16.8±9 months (7–36 months. The mean follow-up time was 52.8±15 months (14–95 months. All patients had good (ptosis <2 mm or moderate (2-3 mm ptosis eyelid level after the operation. All patients achieved satisfactory cosmetic results. Succesfull harvesting was performed in all cases and no additional materials or surgical manipulation were needed during the surgery. Conclusion. Frontalis suspension using autogenous fascia lata can be used in children under 3 years old without harvesting problems. Surgical experience and good knowledge of anatomy are important factors for successful results after the surgery.

  11. Translational control of Nrf2 within the open reading frame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Leal, Oscar; Barrero, Carlos A.; Merali, Salim

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Identification of a novel Nrf2 translational repression mechanism. •The repressor is within the 3′ portion of the Nrf2 ORF. •The translation of Nrf2 or eGFP is reduced by the regulatory element. •The translational repression can be reversed with synonymous codon substitutions. •The molecular mechanism requires the mRNA sequence, but not the encoded amino acids. -- Abstract: Nuclear Factor Erythroid 2-Related Factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that is essential for the regulation of an effective antioxidant and detoxifying response. The regulation of its activity can occur at transcription, translation and post-translational levels. Evidence suggests that under environmental stress conditions, new synthesis of Nrf2 is required – a process that is regulated by translational control and is not fully understood. Here we described the identification of a novel molecular process that under basal conditions strongly represses the translation of Nrf2 within the open reading frame (ORF). This mechanism is dependent on the mRNA sequence within the 3′ portion of the ORF of Nrf2 but not in the encoded amino acid sequence. The Nrf2 translational repression can be reversed with the use of synonymous codon substitutions. This discovery suggests an additional layer of control to explain the reason for the low Nrf2 concentration under quiescent state

  12. TRANSLATION ANALYSIS IN BILINGUAL TOURISM BROCHURE: TRANSLATING INDONESIAN TO ENGLISH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elysa Hartati

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The tourism brochure is considered to be the product of ethnographic translation. The methods used to translate are varied. This paper aims to see what kinds of methods used to translate from Indonesian to English in the tourism brochure, to see the problems emerge in the translation product of tourism brochure, and to find the solution to encounter the problems emerge in the translation product of tourism brochure. Journal articles and book references are mainly the source of this study. From the analysis result, it was shown that literal translation, faithful translation, free translation, and communicative translation were used to translate the text. However, the methods which more stressed on source language were mostly used in translating this product since the influence of Indonesian language still existed on them. Therefore, the product of the translation sometimes was not natural as English as the native-like. It happened on the grammatical function mostly, spelling and punctuation, and also the choice of words which then influenced the evaluation of translation product; they are accuracy, readability, and naturalness. Therefore, it is recommended for the translators to be aware of those components mentioned above. Moreover this is a tourism brochure which is used to promote Indonesia tourism especially for Central Java. The foreigners will need it to guide them go around this province, so that the information given should be acceptable in content and context of tourism.

  13. Innovation, Translation, and Cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-03-01

    The 9th Wound Healing and Tissue Repair and Regeneration Annual Meeting of Chinese Tissue Repair Society was hold in Wuhan, China. This meeting was focused on the innovation, translation application, and cooperation in wound care both in China and other countries. More than 400 delegates took part in this meeting and communicated successfully. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Translating Dyslexia across Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabel, Lisa A.; Manglani, Monica; Escalona, Nicholas; Cysner, Jessica; Hamilton, Rachel; Pfaffmann, Jeffrey; Johnson, Evelyn

    2016-01-01

    Direct relationships between induced mutation in the "DCDC2" candidate dyslexia susceptibility gene in mice and changes in behavioral measures of visual spatial learning have been reported. We were interested in determining whether performance on a visual-spatial learning and memory task could be translated across species (study 1) and…

  15. Intermediation, Brokerage and Translation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hönke, Jana; Müller, Markus-Michael; Risse, Thomas; Draude, Anke; Börzel, Tanja

    2018-01-01

    Brokerage, a term prominent in the 1960s and 1970s, has returned. A huge literature analyses how brokers and intermediators— such as government officials, heads of non-governmental organization (NGOs), translators, neo-traditional authorities— strategically negotiate flows of resources and political

  16. Made in translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaput, John C.

    2018-03-01

    Evolution of highly functionalized DNA could enable the discovery of artificial nucleic acid sequences with different properties to natural DNA. Now, an artificial translation system has been designed that can support the evolution of non-natural sequence-defined nucleic acid polymers carrying eight different functional groups on 32 codons.

  17. Machine Aids to Translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, Karl-Heinz

    1981-01-01

    Describes the TEAM Program System of the Siemens Language Services Department, particularly the main features of its terminology data bank. Discusses criteria to which stored terminology must conform and methods of data bank utilization. Concludes by summarizing the consequences that machine-aided translation development has had for the…

  18. TRANSLATING SERVICE TECHNICAL PROSE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of technical literature: advertising agencies dealing with clients in the technical fields, workshops ..... editing, a subject specialist. (preferably a physician au fait with aerospace matters), and two good translators. Having all the resources at hand, the teams seclude themselves with all their allocated documents and the senior.

  19. Word Translation Entropy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaeffer, Moritz; Dragsted, Barbara; Hvelplund, Kristian Tangsgaard

    This study reports on an investigation into the relationship between the number of translation alternatives for a single word and eye movements on the source text. In addition, the effect of word order differences between source and target text on eye movements on the source text is studied. In p...

  20. Word Translation Entropy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaeffer, Moritz; Dragsted, Barbara; Hvelplund, Kristian Tangsgaard

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on an investigation into the relationship between the number of translation alternatives for a single word and eye movements on the source text. In addition, the effect of word order differences between source and target text on eye movements on the source text is studied. In p...

  1. Translation of research outcome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    unhcc

    2017-01-03

    Jan 3, 2017 ... introducing implementation research, implementation science, knowledge translation to improve the role of research in development programs including health policies and programs. In Ethiopia, health sector felt the gap between health research and health policy, strategy and. 2 CNN TV host's statement.

  2. Regulation of the put Operon in SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM: Characterization of Promoter and Operator Mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Hahn, Donald R.; Maloy, Stanley R.

    1986-01-01

    The two genes required for proline utilization by S. typhimurium form a divergent operon. Expression of the put operon is induced by proline and subject to catabolite repression. Genetic evidence suggests that putA protein autogenously represses transcription of the putA and putP genes. In order to establish the molecular mechanism of put operon regulation we isolated regulatory mutations in the put control region. These mutants were selected using two phenotypes: (1) the ability to degrad...

  3. Urethral Reconstruction Using Mesothelial Cell-Seeded Autogenous Granulation Tissue Tube: An Experimental Study in Male Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shiwei; Xu, Zhonghua; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Yan, Lei; Zhou, Zunlin; Gu, Gangli

    2017-01-01

    Objective . This study was to evaluate the utility of the compound graft for tubularized urethroplasty by seeding mesothelial cells onto autogenous granulation tissue. Methods . Silastic tubes were implanted subcutaneously in 18 male rabbits, of which nine underwent omentum biopsies simultaneously for in vitro expansion of mesothelial cells. The granulation tissue covering the tubes was harvested 2 weeks after operation. Mesothelial cells were seeded onto and cocultured with the tissue for 7 days. A pendulous urethral segment of 1.5 cm was totally excised. Urethroplasty was performed with mesothelial cell-seeded tissue tubes in an end-to-end fashion in nine rabbits and with unseeded grafts in others as controls. Serial urethrograms were performed at 1, 2, and 6 months postoperatively. Meanwhile, the neourethra was harvested and analyzed grossly and histologically. Results . Urethrograms showed cell-seeded grafts maintained wide at each time point, while strictures formation was found in unseeded grafts. Histologically, layers of urothelium surrounded by increasingly organized smooth muscles were observed in seeded grafts. In contrast, myofibroblasts accumulation and extensive scarring occurred in unseeded grafts. Conclusions . Mesothelial cell-seeded granulation tissue tube can be successfully used for tubularized urethroplasty in male rabbits.

  4. Effect of fibrin glue derived from snake venom on the viability of autogenous split-thickness skin graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.C. Rahal

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of snake venom derived from fibrin glue on the viability of split-thickness skin graft. Nine crossbreed dogs were used. Full-thickness skin segments measuring 4 x 4 cm were bilaterally excised from the proximal radial area on each dog. A split-thickness skin graft was harvestedfrom left lateral thoracic area using a freehand graft knife, and was secured to the left recipient bed using several simple interrupted sutures of 3-0 nylon (sutured graft. A split-thickness skin graft was harvested from the right lateral thoracic area using a graft knife. Fibrin glue derived from snake venom was applied to the recipient bed, and 8 equidistant simple interrupted sutures of 3-0 nylon were used to secure the skin graft (glued graft. Viable and nonviable areas were traced on a transparent sheet and measured using a Nikon Photomicroscope connected to a KS-300 image analysis system. The skin graft and recipient bed were collected from three dogs at day 7, 15, and 30 postoperative. The glued grafts had statistically higher graft viability than sutured grafts. Histological examination showed that the tissue repair process in the glued grafts was more accentuated than sutured grafts. It was possible to conclude that fibrin glue derived from snake venom increased survival of autogenous split-thickness skin graft.

  5. Bimaxillary protrusion with an atrophic alveolar defect: orthodontics, autogenous chin-block graft, soft tissue augmentation, and an implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Grace S C; Chang, Chris H N; Roberts, W Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Bimaxillary protrusion in a 28-year-old woman was complicated by multiple missing, restoratively compromised, or hopeless teeth. The maxillary right central incisor had a history of avulsion and replantation that subsequently evolved into generalized external root resorption with Class III mobility and severe loss of the supporting periodontium. This complex malocclusion had a discrepancy index of 21, and 8 additional points were scored for the atrophic dental implant site (maxillary right central incisor). The comprehensive treatment plan included extraction of 4 teeth (both maxillary first premolars, the maxillary right central incisor, and the mandibular right first molar), orthodontic closure of all spaces except for the future implant site (maxillary right central incisor), augmentation of the alveolar defect with an autogenous chin-block graft, enhancement of the gingival biotype with a connective tissue graft, and an implant-supported prosthesis. Orthodontists must understand the limitations of bone grafts. Augmented alveolar defects are slow to completely turn over to living bone, so they are usually good sites for implants but respond poorly to orthodontic space closure. However, postsurgical orthodontic treatment is often indicated to optimally finish the esthetic zone before placing the final prosthesis. The latter was effectively performed for this patient, resulting in a total treatment time of about 36 months for comprehensive interdisciplinary care. An excellent functional and esthetic result was achieved. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. 48 CFR 52.225-14 - Inconsistency between English Version and Translation of Contract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... English Version and Translation of Contract. 52.225-14 Section 52.225-14 Federal Acquisition Regulations... CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.225-14 Inconsistency between English Version and Translation of... and Translation of Contract (FEB 2000) In the event of inconsistency between any terms of this...

  7. The Impact of Machine Translation and Computer-aided Translation on Translators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hao

    2018-03-01

    Under the context of globalization, communications between countries and cultures are becoming increasingly frequent, which make it imperative to use some techniques to help translate. This paper is to explore the influence of computer-aided translation on translators, which is derived from the field of the computer-aided translation (CAT) and machine translation (MT). Followed by an introduction to the development of machine and computer-aided translation, it then depicts the technologies practicable to translators, which are trying to analyze the demand of designing the computer-aided translation so far in translation practice, and optimize the designation of computer-aided translation techniques, and analyze its operability in translation. The findings underline the advantages and disadvantages of MT and CAT tools, and the serviceability and future development of MT and CAT technologies. Finally, this thesis probes into the impact of these new technologies on translators in hope that more translators and translation researchers can learn to use such tools to improve their productivity.

  8. Progress in Documentation: Machine Translation and Machine-Aided Translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the prospects for fully automatic machine translation of good quality. Sections include history and background, operational and experimental machine translation systems of recent years, descriptions of interactive systems and machine-assisted translation, and a general survey of present problems and future possibilities. (VT)

  9. (Con)figuring gender in Bible translation: Cultural, translational and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The gendered intersection of cultural studies and Bible translation is under acknowledged. Accounting for gender criticism in translation work requires, besides responsible theory and practice of translation, also attention to interwoven gender critical aspects. After a brief investigation of the intersections between biblical, ...

  10. A Writer's Thoughts on Translation and Always Living in Translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosin, Marjorie; Jones, Robin

    2000-01-01

    Discusses how it feels to be a poet who writes in Spanish and has her work translated, examining the author's immigration experiences and noting the translator's contributions in making her work accessible across languages, borders, and cultures. Explains that writing in Spanish is a gesture of survival, and translation allows her memories to…

  11. Translation and identity: Translation of the Freedom Charter into ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparative analysis of the Afrikaans translations reveals how the respective translators struggled sporadically through certain ideological constraints in order to provide a satisfactory narrative. Their inability to internalise the principles contained in the Freedom Charter resulted in them presenting a 'framed' translation ...

  12. 'Inhabiting' the Translator's Habitus – Antjie Krog as Translator ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drawing on the Bourdieusian concept of habitus and its applicability in the field of translation, this article discusses Antjie Krog's profile in the practice of translation in. South Africa. Bourdieu's conceptualisation of the relationship between the initiating activities of translators and the structures which constrain and enable ...

  13. Found in translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tietjen, Anne

    2018-01-01

    on a teaching experiment in landscape architecture education, this paper proposes teaching creative site analysis as a translation process of observed site conditions into desirable future site conditions. Guided by actor-network theory, the paper outlines, first, a conceptual framework for creative site...... analysis. Second, it presents the applied educational procedure, with a focus on the decisive step from inventory to intervention which is the formulation of a design problem. The teaching experiment shows that onsite studies of spatial controversies in the form of recent physical changes, emerging new...... for the students. Overall, the produced design work and the student evaluations show that translation offers an operational framework for teaching a creative approach to site analysis....

  14. Translating a wicked problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tietjen, Anne; Jørgensen, Gertrud

    2016-01-01

    In a time of increasing globalisation and urbanisation, shrinking peripheral rural areas have become a truly wicked planning problem in many European countries. Although a problem can be easily perceived and measured by various indicators, the precise definition of the problem is problematic. Based......, place-based and project-oriented process directed at concrete physical outcomes. We frame strategic planning as a translation process where the interaction between human and non-human actors translates a unique, complex and contested situation into an innovated situation. We find that local physical......-understandings, increased social capital, and follow-up projects initiated beyond the actual planning process. We conclude that local physical projects, when conceived in a collaborative and strategic manner, can contribute to sustainable adaptation to rural shrinkage....

  15. Translating organizational change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, John Damm

    2016-01-01

    This paper takes it point of departure in actor-network-theory (ANT). It responds to the Next Management Theory tracks call for papers that address and further develops our understanding of organizational change as translation processes. It moreover addresses a critique of ANT researchers...... in organizational studies for making descriptions of studied empirical phenomena rather than developing theories and giving normative advice about how organizations or organizational change processes may be theorized, analyzed, managed and/or organized better. A new ANT-inspired theory about the characteristics...... of organizations, organizational change and change agents is therefore developed combining ANT with other theories. The relevance of this view is demonstrated in an analysis of a case where a nurse and the leader of a clinic for orthopedic surgery try to translate and thus implement a risk-management and deviation...

  16. Translation of Financial Statements

    OpenAIRE

    Dalthan Simas; Otavio De Medeiros

    2005-01-01

    This paper has the purpose of surveying and critically analyzing the effects of accounting procedures which are closely related to groups of companies operating multinationally. These are the methods for translation of financial statements, e.g. the Temporal and the Closing- rate Methods, as far as those methods are embodied in accounting standards which have been either recommended or adopted by countries such as the UK and US. We conclude that with regard to changing prices, General Price L...

  17. Multiculturalism and Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Rebeca PRECUP STIEGELBAUER

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cultural diversity has emerged as a key concern in recent years, however the implications to this term are very different. A number of people see cultural diversity as fundamentally important and positive, as it points to a sharing of the wealth embodied in each of the world’s cultures and, accordingly, to the links tying us all in processes of exchange and dialogue via translation. On the other hand, for many others, cultural differences are what cause us to lose sight of our shared humanity and as a result are the root of numerous conflicts, since we can get lost in translation. This second finding is today all the more plausible since globalisation has increased the points of interaction and friction between cultures, giving rise to identity-linked tensions, withdrawals and claims, particularly of each one and other, which can become potential sources of dispute. The essential challenge, therefore, would be to propose a coherent vision of cultural diversity, languages and translations and thereby to clarify how, far from being a threat, it can become beneficial to the action of the international community.

  18. Repetition and Translation Shifts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Zupan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Repetition manifests itself in different ways and at different levels of the text. The first basic type of repetition involves complete recurrences; in which a particular textual feature repeats in its entirety. The second type involves partial recurrences; in which the second repetition of the same textual feature includes certain modifications to the first occurrence. In the article; repetitive patterns in Edgar Allan Poe’s short story “The Fall of the House of Usher” and its Slovene translation; “Konec Usherjeve hiše”; are compared. The author examines different kinds of repetitive patterns. Repetitions are compared at both the micro- and macrostructural levels. As detailed analyses have shown; considerable microstructural translation shifts occur in certain types of repetitive patterns. Since these are not only occasional; sporadic phenomena; but are of a relatively high frequency; they reduce the translated text’s potential for achieving some of the gothic effects. The macrostructural textual property particularly affected by these shifts is the narrator’s experience as described by the narrative; which suffers a reduction in intensity.

  19. Machine Translation from Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Richard; Olive, Joseph; McCary, John; Christianson, Caitlin

    This chapter describes approaches for translation from speech. Translation from speech presents two new issues. First, of course, we must recognize the speech in the source language. Although speech recognition has improved considerably over the last three decades, it is still far from being a solved problem. In the best of conditions, when the speech comes from high quality, carefully enunciated speech, on common topics (such as speech read by a trained news broadcaster), the word error rate is typically on the order of 5%. Humans can typically transcribe speech like this with less than 1% disagreement between annotators, so even this best number is still far worse than human performance. However, the task gets much harder when anything changes from this ideal condition. Some of the conditions that cause higher error rate are, if the topic is somewhat unusual, or the speakers are not reading so that their speech is more spontaneous, or if the speakers have an accent or are speaking a dialect, or if there is any acoustic degradation, such as noise or reverberation. In these cases, the word error can increase significantly to 20%, 30%, or higher. Accordingly, most of this chapter discusses techniques for improving speech recognition accuracy, while one section discusses techniques for integrating speech recognition with translation.

  20. Translation-Memory (TM) Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjoldager, Anne Gram; Christensen, Tina Paulsen

    2010-01-01

    to be representative of the research field as a whole. Our analysis suggests that, while considerable knowledge is available about the technical side of TMs, more research is needed to understand how translators interact with TM technology and how TMs influence translators' cognitive translation processes.......  It is no exaggeration to say that the advent of translation-memory (TM) systems in the translation profession has led to drastic changes in translators' processes and workflow, and yet, though many professional translators nowadays depend on some form of TM system, this has not been the object...... of much research. Our paper attempts to find out what we know about the nature, applications and influences of TM technology, including translators' interaction with TMs, and also how we know it. An essential part of the analysis is based on a selection of empirical TM studies, which we assume...

  1. Literary translation and cultural memory

    OpenAIRE

    Long, Lynne

    2008-01-01

    This article intends to investigate the relationship between literary translation and cultural memory, using a twentieth century film version of one of Shakespeare’s plays as a case study in inter-semiotic translation. The common perception of translation is often confined to its use as a language learning tool or as a means of information transfer between languages. The wider academic concept embraces not only inter-lingual translation, but both intra-lingual activity or rewording in the sam...

  2. Machine Translation Effect on Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mika Yasuoka; Bjørn, Pernille

    2011-01-01

    Intercultural collaboration facilitated by machine translation has gradually spread in various settings. Still, little is known as for the practice of machine-translation mediated communication. This paper investigates how machine translation affects intercultural communication in practice. Based...... on communication in which multilingual communication system is applied, we identify four communication types and its’ influences on stakeholders’ communication process, especially focusing on establishment and maintenance of common ground. Different from our expectation that quality of machine translation results...

  3. TEACHING TRANSLATION: OBJECTIVES AND METHODS

    OpenAIRE

    Kobyakova, Iryna; Shvachko, Svitlana

    2016-01-01

    The article is focused on the set of items: teaching translation, objectives, exercises and assignments (both word-centered and text-centered translation), translation analysis. The choice of the items is motivated by the dominant functions of transatology (nominative and communicative). The latter succeed in identification of adequate, congruent, equivalent translation. The article discusses the problems of professional validity, theoretical insertions, textocentric analysis. Gains, achievem...

  4. On Literal Translation of English Idioms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Linli

    2009-01-01

    There are six translation tactics in translating English idioms into Chinese: literal translation, compensatory translation, free translation, explanational translation, borrowing, integrated approach. Each tactic should be reasonably employed in the process of translating, so as to keep the flavor of the original English idioms as well as to…

  5. Machine Translation for Academic Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Grace Hui-chin; Chien, Paul Shih Chieh

    2009-01-01

    Due to the globalization trend and knowledge boost in the second millennium, multi-lingual translation has become a noteworthy issue. For the purposes of learning knowledge in academic fields, Machine Translation (MT) should be noticed not only academically but also practically. MT should be informed to the translating learners because it is a…

  6. BIBLE TRANSLATION AND RELEVANCE THEORY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    translated in the Kings James Version with. (6) and the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters. In this translation the expression rtflch "^lohtm is assigned the referent "Spirit of God", that is, the Holy. Spirit However, the New English Bible translates: (7) and a mighty wind... swept over the surface of the waters,.

  7. Literary Translation: A Personal Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cincotta, Madeleine Strong

    The nature of literary translation and ways in which it differs from other forms of translation are examined, looking at practical difficulties, challenges, and satisfaction in the profession of literary translation. The difficulties discussed include suggestions about how to get started, legal questions of copyright, and choice of text.…

  8. Lexical Discourse Analysis in Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Khotaba, Eissa; Al Tarawneh, Khaled

    2015-01-01

    Lexical Discourse very often depend on lexis. Lexical Discourse analysis, however, has not yet been given enough consideration of the phenomenon of translation. This paper investigates lexical discourse analysis in translation from one language to another. This qualitative study comprises 15 text translated by M.A. students at the Department of…

  9. The Importance of Culture in Translation: Should Culture be Translated?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Al-Hassan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Recognizing the importance of culture in translation, this article presents a descriptive study of translation of literary texts from English into Arabic. Using the data taken from works of Shakespeare and others which were translated by eminent translators, it first describes the study background, research contexts and procedures and problems. It then addresses some research questions on: (1 Will the translation be accepted by the new community of readers; 2 Is the relation between culture and translation important? It is worth noting that this study is significant for translators and readers of the target language, which is Arabic in this case. This has been substantiated by surveying the interests in cultural aspects of translation as early as the 19th Century. Thus translations do not only include lexical content  and syntax, but also ideologies, values and ways of  life in a given culture, which form translating problems. Therefore, translators have to know the audience.

  10. Machine Translation Tools - Tools of The Translator's Trade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastberg, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In this article three of the more common types of translation tools are presented, discussed and critically evaluated. The types of translation tools dealt with in this article are: Fully Automated Machine Translation (or FAMT), Human Aided Machine Translation (or HAMT) and Machine Aided Human...... Translation (or MAHT). The strengths and weaknesses of the different types of tools are discussed and evaluated by means of a number of examples. The article aims at two things: at presenting a sort of state of the art of what is commonly referred to as “machine translation” as well as at providing the reader...... with a sound basis for considering what translation tool (if any) is the most appropriate in order to meet his or her specific translation needs....

  11. Text Detection and Translation from Natural Scenes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gao, Jiang; Yang, Jie; Zhang, Ying; Waibel, Alex

    2001-01-01

    .... The paper addresses challenges in automatic sign extraction and translation, describes methods for automatic sign extraction, and extends example-based machine translation technology for sign translation...

  12. Mamma Mia, A Singable Translation!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Stopar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses and analyzes approaches to translating singable texts. It presents a linguistic (prosodic, lexical and structural analysis of the Slovenian translation of the musical Mamma Mia! The aim of the qualitative and quantitative study is to investigate the translation strategies used to produce a singable target text. The results of the analysis suggest that producing a prosodic match is a basic requirement, whereas the lexical, structural and/or poetic characteristics of the source text are subject to changes. Overall, the findings show that the function and the purpose of the translation play a crucial role in the prioritization of translation strategies.

  13. The Complexity of Indirect Translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenjie, L. I.

    2017-01-01

    its complex nature, and thus determined that many facets of ITr remain to be studied. The present article will try to encompass the complexity of ITr by looking into the reasons for translating indirectly, the challenge of finding out mediating texts (MTs), indirectness in both translation...... of which have been translated and interpreted indirectly through major languages like English, will be employed as examples. Hopefully, this study will offer more insights into the nature of translation as a social activity and raise further interests in studying translation as a complex phenomenon....

  14. Autogenic training and cognitive self-hypnosis for the treatment of recurrent headaches in three different subject groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Kuile, M M; Spinhoven, P; Linssen, A C; Zitman, F G; Van Dyck, R; Rooijmans, H G

    1994-09-01

    The aims of this study were to (a) investigate the efficacy of autogenic training (AT) and cognitive self-hypnosis training (CSH) for the treatment of chronic headaches in comparison with a waiting-list control (WLC) condition, (b) investigate the influence of subject recruitment on treatment outcome and (c) explore whether the level of hypnotizability is related to therapy outcome. Three different subjects groups (group 1, patients (n = 58) who were referred by a neurological outpatient clinic; group 2, members (n = 48) of the community who responded to an advertisement in a newspaper; and group 3, students (n = 40) who responded to an advertisement in a university newspaper) were allocated at random to a therapy or WLC condition. During treatment, there was a significant reduction in the Headache Index scores of the subjects in contrast with the controls. At post-treatment and follow-up almost no significant differences were observed between the 2 treatment conditions or the 3 referral sources regarding the Headache Index, psychological distress (SCL-90) scores and medication use. Follow-up measurements indicated that therapeutic improvement was maintained. In both treatment conditions, the high-hypnotizable subjects achieved a greater reduction in headache pain at post-treatment and follow-up than did the low-hypnotizable subjects. It is concluded that a relatively simple and highly structured relaxation technique for the treatment of chronic headache subjects may be preferable to more complex cognitive hypnotherapeutic procedures, irrespective of the source of recruitment. The level of hypnotic susceptibility seems to be a subject characteristic which is associated with a more favourable outcome in subjects treated with AT or CSH.

  15. Análise por tomografia computadorizada do enxerto autógeno na cirurgia de "sinus lift" Computed tomography evaluation of autogenous graft in sinus lift surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Aron Ajzen

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Quantificar a formação óssea nos enxertos com e sem plasma rico em plaquetas, obtido pelos métodos de centrifugação e aférese, comparando os três tipos de enxertos realizados por meio de análise tomográfica. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Este estudo prospectivo, duplo cego, utilizou uma amostra composta de 34 pacientes adultos, de ambos os sexos, com idade média de 48 anos e 8 meses, portadores de pneumatização unilateral ou bilateral dos seios maxilares, que necessitavam de enxertos ósseos, com a finalidade de melhorar as condições locais para a colocação dos implantes dentários. Todos os pacientes realizaram tomografia computadorizada antes da cirurgia. Foram operados 53 seios maxilares, divididos em três grupos: enxerto de plasma rico em plaquetas obtido pelos métodos de aférese, centrifugação e enxerto apenas de osso autógeno. Após seis meses do procedimento cirúrgico foram realizados novos exames de imagem. RESULTADOS: Pela avaliação tomográfica, houve crescimento em altura e em largura nos três grupos quando foram comparados os momentos inicial e final, entretanto, não houve diferença estatística para a altura e para a largura. CONCLUSÃO: Evidências clínicas demonstram a eficácia dos enxertos autógenos, principalmente os associados a fatores indutores de crescimento ósseo, como o plasma rico em plaquetas, recuperando o arcabouço maxilofacial, necessário para a reconstrução protética e funcional por meio de implantes dentários.OBJECTIVE: To quantify bone formation within autogenous bone grafts and autogenous bone grafts in combination with platelet-rich plasma obtained either from aphaeresis or centrifugation using computed tomography. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This prospective, double-blind study was conducted in 34 male and female adult patients (mean age of 28 years and 8 months, with either unilateral or bilateral pneumatization of the maxillary sinuses, requiring bone graft for dental

  16. Translators: Travellers, Not Tourists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Rot Gabrovec

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article explores various representations of culture(s found in contemporary English children’s literature and discusses how they were rendered into Slovene. In the first part, some introductory definitions of culture and approaches to the translation of children’s literature are presented. In the second part, excerpts from selected literary works (for instance, Mary Poppins, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, Matilda, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time are examined, both from the source and the target texts, with more attention paid to the cultural contexts, and the social changes that possibly influenced the translator’s decisions.

  17. Eye-movements During Translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balling, Laura Winther

    2013-01-01

    -scratch translation with post-editing of machine translated texts, uncovering similarities and dierences between the two processes, overall and in interaction with other variables also investigated. These include gaze and keystroke behaviour, word and n-gram probabilities, participant variables including expertise......Translation process research or TPR, the study of the cognitive processes involved in translation, is a relatively new field characterised by small-scale studies with few participants and variables. However, the translation process is characterised by much variation between different translators......, texts, tasks and languages, and larger-scale investigations are therefore highly desirable. To that end, we have publicly released the CRITT TPR database which currently contains data from 845 translation sessions but is continually extended. The database includes information about the source and target...

  18. Translation Analysis on Civil Engineering Text Produced by Machine Translator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutopo, Anam

    2018-02-01

    Translation is extremely needed in communication since people have serious problem in the language used. Translation activity is done by the person in charge for translating the material. Translation activity is also able to be done by machine. It is called machine translation, reflected in the programs developed by programmer. One of them is Transtool. Many people used Transtool for helping them in solving the problem related with translation activities. This paper wants to deliver how important is the Transtool program, how effective is Transtool program and how is the function of Transtool for human business. This study applies qualitative research. The sources of data were document and informant. This study used documentation and in dept-interviewing as the techniques for collecting data. The collected data were analyzed by using interactive analysis. The results of the study show that, first; Transtool program is helpful for people in translating the civil engineering text and it functions as the aid or helper, second; the working of Transtool software program is effective enough and third; the result of translation produced by Transtool is good for short and simple sentences and not readable, not understandable and not accurate for long sentences (compound, complex and compound complex) thought the result is informative. The translated material must be edited by the professional translator.

  19. Translation Analysis on Civil Engineering Text Produced by Machine Translator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutopo Anam

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Translation is extremely needed in communication since people have serious problem in the language used. Translation activity is done by the person in charge for translating the material. Translation activity is also able to be done by machine. It is called machine translation, reflected in the programs developed by programmer. One of them is Transtool. Many people used Transtool for helping them in solving the problem related with translation activities. This paper wants to deliver how important is the Transtool program, how effective is Transtool program and how is the function of Transtool for human business. This study applies qualitative research. The sources of data were document and informant. This study used documentation and in dept-interviewing as the techniques for collecting data. The collected data were analyzed by using interactive analysis. The results of the study show that, first; Transtool program is helpful for people in translating the civil engineering text and it functions as the aid or helper, second; the working of Transtool software program is effective enough and third; the result of translation produced by Transtool is good for short and simple sentences and not readable, not understandable and not accurate for long sentences (compound, complex and compound complex thought the result is informative. The translated material must be edited by the professional translator.

  20. PERSONALITY TYPE AND TRANSLATION PERFORMANCE OF PERSIAN TRANSLATOR TRAINEES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Shaki

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the relationship between the personality typology of a sample of Iranian translation students and their translation quality in terms of expressive, appellative, and informative text types. The study also attempted to identify the personality types that can perform better in English to Persian translation of the three text types. For that purpose, the personality type and the translation quality of the participants was assessed using Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI personality test and translation quality assessment (TQA, respectively. The analysis of the data revealed that the personality type of the participants seemed relevant to the translation quality of all the text types. The translation quality of the participants with intuitive and thinking types was significantly better than the sensing type counterparts in translating expressive texts. The participants with intuitive and feeling types also performed better than their counterparts with sensing type in translation of the informative text. Moreover, the participants with intuitive, feeling, and thinking personality types performed more successfully than the participants with sensing type in translation of the appellative text. The findings of the study are discussed in light of the existing research literature.